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Sample records for activities general safety

  1. Safety Assessment for Facilities and Activities. General Safety Requirements

    This publication describes the generally applicable requirements to be fulfilled in safety assessments for facilities and activities, with special attention paid to defence in depth, quantitative analyses and the application of a graded approach to the ranges of facilities and of activities that are addressed. The requirements provide a consistent and coherent basis for safety assessments, facilitating the transfer of good practices between organizations. A review of Safety Requirements publications was commenced in 2011 following the accident in the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan. The review revealed no significant areas of weakness and resulted in just a small set of amendments to strengthen the requirements and facilitate their implementation, which are contained in the present publication

  2. Safety assessment for facilities and activities. General safety requirements. Pt. 4

    The Safety Fundamentals publication, Fundamental Safety Principles, establishes principles for ensuring the protection of workers, the public and the environment, now and in the future, from harmful effects of ionizing radiation. The objective of this Safety Requirements publication is to establish the generally applicable requirements to be fulfilled in safety assessment for facilities and activities, with special attention paid to defence in depth, quantitative analyses and the application of a graded approach to the ranges of facilities and of activities that are addressed. The publication also addresses the independent verification of the safety assessment that needs to be carried out by the originators and users of the safety assessment. This publication is intended to provide a consistent and coherent basis for safety assessment across all facilities and activities, which will facilitate the transfer of good practices between organizations conducting safety assessments and will assist in enhancing the confidence of all interested parties that an adequate level of safety has been achieved for facilities and activities. The requirements, which are derived from the Fundamental Safety Principles, relate to any human activity that may cause people to be exposed to radiation risks arising from facilities and activities, as follows: Facilities includes: (a) Nuclear power plants; (b) Other reactors (such as research reactors and critical assemblies); (c) Enrichment facilities and fuel fabrication facilities; (d) Conversion facilities used to generate UF6; (e) Storage and reprocessing plants for irradiated fuel; (f) Facilities for radioactive waste management where radioactive waste is treated, conditioned, stored or disposed of; (g) Any other places where radioactive materials are produced, processed, used, handled or stored; (h) Irradiation facilities for medical, industrial, research and other purposes, and any places where radiation generators are installed; (i

  3. Safety Assessment for Facilities and Activities. General Safety Requirements. Pt. 4

    The Safety Fundamentals publication, Fundamental Safety Principles, establishes principles for ensuring the protection of workers, the public and the environment, now and in the future, from harmful effects of ionizing radiation.? read more The objective of this Safety Requirements publication is to establish the generally applicable requirements to be fulfilled in safety assessment for facilities and activities, with special attention paid to defence in depth, quantitative analyses and the application of a graded approach to the ranges of facilities and of activities that are addressed. The publication also addresses the independent verification of the safety assessment that needs to be carried out by the originators and users of the safety assessment. This publication is intended to provide a consistent and coherent basis for safety assessment across all facilities and activities, which will facilitate the transfer of good practices between organizations conducting safety assessments and will assist in enhancing the confidence of all interested parties that an adequate level of safety has been achieved for facilities and activities. The requirements, which are derived from the Fundamental Safety Principles, relate to any human activity that may cause people to be exposed to radiation risks arising from facilities and activities, as follows: Facilities includes: (a) Nuclear power plants; (b) Other reactors (such as research reactors and critical assemblies); (c) Enrichment facilities and fuel fabrication facilities; (d) Conversion facilities used to generate UF6; (e) Storage and reprocessing plants for irradiated fuel; (f) Facilities for radioactive waste management where radioactive waste is treated, conditioned, stored or disposed of; (g) Any other places where radioactive materials are produced, processed, used, handled or stored; (h) Irradiation facilities for medical, industrial, research and other purposes, and any places where radiation generators are

  4. TIS General Safety Group Annual Report 2000

    Weingarten, W

    2001-01-01

    This report summarises the main activities of the General Safety (GS) Group of the Technical Inspection and Safety Division (TIS) during the year 2000, and the results obtained. The different topics in which the Group is active are covered: general safety inspections and ergonomy, electrical, chemistry and gas safety, chemical pollution containment and control, industrial hygiene, the safety of civil engineering works and outside contractors, fire prevention and the safety aspects of the LHC experiments.

  5. General safety aspects

    In this part next aspects are described: (1) Priority to safety; (2) Financial and human resources;; (3) Human factor; (4) Operator's quality assurance system; (5) Safety assessment and Verification; (6) Radiation protection and (7) Emergency preparedness

  6. General safety considerations

    This document presents the full filling of the Brazilian obligations under the Convention on Nuclear Safety. The Chapter 4 of the document contains some details about the priority to safety, financial and human resources, human factors, quality assurance, safety assessment and verification, radiation protection and emergency preparedness

  7. The General Safety Group Annual Report 2001/2002

    Weingarten, W

    2003-01-01

    This report summarizes the main activities of the General Safety (GS) Group of the Technical Inspection and Safety Division during 2001 and 2002, and the results obtained. The different topics in which the group is active are covered: general safety inspections and ergonomics, electrical, chemical and gas safety, chemical pollution containment and control, industrial hygiene, the safety of civil engineering works and outside contractors, fire prevention and the safety aspects of the LHC experiments.

  8. Waste safety activities

    Safety standards develop by the IAEA in the Safety Standard Series and other publication are reviewed. The Waste Safety Action plan includes: Action 1: Develop a common framework for the management and disposal of different types of radioactive waste, paying particular attention to large volumes of waste containing long-lived naturally occurring radionuclides. Action 2: Assess the safety implications of the extended storage of radioactive waste and of any future reconditioning which may be necessary and develop safety standards for the long-term storage of radioactive waste. Action 3: Promptly develop safety standards for geological disposal, addressing inter alia, issues of human intrusion, institutional control, retrievability, the content of the safety case and any implications of nuclear safeguards requirements for the design of the repositories. Action 4: Develop an internationally accepted and harmonized approach for controlling the removal of materials and sites from regulatory control. Action 5: Develop a structured and systematic programme to ensure adequate application of the Agency waste safety standards and facilitate their application in implementation of the Joint Convention. Action 6: Explore ways to ensure that information, knowledge and skills concerning radioactive waste management are made available to future generations. Action 7: Address the broader societal dimensions of radioactive waste management. Action 8: Review the new developments related to policies for the control of radioactive discharges to the environment, taking into account the availability and cost-effectiveness of discharge reduction technologies and the broader implications for radioactive waste management of reducing discharges. Action 9: Explore international mechanisms for facilitating the management of spent sealed radioactive sources. Some other activities as training courses and technical cooperation are also presented

  9. Deriving and applying generally applicable safety principles

    Spray, S.D.

    1998-08-01

    The nuclear detonation safety of modern nuclear weapons depends on a coordinated safety theme incorporating three general safety principles: isolation, inoperability, and incompatibility. The success of this approach has encouraged them to study whether these and/or other principles might be useful in other applications. Not surprisingly, no additional first-principles (based on physical laws) have been identified. However, a more widely applicable definition and application of the principle-based approach has been developed, resulting in a selection of strategies that are basically subsets and varied combinations of the more general principles above. However, identification of principles to be relied on is only one step in providing a safe design. As one other important example, coordinating overall architecture and strategy is essential: the authors term this a safety theme.

  10. Planned activities to improve safety

    This document presents the fulfilling of the Brazilian obligations under the Convention on Nuclear Safety. The Chapter 6 of the document contains some details about the planed activities to safety improvements

  11. Radiation Safety (General) Regulations 1983 (Western Australia)

    The provisions of the Regulations cover, inter alia, the general precautions and requirements relating to radiation safety of the public and radiation workers and registration of irradiating apparatus or premises on which such apparatus is operated. In addition, the Regulations set forth requirements for the operation of such apparatus and for the premises involved. (NEA)

  12. 21 CFR 610.11 - General safety.

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false General safety. 610.11 Section 610.11 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS... product is processed further after filling, such as by freeze-drying, sterilization, or heat...

  13. [Patient-safety incidents in general practice

    Gaal, S.; Smits, M.; Verstappen, W.H.J.M.; Giesen, P.H.J.; Wensing, M.J.P.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To gain insight into the frequency, severity, causes and consequences of potentially preventable patient-safety incidents in Dutch primary care. DESIGN: Retrospective medical record review study. METHOD: We screened a sample of 1000 medical records in 20 general practices and 1145 medical

  14. EDA activities related to safety

    This article reviews the accomplishments in ITER safety analysis during the course of the Engineering Design Activities (EDA). The key aspects of ITER safety analysis are: effluents and emissions from normal operation, including planned maintenance activities; occupational safety for workers at the facility; radioactive materials and wastes generated during operation and from decommissioning ; potential incidents and accidents and the resulting transients. As a result of the work during the EDA it is concluded that ITER is safe

  15. IAEA activities in nuclear safety: future perspectives. Spanish Nuclear Safety Council, Madrid, 28 May 1998

    The document represents the conference given by the Director General of the IAEA at the Spanish Nuclear Safety Council in Madrid, on 28 May 1998, on Agency's activities in nuclear safety. The following aspects are emphasized: Agency's role in creating a legally binding nuclear safety regime, non-binding safety standards, services provided by the Agency to assist its Member States in the Application of safety standards, Agency's nuclear safety strategy, and future perspective concerning safety aspects related to radioactive wastes, residues of past nuclear activities, and security of radiological sources

  16. Future testing of active safety systems

    Hendriks, F.M.; Pelders, H.A.A.W.

    2010-01-01

    Active safety systems are increasingly becoming available in trucks and passenger vehicles. Developments in the field of active safety are shifting from increasing driver comfort towards increasing occupant safety. Furthermore, this shift is seen within active safety systems: safety functions are ad

  17. JRC activities in nuclear safety

    Manna Giustino

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear energy is today the largest single source of carbon free and base-load electricity in Europe. While highlighting its important role in the overall energy mix, it is necessary to address sustainability, safety, and security concerns, in particular nuclear safety and nuclear waste management issues, which influence the public acceptance of nuclear energy. The present paper describes the Joint Research Centre activities in support to the EU nuclear safety policy. It describes the Joint Research Centre role in the EU institutional context, identifies the various customers to which the Joint Research Centre delivers its services, and provides some results of the Joint Research Centre scientific work inherent to nuclear safety.

  18. Current activities on safety improvement at Ukrainian NPPs

    This report describes general development status of the national programs on safety improvement of the Ukrainian NPPs, basic approaches adopted for planning and implementation of safety improvement works, and state of implementation of principal technical activities aimed at safety improvement of Ukrainian NPPs. (author)

  19. Classification of Radioactive Waste. General Safety Guide

    This publication is a revision of an earlier Safety Guide of the same title issued in 1994. It recommends revised waste management strategies that reflect changes in practices and approaches since then. It sets out a classification system for the management of waste prior to disposal and for disposal, driven by long term safety considerations. It includes a number of schemes for classifying radioactive waste that can be used to assist with planning overall national approaches to radioactive waste management and to assist with operational management at facilities. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. The radioactive waste classification scheme; Appendix: The classification of radioactive waste; Annex I: Evolution of IAEA standards on radioactive waste classification; Annex II: Methods of classification; Annex III: Origin and types of radioactive waste

  20. General aspects of siting and safety considerations

    The siting process from site selection to the different stages of review by the regulatory body is described. Special attention is payed to the role and responsibilities of the licensing authority. Next, the basic considerations involved in the siting process are reviewed. They include system planning, engineering, safety, environmental impact (including land use) and economics. Case studies illustrating different aspects of the siting process (e.g. site selection) are presented. (orig.)

  1. Nuclear safety activities in the SR of Slovenia in 1986

    Currently Yugoslavia has one 632 MWe nuclear power plant (NPP) of PWR design, located at Krsko in the Socialist Republic (SR) of Slovenia. Krsko NPP, which is a two-loop plant, started power operation in 1981. In general, reactor safety activities in the SR of Slovenia are mostly related to upgrading the safety of our Krsko NPP and to developing capabilities for use in future units. This report presents the nuclear safety related legislation and organization of the corresponding regulatory body, and the activities related to nuclear safety of the participating organizations in the SR of Slovenia in 1986. (author)

  2. SAFETY

    Niels Dupont

    2013-01-01

    CERN Safety rules and Radiation Protection at CMS The CERN Safety rules are defined by the Occupational Health & Safety and Environmental Protection Unit (HSE Unit), CERN’s institutional authority and central Safety organ attached to the Director General. In particular the Radiation Protection group (DGS-RP1) ensures that personnel on the CERN sites and the public are protected from potentially harmful effects of ionising radiation linked to CERN activities. The RP Group fulfils its mandate in collaboration with the CERN departments owning or operating sources of ionising radiation and having the responsibility for Radiation Safety of these sources. The specific responsibilities concerning "Radiation Safety" and "Radiation Protection" are delegated as follows: Radiation Safety is the responsibility of every CERN Department owning radiation sources or using radiation sources put at its disposition. These Departments are in charge of implementing the requi...

  3. Lightning Safety and Outdoor Sports Activities

    ... Services Contact Us Glossary Lightning Safety and Outdoor Sports Activities I t’s a common situation — a thunderstorm ... associated with outdoor recreational activities. Officials responsible for sports outdoor activities need to understand thunderstorms and lightning ...

  4. Regulatory activities in reactor safety

    The safety phylosophy in designs and operation of nuclear power plants and, the steps for evaluating the safety and quality assurance, in the licensing procedure are described. The CNEN organization structure and the licensing procedure for nuclear power plants in Brazil are presented. (M.C.K.)

  5. Sequential Generalized Likelihood Ratio Tests for Vaccine Safety Evaluation

    Shih, Mei-Chiung; Lai, Tze Leung; Heyse, Joseph F; Chen, Jie

    2010-01-01

    The evaluation of vaccine safety involves pre-clinical animal studies, pre-licensure randomized clinical trials and post-licensure safety studies. Sequential design and analysis are of particular interest because they allow early termination of the trial or quick detection that the vaccine exceeds a prescribed bound on the adverse event rate. After a review of recent developments in this area, we propose a new class of sequential generalized likelihood ratio tests for evaluating adverse event...

  6. Reactor safety; Description and evaluation of safety activities in Nordic countries

    The report gives a description of safety activities in the nuclear power industry. The study has been carried out as a part of the four year programme in Nordic Safety Research (NKS) which was completed in 1997. The objective of the NKS/RAK-1.1 project 'A survey and an evaluation of safety activities in nuclear power' was to make a broad description of various activities important for safety and to make an assessment of their efficiency. A special consideration was placed on a comparison of practices in Finland and Sweden, and between their nuclear utilities. The study has been divided into two parts, one theoretical part in which a model of the relationships between various activities important for safety has been constructed and one practical part where a total of 62 persons have been interviewed at the authorities, the nuclear utilities and one reactor vendor. To restrict the amount of work two activities, safety analysis and experience feedback, were selected. A few cases connected to incidents at nuclear power plants were discussed in more detail. The report has been structured around a simple model of nuclear safety consisting of the concepts of goals, means and outcomes. This model illustrates the importance of goal formulation, systematic planning and feedback of operational experience as major components in nuclear safety. In assessing organisation and management at authorities and the power utilities there is a clear trend of decentralisation and delegation of authority. The general impression from the study is that the safety activities in Finland and Sweden are efficient and well targeted. The experience from the methodology is favourable and the comparison of practices gives a good ground for a discussion of contents and targeting of safety activities. (EG) activities. (EG)

  7. Recent Activities on Global Nuclear Safety Regime

    Recently, rapid progress on the globalization of the nuclear safety issues is being made in IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) and its member states. With the globalization, the need for international cooperation among international bodies and member states continues to grow for resolving these universal nuclear safety issues. Furthermore, the importance of strengthening the global nuclear safety regime is emphasized through various means, such as efforts in application of IAEA safety standards to all nuclear installations in the world and in strengthening the code of conduct and the convention on nuclear safety. In this regards, it is important for us to keep up with the activities related with the global nuclear safety regime as an IAEA member state and a leading country in nuclear safety regulation

  8. Improved safety approach for general safety designs of the next generation sodium-cooled fast reactor systems

    For the future sodium-cooled fast reactor [SFR], safety approach should realize higher safety level than that of current generation reactor systems, by enhancing prevention and mitigation features of severe accidents with built-in measures in the safety designs. In this study, general safety approaches are developed for the next generation SFR based on the fundamental safety characteristics of the SFR system by comparing those of LWR system and with incorporating lessons learned from the TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plants accidents. The fundamental characteristics of the SFR system are summarized into five key points: 1) reactivity related to reactor core configuration, 2) coolant pressure under operation, 3) coolant sub-cool margin to boiling, 4) ultimate heat sink, and 5) physical and chemical properties of sodium coolant. These points are considered to derive general safety approach related to fundamental function, i.e. reactor shutdown, decay heat removal, and containment, for the future SFR system. The key is to apply passive safety mechanism for prevention/mitigation of severe accident in design extension condition (DEC) with balancing active safety systems - passive mechanism should be built-in design for reactor shutdown and decay heat removal especially for DEC in order to enhance diversity to the engineered safety systems utilized for design basis accident (DBA). From the viewpoint of containment integrity, SFR system has favorable feature due to its low coolant pressure (almost atmospheric) under operation, whereas the potentials of pressure/temperature increases via sodium leak and of significant mechanical energy release by re-criticality in the course of the core disruptive accident (CDA) should be eliminated by the safety designs for both prevention and mitigation of the severe accidents. (author)

  9. Safety of general anaesthesia and surgery in acute hepatic porphyria.

    Dover, S B; Plenderleith, L; Moore, M R; McColl, K E

    1994-01-01

    Patients with acute hepatic porphyria are denied essential operations because of concern that general anaesthesia and surgery will precipitate a life threatening porphyric crisis. This study assessed the safety of surgery under general anaesthesia in these patients. A combined prospective and retrospective case note study, with a biochemical study, was conducted in 25 patients with acute hepatic porphyria undergoing 38 surgical operations. Clinical outcome measures were survival and occurrenc...

  10. IAEA activities in the field of research reactors safety

    IAEA activities in the field of research reactor safety are included in the programme of the Division of Nuclear Installations Safety. Following the objectives of the Division, the results of the IAEA missions and the recommendations from International Advisory Groups, the IAEA has conducted in recent years a certain number of activities aiming to enhance the safety of research reactors. The following activities will be presented: (a) the new Requirements for the Safety of Research Reactors, main features and differences with previous standards (SS-35-S1 and SS-35-S2) and the grading approach for implementation; (b) new documents being developed (safety guides, safety reports and TECDOC's); (c) activities related to the Incident Reporting System for Research Reactor (IRSRR); (d) the new features implemented for the INSARR missions; (e) the Code of Conduct on the Safety of Research Reactors adopted by the Board of Governors on 8 March 2004, following the General Conference Resolution GC(45)/RES/10; and (f) the survey on the safety of research reactors published on the IAEA website on February 2003 and the results obtained. (author)

  11. Recommended general safety requirements for nuclear power plants

    This report presents recommendations for a set of general safety requirements that could form the basis for the licensing of nuclear power plants by the Atomic Energy Control Board. In addition to a number of recommended deterministic requirements the report includes criteria for the acceptability of the design of such plants based upon the calculated probability and consequence (in terms of predicted radiation dose to members of the public) of potential fault sequences. The report also contains a historical review of nuclear safety principles and practices in Canada

  12. Radiation protection and safety of radiation sources: International basic safety standards. General safety requirements. Pt. 3

    This publication is the new edition of the International Basic Safety Standards. The edition is co-sponsored by seven other international organizations — European Commission (EC/Euratom), FAO, ILO, OECD/NEA, PAHO, UNEP and WHO. It replaces the interim edition that was published in November 2011 and the previous edition of the International Basic Safety Standards which was published in 1996. It has been extensively revised and updated to take account of the latest finding of the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation, and the latest recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection. The publication details the requirements for the protection of people and the environment from harmful effects of ionizing radiation and for the safety of radiation sources. All circumstances of radiation exposure are considered

  13. Safety Oversight of Decommissioning Activities at DOE Nuclear Sites

    The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board) is an independent federal agency established by Congress in 1988 to provide nuclear safety oversight of activities at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) defense nuclear facilities. The activities under the Board's jurisdiction include the design, construction, startup, operation, and decommissioning of defense nuclear facilities at DOE sites. This paper reviews the Board's safety oversight of decommissioning activities at DOE sites, identifies the safety problems observed, and discusses Board initiatives to improve the safety of decommissioning activities at DOE sites. The decommissioning of former defense nuclear facilities has reduced the risk of radioactive material contamination and exposure to the public and site workers. In general, efforts to perform decommissioning work at DOE defense nuclear sites have been successful, and contractors performing decommissioning work have a good safety record. Decommissioning activities have recently been completed at sites identified for closure, including the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, the Fernald Closure Project, and the Miamisburg Closure Project (the Mound site). The Rocky Flats and Fernald sites, which produced plutonium parts and uranium materials for defense needs (respectively), have been turned into wildlife refuges. The Mound site, which performed R and D activities on nuclear materials, has been converted into an industrial and technology park called the Mound Advanced Technology Center. The DOE Office of Legacy Management is responsible for the long term stewardship of these former EM sites. The Board has reviewed many decommissioning activities, and noted that there are valuable lessons learned that can benefit both DOE and the contractor. As part of its ongoing safety oversight responsibilities, the Board and its staff will continue to review the safety of DOE and contractor decommissioning activities at DOE defense nuclear sites

  14. Governmental, Legal and Regulatory Framework for Safety. General Safety Requirements. Part 1, Revision 1

    This publication establishes requirements in respect of the governmental, legal and regulatory framework for safety. It covers the essential aspects of the framework for establishing a regulatory body and taking other actions necessary to ensure the effective regulatory control of facilities and activities utilized for peaceful purposes. Other responsibilities and functions, such as liaison within the global safety regime and on support services for safety (including radiation protection), emergency preparedness and response, nuclear security, and the State system of accounting for and control of nuclear material, are also covered. A review of Safety Requirements publications was commenced in 2011 following the accident in the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan. The review revealed no significant areas of weakness and resulted in just a small set of amendments to strengthen the requirements and facilitate their implementation, which are contained in the present publication

  15. GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS ON REGULATIONS AND SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR QUADRICYCLES

    Ana Pavlovic

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, a new class of compact vehicles has been emerging and wide-spreading all around Europe: the quadricycle. These four-wheeled motor vehicles, originally derived from motorcycles, are a small and fuel-efficient mean of transportation used in rural or urban areas as an alternative to motorbikes or city cars. In some countries, they are also endorsed by local authorities and institutions which support small and environmentally-friendly vehicles. In this paper, several general considerations on quadricycles will be provided including the vehicle classification, evolution of regulations (as homologation, driver licence, emissions, etc, technical characteristics, safety requirements, most relevant investigations, and other additional useful information (e.g. references, links. It represents an important and actual topic of investigation for designers and manufacturers considering that the new EU regulation on the approval and market surveillance of quadricycles will soon enter in force providing conclusive requirements for functional safety environmental protection of these promising vehicles.

  16. Predisposal management of radioactive waste. General safety requirements. Pt. 5

    The objective of this Safety Requirements publication is to establish, the requirements that must be satisfied in the predisposal management of radioactive waste. This publication sets out the objectives, criteria and requirements for the protection of human health and the environment that apply to the siting, design, construction, commissioning, operation and shutdown of facilities for the predisposal management of radioactive waste, and the requirements that must be met to ensure the safety of such facilities and activities. This Safety Requirements publication applies to the predisposal management of radioactive waste of all types and covers all the steps in its management from its generation up to its disposal, including its processing (pretreatment, treatment and conditioning), storage and transport. Such waste may arise from the commissioning, operation and decommissioning of nuclear facilities; the use of radionuclides in medicine, industry, agriculture, research and education; the processing of materials that contain naturally occurring radionuclides; and the remediation of contaminated areas. The introduction of the document (Section 1) informs about its objective, scope and structure. The protection of human health and the environment is considered in Section 2 of this publication. Section 3 establishes requirements for the responsibilities associated with the predisposal management of radioactive waste. Requirements for the principal approaches to and the elements of the predisposal management of radioactive waste are established in Section 4. Section 5 establishes requirements for the safe development and operation of predisposal radioactive waste management facilities and safe conduct of activities. The Annex presents a discussion of the consistency of the safety requirements established in this publication with the fundamental safety principles

  17. A randomised controlled trial of general practitioner safety advice for families with children under 5 years

    Clamp, Margaret; Kendrick, Denise

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To assess effectiveness of general practitioner advice about child safety, and provision of low cost safety equipment to low income families, on use of safety equipment and safe practices at home.

  18. 77 FR 33777 - General Aviation Safety Forum: Climbing to the Next Level

    2012-06-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD General Aviation Safety Forum: Climbing to the Next Level The National Transportation Safety...-20, 2012 in Washington, DC. The event, ``General Aviation Safety: Climbing to the Next Level,''...

  19. 21 CFR 610.11a - Inactivated influenza vaccine, general safety test.

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Inactivated influenza vaccine, general safety test. 610.11a Section 610.11a Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Inactivated influenza vaccine, general safety test. For inactivated influenza vaccine, the general safety...

  20. General design safety principles for nuclear power plants

    This Safety Guide provides the safety principles and the approach that have been used to implement the Code in the Safety Guides. These safety principles and the approach are tied closely to the safety analyses needed to assist the design process, and are used to verify the adequacy of nuclear power plant designs. This Guide also provides a framework for the use of other design Safety Guides. However, although it explains the principles on which the other Safety Guides are based, the requirements for specific applications of these principles are mostly found in the other Guides

  1. Risk communication activities toward nuclear safety in Tokai: your safety is our safety

    As several decades have passed since the construction of nuclear power plants began, residents have become gradually less interested in nuclear safety. The Tokai criticality accident in 1909, however, had roused residents in Tokai-Mura to realize that they live with nuclear technology risks. To prepare a field of risk communication, the Tokai-Mura C3 project began as a pilot research project supported by NISA. Alter the project ended, we are continuing risk. communication activities as a non-profit organisation. The most important activity of C3 project is the citizen's inspection programme for nuclear related facilities. This programme was decided by participants who voluntarily applied to the project. The concept of the citizen's inspection programme is 'not the usual facility tours'. Participants are involved from the planning stage and continue to communicate with workers of the inspected nuclear facility. Since 2003, we have conducted six programmes for five nuclear related organisations. Participants evaluated that radiation protection measures were near good but there were some problems concerning the worker's safety and safety culture, and proposed a mixture of advice based on personal experience. Some advice was accepted and it did improve the facility's safety measures. Other suggestions were not agreed upon by nuclear organisations. The reason lies in the difference of concept between the nuclear expert's 'safety' and the citizen's 'safety'. Residents do not worry about radiation only, but also about the facility's safety as a whole including the worker's safety. They say, 'If the workers are not safe, you also are unable to protect us'. Although the disagreement remained, the participants and the nuclear industry learned much about each other. Participating citizens received a substantial amount of knowledge about the nuclear industry and its safety measures, and feel the credibility and openness of the nuclear industry. On the other hand, the nuclear

  2. Discussion on safety culture general contract model of consultation enterprises

    With a high safety requirement, long construction period, a large amount of investment and many influencing factors of the preparation and implementation of project schedule, local nuclear power always is built through EPC. Safety level depends on EPC. Some measures should be taken for local consultation enterprises to improve situation of safety. Some suggestion as follows: safety culture should be received enough attention; management system should be established in according with requirement of safety culture; try to encourage employee involvement; to assess it in time; safety system should be entirely compatible with enterprises system. (authors)

  3. A general approach to computerized inspection of engineered safety systems

    Engineered safety systems are in a standby state during the normal plant operation. Therefore their ability to fulfil their safeguarding functions must be proven by periodic test-start-ups. This paper describes work done on the development of computerized inspection techniques. Generally, engineered safety systems consist of a number of mechanical components and the instrumentation equipment, which is required for supervision. It is assumed that all disturbances are caused by a finite number of component and/or instrumentation faults which are stochastic in nature. To inspect a system, two steps must be carried out. First, an overall performance check, based on the verification of fixed normal operating points is made. If deviations are indicated, disturbance analysis is the next step. Assuming that a system might contain a number of n possible basic faults, theoretically 2sup(n) different disturbance patterns could occur. However, the analysis of large systems can be made easier by decomposition into sub-systems, each of which contains fewer basic faults than the original system. When the failed sub-systems are detected through the process of verification, using the normal operating characteristics for all sub-systems, the prime cause analysis can be restricted to them. The prime cause analysis is based on the substitution of the predefined basic faults. Disturbance patterns of higher complexity can be ignored, since their probability of occurrence has been considerably reduced by the decomposition. Using this concept, simulation experiments are being carried out. An idea of the achievable reliability of computerized inspection techniques can be obtained from the results discussed in this paper. (author)

  4. Improving patient safety culture in general practice: An interview study

    N.J. Verbakel (Natasha J.); A.A. de Bont (Antoinette); T.J. Verheij; C. Wagner (Cordula); D.L.M. Zwart (Dorien Lyd Marieke)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground When improving patient safety a positive safety culture is key. As little is known about improving patient safety culture in primary care, this study examined whether administering a culture questionnaire with or without a complementary workshop could be used as an interventio

  5. Relationship between general safety requirements and safety culture in the improvement of safe operation of I.N.R. TRIGA reactor facilities

    Ciocanescu, M.; Preda, M. [Romanian Power Authority, Pitesti (Romania). Inst. for Nuclear Research; Chiritescu, M.; Dumitru, M.

    1996-07-01

    Acquiring of the basic principles of ''safety culture'' by a large number of profesionals in the nuclear field drew the attention of the decision factors in the INR managerial structure, who decided to promote certain practical actions at each level in order to improve nuclear safety. Starting from the ''Republican Standards for Nuclear Safety'' issued by CSEN in 1975, where general safety criteria are defined for nuclear reactors and NPPs, the specialists at the TRIGA reactor originated and implemented a coherent and secure system to ensure nuclear safety over all steps of nuclear activities: research, conception, execution, commissioning and operation. This system has been continuosly corrected so that now it is completely integrated in a modern safety system. The paper presents the way in which a modern system for nuclear safety at the TRIGA reactor has been implemented and developed, in accordance to specific criteria and requirements imposed by related National Regulations and with the principles of safety culture. Starting from the definition of specific responsabilities, there are presented the internal stipulations and practical actions at all levels in order to enhance nuclear safety. (orig.)

  6. Relationship between general safety requirements and safety culture in the improvement of safe operation of I.N.R. TRIGA reactor facilities

    Acquiring of the basic principles of ''safety culture'' by a large number of profesionals in the nuclear field drew the attention of the decision factors in the INR managerial structure, who decided to promote certain practical actions at each level in order to improve nuclear safety. Starting from the ''Republican Standards for Nuclear Safety'' issued by CSEN in 1975, where general safety criteria are defined for nuclear reactors and NPPs, the specialists at the TRIGA reactor originated and implemented a coherent and secure system to ensure nuclear safety over all steps of nuclear activities: research, conception, execution, commissioning and operation. This system has been continuosly corrected so that now it is completely integrated in a modern safety system. The paper presents the way in which a modern system for nuclear safety at the TRIGA reactor has been implemented and developed, in accordance to specific criteria and requirements imposed by related National Regulations and with the principles of safety culture. Starting from the definition of specific responsabilities, there are presented the internal stipulations and practical actions at all levels in order to enhance nuclear safety. (orig.)

  7. Research reactor management. Safety improvement activities in HANARO

    Safety activities in HANARO have been continuously conducted to enhance its safe operation. Great effort has been placed on a normalization and improvement of the safety attitude of the regular staff and other employees working at the reactor and other experimental facilities. This paper introduces the activities on safety improvement that were performed over the last few years. (author)

  8. Safety performance indicators used by the Russian Safety Regulatory Authority in its practical activities on nuclear power plant safety regulation

    The Sixth Department of the Nuclear, Industrial and Environmental Regulatory Authority of Russia, Scientific and Engineering Centre for Nuclear and Radiation Safety process, analyse and use the information on nuclear power plants (NPPs) operational experience or NPPs safety improvement. Safety performance indicators (SPIs), derived from processing of information on operational violations and analysis of annual NPP Safety Reports, are used as tools to determination of trends towards changing of characteristics of operational safety, to assess the effectiveness of corrective measures, to monitor and evaluate the current operational safety level of NPPs, to regulate NPP safety. This report includes a list of the basic SPIs, those used by the Russian safety regulatory authority in regulatory activity. Some of them are absent in list of IAEA-TECDOC-1141 ('Operational safety performance indicators for nuclear power plants'). (author)

  9. Patient safety in primary care: A survey of general practitioners in the Netherlands

    Gaal, S.; Verstappen, W.H.J.M.; Wensing, M.J.P.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Primary care encompasses many different clinical domains and patient groups, which means that patient safety in primary care may be equally broad. Previous research on safety in primary care has focused on medication safety and incident reporting. In this study, the views of general prac

  10. Active gated imaging for automotive safety applications

    Grauer, Yoav; Sonn, Ezri

    2015-03-01

    The paper presents the Active Gated Imaging System (AGIS), in relation to the automotive field. AGIS is based on a fast gated-camera equipped with a unique Gated-CMOS sensor, and a pulsed Illuminator, synchronized in the time domain to record images of a certain range of interest which are then processed by computer vision real-time algorithms. In recent years we have learned the system parameters which are most beneficial to night-time driving in terms of; field of view, illumination profile, resolution and processing power. AGIS provides also day-time imaging with additional capabilities, which enhances computer vision safety applications. AGIS provides an excellent candidate for camera-based Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) and the path for autonomous driving, in the future, based on its outstanding low/high light-level, harsh weather conditions capabilities and 3D potential growth capabilities.

  11. Generalized Safety and Efficacy of Simplified Intravenous Thrombolysis Treatment (SMART) Criteria in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Sørensen, Sigrid B; Barazangi, Nobl; Chen, Charlene;

    2016-01-01

    within a regional stroke network was performed. Patients were divided into those receiving thrombolysis locally versus at an outside hospital. The primary outcome was modified Rankin Scale score (≤1) at discharge and the main safety outcome was symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (sICH) rate. RESULTS...... eligibility by reducing thrombolysis exclusions, but they have not been assessed on a large scale. We evaluated the safety and efficacy of general adoption of SMART thrombolysis criteria to a large regional stroke network. METHODS: Retrospective analysis of consecutive patients who received IV thrombolysis......BACKGROUND: Common intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (IV rt-PA) exclusion criteria may substantially limit the use of thrombolysis. Preliminary data have shown that the SMART (Simplified Management of Acute stroke using Revised Treatment) criteria greatly expand patient...

  12. EDF - The Inspector General's report on Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection 2009

    After a first chapter in which the Inspector General states his own vision of facts and results regarding nuclear safety and radiation protection for 2009, the relationship with the ASN (Nuclear safety authority), and also gives his own impression on the whole EDF nuclear system, the next chapters more particularly address the following topics: safety management, radiation protection of interveners, abilities and education for new challenges, the exploitation quality, the implementation of new regulatory arrangements, the extension of exploitation duration, the EPR project, the doctors as actors of safety management, service providing or subcontracting companies and fleet performance, prevention and struggle against fire, the activity of British Energy which is part of the EDF group, events which occurred within the EDF group (exposure of an intervener, incidents involving fuel components, biases in work monitoring, a fire on a turbo generator, an incident in Dungeness), lessons drawn from other industrial events (in a Russian hydroelectric station and in a refinery in Texas), and visits in China and in Japan

  13. Activities on safety for the cross-cutting issue of research reactors in the IAEA

    IAEA activities in the field of research reactor safety are included in the programme of the Division of Nuclear Installations Safety and implemented by the Engineering Safety Section through its Research Reactor Safety Unit. Following the objectives of the Division, the results of the IAEA missions and the recommendations from International Advisory Groups, the IAEA has conducted in recent years a certain number of activities aiming to enhance the safety of research reactors. The following activities are discussed in this paper: (a) the new Requirements for the Safety of Research Reactors, main features and differences with previous standards (SS-35-S1 and SS-35-S2) and the grading approach for implementation; (b) new documents being developed (safety guides, safety reports and TECDOCs); (c) activities related to the Incident Reporting System for Research Reactor (IRSRR); (d) the new features implemented for the (Integrated Safety Assessment of Research Reactors) INSARR missions; (e) the Code of Conduct on the Safety of Research Reactors developed, following the General Conference Resolution GC(45)/RES/10; and (f) the survey on the safety of research reactors conducted in the year 2002 and the results obtained. (author)

  14. Specialists' meeting on passive and active safety features of LMFRs

    The objective of the meeting was to discuss and exchange information on passive and active safety concepts and to find some reasonable coupling of these concept, aiming at firmer establishment of plant safety and at the same time of plant cost reduction. The following main topical areas were discussed by delegates: (1) Overview - review of national status on the safety design approaches of LMFRs (2) Safety characteristics of decay heat removal system (DHRS) (3) Safety characteristics of reactor protection system (RPS) and reactor shutdown system (RSS) (4) Core safety characteristics

  15. 49 CFR 238.229 - Safety appliances-general.

    2010-10-01

    ... written list to FRA that identifies each piece of passenger equipment equipped with a welded safety... submit a written list to FRA that identifies each piece of passenger equipment equipped with a welded... section in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. You may obtain a copy of the...

  16. Safety from Crime and Physical Activity among Older Adults: A Population-Based Study in Brazil

    Objective. To evaluate the association between safety from crime and physical activity among older adults. Methods. A population-based survey including 1,656 older adults (60+ years) took place in Florianopolis, Brazil, in 2009-2010. Commuting and leisure time physical activity were assessed through the long version of the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. Perception of safety from crime was assessed using the Neighbourhood Environment Walk ability Scale. Results. Perceiving the neighbourhood as safe during the day was related to a 25% increased likelihood of being active in leisure time (95% CI 1.02-1.53); general perception of safety was also associated with a 25% increase in the likelihood of being active in leisure time (95% CI 1.01-1.54). Street lighting was related to higher levels of commuting physical activity (prevalence ratio: 1.89; 95% CI 1.28-2.80). Conclusions. Safety investments are essential for promoting physical activity among older adults in Brazil

  17. Classification of Radioactive Waste. General Safety Guide (Russian Edition)

    This publication is a revision of an earlier Safety Guide of the same title issued in 1994. It recommends revised waste management strategies that reflect changes in practices and approaches since then. It sets out a classification system for the management of waste prior to disposal and for disposal, driven by long term safety considerations. It includes a number of schemes for classifying radioactive waste that can be used to assist with planning overall national approaches to radioactive waste management and to assist with operational management at facilities. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. The radioactive waste classification scheme; Appendix: The classification of radioactive waste; Annex I: Evolution of IAEA standards on radioactive waste classification; Annex II: Methods of classification; Annex III: Origin and types of radioactive waste

  18. Classification of Radioactive Waste. General Safety Guide (Spanish Edition)

    This publication is a revision of an earlier Safety Guide of the same title issued in 1994. It recommends revised waste management strategies that reflect changes in practices and approaches since then. It sets out a classification system for the management of waste prior to disposal and for disposal, driven by long term safety considerations. It includes a number of schemes for classifying radioactive waste that can be used to assist with planning overall national approaches to radioactive waste management and to assist with operational management at facilities. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. The radioactive waste classification scheme; Appendix: The classification of radioactive waste; Annex I: Evolution of IAEA standards on radioactive waste classification; Annex II: Methods of classification; Annex III: Origin and types of radioactive waste

  19. Clinical Activity in General Practice and Cancer

    Hjertholm, Peter

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS Cancer is a common, serious disease and early diagnosis is a cornerstone in the effort to improve the outcome from cancer disease. The general practitioner (GP) plays a crucial role in achieving this goal. Little is known about GPs’ suspicion of cancer and the activities the GPs...... institute in relation to such suspicion. Knowledge is also sparse on any effects of different diagnostic activities in general practice. The overall aims of this thesis were therefore: -to describe how often Danish GPs suspected cancer or other serious diseases and how they acted on the suspicion......, and to analyse how a suspicion influenced the demand for health care services and predicted a future diagnosis of serious disease - to investigate whether variation in GPs’ diagnostic activity influences cancer patients’ prognosis in relation to prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing and prostate cancer...

  20. Convoy Active Safety Technologies Warfighter Experiment I

    Schoenherr, Edward; Theisen, Bernard L.; Animashaun, Asisat; Davis, James, Jr.; Day, Christopher

    2008-04-01

    The operational ability to project and sustain forces in distant, anti-access and area denial environments poses new challenges for combatant commanders. One of the new challenges is the ability to conduct sustainment operations at operationally feasible times and places on the battlefield. Combatant commanders require a sustainment system that is agile, versatile, and survivable throughout the range of military operations and across the spectrum of conflict. A key component of conducting responsive, operationally feasible sustainment operations is the ability to conduct sustainment convoys. Sustainment convoys are critical to providing combatant commanders the right support, at the right time and place, and in the right quantities, across the full range of military operations. The ability to conduct sustainment convoys in a variety of hostile environments require force protection measures that address the enemy threat and protect the Soldier. One cost effective, technically feasible method of increasing the force protection for sustainment convoys is the use of robotic follower technology and autonomous navigation. The Convoy Active Safety Technologies (CAST) system is a driver assist, convoy autopilot technology aimed to address these issues. Warfigher Experiment I, held at A.P. Hill, VA in the fall of 2007, tested the utility of this vehicle following technology not only in measures of system integrity and performance vs. manual driving, but also the physiological effects on the operators themselves. This paper will detail the Warfigher Experiment's methodology, analysis, results and conclusions.

  1. Periodic safety review of the experimental fast reactor JOYO. Review of the activity for safety

    Periodic safety review (Review of the activity for safety) which consisted of 'Comprehensive evaluation of operation experience' and Incorporation of the latest technical knowledge' was carried out up to January 2005. 1. Comprehensive evaluation of operation experience. It was confirmed that the effectual activities for safety through the operation of JOYO were carried out in terms of (1) Operation management, (2) Maintenance management, (3) Fuel management, (4) Radiation management, (5) Radioactive waste management, (6) Emergency planning and (7) Feedback of incidents and failures. 2. Reflection of the latest technical knowledge. It was confirmed that the latest technical knowledge including regulation and guide line established by Nuclear Safety Commission of Japan until March 31st. 2003 were properly reflected in impressing the safety of the reactor. As a result, it was evaluated that the activity for safety was carried out effectually, and no additional measure was identified continual safe operation of the reactor. (author)

  2. Safety Cultures in Water-Based Outdoor Activities in Denmark

    Andkjær, Søren; Arvidsen, Jan

    2015-01-01

    water-based outdoor activities: small boat fishing, sea kayaking, and kite surfing. The theoretical framework used was cultural analysis and the methodological approach was mixed methods using case studies with survey and qualitative interviews. The study indicates that safety is a complex matter and......In this paper, we report on the study Safe in Nature (Tryg i naturen) in which the aim was to analyze and discuss risk and safety related to outdoor recreation in the coastal regions of Denmark. A cultural perspective is applied to risk management and the safety cultures related to three selected...... that safety culture can be understood as the sum and interaction among six categories. The safety culture is closely related to the activity and differs widely among activities. We suggest a broad perspective be taken on risk management wherein risk and safety can be managed at different levels. Small...

  3. Prestandardisation Activities for Computer Based Safety Systems

    Taylor, J. R.; Bologna, S.; Ehrenberger, W.;

    1981-01-01

    Questions of technical safety become more and more important. Due to the higher complexity of their functions computer based safety systems have special problems. Researchers, producers, licensing personnel and customers have met on a European basis to exchange knowledge and formulate positions....... The Commission of the european Community supports the work. Major topics comprise hardware configuration and self supervision, software design, verification and testing, documentation, system specification and concurrent processing. Preliminary results have been used for the draft of an IEC standard...

  4. Decommissioning of Facilities. General Safety Requirements. Pt. 6

    Decommissioning is the last step in the lifetime management of a facility. It must also be considered during the design, construction, commissioning and operation of facilities. This publication establishes requirements for the safe decommissioning of a broad range of facilities: nuclear power plants, research reactors, nuclear fuel cycle facilities, facilities for processing naturally occurring radioactive material, former military sites, and relevant medical, industrial and research facilities. It addresses all the aspects of decommissioning that are required to ensure safety, aspects such as roles and responsibilities, strategy and planning for decommissioning, conduct of decommissioning actions and termination of the authorization for decommissioning. It is intended for use by those involved in policy development, regulatory control and implementation of decommissioning

  5. Decommissioning of Facilities. General Safety Requirements. Pt. 6 (Arabic Edition)

    Decommissioning is the last step in the lifetime management of a facility. It must also be considered during the design, construction, commissioning and operation of facilities. This publication establishes requirements for the safe decommissioning of a broad range of facilities: nuclear power plants, research reactors, nuclear fuel cycle facilities, facilities for processing naturally occurring radioactive material, former military sites, and relevant medical, industrial and research facilities. It addresses all the aspects of decommissioning that are required to ensure safety, aspects such as roles and responsibilities, strategy and planning for decommissioning, conduct of decommissioning actions and termination of the authorization for decommissioning. It is intended for use by those involved in policy development, regulatory control and implementation of decommissioning

  6. Decommissioning of Facilities. General Safety Requirements. Pt. 6 (Chinese Edition)

    Decommissioning is the last step in the lifetime management of a facility. It must also be considered during the design, construction, commissioning and operation of facilities. This publication establishes requirements for the safe decommissioning of a broad range of facilities: nuclear power plants, research reactors, nuclear fuel cycle facilities, facilities for processing naturally occurring radioactive material, former military sites, and relevant medical, industrial and research facilities. It addresses all the aspects of decommissioning that are required to ensure safety, aspects such as roles and responsibilities, strategy and planning for decommissioning, conduct of decommissioning actions and termination of the authorization for decommissioning. It is intended for use by those involved in policy development, regulatory control and implementation of decommissioning

  7. 21 CFR 570.20 - General principles for evaluating the safety of food additives.

    2010-04-01

    ... food additives. 570.20 Section 570.20 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES Food Additive Safety § 570.20 General principles for evaluating the safety of food additives. (a) In reaching...

  8. 21 CFR 170.20 - General principles for evaluating the safety of food additives.

    2010-04-01

    ... food additives. 170.20 Section 170.20 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES Food Additive Safety § 170.20 General principles for evaluating the safety of food additives. (a) In reaching...

  9. Consultations with general practitioners on patient safety measures based on routinely collected data in primary care

    Tsang, C; Majeed, A; Aylin, P

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To gauge the opinions of doctors working, or interested, in general practice on monitoring patient safety using administrative data. The findings will inform the development of routinely collected data-based patient safety indicators in general practice and elsewhere in primary care. DESIGN Non-systematic participant recruitment, using personal contacts and colleagues' recommendations. SETTING Face-to-face consultations at participants' places of work, between June 2010 a...

  10. Current activities of safety improvements at Ukrainian NPPs

    The basic idea leading the program of safety improvements at Ukrainian NPPs is further development of nuclear power required to ensure at least 40% of country's energy supply. Activities concerning safety improvements of Ukrainian NPPs involved four reactor types: WWER-1000 (V-5) large series, WWER-1000 (V-302, V-338) small series, WWER-400 (V-213) and RBMK (second generation). Most significant safety improvements covered reactor core integrity, reactor components and cooling systems integrity, instrumentation and control system, power supply, internal hazards. Additional measures related to WWER-440 were concerned with feedwater supply, instrumentation and control systems, and containment. Improvements related to Chernobylsk NPP unit 3 involved supervision, control and protection systems; safety assessment and supporting systems; fire safety. The role of quality assurance and training is emphasised when operational safety is concerned. Planned safety upgrading measures are mentioned

  11. Interventions to Promote of Safety Participation Using Generalized Estimating Equations

    IRAJ MOHAMMADFAM

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Accidents and their resulting losses are one of the critical public health issues. Identification the near misses offer the opportunity to improve safety by developing effective prevention approach. The main objective of this study was to investigate the effects of two types of intervention in increasing the participation of first line managers in reporting near misses. In order to increase the participation, the Green Card System (GCS was implemented. After preliminary studies, in order to increase the participation rate, the decision was taken to implement the intervention program. In this program, first line managers were divided into two groups. For the control group, the bonus was increased to double whereas, for the experimental group, in addition to the two-fold increasing remuneration (bonus, appropriate feedback and actions carried out in the context of reported near misses, were presented through regular collaborative meetings. The results showed that six months after the stop of the intervention, the rate of participation in both groups showed a significant increase. After 18 months of intervention, the participation trend in both groups was downward. However, this reduction was only significant in the control group. The findings highlight the long-term effects of the intervention of financial payments along with providing appropriate feedback.

  12. Safety evaluation by living probabilistic safety assessment. Procedures and applications for planning of operational activities and analysis of operating experience

    Living Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) is a daily safety management system and it is based on a plant-specific PSA and supporting information systems. In the living use of PSA, plant status knowledge is used to represent actual plant safety status in monitoring or follow-up perspective. The PSA model must be able to express the risk at a given time and plant configuration. The process, to update the PSA model to represent the current or planned configuration and to use the model to evaluate and direct the changes in the configuration, is called living PSA programme. The main purposes to develop and increase the usefulness of living PSA are: Long term safety planning: To continue the risk assessment process started with the basic PSA by extending and improving the basic models and data to provide a general risk evaluation tool for analyzing the safety effects of changes in plant design and procedures. Risk planning of operational activities: To support the operational management by providing means for searching optimal operational maintenance and testing strategies from the safety point of view. The results provide support for risk decision making in the short term or in a planning mode. The operational limits and conditions given by technical specifications can be analyzed by evaluating the risk effects of alternative requirements in order to balance the requirements with respect to operational flexibility and plant economy. Risk analysis of operating experience: To provide a general risk evaluation tool for analyzing the safety effects of incidents and plant status changes. The analyses are used to: identify possible high risk situations, rank the occurred events from safety point of view, and get feedback from operational events for the identification of risk contributors. This report describes the methods, models and applications required to continue the process towards a living use of PSA. 19 tabs, 20 figs

  13. A review of the nuclear safety activities in Italy

    A review of research programs carried out in Italy in the field of nuclear reactor safety was done in 1986, in the frame of the activities of the Commission of the European Communities, the International Energy Agency and the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. The report contains information on these programs, as well as information on the organization of safety research in Italy and the evolution of safety research programs

  14. Radiation Protection and Safety of Radiation Sources: International Basic Safety Standards. General Safety Requirements. Pt. 3 (Chinese Edition)

    This publication is the new edition of the International Basic Safety Standards. The edition is co-sponsored by seven other international organizations — European Commission (EC/Euratom), FAO, ILO, OECD/NEA, PAHO, UNEP and WHO. It replaces the interim edition that was published in November 2011 and the previous edition of the International Basic Safety Standards which was published in 1996. It has been extensively revised and updated to take account of the latest finding of the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation, and the latest recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection. The publication details the requirements for the protection of people and the environment from harmful effects of ionizing radiation and for the safety of radiation sources. All circumstances of radiation exposure are considered

  15. Radiation protection and safety of radiation sources: International basic safety standards. General safety requirements. Pt. 3 (Russian Edition)

    This publication is the new edition of the International Basic Safety Standards. The edition is co-sponsored by seven other international organizations — European Commission (EC/Euratom), FAO, ILO, OECD/NEA, PAHO, UNEP and WHO. It replaces the interim edition that was published in November 2011 and the previous edition of the International Basic Safety Standards which was published in 1996. It has been extensively revised and updated to take account of the latest finding of the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation, and the latest recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection. The publication details the requirements for the protection of people and the environment from harmful effects of ionizing radiation and for the safety of radiation sources. All circumstances of radiation exposure are considered

  16. Radiation Protection and Safety of Radiation Sources: International Basic Safety Standards. General Safety Requirements. Pt. 3 (Arabic Edition)

    This publication is the new edition of the International Basic Safety Standards. The edition is co-sponsored by seven other international organizations — European Commission (EC/Euratom), FAO, ILO, OECD/NEA, PAHO, UNEP and WHO. It replaces the interim edition that was published in November 2011 and the previous edition of the International Basic Safety Standards which was published in 1996. It has been extensively revised and updated to take account of the latest finding of the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation, and the latest recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection. The publication details the requirements for the protection of people and the environment from harmful effects of ionizing radiation and for the safety of radiation sources. All circumstances of radiation exposure are considered

  17. Review of regulatory activities associated with safety culture and management of safety at UK nuclear installations

    The management of health and safety and the culture of the people who participate in the process have been fundamental to the development of the United Kingdom's nuclear power programme. In the early years of development, the organizations and systems set up in companies which designed, manufactured, constructed and operated nuclear power stations were based upon the best practices needed to ensure, not only the operability of the plant, but also the safety of the workers at the power stations and the public. Over the years the nuclear industry in the UK has changed as has the regulatory body responsible for licensing. The economic environment within which the nuclear electricity generators operate has caused them to review their business and organizational structures. The UK nuclear industry has developed its approach to health and safety management and it is generally recognized that commercially successful companies have excellent health and safety records. This paper discusses the importance of effective health and safety management to the maintenance of high safety standards and the delivery of business goals. It also discusses the model that has been developed to help assess safety management in the changing UK nuclear industry. Finally, it comments upon regulatory developments in management of safety and safety culture. (author)

  18. ILO activities in the area of chemical safety.

    Obadia, Isaac

    2003-08-21

    The ILO has been active in the area of safety in the use of chemicals at work since the year of its creation in 1919, including the development of international treaties and other technical instruments, the provision of technical assistance to its member States, and the development of chemical safety information systems. The two key ILO standards in this area are the Conventions on safety in the use of chemicals at work (No. 170, 1990), and the Prevention of Major Industrial Accidents (No. 174, 1993). The ILO Programme on occupational safety, health and environment (Safe Work) is currently responsible for ILO chemical safety activities. In the past two decades, most of ILO work in this area has been carried out within the context of inter-agency collaboration frameworks linking the ILO, WHO, UNEP, FAO, UNIDO, UNITAR, and the OECD, including the International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS), the Inter-Organisation Programme for the Sound Management of Chemicals (IOMC), and the Intergovernmental Forum on Chemical Safety (IFCS). Apart from the regular development, updating and dissemination of chemical safety information data bases such as the IPCS International Chemical Cards, the elaboration of a Globally harmonized system for the classification and labelling of Chemicals (GHS) has been the most outstanding achievement of this international collaboration on chemical safety. PMID:12909402

  19. Safety Culture Improvement Activities of YGN 3 and 4

    In nuclear power industry all over the world, we can never overemphasize the importance of nuclear safety. After the Chernobyl accident occurred in 1986, Korean nuclear energy industry had made every effort to enhance nuclear safety culture further. And, as a result of the efforts, Korean government declared the five principles for the nuclear energy safety regulation, which were included in the Nuclear Energy Safety Policy Statement published in 1994. In 2001, through the announcement of Nuclear Safety Charter for the peaceful use of nuclear energy, the Ministry of Science and Technology proclaimed at home and abroad that the protection of citizens and environment by securing nuclear safety should be the highest priority in nuclear energy industry. Occupying almost 40% share of domestic electricity generation, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co. decided 'Safety Top Priority Management' as president's management policy, and clearly presented the safety goal to the personnel. By this, the management can effectively place stress on securing safety, which is our highest priority and the only way to win public confidence toward nuclear energy industry. This is prepared to shortly introduce the activities for improving safety culture in Yonggwang Nuclear Power unit 3 and 4 (YGN 3 and 4)

  20. Patient safety culture measurement in general practice. Clinimetric properties of 'SCOPE'

    Zwart Dorien LM

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A supportive patient safety culture is considered to be an essential condition for improving patient safety. Assessing the current safety culture in general practice may be a first step to target improvements. To that end, we studied internal consistency and construct validity of a safety culture questionnaire for general practice (SCOPE which was derived from a comparable questionnaire for hospitals (Dutch-HSOPS. Methods The survey was conducted among caregivers of Dutch general practice as part of an ongoing quality accreditation process using a 46 item questionnaire. We conducted factor analyses and studied validity by calculating correlations between the subscales and testing the hypothesis that respondents' patient safety grade of their practices correlated with their scores on the questionnaire. Results Of 72 practices 294 respondents completed the questionnaire. Eight factors were identified concerning handover and teamwork, support and fellowship, communication openness, feedback and learning from error, intention to report events, adequate procedures and staffing, overall perceptions of patient safety and expectations and actions of managers. Cronbach's alpha of the factors rated between 0.64 and 0.85. The subscales intercorrelated moderately, except for the factor about intention to report events. Respondents who graded patient safety highly scored significantly higher on the questionnaire than those who did not. Conclusions The SCOPE questionnaire seems an appropriate instrument to assess patient safety culture in general practice. The clinimetric properties of the SCOPE are promising, but future research should confirm the factor structure and construct of the SCOPE and delineate its responsiveness to changes in safety culture over time.

  1. EDF - The Inspector General's report on Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection

    This report is destined for the President of EDF with the purpose of informing him of the judgement the Inspector General has about the nuclear safety and radiation protection within the EDF Group. It is also intended for all who, in any way, play a role at EDF in improving nuclear safety. It may also prove useful to those outside the company who work in the nuclear field or indeed any branch of industry where there are risks to be managed and who wish to participate in the debate. It also contributes to the pool of information shared with the other nuclear operators under the auspices of WANO. The continuous improvement of nuclear safety results is a fundamental commitment of the EDF Group. This is notably reflected in a policy of transparency, whether in France, Britain, America or China. This document constitutes an example of this, offering an independent view of the operational situation. It is based on facts and findings derived in EDF's contacts with field staff and meetings with the decision makers, managers, medical personnel and players on both sides of this industry as well as outside stakeholders, especially contractor companies. The resulting snapshot of the situation in the field is particularly instructive. This report therefore concentrates more on problems and weaknesses rather than strengths and progress, except as concerns happenings outside France, where the focus is more on good practices than difficulties. Contents: 1 - The view from the Inspector General of EDF about the nuclear safety in the EDF group; 2 - A panorama of 2011: The management, The state of the installations, Maintenance of the French nuclear power plants, Relations with the French nuclear safety authority (ASN), The EPR projects, The players in the fields of health and safety, Radiation protection, Fire prevention and fire fighting, Increasing nuclear power plant security, Decommissioning; 3 - Nuclear safety management; 4 - The Fukushima Daiichi accident; 5 - Training to

  2. IAEA activity related to safety of nuclear desalination

    The nuclear plants for desalination to be built in the future will have to meet the standards of safety required for the best nuclear power plants currently in operation or being designed. The current safety approach, based on the achievement of the fundamental safety functions and defence in depth strategy, has been shown to be a sound foundation for the safety and protection of public health, and gives the plant the capability of dealing with a large variety of sequences, even beyond the design basis. The Department of Nuclear Safety of the IAEA is involved in many activities, the most important of which are to establish safety standards, and to provide various safety services and technical knowledge in many Technical Co-operation assistance projects. The department is also involved in other safety areas, notably in the field of future reactors. The IAEA is carrying out a project on the safety of new generation reactors, including those used for desalination, with the objective of fostering an exchange of information on safety approaches, promoting harmonization among Member States and contributing towards the development and revision of safety standards and guidelines for nuclear power plant design. The safety, regulatory and environmental concerns in nuclear powered desalination are those related directly to nuclear power plants, with due consideration given to the coupling process. The protection of product water against radioactive contamination must be ensured. An effective infrastructure, including appropriate training, a legal framework and regulatory regime, is a prerequisite to considering use of nuclear power for desalination plants, also in those countries with limited industrial infrastructures and little experience in nuclear technology or safety. (author)

  3. CEC activities in the field of LMFBR safety

    The aim of the ECC is to reach a common LMFBR Safety strategy in Europe. To this end the Commission promotes collaboration between the different fast reactor projects in the Community through working groups and collaborative arrangements and contributes with a research activity executed in its Joint Research Centre Ispra. A short description is given of the activity in the working groups and of the Ispra programme on LMFBR Safety. This programme covers: LMFBR thermohydraulics, fuel coolant interactions, dynamic structure loading and response, safety related material properties and whole core accident code development

  4. Study on application of safety checklist in preventive maintenance activities

    The paper describes the principles and the characteristics of safety checklist as a risk evaluation method. Examples of application of safety checklists to preventive maintenance activities such as criteria comparison and checkup items in place in nuclear power plants are illustrated in details with issues appeared in the checklist establishment. Checklist has a good application in the RCM analysis or in the actual preventive maintenance program for Chashma Nuclear Power Plant indicated by concrete instances. In the light of safety checklist which is used to sustain preventive maintenance as a simple and applicable risk analysis approach, we can get deep knowledge of risks of nuclear power plant to perfect preventive maintenance activities. (authors)

  5. Recent development in safety regulation of nuclear fuel cycle activities

    Through the effort of deliberation and legislation over five years, Japanese government structure was reformed this January, with the aim of realizing simple, efficient and transparent administration. Under the reform, the Agency for Nuclear and Industrial Safety (ANIS) was founded in the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI) to be responsible for safety regulation of energy-related nuclear activities, including nuclear fuel cycle activities, and industrial activities, including explosives, high-pressure gasses and mining. As one of the lessons learned from the JCO criticality accident of September 1999, it was pointed out that government's inspection function was not enough for fuel fabrication facilities. Accordingly, new statutory regulatory activities were introduced, namely, inspection of observance of safety rules and procedures for all kinds of nuclear operators and periodic inspection of fuel fabrication facilities. In addition, in order to cope with insufficient safety education and training of workers in nuclear facilities, licensees of nuclear facilities are required by law to specify safety education and training for their workers. ANIS is committed to enforce these new regulatory activities effectively and efficiently. In addition, it is going to be prepared for, in its capacity of safety regulatory authority, future development of Japanese fuel cycle activities, including commissioning of JNFL Rokkasho reprocessing plant and possible application for licenses for JNFL MOX fabrication plant and for spent fuel interim storage facilities. (author)

  6. Recent development in safety regulation of nuclear fuel cycle activities

    Through the effort of deliberation and legislation over five years, Japanese government structure was reformed this January, with the aim of realizing simple, efficient and transparent administration. Under the reform, the Agency for Nuclear and Industrial Safety (ANIS) was founded in the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI) to be responsible for safety regulation of energy-related nuclear activities, including nuclear fuel cycle activities, and industrial activities, including explosives, high-pressure gasses and mining. As one of the lessons learned from the JCO criticality accident of September 1999, it was pointed out that the government's inspection function was not enough for fuel fabrication facilities. Accordingly, new statutory regulatory activities were introduced, namely, inspection of observance of safety rules and procedures for all kinds of nuclear operators and periodic inspection of fuel fabrication facilities. In addition, in order to cope with insufficient safety education and training of workers in nuclear facilities, licensees of nuclear facilities are required by law to specify safety education and training for their workers. ANIS is committed to enforce these new regulatory activities effectively and efficiently. In addition, it is going to be prepared, in its capacity as safety regulatory authority, for future development of Japanese fuel cycle activities, including commissioning of JNFL Rokkasho reprocessing plant and possible application for licenses for JNFL MOX fabrication plant and for spent fuel interim storage facilities. (author)

  7. EDF - The Inspector General's report on Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection 2012

    After a first chapter in which the Inspector General states his own vision of facts and results regarding nuclear safety and radiation protection for 2012, the next chapters address the following topics: the contrasted results of nuclear operating safety, the need to remain vigilant in nuclear safety management, the challenge of occupational safety, the need of new ambitious goals for radiation protection, an updated training which must be better led by line management, maintenance as a strategic issue, the long road ahead for nuclear technical information system (SDIN), the need of better attention to chemistry in operations, the new impetus of EPRs, plant life extension conditioned by nuclear safety, the mobilization of nuclear operators after Fukushima, and noteworthy operating events

  8. Status of safety in nuclear facilities - 2012. AREVA General Inspectorate Annual report

    After a message from the Areva's Chief Executive Officer and a message from the senior Vice President of safety, health, security, sustainable development, a text by the inspector general comments the key safety results (events, dose levels, radiological impacts), the inspection findings, the areas of vigilance (relationship with the ASN, the management of the criticality risk, and facility compliance), some significant topics after the Fukushima accident. Then this report addresses the status of nuclear safety and radiation protection in the group's facilities and operations. It more specifically addresses the context and findings (lessons learned from the inspections, operating experience from event, employee radiation monitoring, environmental monitoring), crosscutting processes (safety management, controlling facility compliance, subcontractor guidance and management, crisis management), specific risks (criticality risk, fire hazards, transportation safety, radioactive waste management, pollution prevention, liability mitigation and dismantling), and areas for improvement and outlook

  9. Probabilistic safety assessment activities at Ignalina NPP

    The Barselina Project was initiated in the summer 1991. The project was a multilateral co-operation between Lithuania, Russia and Sweden up until phase 3, and phase 4 has been performed as a bilateral between Lithuania and Sweden. The long-range objective is to establish common perspectives and unified bases for assessment of severe accident risks and needs for remedial measures for the RBMK reactors. During phase 3, from 1993 to 1994, a full scope Probabilistic Safety Analysis (PSA) model of the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant unit 2 was developed to identify possible safety improvement of risk importance. The probabilistic methodology was applied on a plant specific basis for a channel type reactor of RBMK design. During phase 4, from 1994 to 1996, the PSA was further developed, taking into account plant changes, improved modelling methods and extended plant information concerning dependencies (area events, dynamic effects, electrical and signal dependencies). The model reflected the plant status before the outage 1996. During phase 4+, 1998 to 1999 the PSA model was upgraded taking into account the newest plant modifications. The new PSA model of CPS/AZRT was developed. Modelling was based on the Single Failure Analysis

  10. Support for the revocation of general safety test regulations in biologics license applications.

    Evans, Dana M; Thorn, Jennifer M; Arch-Douglas, Katherine; Sperry, Justin B; Thompson, Bruce; Davis, Heather L; McCluskie, Michael J

    2016-05-01

    The United States Food and Drug Administration recently removed the requirement for a General Safety Test (GST) for biologics in the Code of Federal Regulations (21 CFR 610.11). The GST, as well as abnormal toxicity (European Pharmacopeia) and innocuity tests (World Health Organization), were designed to test for extraneous toxic contaminants on each product lot intended for human use. Tests require one-week observations for general health and weight following injection of specified volumes of product batches into guinea pigs and mice. At the volumes specified, dose-related toxicity may result when the product is pharmacologically active in rodents. With vaccines, required doses may be > 3 logs higher than intended human dose on a weight-adjusted basis and if an immune modulatory adjuvant is included, systemic immune hyperactivation may cause toxicity. Herein, using the CpG/alum adjuvant combination we evaluated the different test protocols and showed their unsuitability for this adjuvant combination. PMID:26996102

  11. Assessing the general safety and tolerability of vildagliptin: value of pooled analyses from a large safety database versus evaluation of individual studies

    Anja Schweizer

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Anja Schweizer1, Sylvie Dejager2, James E Foley3, Wolfgang Kothny31Novartis Pharma AG, Basel, Switzerland; 2Novartis Pharma SAS, Rueil-Malmaison, France; 3Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation, East Hanover, NJ, USAAim: Analyzing safety aspects of a drug from individual studies can lead to difficult-to-interpret results. The aim of this paper is therefore to assess the general safety and tolerability, including incidences of the most common adverse events (AEs, of vildagliptin based on a large pooled database of Phase II and III clinical trials.Methods: Safety data were pooled from 38 studies of ≥12 to ≥104 weeks' duration. AE profiles of vildagliptin (50 mg bid; N = 6116 were evaluated relative to a pool of comparators (placebo and active comparators; N = 6210. Absolute incidence rates were calculated for all AEs, serious AEs (SAEs, discontinuations due to AEs, and deaths.Results: Overall AEs, SAEs, discontinuations due to AEs, and deaths were all reported with a similar frequency in patients receiving vildagliptin (69.1%, 8.9%, 5.7%, and 0.4%, respectively and patients receiving comparators (69.0%, 9.0%, 6.4%, and 0.4%, respectively, whereas drug-related AEs were seen with a lower frequency in vildagliptin-treated patients (15.7% vs 21.7% with comparators. The incidences of the most commonly reported specific AEs were also similar between vildagliptin and comparators, except for increased incidences of hypoglycemia, tremor, and hyperhidrosis in the comparator group related to the use of sulfonylureas.Conclusions: The present pooled analysis shows that vildagliptin was overall well tolerated in clinical trials of up to >2 years in duration. The data further emphasize the value of a pooled analysis from a large safety database versus assessing safety and tolerability from individual studies.Keywords: type 2 diabetes, dipeptidyl peptidase-4, edema, safety, vildagliptin

  12. Evidence to the Windscale Inquiry on the safety assessment of nuclear fuel reprocessing storage and ancillary activities

    The evidence falls under the following headings: proof of evidence - part 1; description of witness; nature of evidence; need for a safety analysis; general form of a safety analysis; THORP safety analysis; safety information provided to the inquiry; why has complete information not been provided (query); who should conduct the safety analysis (query); conclusions; proof of evidence - part 2; nature of this further evidence (details of some accident sequences and their consequences are presented for Windscale); hazard areas considered for accidents; HAW (high-active waste) tank release; SFS (spent fuel storage) pond release; determination of consequences; conclusions. (U.K.)

  13. 24 CFR 1006.220 - Crime prevention and safety activities.

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Crime prevention and safety... URBAN DEVELOPMENT NATIVE HAWAIIAN HOUSING BLOCK GRANT PROGRAM Eligible Activities § 1006.220 Crime... enforcement measures and activities appropriate to protect residents of affordable housing from...

  14. A generalized framework for assessment of safety margins in nuclear power plants

    analyses, e.g., OK or core damage (CD) as descriptors of fuel barrier damage state. Ideally, the plant safety metric would quantify the probability of exceeding the safety limits for each defense-in-depth barrier. Because obtaining such probabilities is beyond the state-of-the art, safety indices are conceptualized to be proxies for the probability of exceeding the safety limit for design basis accidents (DBA). A second group of safety indices is associated with beyond-DBA events, and are conceptualized to be proxies for the extent of barrier damage. As will be shown elsewhere, individual safety indices can explicitly account for code uncertainty in deterministic barrier state descriptions. The complete set of safety indices is assembled into a plant safety metric. In the assembly process, the probability of occurrence of all relevant threat events is used to weigh the safety indices and extract additional plant safety figures of merit. Thus, the proposed conceptual framework is consistent with the objectives set forth in the letter on the subject from the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safety (ACRS). The proposed method is comprehensive and spans the space from licensing to severe accidents. It relies on traditional safety concepts that are at the core of current regulatory activities. Conceptually, individual indices as well as the overall plant safety metrics are understandable to stake holders and usable by decision makers. The definition of a barrier state lends itself to applying the proposed approach to trajectories for which the independent variable is not time. For example, the approach can be applied to compare deterministic analyses for different nodalization schemes. The proposed framework is applicable to comparing plant safety states before and after a wide range of design/operating modifications. The framework is sufficiently comprehensive to be sensitive to a broad range of design modifications, changes in operating conditions and regulatory requirements

  15. SACRD: a data base for fast reactor safety computer codes, general description

    Greene, N.M.; Forsberg, V.M.; Raiford, G.B.; Arwood, J.W.; Simpson, D.B.; Flanagan, G.F.

    1979-01-01

    SACRD is a data base of material properties and other handbook data needed in computer codes used for fast reactor safety studies. Data are available in the thermodynamics, heat transfer, fluid mechanics, structural mechanics, aerosol transport, meteorology, neutronics, and dosimetry areas. Tabular, graphical and parameterized data are provided in many cases. A general description of the SACRD system is presented in the report.

  16. Further activities of safety culture toward nuclear transportation industry

    On September 30, 1999, a criticality accident occurred at the uranium processing facility of the JCO Co. Ltd. (hereinafter referred to as ''JCO'') Tokai plant, located in Tokaimura, Ibaraki Prefecture. This was an unprecedented accident in Japan's history of peaceful use of nuclear power, resulting in three workers exposed to severe radiation, two of whom died, and the evacuation and enforced indoor confinement of local residents. Nuclear power suppliers must take personal responsibility for ensuring safety. In this connection, the electric power industry, heavy electric machinery manufacturers, fuel fabricators, and nuclear power research organizations gathered together to establish the Nuclear Safety Network (NSnet) in December 1999, based on the resolve to share and improve the level of the safety culture across the entire nuclear power industry and to assure that such an accident never occurs again. NSnet serves as a link between nuclear power enterprises, research organizations, and other bodies, based on the principles of equality and reciprocity. A variety of activities are pursued, such as diffusing a safety culture, implementing mutual evaluation among members, and exchanging safety-related information. Aiming to share and improve the safety culture throughout the entire nuclear power industry, NSnet thoroughly implements the principle of safety first, while at the same time making efforts to restore trust in nuclear power

  17. Summary of the Safety Culture Activities in HANARO of KAERI

    The definition of safety culture in HANARO takes the IAEA's definition and it is the assembly of characteristics of attitudes in the HANARO center and individuals which establishes that, as an overriding priority, the HANARO safety issues receive the attention warranted by their significance. Since the power operation of HANARO started in 1996, HANARO has been operated for about 11 years and its degree of utilization and the number of experimental facilities have increased. This achievement is partly due to the spread of safety culture to the operators and the reactor users. In this paper, the safety culture activities done by the HANARO center of KAERI are described, and its efforts necessary for an improvement of it are presented

  18. Development of a Safety Assessment Information System for the Management of Periodic Safety Assessment Activities

    Song, Tae Young [Nuclear Engineering and Technology Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    At present, the 10-year Periodic Safety Review(PSR) has been performing to confirm all the aspects of safety issues for all the operating plants in compliance with domestic nuclear law of article 23, subarticle 3. For each plant, in addition, Probabilistic Safety Assessment(PSA) and Severe Accident Management Guideline(SAMG) are being implemented and revised periodically to reflect the latest safety level according to principle fulfillment of severe accident policy statement. The assessment reports, as one of outcomes from these activities, are submitted into and reviewed by domestic regulatory body. During reviewing (in-office duty) and licensing (regulatory duty) process, a large number of outcomes of which most are the formal technical reports and licensing materials, are inevitably produced. Moreover, repeated review process over the plants can make them accumulated and produce a variety of documents additionally. This circumstance motivates to develop effective tool or system for the management of these reports and related technical documents for the future use in licensing process and for subsequent plant assessments. This paper presents the development status of Safety Assessment Information System(SAIS) which manages safety-related documents of PSR, PSA and SAMG for practical use for experienced engineers in charge of these areas.

  19. AREVA General Inspectorate 2010 Annual Report. Status of safety in nuclear facilities

    After messages by different managers, this report proposes a description of the context for nuclear safety: group's policy in matters of nuclear safety and radiation protection, regulatory changes (in France, with respect to information, changes in administrative organization, overhaul of general technical regulations, international context). It describes the organizational changes which occurred within the company. It reports actions regarding transparency, briefly describes actions and principles aimed at improving safety, indicates and comments noteworthy nuclear events, discusses their assessment from a HOF (human and organizational factors) perspective, comments lessons learned from inspections, comments data regarding radiation protection and actions aimed at improving radiation protection. It discusses environmental impact issues. It addresses the different processes and factors which transversely appear in nuclear safety: safety management, human and organizational factors, safety in design, project management, and emergency management. Several specific risks are discussed: criticality control, nuclear materials safeguards, fire, spill prevention, transportation, radioactive waste, shutdown and dismantling, service operations, mining, and environmental liabilities. Document in French and in English

  20. Methylphenidate Actively Induces Emergence from General Anesthesia

    Solt, Ken; Cotten, Joseph F.; Cimenser, Aylin; Wong, Kin F.K.; Chemali, Jessica J.; Brown, Emery N.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Although accumulating evidence suggests that arousal pathways in the brain play important roles in emergence from general anesthesia, the roles of monoaminergic arousal circuits are unclear. In this study, the authors tested the hypothesis that methylphenidate (an inhibitor of dopamine and norepinephrine transporters) induces emergence from isoflurane general anesthesia. Methods: Using adult rats, the authors tested the effect of intravenous methylphenidate on time to emergence...

  1. Activities Related to Safety Regulations of Spent Fuel Interim Storage at Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization

    Major research activities in safety regulation of spent fuel interim storage at JNES are presented. In Japan, the first license application was approved by the government in May 2010 and the design and construction method will be submitted to the regulatory authority NISA soon. A commencement of its operation is expected at December 2012. In its plan, dual purpose metal casks for storage and transport will be stored in a concrete building for about 50 years, and then they will be transported to a spent fuel reprocessing facility. When they will be shipped out after the storage, no visual inspection for cask internals will be scheduled. Major reason of no visual inspection is to avoid any radiation exposure from contingent incident during opening the casks lid. JNES as TSO has conducted research activities to support NISA. Before the license application, those activities focused on three areas. The first area was to investigate fundamental safety function of the cask, that is, confinement, shielding, heat removal and subcriticality. Especially, a long term performance of the safety function was key issues. The second one was to confirm integrity of spent fuel cladding during the storage. The third one was to improves and verify the computer codes and/or methods for safety evaluation of the spent fuel interim storage facilities. In usual safety review process in Japan, NISA sometimes asks JNES to perform independent analysis and check the adequacy of the safety analysis conducted by licensees. After the approval of the license application, the applicant should have approvals of “design and construction method”, the welding inspection of the cask and the pre-service inspection. JNES is now supporting to prepare the criteria of the design and construction method. (author)

  2. The relationship between safety net activities and hospital financial performance

    Khan Nasreen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the 1990's hospitals in the U.S were faced with cost containment charges, which may have disproportionately impacted hospitals that serve poor patients. The purposes of this paper are to study the impact of safety net activities on total profit margins and operating expenditures, and to trace these relationships over the 1990s for all U.S urban hospitals, controlling for hospital and market characteristics. Methods The primary data source used for this analysis is the Annual Survey of Hospitals from the American Hospital Association and Medicare Hospital Cost Reports for years 1990-1999. Ordinary least square, hospital fixed effects, and two-stage least square analyses were performed for years 1990-1999. Logged total profit margin and operating expenditure were the dependent variables. The safety net activities are the socioeconomic status of the population in the hospital serving area, and Medicaid intensity. In some specifications, we also included uncompensated care burden. Results We found little evidence of negative effects of safety net activities on total margin. However, hospitals serving a low socioeconomic population had lower expenditure raising concerns for the quality of the services provided. Conclusions Despite potentially negative policy and market changes during the 1990s, safety net activities do not appear to have imperiled the survival of hospitals. There may, however, be concerns about the long-term quality of the services for hospitals serving low socioeconomic population.

  3. AREVA General Inspectorate Annual Report 2013 - Status of safety in nuclear facilities

    This annual report by AREVA's General Inspectorate deals with the status of nuclear safety and radiation protection in the group's facilities and operations over the course of 2013. Based on the findings made during implementation of the annual inspection program, this annual report also includes the results of the analysis of significant events and the observations and assessments of specialists in the Safety Health Security Sustainable Development Department (SHSSDD), supplemented by regular interaction with the safety regulators, different government agencies, stakeholders and other nuclear operators. Additionally, this report presents the action plans put into motion and the directions taken for continuous improvement in risk prevention for operations conducted in France and internationally. In 2013, the level of safety in the group's nuclear facilities and operations remained satisfactory, although improvements are necessary in some domains. This report is based on established indicators, analyses of reported events, responses to commitments made to the regulators, and the results of different improvement actions reported on in the inspected and supported entities. In 2013, no level 2 event on the International Nuclear and Radiological Event Scale (INES) was reported, the bottom-up reporting of weak signals was confirmed, dose levels were low and there were no radiological impacts on the environment. The General Inspectorate conducted 45 inspections in 30 of the group's entities in 2013. Of these, 10 concerned sites outside France and 7 were conducted following events or particular situations. These inspections gave rise to 176 recommendations, which the inspected entities have translated into action plans. Verification of these different action plans according to planned procedures and announced schedules gave rise to 16 follow-up inspections. The major lessons learned from these inspections relate to project management, facility compliance and operational

  4. IAEA activities on safety aspects of NPP ageing

    A review of IAEA activities concerned with safety aspects of nuclear power plants ageing is given for the period from 1995 to 1998 with the prospects till year 2000. Coordinated Research programs were conducted on Management Ageing of Concrete Containment Buildings; Management of Ageing of In-Containment I and C cables. TECDOCs were published on Assessment and Management of Ageing of Major NPP Components Important for Safety of CANDU, PWR and BWR NPPs. Technical Committee Meetings and Interregional training courses concerned with the same subjects were held

  5. The Management System for Facilities and Activities. Safety Requirements

    This publication establishes requirements for management systems that integrate safety, health, security, quality assurance and environmental objectives. A successful management system ensures that nuclear safety matters are not dealt with in isolation but are considered within the context of all these objectives. The aim of this publication is to assist Member States to establish and implement effective management systems that integrate all aspects of managing nuclear facilities and activities in a coherent manner. It details the planned and systematic actions necessary to provide adequate confidence that all these requirements are satisfied

  6. The Management System for Facilities and Activities. Safety Requirements

    This publication establishes requirements for management systems that integrate safety, health, security, quality assurance and environmental objectives. A successful management system ensures that nuclear safety matters are not dealt with in isolation but are considered within the context of all these objectives. The aim of this publication is to assist Member States in establishing and implementing effective management systems that integrate all aspects of managing nuclear facilities and activities in a coherent manner. It details the planned and systematic actions necessary to provide adequate confidence that all these requirements are satisfied. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Management system; 3. Management responsibility; 4. Resource management; 5. Process implementation; 6. Measurement, assessment and improvement.

  7. Implementing and measuring safety goals and safety culture. 4. Utility's Activities for Better Safety Culture After the JCO Accident

    The criticality accident at the JCO plant prompted the Government to enact a law for nuclear emergency preparedness. The nuclear industry established NSnet to facilitate opportunities for peer review among its members. This paper describes the activities by NSnet and TEPCO's Kashiwazaki-Kariwa nuclear power station (NPS) for a better safety culture. Created as a voluntary organization by the nuclear industry in 1999, NSnet has 35 members and is assisted by CRIEPI and NUPEC for its activities relevant to human factors. Given the fact that nuclear facility operators not belonging to WANO had no institutional system available for exchange of experiences and good practices for better safety among themselves, NSnet's activities focus on peer review by member organizations and onsite seminars. Starting April 2000 with visits to three fuel fabricators, NSnet intends to have 23 peer-review visits in 2 yr (Ref. 1). The six-member review team stays on-site for 4 days, during which time they review-using guidelines available from WANO and IAEA-OSART-six areas: organization/management, emergency preparedness, education/training, operation/ maintenance, protection against occupational radiation exposure, and prevention of accidents. A series of on-site seminars is held at members' nuclear facilities, to which NSnet dispatches experts for lectures. NSnet plans to hold such seminars twice per month. Other activities include information-sharing through a newsletter, a Web site (www. nsnet.gr.jp), and others. Although considerable differences exist in the design and the practices in operation/maintenance between power reactors and JCO, utilities can extract lessons from the accident that will be worth consideration for their own facilities in the areas of safety culture, education and training, and interface between design and operation. This thinking prompted the Nuclear Safety Promotion Center at Kashiwazaki-Kariwa NPS, to which the author belonged at that time, to launch the

  8. Teaching Safety Skills to Children: Prevention of Firearm Injury as an Exemplar of Best Practice in Assessment, Training, and Generalization of Safety Skills

    Miltenberger, Raymond G

    2008-01-01

    The focus of this paper is on teaching safety skills to children with an emphasis on recent research on behavioral skills training for the prevention of firearm injury. Following a discussion of safety skills and methods for assessing these skills, the paper reviews recent research on behavioral skills training and in situ training for teaching safety skills to prevent firearm injury. Strategies for promoting generalization and increasing the efficiency of training are then discussed, along w...

  9. General-purpose heat source project and space nuclear safety and fuels program. Progress report

    This formal monthly report covers the studies related to the use of 238PuO2 in radioisotopic power systems carried out for the Advanced Nuclear Systems and Projects Division of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. The two programs involved are general-purpose heat source development and space nuclear safety and fuels. Most of the studies discussed hear are of a continuing nature. Results and conclusions described may change as the work continues

  10. 20 CFR 220.142 - General information about work activity.

    2010-04-01

    ... RETIREMENT ACT DETERMINING DISABILITY Substantial Gainful Activity § 220.142 General information about work activity. (a) The nature of the claimant's work. If the claimant's duties require use of the claimant's... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false General information about work activity....

  11. Evaluation of features to support safety and quality in general practice clinical software

    Schattner Peter

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Electronic prescribing is now the norm in many countries. We wished to find out if clinical software systems used by general practitioners in Australia include features (functional capabilities and other characteristics that facilitate improved patient safety and care, with a focus on quality use of medicines. Methods Seven clinical software systems used in general practice were evaluated. Fifty software features that were previously rated as likely to have a high impact on safety and/or quality of care in general practice were tested and are reported here. Results The range of results for the implementation of 50 features across the 7 clinical software systems was as follows: 17-31 features (34-62% were fully implemented, 9-13 (18-26% partially implemented, and 9-20 (18-40% not implemented. Key findings included: Access to evidence based drug and therapeutic information was limited. Decision support for prescribing was available but varied markedly between systems. During prescribing there was potential for medicine mis-selection in some systems, and linking a medicine with its indication was optional. The definition of 'current medicines' versus 'past medicines' was not always clear. There were limited resources for patients, and some medicines lists for patients were suboptimal. Results were provided to the software vendors, who were keen to improve their systems. Conclusions The clinical systems tested lack some of the features expected to support patient safety and quality of care. Standards and certification for clinical software would ensure that safety features are present and that there is a minimum level of clinical functionality that clinicians could expect to find in any system.

  12. Evaluation of features to support safety and quality in general practice clinical software

    2011-01-01

    Background Electronic prescribing is now the norm in many countries. We wished to find out if clinical software systems used by general practitioners in Australia include features (functional capabilities and other characteristics) that facilitate improved patient safety and care, with a focus on quality use of medicines. Methods Seven clinical software systems used in general practice were evaluated. Fifty software features that were previously rated as likely to have a high impact on safety and/or quality of care in general practice were tested and are reported here. Results The range of results for the implementation of 50 features across the 7 clinical software systems was as follows: 17-31 features (34-62%) were fully implemented, 9-13 (18-26%) partially implemented, and 9-20 (18-40%) not implemented. Key findings included: Access to evidence based drug and therapeutic information was limited. Decision support for prescribing was available but varied markedly between systems. During prescribing there was potential for medicine mis-selection in some systems, and linking a medicine with its indication was optional. The definition of 'current medicines' versus 'past medicines' was not always clear. There were limited resources for patients, and some medicines lists for patients were suboptimal. Results were provided to the software vendors, who were keen to improve their systems. Conclusions The clinical systems tested lack some of the features expected to support patient safety and quality of care. Standards and certification for clinical software would ensure that safety features are present and that there is a minimum level of clinical functionality that clinicians could expect to find in any system.

  13. The impact of blanket design on activation and thermal safety

    Activation and thermal safety analyses for experimental and power reactors are presented. The effects of a strong neutron absorber, B4C, on activation and temperature response of experimental reactors to Loss-of-Cooling Accidents are investigated. Operational neutron fluxes, radioactivities of elements and thermal transients are calculated using the codes ONEDANT, REAC and THIOD, respectively. The inclusion of a small amount of B4C in the steel blanket of an experimental reactor reduces its activation and the post LOCA temperature escalation significantly. Neither the inclusion of excessive amounts of B4C nor enriched 10B in the first walls of an experimental reactor bring much advantage. The employment of a 2 cm graphite tile liner before the first wall helps to limit the post LOCA escalation of first wall temperature. The effect of replacing a 20 cm thick section of a steel shield of a fusion power reactor with B4C is also analyzed. The first wall temperature peak is reduced by 100 degree C in the modified blanket. The natural convection effect on thermal safety of a liquid lithium cooled blanket are investigated. Natural convection has no impact at all, unless the magnetic field can be reduced. If magnets can be shut off rapidly after the accident, then the temperature escalation of the first wall will be limited. Upflow of the coolant is better than the initial downflow design from a thermal safety point of view. Activities of three structural materials, OTR stainless steel, SS-316 and VCrTi are compared. Although VCrTi has higher activity for a period of two hours after the accident, it has one to two orders of magnitude less activity than those of the steels in the mid- and long-terms. 29 refs., 42 figs., 9 tabs

  14. Criteria for use in preparedness and response for a nuclear or radiological emergency. General safety guide

    In March 2002, the IAEA's Board of Governors approved a Safety Requirements publication, Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency (IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-2), jointly sponsored by seven international organizations, which establishes the requirements for an adequate level of preparedness for and response to a nuclear or radiological emergency in any State. The IAEA General Conference, in resolution GC(46)/RES/9, encouraged Member States 'to implement, if necessary, instruments for improving their own preparedness and response capabilities for nuclear and radiological incidents and accidents, including their arrangements for responding to acts involving the malicious use of nuclear or radioactive material and to threats of such acts', and further encouraged them to 'implement the Safety Requirements for Preparedness and Response to a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency'. The Convention on Early Notification of a Nuclear Accident ('the Early Notification Convention') and the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency ('the Assistance Convention') (IAEA Legal Series No. 14), adopted in 1986, place specific obligations on the Parties and on the IAEA. Under Article 5a(ii) of the Assistance Convention, one function of the IAEA is to collect and disseminate to States Parties and Member States information concerning methodologies, techniques and available results of research relating to response to such emergencies. This Safety Guide is intended to assist Member States in the application of the Safety Requirements publication on Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency (IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-2), and to help in the fulfilment of the IAEA's obligations under the Assistance Convention. It provides generic criteria for protective actions and other response actions in the case of a nuclear or radiological emergency, including numerical values of these criteria

  15. International assistance to upgrade the safety of Soviet-designed nuclear power plants. Selected activities in Eastern and Central Europe and the countries of the former Soviet Union

    The overview is merely a snapshot of nuclear safety activities to assist the countries of Eastern and Central Europe and the former Soviet Union. While many other activities are planned or ongoing, this publication is meant to provide a general overview of the world community's commitment to improving the safety of Soviet-designed nuclear reactors

  16. General-purpose heat source project and space nuclear safety fuels program. Progress report, February 1980

    This formal monthly report covers the studies related to the use of 238PuO2 in radioisotopic power systems carried out for the Advanced Nuclear Systems and Projects Division of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. The two programs involved are: General-Purpose Heat Source Development and Space Nuclear Safety and Fuels. Most of the studies discussed here are of a continuing nature. Results and conclusions described may change as the work continues. Published reference to the results cited in this report should not be made without the explicit permission of the person in charge of the work

  17. General-Purpose Heat Source safety verification test series: SVT-1 through SVT-6

    The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) is a modular heat source that will supply energy for Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) in space missions. The Safety Verification Tests (SVTs) are performed to assess the plutonia containment capability of heat source modules subjected to certain accident environments. This interim report described the GPHS module configuration, the test environment, and the response of the module components following simulated reentry and solid Earth impact. The specific test environment of these initial six tests results from failure of the booster rocket to place the spacecraft in a proper trajectory and subsequent reentry of the GPHS modules from Earth orbit. 36 figs

  18. The applicability of nuclear engineering safety principles and criteria to thermal-electric generation stations generally

    The consistently high capacity factors for the Pickering Generating Station provide solid evidence of sound engineering and high quality of component manufacture, construction, maintenance and operation. The achievement of this high level of performance is due to a number of contributing factors, one of which is the observance of the nuclear safety principles and criteria developed over the last two decades. The application of these principles and of the relevant criteria to thermal-electric stations generally would appear to be worthy of serious consideration. (author)

  19. SAFETY

    C. Schaefer and N. Dupont

    2013-01-01

      “Safety is the highest priority”: this statement from CERN is endorsed by the CMS management. An interpretation of this statement may bring you to the conclusion that you should stop working in order to avoid risks. If the safety is the priority, work is not! This would be a misunderstanding and misinterpretation. One should understand that “working safely” or “operating safely” is the priority at CERN. CERN personnel are exposed to different hazards on many levels on a daily basis. However, risk analyses and assessments are done in order to limit the number and the gravity of accidents. For example, this process takes place each time you cross the road. The hazard is the moving vehicle, the stake is you and the risk might be the risk of collision between both. The same principle has to be applied during our daily work. In particular, keeping in mind the general principles of prevention defined in the late 1980s. These principles wer...

  20. Current Activities on Nuclear Safety Culture in Korea. How to meet the challenges for Safety and Safety Culture?

    'Statement of Nuclear Safety Policy' declared by the Korean Government elucidates adherence to the principle of 'priority to safety'. The 3. Comprehensive Nuclear Energy Promotion Plan (2007-2011) more specifically addressed the necessity to develop and apply 'safety culture evaluation criteria' and to strengthen safety management of concerned organizations in an autonomous way. Putting these policies as a backdrop, Korean Government has taken diverse safety culture initiatives and has encouraged the relevant organizations to develop safety culture practices of their own accord. Accordingly, KHNP, the operating organization in Korea, developed a 'safety culture performance indicator', which has been used to evaluate safety mind of employees and the evaluation results have been continuously reflected in operational management and training programs. Furthermore, KHNP inserted 'nuclear safety culture subject' into every course of more than two week length, and provided employees with special lectures on safety culture. KINS, the regulatory organization, developed indicators for the safety culture evaluation based on the IAEA Guidelines. Also, KINS has hosted an annual Nuclear Safety Technology Information Meeting to share information between regulatory organizations and industries. Furthermore, KINS provided a nuclear safety culture class to the new employees and they are given a chance to participate in performance of a role-reversal socio-drama. Additionally, KINS developed a safety culture training program, published training materials and conducted a 'Nuclear Safety Culture Basic Course' in October 2007, 4 times of which are planed this year. In conclusion, from Government to relevant organizations, 'nuclear safety culture' concept is embraced as important and has been put into practice on a variety of forms. Specifically, 'education and training' is a starting line and sharing information and lessons learned through symposium, meeting, and etc are also done in a

  1. Results of activities of the State Office for Nuclear Safety in state supervision of nuclear safety and radiation protection in 1999

    The report summarises results of activities of the State Office for Nuclear Safety in supervision of nuclear safety and radiation protection in the Czech Republic. The first part of the report evaluates nuclear safety of nuclear power plants, other nuclear facilities and major radiation sources. The second part comprises information concerning the results of supervision of radiation protection and gives details of the radiological situation within the Czech Republic. The 'Atomic Act' No. 18/1997 together with fourteen Decrees are now in force in the Czech Republic and regulate all activities in the nuclear area. The report also gives a general overview of how these legislative documents are implemented in everyday practice. (author)

  2. Safety activities and human resource development at NCA

    Toshiba Nuclear Critical Assembly (NCA) has been safely operated since the first criticality in December 1963. The topics covered in this Yayoi Meeting Report are: (1) the outline of NCA, (2) the safety control situation mainly after the Great East Japan Earthquake in 2011, (3) educational training incorporates the lessons learned in this earthquake, and (4) human resource development during 2008-2015. Regarding safety control, facility maintenance has been conducted systematically according to the maintenance plan from the viewpoint of preventive maintenance. Regarding educational training, two disaster handling training based on the safety regulation and one nuclear emergency drill based on the emergency drill plan for licensee of nuclear energy activity based on the Act of Special Measures Concerning Nuclear Emergency Preparedness every year. Regarding human resource development, development training was given to 358 people including students. This year, training that does not require NCA operation was conducted including gamma-ray spectrum measurement of NCA fuel rod and neutron deceleration property measurement using 252Cf neutron source. (S.K.)

  3. OECD/NEA activities to enhance cooperation among technical organizations involved with nuclear safety assessment and research

    The first priority for the member countries of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA) is nuclear safety and regulation. This fact is clearly recognized in the OECD/NEA strategic plan for 2005-2009 and directs the activities of the OECD/NEA's programme of work, in particular, those carried out by the safety committees - the Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) and the Committee on Nuclear Regulatory Activities (CNRA). To accomplish these objectives, the CSNI is organized into six permanent working groups, each covering a different set of technical disciplines. The CSNI has produced numerous state of the art reports (SOARs) or international standard problems (ISPs), which have been key contributors to national safety assessment practices. The CSNI is also responsible for organizing and monitoring cooperative research projects, which are generally organized to share costs and information on research programmes of common interest to many member countries and/or to ensure that key facilities/programmes related to the nuclear safety infrastructure are maintained. Currently, there are 15 ongoing safety research projects. OECD projects like LOFT (Loss of Fluid Test) and Halden are recognized worldwide. The paper underlines the main findings from past OECD/NEA experience, focusing on specific safety activities and showing the added value provided to member countries. From the OECD/ NEA perspective, any concerted action among technical institutions addressing safety should build on the successful cooperation existing today. (author)

  4. Neuropsychological-EEG Activation in Genetic Generalized Epilepsy

    J Gordon Millichap

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Investigators from Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, evaluated the effects of neuropsychological activation (NPA tasks on epileptiform discharges (ED in adolescents with idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE and in comparison with hyperventilation and photic stimulation.

  5. Active Emergence from Propofol General Anesthesia Is Induced by Methylphenidate

    Chemali, Jessica J.; Van Dort, Christa J.; Brown, Emery N.; Solt, Ken

    2011-01-01

    Background: A recent study showed that methylphenidate induces emergence from isoflurane general anesthesia. Isoflurane and propofol are general anesthetics that may have distinct molecular mechanisms of action. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that methylphenidate actively induces emergence from propofol general anesthesia. Methods: Using adult rats, the effect of methylphenidate on time to emergence after a single bolus of propofol was determined. The ability of met...

  6. Review of nuclear regulatory activities associated with safety culture and the management of safety in the United Kingdom

    This paper describes some of the key regulatory activities which have taken place in the United Kingdom in recent years in the areas of safety culture and management of safety. It explains how the UK's nuclear licensing regime, regulated and enforced by the Nuclear Installations Inspectorate, (NII), provides the framework for a viable safety management system and identifies a management of safety model which a NII Task Force has developed. It finally identifies further work which is being undertaken by the NII. (author). 4 refs, 2 figs

  7. Safety- and Risk Analysis Activities in Chemical Industry in Europe

    European and International mechanism of handling safety- and risk-related matters. So, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development's (OECD) core objective on risk management is to support Member countries' efforts to develop national policies and actions, and, where appropriate, to develop and implement international risk management measures. In support of this objective, the OECD Risk Management Programme focuses on two areas: (1) developing methods and technical tools that can be used by OECD and Member countries to enhance their current risk management programmes; and (2) identifying specific chemical exposures of concern in Member countries and evaluating possible risk management opportunities. The current paper highlights the EU legislation on major accident hazards related to the chemical industry, differences in the national approaches to risk analyses in the process industry and European-scale activity in improving the understanding of the sources of uncertainty in risk assessments

  8. NS [Nuclear Safety] update. Current safety and security activities and developments taking place in the Department of Nuclear Safety and Security. Issue no. 3, April 2007

    This newsletter reports on the manual for first responders to a radiological emergency, the IAEA's testing laboratory for radiation measurement, monitoring and protection, which is the first UN laboratory accredited to the international standard ISO17025, and the International Conference on Lessons Learned fro the Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities and the Safe Termination of Nuclear Activities. The IAEA, in recognition of this critical need, has developed a Manual for First Responders to a Radiological Emergency with the objective to provide practical guidance for those responding within the first few hours of a radiological emergency. This guidance document is co-sponsored by the Comite technique international de prevention et d'extinction du feu (CTIF), the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) and the World Health Organization (WHO). The Manual for First Responders provides guidance in the form of action guides, instructions, and supporting data that can be easily applied by a State to build a basic capability to respond to a radiological emergency. The guidance also contains practical procedures and tools on the response to a radiological emergency again easily and quickly adaptable by Member States to prepare first responders to respond adequately to a radiological emergency. The Manual can be used for training purposes at the preparedness stage as well as during the response. The Policy and Programme Support Section (PPSS) within the Division of Radiation, Transport and Waste Security (NSRW) has been operating, for many years, a laboratory (the Testing Laboratory) for radiation safety monitoring of individuals and workplaces. The establishment of a quality management system, as required in the International Basic Safety Standards (the BSS), started in 2000 to cover all measurement methods of the laboratory. This system is based on the international standard ISO17025 (General requirements for the competence of testing and calibration laboratories). PPSS

  9. Annual report on the activities in safety administration department. Report of the fiscal year 2008

    The activities of Safety Administration Department covers many fields in Nuclear Fuel Cycle Engineering Laboratories such as the management of the occupational safety and health, the crisis management, the security, and the management of a quality assurance. This report is the summary of the activities of Safety Administration Department since April, 2008 until March, 2009. (author)

  10. Annual report on the activities in Safety Administration Department. Report of the fiscal year 2011

    The activities of Safety Administration Department cover many fields in Nuclear Fuel Cycle Engineering Laboratories such as the management of the occupational safety and health, the crisis management, the security, and the management of a quality assurance. This report is the summary of the activities of Safety Administration Department from April, 2011 to March, 2012. (author)

  11. Annual report on the activities in safety administration department. Report of the fiscal year 2009

    The activities of Safety Administration Department covers many fields in Nuclear Fuel Cycle Engineering Laboratories such as the management of the occupational safety and health, the crisis management, the security, and the management of a quality assurance. This report is the summary of the activities of Safety Administration Department since April, 2009 until March, 2010. (author)

  12. Environmental assessment of general-purpose heat source safety verification testing

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) was prepared to identify and evaluate potential environmental, safety, and health impacts associated with the Proposed Action to test General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) assemblies at the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) 10,000-Foot Sled Track Facility, Albuquerque, New Mexico. RTGs are used to provide a reliable source of electrical power on board some spacecraft when solar power is inadequate during long duration space missions. These units are designed to convert heat from the natural decay of radioisotope fuel into electrical power. Impact test data are required to support DOE's mission to provide radioisotope power systems to NASA and other user agencies. The proposed tests will expand the available safety database regarding RTG performance under postulated accident conditions. Direct observations and measurements of GPHS/RTG performance upon impact with hard, unyielding surfaces are required to verify model predictions and to ensure the continual evolution of the RTG designs that perform safely under varied accident environments. The Proposed Action is to conduct impact testing of RTG sections containing GPHS modules with simulated fuel. End-On and Side-On impact test series are planned

  13. Environmental assessment of general-purpose heat source safety verification testing

    NONE

    1995-02-01

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) was prepared to identify and evaluate potential environmental, safety, and health impacts associated with the Proposed Action to test General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) assemblies at the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) 10,000-Foot Sled Track Facility, Albuquerque, New Mexico. RTGs are used to provide a reliable source of electrical power on board some spacecraft when solar power is inadequate during long duration space missions. These units are designed to convert heat from the natural decay of radioisotope fuel into electrical power. Impact test data are required to support DOE`s mission to provide radioisotope power systems to NASA and other user agencies. The proposed tests will expand the available safety database regarding RTG performance under postulated accident conditions. Direct observations and measurements of GPHS/RTG performance upon impact with hard, unyielding surfaces are required to verify model predictions and to ensure the continual evolution of the RTG designs that perform safely under varied accident environments. The Proposed Action is to conduct impact testing of RTG sections containing GPHS modules with simulated fuel. End-On and Side-On impact test series are planned.

  14. Current Activities on Nuclear Safety Culture in Korea. How to meet the challenges for Safety and Safety Culture?

    Oh, Chaewoon [International Policy Department Policy and Standard Division, Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, 19 Gusung-Dong Yuseong-Ku, 305-338 DAEJEON (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-07-01

    'Statement of Nuclear Safety Policy' declared by the Korean Government elucidates adherence to the principle of 'priority to safety'. The 3. Comprehensive Nuclear Energy Promotion Plan (2007-2011) more specifically addressed the necessity to develop and apply 'safety culture evaluation criteria' and to strengthen safety management of concerned organizations in an autonomous way. Putting these policies as a backdrop, Korean Government has taken diverse safety culture initiatives and has encouraged the relevant organizations to develop safety culture practices of their own accord. Accordingly, KHNP, the operating organization in Korea, developed a 'safety culture performance indicator', which has been used to evaluate safety mind of employees and the evaluation results have been continuously reflected in operational management and training programs. Furthermore, KHNP inserted 'nuclear safety culture subject' into every course of more than two week length, and provided employees with special lectures on safety culture. KINS, the regulatory organization, developed indicators for the safety culture evaluation based on the IAEA Guidelines. Also, KINS has hosted an annual Nuclear Safety Technology Information Meeting to share information between regulatory organizations and industries. Furthermore, KINS provided a nuclear safety culture class to the new employees and they are given a chance to participate in performance of a role-reversal socio-drama. Additionally, KINS developed a safety culture training program, published training materials and conducted a 'Nuclear Safety Culture Basic Course' in October 2007, 4 times of which are planed this year. In conclusion, from Government to relevant organizations, 'nuclear safety culture' concept is embraced as important and has been put into practice on a variety of forms. Specifically, 'education and training' is a starting line and sharing

  15. General-purpose heat source safety verification test series: SVT-11 through SVT-13

    The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) is a modular component of the radioisotope thermoelectric generator that will provide power for the Galileo and Ulysses (formerly ISPM) space missions. The GPHS provides power by transmitting the heat of 238Pu α-decay to an array of thermoelectric elements. Because the possibility of an orbital abort always exists, the heat source was designed and constructed to minimize plutonia release in any accident environment. The Safety Verification Test (SVT) series was formulated to evaluate the effectiveness of GPHS plutonia containment after atmospheric reentry and Earth impact. The first two reports (covering SVT-1 through SVT-10) described the results of flat, side-on, and angular module impacts against steel targets at 54 m/s. This report describes flat-on module impacts against concrete and granite targets, at velocities equivalent to or higher than previous SVTs

  16. Economics of food safety in chains: a review of general principles

    Valeeva, N.I.; M.P.M. Meuwissen; Huirne, R.B.M.

    2004-01-01

    The increased demand for safer food has resulted in the development and introduction of new food safety standards and regulations to reach a higher level of food safety. An integrated approach of controlling food safety throughout the entire food chain (`farm to table`) has become an important issue in improving the food safety level, but little is known about its economic aspects. This paper reviews important issues in this field, namely the definition of safe food, the nature of food safety...

  17. A Novel Control Algorithm for Integration of Active and Passive Vehicle Safety Systems in Frontal Collisions

    Daniel Wallner

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The present paper investigates an approach to integrate active and passive safety systems of passenger cars. Worldwide, the introduction of Integrated Safety Systems and Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS is considered to continue the today

  18. JRC/IE support activities to PHARE nuclear safety programmes. Dissemination of PHARE project results

    Nuclear safety in Europe is one of European Union's primary concerns, therefore the European Union decided to take a prominent role to help the New Independent States and countries of Central and Eastern Europe to ensure the safety of their nuclear reactors. The European Union TACIS and PHARE programmes in nuclear safety have been undertaken since 1990. The European Commission's Directorate General External Relations (EC DG RELEX) and, Directorate General Europe Aid Co-operation Office (EC DG AIDCO), are responsible for programming and management of implementation of TACIS projects. Directorate General Enlargement (EC DG ELARG) is responsible for programming PHARE programmes, but implementation of most projects has been decentralised since 1999 budget year to the Beneficiary countries. DG ELARG acts as backstopping for the relevant EC Delegations. In these activities, the TSSTP Unit at the JRC/IE in Petten, The Netherlands, is a technical and scientific adviser of DG RELEX and DG AIDCO and provides support to DG ELARG for very specific technical issues. Several PHARE projects aiming at improving nuclear safety have been successfully implemented for a number of plants from Central and Eastern Europe. In some cases major safety issues have been addressed by means of multi-country projects and results have been disseminated to the rest of the nuclear community. Although a lot of information has been exchanged at a bilateral level, further effort is needed to collect the project results in a systematic way and make them available by means of the internet. At present the TSSTP Unit is implementing two projects for dissemination of PHARE project results. This activity will take a better advantage of today's communication technologies and ensure the management of the acquired knowledge through preservation and user-friendly access and retrieval of the project results. The paper provides an outline of the TSSTP Unit relevant knowledge preservation initiative, a description

  19. EC-sponsored research activities on innovative passive safety systems

    On April 26th 1994, the European Union (EU) adopted via a Council Decision a EURATOM Multiannual Programme for community activities in the field of Nuclear Fission Safety (NFS) Research for the period 1994 to 1998. An area of work having, as an objective, to 'explore innovative approaches' to improve the safety of future and existing reactors, was introduced in this programme. Most of the projects selected in this area, which have been grouped under a common cluster known as 'INNO', are currently being carried out on a 'cost-shared' basis, i.e. contribution of the European Commission is up to 50% of the total cost. At present, the 'INNO' cluster is composed of 10 projects in which 25 different organisations, representing research centres, universities, regulators, utilities and vendors from 7 EU member states and Switzerland, are involved. These projects are proving to be an efficient means to gain the necessary phenomenological knowledge and to solve the challenging problems, many times of generic nature, posed among others by the characteristically small driving forces of the systems studied and by the lack of really prototypical test facilities. (author)

  20. Safety

    This annual report of the Senior Inspector for the Nuclear Safety, analyses the nuclear safety at EDF for the year 1999 and proposes twelve subjects of consideration to progress. Five technical documents are also provided and discussed concerning the nuclear power plants maintenance and safety (thermal fatigue, vibration fatigue, assisted control and instrumentation of the N4 bearing, 1300 MW reactors containment and time of life of power plants). (A.L.B.)

  1. Safety of iobitridol in the general population and at-risk patients

    Vogl, Thomas J. [University Hospital Frankfurt, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University, Department of Radiology, Frankfurt (Germany); J. W. Goethe University of Frankfurt, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt (Germany); Honold, Elmar [Guerbet GmbH, Sulzbach (Germany); Wolf, Michael [Michael Wolf Information Systems, Puettlingen (Germany); Mohajeri, H.; Hammerstingl, R. [University Hospital Frankfurt, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University, Department of Radiology, Frankfurt (Germany)

    2006-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to review the rate of adverse events after contrast medium administration in the general population and at-risk patients (renal impairment, heart failure (NYHA III or IV), hypotension or hypertension, coronary artery disease, previous reaction to contrast media, asthma and/or allergies, dehydration, diabetes mellitus, poor general condition) under daily practice conditions in a post-marketing surveillance study. Two hundred and ten radiologists conducted various X-ray examinations in 52,057 patients. To document the safety of iobitridol in routine use, all patients undergoing X-ray examinations were included. Exclusion criteria were contraindications listed in the locally approved summary of product characteristics. The adverse event rate was 0.96% (at-risk patients 1.39%); the rate of serious adverse events 0.044% in all patients (at-risk patients 0.057%). Adverse events occurred more often in women than in men (P<0.001). In patients who had previously reacted to a contrast medium, adverse events were reported in 3.43% with mild to moderate symptoms. In 47.76% of these patients, a premedication was administered. There was no difference in the frequency of adverse events and serious adverse events whether premedicated or not (P=0.311 and P=0.295, respectively). Iobitridol was well-tolerated in 99.04% of cases (at-risk patients 98.61%). (orig.)

  2. Safety of iobitridol in the general population and at-risk patients.

    Vogl, Thomas J; Honold, Elmar; Wolf, Michael; Mohajeri, H; Hammerstingl, R

    2006-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to review the rate of adverse events after contrast medium administration in the general population and at-risk patients (renal impairment, heart failure (NYHA III or IV), hypotension or hypertension, coronary artery disease, previous reaction to contrast media, asthma and/or allergies, dehydration, diabetes mellitus, poor general condition) under daily practice conditions in a post-marketing surveillance study. Two hundred and ten radiologists conducted various X-ray examinations in 52,057 patients. To document the safety of iobitridol in routine use, all patients undergoing X-ray examinations were included. Exclusion criteria were contraindications listed in the locally approved summary of product characteristics. The adverse event rate was 0.96% (at-risk patients 1.39%); the rate of serious adverse events 0.044% in all patients (at-risk patients 0.057%). Adverse events occurred more often in women than in men (P contrast medium, adverse events were reported in 3.43% with mild to moderate symptoms. In 47.76% of these patients, a premedication was administered. There was no difference in the frequency of adverse events and serious adverse events whether premedicated or not (P = 0.311 and P = 0.295, respectively). Iobitridol was well-tolerated in 99.04% of cases (at-risk patients 98.61%). PMID:16429272

  3. Safety of iobitridol in the general population and at-risk patients

    The purpose of this study was to review the rate of adverse events after contrast medium administration in the general population and at-risk patients (renal impairment, heart failure (NYHA III or IV), hypotension or hypertension, coronary artery disease, previous reaction to contrast media, asthma and/or allergies, dehydration, diabetes mellitus, poor general condition) under daily practice conditions in a post-marketing surveillance study. Two hundred and ten radiologists conducted various X-ray examinations in 52,057 patients. To document the safety of iobitridol in routine use, all patients undergoing X-ray examinations were included. Exclusion criteria were contraindications listed in the locally approved summary of product characteristics. The adverse event rate was 0.96% (at-risk patients 1.39%); the rate of serious adverse events 0.044% in all patients (at-risk patients 0.057%). Adverse events occurred more often in women than in men (P<0.001). In patients who had previously reacted to a contrast medium, adverse events were reported in 3.43% with mild to moderate symptoms. In 47.76% of these patients, a premedication was administered. There was no difference in the frequency of adverse events and serious adverse events whether premedicated or not (P=0.311 and P=0.295, respectively). Iobitridol was well-tolerated in 99.04% of cases (at-risk patients 98.61%). (orig.)

  4. Generalized railway tank car safety design optimization for hazardous materials transport: Addressing the trade-off between transportation efficiency and safety

    Saat, Mohd Rapik, E-mail: mohdsaat@illinois.edu [Rail Transportation and Engineering Center (RailTEC), Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, MC-250, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1243 Newmark Civil Engineering Laboratory, 205 N. Mathews Ave., Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Barkan, Christopher P.L. [Rail Transportation and Engineering Center (RailTEC), Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, MC-250, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1243 Newmark Civil Engineering Laboratory, 205 N. Mathews Ave., Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2011-05-15

    North America railways offer safe and generally the most economical means of long distance transport of hazardous materials. Nevertheless, in the event of a train accident releases of these materials can pose substantial risk to human health, property or the environment. The majority of railway shipments of hazardous materials are in tank cars. Improving the safety design of these cars to make them more robust in accidents generally increases their weight thereby reducing their capacity and consequent transportation efficiency. This paper presents a generalized tank car safety design optimization model that addresses this tradeoff. The optimization model enables evaluation of each element of tank car safety design, independently and in combination with one another. We present the optimization model by identifying a set of Pareto-optimal solutions for a baseline tank car design in a bicriteria decision problem. This model provides a quantitative framework for a rational decision-making process involving tank car safety design enhancements to reduce the risk of transporting hazardous materials.

  5. Generalized railway tank car safety design optimization for hazardous materials transport: Addressing the trade-off between transportation efficiency and safety

    North America railways offer safe and generally the most economical means of long distance transport of hazardous materials. Nevertheless, in the event of a train accident releases of these materials can pose substantial risk to human health, property or the environment. The majority of railway shipments of hazardous materials are in tank cars. Improving the safety design of these cars to make them more robust in accidents generally increases their weight thereby reducing their capacity and consequent transportation efficiency. This paper presents a generalized tank car safety design optimization model that addresses this tradeoff. The optimization model enables evaluation of each element of tank car safety design, independently and in combination with one another. We present the optimization model by identifying a set of Pareto-optimal solutions for a baseline tank car design in a bicriteria decision problem. This model provides a quantitative framework for a rational decision-making process involving tank car safety design enhancements to reduce the risk of transporting hazardous materials.

  6. General principles of the criticality safety for handling, processing and transportation of spent fuel in the USSR

    The paper describes the general principles of nuclear criticality safety for handling, processing, transportation and spent fuel storing. Measures to limit the consequences of critical accidents are discussed for the fuel reprocessing plant and spent fuel storage. The system of scientific and technical measures on nuclear safety as well as the system of control and state supervision based on the rules, limits and requirements are described. The nuclear safety aspects for various stages of handling nuclear materials are considered. The paper gives description of the methods and approaches for critical risk assessments for the reprocessing plant and spent fuel storages. (author)

  7. Justification of Practices, Including Non-Medical Human Imaging. General Safety Guide

    This publication presents the proceedings of an international conference on remediation of radioactive contaminated sites with a particular focus on the States of Central Asia. The conference provided a forum for all parties involved in remediation of such sites to gather and exchange ideas, review progress and new developments, compare technologies and methods, and thus disseminate information and experience. The key topical issues identified and discussed by the participants included regulatory and safety regimes, innovative and mature technologies, life cycle planning, technical experience exchange, stakeholder issues, and international cooperation and support. A series of case studies are presented to provide an overview of environmental remediation activities in different parts of the world. The publication summarizes the present status, and outlines future trends in environmental remediation technologies and methods, and identifies possible areas for improvement

  8. NS [Nuclear Safety] update. Current safety and security activities and developments taking place in the Department of Nuclear Safety and Security, Issue no. 6, March 2008

    The current issue presents information about the following activities: 1) International Conference on Illicit Nuclear Trafficking which took place in November 2007 in Edinburgh. The principal aim of the conference was to examine the threat and context of illicit nuclear trafficking of radioactive material, specifically, what is being done to combat such trafficking and where more needs to be done. The conference was also to consider how the obligations and commitments of the legally binding and non-binding international instruments could be and are being implemented by various States. 2) INSAG Message on Nuclear Safety Infrastructure in which the INSAG Chairman Richard Meserve addressed nuclear safety in the current context and various issues that warrant special attention. 3) approved for publication the Safety Requirements publication on Safety of Nuclear Fuel Cycle Facilities. 4) The Asian Nuclear Safety Network (ANSN)

  9. IAEA activities on education and training in radiation and waste safety: Strategic approach for a sustainable system

    The statutory safety functions of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) include the establishment of and provision for the application of safety standards for protection of health, life and property against ionizing radiation. The safety standards are based on the presumption that a national infrastructure is in place enabling the Government to discharge its responsibilities for protection and safety. Education and training is an essential element of the infrastructure. The IAEA education and training activities follows the resolutions of its General Conferences and reflects the latest IAEA standards and guidance. In response to GC(44)/RES/13, the IAEA prepared a 'Strategic Approach to Education and Training in Radiation and Waste Safety' aiming at establishing, by 2010, sustainable education a training programmes in Member States. This Strategy was endorsed by General Conference resolution GC(45)/RES/10C that, inter alia, urged the Secretariat to implement the Strategy on Education and Training and to continue to strengthen, subject to available resources, its current effort in this area, and in particular to assist Member States' national, regional and collaborating centres in conducting such education and training activities in the relevant official languages of the IAEA. In the last General Conference 2002, the IAEA was urged to continue to implement the Strategy, including the convening of the Steering Committee. The first Technical Committee meeting took place during the week 25-29 November 2002. (author)

  10. Patient safety in primary care: incident reporting and significant event reviews in British general practice.

    Rea, David; Griffiths, Sarah

    2016-07-01

    Over the past 20 years, healthcare has adapted to the 'quality revolution' by moving away from direct provision and hierarchical control mechanisms. In their place, new structures based on contractual relationships are being developed coupled with attempts to create an organisational culture that shares learning and that scrutinises existing practice so that it can be improved. The issue here is that contractual arrangements require surveillance, monitoring, regulation and governance systems that can be perceived as antipathetic to the examination of practice and subsequent learning. Historically, reporting levels from general practice have remained low; little information is shared and consequently lessons are not shared across the general practice community. Given large-scale under-engagement of general practitioners (GPs) in incident reporting systems, significant event analysis is advocated to encourage sharing of information about incidents to inform the patient safety agenda at a local and national level. Previous research has concentrated on the secondary care environment and little is known about the situation in primary care, where the majority of patient contacts with healthcare occur. To explore attitudes to incident reporting, the study adopted a qualitative approach to GPs working in a mixture of urban and rural practices reporting to a Welsh Local Health Board. The study found that GPs used significant event analysis methodology to report incidents within their practice, but acknowledged under-reporting. They were less enthusiastic about reporting externally. A number of barriers exist to reporting, including insufficient time to report, lack of feedback, fear of blame, and damage to reputations and patient confidence in a competitive environment. If incident reporting processes are perceived as supportive and formative, and where protected time is allocated to discuss incidents, then GPs are willing to participate. They also need to know how the

  11. Safety- and Risk Analysis Activities in Chemical Industry in Europe

    Kozine, Igor; Duijm, Nijs Jan; Lauridsen Kurt [Risoe National Laboratory, Roskilde (Denmark). Systems Analysis Department

    2001-07-01

    . In this respect there is a European and International mechanism of handling safety- and risk-related matters. So, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development's (OECD) core objective on risk management is to support Member countries' efforts to develop national policies and actions, and, where appropriate, to develop and implement international risk management measures. In support of this objective, the OECD Risk Management Programme focuses on two areas: (1) developing methods and technical tools that can be used by OECD and Member countries to enhance their current risk management programmes; and (2) identifying specific chemical exposures of concern in Member countries and evaluating possible risk management opportunities. The current paper highlights the EU legislation on major accident hazards related to the chemical industry, differences in the national approaches to risk analyses in the process industry and European-scale activity in improving the understanding of the sources of uncertainty in risk assessments.

  12. Solar energy education. Renewable energy activities for general science

    1985-01-01

    Renewable energy topics are integrated with the study of general science. The literature is provided in the form of a teaching manual and includes such topics as passive solar homes, siting a home for solar energy, and wind power for the home. Other energy topics are explored through library research activities. (BCS)

  13. How do general practitioners in Denmark promote physical activity?

    Jørgensen, Tanja K; Nordentoft, Merete; Krogh, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to quantify the frequency of advice given on type, frequency, duration, and intensity of exercise during physical activity (PA) promoting sessions by general practitioners. Second, to find GP characteristics associated with high quality of PA counselling....

  14. Effects of a team-based assessment and intervention on patient safety culture in general practice

    Hoffmann, B; Müller, V; Rochon, J;

    2014-01-01

    12 months, scores were allocated for safety culture as expressed in practice structure and processes (indicators), in safety climate and in patient safety incident reporting. The primary outcome was the indicator error management. Results: During the team sessions, practice teams reflected on their...... safety culture and decided on about 10 actions per practice to improve it. After 12 months, no significant differences were found between intervention and control groups in terms of error management (competing probability = 0.48, 95% CI 0.34 to 0.63, p = 0.823), 11 further patient safety culture...... control practices. Conclusions Applied as a team-based instrument to assess safety culture, FraTrix did not lead to measurable improvements in error management. Comparable studies with more positive results had less robust study designs. In future research, validated combined methods to measure safety...

  15. Risk and Safety Working Group: perspectives,accomplishments and activities

    The Generation IV Technology Road-map identifies 3 specific safety goals: 1) Generation IV nuclear energy systems will excel in safety and reliability; 2) Generation IV nuclear energy systems will have a very low likelihood and degree of reactor core damage; and 3) Generation IV nuclear energy systems will eliminate the need for offsite emergency response. This paper describes an integrated safety philosophy for Generation IV nuclear systems. The following postulates should underlie such a safety philosophy: -) Opportunities exist to further improve on nuclear power's already excellent safety record in most countries; -) Safety improvements should simultaneously be based on several elements which will require specific research efforts; -) The principle of 'defense in depth' has served the nuclear power industry well, and must be preserved in the design of Generation IV systems; -) The Generation IV design process should be driven by a 'risk-informed' approach. The methodology is tentatively called the Integrated Safety Assessment Methodology (ISAM). Although the ISAM is essentially a Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) based methodology for Generation IV systems, the strength of the ISAM is that it offers tools that are tailored to answering specific types of questions at various stages of design development, and that the elements of the methodology complement and support one another in a way that contributes to a much more complete understanding of the range of safety issues. (A.C.)

  16. General-Purpose Heat Source development: Safety Verification Test Program. Bullet/fragment test series

    George, T.G.; Tate, R.E.; Axler, K.M.

    1985-05-01

    The radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) that will provide power for space missions contains 18 General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules. Each module contains four /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/-fueled clads and generates 250 W/sub (t)/. Because a launch-pad or post-launch explosion is always possible, we need to determine the ability of GPHS fueled clads within a module to survive fragment impact. The bullet/fragment test series, part of the Safety Verification Test Plan, was designed to provide information on clad response to impact by a compact, high-energy, aluminum-alloy fragment and to establish a threshold value of fragment energy required to breach the iridium cladding. Test results show that a velocity of 555 m/s (1820 ft/s) with an 18-g bullet is at or near the threshold value of fragment velocity that will cause a clad breach. Results also show that an exothermic Ir/Al reaction occurs if aluminum and hot iridium are in contact, a contact that is possible and most damaging to the clad within a narrow velocity range. The observed reactions between the iridium and the aluminum were studied in the laboratory and are reported in the Appendix.

  17. General-Purpose Heat Source Safety Verification Test program: Edge-on flyer plate tests

    The radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) that will supply power for the Galileo and Ulysses space missions contains 18 General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules. The GPHS modules provide power by transmitting the heat of 238Pu α-decay to an array of thermoelectric elements. Each module contains four 238PuO2-fueled clads and generates 250 W(t). Because the possibility of a launch vehicle explosion always exists, and because such an explosion could generate a field of high-energy fragments, the fueled clads within each GPHS module must survive fragment impact. The edge-on flyer plate tests were included in the Safety Verification Test series to provide information on the module/clad response to the impact of high-energy plate fragments. The test results indicate that the edge-on impact of a 3.2-mm-thick, aluminum-alloy (2219-T87) plate traveling at 915 m/s causes the complete release of fuel from capsules contained within a bare GPHS module, and that the threshold velocity sufficient to cause the breach of a bare, simulant-fueled clad impacted by a 3.5-mm-thick, aluminum-alloy (5052-T0) plate is approximately 140 m/s

  18. Application of the General Methodology of Safety Analysis and Evaluation for Fusion Energy systems (GEMSAFE) to the FER design

    A safety analysis for the FER has been carried out along the framework of the GEMSAFE. First, the safety characteristics of the FER were investigated so that the RI and energy sources were identified and the General Descriptive Model (GDM) was defined to be consistent with the conceptual design of the FER. Second, the radioactive materials and the boundaries of subsystems were classified based on the definition of the proposed event categorization. Finally the Function-Based Safety Analysis (FBSA) has been performed to select 19 Design Basis Events (DBEs), i.e., seven Category-1 events, eight Category-2 events and four Category-3 events. These DBEs not only elucidate the safety requirements to be satisfied with the event categorization, but also suggest crucial items for the safety evaluation of the FER. It is noted that, for establishing the rational safety assurance for the FER, future studies should be performed upon (1) spectra of event propagations which may occur following plasma disruption and coolant inleakage into the vacuum area, and (2) technological feasibility of safety features which can prevent or mitigate these event propagations. (orig.)

  19. Convoy active safety technologies war fighter experiment II

    Schoenherr, Edward W.

    2009-01-01

    The operational ability to project and sustain forces in distant, anti-access and area denial environments poses new challenges for combatant commanders. One of the new challenges is the ability to conduct sustainment operations at operationally feasible times and places on the battlefield. Combatant commanders require a sustainment system that is agile, versatile, and survivable throughout the range of military operations and across the spectrum of conflict. A key component of conducting responsive, operationally feasible sustainment operations is the ability to conduct sustainment convoys. Sustainment convoys are critical to providing combatant commanders the right support, at the right time and place, and in the right quantities, across the full range of military operations. The ability to conduct sustainment convoys in a variety of hostile environments require force protection measures that address the enemy threat and protect the Soldier. One cost effective, technically feasible method of increasing the force protection for sustainment convoys is the use of robotic follower technology and autonomous navigation. The Convoy Active Safety Technologies (CAST) system is a driver assist, convoy autopilot technology aimed to address these issues. The CAST Warfigher Experiment II, being held at The Nevada Automotive Test Center in the fall of 2008, will continue analysis of the utility of this vehicle following technology not only in measures of system integrity and performance vs. manual driving, but also the physiological effects on the operators themselves. This paper will detail this experiment's methodology and analysis. Results will be presented at the SPIE Electronic Imaging 2009 symposium.

  20. The Evaluation of the Safety Benefits of Combined Passive and On-Board Active Safety Applications

    Page, Yves; Cuny, Sophie; Zangmeister, Tobias; Kreiss, Jens-Peter; HERMITTE, Thierry

    2009-01-01

    One of the objectives of the European TRACE project (TRaffic Accident Causation in Europe, 2006–2008) was to estimate the proportion of injury accidents that could be avoided and/or the proportion of injury accidents where the severity could be mitigated for on-the-market safety applications, if 100 % of the car fleet would be equipped with them. We have selected for evaluation the Electronic Stability Control (ESC) and the Emergency Brake Assist (EBA) applications. As for passive safety syst...

  1. Workplace activities to promote small attempts for safety. Toward development of safety culture in a nuclear power plant

    Activities that could possibly grow into learning activities for developing safety culture were explored by intensive fieldwork in a nuclear power plant depending on Engestroem's activity theory. As a first step to achieve this goal, workers' small attempts that might contribute to nurturing a safety culture were investigated. Eight kinds of activity were observed and interpreted as having the possibility to facilitate small recognition and small practice, i.e., activities including (1) workgroup as community, (2) other workgroups and other departments as community, (3) meeting drawing remarks as mediating artifacts, (4) study session and Off-the-Job-Training as mediating artifact, (5) award as mediating artifact, (6) extended leave as mediating artifact, (7) check sheet as mediating artifact, and (8) skill-transfer system as mediating artifact. (author)

  2. Psychology in nuclear power plants: an integrative approach to safety - general statement

    Since the accident at the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant on March 28, 1979, the commercial nuclear industry in the United States has paid increasing attention to the role of humans in overall plant safety. As the regulatory body with primary responsibility for ensuring public health and safety involving nuclear operations, the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has also become increasingly involved with the ''human'' side of nuclear operations. The purpose of this symposium is to describe a major program of research and technical assistance that the Pacific Northwest Laboratory is performing for the NRC that deals with the issues of safety at nuclear power plants (NPPs). This program addresses safety from several different levels of analysis, which are all important within the context of an integrative approach to system safety

  3. Psychology in nuclear power plants: an integrative approach to safety - general statement

    Shikiar, R.

    1983-08-01

    Since the accident at the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant on March 28, 1979, the commercial nuclear industry in the United States has paid increasing attention to the role of humans in overall plant safety. As the regulatory body with primary responsibility for ensuring public health and safety involving nuclear operations, the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has also become increasingly involved with the ''human'' side of nuclear operations. The purpose of this symposium is to describe a major program of research and technical assistance that the Pacific Northwest Laboratory is performing for the NRC that deals with the issues of safety at nuclear power plants (NPPs). This program addresses safety from several different levels of analysis, which are all important within the context of an integrative approach to system safety.

  4. Sedation/general anesthesia for magnetic resonance imaging in paediatrics patients - special considerations and safety

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study requires the patient to remain motionless for extended periods of time, which can not be achieved in children without special care or drug-induced sleep. There are various methods for sedation / general anaesthesia (GA) in children with their different advantages and disadvantages. The aim of this study was to report our experience with sedation/GA in children who require MRI/computed-tomography (CT) studies. We performed a retrospective review of the sedation/GA records in 34 children aged from 6 months to 12 years; class ASA I-III, undergoing diagnostic MR/CT study. Demographic data, information regarding diagnosis, type of sedation/GA, use of premedication, time to readiness for the procedure after premedication administration, duration of procedure, and the recovery time were obtained. Any adverse events were noted. Imaging study in most of the patients (61.8%) was performed for neurological diseases (delayed neuropsychological development, epilepsy, and cerebral palsy). Sedation/GA with Propofol was administered in 50% (n=17) of patients, in 26.5% (n=9) - Ketamine plus Midazolam; in 20.6% (n=7) - Midazolam alone, and in 9% (n=1) - Thiopental. The time to readiness for the procedure and the recovery time were statistically significantly shorter for patients receiving Propofol, and the observed adverse respiratory events were mild in severity, when compared with patients receiving sedation/GA with another hypnotic agent (p<0.05).The evaluation of the respiratory system before sedation/GA should be carefully performed, as the respiratory diseases could increase the patients' risk of adverse events occurrence. Sedation/GA with Propofol is a method of choice in children with neurological disorders with seizures, increased intracranial pressure and myopathies, undergoing MR/CT study. Crucial for patients' safety and good clinical results is the medical professionals, delivering sedation/GA, to have the knowledge and practical

  5. Completeness assessment of general safety requirements for sodium-cooled fast reactor nuclear design utilizing objective provision tree

    A prototype sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) of 150 MWe is under development in Korea. The designer is planning to apply the licensing for construction permit by 2020. To prepare the future licensing review, we are developing general safety requirements for SFR. The requirements are developed first by evaluating the applicability of the current requirements of light water reactor (LWR) to SFR and then taking into account other international requirements available. In this way, we have developed a draft general safety requirements with 59 articles. The LWR safety requirements are coming from the accumulated experiences of long-year licensing and operation, but we do not have sufficient experiences corresponding for SFR, so we need a systematic and integral approach to complement our developed requirements for SFR. For this purpose, we have developed an objective provision tree for the safety function of reactivity control and applied it in assessing the completeness of our draft requirements developed. In this way, we could confirm that our draft requirements include all the requirements to prevent the mechanisms that could challenge the safety function of reactivity control.

  6. NS [Nuclear Safety] update. Current safety and security activities and developments taking place in the Department of Nuclear Safety and Security. Issue no. 4, June 2007

    This newsletter contains information on the Centre for Advanced Safety Assessment Tools (CASAT), the new strategy for the recovery of radioactive sources, the Technical Support Organization Conference and a message form the Director of the Division of Nuclear Installation Safety. To improve the efficiency of safety assessment methods, ensure transparency in their validation and application and establish an excellent knowledge base and training programmes, the IAEA's Centre for Advanced Safety Assessment Tools (CASAT) has therefore been formed. The Centre addresses the need for continuous technical support mechanisms for safety assessment methods. It provides support to Member States to enhance their safety assessment capabilities for present and future generations of nuclear systems, with a special focus on countries with a developing nuclear technology and nuclear safety infrastructure. It serves as a consolidated repository of relevant safety analysis knowledge, provides for focused training including advanced analytical simulations, and supports collaboration on safety assessment projects among Member States. The resources provided through CASAT include codes, models, databases, verification and validation information, analytical procedures and guides. The main purpose of the recently established Radioactive Source Technical Coordination Group (RSTCG) is to facilitate the technical coordination of activities of the IAEA related to the control and management of radioactive sources through the development of common approaches in technical matters and to advise the management of the relevant Divisions. It is the task of the RSTCG to provide the programme managers of the participating divisions/sections with a common opinion/advice on technical issues related to the control and management of radioactive sources. The RSTCG members obtain, inter alia from programme managers, information on all relevant project proposals, and share relevant materials in due time to

  7. Restructuring within an academic health center to support quality and safety: the development of the Center for Quality and Safety at the Massachusetts General Hospital.

    Bohmer, Richard M J; Bloom, Jonathan D; Mort, Elizabeth A; Demehin, Akinluwa A; Meyer, Gregg S

    2009-12-01

    Recent focus on the need to improve the quality and safety of health care has created new challenges for academic health centers (AHCs). Whereas previously quality was largely assumed, today it is increasingly quantifiable and requires organized systems for improvement. Traditional structures and cultures within AHCs, although well suited to the tripartite missions of teaching, research, and clinical care, are not easily adaptable to the tasks of measuring, reporting, and improving quality. Here, the authors use a case study of Massachusetts General Hospital's efforts to restructure quality and safety to illustrate the value of beginning with a focus on organizational culture, using a systematic process of engaging clinical leadership, developing an organizational framework dependent on proven business principles, leveraging focus events, and maintaining executive dedication to execution of the initiative. The case provides a generalizable example for AHCs of how applying explicit management design can foster robust organizational change with relatively modest incremental financial resources. PMID:19940570

  8. Generation IV International Forum Risk and Safety Working Group: Terms of reference, accomplishments, current activities and perspectives

    The Generation IV International Forum (GIF) is a collaboration of governments of countries committed to joint development of the next generation of nuclear technology. A selection of six reactor technologies - four of which with fast spectra - has been identified on the basis of being clean, safe and cost-effective means of meeting increased energy demands on a sustainable basis, while being resistant to diversion of materials for weapons proliferation and secure from terrorist attacks. The Generation IV International Forum (GIF) Risk and Safety Working Group (RSWG) was created to elaborate and recommend a homogeneous and effective safety approach applicable to the design and the assessment of these Gen IV systems. The activities and work of the RSWG include, among others, the following: 1) Identify and promote a common and consistent risk informed approach to safety in the design of Generation IV systems by: a) proposing safety principles, objectives and attributes based on the Gen IV safety goals to guide R and D plans; b) proposing a technology neutral general framework of technical safety criteria and assessment methodologies; c) testing and demonstrating the applicability of the framework and assessment methodologies; d) proposing necessary crosscutting safety related R and D. 2) Provide consultative support on matters related to safety to GIF Systems Steering Committee (SSCs) and other Gen IV entities which develop specific concepts and designs. 3) Interact with the GIF proliferation resistance and Physical protection (PR and PP) Working Group). 4) Interact with the NEA Multinational Design Evaluation Programme (MDEP) addressing the safety aspects of new reactor designs. 5) Undertake appropriate interactions with regulators, IAEA and relevant stakeholders, primarily for the purpose of understanding and communicating regulatory insights to the Generation IV development

  9. Clearance values and permitted activities in the new EU radiation protection basis safety standards

    The current draft version of the Basic Safety Standards (BSS) of the European Union of 24 May 2013 introduces new and joint values for exemption and clearance (from IAEA Safety Guide RS-G-1.7). The mass related activity values will then be numerically identical for general exemption and for unconditional clearance (the existing sets of exemption values will be kept, but only for 'moderate amounts'). The hitherto existing principle that clearance levels must not exceed exemption values (so that no cleared material would need to be regarded as radioactive) therefore now needs to be discarded. If options of clearance for a specific purpose as laid down in Sect. 29 para. 2 no. 2 Radiation Protection Ordinance disappeared, a tremendous increase of the amount of radioactive waste and of costs for radwaste disposal would result, as was discussed elsewhere. The guiding light from this dilemma comes from the way in which the principles for clearance and exemption are treated in the new IAEA BSS. The primary criterion for clearance and exemption is not formed by sets of activity values, which are only derived limits, but by the criterion of trivial dose, which is the original limit. On this basis, all seeming conflicts between clearance levels and exemption values dissolve. (orig.)

  10. Analysis of Paks NPP Personnel Activity during Safety Related Event Sequences

    Within the AGNES Project (Advanced Generic and New Evaluation of Safety) the Level-1 PSA model of the Paks NPP Unit 3 was developed in form of a detailed event tree/fault tree structure (53 initiating events, 580 event sequences, 6300 basic events are involved). This model gives a good basis for quantitative evaluation of potential consequences of actually occurred safety-related events, i.e. for precursor event studies. To make these studies possible and efficient, the current qualitative event analysis practice should be reviewed and a new additional quantitative analysis procedure and system should be developed and applied. The present paper gives an overview of the method outlined for both qualitative and quantitative analyses of the operator crew activity during off-normal situations. First, the operator performance experienced during past operational events is discussed. Sources of raw information, the qualitative evaluation process, the follow-up actions, as well as the documentation requirements are described. Second, the general concept of the proposed precursor event analysis is described. Types of modeled interactions and the considered performance influences are presented. The quantification of the potential consequences of the identified precursor events is based on the task-oriented, Level-1 PSA model of the plant unit. A precursor analysis system covering the evaluation of operator activities is now under development. Preliminary results gained during a case study evaluation of a past historical event are presented. (authors)

  11. IAEA Activities on Education and training in Radiation and Waste Safety: Strategic approach for a sustainable system

    The statutory safety functions of the International Atomic Energy(IAEA) include the establishment of and provision for the application of safety standards for protection of health, life and property against ionizing radiation. The safety standards are based on the presumption that a national infrastructure is in place, enabling the Government to discharge its responsibilities for protection and safety. Education and training is an essential element of the infrastructure. the IAEA education and training activities follow the resolutions of its General Conference and reflect the latest IAEA standards and guidance. Several General Conference resolutions have emphasized the importance of education and training (e. g. GC(XXXV)/RES/552 in 1991; GC(XXXVI)/RES/584 in 1992; GC(43)/RES/13 in 1999 and more recently GC(44)/RES/13 in 2000). In response to GC(44)/RES/13, the IAEA prepared a Strategic Approach to Education and Training in Radiation and Waste Safety (Strategy on Education and Training) aiming at establishing, by 2010, sustainable education and training programmes in its Member States. This Strategy was endorsed by the General Conference resolution GC(45)/RES/10C that, inter alia, urged the Secretariat to implement the Strategy on Education and Training, and to continue to strengthen, subject to available resources, its current effort in this area, and in particular to assist Member States national, regional and collaborating centres in conducting such education and training activities in the relevant official languages of the IAEA. A technical meeting was held in Vienna in March 2002 and concluded with an action plan for implementing the strategy up to 2010, the immediate action being the formation of a Steering Committee by the middle of 2002. This Steering Committee has the general remit to advise on the development and implementation of the strategy, as well as monitoring its progress. The first technical meeting of the Steering Committee took place on 25

  12. Safety orientations, general recommendations and preliminary architecture of the ASTRID I&C

    The overall architecture of Astrid I&C (Instrumentation and Control) has to be compliant with safety and operability requirements for ASTRID. It has to be also compliant with requirements coming from reactor operations principles, human and organizational factors considerations and maintenance strategy. From the safety point of view, it contributes to the defense in depth and the physical and functional segregation of the components involved in a safety function. I&C design achieving safety functions is based on the independence of the functions and has to be compliant with the single failure criterion even during maintenance operations. I&C architecture is divided within three different levels, from the signal acquisition to the information processing to help the operator in normal conditions and in crisis situations. This paper presents the current status of I&C architecture and gives examples of technological solutions which could be implemented. (author)

  13. The Inspector General's report on Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection 2010

    This document is proposed in French and in English. The author reports, comments and discusses the observations he made during 2010 on different aspects or examples regarding nuclear safety management and radioprotection in the EDF Group, the world's largest nuclear operator with 73 reactors in service: safety management, radioprotection, relationship with the French nuclear safety authority (ASN), skills and training, the implementation and action of an integrated nuclear engineering force, the relationship between safety and business efficiency, actors of the health care sector, the case of the Flamanville EPR reactor, the relationships with contractors, fire hazards, and projects aimed at raising standards. He also addresses observations and information about what is going on in the United Kingdom. He comments a radioprotection incident, the case of an uncontrolled dilution, and a railway accident which occurred in 2006. He gives a brief report of missions in China and in the United States

  14. Convention defining the cooperation modalities between the Nuclear Safety Authority and the Work Directorate General

    This document defines the conditions under which the French nuclear safety authority (ASN) contributes to the implementation of the work health and safety policy. It defines the modalities of actions in the field of workers' radiation protection for each national or regional signatory authority. It specifies the reciprocal commitments of each signatory authority with respect to site inspection organization and animation in nuclear power plants

  15. How trust in institutions and organizations builds general consumer confidence in the safety of food: a decomposition of effects.

    de Jonge, J; van Trijp, J C M; van der Lans, I A; Renes, R J; Frewer, L J

    2008-09-01

    This paper investigates the relationship between general consumer confidence in the safety of food and consumer trust in institutions and organizations. More specifically, using a decompositional regression analysis approach, the extent to which the strength of the relationship between trust and general confidence is dependent upon a particular food chain actor (for example, food manufacturers) is assessed. In addition, the impact of specific subdimensions of trust, such as openness, on consumer confidence are analyzed, as well as interaction effects of actors and subdimensions of trust. The results confirm previous findings, which indicate that a higher level of trust is associated with a higher level of confidence. However, the results from the current study extend on previous findings by disentangling the effects that determine the strength of this relationship into specific components associated with the different actors, the different trust dimensions, and specific combinations of actors and trust dimensions. The results show that trust in food manufacturers influences general confidence more than trust in other food chain actors, and that care is the most important trust dimension. However, the contribution of a particular trust dimension in enhancing general confidence is actor-specific, suggesting that different actors should focus on different trust dimensions when the purpose is to enhance consumer confidence in food safety. Implications for the development of communication strategies that are designed to regain or maintain consumer confidence in the safety of food are discussed. PMID:18450326

  16. Application of integrated safety management in decommissioning activities: ensuring the safety of workers throughout the changing environment of decommissioning

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Management (EM) has successfully decommissioned several legacy facilities that were used in the development and manufacture of nuclear weapons. The DOE experience includes laboratories, raw material manufacturing, foundry, separation, reactor, reprocessing canyon, waste storage and repackaging facilities. Some of these facilities date back to the original Manhattan Project in the 1940s. Inventories include a range of isotopes and hazardous chemicals. The physical condition of the facilities and their safety systems also range in age and integrity. As each facility transitions through the decommissioning lifecycle the hazard profile and the available controls change with the facility. One of the most effective means the DOE has found to reliably manage the changing hazards is a strong system of safety management programs (SMPs) that address hazards in an integrated fashion. Statistics demonstrate that the most significant hazards to the worker during decommissioning activities result from industrial accidents. It is imperative that a foundation of strong safety management systems must identify hazards and coordinate between program areas to establish the most appropriate protective measure for the worker. This paper walks through examples to illustrate lessons learned through its decommissioning experience, including coordinating between programs such as electrical safety and radiological protection when both hazards are substantial in a given work evolution. The DOE has institutionalized its Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) and routinely evaluates its contractors to ensure effective implementation. ISMS establishes the foundation for safe, efficient decommissioning of nuclear facilities. (author)

  17. A review of tsunami simulation activities for NPPs safety

    The tsunami generated on December 26, 2004 due to Sumatra earthquake of magnitude 9.3 resulted in inundation at the various coastal sites of India. The site selection and design of Indian nuclear power plants demand the evaluation of run up and the structural barriers for the coastal plants: Besides it is also desirable to evaluate the early warning system for tsunamigenic earthquakes. The tsunamis originate from submarine faults, underwater volcanic activities, sub-aerial landslides impinging on the sea and submarine landslides. In case of a submarine earthquake-induced tsunami the wave is generated in the fluid domain due to displacement of the seabed. There are three phases of tsunami: generation, propagation, and run-up. Reactor Safety Division (RSD) of Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Trombay has initiated computational simulation for all the three phases of tsunami source generation, its propagation and finally run up evaluation for the protection of public life, property and various industrial infrastructures located on the coastal regions of India. These studies could be effectively utilized for design and implementation of early warning system for coastal region of the country apart from catering to the needs of Indian nuclear installations. This paper presents some results of tsunami waves based on finite difference numerical approaches with shallow water wave theory. The present paper evaluate the results of various simulation i.e. Single fault Sumatra model, four and five fault Sumatra Model, Nias insignificant tsunami and also some parametric studies results for tsunami waring system scenario generation. A study is carried for the tsunami due to Sumatra earthquake in 2004 with TUNAMI-N2 software. Bathymetry data available from the National Geophysical Data Center was used for this study. The single fault and detailed four and five fault data were used to calculate sea surface deformations which were subsequently used as initial conditions for

  18. PA activity by using nuclear power plant safety demonstration and analysis

    INS/NUPEC presents one of Public acceptance (PA) methods for nuclear power in Japan, 'PA activity by using Nuclear Power Plant Safety Demonstration and Analysis', by using one of videos which is explained and analyzed accident events (Loss of Coolant Accident). Safety regulations of The National Government are strictly implemented in licensing at each of basic design and detailed design. To support safety regulation activities conducted by the National Government, INS/NLTPEC continuously implement Safety demonstration and analysis. With safety demonstration and analysis, made by assuming some abnormal conditions, what impacts could be produced by the assumed conditions are forecast based on specific design data on a given nuclear power plants. When analysis results compared with relevant decision criteria, the safety of nuclear power plants is confirmed. The decision criteria are designed to help judge if or not safety design of nuclear power plants is properly made. The decision criteria are set in the safety examination guidelines by taking sufficient safety allowance based on the latest technical knowledge obtained from a wide range of tests and safety studies. Safety demonstration and analysis is made by taking the procedure which are summarized in this presentation. In Japan, various PA (Public Acceptance) pamphlets and videos on nuclear energy have been published. But many of them focused on such topics as necessity or importance of nuclear energy, basic principles of nuclear power generation, etc., and a few described safety evaluation particularly of abnormal and accident events in accordance with the regulatory requirements. In this background, INS/NUPEC has been making efforts to prepare PA pamphlets and videos to explain the safety of nuclear power plants, to be simple and concrete enough, using various analytical computations for abnormal and accident events. In results, PA activity of INS/NUPEC is evaluated highly by the people

  19. Annual activity report of Ignalina NPP Safety Analysis Group for 1996 year

    The main results of Ignalina NPP Safety Analysis Group (ISAG) investigations for 1996 are presented. ISAG is concentrating its research activities into four areas: the neutrons dynamics modelling, simulation of transient processes during loss of coolant accident, the reactor cooling systems modelling and the probabilistic safety assessment of accident confinement system. Ignalina Safety Analysis Report was prepared on the basis of these results. 37 refs., 9 tabs., 96 figs

  20. Nuclear activities at KIT: reactor safety research and safety research for waste

    The Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) is the merger of the former Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (FZK), and the Technical University of Karlsruhe, into one single organisation, inheriting the previously existing missions of research, higher education and innovation, and creating a huge potential for synergies, that is now being successfully exploited step by step. One of the major strategic focuses of KIT is energy research, integrating more than 1 250 researchers from both KIT predecessors in the KIT Energy Centre.Within the KIT Energy Centre, the topic NUKLEAR is one of currently seven topics, together covering the integral field of energy including system and society aspects. Currently, the KIT Programme Nuclear Waste Disposal and Safety consists of about 250 research, technical, and management staff. After the reactor accident in Fukushima (Japan) in 2011, the German parliament decided with support of a broad societal consensus to terminate nuclear electricity production with the last nuclear power plant to be shutdown in 2022. Regarding the final disposal of radioactive waste, the Konrad repository is approved and will be available for the disposal of low and intermediate level waste at the end of this decade. A new federal law is expected to be issued in the near future to re-define the site selection procedure for the German high level waste repository. It seems clear that various host rock formations will be investigated. The long-term safety of such a repository is one of the most challenging aspects about nuclear energy in public debates. For these reasons, nuclear expertise in Germany must be maintained, focusing in particular on research into reactor safety and final disposal. Highest safety requirements have to be applied to the operation, shutdown and decommissioning of nuclear power plants and to the final disposal of radioactive waste

  1. The efficacy and safety of multiple doses of vortioxetine for generalized anxiety disorder: a meta-analysis

    Fu, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Jie Fu,1 Lilei Peng,2 Xiaogang Li1 1Department of Neurology, 2Department of Neurosurgery, The Affiliated Hospital of Luzhou Medical College, Luzhou, People’s Republic of China Objective: Vortioxetine is a novel antidepressant approved for the treatment of major depressive disorder by the US Food and Drug Administration in September 2013. This meta-analysis assessed the efficacy and safety of different doses of vortioxetine for generalized anxiety disorder of adults.Methods: PubMed...

  2. The efficacy and safety of multiple doses of vortioxetine for generalized anxiety disorder: a meta-analysis

    Fu J; Peng LL; Li XG

    2016-01-01

    Jie Fu,1 Lilei Peng,2 Xiaogang Li1 1Department of Neurology, 2Department of Neurosurgery, The Affiliated Hospital of Luzhou Medical College, Luzhou, People’s Republic of China Objective: Vortioxetine is a novel antidepressant approved for the treatment of major depressive disorder by the US Food and Drug Administration in September 2013. This meta-analysis assessed the efficacy and safety of different doses of vortioxetine for generalized anxiety disorder of adults.Methods: PubMed, Co...

  3. Implementation of the trigger review method in Scottish general practices: patient safety outcomes and potential for quality improvement

    de Wet, Carl; Black, Chris; Luty, Sarah; McKay, John; O'Donnell, Kate

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To report the implementation of a trigger review method (TRM) in primary care, with a particular focus on its impact on patient safety-related findings Design: Cross-sectional structured review of random samples (n=25) of electronic records of ‘high risk’ patient groups conducted twice per year (each for a retrospective review period of 3-months) Setting: 274 general practices in two regions of Scotland Intervention: Contractual incentivisation of TRM implementation ...

  4. General reliability and safety methodology and its application to wind energy conversion systems

    Edesess, M.; McConnell, R. D.

    1979-09-01

    In conventional system reliability calculations, each component may be in the Operable state or the Under Repair state. These calculations derive system unavailability, or the probability of the system's being down for repairs. By introducing a third component state between Operable and Under Repair - namely, Defective, But Defect Undetected - the methods developed in this report enable system safety projections to be made in addition to availability projections. Also provided is a mechanism for computing the effect of inspection schedules on both safety and availability. A Reliability and Safety Program (RASP) is detailed which performs these computations and also calculates costs for system inspections and repairs. RASP is applied to a simplified wind energy conversion system example.

  5. Estimation of General Toxicity and Immunological Safety of a Novel Therapeutic Vaccine Against Human Papillomavirus-Assosiated Diseases

    A.E. Kukharenko

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the investigation was to study in experiment total toxicity and immunological safety of a novel domestic therapeutic vaccine against recurrent respiratory papillomatosis and anogenital condylomatosis, the vaccine injected intramuscularly. Materials and Methods. We studied acute toxicity of the vaccine by the following parameters: clinical presentation of intoxication, median lethal dose size, the change of body weight of the surviving animals; chronic toxicity — by dynamics of general condition of the animals, body weight, hematological and biochemical indices of peripheral blood, functional status of central nervous system, cardiovascular system, kidneys, as well as pathomorphological changes of viscera. Allergenicity was studied by systemic and active cutaneous anaphylactic tests. We assessed immunotoxicity by direct a hemagglutination assay and a delayed-type hypersensitivity test, as well as by neutrophilic activity using luminal-dependent chemiluminescence. Proliferative activity of В- and Т-lymphocytes to lipopolysaccharides and concanavalin А (ConА was estimated in a direct immunofluorescence test using immunocytochemical assay with anti-Ki-67 monoclonal antibodies. Results. Mean lethal doses (LD50 were not reached in white outbread rats injected intramuscularly by the tested vaccine at a maximum possible single dose (25 ml/kg. Multi-dose administration to white outbread rats and chinchilla rabbits at doses of 0.043; 0.43; 0.86 ml/kg and 0.023; 0.23; 0.4 ml/kg respectively, did not cause significant damage of functional status of basal organs and systems of experimental animals. The findings of systemic anaphylaxis and active cutaneous anaphylactic response to the vaccine in albino guinea pigs at the doses of 0.033 and 0.33 ml/kg intramuscularly indicated the vaccine to exhibit no allergenic properties. Intramuscular vaccine injected to first filial hybrid mice (СВА×С57BL/6F1 at the doses of 0.084; 2.5 and 25 ml

  6. SAFETY

    M. Plagge, C. Schaefer and N. Dupont

    2013-01-01

    Fire Safety – Essential for a particle detector The CMS detector is a marvel of high technology, one of the most precise particle measurement devices we have built until now. Of course it has to be protected from external and internal incidents like the ones that can occur from fires. Due to the fire load, the permanent availability of oxygen and the presence of various ignition sources mostly based on electricity this has to be addressed. Starting from the beam pipe towards the magnet coil, the detector is protected by flooding it with pure gaseous nitrogen during operation. The outer shell of CMS, namely the yoke and the muon chambers are then covered by an emergency inertion system also based on nitrogen. To ensure maximum fire safety, all materials used comply with the CERN regulations IS 23 and IS 41 with only a few exceptions. Every piece of the 30-tonne polyethylene shielding is high-density material, borated, boxed within steel and coated with intumescent (a paint that creates a thick co...

  7. Overview of the activities of the OECD/NEA/NSC working party on nuclear criticality safety

    The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) started dealing with criticality-safety related subjects back in the seventies. In the mid-nineties, several activities related to criticality-safety were grouped together into the Working Party on Nuclear Criticality Safety. This working party has since been operating and reporting to the Nuclear Science Committee. Six expert groups co-ordinate various activities ranging from experimental evaluations to code and data inter-comparisons for the study of static and transient criticality behaviours. The paper describes current activities performed in this framework and the achievements of the various expert groups. (author)

  8. On-going and some future safety related activities of the OECD/NEA

    The CSNI and CNRA structures and current activities of direct relevance to WWERs are presented. The nuclear regulatory challenges arising from economic deregulation like: direct safety challenges, infrastructure issues, increased pressure on regulatory bodies etc. are given. The OECD/NEA initiatives on assuring nuclear safety competence are mentioned

  9. The Norwegian approach to safety in the offshore petroleum activity

    The Norwegian Petroleum Directorate (NPD) is the agency vested with the task of supervising offshore licensees' performance with regard to regulatory compliance. The strategy has developed towards system-oriented supervision, with emphasis on the decision-making processes within the responsible companies. The NPD safety regulations are expressed in terms of goal-setting requirements, thus focusing on the purpose of the requirement rather than specifying the technical solution. Risk analyses are important parts of the decision-making process. The NPD has issued regulations concerning risk analyses, which require the licensee to establish safety goals and acceptance criteria, to carry out a systematic identification of relevant risks, and to ensure that adequate measures are taken to minimize risks, as an integrated part of the decision-making system. (author)

  10. IAEA activities on communication of nuclear safety issues

    The regulatory authorities in several countries have taken the initiative to overcome the renowned difficulties of communicating nuclear safety issues. They communicate with segments of the public specially in case of nuclear/radiological accidents, waste disposal, transport of radioactive material or food irradiation. This reflects the full recognition of the importance of the topic. However it is also recognized that there is hitherto a need of international assistance in order to develop a regulatory communication strategy that could be harmonized and at the same time customized to the different needs. Communications on nuclear, radiation, transport and radioactive waste safety are needed to: disseminate information on safety to the public in both routine and emergency situations ; be attentive to public concerns, and address them; maintain social trust and confidence by keeping society informed on the established safety standards and how they are enforced; facilitate the decision-making process on nuclear matters by promptly presenting factual information in a clear manner; integrate and maintain an information network at both the national and international levels; improve co-operation with other countries and international organizations; encourage the dissemination of factual information on nuclear issues in schools. A major factor in addressing all of these questions is understanding the audience(s). A two way communication process is needed to establish what particular audiences want to know and in what form they prefer to receive information. This will differ depending on the audience and circumstances. For example, the information on a routine day-to-day basis will be different from what might be needed at the time of an accident. Communication with the news media is a matter of particular importance, as they are both an audience in themselves and a channel for communicating with wider audiences. (author)

  11. Activities of nuclear safety culture in foreign organizations such as IAEA, etc

    Safety of nuclear facilities is guaranteed with the safety of instrument and equipment and of human, organization, management and system. In the guarantee, especially the encouragement and the growth of nuclear safety culture which is the basis of the safety of the latter are very important. In recent years, severe accidents and transients due to organizational issues have increased. Then, international organizations, regulatory organizations of each country and nuclear enterprises promote positively the developments of self-assessment methods of safety culture and safety management systems. The activities in the international organizations of IAEA and OECD/NEA and in the foreign regulatory organizations of US NRC and UK NII are described. (K. Kato)

  12. Active Flow Control with Adaptive Design Techniques for Improved Aircraft Safety Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The increased aircraft safety potential of active flow control using synthetic jets - specifically, using synthetic jets on the leading edge of the wing to delay...

  13. 25 Years of Community Activities towards Harmonization of Nuclear Safety Criteria and Requirements - Achievements and Prospects

    The main objective was to advise the EC on future challenges and opportunities in terms of enhanced co-operation in the area of nuclear safety and harmonization of safety requirements and practices in an enlarged European Union. The activities were divided into 3 sub-tasks as follows: part A, to prepare an analysis, synthesis and assessment of the main achievements from Community activities related to the Resolutions on the technological problems of nuclear safety of 1975 and 1992, with due consideration for related research activities; part B, to prepare an overview of safety philosophies and practices in EU Member States, taking account of their specific national practices in terms of legal framework, type and age of operating nuclear reactors; part C, to provide elements of a strategy for future activities in the frame of the Council Resolutions, with particular attention to the context of enlargement of the EU. (author)

  14. Glutarimides: Biological activity, general synthetic methods and physicochemical properties

    Popović-Đorđević Jelena B.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Glutarimides, 2,6-dioxopiperidines are compounds that rarely occur in natural sources, but so far isolated ones exert widespread pharmacological activities, which makes them valuable as potential pharmacotherapeutics. Glutarimides act as androgen receptor antagonists, anti-inflammatory, anxiolytics, antibacterials, and tumor suppressing agents. Some synthetic glutarimide derivatives are already in use as immunosuppressive and sedative (e.g., thalidomide or anxiolytics (buspirone drugs. The wide applicability of this class of compounds, justify the interest of scientists to explore new pathways for its syntheses. General methods for synthesis of six-membered imide ring, are presented in this paper. These methods include: a reaction of dicarboxylic acids with ammonia or primary amine, b reactions of cyclization: amido-acids, diamides, dinitriles, nitrilo-acids, amido-nitriles, amido-esters, amidoacyl-chlorides or diacyl-chlorides, c adition of carbon-monoxide on a,b-unsaturated amides, d oxidation reactions, e Michael adition of active methylen compounds on methacrylamide or conjugated amides. Some of the described methods are used for closing glutarimide ring in syntheses of farmacological active compounds sesbanimide and aldose reductase inhibitors (ARI. Analyses of the geometry, as well as, the spectroscopic analyses (NMR and FT-IR of some glutarimides are presented because of their broad spectrum of pharmacological activity. To elucidate structures of glutarimides, geometrical parameters of newly synthesized tert-pentyl-1-benzyl-4-methyl-glutarimide-3-carboxylate (PBMG are analyzed and compared with the experimental data from X-ray analysis for glutarimide. Moreover, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP surface which is plotted over the optimized geometry to elucidate the reactivity of PBMG molecule is analyzed. The electronic properties of glutarimide derivatives are explained on the example of thalidomide. The Frontier Molecular Orbital

  15. Active and Passive Fatigue in Simulated Driving: Discriminating Styles of Workload Regulation and Their Safety Impacts

    Saxby, Dyani J.; Matthews, Gerald; Warm, Joel S.; Hitchcock, Edward M.; Neubauer, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Despite the known dangers of driver fatigue, it is a difficult construct to study empirically. Different forms of task-induced fatigue may differ in their effects on driver performance and safety. Desmond and Hancock (2001) defined active and passive fatigue states that reflect different styles of workload regulation. In 2 driving simulator studies we investigated the multidimensional subjective states and safety outcomes associated with active and passive fatigue. Wind gusts were used to ind...

  16. Sensitivity Analysis for Safety Design Verification of General Aviation Reciprocating Aircraft Engine

    CAO Jiaokun; DING Shuiting

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an application of global sensitivity analysis for system safety analysis of reciprocating aircraft engine.Compared with local sensitivity analysis results,global sensitivity analysis could provide more information on parameter interactions,which are significant in complex system safety analysis.First,a deterministic aviation reciprocating engine thermodynamics model is developed and parameters of interest are defined as random variables.Then,samples are generated by Monte Carlo method for the parameters used in engine model on the basis of definition of factor distribution.Eventually,results from engine model are generated and importance indices are calculated.Based on the analysis results,design is improved to satisfy the airworthiness requirements.The results reveal that by using global sensitivity analysis,the parameters could be ranked with respect to their importance,including first order indices and total sensitivity indices.By reducing the uncertainty of parameters and adjusting the range of inputs,safety criteria would be satisfied.

  17. Safety assessment of discharge chute isolation barrier preparation and installation activities. Revision 3

    Meichle, R.H.

    1994-11-08

    This revision adds a section addressing impacts of dropping surfacing tool and rack cutter on the basin floor, and corrects typographical errors. The safety assessment is made for the activities for the preparation and installation of the discharge chute isolation barriers. The safety assessment includes a hazard assessment and comparisons of potential accidents/events to those addressed by the current safety basis documentation. No significant hazards were identified. An evaluation against the USQ evaluation questions was made and the determination made that the activities do not represent a USQ. Hazard categorization techniques were used to provide a basis for readiness review classifications.

  18. Safety assessment of discharge chute isolation barrier preparation and installation activities. Revision 3

    This revision adds a section addressing impacts of dropping surfacing tool and rack cutter on the basin floor, and corrects typographical errors. The safety assessment is made for the activities for the preparation and installation of the discharge chute isolation barriers. The safety assessment includes a hazard assessment and comparisons of potential accidents/events to those addressed by the current safety basis documentation. No significant hazards were identified. An evaluation against the USQ evaluation questions was made and the determination made that the activities do not represent a USQ. Hazard categorization techniques were used to provide a basis for readiness review classifications

  19. Generalized activity equations for spiking neural network dynamics

    Michael A Buice

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Much progress has been made in uncovering the computational capabilities of spiking neural networks. However, spiking neurons will always be more expensive to simulate compared to rate neurons because of the inherent disparity in time scales - the spike duration time is much shorter than the inter-spike time, which is much shorter than any learning time scale. In numerical analysis, this is a classic stiff problem. Spiking neurons are also much more difficult to study analytically. One possible approach to making spiking networks more tractable is to augment mean field activity models with some information about spiking correlations. For example, such a generalized activity model could carry information about spiking rates and correlations between spikes self-consistently. Here, we will show how this can be accomplished by constructing a complete formal probabilistic description of the network and then expanding around a small parameter such as the inverse of the number of neurons in the network. The mean field theory of the system gives a rate-like description. The first order terms in the perturbation expansion keep track of covariances.

  20. Addressing the fundamental issues in reliability evaluation of passive safety of AP1000 for a comparison with active safety of PWR

    Passive safety systems adopted in advanced Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR), such as AP1000 and EPR, should attain higher reliability than the existing active safety systems of the conventional PWR. The objective of this study is to discuss the fundamental issues relating to the reliability evaluation of AP1000 passive safety systems for a comparison with the active safety systems of conventional PWR, based on several aspects. First, comparisons between conventional PWR and AP1000 are made from the both aspects of safety design and cost reduction. The main differences between these PWR plants exist in the configurations of safety systems: AP1000 employs the passive safety system while reducing the number of active systems. Second, the safety of AP1000 is discussed from the aspect of severe accident prevention in the event of large break loss of coolant accidents (LOCA). Third, detailed fundamental issues on reliability evaluation of AP1000 passive safety systems are discussed qualitatively by using single loop models of safety systems of both PWRs plants. Lastly, methodology to conduct quantitative estimation of dynamic reliability for AP1000 passive safety systems in LOCA condition is discussed, in order to evaluate the reliability of AP1000 in future by a success-path-based reliability analysis method (i.e., GO-FLOW). (author)

  1. NS [Nuclear Safety] update. Current safety and security activities and developments taking place in the Department of Nuclear Safety and Security, Issue no. 15, February 2011

    The current issue presents information about the following topics: Supporting radiation protection in medicine. Wano's pre-startup support. One stop for incident and emergency communications. Emergency preparedness in IAEA Member States. Sophisticated On-Site Nuclide Identification (RanidSONNI). Over land, sea and air: safe and secure transport of radioactive material. INES at 20: Success from simplicity. IAEA and Ibero-American Forum - strengthening ties. Highlights of the 54th IAEA General Conference, 20-24 September 2010. Highlights of the International conference on Challenges faced by TSOs. Department of Nuclear Safety programme highlights

  2. Modeling approach for safety of high activity waste disposal

    This paper presents two examples of numerical modeling studies performed by IRSN for assessing geochemical interactions and the role of engineered barriers for the confinement of radionuclides. These examples illustrate the ability of numerical calculations to contribute to the long-term safety assessment approach. In the first example, disturbances and interactions between cementitious materials, bentonite and clayey host rock are tackled by numerical calculations at process level that enable addressing main issues of interest for performance assessment, e.g. extension and intensity of mineralogical transformations and alkaline plume spreading in the vicinity of the disposal tunnels. Once main disturbances and their effects on confinement properties of repository barriers have been identified and quantified, one may assess the role of each barrier on the overall safety of the repository for various scenarios of evolution. This assessment is tackled by integrated level calculations allowing quantifying radionuclide confinement performance of the whole repository for different stages of alteration of its components. The second example highlights the role played by bentonite engineered barriers, plugs and seals as hydraulic and migration barrier in presence of an excavation damaged zone around the vaults, drifts and shafts for different hydrogeological settings. (author)

  3. Developing safety culture in nuclear activities. Practical suggestions to assist progress

    The term 'safety culture' was introduced by the International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group (INSAG) in Summary Report on the Post-Accident Review Meeting on the Chernobyl Accident published by the IAEA as Safety Series No. 75-INSAG-1 in 1986, and expanded in Basic Safety Principles for Nuclear Power Plants, Safety Series No. 75-INSAG-3 in 1988. This publication supplements INSAG-4 published in 1991 which includes the definition and concept of safety culture describing practices valuable in establishing and maintaining a sound safety culture in a number of countries. It is intended for those who design, construct, manufacture, operate, maintain or decommission nuclear facilities. It should be practically useful for all those involved in operating nuclear facilities. It will also provide a reference for groups such as regulators who have an interest in developing, improving and evaluating safety culture training and individuals engaged in nuclear activities, and for bodies such as ethics review committees who should take into account safety culture issues for certifying professional excellence in the medical field

  4. Developing safety culture in nuclear activities. Practical suggestions to assist progress

    The term 'safety culture' was introduced by the International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group (INSAG) in Summary Report on the Post-Accident Review Meeting on the Chernobyl Accident published by IAEA as safety Series No. 75-INSAG-1 in 1986, and expanded in Basic Safety principles for Nuclear Power Plants, Safety Series No. 75-INSAG-3 in 1988. This publication supplements INSAG-4 published in 1991 which includes the definition and concept of safety culture describing practices valuable in establishing and maintaining a sound safety culture in a number of countries. It is intended for those who design, construct, manufacture, operate, maintain or decommission nuclear facilities. It should be practically useful for all those involved in operating nuclear facilities. It will also provide a reference for groups such as regulators who have an interest in developing, improving and evaluating safety culture training and individuals engaged in nuclear activities, and for bodies such as ethics review committees who should take into account safety culture issues for certifying professional excellence in the medical field

  5. NS [Nuclear Safety] update. Current safety and security activities and developments taking place in the Department of Nuclear Safety and Security. Issue no. 5, September 2007

    This newsletter reports on the denial of shipments of radioactive materials, the IAEA,s illicit trafficking database, the knowledge management conference and the IAEA Response Assistance network (RANET). Radioactive material needs to be transported for use in public health and industry. Transport of radioactive material is governed by national and international regulations which are based on the IAEA's Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material. These Regulations, developed by experts around the world, ensure high standards of safety. However, even when complying with the Regulations, there continue to be instances where shipments have been denied or delayed. Denying or delaying a shipment of radioactive material for medical use can result in hardships to patients. In addition, radioactive materials for other activities such as sterilization or power generation are also affected. In 2006, to increase transparency, seek effective solutions and permit participation of interested parties, the IAEA Director General created a senior level International Steering Committee on Denials of Shipments of Radioactive Material, which includes representatives from IAEA Member States, international governmental and nongovernmental organizations and industry. The Committee's mandate is to coordinate international efforts at determining solution of issues related to the denial of shipments and facilitate the coordination of a comprehensive international work plan of activities. In the early 1990s a number of trafficking cases in the Czech Republic, Germany and the Russian Federation involved highly enriched uranium (HEU) and Plutonium, some in kilogram quantities. These cases raised serious concerns over the threat posed by nuclear materials which were apparently available for sale on the black market. In response, States asked the IAEA to establish a data base on illicit trafficking incidents. First established in the mid-1990s, this work was greatly accelerated and

  6. Safety assessment and nuclear R/D activities of VTT

    VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland is an impartial multidisciplinary expert organisation. VTT is the major technical support organisation for the Finnish nuclear safety authority (STUK) as well as for the power companies Fortum and TVO operating the Finnish nuclear power plants and for the waste management company Posiva. VTT has also broad international co-operation network and has numerous contracts also from foreign utilities, industrial and regulatory customers. VTT has performed a comprehensive set of independent studies on Olkiluoto 3 EPR to support STUK in its licensing review of the construction licence application. In the forthcoming independent studies to support STUK's review of the operating licence application, VTT is going to have a key role again. (author)

  7. Safety and personnel access aspects of low activation fusion blankets

    The use of silicon carbide and carbon materials for structural applications in fusion reactor first wall and blanket regions has been proposed and a continuing effort spent on the development of the ceramics technology. The advantages identified are an extremely low induced radioactivity inventory, a high temperature operating capability, abundant raw material resource availability, and minimized plasma impurity effects. One of the unique features of the applications of these materials to fusion reactor blanket designs is that no alloying element is needed in order to assure the specified mechanical properties such as occurs in metal alloys. The major source of long term radioactivity in these materials is impurities. The impurity elements and their concentrations carried over to the blanket structure during fabrication can be minimized by proper fabrication procedures and techniques. The safety and personnel access aspects of such fusion blankets in conjunction with the impurity element concentration are the main subjects of this paper

  8. A pilot study exploring awareness among general public toward issues related to medication safety in the state of Penang, Malaysia

    Mohamed Azmi Hassali

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: A better understanding of medication safety ensures better health state among healthcare consumers. Aim: The study aims to assess general public awareness toward issues related to medication safety. Settings and Design: A cross-sectional study was conducted among general public selected conveniently in the state of Penang, Malaysia. Materials and methods: A total of 500 respondents were approached and 476 consumers participated in the survey giving a response rate of 95.2%. Statistical analysis: Data were analyzed by using SPSS version 12.0 and descriptive statistics were reported where appropriate. Results: Majority of the respondents (n=292, 61.3% stated that they were well aware of the possible side effects of their current medications. A total of 196 respondents (41.17% believed that all medicines registered in Malaysia are safe to use as these medicines have no side effects. About 40.33% (n=192 of the respondents claimed that they share their unused medicines with family and friends who are having similar illness. Majority of respondents 57.7% (n=275 were satisfied with the drug information provided by the healthcare professionals. This study also found that more than 80% of the respondents (n=409 did report that they read the labels of their medication before using. Conclusions: In this study, it was revealed that there is a moderate level of public knowledge regarding medication safety. It is evident that public underestimates the risk of their medications. There is a general lack of awareness and understanding among the public especially toward side effects.

  9. Generalized Internal Model Robust Control for Active Front Steering Intervention

    WU Jian; ZHAO Youqun; JI Xuewu; LIU Yahui; ZHANG Lipeng

    2015-01-01

    Because of the tire nonlinearity and vehicle’s parameters’ uncertainties, robust control methods based on the worst cases, such as H∞, μsynthesis, have been widely used in active front steering control, however, in order to guarantee the stability of active front steering system (AFS) controller, the robust control is at the cost of performance so that the robust controller is a little conservative and has low performance for AFS control. In this paper, a generalized internal model robust control (GIMC) that can overcome the contradiction between performance and stability is used in the AFS control. In GIMC, the Youla parameterization is used in an improved way. And GIMC controller includes two sections:a high performance controller designed for the nominal vehicle model and a robust controller compensating the vehicle parameters’ uncertainties and some external disturbances. Simulations of double lane change (DLC) maneuver and that of braking on split-μroad are conducted to compare the performance and stability of the GIMC control, the nominal performance PID controller and the H∞ controller. Simulation results show that the high nominal performance PID controller will be unstable under some extreme situations because of large vehicle’s parameters variations, H∞ controller is conservative so that the performance is a little low, and only the GIMC controller overcomes the contradiction between performance and robustness, which can both ensure the stability of the AFS controller and guarantee the high performance of the AFS controller. Therefore, the GIMC method proposed for AFS can overcome some disadvantages of control methods used by current AFS system, that is, can solve the instability of PID or LQP control methods and the low performance of the standard H∞controller.

  10. Generalized internal model robust control for active front steering intervention

    Wu, Jian; Zhao, Youqun; Ji, Xuewu; Liu, Yahui; Zhang, Lipeng

    2015-03-01

    Because of the tire nonlinearity and vehicle's parameters' uncertainties, robust control methods based on the worst cases, such as H ∞, µ synthesis, have been widely used in active front steering control, however, in order to guarantee the stability of active front steering system (AFS) controller, the robust control is at the cost of performance so that the robust controller is a little conservative and has low performance for AFS control. In this paper, a generalized internal model robust control (GIMC) that can overcome the contradiction between performance and stability is used in the AFS control. In GIMC, the Youla parameterization is used in an improved way. And GIMC controller includes two sections: a high performance controller designed for the nominal vehicle model and a robust controller compensating the vehicle parameters' uncertainties and some external disturbances. Simulations of double lane change (DLC) maneuver and that of braking on split- µ road are conducted to compare the performance and stability of the GIMC control, the nominal performance PID controller and the H ∞ controller. Simulation results show that the high nominal performance PID controller will be unstable under some extreme situations because of large vehicle's parameters variations, H ∞ controller is conservative so that the performance is a little low, and only the GIMC controller overcomes the contradiction between performance and robustness, which can both ensure the stability of the AFS controller and guarantee the high performance of the AFS controller. Therefore, the GIMC method proposed for AFS can overcome some disadvantages of control methods used by current AFS system, that is, can solve the instability of PID or LQP control methods and the low performance of the standard H ∞ controller.

  11. The Safety Analysis of X Rays Generator at Radiologic Installation of Sleman Distric General Hospital in Yogyakarta

    The safety analysis o X-rays generator has been done to evaluate the suitable of X- rays exposure after shielding in Radiologic Department of Sleman District General Hospital in Yogyakarta with the term of maximum permissible dose so the radiation worker, non radiation worker, and community are safe. The method of research is analysis of dose measurement before and after shielding, then compared with theory. The result show that X-rays shielding is safe for radiation worker, non radiation worker, and community. Measurement result after shielding showed dose rate of 0 mR/hour. (author)

  12. General-purpose heat source project and space nuclear safety and fuels program. Progress reportt, January 1980

    This formal monthly report covers the studies related to the use of 238PuO2 in radioisotopic power systems carried out for the Advanced Nuclear Systems and Projects Division of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. The two programs involved are the general-purpose heat source development and space nuclear safety and fuels. Most of the studies discussed here are of a continuing nature. Results and conclusions described may change as the work continues. Published reference to the results cited in this report should not be made without the explicit permission of the person in charge of the work

  13. Technical regulations on the general design and safety criteria for design and construction of nuclear reactors of May 1975

    These Technical Regulations published on 5th September 1975 were made in implementation of Section 33 of Decree No 7/9141 on the procedure for the licensing of nuclear installations. They serve as a guide to licensing authorities, project designers and operators in the nuclear field and therefore provide general criteria for safety standards, engineering codes, siting considerations, design bases for overall environmental radiation protection, and also deal with reactor core design, instrumentation, control, alarm systems, including an emergency core cooling system. Finally, the safe design of fuel elements must be ensured and fuel storage and handling techniques complied with. (NEA)

  14. 24 CFR 574.310 - General standards for eligible housing activities.

    2010-04-01

    ... pose any threat to the health and safety of the occupants and so as to protect the residents from... illumination to permit normal indoor activities and to support the health and safety of residents. Sufficient... payments for health services for any item or service to the extent that payment has been made, or...

  15. Enhancing the NASA Expendable Launch Vehicle Payload Safety Review Process Through Program Activities

    Palo, Thomas E.

    2007-01-01

    The safety review process for NASA spacecraft flown on Expendable Launch Vehicles (ELVs) has been guided by NASA-STD 8719.8, Expendable Launch Vehicle Payload Safety Review Process Standard. The standard focused primarily on the safety approval required to begin pre-launch processing at the launch site. Subsequent changes in the contractual, technical, and operational aspects of payload processing, combined with lessons-learned supported a need for the reassessment of the standard. This has resulted in the formation of a NASA ELV Payload Safety Program. This program has been working to address the programmatic issues that will enhance and supplement the existing process, while continuing to ensure the safety of ELV payload activities.

  16. Active and intelligent food packaging: legal aspects and safety concerns

    Dainelli, D.; Gontard, N.; Spyropoulos, D.; Zondervan-van den Beuken, E.; Tobback, P.

    2008-01-01

    'Active and intelligent' (A&I) food packaging is based on a deliberate interaction of the packaging with the food and/or its direct environment. This article presents: (i) the main types of materials developed for food contact; (ii) the global market and the future trends of active and intelligent p

  17. Multimegawatt Space Reactor Safety

    The Multimegawatt (MMW) Space Reactor Project supports the Strategic Defense Initiative Office requirement to provide reliable, safe, cost-effective, electrical power in the MMW range. Specifically, power may be used for neutral particle beams, free electron lasers, electromagnetic launchers, and orbital transfer vehicles. This power plant technology may also apply to the electrical power required for other uses such as deep-space probes and planetary exploration. The Multimegawatt Space Reactor Project, the Thermionic Fuel Element Verification Program, and Centaurus Program all support the Multimegawatt Space Nuclear Power Program and form an important part of the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) space and defense power systems activities. A major objective of the MMW project is the development of a reference flight system design that provides the desired levels of public safety, health protection, and special nuclear material (SNM) protection when used during its designated missions. The safety requirements for the MMW project are a hierarchy of requirements that consist of safety requirements/regulations, a safety policy, general safety criteria, safety technical specifications, safety design specifications, and the system design. This paper describes the strategy and philosophy behind the development of the safety requirements imposed upon the MMW concept developers. The safety organization, safety policy, generic safety issues, general safety criteria, and the safety technical specifications are discussed

  18. Compensation of Disturbed Load Currents Using Active Power Filter and Generalized Non-active Power Theory

    Lettl, J.; Šimek, Petr; Valouch, Viktor

    Prague: Electromagnetics Academy, 2015, s. 2500-2505. ISSN 1559-9450. [Progress In Electromagnetics Research Symposium Proceedings. Prague (CZ), 06.07.2015-09.07.2015] Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : disturbed load * GNP (Generalized Non-active Power) * parallel compensation Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering www.piers.org

  19. IAEA activities on education and training in radiation and waste safety: Strategic approach for a sustainable system

    The statutory safety functions of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) include the establishment of and provision for the application of safety standards for protection of health, life and property against ionizing radiation. The safety standards are based on the presumption that a national infrastructure is in place enabling the Government to discharge its responsibilities for protection and safety. Education and training is an essential element of the infrastructure. The IAEA education and training activities follows the resolutions of its General Conferences and reflects the latest IAEA standards and guidance. Several General Conference resolutions have emphasized the importance of education and training [e.g. GC(XXXV)/RES/552 in 1991; GC(XXXVI)/RES/584 in 1992; GC(43)/RES/13 in 1999 and more recently GC(44)/RES/13 in 2000]. In response to GC(44)/RES/13, the IAEA prepared a 'Strategic Approach to Education and Training in Radiation and Waste Safety' (Strategy on Education and Training) aiming at establishing, by 2010, sustainable education and training programmes in Member States. This Strategy was endorsed by the General Conference resolution GC(45)/RES/10C that, inter alia, urged the Secretariat to implement the Strategy on Education and Training, and to continue to strengthen, subject to available resources, its current effort in this area, and in particular to assist Member States' national, regional and collaborating centres in conducting such education and training activities in the relevant official languages of the IAEA. A technical meeting was organized in Vienna in March 2002 to advise on the implementation of the strategy. The meeting concluded with an action plan for implementing the strategy up to 2010, the immediate action being the formation of a Steering Committee by the middle of 2002. This Steering Committee would have the general remit to advise on the development and implementation of the strategy, as well as monitoring its progress

  20. Perspective on Secure Development Activities and Features of Safety I and C Systems

    The Enforcement Decree of the Act on Physical Protection and Radiological Emergency (ED-APPRE) was revised December 2013 to include security requirements on computer systems at nuclear facilities to protect those systems against malicious cyber-attacks. It means Cyber-Security-related measures, controls and activities of safety I and C systems against cyber-attacks shall meet the requirements of ED-APPRE. Still regulation upon inadvertent access or non-malicious modifications to the safety I and C systems is covered under the Nuclear Safety Act. The objective of this paper is to propose KINS' regulatory perspective on secure development and features against non-malicious access or modification of safety I and C systems. Secure development activities and features aim to prevent inadvertent and non-malicious access, and to prevent unwanted action from personnel or connected systems for ensuring reliable operation of safety I and C systems. Secure development activities of safety I and C systems are life cycle activities to ensure unwanted, unneeded and undocumented code is not incorporated into the systems. Secure features shall be developed, verified and qualified throughout the development life cycle

  1. Perspective on Secure Development Activities and Features of Safety I and C Systems

    Kang, Youngdoo; Yu, Yeong Jin; Kim, Hyungtae; Kwon, Yong il; Park, Yeunsoo; Choo, Jaeyul; Son, Jun Young; Jeong, Choong Heui [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The Enforcement Decree of the Act on Physical Protection and Radiological Emergency (ED-APPRE) was revised December 2013 to include security requirements on computer systems at nuclear facilities to protect those systems against malicious cyber-attacks. It means Cyber-Security-related measures, controls and activities of safety I and C systems against cyber-attacks shall meet the requirements of ED-APPRE. Still regulation upon inadvertent access or non-malicious modifications to the safety I and C systems is covered under the Nuclear Safety Act. The objective of this paper is to propose KINS' regulatory perspective on secure development and features against non-malicious access or modification of safety I and C systems. Secure development activities and features aim to prevent inadvertent and non-malicious access, and to prevent unwanted action from personnel or connected systems for ensuring reliable operation of safety I and C systems. Secure development activities of safety I and C systems are life cycle activities to ensure unwanted, unneeded and undocumented code is not incorporated into the systems. Secure features shall be developed, verified and qualified throughout the development life cycle.

  2. Quarterly report on the activities in safety administration division. The third quarter of 2002. Document on present state of affairs

    The activities of Safety Administration Division covers many fields in Tokai-Works such as the management of a labor safety health, the crisis management and the security, the safeguards of the nuclear materials, the transport of nuclear materials, and the management of a quality assurance. This report is summary of the activities of Safety Administration Division in October to December in 2002. (author)

  3. Collaboration of general practitioners and exercise providers in promotion of physical activity a written survey among general practitioners.

    Leemrijse, C.J.; Bakker, D.H. de; Ooms, L.; Veenhof, C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: General practitioners have an ideal position to motivate inactive patients to increase their physical activity. Most patients are able to exercise in regular local facilities outside the health care setting. The purpose of this study was to get insight into general practitioners percepti

  4. Collaboration of general practitioners and exercise providers in promotion of physical activity a written survey among general practitioners

    Leemrijse, C J; de Bakker, D H; Ooms, L; Veenhof, C

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: General practitioners have an ideal position to motivate inactive patients to increase their physical activity. Most patients are able to exercise in regular local facilities outside the health care setting. The purpose of this study was to get insight into general practitioners percepti

  5. Change in Neighborhood Traffic Safety: Does It Matter in Terms of Physical Activity?

    Birthe Jongeneel-Grimen; Wim Busschers; Mariël Droomers; van Oers, Hans A.M.; Karien Stronks; Kunst, Anton E.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is limited evidence on the causality of previously observed associations between neighborhood traffic safety and physical activity (PA). This study aims to contribute to this evidence by assessing the extent to which changes over time in neighborhood traffic safety were associated with PA. METHODS: Data were accessed from the national survey Netherlands Housing Research for 2006 and 2009. The two samples of in total 57,092 Dutch residents aged 18-84 years lived in 320 neighb...

  6. Change in Neighborhood Traffic Safety: Does It Matter in Terms of Physical Activity?

    Jongeneel-Grimen, Birthe; Busschers, Wim; Droomers, Mariël; van Oers, Hans A.M.; Stronks, Karien; Kunst, Anton E

    2013-01-01

    Background There is limited evidence on the causality of previously observed associations between neighborhood traffic safety and physical activity (PA). This study aims to contribute to this evidence by assessing the extent to which changes over time in neighborhood traffic safety were associated with PA. Methods Data were accessed from the national survey Netherlands Housing Research for 2006 and 2009. The two samples of in total 57,092 Dutch residents aged 18–84 years lived in 320 neighbou...

  7. Evaluation of the safety culture in the regulatory activity in Camaguey province

    Previous studied accomplished in the country have permitted to evaluate the activity of the regulatory body in nuclear safety matter in part of the national territory. These studies did not encompass the Camaguey province. In the work are shown the results of the study in this part of the territory, accomplished as of the survey elaborated by the National Nuclear Safety Center using guides it ASCOT and other documents of the IAEA

  8. Results of activities of the State Office for Nuclear Safety in state supervision of nuclear safety of nuclear facilities and radiation protection in 2003

    The report summarises results of activities of the State Office for Nuclear Safety (SUJB) in the supervision of nuclear safety and radiation protection in the Czech Republic. The first part of the report evaluates nuclear safety of nuclear installations and contains information concerning the results of supervision of radiation protection in 2003 in the Czech Republic. The second part of the report describes new responsibilities of the SUJB in the domain of nuclear, chemical, bacteriological (biological) and toxin weapons ban. (author)

  9. A review of significant events analysed in general practice: implications for the quality and safety of patient care

    Bradley Nick

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Significant event analysis (SEA is promoted as a team-based approach to enhancing patient safety through reflective learning. Evidence of SEA participation is required for appraisal and contractual purposes in UK general practice. A voluntary educational model in the west of Scotland enables general practitioners (GPs and doctors-in-training to submit SEA reports for feedback from trained peers. We reviewed reports to identify the range of safety issues analysed, learning needs raised and actions taken by GP teams. Method Content analysis of SEA reports submitted in an 18 month period between 2005 and 2007. Results 191 SEA reports were reviewed. 48 described patient harm (25.1%. A further 109 reports (57.1% outlined circumstances that had the potential to cause patient harm. Individual 'error' was cited as the most common reason for event occurrence (32.5%. Learning opportunities were identified in 182 reports (95.3% but were often non-specific professional issues not shared with the wider practice team. 154 SEA reports (80.1% described actions taken to improve practice systems or professional behaviour. However, non-medical staff were less likely to be involved in the changes resulting from event analyses describing patient harm (p Conclusion The study provides some evidence of the potential of SEA to improve healthcare quality and safety. If applied rigorously, GP teams and doctors in training can use the technique to investigate and learn from a wide variety of quality issues including those resulting in patient harm. This leads to reported change but it is unclear if such improvement is sustained.

  10. Kozloduy nuclear power plant. Units 1-4. Status of safety assessment activities. Rev. 2

    This paper presents the results of the status of safety assessment activities carried out by the Kozloduy Nuclear Power Plant (KNPP) in order to evaluate the current status of the safety of its reactor units 1-4. The steam supply system of this units is based of the reactor WWER-440/ B-230, which is a PWR of Russian design developed according to the safety standards in force in USSR in late 60-s. Now a days 10 reactor units of this type are in operation in four NPPs. Despite of efforts of the different plants to implement safety improvements measures during first 10-15 years of operation of this type of reactor its major safety problems were not eliminated and were a subject of international concern. The systematic evaluation of the deficiencies of the original design of this type of reactors have been initiated by IAEA in the beginning of 1990 and brought to developing a comprehensive list of safety problems which required urgent implementation of safety measures in all plants. To solve this problems in 1991 KNPP initiated implementation of so called 'short term' safety improvement program, developed with the help of WANO under agreement with Bulgarian Nuclear Safety Authority (BNSA) and consortium RISKAUDIT. The program was based on a stage approach and was foreseen to be implemented by tree stages in very tight time schedule in order to achieve significant and rapid improvements of the level of safety in operation of the units. The Short Tenn Program was implemented between the years 1991 and 1997 thanks of the strong safety commitment of NEK and KNPP staff and the broad international cooperation and financial support. Important part of resources were supplied under PHARE program of CEC, EBRD grant agreement and EDF support. The plant current safety level analysis has been performed using IAEA analytical methodology according to 50-SG-O12 standard 'Periodic safety review of operational nuclear power plants'. The approach and criteria for acceptable safety level

  11. A proposed statement on safety objectives for nuclear activities in Canada

    This report presents a concise statement of the basic safety objectives which the Committee considers underlie, or should underlie, the regulations and the licensing and compliance practices of the Atomic Energy Control Board. The report also includes a number of general criteria for achieving these objectives

  12. IAEA activities on education and training in radiation and waste safety: Strategic approach for a sustainable system

    The IAEA education and training activities follow the resolutions of its General Conferences and reflect the latest IAEA standards and guidance. Several General Conference Resolutions have emphasized the importance of education and training. In response to General Conference Resolution GC(44)/RES/13, the IAEA prepared a Strategic Approach to Education and Training in Radiation and Waste Safety (Strategy on Education and Training) aiming at establishing, by 2010, sustainable education and training programmes in Member States. This strategy was endorsed by General Conference Resolution GC(45)/RES/10C that, inter alia, urged the Secretariat to implement the Strategy on Education and Training, and to continue to strengthen, subject to available resources, its current effort in this area, and in particular to assist Member States' national, regional and collaborating centres in conducting such education and training activities in the relevant official languages of the IAEA. A technical meeting was organized in Vienna in March 2002 to advise on the implementation of the strategy. The meeting concluded with an action plan for implementing the strategy up to 2010, the immediate action being the formation of a steering committee by the middle of 2002. The steering committee would have the general remit to advise on the development and implementation of the strategy, as well as monitoring its progress. In the 2002 General Conference, the IAEA was urged to continue to implement the strategy, including the convening of the steering committee. The first Steering Committee Meeting took place 25-29 November 2002. The paper presents the IAEA's past experience and the newly established Strategic Approach to Education and Training in Radiation and Waste Safety. (author)

  13. The satiety signaling neuropeptide perisulfakinin inhibits the activity of central neurons promoting general activity.

    Wicher, Dieter; Derst, Christian; Gautier, Hélène; Lapied, Bruno; Heinemann, Stefan H; Agricola, Hans-Jürgen

    2007-01-01

    The metabolic state is one of the determinants of the general activity level. Satiety is related to resting or sleep whereas hunger correlates to wakefulness and activity. The counterpart to the mammalian satiety signal cholecystokinin (CCK) in insects are the sulfakinins. The aim of this study was to resolve the mechanism by which the antifeedant activity of perisulfakinin (PSK) in Periplaneta americana is mediated. We identified the sources of PSK which is used both as hormone and as paracrine messenger. PSK is found in the neurohemal organ of the brain and in nerve endings throughout the central nervous system. To correlate the distributions of PSK and its receptor (PSKR), we cloned the gene coding for PSKR and provide evidence for its expression within the nervous system. It occurs only in a few neurons, among them are the dorsal unpaired median (DUM) neurons which release octopamine thereby regulating the general level of activity. Application of PSK to DUM neurons attenuated the spiking frequency (EC(50)=11pM) due to reduction of a pacemaker Ca(2+) current through cAMP-inhibited pTRPgamma channels. PSK increased the intracellular cAMP level while decreasing the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration in DUM neurons. Thus, the satiety signal conferred by PSK acts antagonistically to the hunger signal, provided by the adipokinetic hormone (AKH): PSK depresses the electrical activity of DUM neurons by inhibiting the pTRPgamma channel that is activated by AKH under conditions of food shortage. PMID:18946521

  14. The satiety signaling neuropeptide perisulfakinin inhibits the activity of central neurons promoting general activity

    Dieter Wicher

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The metabolic state is one of the determinants of the general activity level. Satiety is related to resting or sleep whereas hunger correlates to wakefulness and activity. The counterpart to the mammalian satiety signal cholecystokinin (CCK in insects are the sulfakinins. The aim of this study was to resolve the mechanism by which the antifeedant activity of perisulfakinin (PSK in Periplaneta americana is mediated. We identified the sources of PSK which is used both as hormone and as paracrine messenger. PSK is found in the neurohemal organ of the brain and in nerve endings throughout the central nervous system. To correlate the distributions of PSK and its receptor (PSKR, we cloned the gene coding for PSKR and provide evidence for its expression within the nervous system. It occurs only in a few neurons, among them are the dorsal unpaired median (DUM neurons which release octopamine thereby regulating the general level of activity. Application of PSK to DUM neurons attenuated the spiking frequency (EC50=11pM due to reduction of a pacemaker Ca2+ current through cAMP-inhibited pTRPγ channels. PSK increased the intracellular cAMP level while decreasing the intracellular Ca2+ concentration in DUM neurons. Thus, the satiety signal conferred by PSK acts antagonistically to the hunger signal, provided by the adipokinetic hormone (AKH: PSK depresses the electrical activity of DUM neurons by inhibiting the pTRPγ channel that is activated by AKH under conditions of food shortage.

  15. Specialized consultant in radiological safety to the Tula general hospital, PEMEX. VI. - December of 2001

    The Tula general hospital, dependent of PEMEX, It request consultant of the ININ to be able to maintain their sanitary license for the use of X-ray equipment for the radiologic diagnostic.The proposal of the ININ was to be a program of technical attendance, schedule monthly to be able to solve the observations that are presented in the use of those equipment, and that the hospital can conserve its respective sanitary license.(Author)

  16. Specialized consultant in radiological safety to the Tula general hospital, PEMEX. IV. - October of 2001

    The Tula general hospital, dependent of PEMEX, It request consultant of the ININ to be able to maintain their sanitary license for the use of X-ray equipment for the radiologic diagnostic.The proposal of the ININ was to be a program of technical attendance, schedule monthly to be able to solve the observations that are presented in the use of those equipment, and that the hospital can conserve its respective sanitary license.(Author)

  17. Specialized consultant in radiological safety to the Tula general hospital, PEMEX. I.- July of 2001

    The Tula general hospital, dependent of PEMEX, It request consultant of the ININ to be able to maintain their sanitary license for the use of X-ray equipment for the radiologic diagnostic. The proposal of the ININ was to be a program of technical attendance, schedule monthly to be able to solve the observations that are presented in the use of those equipment, and that the hospital can conserve its respective sanitary license.(Author)

  18. Specialized consultant in radiological safety to the Tula general hospital, PEMEX. II.- August of 2001

    The Tula general hospital, dependent of PEMEX, It request consultant of the ININ to be able to maintain their sanitary license for the use of X-ray equipment for the radiologic diagnostic.The proposal of the ININ was to be a program of technical attendance, schedule monthly to be able to solve the observations that are presented in the use of those equipment, and that the hospital can conserve its respective sanitary license.(Author)

  19. Specialized consultant in radiological safety to the Tula general hospital, PEMEX. III.- September of 2001

    The Tula general hospital, dependent of PEMEX, It request consultant of the ININ to be able to maintain their sanitary license for the use of X-ray equipment for the radiologic diagnostic.The proposal of the ININ was to be a program of technical attendance, schedule monthly to be able to solve the observations that are presented in the use of those equipment, and that the hospital can conserve its respective sanitary license.(Author)

  20. Specialized consultant in radiological safety to the Ciudad del Carmen general hospital, PEMEX

    The Ciudad del Carmen general hospital, dependent of PEMEX, It request consultant of the ININ to be able to maintain their sanitary license for the use of X-ray equipment for the radiologic diagnostic.The proposal of the ININ was to be a program of technical attendance, schedule monthly to be able to solve the observations that are presented in the use of those equipment, and that the hospital can conserve its respective sanitary license.(Author)

  1. Specialized consultant in radiological safety to the Tula general hospital, PEMEX. V. - November of 2001

    The Tula general hospital, dependent of PEMEX, It request consultant of the ININ to be able to maintain their sanitary license for the use of X-ray equipment for the radiologic diagnostic.The proposal of the ININ was to be a program of technical attendance, schedule monthly to be able to solve the observations that are presented in the use of those equipment, and that the hospital can conserve its respective sanitary license.(Author)

  2. Nuclear safety

    The author proposes an overview of methods and concepts used in the nuclear industry, at the design level as well as at the exploitation level, to ensure an acceptable safety level, notably in the case of nuclear reactors. He first addresses the general objectives of nuclear safety and the notion of acceptable risk: definition and organisation of nuclear safety (relationships between safety authorities and operators), notion of acceptable risk, deterministic safety approach and main safety principles (safety functions and confinement barriers, concept of defence in depth). Then, the author addresses the safety approach at the design level: studies of operational situations, studies of internal and external aggressions, safety report, design principles for important-for-safety systems (failure criterion, redundancy, failure prevention, safety classification). The next part addresses safety during exploitation and general exploitation rules: definition of the operation domain and of its limits, periodic controls and tests, management in case of incidents, accidents or aggressions

  3. Safety analysis of thorium-based fuels in the General Electric Standard BWR

    A denatured (U-233/Th)O2 fuel assembly has been designed which is energy equivalent to and hardware interchangeable with a modern boiling water reactor (BWR) reference reload assembly. Relative to the reference UO2 fuel, the thorium fuel design shows better performance during normal and transient reactor operation for the BWR/6 product line and will meet or exceed current safety and licensing criteria. Power distributions are flattened and thermal operating margins are increased by reduced steam void reactivity coefficients caused by U-233. However, a (U-233/Th)O2-fueled BWR will likely have reduced operating flexibility. A (U-235/Th)O2-fueled BWR should perform similar to a UO2-fueled BWR under all operating conditions. A (Pu/Th)O2-fueled BWR may have reduced thermal margins and similar accident response and be less stable than a UO2-fueled BWR. The assessment is based on comparisions of point model and infinite lattice predictions of various nuclear reactivity parameters, including void reactivity coefficients, Doppler reactivity coefficients, and control blade worths

  4. Be active - eat well! Two-wheels’ safety week.

    2009-01-01

    The health campaign "Be active – eat well" was a resounding success. The campaign, which was held from 25 to 29 May 2009, was organised by the Medical Service jointly with the Restaurants Supervisory Committee, the CERN Management, the Staff Association and CHIS, with the active support of CERN’s restaurants. The campaign had a big impact: the interaction was positive and enriching, there were exchanges with visitors of all ages (children, adults, pensioners), and there were plenty of good resolutions. Highlights included Mme Dominique Gerber-Jullien using 20 placemats and dietary texts as browsing material for her French course for adults at CERN; a Scout official picking up documents for teaching purposes; the Novae-inspired idea of bringing an apple with you to work every day, in case you get a sudden snack craving; and the bicycle prize offered by DSR, won by Mr Karol Kruzelecki after making the closest guess of the numb...

  5. NS [Nuclear Safety] update. Current safety and security activities and developments taking place in the Department of Nuclear Safety and Security, Issue no. 10, March 2009

    The current issue contains information about the following meetings: Application of the Code of Conduct on the Safety of Research Reactors (the 'Code'). Environmental Modelling for Radiation Safety (EMRAS II); Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management (the Joint Convention). The document also gives an overview on International Nuclear Security Advisory Service (INSServ)

  6. NS [Nuclear Safety] update. Current safety and security activities and developments taking place in the Department of Nuclear Safety and Security, Issue no. 11, June 2009

    The current issue presents information about the following topics: Nuclear Safety Review for the Year 2008; Feedback from IRS Topical Studies and Events Applied to Safety Standards; Education and Training Programmes at the IAEA Department of Nuclear Safety and Security; Peer Review of Operational Safety Performance (PROSPER)

  7. NS [Nuclear Safety] update. Current safety and security activities and developments taking place in the Department of Nuclear Safety and Security, Issue no. 8, September 2008

    The current issue presents information about the following activities: 1) International Workshops on Denial of Shipments raise awareness of suppliers, recipients, regulators, carriers/consignors and international organizations of the problems relating to denials of radioactive shipments to determine effective measures to prevent or reduce the instances of shipment denials and delays. 2) Communication and knowledge Management in the Department of Nuclear Safety and Security (NS). 3) Nuclear Security at the Beijing Olympics - an excellent example of the IAEA's work in protecting large scale public events. 4) The Incident and Emergency Centre's Participation in the ConvEx 3 Exercise, 9-10 July 2008, which took place at the Laguna Verde nuclear power plant in Mexico. During the 43 hour long exercise, the Incident and Emergency Centre (IEC) was fully activated. Staff members participating in the exercise represented different departments within the IAEA and the diversity of their knowledge and experience ensured an effective response

  8. National program for the fostering and development of safety culture in the nuclear activities in Cuba

    Since its appearance, as a result of the investigations of the accident in the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant, the term Safety Culture has been considered a key element to achieve a high level of safety in the nuclear installations, becoming a basic safety principle, internationally. The Cuban regulatory authority understood from very early the importance of the promotion and development of attitudes and characteristics in the organizations and personnel involved in the nuclear sector, reflecting a high Safety Culture, in order to propitiate a higher involvement of all employees in safety, contributing this way to the prevention of accidents in the nuclear facilities. Although the Cuban Nuclear Program was significantly reduced in the 90's, the regulatory authority has continued working in this direction and assimilated all the international experience for its application in its strategies for the development of a Safety Culture in the nuclear activities in the country. The present work summarizes the Cuban experience in the establishment of a National Program for the fostering and development of a Safety Culture. (author)

  9. Report of Activity, 1996 - 1997. Vol. 3. General activities - Technical Research

    This is the third tome of the Report of Activity of IPN - Orsay on 1996-1997. It deals with general activities and technical research. Summary reports and short communications are grouped in the following sections: 1 - Accelerators with the sub-divisions 1.1 - R and D on superconducting RF cavities; 1.2 - SPIRAL Project; 1.3 - Contribution to the LHC Project; 1.4 - Tandem; 2 - Targets, Sources and Injectors; 3 - Detectors and related instrumentation; 4 - Electronics; 5 - Data processing; 6 - Radioprotection and medical applications

  10. Results of activities of the State Office for Nuclear Safety in the supervision of nuclear safety and radiation protection in 1995

    Based on the Annual Report 1995 of the State Office for Nuclear Safety, the article summarizes results of activities of the State Office for Nuclear Safety in connection with its responsibilities in the field of supervision of nuclear safety and radiation protection in the Czech Republic. The first part of the report evaluates nuclear safety of nuclear power plants, other nuclear facilities and major radiation sources. The second part comprises information on the results of supervision of radiation protection in the Czech Republic and gives details about the radiological situation within the country. 10 tabs., 10 figs

  11. Nuclear ships and their safety

    Several aspects of nuclear ship propulsion, with special reference to nuclear safety, were discussed at an international symposium at Taormina, Italy, from 14-18 November 1960. Discussions on specific topics are conducted, grouped under the following headings: Economics and National Activities in Nuclear Ship Propulsion; International Problems and General Aspects of Safety for Nuclear Ships; Nuclear Ship Projects from the Angle of Safety; Ship Reactor Problems; Sea Motion and Hull Problems; Maintenance and Refuelling Problems; and Safety Aspects of Nuclear Ship Operation

  12. Study of industry safety management

    This book deals with general remarks, industrial accidents, statistics of industrial accidents, unsafe actions, making machinery and facilities safe, safe activities, having working environment safe, survey of industrial accidents and analysis of causes, system of safety management and operations, safety management planning, safety education, human engineering such as human-machines system, system safety, and costs of disaster losses. It lastly adds individual protective equipment and working clothes including protect equipment for eyes, face, hands, arms and feet.

  13. Upgrade activities for the Criticality Safety Program of Hanford High-Level Radioactive Waste Tank Farm

    This document describes the plan for implementing the findings and recommendations made by a team of experts for the US Department of Energy in their Nuclear Criticality Safety Review Of Hanford High-Level Radioactive Waste Tank Farms. The team was chartered to review the nuclear criticality safety of the tank farms and recommend programmatic changes where appropriate, including the specific incident leading to an Unusual Occurrence Report filed in June 1991 on the 241-C-104 specification violation. Although no imminent risks of criticality were found, the review team identified several problems with respect to nuclear criticality safety. Primary among the problems is the Tack of dofinitive knowledge of the fissile material inventory and distribution within the tanks. The lack of good characterization data prompted Westinghouse Hanford Company to declare an Unreviewed Safety Question with respect to criticality safety. Activities by the responsible Hanford Site contractor that address each of the findings, recommendations, and activities required to resolve the Unreviewed Safety Question are described. Schedules and estimated costs are also included with the plan

  14. DOE standard: Integration of environment, safety, and health into facility disposition activities. Volume 1: Technical standard

    NONE

    1998-05-01

    This Department of Energy (DOE) technical standard (referred to as the Standard) provides guidance for integrating and enhancing worker, public, and environmental protection during facility disposition activities. It provides environment, safety, and health (ES and H) guidance to supplement the project management requirements and associated guidelines contained within DOE O 430.1A, Life-Cycle Asset Management (LCAM), and amplified within the corresponding implementation guides. In addition, the Standard is designed to support an Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS), consistent with the guiding principles and core functions contained in DOE P 450.4, Safety Management System Policy, and discussed in DOE G 450.4-1, Integrated Safety Management System Guide. The ISMS guiding principles represent the fundamental policies that guide the safe accomplishment of work and include: (1) line management responsibility for safety; (2) clear roles and responsibilities; (3) competence commensurate with responsibilities; (4) balanced priorities; (5) identification of safety standards and requirements; (6) hazard controls tailored to work being performed; and (7) operations authorization. This Standard specifically addresses the implementation of the above ISMS principles four through seven, as applied to facility disposition activities.

  15. NASA safety program activities in support of the Space Exploration Initiatives Nuclear Propulsion program

    Sawyer, J. C., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The activities of the joint NASA/DOE/DOD Nuclear Propulsion Program Technical Panels have been used as the basis for the current development of safety policies and requirements for the Space Exploration Initiatives (SEI) Nuclear Propulsion Technology development program. The Safety Division of the NASA Office of Safety and Mission Quality has initiated efforts to develop policies for the safe use of nuclear propulsion in space through involvement in the joint agency Nuclear Safety Policy Working Group (NSPWG), encouraged expansion of the initial policy development into proposed programmatic requirements, and suggested further expansion into the overall risk assessment and risk management process for the NASA Exploration Program. Similar efforts are underway within the Department of Energy to ensure the safe development and testing of nuclear propulsion systems on Earth. This paper describes the NASA safety policy related to requirements for the design of systems that may operate where Earth re-entry is a possibility. The expected plan of action is to support and oversee activities related to the technology development of nuclear propulsion in space, and support the overall safety and risk management program being developed for the NASA Exploration Program.

  16. A new semi-active safety control strategy for high-speed railway vehicles

    Guo, Jin; Xu, Zhengguo; Sun, Youxian

    2015-12-01

    This paper focuses on the safety of railway vehicles. A new semi-active control strategy is proposed based on the skyhook control theory. In view of the main railway vehicle safety performance indicators, the new control strategy aims at reducing the derailment coefficient of railway vehicles by restraining the lateral vibrations of the bogie and the wheelset. Furthermore, to evaluate the improvement of the safety performance brought about by the new control strategy, a complete railway vehicle model is established using the ADAMS/Rail software package. In further co-simulations, five conventional control methods are compared with the proposed approach under the same conditions. Co-simulation results indicate that the new control strategy is effective in improving the safety performance of railway vehicles.

  17. Implementation of the safety culture for HANARO Safety Management

    Safety is the fundamental principal upon which the management system is based. The IAEA INSAG(International Nuclear Safety Group) states the general aims of the safety management system. One of which is to foster and support a strong safety culture through the development and reinforcement of good safety attitudes and behavior in individuals and teams so as to allow them to carry out their tasks safety. The safety culture activities have been implemented and the importance of safety management in nuclear activities for a reactor application and utilization has also been emphasized more than 10 years in HANARO which is a 30 MW multi-purpose research reactor and achieved its first criticality in February 1995. The safety culture activities and implementations have been conducted continuously to enhance its safe operation like the seminars and lectures related to safety matters, participation in international workshops, the development of safety culture indicators, the survey on the attitude of safety culture, the development of operational safety performance indicators (SPIs), the preparation of a safety text book and the development of an e-Learning program for safety education. (author)

  18. General-purpose heat source development: Safety Verification Test Program. Titanium bullet/fragment test series

    The radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) that will provide power for the Galileo and Ulysses space missions contains 18 General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules. Each module contains four 238PuO2-fueled clads and generates 250 W(t). Because the possibility of launch-pad or postlaunch explosion exists and because any explosion would generate a field of high-energy fragments, the fueled clads within each GPHS module must be able to survive fragment impact. In this test series we investigated the response of bare, simulant-fueled (UO2) clads to the impact of high-energy titanium alloy fragments. We determined that 425m/s is the threshold impact velocity of a 3.25-g titanium bullet that will cause direct mechanical failure of a bare fueled clad. 40 figs

  19. Effects of patient safety culture interventions on incident reporting in general practice : A cluster randomised trial a cluster randomised trial

    Verbakel, Natasha J.; Langelaan, Maaike; Verheij, Theo J M; Wagner, Cordula; Zwart, Dorien L M

    2015-01-01

    Background: A constructive safety culture is essential for the successful implementation of patient safety improvements. Aim: To assess the effect of two patient safety culture interventions on incident reporting as a proxy of safety culture. Design and setting: A three-arm cluster randomised trial

  20. New set of Chemical Safety rules

    HSE Unit

    2011-01-01

    A new set of four Safety Rules was issued on 28 March 2011: Safety Regulation SR-C ver. 2, Chemical Agents (en); General Safety Instruction GSI-C1, Prevention and Protection Measures (en); General Safety Instruction GSI-C2, Explosive Atmospheres (en); General Safety Instruction GSI-C3, Monitoring of Exposure to Hazardous Chemical Agents in Workplace Atmospheres (en). These documents form part of the CERN Safety Rules and are issued in application of the “Staff Rules and Regulations” and of document SAPOCO 42. These documents set out the minimum requirements for the protection of persons from risks to their occupational safety and health arising, or likely to arise, from the effects of hazardous chemical agents that are present in the workplace or used in any CERN activity. Simultaneously, the HSE Unit has published seven Safety Guidelines and six Safety Forms. These documents are available from the dedicated Web page “Chemical, Cryogenic and Biological Safety&...

  1. NS [Nuclear Safety] update. Current safety and security activities and developments taking place in the Department of Nuclear Safety and Security, Issue no. 7, July 2008

    The current issue presents information about the following activities: 1) International Conference on Radioecology and Environmental Radioactivity 15-20 June 2008, Bergen organized by the Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (NRPA) and the French Institute for Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) in cooperation with IAEA, WHO, OECD/NEA, the International Union of Radioecology (IUR), the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and the Journal of environmental Radioactivity (JER). This conference has evolved from the merging of the series of conferences by ECORAD and of the International Conferences on Radioactivity in the Environment. The primary objective of the conference was to review all scientific themes related to the study of environmental radioactivity and to identify new societal needs and requirements for regulatory bodies and industry. All sources of radiation, from industrial discharges in planned exposure situations through to sources in existing and emergency exposure situations, were included in the scope of the conference. 2) The Ibero American Forum of Nuclear and Radiation Safety and Security Regulatory Agencies (the FORO); 3) Kashiwazaki-Kariwa Nuclear Power Plant in the earthquake on 16 July 2007 - plant's response and effects and lessons learned

  2. Report on the results of activities of the State Office for Nuclear Safety in state supervision of nuclear safety of nuclear facilities and radiation protection in 2001

    The report summarises results of activities of the State Office for Nuclear Safety (SUJB) in supervision of nuclear safety and radiation protection in the Czech Republic. The first part of the report evaluates nuclear safety of nuclear power plants and comprises information concerning the results of supervision of radiation protection. Details of the radiological situation within the Czech Republic in 2001 are also given. The second part of the report contains results of activities of the SUJB in its new competencies; supervision and control in the field of prohibition of chemical, biological and toxin weapons. (author)

  3. IAEA activities related to safety indicators, time frames and reference scenarios

    The fundamental principles for the safe management of radioactive waste have been agreed internationally and form the basis for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management that entered into force in June 2001. Protection of human health and the environment and safety of facilities (including radioactive waste disposal facilities) are widely recognised principles to be followed and demonstrated in post-closure safety assessment of waste repositories. Dose and risk are at present internationally agreed safety criteria, used for judging the acceptability of such facilities. However, there have been a number of activities initiated and co-ordinated by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) which have provided an international forum for discussion and consensus building on the use safety indicators which are complementary to dose and risk. The Agency has been working on the definition of other safety indicators, such as flux, time, environmental concentration, etc.; the desired characteristics, and use of these indicators in different time frames. The IAEA has focused on safety indicators related to geological disposal, exploring their role in the development of a safety case, evaluating the advantages and disadvantages of using other safety indicators and how they complement the dose and risk indicators. The use of these indicators have been discussed also from regulatory perspective, mainly in terms of achieving reasonable assurance and confidence in safety assessments for waste repositories and decision making in the presence of uncertainty in the context of disposal of long-lived waste. Considerable effort has also been expended by the Agency on the development and application of principles for defining critical groups and biospheres for deep geological repositories. One of the important and successful IAEA programmes in this field is the Biosphere Modelling and Assessment (BIOMASS) project

  4. Collaboration of general practitioners and exercise providers in promotion of physical activity a written survey among general practitioners

    Leemrijse, C. J.; Bakker, D.H. de; Ooms, L.; Veenhof, C.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: General practitioners have an ideal position to motivate inactive patients to increase their physical activity. Most patients are able to exercise in regular local facilities outside the health care setting. The purpose of this study was to get insight into general practitioners perceptions and current practices regarding referral of patients to local exercise facilities. Furthermore, collaboration with exercise providers in the community was investigated, and motivators and barri...

  5. Collaboration of general practitioners and exercise providers in promotion of physical activity a written survey among general practitioners

    2015-01-01

    Background General practitioners have an ideal position to motivate inactive patients to increase their physical activity. Most patients are able to exercise in regular local facilities outside the health care setting. The purpose of this study was to get insight into general practitioners perceptions and current practices regarding referral of patients to local exercise facilities. Furthermore, collaboration with exercise providers in the community was investigated, and motivators and barrie...

  6. IAEA activities in preparation of reglamentary documents on nuclear power plant safety

    The activities of the IAEA in the field of working out practical rules and recommendations ensuring the nuclear power plant safety are discussed. The practical rules will establish the aims and the minimum of requirements, that must be carried out to ensure the necessary safety of systems, components and equipment of the nuclear power plant throughout the whole period of its exploitation. Described is the procedure of the document preparation, consisting of the collection of documents, edited in different countries, the integration of documents by the IAEA Secretariat, the consideratiom of documents by the Group of senior advisers, the preparation of the draft document, the additional wort at the document in accordaqce with the remarks of the IAEA member-countries, the edition and dissemination of documents. The necessity for the active participation of the CMEA member-countries in the development and discussion of documents concerning the nuclear power plant safety is stated

  7. Safety : the challenge of today for transportation safety in the future. General report on theme -V "Safety" at the 14th International Study Week on Traffic Engineering and Safety, Strasbourg, September 7-10, 1982.

    Asmussen, E.

    1982-01-01

    Transportation (un)safety is the result of a complex process in the transportation system. A large number of variables (characteristics of the system elements) with many interactions, produce a complex network of relationships expressed in "system behaviour". In this network of relationships, man as

  8. Interferon Type I Driven Immune Activation in Generalized Autoimmune Diseases

    Z. Brkić (Zana)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis describes research performed on several generalized autoimmune diseases with the main focus on primary Sjögren’s syndrome. Interferon type I has been implicated in the pathogenesis of these diseases and will be introduced in this chapter together with other important immune f

  9. Technology, Active Learning, and Retention in General Education Mathematics

    Levi, Inessa; Chahine, Iman; Garrett, Lauretta; Wang, Haifeng

    2016-01-01

    Difficulties in general education mathematics courses may be attributed to many factors, primarily low proficiency in symbol manipulation, a perception that mathematics is an area which eludes mastery, a lack of engagement and effective practice. Educational technology can be a powerful aid in overcoming these factors. This work describes the…

  10. Nuclear Data Activities in Support of the DOE Nuclear Criticality Safety Program

    The DOE Nuclear Criticality Safety Program (NCSP) provides the technical infrastructure maintenance for those technologies applied in the evaluation and performance of safe fissionable-material operations in the DOE complex. These technologies include an Analytical Methods element for neutron transport as well as the development of sensitivity/uncertainty methods, the performance of Critical Experiments, evaluation and qualification of experiments as Benchmarks, and a comprehensive Nuclear Data program coordinated by the NCSP Nuclear Data Advisory Group (NDAG).The NDAG gathers and evaluates differential and integral nuclear data, identifies deficiencies, and recommends priorities on meeting DOE criticality safety needs to the NCSP Criticality Safety Support Group (CSSG). Then the NDAG identifies the required resources and unique capabilities for meeting these needs, not only for performing measurements but also for data evaluation with nuclear model codes as well as for data processing for criticality safety applications. The NDAG coordinates effort with the leadership of the National Nuclear Data Center, the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG), and the Working Party on International Evaluation Cooperation (WPEC) of the OECD/NEA Nuclear Science Committee. The overall objective is to expedite the issuance of new data and methods to the DOE criticality safety user. This paper describes these activities in detail, with examples based upon special studies being performed in support of criticality safety for a variety of DOE operations

  11. 安全心理学在工程总承包企业安全管理中的应用探索%Application of Safety Psychology in Engineering General Contracting Enterprise Safety Management

    袁策凤; 姬宗锋; 夏兵

    2015-01-01

    从安全心理学角度,系统分析工程总承包企业安全管理现状,肯定了工程总承包企业在安全管理工作中取得的成绩,也指出了安全管理中存在的主要问题。最后将安全心理学与工程总承包企业生产实际系统结合,阐述如何从构建员工安全心理分析系统、合理划分责权利、完善安全培训模式、优化工作条件和环境4个方面入手来提升工程总承包企业的安全管理水平。%From the perspective of safety psychology ,in this paper the current safety management situation of general con-tracting enterprises is systematically analyzed ,achievements of general contracting enterprises in safety management have been recognized ,and the main problems existed in safety management have also been pointed out .Safety psychology is com-bined with the actual production situation of general contracting enterprises to elaborate how to enhance the level of safety management of general contracting enterprises through building up the system of staff safety psychology analysis ,reasonable allocation of responsibility and rights ,improvement of safety training mode and optimization of working conditions and envi-ronment .

  12. General discussion about enzymes activities of radiation injury

    Researching reliable and practical indicators of radiation injury, however, is very interesting and considerable department of scientific studies, practical and theoretical. Enzymes activities are among biochemical indicators which are changed after radiation injury. Activity of these specific proteins is important in regulation of every biochemical reaction in existing beings. Biological macromolecules can be damaged by radiation or the cell permeability can be changed. All of these influence directly on enzymes activities. In this paper we present the review of the all important enzymes, indicators of the radiation injury, which variances on reference to normal values are significant of the functional and the structural changes of essential organs (author)

  13. Safety- and risk analysis activities in other areas than the nuclear industry

    The report gives an overview of the legislation within the European Union in the field of major industrial hazards and gives examples of decision criteria applied in a number of European countries when judging the acceptability of an activity. Furthermore, the report mentions a few methods used in the analysis of the safety of chemical installations. (au)

  14. A review of the literature on preventive occupational health and safety activities in small enterprises

    Hasle, Peter; Limborg, Hans Jørgen

    2006-01-01

    The scientific literature regarding preventive occupational health and safety activities in small enterprises has been reviewed in order to identify effective preventive approaches and to develop a future research strategy. During the last couple of years, there has been a significant increase in...

  15. 76 FR 72997 - Railroad Safety Advisory Committee (RSAC); Working Group Activity Update

    2011-11-28

    ... announcement of working group activities and status reports of December 7, 2010 (75 FR 76070). The 44th full... trains. The Passenger Safety Working Group accepted the task on July 28, 2010, by electronic vote. Under..., 2006 (71 FR 50275), and was open for comment until October 23, 2006. The working group agreed...

  16. High Committee for transparency and information on nuclear safety: Annual activity report (January 2010 - December 2010)

    After a description of the operation of the French 'High Committee for transparency and information on nuclear safety' (HCTISN), of its missions, its organisation and its means, the progress report presents the High Committee activity for 2010 with summaries of its report on the transparency of nuclear material and waste management, its meetings, its work groups, its visits and participations to other events

  17. Benchmarking promotion and deployment activities regarding intelligent vehicle safety systems in the EU

    Kievit, M. de; Malone, K.M.; Zwijnenberg, H.; Arem, B. van

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a Benchmarking study performed in the European Union on Awareness and Promotion & Deployment activities related to Intelligent Vehicle Safety (IVS) systems (1). The study, commissioned by the European Commission under the Intelligent Car Initiative (a i2010 flagshi

  18. T & I--Building Construction, Safety. Kit No. 1. Instructor's Manual [and] Student Learning Activity Guide.

    Howard, John

    An instructor's manual and student activity guide on building construction safety are provided in this set of prevocational education materials which focuses on the vocational area of trade and industry. (This set of materials is one of ninety-two prevocational education sets arranged around a cluster of seven vocational offerings: agriculture,…

  19. Safety- and risk analysis activities in other areas than the nuclear industry

    Kozine, I.; Duijm, N.J.; Lauridsen, K. [Risoe National Lab. (Denmark)

    2000-12-01

    The report gives an overview of the legislation within the European Union in the field of major industrial hazards and gives examples of decision criteria applied in a number of European countries when judging the acceptability of an activity. Furthermore, the report mentions a few methods used in the analysis of the safety of chemical installations. (au)

  20. Annual activity report of Ignalina NPP Safety Analysis Group for 1994 year

    The main results of Ignalina NPP Safety Analysis Group (ISAG) investigations for 1994 are presented. ISAG is concentrated its research activities into 3 areas: the neutrons dynamics modeling, simulation of transient processes during loss of coolant accident and calculation of reactor building structure's streses and other mechanical properties in the case of accident. 6 refs., 13 tabs., 69 figs

  1. GENERAL DESCRIPTION OF THE CONCEPTS OF DETERMINING INNOVATION ACTIVITIES

    Kiseleva I. A.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The article reviews the basic concepts used in the analysis of innovation activities; we have also examined the integration of the concepts and proved the necessity of developing the effective innovation-oriented strategy of Russia's development

  2. Mechanical plan and activator system tool for nuclear radiation safety Boaster

    Its has been done a mechanical plan and nuclear radiation safety boaster tool activator system. The mechanical system consists of: frame, source holder, collimator and shielding holder. The activator system axis threads and crank stick handle that can be rotated either clockwise or counter clockwise. The axis thread is to be designed can be coupled with either convention.al activator system or activator that controlled a control system that by can be set forward and backward,or close and for to the source and detector. This system has freedom variable of 1000 mm between source and detector equipped with distance scale in mm. The shielding holder can be set its thickness as according to the shielding to be used. This design it is expected that the system can be used for any experiment related to protection system and safety as a function of distance factor time, and shielding. (author)

  3. Safety basis for selected activities in single-shell tanks with flammable gas concerns. Revision 1

    This is full revision to Revision 0 of this report. The purpose of this report is to provide a summary of analyses done to support activities performed for single-shell tanks. These activities are encompassed by the flammable gas Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ). The basic controls required to perform these activities involve the identification, elimination and/or control of ignition sources and monitoring for flammable gases. Controls are implemented through the Interim Safety Basis (ISB), IOSRs, and OSDs. Since this report only provides a historical compendium of issues and activities, it is not to be used as a basis to perform USQ screenings and evaluations. Furthermore, these analyses and others in process will be used as the basis for developing the Flammable Gas Topical Report for the ISB Upgrade

  4. International Atomic Energy Agency Activities on Education and Training in Radiation, Transport and Waste Safety: Strategic Approach for a Sustainable System

    The statutory safety functions of the international Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) include the establishment of and provision for the application of safety standards for protection of health, life and property against ionizing radiation. The safety standards are based on the presumption that a national infrastructure is in place enabling the government to discharge its responsibilities for protection and safety. Education and training is an essential element of the infrastructure. The IAEA education and training activities follows the the resolutions of its general conferences and reflects the latest IAEA standards and guidance. several general conference resolutions have emphasized the importance of education and training (e.g. GC (XXXV)/RES/552 in 1991,GC (XXXVI)/ RES/584 in 1992, GC (43)/RES/13 in 1999 and more recently GC (44)/RES/13 in 2000). In response to GC (44) /RES/13, the IAEA prepared a strategic approach to education and training in radiation and waste safety (strategy on education and training) aiming at establishing, by 2010 sustainable education and training programmes in member states. This strategy was endorsed by the general conference resolution GC(45)/RES/10C that, inter alia, urged the secretariat to implement the strategy on education and training, and to continue to strengthen, subject to available resources, its current effort in this area, and in particular to assist Member States national, regional and collaborating centres in conducting such education and training activities in the relevant official languages of the IAEA. The General Conference resolutions GC(46)RES/9C in 2002 and GC(47)RES/7 in 2003 urged the Agency to continue its efforts to implement the Strategy. The purpose of this paper is to present the newly established Strategic Approach to Education and Training in Radiation, Transport and Waste Safety and its implementation

  5. 78 FR 48660 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Student Assistance General Provisions...

    2013-08-09

    ... Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Student Assistance General Provisions--Subpart K--Cash Management AGENCY: Federal Student Aid (FSA), Department of Education (ED). ACTION: Notice... notice will be considered public records. Title of Collection: Student Assistance General...

  6. Spatio-temporal elements of articulation work in the achievement of repeat prescribing safety in UK general practice.

    Grant, Suzanne; Mesman, Jessica; Guthrie, Bruce

    2016-02-01

    Prescribing is the most common healthcare intervention, and is both beneficial and risky. An important source of risk in UK general practice is the management of 'repeat prescriptions', which are typically requested from and issued by non-clinically trained reception staff with only intermittent reauthorisation by a clinical prescriber. This paper ethnographically examines the formal and informal work employed by GPs and receptionists to safely conduct repeat prescribing work in primary care using Strauss's (1985, 1988, 1993) concept of 'articulation work' across eight UK general practices. The analytical lens of articulation work provided an investigative framing to contextually map the informal, invisible resources of resilience and strength employed by practice team members in the achievement of repeat prescribing safety, where risk and vulnerability were continually relocated across space and time. In particular, the paper makes visible the micro-level competencies and collaborative practices that were routinely employed by both GPs and receptionists across different socio-cultural contexts, with informal, cross-hierarchical communication usually considered more effective than the formal structures of communication that existed (e.g. protocols). While GPs held formal prescribing authority, this paper also examines the key role of receptionists in both the initiation and safe coordination of the repeat prescribing routine. PMID:26283462

  7. Safety : the challenge of today for transportation safety in the future. General report on theme -V "Safety" at the 14th International Study Week on Traffic Engineering and Safety, Strasbourg, September 7-10, 1982.

    Asmussen, E.

    1982-01-01

    Transportation (un)safety is the result of a complex process in the transportation system. A large number of variables (characteristics of the system elements) with many interactions, produce a complex network of relationships expressed in "system behaviour". In this network of relationships, man as an element in the transportation system has the greatest number of degrees of freedom. His behaviour is therefore the most difficult of all to predict. Theories on the overall process in the trans...

  8. Safety Evaluation Report related to the renewal of the operating license for the General Electric-Nuclear Test Reactor (GE-NTR) (Docket No. 50-73)

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the General Electric Company (GE) for a renewal license number R-33 to continue to operate its research reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned and operated by GE and is located in Pleasanton, California. The staff concludes that the reactor can continue to be operated by GE without endangering the health and safety of the public

  9. Safety upgrading activities against tsunami, earthquake, and severe accident at Hamaoka NPPs

    As the lessons learned by the Fukushima Daiichi NPPs accident, Chubu Electric Power carried out the Emergency Safety Measures at Hamaoka NPPs immediately, and announced the plan for tsunami countermeasures including the construction of 18m-height tsunami protection wall in July 2011. Furthermore, the company announced the additional severe accident and tsunami countermeasures, and etc. in December 2012 and in April 2013, such as the installation of Filtered Containment Venting System and increasing the height of the tsunami protection wall from 18m to 22m. In this paper, we present major safety upgrading activities against tsunami, earthquake and severe accident at Hamaoka NPPs. (author)

  10. Report on the results of activities of the State Office for Nuclear Safety in state supervision of nuclear safety of nuclear facilities and radiation protection in 1997

    The report summarizes results of activities of the State Office for Nuclear Safety in the supervision of nuclear safety and radiation protection in the Czech Republic. The first part of the report evaluates nuclear safety of nuclear power plants, other nuclear facilities and major radiation sources. The second part comprises information on the results of supervision of radiation protection and gives details about radiological situation within the area of the Czech Republic. The new 'Atomic Law' was passed by the Czech Republic Parliament in 1997. Another 10 legislative documents (Decrees) in the field of nuclear safety and radiation protection were prepared and issued by the State Office for Nuclear Safety as the Czech national regulatory authority. (author)

  11. Annual Report To Congress. Department of Energy Activities Relating to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, Calendar Year 2003

    None, None

    2004-02-28

    The Department of Energy (Department) submits an Annual Report to Congress each year detailing the Department’s activities relating to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board), which provides advice and recommendations to the Secretary of Energy (Secretary) regarding public health and safety issues at the Department’s defense nuclear facilities. In 2003, the Department continued ongoing activities to resolve issues identified by the Board in formal recommendations and correspondence, staff issue reports pertaining to Department facilities, and public meetings and briefings. Additionally, the Department is implementing several key safety initiatives to address and prevent safety issues: safety culture and review of the Columbia accident investigation; risk reduction through stabilization of excess nuclear materials; the Facility Representative Program; independent oversight and performance assurance; the Federal Technical Capability Program (FTCP); executive safety initiatives; and quality assurance activities. The following summarizes the key activities addressed in this Annual Report.

  12. SOS-1 seminar about safety culture

    The aim of the seminar was to discuss safety culture in nuclear power utilities, and to exchange experiences about how the term safety culture is accepted by the personnel. The titles of the presentations are: 1) Organisational culture. General ideas as basis for organising; 2) Safety culture - ability and will; 3) View on safety culture at Swedish and Finnish nuclear power plants; 4) Safety culture at Barsebaeck Power Company; 5) Safety culture at Olkiluoto Nuclear Power Plant; 6) How do we improve the safety culture at OKG AB?; 7) Safety culture activities at Ringhals; 8) Aspects in relation to safety culture; 9) Development of regulatory activities/effectiveness of STUK - development as an aspect of culture; 10) Organisational culture research at STUK's Department of Nuclear Reactor Regulation; 11) The IAEA safety culture services; 12) Industrial safety - different perspectives and cultures. (EHS)

  13. Report on results of State Office for Nuclear Safety activities in 1993

    The Report on the results of activities of the State Office for Nuclear Safety in the execution of State Surveillance over Nuclear Safety of Nuclear Facilities in 1993, prepared by the Office, covers the surveillance activities in the whole Czech Republic, notably the Dukovany NPP in operation, the Temelin NPP under construction, and the LVR-15 and LR-0 reactors of the Nuclear Research Institute in Rez, the VR-1P teaching reactor at the Faculty of Nuclear and Physical Engineering in Prague, and the SR-0 reactor of the SKODA company in Pilsen. Attention was also paid to radioactive waste management and radiation safety. The activities of the State Office for Nuclear Safety also concerned the licensing of the CASTOR 440/84 transport and storage container, transportation of nuclear materials, the national system of nuclear material accountancy and inspection, personnel training and qualification, emergency planning, legislation, and international cooperation. The Report was discussed by the Czech Government on 6 April 1994 and a Resolution was adopted, stating that the operation of Czech nuclear facilities was safe in 1993 and that the commitments of the Czech Republic in the field of nuclear material accountancy and inspection were satisfied without interruption of continuity. (Z.S). 2 tabs., 4 figs

  14. Lessons learned from Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident: efficient education items of radiation safety for general public.

    Ohno, K; Endo, K

    2015-07-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (FNP-1) accident, while as tragic as the tsunami, was a man-made disaster created by the ignorance of the effects of radiation and radioactive materials. Therefore, it is important that all specialists in radiation protection in medicine sympathize with the anxiety of the general public regarding the harmful effects of radiation and advise people accordingly. All questions and answers were collected related to inquiries from the general public that were posted to reliable websites, including those of the government and radiation-related organizations, from March 2011 to November 2012. The questions were summarized and classified by similarity of content. (1) The total number of questions is 372. The content was broadly classified into three categories: inquiries for radiation-related knowledge and about health effects and foods. The questions asked to obtain radiation-related knowledge were the most common, accounting for 38 %. Thirty-six percentage of the questions were related to health effects, and 26 % involved foods, whereas 18 % of the questions were related to children and pregnancy. (2) The change over time was investigated in 290 questions for which the time of inquiry was known. Directly after the earthquake, the questions were primarily from people seeking radiation-related knowledge. Later, questions related to health effects increased. The anxiety experienced by residents following the nuclear accident was caused primarily by insufficient knowledge related to radiation, concerns about health effects and uncertainties about food and water safety. The development of educational materials focusing on such content will be important for risk communication with the general public in countries with nuclear power plants. Physicians and medical physicist should possess the ability to respond to questions such as these and should continue with medical examinations and treatments in a safe and appropriate manner. PMID

  15. Lessons learned from Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident: efficient education items of radiation safety for general public

    The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (FNP-1) accident, while as tragic as the tsunami, was a man-made disaster created by the ignorance of the effects of radiation and radioactive materials. Therefore, it is important that all specialists in radiation protection in medicine sympathize with the anxiety of the general public regarding the harmful effects of radiation and advise people accordingly. All questions and answers were collected related to inquiries from the general public that were posted to reliable web sites, including those of the government and radiation-related organizations, from March 2011 to November 2012. The questions were summarized and classified by similarity of content. (1) The total number of questions is 372. The content was broadly classified into three categories: inquiries for radiation-related knowledge and about health effects and foods. The questions asked to obtain radiation-related knowledge were the most common, accounting for 38 %. Thirty-six percentage of the questions were related to health effects, and 26 % involved foods, whereas 18 % of the questions were related to children and pregnancy. (2) The change over time was investigated in 290 questions for which the time of inquiry was known. Directly after the earthquake, the questions were primarily from people seeking radiation-related knowledge. Later, questions related to health effects increased. The anxiety experienced by residents following the nuclear accident was caused primarily by insufficient knowledge related to radiation, concerns about health effects and uncertainties about food and water safety. The development of educational materials focusing on such content will be important for risk communication with the general public in countries with nuclear power plants. Physicians and medical physicist should possess the ability to respond to questions such as these and should continue with medical examinations and treatments in a safe and appropriate manner

  16. Age-Related Declines in General Cognitive Abilities of Balb/C Mice and General Activity Are Associated with Disparities in Working Memory, Body Weight, and General Activity

    Matzel, Louis D.; Grossman, Henya; Light, Kenneth; Townsend, David; Kolata, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    A defining characteristic of age-related cognitive decline is a deficit in general cognitive performance. Here we use a testing and analysis regimen that allows us to characterize the general learning abilities of young (3-5 mo old) and aged (19-21 mo old) male and female Balb/C mice. Animals' performance was assessed on a battery of seven diverse…

  17. Concepts and techniques: Active electronics and computers in safety-critical accelerator operation

    Frankel, R.S.

    1995-12-31

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory, requires an extensive Access Control System to protect personnel from Radiation, Oxygen Deficiency and Electrical hazards. In addition, the complicated nature of operation of the Collider as part of a complex of other Accelerators necessitates the use of active electronic measurement circuitry to ensure compliance with established Operational Safety Limits. Solutions were devised which permit the use of modern computer and interconnections technology for Safety-Critical applications, while preserving and enhancing, tried and proven protection methods. In addition a set of Guidelines, regarding required performance for Accelerator Safety Systems and a Handbook of design criteria and rules were developed to assist future system designers and to provide a framework for internal review and regulation.

  18. Analysis of the reliability of the active injection safety systems of Angra I

    The reliability of the active emergency core cooling systems of Angra I nuclear power plant is evaluated. The fault tree analysis is employed. The unavailability of the above cited systems, is calculated. A parametric sensitivity analysis has been performed, due to the existing scattering in the failure and repair rate data of these system's components. The minimal cut sets were determined and, as a final step, a reliability importance analysis has been performed. This final step has required the development of a computer program. The methodology and data from the 'Reactor Safety Study' (Wash-1400) (in which the reliability of safety systems of a tipical PWR plant is calculated), is employed. The unavailability values for the safety systems analysed are too low, thus showing that in most cases the systems analysed are available to mitigate the effects of a loss-of-coolant accident. (Author)

  19. Low- and Intermediate Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Environmental and Safety Assessment Activities in Slovenia

    The protection of the environment is one of the main concerns in the management of radioactive waste, especially in repository planning. In different stages of repository lifetime the environmental assessment has different functions: it can be used as a decision making process and as a planning, communication and management tool. Safety assessment as a procedure for evaluating the performance of a disposal system, and its potential radiological impact on human health and environment, is also required. Following the international recommendations and Slovene legislation, a presentation is given of the role and importance of the environmental and safety assessment activities in the early stages following concept development and site selection for a low- and intermediate level radioactive waste (LILW) repository in Slovenia. As a case study, a short overview is also given of the preliminary safety assessment that has been carried out in the analysis of possibilities for long-lived LILW disposal in Slovenia. (author)

  20. The Activities of the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP)

    Briggs, Joseph Blair

    2001-10-01

    The International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) was initiated in 1992 by the United States Department of Energy. The ICSBEP became an official activity of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) – Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) in 1995. Representatives from the United States, United Kingdom, France, Japan, the Russian Federation, Hungary, Republic of Korea, Slovenia, Yugoslavia, Kazakhstan, Spain, and Israel are now participating. The purpose of the ICSBEP is to identify, evaluate, verify, and formally document a comprehensive and internationally peer-reviewed set of criticality safety benchmark data. The work of the ICSBEP is published as an OECD handbook entitled “International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments”. The 2001 Edition of the Handbook contains benchmark specifications for 2642 critical or subcritical configurations that are intended for use in validation efforts and for testing basic nuclear data.

  1. The efficacy and safety of multiple doses of vortioxetine for generalized anxiety disorder: a meta-analysis

    Fu J

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Jie Fu,1 Lilei Peng,2 Xiaogang Li1 1Department of Neurology, 2Department of Neurosurgery, The Affiliated Hospital of Luzhou Medical College, Luzhou, People’s Republic of China Objective: Vortioxetine is a novel antidepressant approved for the treatment of major depressive disorder by the US Food and Drug Administration in September 2013. This meta-analysis assessed the efficacy and safety of different doses of vortioxetine for generalized anxiety disorder of adults.Methods: PubMed, Cochrane Library, PsycINFO, and Clinical Trials databases were searched from 2000 through 2015. The abstracts of the annual meetings of the American Psychiatric Association and previous reviews were searched to identify additional studies. The search was limited to individual randomized controlled trials (RCTs, and there was no language restriction. Four RCTs met the selection criteria. These studies included 1,843 adult patients. Results were expressed as odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs. The data were pooled with a random-effects or fixed-effects model.Results: The results showed that multiple doses (2.5, 5, and 10 mg/d of vortioxetine did not significantly improve the generalized anxiety disorder symptoms compared to placebo (OR=1.16, 95% CI=0.84–1.60, Z=0.89, P=0.38; OR=1.41, 95% CI=0.82–2.41, Z=1.25, P=0.21; OR=1.05, 95% CI=0.76–1.46, Z=0.32, P=0.75, respectively. We measured the efficacy of 2.5 mg/d vortioxetine compared to 10 mg/d, and no significant differences were observed. The common adverse effects included nausea and headache. With increased dose, nausea was found to be more frequent in the vortioxetine (5 and 10 mg/d group (OR=2.99, 95% CI=1.31–6.84, Z=2.60, P=0.009; OR=2.80, 95% CI=1.85–4.25, Z=4.85, P<0.00001, respectively, but no significant differences were observed for headache.Conclusion: The results showed no significant improvement in the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder for vortioxetine compared to placebo

  2. Application of the Management System for Facilities and Activities. Safety Guide

    This publication provides guidance for following the requirements for management systems that integrate safety, health, security, quality assurance and environmental objectives. A successful management system ensures that nuclear safety matters are not dealt with in isolation but are considered within the context of all these objectives. The aim of this publication is to assist Member States to establish and implement effective management systems that coherently integrate all aspects of managing nuclear facilities and activities. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Management system; 3. Management responsibility; 4. Resource management; 5. Process implementation; 6. Measurement, assessment and improvement; Appendix I: Transition to an integrated management system; Appendix II: Activities in the document control process; Appendix III: Activities in the procurement process; Appendix IV: Performance of independent assessments; Annex I: Electronic document management system; Annex II: Media for record storage; Annex III: Record retention and storage; Glossary.

  3. Results of activities of the State Office for Nuclear Safety in state supervision of nuclear safety of nuclear facilities and radiation protection in 2009. Pt. 1

    The report is structured as follows: (1) State Office for Nuclear Safety; (2) Nuclear safety (CEZ utility; Dukovany NPP; Temelin NPP; Research facilities; Other nuclear installations; Technological safety); (3) Spent nuclear safety and radioactive waste handling, decommissioning; (4) Nuclear material transports, physical protection of nuclear installations; (5) Radiation protection; (6) Emergency preparedness; (7) Management of the Czech Radiation Monitoring Network; (8) Non-proliferation of nuclear weapons; (9) International cooperation; (10) Research and development; (11) Information provision in compliance with Czech Act No. 106/1999 on free access to information; (12) Activities of the National Institute for Nuclear, Chemical and Biological Protection; and (13) Activities of the National Radiation Protection Institute. (P.A.)

  4. 'Safety: everybody’s concern, everybody’s duty?' Questioning the significance of 'active citizenship' and 'social cohesion' for people's perception of safety

    Van den Herrewegen, Evelien

    2010-01-01

    The catchphrase “Safety: everybody’s concern, everybody’s duty” implies that in order to safe-guard the social order and safety we, the professionals as well as the public, need to unite and work together. In this sense, social connectedness and civic engagement are perceived as the prime sources to counter crime and people’s perception of safety. In this paper, we will first clarify that the references to ‘active citizenship’ and ‘social cohesion’ in criminal policy discourse are the resu...

  5. Decommissioning: Regulatory activities and identification of key organizational and human factors safety issues

    In the late 1990's the Swedish government decided to shut down Unit 1 of the Barsebaeck nuclear power plant. This report documents some of the efforts made by the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate (SKI) to address human factors and organizational issues in nuclear safety during decommissioning of a nuclear facility. This report gives a brief review of the background to the decommissioning of Barsebaeck 1 and points out key safety issues that can arise during decommissioning. The main regulatory activities that were undertaken were requirements that the plant provide special safety reports on decommissioning focusing on first, the operation of both units until closure of Unit 1 and second, the operation of Unit 2 when Unit 1 was closed. In addition, SKI identified areas that might be affected by decommissioning and called these areas out for special attention. With regard to these areas of special attention, SKI required that the plant provide monthly reports on changing and emerging issues as well as self-assessments of the areas to be addressed in the special safety reports. Ten key safety issues were identified and evaluated with regard to different stages of decommissioning and with regard to the actions taken by Barsebaeck. Some key conclusions from SKI's experience in regulating a decommissioning nuclear power plant conclude the report

  6. Development and Testing of a Nutrition, Food Safety, and Physical Activity Checklist for EFNEP and FSNE Adult Programs

    Bradford, Traliece; Serrano, Elena L.; Cox, Ruby H.; Lambur, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To develop and assess reliability and validity of the Nutrition, Food Safety, and Physical Activity Checklist to measure nutrition, food safety, and physical activity practices among adult Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP) and Food Stamp Nutrition Education program (FSNE) participants. Methods: Test-retest…

  7. The Activity Centres (Young Persons' Safety) Act 1995, the Adventure Activities Licensing Regulations 1996.

    Journal of Adventure Education and Outdoor Leadership, 1996

    1996-01-01

    Explains licensing regulations applicable in the United Kingdom to commercial providers of adventure education programs that offer caving, climbing, trekking, and water sports; provides information on license applications, including licensing standards related to risk assessment and safety management procedures; and addresses issues related to the…

  8. Exposure to ionizing radiations having a medical origin. Propositions for the implementation and the development of epidemiology surveillance activities in general population

    This report gives propositions relative to the implementation and the development of epidemiology surveillance activities in general population in relation with medical exposure to ionizing radiations. It is intended for the General Direction of Health and General Direction of Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection. These propositions have been elaborated by a work group coordinated and run by InVS and gathering the following organisms: French Agency of sanitary safety of health products (A.F.S.S.A.P.S.), Center of Quality Assurance of technological applications in the area of health (C.A.A.T.S.), Direction of Hospitals and Care organization (D.H.O.S.), General Direction of Health (D.G.S.), General Direction of Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection (D.G.S.N.R.), National Federation of radiologists physicists (F.N.M.R.), institute of Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety (I.R.S.N.), INSERM 'epidemiology of cancers', French Society of Biology and Nuclear Medicine (S.F.B.M.N.), French Society of Medical Physics (S.F.P.M.), French Society of Radiology (S.F.R.). (N.C.)

  9. Effect of generalized joint hypermobility on knee function and muscle activation in children and adults

    Jensen, Bente Rona; Olesen, Annesofie T.; Pedersen, Mogens Theisen;

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: We investigated muscle activation strategy and performance of knee extensor and flexor muscles in children and adults with generalized joint hypermobility (GJH) and compared them with controls. Methods: Muscle activation, torque steadiness, electromechanical delay, and muscle strength...

  10. Activities of Nuclear Regulatory Authority and safety of nuclear facilities in the Slovak Republic in 1993

    A brief account of activities carried out by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic (NRA SR) in 1993 is presented. These activities are reported under the headings: (1) Introduction; (2) Regulatory activities at nuclear power plants units in operation; (2.1) Nuclear power plant SEP-EBO V-1; (4) Selected operation events and safety assessment in NPP SEP-EBO V-1; (2.2) Safety assessment of NPP SEP-EBO V-2; (3) Results of regulatory activities at the decommissioning of NPP A-1; (4) Regulatory activities at units under construction SEP-EMO - NPP Mochovce; (5) Further regulatory activities. (5.1) Preparation of designated personnel; (5.2) Inspection and accountancy of nuclear material; (5.3) Security provisions; (5.4) Accounted items and double use items; (5.5) Problem of radioactive wastes; (6.1) International co-operation activities of NRA; (6.2) Emergency planning; (6.3) International activities for quality enhancement of national supervision; (7) Conclusion

  11. Remediation of areas contaminated by past activities and accidents. Safety requirements

    A number of activities and events have caused significant radioactive contamination of areas in many States. These include: inadequate practices for the management and disposal of radioactive waste; the intentional or accidental discharge of radioactive material to the environment; nuclear accidents; testing of nuclear weapons; incidents involving radionuclides at nuclear installations or other establishments such as hospitals and industrial and research facilities; and past practices that were not adequately controlled. Such contamination may present a hazard to human populations and the environment. Some older facilities in which radioactive material was processed when criteria for radiation protection were not as stringent as they are now are sources of radioactive contamination. In most such facilities, operations have been terminated. Radioactive contamination can be caused inadvertently by human activities involving processes in which natural radionuclides can become concentrated, in areas not normally controlled by regulatory bodies, to levels beyond the concentration limits set for practices. The IAEA has issued numerous publications dealing with the establishment of intervention levels and criteria for application in the event of a nuclear or radiological emergency and with criteria and techniques for assessment in the event of contamination of the environment. The International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (BSS) establish requirements for radiation protection that apply to practices and to interventions. Interventions are divided into emergency exposure situations and chronic exposure situations on the basis of the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) issued in 1991. The IAEA Safety Fundamentals publication on The Principles of Radioactive Waste Management establishes the internationally agreed principles of radioactive waste management

  12. Toward the environmental recovery. Activities of Fukushima Environmental Safety Center of JAEA

    JAEA has been working on Fukushima remediation projects such as environmental monitoring and decontamination activities since the accident of the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant. JAEA Fukushima Environmental Safety Center has been established since then and the present report presents its activities; radiation monitoring and development of devices for monitoring mappings, the research and development for environmental recovery such as temporary storage for wastes and decontamination model project, the communication activities including the partnership agreements and cooperation with local governments and the ministry of the environment. (S. Ohno)

  13. A Study of Cyber Security Activities for Development of Safety-related Controller

    Nuclear Power Plant Regulatory guide describes the regulatory requirements to implement cyber security activities to ensure that design and operate to respond to cyber threats that exploited to vulnerability of digital-based technologies associated with safety-related digital instrumentation and control systems at nuclear power plants. Cyber security activities coverage is instrumentation and control systems to perform safety functions and digital-based equipment to use development, test, analysis and asset for instrumentation and control systems. Regulatory guidance is required to the cyber security activities that should be performed in each development phase of safety-related controller. Development organization should establish and implement to cyber security plans for responding to cyber threats throughout each lifecycle phase and the result of the cyber security activities should be generated to the documents. In addition, the independent verification and validation organization should perform simulated penetration test for enhancing response capabilities to cyber security threats and development organization should establish and implement response hardening solutions for the cyber security vulnerabilities identified in the simulated penetration test

  14. Handling and safety enhancement of race cars using active aerodynamic systems

    Diba, Fereydoon; Barari, Ahmad; Esmailzadeh, Ebrahim

    2014-09-01

    A methodology is presented in this work that employs the active inverted wings to enhance the road holding by increasing the downward force on the tyres. In the proposed active system, the angles of attack of the vehicle's wings are adjusted by using a real-time controller to increase the road holding and hence improve the vehicle handling. The handling of the race car and safety of the driver are two important concerns in the design of race cars. The handling of a vehicle depends on the dynamic capabilities of the vehicle and also the pneumatic tyres' limitations. The vehicle side-slip angle, as a measure of the vehicle dynamic safety, should be narrowed into an acceptable range. This paper demonstrates that active inverted wings can provide noteworthy dynamic capabilities and enhance the safety features of race cars. Detailed analytical study and formulations of the race car nonlinear model with the airfoils are presented. Computer simulations are carried out to evaluate the performance of the proposed active aerodynamic system.

  15. Optimism about safety and group-serving interpretations of safety among pedestrians and cyclists in relation to road use in general and under low light conditions.

    King, M J; Wood, J M; Lacherez, P F; Marszalek, R P

    2012-01-01

    Drivers are known to be optimistic about their risk of crash involvement, believing that they are less likely to be involved in a crash than other drivers. However, little comparative research has been conducted among other road users. In addition, optimism about crash risk is conceptualised as applying only to an individual's assessment of his or her personal risk of crash involvement. The possibility that the self-serving nature of optimism about safety might be generalised to the group-level as a cyclist or a pedestrian, i.e., becoming group-serving rather than self-serving, has been overlooked in relation to road safety. This study analysed a subset of data collected as part of a larger research project on the visibility of pedestrians, cyclists and road workers, focusing on a set of questionnaire items administered to 406 pedestrians, 838 cyclists and 622 drivers. The items related to safety in various scenarios involving drivers, pedestrians and cyclists, allowing predictions to be derived about group differences in agreement with items based on the assumption that the results would exhibit group-serving bias. Analysis of the responses indicated that specific hypotheses about group-serving interpretations of safety and responsibility were supported in 22 of the 26 comparisons. When the nine comparisons relevant to low lighting conditions were considered separately, seven were found to be supported. The findings of the research have implications for public education and for the likely acceptance of messages which are inconsistent with current assumptions and expectations of pedestrians and cyclists. They also suggest that research into group-serving interpretations of safety, even for temporary roles rather than enduring groups, could be fruitful. Further, there is an implication that gains in safety can be made by better educating road users about the limitations of their visibility and the ramifications of this for their own road safety, particularly in low

  16. Work Practice Simulation of Complex Human-Automation Systems in Safety Critical Situations: The Brahms Generalized berlingen Model

    Clancey, William J.; Linde, Charlotte; Seah, Chin; Shafto, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The transition from the current air traffic system to the next generation air traffic system will require the introduction of new automated systems, including transferring some functions from air traffic controllers to on­-board automation. This report describes a new design verification and validation (V&V) methodology for assessing aviation safety. The approach involves a detailed computer simulation of work practices that includes people interacting with flight-critical systems. The research is part of an effort to develop new modeling and verification methodologies that can assess the safety of flight-critical systems, system configurations, and operational concepts. The 2002 Ueberlingen mid-air collision was chosen for analysis and modeling because one of the main causes of the accident was one crew's response to a conflict between the instructions of the air traffic controller and the instructions of TCAS, an automated Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance System on-board warning system. It thus furnishes an example of the problem of authority versus autonomy. It provides a starting point for exploring authority/autonomy conflict in the larger system of organization, tools, and practices in which the participants' moment-by-moment actions take place. We have developed a general air traffic system model (not a specific simulation of Überlingen events), called the Brahms Generalized Ueberlingen Model (Brahms-GUeM). Brahms is a multi-agent simulation system that models people, tools, facilities/vehicles, and geography to simulate the current air transportation system as a collection of distributed, interactive subsystems (e.g., airports, air-traffic control towers and personnel, aircraft, automated flight systems and air-traffic tools, instruments, crew). Brahms-GUeM can be configured in different ways, called scenarios, such that anomalous events that contributed to the Überlingen accident can be modeled as functioning according to requirements or in an

  17. Present activities of the Nuclear Energy Commission in the field of safety of radiation sources and security of radioactive materials in Mongolia

    The Radiation Safety Department of the Nuclear Energy Commission (NEC) is a regulatory body in Mongolia established in 1997. The paper gives a general overview of the main activities of the NEC on regulatory control of radiation sources in Mongolia. Mongolia declared itself a nuclear-weapon-free zone in 1992. Legal framework and waste management issues are described. The regulatory authority's co-operation with other agencies in radiation protection is also presented in this paper. (author)

  18. OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH IN DISASTER RESTORATION ACTIVITY AFTER SOME MAJOR EARTHQUAKES

    Toyosawa, Yasuo; Itoh, Kazuya; Kikkawa, Naotaka

    Occupational safety and health in disaster restoration activity following the Great Hanshin Earthquake (1995), Niigata Chuetsu Earthquake (2004), Niigata Chuetsu-oki Earthquake (2007) Great East Japan Earthquake (2011) were analyzed and characterized in order to raise awareness on the risks and hazards in such work. In this scenario, the predominant type of accident is a "fall" which increases mainly due to the fact that labourers are working to repair houses and buildings. On the other hand, landslides were prevalent in the Niigata Chuetsu Earthquake, resulting in more accidents occurring during geotechnical works rather than in buildings construction works. In the abnormal conditions that characterize recovery activities, when safety and health measures have a tendency to be neglected, it is important to reinstate adequate measures as soon as possible by carrying out the usial risk assessments.

  19. Nuclear safety

    The Program on Nuclear Safety comprehends Radioprotection, Radioactive Waste Management and Nuclear Material Control. These activities are developed at the Nuclear Safety Directory. The Radioactive Waste Management Department (GRR) was formally created in 1983, to promote research and development, teaching and service activities in the field of radioactive waste. Its mission is to develop and employ technologies to manage safely the radioactive wastes generated at IPEN and at its customer’s facilities all over the country, in order to protect the health and the environment of today's and future generations. The Radioprotection Service (GRP) aims primarily to establish requirements for the protection of people, as workers, contractors, students, members of the general public and the environment from harmful effects of ionizing radiation. Furthermore, it also aims to establish the primary criteria for the safety of radiation sources at IPEN and planning and preparing for response to nuclear and radiological emergencies. The procedures about the management and the control of exposures to ionizing radiation are in compliance with national standards and international recommendations. Research related to the main activities is also performed. The Nuclear Material Control has been performed by the Safeguard Service team, which manages the accountability and the control of nuclear material at IPEN facilities and provides information related to these activities to ABACC and IAEA. (author)

  20. 78 FR 73863 - Public Availability of General Services Administration FY 2013 Federal Activities Inventory...

    2013-12-09

    ... ADMINISTRATION Public Availability of General Services Administration FY 2013 Federal Activities Inventory Reform (FAIR) Act Inventory AGENCY: General Services Administration (GSA). ACTION: Notice of public... the Federal Activities Inventory Reform (FAIR) Act of 1998, Public Law 105-270, and Office...

  1. Sex Differences in Brain Activity Related to General and Emotional Intelligence

    Jausovec, Norbert; Jausovec, Ksenija

    2005-01-01

    The study investigated gender differences in resting EEG (in three individually determined narrow [alpha] frequency bands) related to the level of general and emotional intelligence. Brain activity of males decreased with the level of general intelligence, whereas an opposite pattern of brain activity was observed in females. This difference was…

  2. Steel Erection Safety. Module SH-39. Safety and Health.

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This student module on steel erection safety is one of 50 modules concerned with job safety and health. This module identifies typical jobsite hazards encountered by steel erectors, as well as providing safe job procedures for general and specific construction activities. Following the introduction, 11 objectives (each keyed to a page in the text)…

  3. RESEARCH OF QUALITY, SAFETY AND CONTENT OF BIOLOGICALLY ACTIVE SUBSTANCES OF FOOD RED BEET

    Gorash E. Y.; Victorova E. P.; Kupin G. A.; Aleshin V. N.; Lisovoy V. V.

    2015-01-01

    The article presents results of research of quality, safety and content of biologically active substances of food red beet roots of Bordo 237 variety, grown in the Krasnodar region in 2014. On the basis of the research carried out it was established, that there are carbohydrates, proteins, organic acids and mineral substances in the food red beet roots of Bordo 237 variety. Food red beet roots are a source of dietary fibers (pectin, protopectin, hemicelluloses and cellulose), possessing antit...

  4. Health and safety annual report 1987

    The principal activities and organisation of BNFL are reviewed in relation to the impact these activities have on the workforce, members of the general public and the environment, together with services for occupational safety within the company. (author)

  5. Safety-analysis report for packaging (SARP) general-purpose heat-source module 750-Watt shipping container

    The SARP includes discussions of structural integrity, thermal resistance, radiation shielding and radiological safety, nuclear criticality safety, and quality control. Extensive tests and evaluations were performed to show that the container will function effectively with respect to all required standards and when subjected to normal transportation conditions and the sequence of four hypothetical accident conditions (free drop, puncture, thermal, and water immersion). In addition, a steady state temperature profile and radiation profile were measured using two heat sources that very closely resemble the GPHS. This gave an excellent representation of the GPHS temperature and radiation profile. A nuclear criticality safety analysis determined that all safety requirements are met

  6. Preliminary Results of Ancillary Safety Analyses Supporting TREAT LEU Conversion Activities

    Brunett, A. J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Fei, T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Strons, P. S. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Papadias, D. D. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hoffman, E. A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Kontogeorgakos, D. C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Connaway, H. M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Wright, A. E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Report (FSAR) [3]. Depending on the availability of historical data derived from HEU TREAT operation, results calculated for the LEU core are compared to measurements obtained from HEU TREAT operation. While all analyses in this report are largely considered complete and have been reviewed for technical content, it is important to note that all topics will be revisited once the LEU design approaches its final stages of maturity. For most safety significant issues, it is expected that the analyses presented here will be bounding, but additional calculations will be performed as necessary to support safety analyses and safety documentation. It should also be noted that these analyses were completed as the LEU design evolved, and therefore utilized different LEU reference designs. Preliminary shielding, neutronic, and thermal hydraulic analyses have been completed and have generally demonstrated that the various LEU core designs will satisfy existing safety limits and standards also satisfied by the existing HEU core. These analyses include the assessment of the dose rate in the hodoscope room, near a loaded fuel transfer cask, above the fuel storage area, and near the HEPA filters. The potential change in the concentration of tramp uranium and change in neutron flux reaching instrumentation has also been assessed. Safety-significant thermal hydraulic items addressed in this report include thermally-induced mechanical distortion of the grid plate, and heating in the radial reflector.

  7. Safety Handbook.

    Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD.

    Safety policies, procedures, and related information are presented in this manual to assist school personnel in a continuing program of accident prevention. Chapter 1 discusses safety education and accident prevention in general. Chapter 2 covers traffic regulations relating to school safety patrols, school bus transportation, bicycles, and…

  8. Considering lessons learned about safety culture and their reflection to activity. After Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident experience

    Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident forced neighboring residents to evacuate for a long time and gave Public anxieties greatly and significant effects to social activities in Japan. Public trust of nuclear power was lost by not preventing the accident and future of nuclear power became reconsidered, which nuclear industry people regretted deeply. Japan Nuclear Technology Institute (JANTI) had conducted activities enhancing safety culture in nuclear industry. It would be necessary to consider improvements of accident prevention and mitigation measures after evaluating the accident in a viewpoint of 'safety culture'. Based on published information and knowledge accumulated by activities of JANTI, the accident was examined taking account of greatness of nuclear accident and its effects from the side of safety culture. Lessons learned about safety culture were pointed out as; (1) reconfirmation of specialty of nuclear technology. (2) reinforcement of questioning and learning attitudes and (3) improvement of evaluation capability of nuclear safety and safety assurance against external event. These were reflected in activities such as; (1) reconsideration of safety culture assessment, (2) strengthening further support to improve safety culture consciousness and (3) improvement of peer review activity. (T. Tanaka)

  9. Integration of Active and Passive Safety Technologies--A Method to Study and Estimate Field Capability.

    Hu, Jingwen; Flannagan, Carol A; Bao, Shan; McCoy, Robert W; Siasoco, Kevin M; Barbat, Saeed

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a method that uses a combination of field data analysis, naturalistic driving data analysis, and computational simulations to explore the potential injury reduction capabilities of integrating passive and active safety systems in frontal impact conditions. For the purposes of this study, the active safety system is actually a driver assist (DA) feature that has the potential to reduce delta-V prior to a crash, in frontal or other crash scenarios. A field data analysis was first conducted to estimate the delta-V distribution change based on an assumption of 20% crash avoidance resulting from a pre-crash braking DA feature. Analysis of changes in driver head location during 470 hard braking events in a naturalistic driving study found that drivers' head positions were mostly in the center position before the braking onset, while the percentage of time drivers leaning forward or backward increased significantly after the braking onset. Parametric studies with a total of 4800 MADYMO simulations showed that both delta-V and occupant pre-crash posture had pronounced effects on occupant injury risks and on the optimal restraint designs. By combining the results for the delta-V and head position distribution changes, a weighted average of injury risk reduction of 17% and 48% was predicted by the 50th percentile Anthropomorphic Test Device (ATD) model and human body model, respectively, with the assumption that the restraint system can adapt to the specific delta-V and pre-crash posture. This study demonstrated the potential for further reducing occupant injury risk in frontal crashes by the integration of a passive safety system with a DA feature. Future analyses considering more vehicle models, various crash conditions, and variations of occupant characteristics, such as age, gender, weight, and height, are necessary to further investigate the potential capability of integrating passive and DA or active safety systems. PMID

  10. Overview of activities of the Nuclear Safety Commission of Japan: Key safety issues for responding to nuclear power plant ageing [Keynote address

    The Nuclear Safety Commission (NSC) of Japan agreed on basic political measures to be taken in January 2002, just after the critical accident at the uranium reprocessing plant of JCO. The NSC, based on this decision, has been implementing various measures concerned and taking prompt measures to cope with the related problems, so that it will henceforth improve safety assurance activities in Japan . It can be said that almost all the planned measures have already been carried out, including emergency preparedness for nuclear disasters. In consideration of the recent safety assurance situation in Japan, the NSC decided to settle the basic political measures to be taken for coming years. In the course of discussion of the new basic political measures, a regrettable accident has happened at Mihama Unit 3 of the Kansai Electric Company. After investigation and consideration of the Mihama Unit 3 accident, the NSC has decided on the basic political measures to be taken from 13 September 2004 onwards. As part of the new basic political measures, the NSC emphasizes the following priority issues involving nuclear safety activities in Japan: (1) Establishment of safety goals; (2) Introduction of risk informed nuclear safety regulation; (3) Investigation of the root cause of accidents; (4) Review of the effectiveness of regulation; (5) Fostering a safety culture in the organization of nuclear facilities; (6) Enhancement of regulatory transparency and openness in the NSC's activities. Looking at the present situation of nuclear power plants in Japan, one of the most urgent and common issues deals with the measures in place to respond to ageing problems, in connection with the investigation of the root causes of accidents. Here, key issues for responding to ageing are discussed through the observation of recent cases of accidents

  11. Status of Nuclear Safety Culture Through Lessons Learnt from Licensing, Periodic Safety Review and Relicensing of Activities at Nuclear Research Installations in Russian Federation

    Russian Federation (Russia) has a lot of Nuclear Research Installations (NRIs) of various types and powers for the fundamental and applied sciences in the field of physics, power engineering, material study, biology and medicine. The work is been carried out to optimize the Russian fleet of NRIs, depending on the science and atomic energy needs. Due to the reduction of NRIs in operation in the world the experimental abilities of Russian NRIs as well as their safety conditions, to be in compliance with up-to-date safety requirements, represent the certain interest both to European region and international collaboration as a whole. The effective system for safety regulation in the field of atomic energy use has been established at present in Russia and is being improved. The legal basis and principles of regulation of relations arising in atomic energy use have been put in force at the state level taking into consideration fundamental principles of nuclear law adopted in practice worldwide. The report outlines the results and lessons learnt from licensing of NRIs in Russia as a continuous process having a few stages during the lifetime of a NRI. Enhancement of nuclear and radiation safety and security of NRIs in operation is pointed out at the initial licensing stage in the past, when no sound technical requirements and reference licensing basis were available, and then as a result of further safety evaluations and re-licensing. Through lessons learnt from licensing of NRIs the principal findings are summarized on the safety status of NRIs in Russia and further evaluation of their safety. A sound legal framework, well arranged licensing process and supervision, also scientific and technical support and other advisory organizations can help enhance nuclear safety culture because the activities at NRIs include various aspects related to safety: legal, administrative, technical, economical, ecological, informational, social and even psychological. There exist a few

  12. IAEA Director General's concluding remarks. Meeting of the Contracting Parties to the Convention on Nuclear Safety. Vienna, 26 April 2002

    The Convention on Nuclear Safety is considered as a part of the overall nuclear safety regime. That regime has many components, but they all have one single objective - to make sure that safety is at as high a level as possible. The Convention is a living process, a process which should eventually lead to increasingly greater safety. The Meting has focused on a number of issues that are also priorities for the Agency; one such issue is safety culture. The effectiveness and transparency are key issues. A second issue which is highlighted is management of nuclear knowledge. Other high priority issues which were identified include: planned life extension; the need during life extension to look into the ageing of equipment and structures; deregulation and its impact on safety; and the question of periodic safety reviews. The question of co-operation between regulatory bodies is one that was given emphasis to over the last few years. It is very important that there be exchange of experience and exchange of expertise between regulatory bodies, and between the manufacturers of power reactors and the countries where the reactors are operated. Also of importance in terms of international co-operation is the development of adequate emergency response everywhere. A major point that which is left to the participating countries is that although safety is a national responsibility - there is absolutely no question about that -many issues need international co-operation

  13. Safety and tolerability of iobitridol in general and in patients with risk factors: Results in more than 160 000 patients

    Maurer, Martin, E-mail: martin.maurer@charite.de [Charite - University Medicine Berlin, Department of Radiology, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin (Germany); Heine, Oliver [Guerbet GmbH, Otto-Vogler-Str. 11, 65843 Sulzbach (Germany); Wolf, Michael [Michael Wolf Information Systems, Viktoriastr. 26, 66346 Puettlingen (Germany); Freyhardt, Patrick; Schnapauff, Dirk; Hamm, Bernd [Charite - University Medicine Berlin, Department of Radiology, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin (Germany)

    2011-11-15

    Objective: To review the safety, the tolerability and the diagnostic effectiveness of iobitridol under daily practice conditions in the general population and at-risk patients in a post-marketing surveillance study. Materials and methods: A total of 160 639 patients (55.1% male, 43.6% female, mean age 58.6 years) were analysed in 555 centers. Patients underwent X-ray examinations using iobitridol (Xenetix, Guerbet, Sulzbach, Germany) as IV contrast medium (mean volume 85.6 ml). 21.8% of all patients had at least one risk factor (e.g., renal impairment), 7.3% were at-risk patients with allergies or who had previously reacted to contrast medium. Antiallergic pretreatment before contrast medium administration was given in 1144 patients (0.7%). Adverse events were documented and the image quality was assessed. Results: A diagnosis was possible in 99.5% of all cases. The image quality was rated good or excellent in 92.2%. The adverse event rate (e.g., nausea, urticaria) observed was 0.6% in all patients, 1.6% in patients with allergies and 6.0% in patients with a previous reaction to contrast medium. Adverse events occurred more often in women than in men (p < 0.001). Pretreatment did not decrease the rate of adverse events. The rate of adverse events was not increased in higher doses of iobitridol, even if administered to high-risk patients. Conclusions: Iobitridol was shown to be a safe and well-tolerated contrast medium with a low incidence of adverse events in patients with and without risk factors resulting in a good or excellent image quality in most patients.

  14. Safety and tolerability of iobitridol in general and in patients with risk factors: Results in more than 160 000 patients

    Objective: To review the safety, the tolerability and the diagnostic effectiveness of iobitridol under daily practice conditions in the general population and at-risk patients in a post-marketing surveillance study. Materials and methods: A total of 160 639 patients (55.1% male, 43.6% female, mean age 58.6 years) were analysed in 555 centers. Patients underwent X-ray examinations using iobitridol (Xenetix, Guerbet, Sulzbach, Germany) as IV contrast medium (mean volume 85.6 ml). 21.8% of all patients had at least one risk factor (e.g., renal impairment), 7.3% were at-risk patients with allergies or who had previously reacted to contrast medium. Antiallergic pretreatment before contrast medium administration was given in 1144 patients (0.7%). Adverse events were documented and the image quality was assessed. Results: A diagnosis was possible in 99.5% of all cases. The image quality was rated good or excellent in 92.2%. The adverse event rate (e.g., nausea, urticaria) observed was 0.6% in all patients, 1.6% in patients with allergies and 6.0% in patients with a previous reaction to contrast medium. Adverse events occurred more often in women than in men (p < 0.001). Pretreatment did not decrease the rate of adverse events. The rate of adverse events was not increased in higher doses of iobitridol, even if administered to high-risk patients. Conclusions: Iobitridol was shown to be a safe and well-tolerated contrast medium with a low incidence of adverse events in patients with and without risk factors resulting in a good or excellent image quality in most patients.

  15. Current activities and future trends in reliability analysis and probabilistic safety assessment in Hungary

    In Hungary reliability analysis (RA) and probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) of nuclear power plants was initiated 3 years ago. First, computer codes for automatic fault tree analysis (CAT, PREP) and numerical evaluation (REMO, KITT1,2) were adapted. Two main case studies - detailed availability/reliability calculation of diesel sets and analysis of safety systems influencing event sequences induced by large LOCA - were performed. Input failure data were taken from publications, a need for failure and reliability data bank was revealed. Current and future activities involves: setup of national data bank for WWER-440 units; full-scope level-I PSA of PAKS NPP in Hungary; operational safety assessment of particular problems at PAKS NPP. In the present article the state of RA and PSA activities in Hungary, as well as the main objectives of ongoing work are described. A need for international cooperation (for unified data collection of WWER-440 units) and for IAEA support (within Interregional Program INT/9/063) is emphasized. (author)

  16. Experiences in the promotion of the safety culture in radiological activities in Cuba

    During the last decade, the need to promote and achieve high safety culture levels has been one of the priorities in the nuclear sector around the world, although it has been focused basically on nuclear power. Nevertheless, it is an important and current topic for any risk related activity, since it results in a greater involvement and commitment of managers and personnel to safety, thereby reducing the so called 'organizational failures', one of the most frequent contributors to several of the major industrial disasters in the recent years. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has also pointed that out and in some of its recent publications and meetings has recognized the need for extending this concept to the area of radioactive source. In Cuba, the Regulatory Body has been working in this direction during several years, promoting national research and studies in this field, issuing documents and organizing events and other activities. With this it is expected to introduce new work methods and practices to be applied by management and personnel involved in the use of radioactive sources, reflecting a higher safety culture level. This paper summarizes the experience of Cuban Regulatory Body in this field. (author)

  17. Activity of the Atomic Energy Society of Japan for compiling the consensus standard on nuclear criticality safety control

    Activity of the Atomic Energy Society of Japan for compiling the consensus standard on nuclear criticality safety control is presented. The standard recommends an enhancement of nuclear criticality safety throughout a life cycle of facility in terms of a concept of 'barriers against criticality'. (author)

  18. Safety research activities for Japanese regulations of spent fuel interim storage facilities

    Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization (JNES) carries out (a) preparation of technical documents, (b) technical evaluations of standards (prepared by academic societies), etc. and (c) other R and D activities, to support Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency (NISA: which prepares necessary regulations for Spent Fuel Interim Storage Facilities). In 2010 fiscal year, JNES completed technical evaluation of the standard (prepared by Atomic Energy Society of Japan) used for the storage facility (dual purpose cask system) being constructed in Mutsu-City and R and D for UT test of welded canister lids which is required for concrete cask storage facilities. And also, JNES is preparing dynamic test of spent fuel to examine the integrity of spent fuel at cask drop accidents and PWR spent fuel storage test to prove long term integrity of spent fuel and cask itself. The results of these tests will be reported in 2011 and 2012 fiscal year. (author)

  19. Safety research activities for Japanese regulations of spent fuel interim storage facilities

    Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization (JNES) carries out (a) preparation of technical documents, (b) technical evaluations of standards (prepared by academic societies), etc. and (c) other R and D activities, to support Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency (NISA: which prepares necessary regulations for Spent Fuel Interim Storage Facilities). In 2011 fiscal year, JNES carried out R and D for UT test of welded canister lids which is required for concrete cask storage facilities. And also, JNES carried out dynamic test of spent fuel to examine the integrity of spent fuel at cask drop accidents and PWR spent fuel storage test to prove long term integrity of spent fuel and cask itself. Some of these tests will be carried out in 2012 fiscal year and after. (author)

  20. Overview of probabilistic safety assessment activity for Romanian TRIGA SSR 14 MW reactor

    Current international approach of Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) is not only for Nuclear Power Plants but also for Research Reactors. Recently commissioned Research Reactors use PSA in the process of licensing. In case of the Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti, PSA for TRIGA Research Reactor was developed with a scientific aim joint to the Deterministic Analysis, covering the qualitative and quantitative approach of safety. The paper presents the PSA activity related to TRIGA SSR 14 MW reactor starting with raw data collection for obtaining a historical view of the reactor operation and to obtain reliability data used in PSA. Further on, an overall presentation of the PSA model (Initiating Events, Event Trees and Fault Trees) is made. (authors)

  1. IPN - Orsay Report of activity 1998-1999. General activities. Technical Development

    spectrometer and for HADES experiment. Also the progress in developing the equipment for G0 experiment, VAMOS spectrometer, the large surface annular telescope and EUROBALL 4 detector is described. Finally in the chapter four there are reported works on developing a peak sensing ADC, a VXI D size card for EXOGAM,and data acquisition systems. The first volume begins with short reports of activity from the technical and general servicing departments. The second volume of the IPNO Report presents the results of the Research Division

  2. Development and Validation of Career Development Guidelines by Task/Activity Analysis of Occupational Safety and Health Professions: Industrial Hygiene and Safety Professional. Final Report. Technical Report XII.

    Vernon, Ralph J.; And Others

    This report summarizes research findings which resulted in development of curricula for occupational safety and health professions based on task/activity analyses and related performance objectives. The first seven chapters focus on the seven objectives. Chapter 1, Literature Review and Selection of Employers, concerns tasks required for…

  3. The positive effect on determinants of physical activity of a tailored, general practice-based physical activity intervention

    Sluijs, van der, E.; Poppel - Bruinvels, van, M.N.M.; Twisk, J.W.R.; Brug, J.; Mechelen, Van

    2005-01-01

    PACE (Physician-based Assessment and Counseling for Exercise) is an individualized theory-based minimal intervention strategy aimed at the enhancement of regular physical activity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a PACE intervention applied by general practitioners (GPs) on potential determinants of physical activity. A randomized controlled trial was conducted in 29 general practices with the following inclusion criteria for patients: aged between 18 and 70 years, ...

  4. Reactor safety activities at the Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN)-Nuclebras

    This report presents the major activities developed at NUCLEBRAS in the area of Reactor Safety. The Thermohydraulics and Reactor Safety program consists of activities in the analytical and experimental area. The more recent activities under way in the analytical area are presented together with some results. They are mainly related to the development and assessment of advanced computer codes to be used in the analysis of the behavior of the plant during operational transients and postulated accidents and in thermohydraulic core design. In the experimental area, the main accomplishments and activities under way are reported they refer to steady state CHF tests in a 9-rod bundle and rewetting experiments in a tubular test section. In particular, the status of the design development of a new facility for Separate Effects LOCA tests (DTL-ES) is described. Concerning the Components Testing program, the basic characteristics of a valve test facility (CTC) are described and the present status of its construction is reported. Reference is also made to existing installations and a summary of tests already performed for Angra-2 components qualification is presented. (Author)

  5. Effects of Dynamic and Static Stretching Within General and Activity Specific Warm-Up Protocols

    Michael Samson; Button, Duane C.; Anis Chaouachi; Behm, David G.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the effects of static and dynamic stretching protocols within general and activity specific warm-ups. Nine male and ten female subjects were tested under four warm-up conditions including a 1) general aerobic warm-up with static stretching, 2) general aerobic warm-up with dynamic stretching, 3) general and specific warm-up with static stretching and 4) general and specific warm-up with dynamic stretching. Following all conditions, subjects were tested...

  6. MEMS Sensor Technologies for Human Centred Applications in Healthcare, Physical Activities, Safety and Environmental Sensing: A Review on Research Activities in Italy

    Gastone Ciuti; Leonardo Ricotti; Arianna Menciassi; Paolo Dario

    2015-01-01

    Over the past few decades the increased level of public awareness concerning healthcare, physical activities, safety and environmental sensing has created an emerging need for smart sensor technologies and monitoring devices able to sense, classify, and provide feedbacks to users’ health status and physical activities, as well as to evaluate environmental and safety conditions in a pervasive, accurate and reliable fashion. Monitoring and precisely quantifying users’ physical activity with ine...

  7. Subjective safety in traffic.

    2012-01-01

    The term ‘subjective safety in traffic’ refers to people feeling unsafe in traffic or, more generally, to anxiety regarding being unsafe in traffic for oneself and/or others. Subjective safety in traffic can lead to road users limiting their mobility and social activities, which is one of the reasons it warrants policy-related attention. However, research has shown that, at most, there is a weak link between objective and subjective safety in traffic. There are even indications that some subj...

  8. Annual report on occupational safety 1985

    This report presents information on occupational safety relating to the Company's employees for the year 1985, and compares data with figures for the previous year. The following headings are listed: principle activities of BNFL, general policy and organisation, radiological safety, including whole body, skin and extremity, and internal organ doses, non-radiological safety, incidents reportable to the health and safety executive. (U.K.)

  9. Safety supervision and control on units engaged in civilian nuclear pressure retaining component's activities

    The NNSA organized the SNSC, Safety and Reliability Center of the Mechanical Institute, NSC-SSTC and its regional office's staff to verify the qualification of 55 items in 33 units for the activities in civilian nuclear pressure retaining components. That was conducted by bringing questions to the site and going to the site in company with staff from the competent department, so, the check time was shortened and pace was quickened. After documents checking, on site checking and discussed by the SC meeting on mechanical equipment of NSAC, the NNSA granted the second batch of 27 items qualification licenses in 14 units engaging in the activities of civilian nuclear pressure retaining components on May 27, 1996. So far, there are 39 units that have obtained an associate qualification license for the activities of nuclear pressure retaining components

  10. OECD/NEA expert group on uncertainty analysis for criticality safety assessment: current activities - 295

    The expert group (EG) on Uncertainty Analysis for Criticality Safety Assessment (UACSA) was established within the OECD/NEA Working Party on Nuclear Criticality Safety in December 2007 to promote exchange of information on related topics; compare methods and software tools for uncertainty analysis; test their performance; and assist in selection/development of safe and efficient methodologies. At the current stage, the work of the group is focused on approaches for validation of criticality calculations. With the diversity of the approaches to validate criticality calculations, a thorough description of each approach and assessment of its performance is useful to the criticality safety community. Developers, existing and potential practitioners as well as reviewers of assessments using those approaches should benefit from this effort. Exercise Phase I was conducted in order to illustrate predictive capabilities of criticality validation approaches, which include similarity assessment, definition of keff bias and bias uncertainty, and selection of benchmarks. The approaches and results of the exercises will be thoroughly documented in a pending state-of-the-art report from the EG. This paper provides an overview of current and future activities for the EG, a summary of the participant-contributed validation approaches, and a synthesis of the results for the exercises. (authors)

  11. 77 FR 54917 - Public Availability of General Services Administration FY 2012 Federal Activities Inventory...

    2012-09-06

    ... ADMINISTRATION Public Availability of General Services Administration FY 2012 Federal Activities Inventory Reform (FAIR) Act Inventory AGENCY: General Services Administration (GSA). ACTION: Notice of Public... accordance with the FAIR Act of 1998, Public Law 105-270, and Office of Management and Budget (OMB)...

  12. Physical activity in adolescents with psychiatric disorders and in the general population

    Mangerud, Wenche Langfjord; Bjerkeset, Ottar; Lydersen, Stian; Indredavik, Marit Sæbø

    2014-01-01

    Background: Adults who suffer from psychiatric disorders report low levels of physical activity and the activity levels differ between disorders. Less is known regarding physical activity across psychiatric disorders in adolescence. We investigate the frequency and type of physical activity in adolescent psychiatric patients, compared with adolescents in the general population. Methods: A total of 566 adolescent psychiatric patients aged 13–18 years who participated in the CAP sur...

  13. Physical activity in adolescents with psychiatric disorders and in the general population

    Mangerud, Wenche Langfjord; Bjerkeset, Ottar; Lydersen, Stian; Indredavik, Marit Sæbø

    2014-01-01

    Background Adults who suffer from psychiatric disorders report low levels of physical activity and the activity levels differ between disorders. Less is known regarding physical activity across psychiatric disorders in adolescence. We investigate the frequency and type of physical activity in adolescent psychiatric patients, compared with adolescents in the general population. Methods A total of 566 adolescent psychiatric patients aged 13–18 years who participated in the CAP survey, Norway, w...

  14. RESEARCH OF QUALITY, SAFETY AND CONTENT OF BIOLOGICALLY ACTIVE SUBSTANCES OF FOOD RED BEET

    Gorash E. Y.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The article presents results of research of quality, safety and content of biologically active substances of food red beet roots of Bordo 237 variety, grown in the Krasnodar region in 2014. On the basis of the research carried out it was established, that there are carbohydrates, proteins, organic acids and mineral substances in the food red beet roots of Bordo 237 variety. Food red beet roots are a source of dietary fibers (pectin, protopectin, hemicelluloses and cellulose, possessing antitoxic, antioxidant, radiation protective, cholesterol-lowering and lipid correcting qualities, and also a source of vitamins C, B9 (folic acid and P-active substances, possessing antioxidant properties. Due to high content in food red beet of a complex of microelements – iron, zinc, manganese and copper, and a complex of macro elements – potassium and magnesium, it can be recommended for prophylaxis and treatment of hypertension, atherosclerosis and other diseases of heart and vascular system, and for prophylaxis of iron-deficiency anemia. Thus, the research of quality, safety and content of biologically active substances showed that food red beet roots of Bordo 237 variety are a high quality component ingredient for creation of food products of specialized and functional purpose

  15. Sustainability of Capacity Building Activities to Improve Food Safety and Quality through Nuclear Technology and Networking

    Access to food control laboratories and related services represents a minimum requirement to generate monitoring data for food risk management activities within a nation. Along with its analytical work and component services, each laboratory has the opportunity to undertake a more active role in promoting and facilitating food safety and food quality at many points along the production and supply chain. Provided that their internal mandate allows it, laboratories can address issues such as risk assessment, design of risk-based monitoring programmes, sampling, interpretation of analytical results in the wider context of the food chain, outreach to decision makers, and also research and development activities. Implementing such a broad and multidisciplinary approach requires a step by step process with the involvement of stakeholders and a commitment to continuously build capacity through networking and learning. Currently, outsourcing analytical services and the use of private analytical laboratories through temporary contractual agreements are the only practical options available to some developing countries, and at times these arrangements prove to be unsustainable or impractical. A more sustainable and recommended approach is to establish national accredited laboratories and invest in their long term activities both as a focal point for analytical expertize and as part of a system for the control of food nationally and as traded through imports and exports. The Food and Environmental Protection Laboratory (FEPL) was successful in a competitive bidding process for funding from the USA under the Peaceful Uses Initiative (PUI). The PUI objective is to support the IAEA in facilitating greater access for Member States to peaceful applications of nuclear technology. In this context a three-year project on 'Sustainability of capacity building activities to improve food safety and quality through nuclear technology and networking' started in March 2012. The objective of

  16. Safety research activities for Japanese regulations of spent fuel interim storage facilities

    Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization (JNES) carries out (a) preparation of technical documents, (b) technical evaluations of standards (prepared by academic societies), etc. and (c) other R and D activities, to support Nuclear Regulation Authority (NRA: which controls the regulations for Spent Fuel Interim Storage Facilities). In 2012 fiscal year, JNES carried out dynamic test of spent fuel to examine the integrity of spent fuel under cask drop accidents, and preparation for PWR spent fuel storage test to prove long term integrity of spent fuel and cask itself. Some of these tests will be also carried out in 2013 fiscal year and after. (author)

  17. Status of Safety and Environmental Activities in the US Fusion Program

    Petti, D A; Reyes, S; Cadwallader, L C; Latkowski, J F

    2004-09-02

    This paper presents an overview of recent safety efforts in both magnetic and inertial fusion energy. Safety has been a part of fusion design and operations since the inception of fusion research. Safety research and safety design support have been provided for a variety of experiments in both the magnetic and inertial fusion programs. The main safety issues are reviewed, some recent safety highlights are discussed and the programmatic impacts that safety research has had are presented. Future directions in the safety and environmental area are proposed.

  18. Status of Safety and Environmental Activities in the US Fusion Program

    David A. Petti; Susana Reyes; Lee C. Cadwallader; Jeffery F. Latkowski

    2004-09-01

    This paper presents an overview of recent safety efforts in both magnetic and inertial fusion energy. Safety has been a part of fusion design and operations since the inception of fusion research. Safety research and safety design support have been provided for a variety of experiments in both the magnetic and inertial fusion programs. The main safety issues are reviewed, some recent safety highlights are discussed and the programmatic impacts that safety research has had are presented. Future directions in the safety and environmental area are proposed.

  19. Nuclear Safety

    In this short paper it has only been possible to deal in a rather general way with the standards of safety used in the UK nuclear industry. The record of the industry extending over at least twenty years is impressive and, indeed, unique. No other industry has been so painstaking in protection of its workers and in its avoidance of damage to the environment. Headings are: introduction; how a nuclear power station works; radiation and its effects (including reference to ICRP, the UK National Radiological Protection Board, and safety standards); typical radiation doses (natural radiation, therapy, nuclear power programme and other sources); safety of nuclear reactors - design; key questions (matters of concern which arise in the public mind); safety of operators; safety of people in the vicinity of a nuclear power station; safety of the general public; safety bodies. (U.K.)

  20. Trends and activities regarding the safety of future nuclear power reactors in Italy

    The paper describes the development of new trends regarding the safety of future nuclear reactors in Italy. The situation after the Chernobyl accident and the establishment of a nuclear moratorium as well as recent developments are discussed. The initial stress on inherent and passive safety is described, and the following trend towards a more balanced view is discussed. Recent developments are outlined, with the focus on the defence against severe accidents and on the absence of significant radioactivity releases. With such an approach, an evacuation plant for the population in the vicinity of a nuclear power plant may become unnecessary and external land contamination may be limited. The accent on plant safety simplication and transparency is also mentioned. The activities accompanying this conceptual process are described, with special emphasis on those promoted by the Italian regulatory organization, the National Environmental Protection Agency (ANPA)/Directorate for Nuclear Safety and Health Protection (DISP). The paper discusses the international investigation for the identification of reference severe accident scenarios in the containment. The study is aimed at determining the threats to and loads on the containment and at verifying the adequacy of the containment system on a deterministic basis, possibly supported by sound and simple probabilistic considerations. In this connection, issues such as hydrogen explosions, reactivity excursions, steam explosions, core melt cooling, containment penetration leakage and containment degradation have been considered on the basis of the phenomenology of severe accidents. The most widely agreed advice of experts in this field should be the main basis for the deterministic assessment. (author)

  1. Report for spreading culture of medical radiation safety in Korea: Mainly the activities of the Korean alliance for radiation safety and culture in medicine (KARSM)

    There are many concerns about radiation exposure in Korea after Fukushima Nuclear Plant Accident on 2011 in Japan. As some isotope materials are detected in Korea, people get worried about the radioactive material. In addition, the mass media create an air of anxiety that jump on the people’s fear instead of scientific approach. Therefore, for curbing this flow, health, medical institute from the world provide a variety of information about medical radiation safety and hold the campaign which can give people the image that medical radiation is safe. At this, the Korean Food and Drug Administration(KFDA) suggested that make the alliance of medical radiation safety and culture on August, 2011. Seven societies and institutions related medical radiation started to research and advertise the culture of medical radiation safety in Korea. In this report, mainly introduce the activities of the Korean Alliance for Radiation Safety and Culture in Medicine(KARSM) for spreading culture of medical radiation safety from 2011 to 2012

  2. Safety-Related Improvisation in Led Outdoor Activities: An Exploratory Investigation into Its Occurrence and Influencing Factors

    Trotter, Margaret J.; Salmon, Paul M.; Lenné, Michael G.

    2014-01-01

    The dynamic nature of led outdoor activities means that, despite activity providers' best efforts, activity leaders can be exposed to unanticipated situations for which no procedures exist. Improvisation, the spontaneous, real-time conception and execution of a novel response, has been identified as a potential means of maintaining safety in…

  3. Report of Activity, 1996 - 1997. Vol. 3. General activities - Technical Research; Rapport d`activite 1996 - 1997. Tome 3. Activites generales - Recherches techniques

    Pouthas, Joel; Hutin, Christiane; Niogret Mathias [eds.] [Inst. de Physique Nucleaire, Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France)

    1999-11-01

    This is the third tome of the Report of Activity of IPN - Orsay on 1996-1997. It deals with general activities and technical research. Summary reports and short communications are grouped in the following sections: 1 - Accelerators with the sub-divisions 1.1 - R and D on superconducting RF cavities; 1.2 - SPIRAL Project; 1.3 - Contribution to the LHC Project; 1.4 - Tandem; 2 - Targets, Sources and Injectors; 3 - Detectors and related instrumentation; 4 - Electronics; 5 - Data processing; 6 - Radioprotection and medical applications

  4. Drinking water biotic safety of particles and bacteria attached to fines in activated carbon process

    CHEN Wei; LIN Tao; WANG Leilei

    2007-01-01

    In this paper,the drinking water biotic safety of particles and bacteria attached to fines in activated carbon process was investigated by actual treatment process and advanced treatment pilot trial with granular activated carbon.In the experiment,the particles were detected by IBR particle calculating instrument,the activated carbon fines were counted on the basis of the most probable number (MPN) with a microscope,the total number of bacteria was analyzed between the conventional agar culture medium and the one with R2A,and the bacteria attached to activated carbon fines was resolved by the homogenization technique.The experimental results showed that the average total number of particles was 205 CNT/mL in the activated carbon effluent during a filter cycle,of which the number of particles with sizes>2μm was 77 CNT/mL more than the present particle control criterion of the American drinking water product standard (50 CNT/mL).The backwash of low density and long duration lowered particle number in the effluent.The MPN of activated carbon frees in the effluent was between 400 and 600 CNT/L,which accounted for less than 5‰ of the total particles from activated carbon filtration for a poor relative level (R2= 0.34).The microorganisms in activated carbon effluent consisted mostly of heterotrophic bacillus and the total bacteria number was five times as high as that of the inflow,i.e.the effluent from sand filter.The actual bacteria number may be truly indicated by the detection technique with R2A culture medium compared with the traditional agar cultivation.The inactivation efficiency of bacteria attached to activated carbon fines was less than 40% under 1.1 mg/L of chlorine contacting for 40 min.Results showed that the particles and bacteria attached to activated carbon fines may influence drinking water biotic safety,and that the effective control measures need to be further investigated.

  5. ITER safety

    As part of the series of publications by the IAEA that summarize the results of the Conceptual Design Activities for the ITER project, this document describes the ITER safety analyses. It contains an assessment of normal operation effluents, accident scenarios, plasma chamber safety, tritium system safety, magnet system safety, external loss of coolant and coolant flow problems, and a waste management assessment, while it describes the implementation of the safety approach for ITER. The document ends with a list of major conclusions, a set of topical remarks on technical safety issues, and recommendations for the Engineering Design Activities, safety considerations for siting ITER, and recommendations with regard to the safety issues for the R and D for ITER. Refs, figs and tabs

  6. Nuclear criticality safety guide

    Pruvost, N.L.; Paxton, H.C. [eds.

    1996-09-01

    This technical reference document cites information related to nuclear criticality safety principles, experience, and practice. The document also provides general guidance for criticality safety personnel and regulators.

  7. Nuclear criticality safety guide

    This technical reference document cites information related to nuclear criticality safety principles, experience, and practice. The document also provides general guidance for criticality safety personnel and regulators

  8. Analyses on various activities in the US power stations to enhance safety culture

    In the United States, the regulatory body, NRC, started an evaluation scheme with regard to nuclear power station's Safety Culture, in order to prevent similar serious trouble as the reactor head degradation at Davis Besse station. In this evaluation, NRC picks out various elements of Safety Culture aspects which caused problems from the findings made at Reactor Oversight Program inspections. Such evaluation of power station Safety Culture which results are publicly available is very rare. In this study, we make analyses on the result of ROP performed in the US, and also, make series of interviews at US power stations, in order to extract useful clue to be applied to our own improvement actions of power stations in Japan. So far, there are no obvious tendencies in numbers and extent in ROP findings. On the other hand, the number of findings every year depends on individual power station to a great degree. The power stations in the US put Corrective Action Program in the center of its operation, working very hard to improve its performance. CAP is a form of oversight system in an organization. In the US power stations, they utilize it as a system of continuous improvements. Top management in power stations holds CAP review board periodically to evaluate the performance of CAP in their station, directing particular orders to get over their problems. The manager in charge of the specific improvement theme is responsible for carrying out such activity by showing its goals and deadlines clearly. With such structure, the personnel try to realize the condition of operation in the station objectively, and at the same time, they can improve the efficiency of their operation. In this way of management, its personnel commit themselves to their tasks voluntarily, and this structure has an effect of raising the organization's activity. (author)

  9. Quality and safety issues highlighted by patients in the handling of laboratory test results by general practices–a qualitative study

    Cunningham, David Edward; McNab, Duncan; Bowie, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Background In general practice internationally, many care teams handle large numbers of laboratory test results relating to patients in their care. Related research about safety issues is limited with most of the focus on this workload from secondary care and in North American settings. Little has been published in relation to primary health care in the UK and wider Europe. This study aimed to explore experiences and perceptions of patients with regards to the handling of test results by gene...

  10. Visit safety

    2012-01-01

    Experiment areas, offices, workshops: it is possible to have co-workers or friends visit these places.     You already know about the official visits service, the VIP office, and professional visits. But do you know about the safety instruction GSI-OHS1, “Visits on the CERN site”? This is a mandatory General Safety Instruction that was created to assist you in ensuring safety for all your visits, whatever their nature—especially those that are non-official. Questions? The HSE Unit will be happy to answer them. Write to safety-general@cern.ch.   The HSE Unit

  11. CERN's new safety policy

    2014-01-01

    The documents below, published on 29 September 2014 on the HSE website, together replace the document SAPOCO 42 as well as Safety Codes A1, A5, A9, A10, which are no longer in force. As from the publication date of these documents any reference made to the document SAPOCO 42 or to Safety Codes A1, A5, A9 and A10 in contractual documents or CERN rules and regulations shall be deemed to constitute a reference to the corresponding provisions of the documents listed below.   "The CERN Safety Policy" "Safety Regulation SR-SO - Responsibilities and organisational structure in matters of Safety at CERN" "General Safety Instruction GSI-SO-1 - Departmental Safety Officer (DSO)" "General Safety Instruction GSI-SO-2 - Territorial Safety Officer (TSO)" "General Safety Instruction GSI-SO-3 - Safety Linkperson (SLP)" "General Safety Instruction GSI-SO-4 - Large Experiment Group Leader In Matters of Safety (LEXGLI...

  12. A Minds-On Approach to Active Learning in General Music

    Scott, Sheila

    2010-01-01

    Minds-on engagement in active learning is explored through the experiences of Margaret Sanders, a general music teacher. Minds-on learners think about their experiences. They are actively involved as questioners and problem solvers while they complete musical tasks and reflect on their work after it is completed. Minds-off learners focus on their…

  13. Coordination of nuclear safety regulations and corporate compliance activities. Desirable implementation of the whistle-blower protection scheme in Japan

    Recently, scandals and incidents associated with development and utilization of nuclear energy have attracted social concerns widely. However, there are limitations in preventing nuclear operators from illegal or unethical conduct only through reinforcement and expanding the nuclear safety regulations. From this viewpoint, it has turned out a real issue to develop a desirable coordination between the regulatory system and corporate compliance activities to maintain and further improve nuclear safety. Whistle-blower protection scheme (as depicted 'Declaration to the Competent Minister' in The Law for the Regulation of Nuclear Source Material, Nuclear Fuel Material and Reactors') reveals itself as a promising scheme to promote such coordination of nuclear safety regulations and corporate compliance activities. This study demonstrates that introduction of whistle-blower protection system in the U.S. federal nuclear safety regulations has encouraged developments of Employee Concerns Programs as corporate allegation programs at the U.S. based utility companies, and thereby indicates concrete improvement proposals of whistle-blower protection system enforcement in nuclear safety regulation in Japan that encourages corporate compliance activities. The principal aspects are as follows; (1) Development of compensatory scheme for employees who were discriminated on ground of the declaration, and (2) Clear rulemaking for existing private corporate allegation programs to be compatible with the official whistle-blowing procedure by Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency, the Japanese safety regulatory authority. (author)

  14. 78 FR 65661 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Food Safety Survey

    2013-11-01

    ... Collection; Comment Request; Food Safety Survey AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice... information technology. Food Safety Survey--(OMB Control Number 0910-0345)--Reinstatement I. Background Under... the safety of the nation's food supply. The Food Safety Survey measures consumers'...

  15. The web site UAtom.org as a Platform for Communicating with the General Public on Issues Related to the Safety and Security of Radioactive Sources

    Information technology has a crucial role for the establishment an effective dialogue with the general public on issues related to the safety and security of radioactive sources. Taken note, Ukraine possesses radioactive sources all around its territory. The distribution of the information regarding potential hazards from inappropriate utilization of such sources as well as inadequate actions when such sources are found represents great importance. Informing the general public on these issues would facilitate the awareness raising process, which at the end would help to protect the population against potential consequences of radioactive exposure. One of the ways to address the problems with radioactive sources, especially with the ‘orphan’ sources, is to outreach to the population and provide them with the opportunity to contact relevant experts from competent authorities via web resources. Such web recourse was created within the joint Ukrainian–Swedish project on information support. The web site, UAtom.org, works as an additional source of reliable information concerning nuclear safety, nuclear security and non-proliferation issues and is a useful tool for conducting constant dialogue between competent experts in the field of safety and security of radioactive sources and the general public to resolve the challenges referenced in the paper. (author)

  16. Nuclear Protection and Safety Institute R and D activities in the field of plant ageing

    A part of the work carried out by the CEA's Nuclear Protection and Safety Institute (IPSN) is devoted to revealing possible modifications in nuclear reactor materials under the combined effects of time, temperature and irradiation. The current R and D programme being carried out by the IPSN in collaboration with various specialized CEA departments concentrates on three main fields: - Reactor coolant system materials, - Polymerbased materials, - Coatings and paintings used inside pressurized water reactor containments. These activities are, of course, part of a much wider context which includes operating experience feedback, particularly as regards deterioration already observed in pressurized water reactors; this deterioration is usually the result of phenomena which were overlooked or inadequately studied at the design stage (corrosion, erosion, vibratory or thermal fatigue, cavitation, etc.). With his perspective in view, the IPSN is also undertaking a number of activities to develop powerful inspection methods and increase the effectiveness of preventive maintenance programmes

  17. Neutron activation analysis with k0-standardisation : general formalism and procedure

    Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) with k0-standardisation is a powerful tool for multi-element analysis at a broad range of trace element concentrations. An overview is given of the basic principles, fundamental equations, and general procedure of this method. Different aspects of the description of the neutron activation reaction rate are discussed, applying the Hogdahl convention. A general activation-decay formula is derived and its application to INAA is demonstrated. Relevant k0-definitions for different activation decay schemes are summarised and upgraded to cases of extremely high fluxes. The main standardisation techniques for INAA are discussed, emphasizing the k0-standardisation. Some general aspects of the basic equipment and its calibration are discussed, such as the characterisation of the neutron field and the tuning of the spectrometry part. A method for the prediction and optimisation of the analytical performance of INAA is presented

  18. Neutron activation analysis with k{sub 0}-standardisation : general formalism and procedure

    Pomme, S.; Hardeman, F. [Centre de l`Etude de l`Energie Nucleaire, Mol (Belgium); Robouch, P.; Etxebarria, N.; Arana, G. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements, Geel (Belgium)

    1997-09-01

    Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) with k{sub 0}-standardisation is a powerful tool for multi-element analysis at a broad range of trace element concentrations. An overview is given of the basic principles, fundamental equations, and general procedure of this method. Different aspects of the description of the neutron activation reaction rate are discussed, applying the Hogdahl convention. A general activation-decay formula is derived and its application to INAA is demonstrated. Relevant k{sub 0}-definitions for different activation decay schemes are summarised and upgraded to cases of extremely high fluxes. The main standardisation techniques for INAA are discussed, emphasizing the k{sub 0}-standardisation. Some general aspects of the basic equipment and its calibration are discussed, such as the characterisation of the neutron field and the tuning of the spectrometry part. A method for the prediction and optimisation of the analytical performance of INAA is presented.

  19. NS [Nuclear Safety] update. Current safety and security activities and developments taking place in the Department of Nuclear Safety and Security. Issue no. 2, January 2007

    This newsletter reports on the training of cardiologists in radiation protection, IAEA's safety review services and the operational safety assessment review team (OSART), the international conference on management of spent fuel and the recent INSAG (International Nuclear Safety Group) publications. The IAEA has begun a major international initiative to train interventional cardiologists in radiation protection. Starting with the first course in May 2004, so far 6 regional and 3 national training courses have been conducted with the participation of over 400 health professionals putting the IAEA in a leading role in this area. A programme of two days' training has been developed, covering possible and observed radiation effects among patients and staff, international standards, dose management techniques, examples of good and bad practice and examples indicating prevention of possible injuries as a result of good practice in radiation protection. The training material is freely available on CD and will be placed on the Radiological Protection of Patients website at http://rpop.iaea.org/

  20. PEDAGOGICAL CONDITIONS IS REVITALIZED INDEPENDENT ACTIVITY IN THE STUDY COLLEGE STUDENTS GENERAL PROFESSIONAL DISCIPLINES

    Nadegda Victorovna Basova

    2015-01-01

    One of the main areas of didactics is finding conditions and ways of activization of independent work of students. The article called and revealed pedagogical conditions providing activation of self-employment college students in the study of general subjects. Consider each of the selected pedagogical conditions, namely: the theory of person-activity approach, interdisciplinary communication and inclusion in the content of the educational process professionally oriented tasks. Compliance with...

  1. Order of the Ministry of Labour of 9 March 1971 on health and safety at work. General Ordinance

    This Order regulates the health protection of workers in all fields, including the field of radiation. It lays down provisions to be complied with for the safety of workers involved with infrared and ultra-violet rays as well as with ionizing radiation. (NEA)

  2. Key regulatory and safety issues emerging NEA activities. Lessons Learned from Fukushima Dai-ichi NPS Accident - Key Regulatory and Safety Issues

    A presentation was provided on the key safety and regulatory issues and an update of activities undertaken by the NEA and its members in response to the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power stations (NPS) on 11 March 2011. An overview of the accident sequence and the consequences was provided that identified the safety functions that were lost (electrical power, core cooling, and primary containment) that lead to units 1, 2, and 3 being in severe accident conditions with large off-site releases. Key areas identified for which activities of the NEA and member countries are in progress include accident management; defence-in-depth; crisis communication; initiating events; operating experience; deterministic and probabilistic assessments; regulatory infrastructure; radiological protection and public health; and decontamination and recovery. For each of these areas, a brief description of the on-going and planned NEA activities was provided within the three standing technical committees of the NEA with safety and regulatory mandates (the Committee on Nuclear Regulatory Activities - CNRA, the Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations - CSNI, and the Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health - CRPPH). On-going activities of CNRA include a review of enhancement being made to the regulatory aspects for the oversight of on-site accident management strategies and processes in light of the lessons learned from the accident; providing guidance to regulators on crisis communication; and supporting the peer review of the safety assessments of risk-significant research reactor facilities in light of the accident. Within the scope of the CSNI mandate, activities are being undertaken to better understand accident progression; characteristics of new fuel designs; and a benchmarking study of fast-running software for estimating source term under severe accident conditions to support protective measure recommendations. CSNI also has ongoing work in human

  3. In Vitro and In Vivo Effects and Safety Assessment of Corn Peptides on Alcohol Dehydrogenase Activities

    LI Hong-mei; WEN Lian-kui; LI Shi-jun; ZHANG Da-li; LIN Bai-song

    2011-01-01

    The in vitro and in vivo effects of corn peptides(CPs) prepared from corn gluten meal by proteolysis with an alkaline protease and fractions of CPs from Sephadex G-15 and G-10 columns on activities of alcohol dehydrogenase(ADH) were studied.The results show that CPs and fraction 3 of CPs from Sephadex G-10 column enhance in vitro ADH activity.Furthermore,the in vitro accelerating effect of the fraction 3 of CPs on ADH activity was superior to that of glutathione,which was also found even in the presence of ADH inhibitor,such as pyrazole.In the in vivo experiments,the animals were fed with different dosages of CPs and with a dose of Chinese distilled spirit orally,and sacrificed for the measurement of ADH activity.In vivo experimental results indicate that CPS enhanced hepatic ADH activities.To test the safety of CPs as health food,30 d feeding test was performed.No obvious toxic effects were detected in treated Wistar rats.

  4. R and D activities at INR pitesti related to safety and reliability of CANDU type fuel

    The focus of Nuclear Fuel R and D Program of Institute for Nuclear Research (INR) Pitesti is to maintain and improve the reliability, economics and safety of 37-element natural uranium CANDU fuel bundles in Cernavoda Nuclear Generating Station (CNGS). The second requirement is to improve the CANDU fuel design and to develop 43-element advanced fuel bundle that will reduce capital and fuelling cost, increase the operating and safety margins, improve natural - uranium utilization, and provide synergy with other reactor systems to improve resource utilization and spent fuel management. An experimental database of fuel behaviour parameters including fission - gas release, sheath strain, power - burnup history etc. has been obtained using in-pile measurements and PIE results of CANDU fuel elements irradiated in the TRIGA Material Testing Reactor (MTR) of INR Pitesti. In last time the data base was updated to include the results of Power Pulse Tests performed in TRIGA - Annular Core Pulse Reactor (ACPR) of INR Pitesti. One of the current research objective of our fuel bahaviour studies is to investigate the reliability behaviour of CANDU type fuel during power cycling operation condition. The INR research programme also include the out pile separate effects experiments to evaluate properties of the UO2 and cladding and development of computer models to describe sheath deformation and gas release processes. A program for LOCA simulating in-reactor tests is in progress at INR Pitesti to provide a database for verification of transient fuel performance codes and demonstrate that the significant fuel behaviour phenomena have all been included in the models.This data base is used extensively for the validation of the fuel behaviour codes. This paper summarizes R and D activities of INR Pitesti, related to safety and reliability of CANDU type fuel and presents some of the recent results obtained from in reactor tests. (author)

  5. Pharmacokinetics, safety and tolerability of triflusal and its main active metabolite HTB in healthy Chinese subjects.

    Wang, M; Zhang, Q; Huang, M; Zong, S; Hua, W; Zhou, W

    2014-05-01

    Triflusal presents comparable antiplatelet activity to aspirin while presenting a more favourable safety profile, and is used in the treatment of thrombosis. The study aimed to evaluate the pharmacokinetics and safety of triflusal and its major metabolite 2-(hydroxyl)-4-(trifluoromethyl)- benzoic acid (HTB) in healthy Chinese subjects.30 healthy subjects were recruited in this randomized, single-center, and open-label, parallel, single ascending doses (300, 600, 900 mg) and multiple doses (600 mg, once daily for 7 days) study. Plasma samples were analyzed with a validated liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) method. Safety was assessed by adverse events, ECG, laboratory testing, and vital signs.Triflusal was safe and well tolerated. After single-dose administration, triflusal was rapidly absorbed with a mean Tmax of 0.55-0.92 h and a mean t1/2 kel of 0.35-0.65 h, HTB was absorbed with a mean Tmax of 2.35-3.03 h and a mean t1/2 kel of 52.5-65.57 h. Cmax and AUC for triflusal and HTB were approximately dose proportional over the 300-900 mg dose range. In the steady state, the accumulation index (R) indicated that the exposure of triflusal increased slightly with repeated dosing, and the exposure of HTB increased obviously. 3 adverse events certainly related to the investigational drugs occurred in the multiple-dose phase.Following oral dosing under fasting condition, triflusal is promptly absorbed and rapidly depleted from the systemic circulation. HTB is quickly generated from triflusal and slowly eliminated. Triflusal accumulates slightly in the body. HTB plasma concentration builds up progressively toward steady-state. PMID:24105106

  6. Tailings dams safety - implications for the dam safety community

    In the context of the impact of privatization and globalization on traditional dam safety practice and the Canadian experience of the environmental dimension of dam failures, various aspects of tailings dam safety have much to offer the wider dam safety community. General design principles for tailings dams are not described, rather an attempt is made to frame some contemporary issues of tailings dam safety in ways that bring out their relevance in a broader dam safety context. Lessons applicable to future dam safety practice in related areas are examined, and the dam safety traditions of the mining, hydroelectric and related industries in Canada are brought together by illustrating some of the common elements and concerns they share. It is becoming evident that future dam safety activities for the hydroelectric, water supply and related dams will be carried out in a more privatized and globalized context by organizations less acquainted with traditional dam safety practices than in the past. If so, then tailings dam experience can be a pathfinder for how and why dam safety needs to be addressed in a corporate setting. It shows that the perceived effects of dam failures, environmental and otherwise, influence corporate damowners in ways that can amplify manyfold the objective consequences that dam safety assessments usually address. Dam safety professionals might do well to better understand and effectively communicate the financial and organizational impacts of dam failure on the corporate entity in ways that go beyond the traditional assessment of downstream hazard and failure consequences. Dam safety efforts can come to be seen less as imposed burdens of dam ownership and more as activities consistent with shareholder accountability and corporate self-interest. The Canadian mining industry, in adopting this perspective, is confirming that support for dam safety activities from the highest corporate level is essential for implementing them throughout the

  7. Tailings dams safety - implications for the dam safety community

    Vick, S.G.

    1999-07-01

    In the context of the impact of privatization and globalization on traditional dam safety practice and the Canadian experience of the environmental dimension of dam failures, various aspects of tailings dam safety have much to offer the wider dam safety community. General design principles for tailings dams are not described, rather an attempt is made to frame some contemporary issues of tailings dam safety in ways that bring out their relevance in a broader dam safety context. Lessons applicable to future dam safety practice in related areas are examined, and the dam safety traditions of the mining, hydroelectric and related industries in Canada are brought together by illustrating some of the common elements and concerns they share. It is becoming evident that future dam safety activities for the hydroelectric, water supply and related dams will be carried out in a more privatized and globalized context by organizations less acquainted with traditional dam safety practices than in the past. If so, then tailings dam experience can be a pathfinder for how and why dam safety needs to be addressed in a corporate setting. It shows that the perceived effects of dam failures, environmental and otherwise, influence corporate damowners in ways that can amplify manyfold the objective consequences that dam safety assessments usually address. Dam safety professionals might do well to better understand and effectively communicate the financial and organizational impacts of dam failure on the corporate entity in ways that go beyond the traditional assessment of downstream hazard and failure consequences. Dam safety efforts can come to be seen less as imposed burdens of dam ownership and more as activities consistent with shareholder accountability and corporate self-interest. The Canadian mining industry, in adopting this perspective, is confirming that support for dam safety activities from the highest corporate level is essential for implementing them throughout the

  8. Antibiotic susceptibility and antimicrobial activity of autochthonous starter cultures as safety parameters for fresh cheese production

    Dora Bučan

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The antibiotic susceptibility and antimicrobial activity, as food safety parameters important for application of autochthonous lactic acid bacteria (LAB, that previously satisfied technological criteria for functional starter cultures in fresh cheese production were examined. Soluble whole cell protein patterns of autochthonous LAB strains from fresh cheese, obtained by SDS-PAGE, revealed the presence of two predominant strains, which were identified as Lactobacillus fermentum A8 and Enterococcus faecium A7. These strains were not resistant and shown susceptibility to antibiotics: ampicillin, bacitracin, penicillin G, azithromycin, chloramphenicol, clarithromycin, clindamycin, spiramycin, tetracycline, streptomycin, neomycin, gentamicin, erythromycin, rifampicin and novobiocin. Lb. fermentum A8 strain displayed phenotypic resistance to vancomycin, but this resistance is intrinsic, not transferable and it is acceptable from the safety aspect. The capacity of Lb. fermentum A8 and Ec. faecium A7 to inhibit growth of test-microorganisms Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 11911, Escherichia coli 3014, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium FP1 and Staphylococcus aureus 3048, was also analysed. According to obtained results, Lb. fermentum A8 and Ec. faecium A7 are safe from the aspect of spreading antibiotic resistance and could be useful as bioprotective cultures that inhibit common bacterial food contaminants, including L. monocytogenes.

  9. Probabilistic risk assessment for nuclear safety activities and regulation against external events

    After Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) accident (1F accident), Japan's nuclear power generation is at the crossroads. The three reactors were damaged by giant tsunami, and a lot of radioactivity was released to environment. This accident exposed the vulnerability to external events of NPPs, therefore the importance of risk assessment has been risen. Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) is useful of risk assessment methods, a series of PRA standards have been published from Atomic Energy Society of Japan. Japan's the new nuclear regulation body, Nuclear Regulation Authority (NRA) considered the use of PRA. In particular for external events such as seismic or tsunami PRA is useful to assess the impact on the safety of nuclear power plants, because there are some uncertainties in analysis of impact and frequency of natural phenomena. In this paper, as looking back at development of PRA, including external events PRA in Japan until now, the importance of the PRA is highlighted once again from the lessons of the 1F accident, and some suggestions are provided for safety activities or regulation from view point of PRA. (author)

  10. DOE standard: Integration of environment, safety, and health into facility disposition activities. Volume 2: Appendices

    This volume contains the appendices that provide additional environment, safety, and health (ES and H) information to complement Volume 1 of this Standard. Appendix A provides a set of candidate DOE ES and H directives and external regulations, organized by hazard types that may be used to identify potentially applicable directives to a specific facility disposition activity. Appendix B offers examples and lessons learned that illustrate implementation of ES and H approaches discussed in Section 3 of Volume 1. Appendix C contains ISMS performance expectations to guide a project team in developing and implementing an effective ISMS and in developing specific performance criteria for use in facility disposition. Appendix D provides guidance for identifying potential Applicable or Relevant and Appropriate Requirements (ARARs) when decommissioning facilities fall under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, Liability Act (CERCLA) process. Appendix E discusses ES and H considerations for dispositioning facilities by privatization. Appendix F is an overview of the WSS process. Appendix G provides a copy of two DOE Office of Nuclear Safety Policy and Standards memoranda that form the bases for some of the guidance discussed within the Standard. Appendix H gives information on available hazard analysis techniques and references. Appendix I provides a supplemental discussion to Sections 3.3.4, Hazard Baseline Documentation, and 3.3.6, Environmental Permits. Appendix J presents a sample readiness evaluation checklist

  11. DOE standard: Integration of environment, safety, and health into facility disposition activities. Volume 2: Appendices

    NONE

    1998-05-01

    This volume contains the appendices that provide additional environment, safety, and health (ES and H) information to complement Volume 1 of this Standard. Appendix A provides a set of candidate DOE ES and H directives and external regulations, organized by hazard types that may be used to identify potentially applicable directives to a specific facility disposition activity. Appendix B offers examples and lessons learned that illustrate implementation of ES and H approaches discussed in Section 3 of Volume 1. Appendix C contains ISMS performance expectations to guide a project team in developing and implementing an effective ISMS and in developing specific performance criteria for use in facility disposition. Appendix D provides guidance for identifying potential Applicable or Relevant and Appropriate Requirements (ARARs) when decommissioning facilities fall under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, Liability Act (CERCLA) process. Appendix E discusses ES and H considerations for dispositioning facilities by privatization. Appendix F is an overview of the WSS process. Appendix G provides a copy of two DOE Office of Nuclear Safety Policy and Standards memoranda that form the bases for some of the guidance discussed within the Standard. Appendix H gives information on available hazard analysis techniques and references. Appendix I provides a supplemental discussion to Sections 3.3.4, Hazard Baseline Documentation, and 3.3.6, Environmental Permits. Appendix J presents a sample readiness evaluation checklist.

  12. Development of U.S. Government General Technical Requirements for UAS Flight Safety Systems Utilizing the Iridium Satellite Constellation

    Murray, Jennifer; Birr, Richard

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the development of technical requirements for Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) utilization of the Iridium Satellite Constellation to provide flight safety. The Federal Aviation Authority (FAA) required an over-the-horizon communication standard to guarantee flight safety before permitting widespread UAS flights in the National Air Space (NAS). This is important to ensure reliable control of UASs during loss-link and over-the-horizon scenarios. The core requirement was to utilize a satellite system to send GPS tracking data and other telemetry from a flight vehicle down to the ground. Iridium was chosen as the system because it is one of the only true satellite systems that has world wide coverage, and the service has a highly reliable link margin. The Iridium system, the flight modems, and the test flight are described.

  13. Safety supervision and control on units engaged in the activities in relating to civilian nuclear pressure retaining components

    According to the Code on the Safety Regulation for Civilian Nuclear Pressure Retaining Components (HAF 0900) and its implementation rules, the NNSA verified and issued 26 qualification licenses to 19 organizations, and 11 qualification licenses out of 26 were just for the extension activities of 8 organizations, and permitted 3 organizations to extend the activities under the same license requirements in 1998

  14. Specialized consultant in radiological safety to the Ciudad del Carmen general hospital, PEMEX; Asesoria especializada en seguridad radiologica al hospital general Ciudad del Carmen, PEMEX

    Angeles C, A.; Hernandez C, J. E.; Rodriguez A, F.; Garcia A, J

    2003-02-15

    The Ciudad del Carmen general hospital, dependent of PEMEX, It request consultant of the ININ to be able to maintain their sanitary license for the use of X-ray equipment for the radiologic diagnostic.The proposal of the ININ was to be a program of technical attendance, schedule monthly to be able to solve the observations that are presented in the use of those equipment, and that the hospital can conserve its respective sanitary license.(Author)

  15. Generalized analysis of thermally activated domain-wall motion in Co/Pt multilayers

    Thermally activated domain-wall (DW) motion driven by magnetic field and electric current is investigated experimentally in out-of-plane magnetized Pt(Co/Pt)3 multilayers. We directly extract the thermal activation energy barrier for DW motion and observe the dynamic regimes of creep, depinning, and viscous flow. Further analysis reveals that the activation energy must be corrected with a factor dependent on the Curie temperature, and we derive a generalized Arrhenius-like equation governing thermally activated motion. By using this generalized equation, we quantify the efficiency of current-induced spin torque in assisting DW motion. Current produces no effect aside from Joule heating in the multilayer with 7-Å thick Co layers, whereas it generates a finite spin torque on DWs in the multilayer with atomically thin 3-Å Co layers. These findings suggest that conventional spin-transfer torques from in-plane spin-polarized current do not drive DWs in ultrathin Co/Pt multilayers. - Highlights: • Thermally activated domain-wall motion is investigated in Pt(Co/Pt)3 multilayers. • The activation energy for wall motion is directly extracted, revealing distinct dynamic regimes. • A generalized Arrhenius-like equation governing thermally activated motion is derived. • Conventional spin-transfer torques do not drive domain walls in ultrathin Co/Pt multilayers

  16. A review of the literature on preventive occupational health and safety activities in small enterprises

    Hasle, Peter; Limborg, Hans Jørgen

    2006-01-01

    conclude that employees of small enterprises are subject to higher risks than the employees of larger ones, and that small enterprises have difficulties in controlling risk. The most effective preventive approaches seem to be simple and low cost solutions, disseminated through personal contact. It is......The scientific literature regarding preventive occupational health and safety activities in small enterprises has been reviewed in order to identify effective preventive approaches and to develop a future research strategy. During the last couple of years, there has been a significant increase in...... the number of studies of small enterprises, but the research community is scattered between many different disciplines and institutions. There is a lack of evaluation of intervention studies, both in terms of effect and practical applicability. However, there is sufficiently strong evidence to...

  17. Ferrocyanide safety program: FY 1995 report on Mossbauer spectroscopy tank activities

    This report summarizes FY 1995 activities on the Mossbauer Spectroscopy task. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration has developed a miniaturized Mossbauer spectrometer that is small enough to perform elevation scans in the Hanford Site waste tank liquid observation wells. Mossbauer spectroscopy is a sensitive and selective method that can detect and distinguish between different iron-based compounds in many types of chemical environments. Iron is major constituent of ferrocyanide waste and information about its location and composition in the tanks supports interim safe storage of the waste and final resolution of the Ferrocyanide Safety Issue. Results obtained from studies of ferrocyanide waste simulants and those from the first test in a hot cell environment using radioactive tank waste are presented

  18. Standardization in fiber-optic sensing for structural safety: activities in the ISHMII and IEC

    Habel, Wolfgang R.; Krebber, K.; Daum, W.

    2015-03-01

    Fiber-optic sensors are increasingly established in the sensor market. Their advantages have unquestionably been verified by numerous demonstrations to enhance the operational performance of aged structures or to monitor the structural behavior of safety-relevant structures or their components. However, there are some barriers in use due to a lack of extensive standardization of fiber-optic sensors. This leads very often to restraints in the user's community. The paper shows the status in international standardization of fiber-optic sensors as well as current activities in leading institutions such as IEC and ISHMII and others with the purpose of providing relevant standards for a broader use of selected fiber-optic sensor technologies.

  19. Handbook of driver assistance systems basic information, components and systems for active safety and comfort

    Hakuli, Stephan; Lotz, Felix; Singer, Christina

    2016-01-01

    This fundamental work explains in detail systems for active safety and driver assistance, considering both their structure and their function. These include the well-known standard systems such as Anti-lock braking system (ABS), Electronic Stability Control (ESC) or Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC). But it includes also new systems for protecting collisions protection, for changing the lane, or for convenient parking. The book aims at giving a complete picture focusing on the entire system. First, it describes the components which are necessary for assistance systems, such as sensors, actuators, mechatronic subsystems, and control elements. Then, it explains key features for the user-friendly design of human-machine interfaces between driver and assistance system. Finally, important characteristic features of driver assistance systems for particular vehicles are presented: Systems for commercial vehicles and motorcycles.

  20. EH&S annual report: Summary of activities Environment, Health and Safety Division, 1992

    1994-03-01

    This report presents an overview of the environment, safety, and health program in operation at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. description of research in environmental science, remediation, waste management, safety, health services, radiation assessment, and emergency plans are provided.

  1. Safety-Related Contractor Activities at Nuclear Power Plants. New Challenges for Regulatory Oversight

    The use of contractors has been an integral and important part of the design, construction, operation, and maintenance of nuclear power plants. To ensure the safe and efficient completion of contracted tasks, each nuclear plant licensee has developed and refined formal contract management processes to meet their specific needs and plant requirements. Although these contract management processes have proven to be effective tools for the procurement of support and components tailored to the needs of nuclear power plants, contractor-related incidents and accidents have revealed some serious weaknesses with the implementation of these processes. Identifying and addressing implementation problems are becoming more complicated due to organizational and personnel changes affecting the nuclear power industry. The ability of regulators and licensees to effectively monitor and manage the safety-related performance of contractors will likely be affected by forthcoming organization and personnel changes due to: the aging of the workforce; the decline of the nuclear industry; and the deregulation of nuclear power. The objective of this report is to provide a review of current and potential future challenges facing safety-related contractor activities at nuclear power plants. The purpose is to assist SKI in establishing a strategy for the proactive oversight of contractor safety-related activities at Swedish nuclear power plants and facilities. The nature and role of contractors at nuclear plants is briefly reviewed in the first section of the report. The second section describes the essential elements of the contract management process. Although organizations have had decades of experience with the a contract management process, there remain a number of common implantation weaknesses that have lead to serious contractor-related incidents and accidents. These implementation weaknesses are summarized in the third section. The fourth section of the report highlights the

  2. Safety-Related Contractor Activities at Nuclear Power Plants. New Challenges for Regulatory Oversight

    Chockie, Alan [Chockie Group International, Inc., Seattle, WA (United States)

    2005-09-15

    The use of contractors has been an integral and important part of the design, construction, operation, and maintenance of nuclear power plants. To ensure the safe and efficient completion of contracted tasks, each nuclear plant licensee has developed and refined formal contract management processes to meet their specific needs and plant requirements. Although these contract management processes have proven to be effective tools for the procurement of support and components tailored to the needs of nuclear power plants, contractor-related incidents and accidents have revealed some serious weaknesses with the implementation of these processes. Identifying and addressing implementation problems are becoming more complicated due to organizational and personnel changes affecting the nuclear power industry. The ability of regulators and licensees to effectively monitor and manage the safety-related performance of contractors will likely be affected by forthcoming organization and personnel changes due to: the aging of the workforce; the decline of the nuclear industry; and the deregulation of nuclear power. The objective of this report is to provide a review of current and potential future challenges facing safety-related contractor activities at nuclear power plants. The purpose is to assist SKI in establishing a strategy for the proactive oversight of contractor safety-related activities at Swedish nuclear power plants and facilities. The nature and role of contractors at nuclear plants is briefly reviewed in the first section of the report. The second section describes the essential elements of the contract management process. Although organizations have had decades of experience with the a contract management process, there remain a number of common implantation weaknesses that have lead to serious contractor-related incidents and accidents. These implementation weaknesses are summarized in the third section. The fourth section of the report highlights the

  3. Predicting Child Physical Activity and Screen Time: Parental Support for Physical Activity and General Parenting Styles

    Langer, Shelby L; Crain, A. Lauren; Senso, Meghan M.; Levy, Rona L.; Sherwood, Nancy E

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To examine relationships between parenting styles and practices and child moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and screen time. Methods: Participants were children (6.9 ± 1.8 years) with a body mass index in the 70–95th percentile and their parents (421 dyads). Parent-completed questionnaires assessed parental support for child physical activity (PA), parenting styles and child screen time. Children wore accelerometers to assess MVPA. Results: Parenting style did not predi...

  4. Development of active rear steer actuator. Development of four wheel steer actuator for active safety; Active rear steer actuator no kaihatsu. Yobo anzen ni muketa 4WS actuator no kaihatsu

    Yamanaka, T. [Aisin Seiki Co. Ltd., Aichi (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    Recently, ecology, energy saving and safety have become important issues. And Active Safety is spotlighted in vehicle control area. Many researches and developments on four wheel steer system have been done to improve vehicle stability. We have developed the Active Rear Steer system with electromechanical Actuator, which is mass-productive, compact, and high response and durable. 10 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. Motivating Exercise: The Interactive Effect of General Action Goals and Past Behavior on Physical Activity

    Hepler, Justin; Wang, Wei; Albarracin, Dolores

    2011-01-01

    Although exercise is recognized as a powerful tool to combat obesity, remarkably few US adults pursue adequate amounts of exercise, with one major impediment being a lack of motivation for active behaviors. Recent empirical work has demonstrated that behavior can be guided by goals to be generally active or inactive. In the present paper, an experiment is presented in which participants played or observed a video game, were primed with action or inaction goals, and practiced a stretching exer...

  6. Prevalence of active hepatitis C virus infections among general public of Lahore, Pakistan

    Anwar, Muhammad Ikram; Rahman, Moazur; Hassan, Mahmood Ul; Iqbal, Mazhar

    2013-01-01

    Background To find out the prevalence of active hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections among general public in Lahore city, since data concerning the prevalence of active HCV in this city is currently unavailable. Methods Blood samples were collected randomly from individuals visiting different clinical laboratories in Lahore. Serum was separated and processed by nested PCR qualitative assay for the detection of HCV RNA. The samples were categorized into different age groups on the basis of pre-t...

  7. DOE standard: Integration of environment, safety, and health into facility disposition activities. Volume 1 of 2: Technical standard

    This Department of Energy (DOE) technical standard (referred to as the Standard) provides guidance for integrating and enhancing worker, public, and environmental protection during facility disposition activities. It provides environment, safety, and health (ES and H) guidance to supplement the project management requirements and associated guidelines contained within DOE O 430.1A, Life-Cycle Asset Management (LCAM), and amplified within the corresponding implementation guides. In addition, the Standard is designed to support an Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS), consistent with the guiding principles and core functions contained in DOE P 450.4, Safety Management System Policy, and discussed in DOE G 450.4-1, Integrated Safety Management System Guide. The ISMS guiding principles represent the fundamental policies that guide the safe accomplishment of work and include: (1) line management responsibility for safety; (2) clear roles and responsibilities; (3) competence commensurate with responsibilities; (4) balanced priorities; (5) identification of safety standards and requirements; (6) hazard controls tailored to work being performed; and (7) operations authorization. This Standard specifically addresses the implementation of the above ISMS principles four through seven, as applied to facility disposition activities

  8. Implementation of human factors activities for assuring nuclear and radiation safety

    Implementation of safety culture in the nuclear and radiation facilities should be achieved by introduction of organizational, educational, fitness for duty and recruitment measures focused to the safety goal. Adequate level of nuclear and radiation safety should be achieved by changes in working procedures, level of knowledge, the way of communication and the level of individual working availability. These changes demand modifications of workers' attitudes and facility's policy to the safety and these changes lead to the implementation of safety culture. (author). 3 refs

  9. Generalization of the Activated Complex Theory of Reaction Rates. II. Classical Mechanical Treatment

    Marcus, R. A.

    1964-01-01

    In its usual classical form activated complex theory assumes a particular expression for the kinetic energy of the reacting system -- one associated with a rectilinear motion along the reaction coordinate. The derivation of the rate expression given in the present paper is based on the general kinetic energy expression.

  10. Using Computational Chemistry Activities to Promote Learning and Retention in a Secondary School General Chemistry Setting

    Ochterski, Joseph W.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the results of using state-of-the-art, research-quality software as a learning tool in a general chemistry secondary school classroom setting. I present three activities designed to introduce fundamental chemical concepts regarding molecular shape and atomic orbitals to students with little background in chemistry, such as…

  11. Motor competence and physical activity in 8-year-old school children with generalized joint hypermobility

    Juul-Kristensen, Birgit; Kristensen, Jens Halkjaer; Frausing, Britt;

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Because the criteria used for diagnosing between generalized joint hypermobility (GJH) and musculoskeletal complaints, as well as relations between GJH and an insufficient motor development and/or a reduced physical activity level differ, the prevalence of GJH varies considerably...

  12. Effects of Active Learning on Enhancing Student Critical Thinking in an Undergraduate General Science Course

    Kim, Kyoungna; Sharma, Priya; Land, Susan M.; Furlong, Kevin P.

    2013-01-01

    To enhance students' critical thinking in an undergraduate general science course, we designed and implemented active learning modules by incorporating group-based learning with authentic tasks, scaffolding, and individual reports. This study examined the levels of critical thinking students exhibited in individual reports and the students'…

  13. Annual report to Congress. Department of Energy activities relating to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, calendar year 2000

    None

    2001-03-01

    This Annual Report to the Congress describes the Department of Energy's activities in response to formal recommendations and other interactions with the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board. During 2000, the Department completed its implementation and proposed closure of one Board recommendation and completed all implementation plan milestones associated with two additional Board recommendations. Also in 2000, the Department formally accepted two new Board recommendations and developed implementation plans in response to those recommendations. The Department also made significant progress with a number of broad-based safety initiatives. These include initial implementation of integrated safety management at field sites and within headquarters program offices, issuance of a nuclear safety rule, and continued progress on stabilizing excess nuclear materials to achieve significant risk reduction.

  14. Annual report to Congress. Department of Energy activities relating to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, calendar year 2000

    This Annual Report to the Congress describes the Department of Energy's activities in response to formal recommendations and other interactions with the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board. During 2000, the Department completed its implementation and proposed closure of one Board recommendation and completed all implementation plan milestones associated with two additional Board recommendations. Also in 2000, the Department formally accepted two new Board recommendations and developed implementation plans in response to those recommendations. The Department also made significant progress with a number of broad-based safety initiatives. These include initial implementation of integrated safety management at field sites and within headquarters program offices, issuance of a nuclear safety rule, and continued progress on stabilizing excess nuclear materials to achieve significant risk reduction

  15. Activities on safety culture study. Study status in public and private sectors

    Around after entering in the 21st century, organizational accidents had occurred in Japan at various industries including nuclear industry, which were caused directly by unsafe action, human error and illegal conduct of personnel but there were problems in safety culture of organization such as slow retreat of safety system stimulated by management, schedule control and procedure management becoming a dead letter, lack of safety education, and workplace climate of schedule priority. This article referred to organizational factors common to many severe accidents and introduced safety culture study in public and private sectors to overcome those factors. Safety Culture Evaluation Support Tool (SCEST) was developed for self-evaluation of safety culture of organization as well as Organizational Reliability model (OR model) for analysis of initiation and propagation process of risk event. Safety diagnosis system and feedback type risk assessment system for promoting safe organizational climate and culture were also developed. (T. Tanaka)

  16. Criteria for Use in Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency. General Safety Guide (Arabic Edition)

    This Safety Guide presents a coherent set of generic criteria (expressed numerically in terms of radiation dose) that form a basis for developing the operational levels needed for decision making concerning protective and response actions. The set of generic criteria addresses the requirements established in IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-2 for emergency preparedness and response, including lessons learned from responses to past emergencies, and provides an internally consistent foundation for the application of principles of radiation protection. The publication also provides a basis for a plain language explanation of the criteria for the public and for public officials. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Basic considerations; 3. Framework for emergency response criteria; 4. Guidance values for emergency workers; 5. Operational criteria; Appendix I: Dose concepts and dosimetric quantities; Appendix II: Examples of default OILs for deposition, individual contamination and contamination of food, milk and water; Appendix III: Development of EALs and example EALs for light water reactors; Appendix IV: Observables on the scene of a radiological emergency.

  17. Regulatory regime and its influence in the nuclear safety

    Main elements of nuclear regulatory regime in general is presented. These elements are: national rules and safety regulations, system of nuclear facility licensing, activities of regulatory body. Regulatory body is needed to specify the national safety regulations, review and assess the safety documentation presented to support license application, make inspections to verify fulfilment of safety regulations and license conditions, monitor the quality of work processes of user organization, and to assess whether these processes provide a high safety level, promote high safety culture, promote maintenance and development of national infrastructure relevant to nuclear safety, etc

  18. Efficacy and safety of duloxetine in the treatment of older adult patients with generalized anxiety disorder: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    Alaka, Karla J; Noble, William; Montejo, Angel; Dueñas, Héctor; Munshi, Autar; Strawn, Jeffrey R.; Lenox-Smith, Alan; Ahl, Jonna; Bidzan, Leszek; Dorn, Brita; Ball, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Objective This was a flexible-dosed study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of duloxetine 30–120 mg once daily in the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) in older adult patients. Methods Patients with GAD, who were at least 65 years of age, were randomly assigned to double-blind treatment with either duloxetine (N = 151) or placebo (N = 140). The primary efficacy measure was the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAM-A) total score, and the primary endpoint was at week 10. Global fu...

  19. GENERAL TURBO S. A., active participant to the nuclear and classic power program

    GENERAL TURBO S. A. is a Romanian company involved in the nuclear program since its inception as a manufacturer and supplier of nuclear equipment for Cernavoda NPP. The GENERAL TURBO S. A continues the cooperation as supplier of the 700 MW turbine-generator group for Unit 2. GENERAL TURBO S. A., the late Power Equipment Plant, split off the IMGB in 1992, was involved in the CANDU power program ever since. On the basis of the Contract of Manufacture and License from General Electric for the 700 MW turbine generator group, GENERAL TURBO S. A. proceeded in assimilating the know-how for turbine and electric generators sub-assemblies and components for the five nuclear power units planned initially for Cernavoda NPP. During 1985-1989 all the sub-assemblies associated to Unit 1 were supplied and some of them for Unit 2 and 3. After 1989 the activity pace at GENERAL TURBO S. A. slowed down but never stopped. At present, GENERAL TURBO S. A. is credited as manufacturer, supplier and entrepreneur for the classical part of Cernavoda NPP Unit 2 (author)

  20. Defining safety culture and the nexus between safety goals and safety culture. 1. An Investigation Study on Practical Points of Safety Management

    In a report after the Chernobyl accident, the International Atomic Energy Agency indicated the definition and the importance of safety culture and the ideal organizational state where safety culture pervades. However, the report did not mention practical approaches to enhance safety culture. In Japan, although there had been investigations that clarified the consciousness of employees and the organizational climate in the nuclear power and railway industries, organizational factors that clarified the level of organization safety and practical methods that spread safety culture in an organization had not been studied. The Central Research Institute of the Electric Power Industry conducted surveys of organizational culture for the construction, chemical, and manufacturing industries. The aim of our study was to clarify the organizational factors that influence safety in an organization expressed in employee safety consciousness, commitment to safety activities, rate of accidents, etc. If these areas were clarified, the level of organization safety might be evaluated, and practical ways could be suggested to enhance the safety culture. Consequently, a series of investigations was conducted to clarify relationships among organizational climate, employee consciousness, safety management and activities, and rate of accidents. The questionnaire surveys were conducted in 1998-1999. The subjects were (a) managers of the safety management sections in the head offices of the construction, chemical, and manufacturing industries; (b) responsible persons in factories of the chemical and manufacturing industries; and (c) general workers in factories of the chemical and manufacturing industries. The number of collected data was (a) managers in the head office: 48 from the construction industry and 58 from the chemical and manufacturing industries, (b) responsible persons in factories: 567, and (c) general workers: from 29 factories. Items in the questionnaires were selected from

  1. PEDAGOGICAL CONDITIONS IS REVITALIZED INDEPENDENT ACTIVITY IN THE STUDY COLLEGE STUDENTS GENERAL PROFESSIONAL DISCIPLINES

    Nadegda Victorovna Basova

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the main areas of didactics is finding conditions and ways of activization of independent work of students. The article called and revealed pedagogical conditions providing activation of self-employment college students in the study of general subjects. Consider each of the selected pedagogical conditions, namely: the theory of person-activity approach, interdisciplinary communication and inclusion in the content of the educational process professionally oriented tasks. Compliance with all the names of conditions can increase the effectiveness of students’ independent work, and thus significantly increase its role in achieving the neweducational goals.

  2. Exploratory study to evaluate tolerability, safety, and activity of Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera in healthy volunteers

    Ashwinikumar A Raut

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera (WS, a "rasayana" drug, is recommended for balavardhan and mamsavardhan. The study was intended to evaluate dose-related tolerability, safety, and activity of WS formulation in normal individuals. The design was prospective, open-labeled, variable doses in volunteers. Eighteen apparently healthy volunteers (12M:6F, age:18-30 years, and BMI: 19-30 were enrolled. After baseline investigations, they received WS capsules (Rx (aqueous extract, 8:1 daily in two divided doses with increase in daily dosage every 10 days for 30 days (750 mg/day x10 days, 1 000 mg/day x 10 days, 1 250 mg/day x 10 days. Volunteers were assessed for symptoms/signs, vital functions, hematological and biochemical organ function tests. Muscle activity was measured by hand grip strength, quadriceps strength, and back extensor force. Exercise tolerance was determined using cycle ergometry. Lean body weight and fat% were computed from skin fold thickness measurement. Adverse events were recorded, as volunteered by the subjects. Repeated measures ANOVA, McNemar′s test, and paired t test were employed. All but one volunteer tolerated WS without any adverse event. One volunteer showed increased appetite, libido, and hallucinogenic effects with vertigo at the lowest dose and was withdrawn from study. In six subjects, improvement in quality of sleep was found. Organ function tests were in normal range before and after the intervention. Reduction in total- and LDL- cholesterol and increase of strength in muscle activity was significant. Total body fat percentage showed a reduction trend. WS, in escalated dose, was tolerated well. The formulation appeared safe and strengthened muscle activity. In view of its traditional Rasayana use, further studies are planned to evaluate potential of this drug in patients of sarcopenia.

  3. Opening address by the IAEA Deputy Director General [International conference on safety and security of radioactive sources: Towards a global system for the continuous control of sources throughout their life cycle

    As a direct result of the updated IAEA Action Plan, the Code of Conduct on the Safety and Security of Radioactive Sources was revised and was approved by the IAEA Board of Governors in 2003. Its supporting Guidance on the Import and Export of Radioactive Sources was developed and approved in 2004, and the Safety Guide on Categorization of Radioactive Sources was completed recently. All three documents were developed under the auspices of the IAEA to achieve international consensus, and they play a central role in this conference. More than seventy countries have already expressed their intention to follow the guidance given in the Code of Conduct, and I would like to encourage more countries to do so. The IAEA has actively promoted both, the safety and the security of radioactive sources by organizing several major international conferences. In addition to raising awareness and promoting information exchange, these conferences have given major direction to the IAEA's activities, especially by way of the Action Plan for the Safety and Security of Radioactive Sources, which was first approved by the IAEA Board of Governors and endorsed by the General Conference in 1999 and was subsequently updated in 2001, immediately before 11 September. The IAEA has been promoting for some time now the idea of a global nuclear safety regime. An IAEA Action Plan was developed and was approved by the IAEA Board of Governors that includes actions to assist Member States in establishing sustainable regulatory infrastructures. Playing a leading role in the global efforts to improve the global nuclear security framework has been included in the IAEA's Medium Term Strategy. It will focus on enhancing the sustainability of nuclear security programmes in Member States, complementing their nuclear safety programmes. The IAEA has also conducted practical activities to promote safety and security in a synergetic manner. The Tripartite Agreement between the Russian Federation, the United States

  4. Unreviewed safety question evaluation of 100K East and 100K West in-basin fuel characterization program activities

    The purpose of this report is to provide the basis for answers to an Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) safety evaluation of the 105K East (KE) and 105K West (KW) in-basin activities associated with the fuel characterization program as described in the characterization shipping plan. The significant activities that are common to both 105 KE and 105 KW basins are the movement of canisters from their main basin storage locations (or potentially from the 105 KE Tech View Pit if a dump table is available) to the south loadout pit transfer channel, hydrogen generation testing in the single element fuel container, loading the single element fuel container into the shipping cask, loading of the shipping cask onto a flat-bed trailer, return of the test fuel elements or element pieces from the 327 facility, placement of the fuel elements back into Mark 2 canisters, and placement of the canisters in the main storage basin. Decapping of canisters in the south loadout pit transfer channel and re-encapsulation of canisters are activities specific to the 105 KW basin. The scope of this safety evaluation includes only those characterization fuel shipment activities performed in the 105 KE and 105 KW fuel storage basin structures up to installation of the overpack. The packaging safety evaluation report governs the shipment of the fuel elements. The K Basins Plant Review Committee has determined that the in-basin activities associated with the fuel characterization program fuel shipments are bounded by the current safety envelop and do not constitute an unreviewed safety question. This determination is documented on Attachment 1

  5. A general approach toward enhancement of pseudocapacitive performance of conducting polymers by redox-active electrolytes

    Chen, Wei

    2014-12-01

    A general approach is demonstrated where the pseudocapacitive performance of different conducting polymers is enhanced in redox-active electrolytes. The concept is demonstrated using several electroactive conducting polymers, including polyaniline, polypyrrole, and poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene). As compared to conventional electrolytes, the redox-active electrolytes, prepared by simply adding a redox mediator to the conventional electrolyte, can significantly improve the energy storage capacity of pseudocapacitors with different conducting polymers. The results show that the specific capacitance of conducting polymer based pseudocapacitors can be increased by a factor of two by utilization of the redox-active electrolytes. In fact, this approach gives some of the highest reported specific capacitance values for electroactive conducting polymers. Moreover, our findings present a general and effective approach for the enhancement of energy storage performance of pseudocapacitors using a variety of polymeric electrode materials. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Predicting Child Physical Activity and Screen Time: Parental Support for Physical Activity and General Parenting Styles

    Crain, A. Lauren; Senso, Meghan M.; Levy, Rona L.; Sherwood, Nancy E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To examine relationships between parenting styles and practices and child moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and screen time. Methods: Participants were children (6.9 ± 1.8 years) with a body mass index in the 70–95th percentile and their parents (421 dyads). Parent-completed questionnaires assessed parental support for child physical activity (PA), parenting styles and child screen time. Children wore accelerometers to assess MVPA. Results: Parenting style did not predict MVPA, but support for PA did (positive association). The association between support and MVPA, moreover, varied as a function of permissive parenting. For parents high in permissiveness, the association was positive (greater support was related to greater MVPA and therefore protective). For parents low in permissiveness, the association was neutral; support did not matter. Authoritarian and permissive parenting styles were both associated with greater screen time. Conclusions: Parenting practices and styles should be considered jointly, offering implications for tailored interventions. PMID:24812256

  7. Activation calculation and environmental safety analysis for fusion experimental breeder (FEB)

    An activation calculation code FDKR and decay chain data library AFDCDLIB are used to calculate the radioactivity, decay heat, dose rate and biological hazard potential (BHP) form activation products, actinides and fission products in a Fusion Experiment Breeder (FEB). The code and library are introduced briefly, and calculation results and decay curves of related hazards after one year operation with 150 MW fusion power are given. The total radioactivity inventory, decay heat and BHP are 5.74 x 1020 Bq, 8.34 MW and 4.08 x 108 km3 of air, respectively, at shutdown. Results obtained show that the first wall of FEB can meet the nuclear waste disposal criteria for the NRC 10 CFR61 Class C after a few weeks from shutdown. The inventory of important actinides for the fuel reprocessing, such as 232U and 237Np were also calculated. It was shown that their concentrations do not excess the limit value of environmental safety required. (9 refs., 4 figs., 9 tabs.)

  8. Modeling and Simulation of integrated steering and braking control for vehicle active safety system

    Beibei Zhang

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Active chassis systems like braking, steering, suspension and propulsion systems are increasingly entering the market. In addition to their basic functions, these systems may be used for functions of integrated vehicle dynamics control. An experimental platform which aims to study the integration control of steering and braking is designed due to the research requirement of vehicle active safety control strategy in this paper. A test vehicle which is equipped with the systems of steer-by-wire and brake-bywire is provided and the Autobox, combined with Matlab/simulink and MSCCarsim, is used to fulfill the RCP (Rapid Control Prototyping and HIL (Hardware-in-loop. The seven-freedom vehicle model is constructed first and the approach of vehicle parameters estimation based on the Extended Kalman Filter (EKF is proposed. Testing the vehicle state through the sensor has its own disadvantage that the cost is high and easily affected by environment outside. To find a actual method of receiving the vehicle state using the ready-made sensors in vehicle, the researchers put forward various estimation method, of which have advantages and disadvantages. Based on the above, this paper applies the EKF to estimate the vehicle state, making the actual estimation come true. The primary control methods and controller designment is carried out to prove the validation of the platform.

  9. Calpain Activity Is Generally Elevated during Transformation but Has Oncogene-Specific Biological Functions

    N.O. Carragher

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Several oncogene and tumor-suppressor gene products are known substrates for the calpain family of cysteine proteases, and calpain is required for transformation by v-src and tumor invasion. Thus, we have now addressed whether calpain is generally associated with transformation and how calpain contributes to oncogene function. Our results demonstrate that calpain activity is enhanced upon transformation induced by the v-Src, v-Jun, v-Myc, k-Ras, and v-Fos oncoproteins. Furthermore, elevated calpain activity commonly promotes focal adhesion remodelling, disruption of actin cytoskeleton, morphological transformation, and cell migration, although proteolysis of target substrates (such as focal adhesion kinase, talin, and spectrin is differently specified by individual oncoproteins. Interestingly, v-Fos differs from other common oncoproteins in not requiring calpain activity for actin/adhesion remodelling or migration of v-Fos transformed cells. However, anchorage-independent growth of all transformed cells is sensitive to calpain inhibition. In addition, elevated calpain activity contributes to oncogene-induced apoptosis associated with transformation by v-Myc. Taken together, these studies demonstrate that calpain activity is necessary for full cellular transformation induced by common oncoproteins, but has distinct roles in oncogenic events induced by individual transforming proteins. Thus, targeting calpain activity may represent a useful general strategy for interfering with activated protooncogenes in cancer cells.

  10. Transformational activity by top management for the enhancement of safety in a nuclear power plant in Japan

    Using Engestroem's activity theory, we investigated how company-wide transformational activity was initiated and how it has changed everyday activities in a nuclear power plant in Japan. We renamed 'learning activity' in the theory 'transformational activity' in this paper. It was defined as an activity that continues for a certain amount of period and transforms existing everyday organizational activities into new ones by changing the underlying premises of activities. We described a precise example of transformational activity we observed in our intensive field work in a large electric power company where the first fatal accident in the history of a nuclear power plant in Japan occurred in one plant several years ago. Using the model of activity theory, this transformational activity was depicted as following: the reform committee for maintenance work (subject of activity) acted on existing everyday activities for maintenance (object of activity) and transformed them into new ones (outcome of activity) with the use of requests submitted by subcontracted workers for improvement of working conditions and a budget to materialize them (mediating artifact of activity), in the collaboration with the top management who launched and persistently supported the reform committee, subcontracted workers responsible for the physical labor force in operational fields who actively submitted requests for improvement, and workers of the electric company who reviewed the requests and materialized most of them by a budgetary step (community member of activity and division of labor of activity), and with the shared awareness that any measures should be taken to actualize the lesson from the accident (rule of activity). Prior to the accident, safety was regarded as important as long as efficiency would not be sacrificed. Now, in the everyday activities achieved by the transformational activity, safety in operational fields is emphasized to the extent that anyone could not have

  11. EFFECTS OF DYNAMIC AND STATIC STRETCHING WITHIN GENERAL AND ACTIVITY SPECIFIC WARM-UP PROTOCOLS

    Michael Samson

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to determine the effects of static and dynamic stretching protocols within general and activity specific warm-ups. Nine male and ten female subjects were tested under four warm-up conditions including a 1 general aerobic warm-up with static stretching, 2 general aerobic warm-up with dynamic stretching, 3 general and specific warm-up with static stretching and 4 general and specific warm-up with dynamic stretching. Following all conditions, subjects were tested for movement time (kicking movement of leg over 0.5 m distance, countermovement jump height, sit and reach flexibility and 6 repetitions of 20 metre sprints. Results indicated that when a sport specific warm-up was included, there was an 0.94% improvement (p = 0.0013 in 20 meter sprint time with both the dynamic and static stretch groups. No such difference in sprint performance between dynamic and static stretch groups existed in the absence of the sport specific warm-up. The static stretch condition increased sit and reach range of motion (ROM by 2.8% more (p = 0.0083 than the dynamic condition. These results would support the use of static stretching within an activity specific warm-up to ensure maximal ROM along with an enhancement in sprint performance

  12. Study on safety classifications of software used in nuclear power plants and distinct applications of verification and validation activities in each class

    This paper describes the safety classification regarding instrumentation and control (I and C) systems and their software used in nuclear power plants, provides regulatory positions for software important to safety, and proposes verification and validation (V and V) activities applied differently in software classes which are important elements in ensuring software quality assurance. In other word, the I and C systems important to safety are classified into IC-1, IC-2, IC-3, and Non-IC and their software are classified into safety-critical, safety-related, and non-safety software. Based upon these safety classifications, the extent of software V and V activities in each class is differentiated each other. In addition, the paper presents that the software for use in I and C systems important to safety is divided into newly-developed and previously-developed software in terms of design and implementation, and provides the regulatory positions on each type of software

  13. Application of the council directive of 15 July 1980 laying down the Euratom basic safety standards for the health protection of the general public and workers against the dangers of ionizing radiation

    Commission of the European Communities. Luxembourg

    Application of the council directive of 15 July 1980 laying down the Euratom basic safety standards for the health protection of the general public and workers against the dangers of ionizing radiation

  14. Report of the Institute for Reactor Safety on research and development activities in 1994

    Contributions to nuclear safety research concerned the design basis and safety of innovative reactor concepts as well as unsolved problems in the late phase of a core melt-through accident at future light-water-moderated reactors. The works regarding the breeder reactor were finalized. Contributions to the project of nuclear fusion focussed on the development of breeding blankets, high-resistance components, vacuum engineering and proof of the safety of components and systems as well as blanket engineering. (HP)

  15. 78 FR 18617 - Recreational Boating Safety Projects, Programs and Activities Funded Under Provisions of the...

    2013-03-27

    ... conduct boating safety- related research and analysis. ($681,773). Reimbursable Salaries: Funding was... position was that of a professional mathematician/statistician to conduct necessary national surveys...

  16. 77 FR 3784 - Recreational Boating Safety Projects, Programs and Activities Funded Under Provisions of the...

    2012-01-25

    ... safety- related research and analysis. ($693,266). Reimbursable Salaries: Funding was provided to carry... of a professional mathematician/statistician to conduct necessary national surveys and studies...

  17. The activity at the state organs of Russia in the field for providing radiation safety

    The principles of reliable, efficient radiation safety of enterprises, research institute and organizations of Minatom of Russian Federation, environmental protection and some other problems have been discussed in this report. It consists of three parts. The first contents the information of the governmental and industrial safety systems on the territory of Russian Federation. The second part comprises the findings distinguishing the safety of the NPPs and the enterprises of nuclear industry. Some problems of the actual researches and application developments including the development of new international nuclear safety standards based on recommendations of International Committee of Radiation Protection have been written in third part. (author)

  18. Working group 5: Safety

    The technical aspects of safety for the LWR nuclear power plants, and a reprocessing plant are considered. The origin, the type and the extent of the risks for the civil populations are presented for normal working as well as accidental conditions. A general estimate of comparative risks is given for the nuclear industry with respect to other activities. The legal Belgian aspects and their applications, the kind and the quality of the technical testings, the back-fitting of plants are analysed. Considerations are given on the probabilistic analysis, the safety, and the off-shore power plants. (A.F.)

  19. MSFC Skylab airlock module, volume 2. [systems design and performance, systems support activity, and reliability and safety programs

    1974-01-01

    System design and performance of the Skylab Airlock Module and Payload Shroud are presented for the communication and caution and warning systems. Crew station and storage, crew trainers, experiments, ground support equipment, and system support activities are also reviewed. Other areas documented include the reliability and safety programs, test philosophy, engineering project management, and mission operations support.

  20. Annual report to Congress: Department of Energy activities relating to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, Calendar Year 1999

    None

    2000-02-01

    This is the tenth Annual Report to the Congress describing Department of Energy activities in response to formal recommendations and other interactions with the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board). The Board, an independent executive-branch agency established in 1988, provides advice and recommendations to the Secretary of Energy regarding public health and safety issues at the Department's defense nuclear facilities. The Board also reviews and evaluates the content and implementation of health and safety standards, as well as other requirements, relating to the design, construction, operation, and decommissioning of the Department's defense nuclear facilities. During 1999, Departmental activities resulted in the closure of nine Board recommendations. In addition, the Department has completed all implementation plan milestones associated with three Board recommendations. One new Board recommendation was received and accepted by the Department in 1999, and a new implementation plan is being developed to address this recommendation. The Department has also made significant progress with a number of broad-based initiatives to improve safety. These include expanded implementation of integrated safety management at field sites, opening of a repository for long-term storage of transuranic wastes, and continued progress on stabilizing excess nuclear materials to achieve significant risk reduction.

  1. Annual report to Congress: Department of Energy activities relating to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, Calendar Year 1999

    This is the tenth Annual Report to the Congress describing Department of Energy activities in response to formal recommendations and other interactions with the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board). The Board, an independent executive-branch agency established in 1988, provides advice and recommendations to the Secretary of Energy regarding public health and safety issues at the Department's defense nuclear facilities. The Board also reviews and evaluates the content and implementation of health and safety standards, as well as other requirements, relating to the design, construction, operation, and decommissioning of the Department's defense nuclear facilities. During 1999, Departmental activities resulted in the closure of nine Board recommendations. In addition, the Department has completed all implementation plan milestones associated with three Board recommendations. One new Board recommendation was received and accepted by the Department in 1999, and a new implementation plan is being developed to address this recommendation. The Department has also made significant progress with a number of broad-based initiatives to improve safety. These include expanded implementation of integrated safety management at field sites, opening of a repository for long-term storage of transuranic wastes, and continued progress on stabilizing excess nuclear materials to achieve significant risk reduction

  2. Annual report to Congress: Department of Energy activities relating to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, calendar year 1998

    NONE

    1999-02-01

    This is the ninth Annual Report to the Congress describing Department of Energy (Department) activities in response to formal recommendations and other interactions with the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board). The Board, an independent executive-branch agency established in 1988, provides advice and recommendations to the Secretary of energy regarding public health and safety issues at the Department`s defense nuclear facilities. The Board also reviews and evaluates the content and implementation of health and safety standards, as well as other requirements, relating to the design, construction, operation, and decommissioning of the Department`s defense nuclear facilities. The locations of the major Department facilities are provided. During 1998, Departmental activities resulted in the proposed closure of one Board recommendation. In addition, the Department has completed all implementation plan milestones associated with four other Board recommendations. Two new Board recommendations were received and accepted by the Department in 1998, and two new implementation plans are being developed to address these recommendations. The Department has also made significant progress with a number of broad-based initiatives to improve safety. These include expanded implementation of integrated safety management at field sites, a renewed effort to increase the technical capabilities of the federal workforce, and a revised plan for stabilizing excess nuclear materials to achieve significant risk reduction.

  3. Specialized consultant in radiological safety to the Ciudad del Carmen general hospital, PEMEX. III.- September and October of 2002

    The Ciudad del Carmen general hospital, dependent of PEMEX, It request consultant of the ININ to be able to maintain their sanitary license for the use of X-ray equipment for the radiologic diagnostic.The proposal of the ININ was to be a program of technical attendance, schedule monthly to be able to solve the observations that are presented in the use of those equipment, and that the hospital can conserve its respective sanitary license.(Author)

  4. Recreational activities performed with neoplasia carrier Inpatients in a general hospital

    Caroline de Castro Moura

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at apprehending the contribution of recreational activities in the treatment of hospitalized cancer patients and identifying the most stimulating resources for them. This is a qualitative research of phenomenological nature, it was approved by the Ethics in Research Committee, Protocol 139/2010. It was conducted with patients with cancer in a general hospital, located in Alfenas, in March and April, 2011.The research began from these guiding questions: What are your thoughts on the recreational team work and the activities they do? What do you suggest for this group to be developed? It was perceived that ludic activities help patients to face the disease, that they eased the interaction between the recreational group and the multiprofessional team, besides providing a happy and welcoming environment. The most well accepted activities were music and games the clowns provided. We suggest implementing the humanization by using ludic resources.

  5. Evaluation of safety and efficacy of zonisamide in adult patients with partial, generalized, and combined seizures: an open labeled, noncomparative, observational Indian study

    Dash A

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Amitabh Dash,1 Sangeeta Ravat,2 Avathvadi Venkatesan Srinivasan,3 Ashutosh Shetty,4 Vivek Kumar,5 Renu Achtani,6 Vivek Narain Mathur,7 Boby Varkey Maramattom,8 Veeresh Bajpai,9 Nanjappa C Manjunath,10 Randhi Venkata Narayana,11 Suyog Mehta12 1Eisai Co. Ltd., 2Department of Neurology, Seth GS Medical College & KEM Hospital, Mumbai, 3Department of Neurology, Trinity Acute Care Hospital, Chennai, 4Department of Neurology, Criticare Multispeciality Hospital & Research Centre, Mumbai, 5Department of Neurology, Metro Multispeciality Hospital, Noida, 6Department of Neurology, Mata Chanan Devi Hospital, New Delhi, 7Department of Neurology, Vivekananda Hospital, Hyderabad, 8Department of Neurology, Lourdes Hospital, Kochi, 9Department of Neurology, Sai Neurology Clinic, Lucknow, 10Department of Neurology, Brain and Nerve Care, Bangalore, 11Department of Neurology, Seven Hills Hospital, Visakhapatnam, 12Department of Pharmacology & Therapeutics,Government Medical College, Solapur, India Abstract: A prospective, multicentric, noncomparative open-label observational study was conducted to evaluate the safety and efficacy zonisamide in Indian adult patients for the treatment of partial, generalized, or combined seizures. A total of 655 adult patients with partial, generalized, or combined seizures from 30 centers across India were recruited after initial screening. Patients received 100 mg zonisamide as initiating dose as monotherapy/adjunctive therapy for 24 weeks, with titration of 100 mg every 2 weeks if required. Adverse events, responder rates, and seizure freedom were observed every 4 weeks. Efficacy and safety were also assessed using Clinicians Global Assessment of Response to Therapy and Patients Global Assessment of Tolerability to Therapy, respectively. Follow-up was conducted for a period of 24 weeks after treatment initiation. A total of 655 patients were enrolled and received the treatment and 563 completed the evaluation phase. A total of 20

  6. Dual and chiral objects for optical activity in general scattering directions

    Fernandez-Corbaton, Ivan; Rockstuhl, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    Optically active artificial structures have attracted tremendous research attention. Such structures must meet two requirements: Lack of spatial inversion symmetries and, a condition usually not explicitly considered, the structure shall preserve the helicity of light, which implies that there must be a vanishing coupling between the states of opposite polarization handedness among incident and scattered plane waves. Here, we put forward and demonstrate that a unit cell made from chiraly arranged electromagnetically dual scatterers serves exactly this purpose. We prove this by demonstrating optical activity of such unit cell in general scattering directions.

  7. Activity and safety of sunitinib in poor risk metastatic renal cell carcinoma patients

    Romualdo Barroso-Sousa

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose To assess the activity, safety and treatment patterns of sunitinib in patients with poor-risk metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed the charts of poor risk patients treated with sunitinib from October 2006 to July 2013 who met the eligibility criteria. The primary endpoint was overall survival (OS. Tumor radiological response was measured according to RECIST 1.1 and adverse events (AEs were assessed through standard criteria. Results Median OS was 8.16 months (95% CI, 5.73-10.59. Of the 53 patients included in this analysis, 9 (17.0% achieved partial response, 12 (22.6% had stable disease. Median treatment duration was 3.30 months (95% CI: 1.96-4.63 and 26.4% of patients discontinued treatment due to toxicity. Grade 3 or higher AEs occurred in 39.6% of patients, the most common being fatigue (15.1%, neutropenia (9.5%, nausea, vomiting and diarrhea (7.5% each. Discussion Sunitinib may benefit some unselected poor-risk patients, although the rates of AEs and drug discontinuation suggest a need for careful patient monitoring.

  8. Study of Active Ingredients in Black Soybean Sprouts and Their Safety in Cosmetic Use

    Yinmao Dong

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Active ingredients in different lengths of black soybean sprouts were extracted with water. Concentrations of the main proteins and polysaccharides were determined by the Forint phenol assay and phenol-sulfuric acid assay, respectively. Anti-oxidizing capacities of the extracts were measured in vitro using the DPPH scavenging test and whitening capacity was measured in vitro using the tyrosinase inhibition test. The effects of the bean sprout extracts on human skin fibroblasts damnified by H2O2 were studied using an MTT colorimetric assay. The safety of the extracts was determined using the red blood cell (RBC test, chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM assay and human patch test. Results show that DPPH radical scavenging rates at different shoot lengths were all greater than 95%, while the tyrosinase inhibition capacity of the extracts reached 98%. Hemolysis rate in all extracts were lower than 10%, below the 20% regulatory limit for the RBC test. No signs of allergic reactions were observed in the human patch tests. The optimum extract was obtained from bean sprouts grown to 0.5 cm. Extracts of black bean sprouts are safe and can be used as additives in anti-aging and whitening cosmetic products.

  9. Recent research and development activities on nuclear criticality safety in Japan

    Research and development activities on nuclear fuel cycle processes have recently been remarkably advanced in Japan. A pilot plant of uranium enrichment using centrifuge process has been built and started at Ningyotoge. The PNC reprocessing plant at Tokai, with completion of the works for replacement of the acid recovering evaporator, is ready for resumed operation soon. A plutonium conversion facility using a proliferation-resistant process to be connected to the main reprocessing plant has been designed. Frequency of transportation of spent fuels has also increased, and a number of transportation containers have been designed, safety reviewed, built and used. A research facility, called CPF (Chemical Process Facility), to be used for researchers on reprocessing technology of FBR fuels, as well as on solidification processes of high-level liquid wastes from the PNC reprocessing plant, has been built. Plutonium fuels for JOYO and MONJU, as well as for FUGEN, are being fabricated. Four private plants, with total capacity of about 1000 tons, U/y of LWR fuels, are in operation. A new private company, called Japan Nuclear Fuel Service Co., has been established

  10. Expert consensus and recommendations on safety criteria for active mobilization of mechanically ventilated critically ill adults

    Hodgson, Carol L; Stiller, Kathy; Needham, Dale M.; Tipping, Claire J; Harrold, Megan; Baldwin, Claire E; Bradley, Scott; Berney, Sue; Caruana, Lawrence R; Elliott, Doug; Green, Margot; Haines, Kimberley; Higgins, Alisa M; Kaukonen, Kirsi-Maija; Leditschke, Isabel Anne

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to develop consensus recommendations on safety parameters for mobilizing adult, mechanically ventilated, intensive care unit (ICU) patients. Methods A systematic literature review was followed by a meeting of 23 multidisciplinary ICU experts to seek consensus regarding the safe mobilization of mechanically ventilated patients. Results Safety considerations were summarized in four categories: respiratory, cardiovascular, neurological and other. Consensus ...

  11. 77 FR 28602 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Early Food Safety...

    2012-05-15

    ... (57 FR 22984). The guidance entitled, ``Recommendations for the Early Food Safety Evaluation of New... their new protein. Such communication helps to ensure that any potential food safety issues regarding a new protein in a new plant variety are resolved early in development, prior to any...

  12. Getting There! Mini-Units and Learning Activities on Transportation Safety for Grades 9 through 12.

    Wolff, Peter; And Others

    One of a series of eleven curriculum manuals which cover the four transportation topics of public transportation, transportation and the environment, transportation safety, and bicycles for elementary, secondary, and adult levels, this manual covers the transportation safety topic for grades 9-12. It contains forty-three learning activities…

  13. Getting There! Mini-Units and Learning Activities on Transportation Safety for Grades 6 through 9.

    Wolff, Peter; And Others

    One of a series of eleven curriculum manuals which cover the four transportation topics of public transportation, transportation and the environment, transportation safety, and bicycles for elementary, secondary, and adult levels, this manual covers the transportation safety topic for grades 6-9. The manual contains forty-seven learning activities…

  14. 77 FR 58608 - Railroad Safety Advisory Committee (RSAC); Working Group Activity Update

    2012-09-21

    ... vote on March 2, 2012. These recommendations address safety issues related to high-speed rail trainsets... appropriate safety standards for the high-speed rail projects planned in California and Nevada. The ETF II... such as international operators of high-speed equipment, car builders, wheel/rail interaction...

  15. 75 FR 76070 - Railroad Safety Advisory Committee (RSAC); Working Group Activity Update

    2010-12-07

    ... appropriate safety standards for the high-speed rail projects planned in California and Florida. The ETF II... on developing crashworthiness and occupant protection safety recommendations for high-speed passenger... features. Any type of equipment may be addressed, including conventional locomotives, high-speed power...

  16. Active control of far-field sound radiated by a rectangular panel - a general analysis

    Pan, Jie; Snyder, Scott D.; Hansen, Colin H.; Fuller, Chris R.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper a general analysis is presented for the active control of the far-field harmonic sound radiated by a rectangular panel that is built into an infinite baffle. In this analysis, the panel vibration may be generated by either airborne sound (incident sound field) or by structure borne vibrations. The far-field radiated sound is controlled either by acoustical sources or vibration sources. Minimization of both the local sound pressure and the total power output is considered. Analyt...

  17. Generalization of an Active Electronic Notebook for Teaching Multiple Programming Languages

    Torabzadeh-Tari, Mohsen; Fritzson, Peter; Pop, Adrian; Sjölund, Martin

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present a generalization of the active electronic notebook, OMNotebook, for handling multiple programming languages for educational purposes. OMNotebook can be an alternative or complementary tool to the traditional teaching method with lecturing and reading textbooks. Experience shows that using such an electronic book will lead to more engagement from the students. OMNotebook can contain technical computations and text, as well as graphics. Hence it is a suitable tool for t...

  18. Recreational activities performed with neoplasia carrier Inpatients in a general hospital

    Caroline de Castro Moura; Zélia Marilda Rodrigues Resck; Eliza Maria Rezende Dázio

    2012-01-01

    This study aims at apprehending the contribution of recreational activities in the treatment of hospitalized cancer patients and identifying the most stimulating resources for them. This is a qualitative research of phenomenological nature, it was approved by the Ethics in Research Committee, Protocol 139/2010. It was conducted with patients with cancer in a general hospital, located in Alfenas, in March and April, 2011.The research began from these guiding questions: What are your thoughts o...

  19. A statistical assessment of tropical cyclone activity in atmospheric general circulation models

    Camargo, Suzana J.; Barnston, Anthony G.; Zebiak, Stephen E.

    2005-01-01

    The properties of tropical cyclones in three low-resolution atmospheric general circulation models (AGCMs) in seven ocean basins are discussed. The models are forced by prescribed, observed sea surface temperatures over a period of 40 yr, and their simulations of tropical cyclone activity are compared with observations. The model cyclone characteristics considered include genesis position, number of cyclones per year, seasonality, accumulated cyclone energy, track locations, and number of sto...

  20. Analysis of Generalized Non-Active Power Theory for Compensation of Non-Periodic Disturbances

    Tlustý, J.; Švec, J.; Sedra, J. B.; Valouch, Viktor

    Santiago de Compostela: EA4EPQ, 2012, s. 1-6. ISBN 978-84-615-6648-8. [International Conference on Renewable Energies and Power Quality (ICREPQ 12). Santiago de Compostela (ES), 28.03.2012-30.03.2012] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20570509 Keywords : generalized non-active power theory * electric power system * parallel compensation Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  1. Recent and current activities of the OECD/NEA Working Group on Fuel Safety (NEA/CSNI). Recent and Current Activities of the Working Group on Fuel Safety (NEA/CSNI)

    The Working Group on Fuel Safety (WGFS) is part of the Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) of the Nuclear Energy Agency and has the main mission of advancing the current understanding and addressing fuel safety issues. Recent and current activities of the working group have addressed mainly the loss of coolant accident (LOCA), the reactivity initiated accident (RIA), the fuel safety criteria and leaking fuel issues, as well as Fukushima-related fuel topics. In the area of LOCA, the group issued different documents, the most notable being a very comprehensive state of the art report [NEA/CSNI/R (2009)15]. Regarding RIA, some documents were finalised and issued in the recent years, as well as a state of the art report [NEA/CSNI/R (2010)1]. The question of leaking fuel and how it is handled in the reactors is an activity that is just starting. Of particular interest to people developing new fuel concepts is the Nuclear Fuel Safety Criteria Technical Review - Second Edition [NEA/CSNI/R (2012)3]. This document provides a broad overview of the numerous criteria used in the NEA member countries to demonstrate to safe use of fuel in light water reactors. The WGFS has started discussions about fuel related issues raised by the Fukushima accident, in particular, hydrogen production. New concepts have been proposed to solve these issues but it appears that these concepts will need to go through a long qualification process to assess their adequacy for the different situations considered in the evaluation of fuel safety, from normal operation to accident conditions

  2. A simplified method for quantitative assessment of the relative health and safety risk of environmental management activities

    This report presents a simplified method to assess the health and safety risk of Environmental Management activities of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The method applies to all types of Environmental Management activities including waste management, environmental restoration, and decontamination and decommissioning. The method is particularly useful for planning or tradeoff studies involving multiple conceptual options because it combines rapid evaluation with a quantitative approach. The method is also potentially applicable to risk assessments of activities other than DOE Environmental Management activities if rapid quantitative results are desired

  3. New and recently finalised activities within the NKS Programmes for Nordic cooperation on nuclear reactor safety and emergency preparedness

    Andgren, Karin; Andersson, Kasper Grann; Magnússon, Sigurður M.;

    2015-01-01

    Over the years, NKS has provided funding for hundreds of research activities in fields comprising reactor safety, decommissioning, nuclear and radiological emergency preparedness, and management of radioactive waste. Advanced technologies and methods developed under the NKS framework have been used...... within the Nordic countries as well as internationally. Two programme areas are defined under the NKS platform: The NKS-R programme on nuclear reactor safety and the NKS-B programme on emergency preparedness. Three articles, giving an introduction to NKS and its two programmes, were published in...

  4. Is Wetter Better? An Evaluation of Over-the-Counter Personal Lubricants for Safety and Anti-HIV-1 Activity

    Dezzutti, Charlene S.; Brown, Elizabeth R.; Bernard Moncla; Julie Russo; Marilyn Cost; Lin Wang; Kevin Uranker; Kunjara Na Ayudhya, Ratiya P.; Kara Pryke; Jim Pickett; Marc-André Leblanc; Rohan, Lisa C.

    2012-01-01

    Because lubricants may decrease trauma during coitus, it is hypothesized that they could aid in the prevention of HIV acquisition. Therefore, safety and anti-HIV-1 activity of over-the-counter (OTC) aqueous- (n = 10), lipid- (n = 2), and silicone-based (n = 2) products were tested. The rheological properties of the lipid-based lubricants precluded testing with the exception of explant safety testing. Six aqueous-based gels were hyperosmolar, two were nearly iso-osmolar, and two were hypo-osmo...

  5. A randomized clinical trial comparing the efficacy and safety of ramosetron versus ondansetron in patients undergoing abdominal surgery under general anesthesia

    Sriramamurthy Kaja

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Post-operative nausea and vomiting is one of the most common and distressing complications after anesthesia and surgery. It may lead to serious post-operative complications. Ramosetron is a newer 5-HT3 receptor antagonist and has more potent and longer duration of antiemetic effects compared to first generation 5HT3 receptor antagonists. The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of Ramosetron for the prevention of post-operative nausea and vomiting with that of Ondansetron in patients undergoing abdominal surgeries under general anesthesia. Methods: In this randomized, double-blind study, 60 patients, 18-60 years of both genders falling under ASA I-II category scheduled for abdominal surgery were included. Group I received I.V ramosetron 0.3 mg while group II received I.V Ondansetron 4 mg at the time of extubation. The standard general anesthetic technique was used throughout. Postoperatively the incidences of nausea, vomiting, and safety assessments were performed at 1, 2, 6, and 24 h during the first 24 h after surgery. Results: There were no differences between groups with respect to patient demographics. The percentage of patients who had complete response (no PONV, and no need for another rescue antiemetic from 0 to 24 h after anesthesia was 56% with ramosetron and 33% with ondansetron. The corresponding rates at 1, 2, 6, and 24 h after anesthesia were 76% and 63%, 76% and 50%, 100 and 83%, 100 and 93%, respectively. Safety profiles of the two drugs were comparable, as no clinically serious adverse effects caused by study drugs were observed in either of the groups. Conclusion: Our study concludes that prophylactic therapy with ramosetron is highly efficacious than ondansetron in preventing PONV in patients undergoing abdominal surgery under general anesthesia.

  6. HANARO Safety Performance Indicators

    HANARO is a 30 MW open-tank-in-pool type multi-purpose research reactor. Safety improvement activities have been implemented and the importance of safety management in nuclear activities for reactor application and utilization has also been emphasized. Safety performance indicators (SPIs) are used to assess the safety management status, in combination with other factors such as safety culture, human performance and operation status. The SPI system can provide a proactive approach to complement other safety assessment activities. HANARO has tried to develop a programme for the establishment of safety performance indicators. In this paper the application experience of safety performance indicators in HANARO is described. (author)

  7. Regulatory inspection activities related to inspection planning, plant maintenance and assessment of safety. Proceedings of an international workshop

    The NEA Committee on Nuclear Regulatory Activities (CNRA) believes that an essential factor in ensuring the safety of nuclear installations is the continuing exchange and analysis of technical information and data. To facilitate this exchange the Committee has established Working Groups and Groups of Experts in specialised topics. CNRA believes that safety inspections are a major element in the regulatory authority's efforts to ensure the safe operation of nuclear facilities. Considering the importance of these issues, the Committee has established a special Working Group on Inspection Practices (WGIP). The purpose of WGIP, is to facilitate the exchange of information and experience related to regulatory safety inspections between CNRA Member countries. This was the 3. international workshop held by the WGIP on regulatory inspection activities. The focus of this workshop was on 3 main topics; Inspection Planning, Plant Maintenance and Assessment of Safety. This document presents the proceedings from the workshop, including: workshop programme, results and conclusions, papers and presentations and the list of participants. The main purpose of the Workshop is to provide a forum of exchange of information on the regulatory inspection activities

  8. Status of safety improvements

    A review of safety improvements of the Armenian NPP, i.e. two WWER-440 units is presented. The implemented activities concerning engineering safety; radiation safety; operation safety; personnel training and qualification; operating experience are described in detail. A list of serious problems dealing with safety upgrading of NPP is given

  9. Exposure to ionizing radiations having a medical origin. Propositions for the implementation and the development of epidemiology surveillance activities in general population; Exposition aux rayonnements ionisants d'origine medicale. Propositions pour la mise en place et le developpement d'activites de surveillance epidemiologique en population generale

    NONE

    2002-09-01

    This report gives propositions relative to the implementation and the development of epidemiology surveillance activities in general population in relation with medical exposure to ionizing radiations. It is intended for the General Direction of Health and General Direction of Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection. These propositions have been elaborated by a work group coordinated and run by InVS and gathering the following organisms: French Agency of sanitary safety of health products (A.F.S.S.A.P.S.), Center of Quality Assurance of technological applications in the area of health (C.A.A.T.S.), Direction of Hospitals and Care organization (D.H.O.S.), General Direction of Health (D.G.S.), General Direction of Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection (D.G.S.N.R.), National Federation of radiologists physicists (F.N.M.R.), institute of Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety (I.R.S.N.), INSERM 'epidemiology of cancers', French Society of Biology and Nuclear Medicine (S.F.B.M.N.), French Society of Medical Physics (S.F.P.M.), French Society of Radiology (S.F.R.). (N.C.)

  10. Efficacy and safety of ramosetron versus ondansetron for postoperative nausea and vomiting after general anesthesia: a meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials

    Gao CJ

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Chengjie Gao, Bo Li, Lufeng Xu, Fubin Lv, Guimao Cao, Huixia Wang, Fei Wang, Guanghan WuDepartment of Anesthesiology, General Hospital of Jinan Military Command, Jinan, People’s Republic of ChinaBackground: Postoperative nausea and vomiting is a common side effect of general anesthesia. In this study, we performed a meta-analysis on the efficacy and safety of ramosetron versus ondansetron in the prevention of postoperative nausea and vomiting using the most recently published randomized controlled clinical studies.Methods: PubMed and EMBASE were searched for randomized controlled clinical trials comparing the efficacy and safety of ramosetron and ondansetron. The meta-analysis was performed using Review Manager version 5.3 (Cochrane Collaboration, Oxford, UK. Dichotomous outcomes are presented as the relative risk (RR with a 95% confidence interval (CI.Results: A total of 898 patients from nine selected studies were treated with antiemetics after surgery, including 450 patients who received ondansetron 4 mg and 448 patients who received ramosetron 0.3 mg. The meta-analysis showed no statistically significant difference between the two groups with regard to prevention of postoperative nausea (PON during different time periods in the 48 hours after surgery. When comparing the efficacy of ramosetron and ondansetron in the prevention of postoperative vomiting (POV, at various time intervals in the 24 hours after surgery, ramosetron was significantly more efficient than ondansetron: 0–6 hours (RR 0.46, 95% CI 0.24–0.92; P=0.03, 0–24 hours (RR 0.72, 95% CI 0.52–1.00; P=0.05, and 6–24 hours (RR 0.51, 95% CI 0.31–0.84; P=0.008. At other time periods between 24 and 48 hours after surgery, ramosetron did not show better efficacy than ondansetron. When comparing the safety profiles of ramosetron and ondansetron, fewer side effects were recorded in the ramosetron group (RR 0.65, 95% CI 0.47–0.91; P=0.01.Conclusion: Our meta

  11. A Development Framework for Software Security in Nuclear Safety Systems: Integrating Secure Development and System Security Activities

    The protection of nuclear safety software is essential in that a failure can result in significant economic loss and physical damage to the public. However, software security has often been ignored in nuclear safety software development. To enforce security considerations, nuclear regulator commission recently issued and revised the security regulations for nuclear computer-based systems. It is a great challenge for nuclear developers to comply with the security requirements. However, there is still no clear software development process regarding security activities. This paper proposes an integrated development process suitable for the secure development requirements and system security requirements described by various regulatory bodies. It provides a three-stage framework with eight security activities as the software development process. Detailed descriptions are useful for software developers and licensees to understand the regulatory requirements and to establish a detailed activity plan for software design and engineering

  12. An overview of research activities on materials for nuclear applications at the INL Safety, Tritium and Applied Research facility

    P. Calderoni; P. Sharpe; M. Shimada

    2009-09-01

    The Safety, Tritium and Applied Research facility at the Idaho National Laboratory is a US Department of Energy National User Facility engaged in various aspects of materials research for nuclear applications related to fusion and advanced fission systems. Research activities are mainly focused on the interaction of tritium with materials, in particular plasma facing components, liquid breeders, high temperature coolants, fuel cladding, cooling and blanket structures and heat exchangers. Other activities include validation and verification experiments in support of the Fusion Safety Program, such as beryllium dust reactivity and dust transport in vacuum vessels, and support of Advanced Test Reactor irradiation experiments. This paper presents an overview of the programs engaged in the activities, which include the US-Japan TITAN collaboration, the US ITER program, the Next Generation Power Plant program and the tritium production program, and a presentation of ongoing experiments as well as a summary of recent results with emphasis on fusion relevant materials.

  13. 30 Years of NRWG activities towards harmonization of nuclear safety criteria and requirements

    This report describes the work performed and the results achieved by the NRWG since its creation in 1972 to advise the Commission on nuclear safety matters (safety methodologies, criteria, standards, postulated accidents inside the nuclear installations, natural hazards, man-made hazards, training of personnel and use of simulator, ALARA policy to reduce the doses to the personnel and the public, emergency planning, defence in depth and integrity of the successive barriers between the radioactive products and the environment, radiological consequences of postulated accidents, probabilistic safety analysis, severe accidents analysis and management. The report also lists a number of technical subjects where NRWG has played a leading role. (author)

  14. Radiological safety and control

    The practical objective of radiological safety control is intended for achievement and maintenance of appropreately safe condition in environmental control for activities involving exposure from the use of radiation. In order to establish these objectives, we should be to prevent deterministic effects and to limit the occurrence stochastic effects to level deemed to be acceptable by the application of general principles of radiation protection and systems of dose limitation based on ICRP recommendations. 34 tabs., 19 figs., 11 refs. (Author) .new

  15. New Safety rules

    Safety Commission

    2008-01-01

    The revision of CERN Safety rules is in progress and the following new Safety rules have been issued on 15-04-2008: Safety Procedure SP-R1 Establishing, Updating and Publishing CERN Safety rules: http://cern.ch/safety-rules/SP-R1.htm; Safety Regulation SR-S Smoking at CERN: http://cern.ch/safety-rules/SR-S.htm; Safety Regulation SR-M Mechanical Equipment: http://cern.ch/safety-rules/SR-M.htm; General Safety Instruction GSI-M1 Standard Lifting Equipment: http://cern.ch/safety-rules/GSI-M1.htm; General Safety Instruction GSI-M2 Standard Pressure Equipment: http://cern.ch/safety-rules/GSI-M2.htm; General Safety Instruction GSI-M3 Special Mechanical Equipment: http://cern.ch/safety-rules/GSI-M3.htm. These documents apply to all persons under the Director General’s authority. All Safety rules are available at the web page: http://www.cern.ch/safety-rules The Safety Commission

  16. Active FEL-Klystrons As Formers of Femto-Second Clusters of Electromagnetic Field. General Description

    A.Ju. Brusnik

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A qualitative physical and technological substantiation of the creation possibility of a new class of Femto-second Free Electron Lasers (FFELs (active cluster FEL-klystrons is given in the article. The concept of “electromagnetic field” cluster is introduced. Apart from that, the main difference between the concepts “the electromagnetic cluster” and “the radio-pulse” (which is well-known in radio-physics is formulated. The concept of “cluster electromagnetic wave” is also discussed. A general approach to designing the proposed active cluster FEL-klystrons is formulated. The description of a principal design scheme of the active cluster FEL-klystrons and their key technological basis are discussed.

  17. Review of occupational safety and health activities in Southern Africa funded under the DANIDA/ILO framework agreement on technical cooperation

    Hasle, Peter; Jørgensen, Claus

    2003-01-01

    A review of occupational safety and health activities in Southern Africa (SADC region) which have been funded under the DANIDA/ILO framework agreement on technical cooperation.......A review of occupational safety and health activities in Southern Africa (SADC region) which have been funded under the DANIDA/ILO framework agreement on technical cooperation....

  18. IPN - Orsay Report of activity 1998-1999. General activities. Technical Development; IPN - Orsay. Rapport d'activite 1998-1999. Activites generales. Recherches techniques

    Pouthas, Joel; Hutin, Christiane; Rivenez, Jean-Philippe [eds.] [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, 91406 Orsay cedex (France)

    2000-01-12

    ALICE dimuon spectrometer and for HADES experiment. Also the progress in developing the equipment for G0 experiment, VAMOS spectrometer, the large surface annular telescope and EUROBALL 4 detector is described. Finally in the chapter four there are reported works on developing a peak sensing ADC, a VXI D size card for EXOGAM,and data acquisition systems. The first volume begins with short reports of activity from the technical and general servicing departments. The second volume of the IPNO Report presents the results of the Research Division.

  19. Safety strategy

    The basis for safety strategy in nuclear industry and especially nuclear power plants is the prevention of radioactivity release inside or outside of the technical installation. Therefore either technical or administrative measures are combined to a general strategy concept. This introduction will explain in more detail the following topics: - basic principles of safety - lines of assurance (LOA) - defense in depth - deterministic and probabilistic methods. This presentation is seen as an introduction to the more detailed discussion following in this course, nevertheless some selected examples will be used to illustrate the aspects of safety strategy development although they might be repeated later on. (orig.)

  20. [Anti-counterfeit activities of pharmaceutical companies in Japan: for patient safety].

    Shofuda, Ken-ichi; Aragane, Katsumi; Igari, Yasutaka; Matsumoto, Kinya; Ito, Kazuya

    2014-01-01

    Global spread of counterfeit medicines is an imminent threat for the patients' safety. Although major targets of counterfeits are still erectile dysfunction (ED) drugs in the industrialized countries, including Japan, anti-cancer agents and some medicines for metabolic syndromes are also being counterfeited and circulated to the market mainly through the Internet. Due to the global expansion of the business, pharmaceutical companies based in Japan are suffering from the damage of counterfeits, illegal sales including diversion, and thefts, which have never been experienced in the conventional domestic market. We, pharmaceutical companies, must be responsible for the prevention of the prevalence because our mission is to deliver effective and safe medicine to patients. For this end, we are taking necessary actions including, 1. Forestalling counterfeit, falsification and illicit trade: Measures to prevent counterfeiting are taken by introducing anti-counterfeit technologies to the packaging and tablets on a risk basis. It is also important to establish supply chain security on a global scale. 2. Finding out counterfeits and cooperating crackdown: We are conducting market and internet surveillances when high risk products are sold in high risk markets. The outcome of the criminal investigation is reported to authorities and police if necessary. 3. Conducting educational campaign to medical staff or patients: For example, four companies which manufacture and sell ED drug in Japan are collaboratively continuing activities to raise the awareness of the danger of Internet purchase. To deliver effective and safe medicines stably and globally, pharmaceutical companies extend comprehensive measures against counterfeit and illicit trading. PMID:24492224

  1. Scientific Assessment Activities Conducted by Food Safety Agencies to Support Domestic and International Standards Development

    Saunier, Rozenn

    2014-01-01

    Scientific risk assessment is fundamental to the development of national and international food safety standards which are based upon the outcomes of a formal risk analysis process. In France, for example, scientific risk analysis is achieved through a two-step process. At the outset, the French Agency for Food, Environmental and Occupational Health and Safety (ANSES) uses its competencies in risk assessment, research, monitoring and reference to provide scientific opi...

  2. Safety of a dose-escalated pre-workout supplement in recreationally active females

    Vogel, Roxanne M; Joy, Jordan M; Paul H Falcone; Matt M Mosman; Kim, Michael P; Moon, Jordan R

    2015-01-01

    Background Pre-workout supplements (PWS) have increased in popularity among athletic populations for their purported ergogenic benefits. Most PWS contain a “proprietary blend” of several ingredients, such as caffeine, beta-alanine, and nitrate in undisclosed dosages. Currently, little research exists on the safety and potential side effects of chronic consumption of PWS, and even less so involving female populations. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to examine the safety of con...

  3. 通用航空的飞行安全与人的因素%General aviation flight safety and human factors

    张霞; 郑晓惠; 吴铨; 周晴霖; 吴飞飞; 黄亚萍; 马月欣; 王志翔

    2014-01-01

    Objective To retrospectively analyze the general aviation flight accidents,and the related role of human factors such as pilot's gender,age,flight experience,etc.that played in flight accident as well as to provide constructive advices to China general aviation flight safety.Literature resource and selection Relevant literatures on flight safety of general aviation and human factors published at home and abroad.Literature quotation Thirty-eight published literatures were cited.Literature synthesis U.S.general aviation accident and prevention researches in this area were reviewed,and the roles of pilot's gender,age,flight experience and combination of factors in the general aviation accidents were analyzed,and the advices for China general aviation flight safety were put forward.Human factors were accounted as the first factor in U.S.general aviation accidents.More male pilots were involved in fatal accidents than female pilots because of the nature adventure reason; older pilots' flight experiences might partially compensate their work ability reduction due to physiological and psychological shortages,but with the increased risk potential in flying mission,flight management should be further perfected.In addition,weather and environment conditions,pilot's alcohol taking,drug abuse and other factors could contribute to general aviation accidents.Conclusions General aviation of China is about to usher in a stage of rapid development.Learning from domestic and international existing research results and experiences in aviation medicine,specifying medical examination standards and mechanism for general aviation pilots,strengthening the education and training of pilots and establishing a sound system of accident investigation would be fully helpful to reduce China general aviation flying accidents that caused by human factors in future and to improve flight safety level.%目的 回顾分析国外通用航空飞行事故的概况,及其与飞行员性别、年龄、飞

  4. Patterns of muscle activation during generalized tonic and tonic–clonic epileptic seizures

    Conradsen, Isa; Wolf, Peter; Sams, Thomas; Sørensen, Helge Bjarup Dissing; Beniczky, Sándor

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Tonic seizures and the tonic phase of tonic–clonic epileptic seizures are defined as “sustained tonic” muscle contraction lasting a few seconds to minutes. Visual inspection of the surface electromyogram (EMG) during seizures contributed considerably to a better understanding and accurate...... diagnosis of several seizure types. However, quantitative analysis of the surface EMG during the epileptic seizures has received surprisingly little attention until now. The aim of our study was to elucidate the pathomechanism of the tonic muscle activation during epileptic seizures. Methods: Surface EMG...... was recorded from the deltoid muscles, on both sides, during 63 seizures from 20 patients with epilepsy (10 with generalized tonic and 10 with tonic–clonic seizures). Twenty age‐ and gender‐matched normal controls simulated 100 generalized tonic seizures. To characterize the signal properties we...

  5. Nuclear safety review process at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories

    Atomic Energy of Canada has a extensive health and safety organization in place to protect its facilities and employees, and the public in general. This consists of the operating groups who have the primary responsibility for safety, and a network of safety advisory groups and safety review committees for providing the broadest possible overview of facility safety. A rigorous multi-stage nuclear safety review process is specified by Company policies and procedures to ensure that all activities have undergone thorough review and have satisfied predetermined requirements. For major facilities, this includes up to five distinct safety review and licensing stages with approvals being required from both the Atomic Energy Control Board and AECL Nuclear Safety Advisory Committee for the major steps in the process. In addition, each approved operating facility, including its experimental program, undergoes regular independent safety review and assessment of ongoing operation. The role of the AECL Safety and Reliability Directorate in these activities is described. Other aspects of the overall safety review process including the development of safety criteria, the development of standard safety documentation, and the application of quality assurance to safety assessment activities are discussed. Some thinking is presented on possible future directions in the continuing evolution of these overall safety processes

  6. Report on the 1999 activities of the State Office for Nuclear Safety in the fields of state supervision of nuclear safety of nuclear facilities and of radiation protection

    The responsibilities of the State Office for Nuclear Safety as the Czech national regulatory body are outlined. State supervision encompassed, in particular, the Dukovany NPP which is in operation and the Temelin NPP which is under construction. The operating patterns for Dukovany (operational events, Limits and Conditions, maintenance, support, ...) and construction progress and licensing of Temelin are described in detail. Other topics dealt with include, among others, ionizing radiation sources and workplaces handling such sources, nuclear material transport, state system for nuclear materials accountancy and control, central registries for radiation protection, nuclear waste management, the National Radiation Monitoring Network, personnel qualification and training, emergency planning, legislative activities, international cooperation, and public information. (P.A.)

  7. Active generalized predictive control of turbine tip clearance for aero-engines

    Peng Kai; Fan Ding; Yang Fan; Fu Qiang; Li Yong

    2013-01-01

    Active control of turbine blade tip clearance continues to be a concern in design and con-trol of gas turbines. Ever increasing demands for improved efficiency and higher operating temper-atures require more stringent tolerances on turbine tip clearance. In this paper, a turbine tip clearance control apparatus and a model of turbine tip clearance are proposed;an implicit active generalized predictive control (GPC), with auto-regressive (AR) error modification and fuzzy adjustment on control horizon, is presented, as well as a quantitative analysis method of robust per-turbation radius of the system. The active clearance control (ACC) of aero-engine turbine tip clear-ance is evaluated in a lapse-rate take-off transient, along with the comparative and quantitative analysis of the stability and robustness of the active tip clearance control system. The results show that the resultant active tip clearance control system with the improved GPC has favorable steady-state and dynamic performance and benefits of increased efficiency, reduced specific fuel consump-tion, and additional service life.

  8. Light scattering by two concentric optically active spheres: I. general theory

    An analytic solution to the general problem of light scattering by two concentric optically active, i.e., chiral, spheres is solved, and the nature of the solution in some special cases is analyzed. Since no restriction is imposed on the properties of the incident light, such as an amplitude distribution or the state of polarization, the solution obtained here can be applied to any conceivable experimental situations by adjusting the expansion coefficients of the incident light in terms of vector spherical harmonics in accordance with its nature. This solution is especially relevant to the optical characterization of biological cells which contain chiral constituents, such as DNA in the nuclei.

  9. Chromosome Segmentation and Investigations using Generalized Gradient Vector Flow Active Contours

    Albert Prabhu Britto

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available We investigated Generalized Gradient Vector Flow Active Contours as a suitable boundary mapping technique for Chromosome spread images which have variability in shape and size, expecting to yield a robust segmentation scheme that can be used for segmentation of similar class of images based on optimal set of parameter values. It is found experimentally that a unique set of parameter values is required for boundary mapping each chromosome image. Characterization studies have established that each parameter has an optimal range of values within which good boundary mapping results can be obtained in similar class of images. Statistical testing validates the experimental results

  10. Clearance values and permitted activities in the new EU radiation protection basis safety standards; Freigrenzen und Freigabewerte in den neuen Strahlenschutz-Grundnormen der EU

    Thierfeldt, S. [Brenk Systemplanung GmbH, Aachen (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    The current draft version of the Basic Safety Standards (BSS) of the European Union of 24 May 2013 introduces new and joint values for exemption and clearance (from IAEA Safety Guide RS-G-1.7). The mass related activity values will then be numerically identical for general exemption and for unconditional clearance (the existing sets of exemption values will be kept, but only for 'moderate amounts'). The hitherto existing principle that clearance levels must not exceed exemption values (so that no cleared material would need to be regarded as radioactive) therefore now needs to be discarded. If options of clearance for a specific purpose as laid down in Sect. 29 para. 2 no. 2 Radiation Protection Ordinance disappeared, a tremendous increase of the amount of radioactive waste and of costs for radwaste disposal would result, as was discussed elsewhere. The guiding light from this dilemma comes from the way in which the principles for clearance and exemption are treated in the new IAEA BSS. The primary criterion for clearance and exemption is not formed by sets of activity values, which are only derived limits, but by the criterion of trivial dose, which is the original limit. On this basis, all seeming conflicts between clearance levels and exemption values dissolve. (orig.)

  11. On the Procedures for the Demonstration of the RF Safety of Active and Passive Implants in MRI Environments

    Eugenia CABOT; Maria CABANES-SEMPERE; Niels KUSTER

    2016-01-01

    As a diagnostic method, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is not allowed to be used in patients with medical implants, including both active implants (such as cardiac deifbrillators or deep brain stimulators) and passive implants (such as orthopedics implants and support). MRI imaging scanning can produce magnetic ifelds, which will produce concentrated electromagnetic induction on metal edges of the implants, such as electrodes. The magnetic ifeld can also signiifcantly increase the temperature of surrounding tissues. Besides, the currents and voltage produced by active implants when exposed to MRI scanning can lead to damage and malfunction of pulse generators. Therefore, patients with medical implants cannot receive MRI as a diagnostic method. This safety protocol prevents a large group of patients from receiving MRI diagnosis. This leads to the conclusion that the safety evaluation of implants under MRI environment requires the combination of accurate data analysis and experimental techniques so as to establish the standard testing program.

  12. QSAR study on estrogenic activity of structurally diverse compounds using generalized regression neural network

    JI Li; WANG XiaoDong; LUO Si; QIN Liang; YANG XvShu; LIU ShuShen; WANG LianSheng

    2008-01-01

    Computer-based quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model has been becoming a powerful tool in understanding the structural requirements for chemicals to bind the estrogen receptor (ER), designing drugs for human estrogen replacement therapy, and identifying potential estrogenic endocrine disruptors, in this study, a simple yet powerful neural network technique, generalized regression neural network (GRNN) was used to develop a QSAR model based on 131 structurally diverse estrogens (training set). Only nine descriptors calculated solely from the molecular structures of compounds selected by objective and subjective feature selections were used as inputs of the GRNN model. The predictive power of the built model was found to be comparable to that of the more traditional techniques but requiring significantly easy implementation and a shorter computation-time. The obtained result indicates that the proposed GRNN model is robust and satisfactory, and can provide a feasible and practical tool for the rapid screening of the estrogenic activity of organic compounds.

  13. Nuclear Safety Review for 2014

    The Nuclear Safety Review 2014 focuses on the dominant nuclear safety trends, issues and challenges in 2013. The Executive Overview provides general nuclear safety information along with a summary of the major issues covered in this report: strengthening safety in nuclear installations; improving radiation, transport and waste safety; enhancing emergency preparedness and response (EPR); improving regulatory infrastructure and effectiveness; and strengthening civil liability for nuclear damage. The Appendix provides details on the activities of the Commission on Safety Standards, and activities relevant to the Agency’s safety standards. The global nuclear community has made steady and continuous progress in strengthening nuclear safety in 2013, as promoted by the IAEA Action Plan on Nuclear Safety (hereinafter referred to as “the Action Plan”) and reported in Progress in the Implementation of the IAEA Action Plan on Nuclear Safety (document GOV/INF/2013/8-GC(57)/INF/5), and the Supplementary Information to that report and Progress in the Implementation of the IAEA Action Plan on Nuclear Safety (document GOV/INF/2014/2). • Significant progress continues to be made in several key areas, such as assessments of safety vulnerabilities of nuclear power plants (NPPs), strengthening of the Agency’s peer review services, improvements in EPR capabilities, strengthening and maintaining capacity building, and protecting people and the environment from ionizing radiation. The progress that has been made in these and other areas has contributed to the enhancement of the global nuclear safety framework. • Significant progress has also been made in reviewing the Agency’s safety standards, which continue to be widely applied by regulators, operators and the nuclear industry in general, with increased attention and focus on vitally important areas such as design and operation of NPPs, protection of NPPs against severe accidents, and EPR. • The Agency continued to

  14. The impact of environmental qualification of safety related equipment on future maintenance activities at Darlington NGS

    CANDU nuclear station owners are faced with and increasing amount of equipment considered to be safety related and required to operate successfully during common mode design basis events (CMDBE), such as earthquakes, loss of coolant accidents, main steam line breaks, etc. Designers are faced with the task of either protecting this equipment from the consequence of the events, or supplying equipment which will operate in the environment expected during these events. This trend has continued at Darlington Nuclear Generating Station (NGS) with the identification of 125 safety related systems which must perform a function during or after the CMDBE. In addition to protecting or hardening the safety related equipment, the designers must also provide assurance that the equipment is capable of operating reliably during any of these events. At Darlington NGS, the effects of aging mechanisms on components of safety related equipment is also being taken into account. This paper describes the Darlington Environmental Qualification Program, and discusses how it will change the nature of safety related equipment maintenance, surveillance, and replacement programs

  15. Information report on nuclear safety and radiation protection within the Aube low and medium activity radioactive waste storage Centre - 2011

    After a presentation of the different installations of the Aube waste storage centre, this report describes the different measures regarding nuclear safety, radiation protection and security. It recalls and comments incidents and accidents which occurred within the installations in 2011. It describes the activities of control and survey of releases and of the environment. It describes the management of wastes produced by the centre itself. It indicates the various actions undertaken with respect to information and transparency

  16. Clinical Safety of a High Dose of Phycocyanin-Enriched Aqueous Extract from Arthrospira (Spirulina) platensis: Results from a Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study with a Focus on Anticoagulant Activity and Platelet Activation.

    Jensen, Gitte S; Drapeau, Cassandra; Lenninger, Miki; Benson, Kathleen F

    2016-07-01

    The goal for this study was to evaluate safety regarding anticoagulant activity and platelet activation during daily consumption of an aqueous cyanophyta extract (ACE), containing a high dose of phycocyanin. Using a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study design, 24 men and women were enrolled after informed consent, and consumed either ACE (2.3 g/day) or placebo daily for 2 weeks. The ACE dose was equivalent to ∼1 g phycocyanin per day, chosen based on the highest dose Generally Recognized as Safe (GRAS) by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Consuming ACE did not alter markers for platelet activation (P-selectin expression) or serum P-selectin levels. No changes were seen for activated partial thromboplastin time, thrombin clotting time, or fibrinogen activity. Serum levels of aspartate transaminase (AST) showed a significant reduction after 2 weeks of ACE consumption (P < .001), in contrast to placebo where no changes were seen; the difference in AST levels between the two groups was significant at 2 weeks (P < .02). Reduced levels of alanine transaminase (ALT) were also seen in the group consuming ACE (P < .08). Previous studies showed reduction of chronic pain when consuming 1 g ACE per day. The higher dose of 2.3 g/day in this study was associated with significant reduction of chronic pain at rest and when physically active (P < .05). Consumption of ACE showed safety regarding markers pertaining to anticoagulant activity and platelet activation status, in conjunction with rapid and robust relief of chronic pain. Reduction in AST and ALT suggested improvement in liver function and metabolism. PMID:27362442

  17. Best Estimate plus Uncertainty (BEPU) Analyses in the IAEA Safety Standards

    The Safety Standards Series establishes an essential basis for safety and represents the broadest international consensus. Safety Standards Series publications are categorized into: Safety Fundamental (Present the overall objectives, concepts and principles of protection and safety, they are the policy documents of the safety standards), Safety Requirements (Establish requirements that must be met to ensure the protection and safety of people and the environment, both now and in the future), and Safety Guides (Provide guidance, in the form of more detailed actions, conditions or procedures that can be used to comply with the Requirements). The incorporation of more detailed requirements, in accordance with national practice, may still be necessary. There should be only one set of international safety standards. Each safety standard will be reviewed by the relevant committee or by the commission every five years. Best Estimate plus Uncertainty (BEPU) Analyses are approached in the following IAEA Safety Standards: - Safety Requirements SSR 2/1 - Safety of NPPs, Design (Revision of NS-R-1); - General Safety Requirement GSR Part 4: Safety Assessment for Facilities and Activities; - Safety Guide SSG-2 Deterministic Safety Analysis for Nuclear Power Plants. NUSSC suggested that new safety guides should be accompanied by documents like TECDOCs or Safety Reports describing in detail their recommendations where appropriate. Special review is currently underway to identify needs for revision in the light of the Fukushima accident. Revision will concern, first, the Safety Requirements, and then, the Selected Safety Guides

  18. Activities of ARCAL XX for the development of guidelines for the safety of radiation sources

    This report presents the contribution of the ARCAL XX project 'Guidelines for the Control of Radiation Sources' for the development and harmonization of the safety of radiation sources in Latin America. The project began in 1997 with the participation of nine countries. The methodology adopted has enabled all experts from the nine countries involved in the project to participate in discussions on the development of guidelines based on regional experience. Three common documents for all practices and six safety guides for the main practices have been revised for publication. For the next two years, the project co-ordinators are proposing regional and national workshops for the application of the safety guides approved by the ARCAL programme. (author)

  19. Regulatory activities in the field of fire safety at nuclear power plants in the Russian Federation: Legislative infrastructure and licensing experience

    This paper discusses regulation of fire safety at nuclear power plants in Russia, including issues relating to the legislative infrastructure and licensing activities. The interaction of regulatory bodies in Russia (Gosatomnadzor and the State Fire Fighting Service of the Russian Ministry of Internal Affairs) on the issue of fire safety at nuclear power plants is discussed in detail. The legislative infrastructure for regulation of fire safety at nuclear power plants is described and ways of improving it are discussed, as well as the development of a new fire protection approach, fire protection programmes with acceptability criteria, and methodologies for analysing the effect of fires on nuclear power plant safety. The process for detecting and eliminating faults in the regulation and implementation of fire safety measures at nuclear power plants is also described. In addition, we take a new look at the activities of Gosatomnadzor - licensing, including fire safety at nuclear power plants

  20. Activities of seismic safety enhancement on equipments and components in Kashiwazaki Kariwa Nuclear Power Station

    This article introduced seismic safety enhancement measures and upgrade of seismic evaluation methods on equipments and components in Kashiwazaki Kariwa Nuclear Power Station. Reinforcement works for seismic safety against the earthquake of 1000 gal at the bed rock of reactor building had been made on pipe support structure, fuel handling machine and ceiling mounted crane of reactor building using upgraded seismic response analysis. As for upgrade of seismic evaluation methods, hysteresis characteristics of reactor base structure and seismic affected fatigue of piping had been evaluated as well as forced vibration test of component base anchorage zone and underwater vibration test of spent fuel storage rack to obtain damping constant. (T. Tanaka)