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Sample records for active zone molecule

  1. Physical activation of molecules

    A brief review of processes of physical activation of molecules on the basis of phenomena of electronic and vibrational excitation, electron polarization is presented. Consideration is given to activation by electron impact, photo-, magneto- and mechanoactivation, as well as to radiation activation, proceeding under the effect of high-power radiations (102-107 eV). The character of disturbance of molecules, participating in chemical reactions, under the effect of different types of ionizing radiation (α-particles, electrons, γ-quanta etc.) is discussed

  2. Presynaptic active zone density during development and synaptic plasticity.

    Gwenaëlle L Clarke

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Neural circuits transmit information through synapses, and the efficiency of synaptic transmission is closely related to the density of presynaptic active zones, where synaptic vesicles are released. The goal of this review is to highlight recent insights into the molecular mechanisms that control the number of active zones per presynaptic terminal (active zone density during developmental and stimulus-dependent changes in synaptic efficacy. At the neuromuscular junctions (NMJs, the active zone density is preserved across species, remains constant during development, and is the same between synapses with different activities. However, the NMJ active zones are not always stable, as exemplified by the change in active zone density during acute experimental manipulation or as a result of aging. Therefore, a mechanism must exist to maintain its density. In the central nervous system (CNS, active zones have restricted maximal size, exist in multiple numbers in larger presynaptic terminals, and maintain a constant density during development. These findings suggest that active zone density in the CNS is also controlled. However, in contrast to the NMJ, active zone density in the CNS can also be increased, as observed in hippocampal synapses in response to synaptic plasticity. Although the numbers of known active zone proteins and protein interactions have increased, less is known about the mechanism that controls the number or spacing of active zones. The following molecules are known to control active zone density and will be discussed herein: extracellular matrix laminins and voltage-dependent calcium channels, amyloid precursor proteins, the small GTPase Rab3, an endocytosis mechanism including synaptojanin, cytoskeleton protein spectrins and β-adducin, and a presynaptic web including spectrins. The molecular mechanisms that organize the active zone density are just beginning to be elucidated.

  3. Serpentine in active subduction zones

    Reynard, Bruno

    2013-09-01

    Serpentinization is a key phenomenon for understanding the geodynamics of subduction zones in the 10-200 km depth range. Serpentines are a major water carrier, and their rheological properties have a strong influence on deformation partitioning and seismicity at depths. I review experimental investigations that have been conducted on serpentines, with emphasis on the large body of data acquired over the past decade. Determinations of physical properties at the pressure and temperature conditions of subductions allow interpreting geophysical data in active subduction in terms of mineralogy and petrology, and to link the presence of serpentinites with deformation and fluid circulation. The fluid budget can be partially constrained from geophysical data. Elasticity data provide a quantitative basis for mapping serpentinization in the mantle wedge and slab from seismic tomography. Anisotropy suggests the existence of thin serpentinite channels above the plate interface, that account for mechanical decoupling inferred from down-dip limit of the seismogenic zone and heat flow. Strain-rate dependent rheology of antigorite serpentine is consistent with stable deformation of this thin layer or channel over timescales ranging from those of the seismic cycle to those of thermal equilibration and exhumation of high-pressure rocks, and with the geological record of subduction-related deformation. Circulation of serpentinizing fluids depends on the permeability structure, and is imaged by electrical conductivity tomography. It could be controlled by fracturing in the undeformed cold nose of the mantle wedge, and by plastic deformation along the plate interface. Fluid migration mechanisms are similar to those inferred from petrological and geochemical data on exhumed serpentinites. Estimation of the fluid budget associated with serpentine formation will rely on numerical simulations for which coupling of kinetics of hydration and dehydration at scales ranging from grain size up

  4. Chemical activation of molecules during coordination

    Activation processes of N2, O2, NO molecules in transition metal complexes and electron reconstructions of coordination sphere of compounds, related with it, were considered on tha basis of single-parameter approximation of vibronic activation theory. A special attention is paid to CO molecule activation in carbonyl complexes of transition metals (V, Nb, Mo, W, Tc, Re, Ru and others) and lanthanides. The effect of metal oxidation degree, the nature of metal and ligand, complex structure on chemical activation processes is analyzed

  5. Raman Optical Activity Spectra for Large Molecules through Molecules-in-Molecules Fragment-Based Approach.

    Jovan Jose, K V; Raghavachari, Krishnan

    2016-02-01

    We present an efficient method for the calculation of the Raman optical activity (ROA) spectra for large molecules through the molecules-in-molecules (MIM) fragment-based method. The relevant higher energy derivatives from smaller fragments are used to build the property tensors of the parent molecule to enable the extension of the MIM method for evaluating ROA spectra (MIM-ROA). Two factors were found to be particularly important in yielding accurate results. First, the link-atom tensor components are projected back onto the corresponding host and supporting atoms through the Jacobian projection method, yielding a mathematically rigorous method. Second, the long-range interactions between fragments are taken into account by using a less computationally expensive lower level of theory. The performance of the MIM-ROA model is calibrated on the enantiomeric pairs of 10 carbohydrate benchmark molecules, with strong intramolecular interactions. The vibrational frequencies and ROA intensities are accurately reproduced relative to the full, unfragmented, results for these systems. In addition, the MIM-ROA method is employed to predict the ROA spectra of d-maltose, α-D-cyclodextrin, and cryptophane-A, yielding spectra in excellent agreement with experiment. The accuracy and performance of the benchmark systems validate the MIM-ROA model for exploring ROA spectra of large molecules. PMID:26760444

  6. Uranium-mediated activation of small molecules.

    Arnold, Polly L

    2011-08-28

    Molecular complexes of uranium are capable of activating a range of industrially and economically important small molecules such as CO, CO(2), and N(2); new and often unexpected reactions provide insight into an element that needs to be well-understood if future clean-energy solutions are to involve nuclear power. PMID:21614341

  7. Synaptic Vesicle Proteins and Active Zone Plasticity

    Kittel, Robert J.; Heckmann, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Neurotransmitter is released from synaptic vesicles at the highly specialized presynaptic active zone (AZ). The complex molecular architecture of AZs mediates the speed, precision and plasticity of synaptic transmission. Importantly, structural and functional properties of AZs vary significantly, even for a given connection. Thus, there appear to be distinct AZ states, which fundamentally influence neuronal communication by controlling the positioning and release of synaptic vesicles. Vice versa, recent evidence has revealed that synaptic vesicle components also modulate organizational states of the AZ. The protein-rich cytomatrix at the active zone (CAZ) provides a structural platform for molecular interactions guiding vesicle exocytosis. Studies in Drosophila have now demonstrated that the vesicle proteins Synaptotagmin-1 (Syt1) and Rab3 also regulate glutamate release by shaping differentiation of the CAZ ultrastructure. We review these unexpected findings and discuss mechanistic interpretations of the reciprocal relationship between synaptic vesicles and AZ states, which has heretofore received little attention.

  8. Novel approaches for single molecule activation and detection

    Benfenati, Fabio; Torre, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    How can we obtain tools able to process and exchange information at the molecular scale In order to do this, it is necessary to activate and detect single molecules under controlled conditions. This book focuses on the generation of biologically-inspired molecular devices. These devices are based on the developments of new photonic tools able to activate and stimulate single molecule machines. Additionally, new light sensitive molecules can be selectively activated by photonic tools. These technological innovations will provide a way to control activation of single light-sensitive molecules, a

  9. Active zone stability:insights from fly neuromuscular junction

    Xiaolin Tian; Chunlai Wu

    2015-01-01

    The presynaptic active zone is a dynamic structure that orchestrates regulated release of neurotrans-mitters. Developmental and aging processes, and changes in neuronal network activity can all modulate the number, size and composition of active zone and thereby synaptic efifcacy. However, very little is known about the mechanism that controls the structural stability of active zone. By study-ing a model synapse, theDrosophila neuromuscular junction, our recent work shed light on how two scaffolding proteins at the active zone regulate active zone stability by promoting a localized dephos-phorylation event at the nerve terminal. Here we discuss the major insights from our ifndings and their implications for future research.

  10. A Potent Activator of Melanogenesis Identified from Small Molecule Screening

    McNaughton, Brian R.; Gareiss, Peter C.; Jacobs, Stacey E.; Fricke, Alex F.; Scott, Glynis A.; Miller, Benjamin L.

    2009-01-01

    Small molecules that increase the cellular level of melanin can be used to study melanogenesis, and have therapeutic potential for melanin-related diseases such as albinism. We describe the identification of a potent activator of melanogenesis from a targeted combinatorial library. Treating melanocytes with our most active molecule results in a 1.8-fold increase in melanin, and an increase in tyrosinase-catalyzed oxidation of L-tyrosine, a key step in melanin biosynthesis.

  11. Exploration of the spontaneous fluctuating activity of single enzyme molecules

    Schwabe, A.; Maarleveld, T.R.; Bruggeman, F.J.

    2013-01-01

    Single enzyme molecules display inevitable, stochastic fluctuations in their catalytic activity. In metabolism, for instance, the stochastic activity of individual enzymes is averaged out due to their high copy numbers per single cell. However, many processes inside cells rely on single enzyme activ

  12. Leishmanicidal activity of plants from the Peruvian traditional pharmacopeia and molecules of synthesis; study structure-activity relationship.

    Estevez, Yannick

    2009-01-01

    New world Leishmaniasis are parasitosis with heavy socio-economic consequences. Nowadays the commercially available treatments require parenteral administrations and are not affordable for the concerned populations. The search for new active molecules is thus urgently needed. To contribute to the research effort of therapeutic alternative, we were interested in traditional pharmacopeia of populations living in endemic zone (two ethnic groups of Peruvian Amazonia: the Chayahuita and the Yanesh...

  13. Exploration of the spontaneous fluctuating activity of single enzyme molecules

    Schwabe, Anne; Maarleveld, Timo; Bruggeman, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Single enzyme molecules display inevitable, stochastic fluctuations in their catalytic activity. In metabolism, for instance, the stochastic activity of individual enzymes is averaged out due to their high copy numbers per single cell. However, many processes inside cells rely on single enzyme activity, such as transcription, replication, translation, and histone modifications. Here we introduce the main theoretical concepts of stochastic single-enzyme activity starting from the Michaelis–Men...

  14. Identification of small molecule activators of BMP signaling.

    Karen Vrijens

    Full Text Available Bone Morphogenetic Proteins (BMPs are morphogens that play a major role in regulating development and homeostasis. Although BMPs are used for the treatment of bone and kidney disorders, their clinical use is limited due to the supra-physiological doses required for therapeutic efficacy causing severe side effects. Because recombinant BMPs are expensive to produce, small molecule activators of BMP signaling would be a cost-effective alternative with the added benefit of being potentially more easily deliverable. Here, we report our efforts to identify small molecule activators of BMP signaling. We have developed a cell-based assay to monitor BMP signaling by stably transfecting a BMP-responsive human cervical carcinoma cell line (C33A with a reporter construct in which the expression of luciferase is driven by a multimerized BMP-responsive element from the Id1 promoter. A BMP-responsive clone C33A-2D2 was used to screen a bioactive library containing ∼5,600 small molecules. We identified four small molecules of the family of flavonoids all of which induced luciferase activity in a dose-dependent manner and ventralized zebrafish embryos. Two of the identified compounds induced Smad1, 5 phosphorylation (P-Smad, Id1 and Id2 expression in a dose-dependent manner demonstrating that our assays identified small molecule activators of BMP signaling.

  15. Functionalization of hydroxyl terminated polybutadiene with biologically active fluorescent molecule

    R Murali Sankar; Subhadeep Saha; K Seeni Meera; Tushar Jana

    2009-10-01

    A biologically active molecule, 2-chloro-4,6-bis(dimethylamino)-1,3,5-triazine (CBDT), has been covalently attached at the terminal carbon atoms of the hydroxyl terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) backbone. The modification of HTPB backbone by CBDT molecule does not affect the unique physico-chemical properties such as fluidity, hydroxyl value and microstructure of the parent HTPB. The formation of hydrogen bonding between the terminal hydroxyl groups and the nitrogen atoms of triazine moiety is the driving force for the terminal attachment chemistry. The functionalized HTPB (HTPB–CBDT) shows a strong fluorescence emission at 385 nm.

  16. Triggered tremors beneath the seismogenic zone of an active fault zone, Kyushu, Japan

    Miyazaki, Masahiro; Matsumoto, Satoshi; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2015-11-01

    Non-volcanic tremors were induced by the surface waves of the 2012 Sumatra earthquake around the Hinagu fault zone in Kyushu, Japan. We inferred from dense seismic observation data that the hypocenters of these tremors were located beneath the seismogenic zone of the Hinagu fault. Focal mechanisms of the tremors were estimated using S-wave polarization angles. The estimated focal mechanisms show similarities to those of shallow earthquakes in this region. In addition, one of the nodal planes of the focal mechanisms is almost parallel to the strike direction of the Hinagu fault. These observations suggest that the tremors were triggered at the deeper extension of the active fault zone under stress conditions similar to those in the shallower seismogenic region. A low-velocity anomaly beneath the hypocentral area of the tremors might be related to the tremor activity.

  17. Quantitative analysis on tectonic deformation of active rupture zones

    JIANG Zai-sen; NIU An-fu; WANG Min; LI Kai-wu; FANG Ying; ZHANG Xi; ZHANG Xiao-liang

    2005-01-01

    Based on the regional GPS data of high spatial resolution, we present a method of quantitative analysis on the tectonic deformation of active rupture zones in order to predict the location of forthcoming major earthquakes. Firstly we divide the main fault area into certain deformation units, then derive the geometric deformation and relative dislocation parameters of each unit and finally estimate quantitatively the slip and strain rates in each segment of the rupture zone. Furthermore, by comparing the consistency of deformation in all segments of the whole rupture zone, we can determine the possible anomalous segments as well as their properties and amplitudes. In analyzing the eastern boundaries of Sichuan-Yunnan block with the GPS velocity data for the period of 1991~2001, we have discovered that the Mianning-Ningnan-Dongchuan segment on the Zemuhe-Xiaojiang fault zone is relatively locked and the left-lateral shear strain rate here is higher.

  18. Small molecules reveal an alternative mechanism of Bax activation.

    Brahmbhatt, Hetal; Uehling, David; Al-Awar, Rima; Leber, Brian; Andrews, David

    2016-04-15

    The pro-apoptotic protein Bax commits a cell to death by permeabilizing the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM). To obtain small-molecule probes for elucidating the molecular mechanism(s) of Bax activation, we screened for compounds that induced Bax-mediated liposome permeabilization. We identified five structurally different small molecules that promoted both Bax targeting to and oligomerization at membranes. All five compounds initiated Bax oligomerization in the absence of membranes by a mechanism unlike Bax activation by Bcl-2 homology 3 domain (BH3) proteins. Some of the compounds induced Bax/Bak-dependent apoptosis in cells. Activation of Bax by the most active compound was poorly inhibited by the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-XL and requires a cysteine residue at position 126 of Bax that is not required for activation by BH3 proteins. Our results reveal a novel pathway for Bax activation independent of pro-apoptotic BH3 proteins that may have important implications for the regulation of Bax activity in cells. PMID:26916338

  19. Structure and Structure-activity Relationship of Functional Organic Molecules

    2011-01-01

    @@ Research theme The group is made up of junior scientists from the State Key Laboratory of Elemento-organic Chemistry, Nankai University.The scientists focus their studis on the structure and structure-activity relationship of functional organic molecules not only because it has been the basis of their research, but also because the functional study of organic compounds is now a major scientific issue for organic chemists around the world.

  20. Where Does Metonymy Stop? Senses, Facets, and Active Zones

    Paradis, Carita

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to propose a constrained lexical semantic definition of referential metonymy within a model of meaning as ontology and construal. Due to their various types of lexical-referential pairings, 3 types of construals that are frequently referred to as metonymy in the cognitive literature are distinguished as metonymization, facetization, and zone activation. Metonymization involves the use of a lexical item to evoke the sense of something that is not conventionally l...

  1. Super-resolution microscopy of the synaptic active zone

    Markus Sauer; Kittel, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Brain function relies on accurate information transfer at chemical synapses. At the presynaptic active zone (AZ) a variety of specialised proteins are assembled to complex architectures, which set the basis for speed, precision and plasticity of synaptic transmission. Calcium (Ca2+) channels are pivotal for the initiation of excitation-secretion coupling and, correspondingly, capture a central position at the AZ. Combining quantitative functional studies with modelling approaches has prov...

  2. Inhibition of Nek2 by Small Molecules Affects Proteasome Activity

    Lingyao Meng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Nek2 is a serine/threonine kinase localized to the centrosome. It promotes cell cycle progression from G2 to M by inducing centrosome separation. Recent studies have shown that high Nek2 expression is correlated with drug resistance in multiple myeloma patients. Materials and Methods. To investigate the role of Nek2 in bortezomib resistance, we ectopically overexpressed Nek2 in several cancer cell lines, including multiple myeloma lines. Small-molecule inhibitors of Nek2 were discovered using an in-house library of compounds. We tested the inhibitors on proteasome and cell cycle activity in several cell lines. Results. Proteasome activity was elevated in Nek2-overexpressing cell lines. The Nek2 inhibitors inhibited proteasome activity in these cancer cell lines. Treatment with these inhibitors resulted in inhibition of proteasome-mediated degradation of several cell cycle regulators in HeLa cells, leaving them arrested in G2/M. Combining these Nek2 inhibitors with bortezomib increased the efficacy of bortezomib in decreasing proteasome activity in vitro. Treatment with these novel Nek2 inhibitors successfully mitigated drug resistance in bortezomib-resistant multiple myeloma. Conclusion. Nek2 plays a central role in proteasome-mediated cell cycle regulation and in conferring resistance to bortezomib in cancer cells. Taken together, our results introduce Nek2 as a therapeutic target in bortezomib-resistant multiple myeloma.

  3. Bilirubin: an endogenous molecule with antiviral activity in vitro.

    CesareMancuso

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Bilirubin-IX-alpha (BR is the final product of heme metabolism through the heme oxygenase/biliverdin reductase (HO/BVR system. Previous papers reported on the microbicidal effects of the HO by-products biliverdin-IX-alpha, carbon monoxide and iron, through either direct or indirect mechanisms. In this paper the evidence of a virucidal effect of BR against human herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 and the enterovirus EV71 was provided. Bilirubin-IX-alpha, at concentrations 1-10 µM, close to those found in blood and tissues, significantly reduced HSV-1 and EV71 replication in Hep-2 and Vero cell lines, respectively. Bilirubin-IX-alpha inhibited viral infection of Hep-2 and Vero cells when given 2 hours before, concomitantly and 2 hours after viral infection. Furthermore, BR retained its antiviral activity even complexed with a saturating concentration of human serum-albumin. Moreover, 10 µM BR increased the formation of nitric oxide and the phosphorylation of JNK in Vero and Hep-2 cell lines, respectively, thus implying a role of these two pathways in the mechanism of antiviral activity of the bile pigment. In conclusion, these results support the antiviral effect of BR against HSV-1 and enterovirus in vitro, and put the basis for further basic and clinical studies to understand the real role of BR as an endogenous antiviral molecule.

  4. Geophysical equipment meant for complex studies in geodynamic active zones

    The main purpose of the geophysical equipment is to investigate the electromagnetic (EM) and electric phenomena induced by the crustal and subcrustal processes, especially by the natural and anthropic hazard (seismic active and landslides zones, land collapses in the mining areas with salt dissolution etc.). The equipment's applicability includes electromagnetic (10 kHz to 4096 sec (0.2x10-3 Hz)) and DC observations having the following major objectives: (1) to investigate the shallow and deep structures in order to develop the adequate geodynamic models, (2) to draw up the EM tomographs at different levels to point out the active fault, the geometry of the relic slab in seismo-active zones, caverns with salt dissolution in mining areas, landslide's surfaces, etc., (3) to establish optimum placement and geoelectric pattern (type of geological structure and its strike direction, the standard deviation of the detectable parameters in non-seismic conditions), so that a regular monitoring of some EM parameters be accomplished, simultaneously with seismic events, with the aim to reveal the earthquakes' precursory parameters. (authors)

  5. 50 CFR Table 8 to Part 679 - Harvest Zone Codes for Use With Vessel Activity Reports

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Harvest Zone Codes for Use With Vessel... ECONOMIC ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 679, Table 8 Table 8 to Part 679—Harvest Zone Codes for Use With Vessel Activity Reports Harvest Zone Description A1 BSAI EEZ off Alaska A2 GOA EEZ off Alaska B State waters...

  6. Manipulating lipid bilayer material properties using biologically active amphipathic molecules

    Ashrafuzzaman, Md [Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Weill Medical College of University of Cornell, New York, NY 10021 (United States); Lampson, M A [Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Weill Medical College of University of Cornell, New York, NY 10021 (United States); Greathouse, D V [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701 (United States); II, R E Koeppe [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701 (United States); Andersen, O S [Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Weill Medical College of University of Cornell, New York, NY 10021 (United States)

    2006-07-19

    Lipid bilayers are elastic bodies with properties that can be manipulated/controlled by the adsorption of amphipathic molecules. The resulting changes in bilayer elasticity have been shown to regulate integral membrane protein function. To further understand the amphiphile-induced modulation of bilayer material properties (thickness, intrinsic monolayer curvature and elastic moduli), we examined how an enantiomeric pair of viral anti-fusion peptides (AFPs)-Z-Gly-D-Phe and Z-Gly-Phe, where Z denotes a benzyloxycarbonyl group, as well as Z-Phe-Tyr and Z-D-Phe-Phe-Gly-alters the function of enantiomeric pairs of gramicidin channels of different lengths in planar bilayers. For both short and long channels, the channel lifetimes and appearance frequencies increase as linear functions of the aqueous AFP concentration, with no apparent effect on the single-channel conductance. These changes in channel function do not depend on the chirality of the channels or the AFPs. At pH 7.0, the relative changes in channel lifetimes do not vary when the channel length is varied, indicating that these compounds exert their effects primarily by causing a positive-going change in the intrinsic monolayer curvature. At pH 4.0, the AFPs are more potent than at pH 7.0 and have greater effects on the shorter channels, indicating that these compounds now change the bilayer elastic moduli. When AFPs of different anti-fusion potencies are compared, the rank order of the anti-fusion activity and the channel-modifying activity is similar, but the relative changes in anti-fusion potency are larger than the changes in channel-modifying activity. We conclude that gramicidin channels are useful as molecular force transducers to probe the influence of small amphiphiles upon lipid bilayer material properties.

  7. Friction mediated by redox-active supramolecular connector molecules.

    Bozna, B L; Blass, J; Albrecht, M; Hausen, F; Wenz, G; Bennewitz, R

    2015-10-01

    We report on a friction study at the nanometer scale using atomic force microscopy under electrochemical control. Friction arises from the interaction between two surfaces functionalized with cyclodextrin molecules. The interaction is mediated by connector molecules with (ferrocenylmethyl)ammonium end groups forming supramolecular complexes with the cyclodextrin molecules. With ferrocene connector molecules in solution, the friction increases by a factor of up to 12 compared to control experiments without connector molecules. The electrochemical oxidation of ferrocene to ferrocenium causes a decrease in friction owing to the lower stability of ferrocenium-cyclodextrin complex. Upon switching between oxidative and reduction potentials, a change in friction by a factor of 1.2-1.8 is observed. Isothermal titration calorimetry reveals fast dissociation and rebinding kinetics and thus an equilibrium regime for the friction experiments. PMID:26367352

  8. Activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule in breast cancer: prognostic indicator

    Activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM) (CD166) is an immunoglobulin molecule that has been implicated in cell migration. The present study examined the expression of ALCAM in human breast cancer and assessed its prognostic value. The immunohistochemical distribution and location of ALCAM was assessed in normal breast tissue and carcinoma. The levels of ALCAM transcripts in frozen tissue (normal breast, n = 32; breast cancer, n = 120) were determined using real-time quantitative PCR. The results were then analyzed in relation to clinical data including the tumor type, the grade, the nodal involvement, distant metastases, the tumor, node, metastasis (TNM) stage, the Nottingham Prognostic Index (NPI), and survival over a 6-year follow-up period. Immunohistochemical staining on tissue sections in ducts/acini in normal breast and in breast carcinoma was ALCAM-positive. Differences in the number of ALCAM transcripts were found in different types of breast cancer. The level of ALCAM transcripts was lower (P = 0.05) in tumors from patients who had metastases to regional lymph nodes compared with those patients without, in higher grade tumors compared with Grade 1 tumors (P < 0.01), and in TNM Stage 3 tumors compared with TNM Stage 1 tumors (P < 0.01). Tumors from patients with poor prognosis (with NPI > 5.4) had significantly lower levels (P = 0.014) of ALCAM transcripts compared with patients with good prognosis (with NPI < 3.4), and tumors from patients with local recurrence had significantly lower levels than those patients without local recurrence or metastases (P = 0.04). Notably, tumors from patients who died of breast cancer had significantly lower levels of ALCAM transcripts (P = 0.0041) than those with primary tumors but no metastatic disease or local recurrence. Patients with low levels of ALCAM transcripts had significantly (P = 0.009) more incidents (metastasis, recurrence, death) compared with patients with primary breast tumors with high levels of

  9. How to Make an Active Zone: Unexpected Universal Functional Redundancy between RIMs and RIM-BPs.

    Acuna, Claudio; Liu, Xinran; Südhof, Thomas C

    2016-08-17

    RIMs and RIM-binding proteins (RBPs) are evolutionary conserved multidomain proteins of presynaptic active zones that are known to recruit Ca(2+) channels; in addition, RIMs perform well-recognized functions in tethering and priming synaptic vesicles for exocytosis. However, deletions of RIMs or RBPs in mice cause only partial impairments in various active zone functions and have no effect on active zone structure, as visualized by electron micrographs, suggesting that their contribution to active zone functions is limited. Here, we show in synapses of the calyx of Held in vivo and hippocampal neurons in culture that combined, but not individual, deletions of RIMs and RBPs eliminate tethering and priming of synaptic vesicles, deplete presynaptic Ca(2+) channels, and ablate active zone complexes, as analyzed by electron microscopy of chemically fixed synapses. Thus, RBPs perform unexpectedly broad roles at the active zone that together with those of RIMs are essential for all active zone functions. PMID:27537484

  10. Understanding Enzyme Activity Using Single Molecule Tracking (Poster)

    Liu, Y.-S.; Zeng, Y.; Luo, Y.; Xu, Q.; Himmel, M.; Smith S.; Wei, H.; Ding, S.-Y.

    2009-06-01

    This poster describes single-molecule tracking and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. It discusses whether the carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) moves on cellulose, how the CBM binds to cellulose, and the mechanism of cellulosome assembly.

  11. Nano-sensing of the orientation of fluorescing molecules with active coated nano-particles

    Arslanagic, Samel; Ziolkowski, Richard W.

    2015-01-01

    The potential of using active coated nano-particles to determine the orientation of fluorescing molecules is reported. By treating each fluorescing molecule as an electric Hertzian dipole, single and multiple fluorescing molecules emitting coherently and incoherently in various orientations are...

  12. Small molecules with antiviral activity against the Ebola virus

    Nadia Litterman; Christopher Lipinski; Sean Ekins

    2015-01-01

    The recent outbreak of the Ebola virus in West Africa has highlighted the clear shortage of broad-spectrum antiviral drugs for emerging viruses. There are numerous FDA approved drugs and other small molecules described in the literature that could be further evaluated for their potential as antiviral compounds. These molecules are in addition to the few new antivirals that have been tested in Ebola patients but were not originally developed against the Ebola virus, and may play an important r...

  13. 77 FR 26737 - Foreign-Trade Zone 235-Lakewood, NJ: Notification of Proposed Production Activity; Cosmetic...

    2012-05-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 235--Lakewood, NJ: Notification of Proposed Production Activity; Cosmetic Essence Innovations, LLC (Fragrance Bottling); Holmdel, NJ Cosmetic Essence...

  14. The relations between seismically active and electrically conductive zones

    A. I. Ruzajkin

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available The higher electrical conductivity of rocks in the middle and lower parts of the Earth's crust is generally related to the presence of fluids in rocks. The metamorphic processes of dehydration contribute to release of fluids, above all, water; these processes are also responsible for an increase in rock porosity and fracturing. These processes influence the stressed-strained state of the medium under specific conditions. A probable mechanism of earthquake source formation on the contact of blocks with different rates of dehydration and, consequently, different electrical conductivity is discussed. The spatial positions of electrically conductive and seismically active zones are correlated and definite relations between them are found with special reference to the vast area of the Northern Tien Shan within Kirgizstan and some other regions. The greatest concentration of earthquake sources is observed mainly near the contacts between blocks with contrastingly different electrical conductivity values and on sites with a sharp drop in conductive-layer depths.

  15. Super-resolution microscopy of the synaptic active zone

    Markus Sauer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain function relies on accurate information transfer at chemical synapses. At the presynaptic active zone (AZ a variety of specialised proteins are assembled to complex architectures, which set the basis for speed, precision and plasticity of synaptic transmission. Calcium (Ca2+ channels are pivotal for the initiation of excitation-secretion coupling and, correspondingly, capture a central position at the AZ. Combining quantitative functional studies with modelling approaches has provided predictions of channel properties, numbers and even positions on the nanometre scale. However, elucidating the nanoscopic organisation of the surrounding protein network requires direct ultrastructural access. Without this information, knowledge of molecular synaptic structure-function relationships remains incomplete. Recently, super-resolution microscopy techniques have begun to enter the neurosciences. These approaches combine high spatial resolution with the molecular specificity of fluorescence microscopy. Here, we discuss how super-resolution microscopy can be used to obtain information on the organisation of AZ proteins.

  16. Small molecules with antiviral activity against the Ebola virus.

    Litterman, Nadia; Lipinski, Christopher; Ekins, Sean

    2015-01-01

    The recent outbreak of the Ebola virus in West Africa has highlighted the clear shortage of broad-spectrum antiviral drugs for emerging viruses. There are numerous FDA approved drugs and other small molecules described in the literature that could be further evaluated for their potential as antiviral compounds. These molecules are in addition to the few new antivirals that have been tested in Ebola patients but were not originally developed against the Ebola virus, and may play an important role as we await an effective vaccine. The balance between using FDA approved drugs versus novel antivirals with minimal safety and no efficacy data in humans should be considered. We have evaluated 55 molecules from the perspective of an experienced medicinal chemist as well as using simple molecular properties and have highlighted 16 compounds that have desirable qualities as well as those that may be less desirable. In addition we propose that a collaborative database for sharing such published and novel information on small molecules is needed for the research community studying the Ebola virus. PMID:25713700

  17. Novel Molecular Non-Volatile Memory: Application of Redox-Active Molecules

    Hao Zhu; Qiliang Li

    2015-01-01

    This review briefly describes the development of molecular electronics in the application of non-volatile memory. Molecules, especially redox-active molecules, have become interesting due to their intrinsic redox behavior, which provides an excellent basis for low-power, high-density and high-reliability non-volatile memory applications. Recently, solid-state non-volatile memory devices based on redox-active molecules have been reported, exhibiting fast speed, low operation voltage, excellent...

  18. Seismically active fracture zones in the continental wedge above the Andean subduction zone in the Arica Elbow region

    Vaněk, Jiří; Hanuš, Václav; Slancová, Alice; Špičák, Aleš

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 1-4 (2007), s. 39-57. ISSN 0163-3171 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/95/0264; GA AV ČR IAA3012805 Grant ostatní: UNESCO(FR) IGCP project No. 345 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30120515 Source of funding: V - iné verejné zdroje Keywords : continental lithosphere * Wadati-Benioff zone * seismically active zones Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure

  19. Contemporary approaches to studying and mapping of active water exchange zone of ground water

    Moraru, C. Ye

    2016-03-01

    The article deals with a zone of ground water active exchange. New principles of the zone study and mapping under the platform hydrogeological condition are discussed. The assessment and distribution techniques are suggested for the active water exchange zone under the condition of hydrogeological parameterization uncertainty. The efficiency and significance of the suggested techniques are proved using the example of ground water in the southwest of Black Sea artesian basin.

  20. A Proposition for Geodetic Recording of Active Fault Zones

    Ladislav Placer

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Establishing recent displacements along faults is an important and delicate task. Larger faults are accompanied by broader fault zones that require a specificapproachtogeodeticmeasurements of fault block displacements. The vector of fault block displacements, or resultant, is a vector sum of differential displacements within the fault zone. For the purposes of recording the displacements we propose the stabilization of a geodetic network of points positioned in fault blocks outside the fault zone, whereby the displacements would be manifested in the deformation of the network. The resultant displacement vector can then be derived from the latter deformation, and from that, the dip and strike of the fault zone as well as the extent of the displacement.

  1. A Proposition for Geodetic Recording of Active Fault Zones

    Ladislav Placer; Božo Koler

    2007-01-01

    Establishing recent displacements along faults is an important and delicate task. Larger faults are accompanied by broader fault zones that require a specific approach to geodetic measurements of fault block displacements. The vector of fault block displacements, or resultant, is a vector sum of differential displacements within the fault zone. For the purposes of recording the displacements we propose the stabilization of a geodetic network of points positioned in fault blocks...

  2. Dynamics of water molecules in the active-site cavity of human cytochromes P450

    Rydberg, Patrik; Rod, Thomas Holm; Olsen, Lars;

    2007-01-01

    We have studied the dynamics of water molecules in six crystal structures of four human cytochromes P450, 2A6, 2C8, 2C9, and 3A4, with molecular dynamics simulations. In the crystal structures, only a few water molecules are seen and the reported sizes of the active-site cavity vary a lot. In the...

  3. Adhesion molecules levels in blood correlate with MRI activity and clinical activity in multiple sclerosis

    Research into pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS) has prompted efforts to identify immunological markers associated with disease activity. Adhesion molecules ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 are associated with inflammatory mediated blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction. In this study investigates the correlation between blood level of circulating ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) activity in different clinical phases of patients with MS. We show that RRMS and SPMS patients in clinically active phase with Gd-enhancing lesions in CNS had higher blood levels of cICAM-1 and cVCAM-1 compared these parameters levers of RRMS patients in remission stage. These results suggest that cICAM-1 and cVCAM-1 is a sensitive indicator of disease activity associated with BBB inflammatory dysfunction. Elevated blood level of cICAM-1 more strongly correlated with clinical activity and BBB damage, than cVCAM-1 and that could be used as biological marker of disease activity. Circulating VCAM-1 as an early indicator of BBB disturbance, may also serve as marker of beneficial activity in relapses phase of MS course. (authors)

  4. High quality, small molecule-activity datasets for kinase research.

    Sharma, Rajan; Schürer, Stephan C; Muskal, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    Kinases regulate cell growth, movement, and death. Deregulated kinase activity is a frequent cause of disease. The therapeutic potential of kinase inhibitors has led to large amounts of published structure activity relationship (SAR) data. Bioactivity databases such as the Kinase Knowledgebase (KKB), WOMBAT, GOSTAR, and ChEMBL provide researchers with quantitative data characterizing the activity of compounds across many biological assays. The KKB, for example, contains over 1.8M kinase structure-activity data points reported in peer-reviewed journals and patents. In the spirit of fostering methods development and validation worldwide, we have extracted and have made available from the KKB 258K structure activity data points and 76K associated unique chemical structures across eight kinase targets. These data are freely available for download within this data note. PMID:27429748

  5. Activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule and prognosis in acute ischemic stroke

    Smedbakken, Linda; Jensen, Jesper K; Hallén, Jonas;

    2011-01-01

    Biomarkers predicting mortality and functional outcome in stroke may be clinically helpful in identification of patients likely to benefit from intervention. Activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM) is upregulated during neuroinflammation; we investigated whether ALCAM concentrations ar...

  6. Atmospheric Aerosols: Cloud Condensation Nucleus Activity of Selected Organic Molecules

    Rosenorn, T.; Henning, S.; Hartz, K. H.; Kiss, G.; Pandis, S.; Bilde, M.

    2005-12-01

    Gas/particle partitioning of vapors in the atmosphere plays a major role in both climate through micro meteorology and in the physical and chemical processes of a single particle. This work has focused on the cloud droplet activation of a number of pure and mixed compounds. The means used to investigate these processes have been the University of Copenhagen cloud condensation nucleus counter setup and the Carnegie Mellon University CCNC setup. The importance of correct water activity modeling has been addressed and it has been pointed out that the molecular mass is an important parameter to consider when choosing model compounds for cloud activation models. It was shown that both traditional Kohler theory and Kohler theory modified to account for limited solubility reproduce measurements of soluble compounds well. For less soluble compounds it is necessary to use Kohler theory modified to account for limited solubility. It was also shown that this works for mixtures of compounds containing both inorganic salts and dicarboxylic acids. It has also been shown that particle phase and humidity history is important for activation behavior of particles consisting of two slightly soluble organic substances (succinic and adipic acid) and a soluble salt (NaCl). Model parameters for terpene oxidation product cloud activation have been derived. These are based on two sets of average parameters covering monoterpene oxidation products and sesquiterpene oxidation products. All parameters except the solubility were estimated and an effective solubility was calculated as the fitting parameter. The average solubility of the model compound found for mono terpene oxidation products is similar to those of sodium chloride and ammonium sulfate; however the higher molecular weight leads to a slightly higher activation diameter at fixed supersaturation. On a molar basis the monoterpene oxidation products show a 1.5 times higher effective solubility than the sesquiterpene oxidation products.

  7. Interaction of metallic clusters with biologically active curcumin molecules

    Gupta, Sanjeev K.; He, Haiying; Liu, Chunhui; Dutta, Ranu; Pandey, Ravindra

    2015-09-01

    We have investigated the interaction of subnano metallic Gd and Au clusters with curcumin, an important biomolecule having pharmacological activity. Gd clusters show different site preference to curcumin and much stronger interaction strength, in support of the successful synthesis of highly stable curcumin-coated Gd nanoparticles as reported recently. It can be attributed to significant charge transfer from the Gd cluster to curcumin together with a relatively strong hybridization of the Gd df-orbitals with curcumin p-orbitals. These results suggest that Gd nanoparticles can effectively be used as delivery carriers for curcumin at the cellular level for therapy and medical imaging applications.

  8. Ozone: A Multifaceted Molecule with Unexpected Therapeutic Activity.

    Zanardi, I; Borrelli, E; Valacchi, G; Travagli, V; Bocci, V

    2016-01-01

    A comprehensive outline for understanding and recommending the therapeutic use of ozone in combination with established therapy in diseases characterized by a chronic oxidative stress is currently available. The view of the absolute ozone toxicity is incorrect, because it has been based either on lung or on studies performed in artificial environments that do not correspond to the real antioxidant capacity of body compartments. In fact, ozone exerts either a potent toxic activity or it can stimulate biological responses of vital importance, analogously to gases with prospective therapeutic value such as NO, CO, H2S, H2, as well as O2 itself. Such a crucial difference has increasingly become evident during the last decade. The purpose of this review is to explain the aspects still poorly understood, highlighting the divergent activity of ozone on the various biological districts. It will be clarified that such a dual effect does not depend only upon the final gas concentration, but also on the particular biological system where ozone acts. The real significance of ozone as adjuvant therapeutic treatment concerns severe chronic pathologies among which are cardiovascular diseases, chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases, multiple sclerosis, and the dry form of age-related macular degeneration. It is time for a full insertion of ozone therapy within pharmaceutical sciences, responding to all the requirements of quality, efficacy and safety, rather than as either an alternative or an esoteric approach. PMID:26687830

  9. Root Zone Microbial Populations, Urease Activities, and Purification Efficiency for a Constructed Wetland

    LIANG Wei; WU Zhen-Bin; ZHAN Fa-Cui; DENG Jia-Qi

    2004-01-01

    In order to investigate the effects of microorganisms and their urease activities in macrophytic root zones on pollutant removal, four small-scale plots (SSPs) of vertical/reverse-vertical flow wetlands were set up to determine: a) the relationship between the abundance of microorganisms in the root zones and water purification efficiency; and b) the relationship between urease activities in the root zones and pollutant removal in a constructed wetland system. Total numbers of the microbial population (bacteria, fungi, and actinomyces) along with urease activities in the macrophytic root zones were determined. In addition, the relationships between microbial populations and urease activities as well as the wastewater purification efficiencies of total phosphorus (TP), total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN), biochemical oxygen demand in 5 days (BOD5), and chemical oxygen demand (COD) were also analyzed. The results showed that there was a highly significant positive correlation (r = 0.9772, P < 0.01) between the number of bacteria in the root zones and BOD5 removal efficiency and a significant negative correlation (r = -0.9092, P < 0.05) between the number of fungi and the removal efficiency of TKN. Meanwhile, there was a significant positive correlation (r -- 0.8830, P < 0.05) between urease activities in the root zones and the removal efficiency of TKN. Thus, during wastewater treatment in a constructed wetland system,microorganism and urease activities in the root zones were very important factors.

  10. Auroral Electrojet Index Designed to Provide a Global Measure, Hourly Intervals, of Auroral Zone Magnetic Activity

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Auroral Electrojet (AE) index is designed to provide a global quantitative measure of auroral zone magnetic activity produced by enhanced ionospheric currents...

  11. Group Problem Solving as a Zone of Proximal Development activity

    Brewe, Eric

    2006-12-01

    Vygotsky described learning as a process, intertwined with development, which is strongly influenced by social interactions with others that are at differing developmental stages.i These interactions create a Zone of Proximal Development for each member of the interaction. Vygotsky’s notion of social constructivism is not only a theory of learning, but also of development. While teaching introductory physics in an interactive format, I have found manifestations of Vygotsky’s theory in my classroom. The source of evidence is a paired problem solution. A standard mechanics problem was solved by students in two classes as a homework assignment. Students handed in the homework and then solved the same problem in small groups. The solutions to both the group and individual problem were assessed by multiple reviewers. In many cases the group score was the same as the highest individual score in the group, but in some cases, the group score was higher than any individual score. For this poster, I will analyze the individual and group scores and focus on three groups solutions and video that provide evidence of learning through membership in a Zone of Proximal Development. Endnotes i L. Vygotsky -Mind and society: The development of higher mental processes. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. (1978).

  12. Geomorphic Indices in the Assessment of Tectonic Activity in Forearc of the Active Mexican Subduction Zone

    Gaidzik, K.; Ramirez-Herrera, M. T.

    2015-12-01

    Rapid development of GIS techniques and constant advancement of digital elevation models significantly improved the accuracy of extraction of information on active tectonics from landscape features. Numerous attempts were made to quantitatively evaluate recent tectonic activity using GIS and DEMs, and a set of geomorphic indices (GI), however these studies focused mainly on sub-basins or small-scale areal units. In forearc regions where crustal deformation is usually large-scale and do not concentrate only along one specific fault, an assessment of the complete basin is more accurate. We present here the first attempt to implement thirteen GI in the assessment of active tectonics of a forearc region of an active convergent margin using the entire river basins. The GIs were divided into groups: BTAI - basin geomorphic indices (reflecting areal erosion vs. tectonics) and STAI - stream geomorphic indices (reflecting vertical erosion vs. tectonics). We calculated selected indices for 9 large (> 450 km2) drainage basins. Then we categorized the obtained results of each index into three classes of relative tectonic activity: 1 - high, 2 - moderate, and 3 - low. Finally we averaged these classes for each basin to determine the tectonic activity level (TAI). The analysis for the case study area, the Guerrero sector at the Mexican subduction zone, revealed high tectonic activity in this area, particularly in its central and, to a lesser degree, eastern part. This pattern agrees with and is supported by interpretation of satellite images and DEM, and field observations. The results proved that the proposed approach indeed allows identification and recognition of areas witnessing recent tectonic deformation. Moreover, our results indicated that, even though no large earthquake has been recorded in this sector for more than 100 years, the area is highly active and may represent a seismic hazard for the region.

  13. Brazing zone structure at active brazing of alumina ceramics

    2005-01-01

    @@ Nowadays one of the most effective methods of joining of oxide ceramics with other elements of construction is active brazing based on using of active metals (Ti, Zr), which increase reactivity of brazing alloy relative to ceramic element of a joining.

  14. Investigating organic molecules responsible of auxin-like activity of humic acid fraction extracted from vermicompost.

    Scaglia, Barbara; Nunes, Ramom Rachide; Rezende, Maria Olímpia Oliveira; Tambone, Fulvia; Adani, Fabrizio

    2016-08-15

    This work studied the auxin-like activity of humic acids (HA) obtained from vermicomposts produced using leather wastes plus cattle dung at different maturation stages (fresh, stable and mature). Bioassays were performed by testing HA concentrations in the range of 100-6000mgcarbonL(-1). (13)C CPMAS-NMR and GC-MS instrumental methods were used to assess the effect of biological processes and starting organic mixtures on HA composition. Not all HAs showed IAA-like activity and in general, IAA-like activity increased with the length of the vermicomposting process. The presence of leather wastes was not necessary to produce the auxin-like activity of HA, since HA extracted from a mix of cattle manure and sawdust, where no leather waste was added, showed IAA-like activity as well. CPMAS (13)CNMR revealed that HAs were similar independently of the mix used and that the humification process involved the increasing concentration of pre-existing alkali soluble fractions in the biomass. GC/MS allowed the identification of the molecules involved in IAA-like effects: carboxylic acids and amino acids. The concentration of active molecules, rather than their simple presence in HA, determined the bio-stimulating effect, and a good linear regression between auxin-like activity and active stimulating molecules concentration was found (R(2)=-0.85; p<0.01, n=6). PMID:27100009

  15. Activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule expression predicts lymph node metastasis in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Brand, M. van den; Takes, R.P.; Blokpoel-deRuyter, M.; Slootweg, P.J.; Kempen, L.C.L.T. van

    2010-01-01

    Lymphatic metastasis of oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is important for prognosis and clinical decision making concerning the treatment of the neck but may be difficult to detect. Activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM), has been shown to correlate with prognosis or tumor grade in dif

  16. Harnessing microbial metabolic exchange for the discovery of biologically active molecules

    Liu, Wei-Ting

    2012-01-01

    Microbial metabolic exchange mediates microbial interactions and plays key roles in regulating biology and has shaped modern healthcare, agriculture and other commercial processes. In this thesis, cutting edge mass spectrometry techniques, new genome mining approaches, and innovative bioinformatics tools were coupled and developed into investigating microbial metabolic exchange and led to the identification and characterization of biological active molecules that may have therapeutic values. ...

  17. Database searching for compounds with similar biological activity using short binary bit string representations of molecules.

    Xue, L; Godden, J W; Bajorath, J

    1999-01-01

    In an effort to identify biologically active molecules in compound databases, we have investigated similarity searching using short binary bit strings with a maximum of 54 bit positions. These "minifingerprints" (MFPs) were designed to account for the presence or absence of structural fragments and/or aromatic character, flexibility, and hydrogen-bonding capacity of molecules. MFP design was based on an analysis of distributions of molecular descriptors and structural fragments in two large compound collections. The performance of different MFPs and a reference fingerprint was tested by systematic "one-against-all" similarity searches of molecules in a database containing 364 compounds with different biological activities. For each fingerprint, the most effective similarity cutoff value was determined. An MFP accounting for only 32 structural fragments showed less than 2% false positive similarity matches and correctly assigned on average approximately 40% of the compounds with the same biological activity to a query molecule. Inclusion of three numerical two-dimensional (2D) molecular descriptors increased the performance by 15%. This MFP performed better than a complex 2D fingerprint. At a similarity cutoff value of 0.85, the 2D fingerprint totally eliminated false positives but recognized less than 10% of the compounds within the same activity class. PMID:10529986

  18. Single-active-electron potentials for molecules in intense laser fields

    Abu-Samha, Mahmoud; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2010-01-01

    Single-active-electron potentials are computed for selected molecules, and molecular wave functions with the correct asymptotic behavior are produced. Asymptotic expansion coefficients are extracted from the wave functions and used to compute alignment-dependent ionization yields from molecular...

  19. Optically active push-pull molecules intercalated into layered phosphates and phosphonates

    Zima, Vítězslav; Melánová, Klára; Svoboda, Jan; Beneš, L.; Bureš, F.

    Praha: Ústav fyzikální chemie Jaroslava Heyrovského AV ČR,v.v.i, 2015. OP1. [Workshop on Layered Materials . 15.09.2015-19.09.2015, Třešť] Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : phosphate * phosphonate * optically active molecules Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry

  20. Single-molecule imaging of DNA polymerase I (Klenow fragment) activity by atomic force microscopy

    Chao, J.; Zhang, P.; Wang, Q.; Wu, N.; Zhang, F.; Hu, J.; Fan, C. H.; Li, B.

    2016-03-01

    We report a DNA origami-facilitated single-molecule platform that exploits atomic force microscopy to study DNA replication. We imaged several functional activities of the Klenow fragment of E. coli DNA polymerase I (KF) including binding, moving, and dissociation from the template DNA. Upon completion of these actions, a double-stranded DNA molecule was formed. Furthermore, the direction of KF activities was captured and then confirmed by shifting the KF binding sites on the template DNA.We report a DNA origami-facilitated single-molecule platform that exploits atomic force microscopy to study DNA replication. We imaged several functional activities of the Klenow fragment of E. coli DNA polymerase I (KF) including binding, moving, and dissociation from the template DNA. Upon completion of these actions, a double-stranded DNA molecule was formed. Furthermore, the direction of KF activities was captured and then confirmed by shifting the KF binding sites on the template DNA. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06544e

  1. Machine learning models identify molecules active against the Ebola virus in vitro.

    Ekins, Sean; Freundlich, Joel S; Clark, Alex M; Anantpadma, Manu; Davey, Robert A; Madrid, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The search for small molecule inhibitors of Ebola virus (EBOV) has led to several high throughput screens over the past 3 years. These have identified a range of FDA-approved active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) with anti-EBOV activity in vitro and several of which are also active in a mouse infection model. There are millions of additional commercially-available molecules that could be screened for potential activities as anti-EBOV compounds. One way to prioritize compounds for testing is to generate computational models based on the high throughput screening data and then virtually screen compound libraries. In the current study, we have generated Bayesian machine learning models with viral pseudotype entry assay and the EBOV replication assay data. We have validated the models internally and externally. We have also used these models to computationally score the MicroSource library of drugs to select those likely to be potential inhibitors. Three of the highest scoring molecules that were not in the model training sets, quinacrine, pyronaridine and tilorone, were tested in vitro and had EC 50 values of 350, 420 and 230 nM, respectively. Pyronaridine is a component of a combination therapy for malaria that was recently approved by the European Medicines Agency, which may make it more readily accessible for clinical testing. Like other known antimalarial drugs active against EBOV, it shares the 4-aminoquinoline scaffold. Tilorone, is an investigational antiviral agent that has shown a broad array of biological activities including cell growth inhibition in cancer cells, antifibrotic properties, α7 nicotinic receptor agonist activity, radioprotective activity and activation of hypoxia inducible factor-1. Quinacrine is an antimalarial but also has use as an anthelmintic. Our results suggest data sets with less than 1,000 molecules can produce validated machine learning models that can in turn be utilized to identify novel EBOV inhibitors in vitro. PMID:26834994

  2. Triplet supercurrent due to spin-active zones in a Josephson junction

    Linder, Jacob; Sudbø, Asle

    2010-07-01

    Motivated by a recent experiment evidencing triplet superconductivity in a ferromagnetic Josephson junction with a Cu2MnAl -Heusler barrier, we construct a theoretical model accounting for this observation. The key ingredients in our model which generate the triplet supercurrent are spin-active zones, characterized by an effective canted interface magnetic moment. Using a numerical solution of the quasiclassical equations of superconductivity with spin-active boundary conditions, we find qualitatively very good agreement with the experimentally observed supercurrent. Further experimental implications of the spin-active zones are discussed.

  3. Water molecule network and active site flexibility of apo protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B

    Pedersen, A.K.; Peters, Günther H.J.; Møller, K.B.;

    2004-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) plays a key role as a negative regulator of insulin and leptin signalling and is therefore considered to be an important molecular target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes and obesity. Detailed structural information about the structure of PTP1B, including...... the conformation and flexibility of active-site residues as well as the water-molecule network, is a key issue in understanding ligand binding and enzyme kinetics and in structure-based drug design. A 1.95 Angstrom apo PTP1B structure has been obtained, showing four highly coordinated water molecules...

  4. Facilitating the medical response into an active shooter hot zone

    Tierney, Martin T.

    2016-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited The response to active shooter attacks is not as effective as it could be. People die before receiving care because most jurisdictions have a policy in place that stipulates emergency medical services (EMS) wait to enter a scene until law enforcement (LE) announces that the scene is clear or secure. Since this can take some time, life-saving care is not immediately available to the people who most need it, and consequently, there can b...

  5. CHEMICAL ACTIVATION OF MOLECULES BY METALS: EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES OF ELECTRON DISTRIBUTIONS AND BONDING

    LICHTENBERGER, DENNIS L.

    2002-03-26

    This research program is directed at obtaining detailed experimental information on the electronic interactions between metals and organic molecules. These interactions provide low energy pathways for many important chemical and catalytic processes. A major feature of the program is the continued development and application of our special high-resolution valence photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), and high-precision X-ray core photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) instrumentation for study of organometallic molecules in the gas phase. The study involves a systematic approach towards understanding the interactions and activation of bound carbonyls, C-H bonds, methylenes, vinylidenes, acetylides, alkenes, alkynes, carbenes, carbynes, alkylidenes, alkylidynes, and others with various monometal, dimetal, and cluster metal species. Supporting ligands include -aryls, alkoxides, oxides, and phosphines. We are expanding our studies of both early and late transition metal species and electron-rich and electron-poor environments in order to more completely understand the electronic factors that serve to stabilize particular organic fragments and intermediates on metals. Additional new directions for this program are being taken in ultra-high vacuum surface UPS, XPS, scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments on both physisorbed and chemisorbed organometallic thin films. The combination of these methods provides additional electronic structure information on surface-molecule and molecule-molecule interactions. A very important general result emerging from this program is the identification of a close relationship between the ionization energies of the species and the thermodynamics of the chemical and catalytic reactions of these systems.

  6. CHEMICAL ACTIVATION OF MOLECULES BY METALS: EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES OF ELECTRON DISTRIBUTIONS AND BONDING; FINAL

    This research program is directed at obtaining detailed experimental information on the electronic interactions between metals and organic molecules. These interactions provide low energy pathways for many important chemical and catalytic processes. A major feature of the program is the continued development and application of our special high-resolution valence photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), and high-precision X-ray core photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) instrumentation for study of organometallic molecules in the gas phase. The study involves a systematic approach towards understanding the interactions and activation of bound carbonyls, C-H bonds, methylenes, vinylidenes, acetylides, alkenes, alkynes, carbenes, carbynes, alkylidenes, alkylidynes, and others with various monometal, dimetal, and cluster metal species. Supporting ligands include -aryls, alkoxides, oxides, and phosphines. We are expanding our studies of both early and late transition metal species and electron-rich and electron-poor environments in order to more completely understand the electronic factors that serve to stabilize particular organic fragments and intermediates on metals. Additional new directions for this program are being taken in ultra-high vacuum surface UPS, XPS, scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments on both physisorbed and chemisorbed organometallic thin films. The combination of these methods provides additional electronic structure information on surface-molecule and molecule-molecule interactions. A very important general result emerging from this program is the identification of a close relationship between the ionization energies of the species and the thermodynamics of the chemical and catalytic reactions of these systems

  7. Aqueous phase adsorption of different sized molecules on activated carbon fibers: Effect of textural properties.

    Prajapati, Yogendra N; Bhaduri, Bhaskar; Joshi, Harish C; Srivastava, Anurag; Verma, Nishith

    2016-07-01

    The effect that the textural properties of rayon-based activated carbon fibers (ACFs), such as the BET surface area and pore size distribution (PSD), have on the adsorption of differently sized molecules, namely, brilliant yellow (BY), methyl orange (MO) and phenol (PH), was investigated in the aqueous phase. ACF samples with different BET areas and PSDs were produced by steam-activating carbonized fibers for different activation times (0.25, 0.5, and 1 h). The samples activated for 0.25 h were predominantly microporous, whereas those activated for relatively longer times contained hierarchical micro-mesopores. The adsorption capacities of the ACFs for the adsorbate increased with increasing BET surface area and pore volume, and ranged from 51 to 1306 mg/g depending on the textural properties of the ACFs and adsorbate size. The adsorption capacities of the hierarchical ACF samples followed the order BY > MO > PH. Interestingly, the number of molecules adsorbed by the ACFs followed the reverse order: PH > MO > BY. This anomaly was attributed to the increasing molecular weight of the PH, MO and BY molecules. The equilibrium adsorption data were described using the Langmuir isotherm. This study shows that suitable textural modifications to ACFs are required for the efficient aqueous phase removal of an adsorbate. PMID:27107386

  8. Heavy metals contamination characteristics in soil of different mining activity zones

    LIAO Guo-li; LIAO Da-xue; LI Quan-ming

    2008-01-01

    Depending upon the polluted features of various mining activities in a typical nonferrous metal mine, the contaminated soil area was divided into four zones which were polluted by tailings, mine drainage, dust deposition in wind and spreading minerals during vehicle transportation, respectively. In each zone, soil samples were collected. Total 28 soil samples were dug and analyzed by ICP-AES and other relevant methods. The results indicate that the average contents of Zn, Pb, Cd, Cu and As in soils are 508.6, 384.8, 7.53, 356 and 44.6 mg/kg, respectively. But the contents of heavy metals in different zone have distinct differences. The proportion of oxidizing association with organic substance is small. Difference of the association of heavy metals is small in different polluted zones.

  9. Visualizing repetitive diffusion activity of double-strand RNA binding proteins by single molecule fluorescence assays.

    Koh, Hye Ran; Wang, Xinlei; Myong, Sua

    2016-08-01

    TRBP, one of double strand RNA binding proteins (dsRBPs), is an essential cofactor of Dicer in the RNA interference pathway. Previously we reported that TRBP exhibits repetitive diffusion activity on double strand (ds)RNA in an ATP independent manner. In the TRBP-Dicer complex, the diffusion mobility of TRBP facilitates Dicer-mediated RNA cleavage. Such repetitive diffusion of dsRBPs on a nucleic acid at the nanometer scale can be appropriately captured by several single molecule detection techniques. Here, we provide a step-by-step guide to four different single molecule fluorescence assays by which the diffusion activity of dsRBPs on dsRNA can be detected. One color assay, termed protein induced fluorescence enhancement enables detection of unlabeled protein binding and diffusion on a singly labeled RNA. Two-color Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) in which labeled dsRBPs is applied to labeled RNA, allows for probing the motion of protein along the RNA axis. Three color FRET reports on the diffusion movement of dsRBPs from one to the other end of RNA. The single molecule pull down assay provides an opportunity to collect dsRBPs from mammalian cells and examine the protein-RNA interaction at single molecule platform. PMID:27012177

  10. Single molecule investigation of the onset and minimum size of the calcium-mediated junction zone in alginate.

    Bowman, Kate A; Aarstad, Olav Andreas; Nakamura, Marcela; Stokke, Bjørn Torger; Skjåk-Bræk, Gudmund; Round, Andrew N

    2016-09-01

    One of the principal roles of alginate, both natively and in commercial applications, is gelation via Ca(2+)-mediated crosslinks between blocks of guluronic acid. In this work, single molecule measurements were carried out between well-characterised series of nearly monodisperse guluronic acid blocks ('oligoGs') using dynamic force spectroscopy. The measurements provide evidence that for interaction times on the order of tens of milliseconds the maximum crosslink strength is achieved by pairs of oligoGs long enough to allow the coordination of 4Ca(2+) ions, with both shorter and longer oligomers forming weaker links. Extending the interaction time from tens to hundreds of milliseconds allows longer oligoGs to achieve much stronger crosslinks but does not change the strength of individual links between shorter oligoGs. These results are considered in light of extant models for the onset of cooperative crosslinking in polyelectrolytes and an anisotropic distribution of oligoGs on interacting surfaces and provide a timescale for the formation and relaxation of alginate gels at the single crosslink level. PMID:27185115

  11. Structure Based Discovery of Small Molecules to Regulate the Activity of Human Insulin Degrading Enzyme

    Çakir, Bilal; Dağliyan, Onur; Dağyildiz, Ezgi; Bariş, İbrahim; Kavakli, Ibrahim Halil; Kizilel, Seda; Türkay, Metin

    2012-01-01

    Background Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) is an allosteric Zn+2 metalloprotease involved in the degradation of many peptides including amyloid-β, and insulin that play key roles in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), respectively. Therefore, the use of therapeutic agents that regulate the activity of IDE would be a viable approach towards generating pharmaceutical treatments for these diseases. Crystal structure of IDE revealed that N-terminal has an exosite which is ∼30 Å away from the catalytic region and serves as a regulation site by orientation of the substrates of IDE to the catalytic site. It is possible to find small molecules that bind to the exosite of IDE and enhance its proteolytic activity towards different substrates. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we applied structure based drug design method combined with experimental methods to discover four novel molecules that enhance the activity of human IDE. The novel compounds, designated as D3, D4, D6, and D10 enhanced IDE mediated proteolysis of substrate V, insulin and amyloid-β, while enhanced degradation profiles were obtained towards substrate V and insulin in the presence of D10 only. Conclusion/Significance This paper describes the first examples of a computer-aided discovery of IDE regulators, showing that in vitro and in vivo activation of this important enzyme with small molecules is possible. PMID:22355395

  12. Structure based discovery of small molecules to regulate the activity of human insulin degrading enzyme.

    Bilal Çakir

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE is an allosteric Zn(+2 metalloprotease involved in the degradation of many peptides including amyloid-β, and insulin that play key roles in Alzheimer's disease (AD and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM, respectively. Therefore, the use of therapeutic agents that regulate the activity of IDE would be a viable approach towards generating pharmaceutical treatments for these diseases. Crystal structure of IDE revealed that N-terminal has an exosite which is ∼30 Å away from the catalytic region and serves as a regulation site by orientation of the substrates of IDE to the catalytic site. It is possible to find small molecules that bind to the exosite of IDE and enhance its proteolytic activity towards different substrates. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we applied structure based drug design method combined with experimental methods to discover four novel molecules that enhance the activity of human IDE. The novel compounds, designated as D3, D4, D6, and D10 enhanced IDE mediated proteolysis of substrate V, insulin and amyloid-β, while enhanced degradation profiles were obtained towards substrate V and insulin in the presence of D10 only. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This paper describes the first examples of a computer-aided discovery of IDE regulators, showing that in vitro and in vivo activation of this important enzyme with small molecules is possible.

  13. Nanoscale charge transport in cytochrome c3/DNA network: Comparative studies between redox-active molecules

    Yamaguchi, Harumasa; Che, Dock-Chil; Hirano, Yoshiaki; Suzuki, Masayuki; Higuchi, Yoshiki; Matsumoto, Takuya

    2015-09-01

    The redox-active molecule of a cytochrome c3/DNA network exhibits nonlinear current-voltage (I-V) characteristics with a threshold bias voltage at low temperature and zero-bias conductance at room temperature. I-V curves for the cytochrome c3/DNA network are well matched with the Coulomb blockade network model. Comparative studies of the Mn12 cluster, cytochrome c, and cytochrome c3, which have a wide variety of redox potentials, indicate no difference in charge transport, which suggests that the conduction mechanism is not directly related to the redox states. The charge transport mechanism has been discussed in terms of the newly-formed electronic energy states near the Fermi level, induced by the ionic interaction between redox-active molecules with the DNA network.

  14. Tsunamigenic potential of Mediterranean fault systems and active subduction zones

    Petricca, Patrizio; Babeyko, Andrey

    2016-04-01

    Since the North East Atlantic and Mediterranean Tsunami Warning System (NEAMTWS) is under development by the European scientific community, it becomes necessary to define guidelines for the characterization of the numerous parameters must be taken into account in a fair assessment of the risk. Definition of possible tectonic sources and evaluation of their potential is one of the principal issues. In this study we systematically evaluate tsunamigenic potential of up-to-now known real fault systems and active subduction interfaces in the NEAMTWS region. The task is accomplished by means of numerical modeling of tsunami generation and propagation. We have simulated all possible uniform-slip ruptures populating fault and subduction interfaces with magnitudes ranging from 6.5 up to expected Mmax. A total of 15810 individual ruptures were processed. For each rupture, a tsunami propagation scenario was computed in linear shallow-water approximation on 1-arc minute bathymetric grid (Gebco_08) implying normal reflection boundary conditions. Maximum wave heights at coastal positions (totally - 23236 points of interest) were recorded for four hours of simulation and then classified according to currently adopted warning level thresholds. The resulting dataset allowed us to classify the sources in terms of their tsunamigenic potential as well as to estimate their minimum tsunamigenic magnitude. Our analysis shows that almost every source in the Mediterranean Sea is capable to produce local tsunami at the advisory level (i.e., wave height > 20 cm) starting from magnitude values of Mw=6.6. In respect to the watch level (wave height > 50 cm), the picture is less homogeneous: crustal sources in south-west Mediterranean as well as East-Hellenic arc need larger magnitudes (around Mw=7.0) to trigger watch levels even at the nearby coasts. In the context of the regional warning (i.e., source-to-coast distance > 100 km) faults also behave more heterogeneously in respect to the minimum

  15. Topoisomerase I as a Biomarker: Detection of Activity at the Single Molecule Level

    Proszek, Joanna; Roy, Amit; Jakobsen, Ann-Katrine;

    2014-01-01

    hTopI have been reported to result in CPT resistance. Therefore, hTOPI gene copy number, mRNA level, protein amount, and enzyme activity have been studied to explain differences in cellular response to CPT. We show that Rolling Circle Enhanced Enzyme Activity Detection (REEAD), allowing measurement...... of hTopI cleavage-religation activity at the single molecule level, may be used to detect posttranslational enzymatic differences influencing CPT response. These differences cannot be detected by analysis of hTopI gene copy number, mRNA amount, or protein amount, and only become apparent upon...... measuring the activity of hTopI in the presence of CPT. Furthermore, we detected differences in the activity of the repair enzyme tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 1, which is involved in repair of hTopI-induced DNA damage. Since increased TDP1 activity can reduce cellular CPT sensitivity we suggest that a...

  16. Discovery of fragment molecules that bind the human peroxiredoxin 5 active site.

    Sarah Barelier

    Full Text Available The search for protein ligands is a crucial step in the inhibitor design process. Fragment screening represents an interesting method to rapidly find lead molecules, as it enables the exploration of a larger portion of the chemical space with a smaller number of compounds as compared to screening based on drug-sized molecules. Moreover, fragment screening usually leads to hit molecules that form few but optimal interactions with the target, thus displaying high ligand efficiencies. Here we report the screening of a homemade library composed of 200 highly diverse fragments against the human Peroxiredoxin 5 protein. Peroxiredoxins compose a family of peroxidases that share the ability to reduce peroxides through a conserved cysteine. The three-dimensional structures of these enzymes ubiquitously found throughout evolution have been extensively studied, however, their biological functions are still not well understood and to date few inhibitors have been discovered against these enzymes. Six fragments from the library were shown to bind to the Peroxiredoxin 5 active site and ligand-induced chemical shift changes were used to drive the docking of these small molecules into the protein structure. The orientation of the fragments in the binding pocket was confirmed by the study of fragment homologues, highlighting the role of hydroxyl functions that hang the ligands to the Peroxiredoxin 5 protein. Among the hit fragments, the small catechol molecule was shown to significantly inhibit Peroxiredoxin 5 activity in a thioredoxin peroxidase assay. This study reports novel data about the ligand-Peroxiredoxin interactions that will help considerably the development of potential Peroxiredoxin inhibitors.

  17. Morbilliviruses Use Signaling Lymphocyte Activation Molecules (CD150) as Cellular Receptors

    Tatsuo, Hironobu; Ono, Nobuyuki; Yanagi, Yusuke

    2001-01-01

    Morbilliviruses comprise measles virus, canine distemper virus, rinderpest virus, and several other viruses that cause devastating human and animal diseases accompanied by severe immunosuppression and lymphopenia. Recently, we have shown that human signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM) is a cellular receptor for measles virus. In this study, we examined whether canine distemper and rinderpest viruses also use canine and bovine SLAMs, respectively, as cellular receptors. The Onderste...

  18. Structure-property relationship of quinuclidinium surfactants--Towards multifunctional biologically active molecules.

    Skočibušić, Mirjana; Odžak, Renata; Štefanić, Zoran; Križić, Ivana; Krišto, Lucija; Jović, Ozren; Hrenar, Tomica; Primožič, Ines; Jurašin, Darija

    2016-04-01

    Motivated by diverse biological and pharmacological activity of quinuclidine and oxime compounds we have synthesized and characterized novel class of surfactants, 3-hydroxyimino quinuclidinium bromides with different alkyl chains lengths (CnQNOH; n=12, 14 and 16). The incorporation of non conventional hydroxyimino quinuclidinium headgroup and variation in alkyl chain length affects hydrophilic-hydrophobic balance of surfactant molecule and thereby physicochemical properties important for its application. Therefore, newly synthesized surfactants were characterized by the combination of different experimental techniques: X-ray analysis, potentiometry, electrical conductivity, surface tension and dynamic light scattering measurements, as well as antimicrobial susceptibility tests. Comprehensive investigation of CnQNOH surfactants enabled insight into structure-property relationship i.e., way in which the arrangement of surfactant molecules in the crystal phase correlates with their solution behavior and biologically activity. The synthesized CnQNOH surfactants exhibited high adsorption efficiency and relatively low critical micelle concentrations. In addition, all investigated compounds showed very potent and promising activity against Gram-positive and clinically relevant Gram-negative bacterial strains compared to conventional antimicrobial agents: tetracycline and gentamicin. The overall results indicate that bicyclic headgroup with oxime moiety, which affects both hydrophilicity and hydrophobicity of CnQNOH molecule in addition to enabling hydrogen bonding, has dominant effect on crystal packing and physicochemical properties. The unique structural features of cationic surfactants with hydroxyimino quinuclidine headgroup along with diverse biological activity have made them promising structures in novel drug discovery. Obtained fundamental understanding how combination of different functionalities in a single surfactant molecule affects its physicochemical

  19. A Novel Accessory Molecule Trim59 Involved in Cytotoxicity of BCG-Activated Macrophages

    Zhao, Xiangfeng; Liu, Qihui; Du, Baiqiu; Li, Peng; Cui, Qu; Han, Xiao; Du, Bairong; Yan, Dongmei; Zhu, Xun

    2012-01-01

    BCG-activated macrophages (BAM) could kill the tumor cells through cell-cell contact. In this process membrane proteins play an important role. However, up to date, few membrane proteins were revealed. In this study, we selected a surface molecule named Trim59, which was specifically expressed on BAM membrane (compared with the negative control). We cloned and prokaryoticly expressed the extracellular domain of Trim59, purified the recombinant protein and generated polyclonal antibodies. Immu...

  20. Anticancer molecule AS1411 exhibits low nanomolar antiviral activity against HIV-1.

    Métifiot, Mathieu; Amrane, Samir; Mergny, Jean-Louis; Andreola, Marie-Line

    2015-11-01

    During clinical trials, a number of fully characterized molecules are dropped along the way because they do not provide enough benefit for the patient. Some of them show limited side effects and might be of great use for other applications. AS1411 is a nucleolin-targeting aptamer that underwent phase II clinical trials as anticancer agent. Here, we show that AS1411 exhibits extremely potent antiviral activity and is therefore an attractive new lead as anti-HIV agent. PMID:26363100

  1. Identification of intrinsic catalytic activity for electrochemical reduction of water molecules to generate hydrogen

    Shinagawa, Tatsuya

    2015-01-01

    Insufficient hydronium ion activities at near-neutral pH and under unbuffered conditions induce diffusion-limited currents for hydrogen evolution, followed by a reaction with water molecules to generate hydrogen at elevated potentials. The observed constant current behaviors at near neutral pH reflect the intrinsic electrocatalytic reactivity of the metal electrodes for water reduction. This journal is © the Owner Societies.

  2. Chemical activation of molecules by metals: Experimental studies of electron distributions and bonding

    This quarter has witnessed further progress both in our experimental methods of photoelectron spectroscopy and in our understanding the fundamental relationships between ionization energies and the chemistry of transition metal species. Progress continues on the new gas phase photoelectron spectrometer that combine improved capabilities for HeI/HeII UPS, XPS, and Auger investigations of organometallic molecules. Several measurements have been accomplished this year that were not possible previously. We have published the formal relationship between measured molecular ionization energies and thermodynamic bond dissociation energies, and applied the relationships to homonuclear and heteronuclear diatomic molecules, multiple bonds, and metal-ligand bonds. Studies of C-H bond activation have continued with examination of different degrees of Si-H bond addition to metals. the electronic effects of intermolecular interactions have been observed by comparing the ionizations of metal complexes in the gas phase with the ionizations of monolayer solid organometallic films prepared in ultra-high vacuum. The orientations of the molecules have been determined by scanning tunneling microscopy. Especially interesting has been the recent application of these techniques to the characterization of the soccer-ball shaped C60 molecule, buckminsterfullerene. Studies of the following complexes are described : Fe, Os, Nb, Mo, Rh, Re, Al, and Mn. 19 refs

  3. A chlorite mineral surface actively drives the deposition of DNA molecules in stretched conformations

    Muscovite mica is commonly used to immobilize DNA molecules onto a flat surface. This method, however, requires either the use of divalent cations in the buffer solution or the chemical modification of the surface. Here we show that DNA molecules have different binding affinities and assume different conformations when adsorbed to different layered minerals. In particular, the effect of biotite, muscovite, talc, brucite and chlorite upon DNA binding is investigated. Using atomic force microscopy it is possible to quantify the amount of DNA deposited onto a flat surface and it is experimentally confirmed that biotite, talc and brucite have a much higher affinity than muscovite (7-, 20- and 25-fold more volume of DNA deposited, respectively). The deposition of DNA onto chlorite presents areas (brucite-like) with high DNA coverage and areas (mica-like) where DNA molecules are absent. We regularly observed isolated DNA molecules that became stretched across these regions of low affinity. The stretching is not induced by the deposition procedure but is driven by the surface potential gradient between brucite-like and mica-like regions in chlorite. The active stretching of DNA on chlorite is a clear indication of the technological potential carried by these materials when used as substrates for biomolecules

  4. Supported gold catalysis: from small molecule activation to green chemical synthesis.

    Liu, Xiang; He, Lin; Liu, Yong-Mei; Cao, Yong

    2014-03-18

    With diminishing natural resources, there is an ever-increasing demand for cost-effective and sustainable production of fine and commodity chemicals. For this purpose, there is a need for new catalytic methods that can permit efficient and targeted conversion of fossil and biorenewable feedstocks with lower energy requirements and environmental impact. A significant number of industrial catalytic processes are performed by platinum-group-metal (PGM)-based heterogeneous catalysts capable of activating a range of important small molecules, such as CO, O2, H2, and N2. In contrast, there is a general feeling that gold (Au) cannot act as an efficient catalyst because of its inability to activate most molecules, which is essential to any catalytic processes. As a consequence, researchers have long neglected the potential for use of gold as a catalyst. In recent years, however, chemists have put forth tremendous effort and progress in the use of supported gold catalysts to facilitate a variety of useful synthetic transformations. The seminal discovery by Haruta in 1987 that suitably prepared Au-based catalysts were surprisingly active for CO oxidation even at 200 K initiated rapid development of the field. Since then, researchers have widely employed Au-based catalysts in many types of mild chemical processes, with special focus on selective reactions involving small molecules (for example, CO, H2O, O2, or H2) as a reactant. That gold in the form of tiny nanoparticles (NPs, generally less than 5 nm in diameter) can subtly activate the reactant molecules under mild conditions has been evoked to explain the superior effectiveness of gold compared with conventional PGMs. In this context, Au-based catalysts are gaining great significance in developing new green processes with improved selectivity and energy minimization. In this Account, we describe our efforts toward the development of a range of green and selective processes largely through the appropriate choice of Au

  5. Cloning and expression of the receptor for human urokinase plasminogen activator, a central molecule in cell surface, plasmin dependent proteolysis

    Roldan, A L; Cubellis, M V; Masucci, M T;

    1990-01-01

    The surface receptor for urokinase plasminogen activator (uPAR) has been recognized in recent years as a key molecule in regulating plasminogen mediated extracellular proteolysis. Surface plasminogen activation controls the connections between cells, basement membrane and extracellular matrix, an...

  6. Microbial respiration and extracellular enzyme activity in sediments from the Gulf of Mexico hypoxic zone

    This study explores the relationship between sediment chemistry (TC, TN, TP) and microbial respiration (DHA) and extracellular enzyme activity (EEA) across the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) hypoxic zone. TC, TN, and TP were all positively correlated with each other (r=0.19-0.68). DHA was ...

  7. Reduced endogenous Ca2+ buffering speeds active zone Ca2+ signaling.

    Delvendahl, Igor; Jablonski, Lukasz; Baade, Carolin; Matveev, Victor; Neher, Erwin; Hallermann, Stefan

    2015-06-01

    Fast synchronous neurotransmitter release at the presynaptic active zone is triggered by local Ca(2+) signals, which are confined in their spatiotemporal extent by endogenous Ca(2+) buffers. However, it remains elusive how rapid and reliable Ca(2+) signaling can be sustained during repetitive release. Here, we established quantitative two-photon Ca(2+) imaging in cerebellar mossy fiber boutons, which fire at exceptionally high rates. We show that endogenous fixed buffers have a surprisingly low Ca(2+)-binding ratio (∼ 15) and low affinity, whereas mobile buffers have high affinity. Experimentally constrained modeling revealed that the low endogenous buffering promotes fast clearance of Ca(2+) from the active zone during repetitive firing. Measuring Ca(2+) signals at different distances from active zones with ultra-high-resolution confirmed our model predictions. Our results lead to the concept that reduced Ca(2+) buffering enables fast active zone Ca(2+) signaling, suggesting that the strength of endogenous Ca(2+) buffering limits the rate of synchronous synaptic transmission. PMID:26015575

  8. Dynamical Organization of Syntaxin-1A at the Presynaptic Active Zone.

    Ullrich, Alexander; Böhme, Mathias A; Schöneberg, Johannes; Depner, Harald; Sigrist, Stephan J; Noé, Frank

    2015-09-01

    Synaptic vesicle fusion is mediated by SNARE proteins forming in between synaptic vesicle (v-SNARE) and plasma membrane (t-SNARE), one of which is Syntaxin-1A. Although exocytosis mainly occurs at active zones, Syntaxin-1A appears to cover the entire neuronal membrane. By using STED super-resolution light microscopy and image analysis of Drosophila neuro-muscular junctions, we show that Syntaxin-1A clusters are more abundant and have an increased size at active zones. A computational particle-based model of syntaxin cluster formation and dynamics is developed. The model is parametrized to reproduce Syntaxin cluster-size distributions found by STED analysis, and successfully reproduces existing FRAP results. The model shows that the neuronal membrane is adjusted in a way to strike a balance between having most syntaxins stored in large clusters, while still keeping a mobile fraction of syntaxins free or in small clusters that can efficiently search the membrane or be traded between clusters. This balance is subtle and can be shifted toward almost no clustering and almost complete clustering by modifying the syntaxin interaction energy on the order of only 1 kBT. This capability appears to be exploited at active zones. The larger active-zone syntaxin clusters are more stable and provide regions of high docking and fusion capability, whereas the smaller clusters outside may serve as flexible reserve pool or sites of spontaneous ectopic release. PMID:26367029

  9. Early-Late Heterobimetallic Complexes Linked by Phosphinoamide Ligands. Tuning Redox Potentials and Small Molecule Activation

    Thomas, Christine M. [Brandeis Univ., Waltham, MA (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Recent attention in the chemical community has been focused on the energy efficient and environmentally benign conversion of abundant small molecules (CO2, H2O, etc.) to useful liquid fuels. This project addresses these goals by examining fundamental aspects of catalyst design to ultimately access small molecule activation processes under mild conditions. Specifically, Thomas and coworkers have targetted heterobimetallic complexes that feature metal centers with vastly different electronic properties, dictated both by their respective positions on the periodic table and their coordination environment. Unlike homobimetallic complexes featuring identical or similar metals, the bonds between metals in early/late heterobimetallics are more polarized, with the more electron-rich late metal center donating electron density to the more electron-deficient early metal center. While metal-metal bonds pose an interesting strategy for storing redox equivalents and stabilizing reactive metal fragments, the polar character of metal-metal bonds in heterobimetallic complexes renders these molecules ideally poised to react with small molecule substrates via cleavage of energy-rich single and double bonds. In addition, metal-metal interactions have been shown to dramatically affect redox potentials and promote multielectron redox activity, suggesting that metal-metal interactions may provide a mechanism to tune redox potentials and access substrate reduction/activation at mild overpotentials. This research project has provided a better fundamental understanding of how interactions between transition metals can be used as a strategy to promote and/or control chemical transformations related to the clean production of fuels. While this project focused on the study of homogeneous systems, it is anticipated that the broad conclusions drawn from these investigations will be applicable to heterogeneous catalysis as well, particularly on heterogeneous processes that occur at interfaces in

  10. Green Oxygenation Degradation of Rhodamine B by Using Activated Molecule Oxygen

    Ke Jian DENG; Fei HUANG; Duo Yuan WANG; Zheng He PENG; Yun Hong ZHOU

    2004-01-01

    Iron(Ⅱ) tetra-(1,4-dithin)-porphyrazine, (FePz(dtn)4) is able to activate molecule oxygen for oxygenation degradation of rhodamine B (RhB) in an extensive pH region without light excitation. Experiments indicate that the RhB can be degraded nearly 52% in alkaline aqueous solution, bubbling with dioxygen for seven hours in the presence of FePz(dtn)4 and the hydrogen peroxides as an actve intermediate were determined by DPD method. The catalyst is recyclable and the catalyst activity was maintained after l0 recycles.

  11. Intercellular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1, Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1, and Regulated on Activation Normal T Cell Expressed and Secreted Are Expressed by Human Breast Carcinoma Cells and Support Eosinophil Adhesion and Activation

    Ali, Shahina; Kaur, Jaswinder; Patel, Kamala D.

    2000-01-01

    Eosinophils are usually associated with parasitic and allergic diseases; however, eosinophilia is also observed in several types of human tumors, including breast carcinomas. In this study we examined several human breast carcinoma cell lines for adhesion molecule expression and the ability to bind and activate eosinophils. MDA-MB-435S and MDA-MB-468 cells constitutively expressed both intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and this expressio...

  12. Earthquake doublet in an active shear zone, southwest Japan: Constraints from geophysical and geochemical findings

    Umeda, Koji; Asamori, Koichi; Makuuchi, Ayumu; Kobori, Kazuo

    2014-11-01

    In 1997, the Kagoshima earthquake doublet, consisting of two closely associated Mw ~ 6 strike-slip events, five km and 48 days apart, has occurred in southwest Japan. The location is where an E-W trending discontinuity along 32°N latitude on southern Kyushu Island is clearly defined in GPS velocities, indicating the presence of a highly active left-lateral shear zone. However, there have not been any obvious indications of active faulting at the surface prior to the earthquake doublet, which could be associated with this shear zone. Three-dimensional inversion of magnetotelluric sounding data obtained in the source region of the earthquake doublet reveals a near-vertical conductive zone with a width of 20 km, extending down to the base of the crust and perhaps into the upper mantle toward the Okinawa trough. The prominent conductor corresponds to the western part of the active shear zone. Elevated 3He/4He ratios in groundwaters sampled from hot spring and drinking water wells suggest the emission of mantle-derived helium from the seismic source region. The geophysical and geochemical observations are significant indications that the invasion of mantle fluids into the crust, driven by upwelling asthenosphere from the Okinawa trough, triggers the notable left-lateral shearing in the zone in the present-day subduction system. In addition, the existence of aqueous fluids in and below the seismogenic layer could change the strength of the zones, and alter the local stress regime, resulting in the occurrence of the 1997 earthquake doublet.

  13. Geophysical and Geochemical Signatures Associated with Mantle Fluids Beneath an Active Shear Zone, Southwest Japan

    Umeda, K.; Asamori, K.; Sueoka, S.; Tamura, H.; Shimizu, M.

    2014-12-01

    In 1997, the Kagoshima earthquake doublet, consisting of two closely associated Mw ~ 6 strike-slip events, five km and 48 days apart, has occurred in southwest Japan. The location is where an E-W trending discontinuity along 32°N latitude on southern Kyushu Island is clearly defined in GPS velocities, indicating the presence of a highly active left-lateral shear zone. However, there have not been any obvious indications of active faulting at the surface prior to the earthquake doublet, which could be associated with this shear zone. Three-dimensional inversion of magnetotelluric sounding data obtained in the source region of the earthquake doublet reveals a near-vertical conductive zone with a width of 20 km, extending down to the base of the crust and perhaps into the upper mantle toward the Okinawa trough. The prominent conductor corresponds to the western part of the active shear zone. Elevated 3He/4He ratios in groundwaters sampled from hot spring and drinking water wells suggest the emission of mantle-derived helium from the seismic source region. The geophysical and geochemical observations are significant indications that the invasion of mantle fluids into the crust, driven by upwelling asthenosphere from the Okinawa trough, triggers the notable left-lateral shearing in the zone in the present-day subduction system. In addition, the existence of aqueous fluids in and below the seismogenic layer could change the strength of the zones, and alter the local stress regime, resulting in the occurrence of the 1997 earthquake doublet.

  14. Ethosomes for the delivery of anti-HSV-1 molecules: preparation, characterization and in vitro activity.

    Cortesi, R; Ravani, L; Zaid, A N; Menegatti, E; Romagnoli, R; Drechsler, M; Esposito, E

    2010-10-01

    This paper describes the production, characterization and in vitro activity of ethosomes containing two molecules with antiviral activity, such as acyclovir (ACY) and N1-beta-D-ribofuranosyl-pyrazole [3,4d]pyridazin-7(6p-chlorine-phenyl)-one nucleoside (N1CP). Ethosomes were prepared and morphologically characterized by Cryo-TEM. The encapsulation efficiency was 92.3 +/- 2.5% for ACY and 94.2 +/- 2.8% for N1CP. The release of the drug from vesicles, determined by a Franz cell method, indicated that both drugs were released in a controlled manner. In order to possibly guarantee the stability during long-term storage ethosome suspensions was freeze-dried. It was found that the freeze-dried ethosomes' cakes were compact, glassy characterized by low density and quick re-hydration. However, the storage time slightly influences the percentage of drug encapsulation within ethosomes showing a drug leakage after re-hydration around 10%. The antiviral activity against HSV-1 of both drugs was tested by plaque reduction assay in monolayer cultures of Vero cells. Data showed that ethosomes allowed a reduction of the ED50 of N1CP evidencing an increase of its antiviral activity. However, ACY remains more active than N1CP. No differences are appreciable between drug-containing ethosomes before and after freeze-drying. Taken together these results, ethosomal formulation could be possibly proposed as mean for topical administration of anti-herpetic molecules. PMID:21105576

  15. Single-molecule kinetics under force: probing protein folding and enzymatic activity with optical tweezers

    Wong, Wesley

    2010-03-01

    Weak non-covalent bonds between and within single molecules govern many aspects of biological structure and function (e.g. DNA base-paring, receptor-ligand binding, protein folding, etc.) In living systems, these interactions are often subject to mechanical forces, which can greatly alter their kinetics and activity. My group develops and applies novel single-molecule manipulation techniques to explore and quantify these force-dependent kinetics. Using optical tweezers, we have quantified the force-dependent unfolding and refolding kinetics of different proteins, including the cytoskeletal protein spectrin in collaboration with E. Evans's group [1], and the A2 domain of the von Willebrand factor blood clotting protein in collaboration with T. Springer's group [2]. Furthermore, we have studied the kinetics of the ADAMTS13 enzyme acting on a single A2 domain, and have shown that physiolgical forces in the circulation can act as a cofactor for enzymatic cleavage, regulating hemostatic activity [2]. References: 1. E. Evans, K. Halvorsen, K. Kinoshita, and W.P. Wong, Handbook of Single Molecule Biophysics, P. Hinterdorfer, ed., Springer (2009). 2. X. Zhang, K. Halvorsen, C.-Z. Zhang, W.P. Wong, and T.A. Springer, Science 324 (5932), 1330-1334 (2009).

  16. Theoretical investigation of the degradation mechanisms in host and guest molecules used in OLED active layers

    Winget, Paul

    2014-10-08

    A feature of OLEDs that has to date received little attention is the prediction of the stability of the molecules involved in the electrical and optical processes. Here, we present computational results intended to aid in the development of stable systems. We identify degradation pathways and define new strategies to guide the synthesis of stable materials for OLED applications for both phosphorescent emitters and organic host materials. The chemical reactivity of these molecules in the active layers of the devices is further complicated by the fact that, during operation, they can be either oxidized or reduced (as they localize a hole or an electron) in addition to forming both singlet and triplet excitons. © (2014) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.

  17. Stellar Activity Masquerading as Planets in the Habitable Zone of the M dwarf Gliese 581

    Robertson, Paul; Endl, Michael; Roy, Arpita

    2014-01-01

    The M dwarf Gliese 581 is believed to host four planets, including one (GJ 581d) near the habitable zone that could possibly support liquid water on its surface if it is a rocky planet. The detection of another habitable-zone planet--GJ 581g--is disputed, as its significance depends on the eccentricity assumed for d. Analyzing stellar activity using the H-alpha line, we measure a stellar rotation period of 130+/-2 days and a correlation for H-alpha modulation with radial velocity. Correcting for activity greatly diminishes the signal of GJ 581d (to 1.5 sigma), while significantly boosting the signals of the other known super-Earth planets. GJ 581d does not exist, but is an artifact of stellar activity which, when incompletely corrected, causes the false detection of planet g.

  18. 78 FR 7395 - Foreign-Trade Zone 129-Bellingham, WA; Notification of Proposed Production Activity; T.C. Trading...

    2013-02-01

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 129--Bellingham, WA; Notification of Proposed Production Activity; T.C. Trading Company, Inc. (Eyeglass Assembly and Kitting); Blaine, WA The Port of Bellingham, grantee of FTZ 129, submitted a notification of proposed production activity on behalf of T.C....

  19. 34 CFR 299.3 - What priority may the Secretary establish for activities in an Empowerment Zone or Enterprise...

    2010-07-01

    ... activities in an Empowerment Zone or Enterprise Community? For any ESEA discretionary grant program, the Secretary may establish a priority, as authorized by 34 CFR 75.105(b), for projects that will— (a) Use a... activities in an Empowerment Zone or Enterprise Community? 299.3 Section 299.3 Education Regulations of...

  20. Influence of the water molecules near surface of viral protein on virus activation process

    The infection of a cell with influenza virus comprises the stages of receptor binding to the cell membrane, endocytosis of virus particle, and fusion of the virus envelope and cell endosome membrane, which is determined by the conformational changes in hemagglutinin, a virus envelope protein, caused by pH decrease within the endosome. The pH value that induces conformation rearrangements of hemagglutinin molecule considerably varies for different influenza virus strains, first and foremost, due to the differences in amino acid structure of the corresponding proteins. The main goal of this study was to construct a model making it possible to assess the critical pH value characterizing the fusogenic activity of influenza virus hemagglutinin from the data on hemagglutinin structure and experimental verification of this model. Under this model, we assume that when the electrostatic force between interacting hemagglutinin molecules in the virus envelop exceeds a certain value, the hemagglutinin HA1 subunits are arranged so that they form a cavity sufficient for penetration of water molecules. This event leads to an irreversible hydration of the inner fragments of hemagglutinin molecule in a trimer and to the completion of conformational changes. The geometry of electrostatic field in hemagglutinin trimer was calculated taking into account the polarization effects near the interface of two dielectrics, aqueous medium and protein macromolecule. The critical pH values for the conformational changes in hemagglutinin were measured by the erythrocyte hemolysis induced by influenza virus particles when decreasing pH. The critical pH value conditionally separating the pH range into the regions with and without the conformational changes was calculated for several influenza virus H1N1 and H3N2 strains based on the data on the amino acid structure of the corresponding hemagglutinin molecules. Comparison of the theoretical and experimental values of critical pH values for

  1. High Throughput Extraction of Plant, Marine and Fungal Specimens for Preservation of Biologically Active Molecules

    Thomas G. McCloud

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The Developmental Therapeutics Program (DTP of the U.S. National Cancer Institute (NCI, at its NCI-Frederick facility, has built perhaps the largest and most diverse natural products screening library in the world for drug discovery. Composed of plant, marine organism and microbial extracts, it currently contains in excess of 230,000 unique materials. From the inception of this program to identify new anticancer chemotherapeutics from natural products sources in 1987, two extracts have been sequentially prepared from each specimen: one produced by organic solvent extraction, which yields a complex material that contains non- to moderately polar small molecules, and a water-soluble extract, a milieu largely unexplored for useful drugs in earlier years, which contains polar small to medium-sized molecules. Plant specimens and microbial ferments are extracted by modified traditional methods, while the method developed to produce extracts from marine organisms is unique and very different from that used by marine natural products chemists previously, but again yields both an organic solvent soluble and a water soluble material for inclusion into the screening library. Details of high throughput extract production for preservation of biologically active molecules are presented.

  2. Effect of methylprednisolone on the oxidative burst activity, adhesion molecules and clinical outcome following open heart surgery

    Toft, P; Christiansen, K; Tønnesen, Else Kirstine; Nielsen, C H; Lillevang, S

    1997-01-01

    cytometrically using 123-dihydrorhodamine. A panel of adhesion molecules was measured using monoclonal antibodies. Following CPB the oxidative burst activity and the expression of the adhesion molecule L-selectin more than doubled compared to initial values. There was no difference between the steroid group and...

  3. In vitro and in vivo activity of a novel antifungal small molecule against Candida infections.

    Sarah Sze Wah Wong

    Full Text Available Candida is the most common fungal pathogen of humans worldwide and has become a major clinical problem because of the growing number of immunocompromised patients, who are susceptible to infection. Moreover, the number of available antifungals is limited, and antifungal-resistant Candida strains are emerging. New and effective antifungals are therefore urgently needed. Here, we discovered a small molecule with activity against Candida spp. both in vitro and in vivo. We screened a library of 50,240 small molecules for inhibitors of yeast-to-hypha transition, a major virulence attribute of Candida albicans. This screening identified 20 active compounds. Further examination of the in vitro antifungal and anti-biofilm properties of these compounds, using a range of Candida spp., led to the discovery of SM21, a highly potent antifungal molecule (minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC 0.2-1.6 µg/ml. In vitro, SM21 was toxic to fungi but not to various human cell lines or bacterial species and was active against Candida isolates that are resistant to existing antifungal agents. Moreover, SM21 was relatively more effective against biofilms of Candida spp. than the current antifungal agents. In vivo, SM21 prevented the death of mice in a systemic candidiasis model and was also more effective than the common antifungal nystatin at reducing the extent of tongue lesions in a mouse model of oral candidiasis. Propidium iodide uptake assay showed that SM21 affected the integrity of the cell membrane. Taken together, our results indicate that SM21 has the potential to be developed as a novel antifungal agent for clinical use.

  4. Affinity of Drugs and Small Biologically Active Molecules to Carbon Nanotubes: A Pharmacodynamics and Nanotoxicity Factor?

    Liu, John; Yang, Liu; Hopfinger, Anton J.

    2009-01-01

    The MM-PBSA MD method was used to estimate the affinity, as represented by log kb, of each of a variety of biologically active molecules to a carbon nanotube in an aqueous environment. These ligand-receptor binding simulations were calibrated by first estimating the log kb values for eight ligands to human serum albumin, HSA, whose log kb values have been observed. A validation linear correlation equation was established [R2 = 0.888 Q2 = 0.603] between the observed and estimated log kb values...

  5. Structure Based Discovery of Small Molecules to Regulate the Activity of Human Insulin Degrading Enzyme

    Bilal Çakir; Onur Dağliyan; Ezgi Dağyildiz; İbrahim Bariş; Ibrahim Halil Kavakli; Seda Kizilel; Metin Türkay

    2012-01-01

    Structure Based Discovery of Small Molecules to Regulate the Activity of Human Insulin Degrading Enzyme Bilal C¸ akir1, Onur Dag˘ liyan1, Ezgi Dag˘ yildiz1, I˙brahim Baris¸1, Ibrahim Halil Kavakli1,2*, Seda Kizilel1*, Metin Tu¨ rkay3* 1 Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Koc¸ University, Sariyer, Istanbul, Turkey, 2 Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Koc¸ University, Sariyer, Istanbul, Turkey, 3 Department of Industrial Engineering, Koc¸ University...

  6. Benzimidazole-1,2,3-triazole Hybrid Molecules: Synthesis and Evaluation for Antibacterial/Antifungal Activity

    Ouahrouch, Abdelaaziz; Ighachane, Hana; Taourirte, Moha; Joachim W. Engels; Sedra, My Hassan; Lazrek, Hassan B.

    2014-01-01

    A novel series of hybrid molecules 4a–i and 5a–i were prepared by condensation of 4-(trimethylsilylethynyl)benzaldehyde 1 with substituted o-phenylenediamines. These in turn were reacted with 2-(azidomethoxy)ethyl acetate in a Cu alkyne–azide cycloaddition (CuAAC) to generate the 1,2,3-triazole pharmacophore under microwave assistance. The newly synthesized compounds were examined for their in vitro antimicrobial activities against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and the phytopathoge...

  7. Small molecule activators of SIRT1 replicate signaling pathways triggered by calorie restriction in vivo

    Lavu Siva

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Calorie restriction (CR produces a number of health benefits and ameliorates diseases of aging such as type 2 diabetes. The components of the pathways downstream of CR may provide intervention points for developing therapeutics for treating diseases of aging. The NAD+-dependent protein deacetylase SIRT1 has been implicated as one of the key downstream regulators of CR in yeast, rodents, and humans. Small molecule activators of SIRT1 have been identified that exhibit efficacy in animal models of diseases typically associated with aging including type 2 diabetes. To identify molecular processes induced in the liver of mice treated with two structurally distinct SIRT1 activators, SIRT501 (formulated resveratrol and SRT1720, for three days, we utilized a systems biology approach and applied Causal Network Modeling (CNM on gene expression data to elucidate downstream effects of SIRT1 activation. Results Here we demonstrate that SIRT1 activators recapitulate many of the molecular events downstream of CR in vivo, such as enhancing mitochondrial biogenesis, improving metabolic signaling pathways, and blunting pro-inflammatory pathways in mice fed a high fat, high calorie diet. Conclusion CNM of gene expression data from mice treated with SRT501 or SRT1720 in combination with supporting in vitro and in vivo data demonstrates that SRT501 and SRT1720 produce a signaling profile that mirrors CR, improves glucose and insulin homeostasis, and acts via SIRT1 activation in vivo. Taken together these results are encouraging regarding the use of small molecule activators of SIRT1 for therapeutic intervention into type 2 diabetes, a strategy which is currently being investigated in multiple clinical trials.

  8. Mechanically activated switching of Si-based single-molecule junction as imaged with three-dimensional dynamic probe

    Nakamura, Miki; Yoshida, Shoji; Katayama, Tomoki; Taninaka, Atsushi; Mera, Yutaka; Okada, Susumu; Takeuchi, Osamu; Shigekawa, Hidemi

    2015-10-01

    Understanding and extracting the full functions of single-molecule characteristics are key factors in the development of future device technologies, as well as in basic research on molecular electronics. Here we report a new methodology for realizing a three-dimensional (3D) dynamic probe of single-molecule conductance, which enables the elaborate 3D analysis of the conformational effect on molecular electronics, by the formation of a Si/single molecule/Si structure using scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM). The formation of robust covalent bonds between a molecule and Si electrodes, together with STM-related techniques, enables the stable and repeated control of the conformational modulation of the molecule. By 3D imaging of the conformational effect on a 1,4-diethynylbenzene molecule, a binary change in conductance with hysteresis is observed for the first time, which is considered to originate from a mechanically activated conformational change.

  9. Traumatic Brain Injury Activation of the Adult Subventricular Zone Neurogenic Niche

    Chang, Eun Hyuk; Adorjan, Istvan; Mundim, Mayara V.; Sun, Bin; Dizon, Maria L. V.; Szele, Francis G.

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is common in both civilian and military life, placing a large burden on survivors and society. However, with the recognition of neural stem cells in adult mammals, including humans, came the possibility to harness these cells for repair of damaged brain, whereas previously this was thought to be impossible. In this review, we focus on the rodent adult subventricular zone (SVZ), an important neurogenic niche within the mature brain in which neural stem cells continue to reside. We review how the SVZ is perturbed following various animal TBI models with regards to cell proliferation, emigration, survival, and differentiation, and we review specific molecules involved in these processes. Together, this information suggests next steps in attempting to translate knowledge from TBI animal models into human therapies for TBI. PMID:27531972

  10. Small-molecule CFTR activators increase tear secretion and prevent experimental dry eye disease.

    Flores, Alyssa M; Casey, Scott D; Felix, Christian M; Phuan, Puay W; Verkman, A S; Levin, Marc H

    2016-05-01

    Dry eye disorders, including Sjögren's syndrome, constitute a common problem in the aging population, with limited effective therapeutic options available. The cAMP-activated Cl(-) channel cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a major prosecretory channel at the ocular surface. We investigated whether compounds that target CFTR can correct the abnormal tear film in dry eye. Small-molecule activators of human wild-type CFTR identified by high-throughput screening were evaluated in cell culture and in vivo assays, to select compounds that stimulate Cl(-)-driven fluid secretion across the ocular surface in mice. An aminophenyl-1,3,5-triazine, CFTRact-K089, fully activated CFTR in cell cultures with EC50 ∼250 nM and produced an ∼8.5 mV hyperpolarization in ocular surface potential difference. When delivered topically, CFTRact-K089 doubled basal tear volume for 4 h and had no effect in CF mice. CFTRact-K089 showed sustained tear film bioavailability without detectable systemic absorption. In a mouse model of aqueous-deficient dry eye produced by lacrimal ablation, topical administration of 0.1 nmol CFTRact-K089 3 times daily restored tear volume to basal levels, preventing corneal epithelial disruption when initiated at the time of surgery and reversing it when started after development of dry eye. Our results support the potential utility of CFTR-targeted activators as a novel prosecretory treatment for dry eye.-Flores, A. M., Casey, S. D., Felix, C. M., Phuan, P. W., Verkman, A. S., Levin, M. H. Small-molecule CFTR activators increase tear secretion and prevent experimental dry eye disease. PMID:26842854

  11. Influence of platelet activating factor on expression of adhesion molecules in experimental pancreatitis

    Hua Zhao; Ji-Wei Chen; Ya-Kui Zhou; Xue-Feng Zhou; Pei-Yun Li

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether Platelet activating factor (PAF)has a regulation role in the expression of adhesion moleculesand accumulation of neutrophils in a murine model of acutepancreatitis.METHODS: One hundred twenty-eight Kunming mice weredivided into four groups. Group 1 received 0.1 mi saline s.c.every hour for three hours (sham). Group 2 received cerulein(50 μg/kg dose s.c.) every hour for three hours. Group 3received AP and additional challenge of PAF (50 rg/kg inabsolute ethanol) (AP/PAF). Group 4 received AP, plustherapeutic treatment with GAB (25 mg dose i.p.) immediatelyafter the first challenge of cerulein (AP/GAB). Animals weresacrificed at 12 h after the first challenge of saline or cerulein.Adhesion molecules of pancreas were semi-quantified bySP methods. Standard assays were performed for serumamylase and myeloperoxidase activity (MPO) of pancreas.Histology of pancreas was scored in a blind manner. Watercontent of pancreas was also measured at the same time.RESULTS: Control pancreata showed negligible adhesionmolecule expression and neutrophil accumulation. Therewere evident adhesion molecules expression and neutrophilaccumulation in AP and AP/PAF compared with sham (P<0.05).AP/GAB had a lower level of adhesion molecules, neutrophils,and water content versus AP and AP/PAF (P<0.05). Histologyshowed a trend toward improvement in AP/GAB, but didnot reach statistical significance.CONCLUSION: PAF can induce the expression of adhesionmolecules that mediate neutrophil accumulation. The PAFantagonist reduces the expression of adhesion moleculesand the severity of inflammation when given immediatelyafter the induction of mild AP in mice. These results suggestthat PAF antagonism may be useful in the treatment of mildpancreatitis after its clinical onset.

  12. Outcome of early active mobilization after flexor tendons repair in zones II–V in hand

    Saini Narender; Kundnani Vishal; Patni Purnima; Gupta S

    2010-01-01

    Background: The functional outcome of a flexor tendon injury after repair depends on multiple factors. The postoperative management of tendon injuries has paved a sea through many mobilization protocols. The improved understanding of splinting techniques has promoted the understanding and implication of these mobilization protocols. We conducted a study to observe and record the results of early active mobilization of repaired flexor tendons in zones II-V. Materials and Methods: 25 cases w...

  13. Effect of methylprednisolone on the oxidative burst activity, adhesion molecules and clinical outcome following open heart surgery

    Toft, P; Christiansen, K; Tønnesen, Else Kirstine;

    1997-01-01

    Following cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), activated granulocytes may be involved with ischaemia/ reperfusion injury. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether steroids could reduce the oxidative burst activity of granulocytes, the expression of adhesion molecules on...... cytometrically using 123-dihydrorhodamine. A panel of adhesion molecules was measured using monoclonal antibodies. Following CPB the oxidative burst activity and the expression of the adhesion molecule L-selectin more than doubled compared to initial values. There was no difference between the steroid group and...... the control group regarding the expression of adhesion molecules or the oxidative burst activity. In the steroid group the fluid gain during extracorporeal circulation (ECC) was 683 ml (median) compared to 1488 ml in the control group. Steroids prevented hyperthermia in the postoperative period but...

  14. Tungsten polyoxometalate molecules as active nodes for dynamic carrier exchange in hybrid molecular/semiconductor capacitors

    In this work we study the utilization of molecular transition metal oxides known as polyoxometalates (POMs), in particular the Keggin structure anions of the formula PW12O403−, as active nodes for potential switching and/or fast writing memory applications. The active molecules are being integrated in hybrid Metal-Insulator/POM molecules-Semiconductor capacitors, which serve as prototypes allowing investigation of critical performance characteristics towards the design of more sophisticated devices. The charging ability as well as the electronic structure of the molecular layer is probed by means of electrical characterization, namely, capacitance-voltage and current-voltage measurements, as well as transient capacitance measurements, C (t), under step voltage polarization. It is argued that the transient current peaks observed are manifestations of dynamic carrier exchange between the gate electrode and specific molecular levels, while the transient C (t) curves under conditions of molecular charging can supply information for the rate of change of the charge that is being trapped and de-trapped within the molecular layer. Structural characterization via surface and cross sectional scanning electron microscopy as well as atomic force microscopy, spectroscopic ellipsometry, UV and Fourier-transform IR spectroscopies, UPS, and XPS contribute to the extraction of accurate electronic structure characteristics and open the path for the design of new devices with on-demand tuning of their interfacial properties via the controlled preparation of the POM layer.

  15. Expression of activated molecules on CD5(+)B lymphocytes in autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    Zhu, Hongli; Xu, Wenyan; Liu, Hong; Wang, Huaquan; Fu, Rong; Wu, Yuhong; Qu, Wen; Wang, Guojin; Guan, Jing; Song, Jia; Xing, Limin; Shao, Zonghong

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the expression of activation molecules on CD5(+)B lymphocytes in peripheral blood of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA)/Evans patients. The expression of CD80, CD86, and CD69 on CD5(+)B lymphocytes was detected using flow cytometry in 30 AIHA/Evans patients, 18 normal controls (NC) and nine chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients. CD80 on CD5(+)B lymphocytes in untreated patients was higher than that in remission patients (P  0.05), but lower than those of CD5(-)B lymphocytes in remission patients and NC (P  0.05). CD80 and CD86 on CD5(+)B lymphocytes was negatively correlated with hemoglobin (HB), C3, C4 (P < 0.05) and positively correlated with reticulocyte (Ret) (P < 0.05). CD69 on CD5(+) and CD5(-)B lymphocytes of CLL was higher than those of AIHA/Evans patients and NC (P < 0.05). The active molecules on CD5(+)B lymphocytes in peripheral blood of AIHA/Evans patients differ from those on CD5(-) and clonal CD5(+)B lymphocytes. PMID:26968550

  16. Neutron-activation analysis for investigation of biochemical manganese in soils cotton soweol zone of Uzbekistan

    Full text: For many years we neutron activation analysis of soils sampled from different areas of landscape-geochemical regions of Uzbekistan including zone of extreme ecological catastrophe of Aral. Content of manganese and some other elements in the 'soil-cotton' system was investigated. Neutron-activation method of manganese determining with productivity up to 400 samples on shift with detection limit of 1,1 10-5 % and discrepancies not more than 10%. Was developed extremely uniform distribution of manganese in cotton sowed soils of the Republic (340-1800mg/kg) is determined. Practically all soils of cotton-sowed zone of Republic are with lack of manganese. Distribution of manganese on soil profile of separate organs of cotton (leaves seeds etc.) was studied. Correlation between gross concentration of manganese and its active part extracted by distilled water on the basis of quantity analysis was found. Successive comparison of gross content of manganese in the soil with crop capacity of cotton in different zones of Republic made it possible to find interconnection between these quantities, which proves necessity of using micro-additions of manganese in the soils where its low concentration is detected

  17. A model of ischemia-induced neuroblast activation in the adult subventricular zone.

    Davide Vergni

    Full Text Available We have developed a rat brain organotypic culture model, in which tissue slices contain cortex-subventricular zone-striatum regions, to model neuroblast activity in response to in vitro ischemia. Neuroblast activation has been described in terms of two main parameters, proliferation and migration from the subventricular zone into the injured cortex. We observed distinct phases of neuroblast activation as is known to occur after in vivo ischemia. Thus, immediately after oxygen/glucose deprivation (6-24 hours, neuroblasts reduce their proliferative and migratory activity, whereas, at longer time points after the insult (2 to 5 days, they start to proliferate and migrate into the damaged cortex. Antagonism of ionotropic receptors for extracellular ATP during and after the insult unmasks an early activation of neuroblasts in the subventricular zone, which responded with a rapid and intense migration of neuroblasts into the damaged cortex (within 24 hours. The process is further enhanced by elevating the production of the chemoattractant SDf-1alpha and may also be boosted by blocking the activation of microglia. This organotypic model which we have developed is an excellent in vitro system to study neurogenesis after ischemia and other neurodegenerative diseases. Its application has revealed a SOS response to oxygen/glucose deprivation, which is inhibited by unfavorable conditions due to the ischemic environment. Finally, experimental quantifications have allowed us to elaborate a mathematical model to describe neuroblast activation and to develop a computer simulation which should have promising applications for the screening of drug candidates for novel therapies of ischemia-related pathologies.

  18. Discovery of novel small molecule activators of β-catenin signaling.

    Folkert Verkaar

    Full Text Available Wnt/β-catenin signaling plays a major role in embryonic development and adult stem cell maintenance. Reduced activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway underlies neurodegenerative disorders and aberrations in bone formation. Screening of a small molecule compound library with a β-galactosidase fragment complementation assay measuring β-catenin nuclear entry revealed bona fide activators of β-catenin signaling. The compounds stabilized cytoplasmic β-catenin and activated β-catenin-dependent reporter gene activity. Although the mechanism through which the compounds activate β-catenin signaling has yet to be determined, several key regulators of Wnt/β-catenin signaling, including glycogen synthase kinase 3 and Frizzled receptors, were excluded as the molecular target. The compounds displayed remarkable selectivity, as they only induced β-catenin signaling in a human osteosarcoma U2OS cell line and not in a variety of other cell lines examined. Our data indicate that differences in cellular Wnt/β-catenin signaling machinery can be exploited to identify cell type-specific activators of Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

  19. Small-Molecule Inhibition and Activation-Loop Trans-Phosphorylation of the IGF1 Receptor

    Wu,J.; Li, W.; Craddock, B.; Foreman, K.; Mulvihill, M.; Ji, Q.; Miller, W.; Hubbard, S.

    2008-01-01

    The insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1R) is a receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) that has a critical role in mitogenic signalling during embryogenesis and an antiapoptotic role in the survival and progression of many human tumours. Here, we present the crystal structure of the tyrosine kinase domain of IGF1R (IGF1RK), in its unphosphorylated state, in complex with a novel compound, cis-3-[3-(4-methyl-piperazin-l-yl)-cyclobutyl]-1-(2-phenyl-quinolin-7-yl)-imidazo[1, 5-a]pyrazin-8-ylamine (PQIP), which we show is a potent inhibitor of both the unphosphorylated (basal) and phosphorylated (activated) states of the kinase. PQIP interacts with residues in the ATP-binding pocket and in the activation loop, which confers specificity for IGF1RK and the highly related insulin receptor (IR) kinase. In this crystal structure, the IGF1RK active site is occupied by Tyr1135 from the activation loop of an symmetry (two-fold)-related molecule. This dimeric arrangement affords, for the first time, a visualization of the initial trans-phosphorylation event in the activation loop of an RTK, and provides a molecular rationale for a naturally occurring mutation in the activation loop of the IR that causes type II diabetes mellitus.

  20. Novel small-molecule AMPK activator orally exerts beneficial effects on diabetic db/db mice

    Li, Yuan-Yuan; Yu, Li-Fang; Zhang, Li-Na; Qiu, Bei-Ying; Su, Ming-Bo; Wu, Fang; Chen, Da-Kai; Pang, Tao; Gu, Min; Zhang, Wei; Ma, Wei-Ping; Jiang, Hao-Wen; Li, Jing-Ya, E-mail: jyli@mail.shcnc.ac.cn; Nan, Fa-Jun, E-mail: fjnan@mail.shcnc.ac.cn; Li, Jia, E-mail: jli@mail.shcnc.ac.cn

    2013-12-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which is a pivotal guardian of whole-body energy metabolism, has become an attractive therapeutic target for metabolic syndrome. Previously, using a homogeneous scintillation proximity assay, we identified the small-molecule AMPK activator C24 from an optimization based on the original allosteric activator PT1. In this paper, the AMPK activation mechanism of C24 and its potential beneficial effects on glucose and lipid metabolism on db/db mice were investigated. C24 allosterically stimulated inactive AMPK α subunit truncations and activated AMPK heterotrimers by antagonizing autoinhibition. In primary hepatocytes, C24 increased the phosphorylation of AMPK downstream target acetyl-CoA carboxylase dose-dependently without changing intracellular AMP/ATP ratio, indicating its allosteric activation in cells. Through activating AMPK, C24 decreased glucose output by down-regulating mRNA levels of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) in primary hepatocytes. C24 also decreased the triglyceride and cholesterol contents in HepG2 cells. Due to its improved bioavailability, chronic oral treatment with multiple doses of C24 significantly reduced blood glucose and lipid levels in plasma, and improved the glucose tolerance of diabetic db/db mice. The hepatic transcriptional levels of PEPCK and G6Pase were reduced. These results demonstrate that this orally effective activator of AMPK represents a novel approach to the treatment of metabolic syndrome. - Highlights: • C24 activates AMPK through antagonizing autoinhibition within α subunit. • C24 activates AMPK in hepatocytes and decreases glucose output via AMPK. • C24 exerts beneficial effects on diabetic db/db mice. • C24 represents a novel therapeutic for treatment of metabolic syndrome.

  1. Novel small-molecule AMPK activator orally exerts beneficial effects on diabetic db/db mice

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which is a pivotal guardian of whole-body energy metabolism, has become an attractive therapeutic target for metabolic syndrome. Previously, using a homogeneous scintillation proximity assay, we identified the small-molecule AMPK activator C24 from an optimization based on the original allosteric activator PT1. In this paper, the AMPK activation mechanism of C24 and its potential beneficial effects on glucose and lipid metabolism on db/db mice were investigated. C24 allosterically stimulated inactive AMPK α subunit truncations and activated AMPK heterotrimers by antagonizing autoinhibition. In primary hepatocytes, C24 increased the phosphorylation of AMPK downstream target acetyl-CoA carboxylase dose-dependently without changing intracellular AMP/ATP ratio, indicating its allosteric activation in cells. Through activating AMPK, C24 decreased glucose output by down-regulating mRNA levels of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) in primary hepatocytes. C24 also decreased the triglyceride and cholesterol contents in HepG2 cells. Due to its improved bioavailability, chronic oral treatment with multiple doses of C24 significantly reduced blood glucose and lipid levels in plasma, and improved the glucose tolerance of diabetic db/db mice. The hepatic transcriptional levels of PEPCK and G6Pase were reduced. These results demonstrate that this orally effective activator of AMPK represents a novel approach to the treatment of metabolic syndrome. - Highlights: • C24 activates AMPK through antagonizing autoinhibition within α subunit. • C24 activates AMPK in hepatocytes and decreases glucose output via AMPK. • C24 exerts beneficial effects on diabetic db/db mice. • C24 represents a novel therapeutic for treatment of metabolic syndrome

  2. Small Molecule-Induced Allosteric Activation of the Vibrio Cholerae RTX Cysteine Protease Domain

    Lupardus, P.J.; Shen, A.; Bogyo, M.; Garcia, K.C.

    2009-05-19

    Vibrio cholerae RTX (repeats in toxin) is an actin-disrupting toxin that is autoprocessed by an internal cysteine protease domain (CPD). The RTX CPD is efficiently activated by the eukaryote-specific small molecule inositol hexakisphosphate (InsP{sub 6}), and we present the 2.1 angstrom structure of the RTX CPD in complex with InsP{sub 6}. InsP{sub 6} binds to a conserved basic cleft that is distant from the protease active site. Biochemical and kinetic analyses of CPD mutants indicate that InsP{sub 6} binding induces an allosteric switch that leads to the autoprocessing and intracellular release of toxin-effector domains.

  3. ACTIVITY AND Vp/Vs RATIO OF VOLCANO-TECTONIC SEISMIC SWARM ZONES AT NEVADO DEL RUIZ VOLCANO, COLOMBIA

    Londoño B. John Makario

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of the seismic activity for volcano-tectonic earthquake (VT swarms zones at Nevado del Ruiz Volcano (NRV was carried out for the interval 1985- 2002, which is the most seismic active period at NRV until now (2010. The swarm-like seismicity of NRV was frequently concentrated in very well defined clusters around the volcano. The seismic swarm zone located at the active crater was the most active during the entire time. The seismic swarm zone located to the west of the volcano suggested some relationship with the volcanic crises. It was active before and after the two eruptions occurred in November 1985 and September 1989. It is believed that this seismic activity may be used as a monitoring tool of volcanic activity. For each seismic swarm zone the Vp/Vs ratio was also calculated by grouping of earthquakes and stations. It was found that each seismic swarm zone had a distinct Vp/Vs ratio with respect to the others, except for the crater and west swarm zones, which had the same value. The average Vp/Vs ratios for the seismic swarm zones located at the active crater and to the west of the volcano are about 6-7% lower than that for the north swarm zone, and about 3% lower than that for the south swarm zone. We suggest that the reduction of the Vp/Vs ratio is due to degassing phenomena inside the central and western earthquake swarm zones, or due to the presence of microcracks inside the volcano. This supposition is in agreement with other studies of geophysics, geochemistry and drilling surveys carried out at NRV.

  4. Transcriptome Analysis of Tomato Flower Pedicel Tissues Reveals Abscission Zone-Specific Modulation of Key Meristem Activity Genes

    Wang, Xiang; Liu, Danmei; Li, Aili; Sun, Xiuli; Zhang, Rongzhi; Wu, Liang; Liang, Yanchun; Mao, Long

    2013-01-01

    Tomato flower abscises at the anatomically distinct abscission zone that separates the pedicel into basal and apical portions. During abscission, cell separation occurs only at the abscission zone indicating distinctive molecular regulation in its cells. We conducted a transcriptome analysis of tomato pedicel tissues during ethylene promoted abscission. We found that the abscission zone was the most active site with the largest set of differentially expressed genes when compared with basal an...

  5. Micro 3D ERT tomography for data assimilation modelling of active root zone

    Vanella, Daniela; Busato, Laura; Boaga, Jacopo; Cassiani, Giorgio; Binley, Andrew; Putti, Mario; Consoli, Simona

    2016-04-01

    Within the soil-plant-atmosphere system, root activity plays a fundamental role, as it connects different domains and allows a large part of the water and nutrient exchanges necessary for plant sustenance. The understanding of these processes is not only useful from an environmental point of view, making a fundamental contribution to the understanding of the critical zone dynamics, but also plays a pivotal role in precision agriculture, where the optimisation of water resources exploitation is mandatory and often carried out through deficit irrigation techniques. In this work, we present the results of non-invasive monitoring of the active root zone of two orange trees (Citrus sinensis, cv Tarocco Ippolito) located in an orange orchard in eastern Sicily (Italy) and drip irrigated with two different techniques: partial root drying and 100% crop evapotranspiration. The main goal of the monitoring activity is to assess possible differences between the developed root systems and the root water uptake between the two irrigation strategies. The monitoring is conducted using 3D micro-electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) based on an apparatus composed of a number of micro-boreholes (about 1.2 m deep) housing 12 electrodes each, plus a number of surface electrodes. Time-lapse measurements conducted both with long-term periodicity and short-term repetition before and after irrigation clearly highlight the presence and distribution of root water uptake zone both at shallow and larger depth, likely to correspond to zones utilized during the irrigation period (shallow) and during the time when the crop is not irrigated (deep). Subsidiary information is available in terms of precipitation, sap flow measurements and micrometeorological evapotranspiration estimates. This data ensemble lends itself to the assimilation into a variably saturated flow model, where both soil hydraulic parameters and root distribution shall be identified. Preliminary results in this directions show

  6. Dendrimers and polyamino-phenolic ligands: activity of new molecules against Legionella pneumophila biofilms.

    Elisa Andreozzi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Legionnaires’ disease is a potentially fatal pneumonia caused by Legionella pneumophila, an aquatic bacterium often found within the biofilm niche. In man-made water systems microbial biofilms increase the resistance of legionella to disinfection, posing a significant threat to public health. Disinfection methods currently used in water systems have been shown to be ineffective against legionella over the long-term, allowing recolonization by the biofilm-protected microorganisms. In this study, the anti-biofilm activity of previously fabricated polyamino-phenolic ligands and polyamidoamine dendrimers was investigated against legionella mono-species and multi-species biofilms formed by L. pneumophila in association with other bacteria that can be found in tap water (Aeromonas hydrophila, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae. Bacterial ability to form biofilms was verified using a crystal violet colorimetric assay and testing cell viability by real-time quantitative PCR and Plate Count assay. The concentration of the chemicals tested as anti-biofilm agents was chosen based on cytotoxicity assays: the highest non-cytotoxic chemical concentration was used for biofilm inhibition assays, with dendrimer concentration ten-fold higher than polyamino-phenolic ligands. While Macrophen and Double Macrophen were the most active substances among polyamino-phenolic ligands, dendrimers were overall two-fold more effective than all other compounds with a reduction up to 85% and 73% of legionella and multi-species biofilms, respectively. Chemical interaction with matrix molecules is hypothesized, based on SEM images and considering the low or absent anti-microbial activity on planktonic bacteria showed by flow cytometry. These data suggest that the studied compounds, especially dendrimers, could be considered as novel molecules in the design of research projects aimed at the development of efficacious anti-biofilm disinfection

  7. Dendrimers and Polyamino-Phenolic Ligands: Activity of New Molecules Against Legionella pneumophila Biofilms.

    Andreozzi, Elisa; Barbieri, Federica; Ottaviani, Maria F; Giorgi, Luca; Bruscolini, Francesca; Manti, Anita; Battistelli, Michela; Sabatini, Luigia; Pianetti, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Legionnaires' disease is a potentially fatal pneumonia caused by Legionella pneumophila, an aquatic bacterium often found within the biofilm niche. In man-made water systems microbial biofilms increase the resistance of legionella to disinfection, posing a significant threat to public health. Disinfection methods currently used in water systems have been shown to be ineffective against legionella over the long-term, allowing recolonization by the biofilm-protected microorganisms. In this study, the anti-biofilm activity of previously fabricated polyamino-phenolic ligands and polyamidoamine dendrimers was investigated against legionella mono-species and multi-species biofilms formed by L. pneumophila in association with other bacteria that can be found in tap water (Aeromonas hydrophila, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae). Bacterial ability to form biofilms was verified using a crystal violet colorimetric assay and testing cell viability by real-time quantitative PCR and Plate Count assay. The concentration of the chemicals tested as anti-biofilm agents was chosen based on cytotoxicity assays: the highest non-cytotoxic chemical concentration was used for biofilm inhibition assays, with dendrimer concentration 10-fold higher than polyamino-phenolic ligands. While Macrophen and Double Macrophen were the most active substances among polyamino-phenolic ligands, dendrimers were overall twofold more effective than all other compounds with a reduction up to 85 and 73% of legionella and multi-species biofilms, respectively. Chemical interaction with matrix molecules is hypothesized, based on SEM images and considering the low or absent anti-microbial activity on planktonic bacteria showed by flow cytometry. These data suggest that the studied compounds, especially dendrimers, could be considered as novel molecules in the design of research projects aimed at the development of efficacious anti-biofilm disinfection treatments of water systems in

  8. Dendrimers and Polyamino-Phenolic Ligands: Activity of New Molecules Against Legionella pneumophila Biofilms

    Andreozzi, Elisa; Barbieri, Federica; Ottaviani, Maria F.; Giorgi, Luca; Bruscolini, Francesca; Manti, Anita; Battistelli, Michela; Sabatini, Luigia; Pianetti, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Legionnaires’ disease is a potentially fatal pneumonia caused by Legionella pneumophila, an aquatic bacterium often found within the biofilm niche. In man-made water systems microbial biofilms increase the resistance of legionella to disinfection, posing a significant threat to public health. Disinfection methods currently used in water systems have been shown to be ineffective against legionella over the long-term, allowing recolonization by the biofilm-protected microorganisms. In this study, the anti-biofilm activity of previously fabricated polyamino-phenolic ligands and polyamidoamine dendrimers was investigated against legionella mono-species and multi-species biofilms formed by L. pneumophila in association with other bacteria that can be found in tap water (Aeromonas hydrophila, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae). Bacterial ability to form biofilms was verified using a crystal violet colorimetric assay and testing cell viability by real-time quantitative PCR and Plate Count assay. The concentration of the chemicals tested as anti-biofilm agents was chosen based on cytotoxicity assays: the highest non-cytotoxic chemical concentration was used for biofilm inhibition assays, with dendrimer concentration 10-fold higher than polyamino-phenolic ligands. While Macrophen and Double Macrophen were the most active substances among polyamino-phenolic ligands, dendrimers were overall twofold more effective than all other compounds with a reduction up to 85 and 73% of legionella and multi-species biofilms, respectively. Chemical interaction with matrix molecules is hypothesized, based on SEM images and considering the low or absent anti-microbial activity on planktonic bacteria showed by flow cytometry. These data suggest that the studied compounds, especially dendrimers, could be considered as novel molecules in the design of research projects aimed at the development of efficacious anti-biofilm disinfection treatments of water systems

  9. Stellar activity mimics a habitable-zone planet around Kapteyn's star

    Robertson, Paul; Mahadevan, Suvrath

    2015-01-01

    Kapteyn's star is an old M subdwarf believed to be a member of the Galactic halo population of stars. A recent study has claimed the existence of two super-Earth planets around the star based on radial velocity (RV) observations. The innermost of these candidate planets--Kapteyn b (P = 48 days)--resides within the circumstellar habitable zone. Given recent progress in understanding the impact of stellar activity in detecting planetary signals, we have analyzed the observed HARPS data for signatures of stellar activity. We find that while Kapteyn's star is photometrically very stable, a suite of spectral activity indices reveals a large-amplitude rotation signal, and we determine the stellar rotation period to be 143 days. The spectral activity tracers are strongly correlated with the purported RV signal of "planet b," and the 48-day period is an integer fraction (1/3) of the stellar rotation period. We conclude that Kapteyn b is not a planet in the Habitable Zone, but an artifact of stellar activity.

  10. 78 FR 56655 - Foreign-Trade Zone (FTZ) 203-Moses Lake, Washington; Notification of Proposed Production Activity...

    2013-09-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone (FTZ) 203--Moses Lake, Washington; Notification of Proposed Production Activity; AREVA Inc. (Fuel Rod Assemblies); Richland, Washington The Moses Lake Public...

  11. 77 FR 28851 - Foreign-Trade Zone 126-Reno, NV; Notification of Proposed Production Activity; Brightpoint North...

    2012-05-16

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 126--Reno, NV; Notification of Proposed Production Activity; Brightpoint North America L.P. (Cell Phone Kitting and Distribution); Reno, NV The Economic Development... behalf of Brightpoint North America L.P (Brightpoint), located in Reno, Nevada. The Brightpoint...

  12. 77 FR 28568 - Foreign-Trade Zone 216-Olympia, WA; Notification of Proposed Production Activity; Callisons, Inc...

    2012-05-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 216--Olympia, WA; Notification of Proposed Production Activity; Callisons, Inc., (Mint Products), Lacey and Chehalis, WA The Port of Olympia, grantee of FTZ...

  13. 78 FR 65963 - Foreign-Trade Zone 44-Mt. Olive, New Jersey; Authorization of Production Activity; Givaudan...

    2013-11-04

    ... notice in the Federal Register inviting public comment (78 FR 39707, 07-02-2013). The FTZ Board has... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 44--Mt. Olive, New Jersey; Authorization of Production Activity; Givaudan Fragrances Corporation (Fragrance and Flavor Products); Mt. Olive, New Jersey On June...

  14. 78 FR 66330 - Foreign-Trade Zone (FTZ) 235-Lakewood, New Jersey, Notification of Proposed Production Activity...

    2013-11-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone (FTZ) 235--Lakewood, New Jersey, Notification of Proposed Production Activity, Cosmetic Essence Innovations, LLC, (Fragrance Bottling), Holmdel, New Jersey...

  15. Activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) co-transcriptional scanning at single-molecule resolution

    Senavirathne, Gayan; Bertram, Jeffrey G.; Jaszczur, Malgorzata; Chaurasiya, Kathy R.; Pham, Phuong; Mak, Chi H.; Goodman, Myron F.; Rueda, David

    2015-12-01

    Activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) generates antibody diversity in B cells by initiating somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class-switch recombination (CSR) during transcription of immunoglobulin variable (IgV) and switch region (IgS) DNA. Using single-molecule FRET, we show that AID binds to transcribed dsDNA and translocates unidirectionally in concert with RNA polymerase (RNAP) on moving transcription bubbles, while increasing the fraction of stalled bubbles. AID scans randomly when constrained in an 8 nt model bubble. When unconstrained on single-stranded (ss) DNA, AID moves in random bidirectional short slides/hops over the entire molecule while remaining bound for ~5 min. Our analysis distinguishes dynamic scanning from static ssDNA creasing. That AID alone can track along with RNAP during transcription and scan within stalled transcription bubbles suggests a mechanism by which AID can initiate SHM and CSR when properly regulated, yet when unregulated can access non-Ig genes and cause cancer.

  16. Nucleic Acid Chaperone Activity of HIV-1 NC Proteins Investigated by Single Molecule DNA Stretching

    Williams, Mark C.; Gorelick, Robert J.; Musier-Forsyth, Karin; Bloomfield, Victor A.

    2002-03-01

    HIV-1 Nucleocapsid Protein (NC) is a nucleic acid chaperone protein that is responsible for facilitating numerous nucleic acid rearrangements throughout the reverse transcription cycle of HIV-1. To understand the mechanism of NC’s chaperone function, we carried out single molecule DNA stretching studies in the presence of NC and mutant forms of NC. Using an optical tweezers instrument, we stretch single DNA molecules from the double-stranded helical state to the single-stranded (coil) state. Based on the observed cooperativity of DNA force-induced melting, we find that the fraction of melted base pairs at room temperature is increased dramatically in the presence of NC. Thus, upon NC binding, increased thermal fluctuations cause continuous melting and reannealing of base pairs so that DNA strands are able to rapidly sample configurations in order to find the lowest energy state. While NC destabilizes the double-stranded form of DNA, a mutant form of NC that lacks the zinc finger structures does not. DNA stretching experiments carried out in the presence of NC variants containing more subtle changes in the zinc finger structures were conducted to elucidate the contribution of each individual finger to NC’s chaperone activity, and these results will be reported.

  17. A Method of Permeabilization of Drosophila Embryos for Assays of Small Molecule Activity

    Rand, Matthew D.

    2014-01-01

    The Drosophila embryo has long been a powerful laboratory model for elucidating molecular and genetic mechanisms that control development. The ease of genetic manipulations with this model has supplanted pharmacological approaches that are commonplace in other animal models and cell-based assays. Here we describe recent advances in a protocol that enables application of small molecules to the developing fruit fly embryo. The method details steps to overcome the impermeability of the eggshell while maintaining embryo viability. Eggshell permeabilization across a broad range of developmental stages is achieved by application of a previously described d-limonene embryo permeabilization solvent (EPS1) and by aging embryos at reduced temperature (18 °C) prior to treatments. In addition, use of a far-red dye (CY5) as a permeabilization indicator is described, which is compatible with downstream applications involving standard red and green fluorescent dyes in live and fixed preparations. This protocol is applicable to studies using bioactive compounds to probe developmental mechanisms as well as for studies aimed at evaluating teratogenic or pharmacologic activity of uncharacterized small molecules. PMID:25046169

  18. A Pipeline for Screening Small Molecules with Growth Inhibitory Activity against Burkholderia cenocepacia.

    Carrie Selin

    Full Text Available Infections with the bacteria Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc are very difficult to eradicate in cystic fibrosis patients due the intrinsic resistance of Bcc to most available antibiotics and the emergence of multiple antibiotic resistant strains during antibiotic treatment. In this work, we used a whole-cell based assay to screen a diverse collection of small molecules for growth inhibitors of a relevant strain of Bcc, B. cenocepacia K56-2. The primary screen used bacterial growth in 96-well plate format and identified 206 primary actives among 30,259 compounds. From 100 compounds with no previous record of antibacterial activity secondary screening and data mining selected a total of Bce bioactives that were further analyzed. An experimental pipeline, evaluating in vitro antibacterial and antibiofilm activity, toxicity and in vivo antibacterial activity using C. elegans was used for prioritizing compounds with better chances to be further investigated as potential Bcc antibacterial drugs. This high throughput screen, along with the in vitro and in vivo analysis highlights the utility of this experimental method to quickly identify bioactives as a starting point of antibacterial drug discovery.

  19. Screening and characterization of molecules that modulate the biological activity of IFNs-I.

    Bürgi, Milagros; Zapol'skii, Viktor A; Hinkelmann, Bettina; Köster, Mario; Kaufmann, Dieter E; Sasse, Florenz; Hauser, Hansjörg; Etcheverrigaray, Marina; Kratje, Ricardo; Bollati-Fogolín, Mariela; Oggero, Marcos

    2016-09-10

    Type I Interferons (IFNs-I) are species-specific glycoproteins which play an important role as primary defence against viral infections and that can also modulate the adaptive immune system. In some autoimmune diseases, interferons (IFNs) are over-produced. IFNs are widely used as biopharmaceuticals for a variety of cancer indications, chronic viral diseases, and for their immuno-modulatory action in patients with multiple sclerosis; therefore, increasing their therapeutic efficiency and decreasing their side effects is of high clinical value. In this sense, it is interesting to find molecules that can modulate the activity of IFNs. In order to achieve that, it was necessary to establish a simple, fast and robust assay to analyze numerous compounds simultaneously. We developed four reporter gene assays (RGAs) to identify IFN activity modulator compounds by using WISH-Mx2/EGFP, HeLa-Mx2/EGFP, A549-Mx2/EGFP, and HEp2-Mx2/EGFP reporter cell lines (RCLs). All of them present a Z' factor higher than 0.7. By using these RGAs, natural and synthetic compounds were analyzed simultaneously. A total of 442 compounds were studied by the Low Throughput Screening (LTS) assay using the four RCLs to discriminate between their inhibitory or enhancing effects on IFN activity. Some of them were characterized and 15 leads were identified. Finally, one promising candidate with enhancing effect on IFN-α/-β activity and five compounds with inhibitory effect were described. PMID:27346232

  20. Topical Anti-inflammatory Activity of New Hybrid Molecules of Terpenes and Synthetic Drugs

    Cristina Theoduloz

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to assess changes in the activity of anti-inflammatory terpenes from Chilean medicinal plants after the formation of derivatives incorporating synthetic anti-inflammatory agents. Ten new hybrid molecules were synthesized combining terpenes (ferruginol (1, imbricatolic acid (2 and oleanolic acid (3 with ibuprofen (4 or naproxen (5. The topical anti-inflammatory activity of the compounds was assessed in mice by the arachidonic acid (AA and 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol 13-acetate (TPA induced ear edema assays. Basal cytotoxicity was determined towards human lung fibroblasts, gastric epithelial cells and hepatocytes. At 1.4 µmol/mouse, a strong anti-inflammatory effect in the TPA assay was observed for oleanoyl ibuprofenate 12 (79.9% and oleanoyl ibuprofenate methyl ester 15 (80.0%. In the AA assay, the best activity was observed for 12 at 3.2 µmol/mouse, with 56.8% reduction of inflammation, in the same range as nimesulide (48.9%. All the terpenyl-synthetic anti-inflammatory hybrids showed better effects in the TPA assay, with best activity for 6, 12 and 15. The cytotoxicity of the compounds 8 and 10 with a free COOH, was higher than that of 2. The derivatives from 3 were less toxic than the triterpene. Several of the new compounds presented better anti-inflammatory effect and lower cytotoxicity than the parent terpenes.

  1. Broadband standoff detection of large molecules by mid-infrared active coherent laser spectrometry.

    Macleod, Neil A; Molero, Francisco; Weidmann, Damien

    2015-01-26

    A widely tunable active coherent laser spectrometer (ACLaS) has been demonstrated for standoff detection of broadband absorbers in the 1280 to 1318 cm-1 spectral region using an external cavity quantum cascade laser as a mid-infrared source. The broad tuning range allows detection and quantification of vapor phase molecules, such as dichloroethane, ethylene glycol dinitrate, and tetrafluoroethane. The level of confidence in molecular mixing ratios retrieved from interfering spectral measurements is assessed in a quantitative manner. A first qualitative demonstration of condensed phase chemical detection on nitroacetanilide has also been conducted. Detection performances of the broadband ACLaS have been placed in the context of explosive detection and compared to that obtained using distributed feedback quantum cascade lasers. PMID:25835851

  2. Activation energy of fractional vortices and spectroscopy of a vortex molecule in long Josephson junction

    This thesis is divided into two parts, the measurement of the activation energy of a fractional vortex and the spectroscopy of a vortex-molecule. Fractional vortices can be studied in long 0-κ Josephson junctions, where a jump of the Josephson phase is created artificially with a pair of tiny current injectors. To compensate for this phase discontinuity, a ρ vortex is formed. Here, ρ describes the vortex's so called topological charge. The ρ vortices are pinned at the discontinuity and they carry the fraction (ρ/2).Φ0 of magnetic flux, with the magnetic flux quantum Φ0 2.07.10-15. Two stable vortex configurations are possible, a direct Vortex and a complementary one. ρ depends on the injector current. When the bias current of the junction exceeds a characteristic threshold, which dependents on ρ, the Lorentz force is bigger than the pinning force of the vortex and a fluxon is pulled away. In this case a complementary (ρ-2π) vortex is left behind. This switching of the ρ vortex and the resulting emission of a fluxon can be described as a Kramers like escape of a particle out of a tilted washboard potential. The washboard potential is tilted to the point where the barrier is small enough, so that the particle can escape via thermal or quantum fluctuations. In the case of thermal fluctuations the barrier height is called activation energy. The activation energy can be determined by measuring the junction's switching current statistics. In this thesis, the activation energy, necessary for the vortex escape, was measured as a function of ρ and a homogenous external magnetic field perpendicular to the junction. The main focus was the investigation of 0-π junctions. The temperature dependence of the activation energy was investigated, too. It turns out, that the transition-state-theory is convenient to describe the switching probability of the standard Nb-AlOx-Nb junctions at 4.2 K. For the measurements at 0.5 K a model of low to intermediate damping results

  3. Counteracting Interactions between Lipopolysaccharide Molecules with Differential Activation of Toll-Like Receptors

    Hajishengallis, George; Martin, Michael; Schifferle, Robert E.; Genco, Robert J.

    2002-01-01

    We investigated counteracting interactions between the lipopolysaccharides (LPS) from Escherichia coli (Ec-LPS) and Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg-LPS), which induce cellular activation through Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and TLR2, respectively. We found that Ec-LPS induced tolerance in THP-1 cells to subsequent tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β) induction by Pg-LPS, though the reverse was not true, and looked for explanatory differential effects on the signal transduction pathway. Cells exposed to Pg-LPS, but not to Ec-LPS, displayed persisting expression of IL-1 receptor-associated kinase without apparent degradation, presumably allowing prolonged relay of downstream signals. Accordingly, cells pretreated with Pg-LPS, but not with Ec-LPS, were effectively activated in response to subsequent exposure to either LPS molecule, as evidenced by assessing nuclear factor (NF)-κB activity. In fact, Pg-LPS primed THP-1 cells for enhanced NF-κB activation and TNF-α release upon restimulation with the same LPS. This was a dose-dependent effect and correlated with upregulation of surface TLR2 expression. Furthermore, we observed inhibition of NF-κB-dependent transcription in a reporter cell line pretreated with Ec-LPS and restimulated with Pg-LPS (compared to cells pretreated with medium only and restimulated with Pg-LPS), but not when the reverse treatment was made. Although Pg-LPS could not make cells tolerant to subsequent activation by Ec-LPS, Pg-LPS inhibited Ec-LPS-induced TNF-α and IL-6 release when the two molecules were added simultaneously into THP-1 cell cultures. Pg-LPS also suppressed P. gingivalis FimA protein-induced NF-κB-dependent transcription in the 3E10/huTLR4 reporter cell line, which does not express TLR2. This rules out competition for common signaling intermediates, suggesting that Pg-LPS may block component(s) of the TLR4 receptor complex. Interactions between TLR2 and TLR4 agonists may be important in the

  4. Active Crustal Faults in the Forearc Region, Guerrero Sector of the Mexican Subduction Zone

    Gaidzik, Krzysztof; Ramírez-Herrera, Maria Teresa; Kostoglodov, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    This work explores the characteristics and the seismogenic potential of crustal faults on the overriding plate in an area of high seismic hazard associated with the occurrence of subduction earthquakes and shallow earthquakes of the overriding plate. We present the results of geomorphic, structural, and fault kinematic analyses conducted on the convergent margin between the Cocos plate and the forearc region of the overriding North American plate, within the Guerrero sector of the Mexican subduction zone. We aim to determine the active tectonic processes in the forearc region of the subduction zone, using the river network pattern, topography, and structural data. We suggest that in the studied forearc region, both strike-slip and normal crustal faults sub-parallel to the subduction zone show evidence of activity. The left-lateral offsets of the main stream courses of the largest river basins, GPS measurements, and obliquity of plate convergence along the Cocos subduction zone in the Guerrero sector suggest the activity of sub-latitudinal left-lateral strike-slip faults. Notably, the regional left-lateral strike-slip fault that offsets the Papagayo River near the town of La Venta named "La Venta Fault" shows evidence of recent activity, corroborated also by GPS measurements (4-5 mm/year of sinistral motion). Assuming that during a probable earthquake the whole mapped length of this fault would rupture, it would produce an event of maximum moment magnitude Mw = 7.7. Even though only a few focal mechanism solutions indicate a stress regime relevant for reactivation of these strike-slip structures, we hypothesize that these faults are active and suggest two probable explanations: (1) these faults are characterized by long recurrence period, i.e., beyond the instrumental record, or (2) they experience slow slip events and/or associated fault creep. The analysis of focal mechanism solutions of small magnitude earthquakes in the upper plate, for the period between 1995

  5. Along strike variation of tremor activities and thermal structures in various subduction zones

    Yabe, S.; Ide, S.; Yoshioka, S.

    2012-12-01

    A family of slow earthquakes, e.g., deep low frequency tremors, low frequency earthquakes (LFEs), very low frequency earthquakes (VLFs) and slow slip events (SSEs), are observed in various subduction zones. These phenomena represent shear slip on the plate interface, and they are thought to be related to brittle-ductile transition behavior on the plate interface because they are often located near the transition zones of interplate coupling estimated from GPS data. Such slip behavior along the plate interface would be controlled by temperature. Furthermore, tremors are considered to be related to fluid dehydrated from the subducting slab, through temperature dependent chemical reactions. Therefore, tremors occurrences are expected to be influenced by temperature, though some studies have questioned about the relationship between tremor activity and temperature. Here we investigate the source locations of deep tremor using an envelope correlation method and compare them with the temperature and shear strength profiles along the plate interface calculated using a numerical model (Yoshioka and Sanshadokoro, 2002). The study areas include New Zealand, southern Chile, and Mexico, where tremor behavior changes significantly along the strike of the plate interface. Investigating such along-strike variation in individual subduction zone may clarify the temperature dependence of tremor because environmental conditions affecting tremor occurrence are similar, unlike the comparison between different subduction zones. In the Hikurangi subduction zone beneath the North Island, New Zealand, the depth of SSE are quite different along the strike, e.g., deeper in the central region and shallower in the northern region (e.g. Wallace and Beavan, 2010). We reanalyze tremors detected by previous studies (Kim et al., 2011; Ide, 2012) to estimate their absolute depth and confirm that tremors in North Island are on the plate interface in both the central and the northern regions. Thermal

  6. DEFORMATION WAVES AS A TRIGGER MECHANISM OF SEISMIC ACTIVITY IN SEISMIC ZONES OF THE CONTINENTAL LITHOSPHERE

    S. I. Sherman

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Deformation waves as a trigger mechanism of seismic activity and migration of earthquake foci have been under discussion by researchers in seismology and geodynamics for over 50 years. Four sections of this article present available principal data on impacts of wave processes on seismicity and new data. The first section reviews analytical and experimental studies aimed at identification of relationships between wave processes in the lithosphere and seismic activity manifested as space-and-time migration of individual earthquake foci or clusters of earthquakes. It is concluded that with a systematic approach, instead of using a variety of terms to denote waves that trigger seismic process in the lithosphere, it is reasonable to apply the concise definition of ‘deformation waves’, which is most often used in fact.The second section contains a description of deformation waves considered as the trigger mechanism of seismic activity. It is concluded that a variety of methods are applied to identify deformation waves, and such methods are based on various research methods and concepts that naturally differ in sensitivity concerning detection of waves and/or impact of the waves on seismic process. Epicenters of strong earthquakes are grouped into specific linear or arc-shaped systems, which common criterion is the same time interval of the occurrence of events under analysis. On site the systems compose zones with similar time sequences, which correspond to the physical notion of moving waves (Fig. 9. Periods of manifestation of such waves are estimated as millions of years, and a direct consideration of the presence of waves and wave parameters is highly challenging. In the current state-of-the-art, geodynamics and seismology cannot provide any other solution yet.The third section presents a solution considering record of deformation waves in the lithosphere. With account of the fact that all the earthquakes with М≥3.0 are associated with

  7. Bioorthogonal cyclization-mediated in situ self-assembly of small-molecule probes for imaging caspase activity in vivo.

    Ye, Deju; Shuhendler, Adam J; Cui, Lina; Tong, Ling; Tee, Sui Seng; Tikhomirov, Grigory; Felsher, Dean W; Rao, Jianghong

    2014-06-01

    Directed self-assembly of small molecules in living systems could enable a myriad of applications in biology and medicine, and already this has been used widely to synthesize supramolecules and nano/microstructures in solution and in living cells. However, controlling the self-assembly of synthetic small molecules in living animals is challenging because of the complex and dynamic in vivo physiological environment. Here we employ an optimized first-order bioorthogonal cyclization reaction to control the self-assembly of a fluorescent small molecule, and demonstrate its in vivo applicability by imaging caspase-3/7 activity in human tumour xenograft mouse models of chemotherapy. The fluorescent nanoparticles assembled in situ were imaged successfully in both apoptotic cells and tumour tissues using three-dimensional structured illumination microscopy. This strategy combines the advantages offered by small molecules with those of nanomaterials and should find widespread use for non-invasive imaging of enzyme activity in vivo. PMID:24848238

  8. Small molecule inhibition of 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase suppresses t cell activation

    Telang Sucheta

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background T cell activation is associated with a rapid increase in intracellular fructose-2,6-bisphosphate (F2,6BP, an allosteric activator of the glycolytic enzyme, 6-phosphofructo-1-kinase. The steady state concentration of F2,6BP in T cells is dependent on the expression of the bifunctional 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatases (PFKFB1-4 and the fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase, TIGAR. Of the PFKFB family of enzymes, PFKFB3 has the highest kinase:bisphosphatase ratio and has been demonstrated to be required for T cell proliferation. A small molecule antagonist of PFKFB3, 3-(3-pyridinyl-1-(4-pyridinyl-2-propen-1-one (3PO, recently has been shown to reduce F2,6BP synthesis, glucose uptake and proliferation in transformed cells. We hypothesized that the induction of PFKFB3 expression may be required for the stimulation of glycolysis in T cells and that exposure to the PFKFB3 antagonist, 3PO, would suppress T cell activation. Methods We examined PFKFB1-4 and TIGAR expression and F2,6BP concentration in purified CD3+ T cells stimulated with microbead-conjugated agonist antibodies specific for CD3 and the co-stimulatory receptor, CD28. We then determined the effect of 3PO on anti-CD3/anti-CD28-induced T cell activation, F2,6BP synthesis, 2-[1-14C]-deoxy-d-glucose uptake, lactate secretion, TNF-α secretion and proliferation. Finally, we examined the effect of 3PO administration on the development of delayed type hypersensitivity to methylated BSA and on imiquimod-induced psoriasis in mice. Results We found that purified human CD3+ T cells express PFKFB2, PFKFB3, PFKFB4 and TIGAR, and that anti-CD3/anti-CD28 conjugated microbeads stimulated a >20-fold increase in F2,6BP with a coincident increase in protein expression of the PFKFB3 family member and a decrease in TIGAR protein expression. We then found that exposure to the PFKFB3 small molecule antagonist, 3PO (1–10 μM, markedly attenuated the stimulation of F2,6BP

  9. Crust-mantle structure feature and the seismic activity of the main tectonic units in the North Tanlu fault zone

    2000-01-01

    Using recent data of geoscience transaction in Northeast China, the author analyses and studies the crust-upper mantle structure feature of the North Tanlu fault zone. The result shows the crust-mantle structure are obvious difference at both sides of the North Tanlu fault zone. The fault activity and segmentation are closely related with abruptly change zone of the crust-upper mantle structure. There is a clear mirror image relationship between the big geomorphic shape and asthenosphere undulate, the former restricts tectonic stability and tectonic style of different crustal units. The significantly strengthening seismicity of north set and south set in the North Tanlu fault zone just correspond to the low-velocity and high conductivity layer of crust-upper mantle. In the North Tanlu fault zone, the main controlling structure of the mid-strong seismic generally consists of the active fault sectors, whose crust-mantle structure is more complicated in rigidity massif.

  10. Single molecule analysis of B cell receptor motion during signaling activation

    Rey Suarez, Ivan; Koo, Peter; Mochrie, Simon; Song, Wenxia; Upadhyaya, Arpita

    B cells are an essential part of the adaptive immune system. They patrol the body looking for signs of infection in the form of antigen on the surface of antigen presenting cells. The binding of the B cell receptor (BCR) to antigen induces signaling cascades that lead to B cell activation and eventual production of high affinity antibodies. During activation, BCR organize into signaling microclusters, which are platforms for signal amplification. The physical processes underlying receptor movement and aggregation are not well understood. Here we study the dynamics of single BCRs on activated murine primary B cells using TIRF imaging and single particle tracking. The tracks obtained are analyzed using perturbation expectation-maximization (pEM) a systems-level analysis that allows the identification of different short-time diffusive states from a set of single particle tracks. We identified five different diffusive states on wild type cells, which correspond to different molecular states of the BCR. By using actin polymerization inhibitors and mutant cells lacking important actin regulators we were able to identify the BCR molecule configuration associated with each diffusive state.

  11. High pressure chemistry of red phosphorus by photo-activated simple molecules

    Ceppatelli, M.; Fanetti, S.; Bini, R.; Caporali, M.; Peruzzini, M.

    2014-05-01

    High pressure (HP) is very effective in reducing intermolecular distances and inducing unexpected chemical reactions. In addition the photo-activation of the reactants in HP conditions can lead to very efficient and selective processes. The chemistry of phosphorus is currently based on the white molecular form. The red polymeric allotrope, despite more stable and much less toxic, has not attracted much attention so far. However, switching from the white to the red form would benefit any industrial procedure, especially from an environmental point of view. On the other side, water and ethanol are renewable, environmental friendly and largely available molecules, usable as reactants and photo-activators in HP conditions. Here we report a study on the HP photo-induced reactivity of red phosphorus with water and ethanol, showing the possibility of very efficient and selective processes, leading to molecular hydrogen and valuable phosphorus compounds. The reactions have been studied by means of FTIR and Raman spectroscopy and pressure has been generated using membrane Diamond (DAC) and Sapphire (SAC) anvil cells. HP reactivity has been activated by the two-photon absorption of near-UV wavelengths and occurred in total absence of solvents, catalysts and radical initiators, at room T and mild pressure conditions (0.2-1.5 GPa).

  12. High pressure chemistry of red phosphorus by photo-activated simple molecules

    High pressure (HP) is very effective in reducing intermolecular distances and inducing unexpected chemical reactions. In addition the photo-activation of the reactants in HP conditions can lead to very efficient and selective processes. The chemistry of phosphorus is currently based on the white molecular form. The red polymeric allotrope, despite more stable and much less toxic, has not attracted much attention so far. However, switching from the white to the red form would benefit any industrial procedure, especially from an environmental point of view. On the other side, water and ethanol are renewable, environmental friendly and largely available molecules, usable as reactants and photo-activators in HP conditions. Here we report a study on the HP photo-induced reactivity of red phosphorus with water and ethanol, showing the possibility of very efficient and selective processes, leading to molecular hydrogen and valuable phosphorus compounds. The reactions have been studied by means of FTIR and Raman spectroscopy and pressure has been generated using membrane Diamond (DAC) and Sapphire (SAC) anvil cells. HP reactivity has been activated by the two-photon absorption of near-UV wavelengths and occurred in total absence of solvents, catalysts and radical initiators, at room T and mild pressure conditions (0.2–1.5 GPa).

  13. Auroral Electrojet Indices Designed to Provide a Global Measure, 2.5-Minute Intervals, of Auroral Zone Magnetic Activity

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Auroral Electrojet index (AE) is designed to provide a global quantitative measure of auroral zone magnetic activity produced by enhanced ionospheric currents...

  14. Auroral Electrojet Index Designed to Provide a Global Measure, l-minute Intervals, of Auroral Zone Magnetic Activity

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Auroral Electrojet index (AE) is designed to provide a global quantitative measure of auroral zone magnetic activity produced by enhanced ionospheric currents...

  15. Neotectonic Model of Formation of Oil and Gas Fields and Mineragenic Role of Geodynamic Active Zones

    I. S. Kopylov

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the importance of role of geodynamic active zones in formation of mineral deposits, their distribution, and mineragenic characteristics. Geodynamic model of formation of the oil and gas fields is developed. It reflects the evolution of formation of oil and gas fields and, after the stage of learning, allows predicting the petroleum potential of local areas. The model building procedure uses the integrated analysis of all the available information and determining the most informative indicators for forecasting the oil and gas reserves. The article presents an example of model worked out for oil and gas fields of the Perm Kray.

  16. Studies of Active Ingredients in Cough Syrup by Capillary Zone Electrophoresis with Amperometric Detection

    ZHOU Tian-shu; WANG Ai-fang; WU Fang; SHI Guo-yue; FANG Yu-zhi

    2003-01-01

    The present paper covers a simple, reliable and reproducible method, based on capillary zone electrophoresis(CZE) with amperometric detection(AD), for the separation and the determination of ephedrine hydrochloride, promethazine hydrochloride and codeine phosphate. Under the optimal conditions, the three analytes were base-line separated completely within 16 min. Good linear relationships between the peak heights and the concentrations of the three analytes were obtained with the correlation coefficients better than 0.9993. The method was directly applied to the determination of the active ingredients in pharmaceutical preparations and the assay results were satisfactory.

  17. Oscillatory dynamics of the biologically active zone in in situ bioremediation

    Murray, Regan E.; Luce, Benjamin P.

    2002-10-01

    In situ bioremediation is a promising biotechnology for removing aqueous phase contaminants from groundwater. The system of three partial differential equations used to model bioremediation has a traveling wave solution which loses stability in a Hopf bifurcation, giving rise to oscillating fronts. To understand the origin of these oscillations, we construct a simplified model of the biologically active zone, a time delay differential equation with state-dependent delay. Despite its simplicity the new model mimics the dynamical characteristics of the bioremediation equations remarkably well and yields an approximate parametric expression for the oscillation onset point.

  18. Analysis of protein phosphorylation in nerve terminal reveals extensive changes in active zone proteins upon exocytosis.

    Kohansal-Nodehi, Mahdokht; Chua, John Je; Urlaub, Henning; Jahn, Reinhard; Czernik, Dominika

    2016-01-01

    Neurotransmitter release is mediated by the fast, calcium-triggered fusion of synaptic vesicles with the presynaptic plasma membrane, followed by endocytosis and recycling of the membrane of synaptic vesicles. While many of the proteins governing these processes are known, their regulation is only beginning to be understood. Here we have applied quantitative phosphoproteomics to identify changes in phosphorylation status of presynaptic proteins in resting and stimulated nerve terminals isolated from the brains of Wistar rats. Using rigorous quantification, we identified 252 phosphosites that are either up- or downregulated upon triggering calcium-dependent exocytosis. Particularly pronounced were regulated changes of phosphosites within protein constituents of the presynaptic active zone, including bassoon, piccolo, and RIM1. Additionally, we have mapped kinases and phosphatases that are activated upon stimulation. Overall, our study provides a snapshot of phosphorylation changes associated with presynaptic activity and provides a foundation for further functional analysis of key phosphosites involved in presynaptic plasticity. PMID:27115346

  19. Therapeutic potential of an orally effective small molecule inhibitor of plasminogen activator inhibitor for asthma.

    Liu, Rui-Ming; Eldridge, Stephanie; Watanabe, Nobuo; Deshane, Jessy; Kuo, Hui-Chien; Jiang, Chunsun; Wang, Yong; Liu, Gang; Schwiebert, Lisa; Miyata, Toshio; Thannickal, Victor J

    2016-02-15

    Asthma is one of the most common respiratory diseases. Although progress has been made in our understanding of airway pathology and many drugs are available to relieve asthma symptoms, there is no cure for chronic asthma. Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1), a primary inhibitor of tissue-type and urokinase-type plasminogen activators, has pleiotropic functions besides suppression of fibrinolysis. In this study, we show that administration of TM5275, an orally effective small-molecule PAI-1 inhibitor, 25 days after ovalbumin (OVA) sensitization-challenge, significantly ameliorated airway hyperresponsiveness in an OVA-induced chronic asthma model. Furthermore, we show that TM5275 administration significantly attenuated OVA-induced infiltration of inflammatory cells (neutrophils, eosinophils, and monocytes), the increase in the levels of OVA-specific IgE and Th2 cytokines (IL-4 and IL-5), the production of mucin in the airways, and airway subepithelial fibrosis. Together, the results suggest that the PAI-1 inhibitor TM5275 may have therapeutic potential for asthma through suppressing eosinophilic allergic response and ameliorating airway remodeling. PMID:26702150

  20. Inhibition of Streptococcus mutans polysaccharide synthesis by molecules targeting glycosyltransferase activity

    Zhi Ren

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Glycosyltransferase (Gtf is one of the crucial virulence factors of Streptococcus mutans, a major etiological pathogen of dental caries. All the available evidence indicates that extracellular polysaccharide, particularly glucans produced by S. mutans Gtfs, contribute to the cariogenicity of dental biofilms. Therefore, inhibition of Gtf activity and the consequential polysaccharide synthesis may impair the virulence of cariogenic biofilms, which could be an alternative strategy to prevent the biofilm-related disease. Up to now, many Gtf inhibitors have been recognized in natural products, which remain the major and largely unexplored source of Gtf inhibitors. These include catechin-based polyphenols, flavonoids, proanthocyanidin oligomers, polymeric polyphenols, and some other plant-derived compounds. Metal ions, oxidizing agents, and some other synthetic compounds represent another source of Gtf inhibitors, with some novel molecules either discovered by structure-based virtual screening or synthesized based on key structures of known inhibitors as templates. Antibodies that inhibit one or more Gtfs have also been developed as topical agents. Although many agents have been shown to possess potent inhibitory activity against glucan synthesis by Gtfs, bacterial cell adherence, and caries development in animal models, much research remains to be performed to find out their mechanism of action, biological safety, cariostatic efficacies, and overall influence on the entire oral community. As a strategy to inhibit the virulence of cariogenic microbes rather than eradicate them from the microbial community, Gtf inhibition represents an approach of great potential to prevent dental caries.

  1. A novel molecule with notable activity against multi-drug resistant tuberculosis.

    Nair, Vasu; Okello, Maurice O; Mangu, Naveen K; Seo, Byung I; Gund, Machhindra G

    2015-03-15

    Multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is emerging as a serious global health problem, which has been elevated through co-infection involving HIV and MDR-Mtb. The discovery of new compounds with anti-MDR TB efficacy and favorable metabolism profiles is an important scientific challenge. Using computational biology and ligand docking data, we have conceived a multifunctional molecule, 2, as a potential anti-MDR TB agent. This compound was produced through a multi-step synthesis. It exhibited significant in vitro activity against MDR-TB (MIC 1.56μg/mL) and its half-life (t1/2) in human liver microsomes was 14.4h. The metabolic profiles of compound 2 with respect to human cytochrome P450 (CYP) and uridine 5'-diphospho-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) isozymes were favorable. Compound 2 also had relatively low in vitro cytotoxicity in uninfected macrophages. It displayed synergistic behavior against MDR-TB in combination with PA-824. Interestingly, compound 2 also displayed in vitro anti-HIV activity. PMID:25677656

  2. Small-molecule nociceptin receptor agonist ameliorates mast cell activation and pain in sickle mice.

    Vang, Derek; Paul, Jinny A; Nguyen, Julia; Tran, Huy; Vincent, Lucile; Yasuda, Dennis; Zaveri, Nurulain T; Gupta, Kalpna

    2015-12-01

    Treatment of pain with morphine and its congeners in sickle cell anemia is suboptimal, warranting the need for analgesics devoid of side effects, addiction and tolerance liability. Small-molecule nociceptin opioid receptor ligands show analgesic efficacy in acute and chronic pain models. We show that AT-200, a high affinity nociceptin opioid receptor agonist with low efficacy at the mu opioid receptor, ameliorated chronic and hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced mechanical, thermal and deep tissue/musculoskeletal hyperalgesia in HbSS-BERK sickle mice. The antinociceptive effect of AT-200 was antagonized by SB-612111, a nociceptin opioid receptor antagonist, but not naloxone, a non-selective mu opioid receptor antagonist. Daily 7-day treatment with AT-200 did not develop tolerance and showed a sustained anti-nociceptive effect, which improved over time and led to reduced plasma serum amyloid protein, neuropeptides, inflammatory cytokines and mast cell activation in the periphery. These data suggest that AT-200 ameliorates pain in sickle mice via the nociceptin opioid receptor by reducing inflammation and mast cell activation without causing tolerance. Thus, nociceptin opioid receptor agonists are promising drugs for treating pain in sickle cell anemia. PMID:26294734

  3. Simultaneous measurement of DNA motor protein conformation and activity with combined optical trap and single-molecule fluorescence

    Chemla, Yann

    2013-03-01

    We present single-molecule measurements of Superfamily 1 UvrD helicase DNA unwinding that reveal directly how helicase stoichiometry and conformation regulate motor activity. Using a new instrument that combines high resolution optical tweezers with single-molecule fluorescence microscopy, we record DNA unwinding activity with base pair-scale resolution (via optical tweezers) simultaneously with helicase stoichiometry and conformation (via fluorescence). Quantifying the fluorescence signal from labeled UvrD, we observe that pairs of UvrD molecules are required for long distance unwinding but that individual molecules exhibit limited, non-processive unwinding activity. UvrD is also known to exhibit two different conformations, `closed' and `open', based on the orientation of its 2B regulatory domain. The function of these conformations has remained elusive. Measuring the fluorescence of FRET labeled proteins, we detect directly the conformation of the 2B domain of individual UvrD molecules during unwinding activity. We observe that UvrD is in the `closed' conformation during DNA unwinding but surprisingly switches to the `open' conformation upon reversal of helicase direction, i.e. when UvrD switches strands and translocates on the opposing strand with the DNA junction rezipping behind it. We hypothesize that the 2B domain acts as a conformational switch that controls DNA unwinding vs. re-annealing. Work supported by NSF (PHY-082261, Center for the Physics of Living Cells) and NIH (R21 RR025341A)

  4. Impacts of stellar evolution and dynamics on the habitable zone: The role of rotation and magnetic activity

    Florian, Gallet; Louis, Amard; Sacha, Brun; Ana, Palacios; Stephane, Mathis

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we aim to provide the community with the dependence of the habitable zone upon the stellar mass, metallicity, rotation, and for various prescriptions of the limits of the habitable zone. We use the STAREVOL code to study the evolution of the habitable zone and of the continuously habitable zone limits. Mass and metallicity are the stellar parameters that have the most dramatic effects on the habitable zone limits. Conversely, for a given stellar mass and metallicity, stellar rotation has only a marginal effect on these limits and does not modify the width of the habitable zone. The evolution of the habitable zone limits is also correlated to the evolution of the stellar activity (through the Rossby number) that depends on the stellar mass considered. While the magnetic activity has negligible consequence in the case of more massive stars, these effects may have a strong impact on the habitability of a planet around M dwarf stars. Thus, stellar activity cannot be neglected and may have strong ...

  5. Antimicrobial activity of innate immune molecules against Streptococcus pneumoniae, Moraxella catarrhalis and nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae

    Teufert Karen

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite its direct connection to the nasopharynx which harbors otitis media pathogens as part of its normal flora, the middle ear cavity is kept free of these bacteria by as yet unknown mechanisms. Respiratory mucosal epithelia, including those of the middle ear and eustachian tube, secrete antimicrobial effectors including lysozyme, lactoferrin and β defensins-1 and -2. To elucidate the role of these innate immune molecules in the normal defense and maintenance of sterility of respiratory mucosa such as that of the middle ear, we assessed their effect on the respiratory pathogens nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi 12, Moraxella catarrhalis 035E, and Streptococcus pneumoniae 3, and 6B. Methods Two assay methods, the radial assay and the liquid broth assay, were employed for testing the antimicrobial activity of the molecules. This was done in order to minimize the possibility that the observed effects were artifacts of any single assay system employed. Also, transmission electron microscopy (TEM was employed to evaluate the effect of antimicrobial innate immune molecules on OM pathogens. For the statistical analysis of the data, Student's t-test was performed. Results Results of the radial diffusion assay showed that β defensin-2 was active against all four OM pathogens tested, while treatment with β defensin-1 appeared to only affect M. catarrhalis. The radial assay results also showed that lysozyme was quite effective against S. pneumoniae 3 and 6B and was partially bacteriostatic/bactericidal against M. catarrhalis. Lysozyme however, appeared not to affect the growth of NTHi. Thus, lysozyme seems to have a more pronounced impact on the growth of the Gram-positive S. pneumoniae as compared to that of Gram-negative pathogens. Lactoferrin on the other hand, enhanced the growth of the bacteria tested. The results of the radial assays were confirmed using liquid broth assays for antimicrobial activity, and showed that

  6. Characteristics of Relocated Quiet Zones Using Virtual Microphone Algorithm in an Active Headrest System

    Seokhoon Ryu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study displays theoretical and experimental investigation on the characteristics of the relocated zone of quiet by a virtual microphone (VM based filtered-x LMS (FxLMS algorithm which can be embedded in a real-time digital controller for an active headrest system. The attenuation changes at the relocated zones of quiet by the variation of the distance between the ear and the error microphone are mainly examined. An active headrest system was implemented for the control experiment at a chair and consists of two (left and right secondary loudspeakers, two error microphones, two observer microphones at ear positions in a HATS, and other electronics including a dSPACE 1401 controller. The VM based FxLMS algorithm achieved an attenuation of about 22 dB in the control experiment against a narrowband primary noise by the variation of the distance between the ear and the error microphone. The important factors for the algorithm are discussed as well.

  7. Study on Integrated Recurrence Behaviors of Strong Earthquakes Along Entire Active Fault Zones in the Sichuan-Yunnan Region, China

    Yi Guixi; Wen Xueze; Xu Xiwei

    2003-01-01

    Based on historical earthquake data, we use statistical methods to study integrated recurrencebehaviors of strong earthquakes along 7 selected active fault zones in the Sichuan-Yunnanregion. The results show that recurrences of strong earthquakes in the 7 fault zones displaynear-random, random and clustering behaviors. The recurrence processes are never quasi-periodic, and are neither strength-time nor time-strength dependent. The more independentsegments for strong earthquake rupturing a fault zone has, the more complicated thecorresponding recurrence process is. And relatively active periods and quiescent periods forearthquake activity occur alternatively. Within the active periods, the distribution ofrecurrence time intervals between earthquakes has relatively large discretion, and can bemodelled well by a Weibull distribution. The time distribution of the quiescent periods hasrelatively small discretion, and can be approximately described by some distributions as thenormal. Both the durations of the active periods and the numbers of strong earthquakes withinthe active periods vary obviously cycle by cycle, leading to the relatively active periods havingnever repeated quasi-periodically. Therefore, the prohabilistic assessment for middle- and long-term seismic hazard for entireties of active fault zones based on data of historical strongearthquakes on the fault zones still faces difficulty.

  8. Proapoptotic and antiinvasive activity of Rac1 small molecule inhibitors on malignant glioma cells

    Cardama GA

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Georgina A Cardama,1 Nazareno Gonzalez,1 Matias Ciarlantini,2 Lucia Gandolfi Donadío,2 María Julieta Comin,2 Daniel F Alonso,1 Pablo Lorenzano Menna,1,* Daniel E Gomez1,*1Laboratory of Molecular Oncology, National University of Quilmes, Buenos Aires, Argentina; 2Laboratory of Organic Synthesis, Center of Research and Development in Chemistry, National Institute of Industrial Technology, San Martín, Argentina, *These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Malignant gliomas are characterized by an intrinsic ability to invade diffusely throughout the normal brain tissue. This feature contributes mainly to the failure of existing therapies. Deregulation of small GTPases signaling, in particular Rac1 activity, plays a key role in the invasive phenotype of gliomas. Here we report the effect of ZINC69391, a specific Rac1 inhibitor developed by our group, on human glioma cell lines LN229 and U-87 MG. ZINC69391 is able to interfere with the interaction of Rac1 with Dock180, a relevant Rac1 activator in glioma invasion, and to reduce Rac1-GTP levels. The kinase Pak1, a downstream effector of Dock180–Rac1 signaling, was also downregulated upon ZINC69391 treatment. ZINC69391 reduced cell proliferation, arrested cells in G1 phase, and triggered apoptosis in glioma cells. Importantly, ZINC69391 dramatically affected cell migration and invasion in vitro, interfering with actin cytoskeleton dynamics. We also evaluated the effect of analog 1A-116, a compound derived from ZINC69391 structure. 1A-116 showed an improved antiproliferative and antiinvasive activity on glioma cells. These findings encourage further preclinical testing in clinically relevant animal models.Keywords: GTPases. invasion, Dock180, small molecule

  9. Antiviral activity of a small molecule deubiquitinase inhibitor occurs via induction of the unfolded protein response.

    Jeffrey W Perry

    Full Text Available Ubiquitin (Ub is a vital regulatory component in various cellular processes, including cellular responses to viral infection. As obligate intracellular pathogens, viruses have the capacity to manipulate the ubiquitin (Ub cycle to their advantage by encoding Ub-modifying proteins including deubiquitinases (DUBs. However, how cellular DUBs modulate specific viral infections, such as norovirus, is poorly understood. To examine the role of DUBs during norovirus infection, we used WP1130, a small molecule inhibitor of a subset of cellular DUBs. Replication of murine norovirus in murine macrophages and the human norovirus Norwalk virus in a replicon system were significantly inhibited by WP1130. Chemical proteomics identified the cellular DUB USP14 as a target of WP1130 in murine macrophages, and pharmacologic inhibition or siRNA-mediated knockdown of USP14 inhibited murine norovirus infection. USP14 is a proteasome-associated DUB that also binds to inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1, a critical mediator of the unfolded protein response (UPR. WP1130 treatment of murine macrophages did not alter proteasome activity but activated the X-box binding protein-1 (XBP-1 through an IRE1-dependent mechanism. In addition, WP1130 treatment or induction of the UPR also reduced infection of other RNA viruses including encephalomyocarditis virus, Sindbis virus, and La Crosse virus but not vesicular stomatitis virus. Pharmacologic inhibition of the IRE1 endonuclease activity partially rescued the antiviral effect of WP1130. Taken together, our studies support a model whereby induction of the UPR through cellular DUB inhibition blocks specific viral infections, and suggest that cellular DUBs and the UPR represent novel targets for future development of broad spectrum antiviral therapies.

  10. Fault mirrors in seismically active fault zones: A fossil of small earthquakes at shallow depths

    Kuo, Li-Wei; Song, Sheng-Rong; Suppe, John; Yeh, En-Chao

    2016-03-01

    Fault mirrors (FMs) are naturally polished and glossy fault slip surfaces that can record seismic deformation at shallow depths. They are important for investigating the processes controlling dynamic fault slip. We characterize FMs in borehole samples from the hanging wall damage zone of the active Hsiaotungshi reverse fault, Taiwan. Here we report the first documented occurrence of the combination of silica gel and melt patches coating FMs, with the silica gel resembling those observed on experimentally formed FMs that were cataclastically generated. In addition, the melt patches, which are unambiguous indicators of coseismic slip, suggest that the natural FMs were produced at seismic rates, presumably resulting from flash heating at asperities on the slip surfaces. Since flash heating is efficient at small slip, we propose that these natural FMs represent fossils of small earthquakes, formed in either coseismic faulting and folding or aftershock deformation in the active Taiwan fold-and-thrust belt.

  11. Activation of human ether-a-go-go related gene (hERG) potassium channels by small molecules

    Ping-zheng ZHOU; Joseph BABCOCK; Lian-qing LIU; Min LI; Zhao-bing GAO

    2011-01-01

    Human ether-a-go-go related gene (hERG) potassium (K+) channels play a critical role in cardiac action potential repolarlzatlon. Mutations that reduce hERG conductance or surface expression may cause congenital long QT syndrome (LQTS). Moreover, the channels can be inhibited by structurally diverse small molecules, resulting in an acquired form of LQTS. Consequently, small molecules that increase the hERG current may be of value for treatment of LQTS. So far, nine hERG activators have been reported. The aim of this review is to discuss recent advances concerning the identification and action mechanism of hERG activators.

  12. Active faults in the deformation zone off Noto Peninsula, Japan, revealed by high- resolution seismic profiles

    Inoue, T.; Okamura, Y.; Murakami, F.; Kimura, H.; Ikehara, K.

    2008-12-01

    Recently, a lot of earthquakes occur in Japan. The deformation zone which many faults and folds have concentrated exists on the Japan Sea side of Japan. The 2007 Noto Hanto Earthquake (MJMA 6.9) and 2007 Chuetsu-oki Earthquake (MJMA 6.8) were caused by activity of parts of faults in this deformation zone. The Noto Hanto Earthquake occurred on 25 March, 2007 under the northwestern coast of Noto Peninsula, Ishikawa Prefecture, Japan. This earthquake is located in Quaternary deformation zone that is continued from northern margin of Noto Peninsula to southeast direction (Okamura, 2007a). National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) carried out high-resolution seismic survey using Boomer and 12 channels short streamer cable in the northern part off Noto Peninsula, in order to clarify distribution and activities of active faults in the deformation zone. A twelve channels short streamer cable with 2.5 meter channel spacing developed by AIST and private corporation is designed to get high resolution seismic profiles in shallow sea area. The multi-channel system is possible to equip on a small fishing boat, because the data acquisition system is based on PC and the length of the cable is short and easy to handle. Moreover, because the channel spacing is short, this cable is very effective for a high- resolution seismic profiling survey in the shallow sea, and seismic data obtained by multi-channel cable can be improved by velocity analysis and CDP stack. In the northern part off Noto Peninsula, seismic profiles depicting geologic structure up to 100 meters deep under sea floor were obtained. The most remarkable reflection surface recognized in the seismic profiles is erosion surface at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). In the western part, sediments about 30 meters (40 msec) thick cover the erosional surface that is distributed under the shelf shallower than 100m in depth and the sediments thin toward offshore and east. Flexures like deformation in

  13. Endoplasmic reticulum stress-independent activation of unfolded protein response kinases by a small molecule ATP-mimic.

    Mendez, Aaron S; Alfaro, Jennifer; Morales-Soto, Marisol A; Dar, Arvin C; McCullagh, Emma; Gotthardt, Katja; Li, Han; Acosta-Alvear, Diego; Sidrauski, Carmela; Korennykh, Alexei V; Bernales, Sebastian; Shokat, Kevan M; Walter, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Two ER membrane-resident transmembrane kinases, IRE1 and PERK, function as stress sensors in the unfolded protein response. IRE1 also has an endoribonuclease activity, which initiates a non-conventional mRNA splicing reaction, while PERK phosphorylates eIF2α. We engineered a potent small molecule, IPA, that binds to IRE1's ATP-binding pocket and predisposes the kinase domain to oligomerization, activating its RNase. IPA also inhibits PERK but, paradoxically, activates it at low concentrations, resulting in a bell-shaped activation profile. We reconstituted IPA-activation of PERK-mediated eIF2α phosphorylation from purified components. We estimate that under conditions of maximal activation less than 15% of PERK molecules in the reaction are occupied by IPA. We propose that IPA binding biases the PERK kinase towards its active conformation, which trans-activates apo-PERK molecules. The mechanism by which partial occupancy with an inhibitor can activate kinases may be wide-spread and carries major implications for design and therapeutic application of kinase inhibitors. PMID:25986605

  14. Kinetics of T cell-activation molecules in response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens

    Antas Paulo RZ

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The phenotypic features acquired subsequent to antigen-specific stimulation in vitro were evaluated by means of the kinetic expressions of CD69 and CD25 activation molecules on T lymphocytes and assayed by flow cytometry in response to PPD, Ag85B, and ferritin in PPD-positive healthy control individuals. In response to PHA, CD69 staining on both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells became initially marked after 4 h, peaked at 24 h, and quickly decreased after 120 h. For CD25, a latter expression was detected around 8 h, having increased after 96 h. As expected, the response rate to the mycobacterial antigens was much lower than that to the mitogen. Positive staining was high after 96 h for CD25 and after 24 h for CD69. CD69 expression was significantly enhanced (p < 0.05 on CD8+ as compared to CD4+ T cells. High levels were also found between 96-120 h. Regarding Ag85B, CD25+ cells were mostly CD4+ instead of CD8+ T cells. Moreover, in response to ferritin, a lower CD25 expression was noted. The present data will allow further characterization of the immune response to new mycobacterial-specific antigens and their evaluation for possible inclusion in developing new diagnostic techniques for tuberculosis as well in a new vaccine to prevent the disease.

  15. The new generation drug candidate molecules: Spectral, electrochemical, DNA-binding and anticancer activity properties

    Gölcü, Ayşegül; Muslu, Harun; Kılıçaslan, Derya; Çeşme, Mustafa; Eren, Özge; Ataş, Fatma; Demirtaş, İbrahim

    2016-09-01

    The new generation drug candidate molecules [Cu(5-Fu)2Cl2H2O] (NGDCM1) and [Zn(5-Fu)2(CH3COO)2] (NGDCM2) were obtained from the reaction of copper(II) and zinc(II) salts with the anticancer drug 5-fluoracil (5-Fu). These compounds have been characterized by spectroscopic and analytical techniques. Thermal behavior of the compounds were also investigated. The electrochemical properties of the compounds have been investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) using glassy carbon electrode. The biological activity of the NGDCM1 and NGDCM2 has been evaluated by examining their ability to bind to fish sperm double strand DNA (FSdsDNA) with UV spectroscopy. UV studies of the interaction of the 5-Fu and metal derivatives with FSdsDNA have shown that these compounds can bind to FSdsDNA. The binding constants of the compounds with FSdsDNA have also been calculated. Thermal decomposition of the compounds lead to the formation of CuO and ZnO as final products. The effect of proliferation 5-Fu, NGDCM1 and NGDCM2 were examined on the HeLa cells using real-time cell analyzer with three different concentrations.

  16. Small Molecule Activation by Intermolecular Zr(IV)-Phosphine Frustrated Lewis Pairs.

    Metters, Owen J; Forrest, Sebastian J K; Sparkes, Hazel A; Manners, Ian; Wass, Duncan F

    2016-02-17

    We report intermolecular transition metal frustrated Lewis pairs (FLPs) based on zirconocene aryloxide and phosphine moieties that exhibit a broad range of small molecule activation chemistry that has previously been the preserve of only intramolecular pairs. Reactions with D2, CO2, THF, and PhCCH are reported. By contrast with previous intramolecular examples, these systems allow facile access to a variety of steric and electronic characteristics at the Lewis acidic and Lewis basic components, with the three-step syntheses of 10 new intermolecular transition metal FLPs being reported. Systematic variation to the phosphine Lewis base is used to unravel steric considerations, with the surprising conclusion that phosphines with relatively small Tolman steric parameters not only give highly reactive FLPs but are often seen to have the highest selectivity for the desired product. DOSY NMR spectroscopic studies on these systems reveal for the first time the nature of the Lewis acid/Lewis base interactions in transition metal FLPs of this type. PMID:26788963

  17. Evaluation of Activated Leukocyte Cell Adhesion Molecule as a Biomarker for Breast Cancer in Egyptian Patients

    In this study, serum activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM) levels were evaluated in 41 primary breast cancer patients and 20 healthy females, and its diagnostic value was quantified, and compared with those of carbohydrate antigen 15-3 (CA15-3) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). Also, its prognostic value was examined. Serum ALCAM levels were also evaluated before and after surgical treatment. Serum levels of ALCAM and CA 15-3 were significantly higher in breast cancer patients than healthy controls (P=0.002, P=0.043 respectively), but the difference in serum CEA levels did not reach statistical significance. Serum ALCAM levels had significant area under the curve (AUC) (P=0.002), but serum levels of CA 15-3 and CEA had nonsignificant AUCs, and various combinations between them did not result in any improvement. A significant association was found between serum levels of ALCAM and CEA with age and menopausal status in breast cancer patients. Non-significant difference was shown in serum levels of ALCAM, CA 15-3 and CEA before and after surgical treatment. In conclusion, this study suggests that serum ALCAM may represent a novel diagnostic bio marker for breast cancer

  18. Dimeric aluminum-phosphorus compounds as masked frustrated Lewis pairs for small molecule activation.

    Roters, Steffi; Appelt, Christian; Westenberg, Hauke; Hepp, Alexander; Slootweg, J Chris; Lammertsma, Koop; Uhl, Werner

    2012-08-14

    Hydroalumination of aryldialkynylphosphines RP(C≡C-(t)Bu)(2) (R = Ph, Mes) with equimolar quantities of diethylaluminum hydride afforded mixed alkenyl-alkynyl cyclic dimers in which the dative aluminum-phosphorus bonds are geminal to the exocyclic alkenyl groups. Addition of triethylaluminum to isolated 1 (R = Ph) or to the in situ generated species (R = Mes) caused diethylaluminum ethynide elimination to yield the arylethylphosphorus dimers 2 and 3. These possess a chair-like Al(2)C(2)P(2) heterocycle with intermolecular Al-P interactions. The boat conformation (4) was obtained by the reaction of (t)Bu-P(C≡C-(t)Bu)(2) with di(tert-butyl)aluminum hydride. Despite being dimeric, 2 behaves as a frustrated Lewis pair and activates small molecules. The reaction with carbon dioxide gave cis/trans isomeric AlPC(2)O heterocycles that differ only by the configuration of the exocyclic alkenyl unit. Four isomers resulted from the reaction with phenyl isocyanate. This is caused by cis/trans isomerization of the initial C=O adduct and subsequent rearrangement to the AlPC(2)N heterocycle, being the C=N adduct. PMID:22411491

  19. NMDA modulates oligodendrocyte differentiation of subventricular zone cells through PKC activation

    Fabio eCavaliere

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Multipotent cells from the juvenile subventricular zone (SVZ possess the ability to differentiate into new neural cells. Depending on local signals, SVZ can generate new neurons, astrocytes or oligodendrocytes. We previously demonstrated that activation of NMDA receptors in SVZ progenitors increases the rate of oligodendrocyte differentiation. Here we investigated the mechanisms involved in NMDA receptor-dependent differentiation. Using functional studies performed with the reporter gene luciferase we found that activation of NMDA receptor stimulates PKC. In turn, stimulation of PKC precedes the activation of NADPH oxidase (NOX as demonstrated by translocation of the p67phox subunit to the cellular membrane. We propose that NOX2 is involved in the transduction of the signal from NMDA receptors through PKC activation as the inhibitor gp91 reduced their pro-differentiation effect. In addition, our data and that from other groups suggest that signaling through the NMDA receptor/PKC/NOX2 cascade generates ROS that activate the PI3/mTOR pathway and finally leads to the generation of new oligodendrocytes.

  20. Determination of the Absolute Number of Cytokine mRNA Molecules within Individual Activated Human T Cells

    Karr, Laurel J.; Marshall, Gwen; Hockett, Richard D.; Bucy, R. Pat; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A primary function of activated T cells is the expression and subsequent secretion of cytokines, which orchestrate the differentiation of other lymphocytes, modulate antigen presenting cell activity, and alter vascular endothelium to mediate an immune response. Since many features of immune regulation probably result from modest alterations of endogenous rates of multiple interacting processes, quantitative analysis of the frequency and specific activity of individual T cells is critically important. Using a coordinated set of quantitative methods, the absolute number of molecules of several key cytokine mRNA species in individual T cells has been determined. The frequency of human blood T cells activated in vitro by mitogens and recall protein antigens was determined by intracellular cytokine protein staining, in situ hybridization for cytokine mRNA, and by limiting dilution analysis for cytokine mRNA+ cells. The absolute number of mRNA molecules was simultaneously determined in both homogenates of the entire population of cells and in individual cells obtained by limiting dilution, using a quantitative, competitive RT-PCR assay. The absolute numbers of mRNA molecules in a population of cells divided by the frequency of individual positive cells, yielded essentially the same number of mRNA molecules per cell as direct analysis of individual cells by limiting dilution analysis. Mean numbers of mRNA per positive cell from both mitogen and antigen activated T cells, using these stimulation conditions, were 6000 for IL-2, 6300 for IFN-gamma, and 1600 for IL-4.

  1. Outcome of early active mobilization after flexor tendons repair in zones II-V in hand

    Saini Narender

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The functional outcome of a flexor tendon injury after repair depends on multiple factors. The postoperative management of tendon injuries has paved a sea through many mobilization protocols. The improved understanding of splinting techniques has promoted the understanding and implication of these mobilization protocols. We conducted a study to observe and record the results of early active mobilization of repaired flexor tendons in zones II-V. Materials and Methods: 25 cases with 75 digits involving 129 flexor tendons including 8 flexor pollicis longus (FPL tendons in zones II-V of thumb were subjected to the early active mobilization protocol. Eighteen (72% patients were below 30 years of age. Twenty-four cases (96% sustained injury by sharp instrument either accidentally or by assault. Ring and little finger were involved in 50% instances. In all digits, either a primary repair (n=26 or a delayed primary repair (n=49 was done. The repair was done with the modified Kessler core suture technique with locking epitendinous sutures with a knot inside the repair site, using polypropylene 3-0/4-0 sutures. An end-to-end repair of the cut nerves was done under loupe magnification using a 6-0/8-0 polyamide suture. The rehabilitation program adopted was a modification of Kleinert′s regimen, and Silfverskiold regimen. The final assessment was done at 14 weeks post repair using the Louisville system of Lister et al. Results: Eighteen of excellent results were attributed to ring and little fingers where there was a flexion lag of < 1 cm and an extension lag of < 15o. FPL showed 75% (n=6 excellent flexion. 63% (n=47 digits showed excellent results whereas good results were seen in 19% (n=14 digits. Nine percent (n=7 digits showed fair and the same number showed poor results. The cases where the median (n=4 or ulnar nerve (n=6 or both (n=3 were involved led to some deformity (clawing/ape thumb at 6 months postoperatively. The cases with digital

  2. Transcriptome analysis of tomato flower pedicel tissues reveals abscission zone-specific modulation of key meristem activity genes.

    Xiang Wang

    Full Text Available Tomato flower abscises at the anatomically distinct abscission zone that separates the pedicel into basal and apical portions. During abscission, cell separation occurs only at the abscission zone indicating distinctive molecular regulation in its cells. We conducted a transcriptome analysis of tomato pedicel tissues during ethylene promoted abscission. We found that the abscission zone was the most active site with the largest set of differentially expressed genes when compared with basal and apical portions. Gene Ontology analyses revealed enriched transcription regulation and hydrolase activities in the abscission zone. We also demonstrate coordinated responses of hormone and cell wall related genes. Besides, a number of ESTs representing homologs of key Arabidopsis shoot apical meristem activity genes were found to be preferentially expressed in the abscission zone, including WUSCHEL (WUS, KNAT6, LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES DOMAIN PROTEIN 1(LBD1, and BELL-like homeodomain protein 1 (BLH1, as well as tomato axillary meristem genes BLIND (Bl and LATERAL SUPPRESSOR (Ls. More interestingly, the homologs of WUS and the potential functional partner OVATE FAMILIY PROTEIN (OFP were subsequently down regulated during abscission while Bl and AGL12 were continuously and specifically induced in the abscission zone. The expression patterns of meristem activity genes corroborate the idea that cells of the abscission zone confer meristem-like nature and coincide with the course of abscission and post-abscission cell differentiation. Our data therefore propose a possible regulatory scheme in tomato involving meristem genes that may be required not only for the abscission zone development, but also for abscission.

  3. An enzymatic deconjugation method for the analysis of small molecule active drugs on antibody-drug conjugates.

    Li, Yi; Gu, Christine; Gruenhagen, Jason; Yehl, Peter; Chetwyn, Nik P; Medley, Colin D

    2016-01-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) are complex therapeutic agents that use the specific targeting properties of antibodies and the highly potent cytotoxicity of small molecule drugs to selectively eliminate tumor cells while limiting the toxicity to normal healthy tissues. Two critical quality attributes of ADCs are the purity and stability of the active small molecule drug linked to the ADC, but these are difficult to assess once the drug is conjugated to the antibody. In this study, we report a enzyme deconjugation approach to cleave small molecule drugs from ADCs, which allows the drugs to be subsequently characterized by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography. The model ADC we used in this study utilizes a valine-citrulline linker that is designed to be sensitive to endoproteases after internalization by tumor cells. We screened several proteases to determine the most effective enzyme. Among the 3 cysteine proteases evaluated, papain had the best efficiency in cleaving the small molecule drug from the model ADC. The deconjugation conditions were further optimized to achieve complete cleavage of the small molecule drug. This papain deconjugation approach demonstrated excellent specificity and precision. The purity and stability of the active drug on an ADC drug product was evaluated and the major degradation products of the active drug were identified. The papain deconjugation method was also applied to several other ADCs, with the results suggesting it could be applied generally to ADCs containing a valine-citrulline linker. Our results indicate that the papain deconjugation method is a powerful tool for characterizing the active small molecule drug conjugated to an ADC, and may be useful in ensuring the product quality, efficacy and the safety of ADCs. PMID:26891281

  4. Activated platelets form protected zones of adhesion on fibrinogen and fibronectin-coated surfaces

    1993-01-01

    Leukocytes form zones of close apposition when they adhere to ligand- coated surfaces. Because plasma proteins are excluded from these contact zones, we have termed them protected zones of adhesion. To determine whether platelets form similar protected zones of adhesion, gel-filtered platelets stimulated with thrombin or ADP were allowed to adhere to fibrinogen- or fibronectin-coated surfaces. The protein- coated surfaces with platelets attached were stained with either fluorochrome-conjugate...

  5. Zeolite H-BEA catalysed multicomponent reaction: One-pot synthesis of amidoalkyl naphthols - Biologically active drug-like molecules

    Sunil R Mistry; Rikesh S Joshi; Kalpana C Maheria

    2011-07-01

    Zeolite has been used as an efficient and a novel heterogeneous catalyst for one-pot synthesis of biologically active drug-like molecules, amidoalkyl naphthols. This green route involves multicomponent reaction of 2-naphthol, aromatic aldehydes and amide in the presence of a catalytic amount of zeolite H-Beta (H-BEA) under solvent reflux as well as solvent-free conditions.

  6. Machine learning models identify molecules active against the Ebola virus in vitro [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Sean Ekins

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The search for small molecule inhibitors of Ebola virus (EBOV has led to several high throughput screens over the past 3 years. These have identified a range of FDA-approved active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs with anti-EBOV activity in vitro and several of which are also active in a mouse infection model. There are millions of additional commercially-available molecules that could be screened for potential activities as anti-EBOV compounds. One way to prioritize compounds for testing is to generate computational models based on the high throughput screening data and then virtually screen compound libraries. In the current study, we have generated Bayesian machine learning models with viral pseudotype entry assay and the EBOV replication assay data. We have validated the models internally and externally. We have also used these models to computationally score the MicroSource library of drugs to select those likely to be potential inhibitors. Three of the highest scoring molecules that were not in the model training sets, quinacrine, pyronaridine and tilorone, were tested in vitro and had EC50 values of 350, 420 and 230 nM, respectively. Pyronaridine is a component of a combination therapy for malaria that was recently approved by the European Medicines Agency, which may make it more readily accessible for clinical testing. Like other known antimalarial drugs active against EBOV, it shares the 4-aminoquinoline scaffold. Tilorone, is an investigational antiviral agent that has shown a broad array of biological activities including cell growth inhibition in cancer cells, antifibrotic properties, α7 nicotinic receptor agonist activity, radioprotective activity and activation of hypoxia inducible factor-1. Quinacrine is an antimalarial but also has use as an anthelmintic. Our results suggest data sets with less than 1,000 molecules can produce validated machine learning models that can in turn be utilized to identify novel EBOV inhibitors in

  7. Machine learning models identify molecules active against the Ebola virus in vitro [version 2; referees: 2 approved

    Sean Ekins

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The search for small molecule inhibitors of Ebola virus (EBOV has led to several high throughput screens over the past 3 years. These have identified a range of FDA-approved active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs with anti-EBOV activity in vitro and several of which are also active in a mouse infection model. There are millions of additional commercially-available molecules that could be screened for potential activities as anti-EBOV compounds. One way to prioritize compounds for testing is to generate computational models based on the high throughput screening data and then virtually screen compound libraries. In the current study, we have generated Bayesian machine learning models with viral pseudotype entry assay and the EBOV replication assay data. We have validated the models internally and externally. We have also used these models to computationally score the MicroSource library of drugs to select those likely to be potential inhibitors. Three of the highest scoring molecules that were not in the model training sets, quinacrine, pyronaridine and tilorone, were tested in vitro and had EC50 values of 350, 420 and 230 nM, respectively. Pyronaridine is a component of a combination therapy for malaria that was recently approved by the European Medicines Agency, which may make it more readily accessible for clinical testing. Like other known antimalarial drugs active against EBOV, it shares the 4-aminoquinoline scaffold. Tilorone, is an investigational antiviral agent that has shown a broad array of biological activities including cell growth inhibition in cancer cells, antifibrotic properties, α7 nicotinic receptor agonist activity, radioprotective activity and activation of hypoxia inducible factor-1. Quinacrine is an antimalarial but also has use as an anthelmintic. Our results suggest data sets with less than 1,000 molecules can produce validated machine learning models that can in turn be utilized to identify novel EBOV inhibitors in

  8. Radon variations in an active landslide zone from Himalaya: A preliminary study

    The radon concentration was measured in soil and water samples from an active landslide zone in the Garhwal Himalaya. The landslide is compound in nature i.e. slump in the crown portion and debris slide in the lower part. The measured radon concentration varies from 3.1 to 18.3 Bq/l in water whereas in soil/debris samples it varies from 2.3 to 12.2 kBq/m3. The crown portion (upper portion) show higher radon values in comparison to distal portion. The higher radon concentration in crown portion may be because of the failure plane of landslide associated with high fracturing and crushing whereas, increased porosity of debris of slide does not allow radon to accumulate in soil and water in the lower portion. (author)

  9. Growth of the active zone in nitride based long wavelength laser structures

    Rossow, U.; Jönen, H.; Brendel, M.; Dräger, A.; Langer, T.; Hoffmann, L.; Bremers, H.; Hangleiter, A.

    2011-01-01

    In xGa 1- xN/GaN quantum well (QW) structures grown on c-plane surfaces for long wavelength light emitters have been investigated intended. We reached indium concentrations of xIn≥0.35 with good optical and structural quality. For QW thicknesses dQW≤2 nm a fully strained layer structure is observed. QWs of such high indium concentrations, however, are very sensitive to the growth conditions of the subsequent layers and thermal stability/degradation becomes an important issue. We modified the growth of the QWs to avoid or minimize V-pit formation without temperature ramping in the barriers and showed that their properties were unchanged when used in the active zone of a laser structure.

  10. Determination of dissociation constants of pharmacologically active xanthones by capillary zone electrophoresis with diode array detection.

    Wu, Xiaomu; Gong, Suxuan; Bo, Tao; Liao, Yiping; Liu, Huwei

    2004-12-24

    In this article, the dissociation constants (pKa) of 10 pharmacologically active xanthones isolated from herbal medicine Securidaca inappendiculata were determined by capillary zone electrophoresis with diode array detection. The pKa values determined by the method based on the electrophoretic mobilities (calculated from migration times) have been proved by the method based on UV absorbance calculated from the online spectra corresponding peaks. No conspicuous difference was observed between the two methods with acceptable reproducibility. Two pKa values (pKa1 and pKa2) were found for four xanthones while generally the 10 compounds possess the pKa values ranging from 6.4 to 9.2. PMID:15641365

  11. Structure-activity relationship studies of strigolactone-related molecules for branching inhibition in garden pea: molecule design for shoot branching.

    Boyer, François-Didier; de Saint Germain, Alexandre; Pillot, Jean-Paul; Pouvreau, Jean-Bernard; Chen, Victor Xiao; Ramos, Suzanne; Stévenin, Arnaud; Simier, Philippe; Delavault, Philippe; Beau, Jean-Marie; Rameau, Catherine

    2012-08-01

    Initially known for their role in the rhizosphere in stimulating the seed germination of parasitic weeds such as the Striga and Orobanche species, and later as host recognition signals for arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, strigolactones (SLs) were recently rediscovered as a new class of plant hormones involved in the control of shoot branching in plants. Herein, we report the synthesis of new SL analogs and, to our knowledge, the first study of SL structure-activity relationships for their hormonal activity in garden pea (Pisum sativum). Comparisons with their action for the germination of broomrape (Phelipanche ramosa) are also presented. The pea rms1 SL-deficient mutant was used in a SL bioassay based on axillary bud length after direct SL application on the bud. This assay was compared with an assay where SLs were fed via the roots using hydroponics and with a molecular assay in which transcript levels of BRANCHED1, the pea homolog of the maize TEOSINTE BRANCHED1 gene were quantified in axillary buds only 6 h after application of SLs. We have demonstrated that the presence of a Michael acceptor and a methylbutenolide or dimethylbutenolide motif in the same molecule is essential. It was established that the more active analog 23 with a dimethylbutenolide as the D-ring could be used to control the plant architecture without strongly favoring the germination of P. ramosa seeds. Bold numerals refer to numbers of compounds. PMID:22723084

  12. APP Is a Context-Sensitive Regulator of the Hippocampal Presynaptic Active Zone.

    Laßek, Melanie; Weingarten, Jens; Wegner, Martin; Mueller, Benjamin F; Rohmer, Marion; Baeumlisberger, Dominic; Arrey, Tabiwang N; Hick, Meike; Ackermann, Jörg; Acker-Palmer, Amparo; Koch, Ina; Müller, Ulrike; Karas, Michael; Volknandt, Walter

    2016-04-01

    The hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are characterized by cognitive decline and behavioral changes. The most prominent brain region affected by the progression of AD is the hippocampal formation. The pathogenesis involves a successive loss of hippocampal neurons accompanied by a decline in learning and memory consolidation mainly attributed to an accumulation of senile plaques. The amyloid precursor protein (APP) has been identified as precursor of Aβ-peptides, the main constituents of senile plaques. Until now, little is known about the physiological function of APP within the central nervous system. The allocation of APP to the proteome of the highly dynamic presynaptic active zone (PAZ) highlights APP as a yet unknown player in neuronal communication and signaling. In this study, we analyze the impact of APP deletion on the hippocampal PAZ proteome. The native hippocampal PAZ derived from APP mouse mutants (APP-KOs and NexCreAPP/APLP2-cDKOs) was isolated by subcellular fractionation and immunopurification. Subsequently, an isobaric labeling was performed using TMT6 for protein identification and quantification by high-resolution mass spectrometry. We combine bioinformatics tools and biochemical approaches to address the proteomics dataset and to understand the role of individual proteins. The impact of APP deletion on the hippocampal PAZ proteome was visualized by creating protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks that incorporated APP into the synaptic vesicle cycle, cytoskeletal organization, and calcium-homeostasis. The combination of subcellular fractionation, immunopurification, proteomic analysis, and bioinformatics allowed us to identify APP as structural and functional regulator in a context-sensitive manner within the hippocampal active zone network. PMID:27092780

  13. APP Is a Context-Sensitive Regulator of the Hippocampal Presynaptic Active Zone

    Mueller, Benjamin F.; Rohmer, Marion; Baeumlisberger, Dominic; Arrey, Tabiwang N.; Hick, Meike; Ackermann, Jörg; Acker-Palmer, Amparo; Koch, Ina; Müller, Ulrike; Karas, Michael; Volknandt, Walter

    2016-01-01

    The hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) are characterized by cognitive decline and behavioral changes. The most prominent brain region affected by the progression of AD is the hippocampal formation. The pathogenesis involves a successive loss of hippocampal neurons accompanied by a decline in learning and memory consolidation mainly attributed to an accumulation of senile plaques. The amyloid precursor protein (APP) has been identified as precursor of Aβ-peptides, the main constituents of senile plaques. Until now, little is known about the physiological function of APP within the central nervous system. The allocation of APP to the proteome of the highly dynamic presynaptic active zone (PAZ) highlights APP as a yet unknown player in neuronal communication and signaling. In this study, we analyze the impact of APP deletion on the hippocampal PAZ proteome. The native hippocampal PAZ derived from APP mouse mutants (APP-KOs and NexCreAPP/APLP2-cDKOs) was isolated by subcellular fractionation and immunopurification. Subsequently, an isobaric labeling was performed using TMT6 for protein identification and quantification by high-resolution mass spectrometry. We combine bioinformatics tools and biochemical approaches to address the proteomics dataset and to understand the role of individual proteins. The impact of APP deletion on the hippocampal PAZ proteome was visualized by creating protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks that incorporated APP into the synaptic vesicle cycle, cytoskeletal organization, and calcium-homeostasis. The combination of subcellular fractionation, immunopurification, proteomic analysis, and bioinformatics allowed us to identify APP as structural and functional regulator in a context-sensitive manner within the hippocampal active zone network. PMID:27092780

  14. APP Is a Context-Sensitive Regulator of the Hippocampal Presynaptic Active Zone.

    Melanie Laßek

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD are characterized by cognitive decline and behavioral changes. The most prominent brain region affected by the progression of AD is the hippocampal formation. The pathogenesis involves a successive loss of hippocampal neurons accompanied by a decline in learning and memory consolidation mainly attributed to an accumulation of senile plaques. The amyloid precursor protein (APP has been identified as precursor of Aβ-peptides, the main constituents of senile plaques. Until now, little is known about the physiological function of APP within the central nervous system. The allocation of APP to the proteome of the highly dynamic presynaptic active zone (PAZ highlights APP as a yet unknown player in neuronal communication and signaling. In this study, we analyze the impact of APP deletion on the hippocampal PAZ proteome. The native hippocampal PAZ derived from APP mouse mutants (APP-KOs and NexCreAPP/APLP2-cDKOs was isolated by subcellular fractionation and immunopurification. Subsequently, an isobaric labeling was performed using TMT6 for protein identification and quantification by high-resolution mass spectrometry. We combine bioinformatics tools and biochemical approaches to address the proteomics dataset and to understand the role of individual proteins. The impact of APP deletion on the hippocampal PAZ proteome was visualized by creating protein-protein interaction (PPI networks that incorporated APP into the synaptic vesicle cycle, cytoskeletal organization, and calcium-homeostasis. The combination of subcellular fractionation, immunopurification, proteomic analysis, and bioinformatics allowed us to identify APP as structural and functional regulator in a context-sensitive manner within the hippocampal active zone network.

  15. Classical complement pathway activation by antipneumococcal antibodies leads to covalent binding of C3b to antibody molecules.

    Brown, E J; Berger, M.; Joiner, K A; Frank, M. M.

    1983-01-01

    We have examined whether or not a physical relationship exists between antipneumococcal antibodies (Ab) and C3b when Ab activate the classical complement pathway on the surface of pneumococci (Pn). After sensitization with 125I-labeled Ab, Pn were sequentially incubated with purified C1, C4, C2, and biotinylated C3. Ab molecules were then eluted from Pn, and C3b-associated molecules were purified on avidin-Sepharose. Both 125I-labeled immunoglobulin G (IgG) and [125I]IgM bound to C3b; the ass...

  16. Instrumental neutron activation analysis of well sediments from the costal zone of Kurzeme

    Full text: The coastal zone of Kurzeme 2-4 km wide is located in different economical regions. Geologically this zone is under the influence of the sea. Through the sandy soil the chemical compounds infiltrate very well in the underground waters and so it is possible from the condition of underground waters to judge about the state of the zone. The purpose of this work is to get the information about the influence of the human activities on the coastal zone and also to estimate the influence of the penetration of seawater on the chemical composition of underground waters in wells. As the sediments integrate the chemical composition of water over a longer period of time, then in the first stage for the characterisation of water the sediments were chosen. To solve the mentioned problems it is necessary to obtain information about large amounts of chemical elements (V, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Sb, Th, U, lanthanide, a.o., about 30-40 at all) in macro, micro and trace concentrations. It is possible only by use one of the methods of multielement analysis. We chose the instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA), because it is one of the most sensitive allows to determine elements in wide range of concentrations (from % to ppb) and do not need complicated sample preparation. The INAA was carried out in the Laboratory of Neutron Activation Analysis in the Nuclear Research Center of the Latvian Academy of Sciences, by the use of nuclear reactor as neutron source. For the determination of elements two modes of irradiation and three of measurements were used. 1. The irradiation of samples in reactors horizontal experimental channel neutron flux 1.6 · 1013 n/cm2 s by use of pneumotransporter. The irradiation time was 30 s, cooling time 8 min, measuring time of the gamma-spectrums - 200/s. Under such conditions radionuclides with half periods less than 30 n were determined: Mg, Cl, V, Mn, a.o. 2. The irradiation of samples in reactors vertical experimental channel (neutron

  17. Underground Corrosion of Activated Metals in an Arid Vadose Zone Environment

    The subsurface radioactive disposal site located at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory contains neutron-activated metals from nonfuel nuclear-reactor- core components. A long-term corrosion test is being conducted to obtain site-specific corrosion rates to support efforts to more accurately estimate the transfer of activated elements in an arid vadose zone environment. The tests use nonradioactive metal coupons representing the prominent neutron-activated material buried at the disposal location, namely, Type 304L stainless steel, Type 315L stainless steel, nickel-chromium alloy (UNS NO7718), beryllium, aluminum 6061-T6, and a zirconium alloy, (UNS R60804). In addition, carbon steel (the material presently used in the cask disposal liners and other disposal containers) and a duplex stainless steel (UNS S32550) (the proposed material for the high- integrity disposal containers) are also included in the test program. This paper briefly describes the test program and presents the early corrosion rate results after 1 year and 3 years of underground exposure

  18. Calculations of Induced Activity in the ATLAS Experiment for Nuclear Waste Zoning.

    Morev, M N

    2007-01-01

    Extensive calculations were performed with the general activation formula using the fluxes of high-energy hadrons and low-energy neutrons previously obtained from simulations with the GCALOR code of the ATLAS detector. Three sets of proton cross-sections were used for hadrons energy above 20 MeV: (a) one set calculated with the YIELDX code (i.e., the Silberberg-Tsao formula of partial proton spallation cross-sections), (b) one set calculated with the Rudstam formula, and (c) the ‘best-estimate' dataset which was a compilation of the available experimental and calculated data. In the energy region below 20 MeV, neutron activation cross-sections were taken from evaluated nuclear data files. The activity of each nuclide for a predefined operation scenario (i.e., number and duration of irradiation and shutdown cycles) was normalized to reference values taken from the European or Swiss legislations, to obtain an aggregate estimate of the radiological hazard comparable with a nuclear waste zoning definition cr...

  19. NORM activity concentration in sediment cores from the Peninsular Malaysia East Coast Exclusive Economic Zone

    Study for distribution of Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM) i.e. 226Ra, 228Ra and 40K in the east coast of Peninsular Malaysia Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) was carried out as part of the national marine environment project. Sixteen marine sediment cores from selected locations within the EEZ were collected for determination of NORM activity concentrations using high-purity germanium (HPGe) gamma spectrometer. From the measurement, the activity concentration of 226Ra, 228Ra and 40K is ranged from 16 ± 4 Bq/kg to 46 ± 6 Bq/kg (total mean 30), 28 ± 7 Bq/kg to 87 ± 11 Bq/kg (total mean 56) and 171 ± 33 Bq/kg to 690 ± 89 Bq/kg (total mean 420), dry wt., respectively. The activity concentrations of radionuclides in most of the core were quite uniform suggesting that there were thorough vertical mixed of sediment throughout the core. The results obtained were also in good agreement with those previous reported from other countries in the region and therefore can be used to enhance present radioactivity database. The calculated external hazard values were ranged from 0.25 to 0.51 with the mean of 0.38 (less than unity) showed little risk of external hazard to the workers handling the sediments and it was likely low level of the mainland natural gamma-radiation in the east coast of Peninsular Malaysia. (author)

  20. Phosphate Activation via Reduced Oxidation State Phosphorus (P. Mild Routes to Condensed-P Energy Currency Molecules

    Claire R. Cousins

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of mechanisms for phosphorylating organic and inorganic molecules is a key step en route to the earliest living systems. At the heart of all contemporary biochemical systems reside reactive phosphorus (P molecules (such as adenosine triphosphate, ATP as energy currency molecules to drive endergonic metabolic processes and it has been proposed that a predecessor of such molecules could have been pyrophosphate [P2O74−; PPi(V]. Arguably the most geologically plausible route to PPi(V is dehydration of orthophosphate, Pi(V, normally a highly endergonic process in the absence of mechanisms for activating Pi(V. One possible solution to this problem recognizes the presence of reactive-P containing mineral phases, such as schreibersite [(Fe,Ni3P] within meteorites whose abundance on the early Earth would likely have been significant during a putative Hadean-Archean heavy bombardment. Here, we propose that the reduced oxidation state P-oxyacid, H-phosphite [HPO32−; Pi(III] could have activated Pi(V towards condensation via the intermediacy of the condensed oxyacid pyrophosphite [H2P2O52−; PPi(III]. We provide geologically plausible provenance for PPi(III along with evidence of its ability to activate Pi(V towards PPi(V formation under mild conditions (80 °C in water.

  1. Conformational, spectroscopic and nonlinear optical properties of biologically active N,N-dimethyltryptamine molecule: A theoretical study

    Öner, Nazmiye; Tamer, Ömer; Avcı, Davut; Atalay, Yusuf

    2014-12-01

    The effective psychoactive properties of N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) known as the near-death molecule have encouraged the imagination of many research disciplines for several decades. Although there is no theoretical study, a number of paper composed by experimental techniques have been reported for DMT molecule. In this study, the molecular modeling of DMT was carried out using B3LYP and HSEh1PBE levels of density functional theory (DFT). Our calculations showed that the energy gap between HOMO and LUMO is low, demonstrating that DMT is a biologically active molecule. Large hyperconjugation interaction energies imply that molecular charge transfer occurs in DMT. Moreover, NLO analysis indicates that DMT can be used an effective NLO material.

  2. How water molecules affect the catalytic activity of hydrolases - A XANES study of the local structures of peptide deformylase

    Cui, Peixin; Wang, Yu; Chu, Wangsheng; Guo, Xiaoyun; Yang, Feifei; Yu, Meijuan; Zhao, Haifeng; Dong, Yuhui; Xie, Yaning; Gong, Weimin; Wu, Ziyu

    2014-12-01

    Peptide deformylase (PDF) is a prokaryotic enzyme that catalyzes the deformylation of nascent peptides generated during protein synthesis and water molecules play a key role in these hydrolases. Using X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) and ab initio calculations we accurately probe the local atomic environment of the metal ion binding in the active site of PDF at different pH values and with different metal ions. This new approach is an effective way to monitor existing correlations among functions and structural changes. We show for the first time that the enzymatic activity depends on pH values and metal ions via the bond length of the nearest coordinating water (Wat1) to the metal ion. Combining experimental and theoretical data we may claim that PDF exhibits an enhanced enzymatic activity only when the distance of the Wat1 molecule with the metal ion falls in the limited range from 2.15 to 2.55 Å.

  3. Biochemical and toxicological evaluation of nano-heparins in cell functional properties, proteasome activation and expression of key matrix molecules.

    Piperigkou, Zoi; Karamanou, Konstantina; Afratis, Nikolaos A; Bouris, Panagiotis; Gialeli, Chrysostomi; Belmiro, Celso L R; Pavão, Mauro S G; Vynios, Dimitrios H; Tsatsakis, Aristidis M

    2016-01-01

    The glycosaminoglycan heparin and its derivatives act strongly on blood coagulation, controlling the activity of serine protease inhibitors in plasma. Nonetheless, there is accumulating evidence highlighting different anticancer activities of these molecules in numerous types of cancer. Nano-heparins may have great biological significance since they can inhibit cell proliferation and invasion as well as inhibiting proteasome activation. Moreover, they can cause alterations in the expression of major modulators of the tumor microenvironment, regulating cancer cell behavior. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of two nano-heparin formulations: one isolated from porcine intestine and the other from the sea squirt Styela plicata, on a breast cancer cell model. We determined whether these nano-heparins are able to affect cell proliferation, apoptosis and invasion, as well as proteasome activity and the expression of extracellular matrix molecules. Specifically, we observed that nano-Styela compared to nano-Mammalian analogue has higher inhibitory role on cell proliferation, invasion and proteasome activity. Moreover, nano-Styela regulates cell apoptosis, expression of inflammatory molecules, such as IL-6 and IL-8 and reduces the expression levels of extracellular matrix macromolecules, such as the proteolytic enzymes MT1-MMP, uPA and the cell surface proteoglycans syndecan-1 and -2, but not on syndecan-4. The observations reported in the present article indicate that nano-heparins and especially ascidian heparin are effective agents for heparin-induced effects in critical cancer cell functions, providing an important possibility in pharmacological targeting. PMID:26476401

  4. Variation of radon flux along active fault zones in association with earthquake occurrence

    Radon flux measurements were carried out at three radon stations along an active fault zone in the Langadas basin, Northern Greece by various techniques for earthquake prediction studies. Specially made devices with alpha track-etch detectors (ATDs) were installed by using LR-115, type II, non-strippable cellulose nitrate films (integrating method of measurements). Continuous monitoring of radon gas exhaling from the ground was also performed by using silicon diode detectors, Barasol and Clipperton type, in association with various probes and sensors including simultaneously registration of the meteorological parameters, such as precipitation height (rainfall events), temperature and barometric pressure. The obtained radon data were studied in parallel with the data of seismic events, such as the magnitude, ML of earthquakes, the epicentral distance, the hypocentral distance and the energy released during the earthquake event occurred at the fault zone during the period of measurements to find out any association between the rad on flux and the meteorological and seismological parameters. Seismic events with magnitude ML ≥ 4.0 appeared to be preceded by large precursory signals produced a well-defined 'anomaly' (peak) of radon flux prior to the event. In the results, the radon peaks in the obtained spectra appeared to be sharp and narrow. The rise time of a radon peak, that is the time period from the onset of a radon peak until the time of radon flux maximum is about a week, while the after time, that is the time interval between the time of radon flux maximum and the time of a seismic event ranges from about 3 weeks or more.

  5. Impaired hippocampal activity at the goal zone on the place preference task in a DISC1 mouse model.

    Hayashi, Yuichiro; Sawa, Akira; Hikida, Takatoshi

    2016-05-01

    Learning deficit is a clinical feature of many mental disorders and is hypothesized to result from an inability to integrate information in neural systems. We showed that transgenic mice expressing a dominant-negative form of DISC1, a risk gene for neuropsychiatric disorders, exhibited impaired performance in a reward-place association task when combined with a mild isolation stress. CA1 cells in the mutant mice showed normal place cell properties, but their activity at the goal zone was diminished. This abnormality in hippocampal activity at the goal zone during the task may underlie the learning deficit observed in the DISC1 mutant mice. PMID:26497623

  6. Active faults and related Late Quaternary deformation along the Northwestern Himalayan Frontal Zone, India

    T. Nakata

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Numerous newly-identified traces of active faults in the Himalayan foothill zone along the HFF around Chandigarh, in Pinjore Dun, along the piedmont zone of the Lower Siwalik hill front and within the Lower Tertiary hill range reveal the pattern of thrust and strike-slip faulting, striking parallel to the principal structural trend (NNW-SSE of the orogenic belt. The active Chandigarh Fault, Pinjore Garden Fault and Barsar thrust have vertically dislocated, warped and backtilted fluvial and alluvial-fan surfaces made up of Late Pleistocene-Holocene sediments. West- and southwest-facing fault scarplets with heights ranging from 12 to 50 m along these faults suggest continued tectonic movement through Late Pleistocene to recent times. Gentle warping and backtilting of the terraces on the hanging wall sides of the faults indicate fault-bend folding. These active faults are the manifestation of north-dipping imbricated thrust faults branching out from the major fault systems like the Main Boundary Fault (MBF and Himalayan Frontal Fault (HFF, probably merging down northward into a décollement. The Taksal Fault, striking NNW-SSE, shows prominent right-lateral movement marked by lateral offset of streams and younger Quaternary terraces and occupies a narrow deep linear valley along the fault trace. Right stepping along this fault has resulted in formation of a small pull-apart basin. Fault scarplets facing ENE and WSW are the manifestation of dip-slip movement. This fault is an example of slip-partitioning between the strike-slip and thrust faults, suggesting ongoing oblique convergence of the Indian plate and northward migration of a tectonic sliver. Slip rate along the Taksal Fault has been calculated as 2.8 mm/yr. Preliminary trench investigation at the base of the Chandigarh Fault Scarp has revealed total displacement of 3.5 m along a low angle thrust fault with variable dip of 20° to 46° due northeast, possibly the result of one

  7. Activation of Carbonyl-Containing Molecules with Solid Lewis Acids in Aqueous Media

    Román-Leshkov, Yuriy [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Chemical Engineering; Davis, Mark E. [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States). Chemical Engineering

    2011-09-28

    Current interest in reacting carbonyl-containing molecules in aqueous media is primarily due to the growing emphasis on conversion of biomass to fuels and chemicals. Recently, solid Lewis acids have been shown to perform catalytic reactions with carbonyl-containing molecules such as sugars in aqueous media. Here, catalysis mediated by Lewis acids is briefly discussed, Lewis acid solids that perform catalysis in aqueous media are then described, and the review is concluded with a few comments on the outlook for the future.

  8. Interaction of an immunodominant epitope with Ia molecules in T-cell activation

    Adorini, L; Sette, A; Buus, S;

    1988-01-01

    The amino acid sequence corresponding to residues 107-116 of hen egg-white lysozyme (HEL) has been identified as containing an immunodominant T-cell epitope recognized in association with the I-Ed molecule. The immunodominance of this epitope in HEL-primed H-2d mice was demonstrated by analysis o......-120)-peptide was found to be immunogenic in H-2d mice. Thus, a single semiconservative substitution drastically reduces binding capacity and abolishes immunogenicity, suggesting that a strict correlation exists between binding of a peptide to Ia molecules and its immunogenicity....

  9. New insights on the seismogenic potential of the Eastern Betic Shear Zone (SE Iberia): Quaternary activity and paleoseismicity of the SW segment of the Carrascoy Fault Zone

    Martín-Banda, Raquel; García-Mayordomo, Julián.; Insua-Arévalo, Juan M.; Salazar, Ángel E.; Rodríguez-Escudero, Emilio; Álvarez-Gómez, Jose A.; Medialdea, Alicia; Herrero, María. J.

    2016-01-01

    The Carrascoy Fault (CAF) is one of the main active faults that form part of the Eastern Betic Shear Zone, a 450 km fault system that accommodates most of the convergence between the Eurasian (Iberia) and Nubian plates in the Betic Cordillera, south Spain. Although the CAF represents a major earthquake threat to the nearby City of Murcia, studies on its Quaternary tectonics and seismogenic potential are scarce to date. We present evidence that supports the division of the CAF into two overlapping segments with contrasting tectonic structure, Quaternary activity, and landform control: a SW segment, characterized by a broad fold-and-thrust zone similar to the forebergs defined in the Gobi-Altai region, and a NE segment, characterized by a sharp mountain front controlled by strike-slip tectonics. We attribute the differentiation into these two segments to the stresses associated with topography, which in turn is a consequence of the shortening component, at the middle Pleistocene, after circa 217.4 ka. For the SW segment we infer the occurrence of 9 to 11, Mw 6.7 paleoearthquakes in the last 30.2 kyr, and a slip rate of 0.37 ± 0.08 m/kyr. We date the occurrence of the last surface rupture event after 2750 B.P., and we estimate an average recurrence period of major events of 3.3 ± 0.7 kyr.

  10. Activation of a water molecule coordinated to manganese: four study cases

    The daunting energy consumption of western societies calls for the development of renewable energies. Among them, hydrogen stands as a major candidate. The cleanest way of producing hydrogen is water electro- or photolysis. This reaction is carried out in natural photosynthesis by a manganese-oxo cluster, the functioning of which remains unknown. Insight into this mechanism would greatly help the search for low-cost water splitting catalysts. Our contribution to this field is the understanding of the fundamental processes that govern the activation of water by manganese complexes. This manuscript describes our attempts to generate electrochemically mononuclear manganese(IV) complexes bearing a fully deprotonated water molecule (oxo ligand). We have studied four different cases, which reflect different possible coordination spheres capable of stabilizing such species. In the first chapter, we will give a brief overview of the present energetic challenges faced by western societies. In the second chapter, we will present general considerations about manganese chemistry and a description of the structure and functioning of the water oxidizing enzyme. We will also describe the basic requirements for the splitting of water and present the goals of our work. In the third chapter, we will present the synthesis of a new family of tetradentate ligands, together with the synthesis and full characterization of the corresponding nickel(II) complexes. The first results obtained with the manganese analogue will also be shown. Chapter four presents the formation and the full characterization of a mononuclear manganese(IV)-oxo complex, by electrochemical oxidation of a manganese(II)-aqua complex. We will present different pathways to generate this species and show which intermediates are involved in this 2 e-, 2 H+ reaction. Chapter five describes the formation of a mononuclear manganese(IV) complex, by electrochemical oxidation of a manganese(III)-hydroxo complex. The manganese

  11. An Assessment of Variation in Active Ingredients of Ampucare from Different Zones of India

    Naveen Pathak

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to assess the variation in curcumin content of Curcuma longa rhizome and total polyphenols in Azadirachta indica bark samples procured from different zones of India. Physico-chemical tests such as total ash, acid insoluble ash, alcohol soluble extractive, water soluble extractive, volatile oil content etc. were also determined. A slight variation was seen in the bark samples of Azadirachta indica. Total ash ranged from 4.25±0.15 (East zone to 5.57±0.20 (Central zone whereas acid insoluble ash ranged from 0.80±0.07 (East zone to 1.52±0.06 (Central zone. Alcohol soluble extractive value of East zone sample was found to be more than 4 times higher 16.95±0.80 than that of central zone 3.85±0.12, where lowest value was recorded. Water soluble extractive value was also found to be highest in East zone sample 17.80±1.10 which was 2 times more than that of Central zone sample 8.45±0.15. This variation may be due to variation in climatic conditions, soil type, pollution stress etc. All the results were within the limits as given in The Ayurvedic Pharmacopoeia of India. Total Polyphenols ranged from 190.0 mgGAE/g of dry weight (Central zone to 510.0 mgGAE/g of dry weight (East zone. All the samples were found to be rich in total polyphenols. In Curcuma longa samples, Total ash ranged from 3.10±0.20 (South zone to 4.80±0.25 (North zone whereas acid insoluble ash ranged from 0.55±0.04 (South zone to 1.24±0.06 (North zone. Alcohol soluble extractive value was found to be highest in South zone sample 14.80±0.30 which was found to be more than 3 times higher than that of central zone 4.28±0.19 where lowest value was recorded. Water soluble extractive value was also found to be highest in West zone sample 12.55±0.69 and lowest in Central zone sample 8.90±0.37. Volatile oil ranged from 3.50±0.21 North zone sample to 5.50±0.20 South zone sample, where highest volatile oil was recovered. All the results were within

  12. Rabies Virus Expressing Dendritic Cell-Activating Molecules Enhances the Innate and Adaptive Immune Response to Vaccination ▿

    Wen, Yongjun; Wang, Hualei; Wu, Hua; Yang, Fuhe; Tripp, Ralph A.; Hogan, Robert J.; Fu, Zhen F.

    2010-01-01

    Our previous studies indicated that recruitment and/or activation of dendritic cells (DCs) is important in enhancing the protective immune responses against rabies virus (RABV) (L. Zhao, H. Toriumi, H. Wang, Y. Kuang, X. Guo, K. Morimoto, and Z. F. Fu, J. Virol. 84:9642-9648). To address the importance of DC activation for RABV vaccine efficacy, the genes for several DC recruitment and/or activation molecules, e.g., granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), macrophage-derived...

  13. Persistent downregulation of the pancarcinoma-associated epithelial cell adhesion molecule via active intranuclear methylation

    van der Gun, Bernardina T. F.; Wasserkort, Reinhold; Monami, Amelie; Jeltsch, Albert; Rasko, Tamits; Slaska-Kiss, Krystyna; Cortese, Rene; Rots, Marianne G.; de Leij, Lou F. M. H.; Ruiters, Marcel H. J.; Kiss, Antal; Weinhold, Elmar; McLaughlin, Pamela M. J.

    2008-01-01

    The epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) is expressed at high levels on the surface of most carcinoma cells. SiRNA silencing of EpCAM expression leads to reduced metastatic potential of tumor cells demonstrating its importance in oncogenesis and tumor progression. However, siRNA therapy require

  14. Synthesis of Zn-MOF incorporating titanium-hydrides as active sites binding H2 molecules

    Kim, Jongsik; Ok Kim, Dong; Wook Kim, Dong; Sagong, Kil

    2015-10-01

    This paper describes the synthetic effort for a Zn-MOF imparting Ti-H as a preferential binding site potentially capturing H2 molecules via Kubas-type interaction. The formation mechanism of Ti-H innate to the final material was potentially demonstrated to follow a radical dissociation rather than a β-hydrogen elimination and a C-H reductive elimination.

  15. Unequal Activities of Enantiomers via Biological Receptors: Examples of Chiral Drug, Pesticide, and Fragrance Molecules

    Mannschreck, Albrecht; Kiesswetter, Roland; von Angerer, Erwin

    2007-01-01

    A molecule coming from outside an organism can form a ligand-receptor complex. Upon its formation, a message is transmitted, for example, to certain cells. In this way, two enantiomers can emit messages that differ, either quantitatively or qualitatively. In the present article, these facts are taken as a common basis for the actions of chiral…

  16. Active tectonics west of New Zealand's Alpine Fault: South Westland Fault Zone activity shows Australian Plate instability

    De Pascale, Gregory P.; Chandler-Yates, Nicholas; Dela Pena, Federico; Wilson, Pam; May, Elijah; Twiss, Amber; Cheng, Che

    2016-04-01

    The 300 km long South Westland Fault Zone (SWFZ) is within the footwall of the Central Alpine Fault (<20 km away) and has 3500 m of dip-slip displacement, but it has been unknown if the fault is active. Here the first evidence for SWFZ thrust faulting in the "stable" Australian Plate is shown with cumulative dip-slip displacements up to 5.9 m (with 3 m throw) on Pleistocene and Holocene sediments and gentle hanging wall anticlinal folding. Cone penetration test (CPT) stratigraphy shows repeated sequences within the fault scarp (consistent with thrusting). Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating constrains the most recent rupture post-12.1 ± 1.7 ka with evidence for three to four events during earthquakes of at least Mw 6.8. This study shows significant deformation is accommodated on poorly characterized Australian Plate structures northwest of the Alpine Fault and demonstrates that major active and seismogenic structures remain uncharacterized in densely forested regions on Earth.

  17. Functional role of HLA class I cell-surface molecules in human T-lymphocyte activation and proliferation.

    Taylor, D S; Nowell, P C; Kornbluth, J

    1986-01-01

    This investigation addressed the role of major histocompatibility complex-encoded class I molecules in the activation and proliferation of human lymphocytes. We studied the effect of antibodies specific for HLA-A and HLA-B locus gene products on mitogen-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) subpopulations. Three individually derived, well-characterized anti-HLA class I monoclonal antibodies were demonstrated to inhibit the proliferation of human PBMC stimulated by either OKT3 or...

  18. Isolation and Molecular Characterization of Biofouling Bacteria and Profiling of Quorum Sensing Signal Molecules from Membrane Bioreactor Activated Sludge

    Harshad Lade; Diby Paul; Ji Hyang Kweon

    2014-01-01

    The formation of biofilm in a membrane bioreactor depends on the production of various signaling molecules like N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs). In the present study, a total of 200 bacterial strains were isolated from membrane bioreactor activated sludge and screened for AHLs production using two biosensor systems, Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 and Agrobacterium tumefaciens A136. A correlation between AHLs production and biofilm formation has been made among screened AHLs producing strai...

  19. Distribution of 210Pb activity concentrations in marine surface sediments within East Coast Peninsula Malaysia Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ)

    A sampling expedition into the East Coast Peninsula Malaysia Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) was carried in June 2008. Marine surface sediment samples were taken and the activity concentrations of 210Pb have been determined. Its distribution was plotted and the findings show that the activity concentrations decline from north to south. On the other hand, the activity concentrations are increasing from west to east right to the edge of the EEZ. The highest activity concentrations were found to be near offshore oil platforms. The 210Pb activity concentrations were found to be in the range of 18.3 - 123.1 Bq/ kg. (author)

  20. Cyclosporine A affects the in vitro expression of T cell activation-related molecules and cytokines in dogs.

    Fellman, C L; Stokes, J V; Archer, T M; Pinchuk, L M; Lunsford, K V; Mackin, A J

    2011-04-15

    Cyclosporine is a powerful immunosuppressive drug that is being used with increasing frequency to treat a wide range of immune-mediated diseases in the dog. To date, ideal dosing protocols that will achieve immunosuppression with cyclosporine in dogs remain unclear, and standard methods that can measure effectiveness of immunosuppression have not been established. The aim of our study was to evaluate the effects of in vitro cyclosporine exposure on a panel of molecules expressed by activated T cells to ascertain their potential as biomarkers of immunosuppression in dogs. Blood was drawn from six healthy dogs, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were isolated and activated. Half of the cells were incubated with 200 ng/mL cyclosporine prior to activation, and the other half were not exposed to cyclosporine. Samples were analyzed using flow cytometry, and the expression of intracellular cytokines IL-2, IL-4, and IFN-γ was evaluated after 6, 12, and 24h of drug exposure. Each cytokine exhibited a time-dependent suppression profile, and all but two samples activated in the presence of cyclosporine showed lower cytokine expression than untreated controls. We also evaluated the expression of the surface T cell activation molecules CD25 and CD95 by flow cytometry after 36 h of drug exposure. Expression of these surface molecules decreased significantly when activated in the presence of cyclosporine. Our results suggest that suppressed expression of the markers related to T cell activation could potentially be utilized as an indicator of the efficacy of cyclosporine therapy in dogs. PMID:21227512

  1. Major histocompatibility complex class II (DR) antigen and costimulatory molecules on in vitro and in vivo activated human polymorphonuclear neutrophils

    Sandilands, Gavin P; McCrae, Jame; Hill, Kathryn; Perry, Martin; Baxter, Derek

    2006-01-01

    We have previously shown that normal human peripheral blood polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) contain cytoplasmic ‘stores’ of three key molecules normally associated with antigen presentation and T-cell costimulation, i.e. major histocompatibility complex class II (DR) antigen, CD80 (B7-1) and CD86 (B7-2). These cytoplasmic molecules were found to translocate to the cell surface within a few minutes following cross-linking (X-L) of Mac-1: an early neutrophil activation signal. In this study we have compared X-L of Mac −1 in parallel with four other well documented in vitro neutrophil activators: phorbol myristate acetate, N-formyl methionyl leucyl phenylalanine, lipopolysaccharide, and phagocytosis of immunoglobulin G–Latex particles. In addition, we have used paired samples of neutrophils obtained from peripheral blood (as a control) and synovial fluid from patients with rheumatoid arthritis as a source of in vivo activated cells. With the exception of phagocytosis, all activators resulted in the rapid (within 30 min) generation of two populations of activated neutrophils (designated P1 and P2) based on flow-cytometry measurements of size, granularity and phenotype. Significant up-regulation of DR and costimulatory molecules was observed, predominantly on P2 cells, with all activators except phagocytosis. CD80 and CD86 were noted to respond to the various activation signals in a different pattern suggesting that their intracellular granule location may be different. Dual-staining confocal laser microscopy studies showed that CD80 is largely confined to secretory vesicles (SVs) while CD86 appears to have a much wider distribution being found in SVs and within secondary (specific) and primary (azurophilic) granules. Increased surface expression of these antigens was also observed on P2 synovial fluid neutrophils appearing as large heterogeneous clusters on the cell surface when visualized by confocal laser microscopy. PMID:17034427

  2. Single molecule measurements of DNA helicase activity with magnetic tweezers and t-test based step-finding analysis.

    Seol, Yeonee; Strub, Marie-Paule; Neuman, Keir C

    2016-08-01

    Magnetic tweezers is a versatile and easy to implement single-molecule technique that has become increasingly prevalent in the study of nucleic acid based molecular motors. Here, we provide a description of the magnetic tweezers instrument and guidelines for measuring and analyzing DNA helicase activity. Along with experimental methods, we describe a robust method of single-molecule trajectory analysis based on the Student's t-test that accommodates continuous transitions in addition to the discrete transitions assumed in most widely employed analysis routines. To illustrate the single-molecule unwinding assay and the analysis routine, we provide DNA unwinding measurements of Escherichia coli RecQ helicase under a variety of conditions (Na+, ATP, temperature, and DNA substrate geometry). These examples reveal that DNA unwinding measurements under various conditions can aid in elucidating the unwinding mechanism of DNA helicase but also emphasize that environmental effects on DNA helicase activity must be considered in relation to in vivo activity and mechanism. PMID:27131595

  3. SET7/9 catalytic mutants reveal the role of active site water molecules in lysine multiple methylation.

    Del Rizzo, Paul A; Couture, Jean-François; Dirk, Lynnette M A; Strunk, Bethany S; Roiko, Marijo S; Brunzelle, Joseph S; Houtz, Robert L; Trievel, Raymond C

    2010-10-01

    SET domain lysine methyltransferases (KMTs) methylate specific lysine residues in histone and non-histone substrates. These enzymes also display product specificity by catalyzing distinct degrees of methylation of the lysine ε-amino group. To elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying this specificity, we have characterized the Y245A and Y305F mutants of the human KMT SET7/9 (also known as KMT7) that alter its product specificity from a monomethyltransferase to a di- and a trimethyltransferase, respectively. Crystal structures of these mutants in complex with peptides bearing unmodified, mono-, di-, and trimethylated lysines illustrate the roles of active site water molecules in aligning the lysine ε-amino group for methyl transfer with S-adenosylmethionine. Displacement or dissociation of these solvent molecules enlarges the diameter of the active site, accommodating the increasing size of the methylated ε-amino group during successive methyl transfer reactions. Together, these results furnish new insights into the roles of active site water molecules in modulating lysine multiple methylation by SET domain KMTs and provide the first molecular snapshots of the mono-, di-, and trimethyl transfer reactions catalyzed by these enzymes. PMID:20675860

  4. SET7/9 Catalytic Mutants Reveal the Role of Active Site Water Molecules in Lysine Multiple Methylation*

    Del Rizzo, Paul A.; Couture, Jean-François; Dirk, Lynnette M. A.; Strunk, Bethany S.; Roiko, Marijo S.; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Houtz, Robert L.; Trievel, Raymond C.

    2010-01-01

    SET domain lysine methyltransferases (KMTs) methylate specific lysine residues in histone and non-histone substrates. These enzymes also display product specificity by catalyzing distinct degrees of methylation of the lysine ϵ-amino group. To elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying this specificity, we have characterized the Y245A and Y305F mutants of the human KMT SET7/9 (also known as KMT7) that alter its product specificity from a monomethyltransferase to a di- and a trimethyltransferase, respectively. Crystal structures of these mutants in complex with peptides bearing unmodified, mono-, di-, and trimethylated lysines illustrate the roles of active site water molecules in aligning the lysine ϵ-amino group for methyl transfer with S-adenosylmethionine. Displacement or dissociation of these solvent molecules enlarges the diameter of the active site, accommodating the increasing size of the methylated ϵ-amino group during successive methyl transfer reactions. Together, these results furnish new insights into the roles of active site water molecules in modulating lysine multiple methylation by SET domain KMTs and provide the first molecular snapshots of the mono-, di-, and trimethyl transfer reactions catalyzed by these enzymes. PMID:20675860

  5. SET7/9 Catalytic Mutants Reveal the Role of Active Site Water Molecules in Lysine Multiple Methylation

    Del Rizzo, Paul A.; Couture, Jean-François; Dirk, Lynnette M.A.; Strunk, Bethany S.; Roiko, Marijo S.; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Houtz, Robert L.; Trievel, Raymond C. (Michigan); (NWU); (Kentucky)

    2010-11-15

    SET domain lysine methyltransferases (KMTs) methylate specific lysine residues in histone and non-histone substrates. These enzymes also display product specificity by catalyzing distinct degrees of methylation of the lysine {epsilon}-amino group. To elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying this specificity, we have characterized the Y245A and Y305F mutants of the human KMT SET7/9 (also known as KMT7) that alter its product specificity from a monomethyltransferase to a di- and a trimethyltransferase, respectively. Crystal structures of these mutants in complex with peptides bearing unmodified, mono-, di-, and trimethylated lysines illustrate the roles of active site water molecules in aligning the lysine {epsilon}-amino group for methyl transfer with S-adenosylmethionine. Displacement or dissociation of these solvent molecules enlarges the diameter of the active site, accommodating the increasing size of the methylated {epsilon}-amino group during successive methyl transfer reactions. Together, these results furnish new insights into the roles of active site water molecules in modulating lysine multiple methylation by SET domain KMTs and provide the first molecular snapshots of the mono-, di-, and trimethyl transfer reactions catalyzed by these enzymes.

  6. Liparid and macrourid fishes of the hadal zone: in situ observations of activity and feeding behaviour.

    Jamieson, A J; Fujii, T; Solan, M; Matsumoto, A K; Bagley, P M; Priede, I G

    2009-03-22

    Using baited camera landers, the first images of living fishes were recorded in the hadal zone (6000-11000 m) in the Pacific Ocean. The widespread abyssal macrourid Coryphaenoides yaquinae was observed at a new depth record of approximately 7000 m in the Japan Trench. Two endemic species of liparid were observed at similar depths: Pseudoliparis amblystomopsis in the Japan Trench and Notoliparis kermadecensis in the Kermadec Trench. From these observations, we have documented swimming and feeding behaviour of these species and derived the first estimates of hadal fish abundance. The liparids intercepted bait within 100-200 min but were observed to preferentially feed on scavenging amphipods. Notoliparis kermadecensis act as top predators in the hadal food web, exhibiting up to nine suction-feeding events per minute. Both species showed distinctive swimming gaits: P. amblystomopsis (mean length 22.5 cm) displayed a mean tail-beat frequency of 0.47 Hz and mean caudal:pectoral frequency ratio of 0.76, whereas N. kermadecensis (mean length 31.5 cm) displayed respective values of 1.04 and 2.08 Hz. Despite living at extreme depths, these endemic liparids exhibit similar activity levels compared with shallow-water liparids. PMID:19129104

  7. Determination of Four Active Ingredients in Vc Yinqiao Tablets by Capillary Zone Electrophoresis with Amperometric Detection

    L(U),Jin; WANG,Qing-Jiang; CHENG,Xi; LIU,Hai-Yan; HE,Pin-Gang; FANG,Yu-Zhi

    2006-01-01

    A simple, reliable and reproducible method, based on capillary zone electrophoresis with amperometric detection (CZE-AD), has been developed for simultaneous determination of four active ingredients in Vc Yinqiao tablets including paracetamol, vitamin C, caffeic acid and chlorogenic acid. A carbon-disk electrode was used as working electrode and 0.95 V (versus SCE) was selected as detection potential. The optimal conditions of CZE experiment were 30 mmol·L-1 borate solution (pH 9.5) as running buffer, 14 kV as separation voltage and 8 s (14 kV) as electro-kinetic sampling time. Under the selected optimum conditions, paracetamol, vitamin C, caffeic acid and chlorogenic acid could be perfectly separated within 22 min, and their detection limits (S/N=3) ranged from 5 × 10-7 to 1×10-6 mol·L-1. This proposed method demonstrated good reproducibility with relative standard deviations of less than 3% for both migration time and peak current (n=7). The utility of this method was demonstrated by monitoring a kind of compound medicine named Vc Yinqiao tablets and the assay results were satisfactory.

  8. Synaptophysin 1 Clears Synaptobrevin 2 from the Presynaptic Active Zone to Prevent Short-Term Depression

    Rajit Rajappa

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Release site clearance is an important process during synaptic vesicle (SV recycling. However, little is known about its molecular mechanism. Here we identify self-assembly of exocytosed Synaptobrevin 2 (Syb2 and Synaptophysin 1 (Syp1 by homo- and hetero-oligomerization into clusters as key mechanisms mediating release site clearance for preventing cis-SNARE complex formation at the active zone (AZ. In hippocampal neurons from Syp1 knockout mice, neurons expressing a monomeric Syb2 mutant, or after acute block of the ATPase N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor (NSF, responsible for cis-SNARE complex disassembly, we found strong frequency-dependent short-term depression (STD, whereas retrieval of Syb2 by compensatory endocytosis was only affected weakly. Defects in Syb2 endocytosis were stimulus- and frequency-dependent, indicating that Syp1 is not essential for Syb2 retrieval, but for its efficient clearance upstream of endocytosis. Our findings identify an SV protein as a release site clearance factor.

  9. Photochemical activation and reactivity of polynuclear transition metal complex molecules. Final report

    Several bi- and trinuclear metal complexes containing ligands from β-polyketonates have been synthesized and characterized including homo- and hetero-polynuclear complexes. New synthetic approaches to the preparation of heterobi- and trinuclear complexes have been developed that allow the preparation of a large number of molecules containing heavy-metal ions such as Pd2+ or UO22+ and a first-row transition-metal ion. The electrochemical properties of these complexes have been investigated and many exhibit the ability to transfer two electrons at very nearly the same potential. Photochemical studies on binuclear Cu(II) and Ni(II) showed that these compounds yielded reduced metal species and decomposition upon irradiation. Luminescence of hetero-complexes of uranyl polyketonates is observed at 770K with the UO22+ moiety functioning as an isolated chromophore in which emission is observed only on direct excitation of UO22+ and energy transfer to lower states in the molecule is not observed

  10. Tautocrowns: a concept for a sensing molecule with an active side-arm

    Antonov, Liudmil M.; Kurteva, Vanya B.; Simeonov, Svilen P.; Deneva, Vera V.; Crochet, Aurelien; Katharina M. Fromm

    2010-01-01

    A new sensing molecule containing aza-15-crown-5 as a receptor and 4-(phenyldiazenyl)naphthalen-1-ol as a signal converter has been synthesized. In the free ligand, the hydrogen bonding between the tautomeric OH group and the nitrogen atom from the macrocycle fully shifts the tautomeric equilibrium towards the enol form. The complexation reverses the equilibrium as a result of the strong interaction between the metal ion captured in the macrocyclic moiety and the tautomeric carbonyl group. Th...

  11. Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 signaling inhibits the activation of human platelets

    Cicmil, Milenko; Stevens, Jo; Leduc, Mireille; Bon, Cassian; Gibbins, Jonathan M.

    2002-01-01

    Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1/CD31) is a 130-kd transmembrane glycoprotein and a member of the growing family of receptors with immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs (ITIMs). PECAM-1 is expressed on platelets, certain T cells, monocytes, neutrophils, and vascular endothelial cells and is involved in a range of cellular processes, though the role of PECAM-1 in platelets is unclear. Cross-linking of PECAM-1 results in phosphorylation of the ITIM allowing the r...

  12. Cuticular transport of hydrophilic molecules with special focus on primary metabolites and active ingredients

    Popp, Christian

    2005-01-01

    The plant cuticle as an interface between the plant interior and the adjoining atmosphere plays an important role in any interaction between the plant and its environment. Transport processes across the cuticles were the object of countless research since many decades. However, bulk of the work done was focused on transport of lipophilic molecules. It is highly plausible to examine the penetration of lipophilic compounds, since the cuticle is dominated by lipophilic compartments itself, and t...

  13. Activation of CO2 and Related Small Molecules by Neopentyl-Derivatized Uranium Complexes

    Schmidt, Anna-Corina

    2015-01-01

    The world´s concern about the environment has continued to intensify as the effects of greenhouse gases or complicated work-up and disposal of radioactive substances become more obvious and profound. Unsurprisingly, the number of publications related to the solution of these issues has greatly increased in the last 15 years. Thus, a basic understanding of the specific properties and behavior of small molecules is crucial for the reduction of greenhouse gases, which may be realized through act...

  14. Chemical activation of molecules by metals: Experimental studies of electron distributions and bonding

    The formal relationship between measured molecular ionization energies and thermodynamic bond dissociation energies has been developed into a single equation which unifies the treatment of covalent bonds, ionic bonds, and partially ionic bonds. This relationship has been used to clarify the fundamental thermodynamic information relating to metal-hydrogen, metal-alkyl, and metal-metal bond energies. We have been able to obtain a direct observation and measurement of the stabilization energy provided by the agostic interaction of the C-H bond with the metal. The ionization energies have also been used to correlate the rates of carbonyl substitution reactions of (η5-C5H4X)Rh(CO)2 complexes, and to reveal the electronic factors that control the stability of the transition state. The extent that the electronic features of these bonding interactions transfer to other chemical systems is being investigated in terms of the principle of additivity of ligand electronic effects. Specific examples under study include metal- phosphines, metal-halides, and metallocenes. Especially interesting has been the recent application of these techniques to the characterization of the soccer-ball shaped C60 molecule, buckminsterfullerene, and its interaction with a metal surface. The high-resolution valence ionizations in the gas phase reveal the high symmetry of the molecule, and studies of thin films of C60 reveal weak intermolecular interactions. Scanning tunneling and atomic force microscopy reveal the arrangement of spherical molecules on gold substrates, with significant delocalization of charge from the metal surface. 21 refs

  15. Shoreline changes and its impact on activities in the coastal zone in Greenland

    Kroon, A.; Bendixen, M.; Elberling, B.

    2015-12-01

    Almost all coastal environments in Greenland are developed in high-relief areas, along fjords, or hard-rock cliffs. The sedimentary shores often fringe these areas and a large number of small deltas (areal delta surface temperatures, ice and snow. There is a seasonal variation with open waters and active rivers in summer and ice-covered coastal waters and frozen rivers in winter. The coastal processes by waves and tides are thus often limited to summer and early fall. Nowadays, global climate changes induce many changes along the arctic coasts. Global sea-levels are rising due to thermal expansion and an increased fresh water flux from the glaciers and land ice masses, while ice coverage of the coastal waters decreases and the open water periods in summer extend. However, it is still unknown if the extra input of fluvial sediments can cope with increased erosion rates at the shores. Besides, the rate of actual sea-level rise in West Greenland is probably less than the local rate of isostatic uplift, leading to local relative sea level fall.The focus in this presentation is on shoreline changes and its impact on two coastal environments in Greenland: the Young Sound area (fjord environment in North-East Greenland), and the southern shore of Disko Island (open sea embayment in West Greenland). These coastal environments exhibit a wide variety of coastal landforms like deltas, spits, barriers, etc. The coastal landforms were mapped and aerial images, orthogonal photos, and satellite images were used to digitize successive shorelines. The shoreline changes were estimated using the digital shoreline analysis system (DSAS) of the USGS. The spatial variability of accumulation and erosion patterns was detected and shows a surprising thread for ancient settlements and present-day activities in the coastal zone. The same patterns are finally discussed in terms of coastal risk assessment.

  16. Structural Insights into the Activation of Human Relaxin Family Peptide Receptor 1 by Small-Molecule Agonists.

    Hu, Xin; Myhr, Courtney; Huang, Zaohua; Xiao, Jingbo; Barnaeva, Elena; Ho, Brian A; Agoulnik, Irina U; Ferrer, Marc; Marugan, Juan J; Southall, Noel; Agoulnik, Alexander I

    2016-03-29

    The GPCR relaxin family peptide receptor 1 (RXFP1) mediates the action of relaxin peptide hormone, including its tissue remodeling and antifibrotic effects. The peptide has a short half-life in plasma, limiting its therapeutic utility. However, small-molecule agonists of human RXFP1 can overcome this limitation and may provide a useful therapeutic approach, especially for chronic diseases such as heart failure and fibrosis. The first small-molecule agonists of RXFP1 were recently identified from a high-throughput screening, using a homogeneous cell-based cAMP assay. Optimization of the hit compounds resulted in a series of highly potent and RXFP1 selective agonists with low cytotoxicity, and excellent in vitro ADME and pharmacokinetic properties. Here, we undertook extensive site-directed mutagenesis studies in combination with computational modeling analysis to probe the molecular basis of the small-molecule binding to RXFP1. The results showed that the agonists bind to an allosteric site of RXFP1 in a manner that closely interacts with the seventh transmembrane domain (TM7) and the third extracellular loop (ECL3). Several residues were determined to play an important role in the agonist binding and receptor activation, including a hydrophobic region at TM7 consisting of W664, F668, and L670. The G659/T660 motif within ECL3 is crucial to the observed species selectivity of the agonists for RXFP1. The receptor binding and activation effects by the small molecule ML290 were compared with the cognate ligand, relaxin, providing valuable insights on the structural basis and molecular mechanism of receptor activation and selectivity for RXFP1. PMID:26866459

  17. Living microbial ecosystems within the active zone of catagenesis: Implications for feeding the deep biosphere

    Horsfield, B.; Schenk, H. J.; Zink, K.; Ondrak, R.; Dieckmann, V.; Kallmeyer, J.; Mangelsdorf, K.; di Primio, R.; Wilkes, H.; Parkes, R. J.; Fry, J.; Cragg, B.

    2006-06-01

    Earth's largest reactive carbon pool, marine sedimentary organic matter, becomes increasingly recalcitrant during burial, making it almost inaccessible as a substrate for microorganisms, and thereby limiting metabolic activity in the deep biosphere. Because elevated temperature acting over geological time leads to the massive thermal breakdown of the organic matter into volatiles, including petroleum, the question arises whether microorganisms can directly utilize these maturation products as a substrate. While migrated thermogenic fluids are known to sustain microbial consortia in shallow sediments, an in situ coupling of abiotic generation and microbial utilization has not been demonstrated. Here we show, using a combination of basin modelling, kinetic modelling, geomicrobiology and biogeochemistry, that microorganisms inhabit the active generation zone in the Nankai Trough, offshore Japan. Three sites from ODP Leg 190 have been evaluated, namely 1173, 1174 and 1177, drilled in nearly undeformed Quaternary and Tertiary sedimentary sequences seaward of the Nankai Trough itself. Paleotemperatures were reconstructed based on subsidence profiles, compaction modelling, present-day heat flow, downhole temperature measurements and organic maturity parameters. Today's heat flow distribution can be considered mainly conductive, and is extremely high in places, reaching 180 mW/m 2. The kinetic parameters describing total hydrocarbon generation, determined by laboratory pyrolysis experiments, were utilized by the model in order to predict the timing of generation in time and space. The model predicts that the onset of present day generation lies between 300 and 500 m below sea floor (5100-5300 m below mean sea level), depending on well location. In the case of Site 1174, 5-10% conversion has taken place by a present day temperature of ca. 85 °C. Predictions were largely validated by on-site hydrocarbon gas measurements. Viable organisms in the same depth range have been

  18. Evolution of surface motor activation zones in hemiplegic patients during 20 sessions of FES therapy with multi-pad electrodes

    Jovana Malešević

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine surface motor activation zones for wrist, fingers and thumb extension movements and their temporal change during 20 therapy sessions using advanced multi-pad functional electrical stimulation system. Results from four hemiplegic patients indicate that certain zones have higher probability of eliciting each of the target movements. However, mutual overlap and variations of the zones are present not just between the subjects, but also on the intrasubject level, reflected through these session to session transformations of the selected virtual electrodes. The obtained results could be used as a priori knowledge for semi-automated optimization algorithm and could shorten the time required for calibration of the multi-pad electrode.

  19. Discovery of a small-molecule binder of the oncoprotein gankyrin that modulates gankyrin activity in the cell

    Chattopadhyay, Anasuya; O’Connor, Cornelius J.; Zhang, Fengzhi; Galvagnion, Celine; Galloway, Warren R. J. D.; Tan, Yaw Sing; Stokes, Jamie E.; Rahman, Taufiq; Verma, Chandra; Spring, David R.; Itzhaki, Laura S.

    2016-04-01

    Gankyrin is an ankyrin-repeat oncoprotein whose overexpression has been implicated in the development of many cancer types. Elevated gankyrin levels are linked to aberrant cellular events including enhanced degradation of tumour suppressor protein p53, and inhibition of gankyrin activity has therefore been identified as an attractive anticancer strategy. Gankyrin interacts with several partner proteins, and a number of these protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are of relevance to cancer. Thus, molecules that bind the PPI interface of gankyrin and interrupt these interactions are of considerable interest. Herein, we report the discovery of a small molecule termed cjoc42 that is capable of binding to gankyrin. Cell-based experiments demonstrate that cjoc42 can inhibit gankyrin activity in a dose-dependent manner: cjoc42 prevents the decrease in p53 protein levels normally associated with high amounts of gankyrin, and it restores p53-dependent transcription and sensitivity to DNA damage. The results represent the first evidence that gankyrin is a “druggable” target with small molecules.

  20. Auroral Electrojet (AE, AL, AO, AU) - A Global Measure of Auroral Zone Magnetic Activity

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The AE index is derived from geomagnetic variations in the horizontal component observed at selected (10-13) observatories along the auroral zone in the northern...

  1. Immobilisation of redox active molecules as precursors for nanowire self-assembly

    Campagnoli, Elena

    2007-01-01

    Spontaneously adsorbed monolayers of [Co(ttp-CH2-SH)2](PF6)2 have been formed on platinum microelectrodes by exposure to micromolar solutions of the complex in 0.1 M TBABF4 in acetonitrile, ttp-CH2-SH is 4'-(p-(thiolmethyl)-phenyl)-2,2':6',2''- terpyridine. Resonance Raman spectroscopy on roughened polycrystalline platinum macro electrodes show that the molecule undergoes adsorption by sulphur atom onto the platinum surface. The monolayers show reversible and well defined cyclic voltammetry w...

  2. Depth-dependent activity of non-volcanic tremor and other slow earthquake in the Nankai subduction zone

    Obara, K.

    2010-12-01

    In the Nankai subduction zone, some types of slow earthquakes have been detected by dense seismic/geodetic observation network. At the deeper part in the transition zone between the locked and stable sliding zones, the tremor is distributed within a narrow belt with a 600 km along the strike of the subducting Philippine Sea plate (Obara, 2002). The major tremor burst is often accompanied by the short-term slow slip event (Obara et al., 2004) and deep very low frequency earthquake (Ito et al., 2007). Between the belt-like tremor zone and locked zone, the long-term slow slip event occurs at eastern and western edges of the tremor belt-like zone. These slow earthquakes represent a clear depth-dependent property. The slip behavior in time is drastically different between the shallower long-term slow slip event and deeper coupling events. Within the tremor source area, the temporal behavior of tremor activity is different in depth. In western Shikoku and northeastern Kii where major tremor bursts associated with short-term slow slip events frequently occur, the tremor distribution is separated into double peaks at shallower and deeper edge in the dip direction (Obara et al., 2010). The updip tremor activity is modulated by the major tremor burst occurring at regular recurrence interval. On the other hand, the downdip tremor activity is composed of more frequent occurrence of minor burst. The nucleation of the tremor activity often occurs from the deeper part and migrates updip direction, then propagates along strike laterally. In Bungo channel between Shikoku and Kyushu islands at the western edge of the tremor source belt, the long-term slow slip event with duration from a half to one year occurs every 6 years in 1997, 2003 and 2010. The transient slip event strongly affect to the tremor activity. Especially, the updip part of the tremor activity in Bungo channel is clearly correlated to the GPS displacement caused by the long-term slow slip event; however, the downdip

  3. Coordinated trafficking of synaptic vesicle and active zone proteins prior to synapse formation

    Sabo Shasta L

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The proteins required for synaptic transmission are rapidly assembled at nascent synapses, but the mechanisms through which these proteins are delivered to developing presynaptic terminals are not understood. Prior to synapse formation, active zone proteins and synaptic vesicle proteins are transported along axons in distinct organelles referred to as piccolo-bassoon transport vesicles (PTVs and synaptic vesicle protein transport vesicles (STVs, respectively. Although both PTVs and STVs are recruited to the same site in the axon, often within minutes of axo-dendritic contact, it is not known whether or how PTV and STV trafficking is coordinated before synapse formation. Results Here, using time-lapse confocal imaging of the dynamics of PTVs and STVs in the same axon, we show that vesicle trafficking is coordinated through at least two mechanisms. First, a significant proportion of STVs and PTVs are transported together before forming a stable terminal. Second, individual PTVs and STVs share pause sites within the axon. Importantly, for both STVs and PTVs, encountering the other type of vesicle increases their propensity to pause. To determine if PTV-STV interactions are important for pausing, PTV density was reduced in axons by expression of a dominant negative construct corresponding to the syntaxin binding domain of syntabulin, which links PTVs with their KIF5B motor. This reduction in PTVs had a minimal effect on STV pausing and movement, suggesting that an interaction between STVs and PTVs is not responsible for enhancing STV pausing. Conclusions Our results indicate that trafficking of STVs and PTVs is coordinated even prior to synapse development. This novel coordination of transport and pausing might provide mechanisms through which all of the components of a presynaptic terminal can be rapidly accumulated at sites of synapse formation.

  4. Simultaneous Segmentation of Prostatic Zones Using Active Appearance Models With Multiple Coupled Levelsets.

    Toth, Robert; Ribault, Justin; Gentile, John; Sperling, Dan; Madabhushi, Anant

    2013-09-01

    In this work we present an improvement to the popular Active Appearance Model (AAM) algorithm, that we call the Multiple-Levelset AAM (MLA). The MLA can simultaneously segment multiple objects, and makes use of multiple levelsets, rather than anatomical landmarks, to define the shapes. AAMs traditionally define the shape of each object using a set of anatomical landmarks. However, landmarks can be difficult to identify, and AAMs traditionally only allow for segmentation of a single object of interest. The MLA, which is a landmark independent AAM, allows for levelsets of multiple objects to be determined and allows for them to be coupled with image intensities. This gives the MLA the flexibility to simulataneously segmentation multiple objects of interest in a new image. In this work we apply the MLA to segment the prostate capsule, the prostate peripheral zone (PZ), and the prostate central gland (CG), from a set of 40 endorectal, T2-weighted MRI images. The MLA system we employ in this work leverages a hierarchical segmentation framework, so constructed as to exploit domain specific attributes, by utilizing a given prostate segmentation to help drive the segmentations of the CG and PZ, which are embedded within the prostate. Our coupled MLA scheme yielded mean Dice accuracy values of .81, .79 and .68 for the prostate, CG, and PZ, respectively using a leave-one-out cross validation scheme over 40 patient studies. When only considering the midgland of the prostate, the mean DSC values were .89, .84, and .76 for the prostate, CG, and PZ respectively. PMID:23997571

  5. The Active and Periactive Zone Organization and the Functional Properties of Small and Large Synapses.

    Cano, Raquel; Tabares, Lucia

    2016-01-01

    The arrival of an action potential (AP) at a synaptic terminal elicits highly synchronized quanta release. Repetitive APs produce successive synaptic vesicle (SV) fusions that require management of spent SV components in the presynaptic membrane with minimum disturbance of the secretory apparatus. To this end, the synaptic machinery is structured accordingly to the strength and the range of frequencies at which each particular synapse operates. This results in variations in the number and dimension of Active Zones (AZs), amount and distribution of SVs, and probably, in the primary endocytic mechanisms they use. Understanding better how these structural differences determine the functional response in each case has been a matter of long-term interest. Here we review the structural and functional properties of three distinct types of synapses: the neuromuscular junction (NMJ; a giant, highly reliable synapse that must exocytose a large number of quanta with each stimulus to guarantee excitation of the postsynaptic cell), the hippocampal excitatory small synapse (which most often has a single release site and a relatively small pool of vesicles), and the cerebellar mossy fiber-granule cell synapse (which possesses hundreds of release sites and is able to translocate, dock and prime vesicles at high speed). We will focus on how the release apparatus is organized in each case, the relative amount of vesicular membrane that needs to be accommodated within the periAZ upon stimulation, the different mechanisms for retrieving the excess of membrane and finally, how these factors may influence the functioning of the release sites. PMID:27252645

  6. Synthesis of Zn-MOF incorporating titanium-hydrides as active sites binding H2 molecules

    This paper describes the synthetic effort for a Zn-MOF imparting Ti-H as a preferential binding site potentially capturing H2 molecules via Kubas-type interaction. The formation mechanism of Ti-H innate to the final material was potentially demonstrated to follow a radical dissociation rather than a β-hydrogen elimination and a C-H reductive elimination. - Graphical abstract: This study details the synthesis and the formation mechanism of Zn-MOF adsorbent site-isolating TiH3 that can potentially capture H2 molecules via Kubas-binding mechanism. - Highlights: • OH-functionalized Zn-MOF was employed as a reactive template to site-isolate TiH3. • This MOF was post-synthetically modified using a tetracyclohexyl titanium (IV). • This intermediate was hydrogenolyzed to change ligand from cyclohexyl to hydride. • Formation mechanism of TiH3 was investigated via two control GC–MS experiments. • Final Zn-MOF potentially site-isolating TiH3 species was used as a H2 adsorbent

  7. Gold nano-island arrays on silicon as SERS active substrate for organic molecule detection

    Gold islands forming highly controlled arrays have been fabricated by two potential step electrochemical deposition method using nanopatterned Si surface templates. In the present work, the Raman scattering studies realized using 11-mercaptoundecanoic probe molecule showed that such structures exhibit an enhanced Raman signal compared with nanostructured physical deposited thin gold film on flat silicon substrate and can be valued as surface-enhanced Raman scattering substrates. Besides the more appropriate management of nano-island arrays distribution, the high ratio of their Raman signals can be explain by the epitaxial-like growth mechanism of the metallic nano-islands, clearly showed by X-ray diffraction studies. Furthermore, the substrates enabled reproducibility and stability detection due to the chemically assembling of organothiol molecules, the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies confirming formation of the thiolate species which corresponds to Au-S bonds, and also, the unwanted ‘hot-spots’ are missing, which make them suitable for high sensitivity biosensing applications. - Highlights: • Gold nano-islands are electrochemical deposited on nanopatterned silicon. • The X-ray diffraction studies revealed the epitaxial-like growth mechanism. • Enhanced Raman signal of Au nano-islands was observed compared with Au nano-film

  8. The Activation of Macrophage and Upregulation of CD40 Costimulatory Molecule in Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury

    Wenxiang Bi

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available To study the activation of macrophage and upregulation of costimulatory molecule of CD40 in lipopolysaccharide- (LPS- induced acute lung injury (ALI model, and to investigate the pathogenecy of ALI, mice were randomly divided into two groups. ALI model was created by injecting 0.2 mg/kg LPS in phosphate saline (PBS in trachea. The pathologic changes of mice lungs were observed by HE staining at 24 and 48 hours after LPS treatment, then the alveolar septum damage, abnormal contraction, alveolar space hyperemia, and neutrophils or other inflammatory cells infiltration in the LPS group, but not in the control group, were observed. The expression of CD40 mRNA and CD40 protein molecules were higher in LPS group as compared to the control group by Northern blot and flow cytometry, respectively. Expression of Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4 in activated macrophage (AMΦ was higher in LPS group as compared to the control group by RT-PCR. The activation of NF-κB binding to NF-κB consensus oligos increased in LPS group by EMSA in macrophage. The concentrations of TNF-α, MIP-2, and IL-1β cytokines from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF were increased significantly in LPS group as compared to the control group by ELISA. The activation of AM and upregulation of costimulatory molecule CD40 induced all kinds of inflammatory cytokines releasing, then led to ALI. Therefore, both of them played vital role in the process of development of ALI.

  9. Communities on the move: Pedestrian-oriented zoning as a facilitator of adult active travel to work in the United States

    Jamie Friedman Chriqui

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Communities across the United States have been reforming their zoning codes to create pedestrian-friendly neighborhoods with increased street connectivity, mixed-use and higher density, open space, transportation infrastructure, and a traditional neighborhood structure. Zoning code reforms include new urbanist zoning such as the SmartCode, form-based codes, transects, transportation and pedestrian-oriented developments, and traditional neighborhood developments.Purpose: To examine the relationship of zoning code reforms and more active living-oriented zoning provisions with adult active travel to work via walking, biking, or by using public transit.Methods: Zoning codes effective as of 2010 were compiled for 3,914 municipal-level jurisdictions located in 471 counties and 2 consolidated cities in 48 states and the District of Columbia, and that collectively covered 72.9% of the U.S. population. Zoning codes were evaluated for the presence of code reform zoning and nine pedestrian-oriented zoning provisions (1=yes: sidewalks, crosswalks, bike-pedestrian connectivity, street connectivity, bike lanes, bike parking, bike-pedestrian trails/paths, mixed use development, and other walkability/pedestrian-orientation. A zoning scale reflected the number of provisions addressed (out of 10. Five continuous outcome measures were constructed using 2010-2014 American Community Survey municipal-level 5-year estimates to assess the percentage of workers: walking, biking, walking or biking, or taking public transit to work OR engaged in any active travel to work. Regression models controlled for municipal-level socioeconomic characteristics and a GIS-constructed walkability scale and were clustered on county with robust standard errors. Results: Adjusted models indicated that several pedestrian-oriented zoning provisions were statistically associated (p<.05 or lower with increased rates of walking, biking, or engaging in any active travel (walking

  10. Raman and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopic studies of specific, small molecule activator of histone acetyltransferase p300

    Kundu, Partha P.; Pavan Kumar, G. V.; Mantelingu, Kempegowda; Kundu, Tapas K.; Narayana, Chandrabhas

    2011-07-01

    We report for the first time, the Raman and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) studies of N-(4-chloro-3-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-2-ethoxy-benzamide (CTB). This molecule is specific activator of human histone acetyltransferase (HAT), p300, and serves as lead molecule to design anti-neoplastic therapeutics. A detailed Raman and SERS band assignments have been performed for CTB, which are compared with the density functional theory calculations. The observed red shift of N sbnd H stretching frequency from the computed wavenumber indicates the weakening of N sbnd H bond resulting from proton transfer to the neighboring oxygen atom. We observe Ag sbnd N vibrational mode at 234 cm -1 in SERS of CTB. This indicates there is a metal-molecule bond leading to chemical enhancement in SERS. We also observe, enhancement in the modes pertaining to substituted benzene rings and methyl groups. Based on SERS analysis we propose the adsorption sites and the orientation of CTB on silver surface.

  11. The time-dependent generalized active space configuration interaction approach to correlated ionization dynamics of diatomic molecules

    Bauch, S.; Larsson, H. R.; Hinz, C.; Bonitz, M.

    2016-03-01

    In this contribution, we review the time-dependent generalized-active-space configuration interaction (TD-GAS-CI) approach to the photoionization dynamics of atoms and molecules including electron correlation effects. It is based on the configuration interaction (CI) expansion of the many-body wave function and the restriction of the determinantal space to a reduced subspace. For its numerically efficient application to photoionization, a partially-rotated basis set is used which adopts features of a localized basis with a good reference description and a grid representation for escaping wave packets. After reviewing earlier applications of the theory, we address the strong-field ionization of a one-dimensional model of the four-electron LiH molecule using TD-GAS-CI and demonstrate the importance of electron-electron correlations in the ionization yield for different orientations of the molecule w.r.t the peak of the linearly polarized laser field. A pronounced orientation-dependent variation of the yield with the pulse duration and the level of considered electron-electron correlations is observed.

  12. Role of the primer activation signal in tRNA annealing onto the HIV-1 genome studied by single-molecule FRET microscopy

    N. Beerens (Nancy); M.D.E. Jepsen (Mette); V. Nechyporuk-Zloy (Volodymyr); A.C. Krüger (Asger); J.-L. Darlix (Jean-Luc); J. Kjems (Jørgen); V. Birkedal (Victoria)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractHIV-1 reverse transcription is primed by a cellular tRNAlys3 molecule that binds to the primer binding site (PBS) in the genomic RNA. An additional interaction between the tRNA molecule and the primer activation signal (PAS) is thought to regulate the initiation of reverse transcription.

  13. The range of excursion of flexor tendons in Zone V: a comparison of active vs passive flexion mobilisation regimes.

    Panchal, J

    1997-10-01

    A number of early postoperative mobilisation regimes have been developed in an attempt to increase tendon excursion and gliding and thereby reduce formation of adhesions following repair of flexor tendons. Early active flexion mobilisation regimes are becoming more popular, and have replaced early passive flexion regimes in many centres. The aim of the present study was: (a) to determine the range of excursion of flexor tendons in Zone V, and (b) to compare the excursion ranges between active (Belfast) and passive (modified Duran) flexion mobilisation regimes postoperatively. This was done (a) in two cadavers, and (b) in two patients intraoperatively, and postoperatively at 10 days, 3 weeks and 6 weeks. With passive flexion, the mean tendon excursion in Zone V in cadavers was 1 mm for flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS), flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) and flexor pollicis longus (FPL) tendons respectively. With simulated active flexion, the mean tendon excursion was 14 mm, 10 mm and 11 mm respectively. The mean tendon excursion in clinical cases intraoperatively following passive flexion was 2 mm for FDS, FDP and FPL respectively; following simulated active flexion it was 10 mm, 11 mm and 11 mm for FDS, FDP and FPL respectively. On the tenth day following repair, the mean excursions of FDS, FDP and FPL were 1 mm, 4 mm and 4 mm on passive flexion as compared to 3 mm, 10 mm and 12 mm on active flexion respectively. Three weeks postoperatively, the mean excursions of FDS, FDP and FPL tendons were 1 mm, 2 mm and 1 mm on passive flexion as compared to 5 mm, 15 mm on active flexion respectively. Six weeks postoperatively, the mean excursions of FDS, FDP and FPL tendons were 9 mm, 7 mm and 4 mm on passive flexion as compared to 12 mm, 33 mm and 20 mm on active flexion respectively. These results demonstrate an increased excursion of repaired flexor tendons in Zone V following an active flexion mobilisation regime as compared to a passive flexion mobilisation regime.

  14. A small molecule inhibitor for ATPase activity of Hsp70 and Hsc70 enhances the immune response to protein antigens

    Baek, Kyung-Hwa; Zhang, Haiying; Lee, Bo Ryeong; Kwon, Young-Guen; Ha, Sang-Jun; Shin, Injae

    2015-12-01

    The ATPase activities of Hsp70 and Hsc70 are known to be responsible for regulation of various biological processes. However, little is known about the roles of Hsp70 and Hsc70 in modulation of immune responses to antigens. In the present study, we investigated the effect of apoptozole (Az), a small molecule inhibitor of Hsp70 and Hsc70, on immune responses to protein antigens. The results show that mice administered with both protein antigen and Az produce more antibodies than those treated with antigen alone, showing that Az enhances immune responses to administered antigens. Treatment of mice with Az elicits production of antibodies with a high IgG2c/IgG1 ratio and stimulates the release of Th1 and Th2-type cytokines, suggesting that Az activates the Th1 and Th2 immune responses. The observations made in the present study suggest that inhibition of Hsp70 and Hsc70 activities could be a novel strategy designing small molecule-based adjuvants in protein vaccines.

  15. The Influence of the Nearest Environment of the Active Zone on the Power Pulse Dynamics in the IBR-2 Reactor

    Pepelyshev, Yu N

    2005-01-01

    An analysis of the IBR-2 reactor power pulse shape measured over the entire dynamic range of neutron flux variation (10$^{4})$, i.e., from the maximum pulse power to the background power between pulses, has been carried out. Three variants of the model describing the reactor dynamics during the power pulse have been investigated. The best approximation to the experimental data has been obtained by adding to the six equations describing the effect of delay neutrons on the power pulse of two analogous ones describing the effect of the neutrons reflected from the structural elements of the reactor. It is shown that the most probable source of additional groups of neutrons may be the neutron moderators enveloping the active zone as well as the elements of the biological concrete shielding that are closest to the active zone. These additional groups of neutrons influence essentially the formation of the power pulse.

  16. Activation of Relaxin Family Receptor 1 from Different Mammalian Species by Relaxin Peptide and Small-Molecule Agonist ML290

    Huang, Zaohua; Myhr, Courtney; Bathgate, Ross A. D.; Ho, Brian A.; Bueno, Amaya; Hu, Xin; Xiao, Jingbo; Southall, Noel; Barnaeva, Elena; Agoulnik, Irina U; Marugan, Juan J; Ferrer, Marc; Agoulnik, Alexander I.

    2015-01-01

    Relaxin peptide (RLN), which signals through the relaxin family peptide 1 (RXFP1) GPCR receptor, has shown therapeutic effects in an acute heart failure clinical trial. We have identified a small-molecule agonist of human RXFP1, ML290; however, it does not activate the mouse receptor. To find a suitable animal model for ML290 testing and to gain mechanistic insights into the interaction of various ligands with RXFP1, we have cloned rhesus macaque, pig, rabbit, and guinea pig RXFP1s and analyz...

  17. PdM (M = Pt, Au) bimetallic alloy nanowires with enhanced electrocatalytic activity for electro-oxidation of small molecules

    Zhu, Chengzhou; Guo, Shaojun; Dong, Shaojun [State Key Laboratory of Electroanalytical Chemistry, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun, Jilin, 130022 (China)

    2012-05-02

    A facile and general method has been developed to synthesize well-defined PdPt and PdAu alloy nanowires, which exhibit significantly enhanced activity towards small molecules, such as ethanol, methanol, and glucose electro-oxidation in an alkaline medium. Considering the important role of one-dimensional alloy nanowires in electrocatalytic systems, the present Pd-based alloy nanostructures could offer a promising new class of advanced electrocatalysts for direct alcohol fuel cells and electrochemical sensors. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  18. Single molecule activity measurements of cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase reveal the existence of two discrete functional states

    Laursen, Tomas; Singha, Aparajita; Rantzau, Nicolai;

    2014-01-01

    Electron transfer between membrane spanning oxi-doreductase enzymes crucially controls vital meta-bolic processes. Here we studied for the first time with single molecule resolution the function of P450 oxidoreductase (POR), the canonical membrane spanning activator of all microsomal cytochrome P......450 enzymes. Measurements and statistical analy-sis of individual catalytic turnover cycles shows POR to sample at least two major functional states. This phenotype may underlie regulatory interactions with different cytochromes P450 but to date remained masked in bulk kinetics. To ensure that we...

  19. Soluble Collectin-12 (CL-12) Is a Pattern Recognition Molecule Initiating Complement Activation via the Alternative Pathway

    Ma, Ying Jie; Hein, Estrid; Munthe-Fog, Lea;

    2015-01-01

    recognize Aspergillus fumigatus partially through the carbohydrate-recognition domain in a Ca(2+)-independent manner. This led to activation of the alternative pathway of complement exclusively via association with properdin on A. fumigatus as validated by detection of C3b deposition and formation of the...... terminal complement complex. These results demonstrate the existence of CL-12 in a soluble form and indicate a novel mechanism by which the alternative pathway of complement may be triggered directly by a soluble pattern-recognition molecule....

  20. In vitro antimicrobial activity of plants used in traditional medicine in Gurage and Silti Zones, south central Ethiopia

    Teka Sahile, Alemtshay; Rondevaldova, Johana; Asfaw, Zemede; Demissew, Sebsebe; Van Damme, Patrick; Kokoska, Ladislav; Vanhove, Wouter

    2015-01-01

    Background: To overcome the escalating problems associated with infectious diseases and drug resistance, discovery of new antimicrobials is crucial. The present study aimed to carry out in vitro antimicrobial analysis of 15 medicinal plant species selected according to their traditional medicinal uses in Gurage and Silti Zones, south central Ethiopia. Methods: Ethanol extracts of various plant parts were investigated for their antimicrobial activity against 20 bacterial and one yeast stra...

  1. High quality, small molecule-activity datasets for kinase research [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Rajan Sharma

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Kinases regulate cell growth, movement, and death. Deregulated kinase activity is a frequent cause of disease. The therapeutic potential of kinase inhibitors has led to large amounts of published structure activity relationship (SAR data. Bioactivity databases such as the Kinase Knowledgebase (KKB, WOMBAT, GOSTAR, and ChEMBL provide researchers with quantitative data characterizing the activity of compounds across many biological assays. The KKB, for example, contains over 1.8M kinase structure-activity data points reported in peer-reviewed journals and patents. In the spirit of fostering methods development and validation worldwide, we have extracted and have made available from the KKB 258K structure activity data points and 76K associated unique chemical structures across eight kinase targets. These data are freely available for download within this data note.

  2. CD26 surface molecule involvement in T cell activation and lymphokine synthesis in rheumatoid and other inflammatory synovitis.

    Gerli, R; Muscat, C; Bertotto, A; Bistoni, O; Agea, E; Tognellini, R; Fiorucci, G; Cesarotti, M; Bombardieri, S

    1996-07-01

    T cell surface expression and the functional role of CD26 antigen (Ag), a surface ectoenzyme involved in T cell activation and migration across the extracellular matrix, were analyzed in the peripheral blood (PB) and synovial fluid (SF) from patients with inflammatory arthritides. CD26 membrane expression on T cells was detected by cytofluorometry using two different monoclonal antibodies, anti-Ta1 and anti-1F7, while cell proliferation and both IL-2 and IFN-gamma production were evaluated in anti-CD3- or anti-CD2-stimulated cell cultures after Ag surface modulation with anti-1F7. The results showed that Ta1 and 1F7 Ag expression were increased on T cells from PB of patients with active, but not inactive, rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Most SF T cells from RA or other inflammatory arthritides displayed the memory marker CD45R0 and the Ta1 Ag, but lacked the 1F7 molecule. In addition, in vitro 1F7 modulation, which enhanced RA PB T cell proliferation and both IL-2 and IFN-gamma synthesis, did not synergize with anti-CD3 or anti-CD2 in inducing IL-2-dependent activation of SF T cells, but reduced IFN-gamma production. A spontaneous reappearance of 1F7 Ag on the SF T cell surface was seen after 2-5 days in culture. Phorbol myristate acetate, able to accelerate its reexpression, also restored a normal response of SF T cells to anti-1F7 comitogenic effects. These data confirm a role of the CD26 surface molecule in regulating T cell activation and lymphokine synthesis. This observation may have important implications in the regulation of T cell activity at the joint level during chronic inflammatory processes. PMID:8674237

  3. Synthesis and anti-tumor activity evaluation of rhein-aloe emodin hybrid molecule.

    Yuan, Ye-Fei; Hu, Xiang-Yu; He, Ying; Deng, Jia-Gang

    2012-02-01

    To improve the anti-tumor effects of rhein and aloe-emodin, a rhein-aloe-emodin hybrid molecule (RH-AE) was synthesized from rhein and aloe-emodin in the presence of dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCC) and 4-dimethylaminopyridine (DMAP). Chemical and spectroscopic methods, such as 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy, and HR-ESIMS were used for the structure identification of RH-AE. Using the cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) assay, the in vitro anti-tumor effects were compared between RH-AE, rhein and aloe-emodin on human hepatoma HepG2, human nasopharyngeal carcinoma CNE, human lung cancer NCI-H460, human ovarian cancer SK-OV-3, and human cervical cancer Hela cells. The results showed that the half inhibitory concentration (IC50) of RH-AE on HepG2, CNE, NCI-H460, SK-OV-3, and Hela cells were significantly lower than those of rhein and aloe-emodin. This showed that RH-AE has a better in vitro anti-tumor effect than rhein and aloe-emodin. PMID:22474959

  4. Single Molecule Instrument for Surface Enhanced Raman Optical Activity of Biomolecules Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Stereochemistry is an essential element of our organic life. Only certain enantiomers are useful as drugs for the human body. Raman Optical Activity (ROA) and...

  5. Single Molecule Instrument for Surface Enhanced Raman Optical Activity of Biomolecules Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Stereochemistry is an essential element of our organic life. Only certain enantiomers are useful as drugs for the human body. Raman optical activity (ROA) provides...

  6. Small molecule activators of pre-mRNA 3′ cleavage

    Ryan, Kevin; Khleborodova, Asya; Pan, Jingyi; Ryan, Xiaozhou P.

    2009-01-01

    3′ Cleavage and polyadenylation are obligatory steps in the biogenesis of most mammalian pre-mRNAs. In vitro reconstitution of the 3′ cleavage reaction from human cleavage factors requires high concentrations of creatine phosphate (CP), though how CP activates cleavage is not known. Previously, we proposed that CP might work by competitively inhibiting a cleavage-suppressing serine/threonine (S/T) phosphatase. Here we show that fluoride/EDTA, a general S/T phosphatase inhibitor, activates in ...

  7. Isolation and Molecular Characterization of Biofouling Bacteria and Profiling of Quorum Sensing Signal Molecules from Membrane Bioreactor Activated Sludge

    Harshad Lade

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The formation of biofilm in a membrane bioreactor depends on the production of various signaling molecules like N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs. In the present study, a total of 200 bacterial strains were isolated from membrane bioreactor activated sludge and screened for AHLs production using two biosensor systems, Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 and Agrobacterium tumefaciens A136. A correlation between AHLs production and biofilm formation has been made among screened AHLs producing strains. The 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed the dominance of Aeromonas and Enterobacter sp. in AHLs production; however few a species of Serratia, Leclercia, Pseudomonas, Klebsiella, Raoultella and Citrobacter were also identified. The chromatographic characterization of sludge extract showed the presence of a broad range of quorum sensing signal molecules. Further identification of sludge AHLs by thin layer chromatography bioassay and high performance liquid chromatography confirms the presence of C4-HSL, C6-HSL, C8-HSL, 3-oxo-C8-HSL, C10-HSL, C12-HSL, 3-oxo-C12-HSL and C14-HSL. The occurrence of AHLs in sludge extract and dominance of Aeromonas and Enterobacter sp. in activated sludge suggests the key role of these bacterial strains in AHLs production and thereby membrane fouling.

  8. Isolation and Molecular Characterization of Biofouling Bacteria and Profiling of Quorum Sensing Signal Molecules from Membrane Bioreactor Activated Sludge

    Lade, Harshad; Paul, Diby; Kweon, Ji Hyang

    2014-01-01

    The formation of biofilm in a membrane bioreactor depends on the production of various signaling molecules like N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs). In the present study, a total of 200 bacterial strains were isolated from membrane bioreactor activated sludge and screened for AHLs production using two biosensor systems, Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 and Agrobacterium tumefaciens A136. A correlation between AHLs production and biofilm formation has been made among screened AHLs producing strains. The 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed the dominance of Aeromonas and Enterobacter sp. in AHLs production; however few a species of Serratia, Leclercia, Pseudomonas, Klebsiella, Raoultella and Citrobacter were also identified. The chromatographic characterization of sludge extract showed the presence of a broad range of quorum sensing signal molecules. Further identification of sludge AHLs by thin layer chromatography bioassay and high performance liquid chromatography confirms the presence of C4-HSL, C6-HSL, C8-HSL, 3-oxo-C8-HSL, C10-HSL, C12-HSL, 3-oxo-C12-HSL and C14-HSL. The occurrence of AHLs in sludge extract and dominance of Aeromonas and Enterobacter sp. in activated sludge suggests the key role of these bacterial strains in AHLs production and thereby membrane fouling. PMID:24499972

  9. Modulation of Pantothenate Kinase 3 Activity by Small Molecules that Interact with the Substrate/Allosteric Regulatory Domain

    Leonardi, Roberta; Zhang, Yong-Mei; Yun, Mi-Kyung; Zhou, Ruobing; Zeng, Fu-Yue; Lin, Wenwei; Cui, Jimmy; Chen, Taosheng; Rock, Charles O.; White, Stephen W.; Jackowski, Suzanne (SJCH)

    2010-09-27

    Pantothenate kinase (PanK) catalyzes the rate-controlling step in coenzyme A (CoA) biosynthesis. PanK3 is stringently regulated by acetyl-CoA and uses an ordered kinetic mechanism with ATP as the leading substrate. Biochemical analysis of site-directed mutants indicates that pantothenate binds in a tunnel adjacent to the active site that is occupied by the pantothenate moiety of the acetyl-CoA regulator in the PanK3 acetyl-CoA binary complex. A high-throughput screen for PanK3 inhibitors and activators was applied to a bioactive compound library. Thiazolidinediones, sulfonylureas and steroids were inhibitors, and fatty acyl-amides and tamoxifen were activators. The PanK3 activators and inhibitors either stimulated or repressed CoA biosynthesis in HepG2/C3A cells. The flexible allosteric acetyl-CoA regulatory domain of PanK3 also binds the substrates, pantothenate and pantetheine, and small molecule inhibitors and activators to modulate PanK3 activity.

  10. Preliminary assessment of the nuclide migration from the activation zone around the proposed Spallation Neutron Source facility

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the potential impacts of migrating radionuclides from the activation zone around the proposed Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). Using conservatively high estimates of the potential inventory of radioactive activation products that could form in the proposed compacted-soil shield berm around an SNS facility on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), a conservative, simplified transport model was used to estimate the potential worst-case concentrations of the 12 long-lived isotopes in the groundwater under a site with the hydrologic characteristics of the ORR

  11. Long-Term Uplift in the Altiplano-Puna Neovolcanic Zone: Evidence of an Active Magmatic Diapir?

    Fialko, Y.; Pearse, J.

    2012-12-01

    We present InSAR observations of a long-term uplift in the Altiplano-Puna neovolcanic zone (central Andes, South America). Previous observations revealed a a massive Ultra Low Velocity Zone (ULVZ) at depth of 17-19 km (Zandt et al., 2003), and surface deformation that was attributed to Uturuncu, a dormant volcano in the middle of the Altiplano-Puna neovolcanic zone (Pritchard and Simons, 2002). Our time series analysis of combined data from different sensors (ERS-1/2 and ENVISAT), satellite tracks, and observation modes (fine beam and ScanSAR) reveals that the central uplift has persisted at a nearly constant rate of ~1 cm/yr over the last two decades, and is surrounded by a broad zone of subsidence. We use the satellite line-of-sight velocities from different look directions to constrain the depth and geometry of the inferred sources of magmatic unrest. Inversions based on elastic half-space models indicate that the inflation source is located well below the brittle-ductile transition, and likely resides at the depth of the seismically imaged ULVZ. We investigated the effects of inelastic deformation in the ambient crust using finite element models. The models incorporated laboratory-derived rheologies of the ambient crust, and geotherms appropriate for an active neo-volcanic zone such as the one in the Altiplano-Puna province. Based on a large number of numerical simulations constrained by the observed surface velocities, we conclude that the ongoing uplift and peripheral subsidence result from a large mid-crustal diapir fed by a partially molten source region in the middle crust. The observed pattern of surface deformation due to the Altiplano-Puna ULVZ is remarkably similar to that due to the Socorro Magma Body (SMB) in central New Mexico, USA (Pearse and Fialko, 2010), suggesting a common process. mosaic of the mean LOS velocity showing uplift and peripheral subsidence due to the inferred mid-crustal diapir.

  12. Phytohormones as Important Biologically Active Molecules – Their Simple Simultaneous Detection

    Ladislav Havel

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Phytohormones, their functions, synthesis and effects, are of great interest. To study them in plant tissues accurate and sensitive methods are required. In the present study we aimed at optimizing experimental conditions to separate and determine not only plant hormones but also their metabolites, by liquid chromatography coupled with a UV-VIS detector. The mixture we analyzed was composed of benzyladenine, kinetin, trans-zeatin, cis-zeatin, dihydrozeatin, meta-topolin, ortho-topolin, α-naphthalene acetic acid, indole-3-acetic acid, trans-zeatin-7-glucoside, trans-zeatin-O-glucoside, trans-zeatin-9-riboside, meta-topolin-9-riboside and ortho-topolin-9-riboside. We measured the calibration dependences and estimated limits of detection and quantification under the optimal chromatographic conditions (column: Polaris C18; mobile phase: gradient starting at 2:98 (methanol:0.001% TFA and was increasing to 55:45 during twenty minutes, and then decreasing for 10 min to 35:65, flow rate: 200 µL·min-1, temperature: 50 °C, wavelength: 210 nm. The detection limits for the target molecules were estimated as tens of ng per mL. We also studied the effect of flax extracts on the phytohormones’ signals. Recovery of aliphatic and aromatic cytokinins, metabolites of cytokinins and auxinswere within the range from 87 to 105 %. The experimental conditions were tested on a mass selective detector. In addition we analysed a commercial product used for stimulation of roots formation in cuttings of poorly rooting plants. The determined content of α-naphthalene acetic acid was in good agreement with that declared by the manufacturer.

  13. Evaluation of approximate measurements of activation-free-energy spectra of shear transformation zones in metallic glasses

    Ju, JongDoo [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Atzmon, Michael, E-mail: atzmon@umich.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • We simulate measured activation energy spectra for anelastic relaxation in metallic glasses. • Simulated spectra exhibit the same shape as earlier data obtained by temperature stepping. • The drop previously observed at high activation free energy is an artifact of the measurements. - Abstract: For many years, the only experimental activation free energy spectrum for shear transformations in metallic glasses had been obtained by quenching from high temperature during creep, followed by temperature stepping (Argon and Kuo, 1980). We show that the approximation associated with attributing a single activation energy to each temperature leads to an artificial drop in the spectrum at high activation energies. The detailed spectra of potential shear transformation zones we have recently obtained, which exhibit an atomically quantized hierarchy and are monotonic, lead to the same spectrum shape as obtained by Argon and Kuo when the approximation inherent to the temperature stepping method is applied.

  14. Small-molecule endothelin receptor antagonists: a review of patenting activity across therapeutic areas.

    Mucke, Hermann A M

    2009-06-01

    In the field of nonpeptide NCEs with endothelin receptor antagonist activity, a burst in corporate IP filings occurred in the 1990s once the human endothelin system had been characterized, but patent activity has declined in the past decade. Universities have not been active in this area of research to a degree that would have led to many patent applications. While three endothelin receptor antagonists (bosentan, sitaxentan and ambrisentan) are already available for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension, the use of such compounds for the larger therapy areas of heart failure, cancer and nephropathy is still being evaluated in late-stage clinical trials. Marketed and advanced-stage endothelin receptor blockers have remarkably little chemical diversity; thus, the substantially larger chemical space defined by patenting remains to be explored. PMID:19517317

  15. MS-1020 is a novel small molecule that selectively inhibits JAK3 activity

    Kim, Byung Hak; Oh, Sei-Ryang; Yin, Chang-Hong; Lee, Sangku; Kim, Eun-Ah; Kim, Min-Seok; Sandoval, Claudio; Jayabose, Somasundaram; Bach, Erika A.; Lee, Hyeong-Kyu; Baeg, Gyeong-Hun

    2009-01-01

    To identify JAK/STAT signaling inhibitors, we performed a cell-based high throughput screening using a plant extract library and identified Nb-(α-hydroxynaphthoyl)serotonin called MS-1020 as a novel JAK3 inhibitor. MS-1020 potently inhibited persistently-active STAT3 in a cell type-specific manner. Upon further examination, we found that MS-1020 selectively blocks constitutively-active JAK3. MS-1020 consistently suppressed IL-2-induced JAK3/STAT5 signaling but not prolactin-induced JAK2/STAT5...

  16. Involvement of Signaling Molecules on Na+/H+ Exchanger-1 Activity in Human Monocytes

    Sarigianni, Maria; Tsapas, Apostolos; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P; Kaloyianni, Martha; Koliakos, George; Paletas, Konstantinos

    2010-01-01

    Background: Sodium/hydrogen exchanger-1 (NHE-1) contributes to maintaining intracellular pH (pHi). We assessed the effect of glucose, insulin, leptin and adrenaline on NHE-1 activity in human monocytes in vitro. These cells play a role in atherogenesis and disturbances in the hormones evaluated are associated with obesity and diabetes. Methods and Results: Monocytes were isolated from 16 healthy obese and 10 lean healthy subjects. NHE-1 activity was estimated by measuring pHi with a fluoresce...

  17. Holocene activities of the Taigu fault zone,Shanxi Province, and their relations with the 1303 Hongdong M=8 earthquake

    谢新生; 江娃利; 王焕贞; 冯西英

    2004-01-01

    The Taigu fault zone is one of the major 12 active boundary faults of the Shanxi fault-depression system, locatedon the eastern boundary of the Jinzhong basin. As the latest investigation indicated, the fault zone had dislocatedgully terrace of the f1rst order, forming fault-scarp in front of the loess mesa. It has been discovered in many placesin ground surface and trenches that Holocene deposits were dislocated. The latest activity was the 1303 Hongdongearthquake M=8, the fault appeared as right-lateral strike-slip with normal faulting. During that earthquake, theTaigu fault together with the Mianshan western-side fault on the Lingshi upheaval and the Huoshan pediment faulton the eastern boundary of the Linfen basin was being active, forming a surface rupture belt of 160 km in length.Moreover, the Taigu fault were active in the mid-stage of Holocene and near 7 700 aB.P. From these we learnt that,in Shanxi fault-depression system, the run-through activity of two boundary faults of depression-basins mightgenerate great earthquake with M=8.

  18. Preconditioning of Carbon Monoxide Releasing Molecule-derived CO Attenuates LPS-induced Activation of HUVEC

    Bingwei Sun, Xiangqian Zou, Yueling Chen, Ping Zhang, Gengsheng Shi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the effects and potential mechanisms of preconditioning of tricarbonyldichlororuthenium (III dimer (CORM-2-liberated CO on LPS-induced activation of endothelial cells (HUVEC. Methods: HUVEC were pretreated with CORM-2 at the concentration of 50 or 100μM for 2 hrs, washed and stimulated with LPS (10μg/ml for additional 4 hrs. Activation (oxidative stress of HUVEC was assessed by measuring intracellular oxidation of DHR 123 or nitration of DAF-FM, specific H2O2 and NO fluorochromes, respectively. The expression of HO-1, iNOS (Western blot and ICAM-1 (cell ELISA proteins and activation of inflammation-relevant transcription factor, NF-κB (EMSA were assessed. In addition, PMN adhesion to HUVEC was also assessed. Results: The obtained data indicate that pretreatment of HUVEC with CORM-2 results in: 1 decrease of LPS-induced production of ROS and NO; 2 up-regulation of HO-1 but decrease in iNOS at the protein levels; 3 inhibition of LPS-induced activation of NF-κB; and 4 downregulation of expression of ICAM-1, and this was accompanied by a decrease of PMN adhesion to LPS-stimulated HUVEC. Conclusions: Preconditioning of CO liberated by CORM-2 elicited its anti-inflammatory effects by interfering with the induction of intracellular oxidative stress. In addition, it also supports the notion that CO is a potent inhibitor of iNOS and NF-κB.

  19. Time-dependent generalized-active-space configuration-interaction approach to photoionization dynamics of atoms and molecules

    Bauch, S.; Sørensen, L. K.; Madsen, L. B.

    2014-12-01

    We present a wave-function-based method to solve the time-dependent many-electron Schrödinger equation with special emphasis on strong-field ionization phenomena. The theory builds on the configuration-interaction (CI) approach supplemented by the generalized-active-space concept from quantum chemistry. The latter allows for a controllable reduction in the number of configurations in the CI expansion by imposing restrictions on the active orbital space. The method is similar to the recently formulated time-dependent restricted-active-space CI method [D. Hochstuhl and M. Bonitz, Phys. Rev. A 86, 053424 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevA.86.053424]. We present details of our implementation and address convergence properties with respect to the active spaces and the associated account of electron correlation in both ground-state and excitation scenarios. We apply the time-dependent generalized-active-space CI theory to strong-field ionization of polar diatomic molecules and illustrate how the method allows us to uncover a strong correlation-induced shift of the preferred direction of emission of photoelectrons.

  20. Dynamic fracturing by successive coseismic loadings leads to pulverization in active fault zones

    Aben, F. M.; Doan, M.-L.; Mitchell, T. M.; Toussaint, R.; Reuschlé, T.; Fondriest, M.; Gratier, J.-P.; Renard, F.

    2016-04-01

    Previous studies show that pulverized rocks observed along large faults can be created by single high-strain rate loadings in the laboratory, provided that the strain rate is higher than a certain pulverization threshold. Such loadings are analogous to large seismic events. In reality, pulverized rocks have been subject to numerous seismic events rather than one single event. Therefore, the effect of successive "milder" high-strain rate loadings on the pulverization threshold is investigated by applying loading conditions below the initial pulverization threshold. Single and successive loading experiments were performed on quartz-monzonite using a Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar apparatus. Damage-dependent petrophysical properties and elastic moduli were monitored by applying incremental strains. Furthermore, it is shown that the pulverization threshold can be reduced by successive "milder" dynamic loadings from strain rates of ~180 s-1 to ~90 s-1. To do so, it is imperative that the rock experiences dynamic fracturing during the successive loadings prior to pulverization. Combined with loading conditions during an earthquake rupture event, the following generalized fault damage zone structure perpendicular to the fault will develop: furthest from the fault plane, there is a stationary outer boundary that bounds a zone of dynamically fractured rocks. Closer to the fault, a pulverization boundary delimits a band of pulverized rock. Consecutive seismic events will cause progressive broadening of the band of pulverized rocks, eventually creating a wider damage zone observed in mature faults.

  1. Dermatan sulfate activates nuclear factor-κb and induces endothelial and circulating intercellular adhesion molecule-1

    Penc, Stanley F.; Pomahac, Bohdan; Eriksson, Elof; Detmar, Michael; Gallo, Richard L

    1999-01-01

    Proteoglycans (PGs) can influence cell behaviors through binding events mediated by their glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chains. This report demonstrates that chondroitin sulfate B, also known as dermatan sulfate (DS), a major GAG released during the inflammatory phase of wound repair, directly activates cells at the physiologic concentrations of DS found in wounds. Cultured human dermal microvascular endothelial cells exposed to DS responded with rapid nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-κB (NF...

  2. The Receptor for Activated C Kinase in Plant Signaling: Tale of a Promiscuous Little Molecule

    Islas-Flores, Tania; Rahman, Ahasanur; Ullah, Hemayet; Villanueva, Marco A.

    2015-01-01

    Two decades after the first report of the plant homolog of the Receptor for Activated C Kinase 1 (RACK1) in cultured tobacco BY2 cells, a significant advancement has been made in the elucidation of its cellular and molecular role. The protein is now implicated in many biological functions including protein translation, multiple hormonal responses, developmental processes, pathogen infection resistance, environmental stress responses, and miRNA production. Such multiple functional roles are co...

  3. Continuous monitoring of an active fault in a plate suture zone: a creepmeter study of the Chihshang Fault, eastern Taiwan

    Lee, J.-C.; Angelier, J.; Chu, H.-T.; Hu, J.-C.; Jeng, F.-S.

    2001-04-01

    Data from continuously monitored creepmeters across the active Chihshang Fault in eastern Taiwan are presented. The Chihshang Fault is an active segment of the Longitudinal Valley Fault, the main suture between the converging Philippine and Eurasian plates in Taiwan. Since the 1951 earthquake (Mw=7.0), no earthquake larger than magnitude 6.0 occurred in the Chihshang area. At least during the last 20 years, the Chihshang Fault underwent a steady creep movement, resulting in numerous fractures at the surface. Five creepmeters were installed in 1998 at two sites, Tapo and Chinyuan, within the Chihshang active fault zone. One-year results (from August 1998 to July 1999) show a horizontal shortening of 19.4±0.3 mm and 17.3±0.7 mm, at Tapo and Chinyuan, respectively. These annual shortening rates are in a good agreement with other estimates of strain rate independently obtained from geodetic measurements and geological site investigation. The creepmeter measurements were made on a daily basis, providing accurate information on the previously unknown evolution of creep during the year. The records of fault creep at the Tapo site thus revealed close seasonal correlation with average rainfall: the period of high creep rate coincides with the wet season, whereas that of low creep rate coincides with the dry season. Also, in comparison with the Tapo site, the creep behaviour as a function of time is complex at the Chinyuan site. Possible factors of irregularity are under investigation (thermal effect acting on the concrete basement of the creepmeters, earth tide effect, water table variations in a nearby rice field, and rainfall). The comparison between GPS measurements across the Longitudinal Valley (31 mm/year of horizontal displacement) and the creepmeter measurement across the Chihshang Fault zone (17-19 mm/year of horizontal displacement) suggests that there exists other shortening deformation across the active fault zone in addition to those we have measured from the

  4. A novel molecule integrating therapeutic and diagnostic activities reveals multiple aspects of stem cell-based therapy.

    Hingtgen, Shawn D; Kasmieh, Randa; van de Water, Jeroen; Weissleder, Ralph; Shah, Khalid

    2010-04-01

    Stem cells are promising therapeutic delivery vehicles; however pre-clinical and clinical applications of stem cell-based therapy would benefit significantly from the ability to simultaneously determine therapeutic efficacy and pharmacokinetics of therapies delivered by engineered stem cells. In this study, we engineered and screened numerous fusion variants that contained therapeutic (TRAIL) and diagnostic (luciferase) domains designed to allow simultaneous investigation of multiple events in stem cell-based therapy in vivo. When various stem cell lines were engineered with the optimized molecule, SRL(O)L(2)TR, diagnostic imaging showed marked differences in the levels and duration of secretion between stem cell lines, while the therapeutic activity of the molecule showed the different secretion levels translated to significant variability in tumor cell killing. In vivo, simultaneous diagnostic and therapeutic monitoring revealed that stem cell-based delivery significantly improved pharmacokinetics and anti-tumor effectiveness of the therapy compared to intravenous or intratumoral delivery. As treatment for highly malignant brain tumor xenografts, tracking SRL(O)L(2)TR showed stable stem cell-mediated delivery significantly regressed peripheral and intracranial tumors. Together, the integrated diagnostic and therapeutic properties of SRL(O)L(2)TR answer critical questions necessary for successful utilization of stem cells as novel therapeutic vehicles. PMID:20127797

  5. Assessment of glycosylation-dependent cell adhesion molecule 1 as a correlate of allergen-stimulated lymph node activation

    Early changes in gene expression have been identified by cDNA microarray technology. Analysis of draining auricular lymph node tissue sampled at 48 h following exposure to the potent contact allergen 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene (DNFB) provided examples of up- and down-regulated genes, including onzin and guanylate binding protein 2, and glycosylation-dependent cell adhesion molecule 1 (GlyCAM-1), respectively. Allergen-induced changes in these three genes were confirmed in dose-response and kinetic analyses using Northern blotting and/or reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction techniques. The results confirmed that these genes are robust and relatively sensitive markers of early changes provoked in the lymph node by contact allergen. Upon further investigation, it was found that altered expression of the adhesion molecule GlyCAM-1 was not restricted to treatment with DNFB. Topical sensitization of mice to a chemically unrelated contact allergen, oxazolone, was also associated with a decrease in the expression of mRNA for GlyCAM-1. Supplementary experiments revealed that changes in expression of this gene are independent of the stimulation by chemical allergens of proliferative responses by draining lymph node cells. Taken together these data indicate that the expression of GlyCAM-1 is down-regulated rapidly following epicutaneous treatment of mice with chemical allergens, but that this reduction is associated primarily with changes in lymph node cell number, or some other aspect of lymph node activation, rather than proliferation

  6. Diversity and dynamics of active microbial eukaryotes in the anoxic zone of a freshwater meromictic lake (Pavin, France

    CECILE eLEPERE

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Microbial eukaryotes play a crucial role in ecosystem functioning and oxygen is considered to be one of the strongest barriers against their local dispersal. However, diversity of microbial eukaryotes in freshwater habitats with oxygen gradients has previously received very little attention. We applied high-throughput sequencing (V4 region of the 18S rRNA gene in conjunction with quantitative PCR (DNA and RNA and fluorescent in situ hybridization analyses, to provide an unique spatio-temporal analysis of microbial eukaryotes diversity and potential activity in a meromictic freshwater lake (lake Pavin. This study revealed a high genetic diversity of unicellular eukaryotes in the permanent anoxic zone of lake Pavin and allowed the discrimination of active vs. inactive components. 42 % of the OTUs (Operational taxonomic Units are exclusively present in the monimolimnion, where Alveolata (Ciliophora and Dinophyceae and Fungi (Dikarya and Chytrids are the most active phyla and are probably represented by species capable of anaerobic metabolism. Pigmented eukaryotes (Haptophyceae and Chlorophyceae are also present and active in this zone, which opens up questions regarding their metabolism.

  7. Diversity and Dynamics of Active Small Microbial Eukaryotes in the Anoxic Zone of a Freshwater Meromictic Lake (Pavin, France)

    Lepère, Cécile; Domaizon, Isabelle; Hugoni, Mylène; Vellet, Agnès; Debroas, Didier

    2016-01-01

    Microbial eukaryotes play a crucial role in ecosystem functioning and oxygen is considered to be one of the strongest barriers against their local dispersal. However, diversity of microbial eukaryotes in freshwater habitats with oxygen gradients has previously received very little attention. We applied high-throughput sequencing (V4 region of the 18S rRNA gene) in conjunction with quantitative PCR (DNA and RNA) and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses, to provide an unique spatio-temporal analysis of microbial eukaryotes diversity and potential activity in a meromictic freshwater lake (lake Pavin). This study revealed a high genetic diversity of unicellular eukaryotes in the permanent anoxic zone of lake Pavin and allowed the discrimination of active vs. inactive components. Forty-two percent of the OTUs (Operational Taxonomic Units) are exclusively present in the monimolimnion, where Alveolata (Ciliophora and Dinophyceae) and Fungi (Dikarya and Chytrids) are the most active phyla and are probably represented by species capable of anaerobic metabolism. Pigmented eukaryotes (Haptophyceae and Chlorophyceae) are also present and active in this zone, which opens up questions regarding their metabolism. PMID:26904006

  8. Counteracting Interactions between Lipopolysaccharide Molecules with Differential Activation of Toll-Like Receptors

    Hajishengallis, George; Martin, Michael; Schifferle, Robert E.; Genco, Robert J.

    2002-01-01

    We investigated counteracting interactions between the lipopolysaccharides (LPS) from Escherichia coli (Ec-LPS) and Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg-LPS), which induce cellular activation through Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and TLR2, respectively. We found that Ec-LPS induced tolerance in THP-1 cells to subsequent tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β) induction by Pg-LPS, though the reverse was not true, and looked for explanatory differential effects on the signal tr...

  9. Identification of Quorum-Sensing Signal Molecules and a Biosynthetic Gene in Alicycliphilus sp. Isolated from Activated Sludge.

    Morohoshi, Tomohiro; Okutsu, Noriya; Xie, Xiaonan; Ikeda, Tsukasa

    2016-01-01

    Activated sludge is a complicated mixture of various microorganisms that is used to treat sewage and industrial wastewater. Many bacteria produce N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL) as a quorum-sensing signal molecule to regulate the expression of the exoenzymes used for wastewater treatment. Here, we isolated an AHL-producing bacteria from an activated sludge sample collected from an electronic component factory, which we named Alicycliphilus sp. B1. Clone library analysis revealed that Alicycliphilus was a subdominant genus in this sample. When we screened the activated sludge sample for AHL-producing strains, 12 of 14 the AHL-producing isolates were assigned to the genus Alicycliphilus. A putative AHL-synthase gene, ALISP_0667, was cloned from the genome of B1 and transformed into Escherichia coli DH5α. The AHLs were extracted from the culture supernatants of the B1 strain and E. coli DH5α cells harboring the ALISP_0667 gene and were identified by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry as N-(3-hydroxydecanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone and N-(3-hydroxydodecanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone. The results of comparative genomic analysis suggested that the quorum-sensing genes in the B1 strain might have been acquired by horizontal gene transfer within activated sludge. PMID:27490553

  10. Time-dependent generalized-active-space configuration-interaction approach to photoionization dynamics of atoms and molecules

    Bauch, Sebastian; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2014-01-01

    We present a wave-function based method to solve the time-dependent many-electron Schr\\"odinger equation (TDSE) with special emphasis on strong-field ionization phenomena. The theory builds on the configuration-interaction (CI) approach supplemented by the generalized-active-space (GAS) concept from quantum chemistry. The latter allows for a controllable reduction in the number of configurations in the CI expansion by imposing restrictions on the active orbital space. The method is similar to the recently formulated time-dependent restricted-active-space (TD-RAS) CI method [D. Hochstuhl, and M. Bonitz, Phys. Rev. A 86, 053424 (2012)]. We present details of our implementation and address convergence properties with respect to the active spaces and the associated account of electron correlation in both ground state and excitation scenarios. We apply the TD-GASCI theory to strong-field ionization of polar diatomic molecules and illustrate how the method allows us to uncover a strong correlation-induced shift of ...

  11. Activation of cord T lymphocytes. IV. Analysis of surface expression and functional role of 1F7 (CD26) molecule.

    Gerli, R; Agea, E; Muscat, C; Ercolani, R; Bistoni, O; Tognellini, R; Mariggió, M A; Spinozzi, F; Bertotto, A

    1994-04-15

    A role for CD26 surface antigen (Ag) in both CD3- and CD2-mediated T cell activation has been previously demonstrated. To analyze the functional role of CD26 in the CD3- and CD2-induced activation pathways of cord T cells, which represent the most reliable source of Ag-unprimed T cells, we employed a newly developed anti-CD26 monoclonal antibody, termed anti-1F7, anti-CD3 and anti-CD2 in activating T lymphocytes. The results showed that CD26 Ag is expressed on the surface of almost all resting cord T cells and that its fluorescence intensity is enhanced by activation. The binding of anti-1F7 induced a decrease in CD26 membrane expression, with no detectable effect on the surface expression of other cord T cell-related molecules. Moreover, the modulation of CD26 resulted in an increase in anti-CD3-mediated cord T cell activation through an enhancement in intracellular calcium levels, IL-2 receptor expression, and IL-2 synthesis, whereas it had no effect on cord T cell activation induced by anti-CD2 or anti-CD2 plus exogenous IL-2. The fact that the selective involvement of CD26 in the activation pathway triggered by anti-CD3, but not anti-CD2, could be reversed by prior stimulation of cord T cells with anti-CD3 suggests that this functional feature, which resembles that of mature thymocytes, may be linked to the Ag-unprimed cell phenotype of cord T lymphocytes. PMID:7909498

  12. Phosphate Activation via Reduced Oxidation State Phosphorus (P). Mild Routes to Condensed-P Energy Currency Molecules

    Claire R. Cousins; Pasek, Matthew A.; Zachary D. Atlas; Nichola E. Cosgrove; Marriott, Katie E. R.; Barry Herschy; David E. Bryant; Kee, Terence P.

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of mechanisms for phosphorylating organic and inorganic molecules is a key step en route to the earliest living systems. At the heart of all contemporary biochemical systems reside reactive phosphorus (P) molecules (such as adenosine triphosphate, ATP) as energy currency molecules to drive endergonic metabolic processes and it has been proposed that a predecessor of such molecules could have been pyrophosphate [P2O7 4−; PPi(V)]. Arguably the most geologically plausible route to ...

  13. Neural cell adhesion molecule-stimulated neurite outgrowth depends on activation of protein kinase C and the Ras-mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway

    Kolkova, K; Novitskaya, V; Pedersen, N;

    2000-01-01

    ), protein kinase C (PKC), and the Ras-mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase pathway. This was done using a coculture system consisting of PC12-E2 cells grown on fibroblasts, with or without NCAM expression, allowing NCAM-NCAM interactions resulting in neurite outgrowth. PC12-E2 cells were transiently......The signal transduction pathways associated with neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM)-induced neuritogenesis are only partially characterized. We here demonstrate that NCAM-induced neurite outgrowth depends on activation of p59(fyn), focal adhesion kinase (FAK), phospholipase Cgamma (PLCgamma...... transfected with expression plasmids encoding constitutively active forms of Ras, Raf, MAP kinase kinases MEK1 and 2, dominant negative forms of Ras and Raf, and the FAK-related nonkinase. Alternatively, PC12-E2 cells were submitted to treatment with antibodies to the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) receptor...

  14. Solid state photon upconversion utilizing thermally activated delayed fluorescence molecules as triplet sensitizer

    Wu, Tony C.; Congreve, Daniel N.; Baldo, Marc A., E-mail: baldo@mit.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2015-07-20

    The ability to upconvert light is useful for a range of applications, from biological imaging to solar cells. But modern technologies have struggled to upconvert incoherent incident light at low intensities. Here, we report solid state photon upconversion employing triplet-triplet exciton annihilation in an organic semiconductor, sensitized by a thermally activated-delayed fluorescence (TADF) dye. Compared to conventional phosphorescent sensitizers, the TADF dye maximizes the wavelength shift in upconversion due to its small singlet-triplet splitting. The efficiency of energy transfer from the TADF dye is 9.1%, and the conversion yield of sensitizer exciton pairs to singlet excitons in the annihilator is 1.1%. Our results demonstrate upconversion in solid state geometries and with non-heavy metal-based sensitizer materials.

  15. The use of semiempirical quantum chemical methods in studying the properties of large series of biologically active molecules

    In this work, the productivity (temporal characteristics) of the so-called Electron Topological Method (ETM) proposed for the structure-activity relationships (SAR) investigation is studied. The method is standing aside the methods proposed for quantitative SAR (QSAR) studies because of the essential difference in the languages chosen for the compound structures description. ETM uses Electron Topological Matrices of Contiguity (ETMC) that include the most comprehensive data on the electronic structure of compounds and their topology. The flexibility of real molecules is taken into account in terms of two parameters, Δ1 and Δ2, that characterise the accuracy allowed for atomic properties (diagonal matrix elements) and for bonds (non-diagonal ones). The dependence of the feature realisation on different values of Δ1 and Δ2 is studied and its graphical representation is given

  16. HLA-DR molecules enhance signal transduction through the CD3/Ti complex in activated T cells

    Odum, Niels; Martin, P J; Schieven, G L;

    1991-01-01

    Crosslinking HLA-DR molecules by monoclonal antibodies (mAb) induces protein tyrosine phosphorylation and results in a secondary elevation of free cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in activated human T cells. Here we have studied the effect of DR on CD3-induced signal transduction in...... allospecific T-cell clones and T-leukemia (HUT78) cells. Co-crosslinking of DR with CD3 produced an enhanced [Ca2+]i response compared to that seen with CD3 alone. In contrast, CD2 responses were not enhanced by co-crosslinking with DR. Co-crosslinking CD45 in a tri-molecular complex of CD45, CD3, and DR...

  17. A target-based high throughput screen yields Trypanosoma brucei hexokinase small molecule inhibitors with antiparasitic activity.

    Elizabeth R Sharlow

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The parasitic protozoan Trypanosoma brucei utilizes glycolysis exclusively for ATP production during infection of the mammalian host. The first step in this metabolic pathway is mediated by hexokinase (TbHK, an enzyme essential to the parasite that transfers the gamma-phospho of ATP to a hexose. Here we describe the identification and confirmation of novel small molecule inhibitors of bacterially expressed TbHK1, one of two TbHKs expressed by T. brucei, using a high throughput screening assay. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Exploiting optimized high throughput screening assay procedures, we interrogated 220,233 unique compounds and identified 239 active compounds from which ten small molecules were further characterized. Computation chemical cluster analyses indicated that six compounds were structurally related while the remaining four compounds were classified as unrelated or singletons. All ten compounds were approximately 20-17,000-fold more potent than lonidamine, a previously identified TbHK1 inhibitor. Seven compounds inhibited T. brucei blood stage form parasite growth (0.03activity. None of the compounds displayed structural similarity to known hexokinase inhibitors or human African trypanosomiasis therapeutics. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The novel chemotypes identified here could represent leads for future therapeutic development against the African trypanosome.

  18. Simulation of Thermopower Influence on Fuel Core of Power Rod in Nuclear Power Plant (NPP Active Zone

    I. S. Kulikov

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers problems of modern methods for  calculation of designs and materials of nuclear power. A model of numerical analysis for stress-strain state of fuel pins in the NPP active zone is proposed in the paper. The paper contains simulation concerning a fuel core section of a nuclear reactor heat-generating element with subsequent solution of a temperature and thermoelastic problem in computer program complex FEA ANSYS Workbench 11.0. All the obtained results have passed through checking procedure.

  19. Late Quaternary Activity and Seismogenic Potential of the Gonave Microplate: Plantain Garden Strike-Slip Fault Zone of Eastern Jamaica

    Mann, P.; Prentice, C.; King, W.; Demets, C.; Wiggins-Grandison, M.; Benford, B.

    2008-12-01

    At the longitude of Jamaica, Caribbean (Carib)-North America (Noam) plate motion of 19 ± 2 mm/a is carried by two parallel, left-lateral strike-slip faults, the Oriente fault zone, immediately south of Cuba, and the Enriquillo-Plantain Garden fault zone (EPGFZ), which lies 100-150 km further south. It has been postulated that the lithosphere between these faults constitutes an independent Gonave microplate that has formed in response to the ongoing collision between the leading edge of Carib in Hispaniola and the Bahama carbonate platform. GPS measurements in Jamaica and Hispanola is supportive of the microplate hypothesis and indicates that roughly half of Carib-Noam plate motion (8-14 mm/a) is carried by the EPGFZ of southern Hispaniola and eastern Jamaica. This study applies geomorphic and paleoseismic methods as a direct test of the activity and amount of microplate motion carried on the Plantain Garden fault segment of eastern Hispaniola and how this motion is distributed across a large restraining bend that has formed the island of Jamaica since the late Miocene. The EPFZ curves gently to the northeast and forming a steep mountain front to the Blue Mountains restraining bend with elevations up to 2200 m. Geomorphic fault-related features along the mountain front fault zone include left-laterally deflected rivers and streams, but no small scale features indicative of Holocene activity. River and stream deflections range from 0.1 to 0.5 km. We identified and trenched the most active trace of the mountain front fault at the Morant River where the fault is characterized by a 1.5-m-wide sub-vertical fault zone juxtaposing sheared alluvium and fault Cretaceous basement rocks This section is overlain by a 6-m-thick fluvial terrace. Trenching in the unfaulted terrace immediately overlying the fault trace revealed radiocarbon and OSL ages ranging from 20 to 21 ka that are consistent with a prominent unfaulted alluvial fan along the projection of this fault 1.5 km to

  20. High-resolution water column survey to identify active sublacustrine hydrothermal discharge zones within Lake Rotomahana, North Island, New Zealand

    Walker, Sharon L.; de Ronde, Cornel E. J.; Fornari, Daniel; Tivey, Maurice A.; Stucker, Valerie K.

    2016-03-01

    Autonomous underwater vehicles were used to conduct a high-resolution water column survey of Lake Rotomahana using temperature, pH, turbidity, and oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) to identify active hydrothermal discharge zones within the lake. Five areas with active sublacustrine venting were identified: (1) the area of the historic Pink Terraces; (2) adjacent to the western shoreline subaerial "Steaming Cliffs," boiling springs and geyser; (3) along the northern shoreline to the east of the Pink Terrace site; (4) the newly discovered Patiti hydrothermal system along the south margin of the 1886 Tarawera eruption rift zone; and (5) a location in the east basin (northeast of Patiti Island). The Pink Terrace hydrothermal system was active prior to the 1886 eruption of Mount Tarawera, but venting along the western shoreline, in the east basin, and the Patiti hydrothermal system appear to have been initiated in the aftermath of the eruption, similar to Waimangu Valley to the southwest. Different combinations of turbidity, pH anomalies (both positive and negative), and ORP responses suggest vent fluid compositions vary over short distances within the lake. The seasonal period of stratification limits vertical transport of heat to the surface layer and the hypolimnion temperature of Lake Rotomahana consequently increases with an average warming rate of ~ 0.010 °C/day due to both convective hydrothermal discharge and conductive geothermal heating. A sudden temperature increase occurred during our 2011 survey and was likely the response to an earthquake swarm just 11 days prior.

  1. Update on the Pathophysiological Activities of the Cardiac Molecule Cardiotrophin-1 in Obesity

    Mohamed Asrih

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiotrophin-1 (CT-1 is a heart-targeting cytokine that has been reported to exert a variety of activities also in other organs such as the liver, adipose tissue, and atherosclerotic arteries. CT-1 has been shown to induce these effects via binding to a transmembrane receptor, comprising the leukaemia inhibitory factor receptor (LIFRβ subunit and the glycoprotein 130 (gp130, a common signal transducer. Both local and systemic concentrations of CT-1 have been shown to potentially play a critical role in obesity. For instance, CT-1 plasma concentrations have been shown to be increased in metabolic syndrome (a cluster disease including obesity probably due to adipose tissue overexpression. Interestingly, treatment with exogenous CT-1 has been shown to improve lipid and glucose metabolism in animal models of obesity. These benefits might suggest a potential therapeutic role for CT-1. However, beyond its beneficial properties, CT-1 has been also shown to induce some adverse effects, such as cardiac hypertrophy and adipose tissue inflammation. Although scientific evidence is still needed, CT-1 might be considered as a potential example of damage/danger-associated molecular pattern (DAMP in obesity-related cardiovascular diseases. In this narrative review, we aimed at discussing and updating evidence from basic research on the pathophysiological and potential therapeutic roles of CT-1 in obesity.

  2. Incipient Crustal Stretching across AN Active Collision Belt: the Case of the Siculo-Calabrian Rift Zone (central Mediterranean)

    Catalano, S.; Tortorici, G.; Romagnoli, G.; Pavano, F.

    2012-12-01

    In the Central Mediterranean, the differential roll-back of the subducting Nubia Plate caused the Neogene-Quaternary extrusion of the Calabrian arc onto the oceanic Ionian slab, and the opening of the oceanic Tyrrhenian Basin, in the overriding Eurasia Plate. The differential motion at the edges of the arc was largely accommodated along transform faults that propagated across the orogenic belt. Since the Late Quaternary, the southern edge of the arc has been replaced by the roughly N-S oriented Siculo-Calabrian Rift Zone (SCRZ) that formed as the NNW-directed normal faults of NE Sicily, crossing the orogenic belt, have linked the NNE-oriented Tyrrhenian margin of southern Calabria with the NNW-trending Africa-Ionian boundary of southeastern Sicily. Our study focused on the Sicily shoulder of the SCRZ, where the transition zone between the extensional belt and the still active Nubia-Eurasia convergent margin is characterized by two distinct mobile crustal wedges, both lying on an upwarped Mantle, where a re-orientations of the σ1 is combined with volcanism (e.g. Etna, Aeolian islands) and a huge tectonic uplift. In southeastern Sicily, the Hyblean-Etnean region evolved, since about 0.85 Ma, as an indipendent crustal wedge, moving towards the NNW and pointing to the active Mt. Etna volcano. A local ENE crustal stretching accompanied the traslation of the block and pre-dated the ESE-oriented extension governing the propagation of the southernmost branch of the SCR, which started at about 330 ka B.P.. Similarly, the Peloritani-Aeolian region, flanked by the 125 ka-old NE-Sicily branch of the rift zone, represents a mostly submerged crustal wedge that migrates towards the NE, diverging from the rest of the Sicily collision zone and pointing to the Stromboli volcano. The Peloritani-Aeolian block is characterized by the occurrence of a wide central NE-oriented collapsed basin contoured by an actively uplifting region, whose tectonic boundaries are evidenced by a sharp

  3. The small molecule NS11021 is a potent and specific activator of Ca2+-activated big-conductance K+ channels

    Bentzen, Bo Hjorth; Nardi, Antonio; Calloe, Kirstine;

    2007-01-01

    . Single-channel analysis revealed that NS11021 increased the open probability of the channel by altering gating kinetics without affecting the single-channel conductance. NS11021 (10 microM) influenced neither a number of cloned Kv channels nor endogenous Na(+) and Ca(2+) channels (L- and T-type) in...... guinea pig cardiac myocytes. In conclusion, NS11021 is a novel KCa1.1 channel activator with better specificity and a 10 times higher potency compared with the most broadly applied KCa1.1 opener, NS1619. Thus, NS11021 might be a valuable tool compound when addressing the physiological and......Large-conductance Ca(2+)- and voltage-activated K(+) channels (Kca1.1/BK/MaxiK) are widely expressed ion channels. They provide a Ca(2+)-dependent feedback mechanism for the regulation of various body functions such as blood flow, neurotransmitter release, uresis, and immunity. In addition, a...

  4. Detrmination of the Si-Pin Detector Active Zone Thickness Using Analytic Line Intensity Wavelength Dependence of the Single-Component Standards

    А.А. Mamaluy

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The simple procedure of the detector active zone thickness determination is proposed, in which the fluxes of fluorescent radiation analytical lines from single-component samples excited by monochromatic radiation of a secondary radiator are used as the known fluxes. The superposition of experimental and calculated curves of the analytical line intensity versus the wavelength allows determination of the active zone thickness d = 170 μm with an accuracy of ± 10 μm.

  5. Increased Autoreactivity of the Complement-Activating Molecule Mannan-Binding Lectin in a Type 1 Diabetes Model

    Jakob Appel Østergaard

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Diabetic kidney disease is the leading cause of end-stage renal failure despite intensive treatment of modifiable risk factors. Identification of new drug targets is therefore of paramount importance. The complement system is emerging as a potential new target. The lectin pathway of the complement system, initiated by the carbohydrate-recognition molecule mannan-binding lectin (MBL, is linked to poor kidney prognosis in diabetes. We hypothesized that MBL activates complement upon binding within the diabetic glomerulus. Methods. We investigated this by comparing complement deposition and activation in kidneys from streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice and healthy control mice. Results. After 20 weeks of diabetes, glomerular deposition of MBL was significantly increased. Diabetic animals had 2.0-fold higher (95% CI 1.6–2.5 immunofluorescence intensity from anti-MBL antibodies compared with controls (P<0.001. Diabetes and control groups did not differ in glomerular immunofluorescence intensity obtained by antibodies against complement factors C4, C3, and C9. However, the circulating complement activation product C3a was increased in diabetes as compared to control mice (P=0.04. Conclusion. 20 weeks of diabetes increased MBL autoreactivity in the kidney and circulating C3a concentration. Together with previous findings, these results indicate direct effects of MBL within the kidney in diabetes.

  6. Increased Autoreactivity of the Complement-Activating Molecule Mannan-Binding Lectin in a Type 1 Diabetes Model

    Østergaard, Jakob Appel; Ruseva, Marieta Milkova; Malik, Talat Habib; Hoffmann-Petersen, Ingeborg Torp; Pickering, Matthew Caleb; Thiel, Steffen; Hansen, Troels Krarup

    2016-01-01

    Background. Diabetic kidney disease is the leading cause of end-stage renal failure despite intensive treatment of modifiable risk factors. Identification of new drug targets is therefore of paramount importance. The complement system is emerging as a potential new target. The lectin pathway of the complement system, initiated by the carbohydrate-recognition molecule mannan-binding lectin (MBL), is linked to poor kidney prognosis in diabetes. We hypothesized that MBL activates complement upon binding within the diabetic glomerulus. Methods. We investigated this by comparing complement deposition and activation in kidneys from streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice and healthy control mice. Results. After 20 weeks of diabetes, glomerular deposition of MBL was significantly increased. Diabetic animals had 2.0-fold higher (95% CI 1.6–2.5) immunofluorescence intensity from anti-MBL antibodies compared with controls (P < 0.001). Diabetes and control groups did not differ in glomerular immunofluorescence intensity obtained by antibodies against complement factors C4, C3, and C9. However, the circulating complement activation product C3a was increased in diabetes as compared to control mice (P = 0.04). Conclusion. 20 weeks of diabetes increased MBL autoreactivity in the kidney and circulating C3a concentration. Together with previous findings, these results indicate direct effects of MBL within the kidney in diabetes. PMID:26977416

  7. The Receptor for Activated C Kinase in Plant Signaling: Tale of a Promiscuous Little Molecule

    Tania Islas Flores

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Two decades after the first report of the plant homologue of the Receptor for Activated C Kinase 1 (RACK1 in cultured tobacco BY2 cells, a significant advancement has been made in the elucidation of its celular and molecular role. The protein is now implicated in many biological functions including protein translation, multiple hormonal responses, developmental processes, pathogen infection resistance, environmental stress responses, and miRNA production. Such multiple functional roles are consistent with the scaffolding nature of the plant RACK1 protein. A significant advance was achieved when the β-propeller structure of the Arabidopsis RACK1A isoform was elucidated, thus revealing that its conserved seven WD repeats also assembled into this typical topology. From its crystal structure, it became apparent that it shares the structural platform for the interaction with ligands identified in other systems such as mammals. Although RACK1 proteins maintain conserved Protein Kinase C binding sites, the lack of a bona fide PKC adds complexity and enigma to the nature of the ligand partners with which RACK1 interacts in plants. Nevertheless, ligands recently identified using the split-ubiquitin based and conventional yeast two-hybrid assays, have revealed that plant RACK1 is involved in several processes that include defense response, drought and salt stress, ribosomal function, cell wall biogenesis, and photosynthesis. The information acquired indicates that, in spite of the high degree of conservation of its structure, the functions of the plant RACK1 homologue appear to be distinct and diverse from those in yeast, mammals, insects, etc. In this review, we take a critical look at the novel information regarding the many functions in which plant RACK1 has been reported to participate, with a special emphasis on the information on its currently identified and missing ligand partners.

  8. The Receptor for Activated C Kinase in Plant Signaling: Tale of a Promiscuous Little Molecule.

    Islas-Flores, Tania; Rahman, Ahasanur; Ullah, Hemayet; Villanueva, Marco A

    2015-01-01

    Two decades after the first report of the plant homolog of the Receptor for Activated C Kinase 1 (RACK1) in cultured tobacco BY2 cells, a significant advancement has been made in the elucidation of its cellular and molecular role. The protein is now implicated in many biological functions including protein translation, multiple hormonal responses, developmental processes, pathogen infection resistance, environmental stress responses, and miRNA production. Such multiple functional roles are consistent with the scaffolding nature of the plant RACK1 protein. A significant advance was achieved when the β-propeller structure of the Arabidopsis RACK1A isoform was elucidated, thus revealing that its conserved seven WD repeats also assembled into this typical topology. From its crystal structure, it became apparent that it shares the structural platform for the interaction with ligands identified in other systems such as mammals. Although RACK1 proteins maintain conserved Protein Kinase C binding sites, the lack of a bona fide PKC adds complexity and enigma to the nature of the ligand partners with which RACK1 interacts in plants. Nevertheless, ligands recently identified using the split-ubiquitin based and conventional yeast two-hybrid assays, have revealed that plant RACK1 is involved in several processes that include defense response, drought and salt stress, ribosomal function, cell wall biogenesis, and photosynthesis. The information acquired indicates that, in spite of the high degree of conservation of its structure, the functions of the plant RACK1 homolog appear to be distinct and diverse from those in yeast, mammals, insects, etc. In this review, we take a critical look at the novel information regarding the many functions in which plant RACK1 has been reported to participate, with a special emphasis on the information on its currently identified and missing ligand partners. PMID:26697044

  9. An optically transparent thin-layer electrochemical cell for the study of vibrational circular dichroism of chiral redox-active molecules.

    Domingos, Sérgio R; Luyten, Henk; van Anrooij, Fred; Sanders, Hans J; Bakker, Bert H; Buma, Wybren J; Hartl, František; Woutersen, Sander

    2013-03-01

    An optically transparent thin-layer electrochemical (OTTLE) cell with a locally extended optical path has been developed in order to perform vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectroscopy on chiral molecules prepared in specific oxidation states by means of electrochemical reduction or oxidation. The new design of the electrochemical cell successfully addresses the technical challenges involved in achieving sufficient infrared absorption. The VCD-OTTLE cell proves to be a valuable tool for the investigation of chiral redox-active molecules. PMID:23556803

  10. An optically transparent thin-layer electrochemical cell for the study of vibrational circular dichroism of chiral redox-active molecules

    Domingos, Sérgio R.; Luyten, Henk; van Anrooij, Fred; Sanders, Hans J.; Bakker, Bert H.; Buma, Wybren J.; Hartl, František; Woutersen, Sander

    2013-03-01

    An optically transparent thin-layer electrochemical (OTTLE) cell with a locally extended optical path has been developed in order to perform vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectroscopy on chiral molecules prepared in specific oxidation states by means of electrochemical reduction or oxidation. The new design of the electrochemical cell successfully addresses the technical challenges involved in achieving sufficient infrared absorption. The VCD-OTTLE cell proves to be a valuable tool for the investigation of chiral redox-active molecules.

  11. Diverse redox-active molecules bearing O-, S-, or Se-terminated tethers for attachment to silicon in studies of molecular information storage.

    Balakumar, Arumugham; Lysenko, Andrey B; Carcel, Carole; Malinovskii, Vladimir L; Gryko, Daniel T; Schweikart, Karl-Heinz; Loewe, Robert S; Yasseri, Amir A; Liu, Zhiming; Bocian, David F; Lindsey, Jonathan S

    2004-03-01

    A molecular approach to information storage employs redox-active molecules tethered to an electroactive surface. Attachment of the molecules to electroactive surfaces requires control over the nature of the tether (linker and surface attachment group). We have synthesized a collection of redox-active molecules bearing different linkers and surface anchor groups in free or protected form (hydroxy, mercapto, S-acetylthio, and Se-acetylseleno) for attachment to surfaces such as silicon, germanium, and gold. The molecules exhibit a number of cationic oxidation states, including one (ferrocene), two [zinc(II)porphyrin], three [cobalt(II)porphyrin], or four (lanthanide triple-decker sandwich compound). Electrochemical studies of monolayers of a variety of the redox-active molecules attached to Si(100) electrodes indicate that molecules exhibit a regular mode of attachment (via a Si-X bond, X = O, S, or Se), relatively homogeneous surface organization, and robust reversible electrochemical behavior. The acetyl protecting group undergoes cleavage during the surface deposition process, enabling attachment to silicon via thio or seleno groups without handling free thiols or selenols. PMID:14986994

  12. Photogrammetry surveys and mosaic: a useful tool to monitor active zones. Applications to the Indonesian Lusi eruption site.

    Romeo, Giovanni; Di Stefano, Giuseppe; Mazzini, Adriano; Iarocci, Alessandro; Caramelli, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    Unmanned and remotely operated aircraft showed to be an efficient and cost effective way to explore remote or extreme environments. Comparative photogrammetry studies are an efficient way to study and monitor he evolution of geologically active areas and ongoing events and are able to highlight details that are typically lost during traditional field campaigns. The Lusi mud eruption in eastern Java (Indonesia) represents one of the most spectacular geological phenomena that is ongoing since May 2006. In the framework of the Lusi Lab project (ERC grant n° 308126) we designed and constructed a multipurpose drone to survey the eruption site. Among the numerous other payloads, the Lusi drone is equipped with Olympus EPM-2 and Go-Pro Hero3 cameras that allow the operator to collect video stills, high quality pictures and to complete photogrammetry surveys. Targeted areas have been selected for detailed studies in the 7 km2 region inside the embankment that was prevent the mud burial of the settlements in the Sidoarjo Regency. The region is characterized by the presence of the Watukosek fault zone. This strike slip system originates from the Arjuno-Welirang volcanic complex and extends to the north east of the Java Island intersecting the Lusi crater. Therefore of particular interest are the faulted surveyed areas present around the Lusi crater inside the embankment. Results reveal a surprising accuracy for the collected mosaic. Multiple surveys are able to reveal the changes and the evolution of the fault through time and to indicate more active zones. In particular this type of survey can highlight the weakness zones and is thus useful to prevent potential geohazards in the area. The poster shows the aerial survey results, including a 3d-printed slice of LuSi, obtained combining 2500 16 Mp photographs. A 3d zoomed detail is also shown, evidencing the resolution that this technique can offer.

  13. Isolation of a small molecule with anti-MRSA activity from a mangrove symbiont Streptomyces sp. PVRK-1 and its biomedical studies inZebrafish embryos

    Rajaretinam Rajesh Kannan; Appadurai Muthamil Iniyan; Vincent Samuel Gnana Prakash

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to isolate the anti-MRSA (Methicillin ResistantStaphylococcus aureus ) molecule from the Mangrove symbiont Streptomyces and its biomedical studies in Zebrafish embryos. Methods: MRSA was isolated from the pus samples of Colachal hospitals and confirmed by amplification of mecA gene. Anti-MRSA molecule producing strain was identified by 16s rRNA gene sequencing. Anti-MRSA compound production was optimized by Solid State Fermentation (SSF) and the purification of the active molecule was carried out by TLC and RP-HPLC. The inhibitory concentration and LC50 were calculated using Statistical software SPSS. The Biomedical studies including the cardiac assay and organ toxicity assessment were carried out in Zebrafish. Results: The bioactive anti-MRSA small molecule A2 was purified by TLC with Rf value of 0.37 with 1.389 retention time at RP-HPLC. The Inhibitory Concentration of the purified molecule A2 was 30 μg/mL but, the inhibitory concentration of the MRSA in the infected embryo was 32-34 μg/mL for TLC purified molecule A2 with LC50 mean value was 61.504 μg/mL. Zebrafish toxicity was assessed in 48-60 μg/mL by observing the physiological deformities and the heart beat rates (HBR) of embryos for anti MRSA molecule showed the mean of 41.33-41.67 HBR/15 seconds for 40 μg/mL and control was 42.33-42.67 for 15 seconds which significantly showed that the anti-MRSA molecule A2 did not affected the HBR. Conclusions:Anti-MRSA molecule from Streptomyces sp PVRK-1 was isolated and biomedical studies in Zebrafish model assessed that the molecule was non toxic at the minimal inhibitory concentration of MRSA.

  14. Ground motion parameters of Shillong plateau: One of the most seismically active zones of northeastern India

    Saurabh Baruah; Santanu Baruah; Naba Kumar Gogoi; Olga Erteleva; Felix Aptikaev; J.R.Kayal

    2009-01-01

    Strong ground motion parameters for Shillong plateau of northeastern India are examined. Empirical relations are obtained for main parameters of ground motions as a function of earthquake magnitude, fault type, source depth, velocity characterization of medium and distance. Correlation between ground motion parameters and characteristics of seismogenic zones are established. A new attenuation relation for peak ground acceleration is developed, which predicts higher expected PGA in the region. Parameters of strong motions, particularly the predominant periods and duration of vibrations, depend on the morphology of the studied area. The study measures low estimates of logarithmic width in Shillong plateau. The attenuation relation estimated for pulse width critically indicates increased pulse width dependence on the logarithmic distance which accounts for geometrical spreading and anelastic attenuation.

  15. Geophysical signature of hydration-dehydration processes in active subduction zones

    Reynard, Bruno

    2013-04-01

    Seismological and magneto-telluric tomographies are potential tools for imaging fluid circulation when combined with petrophysical models. Recent measurements of the physical properties of serpentine allow refining hydration of the mantle and fluid circulation in the mantle wedge from geophysical data. In the slab lithospheric mantle, serpentinization caused by bending at the trench is limited to a few kilometers below the oceanic crust ( 700°C), water released by dehydration of the slab induces melting of the mantle under volcanic arcs, explaining the observed high conductivities. In the cold melt-free wedge (Kyushu, Cascadia) reflect high fluid concentration, while low to moderate (Earthquakes and plastic deformation of anhydrous slab mantle in double Wadati-Benioff zones. Geophysical Research Letters, 37, L24309.

  16. The Activity of Major Faults and the Hydrothermal Alteration Zone at Tianchi Volcano of Changbaishan

    Liu Mingjun; Gu Menglin; Sun Zhenguo; Wei Haiquan; Jin Bolu

    2004-01-01

    It is found by field investigation that the near horizontal top surface of the brown or brick-red hydrothermal alteration zone varies obviously in elevation at different sections of the same layer on the caldera's inner wall of Tianchi, with that at the north section near the Tianwen Peak about 110 m higher than that at the south near the Jiangjun Peak in Korea. The top surface of the hydrothermal alteration zone can be taken as key horizon to tectonic movement. The difference indicates that the total uplift height of the NW wall of the Liudaogou-TianchiJingfengshan fault, the principal fault trending NE at Tianchi, is bigger than that of the SE wall ever since the occurrence of hydrothermal alteration. This also explains why the topography in the northwest side of Tianchi is steeper and with more developed river system than in the southeast. The uplifting of the northeastern wall is bigger than that of the southwest along the principal NW-trend fault, namely, the Baishanzhen-Tianchi-Jince fault. It is observed from characters of hydrothermal alteration and the palaeoresiduum, that the recent vertical movement rate along the principal NE-trend fault is larger than that of the principal NW-trend fault. The two faults intersect at Tianchi, dividing the volcano into 4 blocks, with the uplift magnitudes decreasing successively in the order of the north, the west, the east and the south block. The biggest uplift of the north block corresponds well to the shallow magma batch in the north of Tianchi observed by DSS and telluric electromagnetic sounding, and etc.and they may be related with the causes.

  17. Fracturing and earthquake activity within the Prestahnúkur fissure swarm in the Western Volcanic Rift Zone of Iceland

    Hjartardóttir, Ásta Rut; Hjaltadóttir, Sigurlaug; Einarsson, Páll; Vogfjörd, Kristín.; Muñoz-Cobo Belart, Joaquín.

    2015-12-01

    The Prestahnúkur fissure swarm is located within the ultraslowly spreading Western Volcanic Zone in Iceland. The fissure swarm is characterized by normal faults, open fractures, and evidence of subglacial fissure eruptions (tindars). In this study, fractures and faults within the Prestahnúkur fissure swarm were mapped in detail from aerial photographs to determine the extent and activity of the fissure swarm. Earthquakes during the last ~23 years were relocated to map the subsurface fault planes that they delineate. The Prestahnúkur fissure swarm is 40-80 km long and up to ~20 km wide. Most of the areas of the fissure swarm have been glacially eroded, although a part of it is covered by postglacial lava flows. The fissure swarm includes numerous faults with tens of meters vertical offset within the older glacially eroded part, whereas open fractures are found within postglacial lava flows. Comparison of relocated earthquakes and surface fractures indicates that some of the surface fractures have been activated at depth during the last ~23 years, although no dike intrusions have been ongoing. The existence of tindars nevertheless indicates that dike intrusions and rifting events do occur within the Prestahnúkur fissure swarm. The low-fracture density within postglacial lava flows and low density of postglacial eruptive fissures indicate that rifting episodes occur less often than in the faster spreading Northern Volcanic Zone.

  18. Isotopic evidence (B, C, O) of deep fluid processes in fault rocks from the active Woodlark Basin detachment zone

    Kopf, Achim; Behrmann, Jan H.; Deyhle, Annette; Roller, Sybille; Erlenkeuser, Helmut

    2003-03-01

    We report results from boron, carbon and oxygen stable isotope analyses of faulted and veined rocks recovered by scientific ocean drilling during ODP Leg 180 in the western Woodlark Basin, off Papua New Guinea. In this area of active continental extension, crustal break-up and incipient seafloor spreading, a shallow-dipping, seismically active detachment fault accommodates strain, defining a zone of mylonites and cataclasites, vein formation and fluid infiltration. Syntectonic microstructures and vein-fill mineralogy suggest frictional heating during slip during extension and exhumation of Moresby Seamount. Low carbon and oxygen isotope ratios of calcite veins indicate precipitation from hydrothermal fluids (δ 13C PDB down to -17‰; δ 18O PDB down to -22‰) formed by both dehydration and decarbonation. Boron contents are low (parent solutions to calcite vein fills) are low when compared to deep-seated waters in other tectonic environments, likely reflecting preferential loss of 11B during low-grade metamorphism at depth. Pervasive devolatilization and flux of CO 2-rich fluids are evident from similar vein cement geochemistry in the detachment fault zone and splays further updip. Multiple rupture-and-healing history of the veins suggests that precipitation may be an important player in fluid pressure evolution and, hence, seismogenic fault movement.

  19. Offshore active faults of the Mikata fault zone in Fukui, Japan, revealed by high-resolution seismic profiles

    Inoue, T.; Sugiyama, Y.; Sakamoto, I.; Takino, Y.; Murakami, F.; Hosoya, T.; Usami, T.

    2014-12-01

    The Mikata fault zone are located in coastal and shallow sea area off Fukui Prefecture, West Japan. National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) and Tokai University conducted, as part of MEXT 2013 nearshore active fault survey project, a high-resolution multi-channel seismic survey using Boomer and a 12-channel streamer cable, acoustic profiling survey using parametric sub-bottom profiler and shallow-sea offshore drilling, in order to clarify distribution and activity of the Mikata fault zone. The seismic reflection surveys identified four reflection surfaces as vertical displacement markers in the post-glacial deposits at a depth ranging from ca. 4.5m to ca. 17m below the sea bottom on the downthrown side. We estimated the age of each marker reflection surface by using the C14 age and others from 4m-long core obtained on the downthrown side of fault and the sea level change in the latest Pleistocene and early Holocene around Japan. The results of these surveys have revealed that the fault system was reactivated three times since the latest Pleistocene. The vertical slip rate and average recurrence interval of the fault system are estimated at ca. 0.8-1.0 m/ky and 2,000-3,800 years, respectively.

  20. Direct measurement and characterization of active photosynthesis zones inside biofuel producing and wastewater remediating microalgal biofilms

    Bernstein, Hans C.; Kesaano, Maureen; Moll, Karen; Smith, Terence; Gerlach, Robin; Carlson, Ross; Miller, Charles D.; Peyton, Brent; Cooksey, Keith; Gardner, Robert D.; Sims, Ronald C.

    2014-03-01

    Abstract: Microalgal biofilm based technologies are of keen interest due to their high biomass concentrations and ability to utilize renewable resources, such as light and CO2. While photoautotrophic biofilms have long been used for wastewater remediation applications, biofuel production represents a relatively new and under-represented focus area. However, the direct measurement and characterization of fundamental parameters required for physiological analyses are challenging due to biofilm heterogeneity. This study evaluated oxygenic photosynthesis and biofuel precursor molecule production using a novel rotating algal biofilm reactor (RABR) operated at field- and laboratory-scales for wastewater remediation and biofuel production, respectively. Clear differences in oxygenic-photosynthesis, respiration and biofuel-precursor capacities were observed between the two systems and different conditions based on light and nitrogen availability. Nitrogen depletion was not found to have the same effect on lipid accumulation compared to prior planktonic studies. Physiological characterizations of these microalgal biofilms identify potential areas for future process optimization.

  1. Increased Autoreactivity of the Complement-Activating Molecule Mannan-Binding Lectin in a Type 1 Diabetes Model.

    Østergaard, Jakob Appel; Ruseva, Marieta Milkova; Malik, Talat Habib; Hoffmann-Petersen, Ingeborg Torp; Pickering, Matthew Caleb; Thiel, Steffen; Hansen, Troels Krarup

    2016-01-01

    Background. Diabetic kidney disease is the leading cause of end-stage renal failure despite intensive treatment of modifiable risk factors. Identification of new drug targets is therefore of paramount importance. The complement system is emerging as a potential new target. The lectin pathway of the complement system, initiated by the carbohydrate-recognition molecule mannan-binding lectin (MBL), is linked to poor kidney prognosis in diabetes. We hypothesized that MBL activates complement upon binding within the diabetic glomerulus. Methods. We investigated this by comparing complement deposition and activation in kidneys from streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice and healthy control mice. Results. After 20 weeks of diabetes, glomerular deposition of MBL was significantly increased. Diabetic animals had 2.0-fold higher (95% CI 1.6-2.5) immunofluorescence intensity from anti-MBL antibodies compared with controls (P kidney and circulating C3a concentration. Together with previous findings, these results indicate direct effects of MBL within the kidney in diabetes. PMID:26977416

  2. Conversion of Carbon Dioxide by Methane Reforming under Visible-Light Irradiation: Surface-Plasmon-Mediated Nonpolar Molecule Activation.

    Liu, Huimin; Meng, Xianguang; Dao, Thang Duy; Zhang, Huabin; Li, Peng; Chang, Kun; Wang, Tao; Li, Mu; Nagao, Tadaaki; Ye, Jinhua

    2015-09-21

    A novel CO2 photoreduction method, CO2 conversion through methane reforming into syngas (DRM) was adopted as an efficient approach to not only reduce the environmental concentration of the greenhouse gas CO2 but also realize the net energy storage from solar energy to chemical energy. For the first time it is reported that gold, which was generally regarded to be inactive in improving the performance of a catalyst in DRM under thermal conditions, enhanced the catalytic performance of Rh/SBA-15 in DRM under visible-light irradiation (1.7 times, CO2 conversion increased from 2100 to 3600 μmol g(-1) s(-1)). UV/Vis spectra and electromagnetic field simulation results revealed that the highly energetic electrons excited by local surface plasmon resonances of Au facilitated the polarization and activation of CO2 and CH4 with thermal assistance. This work provides a new route for CO2 photoreduction and offers a distinctive method to photocatalytically activate nonpolar molecules. PMID:26271348

  3. Expression of costimulatory molecules in antigen-activated peritoneal macrophages treated with either ovalbumin or palmitoyl-ova conjugates

    Flávia Márcia Oliveira

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the mechanisms by which adjuvants are believed to promote T-cell activation and prevent induction of oral tolerance is by up-regulating the expression of co-stimulatory molecules on antigen presenting cells. Mice treated orally with palmitoyl-ovalbumin conjugates become immunized, while those treated with native ovalbumin (Ova become tolerant. Cells from the peritoneal cavity of B6D2F1 mice were cultured in the presence of 0.01, or 0.1 mg/100ml of either Ova, or palmitoyl-Ova and tested for the presence of cell markers. PE-conjugated anti-mouse CD80, CD86, and CD11b antibodies as well as biotin-PE were used to stain the antigen-activated peritoneal cells. A significant increase in the expression of CD86 and CD80 was observed following in vitro stimulation with palmitoyl-Ova; additionally, both Ova and palmitoyl-Ova induced the basal expression of CD11b. These findings could be related with the strong T-cell proliferative response induced by palmitoyl-Ova.

  4. Screening for active small molecules in mitochondrial complex I deficient patient's fibroblasts, reveals AICAR as the most beneficial compound.

    Anna Golubitzky

    Full Text Available Congenital deficiency of the mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I (CI is a common defect of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS. Despite major advances in the biochemical and molecular diagnostics and the deciphering of CI structure, function assembly and pathomechanism, there is currently no satisfactory cure for patients with mitochondrial complex I defects. Small molecules provide one feasible therapeutic option, however their use has not been systematically evaluated using a standardized experimental system. In order to evaluate potentially therapeutic compounds, we set up a relatively simple system measuring different parameters using only a small amount of patient's fibroblasts, in glucose free medium, where growth is highly OXPOS dependent. Ten different compounds were screened using fibroblasts derived from seven CI patients, harboring different mutations.5-Aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribotide (AICAR was found to be the most beneficial compound improving growth and ATP content while decreasing ROS production. AICAR also increased mitochondrial biogenesis without altering mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψ. Fluorescence microscopy data supported increased mitochondrial biogenesis and activation of the AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK. Other compounds such as; bezafibrate and oltipraz were rated as favorable while polyphenolic phytochemicals (resverastrol, grape seed extract, genistein and epigallocatechin gallate were found not significant or detrimental. Although the results have to be verified by more thorough investigation of additional OXPHOS parameters, preliminary rapid screening of potential therapeutic compounds in individual patient's fibroblasts could direct and advance personalized medical treatment.

  5. The twilight zone: ambient light levels trigger activity in primitive ants

    Narendra, Ajay; Reid, Samuel F.; Hemmi, Jan M.

    2010-01-01

    Many animals become active during twilight, a narrow time window where the properties of the visual environment are dramatically different from both day and night. Despite the fact that many animals including mammals, reptiles, birds and insects become active in this specific temporal niche, we do not know what cues trigger this activity. To identify the onset of specific temporal niches, animals could anticipate the timing of regular events or directly measure environmental variables. We sho...

  6. Evidence of multistage late Quaternary strong earthquakes on typical segments of Longmenshan Active Fault Zone in Sichuan, China

    2009-01-01

    Investigation of offset landforms and trench excavation are important means to acquire the evidence of multistage activities of active faults. Here we present the result of fault trough investigation in Beichuan County and the Pingtong Town of Pingwu County along the Longmenshan Central Fault Belt, as well as the result from trench excavation at the platform foreslope in Hanwang Town of Mianzhu County on the Longmenshan Front Range Fault Belt. These results show that at least three fault activity events, including the Wenchuan earthquake, occurred in the Beichuan fault trough, at least two, including the Wenchuan earthquake, at Pingtong fault trough, and 2-3 paleoearthquakes in the Hanwang trench. Among these three localities, the times of the last strong earthquake prior to Wenchuan earthquake at Beichuan fault trough and Hanwang trench are close, approximately 6000 years ago, i.e., greater than 5.8 ka and smaller than 6.63 ka ago. This provides the evidence of synchronous activity of the Central Fault Belt and the Front Range Fault Belt of the Longmenshan Active Fault Zone during the previous strong earthquake activities prior to Wenchuan earthquake.

  7. Evidence of multistage late Quaternary strong earthquakes on typical segments of Longrnenshan Active Fault Zone in Sichuan,China

    JIANG WaLi; XIE XinSheng; ZHANG JinFa; SUN ChangBin; HUANG Wei; SHENG Qiang; FENG XiYing

    2009-01-01

    Investigation of offset landforms and trench excavation are important means to acquire the evidence of multistage activities of active faults.Here we present the result of fault trough investigation in Beichuan County and the Pingtong Town of Pingwu County along the Longmenshan Central Fault Belt,as well as the result from trench excavation at the platform foreslope in Hanwang Town of Mianzhu County on the Longmenshan Front Range Fault Belt.These results show that at least three fault activity events,including the Wenchuan earthquake,occurred in the Beichuan fault trough,at least two,including the Wenchuan earthquake,at Pingtong fault trough,and 2-3 paleoearthquakes in the Hanwang trench.Among these three localities,the times of the last strong earthquake prior to Wenchuan earthquake at Beichuan fault trough and Hanwang trench are close,approximately 6000 years ago,i.e.,greater than 5.8 ka and smaller than 6.63 ka ago.This provides the evidence of synchronous activity of the Central Fault Belt and the Front Range Fault Belt of the Longmenshan Active Fault Zone during the previous strong earthquake activities prior to Wenchuan earthquake.

  8. Trace Hydrophobic Organic Chemicals Present in Pennsylvania Groundwater are Correlated with Geogenic Brines rather than Hydraulic Fracturing Active Zones

    Drollette, B.; Shregglman, K.; D'Ambro, E.; Elsner, M.; Warner, N. R.; O'Connor, M.; Karatum, O.; Vengosh, A.; Jackson, R. B.; Darrah, T.; Plata, D.

    2014-12-01

    Recent studies demonstrated that deep Marcellus shale brines migrate into shallow groundwater aquifers, presumably via fractures in the subsurface that exist independent of any gas extraction activities. However, whereas many inorganic species are conservative tracers, hydrophobic organic compounds are both sorptive and reactive, and geogenic organic chemicals may not survive transport from deep shales to the subsurface. Here, 40 shallow groundwater samples from private wells in Northeastern Pennsylvania were analyzed for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and gasoline range organic compounds (GRO), and 17 were analyzed for VOCs, GRO, and diesel range organic compounds (DRO). BTEX compounds (i.e., benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes) were detected in 6 of 40 samples at concentrations orders of magnitude below EPA maximum contaminant levels (e.g., detected in 10 of 40 samples at concentrations as high as 8.8 ± 0.4 ppb and did not correlate with distance to the nearest hydraulic fracturing well (p = 0.24) nor in active fracturing zones, which we defined as sample locations less than 1 km from a well (p = 0.60). However, GRO was strongly correlated (p = 0.004) with shallow groundwater with Marcellus Shale inorganic chemical character, as delineated by inorganic chemical analysis. DRO was detected in all 17 samples up to 158 ± 4 ppb and did not spatially correlate with distance to the nearest hydraulic fracturing well (p = 0.74), nor active zones (p = 0.61). Similar to GRO, DRO did correlate with shallow groundwater containing Marcellus Shale character with moderate significance (p = 0.08). These results indicate that: (a) hydrophobic organic chemicals can survive transport from the deep subsurface to shallow groundwaters, and (b) transport of these compounds is not detectably enhanced by hydraulic fracturing activities in Northeastern PA as of the 2012-2014 summers.

  9. 78 FR 22843 - Foreign-Trade Zone 33-Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Authorization of Export Production Activity...

    2013-04-17

    ... Production Activity, Tsudis Chocolate Company (Chocolate Confectionery Bars), Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania On December 4, 2012, Tsudis Chocolate Company, submitted a notification of proposed export production activity... 400), including notice in the Federal Register inviting public comment (77 FR 77016, 12-31-2012)....

  10. Effects of protonation state of Asp181 and position of active site water molecules on the conformation of PTP1B.

    Ozcan, Ahmet; Olmez, Elif Ozkirimli; Alakent, Burak

    2013-05-01

    In protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), the flexible WPD loop adopts a closed conformation (WPDclosed ) in the active state of PTP1B, bringing the catalytic Asp181 close to the active site pocket, while WPD loop is in an open conformation (WPDopen ) in the inactive state. Previous studies showed that Asp181 may be protonated at physiological pH, and ordered water molecules exist in the active site. In the current study, molecular dynamics simulations are employed at different Asp181 protonation states and initial positions of active site water molecules, and compared with the existing crystallographic data of PTP1B. In WPDclosed conformation, the active site is found to maintain its conformation only in the protonated state of Asp181 in both free and liganded states, while Asp181 is likely to be deprotonated in WPDopen conformation. When the active site water molecule network that is a part of the free WPDclosed crystal structure is disrupted, intermediate WPD loop conformations, similar to that in the PTPRR crystal structure, are sampled in the MD simulations. In liganded PTP1B, one active site water molecule is found to be important for facilitating the orientation of Cys215 and the phosphate ion, thus may play a role in the reaction. In conclusion, conformational stability of WPD loop, and possibly catalytic activity of PTP1B, is significantly affected by the protonation state of Asp181 and position of active site water molecules, showing that these aspects should be taken into consideration both in MD simulations and inhibitor design. PMID:23239271

  11. Activation of Relaxin Family Receptor 1 from Different Mammalian Species by Relaxin Peptide and Small-Molecule Agonist ML290.

    Huang, Zaohua; Myhr, Courtney; Bathgate, Ross A D; Ho, Brian A; Bueno, Amaya; Hu, Xin; Xiao, Jingbo; Southall, Noel; Barnaeva, Elena; Agoulnik, Irina U; Marugan, Juan J; Ferrer, Marc; Agoulnik, Alexander I

    2015-01-01

    Relaxin peptide (RLN), which signals through the relaxin family peptide 1 (RXFP1) GPCR receptor, has shown therapeutic effects in an acute heart failure clinical trial. We have identified a small-molecule agonist of human RXFP1, ML290; however, it does not activate the mouse receptor. To find a suitable animal model for ML290 testing and to gain mechanistic insights into the interaction of various ligands with RXFP1, we have cloned rhesus macaque, pig, rabbit, and guinea pig RXFP1s and analyzed their activation by RLN and ML290. HEK293T cells expressing macaque or pig RXFP1 responded to relaxin and ML290 treatment as measured by an increase of cAMP production. Guinea pig RXFP1 responded to relaxin but had very low response to ML290 treatment only at highest concentrations used. The rabbit RXFP1 amino acid sequence was the most divergent, with a number of unique substitutions within the ectodomain and the seven-transmembrane domain (7TM). Two splice variants of rabbit RXFP1 derived through alternative splicing of the fourth exon were identified. In contrast to the other species, rabbit RXFP1s were activated by ML290, but not with human, pig, mouse, or rabbit RLNs. Using FLAG-tagged constructs, we have shown that both rabbit RXFP1 variants are expressed on the cell surface. No binding of human Eu-labeled RLN to rabbit RXFP1 was detected, suggesting that in this species, RXFP1 might be non-functional. We used chimeric rabbit-human and guinea pig-human constructs to identify regions important for RLN or ML290 receptor activation. Chimeras with the human ectodomain and rabbit 7TM domain were activated by RLN, whereas substitution of part of the guinea pig 7TM domain with the human sequence only partially restored ML290 activation, confirming the allosteric mode of action for the two ligands. Our data demonstrate that macaque and pig models can be used for ML290 testing. PMID:26347712

  12. Breast cancer cell migration is regulated through junctional adhesion molecule-A-mediated activation of Rap1 GTPase

    McSherry, Elaine A

    2011-03-23

    Abstract Introduction The adhesion protein junctional adhesion molecule-A (JAM-A) regulates epithelial cell morphology and migration, and its over-expression has recently been linked with increased risk of metastasis in breast cancer patients. As cell migration is an early requirement for tumor metastasis, we sought to identify the JAM-A signalling events regulating migration in breast cancer cells. Methods MCF7 breast cancer cells (which express high endogenous levels of JAM-A) and primary cultures from breast cancer patients were used for this study. JAM-A was knocked down in MCF7 cells using siRNA to determine the consequences for cell adhesion, cell migration and the protein expression of various integrin subunits. As we had previously demonstrated a link between the expression of JAM-A and β1-integrin, we examined activation of the β1-integrin regulator Rap1 GTPase in response to JAM-A knockdown or functional antagonism. To test whether JAM-A, Rap1 and β1-integrin lie in a linear pathway, we tested functional inhibitors of all three proteins separately or together in migration assays. Finally we performed immunoprecipitations in MCF7 cells and primary breast cells to determine the binding partners connecting JAM-A to Rap1 activation. Results JAM-A knockdown in MCF7 breast cancer cells reduced adhesion to, and migration through, the β1-integrin substrate fibronectin. This was accompanied by reduced protein expression of β1-integrin and its binding partners αV- and α5-integrin. Rap1 activity was reduced in response to JAM-A knockdown or inhibition, and pharmacological inhibition of Rap1 reduced MCF7 cell migration. No additive anti-migratory effect was observed in response to simultaneous inhibition of JAM-A, Rap1 and β1-integrin, suggesting that they lie in a linear migratory pathway. Finally, in an attempt to elucidate the binding partners putatively linking JAM-A to Rap1 activation, we have demonstrated the formation of a complex between JAM-A, AF-6

  13. Activation of Relaxin Family Receptor 1 from different mammalian species by relaxin peptide and small molecule agonist ML290

    Zaohua eHuang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Relaxin peptide (RLN, which signals through the relaxin family peptide 1 (RXFP1 GPCR receptor, has shown therapeutic effects in an acute heart failure clinical trial. We have identified a small molecule agonist of human RXFP1, ML290; however, it does not activate the mouse receptor. To find a suitable animal model for ML290 testing and to gain mechanistic insights into the interaction of various ligands with RXFP1, we have cloned rhesus macaque, pig, rabbit, and guinea pig RXFP1s and analyzed their activation by RLN and ML290. HEK293T cells expressing macaque or pig RXFP1 responded to relaxin and ML290 treatment as measured by an increase of cAMP production. Guinea pig RXFP1 responded to relaxin but had very low response to ML290 treatment only at highest concentrations used. The rabbit RXFP1 amino acid sequence was the most divergent, with a number of unique substitutions within the ectodomain and the 7-transmembrane domain (7TM. Two splice variants of rabbit RXFP1 derived through alternative splicing of the forth exon were identified. In contrast to the other species, rabbit RXFP1s were activated by ML290, but not with human, pig, mouse, or rabbit relaxins. Using FLAG-tagged constructs, we have shown that both rabbit RXFP1 variants are expressed on the cell surface. No binding of human Eu-labeled relaxin to rabbit RXFP1 was detected, suggesting that in this species RXFP1 might be non-functional. We used chimeric rabbit-human and guinea pig-human constructs to identify regions important for RLN or ML290 receptor activation. Chimeras with the human ectodomain and rabbit 7TM domain were activated by RLN, whereas substitution of part of the guinea pig 7TM domain with the human sequence only partially restored ML290 activation, confirming the allosteric mode of action for the two ligands. Our data demonstrate that macaque and pig models can be used for ML290 testing.

  14. Breast cancer cell migration is regulated through junctional adhesion molecule-A-mediated activation of Rap1 GTPase.

    McSherry, Elaine A

    2011-03-23

    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: The adhesion protein junctional adhesion molecule-A (JAM-A) regulates epithelial cell morphology and migration, and its over-expression has recently been linked with increased risk of metastasis in breast cancer patients. As cell migration is an early requirement for tumor metastasis, we sought to identify the JAM-A signalling events regulating migration in breast cancer cells. METHODS: MCF7 breast cancer cells (which express high endogenous levels of JAM-A) and primary cultures from breast cancer patients were used for this study. JAM-A was knocked down in MCF7 cells using siRNA to determine the consequences for cell adhesion, cell migration and the protein expression of various integrin subunits. As we had previously demonstrated a link between the expression of JAM-A and β1-integrin, we examined activation of the β1-integrin regulator Rap1 GTPase in response to JAM-A knockdown or functional antagonism. To test whether JAM-A, Rap1 and β1-integrin lie in a linear pathway, we tested functional inhibitors of all three proteins separately or together in migration assays. Finally we performed immunoprecipitations in MCF7 cells and primary breast cells to determine the binding partners connecting JAM-A to Rap1 activation. RESULTS: JAM-A knockdown in MCF7 breast cancer cells reduced adhesion to, and migration through, the β1-integrin substrate fibronectin. This was accompanied by reduced protein expression of β1-integrin and its binding partners αV- and α5-integrin. Rap1 activity was reduced in response to JAM-A knockdown or inhibition, and pharmacological inhibition of Rap1 reduced MCF7 cell migration. No additive anti-migratory effect was observed in response to simultaneous inhibition of JAM-A, Rap1 and β1-integrin, suggesting that they lie in a linear migratory pathway. Finally, in an attempt to elucidate the binding partners putatively linking JAM-A to Rap1 activation, we have demonstrated the formation of a complex between JAM-A, AF

  15. Breast cancer cell migration is regulated through junctional adhesion molecule-A-mediated activation of Rap1 GTPase.

    McSherry, Elaine A

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: The adhesion protein junctional adhesion molecule-A (JAM-A) regulates epithelial cell morphology and migration, and its over-expression has recently been linked with increased risk of metastasis in breast cancer patients. As cell migration is an early requirement for tumor metastasis, we sought to identify the JAM-A signalling events regulating migration in breast cancer cells. METHODS: MCF7 breast cancer cells (which express high endogenous levels of JAM-A) and primary cultures from breast cancer patients were used for this study. JAM-A was knocked down in MCF7 cells using siRNA to determine the consequences for cell adhesion, cell migration and the protein expression of various integrin subunits. As we had previously demonstrated a link between the expression of JAM-A and beta1-integrin, we examined activation of the beta1-integrin regulator Rap1 GTPase in response to JAM-A knockdown or functional antagonism. To test whether JAM-A, Rap1 and beta1-integrin lie in a linear pathway, we tested functional inhibitors of all three proteins separately or together in migration assays. Finally we performed immunoprecipitations in MCF7 cells and primary breast cells to determine the binding partners connecting JAM-A to Rap1 activation. RESULTS: JAM-A knockdown in MCF7 breast cancer cells reduced adhesion to, and migration through, the beta1-integrin substrate fibronectin. This was accompanied by reduced protein expression of beta1-integrin and its binding partners alphaV- and alpha5-integrin. Rap1 activity was reduced in response to JAM-A knockdown or inhibition, and pharmacological inhibition of Rap1 reduced MCF7 cell migration. No additive anti-migratory effect was observed in response to simultaneous inhibition of JAM-A, Rap1 and beta1-integrin, suggesting that they lie in a linear migratory pathway. Finally, in an attempt to elucidate the binding partners putatively linking JAM-A to Rap1 activation, we have demonstrated the formation of a complex between

  16. Indomethacin treatment reduces microglia activation and increases numbers of neuroblasts in the subventricular zone and ischaemic striatum after focal ischaemia

    ROSANA S LOPES; MARCELO M CARDOSO; ARTHUR O SAMPAIO; MARIO SANTOS BARBOSA Jr; CELICE C SOUZA; MICHELLE C DA SILVA; ELANE MAGNO N FERREIRA; MARCO AURELIOM FREIRE; RAFAEL RODRIGUES LIMA; WALACE GOMES-LEAL

    2016-09-01

    Neuroblasts from the subventricular zone (SVZ) migrate to striatum following stroke, but most of them die inthe ischaemic milieu and this can be related to exacerbated microglial activation. Here, we explored theeffects of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory indomethacin on microglial activation, neuronal preservation andneuroblast migration following experimental striatal stroke in adult rats. Animals were submitted toendothelin-1 (ET-1)-induced focal striatal ischaemia and were treated with indomethacin or sterile saline(i.p.) for 7 days, being perfused after 8 or 14 days. Immunohistochemistry was performed to assess neuronalloss (anti-NeuN), microglial activation (anti-Iba1, ED1) and migrating neuroblasts (anti-DCX) by countingNeuN, ED1 and DCX-positive cells in the ischaemic striatum or SVZ. Indomethacin treatment reducedmicroglia activation and the number of ED1^{+} cells in both 8 and 14 days post injury as compared withcontrols. There was an increase in the number of DCX^{+} cells in both SVZ and striatum at the same survivaltimes. Moreover, there was a decrease in the number of NeuN^{+} cells in indomethacin-treated animals ascompared with the control group at 8 days but not after 14 days post injury. Our results suggest thatindomethacin treatment modulates microglia activation, contributing to increased neuroblast proliferation inthe SVZ and migration to the ischaemic striatum following stroke.

  17. Activation of cord T lymphocytes. III. Role of LFA-1/ICAM-1 and CD2/LFA-3 adhesion molecules in CD3-induced proliferative response.

    Gerli, R; Agea, E; Muscat, C; Tognellini, R; Fiorucci, G; Spinozzi, F; Cernetti, C; Bertotto, A

    1993-04-15

    As cord T cells, a model of antigen (Ag)-unprimed cell, display a functional defect when stimulated through the CD3 molecule, the role of lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1(LFA-1)/intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and CD2/lymphocyte function-associated antigen 3 (LFA-3) receptor-ligand pairs in cord CD3-triggered T-cell activation was analyzed using specific monoclonal antibodies (mAb) against each adhesion molecule. The addition of anti-CD11a, anti-CD18, or anti-CD2 to both adult and cord peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) cultures led to a decrease in CD3-induced proliferation. In contrast, CD3-stimulated cord, but not adult, PBMC proliferation was markedly enhanced when anti-CD54 or anti-CD58 were added. Despite the fact that ICAM-1 and LFA-3 molecules were virtually absent on cord resting T cells, mAb against these two molecules boosted both mitogenesis of and interleukin (IL)-2 production by purified cord T cells stimulated with plastic immobilized anti-CD3. Cord T-cell supernatant levels of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) were undetectable with CD3 stimulation, slightly raised with CD58/CD3 costimulation, but normal when T cells were preincubated with IL-2 for 24 hr before being costimulated with anti-CD3/CD58. Evidence that IL-2 and IFN-gamma play a pivotal role in fully activating cord T cells came from the demonstration that IL-2 and IFN-gamma are able to bypass the CD3-proliferative defect through differential up-regulation of the adhesion molecules. It would, therefore, seem that ICAM-1 and LFA-3 molecules are crucially implicated in the CD3-activation pathway of Ag-unprimed T cells. PMID:7684326

  18. Periradicular Tissue Responses to Biologically Active Molecules or MTA When Applied in Furcal Perforation of Dogs' Teeth

    Anna Zairi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was the comparative evaluation of inflammatory reactions and tissue responses to four growth factors, or mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA, or a zinc-oxide-eugenol-based cement (IRM as controls, when used for the repair of furcal perforations in dogs’ teeth. Results showed significantly higher inflammatory cell response in the transforming growth factorβ1 (TGFβ1 and zinc-oxide-eugenol-based cement (IRM groups and higher rates of epithelial proliferation in the TGFβ1, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF, and insulin growth factor-I (IGF-I groups compared to the MTA. Significantly higher rates of bone formation were found in the control groups compared to the osteogenic protein-1 (OP-1. Significantly higher rates of cementum formation were observed in the IGF-I and bFGF groups compared to the IRM. None of the biologically active molecules can be suggested for repairing furcal perforations, despite the fact that growth factors exerted a clear stimulatory effect on cementum formation and inhibited collagen capsule formation. MTA exhibited better results than the growth factors.

  19. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Response and Resistance to Cold Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Is Linked to the Redox-Active Molecule Phenazine.

    Anne Mai-Prochnow

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important opportunistic pathogen displaying high antibiotic resistance. Its resistance is in part due to its outstanding ability to form biofilms on a range of biotic and abiotic surfaces leading to difficult-to-treat, often long-term infections. Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP is a new, promising antibacterial treatment to combat antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Plasma is ionized gas that has antibacterial properties through the generation of a mix of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS, excited molecules, charged particles and UV photons. Our results show the efficient removal of P. aeruginosa biofilms using a plasma jet (kINPen med, with no viable cells detected after 5 min treatment and no attached biofilm cells visible with confocal microscopy after 10 min plasma treatment. Because of its multi-factorial action, it is widely presumed that the development of bacterial resistance to plasma is unlikely. However, our results indicate that a short plasma treatment (3 min may lead to the emergence of a small number of surviving cells exhibiting enhanced resistance to subsequent plasma exposure. Interestingly, these cells also exhibited a higher degree of resistance to hydrogen peroxide. Whole genome comparison between surviving cells and control cells revealed 10 distinct polymorphic regions, including four belonging to the redox active, antibiotic pigment phenazine. Subsequently, the interaction between phenazine production and CAP resistance was demonstrated in biofilms of transposon mutants disrupted in different phenazine pathway genes which exhibited significantly altered sensitivity to CAP.

  20. Cytometric analysis of surface molecules of leucocytes and phagocytic activity of granulocytes and monocytes/macrophages in cows with pyometra.

    Brodzki, P; Kostro, K; Brodzki, A; Niemczuk, K; Lisiecka, U

    2014-10-01

    Pyometra is a serious problem in dairy cow herds, causing large economic losses due to infertility. The development of pyometra depends mainly on the immunological status of the cow. The aim of the study was a comparative evaluation of selected indicators involving non-specific and specific immunity in cows with pyometra and in cows without inflammation of the uterus. The study was performed in 20 cows, which were divided into two groups: pyometra group and healthy group, each comprising 10 cows, based on the results of cytological and ultrasonographic tests. A flow cytometric analysis was performed for the surface molecules CD4, CD8, CD14, CD21, CD25 and CD4(+) CD25(+) on leucocytes, and the phagocytic activity was determined from granulocytes and monocytes/macrophages in the peripheral blood and uterine washings, respectively. It was demonstrated that the percentage of phagocytic granulocytes and monocytes/macrophages in both the peripheral blood and uterine washings was significantly lower in cows with pyometra compared with the healthy group (p pyometra group, along with a significantly higher (p pyometra may be caused by a bacterial infection and the presence of blocking agents (IL-10), released by the increasing number of CD8(+) lymphocytes what leads to the advanced inflammation of uterus. PMID:25124985

  1. Iridium-mediated Bond Activation and Water Oxidation as an Exemplary Case of CARISMA, A European Network for the Development of Catalytic Routines for Small Molecule Activation.

    Licini, Giulia; Albrecht, Martin

    2015-01-01

    CARISMA is a currently running COST Action that pools leading European experts in computational and experimental chemistry to foster synergies for developing new catalytic processes for the transformation of abundant small molecules such as water, carbon dioxide, or ammonia into high-value chemicals and energy-relevant products. CARISMA promotes new collaborations, exchange of knowledge and skills, frontier training to young as well as established researchers, and a platform for the advancement of theoretical and experimental research in an iterative process, comprised of expertise in various connate domains including synthesis, catalysis, spectroscopy, kinetics, and computational chemistry. These interactions stimulate the discovery of new and efficient catalytic processes, illustrated in the second part of this contribution with the collaborative development of powerful iridium-based complexes for bond activation and water oxidation catalysis. PMID:26507475

  2. Photoisomerisable molecules

    Peris Fajarnes, Eduardo Víctor; Mata Martínez, José Antonio; Márquez Linares, Francisco Manuel; Sabater Picot, María José

    2005-01-01

    [EN] The invention relates to a molecule comprising at least one carbon-carbon double bond which is substituted by at least one cyclopentadienyl-metal-cyclopentadienyl complex, having the cis/trans isomerisation property, in a reversible manner in response to the absorption of light. Preferably, the rest of the molecule comprises a dendrimer of any generation, advantageously of the polypropylenimine octaamine type. The inventive molecule can be used as a molecular switch and in various differ...

  3. Discovery and Characterization of a Cell-Permeable, Small-Molecule c-Abl Kinase Activator that Binds to the Myristoyl Binding Site

    Yang, Jingsong; Campobasso, Nino; Biju, Mangatt P.; Fisher, Kelly; Pan, Xiao-Qing; Cottom, Josh; Galbraith, Sarah; Ho, Thau; Zhang, Hong; Hong, Xuan; Ward, Paris; Hofmann, Glenn; Siegfried, Brett; Zappacosta, Francesca; Washio, Yoshiaki; Cao, Ping; Qu, Junya; Bertrand, Sophie; Wang, Da-Yuan; Head, Martha S.; Li, Hu; Moores, Sheri; Lai, Zhihong; Johanson, Kyung; Burton, George; Erickson-Miller, Connie; Simpson, Graham; Tummino, Peter; Copeland, Robert A.; Oliff, Allen (GSKPA)

    2014-10-02

    c-Abl kinase activity is regulated by a unique mechanism involving the formation of an autoinhibited conformation in which the N-terminal myristoyl group binds intramolecularly to the myristoyl binding site on the kinase domain and induces the bending of the {alpha}I helix that creates a docking surface for the SH2 domain. Here, we report a small-molecule c-Abl activator, DPH, that displays potent enzymatic and cellular activity in stimulating c-Abl activation. Structural analyses indicate that DPH binds to the myristoyl binding site and prevents the formation of the bent conformation of the {alpha}I helix through steric hindrance, a mode of action distinct from the previously identified allosteric c-Abl inhibitor, GNF-2, that also binds to the myristoyl binding site. DPH represents the first cell-permeable, small-molecule tool compound for c-Abl activation.

  4. Strontium-90 activity concentration in soil samples from the exclusion zone of the Fukushima daiichi nuclear power plant.

    Sahoo, Sarata Kumar; Kavasi, Norbert; Sorimachi, Atsuyuki; Arae, Hideki; Tokonami, Shinji; Mietelski, Jerzy Wojciech; Łokas, Edyta; Yoshida, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    The radioactive fission product (90)Sr has a long biological half-life (˜18 y) in the human body. Due to its chemical similarity to calcium it accumulates in bones and irradiates the bone marrow, causing its high radio-toxicity. Assessing (90)Sr is therefore extremely important in case of a nuclear disaster. In this work 16 soil samples were collected from the exclusion zone (Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, to measure (90)Sr activity concentration using liquid scintillation counting. (137)Cs activity concentration was also measured with gamma-spectroscopy in order to investigate correlation with (90)Sr. The (90)Sr activity concentrations ranged from 3.0 ± 0.3 to 23.3 ± 1.5 Bq kg(-1) while the (137)Cs from 0.7 ± 0.1 to 110.8 ± 0.3 kBq kg(-1). The fact that radioactive contamination originated from the Fukushima nuclear accident was obvious due to the presence of (134)Cs. However, (90)Sr contamination was not confirmed in all samples although detectable amounts of (90)Sr can be expected in Japanese soils, as a background, stemming from global fallout due to the atmospheric nuclear weapon tests. Correlation analysis between (90)Sr and (137)Cs activity concentrations provides a potentially powerful tool to discriminate background (90)Sr level from its Fukushima contribution. PMID:27048779

  5. Hair cells use active zones with different voltage dependence of Ca2+ influx to decompose sounds into complementary neural codes.

    Ohn, Tzu-Lun; Rutherford, Mark A; Jing, Zhizi; Jung, Sangyong; Duque-Afonso, Carlos J; Hoch, Gerhard; Picher, Maria Magdalena; Scharinger, Anja; Strenzke, Nicola; Moser, Tobias

    2016-08-01

    For sounds of a given frequency, spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) with different thresholds and dynamic ranges collectively encode the wide range of audible sound pressures. Heterogeneity of synapses between inner hair cells (IHCs) and SGNs is an attractive candidate mechanism for generating complementary neural codes covering the entire dynamic range. Here, we quantified active zone (AZ) properties as a function of AZ position within mouse IHCs by combining patch clamp and imaging of presynaptic Ca(2+) influx and by immunohistochemistry. We report substantial AZ heterogeneity whereby the voltage of half-maximal activation of Ca(2+) influx ranged over ∼20 mV. Ca(2+) influx at AZs facing away from the ganglion activated at weaker depolarizations. Estimates of AZ size and Ca(2+) channel number were correlated and larger when AZs faced the ganglion. Disruption of the deafness gene GIPC3 in mice shifted the activation of presynaptic Ca(2+) influx to more hyperpolarized potentials and increased the spontaneous SGN discharge. Moreover, Gipc3 disruption enhanced Ca(2+) influx and exocytosis in IHCs, reversed the spatial gradient of maximal Ca(2+) influx in IHCs, and increased the maximal firing rate of SGNs at sound onset. We propose that IHCs diversify Ca(2+) channel properties among AZs and thereby contribute to decomposing auditory information into complementary representations in SGNs. PMID:27462107

  6. Strontium-90 activity concentration in soil samples from the exclusion zone of the Fukushima daiichi nuclear power plant

    Sahoo, Sarata Kumar; Kavasi, Norbert; Sorimachi, Atsuyuki; Arae, Hideki; Tokonami, Shinji; Mietelski, Jerzy Wojciech; Łokas, Edyta; Yoshida, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    The radioactive fission product 90Sr has a long biological half-life (˜18 y) in the human body. Due to its chemical similarity to calcium it accumulates in bones and irradiates the bone marrow, causing its high radio-toxicity. Assessing 90Sr is therefore extremely important in case of a nuclear disaster. In this work 16 soil samples were collected from the exclusion zone (<30 km) of the earthquake-damaged Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, to measure 90Sr activity concentration using liquid scintillation counting. 137Cs activity concentration was also measured with gamma-spectroscopy in order to investigate correlation with 90Sr. The 90Sr activity concentrations ranged from 3.0 ± 0.3 to 23.3 ± 1.5 Bq kg−1 while the 137Cs from 0.7 ± 0.1 to 110.8 ± 0.3 kBq kg−1. The fact that radioactive contamination originated from the Fukushima nuclear accident was obvious due to the presence of 134Cs. However, 90Sr contamination was not confirmed in all samples although detectable amounts of 90Sr can be expected in Japanese soils, as a background, stemming from global fallout due to the atmospheric nuclear weapon tests. Correlation analysis between 90Sr and 137Cs activity concentrations provides a potentially powerful tool to discriminate background 90Sr level from its Fukushima contribution. PMID:27048779

  7. Activated endothelial interleukin-1beta, -6, and -8 concentrations and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression are attenuated by lidocaine.

    Lan, Wei

    2012-02-03

    Endothelial cells play a key role in ischemia reperfusion injury. We investigated the effects of lidocaine on activated human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6, and IL-8 concentrations and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression. HUVECs were pretreated with different concentrations of lidocaine (0 to 0.5 mg\\/mL) for 60 min, thereafter tumor necrosis factor-alpha was added at a concentration of 2.5 ng\\/mL and the cells incubated for 4 h. Supernatants were harvested, and cytokine concentrations were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Endothelial ICAM-1 expression was analyzed by using flow cytometry. Differences were assessed using analysis of variance and post hoc unpaired Student\\'s t-test where appropriate. Lidocaine (0.5 mg\\/mL) decreased IL-1beta (1.89 +\\/- 0.11 versus 4.16 +\\/- 1.27 pg\\/mL; P = 0.009), IL-6 (65.5 +\\/- 5.14 versus 162 +\\/- 11.5 pg\\/mL; P < 0.001), and IL-8 (3869 +\\/- 785 versus 14,961 +\\/- 406 pg\\/mL; P < 0.001) concentrations compared with the control. IL-1beta, IL-6, and IL-8 concentrations in HUVECs treated with clinically relevant plasma concentrations of lidocaine (0.005 mg\\/mL) were similar to control. ICAM-1 expression on lidocaine-treated (0.05 mg\\/mL) HUVECs was less than on controls (198 +\\/- 52.7 versus 298 +\\/- 50.3; Mean Channel Fluorescence; P < 0.001). Activated endothelial IL-1beta, IL-6, and IL-8 concentrations and ICAM-1 expression are attenuated only by lidocaine at concentrations larger than clinically relevant concentrations.

  8. A heterocyclic molecule kartogenin induces collagen synthesis of human dermal fibroblasts by activating the smad4/smad5 pathway.

    Wang, Jing; Zhou, Jia; Zhang, Ning; Zhang, Xiaoling; Li, Qingfeng

    2014-07-18

    Declined production of collagen by fibroblasts is one of the major causes of aging appearance. However, only few of compounds found in cosmetic products are able to directly increase collagen synthesis. A novel small heterocyclic compound called kartogenin (KGN) was found to stimulate collagen synthesis of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). So, we hypothesized and tested that if KGN could be applied to stimulate the collagen synthesis of fibroblasts. Human dermal fibroblasts in vitro were treated with various concentrations of KGN, with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) serving as the negative control. Real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, Western blot, and immunofluorescence analyses were performed to examine the expression of collagen and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) signaling pathway. The production of collagen was also tested in vivo by Masson's trichrome stain and immunohistochemistry in the dermis of mice administrated with KGN. Results showed that without obvious influence on fibroblasts' apoptosis and viability, KGN stimulated type-I collagen synthesis of fibroblasts at the mRNA and protein levels in a time-dependent manner, but KGN did not induce expression of α-skeletal muscle actin (α-sma) or matrix metallopeptidase1 (MMP1), MMP9 in vitro. Smad4/smad5 of the TGF-β signaling pathway was activated by KGN while MAPK signaling pathway remained unchanged. KGN also increased type-I collagen synthesis in the dermis of BALB/C mice. Our results indicated that KGN promoted the type-I collagen synthesis of dermal fibroblasts in vitro and in the dermis of mice through activation of the smad4/smad5 pathway. This molecule could be used in wound healing, tissue engineering of fibroblasts, or aesthetic and reconstructive procedures. PMID:24928394

  9. Effect of activated sludge in the bottom zone on biogenic sulfate reduction

    Yagafarov, G.G.; Bikchentayeva, A.G.; Yagafarov, R.G.

    1981-01-01

    It is shown that sulfate destruction in the Arlansk group of fields is caused by infection of the formation by sulfate reducing bacteria in the drilling process and flooding by surface water. For the first time, the necessity is shown of considering the activated sludge formed from particles suspended in water and biocenosis of microorganisms during microbiological investigation of wells. It is suggested that biodecomposition of surfactants is possible only in the area of formation of activated sludge around the bottom of the injection well.

  10. Electron-correlation effects in enhanced ionization of molecules: A time-dependent generalized-active-space configuration-interaction study

    Chattopadhyay, S.; Bauch, S.; Madsen, L. B.

    2015-12-01

    We numerically study models of H2 and LiH molecules, aligned collinearly with the linear polarization of the external field, to elucidate the possible role of correlation in the enhanced-ionization (EI) phenomena. Correlation is considered at different levels of approximation with the time-dependent generalized-active-space configuration-interaction method. The results of our studies show that enhanced ionization occurs in multielectron molecules and that correlation is important, and they also demonstrate significant deviations between the results of the single-active-electron approximation and more accurate configuration-interaction methods. We further investigate the role of low-lying excited states in the EI phenomena. With the inclusion of correlation we show strong carrier-envelope-phase effects in the enhanced ionization of the asymmetric heteronuclear LiH -like molecule. The correlated calculation shows an intriguing feature of crossover in enhanced ionization with two carrier-envelope phases at critical internuclear separation.

  11. Electron correlation effects in enhanced-ionization of molecules:A time-dependent generalized-active-space configuration-interaction study

    Chattopadhyay, S; Madsen, L B

    2015-01-01

    We numerically study models of $\\mathrm{H}_2$ and $\\mathrm{LiH}$ molecules, aligned collinearly with the linear polarization of the external field, to elucidate the possible role of correlation in the enhanced-ionization phenomena. Correlation is considered at different levels of approximation with the time-dependent generalized-active-space configuration-interaction method. The results of our studies show that enhanced ionization occurs in multielectron molecules, that correlation is important and they also demonstrate significant deviations between the results of the single-active-electron approximation and more accurate configuration-interaction methods. With the inclusion of correlation we show strong carrier-envelope-phase effects in the enhanced ionization of the asymmetric heteronuclear $\\mathrm{LiH}$-like molecule. The correlated calculation shows an intriguing feature of cross-over in enhanced ionization with two carrier-envelope-phases at critical inter-nuclear separation.

  12. Problems of evaluation of nuclear reactor active zone tubes during pre-irradiation tests

    An analysis of standard methods of graine size estimation of basic indexes of austenitic steel and alloys of active area of atomic reactors. It is shown insolvency of standard methods of grain size estimation in the real wares. The suggested method of computer simulation of structures of pipes-shells raped for working aut of modes of heat treatment

  13. The twilight zone: ambient light levels trigger activity in primitive ants.

    Narendra, Ajay; Reid, Samuel F; Hemmi, Jan M

    2010-05-22

    Many animals become active during twilight, a narrow time window where the properties of the visual environment are dramatically different from both day and night. Despite the fact that many animals including mammals, reptiles, birds and insects become active in this specific temporal niche, we do not know what cues trigger this activity. To identify the onset of specific temporal niches, animals could anticipate the timing of regular events or directly measure environmental variables. We show that the Australian bull ant, Myrmecia pyriformis, starts foraging only during evening twilight throughout the year. The onset occurs neither at a specific temperature nor at a specific time relative to sunset, but at a specific ambient light intensity. Foraging onset occurs later when light intensities at sunset are brighter than normal or earlier when light intensities at sunset are darker than normal. By modifying ambient light intensity experimentally, we provide clear evidence that ants indeed measure light levels and do not rely on an internal rhythm to begin foraging. We suggest that the reason for restricting the foraging onset to twilight and measuring light intensity to trigger activity is to optimize the trade-off between predation risk and ease of navigation. PMID:20129978

  14. 78 FR 66330 - Foreign-Trade Zone 196-Fort Worth, Texas, Authorization of Production Activity, Flextronics...

    2013-11-05

    ... in the Federal Register inviting public comment (78 FR 37785, 6-24-2013). The FTZ Board has..., Flextronics International USA, Inc. (Mobile Phone Assembly and Kitting), Fort Worth, Texas On June 14, 2013, Flextronics International USA, Inc. submitted a notification of proposed production activity to the...

  15. Strontium-90 activity concentration in soil samples from the exclusion zone of the Fukushima daiichi nuclear power plant

    Sahoo, Sarata Kumar; Kavasi, Norbert; Sorimachi, Atsuyuki; Arae, Hideki; Tokonami, Shinji; Mietelski, Jerzy Wojciech; Łokas, Edyta; Yoshida, Satoshi

    2016-04-01

    The radioactive fission product 90Sr has a long biological half-life (˜18 y) in the human body. Due to its chemical similarity to calcium it accumulates in bones and irradiates the bone marrow, causing its high radio-toxicity. Assessing 90Sr is therefore extremely important in case of a nuclear disaster. In this work 16 soil samples were collected from the exclusion zone (accident was obvious due to the presence of 134Cs. However, 90Sr contamination was not confirmed in all samples although detectable amounts of 90Sr can be expected in Japanese soils, as a background, stemming from global fallout due to the atmospheric nuclear weapon tests. Correlation analysis between 90Sr and 137Cs activity concentrations provides a potentially powerful tool to discriminate background 90Sr level from its Fukushima contribution.

  16. Direct observations of hydrothermal waters on the bottom of the Pacific Ocean (Galapagos active zone and Hess depession)

    Gordeev, V.V.; Demina, L.L.

    1979-06-01

    Direct geochemical evidences of hydrothermal alteration of oceanic waters above active oceanic ridges were obtained. In axial part of Galapagos fault and in Hess depression the near-bottom waters having unusually high contents of Fe, Mn, Cu, and Zn in suspension and lowered contents of Fe, Cu, Zn, and Ni in solution (Mn was not detected in solution) were revealed. This is probably due to capture of dissolved metal by amorphous hydroxides of Fe and Mn. The length of the anomalous zone along meridional profile through the Carnegie ridge is near 100 km and its thickness above the bottom reachs 1000 m. Within Hess depression, where waters are more isolated, the alteration in metal concentrations in suspension and solution are detected at the distance 2000 to 5000 m from the bottom.

  17. Immission measurement of airborne Xe-133 activity in the near-range zone of the Fessenheim nuclear power station

    A simple method of the nuclide-specific measurement of airborne Xe-133 is described. The method proceeds from cryogenic enrichment at carbon of the xenon fraction of the air (at 2200K) to the quantitative separation of the xenon of remaining air fractions, and finally to beta-decay measurement of Xe-133 in a counting tube. The results of a one-year measuring campaign show that the atmospheric Xe-133 activity in the near-range zone around the Fessenheim plant is higher by about one order of magnitude than at the reference measuring stations at Freiburg and Schauinsland. The highest weakly mean value of 1.4 Bq/m2 measured so far falls into July 1985. It is due to a short-term release of noble gases after shut-down of the reactor. (orig./PW)

  18. Strontium-90 activity concentration in soil samples from the exclusion zone of the Fukushima daiichi nuclear power plant

    Sahoo, Sarata Kumar; Kavasi, Norbert; Sorimachi, Atsuyuki; Arae, Hideki; Tokonami, Shinji; Mietelski, Jerzy Wojciech; Łokas, Edyta; Yoshida, Satoshi

    2016-04-01

    The radioactive fission product 90Sr has a long biological half-life (˜18 y) in the human body. Due to its chemical similarity to calcium it accumulates in bones and irradiates the bone marrow, causing its high radio-toxicity. Assessing 90Sr is therefore extremely important in case of a nuclear disaster. In this work 16 soil samples were collected from the exclusion zone (contamination originated from the Fukushima nuclear accident was obvious due to the presence of 134Cs. However, 90Sr contamination was not confirmed in all samples although detectable amounts of 90Sr can be expected in Japanese soils, as a background, stemming from global fallout due to the atmospheric nuclear weapon tests. Correlation analysis between 90Sr and 137Cs activity concentrations provides a potentially powerful tool to discriminate background 90Sr level from its Fukushima contribution.

  19. Exploring the Cross-sectional Association between Transit-Oriented Development Zoning and Active Travel and Transit Usage in the United States, 2010-2014

    Emily eThrun

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: In response to traditional zoning codes that contribute to car-dependent, sprawling, and disconnected neighborhoods, communities are reforming their land use laws to create pedestrian-friendly areas that promote physical activity. One such reform is the adoption of transit-oriented developments or districts (TODs. TODs are higher-density, compact, mixed use areas located around transit stops that are designed to encourage walking.Purpose: To identify the characteristics of communities that have adopted TODs in their land use laws and examine if communities that have included TODs in their zoning codes are more likely to have adults that commute by any form of active transportation (i.e., walking, biking, or public transportation or by using public transportation specifically.Methods: Zoning codes effective as of 2010 were obtained for a purposeful sample of the largest 3,914 municipal jurisdictions located in 473 of the most populous US counties and consolidated cities within 48 states and the District of Columbia. They were evaluated to determine whether they included TOD districts or regulations using a coding tool developed by the study team. Descriptive statistics together with t-tests and Pearson’s chi-squared independence test were used to compare characteristics of jurisdictions with and without TOD zoning. Multivariate linear regressions were used to compute the adjusted association between TOD zoning and taking public or active transportation to work.Results: Jurisdictions with TOD zoning were located more in the South and West than non-TOD jurisdictions and were more populous, higher income, more racially diverse, and younger. Jurisdictions with TOD zoning had significantly higher percentages of occupied housing with no vehicle than those without TOD zoning. TOD zoning was associated with significantly higher rates of public transportation to work (β=2.10, 95% CI=0.88, 3.32 and active transportation to work (β=2.48, 95

  20. Characterization Activities to Determine the Extent of DNAPL in the Vadose Zone at the A-014 Outfall of A/M Area

    The purpose of this investigation was to perform characterization activities necessary to confirm the presence and extent of DNAPL in the shallow vadose zone near the headwaters of the A-014 Outfall. Following the characterization, additional soil vapor extraction wells and vadose monitoring probes were installed to promote and monitor remediation activities in regions of identified DNAPL

  1. Antimicrobial activity of traditional medicinal plants from Ankober District, North Shewa Zone, Amhara Region, Ethiopia

    Molla, Ermias Lulekal; Rondevaldova, J; Bernaskova, E; Cepkova, J; Asfaw, Z; Kelbessa, E; Kokoska, L; Van Damme, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Context: Traditional medicinal plants have long been used in Ethiopia to treat human and livestock ailments. Despite a well-documented rich tradition of medicinal plant use in the country, their direct antimicrobial effects are still poorly known. Objective: To investigate the antimicrobial activity of 19 medicinal plant species that were selected based on the ethnobotanical information on their traditional use to treat infectious diseases in Ankober District. Methods: About 23 differ...

  2. A New Perspective of the Radio Bright Zone at The Galactic Center: Feedback from Nuclear Activities

    Zhao, Jun-Hui; Morris, Mark R.; Goss, W. M.

    2016-02-01

    New observations of Sgr A have been carried out with the Jansky VLA in the B and C arrays using the broadband (2 GHz) continuum mode at 5.5 GHz. The field of view covers the central 13‧ (30 pc) region of the radio-bright zone at the Galactic center. Using the multi-scale and multi-frequency-synthesis (MS-MFS) algorithms in CASA, we have imaged Sgr A with a resolution of 1″, achieving an rms noise of 8 μJy beam-1, and a dynamic range of 100,000:1. Both previously known and newly identified radio features in this region are revealed, including numerous filamentary sources. The radio continuum image is compared with Chandra X-ray images, with a CN emission-line image obtained with the Submillimeter Array and with detailed Paschen-α images obtained with Hubble Space Telescope/NICMOS. We discuss several prominent features in the radio image. The “Sgr A west Wings” extend 2‧ (5 pc) from the NW and SE tips of the Sgr A west H ii region (the “Mini-spiral”) to positions located 2.9 and 2.4 arcmin to the northwest and southeast of Sgr A*, respectively. The NW wing, along with several other prominent features, including the previously identified “NW Streamers,” form an elongated radio lobe (NW lobe), oriented nearly perpendicular to the Galactic plane. This radio lobe, with a size of 6.‧3 × 3.‧2 (14.4 pc × 7.3 pc), has a known X-ray counterpart. In the outer region of the NW lobe, a row of three thermally emitting rings is observed. A field containing numerous amorphous radio blobs extends for a distance of ˜2 arcmin beyond the tip of the SE wing; these newly recognized features coincide with the SE X-ray lobe. Most of the amorphous radio blobs in the NW and SE lobes have Paschen-α counterparts. We propose that they have been produced by shock interaction of ambient gas concentrations with a collimated nuclear wind or an outflow that originated from within the circumnuclear disk (CND). We also discuss the possibility that the ionized wind or

  3. Preliminary Assessment of the Nuclide Migration from the Activation Zone Around the Proposed Spallation Neutron Source Facility

    Dole, L.R.

    1998-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the potential impacts of migrating radionuclides from the activation zone around the proposed Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). Using conservatively high estimates of the potential inventory of radioactive activation products that could form in the proposed compacted-soil shield berm around an SNS facility on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), a conservative, simplified transport model was used to estimate the potential worst-case concentrations of the 12 long-lived isotopes in the groundwater under a site with the hydrologic characteristics of the ORR. Of the 12, only 3 isotopes showed any potential to exceed the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 20 Drinking Water Limits (DWLs). These isotopes were 14C, 22Na, and 54Mn. The latter two activation products have very short half-lives of 2.6 years and 0.854 year, respectively. Therefore, these will decay before reaching an off-site receptor, and they cannot pose off-site hazards. However, for this extremely conservative model, which overestimates the mobility of the contaminant, 14C, which has a 5,730-year half-life, was shown to represent a potential concern in the context of this study's conservative assumptions. This study examines alternative modifications to the SNS shield berm and makes recommendations.

  4. Systemic endothelial activation occurs in both mild and severe malaria. Correlating dermal microvascular endothelial cell phenotype and soluble cell adhesion molecules with disease severity.

    Turner, G D; Ly, V. C.; Nguyen, T.H.; Nguyen, H.P.; Bethell, D.; Wyllie, S.; Louwrier, K.; Fox, S B; Gatter, K C; Day, N P; Tran, T. H.; White, N J; Berendt, A R

    1998-01-01

    Fatal Plasmodium falciparum malaria is accompanied by systemic endothelial activation. To study endothelial activation directly during malaria and sepsis in vivo, the expression of cell adhesion molecules on dermal microvascular endothelium was examined in skin biopsies and correlated with plasma levels of soluble (circulating) ICAM-1, E-selectin, and VCAM-1 and the cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha. Skin biopsies were obtained from 61 cases of severe malaria, 42 cases of uncomplicat...

  5. Inhibition of Dengue Virus Replication by a Class of Small-Molecule Compounds That Antagonize Dopamine Receptor D4 and Downstream Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Signaling

    Smith, Jessica L.; Stein, David A.; Shum, David; Fischer, Matthew A.; Radu, Constantin; Bhinder, Bhavneet; Djaballah, Hakim; Nelson, Jay A.; Früh, Klaus; Hirsch, Alec J.

    2014-01-01

    Dengue viruses (DENV) are endemic pathogens of tropical and subtropical regions that cause significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. To date, no vaccines or antiviral therapeutics have been approved for combating DENV-associated disease. In this paper, we describe a class of tricyclic small-molecule compounds—dihydrodibenzothiepines (DHBTs), identified through high-throughput screening—with potent inhibitory activity against DENV serotype 2. SKI-417616, a highly active representative of ...

  6. Serum levels of tumor necrosis factor-α and soluble adhesion molecules in relation to magnetic resonance imaging results and clinical activity in multiple sclerosis

    One direction of research in pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS) has been to identify immunological markers associated with disease activity that are capable of predicting subsequent course of disease and are sensitive to intervention by immunomodulatory therapies. Adhesion molecules and tumor necrosis factor-α of the cytokine superfamily are associated with inflammation-mediated blood-brain barrier dysfunction and demyelination in the central nervous system (CNS). This study investigates the relationship between the serum level of soluble vascular adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM), soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (alCAM), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) activity in 18 patients with relapsing-remitting (RR) MS with different clinical activity. Patients with active gadolinium (Gd)-enhanced lesions on MRI showed a higher serum level of TNF-α, sVCA-1, slCAM-1 than RR MS patients without Gd-enhanced lesions. Control individuals (n=10) without MRI abnormalities had significantly lower serum levels of the above immunological parameters. These results suggest that serum levels of TNF-α and adhesion molecules slCAM-1 in RR MS patients are correlated with Gd-enhanced MRI and disease clinical activity and that they can be used as biological markers of disease activity. The soluble form of VCAM levels in peripheral blood did not correlate with disease activity and Gd-enhanced lesions of MRI. sVCAM as an early indicator of blood-brain barrier dysfunction may also serve as marker of beneficial activity in the relapsing phase of MS course. (authors)

  7. Joint molecule resolution requires the redundant activities of MUS-81 and XPF-1 during Caenorhabditis elegans meiosis.

    Nigel J O'Neil

    Full Text Available The generation and resolution of joint molecule recombination intermediates is required to ensure bipolar chromosome segregation during meiosis. During wild type meiosis in Caenorhabditis elegans, SPO-11-generated double stranded breaks are resolved to generate a single crossover per bivalent and the remaining recombination intermediates are resolved as noncrossovers. We discovered that early recombination intermediates are limited by the C. elegans BLM ortholog, HIM-6, and in the absence of HIM-6 by the structure specific endonuclease MUS-81. In the absence of both MUS-81 and HIM-6, recombination intermediates persist, leading to chromosome breakage at diakinesis and inviable embryos. MUS-81 has an additional role in resolving late recombination intermediates in C. elegans. mus-81 mutants exhibited reduced crossover recombination frequencies suggesting that MUS-81 is required to generate a subset of meiotic crossovers. Similarly, the Mus81-related endonuclease XPF-1 is also required for a subset of meiotic crossovers. Although C. elegans gen-1 mutants have no detectable meiotic defect either alone or in combination with him-6, mus-81 or xpf-1 mutations, mus-81;xpf-1 double mutants are synthetic lethal. While mus-81;xpf-1 double mutants are proficient for the processing of early recombination intermediates, they exhibit defects in the post-pachytene chromosome reorganization and the asymmetric disassembly of the synaptonemal complex, presumably triggered by crossovers or crossover precursors. Consistent with a defect in resolving late recombination intermediates, mus-81; xpf-1 diakinetic bivalents are aberrant with fine DNA bridges visible between two distinct DAPI staining bodies. We were able to suppress the aberrant bivalent phenotype by microinjection of activated human GEN1 protein, which can cleave Holliday junctions, suggesting that the DNA bridges in mus-81; xpf-1 diakinetic oocytes are unresolved Holliday junctions. We propose that the

  8. Could both vitamin D and geomagnetic activity impact serum levels of soluble cell adhesion molecules in young men?

    Bleizgys, Andrius; Šapoka, Virginijus

    2016-07-01

    Vitamin D might have a role in diminishing endothelial dysfunction (ED). The initial aim was to test the hypothesis of reciprocity between levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) and levels of soluble endothelial cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) that could serve as biomarkers of ED. Randomly selected men of age 20-39 were examined at February or March (cold season) and reexamined at August or September (warm season). Some lifestyle and anthropometrical data were recorded. Laboratory measurements, including those for serum levels of soluble CAMs—sICAM-1, sVCAM-1, sE-selectin and sP-selectin—were also performed. As some of the results were rather unexpected, indices of geomagnetic activity (GMA), obtained from the online database, were included in further analysis as a confounder. In 2012-2013, 130 men were examined in cold season, and 125 of them were reexamined in warm season. 25(OH)D levels were found to be significantly negatively associated with sVCAM-1 levels ( β = -0.15, p = 0.043 in warm season; β = -0.19, p = 0.007 for changes). Levels of sVCAM-1 and sICAM-1 from the same seasons were notably different between years and have changed in an opposite manner. Soluble P-selectin levels were higher at warm season in both years. GMA was positively associated with sVCAM-1 ( β = 0.17, p = 0.039 in cold season; β = 0.22, p = 0.002 for changes) and negatively with sICAM-1 ( β = -0.30. p Vitamin D might play a role in diminishing sVCAM-1 levels. Levels of sVCAM-1 and sICAM-1 were associated with the GMA; this implies a need for further research.

  9. Relevance of activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM) in tumor tissue and sera of cervical cancer patients

    An altered expression of the activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM) is associated with cancer progression in various cancer types. In some cancers ALCAM has a prognostic value or is predictive for the benefit of therapeutic interventions. To date there are no data on the role of ALCAM in cervical cancer available. In this study, ALCAM expression was analysed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in tissue samples of 233 patients with cervical cancer, among them 178 with complete follow-up information. In addition, soluble (s-)ALCAM was measured in sera of a subset of the included patients (n = 55) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). ALCAM overexpression was detected (immunoreactive score (IRS) 2-12) in 58.4% of the cervical cancer samples. The normal ectocervical or endocervical epithelium showed no ALCAM reactivity. In untreated patients, ALCAM overexpression in tumor tissue tended to be associated with shorter cancer-specific survival (CSS) and disease-free survival (DFS). Patients, whose tumor samples showed ALCAM overexpression receiving a cytotoxic therapy like radiotherapy or chemoradiation, however, had a favourable prognosis compared to those patients, whose cancers showed no or minimal ALCAM staining. This effect was particularly apparent in patients receiving chemoradiation where the CSS was significantly longer in patients with ALCAM-positive tumors (p = 0.038; cumulative incidence rates at 96 months 8%, 95% CI 0%-23%, and 26%, CI 3%-43% in ALCAM-positive and ALCAM-negative cases, respectively). Median preoperative s-ALCAM concentration in sera from tumor patients was 27.6 ng/ml (range 17.5-55.1 ng/ml, mean 28.9 ng/ml), serum levels did not correlate with intratumoral ALCAM expression. The data of our retrospective study suggest that the prognostic value of ALCAM expression in cervical carcinoma might be therapy-dependent, and that ALCAM might function as a predictive marker for the response to chemoradiation. This should be confirmed in

  10. Could both vitamin D and geomagnetic activity impact serum levels of soluble cell adhesion molecules in young men?

    Bleizgys, Andrius; Šapoka, Virginijus

    2016-07-01

    Vitamin D might have a role in diminishing endothelial dysfunction (ED). The initial aim was to test the hypothesis of reciprocity between levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) and levels of soluble endothelial cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) that could serve as biomarkers of ED. Randomly selected men of age 20-39 were examined at February or March (cold season) and reexamined at August or September (warm season). Some lifestyle and anthropometrical data were recorded. Laboratory measurements, including those for serum levels of soluble CAMs—sICAM-1, sVCAM-1, sE-selectin and sP-selectin—were also performed. As some of the results were rather unexpected, indices of geomagnetic activity (GMA), obtained from the online database, were included in further analysis as a confounder. In 2012-2013, 130 men were examined in cold season, and 125 of them were reexamined in warm season. 25(OH)D levels were found to be significantly negatively associated with sVCAM-1 levels ( β = -0.15, p = 0.043 in warm season; β = -0.19, p = 0.007 for changes). Levels of sVCAM-1 and sICAM-1 from the same seasons were notably different between years and have changed in an opposite manner. Soluble P-selectin levels were higher at warm season in both years. GMA was positively associated with sVCAM-1 ( β = 0.17, p = 0.039 in cold season; β = 0.22, p = 0.002 for changes) and negatively with sICAM-1 ( β = -0.30. p < 0.001 in cold season) levels. Vitamin D might play a role in diminishing sVCAM-1 levels. Levels of sVCAM-1 and sICAM-1 were associated with the GMA; this implies a need for further research.

  11. Could both vitamin D and geomagnetic activity impact serum levels of soluble cell adhesion molecules in young men?

    Bleizgys, Andrius; Šapoka, Virginijus

    2015-11-01

    Vitamin D might have a role in diminishing endothelial dysfunction (ED). The initial aim was to test the hypothesis of reciprocity between levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) and levels of soluble endothelial cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) that could serve as biomarkers of ED. Randomly selected men of age 20-39 were examined at February or March (cold season) and reexamined at August or September (warm season). Some lifestyle and anthropometrical data were recorded. Laboratory measurements, including those for serum levels of soluble CAMs—sICAM-1, sVCAM-1, sE-selectin and sP-selectin—were also performed. As some of the results were rather unexpected, indices of geomagnetic activity (GMA), obtained from the online database, were included in further analysis as a confounder. In 2012-2013, 130 men were examined in cold season, and 125 of them were reexamined in warm season. 25(OH)D levels were found to be significantly negatively associated with sVCAM-1 levels (β = -0.15, p = 0.043 in warm season; β = -0.19, p = 0.007 for changes). Levels of sVCAM-1 and sICAM-1 from the same seasons were notably different between years and have changed in an opposite manner. Soluble P-selectin levels were higher at warm season in both years. GMA was positively associated with sVCAM-1 (β = 0.17, p = 0.039 in cold season; β = 0.22, p = 0.002 for changes) and negatively with sICAM-1 (β = -0.30. p Vitamin D might play a role in diminishing sVCAM-1 levels. Levels of sVCAM-1 and sICAM-1 were associated with the GMA; this implies a need for further research.

  12. Decreasing the singlet-triplet gap for thermally activated delayed fluorescence molecules by structural modification on the donor fragment: First-principles study

    Fan, Jian-zhong; Lin, Li-li; Wang, Chuan-kui

    2016-05-01

    The small energy gap between singlet excitons (S) and triplet excitons (T) of organic molecules is a dominant condition for high efficient thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF). In this study, influence of modification in donor groups of a series of molecules on their geometries, S-T energy gaps, and photophysical properties, is investigated based on first-principles calculations. Investigation shows that, as the electron donating ability is increased, both S-T energy gap and overlap between the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) are decreased. This work provides strategy for designing high efficient and multi-color TADF devices.

  13. Increase in electron transfer activity in photosystem Ⅱ of spinach thylakoids caused by conversion of phosphatidyl-glycerol to phosphatidic acid molecules

    WU Feng; YANG Zhenle; LI Liangbi; KUANG Tingyun

    2003-01-01

    The techniques of oxygen electrode polarography, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacryamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and thin layer chromatography (TLC) were employed to investigate the effect of phospholipase D treatment on physiological function of spinach thylakoids. It was shown that the phospholipase D treatment on thylakoid resulted in the degradation of phosphatidylglycerol (PG) and occurrence of phosphatidic acid (PA). The changes of PG to PA molecules caused an increase in oxygen evolution in photosystem Ⅱ (PSⅡ), which was accompanied by an uncoupling effect on thylakoid membrane. It was revealed that the head-groups of PG molecules play an important role in the maintenance of the appropriate physiological activity of thylakoid membrane.

  14. Hygienic aspects of safety vital activity support of servicemen and their families on the contaminated zone

    Analysis of radiation-and-hygienic, radioecological and medical aspects of vital activity of servicemen and their families at the radioactive contaminated territories (RCT) after the Chernobyl NPP accident has shown that the life there is linked with the increased health risk. The paper presents the examination results of 2550 human beings, over 2100 samples of foods and of the environmental objects have been examined. The direct correlation link between the territory contamination density and Cs-137 content in foods was determined; additional radiation burden from foods through gastrointestinal tract was observed in case of the incorporated radiation of a human being. The values of dose radiation burden of the examined persons during their life at the RCT were estimated. The life at the RCT is linked with the morbidity,with growth of psychonoses, with the rearrangement of the immune system. 10 refs

  15. Nuclear factor kappaB-mediated down-regulation of adhesion molecules: possible mechanism for inhibitory activity of bigelovin against inflammatory monocytes adhesion to endothelial cells.

    Nam, Kung-Woo; Oh, Goo Taeg; Seo, Eun-Kyoung; Kim, Kyeong Ho; Koo, Uk; Lee, Sung-Jin; Mar, Woongchon

    2009-06-22

    The flowers of Inula britannica L. var. chinensis (Rupr.) Reg. (Compositae) are used in traditional medicine to treat asthma, chronic bronchitis, and acute pleurisy in China and Korea. However, the pharmacological actions of Inula britannica L. var. chinensis on endothelial cells and inflammatory monocytes are not clear. In this study, we investigated whether bigelovin, a sesquiterpene lactone isolated from the flowers of Inula britannica L. var. chinensis, inhibits monocyte adhesion and adhesion molecule expression in brain endothelial cells. We measured tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha)-enhanced Raw264.7 monocyte binding to brain endothelial cells and the levels of cell adhesion molecules, including vascular adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), and endothelial-selectin (E-selectin) on the surface of brain endothelial cells. Bigelovin significantly inhibited these in a dose-dependent manner without affecting cell viability. Furthermore, bigelovin suppressed the nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) promoter-driven luciferase activity, NF-kappaB activation, and degradation of NF-kappaB inhibitor protein alpha (IkappaBalpha). These results indicate that bigelovin inhibits inflammatory monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells and the expression of VCAM-1, ICAM-1, and E-selectin by blocking IkappaBalpha degradation and NF-kappaB activation. PMID:19429369

  16. Activation of coherent lattice phonon following ultrafast molecular spin-state photo-switching: A molecule-to-lattice energy transfer

    A. Marino

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We combine ultrafast optical spectroscopy with femtosecond X-ray absorption to study the photo-switching dynamics of the [Fe(PM-AzA2(NCS2] spin-crossover molecular solid. The light-induced excited spin-state trapping process switches the molecules from low spin to high spin (HS states on the sub-picosecond timescale. The change of the electronic state (<50 fs induces a structural reorganization of the molecule within 160 fs. This transformation is accompanied by coherent molecular vibrations in the HS potential and especially a rapidly damped Fe-ligand breathing mode. The time-resolved studies evidence a delayed activation of coherent optical phonons of the lattice surrounding the photoexcited molecules.

  17. Carbon Dioxide Activation by Scandium Atoms and Scandium Monoxide Molecules: Formation and Spectroscopic Characterization of ScCO3 and OCScCO3 in Solid Neon.

    Zhang, Qingnan; Qu, Hui; Chen, Mohua; Zhou, Mingfei

    2016-01-28

    The reactions of carbon dioxide with scandium monoxide molecules and scandium atoms are investigated using matrix isolation infrared spectroscopy in solid neon. The species formed are identified by the effects of isotopic substitution on their infrared spectra as well as density functional calculations. The results show that the ground state ScO molecule reacts with carbon dioxide to form the carbonate complex ScCO3 spontaneously on annealing. The ground state Sc atom reacts with two carbon dioxide molecules to give the carbonate carbonyl complex OCScCO3 via the previously reported OScCO insertion intermediate on annealing. The observation of these spontaneous reactions is consistent with theoretical predictions that both the Sc + 2CO2 → OCScCO3 and ScO + CO2 → ScCO3 reactions are thermodynamically exothermic and are kinetically facile, requiring little or no activation energy. PMID:26738558

  18. Soil physical degradation by human activities in the zone II of the basin of Burgos, Tamaulipas, Mexico

    The objective of this work was to characterize the physical degradation of the soil for antropic activities during the years 2007 and 2008 in the II zone of the Burgos Basin in Tamaulipas, Mexico. In this region, human action manifests itself due to activities such as agriculture, livestock and industry. The conventional farming, based mainly on the cultivation of sorghum, is characterized by great mechanization and tilling the soil which has contributed in large measure to aggravate erosion processes. There is also some logging, mainly for charcoal production and, recently, has joined the exploration and exploitation of natural gas. We used the methodology for Assessment of Soil Degradation (ASSOD) to identify, located and define the types of soil degradation within physiographic units. Results showed that nearly 74% of the study area presents some kind of degradation. The main process was water erosion, followed, by compaction and wind erosion. The main factors are essentially overgrazing and inadequate farming practices. Approximately 60% of the units evaluated presented a moderate level of degradation, but the speed of this process indicates that maintenance works are needed to reverse. (Author) 7 refs.

  19. Neutron activation analysis and scanning electron microscopy of phytoplankton in the coastal zone of the Crimea (Black sea)

    For the first time the concentrations of 45 elements in the coastal phytoplankton communities used as bioindicator of inorganic contamination of the Black Sea coastal area near Sevastopol, Ukraine, were determined by means of neutron activation analysis and scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectrometer. Phytoplankton samples were collected by total tows of the plankton net with 35 μm pore size at 3 stations situated in polluted and relatively pristine water areas of the Sevastopol coastal zone during autumn period of the phytoplankton active growth. The concentration of Mg, Al, Sc, Ti, V, Mn, As, Rb, Ba, Th and Fe, Cr increases exponentially from relatively pristine station to more polluted station and 10 and 3 times greater, respectively, in the phytoplankton of the Sevastopol Bay. The rare-earth elements have relatively the same concentration values of about 1 μg/g and tend to accumulate in the phytoplankton from the polluted station in the Sevastopol Bay. The obtained results are in good agreement with the elemental concentration data in the oceanic plankton, plankton communities from the White Sea and the Black Sea. Using energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry the mineral particles of unknown origin and impurities of copper (0.42% by weight) in the phytoplankton at the polluted station and zinc (0.57% by weight) at the relatively pristine station were determined

  20. Activation of type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1R promotes neurogenesis in murine subventricular zone cell cultures.

    Sara Xapelli

    Full Text Available The endocannabinoid system has been implicated in the modulation of adult neurogenesis. Here, we describe the effect of type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1R activation on self-renewal, proliferation and neuronal differentiation in mouse neonatal subventricular zone (SVZ stem/progenitor cell cultures. Expression of CB1R was detected in SVZ-derived immature cells (Nestin-positive, neurons and astrocytes. Stimulation of the CB1R by (R-(+-Methanandamide (R-m-AEA increased self-renewal of SVZ cells, as assessed by counting the number of secondary neurospheres and the number of Sox2+/+ cell pairs, an effect blocked by Notch pathway inhibition. Moreover, R-m-AEA treatment for 48 h, increased proliferation as assessed by BrdU incorporation assay, an effect mediated by activation of MAPK-ERK and AKT pathways. Surprisingly, stimulation of CB1R by R-m-AEA also promoted neuronal differentiation (without affecting glial differentiation, at 7 days, as shown by counting the number of NeuN-positive neurons in the cultures. Moreover, by monitoring intracellular calcium concentrations ([Ca(2+]i in single cells following KCl and histamine stimuli, a method that allows the functional evaluation of neuronal differentiation, we observed an increase in neuronal-like cells. This proneurogenic effect was blocked when SVZ cells were co-incubated with R-m-AEA and the CB1R antagonist AM 251, for 7 days, thus indicating that this effect involves CB1R activation. In accordance with an effect on neuronal differentiation and maturation, R-m-AEA also increased neurite growth, as evaluated by quantifying and measuring the number of MAP2-positive processes. Taken together, these results demonstrate that CB1R activation induces proliferation, self-renewal and neuronal differentiation from mouse neonatal SVZ cell cultures.

  1. Vadose zone microbial community structure and activity in metal/radionuclide contaminated sediments. Final technical report

    Balkwill, David L.

    2002-08-17

    This final technical report describes the research carried out during the final two months of the no-cost extension ending 11/14/01. The primary goals of the project were (1) to determine the potential for transformation of Cr(VI) (oxidized, mobile) to Cr(III) (reduced, immobile) under unsaturated conditions as a function of different levels and combinations of (a) chromium, (b) nitrate (co-disposed with Cr), and (c) molasses (inexpensive bioremediation substrate), and (2) to determine population structure and activity in experimental treatments by characterization of the microbial community by signature biomarker analysis and by RT-PCR and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and 16S ribosomal RNA genes. It was determined early in the one-year no-cost extension period that the T-RFLP approach was problematic in regard to providing information on the identities of microorganisms in the samples examined. As a result, it could not provide the detailed information on microbial community structure that was needed to assess the effects of treatments with chromium, nitrate, and/or molasses. Therefore, we decided to obtain the desired information by amplifying (using TR-PCR, with the same primers used for T-RFLP) and cloning 16S rRNA gene sequences from the same RNA extracts that were used for T-RFLP analysis. We also decided to use a restriction enzyme digest procedure (fingerprinting procedure) to place the clones into types. The primary focus of the research carried out during this report period was twofold: (a) to complete the sequencing of the clones, and (b) to analyze the clone sequences phylogenetically in order to determine the relatedness of the bacteria detected in the samples to each other and to previously described genera and species.

  2. CP-31398, a putative p53-stabilizing molecule tested in mammalian cells and in yeast for its effects on p53 transcriptional activity

    Barberis Alcide

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CP-31398 is a small molecule that has been reported to stabilize the DNA-binding core domain of the human tumor suppressor protein p53 in vitro. The compound was also reported to function as a potential anti-cancer drug by rescuing the DNA-binding activity and, consequently, the transcription activation function of mutant p53 protein in mammalian tissue culture cells and in mice. Results We performed a series of gene expression experiments to test the activity of CP-31398 in yeast and in human cell cultures. With these cell-based assays, we were unable to detect any specific stimulation of mutant p53 activity by this compound. Concentrations of CP-31398 that were reported to be active in the published work were highly toxic to the human H1299 lung carcinoma and Saos-2 cell lines in our experiments. Conclusion In our experiments, the small molecule CP-31398 was unable to reactivate mutant p53 protein. The results of our in vivo experiments are in agreement with the recently published biochemical analysis of CP-31398 showing that this molecule does not bind p53 as previously claimed, but intercalates into DNA.

  3. Enumerating molecules.

    Visco, Donald Patrick, Jr. (, . Tennessee Technological University, Cookeville, TN); Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Roe, Diana C.

    2004-04-01

    This report is a comprehensive review of the field of molecular enumeration from early isomer counting theories to evolutionary algorithms that design molecules in silico. The core of the review is a detail account on how molecules are counted, enumerated, and sampled. The practical applications of molecular enumeration are also reviewed for chemical information, structure elucidation, molecular design, and combinatorial library design purposes. This review is to appear as a chapter in Reviews in Computational Chemistry volume 21 edited by Kenny B. Lipkowitz.

  4. Pollution from organic contaminants in Greek marine areas, receiving anthropogenic pressures from intense activities in the coastal zone

    Hatzianestis, Ioannis

    2014-05-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are widespread pollutants in marine sediments, receiving the pressures from various anthropogenic activities in the coastal zone. Due to their mutagenic and carcinogenic behaviour, PAHs are classified as priority contaminants to be monitored in environmental quality control schemes. The purpose of this study was to determine the levels of PAHs in coastal areas of Greece directly influenced from the operation of major industrial units in the coastal zone, investigate their sources and evaluate their potential toxicity by comparison against effect - based sediment quality guidelines. Thirty two surface sediment samples were collected from three areas of the Hellenic coastline: a) Antikyra bay in Korinthiakos gulf, influenced from the operation of an alumina and aluminium production plant b) Larymna bay in Noth Evoikos gulf, influenced from the operation of a nickel production plant and c) Aliveri bay in South Evoikos Gulf, influenced from a cement production plant. In all the areas studied, aquaculture and fishing activities have been also developed in the coastal zone. PAH concentrations were determined by GC-MS, after soxhlet extraction and fractionation by silica column chromatography. PAH sources and origin were investigated by applying several isomeric ratio diagnostic criteria. The mean quotient Effect- Range Median (m-ERM) was used to evaluate the potential of adverse effects posed to benthic organisms. Three m-ERM-q values were used to differentiate the probability of observing toxicity and classify sites into four categories: sediments with m-ERM1.5 have the highest probability (76%) of toxicity. Extremely high PAH concentrations more than 100,000 ng/g were found in the close vicinity of the alumina production plant in Antikyra bay. High levels of PAHs up to 22,000 ng/g were also found in Aliveri bay, whereas lowest values, but still indicating significant pollution, were measured close to the nickel production plant

  5. Ventilation rates and activity levels of juvenile jumbo squid under metabolic suppression in the oxygen minimum zone.

    Trübenbach, Katja; Pegado, Maria R; Seibel, Brad A; Rosa, Rui

    2013-02-01

    The Humboldt (jumbo) squid, Dosidicus gigas, is a part-time resident of the permanent oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) in the Eastern Tropical Pacific and, thereby, it encounters oxygen levels below its critical oxygen partial pressure. To better understand the ventilatory mechanisms that accompany the process of metabolic suppression in these top oceanic predators, we exposed juvenile D. gigas to the oxygen levels found in the OMZ (1% O(2), 1 kPa, 10 °C) and measured metabolic rate, activity cycling patterns, swimming mode, escape jet (burst) frequency, mantle contraction frequency and strength, stroke volume and oxygen extraction efficiency. In normoxia, metabolic rate varied between 14 and 29 μmol O(2) g(-1) wet mass h(-1), depending on the level of activity. The mantle contraction frequency and strength were linearly correlated and increased significantly with activity level. Additionally, an increase in stroke volume and ventilatory volume per minute was observed, followed by a mantle hyperinflation process during high activity periods. Squid metabolic rate dropped more than 75% during exposure to hypoxia. Maximum metabolic rate was not achieved under such conditions and the metabolic scope was significantly decreased. Hypoxia changed the relationship between mantle contraction strength and frequency from linear to polynomial with increasing activity, indicating that, under hypoxic conditions, the jumbo squid primarily increases the strength of mantle contraction and does not regulate its frequency. Under hypoxia, jumbo squid also showed a larger inflation period (reduced contraction frequency) and decreased relaxed mantle diameter (shortened diffusion pathway), which optimize oxygen extraction efficiency (up to 82%/34%, without/with consideration of 60% potential skin respiration). Additionally, they breathe 'deeply', with more powerful contractions and enhanced stroke volume. This deep-breathing behavior allows them to display a stable ventilatory volume per

  6. Comparison of the binding of the therapeutically active nucleosides to DNA molecules with different level of lesions

    Kruglova, E. B.; Gladkovskaya, N. A.

    2002-12-01

    Recently we have shown that DNA molecules extracted from epididymis of the Wistar male rats exposed to low doses of gamma radiation interact with some pyrimidine nucleosides. The bindign affinities of NUC to control DNA molecules are unessential. Comparing the UV melting curves for the various DNA sammples we show that observed differences are related to conformational chagnes in the DNA double helix. The samples of the damaged DNA have been obtained by partial denaturation of the calf thymus DNA in the salt-free aqueous solutions. The level of DNA damages in the model DNA smplase depends on the DNA concentration. It was shown that damages in the DNA molecules lead to changes of the melting curves of DNA-NUC mixtures that are similar to those for the DNA samples extracted from irradiated tissues. ALso it has been found that the binding mechanisms to cytosine arabinoside and 6-azacytosine to DNA molecuels having modifeid secondary structures are different.

  7. Inhibition of helicase activity by a small molecule impairs Werner syndrome helicase (WRN) function in the cellular response to DNA damage or replication stress.

    Aggarwal, Monika; Sommers, Joshua A; Shoemaker, Robert H; Brosh, Robert M

    2011-01-25

    Modulation of DNA repair proteins by small molecules has attracted great interest. An in vitro helicase activity screen was used to identify molecules that modulate DNA unwinding by Werner syndrome helicase (WRN), mutated in the premature aging disorder Werner syndrome. A small molecule from the National Cancer Institute Diversity Set designated NSC 19630 [1-(propoxymethyl)-maleimide] was identified that inhibited WRN helicase activity but did not affect other DNA helicases [Bloom syndrome (BLM), Fanconi anemia group J (FANCJ), RECQ1, RecQ, UvrD, or DnaB). Exposure of human cells to NSC 19630 dramatically impaired growth and proliferation, induced apoptosis in a WRN-dependent manner, and resulted in elevated γ-H2AX and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) foci. NSC 19630 exposure led to delayed S-phase progression, consistent with the accumulation of stalled replication forks, and to DNA damage in a WRN-dependent manner. Exposure to NSC 19630 sensitized cancer cells to the G-quadruplex-binding compound telomestatin or a poly(ADP ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitor. Sublethal dosage of NSC 19630 and the chemotherapy drug topotecan acted synergistically to inhibit cell proliferation and induce DNA damage. The use of this WRN helicase inhibitor molecule may provide insight into the importance of WRN-mediated pathway(s) important for DNA repair and the replicational stress response. PMID:21220316

  8. Relevance of activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM in tumor tissue and sera of cervical cancer patients

    Ihnen Maike

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An altered expression of the activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM is associated with cancer progression in various cancer types. In some cancers ALCAM has a prognostic value or is predictive for the benefit of therapeutic interventions. To date there are no data on the role of ALCAM in cervical cancer available. Methods In this study, ALCAM expression was analysed by immunohistochemistry (IHC in tissue samples of 233 patients with cervical cancer, among them 178 with complete follow-up information. In addition, soluble (s-ALCAM was measured in sera of a subset of the included patients (n = 55 by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Results ALCAM overexpression was detected (immunoreactive score (IRS 2-12 in 58.4% of the cervical cancer samples. The normal ectocervical or endocervical epithelium showed no ALCAM reactivity. In untreated patients, ALCAM overexpression in tumor tissue tended to be associated with shorter cancer-specific survival (CSS and disease-free survival (DFS. Patients, whose tumor samples showed ALCAM overexpression receiving a cytotoxic therapy like radiotherapy or chemoradiation, however, had a favourable prognosis compared to those patients, whose cancers showed no or minimal ALCAM staining. This effect was particularly apparent in patients receiving chemoradiation where the CSS was significantly longer in patients with ALCAM-positive tumors (p = 0.038; cumulative incidence rates at 96 months 8%, 95% CI 0%-23%, and 26%, CI 3%-43% in ALCAM-positive and ALCAM-negative cases, respectively. Median preoperative s-ALCAM concentration in sera from tumor patients was 27.6 ng/ml (range 17.5-55.1 ng/ml, mean 28.9 ng/ml, serum levels did not correlate with intratumoral ALCAM expression. Conclusions The data of our retrospective study suggest that the prognostic value of ALCAM expression in cervical carcinoma might be therapy-dependent, and that ALCAM might function as a predictive marker for the

  9. Compound 13, an α1-selective small molecule activator of AMPK, inhibits Helicobacter pylori-induced oxidative stresses and gastric epithelial cell apoptosis

    Half of the world's population experiences Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection, which is a main cause of gastritis, duodenal and gastric ulcer, and gastric cancers. In the current study, we investigated the potential role of compound 13 (C13), a novel α1-selective small molecule activator of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), against H. pylori-induced cytotoxicity in cultured gastric epithelial cells (GECs). We found that C13 induced significant AMPK activation, evidenced by phosphorylation of AMPKα1 and ACC (acetyl-CoA carboxylase), in both primary and transformed GECs. Treatment of C13 inhibited H. pylori-induced GEC apoptosis. AMPK activation was required for C13-mediated GEC protection. Inhibition of AMPK kinase activity by the AMPK inhibitor Compound C, or silencing AMPKα1 expression by targeted-shRNAs, alleviated C13-induced GEC protective activities against H. pylori. Significantly, C13 inhibited H. pylori-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in GECs. C13 induced AMPK-dependent expression of anti-oxidant gene heme oxygenase (HO-1) in GECs. Zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP) and tin protoporphyrin (SnPP), two HO-1 inhibitors, not only suppressed C13-mediated ROS scavenging activity, but also alleviated its activity in GECs against H. pylori. Together, these results indicate that C13 inhibits H. pylori-induced ROS production and GEC apoptosis through activating AMPK–HO–1 signaling. - Highlights: • We synthesized compound 13 (C13), a α1-selective small molecule AMPK activator. • C13-induced AMPK activation requires α1 subunit in gastric epithelial cells (GECs). • C13 enhances Helicobacter pylori-induced pro-survival AMPK activation to inhibit GEC apoptosis. • C13 inhibits H. pylori-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in GECs. • AMPK-heme oxygenase (HO-1) activation is required for C13-mediated anti-oxidant activity

  10. Compound 13, an α1-selective small molecule activator of AMPK, inhibits Helicobacter pylori-induced oxidative stresses and gastric epithelial cell apoptosis

    Zhao, Hangyong; Zhu, Huanghuang; Lin, Zhou; Lin, Gang; Lv, Guoqiang, E-mail: lvguoqiangwuxivip@163.com

    2015-08-07

    Half of the world's population experiences Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection, which is a main cause of gastritis, duodenal and gastric ulcer, and gastric cancers. In the current study, we investigated the potential role of compound 13 (C13), a novel α1-selective small molecule activator of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), against H. pylori-induced cytotoxicity in cultured gastric epithelial cells (GECs). We found that C13 induced significant AMPK activation, evidenced by phosphorylation of AMPKα1 and ACC (acetyl-CoA carboxylase), in both primary and transformed GECs. Treatment of C13 inhibited H. pylori-induced GEC apoptosis. AMPK activation was required for C13-mediated GEC protection. Inhibition of AMPK kinase activity by the AMPK inhibitor Compound C, or silencing AMPKα1 expression by targeted-shRNAs, alleviated C13-induced GEC protective activities against H. pylori. Significantly, C13 inhibited H. pylori-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in GECs. C13 induced AMPK-dependent expression of anti-oxidant gene heme oxygenase (HO-1) in GECs. Zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP) and tin protoporphyrin (SnPP), two HO-1 inhibitors, not only suppressed C13-mediated ROS scavenging activity, but also alleviated its activity in GECs against H. pylori. Together, these results indicate that C13 inhibits H. pylori-induced ROS production and GEC apoptosis through activating AMPK–HO–1 signaling. - Highlights: • We synthesized compound 13 (C13), a α1-selective small molecule AMPK activator. • C13-induced AMPK activation requires α1 subunit in gastric epithelial cells (GECs). • C13 enhances Helicobacter pylori-induced pro-survival AMPK activation to inhibit GEC apoptosis. • C13 inhibits H. pylori-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in GECs. • AMPK-heme oxygenase (HO-1) activation is required for C13-mediated anti-oxidant activity.

  11. Structure–activity relationships of a small-molecule inhibitor of the PDZ domain of PICK1

    Bach, Anders; Stuhr-Hansen, Nicolai; Thorsen, Thor S.;

    2010-01-01

    Recently, we described the first small-molecule inhibitor, (E)-ethyl 2-cyano-3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)acryloylcarbamate (1), of the PDZ domain of protein interacting with Ca-kinase 1 (PICK1), a potential drug target against brain ischemia, pain and cocaine addiction. Herein, we explore structure...

  12. Crustal Structure Across the Okavango Rift Zone, Botswana: Initial Results From the PRIDE-SEISORZ Active-Source Seismic Profile

    Canales, J. P.; Moffat, L.; Lizarralde, D.; Laletsang, K.; Harder, S. H.; Kaip, G.; Modisi, M.

    2015-12-01

    The PRIDE project aims to understand the processes of continental rift initiation and evolution by analyzing along-axis trends in the southern portion of the East Africa Rift System, from Botswana through Zambia and Malawi. The SEISORZ active-source seismic component of PRIDE focused on the Okavango Rift Zone (ORZ) in northwestern Botswana, with the main goal of imaging the crustal structure across the ORZ. This will allow us to estimate total crustal extension, determine the pattern and amount of thinning, assess the possible presence of melt within the rift zone, and assess the contrasts in crustal blocks across the rift, which closely follows the trend of a fold belt. In November 2014 we conducted a crustal-scale, 450-km-long seismic refraction/wide-angle reflection profile consisting of 19 sources (shots in 30-m-deep boreholes) spaced ~25 km apart from each other, and 900 receivers (IRIS/PASSCAL "Texan" dataloggers and 4.5Hz geophones) with ~500 m spacing. From NW to SE, the profile crosses several tectonic domains: the Congo craton, the Damara metamorphic belt and the Ghanzi-Chobe fold belt where the axis of the ORZ is located, and continues into the Kalahari craton. The record sections display clear crustal refraction (Pg) and wide-angle Moho reflection (PmP) phases for all 17 of the good-quality shots, and a mantle refraction arrival (Pn), with the Pg-PmP-Pn triplication appearing at 175 km offset. There are distinct changes in the traveltime and amplitude of these phases along the transect, and on either side of the axis, that seem to correlate with sharp transitions across tectonic terrains. Initial modeling suggests: (1) the presence of a sedimentary half-graben structure at the rift axis beneath the Okavango delta, bounded to the SE by the Kunyere-Thamalakane fault system; (2) faster crustal Vp in the domains to the NW of the ORZ; and (3) thicker crust (45-50 km) at both ends of the profile within the Congo and Kalahari craton domains than at the ORZ and

  13. Sorption Characteristics of Mixed Molecules of Glutaraldehyde from Water on Mesoporous Acid-Amine Modified Low-Cost Activated Carbon: Mechanism, Isotherm, and Kinetics

    2015-01-01

    The environmental discharge of inefficiently treated waste solutions of the strong biocide glutaraldehyde (GA) from hospitals has potential toxic impact on aquatic organisms. The adsorption characteristics of mixed polarized monomeric and polymeric molecules of GA from water on mesoporous acid-amine modified low-cost activated carbon (AC) were investigated. It was found that the adsorption strongly depended on pH and surface chemistry. In acidic pH, the adsorption mechanism was elaborated to ...

  14. The contribution of phenolic acids to the anti-inflammatory activity of mushrooms: screening in phenolic extracts, individual parent molecules and synthesized glucuronated and methylated derivatives

    Ayodele, Oludemi Taofiq; Calhelha, Ricardo C.; Heleno, Sandrina A.; Barros, Lillian; Martins, Anabela; Santos-Buelga, Celestino; Queiroz, Maria João R. P.; Isabel C. F. R. Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, the ethanolic extracts of fourteen edible mushrooms were investigated for their anti-inflammatory potential in LPS (lipopolysaccharide) activated RAW 264.7 macrophages. Furthermore the extracts were chemically characterized in terms of phenolic acids and related compounds. The identified molecules (p-hydroxybenzoic, p-coumaric and cinnamic acids) and their glucuronated and methylated derivatives obtained by chemical synthesis were also evaluated for the same bioactivity,...

  15. Altered active zones, vesicle pools, nerve terminal conductivity, and morphology during experimental MuSK myasthenia gravis.

    Vishwendra Patel

    Full Text Available Recent studies demonstrate reduced motor-nerve function during autoimmune muscle-specific tyrosine kinase (MuSK myasthenia gravis (MG. To further understand the basis of motor-nerve dysfunction during MuSK-MG, we immunized female C57/B6 mice with purified rat MuSK ectodomain. Nerve-muscle preparations were dissected and neuromuscular junctions (NMJs studied electrophysiologically, morphologically, and biochemically. While all mice produced antibodies to MuSK, only 40% developed respiratory muscle weakness. In vitro study of respiratory nerve-muscle preparations isolated from these affected mice revealed that 78% of NMJs produced endplate currents (EPCs with significantly reduced quantal content, although potentiation and depression at 50 Hz remained qualitatively normal. EPC and mEPC amplitude variability indicated significantly reduced number of vesicle-release sites (active zones and reduced probability of vesicle release. The readily releasable vesicle pool size and the frequency of large amplitude mEPCs also declined. The remaining NMJs had intermittent (4% or complete (18% failure of neurotransmitter release in response to 50 Hz nerve stimulation, presumably due to blocked action potential entry into the nerve terminal, which may arise from nerve terminal swelling and thinning. Since MuSK-MG-affected muscles do not express the AChR γ subunit, the observed prolongation of EPC decay time was not due to inactivity-induced expression of embryonic acetylcholine receptor, but rather to reduced catalytic activity of acetylcholinesterase. Muscle protein levels of MuSK did not change. These findings provide novel insight into the pathophysiology of autoimmune MuSK-MG.

  16. Activity-dependent endogenous taurine release facilitates excitatory neurotransmission in the neocortical marginal zone of neonatal rats

    Taizhe eQian

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In the developing cerebral cortex, the marginal zone (MZ, consisting of early-generated neurons such as Cajal-Retzius cells, plays an important role in cell migration and lamination. There is accumulating evidence of widespread excitatory neurotransmission mediated by γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA in the MZ. Cajal-Retzius cells express not only GABAA receptors but also α2/β subunits of glycine receptors, and exhibit glycine receptor-mediated depolarization due to high [Cl−]i. However, the physiological roles of glycine receptors and their endogenous agonists during neurotransmission in the MZ are yet to be elucidated. To address this question, we performed optical imaging from the MZ using the voltage-sensitive dye JPW1114 on tangential neocortical slices of neonatal rats. A single electrical stimulus evoked an action-potential-dependent optical signal that spread radially over the MZ. The amplitude of the signal was not affected by glutamate receptor blockers, but was suppressed by either GABAA or glycine receptor antagonists. Combined application of both antagonists nearly abolished the signal. Inhibition of Na+, K+-2Cl− cotransporter by 20 µM bumetanide reduced the signal, indicating that this transporter contributes to excitation. Analysis of the interstitial fluid obtained by microdialysis from tangential neocortical slices with high-performance liquid chromatography revealed that GABA and taurine, but not glycine or glutamate, were released in the MZ in response to the electrical stimulation. The ambient release of taurine was reduced by the addition of a voltage-sensitive Na+ channel blocker. Immunohistochemistry and immunoelectron microscopy indicated that taurine was stored both in Cajal-Retzius and non-Cajal-Retzius cells in the MZ, but was not localized in presynaptic structures. Our results suggest that activity-dependent non-synaptic release of endogenous taurine facilitates excitatory neurotransmission through activation of

  17. Final Report - Montana State University - Microbial Activity and Precipitation at Solution-Solution Mixing Zones in Porous Media

    Gerlach, Robin [Montana State University

    2014-10-31

    Background. The use of biological and chemical processes that degrade or immobilize contaminants in subsurface environments is a cornerstone of remediation technology. The enhancement of biological and chemical processes in situ, involves the transport, displacement, distribution and mixing of one or more reactive agents. Biological and chemical reactions all require diffusive transport of solutes to reaction sites at the molecular scale and accordingly, the success of processes at the meter-scale and larger is dictated by the success of phenomena that occur at the micron-scale. However, current understanding of scaling effects on the mixing and delivery of nutrients in biogeochemically dynamic porous media systems is limited, despite the limitations this imposes on the efficiency and effectiveness of the remediation challenges at hand. Objectives. We therefore proposed to experimentally characterize and computationally describe the growth, evolution, and distribution of microbial activity and mineral formation as well as changes in transport processes in porous media that receive two or more reactive amendments. The model system chosen for this project was based on a method for immobilizing 90Sr, which involves stimulating microbial urea hydrolysis with ensuing mineral precipitation (CaCO3), and co-precipitation of Sr. Studies at different laboratory scales were used to visualize and quantitatively describe the spatial relationships between amendment transport and consumption that stimulate the production of biomass and mineral phases that subsequently modify the permeability and heterogeneity of porous media. Biomass growth, activity, and mass deposition in mixing zones was investigated using two-dimensional micro-model flow cells as well as flow cells that could be analyzed using synchrotron-based x-ray tomography. Larger-scale flow-cell experiments were conducted where the spatial distribution of media properties, flow, segregation of biological activity and

  18. Suppressive activity of a macrolide antibiotic, roxithromycin on co-stimulatory molecule expression on mouse splenocytes in vivo

    K. Kawazu

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of roxithromycin (RXM on the expression of co-stimulatory molecules, CD40, CD80 and CD86, was examined in vivo. When BALB/c mice were immunized intraperitoneally with two doses of dinitrophenylated ovalbumin (DNP-OVA at 1 week intervals, intraperitoneal administration of RXM at 250 μg/kg once a day for 14 days strongly suppressed IgE contents in sera obtained from mice 22 days after the first immunization. In addition, RXM treatment of mice suppressed endogenous IL–4 contents in aqueous spleen extracts, which were enhanced by DNP-OVA immunization. We next examined the influence of RXM on co-stimulatory molecule expression on splenic lymphocytes. RXM treatment of the immunized mice caused suppression of CD40 expression, but this treatment did not affect CD80 and CD86 expression.

  19. Gab1 Acts as an Adapter Molecule Linking the Cytokine Receptor gp130 to ERK Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase

    Takahashi-Tezuka, Mariko; Yoshida, Yuichi; Fukada, Toshiyuki; Ohtani, Takuya; Yamanaka, Yojiro; Nishida, Keigo; NAKAJIMA, Koichi; Hibi, Masahiko; Hirano, Toshio

    1998-01-01

    Gab1 has structural similarities with Drosophila DOS (daughter of sevenless), which is a substrate of the protein tyrosine phosphatase Corkscrew. Both Gab1 and DOS have a pleckstrin homology domain and tyrosine residues, potential binding sites for various SH2 domain-containing adapter molecules when they are phosphorylated. We found that Gab1 was tyrosine phosphorylated in response to various cytokines, such as interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-3, alpha interferon (IFN-α), and IFN-γ. Upon the stimula...

  20. Integrin Activation by Regulated Dimerization and Oligomerization of Platelet Endothelial Cell Adhesion Molecule (Pecam)-1 from within the Cell

    Zhao, Tieming; Newman, Peter J.

    2001-01-01

    Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM)-1 is a 130-kD transmembrane glycoprotein having six Ig homology domains within its extracellular domain and an immunoreceptor tyrosine–based inhibitory motif within its cytoplasmic domain. Previous studies have shown that addition of bivalent anti–PECAM-1 mAbs to the surface of T cells, natural killer cells, neutrophils, or platelets result in increased cell adhesion to immobilized integrin ligands. However, the mechanism by which this occur...

  1. ADAMTS-2 functions as anti-angiogenic and anti-tumoral molecule independently of its catalytic activity.

    Dubail, Johanne; Kesteloot, F.; Deroanne, Christophe; Motte, Patrick; Lambert, Vincent; Rakic, Jean-Marie; Lapiere, C.; Nusgens, Betty; Colige, Alain

    2010-01-01

    ADAMTS-2 is a metalloproteinase that plays a key role in the processing of fibrillar procollagen precursors into mature collagen molecules by excising the amino-propeptide. We demonstrate that recombinant ADAMTS-2 is also able to reduce proliferation of endothelial cells, and to induce their retraction and detachment from the substrate resulting in apoptosis. Dephosphorylation of Erk1/2 and MLC largely precedes the ADAMTS-2 induced morphological alterations. In 3-D culture models, ADAMTS-2 st...

  2. Density functional theory based direct comparison of coherent tunneling and electron hopping in redox-active single-molecule junctions

    Kastlunger, Georg; Stadler, Robert

    2015-03-01

    To define the conductance of single-molecule junctions with a redox functionality in an electrochemical cell, two conceptually different electron transport mechanisms, namely, coherent tunneling and vibrationally induced hopping, compete with each other, where implicit parameters of the setup such as the length of the molecule and the applied gate voltage decide which mechanism is the dominant one. Although coherent tunneling is most efficiently described within Landauer theory and the common theoretical treatment of electron hopping is based on Marcus theory, both theories are adequate for the processes they describe without introducing accuracy-limiting approximations. For a direct comparison, however, it has to be ensured that the crucial quantities obtained from electronic structure calculations, i.e., the transmission function T (E ) in Landauer theory and the transfer integral V , the reorganization energy λ , and the driving force Δ G0 in Marcus theory, are derived from similar grounds, as pointed out by Nitzan and coworkers in a series of publications. In this paper our framework is a single-particle picture, for which we perform density functional theory calculations for the conductance corresponding to both transport mechanisms for junctions with the central molecule containing one, two, or three Ruthenium centers, from which we extrapolate our results in order to define the critical length of the transition point of the two regimes which we identify at 5.76nm for this type of molecular wire. We also discuss trends in the dependence on an electrochemically induced gate potential.

  3. Influence of chloramine T iodination on the biological and immunological activity or the molecular radius of the human growth hormone molecule

    Potential alterations of the somatotropic activity of human growth hormone (hGH) resulting from Chloramine T labelling reaction, iodination up to 2.7 atoms/molecule and indirect radiation effects, have been studied. Three 2X2 factorial assays, performed in hypophysectomized rats, failed to reveal any significant difference (P greater than 0.05) in true growth promoting activity between hGH and (127-I)hGH, even after storing the latter with 125-I. Similar results were obtained applying a sensitive and precise gel filtration technique for Stokes Radius determination and radioimmunoassay

  4. Aplysia cell adhesion molecule and a novel protein kinase C activity in the postsynaptic neuron are required for presynaptic growth and initial formation of specific synapses

    Hu, Jiang-Yuan; Chen, Yang; Bougie, Joanna K; Sossin, Wayne S.; Schacher, Samuel

    2010-01-01

    To explore the role of both Aplysia cell adhesion molecule (ApCAM) and activity of specific protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms in the initial formation of sensory neuron synapses with specific postsynaptic targets (L7 but not L11), we examined presynaptic growth, initial synapse formation, and the expression of the presynaptic neuropeptide sensorin following cell-specific reduction of ApCAM or of a novel PKC activity. Synapse formation between sensory neurons and L7 begins by 3 h after plating a...

  5. Model of Reentrant Ventricular Tachycardia based upon Infarct Border Zone Geometry Predicts Reentrant Circuit Features as Determined by Activation Mapping

    Ciaccio, Edward J; Ashikaga, Hiroshi; Kaba, Riyaz A; Cervantes, Daniel; Hopenfeld, Bruce; Wit, Andrew L; Peters, Nicholas S; McVeigh, Elliot R; Garan, Hasan; Coromilas, James

    2008-01-01

    Background Infarct border zone (IBZ) geometry likely affects inducibility and characteristics of postinfarction reentrant ventricular tachycardia, but the connection has not been established. Objective To determine characteristics of post infarction ventricular tachycardia in the IBZ. Methods A geometric model describing the relationship between IBZ geometry and wavefront propagation in reentrant circuits was developed. Based on the formulation, slow conduction and block was expected to coincide with areas where IBZ thickness (T) is minimal and the local spatial gradient in thickness (ΔT) is maximal, so that the degree of wavefront curvature ρ ∝ ΔT/T is maximal. Regions of fastest conduction velocity were predicted to coincide with areas of minimum ΔT. In seven arrhythmogenic postinfarction canine heart experiments, tachycardia was induced by programmed stimulation, and activation maps were constructed from multichannel recordings. IBZ thickness was measured in excised hearts from histologic analysis or magnetic resonance imaging. Reentrant circuit properties were predicted from IBZ geometry and compared with ventricular activation maps following tachycardia induction. Results Mean IBZ thickness was 231±140µm at the reentry isthmus and 1440±770µm in the outer pathway (p<0.001). Mean curvature ρ was 1.63±0.45mm−1 at functional block line locations, 0.71±0.18mm−1 at isthmus entrance-exit points, and 0.33±0.13mm−1 in the outer reentrant circuit pathway. The mean conduction velocity about the circuit during reentrant tachycardia was 0.32±0.04mm/ms at entrance-exit points, 0.42±0.13mm/ms for the entire outer pathway, and 0.64±0.16mm/ms at outer pathway regions with minimum ΔT. Model sensitivity and specificity to detect isthmus location was 75.0±5.7% and 97.2±0.7%. Conclusions Reentrant circuit features as determined by activation mapping can be predicted on the basis of IBZ geometrical relationships. PMID:17675078

  6. Abnormal Activation of RhoA/ROCK-I Signaling in Junctional Zone Smooth Muscle Cells of Patients With Adenomyosis.

    Wang, S; Duan, H; Zhang, Y; Sun, F Q

    2016-03-01

    Adenomyosis (ADS) is a common estrogen-dependent gynecological disease with unknown etiology. The RhoA/Rho-kinase (ROCK) signaling pathway is involved in various cellular functions, including migration, proliferation, and smooth muscle contraction. Here we examined the potential role of this pathway in junctional zone (JZ) contraction in women with and without ADS. We demonstrated that in the normal JZ, RhoA and ROCK-I messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expression was significantly higher in the proliferative phase of the menstrual cycle than in the secretory phase. Expression of RhoA and ROCK-I in the JZ from women with ADS was significantly higher than in the control women and showed no significant differences across the menstrual cycle. Treatment of JZ smooth muscle cells (JZSMCs) with estrogen at 0, 1, 10, or 100 nmol/L for 24 hours resulted in increased expression of RhoA, ROCK-I, and myosin light-chain (MLC) phosphorylation (p-MLC) in a dose-dependent manner. In parallel to its effects on p-MLC, estrogen-mediated, dose-dependent contraction responses in JZSMCs. Estrogen-mediated contraction in the ADS group was significantly higher than in the controls and also showed no significant differences across the menstrual cycle. These effects were suppressed in the presence of ICI 182780 or Y27632, supporting an estrogen receptor-dependent and RhoA activation-dependent mechanism. Our results indicate that the level of RhoA and ROCK-I increases in patients with ADS and the cyclic change is lost. Estrogen may affect uterine JZ contraction of ADS by enhancing RhoA/ ROCK-I signaling. PMID:26335177

  7. Neural progenitor cells isolated from the subventricular zone present hemichannel activity and form functional gap junctions with glial cells

    Talaverón, Rocío; Fernández, Paola; Escamilla, Rosalba; Pastor, Angel M.; Matarredona, Esperanza R.; Sáez, Juan C.

    2015-01-01

    The postnatal subventricular zone (SVZ) lining the walls of the lateral ventricles contains neural progenitor cells (NPCs) that generate new olfactory bulb interneurons. Communication via gap junctions between cells in the SVZ is involved in NPC proliferation and in neuroblast migration towards the olfactory bulb. SVZ NPCs can be expanded in vitro in the form of neurospheres that can be used for transplantation purposes after brain injury. We have previously reported that neurosphere-derived NPCs form heterocellular gap junctions with host glial cells when they are implanted after mechanical injury. To analyze functionality of NPC-glial cell gap junctions we performed dye coupling experiments in co-cultures of SVZ NPCs with astrocytes or microglia. Neurosphere-derived cells expressed mRNA for at least the hemichannel/gap junction channel proteins connexin 26 (Cx26), Cx43, Cx45 and pannexin 1 (Panx1). Dye coupling experiments revealed that gap junctional communication occurred among neurosphere cells (incidence of coupling: 100%). Moreover, hemichannel activity was also detected in neurosphere cells as evaluated in time-lapse measurements of ethidium bromide uptake. Heterocellular coupling between NPCs and glial cells was evidenced in co-cultures of neurospheres with astrocytes (incidence of coupling: 91.0 ± 4.7%) or with microglia (incidence of coupling: 71.9 ± 6.7%). Dye coupling in neurospheres and in co-cultures was inhibited by octanol, a gap junction blocker. Altogether, these results suggest the existence of functional hemichannels and gap junction channels in postnatal SVZ neurospheres. In addition, they demonstrate that SVZ-derived NPCs can establish functional gap junctions with astrocytes or microglia. Therefore, cell-cell communication via gap junctions and hemichannels with host glial cells might subserve a role in the functional integration of NPCs after implantation in the damaged brain. PMID:26528139

  8. Expression of the bitter receptor T2R38 in pancreatic cancer: localization in lipid droplets and activation by a bacteria-derived quorum-sensing molecule

    Gaida, Matthias M.; Mayer, Christine; Dapunt, Ulrike; Stegmaier, Sabine; Schirmacher, Peter; Wabnitz, Guido H.; Hänsch, G. Maria

    2016-01-01

    T2R38 belongs to the family of bitter receptors and was initially detected in cells of the oral cavity. We now describe expression of T2R38 in tumor cells in patients with pancreatic cancer and in tumor-derived cell lines. T2R38 is localized predominantly intracellular in association with lipid droplets, particularly with the lipid droplet membrane. The receptor can be activated by the bona fide ligand for T2R38, phenylthiourea (PTU), and by N-acetyl-dodecanoyl homoserine (AHL-12), a quorum sensing molecule of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the latter is the only known natural ligand for T2R38. In response to PTU or AHL-12, key transcription factors are activated including phosphorylation of the MAP kinases p38 and ERK1/2, and upregulation of NFATc1. Moreover, we found increased expression of the multi-drug resistance protein 1 (also known as ABCB1), a transmembrane transporter molecule, participating in shuttling of a plethora of drugs, such as chemotherapeutics or antibiotics. In conclusion, our data indicate a new, additional function of the taste receptor T2R38 beyond sensing ‘bitter’. Moreover, because T2R38 can be stimulated by a bacteria-derived signaling molecule the receptor could link microbiota and cancer. PMID:26862855

  9. Single molecules and nanotechnology

    Vogel, Horst

    2007-01-01

    This book focuses on recent advances in the rapidly evolving field of single molecule research. These advances are of importance for the investigation of biopolymers and cellular biochemical reactions, and are essential to the development of quantitative biology. Written by leading experts in the field, the articles cover a broad range of topics, including: quantum photonics of organic dyes and inorganic nanoparticles their use in detecting properties of single molecules the monitoring of single molecule (enzymatic) reactions single protein (un)folding in nanometer-sized confined volumes the dynamics of molecular interactions in biological cells The book is written for advanced students and scientists who wish to survey the concepts, techniques and results of single molecule research and assess them for their own scientific activities.

  10. Age, tectonic evolution and origin of the Aswa Shear Zone in Uganda: Activation of an oblique ramp during convergence in the East African Orogen

    Saalmann, K.; Mänttäri, I.; Nyakecho, C.; Isabirye, E.

    2016-05-01

    The Aswa Shear Zone (ASZ) is a major NW-SE trending structure of over 1000 km length in East Africa. In Uganda, the ASZ is a steeply NE-dipping, up to 11 km wide mylonitic shear zone that shows multiple stage brittle reactivation. On outcrop-scale, the fabric in the ASZ is characterized by a well-developed NW-SE striking and subvertical or steeply NE or SW dipping mylonitic foliation and a subhorizontal to moderately NW- or SE-plunging stretching lineation. Sinistral kinematics and fabric are very consistent along strike. The strain is heterogeneously distributed and partitioned into lens-shaped lower strain zones dominated by folding and characterized by pure shear, which are surrounded by high strain zones, some of them thick ultramylonites, with intense simple shear combined with flattening and strong transposition of pre-existing fabrics. Ductile shearing occurred during bulk E-W shortening, commenced at amphibolite facies conditions and continued with similar kinematics at greenschist and even lower grade conditions. A number of (sub-)parallel shear zones occur to the NE and SW of the main zone at a distance of up to 20-45 km. They show similar fabrics and kinematics and are thus related to activity along ASZ reflecting strain partitioning into simple shear and pure shear domains on a regional scale. Samples of mylonitic gneisses from the shear zone have been analyzed with U-Pb LA-MC-ICPMS and show Neoarchaean crystallisation ages between 2.66 and 2.61 Ga. Timing of ductile sinistral shearing is poorly constrained by lower intercept ages of 686 ± 62 and 640 ± 44 Ma. The fabric and structural relationship of the ca. 660 Ma Adjumani Granite exposed in the northern segment of ASZ suggest that the age of shear activity can be further limited to ca. 685 and 655 Ma. The Aswa Shear Zone is interpreted as an intra-cratonic, crustal-scale structure close to the northeastern margin of the Congo Craton, possibly inherited from previous continental extension

  11. Assessing the previous activity at the source zone of the 2001 Bhuj earthquake based on the near-source and distant paleoseismological indicators

    Rajendran, C. P.; Rajendran, Kusala; Thakkar, M.; Goyal, Bhanu

    2008-05-01

    The Mw 7.7 2001 Bhuj (Kachchh) earthquake was not associated with any primary surface rupture, but it produced secondary faulting, folding and liquefaction. This study highlights the potential of a secondary rupture and proxies like lateral spreads and sandblows in unraveling the past activity related to the 2001 source. Chronological constraints of an older lateral spread and far-field paleoliquefaction features, combined with archeological data, provide evidence for occurrences of two previous earthquakes at the 2001 source zone about 4000 and 9000 years, ago. Distinct stratigraphic evidence for at least one previous offset dated at 4424 ± 656 years could be detected at a stepover zone associated with a dextral secondary fault, reactivated during the 2001 earthquake. The studies imply longer interseismic intervals for the 2001 source zone, in comparison with the source zone of the 1819 earthquake located toward the northwestern part of the Rann of Kachchh. The spatial and temporal correlation of previous events derived on the basis of the available paleoseismic data from the region suggest not only repeated activity at the 2001 source, but possibility for additional potential sources in parts of Kachchh and Cambay basins. Although we infer a longer recurrence interval for the 2001 Bhuj earthquake source, our study points to the fact that these additional sources may have the potential to rupture in the future, considering the long elapsed time.

  12. Water-soluble carbon monoxide-releasing molecules: helping to elucidate the vascular activity of the 'silent killer'.

    Chatterjee, Prabal Kumar

    2004-06-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is formed during the degradation of haeme by haeme oxygenase (HO). As well as being an important signalling molecule and vasodilator, CO also possesses antihypertensive, anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic qualities and protects against ischaemic tissue injury. Several approaches have been used to investigate the therapeutic potential of CO, ranging from direct administration of CO gas to the use of prodrugs, which generate CO upon metabolism. A novel approach involves the use of specific CO carriers, which will release measurable, controllable and effective amounts of CO into biological systems. Transitional metal carbonyls based around iron, manganese or ruthenium have recently been developed as CO-releasing molecules (CO-RMs) that, under appropriate conditions, will release CO. Such molecules have been shown to provide cardioprotection in both ex vivo and in vivo experiments. To date, CO-RMs have been largely incompatible with biological systems in that they are only soluble in organic solvents or have to be preactivated either by physical or chemical stimuli. However, the recent development of water-soluble CO-RMs has provided new opportunities to investigate the pharmacological and biological features of CO without such confounding influences. CORM-3, a novel water-soluble CO-RM, has recently been used to confirm the cardioprotective actions of CO. In this issue of British Journal of Pharmacology, Foresti and co-workers report that CORM-3 delivers CO, produces aortic vasodilation ex vivo and reduces blood pressure in vivo via modulation of the same cGMP and potassium channels utilised by endogenous and exogenous CO. These findings suggest that CORM-3 has the potential for use as a modulator of vascular function and hypertension. However, the use of water-soluble CO-RMs raises several questions of their own which will need to be addressed if CO-RMs are to be of future use therapeutically. PMID:15148242

  13. Synthesis of Zn-MOF incorporating titanium-hydrides as active sites binding H{sub 2} molecules

    Kim, Jongsik, E-mail: jkim40@nd.edu [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Notre Dame, 182, Fitzpatrick Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Ok Kim, Dong; Wook Kim, Dong; Sagong, Kil [Hanwha Chemical Research & Development Center, 6, Shinseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-804 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    This paper describes the synthetic effort for a Zn-MOF imparting Ti-H as a preferential binding site potentially capturing H{sub 2} molecules via Kubas-type interaction. The formation mechanism of Ti-H innate to the final material was potentially demonstrated to follow a radical dissociation rather than a β-hydrogen elimination and a C-H reductive elimination. - Graphical abstract: This study details the synthesis and the formation mechanism of Zn-MOF adsorbent site-isolating TiH{sub 3} that can potentially capture H{sub 2} molecules via Kubas-binding mechanism. - Highlights: • OH-functionalized Zn-MOF was employed as a reactive template to site-isolate TiH{sub 3}. • This MOF was post-synthetically modified using a tetracyclohexyl titanium (IV). • This intermediate was hydrogenolyzed to change ligand from cyclohexyl to hydride. • Formation mechanism of TiH{sub 3} was investigated via two control GC–MS experiments. • Final Zn-MOF potentially site-isolating TiH{sub 3} species was used as a H{sub 2} adsorbent.

  14. Developing new chemical tools for DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT 1): a small-molecule activity-based probe and novel tetrazole-containing inhibitors.

    Zhu, Biwei; Ge, Jingyan; Yao, Shao Q

    2015-06-15

    DNA methylation is an important epigenetic modification catalyzed by DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs). Abnormal expression of endogenous DNMTs in human causes alterations in the genome methylation patterns which subsequently lead to the development of cancers. Thus detection of endogenous DNMT activities and efficient inhibition of DNMTs have important therapeutic significance. In this work, a small molecule activity-based probe (ABP) of DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1), T1, was developed. The probe was a clickable analog of tryptophan and was able to covalently label endogenous DNMT1 and inhibit its enzymatic activity more effectively than previously known DNMT1 inhibitors (RG108 and its maleimide analog 1149). In addition, we also discovered a new type of small molecule DNMT inhibitors based on tetrazole-containing compounds which were analogs of 1149. Among these compounds, which we called Gn, one of them (G6) possessed reasonable inhibitory activity against DNMT1 in both in vitro enzymatic assays and cell growth proliferation experiments. Both T1 and G6 showed effective labeling of endogenous DNMT1 from mammalian cells by using in vitro competitive pull-down and live-cell bioimaging experiments. PMID:25801160

  15. Computational Ranking of Yerba Mate Small Molecules Based on Their Predicted Contribution to Antibacterial Activity against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Caroline S Rempe

    Full Text Available The aqueous extract of yerba mate, a South American tea beverage made from Ilex paraguariensis leaves, has demonstrated bactericidal and inhibitory activity against bacterial pathogens, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA. The gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS analysis of two unique fractions of yerba mate aqueous extract revealed 8 identifiable small molecules in those fractions with antimicrobial activity. For a more comprehensive analysis, a data analysis pipeline was assembled to prioritize compounds for antimicrobial testing against both MRSA and methicillin-sensitive S. aureus using forty-two unique fractions of the tea extract that were generated in duplicate, assayed for activity, and analyzed with GC-MS. As validation of our automated analysis, we checked our predicted active compounds for activity in literature references and used authentic standards to test for antimicrobial activity. 3,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde showed the most antibacterial activity against MRSA at low concentrations in our bioassays. In addition, quinic acid and quercetin were identified using random forests analysis and 5-hydroxy pipecolic acid was identified using linear discriminant analysis. We also generated a ranked list of unidentified compounds that may contribute to the antimicrobial activity of yerba mate against MRSA. Here we utilized GC-MS data to implement an automated analysis that resulted in a ranked list of compounds that likely contribute to the antimicrobial activity of aqueous yerba mate extract against MRSA.

  16. Compound 13, an α1-selective small molecule activator of AMPK, inhibits Helicobacter pylori-induced oxidative stresses and gastric epithelial cell apoptosis.

    Zhao, Hangyong; Zhu, Huanghuang; Lin, Zhou; Lin, Gang; Lv, Guoqiang

    2015-08-01

    Half of the world's population experiences Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection, which is a main cause of gastritis, duodenal and gastric ulcer, and gastric cancers. In the current study, we investigated the potential role of compound 13 (C13), a novel α1-selective small molecule activator of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), against H. pylori-induced cytotoxicity in cultured gastric epithelial cells (GECs). We found that C13 induced significant AMPK activation, evidenced by phosphorylation of AMPKα1 and ACC (acetyl-CoA carboxylase), in both primary and transformed GECs. Treatment of C13 inhibited H. pylori-induced GEC apoptosis. AMPK activation was required for C13-mediated GEC protection. Inhibition of AMPK kinase activity by the AMPK inhibitor Compound C, or silencing AMPKα1 expression by targeted-shRNAs, alleviated C13-induced GEC protective activities against H. pylori. Significantly, C13 inhibited H. pylori-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in GECs. C13 induced AMPK-dependent expression of anti-oxidant gene heme oxygenase (HO-1) in GECs. Zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP) and tin protoporphyrin (SnPP), two HO-1 inhibitors, not only suppressed C13-mediated ROS scavenging activity, but also alleviated its activity in GECs against H. pylori. Together, these results indicate that C13 inhibits H. pylori-induced ROS production and GEC apoptosis through activating AMPK-HO-1 signaling. PMID:26022128

  17. Crystal Structure of Liganded Rat Peroxisomal Multifunctional Enzyme Type 1: A FLEXIBLE MOLECULE WITH TWO INTERCONNECTED ACTIVE SITES*

    Kasaragod, Prasad; Venkatesan, Rajaram; Kiema, Tiila R.; Hiltunen, J. Kalervo; Wierenga, Rik K.

    2010-01-01

    The crystal structure of the full-length rat peroxisomal multifunctional enzyme, type 1 (rpMFE1), has been determined at 2.8 Å resolution. This enzyme has three catalytic activities and two active sites. The N-terminal part has the crotonase fold, which builds the active site for the Δ3,Δ2-enoyl-CoA isomerase and the Δ2-enoyl-CoA hydratase-1 catalytic activities, and the C-terminal part has the (3S)-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase fold and makes the (3S)-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase active sit...

  18. Optimized geometry, vibration (IR and Raman spectra and nonlinear optical activity of p-nitroanilinium perchlorate molecule: A theoretical study

    Tamer Ömer

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The molecular modeling of p-nitroanilinium perchlorate molecule was carried out by using B3LYP and HSEH1PBE levels of density functional theory (DFT. The IR and Raman spectra were simulated and the assignments of vibrational modes were performed on the basis of relative contribution of various internal co-ordinates. NBO analysis was performed to demonstrate charge transfer, conjugative interactions and the formation of intramolecular hydrogen bonding interactions within PNAPC. Obtained large dipole moment values showed that PNAPC is a highly polarizable complex, and the charge transfer occurs within PNAPC. Hydrogen bonding and charge transfer interactions were also displayed by small HOMO-LUMO gap and molecular electrostatic potential (MEP surface. The strong evidences that the material can be used as an efficient nonlinear optical (NLO material of PNAPC were demonstrated by considerable polarizability and hyperpolarizability values obtained at DFT levels.

  19. Identification of a novel Arabidopsis thaliana nitric oxide-binding molecule with guanylate cyclase activity in vitro

    Mulaudzi, Takalani

    2011-09-01

    While there is evidence of nitric oxide (NO)-dependent signalling via the second messenger cyclic guanosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cGMP) in plants, guanylate cyclases (GCs), enzymes that catalyse the formation of cGMP from guanosine 5′-triphosphate (GTP) have until recently remained elusive and none of the candidates identified to-date are NO-dependent. Using both a GC and heme-binding domain specific (H-NOX) search motif, we have identified an Arabidopsis flavin monooxygenase (At1g62580) and shown electrochemically that it binds NO, has a higher affinity for NO than for O 2 and that this molecule can generate cGMP from GTP in vitro in an NO-dependent manner. © 2011 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Photochemical activation and reactivity of polynuclear transition-metal-complex molecules. Progress report, June 1981-May 31, 1982

    Significant results obtained during the year are summarized for the following programs: (1) reversible, two electron transfer at a single potential in binuclear complexes; (2) photophysics of polyketonate complexes; (3) synthetic strategies and characterization of heavy metal heterobinuclear complexes; (4) high yield synthesis of ligands capable of binding 3 and 4 metal ions per molecule. Electrochemical studies have uncovered a number of new binuclear metal complexes that undergo reversible two-electron reduction at single potential including Cu(II) complexes with two different coordination environments, mixed Ni(II), Cu(II) complexes and binuclear Ni(II) complexes. In each case the species that exhibit these electron transfer properties have been shown to be Na+ ion-paired complexes. Several new trinuclear molecular complexes have been prepared and characterized that contain two UO22+ ions and one transition metal ion. The electrochemistry, absorption spectra, and luminescence have been investigated

  1. SLITHER: a web server for generating contiguous conformations of substrate molecules entering into deep active sites of proteins or migrating through channels in membrane transporters.

    Lee, Po-Hsien; Kuo, Kuei-Ling; Chu, Pei-Ying; Liu, Eric M; Lin, Jung-Hsin

    2009-07-01

    Many proteins use a long channel to guide the substrate or ligand molecules into the well-defined active sites for catalytic reactions or for switching molecular states. In addition, substrates of membrane transporters can migrate to another side of cellular compartment by means of certain selective mechanisms. SLITHER (http://bioinfo.mc.ntu.edu.tw/slither/or http://slither.rcas.sinica.edu.tw/) is a web server that can generate contiguous conformations of a molecule along a curved tunnel inside a protein, and the binding free energy profile along the predicted channel pathway. SLITHER adopts an iterative docking scheme, which combines with a puddle-skimming procedure, i.e. repeatedly elevating the potential energies of the identified global minima, thereby determines the contiguous binding modes of substrates inside the protein. In contrast to some programs that are widely used to determine the geometric dimensions in the ion channels, SLITHER can be applied to predict whether a substrate molecule can crawl through an inner channel or a half-channel of proteins across surmountable energy barriers. Besides, SLITHER also provides the list of the pore-facing residues, which can be directly compared with many genetic diseases. Finally, the adjacent binding poses determined by SLITHER can also be used for fragment-based drug design. PMID:19433508

  2. Jet-Cooled Laser Spectroscopy of a Jahn-Teller and Pseudo Jahn-Teller Active Molecule: the Nitrate Radical

    Chen, Ming-Wei; Takematsu, Kana; Okumura, Mitchio; Miller, Terry A.

    2009-06-01

    Well-known as an important intermediate in atmospheric chemistry, the nitrate radical (NO_3) has been extensively studied both experimentally and theoretically. The three energetically lowest electronic states (tilde{X} ^{2}A_{2}^', tilde{A} ^{2}E^'', and tilde{B} ^{2}E^') are strongly coupled by vibronic interactions and hence it is a textbook molecule for understanding the coupling between nearby potential energy surfaces. Such coupling has been treated in considerable detail theoretically. However, corresponding experimental characterization of the interaction is much less detailed. The experimental results primarily consist of IR measurements of vibrational transitions in the ground state. In addition, the electronically forbidden tilde{A}-tilde{X} transition has been observed in ambient temperature CRDS studies. To understand both the Jahn-Teller and pseudo Jahn-Teller coupling in the molecule, further measurements are required with different selection rules and/or higher resolution to resolve the rotational structures of different transitions. In our group, a high-resolution (source Δν≈ 100 MHz in NIR region), jet-cooled CRDS system can be applied to rotationally resolve the electronically forbidden tilde{A}-tilde{X} transition. Furthermore, our high-resolution LIF/SEP system (source Δν≈ 100 MHz) can provide the direct, rotationally resolved measurements of the tilde{B}-tilde{X} and tilde{B}-tilde{A} transitions by operating in the LIF and SEP modes respectively. Such data can provide unambiguous spectral assignments in the tilde{X}, tilde{A} and tilde{B} states. J. F. Stanton, J. Chem. Phys., 126, 134309 (2007) K. Kawaguchi, E. Hirota, T. Ishiwata, and I. Tanaka, J. Chem. Phys., 93, 951 (1990) K. Kawaguchi, T. Ishiwata, E. Hirota, and I. Tanaka, Chem. Phys., 231, 193 (1998) A. Deev, J. Sommar, and M. Okumura, J. Chem. Phys., 122, 224305 (2005) S. Wu, P. Dupré, and T. A. Miller, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 8, 1682, (2006)

  3. Blocking Wnt signaling by SFRP-like molecules inhibits in vivo cell proliferation and tumor growth in cells carrying active β-catenin.

    Lavergne, E; Hendaoui, I; Coulouarn, C; Ribault, C; Leseur, J; Eliat, P-A; Mebarki, S; Corlu, A; Clément, B; Musso, O

    2011-01-27

    Constitutive activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in cancer results from mutations in pathway components, which frequently coexist with autocrine Wnt signaling or epigenetic silencing of extracellular Wnt antagonists. Among the extracellular Wnt inhibitors, the secreted frizzled-related proteins (SFRPs) are decoy receptors that contain soluble Wnt-binding frizzled domains. In addition to SFRPs, other endogenous molecules harboring frizzled motifs bind to and inhibit Wnt signaling. One of such molecules is V3Nter, a soluble SFRP-like frizzled polypeptide that binds to Wnt3a and inhibits Wnt signaling and expression of the β-catenin target genes cyclin D1 and c-myc. V3Nter is derived from the cell surface extracellular matrix component collagen XVIII. Here, we used HCT116 human colon cancer cells carrying the ΔS45 activating mutation in one of the alleles of β-catenin to show that V3Nter and SFRP-1 decrease baseline and Wnt3a-induced β-catenin stabilization. Consequently, V3Nter reduces the growth of human colorectal cancer xenografts by specifically controlling cell proliferation and cell cycle progression, without affecting angiogenesis or apoptosis, as shown by decreased [(3)H]-thymidine (in vitro) or BrdU (in vivo) incorporation, clonogenesis assays, cell cycle analysis and magnetic resonance imaging in living mice. Additionally, V3Nter switches off the β-catenin target gene expression signature in vivo. Moreover, experiments with β-catenin allele-targeted cells showed that the ΔS45 β-catenin allele hampers, but does not abrogate, inhibition of Wnt signaling by SFRP-1 or by the SFRP-like frizzled domain. Finally, neither SFRP-1 nor V3Nter affect β-catenin signaling in SW480 cells carrying nonfunctional Adenomatous polyposis coli. Thus, SFRP-1 and the SFRP-like molecule V3Nter can inhibit tumor growth of β-catenin-activated tumor cells in vivo. PMID:20856206

  4. Analysis of the pharmaceutical care activities practiced by private homeopathic pharmacies located in Rio de Janeiro North Zone

    Tereza Aguiar

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The complexity of homeopathic treatment delegates to the Pharmacist the need and the responsibility of pharmaceutical care. This paper had the objective of verifying the practices of pharmaceutical care in homeopathy. The study was conducted in homeopathic pharmacies situated in Rio de Janeiro North Zone, during March and April, 2011, where 15 pharmacists were interviewed, with the help of a semi-open questionary self-administered. For the survey were investigated variables related to pharmaceutical: sex, age, nature of the institution where he graduated, having completed post-graduate and working ties. Information professionals for the pharmaceutical care were collected in 14 questions grouped into three areas: attitudes, perceptions and satisfaction. Attending the ethical aspects, the study was submitted to and approved by the Ethics Committee of University Estácio de Sá. The results demonstrated that 33% of the pharmacists have less than 5 years of professional practice, and 53% are specialists graduated by the Hahnemann’s Institutite of Brasil. All Pharmacists claim to orient patients, mostly during dispensation and through phone contacts. Most pharmacists oriented patients passively and actively. The elderly were pointed as the ones, who most often sought orientation. During dispensation of homeopathic drugs, all patients elicit some orientation. 67% of the pharmacies keep material for pharmaceutical guidance to the patients, usually leaflets. The verbal and written orientation was predominanted on homeopathic pharmacist. Posology and instructions of use for the pharmaceutical form dispensed were described as the most common doubts of the patients. Of all pharmacists interviewed, 67% pointed to self-medication practices in the pharmacy. The questions which measure the position and perception of the pharmacists related to pharmaceutical assistance scored over 3. The question which scored higher was related to

  5. Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships of Noncompetitive Antagonists of the NMDA Receptor: A Study of a Series of MK801 Derivative Molecules Using Statistical Methods and Neural Network

    T. Lakhlifi

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: From a series of 50 MK801 derivative molecules, a selected set of 44 compounds was submitted to a principal components analysis (PCA, a multiple regression analysis (MRA, and a neural network (NN. This study shows that the compounds' activity correlates reasonably well with the selected descriptors encoding the chemical structures. The correlation coefficients calculated by MRA and there after by NN, r = 0.986 and r = 0.974 respectively, are fairly good to evaluate a quantitative model, and to predict activity for MK801 derivatives. To test the performance of this model, the activities of the remained set of 6 compounds are deduced from the proposed quantitative model, by NN. This study proved that the predictive power of this model is relevant.

  6. Identification of Epoxide Functionalities in Protonated Monofunctional Analytes by Using Ion/Molecule Reactions and Collision-Activated Dissociation in Different Ion Trap Tandem Mass Spectrometers

    Eismin, Ryan J.; Fu, Mingkun; Yem, Sonoeun; Widjaja, Fanny; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I.

    2012-01-01

    A mass spectrometric method has been delineated for the identification of the epoxide functionalities in unknown monofunctional analytes. This method utilizes gas-phase ion/molecule reactions of protonated analytes with neutral trimethyl borate (TMB) followed by collision-activated dissociation (CAD) in an ion trapping mass spectrometer (tested for a Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance and a linear quadrupole ion trap). The ion/molecule reaction involves proton transfer from the protonated analyte to TMB, followed by addition of the analyte to TMB and elimination of methanol. Based on literature, this reaction allows the general identification of oxygen-containing analytes. Vinyl and phenyl epoxides can be differentiated from other oxygen-containing analytes, including other epoxides, based on the loss of a second methanol molecule upon CAD of the addition/methanol elimination product. The only other analytes found to undergo this elimination are some amides but they also lose O = B-R (R = group bound to carbonyl), which allows their identification. On the other hand, other epoxides can be differentiated from vinyl and phenyl epoxides and from other monofunctional analytes based on the loss of (CH3O)2BOH or formation of protonated (CH3O)2BOH upon CAD of the addition/methanol elimination product. For propylene oxide and 2,3-dimethyloxirane, the (CH3O)2BOH fragment is more basic than the hydrocarbon fragment, and the diagnostic ion (CH3O)2BOH{2/+} is formed. These reactions involve opening of the epoxide ring. The only other analytes found to undergo (CH3O)2BOH elimination are carboxylic acids, but they can be differentiated from the rest based on several published ion/molecule reaction methods. Similar results were obtained in the Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance and linear quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer.

  7. Identification of EPAC (Exchange Protein Activated by cAMP) bioinformatically as a potential signalling biomarker in Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) and its molecular docking by a lead molecule.

    Bala, Saranya; Pathak, Ravi Kant; Mishra, Vachaspati

    2011-01-01

    The present work delineates the combinatorial approach of firstly, creation of a centralized data-set comprising signalling proteins identified on the basis of altered expression, such as over-expression or repression of a set of signalling protein(s) leading to the cause of the disease, which is based on published reports screened through Pubmed and secondly, in the in silico creation of novel lead (drug) molecules and docking of identified signalling biomarkers using such drugs to investigate possibility of their future application in the model systems eventually. EPAC (Exchange Protein Activated by cAMP) emerges as a signalling biomarker in cases studied presently. Brefeldin, the known inhibitor of EPAC, though the mechanism yet unexplored, has been the molecule used as the pharmacophore for creation of lead drug molecule. Various modifications have been incorporated into the pharmacophore to increase the hydrophobic interactions for increasing the binding efficiency of the generated lead molecule. Side-chain modifications of the pharmacophore and refinement of data through firedock upon docking of EPAC with the modified pharmacophore yielded best results on the bases of atomic contact energy, van der Waal and partial electrostatic interactions as well as additional estimations of the binding free energy. Modifications of CH3 at C15 with COOH and H at C2 with OH in brefeldin showed the best docking results on the basis of protein-drug interaction parameters. The present work provides a clue in rational design of EPAC inhibitors which could be developed as drug lead in combating CVD. PMID:21738308

  8. Technical advance: soluble OX40 molecule mimics regulatory T cell modulatory activity on FcεRI-dependent mast cell degranulation.

    Sibilano, Riccardo; Gri, Giorgia; Frossi, Barbara; Tripodo, Claudio; Suzuki, Ryo; Rivera, Juan; MacDonald, Andrew S; Pucillo, Carlo E

    2011-10-01

    Tregs play a central role in modulating FcεRI-dependent MC effector functions in the course of the allergic response. Cellular interaction depends on the constitutive expression of OX40 on Tregs and the OX40L counterpart on MCs. Study of OX40L signaling on MCs is hampered by the need of a highly purified molecule, which triggers OX40L specifically. We now report that sOX40 mimics the physiological activity of Treg interaction by binding to activated MCs. When treated with sOX40, activated MCs showed decreased degranulation and Ca(++) influx, whereas PLC-γ2 phosphorylation remained unaffected. Once injected into experimental animals, sOX40 not only located within the endothelium but also in parenchyma, where it could be found in close proximity and apparently bound to MCs. This soluble molecule triggers MC-OX40L without the requirement of Tregs, thus allowing study of OX40L signaling pathways in MCs and in other OX40L-expressing cell populations. Importantly, as sOX40 inhibits MC degranulation, it may provide an in vivo therapeutic tool in allergic disease. PMID:21653238

  9. Seismically active column and volcanic plumbing system beneath the island arc of the Izu-Bonin subduction zone

    Špičák, Aleš; Vaněk, Jiří; Hanuš, Václav

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 179, č. 3 (2009), s. 1301-1312. ISSN 0956-540X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30120515 Keywords : seismicity and tectonics * volcano seismology * subduction zone processes * volcanic arc processes * magma migration and fragmentation * Pacific Ocean Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure Impact factor: 2.435, year: 2009

  10. New small molecule inhibitors of UPR activation demonstrate that PERK, but not IRE1α signaling is essential for promoting adaptation and survival to hypoxia

    Background and purpose: The unfolded protein response (UPR) is activated in response to hypoxia-induced stress in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and consists of three distinct signaling arms. Here we explore the potential of targeting two of these arms with new potent small-molecule inhibitors designed against IRE1α and PERK. Methods: We utilized shRNAs and small-molecule inhibitors of IRE1α (4μ8c) and PERK (GSK-compound 39). XBP1 splicing and DNAJB9 mRNA was measured by qPCR and was used to monitor IRE1α activity. PERK activity was monitored by immunoblotting eIF2α phosphorylation and qPCR of DDIT3 mRNA. Hypoxia tolerance was measured using proliferation and clonogenic cell survival assays of cells exposed to mild or severe hypoxia in the presence of the inhibitors. Results: Using knockdown experiments we show that PERK is essential for survival of KP4 cells while knockdown of IRE1α dramatically decreases the proliferation and survival of HCT116 during hypoxia. Further, we show that in response to both hypoxia and other ER stress-inducing agents both 4μ8c and the PERK inhibitor are selective and potent inhibitors of IRE1α and PERK activation, respectively. However, despite potent inhibition of IRE1α activation, 4μ8c had no effect on cell proliferation or clonogenic survival of cells exposed to hypoxia. This was in contrast to the inactivation of PERK signaling with the PERK inhibitor, which reduced tolerance to hypoxia and other ER stress inducing agents. Conclusions: Our results demonstrate that IRE1α but not its splicing activity is important for hypoxic cell survival. The PERK signaling arm is uniquely important for promoting adaptation and survival during hypoxia-induced ER stress and should be the focus of future therapeutic efforts

  11. : Seizure onset zone imaging

    David, Olivier; Blauwblomme, Thomas; Job, Anne-Sophie; Chabardès, Stéphan; Hoffmann, Dominique,; Minotti, Lorella; Kahane, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    International audience Stereo-electroencephalography is used to localize the seizure onset zone and connected neuronal networks in surgical candidates suffering from intractable focal epilepsy. The concept of an epileptogenicity index has been proposed recently to represent the likelihood of various regions being part of the seizure onset zone. It quantifies low-voltage fast activity, the electrophysiological signature of seizure onset usually assessed visually by neurologists. Here, we re...

  12. Small molecule antagonism of oxysterol-induced Epstein-Barr virus induced gene 2 (EBI2) activation

    Benned-Jensen, Tau; Madsen, Christian M; Arfelt, Kristine N;

    2013-01-01

    682753A, which blocks oxysterol-induced G-protein activation, β-arrestin recruitment and B-cell chemotaxis. We furthermore demonstrate that activation triggers pertussis toxin-sensitive MAP kinase phosphorylation, which is also inhibited by GSK682753A. Thus, EBI2 signalling in B cells mediates key...

  13. Information flow during gene activation by signaling molecules: ethylene transduction in Arabidopsis cells as a study system

    Díaz José

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We study root cells from the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana and the communication channel conformed by the ethylene signal transduction pathway. A basic equation taken from our previous work relates the probability of expression of the gene ERF1 to the concentration of ethylene. Results The above equation is used to compute the Shannon entropy (H or degree of uncertainty that the genetic machinery has during the decoding of the message encoded by the ethylene specific receptors embedded in the endoplasmic reticulum membrane and transmitted into the nucleus by the ethylene signaling pathway. We show that the amount of information associated with the expression of the master gene ERF1 (Ethylene Response Factor 1 can be computed. Then we examine the system response to sinusoidal input signals with varying frequencies to determine if the cell can distinguish between different regimes of information flow from the environment. Our results demonstrate that the amount of information managed by the root cell can be correlated with the frequency of the input signal. Conclusion The ethylene signaling pathway cuts off very low and very high frequencies, allowing a window of frequency response in which the nucleus reads the incoming message as a sinusoidal input. Out of this window the nucleus reads the input message as an approximately non-varying one. From this frequency response analysis we estimate: a the gain of the system during the synthesis of the protein ERF1 (~-5.6 dB; b the rate of information transfer (0.003 bits during the transport of each new ERF1 molecule into the nucleus and c the time of synthesis of each new ERF1 molecule (~21.3 s. Finally, we demonstrate that in the case of the system of a single master gene (ERF1 and a single slave gene (HLS1, the total Shannon entropy is completely determined by the uncertainty associated with the expression of the master gene. A second proposition shows that the Shannon entropy

  14. Radiant zone heated particulate filter

    Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI

    2011-12-27

    A system includes a particulate matter (PM) filter including an upstream end for receiving exhaust gas and a downstream end. A radiant zoned heater includes N zones, where N is an integer greater than one, wherein each of the N zones includes M sub-zones, where M is an integer greater than or equal to one. A control module selectively activates at least a selected one of the N zones to initiate regeneration in downstream portions of the PM filter from the one of the N zones, restricts exhaust gas flow in a portion of the PM filter that corresponds to the selected one of the N zones, and deactivates non-selected ones of the N zones.

  15. Atoms, molecules & elements

    Graybill, George

    2007-01-01

    Young scientists will be thrilled to explore the invisible world of atoms, molecules and elements. Our resource provides ready-to-use information and activities for remedial students using simplified language and vocabulary. Students will label each part of the atom, learn what compounds are, and explore the patterns in the periodic table of elements to find calcium (Ca), chlorine (Cl), and helium (He) through hands-on activities.

  16. Identification of a small-molecule ligand that activates the neuropeptide receptor GPR171 and increases food intake.

    Wardman, Jonathan H; Gomes, Ivone; Bobeck, Erin N; Stockert, Jennifer A; Kapoor, Abhijeet; Bisignano, Paola; Gupta, Achla; Mezei, Mihaly; Kumar, Sanjai; Filizola, Marta; Devi, Lakshmi A

    2016-01-01

    Several neuropeptide systems in the hypothalamus, including neuropeptide Y and agouti-related protein (AgRP), control food intake. Peptides derived from proSAAS, a precursor implicated in the regulation of body weight, also control food intake. GPR171 is a heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein)-coupled receptor (GPCR) for BigLEN (b-LEN), a peptide derived from proSAAS. To facilitate studies exploring the physiological role of GPR171, we sought to identify small-molecule ligands for this receptor by performing a virtual screen of a compound library for interaction with a homology model of GPR171. We identified MS0015203 as an agonist of GPR171 and demonstrated the selectivity of MS0015203 for GPR171 by testing the binding of this compound to 80 other membrane proteins, including family A GPCRs. Reducing the expression of GPR171 by shRNA (short hairpin RNA)-mediated knockdown blunted the cellular and tissue response to MS0015203. Peripheral injection of MS0015203 into mice increased food intake and body weight, and these responses were significantly attenuated in mice with decreased expression of GPR171 in the hypothalamus. Together, these results suggest that MS0015203 is a useful tool to probe the pharmacological and functional properties of GPR171 and that ligands targeting GPR171 may eventually lead to therapeutics for food-related disorders. PMID:27245612

  17. Computational investigation and synthesis of a sol-gel imprinted material for sensing application of some biologically active molecules

    Atta, Nada F., E-mail: Nada_fah1@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Cairo, Post Code 12613, Giza (Egypt); Hamed, Maher M.; Abdel-Mageed, Ali M. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Cairo, Post Code 12613, Giza (Egypt)

    2010-05-14

    A hybrid sol-gel material was molecularly imprinted with a group of neurotransmitters. Imprinted material is a sol-gel thin film that is spin coated on the surface of a glassy carbon electrode. Imprinted films were characterized electrochemically using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and the encapsulated molecules were extracted from the films and complementary molecular cavities are formed that enable their rebind. The films were tested in their corresponding template solutions for rebinding using square wave voltammetry (SWV). Computational approach for exploring the primary intermolecular forces between templates and hydrolyzed form of the precursor monomer, tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS), were carried out using Hartree-Fock method (HF). Interaction energy values were computed for each adduct formed between a monomer and a template. Analysis of the optimized conformations of various adducts could explain the mode of interaction between the templates and the monomer units. We found that interaction via the amino group is the common mode among the studied compounds and the results are in good agreement with the electrochemical measurements.

  18. Computational investigation and synthesis of a sol-gel imprinted material for sensing application of some biologically active molecules

    A hybrid sol-gel material was molecularly imprinted with a group of neurotransmitters. Imprinted material is a sol-gel thin film that is spin coated on the surface of a glassy carbon electrode. Imprinted films were characterized electrochemically using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and the encapsulated molecules were extracted from the films and complementary molecular cavities are formed that enable their rebind. The films were tested in their corresponding template solutions for rebinding using square wave voltammetry (SWV). Computational approach for exploring the primary intermolecular forces between templates and hydrolyzed form of the precursor monomer, tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS), were carried out using Hartree-Fock method (HF). Interaction energy values were computed for each adduct formed between a monomer and a template. Analysis of the optimized conformations of various adducts could explain the mode of interaction between the templates and the monomer units. We found that interaction via the amino group is the common mode among the studied compounds and the results are in good agreement with the electrochemical measurements.

  19. Structural and Functional Characterization of a Single-chain Peptide-MHC Molecule that Modulates both Naive and Activated CD8plus T Cells

    D Samanta; G Mukherjee; U Ramagopal; R Chaparro; S Nathenson; T DiLorenzo; S Almo

    2011-12-31

    Peptide-MHC (pMHC) multimers, in addition to being tools for tracking and quantifying antigen-specific T cells, can mediate downstream signaling after T-cell receptor engagement. In the absence of costimulation, this can lead to anergy or apoptosis of cognate T cells, a property that could be exploited in the setting of autoimmune disease. Most studies with class I pMHC multimers used noncovalently linked peptides, which can allow unwanted CD8{sup +} T-cell activation as a result of peptide transfer to cellular MHC molecules. To circumvent this problem, and given the role of self-reactive CD8{sup +} T cells in the development of type 1 diabetes, we designed a single-chain pMHC complex (scK{sup d}.IGRP) by using the class I MHC molecule H-2K{sup d} and a covalently linked peptide derived from islet-specific glucose-6-phosphatase catalytic subunit-related protein (IGRP{sub 206-214}), a well established autoantigen in NOD mice. X-ray diffraction studies revealed that the peptide is presented in the groove of the MHC molecule in canonical fashion, and it was also demonstrated that scK{sup d}.IGRP tetramers bound specifically to cognate CD8{sup +} T cells. Tetramer binding induced death of naive T cells and in vitro- and in vivo-differentiated cytotoxic T lymphocytes, and tetramer-treated cytotoxic T lymphocytes showed a diminished IFN-{gamma} response to antigen stimulation. Tetramer accessibility to disease-relevant T cells in vivo was also demonstrated. Our study suggests the potential of single-chain pMHC tetramers as possible therapeutic agents in autoimmune disease. Their ability to affect the fate of naive and activated CD8{sup +} T cells makes them a potential intervention strategy in early and late stages of disease.

  20. Cleavage of human high molecular weight kininogen markedly enhances its coagulant activity. Evidence that this molecule exists as a procofactor.

    Scott, C F; Silver, L D; Schapira, M; Colman, R W

    1984-01-01

    High molecular weight kininogen (HMW)-kininogen, the cofactor of contact-activated blood coagulation, accelerates the activation of Factor XII, prekallikrein, and Factor XI on a negatively charged surface. Although prekallikrein and Factor XI circulate as a complex with HMW-kininogen, no physical association has been demonstrated between Factor XII and HMW-kininogen, nor has the order of adsorption to surfaces of these proteins been fully clarified. In this report we explore the requirements ...

  1. Morphological peculiarities of duodenal peptic ulcer and leucocytes functional activity in the persons who were present in the zone of the accident at Chernobyl Atomic Power Station

    36 persons with duodenal peptic ulcer (DPU) who were in the zone of the accident at Chernobyl Atomic Power Station (experimental group) and 20 patients who were not exposed to small doses of ionizing radiation were examined to study morphological peculiarities of DPU and blood leucocytes functional activity in the persons who were present in the zone of the accident. The finding have shown that in the persons, exposed to small doses of ionizing radiation, peptic ulcer is often accompanied by erosive changes of gastric and duodenal mucosa. Disturbance of mucus formation in myocytes and secret evacuation from the cells, epithelium large-intestine-type metaplasia, were revealed. Shift of cellular correlation balance in inflammatory infiltrate to the side of monocytes number increase as well as decrease of leucocytes functional activity, manifesting itself by slowing a granulocytes migration to the focus of inflammation, were noted, which is necessary to take into account at administration of effective peptic ulcer therapy in the persons who were in the zone of the accident at Chernobyl Atomic Power Station

  2. The Role of Sulfhydryl Reactivity of Small Molecules for the Activation of the KEAP1/NRF2 Pathway and the Heat Shock Response

    Albena T. Dinkova-Kostova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The KEAP1/NRF2 pathway and the heat shock response are two essential cytoprotective mechanisms that allow adaptation and survival under conditions of oxidative, electrophilic, and thermal stress by regulating the expression of elaborate networks of genes with versatile protective functions. The two pathways are independently regulated by the transcription factor nuclear factor-erythroid 2 p45-related factor 2 (NRF2 and heat shock factor 1 (HSF1, respectively. The activity of these transcriptional master regulators increases during conditions of stress and also upon encounter of small molecules (inducers, both naturally occurring as well as synthetically produced. Inducers have a common chemical property: the ability to react with sulfhydryl groups. The protein targets of such sulfhydryl-reactive compounds are equipped with highly reactive cysteine residues, which serve as sensors for inducers. The initial cysteine-sensed signal is further relayed to affect the expression of large networks of genes, which in turn can ultimately influence complex cell fate decisions such as life and death. The paper summarizes the multiple lines of experimental evidence demonstrating that the reactivity with sulfhydryl groups is a major determinant of the mechanism of action of small molecule dual activators of the KEAP1/NRF2 pathway and the heat shock response.

  3. Redox active molecules cytochrome c and vitamin C enhance heme-enzyme peroxidations by serving as non-specific agents for redox relay

    Highlights: ► At low concentrations, cytochrome c/vitamin C do not catalyze peroxidations. ► But low levels of cytochrome c/vitamin C enhance diverse heme peroxidase activities. ► Enhancement positively correlates to the concentration of peroxide in reaction. ► Reducible additives serve as non-specific agents for redox relay in the system. ► Insight into electron transfer processes in routine and oxidative-stress states. -- Abstract: We report that incorporation of very low concentrations of redox protein cytochrome c and redox active small molecule vitamin C impacted the outcome of one-electron oxidations mediated by structurally distinct plant/fungal heme peroxidases. Evidence suggests that cytochrome c and vitamin C function as a redox relay for diffusible reduced oxygen species in the reaction system, without invoking specific or affinity-based molecular interactions for electron transfers. The findings provide novel perspectives to understanding – (1) the promiscuous role of cytochrome b5 in the metabolism mediated by liver microsomal xenobiotic metabolizing systems and (2) the roles of antioxidant molecules in affording relief from oxidative stress.

  4. Notch1 Signaling Modulates Neuronal Progenitor Activity in the Subventricular Zone in Response to Aging and Focal Ischemia

    Sun, Fen; Mao, XiaoOu; Xie, Lin; Ding, Meiping; Shao, Bei; Jin, Kunlin

    2013-01-01

    Neurogenesis diminishes with aging and ischemia-induced neurogenesis also occurs, but reduced in aged brain. Currently, the cellular and molecular pathways mediating these effects remain largely unknown. Our previous study has shown that Notch1 signaling regulates neurogenesis in subventricular zone (SVZ) of young-adult brain after focal ischemia, but whether a similar effect occurs in aged normal and ischemic animals is unknown. Here, we used normal and ischemic aged rat br...

  5. Magnetomineralogical changes along the Kohistan-Karakoram collision zone in North Pakistan: implications for variable thermochemical activities

    ZAMAN, HAIDER; BAMOUSA, ABDULLAH O

    2015-01-01

    To identify remanence-carrying magnetic minerals and document their thermochemical behavior, detailed rock magnetic investigations were conducted on Cretaceous-Tertiary rocks collected from northwestern and northeastern Kohistan, northern Pakistan. Rock magnetic results from each area are clearly differentiated on the basis of site location. Detrital hematite is identified as a main magnetic carrier in red beds of northwestern Kohistan located at some distance from the Northern Suture Zone wi...

  6. MDM4/HIPK2/p53 cytoplasmic assembly uncovers coordinated repression of molecules with anti-apoptotic activity during early DNA damage response.

    Mancini, F; Pieroni, L; Monteleone, V; Lucà, R; Fici, L; Luca, E; Urbani, A; Xiong, S; Soddu, S; Masetti, R; Lozano, G; Pontecorvi, A; Moretti, F

    2016-01-14

    The p53 inhibitor, MDM4 (MDMX) is a cytoplasmic protein with p53-activating function under DNA damage conditions. Particularly, MDM4 promotes phosphorylation of p53 at Ser46, a modification that precedes different p53 activities. We investigated the mechanism by which MDM4 promotes this p53 modification and its consequences in untransformed mammary epithelial cells and tissues. In response to severe DNA damage, MDM4 stimulates p53Ser46(P) by binding and stabilizing serine-threonine kinase HIPK2. Under these conditions, the p53-inhibitory complex, MDM4/MDM2, dissociates and this allows MDM4 to promote p53/HIPK2 functional interaction. Comparative proteomic analysis of DNA damage-treated cells versus -untreated cells evidenced a diffuse downregulation of proteins with anti-apoptotic activity, some of which were targets of p53Ser46(P)/HIPK2 repressive activity. Importantly, MDM4 depletion abolishes the downregulation of these proteins indicating the requirement of MDM4 to promote p53-mediated transcriptional repression. Consistently, MDM4-mediated HIPK2/p53 activation precedes HIPK2/p53 nuclear translocation and activity. Noteworthy, repression of these proteins was evident also in mammary glands of mice subjected to γ-irradiation and was significantly enhanced in transgenic mice overexpressing MDM4. This study evidences the flexibility of MDM2/MDM4 heterodimer, which allows the development of a positive activity of cytoplasmic MDM4 towards p53-mediated transcriptional function. Noteworthy, this activity uncovers coordinated repression of molecules with shared anti-apoptotic function which precedes active cell apoptosis and that are frequently overexpressed and/or markers of tumour phenotype in human cancer. PMID:25961923

  7. Teaching with the Case Study Method to Promote Active Learning in a Small Molecule Crystallography Course for Chemistry Students

    Campbell, Michael G.; Powers, Tamara M.; Zheng, Shao-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Implementing the case study method in a practical X-ray crystallography course designed for graduate or upper-level undergraduate chemistry students is described. Compared with a traditional lecture format, assigning small groups of students to examine literature case studies encourages more active engagement with the course material and…

  8. Optimized circuit design for flexible 8-bit RFID transponders with active layer of ink-jet printed small molecule semiconductors

    Kjellander, B.K.C.; Smaal, W.T.T.; Myny, K.; Genoe, J.; Dehaene, W.; Heremans, P.; Gelinck, G.H.

    2013-01-01

    We ink-jet print a blend of 6,13-bis(triisopropyl-silylethynyl)pentacene and polystyrene as the active layer for flexible circuits. The discrete ink-jet printed transistors exhibit a saturation mobility of 0.5 cm2 V -1 s-1. The relative spread in transistor characteristics can be very large. This sp

  9. Selective killing of gastric cancer cells by a small molecule targeting ROS-mediated ER stress activation.

    Zou, Peng; Xia, Yiqun; Chen, Tongke; Zhang, Junru; Wang, Zhe; Chen, Wenbo; Chen, Minxiao; Kanchana, Karvannan; Yang, Shulin; Liang, Guang

    2016-06-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer mortality in the world. Curcumin is a natural product with multiple pharmacological activities, while its clinical application has been limited by the poor chemical stability. We have previously designed a series of curcumin derivatives with high stability and anticancer potentials. The present study aims to identify the anti-cancer effects and mechanisms of WZ26, an analog of curcumin, in gastric cancer cells. In vitro, WZ26 showed higher chemical stability and much stronger anti-proliferative effects than curcumin, accompanied by dose-dependent induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in gastric cancer cells. Mechanistically, the novel compound WZ26 induced ROS production, resulting in the activation of JNK-mitochondrial and ER stress apoptotic pathways. Blockage of ROS production totally reversed WZ26-induced JNK activation, Bcl-2/Bax decrease, ER stress activation, and final cell apoptosis in SGC-7901 cells. WZ26 also exhibited potent anti-tumor effects in human gastric cancer cell xenograft models. WZ26 could be considered as a potential chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of advanced gastric cancer. In addition, this study also demonstrated that ROS production could be act as a vital candidate pathway for inducing tumor cell apoptosis by targeting mitochondrial and ER stress-related death pathway. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26086416

  10. Fracture-zone conditions on a recently active fault: insights from mineralogical and geochemical analyses of the Hirabayashi NIED drill core on the Nojima fault, southwest Japan, which ruptured in the 1995 Kobe earthquake

    Matsuda, Tatsuo; Omura, Kentaro; Ikeda, Ryuji; Arai, Takashi; Kobayashi, Kenta; Shimada, Koji; Tanaka, Hidemi; Tomita, Tomoaki; Hirano, Satoshi

    2004-01-01

    An 1800-m-deep borehole into the Nojima fault zone was drilled at Nojima-Hirabayashi, Japan, after the 1995 Hyogo-ken Nanbu (Kobe) earthquake. Three possible fracture zones were detected at depths of about 1140, 1300, and 1800 m. To assess these fracture zones in this recently active fault, we analyzed the distributions of fault rocks, minerals, and chemical elements in these zones. The central fault plane in the shallowest fracture zone was identified by foliated blue-gray gouge at a depth of 1140 m. The degree of fracturing was evidently greater in the hanging wall than in the footwall. Minerals detected in this zone were quartz, orthoclase, plagioclase, and biotite, as in the parent rock (granodiorite), and also kaolinite, smectite, laumontite, stilbite, calcite, ankerite, and siderite, which are related to hydrothermal alteration. Biotite was absent in both the hanging wall and footwall across the central fault plane, but it was absent over a greater distance from the central fault plane in the hanging wall than in the footwall. Major element compositions across this zone suggested that hydrothermal alteration minerals such as kaolinite and smectite occurred across the central fault plane for a greater distance in the hanging wall than in the footwall. Similarly, H 2O+ and CO 2 had higher concentrations in the hanging wall than in the footwall. This asymmetrical distribution pattern is probably due to the greater degree of wall-rock fracturing and associated alteration in the hanging wall. We attributed the characteristics of this zone to fault activity and fluid-rock interactions. We analyzed the other fracture zones along this fault in the same way. In the fracture zone at about 1300 m depth, we detected the same kinds of hydrothermal alteration minerals as in the shallower zone, but they were in fewer samples. We detected relatively little H 2O+ and CO 2, and little evidence for movement of the major chemical elements, indicating little past fluid

  11. Molecule modification and antioxidant activity of EGC%EGC分子修饰及其抗氧化活性

    刘金鹏; 蔡烈伟; 杜琪珍

    2012-01-01

    亲水性的表没食子儿茶素(ECC)是绿茶茶多酚的组成成分之一,采用氧杂Pictet-Spengler反应,通过嫁接酮类物质对表没食子儿茶素(EGC)进行了分子修饰,并对反应产物进行了抗氧化活性的研究。反应产物为脂溶性成分,且保持了较高的抗氧化活性。%Water-soluble EGC is one of the composition of green tea polyphenols. In this paper, Oxa- Pictet-Spengler reaction is use to modify EGC by grafting ketones, and studying the antioxidant activity of products. Products is liposoluble components, retaining fine antioxidant activity.

  12. Histone methyltransferase inhibitors are orally bioavailable, fast-acting molecules with activity against different species causing malaria in humans.

    Malmquist, Nicholas A; Sundriyal, Sandeep; Caron, Joachim; Chen, Patty; Witkowski, Benoit; Menard, Didier; Suwanarusk, Rossarin; Renia, Laurent; Nosten, Francois; Jiménez-Díaz, María Belén; Angulo-Barturen, Iñigo; Santos Martínez, María; Ferrer, Santiago; Sanz, Laura M; Gamo, Francisco-Javier; Wittlin, Sergio; Duffy, Sandra; Avery, Vicky M; Ruecker, Andrea; Delves, Michael J; Sinden, Robert E; Fuchter, Matthew J; Scherf, Artur

    2015-02-01

    Current antimalarials are under continuous threat due to the relentless development of drug resistance by malaria parasites. We previously reported promising in vitro parasite-killing activity with the histone methyltransferase inhibitor BIX-01294 and its analogue TM2-115. Here, we further characterize these diaminoquinazolines for in vitro and in vivo efficacy and pharmacokinetic properties to prioritize and direct compound development. BIX-01294 and TM2-115 displayed potent in vitro activity, with 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) of ratio analysis confirms a high asexual-stage rate of killing. Both compounds examined displayed oral efficacy in in vivo mouse models of Plasmodium berghei and P. falciparum infection. The discovery of a rapid and broadly acting antimalarial compound class targeting blood stage infection, including transmission stage parasites, and effective against multiple malaria-causing species reveals the diaminoquinazoline scaffold to be a very promising lead for development into greatly needed novel therapies to control malaria. PMID:25421480

  13. Vasorelaxant activity of extracts obtained from Apium graveolens:Possible source for vasorelaxant molecules isolation with potential antihypertensive effect

    Vergara-Galicia Jorge; Jimenez-Ramirez Luis ngel; Tun-Suarez Adrin; Aguirre-Crespo Francisco; Salazar-Gmez Anuar; Estrada-Soto Samuel; Sierra-Ovando ngel; Hernandez-Nuez Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the vasorelaxant effect of organic extracts from Apium graveolens (A. graveolens) which is a part of a group of plants subjected to pharmacological and phytochemical study with the purpose of offering it as an ideal source for obtaining lead compounds for designing new therapeutic agents with potential vasorelaxant and antihypertensive effects. Methods:An ex vivo method was employed to assess the vasorelaxant activity. This consisted of using rat aortic rings with and without endothelium precontracted with norepinephrine. Results:All extracts caused concentration-dependent relaxation in precontracted aortic rings with and without endothelium;the most active extracts were Dichloromethane and Ethyl Acetate extracts from A. graveolens. These results suggested that secondary metabolites responsible for the vasorelaxant activity belong to a group of compounds of medium polarity. Also, our evidence showed that effect induced by dichloromethane and ethyl acetate extracts from A. graveolens is mediated probably by calcium antagonism. Conclusions: A. graveolens represents an ideal source for obtaining lead compounds for designing new therapeutic agents with potential vasorelaxant and antihypertensive effects.

  14. Histone Methyltransferase Inhibitors Are Orally Bioavailable, Fast-Acting Molecules with Activity against Different Species Causing Malaria in Humans

    Sundriyal, Sandeep; Caron, Joachim; Chen, Patty; Witkowski, Benoit; Menard, Didier; Suwanarusk, Rossarin; Renia, Laurent; Nosten, Francois; Jiménez-Díaz, María Belén; Angulo-Barturen, Iñigo; Martínez, María Santos; Ferrer, Santiago; Sanz, Laura M.; Gamo, Francisco-Javier; Wittlin, Sergio; Duffy, Sandra; Avery, Vicky M.; Ruecker, Andrea; Delves, Michael J.; Sinden, Robert E.; Fuchter, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    Current antimalarials are under continuous threat due to the relentless development of drug resistance by malaria parasites. We previously reported promising in vitro parasite-killing activity with the histone methyltransferase inhibitor BIX-01294 and its analogue TM2-115. Here, we further characterize these diaminoquinazolines for in vitro and in vivo efficacy and pharmacokinetic properties to prioritize and direct compound development. BIX-01294 and TM2-115 displayed potent in vitro activity, with 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) of <50 nM against drug-sensitive laboratory strains and multidrug-resistant field isolates, including artemisinin-refractory Plasmodium falciparum isolates. Activities against ex vivo clinical isolates of both P. falciparum and Plasmodium vivax were similar, with potencies of 300 to 400 nM. Sexual-stage gametocyte inhibition occurs at micromolar levels; however, mature gametocyte progression to gamete formation is inhibited at submicromolar concentrations. Parasite reduction ratio analysis confirms a high asexual-stage rate of killing. Both compounds examined displayed oral efficacy in in vivo mouse models of Plasmodium berghei and P. falciparum infection. The discovery of a rapid and broadly acting antimalarial compound class targeting blood stage infection, including transmission stage parasites, and effective against multiple malaria-causing species reveals the diaminoquinazoline scaffold to be a very promising lead for development into greatly needed novel therapies to control malaria. PMID:25421480

  15. Characterization of Active Hydrothermal Fluid Discharge and Recharge Zones in the Endeavour Axial Valley, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    Salmi, M.; Hutnak, M.; Hearn, C.; Tivey, M.; Bjorklund, T.; Johnson, H. P.

    2012-12-01

    Sites where warm hydrothermal fluid vents at mid-ocean spreading centers are important for understanding a wide range of critical oceanic processes, but discharge zones represent a very limited portion of crustal fluid circulation pathways. Mapping the distribution of both fluid recharge and discharge sites within the axial valley provides wider insight into the larger scale features of hydrothermal circulation. Our 2011 survey consisted of 180 conductive heat flow stations within the Endeavour axial valley in roughly a 400 m by 1000 m grid, extending across the entire axial valley from the outer flank of the western boundary ridge to the eastern wall. Data acquisition used thermal blankets which measured conductive heat flow without requiring substantial sediment cover. A surprising result from this survey was zones of high heat flow extending across-strike, from the summit of the west valley wall across the entire axial valley floor. This trend was correlated with anomalously low seafloor magnetization from a near-bottom survey with the ROV JASON. Unexpectedly, over half of the axial valley floor was anomalously low at 1 W m-2. The areas of extremely low heat flow values are interpreted as being directly influenced by recharge zones. Based on MCS estimates of partial melt depth below the axial valley and the assumption of no fluid advection, the purely conductive heat flow for this region should be on the order of 1 W m-2.The observation that conductive heat flux is suppressed over large portions of the axial valley floor suggests that heat transfer within the crustal sub-surface fluid reservoir is widespread, and impacts a large portion of our survey area. The largely bi-modal distribution of high and low conductive heat flow, coupled with geophysical and video observations, suggest current Endeavour axial valley crustal fluid circulation models need to be re-evaluated.

  16. Influence of encapsulated electron active molecules of single walled-carbon nanotubes on superstrate-type Cu(In,Ga)Se2 solar cells

    Chemical functionalization of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can strongly affect the efficiency of solar cells due to change of three factors viz. electronic energy structures, interfacial resistance, and electrical field. Therefore, it is worthwhile to investigate the influence of these three factors on the solar cells based on the functionalization of various active molecules in CNTs. In the present study, we investigate the influence of the three factors in the efficiency of superstrate-type Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) solar cells [i.e. F-doped SnO2/CNTs/CdS/CIGS/Au] by encapsulation of electron withdrawing and donating organic molecules inside CNTs. The CIGS solar cell was characterized using the electronic diagram, electrochemical impendence spectroscopy, reverse field emission currents, and currents–voltages curves. - Highlights: • We investigated the three effects of CNTs in superstrate-type CIGS solar cells. • Chemical functionalization of CNTs strongly affect the efficiency of solar cells. • The electrical field of solar cell was characterized using the reverse FE-currents

  17. Sorption Characteristics of Mixed Molecules of Glutaraldehyde from Water on Mesoporous Acid-Amine Modified Low-Cost Activated Carbon: Mechanism, Isotherm, and Kinetics

    Mukosha Lloyd

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The environmental discharge of inefficiently treated waste solutions of the strong biocide glutaraldehyde (GA from hospitals has potential toxic impact on aquatic organisms. The adsorption characteristics of mixed polarized monomeric and polymeric molecules of GA from water on mesoporous acid-amine modified low-cost activated carbon (AC were investigated. It was found that the adsorption strongly depended on pH and surface chemistry. In acidic pH, the adsorption mechanism was elaborated to involve chemical sorption of mainly hydroxyl GA monomeric molecules on acidic surface groups, while in alkaline pH, the adsorption was elaborated to involve both chemical and physical sorption of GA polymeric forms having mixed functional groups (aldehyde, carboxyl, and hydroxyl on acidic and amine surface groups. The optimum pH of adsorption was about 12 with significant contribution by cooperative adsorption, elucidated in terms of hydrogen bonding and aldol condensation. Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich models were fitted to isotherm data. The adsorption kinetics was dependent on initial concentration and temperature and described by the Elovich model. The adsorption was endothermic, while the intraparticle diffusion model suggested significant contribution by film diffusion. The developed low-cost AC could be used to supplement the GA alkaline deactivation process for efficient removal of residual GA aquatic toxicity.

  18. Borreliacidal activity of Borrelia metal transporter A (BmtA binding small molecules by manganese transport inhibition

    Wagh D

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Dhananjay Wagh,* Venkata Raveendra Pothineni,* Mohammed Inayathullah, Song Liu, Kwang-Min Kim, Jayakumar Rajadas Biomaterials and Advanced Drug Delivery Laboratory, Stanford Cardiovascular Pharmacology Division, Cardiovascular Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work  Abstract: Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease, utilizes manganese (Mn for its various metabolic needs. We hypothesized that blocking Mn transporter could be a possible approach to inhibit metabolic activity of this pathogen and eliminate the infection. We used a combination of in silico protein structure prediction together with molecular docking to target the Borrelia metal transporter A (BmtA, a single known Mn transporter in Borrelia and screened libraries of FDA approved compounds that could potentially bind to the predicted BmtA structure with high affinity. Tricyclic antihistamines such as loratadine, desloratadine, and 3-hydroxydesloratadine as well as yohimbine and tadalafil demonstrated a tight binding to the in silico folded BmtA transporter. We, then, tested borreliacidal activity and dose response of the shortlisted compounds from this screen using a series of in vitro assays. Amongst the probed compounds, desloratadine exhibited potent borreliacidal activity in vitro at and above 78 µg/mL (250 µM. Borrelia treated with lethal doses of desloratadine exhibited a significant loss of intracellular Mn specifically and a severe structural damage to the bacterial cell wall. Our results support the possibility of developing a novel, targeted therapy to treat Lyme disease by targeting specific metabolic needs of Borrelia.  Keywords: Lyme disease, BmtA, Borrelia burgdorferi, desloratadine, Bac Titer-Glo assay

  19. The adjuvant activity of alphavirus replicons is enhanced by incorporating the microbial molecule flagellin into the replicon.

    Maria L Knudsen

    Full Text Available Ligands of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs including Toll-like receptors (TLRs stimulate innate and adaptive immune responses and are considered as potent adjuvants. Combinations of ligands might act in synergy to induce stronger and broader immune responses compared to stand-alone ligands. Alphaviruses stimulate endosomal TLRs 3, 7 and 8 as well as the cytoplasmic PRR MDA-5, resulting in induction of a strong type I interferon (IFN response. Bacterial flagellin stimulates TLR5 and when delivered intracellularly the cytosolic PRR NLRC4, leading to secretion of proinflammatory cytokines. Both alphaviruses and flagellin have independently been shown to act as adjuvants for antigen-specific antibody responses. Here, we hypothesized that alphavirus and flagellin would act in synergy when combined. We therefore cloned the Salmonella Typhimurium flagellin (FliC gene into an alphavirus replicon and assessed its adjuvant activity on the antibody response against co-administered antigen. In mice immunized with recombinant alphavirus, antibody responses were greatly enhanced compared to soluble FliC or control alphavirus. Both IgG1 and IgG2a/c responses were increased, indicating an enhancement of both Th1 and Th2 type responses. The adjuvant activity of FliC-expressing alphavirus was diminished but not abolished in the absence of TLR5 or type I IFN signaling, suggesting the contribution of several signaling pathways and some synergistic and redundant activity of its components. Thus, we have created a recombinant adjuvant that stimulates multiple signaling pathways of innate immunity resulting in a strong and broad antibody response.

  20. Problems of Chernobyl Exclusion Zone

    The collection comprises the results of researches and design activity in the ChNPP exclusion zone, aimed at the development of technologies, equipment and devices for radioactive waste management and ChNPP accident clean-up, at studying the composition and structure of the Exclusion zone soil activity solid bearers, form transformation of the fission products of fuel fallout radionuclide composition in the ChNPP near zone, the spatial distribution of radionuclides and other radioecological issues.. Much attention is paid to medical and biological aspects of the accident influence on the flora, fauna and people's health, labour conditions and incidence of the workers of the Exclusion zone

  1. A new diamantane functionalized tris(aryloxide) ligand system for small molecule activation chemistry at reactive uranium complexes

    Lam, O.P.; Heinemann, F.W.; Meyer, K. [Department of Chemistry and Pharmacy, Inorganic Chemistry, University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen (Germany); Lam, O.P. [University of California, San Diego, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2010-06-15

    The diamantane functionalized triazacyclononane ligand ({sup Dia}ArOH){sub 3}tacn (L{sub 3}) has been synthesized and the reactivity of its U(III) metallated product [(({sup Dia}ArO){sub 3}tacn)U] (1) has been explored. Complex 1 promotes dichloromethane and azido-trimethyl-silane activation to generate U(IV) complex [(({sup Dia}ArO){sub 3}tacn)U(Cl)] (2) and U(V) complex [(({sup Dia}ArO){sub 3}tacn)U(NTMS)] (3), respectively. Spectroscopic investigations of complexes 1, 2, and 3 will be discussed, along with molecular structures where possible. (authors)

  2. A new diamantane functionalized tris(aryloxide) ligand system for small molecule activation chemistry at reactive uranium complexes

    The diamantane functionalized triazacyclononane ligand (DiaArOH)3tacn (L3) has been synthesized and the reactivity of its U(III) metallated product [((DiaArO)3tacn)U] (1) has been explored. Complex 1 promotes dichloromethane and azido-trimethyl-silane activation to generate U(IV) complex [((DiaArO)3tacn)U(Cl)] (2) and U(V) complex [((DiaArO)3tacn)U(NTMS)] (3), respectively. Spectroscopic investigations of complexes 1, 2, and 3 will be discussed, along with molecular structures where possible. (authors)

  3. Pharmacological activation of CB2 receptors counteracts the deleterious effect of ethanol on cell proliferation in the main neurogenic zones of the adult rat brain

    Rivera, Patricia; Blanco, Eduardo; Bindila, Laura; Alen, Francisco; Vargas, Antonio; Rubio, Leticia; Pavón, Francisco J.; Serrano, Antonia; Lutz, Beat; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Suárez, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Chronic alcohol exposure reduces endocannabinoid activity and disrupts adult neurogenesis in rodents, which results in structural and functional alterations. Cannabinoid receptor agonists promote adult neural progenitor cell (NPC) proliferation. We evaluated the protective effects of the selective CB1 receptor agonist ACEA, the selective CB2 receptor agonist JWH133 and the fatty-acid amide-hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitor URB597, which enhances endocannabinoid receptor activity, on NPC proliferation in rats with forced consumption of ethanol (10%) or sucrose liquid diets for 2 weeks. We performed immunohistochemical and stereological analyses of cells expressing the mitotic phosphorylation of histone-3 (phospho-H3+) and the replicating cell DNA marker 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU+) in the main neurogenic zones of adult brain: subgranular zone of dentate gyrus (SGZ), subventricular zone of lateral ventricles (SVZ) and hypothalamus. Animals were allowed ad libitum ethanol intake (7.3 ± 1.1 g/kg/day) after a controlled isocaloric pair-feeding period of sucrose and alcoholic diets. Alcohol intake reduced the number of BrdU+ cells in SGZ, SVZ, and hypothalamus. The treatments (URB597, ACEA, JWH133) exerted a differential increase in alcohol consumption over time, but JWH133 specifically counteracted the deleterious effect of ethanol on NPC proliferation in the SVZ and SGZ, and ACEA reversed this effect in the SGZ only. JWH133 also induced an increased number of BrdU+ cells expressing neuron-specific β3-tubulin in the SVZ and SGZ. These results indicated that the specific activation of CB2 receptors rescued alcohol-induced impaired NPC proliferation, which is a potential clinical interest for the risk of neural damage in alcohol dependence. PMID:26483633

  4. Identification, mechanism of action, and antitumor activity of a small molecule inhibitor of hippo, TGF-β, and Wnt signaling pathways.

    Basu, Dipanjan; Lettan, Robert; Damodaran, Krishnan; Strellec, Susan; Reyes-Mugica, Miguel; Rebbaa, Abdelhadi

    2014-06-01

    Embryonic signaling pathways, in particular those mediated by Wnt and TGF-β, are known to play key roles in tumor progression through the induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Their simultaneous targeting could therefore represent a desirable anticancer strategy. On the basis of recent findings that both Wnt and TGF-β-associated pathways are regulated by Hippo signaling in mammalian cells, we reasoned that targeting the latter would be more effective in inhibiting EMT. In a search for such inhibitors, we identified a small molecule (C19) with remarkable inhibitory activity not only against Hippo, but also against Wnt and TGF-β pathways. C19 inhibited cancer cell migration, proliferation, and resistance to doxorubicin in vitro, and exerted strong antitumor activity in a mouse tumor model. Mechanistically, C19 induced GSK3-β-mediated degradation of the Hippo transducer TAZ, through activation of the Hippo kinases Mst/Lats and the tumor suppressor kinase AMPK upstream of the degradation complex. Overall, this study identified C19 as a multi-EMT pathway inhibitor with a unique mechanism of action. The findings that both AMPK and Mst/Lats mediate the antitumor activity of C19 shed light on a potential cross-talk between metabolic and organ size control pathways in regulating cancer progression. By simultaneously targeting these two pathways, C19 may represent a new type of agents to suppress cancer progression and/or its recurrence. PMID:24694946

  5. Towards single molecule switches.

    Zhang, Jia Lin; Zhong, Jian Qiang; Lin, Jia Dan; Hu, Wen Ping; Wu, Kai; Xu, Guo Qin; Wee, Andrew T S; Chen, Wei

    2015-05-21

    The concept of using single molecules as key building blocks for logic gates, diodes and transistors to perform basic functions of digital electronic devices at the molecular scale has been explored over the past decades. However, in addition to mimicking the basic functions of current silicon devices, molecules often possess unique properties that have no parallel in conventional materials and promise new hybrid devices with novel functions that cannot be achieved with equivalent solid-state devices. The most appealing example is the molecular switch. Over the past decade, molecular switches on surfaces have been intensely investigated. A variety of external stimuli such as light, electric field, temperature, tunneling electrons and even chemical stimulus have been used to activate these molecular switches between bistable or even multiple states by manipulating molecular conformations, dipole orientations, spin states, charge states and even chemical bond formation. The switching event can occur either on surfaces or in break junctions. The aim of this review is to highlight recent advances in molecular switches triggered by various external stimuli, as investigated by low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (LT-STM) and the break junction technique. We begin by presenting the molecular switches triggered by various external stimuli that do not provide single molecule selectivity, referred to as non-selective switching. Special focus is then given to selective single molecule switching realized using the LT-STM tip on surfaces. Single molecule switches operated by different mechanisms are reviewed and discussed. Finally, molecular switches embedded in self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) and single molecule junctions are addressed. PMID:25757483

  6. Activation of VCAM-1 and Its Associated Molecule CD44 Leads to Increased Malignant Potential of Breast Cancer Cells

    Pei-Chen Wang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available VCAM-1 (CD106, a transmembrane glycoprotein, was first reported to play an important role in leukocyte adhesion, leukocyte transendothelial migration and cell activation by binding to integrin VLA-1 (α4β1. In the present study, we observed that VCAM-1 expression can be induced in many breast cancer epithelial cells by cytokine stimulation in vitro and its up-regulation directly correlated with advanced clinical breast cancer stage. We found that VCAM-1 over-expression in the NMuMG breast epithelial cells controls the epithelial and mesenchymal transition (EMT program to increase cell motility rates and promote chemoresistance to doxorubicin and cisplatin in vitro. Conversely, in the established MDAMB231 metastatic breast cancer cell line, we confirmed that knockdown of endogenous VCAM-1 expression reduced cell proliferation and inhibited TGFβ1 or IL-6 mediated cell migration, and increased chemosensitivity. Furthermore, we demonstrated that knockdown of endogenous VCAM-1 expression in MDAMB231 cells reduced tumor formation in a SCID xenograft mouse model. Signaling studies showed that VCAM-1 physically associates with CD44 and enhances CD44 and ABCG2 expression. Our findings uncover the possible mechanism of VCAM-1 activation facilitating breast cancer progression, and suggest that targeting VCAM-1 is an attractive strategy for therapeutic intervention.

  7. A novel small molecule agent displays potent anti-myeloma activity by inhibiting the JAK2-STAT3 signaling pathway

    Zhu, Jingyu; Xu, Yujia; Wang, Siyu; Xu, Xin; Ji, Peng; Yu, Yang; Cao, Biyin; Han, Kunkun; Hou, Tingjun; Xu, Zhuan; Kong, Yan; Jiang, Gaofeng; Tang, Xiaowen; Qiao, Chunhua; Mao, Xinliang

    2016-01-01

    The oncogenic STAT3 signaling pathway is emerging as a promising target for the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM). In the present study, we identified a novel STAT3 inhibitor SC99 in a target-based high throughput screen. SC99 inhibited JAK2-STAT3 activation but had no effects on other transcription factors such as NF-κB, and kinases such as AKT, ERK, and c-Src that are in association with STAT3 signaling pathway. Furthermore, SC99 downregulated the expression of STAT3-modulated genes, including Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, VEGF, cyclin D2, and E2F-1. By inhibiting the STAT3 signaling, SC99 induced MM cell apoptosis which could be partly abolished by the ectopic expression of STAT3. Furthermore, SC99 displayed potent anti-MM activity in two independent MM xenograft models in nude mice. Oral administration of SC99 led to marked decrease of tumor growth within 10 days at a daily dosage of 30 mg/kg, but did not raise toxic effects. Taken together, this study identified a novel oral JAK2/STAT3 inhibitor that could be developed as an anti-myeloma agent. PMID:26814430

  8. Secreted Toxoplasma gondii molecules interfere with expression of MHC-II in interferon gamma-activated macrophages.

    Leroux, Louis-Philippe; Dasanayake, Dayal; Rommereim, Leah M; Fox, Barbara A; Bzik, David J; Jardim, Armando; Dzierszinski, Florence S

    2015-04-01

    The obligate intracellular protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii interferes with major histocompatibility complex class II antigen presentation to dampen host CD4(+) T cell responses. While it is known that T. gondii inhibits major histocompatibility complex class II gene transcription and expression in infected host cells, the mechanism of this host manipulation is unknown. Here, we show that soluble parasite proteins inhibit IFNγ-induced expression of major histocompatibility complex class II on the surface of the infected cell in a dose-dependent response that was abolished by protease treatment. Subcellular fractionation of T. gondii tachyzoites revealed that the major histocompatibility complex class II inhibitory activity co-partitioned with rhoptries and/or dense granules. However, parasite mutants deleted for single rhoptries or dense granules genes (ROP1, 4/7, 14, 16 and 18 or GRA 2-9 and 12 knock-out strains) retained the ability to inhibit expression of major histocompatibility complex class II. In addition, excreted/secreted antigens released by extracellular tachyzoites displayed immunomodulatory activity characterized by an inhibition of major histocompatibility complex class II expression, and reduced expression and release of TNFα by macrophages. Tandem MS analysis of parasite excreted/secreted antigens generated a list of T. gondii secreted proteins that may participate in major histocompatibility complex class II inhibition and the modulation of host immune functions. PMID:25720921

  9. Orientating lipase molecules through surface chemical control for enhanced activity: A QCM-D and ToF-SIMS investigation.

    Joyce, Paul; Kempson, Ivan; Prestidge, Clive A

    2016-06-01

    Bio-active materials consisting of lipase encapsulated within porous silica particles were engineered to control the adsorption kinetics and molecular orientation of lipase, which play critical roles in the digestion kinetics of triglycerides. The adsorption kinetics of Candida antartica lipase A (CalA) was monitored using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) and controlled by altering the hydrophobicity of a silica binding support. The extent of adsorption was 2-fold greater when CalA was adsorbed onto hydrophobic silica compared to hydrophilic silica. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) fragmentation patterns, in conjunction with multivariate statistics, demonstrated enhanced exposure of the lipase's catalytic domain, specifically the histidine group responsible for activity, when CalA was adsorbed on hydrophilic silica. Consequently, lipid digestion kinetics were enhanced when CalA was loaded in hydrophilic porous silica particles, i.e., a 2-fold increase in the pseudo-first-order rate constant for digestion when compared to free lipase. In contrast, digestion kinetics were inhibited when CalA was hosted in hydrophobic porous silica, i.e., a 5-fold decrease in pseudo-first-order rate constant for digestion when compared to free lipase. These findings provide valuable insights into the mechanism of lipase action which can be exploited to develop smarter food and drug delivery systems consisting of porous lipid-based materials. PMID:26954083

  10. Correlation between the spatial distribution of radon anomalies and fault activity in the northern margin of West Qinling Fault Zone, Central China

    The spatial variations of soil gas in the northern edge of West Qinling Fault were investigated based on the field measurement of radon concentration. Radon concentrations highlighted a decreasing gradient from the middle segment to NW and SE along the fault and the fault zone was divided into three segments. We observed that the measured radon data showed a moderate positive correlation with relative fault activity. The hazard segment area was marked according to the relationship between the spatial concentration anomaly values of soil-gas radon and the seismotectonic background. (author)

  11. SIMULATION OF THE NUCLEAR-REACTOR ACTIVE-ZONE ELEMENTS WITH THICK ROTATING LAYER OF MICRO-PARTICLE FUEL FOR RADIOACTIVE WASTE TRANSMUTATION

    V. V. Sorokin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The effective transmutation of radioactive isotopes into the stable ones with the use of neutrons requires the neutron high-flux and the spectra with significant part of fast and resonance neutrons. It is advisable to alternate a range of specified-duration irradiation sessions with revamping the composition of waste. The depleted fuel of the commercial reactor comprises near 1 % of such isotopes of their individual mass in the batch loading which amounts to several tens of kilograms. The article considers a perspective nuclear reactor for radioactive waste transmutation as regards its design, thermal physics and hydrodynamics. Mobile microparticles of the fuel build up the active zone of the reactor and form a steady dense ringshaped layer. The layer rotates within immovable vortex chamber using the energy of the coolant, i.e. water. The micro particles cool down with the coolant unmediated.The  formulaic  valuation  of  the  device  capacity  with  water  under  pressure  comes to 1–5 MW per 1 liter of the layer. The condition of avoided boiling sets the most restrictive limitations  to  the  capacity.  The  bulk  of  the  layer  constricts  to  tens  of  liters  inasmuch as enlarging the chamber dimensions reduces the rotary acceleration and the force confining the fuel micro-particles on the free surface of the layer. The author offers and substantiates with calculations the active zone composed of several layers or a layer with a large ratio of the volume to the surface area for achieving criticality of nuclear fuel load with limitations on enrichment. The vortex chambers in case of the active zone of several layers can have the joint coolant exscapes along the axis. Implementation of the chambers with reverse vortices in composite active zones with joint escapes allows reducing the flow rotation below the vortex reactor along the coolant course.

  12. An isotopic study of the microbial activity in a vandose zone: A field and mesocosm laboratory study

    Isotope studies on carbon, nitrogen and sulphur can contribute to an increased understanding of biogeochemical and chemical processes occurring above and below the water table controlled by biotic, abiotic and hydraulic factors. Microbial induced respiration of organic material supported by oxidants such a dissolved oxygen, nitrate and sulphate increases pCO2 in relation to the atmosphere. As a result of microbial respiration, a diffusion controlled CO2 flux occurs in the vadose zone. Respiration and the hydraulic conditions in the vadose zone control the CO2 flux to the atmosphere and to the underlying water table. Further, at the interface to the water table (anoxic transition range), redox conditions can influence the oxidation state of the compounds. For that reason, carbon isotopes of soil CO2 gas and of the organic/inorganic carbon in soils were investigated in a mesocosm model and at an associated field site (natural scale) near Saskatoon, Canada. The models are equipped with gas and water sampling devices and with devices for controlling physicochemical parameters. Microbial processes have been investigated there for more than 900 d

  13. Onshore-offshore seismic networks: an inescapable approach to reveal the crustal structure and the seismic activity of large subduction zones

    Charvis, P.; Galve, A.; Laigle, M.; Hirn, A.; Hello, Y. M.; Oge, A.; Yates, B. A.

    2013-12-01

    Ninety percent of the seismic energy released worldwide and ninety percent of the largest earthquakes and tsunamis occur in subduction zones. Several recent catastrophic subduction earthquakes surprised us on many aspects, either because we had been unable to anticipate their extremely large magnitude (2011 Tohoku Earthquake, Mw 9.0), or because we had considered the subduction as partly aseismic (2004 Sumatra Andaman earthquake, Mw 9.1). One of the reasons for our present ignorance of the behavior of large subduction earthquakes is the lack of marine data to image and monitor the structure and evolution of megathrust faults offshore. Over the last 15 years, our group has conducted several passive and active seismic experiments* in the forearc regions of the Ecuador-Colombia, Lesser Antilles and Hellenic subduction zones. The objectives of these experiments were to image the subduction interplate fault at depth and accurately locate the current earthquake activity of the megathrusts using arrays of combined ocean-bottom and land-based seismometers. In the case of very large events and in the absence of geodetic data in the offshore part of the faults, the precise knowledge of current seismicity is mandatory to estimate the seismogenic behavior and potential of the fault interface. 2D dense active seismic lines, shot jointly with multichannel acquisitions, provide invaluable images of the deep structure of the Lesser Antilles arc and forearc, which allow locating the updip and downdip limits of the expected seismogenic zone. Assuming that the Moho is the downdip limit of the seismogenic zone, the 26 km-thick crust of the arc makes the seismogenic zone 3 times wider than it is in ';standard' oceanic arcs (like Marianas). 3D active and passive experiments in the Lesser Antilles and Ecuador forearcs provide an unprecedented way to image the structure in 3D down to the lower plate. The tomography documents the spatial variability of the interplate fault structure and of

  14. Adhesion of human basophils, eosinophils, and neutrophils to interleukin 1-activated human vascular endothelial cells: contributions of endothelial cell adhesion molecules

    1991-01-01

    Cytokines such as interleukin 1 (IL-1) promote adhesiveness in human umbilical vein endothelial cells for leukocytes including basophils, eosinophils, and neutrophils, and induce expression of adherence molecules including ICAM-1 (intercellular adhesion molecule-1), ELAM-1 (endothelial-leukocyte adhesion molecule-1), and VCAM-1 (vascular cell adhesion molecule-1). In the present study, blocking monoclonal antibodies (mAb) recognizing ICAM-1, ELAM-1, and VCAM-1 have been used to compare their ...

  15. Fully relativistic complete active space self-consistent field for large molecules: Quasi-second-order minimax optimization

    We develop an efficient algorithm for four-component complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) methods on the basis of the Dirac equation that takes into account spin–orbit and other relativistic effects self-consistently. Orbitals are optimized using a trust-region quasi-Newton method with Hessian updates so that energies are minimized with respect to rotations among electronic orbitals and maximized with respect to rotations between electronic and positronic orbitals. Utilizing density fitting and parallel computation, we demonstrate that Dirac–Coulomb CASSCF calculations can be routinely performed on systems with 100 atoms and a few heavy-elements. The convergence behavior and wall times for octachloridodirhenate(III) and a tungsten methylidene complex are presented. In addition, the excitation energies of octachloridodirhenate(III) are reported using a state-averaged variant

  16. A Selective Assay to Detect Chitin and Biologically Active Nano-Machineries for Chitin-Biosynthesis with Their Intrinsic Chitin-Synthase Molecules

    Hildgund Schrempf

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available A new assay system for chitin has been developed. It comprises the chitin-binding protein ChbB in fusion with a His-tag as well as with a Strep-tag, the latter of which was chemically coupled to horseradish peroxidase. With the resulting complex, minimal quantities of chitin are photometrically detectable. In addition, the assay allows rapid scoring of the activity of chitin-synthases. As a result, a refined procedure for the rapid purification of yeast chitosomes (nano-machineries for chitin biosynthesis has been established. Immuno-electronmicroscopical studies of purified chitosomes, gained from a yeast strain carrying a chitin-synthase gene fused to that for GFP (green-fluorescence protein, has led to the in situ localization of chitin-synthase-GFP molecules within chitosomes.

  17. Activation energy of fractional vortices and spectroscopy of a vortex molecule in long Josephson junction; Aktivierungsenergie fraktionaler Flusswirbel und Spektroskopie an Vortex-Molekuelen in langen Josephsonkontakten

    Buckenmaier, Kai

    2010-06-09

    This thesis is divided into two parts, the measurement of the activation energy of a fractional vortex and the spectroscopy of a vortex-molecule. Fractional vortices can be studied in long 0-{kappa} Josephson junctions, where a jump of the Josephson phase is created artificially with a pair of tiny current injectors. To compensate for this phase discontinuity, a {rho} vortex is formed. Here, {rho} describes the vortex's so called topological charge. The {rho} vortices are pinned at the discontinuity and they carry the fraction ({rho}/2).{phi}{sub 0} of magnetic flux, with the magnetic flux quantum {phi}{sub 0} 2.07.10{sup -15}. Two stable vortex configurations are possible, a direct Vortex and a complementary one. {rho} depends on the injector current. When the bias current of the junction exceeds a characteristic threshold, which dependents on {rho}, the Lorentz force is bigger than the pinning force of the vortex and a fluxon is pulled away. In this case a complementary ({rho}-2{pi}) vortex is left behind. This switching of the {rho} vortex and the resulting emission of a fluxon can be described as a Kramers like escape of a particle out of a tilted washboard potential. The washboard potential is tilted to the point where the barrier is small enough, so that the particle can escape via thermal or quantum fluctuations. In the case of thermal fluctuations the barrier height is called activation energy. The activation energy can be determined by measuring the junction's switching current statistics. In this thesis, the activation energy, necessary for the vortex escape, was measured as a function of {rho} and a homogenous external magnetic field perpendicular to the junction. The main focus was the investigation of 0-{pi} junctions. The temperature dependence of the activation energy was investigated, too. It turns out, that the transition-state-theory is convenient to describe the switching probability of the standard Nb-AlO{sub x}-Nb junctions at 4.2 K

  18. Dinamic changes of pro-inflammatory cytokines, adhesion molecules and lymphocytes activation markers as early indicators of diseases severity in patients with Dengue

    Silvana Vielma

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Several immunopathogenic mechanisms have been proposed to explain the massive increase of vascular permeability observed in the severe forms of infection by Dengue Virus (DENV. Our aim was to determine the kinetic changes of inflammatory mediators (IL-8, TNF- α, soluble early lymphocyte activation markers (sIL-2R, sTNF-Rp75 and soluble fractions of cell adhesion molecules (sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 as indicators for early recognition of disease severity in patients with laboratory-confirmed dengue. Twenty patients classified as Dengue±Warning Signs (D±WS and thirty patients with Severe Dengue (SD were included in the study. Serums of apparently healthy individuals were included as controls. Compared with normal subjects, D±WS cases did not show significant differences in the levels of IL-8 or TNF-α during the acute nor in the critical stages of the disease; however, in D±WS cases levels of sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 were higher than controls during both phases; in contrast, significant increase of sTNF-p75 and sIL2R levels were observed during the critical phase of the disease. Compared with both dengue patients and controls, patients with SD showed significant rise in the levels of IL-8 and TNF-α during the critical phase of the disease and a significant increase in adhesion molecules were detected in both phases, but the highest levels of sVCAM-1 and sIL-2R were observed only during the acute stage of the disease. In conclusion, sIL-2R and sVCAM-1, as early markers of lymphocyte and endothelial activation, would serves as indicators of severity during the acute phase of dengue infection.

  19. Co-expression of Apoptosis-Related Molecules on Activated CD8+ CD38+ T-cells is Associated with HIV-1 Disease Progression

    José W. Rodríguez

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available CD8+ T cells play a major role in controlling HIV-1 infection through the release of soluble lytic and non-lytic antiviral factors. Their decrease or defective function contributes to the HIV-1 disease progression. HIV-1 disease progression has been associated with a remarkable increase of CD38 expression on CD8+ T-cells. It has been also documented that a significant distribution of HIV-specific CD8+T-cells resides in the CD8+CD38+ T-cell sub-population. The failure of HIV-specific CD8+CD38+ T-cells to control HIV-1 infection has been attributed to several mechanisms including apoptosis. However, the relationship between the CD38 expression and molecular events involved in CD8+ T-cell apoptosis is not well understood. Using four-color flow cytometric analysis, the present cross-sectional study we evaluated the expression of four membrane-associated apoptosis-related molecules (TNFR-1, Annexin-V, CXCR4, and CD95 and two cytoplasm-associated apoptosis-related molecules (Bcl-2 and the active form caspase-3 in 41 HIV-1 positive patients and 15 HIV-1 negative individuals. Flow cytometric analysis made on freshly isolated PBMC showed that HIV-1 infection alters the level of expression of CD38, CD95, CXCR4, Bcl-2 and active caspase-3. No significant change in the expression of Annexin V or TNFR-1 was found. A positive correlation was established between CD95, CXCR4, and active caspase-3 expression with low CD4 count and high plasma viremia and CD38 expression. Data suggest that the majority of activated CD8+CD38+ T-cells were apoptotic because they expressed active caspase-3 and the rest of these cells were highly susceptible to become apoptotic since they co-expressed CD95 and CXCR4. Results also suggest that one of the most likely HIV-mediated apoptosis mechanisms is via CD95 and CXCR4 induction through the caspase cascade despite the expression of Bcl-2. All these observations may provide an additional explanation of why HIV-1 infection is not

  20. Novel non-peptide small molecules preventing IKKβ/NEMO association inhibit NF-κB activation in LPS-stimulated J774 macrophages.

    De Falco, Francesca; Di Giovanni, Carmen; Cerchia, Carmen; De Stefano, Daniela; Capuozzo, Antonella; Irace, Carlo; Iuvone, Teresa; Santamaria, Rita; Carnuccio, Rosa; Lavecchia, Antonio

    2016-03-15

    Nuclear Factor-κB (NF-κB) is a transcription factor regulating several genes involved in important physiological and pathological processes. NF-κB has been found constitutively activated in many inflammatory/immune diseases. In addition, a positive correlation between persistent activation of NF-κB and tumor promotion has been demonstrated. Since the IKK (IκB kinase) activation is an indispensable component of all pro-inflammatory signaling pathways leading to NF-κB activation, considerable efforts have been done in order to develop novel anti-inflammatory therapeutics targeting IKK. Association of the IKK complex relies on critical interactions between the C-terminus NBD (NEMO binding domain) of the catalytic subunits IKKα and IKKβ, and the regulatory subunit NEMO (NF-κB Essential Modulator). Thus, this IKK/NEMO interacting region provides an attractive target to prevent the IKK complex formation and NF-κB activation. In this regard, we have identified non-peptide small molecule disruptors of IKKβ/NEMO complex through a structure-based virtual screening (SBVS) of the NCI chemical library. Phenothiazine 22 and its close analogues (22.2, 22.4 and 22.10) were able to reduce nitrite production and iNOS mRNA expression in J774 murine macrophages stimulated with LPS for 24h. These effects were associated with a reduced NF-κB/DNA binding activity as well as a decreased expression of phosphorylated IKKβ, IκBα and NF-κB/p65 in these cells. These observations suggest that compound 22 and its three structural analogues by inhibiting IKKβ/NEMO association mediate the blockage of NF-κB signaling pathway and may prove effective in treatment of diseases in which the IKK/NF-κB pathway is dysregulated. PMID:26776306

  1. Effect of androgen withdrawal on activation of ERKs and expression of cell cycle regulation molecules in human prostate carcinoma cells

    YE Ding-wei; LI Hui; TSENG Jane; CHAUVIN Priscilla; QIAN Song-xi; ZHENG Jia-fu; SUN Ying-hao; MA Yong-jiang

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To explore the possible mechanisms of growth regression of human androgen dependentprostate carcinoma cells caused by androgen withdrawal. Methods: After 24 h of treatment with 1×10-9mol/L dihydrotestosterone (DHT), the expression of phosphorylated ERK proteins and cell cycle regulationmolecules including CDK2, CDK4, CDK6 and P27kip1 in human androgen dependent prostate carcinoma cellline LNCaP was measured by Western blot analysis 0 h, 8 h and 24 h of after androgen withdrawal. Humanandrogen independent prostate carcinoma cell line PC-3 was also examined as control. Results: Down-regula-tion of phosphorylated ERK, CDK2, CDK4 and CDK6 and up-regulation of P27kip1 were found initially inLNCaP cell line 8 h after androgen withdrawal. The levels of phosphorylated ERK and CDKs decreased con-tinuously and reached the lowest after 24 h, while continuous elevation of P27kip1 was detected thereafter to 24h. No expression change of phosphorylated ERK, CDKs and P27kip1 were detected in PC-3 cell line. Conclu-sion: The androgen withdrawal can cause ERKs activation decrease and cell cycle regulation moleculeschanges, which may be one of the mechanisms for inhibited growth of androgen dependent prostate carcinomaafter androgen ablation by either operative or medicine methods.

  2. 77 FR 63290 - Foreign-Trade Zone 61-San Juan, Puerto Rico; Authorization of Production Activity, Pfizer...

    2012-10-16

    ... comment (77 FR 36997, 6/20/2012). The FTZ Board has determined that no further review of the activity is... Activity, Pfizer Pharmaceuticals, LLC (Subzone 61A), (Ibuprofen Pharmaceutical Products), Guayama, Puerto... notification of proposed production activity on behalf of Pfizer Pharmaceuticals, LLC (Subzone 61A) for...

  3. Tectonic Geomorphology and 36Cl geochronology of the Camardi Alluvial Fan Complex, Central Anatolia: Implications for Neotectonic activity of the Central Anatolian Fault Zone (CAFZ)

    Higgins, M.; Schoenbohm, L. M.; Gosse, J. C.

    2013-12-01

    Situated between an extensional province to the west and younger, compressional forces to the east, the significance of internal deformation within Central Anatolia, and particularly the Central Anatolian Fault Zone, remains poorly understood. The CAFZ, which records approximately 70+/- 10km of Cenozoic sinistral displacement, was initially described as an active, NE trending, 700km long, major intra-plate shear zone. However, the Cenozoic evolution of the CAFZ and its relevance to the modern tectonic setting of Anatolia are the subject of debate, and the kinematics, geometry and activity levels of the CAFZ remain both poorly documented and understood. The aim of this study is to constrain the extrusion related, neotectonic portion of this total displacement using methods unavailable to previous studies of the area: Terrestrial Cosmogenic Nuclide (TCN) geochronology and newly acquired high-resolution satellite imagery. Focusing on a tectonically offset alluvial fan complex, we apply In situ TCN 36Cl exposure dating to produce new geochronologically constrained quaternary slip rates for the southern, Ecemis Segment of the CAFZ. A combination of field observations, high precision GPS based fault scarp profiles and mapping on high-resolution satellite images are used to document offset geomorphic markers including: deflected streams, terrace edges and shutter ridges. These features show sinistral and normal displacement of 60 and 18 m respectively in the older alluvial surface. Determining the ages of this faulted surface, as well as a younger un-deformed alluvial surface using TCN, will yield a minimum quaternary slip-rate. Additionally, morphological characteristics of 25 drainage basins along the Ecemis Fault are determined using Digital Elevation Model (DEM)data. Key geomorphic indices include: hypsometric integral, basin asymmetry and the valley width-to-height ratio (Vf). The results suggest the morphology of these drainage basins is influenced by the recent

  4. Race, Ethnicity, and Discriminatory Zoning

    Allison Shertzer; Tate Twinam; Randall P. Walsh

    2014-01-01

    Zoning has been cited as a discriminatory policy tool by critics, who argue that ordinances are used to deter the entry of minority residents into majority neighborhoods through density restrictions (exclusionary zoning) and locate manufacturing activity in minority neighborhoods (environmental racism). However, identifying discrimination in these regulations is complicated by the fact that land use and zoning have been co-evolving for nearly a century in most American cities, rendering resid...

  5. ALARA Review of the Activation/Repair of Fire Detectors in Zone Three at the 233-S Facility

    A formal as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) review is required by BHI-SH-02, Vol. 1, Procedure 1.22, 'Planning Radiological Work', when radiological conditions exceed trigger levels. The level of contamination inside the viewing room meets this criterion. This ALARA review is for task instruction 1997-03-18-005-8.3.3 (mini task instruction to a living work package), 'Instructions for D ampersand D Support of Fire Detector Troubleshooting and Minor Maintenance Work at 233-S,' and DynCorp 2G-98-7207C, '233-S Reconnect Smoke Detectors Zone 3.' The Radiological Work Permit (RWP) request broke these two task instructions into four separate tasks. The four tasks identified in the RWP request were used to estimate airborne concentrations and the total exposure

  6. Pharmacological modulation of histone demethylase activity by a small molecule isolated from subcritical water extracts of Sasa senanensis leaves prolongs the lifespan of Drosophila melanogaster

    Nakagawa-Yagi Yuzo

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extracts of Sasa senanensis Rehder are used in traditional Japanese medicine; however, little is known about the underlying mechanisms of their potential health benefits. Methods S. senanensis leaves were extracted with subcritical water. An active small-molecule was isolated using reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC, and identified as 3,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde (protocatechuic aldehyde or PA. The effects of PA on the activity of histone demethylase, the Drosophila melanogaster lifespan and gene expression in Drosophila S2 cells were investigated. Results PA inhibited the activity of Jumonji domain-containing protein 2A (JMJD2A histone demethylase in a dose-dependent manner with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50 of 11.6 μM. However, there was no effect on lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1, histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1 or HDAC8. PA significantly extended the lifespan of female, but not male, Drosophila. In Drosophila S2 cells, the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E binding protein (4E-BP was up-regulated by PA exposure. Conclusions Our findings provide insight into the possible relationship between the pharmacological modulation of histone demethylation and lifespan extension by PA; they might also be important in the development of alternative therapies for age-related disorders.

  7. The role of sexual vs. asexual recruitment of Artemisia wudanica in transition zone habitats between inter-dune lowlands and active dunes in Inner Mongolia, China

    Wang, Yongcui; Alberto, Busso Carlos; Jiang, Deming; Ala, Musa; Li, Xuehua; Zhou, Quanlai; Lin, Jixiang; Ren, Guohua; Jia, Lian

    2016-04-01

    Artemisia wudanica is an endemic, perennial, pioneering psammophyte species in the sand dune ecosystems of western Horqin Sand Land in northern China. However, no studies have addressed how sexual and asexual reproduction modes of A. wudanica perform at the transitional zones between active dune inter-dune lowlands and active dunes. In early spring, quadrats were randomly set up in the study area to monitor surviving seedling and/or ramet density and frequency coming from sexual/asexual reproduction of A. wudanica. Iron sticks were inserted near each quadrat to determine wind erosion intensity (WE). Additionally, soil samples were collected nearby each quadrat to test for soil moisture (SM), organic matter (OM) and pH. Surviving seedlings of A. wudanica showed an inverse response in comparison with ramets to SM, OM and WE. Soil moisture showed the most positive effect, and WE the negative effect, on surviving, sexual reproduction seedlings. Contrarily, WE had the most positive effect, and SM the negative effect, on asexual reproduction ramets. This suggests that increases in SM and decreases in WE should benefit recruitment of A. wudanica seedlings. On the contrary, ramets coming from asexual reproduction showed a different response to environmental factors in transition zone habitats. While SM was not a key constraint for the survival of seedlings, they showed a better, positive response to wind erosion environments. Overall, various study environmental parameters could be improved to foster A. wudanica invasion and settlement in the plant community through different reproductive modes, thereby promoting vegetation restoration and rehabilitation.

  8. Quantitative structure-activity relationship of molecules constituent of different essential oils with antimycobacterial activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis

    Andrade-Ochoa, Sergio; Nevárez-Moorillón, Guadalupe Virginia; Sánchez-Torres, Luvia E; Villanueva-García, Manuel; Sánchez-Ramírez, Blanca E.; Rodríguez-Valdez, Luz María; Rivera-Chavira, Blanca E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Essential oils and their constituents are commonly known for their antibacterial, antifungal and antiparasitic activity, and there are also reports on the antimycobacterial properties, but more experimental data are needed for the description of the mechanism of action or structural (and molecular) properties related to the antimicrobial activity. Methods Twenty-five constituents of essential oils were evaluated against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv and Mycobacterium bovis AN5 b...

  9. Recent and Hazardous Volcanic Activity Along the NW Rift Zone of Piton De La Fournaise Volcano, La Réunion Island

    Walther, G.; Frese, I.; Di Muro, A.; Kueppers, U.; Michon, L.; Metrich, N.

    2014-12-01

    Shield volcanoes are a common feature of basaltic volcanism. Their volcanic activity is often confined to a summit crater area and rift systems, both characterized by constructive (scoria and cinder cones; lava flows) and destructive (pit craters; caldera collapse) phenomena. Piton de la Fournaise (PdF) shield volcano (La Réunion Island, Indian Ocean) is an ideal place to study these differences in eruptive behaviour. Besides the frequent eruptions in the central Enclos Fouqué caldera, hundreds of eruptive vents opened along three main rift zones cutting the edifice during the last 50 kyrs. Two short rift zones are characterized by weak seismicity and lateral magma transport at shallow depth (above sea level). Here we focus on the third and largest rift zone (15km wide, 20 km long), which extends in a north-westerly direction between PdF and nearby Piton des Neiges volcanic complex. It is typified by deep seismicity (up to 30 km), emitting mostly primitive magmas, testifying of high fluid pressures (up to 5 kbar) and large-volume eruptions. We present new field data (including stratigraphic logs, a geological map of the area, C-14 dating and geochemical analyses of the eruption products) on one of the youngest (~6kyrs) and largest lava field (Trous Blancs eruption). It extends for 24km from a height of 1800 m asl, passing Le Tampon and Saint Pierre cities, until reaching the coast. The source area of this huge lava flow has been identified in an alignment of four previously unidentified pit craters. The eruption initiated with intense fountaining activity, producing a m-thick bed of loose black scoria, which becomes densely welded in its upper part; followed by an alternation of volume rich lava effusions and strombolian activity, resulting in the emplacement of meter-thick, massive units of olivine-basalt alternating with coarse scoria beds in the proximal area. Activity ended with the emplacement of a dm-thick bed of glassy, dense scoria and a stratified lithic

  10. Environmental restoration plans and activities in the zones of uranium ore extraction and milling in Romania: 1995-1996 progress report

    The objective of this paper is to present the ecological impact on environment as a consequence of more than 30 years of activity in the field of uranium exploration, mining and ore processing in Romania and a brief description of the measures taken for limiting the effects of contamination on the affected zones including the proposed restructuring and rehabilitation programmes. The Autonomous Regie for Rare Metals (RAMR), the coordinator of the activities in the uranium field is responsible to implement the provisions of the IAEA Technical Cooperation Project on Environmental Restoration in Central and Eastern Europe joined by Romania in 1993. The characterization of radioactively contaminated areas is dealt with broadly under two categories, one pertaining to sites where the mining and milling activities have already ceased and the other where the units are still operational but are going to be closed down in the near future and will be placed under surveillance. Generally speaking, the activity in the uranium field is developed by observing the national Norms of Nuclear Safety for the Activity of Geological Investigation, Mining and Milling of Nuclear Raw Material. This report includes an evaluation of the necessary investments for the first stage of the programme dealing with the environmental restoration and the necessary research activities. This will be followed by studies for closing down and surveillance of the mines with special problems taking into account their depth and complex hydrology

  11. Coastal zone

    The report entitled Climate Change Impacts and Adaptation : A Canadian Perspective, presents a summary of research regarding the impacts of climate change on key sectors over the past five years as it relates to Canada. This chapter on the coastal zone focuses on the impact of climate change on Canada's marine and Great Lakes coasts with tips on how to deal with the impacts associated with climate change in sensitive environments. This report is aimed at the sectors that will be most affected by adaptation decisions in the coastal zone, including fisheries, tourism, transportation and water resources. The impact of climate change in the coastal zone may include changes in water levels, wave patterns, storm surges, and thickness of seasonal ice cover. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change projects global average sea level will rise between 9 and 88 centimetres between 1990 to 2100, but not all areas of Canada will experience the same rate of future sea level change. The main physical impact would be shoreline change that could result in a range of biophysical and socio-economic impacts, some beneficial, some negative. The report focuses on issues related to infrastructure and communities in coastal regions. It is noted that appropriate human adaptation will play a vital role in reducing the extent of potential impacts by decreasing the vulnerability of average zone to climate change. The 3 main trends in coastal adaptation include: (1) increase in soft protection, retreat and accommodation, (2) reliance on technology such as geographic information systems to manage information, and (3) awareness of the need for coastal adaptation that is appropriate for local conditions. 61 refs., 7 figs

  12. X-ray diffraction indicates that active cross-bridges bind to actin target zones in insect flight muscle.

    Tregear, R T; Edwards, R J; Irving, T C; Poole, K J; Reedy, M C; Schmitz, H.; Towns-Andrews, E; Reedy, M K

    1998-01-01

    We report the first time-resolved study of the two-dimensional x-ray diffraction pattern during active contraction in insect flight muscle (IFM). Activation of demembranated Lethocerus IFM was triggered by 1.5-2.5% step stretches (risetime 10 ms; held for 1.5 s) giving delayed active tension that peaked at 100-200 ms. Bundles of 8-12 fibers were stretch-activated on SRS synchrotron x-ray beamline 16.1, and time-resolved changes in diffraction were monitored with a SRS 2-D multiwire detector. ...

  13. Hourly activity and natural infection of sandflies (Diptera: psychodidae) captured from the aphotic zone of a cave, minas gerais state, Brazil.

    Carvalho, Gustavo Mayr de Lima; Brazil, Reginaldo Peçanha; Saraiva, Lara; Quaresma, Patrícia Flávia; Botelho, Helbert Antônio; Ramos, Mariana Campos das Neves Farah; de Almeida Zenóbio, Ana Paula Lusardo; e Meira, Paula Cavalcante Lamy Serra; de Castilho Sanguinette, Cristiani; Filho, José Dilermando Andrade

    2012-01-01

    Sandflies are holometabolous insects that are of great epidemiological importance in the neotropical region as vectors of leishmaniases. Caves are ecotopes that significantly differ from external environments and, among the insects that live or visit their internal area and adjacent environment, sandflies are commonly found. Based on this context, the objective of this work was to examine the period of activity of sandflies in the cave environment in the aphotic zone. Thus, four sandfly captures were conducted, one in each season of the year, in a cave where studies on the bioecological aspects of sandfly fauna have been conducted since 2008. In this same study, we have also noticed the presence of flagellates in some captured females. Catches were carried out for 24 hours using a Shannon trap, light bait, and cave walls were actively searched. We collected a total of 638 sandflies, representing 11 species. The most abundant species and with more intense period of activity were, in descending order: Lu. cavernicola (62%), Ev. spelunca (16%) and Ev. sallesi (14%). A total of 69 females were dissected to check for natural infection, and in five specimens we found living flagellated forms: two Ev. spelunca, two Ev. sallesi and one Sc. sordellii. This study shows that the activity of some species caught in the aphotic zone of the cave, especially Lu. cavernicola, differs from what has already been reported in previous sandfly captures, which are almost always conducted at night and during twilight. The existence of sandflies that were naturally infected with flagellates and the lack of awareness regarding the behaviour of sandflies in cave environments are strong indicators of the need for further study on this group of insects in this ecotope, as a safety measure to protect the visitors of such environment. PMID:23284957

  14. The sequence of moderate-size earthquakes at the junction of the Ligurian basin and the Corsica margin (western Mediterranean): The initiation of an active deformation zone revealed?

    Larroque, Christophe; Delouis, Bertrand; Sage, Françoise; Régnier, Marc; Béthoux, Nicole; Courboulex, Françoise; Deschamps, Anne

    2016-04-01

    A new seismically active zone is found in the southern part of the Ligurian basin, 80-km west of Corsica (western Mediterranean). The activity began in February 2011 with a foreshock (ML 4) and a mainshock (ML 5.3) 5 days later, followed by numerous aftershocks. We first analyze the fore- and mainshock in detail. We compare the results obtained using classical methods (linear location in a 1D medium and focal mechanisms from P and S polarities) and new approaches (non-linear location in a 3D medium and waveform modeling for determining the seismic moment and the focal mechanism). Both methods provided similar results for location, depth (in the range of 6-13 km) and focal mechanisms, which reveal reverse faulting with nodal planes oriented N-S and NE-SW. We then locate 27 of the aftershocks in the 3D model and find a 10-km-long NE-SW alignment with a depth between 7 and 16 km. In 2012 and 2013, three other moderate-size events (ML 3.8, 4 and 4.5) occurred and confirm that this zone is still active. The epicentral area is located in the oceanic domain of the Ligurian Basin. From analysis of the bathymetry and high-resolution multi-channel seismic profiles, no morphologic anomaly at surface and no inherited fault in the shallow ~ 4 km depth were imaged, which suggest that no significant deformation occurred in the area since 5 Ma. Thus, the structure(s) activated during the 2011-2013 sequence remain unknown. In light of these results, we point out a notable difference on both sides of the Ligurian Basin: the northern margin, close to the alpine chain, suffered strong earthquakes and large cumulated deformation since 5 Ma, while the southern margin, close to the Corsica-Sardinia continental block, is poorly deformed since 5 Ma.

  15. Phenolic Molecules in Virgin Olive Oils: a Survey of Their Sensory Properties, Health Effects, Antioxidant Activity and Analytical Methods. An Overview of the Last Decade Alessandra

    Giovanni Lercker

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Among vegetable oils, virgin olive oil (VOO has nutritional and sensory characteristics that to make it unique and a basic component of the Mediterranean diet. The importance of VOO is mainly attributed both to its high content of oleic acid a balanced contribution quantity of polyunsaturated fatty acids and its richness in phenolic compounds, which act as natural antioxidants and may contribute to the prevention of several human diseases. The polar phenolic compounds of VOO belong to different classes: phenolic acids, phenyl ethyl alcohols, hydroxy-isochromans, flavonoids, lignans and secoiridoids. This latter family of compounds is characteristic of Oleaceae plants and secoiridoids are the main compounds of the phenolic fraction. Many agronomical and technological factors can affect the presence of phenols in VOO. Its shelf life is higher than other vegetable oils, mainly due to the presence of phenolic molecules having a catechol group, such as hydroxytyrosol and its secoiridoid derivatives. Several assays have been used to establish the antioxidant activity of these isolated phenolic compounds. Typical sensory gustative properties of VOO, such as bitterness and pungency, have been attributed to secoiridoid molecules. Considering the importance of the phenolic fraction of VOO, high performance analytical methods have been developed to characterize its complex phenolic pattern. The aim of this review is to realize a survey on phenolic compounds of virgin olive oils bearing in mind their chemical-analytical, healthy and sensory aspects. In particular, starting from the basic studies, the results of researches developed in the last ten years will be focused.

  16. Photonic Molecule Lasers Revisited

    Gagnon, Denis; Dumont, Joey; Déziel, Jean-Luc; Dubé, Louis J.

    2014-05-01

    Photonic molecules (PMs) formed by coupling two or more optical resonators are ideal candidates for the fabrication of integrated microlasers, photonic molecule lasers. Whereas most calculations on PM lasers have been based on cold-cavity (passive) modes, i.e. quasi-bound states, a recently formulated steady-state ab initio laser theory (SALT) offers the possibility to take into account the spectral properties of the underlying gain transition, its position and linewidth, as well as incorporating an arbitrary pump profile. We will combine two theoretical approaches to characterize the lasing properties of PM lasers: for two-dimensional systems, the generalized Lorenz-Mie theory will obtain the resonant modes of the coupled molecules in an active medium described by SALT. Not only is then the theoretical description more complete, the use of an active medium provides additional parameters to control, engineer and harness the lasing properties of PM lasers for ultra-low threshold and directional single-mode emission. We will extend our recent study and present new results for a number of promising geometries. The authors acknowledge financial support from NSERC (Canada) and the CERC in Photonic Innovations of Y. Messaddeq.

  17. Role of T3 surface molecules in human T-cell activation: T3-dependent activation results in an increase in cytoplasmic free calcium.

    Weiss, A; Imboden, J; Shoback, D; Stobo, J.

    1984-01-01

    The human T-cell leukemia, Jurkat, and a T3-negative mutant of Jurkat (S.5) were used to study the role of T3 in human T-cell activation. Incubation of Jurkat with phytohemagglutinin (PHA) resulted in the production of interleukin 2, which was markedly increased by the addition of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). Antibodies reactive with T3 could activate Jurkat only if added together with PMA. However, S.5 cells failed to produce interleukin 2 in response to PHA and produced 1/16th the...

  18. 78 FR 40427 - Foreign-Trade Zone (FTZ) 183-Austin, Texas; Notification of Proposed Production Activity; Samsung...

    2013-07-05

    ... Activity; Samsung Austin Semiconductor, LLC (Semiconductors); Austin, Texas Samsung Austin Semiconductor, LLC (Samsung), operator of Subzone 183B, submitted a notification of proposed production activity to... the regulations of the FTZ Board (15 CFR 400.22) was received on June 26, 2013. Samsung currently...

  19. 77 FR 36997 - Foreign-Trade Zone 61-San Juan, PR; Notification of Proposed Production Activity; Pfizer...

    2012-06-20

    ... 617, 12/11/ 1992, 57 FR 61046, 12/23/1992). On June 8, 2012, a minor boundary modification under 15... Activity; Pfizer Pharmaceuticals LLC (Subzone 61A); (Ibuprofen Pharmaceutical Products); Guayama, PR The... activity on behalf of Pfizer Pharmaceuticals LLC (Pfizer) (Subzone 61A) for its manufacturing...

  20. 78 FR 69815 - Foreign-Trade Zone (FTZ) 3-San Francisco, CA; Notification of Proposed Production Activity...

    2013-11-21

    ... Production Activity, Phillips 66 Company, (Oil Refining/ Blending), Rodeo, California The San Francisco Port Commission, grantee of FTZ 3, submitted a notification of proposed production activity to the FTZ Board on... processed under Section 400.31 of the FTZ Board's regulations (B-89-2013, 78 FR 64196, 10/28/2013)....