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Sample records for active site residue

  1. Crystallographic B factor of critical residues at enzyme active site

    张海龙; 宋时英; 林政炯

    1999-01-01

    Thirty-seven sets of crystallographic enzyme data were selected from Protein Data Bank (PDB, 1995). The average temperature factors (B) of the critical residues at the active site and the whole molecule of those enzymes were calculated respectively. The statistical results showed that the critical residues at the active site of most of the enzymes had lower B factors than did the whole molecules, indicating that in the crystalline state the critical residues at the active site of the natural enzymes possess more stable conformation than do the whole molecules. The flexibility of the active site during the unfolding by denaturing was also discussed.

  2. Perchlorate Reductase Is Distinguished by Active Site Aromatic Gate Residues.

    Youngblut, Matthew D; Tsai, Chi-Lin; Clark, Iain C; Carlson, Hans K; Maglaqui, Adrian P; Gau-Pan, Phonchien S; Redford, Steven A; Wong, Alan; Tainer, John A; Coates, John D

    2016-04-22

    Perchlorate is an important ion on both Earth and Mars. Perchlorate reductase (PcrAB), a specialized member of the dimethylsulfoxide reductase superfamily, catalyzes the first step of microbial perchlorate respiration, but little is known about the biochemistry, specificity, structure, and mechanism of PcrAB. Here we characterize the biophysics and phylogeny of this enzyme and report the 1.86-Å resolution PcrAB complex crystal structure. Biochemical analysis revealed a relatively high perchlorate affinity (Km = 6 μm) and a characteristic substrate inhibition compared with the highly similar respiratory nitrate reductase NarGHI, which has a relatively much lower affinity for perchlorate (Km = 1.1 mm) and no substrate inhibition. Structural analysis of oxidized and reduced PcrAB with and without the substrate analog SeO3 (2-) bound to the active site identified key residues in the positively charged and funnel-shaped substrate access tunnel that gated substrate entrance and product release while trapping transiently produced chlorate. The structures suggest gating was associated with shifts of a Phe residue between open and closed conformations plus an Asp residue carboxylate shift between monodentate and bidentate coordination to the active site molybdenum atom. Taken together, structural and mutational analyses of gate residues suggest key roles of these gate residues for substrate entrance and product release. Our combined results provide the first detailed structural insight into the mechanism of biological perchlorate reduction, a critical component of the chlorine redox cycle on Earth. PMID:26940877

  3. The balance of flexibility and rigidity in the active site residues of hen egg white lysozyme

    Qi Jian-Xun; Jiang Fan

    2011-01-01

    The crystallographic temperature factors (B factor) of individual atoms contain important information about the thermal motion of the atoms in a macromolecule. Previously the theory of flexibility of active site has been established based on the observation that the enzyme activity is sensitive to low concentration denaturing agents. It has been found that the loss of enzyme activity occurs well before the disruption of the three-dimensional structural scaffold of the enzyme. To test the theory of conformational flexibility of enzyme active site, crystal structures were perturbed by soaking in low concentration guanidine hydrochloride solutions. It was found that many lysozyme crystals tested could still diffract until the concentration of guanidine hydrochloride reached 3 M. It was also found that the B factors averaged over individually collected data sets were more accurate. Thus it suggested that accurate measurement of crystal temperature factors could be achieved for medium-high or even medium resolution crystals by averaging over multiple data sets. Furthermore, we found that the correctly predicted active sites included not only the more flexible residues, but also some more rigid residues. Both the flexible and the rigid residues in the active site played an important role in forming the active site residue network, covering the majority of the substrate binding residues. Therefore, this experimental prediction method may be useful for characterizing the binding site and the function of a protein, such as drug targeting.

  4. SITE-DIRECTED MUTAGENESIS OF PROPOSED ACTIVE-SITE RESIDUES OF PENICILLIN-BINDING PROTEIN-5 FROM ESCHERICHIA-COLI

    VANDERLINDEN, MPG; DEHAAN, L; DIDEBERG, O; KECK, W

    1994-01-01

    Alignment of the amino acid sequence of penicillin-binding protein 5 (PBP5) with the sequences of other members of the family of active-site-serine penicillin-interacting enzymes predicted the residues playing a role in the catalytic mechanism of PBP5. Apart from the active-site (Ser(44)), Lys(47),

  5. Active sites residues of beef liver carnitine octanoyltransferase (COT) and carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT-II).

    Nic a'Bháird, N; Yankovskaya, V; Ramsay, R R

    1998-01-01

    The carnitine acyltransferases which catalyse the reversible transfer of fatty acyl groups between carnitine and coenzyme A have been proposed to contain a catalytic histidine. Here, the chemical reactivity of active site groups has been used to demonstrate differences between the active sites of beef liver carnitine octanoyltransferase (COT) and carnitine palmitoyltransferase-II (CPT-II). Treatment of CPT-II with the histidine-selective reagent, diethyl pyrocarbonate (DEPC), resulted in simple linear pseudo-first-order kinetics. The reversal of the inhibition by hydroxylamine and the pKa (7.1) of the modified residue indicated that the residue was a histidine. The order of the inactivation kinetics showed that 1mol of histidine was modified per mol of CPT-II.When COT was treated with DEPC the kinetics of inhibition were biphasic with an initial rapid loss of activity followed by a slower loss of activity. The residue reacting in the faster phase of inhibition was not a histidine but possibly a serine. The modification of this residue did not lead to complete loss of activity suggesting that a direct role in catalysis is unlikely. It was deduced that the residue modified by DEPC in the slower phase was a lysine and indeed fluorodinitrobenzene (FDNB) inactivated COT with linear pseudo-first-order kinetics. The COT peptide containing the FDNB-labelled lysine was isolated and sequenced. Alignment of this sequence placed it 10 amino acids downstream of the putative active-site histidine. PMID:9480926

  6. Binding stability of peptides derived from 1ALA residue and 7GLY residues to sites near active center of fluctuating papain

    Nishiyama, Katsuhiko

    2012-05-01

    We investigated the binding stability of peptides derived from 1ALA residue and 7GLY residues to sites near active center of fluctuating papain via molecular dynamics and docking simulations. Replacing GLY residue in 8GLY with ALA residue had a positive effect on binding stability to the sites in some cases although the replacing had a negative effect on it in other cases. Furthermore the replacing had a negative effect on the chance of binding to the sites. Residue in peptide should be replaced on the basis of systematic exploration of its position.

  7. Molecular Basis for Enzymatic Sulfite Oxidation -- HOW THREE CONSERVED ACTIVE SITE RESIDUES SHAPE ENZYME ACTIVITY

    Bailey, Susan; Rapson, Trevor; Johnson-Winters, Kayunta; Astashkin, Andrei; Enemark, John; Kappler, Ulrike

    2008-11-10

    Sulfite dehydrogenases (SDHs) catalyze the oxidation and detoxification of sulfite to sulfate, a reaction critical to all forms of life. Sulfite-oxidizing enzymes contain three conserved active site amino acids (Arg-55, His-57, and Tyr-236) that are crucial for catalytic competency. Here we have studied the kinetic and structural effects of two novel and one previously reported substitution (R55M, H57A, Y236F) in these residues on SDH catalysis. Both Arg-55 and His-57 were found to have key roles in substrate binding. An R55M substitution increased Km(sulfite)(app) by 2-3 orders of magnitude, whereas His-57 was required for maintaining a high substrate affinity at low pH when the imidazole ring is fully protonated. This effect may be mediated by interactions of His-57 with Arg-55 that stabilize the position of the Arg-55 side chain or, alternatively, may reflect changes in the protonation state of sulfite. Unlike what is seen for SDHWT and SDHY236F, the catalytic turnover rates of SDHR55M and SDHH57A are relatively insensitive to pH (~;;60 and 200 s-1, respectively). On the structural level, striking kinetic effects appeared to correlate with disorder (in SDHH57A and SDHY236F) or absence of Arg-55 (SDHR55M), suggesting that Arg-55 and the hydrogen bonding interactions it engages in are crucial for substrate binding and catalysis. The structure of SDHR55M has sulfate bound at the active site, a fact that coincides with a significant increase in the inhibitory effect of sulfate in SDHR55M. Thus, Arg-55 also appears to be involved in enabling discrimination between the substrate and product in SDH.

  8. Role of a cysteine residue in the active site of ERK and the MAPKK family

    Kinases of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades, including extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK), represent likely targets for pharmacological intervention in proliferative diseases. Here, we report that FR148083 inhibits ERK2 enzyme activity and TGFβ-induced AP-1-dependent luciferase expression with respective IC50 values of 0.08 and 0.05 μM. FR265083 (1'-2' dihydro form) and FR263574 (1'-2' and 7'-8' tetrahydro form) exhibited 5.5-fold less and no activity, respectively, indicating that both the α,β-unsaturated ketone and the conformation of the lactone ring contribute to this inhibitory activity. The X-ray crystal structure of the ERK2/FR148083 complex revealed that the compound binds to the ATP binding site of ERK2, involving a covalent bond to Sγ of ERK2 Cys166, hydrogen bonds with the backbone NH of Met108, Nζ of Lys114, backbone C=O of Ser153, Nδ2 of Asn154, and hydrophobic interactions with the side chains of Ile31, Val39, Ala52, and Leu156. The covalent bond motif in the ERK2/FR148083 complex assures that the inhibitor has high activity for ERK2 and no activity for other MAPKs such as JNK1 and p38MAPKα/β/γ/δ which have leucine residues at the site corresponding to Cys166 in ERK2. On the other hand, MEK1 and MKK7, kinases of the MAPKK family which also can be inhibited by FR148083, contain a cysteine residue corresponding to Cys166 of ERK2. The covalent binding to the common cysteine residue in the ATP-binding site is therefore likely to play a crucial role in the inhibitory activity for these MAP kinases. These findings on the molecular recognition mechanisms of FR148083 for kinases with Cys166 should provide a novel strategy for the pharmacological intervention of MAPK cascades

  9. The role of active site aromatic residues in substrate degradation by the human chitotriosidase.

    Eide, Kristine Bistrup; Stockinger, Linn Wilhelmsen; Lewin, Anna Sofia; Tøndervik, Anne; Eijsink, Vincent G H; Sørlie, Morten

    2016-02-01

    Human chitotriosidase (HCHT) is a glycoside hydrolase family 18 chitinase synthesized and secreted in human macrophages thought be an innate part of the human immune system. It consists of a catalytic domain with the (β/α)8 TIM barrel fold having a large area of solvent-exposed aromatic amino acids in the active site and an additional family 14 carbohydrate-binding module. To gain further insight into enzyme functionality, especially the effect of the active site aromatic residues, we expressed two variants with mutations in subsites on either side of the catalytic acid, subsite -3 (W31A) and +2 (W218A), and compared their catalytic properties on chitin and high molecular weight chitosans. Exchange of Trp to Ala in subsite -3 resulted in a 12-fold reduction in extent of degradation and a 20-fold reduction in kcat(app) on chitin, while the values are 5-fold and 10-fold for subsite +2. Moreover, aromatic residue mutation resulted in a decrease of the rate of chitosan degradation contrasting previous observations for bacterial family 18 chitinases. Interestingly, the presence of product polymers of 40 sugar moieties and higher starts to disappear already at 8% degradation for HCHT50-W31A. Such behavior contrast that of the wild type and HCHT-W218A and resembles the action of endo-nonprocessive chitinases. PMID:26621384

  10. Site-directed mutagenesis reveals the importance of conserved charged residues for the transport activity of the PheP permease of Escherichia coli.

    Pi, J; Wookey, P J; Pittard, A. J.

    1993-01-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis has been used to identify a number of charged residues essential for the transport activity of the PheP protein. These residues are highly conserved in the cluster of amino acid transporters. However, some other conserved residues and a number of aromatic residues have been shown not to be essential for transport activity.

  11. Insight into the mechanism of phosphoenolpyruvate mutase catalysis derived from site-directed mutagenesis studies of active site residues.

    Jia, Y; Lu, Z; Huang, K; Herzberg, O; Dunaway-Mariano, D

    1999-10-26

    PEP mutase catalyzes the conversion of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) to phosphonopyruvate in biosynthetic pathways leading to phosphonate secondary metabolites. A recent X-ray structure [Huang, K., Li, Z., Jia, Y., Dunaway-Mariano, D., and Herzberg, O. (1999) Structure (in press)] of the Mytilus edulis enzyme complexed with the Mg(II) cofactor and oxalate inhibitor reveals an alpha/beta-barrel backbone-fold housing an active site in which Mg(II) is bound by the two carboxylate groups of the oxalate ligand and the side chain of D85 and, via bridging water molecules, by the side chains of D58, D85, D87, and E114. The oxalate ligand, in turn, interacts with the side chains of R159, W44, and S46 and the backbone amide NHs of G47 and L48. Modeling studies identified two feasible PEP binding modes: model A in which PEP replaces oxalate with its carboxylate group interacting with R159 and its phosphoryl group positioned close to D58 and Mg(II) shifting slightly from its original position in the crystal structure, and model B in which PEP replaces oxalate with its phosphoryl group interacting with R159 and Mg(II) retaining its original position. Site-directed mutagenesis studies of the key mutase active site residues (R159, D58, D85, D87, and E114) were carried out in order to evaluate the catalytic roles predicted by the two models. The observed retention of low catalytic activity in the mutants R159A, D85A, D87A, and E114A, coupled with the absence of detectable catalytic activity in D58A, was interpreted as evidence for model A in which D58 functions in nucleophilic catalysis (phosphoryl transfer), R159 functions in PEP carboxylate group binding, and the carboxylates of D85, D87 and E114 function in Mg(II) binding. These results also provide evidence against model B in which R159 serves to mediate the phosphoryl transfer. A catalytic motif, which could serve both the phosphoryl transfer and the C-C cleavage enzymes of the PEP mutase superfamily, is proposed. PMID:10571990

  12. Mutagenesis of conserved active site residues of dihydrolipoamide succinyltransferase enhances the accumulation of α-ketoglutarate in Yarrowia lipolytica.

    Guo, Hongwei; Madzak, Catherine; Du, Guocheng; Zhou, Jingwen

    2016-01-01

    α-Ketoglutarate (α-KG) is an important intermediate in the tricarboxylic acid cycle and has broad applications. The mitochondrial ketoglutarate dehydrogenase (KGDH) complex catalyzes the oxidation of α-KG to succinyl-CoA. Disruption of KGDH, which may enhance the accumulation of α-KG theoretically, was found to be lethal to obligate aerobic cells. In this study, individual overexpression of dihydrolipoamide succinyltransferase (DLST), which serves as the inner core of KGDH, decreased overall activity of the enzyme complex. Furthermore, two conserved active site residues of DLST, His419, and Asp423 were identified. In order to determine whether these residues are engaged in enzyme reaction or not, these two conserved residues were individually mutated. Analysis of the kinetic parameters of the enzyme variants provided evidence that the catalytic reaction of DLST depended on residues His419 and Asp423. Overexpression of mutated DLST not only impaired balanced assembly of KGDH, but also disrupted the catalytic integrity of the enzyme complex. Replacement of the Asp423 residue by glutamate increased extracellular α-KG by 40 % to 50 g L(-1) in mutant strain. These observations uncovered catalytic roles of two conserved active site residues of DLST and provided clues for effective metabolic strategies for rational carbon flux control for the enhanced production of α-KG and related bioproducts. PMID:26428234

  13. Targeted reengineering of protein geranylgeranyltransferase type I selectivity functionally implicates active-site residues in protein-substrate recognition.

    Gangopadhyay, Soumyashree A; Losito, Erica L; Hougland, James L

    2014-01-21

    Posttranslational modifications are vital for the function of many proteins. Prenylation is one such modification, wherein protein geranylgeranyltransferase type I (GGTase-I) or protein farnesyltransferase (FTase) modify proteins by attaching a 20- or 15-carbon isoprenoid group, respectively, to a cysteine residue near the C-terminus of a target protein. These enzymes require a C-terminal Ca1a2X sequence on their substrates, with the a1, a2, and X residues serving as substrate-recognition elements for FTase and/or GGTase-I. While crystallographic structures of rat GGTase-I show a tightly packed and hydrophobic a2 residue binding pocket, consistent with a preference for moderately sized a2 residues in GGTase-I substrates, the functional impact of enzyme-substrate contacts within this active site remains to be determined. Using site-directed mutagenesis and peptide substrate structure-activity studies, we have identified specific active-site residues within rat GGTase-I involved in substrate recognition and developed novel GGTase-I variants with expanded/altered substrate selectivity. The ability to drastically alter GGTase-I selectivity mirrors similar behavior observed in FTase but employs mutation of a distinct set of structurally homologous active-site residues. Our work demonstrates that tunable selectivity may be a general phenomenon among multispecific enzymes involved in posttranslational modification and raises the possibility of variable substrate selectivity among GGTase-I orthologues from different organisms. Furthermore, the GGTase-I variants developed herein can serve as tools for studying GGTase-I substrate selectivity and the effects of prenylation pathway modifications on specific proteins. PMID:24344934

  14. Biochemical characterization of mutants in the active site residues of the β-galactosidase enzyme of Bacillus circulans ATCC 31382

    Bultema, Jelle B; Bas J.H. Kuipers; Lubbert Dijkhuizen

    2014-01-01

    The Bacillus circulans ATCC 31382 β-galactosidase (BgaD) is a retaining-type glycosidase of glycoside hydrolase family 2 (GH2). Its commercial enzyme preparation, Biolacta N5, is used for commercial-scale production of galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS). The BgaD active site and catalytic amino acid residues have not been studied. Using bioinformatic routines we identified two putative catalytic glutamates and two highly conserved active site histidines. The site-directed mutants E447N, E532Q, an...

  15. Identification of residues involved in nucleotidyltransferase activity of JHP933 from helicobacter pyloriby site-directed mutagenesis

    Ye Xianren

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori is a well-known bacterial pathogen involved in the development of peptic ulcer, gastric adenocarcinoma and other forms of gastric cancer. Evidence has suggested that certain strain-specific genes in the plasticity region may play key roles in the pathogenesis of H. pylori-associated gastroduodenal diseases. Therefore there is considerable interest in the strain-specific genes located in the plasticity regions of H. pylori. JHP933 is encoded by the gene in the plasticity region of H. pylori strain J99. Recently, the crystal structure of JHP933 has confirmed it as a nucleotidyltransferase (NTase superfamily protein and a putative active site has been proposed. However, no evidence from direct functional assay has been presented to confirm the active site and little is known about the functional mechanism of JHP933. Here, through superimposition with Cid1/NTP complex structures, we modelled the complex structures of JHP933 with different NTPs. Based on the models and using rational site-directed mutagenesis combined with enzymatic activity assays, we confirm the active site and identify several residues important for the nucleotidyl transferring function of JHP933. Furthermore, mutations of these active site residues result in the abolishment of the nucleotidyltransferase activity of JHP933. This work provides preliminary insight into the molecular mechanism underlying the pathophysiological role in H. pylori infection of JHP933 as a novel NTase superfamily protein.

  16. Analysis and radiological assessment of residues containing NORM materials resulting from earlier activities including modelling of typical industrial residues. Pt. 1. Historical investigation of the radiological relevance of NORM residues and concepts for site identification

    Natural radionuclides are part of the human environment and of the raw materials used. Technical processes may cause their accumulation in residues, and the result will be so-called NORM materials (Naturally occurring radioactive material). The amended Radiation Protection Ordinance (StrlSchV 2001) specifies how the public should be protected, but there are also residues dating back before the issuing of the StrlSchV 2001, the so-called NORM residues. The project intended to assess the risks resulting from these residues. It comprises four parts. Part 1 was for clarification of the radiological relevance of NORM residues and for the development of concepts to detect them. The criterion for their radiological relevance was their activity per mass unit and the material volume accumulated through the centuries. The former was calculated from a wide bibliographic search in the relevant literature on radiation protection, while the mass volume was obtained by a detailed historical search of the consumption of materials that may leave NORM residues. These are, in particular, residues from coal and ore mining and processing. To identify concrete sites, relevant data sources were identified, and a concept for identification of concrete NORM residues was developed on this basis. (orig.)

  17. A remote palm domain residue of RB69 DNA polymerase is critical for enzyme activity and influences the conformation of the active site.

    Agata Jacewicz

    Full Text Available Non-conserved amino acids that are far removed from the active site can sometimes have an unexpected effect on enzyme catalysis. We have investigated the effects of alanine replacement of residues distant from the active site of the replicative RB69 DNA polymerase, and identified a substitution in a weakly conserved palm residue (D714A, that renders the enzyme incapable of sustaining phage replication in vivo. D714, located several angstroms away from the active site, does not contact the DNA or the incoming dNTP, and our apoenzyme and ternary crystal structures of the Pol(D714A mutant demonstrate that D714A does not affect the overall structure of the protein. The structures reveal a conformational change of several amino acid side chains, which cascade out from the site of the substitution towards the catalytic center, substantially perturbing the geometry of the active site. Consistent with these structural observations, the mutant has a significantly reduced k pol for correct incorporation. We propose that the observed structural changes underlie the severe polymerization defect and thus D714 is a remote, non-catalytic residue that is nevertheless critical for maintaining an optimal active site conformation. This represents a striking example of an action-at-a-distance interaction.

  18. Mass spectrometry and site-directed mutagenesis identify several autophosphorylated residues required for the activity of PrkC, a Ser/Thr kinase from Bacillus subtilis

    Madec, Edwige; Stensballe, Allan; Kjellström, Sven; Cladière, Lionel; Obuchowski, Michal; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard; Séror, Simone J

    2003-01-01

    high mass accuracy electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and nanoelectrospray tandem mass spectrometry, we identified seven phosphorylated threonine and one serine residue in PrkCc. All the corresponding residues were replaced by systematic site-directed mutagenesis and the purified mutant...... proteins were tested for in vitro kinase activity. Single and multiple replacement of four threonine residues, clustered between residues 162 and 167 in a putative activation loop, substantially reduced kinase activity and the effect was clearly additive. Replacement of the other three threonine residues......, clustered between residues 290 and 320, had relatively little effect on activity. In contrast, substitution of Ser214, which is conserved in closely related receptor kinase-like bacterial proteins, independently affected activity and may represent a novel regulatory mechanism. When projected onto a 3D...

  19. Divergent Contributions of Conserved Active Site Residues to Transcription by Eukaryotic RNA Polymerases I and II

    Olga V. Viktorovskaya

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Multisubunit RNA polymerases (msRNAPs exhibit high sequence and structural homology, especially within their active sites, which is generally thought to result in msRNAP functional conservation. However, we show that mutations in the trigger loop (TL in the largest subunit of RNA polymerase I (Pol I yield phenotypes unexpected from studies of Pol II. For example, a well-characterized gain-of-function mutation in Pol II results in loss of function in Pol I (Pol II: rpb1- E1103G; Pol I: rpa190-E1224G. Studies of chimeric Pol II enzymes hosting Pol I or Pol III TLs suggest that consequences of mutations that alter TL dynamics are dictated by the greater enzymatic context and not solely the TL sequence. Although the rpa190-E1224G mutation diminishes polymerase activity, when combined with mutations that perturb Pol I catalysis, it enhances polymerase function, similar to the analogous Pol II mutation. These results suggest that Pol I and Pol II have different rate-limiting steps.

  20. Bromopyruvate, an active site-directed inactivator of E. coli 2-keto-4-hydroxyglutarate(KHG) aldolase, modifies glutamic acid residue-45

    E. coli KHG-aldolase (2-keto-4-hydroxyglutarate ↔ pyruvate + glyoxylate), a novel trimeric Class I aldolase, requires one active-site lysine residue (Lys 133)/subunit for Schiff-base formation as well as one arginine residue (Arg 49)/subunit for catalytic activity. The substrate analog, 3-bromopyruvate (BRPY), causes a time- and concentration-dependent loss of KHG-aldolase activity. This inactivation is regarded as active site-directed since: (a) BRPY modification results in complete loss of enzymatic activity; (b) saturation kinetics are exhibited, suggesting that a reversible complex is formed between the aldolase and BRPY prior to the rate-limiting inactivation step; (c) over 90% of the initial aldolase activity is protected by either substrate, pyruvate or KHG; (d) 1.1 mol of 14C-BRPY is bound/enzyme subunit. Peptide isolation and sequencing show that the incorporated radioactivity is associated with residue Glu-45. Denaturation of the enzyme with guanidine x HCl following treatment with excess 14C-BRPY allows for the incorporation of carbon-14 at Cys-159 and Cys-180 as well. The presence of pyruvate protects Glu-45 from being esterified but does not prevent the alkylation of the two cysteine residues. These results suggest that Glu-45 is essential for the catalytic activity of E. coli KHG-aldolase, most likely functioning as the active-site amphoteric proton donor/acceptor moiety that is involved in the overall mechanism of the reaction catalyzed by this enzyme

  1. Bromopyruvate, an active site-directed inactivator of E. coli 2-keto-4-hydroxyglutarate(KHG) aldolase, modifies glutamic acid residue-45

    Vlahos, C.J.; Dekker, E.E.

    1987-05-01

    E. coli KHG-aldolase (2-keto-4-hydroxyglutarate in equilibrium pyruvate + glyoxylate), a novel trimeric Class I aldolase, requires one active-site lysine residue (Lys 133)/subunit for Schiff-base formation as well as one arginine residue (Arg 49)/subunit for catalytic activity. The substrate analog, 3-bromopyruvate (BRPY), causes a time- and concentration-dependent loss of KHG-aldolase activity. This inactivation is regarded as active site-directed since: (a) BRPY modification results in complete loss of enzymatic activity; (b) saturation kinetics are exhibited, suggesting that a reversible complex is formed between the aldolase and BRPY prior to the rate-limiting inactivation step; (c) over 90% of the initial aldolase activity is protected by either substrate, pyruvate or KHG; (d) 1.1 mol of /sup 14/C-BRPY is bound/enzyme subunit. Peptide isolation and sequencing show that the incorporated radioactivity is associated with residue Glu-45. Denaturation of the enzyme with guanidine x HCl following treatment with excess /sup 14/C-BRPY allows for the incorporation of carbon-14 at Cys-159 and Cys-180 as well. The presence of pyruvate protects Glu-45 from being esterified but does not prevent the alkylation of the two cysteine residues. These results suggest that Glu-45 is essential for the catalytic activity of E. coli KHG-aldolase, most likely functioning as the active-site amphoteric proton donor/acceptor moiety that is involved in the overall mechanism of the reaction catalyzed by this enzyme.

  2. Residual activity criteria for decommissioning

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission development of criteria for release of facilities and sites for unrestricted use following decommissioning is described. Residual activity limits for both materials and soil are covered. The objectives are: small risk of exposure, consistency with relevant existing standards, and feasibility of demonstration of compliance by measurement. Specific aspects discussed related to establishment of limits are: appropriate risk and dose limits, identification of radionuclides to be considered, dose assessment methodology, and confirmatory measurements

  3. Identification of two catalytic residues in RAG1 that define a single active site within the RAG1/RAG2 protein complex.

    Fugmann, S D; Villey, I J; Ptaszek, L M; Schatz, D G

    2000-01-01

    During V(D)J recombination, the RAG1 and RAG2 proteins cooperate to catalyze a series of DNA bond breakage and strand transfer reactions. The structure, location, and number of active sites involved in RAG-mediated catalysis have as yet not been determined. Using protein secondary structure prediction algorithms, we have identified a region of RAG1 with possible structural similarities to the active site regions of transposases and retroviral integrases. Based on this information, we have identified two aspartic acid residues in RAG1 (D600 and D708) that function specifically in catalysis. The results support a model in which RAG1 contains a single, divalent metal ion binding active site structurally related to the active sites of transposases/integrases and responsible for all catalytic functions of the RAG protein complex. PMID:10678172

  4. Identification and clarification of the role of key active site residues in bacterial glutathione S-transferase zeta/maleylpyruvate isomerase

    Highlights: → Application of site-directed mutagenesis to probe the active site residues of glutathione-dependent maleylpyruvate isomerase. → Two conserved residues, Arg8 and Arg176, in zeta class glutathione S-transferases are critical for maleylpyruvate orientation and enolization. → Arg109, found exclusively in NagL, participates in kcat regulation. → The T11A mutant exhibited a significantly decreased Km value for glutathione with little impact on maleylpyruvate kinetics. → The Thr11 residue appears to have significance in the evolution of glutathione S-transferase classes. -- Abstract: The maleylpyruvate isomerase NagL from Ralstonia sp. strain U2, which has been structurally characterized previously, catalyzes the isomerization of maleylpyruvate to fumarylpyruvate. It belongs to the class zeta glutathione S-transferases (GSTZs), part of the cytosolic GST family (cGSTs). In this study, site-directed mutagenesis was conducted to probe the functions of 13 putative active site residues. Steady-state kinetic information for mutants in the reduced glutathione (GSH) binding site, suggested that (a) Gln64 and Asp102 interact directly with the glutamyl moiety of glutathione, (b) Gln49 and Gln64 are involved in a potential electron-sharing network that influences the ionization of the GSH thiol. The information also suggests that (c) His38, Asn108 and Arg109 interact with the GSH glycine moiety, (d) His104 has a role in the ionization of the GSH sulfur and the stabilization of the maleyl terminal carboxyl group in the reaction intermediate and (e) Arg110 influences the electron distribution in the active site and therefore the ionization of the GSH thiolate. Kinetic data for mutants altered in the substrate-binding site imply that (a) Arg8 and Arg176 are critical for maleylpyruvate orientation and enolization, and (b) Arg109 (exclusive to NagL) participates in kcat regulation. Surprisingly, the T11A mutant had a decreased GSH Km value, whereas little impact

  5. Structure-guided mutagenesis of active site residues in the dengue virus two-component protease NS2B-NS3

    Salaemae Wanisa

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The dengue virus two-component protease NS2B/NS3 mediates processing of the viral polyprotein precursor and is therefore an important determinant of virus replication. The enzyme is now intensively studied with a view to the structure-based development of antiviral inhibitors. Although 3-dimensional structures have now been elucidated for a number of flaviviral proteases, enzyme-substrate interactions are characterized only to a limited extend. The high selectivity of the dengue virus protease for the polyprotein precursor offers the distinct advantage of designing inhibitors with exquisite specificity for the viral enzyme. To identify important determinants of substrate binding and catalysis in the active site of the dengue virus NS3 protease, nine residues, L115, D129, G133, T134, Y150, G151, N152, S163 and I165, located within the S1 and S2 pockets of the enzyme were targeted by alanine substitution mutagenesis and effects on enzyme activity were fluorometrically assayed. Methods Alanine substitutions were introduced by site-directed mutagenesis at residues L115, D129, G133, T134, Y150, G151, N152, S163 and I165 and recombinant proteins were purified from overexpressing E. coli. Effects of these substitutions on enzymatic activity of the NS3 protease were assayed by fluorescence release from the synthetic model substrate GRR-amc and kinetic parameters Km, kcat and kcat/Km were determined. Results Kinetic data for mutant derivatives in the active site of the dengue virus NS3 protease were essentially in agreement with a functional role of the selected residues for substrate binding and/or catalysis. Only the L115A mutant displayed activity comparable to the wild-type enzyme, whereas mutation of residues Y150 and G151 to alanine completely abrogated enzyme activity. A G133A mutant had an approximately 10-fold reduced catalytic efficiency thus suggesting a critical role for this residue seemingly as part of the oxyanion

  6. Inhibition of Alkaline Phosphatase from Pearl Oyster Pinctada fucata by o-Phthalaldehyde: Involvement of Lysine and Histidine Residues at the Active Site

    CHEN Hongtao; XIE Liping; YU Zhenyan; ZHANG Rongqing

    2005-01-01

    Alkaline phosphatase from Pinctada fucata was inactivated by o-phthalaldehyde (OPA). The inactivation followed pseudo first-order kinetics with a second rate constant of 0.167 (mmol/L)-1·min-1 at pH 7.5 and 25°C. A Tsou's plot analysis showed that inactivation occurred upon formation of one isoindole group. The OPA-modified enzyme lost the ability to bind with the specific affinity column and the presence of substrates or competitive inhibitors protected the enzyme from inactivation. The results revealed that the OPA-reaction site was at the enzyme substrate binding site. Prior modification of the enzyme by lysine or histidine specific reagent abolished formation of the isoindole derivatives, suggesting that lysine and histidine residues were involved in the OPA-induced inactivation. Taken together, OPA inactivated the alkaline phosphatase from Pinctada fucata by cross-linking lysine and histidine residues at the active site and formed an isoindole group at the substrate binding site of the enzyme.

  7. HEU Measurements of Holdup and Recovered Residue in the Deactivation and Decommission Activities of the 321-M Reactor Fuel Fabrication Facility at the Savannah River Site

    This paper contains a summary of the holdup and material control and accountability assays conducted for the determination of highly enriched uranium in the deactivation and decommissioning of Building 321 -M at the Savannah River Site. The facility was the Reactor Fuel Fabrication Facility at SRS and assemblies and miscellaneous components for the SRS production reactors. The facility operated for 25 years. During this time thousands of uranium-aluminum-alloy production reactor fuel tubes were produced. After the facility ceased operations in 1995, all of the easily accessible U-Al was removed from the building, and only residual amounts remained. The D and D project is likely to represent an important example for D and D activities across SRS and across the Department of Energy weapons complex

  8. HEU Measurements of Holdup and Recovered Residue in the Deactivation and Decommissioning Activities of the 321-M Reactor Fuel Fabrication Facility at the Savannah River Site

    DEWBERRY, RAYMOND; SALAYMEH, SALEEM R.; CASELLA, VITO R.; MOORE, FRANK S.

    2005-03-11

    This paper contains a summary of the holdup and material control and accountability (MC&A) assays conducted for the determination of highly enriched uranium (HEU) in the deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) of Building 321-M at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The 321-M facility was the Reactor Fuel Fabrication Facility at SRS and was used to fabricate HEU fuel assemblies, lithium-aluminum target tubes, neptunium assemblies, and miscellaneous components for the SRS production reactors. The facility operated for more than 35 years. During this time thousands of uranium-aluminum-alloy (U-Al) production reactor fuel tubes were produced. After the facility ceased operations in 1995, all of the easily accessible U-Al was removed from the building, and only residual amounts remained. The bulk of this residue was located in the equipment that generated and handled small U-Al particles and in the exhaust systems for this equipment (e.g., Chip compactor, casting furnaces, log saw, lathes A & B, cyclone separator, Freon{trademark} cart, riser crusher, ...etc). The D&D project is likely to represent an important example for D&D activities across SRS and across the Department of Energy weapons complex. The Savannah River National Laboratory was tasked to conduct holdup assays to quantify the amount of HEU on all components removed from the facility prior to placing in solid waste containers. The U-235 holdup in any single component of process equipment must not exceed 50 g in order to meet the container limit. This limit was imposed to meet criticality requirements of the low level solid waste storage vaults. Thus the holdup measurements were used as guidance to determine if further decontamination of equipment was needed to ensure that the quantity of U-235 did not exceed the 50 g limit and to ensure that the waste met the Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) of the solid waste storage vaults. Since HEU is an accountable nuclear material, the holdup assays and assays of recovered

  9. HEU measurements of holdup and recovered residue in the deactivation and decommission activities of the 321-M Reactor Fuel Fabrication Facility at the Savannah River Site

    This paper contains a summary of the holdup and material control and accountability (MC and A) assays conducted for the determination of highly enriched uranium (HEU) in the deactivation and decommissioning (D and D) of the Reactor Fuel Fabrication Facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The facility was used to fabricate HEU fuel assemblies, lithium-aluminum target tubes, neptunium assemblies, and miscellaneous components for the SRS production reactors. The facility operated for more than 35 years. During this time thousands of uranium-aluminum alloy (U-Al) production reactor fuel tubes were produced. After the facility ceased operations in 1995, all of the easily accessible U-Al was removed from the building, and only residual amounts remained. The bulk of this residue was located in the equipment that generated and handled small U-Al particles and in the exhaust systems for this equipment (e.g., chip compactor, casting furnaces, log saw, lathes A and B, cyclone separator, FreonTM cart, riser crusher, ..., etc). The D and D project is likely to represent an important example for D and D activities across SRS and across the Department of Energy weapons complex. The Savannah River National Laboratory was tasked to conduct holdup assays to quantify the amount of HEU on all components removed from the facility prior to placing in solid waste containers. The 235U holdup in any single component of process equipment must not exceed 50 g in order to meet the container limit. This limit was imposed to meet criticality requirements of the low level solid waste storage vaults. Thus, the holdup measurements were used as guidance to determine if further decontamination of equipment was needed to ensure that the quantity of 235U did not exceed the 50 g limit and to ensure that the waste met the Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) of the solid waste storage vaults. Since HEU is an accountable nuclear material, the holdupassays and assays of recovered residue were also important

  10. Combining specificity determining and conserved residues improves functional site prediction

    Gelfand Mikhail S

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Predicting the location of functionally important sites from protein sequence and/or structure is a long-standing problem in computational biology. Most current approaches make use of sequence conservation, assuming that amino acid residues conserved within a protein family are most likely to be functionally important. Most often these approaches do not consider many residues that act to define specific sub-functions within a family, or they make no distinction between residues important for function and those more relevant for maintaining structure (e.g. in the hydrophobic core. Many protein families bind and/or act on a variety of ligands, meaning that conserved residues often only bind a common ligand sub-structure or perform general catalytic activities. Results Here we present a novel method for functional site prediction based on identification of conserved positions, as well as those responsible for determining ligand specificity. We define Specificity-Determining Positions (SDPs, as those occupied by conserved residues within sub-groups of proteins in a family having a common specificity, but differ between groups, and are thus likely to account for specific recognition events. We benchmark the approach on enzyme families of known 3D structure with bound substrates, and find that in nearly all families residues predicted by SDPsite are in contact with the bound substrate, and that the addition of SDPs significantly improves functional site prediction accuracy. We apply SDPsite to various families of proteins containing known three-dimensional structures, but lacking clear functional annotations, and discusse several illustrative examples. Conclusion The results suggest a better means to predict functional details for the thousands of protein structures determined prior to a clear understanding of molecular function.

  11. Residues from nuclear testing at the test site Azgir

    The Azgir test site is situated in the western part of the Republic of Kazakhstan, about 180 km north of the Caspian Sea. The Azgir test site was used for conducting peaceful nuclear explosions from 1966 to 1979. 17 underground tests were carried out in 10 wells which created 9 special cavities in the salt with depths from 160 to 1500 m. The total volume of these cavities is about 1,000,000 cubic meter. Resulting from this activity, there is an environmental contamination that may have affected population living in the adjacent areas. The results of investigations of radiological conditions that were performed after the closing of the Azgir test site, and current activities of international and Kazakhstan's institutions for studying residues from nuclear tests are also discussed in this report. (author)

  12. Identification of essential residues for binding and activation in the human 5-HT7(a receptor by molecular modeling and site-directed mutagenesis

    Agata Antonina Rita Impellizzeri

    2015-05-01

    We examined molecular determinants of ligand binding and G protein activation by the human 5-HT7(a receptor. The role of several key residues in the 7th transmembrane domain and helix 8 were elucidated combining in silico and experimental mutagenesis. Several single and two double point mutations of the 5-HT7(a wild type receptor were made (W7.33V, E7.35T, E7.35R, E7.35D, E7.35A, R7.36V, Y7.43A, Y7.43F, Y7.43T, R8.52D, D8.53K; E7.35T-R7.36V, R8.52D-D8.53K, and their effects upon ligand binding were assessed by radioligand binding using a potent agonist (5-CT and a potent antagonist (SB269970. In addition, the ability of the mutated 5-HT7(a receptors to activate G protein after 5-HT-stimulation was determined through activation of adenylyl cyclase. In silico investigation on mutated receptors substantiated the predicted importance of TM7 and showed critical roles of residues E7.35, W7.33, R7.36 and Y7.43 in agonist and antagonist binding and conformational changes of receptor structure affecting adenylyl cyclase activation. Experimental data showed that mutants E7.35T and E7.35R were incapable of ligand binding and adenylyl cyclase activation, consistent with a requirement for a negatively charged residue at this position. The mutant R8.52D was unable to activate adenylyl cyclase, despite unaffected ligand binding, consistent with the R8.52 residue playing an important role in the receptor-G protein interface. The mutants Y7.43A and Y7.43T displayed reduced agonist binding and AC agonist potency, not seen in Y7.43F, consistent with a requirement for an aromatic residue at this position. Knowledge of the molecular interactions important in h5-HT7 receptor ligand binding and G protein activation will aid the design of selective h5-HT7 receptor ligands for potential pharmacological use.

  13. The chemical properties and functional role of a lysine residue within the active site of native sodium and potassium ion-activated adenosinetriphosphatase

    The peptide, HLLVMKGAPER, which contains Lysine 501 of the α polypeptide can be released from intact sodium and potassium ion activated adenosinetriphosphatase by tryptic digestion. An immunoadsorbent directed against the carboxy-terminal, -GAPER, has been constructed. Sealed, right-side-out vesicles, prepared from canine renal kidneys, were labeled with pyridoxal phosphate and sodium [3H]borohydride in the absence or presence of saponin, respectively. Large increases in the incorporation of radioactivity into the peptides bound by the immunoadsorbent were observed in the digest obtained from the vesicles exposed to saponin. From the results of several control experiments examining the labeling reaction it could be concluded that the increase in the extent of modification was due to the cytoplasmic disposition of this segment in the native enzyme

  14. The chemical properties and functional role of a lysine residue within the active site of native sodium and potassium ion-activated adenosinetriphosphatase

    Xu, K.Y.

    1988-01-01

    The peptide, HLLVMKGAPER, which contains Lysine 501 of the {alpha} polypeptide can be released from intact sodium and potassium ion activated adenosinetriphosphatase by tryptic digestion. An immunoadsorbent directed against the carboxy-terminal, -GAPER, has been constructed. Sealed, right-side-out vesicles, prepared from canine renal kidneys, were labeled with pyridoxal phosphate and sodium ({sup 3}H)borohydride in the absence or presence of saponin, respectively. Large increases in the incorporation of radioactivity into the peptides bound by the immunoadsorbent were observed in the digest obtained from the vesicles exposed to saponin. From the results of several control experiments examining the labeling reaction it could be concluded that the increase in the extent of modification was due to the cytoplasmic disposition of this segment in the native enzyme.

  15. Identification of essential residues in 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase. Chemical modification and site-directed mutagenesis to investigate the role of cysteine and histidine residues in enzymatic activity.

    Lee, J; Gravel, M; Gao, E; O'Neill, R C; Braun, P E

    2001-05-01

    2',3'-Cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNP; EC ) catalyzes in vitro hydrolysis of 3'-phosphodiester bonds in 2',3'-cyclic nucleotides to produce 2'-nucleotides exclusively. N-terminal deletion mapping of the C-terminal two-thirds of recombinant rat CNP1 identified a region that possesses the catalytic domain, with further truncations abolishing activity. Proteolysis and kinetic analysis indicated that this domain forms a compact globular structure and contains all of the catalytically essential features. Subsequently, this catalytic fragment of CNP1 (CNP-CF) was used for chemical modification studies to identify amino acid residues essential for activity. 5,5'-Dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) modification studies and kinetic analysis of cysteine CNP-CF mutants revealed the nonessential role of cysteines for enzymatic activity. On the other hand, modification studies with diethyl pyrocarbonate indicated that two histidines are essential for CNPase activity. Consequently, the only two conserved histidines, His-230 and His-309, were mutated to phenylalanine and leucine. All four histidine mutants had k(cat) values 1000-fold lower than wild-type CNP-CF, but K(m) values were similar. Circular dichroism studies demonstrated that the low catalytic activities of the histidine mutants were not due to gross changes in secondary structure. Taken together, these results demonstrate that both histidines assume critical roles for catalysis. PMID:11278504

  16. Single Residue Mutation in Active Site of Serine Acetyltransferase Isoform 3 from Entamoeba histolytica Assists in Partial Regaining of Feedback Inhibition by Cysteine

    Kumar, Sudhir; Mazumder, Mohit; Dharavath, Sudhaker; Gourinath, S.

    2013-01-01

    The cysteine biosynthetic pathway is essential for survival of the protist pathogen Entamoeba histolytica, and functions by producing cysteine for countering oxidative attack during infection in human hosts. Serine acetyltransferase (SAT) and O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase (OASS) are involved in cysteine biosynthesis and are present in three isoforms each. While EhSAT1 and EhSAT2 are feedback inhibited by end product cysteine, EhSAT3 is nearly insensitive to such inhibition. The active site res...

  17. Investigation of the Role of Cytochrome P450 2B4 Active Site Residues in Substrate Metabolism Based on Crystal Structures of the Ligand-bound Enzyme

    Hernandez, Cynthia E.; Kumar, Santosh; Liu, Hong; Halpert, James R.

    2006-01-01

    Based on the x-ray crystal structures of 4-(4-chlorophenyl)imidazole (4-CPI)- and bifonazole (BIF)-bound P450 2B4, eight active site mutants at six positions were created in an N-terminal modified construct termed 2B4dH and characterized for enzyme inhibition and catalysis. I363A showed a > 4-fold decrease in differential inhibition by BIF and 4-CPI (IC50,BIF/IC50,4-CPI). F296A, T302A, I363A, V367A, and V477A showed a ≥ 2-fold decreased kcat for 7-ethoxy-4-trifluoromethylcoumarin O-deethylati...

  18. Contaminated Sites by Residues from Romanian Industry

    Full text: In Romania, the mining industries of ferrous ore, non-ferrous ore, bauxite, coal, chemical fertilisers, the extraction of natural gas and oil, etc. have a considerable weight in economy. The study lets us know that in these industries, in different by-products and waste from the process, some radionuclides come out. The preliminary data, which are determined in these industries, are compared with those data, which are published by the countries from EU. There were determined uranium, radium and thorium from ore and sterile (ferrous, non-ferrous, bauxite, talc, clay, asbestos, barytine, salt, coal and bituminous schist). Also, there have been determined the radium and the uranium content of waters from non-uraniferous mining sites. The level of radioactive noxa has been informative determined in each mine. The level of the concentrations requires a systematic research and an assessment of the risk and the impact against the environment, the workers, and the public. (author)

  19. Site-specific mutagenesis of histidine residues in the lac permease of Escherichia coli.

    Padan, E; Sarkar, H K; Viitanen, P V; Poonian, M S; Kaback, H R

    1985-01-01

    The lacY gene of Escherichia coli, which encodes the lac permease, has been modified by oligonucleotide-directed, site-specific mutagenesis such that each of the four histidine residues in the molecule is replaced with an arginine residue. Replacement of histidine-35 and histidine-39 with arginine has no apparent effect on permease activity. In contrast, replacement of either histidine-205 or histidine-322 by arginine causes a dramatic loss of transport activity, although the cells contain a ...

  20. Inventory of sites used to develop residual radioactivity criteria

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in conjunction with the National Conference of Radiation Control Program Directors (CRCPD), has compiled an inventory of never licensed or otherwise poorly documented sites that may be contaminated with radioactive materials. This effort is in support of the EPA's development of radiation protection criteria for residual radioactivity at decommissioned sites. The inventory will help to establish the range of circumstances for which criteria are needed, as well as the suitability of candidate criteria for actual situations. The information will also be used to develop model sites and facilities for analyzing technical and economic feasibility of residual radioactivity criteria and to assess costs and benefits of alternate criteria. Relevant information about each site, such as radionuclides, waste forms, and quantities present will be included in the inventory when such information is available. The CRCPD has requested that each State radiation control agency furnish the information for the inventory. The inventory supplements the relatively extensive documentation of sites regulated by Federal or State agencies with information on old or unlicensed sites, such as old waste storage sites or radium ore processing facilities

  1. Combined Use of Residual Dipolar Couplings and Solution X-ray Scattering To Rapidly Probe Rigid-Body Conformational Transitions in a Non-phosphorylatable Active-Site Mutant of the 128 kDa Enzyme I Dimer

    Takayama, Yuki; Schwieters, Charles D.; Grishaev, Alexander; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Clore, G. Marius (NIH)

    2012-10-23

    The first component of the bacterial phosphotransferase system, enzyme I (EI), is a multidomain 128 kDa dimer that undergoes large rigid-body conformational transitions during the course of its catalytic cycle. Here we investigate the solution structure of a non-phosphorylatable active-site mutant in which the active-site histidine is substituted by glutamine. We show that perturbations in the relative orientations and positions of the domains and subdomains can be rapidly and reliably determined by conjoined rigid-body/torsion angle/Cartesian simulated annealing calculations driven by orientational restraints from residual dipolar couplings and shape and translation information afforded by small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering. Although histidine and glutamine are isosteric, the conformational space available to a Gln side chain is larger than that for the imidazole ring of His. An additional hydrogen bond between the side chain of Gln189 located on the EIN{sup {alpha}/{beta}} subdomain and an aspartate (Asp129) on the EIN{sup {alpha}} subdomain results in a small ({approx}9{sup o}) reorientation of the EIN{sup {alpha}} and EIN{sup {alpha}/{beta}} subdomains that is in turn propagated to a larger reorientation ({approx}26{sup o}) of the EIN domain relative to the EIC dimerization domain, illustrating the positional sensitivity of the EIN domain and its constituent subdomains to small structural perturbations.

  2. Evidence for Participation of Remote Residues in the Catalytic Activity of Co-type Nitrile Hydratase from Pseudomonas putida†

    Brodkin, Heather R.; Novak, Walter R. P.; Milne, Amy C.; D’Aquino, J. Alejandro; Karabacak, N. M.; Agar, Jeffrey N.; Payne, Mark S.; Petsko, Gregory A; Ondrechen, Mary Jo; Ringe, Dagmar

    2011-01-01

    Active sites may be regarded as layers of residues, whereby the residues that interact directly with substrate also interact with residues in a second shell, and these in turn interact with residues in a third shell. These residues in the second and third layers may have distinct roles in maintaining the essential chemical properties of the first-shell catalytic residues, particularly their spatial arrangement relative to the substrate binding pocket, and their electrostatic and dynamic prope...

  3. Study on indium leaching from mechanically activated hard zinc residue

    Yao J.H.; Li X.H.; Li Y.W.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, changes in physicochemical properties and leachability of indium from mechanically activated hard zinc residue by planetary mill were investigated. The results showed that mechanical activation increased specific surface area, reaction activity of hard zinc residue, and decreased its particle size, which had a positive effect on indium extraction from hard zinc residue in hydrochloric acid solution. Kinetics of indium leaching from unmilled and activated hard zinc residue...

  4. Residual Environmental Contamination at a Former Ferroniobium Production Site in Belgium

    From an aerial gamma survey, a site with residues from a former ferroniobium production facility was identified. In close collaboration with the current site operator, an inventory of the mineral residue piled on the ground was made and the material was characterized in terms of its radionuclide content (<1–12 and <1–60 Bq/g for radionuclides of the uranium and thorium decay series, respectively). The possibilities for total or partial use of this kind of heterogeneous material were evaluated and were mostly hindered by its chemical composition. Since it was documented that the residues had been used in the past for the levelling and filling of the site, a systematic gamma screening survey of the whole site was performed at ground level. Gamma dose rates of up to 6 μSv/h were detected at certain locations. Residues with elevated radionuclide concentrations were found to have been buried to depths of up to 1.5 m. In two measurement campaigns, the shallow and deep groundwater was screened for gross alpha and beta activity and for its chemical composition. Gross alpha and beta activity concentrations of up to 1000 and 6000 mBq/L, respectively, were found. At some locations, the pH reached a value of 12.9, as a result of past contamination by a certain calcium product. Short term and long term strategies for the cleanup process are currently under discussion. (author)

  5. Rehabilitation of storage sites for low radioactive uranium ore treatment residues. The example of the Ecarpiere Cogema's site (Loire-Atlantique, France)

    The rehabilitation of storage sites for residues of ore treatment represents the ultimate phase of this industrial activity and belongs to the ore processing cycle. In order to respect the enforced regulation, the objectives consist in ensuring the durable stability of the site and keeping all the residual environmental impacts as low as reasonably achievable. This paper presents the example of the rehabilitation of the Ecarpiere Cogema's site (Loire-Atlantique, France) where 7500000 t of uranium ore residues are stored. The preliminary studies (petrography and mineralogy of residues, hydrogeology, geotechnical study, cover definition, embankments stability), the works (plant dismantling, basins filling, embankments re-profiling, draining and revegetation), and the site surveillance (geotechnical and radiometric) are described. (J.S.)

  6. DOE site performance assessment activities

    Information on performance assessment capabilities and activities was collected from eight DOE sites. All eight sites either currently dispose of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) or plan to dispose of LLW in the near future. A survey questionnaire was developed and sent to key individuals involved in DOE Order 5820.2A performance assessment activities at each site. The sites surveyed included: Hanford Site (Hanford), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site (NTS), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (Paducah), Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (Portsmouth), and Savannah River Site (SRS). The questionnaire addressed all aspects of the performance assessment process; from waste source term to dose conversion factors. This report presents the information developed from the site questionnaire and provides a comparison of site-specific performance assessment approaches, data needs, and ongoing and planned activities. All sites are engaged in completing the radioactive waste disposal facility performance assessment required by DOE Order 5820.2A. Each site has achieved various degrees of progress and have identified a set of critical needs. Within several areas, however, the sites identified common needs and questions

  7. Derivation of uranium residual radioactive material guidelines for the Shpack site

    Residual radioactive material guidelines for uranium were derived for the Shpack site in Norton, Massachusetts. This site has been identified for remedial action under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The uranium guidelines were derived on the basis of the requirement that the 50-year committed effective dose equivalent to a hypothetical individual who lives or works in the immediate vicinity of the Shpack site should not exceed a dose of 100 mrem/yr following decontamination. The DOE residual radioactive material guideline computer code, RESRAD, which implements the methodology described in the DOE manual for implementing residual radioactive material guidelines, was used in this evaluation. Three potential scenarios were considered for the site; the scenarios vary with regard to time spent at the site, sources of water used, and sources of food consumed. The results of the evaluation indicate that the basic dose limit of 100 mrem/yr will not be exceeded for uranium (including uranium-234, uranium-235, and uranium-238) within 1000 years, provided that the soil concentration of combined uranium (uranium-234 and uranium-238) at the Shpack site does not exceed the following levels: 2500 pCi/g for Scenario A (recreationist: the expected scenario); 1100 pCi/g for Scenario B (industrial worker: a plausible scenario); and 53 pCi/g for Scenario C (resident farmer using a well water as the only water source: a possible but unlikely scenario). The uranium guidelines derived in this report apply to the combined activity concentration of uranium-234 and uranium-238 and were calculated on the basis of a dose of 100 mrem/yr. In setting the actual uranium guidelines for the Shpack site, DOE will apply the as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) policy to the decision-making process, along with other factors, such as whether a particular scenario is reasonable and appropriate. 8 refs., 2 figs., 8 tabs

  8. Derivation of uranium residual radioactive material guidelines for the Aliquippa Forge site

    Residual radioactive material guidelines for uranium were derived for the Aliquippa Forge site in Aliquippa, Pennsylvania. This site has been identified for remedial action under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The uranium guidelines were derived on the basis of the requirement that the 50-year committed effective dose equivalent to a hypothetical individual who lives or works in the immediate vicinity of the Aliquippa Forge site should not exceed a dose of 100 mrem/yr following decontamination. The DOE residual radioactive material guideline computer code, RESRAD, which implements the methodology described in the DOE manual for implementing residual radioactive material guidelines, was used in this evaluation. Four potential scenarios were considered for the site; the scenarios vary with regard to time spent at the site, sources of water used, and sources of food consumed. The results of the evaluation indicate that the basic dose limit of 100 mrem/yr will not be exceeded for uranium within 1,000 years, provided that the soil concentration of combined uranium (uranium-234, uranium-235, and uranium-238) at the Aliquippa Forge site does not exceed the following levels: 1,700 pCi/g for Scenario A (industrial worker: the expected scenario); 3,900 pCi/g for Scenario B (recreationist: a plausible scenario); 20 pCi/g for Scenario C (resident farmer using well water as the only water source: a possible but unlikely scenario), and 530 pCi/g for Scenario D (resident farmer using a distant water source not affected by site conditions as the only water source: a possible but unlikely scenario). The uranium guidelines derived in this report apply to the combined activity concentration of uranium-234, uranium-235, and uranium-238 and were calculated on the basis of a dose of 100 mrem/yr

  9. A radiographic study on the prevalence of knife-edge residual alveolar ridge at proposed dental implant sites

    Dental implants are widely used in restoration of completely or partially edentulous dental arches. Before placement of endosseous implants in the jaws, both the quantity and quality of the residual ridge must be assessed radiographically. Remodeling activity after tooth extraction is localized primarily at the crestal area of the residual ridges, resulting in reduction of the height of bone and creation of various three-dimensional shapes of the residual ridges. When bone resorption at the lingual and buccal aspects is greater than that at the crestal area, a knife-edge type of residual ridge develops. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of the knife-edge morphology of the residual alveolar bone at proposed implant sites in partially or completely edentulous patients. Computed tomography (CT) cross-sectional images of the upper and lower jaws were assessed at the proposed sites before implant placement. Images of 258 proposed implant sites belonging to 30 patients were assessed radiographically. In 120 proposed implant sites out of 258 (46.5%), the residual alveolar ridge had a knife-edge configuration, the majority belonging to completely edentulous patients who lost their teeth more than ten years previously. High prevalence of knife-edge ridge was found, therefore, replacement of missing teeth by immediate implant is recommended to prevent atrophy or knife-edge morphology of the residual ridge. (author)

  10. Site-directed Mutagenesis of Cysteine Residues in Phi-class Glutathione S-transferase F3 from Oryza sativa

    To elucidate the roles of cysteine residues in rice Phi-class GST F3, in this study, all three cysteine residues were replaced with alanine by site-directed mutagenesis in order to obtain mutants C22A, C73A and C77A. Three mutant enzymes were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to electrophoretic homogeneity by affinity chromatography on immobilized GSH. The substitutions of Cys73 and Cys77 residues in OsGSTF3 with alanine did not affect the glutathione conjugation activities, showing non-essentiality of these residues. On the other hand, the substitution of Cys22 residue with alanine resulted in approximately a 60% loss of specific activity toward ethacrynic acid. Moreover, the KmCDNB value of the mutant C22A was approximately 2.2 fold larger than that of the wild type. From these results, the evolutionally conserved cysteine 22 residue seems to participate rather in the structural stability of the active site in OsGSTF3 by stabilizing the electrophilic substrates-binding site's conformation than in the substrate binding directly

  11. A coevolutionary residue network at the site of a functionally important conformational change in a phosphohexomutase enzyme family.

    Yingying Lee

    Full Text Available Coevolution analyses identify residues that co-vary with each other during evolution, revealing sequence relationships unobservable from traditional multiple sequence alignments. Here we describe a coevolutionary analysis of phosphomannomutase/phosphoglucomutase (PMM/PGM, a widespread and diverse enzyme family involved in carbohydrate biosynthesis. Mutual information and graph theory were utilized to identify a network of highly connected residues with high significance. An examination of the most tightly connected regions of the coevolutionary network reveals that most of the involved residues are localized near an interdomain interface of this enzyme, known to be the site of a functionally important conformational change. The roles of four interface residues found in this network were examined via site-directed mutagenesis and kinetic characterization. For three of these residues, mutation to alanine reduces enzyme specificity to ~10% or less of wild-type, while the other has ~45% activity of wild-type enzyme. An additional mutant of an interface residue that is not densely connected in the coevolutionary network was also characterized, and shows no change in activity relative to wild-type enzyme. The results of these studies are interpreted in the context of structural and functional data on PMM/PGM. Together, they demonstrate that a network of coevolving residues links the highly conserved active site with the interdomain conformational change necessary for the multi-step catalytic reaction. This work adds to our understanding of the functional roles of coevolving residue networks, and has implications for the definition of catalytically important residues.

  12. Proposed plan for remedial action at the quarry residuals operable unit of the Weldon Spring Site

    This proposed plan addresses the management of contamination present in various components of the quarry residuals operable unit (QROU) of the Weldon Spring site, which is located in St. Charles County, Missouri. The QROU consists of (1) residual waste at the quarry proper; (2) the Femme Osage Slough, Little Femme Osage Creek, and Femme Osage Creek; and (3) quarry groundwater located primarily north of the slough. Potential impacts to the St. Charles County well field downgradient of the quarry area are also being addressed as part of the evaluations for this operable unit. Remedial activities for the QROU will be conducted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended. As part of the remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) process required for the QROU under CERCLA, three major evaluation documents have been prepared to support cleanup decisions for this operable unit. decisions for this operable unit

  13. Derivation of uranium residual radioactive material guidelines for the Elza Gate Site

    Residual radioactive material guidelines for uranium were derived for a large, homogeneously contaminated area at the Elza Gate Site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The derivation of the single-nuclide and total uranium guidelines was based on the requirement that the 50-year committed effective dose equivalent to hypothetical individual who lives or works in the immediate vicinity of the Elza Gate Site should not exceed a dose of 100 mrem/yr following decontamination. The DOE residual radioactive guideline computer code RESRAD was used in this evaluation. Four potential scenarios were considered for the site; the scenarios vary with regard to time spent at the site, sources of water used, and sources of food consumed. The results of the evaluation indicate that the basic dose limit of 100 mrem/yr will not be exceeded for uranium within 1000 years, provided that the soil concentration of uranium at the Elza Gate Site does not exceed the following levels: 1800 pCi/g for Scenario A (industrial worker: the expected scenario); 4000 pCi/g for Scenario B (recreationist: a plausible scenario); 470 pCi/g for Scenario C (resident farmer using pond water as the only water source: a possible but unlikely scenario); and 120 pCi/g for Scenario D (resident farmer using well water as the only water source: a possible but unlikely scenario). The uranium guideline applies to the total activity concentration of uranium isotopes in their natural activity concentration ratio of 1:1: 0.046. These guidelines are calculated on the basis of a dose of 100 mrem/yr. In setting the actual uranium guideline for the Elza Gate Site, the DOE will apply the as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) policy to the decision-making process, along with other factors, such as determining whether a particular scenario is reasonable and appropriate. 10 refs., 3 figs., 7 tabs

  14. Residual Chromium in Leather by Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis

    S. Okoh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Most tanning processes employ the use of chromium sulphate. For chromium tanned leather, finished products may contain high amount of residual chromium. This may pose some health hazards, since chromium is known to be toxic at elevated concentration. This justifies the need for the study. Approach: Various samples of leather were collected from a tannery, a leather crafts market, a leather dump site and from local tanners all in Kano, Nigeria in 2009. The samples were irradiated for 6 h in the inner site of the Nigerian Research Reactor (NIRR-1 at a flux of 5×1011 ncm-2 sec-1. Results: After evaluating the spectrum, the mean results for chromium in the samples were determined as 2.33±0.3, 2.23±0.3 and 2.93±0.4% for samples from the tannery, leather crafts market and leather dump sites respectively. Chromium concentration in samples collected from local tanners who use tannins from Acacia nilotica as tanning agent was below the detection limit of Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA technique used in the study. Conclusion: Although, the concentrations of chromium in the analysed samples were not much higher than what were obtained in literature, they may be enough to sensitize the population that is allergic to chromium.

  15. Derivation of guidelines for uranium residual radioactive material in soil at the Colonie Site, Colonie, New York

    Residual radioactive material guidelines for uranium in soil were derived for the Colonie site located in Colonie, New York. This site has been designated for remedial action under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The site became contaminated with radioactive material as a result of operations conducted by National Lead (NL) Industries from 1958 to 1984; these activities included brass foundry operations, electroplating of metal products, machining of various components using depleted uranium, and limited work with small amounts of enriched uranium and thorium. The Colonie site comprises the former NL Industries property, now designated the Colonie Interim Storage Site (CISS), and 56 vicinity properties contaminated by fallout from airborne emissions; 53 of the vicinity properties were previously remediated between 1984 and 1988. In 1984, DOE accepted ownership of the CISS property from NL Industries. Residual radioactive material guidelines for individual radionuclides and total uranium were derived on the basis of the requirement that the 50-year committed effective dose equivalent to a hypothetical individual who lives or works in the immediate vicinity of the site should not exceed a dose of 30 mrem/yr following remedial action for the current use and likely future use scenarios or a dose of 100 mrem/yr for less likely future use scenarios. The DOE residual radioactive material guideline computer code, RESRAD, was used in this evaluation; RESRAD implements the methodology described in the DOE manual for establishing residual radioactive material guidelines

  16. Fluorescence energy transfer studies on the active site of papain

    Henes, Jill B.; Briggs, Martha S.; Sligar, Stephen G.; Fruton, Joseph S.

    1980-01-01

    Measurements have been performed of the excited-state lifetimes and fluorescence yields of papain tryptophan units when acyl derivatives of Phe-glycinal are bound at the active site of the enzyme. The enhancement of tryptophan fluorescence in complexes of papain with the acetyl or benzyloxycarbonyl derivatives is not stereospecific with respect to the configuration of the phenylalanyl residue, and the L and D isomers are equally effective as active-site-directed inhibitors of papain action. E...

  17. Study on indium leaching from mechanically activated hard zinc residue

    Yao J.H.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, changes in physicochemical properties and leachability of indium from mechanically activated hard zinc residue by planetary mill were investigated. The results showed that mechanical activation increased specific surface area, reaction activity of hard zinc residue, and decreased its particle size, which had a positive effect on indium extraction from hard zinc residue in hydrochloric acid solution. Kinetics of indium leaching from unmilled and activated hard zinc residue were also investigated, respectively. It was found that temperature had an obvious effect on indium leaching rate. Two different kinetic models corresponding to reactions which are diffusion controlled, [1-(1- x1/3]2=kt and (1-2x/3-(1-x2/3=kt were used to describe the kinetics of indium leaching from unmilled sample and activated sample, respectively. Their activation energies were determined to be 17.89 kJ/mol (umilled and 11.65 kJ/mol (activated within the temperature range of 30°C to 90°C, which is characteristic for a diffusion controlled process. The values of activation energy demonstrated that the leaching reaction of indium became less sensitive to temperature after hard zinc residue mechanically activated by planetary mill.

  18. Derivation of residual radioactive material guidelines for uranium in soil at the Middlesex Sampling Plant Site, Middlesex, New Jersey

    Residual radioactive material guidelines for uranium in soil were derived for the Middlesex Sampling Plant (MSP) site in Middlesex, New Jersey. This site has been designated for remedial action under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) of the US Department of Energy. The site became contaminated from operations conducted in support of the Manhattan Engineer District (MED) and the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) between 1943 and 1967. Activities conducted at the site included sampling, storage, and shipment of uranium, thorium, and beryllium ores and residues. Uranium guidelines for single radioisotopes and total uranium were derived on the basis of the requirement that the 50-year committed effective dose equivalent to a hypothetical individual living or working in the immediate vicinity of the MSP site should not exceed a dose of 30 mrem/yr following remedial action for the current-use and likely future-use scenarios or a dose of 100 mrem/yr for less likely future-use scenarios. The RESRAD computer code, which implements the methodology described in the DOE manual for establishing residual radioactive material guidelines, was used in this evaluation. Four scenarios were considered for the site. These scenarios vary regarding future land use at the site, sources of water used, and sources of food consumed

  19. Identification of critical residues of the mycobacterial dephosphocoenzyme a kinase by site-directed mutagenesis.

    Guneet Walia

    Full Text Available Dephosphocoenzyme A kinase performs the transfer of the γ-phosphate of ATP to dephosphocoenzyme A, catalyzing the last step of coenzyme A biosynthesis. This enzyme belongs to the P-loop-containing NTP hydrolase superfamily, all members of which posses a three domain topology consisting of a CoA domain that binds the acceptor substrate, the nucleotide binding domain and the lid domain. Differences in the enzymatic organization and regulation between the human and mycobacterial counterparts, have pointed out the tubercular CoaE as a high confidence drug target (HAMAP database. Unfortunately the absence of a three-dimensional crystal structure of the enzyme, either alone or complexed with either of its substrates/regulators, leaves both the reaction mechanism unidentified and the chief players involved in substrate binding, stabilization and catalysis unknown. Based on homology modeling and sequence analysis, we chose residues in the three functional domains of the enzyme to assess their contributions to ligand binding and catalysis using site-directed mutagenesis. Systematically mutating the residues from the P-loop and the nucleotide-binding site identified Lys14 and Arg140 in ATP binding and the stabilization of the phosphoryl intermediate during the phosphotransfer reaction. Mutagenesis of Asp32 and Arg140 showed catalytic efficiencies less than 5-10% of the wild type, indicating the pivotal roles played by these residues in catalysis. Non-conservative substitution of the Leu114 residue identifies this leucine as the critical residue from the hydrophobic cleft involved in leading substrate, DCoA binding. We show that the mycobacterial enzyme requires the Mg(2+ for its catalytic activity. The binding energetics of the interactions of the mutant enzymes with the substrates were characterized in terms of their enthalpic and entropic contributions by ITC, providing a complete picture of the effects of the mutations on activity. The properties of

  20. On-site treatment and landfilling of MSWI air pollution control residues

    Lundtorp, Kasper; Jensen, Dorthe Lærke; Sørensen, Mette Abildgaard;

    2003-01-01

    Air pollution control (APC) residues from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) are difficult to landfill due to substantial leaching of trace metals. An on-site pretreatment prior to landfilling of APC-residues was investigated in terms of bench-scale experiments with a semidry APC-residue and...... a fly ash. The treatment involved mixing of the residues with a ferrous sulphate solution and subsequent oxidation of the suspension. Afterwards, the suspension was spread on a dedicated landfill section and allowed to drain by gravity through the drainage system of the landfill. The wastewater from...

  1. Chemical Modification of Papain and Subtilisin: An Active Site Comparison

    St-Vincent, Mireille; Dickman, Michael

    2004-01-01

    An experiment using methyle methanethiosulfonate (MMTS) and phenylmethylsulfonyl flouride (PMSF) to specifically modify the cysteine and serine residues in the active sites of papain and subtilism respectively is demonstrated. The covalent modification of these enzymes and subsequent rescue of papain shows the beginning biochemist that proteins…

  2. Neuritogenic and neuroprotective activities of fruit residues.

    Tadtong, Sarin; Kanlayavattanakul, Mayuree; Lourith, Nattaya

    2013-11-01

    Neuritogenic and neuroprotective activities of litchi (Litchi chinensis Sonn., Sapindaceae) and salacca (Salacca edulis Reinw., Arecaceae) pericarp, and sapodilla (Achras sapota L., Sapotaceae) and tamarind Srichompu cultivar (Tamarindus indica L., Caesalpiniaceae) seed coat extracts were evaluated on cultured cholinergic P19-derived neurons. All the extracts, at a very low concentration (1 ng/mL of litchi and salacca pericarp extracts, 10 ng/mL of sapodilla and 100 ng/mL of tamarind seed coat extracts), enhanced the survival of cultured neurons (% viability more than 100%) by XTT reduction assay. The extracts were further evaluated for their neuritogenicity by observing cell morphology by phase-contrast microscopy and neuroprotective activity in serum deprivation and pre- and co-administration of hydrogen peroxide models. The phase-contrast micrographs displayed that all of the extracts possessed neurogenic activity by promoting the neurite outgrowth of the cultured neurons. Moreover, these extracts can protect neurons from oxidative stress-caused cell death in a serum deprivation model, and prevent and protect neuron cells from the toxicity of hydrogen peroxide. In this study we assured that the neuritogenic and neuroprotective activities of these extracts derived from the phenolic components and flavonoids contained in the extracts by acting as signaling molecules to enhance neuron survival and promote neurite outgrowth. These results suggest that all of the extracts are potentially sources of neuritogenic and neuroprotective components which might be used either as pharmaceutical products or dietary supplements for neurodegenerative disorder patients, for example, those suffering from Alzheimer's disease. PMID:24427947

  3. Active Site Engineering in Electrocatalysis

    Verdaguer Casadevall, Arnau; Stephens, Ifan; Chorkendorff, Ib

    The overall goal of this thesis has been to design better catalysts for electrochemical reactions through a fundamental understanding of the materials at atomic scale. This has been achieved by combining electrochemical measurements with a variety of characterization techniques, often in ultra high...... under reaction conditions, which is ultimately controlled by the crystal structure of the underlying alloy.• Oxygen reduction to hydrogen peroxide has been investigated on single site catalysts, mainly alloys of noble metals with Hg. This resulted in a very special structure with isolated atoms of Pt or......, inexistent in other forms of Cu. The presence of strong CO binding sites correlates well with electrochemical activity, which paves the way for the rational development of even better electrocatalysts....

  4. Residual activity induced by ion bombardment on insulating samples

    In this work we investigate some properties of the residual activity induced by protons impinging on quartz, mylar and other insulating materials. In particular, we discuss the time constant related to the decay of the emitted radiation after the primary ion beam is turned off. This radiation includes a continuum of bremsstrahlung and, in some cases, characteristic X-rays induced in the process as well. In general, the results indicate the presence of two time constants in the decaying process. Moreover, it appears that the residual activity has a strong dependence on the material specifications and on the conditions of the surface under bombardment. A simple mechanism for this process is suggested

  5. 4-Oxalocrotonate tautomerase, a 41-kDa homohexamer: backbone and side-chain resonance assignments, solution secondary structure, and location of active site residues by heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy.

    Stivers, J T; Abeygunawardana, C; Whitman, C. P.; Mildvan, A. S.

    1996-01-01

    4-Oxalocrotonate tautomerase (4-OT), a homohexamer consisting of 62 residues per subunit, catalyzes the isomerization of unsaturated alpha-keto acids using Pro-1 as a general base (Stivers et al., 1996a, 1996b). We report the backbone and side-chain 1H, 15N, and 13C NMR assignments and the solution secondary structure for 4-OT using 2D and 3D homonuclear and heteronuclear NMR methods. The subunit secondary structure consists of an alpha-helix (residues 13-30), two beta-strands (beta 1, residu...

  6. Derivation of uranium residual radioactive material guidelines for the former Alba Craft Laboratory site, Oxford, Ohio

    Residual radioactive material guidelines for uranium were derived for the former Alba Craft Laboratory site in Oxford, Ohio. This site has been identified for remedial action under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) of the US Department of Energy (DOE). Single nuclide and total uranium guidelines were derived on the basis of the requirement that the 50-year committed effective dose equivalent to a hypothetical individual who lives or works in the immediate vicinity of the former Alba Craft Laboratory site should not exceed a dose of 30 mrem/yr following remedial action for the current use and likely future use scenarios or a dose of 100 mrem/yr for less likely future use scenarios (Yu et al. 1993). The DOE residual radioactive material guideline computer code, RESRAD, which implements the methodology described in the DOE manual for implementing residual radioactive material guidelines, was used in this evaluation

  7. Derivation of uranium residual radioactive material guidelines for the 4400 Piehl Road Site, Ottawa Lake, Michigan

    Residual radioactive material guidelines for uranium were derived for the 4400 Piehl Road site in Ottawa Lake, Michigan. This site has been designated for remedial action under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) of the US Department of Energy (DOE). Single nuclide and total uranium guidelines were derived on the basis of the requirement that the 50-year committed effective dose equivalent to a hypothetical individual who lives or works in the immediate vicinity of the 4400 Piehl Road site should not exceed 30 mrem/yr following remedial action for the current use and plausible future use scenarios. The DOE residual radioactive material guideline computer code, RESRAD, which applies the methodology described in the DOE manual for implementing residual radioactive material guidelines, was used in this evaluation

  8. Derivation of uranium residual radioactive material guidelines for the Ventron site

    Residual radioactive material guidelines for uranium were derived for the Ventron site in Beverly, Massachusetts. This site has been identified for remedial action under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The derivations for the single radionuclides and the total uranium guidelines were based on the requirement that the 50-year committed effective dose equivalent to a hypothetical individual who lives or works in the immediate vicinity of the Ventron site should not exceed a dose of 100 mrem/yr following remedial action. The DOE residual radioactive material guideline computer code, RESRAD, which implements the methodology described in the DOE manual for implementing residual radioactive material guidelines, was used in this evaluation

  9. Depleted uranium residual radiological risk assessment for Kosovo sites

    During the recent conflict in Yugoslavia, depleted uranium rounds were employed and were left in the battlefield. Health concern is related to the risk arising from contamination of areas in Kosovo with depleted uranium penetrators and dust. Although chemical toxicity is the most significant health risk related to uranium, radiation exposure has been allegedly related to cancers among veterans of the Balkan conflict. Uranium munitions are considered to be a source of radiological contamination of the environment. Based on measurements and estimates from the recent Balkan Task Force UNEP mission in Kosovo, we have estimated effective doses to resident populations using a well-established food-web mathematical model (RESRAD code). The UNEP mission did not find any evidence of widespread contamination in Kosovo. Rather than the actual measurements, we elected to use a desk assessment scenario (Reference Case) proposed by the UNEP group as the source term for computer simulations. Specific applications to two Kosovo sites (Planeja village and Vranovac hill) are described. Results of the simulations suggest that radiation doses from water-independent pathways are negligible (annual doses below 30 μSv). A small radiological risk is expected from contamination of the groundwater in conditions of effective leaching and low distribution coefficient of uranium metal. Under the assumptions of the Reference Case, significant radiological doses (>1 mSv/year) might be achieved after many years from the conflict through water-dependent pathways. Even in this worst-case scenario, DU radiological risk would be far overshadowed by its chemical toxicity

  10. Depleted uranium residual radiological risk assessment for Kosovo sites

    Durante, Marco E-mail: durante@na.infn.it; Pugliese, Mariagabriella

    2003-07-01

    During the recent conflict in Yugoslavia, depleted uranium rounds were employed and were left in the battlefield. Health concern is related to the risk arising from contamination of areas in Kosovo with depleted uranium penetrators and dust. Although chemical toxicity is the most significant health risk related to uranium, radiation exposure has been allegedly related to cancers among veterans of the Balkan conflict. Uranium munitions are considered to be a source of radiological contamination of the environment. Based on measurements and estimates from the recent Balkan Task Force UNEP mission in Kosovo, we have estimated effective doses to resident populations using a well-established food-web mathematical model (RESRAD code). The UNEP mission did not find any evidence of widespread contamination in Kosovo. Rather than the actual measurements, we elected to use a desk assessment scenario (Reference Case) proposed by the UNEP group as the source term for computer simulations. Specific applications to two Kosovo sites (Planeja village and Vranovac hill) are described. Results of the simulations suggest that radiation doses from water-independent pathways are negligible (annual doses below 30 {mu}Sv). A small radiological risk is expected from contamination of the groundwater in conditions of effective leaching and low distribution coefficient of uranium metal. Under the assumptions of the Reference Case, significant radiological doses (>1 mSv/year) might be achieved after many years from the conflict through water-dependent pathways. Even in this worst-case scenario, DU radiological risk would be far overshadowed by its chemical toxicity.

  11. Engineering assessment of radioactive sands and residues, Lowman Site, Lowman, Idaho

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has reevaluated the Lowman site in order to revise the December 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive sands and residues at Lowman, Idaho. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of radioactive sands and residues and radiation exposure of individuals and nearby populations, and investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 191,000 tons of radioactive sands, residues, and contaminated soils at the Lowman site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown radioactive sands and external gamma radiation also are factors

  12. Engineering assessment of radioactive sands and residues, Lowman Site, Lowman, Idaho

    1981-09-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has reevaluated the Lowman site in order to revise the December 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive sands and residues at Lowman, Idaho. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of radioactive sands and residues and radiation exposure of individuals and nearby populations, and investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 191,000 tons of radioactive sands, residues, and contaminated soils at the Lowman site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown radioactive sands and external gamma radiation also are factors.

  13. Summary of the engineering assessment of radioactive sands and residues, Lowman Site, Lowman, Idaho

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has reevaluated the Lowman site in order to revise the December 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive sands and residues at Lowman, Idaho. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of radioactive sands and residues and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 191,000 tons of radioactive sands, residues, and contaminated soils at the Lowman site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown radioactive sands and external gamma radiation also are factors

  14. Derivation of residual radioactive material guidelines for the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research site

    Residual radioactive material guidelines were derived for the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR) Environmental Restoration (ER) site in Davis, California. The guideline derivation was based on a dose limit of 100 mrem/yr. The US Department of Energy (DOE) residual radioactive material guideline computer code was used in this evaluation. This code implements the methodology described in the DOE manual for implementing residual radioactive material guidelines. Three potential site utilization scenarios were considered with the assumption that following ER action, the site will be used without radiological restrictions. The defined scenarios vary with regard to use of the site, time spent at the site, and sources of food consumed. The results of the evaluation indicate that the basic dose limit of 100 mrem/yr will not be exceeded, provided that the soil concentrations of these radionuclides at the LEHR site do not exceed the scenario-specific values calculated by this study. Except for the extent of the contaminated zone (which is very conservative), assumptions used are as site-specific as possible, given available information. The derived guidelines are single- radionuclide guidelines and are linearly proportional to the dose limit used in the calculations. In setting the actual residual soil contamination guides for the LEHR site, DOE will apply the as low as reasonably achievable policy to the decision-making process, along with other factors such as whether a particular scenario is reasonable and appropriate, as well as using site-specific inputs to computer models based on data not yet fully determined

  15. Identification of protein-RNA interaction sites using the information of spatial adjacent residues

    Cheng Yong-Mei

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein-RNA interactions play an important role in numbers of fundamental cellular processes such as RNA splicing, transport and translation, protein synthesis and certain RNA-mediated enzymatic processes. The more knowledge of Protein-RNA recognition can not only help to understand the regulatory mechanism, the site-directed mutagenesis and regulation of RNA–protein complexes in biological systems, but also have a vitally effecting for rational drug design. Results Based on the information of spatial adjacent residues, novel feature extraction methods were proposed to predict protein-RNA interaction sites with SVM-KNN classifier. The total accuracies of spatial adjacent residue profile feature and spatial adjacent residues weighted accessibility solvent area feature are 78%, 67.07% respectively in 5-fold cross-validation test, which are 1.4%, 3.79% higher than that of sequence neighbour residue profile feature and sequence neighbour residue accessibility solvent area feature. Conclusions The results indicate that the performance of feature extraction method using the spatial adjacent information is superior to the sequence neighbour information approach. The performance of SVM-KNN classifier is little better than that of SVM. The feature extraction method of spatial adjacent information with SVM-KNN is very effective for identifying protein-RNA interaction sites and may at least play a complimentary role to the existing methods.

  16. Partial enterectomy decreases somatostatin-binding sites in residual intestine of rabbits

    Colás Escudero, Begoña; Bodega Magro, Guillermo; Sanz, M.; Prieto Villapún, Juan Carlos; Arilla Ferreiro, Eduardo

    1988-01-01

    Three weeks after partial enterectomy in the rabbit there was an increased somatostatin concentration and a decreased number of somatostatin-binding sites (without changes in the corresponding affinity values) in the cytosol of the residual intestinal tissue, except in the terminal ileum and the colon. Five weeks after surgery both the somatostatin concentration and the number of somatostatin-binding sites returned towards control values. These results suggest that an increase in bowel ...

  17. Site energy distribution analysis of Cu (Ⅱ) adsorption on sediments and residues by sequential extraction method.

    Jin, Qiang; Yang, Yan; Dong, Xianbin; Fang, Jimin

    2016-01-01

    Many models (e.g., Langmuir model, Freundlich model and surface complexation model) have been successfully used to explain the mechanism of metal ion adsorption on the pure mineral materials. These materials usually have a homogeneous surface where all sites have the same adsorption energies. However, it's hardly appropriate for such models to describe the adsorption on heterogeneous surfaces (e.g., sediment surface), site energy distribution analysis can be to. In the present study, the site energy distribution analysis was used to describe the surface properties and adsorption behavior of the non-residual and residual components extracted from the natural aquatic sediment samples. The residues were prepared "in-situ" by using the sequential extraction procedure. The present study is intended to investigate the roles of different components and the change of site energy distribution at different temperatures of the sediment samples in controlling Cu (Ⅱ) adsorption. The results of the site energy distribution analysis indicated firstly, that the sorption sites of iron/manganese hydrous oxides (IMHO) and organic matter (OM) have higher energy. Secondly, light fraction (LF) and carbonates have little influence on site energy distribution. Finally, there was increase in site energies with the increase of temperature. Specially, low temperature (5 °C) significantly influenced the site energies of IMHO and OM, and also had obvious effect on the energy distribution of the sediments after removing target components. The site energy distribution analysis proved to be a useful method for us to further understand the energetic characteristics of sediment in comparison with those previously obtained. PMID:26552542

  18. Status policy and criteria for the remediation of sites with radioactive residues in China

    This paper introduces the status policy and criteria for remediation of sites with radioactive residues in China. We deal with the sites in difference patterns according to their circumstances. For the sites related with the decommissioning of the nuclear fuel cycle facilities, the programs for environmental restoration must be reviewed and approved by the State Environmental Protection Administration (SEPA). And the radioactive waste resulting from these facilities should be collected and eventually disposed of at the regional disposal repositories built by the country. For the sites related with use of radionuclides in medicine, research and industry, as well as the small scale extraction and processing of materials containing natural radionuclides, the provincial environmental authority is responsible for approving the restoration projects. These radioactive wastes should finally be sent to the special radioactive waste repositories built by the provincial environmental authorities. So far 21 waste repositories have been built in some provinces. More then 10 sites with radioactive residues have been restored. The standards for general public dose limit and soil residual radionuclides content have been established. (author)

  19. Identification of key residues involved in the activation and signaling properties of dopamine D3 receptor.

    Kota, Kokila; Kuzhikandathil, Eldo V; Afrasiabi, Milad; Lacy, Brett; Kontoyianni, Maria; Crider, A Michael; Song, Daniel

    2015-09-01

    The dopamine D3 receptor exhibits agonist-dependent tolerance and slow response termination (SRT) signaling properties that distinguish it from the closely-related D2 receptors. While amino acid residues important for D3 receptor ligand binding have been identified, the residues involved in activation of D3 receptor signaling and induction of signaling properties have not been determined. In this paper, we used cis and trans isomers of a novel D3 receptor agonist, 8-OH-PBZI, and site-directed mutagenesis to identify key residues involved in D3 receptor signaling function. Our results show that trans-8-OH-PBZI, but not cis-8-OH-PBZI, elicit the D3 receptor tolerance and SRT properties. We show that while both agonists require a subset of residues in the orthosteric binding site of D3 receptors for activation of the receptor, the ability of the two isomers to differentially induce tolerance and SRT is mediated by interactions with specific residues in the sixth transmembrane helix and third extracellular loop of the D3 receptor. We also show that unlike cis-8-OH-PBZI, which is a partial agonist at the dopamine D2S receptor and full agonist at dopamine D2L receptor, trans-8-OH-PBZI is a full agonist at both D2S and D2L receptors. The different effect of the two isomers on D3 receptor signaling properties and D2S receptor activation correlated with differential effects of the isomers on agonist-induced mouse locomotor activity. The two isomers of 8-OH-PBZI represent novel pharmacological tools for in silico D3 and D2 receptor homology modeling and for determining the role of D3 receptor tolerance and SRT properties in signaling and behavior. PMID:26116441

  20. Water quality changes at three reclaimed mine sites related to the injection of coal combustion residues

    Surface and groundwater pollution is a common problem associated with post-surface mining operations. The US Bureau of Mines (BOM) participated in the testing of subsurface injections of coal combustion residues (CCR) at three reclaimed surface mine sites. The addition of alkaline CCR to the subsurface environment can raise the pH, limit propagation of pyrite oxidizing bacteria and reduce the rate of acid generation. Many CCR's can also form cement-like grout, which when injected into buried spoil may decrease its permeability and porosity, diverting water away from the pyritic material. The objective of this work was to develop an effective, economical and permanent method to abate or reduce post-mining water pollution. The effectiveness of CCR injection as an acid mine drainage abatement technique was evaluated by the BOM by monitoring water quality at three sites in: Upshur County, WV, Clinton County, PA and Greene County, PA. Geophysical techniques were used at all sites to locate monitoring and injection wells that were subsequently drilled into the spoil. Grout injection work was completed between 1990 and 1994 at the three sites. Baseline water quality data were collected at all three sites for a minimum of one year. Post-grouting water quality at the discharge of the three sites showed a slight, long-term improvement and no apparent degradation in water quality resulting from the injection of the coal combustion residues. Notable and long-term improvements in water quality at various monitoring wells (on all sites) were also observed

  1. Derivation of cesium-137 residual radioactive material guidelines for the Peek Street site, Schenectady, New York

    Residual radioactive material guidelines for cesium-137 were derived for the Peek rk. The derivation was based on the requirement that the Street site in Schenectady, New York. The derivation was based on the requirement that the 50-year committed effective dose equivalent to a hypothetical individual who lives or works in the immediate vicinity of the Peek Street site should not exceed a dose of 100 mrem/yr following remedial action. The US Department of Energy (DOE) residual radioactive material guideline computer code, RESRAD was used in this evaluation. Three potential scenarios were considered for the site on the assumption that for a period of 1,000 years following remedial action, the site wig be utilized without radiological restrictions. The scenarios vary with regard to use of the site, time spent at the site, and sources of food consumed. Results indicate that the basic dose limit of 100 mrem/yr will not be exceeded for cesium-137 within 1,000 years, provided that the soil concentration of cesium-137 at the Peek Street site does not exceed the following levels: 98 pCi/g for Scenario A (industrial worker: the expected scenario), 240 pCi/g for Scenario B (recreationist: a plausible scenario), and 34 pCi/g for Scenario C (resident farmer ingesting food produced in the decontaminated area: a plausible scenario)

  2. Regulatory Closure Options for the Residue in the Hanford Site Single-Shell Tanks

    Liquid, mixed, high-level radioactive waste (HLW) has been stored in 149 single-shell tanks (SSTS) located in tank farms on the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford Site. The DOE is developing technologies to retrieve as much remaining HLW as technically possible prior to physically closing the tank farms. In support of the Hanford Tanks Initiative, Sandia National Laboratories has addressed the requirements for the regulatory closure of the radioactive component of any SST residue that may remain after physical closure. There is significant uncertainty about the end state of each of the 149 SSTS; that is, the nature and amount of wastes remaining in the SSTS after retrieval is uncertain. As a means of proceeding in the face of these uncertainties, this report links possible end-states with associated closure options. Requirements for disposal of HLW and low-level radioactive waste (LLW) are reviewed in detail. Incidental waste, which is radioactive waste produced incidental to the further processing of HLW, is then discussed. If the low activity waste (LAW) fraction from the further processing of HLW is determined to be incidental waste, then DOE can dispose of that incidental waste onsite without a license from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commissions (NRC). The NRC has proposed three Incidental Waste Criteria for determining if a LAW fraction is incidental waste. One of the three Criteria is that the LAW fraction should not exceed the NRC's Class C limits

  3. Regulatory Closure Options for the Residue in the Hanford Site Single-Shell Tanks

    Cochran, J.R. Shyr, L.J.

    1998-10-05

    Liquid, mixed, high-level radioactive waste (HLW) has been stored in 149 single-shell tanks (SSTS) located in tank farms on the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford Site. The DOE is developing technologies to retrieve as much remaining HLW as technically possible prior to physically closing the tank farms. In support of the Hanford Tanks Initiative, Sandia National Laboratories has addressed the requirements for the regulatory closure of the radioactive component of any SST residue that may remain after physical closure. There is significant uncertainty about the end state of each of the 149 SSTS; that is, the nature and amount of wastes remaining in the SSTS after retrieval is uncertain. As a means of proceeding in the face of these uncertainties, this report links possible end-states with associated closure options. Requirements for disposal of HLW and low-level radioactive waste (LLW) are reviewed in detail. Incidental waste, which is radioactive waste produced incidental to the further processing of HLW, is then discussed. If the low activity waste (LAW) fraction from the further processing of HLW is determined to be incidental waste, then DOE can dispose of that incidental waste onsite without a license from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commissions (NRC). The NRC has proposed three Incidental Waste Criteria for determining if a LAW fraction is incidental waste. One of the three Criteria is that the LAW fraction should not exceed the NRC's Class C limits.

  4. Engineering evaluation of alternatives for the disposition of Niagara Falls Storage Site, its residues and wastes

    The final disposition scenarios selected by DOE for assessment in this document are consistent with those stated in the Notice of Intent to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS) (DOE, 1983d) and the modifications to the alternatives resulting from the public scoping process. The scenarios are: take no action beyond interim remedial measures other than maintenance and surveillance of the NFSS; retain and manage the NFSS as a long-term waste management facility for the wastes and residues on the site; decontaminate, certify, and release the NFSS for other use, with long-term management of the wastes and residues at other DOE sites; and partially decontaminate the NFSS by removal and transport off site of only the more radioactive residues, and upgrade containment of the remaining wastes and residues on site. The objective of this document is to present to DOE the conceptual engineering, occupational radiation exposure, construction schedule, maintenance and surveillance requirements, and cost information relevant to design and implementation of each of the four scenarios. The specific alternatives within each scenario used as the basis for discussion in this document were evaluated on the bases of engineering considerations, technical feasibility, and regulatory requirements. Selected alternatives determined to be acceptable for each of the four final disposition scenarios for the NFSS were approved by DOE to be assessed and costed in this document. These alternatives are also the subject of the EIS for the NFSS currently being prepared by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). 40 figures, 38 tables

  5. 10 CFR 40.27 - General license for custody and long-term care of residual radioactive material disposal sites.

    2010-01-01

    ... lease any subsurface mineral rights associated with land on which residual radioactive materials are... radioactive material disposal sites. 40.27 Section 40.27 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC... residual radioactive material disposal sites. (a) A general license is issued for the custody of and...

  6. Binding site residues control inhibitor selectivity in the human norepinephrine transporter but not in the human dopamine transporter

    Andersen, Jacob; Ringsted, Kristoffer B; Bang-Andersen, Benny; Strømgaard, Kristian; Kristensen, Anders S

    2015-01-01

    in the central site of DAT to the corresponding residues in NET had modest effects on the same inhibitors, suggesting that non-conserved binding site residues in DAT play a minor role for selective inhibitor recognition. Our data points towards distinct structural determinants governing inhibitor...

  7. Prediction and Analysis of Post-Translational Pyruvoyl Residue Modification Sites from Internal Serines in Proteins

    Jiang, Yang; Li, Bi-Qing; Zhang, Yuchao; Feng, Yuan-Ming; Gao, Yu-Fei; Zhang, Ning; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2013-01-01

    Most of pyruvoyl-dependent proteins observed in prokaryotes and eukaryotes are critical regulatory enzymes, which are primary targets of inhibitors for anti-cancer and anti-parasitic therapy. These proteins undergo an autocatalytic, intramolecular self-cleavage reaction in which a covalently bound pyruvoyl group is generated on a conserved serine residue. Traditional detections of the modified serine sites are performed by experimental approaches, which are often labor-intensive and time-cons...

  8. On Terminal Alkynes That Can React with Active-Site Cysteine Nucleophiles in Proteases

    Reggy Ekkebus; van Kasteren, Sander I.; Yogesh Kulathu; Arjen Scholten; Ilana Berlin; Geurink, Paul P; Annemieke de Jong; Soenita Goerdayal; Jacques Neefjes; Heck, Albert J.R.; David Komander; Huib Ovaa

    2013-01-01

    Active-site directed probes are powerful in studies of enzymatic function. We report an active-site directed probe based on a warhead so far considered unreactive. By replacing the C-terminal carboxylate of ubiquitin (Ub) with an alkyne functionality, a selective reaction with the active-site cysteine residue of de-ubiquitinating enzymes was observed. The resulting product was shown to be a quaternary vinyl thioether, as determined by X-ray crystallography. Proteomic analysis of proteins boun...

  9. Epimerase and Reductase Activities of Polyketide Synthase Ketoreductase Domains Utilize the Same Conserved Tyrosine and Serine Residues.

    Xie, Xinqiang; Garg, Ashish; Keatinge-Clay, Adrian T; Khosla, Chaitan; Cane, David E

    2016-03-01

    The role of the conserved active site tyrosine and serine residues in epimerization catalyzed by polyketide synthase ketoreductase (PKS KR) domains has been investigated. Both mutant and wild-type forms of epimerase-active KR domains, including the intrinsically redox-inactive EryKR3° and PicKR3° as well as redox-inactive mutants of EryKR1, were incubated with [2-(2)H]-(2R,3S)-2-methyl-3-hydroxypentanoyl-SACP ([2-(2)H]-2) and 0.05 equiv of NADP(+) in the presence of the redox-active, epimerase-inactive EryKR6 domain. The residual epimerase activity of each mutant was determined by tandem equilibrium isotope exchange, in which the first-order, time-dependent washout of isotope from 2 was monitored by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry with quantitation of the deuterium content of the diagnostic pantetheinate ejection fragment (4). Replacement of the active site Tyr or Ser residues, alone or together, significantly reduced the observed epimerase activity of each KR domain with minimal effect on substrate binding. Our results demonstrate that the epimerase and reductase activities of PKS KR domains share a common active site, with both reactions utilizing the same pair of Tyr and Ser residues. PMID:26863427

  10. Prediction of residual metabolic activity after treatment in NSCLC patients

    Rios Velazquez, Emmanuel; Aerts, Hugo J.W.L.; Oberije, Cary; Ruysscher, Dirk De; Lambin, Philippe (Dept. of Radiation Oncology, School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht Univ. Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands)), E-mail: emmanuel.rios@maastro.nl

    2010-10-15

    Purpose. Metabolic response assessment is often used as a surrogate of local failure and survival. Early identification of patients with residual metabolic activity is essential as this enables selection of patients who could potentially benefit from additional therapy. We report on the development of a pre-treatment prediction model for metabolic response using patient, tumor and treatment factors. Methods. One hundred and one patients with inoperable NSCLC (stage I-IV), treated with 3D conformal radical (chemo)-radiotherapy were retrospectively included in this study. All patients received a pre and post-radiotherapy fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography FDG-PET-CT scan. The electronic medical record system and the medical patient charts were reviewed to obtain demographic, clinical, tumor and treatment data. Primary outcome measure was examined using a metabolic response assessment on a post-radiotherapy FDG-PET-CT scan. Radiotherapy was delivered in fractions of 1.8 Gy, twice a day, with a median prescribed dose of 60 Gy. Results. Overall survival was worse in patients with residual metabolic active areas compared with the patients with a complete metabolic response (p=0.0001). In univariate analysis, three variables were significantly associated with residual disease: larger primary gross tumor volume (GTVprimary, p=0.002), higher pre-treatment maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}, p=0.0005) in the primary tumor and shorter overall treatment time (OTT, p=0.046). A multivariate model including GTVprimary, SUV{sub max}, equivalent radiation dose at 2 Gy corrected for time (EQD2, T) and OTT yielded an area under the curve assessed by the leave-one-out cross validation of 0.71 (95% CI, 0.65-0.76). Conclusion. Our results confirmed the validity of metabolic response assessment as a surrogate of survival. We developed a multivariate model that is able to identify patients at risk of residual disease. These patients may

  11. Sequence and structural features of binding site residues in protein-protein complexes: comparison with protein-nucleic acid complexes

    Selvaraj S; Jayaram B; Saranya N; Gromiha M; Fukui Kazuhiko

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Protein-protein interactions are important for several cellular processes. Understanding the mechanism of protein-protein recognition and predicting the binding sites in protein-protein complexes are long standing goals in molecular and computational biology. Methods We have developed an energy based approach for identifying the binding site residues in protein–protein complexes. The binding site residues have been analyzed with sequence and structure based parameters such...

  12. Evidence for the existence of a tyrosyl residue in the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide binding site of chicken liver xanthine dehydrogenase

    Xanthine-NAD and NADH-methylene blue oxidoreductase activities of chicken liver xanthine dehydrogenase were inactivated by incubation with 5'-[p-(fluorosulfonyl)benzoyl]adenosine (5'-FSBA), an active site directed reagent for nucleotide binding sites. The inactivation reaction displayed pseudo-first-order kinetics. A double-reciprocal plot of inactivation velocity vs. 5'-FSBA concentration showed that 5'-FSBA and enzyme formed a complex prior to inactivation. NAD protected the enzyme from inactivation by 5'-FSBA in a competitive fashion. The modified enzyme had the same xanthine-dichlorophenolindophenol and xanthine-O2 oxidoreductase activities as the native enzyme, and on addition of xanthine to the modified enzyme, bleaching of the spectrum occurred in the visible region. The amount of radioactivity incorporated into the enzyme by incubation with [14C]-5'-FSBA was parallel to the loss of xanthine-NAD oxidoreductase activity, and the stoichiometry was 1 mol/mol of enzyme-bound FAD for complete inactivation. These results indicated that 5'-FSBA modified specifically the binding site for NAD of chicken liver xanthine dehydrogenase. The incorporated radioactivity was released slowly from 14C-labeled enzyme by incubation with dithiothreitol with concomitant restoration of catalytic activity. The modified residue responsible for inactivation was identified as a tyrosine

  13. Recombinant expression, antimicrobial activity and mechanism of action of tritrpticin analogs containing fluoro-tryptophan residues.

    Arias, Mauricio; Hoffarth, Elesha R; Ishida, Hiroaki; Aramini, James M; Vogel, Hans J

    2016-05-01

    The increase in antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections has prompted significant academic research into new therapeutic agents targeted against these pathogens. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) appear as promising candidates, due their potent antimicrobial activity and their ubiquitous presence in almost all organisms. Tritrpticin is a member of this family of peptides and has been shown to exert a strong antimicrobial activity against several bacterial strains. Tritrpticin's main structural characteristic is the presence of three consecutive Trp residues at the center of the peptide. These residues play an important role in the activity of tritrpticin against Escherichia coli. In this work, a recombinant version of tritrpticin was produced in E. coli using calmodulin as a fusion protein expression tag to overcome the toxicity of the peptide. When used in combination with glyphosate, an inhibitor of the endogenous synthesis of aromatic amino acids, this expression system allowed for the incorporation of fluorinated Trp analogs at very high levels (>90%). The antimicrobial activity of the 4-, 5- and 6-fluoro-Trp-containing tritrpticins against E. coli was as strong as the activity of the native peptide. Similarly, the tritrpticin analogs exhibited comparable abilities to perturb and permeabilize synthetic lipid bilayers as well as the outer and inner membrane of E. coli. Furthermore, the use of 19F NMR spectroscopy established that each individual fluoro-Trp residue interacts differently with SDS micelles, supporting the idea that each Trp in the original tritrpticin plays a different role in the perturbing/permeabilizing activity of the peptide. Moreover, our work demonstrates that the use of fluoro-Trp in solvent perturbation 19F NMR experiments provides detailed site-specific information on the insertion of the Trp residues in biological membrane mimetics. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Antimicrobial peptides edited by Karl Lohner and Kai

  14. Sequence and structural features of binding site residues in protein-protein complexes: comparison with protein-nucleic acid complexes

    Selvaraj S

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein-protein interactions are important for several cellular processes. Understanding the mechanism of protein-protein recognition and predicting the binding sites in protein-protein complexes are long standing goals in molecular and computational biology. Methods We have developed an energy based approach for identifying the binding site residues in protein–protein complexes. The binding site residues have been analyzed with sequence and structure based parameters such as binding propensity, neighboring residues in the vicinity of binding sites, conservation score and conformational switching. Results We observed that the binding propensities of amino acid residues are specific for protein-protein complexes. Further, typical dipeptides and tripeptides showed high preference for binding, which is unique to protein-protein complexes. Most of the binding site residues are highly conserved among homologous sequences. Our analysis showed that 7% of residues changed their conformations upon protein-protein complex formation and it is 9.2% and 6.6% in the binding and non-binding sites, respectively. Specifically, the residues Glu, Lys, Leu and Ser changed their conformation from coil to helix/strand and from helix to coil/strand. Leu, Ser, Thr and Val prefer to change their conformation from strand to coil/helix. Conclusions The results obtained in this study will be helpful for understanding and predicting the binding sites in protein-protein complexes.

  15. Application of RESRAD family of computer codes to sites contaminated with radioactive residues

    The RESRAD family of computer codes was developed to provide a scientifically defensible answer to the question 'How clean is clean?' and to provide useful tools for evaluating human health risk at sites contaminated with radioactive residues. The RESRAD codes include (1) RESRAD for soil contaminated with radionuclides; (2) RESRAD-BUILD for buildings contaminated with radionuclides; (3) RESRAD-CHEM for soil contaminated with hazardous chemicals; (4) RESRAD-BASELINE for baseline risk assessment with measured media concentrations of both radionuclides and chemicals; (5) RESRAD-ECORISK for ecological risk assessment; (6) RESRAD-RECYCLE for recycle and reuse of radiologically contaminated metals and equipment; and (7) RESRAD-OFFSITE for off-site receptor radiological dose assessment. Four of these seven codes (RESRAD, RESRAD-BUILD, RESRAD-RECYCLE, and RESRAD-OFFSITE) also have uncertainty analysis capabilities that allow the user to input distributions of parameters. RESRAD has been widely used in the United States and abroad and approved by many federal and state agencies. Experience has shown that the RESRAD codes are useful tools for evaluating sites contaminated with radioactive residues. The use of RESRAD codes has resulted in significant savings in cleanup cost. Analysis of 19 site-specific uranium guidelines is discussed in the paper. (author)

  16. Contaminant Release from Residual Waste in Single Shell Tanks at the Hanford Site, Washington, USA - 9276

    Determinations of elemental and solid-phase compositions, and contaminant release studies have been applied in an ongoing study of residual tank wastes (i.e., waste remaining after final retrieval operations) from five of 149 underground single-shell storage tanks (241-C-103, 241-C-106, 241-C-202, 241-C-203, and 241-S-112) at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site in Washington State. This work is being conducted to support performance assessments that will be required to evaluate long-term health and safety risks associated with tank site closure. The results of studies completed to date show significant variability in the compositions, solid phase properties, and contaminant release characteristics from these residual tank wastes. This variability is the result of differences in waste chemistry/composition of wastes produced from several different spent fuel reprocessing schemes, subsequent waste reprocessing to remove certain target constituents, tank farm operations that concentrated wastes and mixed wastes between tanks, and differences in retrieval processes used to remove the wastes from the tanks. Release models were developed based upon results of chemical characterization of the bulk residual waste, solid-phase characterization (see companion paper 9277 by Krupka et al.), leaching and extraction experiments, and geochemical modeling. In most cases empirical release models were required to describe contaminant release from these wastes. Release of contaminants from residual waste was frequently found to be controlled by the solubility of phases that could not be identified and/or for which thermodynamic data and/or dissolution rates have not been measured. For example, significant fractions of Tc-99, I-129, and Cr appear to be coprecipitated at trace concentrations in metal oxide phases that could not be identified unambiguously. In the case of U release from tank 241-C-103 residual waste, geochemical calculations indicated that leachate

  17. Characterization of Reuse Activities at Contaminated Sites

    Angela Vitulli; Charlotte Dougherty; Kimberly Bosworth

    2004-01-01

    Given the increased focus on reuse activity within EPA and state site cleanup programs, policy makers would benefit from looking across programs to better understand the extent and nature of reuse; examine site characteristics that influence reuse; leverage lessons learned; and coordinate reuse activities, data collection, and information management. This research paper begins to examine these issues. It reports the results of a preliminary review and analysis of available EPA and state progr...

  18. Fingerprinting differential active site constraints of ATPases

    Hacker, Stephan M.; Hardt, Norman; Buntru, Alexander; Pagliarini, Dana; Möckel, Martin; Mayer, Thomas U; Scheffner, Martin; Hauck, Christof R.; Marx, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    The free energy provided by adenosine triphosphate (ATP) hydrolysis is central to many cellular processes and, therefore, the number of enzymes utilizing ATP as a substrate is almost innumerable. Modified analogues of ATP are a valuable means to understand the biological function of ATPases. Although these enzymes have evolved towards binding to ATP, large differences in active site architectures were found. In order to systematically access the specific active site constraints of different A...

  19. Mapping the active site of vaccinia virus RNA triphosphatase

    The RNA triphosphatase component of vaccinia virus mRNA capping enzyme (the product of the viral D1 gene) belongs to a family of metal-dependent phosphohydrolases that includes the RNA triphosphatases of fungi, protozoa, Chlorella virus, and baculoviruses. The family is defined by two glutamate-containing motifs (A and C) that form the metal-binding site. Most of the family members resemble the fungal and Chlorella virus enzymes, which have a complex active site located within the hydrophilic interior of a topologically closed eight-stranded β barrel (the so-called ''triphosphate tunnel''). Here we queried whether vaccinia virus capping enzyme is a member of the tunnel subfamily, via mutational mapping of amino acids required for vaccinia triphosphatase activity. We identified four new essential side chains in vaccinia D1 via alanine scanning and illuminated structure-activity relationships by conservative substitutions. Our results, together with previous mutational data, highlight a constellation of six acidic and three basic amino acids that likely compose the vaccinia triphosphatase active site (Glu37, Glu39, Arg77, Lys107, Glu126, Asp159, Lys161, Glu192, and Glu194). These nine essential residues are conserved in all vertebrate and invertebrate poxvirus RNA capping enzymes. We discerned no pattern of clustering of the catalytic residues of the poxvirus triphosphatase that would suggest structural similarity to the tunnel proteins (exclusive of motifs A and C). We infer that the poxvirus triphosphatases are a distinct lineage within the metal-dependent RNA triphosphatase family. Their unique active site, which is completely different from that of the host cell's capping enzyme, recommends the poxvirus RNA triphosphatase as a molecular target for antipoxviral drug discovery

  20. Feasibility study for remedial action for the Quarry Residuals Operable Unit at the Weldon Spring Site, Weldon Spring, Missouri

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting cleanup activities at the Weldon Spring site, which is located in St. Charles County, Missouri, about 48 km (30 mi) west of St. Louis (Figure 1.1). Cleanup of the Weldon Spring site consists of several integrated components. The quarry residuals operable unit (QROU) is one of four operable units being evaluated. In accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended, a remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) is being conducted to evaluate conditions and potential responses for the following areas and/or media that constitute the QROU: (1) the residual material (soil and sediment) remaining at the Weldon Spring quarry after removal of the bulk waste (about 11 million L [3 million gal] of uranium-contaminated ponded water was also addressed previous to bulk waste removal); (2) other media located in the surrounding vicinity of the quarry, including adjacent soil, surface water, and sediment in Femme Osage Slough and several creeks; and (3) quarry groundwater located primarily north of Femme Osage Slough. Potential impacts to the St. Charles County well field downgradient of the quarry area are also being addressed as part of QROU RI/FS evaluations. For remedial action sites, it is DOE policy to integrate values associated with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) into the CERCLA decision-making process. The analyses contained herein address NEPA values as appropriate to the actions being considered for the QROU. A work plan summarizing initial site conditions and providing conceptual site hydrogeological and exposure models was published in January 1994. The RI and baseline risk assessment (BRA) reports have been completed. The RI discusses in detail the nature and extent and the fate and transport of contamination at the quarry area.

  1. Feasibility study for remedial action for the Quarry Residuals Operable Unit at the Weldon Spring Site, Weldon Spring, Missouri

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting cleanup activities at the Weldon Spring site, which is located in St. Charles County, Missouri, about 48 km (30 mi) west of St. Louis (Figure 1.1). Cleanup of the Weldon Spring site consists of several integrated components. The quarry residuals operable unit (QROU) is one of four operable units being evaluated. In accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended, a remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) is being conducted to evaluate conditions and potential responses for the following areas and/or media that constitute the QROU: (1) the residual material (soil and sediment) remaining at the Weldon Spring quarry after removal of the bulk waste (about 11 million L [3 million gal] of uranium-contaminated ponded water was also addressed previous to bulk waste removal); (2) other media located in the surrounding vicinity of the quarry, including adjacent soil, surface water, and sediment in Femme Osage Slough and several creeks; and (3) quarry groundwater located primarily north of Femme Osage Slough. Potential impacts to the St. Charles County well field downgradient of the quarry area are also being addressed as part of QROU RI/FS evaluations. For remedial action sites, it is DOE policy to integrate values associated with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) into the CERCLA decision-making process. The analyses contained herein address NEPA values as appropriate to the actions being considered for the QROU. A work plan summarizing initial site conditions and providing conceptual site hydrogeological and exposure models was published in January 1994. The RI and baseline risk assessment (BRA) reports have been completed. The RI discusses in detail the nature and extent and the fate and transport of contamination at the quarry area

  2. Site-directed mutagenesis of boar proacrosin reveals residues involved in binding of zona pellucida glycoproteins.

    Jansen, S; Jones, R; Jenneckens, I; Marschall, B; Kriegesmann, B; Coadwell, J; Brenig, B

    1998-10-01

    Proacrosin, the zymogen form of the serine protease beta-acrosin, is thought to function as a secondary binding molecule between mammalian gametes during fertilization (Jansen et al., 1995: Int J Dev Biol 39, 501-510). The interaction involves strong ionic bonds between positively charged amino acids on proacrosin and negatively charged polysulphate groups on zona pellucida glycoproteins. In this investigation, we identified the basic residues on proacrosin that are important for this binding. Site-directed mutagenesis shows that two groups of amino acids comprising His47, Arg50, and Arg51 together with Arg250, Lys252, and Arg253 are crucial because their deletion or replacement severely reduces affinity for zona glycoproteins. Molecular models of proacrosin reveal that these residues are located along one face of the protein on two exposed surface loops that project over and around the catalytic site. These findings support the hypothesis that polysulphate binding sites on proacrosin are formed by a restricted number of basic amino acids on the surface of the protein, presenting a specific orientation that is complementary to negatively charged sulphate groups on zona glycoproteins. Identification and elucidation of the stereochemistry of these charged moieties will aid design of new kinds of nonsteroidal antifertility agents. PMID:9740326

  3. Rebaselining of the plutonium residue elimination project at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site

    Systems Engineering and Value Engineering principles were put into practice in rebaselining the Pu Residue Stabilization and Elimination Project at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site. Tradeoff studies were conducted as to how to best rebaseline the system under the new Safeguards Termination Limits (STSs) issued by the Department of Energy. Through the use of a computerized database, the means by which Stakeholder values and other high-level requirements have been included in the tradeoff studies were documented. 13 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  4. A C. elegans-based foam for rapid on-site detection of residual live virus.

    Negrete, Oscar A.; Branda, Catherine; Hardesty, Jasper O. E. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Tucker, Mark David (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Kaiser, Julia N. (Global Product Management, Hilden, Germany); Kozina, Carol L.; Chirica, Gabriela S.

    2012-02-01

    In the response to and recovery from a critical homeland security event involving deliberate or accidental release of biological agents, initial decontamination efforts are necessarily followed by tests for the presence of residual live virus or bacteria. Such 'clearance sampling' should be rapid and accurate, to inform decision makers as they take appropriate action to ensure the safety of the public and of operational personnel. However, the current protocol for clearance sampling is extremely time-intensive and costly, and requires significant amounts of laboratory space and capacity. Detection of residual live virus is particularly problematic and time-consuming, as it requires evaluation of replication potential within a eukaryotic host such as chicken embryos. The intention of this project was to develop a new method for clearance sampling, by leveraging Sandia's expertise in the biological and material sciences in order to create a C. elegans-based foam that could be applied directly to the entire contaminated area for quick and accurate detection of any and all residual live virus by means of a fluorescent signal. Such a novel technology for rapid, on-site detection of live virus would greatly interest the DHS, DoD, and EPA, and hold broad commercial potential, especially with regard to the transportation industry.

  5. Full scale amendment of a contaminated wood impregnation site with iron water treatment residues

    Nielsen, Sanne Skov; Kjeldsen, Peter; Jakobsen, Rasmus

    2016-01-01

    by 95% in the upper samplers. Dosage and mixing of Fe-WTR in the soil proved to be difficult in the deeper part of the field, and pore water concentrations of arsenic was generally higher. Despite water logged conditions no increase in dissolved iron or arsenic was observed in the amended soil. Our......Iron water treatment residues (Fe-WTR) are a free by-product of the treatment of drinking water with high concentration of iron oxides and potential for arsenic sorption. This paper aims at applying Fe-WTR to a contaminated site, measuring the reduction in contaminant leaching, and discussing...... the design of delivery and mixing strategy for soil stabilization at field scale and present a cost-effective method of soil mixing by common contractor machinery. Soil contaminated by As, Cr, and Cu at an abandoned wood impregnation site was amended with 0.22% (dw) Fe-WTR. To evaluate the full scale...

  6. Stringency of the 2-His-1-Asp active-site motif in prolyl 4-hydroxylase.

    Kelly L Gorres

    Full Text Available The non-heme iron(II dioxygenase family of enzymes contain a common 2-His-1-carboxylate iron-binding motif. These enzymes catalyze a wide variety of oxidative reactions, such as the hydroxylation of aliphatic C-H bonds. Prolyl 4-hydroxylase (P4H is an alpha-ketoglutarate-dependent iron(II dioxygenase that catalyzes the post-translational hydroxylation of proline residues in protocollagen strands, stabilizing the ensuing triple helix. Human P4H residues His412, Asp414, and His483 have been identified as an iron-coordinating 2-His-1-carboxylate motif. Enzymes that catalyze oxidative halogenation do so by a mechanism similar to that of P4H. These halogenases retain the active-site histidine residues, but the carboxylate ligand is replaced with a halide ion. We replaced Asp414 of P4H with alanine (to mimic the active site of a halogenase and with glycine. These substitutions do not, however, convert P4H into a halogenase. Moreover, the hydroxylase activity of D414A P4H cannot be rescued with small molecules. In addition, rearranging the two His and one Asp residues in the active site eliminates hydroxylase activity. Our results demonstrate a high stringency for the iron-binding residues in the P4H active site. We conclude that P4H, which catalyzes an especially demanding chemical transformation, is recalcitrant to change.

  7. Substitution of Val72 residue alters the enantioselectivity and activity of Penicillium expansum lipase.

    Tang, Lianghua; Su, Min; Zhu, Ling; Chi, Liying; Zhang, Junling; Zhou, Qiong

    2013-01-01

    Error-prone PCR was used to create more active or enantioselective variants of Penicillium expansum lipase (PEL). A variant with a valine to glycine substitution at residue 72 in the lid structure exhibited higher activity and enantioselectivity than those of wild-type PEL. Site-directed saturation mutagenesis was used to explore the sequence-function relationship and the substitution of Val72 of P. expansum lipase changed both catalytic activity and enantioselectivity greatly. The variant V72A, displayed a highest enantioselectivity enhanced to about twofold for the resolution of (R, S)-naproxen (E value increased from 104 to 200.7 for wild-type PEL and V72A variant, respectively). In comparison to PEL, the variant V72A showed a remarkable increase in specific activity towards p-nitrophenyl palmitate (11- and 4-fold increase at 25 and 35 °C, respectively) whereas it had a decreased thermostability. The results suggest that the enantioselective variant V72A could be used for the production of pharmaceutical drugs such as enantiomerically pure (S)-naproxen and the residue Val 72 of P. expansum lipase plays a significant role in the enantioselectivity and activity of this enantioselective lipase. PMID:22972595

  8. Bound residues of lindane: Magnitude, microbial release, plant uptake and effects on microbial activities

    Bound residues were detected in unflooded and flooded soils, even one year after the application of 14C-lindane, the higher occurrence being in unflooded soils. Considerably less bound residues were formed in flooded soils which had been amended with green manure. Bound residue formation was higher in neutral and alkaline soils and appeared to be related to the organic matter content of these soils. The bound residues were associated with the fulvic acid and humic acid fractions. When unflooded and flooded soils containing bound residues were incubated under moist conditions, more extractable residues were found in unflooded soils than in flooded soils. The uptake of 14C-residues from soils containing bound 14C-residues by barley plants was observed. The bound residues appeared to have no effect on general soil microbial activities. (author)

  9. Baseline risk assessment for the quarry residuals operable unit of the Weldon Spring Site, Weldon Spring, Missouri

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting cleanup activities at the Weldon Spring site, located in St. Charles County, Missouri, about 48 km (30 mi) west of St. Louis. Cleanup of the site consists of several integrated components. The quarry residuals operable unit (QROU), consisting of the Weldon Spring quarry and its surrounding area, is one of four operable units being evaluated. In accordance with requirements of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended, DOE is conducting a remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) to determine the proper response to address various contaminated media that constitute the QROU. Specifically, the operable unit consists of the following areas and media: the residual material remaining at the Weldon Spring quarry after removal of the pond water and the bulk waste; groundwater underlying the quarry and surrounding area; and other media located in the surrounding vicinity of the quarry, including surface water and sediment at Femme Osage Slough, Little Femme Osage Creek, and Femme Osage Creek. An initial evaluation of conditions at the quarry area identified remaining data requirements needed to support the conceptual site exposure and hydrogeological models. These data requirements are discussed in the RI/FS work plan issued in January 1994. Soil contamination located at a property adjacent to the quarry, referred to as Vicinity Property 9 (VP9), was originally part of the scope of the QROU, as discussed in the work plan. However, a decision was subsequently made to remediate this vicinity property as part of cleanup activities for the chemical plant operable unit, as provided for in the Record of Decision (ROD). Remediation of VP9 was completed in early 1996. Hence, this baseline risk assessment (BRA) does not address VP9

  10. Baseline risk assessment for the quarry residuals operable unit of the Weldon Spring Site, Weldon Spring, Missouri

    NONE

    1998-02-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting cleanup activities at the Weldon Spring site, located in St. Charles County, Missouri, about 48 km (30 mi) west of St. Louis. Cleanup of the site consists of several integrated components. The quarry residuals operable unit (QROU), consisting of the Weldon Spring quarry and its surrounding area, is one of four operable units being evaluated. In accordance with requirements of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended, DOE is conducting a remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) to determine the proper response to address various contaminated media that constitute the QROU. Specifically, the operable unit consists of the following areas and media: the residual material remaining at the Weldon Spring quarry after removal of the pond water and the bulk waste; groundwater underlying the quarry and surrounding area; and other media located in the surrounding vicinity of the quarry, including surface water and sediment at Femme Osage Slough, Little Femme Osage Creek, and Femme Osage Creek. An initial evaluation of conditions at the quarry area identified remaining data requirements needed to support the conceptual site exposure and hydrogeological models. These data requirements are discussed in the RI/FS work plan issued in January 1994. Soil contamination located at a property adjacent to the quarry, referred to as Vicinity Property 9 (VP9), was originally part of the scope of the QROU, as discussed in the work plan. However, a decision was subsequently made to remediate this vicinity property as part of cleanup activities for the chemical plant operable unit, as provided for in the Record of Decision (ROD). Remediation of VP9 was completed in early 1996. Hence, this baseline risk assessment (BRA) does not address VP9.

  11. Testing in support of on-site storage of residues in the Pipe Overpack Container

    The disposition of the large back-log of plutonium residues at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Rocky Flats) will require interim storage and subsequent shipment to a waste repository. Current plans call for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) and the transportation to WIPP in the TRUPACT-II. The transportation phase will require the residues to be packaged in a container that is more robust than a standard 55-gallon waste drum. Rocky Flats has designed the Pipe Overpack Container to meet this need. It is desirable to use this same waste packaging for interim on-site storage in non-hardened buildings. To meet the safety concerns for this storage the Pipe Overpack Container has been subjected to a series of tests at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. In addition to the tests required to qualify the Pipe Overpack Container as a waste container for shipment in the TRUPACT-II several tests were performed solely for the purpose of qualifying the container for interim storage. This report will describe these tests and the packages response to the tests. 12 figs., 3 tabs

  12. Active site and laminarin binding in glycoside hydrolase family 55.

    Bianchetti, Christopher M; Takasuka, Taichi E; Deutsch, Sam; Udell, Hannah S; Yik, Eric J; Bergeman, Lai F; Fox, Brian G

    2015-05-01

    The Carbohydrate Active Enzyme (CAZy) database indicates that glycoside hydrolase family 55 (GH55) contains both endo- and exo-β-1,3-glucanases. The founding structure in the GH55 is PcLam55A from the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium (Ishida, T., Fushinobu, S., Kawai, R., Kitaoka, M., Igarashi, K., and Samejima, M. (2009) Crystal structure of glycoside hydrolase family 55 β-1,3-glucanase from the basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium. J. Biol. Chem. 284, 10100-10109). Here, we present high resolution crystal structures of bacterial SacteLam55A from the highly cellulolytic Streptomyces sp. SirexAA-E with bound substrates and product. These structures, along with mutagenesis and kinetic studies, implicate Glu-502 as the catalytic acid (as proposed earlier for Glu-663 in PcLam55A) and a proton relay network of four residues in activating water as the nucleophile. Further, a set of conserved aromatic residues that define the active site apparently enforce an exo-glucanase reactivity as demonstrated by exhaustive hydrolysis reactions with purified laminarioligosaccharides. Two additional aromatic residues that line the substrate-binding channel show substrate-dependent conformational flexibility that may promote processive reactivity of the bound oligosaccharide in the bacterial enzymes. Gene synthesis carried out on ∼30% of the GH55 family gave 34 active enzymes (19% functional coverage of the nonredundant members of GH55). These active enzymes reacted with only laminarin from a panel of 10 different soluble and insoluble polysaccharides and displayed a broad range of specific activities and optima for pH and temperature. Application of this experimental method provides a new, systematic way to annotate glycoside hydrolase phylogenetic space for functional properties. PMID:25752603

  13. Site-directed mutagenesis of the heterotrimeric killer toxin zymocin identifies residues required for early steps in toxin action.

    Wemhoff, Sabrina; Klassen, Roland; Meinhardt, Friedhelm

    2014-10-01

    Zymocin is a Kluyveromyces lactis protein toxin composed of αβγ subunits encoded by the cytoplasmic virus-like element k1 and functions by αβ-assisted delivery of the anticodon nuclease (ACNase) γ into target cells. The toxin binds to cells' chitin and exhibits chitinase activity in vitro that might be important during γ import. Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains carrying k1-derived hybrid elements deficient in either αβ (k1ORF2) or γ (k1ORF4) were generated. Loss of either gene abrogates toxicity, and unexpectedly, Orf2 secretion depends on Orf4 cosecretion. Functional zymocin assembly can be restored by nuclear expression of k1ORF2 or k1ORF4, providing an opportunity to conduct site-directed mutagenesis of holozymocin. Complementation required active site residues of α's chitinase domain and the sole cysteine residue of β (Cys250). Since βγ are reportedly disulfide linked, the requirement for the conserved γ C231 was probed. Toxicity of intracellularly expressed γ C231A indicated no major defect in ACNase activity, while complementation of k1ΔORF4 by γ C231A was lost, consistent with a role of β C250 and γ C231 in zymocin assembly. To test the capability of αβ to carry alternative cargos, the heterologous ACNase from Pichia acaciae (P. acaciae Orf2 [PaOrf2]) was expressed, along with its immunity gene, in k1ΔORF4. While efficient secretion of PaOrf2 was detected, suppression of the k1ΔORF4-derived k1Orf2 secretion defect was not observed. Thus, the dependency of k1Orf2 on k1Orf4 cosecretion needs to be overcome prior to studying αβ's capability to deliver other cargo proteins into target cells. PMID:25128337

  14. FunFOLDQA: a quality assessment tool for protein-ligand binding site residue predictions.

    Daniel B Roche

    Full Text Available The estimation of prediction quality is important because without quality measures, it is difficult to determine the usefulness of a prediction. Currently, methods for ligand binding site residue predictions are assessed in the function prediction category of the biennial Critical Assessment of Techniques for Protein Structure Prediction (CASP experiment, utilizing the Matthews Correlation Coefficient (MCC and Binding-site Distance Test (BDT metrics. However, the assessment of ligand binding site predictions using such metrics requires the availability of solved structures with bound ligands. Thus, we have developed a ligand binding site quality assessment tool, FunFOLDQA, which utilizes protein feature analysis to predict ligand binding site quality prior to the experimental solution of the protein structures and their ligand interactions. The FunFOLDQA feature scores were combined using: simple linear combinations, multiple linear regression and a neural network. The neural network produced significantly better results for correlations to both the MCC and BDT scores, according to Kendall's τ, Spearman's ρ and Pearson's r correlation coefficients, when tested on both the CASP8 and CASP9 datasets. The neural network also produced the largest Area Under the Curve score (AUC when Receiver Operator Characteristic (ROC analysis was undertaken for the CASP8 dataset. Furthermore, the FunFOLDQA algorithm incorporating the neural network, is shown to add value to FunFOLD, when both methods are employed in combination. This results in a statistically significant improvement over all of the best server methods, the FunFOLD method (6.43%, and one of the top manual groups (FN293 tested on the CASP8 dataset. The FunFOLDQA method was also found to be competitive with the top server methods when tested on the CASP9 dataset. To the best of our knowledge, FunFOLDQA is the first attempt to develop a method that can be used to assess ligand binding site

  15. Metal ion site engineering indicates a global toggle switch model for seven-transmembrane receptor activation

    Elling, Christian E; Frimurer, Thomas M; Gerlach, Lars-Ole;

    2006-01-01

    to form high affinity metal ion sites in both the bidentate and potential tridentate settings. This indicates that the residues involved in the main ligand-binding pocket will have to move closer to each other during receptor activation. On the basis of the distance constraints from these activating metal...

  16. Influence of surface charge, binding site residues and glycosylation on Thielavia terrestris cutinase biochemical characteristics.

    Shirke, Abhijit N; Basore, Danielle; Holton, Samantha; Su, An; Baugh, Evan; Butterfoss, Glenn L; Makhatadze, George; Bystroff, Christopher; Gross, Richard A

    2016-05-01

    Cutinases are esterases of industrial importance for applications in recycling and surface modification of polyesters. The cutinase from Thielavia terrestris (TtC) is distinct in terms of its ability to retain its stability and activity in acidic pH. Stability and activity in acidic pHs are desirable for esterases as the pH of the reaction tends to go down with the generation of acid. The pH stability and activity are governed by the charged state of the residues involved in catalysis or in substrate binding. In this study, we performed the detailed structural and biochemical characterization of TtC coupled with surface charge analysis to understand its acidic tolerance. The stability of TtC in acidic pH was rationalized by evaluating the contribution of charge interactions to the Gibbs free energy of unfolding at varying pHs. The activity of TtC was found to be limited by substrate binding affinity, which is a function of the surface charge. Additionally, the presence of glycosylation affects the biochemical characteristics of TtC owing to steric interactions with residues involved in substrate binding. PMID:26758295

  17. Managing Siting Activities for Nuclear Power Plants

    One of the IAEA's statutory objectives is to ''seek to accelerate and enlarge the contribution of atomic energy to peace, health and prosperity throughout the world''. One way this objective is achieved is through the publication of a range of technical series. Two of these are the IAEA Nuclear Energy Series and the IAEA Safety Standards Series. According to Article III.A.6 of the IAEA Statute, the safety standards establish 'standards of safety for protection of health and minimization of danger to life and property.' The safety standards include the Safety Fundamentals, Safety Requirements and Safety Guides. These standards are written primarily in a regulatory style, and are binding on the IAEA for its own programmes. The principal users are the regulatory bodies in Member States and other national authorities. The IAEA Nuclear Energy Series comprises reports designed to encourage and assist R and D on, and application of, nuclear energy for peaceful uses. This includes practical examples to be used by owners and operators of utilities in Member States, implementing organizations, academia, and government officials, among others. This information is presented in guides, reports on technology status and advances, and best practices for peaceful uses of nuclear energy based on inputs from international experts. The IAEA Nuclear Energy Series complements the IAEA Safety Standards Series. The introduction of nuclear power brings new challenges to States - one of them being the selection of appropriates sites. It is a project that needs to begin early, be well managed, and deploy good communications with all stakeholders; including regulators. This is important, not just for those States introducing nuclear power for the first time, but for any State looking to build a new nuclear power plant. The purpose of the siting activities goes beyond choosing a suitable site and acquiring a licence. A large part of the project is about producing and maintaining a validated

  18. Derivation of guidelines for uranium residual radioactive material in soil at the New Brunswick Site, Middlesex County, New Jersey

    Residual radioactive material guidelines for uranium in soil were derived for the New Brunswick Site, located in Middlesex County, New Jersey. This site has been designated for remedial action under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program of the US Department of Energy (DOE). Residual radioactive material guidelines for individual radionuclides of concern and total uranium were derived on the basis of the requirement that the 50-year committed effective dose equivalent to a hypothetical individual who lives or works in the immediate vicinity of the New Brunswick Site should not exceed a dose of 30 mrem/yr following remedial action for the current-use and likely future-use scenarios or a dose of 100 mrem/yr for less likely future-use scenarios. The DOE residual radioactive material guideline computer code, RESRAD, was used in this evaluation; RESRAD implements the methodology described in the DOE manual for establishing residual radioactive material guidelines. The guidelines derived in this report are intended to apply to the remediation of these remaining residual radioactive materials at the site. The primary radionuclides of concern in these remaining materials are expected to be radium-226 and, to a lesser extent, natural uranium and thorium. The DOE has established generic cleanup guidelines for radium and thorium in soil; however, cleanup guidelines for other radionuclides must be derived on a site-specific basis

  19. SigniSite: Identification of residue-level genotype-phenotype correlations in protein multiple sequence alignments

    Jessen, Leon Ivar; Hoof, Ilka; Lund, Ole; Nielsen, Morten

    Site does not require any pre-definition of subgroups or binary classification. Input is a set of protein sequences where each sequence has an associated real number, quantifying a given phenotype. SigniSite will then identify which amino acid residues are significantly associated with the data set...

  20. Efficient oxygen electrocatalysis on special active sites

    Halck, Niels Bendtsen

    cobalt incorporated in ruthenium dioxide at high overpotentials during the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Density functional theory calculations were used to explain this phenomenon. The special active sites concepts are used to propose a general unified approach to increase the efficiency for oxygen...

  1. A-Site Residues Move Independently from P-Site Residues in all-Atom Molecular Dynamics Simulations of the 70S Bacterial Ribosome

    Relly Brandman; Yigal Brandman; Pande, Vijay S.

    2012-01-01

    The ribosome is a large macromolecular machine, and correlated motion between residues is necessary for coordinating function across multiple protein and RNA chains. We ran two all-atom, explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations of the bacterial ribosome and calculated correlated motion between residue pairs by using mutual information. Because of the short timescales of our simulation (ns), we expect that dynamics are largely local fluctuations around the crystal structure. We hypothes...

  2. Role of cysteine-58 and cysteine-95 residues in the thiol di-sulfide oxidoreductase activity of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor-2 of Wuchereria bancrofti.

    Chauhan, Nikhil; Hoti, S L

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF) is the first human cytokine reported and was thought to have a central role in the regulation of inflammatory responses. Homologs of this molecule have been reported in bacteria, invertebrates and plants. Apart from cytokine activity, it also has two catalytic activities viz., tautomerase and di-sulfide oxidoreductase, which appear to be involved in immunological functions. The CXXC catalytic site is responsible for di-sulfide oxidoreductase activity of MIF. We have recently reported thiol-disulfide oxidoreductase activity of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor-2 of Wuchereria bancrofti (Wba-MIF-2), although it lacks the CXXC motif. We hypothesized that three conserved cysteine residues might be involved in the formation of di-sulfide oxidoreductase catalytic site. Homology modeling of Wba-MIF-2 showed that among the three cysteine residues, Cys58 and Cys95 residues came in close proximity (3.23Å) in the tertiary structure with pKa value 9, indicating that these residues might play a role in the di-sulfide oxidoreductase catalytic activity. We carried out site directed mutagenesis of these residues (Cys58Ser & Cys95Ser) and expressed mutant proteins in Escherichia coli. The mutant proteins did not show any oxidoreductase activity in the insulin reduction assay, thus indicating that these two cysteine residues are vital for the catalytic activity of Wba-MIF-2. PMID:26432350

  3. Measurement of residual CO2 saturation at a geological storage site using hydraulic tests

    Rötting, T. S.; Martinez-Landa, L.; Carrera, J.; Russian, A.; Dentz, M.; Cubillo, B.

    2012-12-01

    Estimating long term capillary trapping of CO2 in aquifers remains a key challenge for CO2 storage. Zhang et al. (2011) proposed a combination of thermal, tracer, and hydraulic experiments to estimate the amount of CO2 trapped in the formation after a CO2 push and pull test. Of these three types of experiments, hydraulic tests are the simplest to perform and possibly the most informative. However, their potential has not yet been fully exploited. Here, a methodology is presented to interpret these tests and analyze which parameters can be estimated. Numerical and analytical solutions are used to simulate a continuous injection in a porous medium where residual CO2 has caused a reduction in hydraulic conductivity and an increase in storativity over a finite thickness (a few meters) skin around the injection well. The model results are interpreted using conventional pressure build-up and diagnostic plots (a plot of the drawdown s and the logarithmic derivative d s / d ln t of the drawdown as a function of time). The methodology is applied using the hydraulic parameters estimated for the Hontomin site (Northern Spain) where a Technology Demonstration Plant (TDP) for geological CO2 storage is planned to be set up. The reduction of hydraulic conductivity causes an increase in observed drawdowns, the increased storativity in the CO2 zone causes a delay in the drawdown curve with respect to the reference curve measured before CO2 injection. The duration (characteristic time) of these effects can be used to estimate the radius of the CO2 zone. The effects of reduced permeability and increased storativity are well separated from wellbore storage and natural formation responses, even if the CO2-brine interface is inclined (i.e. the CO2 forms a cone around the well). We find that both skin hydraulic conductivity and storativity (and thus residual CO2 saturation) can be obtained from the water injection test provided that water flow rate is carefully controlled and head build

  4. Addendum to the East Tennessee Technology Park Site-Wide Residual Contamination Remedial Investigation Work Plan Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SAIC

    2011-04-01

    The East Tennessee Technology Park Site-Wide Residual Contamination Remedial Investigation Work Plan (DOE 2004) describes the planned fieldwork to support the remedial investigation (RI) for residual contamination at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) not addressed in previous Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) decisions. This Addendum describes activities that will be conducted to gather additional information in Zone 1 of the ETTP for groundwater, surface water, and sediments. This Addendum has been developed from agreements reached in meetings held on June 23, 2010, August 25, 2010, October 13, 2010, November 13, 2010, December 1, 2010, and January 13, 2011, with representatives of the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC). Based on historical to recent groundwater data for ETTP and the previously completed Sitewide Remedial Investigation for the ETTP (DOE 2007a), the following six areas of concern have been identified that exhibit groundwater contamination downgradient of these areas above state of Tennessee and EPA drinking water maximum contaminant levels (MCLs): (1) K-720 Fly Ash Pile, (2) K-770 Scrap Yard, (3) Duct Island, (4) K-1085 Firehouse Burn/J.A. Jones Maintenance Area, (5) Contractor's Spoil Area (CSA), and (6) Former K-1070-A Burial Ground. The paper presents a brief summary of the history of the areas, the general conceptual models for the observed groundwater contamination, and the data gaps identified.

  5. Effect of soil-bound residues of malathion on microbial activities

    The effect of soil-bound residues of malathion on CO/sub 2/ evolution, dehydrogenase activity and some nitrogen transformations in a loam soil was investigated under laboratory conditions. The soil samples containing bound residues arising from 10 mg g-1 of the applied malathion were mixed in equal quantity with fresh soil and compared with solvent extracted control soil without bound residues (extracted in the same way as soil containing bound residues). Another control comprising un extracted fresh soil without bound residues was also kept to study the effect of solvent extraction on the biological activity. Rate of Carbon mineralization (CO/sub 2/ evolution) was decreased in the presence of soil-bound residues of malathion. Bound residues also affected dehydrogenase activity of soil. Over 40% inhibition of dehydrogenase activity was observed after 4 days and the inhibition persisted at least for 12 days. Nitrogen mineralization was stimulated in soil containing bound residues of malathion and this stimulatory effect increased with time of incubation. Nitrification was partially inhibited in the presence of soil-bound residues of malathion. The inhibitory effect of the soil-bound residues on nitrification did not show much variation with time. The soil-bound residues did not affect denitrification rate (N/sub 2/O evolution). Nitrogen fixation (acetylene reduction) was partially inhibited in soil amended with bound residues of malathion and the inhibitory effect persisted for at least one week. In general, soil bound residues of malathion inhibited CO/sub 2/ evolution, dehydrogenase activity, nitrification and nitrogen fixation while mineralization of nitrogen was stimulated. Denitrification was not affected by the applied insecticide. (author)

  6. Efficient oxygen electrocatalysis on special active sites

    Halck, Niels Bendtsen

    Oxygen electrocatalysis will be pivotal in future independent of fossil fuels. Renewable energy production will rely heavily on oxygen electrocatalysis as a method for storing energy from intermittent energy sources such as the wind and sun in the form of chemical bonds and to release the energy ...... electrocatalysis (ORR and OER) using organic functional groups on another class of catalysts. These consist of graphene sheets modified to have a local porphyrine site with different transition metals ions as model systems....... stored in these bonds in an eco-friendly fashion in fuel cells. This thesis explores catalysts for oxygen electrocatalysis and how carefully designed local structures on catalysts surfaces termed special active sites can influence the activity. Density functional theory has been used as a method...... throughout this thesis to understand these local structure effects and their influence on surface reactions. The concept of these special active sites is used to explain how oxygen evolution reaction (OER) catalysts can have activities beyond the limits of what was previously thought possible. The concept is...

  7. Radioactive residues at nuclear sites in the United States of America

    The United States of America has a large number of sites where radioactive materials have been mined, processed, produced, or used. Upon completion of activities at these sites, some will be cleaned up completely and released for unrestricted future use. However, at other sites, contamination will remain on the site following cleanup, requiring long term institutional controls. Depending on the purpose or the activity conducted at a specific site, these locations are generally under the jurisdiction of a federal agency: the United States Department of Energy, the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the United States Environmental Protection Agency, or the United States Department of Defense. However, under certain conditions, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission relinquishes regulatory authority to individual states to regulate the commercial uses of radioactive materials (except for nuclear reactors), so some locations with radioactive materials are under the jurisdiction of individual states. Other sites with naturally occurring radioactive contamination may also be controlled by individual states. One or two sites under the jurisdiction of each agency are discussed where radioactive materials either existed in the past or exist today, and the source of contamination, the anticipated end state, and the process by which the responsible agency did or will conduct cleanup and site closure are described. Several issues are reviewed that must be addressed in order to design and implement remediations that will ensure long term protection for the environment and future inhabitants. The role of citizens in environmental cleanups is examined, and how institutional controls may be applied to ensure long term protection of remediations that leave some contaminants in place. (author)

  8. Decommissioning and decontamination activity, Gnome Site, Eddy County, New Mexico

    The purpose of this assessment is to present a brief description of the proposed activity and its potential impacts on the environment. This assessment will constitute an evaluation as to whether or not a formal Environmental Statement need be prepared. As background to the proposed activity, Project Gnome was an underground nuclear test conducted in December 1961 as part of the PLOWSHARE Program. The project site is located about 25 miles southeast of Carlsbad, New Mexico. By means of an excavated shaft and tunnel, a 3-kiloton nuclear explosive was emplaced and detonated in a salt bed about 1200 feet below the surface. The uncontaminated rock and salt muck from the original excavation and subsequent contaminated muck and minor construction debris from reentry activities into the nuclear cavity is commingled and stored in a pile near the Gnome/Coach Shaft. Other areas on the site are known to have been contaminated. In 1969, a program was conducted to cleanup and dispose of all surface contamination to whatever depth it occurred in excess of 0.1 mR/hr. Contaminated materials and soil were collected and disposed into the Gnome shaft, which was filled and sealed. Since then, NV has proposed to DOE/HQ much lower criteria for residual radioactive contamination for the Gnome Site. These proposed criteria were to collect and dispose of surficial materials which contain more than 2 x 10-5 microcuries per gram of soil for beta/gamma emitters and 3 x 10-2 microcuries per milliliter of tritium in soil moisture. According to the latest reconnaissance in 1972, low concentrations of Cs-137, Sr-90 and tritium were present at various locations on the site in excess of these proposed guidelines. Other operational areas within the site are suspected of containing radioactive contamination in much lesser volume, which are to be determined by careful probing and monitoring, as described in the next section

  9. Environmental evaluation of the feasibility of disposal and utilization of coal combustion residues in abandoned mine sites

    The combustion of fossil fuels to generate electricity produces large volumes of solid wastes containing chemicals particularly trace elements. About one fourth of these 80 million tons of coal combustion residues are currently utilized and the remaining accumulate in on site piles and ponds, or are carried away to landfills for disposal. The US Environmental Protection Agency has promulgated regulations governing the disposal of such solid wastes in an environmentally acceptable manner. The major impetus behind these regulations is protection of ground water. Since landfill sites are becoming more scarce, it is highly desirable to find large volume beneficial uses for these combustion residues provided the environmental impacts are minimal and socially acceptable. This study determines the possibility of returning these residues to abounded mine sites for reclamation with subsequent evaluation of environmental implications on groundwater quality. 12 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs

  10. Residual radioactivity in the vicinity of formerly utilized MED/AEC sites

    As demand for uranium and thorium was accelerated during the 1940's, services of chemical and metallurgical firms and major research facilities were contracted as needed by the Manhattan Engineer District (MED). A lack of documentation of the radiological status at the time contracts were terminated at these facilities led the Department of Energy (DOE), and its predecessor the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA), to develop a major radiological resurvey program to fill this information void. A combination of aerial and ground-level radiological monitoring teams were utilized to identify and assess off-site radioactivity. Results from comprehensive aerial surveys provide the approximate areal extent of elevated radiation levels on the ground. These aerial survey results led to two types of ground-level surveys: (1) gamma-ray scanning on foot or from a motorized vehicle (mobile lab based system) to pinpoint the location of residual radioactivity; and (2) compehensive radiological surveys to determine the amount and type of materials present on specific parcels of private and public property identified during the scanning. This type of investigation was initiated in 1978 and has been successful in identifying and assessing the potential radiation hazard from property on which materials bearing natural radioactivity have been found. This paper contains a description of the techniques used to find and evaluate radioactive material displaced outside the boundaries of a formerly utilized site

  11. ANALYTICAL DETERMINATION OF RESIDUAL STRENGTH AND LINKUP STRENGTH FOR CURVED PANELS, WITH MULTIPLE SITE DAMAGE

    Elangovan.R ,

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Airplane fuselage has a large number of riveted joints and is subjected to a major loading of differential internal pressure at cruise altitude and zero pressure on the ground. This constitutes one of the major load cycle on the fuselage often referred to as ground air ground (G-A-G cycle. Due to presence of large number of rivet holes, the fuselage skins have a large number of high stress locations and these are locations of potential crack initiation. Thus at the skin joints of the fuselage shell one can have a number of cracks as it ages (i.e used over a period of time. The practice in earlier time was to consider the largest sized crack and considerits acceptance or otherwise. But in fuselage panels one may have one dominate crack and number of smaller secondary cracks. The understanding the safety of a panel with multi site damages is of concern to airline operations. The present paper deals with the estimation of the strength of a flat panel with multi site damage andlead on to estimation of residual life, using fracture mechanics based approach.

  12. Allowable Residual Contamination Levels in soil for decommissioning the Shippingport Atomic Power Station site

    As part of decommissioning the Shippingport Atomic Power Station, a fundamental concern is the determination of Allowable Residual Contamination Levels (ARCL) for radionuclides in the soil at the site. The ARCL method described in this report is based on a scenario/exposure-pathway analysis and compliance with an annual dose limit for unrestricted use of the land after decommissioning. In addition to naturally occurring radionuclides and fallout from weapons testing, soil contamination could potentially come from five other sources. These include operation of the Shippingport Station as a pressurized water reactor, operations of the Shippingport Station as a light-water breeder, operation of the nearby Beaver Valley reactors, releases during decommissioning, and operation of other nearby industries, including the Bruce-Mansfield coal-fired power plants. ARCL values are presented for 29 individual radionculides and a worksheet is provided so that ARCL values can be determined for any mixture of the individual radionuclides for any annual dose limit selected. In addition, a worksheet is provided for calculating present time soil concentration value that will decay to the ARCL values after any selected period of time, such as would occur during a period of restricted access. The ARCL results are presented for both unconfined (surface) and confined (subsurface) soil contamination. The ARCL method and results described in this report provide a flexible means of determining unrestricted-use site release conditions after decommissioning the Shippingport Atomic Power Station

  13. Residual radioactivity guidelines for the heavy water components test reactor at the Savannah River Site

    Owen, M.B. Smith, R.; McNeil, J.

    1997-04-01

    Guidelines were developed for acceptable levels of residual radioactivity in the Heavy Water Components Test Reactor (HWCTR) facility at the conclusion of its decommissioning. Using source terms developed from data generated in a detailed characterization study, the RESRAD and RASRAD-BUILD computer codes were used to calculate derived concentration guideline levels (DCGLs) for the radionuclides that will remain in the facility. The calculated DCGLs, when compared to existing concentrations of radionuclides measured during a 1996 characterization program, indicate that no decontamination of concrete surfaces will be necessary. Also, based on the results of the calculations, activated concrete in the reactor biological shield does not have to be removed, and imbedded radioactive piping in the facility can remain in place. Viewed in another way, the results of the calculations showed that the present inventory of residual radioactivity in the facility (not including that associated with the reactor vessel and steam generators) would produce less than one millirem per year above background to a hypothetical individual on the property. The residual radioactivity is estimated to be approximately 0.04 percent of the total inventory in the facility as of March, 1997. According to the results, the only radionuclides that would produce greater than 0.0.1-millirem per year are Am-241 (0.013 mrem/yr at 300 years), C-14 (0.022 mrem/yr at 1000 years) and U-238 (0.034 mrem/yr at 6000 years). Human exposure would occur only through the groundwater pathways, that is, from water drawn from, a well on the property. The maximum exposure would be approximately one percent of the 4 millirem per year ground water exposure limit established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. 11 refs., 13 figs., 15 tabs.

  14. Residual radioactivity guidelines for the heavy water components test reactor at the Savannah River Site

    Guidelines were developed for acceptable levels of residual radioactivity in the Heavy Water Components Test Reactor (HWCTR) facility at the conclusion of its decommissioning. Using source terms developed from data generated in a detailed characterization study, the RESRAD and RASRAD-BUILD computer codes were used to calculate derived concentration guideline levels (DCGLs) for the radionuclides that will remain in the facility. The calculated DCGLs, when compared to existing concentrations of radionuclides measured during a 1996 characterization program, indicate that no decontamination of concrete surfaces will be necessary. Also, based on the results of the calculations, activated concrete in the reactor biological shield does not have to be removed, and imbedded radioactive piping in the facility can remain in place. Viewed in another way, the results of the calculations showed that the present inventory of residual radioactivity in the facility (not including that associated with the reactor vessel and steam generators) would produce less than one millirem per year above background to a hypothetical individual on the property. The residual radioactivity is estimated to be approximately 0.04 percent of the total inventory in the facility as of March, 1997. According to the results, the only radionuclides that would produce greater than 0.0.1-millirem per year are Am-241 (0.013 mrem/yr at 300 years), C-14 (0.022 mrem/yr at 1000 years) and U-238 (0.034 mrem/yr at 6000 years). Human exposure would occur only through the groundwater pathways, that is, from water drawn from, a well on the property. The maximum exposure would be approximately one percent of the 4 millirem per year ground water exposure limit established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. 11 refs., 13 figs., 15 tabs

  15. SigniSite: Identification of residue-level genotype-phenotype correlations in protein multiple sequence alignments.

    Jessen, Leon Eyrich; Hoof, Ilka; Lund, Ole; Nielsen, Morten

    2013-07-01

    Identifying which mutation(s) within a given genotype is responsible for an observable phenotype is important in many aspects of molecular biology. Here, we present SigniSite, an online application for subgroup-free residue-level genotype-phenotype correlation. In contrast to similar methods, SigniSite does not require any pre-definition of subgroups or binary classification. Input is a set of protein sequences where each sequence has an associated real number, quantifying a given phenotype. SigniSite will then identify which amino acid residues are significantly associated with the data set phenotype. As output, SigniSite displays a sequence logo, depicting the strength of the phenotype association of each residue and a heat-map identifying 'hot' or 'cold' regions. SigniSite was benchmarked against SPEER, a state-of-the-art method for the prediction of specificity determining positions (SDP) using a set of human immunodeficiency virus protease-inhibitor genotype-phenotype data and corresponding resistance mutation scores from the Stanford University HIV Drug Resistance Database, and a data set of protein families with experimentally annotated SDPs. For both data sets, SigniSite was found to outperform SPEER. SigniSite is available at: http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/SigniSite/. PMID:23761454

  16. Development of an on-site measurement method for residual stress in primary system piping of nuclear power plants

    In residual stress measurement for large-scale pipes and vessels in high radiation areas and highly contaminated areas of nuclear plants, it is difficult to bring the radioactivated pipes and vessels out of the areas as they are. If they can brought out, it is very burdensome to handle them for the measurement. Development of an on-site measurement method of residual stress which can be quickly applied and has sufficient measurement accuracy is desirable. In this study, a new method combining an electric discharge skim-cut method with a microscopic strain measurement method using markers was proposed to realize the on-site residual stress measurement on pipes in high radiation areas and highly contaminated areas. In the electric discharge skim-cut method, a boat-type sample is skimmed out of a pipe outer/inner surface using electric discharge machining and released residual stress is measured. The on-site measurement of residual stress by the method can be done using a small, portable electric discharge machine. In the microscopic strain measurement method using markers, the residual stress is estimated by microscopic measurement of the distance between markers after the stress release. The combination of both methods can evaluate the residual stress with the same accuracy as conventional methods offer and it can achieve reduction of radiation exposure in the measurement because the work is done simply and rapidly. In this study, the applicability of the electric discharge skim-cut method was investigated because the applicability of the microscopic strain measurement method using markers was confirmed previously. The experimental examination clarified the applicable conditions for the residual stress measurement with the same accuracy as the conventional methods. Furthermore, the electric discharge machining conditions using pure water as the machining liquid was found to eliminate the amount of liquid radioactive waste completely. (author)

  17. Synthesis and evaluation of radioactive and fluorescent residualizing labels for identifying sites of plasma protein catabolism

    Inulin and lactose were each coupled to tyramine by reductive amination with NaBH3CN and the tyramine then labeled with 125I. Dilactitol-125I-tyramine (DLT) and inulin-125I-tyramine (InTn) were coupled by reductive amination and cyanuric chloride, respectively, to asialofetuin (ASF), fetuin and rat serum albumin (RSA). Attachment of either label had no effect on the circulating half-lives of the proteins. Radioactivity from labeled ASF was recovered in rat liver (> 90%) by 1 h post-injection and remained in liver with half-lives of 2 and 6 days, respectively, for the DLT and InTn labels. Whole body recoveries of radioactivity from DLT- and InTn labels. Whole body recoveries of radioactivity from DLT- and InTn-labeled RSA were 5 and 6.5 days, respectively, again indicating that the larger glycoconjugate label residualized more efficiently in cells following protein degradation. (Lactitol)2-N-CH2-CH2-NH-fluroescein (DLF) was also coupled to ASF by reductive amination and recovered quantitatively in liver at 1 h post-injection. Native ASF was an effective competitor for clearance of DLF-ASF from the circulation. Fluorescent degradation products were retained in liver with a half-life of 1.2 days. Residualizing fluorescent labels should be useful for identification and sorting of cells active in the degradation of plasma proteins

  18. Chaperone-Like Activity of ß-Casein and Its Effect on Residual in Vitro Activity of Food Enzymes

    Sulewska, Anna Maria

    , tyrosinase from Agaricus bisporus and equine cytochrome c. Only for the first target β-casein was acting as a molecular chaperone i.e. its presence resulted in higher residual activity (higher degree of the function preservation). β-Casein did not have any influence on the residual activity of tyrosinase...

  19. Identification of critical residues in loop E in the 5-HT3ASR binding site

    Muthalagi Mani

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The serotonin type 3 receptor (5-HT3R is a member of a superfamily of ligand gated ion channels. All members of this family share a large degree of sequence homology and presumably significant structural similarity. A large number of studies have explored the structure-function relationships of members of this family, particularly the nicotinic and GABA receptors. This information can be utilized to gain additional insights into specific structural and functional features of other receptors in this family. Results Thirteen amino acids in the mouse 5-HT3ASR that correspond to the putative E binding loop of the nicotinic α7 receptor were chosen for mutagenesis. Due to the presence of a highly conserved glycine in this region, it has been suggested that this binding loop is comprised of a hairpin turn and may form a portion of the ligand-binding site in this ion channel family. Mutation of the conserved glycine (G147 to alanine eliminated binding of the 5-HT3R antagonist [3H]granisetron. Three tyrosine residues (Y140, Y142 and Y152 also significantly altered the binding of 5-HT3R ligands. Mutations in neighboring residues had little or no effect on binding of these ligands to the 5-HT3ASR. Conclusion Our data supports a role for the putative E-loop region of the 5-HT3R in the binding of 5-HT, mCPBG, d-tc and lerisetron. 5-HT and mCPBG interact with Y142, d-tc with Y140 and lerisetron with both Y142 and Y152. Our data also provides support for the hypothesis that this region of the receptor is present in a loop structure.

  20. Site reactivity in the free radicals induced damage to leucine residues: a theoretical study.

    Medina, M E; Galano, A; Alvarez-Idaboy, J R

    2015-02-21

    Several recent computational studies have tried to explain the observed selectivity in radical damage to proteins. In this work we use Density Functional Theory and Transition State Theory including tunnelling corrections, reaction path degeneracy, the effect of diffusion, and the role of free radicals to get further insights into this important topic. The reaction between a leucine derivative and free radicals of biological significance, in aqueous and lipid media, has been investigated. Both thermochemical and kinetic analyses, in both hydrophilic and hydrophobic environments, have been carried out. DPPH, ˙OOH, ˙OOCH3, ˙OOCH2Cl, ˙OOCHCl2 and ˙OOCHCH2 radicals do not react with the target molecule. The reactions are proposed to be kinetically controlled. The leucine gamma site was the most reactive for the reactions with ˙N3, ˙OOCCl3, ˙OCH3, ˙OCH2Cl, and ˙OCHCl2 radicals, with rate constants equal to 1.97 × 10(5), 3.24 × 10(4), 6.68 × 10(5), 5.98 × 10(6) and 8.87 × 10(8) M(-1) s(-1), respectively, in aqueous solution. The ˙Cl, ˙OH and ˙OCCl3 radicals react with leucine at the beta, gamma, and delta positions at rates close to the diffusion limit with the alpha position which is the slowest path and the most thermodynamically favored. The presented results confirm that the Bell-Evans-Polanyi principle does not apply for the reactions between amino acid residues and free radicals. Regarding the influence of the environment on the reactivity of the studied series of free radicals towards leucine residues, it is concluded that hydrophilic media slightly lower the reactivity of the studied radicals, compared to hydrophobic ones, albeit the trends in reactivity are very similar. PMID:25592549

  1. An evaluation of remote sensing technologies for the detection of residual contamination at ready-for-anticipated use sites

    Slonecker, E. Terrence; Fisher, Gary B.

    2014-01-01

    Operational problems with site access and information, XRF instrument operation, and imagery collections hampered the effective data collection and analysis process. Of the 24 sites imaged and analyzed, 17 appeared to be relatively clean with no discernible metal contamination, hydrocarbons, or asbestos in the soil. None of the samples for the sites in Louisiana had any result exceeding the appropriate industrial or residential standard for arsenic or lead. One site in South Carolina (North Street Dump) had two samples that exceeded the residential standard for lead. One site in Texas (Cadiz Street), and four sites in Florida (210 North 12th Street, Encore Retail Site, Clearwater Auto, and 22nd Street Mixed Use) were found to have some level of residual metal contamination above the applicable residential or commercial Risk-Based Concentration (RBC) standard. Three of the Florida sites showing metal contamination also showed a pattern of vegetation stress based on standard vegetation analysis techniques.

  2. Arylfluorosulfates Inactivate Intracellular Lipid Binding Protein(s) through Chemoselective SuFEx Reaction with a Binding Site Tyr Residue.

    Chen, Wentao; Dong, Jiajia; Plate, Lars; Mortenson, David E; Brighty, Gabriel J; Li, Suhua; Liu, Yu; Galmozzi, Andrea; Lee, Peter S; Hulce, Jonathan J; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Saez, Enrique; Powers, Evan T; Wilson, Ian A; Sharpless, K Barry; Kelly, Jeffery W

    2016-06-15

    Arylfluorosulfates have appeared only rarely in the literature and have not been explored as probes for covalent conjugation to proteins, possibly because they were assumed to possess high reactivity, as with other sulfur(VI) halides. However, we find that arylfluorosulfates become reactive only under certain circumstances, e.g., when fluoride displacement by a nucleophile is facilitated. Herein, we explore the reactivity of structurally simple arylfluorosulfates toward the proteome of human cells. We demonstrate that the protein reactivity of arylfluorosulfates is lower than that of the corresponding aryl sulfonyl fluorides, which are better characterized with regard to proteome reactivity. We discovered that simple hydrophobic arylfluorosulfates selectively react with a few members of the intracellular lipid binding protein (iLBP) family. A central function of iLBPs is to deliver small-molecule ligands to nuclear hormone receptors. Arylfluorosulfate probe 1 reacts with a conserved tyrosine residue in the ligand-binding site of a subset of iLBPs. Arylfluorosulfate probes 3 and 4, featuring a biphenyl core, very selectively and efficiently modify cellular retinoic acid binding protein 2 (CRABP2), both in vitro and in living cells. The X-ray crystal structure of the CRABP2-4 conjugate, when considered together with binding site mutagenesis experiments, provides insight into how CRABP2 might activate arylfluorosulfates toward site-specific reaction. Treatment of breast cancer cells with probe 4 attenuates nuclear hormone receptor activity mediated by retinoic acid, an endogenous client lipid of CRABP2. Our findings demonstrate that arylfluorosulfates can selectively target single iLBPs, making them useful for understanding iLBP function. PMID:27191344

  3. Residual matrix from different separation techniques impacts exosome biological activity

    Lucia Paolini; Andrea Zendrini; Giuseppe Di Noto; Sara Busatto; Elisabetta Lottini; Annalisa Radeghieri; Alessandra Dossi; Andrea Caneschi; Doris Ricotta; Paolo Bergese

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes are gaining a prominent role in research due to their intriguing biology and several therapeutic opportunities. However, their accurate purification from body fluids and detailed physicochemical characterization remain open issues. We isolated exosomes from serum of patients with Multiple Myeloma by four of the most popular purification methods and assessed the presence of residual contaminants in the preparations through an ad hoc combination of biochemical and biophysical technique...

  4. BET is active on Sellafield site

    Several companies, all part of BET Plant Services are carrying out work at the British Nuclear Fuels (BNFL) site at Sellafield, Cumbria, on one of the largest construction projects in Europe. The main development scheme is the THORP (Thermal Oxide Reprocessing Plant) buildings. One of the BET companies has the contract to paint the inside of the fuel storage ponds. It will also coat the surfaces of the MASWEP (Medium Active Solid Waste Encapsulation Plant) complex. Other work includes insulation and fire prevention installation. Scaffolding at the EARP (Enhanced Actinide Removal Plant) site is being provided on a common user basis so all the contractors can use the scaffolding and share the cost. Temporary office and living accommodation blocks have been provide by another BET company. (author)

  5. Prediction and Analysis of Post-Translational Pyruvoyl Residue Modification Sites from Internal Serines in Proteins.

    Yang Jiang

    Full Text Available Most of pyruvoyl-dependent proteins observed in prokaryotes and eukaryotes are critical regulatory enzymes, which are primary targets of inhibitors for anti-cancer and anti-parasitic therapy. These proteins undergo an autocatalytic, intramolecular self-cleavage reaction in which a covalently bound pyruvoyl group is generated on a conserved serine residue. Traditional detections of the modified serine sites are performed by experimental approaches, which are often labor-intensive and time-consuming. In this study, we initiated in an attempt for the computational predictions of such serine sites with Feature Selection based on a Random Forest. Since only a small number of experimentally verified pyruvoyl-modified proteins are collected in the protein database at its current version, we only used a small dataset in this study. After removing proteins with sequence identities >60%, a non-redundant dataset was generated and was used, which contained only 46 proteins, with one pyruvoyl serine site for each protein. Several types of features were considered in our method including PSSM conservation scores, disorders, secondary structures, solvent accessibilities, amino acid factors and amino acid occurrence frequencies. As a result, a pretty good performance was achieved in our dataset. The best 100.00% accuracy and 1.0000 MCC value were obtained from the training dataset, and 93.75% accuracy and 0.8441 MCC value from the testing dataset. The optimal feature set contained 9 features. Analysis of the optimal feature set indicated the important roles of some specific features in determining the pyruvoyl-group-serine sites, which were consistent with several results of earlier experimental studies. These selected features may shed some light on the in-depth understanding of the mechanism of the post-translational self-maturation process, providing guidelines for experimental validation. Future work should be made as more pyruvoyl-modified proteins are

  6. Strategy utilized for assessing baseline risks to human health from K-65 and metal oxide residues stored at the Fernald Site

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for cleanup activities at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) site in southwestern Ohio. The 425-hectare site consists of a former 55-hectare Production Area, an adjacent Waste Storage Area and various support facilities. From 1952 until 1989, the FEMP processed uranium into metallic open-quotes feedclose quotes materials for other DOE facilities in the nation's defense program. In accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), the FEMP site is currently listed on the National Priorities List (NPL). To facilitate an expeditious cleanup effort, environmental issues associated with site cleanup are being managed under five operable units. This paper summarizes the risk assessment strategy employed to determine baseline human health risks associated with K-65 and metal oxide residues currently stored in Operable Unit 4. The K-65 and metal oxide residues were generated during the 1950s as a result of the extraction of uranium from uranium-bearing ores and concentrates. These residues are currently stored within Operable Unit 4 in concrete silos. Silos I and 2 contain approximately 6,120 cubic meters [m3] (8,005 cubic yards [yd3]) of K-65 residues, while silos 3 contains approximately 3890 m3 (5,080 yd3) of cold metal oxides. These concrete silos are beyond their design life and require remedial action. The risk assessment conducted for Operable Unit 4 constitutes the first detailed human health risk assessment to be approved by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for the CERCLA clean-up effort at the FEMP Site. This paper discusses the FEMP's use of a Risk Information Quality Objective process in concert with the traditional risk assessment approach to determine baseline risk to human health and the environment posed by Operable Unit 4. A summary of the baseline risks to human health is also presented

  7. Networks of high mutual information define the structural proximity of catalytic sites: implications for catalytic residue identification.

    Cristina Marino Buslje

    Full Text Available Identification of catalytic residues (CR is essential for the characterization of enzyme function. CR are, in general, conserved and located in the functional site of a protein in order to attain their function. However, many non-catalytic residues are highly conserved and not all CR are conserved throughout a given protein family making identification of CR a challenging task. Here, we put forward the hypothesis that CR carry a particular signature defined by networks of close proximity residues with high mutual information (MI, and that this signature can be applied to distinguish functional from other non-functional conserved residues. Using a data set of 434 Pfam families included in the catalytic site atlas (CSA database, we tested this hypothesis and demonstrated that MI can complement amino acid conservation scores to detect CR. The Kullback-Leibler (KL conservation measurement was shown to significantly outperform both the Shannon entropy and maximal frequency measurements. Residues in the proximity of catalytic sites were shown to be rich in shared MI. A structural proximity MI average score (termed pMI was demonstrated to be a strong predictor for CR, thus confirming the proposed hypothesis. A structural proximity conservation average score (termed pC was also calculated and demonstrated to carry distinct information from pMI. A catalytic likeliness score (Cls, combining the KL, pC and pMI measures, was shown to lead to significantly improved prediction accuracy. At a specificity of 0.90, the Cls method was found to have a sensitivity of 0.816. In summary, we demonstrate that networks of residues with high MI provide a distinct signature on CR and propose that such a signature should be present in other classes of functional residues where the requirement to maintain a particular function places limitations on the diversification of the structural environment along the course of evolution.

  8. Radiological conditions at four selected sites in South Iraq with residues of depleted uranium

    During the Iraq war of 2003 several air attacks and tank battles were conducted, which utilized depleted uranium (DU) munitions. Consequently, the possible health effects on the Iraqi population of DU residues in the battlefields raised concerns within the Iraqi population, its authorities responsible for the environment, as well as the media in various parts of the world. In 2006 and 2007 technical staff from the Iraqi Radiation Protection Centre collected environmental samples at four selected sites in Southern Iraq, namely As Samawah, Al Nassiryah, Al Basrah and Al Zubayr. A total of 520 samples of soil, water, vegetation and smear tests, were taken. The samples were shipped from Iraq to the Spiez Laboratory in Switzerland, which, on behalf of UNEP, analyzed them using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS). The radioanalytical results were then made available to the IAEA in order to make a prospective estimation of the radiation doses to the Iraqi population living in the above-mentioned four locations and the associated radiological risks. The annual radiation doses to the public that could arise from the various types of exposure scenarios were calculated. On the basis of the measurements carried out on the samples collected in this study the radiation doses from DU were found sufficiently low not pose a radiological hazard to the population living at the four studied locations. (author)

  9. Recognition of triplex forming oligodeoxynucleotides incorporating abasic sites by 5-arylcytosine residues in duplex DNAs.

    Mizuta, Masahiro; Banba, Jun-Ichi; Kanamori, Takashi; Ohkubo, Akihiro; Sekine, Mitsuo; Seio, Kohji

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we reported our attempt to use a 5arylcytosine (dC(ar)) and the abasic site () as an artificial base pair for DNA triplex. The idea was confirmed by the molecular modeling studied in which the aromatic group of (ph) which protrudes in the major groove was buried into the cleft formed by the residue in the TFO. We synthesized three kinds of dC(ar) and the oligonucleotides incorporating them. Our UV-melting experiments revealed that the DNA triplex containing the dC(ph).phi was more stable than that containing dC.phi pair. Moreover, the dC.phi pair was more stable than any other dC.Y pairs such as dC(ph).G, dC(ph).C, dC(ph).T and dC(ph).A. These results indicated the possibility that the appropriate pair of dC(Ar) and could be the new sequence code of DNA triplex. We also carried out the Tm analyses of other TFOs incorporating dC(Ar) and , and clarified the stability of these triplexes. PMID:18029568

  10. Effect of different detoxification procedures on the residual pertussis toxin activities in vaccines.

    Yuen, Chun-Ting; Asokanathan, Catpagavalli; Cook, Sarah; Lin, Naomi; Xing, Dorothy

    2016-04-19

    Pertussis toxin (PTx) is a major virulence factor produced by Bordetella pertussis and its detoxified form is one of the major protective antigens in vaccines against whooping cough. Ideally, PTx in the vaccine should be completely detoxified while still preserving immunogenicity. However, this may not always be the case. Due to multilevel reaction mechanisms of chemical detoxification that act on different molecular sites and with different production processes, it is difficult to define a molecular characteristic of a pertussis toxoid. PTx has two functional distinctive domains: the ADP-ribosyltransferase enzymatic subunit S1 (A-protomer) and the host cell binding carbohydrate-binding subunits S2-5 (B-oligomer); and in this study, we investigated the effect of different detoxification processes on these two functional activities of the residual PTx in toxoids and vaccines currently marketed worldwide using a recently developed in vitro biochemical assay system. The patho-physiological activities in these samples were also estimated using the in vivo official histamine sensitisation tests. Different types of vaccines, detoxified by formaldehyde, glutaraldehyde or by both, have different residual functional and individual baseline activities. Of the vaccines tested, PT toxoid detoxified by formaldehyde had the lowest residual PTx ADP-ribosyltransferase activity. The carbohydrate binding results detected by anti-PTx polyclonal (pAb) and anti-PTx subunits monoclonal antibodies (mAb) showed specific binding profiles for toxoids and vaccines produced from different detoxification methods. In addition, we also demonstrated that using pAb or mAb S2/3 as detection antibodies would give a better differential difference between these vaccine lots than using mAbs S1 or S4. In summary, we showed for the first time that by measuring the activities of the two functional domains of PTx, we could characterise pertussis toxoids prepared from different chemical detoxification

  11. Identification of key residues that confer Rhodobacter sphaeroides LPS activity at horse TLR4/MD-2.

    Katherine L Irvine

    Full Text Available The molecular determinants underpinning how hexaacylated lipid A and tetraacylated precursor lipid IVa activate Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 are well understood, but how activation is induced by other lipid A species is less clear. Species specificity studies have clarified how TLR4/MD-2 recognises different lipid A structures, for example tetraacylated lipid IVa requires direct electrostatic interactions for agonism. In this study, we examine how pentaacylated lipopolysaccharide from Rhodobacter sphaeroides (RSLPS antagonises human TLR4/MD-2 and activates the horse receptor complex using a computational approach and cross-species mutagenesis. At a functional level, we show that RSLPS is a partial agonist at horse TLR4/MD-2 with greater efficacy than lipid IVa. These data suggest the importance of the additional acyl chain in RSLPS signalling. Based on docking analysis, we propose a model for positioning of the RSLPS lipid A moiety (RSLA within the MD-2 cavity at the TLR4 dimer interface, which allows activity at the horse receptor complex. As for lipid IVa, RSLPS agonism requires species-specific contacts with MD-2 and TLR4, but the R2 chain of RSLA protrudes from the MD-2 pocket to contact the TLR4 dimer in the vicinity of proline 442. Our model explains why RSLPS is only partially dependent on horse TLR4 residue R385, unlike lipid IVa. Mutagenesis of proline 442 into a serine residue, as found in human TLR4, uncovers the importance of this site in RSLPS signalling; horse TLR4 R385G/P442S double mutation completely abolishes RSLPS activity without its counterpart, human TLR4 G384R/S441P, being able to restore it. Our data highlight the importance of subtle changes in ligand positioning, and suggest that TLR4 and MD-2 residues that may not participate directly in ligand binding can determine the signalling outcome of a given ligand. This indicates a cooperative binding mechanism within the receptor complex, which is becoming increasingly

  12. Quantum delocalization of protons in the hydrogen bond network of an enzyme active site

    Wang, Lu; Boxer, Steven G; Markland, Thomas E

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes utilize protein architectures to create highly specialized structural motifs that can greatly enhance the rates of complex chemical transformations. Here we use experiments, combined with ab initio simulations that exactly include nuclear quantum effects, to show that a triad of strongly hydrogen bonded tyrosine residues within the active site of the enzyme ketosteroid isomerase (KSI) facilitates quantum proton delocalization. This delocalization dramatically stabilizes the deprotonation of an active site tyrosine residue, resulting in a very large isotope effect on its acidity. When an intermediate analog is docked, it is incorporated into the hydrogen bond network, giving rise to extended quantum proton delocalization in the active site. These results shed light on the role of nuclear quantum effects in the hydrogen bond network that stabilizes the reactive intermediate of KSI, and the behavior of protons in biological systems containing strong hydrogen bonds.

  13. Mutational analysis of GlnB residues critical for NifA activation in Azospirillum brasilense.

    Inaba, Juliana; Thornton, Jeremy; Huergo, Luciano Fernandes; Monteiro, Rose Adele; Klassen, Giseli; Pedrosa, Fábio de Oliveira; Merrick, Mike; de Souza, Emanuel Maltempi

    2015-02-01

    PII proteins are signal transduction that sense cellular nitrogen status and relay this signals to other targets. Azospirillum brasilense is a nitrogen fixing bacterium, which associates with grasses and cereals promoting beneficial effects on plant growth and crop yields. A. brasilense contains two PII encoding genes, named glnB and glnZ. In this paper, glnB was mutagenised in order to identify amino acid residues involved in GlnB signaling. Two variants were obtained by random mutagenesis, GlnBL13P and GlnBV100A and a site directed mutant, GlnBY51F, was obtained. Their ability to complement nitrogenase activity of glnB mutant strains of A. brasilense were determined. The variant proteins were also overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and characterized biochemically. None of the GlnB variant forms was able to restore nitrogenase activity in glnB mutant strains of A. brasilense LFH3 and 7628. The purified GlnBY51F and GlnBL13P proteins could not be uridylylated by GlnD, whereas GlnBV100A was uridylylated but at only 20% of the rate for wild type GlnB. Biochemical and computational analyses suggest that residue Leu13, located in the α helix 1 of GlnB, is important to maintain GlnB trimeric structure and function. The substitution V100A led to a lower affinity for ATP binding. Together the results suggest that NifA activation requires uridylylated GlnB bound to ATP. PMID:25644954

  14. A method for the determination of residual beta activity in drinking water samples

    Idoeta, R. [Dpto. Ingenieria Nuclear y Mecanica de Fluidos, E. T. S. Ingenieria de Bilbao - Universidad del Pais Vasco (UPV/EHU), Alda. Urquijo s/n. 48013 Bilbao (Spain)], E-mail: raquel.idoeta@ehu.es; Herranz, M.; Abelairas, A.; Legarda, F. [Dpto. Ingenieria Nuclear y Mecanica de Fluidos, E. T. S. Ingenieria de Bilbao - Universidad del Pais Vasco (UPV/EHU), Alda. Urquijo s/n. 48013 Bilbao (Spain)

    2007-09-15

    The determination of residual beta activity in drinking water is usually needed in most monitoring programs. In this work a procedure for its determination is described and expressions for the calculations of detection limits and uncertainties are proposed.

  15. A method for the determination of residual beta activity in drinking water samples

    The determination of residual beta activity in drinking water is usually needed in most monitoring programs. In this work a procedure for its determination is described and expressions for the calculations of detection limits and uncertainties are proposed

  16. Human glutaminyl cyclase and bacterial zinc aminopeptidase share a common fold and active site

    Misquitta Stephanie A

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glutaminyl cyclase (QC forms the pyroglutamyl residue at the amino terminus of numerous secretory peptides and proteins. We previously proposed the mammalian QC has some features in common with zinc aminopeptidases. We now have generated a structural model for human QC based on the aminopeptidase fold (pdb code 1AMP and mutated the apparent active site residues to assess their role in QC catalysis. Results The structural model proposed here for human QC, deposited in the protein databank as 1MOI, is supported by a variety of fold prediction programs, by the circular dichroism spectrum, and by the presence of the disulfide. Mutagenesis of the six active site residues present in both 1AMP and QC reveal essential roles for the two histidines (140 and 330, QC numbering and the two glutamates (201 and 202, while the two aspartates (159 and 248 appear to play no catalytic role. ICP-MS analysis shows less than stoichiometric zinc (0.3:1 in the purified enzyme. Conclusions We conclude that human pituitary glutaminyl cyclase and bacterial zinc aminopeptidase share a common fold and active site residues. In contrast to the aminopeptidase, however, QC does not appear to require zinc for enzymatic activity.

  17. Structural and kinetic contributions of the oxyanion binding site to the catalytic activity of acylaminoacyl peptidase.

    Kiss, András L; Palló, Anna; Náray-Szabó, Gábor; Harmat, Veronika; Polgár, László

    2008-05-01

    It is widely accepted that the catalytic activity of serine proteases depends primarily on the Asp-His-Ser catalytic triad and other residues within the vicinity of this motif. Some of these residues form the oxyanion binding site that stabilizes the tetrahedral intermediate by hydrogen bonding to the negatively charged oxyanion. In acylaminoacyl peptidase from the thermophile Aeropyrum pernix, the main chain NH group of Gly369 is one of the hydrogen bond donors forming the oxyanion binding site. The side chain of His367, a conserved residue in acylaminoacyl peptidases across all species, fastens the loop holding Gly369. Determination of the crystal structure of the H367A mutant revealed that this loop, including Gly369, moves away considerably, accounting for the observed three orders of magnitude decrease in the specificity rate constant. For the wild-type enzyme ln(k(cat)/K(m)) vs. 1/T deviates from linearity indicating greater rate enhancement with increasing temperature for the dissociation of the enzyme-substrate complex compared with its decomposition to product. In contrast, the H367A variant provided a linear Arrhenius plot, and its reaction was associated with unfavourable entropy of activation. These results show that a residue relatively distant from the active site can significantly affect the catalytic activity of acylaminoacyl peptidase without changing the overall structure of the enzyme. PMID:18325786

  18. Identification of Functionally Relevant Lysine Residues That Modulate Human Farnesoid X Receptor Activation

    Sun, An-Qiang; Luo, Yuhuan; Backos, Donald S.; Xu, Shuhua; Balasubramaniyan, Natarajan; Reigan, Philip; Suchy, Frederick J.

    2013-01-01

    Base amino acid lysine residues play an important role in regulation of nuclear receptors [e.g., farnesyl X receptor (FXR)], leading to enhanced or suppressed biologic activity. To understand the molecular mechanisms and the subsequent effects in modulating FXR functions in diverse biologic processes, we individually replaced eight highly conserved lysine residues of human FXR (hFXR) with arginine. The effects of each mutated FXR on target gene activation, subcellular localization, protein-pr...

  19. Residues accessible in the binding site crevice of transmembrane helix 6 of the CB2 cannabinoid receptor†

    Nebane, Ntsang M.; Hurst, Dow P.; Carrasquer, Carl A.; Qiao, Zhuanhong; Reggio, Patricia H.; Song, Zhao-Hui

    2008-01-01

    We have used the substituted-cysteine accessibility method (SCAM) to map the residues in the sixth membrane-spanning segment of the CB2 cannabinoid receptor that contribute to the surface of the water-accessible binding-site crevice. Using a background of the mutant C2.59S which is relatively insensitive to the methanethiosulfonate (MTS) reagents, we mutated to cysteine, one at a time, 34 consecutive residues in TMH6 of the CB2 receptor. These mutant receptors were then expressed in HEK293 ce...

  20. Gamma exposure rate reduction and residual radium-226 concentrations resulting from decontamination activities conducted at the former uranium millsite in Shiprock, New Mexico

    Gamma radiation surveys and residual radium 226 soil samples were taken as part of the decontamination activities of the former Shiprock uranium mill site in New Mexico. In order to facilitate the decontamination activities, the mill site and its contaminated environs were divided into 6 major areas. Extensive data are presented in 2 appendices of the pre- and post-decontamination gamma ray exposure rates made on mill site, and of radium 226 concentrations in surface soil samples. A training program established on the mill site by the Navajo Engineering and Construction Authority is described

  1. Allowable residual-contamination levels for decommissioning facilities in the 100 areas of the Hanford Site

    This report contains the results of a study sponsored by UNC Nuclear Industries to determine Allowable Residual Contamination Levels (ARCL) for five generic categories of facilities in the 100 Areas of the Hanford Site. The purpose of this study is to provide ARCL data useful to UNC engineers in conducting safety and cost comparisons for decommissioning alternatives. The ARCL results are based on a scenario/exposure-pathway analysis and compliance with an annual dose limit for three specific modes of future use of the land and facilities. These modes of use are restricted, controlled, and unrestricted. The information on ARCL values for restricted and controlled use provided by this report is intended to permit a full consideration of decommissioning alternatives. ARCL results are presented both for surface contamination remaining in facilities (in dpm/100 cm2), and for unconfined surface and confined subsurface soil conditions (in pCi/g). Two confined soil conditions are considered: contamination at depths between 1 and 4 m, and contamination at depths greater than or equal to 5 m. A set of worksheets are presented in an appendix for modifying the ARCL values to accommodate changes in the radionuclide mixture or concentrations, to consider the impacts of radioactive decay, and to predict instrument responses. Finally, a comparison is made between the unrestricted release ARCL values for the 100 Area facilities and existing decommissioning and land disposal regulations. For surface contamination, the comparison shows good agreement. For soil contamination, the comparison shows good agreement if reasonable modification factors are applied to account for the differences in modeling soil contamination and licensed low-level waste

  2. Pneumatic transport system development: residuals and releases program at Westinghouse Cheswick site

    Plutonium oxide and uranium oxide powders are processed within glove boxes or within confinement systems during the fabrication of mixed oxide (MOX) pellets for recycle fuel. The release of these powders to the glove box or to the confinement results in some airborne material that is deposited in the enclosure or is carried in the air streams to the effluent air filtration system. Release tests on simulated leaks in pneumatic transport equipment and release tests on simulated failures with powder blending equipment were conducted. A task to develop pneumatic transport for the movement of powders within an MOX fabrication plant has been underway at the Westinghouse Research Laboratories. While testing and evaluating selected pneumatic transport components on a full scale were in progress, it was deemed necessary that final verification of the technology would have to be performed with plutonium-bearing powders because of the marked differences in certain properties of plutonium from those of uranium oxides. A smaller was designed and constructed for the planned installation in glove boxes at the Westinghouse Plutonium Fuel Development Laboratory. However, prior to use with plutonium it was agreed that this system be set up and tested with uranium oxide powder. The test program conducted at the Westinghouse Cheswick site was divided into two major parts. The first of these examined the residuals left as a result of the pneumatic transport of nuclear fuel powders and verified the operability of this one-third scale system. The second part of the program studied the amount of powder released to the air when off-standard process procedures or maintenance operations were conducted on the pneumatic transport system. Air samplers located within the walk-in box housing the transport loop were used to measure the solids concentration in the air. From this information, the total amount of airborne powder was determined

  3. Work plan for the remedial investigation/feasibility study-environmental assessment for the quarry residuals operable unit at the Weldon Spring Site

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting cleanup activities at the Weldon Spring site, which is located in St. Charles County, Missouri, about 48 km (30 mi) west of St. Louis. The Weldon Spring site consists of two noncontiguous areas -- the chemical plant area, which includes four raffinate pits, and the quarry. Cleanup activities at the Weldon Spring site are conducted in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended, incorporating the values of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The contents of the documents prepared for the project are not intended to represent a statement regarding the legal applicability of NEPA to remedial actions conducted under CERCLA. In accordance with the integrated CERCLA/NEPA approach, a remedial investigation/feasibility study-environmental assessment (RI/FS-EA) is being conducted to evaluate conditions and potential responses for the quarry residuals operable unit (QROU). This operable unit consists of the following areas and/or media: the residual material remaining at the Weldon Spring quarry after removal of the pond water and bulk waste; underlying groundwater; and other media located in the surrounding vicinity of the quarry, including adjacent soil, surface water, and sediment in Femme Osage Slough. This work plan identifies the activities within the RI/FS-EA process that are being proposed to address contamination remaining at the quarry area

  4. Work plan for the remedial investigation/feasibility study-environmental assessment for the quarry residuals operable unit at the Weldon Spring Site

    1994-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting cleanup activities at the Weldon Spring site, which is located in St. Charles County, Missouri, about 48 km (30 mi) west of St. Louis. The Weldon Spring site consists of two noncontiguous areas -- the chemical plant area, which includes four raffinate pits, and the quarry. Cleanup activities at the Weldon Spring site are conducted in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended, incorporating the values of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The contents of the documents prepared for the project are not intended to represent a statement regarding the legal applicability of NEPA to remedial actions conducted under CERCLA. In accordance with the integrated CERCLA/NEPA approach, a remedial investigation/feasibility study-environmental assessment (RI/FS-EA) is being conducted to evaluate conditions and potential responses for the quarry residuals operable unit (QROU). This operable unit consists of the following areas and/or media: the residual material remaining at the Weldon Spring quarry after removal of the pond water and bulk waste; underlying groundwater; and other media located in the surrounding vicinity of the quarry, including adjacent soil, surface water, and sediment in Femme Osage Slough. This work plan identifies the activities within the RI/FS-EA process that are being proposed to address contamination remaining at the quarry area.

  5. Residual radioactivity in the terrestrial environment of the Mururoa and Fangataufa Atolls nuclear weapon test sites

    Activity concentration of alpha-emitting Pu isotopes, 241Pu, 241Am, the pure beta-emitting isotope 90Sr, and the gamma-emitting isotope 137Cs measured in geological and biological samples collected in the terrestrial environment of the former French nuclear test sites of Mururoa and Fangataufa is presented. The samples were collected during an international sampling campaign conducted by the IAEA staff and a team of international experts in summer 1996. The IAEA's Seibersdorf Laboratories and a network of test laboratories, selected on the basis of a proficiency test, carried out the analytical determination of the activity concentrations of the radionuclides. The results obtained were compared with the French data. The study concluded that the radioactivity levels are generally low and of no radiological significance. (author)

  6. European sites contaminated by residues from the ore extracting and processing industries

    Activities linked with the ore extraction and processing industries may lead to enhanced levels of naturally occurring radionuclides (NORs) in products, by-products and waste and at the installations and in the surroundings of the facility. In the framework of the EC-DGXI CARE project (Common Approach for REstoration of contaminated sites) nine important categories of industries were identified and discussions were summarized on the industrial processes and the levels of NORs in parent material, waste and by-products. The most contaminating industries are uranium mining and milling, metal mining and smelting and the phosphate industry. Radionuclide levels in products and/or waste products from the oil and gas extraction industry and of the rare earth, zirconium and ceramics industries may be particularly elevated, but waste streams are limited. The impact on the public from coal mining and power production from coal is commonly considered low. No typical values are available for contaminant levels in materials, buildings and surroundings of radium extraction and luminizing plants, nor for thorium extraction and processing plants. An attempt to give an overview of sites in Europe contaminated with NORs, with emphasis on past practices, was only partly successful since information was often limited or unavailable. The most prominent case of environmental contamination due to mining and processing activities (uranium, metal and coal mining) is in eastern Germany. (author)

  7. Two histidine residues are essential for ribonuclease T1 activity as is the case for ribonuclease

    Ribonuclease T1 (RNase T1, EC 3.1.27.3) is a guanosine-specific ribonuclease that cleaves the 3',5'-phosphodiester linkage of single-stranded RNA. It is assumed that the reaction is generated by concerted acid-base catalysis between residues Glu-58 and His-92 or His-40. From the results of chemical modification and NMR studies, it appeared that the residue Glu-58 was indispensable for nucleolytic activity. However, the authors have recently demonstrated that Glu-58 is an important but not an essential residue for catalytic activity, using the methods of genetic engineering to change Glu-58 to Gln-58 etc. In the present paper, the authors report that mutants of RNase T1 with residue Ala-40 or Ala-92 have almost no activity, while mutants that contain Ala-58 retain considerable activity. These results show that the two histidine residues, His-40 and His-92, but not Glu-58, are indispensable for the catalytic activity of the enzyme. They propose a revised reaction mechanism in which two histidine residues play a major role, as they do in the case of RNase A

  8. Active site studies of Escherichia coli 2-keto-4-hydroxyglutarate aldolase

    Vlahos, C.J.

    1987-01-01

    The data presented delineate the complete amino acid sequence of E. coli KHG aldolase and also identify Lys-133, Glu-45, and Arg-49 as aminoacyl residues required for catalytic activity. Incubation of E. coli KHG aldolase with (/sup 14/C)pyruvate in the presence of NaCNBH/sub 3/ results in the incorporation of one mol of /sup 14/C per mol of enzyme subunit. Digestion of this enzyme-adduct with trypsin, followed by purification of the peptides, allowed for the isolation of a unique radioactive peptide. Its amino acid sequence showed that the pyruvate-binding (i.e., Schiff-base forming) lysine residue is located at position 133 in the intact enzyme. E. coli KHG aldolase activity is lost when the enzyme is reacted with bromopyruvate; saturation kinetics are observed. The substrates, pyruvate and KHG, protect the enzyme from inactivation. Both facts suggest that the reagent is active-site specific. Incubation of the aldolase with (3-/sup 14/C)bromopyruvate is associated with a concomitant loss of enzymatic activity and esterification of Glu-45; if the enzyme is denatured in the presence of excess bromopyruvate, Cys-159 and Cys-180 are also alkylated. Blocking the active-site lysine residue with pyruvate prevents Glu-45 from being esterified but does not eliminate alkylation of these two cysteine residues. Woodward's Reagent K was also found to inactivate the aldolase under conditions that are usually specific for carboxyl group modification. This aldolase is also inactivated by 1,2-cyclohexanedione. Loss of enzymatic activity occurs concomitantly with modification of one arginine residue per enzyme subunit. Treatment of the aldolase with the arginine-specific reagent, 4-(oxyacetyl)phenoxyacetic acid, followed by digestion with trypsin allowed for the isolation of a unique peptide and the identification of Arg-49 as the specific residue involved.

  9. Isolation of active site and antibody-binding fragments of human erythrocyte transglutaminase

    Catalytically active human erythrocyte transglutaminase (TGase) was purified using an immunoaffinity column prepared from a monoclonal antibody to guinea pig liver TGase. The enzyme activity was completely inhibited by incorporation of iodo[14C]acetamide to the level of 1 mole per 1 mole of TGase. The 14C-labeled TGase was digested with cyanogen bromide, subjected to HPLC, and four pure peptides were isolated with molecular weights ranging from 3-22 KDa. Only one of the peptides was radiolabeled and characterized as an active site peptide of 10 KDa. Another peptide of 18 KDa was identified as a monoclonal antibody-binding domain of TGase. Although the active site and the antibody-binding domain were present on different cyanogen bromide fragments, the mouse anti-TGase inhibited 100% of TGase activity. The results suggest that the antibody-binding site is not located on the enzyme active site sequence, but that the three dimensional space configuration of the antigen-antibody complex hinders substrate binding to the active site. The radiolabeled active site cysteine residue was not found in the N-terminal 21 amino acids of the 10 KDa peptide. Additional fragments of the active site peptide are currently being analyzed

  10. Serine substitution for cysteine residues in levansucrase selectively abolishes levan forming activity.

    Senthilkumar, Velusamy; Busby, Stephen J W; Gunasekaran, Paramasamy; Senthikumar, Velusamy; Bushby, Stephen J W

    2003-10-01

    Levansucrase is responsible for levan formation during sucrose fermentation of Zymomonas mobilis, and this decreases the efficiency of ethanol production. As thiol modifying agents decrease levan formation, a role for cysteine residues in levansucrase activity has been examined using derivatives of Z. mobilis levansucrase that carry serine substitutions of cysteine at positions 121, 151 or 244. These substitutions abolished the levan forming activity of levansucrase whilst only halving its activity in sucrose hydrolysis. Thus, polymerase and hydrolase activities of Z. mobilis levansucrase are separate and have different requirements for the enzyme's cysteine residues. PMID:14584923

  11. Identification of the active site histidine in Staphylococcus hyicus lipase using chemical modification and mass spectrometry.

    Boots, J W; van Dongen, W D; Verheij, H M; de Haas, G H; Haverkamp, J; Slotboom, A J

    1995-04-01

    Staphylococcus hyicus lipase is a serine hydrolase. In order to identify the active site histidine of S. hyicus lipase we have chemically modified S. hyicus lipase with 1-bromo-octan-2-one. The enzyme is rapidly inactivated by this inhibitor with a half-time of 578 s at pH 6.5 and 30 degrees C. Addition of the enzyme's cofactor calcium increases the inactivation rate approx. 2-fold. When n-hexadecylphosphocholine, a non-hydrolysable substrate analogue, is added the inactivation rate decreases about 3-fold, suggesting that a residue in the active site of S. hyicus lipase is involved in the inactivation reaction. Inactivation of S. hyicus lipase with 14C-labelled 1-bromo-octan-2-one shows that 1.4 moles of inhibitor per mole of lipase are incorporated. The results of an electrospray mass spectrometric study of the inactivated enzyme are consistent with this finding. In order to identify the modified residue, both the inactivated and the unmodified lipase were digested with cyanogen bromide followed by trypsin. The resulting peptides were analysed using HPLC and fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry. The results allow the modified residue to be assigned to the peptide Gly597-Lys612. Collision induced dissociation mass spectrometry allowed the modified residue to be identified as His-600. From these results we conclude that this residue forms part of the catalytic triad of S. hyicus lipase. PMID:7711054

  12. Opposing influences by subsite -1 and subsite +1 residues on relative xylopyranosidase/arabinofuranosidase activities of bifunctional beta-D-xylosidase/alpha-L-arabinofuranosidase

    Conformational inversion occurs 7-8 kcal/mol more readily in furanoses than pyranoses. This difference is exploited here to disclose active-site residues involved in distorting substrate towards reactivity. Spontaneous glycoside hydrolysis rates are ordered 4-nitrophenyl-alpha-L-arabinofuranoside (4...

  13. A Single Residue Change in Vibrio harveyi Hemolysin Results in the Loss of Phospholipase and Hemolytic Activities and Pathogenicity for Turbot (Scophthalmus maximus)▿

    Sun, Boguang; Zhang, Xiao-Hua; Tang, Xuexi; Wang, Shushan; Zhong, Yingbin; Chen, Jixiang; Austin, Brian

    2007-01-01

    Vibrio harveyi hemolysin, an important virulence determinant in fish pathogenesis, was further characterized, and the enzyme was identified as a phospholipase B by gas chromatography. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed that a specific residue, Ser153, was critical for its enzymatic activity and for its virulence in fish. PMID:17220231

  14. Prediction of residual stress due to early age behaviour of massive concrete structures: on site experiments and macroscopic modelling

    Zreiki, Jihad; Lamour, Vincent; Chaouche, Mohend; Moranville, Micheline

    2008-01-01

    Early age behaviour of concrete is based on complex multi-physical and multiscale phenomena. The predication of both cracking risk and residual stresses in hardened concrete structures is still a challenging task. We propose in this paper a practical method to characterize in the construction site the material parameters and to identify a macroscopic model from simple tests. We propose for instance to use a restrained shrinkage ring test to identify a basic early age creep model based on a si...

  15. How do activities walking, standing, and resting influence trans-tibial amputee residual limb fluid volume?

    Sanders, Joan; Cagle, John; Allyn, Katheryn; Harrison, Daniel; Ciol, Marcia

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to determine how fluid volume changes in the residual limbs of people with trans-tibial amputation were affected by activity during test sessions with equal durations of resting, standing, and walking. Residual limb extracellular fluid volume was measured using biompedance analysis on 24 participants. Results showed that all subjects lost fluid volume during standing with equal weight-bearing, averaging a loss rate of 0.4%/min, and a mean loss over the 25 min ...

  16. Physical Properties and Microbial Activity in Forest Residual Substrate

    Many growers in the horticulture industry have expressed concern that switching from a pine bark-based substrate to one with a significant wood content will increase microbial activity, resulting in nitrogen (N) immobilization. This study evaluated four growth substrates (pine bark, peat moss and tw...

  17. In silico analysis of Pycnoporus cinnabarinus laccase active site with toxic industrial dyes.

    Prasad, Nirmal K; Vindal, Vaibhav; Narayana, Siva Lakshmi; Ramakrishna, V; Kunal, Swaraj Priyaranjan; Srinivas, M

    2012-05-01

    Laccases belong to multicopper oxidases, a widespread class of enzymes implicated in many oxidative functions in various industrial oxidative processes like production of fine chemicals to bioremediation of contaminated soil and water. In order to understand the mechanisms of substrate binding and interaction between substrates and Pycnoporus cinnabarinus laccase, a homology model was generated. The resulted model was further validated and used for docking studies with toxic industrial dyes- acid blue 74, reactive black 5 and reactive blue 19. Interactions of chemical mediators with the laccase was also examined. The docking analysis showed that the active site always cannot accommodate the dye molecules, due to constricted nature of the active site pocket and steric hindrance of the residues whereas mediators are relatively small and can easily be accommodated into the active site pocket, which, thereafter leads to the productive binding. The binding properties of these compounds along with identification of critical active site residues can be used for further site-directed mutagenesis experiments in order to identify their role in activity and substrate specificity, ultimately leading to improved mutants for degradation of these toxic compounds. PMID:21877154

  18. Thermodynamic Model for Uranium Release from Hanford Site Tank Residual Waste

    A thermodynamic model of U phase solubility and paragenesis was developed for Hanford tank residual waste that will remain after tank closure. The model was developed using a combination of waste composition data, waste leach test data, and thermodynamic modeling of the leach test data. The testing and analyses were conducted using actual Hanford tank residual waste. Positive identification of the U phases by X-ray diffraction (XRD) was generally not possible because solids in the waste were amorphous, or below the detection limit of XRD for both as-received residual waste and leached residual waste. Three leachant solutions were used in the studies, dionized water, CaCO3 saturated solution, and Ca(OH)2 saturated solution. Thermodynamic modeling verified that equilibrium between U phases in the initial residual waste samples and the leachants was attained in less than a month. The paragenetic sequence of secondary phases that occur as waste leaching progresses for two closure scenarios was identified. These results have significant implications for tank closure design.

  19. Effects of plastic film residues on occurrence of phthalates and microbial activity in soils.

    Wang, Jun; Lv, Shenghong; Zhang, Manyun; Chen, Gangcai; Zhu, Tongbin; Zhang, Shen; Teng, Ying; Christie, Peter; Luo, Yongming

    2016-05-01

    Plastic film mulching has played an important role in Chinese agriculture, especially in vegetable production, but large amounts of film residues can accumulate in the soil. The present study investigated the effects of plastic film residues on the occurrence of soil PAEs and microbial activities using a batch pot experiment. PAE concentrations increased with increasing plastic film residues but the soil microbial carbon and nitrogen, enzyme activities and microbial diversity decreased significantly. At the end of the experiment the PAE concentrations were 0-2.02 mg kg(-1) in the different treatments. Soil microbial C and N, enzyme activities, AWCD value, and Shannon-Weaver and Simpson indices declined by about 28.9-76.2%, 14.9-59.0%, 4.9-22.7%, 23.0-42.0% and 1.8-18.7%, respectively. Soil microbial activity was positively correlated with soil PAE concentration, and soil PAE concentrations were impacted by plastic color and residue volume. Correlations among, and molecular mechanisms of, plastic film residues, PAE occurrence and microbial activity require further study. PMID:26938679

  20. Hanford Site Tank 241-C-108 Residual Waste Contaminant Release Models and Supporting Data

    This report presents the results of laboratory characterization, testing, and analysis for a composite sample (designated 20578) of residual waste collected from single-shell tank C-108 during the waste retrieval process after modified sluicing. These studies were completed to characterize concentration and form of contaminant of interest in the residual waste; assess the leachability of contaminants from the solids; and develop release models for contaminants of interest. Because modified sluicing did not achieve 99% removal of the waste, it is expected that additional retrieval processing will take place. As a result, the sample analyzed here is not expected to represent final retrieval sample.

  1. Hanford Site Tank 241-C-108 Residual Waste Contaminant Release Models and Supporting Data

    Cantrell, Kirk J.; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Arey, Bruce W.; Schaef, Herbert T.

    2010-06-18

    This report presents the results of laboratory characterization, testing, and analysis for a composite sample (designated 20578) of residual waste collected from single-shell tank C-108 during the waste retrieval process after modified sluicing. These studies were completed to characterize concentration and form of contaminant of interest in the residual waste; assess the leachability of contaminants from the solids; and develop release models for contaminants of interest. Because modified sluicing did not achieve 99% removal of the waste, it is expected that additional retrieval processing will take place. As a result, the sample analyzed here is not expected to represent final retrieval sample.

  2. Persistence and residue activity of deltamethrin on indoor residual spraying surfaces against malaria vectors in southeastern Iran

    Abtahi Mohammad; Shayeghi Mansoreh; Khoobdel Mehdi; Vatandoost Hasan; Abaei Mohammad Reza; Akbarzadeh Kamran

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the efficacy of deltamethrin and find a relation between persistence and residue of this insecticide on the prevalent surfaces against malaria vectors in southeastern Iran. Methods:After indoor residual spraying on prevalent surfaces in studied areas (plaster and mud as absorbent surfaces, wood as non absorbent surface and filter paper as control) for malaria control, conical tests as a bioassay method and chromatographic method as an analytical method were used for evolution of persistence and residue of deltamethrin insecticide. Results were investigated statistically by ANOVA and Tukey-HSD tests for determining relations or differences between residue and persistence of deltamethrin. Results:According to the results, there was no significant difference between mortality rates from bioassay tests on different surfaces, and deltamethrin kept its utility to malaria vector control until 120 days after indoor residual spraying on these surfaces. In the case of residue, there was no significant relation between residue amounts and mortality rates on different surfaces, whereas this relation existed between residual amounts on filter papers and mortality rates from bioassay tests. Conclusions: This study shows that measurement of residue in filter papers is a suitable tool for evolution and dictum of efficiency of deltamethrin insecticide in indoor residual spraying for malaria control.

  3. Mechanical Activation-Assisted Reductive Leaching of Cadmium from Zinc Neutral Leaching Residue Using Sulfur Dioxide

    Zhang, Chun; Min, Xiaobo; Chai, Liyuan; Zhang, Jianqiang; Wang, Mi

    2015-12-01

    In this work, zinc neutral leaching residue was mechanically activated by ball-milling. The subsequent leaching behavior and kinetics of cadmium extraction in a mixed SO2-H2SO4 system were studied. Changes in the crystalline phase, lattice distortion, particle size and morphology, which were induced by mechanical activation, were also investigated. The activated samples showed different physicochemical characteristics, and cadmium extraction was found to be easier than for the un-activated samples. Under the same conditions, mechanical activation contributed to higher cadmium leaching. The cadmium extraction kinetics at 75-95°C was found to fit the shrinking core model. The raw neutral leaching residue, and the samples activated for 60 min and 120 min had a calculated activation energy of 65.02 kJ/mol, 59.45 kJ/mol and 53.46 kJ/mol, respectively. The leaching residue was characterized by ICP, XRD and SEM analysis. According to XRD analysis, the main phases in the residue were lead sulfate (PbSO4), zinc sulfide (ZnS) and cadmium sulfide (CdS).

  4. Comparison of long-term stability of containment systems for residues and wastes contaminated with naturally occurring radionuclides at an arid site and two humid sites

    The long-term stability of near-surface containment systems designed for the management of radioactive wastes and residues contaminated with naturally occurring radionuclides are compared at the three different sites. The containment designs are: (1) a diked 8.9-m high mound, including a 3.2-m layered cap at a site (humid) near Lewiston, New York, (2) a 6.8-m-high mound, including a similar 3.2-m cap at a site (humid) near Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and (3) 4.8-m deep trenches with 3.0-m backfilled caps at a site (arid) near Hanford, Washington. Geological, hydrological, and biological factors affecting the long-term (1000-year) integrity of the containment systems at each site are examined, including: erosion, flooding, drought, wildfire, slope and cover failure, plant root penetration, burrowing animals, other soil-forming processes, and land-use changes. For the containment designs evaluated, releases of radon-222 at the arid site are predicted to be several orders of magnitude higher than at the two humid sites-upon initial burial and at 1000 years (after severe erosion). Transfer of wastes containing naturally occurring radionuclides from a humid to an arid environment offers little or no advantage relative to long-term stability of the containment system and has a definite disadvantage in terms of gaseous radioactive releases. 26 references, 2 figures, 4 tables

  5. Comparison of long-term stability of containment systems for residues and wastes contaminated with naturally occurring radionuclides at an arid site and two humid sites

    The long-term stability of near-surface containment systems designed for the management of radioactive wastes and residues contaminated with naturally occurring radionuclides are compared at the three different sites. The containment designs are: (1) a diked 8.9-m high mound, including a 3.2-m layered cap at a site (humid) near Lewiston, New York, (2) a 6.8-m-high mound, including a similar 3.2-m cap at a site (humid) near Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and (3) 4.8-m deep trenches with 3.0-m backfilled caps at a site (arid) near Hanford, Washington. Geological, hydrological, and biological factors affecting the long-term (1000-year) integrity of the containment systems at each site are examined, including: erosion, flooding, drought, wildfire, slope and cover failure, plant root penetration, burrowing animals, other soil-forming processes, and land-use changes. For the containment designs evaluated, releases of radon-222 at the arid site are predicted to be several orders of magnitude higher than at the two humid sites - upon initial burial and at 1000 years (after severe erosion). Transfer of wastes containing naturally occurring radionuclides from a humid to an arid environment offers little or no advantage relative to long-term stability of the containment system and has a definite disadvantage in terms of gaseous radioactive releases. 26 references, 3 figures, 4 tables

  6. Promoter proximal polyadenylation sites reduce transcription activity

    Andersen, Pia Kjølhede; Lykke-Andersen, Søren; Jensen, Torben Heick

    2012-01-01

    transcription requires promoter proximity, as demonstrated using artificial constructs and supported by a genome-wide data set. Importantly, transcription down-regulation can be recapitulated in a gene context devoid of splice sites by placing a functional bona fide pA site/transcription terminator within ∼500...

  7. Residual nutational activity of the sunflower hypocotyl in simulated weightlessness

    Chapman, D. K.; Brown, A. H.

    1979-01-01

    The gravity dependence of circumnutational activity in the sunflower hypocotyl is investigated under conditions of simulated weightlessness. Seedling cultures of the sunflower Helianthus annuus were placed four days after planting in clinostats rotating at a rate of 1.0 rpm in the horizontal or somersaulting configurations, and plant movements around their growth axes were recorded in infrared light by a time-lapse closed-circuit video system. The amplitudes and mean cycle durations of the plant nutations in the horizontal and tumbling clinostats are observed to be 20% and 72%, and 32% and 74%, respectively, of the values observed in stationary plants; extrapolations to a state of zero g by the imposition of small centripetal forces on horizontally clinostated plants also indicate some nutational motion in the absence of gravity. It is concluded that the results are incompatible with the model of Israelsson and Johnsson (1967) of geotropic response with overshoot for sunflower circumnutation; however, results of the Spacelab 1 mission experiment are needed to unambiguously define the role of gravitation.

  8. Effect of Amino Acid Residue and Oligosaccharide Chain Chemical Modifications on Spectral and Hemagglutinating Activity of Millettia dielsiana Harms. ex Diels. Lectin

    Shun GAO; Jie AN; Chuan-Fang WU; Ying GU; Fang CHEN; Yuan YU; Qia-Qing WU; Jin-Ku BAO

    2005-01-01

    The effects of modifying the carbohydrate chain and amino acids on the conformation and activity of Millettia dielsiana Harms. ex Diels. lectin (MDL) were studied by hemagglutination, fluorescence and circular dichroism analysis. The modification of tryptophan residues led to a compete loss of hemagglutinating activity; however, the addition of mannose was able to prevent this loss of activity. The results indicate that two tryptophan residues are involved in the carbohydrate-binding site. Modifications of the carboxyl group residues produced an 80% loss of activity, but the presence of mannose protected against the modification. The results suggest that the carboxyl groups of aspartic and glutamic acids are involved in the carbohydrate-binding site of the lectin. However, oxidation of the carbohydrate chain and modification of the histidine and arginine residues did not affect the hemagglutinating activity of MDL. Fluorescence studies of MDL indicate that tryptophan residues are present in a relatively hydrophobic region, and the binding of mannose to MDL could quench tryptophan fluorescence without any change in λmax. The circular dichroism spectrum showed that all of these modifications affected the conformation of the MDL molecule to different extents, except the modification of arginine residues. Fluorescence quenching showed that acrylamide and iodoacetic acids are able to quench 77% and 98% of the fluorescence of tryptophan in MDL, respectively.However, KI produced a barely perceptible effect on the fluorescence of MDL, even when the concentration of I- was 0.15 M. This demonstrates that most of tryptophan residues are located in relatively hydrophobic or negatively charged areas near the surface of the MDL molecule.

  9. Noncovalent intermolecular interactions between dehydroepiandrosterone and the active site of human dehydroepiandrosterone sulphotransferase: A density functional theory based treatment

    Astani, Elahe; Heshmati, Emran; Chen, Chun-Jung; Hadipour, Nasser L.; Shekarsaraei, Setareh

    2016-04-01

    A theoretical study was performed to characterize noncovalent intermolecular interactions, especially hydrogen bond (HB), in the active site of enzyme human dehydroepiandrosterone sulphotransferase (SULT2A1/DHEA) using the local (M06-L) and hybrid (M06, M06-2X) meta-GGA functionals of density functional theory (DFT). Results revealed that DHEA is able to form HBs with residues His99, Tyr231, Met137 and Met16 in the active site of the SULT2A1/DHEA. It was found that DHEA interacts with the other residues through electrostatic and Van der Waals interactions.

  10. Key amino acid residues for the endo-processive activity of GH74 xyloglucanase.

    Matsuzawa, Tomohiko; Saito, Yuji; Yaoi, Katsuro

    2014-05-01

    Unlike endo-dissociative-xyloglucanases, Paenibacillus XEG74 is an endo-processive xyloglucanase that contains four unique tryptophan residues in the negative subsites (W61 and W64) and the positive subsites (W318 and W319), as indicated by three-dimensional homology modelling. Selective replacement of the positive subsite residues with alanine mutations reduced the degree of processive activity and resulted in the more endo-dissociative-activity. The results showed that W318 and W319, which are found in the positive subsites, are essential for processive degradation and are responsible for maintaining binding interactions with xyloglucan polysaccharide through a stacking effect. PMID:24657616

  11. Antibacterial and leishmanicidal activities of temporin-SHd, a 17-residue long membrane-damaging peptide.

    Abbassi, Feten; Raja, Zahid; Oury, Bruno; Gazanion, Elodie; Piesse, Christophe; Sereno, Denis; Nicolas, Pierre; Foulon, Thierry; Ladram, Ali

    2013-02-01

    Temporins are a family of short antimicrobial peptides (8-17 residues) that mostly show potent activity against Gram-positive bacteria. Herein, we demonstrate that temporin-SHd, a 17-residue peptide with a net charge of +2 (FLPAALAGIGGILGKLF(amide)), expressed a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity. This peptide displayed potent antibacterial activities against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, including multi-drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains, as well as antiparasitic activity against promastigote and the intracellular stage (amastigote) of Leishmania infantum, at concentration not toxic for the macrophages. Temporin-SHd that is structured in a non-amphipathic α-helix in anionic membrane-mimetic environments, strongly and selectively perturbs anionic bilayer membranes by interacting with the polar head groups and acyl region of the phospholipids, with formation of regions of two coexisting phases: one phase rich in peptide and the other lipid-rich. The disruption of lipid packing within the bilayer may lead to the formation of transient pores and membrane permeation/disruption once a threshold peptide accumulation is reached. To our knowledge, Temporin-SHd represents the first known 17-residue long temporin expressing such broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity including members of the trypanosomatidae family. Additionally, since only a few shorter members (13 residues) of the temporin family are known to display antileishmanial activity (temporins-TA, -TB and -SHa), SHd is an interesting tool to analyze the antiparasitic mechanism of action of temporins. PMID:23116712

  12. A tiered analytical protocol for the characterization of heavy oil residues at petroleum-contaminated hazardous waste sites

    The analysis of hydrocarbon-contaminated soils from abandoned refinery sites in Alberta, Canada is used to illustrate a tiered analytical approach to the characterization of complex hydrocarbon wastes. Soil extracts isolated from heavy oil- and creosote-contaminated sites were characterized by thin layer chromatography with flame ionization detection (TLC-FID), ultraviolet fluorescence, simulated distillation (GC-SIMDIS) and chemical ionization GC-MS analysis. The combined screening and detailed analytical methods provided information essential to remedial technology selection including the extent of contamination, the class composition of soil extracts, the distillation profile of component classes and the distribution of individual class components within various waste fractions. Residual contamination was characteristic of heavy, degraded oils, consistent with documented site operations and length of hydrocarbon exposure at the soil surface

  13. Decomposition of biogas residues in soil and their effects on microbial growth kinetics and enzyme activities

    The rapid development of biogas production will result in increased use of biogas residues as organic fertilizers. However, control of microbial activity by organic fertilizers remains a challenge for modern land use, especially with respect to mitigating greenhouse effects and increasing C sequestration in soil. To address this issue, we compared CO2 emissions, microbial growth and extracellular enzyme activities in agricultural soil amended with biogas residues (BGR) versus maize straw (MST). Over a 21 day incubation period, 6.4% of organic C added was mineralised and evolved as CO2 with BGR and 30% with MST. As shown by the substrate-induced growth respiration approach, BGR and MST significantly decreased the specific microbial growth rate (μ) and increased the microbial biomass C in the soil, indicating a clear shift in the microbial community to slower-growing microorganisms. Because of the reduced availability of C associated with the less labile C and more lignin in biogas residues, observed μ values and microbial biomass C were lower after BGR application than after MST application. After 21 days incubation, BGR had no effect on the activity of three extracellular enzymes: β-glucosidase and cellobiohydrolase, both of which are involved in cellulose decomposition; and xylanase, which is involved in hemicellulose decomposition. In contrast, MST significantly increased the activity of these three enzymes. The application of biogas residues in short-term experiment leads to a 34% increase in soil C content and slower C turnover as compared to common maize residues. -- Highlights: ► Biogas residues (BGR) applied to soil as organic fertilizers were decomposed 2.5 times slower as compared to maize straw. ► BGR application stimulated mainly slow-growing soil microorganisms. ► In contrast to maize straw the BGR did not increase the activity of cellulose-degrading soil enzymes. ► BGR leads to slower C turnover and a 34% increase in C sequestration versus

  14. Activities on the site during construction phase

    A survey is given of the work done on the site from site-opening till turn over of the plant to the client. After a short introduction to time schedules, manpower on site, site facilities and civil work and constructions, the commissioning and trial operation phase is discussed in detail. This phase begins with finishing the assembly of individual systems and components and ends with the trial operation and the acceptance measurement. During this period the subsystems are started-up in a useful sequence, first from cold, then from hot conditions and are finally operated as a total with nuclear energy. The single steps are: a) commissioning of indivudal systems; b) hot functional test 1 (without fuels) c) baseline inspection at the reactor pressure vessel; d) hot functional test 2 (with fuels); e) preparation for first criticality; f) postcriticality test program; g) trial operation: h) acceptance measurement. (HP)

  15. Engineering feasibility analysis for in-situ stabilization of Burrell Township site residues. [UMTRA

    1982-11-01

    The Burrell Township site, located in western Pennsylvania, received approximately 11,600 tons of radioactively-contaminated material in late 1956 and early 1957 from the Vitro Manufacturing Company's operations in Canonsburg, Pennsylvania. WESTON was requested to conduct an engineering study to determine the feasibility of stabilizing the site in accordance with the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) interim and proposed standards (45 FR 27366--27368, April 22, 1980, and 46 FR 2556--2563, January 9, 1981). The scope of this study is limited to those alternatives that can be implemented on the site and will not require removal and offsite disposal of radioactively-contaminated material. Four alternatives for control of the radioactive material at the Burrell site were considered and evaluated, as follows: 1. Site stabilization and closure. 2. Site control and containment. 3. Waste excavation and encapsulation. 4. Waste excavation, incineration, and encapsulation. 2 refs., 32 figs., 12 tabs.

  16. Engineering feasibility analysis for in-situ stabilization of Burrell Township site residues

    The Burrell Township site, located in western Pennsylvania, received approximately 11,600 tons of radioactively-contaminated material in late 1956 and early 1957 from the Vitro Manufacturing Company's operations in Canonsburg, Pennsylvania. WESTON was requested to conduct an engineering study to determine the feasibility of stabilizing the site in accordance with the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) interim and proposed standards (45 FR 27366--27368, April 22, 1980, and 46 FR 2556--2563, January 9, 1981). The scope of this study is limited to those alternatives that can be implemented on the site and will not require removal and offsite disposal of radioactively-contaminated material. Four alternatives for control of the radioactive material at the Burrell site were considered and evaluated, as follows: 1. Site stabilization and closure. 2. Site control and containment. 3. Waste excavation and encapsulation. 4. Waste excavation, incineration, and encapsulation. 2 refs., 32 figs., 12 tabs

  17. Residues accessible in the binding-site crevice of transmembrane helix 6 of the CB2 cannabinoid receptor.

    Nebane, Ntsang M; Hurst, Dow P; Carrasquer, Carl A; Qiao, Zhuanhong; Reggio, Patricia H; Song, Zhao-Hui

    2008-12-30

    We have used the substituted-cysteine accessibility method (SCAM) to map the residues in the sixth membrane-spanning segment of the CB2 cannabinoid receptor that contribute to the surface of the water-accessible binding-site crevice. Using a background of the mutant C2.59S which is relatively insensitive to the methanethiosulfonate (MTS) reagents, we mutated to cysteine, one at a time, 34 consecutive residues in TMH6 of the CB2 receptor. These mutant receptors were then expressed in HEK293 cells. By incubating HEK293 cells stably transfected with CB2 receptors with the small, charged, hydrophilic, thiol-specific reagent methanethiosulfonate ethylammonium (MTSEA), [(3)H]CP55940 binding was significantly inhibited for six mutant receptors. All six of the mutants that reacted with MTSEA were protected from the reaction when pretreated with the cannabinoid agonist WIN55212-2, suggesting that MTSEA modification occurred within the binding crevice. Therefore, the side chains of the residues at these reactive loci (V6.51, L6.52, L6.54, M6.55, L6.59, and T6.62) are on the water-accessible surface of the binding-site crevice. These residues are extracellular to the TMH6 CWXP hinge motif. The pattern of accessibility is consistent with a alpha-helical conformation for this segment of TMH6. Molecular modeling studies performed in the context of the CB2 model show that V6.51, L6.52, L6.54, M6.55, L6.59, and T6.62 face into the CB2 binding pocket, further confirming our SCAM results. These results are similar to the accessibility patterns determined by SCAM studies of TMH6 in the opioid and dopamine D2 receptors. PMID:19053233

  18. Mining the waste: prospecting valuable residues optimising processes with modern technology sustainably remediating legacy sites

    Lemière, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    Prospecting valuable residuesAbandoned waste from closed mines or past operations may contain profitably recoverable commodities:-when the market price of the commodity increased significantly since mine closure,-when processing technology improved significantly since mine closure,-when another commodity present in the ore was not recovered and thus sent to waste, because it was not of commercial value at the time. This is especially relevant for some high-tech elements.Abandoned waste rock h...

  19. Relevance of Co, Ag-ferrierite catalysts acidity and cation siting to CH4-NOx-SCR activity

    The influence of acidity on Ag.Co exchanged ferrierite obtained from different parent forms was tested in CH4-DeNOx reaction. Ag and Co cation siting distribution and residual zeolite acidity were evaluated by means of a quantitative evaluation of catalyst acidity through NH3-TPD experiments and a detailed structural catalyst characterization by Rietveld refinement. A new nomenclature for the cation sites in hydrated and dehydrated cation exchange ferrierites was introduced for sake of clarity. The sites relative populations obtained by the UV-Vis spectra did not agree with the values given by the Rietveld refinement and the SCR. activity scale since the high abundance of Co cations in the retained most active position. Co2a, was shown by the less active catalyst obtained from the Na,K form. It was concluded that SCR activity does not only depend on Co and Ag siting within the zeolite framework but also by the presence of residual acidity evidenced on the most active catalysts. CH4 combustion tests showed that the presence of residual acidity appears relevant to SCR catalytic performances, likely related to its ability in methane activation. The importance of the coexistence of Co and zeolitic, acid sites for the HC-SCR suggested that SCR reaction could proceed on a dual site.

  20. Criteria and measurement techniques applicable to residual radioactivity on a decommissioned reactor site

    This document summarises the radiological criteria which might be developed to cover the release of a partly decommissioned nuclear reactor site, then looks at the techniques available by which the site could be monitored to assure compliance with these criteria. In particular, the implications of existing levels of radioactive contamination resulting from airburst nuclear weapons tests and the Chernobyl accident are discussed. (author)

  1. Acidic Residues C-Terminal to the A2 Domain Facilitate Thrombin-Catalyzed Activation of Factor VIII

    Newell, Jennifer L.; Fay, Philip J.

    2008-01-01

    Factor VIII is activated by thrombin through proteolysis at Arg740, Arg372, and Arg1689. One region implicated in this exosite-dependent interaction is the factor VIII a2 segment (residues 711-740) separating the A2 and B domains. Residues 717-725 (DYYEDSYED) within this region consist of five acidic residues and three sulfo-Tyr residues, thus representing a high density of negative charge potential. The contributions of these residues to thrombin-catalyzed activation of factor VIII were asse...

  2. Networks of High Mutual Information Define the Structural Proximity of Catalytic Sites: Implications for Catalytic Residue Identification

    Buslje, Cristina Marino; Teppa, Elin; Di Doménico, Tomas;

    2010-01-01

    to significantly outperform both the Shannon entropy and maximal frequency measurements. Residues in the proximity of catalytic sites were shown to be rich in shared MI. A structural proximity MI average score (termed pMI) was demonstrated to be a strong predictor for CR, thus confirming the proposed...... hypothesis. A structural proximity conservation average score (termed pC) was also calculated and demonstrated to carry distinct information from pMI. A catalytic likeliness score (Cls), combining the KL, pC and pMI measures, was shown to lead to significantly improved prediction accuracy. At a specificity...

  3. Use of activated carbons to remove undesirable residual amylase from factory and refinery streams

    In recent years, there has been increased world-wide concern over residual (carry-over) activity of mostly high temperature (HT) and very high temperature (VHT) stable amylases in white, refined sugars from refineries to various food and end-user industries. HT and VHT stable amylases were develope...

  4. Biotransformation of fluoroquinolone antibiotics by ligninolytic fungi - Metabolites, enzymes and residual antibacterial activity

    Čvančarová, Monika; Moeder, M.; Filipová, Alena; Cajthaml, Tomáš

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 136, OCT 2015 (2015), s. 311-320. ISSN 0045-6535 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TE01020218; GA ČR GA13-28283S Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Fluoroquinolone antibiotics * White rot fungi * Residual antibacterial activity Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.340, year: 2014

  5. Identification of residues essential for catalysis and binding of calmodulin in Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase by site-directed mutagenesis.

    Glaser, P; Elmaoglou-Lazaridou, A; Krin, E.; Ladant, D.; Bârzu, O; Danchin, A

    1989-01-01

    In order to identify molecular features of the calmodulin (CaM) activated adenylate cyclase of Bordetella pertussis, a truncated cya gene was fused after the 459th codon in frame with the alpha-lacZ' gene fragment and expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant, 604 residue long protein was purified to homogeneity by ion-exchange and affinity chromatography. The kinetic parameters of the recombinant protein are very similar to that of adenylate cyclase purified from B.pertussis culture sup...

  6. Mutations Closer to the Active Site Improve the Promiscuous Aldolase Activity of 4-Oxalocrotonate Tautomerase More Effectively than Distant Mutations.

    Rahimi, Mehran; van der Meer, Jan-Ytzen; Geertsema, Edzard M; Poddar, Harshwardhan; Baas, Bert-Jan; Poelarends, Gerrit J

    2016-07-01

    The enzyme 4-oxalocrotonate tautomerase (4-OT), which catalyzes enol-keto tautomerization as part of a degradative pathway for aromatic hydrocarbons, promiscuously catalyzes various carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions. These include the aldol condensation of acetaldehyde with benzaldehyde to yield cinnamaldehyde. Here, we demonstrate that 4-OT can be engineered into a more efficient aldolase for this condensation reaction, with a >5000-fold improvement in catalytic efficiency (kcat /Km ) and a >10(7) -fold change in reaction specificity, by exploring small libraries in which only "hotspots" are varied. The hotspots were identified by systematic mutagenesis (covering each residue), followed by a screen for single mutations that give a strong improvement in the desired aldolase activity. All beneficial mutations were near the active site of 4-OT, thus underpinning the notion that new catalytic activities of a promiscuous enzyme are more effectively enhanced by mutations close to the active site. PMID:27238293

  7. Procedure of Active Residual Heat Removal after Emergency Shutdown of High-Temperature-Gas-Cooled Reactor

    Xingtuan Yang; Yanfei Sun; Huaiming Ju; Shengyao Jiang

    2014-01-01

    After emergency shutdown of high-temperature-gas-cooled reactor, the residual heat of the reactor core should be removed. As the natural circulation process spends too long period of time to be utilized, an active residual heat removal procedure is needed, which makes use of steam generator and start-up loop. During this procedure, the structure of steam generator may suffer cold/heat shock because of the sudden load of coolant or hot helium at the first few minutes. Transient analysis was ca...

  8. An Acidic Thermostable Recombinant Aspergillus nidulans Endoglucanase Is Active towards Distinct Agriculture Residues

    Marcio Jose Poças-Fonseca; Ildinete Silva-Pereira; Cynthia Maria Kyaw; Edivaldo Ximenes Ferreira Filho; Fabrícia Paula de Faria; Gilvan Caetano Duarte; Marciano Regis Rubini; Thiago Machado Mello-de-Sousa; Eveline Queiroz de Pinho Tavares

    2013-01-01

    Aspergillus nidulans is poorly exploited as a source of enzymes for lignocellulosic residues degradation for biotechnological purposes. This work describes the A. nidulans Endoglucanase A heterologous expression in Pichia pastoris, the purification and biochemical characterization of the recombinant enzyme. Active recombinant endoglucanase A (rEG A) was efficiently secreted as a 35 kDa protein which was purified through a two-step chromatography procedure. The highest enzyme activity was dete...

  9. Bats at risk? Bat activity and insecticide residue analysis of food items in an apple orchard.

    Stahlschmidt, Peter; Brühl, Carsten A

    2012-07-01

    Although bats are reported as being threatened by pesticides, they are currently not considered in European Union pesticide risk assessments. The reason for that contradiction is probably related to the scarcity of information on bat activity in pesticide-treated fields and the pesticide residues on their food items. The authors recorded bat activity and measured pesticide residues on bat-specific food items following applications of two insecticides in an apple orchard. High activity levels of the common pipistrelle bat, a foraging habitat generalist, were detected. Airborne foragers and bats that take part of their food by gleaning arthropods from the vegetation were recorded frequently. The initial value and the decline of pesticide residues were found to depend on the arthropod type, their surface to volume ratio, their mobility, and the mode of action of the applied pesticide. The highest initial residue values were measured on foliage-dwelling arthropods. By following the toxicity-exposure ratio approaches of the current pesticide risk assessment, no acute dietary risk was found for all recorded bat species. However, a potential reproductive risk for bat species that include foliage-dwelling arthropods in their diet was indicated. The results emphasize the importance of adequately evaluating the risks of pesticides to bats, which, compared to other mammals, are potentially more sensitive due to their ecological traits. PMID:22505289

  10. Transport and Application of Heat-Activated Persulfate for In-situ Chemical Oxidation of Residual Trichloroethylene

    Quig, L.; Johnson, G. R.

    2015-12-01

    Persulfate ISCO has been shown to treat a wide range of contaminants. While persulfate ISCO can be tailored to site and pollutant specific characteristics (e.g., activation via energy or catalysis), thermal activation of persulfate is particularly promising as it can be easily controlled and requires no additional reagents. A mechanistic study of the physical and chemical processes controlling the effectiveness of this remedial approach is not well documented in the literature with much therein focused on reactions in batch systems. The purpose of this research was twofold. Initial studies characterized the overall transport behavior of unactivated and thermally-activated persulfate (20, 60, and 90°C) in one-dimensional soil column systems. Finally, experiments were conducted to investigate persulfate ISCO as a remedial approach for residual-phase trichloroethylene (TCE). At all activation temperatures investigated, persulfate exhibited ideal transport behavior in miscible displacement experiments. Moment analysis of persulfate ion breakthrough curves indicated negligible interaction of persulfate with the natural sandy material. Persulfate ISCO for residual-phase TCE was characterized at two flow rates, 0.2 mL/min and 0.5 mL/min, resulting in two degrees of persulfate activation, 39.5% and 24.6%, respectively. Both ISCO soil column systems showed an initial, long-term plateau in effluent TCE concentrations indicating steady-state dissolution of pure phase TCE. Observed effluent concentrations decreased after 75 and 100 pore volumes (normalized for the measured residual NAPL fraction) compared to 110 pore volumes in the control study. Pseudo first-order reaction rate constants for the decreasing TCE concentrations equaled 0.063/hr and 0.083/hr, respectively, compared to 0.041/hr for the control. Moment analysis of the complete dissolution of TCE in the persulfate/activated persulfate remediation systems indicated approximately 33% oxidation of TCE mass present. By

  11. Safety Oversight of Decommissioning Activities at DOE Nuclear Sites

    The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board) is an independent federal agency established by Congress in 1988 to provide nuclear safety oversight of activities at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) defense nuclear facilities. The activities under the Board's jurisdiction include the design, construction, startup, operation, and decommissioning of defense nuclear facilities at DOE sites. This paper reviews the Board's safety oversight of decommissioning activities at DOE sites, identifies the safety problems observed, and discusses Board initiatives to improve the safety of decommissioning activities at DOE sites. The decommissioning of former defense nuclear facilities has reduced the risk of radioactive material contamination and exposure to the public and site workers. In general, efforts to perform decommissioning work at DOE defense nuclear sites have been successful, and contractors performing decommissioning work have a good safety record. Decommissioning activities have recently been completed at sites identified for closure, including the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, the Fernald Closure Project, and the Miamisburg Closure Project (the Mound site). The Rocky Flats and Fernald sites, which produced plutonium parts and uranium materials for defense needs (respectively), have been turned into wildlife refuges. The Mound site, which performed R and D activities on nuclear materials, has been converted into an industrial and technology park called the Mound Advanced Technology Center. The DOE Office of Legacy Management is responsible for the long term stewardship of these former EM sites. The Board has reviewed many decommissioning activities, and noted that there are valuable lessons learned that can benefit both DOE and the contractor. As part of its ongoing safety oversight responsibilities, the Board and its staff will continue to review the safety of DOE and contractor decommissioning activities at DOE defense nuclear sites

  12. Savannah River Site prioritization of transition activities

    Effective management of SRS conversion from primarily a production facility to other missions (or Decontamination and Decommissioning (D ampersand D)) requires a systematic and consistent method of prioritizing the transition activities. This report discusses the design of a prioritizing method developed to achieve systematic and consistent methods of prioritizing these activities

  13. Savannah River Site prioritization of transition activities

    Finley, R.H.

    1993-11-01

    Effective management of SRS conversion from primarily a production facility to other missions (or Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D)) requires a systematic and consistent method of prioritizing the transition activities. This report discusses the design of a prioritizing method developed to achieve systematic and consistent methods of prioritizing these activities.

  14. Functional residues essential for the activation of the CB1 cannabinoid receptor.

    Shim, Joong-Youn; Padgett, Lea

    2013-01-01

    Recently developed X-ray crystal structures of active state G-protein-coupled receptors have opened the way for detailed examination of the movement of the transmembrane (TM) helices and the specific residues involved in the receptor activation upon ligand binding. Previous modeling studies have indicated that the brain cannabinoid (CB1) receptor binds with a ligand at least in part through a hydrophobic tail on the ligand. This interaction is believed to be similar to the rotameric toggle switch proposed for the β2 adrenergic receptor (β2AR). In the present study, an active state model for the CB1 receptor, guided by the X-ray structure of the active state for β2AR, was constructed with HU210 bound as a ligand. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were employed to provide a smooth progression between inactive and active states of the receptor. This model was compared with our previously published CB1 receptor model to identify the functional residues that play key roles in triggering receptor conformational changes upon agonist binding. Movements in TM helices and functional residues are discussed. W279(5.43), contributing to an inward movement of the fifth TM helix (TM5) to the helical core, could serve as another rotameric switch for receptor activation. V282(5.46), interacting with the ligand's hydrophobic C3 alkyl chain, appears to play a key role in TM5 inward movement centered at L286(5.50) and subsequent coupling to V204(3.40). V204(3.40), closely interacting with the TM5 and TM6 hydrophobic patch residues in the middle of the receptor, particularly I290(5.54) and L352(6.44), appears to facilitate helical rearrangements, leading to the breakage of the ionic lock and the rotameric change of Y397(7.53), which are key features of the active state. PMID:23332708

  15. Inulin-125I-tyramine, an improved residualizing label for studies on sites of catabolism of circulating proteins

    Residualizing labels for protein, such as dilactitol-125I-tyramine (125I-DLT) and cellobiitol-125I-tyramine, have been used to identify the tissue and cellular sites of catabolism of long-lived plasma proteins, such as albumin, immunoglobulins, and lipoproteins. The radioactive degradation products formed from labeled proteins are relatively large, hydrophilic, resistant to lysosomal hydrolases, and accumulate in lysosomes in the cells involved in degradation of the carrier protein. However, the gradual loss of the catabolites from cells (t1/2 approximately 2 days) has limited the usefulness of residualizing labels in studies on longer lived proteins. We describe here a higher molecular weight (Mr approximately 5000), more efficient residualizing glycoconjugate label, inulin-125I-tyramine (125I-InTn). Attachment of 125I-InTn had no effect on the plasma half-life or tissue sites of catabolism of asialofetuin, fetuin, or rat serum albumin in the rat. The half-life for hepatic retention of degradation products from 125I-InTn-labeled asialofetuin was 5 days, compared to 2.3 days for 125I-DLT-labeled asialofetuin. The whole body half-lives for radioactivity from 125I-InTn-, 125I-DLT-, and 125I-labeled rat serum albumin were 7.5, 4.3, and 2.2 days, respectively. The tissue distribution of degradation products from 125I-InTn-labeled proteins agreed with results of previous studies using 125I-DLT, except that a greater fraction of total degradation products was recovered in tissues. Kinetic analyses indicated that the average half-life for retention of 125I-InTn degradation products in tissues is approximately 5 days and suggested that in vivo there are both slow and rapid routes for release of degradation products from cells

  16. Overall adsorption rate of metronidazole, dimetridazole and diatrizoate on activated carbons prepared from coffee residues and almond shells.

    Flores-Cano, J V; Sánchez-Polo, M; Messoud, J; Velo-Gala, I; Ocampo-Pérez, R; Rivera-Utrilla, J

    2016-03-15

    This study analyzed the overall adsorption rate of metronidazole, dimetridazole, and diatrizoate on activated carbons prepared from coffee residues and almond shells. It was also elucidated whether the overall adsorption rate was controlled by reaction on the adsorbent surface or by intraparticle diffusion. Experimental data of the pollutant concentration decay curves as a function of contact time were interpreted by kinetics (first- and second-order) and diffusion models, considering external mass transfer, surface and/or pore volume diffusion, and adsorption on an active site. The experimental data were better interpreted by a first-order than second-order kinetic model, and the first-order adsorption rate constant varied linearly with respect to the surface area and total pore volume of the adsorbents. According to the diffusion model, the overall adsorption rate is governed by intraparticle diffusion, and surface diffusion is the main mechanism controlling the intraparticle diffusion, representing >90% of total intraparticle diffusion. PMID:26731310

  17. Conformational Change in the Active Site of Streptococcal Unsaturated Glucuronyl Hydrolase Through Site-Directed Mutagenesis at Asp-115.

    Nakamichi, Yusuke; Oiki, Sayoko; Mikami, Bunzo; Murata, Kousaku; Hashimoto, Wataru

    2016-08-01

    Bacterial unsaturated glucuronyl hydrolase (UGL) degrades unsaturated disaccharides generated from mammalian extracellular matrices, glycosaminoglycans, by polysaccharide lyases. Two Asp residues, Asp-115 and Asp-175 of Streptococcus agalactiae UGL (SagUGL), are completely conserved in other bacterial UGLs, one of which (Asp-175 of SagUGL) acts as a general acid and base catalyst. The other Asp (Asp-115 of SagUGL) also affects the enzyme activity, although its role in the enzyme reaction has not been well understood. Here, we show substitution of Asp-115 in SagUGL with Asn caused a conformational change in the active site. Tertiary structures of SagUGL mutants D115N and D115N/K370S with negligible enzyme activity were determined at 2.00 and 1.79 Å resolution, respectively, by X-ray crystallography. The side chain of Asn-115 is drastically shifted in both mutants owing to the interaction with several residues, including Asp-175, by formation of hydrogen bonds. This interaction between Asn-115 and Asp-175 probably prevents the mutants from triggering the enzyme reaction using Asp-175 as an acid catalyst. PMID:27402448

  18. Pathways analysis and radiation-dose estimates for radioactive residues at formerly utilized MED/AEC sites

    Methods of analysis are developed for estimating the largest individual radiation dose that could result from residual radioactivity at sites identified by the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) of the US Department of Energy. Two unique aspects of the methods are (1) a systematic structuring of the radiation pathways analysis into source terms, source-to-exposure analysis, and exposure-to-dose analysis, and (2) the systematic use of data on the average concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides in soil, food, and the human body in order to assess the validity of model calculations and obtain more realistic values. The methods are applied to a typical FUSRAP site in order to obtain generic source-to-dose (D/S) conversion factors for estimating the radiation dose to the maximally exposed individual from a known concentration of radionuclides in the soil. The D/S factors are used to derive soil guidelines, i.e., the limiting concentrations of radionuclides at a typical FUSRAP site that are unlikely to result in individual dose limits that exceed generally accepted radiation protection standards. The results lead to the conclusion that the soil guidelines should not exceed 17, 75, and 300 pCi/g for Ra-226, U-238, and Th-230, respectively

  19. Enzymatic activity measured by microcalorimetry in soil amended with organic residues

    Karina Cenciani

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Enzymatic activity is an important property for soil quality evaluation. Two sequences of experiments were carried out in order to evaluate the enzymatic activity in a soil (Rhodic Eutrudox amended with cattle manure, earthworm casts, or sewage sludges from the municipalities of Barueri and Franca. The activity of commercial enzymes was measured by microcalorimetry in the same soil samples after sterilization. In the first experiment, the enzyme activities of cellulase, protease, and urease were determined in the soil samples during a three month period. In the second sequence of experiments, the thermal effect of the commercial enzymes cellulase, protease, and urease on sterilized soil samples under the same tretaments was monitored for a period of 46 days. The experimental design was randomized and arranged as factorial scheme in five treatments x seven samplings with five replications. The treatment effects were statistically evaluated by one-way analysis of variance. Tukey´s test was used to compare means at p < 0.05. The presence of different sources of organic residues increased the enzymatic activity in the sampling period. Cattle manure induced the highest enzymatic activity, followed by municipal sewage sludge, whereas earthworm casts induced the lowest activity, but differed from control treatment. The thermal effect on the enzyme activity of commercial cellulase, protease, and urease showed a variety of time peaks. These values probably oscillated due to soil physical-chemical factors affecting the enzyme activity on the residues.

  20. Crystal structure of an avian influenza polymerase PA[subscript N] reveals an endonuclease active site

    Yuan, Puwei; Bartlam, Mark; Lou, Zhiyong; Chen, Shoudeng; Zhou, Jie; He, Xiaojing; Lv, Zongyang; Ge, Ruowen; Li, Xuemei; Deng, Tao; Fodor, Ervin; Rao, Zihe; Liu, Yingfang; (NU Sinapore); (Nankai); (Oxford); (Chinese Aca. Sci.); (Tsinghua)

    2009-11-10

    The heterotrimeric influenza virus polymerase, containing the PA, PB1 and PB2 proteins, catalyses viral RNA replication and transcription in the nucleus of infected cells. PB1 holds the polymerase active site and reportedly harbours endonuclease activity, whereas PB2 is responsible for cap binding. The PA amino terminus is understood to be the major functional part of the PA protein and has been implicated in several roles, including endonuclease and protease activities as well as viral RNA/complementary RNA promoter binding. Here we report the 2.2 angstrom (A) crystal structure of the N-terminal 197 residues of PA, termed PA(N), from an avian influenza H5N1 virus. The PA(N) structure has an alpha/beta architecture and reveals a bound magnesium ion coordinated by a motif similar to the (P)DX(N)(D/E)XK motif characteristic of many endonucleases. Structural comparisons and mutagenesis analysis of the motif identified in PA(N) provide further evidence that PA(N) holds an endonuclease active site. Furthermore, functional analysis with in vivo ribonucleoprotein reconstitution and direct in vitro endonuclease assays strongly suggest that PA(N) holds the endonuclease active site and has critical roles in endonuclease activity of the influenza virus polymerase, rather than PB1. The high conservation of this endonuclease active site among influenza strains indicates that PA(N) is an important target for the design of new anti-influenza therapeutics.

  1. Key residues at the riboflavin kinase catalytic site of the bifunctional riboflavin kinase/FMN adenylyltransferase from Corynebacterium ammoniagenes.

    Serrano, Ana; Frago, Susana; Herguedas, Beatriz; Martínez-Júlvez, Marta; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Medina, Milagros

    2013-01-01

    Many known prokaryotic organisms depend on a single bifunctional enzyme, encoded by the RibC of RibF gene and named FAD synthetase (FADS), to convert Riboflavin (RF), first into FMN and then into FAD. The reaction occurs through the sequential action of two activities present on a single polypeptide chain where the N-terminus is responsible for the ATP:FMN adenylyltransferase (FMNAT) activity and the C-terminus for the ATP: riboflavin kinase (RFK) activity. Sequence and structural analysis suggest that T208, N210 and E268 at the C-terminus RFK module of Corynebacterium ammoniagenes FADS (CaFADS) might be key during RF phosphorylation. The effect of site-directed mutagenesis on the RFK activity, as well as on substrates and products binding, indicates that T208 and N210 provide the RFK active-site geometry for binding and catalysis, while E268 might be involved in the catalytic step as catalytic base. These data additionally suggest concerted conformational changes at the RFK module of CaFADS during its activity. Mutations at the RFK site also modulate the binding parameters at the FMNAT active site of CaFADS, altering the catalytic efficiency in the transformation of FMN into FAD. This observation supports the hypothesis that the hexameric assembly previously revealed by the crystal structure of CaFADS might play a functional role during catalysis. PMID:22892871

  2. Three novel acetylation sites in the Foxp3 transcription factor regulate the suppressive activity of regulatory T cells

    Kwon, Hye-Sook; Lim, Hyung W; Wu, Jessica; Schnoelzer, Martina; Verdin, Eric; Ott, Melanie

    2012-01-01

    The Foxp3 transcription factor is the master regulator of regulatory T cell (Treg) differentiation and function. Its activity is regulated by reversible acetylation. Using mass spectrometry of immunoprecipitated proteins, we identify three novel acetylation sites in murine Foxp3 (K31, K262, and K267) and the corresponding sites in human FoxP3 proteins. Newly raised modification-specific antibodies against acetylated K31 and K267 confirm acetylation of these residues in murine Tregs. Mutant Fo...

  3. Probing the putative active site of YjdL

    Jensen, Johanne Mørch; Ismat, Fouzia; Szakonyi, Gerda;

    2012-01-01

    with Glu388, a preliminary orientation model of a dipeptide in the YjdL cavity is presented. Single site mutations of particularly Ala281 and Trp278 support the presented orientation. A dipeptide bound in the cavity of YjdL appears to be oriented such that the N-terminal side chain protrudes into a sub...... pocket that opens towards the extracellular space. The C-terminal side chain faces in the opposite direction into a sub pocket that faces the cytoplasm. These data indicated a stabilizing effect on a bulky N-terminal residue by an Ala281Phe variant and on the dipeptide backbone by Trp278. In the...... presented orientation model, Tyr25 and Tyr58 both appear to be in proximity of the dipeptide backbone while Lys117 appears to be in proximity of the peptide C-terminus. Mutational studies of these conserved residues highlight their functional importance....

  4. Fragment-based identification of determinants of conformational and spectroscopic change at the ricin active site

    Soares Alexei S

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ricin is a potent toxin and known bioterrorism threat with no available antidote. The ricin A-chain (RTA acts enzymatically to cleave a specific adenine base from ribosomal RNA, thereby blocking translation. To understand better the relationship between ligand binding and RTA active site conformational change, we used a fragment-based approach to find a minimal set of bonding interactions able to induce rearrangements in critical side-chain positions. Results We found that the smallest ligand stabilizing an open conformer of the RTA active site pocket was an amide group, bound weakly by only a few hydrogen bonds to the protein. Complexes with small amide-containing molecules also revealed a switch in geometry from a parallel towards a splayed arrangement of an arginine-tryptophan cation-pi interaction that was associated with an increase and red-shift in tryptophan fluorescence upon ligand binding. Using the observed fluorescence signal, we determined the thermodynamic changes of adenine binding to the RTA active site, as well as the site-specific binding of urea. Urea binding had a favorable enthalpy change and unfavorable entropy change, with a ΔH of -13 ± 2 kJ/mol and a ΔS of -0.04 ± 0.01 kJ/(K*mol. The side-chain position of residue Tyr80 in a complex with adenine was found not to involve as large an overlap of rings with the purine as previously considered, suggesting a smaller role for aromatic stacking at the RTA active site. Conclusion We found that amide ligands can bind weakly but specifically to the ricin active site, producing significant shifts in positions of the critical active site residues Arg180 and Tyr80. These results indicate that fragment-based drug discovery methods are capable of identifying minimal bonding determinants of active-site side-chain rearrangements and the mechanistic origins of spectroscopic shifts. Our results suggest that tryptophan fluorescence provides a sensitive probe for the

  5. The Surface Groups and Active Site of Fibrous Mineral Materials

    DONG Fa-qin; WAN Pu; FENG Qi-ming; SONG Gong-bao; PENG Tong-jiang; LI Ping; LI Guo-wu

    2004-01-01

    The exposed and transformed groups of fibrous brucite,wollastonite,chrysotile asbestos,sepiolite,palygorskite,clinoptilolite,crocidolite and diatomaceous earth mineral materials are analyzed by IR spectra after acid and alikali etching,strong mechanical and polarity molecular interaction.The results show the active sites concentrate on the ends in stick mineral materials and on the defect or hole edge in pipe mineral materials.The inside active site of mineral materials plays a main role in small molecular substance.The shape of minerals influence their distribution and density of active site.The strong mechanical impulsion and weak chemical force change the active site feature of minerals,the powder process enables minerals exposed more surface group and more combined types.The surface processing with the small polarity molecular or the brand of middle molecular may produce ionation and new coordinate bond,and change the active properties and level of original mineral materials.

  6. Characterization and sequencing of the active site of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate synthase

    The pyridoxal phosphate (PLP)-dependent 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) synthase the key enzyme in ethylene biosynthesis, is inactivated by its substrate S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet). Apple ACC synthase was purified with an immunoaffinity gel, and its active site was probed with NaB3H4 or Ado[14C]Met. Peptide sequencing of both 3H- and 14C-labeled peptides revealed a common dodecapeptide of Ser-Leu-Ser-Xaa-Asp-Leu-Gly-Leu-Pro-Gly-Phe-Arg, where Xaa was the modified, radioactive residue in each case. Acid hydrolysis of the 3H-labeled enzyme released radioactive N-pyridoxyllysine, indicating that the active-site peptide contained lysine at position 4. Mass spectrometry of the 14C-labeled peptide indicated a protonated molecular ion at m/z 1390.6, from which the mass of Xaa was calculated to be 229, a number that is equivalent to the mass of a lysine residue alkylated by the 2-aminobutyrate portion of AdoMet, as we previously proposed. These results indicate that the same active-site lysine binds the PLP and convalently links to the 2-aminobutyrate portion of AdoMet during inactivation. The active site of tomato ACC synthase was probed in the same manner with Ado [14C]Met. Sequencing of the tomato active-site peptide revealed two highly conserved dodecapeptides; the minor peptide possessed a sequence identical to that of the apple enzyme, whereas the major peptide differed from the minor peptide in that methionine replaced leucine at position 6

  7. The effect of administering long-acting oxytetracycline and tilmicosin either by dart gun or by hand on injection site lesions and drug residues in beef cattle.

    Van Donkersgoed, J; VanderKop, M; Salisbury, C.; L. Sears; Holowath, J

    1999-01-01

    Forty yearling cattle were injected intramuscularly with long-acting oxytetracycline and subcutaneously with tilmicosin by dart gun or by hand in a chute 28 days prior to slaughter. The drugs caused injection site lesions and antibiotic residues in the neck and thigh that varied by technique, dose, and site.

  8. Limitations on the Activity Concentration of Mineral Processing Residues Used as Building Material

    The use of mineral processing residue as a building material accounts for a significant proportion of the various uses of such material. The activity concentrations of radionuclides of natural origin in the material can be significantly elevated, resulting in enhanced exposure of occupants of the buildings concerned unless some restriction is placed on the radioactivity content. Accordingly, in order to comply with the dose limitation requirements of the relevant laws and standards, the activity concentration in the material has to be restricted. The use of mineral processing residues in building material is controlled in three categories according to a parameter known as the equivalent concentration, which can guide the product specification of the building material and control the dose received by a building occupant. (author)

  9. Flexibility and Stability Trade-Off in Active Site of Cold-Adapted Pseudomonas mandelii Esterase EstK.

    Truongvan, Ngoc; Jang, Sei-Heon; Lee, ChangWoo

    2016-06-28

    Cold-adapted enzymes exhibit enhanced conformational flexibility, especially in their active sites, as compared with their warmer-temperature counterparts. However, the mechanism by which cold-adapted enzymes maintain their active site stability is largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the role of conserved D308-Y309 residues located in the same loop as the catalytic H307 residue in the cold-adapted esterase EstK from Pseudomonas mandelii. Mutation of D308 and/or Y309 to Ala or deletion resulted in increased conformational flexibility. Particularly, the D308A or Y309A mutant showed enhanced substrate affinity and catalytic rate, as compared with wild-type EstK, via enlargement of the active site. However, all mutant EstK enzymes exhibited reduced thermal stability. The effect of mutation was greater for D308 than Y309. These results indicate that D308 is not preferable for substrate selection and catalytic activity, whereas hydrogen bond formation involving D308 is critical for active site stabilization. Taken together, conformation of the EstK active site is constrained via flexibility-stability trade-off for enzyme catalysis and thermal stability. Our study provides further insights into active site stabilization of cold-adapted enzymes. PMID:27259687

  10. Assessment of alternatives for long-term management of uranium ore residues and contaminated soils located at DOE's Niagara Falls Storage Site

    Merry-Libby, P.

    1984-11-05

    About 11,000 m/sup 3/ of uranium ore residues and 180,000 m/sup 3/ of wastes (mostly slightly contaminated soils) are consolidated within a diked containment area at the Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS) located about 30 km north of Buffalo, NY. The residues account for less than 6% of the total volume of contaminated materials but almost 99% of the radioactivty. The average /sup 226/Ra concentration in the residues is 67,000 pCi/g. Several alternatives for long-term management of the wastes and residues are being considered, including: improvement of the containment at NFSS, modification of the form of the residues, management of the residues separately from the wastes, management of the wastes and residues at another humid site (Oak Ridge, TN) or arid site (Hanford, WA), and dispersal of the wastes in the ocean. Potential radiological risks are expected to be smaller than the nonradiological risks of occupational and transportation-related injuries and deaths. Dispersal of the slightly contaminated wastes in the ocean is not expected to result in any significant impacts on the ocean environment or pose any significant radiological risk to humans. It will be necessary to take perpetual care of the near-surface burial sites because the residues and wastes will remain hazardous for thousands of years. If controls cease, the radioactive materials will eventually be dispersed in the environment. Predicted loss of the earthen covers over the buried materials ranges from several hundred to more than two million years, depending primarily on the use of the land surface. Groundwater will eventually be contaminated in all alternatives; however, the groundwater pathway is relatively insignificant with respect to radiological risks to the general population. A person intruding into the residues would incur an extremely high radiation dose.

  11. Assessment of alternatives for long-term management of uranium ore residues and contaminated soils located at DOE's Niagara Falls Storage Site

    About 11,000 m3 of uranium ore residues and 180,000 m3 of wastes (mostly slightly contaminated soils) are consolidated within a diked containment area at the Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS) located about 30 km north of Buffalo, NY. The residues account for less than 6% of the total volume of contaminated materials but almost 99% of the radioactivty. The average 226Ra concentration in the residues is 67,000 pCi/g. Several alternatives for long-term management of the wastes and residues are being considered, including: improvement of the containment at NFSS, modification of the form of the residues, management of the residues separately from the wastes, management of the wastes and residues at another humid site (Oak Ridge, TN) or arid site (Hanford, WA), and dispersal of the wastes in the ocean. Potential radiological risks are expected to be smaller than the nonradiological risks of occupational and transportation-related injuries and deaths. Dispersal of the slightly contaminated wastes in the ocean is not expected to result in any significant impacts on the ocean environment or pose any significant radiological risk to humans. It will be necessary to take perpetual care of the near-surface burial sites because the residues and wastes will remain hazardous for thousands of years. If controls cease, the radioactive materials will eventually be dispersed in the environment. Predicted loss of the earthen covers over the buried materials ranges from several hundred to more than two million years, depending primarily on the use of the land surface. Groundwater will eventually be contaminated in all alternatives; however, the groundwater pathway is relatively insignificant with respect to radiological risks to the general population. A person intruding into the residues would incur an extremely high radiation dose

  12. Chaperone-like activity of β-casein and its effect on residual in vitro activity of horseradish peroxidase

    Sulewska, Anna Maria; Olsen, Karsten; Sørensen, Jens Christian; Øgendal, Lars Holm

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the residual activity horseradish peroxidase was used as a novel marker of chaperone-like activity of β-casein under elevated temperature. It was shown that β-casein does affect residual activity of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) depending on the concentration and molar ratio between...

  13. Derivation of residual radioactive material guidelines for uranium in soil at the Former Associate Aircraft Tool and Manufacturing Company Site, Fairfield, Ohio

    Residual radioactive material guidelines for uranium in soil were derived for the former Associate Aircraft Tool and Manufacturing Company site in Fairfield, Ohio. This site has been identified for remedial action under the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). Single-nuclide and total-uranium guidelines were derived on the basis of the requirement that, after remedial action, the 50-year committed effective dose equivalent to a hypothetical individual living or working in the immediate vicinity of the site should not exceed (1) 30 mrem/yr for the current-use and likely future-use scenarios or (2) 100 mrem/yr for less likely future-use scenarios. The DOE residual radioactive material (RESRAD) computer code, which implements the methodology described in the DOE manual for establishing residual radioactive material guidelines, was used in this evaluation

  14. Improving the neutral phytase activity from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens DSM 1061 by site-directed mutagenesis.

    Xu, Wei; Shao, Rong; Wang, Zupeng; Yan, Xiuhua

    2015-03-01

    Neutral phytase is used as a feed additive for degradation of anti-nutritional phytate in aquatic feed industry. Site-directed mutagenesis of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens DSM 1061 phytase was performed with an aim to increase its activity. Mutation residues were chosen based on multiple sequence alignments and structure analysis of neutral phytsaes from different microorganisms. The mutation sites on surface (D148E, S197E and N156E) and around the active site (D52E) of phytase were selected. Analysis of the phytase variants showed that the specific activities of mutants D148E and S197E remarkably increased by about 35 and 13% over a temperature range of 40-75 °C at pH 7.0, respectively. The k cat of mutants D148E and S197E were 1.50 and 1.25 times than that of the wild-type phytase, respectively. Both D148E and S197E showed much higher thermostability than that of the wild-type phytase. However, mutants N156E and D52E led to significant loss of specific activity of the enzyme. Structural analysis revealed that these mutations may affect conformation of the active site of phytase. The present mutant phytases D148E and S197E with increased activities and thermostabilities have application potential as additives in aquaculture feed. PMID:25613522

  15. Solid radioactive waste: evaluation of residual activity in nuclear medicine services

    An experimental programme to estimate, with a better degree of accuracy, the activity that remains adsorbed in flasks and syringes used in Nuclear Medicine Services for the administration of radionuclides to patients submitted to diagnostic or therapy is been conducted under the coordination of the Radioactive Waste Division of the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission, CNEN. The adopted recommendation in Brazil to allow an expedite solid waste management in nuclear medicine facilities, up to the present, is to consider that 2% of the initial activity remains adsorbed in the solid waste, which easily allows the calculation of the storage time to achieve regulatory clearance levels by decay. This research evaluates 17 different kinds of radiopharmaceuticals and three radioisotopes: 99mTc, 67Ga and 201Tl. Results obtained by means of a weighting method to estimate the residual mass in flasks show that the ratio of the mass of the liquid that remains in the solid waste to the mass of the empty flask is constant. This suggests that the residual activity depends on the initial activity concentration of radiopharmaceutical contained in each flask, as assumed by the regulatory body. Additionally, results obtained by determining the remaining activity in flasks, shortly after the injection of its radionuclide contents in patients, indicate that an average value for the residual activity of the order of 10% of the initial activity contained in the flasks or syringes should be adopted to determine the decay storage time before the release of solid waste in the urban conventional land fill disposal system. The 'rule of thumb' of 10 half-lives for storage before clearance is also discussed in the present work. (author)

  16. Preparation of mesoporous activated carbons from coal liquefaction residue for methane decomposition

    Jianbo Zhang; Lijun Jin; Shengwei Zhu; Haoquan Hu

    2012-01-01

    Mesoporous activated carbons were prepared from direct coal liquefaction residue (CLR) by KOH activation method,and the experiments were carried out to investigate the effects of KOH/CLR ratio,solvent for mixing the CLR and KOH,and carbonization procedure on the resultant carbon texture and catalytic activity for catalytic methane decomposition (CMD).The results showed that optimal KOH/CLR ratio of 2 ∶ 1;solvent with higher solubility to KOH or the CLR,and an appropriate carbonization procedure are conductive to improving the carbon pore structure and catalytic activity for CMD.The resultant mesoporous carbons show higher and more stable activity than microporous carbons.Additionally,the relationship between the carbon textural properties and the catalytic activity for CMD was also discussed.

  17. Chemical and structural characterization of interstrand cross-links formed between abasic sites and adenine residues in duplex DNA

    Price, Nathan E.; Catalano, Michael J.; Liu, Shuo; Wang, Yinsheng; Gates, Kent S.

    2015-01-01

    A new type of interstrand DNA–DNA cross-link between abasic (Ap) sites and 2′-deoxyadenosine (dA) residues was recently reported, but the chemical structure and properties of this lesion were not rigorously established. Here we characterized the nucleoside cross-link remnant released by enzymatic digestion of duplex DNA containing the dA-Ap cross-link. A synthetic standard was prepared for the putative nucleoside cross-link remnant 6 in which the anomeric carbon of the 2-deoxyribose residue was connected to the exocyclic N6-amino group of dA. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis showed that the synthetic material 6 matched the authentic cross-link remnant released by enzymatic digestion of cross-linked DNA. These findings establish the chemical structure of the dA-Ap cross-link released from duplex DNA and may provide methods for the detection of this lesion in cellular DNA. Both the nucleoside cross-link remnant 6 and the cross-link in duplex DNA were quite stable at pH 7 and 37°C, suggesting that the dA-Ap cross-link could be a persistent lesion with the potential to block the action of various DNA processing enzymes. PMID:25779045

  18. The active site behaviour of electrochemically synthesised gold nanomaterials.

    Plowman, Blake J; O'Mullane, Anthony P; Bhargava, Suresh K

    2011-01-01

    Even though gold is the noblest of metals, a weak chemisorber and is regarded as being quite inert, it demonstrates significant electrocatalytic activity in its nanostructured form. It is demonstrated here that nanostructured and even evaporated thin films of gold are covered with active sites which are responsible for such activity. The identification of these sites is demonstrated with conventional electrochemical techniques such as cyclic voltammetry as well as a large amplitude Fourier transformed alternating current (FT-ac) method under acidic and alkaline conditions. The latter technique is beneficial in determining if an electrode process is either Faradaic or capacitive in nature. The observed behaviour is analogous to that observed for activated gold electrodes whose surfaces have been severely disrupted by cathodic polarisation in the hydrogen evolution region. It is shown that significant electrochemical oxidation responses occur at discrete potential values well below that for the formation of the compact monolayer oxide of bulk gold and are attributed to the facile oxidation of surface active sites. Several electrocatalytic reactions are explored in which the onset potential is determined by the presence of such sites on the surface. Significantly, the facile oxidation of active sites is used to drive the electroless deposition of metals such as platinum, palladium and silver from their aqueous salts on the surface of gold nanostructures. The resultant surface decoration of gold with secondary metal nanoparticles not only indicates regions on the surface which are rich in active sites but also provides a method to form interesting bimetallic surfaces. PMID:22455038

  19. Nicotinamide Cofactors Suppress Active-Site Labeling of Aldehyde Dehydrogenases.

    Stiti, Naim; Chandrasekar, Balakumaran; Strubl, Laura; Mohammed, Shabaz; Bartels, Dorothea; van der Hoorn, Renier A L

    2016-06-17

    Active site labeling by (re)activity-based probes is a powerful chemical proteomic tool to globally map active sites in native proteomes without using substrates. Active site labeling is usually taken as a readout for the active state of the enzyme because labeling reflects the availability and reactivity of active sites, which are hallmarks for enzyme activities. Here, we show that this relationship holds tightly, but we also reveal an important exception to this rule. Labeling of Arabidopsis ALDH3H1 with a chloroacetamide probe occurs at the catalytic Cys, and labeling is suppressed upon nitrosylation and oxidation, and upon treatment with other Cys modifiers. These experiments display a consistent and strong correlation between active site labeling and enzymatic activity. Surprisingly, however, labeling is suppressed by the cofactor NAD(+), and this property is shared with other members of the ALDH superfamily and also detected for unrelated GAPDH enzymes with an unrelated hydantoin-based probe in crude extracts of plant cell cultures. Suppression requires cofactor binding to its binding pocket. Labeling is also suppressed by ALDH modulators that bind at the substrate entrance tunnel, confirming that labeling occurs through the substrate-binding cavity. Our data indicate that cofactor binding adjusts the catalytic Cys into a conformation that reduces the reactivity toward chloroacetamide probes. PMID:26990764

  20. Prediction of residual stress due to early age behaviour of massive concrete structures: on site experiments and macroscopic modelling

    Zreiki, Jihad; Chaouche, Mohend; Moranville, Micheline

    2008-01-01

    Early age behaviour of concrete is based on complex multi-physical and multiscale phenomena. The predication of both cracking risk and residual stresses in hardened concrete structures is still a challenging task. We propose in this paper a practical method to characterize in the construction site the material parameters and to identify a macroscopic model from simple tests. We propose for instance to use a restrained shrinkage ring test to identify a basic early age creep model based on a simple ageing visco-elastic Kelvin model. The strain data obtained from this test can be treated through an early age finite element incremental procedure such that the fitting parameters of the creep law can be quickly identified. The others properties of concrete have been measured at different ages (elastic properties, hydration kinetics, and coefficient of thermal expansion). From the identified early age model, we computed the temperature rise and the stress development in a non reinforced concrete stress for nuclear w...

  1. Reduction of urease activity by interaction with the flap covering the active site.

    Macomber, Lee; Minkara, Mona S; Hausinger, Robert P; Merz, Kenneth M

    2015-02-23

    With the increasing appreciation for the human microbiome coupled with the global rise of antibiotic resistant organisms, it is imperative that new methods be developed to specifically target pathogens. To that end, a novel computational approach was devised to identify compounds that reduce the activity of urease, a medically important enzyme of Helicobacter pylori, Proteus mirabilis, and many other microorganisms. Urease contains a flexible loop that covers its active site; Glide was used to identify small molecules predicted to lock this loop in an open conformation. These compounds were screened against the model urease from Klebsiella aerogenes, and the natural products epigallocatechin and quercetin were shown to inhibit at low and high micromolar concentrations, respectively. These molecules exhibit a strong time-dependent inactivation of urease that was not due to their oxygen sensitivity. Rather, these compounds appear to inactivate urease by reacting with a specific Cys residue located on the flexible loop. Substitution of this cysteine by alanine in the C319A variant increased the urease resistance to both epigallocatechin and quercetin, as predicted by the computational studies. Protein dynamics are integral to the function of many enzymes; thus, identification of compounds that lock an enzyme into a single conformation presents a useful approach to define potential inhibitors. PMID:25594724

  2. Behavior of peptides combining 1 alanine residue and 8 glycine residues on papain associated with structural fluctuations

    Nishiyama, Katsuhiko

    2011-12-01

    I investigated the behavior of the peptides combining 1 ALA residue and 8 GLY residues on papain associated with structural fluctuations via molecular dynamics and docking simulations. Although the chance of binding to sites near the active center of papain was reduced by replacing the GLY residue in 9GLY with ALA residue, binding stability was improved by the replacement. Furthermore, both the chance and binding stability were greatly affected by positioning of ALA residue in the peptides. Residue in peptides should be replaced in view of the balance between chance of binding to sites near active center and binding stability.

  3. Structural Basis for Substrate and Oxygen Activation in Homoprotocatechuate 2,3-Dioxygenase: Roles of Conserved Active Site Histidine 200.

    Kovaleva, Elena G; Rogers, Melanie S; Lipscomb, John D

    2015-09-01

    Kinetic and spectroscopic studies have shown that the conserved active site residue His200 of the extradiol ring-cleaving homoprotocatechuate 2,3-dioxygenase (FeHPCD) from Brevibacterium fuscum is critical for efficient catalysis. The roles played by this residue are probed here by analysis of the steady-state kinetics, pH dependence, and X-ray crystal structures of the FeHPCD position 200 variants His200Asn, His200Gln, and His200Glu alone and in complex with three catecholic substrates (homoprotocatechuate, 4-sulfonylcatechol, and 4-nitrocatechol) possessing substituents with different inductive capacity. Structures determined at 1.35-1.75 Å resolution show that there is essentially no change in overall active site architecture or substrate binding mode for these variants when compared to the structures of the wild-type enzyme and its analogous complexes. This shows that the maximal 50-fold decrease in kcat for ring cleavage, the dramatic changes in pH dependence, and the switch from ring cleavage to ring oxidation of 4-nitrocatechol by the FeHPCD variants can be attributed specifically to the properties of the altered second-sphere residue and the substrate. The results suggest that proton transfer is necessary for catalysis, and that it occurs most efficiently when the substrate provides the proton and His200 serves as a catalyst. However, in the absence of an available substrate proton, a defined proton-transfer pathway in the protein can be utilized. Changes in the steric bulk and charge of the residue at position 200 appear to be capable of altering the rate-limiting step in catalysis and, perhaps, the nature of the reactive species. PMID:26267790

  4. Sustainable Activated Carbons from Agricultural Residues Dedicated to Antibiotic Removal by Adsorption

    Jonatan Torres-Perez; Claire Gerente; Yves Andres

    2012-01-01

    The. objectives.of this study are to convert at laboratory s.cale agric.ultural residues into activated carbons (AC) with specific properties, to characterize them and to test them in adsorption reactor for tetracycline removal, a common antibiotic. Two new ACs were produced by direct activation with steam from beet pulp (BP-H2O) and peanut hu_lls (PH-H2O) in environmental friendly conditions BP-H2O and PH-H2Opresentcarbon content rangedcarbons with different intrinsic properties.

  5. Relative toxicity and residual activity of insecticides used in blueberry pest management: mortality of natural enemies.

    Roubos, Craig R; Rodriguez-Saona, Cesar; Holdcraft, Robert; Mason, Keith S; Isaacs, Rufus

    2014-02-01

    A series of bioassays were conducted to determine the relative toxicities and residual activities of insecticides labeled for use in blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) on natural enemies, to identify products with low toxicity or short duration effects on biological control agents. In total, 14 insecticides were evaluated using treated petri dishes and four commercially available natural enemies (Aphidius colemani Viereck, Orius insidiosus [Say], Chrysoperla rufilabris [Burmeister], and Hippodamia convergens [Guérin-Menéville]). Dishes were aged under greenhouse conditions for 0, 3, 7, or 14 d before introducing insects to test residual activity. Acute effects (combined mortality and knockdown) varied by insecticide, residue age, and natural enemy species. Broad-spectrum insecticides caused high mortality to all biocontrol agents, whereas products approved for use in organic agriculture had little effect. The reduced-risk insecticide acetamiprid consistently caused significant acute effects, even after aging for 14 d. Methoxyfenozide, novaluron, and chlorantraniliprole, which also are classified as reduced-risk insecticides, had low toxicity, and along with the organic products could be compatible with biological control. This study provides information to guide blueberry growers in their selection of insecticides. Further research will be needed to determine whether adoption of a pest management program based on the use of more selective insecticides will result in higher levels of biological control in blueberry. PMID:24665711

  6. Multiple nucleophilic elbows leading to multiple active sites in a single module esterase from Sorangium cellulosum

    Udatha, D.B.R.K. Gupta; Madsen, Karina Marie; Panagiotou, Gianni; Olsson, Lisbeth

    2015-01-01

    The catalytic residues in carbohydrate esterase enzyme families constitute a highly conserved triad: serine, histidine and aspartic acid. This catalytic triad is generally located in a very sharp turn of the protein backbone structure, called the nucleophilic elbow and identified by the consensus...... sequence GXSXG. An esterase from Sorangium cellulosum Soce56 that contains five nucleophilic elbows was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli and the function of each nucleophilic elbowed site was characterized. In order to elucidate the function of each nucleophilic elbow, site directed mutagenesis was...... used to generate variants with deactivated nucleophilic elbows and the functional promiscuity was analyzed. In silico analysis together with enzymological characterization interestingly showed that each nucleophilic elbow formed a local active site with varied substrate specificities and affinities. To...

  7. Key messages from active CO2 storage sites

    Wildenborg, T.; Wollenweber, J. [TNO, Princetonlaan 6, 3584 CB Utrecht (Netherlands); Chadwick, A. [BGS, Environmental Science Centre, Keyworth, Nottingham, NG12 5GG (United Kingdom); Deflandre, J.P. [IFP Energies nouvelles, 1-4 avenue de Bois Preau, 92852 Rueil-Malmaison (France); Eiken, O. [Statoil Research Centre, Rotvoll, Arkitekt Ebbells vei 10, 7005 Trondheim (Norway); Mathieson, A. [BP, Alternative Energy, Chertsey Road, Sunbury on Thames (United Kingdom); Metcalfe, R. [QUINTESSA, The Hub, 14 Station Road, Henley-on-Thames, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Schmidt Hattenberger, C. [GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, Centre for CO2Storage, Potsdam (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    An extensive programme of modelling, monitoring and verification activities was deployed at a set of active storage sites worldwide including Sleipner, In Salah, Ketzin, Weyburn, K12-B and Snoehvit (EU CO2ReMoVe project). All investigated storage sites were well managed and did not have a negative impact on humans or the environment. Time-lapse seismic and pressure monitoring are key in verifying the deep subsurface performance of the storage sites. Evidence gathered during the site characterisation and operational phases is key to handover responsibility of the storage site to governmental authorities after injection has definitely ceased, which is the focus of the follow-up EU project CO2CARE.

  8. Distribution patterns of firearm discharge residues as revealed by neutron activation analysis

    A systematic investigation using a variety of handguns has revealed the existence of distinguisable distribution patterns of firearm discharge residues on surfaces below the flight path of a bullet. The residues are identificable even at distances of 12 meters from the gun using nondestructive neutron activation analysis. The results of these investigations show that the distribution pattern for a gun is reproducible using similar ammunition and that there exist two distinct regions to the patterns developed between the firearm and the target-one with respect to the position of the gun and the other in the vicinity of the target. The judicious applications of these findings could be of significant value in criminal investigations. (T.G.)

  9. Review of the incineration of 500 tonnes of radio-active residues

    During its first five years operation, the incinerator at the Marcoule Centre has burnt almost 500 tonnes of radio-active residues. Improvements in some of the details of the process have been made during this period; they concern the nature of the materials involved. The technical and radiological results for the installation are very favorable, and have made it possible to maintain a high charge factor.Although the overall economic results are not advantageous in the case of ungraded solid residues this method represents nevertheless the best available for eliminating oils, solvents, wood and dead animals. It can also be of use furthermore each time that a dilution in the atmosphere can advantageously be used as a method of disposing of certain radio elements such as tritium or carbon 14 in the form of gases or vapours. (author)

  10. Klipperaas study site. Scope of activities and main results

    During the period from 1977 - 1986 SKB (Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co.) performed surface and borehole investigations of 14 study sites for the purpose of assessing their suitability for a repository of spent nuclear fuel. The next phase in the SKB site selection rpogramme will be to perform detailed characterisation, including characterization from shafts and/or tunnels, of two or three sites. The detailed investigations will continue over several years to provide all the data needed for a licensing application to build a repository. Such an application is foreseen to be given to the authorities around the year 2003. It is presently not clear if any of the study sites will be selected as a site for detailed characterization. Other sites with geological and/or socio-economical characteristics judged more favorable may very well be the ones selected. However, as a part of the background documentation needed for the site selection studies to come, summary reports will be prepared for most study sites. These reports will include scope of activities, main results, uncertainties and need of complementary investigations. This report concern the Klipperaas study site. The main topics are the scope of activities, geologic model, geohydrological model, groundwater chemistry, assessment of solute transport, and rock mechanics