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Sample records for active structural control

  1. Active interaction control for civil structures

    Wang, Luo-Jia

    1997-01-01

    This thesis presents a civil engineering approach to active control for civil structures. The proposed control technique, termed Active Interaction Control (AIC), utilizes dynamic interactions between different structures, or components of the same structure, to reduce the resonance response of the controlled or primary structure under earthquake excitations. The primary control objective of AIC is to minimize the maximum story drift of the primary structure. This is accomplished by timing th...

  2. Vibration control of active structures an introduction

    Preumont, Andre

    2002-01-01

    This text is an introduction to the dynamics of active structures and to the feedback control of lightly damped flexible structures. The emphasis is placed on basic issues and simple control strategies that work.

  3. Active and passive vibration control of structures

    Spelsberg-Korspeter, Gottfried

    2014-01-01

    Active and Passive Vibration Control of Structures form an issue of very actual interest in many different fields of engineering, for example in the automotive and aerospace industry, in precision engineering (e.g. in large telescopes), and also in civil engineering. The papers in this volume bring together engineers of different background, and it fill gaps between structural mechanics, vibrations and modern control theory.  Also links between the different applications in structural control are shown.

  4. Recent results on structural control of an active precision structure

    Chu, C. C.; Fanson, J. L.; Smith, R. S.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes recent results in structural control of an active precision truss structure at JPL. The goal is to develop practical control methodology and to apply to active truss structures intended for high precision space-based optics applications. The active structure considered incorporates piezoelectric active members which apply control forces internal to the structure and thereby improve the structure's dimensional stability. Two approaches to structural control system design were investigated. The first approach uses only noncollocated measurements of acceleration at the location of a simulated optical component to achieve structural stabilization. The second approach is essentially the same as the first one except that a viscous damper was used in place of a truss member on the structure to improve the dampings of selected flexible modes. The corresponding experimental closed-loop results are presented in this paper.

  5. Active control design of modular tensegrity structures

    Amouri, Sarah; Averseng, Julien; Dubé, Jean-François

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a general methodology for the design of modular active tensegrity structures is presented. The objectives are to propose systems such as grids or footbridges that would be able to actively damper their first vibration modes and to adapt their geometry using a small number of activators. This approach is validated experimentally on a plane regular tensegrity grid. Using numerical simulation, an application on the model of a modular tensegrity footbridge is presented.

  6. Semi-active control of dynamically excited structures using active interaction control

    Zhang, Yunfeng

    2001-01-01

    This thesis presents a family of semi-active control algorithms termed Active Interaction Control (AIC) used for response control of dynamically excited structures. The AIC approach has been developed as a semi﷓active means of protecting building structures against large earthquakes. The AIC algorithms include the Active Interface Damping (AID), Optimal Connection Strategy (OCS), and newly developed Tuned Interaction Damping (TID) algorithms. All of the AIC algorithms are founded upon ...

  7. Active Vibration Control of Satellite Flexible Structures during Attitude Maneuvers

    Saeed Hemmati; Morteza Shahravi; Keramat Malekzadeh

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is controlling active vibration of satellite flexible structures during attitude maneuvers. A smart structure is a structure which is able to sense and control active reaction to any external factors and stimulation. As it comes from the definition of smart structures, development of this knowledge depends on the materials science development, theories and strategies for control. In materials science, smart materials are developed in such a way that they are able to ...

  8. An Overview of Active Structural Control under Seismic Loads

    Soong, T.T.; Masri, S. F.; Housner, G. W.

    1991-01-01

    The concept of active structural control as a means of structural protection against seismic loads, developed over the last 20 years, has received considerable attention in recent years. It has now reached the stage where active systems have been installed in full-scale structures. It is the purpose of this paper to provide an overview of this development with special emphasis placed on laboratory experiments using model structures and on full-scale implementation of some active control syste...

  9. Active control of smart structures : an overall approach

    Nestorović Tamara; Trajkov Miroslav

    2010-01-01

    The paper presents active control of smart structures within a focused frame of piezoelectric applications in active vibration and noise attenuation with potentials for the use in mechanical and civil engineering. An overall approach to active control of piezoelectric structures involves subsequent steps of modeling, control, simulation, experimental verification and implementation. Each of these steps is regarded in details. Different application examples showing the feasibility of the activ...

  10. Optimum optical structures for active control

    Shannon, R. R.; Richard, R. M.; Hansen, J. G. R.

    1980-01-01

    A NASTRAN structural analysis of a lightweight mirror structure has been completed and is compared with previous experimental measurements. A preliminary design for a 4 meter aperture, 6 meter focal length primary mirror is presented.

  11. Active control of noise radiation from vibrating structures

    Mørkholt, Jakob

    The thesis is concerned with the active control of randomly vibrating structures by means of feedback control, with particular emphasis on reducing the sound radiation from such structures. A time domain model of the structural and radiation dynamics of an actively controlled plate has been...... developed, based on the theory of radiation filters for estimating the sound radiation from multimodal vibrations. This model has then been used in simulations of optimal feedback control, with special emphasis of the stability margins of the optimal control scheme. Two different methods of designing...

  12. Innovation in Active Vibration Control Strategy of Intelligent Structures

    A. Moutsopoulou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Large amplitudes and attenuating vibration periods result in fatigue, instability, and poor structural performance. In light of past approaches in this field, this paper intends to discuss some innovative approaches in vibration control of intelligent structures, particularly in the case of structures with embedded piezoelectric materials. Control strategies are presented, such as the linear quadratic control theory, as well as more advanced theories, such as robust control theory. The paper presents sufficiently a recognizable advance in knowledge of active vibration control in intelligent structures.

  13. Finite element models applied in active structural acoustic control

    Oude Nijhuis, Marco H.H.; Boer, de André; Rao, Vittal S.

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses the modeling of systems for active structural acoustic control. The finite element method is applied to model structures including the dynamics of piezoelectric sensors and actuators. A model reduction technique is presented to make the finite element model suitable for controll

  14. Self-Tuning Active Vibration Control of Flexible Beam Structures

    M.O. Tokhi; Hossain, M A

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents the design and performance evaluation of an adaptive active control mechanism for vibration suppression in flexible beam structures. A cantilever beam system in transverse vibration is considered. First order control finite difference methods are used to study the behaviour of the beam and develop a suitable test and verification platform. An active vibration control algorithm is developed within an adaptive control framework for broadband cancellation of vibration along t...

  15. Wireless sensor networks for active vibration control in automobile structures

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) are nowadays widely used in monitoring and tracking applications. This paper presents the feasibility of using WSNs in active vibration control strategies. The method employed here involves active-structural acoustic control using piezoelectric sensors distributed on a car structure. This system aims at being merged with a WSN whose head node collects data and processes control laws so as to command piezoelectric actuators wisely placed on the structure. We will study the feasibility of implementing WSNs in active vibration control and introduce a complete design methodology to optimize hardware/software and control law synergy in mechatronic systems. A design space exploration will be conducted so as to identify the best WSN platform and the resulting impact on control. (paper)

  16. Wireless sensor networks for active vibration control in automobile structures

    Mieyeville, Fabien; Ichchou, Mohamed; Scorletti, Gérard; Navarro, David; Du, Wan

    2012-07-01

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) are nowadays widely used in monitoring and tracking applications. This paper presents the feasibility of using WSNs in active vibration control strategies. The method employed here involves active-structural acoustic control using piezoelectric sensors distributed on a car structure. This system aims at being merged with a WSN whose head node collects data and processes control laws so as to command piezoelectric actuators wisely placed on the structure. We will study the feasibility of implementing WSNs in active vibration control and introduce a complete design methodology to optimize hardware/software and control law synergy in mechatronic systems. A design space exploration will be conducted so as to identify the best WSN platform and the resulting impact on control.

  17. Finite element models applied in active structural acoustic control

    Oude Nijhuis, Marco H.H.; de Boer; Rao, Vittal S.

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses the modeling of systems for active structural acoustic control. The finite element method is applied to model structures including the dynamics of piezoelectric sensors and actuators. A model reduction technique is presented to make the finite element model suitable for controller design. The reduced structural model is combined with an acoustic model which uses the radiation mode concept. For a test case consisting of a rectangular plate with one piezo patch the model re...

  18. Passive and Active Vibration Control of Renewable Energy Structures

    Zhang, Zili

    2015-01-01

    The present thesis deals with fundamental researches on passive and active vibration control of renewable energy structures, and provides useful models for practical applications. Effective and robust vibration control methods have been explored for mitigating the lightly damped edgewise blade vibration and lateral tower vibration, with the main focus on structural control devices. Rigorous theoretical modeling of different dynamic system has been established, based on which detailed design a...

  19. Critical review on active control in civil engineering structures

    One of the existing new application areas for feed-back system design has to do with the protection of Civil Engineering Structures from dynamic loading such as strong earthquakes, high wind, extreme waves, heavy traffic and highway loading. Buildings and other physical have traditionally been relied on their strength and ability to dissipate energy to severe dynamic loading. In recent years greater attention has been directed towards the use of control and automation to mitigate the effects of these dynamic loads on structures. One of such control is active control system. An actively controlled structure is defined as the one consisting of two types of load resisting members -static or passive member and the dynamic or active member. Their integration in optimal fashion produces a structure that is adaptive to changing environmental loads. (author)

  20. Active structural control with stable fuzzy PID techniques

    Yu, Wen

    2016-01-01

    This book presents a detailed discussion of intelligent techniques to measure the displacement of buildings when they are subjected to vibration. It shows how these techniques are used to control active devices that can reduce vibration 60–80% more effectively than widely used passive anti-seismic systems. After introducing various structural control devices and building-modeling and active structural control methods, the authors propose offset cancellation and high-pass filtering techniques to solve some common problems of building-displacement measurement using accelerometers. The most popular control algorithms in industrial settings, PD/PID controllers, are then analyzed and then combined with fuzzy compensation. The stability of this combination is proven with standard weight-training algorithms. These conditions provide explicit methods for selecting PD/PID controllers. Finally, fuzzy-logic and sliding-mode control are applied to the control of wind-induced vibration. The methods described are support...

  1. Impact of active controls technology on structural integrity

    Noll, Thomas; Austin, Edward; Donley, Shawn; Graham, George; Harris, Terry

    1991-01-01

    This paper summarizes the findings of The Technical Cooperation Program to assess the impact of active controls technology on the structural integrity of aeronautical vehicles and to evaluate the present state-of-the-art for predicting the loads caused by a flight-control system modification and the resulting change in the fatigue life of the flight vehicle. The potential for active controls to adversely affect structural integrity is described, and load predictions obtained using two state-of-the-art analytical methods are given.

  2. Active Vibration Control of a Monopile Offshore Structure

    Nielsen, Søren R. K.; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Thesbjerg, L.

    1996-01-01

    structure an active control technique has been proposed in corporation with the consulting company Rambøll, Esbjerg, Denmark. The proposed control technique is based on the relationship between the position of the separation points of the boundary layer flow and the drag term in the wave force on the......, it can be necessary to use an active or a passive vibration control system. However, for a monopile with severe space problems it can be difficult to locate a passive control system such as e.g. a tuned mass damper. Therefore, in order to active control wave introduced vibrations of a monopile...... cylinder. This concept has been experimentally investigated with a test model in stationary flow tests. The idea is to have a large drag coefficient when the cylinder moves opposite of the wave direction implying a relatively large damping excitation. When the structure moves in the wave direction a small...

  3. Active vibration control techniques for flexible space structures

    Parlos, Alexander G.; Jayasuriya, Suhada

    1990-01-01

    Two proposed control system design techniques for active vibration control in flexible space structures are detailed. Control issues relevant only to flexible-body dynamics are addressed, whereas no attempt was made to integrate the flexible and rigid-body spacecraft dynamics. Both of the proposed approaches revealed encouraging results; however, further investigation of the interaction of the flexible and rigid-body dynamics is warranted.

  4. Active structural control by fuzzy logic rules: An introduction

    Tang, Y.

    1995-07-01

    An introduction to fuzzy logic control applied to the active structural control to reduce the dynamic response of structures subjected to earthquake excitations is presented. It is hoped that this presentation will increase the attractiveness of the methodology to structural engineers in research as well as in practice. The basic concept of the fuzzy logic control are explained by examples and by diagrams with a minimum of mathematics. The effectiveness and simplicity of the fuzzy logic control is demonstrated by a numerical example in which the response of a single-degree-of-freedom system subjected to earthquake excitations is controlled by making use of the fuzzy logic controller. In the example, the fuzzy rules are first learned from the results obtained from linear control theory; then they are fine tuned to improve their performance. It is shown that the performance of fuzzy logic control surpasses that of the linear control theory. The paper shows that linear control theory provides experience for fuzzy logic control, and fuzzy logic control can provide better performance; therefore, two controllers complement each other.

  5. Active structural control by fuzzy logic rules: An introduction

    Tang, Yu [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Reactor Engineering Div.; Wu, Kung C. [Texas Univ., El Paso, TX (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering

    1996-12-31

    A zeroth level introduction to fuzzy logic control applied to the active structural control to reduce the dynamic response of structures subjected to earthquake excitations is presented. It is hoped that this presentation will increase the attractiveness of the methodology to structural engineers in research as well as in practice. The basic concept of the fuzzy logic control are explained by examples and by diagrams with a minimum of mathematics. The effectiveness and simplicity of the fuzzy logic control is demonstrated by a numerical example in which the response of a single- degree-of-freedom system subjected to earthquake excitations is controlled by making use of the fuzzy logic controller. In the example, the fuzzy rules are first learned from the results obtained from linear control theory; then they are fine tuned to improve their performance. It is shown that the performance of fuzzy logic control surpasses that of the linear control theory. The paper shows that linear control theory provides experience for fuzzy logic control, and fuzzy logic control can provide better performance; therefore, two controllers complement each other.

  6. Low-cost Active Structural Control Space Experiment (LASC)

    Robinett, Rush; Bukley, Angelia P.

    1992-01-01

    The DOE Lab Director's Conference identified the need for the DOE National Laboratories to actively and aggressively pursue ways to apply DOE technology to problems of national need. Space structures are key elements of DOD and NASA space systems and a space technology area in which DOE can have a significant impact. LASC is a joint agency space technology experiment (DOD Phillips, NASA Marshall, and DOE Sandia). The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: phase 4 investigator testbed; control of large flexible structures in orbit; INFLEX; Controls, Astrophysics; and structures experiments in space; SARSAT; and LASC mission objectives.

  7. Passive and Active Vibration Control of Renewable Energy Structures

    Zhang, Zili

    The present thesis deals with fundamental researches on passive and active vibration control of renewable energy structures, and provides useful models for practical applications. Effective and robust vibration control methods have been explored for mitigating the lightly damped edgewise blade...... vibration and lateral tower vibration, with the main focus on structural control devices. Rigorous theoretical modeling of different dynamic system has been established, based on which detailed design and analysis of the proposed control devices can be carried out. This thesis also explores technical...... solutions for wave energy point absorbers, in order to maximize the mean absorbed power and to deliver more smooth power to the grid. A novel suboptimal causal control law has been established for controlling the motion of the point absorber, and a new type of point absorber has also been proposed with...

  8. Structural control by the use of piezoelectric active members

    Fanson, J. L.; Chen, J.-C.

    1987-01-01

    Large Space Structures (LSS) exhibit characteristics which make the LSS control problem different form other control problems. LSS will most likely exhibit low frequency, densely spaced and lightly damped modes. In theory, the number of these modes is infinite. Because these structures are flexible, Vibration Suppression (VS) is an important aspect of LSS operation. In terms of VS, the control actuators should be as low mass as possible, have infinite bandwidth, and be electrically powered. It is proposed that actuators be built into the structure as dual purpose structural elements. A piezoelectric active member is proposed for the control of LSS. Such a device would consist of a piezoelectric actuator and sensor for measuring strain, and screwjack actuator in series for use in quasi-static shape control. An experiment simulates an active member using piezoelectric ceramic thin sheet material on a thin, uniform cantilever beam. The feasibility of using the piezoelectric materials for VS on LSS was demonstrated. Positive positive feedback as a VS control strategy was implemented. Multi-mode VS was achieved with dramatic reduction in dynamic response.

  9. Optimal placement of active elements in control augmented structural synthesis

    Sepulveda, A. E.; Jin, I. M.; Schmit, L. A., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    A methodology for structural/control synthesis is presented in which the optimal location of active members is treated in terms of (0,1) variables. Structural member sizes, control gains and (0,1) placement variables are treated simultaneously as design variables. Optimization is carried out by generating and solving a sequence of explicit approximate problems using a branch and bound strategy. Intermediate design variable and intermediate response quantity concepts are used to enhance the quality of the approximate design problems. Numerical results for example problems are presented to illustrate the efficacy of the design procedure set forth.

  10. Active vibration control of basic structures using macro fiber composites

    Yi, Guo; Wang, Jinming; Liu, Liwu; Liu, Yanju; Leng, Jinsong

    2011-03-01

    In the modern naval battle, as the anti-detection technique developing fleetly, enhancing submarine's hidden ability is becoming more and more important. However, in view of the worse control effect at low-frequency and weak adjustability to external influence, conventional passive vibration control can't satisfy the modern naval rigorous demands. Fortunately, active vibration control technology not only monitors the structure's real-time vibration, but also has more remarkable control effects and superior suitability. At the present time, it has a primary application in the vibration damping of ship engineering. In addition, due to functional materials rapidly developing, with the coming of piezoelectric composite materials, the advanced active control techniques have more applicability, lager damp amplitude and wider applied field, which basing on the piezoelectric-effect and inverse- piezoelectric-effect of piezoelectric materials. Especially, in the end of nineties, NASA had successfully manufactured the excellent macro fiber composite (MFC), which assembles actuating and sensing abilities. Comparing with the conventional piezoelectric ceramic materials, it provides the required durability, excellent flexibility, higher electromechanical coupling factors and stronger longitudinal actuating force by using interdigital electrodes. On the basis of the application of cantilever beam' active vibration control by using MFC actuators, this paper started with the mechanical characteristics of its actuating and sensing equations, and then investigated its piezoelectric feedback scale factor when equipped on the honeycomb aluminous panel. Finally, in order to validate the theoretical analysis method, the vibration control experiment of cantilever beam and honeycomb aluminous panel are built and tested with different activating force. The experimental results verify that MFC used in submarine structures' active vibration control are feasible and effective.

  11. Researches on active structural acoustic control by radiation modes

    MAO Qibo; JIANG Zhe

    2001-01-01

    Based on the radiation modes, an active control strategy is presented for sound radiation from elastic structures with an example of simply supported rectangular panel. The physical characteristics and mathematical meaning of the radiation modes are analyzed. The radiation efficiency of radiation mode falls off very rapidly with the increase of modes order at low frequency. A new control strategy is developed in which by canceling the adjoint coefficient of the first k radiation modes, the sound powers of the first k radiation modes is zero theoretically. The numerical calculation is made by using point force actuators as control forces.

  12. Development of a Pseudo-Uniform Structural Quantity for the Active Control of Structural Radiation

    Fisher, Jeffrey; Blotter, Jon

    2010-01-01

    Active noise control has been a highly researched field over the past few decades but the active control of the radiating structures has recently excited interest. Multiple structural quantities and their relationships to acoustic radiation are investigated. This paper also looks at the control of a new structural quantity developed taking advantage of the principle of Rayleigh’s integral and radiated power being strongly dependent on volume velocity. The benefit of this new quantity is that ...

  13. Phase and gain control policies for robust active vibration control of flexible structures

    Zhang, Kai; Scorletti, Gérard; Ichchou, Mohamed; Mieyeville, F.

    2013-01-01

    The interest of this paper is to develop a general and systematic robust control methodology for active vibration control of flexible structures. For this purpose, first phase and gain control policies are proposed to impose qualitative frequency-dependent requirements on the controller to consider a complete set of control objectives. Then the proposed control methodology is developed by employing phase and gain control policies in the dynamic output feedback H∞ control: according to the set...

  14. Active shape control of composite structures under thermal loading

    Binette, P.; Dano, M.-L.; Gendron, G.

    2009-02-01

    Maintaining the shape of high-precision structures such as space antennas and optical mirrors is still a challenging issue for designers. These structures are subjected to varying temperature conditions which often introduce thermal distortions. The development of smart materials offers great potential to correct the shape and to minimize the surface error. In this study, shape control of a composite structure under thermal loading using piezocomposites is investigated. The composite structure is made of a foam core and two carbon-epoxy face sheets. Macro-fiber composite (MFC™) patches are bonded on one side of the structure. The structure is subjected to a through-the-thickness temperature gradient which induces thermal distortion, essentially in the form of bending. The objective is to apply electric potential to the MFC™ actuators such that the deflection can be minimized. Finite-element analyses are conducted using the commercial software ABAQUS. Experiments are performed to study thermally induced distortion, piezoelectric actuation, and compensation of thermal distortion using MFC™ actuators. Numerical and experimental results are compared. A control loop based on strain measurements is used to actively control the structure. The results show that MFC™ actuators can compensate thermal distortion at all times, and that this is an efficient methodology.

  15. Active shape control of composite structures under thermal loading

    Maintaining the shape of high-precision structures such as space antennas and optical mirrors is still a challenging issue for designers. These structures are subjected to varying temperature conditions which often introduce thermal distortions. The development of smart materials offers great potential to correct the shape and to minimize the surface error. In this study, shape control of a composite structure under thermal loading using piezocomposites is investigated. The composite structure is made of a foam core and two carbon–epoxy face sheets. Macro-fiber composite (MFC(TM)) patches are bonded on one side of the structure. The structure is subjected to a through-the-thickness temperature gradient which induces thermal distortion, essentially in the form of bending. The objective is to apply electric potential to the MFC(TM) actuators such that the deflection can be minimized. Finite-element analyses are conducted using the commercial software ABAQUS. Experiments are performed to study thermally induced distortion, piezoelectric actuation, and compensation of thermal distortion using MFC(TM) actuators. Numerical and experimental results are compared. A control loop based on strain measurements is used to actively control the structure. The results show that MFC(TM) actuators can compensate thermal distortion at all times, and that this is an efficient methodology

  16. Survey of Active Structural Control and Repair Using Piezoelectric Patches

    Ahmed Abuzaid; Meftah Hrairi; M.S.I. Shaik Dawood

    2015-01-01

    The piezoelectric actuator has gained popularity over the last few years. Attention has been directed towards the study of their electromechanical response in active repair and the control of damaged structures. This has been made possible through the development of various numerical and analytical techniques for such studies. The shift of focus towards the piezoelectric based approaches has been due to their advantages, which include strategic cost benefits in maintenance, as well as an incr...

  17. Power system damping - Structural aspects of controlling active power

    Samuelsson, O.

    1997-04-01

    Environmental and economical aspects make it difficult to build new power lines and to reinforce existing ones. The continued growth in demand for electric power must therefore to a great extent be met by increased loading of available lines. A consequence is that power system damping is reduced, leading to a risk of poorly damped power oscillations between the generators. This thesis proposes the use of controlled active loads to increase damping of such electro-mechanical oscillations. The focus is on structural aspects of controller interaction and of sensor and actuator placement. On-off control based on machine frequency in a single machine infinite bus system is analysed using energy function analysis and phase plane plots. An on-off controller with estimated machine frequency as input has been implemented. At a field test it damped oscillations of a 0.9 MW hydro power generator by controlling a 20kW load. The linear analysis uses two power system models with three and twenty-three machines respectively. Each damper has active power as output and local bus frequency or machine frequency as input. The power system simulator EUROSTAG is used both for generation of the linearized models and for time simulations. Measures of active power mode controllability and phase angle mode observability are obtained from the eigenvectors of the differential-algebraic models. The geographical variation in the network of these quantities is illustrated using the resemblance to bending modes of flexible mechanical structures. Eigenvalue sensitivities are used to determine suitable damper locations. A spring-mass equivalent to an inter-area mode provides analytical expressions, that together with the concept of impedance matching explain the structural behaviour of the power systems. For large gains this is investigated using root locus plots. 64 refs, 99 figs, 20 tabs

  18. Survey of Active Structural Control and Repair Using Piezoelectric Patches

    Ahmed Abuzaid

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The piezoelectric actuator has gained popularity over the last few years. Attention has been directed towards the study of their electromechanical response in active repair and the control of damaged structures. This has been made possible through the development of various numerical and analytical techniques for such studies. The shift of focus towards the piezoelectric based approaches has been due to their advantages, which include strategic cost benefits in maintenance, as well as an increase in the life cycle of the repaired structures. Furthermore, adhesively bonded joints are widely used in the manufacturing and repairing of structures in many industries, especially automotive and aerospace engineering. This is due to the requirement for lightweight materials as well as the potential adhesive used to join materials with different characteristics. The piezoelectric actuator has also shown the capacity in controlling and lowering the shear stress concentration and joint edge peel in adhesively bonded joint systems. The structure’s control of stress and repair can generally be viewed as a reinforcement that influences the structure’s damage tolerance. Therefore, the interest of this review is on the applications of the piezoelectric actuators in both structural damage and the bonded adhesive joint system. The specific goal is to recognize the contemporary scientific challenges, including future opportunities.

  19. Sensitivity method for integrated structure/active control law design

    Gilbert, Michael G.

    1987-01-01

    The development is described of an integrated structure/active control law design methodology for aeroelastic aircraft applications. A short motivating introduction to aeroservoelasticity is given along with the need for integrated structures/controls design algorithms. Three alternative approaches to development of an integrated design method are briefly discussed with regards to complexity, coordination and tradeoff strategies, and the nature of the resulting solutions. This leads to the formulation of the proposed approach which is based on the concepts of sensitivity of optimum solutions and multi-level decompositions. The concept of sensitivity of optimum is explained in more detail and compared with traditional sensitivity concepts of classical control theory. The analytical sensitivity expressions for the solution of the linear, quadratic cost, Gaussian (LQG) control problem are summarized in terms of the linear regulator solution and the Kalman Filter solution. Numerical results for a state space aeroelastic model of the DAST ARW-II vehicle are given, showing the changes in aircraft responses to variations of a structural parameter, in this case first wing bending natural frequency.

  20. Innovation in Active Vibration Control Strategy of Intelligent Structures

    A. Moutsopoulou; G. E. Stavroulakis; Pouliezos, A.

    2013-01-01

    Large amplitudes and attenuating vibration periods result in fatigue, instability, and poor structural performance. In light of past approaches in this field, this paper intends to discuss some innovative approaches in vibration control of intelligent structures, particularly in the case of structures with embedded piezoelectric materials. Control strategies are presented, such as the linear quadratic control theory, as well as more advanced theories, such as robust control theory. The paper ...

  1. Active vibration control of smart grid structure by multiinput and multioutput positive position feedback controller

    Kwak, Moon K.; Heo, Seok

    2007-07-01

    This paper is concerned with the active vibration control of a grid structure equipped with piezoceramic sensors and actuators. The grid structure is a replica of the solar panel commonly mounted on satellites, which contains complex natural mode shapes. The multiinput and multioutput positive position feedback (PPF) controller is considered as an active vibration controller for the grid structure. A new concept, the block-inverse technique, is proposed to cope with more modes than the number of actuators and sensors. This study also deals with the stability and the spillover effect associated with the application of the multiinput multioutput PPF controller based on the block-inverse technique. It was found that the theories developed in this study are capable of predicting the control system characteristics and its performance. The new multiinput multioutput PPF controller was applied to the test structure using a digital signal processor and its efficacy was verified by experiments.

  2. Modelling of piezoelectric actuator dynamics for active structural control

    Hagood, Nesbitt W.; Chung, Walter H.; Von Flotow, Andreas

    1990-01-01

    The paper models the effects of dynamic coupling between a structure and an electrical network through the piezoelectric effect. The coupled equations of motion of an arbitrary elastic structure with piezoelectric elements and passive electronics are derived. State space models are developed for three important cases: direct voltage driven electrodes, direct charge driven electrodes, and an indirect drive case where the piezoelectric electrodes are connected to an arbitrary electrical circuit with embedded voltage and current sources. The equations are applied to the case of a cantilevered beam with surface mounted piezoceramics and indirect voltage and current drive. The theoretical derivations are validated experimentally on an actively controlled cantilevered beam test article with indirect voltage drive.

  3. A model for signal processing and predictive control of semi-active structural control system

    M-H Shih; W-P Sung; Ching-Jong Wang

    2009-06-01

    The theory for structural control has been well developed and applied to perform excellent energy dissipation using dampers. Both active and semi-active control systems may be used to decide on the optimal switch point of the damper based on the current and past structural responses to the excitation of external forces. However, numerous noises may occur when the control signals are accessed and transported thus causing a delay of the damper. Therefore, a predictive control technique that integrates an improved method of detecting the control signal based on the direction of the structural motion, and a calculator for detecting the velocity using the least-square polynomial regression is proposed in this research. Comparisons of the analytical data and experimental results show that this predictor is effective in switching the moving direction of the semi-active damper. This conclusion is further verified using the component and shaking table test with constant amplitude but various frequencies, and the El Centro earthquake test. All tests confirm that this predictive control technique is effective to alleviate the time delay problem of semi-active dampers. This predictive control technique promotes about 30% to 40% reduction of the structural displacement response and about 35% to 45% reduction of the structural acceleration response.

  4. Active control of structures using macro-fiber composite (MFC)

    Kovalovs, A; Barkanov, E; Gluhihs, S [Institute of Materials and Structures, Riga Technical University, 16/20 Azenes Str., Riga, LV-1048 (Latvia)

    2007-12-15

    This paper presents the use of macro-fiber composites (MFC) for vibration reduces of structures. The MFC consist of polyimid films with IDE-electrodes that are glued on the top and the bottom of rectangular piezoceramic fibers. The interdigitated electrodes deliver the electric field required to activate the piezoelectric effect in the fibers and allows to invoke the stronger longitudinal piezoelectric effect along the length of the fibers. When this actuator embedded in a surface or attached to flexible structures, the MFC actuator provides distributed solid-state deflection and vibration control. The major advantages of the piezoelectric fibre composite actuators are their high performance, flexibility, and durability when compared with the traditional piezoceramic (PZT) actuators. In addition, the ability of MFC devices to couple the electrical and mechanical fields is larger than in monolithic PZT. In this study, we showed the experimental results that an MFC could be used as actuator to find modal parameters and reduce vibration for structures such as an aluminium beam and metal music plate. Two MFC actuators were attached to the surfaces of test subjects. First MFC actuator used to supply a signal as exciter of vibration and second MFC show his application for reduction of vibration in the range of resonance frequencies. Experimental results of aluminium beam with MFC actuators compared with finite element model which modelled in ANSYS software. The applied voltage is modelled as a thermal load according to thermal analogy for MFC. The experimental and numerical results presented in this paper confirm the potential of MFC for use in the vibration control of structures.

  5. Active control of structures using macro-fiber composite (MFC)

    Kovalovs, A.; Barkanov, E.; Gluhihs, S.

    2007-12-01

    This paper presents the use of macro-fiber composites (MFC) for vibration reduces of structures. The MFC consist of polyimid films with IDE-electrodes that are glued on the top and the bottom of rectangular piezoceramic fibers. The interdigitated electrodes deliver the electric field required to activate the piezoelectric effect in the fibers and allows to invoke the stronger longitudinal piezoelectric effect along the length of the fibers. When this actuator embedded in a surface or attached to flexible structures, the MFC actuator provides distributed solid-state deflection and vibration control. The major advantages of the piezoelectric fibre composite actuators are their high performance, flexibility, and durability when compared with the traditional piezoceramic (PZT) actuators. In addition, the ability of MFC devices to couple the electrical and mechanical fields is larger than in monolithic PZT. In this study, we showed the experimental results that an MFC could be used as actuator to find modal parameters and reduce vibration for structures such as an aluminium beam and metal music plate. Two MFC actuators were attached to the surfaces of test subjects. First MFC actuator used to supply a signal as exciter of vibration and second MFC show his application for reduction of vibration in the range of resonance frequencies. Experimental results of aluminium beam with MFC actuators compared with finite element model which modelled in ANSYS software. The applied voltage is modelled as a thermal load according to thermal analogy for MFC. The experimental and numerical results presented in this paper confirm the potential of MFC for use in the vibration control of structures.

  6. Optical Sensor/Actuator Locations for Active Structural Acoustic Control

    Padula, Sharon L.; Palumbo, Daniel L.; Kincaid, Rex K.

    1998-01-01

    Researchers at NASA Langley Research Center have extensive experience using active structural acoustic control (ASAC) for aircraft interior noise reduction. One aspect of ASAC involves the selection of optimum locations for microphone sensors and force actuators. This paper explains the importance of sensor/actuator selection, reviews optimization techniques, and summarizes experimental and numerical results. Three combinatorial optimization problems are described. Two involve the determination of the number and position of piezoelectric actuators, and the other involves the determination of the number and location of the sensors. For each case, a solution method is suggested, and typical results are examined. The first case, a simplified problem with simulated data, is used to illustrate the method. The second and third cases are more representative of the potential of the method and use measured data. The three case studies and laboratory test results establish the usefulness of the numerical methods.

  7. Active control of large space structures: An introduction and overview

    Doane, G. B., III; Tollison, D. K.; Waites, H. B.

    1985-01-01

    An overview of the large space structure (LSS) control system design problem is presented. The LSS is defined as a class of system, and LSS modeling techniques are discussed. Model truncation, control system objectives, current control law design techniques, and particular problem areas are discussed.

  8. ACTIVE DIMENSIONAL CONTROL OF LARGE-SCALED STEEL STRUCTURES

    Radosław Rutkowski

    2013-01-01

    The article discusses the issues of dimensional control in the construction process of large-scaled steel structures. The main focus is on the analysis of manufacturing tolerances. The article presents the procedure of tolerance analysis usage in process of design and manufacturing of large-scaled steel structures. The proposed solution could significantly improve the manufacturing process.

  9. Active control of tensegrity structures under random excitation

    Ganesh Raja, M.; Narayanan, S.

    2007-06-01

    In this paper we consider vibration control of tensegrity structures under stationary and nonstationary random excitations. These excitations may be representative of many physical loading conditions, such as earthquake, wind, aerodynamic and acoustic excitations. The optimal control theory based on H2 and \\mathrm {H}_{\\infty } controller with full state and limited state feedback is used for the control. The response of the tensegrity structure is represented by the zero lag covariance matrix and the same is obtained by solving the matrix Lyapunov equation. The force generated by the electro-mechanical coupling of the piezoelectric actuator is used in the formulation. A tensegrity structure of class-1 comprising of two modules, with 24 pretension cables and six struts with piezoelectric actuators, is considered.

  10. O the Use of Modern Control Theory for Active Structural Acoustic Control.

    Saunders, William Richard

    A modern control theory formulation of Active Structural Acoustic Control (ASAC) of simple structures radiating acoustic energy into light or heavy fluid mediums is discussed in this dissertation. ASAC of a baffled, simply-supported plate subject to mechanical disturbances is investigated. For the case of light fluid loading, a finite element modelling approach is used to extend previous ASAC design methods. Vibration and acoustic controllers are designed for the plate. Comparison of the controller performance shows distinct advantages of the ASAC method for minimizing radiated acoustic power. A novel approach to the modelling of the heavy fluid-loaded plate is developed here. Augmenting structural and acoustic dynamics using state vector formalism allows the design of both vibration and ASAC controllers for the fluid-loaded plate. This modern control approach to active structural acoustic control is unique in its ability to suppress both persistent and transient disturbances on a plate in a heavy fluid. Numerical simulations of the open-loop and closed-loop plate response are provided to support the theoretical developments.

  11. Reduction of the Radiating Sound of a Submerged Finite Cylindrical Shell Structure by Active Vibration Control

    Seung-Bok Choi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work, active vibration control of an underwater cylindrical shell structure was investigated, to suppress structural vibration and structure-borne noise in water. Finite element modeling of the submerged cylindrical shell structure was developed, and experimentally evaluated. Modal reduction was conducted to obtain the reduced system equation for the active feedback control algorithm. Three Macro Fiber Composites (MFCs were used as actuators and sensors. One MFC was used as an exciter. The optimum control algorithm was designed based on the reduced system equations. The active control performance was then evaluated using the lab scale underwater cylindrical shell structure. Structural vibration and structure-borne noise of the underwater cylindrical shell structure were reduced significantly by activating the optimal controller associated with the MFC actuators. The results provide that active vibration control of the underwater structure is a useful means to reduce structure-borne noise in water.

  12. Active vibration control of a three-stage tensegrity structure

    Chan, Wai Leung; Arbelaez, Diego; Bossens, Frederic; Skelton, Robert E.

    2004-07-01

    This experimental study demonstrates the efficiency of simple control strategies to damp a 3-stage tensegrity tower structure. The tower is mounted on a moving support which is excited with a limited bandwidth random signal (filtered white noise) by a shaker. Our goal is to minimize the tansmissibility between base acceleration and top plate acceleration using piezoelectric displacement actuators and force sensors collocated at the bottom stage of vertical strings. Two types of controllers have been designed, namely, it local integral force feedback control and acceleration feedback control. It can be shown that both controllers can effectively damp the first 2 bending modes by about 20 dB, and the acceleration feedback controller performs even better as it can also reduce the amplitude of the next 2 bending modes by about 5-10 dB.

  13. Phase and gain control policies for robust active vibration control of flexible structures

    The interest of this paper is to develop a general and systematic robust control methodology for active vibration control of flexible structures. For this purpose, first phase and gain control policies are proposed to impose qualitative frequency-dependent requirements on the controller to consider a complete set of control objectives. Then the proposed control methodology is developed by employing phase and gain control policies in the dynamic output feedback H∞ control: according to the set of control objectives, phase and gain control policies incorporate necessary weighting functions and determine them in a rational and systematic way; on the other hand, with the appropriate weighting functions efficient H∞ control algorithms can automatically realize phase and gain control policies and generate a satisfactory H∞ controller. The proposed control methodology can be used for both SISO and MIMO systems with collocated or non-collocated sensors and actuators. In this paper, it is validated on a non-collocated piezoelectric cantilever beam. Both numerical simulations and experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed control methodology. (paper)

  14. Active control of structural vibration by piezoelectric stack actuators

    NIU Jun-chuan; ZHAO Guo-qun; HU Xia-xia

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a general analytical model of flexible isolation system for application to the installation of high-speed machines and lightweight structures. Piezoelectric stack actuators are employed in the model to achieve vibration control of flexible structures, and dynamic characteristics are also investigated. Mobility technique is used to derive the governing equations of the system. The power flow transmitted into the foundation is solved and considered as a cost function to achieve optimal control of vibration isolation. Some numerical simulations revealed that the analytical model is effective as piezoelectric stack actuators can achieve substantial vibration attenuation by selecting proper value of the input voltage.

  15. Control of high frequency microactuators using active structures

    A fluidically driven microactuator that generates supersonic, pulsed microjets has been implemented with smart materials to actively and precisely control the frequency of the microjets in a closed-loop manner. Since this actuator relies on a number of microscale flow and acoustic phenomena to produce the pulsed microjets, its resonant frequency is determined by its geometry and other flow parameters. The design discussed in this paper integrates piezoelectric stacks by connecting them to movable sidewalls within the actuator such that the microactuator's internal geometry can be controlled by varying the voltage across the piezo-stacks. An open-loop control scheme demonstrates the frequency modulation capabilities that are enabled with this design: very large frequency deviations (up to ±500 Hz) around the actuator design frequency are attained at very high rates (up to 1 kHz). Closed-loop control of the microactuator's frequency was also demonstrated, and the results indicate that (combined with appropriate sensors) this actuator could be used effectively for active, feedback control in high-speed, resonance-dominated flowfields. This proof of concept study clearly illustrates the ability of this robust and compact actuator to produce perturbations that can be modulated and controlled based on the desired control objective. (paper)

  16. A Control Source Structure of Single Loudspeaker and Rear Sound Interference for Inexpensive Active Noise Control

    Yasuhide Kobayashi

    2010-01-01

    phase-lag is imposed by the Swinbanks' source and the rear sound interference. Thirdly, effects on control performances of control source structures are examined by control experiments with robust controllers.

  17. Active queue management controller design for TCP communication networks: Variable structure control approach

    On the basis of variable structure control (VSC), an active queue management (AQM) controller is presented for a class of TCP communication networks. In the TCP/IP networks, the packet drop probability is limited between 0 and 1. Therefore, we modeled TCP/AQM as a rate-based non-linear system with a saturated input. The objective of the VSC-based AQM controller is to achieve the desired queue size and to guarantee the asymptotic stability of the closed-loop TCP non-linear system with saturated input. The performance and effectiveness of the proposed control law are then validated for different network scenarios through numerical simulations in both MATLAB and Network Simulator-2 (NS-2). Both sets of simulation results have confirmed that the proposed scheme outperforms other AQM schemes.

  18. Active queue management controller design for TCP communication networks: Variable structure control approach

    Chen, C.-K. [Department of Engineering Science, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Liao, T.-L. [Department of Engineering Science, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: tlliao@mail.ncku.edu; Yan, J.-J. [Department of Computer and Communication, Shu-Te University, Kaohsiung 824, Taiwan (China)

    2009-04-15

    On the basis of variable structure control (VSC), an active queue management (AQM) controller is presented for a class of TCP communication networks. In the TCP/IP networks, the packet drop probability is limited between 0 and 1. Therefore, we modeled TCP/AQM as a rate-based non-linear system with a saturated input. The objective of the VSC-based AQM controller is to achieve the desired queue size and to guarantee the asymptotic stability of the closed-loop TCP non-linear system with saturated input. The performance and effectiveness of the proposed control law are then validated for different network scenarios through numerical simulations in both MATLAB and Network Simulator-2 (NS-2). Both sets of simulation results have confirmed that the proposed scheme outperforms other AQM schemes.

  19. Reduction of the Radiating Sound of a Submerged Finite Cylindrical Shell Structure by Active Vibration Control

    Seung-Bok Choi; Juncheol Jeon; Jung Woo Sohn; Heung Soo Kim

    2013-01-01

    In this work, active vibration control of an underwater cylindrical shell structure was investigated, to suppress structural vibration and structure-borne noise in water. Finite element modeling of the submerged cylindrical shell structure was developed, and experimentally evaluated. Modal reduction was conducted to obtain the reduced system equation for the active feedback control algorithm. Three Macro Fiber Composites (MFCs) were used as actuators and sensors. One MFC was used as an excite...

  20. Practical Applications of Semi-active Control Systems to Civil Engineering Structures

    Florentina Chira; Cristian Pastia; Septimiu-George Luca

    2007-01-01

    During the last few years, it has been paid a considerable attention to the searching and developing of some procedures and mechanisms of structural control to mitigate the effects of dynamic environmental hazards on civil engineering structures. In this paper we review some full-scale applications of semi-active control systems for the protection of the civil structures under dynamic actions.

  1. An active structural acoustic control approach for the reduction of the structure-borne road noise

    Douville, Hugo; Berry, Alain; Masson, Patrice

    2002-11-01

    The reduction of the structure-borne road noise generated inside the cabin of an automobile is investigated using an Active Structural Acoustic Control (ASAC) approach. First, a laboratory test bench consisting of a wheel/suspension/lower suspension A-arm assembly has been developed in order to identify the vibroacoustic transfer paths (up to 250 Hz) for realistic road noise excitation of the wheel. Frequency Response Function (FRF) measurements between the excitation/control actuators and each suspension/chassis linkage are used to characterize the different transfer paths that transmit energy through the chassis of the car. Second, a FE/BE model (Finite/Boundary Elements) was developed to simulate the acoustic field of an automobile cab interior. This model is used to predict the acoustic field inside the cabin as a response to the measured forces applied on the suspension/chassis linkages. Finally, an experimental implementation of ASAC is presented. The control approach relies on the use of inertial actuators to modify the vibration behavior of the suspension and the automotive chassis such that its noise radiation efficiency is decreased. The implemented algorithm consists of a MIMO (Multiple-Input-Multiple-Output) feedforward configuration with a filtered-X LMS algorithm using an advanced reference signal (width FIR filters) using the Simulink/Dspace environment for control prototyping.

  2. Multilayer Active Control For Structural Damping And Optical-Path Regulation

    Rahman, Zahidul H.; Spanos, John T.; Fanson, James L.

    1995-01-01

    Two active-control concepts incorporated into system for suppression of vibrations in truss structure and regulation of length of optical path on structure to nanometer level. Optical-path-length-control subsystem contains two feedback control loops to obtain active damping in wide amplitude-and-frequency range. Concept described in more detail in number of previous articles, including "Stabilizing Optical-Path Length on a Vibrating Structure" (NPO-19040), "Controllable Optical Delay Line for Stellar Interferometry" (NPO-18686), "Test Bed for Control of Optical-Path Lengths" (NPO-18487).

  3. Development of Control Structure for Hybrid Wind Generators with Active Power Capability

    Mehdi Niroomand

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A hierarchical control structure is proposed for hybrid energy systems (HES which consist of wind energy system (WES and energy storage system (ESS. The proposed multilevel control structure consists of four blocks: reference generation and mode select, power balancing, control algorithms, and switching control blocks. A high performance power management strategy is used for the system. Also, the proposed system is analyzed as an active power filter (APF with ability to control the voltage, to compensate the harmonics, and to deliver active power. The HES is designed with parallel DC coupled structure. Simulation results are shown for verification of the theoretical analysis.

  4. Active control of structural vibration with on-line secondary path modeling

    YANG Tiejun; GU Zhongquan

    2004-01-01

    An active control strategy with on-line secondary path modeling is proposed and applied in active control of helicopter structural vibration. Computer simulations of the secondary path modeling performance demonstrate the superiorities of the active control strategy. A 2-input 4-output active control simulation for a helicopter model is performed and great reduction of structural vibration is achieved. 2-input 2-output and 2-input 4-output experimental studies of structural vibration control for a free-free beam are also carried out in laboratory to simulate a flying helicopter. The experimental results also show better reduction of the structural vibration, which verifies that the proposed method is effective and practical in structural vibration reduction.

  5. Structural design and active control of modular tensegrity systems

    Amouri, Sarah; Averseng, Julien; Quirant, Jérôme; Dube, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    International audience Tensegrity systems are self stressed reticulate structures composed of a set of compressed struts assembled inside a continuum of tendons. This principle is at the origin of lightweight and transparent structures that can cover large spaces and be erected, in particular cases, by deployment. In this paper, we propose a general design and optimization procedure adapted to modular structures following this principle. An application is presented on the case of a curved ...

  6. Active control of space structures: Proof of concept experiment

    Breakwell, J. A.

    1982-03-01

    Modern control theory easily works with multiple input/multiple output systems. Two types of systems which fall into this category are flexible systems, where many measurements and several actuators are necessary to provide control over bending behavior, and articulated systems which consist of several rigid bodies connected together by pivoting connections. In this latter case, multiple controls are implemented as torquers at the joints.

  7. Integrated intelligent control analysis on semi-active structures by using magnetorheological dampers

    2008-01-01

    The control strategy is very important for semiactive control or active control systems. An integrated intelligent control strategy for building structures incorpo rated with magnetorheological (MR) dampers subjected to earthquake excitation is proposed. In this strategy, the time-delay problem is solved by a neural network and the control currents of the MR dampers are determined quickly by a fuzzy controller. Through a numerical example of a three-storey structure with one MR damper installed in the first floor, the seismic responses of the uncontrolled, the intelligently controlled, the passiveon controlled, and the passive-off controlled structures under different earthquake excitations are analyzed. Based on the numerical results, it can be found that the time domain and the frequency domain responses are reduced effectively when the MR damper is added in the structure, and the integrated intelligent control strategy has a better earthquake mitigation effect.

  8. Active structural control design and experiment for the Mini-Mast

    Wie, Bong; Horta, Lucas; Sulla, Jeff

    1990-01-01

    Control system design and closed-loop test results for the Mini-Mast truss structure located at the NASA Langley Research Center are presented. The simplicity and effectiveness of a classical control approach to the active structural control design are demonstrated by ground experiments. The concepts of robust nonminimum phase compensation and periodic disturbance rejection are also experimentally validated. The practicality of a sensor output decoupling approach is demonstrated for the inherent, multivariable control problem of the Mini-Mast.

  9. Recent Applications of Some Active Control Systems to Civil Engineering Structures

    Cristian Pastia; Septimiu-George Luca; Florentina Chira

    2007-01-01

    The application of control systems to civil engineering structures has been investigated in recent years to demonstrate the efficiency of these systems during exceptional natural events such as earthquakes and severe winds. In this paper, a review of some full-scale implementations of active and hybrid control systems for the protection of the civil structures to dynamic actions is performed.

  10. Active structural control for the mini-MAST and ACES structures

    Collins, E. G., Jr.; Phillips, D. J.; Hyland, D. C.; King, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    Two experiments based on the maximum entropy/optimal projection design approach are discussed which were conducted by Harris Corporation as part of the NASA Controls Structures Interaction Guest Investigator program. The design equations consist of four coupled matrix equations which specialize to the standard linear-quadratic Guassian Riccati equations, when the plant is known perfectly and a full order controller is desired. These experiments demonstrate successful control system design and implementation for flexible structures.

  11. Active Vibration Control of a Monopile Offshore Structure

    Nielsen, Søren R. K.; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Thesbjerg, L.

    1999-01-01

    cylinder of the platform, so the drag force in the generalized Morison equation is increased whenever it is acting in the opposite direction of the cylinder motion, whereas an unchanged drag force is applied, whenever it is acting co-directionally to the cylinder motion. The inertial force of the wave load...... is not subjected to control. The increased drag force is obtained by forcing the boundary layers to separate by blowing air into the boundary layer from the inside through small holes in the cylinder surface placed at a relatively large distance from the water surface. The control is specified by the...... wave conditions, where reductions in the vibration level of up to 50% have been registered....

  12. Experimental Active Vibration Control in Truss Structures Considering Uncertainties in System Parameters

    2008-01-01

    This paper deals with the study of algorithms for robust active vibration control in flexible structures considering uncertainties in system parameters. It became an area of enormous interest, mainly due to the countless demands of optimal performance in mechanical systems as aircraft, aerospace, and automotive structures. An important and difficult problem for designing active vibration control is to get a representative dynamic model. Generally, this model can be obtained using finite eleme...

  13. Numerical Comparison of Active Acoustic and Structural Noise Control in a Stiffened Double Wall Cylinder

    Grosveld, Ferdinand W.

    1996-01-01

    The active acoustic and structural noise control characteristics of a double wall cylinder with and without ring stiffeners were numerically evaluated. An exterior monopole was assumed to acoustically excite the outside of the double wall cylinder at an acoustic cavity resonance frequency. Structural modal vibration properties of the inner and outer shells were analyzed by post-processing the results from a finite element analysis. A boundary element approach was used to calculate the acoustic cavity response and the coupled structural-acoustic interaction. In the frequency region of interest, below 500 Hz, all structural resonant modes were found to be acoustically slow and the nonresonant modal response to be dominant. Active sound transmission control was achieved by control forces applied to the inner or outer shell, or acoustic control monopoles placed just outside the inner or outer shell. A least mean square technique was used to minimize the interior sound pressures at the nodes of a data recovery mesh. Results showed that single acoustic control monopoles placed just outside the inner or outer shells resulted in better sound transmission control than six distributed point forces applied to either one of the shells. Adding stiffeners to the double wall structure constrained the modal vibrations of the shells, making the double wall stiffer with associated higher modal frequencies. Active noise control obtained for the stiffened double wall configurations was less than for the unstiffened cylinder. In all cases, the acoustic control monopoles controlled the sound transmission into the interior better than the structural control forces.

  14. Streamlined design and self reliant hardware for active control of precision space structures

    Hyland, David C.; King, James A.; Phillips, Douglas J.

    1994-01-01

    Precision space structures may require active vibration control to satisfy critical performance requirements relating to line-of-sight pointing accuracy and the maintenance of precise, internal alignments. In order for vibration control concepts to become operational, it is necessary that their benefits be practically demonstrated in large scale ground-based experiments. A unique opportunity to carry out such demonstrations on a wide variety of experimental testbeds was provided by the NASA Control-Structure Integration (CSI) Guest Investigator (GI) Program. This report surveys the experimental results achieved by the Harris Corporation GI team on both Phases 1 and 2 of the program and provides a detailed description of Phase 2 activities. The Phase 1 results illustrated the effectiveness of active vibration control for space structures and demonstrated a systematic methodology for control design, implementation test. In Phase 2, this methodology was significantly streamlined to yield an on-site, single session design/test capability. Moreover, the Phase 2 research on adaptive neural control techniques made significant progress toward fully automated, self-reliant space structure control systems. As a further thrust toward productized, self-contained vibration control systems, the Harris Phase II activity concluded with experimental demonstration of new vibration isolation hardware suitable for a wide range of space-flight and ground-based commercial applications.The CSI GI Program Phase 1 activity was conducted under contract NASA1-18872, and the Phase 2 activity was conducted under NASA1-19372.

  15. Fuzzy sliding mode controller of a pneumatic active isolating system using negative stiffness structure

    A novel active vibration isolation system using negative stiffness structure (active system with NSS) for low excitation frequency ranges (< 5 Hz) is developed successfully. Here, the negative stiffness structure (NSS) is used to minimize the attraction of vibration. Then, the fuzzy sliding mode controller (FSMC) is designed to improve the vibration isolation performance of the active system with NSS. Based on Lyapunov stability theorem, the fuzzy control rules are constructed. Next, the experimental apparatus is built for evaluating the isolation efficiency of the proposed system controlled by the FSMC corresponding to various excitation conditions. In addition, the isolation performance of the active system with NSS, the active system without NSS and the passive the system with NSS is compared. The experimental results confirmed that the active system with NSS gives better isolation efficiency than the active system without NSS and the passive system with NSS in low excitation frequency areas

  16. Semi-active friction tendons for vibration control of space structures

    Garrido, Hernán; Curadelli, Oscar; Ambrosini, Daniel

    2014-10-01

    Semi-active vibration control systems are becoming popular because they offer both the reliability of passive systems and the versatility of active control without high power demands. In this work, a new semi-active control system is proposed and studied numerically. The system consists of variable-friction dampers linked to the structure through cables. Auxiliary soft springs in parallel with these friction dampers allow them to return to their initial pre-tensioned state. Using cables makes the system suitable for deployable, flexible and lightweight structures, such as space structures (spacecraft). A control system with three control laws applied to a single-degree-of-freedom structure is studied. Two of these laws are derived by using Lyapunov theory, whereas the third one is developed heuristically. In order to assess the performance of the control system, a parametric study is carried out through numerical simulations. An application of the proposed method to multi-degree-of-freedom structures is also presented and demonstrated through a numerical example. The system in semi-active mode is more effective than in passive mode and its effectiveness is less sensitive to loss of pre-tension.

  17. Current and Future Research in Active Control of Lightweight, Flexible Structures Using the X-56 Aircraft

    Ryan, John J.; Bosworth, John T.; Burken, John J.; Suh, Peter M.

    2014-01-01

    The X-56 Multi-Utility Technology Testbed aircraft system is a versatile experimental research flight platform. The system was primarily designed to investigate active control of lightweight flexible structures, but is reconfigurable and capable of hosting a wide breadth of research. Current research includes flight experimentation of a Lockheed Martin designed active control flutter suppression system. Future research plans continue experimentation with alternative control systems, explore the use of novel sensor systems, and experiments with the use of novel control effectors. This paper describes the aircraft system, current research efforts designed around the system, and future planned research efforts that will be hosted on the aircraft system.

  18. Variable Structure Control on Active Suspension of 4 DOF Vehicle Model

    Chuanbo Ren

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available in this paper, the theory of a variable structure model following control (VSMFC is employed to the design of the controller for an active suspensions of 4-degree-of-freedom (4-DOF automobile model. The sliding mode equation is derived by applying VSMFC theory and the parameters of the switching function are obtained by using the method of pole assignment; a hierarchical algorithm with control variables started in sequence is applied to solve the active force; a method of exponential approach law is used to improve the dynamic performance of the controller. The efficacy of the controller is verified by simulation carried out with the help of Matlab/ Simulink. The results show that the active suspension controller based on VSMFC theory is superior in both robustness and performance.

  19. Active structural acoustic control of aircraft interior flow noise via the use of active trim panels

    Mahnken, Brian W.

    1996-01-01

    Modem jet aircraft interior noise can be categorized into two main types: tonal noise caused by engine imbalance or blade passage, and mid frequency broadband noise resulting from turbulent flow. This project addresses aircraft interior flow noise caused by a flow separation over the crown of the aircraft. The noise control approach is to mount piezoelectric actuators to the aircraft interior cockpit crown trim panel and use them to actively control aircraft interior noise with...

  20. Preliminary structural control results from the Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE)

    Miller, David W.; Saarmaa, Erik; Jacques, Robert N.

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented of on-going closed-loop ground experiments on the MACE test article, the objective of which is to investigate the extent to which closed-loop behavior of flexible spacecraft in zero gravity can be predicted, as well as to examine orbit system identification and control reconfiguration. The MACE hardware consists of three torque wheels, a two-axis gimballing payload, inertial sensors, and a flexible support structure. With the acquisition of a second payload, this is to represent a multiple payload platform with significant structural flexibility. When linear quadratic Gaussian control is used, payload pointing accuracy is improved by an order of magnitude when disturbed by a broadband torque disturbance. The successes and failures of the design and implementation process are discussed.

  1. Independent modal variable structure fuzzy active vibration control of thin plates laminated with photostrictive actuators

    He Rongbo; Zheng Shijie

    2013-01-01

    Photostrictive actuators can produce photodeformation strains under illumination of ultraviolet lights.They can realize non-contact micro-actuation and vibration control for elastic plate structures.Considering the switching actuation and nonlinear dynamic characteristics of photostrictive actuators,a variable structure fuzzy active control scheme is presented to control the light intensity applied to the actuators.Firstly,independent modal vibration control equations of photoelectric laminated plates are established based on modal analysis techniques.Then,the optimal light switching function is derived to increase the range of sliding modal area,and the light intensity self-adjusting fuzzy active controller is designed.Meanwhile,a continuous function is applied to replace a sign function to reduce the variable structure control (VSC) chattering.Finally,numerical simulation is carried out,and simulation results indicate that the proposed control strategy provides better performance and control effect to plate actuation and control than velocity feedback control,and suppresses vibration effectively.

  2. Experimental Active Vibration Control in Truss Structures Considering Uncertainties in System Parameters

    Douglas Domingues Bueno

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the study of algorithms for robust active vibration control in flexible structures considering uncertainties in system parameters. It became an area of enormous interest, mainly due to the countless demands of optimal performance in mechanical systems as aircraft, aerospace, and automotive structures. An important and difficult problem for designing active vibration control is to get a representative dynamic model. Generally, this model can be obtained using finite element method (FEM or an identification method using experimental data. Actuators and sensors may affect the dynamics properties of the structure, for instance, electromechanical coupling of piezoelectric material must be considered in FEM formulation for flexible and lightly damping structure. The nonlinearities and uncertainties involved in these structures make it a difficult task, mainly for complex structures as spatial truss structures. On the other hand, by using an identification method, it is possible to obtain the dynamic model represented through a state space realization considering this coupling. This paper proposes an experimental methodology for vibration control in a 3D truss structure using PZT wafer stacks and a robust control algorithm solved by linear matrix inequalities.

  3. Study on semi-active control of mega-sub controlled structure by MR damper subject to random wind loads

    Qin Xiangjun; Zhang Xun'an; Sheldon Cherry

    2008-01-01

    The recently proposed mega-sub controlled structure (MSCS), a new type of structure associated with the design and construction of super-tall buildings, has attracted the attention of designers for use in enhancing the control effectiveness in mega-fi'ame buildings. In this paper, a dynamic equation and method to assemble parameter matrixes for a mega-sub controlled structure under random wind loads is presented. Semi-active control using magnetorheological dampers for the MSCS under random wind loads is investigated, and is compared with a corresponding system without dampers. A parametric study of the relative stiffness ratio and relative mass ratio between the mega-frame and the substructures, as well as the additional column stiffness ratio that influences the response control effectiveness of the MSCS, is discussed. The studies reveal, for the first time, that different control mechanisms exist. The results indicate that the proposed structure employing semi-active control can offer an effective control mechanism. Guidelines for selecting parameters are provided based on the analytical study.

  4. A robust nonlinear semi-active control for base seismically-isolated structures

    Teodorescu, Catalin-Stefan; Diop, Sette; Politopoulos, Ioannis; Benidir, Messaoud

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a robust nonlinear semi-active control for base seismically-isolated structures. The control is based upon an extension of works of Leitmann et al. on the stabilization of nonlinear systems with uncertain models. For usual models of structure dynamics it is shown that applying a specific control law drives the state variables into a ball of specified radius in finite time. The radius of the ball may be arbitrarily chosen as long as it is not lower than a limiting value. In...

  5. Active Structural Control for Aircraft Efficiency with the X-56A Aircraft

    Ouellette, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    The X-56A Multi-Utility Technology Testbed is an experimental aircraft designed to study active control of flexible structures. The vehicle is easily reconfigured to allow for testing of different configurations. The vehicle is being used to study new sensor, actuator, modeling and controls technologies. These new technologies will allow for lighter vehicles and new configurations that exceed the efficiency currently achievable. A description of the vehicle and the current research efforts that it enables are presented.

  6. Design and implementation of linear controllers for the active control of reduced models of thin-walled structures

    Ghareeb, Nader

    2013-01-01

    The main objectives of this work are twofold: 1.) to create reduced models of smart structures that are fully representative and 2.) to design different linear controllers and implement them into the active control of these reduced models. After a short introduction to the theory of piezoelectricity, the reduced model (super element model) is created starting from the finite element model. Damping properties are also calculated and added to the model. The relation between electrical and mecha...

  7. Robust semi-active control for uncertain structures and smart dampers

    Recent developments in semi-active control technology have led to its application in civil infrastructures as an efficient strategy to protect susceptible structures against seismic and wind induced vibration. The reliable and robust performance of semi-active systems depends on the level of uncertainties in the structural parameters as well as on the sensors’ measurement and on smart mechanical dampers. A common source of uncertainties in semi-active control devices is related to the inherent nonlinear nature of these devices, thermal variation, or their malfunctioning. This study deals with the robust H∞ control problem and aims to model different sources of uncertainty. The uncertainty of the structural model and damper force are assumed to be norm bounded random variables. By using linear fractional transformation (LFT), the uncertain part of the system is decoupled from the nominal parameters of the system. The robust H∞ controller is designed to achieve consistent performance in structures including nominal and perturbed dynamics. Additionally, to reduce the uncertainty of the damper force, an inverse model of the magnetorheological (MR) damper is developed based on an adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS). The robustness of the proposed algorithm is validated by numerical simulations. (paper)

  8. Robust semi-active control for uncertain structures and smart dampers

    Yeganeh Fallah, Arash; Taghikhany, Touraj

    2014-09-01

    Recent developments in semi-active control technology have led to its application in civil infrastructures as an efficient strategy to protect susceptible structures against seismic and wind induced vibration. The reliable and robust performance of semi-active systems depends on the level of uncertainties in the structural parameters as well as on the sensors’ measurement and on smart mechanical dampers. A common source of uncertainties in semi-active control devices is related to the inherent nonlinear nature of these devices, thermal variation, or their malfunctioning. This study deals with the robust H∞ control problem and aims to model different sources of uncertainty. The uncertainty of the structural model and damper force are assumed to be norm bounded random variables. By using linear fractional transformation (LFT), the uncertain part of the system is decoupled from the nominal parameters of the system. The robust H∞ controller is designed to achieve consistent performance in structures including nominal and perturbed dynamics. Additionally, to reduce the uncertainty of the damper force, an inverse model of the magnetorheological (MR) damper is developed based on an adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS). The robustness of the proposed algorithm is validated by numerical simulations.

  9. The impact of active controls technology on the structural integrity of aeronautical vehicles

    Noll, Thomas E.; Austin, Edward; Donley, Shawn; Graham, George; Harris, Terry; Kaynes, Ian; Lee, Ben; Sparrow, James

    1993-01-01

    The findings of an investigation conducted under the auspices of The Technical Cooperation Program (TTCP) to assess the impact of active controls technology on the structural integrity of aeronautical vehicles and to evaluate the present state-of-the-art for predicting loads caused by a flight-control system modification and the resulting change in the fatigue life of the flight vehicle are summarized. Important points concerning structural technology considerations implicit in applying active controls technology in new aircraft are summarized. These points are well founded and based upon information received from within the aerospace industry and government laboratories, acquired by sponsoring workshops which brought together experts from contributing and interacting technical disciplines, and obtained by conducting a case study to independently assess the state of the technology. The paper concludes that communication between technical disciplines is absolutely essential in the design of future high performance aircraft.

  10. Discovery of structural characteristics of RIP1K for activity control using the combination method

    Song, Eun Ju; Do, Yun-Ju; Lee, Myoung Hwi; Kim, Eunhee; Kang, Nam Sook

    2015-11-01

    Receptor-interacting protein kinases 1 (RIPK1) plays an important role in necroptotic disease; it is therefore useful to identify structural characteristics controlling RIPK1 activity. Serine residues such as Ser89 and Ser161 have been reported to be important for RIPK1 activity. ATP binding to the RIPK1 hinge region occurs prior to the transfer of the phosphate group to serine residues. We therefore investigated the regulatory function of residues in the RIPK1 hinge region using a combination of molecular modeling and protein stability experiments. We analyzed the structure and evaluated the kinetic activity and stability of RIPK1 hinge region mutants. In this way, we identified Glu93 and Glu96 as key residues that regulate RIP1K activity, suggesting that mutation of these residues might be related to necroptotic diseases. The presence of a clinical mutation in RIPK1 Glu93 in endometritis patients is consistent with our data.

  11. Neural networkbased semi-active control strategy for structural vibration mitigation with magnetorheological damper

    Bhowmik, Subrata

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a neural network based semi-active control method for a rotary type magnetorheological (MR) damper. The characteristics of the MR damper are described by the classic Bouc-Wen model, and the performance of the proposed control method is evaluated in terms of a base exited shear......-displacement trajectories. The proposed neural network controller is therefore trained based on data derived from these desired forcedisplacement curves, where the optimal relation between friction force level and response amplitude is determined explicitly by simply maximizing the damping ratio of the targeted vibration...... mode of the structure. The neural network control is then developed to reproduce the desired force based on damper displacement and velocity as network input, and it is therefore referred to as an amplitude dependent model reference control method. An inverse model of the MR damper is needed to...

  12. Neural network based semi-active control strategy for structural vibration mitigation with magnetorheological damper

    Bhowmik, Subrata

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a neural network based semi-active control method for a rotary type magnetorheological (MR) damper. The characteristics of the MR damper are described by the classic Bouc-Wen model, and the performance of the proposed control method is evaluated in terms of a base exited shear......-displacement trajectories. The proposed neural network controller is therefore trained based on data derived from these desired forcedisplacement curves, where the optimal relation between friction force level and response amplitude is determined explicitly by simply maximizing the damping ratio of the targeted vibration...... mode of the structure. The neural network control is then developed to reproduce the desired force based on damper displacement and velocity as network input, and it is therefore referred to as an amplitude dependent model reference control method. An inverse model of the MR damper is needed to...

  13. Optimal and robust modal control of a flexible structure using an active dynamic vibration absorber

    This paper is concerned with feedback vibration control of a lightly damped flexible structure that has a large number of well-separated modes. A single active electrical dynamic absorber is used to reduce a particular single vibration mode selectively or multiple modes simultaneously. The absorber is realized electrically by feeding back the structural acceleration at one position to a collocated piezoceramic patch actuator via a controller consisting of one or several second order lowpass filters. A simple analytical method is presented to design a modal control filter that is optimal in that it maximally flattens the mobility frequency response of the target mode, as well as robust in that it works within a prescribed maximum control spillover of 2 dB at all frequencies. Experiments are conducted with a free–free beam to demonstrate its ability to control any single mode optimally and robustly. It is also shown that an active absorber with multiple such filters can effectively control multiple modes simultaneously

  14. Active structural control for damping augmentation and compensation of thermal distortion

    Sirlin, S. W.

    1992-01-01

    A large space-based Focus Mission Interferometer is used as a testbed for the NASA Controls and Structures Interaction Program. Impedance-based adaptive structural control and control of thermal disturbances are demonstrated using an end-to-end simulation of the system's optical performance. Attention is also given to integrated optical/structural modeling and a hierarchical, layered control strategy.

  15. A Multi-Mode Blade Damping Control using Shunted Piezoelectric Transducers with Active Feedback Structure

    Choi, Benjamin; Morrison, Carlos; Min, James

    2009-01-01

    The Structural Dynamics and. Mechanics branch (RXS) is developing smart adaptive structures to improve fan blade damping at resonances using piezoelectric (PE) transducers. In this presentation, only one shunted PE transducer was used to demonstrate active control of multi-mode blade resonance damping on a titanium alloy (Ti-6A1-4V) flat plate model, regardless of bending, torsion, and 2-stripe modes. This work would have a significant impact on the conventional passive shunt damping world because the standard feedback control design tools can now be used to design and implement electric shunt for vibration control. In other words, the passive shunt circuit components using massive inductors and. resistors for multi-mode resonance control can be replaced with digital codes. Furthermore, this active approach with multi patches can simultaneously control several modes in the engine operating range. Dr. Benjamin Choi presented the analytical and experimental results from this work at the Propulsion-Safety and. Affordable Readiness (P-SAR) Conference in March, 2009.

  16. Sliding mode fault detection and fault-tolerant control of smart dampers in semi-active control of building structures

    Yeganeh Fallah, Arash; Taghikhany, Touraj

    2015-12-01

    Recent decades have witnessed much interest in the application of active and semi-active control strategies for seismic protection of civil infrastructures. However, the reliability of these systems is still in doubt as there remains the possibility of malfunctioning of their critical components (i.e. actuators and sensors) during an earthquake. This paper focuses on the application of the sliding mode method due to the inherent robustness of its fault detection observer and fault-tolerant control. The robust sliding mode observer estimates the state of the system and reconstructs the actuators’ faults which are used for calculating a fault distribution matrix. Then the fault-tolerant sliding mode controller reconfigures itself by the fault distribution matrix and accommodates the fault effect on the system. Numerical simulation of a three-story structure with magneto-rheological dampers demonstrates the effectiveness of the proposed fault-tolerant control system. It was shown that the fault-tolerant control system maintains the performance of the structure at an acceptable level in the post-fault case.

  17. Theoretical and experimental research on a new system of semi-active structural control with variable stiffness and damping

    周福霖; 谭平; 阎维明; 魏陆顺

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, a new system of semi active structural control with active variable stiffness and damping (AVSD) issuggested. This new system amplifies the structural displacement to dissipate more energy, and in turn, effectively reduces thestructural response in the case of relatively small story drifts, which occur during earthquakes. A predictive instantaneousoptimal control algorithm is established for a SDOF structure equipped with an AVSD system Comparative shaking table testsof a 1/4 scale single story structural model with a full scale control device have been conducted. From the experimental andanalytical results, it is shown that when compared to structures without control or with the active variable stiffness control alone,the suggested system exhibits higher efficiency in controlling the structural response, requires less energy input, operates withhigher reliability, and can be manufactured at a lower cost and used in a wider range of engineering applications.

  18. Structural Acoustic Characteristics of Aircraft and Active Control of Interior Noise

    Fuller, C. R.

    1998-01-01

    The reduction of aircraft cabin sound levels to acceptable values still remains a topic of much research. The use of conventional passive approaches has been extensively studied and implemented. However performance limits of these techniques have been reached. In this project, new techniques for understanding the structural acoustic behavior of aircraft fuselages and the use of this knowledge in developing advanced new control approaches are investigated. A central feature of the project is the Aircraft Fuselage Test Facility at Va Tech which is based around a full scale Cessna Citation III fuselage. The work is divided into two main parts; the first part investigates the use of an inverse technique for identifying dominant fuselage vibrations. The second part studies the development and implementation of active and active-passive techniques for controlling aircraft interior noise.

  19. Physical mechanisms of active control of sound transmission through rib stiffened double-panel structure

    Ma, Xiyue; Chen, Kean; Ding, Shaohu; Yu, Haoxin

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents an analytical investigation on physical mechanisms of actively controlling sound transmission through a rib stiffened double-panel structure using point source in the cavity. The combined modal expansion and vibro-acoustic coupling methods are applied to establish the theoretical model of such active structure. Under the condition of minimizing radiated power of the radiating ribbed plate, the physical mechanisms are interpreted in detail from the point of view of modal couplings similar as that used in existed literatures. Results obtained demonstrate that the rule of sound energy transmission and the physical mechanisms for the rib stiffened double-panel structure are all changed, and affected by the coupling effects of the rib when compared with the analytical results obtained for unribbed double-panel case. By taking the coupling effects of the rib into considerations, the cavity modal suppression and rearrangement mechanisms obtained in existed investigations are modified and supplemented for the ribbed plate case, which gives a clear interpretation for the physical nature involved in the active rib stiffened double-panel structure.

  20. Active structural acoustic control of a smart cylindrical shell using a virtual microphone

    Loghmani, Ali; Danesh, Mohammad; Kwak, Moon K.; Keshmiri, Mehdi

    2016-04-01

    This paper investigates the active structural acoustic control of sound radiated from a smart cylindrical shell. The cylinder is equipped with piezoelectric sensors and actuators to estimate and control the sound pressure that radiates from the smart shell. This estimated pressure is referred to as a virtual microphone, and it can be used in control systems instead of actual microphones to attenuate noise due to structural vibrations. To this end, the dynamic model for the smart cylinder is derived using the extended Hamilton’s principle, the Sanders shell theory and the assumed mode method. The simplified Kirchhoff-Helmholtz integral estimates the far-field sound pressure radiating from the baffled cylindrical shell. A modified higher harmonic controller that can cope with a harmonic disturbance is designed and experimentally evaluated. The experimental tests were carried out on a baffled cylindrical aluminum shell in an anechoic chamber. The frequency response for the theoretical virtual microphone and the experimental actual microphone are in good agreement with each other, and the results show the effectiveness of the designed virtual microphone and controller in attenuating the radiated sound.

  1. Active Structural Acoustic Control of Interior Noise on a Raytheon 1900D

    Palumbo, Dan; Cabell, Ran; Sullivan, Brenda; Cline, John

    2000-01-01

    An active structural acoustic control system has been demonstrated on a Raytheon Aircraft Company 1900D turboprop airliner. Both single frequency and multi-frequency control of the blade passage frequency and its harmonics was accomplished. The control algorithm was a variant of the popular filtered-x LMS implemented in the principal component domain. The control system consisted of 21 inertial actuators and 32 microphones. The actuators were mounted to the aircraft's ring frames. The microphones were distributed uniformly throughout the interior at head height, both seated and standing. Actuator locations were selected using a combinatorial search optimization algorithm. The control system achieved a 14 dB noise reduction of the blade passage frequency during single frequency tests. Multi-frequency control of the first 1st, 2nd and 3rd harmonics resulted in 10.2 dB, 3.3 dB and 1.6 dB noise reductions respectively. These results fall short of the predictions which were produced by the optimization algorithm (13.5 dB, 8.6 dB and 6.3 dB). The optimization was based on actuator transfer functions taken on the ground and it is postulated that cabin pressurization at flight altitude was a factor in this discrepancy.

  2. Reduction of structural weight, costs and complexity of a control system in the active vibration reduction of flexible structures

    This paper concerns the active vibration reduction of a flexible structure with discrete piezoelectric sensors and actuators in collocated pairs bonded to its surface. In this study, a new fitness and objective function is proposed to determine the optimal number of actuators, based on variations in the average closed loop dB gain margin reduction for all of the optimal piezoelectric pairs and on the modes that are required to be attenuated using the optimal linear quadratic control scheme. The aim of this study is to find the minimum number of optimally located sensor/actuator pairs, which can achieve the same vibration reduction as a greater number, in order to reduce the cost, complexity and power requirement of the control system. This optimization was done using a genetic algorithm. The technique may be applied to any lightly damped structure, and is demonstrated here by attenuating the first six vibration modes of a flat cantilever plate. It is shown that two sensor/actuator pairs, located and controlled optimally, give almost the same vibration reduction as ten pairs. These results are validated by comparing the open and closed loop time responses and actuator feedback voltages for various numbers of piezoelectric pairs using the ANSYS finite element package and a proportional differential control scheme. (paper)

  3. Research and development activities in unified control-structure modeling and design

    Nayak, A. P.

    1985-01-01

    Results of work to develop a unified control/structures modeling and design capability for large space structures modeling are presented. Recent analytical results are presented to demonstrate the significant interdependence between structural and control properties. A new design methodology is suggested in which the structure, material properties, dynamic model and control design are all optimized simultaneously. Parallel research done by other researchers is reviewed. The development of a methodology for global design optimization is recommended as a long-term goal. It is suggested that this methodology should be incorporated into computer aided engineering programs, which eventually will be supplemented by an expert system to aid design optimization.

  4. Wireless sensors with dual-controller architecture for active diagnosis in structural health monitoring

    Wireless sensor technology, which integrates transducers with microcontrollers and wireless communication, has become increasingly vital in structural health monitoring (SHM) applications. However, the low I/O (input/output) throughput of conventional wireless sensors impedes their usage in applications using high-frequency signals, such as active diagnosis and passive acoustic emission (AE). In this paper, the limitations of extending conventional wireless sensors to handle high-speed acquisition are first identified and discussed. Based on the efforts made in improving wireless sensors with centralized system architecture, a novel dual-controller based architecture is proposed to facilitate high-speed data acquisition and improve power efficiency. Then, a wireless sensor platform, specifically designed for active diagnosis employing stress waves to localize damages, is presented. The newly developed wireless sensor with dimensions of 30 mm × 30 mm × 35 mm utilizes a field programmable gate array (FPGA) as a secondary controller and can support a sampling rate up to 20 million samples per second (Msps). Laboratory experiments for verification show that the wireless sensor can explore new applications at the opposite end of the spectrum from conventional applications: those involving high fidelity and high-speed data acquisition

  5. Active vibration control of piezoelectric bonded smart structures using PID algorithm

    Zhang Shunqi; Rüdiger Schmidt; Qin Xiansheng

    2015-01-01

    Thin-walled structures are sensitive to vibrate under even very small disturbances. In order to design a suitable controller for vibration suppression of thin-walled smart structures, an electro-mechanically coupled finite element (FE) model of smart structures is developed based on first-order shear deformation (FOSD) hypothesis. Considering the vibrations generated by various disturbances, which include free and forced vibrations, a PID control is implemented to damp both the free and force...

  6. A survey of experiments and experimental facilities for active control of flexible structures

    Sparks, Dean W., Jr.; Horner, Garnett C.; Juang, Jer-Nan; Klose, Gerhard

    1989-01-01

    A brief survey of large space structure control related experiments and facilities was presented. This survey covered experiments performed before and up to 1982, and those of the present period (1982-...). Finally, the future planned experiments and facilities in support of the control-structure interaction (CSI) program were reported. It was stated that new, improved ground test facilities are needed to verify the new CSI design techniques that will allow future space structures to perform planned NASA missions.

  7. High order single step time delay compensation algorithm for structural active control

    王焕定; 耿淑伟; 王伟

    2002-01-01

    The optimal instantaneous high order single step algorithm for active control is first discussed andthen, the n + 1 time step controlling force vector of the instantaneous optimal algorithm is derived from way of ntime state vector. An estimating algorithm, is developed from this to solve the problem of active control withtime delay compensation. The estimating algorithm based on this high order single step β method (HSM) foun-dation, is proven by simulation and experiment analysis, to be a valid solution to problem of active control withtime delay compensation.

  8. Active structural acoustic control smart panel with small scale proof mass actuators

    González Díaz, Cristóbal

    2007-01-01

    This thesis presents a comprehensive study of decentralised feedback control on a smart panel with electrodynamic proof mass actuators and velocity sensors at their footprints. The aim is to provide guidance for the design of light, simple, robust and low cost, control units which can be attached in large numbers to flexible structures in order to control their spatially averaged response and sound radiation at low audio-frequencies. The first part of the thesis is focused on t...

  9. A quantitative structure-activity relationship to predict efficacy of granular activated carbon adsorption to control emerging contaminants.

    Kennicutt, A R; Morkowchuk, L; Krein, M; Breneman, C M; Kilduff, J E

    2016-08-01

    A quantitative structure-activity relationship was developed to predict the efficacy of carbon adsorption as a control technology for endocrine-disrupting compounds, pharmaceuticals, and components of personal care products, as a tool for water quality professionals to protect public health. Here, we expand previous work to investigate a broad spectrum of molecular descriptors including subdivided surface areas, adjacency and distance matrix descriptors, electrostatic partial charges, potential energy descriptors, conformation-dependent charge descriptors, and Transferable Atom Equivalent (TAE) descriptors that characterize the regional electronic properties of molecules. We compare the efficacy of linear (Partial Least Squares) and non-linear (Support Vector Machine) machine learning methods to describe a broad chemical space and produce a user-friendly model. We employ cross-validation, y-scrambling, and external validation for quality control. The recommended Support Vector Machine model trained on 95 compounds having 23 descriptors offered a good balance between good performance statistics, low error, and low probability of over-fitting while describing a wide range of chemical features. The cross-validated model using a log-uptake (qe) response calculated at an aqueous equilibrium concentration (Ce) of 1 μM described the training dataset with an r(2) of 0.932, had a cross-validated r(2) of 0.833, and an average residual of 0.14 log units. PMID:27586364

  10. Sliding Mode Control of a Multi-Degree-of-Freedom Structural System With Active Tuned Mass Damper

    YAĞIZ, Nurkan

    2001-01-01

    In this study, a sliding mode control system is designed for a multi-degree-of-freedom structure having an Active Tuned Mass Damper (ATMD) to suppress earthquake or wind induced vibration. Since the model might have uncertainties and/or parameter changes, sliding mode control is preferred because of its robust character and superior performance. In addition this control method can easily be applied to non-linear systems. The simulated system has five degrees of freedom. In this stu...

  11. Control Augmented Structural Synthesis

    Lust, Robert V.; Schmit, Lucien A.

    1988-01-01

    A methodology for control augmented structural synthesis is proposed for a class of structures which can be modeled as an assemblage of frame and/or truss elements. It is assumed that both the plant (structure) and the active control system dynamics can be adequately represented with a linear model. The structural sizing variables, active control system feedback gains and nonstructural lumped masses are treated simultaneously as independent design variables. Design constraints are imposed on static and dynamic displacements, static stresses, actuator forces and natural frequencies to ensure acceptable system behavior. Multiple static and dynamic loading conditions are considered. Side constraints imposed on the design variables protect against the generation of unrealizable designs. While the proposed approach is fundamentally more general, here the methodology is developed and demonstrated for the case where: (1) the dynamic loading is harmonic and thus the steady state response is of primary interest; (2) direct output feedback is used for the control system model; and (3) the actuators and sensors are collocated.

  12. The effect of structural-acoustic coupling on the active control of noise in vehicles

    Cheer, Jordan; Elliott, Stephen J.

    2011-01-01

    Active noise control systems offer a potential method of reducing the weight of passive acoustic treatment and, therefore, increasing vehicles’ fuel ef?ciency. These can be particularly cost-ef?cient if integrated with the entertainment system. A combined system is presented employing feedforward control of engine noise and feedback control of road noise, using a‘modal’ error signal. Due to the dependence of the feedback system on the modal response of the vehicle cabin, and the in?uence of s...

  13. Controlled synthesis and structure tunability of photocatalytically active mesoporous metal-based stannate nanostructures

    Liu, Caihong [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Institute of Materials Science, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269-3136 (United States); Chen, Haiyan [Mineral Physics Institute, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Ren, Zheng [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Institute of Materials Science, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269-3136 (United States); Dardona, Sameh; Piech, Martin [Department of Physical Sciences, United Technologies Research Center, East Hartford, CT 06108 (United States); Gao, Haiyong [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Institute of Materials Science, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269-3136 (United States); Gao, Pu-Xian, E-mail: puxian.gao@ims.uconn.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Institute of Materials Science, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269-3136 (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Highlights: • A generic process has been developed for fabricating metal stannate nanostructures by simple substitution solution reactions followed by post-thermal treatments. • Band energy alignment, high carrier mobility and large specific surface area are found to play key roles for the enabled high efficiency in stannate nanostructured photocatalysts. • The developed process can be easily extended to the fabrication of other complex metal oxide nanostructures. - Abstract: A variety of stannate nanostructures have been fabricated for UV photocatalysis, including zinc- and cadmium-based stannates. As the template nanostructures, high surface-area mesoporous metal hydroxystannate [ZnSn(OH){sub 6} and CdSn(OH){sub 6}] nanoparticles (>100 m{sup 2}/g) have been synthesized using a simple, low-temperature substitution chemical process with controlled porosity, morphology and crystallinity. Post-synthetic thermal treatments were employed to obtain amorphous ZnSnO{sub 3}, CdSnO{sub 3}, ilmenite CdSnO{sub 3}, and crystalline Zn{sub 2}SnO{sub 4}–SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles. As a result, the band gaps can be tuned from 5.4 eV to 3.3 eV and from 4.9 eV to 2.1 eV for Zn-based and Cd-based stannates, respectively. Amorphous ZnSnO{sub 3} porous nanoparticles showed highest activity toward dye degradation under UV illumination followed by the Zn{sub 2}SnO{sub 4}-SnO{sub 2} and ilmenite CdSnO{sub 3} nanostructures due to their beneficial band structure alignment, high conductivities, and high specific surface areas. This study may provide an important strategy for high throughput synthesis and screening of functional complex metal oxide nanomaterials, while the enabled stannate nanomaterials could be utilized in various applications.

  14. Structural investigation of heteroyohimbine alkaloid synthesis reveals active site elements that control stereoselectivity.

    Stavrinides, Anna; Tatsis, Evangelos C; Caputi, Lorenzo; Foureau, Emilien; Stevenson, Clare E M; Lawson, David M; Courdavault, Vincent; O'Connor, Sarah E

    2016-01-01

    Plants produce an enormous array of biologically active metabolites, often with stereochemical variations on the same molecular scaffold. These changes in stereochemistry dramatically impact biological activity. Notably, the stereoisomers of the heteroyohimbine alkaloids show diverse pharmacological activities. We reported a medium chain dehydrogenase/reductase (MDR) from Catharanthus roseus that catalyses formation of a heteroyohimbine isomer. Here we report the discovery of additional heteroyohimbine synthases (HYSs), one of which produces a mixture of diastereomers. The crystal structures for three HYSs have been solved, providing insight into the mechanism of reactivity and stereoselectivity, with mutation of one loop transforming product specificity. Localization and gene silencing experiments provide a basis for understanding the function of these enzymes in vivo. This work sets the stage to explore how MDRs evolved to generate structural and biological diversity in specialized plant metabolism and opens the possibility for metabolic engineering of new compounds based on this scaffold. PMID:27418042

  15. The Impact of Model Uncertainty on Spatial Compensation in Active Structural Acoustic Control

    Cabell, Randolph H.; Gibbs, Gary P.; Sprofera, Joseph D.; Clark, Robert L.

    2004-01-01

    Turbulent boundary layer (TBL) noise is considered a primary factor in the interior noise experienced by passengers aboard commercial airliners. There have been numerous investigations of interior noise control devoted to aircraft panels; however, practical realization is a challenge since the physical boundary conditions are uncertain at best. In most prior studies, pinned or clamped boundary conditions have been assumed; however, realistic panels likely display a range of varying boundary conditions between these two limits. Uncertainty in boundary conditions is a challenge for control system designers, both in terms of the compensator implemented and the location of actuators and sensors required to achieve the desired control. The impact of model uncertainties, uncertain boundary conditions in particular, on the selection of actuator and sensor locations for structural acoustic control are considered herein. Results from this research effort indicate that it is possible to optimize the design of actuator and sensor location and aperture, which minimizes the impact of boundary conditions on the desired structural acoustic control.

  16. Active control of the attitude motion and structural vibration of a flexible satellite by jet thrusters

    Lee, Mokin

    A Lagrangian formulation is used to obtain the equations of motion of a flexible satellite in a tree-type geometry. The flexible satellite model is the geosynchronous INSAT-II type satellite with a flexible balance beam and a flexible solar panel attached to the rigid main body. In deriving the equations of motion, the orbital motion, the librational motion, and the structural motion of flexible bodies are involved. The assumed-modes method is used to express the deflections of the flexible structures in the form of a finite series of space-dependent admissible functions multiplied by time-dependent amplitudes. The kinetic energy, potential energy, strain energy, and virtual work of the flexible satellite are evaluated as functions of time in terms of the generalized coordinates. Then, by substituting them into Lagrange's equations for discrete systems, the governing equations of motion of the flexible satellite are obtained as a set of second-order nonlinear ordinary differential equations. The attitude motion and the structural motion of the flexible satellite are coupled motions with one another. Uncontrolled dynamics show that the librational and structural motions are oscillatory and undamped motions. The stability and performance of the flexible satellite needs to be improved by designing control systems. A control objective is proposed to improve the stability and performance for pointing accuracy maneuver by controlling the librational motions and flexible modes simultaneously. For the control objective, a control system is synthesized, using feedback linearization control, thrust determination, thrust management, and pulse-width pulse-frequency modulation. Feedback linearization for second-order nonlinear systems is used to obtain a stable feedback control system for the pointing-accuracy control. A stable feedback control system is obtained by adjusting the diagonal matrices of the linear second-order system. Jet thrusters are used as the primary

  17. HIGH EFFICIENCY STRUCTURAL FLOWTHROUGH ROTOR WITH ACTIVE FLAP CONTROL: VOLUME TWO: INNOVATION & COST OF ENERGY

    Zuteck, Michael D. [Zimitar, Inc.; Jackson, Kevin L. [Zimitar, Inc.; Santos, Richard A. [Zimitar, Inc.

    2015-05-16

    The Zimitar one-piece rotor primary structure is integrated, so balanced thrust and gravity loads flow through the hub region without transferring out of its composite material. Large inner rotor geometry is used since there is no need to neck down to a blade root region and pitch bearing. Rotor control is provided by a highly redundant, five flap system on each blade, sized so that easily handled standard electric linear actuators are sufficient.

  18. HIGH EFFICIENCY STRUCTURAL FLOWTHROUGH ROTOR WITH ACTIVE FLAP CONTROL: VOLUME THREE: MARKET & TEAM

    Zuteck, Michael D. [Zimitar, Inc.; Jackson, Kevin L. [Zimitar, Inc.; Santos, Richard A. [Zimitar, Inc.

    2015-05-16

    The Zimitar one-piece rotor primary structure is integrated, so balanced thrust and gravity loads flow through the hub region without transferring out of its composite material. Large inner rotor geometry is used since there is no need to neck down to a blade root region and pitch bearing. Rotor control is provided by a highly redundant, five flap system on each blade, sized so that easily handled standard electric linear actuators are sufficient.

  19. HIGH EFFICIENCY STRUCTURAL FLOWTHROUGH ROTOR WITH ACTIVE FLAP CONTROL: VOLUME ONE: PRELIMINARY DESIGN REPORT

    Zuteck, Michael D. [Zimitar, Inc.; Jackson, Kevin L. [Zimitar, Inc.; Santos, Richard A. [Zimitar, Inc.; Chow, Ray [Zimitar, Inc.; Nordenholz, Thomas R. [The California Maritime Academy; Wamble, John Lee [Zimitar, Inc.

    2015-05-16

    The Zimitar one-piece rotor primary structure is integrated, so balanced thrust and gravity loads flow through the hub region without transferring out of its composite material. Large inner rotor geometry is used since there is no need to neck down to a blade root region and pitch bearing. Rotor control is provided by a highly redundant, five flap system on each blade, sized so that easily handled standard electric linear actuators are sufficient.

  20. HIGH EFFICIENCY STRUCTURAL FLOWTHROUGH ROTOR WITH ACTIVE FLAP CONTROL: VOLUME ZERO: OVERVIEW AND COMMERCIAL PATH

    Zuteck, Michael D. [Zimitar, Inc.; Jackson, Kevin L. [Zimitar, Inc.; Santos, Richard A. [Zimitar, Inc.

    2015-05-16

    The Zimitar one-piece rotor primary structure is integrated, so balanced thrust and gravity loads flow through the hub region without transferring out of its composite material. Large inner rotor geometry is used since there is no need to neck down to a blade root region and pitch bearing. Rotor control is provided by a highly redundant, five flap system on each blade, sized so that easily handled standard electric linear actuators are sufficient.

  1. An Active Heater Control Concept to Meet IXO Type Mirror Module Thermal-Structural Distortion Requirement

    Choi, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Flight mirror assemblies (FMAs) of large telescopes, such as the International X-ray Observatory (IXO), have very stringent thermal-structural distortion requirements. The spatial temperature gradient requirement within a FMA could be as small as 0.05 C. Con ventionally, heaters and thermistors are attached to the stray light baffle (SLB), and centralized heater controllers (i.e., heater controller boards located in a large electronics box) are used. Due to the large number of heater harnesses, accommodating and routing them is extremely difficult. The total harness length/mass is very large. This innovation uses a thermally conductive pre-collimator to accommodate heaters and a distributed heater controller approach. It minimizes the harness length and mass, and reduces the problem of routing and accommodating them. Heaters and thermistors are attached to a short (4.67 cm) aluminum portion of the pre-collimator, which is thermally coupled to the SLB. Heaters, which have a very small heater power density, and thermistors are attached to the exterior of all the mirror module walls. The major portion (23.4 cm) of the pre-collimator for the middle and outer modules is made of thin, non-conductive material. It minimizes the view factors from the FMA and heated portion of the precollimator to space. It also minimizes heat conduction from one end of the FMA to the other. Small and multi-channel heater controllers, which have adjustable set points and internal redundancy, are used. They are mounted to the mechanical support structure members adjacent to each module. The IXO FMA, which is 3.3 m in diameter, is an example of a large telescope. If the heater controller boards are centralized, routing and accommodating heater harnesses is extremely difficult. This innovation has the following advantages. It minimizes the length/mass of the heater harness between the heater controllers and heater circuits. It reduces the problem of routing and accommodating the harness on the

  2. A new online secondary path modeling method for adaptive active structure vibration control

    This paper proposes a new variable step size FXLMS algorithm with an auxiliary noise power scheduling strategy for online secondary path modeling. The step size for the secondary path modeling filter and the gain of auxiliary noise are varied in accordance with the parameters available directly. The proposed method has a low computational complexity. Computer simulations show that an active vibration control system with the proposed method gives much better vibration attenuation and modeling accuracy at a faster convergence rate than existing methods. National Instruments’ CompactRIO is used as an embedded processor to control simply supported beam vibration. Experimental results indicate that the vibration of the beam has been effectively attenuated. (papers)

  3. Structural Pest Control.

    Kahn, M. S.; Hoffman, W. M.

    This manual is designed for those who seek certification as pesticide applicators for industrial, institutional, structural, and health-related pest control. It is divided into six sections covering general pest control, wood-destroying organisms, bird control, fumigation, rodent control, and industrial weed control. The manual gives information…

  4. Methods for structural control

    Baratta, A.; Bourquin, F.; CORBI, O; HOCHRAINER, M; Luo, N; MAGONETTE, G; Marazzi, F; Rodellar, J.

    2004-01-01

    In the last decades significant advances have been produced in the field of structural control. This paper focuses on some issues related with the problem of controlling (reducing) undesired vibrations, summarizing the experiences of the authors in some specific issues on specific classes of structural control systems.

  5. Robust Adaptive Structural Control

    Yang, Chi-Ming; Beck, James L.

    1995-01-01

    A new robust adaptive structural control design methodology is developed and presented which treats modeling uncertainties and limitations of control devices. Furthermore, no restriction is imposed on the structural models and the nature of the control devices so that the proposed method is very general. A simple linear single degree-of-freedom numerical example is presented to illustrate this approach.

  6. New active control nano-system to use in composites structure

    The present abstract, is a brief description about our project (NEDEA). We considered this project as very important, because it reunites in his development, several basic technologies: electronics, communications, software and new materials, all very interesting in the European industry. The project is developed in the CSIC (Spanish Researcher Center). We are involved. Across the project, in the development of nano-sensors, specialized in detecting defects, difficulties or problems in structures of composed materials. These materials are being used, and in the future more, in applications where a high degree of security is necessary. Some fields in the system usage are Aeronautical and military applications whit a necessary high security degree. The development proposed, is based in nano-sensors and active devices. They are installed into the material structure. The information from sensors is transmitted by optical fibers, to a radio transmitter, equally installed into the material. An external receptor picks up those data and transmits them to an external device. This external device presents/displays all the information across an interface GUI, in real time, to the supervisor. He can see than is happening in the material, in real time. Alarms can be programmed, by the supervisor. Is possible a tracking for the problem. All the devices and software are in develop in our laboratories. We think that this development will be used by the industry of materials, and that gradually, it will have other applications in the transport area (like new vehicles, wagons of train and metro, etc.).

  7. New active control nano-system to use in composites structure

    Arche, M. R.

    2012-09-01

    The present abstract, is a brief description about our project (NEDEA). We considered this project as very important, because it reunites in his development, several basic technologies: electronics, communications, software and new materials, all very interesting in the European industry. The project is developed in the CSIC (Spanish Researcher Center). We are involved. Across the project, in the development of nano-sensors, specialized in detecting defects, difficulties or problems in structures of composed materials. These materials are being used, and in the future more, in applications where a high degree of security is necessary. Some fields in the system usage are Aeronautical and military applications whit a necessary high security degree. The development proposed, is based in nano-sensors and active devices. They are installed into the material structure. The information from sensors is transmitted by optical fibers, to a radio transmitter, equally installed into the material. An external receptor picks up those data and transmits them to an external device. This external device presents/displays all the information across an interface GUI, in real time, to the supervisor. He can see than is happening in the material, in real time. Alarms can be programmed, by the supervisor. Is possible a tracking for the problem. All the devices and software are in develop in our laboratories. We think that this development will be used by the industry of materials, and that gradually, it will have other applications in the transport area (like new vehicles, wagons of train and metro, etc.).

  8. Control of flexible structures

    Russell, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    The requirements for future space missions indicate that many of these spacecraft will be large, flexible, and in some applications, require precision geometries. A technology program that addresses the issues associated with the structure/control interactions for these classes of spacecraft is discussed. The goal of the NASA control of flexible structures technology program is to generate a technology data base that will provide the designer with options and approaches to achieve spacecraft performance such as maintaining geometry and/or suppressing undesired spacecraft dynamics. This technology program will define the appropriate combination of analysis, ground testing, and flight testing required to validate the structural/controls analysis and design tools. This work was motivated by a recognition that large minimum weight space structures will be required for many future missions. The tools necessary to support such design included: (1) improved structural analysis; (2) modern control theory; (3) advanced modeling techniques; (4) system identification; and (5) the integration of structures and controls.

  9. Structural control interaction

    Ryan, R. S.; Mowery, D. K.; Winder, S. W.; Worley, H. E.

    1973-01-01

    The basic guidance and control concepts that lead to structural control interaction and structural dynamic loads are identified. Space vehicle ascent flight load sources and the load relieving mechanism are discussed, along with the the characteristics and special problems of both present and future space vehicles including launch vehicles, orbiting vehicles, and the Space Shuttle flyback vehicle. The special dynamics and control analyses and test problems apparent at this time are summarized.

  10. Controls for space structures

    Balas, Mark

    1991-01-01

    Assembly and operation of large space structures (LSS) in orbit will require robot-assisted docking and berthing of partially-assembled structures. These operations require new solutions to the problems of controls. This is true because of large transient and persistent disturbances, controller-structure interaction with unmodeled modes, poorly known structure parameters, slow actuator/sensor dynamical behavior, and excitation of nonlinear structure vibrations during control and assembly. For on-orbit assembly, controllers must start with finite element models of LSS and adapt on line to the best operating points, without compromising stability. This is not easy to do, since there are often unmodeled dynamic interactions between the controller and the structure. The indirect adaptive controllers are based on parameter estimation. Due to the large number of modes in LSS, this approach leads to very high-order control schemes with consequent poor stability and performance. In contrast, direct model reference adaptive controllers operate to force the LSS to track the desirable behavior of a chosen model. These schemes produce simple control algorithms which are easy to implement on line. One problem with their use for LSS has been that the model must be the same dimension as the LSS - i.e., quite large. A control theory based on the command generator tracker (CGT) ideas of Sobel, Mabins, Kaufman and Wen, Balas to obtain very low-order models based on adaptive algorithms was developed. Closed-loop stability for both finite element models and distributed parameter models of LSS was proved. In addition, successful numerical simulations on several LSS databases were obtained. An adaptive controller based on our theory was also implemented on a flexible robotic manipulator at Martin Marietta Astronautics. Computation schemes for controller-structure interaction with unmodeled modes, the residual mode filters or RMF, were developed. The RMF theory was modified to compensate

  11. Trust-region based instantaneous optimal semi-active control of long span spatially extended structures with MRF-04K damper

    Lin Wei; Li Zhongxian; Ding Yang

    2008-01-01

    In the field of civil engineering,magnetorheological fluid (MRF) damper-based semi-active control systems have received considerable attention for use in protecting structures from natural hazards such as strong earthquakes and high winds.In this paper,the MRF damper-based semi-active control system is applied to a long-span spatially extended structure and its feasibility is discussed.Meanwhile,a _trust-region method based instantaneous optimal semi-active control algorithm (TIOC) is proposed to improve the performance of the semi-active control system in a multiple damper situation.The proposed TIOC describes the control process as a bounded constraint optimization problem,in which an optimal semi active control force vector is solved by the trust-region method in every control step to minimize the structural responses.A numerical example of a railway station roof structure installed with MRF-04K dampers is presented.First,a modified Bouc-Wen model is utilized to describe the behavior of the selected MRF-04K damper.Then,two semi-active control systems,including the well-known clipped-optimal controller and the proposed TIOC controller,are considered.Based on the characteristics of the long-span spatially extended structure,the performance of the control system is evaluated under uniform earthquake excitation and traveUing-wave excitation with different apparent velocities.The simulation results indicate that the MR fluid damper-hased semi-active control systems have the potential to mitigate the responses of full-scale long-span spatially extended structures under earthquake hazards.The superiority of the proposed TIOC controller is demonstrated by comparing its control effectiveness with the clipped-optimal controller for several different cases.

  12. Control Structures Interaction (CSI) Technology

    Layman, W. E.

    1989-01-01

    Control Structures Interaction (CSI) technology for control of space structures is being developed cooperatively by JPL, LaRC and MSFC for NASA OAST/RM. The mid-'90s goal of JPL's CSI program is to demonstrate with analysis, ground and flight tests, the super quiet structures needed for large diffraction-limited instruments such as optical stellar interferometers and large advanced successors to the Hubble Space Telescope. Microprecision CSI technology is intended as a new "building block" for use by the designers of large optical systems. The thrust of the microprecision CSI technology effort is to achieve nanometer-levels of space structure stability/accuracy with designs which employ otherwise conventional spacecraft technologies. JPL design experiences have indicated the following CSI technology development areas are especially applicable to large optical system projects: (1) Active structural members; (2) Control/structures design methods; (3) Microdynamic effects characterization; and (4) Ground and flight test validation of CSI methods.

  13. Trust-region based instantaneous optimal semi-active control of long-span spatially extended structures with MRF-04K damper

    Lin, Wei; Li, Zhongxian; Ding, Yang

    2008-12-01

    In the field of civil engineering, magneto rheological fluid (MRF) damper-based semi-active control systems have received considerable attention for use in protecting structures from natural hazards such as strong earthquakes and high winds. In this paper, the MRF damper-based semi-active control system is applied to a long-span spatially extended structure and its feasibility is discussed. Meanwhile, a trust-region method based instantaneous optimal semi-active control algorithm (TIOC) is proposed to improve the performance of the semi-active control system in a multiple damper situation. The proposed TIOC describes the control process as a bounded constraint optimization problem, in which an optimal semiactive control force vector is solved by the trust-region method in every control step to minimize the structural responses. A numerical example of a railway station roof structure installed with MRF-04K dampers is presented. First, a modified Bouc-Wen model is utilized to describe the behavior of the selected MRF-04K damper. Then, two semi-active control systems, including the well-known clipped-optimal controller and the proposed TIOC controller, are considered. Based on the characteristics of the long-span spatially extended structure, the performance of the control system is evaluated under uniform earthquake excitation and travelling-wave excitation with different apparent velocities. The simulation results indicate that the MR fluid damper-based semi-active control systems have the potential to mitigate the responses of full-scale long-span spatially extended structures under earthquake hazards. The superiority of the proposed TIOC controller is demonstrated by comparing its control effectiveness with the clipped-optimal controller for several different cases.

  14. A Framework for Coupling Visual Control and Active Structure from Motion

    Spica, Riccardo; Robuffo Giordano, Paolo; Chaumette, François

    2015-01-01

    International audience In most sensor-based robotic applications, the robot state can only be partially retrieved from onboard sensors and the use of estimation strategies is necessary for recovering online an approximation of any 'missing information' required to accurately control the robot action. With the exception of some trivial cases, however, the relationship between the sensor readings and the robot state is often nonlinear. As a consequence, and regardless of the particular estim...

  15. Bias Errors in Measurement of Vibratory Power and Implication for Active Control of Structural Vibration

    Ohlrich, Mogens; Henriksen, Eigil; Laugesen, Søren

    1997-01-01

    Uncertainties in power measurements performed with piezoelectric accelerometers and force transducers are investigated. It is shown that the inherent structural damping of the transducers is responsible for a bias phase error, which typically is in the order of one degree. Fortunately, such bias...... errors can be largely compensated for by an absolute calibration of the transducers and inverse filtering that results in very small residual errors. Experimental results of this study indicate that these uncertainties will be in the order of one percent with respect to amplitude and two tenth of a...

  16. Structure of a topoisomerase II-DNA-nucleotide complex reveals a new control mechanism for ATPase activity.

    Schmidt, Bryan H; Osheroff, Neil; Berger, James M

    2012-11-01

    Type IIA topoisomerases control DNA supercoiling and disentangle chromosomes through a complex ATP-dependent strand-passage mechanism. Although a general framework exists for type IIA topoisomerase function, the architecture of the full-length enzyme has remained undefined. Here we present the structure of a fully catalytic Saccharomyces cerevisiae topoisomerase II homodimer complexed with DNA and a nonhydrolyzable ATP analog. The enzyme adopts a domain-swapped configuration wherein the ATPase domain of one protomer sits atop the nucleolytic region of its partner subunit. This organization produces an unexpected interaction between bound DNA and a conformational transducing element in the ATPase domain, which we show is critical for both DNA-stimulated ATP hydrolysis and global topoisomerase activity. Our data indicate that the ATPase domains pivot about each other to ensure unidirectional strand passage and that this state senses bound DNA to promote ATP turnover and enzyme reset. PMID:23022727

  17. Carbon Structure Hazard Control

    Yoder, Tommy; Greene, Ben; Porter, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Carbon composite structures are widely used in virtually all advanced technology industries for a multitude of applications. The high strength-to-weight ratio and resistance to aggressive service environments make them highly desirable. Automotive, aerospace, and petroleum industries extensively use, and will continue to use, this enabling technology. As a result of this broad range of use, field and test personnel are increasingly exposed to hazards associated with these structures. No single published document exists to address the hazards and make recommendations for the hazard controls required for the different exposure possibilities from damaged structures including airborne fibers, fly, and dust. The potential for personnel exposure varies depending on the application or manipulation of the structure. The effect of exposure to carbon hazards is not limited to personnel, protection of electronics and mechanical equipment must be considered as well. The various exposure opportunities defined in this document include pre-manufacturing fly and dust, the cured structure, manufacturing/machining, post-event cleanup, and post-event test and/or evaluation. Hazard control is defined as it is applicable or applied for the specific exposure opportunity. The carbon exposure hazard includes fly, dust, fiber (cured/uncured), and matrix vapor/thermal decomposition products. By using the recommendations in this document, a high level of confidence can be assured for the protection of personnel and equipment.

  18. Active vibration control of a cylindrical structure using flexible piezoactuators: experimental work in air and water environments

    In the present work, the modal characteristics and vibration control performance of a cylindrical structure in air and water are experimentally investigated, and the results are presented in time and frequency domains. In order to achieve this goal, an end-capped cylindrical shell structure is considered as a host structure, and MFC (macro fiber composite) actuators, which are flexible, are bonded on the surface of the structure. After manufacturing a cylindrical shell structure with aluminum, a modal test is carried out, and the natural frequencies of the proposed structure are obtained and analyzed. To verify the modal test results, a finite element analysis is also performed, and the results are compared with the modal test results. By using the experimentally obtained modal characteristics, a state space control model is established. An optimal controller is then designed in order to control the unwanted vibration and is experimentally realized. It has been shown that the structural vibration can be effectively decreased with the optimal control methodology in both air and water environmental conditions. (technical note)

  19. Cooperative Control Method of Active and Semiactive Control: New Framework for Vibration Control

    Kazuhiko Hiramoto

    2014-01-01

    A new control design framework for vibration control, the cooperative control of active and semiactive control, is proposed in the paper. In the cooperative control, a structural system having both of an actuator and a semiactive control device, for example, MR damper and so forth, is defined as the control object. In the proposed control approach, the higher control performance is aimed by the cooperative control between the active control with the actuator and the semiactive control with th...

  20. A piezolaminated composite degenerated shell finite element for active control of structures with distributed piezosensors and actuators

    Balamurugan, V.; Narayanan, S.

    2008-06-01

    potential difference between the top and bottom surfaces of the piezoelectric layer. Few case studies of composite general shells with piezoelectric sensors and actuators have been considered by modeling them with the above elements and the active vibration control performance has been studied using linear quadratic Gaussian (LQG) control.

  1. A piezolaminated composite degenerated shell finite element for active control of structures with distributed piezosensors and actuators

    potential difference between the top and bottom surfaces of the piezoelectric layer. Few case studies of composite general shells with piezoelectric sensors and actuators have been considered by modeling them with the above elements and the active vibration control performance has been studied using linear quadratic Gaussian (LQG) control

  2. Structural Pain Compensating Flight Control

    Miller, Chris J.

    2014-01-01

    The problem of control command and maneuver induced structural loads is an important aspect of any control system design. Designers must design the aircraft structure and the control architecture to achieve desired piloted control responses while limiting the imparted structural loads. The classical approach is to build the structure with high margins, restrict control surface commands to known good combinations, and train pilots to follow procedural maneuvering limitations. With recent advances in structural sensing and the continued desire to improve safety and vehicle fuel efficiency, it is both possible and desirable to develop control architectures that enable lighter vehicle weights while maintaining and improving protection against structural damage.

  3. An approach to optical structures control

    Iwens, R. P.; Benhabib, R. J.; Major, C. S.

    1988-01-01

    The stabilization of a large, spaceborne Cassegrain telescope is examined. Modal gain factors and known characteristics of disturbances are used to determine which structural model affect line of sight (LOS) the most and are candidates for active control. THe approach is to: (1) actively control and maintain alignment of optical components; (2) place structural control actuators for optimum impact on the selected modes for active vibration control; and (3) feed back the best available estimate of LOS error for direct LOS control. Local analog loops are used for lower bandwidth control and multivariable digital control for lower bandwidth control. The control law is synthesized in the frequency domain using the characteristic gain approach. Robustness is measured by employing conicity, which is an outgrowth of the positivity approach to robust feedback system design. The feasibility of the design approach will be demonstrated by conducting a lab experiment on a structure similar to a scaled version of the telescope.

  4. Offshore Structural Control Considering Fluid Structure Interaction

    Ju Myung KIM; Dong Hyawn KIM; Gyu Won LEE

    2006-01-01

    Tuned Mass Damper (TMD) was applied to an offshore structure to control ocean wave-induced vibration. In the analysis of the dynamic response of the offshore structure, fluid-structure interaction is considered and the errors, which occur in the linearization of the interaction, are investigated. For the investigation of the performance of TMD in controlling the vibration, both regular waves with different periods and irregular waves with different significant wave heights are used. Based on the numerical analysis it is concluded that the fluid-structure interaction should be considered in the evaluation of the capability of TMD in vibration control of offshore structures.

  5. Driving electrocatalytic activity by interface electronic structure control in a metalloprotein hybrid catalyst for efficient hydrogen evolution.

    Behera, Sushant Kumar; Deb, Pritam; Ghosh, Arghya

    2016-08-17

    The rational design of metalloprotein hybrid structures and precise calculations for understanding the role of the interfacial electronic structure in regulating the HER activity of water splitting sites and their microscopic effect for obtaining robust hydrogen evolution possess great promise for developing highly efficient nano-bio hybrid HER catalysts. Here, we employ high-accuracy linear-scaling density functional theory calculations using a near-complete basis set and a minimal parameter implicit solvent model within the self-consistent calculations, on silver (Ag) ions assimilated on bacteriorhodopsin (bR) at specific binding sites. Geometry optimization indicates the formation of active sites at the interface of the metalloprotein complex and the density of states reflects the metallic nature of the active sites. The reduced value of the canonical orbital gap indicates the state of dynamic nature after Ag ion assimilation on active sites and smooth electron transfer. These incorporated active protein sites are more efficient in electrolytic splitting of water than pristine sites due to their low value of Gibbs free energy for the HER in terms of hydrogen coverages. Volcano plot analysis and the free energy diagram are compared for understanding the hydrogen evolution efficiency. Moreover, the essential role of the interfacial electronic properties in regulating the HER catalytic activity of water splitting sites and enhancing the efficiency is elucidated. PMID:27499158

  6. Structural interaction with control systems

    Noll, R. B.; Zvara, J.

    1971-01-01

    A monograph which assesses the state of the art of space vehicle design and development is presented. The monograph presents criteria and recommended practices for determining the structural data and a mathematical structural model of the vehicle needed for accurate prediction of structure and control-system interaction; for design to minimize undesirable interactions between the structure and the control system; and for determining techniques to achieve the maximum desirable interactions and associated structural design benefits. All space vehicles are treated, including launch vehicles, spacecraft, and entry vehicles. Important structural characteristics which affect the structural model used for structural and control-system interaction analysis are given.

  7. Pollution Control Meets Sustainability: Structure-Activity Studies on New Iron Oxide-Based CO Oxidation Catalysts.

    Schoch, Roland; Bauer, Matthias

    2016-08-01

    A new class of catalysts for the oxidation of CO based on iron oxide as a biocompatible, earth-abundant and non-toxic metal is presented. The catalytic activities achieved with these catalysts provide promising milestones towards the substitution of noble metals in CO oxidation catalysts. The catalysts can be obtained by using iron core-shell nanoparticle precursors. The metal used for the shell material determines whether the iron core is integrated in or isolated from the support. The active iron site is effectively integrated into the γ-Al2 O3 support if an aluminum shell is present in the core-shell precursor. When the metal used for the shell is different from the support, an isolated structure is formed. Using this directed synthesis approach, different iron oxide species can be obtained and their structural differences are linked to distinct catalytic activities, as demonstrated by combined in-depth analytical studies using XRD, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), UV/Vis, and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) analysis. The key species responsible for high catalytic activity is identified as isolated tetrahedrally coordinated Fe(III) centers, whereas aggregation leads to a reduction in activity. PMID:27440425

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF A NEW SEMI-ACTIVE FRICTION DAMPER USING PIEZOELECTRIC TECHNOLOGY FOR THE ANTI-SEISMIC CONTROL OF CIVIL STRUCTURES

    Romeo DI LEO

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a new semi-active friction damper, based on the piezoelectric technology, for the anti-seismic control of a civil structure. The device has been conceived and designed at D.I.A.S. (Department of Aerospace En­gineering of University Federico II of Naples. It belongs to the family of the semi-active technologies of structural control for a civil structure. Damper is based on an external cylinder and an internal hollow piston that slips in­side the cylinder. Device presents an original conceptual lay-out, developed at D.I.A.S and it is independent by any scheme, available in literature.

  9. Controllable preparation of nanosized TiO2 thin film and relationship between structure of film and its photocatalytic activity

    魏刚; 张元晶; 熊蓉春

    2003-01-01

    TiO2 nano-crystalline film and fixed bed photocatalytic reactor were prepared by the sol-gel process using tetrabutylorthotitanate as a precursor and glass tube as the substrate. XRD, AFM, SEM and thickness analysis results indicate that the preparation of nano-crystalline film can be controlled by optimizing experiment process. Under the optimized process, the phase of TiO2 in film is anatase, and the grain size is 3-4 nm. The size of particles, which is about 20-80 nm, can be controlled. The thickness of monolayer film is in nanometer grade. The thickness and particles size in films growing on nanometer film can also be controlled in nanometer grade. As a result, the crack of film can be effectively avoided. Rhodamine B degradation results using UV-Vis spectrophotometer show that the activity of nano-crystalline film in the photocatalytic reactor has a good relation with the diameter of TiO2 particles, that is, the film shows high activity when the size is 20-30 nm and greatly reduced when the size is above 60 nm. The activity of film does not decrease with the increase of film thickness, and this result indicates that nano-crystalline film has no ill influence on the transmissivity of ultraviolet light.

  10. The crystal structure of Escherichia coli maltodextrin phosphorylase provides an explanation for the activity without control in this basic archetype of a phosphorylase.

    Watson, K A; Schinzel, R; Palm, D; Johnson, L N

    1997-01-01

    In animals, glycogen phosphorylase (GP) exists in an inactive (T state) and an active (R state) equilibrium that can be altered by allosteric effectors or covalent modification. In Escherichia coli, the activity of maltodextrin phosphorylase (MalP) is controlled by induction at the level of gene expression, and the enzyme exhibits no regulatory properties. We report the crystal structure of E. coli maltodextrin phosphorylase refined to 2.4 A resolution. The molecule consists of a dimer with 796 amino acids per monomer, with 46% sequence identity to the mammalian enzyme. The overall structure of MalP shows a similar fold to GP and the catalytic sites are highly conserved. However, the relative orientation of the two subunits in E. coli MalP is different from both the T and R state GP structures, and there are significant changes at the subunit-subunit interfaces. The sequence changes result in loss of each of the control sites present in rabbit muscle GP. As a result of the changes at the subunit interface, the 280s loop, which in T state GP acts as a gate to control access to the catalytic site, is held in an open conformation in MalP. The open access to the conserved catalytic site provides an explanation for the activity without control in this basic archetype of a phosphorylase. PMID:9009262

  11. Structured control for autonomous robots

    To operate in rich, dynamic environments, autonomous robots must be able to effectively utilize and coordinate their limited physical and occupational resources. As complexity increases, it becomes necessary to impose explicit constraints on the control of planning, perception, and action to ensure that unwanted interactions between behaviors do not occur. This paper advocates developing complex robot systems by layering reactive behaviors onto deliberative components. In this structured control approach, the deliberative components handle normal situations and the reactive behaviors, which are explicitly constrained as to when and how they are activated, handle exceptional situations. The Task Control Architecture (TCA) has been developed to support this approach. TCA provides an integrated set of control constructs useful for implementing deliberative and reactive behaviors. The control constructs facilitate modular and evolutionary system development: they are used to integrate and coordinate planning, perception, and execution, and to incrementally improve the efficiency and robustness of the robot systems. To date, TCA has been used in implementing a half-dozen mobile robot systems, including an autonomous six-legged rover and indoor mobile manipulator

  12. Adaptive Structural Mode Control Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — M4 Engineering proposes the development of an adaptive structural mode control system. The adaptive control system will begin from a "baseline" dynamic model of the...

  13. Integrated control-structure design

    Hunziker, K. Scott; Kraft, Raymond H.; Bossi, Joseph A.

    1991-01-01

    A new approach for the design and control of flexible space structures is described. The approach integrates the structure and controller design processes thereby providing extra opportunities for avoiding some of the disastrous effects of control-structures interaction and for discovering new, unexpected avenues of future structural design. A control formulation based on Boyd's implementation of Youla parameterization is employed. Control design parameters are coupled with structural design variables to produce a set of integrated-design variables which are selected through optimization-based methodology. A performance index reflecting spacecraft mission goals and constraints is formulated and optimized with respect to the integrated design variables. Initial studies have been concerned with achieving mission requirements with a lighter, more flexible space structure. Details of the formulation of the integrated-design approach are presented and results are given from a study involving the integrated redesign of a flexible geostationary platform.

  14. Control of large space structures

    Gran, R.; Rossi, M.; Moyer, H. G.; Austin, F.

    1979-01-01

    The control of large space structures was studied to determine what, if any, limitations are imposed on the size of spacecraft which may be controlled using current control system design technology. Using a typical structure in the 35 to 70 meter size category, a control system design that used actuators that are currently available was designed. The amount of control power required to maintain the vehicle in a stabilized gravity gradient pointing orientation that also damped various structural motions was determined. The moment of inertia and mass properties of this structure were varied to verify that stability and performance were maintained. The study concludes that the structure's size is required to change by at least a factor of two before any stability problems arise. The stability margin that is lost is due to the scaling of the gravity gradient torques (the rigid body control) and as such can easily be corrected by changing the control gains associated with the rigid body control. A secondary conclusion from the study is that the control design that accommodates the structural motions (to damp them) is a little more sensitive than the design that works on attitude control of the rigid body only.

  15. Evolutionary Design of Controlled Structures

    Masters, Brett P.; Crawley, Edward F.

    1997-01-01

    Basic physical concepts of structural delay and transmissibility are provided for simple rod and beam structures. Investigations show the sensitivity of these concepts to differing controlled-structures variables, and to rational system modeling effects. An evolutionary controls/structures design method is developed. The basis of the method is an accurate model formulation for dynamic compensator optimization and Genetic Algorithm based updating of sensor/actuator placement and structural attributes. One and three dimensional examples from the literature are used to validate the method. Frequency domain interpretation of these controlled structure systems provide physical insight as to how the objective is optimized and consequently what is important in the objective. Several disturbance rejection type controls-structures systems are optimized for a stellar interferometer spacecraft application. The interferometric designs include closed loop tracking optics. Designs are generated for differing structural aspect ratios, differing disturbance attributes, and differing sensor selections. Physical limitations in achieving performance are given in terms of average system transfer function gains and system phase loss. A spacecraft-like optical interferometry system is investigated experimentally over several different optimized controlled structures configurations. Configurations represent common and not-so-common approaches to mitigating pathlength errors induced by disturbances of two different spectra. Results show that an optimized controlled structure for low frequency broadband disturbances achieves modest performance gains over a mass equivalent regular structure, while an optimized structure for high frequency narrow band disturbances is four times better in terms of root-mean-square pathlength. These results are predictable given the nature of the physical system and the optimization design variables. Fundamental limits on controlled performance are discussed

  16. Integrated Control with Structural Feedback to Enable Lightweight Aircraft

    Taylor, Brian R.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation for the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Technical Conference covers the benefits of active structural control, related research areas, and focuses on the use of optimal control allocation for the prevention of critical loads. Active control of lightweight structures has the potential to reduce aircraft weight and fuel burn. Sensor, control law, materials, control effector, and system level research will be necessary to enable active control of lightweight structures. Optimal control allocation with structural feedback has been shown in simulation to be feasible in preventing critical loads and is one example of a control law to enable future lightweight aircraft.

  17. Efficiency in Controlling Activities

    Van Nguyen, Tuyen

    2015-01-01

    Controlling is essential for financial success of corporations. An efficient controlling system should be implemented in order to manage financial performance from income, expense to profitability. The purpose of the thesis is to provide insight knowledge towards corporate accounting management as well as to propose potential improvement for the existing controlling system of the case company, which is Bosch Rexroth Japan. The theoretical framework creates the knowledge foundation for re...

  18. Active control of the noise

    The problems of acoustic noise are more and more preponderant in the measure in that the amount of equipment and industrial machinery is increased such as fans, transformers, compressors etc. the use of devices passive mechanics for the reduction of the noise is effective and very appreciated because its effects embrace a wide range of acoustic frequency. However, to low frequencies, such devices become too big and expensive besides that present a tendency to do not effective. The control of active noise, CAN, using the electronic generation anti-noise, constitutes an interesting solution to the problem because their operation principle allows achieving an appreciable reduction of the noise by means of the use of compact devices. The traditional techniques for the control of acoustic noise like barriers and silenced to attenuate it, are classified as passive and their works has been accepted as norm as for the treatment of problems of noise it refers. Such techniques are considered in general very effective in the attenuation of noise of wide band. However, for low frequency, the required passive structures are too big and expensive; also, their effectiveness diminishes flagrantly, that which makes them impractical in many applications. The active suppression is profiled like a practical alternative for the reduction of acoustic noise. The idea in the active treatment of the noise it contemplates the use of a device electro-acoustic, like a speaker for example that it cancels to the noise by the generation of sounds of Same width and of contrary phase (anti-noise). The cancellation phenomenon is carried out when the ant-noise combines acoustically with the noise, what is in the cancellation of both sounds. The effectiveness of the cancellation of the primary source of noise depends on the precision with which the width and the phase of the generated ant-noise are controlled. The active control of noise, ANC (activates noise control), it is being investigated for

  19. Robust control for uncertain structures

    Douglas, Joel; Athans, Michael

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs on robust control for uncertain structures are presented. Topics covered include: robust linear quadratic regulator (RLQR) formulas; mismatched LQR design; RLQR design; interpretations of RLQR design; disturbance rejection; and performance comparisons: RLQR vs. mismatched LQR.

  20. SLIDING MODE CONTROL FOR ACTIVE AUTOMOBILE SUSPENSIONS

    1998-01-01

    Nonlinear control methods are presented based on theory of sliding mode control (SMC) or variable structure control (VSC) for application to active automobile suspensions. Requirements of reducing manufacturing cost and energy consumption of the active suspension system may be satisfiedby reasonable design of the sliding surface and hydraulic servo system. Emphasis is placed on the study of the discrete sliding mode control method (DSMC) applicable for a new sort of speed on-off solenoid valves of anti-dust capability and low price. Robustness and effectiveness of the feedback linearized controller in typical road conditions are demonstrated by numerical results fora quarter-car suspension model.

  1. Active control of convection

    Bau, H.H. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Using stability theory, numerical simulations, and in some instances experiments, it is demonstrated that the critical Rayleigh number for the bifurcation (1) from the no-motion (conduction) state to the motion state and (2) from time-independent convection to time-dependent, oscillatory convection in the thermal convection loop and Rayleigh-Benard problems can be significantly increased or decreased. This is accomplished through the use of a feedback controller effectuating small perturbations in the boundary data. The controller consists of sensors which detect deviations in the fluid`s temperature from the motionless, conductive values and then direct actuators to respond to these deviations in such a way as to suppress the naturally occurring flow instabilities. Actuators which modify the boundary`s temperature/heat flux are considered. The feedback controller can also be used to control flow patterns and generate complex dynamic behavior at relatively low Rayleigh numbers.

  2. Active Combustion Control Valve Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Over the past decade, research into active combustion control has yielded impressive results in suppressing thermoacoustic instabilities and widening the...

  3. Event Structure and Cognitive Control

    Reimer, Jason F.; Radvansky, Gabriel A.; Lorsbach, Thomas C.; Armendarez, Joseph J.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, a great deal of research has demonstrated that although everyday experience is continuous in nature, it is parsed into separate events. The aim of the present study was to examine whether event structure can influence the effectiveness of cognitive control. Across 5 experiments we varied the structure of events within the AX-CPT by…

  4. Structural Control Systems Implemented in Civil Engineering

    Cristian Pastia

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past three decades, a great interest has been generated by the use of protection systems to mitigate the effects of dynamic environmental hazards on civil engineering structures, such as earthquakes and strong wind. These control systems develop controllable forces to add or dissipate energy in a structure, or both, due to specific devices integrated with sensors, controllers and real – time process to operate. The paper includes the advantages of these technologies consisting of the following sections: 1 represents an introduction, 2 deals with passive control system, 3 regards some control techniques, 4 concerns hybrid control techniques, 5 contains semi – active control techniques, and 6 is dedicated to general conclusions.

  5. Active weld control

    Powell, Bradley W.; Burroughs, Ivan A.

    1994-01-01

    Through the two phases of this contract, sensors for welding applications and parameter extraction algorithms have been developed. These sensors form the foundation of a weld control system which can provide action weld control through the monitoring of the weld pool and keyhole in a VPPA welding process. Systems of this type offer the potential of quality enhancement and cost reduction (minimization of rework on faulty welds) for high-integrity welding applications. Sensors for preweld and postweld inspection, weld pool monitoring, keyhole/weld wire entry monitoring, and seam tracking were developed. Algorithms for signal extraction were also developed and analyzed to determine their application to an adaptive weld control system. The following sections discuss findings for each of the three sensors developed under this contract: (1) weld profiling sensor; (2) weld pool sensor; and (3) stereo seam tracker/keyhole imaging sensor. Hardened versions of these sensors were designed and built under this contract. A control system, described later, was developed on a multiprocessing/multitasking operating system for maximum power and flexibility. Documentation for sensor mechanical and electrical design is also included as appendices in this report.

  6. Control structure design for resource recovery using the enhanced biological phosphorus removal and recovery (EBP2R) activated sludge process

    Valverde Perez, Borja; Fuentes-Martínez, José Manuel; Flores Alsina, Xavier;

    2016-01-01

    structurefor the novel enhanced biological phosphorus removal and recovery (EBP2R) process, which is currentlyunder development. The aim of the EBP2R is to maximize phosphorus recovery through optimal greenmicro-algal cultivation, which is achieved by controlling the nitrogen to phosphorus ratio (N-to-P ratio......Nowadays, wastewater is considered as a set of resources to be recovered rather than a mixture of pollutantsthat should be removed. Many resource recovery schemes have been proposed, involving the useof novel technologies whose controllability is poorly studied. In this paper we present a control...... in the effluent (16.9 ± 0.07) and can recover about 72% of the influent phosphorus. The phosphorus recovered by the CFS is limited by the influent nitrogen (65% of the influent phosphorus load). Using the CFS configuration the effluent N-to-P ratio cannot be effectively controlled (16.45 ± 2.48). Therefore...

  7. Automaticity or active control

    Tudoran, Ana Alina; Olsen, Svein Ottar

    This study addresses the quasi-moderating role of habit strength in explaining action loyalty. A model of loyalty behaviour is proposed that extends the traditional satisfaction–intention–action loyalty network. Habit strength is conceptualised as a cognitive construct to refer to the psychologic......, respectively, between intended loyalty and action loyalty. At high levels of habit strength, consumers are more likely to free up cognitive resources and incline the balance from controlled to routine and automatic-like responses....

  8. Active Control of Suspension Bridges

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    In this paper some recent research on active control of very long suspension bridges, is presented. The presentation is based on research work at Aalborg University, Denmark. The active control system is based on movable flaps attached to the bridge girder. Wind load on bridges with or without...... flaps attached to the girder is briefly presented. A simple active control system is discussed. Results from wind tunnel experiments with a bridge section show that flaps can be used effectively to control bridge girder vibrations. Flutter conditions for suspension bridges with and without flaps are...

  9. Integrated aerodynamic-structural-control wing design

    Rais-Rohani, M.; Haftka, R. T.; Grossman, B.; Unger, E. R.

    1992-01-01

    The aerodynamic-structural-control design of a forward-swept composite wing for a high subsonic transport aircraft is considered. The structural analysis is based on a finite-element method. The aerodynamic calculations are based on a vortex-lattice method, and the control calculations are based on an output feedback control. The wing is designed for minimum weight subject to structural, performance/aerodynamic and control constraints. Efficient methods are used to calculate the control-deflection and control-effectiveness sensitivities which appear as second-order derivatives in the control constraint equations. To suppress the aeroelastic divergence of the forward-swept wing, and to reduce the gross weight of the design aircraft, two separate cases are studied: (1) combined application of aeroelastic tailoring and active controls; and (2) aeroelastic tailoring alone. The results of this study indicated that, for this particular example, aeroelastic tailoring is sufficient for suppressing the aeroelastic divergence, and the use of active controls was not necessary.

  10. Active control of vibrations in pedestrian bridges

    Álvaro Cunha; Carlos Moutinho

    1999-01-01

    This paper, apart from making a brief general reference to vibration problems in pedestrian bridges, as well as to the form of modelling of dynamic pedestrian loads, presents the use of a predictive control strategy for the numerical simulation of the dynamic response of actively controlled structures of this type. The consideration of this control strategy permitted the development of a computational model, which was applied to the study of a pedestrian cable-stayed bridge, in order to show ...

  11. Active vibration control of lightweight floor systems

    Baader, J.; Fontana, M.

    2016-04-01

    Wide-span and lightweight floors are often prone to structural vibrations due to their low resonance frequency and poor material damping. Their dynamic behaviour can be improved using passive, semi-active or active vibration control devices. The following article proposes a novel method for the controller synthesis for active vibration control. An existing passive TMD (tuned mass damper) is modelled and equipped with an actuator in order to provide more efficient damping. Using an iterative optimization approach under constraints, an optimal controller is found which minimizes a quadratic cost function in frequency domain. A simulation of an existing test bench shows that the active vibration control device is able to provide increased damping compared to the passive TMD.

  12. Active Spacecraft Potential Control Investigation

    Torkar, K.; Nakamura, R.; Tajmar, M.; Scharlemann, C.; Jeszenszky, H.; Laky, G.; Fremuth, G.; Escoubet, C. P.; Svenes, K.

    2016-03-01

    In tenuous plasma the floating potential of sunlit spacecraft reaches tens of volts, positive. The corresponding field disturbs measurements of the ambient plasma by electron and ion sensors and can reduce micro-channel plate lifetime in electron detectors owing to large fluxes of attracted photoelectrons. Also the accuracy of electric field measurements may suffer from a high spacecraft potential. The Active Spacecraft Potential Control (ASPOC) neutralizes the spacecraft potential by releasing positive charge produced by indium ion emitters. The method has been successfully applied on other spacecraft such as Cluster and Double Star. Two ASPOC units are present on each spacecraft. Each unit contains four ion emitters, whereby one emitter per instrument is operated at a time. ASPOC for the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission includes new developments in the design of the emitters and the electronics. New features include the use of capillaries instead of needles, new materials for the emitters and their internal thermal insulators, an extended voltage and current range of the electronics, both for ion emission and heating purposes, and a more capable control software. This enables lower spacecraft potentials, higher reliability, and a more uniform potential structure in the spacecraft's sheath compared to previous missions. Results from on-ground testing demonstrate compliance with requirements. Model calculations confirm the findings from previous applications that the plasma measurements will not be affected by the beam's space charge. Finally, the various operating modes to adapt to changing boundary conditions are described along with the main data products.

  13. Control Structure Design of an Innovative Enhanced Biological Nutrient Recovery Activated Sludge System Coupled with a Photobioreactor

    Valverde Perez, Borja; Fuentes-Martínez, José Manuel; Flores Alsina, Xavier;

    2015-01-01

    The TRENS system is a train of biological units designed for resource recovery from wastewater. It is a sequence of a modified enhanced biological phosphorus removal and recovery system (EBP2R) coupled with a photobioreactor (PBR). The bacteria-based system constructs an optimal culture media for...... needed in order to assess the controllability of the PBR and the possible impact on the upstream operation conditions....

  14. Wind Turbine Rotors with Active Vibration Control

    Svendsen, Martin Nymann

    This thesis presents a framework for structural modeling, analysis and active vibration damping of rotating wind turbine blades and rotors. A structural rotor model is developed in terms of finite beam elements in a rotating frame of reference. The element comprises a representation of general...... that these are geometrically well separated. For active vibration control in three-bladed wind turbine rotors the present work presents a resonance-based method for groups of one collective and two whirling modes. The controller is based on the existing resonant format and introduces a dual system...... system. As in the method for non-rotating systems, an explicit procedure for optimal calibration of the controller gains is established. The control system is applied to an 86m wind turbine rotor by means of active strut actuator mechanisms. The prescribed additional damping ratios are reproduced almost...

  15. Space structure (dynamics and control) theme development

    Russell, Richard A.; Gates, Richard M.

    1988-01-01

    A study was made to define the long-range technical objectives and goals for the Space Structure (Dynamics and Control) theme area. The approach was to evaluate ongoing and proposed technology activities such that the technology gaps and voids could be identified. After the technology needs were identified, a set of recommended experimental activities was defined including the technical objectives of each and their relationship.

  16. Vibration damping with active carbon fiber structures

    Neugebauer, Reimund; Kunze, Holger; Riedel, Mathias; Roscher, Hans-Jürgen

    2007-04-01

    This paper presents a mechatronic strategy for active reduction of vibrations on machine tool struts or car shafts. The active structure is built from a carbon fiber composite with embedded piezofiber actuators that are composed of piezopatches based on the Macro Fiber Composite (MFC) technology, licensed by NASA and produced by Smart Material GmbH in Dresden, Germany. The structure of these actuators allows separate or selectively combined bending and torsion, meaning that both bending and torsion vibrations can be actively absorbed. Initial simulation work was done with a finite element model (ANSYS). This paper describes how state space models are generated out of a structure based on the finite element model and how controller codes are integrated into finite element models for transient analysis and the model-based control design. Finally, it showcases initial experimental findings and provides an outlook for damping multi-mode resonances with a parallel combination of resonant controllers.

  17. Advances in Structural Control in Civil Engineering in China

    Hongnan Li

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In the recent years, much attention has been paid to the research and development of structural control techniques with particular emphasis on alleviation of wind and seismic responses of buildings and bridges in China. Structural control in civil engineering has been developed from the concept into a workable technology and applied into practical engineering structures. The aim of this paper is to review a state of the art of researches and applications of structural control in civil engineering in China. It includes the passive control, active control, hybrid controland semiactive control. Finally, the possible future directions of structural control in civil engineering in China are presented.

  18. Development of an active structure flight experiment

    Manning, R. A.; Wyse, R. E.; Schubert, S. R.

    1993-02-01

    The design and development of the Air Force and TRW's Advanced Control Technology Experiment (ACTEX) flight experiment is described in this paper. The overall objective of ACTEX is to provide an active structure trailblazer which will demonstrate the compatibility of active structures with operational spacecraft performance and lifetime measures. At the heart of the experiment is an active tripod driven by a digitally-programmable analog control electronics subsystem. Piezoceramic sensors and actuators embedded in a graphite epoxy host material provide the sensing and actuation mechanism for the active tripod. Low noise ground-programmable electronics provide a virtually unlimited number of control schemes that can be implemented in the space environment. The flight experiment program provides the opportunity to gather performance, reliability, adaptability, and lifetime performance data on vibration suppression hardware for the next generation of DoD and NASA spacecraft.

  19. Fuzzy Control of Structural Vibration for Offshore Platforms

    ZHOUYa-jun; ZHAODe-you

    2004-01-01

    During the past three decades, fuzzy logic feedback control systems have been utilized for the suppression of structural vibration in numerous studies. With the main advantages of the fuzzy controller, the inherent robustness and ability to handle nonlinearity, uncertainty and imprecision of the structure, active structural control of offshore platforms is accomplished. The robustness of the controller has been demonstrated through the uncertainty in damping ratios of the platforms. The study suggests that the proposed fuzzy control algorithm of structural vibration for offshore platforms is effective and feasible,thus improving both serviceability and survival. This present method undoubtedly provides an efficient way of the active control for offshore platforms.

  20. Jacket Substructure Fatigue Mitigation through Active Control

    Hanis, Tomas; Natarajan, Anand

    As offshore wind farms are being installed farther and in deeper waters offshore, new, and more sophisticated marine substructures such as jackets need to be used. Herein, a 10MW wind turbine mounted on a jacket sub structure at a mean water depth of 50 meters is investigated with regards to the...... fatigue design loads on the braces of the jacket. Since large wind turbines of 10MW rating have low rotor speeds (p), the modal frequencies of the sub structures approach 3p at low wind speeds, which leads to a modal coupling and resonance. Therefore an active control system is developed which provides...... sufficient structural damping and consequently a fatigue reduction at the substructure. The resulting reduction in fatigue design loads on the jacket structure based on the active control system is presented....

  1. Active load control techniques for wind turbines.

    van Dam, C.P. (University of California, Davis, CA); Berg, Dale E.; Johnson, Scott J. (University of California, Davis, CA)

    2008-07-01

    This report provides an overview on the current state of wind turbine control and introduces a number of active techniques that could be potentially used for control of wind turbine blades. The focus is on research regarding active flow control (AFC) as it applies to wind turbine performance and loads. The techniques and concepts described here are often described as 'smart structures' or 'smart rotor control'. This field is rapidly growing and there are numerous concepts currently being investigated around the world; some concepts already are focused on the wind energy industry and others are intended for use in other fields, but have the potential for wind turbine control. An AFC system can be broken into three categories: controls and sensors, actuators and devices, and the flow phenomena. This report focuses on the research involved with the actuators and devices and the generated flow phenomena caused by each device.

  2. Control Structures and Payout Policy

    Renneboog, L.D.R.; Trojanowski, G.

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines the payout policies of UK firms listed on the London Stock Exchange during the 1990s.It complements the existing literature by analyzing the trends in both dividends and total payouts (including share repurchases).In a dynamic panel data regression setting, we relate target payout ratios to control structure variables.Profitability drives payout decisions of the UK companies, but the presence of strong block holders or block holder coalitions considerably weakens the relat...

  3. Optical control of antibacterial activity

    Velema, Willem A.; van der Berg, Jan Pieter; Hansen, Mickel J.; Szymanski, Wiktor; Driessen, Arnold J. M.; Feringa, Ben L.

    2013-11-01

    Bacterial resistance is a major problem in the modern world, stemming in part from the build-up of antibiotics in the environment. Novel molecular approaches that enable an externally triggered increase in antibiotic activity with high spatiotemporal resolution and auto-inactivation are highly desirable. Here we report a responsive, broad-spectrum, antibacterial agent that can be temporally activated with light, whereupon it auto-inactivates on the scale of hours. The use of such a ‘smart’ antibiotic might prevent the build-up of active antimicrobial material in the environment. Reversible optical control over active drug concentration enables us to obtain pharmacodynamic information. Precisely localized control of activity is achieved, allowing the growth of bacteria to be confined to defined patterns, which has potential for the development of treatments that avoid interference with the endogenous microbial population in other parts of the organism.

  4. Electron gun controlled smart structure

    Martin, Jeffrey W.; Main, John Alan; Redmond, James M.; Henson, Tammy D.; Watson, Robert D.

    2001-01-01

    Disclosed is a method and system for actively controlling the shape of a sheet of electroactive material; the system comprising: one or more electrodes attached to the frontside of the electroactive sheet; a charged particle generator, disposed so as to direct a beam of charged particles (e.g. electrons) onto the electrode; a conductive substrate attached to the backside of the sheet; and a power supply electrically connected to the conductive substrate; whereby the sheet changes its shape in response to an electric field created across the sheet by an accumulation of electric charge within the electrode(s), relative to a potential applied to the conductive substrate. Use of multiple electrodes distributed across on the frontside ensures a uniform distribution of the charge with a single point of e-beam incidence, thereby greatly simplifying the beam scanning algorithm and raster control electronics, and reducing the problems associated with "blooming". By placing a distribution of electrodes over the front surface of a piezoelectric film (or other electroactive material), this arrangement enables improved control over the distribution of surface electric charges (e.g. electrons) by creating uniform (and possibly different) charge distributions within each individual electrode. Removal or deposition of net electric charge can be affected by controlling the secondary electron yield through manipulation of the backside electric potential with the power supply. The system can be used for actively controlling the shape of space-based deployable optics, such as adaptive mirrors and inflatable antennae.

  5. Damping and structural control of the JPL phase 0 testbed structure

    Fanson, James L.; Chu, Cheng-Chih; Lurie, Boris J.; Smith, Roy S.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes recent advances in structural quieting technology as applied to active truss structures intended for high precision space based optics applications. The active structure incorporates piezoelectric active members which exert control forces internal to the structure and thereby improve the structure's dimensional stability. The control architecture involves two layers of feedback control. The first utilizes collocated measurements of force and velocity at the active member to achieve active damping, the second utilizes noncollocated measurements of acceleration at the location of a simulated optical component to achieve structural stabilization. The local control loops are based on the concept of impedance matching, the global control loops are designed using robust control methods. These two levels of control are intended to operate simultaneously; however, in this paper each approach is applied individually. The combined implementation is left for future work.

  6. Structural Features of Caspase-Activating Complexes

    Hyun Ho Park

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis, also called programmed cell death, is an orderly cellular suicide program that is critical for the development, immune regulation and homeostasis of a multi-cellular organism. Failure to control this process can lead to serious human diseases, including many types of cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, and autoimmununity. The process of apoptosis is mediated by the sequential activation of caspases, which are cysteine proteases. Initiator caspases, such as caspase-2, -8, -9, and -10, are activated by formation of caspase-activating complexes, which function as a platform to recruit caspases, providing proximity for self-activation. Well-known initiator caspase-activating complexes include (1 DISC (Death Inducing Signaling Complex, which activates caspases-8 and 10; (2 Apoptosome, which activates caspase-9; and (3 PIDDosome, which activates caspase-2. Because of the fundamental biological importance of capases, many structural and biochemical studies to understand the molecular basis of assembly mechanism of caspase-activating complexes have been performed. In this review, we summarize previous studies that have examined the structural and biochemical features of caspase-activating complexes. By analyzing the structural basis for the assembly mechanism of the caspase-activating complex, we hope to provide a comprehensive understanding of caspase activation by these important oligomeric complexes.

  7. Active control: Wind turbine model

    Bindner, H.

    1999-01-01

    This report is a part of the reporting of the work done in the project 'Active Control of Wind Turbines'. This project aim is to develop a simulation model for design of control systems for turbines with pitch control and to use that model to designcontrollers. This report describes the model...... developed for controller design and analysis. Emphasis has been put on establishment of simple models describing the dynamic behavior of the wind turbine in adequate details for controller design. This hasbeen done with extensive use of measurements as the basis for selection of model complexity and model....... The models are all formulated as linear differential equations. The models are validated throughcomparisons with measurements performed on a Vestas WD 34 400 kW wind turbine. It is shown from a control point of view simple linear models can be used to describe the dynamic behavior of a pitch...

  8. Fractional active disturbance rejection control.

    Li, Dazi; Ding, Pan; Gao, Zhiqiang

    2016-05-01

    A fractional active disturbance rejection control (FADRC) scheme is proposed to improve the performance of commensurate linear fractional order systems (FOS) and the robust analysis shows that the controller is also applicable to incommensurate linear FOS control. In FADRC, the traditional extended states observer (ESO) is generalized to a fractional order extended states observer (FESO) by using the fractional calculus, and the tracking differentiator plus nonlinear state error feedback are replaced by a fractional proportional-derivative controller. To simplify controller tuning, the linear bandwidth-parameterization method has been adopted. The impacts of the observer bandwidth ωo and controller bandwidth ωc on system performance are then analyzed. Finally, the FADRC stability and frequency-domain characteristics for linear single-input single-output FOS are analyzed. Simulation results by FADRC and ADRC on typical FOS are compared to demonstrate the superiority and effectiveness of the proposed scheme. PMID:26928516

  9. ABOUT CONTROLLING OF SCIENTIFIC ACTIVITY

    Mukhin V. V.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We have selected the new area of controlling - scientific activity controlling. We consider some problems of development in this field, primarily the problem of selection of key performance indicators. It’s been founded that administrative measures stimulated the pursuit of a number of articles published in scientific journals hinders the development of science. Methodological errors - emphasis on citation indexes, impact factors, etc. - lead to wrong management decisions. As the experience of the UK, an expertise should be applied in the management of science. The article briefly discusses some of the drawbacks of the system of scientific specialties. It is proposed to expand research on the science of science and scientific activity controlling. We have also discussed the problems of controlling in applied research organizations

  10. Adaptive Piezoelectric Absorber for Active Vibration Control

    Sven Herold

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Passive vibration control solutions are often limited to working reliably at one design point. Especially applied to lightweight structures, which tend to have unwanted vibration, active vibration control approaches can outperform passive solutions. To generate dynamic forces in a narrow frequency band, passive single-degree-of-freedom oscillators are frequently used as vibration absorbers and neutralizers. In order to respond to changes in system properties and/or the frequency of excitation forces, in this work, adaptive vibration compensation by a tunable piezoelectric vibration absorber is investigated. A special design containing piezoelectric stack actuators is used to cover a large tuning range for the natural frequency of the adaptive vibration absorber, while also the utilization as an active dynamic inertial mass actuator for active control concepts is possible, which can help to implement a broadband vibration control system. An analytical model is set up to derive general design rules for the system. An absorber prototype is set up and validated experimentally for both use cases of an adaptive vibration absorber and inertial mass actuator. Finally, the adaptive vibration control system is installed and tested with a basic truss structure in the laboratory, using both the possibility to adjust the properties of the absorber and active control.

  11. Dynamic Sensing Performance of a Point-Wise Fiber Bragg Grating Displacement Measurement System Integrated in an Active Structural Control System

    Chien-Ching Ma

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a fiber Bragg grating (FBG sensing system which can measure the transient response of out-of-plane point-wise displacement responses is set up on a smart cantilever beam and the feasibility of its use as a feedback sensor in an active structural control system is studied experimentally. An FBG filter is employed in the proposed fiber sensing system to dynamically demodulate the responses obtained by the FBG displacement sensor with high sensitivity. For comparison, a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV is utilized simultaneously to verify displacement detection ability of the FBG sensing system. An optical full-field measurement technique called amplitude-fluctuation electronic speckle pattern interferometry (AF-ESPI is used to provide full-field vibration mode shapes and resonant frequencies. To verify the dynamic demodulation performance of the FBG filter, a traditional FBG strain sensor calibrated with a strain gauge is first employed to measure the dynamic strain of impact-induced vibrations. Then, system identification of the smart cantilever beam is performed by FBG strain and displacement sensors. Finally, by employing a velocity feedback control algorithm, the feasibility of integrating the proposed FBG displacement sensing system in a collocated feedback system is investigated and excellent dynamic feedback performance is demonstrated. In conclusion, our experiments show that the FBG sensor is capable of performing dynamic displacement feedback and/or strain measurements with high sensitivity and resolution.

  12. Snoezelen, structured reminiscence therapy and 10-minutes activation in long term care residents with dementia (WISDE: study protocol of a cluster randomized controlled trial

    Becker Christiane

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background People with dementia are often inapproachable due to symptoms of their illness. Therefore nurses should establish relationships with dementia patients via their remaining resources and facilitate communication. In order to achieve this, different targeted non-pharmacological interventions are recommended and practiced. However there is no sufficient evidence about the efficacy of most of these interventions. A number of publications highlight the urgent need for methodological sound studies so that more robust conclusions may be drawn. Methods/Design The trial is designed as a cluster randomized controlled trial with 20 nursing homes in Saxony and Saxony-Anhalt (Germany as the units of randomization. Nursing homes will be randomly allocated into 4 study groups consisting of 5 clusters and 90 residents: snoezelen, structured reminiscence therapy, 10-minutes activation or unstructured verbal communication (control group. The purpose is to determine whether the interventions are effective to reduce apathy in long-term care residents with dementia (N = 360 as the main outcome measure. Assessments will be done at baseline, 3, 6 and 12 months after beginning of the interventions. Discussion This trial will particularly contribute to the evidence on efficacy of non-pharmacological interventions in dementia care. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00653731

  13. Control/structure interaction design methodology

    Briggs, Hugh C.; Layman, William E.

    1989-01-01

    The Control Structure Interaction Program is a technology development program for spacecraft that exhibit interactions between the control system and structural dynamics. The program objectives include development and verification of new design concepts (such as active structure) and new tools (such as a combined structure and control optimization algorithm) and their verification in ground and possibly flight test. The new CSI design methodology is centered around interdisciplinary engineers using new tools that closely integrate structures and controls. Verification is an important CSI theme and analysts will be closely integrated to the CSI Test Bed laboratory. Components, concepts, tools and algorithms will be developed and tested in the lab and in future Shuttle-based flight experiments. The design methodology is summarized in block diagrams depicting the evolution of a spacecraft design and descriptions of analytical capabilities used in the process. The multiyear JPL CSI implementation plan is described along with the essentials of several new tools. A distributed network of computation servers and workstations was designed that will provide a state-of-the-art development base for the CSI technologies.

  14. Distributed structural control using multilayered piezoelectric actuators

    Cudney, Harley H.; Inman, Daniel J.; Oshman, Yaakov

    1990-01-01

    A method of segmenting piezoelectric sensors and actuators is proposed which can preclude the currently experienced cancelation of sensor signals, or the reduction of actuator effectiveness, due to the integration of the property undergoing measurement or control. The segmentation method is demonstrated by a model developed for beam structures, to which multiple layers of piezoelectric materials are attached. A numerical study is undertaken of increasing active and passive damping of a beam using the segmented sensors and actuators over unsegmented sensors and actuators.

  15. Structural Dynamics and Control Interaction of Flexible Structures

    Ryan, Robert S. (Editor); Scofield, Harold N. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    A workshop on structural dynamics and control interaction of flexible structures was held to promote technical exchange between the structural dynamics and control disciplines, foster joint technology, and provide a forum for discussing and focusing critical issues in the separate and combined areas. Issues and areas of emphasis were identified in structure-control interaction for the next generation of flexible systems.

  16. Indirect control and power in mutual control structures

    Karos, D.; Peters, H.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    In a mutual control structure agents exercise control over each other. Typical examples occur in the area of corporate governance: firms and investment companies exercise mutual control, in particular by owning each others’ stocks. In this paper we formulate a general model for such situations. There is a fixed set of agents, and a mutual control structure assigns to each subset (coalition) the subset of agents controlled by that coalition. Such a mutual control structure captures direct cont...

  17. Desensitizing structural-control design

    Ponslet, E.; Haftka, R. T.; Hallauer, W. L.; Cudney, H. H.

    1992-01-01

    A new method for targeted robustness optimization is presented. This method allows the analyst to 'target' the most critical performance parameter (or family of design requirements with almost the same criticality) for enhanced protection from uncertainties in the model. To create this protection, this method uses knowledge about the uncertainties in some of the parameters of the model - this information is usually available to the structural analyst. The power of the targeted robustness method is demonstrated numerically using an active damping example. The results show that the most critical damping ratio is protected - its sensitivity to the uncertainties is far below those of non-critical damping ratios.

  18. Adaptive feedback active noise control

    Kuo, Sen M.; Vijayan, Dipa

    Feedforward active noise control (ANC) systems use a reference sensor that senses a reference input to the controller. This signal is assumed to be unaffected by the secondary source and is a good measure of the undesired noise to be cancelled by the system. The reference sensor may be acoustic (e.g., microphone) or non-acoustic (e.g., tachometer, optical transducer). An obvious problem when using acoustic sensors is that the reference signal may be corrupted by the canceling signal generated by the secondary source. This problem is known as acoustic feedback. One way of avoiding this is by using a feedback active noise control (FANC) system which dispenses with the reference sensor. The FANC technique originally proposed by Olson and May employs a high gain negative feedback amplifier. This system suffered from the drawback that the error microphone had to be placed very close to the loudspeaker. The operation of the system was restricted to low frequency range and suffered from instability due to the possibility of positive feedback. Feedback systems employing adaptive filtering techniques for active noise control were developed. This paper presents the FANC system modeled as an adaptive prediction scheme.

  19. Quantifying structural controls of rockfall activity on alpine limestone cliffs: a LiDAR-based geological approach in the Wetterstein Mountains, Bavarian Alps.

    Jacobs, Benjamin; Krautblatter, Michael

    2016-04-01

    In mountainous regions, rockfall represents one of the most hazardous processes potentially threatening human life and infrastructure. For risk assessment and dimensioning rockfall mitigation, a thorough understanding of rockfall processes is crucial. Here, the rate of backweathering and rockfall supply are key factors for sediment budget assessment in rock slope environments. However, recent LiDAR approaches do not cover the entire spectrum of rockfall magnitudes (e.g. small fragmental rockfall, rare large events) and many former rockfall studies do not address geological and geotechnical factors controlling rockfall. The test setup was deliberately chosen to reduce the degrees of freedom for rockfall-controlling factors. Lithology, aspect, slope gradient and porosity were kept uniform but scan sites were chosen vary bedding orientation and joint density systematically along a 600 m high limestone rock face. Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) was used to detect and quantify rockfall activity (mm/a) at five selected rock walls of the north-facing rock slopes of the Reintal Valley over the course of one year. Additionally, structural data were obtained by traditional scanline measurements and TLS-based analysis. The compatibility of TLS methods was tested by validating the data with existing rockfall inventories obtained by direct measurements by Krautblatter et al. (2012). The results show a high discrepancy of seasonal rockfall activity between summer months (0.001 to 0.022 mm/a) and autumn to spring (0.021 to 0.364 mm/a) as well as between favorable bedding orientation (0.015 mm/a) and daylighted bedding (max. 0.264 mm/a). A significant effect of joint spacing on rockfall activity is not evident in the data or overlain by the bedding orientation effect. Nevertheless, the differences in estimated block sizes between the observed rock walls is clearly visible in the TLS derived particle size distribution. The latter was adduced to extrapolate rockfall magnitudes

  20. Distributed control of large space structures

    Schaechter, D. B.

    1981-01-01

    Theoretical developments and the results of laboratory experiments are treated as they apply to active attitude and vibration control, as well as static shape control. Modern control theory was employed throughout as the method for obtaining estimation and control laws.

  1. Morphology-controlled synthesis of Ti3+ self-doped yolk–shell structure titanium oxide with superior photocatalytic activity under visible light

    Ti3+ self-doped yolk–shell structure titanium oxide nanoparticle aggregates are fabricated through an environmental template-free route and the reduction reaction at low temperature subsequently. After the Ti3+ doping, the reduced TiO2 sample exhibits a wide visible-light absorption ranged from 400 nm to 800 nm. The intrinsic hollow core–shell microstructure can make multiple reflections of light within the chamber, and thus results in more efficient use of the light source compared with solid structure. Besides, the large surface area can render the sample with a high activity. Therefore, Ti3+ self-doped yolk–shell structure titanium oxide exhibits a superior photocatalytic activity under visible light. This strategy is simple, cheap and mass-productive, which may shed light on a new avenue for large scale production of self-doped yolk–shell structural nano functional materials for catalyst, sensors, energy storage and other new applications. - Graphical abstract: A facile generic strategy is employed to prepare Ti3+ self-doped yolk–shell structure titanium oxide nanoparticle aggregates with the superior photocatalytic activity under visible light. - Highlights: • Yolk–shell TiO2 mesospheres are synthesized by solvothermal alcoholysis. • Ti3+ self-doped yolk–shell structure titanium oxide is obtained at low temperature. • It exhibits a remarkable photocatalytic activity

  2. Novel Active Combustion Control Valve

    Caspermeyer, Matt

    2014-01-01

    This project presents an innovative solution for active combustion control. Relative to the state of the art, this concept provides frequency modulation (greater than 1,000 Hz) in combination with high-amplitude modulation (in excess of 30 percent flow) and can be adapted to a large range of fuel injector sizes. Existing valves often have low flow modulation strength. To achieve higher flow modulation requires excessively large valves or too much electrical power to be practical. This active combustion control valve (ACCV) has high-frequency and -amplitude modulation, consumes low electrical power, is closely coupled with the fuel injector for modulation strength, and is practical in size and weight. By mitigating combustion instabilities at higher frequencies than have been previously achieved (approximately 1,000 Hz), this new technology enables gas turbines to run at operating points that produce lower emissions and higher performance.

  3. Smart Materials and Active Noise and Vibration Control in Vehicles

    Doppenberg, E.J.J.; Berkhoff, A.P.; Overbeek, van M.

    2001-01-01

    The paper presents the results for the reduction of sound radiated from a structure using different control methodologies, and discusses two approaches for active structural acoustic control: the acoustic approach or the vibro-acoustic approach. Integrated actuators in structure material are necessa

  4. Active Vibration Control of Piezolaminated Smart Beams

    V. Balamurugan

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the active vibration control of beam like structures with distributed piezoelectric sensor and actuator layers bonded on top and bottom surfaces of the beam. A finite element model based on Euler-Bernoulli beam theory has been developed. The contribution of the piezoelectric sensor and actuator layers on the mass and stiffness of the beam is considered. Three types of classical control strategies, namely direct proportional feedback, constant-gain negative velocity feedback and Lyapunov feedback and an optimal control strategy, linear quadratic regulator (LQR scheme are applied to study their control effectiveness. Also, the control performance with different types of loading, such as impulse loading, step loading, harmonic and random loading is studied

  5. Shape control of large space structures

    Hagan, M. T.

    1982-01-01

    A survey has been conducted to determine the types of control strategies which have been proposed for controlling the vibrations in large space structures. From this survey several representative control strategies were singled out for detailed analyses. The application of these strategies to a simplified model of a large space structure has been simulated. These simulations demonstrate the implementation of the control algorithms and provide a basis for a preliminary comparison of their suitability for large space structure control.

  6. Optimal controller design for structural damage detection

    Lew, Jiann-Shiun

    2005-03-01

    The virtual passive control technique has recently been applied to structural damage detection, where the virtual passive controller only uses the existing control devices, and no additional physical elements are attached to the tested structure. One important task is to design passive controllers that can enhance the sensitivity of the identified parameters, such as natural frequencies, to structural damage. This paper presents a novel study of an optimal controller design for structural damage detection. We apply not only passive controllers but also low-order and fixed-structure controllers, such as PID controllers. In the optimal control design, the performance of structural damage detection is based on the application of a neural network technique, which uses the pattern of the correlation between the natural frequency changes of the tested system and the damaged system.

  7. A Digital Controller for Active Aeroelastic Controls

    Ueda, Tetsuhiko; MUROTA, Katsuichi; 上田, 哲彦; 室田, 勝一

    1989-01-01

    A high-speed digital controller for aeroelastic controls was designed and made. The purpose was to minimize adverse phase lag which is inevitably produced by the CPU time of digital processing. The delay deteriorates control performances on rather rapid phenomena like aircraft flutter. With fix-point operation the controller realized 417 microseconds of throughput time including the A/D and D/A conversion. This corresponds to a high sampling rate of 2.4kHz. The controller furnishes two channe...

  8. Active structures to reduce torsional vibrations

    Matthias, M.; Schlote, D.; Atzrodt, H.

    2013-03-01

    This paper describes the development of different active measures to reduce torsional vibrations in power trains. The measures are based on concepts developed for active mounts to reduce the transmission of structure-borne sound. To show the potential of these active measures and investigate their mode of operation to influence torsional vibrations, numerical simulations of powertrains with different active measures were done. First experimental results from tests on an experimental (reduced size) power train were used to align the numerical models. The work was done within the project 'LOEWE-Zentrum AdRIA: Adaptronik - Research, Innovation, Application' funded by the German federal state of Hessen, and the Project AKTos: 'Active control of torsional vibrations by coupling elements' placed in the research Framework program 'Navigation and Maritime Technology for the 21st Century' funded by the German Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology.

  9. Solution Structures of Complement C2 and Its C4 Complexes Propose Pathway-specific Mechanisms for Control and Activation of the Complement Proconvertases.

    Mortensen, Sofia; Jensen, Jan K; Andersen, Gregers R

    2016-08-01

    The lectin (LP) and classical (CP) pathways are two of the three main activation cascades of the complement system. These pathways start with recognition of different pathogen- or danger-associated molecular patterns and include identical steps of proteolytic activation of complement component C4, formation of the C3 proconvertase C4b2, followed by cleavage of complement component C2 within C4b2 resulting in the C3 convertase C4b2a. Here, we describe the solution structures of the two central complexes of the pathways, C3 proconvertase and C3 convertase, as well as the unbound zymogen C2 obtained by small angle x-ray scattering analysis. We analyzed both native and enzymatically deglycosylated C4b2 and C2 and showed that the resulting structural models were independent of the glycans. The small angle x-ray scattering-derived models suggest a different activation mode for the CP/LP C3 proconvertase as compared with that established for the alternative pathway proconvertase C3bB. This is likely due to the rather different structural and functional properties of the proteases activating the proconvertases. The solution structure of a stabilized form of the active CP/LP C3 convertase C4b2a is strikingly similar to the crystal structure of the alternative pathway C3 convertase C3bBb, which is in accordance with their identical functions in cleaving the complement proteins C3 and C5. PMID:27252379

  10. Quantitative robust linear parameter varying H∞ vibration control of flexible structures for saving the control energy

    Zhang, Kai; Scorletti, Gérard; Ichchou, Mohamed; Mieyeville, F.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, a general and systematical quantitative robust linear parameter varying control method is proposed for active vibration control of linear parameter varying flexible structures such that a complete set of control objectives can be considered, especially the reduction of necessarily required control energy and the control input. To achieve this goal, the phase and gain control policies are employed in linear parameter varying H∞ control designs for suitable selection of weighti...

  11. DNA-based control of protein activity.

    Engelen, W; Janssen, B M G; Merkx, M

    2016-03-01

    DNA has emerged as a highly versatile construction material for nanometer-sized structures and sophisticated molecular machines and circuits. The successful application of nucleic acid based systems greatly relies on their ability to autonomously sense and act on their environment. In this feature article, the development of DNA-based strategies to dynamically control protein activity via oligonucleotide triggers is discussed. Depending on the desired application, protein activity can be controlled by directly conjugating them to an oligonucleotide handle, or expressing them as a fusion protein with DNA binding motifs. To control proteins without modifying them chemically or genetically, multivalent ligands and aptamers that reversibly inhibit their function provide valuable tools to regulate proteins in a noncovalent manner. The goal of this feature article is to give an overview of strategies developed to control protein activity via oligonucleotide-based triggers, as well as hurdles yet to be taken to obtain fully autonomous systems that interrogate, process and act on their environments by means of DNA-based protein control. PMID:26812623

  12. Solution Structures of Complement C2 and its C4 Complexes Propose Pathway Specific Mechanisms for Control and Activation of the Complement Proconvertases

    Mortensen, Sofia; Jensen, Jan Kristian; Andersen, Gregers Rom

    2016-01-01

    , formation of the C3 proconvertase C4b2, followed by cleavage of complement component C2 within C4b2 resulting in the C3 convertase C4b2a. Here we describe the solution structures of the two central complexes of the pathways, C3 proconvertase and C3 convertase, as well as the unbound zymogen C2 obtained by...... small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) analysis. We analysed both native and enzymatically deglycosylated C4b2 and C2 and showed that the resulting structural models were independent of the glycans. The SAXS derived models suggest a different activation mode for the CP/LP C3 proconvertase as compared to...... that established for the alternative pathway (AP) proconvertase C3bB. This is likely due to the rather different structural and functional properties of the proteases activating the proconvertases. The solution structure of a stabilized form of the active CP/LP C3 convertase C4b2a is strikingly similar...

  13. Passive control of civil engineering structures

    Braz-César, M.T.; Barros, Rui

    2013-01-01

    Structural control has been a major research area i n aerospace engineering aimed at solving very complex problems related with analysis and des ign of flexible structures. The efficiency of these strategies to improve the performance of s everal structural systems suggests its potential to reduce damage and control earthquake4i nduced response in civil structures. Therefore, this technology has been well accepted b y structural engineers as a feasible approach t...

  14. Optimization for efficient structure-control systems

    Oz, Hayrani; Khot, Narendra S.

    1993-01-01

    The efficiency of a structure-control system is a nondimensional parameter which indicates the fraction of the total control power expended usefully in controlling a finite-dimensional system. The balance of control power is wasted on the truncated dynamics serving no useful purpose towards the control objectives. Recently, it has been demonstrated that the concept of efficiency can be used to address a number of control issues encountered in the control of dynamic systems such as the spillover effects, selection of a good input configuration and obtaining reduced order control models. Reference (1) introduced the concept and presented analyses of several Linear Quadratic Regulator designs on the basis of their efficiencies. Encouraged by the results of Ref. (1), Ref. (2) introduces an efficiency modal analysis of a structure-control system which gives an internal characterization of the controller design and establishes the link between the control design and the initial disturbances to affect efficient structure-control system designs. The efficiency modal analysis leads to identification of principal controller directions (or controller modes) distinct from the structural natural modes. Thus ultimately, many issues of the structure-control system revolve around the idea of insuring compatibility of the structural modes and the controller modes with each other, the better the match the higher the efficiency. A key feature in controlling a reduced order model of a high dimensional (or infinity-dimensional distributed parameter system) structural dynamic system must be to achieve high efficiency of the control system while satisfying the control objectives and/or constraints. Formally, this can be achieved by designing the control system and structural parameters simultaneously within an optimization framework. The subject of this paper is to present such a design procedure.

  15. Towards Automatic Decentralized Control Structure Selection

    Jørgensen, John Bagterp; Jørgensen, Sten Bay

    2000-01-01

    A subtask in integration of design and control of chemical processes is the selection of a control structure. Automating the selection of the control structure enables sequential integration of process and control design. As soon as the process is specified or computed, a structure for...... decentralized control is determined automatically, and the resulting decentralized control structure is automatically tuned using standard techniques. Dynamic simulation of the resulting process system gives immediate feedback to the process design engineer regarding practical operability of the process. The...... control structure selection problem is formulated as a special MILP employing cost coefficients which are computed using Parseval's theorem combined with RGA and IMC concepts. This approach enables selection and tuning of large-scale plant-wide decentralized controllers through efficient combination of...

  16. Implementation of Control Structures in FORTRAN 77.

    Schwar, James P.; Best, Charles L.

    1984-01-01

    Expands on a previous discussion of FORTRAN 77 by describing one of its more powerful innovations--the block IF as the basic implementation for the control structures used in writing structured code. Also shows use of DO-loop as a natural substitute for the black IF in implementing control structures. (JN)

  17. Nonlinear Predictive Control of Semi-Active Landing Gear System

    Wu, Dongsu; Gu, Hongbin; Liu, Hui

    2010-01-01

    The application of model predictive control and constructive nonlinear control methodology to semi-active landing gear system is studied in this paper. A unified shock absorber mathematical model incorporates solenoid valve’s electromechanical and magnetic dynamics is built to facilitate simulation and controller design. Then we propose a hierarchical control structure to deal with the high nonlinearity. A dual mode model predictive controller as an outer loop controller is developed to gen...

  18. On modal energy in civil structural control

    Miao PANG; Tie-jiong LOU; Ming ZHAO

    2008-01-01

    A new control strategy based on modal energy criterion is proposed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the control system in reducing structural earthquake responses. The modal control algorithm combining LQR (linear quadratic regulator) control algorithm is adopted in the discrete time-history analysis. The various modal energy forms are derived by definition of the generalized absolute displacement vector. A preliminary numerical study of the effectiveness of this control strategy is carried out on a 20-storey framed steel structural model. The controlled performance of the model is studied from the perspectives of both response and modal energy. Results show that the modal energy-based control strategy is very effective in reducing structural responses as well as in consuming a large amount of modal energy, while augmentation of additional generalized control force corresponding to the modes that contain little modal energy is unnecessary, as it does little help to improve the controlled structural performance.

  19. Synaptically Released Matrix Metalloproteinase Activity in Control of Structural Plasticity and the Cell Surface Distribution of GluA1-AMPA Receptors

    Zsuzsanna Szepesi; Eric Hosy; Blazej Ruszczycki; Monika Bijata; Marta Pyskaty; Arthur Bikbaev; Martin Heine; Daniel Choquet; Leszek Kaczmarek; Jakub Wlodarczyk

    2014-01-01

    Synapses are particularly prone to dynamic alterations and thus play a major role in neuronal plasticity. Dynamic excitatory synapses are located at the membranous neuronal protrusions called dendritic spines. The ability to change synaptic connections involves both alterations at the morphological level and changes in postsynaptic receptor composition. We report that endogenous matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity promotes the structural and functional plasticity of local synapses by its ...

  20. Recent advances in active control of aircraft cabin noise

    Mathur, Gopal; Fuller, Christopher

    2002-11-01

    Active noise control techniques can provide significant reductions in aircraft interior noise levels without the structural modifications or weight penalties usually associated with passive techniques, particularly for low frequency noise. Our main objective in this presentation is to give a review of active control methods and their applications to aircraft cabin noise reduction with an emphasis on recent advances and challenges facing the noise control engineer in the practical application of these techniques. The active noise control method using secondary acoustic sources, e.g., loudspeakers, as control sources for tonal noise reduction is first discussed with results from an active noise control flight test demonstration. An innovative approach of applying control forces directly to the fuselage structure using piezoelectric actuators, known as active structural acoustic control (ASAC), to control cabin noise is then presented. Experimental results from laboratory ASAC tests conducted on a full-scale fuselage and from flight tests on a helicopter will be discussed. Finally, a hybrid active/passive noise control approach for achieving significant broadband noise reduction will be discussed. Experimental results of control of broadband noise transmission through an aircraft structure will be presented.

  1. Remote Control Guidance Law Design Using Variable Structure Control

    2006-01-01

    A method of sliding mode variable structure control for the missile body being a time varying system is presented. A remote control guidance law is designed. The method has strong robustness to target's maneuver. To reduce the chattering phenomena, quasi-sliding mode variable structure control method is used. Simulation results show that the proposed method has small miss distance for any kind of maneuvering targets and requires small control energy.

  2. A predictive control algorithm for an active three-phase power filter

    R.V. Vlasenko; Bialobrzeski, O. V.

    2014-01-01

    The paper deals with grid connection circuits for active filters, structures of active power filter control systems, and methods based on full capacity components determination. The existing structures of active power filter control and control algorithm adjustment for valve commutation loss reduction are analyzed. A predictive control algorithm for an active three-phase power filter is introduced.

  3. Towards Automatic Decentralized Control Structure Selection

    A subtask in integration of design and control of chemical processes is the selection of a control structure. Automating the selection of the control structure enables sequential integration of process and controld esign. As soon as the process is specified or computed, a structure for...... decentralized control is determined automatically, and the resulting decentralized control structure is automatically tuned using standard techniques. Dynamic simulation of the resulting process system gives immediate feedback to the process design engineer regarding practical operability of the process. The...... control structure selection problem is formulated as a special MILP employing cost coefficients which are computed using Parseval's theorem combined with RGA and IMC concepts. This approach enables selection and tuning of large-scale plant-wide decentralized controllers through efficient combination of...

  4. On Control Strategies for Responsive Architectural Structures

    Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Parigi, Dario

    2012-01-01

    The present paper considers control of responsive architectural structures for improvement of structural performance by recognizing changes in their environments and loads, adapting to meet goals, and using past events to improve future performance or maintain serviceability. The general scope of...... the paper is to discuss control strategies for responsive architectural structures, particularly reconfigurable architectural structures which can transform body shape, i.e. a transformation into more than one or two different shape alternatives....

  5. On Control Strategies for Responsive Architectural Structures

    Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Parigi, Dario

    2012-01-01

    The present paper considers control of responsive architectural structures for improvement of structural performance by recognizing changes in their environments and loads, adapting to meet goals, and using past events to improve future performance or maintain serviceability. The general scope of the paper is to discuss control strategies for responsive architectural structures, particularly reconfigurable architectural structures which can transform body shape, i.e. a transformation into mor...

  6. Structurally Robust Control of Complex Networks

    Nacher, Jose C; Akutsu, Tatsuya

    2014-01-01

    Robust control theory has been successfully applied to numerous real-world problems using a small set of devices called {\\it controllers}. However, the real systems represented by networks contain unreliable components and modern robust control engineering has not addressed the problem of structural changes on a large network. Here, we introduce the concept of structurally robust control of complex networks and provide a concrete example using an algorithmic framework that is widely applied i...

  7. Active control of radiated sound using nearfield pressure sensing

    CHEN Ke'an; YIN Xuefei

    2004-01-01

    Based on nearfield sound pressure sensing to pick up error information, an approach for constructing active acoustic structure to effectively reduce radiated sound power at low frequency is proposed. The idea is that a nearfield pressure after active control is used as error signals and transformed into an objective function in adaptive active control process.Firstly sound power expression using near-field pressure radiated from a flexible structure is derived, and then three kind of nearfield pressure based active control strategies, I.e. Minimization of radiated sound power, minimization of sound power for dominant radiation modes and minimization of sound power for modified dominant radiation modes are respectively presented and applied to active control of radiated single and broadband noise. Finally computer simulations on sound power reduction under three strategies are conducted and it is shown that the proposed active control strategies are invalid and considerable reduction in radiated sound power can be achieved.

  8. The TOYSAT structural control experiment

    Breakwell, J. A.; Chambers, G. J.

    1983-01-01

    The Lockheed TOYSAT experiment is described. The experiment was designed to test hypothesis concerning the application of optimal control theory to flexible spacecraft. The theory is presented, and results described.

  9. Dual structural-control optimization of large space structures

    Messac, A.; Turner, J.

    1984-01-01

    A new approach is proposed for solving dual structural-control optimization problems for high-order flexible space structures where reduced-order structural models are employed. For a given initial structural dessign, a quadratic control cost is minimized subject to a constant-mass constraint. The sensitivity of the optimal control cost with respect to the stuctural design variables is then determined and used to obtain successive structural redesigns using a contrained gradient optimization algorithm. This process is repeated until the constrained control cost sensitivity becomes negligible. A numerical example is presented which demonstrates that this new approach effectively addresses the problem of dual optimization for potentially very high-order structures.

  10. Structural Dissection for Controlling Complex Networks

    Wang, Wen-Xu; Zhao, Chen; Liu, Yang-Yu; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Controlling complex networked systems has been a central goal in different fields and understanding controllability of complex networks has been at the forefront of contemporary science. Despite the recent progress in the development of controllability theories for complex networks, we continue to lack efficient tools to fully understand the effect of network topology and interaction strengths among nodes on controllability. Here we establish a framework to discern the significance of links and nodes for controlling general complex networks in a simple way based on local information. A dissection process is offered by the framework to probe and classify nodes and links completely, giving rise to a criterion for strong structural controllability. Analytical results indicate phase transitions associated with link and node categories, and strong structural controllability. Applying the tools to real networks demonstrate that real technological networks are strong structurally controllable, whereas most of real s...

  11. Modifying Erosion Control Structures for Ecological Benefits

    Edge-of-field water control structures known as drop pipes are widely employed to control gully erosion, particularly along incised streams. Previous research showed that incidental habitats created by installation of these structures supplemented stream corridors by supporting large numbers of inv...

  12. Tuning of active vibration controllers for ACTEX by genetic algorithm

    Kwak, Moon K.; Denoyer, Keith K.

    1999-06-01

    This paper is concerned with the optimal tuning of digitally programmable analog controllers on the ACTEX-1 smart structures flight experiment. The programmable controllers for each channel include a third order Strain Rate Feedback (SRF) controller, a fifth order SRF controller, a second order Positive Position Feedback (PPF) controller, and a fourth order PPF controller. Optimal manual tuning of several control parameters can be a difficult task even though the closed-loop control characteristics of each controller are well known. Hence, the automatic tuning of individual control parameters using Genetic Algorithms is proposed in this paper. The optimal control parameters of each control law are obtained by imposing a constraint on the closed-loop frequency response functions using the ACTEX mathematical model. The tuned control parameters are then uploaded to the ACTEX electronic control electronics and experiments on the active vibration control are carried out in space. The experimental results on ACTEX will be presented.

  13. JPL control/structure interaction test bed real-time control computer architecture

    Briggs, Hugh C.

    1989-01-01

    The Control/Structure Interaction Program is a technology development program for spacecraft that exhibit interactions between the control system and structural dynamics. The program objectives include development and verification of new design concepts - such as active structure - and new tools - such as combined structure and control optimization algorithm - and their verification in ground and possibly flight test. A focus mission spacecraft was designed based upon a space interferometer and is the basis for design of the ground test article. The ground test bed objectives include verification of the spacecraft design concepts, the active structure elements and certain design tools such as the new combined structures and controls optimization tool. In anticipation of CSI technology flight experiments, the test bed control electronics must emulate the computation capacity and control architectures of space qualifiable systems as well as the command and control networks that will be used to connect investigators with the flight experiment hardware. The Test Bed facility electronics were functionally partitioned into three units: a laboratory data acquisition system for structural parameter identification and performance verification; an experiment supervisory computer to oversee the experiment, monitor the environmental parameters and perform data logging; and a multilevel real-time control computing system. The design of the Test Bed electronics is presented along with hardware and software component descriptions. The system should break new ground in experimental control electronics and is of interest to anyone working in the verification of control concepts for large structures.

  14. Real-Time Structural Overload Control via Control Allocation Optimization Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This control methodology utilizes real-time vehicle structural load and shape measurements to actively respond to and protect against vehicle damage due...

  15. SPS structures and control: A perspective

    Ried, R. C.

    1980-01-01

    The characteristics and design requirements for the structure and control systems for a solar power satellite were evaluated. A simplistic, indicative analysis on a representative configuration was developed. Representative configuration masses and dimensions are given in convenient approximate magnitudes. The significance of structure control interaction and the significance of stiffness to the minimization of dynamic energy was demonstrated. It was found that the thermal environment for the SPS was dominated by solar radiation and waste heat rejection by the antenna. A more in-depth assessment of the control system design and associated system performance is still needed, specifically the inter-relatonships between control sensors, actuators, and structural response.

  16. Fluid control structures in microfluidic devices

    Mathies, Richard A.; Grover, William H.; Skelley, Alison; Lagally, Eric; Liu, Chung N.

    2008-11-04

    Methods and apparatus for implementing microfluidic analysis devices are provided. A monolithic elastomer membrane associated with an integrated pneumatic manifold allows the placement and actuation of a variety of fluid control structures, such as structures for pumping, isolating, mixing, routing, merging, splitting, preparing, and storing volumes of fluid. The fluid control structures can be used to implement a variety of sample introduction, preparation, processing, and storage techniques.

  17. Fluid control structures in microfluidic devices

    Mathies, Richard A. (Inventor); Grover, William H. (Inventor); Skelley, Alison (Inventor); Lagally, Eric (Inventor); Liu, Chung N. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for implementing microfluidic analysis devices are provided. A monolithic elastomer membrane associated with an integrated pneumatic manifold allows the placement and actuation of a variety of fluid control structures, such as structures for pumping, isolating, mixing, routing, merging, splitting, preparing, and storing volumes of fluid. The fluid control structures can be used to implement a variety of sample introduction, preparation, processing, and storage techniques.

  18. Holographic sensing for control of flexible structures

    Barsky, Michael Frederick

    1990-01-01

    A state feedback control system for flexible structures implemented using a holographic sensor and optical processor is presented. Real-time holography provides a mechanism for sensing the distributed shape of a broad class of one and two-dimensional flexible structures in a form that can be processed using fixed optics. The optical processing solves the spillover problem in the theory of the control of flexible structures. The optical processing also simplifies the computation allowing the s...

  19. Ribosome-dependent activation of stringent control.

    Brown, Alan; Fernández, Israel S; Gordiyenko, Yuliya; Ramakrishnan, V

    2016-06-01

    In order to survive, bacteria continually sense, and respond to, environmental fluctuations. Stringent control represents a key bacterial stress response to nutrient starvation that leads to rapid and comprehensive reprogramming of metabolic and transcriptional patterns. In general, transcription of genes for growth and proliferation is downregulated, while those important for survival and virulence are upregulated. Amino acid starvation is sensed by depletion of the aminoacylated tRNA pools, and this results in accumulation of ribosomes stalled with non-aminoacylated (uncharged) tRNA in the ribosomal A site. RelA is recruited to stalled ribosomes and activated to synthesize a hyperphosphorylated guanosine analogue, (p)ppGpp, which acts as a pleiotropic secondary messenger. However, structural information about how RelA recognizes stalled ribosomes and discriminates against aminoacylated tRNAs is missing. Here we present the cryo-electron microscopy structure of RelA bound to the bacterial ribosome stalled with uncharged tRNA. The structure reveals that RelA utilizes a distinct binding site compared to the translational factors, with a multi-domain architecture that wraps around a highly distorted A-site tRNA. The TGS (ThrRS, GTPase and SpoT) domain of RelA binds the CCA tail to orient the free 3' hydroxyl group of the terminal adenosine towards a β-strand, such that an aminoacylated tRNA at this position would be sterically precluded. The structure supports a model in which association of RelA with the ribosome suppresses auto-inhibition to activate synthesis of (p)ppGpp and initiate the stringent response. Since stringent control is responsible for the survival of pathogenic bacteria under stress conditions, and contributes to chronic infections and antibiotic tolerance, RelA represents a good target for the development of novel antibacterial therapeutics. PMID:27279228

  20. Structure and activation of rhodopsin

    Zhou, X. Edward; Melcher, Karsten; Xu, H Eric

    2012-01-01

    Rhodopsin is the first G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) with its three-dimensional structure solved by X-ray crystallography. The crystal structure of rhodopsin has revealed the molecular mechanism of photoreception and signal transduction in the visual system. Although several other GPCR crystal structures have been reported over the past few years, the rhodopsin structure remains an important model for understanding the structural and functional characteristics of other GPCRs. This review ...

  1. Experimental Robust Control of Structural Acoustic Radiation

    Cox, David E.; Gibbs, Gary P.; Clark, Robert L.; Vipperman, Jeffrey S.

    1998-01-01

    This work addresses the design and application of robust controllers for structural acoustic control. Both simulation and experimental results are presented. H(infinity) and mu-synthesis design methods were used to design feedback controllers which minimize power radiated from a panel while avoiding instability due to unmodeled dynamics. Specifically, high order structural modes which couple strongly to the actuator-sensor path were poorly modeled. This model error was analytically bounded with an uncertainty model, which allowed controllers to be designed without artificial limits on control effort. It is found that robust control methods provide the control designer with physically meaningful parameters with which to tune control designs and can be very useful in determining limits of performance. Experimental results also showed, however, poor robustness properties for control designs with ad-hoc uncertainty models. The importance of quantifying and bounding model errors is discussed.

  2. Multiplicity Control in Structural Equation Modeling

    Cribbie, Robert A.

    2007-01-01

    Researchers conducting structural equation modeling analyses rarely, if ever, control for the inflated probability of Type I errors when evaluating the statistical significance of multiple parameters in a model. In this study, the Type I error control, power and true model rates of famsilywise and false discovery rate controlling procedures were…

  3. Actively controlled thin-shell space optics

    Denoyer, Keith K.; Flint, Eric M.; Main, John A.; Lindler, Jason E.

    2003-08-01

    Increasingly, scientific and military missions require the use of space-based optical systems. For example, new capabilities are required for imaging terrestrial like planets, for surveillance, and for directed energy applications. Given the difficulties in producing and launching large optics, it is doubtful that refinements of conventional technology will meet future needs, particularly in a cost-effective manner. To meet this need, recent research has been investigating the feasibility of a new class of ultra-lightweight think-skin optical elements that combine recent advances in lightweight thermally formed materials, active materials, and novel sensing and control architectures. If successful, the approach may lead to an order of magnitude reduction in space optics areal density, improved large scale manufacturing capability, and dramatic reductions in manufacturing and launch costs. In a recent effort, a one meter thin-film mirror like structure was fabricated. This paper provides an overview of tools used to model and simulate this structure as well as results from structural dynamic testing. In addition, progress in the area of non-contact global shape control using smart materials is presented.

  4. High performance composites with active stiffness control.

    Tridech, Charnwit; Maples, Henry A; Robinson, Paul; Bismarck, Alexander

    2013-09-25

    High performance carbon fiber reinforced composites with controllable stiffness could revolutionize the use of composite materials in structural applications. Here we describe a structural material, which has a stiffness that can be actively controlled on demand. Such a material could have applications in morphing wings or deployable structures. A carbon fiber reinforced-epoxy composite is described that can undergo an 88% reduction in flexural stiffness at elevated temperatures and fully recover when cooled, with no discernible damage or loss in properties. Once the stiffness has been reduced, the required deformations can be achieved at much lower actuation forces. For this proof-of-concept study a thin polyacrylamide (PAAm) layer was electrocoated onto carbon fibers that were then embedded into an epoxy matrix via resin infusion. Heating the PAAm coating above its glass transition temperature caused it to soften and allowed the fibers to slide within the matrix. To produce the stiffness change the carbon fibers were used as resistance heating elements by passing a current through them. When the PAAm coating had softened, the ability of the interphase to transfer load to the fibers was significantly reduced, greatly lowering the flexural stiffness of the composite. By changing the moisture content in PAAm fiber coating, the temperature at which the PAAm softens and the composites undergo a reduction in stiffness can be tuned. PMID:23978266

  5. Structure and activation of rhodopsin

    X Edward ZHOU; Karsten MELCHER; H Eric XU

    2012-01-01

    Rhodopsin is the first G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) with its three-dimensional structure solved by X-ray crystallography.The crystal structure of rhodopsin has revealed the molecular mechanism of photoreception and signal transduction in the visual system.Although several other GPCR crystal structures have been reported over the past few years,the rhodopsin structure remains an important model for understanding the structural and functional characteristics of other GPCRs.This review summarizes the structural features,the photoactivation,and the G protein signal transduction of rhodopsin.

  6. Model Predictive Vibration Control Efficient Constrained MPC Vibration Control for Lightly Damped Mechanical Structures

    Takács, Gergely

    2012-01-01

    Real-time model predictive controller (MPC) implementation in active vibration control (AVC) is often rendered difficult by fast sampling speeds and extensive actuator-deformation asymmetry. If the control of lightly damped mechanical structures is assumed, the region of attraction containing the set of allowable initial conditions requires a large prediction horizon, making the already computationally demanding on-line process even more complex. Model Predictive Vibration Control provides insight into the predictive control of lightly damped vibrating structures by exploring computationally efficient algorithms which are capable of low frequency vibration control with guaranteed stability and constraint feasibility. In addition to a theoretical primer on active vibration damping and model predictive control, Model Predictive Vibration Control provides a guide through the necessary steps in understanding the founding ideas of predictive control applied in AVC such as: ·         the implementation of ...

  7. PDEMOD: Software for control/structures optimization

    Taylor, Lawrence W., Jr.; Zimmerman, David

    1991-01-01

    Because of the possibility of adverse interaction between the control system and the structural dynamics of large, flexible spacecraft, great care must be taken to ensure stability and system performance. Because of the high cost of insertion of mass into low earth orbit, it is prudent to optimize the roles of structure and control systems simultaneously. Because of the difficulty and the computational burden in modeling and analyzing the control structure system dynamics, the total problem is often split and treated iteratively. It would aid design if the control structure system dynamics could be represented in a single system of equations. With the use of the software PDEMOD (Partial Differential Equation Model), it is now possible to optimize structure and control systems simultaneously. The distributed parameter modeling approach enables embedding the control system dynamics into the same equations for the structural dynamics model. By doing this, the current difficulties involved in model order reduction are avoided. The NASA Mini-MAST truss is used an an example for studying integrated control structure design.

  8. Control Of Flexible Structures-2 (COFS-2) flight control, structure and gimbal system interaction study

    Fay, Stanley; Gates, Stephen; Henderson, Timothy; Sackett, Lester; Kirchwey, Kim; Stoddard, Isaac; Storch, Joel

    1988-01-01

    The second Control Of Flexible Structures Flight Experiment (COFS-2) includes a long mast as in the first flight experiment, but with the Langley 15-m hoop column antenna attached via a gimbal system to the top of the mast. The mast is to be mounted in the Space Shuttle cargo bay. The servo-driven gimbal system could be used to point the antenna relative to the mast. The dynamic interaction of the Shuttle Orbiter/COFS-2 system with the Orbiter on-orbit Flight Control System (FCS) and the gimbal pointing control system has been studied using analysis and simulation. The Orbiter pointing requirements have been assessed for their impact on allowable free drift time for COFS experiments. Three fixed antenna configurations were investigated. Also simulated was Orbiter attitude control behavior with active vernier jets during antenna slewing. The effect of experiment mast dampers was included. Control system stability and performance and loads on various portions of the COFS-2 structure were investigated. The study indicates possible undesirable interaction between the Orbiter FCS and the flexible, articulated COFS-2 mast/antenna system, even when restricted to vernier reaction jets.

  9. Controls-structures-electromagnetics interaction program

    Grantham, William L.; Bailey, Marion C.; Belvin, Wendell K.; Williams, Jeffrey P.

    1987-01-01

    A technology development program is described involving Controls Structures Electromagnetics Interaction (CSEI) for large space structures. The CSEI program was developed as part of the continuing effort following the successful kinematic deployment and RF tests of the 15 meter Hoop/Column antenna. One lesson learned was the importance of making reflector surface adjustment after fabrication and deployment. Given are program objectives, ground based test configuration, Intelsat adaptive feed, reflector shape prediction model, control experiment concepts, master schedule, and Control Of Flexible Structures-II (COFS-II) baseline configuration.

  10. Parallel computations and control of adaptive structures

    Park, K. C.; Alvin, Kenneth F.; Belvin, W. Keith; Chong, K. P. (Editor); Liu, S. C. (Editor); Li, J. C. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The equations of motion for structures with adaptive elements for vibration control are presented for parallel computations to be used as a software package for real-time control of flexible space structures. A brief introduction of the state-of-the-art parallel computational capability is also presented. Time marching strategies are developed for an effective use of massive parallel mapping, partitioning, and the necessary arithmetic operations. An example is offered for the simulation of control-structure interaction on a parallel computer and the impact of the approach presented for applications in other disciplines than aerospace industry is assessed.