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Sample records for active shape models

  1. Face Alignment Using Active Shape Model And Support Vector Machine

    Le, Thai Hoang; Vo, Truong Nhat

    2012-01-01

    The Active Shape Model (ASM) is one of the most popular local texture models for face alignment. It applies in many fields such as locating facial features in the image, face synthesis, etc. However, the experimental results show that the accuracy of the classical ASM for some applications is not high. This paper suggests some improvements on the classical ASM to increase the performance of the model in the application: face alignment. Four of our major improvements include: i) building a mod...

  2. Face Alignment Using Active Shape Model And Support Vector Machine

    Le Hoang Thai; Vo Nhat Truong

    2011-01-01

    The Active Shape Model (ASM) is one of the most popular local texture modelsfor face alignment. It applies in many fields such as locating facial features in theimage, face synthesis, etc. However, the experimental results show that theaccuracy of the classical ASM for some applications is not high. This papersuggests some improvements on the classical ASM to increase the performanceof the model in the application: face alignment. Four of our major improvementsinclude: i) building a model com...

  3. Ultrasound Common Carotid Artery Segmentation Based on Active Shape Model

    Xin Yang; Jiaoying Jin; Mengling Xu; Huihui Wu; Wanji He; Ming Yuchi; Mingyue Ding

    2013-01-01

    Carotid atherosclerosis is a major reason of stroke, a leading cause of death and disability. In this paper, a segmentation method based on Active Shape Model (ASM) is developed and evaluated to outline common carotid artery (CCA) for carotid atherosclerosis computer-aided evaluation and diagnosis. The proposed method is used to segment both media-adventitia-boundary (MAB) and lumen-intima-boundary (LIB) on transverse views slices from three-dimensional ultrasound (3D US) images. The data set...

  4. Abdomen and spinal cord segmentation with augmented active shape models.

    Xu, Zhoubing; Conrad, Benjamin N; Baucom, Rebeccah B; Smith, Seth A; Poulose, Benjamin K; Landman, Bennett A

    2016-07-01

    Active shape models (ASMs) have been widely used for extracting human anatomies in medical images given their capability for shape regularization of topology preservation. However, sensitivity to model initialization and local correspondence search often undermines their performances, especially around highly variable contexts in computed-tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) images. In this study, we propose an augmented ASM (AASM) by integrating the multiatlas label fusion (MALF) and level set (LS) techniques into the traditional ASM framework. Using AASM, landmark updates are optimized globally via a region-based LS evolution applied on the probability map generated from MALF. This augmentation effectively extends the searching range of correspondent landmarks while reducing sensitivity to the image contexts and improves the segmentation robustness. We propose the AASM framework as a two-dimensional segmentation technique targeting structures with one axis of regularity. We apply AASM approach to abdomen CT and spinal cord (SC) MR segmentation challenges. On 20 CT scans, the AASM segmentation of the whole abdominal wall enables the subcutaneous/visceral fat measurement, with high correlation to the measurement derived from manual segmentation. On 28 3T MR scans, AASM yields better performances than other state-of-the-art approaches in segmenting white/gray matter in SC. PMID:27610400

  5. Face Alignment Using Active Shape Model And Support Vector Machine

    Le Hoang Thai; Vo Nhat Truong

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The Active Shape Model (ASM is one of the most popular local texture modelsfor face alignment. It applies in many fields such as locating facial features in theimage, face synthesis, etc. However, the experimental results show that theaccuracy of the classical ASM for some applications is not high. This papersuggests some improvements on the classical ASM to increase the performanceof the model in the application: face alignment. Four of our major improvementsinclude: i building a model combining Sobel filter and the 2-D profile in searchingface in image; ii applying Canny algorithm for the enhancement edge on image;iii Support Vector Machine (SVM is used to classify landmarks on face, in orderto determine exactly location of these landmarks support for ASM; ivautomatically adjust 2-D profile in the multi-level model based on the size of theinput image. The experimental results on Caltech face database and TechnicalUniversity of Denmark database (imm_face show that our proposedimprovement leads to far better performance.

  6. Ultrasound common carotid artery segmentation based on active shape model.

    Yang, Xin; Jin, Jiaoying; Xu, Mengling; Wu, Huihui; He, Wanji; Yuchi, Ming; Ding, Mingyue

    2013-01-01

    Carotid atherosclerosis is a major reason of stroke, a leading cause of death and disability. In this paper, a segmentation method based on Active Shape Model (ASM) is developed and evaluated to outline common carotid artery (CCA) for carotid atherosclerosis computer-aided evaluation and diagnosis. The proposed method is used to segment both media-adventitia-boundary (MAB) and lumen-intima-boundary (LIB) on transverse views slices from three-dimensional ultrasound (3D US) images. The data set consists of sixty-eight, 17 × 2 × 2, 3D US volume data acquired from the left and right carotid arteries of seventeen patients (eight treated with 80 mg atorvastatin and nine with placebo), who had carotid stenosis of 60% or more, at baseline and after three months of treatment. Manually outlined boundaries by expert are adopted as the ground truth for evaluation. For the MAB and LIB segmentations, respectively, the algorithm yielded Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) of 94.4% ± 3.2% and 92.8% ± 3.3%, mean absolute distances (MAD) of 0.26 ± 0.18 mm and 0.33 ± 0.21 mm, and maximum absolute distances (MAXD) of 0.75 ± 0.46 mm and 0.84 ± 0.39 mm. It took 4.3 ± 0.5 mins to segment single 3D US images, while it took 11.7 ± 1.2 mins for manual segmentation. The method would promote the translation of carotid 3D US to clinical care for the monitoring of the atherosclerotic disease progression and regression. PMID:23533535

  7. Modeling injection molding of net-shape active ceramic components.

    Baer, Tomas (Gram Inc.); Cote, Raymond O.; Grillet, Anne Mary; Yang, Pin; Hopkins, Matthew Morgan; Noble, David R.; Notz, Patrick K.; Rao, Rekha Ranjana; Halbleib, Laura L.; Castaneda, Jaime N.; Burns, George Robert; Mondy, Lisa Ann; Brooks, Carlton, F.

    2006-11-01

    To reduce costs and hazardous wastes associated with the production of lead-based active ceramic components, an injection molding process is being investigated to replace the current machining process. Here, lead zirconate titanate (PZT) ceramic particles are suspended in a thermoplastic resin and are injected into a mold and allowed to cool. The part is then bisque fired and sintered to complete the densification process. To help design this new process we use a finite element model to describe the injection molding of the ceramic paste. Flow solutions are obtained using a coupled, finite-element based, Newton-Raphson numerical method based on the GOMA/ARIA suite of Sandia flow solvers. The evolution of the free surface is solved with an advanced level set algorithm. This approach incorporates novel methods for representing surface tension and wetting forces that affect the evolution of the free surface. Thermal, rheological, and wetting properties of the PZT paste are measured for use as input to the model. The viscosity of the PZT is highly dependent both on temperature and shear rate. One challenge in modeling the injection process is coming up with appropriate constitutive equations that capture relevant phenomenology without being too computationally complex. For this reason we model the material as a Carreau fluid and a WLF temperature dependence. Two-dimensional (2D) modeling is performed to explore the effects of the shear in isothermal conditions. Results indicate that very low viscosity regions exist near walls and that these results look similar in terms of meniscus shape and fill times to a simple Newtonian constitutive equation at the shear-thinned viscosity for the paste. These results allow us to pick a representative viscosity to use in fully three-dimensional (3D) simulation, which because of numerical complexities are restricted to using a Newtonian constitutive equation. Further 2D modeling at nonisothermal conditions shows that the choice of

  8. COVARIANCE SHRINKING IN ACTIVE SHAPE MODELS WITH APPLICATION TO GYRAL LABELING OF THE CEREBRAL CORTEX

    Yang, Zhen; Carass, Aaron; Prince, Jerry L.

    2013-01-01

    Active shape models (ASMs) have been widely used in segmentation tasks in medical image analysis. Complex structures and a limited number of training samples can, however, result in the failure to capture the complete range of shape variations. Various modifications to the point distribution model (PDM) have been proposed to increase the flexibility of the model. Still model parameters are often determined empirically without respect to the underlying data structure. We explore shrinkage cova...

  9. Active Shape Model-Based Gait Recognition Using Infrared Images

    Daehee Kim

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a gait recognition system using infra-red (IR images. Since an IR camera is not affected by the intensity of illumination, it is able to provide constant recognition performance regardless of the amount of illumination. Model-based object tracking algorithms enable robust tracking with partial occlusions or dynamic illumination. However, this algorithm often fails in tracking objects if strong edge exists near the object. Replacementof the input image by an IR image guarantees robust object region extraction because background edges do not affect the IR image. In conclusion, the proposed gait recognition algorithm improves accuracy in object extraction by using IR images and the improvementsfinally increase the recognition rate of gaits.

  10. A Framework of Vertebra Segmentation Using the Active Shape Model-Based Approach

    Mohammed Benjelloun; Saïd Mahmoudi; Fabian Lecron

    2011-01-01

    We propose a medical image segmentation approach based on the Active Shape Model theory. We apply this method for cervical vertebra detection. The main advantage of this approach is the application of a statistical model created after a training stage. Thus, the knowledge and interaction of the domain expert intervene in this approach. Our application allows the use of two different models, that is, a global one (with several vertebrae) and a local one (with a single vertebra). Two modes of s...

  11. Segmentation of risk structures for otologic surgery using the Probabilistic Active Shape Model (PASM)

    Becker, Meike; Kirschner, Matthias; Sakas, Georgios

    2014-03-01

    Our research project investigates a multi-port approach for minimally-invasive otologic surgery. For planning such a surgery, an accurate segmentation of the risk structures is crucial. However, the segmentation of these risk structures is a challenging task: The anatomical structures are very small and some have a complex shape, low contrast and vary both in shape and appearance. Therefore, prior knowledge is needed which is why we apply model-based approaches. In the present work, we use the Probabilistic Active Shape Model (PASM), which is a more flexible and specific variant of the Active Shape Model (ASM), to segment the following risk structures: cochlea, semicircular canals, facial nerve, chorda tympani, ossicles, internal auditory canal, external auditory canal and internal carotid artery. For the evaluation we trained and tested the algorithm on 42 computed tomography data sets using leave-one-out tests. Visual assessment of the results shows in general a good agreement of manual and algorithmic segmentations. Further, we achieve a good Average Symmetric Surface Distance while the maximum error is comparatively large due to low contrast at start and end points. Last, we compare the PASM to the standard ASM and show that the PASM leads to a higher accuracy.

  12. Modeling of Asteroid Shapes

    Kokorev, Andrii

    2016-01-01

    In this article we consider different methods of modeling asteroid shapes, especially lightcurve inversion technique, and scattering laws used for it. We also introduce our program, which constructs lightcurves for a given asteroid shape model. It can be used to comparing shape model with observational data.

  13. A deformable lung tumor tracking method in fluoroscopic video using active shape models: a feasibility study

    A dynamic multi-leaf collimator (DMLC) can be used to track a moving target during radiotherapy. One of the major benefits for DMLC tumor tracking is that, in addition to the compensation for tumor translational motion, DMLC can also change the aperture shape to conform to a deforming tumor projection in the beam's eye view. This paper presents a method that can track a deforming lung tumor in fluoroscopic video using active shape models (ASM) (Cootes et al 1995 Comput. Vis. Image Underst. 61 38-59). The method was evaluated by comparing tracking results against tumor projection contours manually edited by an expert observer. The evaluation shows the feasibility of using this method for precise tracking of lung tumors with deformation, which is important for DMLC-based real-time tumor tracking

  14. Dendritic spine shape analysis using disjunctive normal shape models

    Ghani, Muhammad Usman; Mesadi, Fitsum; Demir Kanık, Sümerya Ümmühan; Demir Kanik, Sumerya Ummuhan; Argunşah, Ali Özgür; Argunsah, Ali Ozgur; Israely, Inbal; Ünay, Devrim; Unay, Devrim; Taşdizen, Tolga; Tasdizen, Tolga; Çetin, Müjdat; Cetin, Mujdat

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of dendritic spines is an essential task to understand the functional behavior of neurons. Their shape variations are known to be closely linked with neuronal activities. Spine shape analysis in particular, can assist neuroscientists to identify this relationship. A novel shape representation has been proposed recently, called Disjunctive Normal Shape Models (DNSM). DNSM is a parametric shape representation and has proven to be successful in several segmentation problems. In this pap...

  15. A Framework of Vertebra Segmentation Using the Active Shape Model-Based Approach

    Mohammed Benjelloun

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a medical image segmentation approach based on the Active Shape Model theory. We apply this method for cervical vertebra detection. The main advantage of this approach is the application of a statistical model created after a training stage. Thus, the knowledge and interaction of the domain expert intervene in this approach. Our application allows the use of two different models, that is, a global one (with several vertebrae and a local one (with a single vertebra. Two modes of segmentation are also proposed: manual and semiautomatic. For the manual mode, only two points are selected by the user on a given image. The first point needs to be close to the lower anterior corner of the last vertebra and the second near the upper anterior corner of the first vertebra. These two points are required to initialize the segmentation process. We propose to use the Harris corner detector combined with three successive filters to carry out the semiautomatic process. The results obtained on a large set of X-ray images are very promising.

  16. A framework of vertebra segmentation using the active shape model-based approach.

    Benjelloun, Mohammed; Mahmoudi, Saïd; Lecron, Fabian

    2011-01-01

    We propose a medical image segmentation approach based on the Active Shape Model theory. We apply this method for cervical vertebra detection. The main advantage of this approach is the application of a statistical model created after a training stage. Thus, the knowledge and interaction of the domain expert intervene in this approach. Our application allows the use of two different models, that is, a global one (with several vertebrae) and a local one (with a single vertebra). Two modes of segmentation are also proposed: manual and semiautomatic. For the manual mode, only two points are selected by the user on a given image. The first point needs to be close to the lower anterior corner of the last vertebra and the second near the upper anterior corner of the first vertebra. These two points are required to initialize the segmentation process. We propose to use the Harris corner detector combined with three successive filters to carry out the semiautomatic process. The results obtained on a large set of X-ray images are very promising. PMID:21826134

  17. Enhancing the T-shaped learning profile when teaching hydrology using data, modeling, and visualization activities

    Sanchez, Christopher A.; Ruddell, Benjamin L.; Schiesser, Roy; Merwade, Venkatesh

    2016-03-01

    Previous research has suggested that the use of more authentic learning activities can produce more robust and durable knowledge gains. This is consistent with calls within civil engineering education, specifically hydrology, that suggest that curricula should more often include professional perspective and data analysis skills to better develop the "T-shaped" knowledge profile of a professional hydrologist (i.e., professional breadth combined with technical depth). It was expected that the inclusion of a data-driven simulation lab exercise that was contextualized within a real-world situation and more consistent with the job duties of a professional in the field, would provide enhanced learning and appreciation of job duties beyond more conventional paper-and-pencil exercises in a lower-division undergraduate course. Results indicate that while students learned in both conditions, learning was enhanced for the data-driven simulation group in nearly every content area. This pattern of results suggests that the use of data-driven modeling and visualization activities can have a significant positive impact on instruction. This increase in learning likely facilitates the development of student perspective and conceptual mastery, enabling students to make better choices about their studies, while also better preparing them for work as a professional in the field.

  18. Segmentation of the common carotid artery with active shape models from 3D ultrasound images

    Yang, Xin; Jin, Jiaoying; He, Wanji; Yuchi, Ming; Ding, Mingyue

    2012-03-01

    Carotid atherosclerosis is a major cause of stroke, a leading cause of death and disability. In this paper, we develop and evaluate a new segmentation method for outlining both lumen and adventitia (inner and outer walls) of common carotid artery (CCA) from three-dimensional ultrasound (3D US) images for carotid atherosclerosis diagnosis and evaluation. The data set consists of sixty-eight, 17× 2× 2, 3D US volume data acquired from the left and right carotid arteries of seventeen patients (eight treated with 80mg atorvastain and nine with placebo), who had carotid stenosis of 60% or more, at baseline and after three months of treatment. We investigate the use of Active Shape Models (ASMs) to segment CCA inner and outer walls after statin therapy. The proposed method was evaluated with respect to expert manually outlined boundaries as a surrogate for ground truth. For the lumen and adventitia segmentations, respectively, the algorithm yielded Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) of 93.6%+/- 2.6%, 91.8%+/- 3.5%, mean absolute distances (MAD) of 0.28+/- 0.17mm and 0.34 +/- 0.19mm, maximum absolute distances (MAXD) of 0.87 +/- 0.37mm and 0.74 +/- 0.49mm. The proposed algorithm took 4.4 +/- 0.6min to segment a single 3D US images, compared to 11.7+/-1.2min for manual segmentation. Therefore, the method would promote the translation of carotid 3D US to clinical care for the fast, safety and economical monitoring of the atherosclerotic disease progression and regression during therapy.

  19. A magnetic resonance spectroscopy driven initialization scheme for active shape model based prostate segmentation.

    Toth, Robert; Tiwari, Pallavi; Rosen, Mark; Reed, Galen; Kurhanewicz, John; Kalyanpur, Arjun; Pungavkar, Sona; Madabhushi, Anant

    2011-04-01

    Segmentation of the prostate boundary on clinical images is useful in a large number of applications including calculation of prostate volume pre- and post-treatment, to detect extra-capsular spread, and for creating patient-specific anatomical models. Manual segmentation of the prostate boundary is, however, time consuming and subject to inter- and intra-reader variability. T2-weighted (T2-w) magnetic resonance (MR) structural imaging (MRI) and MR spectroscopy (MRS) have recently emerged as promising modalities for detection of prostate cancer in vivo. MRS data consists of spectral signals measuring relative metabolic concentrations, and the metavoxels near the prostate have distinct spectral signals from metavoxels outside the prostate. Active Shape Models (ASM's) have become very popular segmentation methods for biomedical imagery. However, ASMs require careful initialization and are extremely sensitive to model initialization. The primary contribution of this paper is a scheme to automatically initialize an ASM for prostate segmentation on endorectal in vivo multi-protocol MRI via automated identification of MR spectra that lie within the prostate. A replicated clustering scheme is employed to distinguish prostatic from extra-prostatic MR spectra in the midgland. The spatial locations of the prostate spectra so identified are used as the initial ROI for a 2D ASM. The midgland initializations are used to define a ROI that is then scaled in 3D to cover the base and apex of the prostate. A multi-feature ASM employing statistical texture features is then used to drive the edge detection instead of just image intensity information alone. Quantitative comparison with another recent ASM initialization method by Cosio showed that our scheme resulted in a superior average segmentation performance on a total of 388 2D MRI sections obtained from 32 3D endorectal in vivo patient studies. Initialization of a 2D ASM via our MRS-based clustering scheme resulted in an average

  20. Shape of optimal active flagella

    Eloy, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Many eukaryotic cells use the active waving motion of flexible flagella to self-propel in viscous fluids. However, the criteria governing the selection of particular flagellar waveforms among all possible shapes has proved elusive so far. To address this question, we derive computationally the optimal shape of an internally-forced periodic planar flagellum deforming as a travelling wave. The optimum is here defined as the shape leading to a given swimming speed with minimum energetic cost. To calculate the energetic cost though, we consider the irreversible internal power expanded by the molecular motors forcing the flagellum, only a portion of which ending up dissipated in the fluid. This optimisation approach allows us to derive a family of shapes depending on a single dimensionless number quantifying the relative importance of elastic to viscous effects: the Sperm number. The computed optimal shapes are found to agree with the waveforms observed on spermatozoon of marine organisms, thus suggesting that the...

  1. Issues in Biological Shape Modelling

    Hilger, Klaus Baggesen

    This talk reflects parts of the current research at informatics and Mathematical Modelling at the Technical University of Denmark within biological shape modelling. We illustrate a series of generalizations, modifications, and applications of the elements of constructing models of shape or...

  2. Women in Shape Modeling Workshop

    Tari, Sibel

    2015-01-01

    Presenting the latest research from the growing field of mathematical shape analysis, this volume is comprised of the collaborations of participants of the Women in Shape Modeling (WiSh) workshop, held at UCLA's Institute for Pure and Applied Mathematics in July 2013. Topics include: Simultaneous spectral and spatial analysis of shape Dimensionality reduction and visualization of data in tree-spaces, such as classes of anatomical trees like airways and blood vessels Geometric shape segmentation, exploring shape segmentation from a Gestalt perspective, using information from the Blum medial axis of edge fragments in an image Representing and editing self-similar details on 3D shapes, studying shape deformation and editing techniques Several chapters in the book directly address the problem of continuous measures of context-dependent nearness and right shape models. Medical and biological applications have been a major source of motivation in shape research, and key topics are examined here in detail. All...

  3. Active Shape Analysis of Mandibular Growth

    Hilger, Klaus Baggesen; Larsen, Rasmus; Kreiborg, Sven;

    2003-01-01

    This work contains a clinical validation using biological landmarks of a Geometry Constrained Diffusion registration of mandibular surfaces. Canonical Correlations Analysis is extended to analyse 3D landmarks and the correlations are used as similarity measures for landmark clustering. A novel...... Active Shape Model is proposed targeting growth modelling by applying Partial Least Squares regression in decomposing the Procrustes tangent space. Shape centroid size is applied as dependent variable but the method generalizes to handle other, both uni- and multivariate, effects probing for high...

  4. Robust boundary detection and tracking of left ventricles on ultrasound images using active shape model and ant colony optimization.

    Zhang, Yaonan; Gao, Yuan; Jiao, Jinling; Li, Xian; Li, Sai; Yang, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Information regarding the motion, strain and synchronization are important for cardiac diagnosis and therapy. Extraction of such information from ultrasound images remains an open problem till today. In this paper, a novel method is proposed to extract the boundaries of left ventricles and track these boundaries in ultrasound image sequences. The initial detection of boundaries was performed by an active shape model scheme. Subsequent refinement of the boundaries was done by using local variance information of the images. The main objective of this paper is the formulation of a new boundary tracking algorithm using ant colony optimization technique. The experiments conducted on the simulated image sequences and the real cardiac ultrasound image sequences shows a positive and promising result. PMID:25226995

  5. A magnetic resonance spectroscopy driven initialization scheme for active shape model based prostate segmentation

    Toth, Robert; Tiwari, Pallavi; Rosen, Mark; Reed, Galen; Kurhanewicz, John; Kalyanpur, Arjun; Pungavkar, Sona; Madabhushi, Anant

    2010-01-01

    Segmentation of the prostate boundary on clinical images is useful in a large number of applications including calculation of prostate volume pre- and post-treatment, to detect extra-capsular spread, and for creating patient-specific anatomical models. Manual segmentation of the prostate boundary is, however, time consuming and subject to inter- and intra-reader variability. T2-weighted (T2-w) magnetic resonance (MR) structural imaging (MRI) and MR spectroscopy (MRS) have recently emerged as ...

  6. Towards robust and effective shape modeling: sparse shape composition.

    Zhang, Shaoting; Zhan, Yiqiang; Dewan, Maneesh; Huang, Junzhou; Metaxas, Dimitris N; Zhou, Xiang Sean

    2012-01-01

    Organ shape plays an important role in various clinical practices, e.g., diagnosis, surgical planning and treatment evaluation. It is usually derived from low level appearance cues in medical images. However, due to diseases and imaging artifacts, low level appearance cues might be weak or misleading. In this situation, shape priors become critical to infer and refine the shape derived by image appearances. Effective modeling of shape priors is challenging because: (1) shape variation is complex and cannot always be modeled by a parametric probability distribution; (2) a shape instance derived from image appearance cues (input shape) may have gross errors; and (3) local details of the input shape are difficult to preserve if they are not statistically significant in the training data. In this paper we propose a novel Sparse Shape Composition model (SSC) to deal with these three challenges in a unified framework. In our method, a sparse set of shapes in the shape repository is selected and composed together to infer/refine an input shape. The a priori information is thus implicitly incorporated on-the-fly. Our model leverages two sparsity observations of the input shape instance: (1) the input shape can be approximately represented by a sparse linear combination of shapes in the shape repository; (2) parts of the input shape may contain gross errors but such errors are sparse. Our model is formulated as a sparse learning problem. Using L1 norm relaxation, it can be solved by an efficient expectation-maximization (EM) type of framework. Our method is extensively validated on two medical applications, 2D lung localization in X-ray images and 3D liver segmentation in low-dose CT scans. Compared to state-of-the-art methods, our model exhibits better performance in both studies. PMID:21963296

  7. Shaping Neuronal Network Activity by Presynaptic Mechanisms.

    Ayal Lavi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal microcircuits generate oscillatory activity, which has been linked to basic functions such as sleep, learning and sensorimotor gating. Although synaptic release processes are well known for their ability to shape the interaction between neurons in microcircuits, most computational models do not simulate the synaptic transmission process directly and hence cannot explain how changes in synaptic parameters alter neuronal network activity. In this paper, we present a novel neuronal network model that incorporates presynaptic release mechanisms, such as vesicle pool dynamics and calcium-dependent release probability, to model the spontaneous activity of neuronal networks. The model, which is based on modified leaky integrate-and-fire neurons, generates spontaneous network activity patterns, which are similar to experimental data and robust under changes in the model's primary gain parameters such as excitatory postsynaptic potential and connectivity ratio. Furthermore, it reliably recreates experimental findings and provides mechanistic explanations for data obtained from microelectrode array recordings, such as network burst termination and the effects of pharmacological and genetic manipulations. The model demonstrates how elevated asynchronous release, but not spontaneous release, synchronizes neuronal network activity and reveals that asynchronous release enhances utilization of the recycling vesicle pool to induce the network effect. The model further predicts a positive correlation between vesicle priming at the single-neuron level and burst frequency at the network level; this prediction is supported by experimental findings. Thus, the model is utilized to reveal how synaptic release processes at the neuronal level govern activity patterns and synchronization at the network level.

  8. Shape Restoration by Active Self-Assembly

    D. Arbuckle

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Shape restoration is defined as the problem of constructing a desired, or goal, solid shape Sg by growing an initial solid Si, which is a subset of the goal but is otherwise unknown. This definition attempts to capture abstractly a situation that often arises in the physical world when a solid object loses its desired shape due to wear and tear, corrosion or other phenomena. For example, if the top of the femur becomes distorted, the hip joint no longer functions properly and may have to be replaced surgically. Growing it in place back to its original shape would be an attractive alternative to replacement. This paper presents a solution to the shape restoration problem by using autonomous assembly agents (robots that self-assemble to fill the volume between Sg and Si. If the robots have very small dimension (micro or nano, the desired shape is approximated with high accuracy. The assembly agents initially execute a random walk. When two robots meet, they may exchange a small number of messages. The robot behavior is controlled by a finite state machine with a small number of states. Communication contact models chemical communication, which is likely to be the medium of choice for robots at the nanoscale, while small state and small messages are limitations that also are expected of nanorobots. Simulations presented here show that swarms of such robots organize themselves to achieve shape restoration by using distributed algorithms. This is one more example of an interesting geometric problem that can be solved by the Active Self-Assembly paradigm introduced in previous papers by the authors.

  9. Shaping frequency response of a vibrating plate for passive and active control applications by simultaneous optimization of arrangement of additional masses and ribs. Part I: Modeling

    Wrona, Stanislaw; Pawelczyk, Marek

    2016-03-01

    An ability to shape frequency response of a vibrating plate according to precisely defined demands has a very high practical potential. It can be applied to improve acoustic radiation of the plate for required frequencies or enhance acoustic isolation of noise barriers and device casings by using both passive and active control. The proposed method is based on mounting severaladditional ribs and masses (passive and/or active) to the plate surface at locations followed from an optimization process. This paper, Part I, concerns derivation of a mathematical model of the plate with attached elements in the function of their shape and placement. The model is validated by means of simulations and laboratory experiments, and compared with models known from the literature. This paper is followed by a companion paper, Part II, where the optimization process is described. It includes arrangement of passive elements as well as actuators and sensors to improve controllability and observability measures, if active control is concerned.

  10. Active Light Shaping using GPC

    Glückstad, Jesper; Palima, Darwin; Villangca, Mark Jayson;

    security, parallel laser marking and labelling and recently in contemporary biophotonics applications such as for adaptive and parallel two-photon optogenetics and neurophotonics. We will present our most recent GPC developments geared towards these applications. First, a compact GPC Light Shaper......Generalized Phase Contrast (GPC) is a light efficient method for generating speckle-free contiguous optical distributions using binary-only or analog phase levels. It has been used in applications such as optical trapping and manipulation, active microscopy, structured illumination, optical...

  11. Statistical models of shape optimisation and evaluation

    Davies, Rhodri; Taylor, Chris

    2008-01-01

    Addresses one of the key issues in shape modelling: that of establishing a meaningful correspondence between a set of shapesUses a novel approach to establishing correspondence by casting model-building as an optimisation problem Includes practical examples of applications for both 2D and 3D sets of shapesFull implementation details, perviously unpublished, provided

  12. A Heuristic Image Search Algorithm for Active Shape Model Segmentation of the Caudate Nucleus and Hippocampus in Brain MR Images of Children with FASD

    A A Eicher

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic Resonance Imaging provides a non-invasive means to study the neural correlates of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD - the most common form of preventable mental retardation worldwide. One approach aims to detect brain abnormalities through an assessment of volume and shape of two sub-cortical structures, the caudate nucleus and hippocampus. We present a method for automatically segmenting these structures from high-resolution MR images captured as part of an ongoing study into the neural correlates of FASD. Our method incorporates an Active Shape Model, which is used to learn shape variation from manually segmented training data. A modified discrete Geometrically Deformable Model is used to generate point correspondence between training models. An ASM is then created from the landmark points. Experiments were conducted on the image search phase of ASM segmentation, in order to find the technique best suited to segmentation of the hippocampus and caudate nucleus. Various popular image search techniques were tested, including an edge detection method and a method based on grey profile Mahalanobis distance measurement. A novel heuristic image search method was also developed and tested. This heuristic method improves image segmentation by taking advantage of characteristics specific to the target data, such as a relatively homogeneous tissue colour in target structures. Results show that ASMs that use the heuristic image search technique produce the most accurate segmentations. An ASM constructed using this technique will enable researchers to quickly, reliably, and automatically segment test data for use in the FASD study.

  13. A statistical model for mapping morphological shape

    Li Jiahan; Das Kiranmoy; Berg Arthur; Fu Guifang; Li Runze; Wu Rongling

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Living things come in all shapes and sizes, from bacteria, plants, and animals to humans. Knowledge about the genetic mechanisms for biological shape has far-reaching implications for a range spectrum of scientific disciplines including anthropology, agriculture, developmental biology, evolution and biomedicine. Results We derived a statistical model for mapping specific genes or quantitative trait loci (QTLs) that control morphological shape. The model was formulated with...

  14. Region-based active contour with noise and shape priors

    Lecellier, François; Fadili, Jalal; Aubert, Gilles; Revenu, Marinette; Saloux, Eric

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we propose to combine formally noise and shape priors in region-based active contours. On the one hand, we use the general framework of exponential family as a prior model for noise. On the other hand, translation and scale invariant Legendre moments are considered to incorporate the shape prior (e.g. fidelity to a reference shape). The combination of the two prior terms in the active contour functional yields the final evolution equation whose evolution speed is rigorously derived using shape derivative tools. Experimental results on both synthetic images and real life cardiac echography data clearly demonstrate the robustness to initialization and noise, flexibility and large potential applicability of our segmentation algorithm.

  15. Body shape model, physical activity and eating behaviour Modelo estético corporal, actividad física y conducta alimentaria

    I. Jáuregui Lobera

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Research on the influence of body shape model on adolescent males is scarce. The current study aimed to assess this influence among adult males involved in intense physical activity and to determine its relationship to eating behaviour. Possible variations between 1998 and 2008 were also analysed. Method: A total of 950 males (672 in 1998 and 278 in 2008, all aspiring professional soldiers, were studied using the Questionnaire of Influences on Body Shape Model (CIMEC-V and the Eating Attitudes Test-40 (EAT-40, as well as by assessing their physical/sporting activity and body mass index (BMI. Results: Scores on the CIMEC-V were significantly correlated with the EAT-40 and BMI. As regards physical activity the only positive correlation referred to gym-based exercise. A cluster analysis revealed two subgroups with respect to physical activity, BMI, and scores on the CIMEC-V and EAT-40. One of them scored higher on these three variables and they also had a BMI > 25. The comparative study of data from 1998 and 2008 showed significant changes in some variables. Conclusions: Generally, the results differ considerably from those reported for younger samples (which would suggest a lower risk of disordered eating behaviour. However, there is a higher risk group in which the influence of body shape models, physical activity and eating behaviour are related to greater body volume. The influence of the body shape model on males has increased, especially as regards the influence of friends and in terms of behaviours aimed at weight loss.Objetivos: La investigación sobre la influencia del modelo estético corporal en varones adolescentes es escasa. El presente estudio analiza tal influencia en varones con intensa actividad física y su influencia en la conducta alimentaria. También fueron analizadas las posibles variaciones entre 1998 y 2008. Método: Un total de 950 varones (672 en 1998 y 278 en 2008, aspirante a soldado profesional, fueron

  16. Shapes and shape grammars: from mathematical model to computer implementation

    S C Chase

    1989-01-01

    Shape grammars, a well-structured method of generating designs, are suitable for computer implementation. In this paper, a formal representation of shapes as individuals is developed; some binary operations and relations are then defined upon shapes. The formal mechanisms of shape grammars are presented, with some of the computational problems illustrated. Algorithms to solve some of these problems are given. A Prolog implementation of a generic shape grammar system is demonstrated.

  17. Modeling shape-memory behavior of dielectric elastomers

    Xiao, Rui

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we present a constitutive model to couple the shape memory and dielectric behaviors of polymers. The model adopted multiple relaxation processes and temperature-dependent relaxation time to describe the glass transition behaviors. The model was applied to simulate the thermal-mechanical-electrical behaviors of the dielectric elastomer VHB 4905. We investigated the influence of deformation temperature, voltage rate, relaxation time on the electromechanical and shape-memory behavior of dielectric elastomers. This work provides a method for combining the shape-memory properties and electroactive polymers, which can expand the applications of these soft active materials.

  18. Multi-shape active composites by 3D printing of digital shape memory polymers

    Wu, Jiangtao; Yuan, Chao; Ding, Zhen; Isakov, Michael; Mao, Yiqi; Wang, Tiejun; Dunn, Martin L.; Qi, H. Jerry

    2016-04-01

    Recent research using 3D printing to create active structures has added an exciting new dimension to 3D printing technology. After being printed, these active, often composite, materials can change their shape over time; this has been termed as 4D printing. In this paper, we demonstrate the design and manufacture of active composites that can take multiple shapes, depending on the environmental temperature. This is achieved by 3D printing layered composite structures with multiple families of shape memory polymer (SMP) fibers – digital SMPs - with different glass transition temperatures (Tg) to control the transformation of the structure. After a simple single-step thermomechanical programming process, the fiber families can be sequentially activated to bend when the temperature is increased. By tuning the volume fraction of the fibers, bending deformation can be controlled. We develop a theoretical model to predict the deformation behavior for better understanding the phenomena and aiding the design. We also design and print several flat 2D structures that can be programmed to fold and open themselves when subjected to heat. With the advantages of an easy fabrication process and the controllable multi-shape memory effect, the printed SMP composites have a great potential in 4D printing applications.

  19. Multi-shape active composites by 3D printing of digital shape memory polymers

    Wu, Jiangtao; Yuan, Chao; Ding, Zhen; Isakov, Michael; Mao, Yiqi; Wang, Tiejun; Dunn, Martin L.; Qi, H. Jerry

    2016-01-01

    Recent research using 3D printing to create active structures has added an exciting new dimension to 3D printing technology. After being printed, these active, often composite, materials can change their shape over time; this has been termed as 4D printing. In this paper, we demonstrate the design and manufacture of active composites that can take multiple shapes, depending on the environmental temperature. This is achieved by 3D printing layered composite structures with multiple families of shape memory polymer (SMP) fibers – digital SMPs - with different glass transition temperatures (Tg) to control the transformation of the structure. After a simple single-step thermomechanical programming process, the fiber families can be sequentially activated to bend when the temperature is increased. By tuning the volume fraction of the fibers, bending deformation can be controlled. We develop a theoretical model to predict the deformation behavior for better understanding the phenomena and aiding the design. We also design and print several flat 2D structures that can be programmed to fold and open themselves when subjected to heat. With the advantages of an easy fabrication process and the controllable multi-shape memory effect, the printed SMP composites have a great potential in 4D printing applications. PMID:27071543

  20. The constitutive modeling of shape memory alloys

    Liang, Chen

    1990-01-01

    This dissertation presents a one-dimensional thermomechanical constitutive model for shape memory alloys based on basic concepts of thermodynamics and phase transformation kinetics. Compared with other developed constitutive relations, this thermomechanical constitutive relation not only reflects the physical essence of shape memory alloys, i.e., the martensitic phase transformation involved, but also provides an easy-to-use design tool for engineers. It can predict and describ...

  1. Conditional shape models for cardiac motion estimation

    Metz, C.T.; Baka, N.; Kirisli, H.A.;

    2010-01-01

    We propose a conditional statistical shape model to predict patient specific cardiac motion from the 3D end-diastolic CTA scan. The model is built from 4D CTA sequences by combining atlas based segmentation and 4D registration. Cardiac motion estimation is, for example, relevant in the dynamic al...

  2. Modeling Self-Occlusions/Disocclusions in Dynamic Shape and Appearance Tracking for Obtaining Precise Shape

    Yang, Yanchao

    2013-05-01

    We present a method to determine the precise shape of a dynamic object from video. This problem is fundamental to computer vision, and has a number of applications, for example, 3D video/cinema post-production, activity recognition and augmented reality. Current tracking algorithms that determine precise shape can be roughly divided into two categories: 1) Global statistics partitioning methods, where the shape of the object is determined by discriminating global image statistics, and 2) Joint shape and appearance matching methods, where a template of the object from the previous frame is matched to the next image. The former is limited in cases of complex object appearance and cluttered background, where global statistics cannot distinguish between the object and background. The latter is able to cope with complex appearance and a cluttered background, but is limited in cases of camera viewpoint change and object articulation, which induce self-occlusions and self-disocclusions of the object of interest. The purpose of this thesis is to model self-occlusion/disocclusion phenomena in a joint shape and appearance tracking framework. We derive a non-linear dynamic model of the object shape and appearance taking into account occlusion phenomena, which is then used to infer self-occlusions/disocclusions, shape and appearance of the object in a variational optimization framework. To ensure robustness to other unmodeled phenomena that are present in real-video sequences, the Kalman filter is used for appearance updating. Experiments show that our method, which incorporates the modeling of self-occlusion/disocclusion, increases the accuracy of shape estimation in situations of viewpoint change and articulation, and out-performs current state-of-the-art methods for shape tracking.

  3. Statistical Shape Modeling of Cam Femoroacetabular Impingement

    Harris, Michael D.; Dater, Manasi; Whitaker, Ross; Jurrus, Elizabeth R.; Peters, Christopher L.; Anderson, Andrew E.

    2013-10-01

    In this study, statistical shape modeling (SSM) was used to quantify three-dimensional (3D) variation and morphologic differences between femurs with and without cam femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). 3D surfaces were generated from CT scans of femurs from 41 controls and 30 cam FAI patients. SSM correspondence particles were optimally positioned on each surface using a gradient descent energy function. Mean shapes for control and patient groups were defined from the resulting particle configurations. Morphological differences between group mean shapes and between the control mean and individual patients were calculated. Principal component analysis was used to describe anatomical variation present in both groups. The first 6 modes (or principal components) captured statistically significant shape variations, which comprised 84% of cumulative variation among the femurs. Shape variation was greatest in femoral offset, greater trochanter height, and the head-neck junction. The mean cam femur shape protruded above the control mean by a maximum of 3.3 mm with sustained protrusions of 2.5-3.0 mm along the anterolateral head-neck junction and distally along the anterior neck, corresponding well with reported cam lesion locations and soft-tissue damage. This study provides initial evidence that SSM can describe variations in femoral morphology in both controls and cam FAI patients and may be useful for developing new measurements of pathological anatomy. SSM may also be applied to characterize cam FAI severity and provide templates to guide patient-specific surgical resection of bone.

  4. Lightcurves for Shape/Spin Models

    Klinglesmith, Daniel A., III; Hendrickx, Sebastian; Madden, Karl; Montgomery, Samuel

    2016-04-01

    We obtained lightcurves of 12 asteroids in 2015 for potential use in shape and spin axis modeling: 855 Newcombia, 929 Algunde, 1730 Marceline, 1967 Menzel, 2074 Shoemaker, 2323 Zverev, 3285 Ruth Wolfe, 3640 Gostin, 3682 Welther, 3873 Roddy, (6823) 1988 ED1, and (11424) 1999 LZ24.

  5. Digital Modeling and Shaping of Design Practices

    Reijonen, Satu

    This paper focuses on the role of digital modeling in shaping coordinative practices between architects and energy engineers in construction design. The paper presents a case study of the use of an energy performance calculation programme, a numeric digital modeling tool, that not only enables co...... may be re-enacted and restructured over and over again. In the case at hand, this enabled a ‘trial and error’ type of intervention practice by energy engineers....

  6. A Model Coupling Method for Shape Prediction

    WANG Dong-cheng; LIU Hong-min

    2012-01-01

    The shape of strip is calculated by iterative method which combines strip plastic deformation model with rolls elastic deformation model through their calculation results, which can be called results coupling method. Be- cause the shape and rolling force distribution are very sensitive to strip thickness transverse distribution% variation, the iterative course is rather unstable and sometimes convergence cannot be achieved. In addition, the calculating speed of results coupling method is low, which restricts its usable range. To solve the problem, a new model cou- pling method is developed, which takes the force distribution between rolls, rolling force distribution and strip's exit transverse displacement distribution as basic unknowns, and integrates strip plastic deformation model and rolls elas- tic deformation model as a unified linear equations through their internal relation, so the iterative calculation between the strip plastic deformation model and rolls elastic deformation model can be avoided. To prove the effectiveness of the model coupling method, two examples are calculated by results coupling method and model coupling method re- spectively. The results of front tension stress, back tension stress, strip~s exit gauge, the force between rolls and rolling force distribution calculated by model coupling method coincide very well with results coupling method. How- ever the calculation course of model coupling method is more steady than results coupling method, and its calculating speed is about ten times as much as the maximal speed of results coupling method, which validates its practicability and reliability.

  7. Combining registration and active shape models for the automatic segmentation of the lymph node regions in head and neck CT images

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is the state of the art technique for head and neck cancer treatment. It requires precise delineation of the target to be treated and structures to be spared, which is currently done manually. The process is a time-consuming task of which the delineation of lymph node regions is often the longest step. Atlas-based delineation has been proposed as an alternative, but, in the authors' experience, this approach is not accurate enough for routine clinical use. Here, the authors improve atlas-based segmentation results obtained for level II-IV lymph node regions using an active shape model (ASM) approach. Methods: An average image volume was first created from a set of head and neck patient images with minimally enlarged nodes. The average image volume was then registered using affine, global, and local nonrigid transformations to the other volumes to establish a correspondence between surface points in the atlas and surface points in each of the other volumes. Once the correspondence was established, the ASMs were created for each node level. The models were then used to first constrain the results obtained with an atlas-based approach and then to iteratively refine the solution. Results: The method was evaluated through a leave-one-out experiment. The ASM- and atlas-based segmentations were compared to manual delineations via the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) for volume overlap and the Euclidean distance between manual and automatic 3D surfaces. The mean DSC value obtained with the ASM-based approach is 10.7% higher than with the atlas-based approach; the mean and median surface errors were decreased by 13.6% and 12.0%, respectively. Conclusions: The ASM approach is effective in reducing segmentation errors in areas of low CT contrast where purely atlas-based methods are challenged. Statistical analysis shows that the improvements brought by this approach are significant.

  8. Shape coexistence: the shell model view

    Poves, A.

    2016-02-01

    We shall discuss the meaning of the ‘nuclear shape’ in the laboratory frame proper to the spherical shell model. A brief historical promenade will bring us from Elliott’s SU3 breakthrough to today’s large scale shell model calculations. A section is devoted to the algebraic model which extends drastically the field of applicability of Elliot’s SU3, providing a precious heuristic guidance for the exploration of collectivity in the nuclear chart. Shape coexistence and shape mixing will be shown to occur as the result of the competition between the main actors in the nuclear dynamics; the spherical mean field, and the pairing and quadrupole-quadrupole interactions. These ideas will be illustrated with examples in magic nuclei (40Ca and 68Ni); neutron rich semi-magic (32Mg, and 64Cr); and in proton rich N = Z (72Kr).

  9. Volume Changes During Active Shape Fluctuations in Cells

    La Porta, Caterina A. M.; Taloni, Alessandro; Kardash, Elena; Salman, Oguz Umut; Truskinovsky, Lev; Zapperi, Stefano

    Cells modify their volume in response to changes in osmotic pressure but it is usually assumed that other active shape variations do not involve significant volume fluctuations. Here we report experiments demonstrating that water transport in and out of the cell is needed for the formation of blebs, commonly observed protrusions in the plasma membrane driven by cortex contraction. We develop and simulate a model of fluid-mediated membrane-cortex deformations and show that a permeable membrane is necessary for bleb formation which is otherwise impaired. Taken together, our experimental and theoretical results emphasize the subtle balance between hydrodynamics and elasticity in actively driven cell morphological changes.

  10. Volume changes during active shape fluctuations in cells

    Taloni, Alessandro; Salman, Oguz Umut; Truskinovsky, Lev; Zapperi, Stefano; La Porta, Caterina A M

    2015-01-01

    Cells modify their volume in response to changes in osmotic pressure but it is usually assumed that other active shape variations do not involve significant volume fluctuations. Here we report experiments demonstrating that water transport in and out of the cell is needed for the formation of blebs, commonly observed protrusions in the plasma membrane driven by cortex contraction. We develop and simulate a model of fluid mediated membrane-cortex deformations and show that a permeable membrane is necessary for bleb formation which is otherwise impaired. Taken together our experimental and theoretical results emphasize the subtle balance between hydrodynamics and elasticity in actively driven cell morphological changes.

  11. Multi-shape active composites by 3D printing of digital shape memory polymers

    Jiangtao Wu; Chao Yuan; Zhen Ding; Michael Isakov; Yiqi Mao; Tiejun Wang; Martin L. Dunn; H. Jerry Qi

    2016-01-01

    Recent research using 3D printing to create active structures has added an exciting new dimension to 3D printing technology. After being printed, these active, often composite, materials can change their shape over time; this has been termed as 4D printing. In this paper, we demonstrate the design and manufacture of active composites that can take multiple shapes, depending on the environmental temperature. This is achieved by 3D printing layered composite structures with multiple families of...

  12. Incorporating Prior Shape into Geometric Active Contours for Face Contour Detection

    HUANGFuzhen; SUJianbo; XIYugeng

    2004-01-01

    In this paper a new method that incorporates prior shape information into geometric active contours for face contour detection is proposed. As in general a human face can be treated as an ellipse with a little shape variation, the prior face shape is represented as an elliptical curve. By combining the prior face shape with the powerful geometric active model proposed by Chan and Vese, the improved geometric active model can retain all the advantage of the Chan-Vese model and can detect face contours in images with complex backgrounds accurately even if the image is noisy. Moreover, by implementing the new model in a variational level set framework, automatic topological changes of the model can be achieved naturally and the transformation parameters that map the face boundary to the prior shape can be roughly estimated simultaneously. The experimental results show our procedure to be eiTicient.

  13. Shape control and compartmentalization in active colloidal cells.

    Spellings, Matthew; Engel, Michael; Klotsa, Daphne; Sabrina, Syeda; Drews, Aaron M; Nguyen, Nguyen H P; Bishop, Kyle J M; Glotzer, Sharon C

    2015-08-25

    Small autonomous machines like biological cells or soft robots can convert energy input into control of function and form. It is desired that this behavior emerges spontaneously and can be easily switched over time. For this purpose we introduce an active matter system that is loosely inspired by biology and which we term an active colloidal cell. The active colloidal cell consists of a boundary and a fluid interior, both of which are built from identical rotating spinners whose activity creates convective flows. Similarly to biological cell motility, which is driven by cytoskeletal components spread throughout the entire volume of the cell, active colloidal cells are characterized by highly distributed energy conversion. We demonstrate that we can control the shape of the active colloidal cell and drive compartmentalization by varying the details of the boundary (hard vs. flexible) and the character of the spinners (passive vs. active). We report buckling of the boundary controlled by the pattern of boundary activity, as well as formation of core-shell and inverted Janus phase-separated configurations within the active cell interior. As the cell size is increased, the inverted Janus configuration spontaneously breaks its mirror symmetry. The result is a bubble-crescent configuration, which alternates between two degenerate states over time and exhibits collective migration of the fluid along the boundary. Our results are obtained using microscopic, non-momentum-conserving Langevin dynamics simulations and verified via a phase-field continuum model coupled to a Navier-Stokes equation. PMID:26253763

  14. The Time Course of Activation of Object Shape and Shape+Colour Representations during Memory Retrieval

    Lloyd-Jones, Toby J.; Roberts, Mark V.; Leek, E. Charles; Fouquet, Nathalie C.; Truchanowicz, Ewa G.

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the timing of activating memory for objects and their associated perceptual properties, such as colour, and yet this is important for theories of human cognition. We investigated the time course associated with early cognitive processes related to the activation of object shape and object shape+colour representations respectively, during memory retrieval as assessed by repetition priming in an event-related potential (ERP) study. The main findings were as follows: (1) we...

  15. Shape regulation generates elastic interaction between active force dipoles

    Golkov, Roman

    2016-01-01

    The organization of live cells to tissues is associated with the mechanical interaction between cells, which is mediated through their mechanical environment. We model live cells as spherical active force dipoles surrounded by an infinite elastic matrix, and analytically evaluate their elastic interaction energy for different scenarios of their regulatory behavior. For purely dilational eigenstrains the elastic interaction energy between any two bodies vanishes. We identify mechanical interactions between active cells applying non isotropic displacements with a regulation mechanism designed so that they will preserve their spherical shape. We express the resultant non-isotropic deformation field by a multipole expansion in terms of spherical harmonics. Mechanical self-regulation of live cells is not fully understood, and we compare homeostatic (set point) force applied by the cells on their environment versus homeostatic displacements on their surface. By including or excluding the first term of the expansion...

  16. Weed Identification Using An Automated Active Shape Matching (AASM) Technique

    Swain, K C; Nørremark, Michael; Jørgensen, R N;

    2011-01-01

    concept of ‘active shape modelling’ to identify weed and crop plants based on their morphology. The automated active shape matching system (AASM) technique consisted of, i) a Pixelink camera ii) an LTI (Lehrstuhlfuer technische informatik) image processing library, iii) a laptop pc with the Linux OS. A 2......-identification process required 0.062 s for eight iterations with the Linux platform used....

  17. Weed identification using an automated active shape matching (AASM) technique

    Swain, Kishore; Nørremark, Michael; Jørgensen, Rasmus N.; Midtiby, Henrik S.; Green, Ole

    2011-01-01

    Weed identification and control is a challenge for intercultural operations in agriculture. As an alternative to chemical pest control, a smart weed identification technique followed by mechanical weed control system could be developed. The proposed smart identification technique works on the concept of ‘active shape modelling’ to identify weed and crop plants based on their morphology. The automated active shape matching system (AASM) technique consisted of, i) a Pixelink camera ii) an LTI L...

  18. Shape prior modeling using sparse representation and online dictionary learning.

    Zhang, Shaoting; Zhan, Yiqiang; Zhou, Yan; Uzunbas, Mustafa; Metaxas, Dimitris N

    2012-01-01

    The recently proposed sparse shape composition (SSC) opens a new avenue for shape prior modeling. Instead of assuming any parametric model of shape statistics, SSC incorporates shape priors on-the-fly by approximating a shape instance (usually derived from appearance cues) by a sparse combination of shapes in a training repository. Theoretically, one can increase the modeling capability of SSC by including as many training shapes in the repository. However, this strategy confronts two limitations in practice. First, since SSC involves an iterative sparse optimization at run-time, the more shape instances contained in the repository, the less run-time efficiency SSC has. Therefore, a compact and informative shape dictionary is preferred to a large shape repository. Second, in medical imaging applications, training shapes seldom come in one batch. It is very time consuming and sometimes infeasible to reconstruct the shape dictionary every time new training shapes appear. In this paper, we propose an online learning method to address these two limitations. Our method starts from constructing an initial shape dictionary using the K-SVD algorithm. When new training shapes come, instead of re-constructing the dictionary from the ground up, we update the existing one using a block-coordinates descent approach. Using the dynamically updated dictionary, sparse shape composition can be gracefully scaled up to model shape priors from a large number of training shapes without sacrificing run-time efficiency. Our method is validated on lung localization in X-Ray and cardiac segmentation in MRI time series. Compared to the original SSC, it shows comparable performance while being significantly more efficient. PMID:23286160

  19. Numerical modeling of shape memory alloy linear actuator

    Jani, Jaronie Mohd; Huang, Sunan; Leary, Martin; Subic, Aleksandar

    2015-09-01

    The demand for shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators in high-technology applications is increasing; however, there exist technical challenges to the commercial application of SMA actuator technologies, especially associated with actuation duration. Excessive activation duration results in actuator damage due to overheating while excessive deactivation duration is not practical for high-frequency applications. Analytical and finite difference equation models were developed in this work to predict the activation and deactivation durations and associated SMA thermomechanical behavior under variable environmental and design conditions. Relevant factors, including latent heat effect, induced stress and material property variability are accommodated. An existing constitutive model was integrated into the proposed models to generate custom SMA stress-strain curves. Strong agreement was achieved between the proposed numerical models and experimental results; confirming their applicability for predicting the behavior of SMA actuators with variable thermomechanical conditions.

  20. A probabilistic model for component-based shape synthesis

    Kalogerakis, Evangelos

    2012-07-01

    We present an approach to synthesizing shapes from complex domains, by identifying new plausible combinations of components from existing shapes. Our primary contribution is a new generative model of component-based shape structure. The model represents probabilistic relationships between properties of shape components, and relates them to learned underlying causes of structural variability within the domain. These causes are treated as latent variables, leading to a compact representation that can be effectively learned without supervision from a set of compatibly segmented shapes. We evaluate the model on a number of shape datasets with complex structural variability and demonstrate its application to amplification of shape databases and to interactive shape synthesis. © 2012 ACM 0730-0301/2012/08-ART55.

  1. Fourier Series, the DFT and Shape Modelling

    Skoglund, Karl

    2004-01-01

    This report provides an introduction to Fourier series, the discrete Fourier transform, complex geometry and Fourier descriptors for shape analysis. The content is aimed at undergraduate and graduate students who wish to learn about Fourier analysis in general, as well as its application to shape...

  2. Estimation of shape model parameters for 3D surfaces

    Erbou, Søren Gylling Hemmingsen; Darkner, Sune; Fripp, Jurgen; Ourselin, Sébastien; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær

    surfaces using distance maps, which enables the estimation of model parameters without the requirement of point correspondence. For applications with acquisition limitations such as speed and cost, this formulation enables the fitting of a statistical shape model to arbitrarily sampled data. The method is......Statistical shape models are widely used as a compact way of representing shape variation. Fitting a shape model to unseen data enables characterizing the data in terms of the model parameters. In this paper a Gauss-Newton optimization scheme is proposed to estimate shape model parameters of 3D...... applied to a database of 3D surfaces from a section of the porcine pelvic bone extracted from 33 CT scans. A leave-one-out validation shows that the parameters of the first 3 modes of the shape model can be predicted with a mean difference within [-0.01,0.02] from the true mean, with a standard deviation...

  3. Learning shapes spontaneous activity itinerating over memorized states.

    Tomoki Kurikawa

    Full Text Available Learning is a process that helps create neural dynamical systems so that an appropriate output pattern is generated for a given input. Often, such a memory is considered to be included in one of the attractors in neural dynamical systems, depending on the initial neural state specified by an input. Neither neural activities observed in the absence of inputs nor changes caused in the neural activity when an input is provided were studied extensively in the past. However, recent experimental studies have reported existence of structured spontaneous neural activity and its changes when an input is provided. With this background, we propose that memory recall occurs when the spontaneous neural activity changes to an appropriate output activity upon the application of an input, and this phenomenon is known as bifurcation in the dynamical systems theory. We introduce a reinforcement-learning-based layered neural network model with two synaptic time scales; in this network, I/O relations are successively memorized when the difference between the time scales is appropriate. After the learning process is complete, the neural dynamics are shaped so that it changes appropriately with each input. As the number of memorized patterns is increased, the generated spontaneous neural activity after learning shows itineration over the previously learned output patterns. This theoretical finding also shows remarkable agreement with recent experimental reports, where spontaneous neural activity in the visual cortex without stimuli itinerate over evoked patterns by previously applied signals. Our results suggest that itinerant spontaneous activity can be a natural outcome of successive learning of several patterns, and it facilitates bifurcation of the network when an input is provided.

  4. Adding Curvature to Minimum Description Length Shape Models

    Thodberg, Hans Henrik; Ólafsdóttir, Hildur

    2003-01-01

    The Minimum Description Length (MDL) approach to shape modelling seeks a compact description of a set of shapes in terms of the coordinates of marks on the shapes. It has been shown that the mark positions resulting from this optimisation to a large extent solve the so-called point correspondence...

  5. AC Electric Field Activated Shape Memory Polymer Composite

    Kang, Jin Ho; Siochi, Emilie J.; Penner, Ronald K.; Turner, Travis L.

    2011-01-01

    Shape memory materials have drawn interest for applications like intelligent medical devices, deployable space structures and morphing structures. Compared to other shape memory materials like shape memory alloys (SMAs) or shape memory ceramics (SMCs), shape memory polymers (SMPs) have high elastic deformation that is amenable to tailored of mechanical properties, have lower density, and are easily processed. However, SMPs have low recovery stress and long response times. A new shape memory thermosetting polymer nanocomposite (LaRC-SMPC) was synthesized with conductive fillers to enhance its thermo-mechanical characteristics. A new composition of shape memory thermosetting polymer nanocomposite (LaRC-SMPC) was synthesized with conductive functionalized graphene sheets (FGS) to enhance its thermo-mechanical characteristics. The elastic modulus of LaRC-SMPC is approximately 2.7 GPa at room temperature and 4.3 MPa above its glass transition temperature. Conductive FGSs-doped LaRC-SMPC exhibited higher conductivity compared to pristine LaRC SMP. Applying an electric field at between 0.1 Hz and 1 kHz induced faster heating to activate the LaRC-SMPC s shape memory effect relative to applying DC electric field or AC electric field at frequencies exceeding1 kHz.

  6. Shape optimization in biomimetics by homogenization modelling

    Optimal shape design of microstructured materials has recently attracted a great deal of attention in material science. The shape and the topology of the microstructure have a significant impact on the macroscopic properties. The present work is devoted to the shape optimization of new biomorphic microcellular ceramics produced from natural wood by biotemplating. We are interested in finding the best material-and-shape combination in order to achieve the optimal prespecified performance of the composite material. The computation of the effective material properties is carried out using the homogenization method. Adaptive mesh-refinement technique based on the computation of recovered stresses is applied in the microstructure to find the homogenized elasticity coefficients. Numerical results show the reliability of the implemented a posteriori error estimator. (author)

  7. Persistent Homology Transform for Modeling Shapes and Surfaces

    Turner, Katharine; Mukherjee, Sayan; Doug M Boyer

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a statistic, the persistent homology transform (PHT), to model surfaces in $\\mathbb{R}^3$ and shapes in $\\mathbb{R}^2$. This statistic is a collection of persistence diagrams - multiscale topological summaries used extensively in topological data analysis. We use the PHT to represent shapes and execute operations such as computing distances between shapes or classifying shapes. We prove the map from the space of simplicial complexes in $\\mathbb{R}^3$ into the space ...

  8. Factors Shaping Students' Opportunities to Engage in Argumentative Activity

    Ayalon, Michal; Even, Ruhama

    2016-01-01

    This study examines how students' opportunities to engage in argumentative activity are shaped by the teacher, the class, and the mathematical topic. It compares the argumentative activity between two classes taught by the same teacher using the same textbook and across two beginning algebra topics--investigating algebraic expressions and…

  9. Asteroid Shape Models Refined By Stellar Occultation Silhouettes

    Durech, J.; Kaasalainen, M.

    2004-12-01

    We present shape models of asteroids 2 Pallas, 3 Juno, 39 Laetitia, 41 Daphne, 52 Europa, 85 Io, 129 Antigone, and 208 Lacrimosa derived from their lightcurves and stellar occultation silhouettes. Lightcurve inversion shape models and rotation states of those asteroids were already published. The occultation silhouettes give direct information about the size and shape of asteroid's projected cross-section. We process the lightcurve and occultation data simultaneously and derive more detailed shape models, remove possible ambiguities in the pole directions, and calibrate the models to absolute dimensions.

  10. Statistical Shape Modelling and Markov Random Field Restoration (invited tutorial and exercise)

    Hilger, Klaus Baggesen

    This tutorial focuses on statistical shape analysis using point distribution models (PDM) which is widely used in modelling biological shape variability over a set of annotated training data. Furthermore, Active Shape Models (ASM) and Active Appearance Models (AAM) are based on PDMs and have proven...... themselves a generic holistic tool in various segmentation and simulation studies. Finding a basis of homologous points is a fundamental issue in PDMs which effects both alignment and decomposition of the training data, and may be aided by Markov Random Field Restoration (MRF) of the correspondence...

  11. Confidence of model based shape reconstruction from sparse data

    Baka, N.; de Bruijne, M.; Reiber, J.H.C.;

    2010-01-01

    Statistical shape models (SSM) are commonly applied for plausible interpolation of missing data in medical imaging. However, when fitting a shape model to sparse information, many solutions may fit the available data. In this paper we derive a constrained SSM to fit noisy sparse input landmarks and...

  12. Modeling self-occlusions in dynamic shape and appearance tracking

    Yang, Yanchao

    2013-12-01

    We present a method to track the precise shape of a dynamic object in video. Joint dynamic shape and appearance models, in which a template of the object is propagated to match the object shape and radiance in the next frame, are advantageous over methods employing global image statistics in cases of complex object radiance and cluttered background. In cases of complex 3D object motion and relative viewpoint change, self-occlusions and disocclusions of the object are prominent, and current methods employing joint shape and appearance models are unable to accurately adapt to new shape and appearance information, leading to inaccurate shape detection. In this work, we model self-occlusions and dis-occlusions in a joint shape and appearance tracking framework. Experiments on video exhibiting occlusion/dis-occlusion, complex radiance and background show that occlusion/dis-occlusion modeling leads to superior shape accuracy compared to recent methods employing joint shape/appearance models or employing global statistics. © 2013 IEEE.

  13. Mathematical and computer modeling of component surface shaping

    Lyashkov, A.

    2016-04-01

    The process of shaping technical surfaces is an interaction of a tool (a shape element) and a component (a formable element or a workpiece) in their relative movements. It was established that the main objects of formation are: 1) a discriminant of a surfaces family, formed by the movement of the shape element relatively the workpiece; 2) an enveloping model of the real component surface obtained after machining, including transition curves and undercut lines; 3) The model of cut-off layers obtained in the process of shaping. When modeling shaping objects there are a lot of insufficiently solved or unsolved issues that make up a single scientific problem - a problem of qualitative shaping of the surface of the tool and then the component surface produced by this tool. The improvement of known metal-cutting tools, intensive development of systems of their computer-aided design requires further improvement of the methods of shaping the mating surfaces. In this regard, an important role is played by the study of the processes of shaping of technical surfaces with the use of the positive aspects of analytical and numerical mathematical methods and techniques associated with the use of mathematical and computer modeling. The author of the paper has posed and has solved the problem of development of mathematical, geometric and algorithmic support of computer-aided design of cutting tools based on computer simulation of the shaping process of surfaces.

  14. Tensegrity Models and Shape Control of Vehicle Formations

    Nabet, Benjamin

    2009-01-01

    Using dynamic models of tensegrity structures, we derive provable, distributed control laws for stabilizing and changing the shape of a formation of vehicles in the plane. Tensegrity models define the desired, controlled, multi-vehicle system dynamics, where each node in the tensegrity structure maps to a vehicle and each interconnecting strut or cable in the structure maps to a virtual interconnection between vehicles. Our method provides a smooth map from any desired planar formation shape to a planar tensegrity structure. The stabilizing vehicle formation shape control laws are then given by the forces between nodes in the corresponding tensegrity model. The smooth map makes possible provably well behaved changes of formation shape over a prescribed time interval. A designed path in shape space is mapped to a path in the parametrized space of tensegrity structures and the vehicle formation tracks this path with forces derived from the time-varying tensegrity model. By means of examples, we illustrate the i...

  15. Invading the Mediterranean Sea: biodiversity patterns shaped by human activities

    Katsanevakis, Stelios; Coll, Marta; Piroddi, Chiara; STEENBEEK Jeroen; Ben Rais Lasram, Frida; Zenetos, Argyro; Cardoso, Ana Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Human activities, such as shipping, aquaculture, and the opening of the Suez Canal, have caused the introduction of nearly 1,000 alien species in the Mediterranean Sea. We investigated how human activities, offering pathways for the introduction of alien species, may shape the biodiversity patterns in the Mediterranean. Richness of Red Sea species introduced through the Suez Canal (Lessepsian species) is very high along the eastern Mediterranean coastline, reaching a maximum of 129 species pe...

  16. Limiting shape for directed percolation models

    Martin, James B.

    2003-01-01

    We consider directed first-passage and last-passage percolation on the nonnegative lattice ℤ+d, d≥2, with i.i.d. weights at the vertices. Under certain moment conditions on the common distribution of the weights, the limits g(x)=lim n→∞n−1T(⌊nx⌋) exist and are constant a.s. for x∈ℝ+d, where T(z) is the passage time from the origin to the vertex z∈ℤ+d. We show that this shape function g is continuous on ℝ+d, in particular at the boundaries. In two dimensions, we give more precise asymptotics f...

  17. Modeling automated worlds: A performance shaping factors perspective

    This paper presents preliminary findings regarding a modeling framework under development for use in human reliability analysis (HRA) for automated systems. This framework supports the review of cognitive factors thought to be important for crew performance in control rooms modified by the introduction of digital control systems and advanced information presentation systems. The modeling framework proposed in this paper provides a means conceptualizing the dynamic sharing of responsibilities and information that occurs as a natural part of human machine systems interaction in advanced systems. Performance shaping factors (PSFs) are presented as the interface between plant status and the crew. Special emphasis is placed on the evaluation of traditional versus non-traditional PSFs. Many of the non-traditional PSFs are cognitive in nature. A number of issues pertaining to crew performance in automated environments are discussed. Data collection activities in the form of field studies and controlled experiments necessary to support PSF evaluation methods are discussed

  18. Agricultural activity shapes the communication and migration patterns in Senegal

    Martin-Gutierrez, S.; Borondo, J.; Morales, A. J.; Losada, J. C.; Tarquis, A. M.; Benito, R. M.

    2016-06-01

    The communication and migration patterns of a country are shaped by its socioeconomic processes. The economy of Senegal is predominantly rural, as agriculture employs over 70% of the labor force. In this paper, we use mobile phone records to explore the impact of agricultural activity on the communication and mobility patterns of the inhabitants of Senegal. We find two peaks of phone calls activity emerging during the growing season. Moreover, during the harvest period, we detect an increase in the migration flows throughout the country. However, religious holidays also shape the mobility patterns of the Senegalese people. Hence, in the light of our results, agricultural activity and religious holidays are the primary drivers of mobility inside the country.

  19. Nonlinear Hamiltonian modelling of magnetic shape memory alloy based actuators.

    Gauthier, Jean-Yves; Hubert, Arnaud; Abadie, Joël; Chaillet, Nicolas; Lexcellent, Christian

    2008-01-01

    This paper proposes an application of the Lagrangian formalism and its Hamiltonian extension to design, model and control a mechatronic system using Magnetic Shape Memory Alloys. In this aim, an original dynamical modelling of a Magnetic Shape Memory Alloy based actuator is presented. Energy-based techniques are used to obtain a coherent modelling of the magnetical, mechanical and thermodynamic phenomena. The Lagrangian formalism, well suited in such a case, is introduced and used to take int...

  20. A model of 3D shape memory alloy materials

    Aiki, Toyohiko

    2005-01-01

    It is a crucial step how to describe the relationship between the strain, the stress and the temperature field, when we consider the mathematical modelling for shape memory alloy materials. From the experimental results we know that the relationship can be described by the hysteresis operators. In this paper we propose a new system consisting of differential equations as a mathematical model for shape memory alloy materials occupying the three dimensional domain. The key of the modelling is t...

  1. Analysis of pediatric airway morphology using statistical shape modeling.

    Humphries, Stephen M; Hunter, Kendall S; Shandas, Robin; Deterding, Robin R; DeBoer, Emily M

    2016-06-01

    Traditional studies of airway morphology typically focus on individual measurements or relatively simple lumped summary statistics. The purpose of this work was to use statistical shape modeling (SSM) to synthesize a skeleton model of the large bronchi of the pediatric airway tree and to test for overall airway shape differences between two populations. Airway tree anatomy was segmented from volumetric chest computed tomography of 20 control subjects and 20 subjects with cystic fibrosis (CF). Airway centerlines, particularly bifurcation points, provide landmarks for SSM. Multivariate linear and logistic regression was used to examine the relationships between airway shape variation, subject size, and disease state. Leave-one-out cross-validation was performed to test the ability to detect shape differences between control and CF groups. Simulation experiments, using tree shapes with known size and shape variations, were performed as a technical validation. Models were successfully created using SSM methods. Simulations demonstrated that the analysis process can detect shape differences between groups. In clinical data, CF status was discriminated with good accuracy (precision = 0.7, recall = 0.7) in leave-one-out cross-validation. Logistic regression modeling using all subjects showed a good fit (ROC AUC = 0.85) and revealed significant differences in SSM parameters between control and CF groups. The largest mode of shape variation was highly correlated with subject size (R = 0.95, p control. PMID:26718559

  2. Asteroid Shape and Spin Axis Modeling Via Light Curve Inversion

    Friz, Paul; Gokhale, V.

    2013-01-01

    We present light curves and shape and spin axis models for the five asteroids: 291 Alice, 281 Lucretia, 321 Florentina, 714 Ulula, and 3169 Ostro. These models were obtained using data taken from the Truman Observatory, the Asteroid Photometric Catalogue, and the Minor Planet Center. Knowledge of individual asteroids shapes and spin axes is vital to understanding the solar system. However, currently only 213 out of the 500,000 asteroids with known orbits have been modeled. By taking many light curves of asteroids over several apparitions it is possible to determine their shapes and spin axes by a process known as light curve inversion.

  3. Shape 4.0: 3D Shape Modeling and Processing Using Semantics.

    Spagnuolo, Michela

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade, sensor, communication, and computing technologies have advanced rapidly, producing dramatic changes in our daily lives and in a variety of application domains. Emerging technologies are leading us to a gradual, but inescapable integration of our material and digital realities and the advent of cyber-physical worlds. Although attaining visual realism is within the grasp of current 3D modeling approaches, it is less clear whether current modeling techniques will accommodate the needs of human communication and of the applications that we can already envisage in those futuristic worlds. Inspired by the evolution trends of the Web, this article describes the evolution of shape modeling from the Shape 1.0 geometry-only, mesh-based stage to the forthcoming semantics-driven Shape 4.0 era. PMID:26780764

  4. Gaskell Itokawa Shape Model V1.0

    Gaskell, R.; Saito, J.; Ishiguro, M.; Kubota, T.; Hashimoto, T.; Hirata, N.; Abe, S.; Barnouin-Jha, O.; Scheeres, D.

    2008-09-01

    The shape model of 25143 Itokawa derived by Robert Gaskell from Hayabusa AMICA images. The model is provided in the implicitly connected quadrilateral (ICQ) format in four levels of resolution. This version of the model was prepared on August 29, 2007. Vertex-facet versions of the models are also provided.

  5. Gaskell Eros Shape Model V1.0

    Gaskell, R. W.

    2008-09-01

    The shape model of 433 Eros derived by Robert Gaskell from NEAR MSI images. The model is provided in the implicitly connected quadrilateral (ICQ) format in four levels of resolution. This version of the model was prepared on Feb. 23, 2008. Vertex-facet versions of the models are also provided.

  6. Gaskell Mimas Shape Model V2.0

    Gaskell, R. W.

    2013-09-01

    The shape model of Mimas derived by Robert Gaskell from Cassini ISSNA and ISSWA images and Voyager 1 ISSN images. The model is provided in the implicitly connected quadrilateral (ICQ) format. This version of the model was prepared on June 26, 2012. Vertex-facet versions of the models are also provided.

  7. Gaskell Dione Shape Model V1.0

    Gaskell, R. W.

    2013-09-01

    The shape model of Dione derived by Robert Gaskell from Cassini images. The model is provided in the implicitly connected quadrilateral (ICQ) format. This version of the model was prepared on July 23, 2012. Vertex-facet versions of the models are also provided.

  8. Gaskell Tethys Shape Model V1.0

    Gaskell, R. W.

    2013-09-01

    The shape model of Tethys derived by Robert Gaskell from Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem narrow and wide angle camera (ISSNA and ISSWA) images. The model is provided in the implicitly connected quadrilateral (ICQ) format. This version of the model was prepared on July 25, 2012. Vertex-facet versions of the models are also provided.

  9. Gaskell Phoebe Shape Model V2.0

    Gaskell, R. W.

    2013-09-01

    The shape model of Phoebe derived by Robert Gaskell from Cassini images. The model is provided in the implicitly connected quadrilateral (ICQ) format. This version of the model was prepared on August 4, 2012. Vertex-facet versions of the models are also provided.

  10. Building Statistical Shape Spaces for 3D Human Modeling

    Pishchulin, Leonid; Wuhrer, Stefanie; Helten, Thomas; Theobalt, Christian; Schiele, Bernt

    2015-01-01

    Statistical models of 3D human shape and pose learned from scan databases have developed into valuable tools to solve a variety of vision and graphics problems. Unfortunately, most publicly available models are of limited expressiveness as they were learned on very small databases that hardly reflect the true variety in human body shapes. In this paper, we contribute by rebuilding a widely used statistical body representation from the largest commercially available scan database, and making t...

  11. Self-folding origami: shape memory composites activated by uniform heating

    Self-folding is an approach used frequently in nature for the efficient fabrication of structures, but is seldom used in engineered systems. Here, self-folding origami are presented, which consist of shape memory composites that are activated with uniform heating in an oven. These composites are rapidly fabricated using inexpensive materials and tools. The folding mechanism based on the in-plane contraction of a sheet of shape memory polymer is modeled, and parameters for the design of composites that self-fold into target shapes are characterized. Four self-folding shapes are demonstrated: a cube, an icosahedron, a flower, and a Miura pattern; each of which is activated in an oven in less than 4 min. Self-sealing is also investigated using hot melt adhesive, and the resulting structures are found to bear up to twice the load of unsealed structures. (paper)

  12. A macro-mechanical constitutive model of shape memory alloys

    2009-01-01

    It is of practical interest to establish a precise constitutive model which includes the equations describing the phase transformation behaviors and thermo-mechanical processes of shape memory alloy (SMA). The microscopic mechanism of super elasticity and shape memory effect of SMA is explained based on the concept of shape memory factor defined by the author of this paper. The conventional super elasticity and shape memory effect of SMA are further unified as shape memory effect. Shape memory factor is redefined in order to make clear its physical meaning. A new shape memory evolution equation is developed to predict the phase transformation behaviors of SMA based on the differential relationship between martensitic volume fraction and phase transformation free energy and the results of DSC test. It overcomes the limitations that the previous shape memory evolution equations or phase transformation equations fail to express the influences of the phase transformation peak temperatures on the phase transformation behaviors and the transformation from twinned martensite to detwinned martensite occurring in SMA. A new macro-mechanical constitutive equation is established to predict the thermo-mechanical processes realizing the shape memory effect of SMA from the expression of Gibbs free energy. It is expanded from one-dimension to three-dimension with assuming SMA as isotropic material. All material constants in the new constitutive equation can be determined from macroscopic experiments, which makes it more easily used in practical applications.

  13. Statistical shape model-based segmentation of brain MRI images.

    Bailleul, Jonathan; Ruan, Su; Constans, Jean-Marc

    2007-01-01

    We propose a segmentation method that automatically delineates structures contours from 3D brain MRI images using a statistical shape model. We automatically build this 3D Point Distribution Model (PDM) in applying a Minimum Description Length (MDL) annotation to a training set of shapes, obtained by registration of a 3D anatomical atlas over a set of patients brain MRIs. Delineation of any structure from a new MRI image is first initialized by such registration. Then, delineation is achieved in iterating two consecutive steps until the 3D contour reaches idempotence. The first step consists in applying an intensity model to the latest shape position so as to formulate a closer guess: our model requires far less priors than standard model in aiming at direct interpretation rather than compliance to learned contexts. The second step consists in enforcing shape constraints onto previous guess so as to remove all bias induced by artifacts or low contrast on current MRI. For this, we infer the closest shape instance from the PDM shape space using a new estimation method which accuracy is significantly improved by a huge increase in the model resolution and by a depth-search in the parameter space. The delineation results we obtained are very encouraging and show the interest of the proposed framework. PMID:18003193

  14. A Faceted Shape Model Approach to Altimetry and Velocimetry for Irregularly Shaped Bodies

    Bayard, D.S.; Brugarolas, P.B.; Broschart, S.B.

    2008-01-01

    Range and velocity sensors based on lidar or radar with multiple beams are often used to measure the altitude and velocity, respectively, of a spacecraft above a targetbody. A difficulty that arises when navigating about small bodies such as asteroids or comets, is that the notion of altitude is largely obscured by the irregular shape of the target surface. This paper develops a method to incorporate the multibeam altimeter and Doppler velocimeter measurements into the on-board spacecraft state estimator by using information from a faceted shape model representation of the target body surface.

  15. Modeling of T-Shaped Microcantilever Resonators

    Narducci, M; Gracia, I; Fonseca, L; Santander, J; Cané, C

    2008-01-01

    The extensive research and development of micromechanical resonators is trying to allow the use of these devices for highly sensitive applications. Microcantilevers are some of the simplest MEMS structure and had been proved to be a good platform due to its excellent mechanical properties. A cantilever working in dynamic mode, adjust its resonance frequency depending on changes in both the spring constant (k) and mass (m) of the resonator. The aim of this work was to model a cantilever structure to determine the optimal dimensions in which the resonance frequency would be a function dominated by mass changes and not stiffness changes. In order to validate the model a set of microcantilevers were fabricated and characterized.

  16. Modeling of the Shape Forming of Composite Roll

    2000-01-01

    A shape modeling of spray formed composite roll, which is utilized to predict the shape and dimension of roll during spray forming process, is developed in this paper. The influences of the principal spray forming parameters, suich as the spatial distribution of melt mass flux, spray distance, rotating and translating speeds of substrate bar etc., on the geometry and dimension of spray formed product were investigated.

  17. Modelling the shape hierarchy for visually guided grasping

    Omid eRezai

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The monkey anterior intraparietal area (AIP encodes visual information about three-dimensional object shape that is used to shape the hand for grasping. We modelled shape tuning in visual AIP neurons and its relationship with curvature and gradient information from the caudal intraparietal area (CIP. The main goal was to gain insight into the kinds of shape parameterizations that can account for AIP tuning and that are consistent with both the inputs to AIP and the role of AIP in grasping. We first experimented with superquadric shape parameters. We considered superquadrics because they occupy a role in robotics that is similar to AIP, in that superquadric fits are derived from visual input and used for grasp planning. We also experimented with an alternative shape parameterization that was based on an Isomap dimension reduction of spatial derivatives of depth (i.e. distance from the observer to the object surface. We considered an Isomap-based model because its parameters lacked discontinuities between similar shapes. When we matched the dimension of the Isomap to the number of superquadric parameters, the superquadric model fit the AIP data somewhat more closely. However, higher-dimensional Isomaps provided excellent fits. Also, we found that the Isomap parameters could be approximated much more accurately than superquadric parameters by feedforward neural networks with CIP-like inputs. We conclude that Isomaps, or perhaps alternative dimension reductions of visual inputs to AIP, provide a promising model of AIP electrophysiology data. However (in contrast with superquadrics further work is needed to test whether such shape parameterizations actually provide an effective basis for grasp control.

  18. Active shape control of composite structures under thermal loading

    Binette, P.; Dano, M.-L.; Gendron, G.

    2009-02-01

    Maintaining the shape of high-precision structures such as space antennas and optical mirrors is still a challenging issue for designers. These structures are subjected to varying temperature conditions which often introduce thermal distortions. The development of smart materials offers great potential to correct the shape and to minimize the surface error. In this study, shape control of a composite structure under thermal loading using piezocomposites is investigated. The composite structure is made of a foam core and two carbon-epoxy face sheets. Macro-fiber composite (MFC™) patches are bonded on one side of the structure. The structure is subjected to a through-the-thickness temperature gradient which induces thermal distortion, essentially in the form of bending. The objective is to apply electric potential to the MFC™ actuators such that the deflection can be minimized. Finite-element analyses are conducted using the commercial software ABAQUS. Experiments are performed to study thermally induced distortion, piezoelectric actuation, and compensation of thermal distortion using MFC™ actuators. Numerical and experimental results are compared. A control loop based on strain measurements is used to actively control the structure. The results show that MFC™ actuators can compensate thermal distortion at all times, and that this is an efficient methodology.

  19. Active shape control of composite structures under thermal loading

    Maintaining the shape of high-precision structures such as space antennas and optical mirrors is still a challenging issue for designers. These structures are subjected to varying temperature conditions which often introduce thermal distortions. The development of smart materials offers great potential to correct the shape and to minimize the surface error. In this study, shape control of a composite structure under thermal loading using piezocomposites is investigated. The composite structure is made of a foam core and two carbon–epoxy face sheets. Macro-fiber composite (MFC(TM)) patches are bonded on one side of the structure. The structure is subjected to a through-the-thickness temperature gradient which induces thermal distortion, essentially in the form of bending. The objective is to apply electric potential to the MFC(TM) actuators such that the deflection can be minimized. Finite-element analyses are conducted using the commercial software ABAQUS. Experiments are performed to study thermally induced distortion, piezoelectric actuation, and compensation of thermal distortion using MFC(TM) actuators. Numerical and experimental results are compared. A control loop based on strain measurements is used to actively control the structure. The results show that MFC(TM) actuators can compensate thermal distortion at all times, and that this is an efficient methodology

  20. Politics and economics to shape international oil and gas activity

    This paper reports that political and economic events play unusually strong roles in shaping worldwide oil and gas activity levels this year. Developments in the former U.S.S.R. will be critical. As the now-independent republics adopt new economic systems, production and demand patterns will change, as will exports from what has been the world's leading oil producer. Changing conditions in the Middle East among members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting countries also will affect the industry in the year following the brief Persian Gulf war. Unless worldwide demand surges unexpectedly, these substantial additions to supply will tend to weaken oil prices in 1992

  1. Research for the energy turnaround. Phase transitions actively shape. Contributions

    The Annual Conference 2014 of the Renewable Energy Research Association was held in Berlin on 6 and 7 November 2014. This book documents the contributions of the conference on research for the energy turnaround, phase transitions actively shape. After an introduction and two contributions to the political framework, the contributions to the economic phases of the energy transition, the phase of the current turn, the phases of social energy revolution, the stages of heat turnaround (Waermewende), and the stages of the mobility turn deal with the stages of development of the energy system. Finally, the Research Association Renewable Energy is briefly presented.

  2. Thermoelectric control of shape memory alloy microactuators: a thermal model

    Abadie, J.; Chaillet, Nicolas; Lexcellent, Christian; Bourjault, Alain

    1999-06-01

    Microtechnologies and microsystems engineering use new active materials. These materials are interesting to realize microactuators and microsensors. In this category of materials, Shape Memory Alloys (SMA) are good candidates for microactuation. SMA wires, or thin plates, can be used as active material in microfingers. These microstructures are able to provide very important forces, but have low dynamic response, especially for cooling, in confined environment. The control of the SMA phase transformations, and then the mechanical power generation, is made by the temperature. The Joule effect is an easy and efficiency way to heat the SMA wires, but cooling is not so easy. The dynamic response of the actuator depends on cooling capabilities. The thermal convection and conduction are the traditional ways to cool the SMA, but have limitations for microsystems. We are looking for a reversible way of heating and cooling SMA microactuators, based on the thermoelectric effects. Using Peltier effect, a positive or a negative electrical courant is able to pump or produce heat, in the SMA actuator. A physical model based on thermal exchanges between a Nickel/Titanium (NiTi) SMA, and Bismuth/Telluride (Te3Bi2) thermoelectric material has been developed. For simulation, we use a numerical resolution of our model, with finite elements, which takes into account the Peltier effect, the Joule effect, the convection, the conduction and the phase transformation of the SMA. We have also developed the corresponding experimental system, with two thermoelectric junctions, where the SMA actuator is one of the element of each junction. In this paper, the physical model and its numerical resolution are given, the experimental system used to validate the model is described, and experimental results are shown.

  3. Modeling of Functional Properties of Porous Shape Memory Alloy

    Volkov Aleksandr E.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A model accounting for the microstructure of porous TiNi shape memory alloy samples fabricated by self-propagating high temperature synthesis has been proposed for simulation of their functional-mechanical properties. Structural elements of a porous sample have been approximated by curved beams. An analysis of shapes and sizes of pores and ligaments permitted to identify characteristic sizes of the beams. A mathematical object consisting of rigidly connected small curve beams has been considered. The stress-strain state of a beam was estimated by the classical methods of strength of materials. The microstructural model was used for calculation of the phase deformation of the shape memory material. Simulation of stress-strain curves and phase deformation of a porous TiNi sample on cooling and heating under a constant stress has shown a good correspondence between the experimental data and the results of modeling.

  4. Quantitative modeling of transcription factor binding specificities using DNA shape.

    Zhou, Tianyin; Shen, Ning; Yang, Lin; Abe, Namiko; Horton, John; Mann, Richard S; Bussemaker, Harmen J; Gordân, Raluca; Rohs, Remo

    2015-04-14

    DNA binding specificities of transcription factors (TFs) are a key component of gene regulatory processes. Underlying mechanisms that explain the highly specific binding of TFs to their genomic target sites are poorly understood. A better understanding of TF-DNA binding requires the ability to quantitatively model TF binding to accessible DNA as its basic step, before additional in vivo components can be considered. Traditionally, these models were built based on nucleotide sequence. Here, we integrated 3D DNA shape information derived with a high-throughput approach into the modeling of TF binding specificities. Using support vector regression, we trained quantitative models of TF binding specificity based on protein binding microarray (PBM) data for 68 mammalian TFs. The evaluation of our models included cross-validation on specific PBM array designs, testing across different PBM array designs, and using PBM-trained models to predict relative binding affinities derived from in vitro selection combined with deep sequencing (SELEX-seq). Our results showed that shape-augmented models compared favorably to sequence-based models. Although both k-mer and DNA shape features can encode interdependencies between nucleotide positions of the binding site, using DNA shape features reduced the dimensionality of the feature space. In addition, analyzing the feature weights of DNA shape-augmented models uncovered TF family-specific structural readout mechanisms that were not revealed by the DNA sequence. As such, this work combines knowledge from structural biology and genomics, and suggests a new path toward understanding TF binding and genome function. PMID:25775564

  5. Photometry and shape modeling of Mars crosser asteroid (1011 Laodamia

    Apostolovska G.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of photometric observations of Mars crosser asteroid 1011 Laodamia conducted at Bulgarian National Astronomical Observatory Rozhen over a twelve year interval (2002, 2003, 2004, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2011, 2012 and 2013 is made. Based on the obtained lightcurves the spin vector, sense of rotation, and preliminary shape model of (1011 Laodamia have been determined using the lightcurve inversion method. The aim of this investigation is to increase the set of asteroids with known spin and shape parameters and to contribute in improving the model in combination with other techniques and sparse data produced by photometric asteroid surveys such as Pan-STARRS or GAIA.

  6. Shaping inhibition: activity dependent structural plasticity of GABAergic synapses

    Pablo Mendez

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Inhibitory transmission through the neurotransmitter Ɣ-aminobutyric acid (GABA shapes network activity in the mammalian cerebral cortex by filtering synaptic incoming information and dictating the activity of principal cells. The incredibly diverse population of cortical neurons that use GABA as neurotransmitter shows an equally diverse range of mechanisms that regulate changes in the strength of GABAergic synaptic transmission and allow them to dynamically follow and command the activity of neuronal ensembles. Similarly to glutamatergic synaptic transmission, activity-dependent functional changes in inhibitory neurotransmission are accompanied by alterations in GABAergic synapse structure that range from morphological reorganization of postsynaptic density to de novo formation and elimination of inhibitory contacts. Here we review several aspects of structural plasticity of inhibitory synapses, including its induction by different forms of neuronal activity, behavioral and sensory experience and the molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways involved. We discuss the functional consequences of GABAergic synapse structural plasticity for information processing and memory formation in view of the heterogenous nature of the structural plasticity phenomena affecting inhibitory synapses impinging on somatic and dendritic compartments of cortical and hippocampal neurons.

  7. Shape-Dependent Surface Reactivity and Antimicrobial Activity of Nano-Cupric Oxide.

    Gilbertson, Leanne M; Albalghiti, Eva M; Fishman, Zachary S; Perreault, François; Corredor, Charlie; Posner, Jonathan D; Elimelech, Menachem; Pfefferle, Lisa D; Zimmerman, Julie B

    2016-04-01

    Shape of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) can be used as a design handle to achieve controlled manipulation of physicochemical properties. This tailored material property approach necessitates the establishment of relationships between specific ENM properties that result from such manipulations (e.g., surface area, reactivity, or charge) and the observed trend in behavior, from both a functional performance and hazard perspective. In this study, these structure-property-function (SPF) and structure-property-hazard (SPH) relationships are established for nano-cupric oxide (n-CuO) as a function of shape, including nanospheres and nanosheets. In addition to comparing these shapes at the nanoscale, bulk CuO is studied to compare across length scales. The results from comprehensive material characterization revealed correlations between CuO surface reactivity and bacterial toxicity with CuO nanosheets having the highest surface reactivity, electrochemical activity, and antimicrobial activity. While less active than the nanosheets, CuO nanoparticles (sphere-like shape) demonstrated enhanced reactivity compared to the bulk CuO. This is in agreement with previous studies investigating differences across length-scales. To elucidate the underlying mechanisms of action to further explain the shape-dependent behavior, kinetic models applied to the toxicity data. In addition to revealing different CuO material kinetics, trends in observed response cannot be explained by surface area alone. The compiled results contribute to further elucidate pathways toward controlled design of ENMs. PMID:26943499

  8. Effect of nodule shape for modeling of auxetic microporous polymers

    Lim Teik-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous models for describing auxetic microporous polymers adopt 2D rectangular blocks with fibril interconnections. In this paper, spherical nodes are used in order to approximate the granular nodule shape and for taking into consideration the 3D nature of the nodes. Assuming curvilinear motion of the nodes as a result of fibril rotation, a quantitative description of the Poisson’s ratio is given as a function of the nodule density packing factor. Comparison with the 3D rectangular model shows that the spherical model gives a more conservative description of the Poisson’s ratio although both models exhibit similar trend. Results reveal the significance of the assumed node shape for modeling the Poisson’s ratio of auxetic microporous polymers.

  9. Biomedical Applications of Thermally Activated Shape Memory Polymers

    Small IV, W; Singhal, P; Wilson, T S; Maitland, D J

    2009-04-10

    Shape memory polymers (SMPs) are smart materials that can remember a primary shape and can return to this primary shape from a deformed secondary shape when given an appropriate stimulus. This property allows them to be delivered in a compact form via minimally invasive surgeries in humans, and deployed to achieve complex final shapes. Here we review the various biomedical applications of SMPs and the challenges they face with respect to actuation and biocompatibility. While shape memory behavior has been demonstrated with heat, light and chemical environment, here we focus our discussion on thermally stimulated SMPs.

  10. Advection around ventilated U-shaped burrows: A model study

    Brand, Andreas; Lewandowski, JöRg; Hamann, Enrico; Nützmann, Gunnar

    2013-05-01

    Advective transport in the porous matrix of sediments surrounding burrows formed by fauna such as Chironomus plumosus has been generally neglected. A positron emission tomography study recently revealed that the pumping activity of the midge larvae can indeed induce fluid flow in the sediment. We present a numerical model study which explores the conditions at which advective transport in the sediment becomes relevant. A 0.15 m deep U-shaped burrow with a diameter of 0.002 m within the sediment was represented in a 3-D domain. Fluid flow in the burrow was calculated using the Navier-Stokes equation for incompressible laminar flow in the burrow, and flow in the sediment was described by Darcy's law. Nonreactive and reactive transport scenarios were simulated considering diffusion and advection. The pumping activity of the model larva results in considerable advective flow in the sediment at reasonable high permeabilities with flow velocities of up to 7.0 × 10-6 m s-1 close to the larva for a permeability of 3 × 10-12 m2. At permeabilities below 7 × 10-13 m2 advection is negligible compared to diffusion. Reactive transport simulations using first-order kinetics for oxygen revealed that advective flux into the sediment downstream of the pumping larva enhances sedimentary uptake, while the advective flux into the burrow upstream of the larvae inhibits diffusive sedimentary uptake. Despite the fact that both effects cancel each other with respect to total solute uptake, the advection-induced asymmetry in concentration distribution can lead to a heterogeneous solute and redox distribution in the sediment relevant to complex reaction networks.

  11. Finite Element Model of Shape Memory Alloy Incorporating Drucker-Prager Model

    Yan Tingjun; Zhao Linna

    2013-01-01

    The unique features of shape memory alloys (SMA), including pseudoelasticity and shape memory effect, give SMAs a wide application in aeronautical, biomedical, and structural engineering. These features stimulate the interest in the development of constitutive models.  In this paper, a 3D finite element model of shape memory alloy material model has been developed to incorporate the Drucker – Prager model in order to describe the asymmetry of SMA under tension and compression. This paper also...

  12. Shape Modeling of a Concentric-tube Continuum Robot

    Bai, Shaoping; Xing, Charles Chuhao

    Concentric-tube continuum robots feature with simple and compact structures and have a great potential in medical applications. The paper is concerned with the shape modeling of a type of concentric-tube continuum robot built with a collection of super-elastic NiTiNol tubes. The mechanics is...

  13. Patch-Based Generative Shape Model and MDL Model Selection for Statistical Analysis of Archipelagos

    Ganz, Melanie; Nielsen, Mads; Brandt, Sami

    2010-01-01

    patch-based dictionary for possible shapes, (2) building up a time-homogeneous Markov model to model the neighbourhood correlations between the patches, and (3) automatic selection of the model complexity by the minimum description length principle. The generative shape model is proposed as a...

  14. Irregular Shaped Building Design Optimization with Building Information Modelling

    Lee Xia Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This research is to recognise the function of Building Information Modelling (BIM in design optimization for irregular shaped buildings. The study focuses on a conceptual irregular shaped “twisted” building design similar to some existing sculpture-like architectures. Form and function are the two most important aspects of new buildings, which are becoming more sophisticated as parts of equally sophisticated “systems” that we are living in. Nowadays, it is common to have irregular shaped or sculpture-like buildings which are very different when compared to regular buildings. Construction industry stakeholders are facing stiff challenges in many aspects such as buildability, cost effectiveness, delivery time and facility management when dealing with irregular shaped building projects. Building Information Modelling (BIM is being utilized to enable architects, engineers and constructors to gain improved visualization for irregular shaped buildings; this has a purpose of identifying critical issues before initiating physical construction work. In this study, three variations of design options differing in rotating angle: 30 degrees, 60 degrees and 90 degrees are created to conduct quantifiable comparisons. Discussions are focused on three major aspects including structural planning, usable building space, and structural constructability. This research concludes that Building Information Modelling is instrumental in facilitating design optimization for irregular shaped building. In the process of comparing different design variations, instead of just giving “yes or no” type of response, stakeholders can now easily visualize, evaluate and decide to achieve the right balance based on their own criteria. Therefore, construction project stakeholders are empowered with superior evaluation and decision making capability.

  15. Thermally activated retainer means utilizing shape memory alloy

    Grimaldi, Margaret E. (Inventor); Hartz, Leslie S. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A retainer member suitable for retaining a gap filler placed in gaps between adjacent tile members is presented. One edge of the retainer member may be attached to the gap filler and another edge may be provided with a plurality of tab members which in an intermediate position do not interfere with placement or removal of the gap filler between tile members. The retainer member may be fabricated from a shape memory alloy which when heated to a specified memory temperature will thermally activate the tab members to predetermined memory positions engaging the tile members to retain the gap filler in the gap. This invention has particular application to the thermal tiles on space vehicles such as the Space Shuttle Orbiter.

  16. 3D Model Retrieval Based on Semantic and Shape Indexes

    Kassimi, My Abdellah

    2011-01-01

    The size of 3D models used on the web or stored in databases is becoming increasingly high. Then, an efficient method that allows users to find similar 3D objects for a given 3D model query has become necessary. Keywords and the geometry of a 3D model cannot meet the needs of users' retrieval because they do not include the semantic information. In this paper, a new method has been proposed to 3D models retrieval using semantic concepts combined with shape indexes. To obtain these concepts, we use the machine learning methods to label 3D models by k-means algorithm in measures and shape indexes space. Moreover, semantic concepts have been organized and represented by ontology language OWL and spatial relationships are used to disambiguate among models of similar appearance. The SPARQL query language has been used to question the information displayed in this language and to compute the similarity between two 3D models. We interpret our results using the Princeton Shape Benchmark Database and the results show ...

  17. Orthodontic applications of a superelastic shape-memory alloy model

    During orthodontic treatment, dental appliances (braces) made of shape memory alloys have the potential to provide nearly uniform low level stresses to dentitions during tooth movement over a large range of tooth displacement. In this paper we model superelastic behaviour of dental appliances using the finite element method and constitutive equations developed by F. Auricchio et al. Results of the mathematical model for 3-point bending and several promising 'closing loop' designs are compared with laboratory results for the same configurations. (orig.)

  18. Shape coexistence in the microscopically guided interacting boson model

    Nomura, K; Van Isacker, P

    2015-01-01

    Shape coexistence has been a subject of great interest in nuclear physics for many decades. In the context of the nuclear shell model, intruder excitations may give rise to remarkably low-lying excited $0^+$ states associated with different intrinsic shapes. In heavy open-shell nuclei, the dimension of the shell-model configuration space that includes such intruder excitations becomes exceedingly large, thus requiring a drastic truncation scheme. Such a framework has been provided by the interacting boson model (IBM). In this article we address the phenomenon of shape coexistence and its relevant spectroscopy from the point of view of the IBM. A special focus is placed on the method developed recently which makes use of the link between the IBM and the self-consistent mean-field approach based on the nuclear energy density functional. The method is extended to deal with various intruder configurations associated with different equilibrium shapes. We assess the predictive power of the method and suggest possib...

  19. First Principles Modelling of Shape Memory Alloys Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Kastner, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    Materials sciences relate the macroscopic properties of materials to their microscopic structure and postulate the need for holistic multiscale research. The investigation of shape memory alloys is a prime example in this regard. This particular class of materials exhibits strong coupling of temperature, strain and stress, determined by solid state phase transformations of their metallic lattices. The present book presents a collection of simulation studies of this behaviour. Employing conceptually simple but comprehensive models, the fundamental material properties of shape memory alloys are qualitatively explained from first principles. Using contemporary methods of molecular dynamics simulation experiments, it is shown how microscale dynamics may produce characteristic macroscopic material properties. The work is rooted in the materials sciences of shape memory alloys and  covers  thermodynamical, micro-mechanical  and crystallographical aspects. It addresses scientists in these research fields and thei...

  20. Modeling Macroscopic Shape Distortions during Sintering of Multi-layers

    Tadesse Molla, Tesfaye

    model for tubular bi-layered structures. A multi-scale model of shape distortions during co-firing has also been developed by coupling a meso-scale model of sintering based on kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) methods and a macro-scale continuum model. In this case, computational homogenization theories were....... This model excels in requiring a single optical dilatometry run to collect all the necessary input parameters for modeling of the sintering of the bi-layers. The determined input parameters have also been used in a finite element model, which is developed based on the continuum theory of sintering, to......, the multi-scale model proposed in this study has no limitation as to the number of internal parameters to define shrinkage kinetics as well as viscous properties. This feature of the model makes it to be a promising approach for extending the continuum theory of sintering....

  1. Shaping tissues by balancing active forces and geometric constraints

    The self-organization of cells into complex tissues during growth and regeneration is a combination of physical–mechanical events and biochemical signal processing. Cells actively generate forces at all stages in this process, and according to the laws of mechanics, these forces result in stress fields defined by the geometric boundary conditions of the cell and tissue. The unique ability of cells to translate such force patterns into biochemical information and vice versa sets biological tissues apart from any other material. In this topical review, we summarize the current knowledge and open questions of how forces and geometry act together on scales from the single cell to tissues and organisms, and how their interaction determines biological shape and structure. Starting with a planar surface as the simplest type of geometric constraint, we review literature on how forces during cell spreading and adhesion together with geometric constraints impact cell shape, stress patterns, and the resulting biological response. We then move on to include cell–cell interactions and the role of forces in monolayers and in collective cell migration, and introduce curvature at the transition from flat cell sheets to three-dimensional (3D) tissues. Fibrous 3D environments, as cells experience them in the body, introduce new mechanical boundary conditions and change cell behaviour compared to flat surfaces. Starting from early work on force transmission and collagen remodelling, we discuss recent discoveries on the interaction with geometric constraints and the resulting structure formation and network organization in 3D. Recent literature on two physiological scenarios—embryonic development and bone—is reviewed to demonstrate the role of the force-geometry balance in living organisms. Furthermore, the role of mechanics in pathological scenarios such as cancer is discussed. We conclude by highlighting common physical principles guiding cell mechanics, tissue patterning

  2. Shaping tissues by balancing active forces and geometric constraints

    Foolen, Jasper; Yamashita, Tadahiro; Kollmannsberger, Philip

    2016-02-01

    The self-organization of cells into complex tissues during growth and regeneration is a combination of physical-mechanical events and biochemical signal processing. Cells actively generate forces at all stages in this process, and according to the laws of mechanics, these forces result in stress fields defined by the geometric boundary conditions of the cell and tissue. The unique ability of cells to translate such force patterns into biochemical information and vice versa sets biological tissues apart from any other material. In this topical review, we summarize the current knowledge and open questions of how forces and geometry act together on scales from the single cell to tissues and organisms, and how their interaction determines biological shape and structure. Starting with a planar surface as the simplest type of geometric constraint, we review literature on how forces during cell spreading and adhesion together with geometric constraints impact cell shape, stress patterns, and the resulting biological response. We then move on to include cell-cell interactions and the role of forces in monolayers and in collective cell migration, and introduce curvature at the transition from flat cell sheets to three-dimensional (3D) tissues. Fibrous 3D environments, as cells experience them in the body, introduce new mechanical boundary conditions and change cell behaviour compared to flat surfaces. Starting from early work on force transmission and collagen remodelling, we discuss recent discoveries on the interaction with geometric constraints and the resulting structure formation and network organization in 3D. Recent literature on two physiological scenarios—embryonic development and bone—is reviewed to demonstrate the role of the force-geometry balance in living organisms. Furthermore, the role of mechanics in pathological scenarios such as cancer is discussed. We conclude by highlighting common physical principles guiding cell mechanics, tissue patterning and

  3. A macro-mechanical constitutive model for shape memory polymer

    2010-01-01

    It is of theoretical and engineering interest to establish a macro-mechanical constitutive model of the shape memory polymer (SMP), which includes the mechanical constitutive equation and the material parameter function, from the viewpoint of practical application. In this paper, a new three-dimensional macro-mechanical constitutive equation, which describes the mechanical behaviors associated with the shape memory effect of SMP, is developed based on solid mechanics and the viscoelasticity theorem. According to the results of the DMA test, a new material parameter function is established to express the relationship of the material parameters and temperature during the glass transition of SMP. The new macro-mechanical constitutive equation and material parameter function are used to numerically simulate the process producing the shape memory effect of SMP, which includes deforming at high temperature, stress freezing, unloading at low temperature and shape recovery. They are also used to investigate and analyze the influences of loading rate and temperature change rate on the thermo-mechanical behaviors of SMP. The numerical results and the comparisons with Zhou’s material parameter function and Tobushi’s mechanical constitutive equation illustrate that the proposed three-dimensional macro-mechanical constitutive model can effectively predict the thermo-mechanical behaviors of SMP under the state of complex stress.

  4. Active Player Modelling

    Togelius, Julian; Shaker, Noor; Yannakakis, Georgios N.

    2013-01-01

    We argue for the use of active learning methods for player modelling. In active learning, the learning algorithm chooses where to sample the search space so as to optimise learning progress. We hypothesise that player modelling based on active learning could result in vastly more efficient learning, but will require big changes in how data is collected. Some example active player modelling scenarios are described. A particular form of active learning is also equivalent to an influential forma...

  5. A macroscopic model for magnetic shape-memory single crystals

    Bessoud, A. L.; Kružík, Martin; Stefanelli, U.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 64, č. 2 (2013), s. 343-359. ISSN 0044-2275 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100750802; GA ČR GAP201/10/0357 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : magneto striction * evolution Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.214, year: 2013 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2012/MTR/kruzik-a macroscopic model for magnetic shape-memory single crystals.pdf

  6. Semantic Part Segmentation using Compositional Model combining Shape and Appearance

    Wang, Jianyu; Yuille, Alan

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we study the problem of semantic part segmentation for animals. This is more challenging than standard object detection, object segmentation and pose estimation tasks because semantic parts of animals often have similar appearance and highly varying shapes. To tackle these challenges, we build a mixture of compositional models to represent the object boundary and the boundaries of semantic parts. And we incorporate edge, appearance, and semantic part cues into the compositional...

  7. Shape memory polymer filled honeycomb model and experimental validation

    An analytical model predicting the in-plane Young’s and shear moduli of a shape memory polymer filled honeycomb composite is presented. By modeling the composite as a series of rigidly attached beams, the mechanical advantage of the load distributed on each beam by the infill is accounted for. The model is compared to currently available analytical models as well as experimental data. The model correlates extremely well with experimental data for empty honeycomb and when the polymer is above its glass transition temperature. Below the glass transition temperature, rule of mixtures is shown to be more accurate as bending is no longer the dominant mode of deformation. The model is also derived for directions other than the typical x and y allowing interpolation of the stiffness of the composite in any direction. (paper)

  8. Rock shape, restitution coefficients and rockfall trajectory modelling

    Glover, James; Christen, Marc; Bühler, Yves; Bartelt, Perry

    2014-05-01

    Restitution coefficients are used in rockfall trajectory modelling to describe the ratio between incident and rebound velocities during ground impact. They are central to the problem of rockfall hazard analysis as they link rock mass characteristics to terrain properties. Using laboratory experiments as a guide, we first show that restitution coefficients exhibit a wide range of scatter, although the material properties of the rock and ground are constant. This leads us to the conclusion that restitution coefficients are poor descriptors of rock-ground interaction. The primary problem is that "apparent" restitution coefficients are applied at the rock's centre-of-mass and do not account for rock shape. An accurate description of the rock-ground interaction requires the contact forces to be applied at the rock surface with consideration of the momentary rock position and spin. This leads to a variety of rock motions including bouncing, sliding, skipping and rolling. Depending on the impact configuration a wide range of motions is possible. This explains the large scatter of apparent restitution coefficients. We present a rockfall model based on newly developed hard-contact algorithms which includes the effects of rock shape and therefore is able to reproduce the results of different impact configurations. We simulate the laboratory experiments to show that it is possible to reproduce run-out and dispersion of different rock shapes using parameters obtained from independent tests. Although this is a step forward in rockfall trajectory modelling, the problem of parametersing real terrain remains.

  9. SHADE: A Shape-Memory-Activated Device Promoting Ankle Dorsiflexion

    Pittaccio, S.; Viscuso, S.; Rossini, M.; Magoni, L.; Pirovano, S.; Villa, E.; Besseghini, S.; Molteni, F.

    2009-08-01

    Acute post-stroke rehabilitation protocols include passive mobilization as a means to prevent contractures. A device (SHADE) that provides repetitive passive motion to a flaccid ankle by using shape memory alloy actuators could be of great help in providing this treatment. A suitable actuator was designed as a cartridge of approximately 150 × 20 × 15 mm, containing 2.5 m of 0.25 mm diameter NiTi wire. This actuator was activated by Joule’s effect employing a 7 s current input at 0.7 A, which provided 10 N through 76 mm displacement. Cooling and reset by natural convection took 30 s. A prototype of SHADE was assembled with two thermoplastic shells hinged together at the ankle and strapped on the shin and foot. Two actuators were fixed on the upper shell while an inextensible thread connected each NiTi wire to the foot shell. The passive ankle motion (passive range of motion, PROM) generated by SHADE was evaluated optoelectronically on three flaccid patients (58 ± 5 years old); acceptability was assessed by a questionnaire presented to further three flaccid patients (44 ± 11.5 years old) who used SHADE for 5 days, 30 min a day. SHADE was well accepted by all patients, produced good PROM, and caused no pain. The results prove that suitable limb mobilization can be produced by SMA actuators.

  10. Orthodontic applications of a superelastic shape-memory alloy model

    Glendenning, R.W.; Enlow, R.L. [Otago Univ., Dunedin (New Zealand). Dept. of Math. and Stat.; Hood, J.A.A. [Dept. of Oral Sciences and Orthodontics, Univ. of Otago, Dunedin (New Zealand)

    2000-07-01

    During orthodontic treatment, dental appliances (braces) made of shape memory alloys have the potential to provide nearly uniform low level stresses to dentitions during tooth movement over a large range of tooth displacement. In this paper we model superelastic behaviour of dental appliances using the finite element method and constitutive equations developed by F. Auricchio et al. Results of the mathematical model for 3-point bending and several promising 'closing loop' designs are compared with laboratory results for the same configurations. (orig.)

  11. Hysteresis in Magnetic Shape Memory Composites: Modeling and Simulation

    Conti, Sergio; Rumpf, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic shape memory alloys are characterized by the coupling between a structural phase transition and magnetic one. This permits to control the shape change via an external magnetic field, at least in single crystals. Composite materials with single-crystalline particles embedded in a softer matrix have been proposed as a way to overcome the blocking of the transformation at grain boundaries. We investigate hysteresis phenomena for small NiMnGa single crystals embedded in a polymer matrix for slowly varying magnetic fields. The evolution of the microstructure is studied within the rate-independent variational framework proposed by Mielke and Theil (1999). The underlying variational model incorporates linearized elasticity, micromagnetism, stray field and a dissipation term proportional to the volume swept by the phase boundary. The time discretization is based on an incremental minimization of the sum of energy and dissipation. A backtracking approach is employed to approximately ensure the global minimali...

  12. Improved methods for modeling pulse shapes of accreting millisecond pulsars

    Leahy, D; Cadeau, C

    2006-01-01

    Raytracing computations for light emitted from the surface of a rapidly rotating neutron star are carried out in order to construct light curves for accreting millisecond pulsars. These calculations are for realistic models of rapidly rotating neutron stars which take into account both the correct exterior metric and the oblate shape of the star. We find that the most important effect, comparing the full raytracing computations with simpler approximations currently in use, arises from the oblate shape of the rotating star. Approximating a rotating neutron star as a sphere introduces serious errors in fitted values of the star's radius and mass if the rotation rate is very large. However, for lower rotation rates acceptable mass and radius values can be obtained using the spherical approximation.

  13. Error Model and Compensation of Bell-Shaped Vibratory Gyro

    Zhong Su

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A bell-shaped vibratory angular velocity gyro (BVG, inspired by the Chinese traditional bell, is a type of axisymmetric shell resonator gyroscope. This paper focuses on development of an error model and compensation of the BVG. A dynamic equation is firstly established, based on a study of the BVG working mechanism. This equation is then used to evaluate the relationship between the angular rate output signal and bell-shaped resonator character, analyze the influence of the main error sources and set up an error model for the BVG. The error sources are classified from the error propagation characteristics, and the compensation method is presented based on the error model. Finally, using the error model and compensation method, the BVG is calibrated experimentally including rough compensation, temperature and bias compensation, scale factor compensation and noise filter. The experimentally obtained bias instability is from 20.5°/h to 4.7°/h, the random walk is from 2.8°/h1/2 to 0.7°/h1/2 and the nonlinearity is from 0.2% to 0.03%. Based on the error compensation, it is shown that there is a good linear relationship between the sensing signal and the angular velocity, suggesting that the BVG is a good candidate for the field of low and medium rotational speed measurement.

  14. Constitutive model for a stress- and thermal-induced phase transition in a shape memory polymer

    Recently, increasing applications of shape memory polymers have pushed forward the development of appropriate constitutive models for smart materials such as the shape memory polymer. During the heating process, the phase transition, which is a continuous time-dependent process, happens in the shape memory polymer, and various individual phases will form at different configuration temperatures. In addition, these phases can generally be divided into two parts: the frozen and active phase (Liu Y et al 2006 Int. J. Plast. 22 279–313). During the heating or cooling process, the strain will be stored or released with the occurring phase transition between these two parts. Therefore, a shape memory effect emerges. In this paper, a new type of model was developed to characterize the variation of the volume fraction in a shape memory polymer during the phase transition. In addition to the temperature variation, the applied stress was also taken as a significant influence factor on the phase transition. Based on the experimental results, an exponential equation was proposed to describe the relationship between the stress and phase transition temperature. For the sake of describing the mechanical behaviors of the shape memory polymer, a three-dimensional constitutive model was established. Also, the storage strain, which was the key factor of the shape memory effect, was also discussed in detail. Similar to previous works, we first explored the effect of applied stress on storage strain. Through comparisons with the DMA and the creep experimental results, the rationality and accuracy of the new phase transition and constitutive model were finally verified. (paper)

  15. Sparse decomposition and modeling of anatomical shape variation

    Sjöstrand, Karl; Rostrup, Egill; Ryberg, Charlotte;

    2007-01-01

    counterparts if constructed carefully. In most medical applications, models are required to have both good statistical performance and a relevant clinical interpretation to be of value. Morphometry of the corpus callosum is one illustrative example. This paper presents a method for relating spatial features to...... anatomical variation related to clinical outcome. In the present application, landmark-based shape data of the corpus callosum is analyzed in relation to age, gender, and clinical tests of walking speed and verbal fluency. To put the data-driven sparse principal component method into perspective, we consider...

  16. Sparse Decomposition and Modeling of Anatomical Shape Variation

    Sjöstrand, Karl; Rostrup, Egill; Ryberg, Charlotte;

    2007-01-01

    counterparts if constructed carefully. In most medical applications, models are required to have both good statistical performance and a relevant clinical interpretation to be of value. Morphometry of the corpus callosum is one illustrative example. This paper presents a method for relating spatial features to...... anatomical variation related to clinical outcome. In the present application, landmark-based shape data of the corpus callosum is analyzed in relation to age, gender, and clinical tests of walking speed and verbal fluency. To put the data-driven sparse principal component method into perspective, we consider...

  17. Modeling variance structure of body shape traits of Lipizzan horses.

    Kaps, M; Curik, I; Baban, M

    2010-09-01

    Heterogeneity of variance of growth traits over age is a common issue in estimating genetic parameters and is addressed in this study by selecting appropriate variance structure models for additive genetic and environmental variances. Modeling and partitioning those variances connected with analyzing small data sets were demonstrated on Lipizzan horses. The following traits were analyzed: withers height, chest girth, and cannon bone circumference. The measurements were taken at birth, and at approximately 6, 12, 24, and 36 mo of age of 660 Lipizzan horses born in Croatia between 1948 and 2000. The corresponding pedigree file consisted of 1,458 horses. Sex, age of dam, and stud-year-season interaction were considered fixed effects; additive genetic and permanent environment effects were defined as random. Linear adjustments of age at measuring were done within measuring groups. Maternal effects were included only for measurements taken at birth and at 6 mo. Additive genetic variance structures were modeled by using uniform structures or structures based on polynomial random regression. Environmental variance structures were modeled by using one of the following models: unstructured, exponential, Gaussian, or combinations of identity or diagonal with structures based on polynomial random regression. The parameters were estimated by using REML. Comparison and fits of the models were assessed by using Akaike and Bayesian information criteria, and by checking graphically the adequacy of the shape of the overall (phenotypic) and component (additive genetic and environmental) variance functions. The best overall fit was obtained from models with unstructured error variance. Compared with the model with uniform additive genetic variance, models with structures based on random regression only slightly improved overall fit. Exponential and Gaussian models were generally not suitable because they do not accommodate adequately heterogeneity of variance. Using the unstructured

  18. Electrospun nanofiber membranes for electrically activated shape memory nanocomposites

    A novel shape memory nanocomposite system, consisting of a thermoplastic Nafion polymer and ultrathin electrospun polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based carbonization nanofiber membranes, is successfully synthesized. PAN-based carbonization nanofiber networks that offer responses to deformations are considered to be an excellent actuation source. Significant improvement in the electrical conductivity of carbon nanofiber membranes is found by adjusting the applied voltage power in the electrospinning PAN process varying from 7.85 to 12.30 S cm−1. The porous structure of the carbon nanofiber membranes provides a large specific surface area and interfacial contact area when combined with the polymer matrix. Shape memory Nafion nanocomposites filled with interpenetrating non-woven electrospun PAN carbonization membranes can be actuated by applying 14 V electrical voltage within 5 s. The results, as demonstrated through morphology, electrical and thermal measurements and a shape recovery test, suggest a valuable route to producing soft nanocomposites. (papers)

  19. Attitude Estimation for Unresolved Agile Space Objects with Shape Model Uncertainty

    Holzinger, M.; Alfriend, K. T.; Wetterer, C. J.; Luu, K. K.; Sabol, C.; Hamada, K.; Harms, A.

    2012-09-01

    The increasing number of manufactured on-orbit objects as well as improving sensor capabilities indicate that the number of trackable objects will likely exceed 100,000 within the next several years. Characterizing the large population of non-spatially resolved active spacecraft, retired spacecraft, rocket bodies, debris, and High Area to Mass Ratio (HAMR) objects necessarily involves both attitude and shape estimation. While spatially unresolved space objects cannot be directly imaged, attitude and shape may be inferred by carefully examining their lightcurves. Lightcurves are temporally-resolved sequences of photometric intensity measurements over one or more bandwidths. Because the observable reflected light from an unresolved space object is a strong function of both its shape and attitude, estimating these parameters using lightcurves can provide an avenue to determine both space object attitude and shape. This problem is traditionally called `lightcurve inversion.' While lightcurves have been used for 25 years to characterize spin states and shapes of asteroids, estimating the attitude states and shapes of manufactured space objects involves a new set of challenges. New challenges addressed in this paper are 1) An active (agile) space object is often directly controlling its attitude, meaning that torques acting on the space object are not necessarily zero (non-homogeneous motion) and mass properties may not be known, 2) Shape models must often be estimated, and as such contain errors that need to be accounted for in the measurement function, 3) Dynamics and measurement functions are excessively nonlinear, and manufactured space objects may be quite symmetric about at least one axis of rotation/reflection. This can lead to multiple possible attitude estimate solutions and suggests the use of non-Gaussian estimation approaches. Agile space objects (those that can actively maneuver) pose new problems to lightcurve inversion efforts to estimate attitude. Because

  20. Three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics model of a tubular-shaped PEM fuel cell

    Sadiq Al-Baghdadi, Maher A.R. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, International Technological University, 289 Cricklewood Broadway, London NW2 6NX (United Kingdom)

    2008-06-15

    A full three-dimensional, non-isothermal computational fluid dynamics model of a tubular-shaped proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell has been developed. This comprehensive model accounts for the major transport phenomena in a PEM fuel cell: convective and diffusive heat and mass transfer, electrode kinetics, and potential fields. In addition to the tubular-shaped geometry, the model feature an algorithm that allows for more realistic representation of the local activation overpotentials which leads to improved prediction of the local current density distribution. Three-dimensional results of the species profiles, temperature distribution, potential distribution, and local current density distribution are presented. The model is shown to be able to understand the many interacting, complex electrochemical, and transport phenomena that cannot be studied experimentally. (author)

  1. Thermophysical modeling of asteroids from WISE thermal infrared data - Significance of the shape model and the pole orientation uncertainties

    Hanuš, Josef; Delbo', Marco; Ďurech, Josef; Alí-Lagoa, Victor

    2015-01-01

    In the analysis of thermal infrared data of asteroids by means of thermophysical models (TPMs) it is a common practice to neglect the uncertainty of the shape model and the rotational state, which are taken as an input for the model. Here, we present a novel method of investigating the importance of the shape model and the pole orientation uncertainties in the thermophysical modeling - the varied shape TPM (VS-TPM). Our method uses optical photometric data to generate various shape models tha...

  2. A white-box model of S-shaped and double S-shaped single-species population growth.

    Kalmykov, Lev V; Kalmykov, Vyacheslav L

    2015-01-01

    Complex systems may be mechanistically modelled by white-box modeling with using logical deterministic individual-based cellular automata. Mathematical models of complex systems are of three types: black-box (phenomenological), white-box (mechanistic, based on the first principles) and grey-box (mixtures of phenomenological and mechanistic models). Most basic ecological models are of black-box type, including Malthusian, Verhulst, Lotka-Volterra models. In black-box models, the individual-based (mechanistic) mechanisms of population dynamics remain hidden. Here we mechanistically model the S-shaped and double S-shaped population growth of vegetatively propagated rhizomatous lawn grasses. Using purely logical deterministic individual-based cellular automata we create a white-box model. From a general physical standpoint, the vegetative propagation of plants is an analogue of excitation propagation in excitable media. Using the Monte Carlo method, we investigate a role of different initial positioning of an individual in the habitat. We have investigated mechanisms of the single-species population growth limited by habitat size, intraspecific competition, regeneration time and fecundity of individuals in two types of boundary conditions and at two types of fecundity. Besides that, we have compared the S-shaped and J-shaped population growth. We consider this white-box modeling approach as a method of artificial intelligence which works as automatic hyper-logical inference from the first principles of the studied subject. This approach is perspective for direct mechanistic insights into nature of any complex systems. PMID:26038717

  3. Hierarchical modeling of active materials

    Intelligent (or smart) materials are increasingly becoming key materials for use in actuators and sensors. If an intelligent material is used as a sensor, it can be embedded in a variety of structure functioning as a health monitoring system to make their life longer with high reliability. If an intelligent material is used as an active material in an actuator, it plays a key role of making dynamic movement of the actuator under a set of stimuli. This talk intends to cover two different active materials in actuators, (1) piezoelectric laminate with FGM microstructure, (2) ferromagnetic shape memory alloy (FSMA). The advantage of using the FGM piezo laminate is to enhance its fatigue life while maintaining large bending displacement, while that of use in FSMA is its fast actuation while providing a large force and stroke capability. Use of hierarchical modeling of the above active materials is a key design step in optimizing its microstructure for enhancement of their performance. I will discuss briefly hierarchical modeling of the above two active materials. For FGM piezo laminate, we will use both micromechanical model and laminate theory, while for FSMA, the modeling interfacing nano-structure, microstructure and macro-behavior is discussed. (author)

  4. The way organizational models shape human resource management practices and the perceptions of workers

    Marques, Maria Amélia

    2012-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to analyse the way organizational models shape human resource management practices in firms linked to technology-intensive sectors. We used multiple-case study methodology. Four firms we chosen for the case study. The methodology included the use of a series of data collecting techniques, namely: interviews with HRM directors, questionnaires to workers, documental analysis and observation. Our main findings were, first, that the sector of activity, understood in...

  5. Thermomechanical model for NiTi shape memory wires

    Frost, Miroslav; Sedlák, Petr; Sippola, M.; Šittner, Petr

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 9 (2010), s. 1-10. ISSN 0964-1726 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06031; GA ČR(CZ) GA106/09/1573; GA ČR(CZ) GP106/09/P302; GA ČR GAP108/10/1296 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514; CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : shape memory alloys * modeling * proportional loading Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.094, year: 2010 http:// apps .isiknowledge.com/full_record.do?product=WOS&search_mode=GeneralSearch&qid=3&SID=U2fe5mHN9p3gHClCdF1&page=1&doc=1

  6. Nonlinear Model of Pseudoelastic Shape Memory Alloy Damper Considering Residual Martensite Strain Effect

    Y.M. Parulekar; G.R. Reddy

    2012-01-01

    Recently, there has been increasing interest in using superelastic shape memory alloys for applications in seismic resistant-design. Shape memory alloys (SMAs) have a unique property by which they can recover their original shape after experiencing large strains up to 8% either by heating (shape memory effect) or removing stress (pseudoelastic effect). Many simplified shape memory alloy models are suggested in the past literature for capturing the pseudoelastic response of SMAs in passive vib...

  7. 2D-3D shape reconstruction of the distal femur from stereo X-Ray imaging using statistical shape models

    Baka, N.; Kaptein, B.L.; de Bruijne, Marleen; van Walsum, T.; Giphart, J.E.; Niessen, W.J.; Lelieveldt, B.P.F.

    2011-01-01

    as it lowers both the acquisition costs and the radiation dose compared to CT. We propose a method for pose estimation and shape reconstruction of 3D bone surfaces from two (or more) calibrated X-ray images using a statistical shape model (SSM). User interaction is limited to manual initialization of...... the mean shape. The proposed method combines a 3D distance based objective function with automatic edge selection on a Canny edge map. Landmark-edge correspondences are weighted based on the orientation difference of the projected silhouette and the corresponding image edge. The method was evaluated...... segmentations. Rigid registration of the ground truth shape to the biplane fluoroscopy achieved sub-millimeter accuracy (0.68mm) measured as root mean squared (RMS) point-to-surface (P2S) distance. The non-rigid reconstruction from the biplane fluoroscopy using the SSM also showed promising results (1.68mm RMS...

  8. Active sway control of a gantry crane using hybrid input shaping and PID control schemes

    Mohd Tumari, M. Z.; Shabudin, L.; Zawawi, M. A.; Shah, L. H. Ahmad

    2013-12-01

    This project presents investigations into the development of hybrid input-shaping and PID control schemes for active sway control of a gantry crane system. The application of positive input shaping involves a technique that can reduce the sway by creating a common signal that cancels its own vibration and used as a feed-forward control which is for controlling the sway angle of the pendulum, while the proportional integral derivative (PID) controller is used as a feedback control which is for controlling the crane position. The PID controller was tuned using Ziegler-Nichols method to get the best performance of the system. The hybrid input-shaping and PID control schemes guarantee a fast input tracking capability, precise payload positioning and very minimal sway motion. The modeling of gantry crane is used to simulate the system using MATLAB/SIMULINK software. The results of the response with the controllers are presented in time domains and frequency domains. The performances of control schemes are examined in terms of level of input tracking capability, sway angle reduction and time response specification.

  9. Active sway control of a gantry crane using hybrid input shaping and PID control schemes

    This project presents investigations into the development of hybrid input-shaping and PID control schemes for active sway control of a gantry crane system. The application of positive input shaping involves a technique that can reduce the sway by creating a common signal that cancels its own vibration and used as a feed-forward control which is for controlling the sway angle of the pendulum, while the proportional integral derivative (PID) controller is used as a feedback control which is for controlling the crane position. The PID controller was tuned using Ziegler-Nichols method to get the best performance of the system. The hybrid input-shaping and PID control schemes guarantee a fast input tracking capability, precise payload positioning and very minimal sway motion. The modeling of gantry crane is used to simulate the system using MATLAB/SIMULINK software. The results of the response with the controllers are presented in time domains and frequency domains. The performances of control schemes are examined in terms of level of input tracking capability, sway angle reduction and time response specification

  10. Activation of shape and semantic information during ambiguous homophone processing: eye tracking evidence from Hindi.

    Mishra, Ramesh Kumar; Singh, Siddharth

    2014-11-01

    In two visual world eye tracking studies, we examined the activation of subordinate meanings of ambiguous homophones in Hindi and particularly when the sentence context is biased towards the dominant meaning. Participants listened to sentences that were either neutral or biased towards the dominant meaning of the homophone and saw a display containing four pictures. In experiment 1, the display had a shape competitor of the subordinate meaning of the homophone in both neutral and biased conditions along with three unrelated distractors. Experiment 2 had semantic competitors of the subordinate meaning of the homophones along with three distractors. Proportion of fixations to different objects overtime suggested that participants activated the subordinate meanings and oriented their attention to the shape and semantic competitors even when the prior context was biased towards the dominant meaning. Overall, these data from Hindi provide further support to those models of lexical access that assume exhaustive access of both the meanings of an ambiguous homophone. These data suggest even a dominant bias does not eliminate the activation of perceptual and conceptual features of the subordinate meaning. PMID:25015722

  11. The Social Shaping of Canteen TakeAway activitis

    Poulsen, Signe

    During recent decades, the prevalence of overweight and obesity in the world has been increasing. Many factors are influencing this development, one of which is nutrition. In order to improve dietary intake, interventions has been carried out in different settings. Such interventions have shown...... work-life balance for the employees. Furthermore, in two of the cases, CTA is also linked to providing employees working irregular hours with a meal solution. The shaping of the scheme is thus decisive for who that can integrate the scheme into their everyday life. It is found that number of users of...... to be important. In three cases this has primarily importance after the employees have become users. The wish for big portions and a great amount of meat was important for the acceptance of the scheme at the industrial worksite. The production of CTA is integrated into the existing food production by...

  12. Sparse principal component analysis in medical shape modeling

    Sjöstrand, Karl; Stegmann, Mikkel B.; Larsen, Rasmus

    2006-03-01

    Principal component analysis (PCA) is a widely used tool in medical image analysis for data reduction, model building, and data understanding and exploration. While PCA is a holistic approach where each new variable is a linear combination of all original variables, sparse PCA (SPCA) aims at producing easily interpreted models through sparse loadings, i.e. each new variable is a linear combination of a subset of the original variables. One of the aims of using SPCA is the possible separation of the results into isolated and easily identifiable effects. This article introduces SPCA for shape analysis in medicine. Results for three different data sets are given in relation to standard PCA and sparse PCA by simple thresholding of small loadings. Focus is on a recent algorithm for computing sparse principal components, but a review of other approaches is supplied as well. The SPCA algorithm has been implemented using Matlab and is available for download. The general behavior of the algorithm is investigated, and strengths and weaknesses are discussed. The original report on the SPCA algorithm argues that the ordering of modes is not an issue. We disagree on this point and propose several approaches to establish sensible orderings. A method that orders modes by decreasing variance and maximizes the sum of variances for all modes is presented and investigated in detail.

  13. Unified Taxonomy for Reference Ontology of Shape Features in Product Model

    Gupta, Ravi Kumar; Gurumoorthy, B

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a unified taxonomy of shape features. Such taxonomy is required to construct ontologies to address heterogeneity in product/shape models. Literature provides separate classifications for volumetric, deformation and free-form surface features. The unified taxonomy proposed allows classification, representation and extraction of shape features in a product model. The novelty of the taxonomy is that the classification is based purely on shape entities and therefore it is poss...

  14. Hippocampal sub-regional shape and physical activity in older adults.

    Varma, Vijay R; Tang, Xiaoying; Carlson, Michelle C

    2016-08-01

    Hippocampal atrophy is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease pathology, and a target biomarker region for testing intervention efficacy. Over the last few decades, a growing body of evidence from animal and human models suggests that physical activity (PA) is associated with structural benefits to the hippocampus in older adults. Very few human studies, however have explored hippocampal sub-regional specificity of PA; this is significant considering that sub-regions of the hippocampus are associated with distinct cognitive tasks and are differentially affected by disease pathology. This study used objective and self-reported measures of daily walking activity and exercise, and surface-based regional shape analysis using high-field hippocampal sub-regional partitions to explore sub-region specific hippocampal associations in a sample of nondemented, community-dwelling older adults at elevated sociodemographic risk for cognitive decline. Vertex-wise surface areas, which may be more sensitive than global volume measures, were calculated using shape diffeomorphometry, and PA was assessed using step activity monitors and PA questionnaires. We found that daily walking activity in a participant's environment was associated in cross-section mainly with larger surface areas of the subiculum in women. Associations remained significant when controlling for self-reported exercise. Prior studies have found that PA related to exercise and aerobic fitness may be most closely associated with the anterior hippocampus, particularly the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. These novel findings are the first, to our knowledge, in human models to suggest that PA related to navigation that may not reach the level of moderate-intensity exercise may be associated with specific sub-regions of the hippocampus. These findings underscore the importance of better understanding the independent and related biological mechanisms and pathways by which increasing exercise as well as non

  15. A white-box model of S-shaped and double S-shaped single-species population growth

    Lev V. Kalmykov

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Complex systems may be mechanistically modelled by white-box modeling with using logical deterministic individual-based cellular automata. Mathematical models of complex systems are of three types: black-box (phenomenological, white-box (mechanistic, based on the first principles and grey-box (mixtures of phenomenological and mechanistic models. Most basic ecological models are of black-box type, including Malthusian, Verhulst, Lotka–Volterra models. In black-box models, the individual-based (mechanistic mechanisms of population dynamics remain hidden. Here we mechanistically model the S-shaped and double S-shaped population growth of vegetatively propagated rhizomatous lawn grasses. Using purely logical deterministic individual-based cellular automata we create a white-box model. From a general physical standpoint, the vegetative propagation of plants is an analogue of excitation propagation in excitable media. Using the Monte Carlo method, we investigate a role of different initial positioning of an individual in the habitat. We have investigated mechanisms of the single-species population growth limited by habitat size, intraspecific competition, regeneration time and fecundity of individuals in two types of boundary conditions and at two types of fecundity. Besides that, we have compared the S-shaped and J-shaped population growth. We consider this white-box modeling approach as a method of artificial intelligence which works as automatic hyper-logical inference from the first principles of the studied subject. This approach is perspective for direct mechanistic insights into nature of any complex systems.

  16. Segmentation of the left ventricular endocardium from magnetic resonance images by using different statistical shape models.

    Piazzese, Concetta; Carminati, M Chiara; Colombo, Andrea; Krause, Rolf; Potse, Mark; Auricchio, Angelo; Weinert, Lynn; Tamborini, Gloria; Pepi, Mauro; Lang, Roberto M; Caiani, Enrico G

    2016-01-01

    We evaluate in this paper different strategies for the construction of a statistical shape model (SSM) of the left ventricle (LV) to be used for segmentation in cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) images. From a large database of LV surfaces obtained throughout the cardiac cycle from 3D echocardiographic (3DE) LV images, different LV shape models were built by varying the considered phase in the cardiac cycle and the registration procedure employed for surface alignment. Principal component analysis was computed to describe the statistical variability of the SSMs, which were then deformed by applying an active shape model (ASM) approach to segment the LV endocardium in CMR images of 45 patients. Segmentation performance was evaluated by comparing LV volumes derived by ASM segmentation with different SSMs and those obtained by manual tracing, considered as a reference. A high correlation (r(2)>0.92) was found in all cases, with better results when using the SSM models comprising more than one frame of the cardiac cycle. PMID:27046100

  17. Shape-memory properties of magnetically active triple-shape nanocomposites based on a grafted polymer network with two crystallizable switching segments

    A. Lendlein

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermo-sensitive shape-memory polymers (SMP, which are capable of memorizing two or more different shapes, have generated significant research and technological interest. A triple-shape effect (TSE of SMP can be activated e.g. by increasing the environmental temperature (Tenv, whereby two switching temperatures (Tsw have to be exceeded to enable the subsequent shape changes from shape (A to shape (B and finally the original shape (C. In this work, we explored the thermally and magnetically initiated shape-memory properties of triple-shape nanocomposites with various compositions and particle contents using different shape-memory creation procedures (SMCP. The nanocomposites were prepared by the incorporation of magnetite nanoparticles into a multiphase polymer network matrix with grafted polymer network architecture containing crystallizable poly(ethylene glycol (PEG side chains and poly(ε-caprolactone (PCL crosslinks named CLEGC. Excellent triple-shape properties were achieved for nanocomposites with high PEG weight fraction when two-step programming procedures were applied. In contrast, single-step programming resulted in dual-shape properties for all investigated materials as here the temporary shape (A was predominantly fixed by PCL crystallites.

  18. Motor-driven marginal band coiling promotes cell shape change during platelet activation.

    Diagouraga, Boubou; Grichine, Alexei; Fertin, Arnold; Wang, Jin; Khochbin, Saadi; Sadoul, Karin

    2014-01-20

    Platelets float in the blood as discoid particles. Their shape is maintained by microtubules organized in a ring structure, the so-called marginal band (MB), in the periphery of resting platelets. Platelets are activated after vessel injury and undergo a major shape change known as disc to sphere transition. It has been suggested that actomyosin tension induces the contraction of the MB to a smaller ring. In this paper, we show that antagonistic microtubule motors keep the MB in its resting state. During platelet activation, dynein slides microtubules apart, leading to MB extension rather than contraction. The MB then starts to coil, thereby inducing the spherical shape of activating platelets. Newly polymerizing microtubules within the coiled MB will then take a new path to form the smaller microtubule ring, in concerted action with actomyosin tension. These results present a new view of the platelet activation mechanism and reveal principal mechanistic features underlying cellular shape changes. PMID:24421335

  19. Design optimization study of a shape memory alloy active needle for biomedical applications.

    Konh, Bardia; Honarvar, Mohammad; Hutapea, Parsaoran

    2015-05-01

    Majority of cancer interventions today are performed percutaneously using needle-based procedures, i.e. through the skin and soft tissue. The difficulty in most of these procedures is to attain a precise navigation through tissue reaching target locations. To overcome this challenge, active needles have been proposed recently where actuation forces from shape memory alloys (SMAs) are utilized to assist the maneuverability and accuracy of surgical needles. In the first part of this study, actuation capability of SMA wires was studied. The complex response of SMAs was investigated via a MATLAB implementation of the Brinson model and verified via experimental tests. The isothermal stress-strain curves of SMAs were simulated and defined as a material model in finite element analysis (FEA). The FEA was validated experimentally with developed prototypes. In the second part of this study, the active needle design was optimized using genetic algorithm aiming its maximum flexibility. Design parameters influencing the steerability include the needle's diameter, wire diameter, pre-strain and its offset from the needle. A simplified model was presented to decrease the computation time in iterative analyses. Integration of the SMA characteristics with the automated optimization schemes described in this study led to an improved design of the active needle. PMID:25782329

  20. SU-F-BRF-02: Automated Lung Segmentation Method Using Atlas-Based Sparse Shape Composition with a Shape Constrained Deformable Model

    Purpose: To develop an automated lung segmentation method, which combines the atlas-based sparse shape composition with a shape constrained deformable model in thoracic CT for patients with compromised lung volumes. Methods: Ten thoracic computed tomography scans for patients with large lung tumors were collected and reference lung ROIs in each scan was manually segmented to assess the performance of the method. We propose an automated and robust framework for lung tissue segmentation by using single statistical atlas registration to initialize a robust deformable model in order to perform fine segmentation that includes compromised lung tissue. First, a statistical image atlas with sparse shape composition is constructed and employed to obtain an approximate estimation of lung volume. Next, a robust deformable model with shape prior is initialized from this estimation. Energy terms from ROI edge potential and interior ROI region based potential as well as the initial ROI are combined in this model for accurate and robust segmentation. Results: The proposed segmentation method is applied to segment right lung on three CT scans. The quantitative results of our segmentation method achieved mean dice score of (0.92–0.95), mean accuracy of (0.97,0.98), and mean relative error of (0.10,0.16) with 95% CI. The quantitative results of previously published RASM segmentation method achieved mean dice score of (0.74,0.96), mean accuracy of (0.66,0.98), and mean relative error of (0.04, 0.38) with 95% CI. The qualitative and quantitative comparisons show that our proposed method can achieve better segmentation accuracy with less variance compared with a robust active shape model method. Conclusion: The atlas-based segmentation approach achieved relatively high accuracy with less variance compared to RASM in the sample dataset and the proposed method will be useful in image analysis applications for lung nodule or lung cancer diagnosis and radiotherapy assessment in thoracic

  1. Investigating Energetic X-Shaped Flares on the Outskirts of A Solar Active Region

    Liu, Rui; Wang, Yuming; Liu, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Typical solar flares display two quasi-parallel, bright ribbons on the chromosphere. In between is the polarity inversion line (PIL) separating concentrated magnetic fluxes of opposite polarity in active regions (ARs). Intriguingly a series of flares exhibiting X-shaped ribbons occurred at the similar location on the outskirts of NOAA AR 11967, where magnetic fluxes were scattered, yet three of them were alarmingly energetic. The X shape, whose center coincided with hard X-ray emission, was similar in UV/EUV, which cannot be accommodated in the standard flare model. Mapping out magnetic connectivities in potential fields, we found that the X morphology was dictated by the intersection of two quasi-separatrix layers, i.e., a hyperbolic flux tube (HFT), within which a separator connecting a double null was embedded. This topology was not purely local but regulated by fluxes and flows over the whole AR. The nonlinear force-free field model suggested the formation of a current layer at the HFT, where the current ...

  2. Shaping Student Activists: Discursive Sensemaking of Activism and Participation Research

    Taha, Diane E.; Hastings, Sally O.; Minei, Elizabeth M.

    2015-01-01

    As social media becomes a more potent force in society, particularly for younger generations, the role in activism has been contested. This qualitative study examines 35 interviews with students regarding their perceptions of the use of social media in social change, their perceptions of activists, and their level of self-identification as an…

  3. Segmentation of uterine fibroid ultrasound images using a dynamic statistical shape model in HIFU therapy.

    Ni, Bo; He, Fazhi; Yuan, ZhiYong

    2015-12-01

    Segmenting the lesion areas from ultrasound (US) images is an important step in the intra-operative planning of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). However, accurate segmentation remains a challenge due to intensity inhomogeneity, blurry boundaries in HIFU US images and the deformation of uterine fibroids caused by patient's breathing or external force. This paper presents a novel dynamic statistical shape model (SSM)-based segmentation method to accurately and efficiently segment the target region in HIFU US images of uterine fibroids. For accurately learning the prior shape information of lesion boundary fluctuations in the training set, the dynamic properties of stochastic differential equation and Fokker-Planck equation are incorporated into SSM (referred to as SF-SSM). Then, a new observation model of lesion areas (named to RPFM) in HIFU US images is developed to describe the features of the lesion areas and provide a likelihood probability to the prior shape given by SF-SSM. SF-SSM and RPFM are integrated into active contour model to improve the accuracy and robustness of segmentation in HIFU US images. We compare the proposed method with four well-known US segmentation methods to demonstrate its superiority. The experimental results in clinical HIFU US images validate the high accuracy and robustness of our approach, even when the quality of the images is unsatisfactory, indicating its potential for practical application in HIFU therapy. PMID:26459767

  4. A Model for Conjoint Shape Memory and Pseudo-Elastic Effects during Martensitic Transformation

    K. Boubaker

    2012-01-01

    Shape memory alloys (SMA) are metals which can restore their initial shape after having been subjected to a deformation. They exhibit in general both nonlinear shape memory and pseudoelastic effects. In this paper, shape memory alloy (SMA) and its constitutive model with an empirical kinetics equation are investigated. A new formulation to the martensite fraction-dependent Young modulus has been adopted and the plastic deformation was taken into account. To simulate the variations, a one-dime...

  5. Modeling of mechanical properties for ferrous shape memory alloy

    In order to acquire technical data that are necessary for manufacture and design of the simulation test device for analyzing the core mechanics of Fast Breeder Reactor, ferrous shape memory alloy of Fe-28%Mn-6%Si-5%Cr is melted, forged and heat-treated. The microstructures are austenite. The specimens are deformed of up to 16% work-strain by tensile and compressive test, resulting in appearance of epsilon-martensite that is induced by stress. Then, heating at 673K for 10 minutes causes austenitic transformation from epsilon-martensite and shape memory strains are measured. We also investigate shape memory character of specimens, which are given, so called 'training treatment' of 5% pre-strain and recovery heat treatment. As a result, there is little difference between tensile and compressive test without training treatment and shape memory strain is 2% after being given 5% work-strain and recovery heat treatment. On the other hand, training treatment is remarkable and shape memory strain reaches to 3.7% after 5% work-strain. We analyze shape recovery character of this alloy specimen at three-point bending by using finite element method, and indicate possibility that its deformation behavior can be estimated from mechanical properties' data obtained at tensile and compressive test. (author)

  6. Optimization of ultrasonic array inspections using an efficient hybrid model and real crack shapes

    Models which simulate the interaction of ultrasound with cracks can be used to optimize ultrasonic array inspections, but this approach can be time-consuming. To overcome this issue an efficient hybrid model is implemented which includes a finite element method that requires only a single layer of elements around the crack shape. Scattering Matrices are used to capture the scattering behavior of the individual cracks and a discussion on the angular degrees of freedom of elastodynamic scatterers is included. Real crack shapes are obtained from X-ray Computed Tomography images of cracked parts and these shapes are inputted into the hybrid model. The effect of using real crack shapes instead of straight notch shapes is demonstrated. An array optimization methodology which incorporates the hybrid model, an approximate single-scattering relative noise model and the real crack shapes is then described

  7. Optimization of ultrasonic array inspections using an efficient hybrid model and real crack shapes

    Felice, Maria V.; Velichko, Alexander; Wilcox, Paul D.; Barden, Tim; Dunhill, Tony

    2015-03-01

    Models which simulate the interaction of ultrasound with cracks can be used to optimize ultrasonic array inspections, but this approach can be time-consuming. To overcome this issue an efficient hybrid model is implemented which includes a finite element method that requires only a single layer of elements around the crack shape. Scattering Matrices are used to capture the scattering behavior of the individual cracks and a discussion on the angular degrees of freedom of elastodynamic scatterers is included. Real crack shapes are obtained from X-ray Computed Tomography images of cracked parts and these shapes are inputted into the hybrid model. The effect of using real crack shapes instead of straight notch shapes is demonstrated. An array optimization methodology which incorporates the hybrid model, an approximate single-scattering relative noise model and the real crack shapes is then described.

  8. Optimization of ultrasonic array inspections using an efficient hybrid model and real crack shapes

    Felice, Maria V., E-mail: maria.felice@bristol.ac.uk [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Bristol, Bristol, U.K. and NDE Laboratory, Rolls-Royce plc., Bristol (United Kingdom); Velichko, Alexander, E-mail: p.wilcox@bristol.ac.uk; Wilcox, Paul D., E-mail: p.wilcox@bristol.ac.uk [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Bristol, Bristol (United Kingdom); Barden, Tim; Dunhill, Tony [NDE Laboratory, Rolls-Royce plc., Bristol (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-31

    Models which simulate the interaction of ultrasound with cracks can be used to optimize ultrasonic array inspections, but this approach can be time-consuming. To overcome this issue an efficient hybrid model is implemented which includes a finite element method that requires only a single layer of elements around the crack shape. Scattering Matrices are used to capture the scattering behavior of the individual cracks and a discussion on the angular degrees of freedom of elastodynamic scatterers is included. Real crack shapes are obtained from X-ray Computed Tomography images of cracked parts and these shapes are inputted into the hybrid model. The effect of using real crack shapes instead of straight notch shapes is demonstrated. An array optimization methodology which incorporates the hybrid model, an approximate single-scattering relative noise model and the real crack shapes is then described.

  9. Hippocampal Shape Modeling Based on a Progressive Template Surface Deformation and its Verification.

    Kim, Jaeil; Valdes-Hernandez, Maria Del C; Royle, Natalie A; Park, Jinah

    2015-06-01

    Accurately recovering the hippocampal shapes against rough and noisy segmentations is as challenging as achieving good anatomical correspondence between the individual shapes. To address these issues, we propose a mesh-to-volume registration approach, characterized by a progressive model deformation. Our model implements flexible weighting scheme for model rigidity under a multi-level neighborhood for vertex connectivity. This method induces a large-to-small scale deformation of a template surface to build the pairwise correspondence by minimizing geometric distortion while robustly restoring the individuals' shape characteristics. We evaluated the proposed method's (1) accuracy and robustness in smooth surface reconstruction, (2) sensitivity in detecting significant shape differences between healthy control and disease groups (mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease), (3) robustness in constructing the anatomical correspondence between individual shape models, and (4) applicability in identifying subtle shape changes in relation to cognitive abilities in a healthy population. We compared the performance of the proposed method with other well-known methods--SPHARM-PDM, ShapeWorks and LDDMM volume registration with template injection--using various metrics of shape similarity, surface roughness, volume, and shape deformity. The experimental results showed that the proposed method generated smooth surfaces with less volume differences and better shape similarity to input volumes than others. The statistical analyses with clinical variables also showed that it was sensitive in detecting subtle shape changes of hippocampus. PMID:25532173

  10. Analytical modeling and experimental validation of a V-shape piezoelectric ultrasonic transducer

    Li, Xiaoniu; Yao, Zhiyuan

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, an analytical model of a V-shape piezoelectric ultrasonic transducer is presented. The V-shape piezoelectric ultrasonic transducer has been widely applied to the piezoelectric actuator (ultrasonic motor), ultrasonic aided fabrication, sensor, and energy harvesting device. The V-shape piezoelectric ultrasonic transducer consists of two Langevin-type transducers connected together through a coupling point with a certain coupling angle. Considering the longitudinal and lateral movements of a single beam, the symmetrical and asymmetrical modals of the V-shape piezoelectric ultrasonic transducer are calculated. By using Hamilton–Lagrange equations, the electromechanical coupling model of the V-shape piezoelectric ultrasonic transducer is proposed. The influence of the coupling angle and cross-section on modal characteristics and electromechanical coupling coefficient are analyzed by the analytical model. A prototype of the V-shape piezoelectric ultrasonic transducer is fabricated, and the results of the experiments are in good agreement with the analytical model.

  11. Shape-dependent bactericidal activity of copper oxide nanoparticle mediated by DNA and membrane damage

    Highlights: • Spherical and sheet shaped copper oxide nanoparticles were synthesized. • Physical characterizations of these nanoparticles were done by TEM, DLS, XRD, FTIR. • They showed shape dependent antibacterial activity on different bacterial strain. • They induced both membrane damage and ROS mediated DNA damage in bacteria. - Abstract: In this work, we synthesized spherical and sheet shaped copper oxide nanoparticles and their physical characterizations were done by the X-ray diffraction, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. The antibacterial activity of these nanoparticles was determined on both gram positive and gram negative bacterial. Spherical shaped copper oxide nanoparticles showed more antibacterial property on gram positive bacteria where as sheet shaped copper oxide nanoparticles are more active on gram negative bacteria. We also demonstrated that copper oxide nanoparticles produced reactive oxygen species in both gram negative and gram positive bacteria. Furthermore, they induced membrane damage as determined by atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Thus production of and membrane damage are major mechanisms of the bactericidal activity of these copper oxide nanoparticles. Finally it was concluded that antibacterial activity of nanoparticles depend on physicochemical properties of copper oxide nanoparticles and bacterial strain

  12. A Vertical Resonance Heating Model for X- or Peanut-Shaped Galactic Bulges

    Quillen, Alice C.; Minchev, Ivan; Sharma, Sanjib; Qin, Yu-Jing; Di Matteo, Paola

    2013-01-01

    We explore a second order Hamiltonian vertical resonance model for X-shaped or peanut-shaped galactic bulges. The X-shape is caused by the 2:1 vertical Lindblad resonance with the bar, with two vertical oscillation periods per orbital period in the bar frame. We examine N-body simulations and find that due to the bar slowing down and disk thickening during bar buckling, the resonance and associated peanut-shape moves outward. The peanut-shape is consistent with the location of the vertical re...

  13. Using a Shape Model in the Design of Hearing Aids

    Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold; Nielsen, Claus; Laugesen, Søren;

    2004-01-01

    Today the design of custom completely-in-the-canal hearing aids is a manual process and therefore there is a variation in the quality of the finished hearing aids. Especially the placement of the so-called faceplate on the hearing aid strongly influences the size and shape of the hearing aid. Since...

  14. Shape interior modeling and mass property optimization using ray-reps

    Wu, Jun; Kramer, Lou; Westermann, Rüdiger

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel method for the modeling and optimization of the material distribution inside 3D shapes, such that their 3D printed replicas satisfy prescribed constraints regarding mass properties. In particular, we introduce an extension of ray-representation to shape interior modeling, and...

  15. Improved shape hardening function for bounding surface model for cohesive soils

    Andrés Nieto-Leal

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A shape hardening function is developed that improves the predictive capabilities of the generalized bounding surface model for cohesive soils, especially when applied to overconsolidated specimens. This improvement is realized without any changes to the simple elliptical shape of the bounding surface, and actually reduces the number of parameters associated with the model by one.

  16. Hydrothermal synthesis of bamboo-shaped nanosheet KNb3O8 with enhanced photocatalytic activity

    Graphical abstract: A new type of bamboo-shaped KNb3O8 nanosheet was synthesized by using a two-step hydrothermal method. In addition, the photocatalytic degradation performances of the bamboo-shaped KNb3O8 nanosheet and a rod-like KNb3O8 prepared by using molted salt method were also investigated and compared in terms of degradation of Rhodamine B, and the results indicated that the bamboo-shaped KNb3O8 nanosheet had higher photocatalytic activity. Importantly, the crystal structure and morphology diagram of KNb3O8 nanosheet and their photocatalytic degradation performances as well as a possible mechanism for the photocatalytic degradation are shown below. - Highlights: • A new type of bamboo-shaped KNb3O8 nanosheet was synthesized. • The effect of potassium content on the KNb3O8 phase formation has been studied. • The specific surface area, structural and optical characteristics were studied. • The bamboo-shaped nanosheet KNb3O8 exhibits higher photocatalytic activity. - Abstract: A new type of bamboo-shaped KNb3O8 nanosheet was synthesized by using a two-step hydrothermal method. In particular, an effect of potassium content on the phase formation of KNb3O8 in the second-step hydrothermal process at pH = 5–6 was investigated. Specific surface area, structural properties and optical characteristics of the as-synthesized samples were investigated by using Brunauer–Emmett–Teller measurement, X-ray diffraction analysis, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and UV–visible diffuse reflectance. Furthermore, the photocatalytic degradation performances of the bamboo-shaped KNb3O8 nanosheet and a rod-like KNb3O8 prepared by using molted salt method were also investigated and compared in terms of degradation of Rhodamine B, and the results indicated that the bamboo-shaped KNb3O8 nanosheet had a higher photocatalytic activity

  17. Computational Modeling aided Near Net Shape Manufacturing for Aluminum Alloys Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This program will focus on developing and validating computational models for near-net shape processing of aluminum alloys. Computational models will be developed...

  18. Magnetic shape-memory alloys: thermomechanical modelling and analysis

    Roubíček, Tomáš; Stefanelli, U.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 6 (2014), s. 783-810. ISSN 0935-1175 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP201/10/0357 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : magnetic shape-memory alloys * martensitic phase transformation * ferro/paramagnetic phase transformation Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.779, year: 2014 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00161-014-0339-8#

  19. Thermally Activated Composite with Two-Way and Multi-Shape Memory Effects

    Bernard Durand

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of shape memory polymer composites is growing rapidly in smart structure applications. In this work, an active asymmetric composite called “controlled behavior composite material (CBCM” is used as shape memory polymer composite. The programming and the corresponding initial fixity of the composite structure is obtained during a bending test, by heating CBCM above thermal glass transition temperature of the used Epoxy polymer. The shape memory properties of these composites are investigated by a bending test. Three types of recoveries are conducted, two classical recovery tests: unconstrained recovery and constrained recovery, and a new test of partial recovery under load. During recovery, high recovery displacement and force are produced that enables the composite to perform strong two-way actuations along with multi-shape memory effect. The recovery force confirms full recovery with two-way actuation even under a high load. This unique property of CBCM is characterized by the recovered mechanical work.

  20. Fuzzy Shape Control Based on Elman Dynamic Recursion Network Prediction Model

    JIA Chun-yu; LIU Hong-min

    2006-01-01

    In the strip rolling process, shape control system possesses the characteristics of nonlinearity, strong coupling, time delay and time variation. Based on self-adapting Elman dynamic recursion network prediction model, the fuzzy control method was used to control the shape on four-high cold mill. The simulation results showed that the system can be applied to real time on line control of the shape.

  1. A Solvable Model for Nuclear Shape Phase Transitions

    There has been considerable interest recently in phase transitions that occur between some well-defined nuclear shapes, e.g. the spherical vibrator, the axially deformed rotor and the γ-unstable rotor, which are assigned to the U(5), SU(3) and 0(6) symmetries. These shape phase transitions occur through critical points of the IBM phase diagram and correspond to rapid structural changes. The first transition of this type describes transition form the spherical to the γ-unstable phase and has been associated with an E(5) symmetry. Later further critical point symmetries e.g. X(5) and Y(5) have also been proposed for transitions between other nuclear shape phases. In another application the chain of even Ru isotopes was considered from A 98 to 112 [2]. The parameters were extracted from a fit to the low-lying energy spectrum of each nucleus and were used to plot the corresponding potential. It was found that up to A =102 the potential is essentially an harmonic oscillator, while at A =104 a rather flat potential was seen, in accordance with the expected phase transition and E(5) symmetry there. With increasing A then the minimum got increasingly deeper and moved away from β = 0. We discuss the possibility of generalizing the formalism in two ways: first by including dependence on the 7 variable allowing for the approximate description of nuclei close to the X(5) symmetry, and second, including higher-lying energy levels in the quasi-exactly solvable formalism

  2. Genetic Fuzzy Modelling of User Perception of 3D Shapes

    Achiche, Sofiane; Ahmed-Kristensen, Saeema

    2011-01-01

    Defining the aesthetic and emotional value of a product is an important consideration for its design. Furthermore, if several designers are faced with the task of creating an object that describe a certain emotion/perception (aggressive, soft, heavy, etc.), each is most likely to interpret the...... emotion/perception with different shapes composed of a set of different geometric features. In this paper, the authors propose an automatic approach to formalize the relationships between geometric information of 3D objects and the intended emotional content using fuzzy logic. In addition, the...

  3. Actively compensation of low order aberrations by refractive shaping system for high power slab lasers

    Xue, Zheng-wei; Guo, Ya-ding; Chen, Zhong-zheng; Li, Shuai; Xu, Yi-ting; Xu, Jian; Wang, Bao-shan; Gong, Ke-ling; Gao, Hong-wei; Bo, Yong; Peng, Qin-jun; Cui, Da-fu; Xu, Zu-yan

    2015-12-01

    We present a compact refractive shaping system for actively compensating low order aberrations of high power slab lasers. The shaping system includes three spherical lenses and two cylindrical lenses. Both theoretical and experimental investigations were performed to evaluate the compensation capability of the refractive shaping system. For a typical input beam with large low order aberrations of peak-to-valley (PV)=66.10λ and root-mean-square (RMS)=16.05λ, adjusting the distance between lenses, the wavefront aberrations are reduced to PV=0.48λ, RMS=0.10λ for the theoretical simulation and PV=0.50λ, RMS=0.11λ for the experimental result, respectively. It indicates that the main low order aberrations of defocus and 0° astigmatism can be significantly compensated by actively adjusting the distance between lenses and the experimental result agree well with the theoretical simulation.

  4. Modified peak shape method for the determination of activation energy in thermoluminescence

    We have reconsidered the peak shape method in thermoluminescence by taking into account the main difficulty of the peak shape method, i.e. the dependence of the symmetry factor μ g on um (=E/kTm ) , where E is the activation energy, Tm is the peak temperature and k is the Boltzmann constant. In the present paper, the peak shape method is improved by taking into account this dependence. Finally, the applicability of the present findings has been analyzed by considering both synthetic and experimental thermoluminescence curves including glow curves of the most common dosimetric material LiF : Mg, Ti (TLD-100). It is also found that activation energies as calculated by the present method are in good agreement with those calculated by the rigorous method of curve fitting.

  5. Thermophysical modeling of asteroids from WISE thermal infrared data - Significance of the shape model and the pole orientation uncertainties

    Hanuš, J.; Delbo', M.; Ďurech, J.; Alí-Lagoa, V.

    2015-08-01

    In the analysis of thermal infrared data of asteroids by means of thermophysical models (TPMs) it is a common practice to neglect the uncertainty of the shape model and the rotational state, which are taken as an input for the model. Here, we present a novel method of investigating the importance of the shape model and the pole orientation uncertainties in the thermophysical modeling - the varied shape TPM (VS-TPM). Our method uses optical photometric data to generate various shape models that map the uncertainty in the shape and the rotational state. The TPM procedure is then run for all these shape models. We apply the implementation of the classical TPM as well as our VS-TPM to the convex shape models of several asteroids together with their thermal infrared data acquired by the NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) and compare the results. These show that the uncertainties of the shape model and the pole orientation can be very important (e.g., for the determination of the thermal inertia) and should be considered in the thermophysical analyses. We present thermophysical properties for six asteroids - (624) Hektor, (771) Libera, (1036) Ganymed, (1472) Muonio, (1627) Ivar, and (2606) Odessa.

  6. Thermophysical modeling of asteroids from WISE thermal infrared data - Significance of the shape model and the pole orientation uncertainties

    Hanuš, Josef; Ďurech, Josef; Alí-Lagoa, Victor

    2015-01-01

    In the analysis of thermal infrared data of asteroids by means of thermophysical models (TPMs) it is a common practice to neglect the uncertainty of the shape model and the rotational state, which are taken as an input for the model. Here, we present a novel method of investigating the importance of the shape model and the pole orientation uncertainties in the thermophysical modeling - the varied shape TPM (VS-TPM). Our method uses optical photometric data to generate various shape models that map the uncertainty in the shape and the rotational state. The TPM procedure is then run for all these shape models. We apply the implementation of the classical TPM as well as our VS-TPM to the convex shape models of several asteroids together with their thermal infrared data acquired by the NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) and compare the results. These show that the uncertainties of the shape model and the pole orientation can be very important (e.g., for the determination of the thermal inertia) and...

  7. Development of a statistical shape model of multi-organ and its performance evaluation

    Existing statistical shape modeling methods for an organ can not take into account the correlation between neighboring organs. This study focuses on a level set distribution model and proposes two modeling methods for multiple organs that can take into account the correlation between neighboring organs. The first method combines level set functions of multiple organs into a vector. Subsequently it analyses the distribution of the vectors of a training dataset by a principal component analysis and builds a multiple statistical shape model. Second method constructs a statistical shape model for each organ independently and assembles component scores of different organs in a training dataset so as to generate a vector. It analyses the distribution of the vectors of to build a statistical shape model of multiple organs. This paper shows results of applying the proposed methods trained by 15 abdominal CT volumes to unknown 8 CT volumes. (author)

  8. Visualization of a Fish Behavior using Successive Three-Dimensional Shape Modeling

    Doi, Junta; Miyake, Tetsuo

    2000-01-01

    Visualization of a three-dimensional fish behavior based on the successive feature extraction using the time sequential three-dimensional shape modeling is reported. The principle of the modeling is based on the intersected viewing pyramid consisting of each image boundary of the object and the corresponding focal point. Threedirectional video images are simultaneously acquired and sequential solid models are then reconstructed to obtain behavioral parameters such as body shape, skeleton, hea...

  9. Solvothermal synthesis of Pt-Pd alloys with selective shapes and their enhanced electrocatalytic activities

    Zhang, Zhi-Cheng; Hui, Jun-Feng; Guo, Zhen-Guo; Yu, Qi-Yu; Xu, Biao; Zhang, Xin; Liu, Zhi-Chang; Xu, Chun-Ming; Gao, Jin-Sen; Wang, Xun

    2012-03-01

    Pt-Pd bimetallic alloy nanostructures with highly selective morphologies such as cube, bar, flower, concave cube, and dendrite have been achieved through a facile one-pot solvothermal synthesis. The effects of shape-controllers (sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), ethylenediamine-tetraacetic acid disodium salt (EDTA-2Na), NaI) and solvents (water/DMF) on the morphologies were systematically investigated. The electrocatalytic activities of these Pt-Pd alloy nanostructures toward formic acid oxidation were tested. The results indicated that these alloy nanocrystals exhibited enhanced and shape-dependent electrocatalytic activity toward formic acid oxidation compared to commercial Pt black and Pt/C catalysts.Pt-Pd bimetallic alloy nanostructures with highly selective morphologies such as cube, bar, flower, concave cube, and dendrite have been achieved through a facile one-pot solvothermal synthesis. The effects of shape-controllers (sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), ethylenediamine-tetraacetic acid disodium salt (EDTA-2Na), NaI) and solvents (water/DMF) on the morphologies were systematically investigated. The electrocatalytic activities of these Pt-Pd alloy nanostructures toward formic acid oxidation were tested. The results indicated that these alloy nanocrystals exhibited enhanced and shape-dependent electrocatalytic activity toward formic acid oxidation compared to commercial Pt black and Pt/C catalysts. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr12135b

  10. Wave shape classification of spontaneous neuronal activity in cortical cultures on micro-electrode arrays

    Staveren, van, R.; Buitenweg, J.R.; Heida, T.; Rutten, W.L.C.

    2002-01-01

    Dissociated embryonal or postnatal rat cortical cells were cultured onto multi electrode arrays (MEA's) with 61 electrode sites. They developed into networks and became spontaneously active after about one week in vitro. About 180,000 recorded action potential waveforms were sorted using several spike features and classified with a Mahalanobis distance sorting procedure. They were classified into six basic wave shapes.

  11. Atypical balance between occipital and fronto-parietal activation for visual shape extraction in dyslexia.

    Ying Zhang

    Full Text Available Reading requires the extraction of letter shapes from a complex background of text, and an impairment in visual shape extraction would cause difficulty in reading. To investigate the neural mechanisms of visual shape extraction in dyslexia, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI to examine brain activation while adults with or without dyslexia responded to the change of an arrow's direction in a complex, relative to a simple, visual background. In comparison to adults with typical reading ability, adults with dyslexia exhibited opposite patterns of atypical activation: decreased activation in occipital visual areas associated with visual perception, and increased activation in frontal and parietal regions associated with visual attention. These findings indicate that dyslexia involves atypical brain organization for fundamental processes of visual shape extraction even when reading is not involved. Overengagement in higher-order association cortices, required to compensate for underengagment in lower-order visual cortices, may result in competition for top-down attentional resources helpful for fluent reading.

  12. IgE epitope proximity determines immune complex shape and effector cell activation capacity

    Gieras, Anna; Linhart, Birgit; Roux, Kenneth H.; Dutta, Moumita; Khodoun, Marat; Zafred, Domen; Cabauatan, Clarissa R.; Lupinek, Christian; Weber, Milena; Focke-Tejkl, Margarete; Keller, Walter; Finkelman, Fred D.; Valenta, Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    Background IgE-allergen complexes induce mast cell and basophil activation and thus immediate allergic inflammation. They are also important for IgE-facilitated allergen presentation to T cells by antigen-presenting cells. Objective To investigate whether the proximity of IgE binding sites on an allergen affects immune complex shape and subsequent effector cell activation in vitro and in vivo. Methods We constructed artificial allergens by grafting IgE epitopes in different numbers and proximity onto a scaffold protein. The shape of immune complexes formed between artificial allergens and the corresponding IgE was studied by negative-stain electron microscopy. Allergenic activity was determined using basophil activation assays. Mice were primed with IgE, followed by injection of artificial allergens to evaluate their in vivo allergenic activity. Severity of systemic anaphylaxis was measured by changes in body temperature. Results We could demonstrate simultaneous binding of 4 IgE antibodies in close vicinity to each other. The proximity of IgE binding sites on allergens influenced the shape of the resulting immune complexes and the magnitude of effector cell activation and in vivo inflammation. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that the proximity of IgE epitopes on an allergen affects its allergenic activity. We thus identified a novel mechanism by which IgE-allergen complexes regulate allergic inflammation. This mechanism should be important for allergy and other immune complex–mediated diseases. PMID:26684291

  13. Intelligent structures based on the improved activation of shape memory polymers using Peltier cells

    This study is focused on obtaining intelligent structures manufactured from shape memory polymers possessing the ability to change their geometry in successive or 'step-by-step' actions. This objective has been reached by changing the conventionally used shape memory activation systems (heating resistance, laser or induction heating). The solution set out consists in using Peltier cells as a heating system capable of heating (and activating) a specific zone of the device in the first activation, while the opposite zone keeps its original geometry. By carefully reversing the polarity of the electrical supply to the Peltier cell, in the second activation, the as yet unchanged zone is activated while the already changed zone in the first activation remains unaltered. We have described the criteria for the selection, calibration and design of this alternative heating (activation) system based on the thermoelectric effect, together with the development of different 'proof of concept' prototypes that have enabled us to validate the concepts put forward, as well as suggest future improvements for 'intelligent' shape memory polymer-based devices

  14. Disentangling the nuclear shape coexistence in even-even Hg isotopes using the interacting boson model

    García-Ramos, J E

    2014-01-01

    We intend to provide a consistent description of the even-even Hg isotopes, 172-200Hg, using the interacting boson model including configuration mixing. We pay special attention to the description of the shape of the nuclei and to its connection with the shape coexistence phenomenon.

  15. Modeling concepts for communication of geometric shape data

    Collins, M. F.; Emnett, R. F.; Magedson, R. L.; Shu, H. H.

    1984-01-01

    ANSI5, an abbreviation for Section 5 of the American National Standard under Engineering Drawing and Related Documentation Practices (Committee Y14) on Digital Representation for Communication of Product Definition Data (ANSI Y14.26M-1981), allows encoding of a broad range of geometric shapes to be communicated through digital channels. A brief review of its underlying concepts is presented. The intent of ANSI5 is to devise a unified set of concise language formats for transmission of data pertaining to five types of geometric entities in Euclidean 3 space (E(3)). These are regarded as point like, curve like, surface like, solid like, and a combination of these types. For the first four types, ANSI5 makes a distinction between the geometry and topology. Geometry is a description of the spatial occupancy of the entity, and topology discusses the interconnectedness of the entity's boundary components.

  16. Towards Low-Cost Effective and Homogeneous Thermal Activation of Shape Memory Polymers

    Andrés Díaz Lantada; María Santamaría Rebollo

    2013-01-01

    A typical limitation of intelligent devices based on the use of shape-memory polymers as actuators is linked to the widespread use of distributed heating resistors, via Joule effect, as activation method, which involves several relevant issues needing attention, such as: (a) Final device size is importantly increased due to the additional space required for the resistances; (b) the use of resistances limits materials’ strength and the obtained devices are normally weaker; (c) the activation p...

  17. Influence of metal nanoparticle decorated CNTs on polyurethane based electro active shape memory nanocomposite actuators

    Highlights: → Polyurethane based on pristine and metal (Ag and Cu) nanoparticle decorated CNTs nanocomposites are prepared through melt blending process. → The electrical, mechanical, dynamic mechanical, thermal conductivity and electro active shape memory properties of the PU nanocomposites were investigated. → The influence of metal nanoparticle decorated CNTs showed significant improvement in their all properties to compare to pristine CNTs. → Electro active shape memory studies of the PU/M-CNTs nanocomposites reveal extraordinary recoverability of its shape at lower applied dc voltages. - Abstract: Polymer nanocomposites based on thermoplastic polyurethane (PU) elastomer and metal nanoparticle (Ag and Cu) decorated multiwall carbon nanotubes (M-CNTs) were prepared through melt mixing process and investigated for its mechanical, dynamic mechanical and electro active shape memory properties. Structural characterization and morphological characterization of the PU nanocomposites were done using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Morphological characterization revealed better dispersion of M-CNTs in the polyurethane, which is attributed to the improved interaction between the M-CNTs and polyurethane. Loading of the metal nanoparticle coated carbon nanotubes resulted in the significant improvement on the mechanical properties such as tensile strength of the PU composites in comparison to the pristine carbon nanotubes (P-CNTs). Dynamic mechanical analysis showed that the glass transition temperature (Tg) of the polyurethane increases slightly with increasing loading of both pristine and metal nanoparticle functionalized carbon nanotubes. The metal nanoparticles decorated carbon nanotubes also showed significant improvement in the thermal and electrical conductivity of the PU/M-CNTs nanocomposites. Shape memory studies of the PU/M-CNTs nanocomposites exhibit remarkable recoverability of its shape at lower applied dc voltages.

  18. Towards Low-Cost Effective and Homogeneous Thermal Activation of Shape Memory Polymers

    Andrés Díaz Lantada

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A typical limitation of intelligent devices based on the use of shape-memory polymers as actuators is linked to the widespread use of distributed heating resistors, via Joule effect, as activation method, which involves several relevant issues needing attention, such as: (a Final device size is importantly increased due to the additional space required for the resistances; (b the use of resistances limits materials’ strength and the obtained devices are normally weaker; (c the activation process through heating resistances is not homogeneous, thus leading to important temperature differences among the polymeric structure and to undesirable thermal gradients and stresses, also limiting the application fields of shape-memory polymers. In our present work we describe interesting activation alternatives, based on coating shape-memory polymers with different kinds of conductive materials, including textiles, conductive threads and conductive paint, which stand out for their easy, rapid and very cheap implementation. Distributed heating and homogeneous activation can be achieved in several of the alternatives studied and the technical results are comparable to those obtained by using advanced shape-memory nanocomposites, which have to deal with complex synthesis, processing and security aspects. Different combinations of shape memory epoxy resin with several coating electrotextiles, conductive films and paints are prepared, simulated with the help of thermal finite element method based resources and characterized using infrared thermography for validating the simulations and overall design process. A final application linked to an active catheter pincer is detailed and the advantages of using distributed heating instead of conventional resistors are discussed.

  19. Emergent Structures in an Active Polar Fluid : dynamics of shape, scattering and merger

    Husain, Kabir

    2016-01-01

    Spatially localised defect structures emerge spontaneously in a hydrodynamic description of an active polar fluid comprising polar 'actin' filaments and 'myosin' motor proteins that (un)bind to filaments and exert active contractile stresses. These emergent defect structures are characterized by distinct textures and can be either static or mobile - we derive effective equations of motion for these 'extended particles' and analyse their shape, kinetics, interactions and scattering. Depending on the impact parameter and propulsion speed, these active defects undergo elastic scattering or merger. Our results are relevant for the dynamics of actomyosin-dense structures at the cell cortex, reconstituted actomyosin complexes and 2D active colloidal gels.

  20. Deep Neural Networks as a Computational Model for Human Shape Sensitivity.

    Jonas Kubilius

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Theories of object recognition agree that shape is of primordial importance, but there is no consensus about how shape might be represented, and so far attempts to implement a model of shape perception that would work with realistic stimuli have largely failed. Recent studies suggest that state-of-the-art convolutional 'deep' neural networks (DNNs capture important aspects of human object perception. We hypothesized that these successes might be partially related to a human-like representation of object shape. Here we demonstrate that sensitivity for shape features, characteristic to human and primate vision, emerges in DNNs when trained for generic object recognition from natural photographs. We show that these models explain human shape judgments for several benchmark behavioral and neural stimulus sets on which earlier models mostly failed. In particular, although never explicitly trained for such stimuli, DNNs develop acute sensitivity to minute variations in shape and to non-accidental properties that have long been implicated to form the basis for object recognition. Even more strikingly, when tested with a challenging stimulus set in which shape and category membership are dissociated, the most complex model architectures capture human shape sensitivity as well as some aspects of the category structure that emerges from human judgments. As a whole, these results indicate that convolutional neural networks not only learn physically correct representations of object categories but also develop perceptually accurate representational spaces of shapes. An even more complete model of human object representations might be in sight by training deep architectures for multiple tasks, which is so characteristic in human development.

  1. Deep Neural Networks as a Computational Model for Human Shape Sensitivity.

    Kubilius, Jonas; Bracci, Stefania; Op de Beeck, Hans P

    2016-04-01

    Theories of object recognition agree that shape is of primordial importance, but there is no consensus about how shape might be represented, and so far attempts to implement a model of shape perception that would work with realistic stimuli have largely failed. Recent studies suggest that state-of-the-art convolutional 'deep' neural networks (DNNs) capture important aspects of human object perception. We hypothesized that these successes might be partially related to a human-like representation of object shape. Here we demonstrate that sensitivity for shape features, characteristic to human and primate vision, emerges in DNNs when trained for generic object recognition from natural photographs. We show that these models explain human shape judgments for several benchmark behavioral and neural stimulus sets on which earlier models mostly failed. In particular, although never explicitly trained for such stimuli, DNNs develop acute sensitivity to minute variations in shape and to non-accidental properties that have long been implicated to form the basis for object recognition. Even more strikingly, when tested with a challenging stimulus set in which shape and category membership are dissociated, the most complex model architectures capture human shape sensitivity as well as some aspects of the category structure that emerges from human judgments. As a whole, these results indicate that convolutional neural networks not only learn physically correct representations of object categories but also develop perceptually accurate representational spaces of shapes. An even more complete model of human object representations might be in sight by training deep architectures for multiple tasks, which is so characteristic in human development. PMID:27124699

  2. Deep Neural Networks as a Computational Model for Human Shape Sensitivity

    Op de Beeck, Hans P.

    2016-01-01

    Theories of object recognition agree that shape is of primordial importance, but there is no consensus about how shape might be represented, and so far attempts to implement a model of shape perception that would work with realistic stimuli have largely failed. Recent studies suggest that state-of-the-art convolutional ‘deep’ neural networks (DNNs) capture important aspects of human object perception. We hypothesized that these successes might be partially related to a human-like representation of object shape. Here we demonstrate that sensitivity for shape features, characteristic to human and primate vision, emerges in DNNs when trained for generic object recognition from natural photographs. We show that these models explain human shape judgments for several benchmark behavioral and neural stimulus sets on which earlier models mostly failed. In particular, although never explicitly trained for such stimuli, DNNs develop acute sensitivity to minute variations in shape and to non-accidental properties that have long been implicated to form the basis for object recognition. Even more strikingly, when tested with a challenging stimulus set in which shape and category membership are dissociated, the most complex model architectures capture human shape sensitivity as well as some aspects of the category structure that emerges from human judgments. As a whole, these results indicate that convolutional neural networks not only learn physically correct representations of object categories but also develop perceptually accurate representational spaces of shapes. An even more complete model of human object representations might be in sight by training deep architectures for multiple tasks, which is so characteristic in human development. PMID:27124699

  3. Investigation on penetration model of shaped charge jet in water

    Shi, Jinwei; Luo, Xingbai; Li, Jinming; Jiang, Jianwei

    2016-01-01

    To analyze the process of jet penetration in water medium quantitatively, the properties of jet penetration spaced target with water interlayer were studied through test and numerical simulation. Two theoretical models of jet penetration in water were proposed. The theoretical model 1 was established considering the impact of the shock wave, combined with the shock equation Rankine-Hugoniot and the virtual origin calculation method. The theoretical model 2 was obtained by fitting theoretical analysis and numerical simulation results. The effectiveness and universality of the two theoretical models were compared through the numerical simulation results. Both the models can reflect the relationship between the penetration velocity and the penetration distance in water well, and both the deviation and stability of theoretical model 1 are better than 2, the lower penetration velocity, and the larger deviation of the theoretical model 2. Therefore, the theoretical model 1 can reflect the properties of jet penetration in water effectively, and provide the reference of model simulation and theoretical research.

  4. 4D Shape-Preserving Modelling of Bone Growth

    Andresen, Per Rønsholt; Nielsen, Mads; Kreiborg, Sven

    1998-01-01

    subdivide the growth analysis into growth simulation, growth modelling, and finally the growth analysis. In this paper, we present results of growth simulation of the mandible from 3 scannings of the same patient in the age of 9 months, 21 months, and 7 years. We also present the first growth models and...

  5. 3D Shape Modeling Using High Level Descriptors

    Andersen, Vedrana

    The goal of this Ph.D. project is to investigate and improve the methods for describing the surface of 3D objects, with focus on modeling geometric texture on surfaces. Surface modeling being a large field of research, the work done during this project concentrated around a few smaller areas...

  6. One-dimensional shape memory alloy models for use with reinforced composite structures

    Zak, A. J.; Cartmell, M. P.; Ostachowicz, W. M.; Wiercigroch, M.

    2003-06-01

    In this paper three models of the shape memory alloy behaviour have been presented and re-investigated. The models are attributed to Tanaka, Liang and Rogers, and Brinson, and have been used extensively in the literature for studying the static or dynamic performance of different composite material structures with embedded shape memory alloy components. The major differences and similarities between these models have been emphasised and examined in the paper. A simple experimental rig was designed and manufactured to gain additional insight into the main mechanics governing the shape memory alloy (SMA) mechanical properties. Data obtained from the experimental measurements on Ni-Ti wires have been used in the numerical simulation for validation purposes. It has been found that the three models all agree well in their predictions of the superelastic behaviour at higher temperatures, above the austenite finish temperature when shape memory alloys stay in the fully austenitic phase. However, at low temperatures, when the alloys stay in the fully martensitic phase, some difficulties may be encountered. The model developed by Brinson introduces two new state variables and therefore two different mechanisms for the instigation of stress-induced and temperature-induced martensite. This enables more accurate predictions of the superelastic behaviour. In general, it can be recommended that for investigations of the shape memory and superelastic behaviour of shape memory alloy components the Brinson model, or refinements based on the Brinson model, should be applied.

  7. Approximate models of dynamic thermoviscoelasticity describing shape-memory-alloy phase transitions

    Melnik, R. V. N.; Roberts, A. J.

    1999-01-01

    We consider problems of dynamic viscoelasticity taking into account the coupling of elastic and thermal fields. Efficient approximate models are developed and computational results on thermomechanical behaviour of shape-memory-alloy structures are presented.

  8. Fabrication and In Vitro Deployment of a Laser-Activated Shape Memory Polymer Vascular Stent

    Baer, G M; Small IV, W; Wilson, T S; Benett, W J; Matthews, D L; Hartman, J; Maitland, D J

    2007-04-25

    Vascular stents are small tubular scaffolds used in the treatment of arterial stenosis (narrowing of the vessel). Most vascular stents are metallic and are deployed either by balloon expansion or by self-expansion. A shape memory polymer (SMP) stent may enhance flexibility, compliance, and drug elution compared to its current metallic counterparts. The purpose of this study was to describe the fabrication of a laser-activated SMP stent and demonstrate photothermal expansion of the stent in an in vitro artery model. A novel SMP stent was fabricated from thermoplastic polyurethane. A solid SMP tube formed by dip coating a stainless steel pin was laser-etched to create the mesh pattern of the finished stent. The stent was crimped over a fiber-optic cylindrical light diffuser coupled to an infrared diode laser. Photothermal actuation of the stent was performed in a water-filled mock artery. At a physiological flow rate, the stent did not fully expand at the maximum laser power (8.6 W) due to convective cooling. However, under zero flow, simulating the technique of endovascular flow occlusion, complete laser actuation was achieved in the mock artery at a laser power of {approx}8 W. We have shown the design and fabrication of an SMP stent and a means of light delivery for photothermal actuation. Though further studies are required to optimize the device and assess thermal tissue damage, photothermal actuation of the SMP stent was demonstrated.

  9. Fabrication and in vitro deployment of a laser-activated shape memory polymer vascular stent

    Matthews Dennis L

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vascular stents are small tubular scaffolds used in the treatment of arterial stenosis (narrowing of the vessel. Most vascular stents are metallic and are deployed either by balloon expansion or by self-expansion. A shape memory polymer (SMP stent may enhance flexibility, compliance, and drug elution compared to its current metallic counterparts. The purpose of this study was to describe the fabrication of a laser-activated SMP stent and demonstrate photothermal expansion of the stent in an in vitro artery model. Methods A novel SMP stent was fabricated from thermoplastic polyurethane. A solid SMP tube formed by dip coating a stainless steel pin was laser-etched to create the mesh pattern of the finished stent. The stent was crimped over a fiber-optic cylindrical light diffuser coupled to an infrared diode laser. Photothermal actuation of the stent was performed in a water-filled mock artery. Results At a physiological flow rate, the stent did not fully expand at the maximum laser power (8.6 W due to convective cooling. However, under zero flow, simulating the technique of endovascular flow occlusion, complete laser actuation was achieved in the mock artery at a laser power of ~8 W. Conclusion We have shown the design and fabrication of an SMP stent and a means of light delivery for photothermal actuation. Though further studies are required to optimize the device and assess thermal tissue damage, photothermal actuation of the SMP stent was demonstrated.

  10. Position control of active magnetic levitation using sphere-shaped HTS bulk for inertial nuclear fusion

    We have developed an active magnetic levitation system that comprises a field-cooled disk-shaped or sphere-shaped HTS bulk and multiple ring-shaped electromagnets. In this system, the levitation height of HTS bulk can be controlled by adjusting the operating current of each electromagnet individually. Further, the application of the vertical noncontact levitation system is expected due to its levitation stability without mechanical supports. We assume that this system is applied to inertial nuclear fusion. However, one of the important issues is to achieve position control with high accuracy of the fusion fuel in order to illuminate the target evenly over the entire surface. Therefore, this system is applied to the levitation and position control of a sphere-shaped superconducting capsule containing nuclear fusion fuel. In this study, we designed and constructed a position control system for the sphere-shaped HTS bulk with a diameter of 5 mm by using numerical simulation based on hybrid finite element and boundary element analysis. We then carried out the experiment of levitation height and position control characteristics of the HTS bulk in this system. With regard to position control, accuracies within 59 μm are obtained

  11. A Model to Describe the Magnetomechanical Behavior of Martensite in Magnetic Shape Memory Alloy

    Zaoyang Guo; Haitao Li; Qiang Wan; Xianghe Peng; Jing Wen

    2014-01-01

    A model to describe the constitutive behavior of magnetic shape memory alloy composed with pure martensite is proposed based on the analysis of variants reorientation. A hyperbolic tangent expression is given to describe the variants transition during magnetic and mechanical loading process. The main features of magnetic shape memory alloy, such as pseudoelastic and partially pseudoelastic behavior as well as minor hysteretic loops, can be successfully replicated with the proposed model. A go...

  12. Effect of Particle Shape on Mechanical Behaviors of Rocks: A Numerical Study Using Clumped Particle Model

    Guan Rong; Guang Liu; Di Hou; Chuang-bing Zhou

    2013-01-01

    Since rocks are aggregates of mineral particles, the effect of mineral microstructure on macroscopic mechanical behaviors of rocks is inneglectable. Rock samples of four different particle shapes are established in this study based on clumped particle model, and a sphericity index is used to quantify particle shape. Model parameters for simulation in PFC are obtained by triaxial compression test of quartz sandstone, and simulation of triaxial compression test is then conducted on four rock sa...

  13. Biosynthesis and recovery of rod-shaped tellurium nanoparticles and their bactericidal activities

    Zare, Bijan; Faramarzi, Mohammad Ali; Sepehrizadeh, Zargham [Department of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology and Biotechnology Research Center, Faculty of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, P.O. Box 14155-6451 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shakibaie, Mojtaba [Department of Pharmacognosy and Biotechnology, School of Pharmacy, Pharmaceutics Research Center, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, P.O. Box 76175-493 Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rezaie, Sassan [Department of Medical Biotechnology, School of Advanced Medical Technologies, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shahverdi, Ahmad Reza, E-mail: shahverd@sina.tums.ac.ir [Department of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology and Biotechnology Research Center, Faculty of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, P.O. Box 14155-6451 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: ► Biosynthesis of rod shape tellurium nanoparticles with a hexagonal crystal structure. ► Extraction procedure for isolation of tellurium nanoparticles from Bacillus sp. BZ. ► Extracted tellurium nanoparticles have good bactericidal activity against some bacteria. -- Abstract: In this study, a tellurium-transforming Bacillus sp. BZ was isolated from the Caspian Sea in northern Iran. The isolate was identified by various tests and 16S rDNA analysis, and then used to prepare elemental tellurium nanoparticles. The isolate was subsequently used for the intracellular biosynthesis of elemental tellurium nanoparticles. The biogenic nanoparticles were released by liquid nitrogen and purified by an n-octyl alcohol water extraction system. The shape, size, and composition of the extracted nanoparticles were characterized. The transmission electron micrograph showed rod-shaped nanoparticles with dimensions of about 20 nm × 180 nm. The energy dispersive X-ray and X-ray diffraction spectra respectively demonstrated that the extracted nanoparticles consisted of only tellurium and have a hexagonal crystal structure. This is the first study to demonstrate a biological method for synthesizing rod-shaped elemental tellurium by a Bacillus sp., its extraction and its antibacterial activity against different clinical isolates.

  14. The Influence of Particle Shape and Size on the Activity of Platinum Nanoparticles for Oxygen Reduction Reaction: A Density Functional Theory Study

    Tripkovic, Vladimir; Cerri, Isotta; Bligaard, Thomas;

    2014-01-01

    We present first principle investigation of the influence of platinum nanoparticle shape and size on the oxygen reduction reaction activity. We compare the activities of nanoparticles with specific shapes (tetrahedron, octahedron, cube and truncated octahedron) with that of equilibrium particle...... by explicitly taking the coverage of oxygenated species into account. A kinetic model derived from counting the number of sites shows that the theoretical activity obtained for equilibrium particle fits well with experimental data. Particles with similar to 3 nm diameter are found to possess the...

  15. Sparse Principal Component Analysis in Medical Shape Modeling

    Sjöstrand, Karl; Stegmann, Mikkel Bille; Larsen, Rasmus

    2006-01-01

    Principal component analysis (PCA) is a widely used tool in medical image analysis for data reduction, model building, and data understanding and exploration. While PCA is a holistic approach where each new variable is a linear combination of all original variables, sparse PCA (SPCA) aims at prod...

  16. Triaxial shapes in the interacting vector boson model

    A new dynamical symmetry limit of the two-fluid interacting vector boson model (IVBM), defined through the chain Sp(12,R) superset of U(3,3) superset of U*(3) x SU(1,1) superset of SU*(3) superset of SO(3), is introduced. The SU*(3) algebra considered in the present paper closely resembles many properties of the SU*(3) limit of the interacting boson model-2, which have been shown by many authors geometrically to correspond to the rigid triaxial model. The influence of different types of perturbations on the SU*(3) energy surface, in particular the addition of a Majorana interaction and an O(6) term to the model Hamiltonian, is studied. The effect of these perturbations results in the formation of a stable triaxial minimum in the energy surface of the IVBM Hamiltonian under consideration. Using a schematic Hamiltonian that possesses a perturbed SU*(3) dynamical symmetry, the theory is applied for the calculation of the low-lying energy spectrum of the nucleus 192Os. The theoretical results obtained agree reasonably with the experimental data and show a very shallow triaxial minimum in the energy surface for the ground state in 192Os, suggesting that the proposed dynamical symmetry might be appropriate for the description of the collective properties of different nuclei, exhibiting triaxial features.

  17. 3D segmentation of rodent brain structures using hierarchical shape priors and deformable models.

    Zhang, Shaoting; Huang, Junzhou; Uzunbas, Mustafa; Shen, Tian; Delis, Foteini; Huang, Xiaolei; Volkow, Nora; Thanos, Panayotis; Metaxas, Dimitris N

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a method to segment multiple rodent brain structures simultaneously. This method combines deformable models and hierarchical shape priors within one framework. The deformation module employs both gradient and appearance information to generate image forces to deform the shape. The shape prior module uses Principal Component Analysis to hierarchically model the multiple structures at both global and local levels. At the global level, the statistics of relative positions among different structures are modeled. At the local level, the shape statistics within each structure is learned from training samples. Our segmentation method adaptively employs both priors to constrain the intermediate deformation result. This prior constraint improves the robustness of the model and benefits the segmentation accuracy. Another merit of our prior module is that the size of the training data can be small, because the shape prior module models each structure individually and combines them using global statistics. This scheme can preserve shape details better than directly applying PCA on all structures. We use this method to segment rodent brain structures, such as the cerebellum, the left and right striatum, and the left and right hippocampus. The experiments show that our method works effectively and this hierarchical prior improves the segmentation performance. PMID:22003750

  18. Variable Camber Continuous Aerodynamic Control Surfaces and Methods for Active Wing Shaping Control

    Nguyen, Nhan T. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An aerodynamic control apparatus for an air vehicle improves various aerodynamic performance metrics by employing multiple spanwise flap segments that jointly form a continuous or a piecewise continuous trailing edge to minimize drag induced by lift or vortices. At least one of the multiple spanwise flap segments includes a variable camber flap subsystem having multiple chordwise flap segments that may be independently actuated. Some embodiments also employ a continuous leading edge slat system that includes multiple spanwise slat segments, each of which has one or more chordwise slat segment. A method and an apparatus for implementing active control of a wing shape are also described and include the determination of desired lift distribution to determine the improved aerodynamic deflection of the wings. Flap deflections are determined and control signals are generated to actively control the wing shape to approximate the desired deflection.

  19. Method of Modeling and Simulation of Shaped External Occulters

    Lyon, Richard G. (Inventor); Clampin, Mark (Inventor); Petrone, Peter, III (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    The present invention relates to modeling an external occulter including: providing at least one processor executing program code to implement a simulation system, the program code including: providing an external occulter having a plurality of petals, the occulter being coupled to a telescope; and propagating light from the occulter to a telescope aperture of the telescope by scalar Fresnel propagation, by: obtaining an incident field strength at a predetermined wavelength at an occulter surface; obtaining a field propagation from the occulter to the telescope aperture using a Fresnel integral; modeling a celestial object at differing field angles by shifting a location of a shadow cast by the occulter on the telescope aperture; calculating an intensity of the occulter shadow on the telescope aperture; and applying a telescope aperture mask to a field of the occulter shadow, and propagating the light to a focal plane of the telescope via FFT techniques.

  20. Deep Learning Guided Partitioned Shape Model for Anterior Visual Pathway Segmentation.

    Mansoor, Awais; Cerrolaza, Juan J; Idrees, Rabia; Biggs, Elijah; Alsharid, Mohammad A; Avery, Robert A; Linguraru, Marius George

    2016-08-01

    Analysis of cranial nerve systems, such as the anterior visual pathway (AVP), from MRI sequences is challenging due to their thin long architecture, structural variations along the path, and low contrast with adjacent anatomic structures. Segmentation of a pathologic AVP (e.g., with low-grade gliomas) poses additional challenges. In this work, we propose a fully automated partitioned shape model segmentation mechanism for AVP steered by multiple MRI sequences and deep learning features. Employing deep learning feature representation, this framework presents a joint partitioned statistical shape model able to deal with healthy and pathological AVP. The deep learning assistance is particularly useful in the poor contrast regions, such as optic tracts and pathological areas. Our main contributions are: 1) a fast and robust shape localization method using conditional space deep learning, 2) a volumetric multiscale curvelet transform-based intensity normalization method for robust statistical model, and 3) optimally partitioned statistical shape and appearance models based on regional shape variations for greater local flexibility. Our method was evaluated on MRI sequences obtained from 165 pediatric subjects. A mean Dice similarity coefficient of 0.779 was obtained for the segmentation of the entire AVP (optic nerve only =0.791 ) using the leave-one-out validation. Results demonstrated that the proposed localized shape and sparse appearance-based learning approach significantly outperforms current state-of-the-art segmentation approaches and is as robust as the manual segmentation. PMID:26930677

  1. Interior Models of Saturn: Including the Uncertainties in Shape and Rotation

    Helled, Ravit

    2013-01-01

    The accurate determination of Saturn's gravitational coefficients by Cassini could provide tighter constrains on Saturn's internal structure. Also, occultation measurements provide important information on the planetary shape which is often not considered in structure models. In this paper we explore how wind velocities and internal rotation affect the planetary shape and the constraints on Saturn's interior. We show that within the geodetic approach (Lindal et al., 1985, ApJ, 90, 1136) the derived physical shape is insensitive to the assumed deep rotation. Saturn's re-derived equatorial and polar radii at 100 mbar are found to be 54,445 $\\pm$10 km and 60,365$\\pm$10 km, respectively. To determine Saturn's interior we use {\\it 1 D} three-layer hydrostatic structure models, and present two approaches to include the constraints on the shape. These approaches, however, result in only small differences in Saturn's derived composition. The uncertainty in Saturn's rotation period is more significant: with Voyager's ...

  2. Hysteresis Modeling of Magnetic Shape Memory Alloy Actuator Based on Krasnosel'skii-Pokrovskii Model

    Miaolei Zhou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available As a new type of intelligent material, magnetically shape memory alloy (MSMA has a good performance in its applications in the actuator manufacturing. Compared with traditional actuators, MSMA actuator has the advantages as fast response and large deformation; however, the hysteresis nonlinearity of the MSMA actuator restricts its further improving of control precision. In this paper, an improved Krasnosel'skii-Pokrovskii (KP model is used to establish the hysteresis model of MSMA actuator. To identify the weighting parameters of the KP operators, an improved gradient correction algorithm and a variable step-size recursive least square estimation algorithm are proposed in this paper. In order to demonstrate the validity of the proposed modeling approach, simulation experiments are performed, simulations with improved gradient correction algorithm and variable step-size recursive least square estimation algorithm are studied, respectively. Simulation results of both identification algorithms demonstrate that the proposed modeling approach in this paper can establish an effective and accurate hysteresis model for MSMA actuator, and it provides a foundation for improving the control precision of MSMA actuator.

  3. Line shape modeling in warm and dense hydrogen plasmas

    Ferri, S.; Calisti, A.; Mossé, C.; Talin, B.; Gigosos, M. A.; González, M. A.

    2007-05-01

    A study of hydrogen lines emitted in warm ( T˜1eV) and dense ( N≥1018cm -3) plasmas is presented. Under such plasma conditions, the electronic and the ionic contributions to the line width are comparable, and the general question related to a transition from impact to quasi-static broadening arises not only for the far wings but also for the core of spectral lines. The transition from impact to quasi-static broadening for electrons is analyzed by means of Frequency Fluctuation Model (FFM). In parallel, direct integration of the semi-classical evolution equation is performed using electron electric fields calculated by Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations that permit one to correctly describe the emitter environment. New cross comparisons between benchmark MD simulations and FFM are carried out for electron broadening of the Balmer series lines, and, especially, for the Hα line, for which a few experiments in the warm and dense plasma regimes are available.

  4. Titanium-Nickel Shape Memory Alloy Spring Actuator for Forward-Looking Active Catheter

    Shozo Inoue; Takahiro Miki; Takafumi Tsurui; Hiroyuki Nagasawa; Mamoru Komatsubara; Takahiro Namazu

    2011-01-01

    The fabrication and characterization of forward-looking active catheter actuated by titanium-nickel (Ti-Ni) shape memory alloy (SMA) springs are described. The catheter has been designed for wide-range observation of an affected area inside a blood vessel when the blood vessel is occluded. The developed active catheter consists of eight Ti-Ni SMA spring actuators for actuation of catheter tip, an ultrasonic transducer for forward-looking, a guide wire, a polyurethane tube for coating, and spi...

  5. 3D shape analysis of the brain's third ventricle using a midplane encoded symmetric template model

    Kim, J; Valdes Hernandez, Maria; Royle, Natalie; Muñoz Maniega, Susana; Aribisala, Benjamin; Gow, Alan; Bastin, Mark; Deary, Ian; Wardlaw, Joanna; Park, J.

    2016-01-01

    BackgroundStructural changes of the brain's third ventricle have been acknowledged as an indicative measure of the brain atrophy progression in neurodegenerative and endocrinal diseases. To investigate the ventricular enlargement in relation to the atrophy of the surrounding structures, shape analysis is a promising approach. However, there are hurdles in modeling the third ventricle shape. First, it has topological variations across individuals due to the inter-thalamic adhesion. In addition...

  6. A SHAPE-NAVIGATED IMAGE DEFORMATION MODEL FOR 4D LUNG RESPIRATORY MOTION ESTIMATION

    Liu, Xiaoxiao; Saboo, Rohit R.; Pizer, Stephen M.; Mageras, Gig S.

    2009-01-01

    Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for cancers in the lung remains challenging due to the complicated respiratory dynamics. We propose a shape-navigated dense image deformation model to estimate the patient-specific breathing motion using 4D respiratory correlated CT (RCCT) images. The idea is to use the shape change of the lungs, the major motion feature in the thorax image, as a surrogate to predict the corresponding dense image deformation from training.

  7. Restructuring shapes in terms of emergent subshapes: a computational and cognitive model

    Liu, Y.T.

    1996-01-01

    In order to interpret the current state of a design, designers possess the powerful, spontaneous ability to restructure shapes in terms of emergent subshapes. In this paper a theoretical model of restructuring shapes is presented, one that aims to recognize explicit and implicit emergent subshapes computationally and to explain cognitively some critical phenomena of designers' visual behaviors. A computing procedure using two neuron-like connectionist networks and two attentional techniques s...

  8. Event-Based Activity Modeling

    Bækgaard, Lars

    2004-01-01

    We present and discuss a modeling approach that supports event-based modeling of information and activity in information systems. Interacting human actors and IT-actors may carry out such activity. We use events to create meaningful relations between information structures and the related...

  9. Automated Finite Element Modeling of Wing Structures for Shape Optimization

    Harvey, Michael Stephen

    1993-01-01

    The displacement formulation of the finite element method is the most general and most widely used technique for structural analysis of airplane configurations. Modem structural synthesis techniques based on the finite element method have reached a certain maturity in recent years, and large airplane structures can now be optimized with respect to sizing type design variables for many load cases subject to a rich variety of constraints including stress, buckling, frequency, stiffness and aeroelastic constraints (Refs. 1-3). These structural synthesis capabilities use gradient based nonlinear programming techniques to search for improved designs. For these techniques to be practical a major improvement was required in computational cost of finite element analyses (needed repeatedly in the optimization process). Thus, associated with the progress in structural optimization, a new perspective of structural analysis has emerged, namely, structural analysis specialized for design optimization application, or.what is known as "design oriented structural analysis" (Ref. 4). This discipline includes approximation concepts and methods for obtaining behavior sensitivity information (Ref. 1), all needed to make the optimization of large structural systems (modeled by thousands of degrees of freedom and thousands of design variables) practical and cost effective.

  10. 3D reconstruction of femoral shape using a two 2D radiographs and statistical parametric model

    In medical imaging, X-ray CT scanner or MRI system are quite useful to acquire 3D shapes of internal organs or bones. However, these apparatuses are generally very expensive and of large size. They also need a prior arrangement, and thus, they are unsuitable for an urgent fracture diagnosis in emergency treatment. This paper proposes a method to estimate a 3D shape of patient's femur from only two radiographs using a parametric femoral model. Firstly, we develop the parametric femoral model utilizing statistical procedure of 3D femoral models by CT images of 51 patients. Then, the pose and shape parameters of the parametric model are estimated from two 2D images using a distance map constructed by the Level Set Method. Experiments using synthesized images and radiographs of a phantom femur are carried out to verify the performance of the proposed technique. (author)

  11. Modeling fluid structure interaction with shape memory alloy actuated morphing aerostructures

    Oehler, Stephen D.; Hartl, Darren J.; Turner, Travis L.; Lagoudas, Dimitris C.

    2012-04-01

    The development of efficient and accurate analysis techniques for morphing aerostructures incorporating shape memory alloys (SMAs) continues to garner attention. These active materials have a high actuation energy density, making them an ideal replacement for conventional actuation mechanisms in morphing structures. However, SMA components are often exposed to the same highly variable environments experienced by the aeroelastic assemblies into which they are incorporated. This is motivating design engineers to consider modeling fluidstructure interaction for prescribing dynamic, solution-dependent boundary conditions. This work presents a computational study of a particular morphing aerostructure with embedded, thermally actuating SMA ribbons and demonstrates the effective use of fluid-structure interaction modeling. A cosimulation analysis is utilized to determine the surface deflections and stress distributions of an example aerostructure with embedded SMA ribbons using the Abaqus Finite Element Analysis (FEA) software suite, combined with an Abaqus Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) processor. The global FEA solver utilizes a robust user-defined material subroutine which contains an accurate three-dimensional SMA constitutive model. Variations in the ambient fluid environment are computed using the CFD solver, and fluid pressure is mapped into surface distributed loads. Results from the analysis are qualitatively validated with independently obtained data from representative flow tests previously conducted on a physical prototype of the same aerostructure.

  12. A shape theorem and semi-infinite geodesics for the Hammersley model with random weights

    Cator, E A

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we will prove a shape theorem for the last passage percolation model on a two dimensional $F$-compound Poisson process, called the Hammersley model with random weights. We will also provide diffusive upper bounds for shape fluctuations. Finally we will indicate how these results can be used to prove existence and coalescence of semi-infinite geodesics in some fixed direction $\\alpha$, following an approach developed by Newman and co-authors, and applied to the classical Hammersley process by W\\"uthrich. These results will be crucial in the development of an upcoming paper on the relation between Busemann functions and equilibrium measures in last passage percolation models.

  13. A virtual age model based on a bathtub shaped initial intensity

    Dijoux, Yann [Laboratoire Jean Kuntzmann, Institut National Polytechnique de Grenoble, BP 53, 38 041 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)], E-mail: yann.dijoux@imag.fr

    2009-05-15

    This paper presents a new reliability model for complex repairable systems, which combines a bathtub shaped ageing and imperfect maintenance. A bathtub shaped initial intensity function allows to take into account the burn-in period, the useful life and wear out of the systems. Repair effect is expressed by a reduction of the system virtual age, which depends on the ageing of the system. The main characteristics of the model are derived. The most important one is that the maintenance efficiency allows an extension of the system useful life duration. A statistical analysis of the model and an application to real failure data are presented.

  14. A virtual age model based on a bathtub shaped initial intensity

    This paper presents a new reliability model for complex repairable systems, which combines a bathtub shaped ageing and imperfect maintenance. A bathtub shaped initial intensity function allows to take into account the burn-in period, the useful life and wear out of the systems. Repair effect is expressed by a reduction of the system virtual age, which depends on the ageing of the system. The main characteristics of the model are derived. The most important one is that the maintenance efficiency allows an extension of the system useful life duration. A statistical analysis of the model and an application to real failure data are presented

  15. Shape regulated anticancer activities and systematic toxicities of drug nanocrystals in vivo.

    Zhou, Mengjiao; Zhang, Xiujuan; Yu, Caitong; Nan, Xueyan; Chen, Xianfeng; Zhang, Xiaohong

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, shape regulated anticancer activities as well as systematic toxicities of hydroxycamptothecin nanorods and nanoparticles (HCPT NRs and NPs) were systematically studied. In vitro and in vivo therapeutic efficacies were evaluated in cancer cells and tumor-bearing mice, indicating that NRs possessed superior antitumor efficacy over NPs at the equivalent dose, while systematic toxicity of the differently shaped nanodrugs assessed in healthy mice, including the maximum tolerated dose, blood analysis and histology examinations and so on, suggested that the NRs also caused higher toxicities than NPs, and also had a long-term toxicity. These results imply that the balance between anticancer efficiency and systematic toxicity of drug nanocrystals should be fully considered in practice, which will provide new concept in the future design of drug nanocrystals for cancer therapy. From the Clinical Editor: Advances in nanotechnology have enabled the design of novel nanosized drugs for the treatment of cancer. One of the interesting findings thus far is the different biological effects seen with different shaped nanoparticles. In this article, the authors investigated and compared the anticancer activities of hydroxycamptothecin nanorods and nanoparticles. The experimental data would provide a better understanding for future drug design. PMID:26427356

  16. Multistage Development of Müller-Achenbach model for Shape Memory Alloy

    Simin A. Oshkovr

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This research focused on the conceptual development of constitutive Müller-Achenbach model and proceeds to construct a model based on phase transition under changing temperature and load for variants of martensite in shape memory alloy CuAlNi (Copper-aluminum-nickel. Problem statement: Motivation of this research is rare information of a variant of martensite phase (M++ and prediction of the shape recovery of shape memory alloy in this stage of transformation. Approach: The mathematical equations proposed a prediction of stability of Austenite phases and extend it to multistage martensitic phase transformation. These phase transformations occurred by loading on the material. Equations described free energy landscape in CuAlNi shape memory alloys at low (260K and high temperature (440K. The model evaluated the free energy due to the phase transformation between the austenite and multistage martensitic structures. Results: Results for M++ phase showed decrease in temperature from 440K to 260K presented decrease in stress approximately from 1 kN to 0.4kN and free energy from 5 kJ/kg to 0.1 kJ/kg. Equations have been solved and plotted by software programmed in MATLAB. Conclusions/Recommendations: The model which has derived focused on homogeneous shape memory alloys, but future performance requirements will most likely be met with heterogeneous materials. Therefore, simulation models for heterogeneous materials must be developed.

  17. Effect of ocular shape and vascular geometry on retinal hemodynamics: a computational model.

    Dziubek, Andrea; Guidoboni, Giovanna; Harris, Alon; Hirani, Anil N; Rusjan, Edmond; Thistleton, William

    2016-08-01

    A computational model for retinal hemodynamics accounting for ocular curvature is presented. The model combines (i) a hierarchical Darcy model for the flow through small arterioles, capillaries and small venules in the retinal tissue, where blood vessels of different size are comprised in different hierarchical levels of a porous medium; and (ii) a one-dimensional network model for the blood flow through retinal arterioles and venules of larger size. The non-planar ocular shape is included by (i) defining the hierarchical Darcy flow model on a two-dimensional curved surface embedded in the three-dimensional space; and (ii) mapping the simplified one-dimensional network model onto the curved surface. The model is solved numerically using a finite element method in which spatial domain and hierarchical levels are discretized separately. For the finite element method, we use an exterior calculus-based implementation which permits an easier treatment of non-planar domains. Numerical solutions are verified against suitably constructed analytical solutions. Numerical experiments are performed to investigate how retinal hemodynamics is influenced by the ocular shape (sphere, oblate spheroid, prolate spheroid and barrel are compared) and vascular architecture (four vascular arcs and a branching vascular tree are compared). The model predictions show that changes in ocular shape induce non-uniform alterations of blood pressure and velocity in the retina. In particular, we found that (i) the temporal region is affected the least by changes in ocular shape, and (ii) the barrel shape departs the most from the hemispherical reference geometry in terms of associated pressure and velocity distributions in the retinal microvasculature. These results support the clinical hypothesis that alterations in ocular shape, such as those occurring in myopic eyes, might be associated with pathological alterations in retinal hemodynamics. PMID:26445874

  18. 3D shape analysis of the brain's third ventricle using a midplane encoded symmetric template model

    Kim, Jaeil; Valdés Hernández, Maria del C.; Royle, Natalie A.; Maniega, Susana Muñoz; Aribisala, Benjamin S.; Gow, Alan J.; Bastin, Mark E.; Deary, Ian J.; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; Park, Jinah

    2016-01-01

    Background Structural changes of the brain's third ventricle have been acknowledged as an indicative measure of the brain atrophy progression in neurodegenerative and endocrinal diseases. To investigate the ventricular enlargement in relation to the atrophy of the surrounding structures, shape analysis is a promising approach. However, there are hurdles in modeling the third ventricle shape. First, it has topological variations across individuals due to the inter-thalamic adhesion. In addition, as an interhemispheric structure, it needs to be aligned to the midsagittal plane to assess its asymmetric and regional deformation. Method To address these issues, we propose a model-based shape assessment. Our template model of the third ventricle consists of a midplane and a symmetric mesh of generic shape. By mapping the template's midplane to the individuals’ brain midsagittal plane, we align the symmetric mesh on the midline of the brain before quantifying the third ventricle shape. To build the vertex-wise correspondence between the individual third ventricle and the template mesh, we employ a minimal-distortion surface deformation framework. In addition, to account for topological variations, we implement geometric constraints guiding the template mesh to have zero width where the inter-thalamic adhesion passes through, preventing vertices crossing between left and right walls of the third ventricle. The individual shapes are compared using a vertex-wise deformity from the symmetric template. Results Experiments on imaging and demographic data from a study of aging showed that our model was sensitive in assessing morphological differences between individuals in relation to brain volume (i.e. proxy for general brain atrophy), gender and the fluid intelligence at age 72. It also revealed that the proposed method can detect the regional and asymmetrical deformation unlike the conventional measures: volume (median 1.95 ml, IQR 0.96 ml) and width of the third

  19. Building and Testing a Statistical Shape Model of the Human Ear Canal

    Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold; Larsen, Rasmus; Laugesen, Søren; Nielsen, Claus; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær

    2002-01-01

    training set of laser scanned ear impressions and a sparse set of anatomical landmarks placed by an expert. The landmarks are used to warp a template mesh onto all shapes in the training set. Using the vertices from the warped meshes, a 3D point distribution model is made. The model is used for testing for...

  20. Sub-barrier fusion in a macroscopic model of nuclear shape evolutions

    The macroscopic model of nuclear shape evolutions describing nuclear coalescence and reseparation in heavy-ion collisions is applied to the sub-barrier region. The model brings out the important role of neck formation on sub-barrier fusion in addition to effects arising from collective excitations of the colliding partners and nucleons transfer in the entrance channel

  1. A model of growth restraints to explain the development and evolution of tooth shapes in mammals.

    Osborn, Jeffrey W

    2008-12-01

    The problem investigated here is control of the development of tooth shape. Cells at the growing soft tissue interface between the ectoderm and mesoderm in a tooth anlage are observed to buckle and fold into a template for the shape of the tooth crown. The final shape is created by enamel secreted onto the folds. The pattern in which the folds develop is generally explained as a response to the pattern in which genes are locally expressed at the interface. This congruence leaves the problem of control unanswered because it does not explain how either pattern is controlled. Obviously, cells are subject to Newton's laws of motion so that mechanical forces and constraints must ultimately cause the movements of cells during tooth morphogenesis. A computer model is used to test the hypothesis that directional resistances to growth of the epithelial part of the interface could account for the shape into which the interface folds. The model starts with a single epithelial cell whose growth is constrained by 4 constant directional resistances (anterior, posterior, medial and lateral). The constraints force the growing epithelium to buckle and fold. By entering into the model different values for these constraints the modeled epithelium is induced to buckle and fold into the different shapes associated with the evolution of a human upper molar from that of a reptilian ancestor. The patterns and sizes of cusps and the sequences in which they develop are all correctly reproduced. The model predicts the changes in the 4 directional constraints necessary to develop and evolve from one tooth shape into another. I conclude more generally expressed genes that control directional resistances to growth, not locally expressed genes, may provide the information for the shape into which a tooth develops. PMID:18838080

  2. On the selection of shape and orientation of a greenhouse. Thermal modeling and experimental validation

    Sethi, V.P. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Punjab Agricultural University, Ludhiana 141 004, Punjab (India)

    2009-01-15

    In this study, five most commonly used single span shapes of greenhouses viz. even-span, uneven-span, vinery, modified arch and quonset type have been selected for comparison. The length, width and height (at the center) are kept same for all the selected shapes. A mathematical model for computing transmitted total solar radiation (beam, diffused and ground reflected) at each hour, for each month and at any latitude for the selected geometry greenhouses (through each wall, inclined surfaces and roofs) is developed for both east-west and north-south orientation. Computed transmitted solar radiation is then introduced in a transient thermal model developed to compute hourly inside air temperature for each shape and orientation. Experimental validation of both the models is carried out for the measured total solar radiation and inside air temperature for an east-west orientation, even-span greenhouse (for a typical day in summer) at Ludhiana (31 N and 77 E) Punjab, India. During the experimentation, capsicum crop is grown inside the greenhouse. The predicted and measured values are in close agreement. Results show that uneven-span shape greenhouse receives the maximum and quonset shape receives the minimum solar radiation during each month of the year at all latitudes. East-west orientation is the best suited for year round greenhouse applications at all latitudes as this orientation receives greater total radiation in winter and less in summer except near the equator. Results also show that inside air temperature rise depends upon the shape of the greenhouse and this variation from uneven-span shape to quonset shape is 4.6 C (maximum) and 3.5 C (daily average) at 31 N latitude. (author)

  3. Hydration and diffusion processes shape microbial community organization and function in model soil aggregates

    Ebrahimi, Ali; Or, Dani

    2015-12-01

    The constantly changing soil hydration status affects gas and nutrient diffusion through soil pores and thus the functioning of soil microbial communities. The conditions within soil aggregates are of particular interest due to limitations to oxygen diffusion into their core, and the presence of organic carbon often acting as binding agent. We developed a model for microbial life in simulated soil aggregates comprising of 3-D angular pore network model (APNM) that mimics soil hydraulic and transport properties. Within these APNM, we introduced individual motile (flagellated) microbial cells with different physiological traits that grow, disperse, and respond to local nutrients and oxygen concentrations. The model quantifies the dynamics and spatial extent of anoxic regions that vary with hydration conditions, and their role in shaping microbial community size and activity and the spatial (self) segregation of anaerobes and aerobes. Internal carbon source and opposing diffusion directions of oxygen and carbon within an aggregate were essential to emergence of stable coexistence of aerobic and anaerobic communities (anaerobes become extinct when carbon sources are external). The model illustrates a range of hydration conditions that promote or suppress denitrification or decomposition of organic matter and thus affect soil GHG emissions. Model predictions of CO2 and N2O production rates were in good agreement with limited experimental data. These limited tests support the dynamic modeling approach whereby microbial community size, composition, and spatial arrangement emerge from internal interactions within soil aggregates. The upscaling of the results to a population of aggregates of different sizes embedded in a soil profile is underway.

  4. A unified spray forming model for the prediction of billet shape geometry

    Hattel, Jesper; Pryds, Nini

    2004-01-01

    In the present work a unified model for simulating the spray forming process has been developed. Models for the atomization and the deposition processes have been coupled together in order to obtain a new unified description of the spray forming process. The model is able to predict the shape and...... part of the present work, is also described. Results from the integrated model are presented and the potential for better process understanding as well as process optimization is evident....

  5. Shape-Dependent Biomimetic Inhibition of Enzyme by Nanoparticles and Their Antibacterial Activity.

    Cha, Sang-Ho; Hong, Jin; McGuffie, Matt; Yeom, Bongjun; VanEpps, J Scott; Kotov, Nicholas A

    2015-09-22

    Enzyme inhibitors are ubiquitous in all living systems, and their biological inhibitory activity is strongly dependent on their molecular shape. Here, we show that small zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs)-pyramids, plates, and spheres-possess the ability to inhibit activity of a typical enzyme β-galactosidase (GAL) in a biomimetic fashion. Enzyme inhibition by ZnO NPs is reversible and follows classical Michaelis-Menten kinetics with parameters strongly dependent on their geometry. Diverse spectroscopic, biochemical, and computational experimental data indicate that association of GAL with specific ZnO NP geometries interferes with conformational reorganization of the enzyme necessary for its catalytic activity. The strongest inhibition was observed for ZnO nanopyramids and compares favorably to that of the best natural GAL inhibitors while being resistant to proteases. Besides the fundamental significance of this biomimetic function of anisotropic NPs, their capacity to serve as degradation-resistant enzyme inhibitors is technologically attractive and is substantiated by strong shape-specific antibacterial activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), endemic for most hospitals in the world. PMID:26325486

  6. A Unit Cell Model for Simulating The Stress-Strain Response of Porous Shape Memory Alloys

    Karamooz Ravari, M. R.; Kadkhodaei, M.; Ghaei, A.

    2015-10-01

    Porous shape memory alloys are a new class of advanced materials with combined advantages of both shape memory alloys and porous materials. In order to manufacture a porous shape memory alloy with the desired mechanical properties, it is important to predict its mechanical properties before fabrication. In this paper, a new unit cell model is proposed to simulate the mechanical stress-strain response of porous shape memory alloys. Microplane theory is used to attribute mechanical constitutive relations of shape memory alloys to the bulk material, and the finite element method is employed for numerical simulations. The results show a good agreement with the experimental stress-strain behavior reported in the literature. The effect of pore volume fraction on the stress-strain response is also studied using the proposed approach. Random microstructures are generated in the FE model, and the effects of randomness on the mechanical behavior of porous shape memory alloys are also investigated for different values of pore volume fraction.

  7. Experiments on functional fatigue of thermally activated shape memory alloy springs and correlations with driving force intensity

    Rao, Ashwin; Srinivasa, A. R.

    2013-04-01

    The issue of material performance over its designed life is of prime concern with designers lately due to increasing use of shape memory alloy (SMA) components in different engineering applications. In this work, a concept of "Driving force amplitude v/s no of cycles" is proposed to analyze functional degradation of SMA components under torsion. The model is formulated using experimentally measurable quantities such as torque and angle of twist with the inclusion of both mechanical and thermal loading in the same framework. Such an approach can potentially substitute the traditional fatigue theories like S-N, epsilon-N theories which primarily use mechanical loading effects with temperature being an external control parameter. Such traditional S-N, epsilon-N fatigue theories work well for capturing superelastic effects at a given temperature but not for shape memory effects or temperature dependent superelastic effects which involves mechanical and thermal coupling. Experiments on SMA extension springs are performed using a custom designed thermomechanical test rig capable of mimicking shape memory effect on thermally activated SMA springs held under constant deformation. For every thermomechanical cycle, load and temperature sensor readings are continually recorded as a function of time using LabVIEW software. The sensor data over the specimen lifetime is used to construct a "Driving force amplitude v/s no of cycles" relationship that can be used as a guideline for analyzing functional degradation of SMA components.

  8. Experimental and modelling studies of the shape memory properties of amorphous polymer network composites

    Shape memory polymer composites (SMPCs) have become an important way to leverage improvements in the development of applications featuring shape memory polymers (SMPs). In this study, an amorphous SMP matrix has been filled with different types of reinforcements. An experimental set of results is presented and then compared to three-dimensional (3D) finite-element simulations. Thermomechanical shape memory cycles were performed in uniaxial tension. The fillers effect was studied in stress-free and constrained-strain recoveries. Experimental observations indicate complete shape recovery and put in evidence the increased sensitivity of constrained length stress recoveries to the heating ramp on the tested composites. The simulations reproduced a simplified periodic reinforced composite and used a model for the matrix material that has been previously tested on regular SMPs. The latter combines viscoelasticity at finite strain and time-temperature superposition. The simulations easily allow representation of the recovery properties of a reinforced SMP. (paper)

  9. Experimental and modelling studies of the shape memory properties of amorphous polymer network composites

    Arrieta, J. S.; Diani, J.; Gilormini, P.

    2014-09-01

    Shape memory polymer composites (SMPCs) have become an important way to leverage improvements in the development of applications featuring shape memory polymers (SMPs). In this study, an amorphous SMP matrix has been filled with different types of reinforcements. An experimental set of results is presented and then compared to three-dimensional (3D) finite-element simulations. Thermomechanical shape memory cycles were performed in uniaxial tension. The fillers effect was studied in stress-free and constrained-strain recoveries. Experimental observations indicate complete shape recovery and put in evidence the increased sensitivity of constrained length stress recoveries to the heating ramp on the tested composites. The simulations reproduced a simplified periodic reinforced composite and used a model for the matrix material that has been previously tested on regular SMPs. The latter combines viscoelasticity at finite strain and time-temperature superposition. The simulations easily allow representation of the recovery properties of a reinforced SMP.

  10. An accurate, fast and stable material model for shape memory alloys

    Shape memory alloys possess several features that make them interesting for industrial applications. However, due to their complex and thermo-mechanically coupled behavior, direct use of shape memory alloys in engineering construction is problematic. There is thus a demand for tools to achieve realistic, predictive simulations that are numerically robust when computing complex, coupled load states, are fast enough to calculate geometries of industrial interest, and yield realistic and reliable results without the use of fitting curves. In this paper a new and numerically fast material model for shape memory alloys is presented. It is based solely on energetic quantities, which thus creates a quite universal approach. In the beginning, a short derivation is given before it is demonstrated how this model can be easily calibrated by means of tension tests. Then, several examples of engineering applications under mechanical and thermal loads are presented to demonstrate the numerical stability and high computation speed of the model. (paper)

  11. A new automated method for analysis of gated-SPECT images based on a three-dimensional heart shaped model

    Lomsky, Milan; Richter, Jens; Johansson, Lena; El-Ali, Henrik; Aström, Karl; Ljungberg, Michael; Edenbrandt, Lars; El Ali, Henrik H.

    2005-01-01

    A new automated method for quantification of left ventricular function from gated-single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images has been developed. The method for quantification of cardiac function (CAFU) is based on a heart shaped model and the active shape algorithm. The model....... The maximal differences between the CAFU estimations and the true left ventricular volumes of the digital phantoms were 11 ml for the end-diastolic volume (EDV), 3 ml for the end-systolic volume (ESV) and 3% for the ejection fraction (EF). The largest differences were seen in the smallest heart. In...... the patient group the EDV calculated using QGS and CAFU showed good agreement for large hearts and higher CAFU values compared with QGS for the smaller hearts. In the larger hearts, ESV was much larger for QGS than for CAFU both in the phantom and patient studies. In the smallest hearts there was good...

  12. Passive mechanical models of fish caudal fins: effects of shape and stiffness on self-propulsion.

    Feilich, Kara L; Lauder, George V

    2015-06-01

    Fishes are found in a great variety of body forms with tail shapes that vary from forked tuna-like tails to the square-shaped tails found in some deep-bodied species. Hydrodynamic theory suggests that a fish's body and tail shape affects undulatory swimming performance. For example, a narrow caudal peduncle is believed to reduce drag, and a tuna-like tail to increase thrust. Despite the prevalence of these assertions, there is no experimental verification of the hydrodynamic mechanisms that may confer advantages on specific forms. Here, we use a mechanically-actuated flapping foil model to study how two aspects of shape, caudal peduncle depth and presence or absence of a forked caudal fin, may affect different aspects of swimming performance. Four different foil shapes were each made of plastics of three different flexural stiffnesses, permitting us to study how shape might interact with stiffness to produce swimming performance. For each foil, we measured the self-propelling swimming speed. In addition, we measured the forces, torques, cost of transport and power coefficient of each foil swimming at its self-propelling speed. There was no single 'optimal' foil exhibiting the highest performance in all metrics, and for almost all measures of swimming performance, foil shape and flexural stiffness interacted in complicated ways. Particle image velocimetry of several foils suggested that stiffness might affect the relative phasing of the body trailing edge and the caudal fin leading edge, changing the flow incident to the tail, and affecting hydrodynamics of the entire foil. The results of this study of a simplified model of fish body and tail morphology suggest that considerable caution should be used when inferring a swimming performance advantage from body and tail shape alone. PMID:25879846

  13. Modeling and Testing of Hydrodynamic Damping Model for a Complex-shaped Remotely-operated Vehicle for Control

    Cheng Chin; Michael Lau

    2012-01-01

    In this paper,numerical modeling and model testing of a complex-shaped remotely-operated vehicle (ROV) were shown.The paper emphasized the systematic modeling of hydrodynamic damping using the computational fluid dynamic software ANSYS-CFXTM on the complex-shaped ROV,a practice that is not commonly applied.For initial design and prototype testing during the developmental stage,small-scale testing using a free-decaying experiment was used to verify the theoretical models obtained from ANSYS-CFXTM.Simulation results are shown to coincide with the experimental tests.The proposed method could determine the hydrodynamic damping coefficients of the ROV.

  14. Instability of the hedgehog shape for the octet baryon in the chiral quark soliton model

    Akiyama, S; Akiyama, Satoru; Futami, Yasuhiko

    2003-01-01

    In this paper the stability of the hedgehog shape of the chiral soliton is studied for the octet baryon with the SU(3) chiral quark soliton model. The strangeness degrees of freedom are treated by a simplified bound-state approach, which omits the locality of the kaon wave function. The mean field approximation for the flavor rotation is applied to the model. The classical soliton changes shape according to the strangeness. The baryon appears as a rotational band of the combined system of the deformed soliton and the kaon.

  15. Interactive Shape Modeling using a Skeleton-Mesh Co-Representation

    Bærentzen, Jacob Andreas; Abdrashitov, Rinat; Singh, Karan

    2014-01-01

    We introduce the Polar-Annular Mesh representation (PAM). A PAM is a mesh-skeleton co-representation designed for the modeling of 3D organic, articulated shapes. A PAM represents a manifold mesh as a partition of polar (triangle fans) and annular (rings of quads) regions. The skeletal topology of a shape is uniquely embedded in the mesh connectivity of a PAM, enabling both surface and skeletal modeling operations, interchangeably and directly on the mesh itself. We develop an algorithm to con...

  16. Interactive Shape Modeling using a Skeleton-Mesh Co-Representation

    Bærentzen, Jacob Andreas; Abdrashitov, Rinat; Singh, Karan

    2014-01-01

    We introduce the Polar-Annular Mesh representation (PAM). A PAM is a mesh-skeleton co-representation designed for the modeling of 3D organic, articulated shapes. A PAM represents a manifold mesh as a partition of polar (triangle fans) and annular (rings of quads) regions. The skeletal topology of a...... shape is uniquely embedded in the mesh connectivity of a PAM, enabling both surface and skeletal modeling operations, interchangeably and directly on the mesh itself. We develop an algorithm to convert arbitrary triangle meshes into PAMs as well as techniques to simplify PAMs and a method to convert a...

  17. Seamless tube shape is constrained by endocytosis-dependent regulation of active Moesin.

    Schottenfeld-Roames, Jodi; Rosa, Jeffrey B; Ghabrial, Amin S

    2014-08-01

    Most tubes have seams (intercellular or autocellular junctions that seal membranes together into a tube), but "seamless" tubes also exist. In Drosophila, stellate-shaped tracheal terminal cells make seamless tubes, with single branches running through each of dozens of cellular extensions. We find that mutations in braided impair terminal cell branching and cause formation of seamless tube cysts. We show that braided encodes Syntaxin7 and that cysts also form in cells deficient for other genes required either for membrane scission (shibire) or for early endosome formation (Rab5, Vps45, and Rabenosyn-5). These data define a requirement for early endocytosis in shaping seamless tube lumens. Importantly, apical proteins Crumbs and phospho-Moesin accumulate to aberrantly high levels in braided terminal cells. Overexpression of either Crumbs or phosphomimetic Moesin induced lumenal cysts and decreased terminal branching. Conversely, the braided seamless tube cyst phenotype was suppressed by mutations in crumbs or Moesin. Indeed, mutations in Moesin dominantly suppressed seamless tube cyst formation and restored terminal branching. We propose that early endocytosis maintains normal steady-state levels of Crumbs, which recruits apical phosphorylated (active) Moe, which in turn regulates seamless tube shape through modulation of cortical actin filaments. PMID:25065756

  18. A reconfigurable CBP/LP active RC filter with noise-shaping technique for wireless receivers

    A reconfigurable complex band-pass (CBP)/low-pass (LP) active-RC filter with a noise-shaping technique for wireless receivers is presented. Its bandwidth is reconfigurable among 500 kHz, 1 MHz and 4 MHz in LP mode and 1 MHz, 2 MHz and 8 MHz in CBP mode with 3 MHz center frequency. The Op-Amps used in the filter are realized in cell arrays in order to obtain scalable power consumption among the different operation modes. Furthermore, the filter can be configured into the 1st order, 2nd order or 3rd order mode, thus achieving a flexible filtering property. The noise-shaping technique is introduced to suppress the flicker noise contribution. The filter has been implemented in 180 nm CMOS and consumes less than 3 mA in the 3rd 8 MHz-bandwidth CBP mode. The spot noise at 100 Hz can be reduced by 14.4 dB at most with the introduced noise-shaping technique. (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  19. In-situ X-Rays Diffraction and Multiscale Modeling of Shape Memory Alloys

    Fall, Mame Daro; Hubert, Olivier; Lavernhe Taillard, Karine; Maynadier, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Increasing use of Shape Memory Alloys (SMA) for complex applications requires a robust modeling of phenomena governing their behavior. The development of micro-macro multiaxial model is relevant. Such approach relies the definition of transition scale rules, depending on the microstructure, and a description of the behavior of constituents. On the other hand, it requires experiments for identification of parameters such as enthalpies or kinetic constants and validation of the model. In this p...

  20. A Model of Shape Memory Materials with Hierarchical Twinning : Statics and Dynamics

    Saxena, A.; Shenoy, S.; Bishop, A.; Wu, Y; Lookman, T.

    1995-01-01

    We consider a model of shape memory materials in which hierarchical twinning near the habit plane (austenite-martensite interface) is a new and crucial ingredient. The model includes (1) a triple-well potential (Φ6 model) in local shear strain, (2) strain gradient terms up to second order in strain and fourth order in gradient, and (3) all symmetry allowed compositional fluctuation-induced strain gradient terms. The last term favors hierarchy which enables communication between macroscopic (c...

  1. Moving Kriging shape function modeling of vector TARMA models for modal identification of linear time-varying structural systems

    Yang, Wu; Liu, Li; Zhou, Si-Da; Ma, Zhi-Sai

    2015-10-01

    This work proposes a Moving Kriging (MK) shape function modeling method for modal identification of linear time-varying (LTV) structural systems based on vector time-dependent autoregressive moving average (VTARMA) models. It aims to avoid the functional subspaces selection of the conventional functional series VTARMA (FS-VTARMA) models. Instead of the common basis functions, it constructs the time-varying coefficients on the time nodes with the MK shape functions in a compact support domain. The merit of the MK shape function is to determine its shape parameters upon vector random vibration signals adaptively. Model identification is effectively dealt with through an optimization scheme that decomposes the identification problem into two subproblems: estimating model parameters via two-stage least squares (2SLS) method and estimating shape function parameters via a discrete-continuous-variable hybrid optimization. In addition, the model order selection is achieved by the optimization scheme. This method has been validated by a Monte Carlo study of simulation case and further by an experimental test case, and the performance and potential advantages are illustrated.

  2. A New Finite Interval Lifetime Distribution Model for Fitting Bathtub-Shaped Failure Rate Curve

    Xiaohong Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper raised a new four-parameter fitting model to describe bathtub curve, which is widely used in research on components’ life analysis, then gave explanation of model parameters, and provided parameter estimation method as well as application examples utilizing some well-known lifetime data. By comparative analysis between the new model and some existing bathtub curve fitting model, we can find that the new fitting model is very convenient and its parameters are clear; moreover, this model is of universal applicability which is not only suitable for bathtub-shaped failure rate curves but also applicable for the constant, increasing, and decreasing failure rate curves.

  3. Active Vibration Control of Elastic Beam by Means of Shape Memory Alloy Layers

    Chen, Q.; Levy, C.

    1996-01-01

    The mathematical model of a flexible beam covered with shape memory alloy (SMA) layers is presented. The SMA layers are used as actuators, which are capable of changing their elastic modulus and recovery stress, thus changing the natural frequency of, and adjusting the excitation to, the vibrating beam. The frequency factor variation as a function of SMA Young's modulus, SMA layer thickness and beam thickness is discussed. Also control of the beam employing an optimal linear control law is evaluated. The control results indicate how the system reacts to various levels of excitation input through the non-homogeneous recovery shear term of the governing differential equation.

  4. Active control: Wind turbine model

    Bindner, H.

    1999-01-01

    This report is a part of the reporting of the work done in the project 'Active Control of Wind Turbines'. This project aim is to develop a simulation model for design of control systems for turbines with pitch control and to use that model to designcontrollers. This report describes the model...... developed for controller design and analysis. Emphasis has been put on establishment of simple models describing the dynamic behavior of the wind turbine in adequate details for controller design. This hasbeen done with extensive use of measurements as the basis for selection of model complexity and model....... The models are all formulated as linear differential equations. The models are validated throughcomparisons with measurements performed on a Vestas WD 34 400 kW wind turbine. It is shown from a control point of view simple linear models can be used to describe the dynamic behavior of a pitch...

  5. A unified spray forming model for the prediction of billet shape geometry

    In the present work a unified model for simulating the spray forming process has been developed. Models for the atomization and the deposition processes have been coupled together in order to obtain a new unified description of the spray forming process. The model is able to predict the shape and the temperatures of a spray-formed billet and takes into account the thermal coupling between the gas and the droplets, the change in droplet size distribution along the r-axis in the spray cone and the shading effect. The deposition describes the evolution of the preform with time. For this stage a novel 3D model, which allows the atomizer to be placed asymmetrically over the substrate and also includes the withdrawal of the deposit, was developed. This makes it possible to model not only the growth of a Gaussian shaped preform in which case the spray axis and the rotation axis coincide, but also the surface evolution during billet growth. For this purpose, shading must be taken into account as a core part of the surface evolution algorithm. The unified model involves coupling of three sub models for the atomization, the deposition and the shape of the billet. This coupling, which is a central part of the present work, is also described. Results from the integrated model are presented and the potential for better process understanding as well as process optimization is evident

  6. Solar granulation and statistical crystallography: A modeling approach using size-shape relations

    Noever, D. A.

    1994-01-01

    The irregular polygonal pattern of solar granulation is analyzed for size-shape relations using statistical crystallography. In contrast to previous work which has assumed perfectly hexagonal patterns for granulation, more realistic accounting of cell (granule) shapes reveals a broader basis for quantitative analysis. Several features emerge as noteworthy: (1) a linear correlation between number of cell-sides and neighboring shapes (called Aboav-Weaire's law); (2) a linear correlation between both average cell area and perimeter and the number of cell-sides (called Lewis's law and a perimeter law, respectively) and (3) a linear correlation between cell area and squared perimeter (called convolution index). This statistical picture of granulation is consistent with a finding of no correlation in cell shapes beyond nearest neighbors. A comparative calculation between existing model predictions taken from luminosity data and the present analysis shows substantial agreements for cell-size distributions. A model for understanding grain lifetimes is proposed which links convective times to cell shape using crystallographic results.

  7. Short Term Evaluation of an Anatomically Shaped Polycarbonate Urethane Total Meniscus Replacement in a Goat Model

    Vrancken, A.C.T.; Madej, W.; Hannink, G.; Verdonschot, N.J.; Tienen, T.G. van; Buma, P.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Since the treatment options for symptomatic total meniscectomy patients are still limited, an anatomically shaped, polycarbonate urethane (PCU), total meniscus replacement was developed. This study evaluates the in vivo performance of the implant in a goat model, with a specific focus on th

  8. Landmark-based model-free 3D face shape reconstruction from video sequences

    Dam, van Chris; Veldhuis, Raymond; Spreeuwers, Luuk; Broemme, A.; Busch, C.

    2013-01-01

    In forensic comparison of facial video data, often only the best quality frontal face frames are selected, and hence potentially useful video data is ignored. To improve 2D facial comparison for law enforcement and forensic investigation, we introduce a model-free 3D shape reconstruction algorithm b

  9. Model-free 3D face shape reconstruction from video sequences

    Dam, van Chris; Veldhuis, Raymond; Spreeuwers, Luuk

    2013-01-01

    In forensic comparison of facial video data, often only the best quality frontal face frames are selected, and hence much video data is ignored. To improve 2D facial comparison for law enforcement and forensic investigation, we introduce a model-free 3D shape reconstruction algorithm based on 2D lan

  10. Shape Optimization for Navier-Stokes Equations with Algebraic Turbulence Model: Existence Analysis

    Bulíček, M.; Haslinger, J.; Málek, J.; Stebel, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 2 (2009), s. 185-212. ISSN 0095-4616 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC06052 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : optimal shape design * paper machine headbox * incompressible non-Newtonian fluid * algebraic turbulence model * outflow boundary condition Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.757, year: 2009

  11. Numerical Modeling of Induction Heating Process using Inductors with Circular Shape Turns

    Mihaela Novac

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper is focused on the problemof numerical modeling of electromagneticfield coupled with the thermal one in theheating process of the steel billets, usinginductors with circular shape turns. As resultswe have: electromagnetic field lines evolutionand map temperatures in piece at the endingof heating process.

  12. Extraction of the mode shapes of a segmented ship model with a hydroelastic response

    Kim Yooil

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The mode shapes of a segmented hull model towed in a model basin were predicted using both the Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD and cross random decrement technique. The proper orthogonal decomposition, which is also known as Karhunen-Loeve decomposition, is an emerging technology as a useful signal processing technique in structural dynamics. The technique is based on the fact that the eigenvectors of a spatial coherence matrix become the mode shapes of the system under free and randomly excited forced vibration conditions. Taking advantage of the simplicity of POD, efforts have been made to reveal the mode shapes of vibrating flexible hull under random wave excitation. First, the segmented hull model of a 400 K ore carrier with 3 flexible connections was towed in a model basin under different sea states and the time histories of the vertical bending moment at three different locations were measured. The measured response time histories were processed using the proper orthogonal decomposition, eventually to obtain both the first and second vertical vibration modes of the flexible hull. A comparison of the obtained mode shapes with those obtained using the cross random decrement technique showed excellent correspondence between the two results.

  13. Jacobi shape transitions within the LSD model and the Skyrme-ETF approach

    The "Modified Funny-Hills parametrisation" is used together with the Lublin-Strasbourg Drop Model to evaluate the stability of rotating nuclei. The Jacobi transition into triaxial shapes is studied. By a comparison with selfconsistent semiclassical calculations in the framework of the Extended Thomas-Fermi method, the validity of the present approach is demonstrated and possible improvements are indicated. (author)

  14. Modeling the spatial shape of nondiffracting beams: Experimental generation of Frozen Waves via holographic method

    Vieira, Tárcio A.; Zamboni-Rached, Michel; Gesualdi, Marcos R. R.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we experimentally implement the spatial shape modeling of nondiffracting optical beams via computer generated holograms reconstructed optically by spatial light modulators. The results reported here are an experimental confirmation of the so-called Frozen Wave method, developed a few years ago. Optical beams of this type have potential applications in optical tweezers, medicine, atom guiding, remote sensing, etc.

  15. Spin dependence of even-even nucleus shape in the model of Davydov-Chaban

    The shape parameters of the even-even nuclei 154Gd, 156,158,160Dy, 164,168Er, 168Yb, 176Hf, 180W are calculated within the phenomenological model of the nonaxial soft by β-oscillation deformed nucleus. The spin dependence of the softness, nonaxiality and energy factor is assumed

  16. Modelling the spatial shape of nondiffracting beams: Experimental generation of Frozen Waves via computer generated holograms

    Vieira, Tárcio A; Gesualdi, Marcos R R

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we implement experimentally the spatial shape modelling of nondiffracting optical beams via computer generated holograms. The results reported here are the experimental confirmation of the so called Frozen Wave method, developed few years ago. Optical beams of this type can possess potential applications in optical tweezers, medicine, atom guiding, remote sensing, etc..

  17. Shape Models of Asteroids as a Missing Input for Bulk Density Determinations

    Hanuš, Josef

    2015-07-01

    To determine a meaningful bulk density of an asteroid, both accurate volume and mass estimates are necessary. The volume can be computed by scaling the size of the 3D shape model to fit the disk-resolved images or stellar occultation profiles, which are available in the literature or through collaborations. This work provides a list of asteroids, for which (i) there are already mass estimates with reported uncertainties better than 20% or their mass will be most likely determined in the future from Gaia astrometric observations, and (ii) their 3D shape models are currently unknown. Additional optical lightcurves are necessary to determine the convex shape models of these asteroids. The main aim of this article is to motivate the observers to obtain lightcurves of these asteroids, and thus contribute to their shape model determinations. Moreover, a web page https://asteroid-obs.oca.eu, which maintains an up-to-date list of these objects to assure efficiency and to avoid any overlapping efforts, was created.

  18. Shape-control and electrocatalytic activity-enhancement of Pt-based bimetallic nanocrystals.

    Porter, Nathan S; Wu, Hong; Quan, Zewei; Fang, Jiye

    2013-08-20

    Due to the increasing worldwide energy demand and environ-mental concerns, the need for alternative energy sources is growing stronger, and platinum catalysts in fuel cells may help make the technologies a reality. However, the pursuit of highly active Pt-based electrocatalysts continues to be a challenge. Scientists developing electrocatalysts continue to focus on characterizing and directing the construction of nanocrystals and advancing their electrochemical applications. Although chemists have worked on Pt-based bimetallic (Pt-M) preparations in the past, more recent research shows that both shape-controlled Pt-M nanocrystals and the assembly of these nanocrystals into supercrystals are promising new directions. A solution-based synthesis approach is an effective technique for preparing crystallographic facet-directed nanocatalysts. This is aided by careful selection of the metal precursor, capping ligand, reducing agent, and solvent. Incorporating a secondary metal M into the Pt lattice and manipulating the crystal facets on the surface cooperatively alter the electrocatalytic behavior of these Pt-M bimetallic nanocrystals. Specifically, chemists have extensively studied the {111}- and {100}-terminated crystal facets because they show unique atomic arrangement on surfaces, exhibit different catalytic performance, and possess specific resistance to toxic adsorbed carbon monoxide (COads). For catalysts to have maximum efficiency, they need to have resistance to COads and other poisonous carbon-containing intermediates when the catalysts operate under harsh conditions. A necessary design to any synthesis is to clearly understand and utilize the role of each component in order to successfully induce shape-controlled growth. Since chemists began to understand Pt nanocrystal shape-dependent electrocatalytic activity, the main obstacles blocking proton exchange membrane fuel cells are anode poisoning, sluggish kinetics at the cathode, and low activity. In this

  19. Shape memory alloy-based biopsy device for active locomotive intestinal capsule endoscope.

    Le, Viet Ha; Hernando, Leon-Rodriguez; Lee, Cheong; Choi, Hyunchul; Jin, Zhen; Nguyen, Kim Tien; Go, Gwangjun; Ko, Seong-Young; Park, Jong-Oh; Park, Sukho

    2015-03-01

    Recently, capsule endoscopes have been used for diagnosis in digestive organs. However, because a capsule endoscope does not have a locomotive function, its use has been limited to small tubular digestive organs, such as small intestine and esophagus. To address this problem, researchers have begun studying an active locomotive intestine capsule endoscope as a medical instrument for the whole gastrointestinal tract. We have developed a capsule endoscope with a small permanent magnet that is actuated by an electromagnetic actuation system, allowing active and flexible movement in the patient's gut environment. In addition, researchers have noted the need for a biopsy function in capsule endoscope for the definitive diagnosis of digestive diseases. Therefore, this paper proposes a novel robotic biopsy device for active locomotive intestine capsule endoscope. The proposed biopsy device has a sharp blade connected with a shape memory alloy actuator. The biopsy device measuring 12 mm in diameter and 3 mm in length was integrated into our capsule endoscope prototype, where the device's sharp blade was activated and exposed by the shape memory alloy actuator. Then the electromagnetic actuation system generated a specific motion of the capsule endoscope to extract the tissue sample from the intestines. The final biopsy sample tissue had a volume of about 6 mm(3), which is a sufficient amount for a histological analysis. Consequently, we proposed the working principle of the biopsy device and conducted an in-vitro biopsy test to verify the feasibility of the biopsy device integrated into the capsule endoscope prototype using the electro-magnetic actuation system. PMID:25834001

  20. A 3-D constitutive model for pressure-dependent phase transformation of porous shape memory alloys.

    Ashrafi, M J; Arghavani, J; Naghdabadi, R; Sohrabpour, S

    2015-02-01

    Porous shape memory alloys (SMAs) exhibit the interesting characteristics of porous metals together with shape memory effect and pseudo-elasticity of SMAs that make them appropriate for biomedical applications. In this paper, a 3-D phenomenological constitutive model for the pseudo-elastic behavior and shape memory effect of porous SMAs is developed within the framework of irreversible thermodynamics. Comparing to micromechanical and computational models, the proposed model is computationally cost effective and predicts the behavior of porous SMAs under proportional and non-proportional multiaxial loadings. Considering the pressure dependency of phase transformation in porous SMAs, proper internal variables, free energy and limit functions are introduced. With the aim of numerical implementation, time discretization and solution algorithm for the proposed model are also presented. Due to lack of enough experimental data on multiaxial loadings of porous SMAs, we employ a computational simulation method (CSM) together with available experimental data to validate the proposed constitutive model. The method is based on a 3-D finite element model of a representative volume element (RVE) with random pores pattern. Good agreement between the numerical predictions of the model and CSM results is observed for elastic and phase transformation behaviors in various thermomechanical loadings. PMID:25528691

  1. Numerical Modeling of a Teeth-shaped Nano-plasmonic Waveguide Filter

    Lin, Xianshi

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, tooth-shaped and multiple-teeth-shaped plasmonic filters in the metal-insulator-metal (MIM) waveguides are demonstrated numerically. By introducing a three-port waveguide splitter, a modified model based on the multiple-beam-interference and the scattering matrix is given. The ransmittance spectrum as a function of teeth width, depth, period and period number are respectively addressed. The result shows the new structure not only performs the filtering function as well as MIM grating-like structures, but also is of submicrometer size for ultra-high integration and relatively easy fabrication.

  2. Model-based pulse shape correction for CdTe detectors

    Bargholtz, C; Maartensson, L

    1999-01-01

    We present a systematic method to improve energy resolution of CdTe-detector systems with full control of the efficiency. Sampled pulses and multiple amplifier data are fitted by a model of the pulse shape including the deposited energy and the interaction point within the detector as parameters. We show the decisive improvements of spectral resolution and photo-peak efficiency that is obtained without distortion of spectral shape. The information concerning the interaction depth of individual events can be used to discriminate between beta particles and gamma quanta. (author)

  3. Model-based pulse shape correction for CdTe detectors

    Bargholtz, Chr.; Fumero, E.; Mårtensson, L.

    1999-02-01

    We present a systematic method to improve energy resolution of CdTe-detector systems with full control of the efficiency. Sampled pulses and multiple amplifier data are fitted by a model of the pulse shape including the deposited energy and the interaction point within the detector as parameters. We show the decisive improvements of spectral resolution and photo-peak efficiency that is obtained without distortion of spectral shape. The information concerning the interaction depth of individual events can be used to discriminate between beta particles and gamma quanta.

  4. Pattern formation in a gene network model with boundary shape dependence

    Diambra, Luis; da Fontoura Costa, Luciano

    2006-03-01

    A fundamental task in developmental biology is to identify the mechanisms which drive morphogenesis. Traditionally pattern formation have been modeled mainly using Turing-type mechanisms, where complex patterns arise by symmetry breaking. However, there is a growing experimental evidence that the influence of signals derived from surrounding tissues can contribute to the patterning processes. In this paper, we show that the interplay between the shape of surrounding tissues and a hierarchically organized gene regulatory network can be able to induce stable complex patterns. The rise of these patterns depends strongly on the shape of the surrounding tissues.

  5. Neural network modeling for weld shape process of P-GMAW

    Yan Zhihong; Wu Lin; Zhang Guangjun; Gao Hongming

    2007-01-01

    Weld shape control is a fundamental issue in automatic welding. In this paper, a double side visual system is established for pulsed gas metal arc welding (P-GMAW), and both topside and backside weld pool images can be captured and stored continuously in real time. By analyzing the weld shape regulation with the molten metal volume, some topside weld pool characterized parameters (WPCPs) are proposed for determining penetration in butt welding of thin mild steel. Moreover, some BP network models are established to predict backside weld pool width with welding parameters and WPCPs as inputs.

  6. A computer graphics based model for scattering from objects of arbitrary shapes in the optical region

    Goel, Narendra S.; Rozehnal, Ivan; Thompson, Richard L.

    1991-01-01

    A computer-graphics-based model, named DIANA, is presented for generation of objects of arbitrary shape and for calculating bidirectional reflectances and scattering from them, in the visible and infrared region. The computer generation is based on a modified Lindenmayer system approach which makes it possible to generate objects of arbitrary shapes and to simulate their growth, dynamics, and movement. Rendering techniques are used to display an object on a computer screen with appropriate shading and shadowing and to calculate the scattering and reflectance from the object. The technique is illustrated with scattering from canopies of simulated corn plants.

  7. Joint optimization of segmentation and shape prior from level-set-based statistical shape model, and its application to the automated segmentation of abdominal organs.

    Saito, Atsushi; Nawano, Shigeru; Shimizu, Akinobu

    2016-02-01

    The goal of this study is to provide a theoretical framework for accurately optimizing the segmentation energy considering all of the possible shapes generated from the level-set-based statistical shape model (SSM). The proposed algorithm solves the well-known open problem, in which a shape prior may not be optimal in terms of an objective functional that needs to be minimized during segmentation. The algorithm allows the selection of an optimal shape prior from among all possible shapes generated from an SSM by conducting a branch-and-bound search over an eigenshape space. The proposed algorithm does not require predefined shape templates or the construction of a hierarchical clustering tree before graph-cut segmentation. It jointly optimizes an objective functional in terms of both the shape prior and segmentation labeling, and finds an optimal solution by considering all possible shapes generated from an SSM. We apply the proposed algorithm to both pancreas and spleen segmentation using multiphase computed tomography volumes, and we compare the results obtained with those produced by a conventional algorithm employing a branch-and-bound search over a search tree of predefined shapes, which were sampled discretely from an SSM. The proposed algorithm significantly improves the segmentation performance in terms of the Jaccard index and Dice similarity index. In addition, we compare the results with the state-of-the-art multiple abdominal organs segmentation algorithm, and confirmed that the performances of both algorithms are comparable to each other. We discuss the high computational efficiency of the proposed algorithm, which was determined experimentally using a normalized number of traversed nodes in a search tree, and the extensibility of the proposed algorithm to other SSMs or energy functionals. PMID:26716720

  8. Validation of Shape Memory Alloys Multiscale Modeling thanks to in-situ X- Rays Diffraction

    Fall, Mame Daro; Lavernhe Taillard, Karine; Maynadier, Anne; Hubert, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    The increasing use of Shape Memory Alloys (SMA) for complex applications requires a robust modeling of phenomena governing their behavior. The development of micro-macro multiaxial models is relevant since the SMA behavior is strongly correlated to appearance/disappearance/re-orientation of martensite variants at the microscale. Such approach relies the definition of transition scale rules, depending on the material microstructure, and an appropriate description of the behavior of constituent...

  9. Exact limiting shape for a simplified model of first-passage percolation on the plane

    Seppäläinen, Timo

    1998-01-01

    We derive the limiting shape for the following model of first-passage bond percolation on the two-dimensional integer lattice: the percolation is directed in the sense that admissible paths are nondecreasing in both coordinate directions. The passage times of horizontal bonds are Bernoulli distributed, while the passage times of vertical bonds are all equal to a deterministic constant. To analyze the percolation model, we couple it with a one-dimensional interacting particle...

  10. Current-based 4D shape analysis for the mechanical personalization of heart models

    Le Folgoc, Loïc; Delingette, Hervé; Criminisi, Antonio; Ayache, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    Patient-specific models of the heart may lead to better understanding of cardiovascular diseases and better planning of therapy. A machine-learning approach to the personalization of an electro-mechanical model of the heart, from the kinematics of the endo- and epicardium, is presented in this paper. We use 4D mathematical currents to encapsulate information about the shape and deformation of the heart. The method is largely insensitive to initialization and does not require on-line simulatio...

  11. Shape Evolution of the Compound Nucleus in the Superheavy Element Synthesis Reaction via the BUU Model

    WEI Liang; LIU Yu-Xin

    2005-01-01

    @@ By taking the BUU model, we simulate the superheavy element synthesis reaction. With the rotation effect being included in the B UU model, the effect of the non-centrality of the reaction 48 Ca + 238U→ 286112 is studied. It is shown that the promising impact parameter in the synthesis process can be released from zero to a value little smaller than the radius of the smaller nucleus involved in the reaction. Meanwhile, the compound nucleus may involve rich shape phases.

  12. Analysis of shape isomer yields of 237Pu in the framework of dynamical–statistical model

    Hadi Eslamizadeh

    2012-02-01

    Data on shape isomer yield for + 235U reaction at $E^{\\text{lab}}$ = 20–29 MeV are analysed in the framework of a combined dynamical–statistical model. From this analysis, information on the double humped fission barrier parameters for some Pu isotopes has been obtained and it is shown that the depth of the second potential well should be less than the results of statistical model calculations.

  13. Molecular Basis for Enzymatic Sulfite Oxidation -- HOW THREE CONSERVED ACTIVE SITE RESIDUES SHAPE ENZYME ACTIVITY

    Bailey, Susan; Rapson, Trevor; Johnson-Winters, Kayunta; Astashkin, Andrei; Enemark, John; Kappler, Ulrike

    2008-11-10

    Sulfite dehydrogenases (SDHs) catalyze the oxidation and detoxification of sulfite to sulfate, a reaction critical to all forms of life. Sulfite-oxidizing enzymes contain three conserved active site amino acids (Arg-55, His-57, and Tyr-236) that are crucial for catalytic competency. Here we have studied the kinetic and structural effects of two novel and one previously reported substitution (R55M, H57A, Y236F) in these residues on SDH catalysis. Both Arg-55 and His-57 were found to have key roles in substrate binding. An R55M substitution increased Km(sulfite)(app) by 2-3 orders of magnitude, whereas His-57 was required for maintaining a high substrate affinity at low pH when the imidazole ring is fully protonated. This effect may be mediated by interactions of His-57 with Arg-55 that stabilize the position of the Arg-55 side chain or, alternatively, may reflect changes in the protonation state of sulfite. Unlike what is seen for SDHWT and SDHY236F, the catalytic turnover rates of SDHR55M and SDHH57A are relatively insensitive to pH (~;;60 and 200 s-1, respectively). On the structural level, striking kinetic effects appeared to correlate with disorder (in SDHH57A and SDHY236F) or absence of Arg-55 (SDHR55M), suggesting that Arg-55 and the hydrogen bonding interactions it engages in are crucial for substrate binding and catalysis. The structure of SDHR55M has sulfate bound at the active site, a fact that coincides with a significant increase in the inhibitory effect of sulfate in SDHR55M. Thus, Arg-55 also appears to be involved in enabling discrimination between the substrate and product in SDH.

  14. Use of a Ni60Ti shape memory alloy for active jet engine chevron application: II. Experimentally validated numerical analysis

    A shape memory alloy (SMA) composition of Ni60Ti40 (wt%) was chosen for the fabrication of active beam components used as cyclic actuators and incorporated into morphing aerospace structures. The active structure is a variable-geometry chevron (VGC) designed to reduce jet engine noise in the take-off flight regime while maintaining efficiency in the cruise regime. This two-part work addresses the training, characterization and derived material properties of the new nickel-rich NiTi composition, the assessment of the actuation properties of the active beam actuator and the accurate analysis of the VGC and its subcomponents using a model calibrated from the material characterization. The second part of this two-part work focuses on the numerical modeling of the jet engine chevron application, where the end goal is the accurate prediction of the VGC actuation response. A three-dimensional (3D) thermomechanical constitutive model is used for the analysis and is calibrated using the axial testing results from part I. To best capture the material response, features of several SMA constitutive models proposed in the literature are combined to form a new model that accounts for two material behaviors not previously addressed simultaneously. These are the variation in the generated maximum actuation strain with applied stress level and a smooth strain–temperature constitutive response at the beginning and end of transformation. The accuracy of the modeling effort is assessed by comparing the analysis deflection predictions for a given loading path imposed on the VGC or its subcomponents to independently obtained experimental results consisting of photogrammetric data. For the case of full actuation of the assembled VGC, the average error in predicted centerline deflection is less than 6%

  15. A model of dispenser cathode activity

    Lamartine, B. C.; Eyink, K. G.; Czarnecki, J. V.; Lampert, W. V.; Haas, T. W.

    1985-12-01

    A semiquantitative model of dispenser cathode activity based on recent work on the co-adsorption of Ba and O onto W surfaces is presented. The co-adsorption studies have determined the shape of a three-dimensional surface of work function as a function of θO and θBa, the surface coverages of O and Ba, respectively. Compositions of a variety of pedigreed dispenser cathodes were fitted to this surface and their composition changes during lifetime were modeled. Changes of surface composition with temperature and of workfunction, φ, with temperature were also found to fit these curves. The concept of a patchy surface implied by the co-adsorption measurements was used to explain earlier results on the shape of the X-ray excited Ba MNN Auger feature. Finally, SIMS measurements under UHV conditions was found to provide an extremely sensitive measurement of surface composition in the region of surface coverages of interest in the study of cathode phenomena. Extensions of this work to other types of cathodes such as M-types, and rhenium substrate cathodes is also discussed.

  16. A Numerical Method for Modeling the Effects of Irregular Shape on Interconnect Resistance

    Chen, Bao-Jun; Tang, Zhen-An; Ju, Yan-Jie

    2014-05-01

    When clock frequencies exceed gigahertz, the skin depth in analog and digital circuits greatly decreases. The irregular shape of the cross section of the interconnect plays an increasingly important role in interconnect parasitic extraction. However, existing methods only focus on the rough surface of the interconnect, while ignoring other irregular shapes, such as the trapezoidal cross section. In this work, a new simulation method is proposed for irregular interconnects, which is applicable to arbitrary irregular shapes and to a wide range of frequencies. The method involves generating a mesh information file firstly and then extracting the frequency-dependent resistance based on a numerical solution of scalar wave modeling by using the method of moments. The singularity extraction method is used to calculate the self-inductors. The data from experiments verify the accuracy of our proposed method.

  17. A parabolic model to control quantum interference in T-shaped molecular junctions

    Nozaki, Daijiro; Sevincli, Haldun; Avdoshenko, Stanislav M.;

    2013-01-01

    interest to develop simple methods controlling the emergence and the positions of QI effects like anti-resonances or Fano line shapes in conductance spectra. In this work, starting from a well-known generic molecular junction with a side group (T-shaped molecule), we propose a simple graphical method...... and the main conduction channel from measurements in the case of orthogonal basis. The results obtained within the parabolic model are validated using density-functional based quantum transport calculations in realistic T-shaped molecular junctions.......Quantum interference (QI) effects in molecular devices have drawn increasing attention over the past years due to their unique features observed in the conductance spectrum. For the further development of single molecular devices exploiting QI effects, it is of great theoretical and practical...

  18. Laboratory simulation and modeling of size, shape distributed interstellar graphite dust analogues: A comparative study

    Boruah, Manash J.; Gogoi, Ankur; Ahmed, Gazi A.

    2016-06-01

    The computation of the light scattering properties of size and shape distributed interstellar graphite dust analogues using discrete dipole approximation (DDA) is presented. The light scattering properties of dust particles of arbitrary shapes having sizes ranging from 0.5 to 5.0 μm were computed using DDSCAT 7.3.0 software package and an indigenously developed post-processing tool for size and shape averaging. In order to model realistic samples of graphite dust and compute their light scattering properties using DDA, different target geometries were generated to represent the graphite particle composition in terms of surface smoothness, surface roughness and aggregation or their combination, for using as the target for DDSCAT calculations. A comparison of the theoretical volume scattering function at 543.5 nm and 632.8 nm incident wavelengths with laboratory simulation is also presented in this paper.

  19. A thermo dynamical model for the shape and size effect on melting of boron carbide nanoparticles.

    Antoniammal, Paneerselvam; Arivuoli, Dakshanamoorthy

    2012-02-01

    The size and shape dependence of the melting temperature of Boron Carbide (B4C) nanoparticles has been investigated with a numerical thermo dynamical approach. The problem considered in this paper is the inward melting of nanoparticles with spherical and cylindrical geometry. The cylindrical Boron Carbide (B4C) nanoparticles, whose melting point has been reported to decrease with decreasing particle radius, become larger than spherical shaped nanoparticle. Comparative investigation of the size dependence of the melting temperature with respect to the two shapes is also been done. The melting temperature obtained in the present study is approximately a dealing function of radius, in a good agreement with prediction of thermo dynamical model. PMID:22629885

  20. Patient-specific acetabular shape modelling: comparison among sphere, ellipsoid and conchoid parameterisations.

    Cerveri, Pietro; Manzotti, Alfonso; Baroni, Guido

    2014-04-01

    The shape of the human acetabular cup was commonly represented as a hemisphere, but different geometries and patient-specific shapes have been recently proposed in the literature. Our aim was to test the limits of the sphericity assumption by comparing three different parameterisations, namely the sphere, the ellipsoid and the rotational conchoid. Models of hip surfaces, reconstructed from CT scans taken from Caucasian race cadavers and patients, were automatically processed to extract the acetabular surface. Two separate analyses were carried out on the overall acetabular shape, including both the acetabular fossa and the lunate surface (case A) and acetabular cup represented by the lunate surface only (case B). Nonlinear gradient-based and evolutionary computation approaches were implemented for the fitting process. Minor differences from the three idealised geometries were detected (median values of the fitting errors different from both the ellipsoid (p difference was detected between the ellipsoid and the conchoid for case A. Significance of the difference between ellipsoid and sphere (p difference was detected between the ellipsoid and the conchoid. In conclusion, we synthesise that the morphology of the overall acetabular cup can be parameterised both with an ellipsoid shape and with a conchoid shape as well with superior quality than the simple sphere. Differently, if one considers just the lunate surface, better fitting results are expected when using the ellipsoid. PMID:22789071

  1. Multi-scale modeling of shape distortions during sintering of bi-layers

    Tadesse Molla, Tesfaye; Bjørk, Rasmus; Olevsky, Eugene;

    2014-01-01

    theories like the continuum theory of sintering. A new multi-scale numerical approach for modeling of shape distortions during sintering of macroscopically inhomogeneous structures combined with a microstructure model is developed. The microstructures of the porous body are described by unit cells based on...... unit cells simulated by the kMC model. Examples of simulation of sintering of bi-layers based on different material systems are presented to illustrate the multi-scale model. The approach can be considered as an extension to the continuum theory of sintering combined with the meso-scale kinetic Monte...

  2. Hexagonal-shaped chondroitin sulfate self-assemblies have exalted anti-HSV-2 activity.

    Galus, Aurélia; Mallet, Jean-Maurice; Lembo, David; Cagno, Valeria; Djabourov, Madeleine; Lortat-Jacob, Hugues; Bouchemal, Kawthar

    2016-01-20

    The initial step in mucosal infection by the herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) requires its binding to certain glycosaminoglycans naturally present on host cell membranes. We took advantage of this interaction to design biomimetic supramolecular hexagonal-shaped nanoassemblies composed of chondroitin sulfate having exalted anti-HSV-2 activity in comparison with native chondroitin sulfate. Nanoassemblies were formed by mixing hydrophobically-modified chondroitin sulfate with α-cyclodextrin in water. Optimization of alkyl chain length grafted on chondroitin sulfate and the ratio between hydrophobically-modified chondroitin sulfate and α-cyclodextrin showed that more cohesive and well-structured nanoassemblies were obtained using higher α-cyclodextrin concentration and longer alkyl chain lengths. A structure-activity relationship was found between anti-HSV-2 activity and the amphiphilic nature of hydrophobically-modified chondroitin sulfate. Also, antiviral activity of hexagonal nanoassemblies against HSV-2 was further improved in comparison with hydrophobically-modified chondroitin sulfate. This work suggests a new biomimetic formulation approach that can be extended to other heparan-sulfate-dependent viruses. PMID:26572336

  3. Subjective Significance Shapes Arousal Effects on Modified Stroop Task Performance: A Duality of Activation Mechanisms Account.

    Imbir, Kamil K

    2016-01-01

    Activation mechanisms such as arousal are known to be responsible for slowdown observed in the Emotional Stroop and modified Stroop tasks. Using the duality of mind perspective, we may conclude that both ways of processing information (automatic or controlled) should have their own mechanisms of activation, namely, arousal for an experiential mind, and subjective significance for a rational mind. To investigate the consequences of both, factorial manipulation was prepared. Other factors that influence Stroop task processing such as valence, concreteness, frequency, and word length were controlled. Subjective significance was expected to influence arousal effects. In the first study, the task was to name the color of font for activation charged words. In the second study, activation charged words were, at the same time, combined with an incongruent condition of the classical Stroop task around a fixation point. The task was to indicate the font color for color-meaning words. In both studies, subjective significance was found to shape the arousal impact on performance in terms of the slowdown reduction for words charged with subjective significance. PMID:26869974

  4. Computational models of epileptiform activity.

    Wendling, Fabrice; Benquet, Pascal; Bartolomei, Fabrice; Jirsa, Viktor

    2016-02-15

    We reviewed computer models that have been developed to reproduce and explain epileptiform activity. Unlike other already-published reviews on computer models of epilepsy, the proposed overview starts from the various types of epileptiform activity encountered during both interictal and ictal periods. Computational models proposed so far in the context of partial and generalized epilepsies are classified according to the following taxonomy: neural mass, neural field, detailed network and formal mathematical models. Insights gained about interictal epileptic spikes and high-frequency oscillations, about fast oscillations at seizure onset, about seizure initiation and propagation, about spike-wave discharges and about status epilepticus are described. This review shows the richness and complementarity of the various modeling approaches as well as the fruitful contribution of the computational neuroscience community in the field of epilepsy research. It shows that models have progressively gained acceptance and are now considered as an efficient way of integrating structural, functional and pathophysiological data about neural systems into "coherent and interpretable views". The advantages, limitations and future of modeling approaches are discussed. Perspectives in epilepsy research and clinical epileptology indicate that very promising directions are foreseen, like model-guided experiments or model-guided therapeutic strategy, among others. PMID:25843066

  5. A simplified constitutive model for predicting shape memory polymers deformation behavior

    Li, Yunxin; Guo, Siu-Siu; He, Yuhao; Liu, Zishun

    2015-12-01

    Shape memory polymers (SMPs) can keep a temporary shape after pre-deformation at a higher temperature and subsequent cooling. When they are reheated, their original shapes can be recovered. Such special characteristics of SMPs make them widely used in aerospace structures, biomedical devices, functional textiles and other devices. Increasing usefulness of SMPs motivates us to further understand their thermomechanical properties and deformation behavior, of which the development of appropriate constitutive models for SMPs is imperative. There is much work in literatures that address constitutive models of the thermo-mechanical coupling in SMPs. However, due to their complex forms, it is difficult to apply these constitutive models in the real world. In this paper, a three-element model with simple form is proposed to investigate the thermo-mechanical small strain (within 10%) behavior of polyurethane under uniaxial tension. Two different cases of heated recovery are considered: (1) unconstrained free strain recovery and (2) stress recovery under full constraint at a strain level fixed during low temperature unloading. To validate the model, simulated and predicted results are compared with Tobushi's experimental results and good agreement can be observed.

  6. Active vibration control of Flexible Joint Manipulator using Input Shaping and Adaptive Parameter Auto Disturbance Rejection Controller

    Li, W. P.; Luo, B.; Huang, H.

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a vibration control strategy for a two-link Flexible Joint Manipulator (FJM) with a Hexapod Active Manipulator (HAM). A dynamic model of the multi-body, rigid-flexible system composed of an FJM, a HAM and a spacecraft was built. A hybrid controller was proposed by combining the Input Shaping (IS) technique with an Adaptive-Parameter Auto Disturbance Rejection Controller (APADRC). The controller was used to suppress the vibration caused by external disturbances and input motions. Parameters of the APADRC were adaptively adjusted to ensure the characteristic of the closed loop system to be a given reference system, even if the configuration of the manipulator significantly changes during motion. Because precise parameters of the flexible manipulator are not required in the IS system, the operation of the controller was sufficiently robust to accommodate uncertainties in system parameters. Simulations results verified the effectiveness of the HAM scheme and controller in the vibration suppression of FJM during operation.

  7. Design and synthesis of novel Y-shaped barbituric acid derivatives as PPARγ activators.

    Dixit, Vaibhav A; Rathi, Prakash Chandra; Bhagat, Shweta; Gohlke, Holger; Petersen, Rasmus K; Kristiansen, Karsten; Chakraborti, Asit K; Bharatam, Prasad V

    2016-01-27

    Novel Y-shaped barbituric acid (BA) derivatives have been designed using rational methods including molecular docking. Fourteen novel compounds were synthesized using hydroxyl group protection-deprotection strategies for PPARγ activation. Competitive binding analysis of the synthesized molecules using time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) method was carried out, and the IC50 values were determined. The symmetrically substituted derivatives have shown greater binding affinity than unsymmetrically substituted derivatives. Nitrobenzyl and cyanophenyl substituted derivatives have shown reasonable binding affinities (10.1 and 6.5 μM, respectively), while mono and diacetate derivatives were found inactive. Molecular dynamics simulations show that the designed compounds have interaction profiles similar to partial agonists. The most significant finding of our study is that BA derivatives with symmetrically substituted weakly polar side chains result in the desired moderate level of PPARγ binding affinities. PMID:26708109

  8. Pulmonary nodule detection in CT images based on shape constraint CV model

    Wang, Bing; Tian, Xuedong [College of Mathematics and Computer Science, Hebei University, Baoding 071002 (China); Wang, Qian [Hebei Geological Laboratory, Baoding 071000, China and Multi-disciplinary Research Center, Hebei University, Baoding 071002 (China); Yang, Ying [Hebei University Affiliated Hospital, Baoding 071002 (China); Xie, Hongzhi, E-mail: gulixu@sjtu.edu.cn, E-mail: xiehongzhi@medmail.com.cn; Zhang, Shuyang [Department of Cardiology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Peking 100005 (China); Gu, Lixu, E-mail: gulixu@sjtu.edu.cn, E-mail: xiehongzhi@medmail.com.cn [Multi-disciplinary Research Center, Hebei University, Baoding 071002, China and School of Biomedical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200030 (China)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Accurate detection of pulmonary nodules remains a technical challenge in computer-aided diagnosis systems because some nodules may adhere to the blood vessels or the lung wall, which have low contrast compared to the surrounding tissues. In this paper, the analysis of typical shape features of candidate nodules based on a shape constraint Chan–Vese (CV) model combined with calculation of the number of blood branches adhered to nodule candidates is proposed to reduce false positive (FP) nodules from candidate nodules. Methods: The proposed scheme consists of three major stages: (1) Segmentation of lung parenchyma from computed tomography images. (2) Extraction of candidate nodules. (3) Reduction of FP nodules. A gray level enhancement combined with a spherical shape enhancement filter is introduced to extract the candidate nodules and their sphere-like contour regions. FPs are removed by analysis of the typical shape features of nodule candidates based on the CV model using spherical constraint and by investigating the number of blood branches adhered to the candidate nodules. The constrained shapes of CV model are automatically achieved from the extracted candidate nodules. Results: The detection performance was evaluated on 127 nodules of 103 cases including three types of challenging nodules, which are juxta-pleural nodules, juxta-vascular nodules, and ground glass opacity nodules. The free-receiver operating characteristic (FROC) curve shows that the proposed method is able to detect 88% of all the nodules in the data set with 4 FPs per case. Conclusions: Evaluation shows that the authors’ method is feasible and effective for detection of three types of nodules in this study.

  9. Pulmonary nodule detection in CT images based on shape constraint CV model

    Purpose: Accurate detection of pulmonary nodules remains a technical challenge in computer-aided diagnosis systems because some nodules may adhere to the blood vessels or the lung wall, which have low contrast compared to the surrounding tissues. In this paper, the analysis of typical shape features of candidate nodules based on a shape constraint Chan–Vese (CV) model combined with calculation of the number of blood branches adhered to nodule candidates is proposed to reduce false positive (FP) nodules from candidate nodules. Methods: The proposed scheme consists of three major stages: (1) Segmentation of lung parenchyma from computed tomography images. (2) Extraction of candidate nodules. (3) Reduction of FP nodules. A gray level enhancement combined with a spherical shape enhancement filter is introduced to extract the candidate nodules and their sphere-like contour regions. FPs are removed by analysis of the typical shape features of nodule candidates based on the CV model using spherical constraint and by investigating the number of blood branches adhered to the candidate nodules. The constrained shapes of CV model are automatically achieved from the extracted candidate nodules. Results: The detection performance was evaluated on 127 nodules of 103 cases including three types of challenging nodules, which are juxta-pleural nodules, juxta-vascular nodules, and ground glass opacity nodules. The free-receiver operating characteristic (FROC) curve shows that the proposed method is able to detect 88% of all the nodules in the data set with 4 FPs per case. Conclusions: Evaluation shows that the authors’ method is feasible and effective for detection of three types of nodules in this study

  10. INTERIOR MODELS OF SATURN: INCLUDING THE UNCERTAINTIES IN SHAPE AND ROTATION

    Helled, Ravit [Department of Geophysics, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv (Israel); Guillot, Tristan [Universite de Nice-Sophia Antipolis, Observatoire de la Cote d' Azur, CNRS UMR 7293, BP 4229, F-06304 Nice (France)

    2013-04-20

    The accurate determination of Saturn's gravitational coefficients by Cassini could provide tighter constraints on Saturn's internal structure. Also, occultation measurements provide important information on the planetary shape which is often not considered in structure models. In this paper we explore how wind velocities and internal rotation affect the planetary shape and the constraints on Saturn's interior. We show that within the geodetic approach the derived physical shape is insensitive to the assumed deep rotation. Saturn's re-derived equatorial and polar radii at 100 mbar are found to be 54,445 {+-} 10 km and 60,365 {+-} 10 km, respectively. To determine Saturn's interior, we use one-dimensional three-layer hydrostatic structure models and present two approaches to include the constraints on the shape. These approaches, however, result in only small differences in Saturn's derived composition. The uncertainty in Saturn's rotation period is more significant: with Voyager's 10{sup h}39{sup m} period, the derived mass of heavy elements in the envelope is 0-7 M{sub Circled-Plus }. With a rotation period of 10{sup h}32{sup m}, this value becomes <4 M{sub Circled-Plus }, below the minimum mass inferred from spectroscopic measurements. Saturn's core mass is found to depend strongly on the pressure at which helium phase separation occurs, and is estimated to be 5-20 M{sub Circled-Plus }. Lower core masses are possible if the separation occurs deeper than 4 Mbar. We suggest that the analysis of Cassini's radio occultation measurements is crucial to test shape models and could lead to constraints on Saturn's rotation profile and departures from hydrostatic equilibrium.

  11. Filamentous Network Mechanics and Active Contractility Determine Cell and Tissue Shape

    Bischofs, Ilka B.; Klein, Franziska; Lehnert, Dirk; Bastmeyer, Martin; Schwarz, Ulrich S

    2008-01-01

    For both cells and tissues, shape is closely correlated with function presumably via geometry-dependent distribution of tension. In this study, we identify common shape determinants spanning cell and tissue scales. For cells whose sites of adhesion are restricted to small adhesive islands on a micropatterned substrate, shape resembles a sequence of inward-curved circular arcs. The same shape is observed for fibroblast-populated collagen gels that are pinned to a flat substrate. Quantitative i...

  12. Design and Control of a Proof-of-Concept Active Jet Engine Intake Using Shape Memory Alloy Actuators

    Song, Gangbing; Ma, Ning; Penney, Nicholas; Barr, Todd; Lee, Ho-Jun; Arnold, Steven M.

    2004-01-01

    The design and control of a novel proof-of-concept active jet engine intake using Nickel-Titanium (Ni-Ti or Nitinol) shape memory alloy (SMA) wire actuators is used to demonstrate the potential of an adaptive intake to improve the fuel efficiency of a jet engine. The Nitinol SMA material is selected for this research due to the material's ability to generate large strains of up to 5 percent for repeated operations, a high power-to-weight ratio, electrical resistive actuation, and easy fabrication into a variety of shapes. The proof-of-concept engine intake employs an overlapping leaf design arranged in a concentric configuration. Each leaf is mounted on a supporting bar that rotates upon actuation by SMA wires electrical resistive heating. Feedback control is enabled through the use of a laser range sensor to detect the movement of a leaf and determine the radius of the intake area. Due to the hysteresis behavior inherent in SMAs, a nonlinear robust controller is used to direct the SMA wire actuation. The controller design utilizes the sliding-mode approach to compensate for the nonlinearities associated with the SMA actuator. Feedback control experiments conducted on a fabricated proof-of-concept model have demonstrated the capability to precisely control the intake area and achieve up to a 25 percent reduction in intake area. The experiments demonstrate the feasibility of engine intake area control using the proposed design.

  13. Titanium-Nickel Shape Memory Alloy Spring Actuator for Forward-Looking Active Catheter

    Takahiro Namazu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The fabrication and characterization of forward-looking active catheter actuated by titanium-nickel (Ti-Ni shape memory alloy (SMA springs are described. The catheter has been designed for wide-range observation of an affected area inside a blood vessel when the blood vessel is occluded. The developed active catheter consists of eight Ti-Ni SMA spring actuators for actuation of catheter tip, an ultrasonic transducer for forward-looking, a guide wire, a polyurethane tube for coating, and spiral wirings for realization of various flexure motions of catheter tip using Ti-Ni SMA actuators. The size of the catheter is 3.5 mm in diameter and 60 mm in length of the sum of transducer and actuator sections. Ti-Ni SMA springs were fabricated from a Ti-50.9at.%Ni sheet by electrochemical etching with a mixed solution of ethanol and lithium chloride. The catheter was assembled by hand under a stereomicroscope. The tip of the produced catheter was able to move in parallel toward at least eight directions by controlling an applied current to Ti-Ni SMA springs. We have confirmed that the active catheter was able to observe an object settled in the front.

  14. Shaping prestimulus neural activity with auditory rhythmic stimulation improves the temporal allocation of attention

    Pincham, Hannah L.; Cristoforetti, Giulia; Facoetti, Andrea; Szűcs, Dénes

    2016-01-01

    Human attention fluctuates across time, and even when stimuli have identical physical characteristics and the task demands are the same, relevant information is sometimes consciously perceived and at other times not. A typical example of this phenomenon is the attentional blink, where participants show a robust deficit in reporting the second of two targets (T2) in a rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) stream. Previous electroencephalographical (EEG) studies showed that neural correlates of correct T2 report are not limited to the RSVP period, but extend before visual stimulation begins. In particular, reduced oscillatory neural activity in the alpha band (8-12 Hz) before the onset of the RSVP has been linked to lower T2 accuracy. We therefore examined whether auditory rhythmic stimuli presented at a rate of 10 Hz (within the alpha band) could increase oscillatory alpha-band activity and improve T2 performance in the attentional blink time window. Behaviourally, the auditory rhythmic stimulation worked to enhance T2 accuracy. This enhanced perception was associated with increases in the posterior T2-evoked N2 component of the event-related potentials and this effect was observed selectively at lag 3. Frontal and posterior oscillatory alpha-band activity was also enhanced during auditory stimulation in the pre-RSVP period and positively correlated with T2 accuracy. These findings suggest that ongoing fluctuations can be shaped by sensorial events to improve the allocation of attention in time. PMID:26986506

  15. Shaping prestimulus neural activity with auditory rhythmic stimulation improves the temporal allocation of attention.

    Ronconi, Luca; Pincham, Hannah L; Cristoforetti, Giulia; Facoetti, Andrea; Szűcs, Dénes

    2016-05-01

    Human attention fluctuates across time, and even when stimuli have identical physical characteristics and the task demands are the same, relevant information is sometimes consciously perceived and at other times not. A typical example of this phenomenon is the attentional blink, where participants show a robust deficit in reporting the second of two targets (T2) in a rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) stream. Previous electroencephalographical (EEG) studies showed that neural correlates of correct T2 report are not limited to the RSVP period, but extend before visual stimulation begins. In particular, reduced oscillatory neural activity in the alpha band (8-12 Hz) before the onset of the RSVP has been linked to lower T2 accuracy. We therefore examined whether auditory rhythmic stimuli presented at a rate of 10 Hz (within the alpha band) could increase oscillatory alpha-band activity and improve T2 performance in the attentional blink time window. Behaviourally, the auditory rhythmic stimulation worked to enhance T2 accuracy. This enhanced perception was associated with increases in the posterior T2-evoked N2 component of the event-related potentials and this effect was observed selectively at lag 3. Frontal and posterior oscillatory alpha-band activity was also enhanced during auditory stimulation in the pre-RSVP period and positively correlated with T2 accuracy. These findings suggest that ongoing fluctuations can be shaped by sensorial events to improve the allocation of attention in time. PMID:26986506

  16. Diffusion models and neural activity

    Ricciardi, L. M.; Lánský, Petr

    London : Nature publishing group, 2003 - (Nadel, L.), s. 968-972 ISBN 0-333-79261-0 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA309/02/0168 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : Neuronal activity, Diffusion model Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  17. Modeling the Pulse Signal by Wave-Shape Function and Analyzing by Synchrosqueezing Transform.

    Hau-Tieng Wu

    Full Text Available We apply the recently developed adaptive non-harmonic model based on the wave-shape function, as well as the time-frequency analysis tool called synchrosqueezing transform (SST to model and analyze oscillatory physiological signals. To demonstrate how the model and algorithm work, we apply them to study the pulse wave signal. By extracting features called the spectral pulse signature, and based on functional regression, we characterize the hemodynamics from the radial pulse wave signals recorded by the sphygmomanometer. Analysis results suggest the potential of the proposed signal processing approach to extract health-related hemodynamics features.

  18. A penny-shaped crack in a filament reinforced matrix. 1: The filament model

    Erdogan, F.; Pacella, A. H.

    1973-01-01

    The electrostatic problem of a penny-shaped crack in an elastic matrix which reinforced by filaments or fibers perpendicular to the plane of the crack was studied. The elastic filament model was developed for application to evaluation studies of the stress intensity factor along the periphery of the crack, the stresses in the filaments or fibers, and the interface shear between the matrix and the filaments or fibers. The requirements expected of the model are a sufficiently accurate representation of the filament and applicability to the interaction problems involving a cracked elastic continuum with multi-filament reinforcements. The technique for developing the model and numerical examples of it are shown.

  19. A simplified compact model of miniaturized cross-shaped CMOS integrated Hall devices

    Huang Haiyun; Wang Dejun; Li Wenbo; Xu Yue; Qin Huibin; Hu Yongcai

    2012-01-01

    A simplified compact model for a miniaturized cross-shaped CMOS integrated Hall device is presented.The model has a simple circuit structure,only consisting of a passive network with eight non-linear resistors and four current-controlled voltage sources.It completely considers the following effects:non-linear conductivity,geometry dependence of sensitivity,temperature drift,lateral diffusion,and junction field effect.The model has been implemented in Verilog-A hardware description language and was successfully performed in a Cadence Spectre simulator.The simulation results are in good accordance with the classic experimental results reported in the literature.

  20. Electropolishing on single-cell: (TESLA, Reentrant and Low Loss shapes) Comsol modelling

    In the framework of improvement of cavity electropolishing, modelling permits to evaluate some parameters not easily accessible by experiments and can also help us to guide them. Different laboratories (DESY, Fermilab) work on electro or chemical polishing modelling with different approaches and softwares. At CEA Saclay, COMSOL software is used to model horizontal electropolishing of cavity in two dimensions. The goal of this study has been motivated by improvement of our electropolishing setup by modifying the arrival of the acid. The influence of a protuberant cathode has been evaluated and compared for different shapes of single cell cavities: TESLA, ILC Low Loss (LLILC), and ILC Reentrant (REILC). (author)

  1. A phenomenological two-phase constitutive model for porous shape memory alloys

    El Sayed, Tamer S.

    2012-07-01

    We present a two-phase constitutive model for pseudoelastoplastic behavior of porous shape memory alloys (SMAs). The model consists of a dense SMA phase and a porous plasticity phase. The overall response of the porous SMA is obtained by a weighted average of responses of individual phases. Based on the chosen constitutive model parameters, the model incorporates the pseudoelastic and pseudoplastic behavior simultaneously (commonly reported for porous SMAs) as well as sequentially (i.e. dense SMAs; pseudoelastic deformation followed by the pseudoplastic deformation until failure). The presented model also incorporates failure due to the deviatoric (shear band formation) and volumetric (void growth and coalescence) plastic deformation. The model is calibrated by representative volume elements (RVEs) with different sizes of spherical voids that are solved by unit cell finite element calculations. The overall response of the model is tested against experimental results from literature. Finally, application of the presented constitutive model has been presented by performing finite element simulations of the deformation and failure in unaixial dog-bone shaped specimen and compact tension (CT) test specimen. Results show a good agreement with the experimental data reported in the literature. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A white-box model of S-shaped and double S-shaped single-species population growth

    Kalmykov, Lev V.; Vyacheslav L. Kalmykov

    2015-01-01

    Complex systems may be mechanistically modelled by white-box modeling with using logical deterministic individual-based cellular automata. Mathematical models of complex systems are of three types: black-box (phenomenological), white-box (mechanistic, based on the first principles) and grey-box (mixtures of phenomenological and mechanistic models). Most basic ecological models are of black-box type, including Malthusian, Verhulst, Lotka–Volterra models. In black-box models, the individual-bas...

  3. Automatic Segmentation of Wrist Bones in CT Using a Statistical Wrist Shape + Pose Model.

    Anas, Emran Mohammad Abu; Rasoulian, Abtin; Seitel, Alexander; Darras, Kathryn; Wilson, David; John, Paul St; Pichora, David; Mousavi, Parvin; Rohling, Robert; Abolmaesumi, Purang

    2016-08-01

    Segmentation of the wrist bones in CT images has been frequently used in different clinical applications including arthritis evaluation, bone age assessment and image-guided interventions. The major challenges include non-uniformity and spongy textures of the bone tissue as well as narrow inter-bone spaces. In this work, we propose an automatic wrist bone segmentation technique for CT images based on a statistical model that captures the shape and pose variations of the wrist joint across 60 example wrists at nine different wrist positions. To establish the correspondences across the training shapes at neutral positions, the wrist bone surfaces are jointly aligned using a group-wise registration framework based on a Gaussian Mixture Model. Principal component analysis is then used to determine the major modes of shape variations. The variations in poses not only across the population but also across different wrist positions are incorporated in two pose models. An intra-subject pose model is developed by utilizing the similarity transforms at all wrist positions across the population. Further, an inter-subject pose model is used to model the pose variations across different wrist positions. For segmentation of the wrist bones in CT images, the developed model is registered to the edge point cloud extracted from the CT volume through an expectation maximization based probabilistic approach. Residual registration errors are corrected by application of a non-rigid registration technique. We validate the proposed segmentation method by registering the wrist model to a total of 66 unseen CT volumes of average voxel size of 0.38 mm. We report a mean surface distance error of 0.33 mm and a mean Jaccard index of 0.86. PMID:26890640

  4. IMC-PID design based on model matching approach and closed-loop shaping.

    Jin, Qi B; Liu, Q

    2014-03-01

    Motivated by the limitations of the conventional internal model control (IMC), this communication addresses the design of IMC-based PID in terms of the robust performance of the control system. The IMC controller form is obtained by solving an H-infinity problem based on the model matching approach, and the parameters are determined by closed-loop shaping. The shaping of the closed-loop transfer function is considered both for the set-point tracking and for the load disturbance rejection. The design procedure is formulated as a multi-objective optimization problem which is solved by a specific optimization algorithm. A nice feature of this design method is that it permits a clear tradeoff between robustness and performance. Simulation examples show that the proposed method is effective and has a wide applicability. PMID:24280534

  5. Modelling of the non isothermal cyclic behaviour of a polycrystalline Cu Zn Al shape memory alloy

    In this paper, a model describing the behaviour of Shape Memory Alloys (SMA) under constant applied stress and thermal cycling is developed. This is the first (and necessary) step to obtain a coherent modelling of the well-known Two Way Shape Memory Effect (TWSME) exhibited by SMA after a training process. Two different mechanisms characteristic to SMA are involved in the present description. The first one is related to training itself, whose macroscopic manifestation is the appearance of a permanent strain. The second one concerns the response of SMA to non-isothermal loading. It can be solved by the introduction of news variables in the internal variables set. There are the volume fraction of self-accommodating martensite (pure thermal effect) and the volume fraction of ''oriented'' martensite (thermo-mechanical effect). The comparison between simulation and our experimental results on Cu Zn Al polycrystals is fairly good. (orig.)

  6. Modeling and measurements of circular and trapezoidal shape HTS coils for electrical machines applications

    Axial Flux Electrical Machines (AFEM) with good power-to-weight and diameter-to-length ratio and high efficiency are very attractive for most industrial and power applications. Investigations with both theoretical and experimental methods of ac losses are important for a reliable prediction of dissipation mechanisms in AFEM. In this paper, simulated and measured results for both critical current (Ic) and transport current losses (Ploss), obtained on HTS coils, are reported. To investigate shape effects, double pancake coils with variable turns and shapes have been manufacted. Commercial grade ReBa2Cu3O7−x (Re = Y or rare earths, ReBCO) tape and epoxy resin has been used for coil winding. A magneto-static 2D finite element model (FEM) for the coils cross section, and a lumped model for AC losses estimations, have been implemented. The agreement among measured and simulated results are satisfactory.

  7. Use of Image Based Modelling for Documentation of Intricately Shaped Objects

    Marčiš, M.; Barták, P.; Valaška, D.; Fraštia, M.; Trhan, O.

    2016-06-01

    In the documentation of cultural heritage, we can encounter three dimensional shapes and structures which are complicated to measure. Such objects are for example spiral staircases, timber roof trusses, historical furniture or folk costume where it is nearly impossible to effectively use the traditional surveying or the terrestrial laser scanning due to the shape of the object, its dimensions and the crowded environment. The actual methods of digital photogrammetry can be very helpful in such cases with the emphasis on the automated processing of the extensive image data. The created high resolution 3D models and 2D orthophotos are very important for the documentation of architectural elements and they can serve as an ideal base for the vectorization and 2D drawing documentation. This contribution wants to describe the various usage of image based modelling in specific interior spaces and specific objects. The advantages and disadvantages of the photogrammetric measurement of such objects in comparison to other surveying methods are reviewed.

  8. A structured continuum modelling framework for martensitic transformation and reorientation in shape memory materials.

    Bernardini, Davide; Pence, Thomas J

    2016-04-28

    Models for shape memory material behaviour can be posed in the framework of a structured continuum theory. We study such a framework in which a scalar phase fraction field and a tensor field of martensite reorientation describe the material microstructure, in the context of finite strains. Gradients of the microstructural descriptors naturally enter the formulation and offer the possibility to describe and resolve phase transformation localizations. The constitutive theory is thoroughly described by a single free energy function in conjunction with a path-dependent dissipation function. Balance laws in the form of differential equations are obtained and contain both bulk and surface terms, the latter in terms of microstreses. A natural constraint on the tensor field for martensite reorientation gives rise to reactive fields in these balance laws. Conditions ensuring objectivity as well as the relation of this framework to that provided by currently used models for shape memory alloy behaviour are discussed. PMID:27002064

  9. Quantitative model for the generic 3D shape of ICMEs at 1 AU

    Démoulin, P; Masías-Meza, J J; Dasso, S

    2016-01-01

    Interplanetary imagers provide 2D projected views of the densest plasma parts of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) while in situ measurements provide magnetic field and plasma parameter measurements along the spacecraft trajectory, so along a 1D cut. As such, the data only give a partial view of their 3D structures. By studying a large number of ICMEs, crossed at different distances from their apex, we develop statistical methods to obtain a quantitative generic 3D shape of ICMEs. In a first approach we theoretically obtain the expected statistical distribution of the shock-normal orientation from assuming simple models of 3D shock shapes, including distorted profiles, and compare their compatibility with observed distributions. In a second approach we use the shock normal and the flux rope axis orientations, as well as the impact parameter, to provide statistical information across the spacecraft trajectory. The study of different 3D shock models shows that the observations are compatible with a ...

  10. Applying shape and phase restrictions in generalized dynamic categorical models of the business cycle

    Don Harding

    2010-01-01

    To match the NBER business cycle features it is necessary to employ Gen- eralised dynamic categorical (GDC) models that impose certain phase re- strictions and permit multiple indexes. Theory suggests additional shape re- strictions in the form of monotonicity and boundedness of certain transition probabilities. Maximum likelihood and constraint weighted bootstrap esti- mators are developed to impose these restrictions. In the application these estimators generate improved estimates of how th...

  11. Shape optimization for Navier-Stokes equations with algebraic turbulence model : numerical analysis and computation

    Haslinger, J.; Stebel, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 63, č. 2 (2011), s. 277-308. ISSN 0095-4616 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC06052 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : optimal shape design * paper machine headbox * incompressible non-Newtonian fluid * algebraic turbulence model Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.952, year: 2011 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00245-010-9121-x

  12. Kinetics modeling of precipitation with characteristic shape during post-implantation annealing

    Kun-Dar Li; Kwanyu Chen

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the precipitation with characteristic shape in the microstructure during post-implantation annealing via a theoretical modeling approach. The processes of precipitates formation and evolution during phase separation were based on a nucleation and growth mechanism of atomic diffusion. Different stages of the precipitation, including the nucleation, growth and coalescence, were distinctly revealed in the numerical simulations. In addition, the influences of ion do...

  13. Response of a Shape Memory Alloy Beam Model under Narrow Band Noise Excitation

    Gen Ge

    2014-01-01

    To describe the hysteretic nonlinear characteristic of the strain-stress relation of shape memory alloy (SMA), a Van-der-Pol hysteretic cycle is applied to simulate the hysteretic loops. Then, the model of a simply supported SMA beam subject to transverse narrow band noise excitation with nonlinear damping was proposed. The deterministic and the stochastic responses are studied, respectively, applying the multiple scale method. The stability of the steady state responses is analyzed by Floque...

  14. A microscopically motivated constitutive model for shape memory alloys: Formulation, analysis and computations

    Frost, Miroslav; Benešová, B.; Sedlák, P.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 3 (2016), s. 358-382. ISSN 1081-2865 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-13616S; GA ČR GAP201/10/0357 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : shape memory alloys * constitutive model * generalized standard materials * dissipation * energetic solution Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.298, year: 2014 http://mms.sagepub.com/content/21/3/358

  15. Biological models for active vision: Towards a unified architecture

    Terzic K.; Lobato D.; Saleiro M.; Martins J; Farrajota M.; Rodrigues J.M.F.; Du Buf J.M.H.

    2013-01-01

    Building a general-purpose, real-time active vision system completely based on biological models is a great challenge. We apply a number of biologically plausible algorithms which address different aspects of vision, such as edge and keypoint detection, feature extraction,optical flow and disparity, shape detection, object recognition and scene modelling into a complete system. We present some of the experiments from our ongoing work, where our system leverages a combination of algorithms to ...

  16. Nuclear Phase Transition from Spherical to Axially Symmetric Deformed Shapes Using Interacting Boson Model

    Khalaf A. M.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The interacting boson model (sd-IBM1 with intrinsic coherent state is used to study the shape phase transitions from spherical U(5 to prolate deformed SU(3 shapes in Nd- Sm isotopic chains. The Hamiltonian is written in the creation and annihilation form with one and two body terms.For each nucleus a fitting procedure is adopted to get the best model parameters by fitting selected experimental energy levels, B(E2 transi- tion rates and two-neutron separation energies with the calculated ones.The U(5-SU(3 IBM potential energy surfaces (PES’s are analyzed and the critical phase transition points are identified in the space of model parameters.In Nd-Sm isotopic chains nuclei evolve from spherical to deformed shapes by increasing the boson number. The nuclei 150 Nd and 152 Sm have been found to be close to critical points.We have also studied the energy ratios and the B(E2 values for yrast band at the critical points.

  17. Automatic Sex Determination of Skulls Based on a Statistical Shape Model

    Li Luo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sex determination from skeletons is an important research subject in forensic medicine. Previous skeletal sex assessments are through subjective visual analysis by anthropologists or metric analysis of sexually dimorphic features. In this work, we present an automatic sex determination method for 3D digital skulls, in which a statistical shape model for skulls is constructed, which projects the high-dimensional skull data into a low-dimensional shape space, and Fisher discriminant analysis is used to classify skulls in the shape space. This method combines the advantages of metrical and morphological methods. It is easy to use without professional qualification and tedious manual measurement. With a group of Chinese skulls including 127 males and 81 females, we choose 92 males and 58 females to establish the discriminant model and validate the model with the other skulls. The correct rate is 95.7% and 91.4% for females and males, respectively. Leave-one-out test also shows that the method has a high accuracy.

  18. A STUDY FOR THE MATHEMATIC MODELING OF 2D IRREGULAR SHAPES FOR FOOTWEAR CAD SYSTEM

    DRIŞCU Mariana

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available For using a specialized footwear CAD system it's imperative to know the analytical expression of the outlines of the footwear patterns. This brings us to the field of mathematical modeling. Mathematic modeling is based on the equation of the function defining the outline of the model contour. Shapes, contours cannot be identified, in designing, by simple function of the form y=f(x, because most of them have irregular forms, with many concavities and convexities, which explains why their form is intrinsically dependent on the coordinates system. For example, if we want to plot a curve, it is absolutely necessary that we choose the right set of contour points in a system of coordinates, but the important factor in determining the form of the object is the relation between these points, not that between the points and the randomly chosen coordinates system. Further more, the contour forms may have vertical tangents. If the shape were represented by a function y=f(x, the vertical tangents would be an inconvenient in designing, which might be avoided by an approximation of analytic function (e.g. of polynomials For all these reasons, the dominant representation of shapes in CAD is not possible a function y=f(x but a set of function which can be obtained on various portions. This paper presents a study regarding the interpolation of the footwear components and outlines contours and the graphic visualization, using the following methods: Lagrange, B-Spline, Bezier.

  19. Somatostatin and Somatostatin-Containing Neurons in Shaping Neuronal Activity and Plasticity

    Liguz-Lecznar, Monika; Urban-Ciecko, Joanna; Kossut, Malgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Since its discovery over four decades ago, somatostatin (SOM) receives growing scientific and clinical interest. Being localized in the nervous system in a subset of interneurons somatostatin acts as a neurotransmitter or neuromodulator and its role in the fine-tuning of neuronal activity and involvement in synaptic plasticity and memory formation are widely recognized in the recent literature. Combining transgenic animals with electrophysiological, anatomical and molecular methods allowed to characterize several subpopulations of somatostatin-containing interneurons possessing specific anatomical and physiological features engaged in controlling the output of cortical excitatory neurons. Special characteristic and connectivity of somatostatin-containing neurons set them up as significant players in shaping activity and plasticity of the nervous system. However, somatostatin is not just a marker of particular interneuronal subpopulation. Somatostatin itself acts pre- and postsynaptically, modulating excitability and neuronal responses. In the present review, we combine the knowledge regarding somatostatin and somatostatin-containing interneurons, trying to incorporate it into the current view concerning the role of the somatostatinergic system in cortical plasticity. PMID:27445703

  20. Emphasis: an active management model

    The Institute of Nuclear Materials Management was founded and has grown on the basis of promoting professionalism in the nuclear industry. This paper is concerned with professional management of nuclear material. The paper introduces the reader to Emphasis, an active management model. The management model provides the framework to assist a manager in directing his available resources. Emphasis provides for establishing goals, identifying and selecting objectives, matching objectives to specific personnel, preparing and monitoring action plans, and evaluating results. The model stresses crisis prevention by systematically administering and controlling resources. A critical requirement for implementation of the model is the desire to manage, to be in charge of the situation. The nuclear industry does need managers - people who realize the sensitive nature of the industry, professionals who insist on improved performance

  1. Brain Tumor Segmentation Using a Generative Model with an RBM Prior on Tumor Shape

    Agn, Mikael; Puonti, Oula; Rosenschöld, Per Munck af; Law, Ian; Van Leemput, Koen

    with a spatial atlas-based tissue prior. We extend this basic model with a tumor prior, which uses convolutional restricted Boltzmann machines (cRBMs) to model the shape of both tumor core and complete tumor, which includes edema and core. The cRBMs are trained on expert segmentations of training...... images, without the use of the intensity information in the training images. Experiments on public benchmark data of patients suffering from low- and high-grade gliomas show that the method performs well compared to current state-of-the-art methods, while not being tied to any specific imaging protocol....

  2. Atomically thin spherical shell-shaped superscatterers based on Bohr model

    Li, Rujiang; Lin, Shisheng; Liu, Xu; Chen, Hongsheng

    2015-01-01

    Graphene monolayers can be used for atomically thin three-dimensional shell-shaped superscatterer designs. Due to the excitation of the first-order resonance of transverse magnetic (TM) graphene plasmons, the scattering cross section of the bare subwavelength dielectric particle is enhanced significantly by five orders of magnitude. The superscattering phenomenon can be intuitively understood and interpreted with Bohr model. Besides, based on the analysis of Bohr model, it is shown that contrary to the TM case, superscattering is hard to occur by exciting the resonance of transverse electric (TE) graphene plasmons due to their poor field confinements.

  3. Calibration and Finite Element Implementation of an Energy-Based Material Model for Shape Memory Alloys

    Junker, Philipp; Hackl, Klaus

    2016-06-01

    Numerical simulations are a powerful tool to analyze the complex thermo-mechanically coupled material behavior of shape memory alloys during product engineering. The benefit of the simulations strongly depends on the quality of the underlying material model. In this contribution, we discuss a variational approach which is based solely on energetic considerations and demonstrate that unique calibration of such a model is sufficient to predict the material behavior at varying ambient temperature. In the beginning, we recall the necessary equations of the material model and explain the fundamental idea. Afterwards, we focus on the numerical implementation and provide all information that is needed for programing. Then, we show two different ways to calibrate the model and discuss the results. Furthermore, we show how this model is used during real-life industrial product engineering.

  4. Improving the S-Shape Solar Radiation Estimation Method for Supporting Crop Models

    Nándor Fodor

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In line with the critical comments formulated in relation to the S-shape global solar radiation estimation method, the original formula was improved via a 5-step procedure. The improved method was compared to four-reference methods on a large North-American database. According to the investigated error indicators, the final 7-parameter S-shape method has the same or even better estimation efficiency than the original formula. The improved formula is able to provide radiation estimates with a particularly low error pattern index (PIdoy which is especially important concerning the usability of the estimated radiation values in crop models. Using site-specific calibration, the radiation estimates of the improved S-shape method caused an average of 2.72±1.02 (=0.05 relative error in the calculated biomass. Using only readily available site specific metadata the radiation estimates caused less than 5% relative error in the crop model calculations when they were used for locations in the middle, plain territories of the USA.

  5. Modeling Defects, Shape Evolution, and Programmed Auto-origami in Liquid Crystal Elastomers

    Konya, Andrew; Gimenez-Pinto, Vianney; Selinger, Robin

    2016-06-01

    Liquid crystal elastomers represent a novel class of programmable shape-transforming materials whose shape change trajectory is encoded in the material’s nematic director field. Using three-dimensional nonlinear finite element elastodynamics simulation, we model a variety of different actuation geometries and device designs: thin films containing topological defects, patterns that induce formation of folds and twists, and a bas-relief structure. The inclusion of finite bending energy in the simulation model reveals features of actuation trajectory that may be absent when bending energy is neglected. We examine geometries with a director pattern uniform through the film thickness encoding multiple regions of positive Gaussian curvature. Simulations indicate that heating such a system uniformly produces a disordered state with curved regions emerging randomly in both directions due to the film’s up/down symmetry. By contrast, applying a thermal gradient by heating the material first on one side breaks up/down symmetry and results in a deterministic trajectory producing a more ordered final shape. We demonstrate that a folding zone design containing cut-out areas accommodates transverse displacements without warping or buckling; and demonstrate that bas-relief and more complex bent/twisted structures can be assembled by combining simple design motifs.

  6. Molecular dynamics simulation of shape memory behaviour using a multi-grain model

    Shape-memory behaviour in multi-grain material is simulated using a molecular dynamics method. An embedded-atom-method potential for NiAl alloy is applied, and a sequence of conditions including loading, unloading, heating and cooling is imposed. Two types of grain arrangement are used, and the deformation and shape recovery due to phase transformation are observed for both models. The stress–strain relation is revealed to draw a hysteresis loop, and the individual curves are smoother than those previously obtained from a single-crystal model. The deformation mechanism during loading is discussed using local structure analysis. Local deformation is initiated at the grain boundaries, and the deformed region propagates along the twin plane in the grain. The propagation is then obstructed by the grain boundaries, and a band pattern of the deformed area is formed. The influence of the grain shape and distribution, as well as the crystal orientation of each grain, on the deformation behaviour is also investigated. Qualitatively common features in the deformation mechanism and stress–strain relation are observed despite different grain distributions, while the critical values in stress vary, owing to the crystal orientations of the grains

  7. A parabolic model to control quantum interference in T-shaped molecular junctions.

    Nozaki, Daijiro; Sevinçli, Hâldun; Avdoshenko, Stanislav M; Gutierrez, Rafael; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2013-09-01

    Quantum interference (QI) effects in molecular devices have drawn increasing attention over the past years due to their unique features observed in the conductance spectrum. For the further development of single molecular devices exploiting QI effects, it is of great theoretical and practical interest to develop simple methods controlling the emergence and the positions of QI effects like anti-resonances or Fano line shapes in conductance spectra. In this work, starting from a well-known generic molecular junction with a side group (T-shaped molecule), we propose a simple graphical method to visualize the conditions for the appearance of quantum interference, Fano resonances or anti-resonances, in the conductance spectrum. By introducing a simple graphical representation (parabolic diagram), we can easily visualize the relation between the electronic parameters and the positions of normal resonant peaks and anti-resonant peaks induced by quantum interference in the conductance spectrum. This parabolic model not only can predict the emergence and energetic position of quantum interference from a few electronic parameters but also can enable one to know the coupling between the side group and the main conduction channel from measurements in the case of orthogonal basis. The results obtained within the parabolic model are validated using density-functional based quantum transport calculations in realistic T-shaped molecular junctions. PMID:23558406

  8. A Constitutive Model for Superelastic Shape Memory Alloys Considering the Influence of Strain Rate

    Hui Qian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Shape memory alloys (SMAs are a relatively new class of functional materials, exhibiting special thermomechanical behaviors, such as shape memory effect and superelasticity, which enable their applications in seismic engineering as energy dissipation devices. This paper investigates the properties of superelastic NiTi shape memory alloys, emphasizing the influence of strain rate on superelastic behavior under various strain amplitudes by cyclic tensile tests. A novel constitutive equation based on Graesser and Cozzarelli’s model is proposed to describe the strain-rate-dependent hysteretic behavior of superelastic SMAs at different strain levels. A stress variable including the influence of strain rate is introduced into Graesser and Cozzarelli’s model. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed constitutive equation, experiments on superelastic NiTi wires with different strain rates and strain levels are conducted. Numerical simulation results based on the proposed constitutive equation and experimental results are in good agreement. The findings in this paper will assist the future design of superelastic SMA-based energy dissipation devices for seismic protection of structures.

  9. Modeling Defects, Shape Evolution, and Programmed Auto-origami in Liquid Crystal Elastomers

    Andrew eKonya

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Liquid crystal elastomers represent a novel class of programmable shape-transforming materials whose shape change trajectory is encoded in the material’s nematic director field. Using three-dimensional nonlinear finite element elastodynamics simulation, we model a variety of different actuation geometries and device designs: thin films containing topological defects, patterns that induce formation of folds and twists, and a bas-relief structure. The inclusion of finite bending energy in the simulation model reveals features of actuation trajectory that may be absent when bending energy is neglected. We examine geometries with a director pattern uniform through the film thickness encoding multiple regions of positive Gaussian curvature. Simulations indicate that heating such a system uniformly produces a disordered state with curved regions emerging randomly in both directions due to the film’s up/down symmetry. By contrast, applying a thermal gradient by heating the material first on one side breaks up/down symmetry and results in a deterministic trajectory producing a more ordered final shape. We demonstrate that a folding zone design containing cut-out areas accommodates transverse displacements without warping or buckling; and demonstrate that bas-relief and more complex bent/twisted structures can be assembled by combining simple design motifs.

  10. Rhizosphere heterogeneity shapes abundance and activity of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in vegetated salt marsh sediments

    François eThomas

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Salt marshes are highly productive ecosystems hosting an intense sulfur (S cycle, yet little is known about S-oxidizing microorganisms in these ecosystems. Here, we studied the diversity and transcriptional activity of S-oxidizers in salt marsh sediments colonized by the plant Spartina alterniflora, and assessed variations with sediment depth and small-scale compartments within the rhizosphere. We combined next-generation amplicon sequencing of 16S rDNA and rRNA libraries with phylogenetic analyses of marker genes for two S-oxidation pathways (soxB and rdsrAB. Gene and transcript numbers of soxB and rdsrAB phylotypes were quantified simultaneously, using newly designed (RT-qPCR assays. We identified a diverse assemblage of S-oxidizers, with Chromatiales and Thiotrichales being dominant. The detection of transcripts from S-oxidizers was mostly confined to the upper 5 cm sediments, following the expected distribution of root biomass. A common pool of species dominated by Gammaproteobacteria transcribed S-oxidation genes across roots, rhizosphere, and surrounding sediment compartments, with rdsrAB transcripts prevailing over soxB. However, the root environment fine-tuned the abundance and transcriptional activity of the S-oxidizing community. In particular, the global transcription of soxB was higher on the roots compared to mix and rhizosphere samples. Furthermore, the contribution of Epsilonproteobacteria-related S-oxidizers tended to increase on Spartina roots compared to surrounding sediments. These data shed light on the under-studied oxidative part of the sulfur cycle in salt marsh sediments and indicate small-scale heterogeneities are important factors shaping abundance and potential activity of S-oxidizers in the rhizosphere.

  11. Using serial imaging data to model variabilities in organ position and shape during radiotherapy

    A model is proposed for incorporating the effects of organ motion into the calculation of dose in a statistical fashion based on serial imaging measurements of organ motion. These measurements can either come from a previously studied population of patients, or they can be specific to the particular patient undergoing therapy. The statistical distribution underlying the measurements of organ motion, including the changes in organ shape, is reconstructed non-parametrically without requiring any assumptions about its functional form. The model is thus capable of simulating organ motions that are not present in the original measurements, yet nonetheless come from the same underlying statistical distribution. The present model overcomes two particular limitations of many organ motion models: (a) the fact that they do not account for changes in organ shape, and (b) the fact that they make physically unrealistic assumptions about the functional form of the statistical distribution of organ motion, such as assuming that it is Gaussian. The present model can form the foundation of methods for the more accurate and clinically relevant calculation of the dose to the target volume and normal tissues. (author)

  12. Modeling of effects of matrix on actuation characteristics of embedded shape memory alloy wires

    CUI Xiao-long; ZHENG Yan-jun; CUI Li-shan

    2005-01-01

    Effects of matrix properties on the actuation characteristics of embedded shape memory alloy wires were studied. The coefficient of thermal expansion and the modulus of matrix have significant effect on the maximum recovery stress. The thermal strain rate of the SMA wires upon heating is more sensitive to the matrix properties than the stress rate does. Additional fibers embedded in the matrix have significant effect on the stress distribution between the SMA wires and the matrix, and thus affect the interface quality significantly. Fibers with negative thermal expansion coefficient are beneficial to the interface between shape memory alloy wires and the epoxy matrix. All conclusions based on the numerical modeling can find experimental supports.

  13. Modelling changes in leaf shape prior to phyllode acquisition in Acacia mangium Willd. seedlings.

    Leroy, Céline; Heuret, Patrick

    2008-02-01

    The aim of this study was to characterise changes in leaf shape prior to phyllode acquisition along the axes of Acacia mangium seedlings. The study area was located in North Lampung (South Sumatra, Indonesia), where these trees belong to a naturally regenerated stand. A total of 173 seedlings, less than three months old, were described node by node. Leaf shape and leaf length were recorded and the way in which one leaf type succeeded another was modelled using a hidden semi-Markov chain composed of seven states. The phyllotactical pattern was studied using another sample of forty 6-month-old seedlings. The results indicate (i) the existence of successive zones characterised by one or a combination of leaf types, and (ii) that phyllode acquisition seems to be accompanied by a change in the phyllotactical pattern. The concepts of juvenility and heteroblasty, as well as potential applications for taxonomy are discussed. PMID:18241805

  14. Attractors for a Three-Dimensional Thermo-Mechanical Model of Shape Memory Alloys

    Pierluigi COLLI; Michel FR(E)MOND; Elisabetta ROCCA; Ken SHIRAKAWA

    2006-01-01

    In this note, we consider a Frémond model of shape memory alloys. Let us imagine a piece of a shape memory alloy which is fixed on one part of its boundary, and assume that forcing terms, e.g., heat sources and external stress on the remaining part of its boundary, converge to some time-independent functions, in appropriate senses, as time goes to infinity. Under the above assumption, we shall discuss the asymptotic stability for the dynamical system from the viewpoint of the global attractor. More precisely,we generalize the paper [12] dealing with the one-dimensional case. First, we show the existence of the global attractor for the limiting autonomous dynamical system; then we characterize the asymptotic stability for the non-autonomous case by the limiting global attractor.

  15. Average pulse shape model for leading edge timing with Ge(Li) coaxial detector

    A model is presented for prompt time-response from leading-edge triggering, where calculations are rendered simpler for uniform γ-irradiation of coaxial Ge(Li) detector. Pulse shapes are formed at the timing filter amplifier output, from direct detector pulse. Average pulse-shape method is found responsible for some sort of walk compensation and by drawing time-resolution vs triggering fraction, one can predict the best FWHM with detector of RC-filtered signal. It also shows the effect of mixed filter time-constant on r.m.s. noise. Taking account of both statistical and noise effects on FWHM, the statistical contribution increases to 7% at 3 MeV of the detected energy

  16. Improved Frequency Fluctuation Model for Spectral Line Shape Calculations in Fusion Plasmas

    Ferri, S.; Calisti, A.; Mossé, C.; Talin, B.; Lisitsa, V.

    2010-10-01

    A very fast method to calculate spectral line shapes emitted by plasmas accounting for charge particle dynamics and effects of an external magnetic field is proposed. This method relies on a new formulation of the Frequency Fluctuation Model (FFM), which yields to an expression of the dynamic line profile as a functional of the static distribution function of frequencies. This highly efficient formalism, not limited to hydrogen-like systems, allows to calculate pure Stark and Stark-Zeeman line shapes for a wide range of density, temperature and magnetic field values, which is of importance in plasma physics and astrophysics. Various applications of this method are presented for conditions related to fusion plasmas.

  17. Hysteresis model of shape memory alloy wire-based laminated rubber bearing under compression and unidirectional shear loadings

    Hedayati Dezfuli, F.; Shahria Alam, M.

    2015-06-01

    Smart lead rubber bearings (LRBs), in which a shape memory alloy (SMA) is used in the form of wires, are a new generation of elastomeric isolators with improved performance in terms of recentering capability and energy dissipation capacity. It is of great interest to implement SMA wire-based lead rubber bearings (SMA-LRBs) in bridges; however, currently there is no appropriate hysteresis model for accurately simulating the behavior of such isolators. A constitutive model for SMA-LRBs is proposed in this study. An LRB is equipped with a double cross configuration of SMA wires (DC-SMAW) and subjected to compression and unidirectional shear loadings. Due to the complexity of the shear behavior of the SMA-LRB, a hysteresis model is developed for the DC-SMAWs and then combined with the bilinear kinematic hardening model, which is assumed for the LRB. Comparing the hysteretic response of decoupled systems with that of the SMA-LRB shows that the high recentering capability of the DC-SMAW model with zero residual deformation could noticeably reduce the residual deformation of the LRB. The developed constitutive model for DC-SMAWs is characterized by three stiffnesses when the shear strain exceeds a starting limit at which the SMA wires are activated due to phase transformation. An important point is that the shear hysteresis of the DC-SMAW model looks different from the flag-shaped hysteresis of the SMA because of the specific arrangement of wires and its effect on the resultant forces transferred from the wires to the rubber bearing.

  18. A Model for the Secondary Scintillation Pulse Shape from a Gas Proportional Scintillation Counter

    Kazkaz, Kareem

    2015-01-01

    Proportional scintillation counters (PSCs), both single- and dual-phase, can measure the scintillation (S1) and ionization (S2) channels from particle interactions within the detector volume. The signal obtained from these detectors depends first on the physics of the medium (the initial scintillation and ionization), and second how the physics of the detector manipulates the resulting photons and liberated electrons. In this paper we develop a model of the detector physics that incorporates event topology, detector geometry, electric field configuration, purity, optical properties of components, and wavelength shifters. We present an analytic form of the model, which allows for general study of detector design and operation, and a Monte Carlo model which enables a more detailed exploration of S2 events. This model may be used to study systematic effects in currents detectors such as energy and position reconstruction, pulse shape discrimination, event topology, dead time calculations, purity, and electric fi...

  19. Computational modeling of size-dependent superelasticity of shape memory alloys

    Qiao, Lei; Radovitzky, Raul

    2016-08-01

    We propose a nonlocal continuum model to describe the size-dependent superelastic responses observed in recent experiments of shape memory alloys. The modeling approach extends a superelasticity formulation based on the martensitic volume fraction, and combines it with gradient plasticity theories. Size effects are incorporated through two internal length scales, an energetic length scale and a dissipative length scale, which correspond to the gradient terms in the free energy and the dissipation, respectively. We also propose a computational framework based on a variational formulation to solve the coupled governing equations resulting from the nonlocal superelastic model. Within this framework, a robust and scalable algorithm is implemented for large scale three-dimensional problems. A numerical study of the grain boundary constraint effect shows that the model is able to capture the size-dependent stress hysteresis and strain hardening during the loading and unloading cycles in polycrystalline SMAs.

  20. Nanobiomimetic Active Shape Control - Fluidic and Swarm-Intelligence Embodiments for Planetary Exploration

    Santoli, S.

    The concepts of Active Shape Control ( ASC ) and of Generalized Quantum Holography ( GQH ), respectively embodying a closer approach to biomimicry than the current macrophysics-based attempts at bioinspired robotic systems, and realizing a non-connectionistic, life-like kind of information processing that allows increasingly depths of mimicking of the biological structure-function solidarity, which have been formulated in physical terms in previous papers, are here further investigated for application to bioinspired flying or swimming robots for planetary exploration. It is shown that nano-to-micro integration would give the deepest level of biomimicry, and that both low and very low Reynolds number ( Re ) fluidics would involve GQH and Fiber Bundle Topology ( FBT ) for processing information at the various levels of ASC bioinspired robotics. While very low Re flows lend themselves to geometrization of microrobot dynamics and to FBT design, the general design problem is geometrized through GQH , i.e. made independent of dynamic considerations, thus allowing possible problems of semantic dyscrasias in highly complex hierarchical dynamical chains of sensing information processing actuating to be overcome. A roadmap to near- and medium-term nanostructured and nano-to-micro integration realizations is suggested.

  1. Mechanisms Of Saucer-Shaped Sill Emplacement: Insight From Experimental Modeling

    Galland, O.; Planke, S.; Malthe-Sørenssen, A.; Polteau, S.; Svensen, H.; Podladchikov, Y. Y.

    2006-12-01

    It has been recently demonstrated that magma intrusions in sedimentary basins had a strong impact on petroleum systems. Most of these intrusions are sills, and especially saucer-shaped sills. These features can be observed in many sedimentary basins (i.e. the Karoo basin, South Africa; the Norwegian and North Sea; the Tunguska basin, Siberia; the Neuquén basin in Argentina). The occurrence of such features in so various settings suggests that their emplacement results from fundamental processes. However, the mechanisms that govern their formation remain poorly constrained. Experiments were conducted to simulate the emplacement of saucer-shaped magma intrusions in sedimentary basins. The model rock and magma were fine-grained silica flour and molten vegetable oil, respectively. This modeling technique allows simultaneous simulation of magma emplacement and brittle deformation at a basin scale. For our purpose, we performed our experiments without external deformation. During the experiments, the oil was injected horizontally at constant flow rate within the silica flour. Then the oil initially emplaced in a sill, whereas the surface of the model inflated into a smooth dome. Subsequently, the oil propagated upwards along inclined sheets, finally reaching the surface at the edge of the dome. The resulting geometries of the intrusions were saucer-shaped sills. Then the oil solidified, and the model was cut in serial cross-sections through which the structures of the intrusive body and of the overburden can be observed. In order to constraint the processes governing the emplacement of such features, we performed a parametric study based on a set of experiments in which we systematically varied parameters such as the depth of emplacement and the injection flow rate of the oil. Our results showed that saucer diameters are larger at deeper level of emplacement. Opposite trend was obtained with varying injection flow rates. Based on our results, we conducted a detailed

  2. A mathematical model for smart functionally graded beam integrated with shape memory alloy actuators

    Sepiani, H.; Ebrahimi, F. [University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Karimipour, H. [Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2009-12-15

    This paper presents a theoretical study of the thermally driven behavior of a shape memory alloy (SMA)/FGM actuator under arbitrary loading and boundary conditions by developing an integrated mathematical model. The model studied is established on the geometric parameters of the three-dimensional laminated composite box beam as an actuator that consists of a functionally graded core integrated with SMA actuator layers with a uniform rectangular cross section. The constitutive equation and linear phase transformation kinetics relations of SMA layers based on Tanaka and Nagaki model are coupled with the governing equation of the actuator to predict the stress history and to model the thermo-mechanical behavior of the smart shape memory alloy/FGM beam. Based on the classical laminated beam theory, the explicit solution to the structural response of the structure, including axial and lateral deflections of the structure, is investigated. As an example, a cantilever box beam subjected to a transverse concentrated load is solved numerically. It is found that the changes in the actuator's responses during the phase transformation due to the strain recovery are significant

  3. A multidimensional stability model for predicting shallow landslide size and shape across landscapes

    Milledge, David G; Bellugi, Dino; McKean, Jim A; Densmore, Alexander L; Dietrich, William E

    2014-01-01

    The size of a shallow landslide is a fundamental control on both its hazard and geomorphic importance. Existing models are either unable to predict landslide size or are computationally intensive such that they cannot practically be applied across landscapes. We derive a model appropriate for natural slopes that is capable of predicting shallow landslide size but simple enough to be applied over entire watersheds. It accounts for lateral resistance by representing the forces acting on each margin of potential landslides using earth pressure theory and by representing root reinforcement as an exponential function of soil depth. We test our model's ability to predict failure of an observed landslide where the relevant parameters are well constrained by field data. The model predicts failure for the observed scar geometry and finds that larger or smaller conformal shapes are more stable. Numerical experiments demonstrate that friction on the boundaries of a potential landslide increases considerably the magnitude of lateral reinforcement, relative to that due to root cohesion alone. We find that there is a critical depth in both cohesive and cohesionless soils, resulting in a minimum size for failure, which is consistent with observed size-frequency distributions. Furthermore, the differential resistance on the boundaries of a potential landslide is responsible for a critical landslide shape which is longer than it is wide, consistent with observed aspect ratios. Finally, our results show that minimum size increases as approximately the square of failure surface depth, consistent with observed landslide depth-area data. PMID:26213663

  4. A mathematical model for smart functionally graded beam integrated with shape memory alloy actuators

    This paper presents a theoretical study of the thermally driven behavior of a shape memory alloy (SMA)/FGM actuator under arbitrary loading and boundary conditions by developing an integrated mathematical model. The model studied is established on the geometric parameters of the three-dimensional laminated composite box beam as an actuator that consists of a functionally graded core integrated with SMA actuator layers with a uniform rectangular cross section. The constitutive equation and linear phase transformation kinetics relations of SMA layers based on Tanaka and Nagaki model are coupled with the governing equation of the actuator to predict the stress history and to model the thermo-mechanical behavior of the smart shape memory alloy/FGM beam. Based on the classical laminated beam theory, the explicit solution to the structural response of the structure, including axial and lateral deflections of the structure, is investigated. As an example, a cantilever box beam subjected to a transverse concentrated load is solved numerically. It is found that the changes in the actuator's responses during the phase transformation due to the strain recovery are significant

  5. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide assisted shape-controlled synthesis of catalytically active raspberry-like gold nanostructures

    Graphical abstract: A facile method was developed for the synthesis of raspberry-like Au nanostructure and it was used as an electrocatalyst for the oxidation of methanol and reduction of oxygen. - Highlights: • Raspberry-like gold nanostructures have been synthesized. • Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide plays an important role in the synthesis. • Raspberry-like Au nanostructure has an excellent electrocatalytic activity in methanol oxidation and oxygen reduction. - Abstract: We describe the shape-controlled growth of raspberry-like gold (Au) nanostructures and their application in the electrochemical oxidation of methanol and reduction of oxygen. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) plays a vital role in the growth of raspberry-like Au nanostructures. The preferential adsorption of NAD+ onto the (011) facets of Au favors the growth of raspberry-like morphology. In the absence of NAD+, icosahedral Au nanostructures were obtained. The raspberry-like Au nanostructures have been characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), and electrochemical measurements. The FESEM image shows that the raspberry-like morphology has an average size of 170 nm. The spectral profile shows a broad band between 650 and 795 nm. Compared to Au nanoseeds and icosahedral Au nanostructures that were grown in the absence of NAD+, the raspberry-like morphology has excellent catalytic activity towards the electrochemical oxidation of methanol and reduction of oxygen. On the raspberry-like nanoparticle-based electrode, the oxidation of methanol was observed at 0.35 V in alkaline pH, and the reduction of oxygen was observed at -0.06 and -0.4 V in 0.1 M PBS. The electrochemical reduction of oxygen occurs in two steps: (i) reduction of oxygen to H2O2 and (ii) further reduction of electrogenerated H2O2 to water. The electrochemical performance of the raspberry-like nanostructure-based electrode is highly stable

  6. System-Level Design of a Shape Memory Alloy Actuator for Active Clearance Control in the High-Pressure Turbine

    DeCastro, Jonathan A.; Melcher, Kevin J.; Noebe, Ronald D.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes results of a numerical analysis evaluating the feasibility of high-temperature shape memory alloys (HTSMA) for active clearance control actuation in the high-pressure turbine section of a modern turbofan engine. The prototype actuator concept considered here consists of parallel HTSMA wires attached to the shroud that is located on the exterior of the turbine case. A transient model of an HTSMA actuator was used to evaluate active clearance control at various operating points in a test bed aircraft engine simulation. For the engine under consideration, each actuator must be designed to counteract loads from 380 to 2000 lbf and displace at least 0.033 inches. Design results show that an actuator comprised of 10 wires 2 inches in length is adequate for control at critical engine operating points and still exhibits acceptable failsafe operability and cycle life. A proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller with integrator windup protection was implemented to control clearance amidst engine transients during a normal mission. Simulation results show that the control system exhibits minimal variability in clearance control performance across the operating envelope. The final actuator design is sufficiently small to fit within the limited space outside the high-pressure turbine case and is shown to consume only small amounts of bleed air to adequately regulate temperature.

  7. A subspace thermodynamic model for shape memory alloy wire elements undergoing combined thermo-mechanical axial and torsional loads

    Given that most applications of shape memory alloys (SMA) are in the wire form, a reduced order model and analysis has been attempted in this paper. It takes into account the fact that the predominant actions are axial (bending inclusive) and torsional. A thermodynamic framework is first developed to simulate the behaviour of the SMA material under thermo-mechanical loading that is a combination of axial and shear stresses arising at a point in a wire due to axial and torsional loads applied to the wire. Since only a few variants relevant to axial-torsion are going to be active in transformation under this kind of loading, a reduced order model that tracks the evolution of four martensite variants and an austenite variant is proposed. It is shown through simulations that these five model parameters amply form a minimal set of model parameters sufficient for simulating response under tension–torsion loading excursions. The model is further applied to the structural member, in this case, a wire of circular cross-section subject to a twist and an axial extension and the capability of the model to simulate the kind of response expected in wires. Incorporation of this model into a large deformation space frame nonlinear analysis will help in the design and analysis of several applications where SMA wire forms are used. (paper)

  8. VOF Modeling and Analysis of the Segmented Flow in Y-Shaped Microchannels for Microreactor Systems

    Xian Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Microscaled devices receive great attention in microreactor systems for producing high renewable energy due to higher surface-to-volume, higher transport rates (heat or/and mass transfer rates, and other advantages over conventional-size reactors. In this paper, the two-phase liquid-liquid flow in a microchannel with various Y-shaped junctions has been studied numerically. Two kinds of immiscible liquids were injected into a microchannel from the Y-shaped junctions to generate the segment flow mode. The segment length was studied. The volume of fluid (VOF method was used to track the liquid-liquid interface and the piecewise-liner interface construction (PLIC technique was adopted to get a sharp interface. The interfacial tension was simulated with continuum surface force (CSF model and the wall adhesion boundary condition was taken into consideration. The simulated flow pattern presents consistence with our experimental one. The numerical results show that a segmented flow mode appears in the main channel. Under the same inlet velocities of two liquids, the segment lengths of the two liquids are the same and depend on the inclined angles of two lateral channels. The effect of inlet velocity is studied in a typical T-shaped microchannel. It is found that the ratio between the lengths of two liquids is almost equal to the ratio between their inlet velocities.

  9. Interactive modeling of scintillation pulses by visual overlay of computed pulse shapes with the raw data

    The modeling technique described in this paper was developed to aid in interpretation of the effects of various changes in scintillator formulations on the shape of scintillation pulses. For example, addition of quenchers to single-solute systems can quench either the solute or excited solvent, or both, and it is useful to understand these effects in tailoring a scintillator for optimum brightness or speed for a specific application. In multisolute scintillators, an understanding of the detailed energy transfer steps is also desirable. Inspection of pulse rise and decay times often give general information on these effects, but a more detailed interpretation is complicated by several factors. First of all, many scintillators are fast enough (1-2 ns FWHM) so that empirically determined pulse parameters, especially rise times, are significantly affected by the response time of the measuring system. In addition, decay times are difficult to determine until the signal has decayed considerably past the peak where noise can become a problem. It occurred to us that it might be possible to understand the effects of additives on the rise and decay constants that determine the true pulse shape if we synthesized theoretical pulse shapes, folded in the system response function, and overlaid the resulting curves on the raw data arrays. The results have been gratifying in that in most cases it has been possible to distinguish relatively unambiguously between quenching of the solvent and the solute when various heavy-atom quenchers were added to solutions of a series of substituted terphenyls

  10. How caldera collapse shapes the shallow emplacement and transfer of magma in active volcanoes

    Corbi, F.; Rivalta, E.; Pinel, V.; Maccaferri, F.; Bagnardi, M.; Acocella, V.

    2015-12-01

    Calderas are topographic depressions formed by the collapse of a partly drained magma reservoir. At volcanic edifices with calderas, eruptive fissures can circumscribe the outer caldera rim, be oriented radially and/or align with the regional tectonic stress field. Constraining the mechanisms that govern this spatial arrangement is fundamental to understand the dynamics of shallow magma storage and transport and evaluate volcanic hazard. Here we show with numerical models that the previously unappreciated unloading effect of caldera formation may contribute significantly to the stress budget of a volcano. We first test this hypothesis against the ideal case of Fernandina, Galápagos, where previous models only partly explained the peculiar pattern of circumferential and radial eruptive fissures and the geometry of the intrusions determined by inverting the deformation data. We show that by taking into account the decompression due to the caldera formation, the modeled edifice stress field is consistent with all the observations. We then develop a general model for the stress state at volcanic edifices with calderas based on the competition of caldera decompression, magma buoyancy forces and tectonic stresses. These factors control: 1) the shallow accumulation of magma in stacked sills, consistently with observations; 2) the conditions for the development of circumferential and/or radial eruptive fissures, as observed on active volcanoes. This top-down control exerted by changes in the distribution of mass at the surface allows better understanding of how shallow magma is transferred at active calderas, contributing to forecasting the location and type of opening fissures.

  11. ON SKEW-NORMAL MODEL FOR ECONOMICALLY ACTIVE POPULATION

    OLOSUNDE AKINLOLU A

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The literature related to skew-symmetric distribution have grown rapidly in recent years but at the moment no publication on its applications concerning the description of economically active data with this type of probability models. In this paper, we provided an extension to this skew-normal distribution, which is also part of the family of skewed class of normal but with additional shape parameters δ. Some properties of this distribution are presented and finally, we considered fitting it to economically active population data. The model exhibited a better behaviour when compared to normal and skew normal distributions.

  12. Parametric geometric model and shape optimization of an underwater glider with blended-wing-body

    Sun Chunya; Song Baowei; Wang Peng

    2015-01-01

    Underwater glider, as a new kind of autonomous underwater vehicles, has many merits such as long-range, extended-duration and low costs. The shape of underwater glider is an important factor in determining the hydrodynamic efficiency. In this paper, a high lift to drag ratio configuration, the Blended-Wing-Body (BWB), is used to design a small civilian under water glider. In the parametric geometric model of the BWB underwater glider, the planform is defined with Bezier curve and linear line,...

  13. Nucleon shape and electromagnetic form factors in the chiral constituent quark model

    Dahiya, Harleen

    2010-01-01

    The electromagnetic form factors are the most fundamental quantities to describe the internal structure of the nucleon and the shape of a spatially extended particle is determined by its intrinsic quadrupole moment which can be related to the charge radii. We have calculated the electromagnetic form factors, nucleon charge radii and the intrinsic quadrupole moment of the nucleon in the framework of chiral constituent quark model. The results obtained are comparable to the latest experimental studies and also show improvement over some theoretical interpretations.

  14. Load partition in shape memory alloy polycrystals studied by in-situ neutron diffraction and modeling

    Šittner, Petr; Novák, Václav; Lukáš, Petr

    Dodrecht : Kluwer Academic Publishers, 2002 - (Sun, Q.), s. 179-188 ISBN 1-4020-0741-8. [IUTAM Symposium on Mechanics of Martensitic Phase Transformation in Solids. Hong Kong (CN), 11.06.2001-15.06.2001] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1048107; GA AV ČR IAA1010909; GA ČR GV202/97/K038 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : neutron difraction * shape memory alloy * polycrystal modelling Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  15. Shape evolution of highly deformed 75Kr and projected shell model description

    A study of recently-measured high spin states of 75Kr is carried out by using the Projected Shell Model. Calculations are performed up to spin I = 33/2 for the positive parity band and I = 27/2 for the negative parity band. Irregularities found in moment of inertia and in the deduced transition quadrupole moments Qt of the two bands are discussed in terms of the alignment of g9/2 protons. Our study provides an insight into the shape evolution of the well-deformed nucleus 75kr. (author)

  16. Modulated Martensites in Ferromagnetic Shape Memory Alloys: From Experimental Observations to Mathematical Modelling

    Benešová, B.; Frost, Miroslav; Kampschulte, M.; Melcher, C.; Seiner, Hanuš

    Regensburg: Department of Mathematics, University of Regensburg, 2015. s. 22-22. [GAMM-Seminar on Microstructures /14./. 16.01.2015-17.01.2015, Regensburg] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) DAAD/14/11; GA ČR GA14-15264S; GA ČR(CZ) GP14-28306P Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : ferromagnetic shape memory alloys * modulated martensite * modelling Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism http://www.mathematik.uni-regensburg.de/Dolzmann/GAMM15/GAMMSeminar2015_Abstracts.pdf

  17. A drifting trajectory prediction model based on object shape and stochastic mo-tion features

    王胜正; 聂皓冰; 施朝健

    2014-01-01

    There is a huge demand to develop a method for marine search and rescue (SAR) operators automatically predicting the most probable searching area of the drifting object. This paper presents a novel drifting prediction model to improve the accuracy of the drifting trajectory computation of the sea-surface objects. First, a new drifting kinetic model based on the geometry characteristics of the objects is proposed that involves the effects of the object shape and stochastic motion features in addition to the traditional factors of wind and currents. Then, a computer simulation-based method is employed to analyze the stochastic motion features of the drifting objects, which is applied to estimate the uncertainty parameters of the stochastic factors of the drifting objects. Finally, the accuracy of the model is evaluated by comparison with the flume experimental results. It is shown that the proposed method can be used for various shape objects in the drifting trajectory prediction and the maritime search and rescue decision-making system.

  18. Functional data analytic approach of modeling ECG T-wave shape to measure cardiovascular behavior

    Zhou, Yingchun; 10.1214/09-AOAS273

    2010-01-01

    The T-wave of an electrocardiogram (ECG) represents the ventricular repolarization that is critical in restoration of the heart muscle to a pre-contractile state prior to the next beat. Alterations in the T-wave reflect various cardiac conditions; and links between abnormal (prolonged) ventricular repolarization and malignant arrhythmias have been documented. Cardiac safety testing prior to approval of any new drug currently relies on two points of the ECG waveform: onset of the Q-wave and termination of the T-wave; and only a few beats are measured. Using functional data analysis, a statistical approach extracts a common shape for each subject (reference curve) from a sequence of beats, and then models the deviation of each curve in the sequence from that reference curve as a four-dimensional vector. The representation can be used to distinguish differences between beats or to model shape changes in a subject's T-wave over time. This model provides physically interpretable parameters characterizing T-wave sh...

  19. Review of critical point symmetries and shape phase transitions within algebraic and collective models

    Several aspect of shape phase transitions and critical point symmetries are reviewed in this contribution within the frameworks of the Interacting Boson Model (IBM) and the Interacting Boson Fermion Model (IBFM) for even and odd systems respectively and compared with collective geometric models. We discuss in particular the case of an odd j = 3/2 particle coupled to an even-even boson core that undergoes a transition from the spherical limit U(5) to the γ-unstable limit O(6). The spectrum and transition rates at the critical point are similar to those of the even core and they agree qualitatively with the E(5/4) boson-fermion symmetry. We discuss also the UBF (5) to SUBF (3) shape phase transition in which the allowed fermionic orbitals are j = 1/2; 3/2; 5/2. The formalism of the intrinsic or coherent states is used to describe in details the ground state as well as the excited β- and γ- bands. This formalism is also used to calculate the Potential Energy Surface of the cubic quadrupole operator that leads to triaxiality. (author)

  20. A Thrombus Generation Model Applied to Aneurysms Treated with Shape Memory Polymer Foam and Metal Coils

    Horn, John; Ortega, Jason; Hartman, Jonathan; Maitland, Duncan

    2015-11-01

    To prevent their rupture, intracranial aneurysms are often treated with endovascular metal coils which fill the aneurysm sac and isolate it from the arterial flow. Despite its widespread use, this method can result in suboptimal outcomes leading to aneurysm recurrence. Recently, shape memory polymer foam has been proposed as an alternative aneurysm filler. In this work, a computational model has been developed to predict thrombus formation in blood in response to such cardiovascular implantable devices. The model couples biofluid and biochemical phenomena present as the blood interacts with a device and stimulates thrombus formation. This model is applied to simulations of both metal coil and shape memory polymer foam treatments within an idealized 2D aneurysm geometry. Using the predicted thrombus responses, the performance of these treatments is evaluated and compared. The results suggest that foam-treated aneurysms may fill more quickly and more completely with thrombus than coil-filled aneurysms, potentially leading to improved long-term aneurysm healing. This work was performed in part under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  1. A unified model for an external trap in a cigar-shaped Bose–Einstein condensate

    In recent years, the study of cigar shaped Bose–Einstein condensate (BEC) under a variety of external confinements has attracted a great deal of attention, from both theoretical and experimental researchers. We report a unified model for obtaining explicit solutions under various kinds of physically relevant space- and time-modulated external traps and nonlinearities for the cigar shaped BEC. Our novel mechanism paves the way to investigate the system for a family of potential functions unified as a physical parameter of the system. We apply and illustrate our results for a number of exactly solvable quantum mechanical potentials; harmonic, double-well, Pösch–Teller, Morse, Toda lattice and power-law as some of the applications of our model. Expressions of the condensate density are provided for these potentials. In addition, as an application of our model, we have illustrated the condensate dynamics for harmonic, double-well and Pösch–Teller potentials. In the presence of loss/gain for a Pösch–Teller potential, the condensate density shows an interesting collapse and revival. (paper)

  2. Modelling profile and shape evolution during hot rolling of steel strip

    Profile and shape control are required to assure the dimensional quality of rolled strip. Occurrence of waves either at the edges or centre of strips is attributed to inconsistency between the entry and exit cross-section profiles of the stock within a given rolling pass. The exit profile of the strip can be computed by considering that the such profile is the complement of that of the roll-gap, which is affected by wear, thermal expansion and distortion of the work rolls. A computer model was developed to predict the profile of the roll-gap taking into account the thermal gradient within the work roll and the distortion caused by the acting forces. It was possible to establish a good correlation between the profiles of strips obtained from trials carried out on site, and the predictions of the model. The model allows for the prediction of the onset of shape defects from changes in the profile of rolled strips. (Author) 17 refs

  3. Void probability as a function of the void's shape and scale-invariant models

    Elizalde, E.; Gaztanaga, E.

    1991-01-01

    The dependence of counts in cells on the shape of the cell for the large scale galaxy distribution is studied. A very concrete prediction can be done concerning the void distribution for scale invariant models. The prediction is tested on a sample of the CfA catalog, and good agreement is found. It is observed that the probability of a cell to be occupied is bigger for some elongated cells. A phenomenological scale invariant model for the observed distribution of the counts in cells, an extension of the negative binomial distribution, is presented in order to illustrate how this dependence can be quantitatively determined. An original, intuitive derivation of this model is presented.

  4. Using Soft Constraints To Learn Semantic Models Of Descriptions Of Shapes

    Guadarrama, Sergio

    2010-01-01

    The contribution of this paper is to provide a semantic model (using soft constraints) of the words used by web-users to describe objects in a language game; a game in which one user describes a selected object of those composing the scene, and another user has to guess which object has been described. The given description needs to be non ambiguous and accurate enough to allow other users to guess the described shape correctly. To build these semantic models the descriptions need to be analyzed to extract the syntax and words' classes used. We have modeled the meaning of these descriptions using soft constraints as a way for grounding the meaning. The descriptions generated by the system took into account the context of the object to avoid ambiguous descriptions, and allowed users to guess the described object correctly 72% of the times.

  5. Analytical model for low-frequency transmission loss calculation of membranes loaded with arbitrarily shaped masses

    Langfeldt, F.; Gleine, W.; von Estorff, O.

    2015-08-01

    An analytical model for the transmission loss calculation of thin rectangular and circular membranes loaded with rigid masses of arbitrary shape, the so-called membrane-type acoustic metamaterials, is presented. The coupling between the membrane and the added masses is introduced by approximating the continuous interaction force with a set of discrete point forces. This results in a generalized linear eigenvalue problem that is solved for the eigenfrequencies and eigenvectors of the coupled system. The concept of the effective surface mass density is employed to calculate the low-frequency transmission loss using the obtained eigenpairs. The proposed model is verified using numerical data from a finite element model and the convergence behavior of the point matching approach is investigated using Richardson extrapolation. Finally, a method based upon the grid convergence index for estimating the error that is introduced due to the point matching approach is presented.

  6. A coupled kinetic Monte Carlo–finite element mesoscale model for thermoelastic martensitic phase transformations in shape memory alloys

    A mesoscale modeling framework integrating thermodynamics, kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) and finite element mechanics (FEM) is developed to simulate displacive thermoelastic transformations between austenite and martensite in shape memory alloys (SMAs). The model is based on a transition state approximation for the energy landscape of the two phases under loading or cooling, which leads to the activation energy and rate for transformation domains incorporating local stress states. The evolved stress state after each domain transformation event is calculated by FEM, and is subsequently used in the stochastic KMC algorithm to determine the next domain to transform. The model captures transformation stochasticity, and predicts internal phase and stress distributions and evolution throughout the entire incubation, nucleation and growth process. It also relates the critical transformation stresses or temperatures to internal activation energies. It therefore enables quantitative exploration of transformation dynamics and transformation–microstructure interactions. The model is used to simulate superelasticity (mechanically induced transformation) under both load control and strain control in single-crystal SMAs under uniaxial tension

  7. Statistical modelling of tropical cyclone tracks: modelling the autocorrelation in track shape

    Hall, T; Hall, Tim; Jewson, Stephen

    2005-01-01

    We describe results from the third stage of a project to build a statistical model for hurricane tracks. In the first stage we modelled the unconditional mean track. In the second stage we modelled the unconditional variance of fluctuations around the mean. Now we address the question of how to model the autocorrelations in the standardised fluctuations. We perform a thorough diagnostic analysis of these fluctuations, and fit a type of AR(1) model. We then assess the goodness of fit of this model in a number of ways, including an out-of-sample comparison with a simpler model, an in-sample residual analysis, and a comparison of simulated tracks from the model with the observed tracks. Broadly speaking, the model captures the behaviour of observed hurricane tracks. In detail, however, there are a number of systematic errors.

  8. Poly(glycerol sebacate urethane)-cellulose nanocomposites with water-active shape-memory effects.

    Wu, Tongfei; Frydrych, Martin; O'Kelly, Kevin; Chen, Biqiong

    2014-07-14

    Biodegradable and biocompatible materials with shape-memory effects (SMEs) are attractive for use as minimally invasive medical devices. Nanocomposites with SMEs were prepared from biodegradable poly(glycerol sebacate urethane) (PGSU) and renewable cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs). The effects of CNC content on the structure, water absorption, and mechanical properties of the PGSU were studied. The water-responsive mechanically adaptive properties and shape-memory performance of PGSU-CNC nanocomposites were observed, which are dependent on the content of CNCs. The PGSU-CNC nanocomposite containing 23.2 vol % CNCs exhibited the best SMEs among the nanocomposites investigated, with the stable shape fixing and shape recovery ratios being 98 and 99%, respectively, attributable to the formation of a hydrophilic, yet strong, CNC network in the elastomeric matrix. In vitro degradation profiles of the nanocomposites were assessed with and without the presence of an enzyme. PMID:24877559

  9. Reliability Criteria for Testing the Goodness of the Activation Energy Values Obtained by the Peak Shape Methods in Thermoluminescence Experiments

    Kitis, G.; Furetta, C.; E. Cruz-Zaragoza

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study is to give some expressions able to give a criteria of acceptance for the activation energy values determined through the so called peak shape methods. The expressions are derived for both first and second order kinetics. Furthermore, using approximations concerning the peak temperature parameters, the reliability expressions are simplified for getting a more quickly criteria of acceptance. A table lists several data, from literature, concerning the activation energy det...

  10. Classification of bones from MR images in torso PET-MR imaging using a statistical shape model

    Reza Ay, Mohammad, E-mail: mohammadreza_ay@tums.ac.ir [Research Center for Molecular and Cellular Imaging, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Akbarzadeh, Afshin [Research Center for Molecular and Cellular Imaging, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ahmadian, Alireza [Research Center for Molecular and Cellular Imaging, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Center for Biomedical Technology and Robotics, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zaidi, Habib [Geneva University Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland); Geneva Neuroscience Center, Geneva University, CH-1205 Geneva (Switzerland); Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, 9700 RB Groningen (Netherlands)

    2014-01-11

    of 20 clinical studies was designed. Using this training set, a bone atlas was trained taking advantage of PCA analysis. Our active shape segmentation technique uses the trained shape model to segment bones from user defined initial seed points. The segmentation algorithm was evaluated using 10 clinical datasets (aligned MR and CT pairs). The resulting attenuation maps were compared to corresponding attenuation maps derived from CT resulting in a mean relative difference less than 7%.

  11. Classification of bones from MR images in torso PET-MR imaging using a statistical shape model

    Reza Ay, Mohammad; Akbarzadeh, Afshin; Ahmadian, Alireza; Zaidi, Habib

    2014-01-01

    of 20 clinical studies was designed. Using this training set, a bone atlas was trained taking advantage of PCA analysis. Our active shape segmentation technique uses the trained shape model to segment bones from user defined initial seed points. The segmentation algorithm was evaluated using 10 clinical datasets (aligned MR and CT pairs). The resulting attenuation maps were compared to corresponding attenuation maps derived from CT resulting in a mean relative difference less than 7%.

  12. Classification of bones from MR images in torso PET-MR imaging using a statistical shape model

    of 20 clinical studies was designed. Using this training set, a bone atlas was trained taking advantage of PCA analysis. Our active shape segmentation technique uses the trained shape model to segment bones from user defined initial seed points. The segmentation algorithm was evaluated using 10 clinical datasets (aligned MR and CT pairs). The resulting attenuation maps were compared to corresponding attenuation maps derived from CT resulting in a mean relative difference less than 7%

  13. Generation of a statistical shape model with probabilistic point correspondences and the expectation maximization- iterative closest point algorithm

    Identification of point correspondences between shapes is required for statistical analysis of organ shapes differences. Since manual identification of landmarks is not a feasible option in 3D, several methods were developed to automatically find one-to-one correspondences on shape surfaces. For unstructured point sets, however, one-to-one correspondences do not exist but correspondence probabilities can be determined. A method was developed to compute a statistical shape model based on shapes which are represented by unstructured point sets with arbitrary point numbers. A fundamental problem when computing statistical shape models is the determination of correspondences between the points of the shape observations of the training data set. In the absence of landmarks, exact correspondences can only be determined between continuous surfaces, not between unstructured point sets. To overcome this problem, we introduce correspondence probabilities instead of exact correspondences. The correspondence probabilities are found by aligning the observation shapes with the affine expectation maximization-iterative closest points (EM-ICP) registration algorithm. In a second step, the correspondence probabilities are used as input to compute a mean shape (represented once again by an unstructured point set). Both steps are unified in a single optimization criterion which depe nds on the two parameters 'registration transformation' and 'mean shape'. In a last step, a variability model which best represents the variability in the training data set is computed. Experiments on synthetic data sets and in vivo brain structure data sets (MRI) are then designed to evaluate the performance of our algorithm. The new method was applied to brain MRI data sets, and the estimated point correspondences were compared to a statistical shape model built on exact correspondences. Based on established measures of ''generalization ability'' and ''specificity'', the estimates were very satisfactory

  14. Generation of a statistical shape model with probabilistic point correspondences and the expectation maximization- iterative closest point algorithm

    Hufnagel, Heike [Institut National de Recherche en Informatique et en Automatique (INRIA), Asclepios Project, Sophia Antipolis (France); University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Medical Informatics, Hamburg (Germany); Pennec, Xavier; Ayache, Nicholas [Institut National de Recherche en Informatique et en Automatique (INRIA), Asclepios Project, Sophia Antipolis (France); Ehrhardt, Jan; Handels, Heinz [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Medical Informatics, Hamburg (Germany)

    2008-03-15

    Identification of point correspondences between shapes is required for statistical analysis of organ shapes differences. Since manual identification of landmarks is not a feasible option in 3D, several methods were developed to automatically find one-to-one correspondences on shape surfaces. For unstructured point sets, however, one-to-one correspondences do not exist but correspondence probabilities can be determined. A method was developed to compute a statistical shape model based on shapes which are represented by unstructured point sets with arbitrary point numbers. A fundamental problem when computing statistical shape models is the determination of correspondences between the points of the shape observations of the training data set. In the absence of landmarks, exact correspondences can only be determined between continuous surfaces, not between unstructured point sets. To overcome this problem, we introduce correspondence probabilities instead of exact correspondences. The correspondence probabilities are found by aligning the observation shapes with the affine expectation maximization-iterative closest points (EM-ICP) registration algorithm. In a second step, the correspondence probabilities are used as input to compute a mean shape (represented once again by an unstructured point set). Both steps are unified in a single optimization criterion which depe nds on the two parameters 'registration transformation' and 'mean shape'. In a last step, a variability model which best represents the variability in the training data set is computed. Experiments on synthetic data sets and in vivo brain structure data sets (MRI) are then designed to evaluate the performance of our algorithm. The new method was applied to brain MRI data sets, and the estimated point correspondences were compared to a statistical shape model built on exact correspondences. Based on established measures of 'generalization ability' and &apos

  15. Consistent dust and gas models for protoplanetary disks. I. Disk shape, dust settling, opacities, and PAHs

    Woitke, P.; Min, M.; Pinte, C.; Thi, W.-F.; Kamp, I.; Rab, C.; Anthonioz, F.; Antonellini, S.; Baldovin-Saavedra, C.; Carmona, A.; Dominik, C.; Dionatos, O.; Greaves, J.; Güdel, M.; Ilee, J. D.; Liebhart, A.; Ménard, F.; Rigon, L.; Waters, L. B. F. M.; Aresu, G.; Meijerink, R.; Spaans, M.

    2016-02-01

    We propose a set of standard assumptions for the modelling of Class II and III protoplanetary disks, which includes detailed continuum radiative transfer, thermo-chemical modelling of gas and ice, and line radiative transfer from optical to cm wavelengths. The first paper of this series focuses on the assumptions about the shape of the disk, the dust opacities, dust settling, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). In particular, we propose new standard dust opacities for disk models, we present a simplified treatment of PAHs in radiative equilibrium which is sufficient to reproduce the PAH emission features, and we suggest using a simple yet physically justified treatment of dust settling. We roughly adjust parameters to obtain a model that predicts continuum and line observations that resemble typical multi-wavelength continuum and line observations of Class II T Tauri stars. We systematically study the impact of each model parameter (disk mass, disk extension and shape, dust settling, dust size and opacity, gas/dust ratio, etc.) on all mainstream continuum and line observables, in particular on the SED, mm-slope, continuum visibilities, and emission lines including [OI] 63 μm, high-J CO lines, (sub-)mm CO isotopologue lines, and CO fundamental ro-vibrational lines. We find that evolved dust properties, i.e. large grains, often needed to fit the SED, have important consequences for disk chemistry and heating/cooling balance, leading to stronger near- to far-IR emission lines in general. Strong dust settling and missing disk flaring have similar effects on continuum observations, but opposite effects on far-IR gas emission lines. PAH molecules can efficiently shield the gas from stellar UV radiation because of their strong absorption and negligible scattering opacities in comparison to evolved dust. The observable millimetre-slope of the SED can become significantly more gentle in the case of cold disk midplanes, which we find regularly in our T Tauri models

  16. An anatomically shaped lower body model for CT scanning of cadaver femurs

    Bone specific, CT-based finite element (FE) analyses have great potential to accurately predict the fracture risk of deteriorated bones. However, it has been shown that differences exist between FE-models of femora scanned in a water basin or scanned in situ within the human body, as caused by differences in measured bone mineral densities (BMD). In this study we hypothesized that these differences can be reduced by re-creating the patient CT-conditions by using an anatomically shaped physical model of the lower body. BMD distributions were obtained from four different femora that were scanned under three conditions: (1) in situ within the cadaver body, (2) in a water basin and (3) in the body model. The BMD of the three scanning protocols were compared at two locations: proximally, in the trabecular bone of the femoral head, and in the cortical bone of the femoral shaft. Proximally, no significant differences in BMD were found between the in situ scans and the scans in the body model, whereas the densities from the water basin scans were on average 10.8% lower than in situ. In the femoral shaft the differences between the three scanning protocols were insignificant. In conclusion, the body model better approached the in situ situation than a water basin. Future studies can use this body model to mimic patient situations and to develop protocols to improve the performance of the FE-models in actual patients. (note)

  17. An anatomically shaped lower body model for CT scanning of cadaver femurs

    Tanck, Esther; Deenen, J C W; Verdonschot, Nico [Orthopaedic Research Laboratory, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, PO Box 9101, 6500 HB Nijmegen (Netherlands); Huisman, Henk Jan [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Kooloos, Jan G [Department of Anatomy, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Huizenga, Henk [Department of Radiotherapy, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Nijmegen (Netherlands)], E-mail: e.tanck@orthop.umcn.nl

    2010-01-21

    Bone specific, CT-based finite element (FE) analyses have great potential to accurately predict the fracture risk of deteriorated bones. However, it has been shown that differences exist between FE-models of femora scanned in a water basin or scanned in situ within the human body, as caused by differences in measured bone mineral densities (BMD). In this study we hypothesized that these differences can be reduced by re-creating the patient CT-conditions by using an anatomically shaped physical model of the lower body. BMD distributions were obtained from four different femora that were scanned under three conditions: (1) in situ within the cadaver body, (2) in a water basin and (3) in the body model. The BMD of the three scanning protocols were compared at two locations: proximally, in the trabecular bone of the femoral head, and in the cortical bone of the femoral shaft. Proximally, no significant differences in BMD were found between the in situ scans and the scans in the body model, whereas the densities from the water basin scans were on average 10.8% lower than in situ. In the femoral shaft the differences between the three scanning protocols were insignificant. In conclusion, the body model better approached the in situ situation than a water basin. Future studies can use this body model to mimic patient situations and to develop protocols to improve the performance of the FE-models in actual patients. (note)

  18. Development of a Numerical Model for High-Temperature Shape Memory Alloys

    DeCastro, Jonathan A.; Melcher, Kevin J.; Noebe, Ronald D.; Gaydosh, Darrell J.

    2006-01-01

    A thermomechanical hysteresis model for a high-temperature shape memory alloy (HTSMA) actuator material is presented. The model is capable of predicting strain output of a tensile-loaded HTSMA when excited by arbitrary temperature-stress inputs for the purpose of actuator and controls design. Common quasi-static generalized Preisach hysteresis models available in the literature require large sets of experimental data for model identification at a particular operating point, and substantially more data for multiple operating points. The novel algorithm introduced here proposes an alternate approach to Preisach methods that is better suited for research-stage alloys, such as recently-developed HTSMAs, for which a complete database is not yet available. A detailed description of the minor loop hysteresis model is presented in this paper, as well as a methodology for determination of model parameters. The model is then qualitatively evaluated with respect to well-established Preisach properties and against a set of low-temperature cycled loading data using a modified form of the one-dimensional Brinson constitutive equation. The computationally efficient algorithm demonstrates adherence to Preisach properties and excellent agreement to the validation data set.

  19. Kinetics modeling of precipitation with characteristic shape during post-implantation annealing

    Li, Kun-Dar, E-mail: kundar@mail.nutn.edu.tw; Chen, Kwanyu [Department of Materials Science, National University of Tainan, Tainan 700, Taiwan (China)

    2015-11-15

    In this study, we investigated the precipitation with characteristic shape in the microstructure during post-implantation annealing via a theoretical modeling approach. The processes of precipitates formation and evolution during phase separation were based on a nucleation and growth mechanism of atomic diffusion. Different stages of the precipitation, including the nucleation, growth and coalescence, were distinctly revealed in the numerical simulations. In addition, the influences of ion dose, temperature and crystallographic symmetry on the processes of faceted precipitation were also demonstrated. To comprehend the kinetic mechanism, the simulation results were further analyzed quantitatively by the Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (KJMA) equation. The Avrami exponents obtained from the regression curves varied from 1.47 to 0.52 for different conditions. With the increase of ion dose and temperature, the nucleation and growth of precipitations were expedited in accordance with the shortened incubation time and the raised coefficient of growth rate. A miscellaneous shape of precipitates in various crystallographic symmetry systems could be simulated through this anisotropic model. From the analyses of the kinetics, more fundamental information about the nucleation and growth mechanism of faceted precipitation during post-implantation annealing was acquired for future application.

  20. Kinetics modeling of precipitation with characteristic shape during post-implantation annealing

    Kun-Dar Li

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated the precipitation with characteristic shape in the microstructure during post-implantation annealing via a theoretical modeling approach. The processes of precipitates formation and evolution during phase separation were based on a nucleation and growth mechanism of atomic diffusion. Different stages of the precipitation, including the nucleation, growth and coalescence, were distinctly revealed in the numerical simulations. In addition, the influences of ion dose, temperature and crystallographic symmetry on the processes of faceted precipitation were also demonstrated. To comprehend the kinetic mechanism, the simulation results were further analyzed quantitatively by the Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (KJMA equation. The Avrami exponents obtained from the regression curves varied from 1.47 to 0.52 for different conditions. With the increase of ion dose and temperature, the nucleation and growth of precipitations were expedited in accordance with the shortened incubation time and the raised coefficient of growth rate. A miscellaneous shape of precipitates in various crystallographic symmetry systems could be simulated through this anisotropic model. From the analyses of the kinetics, more fundamental information about the nucleation and growth mechanism of faceted precipitation during post-implantation annealing was acquired for future application.

  1. Kinetics modeling of precipitation with characteristic shape during post-implantation annealing

    Li, Kun-Dar; Chen, Kwanyu

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we investigated the precipitation with characteristic shape in the microstructure during post-implantation annealing via a theoretical modeling approach. The processes of precipitates formation and evolution during phase separation were based on a nucleation and growth mechanism of atomic diffusion. Different stages of the precipitation, including the nucleation, growth and coalescence, were distinctly revealed in the numerical simulations. In addition, the influences of ion dose, temperature and crystallographic symmetry on the processes of faceted precipitation were also demonstrated. To comprehend the kinetic mechanism, the simulation results were further analyzed quantitatively by the Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (KJMA) equation. The Avrami exponents obtained from the regression curves varied from 1.47 to 0.52 for different conditions. With the increase of ion dose and temperature, the nucleation and growth of precipitations were expedited in accordance with the shortened incubation time and the raised coefficient of growth rate. A miscellaneous shape of precipitates in various crystallographic symmetry systems could be simulated through this anisotropic model. From the analyses of the kinetics, more fundamental information about the nucleation and growth mechanism of faceted precipitation during post-implantation annealing was acquired for future application.

  2. Nuclear shape coexistence in Po isotopes: An interacting boson model study

    Garcia-Ramos, J E

    2015-01-01

    Background: The lead region, Po, Pb, Hg, and Pt, shows up the presence of coexisting structures having different deformation and corresponding to different particle-hole configurations in the Shell Model language. Purpose: We intend to study the importance of configuration mixing in the understanding of the nuclear structure of even-even Po isotopes, where the shape coexistence phenomena are not clear enough. Method: We study in detail a long chain of polonium isotopes, 190-208Po, using the interacting boson model with configuration mixing (IBM-CM). We fix the parameters of the Hamiltonians through a least-squares fit to the known energies and absolute B(E2) transition rates of states up to 3 MeV. Results: We obtained the IBM-CM Hamiltonians and we calculate excitation energies, B(E2)'s, electric quadrupole moments, nuclear radii and isotopic shifts, quadrupole shape invariants, wave functions, and deformations. Conclusions: We obtain a good agreement with the experimental data for all the studied observables...

  3. Kinetics modeling of precipitation with characteristic shape during post-implantation annealing

    In this study, we investigated the precipitation with characteristic shape in the microstructure during post-implantation annealing via a theoretical modeling approach. The processes of precipitates formation and evolution during phase separation were based on a nucleation and growth mechanism of atomic diffusion. Different stages of the precipitation, including the nucleation, growth and coalescence, were distinctly revealed in the numerical simulations. In addition, the influences of ion dose, temperature and crystallographic symmetry on the processes of faceted precipitation were also demonstrated. To comprehend the kinetic mechanism, the simulation results were further analyzed quantitatively by the Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (KJMA) equation. The Avrami exponents obtained from the regression curves varied from 1.47 to 0.52 for different conditions. With the increase of ion dose and temperature, the nucleation and growth of precipitations were expedited in accordance with the shortened incubation time and the raised coefficient of growth rate. A miscellaneous shape of precipitates in various crystallographic symmetry systems could be simulated through this anisotropic model. From the analyses of the kinetics, more fundamental information about the nucleation and growth mechanism of faceted precipitation during post-implantation annealing was acquired for future application

  4. A computational model that recovers the 3D shape of an object from a single 2D retinal representation.

    Li, Yunfeng; Pizlo, Zygmunt; Steinman, Robert M

    2009-05-01

    Human beings perceive 3D shapes veridically, but the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. The problem of producing veridical shape percepts is computationally difficult because the 3D shapes have to be recovered from 2D retinal images. This paper describes a new model, based on a regularization approach, that does this very well. It uses a new simplicity principle composed of four shape constraints: viz., symmetry, planarity, maximum compactness and minimum surface. Maximum compactness and minimum surface have never been used before. The model was tested with random symmetrical polyhedra. It recovered their 3D shapes from a single randomly-chosen 2D image. Neither learning, nor depth perception, was required. The effectiveness of the maximum compactness and the minimum surface constraints were measured by how well the aspect ratio of the 3D shapes was recovered. These constraints were effective; they recovered the aspect ratio of the 3D shapes very well. Aspect ratios recovered by the model were compared to aspect ratios adjusted by four human observers. They also adjusted aspect ratios very well. In those rare cases, in which the human observers showed large errors in adjusted aspect ratios, their errors were very similar to the errors made by the model. PMID:18621410

  5. Modeling the Influence of Antifreeze Proteins on Three-Dimensional Ice Crystal Melt Shapes using a Geometric Approach

    Liu, Jun Jie; Dolev, Maya Bar; Celik, Yeliz; Wettlaufer, J S; Braslavsky, Ido

    2012-01-01

    The melting of pure axisymmetric ice crystals has been described previously by us within the framework of so-called geometric crystal growth. Nonequilibrium ice crystal shapes evolving in the presence of hyperactive antifreeze proteins (hypAFPs) are experimentally observed to assume ellipsoidal geometries ("lemon" or "rice" shapes). To analyze such shapes we harness the underlying symmetry of hexagonal ice Ih and extend two-dimensional geometric models to three-dimensions to reproduce the experimental dissolution process. The geometrical model developed will be useful as a quantitative test of the mechanisms of interaction between hypAFPs and ice.

  6. Cohesive granular media modelization with non-convex particles shape: Application to UO2 powder compaction

    We model in this work granular materials composed of non-convex and cohesive aggregates, in view of application to the rheology of UO2 powders. The effect of non convexity is analyzed in terms of bulk quantities (Coulomb internal friction and cohesion) and micromechanical parameters such as texture anisotropy and force transmission. In particular, we find that the packing fraction evolves in a complex manner with the shape non convexity and the shear strength increases but saturates due to interlocking between the aggregates. We introduce simple models to describe these features in terms of micro-mechanical parameters. Furthermore, a systematic investigation of shearing, uniaxial compaction and simple compression of cohesive packings show that bulk cohesion increases with non-convexity but is strongly influenced by the boundary conditions and shear bands or stress concentration. (author)

  7. TENSILE TEST AND PHYSICAL MODEL OF NiTi SHAPE MEMORY ALLOY

    HUZi-li; WANGXin-wei; XIONGKe

    2004-01-01

    The tensile stress-strain curves of NiTi wires are obtained by tensile experiments under different heat treatments. A phenomenological physical model based on hysteresis element method is developed to describe the experimentally determined stress-strain curves of shape memory alloy (SMA) wires. Numerical simulations are made. Simulation results show that:(1) a series of unusual changes on physical and mechanical properties of SMA wires occur when martensitic, especially R (rhombohedral) phase transformation emerge. The stress-strain relation of SMA wires is highly non-linear; (2) there are no notable yielding phenomena before NiTi wires are broken; (3) numerical results obtained by the physical model are in good agreement with experimental data.

  8. Modeling of the shape of infrared stimulated luminescence signals in feldspars

    Pagonis, Vasilis; Jain, Mayank; Murray, Andrew S.;

    2012-01-01

    corresponds to a fast rate of recombination processes taking place along the infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL) curves. The subsequent decay of the simulated IRSL signal is characterized by a much slower recombination rate, which can be described by a power-law type of equation.Several simulations of...... shape of the IRSL curves does not change significantly under different experimental conditions. The relationship between the simulated IRSL signal and the well-known power-law dependence of relaxation processes in solids is also explored, by fitting the IRSL signal at long times with a power-law type of...... equation. The exponent in this power-law is found to depend very weakly on the various parameters in the model, in agreement with the results of experimental studies. The results from the model are compared with experimental IRSL curves obtained using different IR stimulating power, and good quantitative...

  9. A model for shape memory alloys with the possibility of voids

    Fremond, Michel

    2009-01-01

    The paper is devoted to the study of a mathematical model for the thermomechanical evolution of metallic shape memory alloys. The main novelty of our approach consists in the fact that we include the possibility for these materials to exhibit voids during the phase change process. Indeed, in the engineering paper has been recently proved that voids may appear when the mixture is produced by the aggregations of powder. Hence, the composition of the mixture varies (under either thermal or mechanical actions) in this way: the martensites and the austenite transform into one another whereas the voids volume fraction evolves. The first goal of this contribution is hence to state a PDE system capturing all these modelling aspects in order then to establish the well-posedness of the associated initial-boundary value problem.

  10. A model for the secondary scintillation pulse shape from a gas proportional scintillation counter

    Kazkaz, K.; Joshi, T. H.

    2016-03-01

    Proportional scintillation counters (PSCs), both single- and dual-phase, can measure the scintillation (S1) and ionization (S2) channels from particle interactions within the detector volume. The signal obtained from these detectors depends first on the physics of the medium (the initial scintillation and ionization), and second how the physics of the detector manipulates the resulting photons and liberated electrons. In this paper we develop a model of the detector physics that incorporates event topology, detector geometry, electric field configuration, purity, optical properties of components, and wavelength shifters. We present an analytic form of the model, which allows for general study of detector design and operation, and a Monte Carlo model which enables a more detailed exploration of S2 events. This model may be used to study systematic effects in current detectors such as energy and position reconstruction, pulse shape discrimination, event topology, dead time calculations, purity, and electric field uniformity. We present a comparison of this model with experimental data collected with an argon gas proportional scintillation counter (GPSC), operated at 20 C and 1 bar, and irradiated with an internal, collimated 55Fe source. Additionally we discuss how the model may be incorporated in Monte Carlo simulations of both GPSCs and dual-phase detectors, increasing the reliability of the simulation results and allowing for tests of the experimental data analysis algorithms.

  11. How caldera collapse shapes the shallow emplacement and transfer of magma in active volcanoes

    Corbi, Fabio; Rivalta, Eleonora; Pinel, Virginie; Maccaferri, Francesco; Bagnardi, Marco; Acocella, Valerio

    2016-04-01

    Calderas are topographic depressions formed by the collapse of a partly drained magma reservoir. At volcanic edifices with calderas, eruptive fissures can circumscribe the outer caldera rim, be oriented radially and/or align with the regional tectonic stress field. Constraining the mechanisms that govern this spatial arrangement is fundamental to understand the dynamics of shallow magma storage and transport and evaluate volcanic hazard. Here we use numerical models to show that the previously unappreciated unloading effect of caldera formation may contribute significantly to the stress budget of a volcano. We first test this hypothesis against the ideal case of Fernandina, Galápagos, where previous models only partly explained the peculiar pattern of circumferential and radial eruptive fissures and the geometry of the intrusions determined by inverting the deformation data. We show that by taking into account the decompression due to the caldera formation, the modeled edifice stress field is consistent with all the observation. We then develop a general model for the stress state at volcanic edifices with calderas based on the competition of caldera decompression, magma buoyancy forces and tectonic stresses. These factors control the shallow accumulation of magma in stacked sills, consistently with observations as well as the conditions for the development of circumferential and/or radial eruptive fissures, as observed on active volcanoes. This top-down control exerted by changes in the distribution of mass at the surface allows better understanding of how shallow magma is transferred at active calderas, contributing to forecasting the location and type of opening fissures.

  12. Face to Face: Anthropometry-Based Interactive Face Shape Modeling Using Model Priors

    Yu Zhang; Edmond C. Prakash

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a new anthropometrics-based method for generating realistic, controllable face models. Our method establishes an intuitive and efficient interface to facilitate procedures for interactive 3D face modeling and editing. It takes 3D face scans as examples in order to exploit the variations presented in the real faces of individuals. The system automatically learns a model prior from the data-sets of example meshes of facial features using principal component analysis (PCA) an...

  13. Distributional modeling and short-term forecasting of electricity prices by Generalized Additive Models for Location, Scale and Shape

    In the context of the liberalized and deregulated electricity markets, price forecasting has become increasingly important for energy company's plans and market strategies. Within the class of the time series models that are used to perform price forecasting, the subclasses of methods based on stochastic time series and causal models commonly provide point forecasts, whereas the corresponding uncertainty is quantified by approximate or simulation-based confidence intervals. Aiming to improve the uncertainty assessment, this study introduces the Generalized Additive Models for Location, Scale and Shape (GAMLSS) to model the dynamically varying distribution of prices. The GAMLSS allow fitting a variety of distributions whose parameters change according to covariates via a number of linear and nonlinear relationships. In this way, price periodicities, trends and abrupt changes characterizing both the position parameter (linked to the expected value of prices), and the scale and shape parameters (related to price volatility, skewness, and kurtosis) can be explicitly incorporated in the model setup. Relying on the past behavior of the prices and exogenous variables, the GAMLSS enable the short-term (one-day ahead) forecast of the entire distribution of prices. The approach was tested on two datasets from the widely studied California Power Exchange (CalPX) market, and the less mature Italian Power Exchange (IPEX). CalPX data allow comparing the GAMLSS forecasting performance with published results obtained by different models. The study points out that the GAMLSS framework can be a flexible alternative to several linear and nonlinear stochastic models. - Research Highlights: ► Generalized Additive Models for Location, Scale and Shape (GAMLSS) are used to model electricity prices' time series. ► GAMLSS provide the entire dynamicaly varying distribution function of prices resorting to a suitable set of covariates that drive the instantaneous values of the parameters

  14. Controlled synthesis of T-shaped BiVO4 and enhanced visible light responsive photocatalytic activity

    A novel T-shaped BiVO4 microcrystal photocatalyst was successfully synthesized by the hydrothermal method with the aid of a structure-directing surfactant SDBS in the present study. Having received well characterization with the aid of various techniques and the results showed that the SDBS greatly changed the microstructure of BiVO4, which had a unique T shape and belonged to the monoclinic family. The fast exchange dynamics between the surfactants bound to the Bi3+ seed surface and the free VO3− in the solution significantly increase the rate of heterogeneous nucleation. In addition, the photocatalytic activity of the prepared T-shaped BiVO4 was evaluated by the degradation of Methylene Blue solution under visible light irradiation, 17% and 47% higher decolorization rates than the commercial P25 and BiVO4 synthesized without SDBS, respectively. Meanwhile, it has been found that the degradation kinetics of MB fitted the pseudo-first-order kinetics and the T-shaped BiVO4 also displayed high photocatalytic performance for metronidazole degradation. -- Graphical abstract: H2O2 molecules function as electron trapping reagent to react with e− to enhance the photocatalytic degradation efficiency of MB in the BiVO4/H2O2 system under visible light irradiation. Highlights: • T-shaped BiVO4 was synthesized using SDBS as a structure-directing surfactant. • SDBS greatly changed the microstructure of BiVO4. • The T-shaped BiVO4 had a better visible-light photocatalytic activity. • Degradation kinetics of MB by BiVO4 fitted the pseudo-first-order kinetics

  15. Shape-memory polymers

    Marc Behl

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Shape-memory polymers are an emerging class of active polymers that have dual-shape capability. They can change their shape in a predefined way from shape A to shape B when exposed to an appropriate stimulus. While shape B is given by the initial processing step, shape A is determined by applying a process called programming. We review fundamental aspects of the molecular design of suitable polymer architectures, tailored programming and recovery processes, and the quantification of the shape-memory effect. Shape-memory research was initially founded on the thermally induced dual-shape effect. This concept has been extended to other stimuli by either indirect thermal actuation or direct actuation by addressing stimuli-sensitive groups on the molecular level. Finally, polymers are introduced that can be multifunctional. Besides their dual-shape capability, these active materials are biofunctional or biodegradable. Potential applications for such materials as active medical devices are highlighted.

  16. A homotopy-based sparse representation for fast and accurate shape prior modeling in liver surgical planning.

    Wang, Guotai; Zhang, Shaoting; Xie, Hongzhi; Metaxas, Dimitris N; Gu, Lixu

    2015-01-01

    Shape prior plays an important role in accurate and robust liver segmentation. However, liver shapes have complex variations and accurate modeling of liver shapes is challenging. Using large-scale training data can improve the accuracy but it limits the computational efficiency. In order to obtain accurate liver shape priors without sacrificing the efficiency when dealing with large-scale training data, we investigate effective and scalable shape prior modeling method that is more applicable in clinical liver surgical planning system. We employed the Sparse Shape Composition (SSC) to represent liver shapes by an optimized sparse combination of shapes in the repository, without any assumptions on parametric distributions of liver shapes. To leverage large-scale training data and improve the computational efficiency of SSC, we also introduced a homotopy-based method to quickly solve the L1-norm optimization problem in SSC. This method takes advantage of the sparsity of shape modeling, and solves the original optimization problem in SSC by continuously transforming it into a series of simplified problems whose solution is fast to compute. When new training shapes arrive gradually, the homotopy strategy updates the optimal solution on the fly and avoids re-computing it from scratch. Experiments showed that SSC had a high accuracy and efficiency in dealing with complex liver shape variations, excluding gross errors and preserving local details on the input liver shape. The homotopy-based SSC had a high computational efficiency, and its runtime increased very slowly when repository's capacity and vertex number rose to a large degree. When repository's capacity was 10,000, with 2000 vertices on each shape, homotopy method cost merely about 11.29 s to solve the optimization problem in SSC, nearly 2000 times faster than interior point method. The dice similarity coefficient (DSC), average symmetric surface distance (ASD), and maximum symmetric surface distance measurement

  17. New and updated convex shape models of asteroids based on optical data from a large collaboration network

    Hanuš, J; Oszkiewicz, D A; Behrend, R; Carry, B; Delbo', M; Adam, O; Afonina, V; Anquetin, R; Antonini, P; Arnold, L; Audejean, M; Aurard, P; Bachschmidt, M; Badue, B; Barbotin, E; Barroy, P; Baudouin, P; Berard, L; Berger, N; Bernasconi, L; Bosch, J-G; Bouley, S; Bozhinova, I; Brinsfield, J; Brunetto, L; Canaud, G; Caron, J; Carrier, F; Casalnuovo, G; Casulli, S; Cerda, M; Chalamet, L; Charbonnel, S; Chinaglia, B; Cikota, A; Colas, F; Coliac, J-F; Collet, A; Coloma, J; Conjat, M; Conseil, E; Costa, R; Crippa, R; Cristofanelli, M; Damerdji, Y; Debackere, A; Decock, A; Déhais, Q; Déléage, T; Delmelle, S; Demeautis, C; Dróżdż, M; Dubos, G; Dulcamara, T; Dumont, M; Durkee, R; Dymock, R; del Valle, A Escalante; Esseiva, N; Esseiva, R; Esteban, M; Fauchez, T; Fauerbach, M; Fauvaud, M; Fauvaud, S; Forné, E; Fournel, C; Fradet, D; Garlitz, J; Gerteis, O; Gillier, C; Gillon, M; Giraud, R; Godard, J-P; Goncalves, R; Hamanowa, H; Hamanowa, H; Hay, K; Hellmich, S; Heterier, S; Higgins, D; Hirsch, R; Hodosan, G; Hren, M; Hygate, A; Innocent, N; Jacquinot, H; Jawahar, S; Jehin, E; Jerosimic, L; Klotz, A; Koff, W; Korlevic, P; Kosturkiewicz, E; Krafft, P; Krugly, Y; Kugel, F; Labrevoir, O; Lecacheux, J; Lehký, M; Leroy, A; Lesquerbault, B; Lopez-Gonzales, M J; Lutz, M; Mallecot, B; Manfroid, J; Manzini, F; Marciniak, A; Martin, A; Modave, B; Montaigut, R; Montier, J; Morelle, E; Morton, B; Mottola, S; Naves, R; Nomen, J; Oey, J; Ogłoza, W; Paiella, M; Pallares, H; Peyrot, A; Pilcher, F; Pirenne, J-F; Piron, P; Polinska, M; Polotto, M; Poncy, R; Previt, J P; Reignier, F; Renauld, D; Ricci, D; Richard, F; Rinner, C; Risoldi, V; Robilliard, D; Romeuf, D; Rousseau, G; Roy, R; Ruthroff, J; Salom, P A; Salvador, L; Sanchez, S; Santana-Ros, T; Scholz, A; Séné, G; Skiff, B; Sobkowiak, K; Sogorb, P; Soldán, F; Spiridakis, A; Splanska, E; Sposetti, S; Starkey, D; Stephens, R; Stiepen, A; Stoss, R; Strajnic, J; Teng, J-P; Tumolo, G; Vagnozzi, A; Vanoutryve, B; Vugnon, J M; Warner, B D; Waucomont, M; Wertz, O; Winiarski, M; Wolf, M

    2015-01-01

    Asteroid modeling efforts in the last decade resulted in a comprehensive dataset of almost 400 convex shape models and their rotation states. This amount already provided a deep insight into physical properties of main-belt asteroids or large collisional families. We aim to increase the number of asteroid shape models and rotation states. Such results are an important input for various further studies such as analysis of asteroid physical properties in different populations, including smaller collisional families, thermophysical modeling, and scaling shape models by disk-resolved images, or stellar occultation data. This provides, in combination with known masses, bulk density estimates, but constrains also theoretical collisional and evolutional models of the Solar System. We use all available disk-integrated optical data (i.e., classical dense-in-time photometry obtained from public databases and through a large collaboration network as well as sparse-in-time individual measurements from a few sky surveys) ...

  18. Efficient Measurement of Shape Dissimilarity between 3D Models Using Z-Buffer and Surface Roving Method

    In Kyu Park

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Estimation of the shape dissimilarity between 3D models is a very important problem in both computer vision and graphics for 3D surface reconstruction, modeling, matching, and compression. In this paper, we propose a novel method called surface roving technique to estimate the shape dissimilarity between 3D models. Unlike conventional methods, our surface roving approach exploits a virtual camera and Z-buffer, which is commonly used in 3D graphics. The corresponding points on different 3D models can be easily identified, and also the distance between them is determined efficiently, regardless of the representation types of the 3D models. Moreover, by employing the viewpoint sampling technique, the overall computation can be greatly reduced so that the dissimilarity is obtained rapidly without loss of accuracy. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm achieves fast and accurate measurement of shape dissimilarity for different types of 3D object models.

  19. Consistent dust and gas models for protoplanetary disks. I. Disk shape, dust settling, opacities, and PAHs

    Woitke, P; Pinte, C; Thi, W -F; Kamp, I; Rab, C; Anthonioz, F; Antonellini, S; Baldovin-Saavedra, C; Carmona, A; Dominik, C; Dionatos, O; Greaves, J; Güdel, M; Ilee, J D; Liebhart, A; Ménard, F; Rigon, L; Waters, L B F M; Aresu, G; Meijerink, R; Spaans, M

    2015-01-01

    We propose a set of standard assumptions for the modelling of Class II and III protoplanetary disks, which includes detailed continuum radiative transfer, thermo-chemical modelling of gas and ice, and line radiative transfer from optical to cm wavelengths. We propose new standard dust opacities for disk models, we present a simplified treatment of PAHs sufficient to reproduce the PAH emission features, and we suggest using a simple treatment of dust settling. We roughly adjust parameters to obtain a model that predicts typical Class II T Tauri star continuum and line observations. We systematically study the impact of each model parameter (disk mass, disk extension and shape, dust settling, dust size and opacity, gas/dust ratio, etc.) on all continuum and line observables, in particular on the SED, mm-slope, continuum visibilities, and emission lines including [OI] 63um, high-J CO lines, (sub-)mm CO isotopologue lines, and CO fundamental ro-vibrational lines. We find that evolved dust properties (large grains...

  20. New shape models of asteroids reconstructed from sparse-in-time photometry

    Durech, Josef; Hanus, Josef; Vanco, Radim; Oszkiewicz, Dagmara Anna

    2015-08-01

    Asteroid physical parameters - the shape, the sidereal rotation period, and the spin axis orientation - can be reconstructed from the disk-integrated photometry either dense (classical lightcurves) or sparse in time by the lightcurve inversion method. We will review our recent progress in asteroid shape reconstruction from sparse photometry. The problem of finding a unique solution of the inverse problem is time consuming because the sidereal rotation period has to be found by scanning a wide interval of possible periods. This can be efficiently solved by splitting the period parameter space into small parts that are sent to computers of volunteers and processed in parallel. We will show how this approach of distributed computing works with currently available sparse photometry processed in the framework of project Asteroids@home. In particular, we will show the results based on the Lowell Photometric Database. The method produce reliable asteroid models with very low rate of false solutions and the pipelines and codes can be directly used also to other sources of sparse photometry - Gaia data, for example. We will present the distribution of spin axis of hundreds of asteroids, discuss the dependence of the spin obliquity on the size of an asteroid,and show examples of spin-axis distribution in asteroid families that confirm the Yarkovsky/YORP evolution scenario.

  1. TECHNICAL NOTE: Thermal modelling of shape memory alloy fixator for medical application

    Song, C.; Campbell, P. A.; Frank, T. G.; Cuschieri, A.

    2002-04-01

    Shape memory alloy has been recently used for tissue fixation in minimal access surgery (MAS). It offers an alternative to conventional thread-based suturing of human tissue, with the advantage that its deployment is faster and requires fewer surgical skills. To minimize the damage to surrounding tissue, thermal analysis of tissue-fixator interactions has been done to optimize the heating method, and to predict the heating effect and affected range. The finite-difference method has been used to solve the one-dimensional transient heat transfer problem, with fixator-tissue conduction boundary condition, and the finite-element method was used to build a three-dimensional model for the design optimization. The predicted temperature responses of tissue are considered within a safety range. Tissue temperature drops quickly after heating, and the affected tissue is limited to a layer 1 mm thick next to the fixator. Further in vivo animal studies on the use of the shape memory alloy fixator are ongoing for future applications of tissue suturing in MAS.

  2. Noise-shaping all-digital phase-locked loops modeling, simulation, analysis and design

    Brandonisio, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    This book presents a novel approach to the analysis and design of all-digital phase-locked loops (ADPLLs), technology widely used in wireless communication devices. The authors provide an overview of ADPLL architectures, time-to-digital converters (TDCs) and noise shaping. Realistic examples illustrate how to analyze and simulate phase noise in the presence of sigma-delta modulation and time-to-digital conversion. Readers will gain a deep understanding of ADPLLs and the central role played by noise-shaping. A range of ADPLL and TDC architectures are presented in unified manner. Analytical and simulation tools are discussed in detail. Matlab code is included that can be reused to design, simulate and analyze the ADPLL architectures that are presented in the book.   • Discusses in detail a wide range of all-digital phase-locked loops architectures; • Presents a unified framework in which to model time-to-digital converters for ADPLLs; • Explains a procedure to predict and simulate phase noise in oscil...

  3. A Finger-Shaped Tactile Sensor for Fabric Surfaces Evaluation by 2-Dimensional Active Sliding Touch

    Haihua Hu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Sliding tactile perception is a basic function for human beings to determine the mechanical properties of object surfaces and recognize materials. Imitating this process, this paper proposes a novel finger-shaped tactile sensor based on a thin piezoelectric polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF film for surface texture measurement. A parallelogram mechanism is designed to ensure that the sensor applies a constant contact force perpendicular to the object surface, and a 2-dimensional movable mechanical structure is utilized to generate the relative motion at a certain speed between the sensor and the object surface. By controlling the 2-dimensional motion of the finger-shaped sensor along the object surface, small height/depth variation of surface texture changes the output charge of PVDF film then surface texture can be measured. In this paper, the finger-shaped tactile sensor is used to evaluate and classify five different kinds of linen. Fast Fourier Transformation (FFT is utilized to get original attribute data of surface in the frequency domain, and principal component analysis (PCA is used to compress the attribute data and extract feature information. Finally, low dimensional features are classified by Support Vector Machine (SVM. The experimental results show that this finger-shaped tactile sensor is effective and high accurate for discriminating the five textures.

  4. A validated model for induction heating of shape memory alloy actuators

    Saunders, Robert N.; Boyd, James G.; Hartl, Darren J.; Brown, Jonathan K.; Calkins, Frederick T.; Lagoudas, Dimitris C.

    2016-04-01

    Shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators deliver high forces while being compact and reliable, making them ideal for consideration in aerospace applications. One disadvantage of these thermally driven actuators is their slow cyclic time response compared to conventional actuators. Induction heating has recently been proposed to quickly heat SMA components. However efforts to date have been purely empirical. The present work approachs this problem in a computational manner by developing a finite element model of induction heating in which the time-harmonic electromagnetic equations are solved for the Joule heat power field, the energy equation is solved for the temperature field, and the linear momentum equations are solved to find the stress, displacement, and internal state variable fields. The combined model was implemented in Abaqus using a Python script approach and applied to SMA torque tube and beam actuators. The model has also been used to examine magnetic flux concentrators to improve the induction systems performance. Induction heating experiments were performed using the SMA torque tube, and the model agreed well with the experiments.

  5. Design, modelling and control of a micro-positioning actuator based on magnetic shape memory alloys

    Minorowicz, Bartosz; Leonetti, Giuseppe; Stefanski, Frederik; Binetti, Giulio; Naso, David

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents an actuator based on magnetic shape memory alloys (MSMAs) suitable for precise positioning in a wide range (up to 1 mm). The actuator is based on the spring returned operating mode and uses a Smalley wave spring to maintain the same operating parameters of a classical coil spring, while being characterized by a smaller dimension. The MSMA element inside the actuator provides a deformation when excited by an external magnetic field, but its behavior is characterized by an asymmetric and saturated hysteresis. Thus, two models are exploited in this work to represent such a non-linear behavior, i.e., the modified and generalized Prandtl–Ishlinskii models. These models are particularly suitable for control purposes due to the existence of their analytical inversion that can be easily exploited in real time control systems. To this aim, this paper investigates three closed-loop control strategies, namely a classical PID regulator, a PID regulator with direct hysteresis compensation, and a combined PID and feedforward compensation strategy. The effectiveness of both modelling and control strategies applied to the designed MSMA-based actuator is illustrated by means of experimental results.

  6. Modeling the Role of Small Scale Physics in Sediment Transport From Grain Size to Grain Shape

    Calantoni, J.; Holland, K. T.

    2007-12-01

    In recent years work has focused on the detailed physics of sediment transport at or near the grain scale. Although computational resources often restrict the domain size, deterministic models for sediment motions can prove useful in improving our understanding of sediment dynamics. Using a discrete particle model (DPM), we have performed computer simulations that describe the collective and individual motions of sediment grains immersed in fluid in an effort to emulate the physics of the sea floor, at the fluid-sediment interface, in shallow water under forcing from waves and currents. Examples of our DPM (briefly described) are shown for research applications at a range scales from millimeters to meters involving fluid flow models from simple one- dimensional eddy viscosity up to three-dimensional direct numerical simulation. Based on hundreds of different simulations over the past decade, our findings have shown: how a parameterization of pressure gradients or equivalently fluid accelerations on particle motions under waves influences sand bar migration in the surf zone; how grain shape changes bulk bedload transport rates; how efforts to model sediment particle motions in the swash zone can yield insight toward models for shoreline erosion and accretion; how recently simulated bedload transport using bimodal size distributions has uncovered a new power law; how upcoming work focuses on simulating the role of grain size distributions in small-scale sand ripple dynamics. Good agreement is found between comparisons of model output for both bulk transport rates and time dependent concentration profiles with laboratory data. Likewise, parameterizations obtained from simulation results have demonstrated skill in hindcast applications to both field and laboratory measurements. Conclusions will discuss the future role of reductionism in sediment transport modeling.

  7. Application of a shape accommodating HIP densification model to high temperature yttria oxide material

    As the need for higher operating temperatures increases, there will be a greater need for materials that can withstand +2,000 C and oxidizing conditions. Y2O3, a high-temperature oxide, was selected on the basis of its high melting point and resistance to surface recession at 2,000 C. The need for processing such a high temperature material demands alternative approaches to production of reliable parts. Hot isostatic pressing offers a route to reliable production of parts for high temperature applications. This study developed empirical relationships to account for the shape of particles and attempts to modify the Ashby, Easterling and Arzt model by incorporating the morphological characteristics into the description of effective pressure on the particle contacts

  8. Shape Optimization of Hollow Concrete Blocks Using the Lattice Discrete Particle Model

    Fatemeh Javidan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hollow concrete blocks are one of the widely used building elements of masonry structures in whichthey are normally loaded under combined action of shear and compression. Accordingly and due to theirstructural importance, the present study intends to numerically search for an optimum shape of such blocks.The optimality index is selected to be the ratio of block’s failure strength to its weight, a non-dimensionalparameter, which needs to be maximized. The nonlinear analysis has been done using a homemade code writtenbased on the recently developed Lattice Discrete Particle Model (LDPM for the meso-scale simulation ofconcrete. This numerical approach accounts for the different aspects of concrete’s complex behavior such astensile fracturing, cohesive and frictional shearing and also its nonlinear compressive response. The modelparameters were calibrated against previously reported experimental data. Various two-core configurations forthe hollow blocks are examined, compared and discussed.

  9. The Scission-Point Configuration within the Two-Center Shell Model Shape Parameterization

    Ivanyuk, F A; Aritomo, Y

    2014-01-01

    Within the two-center shell model parameterization we have defined the optimal shape which fissioning nuclei attain just before the scission and calculated the total deformation energy (liquid drop part plus the shell correction) as function of the mass asymmetry and elongation at the scission point. The three minima corresponding to mass symmetric and two mass asymmetric peaks in the mass distribution of fission fragments are found in the deformation energy at the scission point. The calculated deformation energy is used in quasi-static approximation for the estimation of the total kinetic and excitation energy of fission fragments and the total number of emitted prompt neutrons. The calculated results reproduce rather well the experimental data on the position of the peaks in the mass distribution of fission fragments, the total kinetic and excitation energy of fission fragments. The calculated value of neutron multiplicity is somewhat larger than experimental results.

  10. Parametric geometric model and shape optimization of an underwater glider with blended-wing-body

    Sun, Chunya; Song, Baowei; Wang, Peng

    2015-11-01

    Underwater glider, as a new kind of autonomous underwater vehicles, has many merits such as long-range, extended-duration and low costs. The shape of underwater glider is an important factor in determining the hydrodynamic efficiency. In this paper, a high lift to drag ratio configuration, the Blended-Wing-Body (BWB), is used to design a small civilian under water glider. In the parametric geometric model of the BWB underwater glider, the planform is defined with Bezier curve and linear line, and the section is defined with symmetrical airfoil NACA 0012. Computational investigations are carried out to study the hydrodynamic performance of the glider using the commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code Fluent. The Kriging-based genetic algorithm, called Efficient Global Optimization (EGO), is applied to hydrodynamic design optimization. The result demonstrates that the BWB underwater glider has excellent hydrodynamic performance, and the lift to drag ratio of initial design is increased by 7% in the EGO process.

  11. Energy-based fatigue model for shape memory alloys including thermomechanical coupling

    Zhang, Yahui; Zhu, Jihong; Moumni, Ziad; Van Herpen, Alain; Zhang, Weihong

    2016-03-01

    This paper is aimed at developing a low cycle fatigue criterion for pseudoelastic shape memory alloys to take into account thermomechanical coupling. To this end, fatigue tests are carried out at different loading rates under strain control at room temperature using NiTi wires. Temperature distribution on the specimen is measured using a high speed thermal camera. Specimens are tested to failure and fatigue lifetimes of specimens are measured. Test results show that the fatigue lifetime is greatly influenced by the loading rate: as the strain rate increases, the fatigue lifetime decreases. Furthermore, it is shown that the fatigue cracks initiate when the stored energy inside the material reaches a critical value. An energy-based fatigue criterion is thus proposed as a function of the irreversible hysteresis energy of the stabilized cycle and the loading rate. Fatigue life is calculated using the proposed model. The experimental and computational results compare well.

  12. Modelling elasticity in solids using active cubes - application to simulated operations

    Bro-Nielsen, Morten

    The paper describes an approach to elastic modelling of human tissue based on the use of 3D solid active models-active cubes (M. Bro-Nielsen, 1994)-and a shape description based on the metric tensor in a solid. Active cubes are used because they provide a natural parameterization of the surface and....... The application of this approach to modelling the elastic deformation of human tissue in response to movement of bones is demonstrated...

  13. Shape dependency of the extinction and absorption cross sections of dust aerosols modeled as randomly oriented spheroids

    R. Wagner

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We present computational results on the shape dependency of the extinction and absorption cross sections of dustlike aerosol particles that were modeled as randomly oriented spheroids. Shape dependent variations in the extinction cross sections are largest in the size regime that is governed by the interference structure. Elongated spheroids best fitted measured extinction spectra of re-dispersed Saharan dust samples. For dust particles smaller than 1.5 μm in diameter and low absorption potential, shape effects on the absorption cross sections are very small.

  14. Rapidly re-computable EEG (electroencephalography) forward models for realistic head shapes

    Solution of the EEG source localization (inverse) problem utilizing model-based methods typically requires a significant number of forward model evaluations. For subspace based inverse methods like MUSIC (6), the total number of forward model evaluations can often approach an order of 103 or 104. Techniques based on least-squares minimization may require significantly more evaluations. The observed set of measurements over an M-sensor array is often expressed as a linear forward spatio-temporal model of the form: F = GQ + N (1) where the observed forward field F (M-sensors x N-time samples) can be expressed in terms of the forward model G, a set of dipole moment(s) Q (3xP-dipoles x N-time samples) and additive noise N. Because of their simplicity, ease of computation, and relatively good accuracy, multi-layer spherical models (7) (or fast approximations described in (1), (7)) have traditionally been the 'forward model of choice' for approximating the human head. However, approximation of the human head via a spherical model does have several key drawbacks. By its very shape, the use of a spherical model distorts the true distribution of passive currents in the skull cavity. Spherical models also require that the sensor positions be projected onto the fitted sphere (Fig. 1), resulting in a distortion of the true sensor-dipole spatial geometry (and ultimately the computed surface potential). The use of a single 'best-fitted' sphere has the added drawback of incomplete coverage of the inner skull region, often ignoring areas such as the frontal cortex. In practice, this problem is typically countered by fitting additional sphere(s) to those region(s) not covered by the primary sphere. The use of these additional spheres results in added complication to the forward model. Using high-resolution spatial information obtained via X-ray CT or MR imaging, a realistic head model can be formed by tessellating the head into a set of contiguous regions (typically the scalp

  15. Modeling the X-ray fractional variability spectrum of Active Galactic Nuclei using multiple flares

    Goosmann, R. W.; Dovciak, M.; Karas, V.; Czerny, B.; Mouchet, M.; Ponti, G.

    2007-01-01

    Using Monte-Carlo simulations of X-ray flare distributions across the accretion disk of active galactic nuclei (AGN), we obtain modeling results for the energy-dependent fractional variability amplitude. Referring to previous results of this model, we illustrate the relation between the shape of the point-to-point fractional variability spectrum, F_pp, and the time-integrated spectral energy distribution, F_E. The results confirm that the spectral shape and variability of the iron Kalpha line...

  16. Shape dynamics of growing cell walls

    Banerjee, Shiladitya; Scherer, Norbert F.; Dinner, Aaron R.

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a general theoretical framework to study the shape dynamics of actively growing and remodeling surfaces. Using this framework we develop a physical model for growing bacterial cell walls and study the interplay of cell shape with the dynamics of growth and constriction. The model allows us to derive constraints on cell wall mechanical energy based on the observed dynamics of cell shape. We predict that exponential growth in cell size requires a constant amount of cell wall energy...

  17. Evolution of ground state nuclear shapes in tungsten nuclei in terms of interacting boson model

    Khalaf, A. M.; El-Shal, A. O.; Taha, M. M.; El-Sayed, M. A.

    2016-03-01

    The tungsten nuclei 180-190W are investigated within the framework of the interacting boson model using an intrinsic coherent state formalism. The Hamiltonian operator contains only multipole operators of the subalgebra associated with the dynamical symmetries SU(3) and O(6). The study includes the behavior of potential energy surfaces (BES's) and critical points in the space of the model parameters to declare the geometric character of the tungsten isotopic chain. Some selected energy levels and reduced E2 transition probabilities B(E2) for each nucleus are calculated to adjust the model parameters by using a computer code PH INT and simulated computer fitting programme to fit the experimental data with the IBM calculation by minimizing the root mean square deviations. The 180-190W isotopes lies in shape transition SU(3)-O(6) region of the IBM such that the lighter isotopes comes very clare to the SU(3) limit, while the behavior ones tend to be near the γ-unstable O(6) limit.

  18. Human performance modeling for system of systems analytics: combat performance-shaping factors.

    Lawton, Craig R.; Miller, Dwight Peter

    2006-01-01

    The US military has identified Human Performance Modeling (HPM) as a significant requirement and challenge of future systems modeling and analysis initiatives. To support this goal, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has undertaken a program of HPM as an integral augmentation to its system-of-system (SoS) analytics capabilities. The previous effort, reported in SAND2005-6569, evaluated the effects of soldier cognitive fatigue on SoS performance. The current effort began with a very broad survey of any performance-shaping factors (PSFs) that also might affect soldiers performance in combat situations. The work included consideration of three different approaches to cognition modeling and how appropriate they would be for application to SoS analytics. This bulk of this report categorizes 47 PSFs into three groups (internal, external, and task-related) and provides brief descriptions of how each affects combat performance, according to the literature. The PSFs were then assembled into a matrix with 22 representative military tasks and assigned one of four levels of estimated negative impact on task performance, based on the literature. Blank versions of the matrix were then sent to two ex-military subject-matter experts to be filled out based on their personal experiences. Data analysis was performed to identify the consensus most influential PSFs. Results indicate that combat-related injury, cognitive fatigue, inadequate training, physical fatigue, thirst, stress, poor perceptual processing, and presence of chemical agents are among the PSFs with the most negative impact on combat performance.

  19. U(5)-SU(3) nuclear shape transition within the interacting boson model applied to dysprosium isotopes

    Kotb, M.

    2016-07-01

    In the framework of the interacting boson model (IBM) with intrinsic coherent state, the shape Hamiltonian from spherical vibrator U(5) to axially symmetric prolate deformed rotator SU(3) are examined. The Hamiltonian used is composed of a single boson energy term and quadrupole term. The potential energy surfaces (PES' s) corresponding to the U(5)-SU(3) transition are calculated with variation of a scaling and control parameters. The model is applied to 150-162Dy chain of isotopes. In this chain a change from spherical to well deformed nuclei is observed when moving from the lighter to heavier isotopes. 156Dy is a good candidate for the critical point symmetry X(5). The parameters of the model are determined by using a computer simulated search program in order to minimize the deviation between our calculated and some selected experimental energy levels, B(E2) transition rates and the two neutron separation energies S2n. We have also studied the energy ratios and the B(E2) values for the yrast state of the critical nucleus. The nucleon pair transfer intensities between ground-ground and ground-beta states are examined within IBM and boson intrinsic coherent framework.

  20. Modelling and assessment of dependent performance shaping factors through Analytic Network Process

    De Ambroggi, Massimiliano, E-mail: massimiliano.deambroggi@mail.polimi.i [Politecnico di Milano, Department of Management, Economics and Industrial Engineering, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, Milan 20132 (Italy); Trucco, Paolo [Politecnico di Milano, Department of Management, Economics and Industrial Engineering, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, Milan 20132 (Italy)

    2011-07-15

    Despite continuous progresses in research and applications, one of the major weaknesses of current HRA methods dwells in their limited capability of modelling the mutual influences between performance shaping factors (PSFs). Indeed at least two types of dependencies between PSFs can be defined: (i) dependency between the states of the PSFs; (ii) dependency between the influences (impacts) of the PSFs on the human performance. This paper introduces a method, based on Analytic Network Process (ANP), for the quantification of the latter, where the overall contribution of each PSF (weight) to the human error probability (HEP) is eventually returned. The core of the method is the modelling process, articulated into two steps: firstly, a qualitative network of dependencies between PSFs is identified, then, the importance of each PSF is quantitatively assessed using ANP. The model allows to distinguish two components of the PSF influence: direct influence that is the influence that the considered PSF is able to express by itself, notwithstanding the presence of other PSFs and indirect influence that is the incremental influence of the considered PSF through its influence on other PSFs. A case study in Air Traffic Control is presented where the proposed approach is integrated into the cognitive simulator PROCOS. The results demonstrated a significant modification of the influence of PSFs over the operator performance when dependencies are taken into account, underlining the importance of considering not only the possible correlation between the states of PSFs but also their mutual dependency in affecting human performance in complex systems.

  1. Characterisation and modelling of vacancy dynamics in Ni–Mn–Ga ferromagnetic shape memory alloys

    Merida, D., E-mail: david.merida@ehu.es [Fisika Aplikatua II Saila, Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea UPV/EHU, p.k. 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain); Elektrizitate eta Elektronika Saila, Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea UPV/EHU, p.k. 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain); García, J.A. [Fisika Aplikatua II Saila, Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea UPV/EHU, p.k. 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain); BC Materials (Basque Centre for Materials, Application and Nanostructures), 48040 Leioa (Spain); Sánchez-Alarcos, V. [Departamento de Física, Universidad Pública de Navarra, Campus de Arrosadia, 31006 Pamplona (Spain); Pérez-Landazábal, J.I.; Recarte, V. [Departamento de Física, Universidad Pública de Navarra, Campus de Arrosadia, 31006 Pamplona (Spain); Institute for Advanced Materials (INAMAT), Universidad Pública de Navarra, Campus de Arrosadía, 31006 Pamplona (Spain); Plazaola, F. [Elektrizitate eta Elektronika Saila, Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea UPV/EHU, p.k. 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain)

    2015-08-05

    Highlights: • We study the dynamics of vacancies for three different Ni–Mn–Ga alloy samples. • The formation and migration energies have been obtained experimentally. • The entropic factor and the distance a vacancy has to reach a sink are measured. • We present a theoretical model to explain the dynamics of vacancies. • Results are applicable for any thermal treatment and extensible to other alloys. - Abstract: The dynamics of vacancies in Ni–Mn–Ga shape memory alloys has been studied by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy. The temperature evolution of the vacancy concentration for three different Ni–Mn–Ga samples, two polycrystalline and one monocrystalline, have been determined. The formation and migration energies and the entropic factors are quite similar in all cases, but vary slightly according to composition. However, the number of jumps a vacancy has to overtake to reach a sink is five times higher in the single crystal. This is an expected result, due to the role that surfaces and grain boundaries should play in balancing the vacancy concentration. In all cases, the initial vacancy concentration for the samples quenched from 1173 K lies between 1000 ppm and 2000 ppm. A phenomenological model able to explain the dynamics of vacancies has been developed in terms of the previous parameters. The model can reproduce the vacancy dynamics for any different kind of thermal history and can be easily extended to other alloys.

  2. Characterisation and modelling of vacancy dynamics in Ni–Mn–Ga ferromagnetic shape memory alloys

    Highlights: • We study the dynamics of vacancies for three different Ni–Mn–Ga alloy samples. • The formation and migration energies have been obtained experimentally. • The entropic factor and the distance a vacancy has to reach a sink are measured. • We present a theoretical model to explain the dynamics of vacancies. • Results are applicable for any thermal treatment and extensible to other alloys. - Abstract: The dynamics of vacancies in Ni–Mn–Ga shape memory alloys has been studied by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy. The temperature evolution of the vacancy concentration for three different Ni–Mn–Ga samples, two polycrystalline and one monocrystalline, have been determined. The formation and migration energies and the entropic factors are quite similar in all cases, but vary slightly according to composition. However, the number of jumps a vacancy has to overtake to reach a sink is five times higher in the single crystal. This is an expected result, due to the role that surfaces and grain boundaries should play in balancing the vacancy concentration. In all cases, the initial vacancy concentration for the samples quenched from 1173 K lies between 1000 ppm and 2000 ppm. A phenomenological model able to explain the dynamics of vacancies has been developed in terms of the previous parameters. The model can reproduce the vacancy dynamics for any different kind of thermal history and can be easily extended to other alloys

  3. A study on radiation energy of Pyramidal shape 1- Effect of housing within a Pyramid model on cancer growth and some blood parameters of mice

    A study of solid tumor growth retardation by impaling the pyramid energy radiation in a pyramidal model shape was carried out. The great Pyramid of Egypt has evoked a keen interest since 1920, both for its architectural, marvel and mystical significance. Its strange thing (via shaping of razers, longer shelf life of vegetables, alerted states of consciousnesses, sleeping in hum and, wound healing). Power energy radiations are said to occur within a pyramid constructed in the exact geometric properties of Giza pyramid. The effect of housing in two different pyramidal shapes on cancer growth and some blood physiological indices in mice infected with cancer were observed. The results obtained that housing in pyramid shape cage significantly reduced the development of cancer, significant increase in liver enzymes activity and α feto proteins, however, no effect was observed in levels of thyroid hormones concentration when compared with their matched value in ordinary 2 inverted pyramid cages. It could be concluded that the radiation energy of pyramidal shapes might improve certain biochemical and physiological indices leading to tumor growth retardation

  4. Recent activities of association of shape memory alloys (ASMA) in Japan

    The Association of Shape Memory Alloys(ASMA) was established in 1983 and systematic surveys on the Ni-Ti and Cu based SMAs were carried out until 1986. The ASMA is now reorganized as a private association. In this paper, we briefly introduce several SMA products of the member companies and present a couple of products, a static rock breaking system and a thermostatic mixing valve in detail. (orig.)

  5. Shape-memory surface with dynamically tunable nano-geometry activated by body heat.

    Ebara, Mitsuhiro; Uto, Koichiro; Idota, Naokazu; Hoffman, John M; Aoyagi, Takao

    2012-01-10

    Shape-memory surfaces with on-demand, tunable nanopatterns are developed to observe time dependent changes in cell alignment using temperature-responsive poly(ϵ-caprolactone) (PCL) films. Temporary grooved nanopatterns are easily programmed on the films and triggered to transition quickly to permanent surface patterns by the application of body heat. A time-dependent cytoskeleton remodeling is also observed under biologically relevant conditions. PMID:21954058

  6. Spectral Line-Shape Model to Replace the Voigt Profile in Spectroscopic Databases

    Lisak, Daniel; Ngo, Ngoc Hoa; Tran, Ha; Hartmann, Jean-Michel

    2014-06-01

    The standard description of molecular line shapes in spectral databases and radiative transfer codes is based on the Voigt profile. It is well known that its simplified assumptions of absorber free motion and independence of collisional parameters from absorber velocity lead to systematic errors in analysis of experimental spectra, and retrieval of gas concentration. We demonstrate1,2 that the partially correlated quadratic speed-dependent hardcollision profile3. (pCqSDHCP) is a good candidate to replace the Voigt profile in the next generations of spectroscopic databases. This profile takes into account the following physical effects: the Doppler broadening, the pressure broadening and shifting of the line, the velocity-changing collisions, the speed-dependence of pressure broadening and shifting, and correlations between velocity- and phase/state-changing collisions. The speed-dependence of pressure broadening and shifting is incorporated into the pCqSDNGP in the so-called quadratic approximation. The velocity-changing collisions lead to the Dicke narrowing effect; however in many cases correlations between velocityand phase/state-changing collisions may lead to effective reduction of observed Dicke narrowing. The hard-collision model of velocity-changing collisions is also known as the Nelkin-Ghatak model or Rautian model. Applicability of the pCqSDHCP for different molecular systems was tested on calculated and experimental spectra of such molecules as H2, O2, CO2, H2O in a wide span of pressures. For all considered systems, pCqSDHCP is able to describe molecular spectra at least an order of magnitude better than the Voigt profile with all fitted parameters being linear with pressure. In the most cases pCqSDHCP can reproduce the reference spectra down to 0.2% or better, which fulfills the requirements of the most demanding remote-sensing applications. An important advantage of pCqSDHCP is that a fast algorithm for its computation was developedab4,5 and allows

  7. A phenomenological model for simulating the chemo-responsive shape memory effect in polymers undergoing a permeation transition

    We present a phenomenological model for studying the constitutive relations and working mechanism of the chemo-responsive shape memory effect (SME) in shape memory polymers (SMPs). On the basis of the solubility parameter equation, diffusion model and permeation transition model, a phenomenological model is derived for quantitatively identifying the influential factors in the chemically induced SME in SMPs. After this, a permeability parallel model and series model are implemented in order to couple the constitutive relations of the permeability coefficient, stress and relaxation time as a function of stretch, separately. The inductive effect of the permeability transition on the transition temperature is confirmed as the driving force for the chemo-responsive SME. Furthermore, the analytical result from the phenomenological model is compared with the available experimental results and the simulation of a semi-empirical model reported in the literature for verification. (paper)

  8. A two-dimensional analytical model and experimental validation of garter stitch knitted shape memory alloy actuator architecture

    Active knits are a unique architectural approach to meeting emerging smart structure needs for distributed high strain actuation with simultaneous force generation. This paper presents an analytical state-based model for predicting the actuation response of a shape memory alloy (SMA) garter knit textile. Garter knits generate significant contraction against moderate to large loads when heated, due to the continuous interlocked network of loops of SMA wire. For this knit architecture, the states of operation are defined on the basis of the thermal and mechanical loading of the textile, the resulting phase change of the SMA, and the load path followed to that state. Transitions between these operational states induce either stick or slip frictional forces depending upon the state and path, which affect the actuation response. A load–extension model of the textile is derived for each operational state using elastica theory and Euler–Bernoulli beam bending for the large deformations within a loop of wire based on the stress–strain behavior of the SMA material. This provides kinematic and kinetic relations which scale to form analytical transcendental expressions for the net actuation motion against an external load. This model was validated experimentally for an SMA garter knit textile over a range of applied forces with good correlation for both the load–extension behavior in each state as well as the net motion produced during the actuation cycle (250% recoverable strain and over 50% actuation). The two-dimensional analytical model of the garter stitch active knit provides the ability to predict the kinetic actuation performance, providing the basis for the design and synthesis of large stroke, large force distributed actuators that employ this novel architecture. (paper)

  9. Neonatal rearing conditions distinctly shape locus coeruleus neuronal activity, dendritic arborization, and sensitivity to corticotrophin-releasing factor

    Swinny, Jerome D.; O'Farrell, Eimear; Bingham, Brian C.; Piel, David A.; Valentino, Rita J.; Beck, Sheryl G.

    2009-01-01

    Early life events influence vulnerability to psychiatric illness. This has been modelled in rats and it has been demonstrated that different durations of maternal separation shape adult endocrine and behavioural stress reactivity. One system through which maternal separation may act is the locus coeruleus (LC)–norepinephrine system that regulates emotional arousal. Here we demonstrate that different durations of maternal separation have distinct effects on LC physiology and dendritic morpholo...

  10. Reliability Criteria for Testing the Goodness of the Activation Energy Values Obtained by the Peak Shape Methods in Thermoluminescence Experiments

    G. Kitis

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to give some expressions able to give a criteria of acceptance for the activation energy values determined through the so called peak shape methods. The expressions are derived for both first and second order kinetics. Furthermore, using approximations concerning the peak temperature parameters, the reliability expressions are simplified for getting a more quickly criteria of acceptance. A table lists several data, from literature, concerning the activation energy determined for various Thermoluminescence materials; the experimental values are then tested using the criteria of acceptance showing the goodness of the method here presented in this research.

  11. Ventral-stream-like shape representation : from pixel intensity values to trainable object-selective COSFIRE models

    Azzopardi, George; Petkov, Nicolai

    2014-01-01

    The remarkable abilities of the primate visual system have inspired the construction of computational models of some visual neurons. We propose a trainable hierarchical object recognition model, which we call S-COSFIRE (S stands for Shape and COSFIRE stands for Combination Of Shifted Filter REsponse

  12. Ventral-stream-like shape representation: from pixel intensity values to trainable object-selective COSFIRE models

    Azzopardi, G.; Petkov, N.

    2014-01-01

    The remarkable abilities of the primate visual system have inspired the construction of computational models of some visual neurons. We propose a trainable hierarchical object recognition model, which we call S-COSFIRE (S stands for Shape and COSFIRE stands for Combination Of Shifted FIlter REsponse

  13. Shaping old age: Innovation partnerships, senior centres and billiards tables as active ageing technologies

    Lassen, Aske Juul

    2015-01-01

    During the past decade active ageing has been positioned as a solution to the problem of global ageing. While the scientific, economic and even moral arguments for pursuing a more active old age has been many, the integration of active ageing in everyday practices face challenges. This chapter...... activity centres and a billiards table, the author explores how active ageing policies are transformed in practice. The chapter draws on an ethnographic study of active ageing conducted at the two activity centres, as well as the author’s participation in the innovation partnership. The author uses this...... explores the ways that active ageing policies become part of everyday practices, by proposing the concept of active ageing technologies. Active ageing technologies are material and immaterial condensations of knowledge that form old age in specific ways. Through the cases of an innovation partnership, two...

  14. Short Term Evaluation of an Anatomically Shaped Polycarbonate Urethane Total Meniscus Replacement in a Goat Model.

    A C T Vrancken

    Full Text Available Since the treatment options for symptomatic total meniscectomy patients are still limited, an anatomically shaped, polycarbonate urethane (PCU, total meniscus replacement was developed. This study evaluates the in vivo performance of the implant in a goat model, with a specific focus on the implant location in the joint, geometrical integrity of the implant and the effect of the implant on synovial membrane and articular cartilage histopathological condition.The right medial meniscus of seven Saanen goats was replaced by the implant. Sham surgery (transection of the MCL, arthrotomy and MCL suturing was performed in six animals. The contralateral knee joints of both groups served as control groups. After three months follow-up the following aspects of implant performance were evaluated: implant position, implant deformation and the histopathological condition of the synovium and cartilage.Implant geometry was well maintained during the three month implantation period. No signs of PCU wear were found and the implant did not induce an inflammatory response in the knee joint. In all animals, implant fixation was compromised due to suture breakage, wear or elongation, likely causing the increase in extrusion observed in the implant group. Both the femoral cartilage and tibial cartilage in direct contact with the implant showed increased damage compared to the sham and sham-control groups.This study demonstrates that the novel, anatomically shaped PCU total meniscal replacement is biocompatible and resistant to three months of physiological loading. Failure of the fixation sutures may have increased implant mobility, which probably induced implant extrusion and potentially stimulated cartilage degeneration. Evidently, redesigning the fixation method is necessary. Future animal studies should evaluate the improved fixation method and compare implant performance to current treatment standards, such as allografts.

  15. Longitudinal modeling of appearance and shape and its potential for clinical use.

    Gerig, Guido; Fishbaugh, James; Sadeghi, Neda

    2016-10-01

    Clinical assessment routinely uses terms such as development, growth trajectory, degeneration, disease progression, recovery or prediction. This terminology inherently carries the aspect of dynamic processes, suggesting that single measurements in time and cross-sectional comparison may not sufficiently describe spatiotemporal changes. In view of medical imaging, such tasks encourage subject-specific longitudinal imaging. Whereas follow-up, monitoring and prediction are natural tasks in clinical diagnosis of disease progression and of assessment of therapeutic intervention, translation of methodologies for calculation of temporal profiles from longitudinal data to clinical routine still requires significant research and development efforts. Rapid advances in image acquisition technology with significantly reduced acquisition times and with increase of patient comfort favor repeated imaging over the observation period. In view of serial imaging ranging over multiple years, image acquisition faces the challenging issue of scanner standardization and calibration which is crucial for successful spatiotemporal analysis. Longitudinal 3D data, represented as 4D images, capture time-varying anatomy and function. Such data benefits from dedicated analysis methods and tools that make use of the inherent correlation and causality of repeated acquisitions of the same subject. Availability of such data spawned progress in the development of advanced 4D image analysis methodologies that carry the notion of linear and nonlinear regression, now applied to complex, high-dimensional data such as images, image-derived shapes and structures, or a combination thereof. This paper provides examples of recently developed analysis methodologies for 4D image data, primarily focusing on progress in areas of core expertise of the authors. These include spatiotemporal shape modeling and growth trajectories of white matter fiber tracts demonstrated with examples from ongoing longitudinal

  16. Use of a Ni60Ti shape memory alloy for active jet engine chevron application: I. Thermomechanical characterization

    A shape memory alloy (SMA) with a composition of Ni60Ti40 (wt%) was chosen for the fabrication of active beam elements intended for use as cyclic actuators and incorporated into a morphing aerospace structure. The active structure is a variable-geometry chevron (VGC) designed to reduce jet engine noise in the take-off flight regime while maintaining efficiency in the cruise regime. This two-part work addresses the training, characterization and derived material properties of the new nickel-rich composition, the assessment of the actuation properties of the active beam actuator and the accurate analysis of the VGC and its subcomponents using a model calibrated from the material characterization. The characterization performed in part I of this work was intended to provide quantitative information used to predict the response of SMA beam actuators of the same composition and with the same heat treatment history. Material in the form of plates was received and ASTM standard tensile testing coupons were fabricated and tested. To fully characterize the material response as an actuator, various thermomechanical experiments were performed. Properties such as actuation strain and transformation temperatures as a function of applied stress were of primary interest. Results from differential scanning calorimetry, monotonic tensile loading and constant stress thermal loading for the as-received, untrained material are first presented. These show lower transformation temperatures, higher elastic stiffnesses (60–90 GPa) and lower recoverable transformation strains (≈1.5%) when compared to equiatomic NiTi (Nitinol). Stabilization (training) cycles were applied to the tensile specimens and characterization tests were repeated for the stable (trained) material. The effects of specimen training included the saturation of cyclically generated irrecoverable plastic strains and a broadening of the thermal transformation hysteresis. A set of final derived material properties for

  17. Modelling profile and shape evolution during hot rolling of steel strip

    Zambrano, P. C.

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Profile and shape control are required to assure the dimensional quality of rolled strip. Occurrence of waves either at the edges or centre of strips is attributed to inconsistency between the entry and exit cross-section profiles of the stock within a given rolling pass. The exit profile of the strip can be computed by considering that the such profile is the complement of that of the roll-gap, which is affected by wear, thermal expansion and distortion of the work rolls A computer model was developed to predict the profile of the roll-gap taking into account the thermal gradient within the work roll and the distortion caused by the acting forces. It was possible to establish a good correlation between the profiles of strips obtained from trials carried out on site, and the predictions of the model. The model allows for the prediction of the onset of shape defects from changes in the profile of rolled strips.

    Se requiere del control del perfil y forma para asegurar la calidad dimensional de la cinta laminada. La presencia de ondulaciones, ya sea en la orilla o al centro de la cinta, se atribuye a la inconsistencia entre el perfil de la sección transversal de la pieza a la entrada y a la salida, en un dado paso. El perfil de salida de la cinta se puede calcular al suponer que dicho perfil es el complemento del entrehierro, que es afectado por desgaste, expansión térmica y distorsión de los rodillos de trabajo. Un modelo matemático se desarrolló para predecir el perfil del entrehierro tomando en cuenta el gradiente térmico en el rodillo de trabajo y la distorsión producida por las fuerzas actuantes. Fue posible encontrar una buena correlación entre los perfiles de cintas obtenidos a partir de pruebas en planta y las predicciones del modelo. El modelo permite predecir el origen de defectos de forma a partir de cambios en el perfil de cintas laminadas.

  18. Development and implementation of configurational forces based constitutive phase field models for shape memory alloys

    Agboola, Babatunde Omogbolahan

    Continuum thermodynamic constitutive phase field models are developed to simulate the rate dependent, thermomechanical response and precipitate formation in shape memory alloys (SMAs). The two models are based on the application of the balance of configurational forces, a scalar order parameter (a phase field) and atomic concentration to extend standard continuum thermodynamics approach. Constitutive field equations that capture the kinetics of solid-solid martensitic phase transition in SMA and the diffusion mediated precipitate formation in an elastic solid are developed. The coupled set of thermodynamically consistent field equations results from balance of configuration forces, balance of linear momentum, balance of energy and balance of atomic species mass. The field equations capture the kinetics of phase transition, deformation and elastic wave, heat transfer and atomic diffusion respectively. The first model is thermomechanical and is used to simulate the macroscopic response of SMA such as pseudoelasticity; transformation induced pseudo-creep, stress relaxation as well as the effect of cooling rate on mechanical and thermally induced phase transformation of SMA. The second model couples diffusion with elasticity to simulate growth and coarsening of precipitate and experimentally observed concentration depletion near the precipitates Results of the simulations of the macroscopic SMA response are in very good agreement with experimental observation. Simulations suggest that rate dependent and complex thermomechanical response of SMA are due to the interaction of an inherent time scale ( as well as length scale) of phase transformation, introduced through the balance of configurational forces, with other time scales. This work contributes to improved SMA modeling, scientific understanding and design. In particular, for aerospace application under stringent requirement and severe environmental conditions. Contribution of fundamental use of balance of

  19. Shape optimization for Navier-Stokes equations with algebraic turbulence model : numerical analysis and computation

    Haslinger, J.; Stebel, J. (Jan)

    2011-01-01

    We study the shape optimization problem for the paper machine headbox which distributes a mixture of water and wood fibers in the paper making process. The aim is to find a shape which a priori ensures the given velocity profile on the outlet part. The mathematical formulation leads to the optimal control problem in which the control variable is the shape of the domain representing the header, the state problem is represented by the generalized Navier-Stokes system with nontrivial boundary co...

  20. Locally Linear Diffeomorphic Metric Embedding (LLDME) for surface-based anatomical shape modeling.

    Yang, Xianfeng; Goh, Alvina; Qiu, Anqi

    2011-05-01

    This paper presents the algorithm, Locally Linear Diffeomorphic Metric Embedding (LLDME), for constructing efficient and compact representations of surface-based brain shapes whose variations are characterized using Large Deformation Diffeomorphic Metric Mapping (LDDMM). Our hypothesis is that the shape variations in the infinite-dimensional diffeomorphic metric space can be captured by a low-dimensional space. To do so, traditional Locally Linear Embedding (LLE) that reconstructs a data point from its neighbors in Euclidean space is extended to LLDME that requires interpolating a shape from its neighbors in the infinite-dimensional diffeomorphic metric space. This is made possible through the conservation law of momentum derived from LDDMM. It indicates that initial momentum, a linear transformation of the initial velocity of diffeomorphic flows, at a fixed template shape determines the geodesic connecting the template to a subject's shape in the diffeomorphic metric space and becomes the shape signature of an individual subject. This leads to the compact linear representation of the nonlinear diffeomorphisms in terms of the initial momentum. Since the initial momentum is in a linear space, a shape can be approximated by a linear combination of its neighbors in the diffeomorphic metric space. In addition, we provide efficient computations for the metric distance between two shapes through the first order approximation of the geodesic using the initial momentum as well as for the reconstruction of a shape given its low-dimensional Euclidean coordinates using the geodesic shooting with the initial momentum as the initial condition. Experiments are performed on the hippocampal shapes of 302 normal subjects across the whole life span (18-94years). Compared with Principal Component Analysis and ISOMAP, LLDME provides the most compact and efficient representation of the age-related hippocampal shapes. Even though the hippocampal volumes among young adults are as

  1. Scanning electron microscope measurement of width and shape of 10 nm patterned lines using a JMONSEL-modeled library

    The width and shape of 10 nm to 12 nm wide lithographically patterned SiO2 lines were measured in the scanning electron microscope by fitting the measured intensity vs. position to a physics-based model in which the lines' widths and shapes are parameters. The approximately 32 nm pitch sample was patterned at Intel using a state-of-the-art pitch quartering process. Their narrow widths and asymmetrical shapes are representative of near-future generation transistor gates. These pose a challenge: the narrowness because electrons landing near one edge may scatter out of the other, so that the intensity profile at each edge becomes width-dependent, and the asymmetry because the shape requires more parameters to describe and measure. Modeling was performed by JMONSEL (Java Monte Carlo Simulation of Secondary Electrons), which produces a predicted yield vs. position for a given sample shape and composition. The simulator produces a library of predicted profiles for varying sample geometry. Shape parameter values are adjusted until interpolation of the library with those values best matches the measured image. Profiles thereby determined agreed with those determined by transmission electron microscopy and critical dimension small-angle x-ray scattering to better than 1 nm

  2. Scanning electron microscope measurement of width and shape of 10 nm patterned lines using a JMONSEL-modeled library

    Villarrubia, J.S., E-mail: john.villarrubia@nist.gov [Semiconductor and Dimensional Metrology Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Vladár, A.E.; Ming, B. [Semiconductor and Dimensional Metrology Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Kline, R.J.; Sunday, D.F. [Materials Science and Engineering Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Chawla, J.S.; List, S. [Intel Corporation, RA3-252, 5200 NE Elam Young Pkwy, Hillsboro, OR 97124 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    The width and shape of 10 nm to 12 nm wide lithographically patterned SiO{sub 2} lines were measured in the scanning electron microscope by fitting the measured intensity vs. position to a physics-based model in which the lines' widths and shapes are parameters. The approximately 32 nm pitch sample was patterned at Intel using a state-of-the-art pitch quartering process. Their narrow widths and asymmetrical shapes are representative of near-future generation transistor gates. These pose a challenge: the narrowness because electrons landing near one edge may scatter out of the other, so that the intensity profile at each edge becomes width-dependent, and the asymmetry because the shape requires more parameters to describe and measure. Modeling was performed by JMONSEL (Java Monte Carlo Simulation of Secondary Electrons), which produces a predicted yield vs. position for a given sample shape and composition. The simulator produces a library of predicted profiles for varying sample geometry. Shape parameter values are adjusted until interpolation of the library with those values best matches the measured image. Profiles thereby determined agreed with those determined by transmission electron microscopy and critical dimension small-angle x-ray scattering to better than 1 nm.

  3. Modeling of thermo-mechanical fatigue and damage in shape memory alloy axial actuators

    Wheeler, Robert W.; Hartl, Darren J.; Chemisky, Yves; Lagoudas, Dimitris C.

    2015-04-01

    The aerospace, automotive, and energy industries have seen the potential benefits of using shape memory alloys (SMAs) as solid state actuators. Thus far, however, these actuators are generally limited to non-critical components or over-designed due to a lack of understanding regarding how SMAs undergo thermomechanical or actuation fatigue and the inability to accurately predict failure in an actuator during use. The purpose of this study was to characterize the actuation fatigue response of Nickel-Titanium-Hafnium (NiTiHf) axial actuators and, in turn, use this characterization to predict failure and monitor damage in dogbone actuators undergoing various thermomechanical loading paths. Calibration data was collected from constant load, full cycle tests ranging from 200-600MPa. Subsequently, actuator lifetimes were predicted for four additional loading paths. These loading paths consisted of linearly varying load with full transformation (300-500MPa) and step loads which transition from zero stress to 300-400MPa at various martensitic volume fractions. Thermal cycling was achieved via resistive heating and convective cooling and was controlled via a state machine developed in LabVIEW. A previously developed fatigue damage model, which is formulated such that the damage accumulation rate is general in terms of its dependence on current and local stress and actuation strain states, was utilized. This form allows the model to be utilized for specimens undergoing complex loading paths. Agreement between experiments and simulations is discussed.

  4. Modeling and development of a twisting wing using inductively heated shape memory alloy actuators

    Saunders, Robert N.; Hartl, Darren J.; Boyd, James G.; Lagoudas, Dimitris C.

    2015-04-01

    Wing twisting has been shown to improve aircraft flight performance. The potential benefits of a twisting wing are often outweighed by the mass of the system required to twist the wing. Shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators repeatedly demonstrate abilities and properties that are ideal for aerospace actuation systems. Recent advances have shown an SMA torsional actuator that can be manufactured and trained with the ability to generate large twisting deformations under substantial loading. The primary disadvantage of implementing large SMA actuators has been their slow actuation time compared to conventional actuators. However, inductive heating of an SMA actuator allows it to generate a full actuation cycle in just seconds rather than minutes while still . The aim of this work is to demonstrate an experimental wing being twisted to approximately 10 degrees by using an inductively heated SMA torsional actuator. This study also considers a 3-D electromagnetic thermo-mechanical model of the SMA-wing system and compare these results to experiments to demonstrate modeling capabilities.

  5. Modeling transport through an environment crowded by a mixture of obstacles of different shapes and sizes

    Ellery, Adam J.; Baker, Ruth E.; McCue, Scott W.; Simpson, Matthew J.

    2016-05-01

    Many biological environments are crowded by macromolecules, organelles and cells which can impede the transport of other cells and molecules. Previous studies have sought to describe these effects using either random walk models or fractional order diffusion equations. Here we examine the transport of both a single agent and a population of agents through an environment containing obstacles of varying size and shape, whose relative densities are drawn from a specified distribution. Our simulation results for a single agent indicate that smaller obstacles are more effective at retarding transport than larger obstacles; these findings are consistent with our simulations of the collective motion of populations of agents. In an attempt to explore whether these kinds of stochastic random walk simulations can be described using a fractional order diffusion equation framework, we calibrate the solution of such a differential equation to our averaged agent density information. Our approach suggests that these kinds of commonly used differential equation models ought to be used with care since we are unable to match the solution of a fractional order diffusion equation to our data in a consistent fashion over a finite time period.

  6. Indentation response of a NiTi shape memory alloy: modeling and experiments

    C. Maletta

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The indentation response of a pseudoelastic nickel-titanium based shape memory alloy (SMA has been analyzed. Indentation tests have been carried out at room temperature using a spherical diamond tip and indentation loads in the range 50-500 mN in order to promote a large stress-induced transformation zone in the indentation region and, consequently, to avoid local effects due to microstructural variations. The measured load-displacement data have been analyzed to obtain information on the pseudoelastic response of the alloy. To aid this analysis numerical simulations were performed, by using a commercial finite element (FE software code and a special constitutive model for SMAs, so as to understand better the microstructural evolution occurring during the indentation process. Finally, the FE model has been used to analyze the effects of temperature on the indentation response of the alloy. This analysis revealed a marked variation of both the maximum and residual penetration depths with increasing test temperature.

  7. A spherical harmonics intensity model for 3D segmentation and 3D shape analysis of heterochromatin foci.

    Eck, Simon; Wörz, Stefan; Müller-Ott, Katharina; Hahn, Matthias; Biesdorf, Andreas; Schotta, Gunnar; Rippe, Karsten; Rohr, Karl

    2016-08-01

    The genome is partitioned into regions of euchromatin and heterochromatin. The organization of heterochromatin is important for the regulation of cellular processes such as chromosome segregation and gene silencing, and their misregulation is linked to cancer and other diseases. We present a model-based approach for automatic 3D segmentation and 3D shape analysis of heterochromatin foci from 3D confocal light microscopy images. Our approach employs a novel 3D intensity model based on spherical harmonics, which analytically describes the shape and intensities of the foci. The model parameters are determined by fitting the model to the image intensities using least-squares minimization. To characterize the 3D shape of the foci, we exploit the computed spherical harmonics coefficients and determine a shape descriptor. We applied our approach to 3D synthetic image data as well as real 3D static and real 3D time-lapse microscopy images, and compared the performance with that of previous approaches. It turned out that our approach yields accurate 3D segmentation results and performs better than previous approaches. We also show that our approach can be used for quantifying 3D shape differences of heterochromatin foci. PMID:27037463

  8. A model considering mechanical anisotropy of magnetic-field-induced superelastic strain in magnetic shape memory alloys

    Highlights: ► The model analyzes mechanical anisotropy of magnetic shape memory alloy. ► The numerical evaluation of Eshelby tensor of shape memory alloy is obtained. ► Interaction energy of magnetic shape memory alloy is analyzed. - Abstract: Under applied mechanical load and magnetic field, a micromechanics-based thermodynamic model taking account of mechanical anisotropy of magnetic shape memory alloys (MSMAs) is developed in this work. Considering the crystallographic and magnetic microstructure, the internal state variables are chosen and the model can capture the magnetic shape memory effect caused by the martensitic variant reorientation process. It is assumed that the Gibbs free energy is consisted of the mechanical potential energy of anisotropic matrix, the Zeeman energy and the magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy in the model. In terms of the balance between the thermodynamic driving force derived from the reduction of Gibbs free energy and the resistive force for the variant reorientation, the kinetic equation is established and the Eshelby tensor of anisotropic MSMAs is then obtained by using numerical evaluation. At last, the effects of the anisotropy on interaction energy and macroscopic strain are discussed. The assumption of isotropy tends to underestimate interaction energy and macroscopic strain. The results considering mechanical anisotropy are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  9. Particle-in-cell modeling for MJ scale dense plasma focus with varied anode shape

    Megajoule scale dense plasma focus (DPF) Z-pinches with deuterium gas fill are compact devices capable of producing 1012 neutrons per shot but past predictive models of large-scale DPF have not included kinetic effects such as ion beam formation or anomalous resistivity. We report on progress of developing a predictive DPF model by extending our 2D axisymmetric collisional kinetic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations from the 4 kJ, 200 kA LLNL DPF to 1 MJ, 2 MA Gemini DPF using the PIC code LSP. These new simulations incorporate electrodes, an external pulsed-power driver circuit, and model the plasma from insulator lift-off through the pinch phase. To accommodate the vast range of relevant spatial and temporal scales involved in the Gemini DPF within the available computational resources, the simulations were performed using a new hybrid fluid-to-kinetic model. This new approach allows single simulations to begin in an electron/ion fluid mode from insulator lift-off through the 5-6 μs run-down of the 50+ cm anode, then transition to a fully kinetic PIC description during the run-in phase, when the current sheath is 2-3 mm from the central axis of the anode. Simulations are advanced through the final pinch phase using an adaptive variable time-step to capture the fs and sub-mm scales of the kinetic instabilities involved in the ion beam formation and neutron production. Validation assessments are being performed using a variety of different anode shapes, comparing against experimental measurements of neutron yield, neutron anisotropy and ion beam production

  10. A penny-shaped crack in a filament-reinforced matrix. I - The filament model. II - The crack problem

    Erdogan, F.; Pacella, A. H.

    1974-01-01

    The study deals with the elastostatic problem of a penny-shaped crack in an elastic matrix which is reinforced by filaments or fibers perpendicular to the plane of the crack. An elastic filament model is first developed, followed by consideration of the application of the model to the penny-shaped crack problem in which the filaments of finite length are asymmetrically distributed around the crack. Since the primary interest is in the application of the results to studies relating to the fracture of fiber or filament-reinforced composites and reinforced concrete, the main emphasis of the study is on the evaluation of the stress intensity factor along the periphery of the crack, the stresses in the filaments or fibers, and the interface shear between the matrix and the filaments or fibers. Using the filament model developed, the elastostatic interaction problem between a penny-shaped crack and a slender inclusion or filament in an elastic matrix is formulated.

  11. Shape Optimization for Navier-Stokes Equations with Algebraic Turbulence Model: Existence Analysis

    We study a shape optimization problem for the paper machine headbox which distributes a mixture of water and wood fibers in the paper making process. The aim is to find a shape which a priori ensures the given velocity profile on the outlet part. The mathematical formulation leads to an optimal control problem in which the control variable is the shape of the domain representing the header, the state problem is represented by a generalized stationary Navier-Stokes system with nontrivial mixed boundary conditions. In this paper we prove the existence of solutions both to the generalized Navier-Stokes system and to the shape optimization problem

  12. Seamless tube shape is constrained by endocytosis-dependent regulation of active Moesin

    Schottenfeld-Roames, Jodi; Rosa, Jeffrey B.; Ghabrial, Amin S.

    2014-01-01

    Most tubes have “seams” – intercellular or autocellular junctions that seal membranes together into a tube – but “seamless” tubes also exist [1-3]. In Drosophila, stellate-shaped tracheal terminal cells make seamless tubes, with single branches running through each of dozens of cellular extensions. We find that mutations in braided impair terminal cell branching and cause formation of seamless tube cysts. We show that braided encodes Syntaxin7, and that cysts also form in cells deficient for ...

  13. A tolerance analysis on design parameters of parabolic and hyperbolic secant active GRIN materials for laser beam shaping purposes

    The present paper considers two gain GRIN media, characterized by a complex parabolic and hyperbolic secant refractive index profile, for the design of uniform beam shaper systems. A general condition for beam shaping is obtained from the equation describing the evolution of the half-width of a plane Gaussian beam in the GRIN media. The simulation of the irradiance evolution of an input plane Gaussian beam—operating at 575 nm and beam waist radius of 0.45 mm—in each material is shown, in order to examine the beam shaping quality in terms of thickness of the active GRIN media and input beam wavelength. (paper)

  14. Dependence of the single-scattering properties of small ice crystals on idealized shape models

    J. Um

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The projections of small ice crystals (with maximum dimension <50 μm appear quasi-circular when imaged by probes on aircraft flying through cloud. Therefore, idealized models constructed to calculate their single-scattering properties have included quasi-spherical models such as Chebyshev particles, Gaussian random spheres, and droxtals. Recently, an ice analogue grown from sodium fluorosilicate solution on a glass substrate, with several columns emanating from a common center of mass, was shown to be quasi-circular when imaged by state-of-the-art cloud probes. In this study, a new idealized model, called the budding Bucky ball (3B that resembles the shape of the small ice analogue is developed. The corresponding single-scattering properties (scattering phase function P11 and asymmetry parameter g are computed by a ray-tracing code. Compared with previously used models, 3B scatters less light in the forward and more light in the lateral and backward directions. The Chebyshev particles and Gaussian random spheres show smooth and featureless P11, whereas droxtals and 3Bs, which have a faceted structure, show several peaks in P11 associated with angles of minimum deviation. Overall, the difference in the forward (lateral; backward scattering between models are up to 22% (994%; 132%, 20% (510%; 101%, and 16% (146%; 156% for small ice crystals with respective area ratios of 0.85, 0.77, and 0.69. The g for different models varies by up to 25%, 23%, and 19% for particles with area ratios of 0.85, 0.77, and 0.69, respectively. Because the single-scattering properties of small ice crystals depend both on the choice of the idealized model and the area ratios used to characterize the small ice crystals, higher resolution observations of small ice crystals or direct observations of their single-scattering properties are required.

  15. Dependence of the single-scattering properties of small ice crystals on idealized shape models

    J. Um

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Small ice crystals (with maximum dimension <50 μm appear quasi-circular when imaged by probes on aircraft flying through cloud. Therefore, idealized models constructed to calculate their single-scattering properties have included quasi-spherical models such as Chebyshev particles, Gaussian random spheres, and droxtals. Recently, an ice analogue grown from sodium fluorosilicate solution on a glass substrate, with several columns emanating from a common center of mass, was shown to be quasi-circular when imaged by state-of-the-art cloud probes. In this study, a new idealized model, called the budding Bucky ball (3B that resembles the shape of the small ice analogue is developed. The corresponding single-scattering properties (scattering phase function P11 and asymmetry parameter g are computed by a ray-tracing code. Compared with previosly used models, 3B scatters less light in the forward and more light in the lateral and backward directions. The Chebyshev particles and Gaussian random spheres show smooth and featureless P11, whereas droxtals and 3Bs, which have a faceted structure, show several peaks in P11 associated with angles of minimum deviation. Overall, the difference in the forward (lateral; backward scattering between models are up to 22% (994%; 132%, 20% (510%; 101%, and 16% (146%; 156% for small ice crystals with repective area ratios of 0.85, 0.77, and 0.69. The g for different models varies by up to 25%, 23%, and 19% for particles with area ratios of 0.85, 0.77, and 0.69, respectively. Becuase the single-scattering properties of small ice crystals depend both on the choice of the idealized model and the area ratios used to characterize the small ice crystals, higher resolution observations of small ice crystals or direct observations of their single-scattering properties are required.

  16. Graphical processing unit implementation of an integrated shape-based active contour: Application to digital pathology

    Sahirzeeshan Ali

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Commodity graphics hardware has become a cost-effective parallel platform to solve many general computational problems. In medical imaging and more so in digital pathology, segmentation of multiple structures on high-resolution images, is often a complex and computationally expensive task. Shape-based level set segmentation has recently emerged as a natural solution to segmenting overlapping and occluded objects. However the flexibility of the level set method has traditionally resulted in long computation times and therefore might have limited clinical utility. The processing times even for moderately sized images could run into several hours of computation time. Hence there is a clear need to accelerate these segmentations schemes. In this paper, we present a parallel implementation of a computationally heavy segmentation scheme on a graphical processing unit (GPU. The segmentation scheme incorporates level sets with shape priors to segment multiple overlapping nuclei from very large digital pathology images. We report a speedup of 19× compared to multithreaded C and MATLAB-based implementations of the same scheme, albeit with slight reduction in accuracy. Our GPU-based segmentation scheme was rigorously and quantitatively evaluated for the problem of nuclei segmentation and overlap resolution on digitized histopathology images corresponding to breast and prostate biopsy tissue specimens.

  17. Pulmonary lobe segmentation based on ridge surface sampling and shape model fitting

    Purpose: Performing lobe-based quantitative analysis of the lung in computed tomography (CT) scans can assist in efforts to better characterize complex diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). While airways and vessels can help to indicate the location of lobe boundaries, segmentations of these structures are not always available, so methods to define the lobes in the absence of these structures are desirable. Methods: The authors present a fully automatic lung lobe segmentation algorithm that is effective in volumetric inspiratory and expiratory computed tomography (CT) datasets. The authors rely on ridge surface image features indicating fissure locations and a novel approach to modeling shape variation in the surfaces defining the lobe boundaries. The authors employ a particle system that efficiently samples ridge surfaces in the image domain and provides a set of candidate fissure locations based on the Hessian matrix. Following this, lobe boundary shape models generated from principal component analysis (PCA) are fit to the particles data to discriminate between fissure and nonfissure candidates. The resulting set of particle points are used to fit thin plate spline (TPS) interpolating surfaces to form the final boundaries between the lung lobes. Results: The authors tested algorithm performance on 50 inspiratory and 50 expiratory CT scans taken from the COPDGene study. Results indicate that the authors' algorithm performs comparably to pulmonologist-generated lung lobe segmentations and can produce good results in cases with accessory fissures, incomplete fissures, advanced emphysema, and low dose acquisition protocols. Dice scores indicate that only 29 out of 500 (5.85%) lobes showed Dice scores lower than 0.9. Two different approaches for evaluating lobe boundary surface discrepancies were applied and indicate that algorithm boundary identification is most accurate in the vicinity of fissures detectable on CT. Conclusions: The proposed

  18. Pulmonary lobe segmentation based on ridge surface sampling and shape model fitting

    Ross, James C., E-mail: jross@bwh.harvard.edu [Channing Laboratory, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Surgical Planning Lab, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Laboratory of Mathematics in Imaging, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02126 (United States); Kindlmann, Gordon L. [Computer Science Department and Computation Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Okajima, Yuka; Hatabu, Hiroto [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Díaz, Alejandro A. [Pulmonary and Critical Care Division, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 and Department of Pulmonary Diseases, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Silverman, Edwin K. [Channing Laboratory, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 and Pulmonary and Critical Care Division, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Washko, George R. [Pulmonary and Critical Care Division, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Dy, Jennifer [ECE Department, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Estépar, Raúl San José [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Surgical Planning Lab, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Laboratory of Mathematics in Imaging, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02126 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Performing lobe-based quantitative analysis of the lung in computed tomography (CT) scans can assist in efforts to better characterize complex diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). While airways and vessels can help to indicate the location of lobe boundaries, segmentations of these structures are not always available, so methods to define the lobes in the absence of these structures are desirable. Methods: The authors present a fully automatic lung lobe segmentation algorithm that is effective in volumetric inspiratory and expiratory computed tomography (CT) datasets. The authors rely on ridge surface image features indicating fissure locations and a novel approach to modeling shape variation in the surfaces defining the lobe boundaries. The authors employ a particle system that efficiently samples ridge surfaces in the image domain and provides a set of candidate fissure locations based on the Hessian matrix. Following this, lobe boundary shape models generated from principal component analysis (PCA) are fit to the particles data to discriminate between fissure and nonfissure candidates. The resulting set of particle points are used to fit thin plate spline (TPS) interpolating surfaces to form the final boundaries between the lung lobes. Results: The authors tested algorithm performance on 50 inspiratory and 50 expiratory CT scans taken from the COPDGene study. Results indicate that the authors' algorithm performs comparably to pulmonologist-generated lung lobe segmentations and can produce good results in cases with accessory fissures, incomplete fissures, advanced emphysema, and low dose acquisition protocols. Dice scores indicate that only 29 out of 500 (5.85%) lobes showed Dice scores lower than 0.9. Two different approaches for evaluating lobe boundary surface discrepancies were applied and indicate that algorithm boundary identification is most accurate in the vicinity of fissures detectable on CT. Conclusions: The

  19. Determination of reactive oxygen species from ZnO micro-nano structures with shape-dependent photocatalytic activity

    He, Weiwei; Zhao, Hongxiao; Jia, Huimin [Key Laboratory of Micro-Nano Materials for Energy Storage and Conversion of Henan Province, Institute of Surface Micro and Nano Materials, Xuchang University, Henan 461000 (China); Yin, Jun-Jie [Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, College Park, MD 20740 (United States); Zheng, Zhi, E-mail: zhengzhi99999@gmail.com [Key Laboratory of Micro-Nano Materials for Energy Storage and Conversion of Henan Province, Institute of Surface Micro and Nano Materials, Xuchang University, Henan 461000 (China)

    2014-05-01

    Graphical abstract: ZnO micro/nano structures with shape dependent photocatalytic activity were prepared by hydrothermal reaction. The generations of hydroxyl radical, superoxide and singlet oxygen from irradiated ZnO were identified precisely by electron spin resonance spectroscopy. The type of reactive oxygen species was determined by band gap structure of ZnO. - Highlights: • ZnO micro/nano structures with different morphologies were prepared by solvothermal reaction. • Multi-pod like ZnO structures exhibited superior photocatalytic activity. • The generations of hydroxyl radical, superoxide and singlet oxygen from irradiated ZnO were characterized precisely by electron spin resonance spectroscopy. • The type of reactive oxygen species was determined by band gap structure of ZnO. - Abstract: ZnO micro/nano structures with different morphologies have been prepared by the changing solvents used during their synthesis by solvothermal reaction. Three typical shapes of ZnO structures including hexagonal, bell bottom like and multi-pod formed and were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Multi pod like ZnO structures exhibited the highest photocatalytic activity toward degradation of methyl orange. Using electron spin resonance spectroscopy coupled with spin trapping techniques, we demonstrate an effective way to identify precisely the generation of hydroxyl radicals, superoxide and singlet oxygen from the irradiated ZnO multi pod structures. The type of reactive oxygen species formed was predictable from the band gap structure of ZnO. These results indicate that the shape of micro-nano structures significantly affects the photocatalytic activity of ZnO, and demonstrate the value of electron spin resonance spectroscopy for characterizing the type of reactive oxygen species formed during photoexcitation of semiconductors.

  20. Shape dynamics of growing cell walls

    Banerjee, Shiladitya; Dinner, Aaron R

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a general theoretical framework to study the shape dynamics of actively growing and remodeling surfaces. Using this framework we develop a physical model for growing bacterial cell walls and study the interplay of cell shape with the dynamics of growth and constriction. The model allows us to derive constraints on cell wall mechanical energy based on the observed dynamics of cell shape. We predict that exponential growth in cell size requires a constant amount of cell wall energy to be dissipated per unit volume. We use the model to understand and contrast growth in bacteria with different shapes such as spherical, ellipsoidal, cylindrical and toroidal morphologies. Coupling growth to cell wall constriction, we predict a discontinuous shape transformation, from partial constriction to cell division, as a function of the chemical potential driving cell-wall synthesis. Our model for cell wall energy and shape dynamics relates growth kinetics with cell geometry, and provides a unified framework to d...

  1. Micromechanical modelling of stress-induced martensitic transformation in shape memory alloys

    Modeling the functional behavior of shape memory alloys (SMA) is a challenge for the development of industrial applications using these materials. Modern concepts developed in mechanics of materials are very well adapted to solve this problem. Due to the specific characteristic length scales involved in the SMA behavior several different models are developed to deal with the physical mechanisms which are responsible to the observed macroscopic behavior. The formation and growth of the different variants of martensite at the crystal level and granular structure and texture effects greatly affect the overall behavior and must be accounted. The possibility to induce several variants is considered for the definition of constitutive equations for a crystal of austenite undergoing a martensitic transformation. These equations are derived from a kinematical description of the strain mechanism and using thermodynamical concepts. At this point the more difficult aspect is the description of the different classes of interaction which are observed between martensite variants. The use of the interfacial operators technique leads to the definition of an interaction matrix in copper based and in NiTi SMAs. The building of strong intergranular stresses during the transformation in polycrystalline material is the second important point to deal with. We propose to determine these stresses using a scale transition method issued from the field theory. Considering each grain as a single crystal, the classical self-consistent framework allows to compute the macroscopic behavior according to the initial crystallographic texture of the alloy considered. This model is applied to superelastic behavior and non-isothermal loading. The evolution of different microstructural parameters are presented and discussed. Complex loading conditions are also described and transformation surfaces useful for structure analysis are computed. A finite element simulation of the behavior of thin film will be

  2. Variational formulation and stability analysis of a three dimensional superelastic model for shape memory alloys

    Alessi, Roberto; Pham, Kim

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a variational framework for the three-dimensional macroscopic modelling of superelastic shape memory alloys in an isothermal setting. Phase transformation is accounted through a unique second order tensorial internal variable, acting as the transformation strain. Postulating the total strain energy density as the sum of a free energy and a dissipated energy, the model depends on two material scalar functions of the norm of the transformation strain and a material scalar constant. Appropriate calibration of these material functions allows to render a wide range of constitutive behaviours including stress-softening and stress-hardening. The quasi-static evolution problem of a domain is formulated in terms of two physical principles based on the total energy of the system: a stability criterion, which selects the local minima of the total energy, and an energy balance condition, which ensures the consistency of the evolution of the total energy with respect to the external loadings. The local phase transformation laws in terms of Kuhn-Tucker relations are deduced from the first-order stability condition and the energy balance condition. The response of the model is illustrated with a numerical traction-torsion test performed on a thin-walled cylinder. Evolutions of homogeneous states are given for proportional and non-proportional loadings. Influence of the stress-hardening/softening properties on the evolution of the transformation domain is emphasized. Finally, in view of an identification process, the issue of stability of homogeneous states in a multi-dimensional setting is answered based on the study of second-order derivative of the total energy. Explicit necessary and sufficient conditions of stability are provided.

  3. Mechanical properties and theoretical modeling of self-centering shape memory alloy pseudo-rubber

    Pounding between adjacent components and structures has become an important cause of structural damage or even collapse under large excitations such as earthquakes and ship collisions. Shock absorber devices (SAD) are often used to connect the separation gap to reduce the pounding force. However, some shock absorber devices may have residual deformation and need to be repaired or replaced after strong impact. A novel energy absorbing material with residual deformation self-recovery ability, martensitic nickel titanium (NiTi) shape memory alloy pseudo-rubber (SMAPR), is fabricated using three methods in this study. The mechanical properties of SMAPR at room temperature and deformation self-recovery ability of SMAPR material are investigated. After that, the deformation recovery ability of SMAPR specimens even with residual deformation is further tested through heating the specimens in a thermo-control stove. The subsequent mechanical properties after deformation recovery are further investigated to investigate whether degradation in mechanical properties occurs for all kinds of specimens. The experimental results indicate that SMAPR is a kind of material with good potential to develop novel shock absorber devices for engineering applications. Furthermore, theoretical modeling of SMAPR is conducted. Micro-variable-pitch springs in parallel and series, in parallel with a friction component, are employed to model the mechanical behavior of SMAPR. The hysteretic rules are presented and the parameters of this model are derived and identified. Finally, based on micro-variable-pitch springs (MVPS) in parallel and series, a parametric analysis is carried out and the effects of nominal densities, diameters of metal wires, diameters of micro-springs and generalized coefficients of friction of SMAPR are analyzed and discussed

  4. Numerical modeling of the equilibrium shapes of a ferrofluid drop in an external magnetic field

    Lavrova, O.; Matthies, G.; Polevikov, V.; Tobiska, L.

    2004-01-01

    A numerical solution strategy for calculating equilibrium free surfaces of a magnetic fluid under the action of a magnetic field is proposed and applied to determine shapes of a linear magnetizable ferrofluid drop in a uniform magnetic field. Hysteresis phenomena for the drop deformation and the drop shapes with ends, close to conical, were observed numerically

  5. Modeling Students' Units Coordinating Activity

    Boyce, Steven James

    2014-01-01

    Primarily via constructivist teaching experiment methodology, units coordination (Steffe, 1992) has emerged as a useful construct for modeling students' psychological constructions pertaining to several mathematical domains, including counting sequences, whole number multiplicative conceptions, and fractions schemes. I describe how consideration of units coordination as a Piagetian (1970b) structure is useful for modeling units coordination across contexts. In this study, I extend teaching ...

  6. Modeling Workflow Using UML Activity Diagram

    Wei Yinxing(韦银星); Zhang Shensheng

    2004-01-01

    An enterprise can improve its adaptability in the changing market by means of workflow technologies. In the build time, the main function of Workflow Management System (WFMS) is to model business process. Workflow model is an abstract representation of the real-world business process. The Unified Modeling Language (UML) activity diagram is an important visual process modeling language proposed by the Object Management Group (OMG). The novelty of this paper is representing workflow model by means of UML activity diagram. A translation from UML activity diagram to π-calculus is established. Using π-calculus, the deadlock property of workflow is analyzed.

  7. A case of impaired shape integration: Implications for models of visual object processing

    Gerlach, Christian; Marstrand, Lisbeth; Habekost, Thomas;

    2005-01-01

    We describe a patient, HE, who was left with a remarkably selective deficit in intermediate vision following an infarct in the right occipito-temporal region. Thus, HE was able to group elements by colour and proximity but impaired in grouping based on similarity in shape. This finding supports the...... notion that grouping may be divided into two general steps: (i) element clustering and (ii) shape configuration, with the latter operation being impaired in HE. As opposed to previous cases with shape integration deficits, HE was able to name objects accurately. Initially, this might suggest that shape...... integration is not a prerequisite for normal object naming. However, on more demanding tests of visual object recognition, HE's performance deteriorated, with her performance being inversely related to the demand placed on integration of local elements into more elaborate shape descriptions. From this we...

  8. MODELING OF RUNNING CUTTERS FOR SHAPING OF IMPROVED NONINVOLUTE TOOTH GEARS

    Tatyana TRETYAK

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The questions of tooling design for production of advanced gears are considered. Engineering is based on the special applied development of the mathematical theory of multiparametric mappings of space. In fulfilled engineering of gear cutting tools for shaping of noninvolute gears it is provided for exclusion of distorted profiling after tool regrinds. There are proposed calculation algorithms, which may be used in dataware of respective CAD/CAM systems of maintenance for tooling backup. Among developed tools there are assembled shaping cutters with prismatic and round cutters. Compensatory possibilities of proposed assembled shaping cutters are ensured by repositioning of shaped cutting edges after their regrindings: by linear displacement of prismatic shaped cutters and angular displacement of round ones respectively.

  9. Modeling and experimental vibration analysis of nanomechanical cantilever active probes

    Nanomechanical cantilever (NMC) active probes have recently received increased attention in a variety of nanoscale sensing and measurement applications. Current modeling practices call for a uniform cantilever beam without considering the intentional jump discontinuities associated with the piezoelectric layer attachment and the NMC cross-sectional step. This paper presents a comprehensive modeling framework for modal characterization and dynamic response analysis of NMC active probes with geometrical discontinuities. The entire length of the NMC is divided into three segments of uniform beams followed by applying appropriate continuity conditions. The characteristics matrix equation is then used to solve for system natural frequencies and mode shapes. Using an equivalent electromechanical moment of a piezoelectric layer, forced motion analysis of the system is carried out. An experimental setup consisting of a commercial NMC active probe from Veeco and a state-of-the-art microsystem analyzer, the MSA-400 from Polytec, is developed to verify the theoretical developments proposed here. Using a parameter estimation technique based on minimizing the modeling error, optimal values of system parameters are identified. Mode shapes and the modal frequency response of the system for the first three modes determined from the proposed model are compared with those obtained from the experiment and commonly used theory for uniform beams. Results indicate that the uniform beam model fails to accurately predict the actual system response, especially in multiple-mode operation, while the proposed discontinuous beam model demonstrates good agreement with the experimental data. Such detailed and accurate modeling framework can lead to significant enhancement in the sensitivity of piezoelectric-based NMC sensors for use in variety of sensing and imaging applications

  10. Graphene oxide supported Au–Ag alloy nanoparticles with different shapes and their high catalytic activities

    A simple method was developed to fabricate Au–Ag nanoparticle/graphene oxide nanocomposites (Au–Ag/GO) by using simultaneous redox reactions between AgNO3, HAuCl4 and GO. The Au–Ag/GO was characterized by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. The GO nanosheets acted as the reducing agent and the support for the Au–Ag alloy nanoparticles. In addition, Au–Ag alloy nanoparticles with different shapes including core–shell-like, dendrimer-like and flower-like were obtained by simply modifying the concentration of the reactants and the reaction temperature. With no reducing or stabilizing agents added, the Au–Ag/GO nanocomposites show superior catalytic performance for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol and for the aerobic homocoupling of phenylboronic acid. (paper)

  11. Modeling of a honeycomb-shaped pyroelectric energy harvester for human body heat harvesting

    Kim, Myoung-Soo; Jo, Sung-Eun; Ahn, Hye-Rin; Kim, Yong-Jun

    2015-06-01

    Pyroelectric conversion can be used for thermal energy harvesting in lieu of thermoelectric conversion. In the case of human body energy harvesting, the general pyroelectric energy harvester (PEH) cannot be applied because the weak body heat can hardly penetrate the protecting layer to reach the pyroelectric material. This paper presents the realization of a honeycomb-shaped PEH (H-PEH) and a modeling method of the electrode and hole areas. The fabricated H-PEH successfully generated electrical energy using human body heat. The H-PEH with a 1:1.5 electrode-and-hole area ratio showed the best performance. To verify the human energy harvesting, we evaluated the characteristics of conventional PEH and H-PEH when body heat was used as a heat source. The maximum power of the H-PEH was 0.06 and 0.16 μW at wind velocities of 2 and 4 m s-1, respectively. These output power values of the H-PEH were 200 and 224% larger than those of the PEH, respectively, according to the wind velocity.

  12. Thermal shape fluctuation model study of the giant dipole resonance in $^{152}$Gd

    Kumar, A K Rhine

    2015-01-01

    We have studied the giant dipole resonance (GDR) in the hot and rotating nucleus $^{152}$Gd within the framework of thermal shape fluctuation model (TSFM) built on the microscopic-macroscopic calculations of the free energies with a macroscopic approach for the GDR. Our results for GDR cross sections are in good agreement with the experimental values except for a component peaking around 17 MeV where the data has large uncertainties. Such a component is beyond our description which properly takes care of the splitting of GDR components due to the deformation and Coriolis effects. Around this 17 MeV lies the half maximum in experimental cross sections, and hence the extracted GDR widths and deformations (estimated from these widths) turn out to be overestimated and less reliable. Reproducing these widths with empirical formulae could conceal the information contained in the cross sections. Fully microscopic GDR calculations and a more careful look at the data could be useful to understand the GDR component aro...

  13. Refined rotational period, pole solution, and shape model for (3200) Phaethon

    (3200) Phaethon exhibits both comet- and asteroid-like properties, suggesting it could be a rare transitional object such as a dormant comet or previously volatile-rich asteroid. This justifies detailed study of (3200) Phaethon's physical properties as a better understanding of asteroid-comet transition objects can provide insight into minor body evolution. We therefore acquired time series photometry of (3200) Phaethon over 15 nights from 1994 to 2013, primarily using the Tektronix 2048 × 2048 pixel CCD on the University of Hawaii 2.2 m telescope. We utilized light curve inversion to (1) refine (3200) Phaethon's rotational period to P = 3.6032 ± 0.0008 hr; (2) estimate a rotational pole orientation of λ = +85° ± 13° and β = –20° ± 10°; and (3) derive a shape model. We also used our extensive light curve data set to estimate the slope parameter of (3200) Phaethon's phase curve as G ∼ 0.06, consistent with C-type asteroids. We discuss how this highly oblique pole orientation with a negative ecliptic latitude supports previous evidence for (3200) Phaethon's origin in the inner main asteroid belt as well as the potential for deeply buried volatiles fueling impulsive yet rare cometary outbursts.

  14. Refined rotational period, pole solution, and shape model for (3200) Phaethon

    Ansdell, Megan; Meech, Karen J.; Kaluna, Heather [NASA Astrobiology Institute, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Hainaut, Olivier [European Southern Observatory, Karl Schwarzschild Straße, 85748 Garching bei München (Germany); Buie, Marc W. [Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut Street, Suite 300, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States); Bauer, James [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, MS 183-401, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Dundon, Luke, E-mail: mansdell@ifa.hawaii.edu [United States Navy, Washington, DC 20350 (United States)

    2014-09-20

    (3200) Phaethon exhibits both comet- and asteroid-like properties, suggesting it could be a rare transitional object such as a dormant comet or previously volatile-rich asteroid. This justifies detailed study of (3200) Phaethon's physical properties as a better understanding of asteroid-comet transition objects can provide insight into minor body evolution. We therefore acquired time series photometry of (3200) Phaethon over 15 nights from 1994 to 2013, primarily using the Tektronix 2048 × 2048 pixel CCD on the University of Hawaii 2.2 m telescope. We utilized light curve inversion to (1) refine (3200) Phaethon's rotational period to P = 3.6032 ± 0.0008 hr; (2) estimate a rotational pole orientation of λ = +85° ± 13° and β = –20° ± 10°; and (3) derive a shape model. We also used our extensive light curve data set to estimate the slope parameter of (3200) Phaethon's phase curve as G ∼ 0.06, consistent with C-type asteroids. We discuss how this highly oblique pole orientation with a negative ecliptic latitude supports previous evidence for (3200) Phaethon's origin in the inner main asteroid belt as well as the potential for deeply buried volatiles fueling impulsive yet rare cometary outbursts.

  15. Parametric geometric model and shape optimization of an underwater glider with blended-wing-body

    Sun Chunya

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Underwater glider, as a new kind of autonomous underwater vehicles, has many merits such as long-range, extended-duration and low costs. The shape of underwater glider is an important factor in determining the hydrodynamic efficiency. In this paper, a high lift to drag ratio configuration, the Blended-Wing-Body (BWB, is used to design a small civilian under water glider. In the parametric geometric model of the BWB underwater glider, the planform is defined with Bezier curve and linear line, and the section is defined with symmetrical airfoil NACA 0012. Computational investigations are carried out to study the hydrodynamic performance of the glider using the commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD code Fluent. The Kriging-based genetic algorithm, called Efficient Global Optimization (EGO, is applied to hydrodynamic design optimization. The result demonstrates that the BWB underwater glider has excellent hydrodynamic performance, and the lift to drag ratio of initial design is increased by 7% in the EGO process.

  16. CT segmentation of dental shapes by anatomy-driven reformation imaging and B-spline modelling.

    Barone, S; Paoli, A; Razionale, A V

    2016-06-01

    Dedicated imaging methods are among the most important tools of modern computer-aided medical applications. In the last few years, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) has gained popularity in digital dentistry for 3D imaging of jawbones and teeth. However, the anatomy of a maxillofacial region complicates the assessment of tooth geometry and anatomical location when using standard orthogonal views of the CT data set. In particular, a tooth is defined by a sub-region, which cannot be easily separated from surrounding tissues by only considering pixel grey-intensity values. For this reason, an image enhancement is usually necessary in order to properly segment tooth geometries. In this paper, an anatomy-driven methodology to reconstruct individual 3D tooth anatomies by processing CBCT data is presented. The main concept is to generate a small set of multi-planar reformation images along significant views for each target tooth, driven by the individual anatomical geometry of a specific patient. The reformation images greatly enhance the clearness of the target tooth contours. A set of meaningful 2D tooth contours is extracted and used to automatically model the overall 3D tooth shape through a B-spline representation. The effectiveness of the methodology has been verified by comparing some anatomy-driven reconstructions of anterior and premolar teeth with those obtained by using standard tooth segmentation tools. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26418417

  17. Flower-shaped gold nanoparticles: synthesis, characterization and their application as SERS-active tags inside living cells

    Boca, Sanda; Astilean, Simion [Nanobiophotonics Center, Institute for Interdisciplinary Research in Nanobioscience, Babes-Bolyai University, Treboniu Laurian 42, 400271 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Rugina, Dumitrita; Pintea, Adela [Department of Biochemistry, University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine, Manastur 3-5, 400372, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Barbu-Tudoran, Lucian, E-mail: sanda.boca@phys.ubbcluj.ro, E-mail: simion.astilean@phys.ubbcluj.ro [Electron Microscopy Center, Faculty of Biology and Geology, Babes-Bolyai University, Clinicilor 5-7, 400006, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2011-02-04

    The detection of Raman signals inside living cells is a topic of great interest in the study of cell biology mechanisms and for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. This work presents the synthesis and characterization of flower-shaped gold nanoparticles and demonstrates their applicability as SERS-active tags for cellular spectral detection. The particles were synthesized by a facile, rapid new route that uses ascorbic acid as a reducing agent of gold salt. Two triarylmethane dyes which are widely used as biological stains, namely malachite green oxalate and basic fuchsin, were used as Raman-active molecules and the polymer mPEG-SH as capping material. The as-prepared SERS-active nanoparticles were tested on a human retinal pigment epithelial cell line and found to present a low level of cytotoxicity and high chemical stability together with SERS sensitivity down to picomolar particle concentrations.

  18. PdPt bimetallic nanoparticles enabled by shape control with halide ions and their enhanced catalytic activities.

    Zhang, Jinfeng; Wan, Lei; Liu, Lei; Deng, Yida; Zhong, Cheng; Hu, Wenbin

    2016-02-11

    In this study, a new and convenient one step approach is described for synthesizing shape controlled PdPt bimetallic nanoparticles. It is found that the resultant morphologies of these PdPt nanoparticles can be well controlled by simply altering the participation of different halide ions that serve as shape controlling agents in the reaction solution. The dendritic core-shell PdPt bimetallic nanoparticles generated with Pt atoms adopt usual island growth pattern in the presence of Cl(-) ions, whereas the introduction of Br(-) ions with a relatively strong adsorption effect facilitate the formation of a layered core-shell structure due to the layered growth mode of Pt atoms on the exterior surface of the central Pd core. Moreover, the stronger adsorption function of I(-) ions and the resulting fast atomic diffusion promoted the generation of mesoporous core-shell PdPt bimetallic nanoparticles with many pore channels. In addition, the size of these synthesized PdPt nanoparticles exhibited a significant dependence on the concentration of the halide ions involved. Due to their specific structural features and synergistic effects, these PdPt catalysts exhibited shape-dependent catalytic performance and drastically enhanced electrocatalytic activities relative to that of commercial Pt black and Pt/C toward methanol oxidation. PMID:26511671

  19. Shape Memory Alloy Modeling and Applications to Porous and Composite Structures

    Zhu, Pingping

    There has been a growing concern about an exciting class of advanced material -- shape memory alloys (SMAs) since their discovery several decades ago. SMAs exhibit large reversible stresses and strains owing to a thermoelastic phase transformation. They have been widely used in many engineering fields including aerospace, biomedical, and automotive engineering, especially as sensors, actuators, bone implants and deployable switches. The behavior of SMAs is very complex due to the coupling between thermal and mechanical effects. Theoretical and computational tools are used in this dissertation to investigate the mechanical behavior of SMA and its related structures for seeking better and wider application of this material. In the first part of this dissertation, we proposed an improved macroscopic phenomenological constitutive model of SMA that accounts for all major mechanical behaviors including elasticity, phase transformation, reorientation and plasticity. The model is based on some previous work developed in the Brinson group, and the current efforts are focused on plasticity, the application of a pre-defined strain, unification of notations, and other coding-related work. A user subroutine script VUMAT is developed to implement the constitutive model to the commercial finite element software Abaqus. Typical simulation results based on the model are presented, as well as verification with some experimental results. In the second part, we apply the developed constitutive model to a series of two-dimensional SMA plates with structured arrays of pores to investigate the structural response, especially the stress, strain, phase transformation, and plastic fields. Results are documented about the coupling of the elastic, transformation and plastic fields about the arrays of pores. Theoretical and experimental DIC results are also utilized to validate some simulation results. Conclusions are then drawn to provide understanding in the effect of pores and the

  20. Gleason grading of prostate histology utilizing manifold regularization via statistical shape model of manifolds

    Sparks, Rachel; Madabhushi, Anant

    2012-03-01

    Gleason patterns of prostate cancer histopathology, characterized primarily by morphological and architectural attributes of histological structures (glands and nuclei), have been found to be highly correlated with disease aggressiveness and patient outcome. Gleason patterns 4 and 5 are highly correlated with more aggressive disease and poorer patient outcome, while Gleason patterns 1-3 tend to reflect more favorable patient outcome. Because Gleason grading is done manually by a pathologist visually examining glass (or digital) slides, subtle morphologic and architectural differences of histological attributes may result in grading errors and hence cause high inter-observer variability. Recently some researchers have proposed computerized decision support systems to automatically grade Gleason patterns by using features pertaining to nuclear architecture, gland morphology, as well as tissue texture. Automated characterization of gland morphology has been shown to distinguish between intermediate Gleason patterns 3 and 4 with high accuracy. Manifold learning (ML) schemes attempt to generate a low dimensional manifold representation of a higher dimensional feature space while simultaneously preserving nonlinear relationships between object instances. Classification can then be performed in the low dimensional space with high accuracy. However ML is sensitive to the samples contained in the dataset; changes in the dataset may alter the manifold structure. In this paper we present a manifold regularization technique to constrain the low dimensional manifold to a specific range of possible manifold shapes, the range being determined via a statistical shape model of manifolds (SSMM). In this work we demonstrate applications of the SSMM in (1) identifying samples on the manifold which contain noise, defined as those samples which deviate from the SSMM, and (2) accurate out-of-sample extrapolation (OSE) of newly acquired samples onto a manifold constrained by the SSMM. We