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Sample records for active structural control

  1. Active interaction control for civil structures

    Wang, Luo-Jia

    1997-01-01

    This thesis presents a civil engineering approach to active control for civil structures. The proposed control technique, termed Active Interaction Control (AIC), utilizes dynamic interactions between different structures, or components of the same structure, to reduce the resonance response of the controlled or primary structure under earthquake excitations. The primary control objective of AIC is to minimize the maximum story drift of the primary structure. This is accomplished by timing th...

  2. Vibration control of active structures an introduction

    Preumont, Andre

    2002-01-01

    This text is an introduction to the dynamics of active structures and to the feedback control of lightly damped flexible structures. The emphasis is placed on basic issues and simple control strategies that work.

  3. Active and passive vibration control of structures

    Spelsberg-Korspeter, Gottfried

    2014-01-01

    Active and Passive Vibration Control of Structures form an issue of very actual interest in many different fields of engineering, for example in the automotive and aerospace industry, in precision engineering (e.g. in large telescopes), and also in civil engineering. The papers in this volume bring together engineers of different background, and it fill gaps between structural mechanics, vibrations and modern control theory.  Also links between the different applications in structural control are shown.

  4. Recent results on structural control of an active precision structure

    Chu, C. C.; Fanson, J. L.; Smith, R. S.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes recent results in structural control of an active precision truss structure at JPL. The goal is to develop practical control methodology and to apply to active truss structures intended for high precision space-based optics applications. The active structure considered incorporates piezoelectric active members which apply control forces internal to the structure and thereby improve the structure's dimensional stability. Two approaches to structural control system design were investigated. The first approach uses only noncollocated measurements of acceleration at the location of a simulated optical component to achieve structural stabilization. The second approach is essentially the same as the first one except that a viscous damper was used in place of a truss member on the structure to improve the dampings of selected flexible modes. The corresponding experimental closed-loop results are presented in this paper.

  5. Active control design of modular tensegrity structures

    Amouri, Sarah; Averseng, Julien; Dubé, Jean-François

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a general methodology for the design of modular active tensegrity structures is presented. The objectives are to propose systems such as grids or footbridges that would be able to actively damper their first vibration modes and to adapt their geometry using a small number of activators. This approach is validated experimentally on a plane regular tensegrity grid. Using numerical simulation, an application on the model of a modular tensegrity footbridge is presented.

  6. Semi-active control of dynamically excited structures using active interaction control

    Zhang, Yunfeng

    2001-01-01

    This thesis presents a family of semi-active control algorithms termed Active Interaction Control (AIC) used for response control of dynamically excited structures. The AIC approach has been developed as a semi﷓active means of protecting building structures against large earthquakes. The AIC algorithms include the Active Interface Damping (AID), Optimal Connection Strategy (OCS), and newly developed Tuned Interaction Damping (TID) algorithms. All of the AIC algorithms are founded upon ...

  7. Active Vibration Control of Satellite Flexible Structures during Attitude Maneuvers

    Saeed Hemmati; Morteza Shahravi; Keramat Malekzadeh

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is controlling active vibration of satellite flexible structures during attitude maneuvers. A smart structure is a structure which is able to sense and control active reaction to any external factors and stimulation. As it comes from the definition of smart structures, development of this knowledge depends on the materials science development, theories and strategies for control. In materials science, smart materials are developed in such a way that they are able to ...

  8. An Overview of Active Structural Control under Seismic Loads

    Soong, T.T.; Masri, S. F.; Housner, G. W.

    1991-01-01

    The concept of active structural control as a means of structural protection against seismic loads, developed over the last 20 years, has received considerable attention in recent years. It has now reached the stage where active systems have been installed in full-scale structures. It is the purpose of this paper to provide an overview of this development with special emphasis placed on laboratory experiments using model structures and on full-scale implementation of some active control syste...

  9. Active control of smart structures : an overall approach

    Nestorović Tamara; Trajkov Miroslav

    2010-01-01

    The paper presents active control of smart structures within a focused frame of piezoelectric applications in active vibration and noise attenuation with potentials for the use in mechanical and civil engineering. An overall approach to active control of piezoelectric structures involves subsequent steps of modeling, control, simulation, experimental verification and implementation. Each of these steps is regarded in details. Different application examples showing the feasibility of the activ...

  10. Optimum optical structures for active control

    Shannon, R. R.; Richard, R. M.; Hansen, J. G. R.

    1980-01-01

    A NASTRAN structural analysis of a lightweight mirror structure has been completed and is compared with previous experimental measurements. A preliminary design for a 4 meter aperture, 6 meter focal length primary mirror is presented.

  11. Active control of noise radiation from vibrating structures

    Mørkholt, Jakob

    The thesis is concerned with the active control of randomly vibrating structures by means of feedback control, with particular emphasis on reducing the sound radiation from such structures. A time domain model of the structural and radiation dynamics of an actively controlled plate has been...... developed, based on the theory of radiation filters for estimating the sound radiation from multimodal vibrations. This model has then been used in simulations of optimal feedback control, with special emphasis of the stability margins of the optimal control scheme. Two different methods of designing...

  12. Innovation in Active Vibration Control Strategy of Intelligent Structures

    A. Moutsopoulou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Large amplitudes and attenuating vibration periods result in fatigue, instability, and poor structural performance. In light of past approaches in this field, this paper intends to discuss some innovative approaches in vibration control of intelligent structures, particularly in the case of structures with embedded piezoelectric materials. Control strategies are presented, such as the linear quadratic control theory, as well as more advanced theories, such as robust control theory. The paper presents sufficiently a recognizable advance in knowledge of active vibration control in intelligent structures.

  13. Finite element models applied in active structural acoustic control

    Oude Nijhuis, Marco H.H.; Boer, de André; Rao, Vittal S.

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses the modeling of systems for active structural acoustic control. The finite element method is applied to model structures including the dynamics of piezoelectric sensors and actuators. A model reduction technique is presented to make the finite element model suitable for controll

  14. Self-Tuning Active Vibration Control of Flexible Beam Structures

    M.O. Tokhi; Hossain, M A

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents the design and performance evaluation of an adaptive active control mechanism for vibration suppression in flexible beam structures. A cantilever beam system in transverse vibration is considered. First order control finite difference methods are used to study the behaviour of the beam and develop a suitable test and verification platform. An active vibration control algorithm is developed within an adaptive control framework for broadband cancellation of vibration along t...

  15. Wireless sensor networks for active vibration control in automobile structures

    Mieyeville, Fabien; Ichchou, Mohamed; Scorletti, Gérard; Navarro, David; Du, Wan

    2012-07-01

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) are nowadays widely used in monitoring and tracking applications. This paper presents the feasibility of using WSNs in active vibration control strategies. The method employed here involves active-structural acoustic control using piezoelectric sensors distributed on a car structure. This system aims at being merged with a WSN whose head node collects data and processes control laws so as to command piezoelectric actuators wisely placed on the structure. We will study the feasibility of implementing WSNs in active vibration control and introduce a complete design methodology to optimize hardware/software and control law synergy in mechatronic systems. A design space exploration will be conducted so as to identify the best WSN platform and the resulting impact on control.

  16. Wireless sensor networks for active vibration control in automobile structures

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) are nowadays widely used in monitoring and tracking applications. This paper presents the feasibility of using WSNs in active vibration control strategies. The method employed here involves active-structural acoustic control using piezoelectric sensors distributed on a car structure. This system aims at being merged with a WSN whose head node collects data and processes control laws so as to command piezoelectric actuators wisely placed on the structure. We will study the feasibility of implementing WSNs in active vibration control and introduce a complete design methodology to optimize hardware/software and control law synergy in mechatronic systems. A design space exploration will be conducted so as to identify the best WSN platform and the resulting impact on control. (paper)

  17. Finite element models applied in active structural acoustic control

    Oude Nijhuis, Marco H.H.; de Boer; Rao, Vittal S.

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses the modeling of systems for active structural acoustic control. The finite element method is applied to model structures including the dynamics of piezoelectric sensors and actuators. A model reduction technique is presented to make the finite element model suitable for controller design. The reduced structural model is combined with an acoustic model which uses the radiation mode concept. For a test case consisting of a rectangular plate with one piezo patch the model re...

  18. Passive and Active Vibration Control of Renewable Energy Structures

    Zhang, Zili

    2015-01-01

    The present thesis deals with fundamental researches on passive and active vibration control of renewable energy structures, and provides useful models for practical applications. Effective and robust vibration control methods have been explored for mitigating the lightly damped edgewise blade vibration and lateral tower vibration, with the main focus on structural control devices. Rigorous theoretical modeling of different dynamic system has been established, based on which detailed design a...

  19. Critical review on active control in civil engineering structures

    One of the existing new application areas for feed-back system design has to do with the protection of Civil Engineering Structures from dynamic loading such as strong earthquakes, high wind, extreme waves, heavy traffic and highway loading. Buildings and other physical have traditionally been relied on their strength and ability to dissipate energy to severe dynamic loading. In recent years greater attention has been directed towards the use of control and automation to mitigate the effects of these dynamic loads on structures. One of such control is active control system. An actively controlled structure is defined as the one consisting of two types of load resisting members -static or passive member and the dynamic or active member. Their integration in optimal fashion produces a structure that is adaptive to changing environmental loads. (author)

  20. Active structural control with stable fuzzy PID techniques

    Yu, Wen

    2016-01-01

    This book presents a detailed discussion of intelligent techniques to measure the displacement of buildings when they are subjected to vibration. It shows how these techniques are used to control active devices that can reduce vibration 60–80% more effectively than widely used passive anti-seismic systems. After introducing various structural control devices and building-modeling and active structural control methods, the authors propose offset cancellation and high-pass filtering techniques to solve some common problems of building-displacement measurement using accelerometers. The most popular control algorithms in industrial settings, PD/PID controllers, are then analyzed and then combined with fuzzy compensation. The stability of this combination is proven with standard weight-training algorithms. These conditions provide explicit methods for selecting PD/PID controllers. Finally, fuzzy-logic and sliding-mode control are applied to the control of wind-induced vibration. The methods described are support...

  1. Impact of active controls technology on structural integrity

    Noll, Thomas; Austin, Edward; Donley, Shawn; Graham, George; Harris, Terry

    1991-01-01

    This paper summarizes the findings of The Technical Cooperation Program to assess the impact of active controls technology on the structural integrity of aeronautical vehicles and to evaluate the present state-of-the-art for predicting the loads caused by a flight-control system modification and the resulting change in the fatigue life of the flight vehicle. The potential for active controls to adversely affect structural integrity is described, and load predictions obtained using two state-of-the-art analytical methods are given.

  2. Active Vibration Control of a Monopile Offshore Structure

    Nielsen, Søren R. K.; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Thesbjerg, L.

    1996-01-01

    structure an active control technique has been proposed in corporation with the consulting company Rambøll, Esbjerg, Denmark. The proposed control technique is based on the relationship between the position of the separation points of the boundary layer flow and the drag term in the wave force on the......, it can be necessary to use an active or a passive vibration control system. However, for a monopile with severe space problems it can be difficult to locate a passive control system such as e.g. a tuned mass damper. Therefore, in order to active control wave introduced vibrations of a monopile...... cylinder. This concept has been experimentally investigated with a test model in stationary flow tests. The idea is to have a large drag coefficient when the cylinder moves opposite of the wave direction implying a relatively large damping excitation. When the structure moves in the wave direction a small...

  3. Active vibration control techniques for flexible space structures

    Parlos, Alexander G.; Jayasuriya, Suhada

    1990-01-01

    Two proposed control system design techniques for active vibration control in flexible space structures are detailed. Control issues relevant only to flexible-body dynamics are addressed, whereas no attempt was made to integrate the flexible and rigid-body spacecraft dynamics. Both of the proposed approaches revealed encouraging results; however, further investigation of the interaction of the flexible and rigid-body dynamics is warranted.

  4. Active structural control by fuzzy logic rules: An introduction

    Tang, Y.

    1995-07-01

    An introduction to fuzzy logic control applied to the active structural control to reduce the dynamic response of structures subjected to earthquake excitations is presented. It is hoped that this presentation will increase the attractiveness of the methodology to structural engineers in research as well as in practice. The basic concept of the fuzzy logic control are explained by examples and by diagrams with a minimum of mathematics. The effectiveness and simplicity of the fuzzy logic control is demonstrated by a numerical example in which the response of a single-degree-of-freedom system subjected to earthquake excitations is controlled by making use of the fuzzy logic controller. In the example, the fuzzy rules are first learned from the results obtained from linear control theory; then they are fine tuned to improve their performance. It is shown that the performance of fuzzy logic control surpasses that of the linear control theory. The paper shows that linear control theory provides experience for fuzzy logic control, and fuzzy logic control can provide better performance; therefore, two controllers complement each other.

  5. Active structural control by fuzzy logic rules: An introduction

    Tang, Yu [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Reactor Engineering Div.; Wu, Kung C. [Texas Univ., El Paso, TX (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering

    1996-12-31

    A zeroth level introduction to fuzzy logic control applied to the active structural control to reduce the dynamic response of structures subjected to earthquake excitations is presented. It is hoped that this presentation will increase the attractiveness of the methodology to structural engineers in research as well as in practice. The basic concept of the fuzzy logic control are explained by examples and by diagrams with a minimum of mathematics. The effectiveness and simplicity of the fuzzy logic control is demonstrated by a numerical example in which the response of a single- degree-of-freedom system subjected to earthquake excitations is controlled by making use of the fuzzy logic controller. In the example, the fuzzy rules are first learned from the results obtained from linear control theory; then they are fine tuned to improve their performance. It is shown that the performance of fuzzy logic control surpasses that of the linear control theory. The paper shows that linear control theory provides experience for fuzzy logic control, and fuzzy logic control can provide better performance; therefore, two controllers complement each other.

  6. Low-cost Active Structural Control Space Experiment (LASC)

    Robinett, Rush; Bukley, Angelia P.

    1992-01-01

    The DOE Lab Director's Conference identified the need for the DOE National Laboratories to actively and aggressively pursue ways to apply DOE technology to problems of national need. Space structures are key elements of DOD and NASA space systems and a space technology area in which DOE can have a significant impact. LASC is a joint agency space technology experiment (DOD Phillips, NASA Marshall, and DOE Sandia). The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: phase 4 investigator testbed; control of large flexible structures in orbit; INFLEX; Controls, Astrophysics; and structures experiments in space; SARSAT; and LASC mission objectives.

  7. Passive and Active Vibration Control of Renewable Energy Structures

    Zhang, Zili

    The present thesis deals with fundamental researches on passive and active vibration control of renewable energy structures, and provides useful models for practical applications. Effective and robust vibration control methods have been explored for mitigating the lightly damped edgewise blade...... vibration and lateral tower vibration, with the main focus on structural control devices. Rigorous theoretical modeling of different dynamic system has been established, based on which detailed design and analysis of the proposed control devices can be carried out. This thesis also explores technical...... solutions for wave energy point absorbers, in order to maximize the mean absorbed power and to deliver more smooth power to the grid. A novel suboptimal causal control law has been established for controlling the motion of the point absorber, and a new type of point absorber has also been proposed with...

  8. Structural control by the use of piezoelectric active members

    Fanson, J. L.; Chen, J.-C.

    1987-01-01

    Large Space Structures (LSS) exhibit characteristics which make the LSS control problem different form other control problems. LSS will most likely exhibit low frequency, densely spaced and lightly damped modes. In theory, the number of these modes is infinite. Because these structures are flexible, Vibration Suppression (VS) is an important aspect of LSS operation. In terms of VS, the control actuators should be as low mass as possible, have infinite bandwidth, and be electrically powered. It is proposed that actuators be built into the structure as dual purpose structural elements. A piezoelectric active member is proposed for the control of LSS. Such a device would consist of a piezoelectric actuator and sensor for measuring strain, and screwjack actuator in series for use in quasi-static shape control. An experiment simulates an active member using piezoelectric ceramic thin sheet material on a thin, uniform cantilever beam. The feasibility of using the piezoelectric materials for VS on LSS was demonstrated. Positive positive feedback as a VS control strategy was implemented. Multi-mode VS was achieved with dramatic reduction in dynamic response.

  9. Optimal placement of active elements in control augmented structural synthesis

    Sepulveda, A. E.; Jin, I. M.; Schmit, L. A., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    A methodology for structural/control synthesis is presented in which the optimal location of active members is treated in terms of (0,1) variables. Structural member sizes, control gains and (0,1) placement variables are treated simultaneously as design variables. Optimization is carried out by generating and solving a sequence of explicit approximate problems using a branch and bound strategy. Intermediate design variable and intermediate response quantity concepts are used to enhance the quality of the approximate design problems. Numerical results for example problems are presented to illustrate the efficacy of the design procedure set forth.

  10. Active vibration control of basic structures using macro fiber composites

    Yi, Guo; Wang, Jinming; Liu, Liwu; Liu, Yanju; Leng, Jinsong

    2011-03-01

    In the modern naval battle, as the anti-detection technique developing fleetly, enhancing submarine's hidden ability is becoming more and more important. However, in view of the worse control effect at low-frequency and weak adjustability to external influence, conventional passive vibration control can't satisfy the modern naval rigorous demands. Fortunately, active vibration control technology not only monitors the structure's real-time vibration, but also has more remarkable control effects and superior suitability. At the present time, it has a primary application in the vibration damping of ship engineering. In addition, due to functional materials rapidly developing, with the coming of piezoelectric composite materials, the advanced active control techniques have more applicability, lager damp amplitude and wider applied field, which basing on the piezoelectric-effect and inverse- piezoelectric-effect of piezoelectric materials. Especially, in the end of nineties, NASA had successfully manufactured the excellent macro fiber composite (MFC), which assembles actuating and sensing abilities. Comparing with the conventional piezoelectric ceramic materials, it provides the required durability, excellent flexibility, higher electromechanical coupling factors and stronger longitudinal actuating force by using interdigital electrodes. On the basis of the application of cantilever beam' active vibration control by using MFC actuators, this paper started with the mechanical characteristics of its actuating and sensing equations, and then investigated its piezoelectric feedback scale factor when equipped on the honeycomb aluminous panel. Finally, in order to validate the theoretical analysis method, the vibration control experiment of cantilever beam and honeycomb aluminous panel are built and tested with different activating force. The experimental results verify that MFC used in submarine structures' active vibration control are feasible and effective.

  11. Researches on active structural acoustic control by radiation modes

    MAO Qibo; JIANG Zhe

    2001-01-01

    Based on the radiation modes, an active control strategy is presented for sound radiation from elastic structures with an example of simply supported rectangular panel. The physical characteristics and mathematical meaning of the radiation modes are analyzed. The radiation efficiency of radiation mode falls off very rapidly with the increase of modes order at low frequency. A new control strategy is developed in which by canceling the adjoint coefficient of the first k radiation modes, the sound powers of the first k radiation modes is zero theoretically. The numerical calculation is made by using point force actuators as control forces.

  12. Development of a Pseudo-Uniform Structural Quantity for the Active Control of Structural Radiation

    Fisher, Jeffrey; Blotter, Jon

    2010-01-01

    Active noise control has been a highly researched field over the past few decades but the active control of the radiating structures has recently excited interest. Multiple structural quantities and their relationships to acoustic radiation are investigated. This paper also looks at the control of a new structural quantity developed taking advantage of the principle of Rayleigh’s integral and radiated power being strongly dependent on volume velocity. The benefit of this new quantity is that ...

  13. Phase and gain control policies for robust active vibration control of flexible structures

    Zhang, Kai; Scorletti, Gérard; Ichchou, Mohamed; Mieyeville, F.

    2013-01-01

    The interest of this paper is to develop a general and systematic robust control methodology for active vibration control of flexible structures. For this purpose, first phase and gain control policies are proposed to impose qualitative frequency-dependent requirements on the controller to consider a complete set of control objectives. Then the proposed control methodology is developed by employing phase and gain control policies in the dynamic output feedback H∞ control: according to the set...

  14. Active shape control of composite structures under thermal loading

    Binette, P.; Dano, M.-L.; Gendron, G.

    2009-02-01

    Maintaining the shape of high-precision structures such as space antennas and optical mirrors is still a challenging issue for designers. These structures are subjected to varying temperature conditions which often introduce thermal distortions. The development of smart materials offers great potential to correct the shape and to minimize the surface error. In this study, shape control of a composite structure under thermal loading using piezocomposites is investigated. The composite structure is made of a foam core and two carbon-epoxy face sheets. Macro-fiber composite (MFC™) patches are bonded on one side of the structure. The structure is subjected to a through-the-thickness temperature gradient which induces thermal distortion, essentially in the form of bending. The objective is to apply electric potential to the MFC™ actuators such that the deflection can be minimized. Finite-element analyses are conducted using the commercial software ABAQUS. Experiments are performed to study thermally induced distortion, piezoelectric actuation, and compensation of thermal distortion using MFC™ actuators. Numerical and experimental results are compared. A control loop based on strain measurements is used to actively control the structure. The results show that MFC™ actuators can compensate thermal distortion at all times, and that this is an efficient methodology.

  15. Active shape control of composite structures under thermal loading

    Maintaining the shape of high-precision structures such as space antennas and optical mirrors is still a challenging issue for designers. These structures are subjected to varying temperature conditions which often introduce thermal distortions. The development of smart materials offers great potential to correct the shape and to minimize the surface error. In this study, shape control of a composite structure under thermal loading using piezocomposites is investigated. The composite structure is made of a foam core and two carbon–epoxy face sheets. Macro-fiber composite (MFC(TM)) patches are bonded on one side of the structure. The structure is subjected to a through-the-thickness temperature gradient which induces thermal distortion, essentially in the form of bending. The objective is to apply electric potential to the MFC(TM) actuators such that the deflection can be minimized. Finite-element analyses are conducted using the commercial software ABAQUS. Experiments are performed to study thermally induced distortion, piezoelectric actuation, and compensation of thermal distortion using MFC(TM) actuators. Numerical and experimental results are compared. A control loop based on strain measurements is used to actively control the structure. The results show that MFC(TM) actuators can compensate thermal distortion at all times, and that this is an efficient methodology

  16. Survey of Active Structural Control and Repair Using Piezoelectric Patches

    Ahmed Abuzaid; Meftah Hrairi; M.S.I. Shaik Dawood

    2015-01-01

    The piezoelectric actuator has gained popularity over the last few years. Attention has been directed towards the study of their electromechanical response in active repair and the control of damaged structures. This has been made possible through the development of various numerical and analytical techniques for such studies. The shift of focus towards the piezoelectric based approaches has been due to their advantages, which include strategic cost benefits in maintenance, as well as an incr...

  17. Power system damping - Structural aspects of controlling active power

    Samuelsson, O.

    1997-04-01

    Environmental and economical aspects make it difficult to build new power lines and to reinforce existing ones. The continued growth in demand for electric power must therefore to a great extent be met by increased loading of available lines. A consequence is that power system damping is reduced, leading to a risk of poorly damped power oscillations between the generators. This thesis proposes the use of controlled active loads to increase damping of such electro-mechanical oscillations. The focus is on structural aspects of controller interaction and of sensor and actuator placement. On-off control based on machine frequency in a single machine infinite bus system is analysed using energy function analysis and phase plane plots. An on-off controller with estimated machine frequency as input has been implemented. At a field test it damped oscillations of a 0.9 MW hydro power generator by controlling a 20kW load. The linear analysis uses two power system models with three and twenty-three machines respectively. Each damper has active power as output and local bus frequency or machine frequency as input. The power system simulator EUROSTAG is used both for generation of the linearized models and for time simulations. Measures of active power mode controllability and phase angle mode observability are obtained from the eigenvectors of the differential-algebraic models. The geographical variation in the network of these quantities is illustrated using the resemblance to bending modes of flexible mechanical structures. Eigenvalue sensitivities are used to determine suitable damper locations. A spring-mass equivalent to an inter-area mode provides analytical expressions, that together with the concept of impedance matching explain the structural behaviour of the power systems. For large gains this is investigated using root locus plots. 64 refs, 99 figs, 20 tabs

  18. Survey of Active Structural Control and Repair Using Piezoelectric Patches

    Ahmed Abuzaid

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The piezoelectric actuator has gained popularity over the last few years. Attention has been directed towards the study of their electromechanical response in active repair and the control of damaged structures. This has been made possible through the development of various numerical and analytical techniques for such studies. The shift of focus towards the piezoelectric based approaches has been due to their advantages, which include strategic cost benefits in maintenance, as well as an increase in the life cycle of the repaired structures. Furthermore, adhesively bonded joints are widely used in the manufacturing and repairing of structures in many industries, especially automotive and aerospace engineering. This is due to the requirement for lightweight materials as well as the potential adhesive used to join materials with different characteristics. The piezoelectric actuator has also shown the capacity in controlling and lowering the shear stress concentration and joint edge peel in adhesively bonded joint systems. The structure’s control of stress and repair can generally be viewed as a reinforcement that influences the structure’s damage tolerance. Therefore, the interest of this review is on the applications of the piezoelectric actuators in both structural damage and the bonded adhesive joint system. The specific goal is to recognize the contemporary scientific challenges, including future opportunities.

  19. Sensitivity method for integrated structure/active control law design

    Gilbert, Michael G.

    1987-01-01

    The development is described of an integrated structure/active control law design methodology for aeroelastic aircraft applications. A short motivating introduction to aeroservoelasticity is given along with the need for integrated structures/controls design algorithms. Three alternative approaches to development of an integrated design method are briefly discussed with regards to complexity, coordination and tradeoff strategies, and the nature of the resulting solutions. This leads to the formulation of the proposed approach which is based on the concepts of sensitivity of optimum solutions and multi-level decompositions. The concept of sensitivity of optimum is explained in more detail and compared with traditional sensitivity concepts of classical control theory. The analytical sensitivity expressions for the solution of the linear, quadratic cost, Gaussian (LQG) control problem are summarized in terms of the linear regulator solution and the Kalman Filter solution. Numerical results for a state space aeroelastic model of the DAST ARW-II vehicle are given, showing the changes in aircraft responses to variations of a structural parameter, in this case first wing bending natural frequency.

  20. Innovation in Active Vibration Control Strategy of Intelligent Structures

    A. Moutsopoulou; G. E. Stavroulakis; Pouliezos, A.

    2013-01-01

    Large amplitudes and attenuating vibration periods result in fatigue, instability, and poor structural performance. In light of past approaches in this field, this paper intends to discuss some innovative approaches in vibration control of intelligent structures, particularly in the case of structures with embedded piezoelectric materials. Control strategies are presented, such as the linear quadratic control theory, as well as more advanced theories, such as robust control theory. The paper ...

  1. Active vibration control of smart grid structure by multiinput and multioutput positive position feedback controller

    Kwak, Moon K.; Heo, Seok

    2007-07-01

    This paper is concerned with the active vibration control of a grid structure equipped with piezoceramic sensors and actuators. The grid structure is a replica of the solar panel commonly mounted on satellites, which contains complex natural mode shapes. The multiinput and multioutput positive position feedback (PPF) controller is considered as an active vibration controller for the grid structure. A new concept, the block-inverse technique, is proposed to cope with more modes than the number of actuators and sensors. This study also deals with the stability and the spillover effect associated with the application of the multiinput multioutput PPF controller based on the block-inverse technique. It was found that the theories developed in this study are capable of predicting the control system characteristics and its performance. The new multiinput multioutput PPF controller was applied to the test structure using a digital signal processor and its efficacy was verified by experiments.

  2. Modelling of piezoelectric actuator dynamics for active structural control

    Hagood, Nesbitt W.; Chung, Walter H.; Von Flotow, Andreas

    1990-01-01

    The paper models the effects of dynamic coupling between a structure and an electrical network through the piezoelectric effect. The coupled equations of motion of an arbitrary elastic structure with piezoelectric elements and passive electronics are derived. State space models are developed for three important cases: direct voltage driven electrodes, direct charge driven electrodes, and an indirect drive case where the piezoelectric electrodes are connected to an arbitrary electrical circuit with embedded voltage and current sources. The equations are applied to the case of a cantilevered beam with surface mounted piezoceramics and indirect voltage and current drive. The theoretical derivations are validated experimentally on an actively controlled cantilevered beam test article with indirect voltage drive.

  3. Active control of structures using macro-fiber composite (MFC)

    Kovalovs, A; Barkanov, E; Gluhihs, S [Institute of Materials and Structures, Riga Technical University, 16/20 Azenes Str., Riga, LV-1048 (Latvia)

    2007-12-15

    This paper presents the use of macro-fiber composites (MFC) for vibration reduces of structures. The MFC consist of polyimid films with IDE-electrodes that are glued on the top and the bottom of rectangular piezoceramic fibers. The interdigitated electrodes deliver the electric field required to activate the piezoelectric effect in the fibers and allows to invoke the stronger longitudinal piezoelectric effect along the length of the fibers. When this actuator embedded in a surface or attached to flexible structures, the MFC actuator provides distributed solid-state deflection and vibration control. The major advantages of the piezoelectric fibre composite actuators are their high performance, flexibility, and durability when compared with the traditional piezoceramic (PZT) actuators. In addition, the ability of MFC devices to couple the electrical and mechanical fields is larger than in monolithic PZT. In this study, we showed the experimental results that an MFC could be used as actuator to find modal parameters and reduce vibration for structures such as an aluminium beam and metal music plate. Two MFC actuators were attached to the surfaces of test subjects. First MFC actuator used to supply a signal as exciter of vibration and second MFC show his application for reduction of vibration in the range of resonance frequencies. Experimental results of aluminium beam with MFC actuators compared with finite element model which modelled in ANSYS software. The applied voltage is modelled as a thermal load according to thermal analogy for MFC. The experimental and numerical results presented in this paper confirm the potential of MFC for use in the vibration control of structures.

  4. Active control of structures using macro-fiber composite (MFC)

    Kovalovs, A.; Barkanov, E.; Gluhihs, S.

    2007-12-01

    This paper presents the use of macro-fiber composites (MFC) for vibration reduces of structures. The MFC consist of polyimid films with IDE-electrodes that are glued on the top and the bottom of rectangular piezoceramic fibers. The interdigitated electrodes deliver the electric field required to activate the piezoelectric effect in the fibers and allows to invoke the stronger longitudinal piezoelectric effect along the length of the fibers. When this actuator embedded in a surface or attached to flexible structures, the MFC actuator provides distributed solid-state deflection and vibration control. The major advantages of the piezoelectric fibre composite actuators are their high performance, flexibility, and durability when compared with the traditional piezoceramic (PZT) actuators. In addition, the ability of MFC devices to couple the electrical and mechanical fields is larger than in monolithic PZT. In this study, we showed the experimental results that an MFC could be used as actuator to find modal parameters and reduce vibration for structures such as an aluminium beam and metal music plate. Two MFC actuators were attached to the surfaces of test subjects. First MFC actuator used to supply a signal as exciter of vibration and second MFC show his application for reduction of vibration in the range of resonance frequencies. Experimental results of aluminium beam with MFC actuators compared with finite element model which modelled in ANSYS software. The applied voltage is modelled as a thermal load according to thermal analogy for MFC. The experimental and numerical results presented in this paper confirm the potential of MFC for use in the vibration control of structures.

  5. A model for signal processing and predictive control of semi-active structural control system

    M-H Shih; W-P Sung; Ching-Jong Wang

    2009-06-01

    The theory for structural control has been well developed and applied to perform excellent energy dissipation using dampers. Both active and semi-active control systems may be used to decide on the optimal switch point of the damper based on the current and past structural responses to the excitation of external forces. However, numerous noises may occur when the control signals are accessed and transported thus causing a delay of the damper. Therefore, a predictive control technique that integrates an improved method of detecting the control signal based on the direction of the structural motion, and a calculator for detecting the velocity using the least-square polynomial regression is proposed in this research. Comparisons of the analytical data and experimental results show that this predictor is effective in switching the moving direction of the semi-active damper. This conclusion is further verified using the component and shaking table test with constant amplitude but various frequencies, and the El Centro earthquake test. All tests confirm that this predictive control technique is effective to alleviate the time delay problem of semi-active dampers. This predictive control technique promotes about 30% to 40% reduction of the structural displacement response and about 35% to 45% reduction of the structural acceleration response.

  6. Optical Sensor/Actuator Locations for Active Structural Acoustic Control

    Padula, Sharon L.; Palumbo, Daniel L.; Kincaid, Rex K.

    1998-01-01

    Researchers at NASA Langley Research Center have extensive experience using active structural acoustic control (ASAC) for aircraft interior noise reduction. One aspect of ASAC involves the selection of optimum locations for microphone sensors and force actuators. This paper explains the importance of sensor/actuator selection, reviews optimization techniques, and summarizes experimental and numerical results. Three combinatorial optimization problems are described. Two involve the determination of the number and position of piezoelectric actuators, and the other involves the determination of the number and location of the sensors. For each case, a solution method is suggested, and typical results are examined. The first case, a simplified problem with simulated data, is used to illustrate the method. The second and third cases are more representative of the potential of the method and use measured data. The three case studies and laboratory test results establish the usefulness of the numerical methods.

  7. Active control of large space structures: An introduction and overview

    Doane, G. B., III; Tollison, D. K.; Waites, H. B.

    1985-01-01

    An overview of the large space structure (LSS) control system design problem is presented. The LSS is defined as a class of system, and LSS modeling techniques are discussed. Model truncation, control system objectives, current control law design techniques, and particular problem areas are discussed.

  8. ACTIVE DIMENSIONAL CONTROL OF LARGE-SCALED STEEL STRUCTURES

    Radosław Rutkowski

    2013-01-01

    The article discusses the issues of dimensional control in the construction process of large-scaled steel structures. The main focus is on the analysis of manufacturing tolerances. The article presents the procedure of tolerance analysis usage in process of design and manufacturing of large-scaled steel structures. The proposed solution could significantly improve the manufacturing process.

  9. Active control of tensegrity structures under random excitation

    Ganesh Raja, M.; Narayanan, S.

    2007-06-01

    In this paper we consider vibration control of tensegrity structures under stationary and nonstationary random excitations. These excitations may be representative of many physical loading conditions, such as earthquake, wind, aerodynamic and acoustic excitations. The optimal control theory based on H2 and \\mathrm {H}_{\\infty } controller with full state and limited state feedback is used for the control. The response of the tensegrity structure is represented by the zero lag covariance matrix and the same is obtained by solving the matrix Lyapunov equation. The force generated by the electro-mechanical coupling of the piezoelectric actuator is used in the formulation. A tensegrity structure of class-1 comprising of two modules, with 24 pretension cables and six struts with piezoelectric actuators, is considered.

  10. O the Use of Modern Control Theory for Active Structural Acoustic Control.

    Saunders, William Richard

    A modern control theory formulation of Active Structural Acoustic Control (ASAC) of simple structures radiating acoustic energy into light or heavy fluid mediums is discussed in this dissertation. ASAC of a baffled, simply-supported plate subject to mechanical disturbances is investigated. For the case of light fluid loading, a finite element modelling approach is used to extend previous ASAC design methods. Vibration and acoustic controllers are designed for the plate. Comparison of the controller performance shows distinct advantages of the ASAC method for minimizing radiated acoustic power. A novel approach to the modelling of the heavy fluid-loaded plate is developed here. Augmenting structural and acoustic dynamics using state vector formalism allows the design of both vibration and ASAC controllers for the fluid-loaded plate. This modern control approach to active structural acoustic control is unique in its ability to suppress both persistent and transient disturbances on a plate in a heavy fluid. Numerical simulations of the open-loop and closed-loop plate response are provided to support the theoretical developments.

  11. Reduction of the Radiating Sound of a Submerged Finite Cylindrical Shell Structure by Active Vibration Control

    Seung-Bok Choi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work, active vibration control of an underwater cylindrical shell structure was investigated, to suppress structural vibration and structure-borne noise in water. Finite element modeling of the submerged cylindrical shell structure was developed, and experimentally evaluated. Modal reduction was conducted to obtain the reduced system equation for the active feedback control algorithm. Three Macro Fiber Composites (MFCs were used as actuators and sensors. One MFC was used as an exciter. The optimum control algorithm was designed based on the reduced system equations. The active control performance was then evaluated using the lab scale underwater cylindrical shell structure. Structural vibration and structure-borne noise of the underwater cylindrical shell structure were reduced significantly by activating the optimal controller associated with the MFC actuators. The results provide that active vibration control of the underwater structure is a useful means to reduce structure-borne noise in water.

  12. Active vibration control of a three-stage tensegrity structure

    Chan, Wai Leung; Arbelaez, Diego; Bossens, Frederic; Skelton, Robert E.

    2004-07-01

    This experimental study demonstrates the efficiency of simple control strategies to damp a 3-stage tensegrity tower structure. The tower is mounted on a moving support which is excited with a limited bandwidth random signal (filtered white noise) by a shaker. Our goal is to minimize the tansmissibility between base acceleration and top plate acceleration using piezoelectric displacement actuators and force sensors collocated at the bottom stage of vertical strings. Two types of controllers have been designed, namely, it local integral force feedback control and acceleration feedback control. It can be shown that both controllers can effectively damp the first 2 bending modes by about 20 dB, and the acceleration feedback controller performs even better as it can also reduce the amplitude of the next 2 bending modes by about 5-10 dB.

  13. Phase and gain control policies for robust active vibration control of flexible structures

    The interest of this paper is to develop a general and systematic robust control methodology for active vibration control of flexible structures. For this purpose, first phase and gain control policies are proposed to impose qualitative frequency-dependent requirements on the controller to consider a complete set of control objectives. Then the proposed control methodology is developed by employing phase and gain control policies in the dynamic output feedback H∞ control: according to the set of control objectives, phase and gain control policies incorporate necessary weighting functions and determine them in a rational and systematic way; on the other hand, with the appropriate weighting functions efficient H∞ control algorithms can automatically realize phase and gain control policies and generate a satisfactory H∞ controller. The proposed control methodology can be used for both SISO and MIMO systems with collocated or non-collocated sensors and actuators. In this paper, it is validated on a non-collocated piezoelectric cantilever beam. Both numerical simulations and experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed control methodology. (paper)

  14. Active control of structural vibration by piezoelectric stack actuators

    NIU Jun-chuan; ZHAO Guo-qun; HU Xia-xia

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a general analytical model of flexible isolation system for application to the installation of high-speed machines and lightweight structures. Piezoelectric stack actuators are employed in the model to achieve vibration control of flexible structures, and dynamic characteristics are also investigated. Mobility technique is used to derive the governing equations of the system. The power flow transmitted into the foundation is solved and considered as a cost function to achieve optimal control of vibration isolation. Some numerical simulations revealed that the analytical model is effective as piezoelectric stack actuators can achieve substantial vibration attenuation by selecting proper value of the input voltage.

  15. Control of high frequency microactuators using active structures

    A fluidically driven microactuator that generates supersonic, pulsed microjets has been implemented with smart materials to actively and precisely control the frequency of the microjets in a closed-loop manner. Since this actuator relies on a number of microscale flow and acoustic phenomena to produce the pulsed microjets, its resonant frequency is determined by its geometry and other flow parameters. The design discussed in this paper integrates piezoelectric stacks by connecting them to movable sidewalls within the actuator such that the microactuator's internal geometry can be controlled by varying the voltage across the piezo-stacks. An open-loop control scheme demonstrates the frequency modulation capabilities that are enabled with this design: very large frequency deviations (up to ±500 Hz) around the actuator design frequency are attained at very high rates (up to 1 kHz). Closed-loop control of the microactuator's frequency was also demonstrated, and the results indicate that (combined with appropriate sensors) this actuator could be used effectively for active, feedback control in high-speed, resonance-dominated flowfields. This proof of concept study clearly illustrates the ability of this robust and compact actuator to produce perturbations that can be modulated and controlled based on the desired control objective. (paper)

  16. A Control Source Structure of Single Loudspeaker and Rear Sound Interference for Inexpensive Active Noise Control

    Yasuhide Kobayashi

    2010-01-01

    phase-lag is imposed by the Swinbanks' source and the rear sound interference. Thirdly, effects on control performances of control source structures are examined by control experiments with robust controllers.

  17. Active queue management controller design for TCP communication networks: Variable structure control approach

    On the basis of variable structure control (VSC), an active queue management (AQM) controller is presented for a class of TCP communication networks. In the TCP/IP networks, the packet drop probability is limited between 0 and 1. Therefore, we modeled TCP/AQM as a rate-based non-linear system with a saturated input. The objective of the VSC-based AQM controller is to achieve the desired queue size and to guarantee the asymptotic stability of the closed-loop TCP non-linear system with saturated input. The performance and effectiveness of the proposed control law are then validated for different network scenarios through numerical simulations in both MATLAB and Network Simulator-2 (NS-2). Both sets of simulation results have confirmed that the proposed scheme outperforms other AQM schemes.

  18. Active queue management controller design for TCP communication networks: Variable structure control approach

    Chen, C.-K. [Department of Engineering Science, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Liao, T.-L. [Department of Engineering Science, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: tlliao@mail.ncku.edu; Yan, J.-J. [Department of Computer and Communication, Shu-Te University, Kaohsiung 824, Taiwan (China)

    2009-04-15

    On the basis of variable structure control (VSC), an active queue management (AQM) controller is presented for a class of TCP communication networks. In the TCP/IP networks, the packet drop probability is limited between 0 and 1. Therefore, we modeled TCP/AQM as a rate-based non-linear system with a saturated input. The objective of the VSC-based AQM controller is to achieve the desired queue size and to guarantee the asymptotic stability of the closed-loop TCP non-linear system with saturated input. The performance and effectiveness of the proposed control law are then validated for different network scenarios through numerical simulations in both MATLAB and Network Simulator-2 (NS-2). Both sets of simulation results have confirmed that the proposed scheme outperforms other AQM schemes.

  19. Reduction of the Radiating Sound of a Submerged Finite Cylindrical Shell Structure by Active Vibration Control

    Seung-Bok Choi; Juncheol Jeon; Jung Woo Sohn; Heung Soo Kim

    2013-01-01

    In this work, active vibration control of an underwater cylindrical shell structure was investigated, to suppress structural vibration and structure-borne noise in water. Finite element modeling of the submerged cylindrical shell structure was developed, and experimentally evaluated. Modal reduction was conducted to obtain the reduced system equation for the active feedback control algorithm. Three Macro Fiber Composites (MFCs) were used as actuators and sensors. One MFC was used as an excite...

  20. Practical Applications of Semi-active Control Systems to Civil Engineering Structures

    Florentina Chira; Cristian Pastia; Septimiu-George Luca

    2007-01-01

    During the last few years, it has been paid a considerable attention to the searching and developing of some procedures and mechanisms of structural control to mitigate the effects of dynamic environmental hazards on civil engineering structures. In this paper we review some full-scale applications of semi-active control systems for the protection of the civil structures under dynamic actions.

  1. An active structural acoustic control approach for the reduction of the structure-borne road noise

    Douville, Hugo; Berry, Alain; Masson, Patrice

    2002-11-01

    The reduction of the structure-borne road noise generated inside the cabin of an automobile is investigated using an Active Structural Acoustic Control (ASAC) approach. First, a laboratory test bench consisting of a wheel/suspension/lower suspension A-arm assembly has been developed in order to identify the vibroacoustic transfer paths (up to 250 Hz) for realistic road noise excitation of the wheel. Frequency Response Function (FRF) measurements between the excitation/control actuators and each suspension/chassis linkage are used to characterize the different transfer paths that transmit energy through the chassis of the car. Second, a FE/BE model (Finite/Boundary Elements) was developed to simulate the acoustic field of an automobile cab interior. This model is used to predict the acoustic field inside the cabin as a response to the measured forces applied on the suspension/chassis linkages. Finally, an experimental implementation of ASAC is presented. The control approach relies on the use of inertial actuators to modify the vibration behavior of the suspension and the automotive chassis such that its noise radiation efficiency is decreased. The implemented algorithm consists of a MIMO (Multiple-Input-Multiple-Output) feedforward configuration with a filtered-X LMS algorithm using an advanced reference signal (width FIR filters) using the Simulink/Dspace environment for control prototyping.

  2. Multilayer Active Control For Structural Damping And Optical-Path Regulation

    Rahman, Zahidul H.; Spanos, John T.; Fanson, James L.

    1995-01-01

    Two active-control concepts incorporated into system for suppression of vibrations in truss structure and regulation of length of optical path on structure to nanometer level. Optical-path-length-control subsystem contains two feedback control loops to obtain active damping in wide amplitude-and-frequency range. Concept described in more detail in number of previous articles, including "Stabilizing Optical-Path Length on a Vibrating Structure" (NPO-19040), "Controllable Optical Delay Line for Stellar Interferometry" (NPO-18686), "Test Bed for Control of Optical-Path Lengths" (NPO-18487).

  3. Development of Control Structure for Hybrid Wind Generators with Active Power Capability

    Mehdi Niroomand

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A hierarchical control structure is proposed for hybrid energy systems (HES which consist of wind energy system (WES and energy storage system (ESS. The proposed multilevel control structure consists of four blocks: reference generation and mode select, power balancing, control algorithms, and switching control blocks. A high performance power management strategy is used for the system. Also, the proposed system is analyzed as an active power filter (APF with ability to control the voltage, to compensate the harmonics, and to deliver active power. The HES is designed with parallel DC coupled structure. Simulation results are shown for verification of the theoretical analysis.

  4. Active control of structural vibration with on-line secondary path modeling

    YANG Tiejun; GU Zhongquan

    2004-01-01

    An active control strategy with on-line secondary path modeling is proposed and applied in active control of helicopter structural vibration. Computer simulations of the secondary path modeling performance demonstrate the superiorities of the active control strategy. A 2-input 4-output active control simulation for a helicopter model is performed and great reduction of structural vibration is achieved. 2-input 2-output and 2-input 4-output experimental studies of structural vibration control for a free-free beam are also carried out in laboratory to simulate a flying helicopter. The experimental results also show better reduction of the structural vibration, which verifies that the proposed method is effective and practical in structural vibration reduction.

  5. Structural design and active control of modular tensegrity systems

    Amouri, Sarah; Averseng, Julien; Quirant, Jérôme; Dube, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    International audience Tensegrity systems are self stressed reticulate structures composed of a set of compressed struts assembled inside a continuum of tendons. This principle is at the origin of lightweight and transparent structures that can cover large spaces and be erected, in particular cases, by deployment. In this paper, we propose a general design and optimization procedure adapted to modular structures following this principle. An application is presented on the case of a curved ...

  6. Active control of space structures: Proof of concept experiment

    Breakwell, J. A.

    1982-03-01

    Modern control theory easily works with multiple input/multiple output systems. Two types of systems which fall into this category are flexible systems, where many measurements and several actuators are necessary to provide control over bending behavior, and articulated systems which consist of several rigid bodies connected together by pivoting connections. In this latter case, multiple controls are implemented as torquers at the joints.

  7. Integrated intelligent control analysis on semi-active structures by using magnetorheological dampers

    2008-01-01

    The control strategy is very important for semiactive control or active control systems. An integrated intelligent control strategy for building structures incorpo rated with magnetorheological (MR) dampers subjected to earthquake excitation is proposed. In this strategy, the time-delay problem is solved by a neural network and the control currents of the MR dampers are determined quickly by a fuzzy controller. Through a numerical example of a three-storey structure with one MR damper installed in the first floor, the seismic responses of the uncontrolled, the intelligently controlled, the passiveon controlled, and the passive-off controlled structures under different earthquake excitations are analyzed. Based on the numerical results, it can be found that the time domain and the frequency domain responses are reduced effectively when the MR damper is added in the structure, and the integrated intelligent control strategy has a better earthquake mitigation effect.

  8. Active structural control design and experiment for the Mini-Mast

    Wie, Bong; Horta, Lucas; Sulla, Jeff

    1990-01-01

    Control system design and closed-loop test results for the Mini-Mast truss structure located at the NASA Langley Research Center are presented. The simplicity and effectiveness of a classical control approach to the active structural control design are demonstrated by ground experiments. The concepts of robust nonminimum phase compensation and periodic disturbance rejection are also experimentally validated. The practicality of a sensor output decoupling approach is demonstrated for the inherent, multivariable control problem of the Mini-Mast.

  9. Recent Applications of Some Active Control Systems to Civil Engineering Structures

    Cristian Pastia; Septimiu-George Luca; Florentina Chira

    2007-01-01

    The application of control systems to civil engineering structures has been investigated in recent years to demonstrate the efficiency of these systems during exceptional natural events such as earthquakes and severe winds. In this paper, a review of some full-scale implementations of active and hybrid control systems for the protection of the civil structures to dynamic actions is performed.

  10. Active structural control for the mini-MAST and ACES structures

    Collins, E. G., Jr.; Phillips, D. J.; Hyland, D. C.; King, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    Two experiments based on the maximum entropy/optimal projection design approach are discussed which were conducted by Harris Corporation as part of the NASA Controls Structures Interaction Guest Investigator program. The design equations consist of four coupled matrix equations which specialize to the standard linear-quadratic Guassian Riccati equations, when the plant is known perfectly and a full order controller is desired. These experiments demonstrate successful control system design and implementation for flexible structures.

  11. Active Vibration Control of a Monopile Offshore Structure

    Nielsen, Søren R. K.; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Thesbjerg, L.

    1999-01-01

    cylinder of the platform, so the drag force in the generalized Morison equation is increased whenever it is acting in the opposite direction of the cylinder motion, whereas an unchanged drag force is applied, whenever it is acting co-directionally to the cylinder motion. The inertial force of the wave load...... is not subjected to control. The increased drag force is obtained by forcing the boundary layers to separate by blowing air into the boundary layer from the inside through small holes in the cylinder surface placed at a relatively large distance from the water surface. The control is specified by the...... wave conditions, where reductions in the vibration level of up to 50% have been registered....

  12. Experimental Active Vibration Control in Truss Structures Considering Uncertainties in System Parameters

    2008-01-01

    This paper deals with the study of algorithms for robust active vibration control in flexible structures considering uncertainties in system parameters. It became an area of enormous interest, mainly due to the countless demands of optimal performance in mechanical systems as aircraft, aerospace, and automotive structures. An important and difficult problem for designing active vibration control is to get a representative dynamic model. Generally, this model can be obtained using finite eleme...

  13. Numerical Comparison of Active Acoustic and Structural Noise Control in a Stiffened Double Wall Cylinder

    Grosveld, Ferdinand W.

    1996-01-01

    The active acoustic and structural noise control characteristics of a double wall cylinder with and without ring stiffeners were numerically evaluated. An exterior monopole was assumed to acoustically excite the outside of the double wall cylinder at an acoustic cavity resonance frequency. Structural modal vibration properties of the inner and outer shells were analyzed by post-processing the results from a finite element analysis. A boundary element approach was used to calculate the acoustic cavity response and the coupled structural-acoustic interaction. In the frequency region of interest, below 500 Hz, all structural resonant modes were found to be acoustically slow and the nonresonant modal response to be dominant. Active sound transmission control was achieved by control forces applied to the inner or outer shell, or acoustic control monopoles placed just outside the inner or outer shell. A least mean square technique was used to minimize the interior sound pressures at the nodes of a data recovery mesh. Results showed that single acoustic control monopoles placed just outside the inner or outer shells resulted in better sound transmission control than six distributed point forces applied to either one of the shells. Adding stiffeners to the double wall structure constrained the modal vibrations of the shells, making the double wall stiffer with associated higher modal frequencies. Active noise control obtained for the stiffened double wall configurations was less than for the unstiffened cylinder. In all cases, the acoustic control monopoles controlled the sound transmission into the interior better than the structural control forces.

  14. Streamlined design and self reliant hardware for active control of precision space structures

    Hyland, David C.; King, James A.; Phillips, Douglas J.

    1994-01-01

    Precision space structures may require active vibration control to satisfy critical performance requirements relating to line-of-sight pointing accuracy and the maintenance of precise, internal alignments. In order for vibration control concepts to become operational, it is necessary that their benefits be practically demonstrated in large scale ground-based experiments. A unique opportunity to carry out such demonstrations on a wide variety of experimental testbeds was provided by the NASA Control-Structure Integration (CSI) Guest Investigator (GI) Program. This report surveys the experimental results achieved by the Harris Corporation GI team on both Phases 1 and 2 of the program and provides a detailed description of Phase 2 activities. The Phase 1 results illustrated the effectiveness of active vibration control for space structures and demonstrated a systematic methodology for control design, implementation test. In Phase 2, this methodology was significantly streamlined to yield an on-site, single session design/test capability. Moreover, the Phase 2 research on adaptive neural control techniques made significant progress toward fully automated, self-reliant space structure control systems. As a further thrust toward productized, self-contained vibration control systems, the Harris Phase II activity concluded with experimental demonstration of new vibration isolation hardware suitable for a wide range of space-flight and ground-based commercial applications.The CSI GI Program Phase 1 activity was conducted under contract NASA1-18872, and the Phase 2 activity was conducted under NASA1-19372.

  15. Fuzzy sliding mode controller of a pneumatic active isolating system using negative stiffness structure

    A novel active vibration isolation system using negative stiffness structure (active system with NSS) for low excitation frequency ranges (< 5 Hz) is developed successfully. Here, the negative stiffness structure (NSS) is used to minimize the attraction of vibration. Then, the fuzzy sliding mode controller (FSMC) is designed to improve the vibration isolation performance of the active system with NSS. Based on Lyapunov stability theorem, the fuzzy control rules are constructed. Next, the experimental apparatus is built for evaluating the isolation efficiency of the proposed system controlled by the FSMC corresponding to various excitation conditions. In addition, the isolation performance of the active system with NSS, the active system without NSS and the passive the system with NSS is compared. The experimental results confirmed that the active system with NSS gives better isolation efficiency than the active system without NSS and the passive system with NSS in low excitation frequency areas

  16. Semi-active friction tendons for vibration control of space structures

    Garrido, Hernán; Curadelli, Oscar; Ambrosini, Daniel

    2014-10-01

    Semi-active vibration control systems are becoming popular because they offer both the reliability of passive systems and the versatility of active control without high power demands. In this work, a new semi-active control system is proposed and studied numerically. The system consists of variable-friction dampers linked to the structure through cables. Auxiliary soft springs in parallel with these friction dampers allow them to return to their initial pre-tensioned state. Using cables makes the system suitable for deployable, flexible and lightweight structures, such as space structures (spacecraft). A control system with three control laws applied to a single-degree-of-freedom structure is studied. Two of these laws are derived by using Lyapunov theory, whereas the third one is developed heuristically. In order to assess the performance of the control system, a parametric study is carried out through numerical simulations. An application of the proposed method to multi-degree-of-freedom structures is also presented and demonstrated through a numerical example. The system in semi-active mode is more effective than in passive mode and its effectiveness is less sensitive to loss of pre-tension.

  17. Current and Future Research in Active Control of Lightweight, Flexible Structures Using the X-56 Aircraft

    Ryan, John J.; Bosworth, John T.; Burken, John J.; Suh, Peter M.

    2014-01-01

    The X-56 Multi-Utility Technology Testbed aircraft system is a versatile experimental research flight platform. The system was primarily designed to investigate active control of lightweight flexible structures, but is reconfigurable and capable of hosting a wide breadth of research. Current research includes flight experimentation of a Lockheed Martin designed active control flutter suppression system. Future research plans continue experimentation with alternative control systems, explore the use of novel sensor systems, and experiments with the use of novel control effectors. This paper describes the aircraft system, current research efforts designed around the system, and future planned research efforts that will be hosted on the aircraft system.

  18. Variable Structure Control on Active Suspension of 4 DOF Vehicle Model

    Chuanbo Ren

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available in this paper, the theory of a variable structure model following control (VSMFC is employed to the design of the controller for an active suspensions of 4-degree-of-freedom (4-DOF automobile model. The sliding mode equation is derived by applying VSMFC theory and the parameters of the switching function are obtained by using the method of pole assignment; a hierarchical algorithm with control variables started in sequence is applied to solve the active force; a method of exponential approach law is used to improve the dynamic performance of the controller. The efficacy of the controller is verified by simulation carried out with the help of Matlab/ Simulink. The results show that the active suspension controller based on VSMFC theory is superior in both robustness and performance.

  19. Active structural acoustic control of aircraft interior flow noise via the use of active trim panels

    Mahnken, Brian W.

    1996-01-01

    Modem jet aircraft interior noise can be categorized into two main types: tonal noise caused by engine imbalance or blade passage, and mid frequency broadband noise resulting from turbulent flow. This project addresses aircraft interior flow noise caused by a flow separation over the crown of the aircraft. The noise control approach is to mount piezoelectric actuators to the aircraft interior cockpit crown trim panel and use them to actively control aircraft interior noise with...

  20. Preliminary structural control results from the Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE)

    Miller, David W.; Saarmaa, Erik; Jacques, Robert N.

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented of on-going closed-loop ground experiments on the MACE test article, the objective of which is to investigate the extent to which closed-loop behavior of flexible spacecraft in zero gravity can be predicted, as well as to examine orbit system identification and control reconfiguration. The MACE hardware consists of three torque wheels, a two-axis gimballing payload, inertial sensors, and a flexible support structure. With the acquisition of a second payload, this is to represent a multiple payload platform with significant structural flexibility. When linear quadratic Gaussian control is used, payload pointing accuracy is improved by an order of magnitude when disturbed by a broadband torque disturbance. The successes and failures of the design and implementation process are discussed.

  1. Independent modal variable structure fuzzy active vibration control of thin plates laminated with photostrictive actuators

    He Rongbo; Zheng Shijie

    2013-01-01

    Photostrictive actuators can produce photodeformation strains under illumination of ultraviolet lights.They can realize non-contact micro-actuation and vibration control for elastic plate structures.Considering the switching actuation and nonlinear dynamic characteristics of photostrictive actuators,a variable structure fuzzy active control scheme is presented to control the light intensity applied to the actuators.Firstly,independent modal vibration control equations of photoelectric laminated plates are established based on modal analysis techniques.Then,the optimal light switching function is derived to increase the range of sliding modal area,and the light intensity self-adjusting fuzzy active controller is designed.Meanwhile,a continuous function is applied to replace a sign function to reduce the variable structure control (VSC) chattering.Finally,numerical simulation is carried out,and simulation results indicate that the proposed control strategy provides better performance and control effect to plate actuation and control than velocity feedback control,and suppresses vibration effectively.

  2. Experimental Active Vibration Control in Truss Structures Considering Uncertainties in System Parameters

    Douglas Domingues Bueno

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the study of algorithms for robust active vibration control in flexible structures considering uncertainties in system parameters. It became an area of enormous interest, mainly due to the countless demands of optimal performance in mechanical systems as aircraft, aerospace, and automotive structures. An important and difficult problem for designing active vibration control is to get a representative dynamic model. Generally, this model can be obtained using finite element method (FEM or an identification method using experimental data. Actuators and sensors may affect the dynamics properties of the structure, for instance, electromechanical coupling of piezoelectric material must be considered in FEM formulation for flexible and lightly damping structure. The nonlinearities and uncertainties involved in these structures make it a difficult task, mainly for complex structures as spatial truss structures. On the other hand, by using an identification method, it is possible to obtain the dynamic model represented through a state space realization considering this coupling. This paper proposes an experimental methodology for vibration control in a 3D truss structure using PZT wafer stacks and a robust control algorithm solved by linear matrix inequalities.

  3. Study on semi-active control of mega-sub controlled structure by MR damper subject to random wind loads

    Qin Xiangjun; Zhang Xun'an; Sheldon Cherry

    2008-01-01

    The recently proposed mega-sub controlled structure (MSCS), a new type of structure associated with the design and construction of super-tall buildings, has attracted the attention of designers for use in enhancing the control effectiveness in mega-fi'ame buildings. In this paper, a dynamic equation and method to assemble parameter matrixes for a mega-sub controlled structure under random wind loads is presented. Semi-active control using magnetorheological dampers for the MSCS under random wind loads is investigated, and is compared with a corresponding system without dampers. A parametric study of the relative stiffness ratio and relative mass ratio between the mega-frame and the substructures, as well as the additional column stiffness ratio that influences the response control effectiveness of the MSCS, is discussed. The studies reveal, for the first time, that different control mechanisms exist. The results indicate that the proposed structure employing semi-active control can offer an effective control mechanism. Guidelines for selecting parameters are provided based on the analytical study.

  4. A robust nonlinear semi-active control for base seismically-isolated structures

    Teodorescu, Catalin-Stefan; Diop, Sette; Politopoulos, Ioannis; Benidir, Messaoud

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a robust nonlinear semi-active control for base seismically-isolated structures. The control is based upon an extension of works of Leitmann et al. on the stabilization of nonlinear systems with uncertain models. For usual models of structure dynamics it is shown that applying a specific control law drives the state variables into a ball of specified radius in finite time. The radius of the ball may be arbitrarily chosen as long as it is not lower than a limiting value. In...

  5. Active Structural Control for Aircraft Efficiency with the X-56A Aircraft

    Ouellette, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    The X-56A Multi-Utility Technology Testbed is an experimental aircraft designed to study active control of flexible structures. The vehicle is easily reconfigured to allow for testing of different configurations. The vehicle is being used to study new sensor, actuator, modeling and controls technologies. These new technologies will allow for lighter vehicles and new configurations that exceed the efficiency currently achievable. A description of the vehicle and the current research efforts that it enables are presented.

  6. Design and implementation of linear controllers for the active control of reduced models of thin-walled structures

    Ghareeb, Nader

    2013-01-01

    The main objectives of this work are twofold: 1.) to create reduced models of smart structures that are fully representative and 2.) to design different linear controllers and implement them into the active control of these reduced models. After a short introduction to the theory of piezoelectricity, the reduced model (super element model) is created starting from the finite element model. Damping properties are also calculated and added to the model. The relation between electrical and mecha...

  7. Robust semi-active control for uncertain structures and smart dampers

    Recent developments in semi-active control technology have led to its application in civil infrastructures as an efficient strategy to protect susceptible structures against seismic and wind induced vibration. The reliable and robust performance of semi-active systems depends on the level of uncertainties in the structural parameters as well as on the sensors’ measurement and on smart mechanical dampers. A common source of uncertainties in semi-active control devices is related to the inherent nonlinear nature of these devices, thermal variation, or their malfunctioning. This study deals with the robust H∞ control problem and aims to model different sources of uncertainty. The uncertainty of the structural model and damper force are assumed to be norm bounded random variables. By using linear fractional transformation (LFT), the uncertain part of the system is decoupled from the nominal parameters of the system. The robust H∞ controller is designed to achieve consistent performance in structures including nominal and perturbed dynamics. Additionally, to reduce the uncertainty of the damper force, an inverse model of the magnetorheological (MR) damper is developed based on an adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS). The robustness of the proposed algorithm is validated by numerical simulations. (paper)

  8. Robust semi-active control for uncertain structures and smart dampers

    Yeganeh Fallah, Arash; Taghikhany, Touraj

    2014-09-01

    Recent developments in semi-active control technology have led to its application in civil infrastructures as an efficient strategy to protect susceptible structures against seismic and wind induced vibration. The reliable and robust performance of semi-active systems depends on the level of uncertainties in the structural parameters as well as on the sensors’ measurement and on smart mechanical dampers. A common source of uncertainties in semi-active control devices is related to the inherent nonlinear nature of these devices, thermal variation, or their malfunctioning. This study deals with the robust H∞ control problem and aims to model different sources of uncertainty. The uncertainty of the structural model and damper force are assumed to be norm bounded random variables. By using linear fractional transformation (LFT), the uncertain part of the system is decoupled from the nominal parameters of the system. The robust H∞ controller is designed to achieve consistent performance in structures including nominal and perturbed dynamics. Additionally, to reduce the uncertainty of the damper force, an inverse model of the magnetorheological (MR) damper is developed based on an adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS). The robustness of the proposed algorithm is validated by numerical simulations.

  9. The impact of active controls technology on the structural integrity of aeronautical vehicles

    Noll, Thomas E.; Austin, Edward; Donley, Shawn; Graham, George; Harris, Terry; Kaynes, Ian; Lee, Ben; Sparrow, James

    1993-01-01

    The findings of an investigation conducted under the auspices of The Technical Cooperation Program (TTCP) to assess the impact of active controls technology on the structural integrity of aeronautical vehicles and to evaluate the present state-of-the-art for predicting loads caused by a flight-control system modification and the resulting change in the fatigue life of the flight vehicle are summarized. Important points concerning structural technology considerations implicit in applying active controls technology in new aircraft are summarized. These points are well founded and based upon information received from within the aerospace industry and government laboratories, acquired by sponsoring workshops which brought together experts from contributing and interacting technical disciplines, and obtained by conducting a case study to independently assess the state of the technology. The paper concludes that communication between technical disciplines is absolutely essential in the design of future high performance aircraft.

  10. Discovery of structural characteristics of RIP1K for activity control using the combination method

    Song, Eun Ju; Do, Yun-Ju; Lee, Myoung Hwi; Kim, Eunhee; Kang, Nam Sook

    2015-11-01

    Receptor-interacting protein kinases 1 (RIPK1) plays an important role in necroptotic disease; it is therefore useful to identify structural characteristics controlling RIPK1 activity. Serine residues such as Ser89 and Ser161 have been reported to be important for RIPK1 activity. ATP binding to the RIPK1 hinge region occurs prior to the transfer of the phosphate group to serine residues. We therefore investigated the regulatory function of residues in the RIPK1 hinge region using a combination of molecular modeling and protein stability experiments. We analyzed the structure and evaluated the kinetic activity and stability of RIPK1 hinge region mutants. In this way, we identified Glu93 and Glu96 as key residues that regulate RIP1K activity, suggesting that mutation of these residues might be related to necroptotic diseases. The presence of a clinical mutation in RIPK1 Glu93 in endometritis patients is consistent with our data.

  11. Neural networkbased semi-active control strategy for structural vibration mitigation with magnetorheological damper

    Bhowmik, Subrata

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a neural network based semi-active control method for a rotary type magnetorheological (MR) damper. The characteristics of the MR damper are described by the classic Bouc-Wen model, and the performance of the proposed control method is evaluated in terms of a base exited shear......-displacement trajectories. The proposed neural network controller is therefore trained based on data derived from these desired forcedisplacement curves, where the optimal relation between friction force level and response amplitude is determined explicitly by simply maximizing the damping ratio of the targeted vibration...... mode of the structure. The neural network control is then developed to reproduce the desired force based on damper displacement and velocity as network input, and it is therefore referred to as an amplitude dependent model reference control method. An inverse model of the MR damper is needed to...

  12. Neural network based semi-active control strategy for structural vibration mitigation with magnetorheological damper

    Bhowmik, Subrata

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a neural network based semi-active control method for a rotary type magnetorheological (MR) damper. The characteristics of the MR damper are described by the classic Bouc-Wen model, and the performance of the proposed control method is evaluated in terms of a base exited shear......-displacement trajectories. The proposed neural network controller is therefore trained based on data derived from these desired forcedisplacement curves, where the optimal relation between friction force level and response amplitude is determined explicitly by simply maximizing the damping ratio of the targeted vibration...... mode of the structure. The neural network control is then developed to reproduce the desired force based on damper displacement and velocity as network input, and it is therefore referred to as an amplitude dependent model reference control method. An inverse model of the MR damper is needed to...

  13. Optimal and robust modal control of a flexible structure using an active dynamic vibration absorber

    This paper is concerned with feedback vibration control of a lightly damped flexible structure that has a large number of well-separated modes. A single active electrical dynamic absorber is used to reduce a particular single vibration mode selectively or multiple modes simultaneously. The absorber is realized electrically by feeding back the structural acceleration at one position to a collocated piezoceramic patch actuator via a controller consisting of one or several second order lowpass filters. A simple analytical method is presented to design a modal control filter that is optimal in that it maximally flattens the mobility frequency response of the target mode, as well as robust in that it works within a prescribed maximum control spillover of 2 dB at all frequencies. Experiments are conducted with a free–free beam to demonstrate its ability to control any single mode optimally and robustly. It is also shown that an active absorber with multiple such filters can effectively control multiple modes simultaneously

  14. Active structural control for damping augmentation and compensation of thermal distortion

    Sirlin, S. W.

    1992-01-01

    A large space-based Focus Mission Interferometer is used as a testbed for the NASA Controls and Structures Interaction Program. Impedance-based adaptive structural control and control of thermal disturbances are demonstrated using an end-to-end simulation of the system's optical performance. Attention is also given to integrated optical/structural modeling and a hierarchical, layered control strategy.

  15. A Multi-Mode Blade Damping Control using Shunted Piezoelectric Transducers with Active Feedback Structure

    Choi, Benjamin; Morrison, Carlos; Min, James

    2009-01-01

    The Structural Dynamics and. Mechanics branch (RXS) is developing smart adaptive structures to improve fan blade damping at resonances using piezoelectric (PE) transducers. In this presentation, only one shunted PE transducer was used to demonstrate active control of multi-mode blade resonance damping on a titanium alloy (Ti-6A1-4V) flat plate model, regardless of bending, torsion, and 2-stripe modes. This work would have a significant impact on the conventional passive shunt damping world because the standard feedback control design tools can now be used to design and implement electric shunt for vibration control. In other words, the passive shunt circuit components using massive inductors and. resistors for multi-mode resonance control can be replaced with digital codes. Furthermore, this active approach with multi patches can simultaneously control several modes in the engine operating range. Dr. Benjamin Choi presented the analytical and experimental results from this work at the Propulsion-Safety and. Affordable Readiness (P-SAR) Conference in March, 2009.

  16. Sliding mode fault detection and fault-tolerant control of smart dampers in semi-active control of building structures

    Yeganeh Fallah, Arash; Taghikhany, Touraj

    2015-12-01

    Recent decades have witnessed much interest in the application of active and semi-active control strategies for seismic protection of civil infrastructures. However, the reliability of these systems is still in doubt as there remains the possibility of malfunctioning of their critical components (i.e. actuators and sensors) during an earthquake. This paper focuses on the application of the sliding mode method due to the inherent robustness of its fault detection observer and fault-tolerant control. The robust sliding mode observer estimates the state of the system and reconstructs the actuators’ faults which are used for calculating a fault distribution matrix. Then the fault-tolerant sliding mode controller reconfigures itself by the fault distribution matrix and accommodates the fault effect on the system. Numerical simulation of a three-story structure with magneto-rheological dampers demonstrates the effectiveness of the proposed fault-tolerant control system. It was shown that the fault-tolerant control system maintains the performance of the structure at an acceptable level in the post-fault case.

  17. Theoretical and experimental research on a new system of semi-active structural control with variable stiffness and damping

    周福霖; 谭平; 阎维明; 魏陆顺

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, a new system of semi active structural control with active variable stiffness and damping (AVSD) issuggested. This new system amplifies the structural displacement to dissipate more energy, and in turn, effectively reduces thestructural response in the case of relatively small story drifts, which occur during earthquakes. A predictive instantaneousoptimal control algorithm is established for a SDOF structure equipped with an AVSD system Comparative shaking table testsof a 1/4 scale single story structural model with a full scale control device have been conducted. From the experimental andanalytical results, it is shown that when compared to structures without control or with the active variable stiffness control alone,the suggested system exhibits higher efficiency in controlling the structural response, requires less energy input, operates withhigher reliability, and can be manufactured at a lower cost and used in a wider range of engineering applications.

  18. Structural Acoustic Characteristics of Aircraft and Active Control of Interior Noise

    Fuller, C. R.

    1998-01-01

    The reduction of aircraft cabin sound levels to acceptable values still remains a topic of much research. The use of conventional passive approaches has been extensively studied and implemented. However performance limits of these techniques have been reached. In this project, new techniques for understanding the structural acoustic behavior of aircraft fuselages and the use of this knowledge in developing advanced new control approaches are investigated. A central feature of the project is the Aircraft Fuselage Test Facility at Va Tech which is based around a full scale Cessna Citation III fuselage. The work is divided into two main parts; the first part investigates the use of an inverse technique for identifying dominant fuselage vibrations. The second part studies the development and implementation of active and active-passive techniques for controlling aircraft interior noise.

  19. Physical mechanisms of active control of sound transmission through rib stiffened double-panel structure

    Ma, Xiyue; Chen, Kean; Ding, Shaohu; Yu, Haoxin

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents an analytical investigation on physical mechanisms of actively controlling sound transmission through a rib stiffened double-panel structure using point source in the cavity. The combined modal expansion and vibro-acoustic coupling methods are applied to establish the theoretical model of such active structure. Under the condition of minimizing radiated power of the radiating ribbed plate, the physical mechanisms are interpreted in detail from the point of view of modal couplings similar as that used in existed literatures. Results obtained demonstrate that the rule of sound energy transmission and the physical mechanisms for the rib stiffened double-panel structure are all changed, and affected by the coupling effects of the rib when compared with the analytical results obtained for unribbed double-panel case. By taking the coupling effects of the rib into considerations, the cavity modal suppression and rearrangement mechanisms obtained in existed investigations are modified and supplemented for the ribbed plate case, which gives a clear interpretation for the physical nature involved in the active rib stiffened double-panel structure.

  20. Active structural acoustic control of a smart cylindrical shell using a virtual microphone

    Loghmani, Ali; Danesh, Mohammad; Kwak, Moon K.; Keshmiri, Mehdi

    2016-04-01

    This paper investigates the active structural acoustic control of sound radiated from a smart cylindrical shell. The cylinder is equipped with piezoelectric sensors and actuators to estimate and control the sound pressure that radiates from the smart shell. This estimated pressure is referred to as a virtual microphone, and it can be used in control systems instead of actual microphones to attenuate noise due to structural vibrations. To this end, the dynamic model for the smart cylinder is derived using the extended Hamilton’s principle, the Sanders shell theory and the assumed mode method. The simplified Kirchhoff-Helmholtz integral estimates the far-field sound pressure radiating from the baffled cylindrical shell. A modified higher harmonic controller that can cope with a harmonic disturbance is designed and experimentally evaluated. The experimental tests were carried out on a baffled cylindrical aluminum shell in an anechoic chamber. The frequency response for the theoretical virtual microphone and the experimental actual microphone are in good agreement with each other, and the results show the effectiveness of the designed virtual microphone and controller in attenuating the radiated sound.

  1. Active Structural Acoustic Control of Interior Noise on a Raytheon 1900D

    Palumbo, Dan; Cabell, Ran; Sullivan, Brenda; Cline, John

    2000-01-01

    An active structural acoustic control system has been demonstrated on a Raytheon Aircraft Company 1900D turboprop airliner. Both single frequency and multi-frequency control of the blade passage frequency and its harmonics was accomplished. The control algorithm was a variant of the popular filtered-x LMS implemented in the principal component domain. The control system consisted of 21 inertial actuators and 32 microphones. The actuators were mounted to the aircraft's ring frames. The microphones were distributed uniformly throughout the interior at head height, both seated and standing. Actuator locations were selected using a combinatorial search optimization algorithm. The control system achieved a 14 dB noise reduction of the blade passage frequency during single frequency tests. Multi-frequency control of the first 1st, 2nd and 3rd harmonics resulted in 10.2 dB, 3.3 dB and 1.6 dB noise reductions respectively. These results fall short of the predictions which were produced by the optimization algorithm (13.5 dB, 8.6 dB and 6.3 dB). The optimization was based on actuator transfer functions taken on the ground and it is postulated that cabin pressurization at flight altitude was a factor in this discrepancy.

  2. Reduction of structural weight, costs and complexity of a control system in the active vibration reduction of flexible structures

    This paper concerns the active vibration reduction of a flexible structure with discrete piezoelectric sensors and actuators in collocated pairs bonded to its surface. In this study, a new fitness and objective function is proposed to determine the optimal number of actuators, based on variations in the average closed loop dB gain margin reduction for all of the optimal piezoelectric pairs and on the modes that are required to be attenuated using the optimal linear quadratic control scheme. The aim of this study is to find the minimum number of optimally located sensor/actuator pairs, which can achieve the same vibration reduction as a greater number, in order to reduce the cost, complexity and power requirement of the control system. This optimization was done using a genetic algorithm. The technique may be applied to any lightly damped structure, and is demonstrated here by attenuating the first six vibration modes of a flat cantilever plate. It is shown that two sensor/actuator pairs, located and controlled optimally, give almost the same vibration reduction as ten pairs. These results are validated by comparing the open and closed loop time responses and actuator feedback voltages for various numbers of piezoelectric pairs using the ANSYS finite element package and a proportional differential control scheme. (paper)

  3. Research and development activities in unified control-structure modeling and design

    Nayak, A. P.

    1985-01-01

    Results of work to develop a unified control/structures modeling and design capability for large space structures modeling are presented. Recent analytical results are presented to demonstrate the significant interdependence between structural and control properties. A new design methodology is suggested in which the structure, material properties, dynamic model and control design are all optimized simultaneously. Parallel research done by other researchers is reviewed. The development of a methodology for global design optimization is recommended as a long-term goal. It is suggested that this methodology should be incorporated into computer aided engineering programs, which eventually will be supplemented by an expert system to aid design optimization.

  4. Wireless sensors with dual-controller architecture for active diagnosis in structural health monitoring

    Wireless sensor technology, which integrates transducers with microcontrollers and wireless communication, has become increasingly vital in structural health monitoring (SHM) applications. However, the low I/O (input/output) throughput of conventional wireless sensors impedes their usage in applications using high-frequency signals, such as active diagnosis and passive acoustic emission (AE). In this paper, the limitations of extending conventional wireless sensors to handle high-speed acquisition are first identified and discussed. Based on the efforts made in improving wireless sensors with centralized system architecture, a novel dual-controller based architecture is proposed to facilitate high-speed data acquisition and improve power efficiency. Then, a wireless sensor platform, specifically designed for active diagnosis employing stress waves to localize damages, is presented. The newly developed wireless sensor with dimensions of 30 mm × 30 mm × 35 mm utilizes a field programmable gate array (FPGA) as a secondary controller and can support a sampling rate up to 20 million samples per second (Msps). Laboratory experiments for verification show that the wireless sensor can explore new applications at the opposite end of the spectrum from conventional applications: those involving high fidelity and high-speed data acquisition

  5. Active vibration control of piezoelectric bonded smart structures using PID algorithm

    Zhang Shunqi; Rüdiger Schmidt; Qin Xiansheng

    2015-01-01

    Thin-walled structures are sensitive to vibrate under even very small disturbances. In order to design a suitable controller for vibration suppression of thin-walled smart structures, an electro-mechanically coupled finite element (FE) model of smart structures is developed based on first-order shear deformation (FOSD) hypothesis. Considering the vibrations generated by various disturbances, which include free and forced vibrations, a PID control is implemented to damp both the free and force...

  6. A survey of experiments and experimental facilities for active control of flexible structures

    Sparks, Dean W., Jr.; Horner, Garnett C.; Juang, Jer-Nan; Klose, Gerhard

    1989-01-01

    A brief survey of large space structure control related experiments and facilities was presented. This survey covered experiments performed before and up to 1982, and those of the present period (1982-...). Finally, the future planned experiments and facilities in support of the control-structure interaction (CSI) program were reported. It was stated that new, improved ground test facilities are needed to verify the new CSI design techniques that will allow future space structures to perform planned NASA missions.

  7. High order single step time delay compensation algorithm for structural active control

    王焕定; 耿淑伟; 王伟

    2002-01-01

    The optimal instantaneous high order single step algorithm for active control is first discussed andthen, the n + 1 time step controlling force vector of the instantaneous optimal algorithm is derived from way of ntime state vector. An estimating algorithm, is developed from this to solve the problem of active control withtime delay compensation. The estimating algorithm based on this high order single step β method (HSM) foun-dation, is proven by simulation and experiment analysis, to be a valid solution to problem of active control withtime delay compensation.

  8. Active structural acoustic control smart panel with small scale proof mass actuators

    González Díaz, Cristóbal

    2007-01-01

    This thesis presents a comprehensive study of decentralised feedback control on a smart panel with electrodynamic proof mass actuators and velocity sensors at their footprints. The aim is to provide guidance for the design of light, simple, robust and low cost, control units which can be attached in large numbers to flexible structures in order to control their spatially averaged response and sound radiation at low audio-frequencies. The first part of the thesis is focused on t...

  9. A quantitative structure-activity relationship to predict efficacy of granular activated carbon adsorption to control emerging contaminants.

    Kennicutt, A R; Morkowchuk, L; Krein, M; Breneman, C M; Kilduff, J E

    2016-08-01

    A quantitative structure-activity relationship was developed to predict the efficacy of carbon adsorption as a control technology for endocrine-disrupting compounds, pharmaceuticals, and components of personal care products, as a tool for water quality professionals to protect public health. Here, we expand previous work to investigate a broad spectrum of molecular descriptors including subdivided surface areas, adjacency and distance matrix descriptors, electrostatic partial charges, potential energy descriptors, conformation-dependent charge descriptors, and Transferable Atom Equivalent (TAE) descriptors that characterize the regional electronic properties of molecules. We compare the efficacy of linear (Partial Least Squares) and non-linear (Support Vector Machine) machine learning methods to describe a broad chemical space and produce a user-friendly model. We employ cross-validation, y-scrambling, and external validation for quality control. The recommended Support Vector Machine model trained on 95 compounds having 23 descriptors offered a good balance between good performance statistics, low error, and low probability of over-fitting while describing a wide range of chemical features. The cross-validated model using a log-uptake (qe) response calculated at an aqueous equilibrium concentration (Ce) of 1 μM described the training dataset with an r(2) of 0.932, had a cross-validated r(2) of 0.833, and an average residual of 0.14 log units. PMID:27586364

  10. Sliding Mode Control of a Multi-Degree-of-Freedom Structural System With Active Tuned Mass Damper

    YAĞIZ, Nurkan

    2001-01-01

    In this study, a sliding mode control system is designed for a multi-degree-of-freedom structure having an Active Tuned Mass Damper (ATMD) to suppress earthquake or wind induced vibration. Since the model might have uncertainties and/or parameter changes, sliding mode control is preferred because of its robust character and superior performance. In addition this control method can easily be applied to non-linear systems. The simulated system has five degrees of freedom. In this stu...

  11. Control Augmented Structural Synthesis

    Lust, Robert V.; Schmit, Lucien A.

    1988-01-01

    A methodology for control augmented structural synthesis is proposed for a class of structures which can be modeled as an assemblage of frame and/or truss elements. It is assumed that both the plant (structure) and the active control system dynamics can be adequately represented with a linear model. The structural sizing variables, active control system feedback gains and nonstructural lumped masses are treated simultaneously as independent design variables. Design constraints are imposed on static and dynamic displacements, static stresses, actuator forces and natural frequencies to ensure acceptable system behavior. Multiple static and dynamic loading conditions are considered. Side constraints imposed on the design variables protect against the generation of unrealizable designs. While the proposed approach is fundamentally more general, here the methodology is developed and demonstrated for the case where: (1) the dynamic loading is harmonic and thus the steady state response is of primary interest; (2) direct output feedback is used for the control system model; and (3) the actuators and sensors are collocated.

  12. The effect of structural-acoustic coupling on the active control of noise in vehicles

    Cheer, Jordan; Elliott, Stephen J.

    2011-01-01

    Active noise control systems offer a potential method of reducing the weight of passive acoustic treatment and, therefore, increasing vehicles’ fuel ef?ciency. These can be particularly cost-ef?cient if integrated with the entertainment system. A combined system is presented employing feedforward control of engine noise and feedback control of road noise, using a‘modal’ error signal. Due to the dependence of the feedback system on the modal response of the vehicle cabin, and the in?uence of s...

  13. Controlled synthesis and structure tunability of photocatalytically active mesoporous metal-based stannate nanostructures

    Liu, Caihong [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Institute of Materials Science, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269-3136 (United States); Chen, Haiyan [Mineral Physics Institute, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Ren, Zheng [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Institute of Materials Science, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269-3136 (United States); Dardona, Sameh; Piech, Martin [Department of Physical Sciences, United Technologies Research Center, East Hartford, CT 06108 (United States); Gao, Haiyong [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Institute of Materials Science, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269-3136 (United States); Gao, Pu-Xian, E-mail: puxian.gao@ims.uconn.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Institute of Materials Science, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269-3136 (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Highlights: • A generic process has been developed for fabricating metal stannate nanostructures by simple substitution solution reactions followed by post-thermal treatments. • Band energy alignment, high carrier mobility and large specific surface area are found to play key roles for the enabled high efficiency in stannate nanostructured photocatalysts. • The developed process can be easily extended to the fabrication of other complex metal oxide nanostructures. - Abstract: A variety of stannate nanostructures have been fabricated for UV photocatalysis, including zinc- and cadmium-based stannates. As the template nanostructures, high surface-area mesoporous metal hydroxystannate [ZnSn(OH){sub 6} and CdSn(OH){sub 6}] nanoparticles (>100 m{sup 2}/g) have been synthesized using a simple, low-temperature substitution chemical process with controlled porosity, morphology and crystallinity. Post-synthetic thermal treatments were employed to obtain amorphous ZnSnO{sub 3}, CdSnO{sub 3}, ilmenite CdSnO{sub 3}, and crystalline Zn{sub 2}SnO{sub 4}–SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles. As a result, the band gaps can be tuned from 5.4 eV to 3.3 eV and from 4.9 eV to 2.1 eV for Zn-based and Cd-based stannates, respectively. Amorphous ZnSnO{sub 3} porous nanoparticles showed highest activity toward dye degradation under UV illumination followed by the Zn{sub 2}SnO{sub 4}-SnO{sub 2} and ilmenite CdSnO{sub 3} nanostructures due to their beneficial band structure alignment, high conductivities, and high specific surface areas. This study may provide an important strategy for high throughput synthesis and screening of functional complex metal oxide nanomaterials, while the enabled stannate nanomaterials could be utilized in various applications.

  14. Structural investigation of heteroyohimbine alkaloid synthesis reveals active site elements that control stereoselectivity.

    Stavrinides, Anna; Tatsis, Evangelos C; Caputi, Lorenzo; Foureau, Emilien; Stevenson, Clare E M; Lawson, David M; Courdavault, Vincent; O'Connor, Sarah E

    2016-01-01

    Plants produce an enormous array of biologically active metabolites, often with stereochemical variations on the same molecular scaffold. These changes in stereochemistry dramatically impact biological activity. Notably, the stereoisomers of the heteroyohimbine alkaloids show diverse pharmacological activities. We reported a medium chain dehydrogenase/reductase (MDR) from Catharanthus roseus that catalyses formation of a heteroyohimbine isomer. Here we report the discovery of additional heteroyohimbine synthases (HYSs), one of which produces a mixture of diastereomers. The crystal structures for three HYSs have been solved, providing insight into the mechanism of reactivity and stereoselectivity, with mutation of one loop transforming product specificity. Localization and gene silencing experiments provide a basis for understanding the function of these enzymes in vivo. This work sets the stage to explore how MDRs evolved to generate structural and biological diversity in specialized plant metabolism and opens the possibility for metabolic engineering of new compounds based on this scaffold. PMID:27418042

  15. The Impact of Model Uncertainty on Spatial Compensation in Active Structural Acoustic Control

    Cabell, Randolph H.; Gibbs, Gary P.; Sprofera, Joseph D.; Clark, Robert L.

    2004-01-01

    Turbulent boundary layer (TBL) noise is considered a primary factor in the interior noise experienced by passengers aboard commercial airliners. There have been numerous investigations of interior noise control devoted to aircraft panels; however, practical realization is a challenge since the physical boundary conditions are uncertain at best. In most prior studies, pinned or clamped boundary conditions have been assumed; however, realistic panels likely display a range of varying boundary conditions between these two limits. Uncertainty in boundary conditions is a challenge for control system designers, both in terms of the compensator implemented and the location of actuators and sensors required to achieve the desired control. The impact of model uncertainties, uncertain boundary conditions in particular, on the selection of actuator and sensor locations for structural acoustic control are considered herein. Results from this research effort indicate that it is possible to optimize the design of actuator and sensor location and aperture, which minimizes the impact of boundary conditions on the desired structural acoustic control.

  16. Active control of the attitude motion and structural vibration of a flexible satellite by jet thrusters

    Lee, Mokin

    A Lagrangian formulation is used to obtain the equations of motion of a flexible satellite in a tree-type geometry. The flexible satellite model is the geosynchronous INSAT-II type satellite with a flexible balance beam and a flexible solar panel attached to the rigid main body. In deriving the equations of motion, the orbital motion, the librational motion, and the structural motion of flexible bodies are involved. The assumed-modes method is used to express the deflections of the flexible structures in the form of a finite series of space-dependent admissible functions multiplied by time-dependent amplitudes. The kinetic energy, potential energy, strain energy, and virtual work of the flexible satellite are evaluated as functions of time in terms of the generalized coordinates. Then, by substituting them into Lagrange's equations for discrete systems, the governing equations of motion of the flexible satellite are obtained as a set of second-order nonlinear ordinary differential equations. The attitude motion and the structural motion of the flexible satellite are coupled motions with one another. Uncontrolled dynamics show that the librational and structural motions are oscillatory and undamped motions. The stability and performance of the flexible satellite needs to be improved by designing control systems. A control objective is proposed to improve the stability and performance for pointing accuracy maneuver by controlling the librational motions and flexible modes simultaneously. For the control objective, a control system is synthesized, using feedback linearization control, thrust determination, thrust management, and pulse-width pulse-frequency modulation. Feedback linearization for second-order nonlinear systems is used to obtain a stable feedback control system for the pointing-accuracy control. A stable feedback control system is obtained by adjusting the diagonal matrices of the linear second-order system. Jet thrusters are used as the primary

  17. HIGH EFFICIENCY STRUCTURAL FLOWTHROUGH ROTOR WITH ACTIVE FLAP CONTROL: VOLUME THREE: MARKET & TEAM

    Zuteck, Michael D. [Zimitar, Inc.; Jackson, Kevin L. [Zimitar, Inc.; Santos, Richard A. [Zimitar, Inc.

    2015-05-16

    The Zimitar one-piece rotor primary structure is integrated, so balanced thrust and gravity loads flow through the hub region without transferring out of its composite material. Large inner rotor geometry is used since there is no need to neck down to a blade root region and pitch bearing. Rotor control is provided by a highly redundant, five flap system on each blade, sized so that easily handled standard electric linear actuators are sufficient.

  18. HIGH EFFICIENCY STRUCTURAL FLOWTHROUGH ROTOR WITH ACTIVE FLAP CONTROL: VOLUME TWO: INNOVATION & COST OF ENERGY

    Zuteck, Michael D. [Zimitar, Inc.; Jackson, Kevin L. [Zimitar, Inc.; Santos, Richard A. [Zimitar, Inc.

    2015-05-16

    The Zimitar one-piece rotor primary structure is integrated, so balanced thrust and gravity loads flow through the hub region without transferring out of its composite material. Large inner rotor geometry is used since there is no need to neck down to a blade root region and pitch bearing. Rotor control is provided by a highly redundant, five flap system on each blade, sized so that easily handled standard electric linear actuators are sufficient.

  19. HIGH EFFICIENCY STRUCTURAL FLOWTHROUGH ROTOR WITH ACTIVE FLAP CONTROL: VOLUME ONE: PRELIMINARY DESIGN REPORT

    Zuteck, Michael D. [Zimitar, Inc.; Jackson, Kevin L. [Zimitar, Inc.; Santos, Richard A. [Zimitar, Inc.; Chow, Ray [Zimitar, Inc.; Nordenholz, Thomas R. [The California Maritime Academy; Wamble, John Lee [Zimitar, Inc.

    2015-05-16

    The Zimitar one-piece rotor primary structure is integrated, so balanced thrust and gravity loads flow through the hub region without transferring out of its composite material. Large inner rotor geometry is used since there is no need to neck down to a blade root region and pitch bearing. Rotor control is provided by a highly redundant, five flap system on each blade, sized so that easily handled standard electric linear actuators are sufficient.

  20. HIGH EFFICIENCY STRUCTURAL FLOWTHROUGH ROTOR WITH ACTIVE FLAP CONTROL: VOLUME ZERO: OVERVIEW AND COMMERCIAL PATH

    Zuteck, Michael D. [Zimitar, Inc.; Jackson, Kevin L. [Zimitar, Inc.; Santos, Richard A. [Zimitar, Inc.

    2015-05-16

    The Zimitar one-piece rotor primary structure is integrated, so balanced thrust and gravity loads flow through the hub region without transferring out of its composite material. Large inner rotor geometry is used since there is no need to neck down to a blade root region and pitch bearing. Rotor control is provided by a highly redundant, five flap system on each blade, sized so that easily handled standard electric linear actuators are sufficient.

  1. An Active Heater Control Concept to Meet IXO Type Mirror Module Thermal-Structural Distortion Requirement

    Choi, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Flight mirror assemblies (FMAs) of large telescopes, such as the International X-ray Observatory (IXO), have very stringent thermal-structural distortion requirements. The spatial temperature gradient requirement within a FMA could be as small as 0.05 C. Con ventionally, heaters and thermistors are attached to the stray light baffle (SLB), and centralized heater controllers (i.e., heater controller boards located in a large electronics box) are used. Due to the large number of heater harnesses, accommodating and routing them is extremely difficult. The total harness length/mass is very large. This innovation uses a thermally conductive pre-collimator to accommodate heaters and a distributed heater controller approach. It minimizes the harness length and mass, and reduces the problem of routing and accommodating them. Heaters and thermistors are attached to a short (4.67 cm) aluminum portion of the pre-collimator, which is thermally coupled to the SLB. Heaters, which have a very small heater power density, and thermistors are attached to the exterior of all the mirror module walls. The major portion (23.4 cm) of the pre-collimator for the middle and outer modules is made of thin, non-conductive material. It minimizes the view factors from the FMA and heated portion of the precollimator to space. It also minimizes heat conduction from one end of the FMA to the other. Small and multi-channel heater controllers, which have adjustable set points and internal redundancy, are used. They are mounted to the mechanical support structure members adjacent to each module. The IXO FMA, which is 3.3 m in diameter, is an example of a large telescope. If the heater controller boards are centralized, routing and accommodating heater harnesses is extremely difficult. This innovation has the following advantages. It minimizes the length/mass of the heater harness between the heater controllers and heater circuits. It reduces the problem of routing and accommodating the harness on the

  2. A new online secondary path modeling method for adaptive active structure vibration control

    This paper proposes a new variable step size FXLMS algorithm with an auxiliary noise power scheduling strategy for online secondary path modeling. The step size for the secondary path modeling filter and the gain of auxiliary noise are varied in accordance with the parameters available directly. The proposed method has a low computational complexity. Computer simulations show that an active vibration control system with the proposed method gives much better vibration attenuation and modeling accuracy at a faster convergence rate than existing methods. National Instruments’ CompactRIO is used as an embedded processor to control simply supported beam vibration. Experimental results indicate that the vibration of the beam has been effectively attenuated. (papers)

  3. Structural Pest Control.

    Kahn, M. S.; Hoffman, W. M.

    This manual is designed for those who seek certification as pesticide applicators for industrial, institutional, structural, and health-related pest control. It is divided into six sections covering general pest control, wood-destroying organisms, bird control, fumigation, rodent control, and industrial weed control. The manual gives information…

  4. Methods for structural control

    Baratta, A.; Bourquin, F.; CORBI, O; HOCHRAINER, M; Luo, N; MAGONETTE, G; Marazzi, F; Rodellar, J.

    2004-01-01

    In the last decades significant advances have been produced in the field of structural control. This paper focuses on some issues related with the problem of controlling (reducing) undesired vibrations, summarizing the experiences of the authors in some specific issues on specific classes of structural control systems.

  5. Robust Adaptive Structural Control

    Yang, Chi-Ming; Beck, James L.

    1995-01-01

    A new robust adaptive structural control design methodology is developed and presented which treats modeling uncertainties and limitations of control devices. Furthermore, no restriction is imposed on the structural models and the nature of the control devices so that the proposed method is very general. A simple linear single degree-of-freedom numerical example is presented to illustrate this approach.

  6. New active control nano-system to use in composites structure

    The present abstract, is a brief description about our project (NEDEA). We considered this project as very important, because it reunites in his development, several basic technologies: electronics, communications, software and new materials, all very interesting in the European industry. The project is developed in the CSIC (Spanish Researcher Center). We are involved. Across the project, in the development of nano-sensors, specialized in detecting defects, difficulties or problems in structures of composed materials. These materials are being used, and in the future more, in applications where a high degree of security is necessary. Some fields in the system usage are Aeronautical and military applications whit a necessary high security degree. The development proposed, is based in nano-sensors and active devices. They are installed into the material structure. The information from sensors is transmitted by optical fibers, to a radio transmitter, equally installed into the material. An external receptor picks up those data and transmits them to an external device. This external device presents/displays all the information across an interface GUI, in real time, to the supervisor. He can see than is happening in the material, in real time. Alarms can be programmed, by the supervisor. Is possible a tracking for the problem. All the devices and software are in develop in our laboratories. We think that this development will be used by the industry of materials, and that gradually, it will have other applications in the transport area (like new vehicles, wagons of train and metro, etc.).

  7. New active control nano-system to use in composites structure

    Arche, M. R.

    2012-09-01

    The present abstract, is a brief description about our project (NEDEA). We considered this project as very important, because it reunites in his development, several basic technologies: electronics, communications, software and new materials, all very interesting in the European industry. The project is developed in the CSIC (Spanish Researcher Center). We are involved. Across the project, in the development of nano-sensors, specialized in detecting defects, difficulties or problems in structures of composed materials. These materials are being used, and in the future more, in applications where a high degree of security is necessary. Some fields in the system usage are Aeronautical and military applications whit a necessary high security degree. The development proposed, is based in nano-sensors and active devices. They are installed into the material structure. The information from sensors is transmitted by optical fibers, to a radio transmitter, equally installed into the material. An external receptor picks up those data and transmits them to an external device. This external device presents/displays all the information across an interface GUI, in real time, to the supervisor. He can see than is happening in the material, in real time. Alarms can be programmed, by the supervisor. Is possible a tracking for the problem. All the devices and software are in develop in our laboratories. We think that this development will be used by the industry of materials, and that gradually, it will have other applications in the transport area (like new vehicles, wagons of train and metro, etc.).

  8. Control of flexible structures

    Russell, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    The requirements for future space missions indicate that many of these spacecraft will be large, flexible, and in some applications, require precision geometries. A technology program that addresses the issues associated with the structure/control interactions for these classes of spacecraft is discussed. The goal of the NASA control of flexible structures technology program is to generate a technology data base that will provide the designer with options and approaches to achieve spacecraft performance such as maintaining geometry and/or suppressing undesired spacecraft dynamics. This technology program will define the appropriate combination of analysis, ground testing, and flight testing required to validate the structural/controls analysis and design tools. This work was motivated by a recognition that large minimum weight space structures will be required for many future missions. The tools necessary to support such design included: (1) improved structural analysis; (2) modern control theory; (3) advanced modeling techniques; (4) system identification; and (5) the integration of structures and controls.

  9. Structural control interaction

    Ryan, R. S.; Mowery, D. K.; Winder, S. W.; Worley, H. E.

    1973-01-01

    The basic guidance and control concepts that lead to structural control interaction and structural dynamic loads are identified. Space vehicle ascent flight load sources and the load relieving mechanism are discussed, along with the the characteristics and special problems of both present and future space vehicles including launch vehicles, orbiting vehicles, and the Space Shuttle flyback vehicle. The special dynamics and control analyses and test problems apparent at this time are summarized.

  10. Controls for space structures

    Balas, Mark

    1991-01-01

    Assembly and operation of large space structures (LSS) in orbit will require robot-assisted docking and berthing of partially-assembled structures. These operations require new solutions to the problems of controls. This is true because of large transient and persistent disturbances, controller-structure interaction with unmodeled modes, poorly known structure parameters, slow actuator/sensor dynamical behavior, and excitation of nonlinear structure vibrations during control and assembly. For on-orbit assembly, controllers must start with finite element models of LSS and adapt on line to the best operating points, without compromising stability. This is not easy to do, since there are often unmodeled dynamic interactions between the controller and the structure. The indirect adaptive controllers are based on parameter estimation. Due to the large number of modes in LSS, this approach leads to very high-order control schemes with consequent poor stability and performance. In contrast, direct model reference adaptive controllers operate to force the LSS to track the desirable behavior of a chosen model. These schemes produce simple control algorithms which are easy to implement on line. One problem with their use for LSS has been that the model must be the same dimension as the LSS - i.e., quite large. A control theory based on the command generator tracker (CGT) ideas of Sobel, Mabins, Kaufman and Wen, Balas to obtain very low-order models based on adaptive algorithms was developed. Closed-loop stability for both finite element models and distributed parameter models of LSS was proved. In addition, successful numerical simulations on several LSS databases were obtained. An adaptive controller based on our theory was also implemented on a flexible robotic manipulator at Martin Marietta Astronautics. Computation schemes for controller-structure interaction with unmodeled modes, the residual mode filters or RMF, were developed. The RMF theory was modified to compensate

  11. Trust-region based instantaneous optimal semi-active control of long span spatially extended structures with MRF-04K damper

    Lin Wei; Li Zhongxian; Ding Yang

    2008-01-01

    In the field of civil engineering,magnetorheological fluid (MRF) damper-based semi-active control systems have received considerable attention for use in protecting structures from natural hazards such as strong earthquakes and high winds.In this paper,the MRF damper-based semi-active control system is applied to a long-span spatially extended structure and its feasibility is discussed.Meanwhile,a _trust-region method based instantaneous optimal semi-active control algorithm (TIOC) is proposed to improve the performance of the semi-active control system in a multiple damper situation.The proposed TIOC describes the control process as a bounded constraint optimization problem,in which an optimal semi active control force vector is solved by the trust-region method in every control step to minimize the structural responses.A numerical example of a railway station roof structure installed with MRF-04K dampers is presented.First,a modified Bouc-Wen model is utilized to describe the behavior of the selected MRF-04K damper.Then,two semi-active control systems,including the well-known clipped-optimal controller and the proposed TIOC controller,are considered.Based on the characteristics of the long-span spatially extended structure,the performance of the control system is evaluated under uniform earthquake excitation and traveUing-wave excitation with different apparent velocities.The simulation results indicate that the MR fluid damper-hased semi-active control systems have the potential to mitigate the responses of full-scale long-span spatially extended structures under earthquake hazards.The superiority of the proposed TIOC controller is demonstrated by comparing its control effectiveness with the clipped-optimal controller for several different cases.

  12. Control Structures Interaction (CSI) Technology

    Layman, W. E.

    1989-01-01

    Control Structures Interaction (CSI) technology for control of space structures is being developed cooperatively by JPL, LaRC and MSFC for NASA OAST/RM. The mid-'90s goal of JPL's CSI program is to demonstrate with analysis, ground and flight tests, the super quiet structures needed for large diffraction-limited instruments such as optical stellar interferometers and large advanced successors to the Hubble Space Telescope. Microprecision CSI technology is intended as a new "building block" for use by the designers of large optical systems. The thrust of the microprecision CSI technology effort is to achieve nanometer-levels of space structure stability/accuracy with designs which employ otherwise conventional spacecraft technologies. JPL design experiences have indicated the following CSI technology development areas are especially applicable to large optical system projects: (1) Active structural members; (2) Control/structures design methods; (3) Microdynamic effects characterization; and (4) Ground and flight test validation of CSI methods.

  13. Trust-region based instantaneous optimal semi-active control of long-span spatially extended structures with MRF-04K damper

    Lin, Wei; Li, Zhongxian; Ding, Yang

    2008-12-01

    In the field of civil engineering, magneto rheological fluid (MRF) damper-based semi-active control systems have received considerable attention for use in protecting structures from natural hazards such as strong earthquakes and high winds. In this paper, the MRF damper-based semi-active control system is applied to a long-span spatially extended structure and its feasibility is discussed. Meanwhile, a trust-region method based instantaneous optimal semi-active control algorithm (TIOC) is proposed to improve the performance of the semi-active control system in a multiple damper situation. The proposed TIOC describes the control process as a bounded constraint optimization problem, in which an optimal semiactive control force vector is solved by the trust-region method in every control step to minimize the structural responses. A numerical example of a railway station roof structure installed with MRF-04K dampers is presented. First, a modified Bouc-Wen model is utilized to describe the behavior of the selected MRF-04K damper. Then, two semi-active control systems, including the well-known clipped-optimal controller and the proposed TIOC controller, are considered. Based on the characteristics of the long-span spatially extended structure, the performance of the control system is evaluated under uniform earthquake excitation and travelling-wave excitation with different apparent velocities. The simulation results indicate that the MR fluid damper-based semi-active control systems have the potential to mitigate the responses of full-scale long-span spatially extended structures under earthquake hazards. The superiority of the proposed TIOC controller is demonstrated by comparing its control effectiveness with the clipped-optimal controller for several different cases.

  14. A Framework for Coupling Visual Control and Active Structure from Motion

    Spica, Riccardo; Robuffo Giordano, Paolo; Chaumette, François

    2015-01-01

    International audience In most sensor-based robotic applications, the robot state can only be partially retrieved from onboard sensors and the use of estimation strategies is necessary for recovering online an approximation of any 'missing information' required to accurately control the robot action. With the exception of some trivial cases, however, the relationship between the sensor readings and the robot state is often nonlinear. As a consequence, and regardless of the particular estim...

  15. Bias Errors in Measurement of Vibratory Power and Implication for Active Control of Structural Vibration

    Ohlrich, Mogens; Henriksen, Eigil; Laugesen, Søren

    1997-01-01

    Uncertainties in power measurements performed with piezoelectric accelerometers and force transducers are investigated. It is shown that the inherent structural damping of the transducers is responsible for a bias phase error, which typically is in the order of one degree. Fortunately, such bias...... errors can be largely compensated for by an absolute calibration of the transducers and inverse filtering that results in very small residual errors. Experimental results of this study indicate that these uncertainties will be in the order of one percent with respect to amplitude and two tenth of a...

  16. Structure of a topoisomerase II-DNA-nucleotide complex reveals a new control mechanism for ATPase activity.

    Schmidt, Bryan H; Osheroff, Neil; Berger, James M

    2012-11-01

    Type IIA topoisomerases control DNA supercoiling and disentangle chromosomes through a complex ATP-dependent strand-passage mechanism. Although a general framework exists for type IIA topoisomerase function, the architecture of the full-length enzyme has remained undefined. Here we present the structure of a fully catalytic Saccharomyces cerevisiae topoisomerase II homodimer complexed with DNA and a nonhydrolyzable ATP analog. The enzyme adopts a domain-swapped configuration wherein the ATPase domain of one protomer sits atop the nucleolytic region of its partner subunit. This organization produces an unexpected interaction between bound DNA and a conformational transducing element in the ATPase domain, which we show is critical for both DNA-stimulated ATP hydrolysis and global topoisomerase activity. Our data indicate that the ATPase domains pivot about each other to ensure unidirectional strand passage and that this state senses bound DNA to promote ATP turnover and enzyme reset. PMID:23022727

  17. Carbon Structure Hazard Control

    Yoder, Tommy; Greene, Ben; Porter, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Carbon composite structures are widely used in virtually all advanced technology industries for a multitude of applications. The high strength-to-weight ratio and resistance to aggressive service environments make them highly desirable. Automotive, aerospace, and petroleum industries extensively use, and will continue to use, this enabling technology. As a result of this broad range of use, field and test personnel are increasingly exposed to hazards associated with these structures. No single published document exists to address the hazards and make recommendations for the hazard controls required for the different exposure possibilities from damaged structures including airborne fibers, fly, and dust. The potential for personnel exposure varies depending on the application or manipulation of the structure. The effect of exposure to carbon hazards is not limited to personnel, protection of electronics and mechanical equipment must be considered as well. The various exposure opportunities defined in this document include pre-manufacturing fly and dust, the cured structure, manufacturing/machining, post-event cleanup, and post-event test and/or evaluation. Hazard control is defined as it is applicable or applied for the specific exposure opportunity. The carbon exposure hazard includes fly, dust, fiber (cured/uncured), and matrix vapor/thermal decomposition products. By using the recommendations in this document, a high level of confidence can be assured for the protection of personnel and equipment.

  18. Active vibration control of a cylindrical structure using flexible piezoactuators: experimental work in air and water environments

    In the present work, the modal characteristics and vibration control performance of a cylindrical structure in air and water are experimentally investigated, and the results are presented in time and frequency domains. In order to achieve this goal, an end-capped cylindrical shell structure is considered as a host structure, and MFC (macro fiber composite) actuators, which are flexible, are bonded on the surface of the structure. After manufacturing a cylindrical shell structure with aluminum, a modal test is carried out, and the natural frequencies of the proposed structure are obtained and analyzed. To verify the modal test results, a finite element analysis is also performed, and the results are compared with the modal test results. By using the experimentally obtained modal characteristics, a state space control model is established. An optimal controller is then designed in order to control the unwanted vibration and is experimentally realized. It has been shown that the structural vibration can be effectively decreased with the optimal control methodology in both air and water environmental conditions. (technical note)

  19. Cooperative Control Method of Active and Semiactive Control: New Framework for Vibration Control

    Kazuhiko Hiramoto

    2014-01-01

    A new control design framework for vibration control, the cooperative control of active and semiactive control, is proposed in the paper. In the cooperative control, a structural system having both of an actuator and a semiactive control device, for example, MR damper and so forth, is defined as the control object. In the proposed control approach, the higher control performance is aimed by the cooperative control between the active control with the actuator and the semiactive control with th...

  20. A piezolaminated composite degenerated shell finite element for active control of structures with distributed piezosensors and actuators

    Balamurugan, V.; Narayanan, S.

    2008-06-01

    potential difference between the top and bottom surfaces of the piezoelectric layer. Few case studies of composite general shells with piezoelectric sensors and actuators have been considered by modeling them with the above elements and the active vibration control performance has been studied using linear quadratic Gaussian (LQG) control.

  1. A piezolaminated composite degenerated shell finite element for active control of structures with distributed piezosensors and actuators

    potential difference between the top and bottom surfaces of the piezoelectric layer. Few case studies of composite general shells with piezoelectric sensors and actuators have been considered by modeling them with the above elements and the active vibration control performance has been studied using linear quadratic Gaussian (LQG) control

  2. Structural Pain Compensating Flight Control

    Miller, Chris J.

    2014-01-01

    The problem of control command and maneuver induced structural loads is an important aspect of any control system design. Designers must design the aircraft structure and the control architecture to achieve desired piloted control responses while limiting the imparted structural loads. The classical approach is to build the structure with high margins, restrict control surface commands to known good combinations, and train pilots to follow procedural maneuvering limitations. With recent advances in structural sensing and the continued desire to improve safety and vehicle fuel efficiency, it is both possible and desirable to develop control architectures that enable lighter vehicle weights while maintaining and improving protection against structural damage.

  3. An approach to optical structures control

    Iwens, R. P.; Benhabib, R. J.; Major, C. S.

    1988-01-01

    The stabilization of a large, spaceborne Cassegrain telescope is examined. Modal gain factors and known characteristics of disturbances are used to determine which structural model affect line of sight (LOS) the most and are candidates for active control. THe approach is to: (1) actively control and maintain alignment of optical components; (2) place structural control actuators for optimum impact on the selected modes for active vibration control; and (3) feed back the best available estimate of LOS error for direct LOS control. Local analog loops are used for lower bandwidth control and multivariable digital control for lower bandwidth control. The control law is synthesized in the frequency domain using the characteristic gain approach. Robustness is measured by employing conicity, which is an outgrowth of the positivity approach to robust feedback system design. The feasibility of the design approach will be demonstrated by conducting a lab experiment on a structure similar to a scaled version of the telescope.

  4. Offshore Structural Control Considering Fluid Structure Interaction

    Ju Myung KIM; Dong Hyawn KIM; Gyu Won LEE

    2006-01-01

    Tuned Mass Damper (TMD) was applied to an offshore structure to control ocean wave-induced vibration. In the analysis of the dynamic response of the offshore structure, fluid-structure interaction is considered and the errors, which occur in the linearization of the interaction, are investigated. For the investigation of the performance of TMD in controlling the vibration, both regular waves with different periods and irregular waves with different significant wave heights are used. Based on the numerical analysis it is concluded that the fluid-structure interaction should be considered in the evaluation of the capability of TMD in vibration control of offshore structures.

  5. Driving electrocatalytic activity by interface electronic structure control in a metalloprotein hybrid catalyst for efficient hydrogen evolution.

    Behera, Sushant Kumar; Deb, Pritam; Ghosh, Arghya

    2016-08-17

    The rational design of metalloprotein hybrid structures and precise calculations for understanding the role of the interfacial electronic structure in regulating the HER activity of water splitting sites and their microscopic effect for obtaining robust hydrogen evolution possess great promise for developing highly efficient nano-bio hybrid HER catalysts. Here, we employ high-accuracy linear-scaling density functional theory calculations using a near-complete basis set and a minimal parameter implicit solvent model within the self-consistent calculations, on silver (Ag) ions assimilated on bacteriorhodopsin (bR) at specific binding sites. Geometry optimization indicates the formation of active sites at the interface of the metalloprotein complex and the density of states reflects the metallic nature of the active sites. The reduced value of the canonical orbital gap indicates the state of dynamic nature after Ag ion assimilation on active sites and smooth electron transfer. These incorporated active protein sites are more efficient in electrolytic splitting of water than pristine sites due to their low value of Gibbs free energy for the HER in terms of hydrogen coverages. Volcano plot analysis and the free energy diagram are compared for understanding the hydrogen evolution efficiency. Moreover, the essential role of the interfacial electronic properties in regulating the HER catalytic activity of water splitting sites and enhancing the efficiency is elucidated. PMID:27499158

  6. Structural interaction with control systems

    Noll, R. B.; Zvara, J.

    1971-01-01

    A monograph which assesses the state of the art of space vehicle design and development is presented. The monograph presents criteria and recommended practices for determining the structural data and a mathematical structural model of the vehicle needed for accurate prediction of structure and control-system interaction; for design to minimize undesirable interactions between the structure and the control system; and for determining techniques to achieve the maximum desirable interactions and associated structural design benefits. All space vehicles are treated, including launch vehicles, spacecraft, and entry vehicles. Important structural characteristics which affect the structural model used for structural and control-system interaction analysis are given.

  7. Pollution Control Meets Sustainability: Structure-Activity Studies on New Iron Oxide-Based CO Oxidation Catalysts.

    Schoch, Roland; Bauer, Matthias

    2016-08-01

    A new class of catalysts for the oxidation of CO based on iron oxide as a biocompatible, earth-abundant and non-toxic metal is presented. The catalytic activities achieved with these catalysts provide promising milestones towards the substitution of noble metals in CO oxidation catalysts. The catalysts can be obtained by using iron core-shell nanoparticle precursors. The metal used for the shell material determines whether the iron core is integrated in or isolated from the support. The active iron site is effectively integrated into the γ-Al2 O3 support if an aluminum shell is present in the core-shell precursor. When the metal used for the shell is different from the support, an isolated structure is formed. Using this directed synthesis approach, different iron oxide species can be obtained and their structural differences are linked to distinct catalytic activities, as demonstrated by combined in-depth analytical studies using XRD, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), UV/Vis, and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) analysis. The key species responsible for high catalytic activity is identified as isolated tetrahedrally coordinated Fe(III) centers, whereas aggregation leads to a reduction in activity. PMID:27440425

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF A NEW SEMI-ACTIVE FRICTION DAMPER USING PIEZOELECTRIC TECHNOLOGY FOR THE ANTI-SEISMIC CONTROL OF CIVIL STRUCTURES

    Romeo DI LEO

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a new semi-active friction damper, based on the piezoelectric technology, for the anti-seismic control of a civil structure. The device has been conceived and designed at D.I.A.S. (Department of Aerospace En­gineering of University Federico II of Naples. It belongs to the family of the semi-active technologies of structural control for a civil structure. Damper is based on an external cylinder and an internal hollow piston that slips in­side the cylinder. Device presents an original conceptual lay-out, developed at D.I.A.S and it is independent by any scheme, available in literature.

  9. Controllable preparation of nanosized TiO2 thin film and relationship between structure of film and its photocatalytic activity

    魏刚; 张元晶; 熊蓉春

    2003-01-01

    TiO2 nano-crystalline film and fixed bed photocatalytic reactor were prepared by the sol-gel process using tetrabutylorthotitanate as a precursor and glass tube as the substrate. XRD, AFM, SEM and thickness analysis results indicate that the preparation of nano-crystalline film can be controlled by optimizing experiment process. Under the optimized process, the phase of TiO2 in film is anatase, and the grain size is 3-4 nm. The size of particles, which is about 20-80 nm, can be controlled. The thickness of monolayer film is in nanometer grade. The thickness and particles size in films growing on nanometer film can also be controlled in nanometer grade. As a result, the crack of film can be effectively avoided. Rhodamine B degradation results using UV-Vis spectrophotometer show that the activity of nano-crystalline film in the photocatalytic reactor has a good relation with the diameter of TiO2 particles, that is, the film shows high activity when the size is 20-30 nm and greatly reduced when the size is above 60 nm. The activity of film does not decrease with the increase of film thickness, and this result indicates that nano-crystalline film has no ill influence on the transmissivity of ultraviolet light.

  10. The crystal structure of Escherichia coli maltodextrin phosphorylase provides an explanation for the activity without control in this basic archetype of a phosphorylase.

    Watson, K A; Schinzel, R; Palm, D; Johnson, L N

    1997-01-01

    In animals, glycogen phosphorylase (GP) exists in an inactive (T state) and an active (R state) equilibrium that can be altered by allosteric effectors or covalent modification. In Escherichia coli, the activity of maltodextrin phosphorylase (MalP) is controlled by induction at the level of gene expression, and the enzyme exhibits no regulatory properties. We report the crystal structure of E. coli maltodextrin phosphorylase refined to 2.4 A resolution. The molecule consists of a dimer with 796 amino acids per monomer, with 46% sequence identity to the mammalian enzyme. The overall structure of MalP shows a similar fold to GP and the catalytic sites are highly conserved. However, the relative orientation of the two subunits in E. coli MalP is different from both the T and R state GP structures, and there are significant changes at the subunit-subunit interfaces. The sequence changes result in loss of each of the control sites present in rabbit muscle GP. As a result of the changes at the subunit interface, the 280s loop, which in T state GP acts as a gate to control access to the catalytic site, is held in an open conformation in MalP. The open access to the conserved catalytic site provides an explanation for the activity without control in this basic archetype of a phosphorylase. PMID:9009262

  11. Structured control for autonomous robots

    To operate in rich, dynamic environments, autonomous robots must be able to effectively utilize and coordinate their limited physical and occupational resources. As complexity increases, it becomes necessary to impose explicit constraints on the control of planning, perception, and action to ensure that unwanted interactions between behaviors do not occur. This paper advocates developing complex robot systems by layering reactive behaviors onto deliberative components. In this structured control approach, the deliberative components handle normal situations and the reactive behaviors, which are explicitly constrained as to when and how they are activated, handle exceptional situations. The Task Control Architecture (TCA) has been developed to support this approach. TCA provides an integrated set of control constructs useful for implementing deliberative and reactive behaviors. The control constructs facilitate modular and evolutionary system development: they are used to integrate and coordinate planning, perception, and execution, and to incrementally improve the efficiency and robustness of the robot systems. To date, TCA has been used in implementing a half-dozen mobile robot systems, including an autonomous six-legged rover and indoor mobile manipulator

  12. Adaptive Structural Mode Control Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — M4 Engineering proposes the development of an adaptive structural mode control system. The adaptive control system will begin from a "baseline" dynamic model of the...

  13. Integrated control-structure design

    Hunziker, K. Scott; Kraft, Raymond H.; Bossi, Joseph A.

    1991-01-01

    A new approach for the design and control of flexible space structures is described. The approach integrates the structure and controller design processes thereby providing extra opportunities for avoiding some of the disastrous effects of control-structures interaction and for discovering new, unexpected avenues of future structural design. A control formulation based on Boyd's implementation of Youla parameterization is employed. Control design parameters are coupled with structural design variables to produce a set of integrated-design variables which are selected through optimization-based methodology. A performance index reflecting spacecraft mission goals and constraints is formulated and optimized with respect to the integrated design variables. Initial studies have been concerned with achieving mission requirements with a lighter, more flexible space structure. Details of the formulation of the integrated-design approach are presented and results are given from a study involving the integrated redesign of a flexible geostationary platform.

  14. Control of large space structures

    Gran, R.; Rossi, M.; Moyer, H. G.; Austin, F.

    1979-01-01

    The control of large space structures was studied to determine what, if any, limitations are imposed on the size of spacecraft which may be controlled using current control system design technology. Using a typical structure in the 35 to 70 meter size category, a control system design that used actuators that are currently available was designed. The amount of control power required to maintain the vehicle in a stabilized gravity gradient pointing orientation that also damped various structural motions was determined. The moment of inertia and mass properties of this structure were varied to verify that stability and performance were maintained. The study concludes that the structure's size is required to change by at least a factor of two before any stability problems arise. The stability margin that is lost is due to the scaling of the gravity gradient torques (the rigid body control) and as such can easily be corrected by changing the control gains associated with the rigid body control. A secondary conclusion from the study is that the control design that accommodates the structural motions (to damp them) is a little more sensitive than the design that works on attitude control of the rigid body only.

  15. Evolutionary Design of Controlled Structures

    Masters, Brett P.; Crawley, Edward F.

    1997-01-01

    Basic physical concepts of structural delay and transmissibility are provided for simple rod and beam structures. Investigations show the sensitivity of these concepts to differing controlled-structures variables, and to rational system modeling effects. An evolutionary controls/structures design method is developed. The basis of the method is an accurate model formulation for dynamic compensator optimization and Genetic Algorithm based updating of sensor/actuator placement and structural attributes. One and three dimensional examples from the literature are used to validate the method. Frequency domain interpretation of these controlled structure systems provide physical insight as to how the objective is optimized and consequently what is important in the objective. Several disturbance rejection type controls-structures systems are optimized for a stellar interferometer spacecraft application. The interferometric designs include closed loop tracking optics. Designs are generated for differing structural aspect ratios, differing disturbance attributes, and differing sensor selections. Physical limitations in achieving performance are given in terms of average system transfer function gains and system phase loss. A spacecraft-like optical interferometry system is investigated experimentally over several different optimized controlled structures configurations. Configurations represent common and not-so-common approaches to mitigating pathlength errors induced by disturbances of two different spectra. Results show that an optimized controlled structure for low frequency broadband disturbances achieves modest performance gains over a mass equivalent regular structure, while an optimized structure for high frequency narrow band disturbances is four times better in terms of root-mean-square pathlength. These results are predictable given the nature of the physical system and the optimization design variables. Fundamental limits on controlled performance are discussed

  16. Integrated Control with Structural Feedback to Enable Lightweight Aircraft

    Taylor, Brian R.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation for the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Technical Conference covers the benefits of active structural control, related research areas, and focuses on the use of optimal control allocation for the prevention of critical loads. Active control of lightweight structures has the potential to reduce aircraft weight and fuel burn. Sensor, control law, materials, control effector, and system level research will be necessary to enable active control of lightweight structures. Optimal control allocation with structural feedback has been shown in simulation to be feasible in preventing critical loads and is one example of a control law to enable future lightweight aircraft.

  17. Efficiency in Controlling Activities

    Van Nguyen, Tuyen

    2015-01-01

    Controlling is essential for financial success of corporations. An efficient controlling system should be implemented in order to manage financial performance from income, expense to profitability. The purpose of the thesis is to provide insight knowledge towards corporate accounting management as well as to propose potential improvement for the existing controlling system of the case company, which is Bosch Rexroth Japan. The theoretical framework creates the knowledge foundation for re...

  18. Active control of the noise

    The problems of acoustic noise are more and more preponderant in the measure in that the amount of equipment and industrial machinery is increased such as fans, transformers, compressors etc. the use of devices passive mechanics for the reduction of the noise is effective and very appreciated because its effects embrace a wide range of acoustic frequency. However, to low frequencies, such devices become too big and expensive besides that present a tendency to do not effective. The control of active noise, CAN, using the electronic generation anti-noise, constitutes an interesting solution to the problem because their operation principle allows achieving an appreciable reduction of the noise by means of the use of compact devices. The traditional techniques for the control of acoustic noise like barriers and silenced to attenuate it, are classified as passive and their works has been accepted as norm as for the treatment of problems of noise it refers. Such techniques are considered in general very effective in the attenuation of noise of wide band. However, for low frequency, the required passive structures are too big and expensive; also, their effectiveness diminishes flagrantly, that which makes them impractical in many applications. The active suppression is profiled like a practical alternative for the reduction of acoustic noise. The idea in the active treatment of the noise it contemplates the use of a device electro-acoustic, like a speaker for example that it cancels to the noise by the generation of sounds of Same width and of contrary phase (anti-noise). The cancellation phenomenon is carried out when the ant-noise combines acoustically with the noise, what is in the cancellation of both sounds. The effectiveness of the cancellation of the primary source of noise depends on the precision with which the width and the phase of the generated ant-noise are controlled. The active control of noise, ANC (activates noise control), it is being investigated for

  19. Robust control for uncertain structures

    Douglas, Joel; Athans, Michael

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs on robust control for uncertain structures are presented. Topics covered include: robust linear quadratic regulator (RLQR) formulas; mismatched LQR design; RLQR design; interpretations of RLQR design; disturbance rejection; and performance comparisons: RLQR vs. mismatched LQR.

  20. Active control of convection

    Bau, H.H. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Using stability theory, numerical simulations, and in some instances experiments, it is demonstrated that the critical Rayleigh number for the bifurcation (1) from the no-motion (conduction) state to the motion state and (2) from time-independent convection to time-dependent, oscillatory convection in the thermal convection loop and Rayleigh-Benard problems can be significantly increased or decreased. This is accomplished through the use of a feedback controller effectuating small perturbations in the boundary data. The controller consists of sensors which detect deviations in the fluid`s temperature from the motionless, conductive values and then direct actuators to respond to these deviations in such a way as to suppress the naturally occurring flow instabilities. Actuators which modify the boundary`s temperature/heat flux are considered. The feedback controller can also be used to control flow patterns and generate complex dynamic behavior at relatively low Rayleigh numbers.

  1. SLIDING MODE CONTROL FOR ACTIVE AUTOMOBILE SUSPENSIONS

    1998-01-01

    Nonlinear control methods are presented based on theory of sliding mode control (SMC) or variable structure control (VSC) for application to active automobile suspensions. Requirements of reducing manufacturing cost and energy consumption of the active suspension system may be satisfiedby reasonable design of the sliding surface and hydraulic servo system. Emphasis is placed on the study of the discrete sliding mode control method (DSMC) applicable for a new sort of speed on-off solenoid valves of anti-dust capability and low price. Robustness and effectiveness of the feedback linearized controller in typical road conditions are demonstrated by numerical results fora quarter-car suspension model.

  2. Active Combustion Control Valve Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Over the past decade, research into active combustion control has yielded impressive results in suppressing thermoacoustic instabilities and widening the...

  3. Event Structure and Cognitive Control

    Reimer, Jason F.; Radvansky, Gabriel A.; Lorsbach, Thomas C.; Armendarez, Joseph J.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, a great deal of research has demonstrated that although everyday experience is continuous in nature, it is parsed into separate events. The aim of the present study was to examine whether event structure can influence the effectiveness of cognitive control. Across 5 experiments we varied the structure of events within the AX-CPT by…

  4. Structural Control Systems Implemented in Civil Engineering

    Cristian Pastia

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past three decades, a great interest has been generated by the use of protection systems to mitigate the effects of dynamic environmental hazards on civil engineering structures, such as earthquakes and strong wind. These control systems develop controllable forces to add or dissipate energy in a structure, or both, due to specific devices integrated with sensors, controllers and real – time process to operate. The paper includes the advantages of these technologies consisting of the following sections: 1 represents an introduction, 2 deals with passive control system, 3 regards some control techniques, 4 concerns hybrid control techniques, 5 contains semi – active control techniques, and 6 is dedicated to general conclusions.

  5. Active weld control

    Powell, Bradley W.; Burroughs, Ivan A.

    1994-01-01

    Through the two phases of this contract, sensors for welding applications and parameter extraction algorithms have been developed. These sensors form the foundation of a weld control system which can provide action weld control through the monitoring of the weld pool and keyhole in a VPPA welding process. Systems of this type offer the potential of quality enhancement and cost reduction (minimization of rework on faulty welds) for high-integrity welding applications. Sensors for preweld and postweld inspection, weld pool monitoring, keyhole/weld wire entry monitoring, and seam tracking were developed. Algorithms for signal extraction were also developed and analyzed to determine their application to an adaptive weld control system. The following sections discuss findings for each of the three sensors developed under this contract: (1) weld profiling sensor; (2) weld pool sensor; and (3) stereo seam tracker/keyhole imaging sensor. Hardened versions of these sensors were designed and built under this contract. A control system, described later, was developed on a multiprocessing/multitasking operating system for maximum power and flexibility. Documentation for sensor mechanical and electrical design is also included as appendices in this report.

  6. Control structure design for resource recovery using the enhanced biological phosphorus removal and recovery (EBP2R) activated sludge process

    Valverde Perez, Borja; Fuentes-Martínez, José Manuel; Flores Alsina, Xavier;

    2016-01-01

    structurefor the novel enhanced biological phosphorus removal and recovery (EBP2R) process, which is currentlyunder development. The aim of the EBP2R is to maximize phosphorus recovery through optimal greenmicro-algal cultivation, which is achieved by controlling the nitrogen to phosphorus ratio (N-to-P ratio......Nowadays, wastewater is considered as a set of resources to be recovered rather than a mixture of pollutantsthat should be removed. Many resource recovery schemes have been proposed, involving the useof novel technologies whose controllability is poorly studied. In this paper we present a control...... in the effluent (16.9 ± 0.07) and can recover about 72% of the influent phosphorus. The phosphorus recovered by the CFS is limited by the influent nitrogen (65% of the influent phosphorus load). Using the CFS configuration the effluent N-to-P ratio cannot be effectively controlled (16.45 ± 2.48). Therefore...

  7. Automaticity or active control

    Tudoran, Ana Alina; Olsen, Svein Ottar

    This study addresses the quasi-moderating role of habit strength in explaining action loyalty. A model of loyalty behaviour is proposed that extends the traditional satisfaction–intention–action loyalty network. Habit strength is conceptualised as a cognitive construct to refer to the psychologic......, respectively, between intended loyalty and action loyalty. At high levels of habit strength, consumers are more likely to free up cognitive resources and incline the balance from controlled to routine and automatic-like responses....

  8. Active Control of Suspension Bridges

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    In this paper some recent research on active control of very long suspension bridges, is presented. The presentation is based on research work at Aalborg University, Denmark. The active control system is based on movable flaps attached to the bridge girder. Wind load on bridges with or without...... flaps attached to the girder is briefly presented. A simple active control system is discussed. Results from wind tunnel experiments with a bridge section show that flaps can be used effectively to control bridge girder vibrations. Flutter conditions for suspension bridges with and without flaps are...

  9. Integrated aerodynamic-structural-control wing design

    Rais-Rohani, M.; Haftka, R. T.; Grossman, B.; Unger, E. R.

    1992-01-01

    The aerodynamic-structural-control design of a forward-swept composite wing for a high subsonic transport aircraft is considered. The structural analysis is based on a finite-element method. The aerodynamic calculations are based on a vortex-lattice method, and the control calculations are based on an output feedback control. The wing is designed for minimum weight subject to structural, performance/aerodynamic and control constraints. Efficient methods are used to calculate the control-deflection and control-effectiveness sensitivities which appear as second-order derivatives in the control constraint equations. To suppress the aeroelastic divergence of the forward-swept wing, and to reduce the gross weight of the design aircraft, two separate cases are studied: (1) combined application of aeroelastic tailoring and active controls; and (2) aeroelastic tailoring alone. The results of this study indicated that, for this particular example, aeroelastic tailoring is sufficient for suppressing the aeroelastic divergence, and the use of active controls was not necessary.

  10. Active control of vibrations in pedestrian bridges

    Álvaro Cunha; Carlos Moutinho

    1999-01-01

    This paper, apart from making a brief general reference to vibration problems in pedestrian bridges, as well as to the form of modelling of dynamic pedestrian loads, presents the use of a predictive control strategy for the numerical simulation of the dynamic response of actively controlled structures of this type. The consideration of this control strategy permitted the development of a computational model, which was applied to the study of a pedestrian cable-stayed bridge, in order to show ...

  11. Active vibration control of lightweight floor systems

    Baader, J.; Fontana, M.

    2016-04-01

    Wide-span and lightweight floors are often prone to structural vibrations due to their low resonance frequency and poor material damping. Their dynamic behaviour can be improved using passive, semi-active or active vibration control devices. The following article proposes a novel method for the controller synthesis for active vibration control. An existing passive TMD (tuned mass damper) is modelled and equipped with an actuator in order to provide more efficient damping. Using an iterative optimization approach under constraints, an optimal controller is found which minimizes a quadratic cost function in frequency domain. A simulation of an existing test bench shows that the active vibration control device is able to provide increased damping compared to the passive TMD.

  12. Active Spacecraft Potential Control Investigation

    Torkar, K.; Nakamura, R.; Tajmar, M.; Scharlemann, C.; Jeszenszky, H.; Laky, G.; Fremuth, G.; Escoubet, C. P.; Svenes, K.

    2016-03-01

    In tenuous plasma the floating potential of sunlit spacecraft reaches tens of volts, positive. The corresponding field disturbs measurements of the ambient plasma by electron and ion sensors and can reduce micro-channel plate lifetime in electron detectors owing to large fluxes of attracted photoelectrons. Also the accuracy of electric field measurements may suffer from a high spacecraft potential. The Active Spacecraft Potential Control (ASPOC) neutralizes the spacecraft potential by releasing positive charge produced by indium ion emitters. The method has been successfully applied on other spacecraft such as Cluster and Double Star. Two ASPOC units are present on each spacecraft. Each unit contains four ion emitters, whereby one emitter per instrument is operated at a time. ASPOC for the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission includes new developments in the design of the emitters and the electronics. New features include the use of capillaries instead of needles, new materials for the emitters and their internal thermal insulators, an extended voltage and current range of the electronics, both for ion emission and heating purposes, and a more capable control software. This enables lower spacecraft potentials, higher reliability, and a more uniform potential structure in the spacecraft's sheath compared to previous missions. Results from on-ground testing demonstrate compliance with requirements. Model calculations confirm the findings from previous applications that the plasma measurements will not be affected by the beam's space charge. Finally, the various operating modes to adapt to changing boundary conditions are described along with the main data products.

  13. Control Structure Design of an Innovative Enhanced Biological Nutrient Recovery Activated Sludge System Coupled with a Photobioreactor

    Valverde Perez, Borja; Fuentes-Martínez, José Manuel; Flores Alsina, Xavier;

    2015-01-01

    The TRENS system is a train of biological units designed for resource recovery from wastewater. It is a sequence of a modified enhanced biological phosphorus removal and recovery system (EBP2R) coupled with a photobioreactor (PBR). The bacteria-based system constructs an optimal culture media for...... needed in order to assess the controllability of the PBR and the possible impact on the upstream operation conditions....

  14. Wind Turbine Rotors with Active Vibration Control

    Svendsen, Martin Nymann

    This thesis presents a framework for structural modeling, analysis and active vibration damping of rotating wind turbine blades and rotors. A structural rotor model is developed in terms of finite beam elements in a rotating frame of reference. The element comprises a representation of general...... that these are geometrically well separated. For active vibration control in three-bladed wind turbine rotors the present work presents a resonance-based method for groups of one collective and two whirling modes. The controller is based on the existing resonant format and introduces a dual system...... system. As in the method for non-rotating systems, an explicit procedure for optimal calibration of the controller gains is established. The control system is applied to an 86m wind turbine rotor by means of active strut actuator mechanisms. The prescribed additional damping ratios are reproduced almost...

  15. Space structure (dynamics and control) theme development

    Russell, Richard A.; Gates, Richard M.

    1988-01-01

    A study was made to define the long-range technical objectives and goals for the Space Structure (Dynamics and Control) theme area. The approach was to evaluate ongoing and proposed technology activities such that the technology gaps and voids could be identified. After the technology needs were identified, a set of recommended experimental activities was defined including the technical objectives of each and their relationship.

  16. Vibration damping with active carbon fiber structures

    Neugebauer, Reimund; Kunze, Holger; Riedel, Mathias; Roscher, Hans-Jürgen

    2007-04-01

    This paper presents a mechatronic strategy for active reduction of vibrations on machine tool struts or car shafts. The active structure is built from a carbon fiber composite with embedded piezofiber actuators that are composed of piezopatches based on the Macro Fiber Composite (MFC) technology, licensed by NASA and produced by Smart Material GmbH in Dresden, Germany. The structure of these actuators allows separate or selectively combined bending and torsion, meaning that both bending and torsion vibrations can be actively absorbed. Initial simulation work was done with a finite element model (ANSYS). This paper describes how state space models are generated out of a structure based on the finite element model and how controller codes are integrated into finite element models for transient analysis and the model-based control design. Finally, it showcases initial experimental findings and provides an outlook for damping multi-mode resonances with a parallel combination of resonant controllers.

  17. Advances in Structural Control in Civil Engineering in China

    Hongnan Li

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In the recent years, much attention has been paid to the research and development of structural control techniques with particular emphasis on alleviation of wind and seismic responses of buildings and bridges in China. Structural control in civil engineering has been developed from the concept into a workable technology and applied into practical engineering structures. The aim of this paper is to review a state of the art of researches and applications of structural control in civil engineering in China. It includes the passive control, active control, hybrid controland semiactive control. Finally, the possible future directions of structural control in civil engineering in China are presented.

  18. Development of an active structure flight experiment

    Manning, R. A.; Wyse, R. E.; Schubert, S. R.

    1993-02-01

    The design and development of the Air Force and TRW's Advanced Control Technology Experiment (ACTEX) flight experiment is described in this paper. The overall objective of ACTEX is to provide an active structure trailblazer which will demonstrate the compatibility of active structures with operational spacecraft performance and lifetime measures. At the heart of the experiment is an active tripod driven by a digitally-programmable analog control electronics subsystem. Piezoceramic sensors and actuators embedded in a graphite epoxy host material provide the sensing and actuation mechanism for the active tripod. Low noise ground-programmable electronics provide a virtually unlimited number of control schemes that can be implemented in the space environment. The flight experiment program provides the opportunity to gather performance, reliability, adaptability, and lifetime performance data on vibration suppression hardware for the next generation of DoD and NASA spacecraft.

  19. Fuzzy Control of Structural Vibration for Offshore Platforms

    ZHOUYa-jun; ZHAODe-you

    2004-01-01

    During the past three decades, fuzzy logic feedback control systems have been utilized for the suppression of structural vibration in numerous studies. With the main advantages of the fuzzy controller, the inherent robustness and ability to handle nonlinearity, uncertainty and imprecision of the structure, active structural control of offshore platforms is accomplished. The robustness of the controller has been demonstrated through the uncertainty in damping ratios of the platforms. The study suggests that the proposed fuzzy control algorithm of structural vibration for offshore platforms is effective and feasible,thus improving both serviceability and survival. This present method undoubtedly provides an efficient way of the active control for offshore platforms.

  20. Jacket Substructure Fatigue Mitigation through Active Control

    Hanis, Tomas; Natarajan, Anand

    As offshore wind farms are being installed farther and in deeper waters offshore, new, and more sophisticated marine substructures such as jackets need to be used. Herein, a 10MW wind turbine mounted on a jacket sub structure at a mean water depth of 50 meters is investigated with regards to the...... fatigue design loads on the braces of the jacket. Since large wind turbines of 10MW rating have low rotor speeds (p), the modal frequencies of the sub structures approach 3p at low wind speeds, which leads to a modal coupling and resonance. Therefore an active control system is developed which provides...... sufficient structural damping and consequently a fatigue reduction at the substructure. The resulting reduction in fatigue design loads on the jacket structure based on the active control system is presented....

  1. Active load control techniques for wind turbines.

    van Dam, C.P. (University of California, Davis, CA); Berg, Dale E.; Johnson, Scott J. (University of California, Davis, CA)

    2008-07-01

    This report provides an overview on the current state of wind turbine control and introduces a number of active techniques that could be potentially used for control of wind turbine blades. The focus is on research regarding active flow control (AFC) as it applies to wind turbine performance and loads. The techniques and concepts described here are often described as 'smart structures' or 'smart rotor control'. This field is rapidly growing and there are numerous concepts currently being investigated around the world; some concepts already are focused on the wind energy industry and others are intended for use in other fields, but have the potential for wind turbine control. An AFC system can be broken into three categories: controls and sensors, actuators and devices, and the flow phenomena. This report focuses on the research involved with the actuators and devices and the generated flow phenomena caused by each device.

  2. Control Structures and Payout Policy

    Renneboog, L.D.R.; Trojanowski, G.

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines the payout policies of UK firms listed on the London Stock Exchange during the 1990s.It complements the existing literature by analyzing the trends in both dividends and total payouts (including share repurchases).In a dynamic panel data regression setting, we relate target payout ratios to control structure variables.Profitability drives payout decisions of the UK companies, but the presence of strong block holders or block holder coalitions considerably weakens the relat...

  3. Optical control of antibacterial activity

    Velema, Willem A.; van der Berg, Jan Pieter; Hansen, Mickel J.; Szymanski, Wiktor; Driessen, Arnold J. M.; Feringa, Ben L.

    2013-11-01

    Bacterial resistance is a major problem in the modern world, stemming in part from the build-up of antibiotics in the environment. Novel molecular approaches that enable an externally triggered increase in antibiotic activity with high spatiotemporal resolution and auto-inactivation are highly desirable. Here we report a responsive, broad-spectrum, antibacterial agent that can be temporally activated with light, whereupon it auto-inactivates on the scale of hours. The use of such a ‘smart’ antibiotic might prevent the build-up of active antimicrobial material in the environment. Reversible optical control over active drug concentration enables us to obtain pharmacodynamic information. Precisely localized control of activity is achieved, allowing the growth of bacteria to be confined to defined patterns, which has potential for the development of treatments that avoid interference with the endogenous microbial population in other parts of the organism.

  4. Electron gun controlled smart structure

    Martin, Jeffrey W.; Main, John Alan; Redmond, James M.; Henson, Tammy D.; Watson, Robert D.

    2001-01-01

    Disclosed is a method and system for actively controlling the shape of a sheet of electroactive material; the system comprising: one or more electrodes attached to the frontside of the electroactive sheet; a charged particle generator, disposed so as to direct a beam of charged particles (e.g. electrons) onto the electrode; a conductive substrate attached to the backside of the sheet; and a power supply electrically connected to the conductive substrate; whereby the sheet changes its shape in response to an electric field created across the sheet by an accumulation of electric charge within the electrode(s), relative to a potential applied to the conductive substrate. Use of multiple electrodes distributed across on the frontside ensures a uniform distribution of the charge with a single point of e-beam incidence, thereby greatly simplifying the beam scanning algorithm and raster control electronics, and reducing the problems associated with "blooming". By placing a distribution of electrodes over the front surface of a piezoelectric film (or other electroactive material), this arrangement enables improved control over the distribution of surface electric charges (e.g. electrons) by creating uniform (and possibly different) charge distributions within each individual electrode. Removal or deposition of net electric charge can be affected by controlling the secondary electron yield through manipulation of the backside electric potential with the power supply. The system can be used for actively controlling the shape of space-based deployable optics, such as adaptive mirrors and inflatable antennae.

  5. Damping and structural control of the JPL phase 0 testbed structure

    Fanson, James L.; Chu, Cheng-Chih; Lurie, Boris J.; Smith, Roy S.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes recent advances in structural quieting technology as applied to active truss structures intended for high precision space based optics applications. The active structure incorporates piezoelectric active members which exert control forces internal to the structure and thereby improve the structure's dimensional stability. The control architecture involves two layers of feedback control. The first utilizes collocated measurements of force and velocity at the active member to achieve active damping, the second utilizes noncollocated measurements of acceleration at the location of a simulated optical component to achieve structural stabilization. The local control loops are based on the concept of impedance matching, the global control loops are designed using robust control methods. These two levels of control are intended to operate simultaneously; however, in this paper each approach is applied individually. The combined implementation is left for future work.

  6. Structural Features of Caspase-Activating Complexes

    Hyun Ho Park

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis, also called programmed cell death, is an orderly cellular suicide program that is critical for the development, immune regulation and homeostasis of a multi-cellular organism. Failure to control this process can lead to serious human diseases, including many types of cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, and autoimmununity. The process of apoptosis is mediated by the sequential activation of caspases, which are cysteine proteases. Initiator caspases, such as caspase-2, -8, -9, and -10, are activated by formation of caspase-activating complexes, which function as a platform to recruit caspases, providing proximity for self-activation. Well-known initiator caspase-activating complexes include (1 DISC (Death Inducing Signaling Complex, which activates caspases-8 and 10; (2 Apoptosome, which activates caspase-9; and (3 PIDDosome, which activates caspase-2. Because of the fundamental biological importance of capases, many structural and biochemical studies to understand the molecular basis of assembly mechanism of caspase-activating complexes have been performed. In this review, we summarize previous studies that have examined the structural and biochemical features of caspase-activating complexes. By analyzing the structural basis for the assembly mechanism of the caspase-activating complex, we hope to provide a comprehensive understanding of caspase activation by these important oligomeric complexes.

  7. Fractional active disturbance rejection control.

    Li, Dazi; Ding, Pan; Gao, Zhiqiang

    2016-05-01

    A fractional active disturbance rejection control (FADRC) scheme is proposed to improve the performance of commensurate linear fractional order systems (FOS) and the robust analysis shows that the controller is also applicable to incommensurate linear FOS control. In FADRC, the traditional extended states observer (ESO) is generalized to a fractional order extended states observer (FESO) by using the fractional calculus, and the tracking differentiator plus nonlinear state error feedback are replaced by a fractional proportional-derivative controller. To simplify controller tuning, the linear bandwidth-parameterization method has been adopted. The impacts of the observer bandwidth ωo and controller bandwidth ωc on system performance are then analyzed. Finally, the FADRC stability and frequency-domain characteristics for linear single-input single-output FOS are analyzed. Simulation results by FADRC and ADRC on typical FOS are compared to demonstrate the superiority and effectiveness of the proposed scheme. PMID:26928516

  8. Active control: Wind turbine model

    Bindner, H.

    1999-01-01

    This report is a part of the reporting of the work done in the project 'Active Control of Wind Turbines'. This project aim is to develop a simulation model for design of control systems for turbines with pitch control and to use that model to designcontrollers. This report describes the model...... developed for controller design and analysis. Emphasis has been put on establishment of simple models describing the dynamic behavior of the wind turbine in adequate details for controller design. This hasbeen done with extensive use of measurements as the basis for selection of model complexity and model....... The models are all formulated as linear differential equations. The models are validated throughcomparisons with measurements performed on a Vestas WD 34 400 kW wind turbine. It is shown from a control point of view simple linear models can be used to describe the dynamic behavior of a pitch...

  9. ABOUT CONTROLLING OF SCIENTIFIC ACTIVITY

    Mukhin V. V.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We have selected the new area of controlling - scientific activity controlling. We consider some problems of development in this field, primarily the problem of selection of key performance indicators. It’s been founded that administrative measures stimulated the pursuit of a number of articles published in scientific journals hinders the development of science. Methodological errors - emphasis on citation indexes, impact factors, etc. - lead to wrong management decisions. As the experience of the UK, an expertise should be applied in the management of science. The article briefly discusses some of the drawbacks of the system of scientific specialties. It is proposed to expand research on the science of science and scientific activity controlling. We have also discussed the problems of controlling in applied research organizations

  10. Adaptive Piezoelectric Absorber for Active Vibration Control

    Sven Herold

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Passive vibration control solutions are often limited to working reliably at one design point. Especially applied to lightweight structures, which tend to have unwanted vibration, active vibration control approaches can outperform passive solutions. To generate dynamic forces in a narrow frequency band, passive single-degree-of-freedom oscillators are frequently used as vibration absorbers and neutralizers. In order to respond to changes in system properties and/or the frequency of excitation forces, in this work, adaptive vibration compensation by a tunable piezoelectric vibration absorber is investigated. A special design containing piezoelectric stack actuators is used to cover a large tuning range for the natural frequency of the adaptive vibration absorber, while also the utilization as an active dynamic inertial mass actuator for active control concepts is possible, which can help to implement a broadband vibration control system. An analytical model is set up to derive general design rules for the system. An absorber prototype is set up and validated experimentally for both use cases of an adaptive vibration absorber and inertial mass actuator. Finally, the adaptive vibration control system is installed and tested with a basic truss structure in the laboratory, using both the possibility to adjust the properties of the absorber and active control.

  11. Dynamic Sensing Performance of a Point-Wise Fiber Bragg Grating Displacement Measurement System Integrated in an Active Structural Control System

    Chien-Ching Ma

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a fiber Bragg grating (FBG sensing system which can measure the transient response of out-of-plane point-wise displacement responses is set up on a smart cantilever beam and the feasibility of its use as a feedback sensor in an active structural control system is studied experimentally. An FBG filter is employed in the proposed fiber sensing system to dynamically demodulate the responses obtained by the FBG displacement sensor with high sensitivity. For comparison, a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV is utilized simultaneously to verify displacement detection ability of the FBG sensing system. An optical full-field measurement technique called amplitude-fluctuation electronic speckle pattern interferometry (AF-ESPI is used to provide full-field vibration mode shapes and resonant frequencies. To verify the dynamic demodulation performance of the FBG filter, a traditional FBG strain sensor calibrated with a strain gauge is first employed to measure the dynamic strain of impact-induced vibrations. Then, system identification of the smart cantilever beam is performed by FBG strain and displacement sensors. Finally, by employing a velocity feedback control algorithm, the feasibility of integrating the proposed FBG displacement sensing system in a collocated feedback system is investigated and excellent dynamic feedback performance is demonstrated. In conclusion, our experiments show that the FBG sensor is capable of performing dynamic displacement feedback and/or strain measurements with high sensitivity and resolution.

  12. Snoezelen, structured reminiscence therapy and 10-minutes activation in long term care residents with dementia (WISDE: study protocol of a cluster randomized controlled trial

    Becker Christiane

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background People with dementia are often inapproachable due to symptoms of their illness. Therefore nurses should establish relationships with dementia patients via their remaining resources and facilitate communication. In order to achieve this, different targeted non-pharmacological interventions are recommended and practiced. However there is no sufficient evidence about the efficacy of most of these interventions. A number of publications highlight the urgent need for methodological sound studies so that more robust conclusions may be drawn. Methods/Design The trial is designed as a cluster randomized controlled trial with 20 nursing homes in Saxony and Saxony-Anhalt (Germany as the units of randomization. Nursing homes will be randomly allocated into 4 study groups consisting of 5 clusters and 90 residents: snoezelen, structured reminiscence therapy, 10-minutes activation or unstructured verbal communication (control group. The purpose is to determine whether the interventions are effective to reduce apathy in long-term care residents with dementia (N = 360 as the main outcome measure. Assessments will be done at baseline, 3, 6 and 12 months after beginning of the interventions. Discussion This trial will particularly contribute to the evidence on efficacy of non-pharmacological interventions in dementia care. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00653731

  13. Control/structure interaction design methodology

    Briggs, Hugh C.; Layman, William E.

    1989-01-01

    The Control Structure Interaction Program is a technology development program for spacecraft that exhibit interactions between the control system and structural dynamics. The program objectives include development and verification of new design concepts (such as active structure) and new tools (such as a combined structure and control optimization algorithm) and their verification in ground and possibly flight test. The new CSI design methodology is centered around interdisciplinary engineers using new tools that closely integrate structures and controls. Verification is an important CSI theme and analysts will be closely integrated to the CSI Test Bed laboratory. Components, concepts, tools and algorithms will be developed and tested in the lab and in future Shuttle-based flight experiments. The design methodology is summarized in block diagrams depicting the evolution of a spacecraft design and descriptions of analytical capabilities used in the process. The multiyear JPL CSI implementation plan is described along with the essentials of several new tools. A distributed network of computation servers and workstations was designed that will provide a state-of-the-art development base for the CSI technologies.

  14. Distributed structural control using multilayered piezoelectric actuators

    Cudney, Harley H.; Inman, Daniel J.; Oshman, Yaakov

    1990-01-01

    A method of segmenting piezoelectric sensors and actuators is proposed which can preclude the currently experienced cancelation of sensor signals, or the reduction of actuator effectiveness, due to the integration of the property undergoing measurement or control. The segmentation method is demonstrated by a model developed for beam structures, to which multiple layers of piezoelectric materials are attached. A numerical study is undertaken of increasing active and passive damping of a beam using the segmented sensors and actuators over unsegmented sensors and actuators.

  15. Structural Dynamics and Control Interaction of Flexible Structures

    Ryan, Robert S. (Editor); Scofield, Harold N. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    A workshop on structural dynamics and control interaction of flexible structures was held to promote technical exchange between the structural dynamics and control disciplines, foster joint technology, and provide a forum for discussing and focusing critical issues in the separate and combined areas. Issues and areas of emphasis were identified in structure-control interaction for the next generation of flexible systems.

  16. Indirect control and power in mutual control structures

    Karos, D.; Peters, H.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    In a mutual control structure agents exercise control over each other. Typical examples occur in the area of corporate governance: firms and investment companies exercise mutual control, in particular by owning each others’ stocks. In this paper we formulate a general model for such situations. There is a fixed set of agents, and a mutual control structure assigns to each subset (coalition) the subset of agents controlled by that coalition. Such a mutual control structure captures direct cont...

  17. Desensitizing structural-control design

    Ponslet, E.; Haftka, R. T.; Hallauer, W. L.; Cudney, H. H.

    1992-01-01

    A new method for targeted robustness optimization is presented. This method allows the analyst to 'target' the most critical performance parameter (or family of design requirements with almost the same criticality) for enhanced protection from uncertainties in the model. To create this protection, this method uses knowledge about the uncertainties in some of the parameters of the model - this information is usually available to the structural analyst. The power of the targeted robustness method is demonstrated numerically using an active damping example. The results show that the most critical damping ratio is protected - its sensitivity to the uncertainties is far below those of non-critical damping ratios.

  18. Adaptive feedback active noise control

    Kuo, Sen M.; Vijayan, Dipa

    Feedforward active noise control (ANC) systems use a reference sensor that senses a reference input to the controller. This signal is assumed to be unaffected by the secondary source and is a good measure of the undesired noise to be cancelled by the system. The reference sensor may be acoustic (e.g., microphone) or non-acoustic (e.g., tachometer, optical transducer). An obvious problem when using acoustic sensors is that the reference signal may be corrupted by the canceling signal generated by the secondary source. This problem is known as acoustic feedback. One way of avoiding this is by using a feedback active noise control (FANC) system which dispenses with the reference sensor. The FANC technique originally proposed by Olson and May employs a high gain negative feedback amplifier. This system suffered from the drawback that the error microphone had to be placed very close to the loudspeaker. The operation of the system was restricted to low frequency range and suffered from instability due to the possibility of positive feedback. Feedback systems employing adaptive filtering techniques for active noise control were developed. This paper presents the FANC system modeled as an adaptive prediction scheme.

  19. Quantifying structural controls of rockfall activity on alpine limestone cliffs: a LiDAR-based geological approach in the Wetterstein Mountains, Bavarian Alps.

    Jacobs, Benjamin; Krautblatter, Michael

    2016-04-01

    In mountainous regions, rockfall represents one of the most hazardous processes potentially threatening human life and infrastructure. For risk assessment and dimensioning rockfall mitigation, a thorough understanding of rockfall processes is crucial. Here, the rate of backweathering and rockfall supply are key factors for sediment budget assessment in rock slope environments. However, recent LiDAR approaches do not cover the entire spectrum of rockfall magnitudes (e.g. small fragmental rockfall, rare large events) and many former rockfall studies do not address geological and geotechnical factors controlling rockfall. The test setup was deliberately chosen to reduce the degrees of freedom for rockfall-controlling factors. Lithology, aspect, slope gradient and porosity were kept uniform but scan sites were chosen vary bedding orientation and joint density systematically along a 600 m high limestone rock face. Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) was used to detect and quantify rockfall activity (mm/a) at five selected rock walls of the north-facing rock slopes of the Reintal Valley over the course of one year. Additionally, structural data were obtained by traditional scanline measurements and TLS-based analysis. The compatibility of TLS methods was tested by validating the data with existing rockfall inventories obtained by direct measurements by Krautblatter et al. (2012). The results show a high discrepancy of seasonal rockfall activity between summer months (0.001 to 0.022 mm/a) and autumn to spring (0.021 to 0.364 mm/a) as well as between favorable bedding orientation (0.015 mm/a) and daylighted bedding (max. 0.264 mm/a). A significant effect of joint spacing on rockfall activity is not evident in the data or overlain by the bedding orientation effect. Nevertheless, the differences in estimated block sizes between the observed rock walls is clearly visible in the TLS derived particle size distribution. The latter was adduced to extrapolate rockfall magnitudes

  20. Distributed control of large space structures

    Schaechter, D. B.

    1981-01-01

    Theoretical developments and the results of laboratory experiments are treated as they apply to active attitude and vibration control, as well as static shape control. Modern control theory was employed throughout as the method for obtaining estimation and control laws.

  1. Morphology-controlled synthesis of Ti3+ self-doped yolk–shell structure titanium oxide with superior photocatalytic activity under visible light

    Ti3+ self-doped yolk–shell structure titanium oxide nanoparticle aggregates are fabricated through an environmental template-free route and the reduction reaction at low temperature subsequently. After the Ti3+ doping, the reduced TiO2 sample exhibits a wide visible-light absorption ranged from 400 nm to 800 nm. The intrinsic hollow core–shell microstructure can make multiple reflections of light within the chamber, and thus results in more efficient use of the light source compared with solid structure. Besides, the large surface area can render the sample with a high activity. Therefore, Ti3+ self-doped yolk–shell structure titanium oxide exhibits a superior photocatalytic activity under visible light. This strategy is simple, cheap and mass-productive, which may shed light on a new avenue for large scale production of self-doped yolk–shell structural nano functional materials for catalyst, sensors, energy storage and other new applications. - Graphical abstract: A facile generic strategy is employed to prepare Ti3+ self-doped yolk–shell structure titanium oxide nanoparticle aggregates with the superior photocatalytic activity under visible light. - Highlights: • Yolk–shell TiO2 mesospheres are synthesized by solvothermal alcoholysis. • Ti3+ self-doped yolk–shell structure titanium oxide is obtained at low temperature. • It exhibits a remarkable photocatalytic activity

  2. Novel Active Combustion Control Valve

    Caspermeyer, Matt

    2014-01-01

    This project presents an innovative solution for active combustion control. Relative to the state of the art, this concept provides frequency modulation (greater than 1,000 Hz) in combination with high-amplitude modulation (in excess of 30 percent flow) and can be adapted to a large range of fuel injector sizes. Existing valves often have low flow modulation strength. To achieve higher flow modulation requires excessively large valves or too much electrical power to be practical. This active combustion control valve (ACCV) has high-frequency and -amplitude modulation, consumes low electrical power, is closely coupled with the fuel injector for modulation strength, and is practical in size and weight. By mitigating combustion instabilities at higher frequencies than have been previously achieved (approximately 1,000 Hz), this new technology enables gas turbines to run at operating points that produce lower emissions and higher performance.

  3. Smart Materials and Active Noise and Vibration Control in Vehicles

    Doppenberg, E.J.J.; Berkhoff, A.P.; Overbeek, van M.

    2001-01-01

    The paper presents the results for the reduction of sound radiated from a structure using different control methodologies, and discusses two approaches for active structural acoustic control: the acoustic approach or the vibro-acoustic approach. Integrated actuators in structure material are necessa

  4. Active Vibration Control of Piezolaminated Smart Beams

    V. Balamurugan

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the active vibration control of beam like structures with distributed piezoelectric sensor and actuator layers bonded on top and bottom surfaces of the beam. A finite element model based on Euler-Bernoulli beam theory has been developed. The contribution of the piezoelectric sensor and actuator layers on the mass and stiffness of the beam is considered. Three types of classical control strategies, namely direct proportional feedback, constant-gain negative velocity feedback and Lyapunov feedback and an optimal control strategy, linear quadratic regulator (LQR scheme are applied to study their control effectiveness. Also, the control performance with different types of loading, such as impulse loading, step loading, harmonic and random loading is studied

  5. Shape control of large space structures

    Hagan, M. T.

    1982-01-01

    A survey has been conducted to determine the types of control strategies which have been proposed for controlling the vibrations in large space structures. From this survey several representative control strategies were singled out for detailed analyses. The application of these strategies to a simplified model of a large space structure has been simulated. These simulations demonstrate the implementation of the control algorithms and provide a basis for a preliminary comparison of their suitability for large space structure control.

  6. Optimal controller design for structural damage detection

    Lew, Jiann-Shiun

    2005-03-01

    The virtual passive control technique has recently been applied to structural damage detection, where the virtual passive controller only uses the existing control devices, and no additional physical elements are attached to the tested structure. One important task is to design passive controllers that can enhance the sensitivity of the identified parameters, such as natural frequencies, to structural damage. This paper presents a novel study of an optimal controller design for structural damage detection. We apply not only passive controllers but also low-order and fixed-structure controllers, such as PID controllers. In the optimal control design, the performance of structural damage detection is based on the application of a neural network technique, which uses the pattern of the correlation between the natural frequency changes of the tested system and the damaged system.

  7. A Digital Controller for Active Aeroelastic Controls

    Ueda, Tetsuhiko; MUROTA, Katsuichi; 上田, 哲彦; 室田, 勝一

    1989-01-01

    A high-speed digital controller for aeroelastic controls was designed and made. The purpose was to minimize adverse phase lag which is inevitably produced by the CPU time of digital processing. The delay deteriorates control performances on rather rapid phenomena like aircraft flutter. With fix-point operation the controller realized 417 microseconds of throughput time including the A/D and D/A conversion. This corresponds to a high sampling rate of 2.4kHz. The controller furnishes two channe...

  8. Active structures to reduce torsional vibrations

    Matthias, M.; Schlote, D.; Atzrodt, H.

    2013-03-01

    This paper describes the development of different active measures to reduce torsional vibrations in power trains. The measures are based on concepts developed for active mounts to reduce the transmission of structure-borne sound. To show the potential of these active measures and investigate their mode of operation to influence torsional vibrations, numerical simulations of powertrains with different active measures were done. First experimental results from tests on an experimental (reduced size) power train were used to align the numerical models. The work was done within the project 'LOEWE-Zentrum AdRIA: Adaptronik - Research, Innovation, Application' funded by the German federal state of Hessen, and the Project AKTos: 'Active control of torsional vibrations by coupling elements' placed in the research Framework program 'Navigation and Maritime Technology for the 21st Century' funded by the German Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology.

  9. Solution Structures of Complement C2 and Its C4 Complexes Propose Pathway-specific Mechanisms for Control and Activation of the Complement Proconvertases.

    Mortensen, Sofia; Jensen, Jan K; Andersen, Gregers R

    2016-08-01

    The lectin (LP) and classical (CP) pathways are two of the three main activation cascades of the complement system. These pathways start with recognition of different pathogen- or danger-associated molecular patterns and include identical steps of proteolytic activation of complement component C4, formation of the C3 proconvertase C4b2, followed by cleavage of complement component C2 within C4b2 resulting in the C3 convertase C4b2a. Here, we describe the solution structures of the two central complexes of the pathways, C3 proconvertase and C3 convertase, as well as the unbound zymogen C2 obtained by small angle x-ray scattering analysis. We analyzed both native and enzymatically deglycosylated C4b2 and C2 and showed that the resulting structural models were independent of the glycans. The small angle x-ray scattering-derived models suggest a different activation mode for the CP/LP C3 proconvertase as compared with that established for the alternative pathway proconvertase C3bB. This is likely due to the rather different structural and functional properties of the proteases activating the proconvertases. The solution structure of a stabilized form of the active CP/LP C3 convertase C4b2a is strikingly similar to the crystal structure of the alternative pathway C3 convertase C3bBb, which is in accordance with their identical functions in cleaving the complement proteins C3 and C5. PMID:27252379

  10. Quantitative robust linear parameter varying H∞ vibration control of flexible structures for saving the control energy

    Zhang, Kai; Scorletti, Gérard; Ichchou, Mohamed; Mieyeville, F.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, a general and systematical quantitative robust linear parameter varying control method is proposed for active vibration control of linear parameter varying flexible structures such that a complete set of control objectives can be considered, especially the reduction of necessarily required control energy and the control input. To achieve this goal, the phase and gain control policies are employed in linear parameter varying H∞ control designs for suitable selection of weighti...

  11. DNA-based control of protein activity.

    Engelen, W; Janssen, B M G; Merkx, M

    2016-03-01

    DNA has emerged as a highly versatile construction material for nanometer-sized structures and sophisticated molecular machines and circuits. The successful application of nucleic acid based systems greatly relies on their ability to autonomously sense and act on their environment. In this feature article, the development of DNA-based strategies to dynamically control protein activity via oligonucleotide triggers is discussed. Depending on the desired application, protein activity can be controlled by directly conjugating them to an oligonucleotide handle, or expressing them as a fusion protein with DNA binding motifs. To control proteins without modifying them chemically or genetically, multivalent ligands and aptamers that reversibly inhibit their function provide valuable tools to regulate proteins in a noncovalent manner. The goal of this feature article is to give an overview of strategies developed to control protein activity via oligonucleotide-based triggers, as well as hurdles yet to be taken to obtain fully autonomous systems that interrogate, process and act on their environments by means of DNA-based protein control. PMID:26812623

  12. Solution Structures of Complement C2 and its C4 Complexes Propose Pathway Specific Mechanisms for Control and Activation of the Complement Proconvertases

    Mortensen, Sofia; Jensen, Jan Kristian; Andersen, Gregers Rom

    2016-01-01

    , formation of the C3 proconvertase C4b2, followed by cleavage of complement component C2 within C4b2 resulting in the C3 convertase C4b2a. Here we describe the solution structures of the two central complexes of the pathways, C3 proconvertase and C3 convertase, as well as the unbound zymogen C2 obtained by...... small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) analysis. We analysed both native and enzymatically deglycosylated C4b2 and C2 and showed that the resulting structural models were independent of the glycans. The SAXS derived models suggest a different activation mode for the CP/LP C3 proconvertase as compared to...... that established for the alternative pathway (AP) proconvertase C3bB. This is likely due to the rather different structural and functional properties of the proteases activating the proconvertases. The solution structure of a stabilized form of the active CP/LP C3 convertase C4b2a is strikingly similar...

  13. Passive control of civil engineering structures

    Braz-César, M.T.; Barros, Rui

    2013-01-01

    Structural control has been a major research area i n aerospace engineering aimed at solving very complex problems related with analysis and des ign of flexible structures. The efficiency of these strategies to improve the performance of s everal structural systems suggests its potential to reduce damage and control earthquake4i nduced response in civil structures. Therefore, this technology has been well accepted b y structural engineers as a feasible approach t...

  14. Optimization for efficient structure-control systems

    Oz, Hayrani; Khot, Narendra S.

    1993-01-01

    The efficiency of a structure-control system is a nondimensional parameter which indicates the fraction of the total control power expended usefully in controlling a finite-dimensional system. The balance of control power is wasted on the truncated dynamics serving no useful purpose towards the control objectives. Recently, it has been demonstrated that the concept of efficiency can be used to address a number of control issues encountered in the control of dynamic systems such as the spillover effects, selection of a good input configuration and obtaining reduced order control models. Reference (1) introduced the concept and presented analyses of several Linear Quadratic Regulator designs on the basis of their efficiencies. Encouraged by the results of Ref. (1), Ref. (2) introduces an efficiency modal analysis of a structure-control system which gives an internal characterization of the controller design and establishes the link between the control design and the initial disturbances to affect efficient structure-control system designs. The efficiency modal analysis leads to identification of principal controller directions (or controller modes) distinct from the structural natural modes. Thus ultimately, many issues of the structure-control system revolve around the idea of insuring compatibility of the structural modes and the controller modes with each other, the better the match the higher the efficiency. A key feature in controlling a reduced order model of a high dimensional (or infinity-dimensional distributed parameter system) structural dynamic system must be to achieve high efficiency of the control system while satisfying the control objectives and/or constraints. Formally, this can be achieved by designing the control system and structural parameters simultaneously within an optimization framework. The subject of this paper is to present such a design procedure.

  15. Towards Automatic Decentralized Control Structure Selection

    Jørgensen, John Bagterp; Jørgensen, Sten Bay

    2000-01-01

    A subtask in integration of design and control of chemical processes is the selection of a control structure. Automating the selection of the control structure enables sequential integration of process and control design. As soon as the process is specified or computed, a structure for...... decentralized control is determined automatically, and the resulting decentralized control structure is automatically tuned using standard techniques. Dynamic simulation of the resulting process system gives immediate feedback to the process design engineer regarding practical operability of the process. The...... control structure selection problem is formulated as a special MILP employing cost coefficients which are computed using Parseval's theorem combined with RGA and IMC concepts. This approach enables selection and tuning of large-scale plant-wide decentralized controllers through efficient combination of...

  16. Implementation of Control Structures in FORTRAN 77.

    Schwar, James P.; Best, Charles L.

    1984-01-01

    Expands on a previous discussion of FORTRAN 77 by describing one of its more powerful innovations--the block IF as the basic implementation for the control structures used in writing structured code. Also shows use of DO-loop as a natural substitute for the black IF in implementing control structures. (JN)

  17. Nonlinear Predictive Control of Semi-Active Landing Gear System

    Wu, Dongsu; Gu, Hongbin; Liu, Hui

    2010-01-01

    The application of model predictive control and constructive nonlinear control methodology to semi-active landing gear system is studied in this paper. A unified shock absorber mathematical model incorporates solenoid valve’s electromechanical and magnetic dynamics is built to facilitate simulation and controller design. Then we propose a hierarchical control structure to deal with the high nonlinearity. A dual mode model predictive controller as an outer loop controller is developed to gen...

  18. On modal energy in civil structural control

    Miao PANG; Tie-jiong LOU; Ming ZHAO

    2008-01-01

    A new control strategy based on modal energy criterion is proposed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the control system in reducing structural earthquake responses. The modal control algorithm combining LQR (linear quadratic regulator) control algorithm is adopted in the discrete time-history analysis. The various modal energy forms are derived by definition of the generalized absolute displacement vector. A preliminary numerical study of the effectiveness of this control strategy is carried out on a 20-storey framed steel structural model. The controlled performance of the model is studied from the perspectives of both response and modal energy. Results show that the modal energy-based control strategy is very effective in reducing structural responses as well as in consuming a large amount of modal energy, while augmentation of additional generalized control force corresponding to the modes that contain little modal energy is unnecessary, as it does little help to improve the controlled structural performance.

  19. Synaptically Released Matrix Metalloproteinase Activity in Control of Structural Plasticity and the Cell Surface Distribution of GluA1-AMPA Receptors

    Zsuzsanna Szepesi; Eric Hosy; Blazej Ruszczycki; Monika Bijata; Marta Pyskaty; Arthur Bikbaev; Martin Heine; Daniel Choquet; Leszek Kaczmarek; Jakub Wlodarczyk

    2014-01-01

    Synapses are particularly prone to dynamic alterations and thus play a major role in neuronal plasticity. Dynamic excitatory synapses are located at the membranous neuronal protrusions called dendritic spines. The ability to change synaptic connections involves both alterations at the morphological level and changes in postsynaptic receptor composition. We report that endogenous matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity promotes the structural and functional plasticity of local synapses by its ...

  20. Remote Control Guidance Law Design Using Variable Structure Control

    2006-01-01

    A method of sliding mode variable structure control for the missile body being a time varying system is presented. A remote control guidance law is designed. The method has strong robustness to target's maneuver. To reduce the chattering phenomena, quasi-sliding mode variable structure control method is used. Simulation results show that the proposed method has small miss distance for any kind of maneuvering targets and requires small control energy.

  1. Recent advances in active control of aircraft cabin noise

    Mathur, Gopal; Fuller, Christopher

    2002-11-01

    Active noise control techniques can provide significant reductions in aircraft interior noise levels without the structural modifications or weight penalties usually associated with passive techniques, particularly for low frequency noise. Our main objective in this presentation is to give a review of active control methods and their applications to aircraft cabin noise reduction with an emphasis on recent advances and challenges facing the noise control engineer in the practical application of these techniques. The active noise control method using secondary acoustic sources, e.g., loudspeakers, as control sources for tonal noise reduction is first discussed with results from an active noise control flight test demonstration. An innovative approach of applying control forces directly to the fuselage structure using piezoelectric actuators, known as active structural acoustic control (ASAC), to control cabin noise is then presented. Experimental results from laboratory ASAC tests conducted on a full-scale fuselage and from flight tests on a helicopter will be discussed. Finally, a hybrid active/passive noise control approach for achieving significant broadband noise reduction will be discussed. Experimental results of control of broadband noise transmission through an aircraft structure will be presented.

  2. Towards Automatic Decentralized Control Structure Selection

    A subtask in integration of design and control of chemical processes is the selection of a control structure. Automating the selection of the control structure enables sequential integration of process and controld esign. As soon as the process is specified or computed, a structure for...... decentralized control is determined automatically, and the resulting decentralized control structure is automatically tuned using standard techniques. Dynamic simulation of the resulting process system gives immediate feedback to the process design engineer regarding practical operability of the process. The...... control structure selection problem is formulated as a special MILP employing cost coefficients which are computed using Parseval's theorem combined with RGA and IMC concepts. This approach enables selection and tuning of large-scale plant-wide decentralized controllers through efficient combination of...

  3. A predictive control algorithm for an active three-phase power filter

    R.V. Vlasenko; Bialobrzeski, O. V.

    2014-01-01

    The paper deals with grid connection circuits for active filters, structures of active power filter control systems, and methods based on full capacity components determination. The existing structures of active power filter control and control algorithm adjustment for valve commutation loss reduction are analyzed. A predictive control algorithm for an active three-phase power filter is introduced.

  4. On Control Strategies for Responsive Architectural Structures

    Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Parigi, Dario

    2012-01-01

    The present paper considers control of responsive architectural structures for improvement of structural performance by recognizing changes in their environments and loads, adapting to meet goals, and using past events to improve future performance or maintain serviceability. The general scope of...... the paper is to discuss control strategies for responsive architectural structures, particularly reconfigurable architectural structures which can transform body shape, i.e. a transformation into more than one or two different shape alternatives....

  5. On Control Strategies for Responsive Architectural Structures

    Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Parigi, Dario

    2012-01-01

    The present paper considers control of responsive architectural structures for improvement of structural performance by recognizing changes in their environments and loads, adapting to meet goals, and using past events to improve future performance or maintain serviceability. The general scope of the paper is to discuss control strategies for responsive architectural structures, particularly reconfigurable architectural structures which can transform body shape, i.e. a transformation into mor...

  6. Structurally Robust Control of Complex Networks

    Nacher, Jose C; Akutsu, Tatsuya

    2014-01-01

    Robust control theory has been successfully applied to numerous real-world problems using a small set of devices called {\\it controllers}. However, the real systems represented by networks contain unreliable components and modern robust control engineering has not addressed the problem of structural changes on a large network. Here, we introduce the concept of structurally robust control of complex networks and provide a concrete example using an algorithmic framework that is widely applied i...

  7. Active control of radiated sound using nearfield pressure sensing

    CHEN Ke'an; YIN Xuefei

    2004-01-01

    Based on nearfield sound pressure sensing to pick up error information, an approach for constructing active acoustic structure to effectively reduce radiated sound power at low frequency is proposed. The idea is that a nearfield pressure after active control is used as error signals and transformed into an objective function in adaptive active control process.Firstly sound power expression using near-field pressure radiated from a flexible structure is derived, and then three kind of nearfield pressure based active control strategies, I.e. Minimization of radiated sound power, minimization of sound power for dominant radiation modes and minimization of sound power for modified dominant radiation modes are respectively presented and applied to active control of radiated single and broadband noise. Finally computer simulations on sound power reduction under three strategies are conducted and it is shown that the proposed active control strategies are invalid and considerable reduction in radiated sound power can be achieved.

  8. The TOYSAT structural control experiment

    Breakwell, J. A.; Chambers, G. J.

    1983-01-01

    The Lockheed TOYSAT experiment is described. The experiment was designed to test hypothesis concerning the application of optimal control theory to flexible spacecraft. The theory is presented, and results described.

  9. Dual structural-control optimization of large space structures

    Messac, A.; Turner, J.

    1984-01-01

    A new approach is proposed for solving dual structural-control optimization problems for high-order flexible space structures where reduced-order structural models are employed. For a given initial structural dessign, a quadratic control cost is minimized subject to a constant-mass constraint. The sensitivity of the optimal control cost with respect to the stuctural design variables is then determined and used to obtain successive structural redesigns using a contrained gradient optimization algorithm. This process is repeated until the constrained control cost sensitivity becomes negligible. A numerical example is presented which demonstrates that this new approach effectively addresses the problem of dual optimization for potentially very high-order structures.

  10. Structural Dissection for Controlling Complex Networks

    Wang, Wen-Xu; Zhao, Chen; Liu, Yang-Yu; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Controlling complex networked systems has been a central goal in different fields and understanding controllability of complex networks has been at the forefront of contemporary science. Despite the recent progress in the development of controllability theories for complex networks, we continue to lack efficient tools to fully understand the effect of network topology and interaction strengths among nodes on controllability. Here we establish a framework to discern the significance of links and nodes for controlling general complex networks in a simple way based on local information. A dissection process is offered by the framework to probe and classify nodes and links completely, giving rise to a criterion for strong structural controllability. Analytical results indicate phase transitions associated with link and node categories, and strong structural controllability. Applying the tools to real networks demonstrate that real technological networks are strong structurally controllable, whereas most of real s...

  11. Modifying Erosion Control Structures for Ecological Benefits

    Edge-of-field water control structures known as drop pipes are widely employed to control gully erosion, particularly along incised streams. Previous research showed that incidental habitats created by installation of these structures supplemented stream corridors by supporting large numbers of inv...

  12. Tuning of active vibration controllers for ACTEX by genetic algorithm

    Kwak, Moon K.; Denoyer, Keith K.

    1999-06-01

    This paper is concerned with the optimal tuning of digitally programmable analog controllers on the ACTEX-1 smart structures flight experiment. The programmable controllers for each channel include a third order Strain Rate Feedback (SRF) controller, a fifth order SRF controller, a second order Positive Position Feedback (PPF) controller, and a fourth order PPF controller. Optimal manual tuning of several control parameters can be a difficult task even though the closed-loop control characteristics of each controller are well known. Hence, the automatic tuning of individual control parameters using Genetic Algorithms is proposed in this paper. The optimal control parameters of each control law are obtained by imposing a constraint on the closed-loop frequency response functions using the ACTEX mathematical model. The tuned control parameters are then uploaded to the ACTEX electronic control electronics and experiments on the active vibration control are carried out in space. The experimental results on ACTEX will be presented.

  13. SPS structures and control: A perspective

    Ried, R. C.

    1980-01-01

    The characteristics and design requirements for the structure and control systems for a solar power satellite were evaluated. A simplistic, indicative analysis on a representative configuration was developed. Representative configuration masses and dimensions are given in convenient approximate magnitudes. The significance of structure control interaction and the significance of stiffness to the minimization of dynamic energy was demonstrated. It was found that the thermal environment for the SPS was dominated by solar radiation and waste heat rejection by the antenna. A more in-depth assessment of the control system design and associated system performance is still needed, specifically the inter-relatonships between control sensors, actuators, and structural response.

  14. JPL control/structure interaction test bed real-time control computer architecture

    Briggs, Hugh C.

    1989-01-01

    The Control/Structure Interaction Program is a technology development program for spacecraft that exhibit interactions between the control system and structural dynamics. The program objectives include development and verification of new design concepts - such as active structure - and new tools - such as combined structure and control optimization algorithm - and their verification in ground and possibly flight test. A focus mission spacecraft was designed based upon a space interferometer and is the basis for design of the ground test article. The ground test bed objectives include verification of the spacecraft design concepts, the active structure elements and certain design tools such as the new combined structures and controls optimization tool. In anticipation of CSI technology flight experiments, the test bed control electronics must emulate the computation capacity and control architectures of space qualifiable systems as well as the command and control networks that will be used to connect investigators with the flight experiment hardware. The Test Bed facility electronics were functionally partitioned into three units: a laboratory data acquisition system for structural parameter identification and performance verification; an experiment supervisory computer to oversee the experiment, monitor the environmental parameters and perform data logging; and a multilevel real-time control computing system. The design of the Test Bed electronics is presented along with hardware and software component descriptions. The system should break new ground in experimental control electronics and is of interest to anyone working in the verification of control concepts for large structures.

  15. Real-Time Structural Overload Control via Control Allocation Optimization Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This control methodology utilizes real-time vehicle structural load and shape measurements to actively respond to and protect against vehicle damage due...

  16. Fluid control structures in microfluidic devices

    Mathies, Richard A. (Inventor); Grover, William H. (Inventor); Skelley, Alison (Inventor); Lagally, Eric (Inventor); Liu, Chung N. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for implementing microfluidic analysis devices are provided. A monolithic elastomer membrane associated with an integrated pneumatic manifold allows the placement and actuation of a variety of fluid control structures, such as structures for pumping, isolating, mixing, routing, merging, splitting, preparing, and storing volumes of fluid. The fluid control structures can be used to implement a variety of sample introduction, preparation, processing, and storage techniques.

  17. Holographic sensing for control of flexible structures

    Barsky, Michael Frederick

    1990-01-01

    A state feedback control system for flexible structures implemented using a holographic sensor and optical processor is presented. Real-time holography provides a mechanism for sensing the distributed shape of a broad class of one and two-dimensional flexible structures in a form that can be processed using fixed optics. The optical processing solves the spillover problem in the theory of the control of flexible structures. The optical processing also simplifies the computation allowing the s...

  18. Fluid control structures in microfluidic devices

    Mathies, Richard A.; Grover, William H.; Skelley, Alison; Lagally, Eric; Liu, Chung N.

    2008-11-04

    Methods and apparatus for implementing microfluidic analysis devices are provided. A monolithic elastomer membrane associated with an integrated pneumatic manifold allows the placement and actuation of a variety of fluid control structures, such as structures for pumping, isolating, mixing, routing, merging, splitting, preparing, and storing volumes of fluid. The fluid control structures can be used to implement a variety of sample introduction, preparation, processing, and storage techniques.

  19. Ribosome-dependent activation of stringent control.

    Brown, Alan; Fernández, Israel S; Gordiyenko, Yuliya; Ramakrishnan, V

    2016-06-01

    In order to survive, bacteria continually sense, and respond to, environmental fluctuations. Stringent control represents a key bacterial stress response to nutrient starvation that leads to rapid and comprehensive reprogramming of metabolic and transcriptional patterns. In general, transcription of genes for growth and proliferation is downregulated, while those important for survival and virulence are upregulated. Amino acid starvation is sensed by depletion of the aminoacylated tRNA pools, and this results in accumulation of ribosomes stalled with non-aminoacylated (uncharged) tRNA in the ribosomal A site. RelA is recruited to stalled ribosomes and activated to synthesize a hyperphosphorylated guanosine analogue, (p)ppGpp, which acts as a pleiotropic secondary messenger. However, structural information about how RelA recognizes stalled ribosomes and discriminates against aminoacylated tRNAs is missing. Here we present the cryo-electron microscopy structure of RelA bound to the bacterial ribosome stalled with uncharged tRNA. The structure reveals that RelA utilizes a distinct binding site compared to the translational factors, with a multi-domain architecture that wraps around a highly distorted A-site tRNA. The TGS (ThrRS, GTPase and SpoT) domain of RelA binds the CCA tail to orient the free 3' hydroxyl group of the terminal adenosine towards a β-strand, such that an aminoacylated tRNA at this position would be sterically precluded. The structure supports a model in which association of RelA with the ribosome suppresses auto-inhibition to activate synthesis of (p)ppGpp and initiate the stringent response. Since stringent control is responsible for the survival of pathogenic bacteria under stress conditions, and contributes to chronic infections and antibiotic tolerance, RelA represents a good target for the development of novel antibacterial therapeutics. PMID:27279228

  20. Structure and activation of rhodopsin

    Zhou, X. Edward; Melcher, Karsten; Xu, H Eric

    2012-01-01

    Rhodopsin is the first G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) with its three-dimensional structure solved by X-ray crystallography. The crystal structure of rhodopsin has revealed the molecular mechanism of photoreception and signal transduction in the visual system. Although several other GPCR crystal structures have been reported over the past few years, the rhodopsin structure remains an important model for understanding the structural and functional characteristics of other GPCRs. This review ...

  1. Experimental Robust Control of Structural Acoustic Radiation

    Cox, David E.; Gibbs, Gary P.; Clark, Robert L.; Vipperman, Jeffrey S.

    1998-01-01

    This work addresses the design and application of robust controllers for structural acoustic control. Both simulation and experimental results are presented. H(infinity) and mu-synthesis design methods were used to design feedback controllers which minimize power radiated from a panel while avoiding instability due to unmodeled dynamics. Specifically, high order structural modes which couple strongly to the actuator-sensor path were poorly modeled. This model error was analytically bounded with an uncertainty model, which allowed controllers to be designed without artificial limits on control effort. It is found that robust control methods provide the control designer with physically meaningful parameters with which to tune control designs and can be very useful in determining limits of performance. Experimental results also showed, however, poor robustness properties for control designs with ad-hoc uncertainty models. The importance of quantifying and bounding model errors is discussed.

  2. Multiplicity Control in Structural Equation Modeling

    Cribbie, Robert A.

    2007-01-01

    Researchers conducting structural equation modeling analyses rarely, if ever, control for the inflated probability of Type I errors when evaluating the statistical significance of multiple parameters in a model. In this study, the Type I error control, power and true model rates of famsilywise and false discovery rate controlling procedures were…

  3. Actively controlled thin-shell space optics

    Denoyer, Keith K.; Flint, Eric M.; Main, John A.; Lindler, Jason E.

    2003-08-01

    Increasingly, scientific and military missions require the use of space-based optical systems. For example, new capabilities are required for imaging terrestrial like planets, for surveillance, and for directed energy applications. Given the difficulties in producing and launching large optics, it is doubtful that refinements of conventional technology will meet future needs, particularly in a cost-effective manner. To meet this need, recent research has been investigating the feasibility of a new class of ultra-lightweight think-skin optical elements that combine recent advances in lightweight thermally formed materials, active materials, and novel sensing and control architectures. If successful, the approach may lead to an order of magnitude reduction in space optics areal density, improved large scale manufacturing capability, and dramatic reductions in manufacturing and launch costs. In a recent effort, a one meter thin-film mirror like structure was fabricated. This paper provides an overview of tools used to model and simulate this structure as well as results from structural dynamic testing. In addition, progress in the area of non-contact global shape control using smart materials is presented.

  4. High performance composites with active stiffness control.

    Tridech, Charnwit; Maples, Henry A; Robinson, Paul; Bismarck, Alexander

    2013-09-25

    High performance carbon fiber reinforced composites with controllable stiffness could revolutionize the use of composite materials in structural applications. Here we describe a structural material, which has a stiffness that can be actively controlled on demand. Such a material could have applications in morphing wings or deployable structures. A carbon fiber reinforced-epoxy composite is described that can undergo an 88% reduction in flexural stiffness at elevated temperatures and fully recover when cooled, with no discernible damage or loss in properties. Once the stiffness has been reduced, the required deformations can be achieved at much lower actuation forces. For this proof-of-concept study a thin polyacrylamide (PAAm) layer was electrocoated onto carbon fibers that were then embedded into an epoxy matrix via resin infusion. Heating the PAAm coating above its glass transition temperature caused it to soften and allowed the fibers to slide within the matrix. To produce the stiffness change the carbon fibers were used as resistance heating elements by passing a current through them. When the PAAm coating had softened, the ability of the interphase to transfer load to the fibers was significantly reduced, greatly lowering the flexural stiffness of the composite. By changing the moisture content in PAAm fiber coating, the temperature at which the PAAm softens and the composites undergo a reduction in stiffness can be tuned. PMID:23978266

  5. Structure and activation of rhodopsin

    X Edward ZHOU; Karsten MELCHER; H Eric XU

    2012-01-01

    Rhodopsin is the first G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) with its three-dimensional structure solved by X-ray crystallography.The crystal structure of rhodopsin has revealed the molecular mechanism of photoreception and signal transduction in the visual system.Although several other GPCR crystal structures have been reported over the past few years,the rhodopsin structure remains an important model for understanding the structural and functional characteristics of other GPCRs.This review summarizes the structural features,the photoactivation,and the G protein signal transduction of rhodopsin.

  6. Model Predictive Vibration Control Efficient Constrained MPC Vibration Control for Lightly Damped Mechanical Structures

    Takács, Gergely

    2012-01-01

    Real-time model predictive controller (MPC) implementation in active vibration control (AVC) is often rendered difficult by fast sampling speeds and extensive actuator-deformation asymmetry. If the control of lightly damped mechanical structures is assumed, the region of attraction containing the set of allowable initial conditions requires a large prediction horizon, making the already computationally demanding on-line process even more complex. Model Predictive Vibration Control provides insight into the predictive control of lightly damped vibrating structures by exploring computationally efficient algorithms which are capable of low frequency vibration control with guaranteed stability and constraint feasibility. In addition to a theoretical primer on active vibration damping and model predictive control, Model Predictive Vibration Control provides a guide through the necessary steps in understanding the founding ideas of predictive control applied in AVC such as: ·         the implementation of ...

  7. PDEMOD: Software for control/structures optimization

    Taylor, Lawrence W., Jr.; Zimmerman, David

    1991-01-01

    Because of the possibility of adverse interaction between the control system and the structural dynamics of large, flexible spacecraft, great care must be taken to ensure stability and system performance. Because of the high cost of insertion of mass into low earth orbit, it is prudent to optimize the roles of structure and control systems simultaneously. Because of the difficulty and the computational burden in modeling and analyzing the control structure system dynamics, the total problem is often split and treated iteratively. It would aid design if the control structure system dynamics could be represented in a single system of equations. With the use of the software PDEMOD (Partial Differential Equation Model), it is now possible to optimize structure and control systems simultaneously. The distributed parameter modeling approach enables embedding the control system dynamics into the same equations for the structural dynamics model. By doing this, the current difficulties involved in model order reduction are avoided. The NASA Mini-MAST truss is used an an example for studying integrated control structure design.

  8. Control Of Flexible Structures-2 (COFS-2) flight control, structure and gimbal system interaction study

    Fay, Stanley; Gates, Stephen; Henderson, Timothy; Sackett, Lester; Kirchwey, Kim; Stoddard, Isaac; Storch, Joel

    1988-01-01

    The second Control Of Flexible Structures Flight Experiment (COFS-2) includes a long mast as in the first flight experiment, but with the Langley 15-m hoop column antenna attached via a gimbal system to the top of the mast. The mast is to be mounted in the Space Shuttle cargo bay. The servo-driven gimbal system could be used to point the antenna relative to the mast. The dynamic interaction of the Shuttle Orbiter/COFS-2 system with the Orbiter on-orbit Flight Control System (FCS) and the gimbal pointing control system has been studied using analysis and simulation. The Orbiter pointing requirements have been assessed for their impact on allowable free drift time for COFS experiments. Three fixed antenna configurations were investigated. Also simulated was Orbiter attitude control behavior with active vernier jets during antenna slewing. The effect of experiment mast dampers was included. Control system stability and performance and loads on various portions of the COFS-2 structure were investigated. The study indicates possible undesirable interaction between the Orbiter FCS and the flexible, articulated COFS-2 mast/antenna system, even when restricted to vernier reaction jets.

  9. Parallel computations and control of adaptive structures

    Park, K. C.; Alvin, Kenneth F.; Belvin, W. Keith; Chong, K. P. (Editor); Liu, S. C. (Editor); Li, J. C. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The equations of motion for structures with adaptive elements for vibration control are presented for parallel computations to be used as a software package for real-time control of flexible space structures. A brief introduction of the state-of-the-art parallel computational capability is also presented. Time marching strategies are developed for an effective use of massive parallel mapping, partitioning, and the necessary arithmetic operations. An example is offered for the simulation of control-structure interaction on a parallel computer and the impact of the approach presented for applications in other disciplines than aerospace industry is assessed.

  10. Controls-structures-electromagnetics interaction program

    Grantham, William L.; Bailey, Marion C.; Belvin, Wendell K.; Williams, Jeffrey P.

    1987-01-01

    A technology development program is described involving Controls Structures Electromagnetics Interaction (CSEI) for large space structures. The CSEI program was developed as part of the continuing effort following the successful kinematic deployment and RF tests of the 15 meter Hoop/Column antenna. One lesson learned was the importance of making reflector surface adjustment after fabrication and deployment. Given are program objectives, ground based test configuration, Intelsat adaptive feed, reflector shape prediction model, control experiment concepts, master schedule, and Control Of Flexible Structures-II (COFS-II) baseline configuration.

  11. Optimal decentralized feedback control for a truss structure

    Cagle, A.; Ozguner, U.

    1989-01-01

    One approach to the decentralized control of large flexible space structures involves the design of controllers for the substructures of large systems and their subsequent application to the entire coupled system. This approach is presently developed for the case of active vibration damping on an experimental large struss structure. The isolated boundary loading method is used to define component models by FEM; component controllers are designed using an interlocking control concept which minimizes the motion of the boundary nodes, thereby reducing the exchange of mechanical disturbances among components.

  12. Microglial control of neuronal activity

    Catherine eBéchade

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Fine-tuning of neuronal activity was thought to be a neuron-autonomous mechanism until the discovery that astrocytes are active players of synaptic transmission. The involvement of astrocytes has changed our understanding of the roles of non-neuronal cells and shed new light on the regulation of neuronal activity. Microglial cells are the macrophages of the brain and they have been mostly investigated as immune cells. However recent data discussed in this review support the notion that, similarly to astrocytes, microglia are involved in the regulation of neuronal activity. For instance, in most, if not all, brain pathologies a strong temporal correlation has long been known to exist between the pathological activation of microglia and dysfunction of neuronal activity. Recent studies have convincingly shown that alteration of microglial function is responsible for pathological neuronal activity. This causal relationship has also been demonstrated in mice bearing loss-of-function mutations in genes specifically expressed by microglia. In addition to these long-term regulations of neuronal activity, recent data show that microglia can also rapidly regulate neuronal activity, thereby acting as partners of neurotransmission.

  13. Active healing of delaminated composite structure using piezoelectric actuator

    Sohn, Jung Woo; Kim, Heung Soo

    2014-03-01

    Recently, light weight structure becomes an object of attention because increase of energy efficiency becomes the most important global hot issue. Then, composite structures, which have inherent high strength and stiffness to weight ratio, are in the limelight for light weight structures. However, complex failure modes of composite structure are still remains unsolved problem and become main obstacle of wide application of composite structures. Delamination is one of frequent damage phenomenon of laminated composite structure. Delamination can cause reduction of structural stiffness and decrement of natural frequencies. This might induce increase of structural vibration and resonant phenomenon of operating structures. Then, delamination should be detected and complemented. In this work, active control scheme and piezoelectric actuators are used to reduce the delamination effect of damaged composite structure. At first, finite element model for delaminated composite structure is constructed based on improved layerwise theory and then state space control model is established. After design and implementation of active controller, dynamic characteristics and structural performances of damaged composite structure are investigated and effectiveness of active healing is evaluated.

  14. Structural Basis for Plexin Activation and Regulation.

    Kong, Youxin; Janssen, Bert J C; Malinauskas, Tomas; Vangoor, Vamshidhar R; Coles, Charlotte H; Kaufmann, Rainer; Ni, Tao; Gilbert, Robert J C; Padilla-Parra, Sergi; Pasterkamp, R Jeroen; Jones, E Yvonne

    2016-08-01

    Class A plexins (PlxnAs) act as semaphorin receptors and control diverse aspects of nervous system development and plasticity, ranging from axon guidance and neuron migration to synaptic organization. PlxnA signaling requires cytoplasmic domain dimerization, but extracellular regulation and activation mechanisms remain unclear. Here we present crystal structures of PlxnA (PlxnA1, PlxnA2, and PlxnA4) full ectodomains. Domains 1-9 form a ring-like conformation from which the C-terminal domain 10 points away. All our PlxnA ectodomain structures show autoinhibitory, intermolecular "head-to-stalk" (domain 1 to domain 4-5) interactions, which are confirmed by biophysical assays, live cell fluorescence microscopy, and cell-based and neuronal growth cone collapse assays. This work reveals a 2-fold role of the PlxnA ectodomains: imposing a pre-signaling autoinhibitory separation for the cytoplasmic domains via intermolecular head-to-stalk interactions and supporting dimerization-based PlxnA activation upon ligand binding. More generally, our data identify a novel molecular mechanism for preventing premature activation of axon guidance receptors. PMID:27397516

  15. Developing Internal Controls through Activities

    Barnes, F. Herbert

    2009-01-01

    Life events can include the Tuesday afternoon cooking class with the group worker or the Saturday afternoon football game, but in the sense that Fritz Redl thought of them, these activities are only threads in a fabric of living that includes all the elements of daily life: playing, working, school-based learning, learning through activities,…

  16. Optimal resonant control of flexible structures

    Krenk, Steen; Høgsberg, Jan Becker

    2009-01-01

    When introducing a resonant controller for a particular vibration mode in a structure this mode splits into two. A design principle is developed for resonant control based oil equal damping of these two modes. First the design principle is developed for control of a system with a single degree of...... freedom, and then it is extended to multi-mode structures. A root locus analysis of the controlled single-mode structure identifies the equal modal damping property as a condition oil the linear and Cubic terms of the characteristic equation. Particular solutions for filtered displacement feedback and...... filtered acceleration feedback are developed by combining the root locus analysis with optimal properties of the displacement amplification frequency curve. The results are then extended to multi-mode structures by including a quasi-static representation of the background modes in the equations for the...

  17. Modeling and control of vibration in mechanical structures

    Nauclér, Peter

    2005-01-01

    All mechanical systems exhibit vibrational response when exposed to external disturbances. In many engineering applications vibrations are undesirable and may even have harmful effects. Therefore, control of mechanical vibration is an important topic and extensive research has been going on in the field over the years. In active control of vibration, the ability to actuate the system in a controlled manner is incorporated into the structure. Sensors are used to measure the vibrations and seco...

  18. Formation flying control via elliptical virtual structure

    Kahn, Arthur; Marzat, Julien; Piet-Lahanier, Hélène

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a guidance law for the formation flight of a flock of autonomous vehicles. The formation is defined by a virtual geometrical structure - here, an ellipse - that can modify its shape and orientation to avoid collision with obstacles of the environment. The proposed guidance law is divided into two layers, with a model predictive control scheme at each level. The higher layer controls the structure itself to fulfill the goals and constraints of the required mission. The tra...

  19. A Semi-active Control System for Wind Turbines

    Caterino, N.; Georgakis, Christos T.; Trinchillo, F.; Occhiuzzi, A.

    A semi-active (SA) control system based on the use of smart magnetorheological (MR) dampers to control the structural response of a wind turbine is proposed herein. The innovative approach is based on the implementation and use of a variable-properties base restraint. This is able to modify in re...

  20. Control–structure interaction for micro-vibration structural control

    The giant magnetostrictive actuator (GMA) is a typical actuator used in micro-vibration control applications. Research in the area of micro-vibration control has been conducted, but the effects of control–structure interaction have not been considered in most of the previous studies. Only hydraulic actuator and linear motor models have been developed to investigate actuator–structure interaction. To investigate the role of control–structure interaction (CSI) with the new GMA and multi-degree-of-freedom (MDOF) coupling platform system for micro-vibration control, computational models considering the interaction between the GMA and structure are developed in this paper. The models show that the dynamics of the GMA and the structure are tightly coupled. The model is further verified through experiments. Numerical results of a control study in which the multi-degree coupling platform system does and does not consider CSI are compared. The results demonstrate that consideration of the CSI and the dynamics of the GMA can improve the performance of a controller significantly. Consideration of this interaction and the dynamics of the GMA is essential when modeling a micro-vibration control system. (paper)

  1. Large space structures control algorithm characterization

    Fogel, E.

    1983-01-01

    Feedback control algorithms are developed for sensor/actuator pairs on large space systems. These algorithms have been sized in terms of (1) floating point operation (FLOP) demands; (2) storage for variables; and (3) input/output data flow. FLOP sizing (per control cycle) was done as a function of the number of control states and the number of sensor/actuator pairs. Storage for variables and I/O sizing was done for specific structure examples.

  2. Robust Structured Control Design via LMI Optimization

    Adegas, Fabiano Daher; Stoustrup, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a new procedure for discrete-time robust structured control design. Parameter-dependent nonconvex conditions for stabilizable and induced L2-norm performance controllers are solved by an iterative linear matrix inequalities (LMI) optimization. A wide class of controller...... structures including decentralized of any order, fixed-order dynamic output feedback, static output feedback can be designed robust to polytopic uncertainties. Stability is proven by a parameter-dependent Lyapunov function. Numerical examples on robust stability margins shows that the proposed procedure can...

  3. Reliable overlapping control for civil structures

    Bakule, Lubomír; Papík, Martin; Rehák, Branislav

    Les Ulis Cedex A: EDP Sciences, 2015 - (Feltrin, G.), 06001-1-06001-6. (MATEC Web of Conferences. 24). E-ISSN 2261-236X. [International Conference on Experimental Vibration Analysis for Civil Engineering Structures EVACES’15, /6./. Dübendorf (CH), 19.10.2015-21.10.2015] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-02149S Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : reliable control * overlapping control * civil structures Subject RIV: BC - Control Systems Theory http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2015/AS/bakule-0449128.pdf

  4. Control theoretics for large structural systems

    Montgomery, R. C.

    1981-01-01

    The areas of research addressed include modeling identification for both the purposes of analysis and controls, design of structural control systems actuator sensor placement, and distributed sensing and actuation as opposed to co-located sensor and actuators. Also investigated are adaptive/learning processes that could more specifically be referred to as inflight testing procedures where a structure is tested during its deployment or assembly and during its orbital life at specific points where the characteristics of the structure for the purpose of tuning the control system are identified. Another area is redundancy management techniques for structural systems. This is important because of the reliability issue for managing multiple very large numbers of sensors and actuators.

  5. Control strategies and experimental verifications of the electromagnetic mass damper system for structural vibration control

    Zhang Chunwei; Ou Jinping

    2008-01-01

    The electromagnetic mass damper (EMD) control system, as an innovative active control system to reducestructural vibration, offers many advantages over traditional active mass driver/damper (AMD) control systems. In this paper,studies of several EMD control strategies and bench-scale shaking table tests of a two-story model structure are described.First, two structural models corresponding to uncontrolled and Zeroed cases are developed, and parameters of these modelsare validated through sinusoidal sweep tests to provide a basis for establishing an accurate mathematical model for furtherstudies. Then, a simplified control strategy for the EMD system based on the pole assignment control algorithm is proposed.Moreover, ideal pole locations are derived and validated through a series of shaking table tests. Finally, three benchmarkearthquake ground motions and sinusoidal sweep waves are imposed onto the structure to investigate the effectiveness andfeasibility of using this type of innovative active control system for structural vibration control. In addition, the robustnessof the EMD system is examined. The test results show that the EMD system is an effective and robust system for the controlof structural vibrations.

  6. Nonlinear vibration with control for flexible and adaptive structures

    Wagg, David

    2015-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive discussion of nonlinear multi-modal structural vibration problems, and shows how vibration suppression can be applied to such systems by considering a sample set of relevant control techniques. It covers the basic principles of nonlinear vibrations that occur in flexible and/or adaptive structures, with an emphasis on engineering analysis and relevant control techniques. Understanding nonlinear vibrations is becoming increasingly important in a range of engineering applications, particularly in the design of flexible structures such as aircraft, satellites, bridges, and sports stadia. There is an increasing trend towards lighter structures, with increased slenderness, often made of new composite materials and requiring some form of deployment and/or active vibration control. There are also applications in the areas of robotics, mechatronics, micro electrical mechanical systems, non-destructive testing and related disciplines such as structural health monitoring. Two broader ...

  7. Design, optimization, and control of tensegrity structures

    Masic, Milenko

    The contributions of this dissertation may be divided into four categories. The first category involves developing a systematic form-finding method for general and symmetric tensegrity structures. As an extension of the available results, different shape constraints are incorporated in the problem. Methods for treatment of these constraints are considered and proposed. A systematic formulation of the form-finding problem for symmetric tensegrity structures is introduced, and it uses the symmetry to reduce both the number of equations and the number of variables in the problem. The equilibrium analysis of modular tensegrities exploits their peculiar symmetry. The tensegrity similarity transformation completes the contributions in the area of enabling tools for tensegrity form-finding. The second group of contributions develops the methods for optimal mass-to-stiffness-ratio design of tensegrity structures. This technique represents the state-of-the-art for the static design of tensegrity structures. It is an extension of the results available for the topology optimization of truss structures. Besides guaranteeing that the final design satisfies the tensegrity paradigm, the problem constrains the structure from different modes of failure, which makes it very general. The open-loop control of the shape of modular tensegrities is the third contribution of the dissertation. This analytical result offers a closed form solution for the control of the reconfiguration of modular structures. Applications range from the deployment and stowing of large-scale space structures to the locomotion-inducing control for biologically inspired structures. The control algorithm is applicable regardless of the size of the structures, and it represents a very general result for a large class of tensegrities. Controlled deployments of large-scale tensegrity plates and tensegrity towers are shown as examples that demonstrate the full potential of this reconfiguration strategy. The last

  8. Adaptive Control of Truss Structures for Gossamer Spacecraft

    Yang, Bong-Jun; Calise, Anthony J.; Craig, James I.; Whorton, Mark S.

    2007-01-01

    Neural network-based adaptive control is considered for active control of a highly flexible truss structure which may be used to support solar sail membranes. The objective is to suppress unwanted vibrations in SAFE (Solar Array Flight Experiment) boom, a test-bed located at NASA. Compared to previous tests that restrained truss structures in planar motion, full three dimensional motions are tested. Experimental results illustrate the potential of adaptive control in compensating for nonlinear actuation and modeling error, and in rejecting external disturbances.

  9. Control methodologies for large space structures

    Mcree, G. J.; Altonji, E.

    1984-01-01

    The objectives of this research were to develop techniques of controlling a dc-motor driven flywheel which would apply torque to the structure to which it was mounted. The motor control system was to be implemented using a microprocessor based controller. The purpose of the torque applied by this system was to dampen oscillations of the structure to which it was mounted. Before the work was terminated due to the unavailability of equipment, a system was developed and partially tested which would provide tight control of the flywheel velocity when it received a velocity command in the form of a voltage. The procedure followed in this development was to first model the motor and flywheel system on an analog computer. Prior to the time the microprocessor development system was available, an analog control loop was replaced by the microprocessor and the system was partially tested.

  10. Structural control on karst collapse sinkhole formation

    Santo, Antonio; Ascione, Alessandra; Mazzoli, Stefano; Santangelo, Nicoletta

    2013-04-01

    Collapse sinkholes owing their formation to erosion and deformation phenomena caused by subsurface karstification are widespread in the carbonate massifs of peninsular Italy. In contrast with solution dolines, which are densely distributed on the subplanar top surfaces of the carbonate massifs, the collapse sinkholes (hereinafter labelled karst collapse sinkholes) generally occur as isolated landforms and mostly affect the slopes and piedmont areas. In the latter instances, the sinkholes also affect alluvial fan conglomerates, or slope debris, overlying the carbonate rocks. We investigated the karst collapse sinkholes of the southern-central Apennines mountain belt (Italy), which is representative of a young orogenic system, characterised by recent tectonic activity and strong seismicity. The aim of the study is the identification of the causative factors which control the occurrence of such hazardous phenomena. The study was based on a regional scale analysis on sinkhole distribution in relation to the local geological-structural, geomorphological and hydrogeological contexts, and was paralleled with field analysis of some selected areas. The regional scale analysis indicates that the karst collapse sinkholes are not the mere response to the concurrence of the climatic and lithological conditions which commonly favour the development of karst processes, the occurrence of such landforms appearing strongly influenced by distinctive structural and hydrogeological conditions. In particular, a close relationship between the karst collapse sinkholes and the main extensional faults showing evidence of late Quaternary activity may be envisaged. This is inferred from the spatial distribution of the karst collapse sinkholes, which is strikingly uneven, the sinkholes generally occurring in alignments following large late Quaternary fault zones, or being clustered at the terminations of those faults. In addition, areas affected by the occurrence of groups of sinkholes, are

  11. Theory of the control of structures by low authority controllers

    Aubrun, J. N.

    1978-01-01

    The novel idea presented is based on the observation that if a structure is controlled by distributed systems of sensors and actuators with limited authority, i.e., if the controller is allowed to modify only moderately the natural modes and frequencies of the structure, then it should be possible to apply root perturbation techniques to predict analytically the behavior of the total system. Attention is given to the root perturbation formula first derived by Jacobi for infinitesimal perturbations which neglect the induced eigenvector perturbation, a more general form of Jacobi's formula, first-order structural equations and modal state vectors, state-space equations for damper-augmented structures, and modal damping prediction formulas.

  12. Recent advances in structural control research and applications in China mainland

    吕西林; 赵斌

    2003-01-01

    The recent developments of theoretical research, model tests and engineering applications of structural control in mainland China are reviewed in this paper. It includes seismic isolation, passive energy dissipation, active and semi-active control, smart materials and smart structural systems. It can be seen that passive control methods, such as seismic isolation and energy dissipation methods, have developed into the mature stage in China. At the same time, great progress has been made in active and semi-active control, and smart actuators or smart dampers and smart structural systems. Finally, some future research initiatives for structural control in civil engineering are suggested.

  13. Structural Antitumoral Activity Relationships of Synthetic Chalcones

    Cesar Echeverria; Juan Francisco Santibañez; Oscar Donoso-Tauda; Escobar, Carlos A.; Rodrigo Ramirez-Tagle

    2009-01-01

    Relationships between the structural characteristic of synthetic chalcones and their antitumoral activity were studied. Treatment of HepG2 cells for 24 h with synthetic 2’-hydroxychalcones resulted in apoptosis induction and dose-dependent inhibition of cell proliferation. The calculated reactivity indexes and the adiabatic electron affinities using the DFT method including solvent effects, suggest a structure-activity relationship between the Chalcones structure and the apoptosis in Hep...

  14. Forming the organizational structure for activities

    U. S. Barash

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Development of theoretical and methodological foundations of efficiency of freight cars operating companies in railway reform through improved management structure them. Methodology. A theoretical and methodological approach for building effective management structure of freight wagons operating companies of different ownership forms is proposed, its introduction will significantly reduce detention of cars on technical stations under loading operations and maintenance, and thereby to improve the quality parameters of rolling stock usage in reform conditions of Ukraine railway transport. Findings. An improved control mechanism of cargo transportation is developed, it is different from the existing by its adaptation to the conditions of the reformed sector and the organization of management companies which together with the Ukrainian Transport and Logistics Center (UTLC centralize management of all freight cars of domestic and foreign operating companies. Originality. It is proposed for management of cargo transportation in wagons operating companies of different ownership to organize a series of management companies that would have the right to dispose of universal cars of other domestic operating companies, being on leasehold basis, and to direct them to current and scheduled repairs by themselves; to organize the cargo transportation in wagons of domestic and foreign operating companies on a contractual terms, depending on the type and content of the contract, on the basis of additional contracts for a separate fee to perform current and scheduled repair of freight cars; the management company organizational structure is developed, it includes simultaneously two directions of activity: commercial and repair, it will reduce the stay time of rolling stock on the engineering stations during loading and in a non-operating park as far as this company will manage a significant part of the production cycle of the transportation process

  15. Figure Control of Lightweight Optical Structures

    Main, John A.; Song, Haiping

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to demonstrate the use of fuzzy logic controllers in modifying the figure of a piezoceramic bimorph mirror. Non-contact electron actuation technology is used to actively control a bimorph mirror comprised two PZT-5H wafers by varying the electron flux and electron voltages. Due to electron blooming generated by the electron flux, it is difficult to develop an accurate control model for the bimorph mirror through theoretical analysis alone. The non-contact shape control system with electron flux blooming can be approximately described with a heuristic model based on experimental data. Two fuzzy logic feedback controllers are developed to control the shape of the bimorph mirror according to heuristic fuzzy inference rules generated from previous experimental results. Validation of the proposed fuzzy logic controllers is also discussed.

  16. Global sensitivity analysis in control-augmented structural synthesis

    Bloebaum, Christina L.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper, an integrated approach to structural/control design is proposed in which variables in both the passive (structural) and active (control) disciplines of an optimization process are changed simultaneously. The global sensitivity equation (GSE) method of Sobieszczanski-Sobieski (1988) is used to obtain the behavior sensitivity derivatives necessary for the linear approximations used in the parallel multidisciplinary synthesis problem. The GSE allows for the decoupling of large systems into smaller subsystems and thus makes it possible to determine the local sensitivities of each subsystem's outputs to its inputs and parameters. The advantages in using the GSE method are demonstrated using a finite-element representation of a truss structure equipped with active lateral displacement controllers, which is undergoing forced vibration.

  17. Modal representations in control/structure interaction

    Blelloch, Paul A.; Young, Jeffrey W.; Carney, Kelly S.

    1989-01-01

    When control/structure interaction problems are examined, a standard method for representing the structure is to choose a truncated set of normal modes calculated from either a finite-element or a distributed-parameter model. However, the normal modes can neglect important static information about the structure. Using a set of fixed interface modes results in a much more accurate closed-loop model, even when relatively low-bandwidth controllers are used. The fixed interface modes are calculated with control input degrees of freedom held fixed, and standard finite-element software can be used. Illustrative examples include a simple hinged beam and a complex model of the phase-I Space Station configuration.

  18. Experimental demonstration of a classical approach for flexible space structure control: NASA CSI testbeds

    Bond, Wie

    1991-01-01

    The results of active control experiments performed for the Mini-Mast truss structure are presented. The primary research objectives were: (1) to develop active structural control concepts and/or techniques; (2) to verify the concept of robust non-minimum-phase compensation for a certain class of non-colocated structural control problems through ground experiments; (3) to verify a 'dipole' concept for persistent disturbance rejection control of flexible structures; and (4) to identify CSI (Control Structure Interaction) issues and areas of emphasis for the next generation of large flexible spacecraft. The classical SISO (Single Input and Single Output) control design approach was employed.

  19. Smart structures for rotorcraft control (SSRC)

    Jacot, A. Dean

    1997-05-01

    The Smart Structures for Rotor Control (SSRC) is a consortium under the overall Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency Smart Structures program. The program is administered by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, with Boeing Seattle as the consortium administrator, and MIT, PSU and Boeing Helicopters as the other principal consortium members. The SSRC objectives are to research smart structure methods to achieve reduced rotorcraft vibration, reduced acoustic noise, and increased performance (i.e., payload). The SSRC program includes dynamic piezoelectric actuation of flaps on each rotor, distributed dynamic piezo actuation of the rotor twist, and quasi-static rotor twist control using shape memory alloys. Supporting these actuation approaches are system studies, rotorcraft structural and aero-elastic analyses, piezoelectric materials development, electronics development, and health monitoring studies.

  20. Compact Radiative Control Structures for Millimeter Astronomy

    Brown, Ari D.; Chuss, David T.; Chervenak, James A.; Henry, Ross M.; Moseley, s. Harvey; Wollack, Edward J.

    2010-01-01

    We have designed, fabricated, and tested compact radiative control structures, including antireflection coatings and resonant absorbers, for millimeter through submillimeter wave astronomy. The antireflection coatings consist of micromachined single crystal silicon dielectric sub-wavelength honeycombs. The effective dielectric constant of the structures is set by the honeycomb cell geometry. The resonant absorbers consist of pieces of solid single crystal silicon substrate and thin phosphorus implanted regions whose sheet resistance is tailored to maximize absorption by the structure. We present an implantation model that can be used to predict the ion energy and dose required for obtaining a target implant layer sheet resistance. A neutral density filter, a hybrid of a silicon dielectric honeycomb with an implanted region, has also been fabricated with this basic approach. These radiative control structures are scalable and compatible for use large focal plane detector arrays.

  1. Structural control design and defective systems

    Gattulli, Vincenzo; Potenza, Francesco

    2016-05-01

    The intersection between the two concepts of structural control and defectiveness is discussed. Two simple oscillators differently connected by serial spring-dashpot arrangement are used to simply simulate technically relevant cases: dissipatively coupled adjacent free-standing structures, structures equipped by TMD and base-isolated structures. Eigensolution loci of the two classes of systems are tracked against one or more significant parameters to determine the potential benefits realized by different combinations of stiffness and viscosity. In both studied cases, codimension-two manifolds in the four-parameter space corresponding to coalescing eigenvalues are determined by analytical expressions. Conditions to discern semi-simple eigenvalues from defective ones confirm that the latter is the generic case laying in a two-parameter space while the former span a one-parameter subspace. The knowledge of the location of the defective systems in the parameter space permits to determine regions with specific dynamical properties useful for control design purpose.

  2. Solvent-controlled synthesis of tetranuclear cage-like copper(II) silsesquioxanes. Remarkable features of the cage structures and their high catalytic activity in oxidation with peroxides.

    Dronova, Marina S; Bilyachenko, Alexey N; Yalymov, Alexey I; Kozlov, Yuriy N; Shul'pina, Lidia S; Korlyukov, Alexander A; Arkhipov, Dmitry E; Levitsky, Mikhail M; Shubina, Elena S; Shul'pin, Georgiy B

    2014-01-14

    Two principally different in their molecular architecture isomeric tetranuclear copper(ii) silsesquioxanes, "Globule"-like compound [(PhSiO1.5)12(CuO)4(NaO0.5)4] (1) and "Sandwich"-like derivative [(PhSiO1.5)6(CuO)4(NaO0.5)4(PhSiO1.5)6] (2), were synthesized by the partial cleavage of polymeric copper(ii) silsesquioxane [(PhSiO1.5)2(CuO)]n by tetraphenylcyclotetrasiloxanolate. The route leading to the formation of either 1 or 2 entirely depends on the nature and composition of the solvent used for this reaction. Thus, the process in an ethanol-1-butanol solution gives compound 1. When a 1,4-dioxane-methanol mixture was used, compound 2 was prepared. The structures and unusual crystal packing of the cages were confirmed by the X-ray studies. It has been found that the reaction of benzene with H2O2 in acetonitrile solution at 50 °C catalyzed by 1 requires addition of trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) in low concentration and gives phenol with a turnover number (TON) of 250 after 3 h. The initial reaction rate W0 linearly depends on the concentration of catalyst 2. The oxidation of 1-phenylethanol to acetophenone with hydrogen peroxide catalyzed by complex 1 in the presence of TFA is not efficient. In contrast, 1 exhibited excellent activity in the oxidation with tert-butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP) in the absence of any acid (the yield of acetophenone was close to the quantitative, TON attained 475 after 2 h). A kinetic study of this reaction led to the conclusion that the process occurs with the participation of radicals tert-BuO˙ produced in the Cu-promoted decomposition of TBHP. The mode of dependence of W0 on the initial concentration of TBHP indicates the formation of an intermediate adduct between the catalyst 1 and TBHP (characterized by the equilibrium constant K1≈ 2 M(-1) for the conditions of conducted experiments) followed by subsequent decomposition of the adduct (k2≈ 0.2 s(-1)) to generate an intermediate species tert-BuO˙ which induces the alcohol oxidation

  3. Active Control of Fan Noise

    Nobuhiko YAMASAKI; Hirotoshi TAJIMA

    2008-01-01

    In the wake-rotor interaction fan noise, a number of the interacting modes at the blade passing frequency (BPF)and its harmonics are generated which are prescribed by the number of stator and rotor blades etc. In the present study, the dominant mode is tried to be suppressed by the secondary sound from the loudspeaker actuators. One of the novel features of the present system is the adoption of the control board with the Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) hardware and the LabVIEW software to synchronize the circumferentially installed loudspeaker actuators with the relative location of rotational blades under arbitrary fan rotational speeds. The experiments were conducted under the conditions of three rotational speeds of 2004, 3150, and 4002 [rpm]. The reduction in the sound pressure level (SPL) was observed for all three rotational speeds. The sound pressure level at the BPF was reduced approximately 13 [dB] for 2004 [rpm] case, but not so large reduction was attained for other cases probably due to the inefficiency of the loudspeaker actuators at high frequencies

  4. Smart materials and active noise and vibration control in vehicles

    Doppenberg, E.J.J.; Berkhoff, A.P.; Overbeek, M. van [TNO Institute of Applied Physics, Delft (Netherlands)

    2001-07-01

    Results are presented for the reduction of sound radiated from a structure using different control methodologies. Two approaches for active structural acoustic control are mentioned to reduce sound radiated by the structure: the acoustic approach or the vibro-acoustic approach. In both cases integrated actuators in structure materials are necessary to realise feasible products. Furthermore the development of an efficient shaker for Active Isolation techniques is described. The prototype of TNO TPD can produce a force of 400 N up to 250 Hz at a good performance-volume ratio. To enhance the robustness of the active control applications, the use of the subspace identification based control methods are developed. The robustness property of subspace identification methods forms the basis of an accurate model updating mechanism, using small size data batches. The performed simulations reveal excellent robustness performance under very general noise conditions or during operation of the control system. Furthermore the development of the techniques can be exploited to realise sound comfort requirements to enhance audible communications of vehicle related applications. To anticipate to these developments in the automotive industry, TNO has set up a Sound and Vibrations Research Centre with Twente University and a research program on Smart Panels with the Delft University. To investigate the potential markets and applications for sound comfort in the means of transportation, TNO-TPD and the Institute of Sound and Vibration Research in England (ISVR) have agreed on a cooperative venture to develop and realise 'active control of electroacoustics' (ACE). (orig.)

  5. Analyzing the Control Structure of PEPA

    Yang, Fan; Nielson, Hanne Riis

    The Performance Evaluation Process Algebra, PEPA, is introduced by Jane Hillston as a stochastic process algebra for modelling distributed systems and especially suitable for performance evaluation. We present a static analysis that very precisely approximates the control structure of processes...... to PEPA programs, the approximating result is very precise. Based on the analysis, we also develop algorithms for validating the deadlock property of PEPA programs. The techniques have been implemented in a tool which is able to analyze processes with a control structure that more than one thousand...

  6. Optimization Solution for Multiple Model Control Structures

    2012-01-01

    The multiple model structures are specific control solutions for some classes of systems with important nonlinearities or different functioning regimes. One of these structures’ specific problems isthe determination of the models number: an increased number leads to superior performances but very complex structure. The paper presents an original methodology for models number reducing withoutdecreasing the performances. This solution is of practical importance allowing facile implementation on...

  7. Control Structures for Smart Grid Balancing

    Juelsgaard, Morten; Totu, Luminita Cristiana; Shafiei, Seyed Ehsan;

    2013-01-01

    This work addresses the problem of maintaining the balance between consumption and production in the electricity grid when volatile resources, such as wind and sun, account for a large percentage of the power generation. We present control structures for Smart Grid balancing services on three...... different hierarchical levels: aggregator, large scale consumption and residential consumption. Our focus is on illustrating the connection between coordination and control algorithms at each of these levels....

  8. Ownership and Control Structures: A Case Study

    Apostolov, Mico

    2015-01-01

    This is a study on separation of ownership and control in Southeast Europe, and in particular it is a case study of Macedonia. For structured analysis of this case study we use the World Bank Microdata Library, specifically the Enterprise Surveys which contains firm-level data of a representative sample of economies private sectors. What we are interested in are the ties of ownership and control and whether such linkages contribute to the development of domestic firms and the overall ec...

  9. Reliable control of large scale flexible structures

    Bakule, Lubomír

    Gdansk : IFAC - GUT, 2007, s. 1-6. ISSN 1367-5788. [IFAC/IFORS/IMACS/IFIP Symposium on Large Scale Complex Systems: Theory and Applications /11./. Gdansk (PL), 23.07.2007-25.07.2007] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA2075304; GA MŠk(CZ) LA 282 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : decentralized control * large scale systems * decomposition * reliability * flexible structures * redundancy Subject RIV: BC - Control Systems Theory

  10. Decentralized overlapping control for civil structures

    Bakule, Lubomír; Papík, Martin; Rehák, Branislav

    Ponta Delgada: University of the Azores, 2015 - (Araújo, A.; Mota Soreas, C.) ISBN 978-989-96276-7-3. [ECCOMAS Thematic Conference on Smart Structures and Materials (SMART 2015) /7./. Ponta Delgada (PT), 03.06.2015-06.06.2015] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-02149S Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : building benchmark * decentralized control * overlapping decompositions Subject RIV: BC - Control Systems Theory

  11. 75 FR 77047 - Statement on Sound Practices Concerning Elevated Risk Complex Structured Finance Activities

    2010-12-10

    ... Finance Activities AGENCY: Office of Thrift Supervision (OTS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice and request for.... Title of Proposal: Statement on Sound Practices Concerning Elevated Risk Complex Structured Finance... Elevated Risk Complex Structured Finance Activities describes the types of internal controls and...

  12. Noise transmission properties and control strategies for composite structures

    Silcox, Richard J.; Beyer, Todd B.; Lester, Harold C.

    1991-01-01

    A study of several component technologies required to apply active control techniques to reduce interior noise in composite aircraft structures is described. The mechanisms of noise transmission in an all composite, large-scale, fuselage model are studied in an experimental program and found similar to mechanisms found in conventional aircraft construction. Two primary conditions of structural acoustic response are found to account for the dominant interior acoustic response. A preliminary study of active noise control in cylinders used piezoceramic actuators as force inputs for a simple aluminum fuselage model. These actuators provided effective control for the same two conditions of noise transmission found in the composite fuselage structure. The use of piezoceramic actuators to apply force inputs overcomes the weight and structural requirements of conventional shaker actuators. Finally, in order to accurately simulate these types of actuators in a cylindrical shell, two analytical models are investigated that apply either in-plane forces or bending moments along the boundaries of a finite patch. It is shown that the bending model may not be as effective as the force model for exciting the low order azimuthal modes that typically dominate the structural acoustic response in these systems. This result will affect the arrangement and distribution of actuators required for effective active control systems.

  13. DSP Control of Line Hybrid Active Filter

    Dan, Stan George; Benjamin, Doniga Daniel; Magureanu, R.;

    2005-01-01

    Active Power Filters have been intensively explored in the past decade. Hybrid active filters inherit the efficiency of passive filters and the improved performance of active filters, and thus constitute a viable improved approach for harmonic compensation. In this paper a parallel hybrid filter...... is studied for current harmonic compensation. The hybrid filter is formed by a single tuned Le filter and a small-rated power active filter, which are directly connected in series without any matching transformer. Thus the required rating of the active filter is much smaller than a conventional standalone...... active filter. Simulation and experimental results obtained in laboratory confirmed the validity and effectiveness of the control....

  14. Manually controlled neutron-activation system

    Johns, R. A.; Carothers, G. A.

    1982-01-01

    A manually controlled neutron activation system, the Manual Reactor Activation System, was designed and built and has been operating at one of the Savannah River Plant's production reactors. With this system, samples can be irradiated for up to 24 hours and pneumatically transferred to a shielded repository for decay until their activity is low enough for them to be handled at a radiobench. The Manual Reactor Activation System was built to provide neutron activation of solid waste forms for the Alternative Waste Forms Leach Testing Program. Neutron activation of the bulk sample prior to leaching permits sensitive multielement radiometric analyses of the leachates.

  15. MULTI-CONTROLLER STRUCTURE OF SUPERMANEUVERABLE AIRCRAFT

    2000-01-01

    This paper proposes a method of using multi-controllers to control supermaneuverable aircraft. A nonlinear dynamic-inversion controller is used for supermaneuver. A gain-scheduled controller is used for routine maneuver. A switch algorithm is designed to switch the controllers. The flight envelopes of the controllers are different but have a common area in which the controllers are switched from one to the other. In the common area, some special boundaries are selected to decide switch conditions. The controllers all use vector-thrust for lower velocity maneuver control. Unlike the variation-structure theory to use a single boundary, this paper uses two boundaries for switching between the two controllers. One boundary is used for switching from dynamic-inversion to gain-scheduling, while the other is used for switching from gain-scheduling to dynamic-inversion. This can effectively avoid the system vibration caused by switching repeatedly at a single boundary. The method is very easy for engineering. It can reduce the risk of design of the supermaneuverable aircraft.

  16. Structural Dynamics and Control Interaction of Flexible Structures

    Ryan, Robert S. (Editor); Scofield, Harold N. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    A Workshop was held to promote technical exchange between the structural dynamic and control disciplines, foster joint technology, and provide a forum for discussing and focusing critical issues in the separate and combined areas. The workshop was closed by a panel meeting. Panel members' viewpoints and their responses to questions are included.

  17. ALECS: assembly language extensions and control structures

    ALECS is an assembly language preprocessor allowing the use of structured programming techniques in MACRO-11 code. Programs are written using standard control structures with normal MACRO-11 code embedded as needed. The ALECS task is used to translate the source to pure MACRO-11 source file which is then submitted to the assembler. ALECS also produces a structured source listing showing the true logical flow of code. ALECS has been used for short subroutines as well as RSX-11M I/0 drivers and an ACP

  18. Simultaneous structure and control optimization of tensegrities

    Masic, Milenko; Skelton, Robert E.

    2005-05-01

    This paper concerns optimization of prestress of a tensegrity structure to achieve the optimal mixed dynamic and control performance. A linearized dynamic model of the structure is derived. The force density variables that parameterize prestress of the structure appear linearly in the model. The feasible region of these parameters is defined in terms of the extreme directions of the prestress cone. Several properties of the problem are established inside the feasible region of the parameters. The problem is solved using a gradient method that provides a monotonic decrease of the objective function inside the feasible region. A numerical example of a cantilevered planar tensegrity beam is shown.

  19. Active Power Filter Using Predicted Current Control

    Xiaojie, Y.; Pivoňka, P.; Valouch, Viktor

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. 1 (2001), s. 41-50. ISSN 0001-7043 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2057903 Keywords : active power filter * control strategy Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  20. A hybrid clustering based fuzzy structure for vibration control - Part 2: An application to semi-active vehicle seat-suspension system

    Nguyen, Sy Dzung; Nguyen, Quoc Hung; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2015-05-01

    This work presents a novel neuro-fuzzy controller (NFC) for car-driver's seat-suspension system featuring magnetorheological (MR) dampers. The NFC is built based on the algorithm for building adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference systems (ANFISs) named B-ANFIS, which has been developed in Part 1, and fuzzy logic inference systems (FISs). In order to create the NFC, the following steps are performed. Firstly, a control strategy based on a ride-comfort-oriented tendency (RCOT) is established. Subsequently, optimal FISs are built based on a genetic algorithm (GA) to estimate the desired damping force that satisfies the RCOT corresponding to the road status at each time. The B-ANFIS is then used to build ANFISs for inverse dynamic models of the suspension system (I-ANFIS). Based on the FISs, the desired force values are calculated according to the status of road at each time. The corresponding exciting current value to be applied to the MR damper is then determined by the I-ANFIS. In order to validate the effectiveness of the developed neuro-fuzzy controller, control performances of the seat-suspension systems featuring MR dampers are evaluated under different road conditions. In addition, a comparative work between conventional skyhook controller and the proposed NFC is undertaken in order to demonstrate superior control performances of the proposed methodology.

  1. Modeling and vibration control of an active membrane mirror

    Ruggiero, Eric J.; Inman, Daniel J.

    2009-09-01

    The future of space satellite technology lies in ultra-large mirrors and radar apertures for significant improvements in imaging and communication bandwidths. The availability of optical-quality membranes drives a parallel effort for structural models that can capture the dominant dynamics of large, ultra-flexible satellite payloads. Unfortunately, the inherent flexibility of membrane mirrors wreaks havoc with the payload's on-orbit stability and maneuverability. One possible means of controlling these undesirable dynamics is by embedding active piezoelectric ceramics near the boundary of the membrane mirror. In doing so, active feedback control can be used to eliminate detrimental vibration, perform static shape control, and evaluate the health of the structure. The overall motivation of the present work is to design a control system using distributed bimorph actuators to eliminate any detrimental vibration of the membrane mirror. As a basis for this study, a piezoceramic wafer was attached in a bimorph configuration near the boundary of a tensioned rectangular membrane sample. A finite element model of the system was developed to capture the relevant system dynamics from 0 to 300 Hz. The finite element model was compared against experimental results, and fair agreement found. Using the validated finite element models, structural control using linear quadratic regulator control techniques was then used to numerically demonstrate effective vibration control. Typical results show that less than 12 V of actuation voltage is required to eliminate detrimental vibration of the membrane samples in less than 15 ms. The functional gains of the active system are also derived and presented. These spatially descriptive control terms dictate favorable regions within the membrane domain for placing sensors and can be used as a design guideline for structural control applications. The results of the present work demonstrate that thin plate theory is an appropriate modeling

  2. Active Noise Control in Propeller Aircraft

    Johansson, Sven; Claesson, Ingvar

    2001-01-01

    A noisy environment dominated by low frequency noise can often be improved through the use of active noise control. This situation arises naturally in propeller aircraft where the propellers induce periodic low frequency noise inside the cabin. The cabin noise is typically rather high, and the passenger flight comfort could be improved considerably if this level were significantly reduced. This paper addresses same design aspects for multiple-reference active noise control systems based on th...

  3. Fracture control procedures for aircraft structural integrity

    Wood, H. A.

    1972-01-01

    The application of applied fracture mechanics in the design, analysis, and qualification of aircraft structural systems are reviewed. Recent service experiences are cited. Current trends in high-strength materials application are reviewed with particular emphasis on the manner in which fracture toughness and structural efficiency may affect the material selection process. General fracture control procedures are reviewed in depth with specific reference to the impact of inspectability, structural arrangement, and material on proposed analysis requirements for safe crack growth. The relative impact on allowable design stress is indicated by example. Design criteria, material, and analysis requirements for implementation of fracture control procedures are reviewed together with limitations in current available data techniques. A summary of items which require further study and attention is presented.

  4. Experimental research on structural dynamics and control

    Montgomery, R. C.; Horner, G. C.; Cole, S. R.

    1981-01-01

    This report describes an apparatus at the NASA Langley Research Center for conducting research on dynamics and control of structural dynamics systems. The apparatus consists of a 3.66 m (12 ft.) long flexible beam to which are attached four electromagnetic actuators, nine noncontacting sensors to measure deflection of beam at various locations, and four strain gage type load cells one at each actuator attachment point. The important feature of the apparatus is that the actuators can be controlled and deflection and load sensor data can be processed in real time using the research centers CDC Cyber 175 computer system - thereby allowing research to be conducted on structural dynamics systems using advanced control laws. The facility is described in the report along with a detailed discussion of the actuators used.

  5. Measuring control structure complexity through execution sequence grammars

    MacLennan, Bruce J.

    1981-01-01

    A method for measuring the complexity of control structures is presented. It is based on the size of a grammar describing the possible execution sequences of the control structure. This method is applied to a number of control structures, including Pascal's control structures, Dijkstra's operators, and a structure recently proposed by Parnas. The verification of complexity measures is briefly discussed. (Author)

  6. Structural Relationships and Vasorelaxant Activity of Monoterpenes

    Cardoso Lima Tamires; Mota Marcelo; Barbosa-Filho José; Viana Dos Santos Márcio; De Sousa Damião

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background and purpose of the study The hypotensive activity of the essential oil of Mentha x villosa and its main constituent, the monoterpene rotundifolone, have been reported. Therefore, our objective was to evaluate the vasorelaxant effect of monoterpenes found in medicinal plants and establish the structure-activity relationship of rotundifolone and its structural analogues on the rat superior mesenteric artery. Methods Contractions of the vessels were induced with 10 μM of phen...

  7. Control of nucleus accumbens activity with neurofeedback

    Greer, Stephanie M.; Trujillo, Andrew J.; Glover, Gary H.; Knutson, Brian

    2014-01-01

    The nucleus accumbens (NAcc) plays critical roles in healthy motivation and learning, as well as in psychiatric disorders (including schizophrenia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder). Thus, techniques that confer control of NAcc activity might inspire new therapeutic interventions. By providing second-to-second temporal resolution of activity in small subcortical regions, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) can resolve online changes in NAcc activity, which can then be pres...

  8. Adaptive control of active filter using DSP

    In order to reduce output-voltage ripple of power supply, an active filter is necessary. In this paper, the active filter with DSP is proposed. The waveform from active filter can be flexibly improved by DSP programming. The output-voltage ripple can be enough reduced by mixing frequency components of the input-voltage ripple. The result of adaptive control using LMS algorism is presented. The improvement by using filtered-X method is discussed. (author)

  9. Dynamic and structural control utilizing smart materials and structures

    Rogers, C. A.; Robertshaw, H. H.

    1989-01-01

    An account is given of several novel 'smart material' structural control concepts that are currently under development. The thrust of these investigations is the evolution of intelligent materials and structures superceding the recently defined variable-geometry trusses and shape memory alloy-reinforced composites; the substances envisioned will be able to autonomously evaluate emergent environmental conditions and adapt to them, and even change their operational objectives. While until now the primary objective of the developmental efforts presently discussed has been materials that mimic biological functions, entirely novel concepts may be formulated in due course.

  10. Analysis of virtual passive controllers for flexible space structures

    Williams, Trevor W.

    1992-01-01

    The dynamics of flexible spacecraft are not usually well known before launch. This makes it important to develop controllers for such systems that can never be destabilized by perturbations in the structural model. Virtual passive controllers, or active vibration absorbers, possess this guaranteed stability property; they mimic a fictitious flexible structure attached to the true physical one. This report analyzes the properties of such controllers, and shows that disturbance absorption behavior can be naturally described in terms of a set of virtual zeros that they introduce into the closed-loop dynamics of the system. Based on this analysis, techniques are then derived for selecting the active vibration absorber internal parameters, i.e., the gain matrices of such controllers, so as to achieve specified control objectives. Finally, the effects on closed-loop stability of small delays in the feedback loop are investigated. Such delays would typically be introduced by a digital implementation of an active vibration absorber. It is shown that these delays only affect the real parts of the eigenvalues of a lightly-damped structure. Furthermore, it is only the high-frequency modes that are destabilized by delays; low-frequency modes are actually made more heavily damped. Eigenvalue perturbation methods are used to obtain accurate predictions of the critical delay at which a given system will become unstable; these methods also determine which mode is critical.

  11. Controlling Function and Structure with DNA

    Tørring, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    that the DNA origami could be massively modified fast and efficiently with versatile groups such as amines, fluorophores and biotin. Applying small dynamic DNA structures to control the function of so-called photosensitizers, was the aim of the third and final research topic presented. Photosensitizers...... are functional molecules that upon irradiation can excite naturally occurring triplet oxygen to the cytotoxic singlet oxygen. This process is interesting in terms of photodynamic therapy, but lack of control is limiting the applications. The excitation can be controlled by installing quenching...... molecules close to the photosensitizer, and we exploited this by tethering the two molecules together with a dynamic DNA nanostructure, known as an i-motif. This allowed us to control the distance between the two molecules, and thereby the excitation of triplet oxygen. Finally, the thesis is concluded with...

  12. THE CONTROL AND EVALUATION OF PROMOTIONAL ACTIVITIES

    Felicia Sabou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper focused on importance and benefits of control and evaluation of marketing activities. The control of efficiency review the assessment of the resources for marketing activity, checking also the efficiency of the human resources, advertising, promotion activities and distribution activities. In the analyse of human resources the most important ratio are: the average of costumers visits on a day, the number of custom order received from 100 visits, the number of new customers from a period, the number of lost customers from a period, the marketing human expenditures from all the sales.The strategic control is made to check if the objectives and the company strategy are adapted to the marketing environment.

  13. Xanthane sesquiterpenoids: structure, synthesis and biological activity.

    Vasas, Andrea; Hohmann, Judit

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this review is to survey the naturally occurring xanthanes and xanthanolides, their structures, biological activities, structure–activity relationships and synthesis. There has been no comprehensive review of this topic previously. On the basis of 126 references, 112 compounds are summarized. PMID:21321751

  14. Neural Network-Based Active Control for Offshore Platforms

    周亚军; 赵德有

    2003-01-01

    A new active control scheme, based on neural network, for the suppression of oscillation in multiple-degree-of-freedom (MDOF) offshore platforms, is studied in this paper. With the main advantages of neural network, i.e. the inherent robustness, fault tolerance, and generalized capability of its parallel massive interconnection structure, the active structural control of offshore platforms under random waves is accomplished by use of the BP neural network model. The neural network is trained offline with the data generated from numerical analysis, and it simulates the process of Classical Linear Quadratic Regular Control for the platform under random waves. After the learning phase, the trained network has learned about the nonlinear dynamic behavior of the active control system, and is capable of predicting the active control forces of the next time steps. The results obtained show that the active control is feasible and effective, and it finally overcomes time delay owing to the robustness, fault tolerance, and generalized capability of artificial neural network.

  15. Structural Analysis Extended with Active Fault Isolation - Methods and Algorithms

    Gelso, Esteban R.; Blanke, Mogens

    2009-01-01

    Isolability of faults is a key issue in fault diagnosis whether the aim is maintenance or active fault-tolerant control. It is often encountered that while faults are detectable, they are only group-wise isolable from a usual diagnostic point of view. However, active injection of test signals on...... system inputs can considerably enhance fault isolability. This paper investigates this possibility of active fault isolation from a structural point of view. While such extension of the structural analysis approach was suggested earlier, algorithms and case studies were needed to explore this theory. The...

  16. Landscape structure and biological control in agroecosystems

    Thies; Tscharntke

    1999-08-01

    Biological pest control has primarily relied on local improvements in populations of natural enemies, but landscape structure may also be important. This is shown here with experiments at different spatial scales using the rape pollen beetle (Meligethes aeneus), an important pest on oilseed rape (Brassica napus). The presence of old field margin strips along rape fields was associated with increased mortality of pollen beetles resulting from parasitism and adjacent, large, old fallow habitats had an even greater effect. In structurally complex landscapes, parasitism was higher and crop damage was lower than in simple landscapes with a high percentage of agricultural use. PMID:10436158

  17. Structural dynamics and control of large space structures. [conference

    Lightner, E. B. (Compiler)

    1981-01-01

    The focus of the workshop was the basic research program assembled by LaRC to address the fundamental technology deficiencies that were identified in several studies on large space systems (LSS) conducted by NASA in the last several years. The staffs of the respective participants were assembled at the workshop to review the current state of research in the control technology for large structural systems and to plan the efforts that would be pursued by their respective organizations.

  18. Application of neural networks to seismic active control

    An exploratory study on seismic active control using an artificial neural network (ANN) is presented in which a singledegree-of-freedom (SDF) structural system is controlled by a trained neural network. A feed-forward neural network and the backpropagation training method are used in the study. In backpropagation training, the learning rate is determined by ensuring the decrease of the error function at each training cycle. The training patterns for the neural net are generated randomly. Then, the trained ANN is used to compute the control force according to the control algorithm. The control strategy proposed herein is to apply the control force at every time step to destroy the build-up of the system response. The ground motions considered in the simulations are the N21E and N69W components of the Lake Hughes No. 12 record that occurred in the San Fernando Valley in California on February 9, 1971. Significant reduction of the structural response by one order of magnitude is observed. Also, it is shown that the proposed control strategy has the ability to reduce the peak that occurs during the first few cycles of the time history. These promising results assert the potential of applying ANNs to active structural control under seismic loads

  19. Active resonance tuning of stretchable plasmonic structures

    Zhu, Xiaolong; Xiao, Sanshui; Mortensen, N. Asger

    2012-01-01

    Active resonance tuning is highly desired for the applications of plasmonic structures, such as optical switches and surface enhanced Raman substrates. In this paper, we demonstrate the active tunable plasmonic structures, which composed of monolayer arrays of metallic semishells with dielectric...... cores on stretchable elastic substrates. These composite structures support Bragg-type surface plasmon resonances whose frequencies are sensitive to the arrangement of the metallic semishells. Under uniaxial stretching, the lattice symmetry of these plasmonic structures can be reconfigured from...... hexagonal to monoclinic lattice, leading to not only large but also polarization-dependent shifts of the resonance frequency. The experimental results are supported by the numerical simulations. Our structures fabricated using simple and inexpensive self-assembly and lift-transfer techniques can open up...

  20. Structural control sensors for the CASES GTF

    Davis, Hugh W.; Bukley, Angelia P.

    1993-01-01

    CASES (Controls, Astrophysics and Structures Experiment in Space) is a proposed space experiment to collect x-ray images of the galactic center and solar disk with unprecedented resolution. This requires precision pointing and suppression of vibrations in the long flexible structure that comprises the 32-m x-ray telescope optical bench. Two separate electro-optical sensor systems are provided for the ground test facility (GTF). The Boom Motion Tracker (BMT) measures eigenvector data for post-mission use in system identification. The Tip Displacement Sensor (TDS) measures boom tip position and is used as feedback for the closed-loop control system that stabilizes the boom. Both the BMT and the TDS have met acceptance specifications and were delivered to MSFC in February 1992. This paper describes the sensor concept, the sensor configuration as implemented in the GTF, and the results of characterization and performance testing.

  1. Active control for performance enhancement of electrically controlled rotor

    Lu Yang; Wang Chao

    2015-01-01

    Electrically controlled rotor (ECR) system has the potential to enhance the rotor perfor-mance by applying higher harmonic flap inputs. In order to explore the feasibility and effectiveness for ECR performance enhancement using closed-loop control method, firstly, an ECR rotor perfor-mance analysis model based on helicopter flight dynamic model is established, which can reflect the performance characteristics of ECR helicopter at high advance ratio. Based on the simulation platform, an active control method named adaptive T-matrix algorithm is adopted to explore the feasibility and effectiveness for ECR performance enhancement. The simulation results verify the effectiveness of this closed-loop control method. For the sample ECR helicopter, about 3%rotor power reduction is obtained with the optimum 2/rev flap inputs at the advance ratio of 0.34. And through analyzing the distributions of attack of angle and drag in rotor disk, the underlying physical essence of ECR power reduction is cleared. Furthermore, the influence of the key control parameters, including convergence factor and weighting matrix, on the effectiveness of closed-loop control for ECR performance enhancement is explored. Some useful results are summarized, which can be used to direct the future active control law design of ECR performance enhancement.

  2. Active control for performance enhancement of electrically controlled rotor

    Lu Yang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Electrically controlled rotor (ECR system has the potential to enhance the rotor performance by applying higher harmonic flap inputs. In order to explore the feasibility and effectiveness for ECR performance enhancement using closed-loop control method, firstly, an ECR rotor performance analysis model based on helicopter flight dynamic model is established, which can reflect the performance characteristics of ECR helicopter at high advance ratio. Based on the simulation platform, an active control method named adaptive T-matrix algorithm is adopted to explore the feasibility and effectiveness for ECR performance enhancement. The simulation results verify the effectiveness of this closed-loop control method. For the sample ECR helicopter, about 3% rotor power reduction is obtained with the optimum 2/rev flap inputs at the advance ratio of 0.34. And through analyzing the distributions of attack of angle and drag in rotor disk, the underlying physical essence of ECR power reduction is cleared. Furthermore, the influence of the key control parameters, including convergence factor and weighting matrix, on the effectiveness of closed-loop control for ECR performance enhancement is explored. Some useful results are summarized, which can be used to direct the future active control law design of ECR performance enhancement.

  3. Centralized and decentralized network control structures

    Hock, G.; Motl, G.

    1983-03-01

    Network control systems are aids for network operation resulting from take-over, transport and distribution of the electric power generated in power plants. In order to achieve this, the energy used by the consumers must be generated and supplied at the very moment of demand. From this objective the network structure in the Federal Republic of Germany, which in principle is also valid for other contries comparable in infrastructure, has developed.

  4. Landscape Structure and Biological Control in Agroecosystems

    Thies, Carsten; Tscharntke, Teja

    1999-01-01

    Biological pest control has primarily relied on local improvements in populations of natural enemies, but landscape structure may also be important. This is shown here with experiments at different spatial scales using the rape pollen beetle (Meligethes aeneus), an important pest on oilseed rape (Brassica napus). The presence of old field margin strips along rape fields was associated with increased mortality of pollen beetles resulting from parasitism and adjacent, large, old fallow habit...

  5. Characteristics of self-sensing actuation for active control

    Barney, P.; Redmond, J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Experimental Structural Dynamics Dept.; Smith, D. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The benefits of a collocated sensor actuator pair are well known within the controls community. Generally speaking, collocation offers the use of simple control algorithms with reduced instabilities due to spillover. One method for achieving collocation is the implementation of a ``sentuator`` in which a piezoelectric element functions simultaneously as both a sensor and an actuator. Past work in utilizing a sentuator has primarily been limited to piezoelectric films and patches mounted to flexible structures. Additional papers have provided information and methodology for dealing with the non-linear aspects of a piezoceramic sentuator. The need arises for methods of self-sensing when performing active vibration control of very stiff structures. A method for understanding and using self-sensing lead zirconate titanate stacks for active vibration control is presented. This paper specifically provides a basic understanding of self-sensing methods as applied to stiff structures for the purposes of control. The discussion of the methodology is followed by a simple example in which active vibration control is applied to a model of a boring bar with embedded PZT stacks.

  6. Structure and Structure-activity Relationship of Functional Organic Molecules

    2011-01-01

    @@ Research theme The group is made up of junior scientists from the State Key Laboratory of Elemento-organic Chemistry, Nankai University.The scientists focus their studis on the structure and structure-activity relationship of functional organic molecules not only because it has been the basis of their research, but also because the functional study of organic compounds is now a major scientific issue for organic chemists around the world.

  7. Controlling Structure in Sulfonated Block Copolymer Membranes

    Truong, Phuc; Stein, Gila; Strzalka, Joe

    2015-03-01

    In many ionic block copolymer systems, the strong incompatibility between ionic and non-ionic segments will trap non-equilibrium structures in the film, making it difficult to engineer the optimal domain sizes and transport pathways. The goal of this work is to establish a framework for controlling the solid-state structure of sulfonated pentablock copolymer membranes. They have ABCBA block sequence, where A is poly(t-butyl styrene), B is poly(hydrogenated isoprene), and C is poly(styrene sulfonate). To process into films, the polymer is dissolved in toluene/n-propanol solvent mixtures, where the solvent proportions and the polymer loading were both varied. Solution-state structure was measured with small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). We detected micelles with radii that depend on the solvent composition and polymer loading. Film structure was measured with grazing-incidence SAXS, which shows (i) domain periodicity is constant throughout film thickness; (ii) domain periodicity depends on solvent composition and polymer loading, and approximately matches the micelle radii in solutions. The solid-state packing is consistent with a hard sphere structure factor. Results suggest that solid-state structure can be tuned by manipulating the solution-state self-assembly.

  8. Active control of ionized boundary layers

    Mendes, R V

    1997-01-01

    The challenging problems, in the field of control of chaos or of transition to chaos, lie in the domain of infinite-dimensional systems. Access to all variables being impossible in this case and the controlling action being limited to a few collective variables, it will not in general be possible to drive the whole system to the desired behaviour. A paradigmatic problem of this type is the control of the transition to turbulence in the boundary layer of fluid motion. By analysing a boundary layer flow for an ionized fluid near an airfoil, one concludes that active control of the transition amounts to the resolution of an generalized integro-differential eigenvalue problem. To cope with the required response times and phase accuracy, electromagnetic control, whenever possible, seems more appropriate than mechanical control by microactuators.

  9. Structural Vibration Control Using Solid Particle Damper

    Haseena. A

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the effectiveness of a solid particle damper to control structural vibration is experimentally investigated. The vibration control performance and its influencing parameters are examined by a Multi Degree of Freedom (MDOF structure attached with a particle damper (PD under horizontal excitation. In a particle damping system damping is achieved using solid particles or granules and is a passive damping method. Here the enclosure filled with particles is attached to the primary structure undergoing vibration. As the primary structure vibrates, particles undergo inelastic collision within the enclosure resulting high amount of energy dissipation. Based on the analytical study of undamped frame in ANSYS WORKBENCH, dimensions of the frame were fixed and shake table study of a two storied steel frame with and without damper system are carried out. Results shows that effectiveness of damping depends on various parameters like mass, particle size, shape etc. The effectiveness is compared with a friction damper (FD and is observed that PD is more efficient than FD since 31.80% energy is dissipated more in PD compared to FD

  10. Inner structure of capital control networks

    Battiston, Stefano

    2004-07-01

    We study the topological structure of the network of shareholding relationships in the Italian stock market (MIB) and in two US stock markets (NYSE and NASDAQ). The portfolio diversification and the wealth invested on the market by economical agents have been shown in our previous work to have all a power law behavior. However, a further investigation shows that the inner structure of the capital control network are not at all the same across markets. The shareholding network is a weighted graph, therefore we introduce two quantities analogous to in-degree and out-degree for weighted graphs which measure, respectively: the number of effective shareholders of a stock and the number of companies effectively controlled by a single holder. Combining the information carried by the distributions of these two quantities we are able to extract the backbone of each market and we find that while the MIB splits into several separated groups of interest, the US markets is characterized by very large holders sharing control on overlapping subsets of stocks. This method seems promising for the analysis of the topology of capital control networks in general and not only in the stock market.

  11. Average-cost based robust structural control

    Hagood, Nesbitt W.

    1993-01-01

    A method is presented for the synthesis of robust controllers for linear time invariant structural systems with parameterized uncertainty. The method involves minimizing quantities related to the quadratic cost (H2-norm) averaged over a set of systems described by real parameters such as natural frequencies and modal residues. Bounded average cost is shown to imply stability over the set of systems. Approximations for the exact average are derived and proposed as cost functionals. The properties of these approximate average cost functionals are established. The exact average and approximate average cost functionals are used to derive dynamic controllers which can provide stability robustness. The robustness properties of these controllers are demonstrated in illustrative numerical examples and tested in a simple SISO experiment on the MIT multi-point alignment testbed.

  12. Robust Feedback Control of Flow Induced Structural Radiation of Sound

    Heatwole, Craig M.; Bernhard, Robert J.; Franchek, Matthew A.

    1997-01-01

    A significant component of the interior noise of aircraft and automobiles is a result of turbulent boundary layer excitation of the vehicular structure. In this work, active robust feedback control of the noise due to this non-predictable excitation is investigated. Both an analytical model and experimental investigations are used to determine the characteristics of the flow induced structural sound radiation problem. The problem is shown to be broadband in nature with large system uncertainties associated with the various operating conditions. Furthermore the delay associated with sound propagation is shown to restrict the use of microphone feedback. The state of the art control methodologies, IL synthesis and adaptive feedback control, are evaluated and shown to have limited success for solving this problem. A robust frequency domain controller design methodology is developed for the problem of sound radiated from turbulent flow driven plates. The control design methodology uses frequency domain sequential loop shaping techniques. System uncertainty, sound pressure level reduction performance, and actuator constraints are included in the design process. Using this design method, phase lag was added using non-minimum phase zeros such that the beneficial plant dynamics could be used. This general control approach has application to lightly damped vibration and sound radiation problems where there are high bandwidth control objectives requiring a low controller DC gain and controller order.

  13. Experimental investigation of jet pulse control on flexible vibrating structures

    Karaiskos, Grigorios; Papanicolaou, Panos; Zacharopoulos, Dimitrios

    2016-08-01

    The feasibility of applying on-line fluid jet pulses to actively control the vibrations of flexible structures subjected to harmonic and earthquake-like base excitations provided by a shake table is explored. The operating principles and capabilities of the control system applied have been investigated in a simplified small-scale laboratory model that is a mass attached at the top free end of a vertical flexible slender beam with rectangular cross-section, the other end of which is mounted on an electrodynamic shaker. A pair of opposite jets placed on the mass at the top of the cantilever beam applied the appropriate forces by ejecting pressurized air pulses controlled by on/off solenoid electro-valves via in house developed control software, in order to control the vibration caused by harmonic, periodic and random excitations at pre-selected frequency content provided by the shaker. The dynamics of the structure was monitored by accelerometers and the jet impulses by pressure sensors. The experimental results have demonstrated the effectiveness and reliability of Jet Pulse Control Systems (JPCS). It was verified that the measured root mean square (RMS) vibration levels of the controlled structure from harmonic and earthquake base excitations, could be reduced by approximately 50% and 33% respectively.

  14. Active Flow Effectors for Noise and Separation Control

    Turner, Travis L.

    2011-01-01

    New flow effector technology for separation control and enhanced mixing is based upon shape memory alloy hybrid composite (SMAHC) technology. The technology allows for variable shape control of aircraft structures through actively deformable surfaces. The flow effectors are made by embedding shape memory alloy actuator material in a composite structure. When thermally actuated, the flow effector def1ects into or out of the flow in a prescribed manner to enhance mixing or induce separation for a variety of applications, including aeroacoustic noise reduction, drag reduction, and f1ight control. The active flow effectors were developed for noise reduction as an alternative to fixed-configuration effectors, such as static chevrons, that cannot be optimized for airframe installation effects or variable operating conditions and cannot be retracted for off-design or fail-safe conditions. Benefits include: Increased vehicle control, overall efficiency, and reduced noise throughout all f1ight regimes, Reduced flow noise, Reduced drag, Simplicity of design and fabrication, Simplicity of control through direct current stimulation, autonomous re sponse to environmental heating, fast re sponse, and a high degree of geometric stability. The concept involves embedding prestrained SMA actuators on one side of the chevron neutral axis in order to generate a thermal moment and def1ect the structure out of plane when heated. The force developed in the host structure during def1ection and the aerodynamic load is used for returning the structure to the retracted position. The chevron design is highly scalable and versatile, and easily affords active and/or autonomous (environmental) control. The technology offers wide-ranging market applications, including aerospace, automotive, and any application that requires flow separation or noise control.

  15. Application of modern control theory for building structures

    Basharkhah, M. A.; Yao, J. T. P.

    The design of feedback compensators is considered for linear and constant-coefficient multivariable systems and an attempt is made to find a suitable gain matrix for active control of structures. The application of the pole-assignment method is discussed. It is based on the shifting of open-loop poles to the left side of the s-plane, and is applicable to mechanical and electrical systems. The second method developed in this study provides a physical understanding of the active control of civil engineering structures because it allows control of several modes of the system. The K matrix of the control law can be found so that the first few modes of the system have smaller displacements than the corresponding displacements of the original system. Therefore, more modes of higher gain can be used to substantially reduce system displacements. Because the pole-assignment method will not always significantly reduce displacements, the second method is found to be better for the control of civil engineering structures.

  16. Span of Control and Span of Activity

    Oriana Bandiera; Andrea Prat; Raffaella Sadun; Julie Wulf

    2012-01-01

    For both practitioners and researchers, span of control plays an important role in defining and understanding the role of the CEO. In this paper, we combine organizational chart information for a sample of 65 companies with detailed data on how their CEOs allocate their work time, which we define as their span of activity. Span of activity provides a direct measure of the CEO's management style, including the attention devoted to specific subordinates and functions, the time devoted to indivi...

  17. Capital Control, Debt Financing and Innovative Activity

    Czarnitzki, Dirk; Kraft, Kornelius

    2009-01-01

    "The present paper discusses the effects of dispersed versus concentrated capital ownership on investment into innovative activity. While the market for equity capital might exert insufficient control on top managements’ behavior, this weakness may be mitigated by a suitable degree of debt financing. We report the results of an empirical study on the determinants of innovative activity measured by patent applications. Using a large sample of German manufacturing firms, we find that companies ...

  18. Comparison of various decentralised structural and cavity feedback control strategies for transmitted noise reduction through a double panel structure

    Ho, Jen-Hsuan; Berkhoff, Arthur

    2014-03-01

    This paper compares various decentralised control strategies, including structural and acoustic actuator-sensor configuration designs, to reduce noise transmission through a double panel structure. The comparison is based on identical control stability indexes. The double panel structure consists of two panels with air in between and offers the advantages of low sound transmission at high frequencies, low heat transmission, and low weight. The double panel structure is widely used, such as in the aerospace and automotive industries. Nevertheless, the resonance of the cavity and the poor sound transmission loss at low frequencies limit the double panel's noise control performance. Applying active structural acoustic control to the panels or active noise control to the cavity has been discussed in many papers. In this paper, the resonances of the panels and the cavity are considered simultaneously to further reduce the transmitted noise through an existing double panel structure. A structural-acoustic coupled model is developed to investigate and compare various structural control and cavity control methods. Numerical analysis and real-time control results show that structural control should be applied to both panels. Three types of cavity control sources are presented and compared. The results indicate that the largest noise reduction is obtained with cavity control by loudspeakers modified to operate as incident pressure sources.

  19. Systems Variables and Structural Controllability: An Inverted Pendulum Case

    Qiang Ma; Xiao-Quan Li

    2013-01-01

    In order to explore the essence of structural controllability, structural controllability of inverted pendulum is analyzed in this presented study and a sufficient controllability condition of a class of perturbed linear system is obtained, which is essential to prove the structural controllability for the perturbed inverted pendulum. Two different structured models of inverted pendulum are constructed. Structural controllability of both cases are discussed and compared, which shows that the ...

  20. Variable structure attitude maneuver and vibration control of flexible spacecraft

    HU Qing-lei; MA Cuang-fu

    2008-01-01

    A dual-stage control system design method is presented for the three-axis-rotational maneuver and vibration stabilization of a spacecraft with flexible appendages embedded with piezoceramics as sensor and actuator.In this design approach,the attitude control and the vibration suppression sub-systems ale designed separately using the lower order model.The design of attitude controller is based on the variable structure control (VSC)theory leading to a discontinuous control law.This controller accomplishes asymptotic attitude maneuvering in the closed-loop system and is insensitive to the interaction of elastic modes and uncertainty in the system.To actively suppress the flexible vibrations,the modal velocity feedback control method is presented by using piezoelectric materials as additional sensor and actuator bonded on the surface of the flexible appendages.In addition,a special configuration of actuators for three-axis attitude control is also investigated:the pitch attitude controlled by a momentum wheel,and the roll/yaw control achieved by on-off thrustem.which is modulated by pulse width pulse frequency modulation technique to construct the proper control torque history.Numerical simulations performed show that the rotational maneuver and vibration suppression ale accomplished in spite of the presence of disturbance torque and parameter uncertainty.

  1. A Dynamic Absorber With Active Vibration Control

    Huang, S.-J.; Lian, R.-J.

    1994-12-01

    The design and construction of a dynamic absorber incorporating active vibration control is described. The absorber is a two-degrees-of-freedom spring — lumped mass system sliding on a guide pillar, with two internal vibration disturbance sources. Both the main mass and the secondary absorber mass are acted on by DC servo motors, respectively, to suppress the vibration amplitude. The state variable technique is used to model this dynamic system and a decoupling PID control method is used. First, the discrete time state space model is identified by using the commercial software MATLAB. Then the decoupling controller of this multi-input/multi-output system is derived from the identified model. Finally the results of some experiments are presented. The experimental results show that the system is effective in suppressing vibration. Also, the performance of this control strategy for position tracking control is evaluated based on experimental data.

  2. Structural relationships and vasorelaxant activity of monoterpenes

    Cardoso Lima Tamires

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and purpose of the study The hypotensive activity of the essential oil of Mentha x villosa and its main constituent, the monoterpene rotundifolone, have been reported. Therefore, our objective was to evaluate the vasorelaxant effect of monoterpenes found in medicinal plants and establish the structure-activity relationship of rotundifolone and its structural analogues on the rat superior mesenteric artery. Methods Contractions of the vessels were induced with 10 μM of phenylephine (Phe in rings with endothelium. During the tonic phase of the contraction, the monoterpenes (10-8 - 10-3, cumulatively were added to the organ bath. The extent of relaxation was expressed as the percentage of Phe-induced contraction. Results The results from the present study showed that both oxygenated terpenes (rotundifolone, (+-limonene epoxide, pulegone epoxide, carvone epoxide, and (+-pulegone and non-oxygenated terpene ((+-limonene exhibit relaxation activity. The absence of an oxygenated molecular structure was not a critical requirement for the molecule to be bioactive. Also it was found that the position of ketone and epoxide groups in the monoterpene structures influence the vasorelaxant potency and efficacy. Major conclusion The results suggest that the presence of functional groups in the chemical structure of rotundifolone is not essential for its vasorelaxant activity.

  3. Activity and Structure of Calcined Coal Gangue

    2007-01-01

    Coal gangue was activated by means of calcination in seven temperature ranges. Systematic research was made about activation mechanism and structural evolution. Glycerin-ethanol method, SEM, MIP and XRD were used to determine the variation of structure and activation of coal gangue during the calcination.The experimental results show that because of heat treatment in the range of calcination temperature, mineral composition and microstructure of coal gangue are changed. In addition, its activity is improved evidently. The amount of lime absorbed by the sample calcined at 700 C is 2-4 times that by uncalcined coal gangue in the course of hydration. When NaOH is added to coal gangue-lime system, hydration reaction of the system is sped up and the microstructure of hydrating samples of coal gangue is improved.

  4. Activity and structure of calcined coal gangue

    Gong Chenchen; Li Dongxu; Wang Xiaojun; Li Zongjin [Nanjing University of Technology, Nanjing (China). College of Materials Science and Engineering

    2007-12-15

    Coal gangue was activated by means of calcination in seven temperature ranges. Systematic research was made about activation mechanism and structural evolution. The glycerin-ethanol method, SEM, MIP and XRD were used to determine the variation of structure and activation of coal gangue during calcination. The experimental results show that because of heat treatment in the range of calcination temperatures, mineral composition and microstructure of coal gangue are changed. In addition, its activity is improved. The amount of lime absorbed by the sample calcined at 700{sup o}C is 2-4 times that by uncalcined coal gangue in the course of hydration. When NaOH is added to coal gangue-lime system, the hydration reaction rate of the system is increased and the microstructure of hydrating samples of coal gangue is improved.

  5. MODELING MERCURY CONTROL WITH POWDERED ACTIVATED CARBON

    The paper presents a mathematical model of total mercury removed from the flue gas at coal-fired plants equipped with powdered activated carbon (PAC) injection for Mercury control. The developed algorithms account for mercury removal by both existing equipment and an added PAC in...

  6. Active Blade Vibration Control Being Developed and Tested

    Johnson, Dexter

    2003-01-01

    Gas turbine engines are currently being designed to have increased performance, lower weight and manufacturing costs, and higher reliability. Consequently, turbomachinery components, such as turbine and compressor blades, have designs that are susceptible to new vibration problems and eventual in-service failure due to high-cycle fatigue. To address this problem, researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center are developing and testing innovative active blade vibration control concepts. Preliminary results of using an active blade vibration control system, involving a rotor supported by an active magnetic bearing in Glenn's Dynamic Spin Rig, indicate promising results (see the photograph). Active blade vibration control was achieved using feedback of blade strain gauge signals within the magnetic bearing control loop. The vibration amplitude was reduced substantially (see the graphs). Also, vibration amplitude amplification was demonstrated; this could be used to enhance structural mode identification, if desired. These results were for a nonrotating two-bladed disk. Tests for rotating blades are planned. Current and future active blade vibration control research is planned to use a fully magnetically suspended rotor and smart materials. For the fully magnetically suspended rotor work, three magnetic bearings (two radial and one axial) will be used as actuators instead of one magnetic bearing. This will allow additional degrees of freedom to be used for control. For the smart materials work, control effectors located on and off the blade will be considered. Piezoelectric materials will be considered for on-the-blade actuation, and actuator placement on a stator vane, or other nearby structure, will be investigated for off-the-blade actuation. Initial work will focus on determining the feasibility of these methods by performing basic analysis and simple experiments involving feedback control.

  7. Active control of transmitted sound in buildings

    Thompsett, Russell Harvey George

    The problem of noise from neighbours has increased dramatically over the last few years. Many of the noise complaints are due to the high level, low frequency noise from modern stereo equipment, and are often described in terms of the low frequency characteristics of the music; the repetitive, booming, bass beat. The objective of this research was to establish the feasibility of applying active noise control to alleviate this problem. The initial approach was to evaluate the possibility of exploiting the dominance of individual modes in the response of rooms at low frequency to effect global control. However, initial investigations using a modal model of the sound field revealed that this would be difficult due to the contribution of many acoustic modes excited off resonance. This conclusion was supported by measurements of acoustic room responses in typical buildings, illustrating a non-resonant characteristic. Consequently, attention was turned to the feasibility of using local active control systems to create zones of quiet by concentrating control at a specific location near the observers ears, for example in a seat headrest, or near the pillows of a bed. The lack of a reference signal in either approach requires the use of a feedback control strategy. With a typically non-resonant system, the predictability in the disturbance necessary for successful feedback control must be contained in the primary excitation, namely the music. Examples of different music styles were investigated and of those with the potential to be a nuisance surprisingly few were significantly more predictable than a random disturbance. As expected the most encouraging control performance simulations were found for modern dance music, with a strong repetitive beat. A real-time, local controller was demonstrated in the laboratory with such a disturbance signal and the properties of the quiet zone were measured. The subjective response when hearing the controller in operation was found to be

  8. Active control of multiple resistive wall modes

    A two-dimensional array of saddle coils at Mc poloidal and Nc toroidal positions is used on the EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch (Brunsell P R et al 2001 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 43 1457) to study active control of resistive wall modes (RWMs). Spontaneous growth of several RWMs with poloidal mode number m = 1 and different toroidal mode number n is observed experimentally, in agreement with linear MHD modelling. The measured plasma response to a controlled coil field and the plasma response computed using the linear circular cylinder MHD model are in quantitative agreement. Feedback control introduces a linear coupling of modes with toroidal mode numbers n, n' that fulfil the condition |n - n'| = Nc. Pairs of coupled unstable RWMs are present in feedback experiments with an array of Mc x Nc = 4 x 16 coils. Using intelligent shell feedback, the coupled modes are generally not controlled even though the field is suppressed at the active coils. A better suppression of coupled modes may be achieved in the case of rotating modes by using the mode control feedback scheme with individually set complex gains. In feedback with a larger array of Mc x Nc = 4 x 32 coils, the coupling effect largely disappears, and with this array, the main internal RWMs n = -11, -10, +5, +6 are all simultaneously suppressed throughout the discharge (7-8 wall times). With feedback there is a two-fold extension of the pulse length, compared to discharges without feedback

  9. Active vibration control based on piezoelectric smart composite

    An aircraft’s vertical fin may experience dramatic buffet loads in high angle of attack flight conditions, and these buffet loads would cause huge vibration and dynamic stress on the vertical fin structure. To reduce the dynamic vibration of the vertical fin structure, macro fiber composite (MFC) actuators were used in this paper. The drive moment equations and sensing voltage equations of the MFC actuators were developed. Finite element analysis models based on three kinds of models of simplified vertical fin structures with surface-bonded MFC actuators were established in ABAQUS. The equivalent damping ratio of the structure was employed in finite element analysis, in order to measure the effectiveness of vibration control. Further, an open-loop test for the active vibration control system of the vertical fin with MFC actuators was designed and developed. The experimental results validated the effectiveness of the MFC actuators as well as the developed methodology. (paper)

  10. Active Power Controls from Wind Power: Bridging the Gaps

    Ela, E.; Gevorgian, V.; Fleming, P.; Zhang, Y. C.; Singh, M.; Muljadi, E.; Scholbrook, A.; Aho, J.; Buckspan, A.; Pao, L.; Singhvi, V.; Tuohy, A.; Pourbeik, P.; Brooks, D.; Bhatt, N.

    2014-01-01

    This paper details a comprehensive study undertaken by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Electric Power Research Institute, and the University of Colorado to understand how the contribution of wind power providing active power control (APC) can benefit the total power system economics, increase revenue streams, improve the reliability and security of the power system, and provide superior and efficient response while reducing any structural and loading impacts that may reduce the life of the wind turbine or its components. The study includes power system simulations, control simulations, and actual field tests using turbines at NREL's National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). The study focuses on synthetic inertial control, primary frequency control, and automatic generation control, and analyzes timeframes ranging from milliseconds to minutes to the lifetime of wind turbines, locational scope ranging from components of turbines to large wind plants to entire synchronous interconnections, and additional topics ranging from economics to power system engineering to control design.

  11. Optimizing Dynamical Network Structure for Pinning Control

    Orouskhani, Yasin; Jalili, Mahdi; Yu, Xinghuo

    2016-04-01

    Controlling dynamics of a network from any initial state to a final desired state has many applications in different disciplines from engineering to biology and social sciences. In this work, we optimize the network structure for pinning control. The problem is formulated as four optimization tasks: i) optimizing the locations of driver nodes, ii) optimizing the feedback gains, iii) optimizing simultaneously the locations of driver nodes and feedback gains, and iv) optimizing the connection weights. A newly developed population-based optimization technique (cat swarm optimization) is used as the optimization method. In order to verify the methods, we use both real-world networks, and model scale-free and small-world networks. Extensive simulation results show that the optimal placement of driver nodes significantly outperforms heuristic methods including placing drivers based on various centrality measures (degree, betweenness, closeness and clustering coefficient). The pinning controllability is further improved by optimizing the feedback gains. We also show that one can significantly improve the controllability by optimizing the connection weights.

  12. 3D monitoring of active tectonic structures

    Stemberk, Josef; Košťák, Blahoslav; Vilímek, V.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 36, 1-2 (2003), s. 103-112. ISSN 0264-3707 R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC 625.10 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3046908 Keywords : tectonics * monitoring * active structures Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 0.754, year: 2003

  13. Actively controlled vibration welding system and method

    Cai, Wayne W.; Kang, Bongsu; Tan, Chin-An

    2013-04-02

    A vibration welding system includes a controller, welding horn, an active material element, and anvil assembly. The assembly may include an anvil body connected to a back plate and support member. The element, e.g., a piezoelectric stack or shape memory alloy, is positioned with respect to the assembly. The horn vibrates in a desirable first direction to form a weld on a work piece. The element controls any vibrations in a second direction by applying calibrated response to the anvil body in the second direction. A method for controlling undesirable vibrations in the system includes positioning the element with respect to the anvil assembly, connecting the anvil body to the support member through the back plate, vibrating the horn in a desirable first direction, and transmitting an input signal to the element to control vibration in an undesirable second direction.

  14. Control Systems Cyber Security Standards Support Activities

    Robert Evans

    2009-01-01

    The Department of Homeland Security’s Control Systems Security Program (CSSP) is working with industry to secure critical infrastructure sectors from cyber intrusions that could compromise control systems. This document describes CSSP’s current activities with industry organizations in developing cyber security standards for control systems. In addition, it summarizes the standards work being conducted by organizations within the sector and provides a brief listing of sector meetings and conferences that might be of interest for each sector. Control systems cyber security standards are part of a rapidly changing environment. The participation of CSSP in the development effort for these standards has provided consistency in the technical content of the standards while ensuring that information developed by CSSP is included.

  15. Structure modulated electrostatic deformable mirror for focus and geometry control.

    Nam, Saekwang; Park, Suntak; Yun, Sungryul; Park, Bongje; Park, Seung Koo; Kyung, Ki-Uk

    2016-01-11

    We suggest a way to electrostatically control deformed geometry of an electrostatic deformable mirror (EDM) based on geometric modulation of a basement. The EDM is composed of a metal coated elastomeric membrane (active mirror) and a polymeric basement with electrode (ground). When an electrical voltage is applied across the components, the active mirror deforms toward the stationary basement responding to electrostatic attraction force in an air gap. Since the differentiated gap distance can induce change in electrostatic force distribution between the active mirror and the basement, the EDMs are capable of controlling deformed geometry of the active mirror with different basement structures (concave, flat, and protrusive). The modulation of the deformed geometry leads to significant change in the range of the focal length of the EDMs. Even under dynamic operations, the EDM shows fairly consistent and large deformation enough to change focal length in a wide frequency range (1~175 Hz). The geometric modulation of the active mirror with dynamic focus tunability can allow the EDM to be an active mirror lens for optical zoom devices as well as an optical component controlling field of view. PMID:26832237

  16. BWR startup and shutdown activity transport control

    This paper summarizes BWR industry experience on good practices for controlling the transport of corrosion product activity during shutdowns, particularly refueling outages, and for startup chemistry control to minimize IGSCC (intergranular stress corrosion cracking). For shutdown, overall goals are to minimize adverse impacts of crud bursts and the time required to remove activated corrosion products from the reactor coolant during the shutdown process prior to refueling, and to assist plants in predicting and controlling radiation exposure during outages. For startup, the overall goals are to highlight conditions during early heatup and startup when sources of reactor coolant oxidants are high, when there is a greater likelihood for chemical excursions associated with refueling outage work activities, and when hydrogen injection is not available to mitigate IGSCC due to system design limitations. BWR water chemistry has changed significantly in recent years with the adoption of hydrogen water chemistry, zinc addition and noble metal chemical applications. These processes have, in some instances, resulted in significant activity increases during shutdown evolutions, which together with reduced time for cleanup because of shorter outages, has consequently increased outage radiation exposure. A review several recent outages shows that adverse effects from these conditions can be minimized, leading to the set of good practice recommendations for shutdown chemistry control. Most plants lose the majority of their hydrogen availability hours during early startup because feedwater hydrogen injection systems were not originally designed to inject hydrogen below 20% power. Hydrogen availability has improved through modifications to inject hydrogen at lower power levels, some near 5%. However, data indicate that IGSCC is accelerated during early startup, when dissolved oxygen and hydrogen peroxide levels are high and reactor coolant temperatures are in the 300 to 400 oF (

  17. Active Vibration Control of Lightweight Composite Structures

    Kovaļovs, A; Barkanovs, J; Gluhih, S

    2007-01-01

    Šajā darbā apskatīta plātņu vibrāciju slāpēšana, kas pakļauta mainīgai harmoniskai slodzei, izmantojot pjezoelektriskus aktuatorus. Pētījuma objekts ir taisnstūra veida kompozītmateriālu plāksne, uz kuras virsmas simetriski novietoti divi pjezoelektriskie aktuatori. Šī pētījuma objektu modelēja ar galīgo elementu metodes programmu ANSYS. Pielietojot temperatūras analoģiju, strāvas sprieguma lielums tiek aizstāts ar temperatūru. Darbā noteikts optimālais pjezoelektrisko aktuatoru izvietojums u...

  18. Fault Tolerant Control for Civil Structures Based on LMI Approach

    Chunxu Qu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The control system may lose the performance to suppress the structural vibration due to the faults in sensors or actuators. This paper designs the filter to perform the fault detection and isolation (FDI and then reforms the control strategy to achieve the fault tolerant control (FTC. The dynamic equation of the structure with active mass damper (AMD is first formulated. Then, an estimated system is built to transform the FDI filter design problem to the static gain optimization problem. The gain is designed to minimize the gap between the estimated system and the practical system, which can be calculated by linear matrix inequality (LMI approach. The FDI filter is finally used to isolate the sensor faults and reform the FTC strategy. The efficiency of FDI and FTC is validated by the numerical simulation of a three-story structure with AMD system with the consideration of sensor faults. The results show that the proposed FDI filter can detect the sensor faults and FTC controller can effectively tolerate the faults and suppress the structural vibration.

  19. Computational Strategies for the Architectural Design of Bending Active Structures

    Tamke, Martin; Nicholas, Paul

    2013-01-01

    stiffness, it is possible to control and pre-calibrate the bending behaviour of a composite element. This material capacity challenges architecture’s existing methods for design, specification and prediction. In this paper, we demonstrate how architects might connect the designed nature of composites with...... the design of bending-active structures, through computational strategies. We report three built structures that develop architecturally oriented design methods for bending-active systems using composite materials. These projects demonstrate the application and limits of the introduction of advanced......Active bending introduces a new level of integration into the design of architectural structures, and opens up new complexities for the architectural design process. In particular, the introduction of material variation reconfigures the design space. Through the precise specification of their...

  20. Active Control of Long Bridges Using Flaps

    Hansen, H. I.; Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    The main problem in designing ultra-long span suspension bridges is flutter. A solution to this problem might be to introduce an active flap control system to increase the flutter wind velocity. The investigated flap control system consists of flaps integrated in the bridge girder so each flap is...... different flap configurations for a bridge section model by using aerodynamic derivatives for a flat plate. The example shows that different flap configurations can either increase or decrease the flutter wind velocity. for optimal flap configurations flutter will not occur....

  1. Optimal control for the active above-knee prosthesis.

    Popović, D; Oğuztöreli, M N; Stein, R B

    1991-01-01

    Control of an active above-knee prosthesis has been simulated for a selected gait activity using a hierarchical closed-loop method. An extension of finite-state control, referred to as artificial reflex control, was adopted at the strategic level of control. At the actuator level of control an optimal tracking method, based on dynamic programming, is applied. This deals mainly with the actuator level of control, but considers the interaction of the leg dynamics and the switching effects of artificial reflex control. Optimal tracking at the actuator level of the above-knee prosthesis reduces the on-off effects of finite-state methods, such as artificial reflex control. The proposed method can also be used for the design of prosthetic elements. Specific attention is paid to the limited torque and power in the prosthetic joint actuator, which are imposed by the principle of self-containment in the artificial leg. The hierarchical structure, integrating artificial reflex control and optimal tracking, can be used in real time, as estimated from the number of computer operations required for the suggested method. PMID:2048773

  2. Structural Relationships and Vasorelaxant Activity of Monoterpenes

    Tamires Cardoso Lima

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose of the study The hypotensive activity of the essential oil of Mentha x villosa and its main constituent, the monoterpene rotundifolone, have been reported. Therefore, our objective was to evaluate the vasorelaxant effect of monoterpenes found in medicinal plants and establish the structureactivity relationship of rotundifolone and its structural analogues on the rat superior mesenteric artery. Methods:Contractions of the vessels were induced with 10 muM of phenylephine (Phe in rings with endothelium. During the tonic phase of the contraction, the monoterpenes (10-8 - 10-3, cumulatively were added to the organ bath. The extent of relaxation was expressed as the percentage of Phe-induced contraction. Results:The results from the present study showed that both oxygenated terpenes (rotundifolone, (+- limonene epoxide, pulegone epoxide, carvone epoxide, and (+-pulegone and nonoxygenated terpene ((+-limonene exhibit relaxation activity. The absence of an oxygenated molecular structure was not a critical requirement for the molecule to be bioactive. Also it was found that the position of ketone and epoxide groups in the monoterpene structures influence the vasorelaxant potency and efficacy. Major conclusion The results suggest that the presence of functional groups in the chemical structure of rotundifolone is not essential for its vasorelaxant activity.

  3. Adaptive flight control surfaces, wings, rotors, and active aerodynamics

    Barrett, Ronald M.; Brozoski, Fred

    1996-05-01

    This study outlines active flight control materials, structural arrangements, and several new active flight control methods for rotorcraft, airplanes and missiles. A system-level comparison shows that flight control actuator systems using materials like piezoceramics have approximately double the mass-specific energy and 4 to 6 times the volume specific energy of conventional actuators. New fabrication techniques centered on the principal of directional attachment allow wings and rotor blades to become twist active. Using these new methods, directionally attached piezoelectric (DAP) actuator elements were built into graphite-epoxy sandwich structures. When compared to conventionally attached piezoelectric (CAP) elements, twist deflections (important for flight control) of DAP plates were an order of magnitude greater. By using such twist-active elements in a torque-plate configuration, an active helicopter rotor was built. This Froude-scaled solid state rotor was whirl-stand tested and showed steady blade pitch deflections in excess of plus or minus 8 degrees with good correlation between theory and experiment rates up to 42 Hz (which corresponded to 2.5/rev) and no degradation in deflection as RPM was increased. DAP elements were also used in high aspect ratio subsonic and supersonic wings, demonstrating static twist deflections of plus or minus 2 degrees and plus or minus 6 degrees respectively, with good correlation between experiment and finite element results. The final section compares all-moving active stabilator structural arrangements and pitch deflections, which range up to plus or minus 12 degrees, generating lift coefficient changes in excess of plus or minus 0.8.

  4. Active Fault Tolerant Control for Ultrasonic Piezoelectric Motor

    Boukhnifer, Moussa

    2012-07-01

    Ultrasonic piezoelectric motor technology is an important system component in integrated mechatronics devices working on extreme operating conditions. Due to these constraints, robustness and performance of the control interfaces should be taken into account in the motor design. In this paper, we apply a new architecture for a fault tolerant control using Youla parameterization for an ultrasonic piezoelectric motor. The distinguished feature of proposed controller architecture is that it shows structurally how the controller design for performance and robustness may be done separately which has the potential to overcome the conflict between performance and robustness in the traditional feedback framework. A fault tolerant control architecture includes two parts: one part for performance and the other part for robustness. The controller design works in such a way that the feedback control system will be solely controlled by the proportional plus double-integral PI2 performance controller for a nominal model without disturbances and H∞ robustification controller will only be activated in the presence of the uncertainties or an external disturbances. The simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed fault tolerant control architecture.

  5. An evaluating methodology for hydrotechnical torrent-control structures condition

    Şerban Octavian Davidescu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Watershed management using torrent-control structures is an activity having more than 100 years history in Romania, So far, researches regarding works behaviour in service focused mainly on defining and assessing each damage type, without studying the inte-raction between them. Thus, damage classification criteria were substantiated taking into account nature and strength of the damages.This paper presents a methodology for assessing the condition of hydrotechnical structures by quantifying the cumulative effects of damages which occur with a significant frequency during their service. The model was created using a database, nationwide representative, with 3845 torrent-control structures.The identified damage types identified were weighted using multi-criteria analysis. Depending on the weight and strength off all damages occurred was calculated an indicator named “condition rate” (Ys. This new parameter may be used to track the impact of different features (structure age, components sizes, the position in the system, the construction materials, riverbed slope, geology of the area, etc. on the condition of structures.By establishing the condition rate for all the structures within a collectivity (an entire watershed or catchment area, a single watercourse, a battery of works etc., there may be made an analysis and a grading both at individual level and population-wide level, which lead to order the repairs or additions of new structures to existing hydrotechnical systems.Also, the model designed can be a part of a monitoring system regarding torrent-control structures, answering, thus, the requirements on this issue of the “National Strategy for Flood Risk Management” approved by the Romanian Government in 2010.

  6. Active noise control for high frequencies

    Kaymak, E; Atherton, MA; Rotter, KRG; Millar, B.

    2006-01-01

    There are many applications that can benefit from Active Noise Control (ANC) such as in aircraft cabins and air conditioning ducts, i.e. in situations where technology interferes with human hearing in a harmful way or disrupts communication. Headsets with analogue ANC circuits have been used in the armed forces for attenuating frequencies below 1 kHz, which when combined with passive filtering offers protection across the whole frequency range of human hearing. A dental surgery is also a nois...

  7. Active Noise Control in Forest Machines

    Forsgren, Fredrik

    2011-01-01

    Achieving a low noise level is of great interest to the forest machine industry. Traditionally this is obtained by using passive noise reduction, i.e. by using materials for sound isolation and sound absorption. Especially designs to attenuate low frequency noise tend to be bulky and impractical from an installation point of view. An alternative solution to the problem is to use active noise control (ANC). The basic principle of ANC is to generate an anti-noise signal designed to destructivel...

  8. Structural Dynamics Experimental Activities in Ultra-Lightweight and Inflatable Space Structures

    Pappa, Richard S.; Lassiter, John O.; Ross, Brian P.

    2001-01-01

    This paper reports recently completed structural dynamics experimental activities with new ultra-lightweight and inflatable space structures (a.k.a., "Gossamer" spacecraft) at NASA Langley Research Center, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Nine aspects of this work are covered: 1) inflated, rigidized tubes, 2) active control experiments, 3) photogrammetry, 4) laser vibrometry, 5) modal tests of inflatable structures, 6) in-vacuum modal tests, 7) tensioned membranes, 8) deployment tests, and 9) flight experiment support. Structural dynamics will play a major role in the design and eventually in-space deployment and performance of Gossamer spacecraft. Experimental research and development such as this is required to validate new analysis methods. The activities discussed in the paper are pathfinder accomplishments. conducted on unique components and prototypes of future spacecraft systems.

  9. Active and passive vibration suppression for space structures

    Hyland, David C.

    1991-01-01

    The relative benefits of passive and active vibration suppression for large space structures (LSS) are discussed. The intent is to sketch the true ranges of applicability of these approaches using previously published technical results. It was found that the distinction between active and passive vibration suppression approaches is not as sharp as might be thought at first. The relative simplicity, reliability, and cost effectiveness touted for passive measures are vitiated by 'hidden costs' bound up with detailed engineering implementation issues and inherent performance limitations. At the same time, reliability and robustness issues are often cited against active control. It is argued that a continuum of vibration suppression measures offering mutually supporting capabilities is needed. The challenge is to properly orchestrate a spectrum of methods to reap the synergistic benefits of combined advanced materials, passive damping, and active control.

  10. Active Thermal Control System Development for Exploration

    Westheimer, David

    2007-01-01

    All space vehicles or habitats require thermal management to maintain a safe and operational environment for both crew and hardware. Active Thermal Control Systems (ATCS) perform the functions of acquiring heat from both crew and hardware within a vehicle, transporting that heat throughout the vehicle, and finally rejecting that energy into space. Almost all of the energy used in a space vehicle eventually turns into heat, which must be rejected in order to maintain an energy balance and temperature control of the vehicle. For crewed vehicles, Active Thermal Control Systems are pumped fluid loops that are made up of components designed to perform these functions. NASA has been actively developing technologies that will enable future missions or will provide significant improvements over the state of the art technologies. These technologies have are targeted for application on the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV), or Orion, and a Lunar Surface Access Module (LSAM). The technologies that have been selected and are currently under development include: fluids that enable single loop ATCS architectures, a gravity insensitive vapor compression cycle heat pump, a sublimator with reduced sensitivity to feedwater contamination, an evaporative heat sink that can operate in multiple ambient pressure environments, a compact spray evaporator, and lightweight radiators that take advantage of carbon composites and advanced optical coatings.

  11. Active control of electric potential of spacecraft

    Goldstein, R.

    1977-01-01

    Techniques are discussed for controlling the potential of a spacecraft by means of devices which release appropriate charged particles from the spacecraft to the environment. Attention is given to electron emitters, ion emitters, a basic electron emitter arrangement, techniques for sensing electric field or potential, and flight experiments on active potential control. It is recommended to avoid differential charging on spacecraft surfaces because it can severely affect the efficacy of emitters. Discharging the frame of a spacecraft with dielectric surfaces involves the risk of stressing the dielectric material excessively. The spacecraft should, therefore, be provided with grounded conductive surfaces. It is pointed out that particles released by control systems can return to the spacecraft.

  12. Active Control of Shear Thickening in Suspensions

    Lin, Neil Y C; Cates, Michael E; Sun, Jin; Cohen, Itai

    2016-01-01

    Shear thickening, an increase of viscosity with shear rate, is a ubiquitous phenomena in suspended materials that has implications for broad technological applications. Controlling this thickening behavior remains a major challenge and has led to empirical strategies ranging from altering the particle surfaces and shape to modifying the solvent properties. However, none of these methods allow for active control of flow properties during shear itself. Here, we demonstrate that by strategic imposition of a high-frequency and low-amplitude shear perturbation orthogonal to the primary shearing flow, we can largely eradicate shear thickening. The orthogonal shear effectively becomes a regulator for controlling thickening in the suspension, allowing the viscosity to be reduced by up to two decades on demand. In a separate setup, we show that such effects can be induced by simply agitating the sample transversely to the primary shear direction. Overall, the ability of in situ manipulation of shear thickening paves a...

  13. Vehicle active steering control research based on two-DOF robust internal model control

    Wu, Jian; Liu, Yahui; Wang, Fengbo; Bao, Chunjiang; Sun, Qun; Zhao, Youqun

    2016-03-01

    Because of vehicle's external disturbances and model uncertainties, robust control algorithms have obtained popularity in vehicle stability control. The robust control usually gives up performance in order to guarantee the robustness of the control algorithm, therefore an improved robust internal model control(IMC) algorithm blending model tracking and internal model control is put forward for active steering system in order to reach high performance of yaw rate tracking with certain robustness. The proposed algorithm inherits the good model tracking ability of the IMC control and guarantees robustness to model uncertainties. In order to separate the design process of model tracking from the robustness design process, the improved 2 degree of freedom(DOF) robust internal model controller structure is given from the standard Youla parameterization. Simulations of double lane change maneuver and those of crosswind disturbances are conducted for evaluating the robust control algorithm, on the basis of a nonlinear vehicle simulation model with a magic tyre model. Results show that the established 2-DOF robust IMC method has better model tracking ability and a guaranteed level of robustness and robust performance, which can enhance the vehicle stability and handling, regardless of variations of the vehicle model parameters and the external crosswind interferences. Contradiction between performance and robustness of active steering control algorithm is solved and higher control performance with certain robustness to model uncertainties is obtained.

  14. Improving aerobic capacity through active videogames: A randomized controlled trial

    Jorge Luiz de Brito-Gomes; Raphael José Perrier-Melo; Erik Anders Wikstrom; Manoel da Cunha Costa

    2015-01-01

    AbstractThe rate of peak workload improvement between different types of Active Video Games (AVG) in young sedentary adults was investigated. Aerobic capacity improvement after a 6-week intervention between AVG types was also compared. Twenty participants, after baseline assessments, were randomized into one of three parallel groups: structured AVG (n= 6), unstructured AVG (n= 7) and a control group (n= 7). Participants played their respective AVG 3 times a week for 6-weeks (30 minutes-sessio...

  15. Active control landing gear for ground loads alleviation

    Mcgehee, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    An active landing gear has been created by connecting the hydraulic piston in an oleo strut to a hydraulic supply. A controller modulates the pressure in the oleo to achieve the desired dynamic characteristics. Tests on ground rigs (documented by a film) have demonstrated the successful alleviation of induced structural ground loads and the next step will be a flight test using a fighter aircraft.

  16. HBT-EP Program: Active MHD Mode Dynamics and Control

    Navratil, G. A.; Bialek, J.; Boozer, A. H.; Byrne, P. J.; Donald, G. V.; Hughes, P. E.; Levesque, J. P.; Mauel, M. E.; Peng, Q.; Rhodes, D. J.; Stoafer, C. C.; Hansen, C. J.

    2015-11-01

    The HBT-EP active mode control research program aims to: (i) quantify external kink dynamics and multimode response to magnetic perturbations, (ii) understand the relationship between control coil configuration, conducting and ferritic wall effects, and active feedback control, and (iii) explore advanced feedback algorithms. Biorthogonal decomposition is used to observe multiple simultaneous resistive wall modes (RWM). A 512 core GPU-based low latency (14 μs) MIMO control system uses 96 inputs and 64 outputs for Adaptive Control of RWMs. An in-vessel adjustable ferritic wall is used to study ferritic RWMs with increased growth rates, RMP response, and disruptivity. A biased electrode in the plasma is used to control the rotation of external kinks and evaluate error fields. A Thomson scattering diagnostic measures Te and ne at 3 spatial points, soon to be extended to 10 points. A quasi-linear sharp-boundary model of the plasma's multimode response to error fields is developed to determine harmful error field structures and associated NTV and resonant torques. Upcoming machine upgrades will allow measurements and control of scrape-off-layer currents, and control of kink modes using optical diagnostics. Supported by U.S. DOE Grant DE-FG02-86ER53222.

  17. Control structures for high speed processors

    Maki, G. K.; Mankin, R.; Owsley, P. A.; Kim, G. M.

    1982-01-01

    A special processor was designed to function as a Reed Solomon decoder with throughput data rate in the Mhz range. This data rate is significantly greater than is possible with conventional digital architectures. To achieve this rate, the processor design includes sequential, pipelined, distributed, and parallel processing. The processor was designed using a high level language register transfer language. The RTL can be used to describe how the different processes are implemented by the hardware. One problem of special interest was the development of dependent processes which are analogous to software subroutines. For greater flexibility, the RTL control structure was implemented in ROM. The special purpose hardware required approximately 1000 SSI and MSI components. The data rate throughput is 2.5 megabits/second. This data rate is achieved through the use of pipelined and distributed processing. This data rate can be compared with 800 kilobits/second in a recently proposed very large scale integration design of a Reed Solomon encoder.

  18. Control source development for reduction of noise transmitted through a double panel structure

    Ho, Jen-Hsuan

    2014-01-01

    A double panel structure, which consists of two panels with air in between, is widely adopted in many applications such as aerospace, automotive industries, and buildings due to its low sound transmission at high frequencies, low heat transmission, and low weight. Nevertheless, the resonance of the cavity and the poor sound transmission loss at low frequencies limit the double panel’s noise control performance. Applying active structural acoustic control to the panels or active noise control ...

  19. Structure-activity relationship of anthelmintic cyclooctadepsipeptides.

    Ohyama, Makoto; Okada, Yumiko; Takahashi, Masaaki; Sakanaka, Osamu; Matsumoto, Maki; Atsumi, Kunio

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between cyclooctadepsipeptides and their anthelmintic efficacy was examined by converting the natural products, PF1022A, PF1022E and PF1022H. Some analogues substituted at the para position of the phenyllactate moiety showed higher or equivalent activity against the parasitic nematode, Ascaridia galli in chicken when compared with the parent compounds. It is suggested that lipophilicity and the polar surface area, in addition to structural requirements of the derivatives, influenced the anthelmintic efficacy in vivo. PMID:21737929

  20. Systems Variables and Structural Controllability: An Inverted Pendulum Case

    Qiang Ma

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to explore the essence of structural controllability, structural controllability of inverted pendulum is analyzed in this presented study and a sufficient controllability condition of a class of perturbed linear system is obtained, which is essential to prove the structural controllability for the perturbed inverted pendulum. Two different structured models of inverted pendulum are constructed. Structural controllability of both cases are discussed and compared, which shows that the usual model used in controller design for inverted pendulum is just a special case of normal model for inverted pendulum.

  1. Fuzzy Variable Structure Control of Photovoltaic MPPT System

    LI Wei; ZHU Xin-jian; CAO Guang-yi

    2006-01-01

    In order to reduce chattering phenomenon of variable structure control, a fuzzy variable structure control method is adopted and applied in the photovoitaic maximum power point tracking (MPPT) control system. Firstly, the electric features of PV cells and a dynamic model of photovoltaic system with a DC-DC buck converter are analysed. Then a hybrid fuzzy variable structure controller is designed. The controller is composed of a fuzzy variable structure control term and a supervisory control term. The former is the main part of the controller and the latter is used to ensure the stability of the system. Finally, the conventional variable structure control method and the fuzzy variable structure control method are applied respectively. The comparing of simulation results shows the superiority of the latter.

  2. Integrated and Distributed Adaptive Metacomposites for vibroacoustic control of Aerospace Structures

    Collet, Manuel; Ouisse, Morvan; Tateo, Flaviano; Ichchou, Mohamed Najib

    2013-01-01

    Research activities in smart materials and structures represent a significant potential for technological innovation in mechanics and electronics. The necessity of controlling vibroacoustic behavior of industrial systems motivates a broad research effort for introducing active or passive technologies to control noise and vibrations. New processes are now available which allow active transducers and their driving electronics to be directly integrated into otherwise passive structures. This new...

  3. Nonlinear and Variable Structure Excitation Controller for Power System Stability

    Wang Ben; Ronnie Belmans

    2006-01-01

    A new nonlinear variable structure excitation controller is proposed. Its design combines the differential geometry theory and the variable structure controlling theory. The mathematical model in the form of "an affine nonlinear system" is set up for the control of a large-scale power system. The static and dynamic performances of the nonlinear variable structure controller are simulated. The response of system with the controller proposed is compared to that of the nonlinear optimal controller when the system is subjected to a variety of disturbances. Simulation results show that the nonlinear variable structure excitation controller gives more satisfactorily static and dynamic performance and better robustness.

  4. On the control of structures by applied thermal gradients

    Edberg, Don; Chen, JAY-C.

    1987-01-01

    Some preliminary results of research on control of flexible structures performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory are presented. It was shown that the thermoelectric device is a feasible actuator and may effectively be used to control structures, provided the structure has a relatively low thermal inertia. The control law only depends on the open-loop system natural frequency.

  5. An absorbing phase transition from a structured active particle phase

    Lopez, Cristobal [Instituto Mediterraneo de Estudios Avanzados IMEDEA (CSIC-UIB), Campus de la Universidad de las Islas Baleares, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Ramos, Francisco [Departamento de Electromagnetismo y Fisica de la Materia and Instituto de Fisica Teorica y Computacional Carlos I, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Granada, 18071 Granada (Spain); Hernandez-GarcIa, Emilio [Instituto Mediterraneo de Estudios Avanzados IMEDEA (CSIC-UIB), Campus de la Universidad de las Islas Baleares, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain)

    2007-02-14

    In this work we study the absorbing state phase transition of a recently introduced model for interacting particles with neighbourhood-dependent reproduction rates. The novelty of the transition is that as soon as the active phase is reached by increasing a control parameter a periodically arranged structure of particle clusters appears. A numerical study in one and two dimensions shows that the system falls into the directed percolation universality class.

  6. Improving aerobic capacity through active videogames: A randomized controlled trial

    Jorge Luiz de Brito-Gomes

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe rate of peak workload improvement between different types of Active Video Games (AVG in young sedentary adults was investigated. Aerobic capacity improvement after a 6-week intervention between AVG types was also compared. Twenty participants, after baseline assessments, were randomized into one of three parallel groups: structured AVG (n= 6, unstructured AVG (n= 7 and a control group (n= 7. Participants played their respective AVG 3 times a week for 6-weeks (30 minutes-session. The control group maintained normal activities. Both structured and unstructured AVG improved peak workload after four weeks but only the structured group maintained this improvement through week five and six. Aerobic capacity improved in the unstructured (Pre: 36.0 ± 5.2ml.kg.min-¹,Post: 39.7 ± 4.9ml.kg.min-¹, p = .038 and structured AVG (Pre: 39.0 ± 5.9ml.kg.min-¹,Post: 47.8 ± 4.3ml.kg.min-¹, p = .006 groups. Structured AVG provide greater health benefits to aerobic capacity and peak workload in young sedentary but otherwise healthy males relative to unstructured AVG.

  7. Temporal Translational Control by a Metastable RNA Structure

    Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Franch, Thomas; Gerdes, Kenn

    2001-01-01

    Programmed cell death by the hok/sok locus of plasmid R1 relies on a complex translational control mechanism. The highly stable hok mRNA is activated by 3'-end exonucleolytical processing. Removal of the mRNA 3' end releases a 5'-end sequence that triggers refolding of the mRNA. The refolded hok m......RNA is translatable but can also bind the inhibitory Sok antisense RNA. Binding of Sok RNA leads to irreversible mRNA inactivation by an RNase III-dependent mechanism. A coherent model predicts that during transcription hok mRNA must be refractory to translation and antisense RNA binding. Here we provide...... genetic evidence for the existence of a 5' metastable structure in hok mRNA that locks the nascent transcript in an inactive configuration in vivo. Consistently, the metastable structure reduces the rate of Sok RNA binding and completely blocks hok translation in vitro. Structural analyses of native RNAs...

  8. Variable-Structure Control of a Model Glider Airplane

    Waszak, Martin R.; Anderson, Mark R.

    2008-01-01

    A variable-structure control system designed to enable a fuselage-heavy airplane to recover from spin has been demonstrated in a hand-launched, instrumented model glider airplane. Variable-structure control is a high-speed switching feedback control technique that has been developed for control of nonlinear dynamic systems.

  9. Control structure selection for vapor compression refrigeration cycle

    Yin, Xiaohong; Li, Shaoyuan [Shanghai Jiao Tong Univ., Shanghai (China). Dept. of Automation; Shandong Jianzhu Univ., Jinan (China). School of Information and Electrical Engineering; Cai, Wenjian; Ding, Xudong [Nanyang Technological Univ., Singapore (Singapore). School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering

    2013-07-01

    A control structure selection criterion which can be used to evaluate the control performance of different control structures for the vapor compression refrigeration cycle is proposed in this paper. The calculation results of the proposed criterion based on the different reduction models are utilized to determine the optimized control model structure. The effectiveness of the criterion is verified by the control effects of the model predictive control (MPC) controllers which are designed based on different model structures. The response of the different controllers applied on the actual vapor compression refrigeration system indicate that the best model structure is in consistent with the one obtained by the proposed structure selection criterion which is a trade-off between computation complexity and control performance.

  10. Structural Acoustic Prediction and Interior Noise Control Technology

    Mathur, G. P.; Chin, C. L.; Simpson, M. A.; Lee, J. T.; Palumbo, Daniel L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This report documents the results of Task 14, "Structural Acoustic Prediction and Interior Noise Control Technology". The task was to evaluate the performance of tuned foam elements (termed Smart Foam) both analytically and experimentally. Results taken from a three-dimensional finite element model of an active, tuned foam element are presented. Measurements of sound absorption and sound transmission loss were taken using the model. These results agree well with published data. Experimental performance data were taken in Boeing's Interior Noise Test Facility where 12 smart foam elements were applied to a 757 sidewall. Several configurations were tested. Noise reductions of 5-10 dB were achieved over the 200-800 Hz bandwidth of the controller. Accelerometers mounted on the panel provided a good reference for the controller. Configurations with far-field error microphones outperformed near-field cases.

  11. Neotectonics and structure of the Himalayan deformation front in the Kashmir Himalaya, India: Implication in defining what controls a blind thrust front in an active fold-thrust belt

    Gavillot, Y. G.; Meigs, A.; Yule, J. D.; Rittenour, T. M.; Malik, M. O. A.

    2014-12-01

    Active tectonics of a deformation front constrains the kinematic evolution and structural interaction between the fold-thrust belt and most-recently accreted foreland basin. In Kashmir, the Himalayan Frontal thrust (HFT) is blind, characterized by a broad fold, the Suruin-Mastargh anticline (SMA), and displays no emergent faults cutting either limb. A lack of knowledge of the rate of shortening and structural framework of the SMA hampers quantifying the earthquake potential for the deformation front. Our study utilized the geomorphic expression of dated deformed terraces on the Ujh River in Kashmir. Six terraces are recognized, and three yield OSL ages of 53 ka, 33 ka, and 0.4 ka. Vector fold restoration of long terrace profiles indicates a deformation pattern characterized by regional uplift across the anticlinal axis and back-limb, and by fold limb rotation on the forelimb. Differential uplift across the fold trace suggests localized deformation. Dip data and stratigraphic thicknesses suggest that a duplex structure is emplaced at depth along the basal décollement, folding the overlying roof thrust and Siwalik-Muree strata into a detachment-like fold. Localized faulting at the fold axis explains the asymmetrical fold geometry. Folding of the oldest dated terrace, suggest that rock uplift rates across the SMA range between 2.0-1.8 mm/yr. Assuming a 25° dipping ramp for the blind structure on the basis of dip data constraints, the shortening rate across the SMA ranges between 4.4-3.8 mm/yr since ~53 ka. Of that rate, ~1 mm/yr is likely absorbed by minor faulting in the near field of the fold axis. Given that Himalaya-India convergence is ~18.8-11 mm/yr, internal faults north of the deformation front, such as the Riasi thrust absorbs more of the Himalayan shortening than does the HFT in Kashmir. We attribute a non-emergent thrust at the deformation front to reflect deformation controlled by pre-existing basin architecture in Kashmir, in which the thick succession

  12. Coordinated Voltage Control of Active Distribution Network

    Xie Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a centralized coordinated voltage control method for active distribution network to solve off-limit problem of voltage after incorporation of distributed generation (DG. The proposed method consists of two parts, it coordinated primal-dual interior point method-based voltage regulation schemes of DG reactive powers and capacitors with centralized on-load tap changer (OLTC controlling method which utilizes system’s maximum and minimum voltages, to improve the qualified rate of voltage and reduce the operation numbers of OLTC. The proposed coordination has considered the cost of capacitors. The method is tested using a radial edited IEEE-33 nodes distribution network which is modelled using MATLAB.

  13. Controller modification applied for active fault detection

    Niemann, Hans Henrik; Stoustrup, Jakob; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad

    2014-01-01

    This paper is focusing on active fault detection (AFD) for parametric faults in closed-loop systems. This auxiliary input applied for the fault detection will also disturb the external output and consequently reduce the performance of the controller. Therefore, only small auxiliary inputs are used...... modify the feedback controller with a minor effect on the external output in the fault free case. Further, in the faulty case, the signature of the auxiliary input can be optimized. This is obtained by using a band-pass filter for the YJBK parameter that is only effective in a small frequency range where...... the frequency for the auxiliary input is selected. This gives that it is possible to apply an auxiliary input with a reduced amplitude. An example is included to show the results....

  14. Antioxidant activity of taxifolin: an activity-structure relationship.

    Topal, Fevzi; Nar, Meryem; Gocer, Hulya; Kalin, Pınar; Kocyigit, Umit M; Gülçin, İlhami; Alwasel, Saleh H

    2016-08-01

    Taxifolin is a kind of flavanonol, whose biological ability. The objectives of this study were to investigate the antioxidants and antiradical activities of taxifolin by using different in vitro bioanalytical antioxidant methods including DMPD√(+), ABTS√(+), [Formula: see text], and DPPH√-scavenging effects, the total antioxidant influence, reducing capabilities, and Fe(2+)-chelating activities. Taxifolin demonstrated 81.02% inhibition of linoleic acid emulsion peroxidation at 30 µg/mL concentration. At the same concentration, standard antioxidants including trolox, α-tocopherol, BHT, and BHA exhibited inhibitions of linoleic acid emulsion as 88.57, 73.88, 94.29, and 90.12%, respectively. Also, taxifolin exhibited effective DMPD√(+), ABTS√(+), [Formula: see text], and DPPH√-scavenging effects, reducing capabilities, and Fe(2+)-chelating effects. The results obtained from this study clearly showed that taxifolin had marked antioxidant, reducing ability, radical scavenging and metal-chelating activities. Also, this study exhibits a scientific shore for the significant antioxidant activity of taxifolin and its structure-activity insight. PMID:26147349

  15. Crustal structure and active tectonics in the Eastern Alps

    Brückl, E.; Behm, M.; Decker, K.;

    2010-01-01

    During the last decade, a series of controlled source seismic experiments brought new insight into the crustal and lithospheric structure of the Eastern Alps and their adjacent tectonic provinces. A fragmentation of the lithosphere into three blocks, Europe (EU), Adria (AD), and the new Pannonian...... compensated by the lateral extrusion of the central Eastern Alps. The Periadriatic (Insubric) line east of the triple junction and the mid-Hungarian fault zone have relatively recently lost their role as first-order active structures. We favor the idea that the Pannonian fragment and the TISZA block merged to...

  16. Improved training of neural networks for the nonlinear active control of sound and vibration.

    Bouchard, M; Paillard, B; Le Dinh, C T

    1999-01-01

    Active control of sound and vibration has been the subject of a lot of research in recent years, and examples of applications are now numerous. However, few practical implementations of nonlinear active controllers have been realized. Nonlinear active controllers may be required in cases where the actuators used in active control systems exhibit nonlinear characteristics, or in cases when the structure to be controlled exhibits a nonlinear behavior. A multilayer perceptron neural-network based control structure was previously introduced as a nonlinear active controller, with a training algorithm based on an extended backpropagation scheme. This paper introduces new heuristical training algorithms for the same neural-network control structure. The objective is to develop new algorithms with faster convergence speed (by using nonlinear recursive-least-squares algorithms) and/or lower computational loads (by using an alternative approach to compute the instantaneous gradient of the cost function). Experimental results of active sound control using a nonlinear actuator with linear and nonlinear controllers are presented. The results show that some of the new algorithms can greatly improve the learning rate of the neural-network control structure, and that for the considered experimental setup a neural-network controller can outperform linear controllers. PMID:18252535

  17. Real Time Vibration Control of Active Suspension System with Active Force Control using Iterative Learning Algorithm

    Kalaivani

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents concurrent vibration control of a laboratory scaled vibration isolator platform with Active Force Control (AFC using Iterative Learning Algorithm (ILA. The work investigates the performance of the traditional Proportional Integral Derivative Controller (PIDC with and without AFC using ILA for vibration suppression. The physical single degree of freedom quarter car has been interfaced with a personal computer using a National Instruments data acquisition card NI USB 6008. The controllers are designed and simulated using LabVIEW simulation software. The results infer that the PIDC with AFC using ILA works superior than the PIDC.

  18. Integrated controls/structures study of advanced space systems

    Greene, C. S.; Cunningham, T. B.

    1982-01-01

    A cost tradeoff is postulated for a stiff structure utilizing minimal controls (and control expense) to point and stabilize the vehicle. Extra costs for a stiff structure are caused by weight, packaging size, etc. Likewise, a more flexible vehicle should result in reduced structural costs but increased costs associated with additional control hardware and data processing required for vibration control of the structure. This tradeoff occurs as the ratio of the control bandwidth required for the mission to the lowest (significant) bending mode of the vehicle. The cost of controlling a spacecraft for a specific mission and the same basic configuration but varying the flexibility is established.

  19. Reduction of helicopter blade-vortex interaction noise by active rotor control technology

    Yu, Yung H.; Gmelin, Bernd; Splettstoesser, Wolf; Philippe, Jean J.; Prieur, Jean; Brooks, Thomas F.

    Helicopter blade-vortex interaction noise is one of the most severe noise sources and is very important both in community annoyance and military detection. Research over the decades has substantially improved basic physical understanding of the mechanisms generating rotor blade-vortex interaction noise and also of controlling techniques, particularly using active rotor control technology. This paper reviews active rotor control techniques currently available for rotor blade-vortex interaction noise reduction, including higher harmonic pitch control, individual blade control, and on-blade control technologies. Basic physical mechanisms of each active control technique are reviewed in terms of noise reduction mechanism and controlling aerodynamic or structural parameters of a blade. Active rotor control techniques using smart structures/materials are discussed, including distributed smart actuators to induce local torsional or flapping deformations.

  20. Reduction of Helicopter Blade-Vortex Interaction Noise by Active Rotor Control Technology

    Yu, Yung H.; Gmelin, Bernd; Splettstoesser, Wolf; Brooks, Thomas F.; Philippe, Jean J.; Prieur, Jean

    1997-01-01

    Helicopter blade-vortex interaction noise is one of the most severe noise sources and is very important both in community annoyance and military detection. Research over the decades has substantially improved basic physical understanding of the mechanisms generating rotor blade-vortex interaction noise and also of controlling techniques, particularly using active rotor control technology. This paper reviews active rotor control techniques currently available for rotor blade vortex interaction noise reduction, including higher harmonic pitch control, individual blade control, and on-blade control technologies. Basic physical mechanisms of each active control technique are reviewed in terms of noise reduction mechanism and controlling aerodynamic or structural parameters of a blade. Active rotor control techniques using smart structures/materials are discussed, including distributed smart actuators to induce local torsional or flapping deformations, Published by Elsevier Science Ltd.

  1. Development of semi-active hydraulic damper as active interaction control device to withstand external excitation

    Ming-Hsiang Shih; Wen-Pei Sung

    2014-02-01

    Semi-automatic control systems have the characteristics of being adaptable and requiring low energy. The objective of this research was to study the performance of an improved DSHD (Displacement Semi-Active Hydraulic Damper) by converting it to AIC (Active Interaction Control Device) with the addition of an accumulator. The prototype was tested using full-scale elements for examining the structural displacement, and typical responses of the interacting interface element developed in this research, the pressure variation of the pressure storage device, and the energy dissipation hysteresis loop when the structure installed with these elements is subjected to external force of various magnitude. The laboratory results confirm that the device developed in this research is capable of applying the energy dissipation characteristics of DSHD so that these elements are appropriate for developing the proposed AIC. The mutual interaction between the subordinate structure and the main structure to be protected is capable of transforming the quake energy applied to the main structure to the subordinate structure so that the objective of minimizing the deformation of main structural can be achieved.

  2. Resistive wall mode active control physics design for KSTAR

    Park, Y. S.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Bak, J. G.; Bialek, J. M.; Berkery, J. W.; Lee, S. G.; Oh, Y. K.

    2014-01-01

    As KSTAR H-mode operation approaches the region where the resistive wall mode (RWM) can be unstable, an important issue for future long pulse, high beta plasma operation is to evaluate RWM active feedback control performance using a planned active/passive RWM stabilization system on the device. In particular, an optimal design of feedback sensors allows mode stabilization up to the highest achievable βN close to the ideal with-wall limit, βNwall, with reduced control power requirements. The computed ideal n = 1 mode structure from the DCON code has been input to the VALEN-3D code to calculate the projected performance of an active RWM control system in the KSTAR three-dimensional conducting structure device geometry. Control performance with the midplane locked mode detection sensors, off-midplane saddle loops, and magnetic pickup coils is examined. The midplane sensors measuring the radial component of the mode perturbation is found to be strongly affected by the wall eddy current. The off-axis saddle loops with proper compensation of the prompt applied field are computed to provide stabilization at βN up to 86% of βNwall but the low RWM amplitude computed in the off-axis regions near the sensors can produce a low signal-to-noise ratio. The required control power and bandwidth are also estimated with varied noise levels in the feedback sensors. Further improvements have been explored by examining a new RWM sensor design motivated by the off-midplane poloidal magnetic field sensors in NSTX. The new sensors mounted off of the copper passive stabilizer plates near the device midplane show a clear advantage in control performance corresponding to achieving 99% of βNwall without the need of compensation of the prompt field. The result shows a significant improvement of RWM feedback stabilization using the new sensor set which motivates a future feedback sensor upgrade.

  3. Resistive wall mode active control physics design for KSTAR

    As KSTAR H-mode operation approaches the region where the resistive wall mode (RWM) can be unstable, an important issue for future long pulse, high beta plasma operation is to evaluate RWM active feedback control performance using a planned active/passive RWM stabilization system on the device. In particular, an optimal design of feedback sensors allows mode stabilization up to the highest achievable βN close to the ideal with-wall limit, βNwall, with reduced control power requirements. The computed ideal n = 1 mode structure from the DCON code has been input to the VALEN-3D code to calculate the projected performance of an active RWM control system in the KSTAR three-dimensional conducting structure device geometry. Control performance with the midplane locked mode detection sensors, off-midplane saddle loops, and magnetic pickup coils is examined. The midplane sensors measuring the radial component of the mode perturbation is found to be strongly affected by the wall eddy current. The off-axis saddle loops with proper compensation of the prompt applied field are computed to provide stabilization at βN up to 86% of βNwall but the low RWM amplitude computed in the off-axis regions near the sensors can produce a low signal-to-noise ratio. The required control power and bandwidth are also estimated with varied noise levels in the feedback sensors. Further improvements have been explored by examining a new RWM sensor design motivated by the off-midplane poloidal magnetic field sensors in NSTX. The new sensors mounted off of the copper passive stabilizer plates near the device midplane show a clear advantage in control performance corresponding to achieving 99% of βNwall without the need of compensation of the prompt field. The result shows a significant improvement of RWM feedback stabilization using the new sensor set which motivates a future feedback sensor upgrade

  4. Parameter Estimation in Active Plate Structures

    Araujo, A. L.; Lopes, H. M. R.; Vaz, M. A. P.;

    2006-01-01

    In this paper two non-destructive methods for elastic and piezoelectric parameter estimation in active plate structures with surface bonded piezoelectric patches are presented. These methods rely on experimental undamped natural frequencies of free vibration. The first solves the inverse problem...... through gradient based optimization techniques, while the second is based on a metamodel of the inverse problem, using artificial neural networks. A numerical higher order finite element laminated plate model is used in both methods and results are compared and discussed through a simulated and an...

  5. Activism and the Online Mediation Opportunity Structure

    Uldam, Julie

    2013-01-01

    The annual United Nations (UN) Framework Convention on Climate Change conferences provides a transnational mediation opportunity structure for activist networks to contest policies that favor market-based models for solving the climate crisis. Online technologies, including commercial social media...... climate change activism. This impedes possibilities for using online media to protest at the radical end of the climate justice movement spectrum. This article explores this interrelationship between activist demands and (online) modes of action through a focus on the mobilization efforts of London...

  6. Advances in Structural Control in Civil Engineering in China

    Hongnan Li; Linsheng Huo

    2010-01-01

    In the recent years, much attention has been paid to the research and development of structural control techniques with particular emphasis on alleviation of wind and seismic responses of buildings and bridges in China. Structural control in civil engineering has been developed from the concept into a workable technology and applied into practical engineering structures. The aim of this paper is to review a state of the art of researches and applications of structural control in civil enginee...

  7. Organization structure. Main activities of the Division

    In this chapter the organization structure as well as main activities of the Division for radiation safety, NPP decommissioning and radioactive waste management are presented. This Division of the VUJE, a.s. consists of the following sections and departments: Section for economic and technical services; Section for radiation protection of employees; Department for management of emergency situations and risk assessment; Department for implementation of nuclear power facilities decommissioning and RAW management; Department for personnel and environmental dosimetry; Department for preparation of NPP decommissioning; Department for RAW treatment technologies; Department for chemical regimes and physico-chemical analyses; Department for management of nuclear power facilities decommissioning and RAW management. Main activities of this Division are presented.

  8. APPROXIMATION LAWS OF DISCRETE-TIME VARIABLE STRUCTURE CONTROL SYSTEMS

    2008-01-01

    Two new approximation laws of sliding mode for discrete-time variable structure control systems are proposed in this paper. By applying the proposed approximation laws of sliding mode to discrete-time variable structure control systems,the stability of origin can be guaranteed,and the chattering along the switching surface caused by discrete-time variable structure control can be restrained effectively. In designing of these approximation laws,the problem that the system control input is restricted is also ...

  9. Improving the vibration suppression capabilities of a magneto-rheological damper using hybrid active and semi-active control

    Ullah Khan, Irfan; Wagg, David; Sims, Neil D.

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a new hybrid active and semi-active control method for vibration suppression in flexible structures. The method uses a combination of a semi-active device and an active control actuator situated elsewhere in the structure to suppress vibrations. The key novelty is to use the hybrid controller to enable the magneto-rheological damper to achieve a performance as close to a fully active device as possible. This is achieved by ensuring that the active actuator can assist the magneto-rheological damper in the regions where energy is required. In addition, the hybrid active and semi-active controller is designed to minimize the switching of the semi-active controller. The control framework used is the immersion and invariance control technique in combination with sliding mode control. A two degree-of-freedom system with lightly damped resonances is used as an example system. Both numerical and experimental results are generated for this system, and then compared as part of a validation study. The experimental system uses hardware-in-the-loop to simulate the effect of both the degrees-of-freedom. The results show that the concept is viable both numerically and experimentally, and improved vibration suppression results can be obtained for the magneto-rheological damper that approach the performance of an active device.

  10. System identification for modeling for control of flexible structures

    Mettler, Edward; Milman, Mark

    1986-01-01

    The major components of a design and operational flight strategy for flexible structure control systems are presented. In this strategy an initial distributed parameter control design is developed and implemented from available ground test data and on-orbit identification using sophisticated modeling and synthesis techniques. The reliability of this high performance controller is directly linked to the accuracy of the parameters on which the design is based. Because uncertainties inevitably grow without system monitoring, maintaining the control system requires an active on-line system identification function to supply parameter updates and covariance information. Control laws can then be modified to improve performance when the error envelopes are decreased. In terms of system safety and stability the covariance information is of equal importance as the parameter values themselves. If the on-line system ID function detects an increase in parameter error covariances, then corresponding adjustments must be made in the control laws to increase robustness. If the error covariances exceed some threshold, an autonomous calibration sequence could be initiated to restore the error enveloped to an acceptable level.

  11. Performance of active vibration control technology: the ACTEX flight experiments

    Nye, T. W.; Manning, R. A.; Qassim, K.

    1999-12-01

    This paper discusses the development and results of two intelligent structures space-flight experiments, each of which could affect architecture designs of future spacecraft. The first, the advanced controls technology experiment I (ACTEX I), is a variable stiffness tripod structure riding as a secondary payload on a classified spacecraft. It has been operating well past its expected life since becoming operational in 1996. Over 60 on-orbit experiments have been run on the ACTEX I flight experiment. These experiments form the basis for in-space controller design problems and for concluding lifetime/reliability data on the active control components. Transfer functions taken during the life of ACTEX I have shown consistent predictability and stability in structural behavior, including consistency with those measurements taken on the ground prior to a three year storage period and the launch event. ACTEX I can change its modal characteristics by employing its dynamic change mechanism that varies preloads in portions of its structure. Active control experiments have demonstrated maximum vibration reductions of 29 dB and 16 dB in the first two variable modes of the system, while operating over a remarkable on-orbit temperature range of -80 °C to 129 °C. The second experiment, ACTEX II, was successfully designed, ground-tested, and integrated on an experimental Department of Defense satellite prior to its loss during a launch vehicle failure in 1995. ACTEX II also had variable modal behavior by virtue of a two-axis gimbal and added challenges of structural flexibility by being a large deployable appendage. Although the loss of ACTEX II did not provide space environment experience, ground testing resulted in space qualifying the hardware and demonstrated 21 dB, 14 dB, and 8 dB reductions in amplitude of the first three primary structural modes. ACTEX II could use either active and/or passive techniques to affect vibration suppression. Both experiments trailblazed

  12. Activation and micropore structure of carbon-fiber composites

    Jagtoyen, M.; Derbyshire, F.; Kimber, G. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research

    1997-12-01

    Rigid, high surface area activated carbon fiber composites have been produced with high permeabilities for environmental applications in gas and water purification. The project involves a collaboration between the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER), University of Kentucky. The main focus of recent work has been to find a satisfactory means to uniformly activate large samples of carbon fiber composites to produce controlled pore structures. Processes have been developed using activation in steam and CO{sub 2}, and a less conventional method involving oxygen chemisorption and subsequent heat treatment. Another objective has been to explore applications for the activated composites in environmental applications related to fossil energy production.

  13. Acoustic and Vibration Control for an Underwater Structure under Mechanical Excitation

    Shi-Jian Zhu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic and vibration control for an underwater structure under mechanical excitation has been investigated by using negative feedback control algorithm. The underwater structure is modeled with cylindrical shells, conical shells, and circular bulkheads, of which the motion equations are built with the variational approach, respectively. Acoustic property is analyzed by the Helmholtz integration formulation with boundary element method. Based on negative feedback control algorithm, a control loop with a coupling use of piezoelectric sensor and actuator is built, and accordingly some numerical examples are carried out on active control of structural vibration and acoustic response. Effects of geometrical and material parameters on acoustic and vibration properties are investigated and discussed.

  14. System identification and structural control on the JPL Phase B testbed

    Chu, Cheng-Chih; Obrien, John F.; Lurie, Boris J.

    1993-01-01

    The primary objective of NASA's CSI program at JPL is to develop and demonstrate the CSI technology required to achieve high precision structural stability on large complex optical class spacecraft. The focus mission for this work is an orbiting interferometer telescope. Toward the realization of such a mission, a series of evolutionary testbed structures are being constructed. The JPL's CSI Phase B testbed is the second structure constructed in this series which is designed to study the pathlength control problem of the optical train of a stellar interferometer telescope mounted on a large flexible structure. A detailed description of this testbed can be found. This paper describes our efforts in the first phase of active structural control experiments of Phase B testbed using the active control approach where a single piezoelectric active member is used as an actuation device and the measurements include both colocated and noncolocated sensors. Our goal for this experiment is to demonstrate the feasibility of active structural control using both colocated and noncolocated measurements by means of successive control design and loop closing. More specifically, the colocated control loop was designed and closed first to provide good damping improvement over the frequency range of interest. The noncolocated controller was then designed with respect to a partially controlled structure to further improve the performance. Based on our approach, experimental closed-loop results have demonstrated significant performance improvement with excellent stability margins.

  15. Recent Advances in Bidirectional Modeling and Structural Control

    Paul, Satyam; Yu, Wen; Li, Xiaoou

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of building structure modeling and control under bidirectional seismic waves. It focuses on different types of bidirectional control devices, control strategies, and bidirectional sensors used in structural control systems. This paper also highlights the various issues like system identification techniques, the time-delay in the system, estimation of velocity and position from acceleration signals, and optimal placement of the sensors and control devices. The i...

  16. Recent Advances in Bidirectional Modeling and Structural Control

    Satyam Paul; Wen Yu; Xiaoou Li

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of building structure modeling and control under bidirectional seismic waves. It focuses on different types of bidirectional control devices, control strategies, and bidirectional sensors used in structural control systems. This paper also highlights the various issues like system identification techniques, the time-delay in the system, estimation of velocity and position from acceleration signals, and optimal placement of the sensors and control devices. Th...

  17. Outlook for activity and structural change

    The level of energy-using activities is continuing to increase throughout the world, but the rates of likely growth differ among regions. Over the next 20 years, manufacturing production is expected to grow at a rapid pace in parts of the developing world, and moderately in the OECD countries. In the Former East Bloc, it seems likely to stagnate or decline for much of the 1990s, but could then grow at a moderate pace if the transition to a market economy is successfully managed. Domestic passenger travel seems likely to increase everywhere, and growth in international travel will be especially strong. Freight transport activity is difficult to evaluate in the aggregate, since the composition of goods changes over time, but increase is expected in all regions, especially in the developing countries. Structural change within sectors will have significant impacts on energy use. In manufacturing, faster growth in light industry will lead to lower energy intensity in the OECD countries and especially in the Former East Bloc. The outlook in the LDCs suggests somewhat higher growth in energy-intensive industries, but this trend will vary among countries. In passenger travel, structural change is pointing toward higher energy intensity in most of the world as the role of automobiles and air travel continues to grow. Increase in the use of trucks is pushing in a similar direction in freight transport. In the residential sector, structural change will have only a moderate impact in the OECD countries, where per capita levels of home services are already high, but will push energy use significantly upward in the LDCs, and to a lesser extent, in the Former East Bloc. 17 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  18. Definition of ground test for Large Space Structure (LSS) control verification, appendix G

    1984-01-01

    A Large Space Structure (LSS) ground test facility was developed to help verify LSS passive and active control theories. The facility also perform: (1) subsystem and component testing; (2) remote sensing and control; (3) parameter estimation and model verification; and (4) evolutionary modeling and control. The program is examined as is and looks at the first experiment to be performed in the laboratory.

  19. Active vibration control of multibody system with quick startup and brake based on active damping

    TANG Hua-ping; TANG Yun-jun; TAO Gong-an

    2006-01-01

    A kind of active vibration control method was presented based on active damping and optimization design for driving load of multibody system with quick startup and brake. Dynamical equation of multibody system with quick startup and brake and piezoelectric actuators intelligent structure was built. The optimum driving load was calculated by applying the presented method. The self-sensing and self-tuning closed-loop active vibration control in quick startup and brake process was realized. The control algorithm, using local velocity negative feedback, i.e. the output of a sensor only affects the output of the actuator collocated, can induce damping effectively to actively suppress the system vibration. Based on the optimization design for driving load of multibody system with quick startup and bake, the active damping of piezoelectric actuators intelligent structure was used to farther suppress the vibration of system. Theoretical analysis and calculation of numerical show that the proposed method makes the vibration of system decrease more than the optimal design method for driving load of multibody system.

  20. Optimization of structure-control systems with efficiency constraint

    Oz, H.; Khot, N. S.

    1990-01-01

    The structure-control system optimization problem is formulated with constraints on the closed-loop eigenvalues and the efficiency of the reduced order system. The feasibility of the approach is illustrated by designing the ACOSS-FOUR structure with a reduced order system and improving the efficiency characteristics of the structures-control system.

  1. Zenith Star: A structural control challenge

    Morine, L. A.

    1989-01-01

    The Zenith Star Experiment is designed to demonstrate and evaluate the performance of a laser in space to answer critical issues relevant to SDI. The spacecraft design, control system architecture, and vehicle control are discussed.

  2. A stochastic approach to robust broadband structural control

    Macmartin, Douglas G.; Hall, Steven R.

    1992-01-01

    Viewgraphs on a stochastic approach to robust broadband structural control are presented. Topics covered include: travelling wave model; dereverberated mobility model; computation of dereverberated mobility; power flow; impedance matching; stochastic systems; control problem; control of stochastic systems; using cost functional; Bernoulli-Euler beam example; compensator design; 'power' dual variables; dereverberation of complex structure; and dereverberated transfer function.

  3. Structured Control of Affine Linear Parameter Varying Systems

    Adegas, Fabiano Daher; Stoustrup, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a new procedure to design structured controllers for discrete-time affine linear parametervarying systems (A LPV). The class of control structures includes decentralized of any order, fixed order output feedback, simultaneous plant-control design, among others. A parametervarying...

  4. 15 CFR 738.2 - Commerce Control List (CCL) structure.

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Commerce Control List (CCL) structure... COMMERCE CONTROL LIST OVERVIEW AND THE COUNTRY CHART § 738.2 Commerce Control List (CCL) structure. (a... Avionics 8—Marine 9—Propulsion Systems, Space Vehicles and Related Equipment (b) Groups. Within...

  5. RSOFCPN: CONTROL SYSTEM STRUCTURE AND ALGORITHM DESIGN

    2000-01-01

    A stable control scheme for a class of unknown nonlinear systems was presented. The control architecture is composed of two parts, the fuzzy sliding mode controller (FSMC) is applied to drive the state to a designed switching hyperplane, and a reinforcement self-organizing fuzzy CPN (RSOFCPN) as a feedforward compensator is used to reduce the influence of system uncertainties. The simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed control scheme.

  6. A Framework for Optimal Control Allocation with Structural Load Constraints

    Frost, Susan A.; Taylor, Brian R.; Jutte, Christine V.; Burken, John J.; Trinh, Khanh V.; Bodson, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Conventional aircraft generally employ mixing algorithms or lookup tables to determine control surface deflections needed to achieve moments commanded by the flight control system. Control allocation is the problem of converting desired moments into control effector commands. Next generation aircraft may have many multipurpose, redundant control surfaces, adding considerable complexity to the control allocation problem. These issues can be addressed with optimal control allocation. Most optimal control allocation algorithms have control surface position and rate constraints. However, these constraints are insufficient to ensure that the aircraft's structural load limits will not be exceeded by commanded surface deflections. In this paper, a framework is proposed to enable a flight control system with optimal control allocation to incorporate real-time structural load feedback and structural load constraints. A proof of concept simulation that demonstrates the framework in a simulation of a generic transport aircraft is presented.

  7. Variable Structure Control of DFIG for Wind Power Generation and Harmonic Current Mitigation

    Belmadani, B.; R. Wamkeue; KAIRUS, D.; BENGHANEM, M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper focuses on wind energy conversion system (WECS) analysis and control for power generation along with problems related to the mitigation of harmonic pollution in the grid using a variable-speed structure control of the doubly fed induction generator (DFIG). A control approach based on the so-called sliding mode control (SMC) that is both efficient and suitable is used for power generation control and harmonic-current compensation. The WECS then behaves as an active power filter ...

  8. REDUCTION APPROACHES FOR VIBRATION CONTROL OF REPETITIVE STRUCTURES

    CHEN Wei-min; SUN Dong-chang; WANG Da-jun; WEI Jian-ping; TONG Li-yong; WANG Quan

    2006-01-01

    The reduction approaches are presented for vibration control of symmetric,cyclic periodic and linking structures. The condensation of generalized coordinates, the locations of sensors and actuators, and the relation between system inputs and control forces are assumed to be set in a symmetric way so that the control system posses the same repetition as the structure considered. By employing proper transformations of condensed generalized coordinates and the system inputs, the vibration control of an entire system can be implemented by carrying out the control of a number of sub-structures, and thus the dimension of the control problem can be significantly reduced.

  9. Prediction control of active power filters

    王莉娜; 罗安

    2003-01-01

    A prediction method to obtain harmonic reference for active power filter is presented. It is a new use ofthe adaptive predictive filter based on FIR. The delay inherent in digital controller is successfully compensated by u-sing the proposed method, and the computing load is not very large compared with the conventional method. Moreo-ver, no additional hardware is needed. Its DSP-based realization is also presented, which is characterized by time-va-riant rate sampling, quasi synchronous sampling, and synchronous operation among the line frequency, PWM gener-ating and sampling in A/D unit. Synchronous operation releases the limitation on PWM modulation ratio and guar-antees that the electrical noises resulting from the switching operation of IGBTs do not interfere with the sampledcurrent. The simulation and experimental results verify the satisfactory performance of the proposed method.

  10. Activation analyses for different fusion structural alloys

    The leading candidate structural materials, viz., the vanadium alloys, the nickel or the manganese stabilized austenitic steels, and the ferritic steels, are analysed in terms of their induced activation in the TPSS fusion power reactor. The TPSS reactor has 1950 MW fusion power and inboard and outboard average neutron wall loading of 3.75 and 5.35 MW/m2 respectively. The results shows that, after one year of continuous operation, the vanadium alloys have the least radioactivity at reactor shutdown. The maximum difference between the induced radioactivity in the vanadium alloys and in the other iron-based alloys occurs at about 10 years after reactor shutdown. At this time, the total reactor radioactivity, using the vanadium alloys, is about two orders of magnitude less than the total reactor radioactivity utilizing any other alloy. The difference is even larger in the first wall, the FW-vanadium activation is 3 orders of magnitude less than other alloys' FW activation. 2 refs., 7 figs

  11. Integrated Multiobjective Optimal Design for Active Control System Based on Genetic Algorithm

    Ma Yong-Quan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The integrated multiobjective optimal design method for structural active control system is put forward based on improved Pareto multiobjective genetic algorithm, through which the position of actuator is synchronously optimized with active controller. External excitation is simulated by stationary filtered white noise. The root-mean-square (RMS of structural response and active control force can be achieved by solving Lyapunov equation in the state space. The design of active controller adopts linear quadratic regulator (LQR control algorithm. Minimum ratio of the maximum RMS of controlled structural displacement divided by the maximum RMS of uncontrolled structural displacement and minimum ratio of the maximum RMS of controlled structural shear divided by the maximum RMS of uncontrolled structural shear, together with minimization of the sum of RMS of active control force, are used as the three objective functions of multiobjective optimization. The optimization process takes the impact of structure and excitation parameter on the optimized results. An eight-storey six-span plane steel frame was used as an emulational example to demonstrate the validity of this optimization method. Results show that the proposed integrated multiobjective optimal design method is simple, efficient, and practical with good universality.

  12. Activation and micropore structure determination of activated carbon-fiber composites

    Jagtoyen, M.; Derbyshire, F.; Kimber, G. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research

    1997-09-05

    Rigid, high surface area activated carbon fiber composites have been produced with high permeabilities for environmental applications in gas and water purification. These novel monolithic adsorbents can be produced in single pieces to a given size and shape. The project involves a collaboration between the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER), University of Kentucky. The carbon fiber composites are produced at the ORNL and activated at the CAER using different methods, with the aims of producing a uniform degree of activation, and of closely controlling pore structure and adsorptive properties. The main focus of the present work has been to find a satisfactory means to uniformly activate large samples of carbon fiber composites and produce controlled pore structures. Several environmental applications have been explored for the activated carbon fiber composites. One of these was to evaluate the activated composites for the separation of CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2} mixtures, and an apparatus was constructed specifically for this purpose. The composites were further evaluated in the cyclic recovery of volatile organics. The activated carbon fiber composites have also been tested for possible water treatment applications by studying the adsorption of sodium pentachlorophenolate, PCP.

  13. Active control of an aircraft tail subject to harmonic excitation

    M. Eissa; H. S. Bauomy; Y. A. Amer

    2007-01-01

    Vibration of structures is often an undesirable phenomena and should be avoided or controlled. There are two techniques to control the vibration of a system, that is,active and passive control techniques. In this paper, a negative feedback velocity is applied to a dynamical system, which is represented by two coupled second order nonlinear differ-ential equations having both quadratic and cubic nonlinear-ties. The system describes the vibration of an aircraft tail.The system is subjected to multi-external excitation forces.The method of multiple time scale perturbation is applied to solve the nonlinear differential equations and obtain approx-imate solutions up to third order of accuracy. The stability of the system is investigated applying frequency response equations. The effects of the different parameters are stud-ied numerically. Various resonance cases are investigated. A comparison is made with the available published work.

  14. Biodegradable polymeric microcarriers with controllable porous structure for tissue engineering.

    Shi, Xudong; Sun, Lei; Jiang, Jian; Zhang, Xiaolin; Ding, Wenjun; Gan, Zhihua

    2009-12-01

    Porous microspheres fabricated by biodegradable polymers show great potential as microcarriers for cell cultivation in tissue engineering. Herein biodegradable poly(DL-lactide) (PLA) was used to fabricate porous microspheres through a modified double emulsion solvent evaporation method. The influence of fabrication parameters, such as the stirring speed of the primary and secondary emulsion, the polymer concentration of the oil phase, and solvent type, as well as the post-hydrolysis treatment of the porous structure of the PLA microspheres are discussed. Good attachment and an active spread of MG-63 cells on the microspheres is observed, which indicates that the PLA microspheres with controllable porous structure are of great potential as cell delivery carriers for tissue engineering. PMID:19821453

  15. Finding Community Structures In Social Activity Data

    Peng, Chengbin

    2015-05-19

    Social activity data sets are increasing in number and volume. Finding community structure in such data is valuable in many applications. For example, understand- ing the community structure of social networks may reduce the spread of epidemics or boost advertising revenue; discovering partitions in tra c networks can help to optimize routing and to reduce congestion; finding a group of users with common interests can allow a system to recommend useful items. Among many aspects, qual- ity of inference and e ciency in finding community structures in such data sets are of paramount concern. In this thesis, we propose several approaches to improve com- munity detection in these aspects. The first approach utilizes the concept of K-cores to reduce the size of the problem. The K-core of a graph is the largest subgraph within which each node has at least K connections. We propose a framework that accelerates community detection. It first applies a traditional algorithm that is relatively slow to the K-core, and then uses a fast heuristic to infer community labels for the remaining nodes. The second approach is to scale the algorithm to multi-processor systems. We de- vise a scalable community detection algorithm for large networks based on stochastic block models. It is an alternating iterative algorithm using a maximum likelihood ap- proach. Compared with traditional inference algorithms for stochastic block models, our algorithm can scale to large networks and run on multi-processor systems. The time complexity is linear in the number of edges of the input network. The third approach is to improve the quality. We propose a framework for non- negative matrix factorization that allows the imposition of linear or approximately linear constraints on each factor. An example of the applications is to find community structures in bipartite networks, which is useful in recommender systems. Our algorithms are compared with the results in recent papers and their quality and e

  16. Synthesis of active controls for flutter suppression on a flight research wing

    Abel, I.; Perry, B., III; Murrow, H. N.

    1977-01-01

    This paper describes some activities associated with the preliminary design of an active control system for flutter suppression capable of demonstrating a 20% increase in flutter velocity. Results from two control system synthesis techniques are given. One technique uses classical control theory, and the other uses an 'aerodynamic energy method' where control surface rates or displacements are minimized. Analytical methods used to synthesize the control systems and evaluate their performance are described. Some aspects of a program for flight testing the active control system are also given. This program, called DAST (Drones for Aerodynamics and Structural Testing), employs modified drone-type vehicles for flight assessments and validation testing.

  17. A velocity-based seismic control for base-isolated building structures

    Pozo Montero, Francesc; Acho Zuppa, Leonardo; Rodellar Benedé, José; Rossell Garriga, Josep Maria

    2009-01-01

    Passive, active and semi-active control have been extensively considered to improve the protection of base-isolated structures against earthquakes. This paper presents a strategy to apply control forces to the base of an isolated structure to enhance the performance of purely passive devices. The main feature is the simplicity in formulation, design and implementation. It is formulated as a static nonlinear function depending only on the base velocity. This function ensures energy dissi...

  18. Modeling of active control of external magnetohydrodynamic instabilities

    A general circuit formulation of resistive wall mode (RWM) feedback stabilization developed by Boozer [Phys. Plasmas 5, 3350 (1998)] has been used as the basis for the VALEN computer code that calculates the performance of an active control system in arbitrary geometry. The code uses a finite element representation of a thin shell structure in an integral formulation to model arbitrary conducting walls. This is combined with a circuit representation of stable and unstable plasma modes. Benchmark comparisons of VALEN results with large aspect ratio analytic model of the current driven kink mode are in very good agreement. VALEN also models arbitrary sensors, control coils, and the feedback logic connecting these sensors and control coils to provide a complete simulation capability for feedback control of plasma instabilities. VALEN modeling is in good agreement with experimental results on DIII-D [Garofalo et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 1491 (2000)] and HBT-EP [Cates et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 3133 (2000)]. VALEN feedback simulations have also been used to evaluate and optimize the sensor/coil configurations for present and planned RWM experiments on DIII-D. These studies have shown a clear advantage for the use of local poloidal field sensors driving a 'mode control' feedback logic control loop and configurations which minimize the control coil coupling to the stabilizing resistive wall

  19. Missile flight control using active flexspar actuators

    Barrett, Ron; Gross, R. Steven; Brozoski, Fred

    1996-04-01

    A new type of subsonic missile flight control surface using piezoelectric flexspar actuators is presented. The flexspar design uses an aerodynamic shell which is pivoted at the quarter-chord about a graphite main spar. The shell is pitched up and down by a piezoelectric bender element which is rigidly attached to a base mount and allowed to rotate freely at the tip. The element curvature, shell pitch deflection and torsional stiffness are modeled using laminated plate theory. A one-third scale TOW 2B missile model was used as a demonstration platform. A static wing of the missile was replaced with an active flexspar wing. The 1 in 0964-1726/5/2/002/img1 2.7 in active flight control surface was powered by a bimorph bender with 5 mil PZT-5H sheets. Bench and wind tunnel testing showed good correlation between theory and experiment and static pitch deflections in excess of 0964-1726/5/2/002/img2. A natural frequency of 78.5 rad 0964-1726/5/2/002/img3 with a break frequency of 157 rad 0964-1726/5/2/002/img3 was measured. Wind tunnel tests revealed no flutter or divergence tendencies. Maximum changes in lift coefficient were measured at 0964-1726/5/2/002/img5 which indicates that terminal and initial missile load factors may be increased by approximately 3.1 and 12.6 g respectively, leading to a greatly reduced turn radius of only 2400 ft.

  20. Recent Research and Application on Seismic Isolation, Energy Dissipation and Control for Structures in China

    This paper briefly introduces the recent research, testing analysis, design and application on seismic isolation, energy dissipation, tuned mass damper and active control for buildings and bridges in mainland China. Paper introduces some typical researches, testing and analysis, including the mechanical tests for bearings and control devices, and the shaking table tests for structural models with different control systems. Paper also introduces the Chinese design codes for structures with seismic isolation and energy dissipation. Paper describes the recent application status and typical examples, especially introduces the largest isolation buildings group in the world, and the using passive and semi active control for structures. Also the paper makes discussion some problems existed on passive and active control technique now and the tendency of development on seismic control in future

  1. Structural Controls of the Tuscarora Geothermal Field, Elko County, Nevada

    Dering, Gregory M.

    Detailed geologic mapping, structural analysis, and well data have been integrated to elucidate the stratigraphic framework and structural setting of the Tuscarora geothermal area. Tuscarora is an amagmatic geothermal system that lies in the northern part of the Basin and Range province, ˜15 km southeast of the Snake River Plain and ˜90 km northwest of Elko, Nevada. The Tuscarora area is dominated by late Eocene to middle Miocene volcanic and sedimentary rocks, all overlying Paleozoic metasedimentary rocks. A geothermal power plant was constructed in 2011 and currently produces 18 MWe from an ˜170°C reservoir in metasedimentary rocks at a depth of 1740 m. Analysis of drill core reveals that the subsurface geology is dominated to depths of ˜700-1000 m by intracaldera deposits of the Eocene Big Cottonwood Canyon caldera, including blocks of basement-derived megabreccia. Furthermore, the Tertiary-Paleozoic nonconformity within the geothermal field has been recognized as the margin of this Eocene caldera. Structural relations combined with geochronologic data from previous studies indicate that Tuscarora has undergone extension since the late Eocene, with significant extension in the late Miocene-Pliocene to early Pleistocene. Kinematic analysis of fault slip data reveal an east-west-trending least principal paleostress direction, which probably reflects an earlier episode of Miocene extension. Two distinct structural settings at different scales appear to control the geothermal field. The regional structural setting is a 10-km wide complexly faulted left step or relay ramp in the west-dipping range-bounding Independence-Bull Run Mountains normal fault system. Geothermal activity occurs within the step-over where sets of east- and west-dipping normal faults overlap in a northerly trending accommodation zone. The distribution of hot wells and hydrothermal surface features, including boiling springs, fumaroles, and siliceous sinter, indicate that the geothermal

  2. Optimal Vibration Control of Civil Engineering Structures

    Thesbjerg, Leo

    In designing large civil engineering structures, an important consideration is prospective dynamic loadings which may include earthquake ground motion, wind gusts, severe sea states and moving vehicles, rotating and reciprocating machinery and others. successful design of such structures requires...... providing for the safety and integrity of the structure, and in some cases also providing for a measure of comfort for the occupants during such loading which the structure and its occupants must endure. Due to these uncertainties, the civil engineering community has traditionally adopted a very...

  3. Development of a generic activities model of command and control

    Stanton, NA; Baber, C; Walker, GH; Houghton, RJ; McMaster, R.; Stewart, R; Harris, D.; Jenkins, DP; Young, MS; Salmon, PM

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports on five different models of command and control. Four different models are reviewed: a process model, a contextual control model, a decision ladder model and a functional model. Further to this, command and control activities are analysed in three distinct domains: armed forces, emergency services and civilian services. From this analysis, taxonomies of command and control activities are developed that give rise to an activities model of command and control. This model w...

  4. Machine structure oriented control code logic

    Bergstra, JA Jan; Middelburg, CA Kees

    2007-01-01

    Control code is a concept that is closely related to a frequently occurring practitioner's view on what is a program: code that is capable of controlling the behaviour of some machine. We present a logical approach to explain issues concerning control codes that are independent of the details of the behaviours that are controlled. Using this approach, such issues can be explained at a very abstract level. We illustrate this among other things by means of an example about the production of a n...

  5. Cost averaging techniques for robust control of flexible structural systems

    Hagood, Nesbitt W.; Crawley, Edward F.

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs on cost averaging techniques for robust control of flexible structural systems are presented. Topics covered include: modeling of parameterized systems; average cost analysis; reduction of parameterized systems; and static and dynamic controller synthesis.

  6. Control of optical active borates nanocrystals agglomeration

    I. Cieślik

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purposes of this study explore the possibility of total control the agglomeration of nanoborates powders. The great potential of PDLCs can be enhanced by using dye-doped or nanoparticles-doped materials, such as borates [1]. It is important to know how to prepare nanoparticles in order to obtain a high level of dispersion in the composites. Otherwise, even small an agglomeration does not give a possibility on the appropriate characteristic of properties and interpretation of the results. The deagglomeration methods applied until now give the decrease of agglomeration to a lesser extent than our method. Characteristic size and shape of particles made with sol-gel process is difficult to perform. Design/methodology/approach: Nanopowders samples of YAB and LCBO were prepared with sol-gel method. Deagglomeration process was carried out using acetic acid. The morphology and size of nanopowders were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The crystallite sizes were determinated with IPS UA method. Findings: It was confirmed that the acetic acid influence on the decrease of agglomeration. It was also determined of conditions for preparation borates nanopowders samples (concentration acetic acind time and temperature of drying prepared samples. We have proved that a reagent used for deagglomeration process does not affect the structure of the investigated nanoborates used in an experimental. Research limitations/implications: The results can be used to the prepared of nanocompades of borates to observe a morphology and reliable assessment of nanocrystalline size. Originality/value: Our study shows how to prepare a sample of particles to observe morphology and measure the size of nanograins. In our study we found excellent solution, the medium, which not influence the inorganic nanomaterial structure. Result seems to be excellent and very perspective. We have showed as that measurement type influence the results of particles size.

  7. The spatial structure of transnational human activity.

    Deutschmann, Emanuel

    2016-09-01

    Starting from conflictive predictions of hitherto disconnected debates in the natural and social sciences, this article examines the spatial structure of transnational human activity (THA) worldwide (a) across eight types of mobility and communication and (b) in its development over time. It is shown that the spatial structure of THA is similar to that of animal displacements and local-scale human motion in that it can be approximated by Lévy flights with heavy tails that obey power laws. Scaling exponent and power-law fit differ by type of THA, being highest in refuge-seeking and tourism and lowest in student exchange. Variance in the availability of resources and opportunities for satisfying associated needs appears to explain these differences. Over time (1960-2010), the Lévy-flight pattern remains intact and remarkably stable, contradicting the popular notion that socio-technological trends lead to a "death of distance." Humans have not become more "global" over time, they rather became more mobile in general, i.e. they move and communicate more at all distances. Hence, it would be more adequate to speak of "mobilization" than of "globalization." Longitudinal change occurs only in some types of THA and predominantly at short distances, indicating regional rather than global shifts. PMID:27480376

  8. Structural control sensors for CASES. [Control, Astrophysics and Structures Experiment in Space

    Davis, Hugh W.; Sharkey, John P.; Carrington, Connie K.

    1990-01-01

    The Remote Attitude Measurement Sensor (RAMS) is currently baselined to meet two important sensor needs for CASES (Control, Astrophysics and Structures Experiment in Space). First, as a tip displacement sensor, RAMS is designed to provide accurate knowledge of the position and orientation of the boom tip assembly. Secondly, as a boom motion tracker, it is designed to monitor 43 reflective targets which are distributed along the length of the boom and provide displacment information for post facto processing. The design and operation of RAMS as these two types of sesnors are described, and attention is given to how RAMS interfaces with the CASES closed-loop control system and how systems identification is accommodated.

  9. A Robust Controller Structure for Pico-Satellite Applications

    Kragelund, Martin Nygaard; Green, Martin; Kristensen, Mads;

    This paper describes the development of a robust controller structure for use in pico-satellite missions. The structure relies on unknown disturbance estimation and use of robust control theory to implement a system that is robust to both unmodeled disturbances and parameter uncertainties. As one...... possible application, a satellite mission with the purpose of monitoring shipping routes for oil spills has been considered. However, it is the aim of the control structure to be widely applicable and adaptable for a vide variety of pico-satellite missions. The robust control structure has been evaluated...

  10. Active vibration control of spatial flexible multibody systems

    Neto, Maria Augusta, E-mail: augusta.neto@dem.uc.pt [Universidade de Coimbra (Polo II), Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica, Faculdade de Ciencia e Tecnologia (Portugal); Ambrosio, Jorge A. C., E-mail: jorge@dem.ist.utl.pt [Instituto Superior Tecnico, Instituto de Engenharia Mecanica (Portugal); Roseiro, Luis M., E-mail: lroseiro@isec.pt [Instituto Superior de Engenharia de Coimbra, Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica (Portugal); Amaro, A., E-mail: ana.amaro@dem.uc.pt [Universidade de Coimbra (Polo II), Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica, Faculdade de Ciencia e Tecnologia (Portugal); Vasques, C. M. A., E-mail: cvasques@inegi.up.pt [Universidade do Porto, INEGI-Instituto de Engenharia Mecanica e Gestao Industrial (Portugal)

    2013-06-15

    In this work a flexible multibody dynamics formulation of complex models including elastic components made of composite materials is extended to include piezoelectric sensors and actuators. The only limitation for the deformation of a structural member is that they must remain elastic and linear when described in a coordinate frame fixed to a material point or region of its domain. The flexible finite-element model of each flexible body is obtained referring the flexible body nodal coordinates to the body fixed frame and using a diagonalized mass description of the inertia in the mass matrix and on the gyroscopic force vector. The modal superposition technique is used to reduce the number of generalized coordinates to a reasonable dimension for complex shaped structural models of flexible bodies. The active vibration control of the flexible multibody components is implemented using an asymmetric collocated piezoelectric sensor/actuator pair. An electromechanically coupled model is taken into account to properly consider the surface-bonded piezoelectric transducers and their effects on the time and spatial response of the flexible multibody components. The electromechanical effects are introduced in the flexible multibody equations of motion by the use of beam and plate/shell elements, developed to this purpose. A comparative study between the classical control strategies, constant gain and amplitude velocity feedback, and optimal control strategy, linear quadratic regulator (LQR), is performed in order to investigate their effectiveness to suppress vibrations in structures with piezoelectric sensing and actuating patches.

  11. Active vibration control of spatial flexible multibody systems

    In this work a flexible multibody dynamics formulation of complex models including elastic components made of composite materials is extended to include piezoelectric sensors and actuators. The only limitation for the deformation of a structural member is that they must remain elastic and linear when described in a coordinate frame fixed to a material point or region of its domain. The flexible finite-element model of each flexible body is obtained referring the flexible body nodal coordinates to the body fixed frame and using a diagonalized mass description of the inertia in the mass matrix and on the gyroscopic force vector. The modal superposition technique is used to reduce the number of generalized coordinates to a reasonable dimension for complex shaped structural models of flexible bodies. The active vibration control of the flexible multibody components is implemented using an asymmetric collocated piezoelectric sensor/actuator pair. An electromechanically coupled model is taken into account to properly consider the surface-bonded piezoelectric transducers and their effects on the time and spatial response of the flexible multibody components. The electromechanical effects are introduced in the flexible multibody equations of motion by the use of beam and plate/shell elements, developed to this purpose. A comparative study between the classical control strategies, constant gain and amplitude velocity feedback, and optimal control strategy, linear quadratic regulator (LQR), is performed in order to investigate their effectiveness to suppress vibrations in structures with piezoelectric sensing and actuating patches.

  12. Active structural waveguide for sensing application

    Czajkowski, Karol; Kochanowicz, Marcin; Zmojda, Jacek; Miluski, Piotr; Dorosz, Dominik

    2014-05-01

    In the article a microstructural active optical fiber for sensing application was presented. Construction consists of three hexagonal rings and a core made of SiO2 - Al2O3 - Sb2O3 glass co-doped with 1Yb2O3/0.1Tm2O3 [mol%]. Developed optical fiber is characterized by upconversion luminescence (λp=980nm) at 480nm (Tm3+: 1G4→3H6) and 650 nm (Tm3+ : 1G4→3F4). Population of thulium levels was attained in result of the Yb 3+→Tm3+ upconversion energy transfer. Sensing application of elaborated active photonic structure was presented on the example of aqueous fluorescein solution. Fabricated microstructural optical fiber enables to measure of the fluorescein solutions with the concentration of (0.25 - 5.42)·10-4 [mol%]. Sensitivity of the elaborated measurement setup is 1.51·104 [1/mol%].

  13. Structure-activity relationships of bumetanide derivatives

    Pedersen, Kasper Lykke; Töllner, Kathrin; Römermann, Kerstin;

    2015-01-01

    and its derivatives in dogs and their inhibition of hNKCC2A (r(2) = 0.817; P < 0.01). Replacement of the carboxylic group of bumetanide by a non-ionic residue, for example, an anilinomethyl group, decreased inhibition of hNKCC2A, indicating that an acidic group was required for transporter inhibition...... diuretics such as bumetanide. Bumetanide was discovered by screening ∼5000 3-amino-5-sulfamoylbenzoic acid derivatives, long before NKCC2 was identified in the kidney. Therefore, structure-activity studies on effects of bumetanide derivatives on NKCC2 are not available. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH: In this study......, the effect of a series of diuretically active bumetanide derivatives was investigated on human NKCC2 variant A (hNKCC2A) expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. KEY RESULTS: Bumetanide blocked hNKCC2A transport with an IC50 of 4 μM. There was good correlation between the diuretic potency of bumetanide...

  14. Application of Lanczos vectors to control design of flexible structures

    Craig, Roy R., Jr.; Su, Tzu-Jeng

    1990-01-01

    This report covers research conducted during the first year of the two-year grant. The research, entitled 'Application of Lanczos Vectors to Control Design of Flexible Structures' concerns various ways to obtain reduced-order mathematical models for use in dynamic response analyses and in control design studies. This report summarizes research described in several reports and papers that were written under this contract. Extended abstracts are presented for technical papers covering the following topics: controller reduction by preserving impulse response energy; substructuring decomposition and controller synthesis; model reduction methods for structural control design; and recent literature on structural modeling, identification, and analysis.

  15. Lightning activity and precipitation structure of hailstorms

    2007-01-01

    By using the cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning location data from the lightning detection network of He- nan Province, surface Doppler radar data and standard orbit data of PR, TMI and LIS on TRMM satellite, the spatial and temporal characteristics of CG lightning flashes in 10 severe hailstorms are analyzed. The results show that the percentage of +CG lightning in these hailstorms is high with an average value of 45.5%. There is a distinct increase in CG flash rate during the rapid development stage of hailstorms. The hailstone falling corresponds to an active positive flash period, and the increase of +CG flash rate is generally accompanied with a decrease of –CG flash rate. The flash rate declines rapidly during the dissipating stage of hailstorms. The precipitation structure and lightning activity in two typical hail- storms are studied in detail. It is found that strong convective cells with reflectivity greater than 30dBZ mainly are situated in the front region of hailstorms, whereas the trailing stratiform region is in the rear part of the hailstorms. The maximum heights of echo top are higher than 14 km. Convective rain con- tributes much more rainfall to the total than stratiform rain, and the convective rain takes about 85% and 97% of the total in the two cases, respectively. Total lightning in the hailstorms is very active with the flash rate up to 183 fl/min and 55 fl/min, respectively. The results also indicate that most lightning flashes occurred in the echo region greater than 30 dBZ and its immediate periphery. The probability of lightning occurrence is 20 times higher in the convective region than in the stratiform region. The result suggests that the lightning information is helpful to the identification of convective rain region. The linear relationship between flash rate and ice water content is disclosed primarily.

  16. Lightning activity and precipitation structure of hailstorms

    FENG GuiLi; QIE XiuShu; YUAN Tie; NIU ShuZhen

    2007-01-01

    By using the cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning location data from the lightning detection network of Henan Province, surface Doppler radar data and standard orbit data of PR, TMI and LIS on TRMM satellite, the apatjal and temporal characteristice of CG lightning flashes in 10 severe hailstorms are analyzed. The results show that the percentage of+CG lightning in these hailstorms is high with an average value of 45.5%.There is a distinct increase in CG flash rate during the rapid development stage of hailstorms. The hailstone falling corresponds to an active positive flash period, and the increase of+CG flash rate is generally accompanied with a decrease of-CG flash rate. The flash rate declines rapidly during the dissipating stage of hailstorms. The precipitation structure and lightning activity in two typical hailstorms are studied in detail. It is found that strong convective cells with reflectivity greater than 30dBZ mainly are situated in the front region of hailstorms, whereas the trailing stratiform region is in the rear part of the hailstorme. The maximum heights of echo top are higher than 14km.Convective rain contributes much more rainfall to the total than stratiform rain, and the convective rain takes about 85% and 97% of the total in the two cases, respectively. Total lightning in the hailstorms is very active with the flash rate up to 183 fl/min and 55 fl/min, respectively. The results also indicate that most lightning flashes occurred in the echo region greater than 30dBZ and its immediate periphery. The probability of lightning occurrence is 20 times higher in the convective region than in the stratiform region. The result suggests that the lightning information is helpful to the identification of convective rain region. The linear relationship between flash rate and ice water content is disclosed primarily.

  17. Control and structural optimization for maneuvering large spacecraft

    Chun, H. M.; Turner, J. D.; Yu, C. C.

    1990-01-01

    Presented here are the results of an advanced control design as well as a discussion of the requirements for automating both the structures and control design efforts for maneuvering a large spacecraft. The advanced control application addresses a general three dimensional slewing problem, and is applied to a large geostationary platform. The platform consists of two flexible antennas attached to the ends of a flexible truss. The control strategy involves an open-loop rigid body control profile which is derived from a nonlinear optimal control problem and provides the main control effort. A perturbation feedback control reduces the response due to the flexibility of the structure. Results are shown which demonstrate the usefulness of the approach. Software issues are considered for developing an integrated structures and control design environment.

  18. Control structure selection for energy integrated distillation column

    Hansen, J.E.; Jørgensen, Sten Bay

    1998-01-01

    This paper treats a case study on control structure selection for an almost binary distillation column. The column is energy integrated with a heat pump in order to transfer heat from the condenser to the reboiler. This integrated plant configuration renders the possible control structures somewhat...... determine the best structure in terms disturbance rejection and setpoint tracking. The pairing and controller design are implemented and evaluated through nonlinear simulation. The suggested control structure is also qualitatively compared to a control structure applied experimentally. (C) 1998 Elsevier...... different from what is usual for binary distillation columns. Further the heat pump enables disturbances to propagate faster through the system. The plant has six possible actuators of which three must be used to stabilize the system. Hereby three actuators are left for product purity control. An MILP...

  19. Control/structure interactions of Freedom's solar dynamic modules

    Quinn, R. D.; Yunis, I.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to address potential control/structures interaction (CSI) problems of large flexible multibody structures in the presence of pointing and tracking requirements. A control approach is introduced for the simultaneous tracking and vibration control of multibody space structures. The application that is discussed is Space Station Freedom configured with solar dynamic (SD) modules. The SD fine-pointing and tracking requirements may necessitate controller frequencies above the structural natural frequencies of Freedom and the SD modules. It is well known that this can give rise to CSI problems if the controller is designed without due consideration given to the structural dynamics of the system. In this paper, possible CSI problems of Freedom's solar dynamic power systems are demonstrated using a simple lumped mass model. A NASTRAN model of Freedom developed at NASA Lewis is used to demonstrate potential CSI problems and the proposed tracking and vibration control approach.

  20. Active control of horseshoes chaos in a driven Rayleigh oscillator with fractional order deflection

    The problem of suppressing chaos in the Rayleigh oscillator with fractional order deflection is considered. The explanation of Melnikov's techniques shows that the dynamic performance and robustness of the system are highly dependent on the fractional order α. The feedback control system is considered as active control strategy. It is revealed with analytical results that periodic perturbation from the controller enhances the performance of the active control strategy. The proposed control strategy is more efficient for deflection order α element of [1.5,2.5] and under super resonant condition between the driven frequency and perturbation frequency. Numerical simulations demonstrate the effectiveness of Melnikov's analysis. -- Highlights: → Melnikov theorem it applied with an active control strategy. → The Rayleigh oscillator with fractional order deflection is considered. → The horseshoes structure of chaos in analyzed. → The parameter order α influence considerably the control strategy. → The periodic perturbation from the controller enhances the performance of the active control strategy.

  1. Quantum control by means of hamiltonian structure manipulation.

    Donovan, A; Beltrani, V; Rabitz, H

    2011-04-28

    A traditional quantum optimal control experiment begins with a specific physical system and seeks an optimal time-dependent field to steer the evolution towards a target observable value. In a more general framework, the Hamiltonian structure may also be manipulated when the material or molecular 'stockroom' is accessible as a part of the controls. The current work takes a step in this direction by considering the converse of the normal perspective to now start with a specific fixed field and employ the system's time-independent Hamiltonian structure as the control to identify an optimal form. The Hamiltonian structure control variables are taken as the system energies and transition dipole matrix elements. An analysis is presented of the Hamiltonian structure control landscape, defined by the observable as a function of the Hamiltonian structure. A proof of system controllability is provided, showing the existence of a Hamiltonian structure that yields an arbitrary unitary transformation when working with virtually any field. The landscape analysis shows that there are no suboptimal traps (i.e., local extrema) for controllable quantum systems when unconstrained structural controls are utilized to optimize a state-to-state transition probability. This analysis is corroborated by numerical simulations on model multilevel systems. The search effort to reach the top of the Hamiltonian structure landscape is found to be nearly invariant to system dimension. A control mechanism analysis is performed, showing a wide variety of behavior for different systems at the top of the Hamiltonian structure landscape. It is also shown that reducing the number of available Hamiltonian structure controls, thus constraining the system, does not always prevent reaching the landscape top. The results from this work lay a foundation for considering the laboratory implementation of optimal Hamiltonian structure manipulation for seeking the best control performance, especially with limited

  2. Controlled movement processing: superior colliculus activity associated with countermanded saccades.

    Paré, Martin; Hanes, Doug P

    2003-07-23

    We investigated whether the monkey superior colliculus (SC), an important midbrain structure for the regulation of saccadic eye movements, contains neurons with activity patterns sufficient to control both the cancellation and the production of saccades. We used a countermanding task to manipulate the probability that, after the presentation of a stop signal, the monkeys canceled a saccade that was planned in response to an eccentric visual stimulus. By modeling each animal's behavioral responses, with a race between GO and STOP processes leading up to either saccade initiation or cancellation, we estimated that saccade cancellation took on average 110 msec. Neurons recorded in the superior colliculus intermediate layers during this task exhibited the discharge properties expected from neurons closely involved in behavioral control. Both saccade- and fixation-related discharged differently when saccades were counter-manded instead of executed, and the time at which they changed their activity preceded the behavioral estimate of saccade cancellation obtained from the same trials by 10 and 13 msec, respectively. Furthermore, these intervals exceed the minimal amount of time needed for SC activity to influence eye movements. The additional observation that saccade-related neurons discharged significantly less when saccades were countermanded instead of executed suggests that saccades are triggered when these neurons reach a critical activation level. Altogether, these findings provide solid evidence that the superior colliculus contains the necessary neural signals to be directly involved in the decision process that regulates whether a saccade is to be produced. PMID:12878689

  3. Optimal semi-active vibration absorber for harmonic excitation based on controlled semi-active damper

    The semi-active vibration absorber (SVA) based on controlled semi-active damper is formulated to realize the behaviour of the passive undamped vibration absorber tuned to the actual harmonic disturbing frequency. It is shown that the controlled stiffness force, which is emulated by the semi-active damper to realize the precise real-time frequency tuning of the SVA, is unpreventably combined with the generation of undesirable damping in the semi-active damper whereby the SVA does not behave as targeted. The semi-active stiffness force is therefore optimized for minimum primary structure response. The results point out that the optimal semi-active stiffness force reduces the undesirable energy dissipation in the SVA at the expenses of slight imprecise frequency tuning. Based on these findings, a real-time applicable suboptimal SVA is formulated that also takes the relative motion constraint of real mass dampers into account. The results demonstrate that the performance of the suboptimal SVA is closer to that of the active solution than that of the passive mass damper. (paper)

  4. A layered approach to structural control system design for the JPL phase B testbed

    Chu, Cheng-Chih; O'Brien, John

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes our efforts in structural control experiments for a flexible precision structure using both passive and active control. Specifically, a layered structural control approach utilizing passive viscous dampers, colocated and noncolocated active control is used. The passive dampers and active colocated control loops are used to enhance stability and robustness and the noncolocated multivariable controller is designed with respect to a partially controlled structure to further improve the performance. Our approach to the multivariable design problem requires not only a state space model description of the plant, but also an accompanying uncertainty model. To support the multivariable robust control design development, a significant effort in system identification was undertaken. The process of identification and identified results are discussed. Noncolocated controllers are designed using the H(infinity)/mu-synthesis methodology. The order of the controller is typically large, hence, model reduction is performed for practical digital implementation on a real-time control system developed at JPL. Finally, experimental results are presented and some of lessons are discussed.

  5. Semi-active control of a cable-stayed bridge under multiple-support excitations

    代泽兵; 黄金枝; 王红霞

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a semi-active strategy for seismic protection of a benchmark cable-stayed bridge with consideration of multiple-support excitations. In this control strategy, Magnetorheological (MR) dampers are proposed as control devices, a LQG-clipped-optimal control algorithm is employed. An active control strategy, shown in previous researches to perform well at controlling the benchmark bridge when uniform earthquake motion was assumed, is also used in this study to control this benchmark bridge with consideration of multiple-support excitations. The performance of active control system is compared to that of the presented semi-active control strategy. Because the MR fluid damper is a controllable energy- dissipation device that cannot add mechanical energy to the structural system, the proposed control strategy is fail-safe in that bounded-input, bounded-output stability of the controlled structure is guaranteed. The numerical results demonstrated that the performance of the presented control design is nearly the same as that of the active control system; and that the MR dampers can effectively be used to control seismically excited cable-stayed bridges with multiple-support excitations.

  6. Determinate structures for wing camber control

    An investigation of truss structures for the purpose of creating a continuously variable camber trailing edge device for an aircraft wing is presented. By creating structures that are both statically and kinematically determinate and then substituting truss elements for actuators, it is possible to impose structural deflection without inducing member stress. A limited number of actuators with limited strain capabilities are located within the structure in order to achieve a target deflected shape starting from an initially symmetric profile. Two objective functions are used to achieve this: a geometric objective for which the target displacement is fixed and a shape objective for which the target displacement is dependent on the surface shape of the targeted aerofoil. The proposed shape objective function is able to offer improvements over the geometric objective by removing some of the constraints applied to the targeted structure joint locations. Four methods for selecting the location of a set of actuators are compared, namely exhaustive search, a genetic algorithm, stepwise forward selection (SFS) and incremental forward selection (IFS). Both SFS and IFS are variations of regression methods for subset selection; in each case an approach has been created to allow the imposing of upper and lower bounds on the search space. It is shown that the genetic algorithm is well suited to addressing the problem of optimally locating a set of actuators; however, regression methods, particularly IFS, can provide a rapid tool suitable for addressing large selection problems

  7. Optimal control of large space structures via generalized inverse matrix

    Nguyen, Charles C.; Fang, Xiaowen

    1987-01-01

    Independent Modal Space Control (IMSC) is a control scheme that decouples the space structure into n independent second-order subsystems according to n controlled modes and controls each mode independently. It is well-known that the IMSC eliminates control and observation spillover caused when the conventional coupled modal control scheme is employed. The independent control of each mode requires that the number of actuators be equal to the number of modelled modes, which is very high for a faithful modeling of large space structures. A control scheme is proposed that allows one to use a reduced number of actuators to control all modeled modes suboptimally. In particular, the method of generalized inverse matrices is employed to implement the actuators such that the eigenvalues of the closed-loop system are as closed as possible to those specified by the optimal IMSC. Computer simulation of the proposed control scheme on a simply supported beam is given.

  8. A variable structure approach to robust control of VTOL aircraft

    Calise, A. J.; Kramer, F. S.

    1984-01-01

    This paper examines the application of variable structure control theory to the design of a flight control system for the AV-8A Harrier in a hover mode. The objective in variable structure design is to confine the state trajectories to a subspace of the total state space. The motion in this subspace is insensitive to system parameter variations and external disturbances that lie in the range space of the control. A switching type of control law results from the design procedure. The control system was designed to track a vector-valued velocity command. For comparison, a proportional controller was designed using optimal linear regulator theory. Both controllers were evaluated for their transient response performance using a linear model; then a nonlinear simulation study of a hovering approach to landing was conducted. The variable structure controller outperformed its linear counterpart in the presence of wind disturbances and plant parameter uncertainties afforded by the simulation.

  9. Temporal network structures controlling disease spreading

    Holme, Petter

    2016-01-01

    We investigate disease spreading on eight empirical data sets of human contacts (mostly proximity networks recording who is close to whom, at what time). We compare three levels of representations of these data sets: temporal networks, static networks and a fully connected topology. We notice that the difference between the static and fully-connected networks -- with respect to time to extinction and average outbreak size -- is smaller than between the temporal and static topologies. This suggests that, for these data sets, temporal structures influence disease spreading more than static network structures. To explain the details in the differences between the representations, we use 32 network measures. This study concur that long-time temporal structures, like the turnover of nodes and links, are the most important for the spreading dynamics.

  10. Temporal network structures controlling disease spreading

    Holme, Petter

    2016-08-01

    We investigate disease spreading on eight empirical data sets of human contacts (mostly proximity networks recording who is close to whom, at what time). We compare three levels of representations of these data sets: temporal networks, static networks, and a fully connected topology. We notice that the difference between the static and fully connected networks—with respect to time to extinction and average outbreak size—is smaller than between the temporal and static topologies. This suggests that, for these data sets, temporal structures influence disease spreading more than static-network structures. To explain the details in the differences between the representations, we use 32 network measures. This study concurs that long-time temporal structures, like the turnover of nodes and links, are the most important for the spreading dynamics.

  11. Active controllers and the time duration to learn a task

    Repperger, D. W.; Goodyear, C.

    1986-01-01

    An active controller was used to help train naive subjects involved in a compensatory tracking task. The controller is called active in this context because it moves the subject's hand in a direction to improve tracking. It is of interest here to question whether the active controller helps the subject to learn a task more rapidly than the passive controller. Six subjects, inexperienced to compensatory tracking, were run to asymptote root mean square error tracking levels with an active controller or a passive controller. The time required to learn the task was defined several different ways. The results of the different measures of learning were examined across pools of subjects and across controllers using statistical tests. The comparison between the active controller and the passive controller as to their ability to accelerate the learning process as well as reduce levels of asymptotic tracking error is reported here.

  12. The X-37 Hot Structure Control Surface Testing

    Hudson, Larry D.; Stephens, Craig A.

    2006-01-01

    Thermal-structural testing of three hot structure control surface subcomponent test articles (STA) designed for the X-37 (Boeing Phantom Works, Huntington Beach, California) Orbital Vehicle (OV) has been completed. The test articles were subcomponents of the X-37 OV bodyflap and flaperon control surfaces.

  13. Conjugated polymer based active electric-controlled terahertz device

    Zhong, Liang; Zhang, Bo; He, Ting; Lv, Longfeng; Hou, Yanbing; Shen, Jingling

    2016-03-01

    A modulation of terahertz response in a highly efficient, electric-controlled conjugated polymer-silicon hybrid device with low photo-excitation was investigated. The polymer-silicon forms a hybrid structure, where the active depletion region modifies the semiconductor conductivity in real time by applying an external bias voltage. The THz transmission was efficiently modulated by effective controlling. In a THz-TDS system, the modulation depth reached nearly 100% when the applied voltage was 3.8 V at an external laser intensity of 0.3 W/cm2. The saturation voltage decreased with increasing photo-excited intensity. In a THz-CW system, a significant decline in THz transmission was also observed with increasing applied bias voltage. This reduction in THz transmission is induced by the enhancement of carrier density.

  14. Structural vibration control for a class of connected multistructure mechanical systems

    Francisco Palacios-Quiñonero; Josep M. Rossell; Josep Rubió-Massegú; Hamid R. Karimi

    2012-01-01

    A mathematical model to compute the overall vibrational response of connected multistructure mechanical systems is presented. Using the proposed model, structural vibration control strategies for seismic protection of multibuilding systems can be efficiently designed. Particular attention is paid to the design of control configurations that combine passive interbuilding dampers with local feedback control systems implemented in the buildings. These hybrid active-passive control strategies pos...

  15. Force Feedback Control of a Semi-Active Shock Absorber

    Svennerbrandt, Per

    2014-01-01

    Semi-active suspension systems promise to significantly reduce the necessary trade-off be-tween handling and passenger comfort present in conventional suspension systems by enabling active chassis and wheel control. Öhlins Racing AB have developed a semi-active suspension technology known as CES, Continuously controlled Electronic Suspension, based on solenoid control valves which are integrated into specially designed hydraulic dampers, and are currently developing control and estimation sys...

  16. Optimal designs for dose finding studies with an active control

    Benda, Norbert; Bretz, Frank; Dette, Holger; Kiss , Christine

    2011-01-01

    Dose finding studies often compare several doses of a new compound with a marketed standard treatment as an active control. In the past, however, research has focused mostly on experimental designs for placebo-controlled dose finding studies. To the best of our knowledge, optimal designs for dose finding studies with an active control have not been considered so far. As the statistical analysis for an active controlled dose finding study can be formulated in terms of a mixture ...

  17. A decentralized Fuzzy Logic enhanced variable structure controller applied to load frequency control system

    This paper present a variable structure based approach to the load frequency control system problem in electric power generation systems. This approach combines the salient features of both variable structure and Fuzzy systems to achieve high-performance and robustness. The control signal consists of equivalent control, switching control and Fuzzy control components. The influence of system nonlinearities such as generation rate constraint and governor dead band is considered. In results show that the system responses are strongly robust for parameter variations

  18. Extracellular melanogenesis inhibitory activity and the structure-activity relationships of ugonins from Helminthostachys zeylanica roots.

    Yamauchi, Kosei; Mitsunaga, Tohru; Itakura, Yuki; Batubara, Irmanida

    2015-07-01

    Ugonin J, K, and L, which are luteolin derivatives, were isolated from Helminthostachys zeylanica roots by a series of chromatographic separations of a 50% ethanol/water extract. They were identified using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), ultraviolet (UV) spectra, and ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-TOF-MS). In this study, the intra and extracellular melanogenic activity of the ugonins were determined using B16 melanoma cells. The results showed that ugonin J at 12.5, 25, and 50μM reduced extracellular melanin contents to 75, 16, and 14%, respectively, compared to the control. This indicates that ugonin J showed a stronger activity than arbutin, used as the positive control. Moreover, ugonin K showed a more potent inhibition with 19, 8, and 9% extracellular melanin reduction at the same concentrations, than that shown by ugonin J. In contrast, ugonin L did not inhibit intra- or extracellular melanogenic activity. Furthermore, in order to investigate the structure-activity relationships of the ugonins, the intra- and extracellular melanogenic activity of luteolin, methylluteolin, quercetin, eriodictyol, apigenin, and chrysin were determined. Consequently, it was suggested that the catechol and flavone skeleton of ugonin K is essential for the extracellular melanogenic inhibitory activity, and the low polarity substituent groups on the A ring of ugonin K may increase the activity. PMID:25979512

  19. Modeling of the slewing control of a flexible structure

    Garcia, Ephrahim; Inman, Daniel J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents a formulation for the modeling of a single-link flexible beam that is undergoing slewing motion at an actively controlled pinned end, where the other end of the beam is free. This pinned end, or slewing axis, is of fixed orientation such that the beam rotates in the horizontal plane. A geared dc electric motor is connected to the beam at the slewing axis. A position and a velocity sensor are placed at this hinged location, and their proportional feedback provides a position control system about the slewing axis. The motor characteristics, gear ratio, and the position feedback constant determine an equivalent rotational spring constant, often called the servo stiffness. This paper generalizes the structure's boundary conditions at the slewing axis to include the effects of the servo system. It is shown that the clamped-free beam assumption for the dynamics of the structure is a valid assumption if the ratio of the servo stiffness to beam flexibility is high. However, for moderate or low values of this ratio, the clamped-free beam leads to erroneous system models so that it becomes necessary to consider the effects of the driving servo on the dynamics of the flexible beam.

  20. Photo-active collagen systems with controlled triple helix architecture

    Tronci, Giuseppe; Wood, David J

    2013-01-01

    The design of photo-active collagen systems is presented as a basis for establishing biomimetic materials with varied network architecture and programmable macroscopic properties. Following in-house isolation of type I collagen, reaction with vinyl-bearing compounds of varied backbone rigidity, i.e. 4-vinylbenzyl chloride (4VBC) and glycidyl methacrylate (GMA), was carried out. TNBS colorimetric assay, 1H-NMR and ATR-FTIR confirmed covalent and tunable functionalization of collagen lysines. Depending on the type and extent of functionalization, controlled stability and thermal denaturation of triple helices were observed via circular dichroism (CD), whereby the hydrogen-bonding capability of introduced moieties was shown to play a major role. Full gel formation was observed following photo-activation of functionalized collagen solutions. The presence of a covalent network only slightly affected collagen triple helix conformation (as observed by WAXS and ATR-FTIR), confirming the structural organization of fun...

  1. Management Control of Public and Not-for-Profit Activities

    Hofstede, G.

    1981-01-01

    Traditional approaches to management control usually fail for public and not-for-profit activities. The type of control applicable to such activities depends on four criteria: are objectives unambiguous, outputs measurable, effects of interventions known, and is the activity repetitive? Depending on where activities stand with regard to these criteria, the control applicable corresponds to one of six different types: routine, expert, trial-and-error, intuitive, judgemental, or political contr...

  2. Approximation law for discrete-time variable structure control systems

    Yan ZHENG; Yuanwei JING

    2006-01-01

    Two approximation laws of sliding mode for discrete-time variable structure control systems are proposed to overcome the limitations of the exponential approximation law and the variable rate approximation law. By applying the proposed approximation laws of sliding mode to discrete-time variable structure control systems, the stability of origin can be guaranteed, and the chattering along the switching surface caused by discrete-time variable structure control can be restrained effectively. In designing of approximation laws, the problem that the system control input is restricted is also considered, which is very important in practical systems. Finally a simulation example shows the effectiveness of the two approximation laws proposed.

  3. Dynamic active earth pressure on retaining structures

    Deepankar Choudhury; Santiram Chatterjee

    2006-12-01

    Earth-retaining structures constitute an important topic of research in civil engineering, more so under earthquake conditions. For the analysis and design of retaining walls in earthquake-prone zones, accurate estimation of dynamic earth pressures is very important. Conventional methods either use pseudo-static approaches of analysis even for dynamic cases or a simple single-degree of freedom model for the retaining wall–soil system. In this paper, a simplified two-degree of freedom mass–spring–dashpot (2-DOF) dynamic model has been proposed to estimate the active earth pressure at the back of the retaining walls for translation modes of wall movement under seismic conditions. The horizontal zone of influence on dynamic earth force on the wall is estimated. Results in terms of displacement, velocity and acceleration-time history are presented for some typical cases, which show the final movement of the wall in terms of wall height, which is required for the design. The non-dimensional design chart proposed in the present study can be used to compute the total dynamic earth force on the wall under different input ground motion and backfill conditions. Finally, the results obtained have been compared with those of the available Scott model and the merits of the present results have been discussed.

  4. NOVEL STRUCTURE FOR DISTRIBUTED NUMERICAL CONTROL

    Wang Shilong; Jian Yi; Liu Fei; Robert Young

    2003-01-01

    Because of an unexpected signal noise within the network or an unpredicted fault with personal computers (PCs), many problems emerge in the implementation of distributed numerical control (DNC) with PCs-based network. To solve the problems, an industrial solution of involving the field-bus technology in DNC communicating area is provided. A kind of advanced Field-bus, named controller area network (CAN), is originally developed to support cheap and rather simple automotive applications. However, because of its good performance and low cost, it is also being considered in automatedmanufacturing and process control environments to interconnect intelligent devices, such as modern sensors and actuators. Recently it creates a new role for CANBus in DNC that brings new thinking to DNC. CAN is used as the network platform for connecting machine tools to share information with each other reliably. Additionally, thanks to also applying of "plug-in" technology and a special interface of hardware, this solution exhibits some high compatibility with different pedigree numerical control (NC) systems, such as Fanuc, Siemens, Cincinnati and so on. In order to improve CANBus for DNC application, a communicating competition model of the basic CAN protocol, called CC model, is then highlighted. This model is able to satisfy the requirements that different machine tools share the communicating bandwidth fairly when they run concurrently. Finally the novel view of the latest advancement in CANBus-based DNC in combination with the manufacturing paradigm is also presented.

  5. Low Activity Waste Feed Process Control Strategy

    The primary purpose of this document is to describe the overall process control strategy for monitoring and controlling the functions associated with the Phase 1B high-level waste feed delivery. This document provides the basis for process monitoring and control functions and requirements needed throughput the double-shell tank system during Phase 1 high-level waste feed delivery. This document is intended to be used by (1) the developers of the future Process Control Plan and (2) the developers of the monitoring and control system

  6. Low Activity Waste Feed Process Control Strategy

    STAEHR, T.W.

    2000-06-14

    The primary purpose of this document is to describe the overall process control strategy for monitoring and controlling the functions associated with the Phase 1B high-level waste feed delivery. This document provides the basis for process monitoring and control functions and requirements needed throughput the double-shell tank system during Phase 1 high-level waste feed delivery. This document is intended to be used by (1) the developers of the future Process Control Plan and (2) the developers of the monitoring and control system.

  7. Orthonormal filters for identification in active control systems

    Mayer, Dirk

    2015-12-01

    Many active noise and vibration control systems require models of the control paths. When the controlled system changes slightly over time, adaptive digital filters for the identification of the models are useful. This paper aims at the investigation of a special class of adaptive digital filters: orthonormal filter banks possess the robust and simple adaptation of the widely applied finite impulse response (FIR) filters, but at a lower model order, which is important when considering implementation on embedded systems. However, the filter banks require prior knowledge about the resonance frequencies and damping of the structure. This knowledge can be supposed to be of limited precision, since in many practical systems, uncertainties in the structural parameters exist. In this work, a procedure using a number of training systems to find the fixed parameters for the filter banks is applied. The effect of uncertainties in the prior knowledge on the model error is examined both with a basic example and in an experiment. Furthermore, the possibilities to compensate for the imprecise prior knowledge by a higher filter order are investigated. Also comparisons with FIR filters are implemented in order to assess the possible advantages of the orthonormal filter banks. Numerical and experimental investigations show that significantly lower computational effort can be reached by the filter banks under certain conditions.

  8. Vibration control of cylindrical shells using active constrained layer damping

    Ray, Manas C.; Chen, Tung-Huei; Baz, Amr M.

    1997-05-01

    The fundamentals of controlling the structural vibration of cylindrical shells treated with active constrained layer damping (ACLD) treatments are presented. The effectiveness of the ACLD treatments in enhancing the damping characteristics of thin cylindrical shells is demonstrated theoretically and experimentally. A finite element model (FEM) is developed to describe the dynamic interaction between the shells and the ACLD treatments. The FEM is used to predict the natural frequencies and the modal loss factors of shells which are partially treated with patches of the ACLD treatments. The predictions of the FEM are validated experimentally using stainless steel cylinders which are 20.32 cm in diameter, 30.4 cm in length and 0.05 cm in thickness. The cylinders are treated with ACLD patches of different configurations in order to target single or multi-modes of lobar vibrations. The ACLD patches used are made of DYAD 606 visco-elastic layer which is sandwiched between two layers of PVDF piezo-electric films. Vibration attenuations of 85% are obtained with maximum control voltage of 40 volts. Such attenuations are attributed to the effectiveness of the ACLD treatment in increasing the modal damping ratios by about a factor of four over those of conventional passive constrained layer damping (PCLD) treatments. The obtained results suggest the potential of the ACLD treatments in controlling the vibration of cylindrical shells which constitute the major building block of many critical structures such as cabins of aircrafts, hulls of submarines and bodies of rockets and missiles.

  9. Control of noise and structural vibration a MATLAB-based approach

    Mao, Qibo

    2013-01-01

    Control of Noise and Structural Vibration presents a MATLAB®-based approach to solving the problems of undesirable noise generation and transmission by structures and of undesirable vibration within structures in response to environmental or operational forces. The fundamentals of acoustics, vibration and coupling between vibrating structures and the sound fields they generate are introduced including a discussion of the finite element method for vibration analysis. Following this, the treatment of sound and vibration control begins, illustrated by example systems such as beams, plates and double plate structures. Sensor and actuator placement is explained as is the idea of modal sensor–actuators. The design of appropriate feedback systems includes consideration of basic stability criteria and robust active structural acoustic control. Single and multi-mode positive position feedback (PPF) control systems are also described in the context of loudspeaker–duct model with non-collocated loudspeaker–microp...

  10. Explaining finite state machine characteristics using variable structure control

    Feddema, J.T.; Robinett, R.D.; Driessen, B.J.

    1997-10-01

    This paper describes how variable structure control can be used to describe the overall behavior of multiple autonomous robotic vehicles with simple finite state machine rules. The importance of this result is that it allows for the design of provably asymptotically stable group behaviors from a set of simple control laws and appropriate switching points with variable structure control. The ability to prove convergence to a goal is especially important for applications such as locating military targets or land mines.

  11. Integrated seismic design of structure and control systems

    Castaldo, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    The structural optimization procedure presented in this book makes it possible to achieve seismic protection through integrated structural/control system design. In particular, it is explained how slender structural systems with a high seismic performance can be achieved through inclusion of viscous and viscoelastic dampers as an integral part of the system. Readers are provided with essential introductory information on passive structural control and passive energy dissipation systems. Dynamic analyses of both single and multiple degree of freedom systems are performed in order to verify the achievement of pre-assigned performance targets, and it is explained how the optimal integrated design methodology, also relevant to retrofitting of existing buildings, should be applied. The book illustrates how structural control research is opening up new possibilities in structural forms and configurations without compromising structural performance.

  12. An adaptive active control for the modified Chua's circuit

    In this Letter, it is shown that a couple of the modified Chua's systems with different parameters and initial conditions can be synchronized using active control when the values of parameters both in drive system and response system are known aforehand. Furthermore, an adaptive active control approach is proposed based on Lyapunov stability theory to make the states of two identical Chua's systems with unknown constant parameters be asymptotically synchronized. In addition, the proposed adaptive active control method guarantees that the designed controller is independent to those uncertain parameters. Simulation results by using both active control and adaptive active control are provided, and the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed adaptive active control are demonstrated

  13. Seismic activity and deep conductivity structure\

    Kováčiková, Světlana; Logvinov, I. M.; Nazarevych, A.; Nazarevych, L.; Pek, Josef; Tarasov, V.; Kalenda, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 60 (2016). ISSN 0039-3169 Institutional support: RVO:67985530 Keywords : seismicity * conductivity structure * Earth ´s crust * Eastern Carpathians Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure Impact factor: 0.806, year: 2014

  14. Decentralized control of large flexible structures by joint decoupling

    Su, Tzu-Jeng; Juang, Jer-Nan

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents a novel method to design decentralized controllers for large complex flexible structures by using the idea of joint decoupling. Decoupling of joint degrees of freedom from the interior degrees of freedom is achieved by setting the joint actuator commands to cancel the internal forces exerting on the joint degrees of freedom. By doing so, the interactions between substructures are eliminated. The global structure control design problem is then decomposed into several substructure control design problems. Control commands for interior actuators are set to be localized state feedback using decentralized observers for state estimation. The proposed decentralized controllers can operate successfully at the individual substructure level as well as at the global structure level. Not only control design but also control implementation is decentralized. A two-component mass-spring-damper system is used as an example to demonstrate the proposed method.

  15. Active vibration suppression through positive acceleration feedback on a building-like structure: An experimental study

    Enríquez-Zárate, J.; Silva-Navarro, G.; Abundis-Fong, H. F.

    2016-05-01

    This work deals with the structural and dynamic analysis of a building-like structure consisting of a three-story building with one active vibration absorber. The base of the structure is perturbed using an electromagnetic shaker, which provides forces with a wide range of excitation frequencies, including some resonance frequencies of the structure. One beam-column of the structure is coupled with a PZT stack actuator to reduce the vibrations. The overall mechanical structure is modeled using Euler-Lagrange methodology and validated using experimental modal analysis and Fine Element Method (FEM) techniques. The active control laws are synthesized to actively attenuate the vibration system response via the PZT stack actuator, caused by excitation forces acting on the base of the structure. The control scheme is obtained using Positive Acceleration Feedback (PAF) and Multiple Positive Acceleration Feedback (MPAF) to improve the closed-loop system response. Some experimental results are included to illustrate the overall system performance.

  16. Automatic Control of ITER-like Structures

    In ITER Ion Cyclotron System requires a power transfer efficiency in excess of 90% from power source to plasma in quasi continuous operation. This implies the availability of a control system capable of optimizing the array radiation spectrum, automatically acquiring impedance match between the power source and the plasma loaded array at the beginning of the power pulse and maintaining it against load variations due to plasma position and plasma edge parameters fluctuations, rapidly detecting voltage breakdowns in the array and/or in the transmission system and reliably discriminating them from fast load variations. In this paper a proposal for a practical ITER control system, including power, phase, frequency and impedance matching is described. (authors)

  17. Active Power Control of Wind Turbines for Ancillary Services: A Comparison of Pitch and Torque Control Methodologies

    Aho, Jacob; Fleming, Paul; Pao, Lucy Y.

    2016-08-01

    As wind energy generation becomes more prevalent in some regions, there is increased demand for wind power plants to provide ancillary services, which are essential for grid reliability. This paper compares two different wind turbine control methodologies to provide active power control (APC) ancillary services, which include derating or curtailing power generation, providing automatic generation control (AGC), and providing primary frequency control (PFC). The torque APC controller provides all power control through the power electronics whereas the pitch APC controller uses the blade pitch actuators as the primary means of power control. These controllers are simulated under various wind conditions with different derating set points and AGC participation levels. The metrics used to compare their performance are the damage equivalent loads (DELs) induced on the structural components and AGC performance metrics, which are used to determine the payments for AGC services by system operators in the United States. The simulation results show that derating the turbine reduces structural loads for both control methods, with the APC pitch control providing larger reductions in DELs, lower AGC performance scores, and higher root-mean-square pitch rates. Providing AGC increases the structural loads when compared to only derating the turbine, but even the AGC DELs are generally lower than those of the baseline control system. The torque APC control methodology also allows for more sustained PFC responses under certain derating conditions.

  18. Structural learning in feedforward and feedback control

    Yousif, Nada; Diedrichsen, Jörn

    2012-01-01

    For smooth and efficient motor control, the brain needs to make fast corrections during the movement to resist possible perturbations. It also needs to adapt subsequent movements to improve future performance. It is important that both feedback corrections and feedforward adaptation need to be made based on noisy and often ambiguous sensory data. Therefore, the initial response of the motor system, both for online corrections and adaptive responses, is guided by prior assumptions about the li...

  19. Structural vibration control of micro/macro-manipulator using feedforward and feedback approaches

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PDL) researchers investigated the combined use of two control approaches to minimize micro/macro-manipulator structural vibration: (1) modified input shaping and (2) inertial force active damping control. Modified input shaping (MIS) is used as a feedforward controller to modify reference input by canceling the vibratory motion. Inertial force active damping (IFAD) is applied as a feedback controller to increase the system damping and robustness to unexpected disturbances. Researchers implemented both control schemes in the PNL micro/macro flexible-link manipulator testbed collaborating with Georgia Institute of Technology. The experiments successfully demonstrated the effectiveness of two control approaches in reducing structural vibration. Based on the results of the experiments, the combined use of two controllers is recommended for a micro/macro manipulator to achieve the fastest response to commands while canceling disturbances from unexpected forces

  20. Adaptive control of an active seat for occupant vibration reduction

    Gan, Zengkang; Hillis, Andrew J.; Darling, Jocelyn

    2015-08-01

    The harmful effects on human performance and health caused by unwanted vibration from vehicle seats are of increasing concern. This paper presents an active seat system to reduce the vibration level transmitted to the seat pan and the occupants' body under low frequency periodic excitation. Firstly, the detail of the mechanical structure is given and the active seat dynamics without external load are characterized by vibration transmissibility and frequency responses under different excitation forces. Owing the nonlinear and time-varying behaviour of the proposed system, a Filtered-x least-mean-square (FXLMS) adaptive control algorithm with on-line Fast-block LMS (FBLMS) identification process is employed to manage the system operation for high vibration cancellation performance. The effectiveness of the active seat system is assessed through real-time experimental tests using different excitation profiles. The system identification results show that an accurate estimation of the secondary path is achieved by using the FBLMS on-line technique. Substantial reduction is found for cancelling periodic vibration containing single and multiple frequencies. Additionally, the robustness and stability of the control system are validated through transient switching frequency tests.