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Sample records for active rotor-blade vibration

  1. Active Control of Parametric Vibrations in Coupled Rotor-Blade Systems

    Christensen, Rene Hardam; Santos, Ilmar

    2003-01-01

    In rotor-blade systems basis as well as parametric vibration modes will appear due to the vibration coupling among flexible rotating blades and hub rigid body motion. Parametric vibration will typically occur when the hub operates at a constant angular velocity. Operating at constant velocity the...

  2. A Study of Active Rotor-Blade Vibration Control using Electro-Magnetic Actuation - Part I: Theory

    Christensen, Rene Hardam; Santos, Ilmar

    This is the first paper in a two-part study on active rotor-blade vibration control. Blade faults are a major problem in bladed machines, such as turbines and compressors. Moreover, increasing demands for higher efficiency, lower weight and higher speed imply that blades become even more...... onto the shaft if the system has identical tuned blades. Time-periodic modal state feedback controllers are designed based on the modal model and numerical simulations are provided to show the efficiency of the designed active controllers for a tuned as well as a mistuned rotor-blade system....... susceptible to vibrational problems. Passive damping methods, such as frictional damping, are typically used for this kind of machines, working very well at the specific design conditions. However, when the running conditions exceed the design specification, then passive damping devices become inefficient...

  3. Design optimization for active twist rotor blades

    Mok, Ji Won

    This dissertation introduces the process of optimizing active twist rotor blades in the presence of embedded anisotropic piezo-composite actuators. Optimum design of active twist blades is a complex task, since it involves a rich design space with tightly coupled design variables. The study presents the development of an optimization framework for active helicopter rotor blade cross-sectional design. This optimization framework allows for exploring a rich and highly nonlinear design space in order to optimize the active twist rotor blades. Different analytical components are combined in the framework: cross-sectional analysis (UM/VABS), an automated mesh generator, a beam solver (DYMORE), a three-dimensional local strain recovery module, and a gradient based optimizer within MATLAB. Through the mathematical optimization problem, the static twist actuation performance of a blade is maximized while satisfying a series of blade constraints. These constraints are associated with locations of the center of gravity and elastic axis, blade mass per unit span, fundamental rotating blade frequencies, and the blade strength based on local three-dimensional strain fields under worst loading conditions. Through pre-processing, limitations of the proposed process have been studied. When limitations were detected, resolution strategies were proposed. These include mesh overlapping, element distortion, trailing edge tab modeling, electrode modeling and foam implementation of the mesh generator, and the initial point sensibility of the current optimization scheme. Examples demonstrate the effectiveness of this process. Optimization studies were performed on the NASA/Army/MIT ATR blade case. Even though that design was built and shown significant impact in vibration reduction, the proposed optimization process showed that the design could be improved significantly. The second example, based on a model scale of the AH-64D Apache blade, emphasized the capability of this framework to

  4. A Study of Active Rotor-Blade Vibration Control using Electro-Magnetic Actuation - Part I: Theory

    Christensen, Rene Hardam; Santos, Ilmar

    2004-01-01

    actuators fixed directly in the blades. However, due to the impracticability and problems by fixing actuators in the rotating blades, it is for practical application of great interest to study whether the vibrations can be controlled using shaft-based actuators, i.e. electro-magnetic bearings. In this...... framework, the present paper gives a theoretical contribution into the controllability and observability analysis of rotor-blade systems with the aim of investigating this field. The analysis is based on time-variant modal analysis, due to the time-periodic dynamical characteristics of this kind of system...

  5. Optimization of helicopter rotor blade design for minimum vibration

    Davis, M. W.

    1984-01-01

    The optimization approach discussed is part of an ongoing effort to develop a general automated procedure for rotor blade design. This procedure can be used to determine the necessary geometric, structural, and material properties of a rotor system to achieve desired objectives relating to vibration, stress, and aerodynamic performance. The approach used for helicopter vibration is emphasized. Based on analytical studies performed at the United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), a simplified vibration analysis was developed to be used in conjunction with a forced response analysis in the optimization process. This simplified analysis improves the efficiency of the design process significantly. Results of applying this approach to the design of an existing rotor blade model are presented.

  6. Helicopter rotor blade design for minimum vibration

    Taylor, R. B.

    1984-01-01

    The importance of blade design parameters in rotor vibratory response and the design of a minimum vibration blade based upon this understanding are examined. Various design approaches are examined for a 4 bladed articulated rotor operating at a high speed flight condition. Blade modal shaping, frequency placement, structural and aerodynamic coupling, and intermodal cancellation are investigated to systematically identify and evaluate blade design parameters that influence blade airloads, blade modal response, hub loads, and fuselage vibration. The relative contributions of the various components of blade force excitation and response to the vibratory hub loads transmitted to the fuselage are determined in order to isolate primary candidates for vibration alleviation. A blade design is achieved which reduces the predicted fuselage vibration from the baseline blade by approximately one half. Blade designs are developed that offer significant reductions in vibration (and fatigue stresses) without resorting to special vibration alleviation devices, radical blade geometries, or weight penalties.

  7. Integral Twist Actuation of Helicopter Rotor Blades for Vibration Reduction

    Shin, SangJoon; Cesnik, Carlos E. S.

    2001-01-01

    Active integral twist control for vibration reduction of helicopter rotors during forward flight is investigated. The twist deformation is obtained using embedded anisotropic piezocomposite actuators. An analytical framework is developed to examine integrally-twisted blades and their aeroelastic response during different flight conditions: frequency domain analysis for hover, and time domain analysis for forward flight. Both stem from the same three-dimensional electroelastic beam formulation with geometrical-exactness, and axe coupled with a finite-state dynamic inflow aerodynamics model. A prototype Active Twist Rotor blade was designed with this framework using Active Fiber Composites as the actuator. The ATR prototype blade was successfully tested under non-rotating conditions. Hover testing was conducted to evaluate structural integrity and dynamic response. In both conditions, a very good correlation was obtained against the analysis. Finally, a four-bladed ATR system is built and tested to demonstrate its concept in forward flight. This experiment was conducted at NASA Langley Tansonic Dynamics Tunnel and represents the first-of-a-kind Mach-scaled fully-active-twist rotor system to undergo forward flight test. In parallel, the impact upon the fixed- and rotating-system loads is estimated by the analysis. While discrepancies are found in the amplitude of the loads under actuation, the predicted trend of load variation with respect to its control phase correlates well. It was also shown, both experimentally and numerically, that the ATR blade design has the potential for hub vibratory load reduction of up to 90% using individual blade control actuation. Using the numerical framework, system identification is performed to estimate the harmonic transfer functions. The linear time-periodic system can be represented by a linear time-invariant system under the three modes of blade actuation: collective, longitudinal cyclic, and lateral cyclic. A vibration

  8. A Study of Active Rotor-Blade Vibration Control using Electro-Magnetic Actuation - Part II: Experiment

    Christensen, Rene Hardam; Santos, Ilmar

    2004-01-01

    mistuning, can easily be generated by substitution or rearranging the blades. Six sets of electro-magnetic actuators are applied to the system in order to control the blades as well as the rotor vibrations. Four sets of actuators are mounted in the rotating disc acting directly onto each one of the blades....... The remaining two sets of actuators are applied to act directly onto the hub, working as an active radial bearing controlling the rotor lateral movement. The rig is equipped with sensors measuring blade and rotor vibrations. Actuators and sensors are connected to a digital signal processor running the...... control algorithm. Measurement signals and actuator control signals from the sensors and actuators fixed in the rotating disc are transmitted to the control unit through a slip-ring device. Various measured responses of both the controlled and the non-controlled system with identical blades and with...

  9. Turbine engine rotor blade fault diagnostics through casing pressure and vibration sensors

    In this study, an exact solution is provided for a previously indeterminate equation used for rotor blade fault diagnostics. The method estimates rotor blade natural frequency through turbine engine casing pressure and vibration sensors. The equation requires accurate measurements of low-amplitude sideband signals in the frequency domain. With this in mind, statistical evaluation was also completed with the goal of determining the effect of sampling time and frequency on sideband resolution in the frequency domain

  10. Dynamic response of active twist rotor blades

    Cesnik, Carlos E. S.; Shin, Sang Joon; Wilbur, Matthew L.

    2001-02-01

    Dynamic characteristics of active twist rotor (ATR) blades are investigated analytically and experimentally in this paper. The ATR system is intended for vibration and potentially for noise reductions in helicopters through individual blade control. An aeroelastic model is developed to identify frequency response characteristics of the ATR blade with integral, generally anisotropic, strain actuators embedded in its composite construction. An ATR prototype blade was designed and manufactured to experimentally study the vibration reduction capabilities of such systems. Several bench and hover tests were conducted and those results are presented and discussed here. Selected results on sensitivity of the ATR system to collective setting (i.e. blade loading), blade rpm (i.e. centrifugal force and blade station velocity), and media density (i.e. altitude) are presented. They indicated that the twist actuation authority of the ATR blade is independent of the collective setting up to approximately 10P, and dependent on rotational speed and altitude near the torsional resonance frequency due to its dependency on the aerodynamic damping. The proposed model captures very well the physics and sensitivities to selected test parameters of the ATR system. The numerical result of the blade torsional loads show an average error of 20% in magnitude and virtually no difference in phase for the blade frequency response. Overall, the active blade model is in very good agreement with the experiments and can be used to analyze and design future active helicopter blade systems.

  11. Novel controller design demonstration for vibration alleviation of helicopter rotor blades

    Ulker, Fatma Demet; Nitzsche, Fred

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents an advanced controller design methodology for vibration alleviation of helicopter rotor sys- tems. Particularly, vibration alleviation in a forward ight regime where the rotor blades experience periodically varying aerodynamic loading was investigated. Controller synthesis was carried out under the time-periodic H2 and H∞ framework and the synthesis problem was solved based on both periodic Riccati and Linear Matrix Inequality (LMI) formulations. The closed-loop stability was analyzed using Floquet-Lyapunov theory, and the controller's performance was validated by closed-loop high-delity aeroelastic simulations. To validate the con- troller's performance an actively controlled trailing edge ap strategy was implemented. Computational cost was compared for both formulations.

  12. Control of Rotor-Blade Coupled Vibrations Using Shaft-Based Actuation

    Christensen, Rene H.; Santos, Ilmar

    When implementing active control into bladed rotating machines aiming at reducing blade vibrations, it can be shown that blade as well as rotor vibrations can in fact be controlled by the use of only shaft-based actuation. Thus the blades have to be deliberately mistuned. This paper investigates....... The dependency of the controllability and observability on varying rotational speed and mode shape interaction phenomena between parametric and basis mode shape components are also analysed. Numerical results reveal a limitation of the achievable controllability and observability, once quantitative...... the dynamical characteristics of a mistuned bladed rotor and shows how, why and when a bladed rotor becomes controllable and observable if properly mistuned. As part of such investigation modal controllability and observability of a tuned as well as a mistuned coupled rotor-blade system are analysed...

  13. Development of an active twist rotor blade with distributed actuation and orthotropic material

    Wierach, Peter; Riemenschneider, Johannes; Keye, Stefan

    2005-05-01

    Individual blade control (IBC) as well as higher harmonic control (HHC) for helicopter rotors promises to be a method to increase flight performance and to reduce vibration and noise. For those controls, an additional twist actuation of the rotor blade is needed. The developed concept comprises the implementation of distributed piezoelectric actuation into the rotor blade skin. In order to maximize the twist within given constraints, as torsional rigidity and given actuator design, the concept takes advantage of an orthotropic rotor blade skin. That way, a combination of shear actuation with orthotropic coupling generates more twist than each one of these effects alone. Previous approaches with distributed actuation used actuators operating in +/-45° direction with quasi-isotropic composites. A FE-Model of the blade was developed and validated using a simplified demonstrator. The objective of this study was to identify the effects of various geometric and material parameters to optimize the active twist performance of the blades. The whole development was embedded in an iterative process followed by an objective assessment. For this purpose a detailed structural model on the basis of the BO105 model rotor blade was developed, to predict the performance with respect to rotor dynamics, stability, aerodynamics and acoustics. Rotor dynamic simulations provided an initial overview of the active twist rotor performance. In comparison to the BO105 baseline rotor a noise reduction of 3 dB was predicted for an active twist of 0.8° at the blade tip. Additionally, a power reduction of 2.3% at 87m/s based on a 2.5 to BO105 was computed. A demonstrator blade with a rotor radius of 2m has been designed and manufactured. This blade will be tested to prove, that the calculated maximum twist can also be achieved under centrifugal loads.

  14. Optimal Design and Acoustic Assessment of Low-Vibration Rotor Blades

    G. Bernardini

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An optimal procedure for the design of rotor blade that generates low vibratory hub loads in nonaxial flow conditions is presented and applied to a helicopter rotor in forward flight, a condition where vibrations and noise become severe. Blade shape and structural properties are the design parameters to be identified within a binary genetic optimization algorithm under aeroelastic stability constraint. The process exploits an aeroelastic solver that is based on a nonlinear, beam-like model, suited for the analysis of arbitrary curved-elastic-axis blades, with the introduction of a surrogate wake inflow model for the analysis of sectional aerodynamic loads. Numerical results are presented to demonstrate the capability of the proposed approach to identify low vibratory hub loads rotor blades as well as to assess the robustness of solution at off-design operating conditions. Further, the aeroacoustic assessment of the rotor configurations determined is carried out in order to examine the impact of low-vibration blade design on the emitted noise field.

  15. Contribution to Experimental Validation of Linear and Non-Linear Dynamic Models for Representing Rotor-Blade Parametric Coupled Vibrations

    Santos, Ilmar; Saracho, C.M.; Smith, J.T.;

    2004-01-01

    illustrate linear, non-linear and time-depending terms in a very transparent way. Although neither gyroscopic effect due to rotor angular vibrations nor higher blade mode shapes are considered in the analysis, the equations of motion of the rotor-blades system are still general enough for the purpose of the......This work gives a theoretical and experimental contribution to the problem of rotor-blades dynamic interaction. A validation procedure of mathematical models is carried out with help of a simple test rig, built by a mass-spring system attached to four flexible rotating blades. With this test rig...... the test rig by attaching the rigid rotor to a flexible foundation. The blades are modeled as Euler-Bernoulli beams. Using three different approaches to describe the beam deformation one achieves: (a) a linear model; (b) a linear beam model with second order terms; (c) a fully non-linear model. Tip...

  16. Identification of Flap Motion Parameters for Vibration Reduction in Helicopter Rotors with Multiple Active Trailing Edge Flaps

    Uğbreve;ur Dalli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An active control method utilizing the multiple trailing edge flap configuration for rotorcraft vibration suppression and blade loads control is presented. A comprehensive model for rotor blade with active trailing edge flaps is used to calculate the vibration characteristics, natural frequencies and mode shapes of any complex composite helicopter rotor blade. A computer program is developed to calculate the system response, rotor blade root forces and moments under aerodynamic forcing conditions. Rotor blade system response is calculated using the proposed solution method and the developed program depending on any structural and aerodynamic properties of rotor blades, structural properties of trailing edge flaps and properties of trailing edge flap actuator inputs. Rotor blade loads are determined first on a nominal rotor blade without multiple active trailing edge flaps and then the effects of the active flap motions on the existing rotor blade loads are investigated. Multiple active trailing edge flaps are controlled by using open loop controllers to identify the effects of the actuator signal output properties such as frequency, amplitude and phase on the system response. Effects of using multiple trailing edge flaps on controlling rotor blade vibrations are investigated and some design criteria are determined for the design of trailing edge flap controller that will provide actuator signal outputs to minimize the rotor blade root loads. It is calculated that using the developed active trailing edge rotor blade model, helicopter rotor blade vibrations can be reduced up to 36% of the nominal rotor blade vibrations.

  17. Rotor blade vortex interaction noise

    Yu, Yung H.

    2000-02-01

    Blade-vortex interaction noise-generated by helicopter main rotor blades is one of the most severe noise problems and is very important both in military applications and community acceptance of rotorcraft. Research over the decades has substantially improved physical understanding of noise-generating mechanisms, and various design concepts have been investigated to control noise radiation using advanced blade planform shapes and active blade control techniques. The important parameters to control rotor blade-vortex interaction noise and vibration have been identified: blade tip vortex structures and its trajectory, blade aeroelastic deformation, and airloads. Several blade tip design concepts have been investigated for diffusing tip vortices and also for reducing noise. However, these tip shapes have not been able to substantially reduce blade-vortex interaction noise without degradation of rotor performance. Meanwhile, blade root control techniques, such as higher-harmonic pitch control (HHC) and individual blade control (IBC) concepts, have been extensively investigated for noise and vibration reduction. The HHC technique has proved the substantial blade-vortex interaction noise reduction, up to 6 dB, while vibration and low-frequency noise have been increased. Tests with IBC techniques have shown the simultaneous reduction of rotor noise and vibratory loads with 2/rev pitch control inputs. Recently, active blade control concepts with smart structures have been investigated with the emphasis on active blade twist and trailing edge flap. Smart structures technologies are very promising, but further advancements are needed to meet all the requirements of rotorcraft applications in frequency, force, and displacement.

  18. Control of Rotor-Blade Coupled Vibrations Using Shaft-Based Actuation

    Christensen, Rene H.; Santos, Ilmar

    When implementing active control into bladed rotating machines aiming at reducing blade vibrations, it can be shown that blade as well as rotor vibrations can in fact be controlled by the use of only shaft-based actuation. Thus the blades have to be deliberately mistuned. This paper investigates......-based actuation in practice....

  19. Structural integrity design for an active helicopter rotor blade with piezoelectric flap actuators

    Lee, Jaehwan; Shin, SangJoon

    2011-04-01

    Helicopter uses a rotor system to generate lift, thrust and forces, and its aerodynamic environment is generally complex. Unsteady aerodynamic environment arises such as blade vortex interaction. This unsteady aerodynamic environment induces vibratory aerodynamic loads and high aeroacoustic noise. The aerodynamic load and aeroacoustic noise is at N times the rotor blade revolutions (N/rev). But conventional rotor control system composed of pitch links and swash plate is not capable of adjusting such vibratory loads because its control is restricted to 1/rev. Many active control methodologies have been examined to alleviate the problem. The blade using active control device manipulates the blade pitch angle with N/rev. In this paper, Active Trailing-edge Flap blade, which is one of the active control methods, is designed to reduce the unsteady aerodynamic loads. Active Trailing-edge Flap blade uses a trailing edge flap manipulated by an actuator to change camber line of the airfoil. Piezoelectric actuators are installed inside the blade to manipulate the trailing edge flap.

  20. The Torsional Vibration of Turbo Axis Induced by Unsteady Aerodynamic Force on Rotor blade

    ChenZuoyi; WuXiaofeng

    1998-01-01

    An algorithm for computing the 3-D oscillating flow field of the balde passage under the torsional vibration of the rotor is applied to analyze the stability in turbomachines.The induced flow field responding to blade vibration is computed by Oscillating Fluid Mechanics Method and parametric Polynomial Method.After getting the solution of the unsteady flow field,the work done by the unsteay aerodynamic force acting on the blade can be obtained.The negative or positive work is the criterion of the aeroelastic stability.Numerical results indicate that there are instabilities of the torsional vibration in some frequency bands.

  1. Optimization of an Active Twist Rotor Blade Planform for Improved Active Response and Forward Flight Performance

    Sekula, Martin K; Wilbur, Matthew L.

    2014-01-01

    A study was conducted to identify the optimum blade tip planform for a model-scale active twist rotor. The analysis identified blade tip design traits which simultaneously reduce rotor power of an unactuated rotor while leveraging aeromechanical couplings to tailor the active response of the blade. Optimizing the blade tip planform for minimum rotor power in forward flight provided a 5 percent improvement in performance compared to a rectangular blade tip, but reduced the vibration control authority of active twist actuation by 75 percent. Optimizing for maximum blade twist response increased the vibration control authority by 50 percent compared to the rectangular blade tip, with little effect on performance. Combined response and power optimization resulted in a blade tip design which provided similar vibration control authority to the rectangular blade tip, but with a 3.4 percent improvement in rotor performance in forward flight.

  2. Forward sweep, low noise rotor blade

    Brooks, Thomas F. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A forward-swept, low-noise rotor blade includes an inboard section, an aft-swept section and a forward-swept outboard section. The rotor blade reduces the noise of rotorcraft, including both standard helicopters and advanced systems such as tiltrotors. The primary noise reduction feature is the forward sweep of the planform over a large portion of the outer blade radius. The rotor blade also includes an aft-swept section. The purpose of the aft-swept region is to provide a partial balance to pitching moments produced by the outboard forward-swept portion of the blade. The rotor blade has a constant chord width; or has a chord width which decreases linearly along the entire blade span; or combines constant and decreasing chord widths, wherein the blade is of constant chord width from the blade root to a certain location on the rotor blade, then decreases linearly to the blade tip thereafter. The noise source showing maximum noise reduction is blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise. Also reduced are thickness, noise, high speed impulsive noise, cabin vibration and loading noise.

  3. Optimizing tuning masses for helicopter rotor blade vibration reduction including computed airloads and comparison with test data

    Pritchard, Jocelyn I.; Adelman, Howard M.; Walsh, Joanne L.; Wilbur, Matthew L.

    1992-01-01

    An optimization procedure is developed for locating tuning masses on a rotor blade so that vibratory loads are minimized and hub-shear harmonics are reduced without adding a large mass penalty. The airloads are computed by means of a helicopter analysis for the cases of three vs six tuning masses, with attention given to the prediction of changes in airloads. Frequencies, airloads, and hub loads are computed with the CAMRAD/JA helicopter analysis code and the Conmin general-purpose optimization program. The hub shear is found to be significantly reduced in both cases with the added mass, and the reduction of hub shear is demonstrated under three flight conditions. Comparisons with wind-tunnel data demonstrate that the correlation of mass location is good and the relationship between mass location and flight speed is predicted well by the model.

  4. Vibration crack corrosion behavior and failure mechanisms of highly alloyed duplex steels in steam turbine rotor blades

    The aim was to test the new duplex steel X3CrMnNiMoN 25 6 4 (A905) for its suitability as a steam turbine rotor blade material. Due to the increased proportion of manganese and nitrogen, compared to A903, in this duplex steel in the solution annealed state, an elastic limit of about 600 N/mm2 acceptable for steam turbine rotor blades was reached. A micro-duplex structure (recrystallized secondary structure) consisting of 50% each of ferrite and Austenite proved to be the optimum structure composition. To measure the SwRK behaviour, Woehler curves were produced in media containing corrosive NaCl. The mean stress was 250 N/mm2, partly 350 N/mm2. The maximum duration of the test was given as 3 x 107 load cycles at a frequency of 50 Hz. The experimental time was partly extended to 5 x 107 load cycles. In order to guarantee as realistic a test as possible, the Sw RK tests took place in aqueous NaCl solution saturated with air. To correspond to envorinmental conditions in actual operation, the electrolyte temperature was varied between 80deg and 150deg C, the Na Cl concentration of the solution was varied between very dilute (0.01 M) and nearly saturated (22%) and the pH value was varied between pH 8 and pH 3. Accompanying passive oxide layer investigations should give information on the thickness and morphology of the layers formed. (orig./MM)

  5. Numerical simulation of actuation behavior of active fiber composites in helicopter rotor blade application

    Paik, Seung Hoon; Kim, Ji Yeon; Shin, Sang Joon; Kim, Seung Jo

    2004-07-01

    Smart structures incorporating active materials have been designed and analyzed to improve aerospace vehicle performance and its vibration/noise characteristics. Helicopter integral blade actuation is one example of those efforts using embedded anisotropic piezoelectric actuators. To design and analyze such integrally-actuated blades, beam approach based on homogenization methodology has been traditionally used. Using this approach, the global behavior of the structures is predicted in an averaged sense. However, this approach has intrinsic limitations in describing the local behaviors in the level of the constituents. For example, the failure analysis of the individual active fibers requires the knowledge of the local behaviors. Microscopic approach for the analysis of integrally-actuated structures is established in this paper. Piezoelectric fibers and matrices are modeled individually and finite element method using three-dimensional solid elements is adopted. Due to huge size of the resulting finite element meshes, high performance computing technology is required in its solution process. The present methodology is quoted as Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of the smart structure. As an initial validation effort, present analytical results are correlated with the experiments from a small-scaled integrally-actuated blade, Active Twist Rotor (ATR). Through DNS, local stress distribution around the interface of fiber and matrix can be analyzed.

  6. Growian rotor blades: Production development, construction and test

    Thiele, H. M.

    1984-01-01

    Development and construction of three 50 m rotor blades for a 3 MW wind turbine are described. A hybrid concept was chosen, i.e., a load carrying inflexible steel spar and a glass fiber reinforced plastic skin. A test blade was constructed and static loading tests, dynamic vibration tests and fatigue tests on critical welds as well as at the connection between spar and blade skin were performed. All test results show good accordance with calculated values, and were taken into consideration during the construction of two rotor blades.

  7. Helicopter Rotor Blade Monitoring using Autonomous Wireless Sensor Network

    Sanchez Ramirez, Andrea; Loendersloot, Richard; Tinga, Tiedo; Basu, B

    2013-01-01

    The advancement on Wireless Sensor Networks for vibration monitoring presents important possibilities for helicopter rotor health and usage monitoring. While main rotor blades account for the main source of lift for helicopters, rotor induced vibration establishes an important source for understanding the rotor performance and blade condition. A discussion on the dual character of blades as rotating structures results in two different interrogation strategies for external and internal dynamic...

  8. Multiple piece turbine rotor blade

    Jones, Russell B; Fedock, John A

    2013-05-21

    A multiple piece turbine rotor blade with a shell having an airfoil shape and secured between a spar and a platform with the spar including a tip end piece. a snap ring fits around the spar and abuts against the spar tip end piece on a top side and abuts against a shell on the bottom side so that the centrifugal loads from the shell is passed through the snap ring and into the spar and not through a tip cap dovetail slot and projection structure.

  9. Multiple piece turbine rotor blade

    Kimmel, Keith D.; Plank, William L.

    2016-07-19

    A spar and shell turbine rotor blade with a spar and a tip cap formed as a single piece, the spar includes a bottom end with dovetail or fir tree slots that engage with slots on a top end of a root section, and a platform includes an opening on a top surface for insertion of the spar in which a shell made from an exotic high temperature resistant material is secured between the tip cap and the platform. The spar is tapered to form thinner walls at the tip end to further reduce the weight and therefore a pulling force due to blade rotation. The spar and tip cap piece is made from a NiAL material to further reduce the weight and the pulling force.

  10. Bistable devices for morphing rotor blades

    Johnson, Terrence

    This dissertation presents two bistable concepts for morphing rotor blades. These concepts are simple and are composed of bistable devices that act as coupling structures between an actuator and the rotor blade. Bistable or "snap-through" mechanisms have two stable equilibrium states and are a novel way to achieve large actuation output stroke at relatively modest effort for gross rotor morphing applications. This is because in addition to the large actuation stroke associated with the snap-through (relative to conventional actuator/ amplification systems) coming at relatively low actuation effort, no locking is required in either equilibrium state (since they are both stable). The first concept that is presented in this dissertation is a that is composed of a bistable twisting device that twists the tip of helicopter rotor blades. This work examines the performance of the presented bistable twisting device for rotor morphing, specifically, blade tip twist under an aerodynamic lift load. The device is analyzed using finite element analysis to predict its load carrying capability and bistable behavior. The second concept that is presented is a concept that is composed of a bistable arch for rotor blade chord extension. The bistable arch is coupled to a thin flat plate that is supported by rollers. Increasing the chord of the rotor blade is expected to generate more lift-load and improve helicopter performance. In this work, a methodology is presented to design the bistable arches for chord morphing using the finite element analysis and pseudo-rigid body model method. This work also examines the effect of different arches, arch hinge size and shape, inertial loads and rigidity on arch performance. Finally, this work shows results from an experiment that was conducted to validate the developed numerical model and demonstrates how the arch can be actuated using a Nitinol Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) wire to extend the chord of a helicopter rotor blade.

  11. 14 CFR 27.661 - Rotor blade clearance.

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Rotor blade clearance. 27.661 Section 27... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Rotors § 27.661 Rotor blade clearance. There must be enough clearance between the rotor blades and other parts of the structure...

  12. 14 CFR 29.661 - Rotor blade clearance.

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Rotor blade clearance. 29.661 Section 29... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Rotors § 29.661 Rotor blade clearance. There must be enough clearance between the rotor blades and other parts of the structure...

  13. Tip cap for a rotor blade

    Kofel, W. K.; Tuley, E. N.; Gay, C. H., Jr.; Troeger, R. E.; Sterman, A. P. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A replaceable tip cap for attachment to the end of a rotor blade is described. The tip cap includes a plurality of walls defining a compartment which, if desired, can be divided into a plurality of subcompartments. The tip cap can include inlet and outlet holes in walls thereof to permit fluid communication of a cooling fluid there through. Abrasive material can be attached with the radially outer wall of the tip cap.

  14. Free-form design of rotor blades

    This work investigates an integrated free-form approach for the design of rotor blades, where airfoil shapes are treated as unknowns. This leads to the simultaneous optimization of the chord, twist and structural design variables, together with the airfoil shapes along the blade. As airfoils are automatically tailored to the evolution of the blade, this process results in a better exploration of the solution space and relieves the user from the burden of up-front choices, leading to better final designs. The proposed approach is demonstrated by sizing a 2 MW wind turbine blade

  15. Structural characterization of rotor blades through photogrammetry

    Bernardini, Giovanni; Serafini, Jacopo; Enei, Claudio; Mattioni, Luca; Ficuciello, Corrado; Vezzari, Valerio

    2016-06-01

    This paper deals with the use of photogrammetry for the experimental identification of structural and inertial properties of helicopter rotor blades4. The identification procedure is based upon theoretical/numerical algorithms for the evaluation of mass and flexural stiffness distributions which are an extension of those proposed in the past by Larsen, whereas the torsional properties (stiffness and shear center position) are determined through the Euler–Bernoulli beam theory. The identification algorithms require the knowledge of the blade displacement field produced by known steady loads. These data are experimentally obtained through photogrammetric detection technique, which allows the identification of 3D coordinates of labeled points (markers) on the structure through the correlation of 2D digital photos. Indeed, the displacement field is simply evaluated by comparing the markers positions on the loaded configuration with those on the reference one. The proposed identification procedure, numerically and experimentally validated in the past by the authors, has been here applied to the structural characterization of two main rotor blades, designed for ultra-light helicopters. Strain gauges measurements have been used to assess the accuracy of the identified properties through natural frequencies comparison as well as to evaluate the blades damping characteristics.

  16. Single-crystal-material-based induced-shear actuation for vibration reduction of helicopters with composite rotor system

    In this study, an assessment is made for the helicopter vibration reduction of composite rotor blades using an active twist control concept. Special focus is given to the feasibility of implementing the benefits of the shear actuation mechanism along with elastic couplings of composite blades for achieving maximum vibration reduction. The governing equations of motion for composite rotor blades with surface bonded piezoceramic actuators are obtained using Hamilton's principle. The equations are then solved for dynamic response using finite element discretization in the spatial and time domains. A time domain unsteady aerodynamic theory with free wake model is used to obtain the airloads. A newly developed single-crystal piezoceramic material is introduced as an actuator material to exploit its superior shear actuation authority. Seven rotor blades with different elastic couplings representing stiffness properties similar to stiff-in-plane rotor blades are used to investigate the hub vibration characteristics. The rotor blades are modeled as a box beam with actuator layers bonded on the outer surface of the top and bottom of the box section. Numerical results show that a notable vibration reduction can be achieved for all the combinations of composite rotor blades. This investigation also brings out the effect of different elastic couplings on various vibration-reduction-related parameters which could be useful for the optimal design of composite helicopter blades

  17. Single-crystal-material-based induced-shear actuation for vibration reduction of helicopters with composite rotor system

    Pawar, Prashant M.; Jung, Sung Nam

    2008-12-01

    In this study, an assessment is made for the helicopter vibration reduction of composite rotor blades using an active twist control concept. Special focus is given to the feasibility of implementing the benefits of the shear actuation mechanism along with elastic couplings of composite blades for achieving maximum vibration reduction. The governing equations of motion for composite rotor blades with surface bonded piezoceramic actuators are obtained using Hamilton's principle. The equations are then solved for dynamic response using finite element discretization in the spatial and time domains. A time domain unsteady aerodynamic theory with free wake model is used to obtain the airloads. A newly developed single-crystal piezoceramic material is introduced as an actuator material to exploit its superior shear actuation authority. Seven rotor blades with different elastic couplings representing stiffness properties similar to stiff-in-plane rotor blades are used to investigate the hub vibration characteristics. The rotor blades are modeled as a box beam with actuator layers bonded on the outer surface of the top and bottom of the box section. Numerical results show that a notable vibration reduction can be achieved for all the combinations of composite rotor blades. This investigation also brings out the effect of different elastic couplings on various vibration-reduction-related parameters which could be useful for the optimal design of composite helicopter blades.

  18. Helicopter Rotor Blade With Free Tip

    Stroub, Robert H.; Young, Larry; Cawthorne, Matthew; Keys, Charles

    1992-01-01

    Free-tip rotor blades improve fuel efficiency and performance characteristics of helicopters. Outermost portion of blade pivots independently with respect to inboard portion about pitch axis parallel to blade axis, located forward of aerodynamic center. Centrifugal force acts on tension/torsion strap and biases tip nose-up. Airstream turns tip nose-down, other torques cause tip to "weathervane" to intermediate angular position resulting in net lift. Reduces fluctuations in lift, with two effects: flapwise vibratory loads on blade and vibratory loads on pitch-control mechanism reduced; negative lift produced by advancing fixed tip eliminated, reducing power required to achieve same overall lift. Applies to tilt rotors and tail rotors as well.

  19. Rotor blade online monitoring and fault diagnosis technology research

    Tesauro, Angelo; Pavese, Christian; Branner, Kim

    Rotor blade online monitoring and fault diagnosis technology is an important way to find blade failure mechanisms and thereby improve the blade design. Condition monitoring of rotor blades is necessary in order to ensure the safe operation of the wind turbine, make the maintenance more economical......, unbalancing of the rotor, icing and lightning. Research is done throughout the world in order to develop and improve such measurement systems. Commercial hardware and software available for the described purpose is presented in the report....

  20. Blade lock for a rotor disk and rotor blade assembly

    Moore, Jerry H. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A rotor disk 18 and rotor blade 26 assembly is disclosed having a blade lock 66 which retains the rotor blade against axial movement in an axially extending blade retention slot 58. Various construction details are developed which shield the dead rim region D.sub.d and shift at least a portion of the loads associated with the locking device from the dead rim. In one detailed embodiment, a projection 68 from the live rim D.sub.1 of the disk 18 is adapted by slots 86 to receive blade locks 66.

  1. Determination of the angle of attack on rotor blades

    Shen, Wen Zhong; Hansen, Martin Otto Laver; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2009-01-01

    Two simple methods for determining the angle of attack (AOA) on a section of a rotor blade are proposed. Both techniques consist of employing the Biot-Savart integral to determine the influence of the bound vorticity on the velocity field. In the first technique, the force distribution along the...... techniques. The advantage of the proposed techniques, as compared with existing techniques, is that they can be used to determine the AOA on rotor blades under general flow conditions (e.g. operations in yaw or with dynamic inflow)....

  2. Design of helicopter rotor blades for optimum dynamic characteristics

    Peters, D. A.; Ko, T.; Korn, A.; Rossow, M. P.

    1985-01-01

    The mass and stiffness distributions for helicopter rotor blades are tailored in such a way to give a predetermined placement of blade natural frequencies. The optimal design is pursued with respect of minimum weight, sufficient inertia, and reasonable dynamic characteristics. Finite element techniques are used as a tool. Rotor types include hingeless, articulated, and teetering.

  3. Efficient Beam-Type Structural Modeling of Rotor Blades

    Couturier, Philippe; Krenk, Steen

    2015-01-01

    The present paper presents two recently developed numerical formulations which enable accurate representation of the static and dynamic behaviour of wind turbine rotor blades using little modeling and computational effort. The first development consists of an intuitive method to extract fully cou...... application to a composite section with bend-twist coupling and a real wind turbine blade....

  4. Vibration Reduction Methods and Techniques for Rotorcraft Utilizing On-Blade Active Control Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Rotor blades adapted for vibration control have the added benefit of extended blade and rotor life, as well as improved passenger comfort. Approaches that have been...

  5. Sound generation by non-synchronously oscillating rotor blades in turbomachinery

    Zhou, Di; Wang, Xiaoyu; Chen, Jun; Jing, Xiaodong; Sun, Xiaofeng

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, the sound generation by non-synchronously oscillating rotor blades in axial compressor is investigated with emphasis on establishing an analytical model for the corresponding sound field inside an annular duct. In terms of the present model, it is found that the acoustic frequency and propagating modes generated by non-synchronously oscillating rotor blades are not only associated with the blade vibration frequency and rotational speed, but also depend on the cascade inter-blade phase angle (IBPA) and the interaction between blades, which is clearly distinguished from typical Doppler effect. Moreover, it is also shown that although the IBPA of cascade is non-constant practically, the characteristics of sound generation are only slightly affected. Besides, the present work has conducted experimental investigations in order to gain insight into the generation mechanism of such complex sound field. Excellent agreement between the model prediction and experimental measurement in the near and far fields is generally observed in the circumstances with different parameter settings. Since the present study links the sound generation with blade oscillation, it would be very helpful to the fault diagnosis of rotor non-synchronous oscillation to some extent.

  6. Aeroelasticity and structural optimization of composite helicopter rotor blades with swept tips

    Yuan, K. A.; Friedmann, P. P.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes the development of an aeroelastic analysis capability for composite helicopter rotor blades with straight and swept tips, and its application to the simulation of helicopter vibration reduction through structural optimization. A new aeroelastic model is developed in this study which is suitable for composite rotor blades with swept tips in hover and in forward flight. The hingeless blade is modeled by beam type finite elements. A single finite element is used to model the swept tip. Arbitrary cross-sectional shape, generally anisotropic material behavior, transverse shears and out-of-plane warping are included in the blade model. The nonlinear equations of motion, derived using Hamilton's principle, are based on a moderate deflection theory. Composite blade cross-sectbnal properties are calculated by a separate linear, two-dimensional cross section analysis. The aerodynamic loads are obtained from quasi-steady, incompressible aerodynamics, based on an implicit formulation. The trim and steady state blade aeroelastic response are solved in a fully coupled manner. In forward flight, where the blade equations of motion are periodic, the coupled trim-aeroelastic response solution is obtained from the harmonic balance method. Subsequently, the periodic system is linearized about the steady state response, and its stability is determined from Floquet theory.

  7. Lift capability prediction for helicopter rotor blade-numerical evaluation

    Rotaru, Constantin; Cîrciu, Ionicǎ; Luculescu, Doru

    2016-06-01

    The main objective of this paper is to describe the key physical features for modelling the unsteady aerodynamic effects found on helicopter rotor blade operating under nominally attached flow conditions away from stall. The unsteady effects were considered as phase differences between the forcing function and the aerodynamic response, being functions of the reduced frequency, the Mach number and the mode forcing. For a helicopter rotor, the reduced frequency at any blade element can't be exactly calculated but a first order approximation for the reduced frequency gives useful information about the degree of unsteadiness. The sources of unsteady effects were decomposed into perturbations to the local angle of attack and velocity field. The numerical calculus and graphics were made in FLUENT and MAPLE soft environments. This mathematical model is applicable for aerodynamic design of wind turbine rotor blades, hybrid energy systems optimization and aeroelastic analysis.

  8. Reliability analysis of rotor blades of tidal stream turbines

    Tidal stream turbines are used for converting kinetic energy of tidal currents into electricity. There are a number of uncertainties involved in the design of such devices and their components. To ensure safety of the turbines these uncertainties must be taken into account. The paper shows how this may be achieved for the design of rotor blades of horizontal-axis tidal stream turbines in the context of bending failure due to extreme loading. Initially, basic characteristics of such turbines in general and their blades in particular are briefly described. A probabilistic model of tidal current velocity fluctuations, which are the main source of load uncertainty, is then presented. This is followed by the description of reliability analysis of the blades, which takes into account uncertainties associated with tidal current speed, the blade resistance and the model used to calculate bending moments in the blades. Finally, the paper demonstrates how results of the reliability analysis can be applied to set values of the partial factors for the blade design. - Highlights: • A probabilistic model of the maximum of tidal current velocity fluctuations is proposed. • Reliability analysis of rotor blades of a tidal stream turbine is described. • Influence of pitch control system on the blade reliability is investigated. • Partial safety factors for the design of tidal turbine rotor blades are calibrated

  9. Thermographic inspection of a wind turbine rotor blade segment utilizing natural conditions as excitation source, Part I: Solar excitation for detecting deep structures in GFRP

    Worzewski, Tamara; Krankenhagen, Rainer; Doroshtnasir, Manoucher; Röllig, Mathias; Maierhofer, Christiane; Steinfurth, Henrik

    2016-05-01

    This study evaluates whether subsurface features in rotor blades, mainly made of Glass Fibre Reinforced Plastics (GFRP), can generally be detected with "solar thermography". First, the suitability of the sun is tested for acting as a heat source for applying active thermography on a 30 mm thick GFRP test specimen. Second, a defective rotor blade segment is inspected outdoors under ideal natural conditions using the sun as excitation source. Additionally, numerical FEM-simulations are performed and the comparability between experiment and simulation is evaluated for outdoor measurements.

  10. Development of a piezoelectric actuator for trailing-edge flap control of rotor blades

    Straub, Friedrich K.; Ngo, Hieu T.; Anand, V.; Domzalski, David B.

    1999-06-01

    Piezoelectric actuator technology has now reached a level where macro-positioning applications in the context of smart structures can be considered. One application with high payoffs is vibration reduction, noise reduction, and performance improvements in helicopters. Integration of piezoelectric actuators in the rotor blade is attractive, since it attacks the problem at the source. The present paper covers the development of a piezoelectric actuator for trailing edge flap control on a 34-foot diameter helicopter main rotor. The design of an actuator using bi-axial stack columns, and its bench, shake, and spin testing are described. A series of enhancements lead to an improved version that, together with use of latest stack technology, meets the requirements. Next steps in this DARPA sponsored program are development of the actuator and full scale rotor system for wind tunnel testing in the NASA Ames 40 X 80 foot wind tunnel and flight testing on the MD Explorer.

  11. Applying Pressure Sensitive Paint Technology to Rotor Blades

    Watkins, A. Neal; Leighty, Bradley D.; Lipford, William E.; Goodman, Kyle Z.; Crafton, Jim; Gregory, James W.

    2014-01-01

    This report will present details of a Pressure Sensitive Paint (PSP) system for measuring global surface pressures on rotorcrtaft blades in simulated forward flight at the 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel at the NASA Langley Research Center. The basics of the PSP method will be discussed and the modifications that were needed to extend this technology for use on rotor blades. Results from a series of tests will also be presented as well as several areas of improvement that have been identified and are currently being developed for future testing.

  12. Acoustic design of rotor blades using a genetic algorithm

    Wells, V. L.; Han, A. Y.; Crossley, W. A.

    1995-01-01

    A genetic algorithm coupled with a simplified acoustic analysis was used to generate low-noise rotor blade designs. The model includes thickness, steady loading and blade-vortex interaction noise estimates. The paper presents solutions for several variations in the fitness function, including thickness noise only, loading noise only, and combinations of the noise types. Preliminary results indicate that the analysis provides reasonable assessments of the noise produced, and that genetic algorithm successfully searches for 'good' designs. The results show that, for a given required thrust coefficient, proper blade design can noticeably reduce the noise produced at some expense to the power requirements.

  13. A review of helicopter rotor blade tip shapes

    Brocklehurst, A.; Barakos, G. N.

    2013-01-01

    A review of helicopter rotor blade tip design technology has been carried out with a view to undertaking subsequent computations to evaluate the performance of new tip designs. The review starts by briefly looking at (fixed) wing tip design concepts and the underlying fluid mechanics on which they are based in order to see if there is any carry-over of ideas on which improved tip design concepts might be based. Then, rotor blade tip shapes that have been used, or suggested for use, on past and present rotorcraft are examined to obtain a better understanding of the helicopter tip design problem. In parallel, the review traces the development of analysis tools to evaluate the performance of the rotor and blade tip design. It is clear that in the past, the designer relied heavily on classical aerodynamic knowledge, supplemented by experience and intuition, supported by wind tunnel and model rotor testing, and relatively low-order aerodynamic calculations. New rotor designs were, and still are the subject of intensive flight test verification. However, recent development of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) now offers an opportunity to accurately predict the viscous, compressible flow-field in the tip region, and thus predict the performance of new rotor and tip designs, provided that the solver has adequate resolution, is able to handle all aspects of the helicopter problem, and sufficient computational resources are available to complete the design in a practical time-scale.

  14. Photogrammetric detection technique for rotor blades structural characterization

    Enei, C.; Bernardini, G.; Serafini, J.; Mattioni, L.; Ficuciello, C.; Vezzari, V.

    2015-11-01

    This paper describes an innovative use of photogrammetric detection techniques to experimentally estimate structural/inertial properties of helicopter rotor blades. The identification algorithms for the evaluation of mass and flexural stiffness distributions are an extension of the ones proposed by Larsen, whereas the procedure for torsional properties determination (stiffness and shear center position) is based on the Euler-Prandtl beam theory. These algorithms rely on measurements performed through photogrammetric detection, which requires the collection of digital photos allowing the identification of 3D coordinates of labeled points (markers) on the structure through the correlation of 2D pictures. The displacements are evaluated by comparing the positions of markers in loaded and reference configuration. Being the applied loads known, the structural characteristics can be directly obtained from the measured displacements. The accuracy of the proposed identification algorithms has been firstly verified by comparison with numerical and experimental data, and then applied to the structural characterization of two main rotor blades, designed for ultra-light helicopter applications.

  15. A new approach to helicopter rotor blade research instrumentation

    Knight, V. H., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    A rotor-blade-mounted telemetry instrumentation system developed and used in flight tests by the NASA/Langley Research Center is described. The system uses high-speed digital techniques to acquire research data from miniature pressure transducers on advanced rotor airfoils which are flight tested using an AH-1G helicopter. The system employs microelectronic PCM multiplexer-digitizer stations located remotely on the blade and in a hub-mounted metal canister. The electronics contained in the canister digitizes up to 16 sensors, formats this data with serial PCM data from the remote stations, and transmits the data from the canister which is above the plane of the rotor. Data is transmitted over an RF link to the ground for real-time monitoring and to the helicopter fuselage for tape recording.

  16. Optimization model for rotor blades of horizontal axis wind turbines

    LIU Xiong; CHEN Yan; YE Zhiquan

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents an optimization model for rotor blades of horizontal axis wind turbines. The model refers to the wind speed distribution function on the specific wind site, with an objective to satisfy the maximum annual energy output. To speed up the search process and guarantee a global optimal result, the extended compact genetic algorithm (ECGA) is used to carry out the search process.Compared with the simple genetic algorithm, ECGA runs much faster and can get more accurate results with a much smaller population size and fewer function evaluations. Using the developed optimization program, blades of a 1.3 MW stall-regulated wind turbine are designed. Compared with the existing blades, the designed blades have obviously better aerodynamic performance.

  17. Nondestructive evaluation of helicopter rotor blades using guided Lamb modes.

    Chakrapani, Sunil Kishore; Barnard, Daniel; Dayal, Vinay

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents an application for turning and direct modes in a complex composite laminate structure. The propagation and interaction of turning modes and fundamental Lamb modes are investigated in the skin, spar and web sections of a helicopter rotor blade. Finite element models were used to understand the various mode conversions at geometric discontinuities such as web-spar joints. Experimental investigation was carried out with the help of air coupled ultrasonic transducers. The turning and direct modes were confirmed with the help of particle displacements and velocities. Experimental B-Scans were performed on damaged and undamaged samples for qualitative and quantitative assessment of the structure. A strong correlation between the numerical and experimental results was observed and reported. PMID:24210414

  18. Application of optimization methods to helicopter rotor blade design

    Chattopadhyay, A.; Walsh, J. L.

    1990-01-01

    A procedure for the minimum weight design of helicopter rotor blades with constraints on multiple coupled flap-lag natural frequencies, autorotational inertia, and centrifugal stress is presented. Optimum designs are obtained for blades with both rectangular and tapered planforms and are compared within a reference blade. The effects of higher-frequency constraints and stress constraints on the optimum blade designs are assessed. The results indicate that there is an increase in blade weight and a significant change in the design variable distributions with an increase in the number of frequency constraints. The inclusion of stress constraints has different effects on the wall thickness distributions of rectangular and tapered blades, but tends to increase the magnitude of the nonstructural segment weight distributions for both blade types.

  19. A study of autogiro rotor-blade oscillations in the plane of the rotor disk

    Wheatley, John B

    1936-01-01

    An analysis of the factors governing the oscillation of an autogiro rotor blade in the plane of the rotor disk showed that the contribution of the air forces to the resultant motion was small and that the oscillation is essentially a direct effect of the rotor-blade flapping motion. A comparison of calculated oscillations with those measured in flight on three different rotors disclosed that the calculations gave satisfactory agreement with experiment. The calculated air forces on the rotor blade appear to be larger than the experimental ones, but this discrepancy can be attributed to the deficiencies in the strip analysis.

  20. Optimization methods applied to the aerodynamic design of helicopter rotor blades

    Walsh, Joanne L.; Bingham, Gene J.; Riley, Michael F.

    1987-01-01

    Described is a formal optimization procedure for helicopter rotor blade design which minimizes hover horsepower while assuring satisfactory forward flight performance. The approach is to couple hover and forward flight analysis programs with a general-purpose optimization procedure. The resulting optimization system provides a systematic evaluation of the rotor blade design variables and their interaction, thus reducing the time and cost of designing advanced rotor blades. The paper discusses the basis for and details of the overall procedure, describes the generation of advanced blade designs for representative Army helicopters, and compares design and design effort with those from the conventional approach which is based on parametric studies and extensive cross-plots.

  1. Optimization of rotor blades for combined structural, dynamic, and aerodynamic properties

    He, Cheng-Jian; Peters, David A.

    1990-01-01

    Optimal helicopter blade design with computer-based mathematical programming has received more and more attention in recent years. Most of the research has focused on optimum dynamic characteristics of rotor blades to reduce vehicle vibration. There is also work on optimization of aerodynamic performance and on composite structural design. This research has greatly increased our understanding of helicopter optimum design in each of these aspects. Helicopter design is an inherently multidisciplinary process involving strong interactions among various disciplines which can appropriately include aerodynamics; dynamics, both flight dynamics and structural dynamics; aeroelasticity: vibrations and stability; and even acoustics. Therefore, the helicopter design process must satisfy manifold requirements related to the aforementioned diverse disciplines. In our present work, we attempt to combine several of these important effects in a unified manner. First, we design a blade with optimum aerodynamic performance by proper layout of blade planform and spanwise twist. Second, the blade is designed to have natural frequencies that are placed away from integer multiples of the rotor speed for a good dynamic characteristics. Third, the structure is made as light as possible with sufficient rotational inertia to allow for autorotational landing, with safe stress margins and flight fatigue life at each cross-section, and with aeroelastical stability and low vibrations. Finally, a unified optimization refines the solution.

  2. OPTIMAT Blades. Reliable Optimal Use of Materials for Wind Turbine Rotor Blades. Final Report

    Janssen, L.G.J. [ECN Wind Energy, Petten (Netherlands); Van Wingerde, A.M.; Nijssen, R.P.L. [Knowledge Centre Wind Trubine Materials and Constructions, Delft (Netherlands); Philippidis, T.P. [University of Patras, Patras (Greece); Broendsted, P. [Risoe National Laboratory, Roskilde (Denmark); Dutton, A.G. [Council for the Central Laboratory of Research Councils CCLRC, Chilton, Didcot (United Kingdom); Kensche, C.W. [Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt, Berlin (Germany)

    2006-06-15

    As the required financial investments to achieve the expansion of the installed capacity of wind turbine grow, the economical pressure on reliable and structurally optimised blades, that are fit for their designed life, will increase. Very large blades may even become practically impossible without further knowledge of the material behaviour since the dominating loads on the material are caused by the blade mass. Therefore, a sound and accurate understanding of the structural behaviour of the material under all for wind turbine applications possible loading conditions is necessary. The project aims to provide accurate design recommendations for the optimised use of materials within wind turbine rotor blades and to achieve improved reliability. The major deliverable of the project will be improved design recommendations for the next generation of rotor blades. With the accurate and reliable design recommendations resulting from this project, reliable blades with optimised use of materials can be designed. The increased reliability and weight reduction of the blades will stimulate further the offshore exploitation with large capacity wind turbines. This supports the increase in wind energy and by that helps to reach the White Paper target of 40GW of installed power by 2010. The possible reduction of the material use will lower the impact on earth's resources and environment. The reduction can result from direct weight saving and from the increased reliability which prevents the need for replacements and waste of material. To execute the research activities a consortium was formed consisting of 10 research institutes from 7 EU countries; 5 wind turbine and/or blade manufactures from 3 EU countries; and the two leading certification bodies that carry out wind turbine certification throughout the world today. Over 3000 individual tests have been carried out on epoxy GFRP coupons, with numerous technical reports being issued to analyse and understand this data. The

  3. Smart helicopter rotors optimization and piezoelectric vibration control

    Ganguli, Ranjan; Viswamurthy, Sathyamangalam Ramanarayanan

    2016-01-01

    Exploiting the properties of piezoelectric materials to minimize vibration in rotor-blade actuators, this book demonstrates the potential of smart helicopter rotors to achieve the smoothness of ride associated with jet-engined, fixed-wing aircraft. Vibration control is effected using the concepts of trailing-edge flaps and active-twist. The authors’ optimization-based approach shows the advantage of multiple trailing-edge flaps and algorithms for full-authority control of dual trailing-edge-flap actuators are presented. Hysteresis nonlinearity in piezoelectric stack actuators is highlighted and compensated by use of another algorithm. The idea of response surfaces provides for optimal placement of trailing-edge flaps. The concept of active twist involves the employment of piezoelectrically induced shear actuation in rotating beams. Shear is then demonstrated for a thin-walled aerofoil-section rotor blade under feedback-control vibration minimization. Active twist is shown to be significant in reducing vibra...

  4. Helicopter rotor blade injury: a persistent safety hazard in the U.S. Army.

    Crowley, J S; Geyer, S L

    1993-09-01

    Rotor blade injuries are an inherent hazard of helicopter operations. To determine the recent incidence of rotor blade injuries in the U.S. Army, a review of accident records (1972-91) was conducted. Crash-related injuries were not included. During the study period, there were 24 blade strike injuries (12 involving the main rotor), 11 (46%) of which were fatal. Comparison with previous reports indicates a lower rotor blade injury rate in the last decade than in any previous period. The head was injured most frequently (65%), followed by the chest (17%) and abdomen (7%). Protective helmets helped to reduce injury in several instances. Flight crew comprised 49% of the victims, passengers 29%, ground crew 14%, and bystanders 8%. Helicopter crews must maintain situational awareness when around turning blades--professional training alone does not guarantee protection from rotor blade injury. PMID:8216149

  5. The Effect of Composite Flexures on Aeroelastic Stability of a Hingeless Rotor Blade

    Shi; Qinghua

    2007-01-01

    The effects of ply orientation angle of composite flexures on stability of hingeless rotor blade system are studied.The composite hingeless rotor blade system is simplified as a hub,a flap flexure and a lag flexure.pitch bearing and main blade.The kinematics formulations are inferred by employing the moderate deflection beam theory.The shear deformation and warping related to torsion are considered.The quasi-steady strip theory with dynamic inflow effects is applied to obtain the aerodynamic loads acting on the blade.Based on these.the set of finite element formulations of a hingeless rotor blade system is worked out.The numerical results show that the ply angle of the composite flexures has great effects on the aeroelastic stability of rotor blade.

  6. Rotor-blade wheel solves the sediment problems; Loepehjul loeser sedimentproblemer

    Bakken, Marte

    2009-07-01

    Test period in Peru is over for the recently developed rotor-blade wheel from the Norwegian firm DynaVec. The result shows that the wear and tear problems caused by sediments in great extent is solved. (AG)

  7. Method and apparatus for reducing rotor blade deflections, loads, and/or peak rotational speed

    Moroz, Emilian Mieczyslaw; Pierce, Kirk Gee

    2006-10-17

    A method for reducing at least one of loads, deflections of rotor blades, or peak rotational speed of a wind turbine includes storing recent historical pitch related data, wind related data, or both. The stored recent historical data is analyzed to determine at least one of whether rapid pitching is occurring or whether wind speed decreases are occurring. A minimum pitch, a pitch rate limit, or both are imposed on pitch angle controls of the rotor blades conditioned upon results of the analysis.

  8. Fully integrated aerodynamic/dynamic optimization of helicopter rotor blades

    Walsh, Joanne L.; Lamarsh, William J., II; Adelman, Howard M.

    1992-01-01

    A fully integrated aerodynamic/dynamic optimization procedure is described for helicopter rotor blades. The procedure combines performance and dynamic analyses with a general purpose optimizer. The procedure minimizes a linear combination of power required (in hover, forward flight, and maneuver) and vibratory hub shear. The design variables include pretwist, taper initiation, taper ratio, root chord, blade stiffnesses, tuning masses, and tuning mass locations. Aerodynamic constraints consist of limits on power required in hover, forward flight and maneuvers; airfoil section stall; drag divergence Mach number; minimum tip chord; and trim. Dynamic constraints are on frequencies, minimum autorotational inertia, and maximum blade weight. The procedure is demonstrated for two cases. In the first case, the objective function involves power required (in hover, forward flight and maneuver) and dynamics. The second case involves only hover power and dynamics. The designs from the integrated procedure are compared with designs from a sequential optimization approach in which the blade is first optimized for performance and then for dynamics. In both cases, the integrated approach is superior.

  9. Minimum weight design of helicopter rotor blades with frequency constraints

    Chattopadhyay, Aditi; Walsh, Joanne L.

    1989-01-01

    The minimum weight design of helicopter rotor blades subject to constraints on fundamental coupled flap-lag natural frequencies has been studied in this paper. A constraint has also been imposed on the minimum value of the blade autorotational inertia to ensure that the blade has sufficient inertia to autorotate in case of an engine failure. The program CAMRAD has been used for the blade modal analysis and the program CONMIN has been used for the optimization. In addition, a linear approximation analysis involving Taylor series expansion has been used to reduce the analysis effort. The procedure contains a sensitivity analysis which consists of analytical derivatives of the objective function and the autorotational inertia constraint and central finite difference derivatives of the frequency constraints. Optimum designs have been obtained for blades in vacuum with both rectangular and tapered box beam structures. Design variables include taper ratio, nonstructural segment weights and box beam dimensions. The paper shows that even when starting with an acceptable baseline design, a significant amount of weight reduction is possible while satisfying all the constraints for blades with rectangular and tapered box beams.

  10. Ice accretion modeling for wind turbine rotor blades

    Chocron, D.; Brahimi, T.; Paraschivoiu, I.; Bombardier, J.A. [Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal (Canada)

    1997-12-31

    The increasing application of wind energy in northern climates implies operation of wind turbines under severe atmospheric icing conditions. Such conditions are well known in the Scandinavian countries, Canada and most of Eastern European countries. An extensive study to develop a procedure for the prediction of ice accretion on wind turbines rotor blades appears to be essential for the safe and economic operation of wind turbines in these cold regions. The objective of the present paper is to develop a computer code capable of simulating the shape and amount of ice which may accumulate on horizontal axis wind turbine blades when operating in icing conditions. The resulting code is capable to predict and simulate the formation of ice in rime and glaze conditions, calculate the flow field and particle trajectories and to perform thermodynamic analysis. It also gives the possibility of studying the effect of different parameters that influence ice formation such as temperature, liquid water content, droplet diameter and accretion time. The analysis has been conducted on different typical airfoils as well as on NASA/DOE Mod-0 wind turbine. Results showed that ice accretion on wind turbines may reduce the power output by more than 20%.

  11. Investigation of the impact of rain and particle erosion on rotor blade aerodynamics with an erosion test facility to enhancing the rotor blade performance and durability

    During their operational life span of around 20 years, the individual components of a wind turbine, especially the rotor blades, are exposed to extreme environmental influences. This is the result of the continuous exposure of wind turbines to the elements and of particularly high rotor blade tip speeds, which exceed a velocity of 90 m/s. These effects result in leading edge erosion. Rotor blades are therefore protected by special coating systems, e.g. varnishes and foils. The durability of those surface coatings varies depending on the location of the wind turbine and often proves to be insufficient. Additionally, there is no standardised test procedure for the evaluation of the durability and protective effect of the coating materials under the highly erosive conditions at the location of the wind turbines. In the course of this project, we will develop a testing procedure to evaluate the erosion of coating materials on actual leading edges of rotor blades, which will be applied in a test facility. The test rig will be capable of simulating a realistic application of rain and sand to gauge the effects of erosion. During the application, two test objects can be tested simultaneously. The geometry of the test objects will be adapted to represent that of real rotor blade tips. In order to generate comparable and transferable results, several challenges have to be met during the implementation, especially the realistic reproduction of environmental influences and the corrosion damage mechanism. In this regard, the duration of the test procedure is very important because a time lapse factor of 100-260 is intended. An operation of 20 years can thereby be simulated within 4 to 10 weeks

  12. Assessment Report on Innovative Rotor Blades (MAREWINT WP1,D1.3)

    McGugan, Malcolm; Leble, Vladimir; Pereira, Gilmar Ferreira

    The offshore wind energy industry faces many challenges in the short to medium term if it is to meet the ambitions of the global community for sustainable energy supply in the future. Not least among these challenges is the issue of rotor blades. Innovative design for “smart” rotor blades with...... innovative concept development for wind turbine blades. This covers models and experiments with damage measurement systems embedded within the composite material/structure and numerical methods investigating the effects of leading and trailing edge flaps on modifying the aerodynamic loads on the operating...

  13. Foreign Object Damage to Fan Rotor Blades of Aeroengine Part Ⅰ: Experimental Study of Bird Impact

    2007-01-01

    The conditions of experiment for bird impact to blades have been improved. The experiment of bird impact to the fan rotor blades of an aeroengine is carried out. Through analyzing the transient state response of blades impacted by bird and the change of blade profile before and after the impact, the anti-bird impact performance of blades in the first fan rotor is verified. The basis of anti-foreign object damage design for the fan rotor blades of an aeroengine is provided.

  14. Boundary Layer Transition Detection on a Rotor Blade Using Rotating Mirror Thermography

    Heineck, James T.; Schuelein, Erich; Raffel, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Laminar-to-turbulent transition on a rotor blade in hover has been imaged using an area-scan infrared camera. A new method for tracking a blade using a rotating mirror was employed. The mirror axis of rotation roughly corresponded to the rotor axis of rotation and the mirror rotational frequency is 1/2 that of the rotor. This permitted the use of cameras whose integration time was too long to prevent image blur due to the motion of the blade. This article will show the use of this method for a rotor blade at different collective pitch angles.

  15. A multi-fidelity framework for physics based rotor blade simulation and optimization

    Collins, Kyle Brian

    New helicopter rotor designs are desired that offer increased efficiency, reduced vibration, and reduced noise. Rotor Designers in industry need methods that allow them to use the most accurate simulation tools available to search for these optimal designs. Computer based rotor analysis and optimization have been advanced by the development of industry standard codes known as "comprehensive" rotorcraft analysis tools. These tools typically use table look-up aerodynamics, simplified inflow models and perform aeroelastic analysis using Computational Structural Dynamics (CSD). Due to the simplified aerodynamics, most design studies are performed varying structural related design variables like sectional mass and stiffness. The optimization of shape related variables in forward flight using these tools is complicated and results are viewed with skepticism because rotor blade loads are not accurately predicted. The most accurate methods of rotor simulation utilize Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) but have historically been considered too computationally intensive to be used in computer based optimization, where numerous simulations are required. An approach is needed where high fidelity CFD rotor analysis can be utilized in a shape variable optimization problem with multiple objectives. Any approach should be capable of working in forward flight in addition to hover. An alternative is proposed and founded on the idea that efficient hybrid CFD methods of rotor analysis are ready to be used in preliminary design. In addition, the proposed approach recognizes the usefulness of lower fidelity physics based analysis and surrogate modeling. Together, they are used with high fidelity analysis in an intelligent process of surrogate model building of parameters in the high fidelity domain. Closing the loop between high and low fidelity analysis is a key aspect of the proposed approach. This is done by using information from higher fidelity analysis to improve predictions made

  16. Fatigue life prediction and strength degradation of wind turbine rotor blade composites

    Nijssen, R.P.L.

    2006-01-01

    Wind turbine rotor blades are subjected to a large number of highly variable loads, but life predictions are typically based on constant amplitude fatigue behaviour. Therefore, it is important to determine how service life under variable amplitude fatigue can be estimated from constant amplitude fat

  17. Aerodynamic design optimization of helicopter rotor blades including airfoil shape for hover performance

    Ngoc Anh Vu; Jae Woo Lee; Jung Il Shu

    2013-01-01

    This study proposes a process to obtain an optimal helicopter rotor blade shape for aerodynamic performance in hover flight.A new geometry representation algorithm which uses the class function/shape function transformation (CST) is employed to generate airfoil coordinates.With this approach,airfoil shape is considered in terms of design variables.The optimization process is constructed by integrating several programs developed by author.The design variables include twist,taper ratio,point of taper initiation,blade root chord,and coefficients of the airfoil distribution function.Aerodynamic constraints consist of limits on power available in hover and forward flight.The trim condition must be attainable.This paper considers rotor blade configuration for the hover flight condition only,so that the required power in hover is chosen as the objective function of the optimization problem.Sensitivity analysis of each design variable shows that airfoil shape has an important role in rotor performance.The optimum rotor blade reduces the required hover power by 7.4% and increases the figure of merit by 6.5%,which is a good improvement for rotor blade design.

  18. Composite structure of helicopter rotor blades studied by neutron- and X-ray radiography

    In order to inspect the possible defects in the composite structure of helicopter rotor blades combined neutron- and X-ray radiography investigations were performed at the Budapest Research Reactor. Imperfections in the honeycomb structure, resin rich or starved areas at the core-honeycomb surfaces, inhomogeneities at the adhesive filling and water percolation at the sealing interfaces of the honeycomb sections were discovered

  19. 14 CFR 29.653 - Pressure venting and drainage of rotor blades.

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pressure venting and drainage of rotor... TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Rotors § 29.653 Pressure venting and drainage of rotor blades. (a) For each rotor blade— (1) There must...

  20. 14 CFR 27.653 - Pressure venting and drainage of rotor blades.

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pressure venting and drainage of rotor... TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Rotors § 27.653 Pressure venting and drainage of rotor blades. (a) For each rotor blade— (1) There must be...

  1. Measurement of Rotor Blade Deformations of Wind Energy Converters with Laser Scanners

    Wind energy converters in operation are exposed to high stresses which result in large deformations of the rotor blades. In this paper a method for determination of deformations of rotating rotor blades is presented using multiple synchronous laser scanners and cameras. In a first step, multiple scanners in 1D mode are used which record cross sections at different positions along the rotor blades. By comparing the recorded cross sections with a CAD model of the rotor blade, the deformations in out-of-plane and torsional direction can be derived. In order to ensure that the positions of the cross sections are defined in the coordinate system of the wind energy converter, the nacelle is pre-scanned and a 3D transformation is performed using known coordinates from the manufacturer. To account for the relatively slow movement of the nacelle, it is observed by a photogrammetric camera. The results of the nacelle's motion are considered in the analysis of the 1D data. First test recordings were carried out with different measurement frequencies to enable comparisons of accuracy. Furthermore, first results of the cross-section measurements are presented. For the next step the 3D scans will be evaluated which have been acquired using a further instrument simultaneously with the 1D scans. In the same way as before the 3D points will be transferred to the reference system of the nacelle, and then combined with the 1D data

  2. Design of a fibrous composite preform for wind turbine rotor blades

    Hansen, Jens Zangenberg; Brøndsted, Povl; Kofoed, M.

    2014-01-01

    The present work addresses the different factors and challenges one must cope with in the design process of a composite preform used for the load-carrying main laminate of a wind turbine rotor blade. The design process is split up into different key elements, each of which are presented and...

  3. Effects of rotating stall and surge on the first rotor blade row in a six stage industrial axial flow compressor

    Eisenberg, B.; Thomas, P.; Turanskyj, L.

    1995-12-31

    A six stage speed controlled research compressor representing the front section of an industrial axial flow compressor was fitted with a new wide chord controlled-diffusion-airfoil-bladed 1st stage rotor blade row. In order to check mechanical behaviour of this blade type when effected by rotating stall and surge the first stage blading was equipped with strain gauges. As the presence of rotating-stall changes also frequency spectrum of shaft vibration the output signals of three different types of transducers - i.e. strain gauge, dynamic wall pressure and shaft vibration - are compared. Rotating stall was detected by fast fourier transform (FFT) analysis of the pressure transducer`s output signal. In some cases a change of shaft vibration signals was observed. The compressor has a relatively small area of rotating stall which is located below 50% speed. Strain gauge measurements show a comapratively low stress level induced by rotating stall and surge in the first rotor blade row. Results of measurements taken during transient start-up and shut-down with different throttle valve positions behind the compressor are presented as well. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ein 6-stufiger drehzahlgeregelter Versuchskompressor, der dem vorderen Teil eines Industrie-Axialkompressors entspricht, wurde in der 1. Laufschaufelreihe mit einer neuen Breitschaufel mit `Controlled-diffusion`-Profilen versehen. Zur Ueberpruefung des mechanischen Verhaltens dieser neuen Beschaufelung im Kennfeld - insbesondere bei Auftreten von `Rotating-Stall` - wurden auf die Laufschaufeln Dehnungsmessstreifen appliziert. Da das Autreten von `Rotating-Stall` auch das Frequenzspektrum der Wellenschwingungen beeinflusst, wurden die Signale dreier verschiedener Aufnehmertypen - Dehnungsmessstreifen, dynamischer Wanddruck und Wellenschwingungen - verglichen. Das Auftreten von `Rotating-Stall` wurde ueber eine Frequenzanalyse des Ausgangssignals der dynamischen Wanddruckaufnehmer indiziert. In einigen Faellen wurde

  4. Active twist control methodology for vibration reduction of a helicopter with dissimilar rotor system

    In this work, an active vibration reduction of hingeless composite rotor blades with dissimilarity is investigated using the active twist concept and the optimal control theory. The induced shear strain on the actuation mechanism by the piezoelectric constant d15 from the PZN–8% PT-based single-crystal material is used to achieve more active twisting to suppress the extra vibrations. The optimal control algorithm is based on the minimization of an objective function comprised of quadratic functions of vibratory hub loads and voltage control harmonics. The blade-to-blade dissimilarity is modeled using the stiffness degradation of composite blades. The optimal controller is applied to various possible dissimilarities arising from different damage patterns of composite blades. The governing equations of motion are derived using Hamilton's principle. The effects of composite materials and smart actuators are incorporated into the comprehensive aeroelastic analysis system. Numerical results showing the impact of addressing the blade dissimilarities on hub vibrations and voltage inputs required to suppress the vibrations are demonstrated. It is observed that all vibratory shear forces are reduced considerably and the major harmonics of moments are reduced significantly. However, the controller needs further improvement to suppress 1/rev moment loads. A mechanism to achieve vibration reduction for the dissimilar rotor system has also been identified

  5. Simulation of unsteady flows through stator and rotor blades of a gas turbine using the Chimera method

    Nakamura, S.; Scott, J. N.

    1993-01-01

    A two-dimensional model to solve compressible Navier-Stokes equations for the flow through stator and rotor blades of a turbine is developed. The flow domains for the stator and rotor blades are coupled by the Chimera method that makes grid generation easy and enhances accuracy because the area of the grid that have high turning of grid lines or high skewness can be eliminated from the computational domain after the grids are generated. The results of flow computations show various important features of unsteady flows including the acoustic waves interacting with boundary layers, Karman vortex shedding from the trailing edge of the stator blades, pulsating incoming flow to a rotor blade from passing stator blades, and flow separation from both suction and pressure sides of the rotor blades.

  6. Wind turbine rotor blade monitoring using digital image correlation: a comparison to aeroelastic simulations of a multi-megawatt wind turbine

    Optical full-field measurement methods such as Digital Image Correlation (DIC) provide a new opportunity for measuring deformations and vibrations with high spatial and temporal resolution. However, application to full-scale wind turbines is not trivial. Elaborate preparation of the experiment is vital and sophisticated post processing of the DIC results essential. In the present study, a rotor blade of a 3.2 MW wind turbine is equipped with a random black-and-white dot pattern at four different radial positions. Two cameras are located in front of the wind turbine and the response of the rotor blade is monitored using DIC for different turbine operations. In addition, a Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) system is used in order to measure the wind conditions. Wind fields are created based on the LiDAR measurements and used to perform aeroelastic simulations of the wind turbine by means of advanced multibody codes. The results from the optical DIC system appear plausible when checked against common and expected results. In addition, the comparison of relative out-ofplane blade deflections shows good agreement between DIC results and aeroelastic simulations

  7. Flow Modification over Rotor Blade with Suction Boundary Layer Control Technique

    Navneet Kumar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of transonic aircraft engines depend upon the performance of compressor rotor. To increase compressor rotors performance flow separation around rotor blades must be delayed and controlled. The aim was to control the flow separation of blades using suction boundary layer control method. Rotor blade has been modelled in designing software CATIA and then a suction surface has been created on blade and then import these geometries to ANSYS-CFX 14.5 for computational analysis of flow around blades. Suction slot has been applied at the trailing edge of suction surface and Shear stress transport model has been used for computational analysis. Two different suction mass flow rates 1 kg/s and 1.5 kg/s have been used here and boundary layer separation effects have been changed and this could be readily seen that the velocity vectors have reattached, preventing the boundary layer separation at the suction surface of the blade.

  8. Shape Optimization of Rotor Blade for Pulp Pressure Screen Based on FLUENT

    Qu Qingwen

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The study got two modified blades by changing the structure and shape of the rotor blade of the pressure screen. Pulp flow field in the same condition is numerically simulated by the fluid dynamics software FLUENT. The pressure distribution is showed especially in the location of the sieve drum circle. The ideal blade structure is obtained by the pressure field compared with conventional blades. It has strong cleaning ability and not easy to blockage sieve drum. The shape of the rotor blade is optimized. The blade shape is analyzed to the influence law of energy consumption. It is proved that the new rotor has energy-saving advantages. It is significant to improve the performance of pulp screening equipment. The theoretical support for select of blade shape of bars is provided by analysis of flow field.

  9. Rotating Shake Test and Modal Analysis of a Model Helicopter Rotor Blade

    Wilkie, W. Keats; Mirick, Paul H.; Langston, Chester W.

    1997-01-01

    Rotating blade frequencies for a model generic helicopter rotor blade mounted on an articulated hub were experimentally determined. Testing was conducted using the Aeroelastic Rotor Experimental System (ARES) testbed in the Helicopter Hover Facility (HBF) at Langley Research Center. The measured data were compared to pretest analytical predictions of the rotating blade frequencies made using the MSC/NASTRAN finite-element computer code. The MSC/NASTRAN solution sequences used to analyze the model were modified to account for differential stiffening effects caused by the centrifugal force acting on the blade and rotating system dynamic effects. The correlation of the MSC/NASTRAN-derived frequencies with the experimental data is, in general, very good although discrepancies in the blade torsional frequency trends and magnitudes were observed. The procedures necessary to perform a rotating system modal analysis of a helicopter rotor blade with MSC/NASTRAN are outlined, and complete sample data deck listings are provided.

  10. Aerodynamic analysis of potential use of flow control devices on helicopter rotor blades

    Tejero, F.; Doerffer, P.; Szulc, O.

    2014-08-01

    The interest in the application of flow control devices has been rising in the last years. Recently, several passive streamwise vortex generators have been analysed in a configuration of a curved wall nozzle within the framework of the UFAST project (Unsteady Effects of Shock Wave Induced Separation, 2005 - 2009). Experimental and numerical results proved that the technology is effective in delaying flow separation. The numerical investigation has been extended to helicopter rotor blades in hover and forward flight applying the FLOWer solver (RANS approach) implementing the chimera overlapping grids technique and high performance computing. CFD results for hover conditions confirm that the proposed passive control method reduces the flow separation increasing the thrust over power consumption. The paper presents the numerical validation for both states of flight and the possible implementation of RVGs on helicopter rotor blades.

  11. Aerodynamic analysis of potential use of flow control devices on helicopter rotor blades

    The interest in the application of flow control devices has been rising in the last years. Recently, several passive streamwise vortex generators have been analysed in a configuration of a curved wall nozzle within the framework of the UFAST project (Unsteady Effects of Shock Wave Induced Separation, 2005 – 2009). Experimental and numerical results proved that the technology is effective in delaying flow separation. The numerical investigation has been extended to helicopter rotor blades in hover and forward flight applying the FLOWer solver (RANS approach) implementing the chimera overlapping grids technique and high performance computing. CFD results for hover conditions confirm that the proposed passive control method reduces the flow separation increasing the thrust over power consumption. The paper presents the numerical validation for both states of flight and the possible implementation of RVGs on helicopter rotor blades.

  12. Design of helicopter rotor blades for desired placement of natural frequencies

    Peters, D. A.; Ko, T.; Korn, A.; Rossow, M. P.

    1984-01-01

    The mass and stiffness distributions for helicopter rotor blades are to be tailored in such a way to give a predetermined placement of blade natural frequencies. This optimization problem is addressed in a methodical, step-by-step process in which each aspect of the optimization is studied in detail. Careful consideration is also given to the mathematical formulation of the problem and to the introduction of appropriate constraints.

  13. A new experimental method for determining local airloads on rotor blades in forward flight

    Berton, E.; Maresca, C.; Favier, D. [Aerodynamics and Biomechanics of Motion Laboratory, LABM, Parc Scientifique et technologique de Luminy, Case 918, 13288, Marseille Cedex 09 (France)

    2004-09-01

    This paper presents a new approach for determining local airloads on helicopter rotor blade sections in forward flight. The method is based on the momentum equation in which all the terms are expressed by means of the velocity field measured by a laser Doppler velocimeter. The relative magnitude of the different terms involved in the momentum and Bernoulli equations is estimated and the results are encouraging. (orig.)

  14. MEASUREMENTS OF PRESSURE DISTRIBUTIONS ON A ROTOR BLADE USING PSP TECHNIQUES

    Kidong Kim

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Surface pressure distributions on a rotating blade were measured by using pressure sensitive paint (PSP to understand aerodynamic characteristics of a rotor blade. The present study was conducted to investigate the PSP techniques for measuring the pressure distributions on a rotor blade. In order to perform the experiment, the PSP was required to response very fast due to rapid pressure fluctuations on a rotor blade. High energy excitation light source was also needed to acquire proper intensity images in a short excitation time. The techniques were based on a lifetime method. Qualitative pressure distributions on an upper surface of small scale rotor in hovering condition were measured as a preliminary experiment prior to forward flight conditions in the KARI low speed wind tunnel laboratory. From measured pressure distributions, striking pressure gradient was observed on an upper surface of rotor blade and the resulting pressure showed expected gradient depending on different collective pitch angles. ABSTRAK : Pengagihan tekanan permukaan ke atas berbilah putar disukat menggunakan cat sensitive tekanan (pressure sensitive paint (PSP untuk memahami sifat-sifat aerodinamik suatu berbilah putar. Kajian telah dijalankan untuk menyelidik teknik-teknik PSP dengan mengukur agihan tekanan ke atas suatu berbilah putar. Agar eksperimen dapat dijalankan dengan baik, PSP harus bertindak cepat kerana tekanan naik turun dengan pantas ke atas berbilah putar. Sumber cahaya ujaan tenaga tinggi diperlukan untuk mendapatkan imej keamatan wajar dalam jangka masa ujaan yang pendek. Teknik-teknik tersebut terhasil daripada kajian semasa hayat. Agihan tekanan kualitatif ke permukaan atas berskala kecil pemutar dalam keadaan mengapung diukur sebagai permulaan eksperimen, sebelum penerbangan kehadapan dalam makmal terowong angin laju rendah KARI. Daripada agihan tekanan yang disukat, kecerunan tekanan yang ketara diperolehi daripada permerhatian terhadap permukaan

  15. An innovative medium speed wind turbine rotor blade design for low wind regime (electrical power generation)

    This paper describes the preliminary study of a small-scale wind turbine rotor blade (a low wind speed region turbine). A new wind turbine rotor blade (AE2 blade) for stand alone system has been conceptualized, designed, constructed and tested. The system is a reduced size prototype (half-scaled) to develop an efficient (adapted to Malaysian wind conditions)and cost effective wind energy conversion system (WECS) with local design and production technique. The blades were constructed from aluminium sheet with metal blending technique. The layout and design of rotor blade, its innovative features and test results are presented. Results from indoor test showed that the advantages of AE2 blade in low speed, with the potential of further improvements. The best rotor efficiency, CP attained with simple AE2 blades rotor (number of blade = 3) was 37.3% (Betz efficiency = 63%) at tip speed ratio (TSR) = 3.6. From the fabrication works and indoor testing, the AE2 blade rotor has demonstrated its structural integrity (ease of assembly and transportation), simplicity, acceptable performance and low noise level. (Author)

  16. Foreign Object Damage to Fan Rotor Blades of Aeroengine Part Ⅱ: Numerical Simulation of Bird Impact

    Guan Yupu; Zhao Zhenhua; Chen Wei; Gao Deping

    2008-01-01

    Bird impact is one of the most dangerous threats to flight safety. The consequences of bird impact can be severe and, therefore, the aircraft components have to be certified for a proven level of bird impact resistance before being put into service. The fan rotor blades of aeroengine are the components being easily impacted by birds. It is necessary to ensure that the fan rotor blades should have adequate resistance against the bird impact, to reduce the flying accidents caused by bird impacts. Using the contacting-impacting algorithm, the numerical simulation is carried out to simulate bird impact. A three-blade computational model is set up for the fan rotor blade having shrouds. The transient response curves of the points corresponding to measured points in experiments, displacements and equivalent stresses on the blades are obtained during the simulation. From the comparison of the transient response curves obtained from numerical simulation with that obtained from experiments, it can be found that the variations in measured points and the corresponding points of simulation are basically the same. The deforming process, the maximum displacements and the maximum equivalent stresses on blades are analyzed. The numerical simulation verifies and complements the experiment results.

  17. Simultaneous BVI noise and vibration reduction in rotorcraft using actively-controlled flaps and including performance considerations

    Patt, Daniel A.

    This work presents the development and application of an active control approach for reduction of both vibration and noise induced by helicopter rotor blade vortex interaction (BVI). Control is implemented through single or dual actively controlled flaps (ACFs) on each blade. Low-speed helicopter flight is prone to severe BVI, resulting in elevated vibration and noise levels. Existing research has suggested that when some form of active control is used to reduce vibration, noise will increase and vice versa. The present research achieves simultaneous reduction of noise and vibration, and also investigates the physical sources of the observed reduction. The initial portion of this work focused on developing a tool for simulating helicopter noise and vibrations in the BVI flight regime. A method for predicting compressible unsteady blade surface pressure distribution on rotor blades was developed and combined with an enhanced free-wake model and an acoustic prediction tool with provisions for blade flexibility. These elements were incorporated within an aeroelastic analysis featuring fully coupled flap-lag-torsional blade dynamics. Subsequently, control algorithms were developed that were effective for reducing noise and vibration even in the nonlinear BVI flight regime; saturation limits were incorporated constraining flap deflections to specified limits. The resulting simulation was also validated with a wide range of experimental data, achieving excellent correlation. Finally, a number of active control studies were performed. Multi-component vibration reductions of 40--80% could be achieved, while incurring a small noise penalty. Noise was reduced using an onboard feedback microphone; reductions of 4--10 dB on the advancing side were observed on a plane beneath the rotor when using dual flaps. Finally, simultaneous noise and vibration reduction was studied. A reduction of about 5 dB in noise on the advancing side combined with a 60% reduction in vibration was

  18. Fe Analysis of a Steam Turbine HP Rotor Blade Stage Concerning Material Effort, Dynamic Properties and Creep Damage Assessment

    Borkowski Paweł

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with the 1st stage of HP rotor blade assembly steam turbine TK 120. The methodology was focused on the selection of mechanical properties and the way of the rotor disc modeling and estimating the degree of damage caused by creep. Then the dynamic interference between the frequencies of excitation and the natural frequencies was assessed. Static calculations were performed for the cyclic sectors consisting of the disc, disc blades, spacers and shrouding, including loads as temperature, mass forces from the angular velocity and the pressure on the blades. Then, the creep analysis using a Norton’s model and the modal analysis were performed. Static analysis gave information concerning the distributions of displacements, stress and strain components. In the creep analysis, the creep displacements and stress relaxation versus time were determined and the estimated degree of damage caused by creep was evaluated at each part of the rotor disc. In the modal analysis, the natural frequencies and modes of vibrations corresponding to the nodal diameters were found. The results of modal analysis were shown in the SAFE graph. Numerical calculations have shown that the rotor disc was a well-designed structure and did not reveal any dynamic interference.

  19. The Effect of Rotor Blade Speed to the Best Efficiency Point of Single Stage Axial Flow Compressor

    Sukri, Mohamad Firdaus; Wasbari, Faizil; Mat, Shafizal

    2010-06-01

    The best efficiency point is ideal operational point for any turbomachinery. Selections of turbomachines in industry such as pump, turbine, compressor, etc are basically based on their operating point. The best efficiency point is a point at the highest efficiency. Therefore, turbomachines with nearest operating point to best efficiency point will be chosen due to higher efficiency thus produce great reduction in cost saving. Different speed of rotor blade will cause effect to the best efficiency point, as well as different in rotor and stator blade angle. If angle of rotor and stator blade constant while speed of rotor blade increased, the net head produced by the compressor will also increased. Thus, it will increase the brake horse power and fluid horse power. Although the efficiency of the compressor increases if fluid horse power increased, the increasing in brake horse power will produce lower efficiency. In this paper, the effect of rotor blade speed on best efficiency point of an axial flow compressor will be investigated and discussed. Through this paper, the highest efficiency is only 73 %, achieved at rotor blade speed of 750 rpm with net head of 9.4 mmWG, and air volumetric flow rate of 0.56m3/s. For higher net head, the rotor blade speed must be increased, but the efficiency will decrease simultaneously. The type of compressor used in this research is single stage axial flow compressor; model Dixson FM36, manufactured by Dixson FA Engineering Sdn. Bhd.

  20. Advanced grid-stiffened composite shells for applications in heavy-lift helicopter rotor blade spars

    Narayanan Nampy, Sreenivas

    Modern rotor blades are constructed using composite materials to exploit their superior structural performance compared to metals. Helicopter rotor blade spars are conventionally designed as monocoque structures. Blades of the proposed Heavy Lift Helicopter are envisioned to be as heavy as 800 lbs when designed using the monocoque spar design. A new and innovative design is proposed to replace the conventional spar designs with light weight grid-stiffened composite shell. Composite stiffened shells have been known to provide excellent strength to weight ratio and damage tolerance with an excellent potential to reduce weight. Conventional stringer--rib stiffened construction is not suitable for rotor blade spars since they are limited in generating high torsion stiffness that is required for aeroelastic stability of the rotor. As a result, off-axis (helical) stiffeners must be provided. This is a new design space where innovative modeling techniques are needed. The structural behavior of grid-stiffened structures under axial, bending, and torsion loads, typically experienced by rotor blades need to be accurately predicted. The overall objective of the present research is to develop and integrate the necessary design analysis tools to conduct a feasibility study in employing grid-stiffened shells for heavy-lift rotor blade spars. Upon evaluating the limitations in state-of-the-art analytical models in predicting the axial, bending, and torsion stiffness coefficients of grid and grid-stiffened structures, a new analytical model was developed. The new analytical model based on the smeared stiffness approach was developed employing the stiffness matrices of the constituent members of the grid structure such as an arch, helical, or straight beam representing circumferential, helical, and longitudinal stiffeners. This analysis has the capability to model various stiffening configurations such as angle-grid, ortho-grid, and general-grid. Analyses were performed using an

  1. Thermographic inspection of wind turbine rotor blade segment utilizing natural conditions as excitation source, Part II: The effect of climatic conditions on thermographic inspections - A long term outdoor experiment

    Worzewski, Tamara; Krankenhagen, Rainer; Doroshtnasir, Manoucher

    2016-05-01

    The present study continues the work described in part I of this paper in evaluating a long-term-experiment, where a rotor blade segment of a wind turbine is exposed to the elements and thereby monitored with passive thermography. First, it is investigated whether subsurface features in rotor blades - mainly made of GFRP - can generally be detected with thermography from greater distances under favorable conditions. The suitability of the sun for acting as a heat source in applying active thermography has been tested in the previous study. In this study, the climatic influence on thermographic measurement is evaluated. It is demonstrated that there are favorable and unfavorable circumstances for imaging thermal contrasts which reflect inner structures and other subsurface features like potential defects. It turns out that solar radiation serves as a very effective heat source, but not at all times of day. Other environmental influences such as diurnal temperature variations also create temperature contrasts that permit conclusions on subsurface features. Particular scenarios are reconstructed with FEM-simulations in order to gain deeper insight into the driving mechanisms that produce the observed thermal contrasts. These investigations may help planning useful outdoor operations for inspecting rotor blades with thermography.

  2. Application of response surface techniques to helicopter rotor blade optimization procedure

    Henderson, Joseph Lynn; Walsh, Joanne L.; Young, Katherine C.

    1995-01-01

    In multidisciplinary optimization problems, response surface techniques can be used to replace the complex analyses that define the objective function and/or constraints with simple functions, typically polynomials. In this work a response surface is applied to the design optimization of a helicopter rotor blade. In previous work, this problem has been formulated with a multilevel approach. Here, the response surface takes advantage of this decomposition and is used to replace the lower level, a structural optimization of the blade. Problems that were encountered and important considerations in applying the response surface are discussed. Preliminary results are also presented that illustrate the benefits of using the response surface.

  3. Aerodynamic Data for Two Variants of Root Turbine Blade Sections for A 54" Turbine Rotor Blade

    Šimurda, David; Luxa, Martin; Šafařík, P.; Synáč, J.; Rudas, B.

    Düsseldorf: ASME, 2014, V02CT38A007-V02CT38A019. (2C). ISBN 978-0-7918-4562-2. [ASME Turbo Expo 2014: Turbine Technical Conference and Exposition. Düsseldorf (DE), 16.06.2014-20.06.2014] R&D Projects: GA TA ČR(CZ) TA03020277; GA ČR(CZ) GAP101/10/1329 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : steam turbine * rotor * blade cascade * root section Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics

  4. Vibrational optical activity

    Recent vibrational activity (VOA) research is discussed. The vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) experiments were carried out with a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. One of the major anticipations from VOA spectroscopy is to be able to derive new pathways for determining the molecular structure. Shown is Fourier transform infrared absorption and VCD spectra of lyxopyranose in pyradine-d5 solvent. Raman optical activity measurements are discussed, and depolarized Raman and Raman optical activity spectra for (+)-alpha-pinene are presented. It was concluded that at present Raman optical activity can be measured in the entire vibrational spectral region, where as VCD has not been measured below 600 cm-1

  5. Wind-tunnel evaluation of an advanced main-rotor blade design for a utility-class helicopter

    Yeager, William T., Jr.; Mantay, Wayne R.; Wilbur, Matthew L.; Cramer, Robert G., Jr.; Singleton, Jeffrey D.

    1987-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel to evaluate differences between an existing utility-class main-rotor blade and an advanced-design main-rotor blade. The two rotor blade designs were compared with regard to rotor performance oscillatory pitch-link loads, and 4-per-rev vertical fixed-system loads. Tests were conducted in hover and over a range of simulated full-scale gross weights and density altitude conditions at advance ratios from 0.15 to 0.40. Results indicate that the advanced blade design offers performance improvements over the baseline blade in both hover and forward flight. Pitch-link oscillatory loads for the baseline rotor were more sensitive to the test conditions than those of the advanced rotor. The 4-per-rev vertical fixed-system load produced by the advanced blade was larger than that produced by the baseline blade at all test conditions.

  6. Classification of defects in honeycomb composite structure of helicopter rotor blades

    Balasko, M. [KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute, H-1525 Budapest, POB 49 (Hungary)]. E-mail: balasko@sunserv.kfki.hu; Svab, E. [Research Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, H-1525 Budapest, POB 49 (Hungary); Molnar, Gy. [Aircraft Maintenance Branch of Hungarian Defence Forces, H-1885 Budapest, POB 25 (Hungary); Veres, I. [Aircraft Maintenance Branch of Hungarian Defence Forces, H-1885 Budapest, POB 25 (Hungary)

    2005-04-21

    The use of non-destructive testing methods to qualify the state of rotor blades with respect to their expected flight hours, with the aim to extend their lifetime without any risk of breakdown, is an important financial demand. In order to detect the possible defects in the composite structure of Mi-8 and Mi-24 type helicopter rotor blades used by the Hungarian Army, we have performed combined neutron- and X-ray radiography measurements at the Budapest Research Reactor. Several types of defects were detected, analysed and typified. Among the most frequent and important defects observed were cavities, holes and or cracks in the sealing elements on the interface of the honeycomb structure and the section boarders. Inhomogeneities of the resin materials (resin-rich or starved areas) at the core-honeycomb surfaces proved to be an other important point. Defects were detected at the adhesive filling, and water percolation was visualized at the sealing interfaces of the honeycomb sections. Corrosion effects, and metal inclusions have also been detected.

  7. Classification of defects in honeycomb composite structure of helicopter rotor blades

    The use of non-destructive testing methods to qualify the state of rotor blades with respect to their expected flight hours, with the aim to extend their lifetime without any risk of breakdown, is an important financial demand. In order to detect the possible defects in the composite structure of Mi-8 and Mi-24 type helicopter rotor blades used by the Hungarian Army, we have performed combined neutron- and X-ray radiography measurements at the Budapest Research Reactor. Several types of defects were detected, analysed and typified. Among the most frequent and important defects observed were cavities, holes and or cracks in the sealing elements on the interface of the honeycomb structure and the section boarders. Inhomogeneities of the resin materials (resin-rich or starved areas) at the core-honeycomb surfaces proved to be an other important point. Defects were detected at the adhesive filling, and water percolation was visualized at the sealing interfaces of the honeycomb sections. Corrosion effects, and metal inclusions have also been detected

  8. Some issues on modeling atmospheric turbulence experienced by helicopter rotor blades

    Costello, Mark; Gaonkar, G. H.; Prasad, J. V. R.; Schrage, D. P.

    1992-01-01

    The atmospheric turbulence velocities seen by nonrotating aircraft components and rotating blades can be substantially different. The differences are due to the spatial motion of the rotor blades, which move fore and aft through the gust waves. Body-fixed atmospheric turbulence refers to the actual atmospheric turbulence experienced by a point fixed on a nonrotating aircraft component such as the aircraft's center of gravity or the rotor hub, while blade-fixed atmospheric turbulence refers to the atmospheric turbulence experienced by an element of the rotating rotor blade. An example is presented, which, though overly simplified, shows important differences between blade- and body-fixed rotorcraft atmospheric turbulence models. All of the information necessary to develop the dynamic equations describing the atmospheric turbulence velocity field experienced by an aircraft is contained in the atmospheric turbulence velocity correlation matrix. It is for this reason that a generalized formulation of the correlation matrix describing atmospheric turbulence that a rotating blade encounters is developed. From this correlation matrix, earlier treated cases restricted to a rotor flying straight and level directly into the mean wind can be recovered as special cases.

  9. Finite element simulation of core inspection in helicopter rotor blades using guided waves.

    Chakrapani, Sunil Kishore; Barnard, Daniel; Dayal, Vinay

    2015-09-01

    This paper extends the work presented earlier on inspection of helicopter rotor blades using guided Lamb modes by focusing on inspecting the spar-core bond. In particular, this research focuses on structures which employ high stiffness, high density core materials. Wave propagation in such structures deviate from the generic Lamb wave propagation in sandwich panels. To understand the various mode conversions, finite element models of a generalized helicopter rotor blade were created and subjected to transient analysis using a commercial finite element code; ANSYS. Numerical simulations showed that a Lamb wave excited in the spar section of the blade gets converted into Rayleigh wave which travels across the spar-core section and mode converts back into Lamb wave. Dispersion of Rayleigh waves in multi-layered half-space was also explored. Damage was modeled in the form of a notch in the core section to simulate a cracked core, and delamination was modeled between the spar and core material to simulate spar-core disbond. Mode conversions under these damaged conditions were examined numerically. The numerical models help in assessing the difficulty of using nondestructive evaluation for complex structures and also highlight the physics behind the mode conversions which occur at various discontinuities. PMID:26048172

  10. Panel/full-span free-wake coupled method for unsteady aerodynamics of helicopter rotor blade

    Tan Jianfeng; Wang Haowen

    2013-01-01

    A full-span free-wake method is coupled with an unsteady panel method to accurately predict the unsteady aerodynamics of helicopter rotor blades in hover and forward flight.The unsteady potential-based panel method is used to consider aerodynamics of finite thickness multi-bladed rotors,and the full-span free-wake method is applied to simulating dynamics of rotor wake.These methods are tightly coupled through trailing-edge Kutta condition and by converting doublet-wake panels to full-span vortex filaments.A velocity-field integration technique is also adopted to overcome singularity problem during the interaction between the rotor wake and blades.Helicopter rotors including Caradonna-Tung,UH-60A,and AH-1G rotors,are simulated in hover and forward flight to validate the accuracy of this approach.The predicted aerodynamic loads of rotor blades agree well with available measured data and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) results,and the unsteady dynamics of rotor wake is also well simulated.Compared to CFD,the present method obtains accurate results more efficiently and is suitable to rotorcraft aeroelastic analysis.

  11. An aeroelastic analysis of helicopter rotor blades incorporating piezoelectric fiber composite twist actuation

    Wilkie, W. Keats; Park, K. C.

    1996-01-01

    A simple aeroelastic analysis of a helicopter rotor blade incorporating embedded piezoelectric fiber composite, interdigitated electrode blade twist actuators is described. The analysis consist of a linear torsion and flapwise bending model coupled with a nonlinear ONERA based unsteady aerodynamics model. A modified Galerkin procedure is performed upon the rotor blade partial differential equations of motion to develop a system of ordinary differential equations suitable for numerical integration. The twist actuation responses for three conceptual full-scale blade designs with realistic constraints on blade mass are numerically evaluated using the analysis. Numerical results indicate that useful amplitudes of nonresonant elastic twist, on the order of one to two degrees, are achievable under one-g hovering flight conditions for interdigitated electrode poling configurations. Twist actuation for the interdigitated electrode blades is also compared with the twist actuation of a conventionally poled piezoelectric fiber composite blade. Elastic twist produced using the interdigitated electrode actuators was found to be four to five times larger than that obtained with the conventionally poled actuators.

  12. Aeroelastic Analysis of Helicopter Rotor Blades Incorporating Anisotropic Piezoelectric Twist Actuation

    Wilkie, W. Keats; Belvin, W. Keith; Park, K. C.

    1996-01-01

    A simple aeroelastic analysis of a helicopter rotor blade incorporating embedded piezoelectric fiber composite, interdigitated electrode blade twist actuators is described. The analysis consists of a linear torsion and flapwise bending model coupled with a nonlinear ONERA based unsteady aerodynamics model. A modified Galerkin procedure is performed upon the rotor blade partial differential equations of motion to develop a system of ordinary differential equations suitable for dynamics simulation using numerical integration. The twist actuation responses for three conceptual fullscale blade designs with realistic constraints on blade mass are numerically evaluated using the analysis. Numerical results indicate that useful amplitudes of nonresonant elastic twist, on the order of one to two degrees, are achievable under one-g hovering flight conditions for interdigitated electrode poling configurations. Twist actuation for the interdigitated electrode blades is also compared with the twist actuation of a conventionally poled piezoelectric fiber composite blade. Elastic twist produced using the interdigitated electrode actuators was found to be four to five times larger than that obtained with the conventionally poled actuators.

  13. Aeroelastic response and stability of tiltrotors with elastically-coupled composite rotor blades. Ph.D. Thesis

    Nixon, Mark W.

    1993-01-01

    There is a potential for improving the performance and aeroelastic stability of tiltrotors through the use of elastically-coupled composite rotor blades. To study the characteristics of tiltrotors with these types of rotor blades it is necessary to formulate a new analysis which has the capabilities of modeling both a tiltrotor configuration and an anisotropic rotor blade. Background for these formulations is established in two preliminary investigations. In the first, the influence of several system design parameters on tiltrotor aeroelastic stability is examined for the high-speed axial flight mode using a newly-developed rigid-blade analysis with an elastic wing finite element model. The second preliminary investigation addresses the accuracy of using a one-dimensional beam analysis to predict frequencies of elastically-coupled highly-twisted rotor blades. Important aspects of the new aeroelastic formulations are the inclusion of a large steady pylon angle which controls tilt of the rotor system with respect to the airflow, the inclusion of elastic pitch-lag coupling terms related to rotor precone, the inclusion of hub-related degrees of freedom which enable modeling of a gimballed rotor system and engine drive-train dynamics, and additional elastic coupling terms which enable modeling of the anisotropic features for both the rotor blades and the tiltrotor wing. Accuracy of the new tiltrotor analysis is demonstrated by a comparison of the results produced for a baseline case with analytical and experimental results reported in the open literature. Two investigations of elastically tailored blades on a baseline tiltrotor are then conducted. One investigation shows that elastic bending-twist coupling of the rotor blade is a very effective means for increasing the flutter velocity of a tiltrotor, and the magnitude of coupling required does not have an adverse effect on performance or blade loads. The second investigation shows that passive blade twist control via

  14. Design and optimization for strength and integrity of tidal turbine rotor blades

    Tidal turbine rotor blade fractures and failures have resulted in substantial damage and hence cost of repair and recovery. The present work presents a rotor blade design and optimization method to address the blade structural strength design problem. The generic procedure is applicable to both turbine rotors and propellers. The optimization method seeks an optimum blade thickness distribution across the span with a prescribed constant safety factor for all the blade sections. This optimization procedure serves two purposes: while maintaining the required structural strength and integrity for an ultimate inflow speed, it aims to reduce the material to a minimum and to maintain power generation efficiency or improve the hydrodynamic efficiency. The value of the chosen minimum safety factor depends on the actual working conditions of the turbine in which the sectional peak loading and frequency are used: the harsher the environment, the larger the required safety factor. An engineering software tool with both hydrodynamic and structural capabilities was required to predict the instantaneous loading acting on all the blade sections, as well as the strength of a local blade section with a given blade geometry and chosen material. A time-domain, 3D unsteady panel method was then implemented based on a marine propeller software tool and used to perform the optimization. A 3-blade 20-m tidal turbine that was prototyped in parallel with the current work for the Bay of Fundy was used as an example for optimization. The optimum thickness distribution for a required safety factor at the ultimate possible inflow speed resulted in 37.6% saving in blade material. The blade thickness and distribution as a function of a maximum inflow speed of 6 m/s is also presented. The blade material used in the example was taken as nickel–aluminium–bronze (NAB) but the procedure was developed to be applicable to propeller or turbine blades of basically any material. -- Highlights: ► A

  15. A practical approach to fracture analysis at the trailing edge of wind turbine rotor blades

    Eder, Martin Alexander; Bitsche, Robert; Nielsen, Magda;

    2014-01-01

    Wind turbine rotor blades are commonly manufactured from composite materials by a moulding process. Typically, the wind turbine blade is produced in two halves, which are eventually adhesively joined along their edges. Investigations of operating wind turbine blades show that debonding of the...... virtual crack closure technique (VCCT) is proposed, which can be used to identify critical areas in the adhesive joint of a trailing edge. The paper gives an overview of methods applicable for fracture cases comprising non-parallel crack faces in the realm of linear fracture mechanics. Furthermore, the...... VCCT is discussed in detail and validated against numerical analyses in 2D and 3D. Finally, the SERR of a typical blade section subjected to various loading conditions is investigated and assessed in order to identify potential design drivers for trailing edge details. Analysis of the blade section...

  16. Mach number scaling of helicopter rotor blade/vortex interaction noise

    Leighton, Kenneth P.; Harris, Wesley L.

    1985-01-01

    A parametric study of model helicopter rotor blade slap due to blade vortex interaction (BVI) was conducted in a 5 by 7.5-foot anechoic wind tunnel using model helicopter rotors with two, three, and four blades. The results were compared with a previously developed Mach number scaling theory. Three- and four-bladed rotor configurations were found to show very good agreement with the Mach number to the sixth power law for all conditions tested. A reduction of conditions for which BVI blade slap is detected was observed for three-bladed rotors when compared to the two-bladed baseline. The advance ratio boundaries of the four-bladed rotor exhibited an angular dependence not present for the two-bladed configuration. The upper limits for the advance ratio boundaries of the four-bladed rotors increased with increasing rotational speed.

  17. Multilevel decomposition approach to integrated aerodynamic/dynamic/structural optimization of helicopter rotor blades

    Walsh, Joanne L.; Young, Katherine C.; Pritchard, Jocelyn I.; Adelman, Howard M.; Mantay, Wayne R.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes an integrated aerodynamic, dynamic, and structural (IADS) optimization procedure for helicopter rotor blades. The procedure combines performance, dynamics, and structural analyses with a general purpose optimizer using multilevel decomposition techniques. At the upper level, the structure is defined in terms of local quantities (stiffnesses, mass, and average strains). At the lower level, the structure is defined in terms of local quantities (detailed dimensions of the blade structure and stresses). The IADS procedure provides an optimization technique that is compatible with industrial design practices in which the aerodynamic and dynamic design is performed at a global level and the structural design is carried out at a detailed level with considerable dialogue and compromise among the aerodynamic, dynamic, and structural groups. The IADS procedure is demonstrated for several cases.

  18. Extracting radar micro-Doppler signatures of helicopter rotating rotor blades using K-band radars

    Chen, Rachel; Liu, Baokun

    2014-06-01

    Helicopter identification has been an attractive topic. In this paper, we applied radar micro-Doppler signatures to identify helicopter. For identifying the type of a helicopter, besides its shape and size, the number of blades, the length of the blade, and the rotation rate of the rotor are important features, which can be estimated from radar micro-Doppler signatures of the helicopter's rotating rotor blades. In our study, K-band CW/FMCW radars are used for collecting returned signals from helicopters. By analyzing radar micro-Doppler signatures, we can estimate the number of blades, the length of the blade, the angular rotation rate of the rotating blade, and other necessary parameters for identifying the type of a helicopter.

  19. Integrated aerodynamic/dynamic/structural optimization of helicopter rotor blades using multilevel decomposition

    Walsh, Joanne L.; Young, Katherine C.; Pritchard, Jocelyn I.; Adelman, Howard M.; Mantay, Wayne R.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes an integrated aerodynamic/dynamic/structural (IADS) optimization procedure for helicopter rotor blades. The procedure combines performance, dynamics, and structural analyses with a general-purpose optimizer using multilevel decomposition techniques. At the upper level, the structure is defined in terms of global quantities (stiffness, mass, and average strains). At the lower level, the structure is defined in terms of local quantities (detailed dimensions of the blade structure and stresses). The IADS procedure provides an optimization technique that is compatible with industrial design practices in which the aerodynamic and dynamic designs are performed at a global level and the structural design is carried out at a detailed level with considerable dialog and compromise among the aerodynamic, dynamic, and structural groups. The IADS procedure is demonstrated for several examples.

  20. Inspection of spar-core bond in helicopter rotor blades using finite element analysis

    Chakrapani, Sunil Kishore; Barnard, Daniel J.; Dayal, Vinay

    2015-03-01

    This work focuses on inspection of spar-core bond of a helicopter rotor blade using finite element analysis. Structures which have high density, high stiffness cores can be very difficult to inspect due to various mode conversions. FEM was used to capture these mode conversions effectively. The structure consists of a thin spar section followed by a spar-core half space and another thin spar section. A Lamb wave excited in the spar section can mode convert into a Rayleigh wave in the spar-core section due to the coupling of the core material. This in turn mode converts back into a Lamb wave upon interacting with the next spar section. This work focuses solely on capturing the mode conversions between Rayleigh and Lamb modes at different discontinuities in the geometry.

  1. Wind energy conversion. Volume X. Aeroelastic stability of wind turbine rotor blades

    Wendell, J.

    1978-09-01

    The nonlinear equations of motion of a general wind turbine rotor blade are derived from first principles. The twisted, tapered blade may be preconed out of the plane of rotation, and its root may be offset from the axis of rotation by a small amount. The aerodynamic center, center of mass, shear center, and area centroid are distinct in this derivation. The equations are applicable to studies of forced response or of aeroelastic flutter, however, neither gravity forcing, nor wind shear and gust forcing are included. The equations derived are applied to study the aeroelastic stability of the NASA-ERDA 100 kW wind turbine, and solved using the Galerkin method. The numerical results are used in conjunction with a mathematical comparison to prove the validity of an equivalent hinge model developed by the Wind Energy Conversion Project at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

  2. Structural optimization of wind turbine rotor blades by multilevel sectional/multibody/3D-FEM analysis

    Bottasso, C. L.; Campagnolo, F.; Croce, A.;

    2014-01-01

    constraints. In addition, a buckling analysis is performed at the fine description level, which in turn affects the nonstructural blade mass. The updated constraint bounds and mass make their effects felt at the next coarse-level constrained design optimization, thereby closing the loop between the coarse and......The present work describes a method for the structural optimization of wind turbine rotor blades for given prescribed aerodynamic shape. The proposed approach operates at various description levels producing cost-minimizing solutions that satisfy desired design constraints at the finest modeling...... fine description levels. The multilevel optimization procedure is implemented in a computer program and it is demonstrated on the design of a multi-MW horizontal axis wind turbine rotor blade. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht....

  3. Structural Optimization of Wind Turbine Rotor Blades by Multi-Level Sectional/Multibody/3DFEM Analysis

    Bottasso, C. L.; Campagnolo, F.; Croce, A.;

    constraints. In addition, a buckling analysis is performed at the fine description level, which in turn affects the non-structural blade mass. The updated constraint bounds and mass make their effects felt at the next coarse-level constrained design optimization, thereby closing the loop between the coarse......The present work describes a method for the structural optimization of wind turbine rotor blades for given prescribed aerodynamic shape. The proposed approach operates at various description levels producing cost-minimizing solutions that satisfy desired design constraints at the finest modeling...... and fine description levels. The multi-level optimization procedure is implemented in a computer program and it is demonstrated on the design of a multi-MW horizontal axis wind turbine rotor blade....

  4. Aerodynamics at off Design Performance of Root Section of Rotor Blade Last Stage of Large Output Steam Turbine

    Luxa, Martin; Synáč, J.; Šafařík, P.; Šimurda, D.

    Plzeň: klub ASI-TURBOSTROJE Plzeň, 2007, s. 1-8. [Parní turbíny a jiné turbostroje 2007. Plzeň (CZ), 06.09.2007-07.09.2007] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA101/05/2536 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : steam turbine * aerodynamics * rotor blade Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics

  5. An experimental study of static and oscillating rotor blade sections in reverse flow

    Lind, Andrew Hume

    The rotorcraft community has a growing interest in the development of high-speed helicopters to replace outdated fleets. One barrier to the design of such helicopters is the lack of understanding of the aerodynamic behavior of retreating rotor blades in the reverse flow region. This work considers two fundamental models of this complex unsteady flow regime: static and oscillating (i.e., pitching) airfoils in reverse flow. Wind tunnel tests have been performed at the University of Maryland (UMD) and the United States Naval Academy (USNA). Four rotor blade sections are considered: two featuring a sharp geometric trailing edge (NACA 0012 and NACA 0024) and two featuring a blunt geometric trailing edge (ellipse and cambered ellipse). Static airfoil experiments were performed at angles of attack through 180 deg and Reynolds numbers up to one million, representative of the conditions found in the reverse flow region of a full-scale high-speed helicopter. Time-resolved velocity field measurements were used to identify three unsteady flow regimes: slender body vortex shedding, turbulent wake, and deep stall vortex shedding. Unsteady airloads were measured in these three regimes using unsteady pressure transducers. The magnitude of the unsteady airloads is high in the turbulent wake regime when the separated shear layer is close to the airfoil surface and in deep stall due to periodic vortex-induced flow. Oscillating airfoil experiments were performed on a NACA 0012 and cambered ellipse to investigate reverse flow dynamic stall characteristics by modeling cyclic pitching kinematics. The parameter space spanned three Reynolds numbers (165,000; 330,000; and 500,000), five reduced frequencies between 0.100 and 0.511, three mean pitch angles (5,10, and 15 deg), and two pitch amplitudes (5 deg and 10 deg). The sharp aerodynamic leading edge of the NACA 0012 airfoil forces flow separation resulting in deep dynamic stall. The number of associated vortex structures depends strongly

  6. Design Framework for Vibration Monitoring Systems for Helicopter Rotor Blade Monitoring Using Wireless Sensor Networks

    Sanchez Ramirez, Andrea; Loendersloot, Richard; Jauregui Becker, Juan Manuel; Tinga, Tiedo; Chang, F.-K

    2013-01-01

    The pursue of methods for supporting Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) has been an important driver for the technological innovation in several engineering fields such as wireless communication, sensing and power harvesting. However, despite of the innovative and scientific value of these advances, the adoption of SHM and associated technologies by industry has not occurred at the expected pace. One of the possible reasons for this is the lack of a systematic design process for condition mon...

  7. Modal Vibration Control in Periodic Time-Varying Structures with Focus on Rotor Blade Systems

    Christensen, Rene Hardam; Santos, Ilmar

    2004-01-01

    overcome. Among others it is necessary, that the control scheme is capable to cope with non-linear time-varying dynamical system behaviour. However, rotating at constant speed the mathematical model becomes periodic time-variant. In this framework the present paper gives a contribution to design procedures...... results are provided to demonstrate the applicability and effectiveness of the technique. The results obtained shows that the control design technique is capable to cope with the time periodicity of this class of systems....

  8. Modal Vibration Control in Periodic Time-Varying Structures with Focus on Rotor-Blade Systems

    Christensen, Rene Hardam; Santos, Ilmar

    2003-01-01

    overcome. Among others it is necessary, that the control scheme is capable to cope with non-linear time-varying dynamical system behaviour. However, rotating at constant speed the mathematical model becomes periodic time-variant. In this framework the present paper gives a contribution to design procedures...... results are provided to demonstrate the applicability and effectiveness of the technique. The results obtained shows that the control design technique is capable to cope with the time periodicity of this class of systems....

  9. OPTIMIZING THE SHAPE OF ROTOR BLADES FOR MAXIMUM POWER EXTRACTION IN MARINE CURRENT TURBINES

    J.A. Esfahani

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the shape of rotor blades in Marine Current Turbines (MCTs are investigated. The evaluation of hydrodynamic loads on blades is performed based on the Blade Element Momentum (BEM theory. The shape of blades is optimized according to the main parameters in the configuration and operation of these devices. The optimization is conducted based on the ability of the blades to harness the maximum energy during operating. The main parameters investigated are the tip speed ratio and angle of attack. Furthermore, the influence of these parameters on the maximum energy extraction from fluid flow over a hydrofoil is evaluated. It is shown that the effect of the angle of attack on power extraction is greater than that of the tip speed ratio, while both are found to be significant. Additionally, the proper angle of attack is the angle at which the lift to drag ratio is at its maximum value. However, if a proper angle of attack is chosen, the variations in power coefficient would not be effectively changed with small variations in the tip speed ratio.

  10. A preliminary investigation of finite-element modeling for composite rotor blades

    Lake, Renee C.; Nixon, Mark W.

    1988-01-01

    The results from an initial phase of an in-house study aimed at improving the dynamic and aerodynamic characteristics of composite rotor blades through the use of elastic couplings are presented. Large degree of freedom shell finite element models of an extension twist coupled composite tube were developed and analyzed using MSC/NASTRAN. An analysis employing a simplified beam finite element representation of the specimen with the equivalent engineering stiffness was additionally performed. Results from the shell finite element normal modes and frequency analysis were compared to those obtained experimentally, showing an agreement within 13 percent. There was appreciable degradation in the frequency prediction for the torsional mode, which is elastically coupled. This was due to the absence of off-diagonal coupling terms in the formulation of the equivalent engineering stiffness. Parametric studies of frequency variation due to small changes in ply orientation angle and ply thickness were also performed. Results showed linear frequency variations less than 2 percent per 1 degree variation in the ply orientation angle, and 1 percent per 0.0001 inch variation in the ply thickness.

  11. Effects of Unsteadiness Due to Wake Passing on Rotor Blade Heat Transfer

    Ameri, Ali A.; Rigby, David L.; Heidmann, James; Steinthorsson, Erlendur; Fabian, John C.

    2007-01-01

    14. ABSTRACT In a gas turbine engine, the turbine rotor blades are buffeted by the wakes of the vanes located upstream. There is a transient effect from the passing of wakes on the blade heat transfer. This transient effect has been computed for a representative rotor by introducing a wake upstream via an unsteady inlet flow boundary condition, or "gust" condition. Two cases of turbulent flow and laminar flow with Reynolds numbers of 385,000 and 385 respectively were considered. For the turbulent flow case a quasi-steady calculation was also performed. The variation in the unsteady heat transfer coefficient was found to be as high as 120 percent of the mean. For the turbulent flow case a quasisteady calculation was also performed. The time mean of the unsteady heat transfer, the mean of the quasi-steady variations and the steady results agree reasonably well on all blade locations except for the turbulent results which differ near the leading edge. The quasi-steady heat transfer results do not agree with the instantaneous unsteady results, although the time-mean values are similar.

  12. Helicopter Rotor Blade Computation in Unsteady Flows Using Moving Overset Grids

    Ahmad, Jasim; Duque, Earl P. N.

    1996-01-01

    An overset grid thin-layer Navier-Stokes code has been extended to include dynamic motion of helicopter rotor blades through relative grid motion. The unsteady flowfield and airloads on an AH-IG rotor in forward flight were computed to verify the methodology and to demonstrate the method's potential usefulness towards comprehensive helicopter codes. In addition, the method uses the blade's first harmonics measured in the flight test to prescribe the blade motion. The solution was impulsively started and became periodic in less than three rotor revolutions. Detailed unsteady numerical flow visualization techniques were applied to the entire unsteady data set of five rotor revolutions and exhibited flowfield features such as blade vortex interaction and wake roll-up. The unsteady blade loads and surface pressures compare well against those from flight measurements. Details of the method, a discussion of the resulting predicted flowfield, and requirements for future work are presented. Overall, given the proper blade dynamics, this method can compute the unsteady flowfield of a general helicopter rotor in forward flight.

  13. Design, development, and hover testing of a helicopter rotor blade chord extension morphing system

    Gandhi, Farhan; Hayden, Eric

    2015-03-01

    A rotor blade chord extension system was designed, fabricated and hover tested, using electromechanical and pneumatic actuation. A 1.5 in actuator stroke output in the spanwise direction was converted into chordwise motion of a trailing-edge plate (TEP), via a rigid link. On the hover stand, with a 20 V dc input, the electromechanical actuator was shown to fully extend and retract the plate at rotational speeds up to 385 RPM (which put the system at a centrifugal loading of 209.5 g, or 47.2% of that on a Black Hawk helicopter at 73% span). The configuration was changed to reduce the actuator force requirement for the pneumatic actuator. The rotor test facility allowed a maximum of 105 psi pressure input through the rotary union (significantly lower than the rating of the actuator). At these moderate pressure inputs, full TEP deployment was observed at 315 RPM (140.2 g, or 31.6% of that on a Black Hawk helicopter at 73% span). The model prediction of TEP displacement versus pressure showed good correlation with test results.

  14. Minimum weight design of rectangular and tapered helicopter rotor blades with frequency constraints

    Chattopadhyay, Aditi; Walsh, Joanne L.

    1988-01-01

    The minimum weight design of a helicopter rotor blade subject to constraints on coupled flap-lag natural frequencies has been studied. A constraint has also been imposed on the minimum value of the autorotational inertia of the blade in order to ensure that it has sufficient inertia to autorotate in the case of engine failure. The program CAMRAD is used for the blade modal analysis and CONMIN is used for the optimization. In addition, a linear approximation analysis involving Taylor series expansion has been used to reduce the analysis effort. The procedure contains a sensitivity analysis which consists of analytical derivatives of the objective function and the autorotational inertia constraint and central finite difference derivatives of the frequency constraints. Optimum designs have been obtained for both rectangular and tapered blades. Design variables include taper ratio, segment weights, and box beam dimensions. It is shown that even when starting with an acceptable baseline design, a significant amount of weight reduction is possible while satisfying all the constraints for both rectangular and tapered blades.

  15. Control of LP Turbine Rotor Blade Underloading Using Stator Blade Compound Lean at Root

    PiotrLampart

    2000-01-01

    Due to a large gradient of reaction,LP rotor blades remain underloaded at the root over some range of volumetric flow rates.An interesting design to control the flow through the root passage of the overloaded stator and underloaded moving blade row is compound lean at the root of stator blades.The paper describes results of numerical investigations from a 3D NS solver FlowER conducted for several configurations of stator blade compund lean.The computations are carried out for a wide range of volumetric flow rates.accounting for the nominal operating regime as well as low and high load.It is found that compund lean induces additional blade force.streamwise curature and redistribution of flow parameters in the stage,including pressure and mass flow rate spanwise that can improve the flow conditions in both the stator and the rotor.The obtained efficiency improvements depend greatly on the flow regime,with the highest gains in the region of low load.

  16. Design of rotor blade for vertical axis wind turbine using double aerofoil

    Chougule, P.D.; Ratkovich, N.; Kirkegaard, P.H.; Nielsen, Soeren R.K. [Aalborg Univ.. Dept. of Civil Engineering, Aalborg (Denmark)

    2012-07-01

    Nowadays, small vertical axis wind turbines are receiving more attention compared to horizontal wind turbines due to their suitability in urban use,because they generate less noise, have bird free turbines and lower cost. There are few vertical axis wind turbines design with good power curve. However, the efficiency of power extraction has not been improved. Therefore, an attempt has been made to utilize high lift technology in practice for vertical axis wind turbines in order to improve power efficiency. High lift is obtained by double aerofoil elements mainly used in aeroplane wing design. In this current work, two aerofoils are used to design a rotor blade for a vertical axis wind turbine to improve the power efficiency on the rotor. Double aerofoil blade design consists of a main aerofoil and a slat aerofoil. The parameters related to position and orientation of the slat aerofoil with respect to the main aerofoil defines the high lift. Orientation of slat aerofoil is a parameter of investigation in this paper. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) have been used to obtain the aerodynamic characteristics of double aerofoil. The CFD simulations were carried out using Star CCM+ v7.04 (CD-adapco, UK) software. Aerofoils used in this work are selected from standard aerofoil shapes. (Author)

  17. An analysis of rotor blade twist variables associated with different Euler sequences and pretwist treatments

    Alkire, K.

    1984-01-01

    A nonlinear analysis which is necessary to adequately model elastic helicopter rotor blades experiencing moderately large deformations was examined. The analysis must be based on an appropriate description of the blade's deformation geometry including elastic bending and twist. Built-in pretwist angles complicate the deformation process ant its definition. Relationships between the twist variables associated with different rotation sequences and corresponding forms of the transformation matrix are lasted. Relationships between the twist variables associated with first, the pretwist combined with the deformation twist are included. Many of the corresponding forms of the transformation matrix for the two cases are listed. It is shown that twist variables connected with the combined twist treatment are related to those where the pretwist is applied initially. A method to determine the relationships and some results are outlined. A procedure to evaluate the transformation matrix that eliminates the Eulerlike sequence altogether is demonstrated. The resulting form of the transformation matrix is unaffected by rotation sequence or pretwist treatment.

  18. Improved Active Vibration Isolation Systems

    2007-01-01

    The control force, feedback gain, and actuator stroke of several active vibration isolation systems were analyzed based on a single-layer active vibration isolation system. The analysis shows that the feedback gain and actuator stroke cannot be selected independently and the active isolation system design must make a compromise between the feedback gain and actuator stroke. The performance of active isolation systems can be improved by the joint vibration reduction using an active vibration isolation system with an adaptive dynamic vibration absorber. The results show that the joint vibration reduction method can successfully avoid the compromise between the feedback gain and actuator stroke. The control force and the object vibration amplitude are also greatly reduced.

  19. Unified continuum damage model for matrix cracking in composite rotor blades

    Pollayi, Hemaraju; Harursampath, Dineshkumar [Nonlinear Multifunctional Composites - Analysis and Design Lab (NMCAD Lab) Department of Aerospace Engineering Indian Institute of Science Bangalore - 560012, Karnataka (India)

    2015-03-10

    This paper deals with modeling of the first damage mode, matrix micro-cracking, in helicopter rotor/wind turbine blades and how this effects the overall cross-sectional stiffness. The helicopter/wind turbine rotor system operates in a highly dynamic and unsteady environment leading to severe vibratory loads present in the system. Repeated exposure to this loading condition can induce damage in the composite rotor blades. These rotor/turbine blades are generally made of fiber-reinforced laminated composites and exhibit various competing modes of damage such as matrix micro-cracking, delamination, and fiber breakage. There is a need to study the behavior of the composite rotor system under various key damage modes in composite materials for developing Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) system. Each blade is modeled as a beam based on geometrically non-linear 3-D elasticity theory. Each blade thus splits into 2-D analyzes of cross-sections and non-linear 1-D analyzes along the beam reference curves. Two different tools are used here for complete 3-D analysis: VABS for 2-D cross-sectional analysis and GEBT for 1-D beam analysis. The physically-based failure models for matrix in compression and tension loading are used in the present work. Matrix cracking is detected using two failure criterion: Matrix Failure in Compression and Matrix Failure in Tension which are based on the recovered field. A strain variable is set which drives the damage variable for matrix cracking and this damage variable is used to estimate the reduced cross-sectional stiffness. The matrix micro-cracking is performed in two different approaches: (i) Element-wise, and (ii) Node-wise. The procedure presented in this paper is implemented in VABS as matrix micro-cracking modeling module. Three examples are presented to investigate the matrix failure model which illustrate the effect of matrix cracking on cross-sectional stiffness by varying the applied cyclic load.

  20. Unified continuum damage model for matrix cracking in composite rotor blades

    This paper deals with modeling of the first damage mode, matrix micro-cracking, in helicopter rotor/wind turbine blades and how this effects the overall cross-sectional stiffness. The helicopter/wind turbine rotor system operates in a highly dynamic and unsteady environment leading to severe vibratory loads present in the system. Repeated exposure to this loading condition can induce damage in the composite rotor blades. These rotor/turbine blades are generally made of fiber-reinforced laminated composites and exhibit various competing modes of damage such as matrix micro-cracking, delamination, and fiber breakage. There is a need to study the behavior of the composite rotor system under various key damage modes in composite materials for developing Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) system. Each blade is modeled as a beam based on geometrically non-linear 3-D elasticity theory. Each blade thus splits into 2-D analyzes of cross-sections and non-linear 1-D analyzes along the beam reference curves. Two different tools are used here for complete 3-D analysis: VABS for 2-D cross-sectional analysis and GEBT for 1-D beam analysis. The physically-based failure models for matrix in compression and tension loading are used in the present work. Matrix cracking is detected using two failure criterion: Matrix Failure in Compression and Matrix Failure in Tension which are based on the recovered field. A strain variable is set which drives the damage variable for matrix cracking and this damage variable is used to estimate the reduced cross-sectional stiffness. The matrix micro-cracking is performed in two different approaches: (i) Element-wise, and (ii) Node-wise. The procedure presented in this paper is implemented in VABS as matrix micro-cracking modeling module. Three examples are presented to investigate the matrix failure model which illustrate the effect of matrix cracking on cross-sectional stiffness by varying the applied cyclic load

  1. Application of Out-of-Plane Warping to Control Rotor Blade Twist

    VanWeddingen, Yannick; Bauchau, Olivier; Kottapalli, Sesi; Ozbay, Serkan; Mehrotra, Yogesh

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this ongoing study is to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of a blade actuation system to dynamically change the twist, and/or the camber, of an airfoil section and, consequently, alter the in-flight aerodynamic loading on the blade for efficient flight control. The required analytical and finite element tools are under development to enable an accurate and comprehensive aeroelastic assessment of the current Full-Blade Warping and 3D Warping Actuated Trailing Edge Flap concepts. The feasibility of the current concepts for swashplateless rotors and higher harmonic blade control is also being investigated. In particular, the aim is to complete the following objectives, some of which have been completed (as noted below) and others that are currently ongoing: i) Develop a Vlasov finite element model and validate against the ABAQUS shell models (completed). ii) Implement the 3D warping actuation concept within the comprehensive analysis code DYMORE. iii) Perform preliminary aeroelastic simulations of blades using DYMORE with 3D warping actuation: a) Investigate the blade behavior under 1 per/rev actuation. Determine whether sufficient twist can be generated and sustained to achieve primary blade control. b) Investigate the behavior of a trailing edge flap configuration under higher harmonic excitations. Determine how much twist can be obtained at the harmonics 2-5 per/rev. iv) Determine actuator specifications such as the power required, load and displacements, and identify the stress and strain distributions in the actuated blades. In general, the completion of Item ii) above will give an additional research capability in rotorcraft dynamics analyses, i.e., the capability to calculate the rotor blade twist due to warping, something that is not currently available in any of the existing comprehensive rotorcraft analyses.

  2. The Seventh International Conference on Vibration Problems ICOVP 2005

    İnan, Esin; ICOVP-2005

    2007-01-01

    This volume presents the Proceedings of the Seventh International Conference on Vibration Problems, held in Istanbul, Turkey, 05-09 September 2005. As with the earlier conferences in the ICOVP series, the purpose of ICOVP-2005 was to bring together scientists with different backgrounds, actively working on vibration-related problems of engineering both in theoretical and applied fields. The main objective did not lie, however, in reporting specific results as such, but rather in joining/exchanging different languages, questions and methods developed in the respective disciplines, and to thus stimulate a broad interdisciplinary research. The topics, indeed, vary from the effect of ground motion on the stochastic response of suspension bridges to coupling effects between different vibrations in rotor-blade systems. All lectures delivered at the Conference are recorded in their full text. Audience: Scientists, researchers and graduate students in physics and engineering

  3. Inspection of helicopter rotor blades with the help of guided waves and "turning modes": Experimental and finite element analysis

    Barnard, Daniel; Chakrapani, Sunil Kishore; Dayal, Vinay

    2013-01-01

    Modern helicopter rotor blades constructed of composite materials offer significant inspection challenges, particularly at inner structures, where geometry and differing material properties and anisotropy make placement of the probing energy difficult. This paper presents an application of Lamb waves to these structures, where mode conversion occurs at internal geometric discontinuities. These additional modes were found to successfully propagate to the targeted regions inside the rotor and back out, allowing evaluation of the structure. A finite element model was developed to simulate wave propagation and mode conversion in the structure and aid in identifying the signals received in the laboratory experiment. A good correlation between numerical and experimental results was observed.

  4. Data Summary Report for the Open Rotor Propulsion Rig Equipped With F31/A31 Rotor Blades

    Stephens, David

    2014-01-01

    An extensive wind tunnel test campaign was undertaken to quantify the performance and acoustics of a counter-rotating open rotor system. The present document summarizes the portion of this test performed with the so-called Historical Baseline rotor blades, designated F31A31. It includes performance and acoustic data acquired at Mach numbers from take-off to cruise. It also includes the effect of propulsor angle of attack as well as an upstream pylon. This report is accompanied by an electronic data set including relevant acoustic and performance measurements for all of the F31A31 data.

  5. BVI induced vibration and noise alleviation by active and passive approaches

    Liu, Li

    This dissertation describes the development of a comprehensive aeroelastic/aeroacoustic simulation capability for the modeling of vibration and noise in rotorcraft induced by blade-vortex interaction (BVI). Subsequently this capability is applied to study vibration and noise reduction, using active and passive control approaches. The active approach employed is the actively controlled partial span trailing edge flaps (ACF), implemented in single and dual, servo and plain flap configurations. The passive approach is based on varying the sweep and anhedral on the tip of the rotor. Two different modern helicopters are chosen as the baseline for the implementation of ACF approach, one resembling a four-bladed MBB BO-105 hingeless rotor and the other similar to a five-bladed MD-900 bearingless rotor. The structural model is based on a finite element approach capable of simulating composite helicopter blades with swept tips, and representing multiple load paths at the blade root which is a characteristic of bearingless rotors. An unsteady compressible aerodynamic model based on a rational function approximation (RFA) approach is combined with a free wake analysis which has been enhanced by improving the wake analysis resolution and modeling a dual vortex structure. These enhancements are important for capturing BVI effects. A method for predicting compressible unsteady blade surface pressure distribution on rotor blades has been developed, which is required by the acoustic analysis. A modified version of helicopter noise code WOPWOP with provisions for blade flexibility has been combined with the aeroelastic analysis to predict the BVI noise. Several variants of the higher harmonic control (HHC) algorithm have been applied for the active noise control, as well as the simultaneous vibration and noise control. Active control of BVI noise is accomplished using feedback from an onboard microphone. The simulation has been extensively validated against experimental data and

  6. Effects of Mie tip-vane on pressure distribution of rotor blade and power augmentation of horizontal axis wind turbine; Yokutan shoyoku Mie ben ni yoru suiheijiku fusha yokumenjo no atsuryoku bunpu no kaizen to seino kojo tono kankei

    Shimizu, Y.; Maeda, T.; Kamada, Y. [Mie Univ., Mie (Japan); Seto, H. [Mitsubishi Motors Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-04-01

    By recent developments of exclusive rotor blade, the efficiency of wind turbine is improved substantially. By measuring pressure on rotor blades of horizontal axis wind turbines rotating in wind tunnels, this report clarified relation between improvement of pressure distribution on main rotor blades by Mie vane and upgrade of wind turbine performance. The results under mentioned have been got by measuring pressure distribution on rotor blades, visualization by tuft, and measuring resistance of Mie vane. (1) The difference of pressure between suction surface and pressure surface on the end of rotor blade increase, and output power of wind turbine improves. (2) Vortex of blade end is inhibited by Mie vane. (3) The reason of reduction on wind turbine performance with Mie vane in aria of high rotating speed ratio is the increase of Mie vane flow resistance.(NEDO)

  7. Comparison of composite rotor blade models: A coupled-beam analysis and an MSC/NASTRAN finite-element model

    Hodges, Robert V.; Nixon, Mark W.; Rehfield, Lawrence W.

    1987-01-01

    A methodology was developed for the structural analysis of composite rotor blades. This coupled-beam analysis is relatively simple to use compared with alternative analysis techniques. The beam analysis was developed for thin-wall single-cell rotor structures and includes the effects of elastic coupling. This paper demonstrates the effectiveness of the new composite-beam analysis method through comparison of its results with those of an established baseline analysis technique. The baseline analysis is an MSC/NASTRAN finite-element model built up from anisotropic shell elements. Deformations are compared for three linear static load cases of centrifugal force at design rotor speed, applied torque, and lift for an ideal rotor in hover. A D-spar designed to twist under axial loading is the subject of the analysis. Results indicate the coupled-beam analysis is well within engineering accuracy.

  8. Acoustic emission analysis in overall fatigue testing of a wind rotor blade; Schallemissionsanalyse beim Gesamtermuedungstest eines Windkraftrotorblattes

    Schulze, Eberhard; Frankenstein, Bernd; Schubert, Lars [Fraunhofer-Instiut fuer Zerstoerungsfreie Pruefverfahren (IZFP), Dresden (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    The Fraunhofer Institut fuer zerstoerungsfreie Pruefverfahren Dresden (IZFP-D, Fraunhofer Institute of Nondestructive Testing) is developing condition monitoring systems (CMS) for safety-relevant components. By permanent monitoring, e.g. of wind rotors, aircraft components or pipelines, these systems will ensure high avalability during the whole component life. Crack initiation, crack propagation or delamination can be detected and repaired at an early stage. Early repair will prolong the component life, and outage periods can be reduced. Currently, full-scale fatigue tests are made on a 40 m wind rotor blade of CFRP and GFRP materials. After a static pre-load period, 2,000,000 fatigue cycles will be applied. The contribution describes the measuring technology and the evaluation methods, in particular event identification and parametrization. Finally, the current experimental status is outlined, fatigue test results so far are presented, and development trends are indicated. (orig.)

  9. Active control system for a rotor blade trailing-edge flap

    Duvernier, Marc; Reithler, Livier; Guerrero, Jean Y.; Rossi, Rinaldo A.

    2000-06-01

    Reducing the external noise is becoming a major issue for helicopter manufacturers. The idea beyond this goal is to reduce or even avoid the blade vortex interaction (BVI), especially during descent and flights over inhabited areas. This can be achieved by changing locally the lift of the blade. Several strategies to reach this goal are under investigation at EUROCOPTER such as the control of the local incidence of the blade by a direct lift flap. AEROSPATIALE MATRA Corporate Research Centre and AEROSPATIALE MATRA MISSILES proposed an actuator system able to answer EUROCOPTER's needs for moving a direct lift flap. The present paper describes the definition, manufacturing and testing of this new actuator system. This actuator is based on an electromagnetic patented actuation system developed by AEROSPATIALE MATRA MISSILES for missile and aeronautic applications. The particularity of this actuator is its ability to produce the desired force on its whole range of stroke. The flap is designed to be fitted on a DAUPHIN type blade produced by EUROCOPTER and the actuator system was designed to fit the room available within the blade and to produce the right amount of stroke and force within the required frequency range. Other constraints such as centrifugal loading were also taken into account. This paper describes briefly the specifications and the major characteristics of the actuating system and presents some results of its behavior on a representative composite test-bed manufactured by EUROCOPTER when subjected to realistic mechanical loads.

  10. Calibration of partial safety factors for wind turbine rotor blades against fatigue failure; Kalibrering af partielle sikkerhedsfaktorer for udmattelse af vindmoellerotorer

    Christensen, C.J.; Ronold, K.O.; Thoegersen, M.L.

    2000-08-01

    The report describes a calibration of partial safety factors for wind turbine rotor blades subjected to fatigue loading in flapwise and edgewise bending. While earlier models - developed by the authors - dealt with such calibrations for site-specific individual turbines only, the calibration model applied herein covers an integrated analysis with different turbines on different sites and with different blade materials. The result is an optimized set of partial safety factors, i.e. a set of safety factors that lead to minimum deviation from the target reliability of the achieved reliabilities over the selected scope of turbines, sites and materials. The turbines included in the study cover rated powers of 450-600 kW. The result from the calibration are discussed in relation to the partial safety factors that are given in the Danish codes for design of glass fibre reinforced rotor blades (DS472 and DS456). (au)

  11. A Critical Evaluation of Structural Analysis Tools used for the Design of Large Composite Wind Turbine Rotor Blades under Ultimate and Cycle Loading

    Lekou, D.J.; Bacharoudis, K. C.; Farinas, A. B.; Branner, Kim; Berring, Peter; CROCE, A.; Philippidis, T.P.; De Winkel, G.D.

    2015-01-01

    Rotor blades for 10-20MW wind turbines may exceed 120m. To meet the demanding requirements of the blade design, structural analysis tools have been developed individually and combined with commercial available ones by blade designers. Due to the various available codes, understanding and estimating the uncertainty introduced in the design calculations by using these tools is needed to allow assessment of the effectiveness of any future design modification. For quantifying the introduced uncer...

  12. Wind Tunnel Evaluation of a Model Helicopter Main-Rotor Blade With Slotted Airfoils at the Tip

    Noonan, Kevin W.; Yeager, William T., Jr.; Singleton, Jeffrey D.; Wilbur, Matthew L.; Mirick, Paul H.

    2001-01-01

    Data for rotors using unconventional airfoils are of interest to permit an evaluation of this technology's capability to meet the U.S. Army's need for increased helicopter mission effectiveness and improved safety and survivability. Thus, an experimental investigation was conducted in the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) to evaluate the effect of using slotted airfoils in the rotor blade tip region (85 to 100 percent radius) on rotor aerodynamic performance and loads. Four rotor configurations were tested in forward flight at advance ratios from 0.15 to 0.45 and in hover in-ground effect. The hover tip Mach number was 0.627, which is representative of a design point of 4000-ft geometric altitude and a temperature of 95 F. The baseline rotor configuration had a conventional single-element airfoil in the tip region. A second rotor configuration had a forward-slotted airfoil with a -6 deg slat, a third configuration had a forward-slotted airfoil with a -10 slat, and a fourth configuration had an aft-slotted airfoil with a 3 deg flap (trailing edge down). The results of this investigation indicate that the -6 deg slat configuration offers some performance and loads benefits over the other three configurations.

  13. ACTIVE VIBRATION ISOLATION OF MECHANICAL VIBRATION IN RAILWAY PASSENGER CAR

    Aleksander SŁADKOWSKI

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an attempt of numerical description of the active vibration isolation system of railway passenger car. Computer simulations were performed for different speeds of the passenger car riding along the same track. Formal basis to solve the formulated research problem was achieved by using the law and the principles of mechanics and control theory. Model results clearly indicate that the use of active vibration reduction systems in rail transport can significantly increase comfort

  14. Novel active vibration absorber with magnetorheological fluid

    Gerlach, T.; Ehrlich, J.; Böse, H.

    2009-02-01

    Disturbing vibrations diminish the performance of technical high precision devices significantly. In search of a suitable solution for reducing these vibrations, a novel concept of active vibration reduction was developed which exploits the special properties of magnetorheological fluids. In order to evaluate the concept of such an active vibration absorber (AVA) a demonstrator was designed and manufactured. This demonstrator generates a force which counteracts the motion of the vibrating body. Since the counterforce is generated by a centrifugal exciter, the AVA provides the capability to compensate vibrations even in two dimensions. To control the strength of the force transmitted to the vibrating body, the exciter is based on a tunable MR coupling. The AVA was integrated in an appropriate testing device to investigate its performance. The recorded results show a significant reduction of the vibration amplitudes by an order of magnitude.

  15. Design and development of an active Gurney flap for rotorcraft

    Freire Gómez, Jon; Booker, Julian D.; Mellor, Phil H.

    2013-03-01

    The EU's Green Rotorcraft programme will develop an Active Gurney Flap (AGF) for a full-scale helicopter main rotor blade as part of its `smart adaptive rotor blade' technology demonstrators. AGFs can be utilized to provide a localized and variable lift enhancement on the rotor, enabling a redistribution of loading on the rotor blade around the rotor azimuth. Further advantages include the possibility of using AGFs to allow a rotor speed reduction, which subsequently provides acoustic benefits. Designed to be integrable into a commercial helicopter blade, and thereby capable of withstanding real in-flight centrifugal loading, blade vibrations and aerodynamic loads, the demonstrator is expected to achieve a high technology readiness level (TRL). The AGF will be validated initially by a constant blade section 2D wind tunnel test and latterly by full blade 3D whirl tower testing. This paper presents the methodology adopted for the AGF concept topology selection, based on a series of both qualitative and quantitative performance criteria. Two different AGF candidate mechanisms are compared, both powered by a small commercial electromagnetic actuator. In both topologies, the link between the actuator and the control surface consists of two rotating torque bars, pivoting on flexure bearings. This provides the required reliability and precision, while making the design virtually frictionless. The engineering analysis presented suggests that both candidates would perform satisfactorily in a 2D wind tunnel test, but that equally, both have design constraints which limit their potential to be further taken into a whirl tower test under full scale centrifugal and inertial loads.

  16. Adaptive Piezoelectric Absorber for Active Vibration Control

    Sven Herold

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Passive vibration control solutions are often limited to working reliably at one design point. Especially applied to lightweight structures, which tend to have unwanted vibration, active vibration control approaches can outperform passive solutions. To generate dynamic forces in a narrow frequency band, passive single-degree-of-freedom oscillators are frequently used as vibration absorbers and neutralizers. In order to respond to changes in system properties and/or the frequency of excitation forces, in this work, adaptive vibration compensation by a tunable piezoelectric vibration absorber is investigated. A special design containing piezoelectric stack actuators is used to cover a large tuning range for the natural frequency of the adaptive vibration absorber, while also the utilization as an active dynamic inertial mass actuator for active control concepts is possible, which can help to implement a broadband vibration control system. An analytical model is set up to derive general design rules for the system. An absorber prototype is set up and validated experimentally for both use cases of an adaptive vibration absorber and inertial mass actuator. Finally, the adaptive vibration control system is installed and tested with a basic truss structure in the laboratory, using both the possibility to adjust the properties of the absorber and active control.

  17. A methodology for exploiting the tolerance for imprecision in genetic fuzzy systems and its application to characterization of rotor blade leading edge materials

    Sánchez, Luciano; Couso, Inés; Palacios, Ana M.; Palacios, José L.

    2013-05-01

    A methodology for obtaining fuzzy rule-based models from uncertain data is proposed. The granularity of the linguistic discretization is decided with the help of a new estimation of the mutual information between ill-known random variables, and a combination of boosting and genetic algorithms is used for discovering new rules. This methodology has been applied to predict whether the coating of an helicopter rotor blade is adequate, considering the shear adhesion strength of ice to different materials. The discovered knowledge is intended to increase the level of post-processing interpretation accuracy of experimental data obtained during the evaluation of ice-phobic materials for rotorcraft applications.

  18. Design, fabrication, and testing of an ultrasonic de-icing system for helicopter rotor blades

    Palacios, Jose Luis

    A low-power, non-thermal ultrasonic de-icing system is introduced as a possible substitute for current electro-thermal systems. The system generates delaminating ultrasonic transverse shear stresses at the interface of accreted ice. A PZT-4 disk driven at 28.5 KHz (radial resonance of the disk) instantaneously de-bonds 2 mm thick freezer ice layers. The ice layers are accreted to a 0.7 mm thick, 30.4 cm x 30.4 cm steel plate at an environment temperature of -20°C. A power input of 50 Watts is applied to the actuator (50 V, 19.6 KV/m), which translates to a de-icing power of 0.07 W/cm2. A finite element model of the actuator bonded to the isotropic plate is used to guide the design of the system, and predicts the transverse shear stresses at the ice interface. Wind tunnel icing tests were conducted to demonstrate the potential use of the proposed system under impact icing conditions. Both glaze ice and rime ice were generated on steel and composite plates by changing the cloud conditions of the wind tunnel. Continuous ultrasonic vibration prevented impact ice formation around the actuator location at an input power not exceeding 0.18 W/cm 2 (1.2 W/in2). As ice thickness reached a critical thickness of approximately 1.2 mm, shedding occurred on those locations where ultrasonic transverse shear stresses exceeded the shear adhesion strength of the ice. Finite element transverse shear stress predictions correlate with observed experimental impact ice de-bonding behavior. To increase the traveling distance of propagating ultrasonic waves, ultrasonic shear horizontal wave modes are studied. Wave modes providing large modal interface transverse shear stress concentration coefficients (ISCC) between the host structure (0.7 mm thick steel plate) and accreted ice (2.5 mm thick ice layer) are identified and investigated for a potential increase in the wave propagation distance. Ultrasonic actuators able to trigger these optimum wave modes are designed and fabricated. Despite

  19. Software integration for automated stability analysis and design optimization of a bearingless rotor blade

    Gunduz, Mustafa Emre

    Many government agencies and corporations around the world have found the unique capabilities of rotorcraft indispensable. Incorporating such capabilities into rotorcraft design poses extra challenges because it is a complicated multidisciplinary process. The concept of applying several disciplines to the design and optimization processes may not be new, but it does not currently seem to be widely accepted in industry. The reason for this might be the lack of well-known tools for realizing a complete multidisciplinary design and analysis of a product. This study aims to propose a method that enables engineers in some design disciplines to perform a fairly detailed analysis and optimization of a design using commercially available software as well as codes developed at Georgia Tech. The ultimate goal is when the system is set up properly, the CAD model of the design, including all subsystems, will be automatically updated as soon as a new part or assembly is added to the design; or it will be updated when an analysis and/or an optimization is performed and the geometry needs to be modified. Designers and engineers will be involved in only checking the latest design for errors or adding/removing features. Such a design process will take dramatically less time to complete; therefore, it should reduce development time and costs. The optimization method is demonstrated on an existing helicopter rotor originally designed in the 1960's. The rotor is already an effective design with novel features. However, application of the optimization principles together with high-speed computing resulted in an even better design. The objective function to be minimized is related to the vibrations of the rotor system under gusty wind conditions. The design parameters are all continuous variables. Optimization is performed in a number of steps. First, the most crucial design variables of the objective function are identified. With these variables, Latin Hypercube Sampling method is used

  20. Actively controlled vibration welding system and method

    Cai, Wayne W.; Kang, Bongsu; Tan, Chin-An

    2013-04-02

    A vibration welding system includes a controller, welding horn, an active material element, and anvil assembly. The assembly may include an anvil body connected to a back plate and support member. The element, e.g., a piezoelectric stack or shape memory alloy, is positioned with respect to the assembly. The horn vibrates in a desirable first direction to form a weld on a work piece. The element controls any vibrations in a second direction by applying calibrated response to the anvil body in the second direction. A method for controlling undesirable vibrations in the system includes positioning the element with respect to the anvil assembly, connecting the anvil body to the support member through the back plate, vibrating the horn in a desirable first direction, and transmitting an input signal to the element to control vibration in an undesirable second direction.

  1. The spectral characteristics of rotor blade-vortex interaction noise - Experimental and mathematical results

    Martin, Ruth M.; Hardin, Jay C.

    1987-01-01

    The BVI impulsive content of a rotor acoustic signal is shown to appear in the mid-frequency range of the power spectrum, between the fifth and thirtieth harmonics of the blade passage frequency, concentrated at the harmonics of the blade passage frequency. These harmonics exhibit a humped or scalloped shape in this mid-frequency spectral region. Increased energy at the harmonics of the shaft frequency appears when the BVI impulsive content demonstrates unsteadiness and blade-to-blade differences in the time domain. A mathematical model of a generalized BVI acoustic signal and its power spectrum shows that the power spectrum is scalloped and filtered by a comb function. The spectrum amplitude is defined by the impulse amplitude and emission time. The scalloping of the spectrum is related to the emission time of the impulse itself, and the spacing of the comb function is related to the repetition time (period) of the impulse. The decay rate of the spectral humps is governed by the inverse of frequency squared. The mathematical model validates the characteristics observed in the data and verify that these characteristics are due to blade-vortex interaction activity.

  2. Dynamic survey of wind turbine vibrations

    Chiang, Chih-Hung; Hsu, Keng-Tsang; Cheng, Chia-Chi; Pan, Chieh-Chen; Huang, Chi-Luen; Cheng, Tao-Ming

    2016-04-01

    Six wind turbines were blown to the ground by the wind gust during the attack of Typhoon Soudelor in August 2015. Survey using unmanned aerial vehicle, UAV, found the collapsed wind turbines had been broken at the lower section of the supporting towers. The dynamic behavior of wind turbine systems is thus in need of attention. The vibration of rotor blades and supporting towers of two wind turbine systems have been measured remotely using IBIS, a microwave interferometer. However the frequency of the rotor blade can be analyzed only if the microwave measurements are taken as the wind turbine is parked and secured. Time-frequency analyses such as continuous wavelet transform and reassigned spectrograms are applied to the displacement signals obtained. A frequency of 0.44Hz exists in both turbines B and C at various operating conditions. Possible links between dynamic characteristics and structural integrity of wind turbine -tower systems is discussed.

  3. Rotor blade dynamic design

    Pritchard, Jocelyn I.; Adelman, Howard M.; Mantay, Wayne R.

    1989-01-01

    The rotor dynamic design considerations are essentially limitations on the vibratory response of the blades which in turn limit the dynamic excitation of the fuselage by forces and moments transmitted to the hub. Quantities which are associated with the blade response and which are subject to design constraints are discussed. These include blade frequencies, vertical and inplane hub shear, rolling and pitching moments, and aeroelastic stability margin.

  4. [Raman active vibrations of aluminosilicates].

    Pan, Feng; Yu, Xue-hui; Mo, Xuan-xue; You, Jing-lin; Wang, Chen; Chen, Hui; Jiang, Guo-chang

    2006-10-01

    Raman spectra of aluminosilicate minerals, namely kyanite, andalusite, and sillimanite and K2O-Al2O3-SiO2 glasses were recorded. Four alumino-silicon tetrahedral model clusters were calculated by self-consistent (SCF) molecular orbital ab-ini-tio calculation of the quantum chem (QC) method. The result shows a decrease tendency in Raman frequencies in the 800-1200 cm(-1) frequency region with increase in four-coordinated Al content, which is assigned to the Si--Onb symmetry stretching vibrations. The Raman spectra in the 700-800 cm(-1) frequency region is attributed to Al-Onb symmetry stretching vibrations. PMID:17205741

  5. Active vibration control of lightweight floor systems

    Baader, J.; Fontana, M.

    2016-04-01

    Wide-span and lightweight floors are often prone to structural vibrations due to their low resonance frequency and poor material damping. Their dynamic behaviour can be improved using passive, semi-active or active vibration control devices. The following article proposes a novel method for the controller synthesis for active vibration control. An existing passive TMD (tuned mass damper) is modelled and equipped with an actuator in order to provide more efficient damping. Using an iterative optimization approach under constraints, an optimal controller is found which minimizes a quadratic cost function in frequency domain. A simulation of an existing test bench shows that the active vibration control device is able to provide increased damping compared to the passive TMD.

  6. Rotor Vibration Reduction Using Multi-Element Multi-Path Design

    Su, Keye

    Multi-Element Multi-Path (MEMP) structural design is a new concept for rotor vibration reduction. This thesis explores the possibility of applying MEMP design to helicopter rotor blades. A conceptual design is developed to investigate the MEMP blade's vibration reduction performance. In the design, the rotor blade is characterized by two centrifugally loaded beams which are connected to each other through linear and torsional springs. A computer program is built to simulate the behavior of such structures. Detailed parametric studies are conducted. The main challenges in this thesis involve the blade hub load vibration analysis, the blade thickness constraint and the blade parameter selection. The results show substantial vibration reduction for the MEMP design but the large relative deflection between the two beams, conceptualized as an internal spar and airfoil shell, remains a problem for further study.

  7. Active Vibration Damping of Solar Arrays

    Reinicke, Gunar; Baier, Horst; Grillebeck, Anton; Scharfeld, Frank; Hunger, Joseph; Abou-El-Ela, A.; Lohberg, Andreas

    2012-07-01

    Current generations of large solar array panels are lightweight and flexible constructions to reduce net masses. They undergo strong vibrations during launch. The active vibration damping is one convenient option to reduce vibration responses and limit stresses in facesheets. In this study, two actuator concepts are used for vibration damping. A stack interface actuator replaces a panel hold down and is decoupled from bending moments and shear forces. Piezoelectric patch actuators are used as an alternative, where the number, position and size of actuators are mainly driven by controllability analyses. Linear Quadratic Gaussian control is used to attenuate vibrations of selected mode shapes with both actuators. Simulations as well as modal and acoustic tests show the feasibility of selected actuator concepts.

  8. Development of a smart trailing-edge flap actuator with multistage stroke amplifier for a rotor blade

    Lee, Taeoh; Chopra, Inderjit

    2000-06-01

    The present research experimentally investigates the feasibility of a trailing-edge flap mechanism actuated in a helicopter rotor by piezoelectric stacks in conjunction with a dual-stage mechanical stroke amplifier to actively control vibration. A new mechanical leverage amplification concept was developed to extend the capability of a simple lever-fulcrum stroke amplifier. A refined prototype actuator and flap mechanism were designed and fabricated using five piezostacks. The bench-top test of the actuator showed 73.7 mils of free stroke and uniform displacement output up to a frequency of 150 Hz. Spin testing was performed in the vacuum chamber to evaluate the performance in rotating environment, and the refined prototype actuator showed approximately 13% loss in actuation stroke at 710 g of full-scale centrifugal loading. In the Open-Jet wind tunnel testing to simulate the aerodynamic loading environment, the peak-to-peak flap deflections above 8 degrees for freestream velocity of 120 ft/sec were obtained at different excitation frequencies. It demonstrated the capability of the refined prototype actuator in rotating environment to potentially reduce helicopter vibration.

  9. Active and passive vibration control of structures

    Spelsberg-Korspeter, Gottfried

    2014-01-01

    Active and Passive Vibration Control of Structures form an issue of very actual interest in many different fields of engineering, for example in the automotive and aerospace industry, in precision engineering (e.g. in large telescopes), and also in civil engineering. The papers in this volume bring together engineers of different background, and it fill gaps between structural mechanics, vibrations and modern control theory.  Also links between the different applications in structural control are shown.

  10. Active structures to reduce torsional vibrations

    Matthias, M.; Schlote, D.; Atzrodt, H.

    2013-03-01

    This paper describes the development of different active measures to reduce torsional vibrations in power trains. The measures are based on concepts developed for active mounts to reduce the transmission of structure-borne sound. To show the potential of these active measures and investigate their mode of operation to influence torsional vibrations, numerical simulations of powertrains with different active measures were done. First experimental results from tests on an experimental (reduced size) power train were used to align the numerical models. The work was done within the project 'LOEWE-Zentrum AdRIA: Adaptronik - Research, Innovation, Application' funded by the German federal state of Hessen, and the Project AKTos: 'Active control of torsional vibrations by coupling elements' placed in the research Framework program 'Navigation and Maritime Technology for the 21st Century' funded by the German Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology.

  11. A Dynamic Absorber With Active Vibration Control

    Huang, S.-J.; Lian, R.-J.

    1994-12-01

    The design and construction of a dynamic absorber incorporating active vibration control is described. The absorber is a two-degrees-of-freedom spring — lumped mass system sliding on a guide pillar, with two internal vibration disturbance sources. Both the main mass and the secondary absorber mass are acted on by DC servo motors, respectively, to suppress the vibration amplitude. The state variable technique is used to model this dynamic system and a decoupling PID control method is used. First, the discrete time state space model is identified by using the commercial software MATLAB. Then the decoupling controller of this multi-input/multi-output system is derived from the identified model. Finally the results of some experiments are presented. The experimental results show that the system is effective in suppressing vibration. Also, the performance of this control strategy for position tracking control is evaluated based on experimental data.

  12. Rotor Vibration Reduction via Active Hybrid Bearings

    Nicoletti, Rodrigo; Santos, Ilmar

    2002-01-01

    The use of fluid power to reduce and control rotor vibration in rotating machines is investigated. An active hybrid bearing is studied, whose main objective is to reduce wear and vibration between rotating and stationary machinery parts. By injecting pressurised oil into the oil film, through...... orifices machined in the bearing pads, one can alter the machine dynamic characteristics, thus enhancing its operational range. A mathematical model of the rotor-bearing system, as well as of the hydraulic system, is presented. Numerical results of the system frequency response show good agreement with...

  13. A New Framework For Helicopter Vibration Suppression; Time-Periodic System Identification and Controller Design

    Ulker, Fatma Demet

    In forward flight, helicopter rotor blades function within a highly complex aerodynamic environment that includes both near-blade and far-blade aerodynamic phenomena. These aerodynamic phenomena cause fluctuating aerodynamic loads on the rotor blades. These loads when coupled with the dynamic characteristics and elastic motion of the blade create excessive amount of vibration. These vibrations degrade helicopter performance, passenger comfort and contributes to high cost maintenance problems. In an effort to suppress helicopter vibration, recent studies have developed active control strategies using active pitch links, flaps, twist actuation and higher harmonic control of the swash plate. In active helicopter vibration control, designing a controller in a computationally efficient way requires accurate reduced-order models of complex helicopter aeroelasticity. In previous studies, controllers were designed using aeroelastic models that were obtained by coupling independently reduced aerodynamic and structural dynamic models. Unfortunately, these controllers could not satisfy stability and performance criteria when implemented in high-fidelity computer simulations or real-time experiments. In this thesis, we present a novel approach that provides accurate time-periodic reduced-order models and time-periodic H2 and H infinity controllers that satisfy the stability and performance criteria. Computational efficiency and the necessity of using the approach were validated by implementing an actively controlled flap strategy. In this proposed approach, the reduced-order models were directly identified from high-fidelity coupled aeroelastic analysis by using the time-periodic subspace identification method. Time-periodic H2 and Hinfinity controllers that update the control actuation at every time step were designed. The control synthesis problem was solved using Linear Matrix Inequality and periodic Riccati Equation based formulations, for which an in-house periodic

  14. Aeroelastic Stability of Damperless Rotor Blade%无减摆器旋翼桨叶气弹稳定性分析

    夏品奇; 周景良

    2012-01-01

    无减摆器旋翼具有桨毂结构简单、桨毂气动阻力小、桨毂维护简便等优点,但取消了桨毂减摆器后必须确保桨叶在摆振方向有足够的阻尼以保证桨叶的摆振稳定性.基于气弹耦合的方法是实现无减摆器旋翼桨叶摆振稳定性的一个有效方法.建立了无减摆器无铰式旋翼桨叶带有预锥角、下垂角、后掠角和预扭角等结构参数的非线性气弹动力学模型,利用伽辽金方法把桨叶偏微分运动方程简化为非线性常微分平衡方程和关于平衡位置的小扰动运动方程,分析了桨叶的气弹稳定性并进行了参数影响分析.数值结果表明,合理的桨叶结构参数和气弹耦合可确保无减摆器旋翼桨叶在摆振方向的气弹稳定性.%The damperless rotor has the advantage of the hub with simple structure, small aerodynamic drag and easy maintainance. However, without blade lag damper, the blade must have sufficient damping in the lag direction to ensure lag stability. And the aeroelastic coupling based method can approach that effectively. Therefore, the nonlinear aeroelastic dynamic model is established for the damperless and hingeless rotor blade with structural parameters of pre-cone angle, pre-droop angle, sweep angle and pre-twist angle. By using the Galerkin method, the partial differential equations of motion are simplified to the nonlinear ordinary differential balance equations and the small perturbation equations for the equilibrium positions. The blade aeroelastic stability and the parameters effects are analyzed. The numerical results show that reasonable structural parameters and aeroelastic coupling of blade can ensure the aeroelastic stability of damperless rotor blade in the lag direction.

  15. Vibration damping with active carbon fiber structures

    Neugebauer, Reimund; Kunze, Holger; Riedel, Mathias; Roscher, Hans-Jürgen

    2007-04-01

    This paper presents a mechatronic strategy for active reduction of vibrations on machine tool struts or car shafts. The active structure is built from a carbon fiber composite with embedded piezofiber actuators that are composed of piezopatches based on the Macro Fiber Composite (MFC) technology, licensed by NASA and produced by Smart Material GmbH in Dresden, Germany. The structure of these actuators allows separate or selectively combined bending and torsion, meaning that both bending and torsion vibrations can be actively absorbed. Initial simulation work was done with a finite element model (ANSYS). This paper describes how state space models are generated out of a structure based on the finite element model and how controller codes are integrated into finite element models for transient analysis and the model-based control design. Finally, it showcases initial experimental findings and provides an outlook for damping multi-mode resonances with a parallel combination of resonant controllers.

  16. Wind Turbine Rotors with Active Vibration Control

    Svendsen, Martin Nymann

    This thesis presents a framework for structural modeling, analysis and active vibration damping of rotating wind turbine blades and rotors. A structural rotor model is developed in terms of finite beam elements in a rotating frame of reference. The element comprises a representation of general...... that these are geometrically well separated. For active vibration control in three-bladed wind turbine rotors the present work presents a resonance-based method for groups of one collective and two whirling modes. The controller is based on the existing resonant format and introduces a dual system...... system. As in the method for non-rotating systems, an explicit procedure for optimal calibration of the controller gains is established. The control system is applied to an 86m wind turbine rotor by means of active strut actuator mechanisms. The prescribed additional damping ratios are reproduced almost...

  17. Active control of vibrations in pedestrian bridges

    Álvaro Cunha; Carlos Moutinho

    1999-01-01

    This paper, apart from making a brief general reference to vibration problems in pedestrian bridges, as well as to the form of modelling of dynamic pedestrian loads, presents the use of a predictive control strategy for the numerical simulation of the dynamic response of actively controlled structures of this type. The consideration of this control strategy permitted the development of a computational model, which was applied to the study of a pedestrian cable-stayed bridge, in order to show ...

  18. Performance Data from a Wind-Tunnel Test of Two Main-rotor Blade Designs for a Utility-Class Helicopter

    Singleton, Jeffrey D.; Yeager, William T., Jr.; Wilbur, Matthew L.

    1990-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel to evaluate an advanced main rotor designed for use on a utility class helicopter, specifically the U.S. Army UH-60A Blackhawk. This rotor design incorporated advanced twist, airfoil cross sections, and geometric planform. For evaluation purposes, the current UH-60A main rotor was also tested and is referred to as the baseline blade set. A total of four blade sets were tested. One set of both the baseline and the advanced rotors were dynamically scaled to represent a full scale helicopter rotor blade design. The remaining advanced and baseline blade sets were not dynamically scaled so as to isolate the effects of structural elasticity. The investigation was conducted in hover and at rotor advance ratios ranging from 0.15 to 0.4 at a range of nominal test medium densities from 0.00238 to 0.009 slugs/cu ft. This range of densities, coupled with varying rotor lift and propulsive force, allowed for the simulation of several vehicle gross weight and density altitude combinations. Performance data are presented for all blade sets without analysis; however, cross referencing of data with flight condition may be useful to the analyst for validating aeroelastic theories and design methodologies as well as for evaluating advanced design parameters.

  19. Nonlinear Equations of Motion for Cantilever Rotor Blades in Hover with Pitch Link Flexibility, Twist, Precone, Droop, Sweep, Torque Offset, and Blade Root Offset

    Hodges, D. H.

    1976-01-01

    Nonlinear equations of motion for a cantilever rotor blade are derived for the hovering flight condition. The blade is assumed to have twist, precone, droop, sweep, torque offset and blade root offset, and the elastic axis and the axes of center of mass, tension, and aerodynamic center coincident at the quarter chord. The blade is cantilevered in bending, but has a torsional root spring to simulate pitch link flexibility. Aerodynamic forces acting on the blade are derived from strip theory based on quasi-steady two-dimensional airfoil theory. The equations are hybrid, consisting of one integro-differential equation for root torsion and three integro-partial differential equations for flatwise and chordwise bending and elastic torsion. The equations are specialized for a uniform blade and reduced to nonlinear ordinary differential equations by Galerkin's method. They are linearized for small perturbation motions about the equilibrium operating condition. Modal analysis leads to formulation of a standard eigenvalue problem where the elements of the stability matrix depend on the solution of the equilibrium equations. Two different forms of the root torsion equation are derived that yield virtually identical numerical results. This provides a reasonable check for the accuracy of the equations.

  20. 开式转子叶片气动设计研究%Research on Aerodynamic Design of Open Rotor Blade

    刘政良; 严明; 洪青松

    2013-01-01

    参考现代民航飞机设计方案要求,完成了开式转子发动机叶片的气动设计工作。在设计过程中引入可压缩流动叶片数据改进了螺旋桨片条理论,使之适用于高亚声速来流的叶片设计。采用后掠叶片,NACA16系列叶型,前缘积叠方式。数值模拟结果与设计结果相近,基本满足气动设计要求。%Aerodynamic design of open rotor blade which refers to performance of engines which used on modern civil airplane is completed. Compressible blade data is introduced to optimize strip theory in order to satisfy blade design under high subsonic free stream. Sept blade, NACA-16 series data and leading edge accumulation is used. Numerical simulation is similar to the design which basicaly satisifed the design requirements.

  1. Development and whirl tower test of the SMART active flap rotor

    Straub, Friedrich K.; Kennedy, Dennis K.; Stemple, Alan D.; Anand, V. R.; Birchette, Terry S.

    2004-07-01

    A full scale Smart Material Actuated Rotor Technology (SMART) system with piezoelectric actuated blade flaps was developed and whirl tower tested. The development effort included design, fabrication, and component testing of rotor blades, trailing edge flaps, piezoelectric actuators, switching power amplifiers, and the data/power system. Simulations and model scale wind tunnel tests have shown that this system can provide 80% vibration reduction, 10dB noise reduction for a helicopter passing overhead, and substantial aerodynamic performance gains. Whirl tower testing of the 34-foot diameter rotor demonstrated the functionality, robustness, and required authority of the active flap system. The program involved extensive development work and risk reduction tests which resulted in a robust, high performance actuator and a tightly integrated actuator, flap, and blade system. The actuator demonstrated excellent performance during bench testing and has accumulated over 60 million cycles under a spectrum of loading conditions. The flight worthy active flap rotor blades were based on a modified design of the FAA certified MD900 Explorer production rotor blade. Whirl tower testing was conducted with full rotor instrumentation and a 5-component balance. The rotor was tested for 13 hours under a range of conditions, including 7 hours of flap operation. Flap inputs included open loop static and dynamic commands. The flaps showed excellent authority with oscillatory thrust greater than 10% of the steady baseline thrust. Various flap actuation frequency sweeps were run to investigate the dynamics of the rotor and the flap system. Limited closed loop tests used hub accelerations and hub loads for feedback. Proving the integration, robust operation, and authority of the flap system were the key objectives met by the whirl tower test. This success depended on tailoring the piezoelectric materials and actuator to the application and meeting actuator/blade integration requirements

  2. Self-Tuning Active Vibration Control of Flexible Beam Structures

    M.O. Tokhi; Hossain, M A

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents the design and performance evaluation of an adaptive active control mechanism for vibration suppression in flexible beam structures. A cantilever beam system in transverse vibration is considered. First order control finite difference methods are used to study the behaviour of the beam and develop a suitable test and verification platform. An active vibration control algorithm is developed within an adaptive control framework for broadband cancellation of vibration along t...

  3. Vibrational optical activity principles and applications

    Nafie, Laurence A

    2011-01-01

    This unique book stands as the only comprehensive introduction to vibrational optical activity (VOA) and is the first single book that serves as a complete reference for this relatively new, but increasingly important area of molecular spectroscopy. Key features:A single-source reference on this topic that introduces, describes the background and foundation of this area of spectroscopy.Serves as a guide on how to use it to carry out applications with relevant problem solving.Depth and breadth of the subject is presented in a logical, complete and progressive fashion. A

  4. Passive and Active Vibration Control of Renewable Energy Structures

    Zhang, Zili

    2015-01-01

    The present thesis deals with fundamental researches on passive and active vibration control of renewable energy structures, and provides useful models for practical applications. Effective and robust vibration control methods have been explored for mitigating the lightly damped edgewise blade vibration and lateral tower vibration, with the main focus on structural control devices. Rigorous theoretical modeling of different dynamic system has been established, based on which detailed design a...

  5. Modeling of Axial Spring Stiffness in Active Vibration Controlled Drilling

    Pao William; Hashim Fakhruldin M; Parman Setyamartana

    2014-01-01

    During drilling process, substantial amount of vibration and shock are induced to the drill string. Active vibration controlled drilling is introduced to reduce the vibration and increase the efficiency of drilling process. In this system, two main components that determine the damping coefficient are magnetorheological (MR) damper and spring assembly. Performance of vibration damping system is depending on the viscosity of MR fluid in the damper and spring constant of spring assembly. One of...

  6. Automotive applications of rapid prototyping for active vibration control

    Bohn, C.; Svaricek, F. [Continental Gummi-Werke AG, Hannover (Germany); Karkosch, H.J.; Marienfeld, P.M. [ContiTech Vibration Control GmbH, Hannover (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    This paper presents some recent results of Continental's research and development activities in the area of active vibration control. First, a brief overview of different approaches to active noise and vibration control is given. This is followed by a discussion of the rapid controller prototyping process that is currently being introduced. Finally, some experimental results obtained in cooperation with an automobile manufacturer are presented. These results demonstrate that major noise and vibration attenuation can be achieved through active vibration control in automobiles. (orig.)

  7. Active Vibration Control of Piezolaminated Smart Beams

    V. Balamurugan

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the active vibration control of beam like structures with distributed piezoelectric sensor and actuator layers bonded on top and bottom surfaces of the beam. A finite element model based on Euler-Bernoulli beam theory has been developed. The contribution of the piezoelectric sensor and actuator layers on the mass and stiffness of the beam is considered. Three types of classical control strategies, namely direct proportional feedback, constant-gain negative velocity feedback and Lyapunov feedback and an optimal control strategy, linear quadratic regulator (LQR scheme are applied to study their control effectiveness. Also, the control performance with different types of loading, such as impulse loading, step loading, harmonic and random loading is studied

  8. Active balance system and vibration balanced machine

    Qiu, Songgang (Inventor); Augenblick, John E. (Inventor); Peterson, Allen A. (Inventor); White, Maurice A. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An active balance system is provided for counterbalancing vibrations of an axially reciprocating machine. The balance system includes a support member, a flexure assembly, a counterbalance mass, and a linear motor or an actuator. The support member is configured for attachment to the machine. The flexure assembly includes at least one flat spring having connections along a central portion and an outer peripheral portion. One of the central portion and the outer peripheral portion is fixedly mounted to the support member. The counterbalance mass is fixedly carried by the flexure assembly along another of the central portion and the outer peripheral portion. The linear motor has one of a stator and a mover fixedly mounted to the support member and another of the stator and the mover fixedly mounted to the counterbalance mass. The linear motor is operative to axially reciprocate the counterbalance mass.

  9. Effect of Vibration Magnitude and Seated Posture on Reading Activity in Fore and AFT Vibration

    V. Kumar

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available A large number of passengers prefer to utilize the time while commuting from one place to other in public transport like train, car and other vehicles. Traveling time can be utilized performing many sedentary activities e.g. Reading, writing, sketching etc. Reading activity is the most preferred activity for utilization of time. Experimental study has been performed to find the effect of vibration magnitude and different posture. Six healthy subjects were exposed sinusoidal vibrations, total 28 conditions while performing reading activity: one direction: fore and aft, two magnitudes: 0.6 and 1.2 ms-2 rms (un-weighted, seven frequencies: 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 10 Hz and two postures: vertical backrest and 30o inclined backrest. Significant effect of vibration magnitude and different posture are observed for both subjective and objective measure. Reading performance decreases with the increase vibration magnitude and with the inclined backrest conditions.

  10. Modelling of vibrational optical activity of fibrillar systems

    Kessler, Jiří; Kapitán, J.; Yamamoto, S.; Kiederling, T. A.; Bouř, Petr

    Vienna : Vienna University of Technology, 2015 - (Lendl, B.; Koch, C.; Kraft, M.; Ofner, J.; Ramer, G.). s. 504-505 ISBN 978-3-200-04205-6. [ICAVS8. International Conference on Advanced Vibrational Spectroscopy /8./. 12.07.2015-17.07.2015, Vienna] Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : vibrational optical activity * proteins * fibrills Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  11. Development of active vibration isolation system for precision machines

    Li, H. Z.; Lin, W. J.; Yang, G. L.

    2010-03-01

    It is a common understanding by manufacturers of precision machines that vibrations are a potentially disastrous threat to precision and throughput. To satisfy the quest for more stable processes and tighter critical dimension control in the microelectronics manufacturing industry, active vibration control becomes increasingly important for high-precision equipment developers. This paper introduced the development of an active vibration isolation system for precision machines. Innovative mechatronic approaches are investigated that can effectively suppress both environmental and payload-generated vibration. In this system, accelerometers are used as the feedback sensor, voice coil motors are used to generate the counter force, and a TI DSP controller is used to couple sensor measurements to actuator forces via specially designed control algorithms in real-time to counteract the vibration disturbances. Experimental results by using the developed AVI prototype showed promising performance on vibration attenuation. It demonstrated a reduction of the settling time from 2s to 0.1s under impulsive disturbances; and a vibration attenuation level of more than 20dB for harmonic disturbances. The technology can be used to suppress vibration for a wide range of precision machines to achieve fast settling time and higher accuracy.

  12. MEASUREMENT OF ANGULAR VIBRATION AMPLITUDE BY ACTIVELY BLURRED IMAGES

    GUAN Baiqing; WANG Shigang; LIU Chong; LI Qian

    2007-01-01

    A novel motion-blur-based method for measuring the angular amplitude of a high-frequency rotational vibration is schemed. The proposed approach combines the active vision concept and the mechanism of motion-from-blur, generates motion blur on the image plane actively by extending exposure time, and utilizes the motion blur information in polar images to estimate the angular amplitude of a high-frequency rotational vibration. This method obtains the analytical results of the angular vibration amplitude from the geometric moments of a motion blurred polar image and an unblurred image for reference. Experimental results are provided to validate the presented scheme.

  13. Innovation in Active Vibration Control Strategy of Intelligent Structures

    A. Moutsopoulou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Large amplitudes and attenuating vibration periods result in fatigue, instability, and poor structural performance. In light of past approaches in this field, this paper intends to discuss some innovative approaches in vibration control of intelligent structures, particularly in the case of structures with embedded piezoelectric materials. Control strategies are presented, such as the linear quadratic control theory, as well as more advanced theories, such as robust control theory. The paper presents sufficiently a recognizable advance in knowledge of active vibration control in intelligent structures.

  14. Active vibration control of doubly-curved panels

    Nourzad, Delphine

    2014-01-01

    This thesis considers active control of the vibration of doubly-curved panels. Such panels are widely used in vehicles such as cars and aircraft, whose vibration is becoming more problematic as the weight of these vehicles is reduced to control their CO2 emissions. The dynamic properties of doubly-curved panels are first considered and an analytic model which includes in-plane inertia is introduced. The results of this analytical model are compared with those from numerical modelling. Of part...

  15. Modeling of Axial Spring Stiffness in Active Vibration Controlled Drilling

    Pao William

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available During drilling process, substantial amount of vibration and shock are induced to the drill string. Active vibration controlled drilling is introduced to reduce the vibration and increase the efficiency of drilling process. In this system, two main components that determine the damping coefficient are magnetorheological (MR damper and spring assembly. Performance of vibration damping system is depending on the viscosity of MR fluid in the damper and spring constant of spring assembly. One of the key issues that are unclear from the design is the correlation between the axial spring stiffness configuration and the damping force which needs to be tuned actively. There has been lack of studies on how the viscosity of MR fluid on the active vibration damper affects the damping stiffness of the whole system. The objective of the project is to extract the correlations for the viscous damping coefficient, equivalent spring stiffness and power input to the system. Simplified vibration model is thus created using Simulink, together with experimental data fed from APS Technology’s in-house team. Inputs of the simulation such as force exerted, mass of mandrel, spring constant and step time are based on the experimental data and can be adjusted to suit different experiments. By having the model, behavior of the system can be studied and analyzed. From the simulation, it is also observed that the relationship between damping coefficient and power input of the system is linear.

  16. Active Blade Vibration Control Being Developed and Tested

    Johnson, Dexter

    2003-01-01

    Gas turbine engines are currently being designed to have increased performance, lower weight and manufacturing costs, and higher reliability. Consequently, turbomachinery components, such as turbine and compressor blades, have designs that are susceptible to new vibration problems and eventual in-service failure due to high-cycle fatigue. To address this problem, researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center are developing and testing innovative active blade vibration control concepts. Preliminary results of using an active blade vibration control system, involving a rotor supported by an active magnetic bearing in Glenn's Dynamic Spin Rig, indicate promising results (see the photograph). Active blade vibration control was achieved using feedback of blade strain gauge signals within the magnetic bearing control loop. The vibration amplitude was reduced substantially (see the graphs). Also, vibration amplitude amplification was demonstrated; this could be used to enhance structural mode identification, if desired. These results were for a nonrotating two-bladed disk. Tests for rotating blades are planned. Current and future active blade vibration control research is planned to use a fully magnetically suspended rotor and smart materials. For the fully magnetically suspended rotor work, three magnetic bearings (two radial and one axial) will be used as actuators instead of one magnetic bearing. This will allow additional degrees of freedom to be used for control. For the smart materials work, control effectors located on and off the blade will be considered. Piezoelectric materials will be considered for on-the-blade actuation, and actuator placement on a stator vane, or other nearby structure, will be investigated for off-the-blade actuation. Initial work will focus on determining the feasibility of these methods by performing basic analysis and simple experiments involving feedback control.

  17. Active vibration control of basic structures using macro fiber composites

    Yi, Guo; Wang, Jinming; Liu, Liwu; Liu, Yanju; Leng, Jinsong

    2011-03-01

    In the modern naval battle, as the anti-detection technique developing fleetly, enhancing submarine's hidden ability is becoming more and more important. However, in view of the worse control effect at low-frequency and weak adjustability to external influence, conventional passive vibration control can't satisfy the modern naval rigorous demands. Fortunately, active vibration control technology not only monitors the structure's real-time vibration, but also has more remarkable control effects and superior suitability. At the present time, it has a primary application in the vibration damping of ship engineering. In addition, due to functional materials rapidly developing, with the coming of piezoelectric composite materials, the advanced active control techniques have more applicability, lager damp amplitude and wider applied field, which basing on the piezoelectric-effect and inverse- piezoelectric-effect of piezoelectric materials. Especially, in the end of nineties, NASA had successfully manufactured the excellent macro fiber composite (MFC), which assembles actuating and sensing abilities. Comparing with the conventional piezoelectric ceramic materials, it provides the required durability, excellent flexibility, higher electromechanical coupling factors and stronger longitudinal actuating force by using interdigital electrodes. On the basis of the application of cantilever beam' active vibration control by using MFC actuators, this paper started with the mechanical characteristics of its actuating and sensing equations, and then investigated its piezoelectric feedback scale factor when equipped on the honeycomb aluminous panel. Finally, in order to validate the theoretical analysis method, the vibration control experiment of cantilever beam and honeycomb aluminous panel are built and tested with different activating force. The experimental results verify that MFC used in submarine structures' active vibration control are feasible and effective.

  18. Passive and Active Vibration Control of Renewable Energy Structures

    Zhang, Zili

    The present thesis deals with fundamental researches on passive and active vibration control of renewable energy structures, and provides useful models for practical applications. Effective and robust vibration control methods have been explored for mitigating the lightly damped edgewise blade...... vibration and lateral tower vibration, with the main focus on structural control devices. Rigorous theoretical modeling of different dynamic system has been established, based on which detailed design and analysis of the proposed control devices can be carried out. This thesis also explores technical...... solutions for wave energy point absorbers, in order to maximize the mean absorbed power and to deliver more smooth power to the grid. A novel suboptimal causal control law has been established for controlling the motion of the point absorber, and a new type of point absorber has also been proposed with...

  19. Active vibration control based on piezoelectric smart composite

    An aircraft’s vertical fin may experience dramatic buffet loads in high angle of attack flight conditions, and these buffet loads would cause huge vibration and dynamic stress on the vertical fin structure. To reduce the dynamic vibration of the vertical fin structure, macro fiber composite (MFC) actuators were used in this paper. The drive moment equations and sensing voltage equations of the MFC actuators were developed. Finite element analysis models based on three kinds of models of simplified vertical fin structures with surface-bonded MFC actuators were established in ABAQUS. The equivalent damping ratio of the structure was employed in finite element analysis, in order to measure the effectiveness of vibration control. Further, an open-loop test for the active vibration control system of the vertical fin with MFC actuators was designed and developed. The experimental results validated the effectiveness of the MFC actuators as well as the developed methodology. (paper)

  20. Active and passive vibration suppression for space structures

    Hyland, David C.

    1991-01-01

    The relative benefits of passive and active vibration suppression for large space structures (LSS) are discussed. The intent is to sketch the true ranges of applicability of these approaches using previously published technical results. It was found that the distinction between active and passive vibration suppression approaches is not as sharp as might be thought at first. The relative simplicity, reliability, and cost effectiveness touted for passive measures are vitiated by 'hidden costs' bound up with detailed engineering implementation issues and inherent performance limitations. At the same time, reliability and robustness issues are often cited against active control. It is argued that a continuum of vibration suppression measures offering mutually supporting capabilities is needed. The challenge is to properly orchestrate a spectrum of methods to reap the synergistic benefits of combined advanced materials, passive damping, and active control.

  1. Adaptive control of an active seat for occupant vibration reduction

    Gan, Zengkang; Hillis, Andrew J.; Darling, Jocelyn

    2015-08-01

    The harmful effects on human performance and health caused by unwanted vibration from vehicle seats are of increasing concern. This paper presents an active seat system to reduce the vibration level transmitted to the seat pan and the occupants' body under low frequency periodic excitation. Firstly, the detail of the mechanical structure is given and the active seat dynamics without external load are characterized by vibration transmissibility and frequency responses under different excitation forces. Owing the nonlinear and time-varying behaviour of the proposed system, a Filtered-x least-mean-square (FXLMS) adaptive control algorithm with on-line Fast-block LMS (FBLMS) identification process is employed to manage the system operation for high vibration cancellation performance. The effectiveness of the active seat system is assessed through real-time experimental tests using different excitation profiles. The system identification results show that an accurate estimation of the secondary path is achieved by using the FBLMS on-line technique. Substantial reduction is found for cancelling periodic vibration containing single and multiple frequencies. Additionally, the robustness and stability of the control system are validated through transient switching frequency tests.

  2. Integrated active sensor system for real time vibration monitoring

    Liang, Qijie; Yan, Xiaoqin; Liao, Xinqin; Cao, Shiyao; Lu, Shengnan; Zheng, Xin; Zhang, Yue

    2015-11-01

    We report a self-powered, lightweight and cost-effective active sensor system for vibration monitoring with multiplexed operation based on contact electrification between sensor and detected objects. The as-fabricated sensor matrix is capable of monitoring and mapping the vibration state of large amounts of units. The monitoring contents include: on-off state, vibration frequency and vibration amplitude of each unit. The active sensor system delivers a detection range of 0-60 Hz, high accuracy (relative error below 0.42%), long-term stability (10000 cycles). On the time dimension, the sensor can provide the vibration process memory by recording the outputs of the sensor system in an extend period of time. Besides, the developed sensor system can realize detection under contact mode and non-contact mode. Its high performance is not sensitive to the shape or the conductivity of the detected object. With these features, the active sensor system has great potential in automatic control, remote operation, surveillance and security systems.

  3. Active control of noise radiation from vibrating structures

    Mørkholt, Jakob

    The thesis is concerned with the active control of randomly vibrating structures by means of feedback control, with particular emphasis on reducing the sound radiation from such structures. A time domain model of the structural and radiation dynamics of an actively controlled plate has been...... developed, based on the theory of radiation filters for estimating the sound radiation from multimodal vibrations. This model has then been used in simulations of optimal feedback control, with special emphasis of the stability margins of the optimal control scheme. Two different methods of designing...

  4. Vibrational behavior of adaptive aircraft wing structures modelled as composite thin-walled beams

    Song, O.; Librescu, L.; Rogers, C. A.

    1992-01-01

    The vibrational behavior of cantilevered aircraft wings modeled as thin-walled beams and incorporating piezoelectric effects is studied. Based on the converse piezoelectric effect, the system of piezoelectric actuators conveniently located on the wing yield the control of its associated vertical and lateral bending eigenfrequencies. The possibility revealed by this study enabling one to increase adaptively the eigenfrequencies of thin-walled cantilevered beams could play a significant role in the control of the dynamic response and flutter of wing and rotor blade structures.

  5. Integrated Passive and Active Vibration Control of Ultra-precision Lathe

    2000-01-01

    In ultra-precision cutting process, vibration is one of the key factors affecting the machining quality. In this paper, the damping methods of HCM-I Ultra-precision Lathe are discussed in both complete machine and slide. It is pointed out that integrated passive and active vibration control (IPAVC) by combining passive vibration control (PVC) and active vibration control (AVC) can not only eliminate high frequency vibration but also improve the damping effect to low frequency vibration. Experiment results show the effectiveness of the integrated passive and active vibration control.

  6. Active Vibration Reduction Of Rigid Rotor Supported By Journal Bearings

    Ondrouch, Jan; Ferfecki, Petr; Poruba, Z.

    Gliwice: Politechnika Slaska, 2009, s. 85-90. ISBN 978-83-60102-52-7. [International Seminar of Applied Mechanics /13./. Wisla (PL), 29.05.2009-31.05.2009] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : rotor system * hydrodynamic bearing * active vibration reduction Subject RIV: JR - Other Machinery

  7. Prototype magnetorheological fluid damper for active vibration control system

    S. Duda

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The paper presents a concept of a system for isolation from external vibration sources with use of a magnetorheological (MR dampers.Design/methodology/approach: Results of experimental studies of a prototype magnetorheological damper at various magnitudes of control current and the manner of modelling electromagnetic phenomena occurring in the damper are presented in this paper. The effect of magnetic field on magnetorheological fluid is modelled by the finite element method. The mathematical model of the system as well as the damper model are outlined along with the relevant control facilities. Numerical simulations were carried out for an exemplary excitation.Findings: The elaborated damper and applied control algorithms substantially influences the values for velocities and accelerations. Incorporation of a controllable damper into the stabilization system significantly decreases displacements of the mass to be stabilized being the results of shocks and bumps caused by excitations w(t as compared to similar displacement of the same mass when only a passive damper was used.Research limitations/implications: For the future research it is necessary to improve characteristics of elaborated damper in order to improve its efficiency.Practical implications: Many mechanical systems should separate from sources of vibrations. The active or semiactive vibration control systems offer a number of advantages as compared with passive systems so that better efficiency of vibration damping is assured.Originality/value: The paper presents new concept of vibration damper with magnetorheological fluids and way of its application in industrial practice.

  8. Vibration control of active structures an introduction

    Preumont, Andre

    2002-01-01

    This text is an introduction to the dynamics of active structures and to the feedback control of lightly damped flexible structures. The emphasis is placed on basic issues and simple control strategies that work.

  9. Modeling and vibration control of an active membrane mirror

    Ruggiero, Eric J.; Inman, Daniel J.

    2009-09-01

    The future of space satellite technology lies in ultra-large mirrors and radar apertures for significant improvements in imaging and communication bandwidths. The availability of optical-quality membranes drives a parallel effort for structural models that can capture the dominant dynamics of large, ultra-flexible satellite payloads. Unfortunately, the inherent flexibility of membrane mirrors wreaks havoc with the payload's on-orbit stability and maneuverability. One possible means of controlling these undesirable dynamics is by embedding active piezoelectric ceramics near the boundary of the membrane mirror. In doing so, active feedback control can be used to eliminate detrimental vibration, perform static shape control, and evaluate the health of the structure. The overall motivation of the present work is to design a control system using distributed bimorph actuators to eliminate any detrimental vibration of the membrane mirror. As a basis for this study, a piezoceramic wafer was attached in a bimorph configuration near the boundary of a tensioned rectangular membrane sample. A finite element model of the system was developed to capture the relevant system dynamics from 0 to 300 Hz. The finite element model was compared against experimental results, and fair agreement found. Using the validated finite element models, structural control using linear quadratic regulator control techniques was then used to numerically demonstrate effective vibration control. Typical results show that less than 12 V of actuation voltage is required to eliminate detrimental vibration of the membrane samples in less than 15 ms. The functional gains of the active system are also derived and presented. These spatially descriptive control terms dictate favorable regions within the membrane domain for placing sensors and can be used as a design guideline for structural control applications. The results of the present work demonstrate that thin plate theory is an appropriate modeling

  10. Active Vibration Control of Satellite Flexible Structures during Attitude Maneuvers

    Saeed Hemmati; Morteza Shahravi; Keramat Malekzadeh

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is controlling active vibration of satellite flexible structures during attitude maneuvers. A smart structure is a structure which is able to sense and control active reaction to any external factors and stimulation. As it comes from the definition of smart structures, development of this knowledge depends on the materials science development, theories and strategies for control. In materials science, smart materials are developed in such a way that they are able to ...

  11. Neuroreceptor Activation by Vibration-Assisted Tunneling

    Hoehn, Ross D; Neven, Hartmut; Kais, Sabre

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute a large family of receptor proteins that sense molecular signals on the exterior of a cell and activate signal transduction pathways within the cell. Modeling how an agonist activates such a receptor is fundamental for an understanding of a wide variety of physiological processes and it is of tremendous value for pharmacology and drug design. Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) has been proposed as a model for the mechanism by which olfactory GPCRs are activated by a bound agonist. We apply this hypothesis to GPCRs within the mammalian nervous system using quantum chemical modeling. We found that non-endogenous agonists of the serotonin receptor share a particular IET spectral aspect both amongst each other and with the serotonin molecule: a peak whose intensity scales with the known agonist potencies. We propose an experiential validation of this model by utilizing lysergic acid dimethylamide (DAM-57), an ergot derivative, and its deuterated isotopo...

  12. Microgravity Active Vibration Isolation System on Parabolic Flights

    Dong, Wenbo; Pletser, Vladimir; Yang, Yang

    2016-07-01

    The Microgravity Active Vibration Isolation System (MAIS) aims at reducing on-orbit vibrations, providing a better controlled lower gravity environment for microgravity physical science experiments. The MAIS will be launched on Tianzhou-1, the first cargo ship of the China Manned Space Program. The principle of the MAIS is to suspend with electro-magnetic actuators a scientific payload, isolating it from the vibrating stator. The MAIS's vibration isolation capability is frequency-dependent and a decrease of vibration of about 40dB can be attained. The MAIS can accommodate 20kg of scientific payload or sample unit, and provide 30W of power and 1Mbps of data transmission. The MAIS is developed to support microgravity scientific experiments on manned platforms in low earth orbit, in order to meet the scientific requirements for fluid physics, materials science, and fundamental physics investigations, which usually need a very quiet environment, increasing their chances of success and their scientific outcomes. The results of scientific experiments and technology tests obtained with the MAIS will be used to improve future space based research. As the suspension force acting on the payload is very small, the MAIS can only be operative and tested in a weightless environment. The 'Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V.' (DLR, German Aerospace Centre) granted a flight opportunity to the MAIS experiment to be tested during its 27th parabolic flight campaign of September 2015 performed on the A310 ZERO-G aircraft managed by the French company Novespace, a subsidiary of the 'Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales' (CNES, French Space Agency). The experiment results confirmed that the 6 degrees of freedom motion control technique was effective, and that the vibration isolation performance fulfilled perfectly the expectations based on theoretical analyses and simulations. This paper will present the design of the MAIS and the experiment results obtained during the

  13. Anharmonic Effects on Vibrational Spectra Intensities: Infrared, Raman, Vibrational Circular Dichroism, and Raman Optical Activity.

    Bloino, Julien; Biczysko, Malgorzata; Barone, Vincenzo

    2015-12-10

    The aim of this paper is 2-fold. First, we want to report the extension of our virtual multifrequency spectrometer (VMS) to anharmonic intensities for Raman optical activity (ROA) with the full inclusion of first- and second-order resonances for both frequencies and intensities in the framework of the generalized second-order vibrational perturbation theory (GVPT2) for all kinds of vibrational spectroscopies. Then, from a more general point of view, we want to present and validate the performance of VMS for the parallel analysis of different vibrational spectra for medium-sized molecules (IR, Raman, VCD, ROA) including both mechanical and electric/magnetic anharmonicity. For the well-known methyloxirane benchmark, careful selection of density functional, basis set, and resonance thresholds permitted us to reach qualitative and quantitative agreement between experimental and computed band positions and shapes. Next, the whole series of halogenated azetidinones is analyzed, showing that it is now possible to interpret different spectra in terms of mass, electronegativity, polarizability, and hindrance variation between closely related substituents, chiral spectroscopies being particular effective in this connection. PMID:26580121

  14. Wireless sensor networks for active vibration control in automobile structures

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) are nowadays widely used in monitoring and tracking applications. This paper presents the feasibility of using WSNs in active vibration control strategies. The method employed here involves active-structural acoustic control using piezoelectric sensors distributed on a car structure. This system aims at being merged with a WSN whose head node collects data and processes control laws so as to command piezoelectric actuators wisely placed on the structure. We will study the feasibility of implementing WSNs in active vibration control and introduce a complete design methodology to optimize hardware/software and control law synergy in mechatronic systems. A design space exploration will be conducted so as to identify the best WSN platform and the resulting impact on control. (paper)

  15. Wireless sensor networks for active vibration control in automobile structures

    Mieyeville, Fabien; Ichchou, Mohamed; Scorletti, Gérard; Navarro, David; Du, Wan

    2012-07-01

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) are nowadays widely used in monitoring and tracking applications. This paper presents the feasibility of using WSNs in active vibration control strategies. The method employed here involves active-structural acoustic control using piezoelectric sensors distributed on a car structure. This system aims at being merged with a WSN whose head node collects data and processes control laws so as to command piezoelectric actuators wisely placed on the structure. We will study the feasibility of implementing WSNs in active vibration control and introduce a complete design methodology to optimize hardware/software and control law synergy in mechatronic systems. A design space exploration will be conducted so as to identify the best WSN platform and the resulting impact on control.

  16. Active Vibration Control of a Monopile Offshore Structure

    Nielsen, Søren R. K.; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Thesbjerg, L.

    1996-01-01

    structure an active control technique has been proposed in corporation with the consulting company Rambøll, Esbjerg, Denmark. The proposed control technique is based on the relationship between the position of the separation points of the boundary layer flow and the drag term in the wave force on the......, it can be necessary to use an active or a passive vibration control system. However, for a monopile with severe space problems it can be difficult to locate a passive control system such as e.g. a tuned mass damper. Therefore, in order to active control wave introduced vibrations of a monopile...... cylinder. This concept has been experimentally investigated with a test model in stationary flow tests. The idea is to have a large drag coefficient when the cylinder moves opposite of the wave direction implying a relatively large damping excitation. When the structure moves in the wave direction a small...

  17. Online identification of active absorbers in automotive vibration control

    Buttelmann, M.; Lohmann, B.; Vinogradski, M.; Nedeljkovic, N. [Bremen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Automatisierungstechnik; Marienfeld, P. [ContiTech Vibration Control GmbH, Hannover (Germany); Svaricek, F. [Continental Gummi-Werke AG, Hannover (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    In the past, engine-related noise and vibration in the vehicle cabin was exclusively reduced by passive absorption. Today, modern actuators and control systems make an active noise reduction possible by introducing counteracting vibration at 180 degrees phase lag. Within a cooperation of the Institute of Automation Systems and Continental AG, an approach using active absorbers at the engine mounts is investigated. As the dynamic behaviour of the active absorbers and other elements in the secondary path are time-variant (depending on temperature, age and other factors), an online identification is carried out. By this, the implemented feedforward control strategy is supported on a precise and frequently updated model of the secondary path. The chosen approaches to online and offline identification are presented together with first results achieved in online identification and with the overall control system. (orig.)

  18. Vibration Suppression of a Helicopter Fuselage by Pendulum Absorbers : Rigid-Body Blades with Aerodynamic Excitation Force

    Nagasaka, Imao; Ishida, Yukio; Koyama, Takayuki; Fujimatsu, Naoki

    Currently, some kinds of helicopters use pendulum absorbers in order to reduce vibrations. Present pendulum absorbers are designed based on the antiresonance concept used in the linear theory. However, since the vibration amplitudes of the pendulum are not small, it is considered that the nonlinearity has influence on the vibration characteristics. Therefore, the best suppression cannot be attained by using the linear theory. In a helicopter, periodic forces act on the blades due to the influences of the air thrust. These periodic forces act on the blades with the frequency which is the integer multiple of the rotational speed of the rotor. Our previous study proposed a 2-degree-of-freedom (2DOF) model composed of a rotor blade and a pendulum absorber. The blade was considered as a rigid body and it was excited by giving a sinusoidal deflection at its end. The present paper proposes a 3DOF model that is more similar to the real helicopter, since the freedom of the fuselage is added and the periodic forces are applied to the blade by aerodynamic force. The vibration is analyzed considering the nonlinear characteristics. The resonance curves of rotor blades with pendulum absorbers are obtained analytically and experimentally. It is clarified that the most efficient condition is obtained when the natural frequency of the pendulum is a little bit different from the frequency of the external force. Various unique nonlinear characteristics, such as bifurcations, are also shown.

  19. Vibration control of cylindrical shells using active constrained layer damping

    Ray, Manas C.; Chen, Tung-Huei; Baz, Amr M.

    1997-05-01

    The fundamentals of controlling the structural vibration of cylindrical shells treated with active constrained layer damping (ACLD) treatments are presented. The effectiveness of the ACLD treatments in enhancing the damping characteristics of thin cylindrical shells is demonstrated theoretically and experimentally. A finite element model (FEM) is developed to describe the dynamic interaction between the shells and the ACLD treatments. The FEM is used to predict the natural frequencies and the modal loss factors of shells which are partially treated with patches of the ACLD treatments. The predictions of the FEM are validated experimentally using stainless steel cylinders which are 20.32 cm in diameter, 30.4 cm in length and 0.05 cm in thickness. The cylinders are treated with ACLD patches of different configurations in order to target single or multi-modes of lobar vibrations. The ACLD patches used are made of DYAD 606 visco-elastic layer which is sandwiched between two layers of PVDF piezo-electric films. Vibration attenuations of 85% are obtained with maximum control voltage of 40 volts. Such attenuations are attributed to the effectiveness of the ACLD treatment in increasing the modal damping ratios by about a factor of four over those of conventional passive constrained layer damping (PCLD) treatments. The obtained results suggest the potential of the ACLD treatments in controlling the vibration of cylindrical shells which constitute the major building block of many critical structures such as cabins of aircrafts, hulls of submarines and bodies of rockets and missiles.

  20. Actively Controlled Landing Gear for Aircraft Vibration Reduction

    Horta, Lucas G.; Daugherty, Robert H.; Martinson, Veloria J.

    1999-01-01

    Concepts for long-range air travel are characterized by airframe designs with long, slender, relatively flexible fuselages. One aspect often overlooked is ground induced vibration of these aircraft. This paper presents an analytical and experimental study of reducing ground-induced aircraft vibration loads using actively controlled landing gears. A facility has been developed to test various active landing gear control concepts and their performance. The facility uses a NAVY A6-intruder landing gear fitted with an auxiliary hydraulic supply electronically controlled by servo valves. An analytical model of the gear is presented including modifications to actuate the gear externally and test data is used to validate the model. The control design is described and closed-loop test and analysis comparisons are presented.

  1. Active elastic metamaterials with applications in vibration and acoustics

    Pope, Simon A.; Laalej, Hatim; Daley, Stephen; Reynolds, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Elastic metamaterials provide a new approach to solving existing problems in vibration and acoustics. They have also been associated with novel concepts such as acoustic invisibility and subwavelength imaging. To be applied to many of the proposed applications a metamaterial would need to have the desired mass density and elastic moduli over a prescribed frequency band. Importantly active metamaterials provide a degree of adaptability. This paper will focus on extending a previous theoretical...

  2. Adaptive active vibration isolation – A control perspective

    Landau Ioan Doré

    2015-01-01

    The paper will review a number of recent developments for adaptive feedback compensation of multiple unknown and time-varying narrow band disturbances and for adaptive feedforward compensation of broad band disturbances in the presence of the inherent internal positive feedback caused by the coupling between the compensator system and the measurement of the image of the disturbance. Some experimental results obtained on a relevant active vibration control system will illustrate the performance of the various algorithms presented.

  3. Active Vibration Control of Rotor-Bearing Systems

    Blanco-Ortega, Andres; Silva-Navaro, Gerardo; Beltran-Carbajal, Francisco; Vela-Valdes, Luis Gerardo

    2010-01-01

    The active vibration control of a Jeffcott-like rotor through dynamic stiffness control and acceleration scheduling is addressed. The control approach consists of a servomechanism able to move one of the supporting bearings in such a way that the effective rotor length is controlled. As a consequence, the rotor stiffness and natural frequency are modified according to an off-line and smooth trajectory planning of the rotor speed/acceleration in order to reduce the unbalance response when pass...

  4. Active Vibration Suppression R and D for the NLC

    The nanometer scale beam sizes at the interaction point in linear colliders limit the allowable motion of the final focus magnets. We have constructed a prototype system to investigate the use of active vibration damping to control magnet motion. Inertial sensors are used to measure the position of a test mass, and a DSP based system provides feedback using electrostatic pushers. Simulation and experimental results for the control of a mechanically simple system are presented

  5. Active vibration control techniques for flexible space structures

    Parlos, Alexander G.; Jayasuriya, Suhada

    1990-01-01

    Two proposed control system design techniques for active vibration control in flexible space structures are detailed. Control issues relevant only to flexible-body dynamics are addressed, whereas no attempt was made to integrate the flexible and rigid-body spacecraft dynamics. Both of the proposed approaches revealed encouraging results; however, further investigation of the interaction of the flexible and rigid-body dynamics is warranted.

  6. Optically active vibrational modes of PPV derivatives on textile substrate

    In this work, MEH-PPV and BDMO-PPV films were deposited by spin-coating on “dirty” textile substrates of canvas, nylon, canvas with resin, jeans and on glass and the temperature dependence of the optical properties of them was studied by photoluminescence and Raman (300 K) techniques. The temperature dependence of the energy, of the half line width at half height of the purely electronic peak, of the integrated PL intensity and of the Huang-Rhys factor, S=I(01)/I(00), were obtained directly from the PL spectrum. For an analysis of the vibrational modes involved, Raman measurements were performed on substrates with and without polymers deposited and the results compared with those found in the literature. The films of MEH-PPV and BDMO-PPV showed optical properties similar to those films deposited on other substrates such as glass, metals, etc. It was observed an inversion of the first vibrational band in relation to the purely electronic peak with increasing temperature in the films deposited on nylon and canvas. The vibrational modes obtained by Raman were used to compose the simulation of the PL line shape of BDMO-PPV films on canvas and nylon, using a model proposed by Lin [29]. - Highlights: ► MEH-PPV and BDMO-PPV films were deposited by spin-coating on dirty textile. ► Their properties were studied by photoluminescence and Raman techniques. ► We observed inversion of first vibrational band in relation to purely electronic peak. ► Optically active vibrational modes of PPV derivatives were studied.

  7. Vibrations of wind power plants; Schwingungen von Windenergieanlagen

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    Within the meeting of the department vibration engineering of the Association of German Engineers (Duesseldorf, Federal Republic of Germany) between 3rd and 4th February, 2010 in Hanover (Federal Republic of Germany) the following lectures are presented: (1) Reduction of forced strengths generated by wagging and snaking of the rotor in the power strain of wind power plants (F. Mitsch); (2) Reduction of vibrations at wind power plants by means of active additional systems (S. Katz, S. Pankoke, N. Loix); (3) Reduction of vibrations by means of balancing and alignment (E. Becker, M. Kenzler); (4) Active absorber for reducing tonal emissions of vibration at wind power plants (R. Neugebauer, M. Linke, H. Kunze, M. Ulrich); (5) Control structures for damping torsion vibrations and peak loads in the power strain of wind power converters (C. Sourkounis); (6) Possibilities of a non-contact investigation of vibrations at wind power plants (R. Behrendt, E. Reimers, H. Wiegers); (7) Influences on the loadability of CMS statements (R. Wirth); (8) Recording modal structural properties with sensor grids and methods of operational modal analysis (A. Friedmann, D. Mayer, M. Koch, M. Kauba, T. Melz); (9) Early failure detection of damages of roller bearings in wind power gear units with variable speed (B. Hacke, G. Poll); (10) Condition monitoring in wind power plants - structure monitoring and life time monitoring of wind power plants (SCMS and LCMS) (H. Lange); (11) Development of a model-based structural health monitoring system for condition monitoring of rotor blades (C. Ebert, H. Friedmann, F.O. Henkel, B. Frankenstein, L. Schubert); (12) Efficient remote monitoring at wind power plants by means of an external diagnosis centre (G. Ceglarek); (13) Accurate turbine modelling at component and assembly level for durability and acoustic analysis (D. v. Werner, W. Hendricx); (14) Possibilities of the investigation of the dynamic behaviour of power strains in wind power plants by

  8. Coupled Torsional and Bending Vibrations of Actively Controlled Drillstrings

    YIGIT, A. S.; CHRISTOFOROU, A. P.

    2000-06-01

    The dynamics of actively controlled drillstrings is studied. The equations of motion are derived using a lumped parameter model in which the coupling between torsional and bending vibrations is considered. The model also includes the dynamics of the rotary drive system which contains the rotary table, the gearbox and an armature controlled DC motor. The interactions between the drillstring and the borehole which are considered, include the impacts of collars with the borehole wall as well as bit rotation-dependent weight and torque on bit (WOB and TOB). Simulation results obtained by numerically solving the equations of motion are in close qualitative agreement with field and laboratory observations regarding stick-slip oscillations. A linear quadratic regulator (LQR) controller is designed based on a linearized model and is shown to be effective in eliminating this type of oscillations. It is also shown that for some operational parameters the control action may excite large bending vibrations due to coupling with the torsional motion.

  9. Research of Air-Magnet Active Vibration Isolation System Based on H∞ Control

    Wen Xianglong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Considering the uncertainty of air-magnet active vibration isolation system (AMAVIS, passive vibration isolation was combined with active vibration isolation, which adopted H∞ control strategies. System identification method was used to get the channel model. By adopting mixed sensitivity design strategy, weighting functions were chosen and H∞ controller was designed. Both simulation results and experimental results show AMAVIS based on H∞ control had satisfying effect of vibration reduction in assigned frequency band.

  10. 旋翼复合材料桨叶弹损穿孔的有限元建模方法%FINITE ELEMENT MODLEING METHOD OF COMPOSITE ROTOR BLADE WITH BALLISTIC PERFORATION

    孙中涛; 王华明

    2013-01-01

    军用直升机旋翼桨叶具有抗弹击设计要求.根据复合材料桨叶的结构特点和工作特性,提出了建立复合材料桨叶弹击穿孔有限元模型的等截面节点移除法,该建模方法先采用等截面拉伸建立桨叶典型结构段的三维模型,然后将弹孔处的节点移除以模拟桨叶的弹损状况.所建立的桨叶弹损模型具有较高的置信度和可接受的解算规模,可作为进一步研究复合材料桨叶抗弹击性能的基础.%The military helicopter rotor blade has design requirement of sustaining some kind of ballistic damage. According to the structural properties and operating characteristics of composite blades, this article provides an even cross-section and node removed method to build finite elements model of composite blade with ballistic perforation. This modeling method builds three-dimensional model of blade typical section by even cross-section tension, then nodes around bullet holes are removed to simulate ballistic damage of the blade. The model of ballistic blade built in this article has a high degree of confidence and an acceptable solver scale, it can be used for further research of composite blades performance of resisting ballistic damage.

  11. Smart materials and active noise and vibration control in vehicles

    Doppenberg, E.J.J.; Berkhoff, A.P.; Overbeek, M. van [TNO Institute of Applied Physics, Delft (Netherlands)

    2001-07-01

    Results are presented for the reduction of sound radiated from a structure using different control methodologies. Two approaches for active structural acoustic control are mentioned to reduce sound radiated by the structure: the acoustic approach or the vibro-acoustic approach. In both cases integrated actuators in structure materials are necessary to realise feasible products. Furthermore the development of an efficient shaker for Active Isolation techniques is described. The prototype of TNO TPD can produce a force of 400 N up to 250 Hz at a good performance-volume ratio. To enhance the robustness of the active control applications, the use of the subspace identification based control methods are developed. The robustness property of subspace identification methods forms the basis of an accurate model updating mechanism, using small size data batches. The performed simulations reveal excellent robustness performance under very general noise conditions or during operation of the control system. Furthermore the development of the techniques can be exploited to realise sound comfort requirements to enhance audible communications of vehicle related applications. To anticipate to these developments in the automotive industry, TNO has set up a Sound and Vibrations Research Centre with Twente University and a research program on Smart Panels with the Delft University. To investigate the potential markets and applications for sound comfort in the means of transportation, TNO-TPD and the Institute of Sound and Vibration Research in England (ISVR) have agreed on a cooperative venture to develop and realise 'active control of electroacoustics' (ACE). (orig.)

  12. Real Time Vibration Control of Active Suspension System with Active Force Control using Iterative Learning Algorithm

    Kalaivani

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents concurrent vibration control of a laboratory scaled vibration isolator platform with Active Force Control (AFC using Iterative Learning Algorithm (ILA. The work investigates the performance of the traditional Proportional Integral Derivative Controller (PIDC with and without AFC using ILA for vibration suppression. The physical single degree of freedom quarter car has been interfaced with a personal computer using a National Instruments data acquisition card NI USB 6008. The controllers are designed and simulated using LabVIEW simulation software. The results infer that the PIDC with AFC using ILA works superior than the PIDC.

  13. Computational Fluid Dynamic Analysis of a Vibrating Turbine Blade

    Osama N. Alshroof

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the numerical fluid-structure interaction (FSI modelling of a vibrating turbine blade using the commercial software ANSYS-12.1. The study has two major aims: (i discussion of the current state of the art of modelling FSI in gas turbine engines and (ii development of a “tuned” one-way FSI model of a vibrating turbine blade to investigate the correlation between the pressure at the turbine casing surface and the vibrating blade motion. Firstly, the feasibility of the complete FSI coupled two-way, three-dimensional modelling of a turbine blade undergoing vibration using current commercial software is discussed. Various modelling simplifications, which reduce the full coupling between the fluid and structural domains, are then presented. The one-way FSI model of the vibrating turbine blade is introduced, which has the computational efficiency of a moving boundary CFD model. This one-way FSI model includes the corrected motion of the vibrating turbine blade under given engine flow conditions. This one-way FSI model is used to interrogate the pressure around a vibrating gas turbine blade. The results obtained show that the pressure distribution at the casing surface does not differ significantly, in its general form, from the pressure at the vibrating rotor blade tip.

  14. Active vibration control of multibody system with quick startup and brake based on active damping

    TANG Hua-ping; TANG Yun-jun; TAO Gong-an

    2006-01-01

    A kind of active vibration control method was presented based on active damping and optimization design for driving load of multibody system with quick startup and brake. Dynamical equation of multibody system with quick startup and brake and piezoelectric actuators intelligent structure was built. The optimum driving load was calculated by applying the presented method. The self-sensing and self-tuning closed-loop active vibration control in quick startup and brake process was realized. The control algorithm, using local velocity negative feedback, i.e. the output of a sensor only affects the output of the actuator collocated, can induce damping effectively to actively suppress the system vibration. Based on the optimization design for driving load of multibody system with quick startup and bake, the active damping of piezoelectric actuators intelligent structure was used to farther suppress the vibration of system. Theoretical analysis and calculation of numerical show that the proposed method makes the vibration of system decrease more than the optimal design method for driving load of multibody system.

  15. Vibrational spectra, structure and antioxidant activity of gossypol imine derivatives

    Ilkevych, N. S.; Schroeder, G.; Rybachenko, V. I.; Chotiy, K. Y.; Makarova, R. A.

    2012-02-01

    The structures and tautomeric equilibria of natural polyphenol gossypol and four its imine derivatives were studied by FT-IR-, NMR-spectroscopy and quantum chemistry methods. It was shown that gossypol Schiff bases exist in solution as enamine-enamine tautomer and hydrazones as imine-imine tautomer. Infrared absorption spectra of studied compounds were simulated using the PM3 method. The fundamental vibrational frequencies were evaluated using various scale factors which yield a good agreement between observed and calculated frequencies. Free radical scavenging activity of gossypol and its imine derivatives was evaluated using DPPH method. Antioxidant activity of studied compounds was characterized. Gossypol hydrazones were shown to be more efficient, while Schiff base to be less efficient as antioxidants in comparison with gossypol itself.

  16. Active vibration control of spatial flexible multibody systems

    In this work a flexible multibody dynamics formulation of complex models including elastic components made of composite materials is extended to include piezoelectric sensors and actuators. The only limitation for the deformation of a structural member is that they must remain elastic and linear when described in a coordinate frame fixed to a material point or region of its domain. The flexible finite-element model of each flexible body is obtained referring the flexible body nodal coordinates to the body fixed frame and using a diagonalized mass description of the inertia in the mass matrix and on the gyroscopic force vector. The modal superposition technique is used to reduce the number of generalized coordinates to a reasonable dimension for complex shaped structural models of flexible bodies. The active vibration control of the flexible multibody components is implemented using an asymmetric collocated piezoelectric sensor/actuator pair. An electromechanically coupled model is taken into account to properly consider the surface-bonded piezoelectric transducers and their effects on the time and spatial response of the flexible multibody components. The electromechanical effects are introduced in the flexible multibody equations of motion by the use of beam and plate/shell elements, developed to this purpose. A comparative study between the classical control strategies, constant gain and amplitude velocity feedback, and optimal control strategy, linear quadratic regulator (LQR), is performed in order to investigate their effectiveness to suppress vibrations in structures with piezoelectric sensing and actuating patches.

  17. Active vibration control of spatial flexible multibody systems

    Neto, Maria Augusta, E-mail: augusta.neto@dem.uc.pt [Universidade de Coimbra (Polo II), Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica, Faculdade de Ciencia e Tecnologia (Portugal); Ambrosio, Jorge A. C., E-mail: jorge@dem.ist.utl.pt [Instituto Superior Tecnico, Instituto de Engenharia Mecanica (Portugal); Roseiro, Luis M., E-mail: lroseiro@isec.pt [Instituto Superior de Engenharia de Coimbra, Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica (Portugal); Amaro, A., E-mail: ana.amaro@dem.uc.pt [Universidade de Coimbra (Polo II), Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica, Faculdade de Ciencia e Tecnologia (Portugal); Vasques, C. M. A., E-mail: cvasques@inegi.up.pt [Universidade do Porto, INEGI-Instituto de Engenharia Mecanica e Gestao Industrial (Portugal)

    2013-06-15

    In this work a flexible multibody dynamics formulation of complex models including elastic components made of composite materials is extended to include piezoelectric sensors and actuators. The only limitation for the deformation of a structural member is that they must remain elastic and linear when described in a coordinate frame fixed to a material point or region of its domain. The flexible finite-element model of each flexible body is obtained referring the flexible body nodal coordinates to the body fixed frame and using a diagonalized mass description of the inertia in the mass matrix and on the gyroscopic force vector. The modal superposition technique is used to reduce the number of generalized coordinates to a reasonable dimension for complex shaped structural models of flexible bodies. The active vibration control of the flexible multibody components is implemented using an asymmetric collocated piezoelectric sensor/actuator pair. An electromechanically coupled model is taken into account to properly consider the surface-bonded piezoelectric transducers and their effects on the time and spatial response of the flexible multibody components. The electromechanical effects are introduced in the flexible multibody equations of motion by the use of beam and plate/shell elements, developed to this purpose. A comparative study between the classical control strategies, constant gain and amplitude velocity feedback, and optimal control strategy, linear quadratic regulator (LQR), is performed in order to investigate their effectiveness to suppress vibrations in structures with piezoelectric sensing and actuating patches.

  18. Aerodynamic unsteady loads and vibrations of steam turbine L.P. blades

    In steam turbines, the aerodynamic sources of the blades vibrations for low pressure stages can induce a high stress level for some operating points. Therefore theoretical and experimental investigations are performed at E.D.F. They specially focus on the turbine rotor-stator interaction and the aerolastic rotor stability. A numerical method has been developed for predicting the aerodynamic damping of one cascade of profiles. The insteady flow calculation is based on the boundary element method, and is performed for the blade-to-blade surfaces. The results obtained on the first flexural mode for the L.P. blades of a 900 MW steam turbine, for several displacements and for several interblade phase angles, exhibits no instability of the rotor except low phase angles, but it is difficult to investigate these cases. The numerical results also support the relevance of the quasi-steady assumption. The same method has been used to calculate the rotor-stator interaction in the case of a potential flow. The main parameters are the gap between the two rows and the stator blade number/rotor blade number ratio (NR/NS). The results show that the dynamic loads strongly decrease with respect to the gap increase. Otherwise NR/NS = 2 (periodical pattern), which is a good approximation of the industrial value, provides slight unsteady loads on the rotor blades comparatively to other values

  19. Active Vibration Isolation System for Sub-microultra-precision Turning Machine

    2000-01-01

    Now vibration isolation of ultra-precision machine tool is usually achieved through air-springs systems. As far as HCM-I sub-micro turning machine developed by HIT, an active vibration isolation system that consists of air-springs and electro-magnetic actuators was presented. The primary function of air-springs is to support the turning machine and to isolate the high-frequency vibration. The electro-magnetic actuators controlled by fuzzy-neural networks isolate the low-frequency vibration. The experiment indicates that active vibration isolation system isolates base-vibration effectively in all the frequency range. So the vibration of the machine bed is controlled under 10-6g and the surface roughness is improved.

  20. Reduction of helicopter blade-vortex interaction noise by active rotor control technology

    Yu, Yung H.; Gmelin, Bernd; Splettstoesser, Wolf; Philippe, Jean J.; Prieur, Jean; Brooks, Thomas F.

    Helicopter blade-vortex interaction noise is one of the most severe noise sources and is very important both in community annoyance and military detection. Research over the decades has substantially improved basic physical understanding of the mechanisms generating rotor blade-vortex interaction noise and also of controlling techniques, particularly using active rotor control technology. This paper reviews active rotor control techniques currently available for rotor blade-vortex interaction noise reduction, including higher harmonic pitch control, individual blade control, and on-blade control technologies. Basic physical mechanisms of each active control technique are reviewed in terms of noise reduction mechanism and controlling aerodynamic or structural parameters of a blade. Active rotor control techniques using smart structures/materials are discussed, including distributed smart actuators to induce local torsional or flapping deformations.

  1. Reduction of Helicopter Blade-Vortex Interaction Noise by Active Rotor Control Technology

    Yu, Yung H.; Gmelin, Bernd; Splettstoesser, Wolf; Brooks, Thomas F.; Philippe, Jean J.; Prieur, Jean

    1997-01-01

    Helicopter blade-vortex interaction noise is one of the most severe noise sources and is very important both in community annoyance and military detection. Research over the decades has substantially improved basic physical understanding of the mechanisms generating rotor blade-vortex interaction noise and also of controlling techniques, particularly using active rotor control technology. This paper reviews active rotor control techniques currently available for rotor blade vortex interaction noise reduction, including higher harmonic pitch control, individual blade control, and on-blade control technologies. Basic physical mechanisms of each active control technique are reviewed in terms of noise reduction mechanism and controlling aerodynamic or structural parameters of a blade. Active rotor control techniques using smart structures/materials are discussed, including distributed smart actuators to induce local torsional or flapping deformations, Published by Elsevier Science Ltd.

  2. Active low-frequency vertical vibration isolation system for precision measurements

    Wu, Kang; Li, Gang; Hu, Hua; Wang, Lijun

    2016-06-01

    Low-frequency vertical vibration isolation systems play important roles in precision measurements to reduce seismic and environmental vibration noise. Several types of active vibration isolation systems have been developed. However, few researches focus on how to optimize the test mass install position in order to improve the vibration transmissibility. An active low-frequency vertical vibration isolation system based on an earlier instrument, the Super Spring, is designed and implemented. The system, which is simple and compact, consists of two stages: a parallelogram-shaped linkage to ensure vertical motion, and a simple spring-mass system. The theoretical analysis of the vibration isolation system is presented, including terms erroneously ignored before. By carefully choosing the mechanical parameters according to the above analysis and using feedback control, the resonance frequency of the system is reduced from 2.3 to 0.03 Hz, a reduction by a factor of more than 75. The vibration isolation system is installed as an inertial reference in an absolute gravimeter, where it improved the scatter of the absolute gravity values by a factor of 5. The experimental results verifies the improved performance of the isolation system, making it particularly suitable for precision experiments. The improved vertical vibration isolation system can be used as a prototype for designing high-performance active vertical isolation systems. An improved theoretical model of this active vibration isolation system with beam-pivot configuration is proposed, providing fundamental guidelines for vibration isolator design and assembling.

  3. Numerical Simulation of Supersonic Flow Field in Rotor Blade Cascade for Impulse Torpedo Turbine%纯冲动式鱼雷涡轮机动叶栅超音速流动数值仿真

    郭兆元; 曹浩; 赵卫兵

    2013-01-01

      为了研究鱼雷涡轮机通流道内的流动特征进而指导涡轮通流结构设计,在合理简化模型基础上,采用计算流体力学(CFD)方法对纯冲动式鱼雷涡轮发动机转子动叶流道内超音速流动状况进行了数值仿真,详细分析了叶栅内流动状况、总压损失、叶片气动载荷和温度载荷。仿真结果表明,动叶流道内流动比较复杂,攻角对其内的流动有较大影响,该数值越大,附面层分离越严重,激波越强,总压损失也越大;同一个叶片在经过喷嘴流域时,其气动载荷呈现先增大后减小的趋势,受交变的气动力作用,而叶片气动承受载荷越大其温度载荷就越小,叶片内的温度梯度就越小。%To study fluid characteristic in torpedo turbine flow passages and guide structure design of the flow passag-es, the flow field in rotor blade cascade of an impulse supersonic torpedo turbine was numerically investigated by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method. The detail information of flow, total pressure loss, and aerodynamic load and temperature load on a blade were analyzed. Simulation results show that: flow in rotor flow passages is very com-plicated; blade incidence angle exerts significant effect on the flow; the larger the incidence angle, the more severe the boundary layer separation, the stronger the shock wave, and the more the total pressure loss; when a blade is pass through the nozzle area, the aerodynamic load on it first increases and then decreases; heavier aerodynamic load leads to smaller temperature load and temperature gradient in the blade.

  4. 鱼雷涡轮机叶片顶部气封流场数值研究%Numerical Investigation on the Tip Leakage Flow of Rotor Blade of Torpedo Turbine

    伊进宝; 赵卫兵; 师海潮

    2011-01-01

    A three-dimensional(3D) viscous and steady computational fluid dynamics(CFD) analysis is performed for calculating turbine rotor tip leakage flow field of a torpedo by solving RANS-Navier-Stocks equations. The effect of different seal structure on turbine passage efficiency and rotor tip leakage flow is studied. Different numbers of sealing fins at the rotor blade are simulated, and the influence of the number of sealing fins on turbine passage efficiency and rotor tip leakage flow characteristic is analyzed. The results show that the turbine efficiency is improved remarkably after applying the seal technology. Compared with comb-type seal structure, the labyrinth seal exhibits better airtight performance. The leakage flow in the labyrinth seal housing forms 3D vortex current which transform the kinetic energy of the leakage flow into heat energy, and leads to a decrease in the seal leakage flow rate of the labyrinth seal. Airtight performance gets better with increasing number of fins.%通过求解雷诺平均的NAVIER-STOKES方程组,数值计算了带气封围带结构的鱼雷涡轮机动叶顶部间隙内部3D流场及特性,研究了不同气封结构形式对涡轮机通流效率和动叶顶部泄漏流动的作用,比较了迷宫式气封不同齿数下动叶间隙泄漏气流的流动特性,分析了迷宫式气封齿数对鱼雷涡轮机通流效率和泄漏特性的影响.研究表明,在叶片顶部间隙中采用气封结构能够有效减小燃气泄露流量,提高涡轮机通流气动性能;在相同气封齿数下,迷宫式气封结构要比一般梳齿型气封结构密封效果好;迷宫气封通过气流在气封齿间空腔形成的3D涡流,将气流动能转化为热能,从而起到密封效果;气封齿数越多,密封效果越好,对涡轮机通流性能的改善也越大.

  5. Voice Coil Actuator for Active Vibration Isolation in Microgravity

    Brusa, E.; Carabelli, S.; Genta, G.; Maddaleno, F.; Silvagni, M.; Tonoli, A.

    2002-01-01

    Many microgravity experiments require very low levels of acceleration which cannot be achieved on the International Space Station due to the residual vibration. A vibration isolation system is then usually devised between the experiment and the space station to obtain the desired accelerations at the experiment level. The very low frequency threshold required by the isolation specifications makes passive solutions for the isolation difficult to implement. This is mainly due to the practical impossibility of achieving high values of compliance of the elastic suspension. Furthermore, the unavoidable connections of uncertain characteristics between the experiment and the space station makes the problem even more difficult to be addressed. Disturbance reduction can be performed by means of active vibration isolation, based on magnetic suspension technology acting both at rack and at scientific experiment levels. The stiffness and damping of the active suspension can be tuned by the control loop to minimise the acceleration of the payload. The mechatronic design of an active magnetic suspension for vibration isolation in microgravity has been performed by resorting to the so-called voice-coil configuration, after a preliminary trade-off analysis of the available magnetic actuators and materials. The optimisation of the actuator layout was developed with respect to the design airgap and force density (N/kg of actuator) and force resolution requirements, by demonstrating that the configuration based on Lorentz magnetic force is more suitable for the above application in terms of stability, bi- directionality of the actuation, cross coupling effects and linearity of the force. The aim of the design was the maximisation of the actuation force/mass ratio. The FEM analysis of the voice coil allowed to investigate the flux leakage and the cross coupling effects between the actuation forces along the three principal directions of the active device. A procedure for the numerical

  6. Active vibration and balance system for closed cycle thermodynamic machines

    Qiu, Songgang (Inventor); Augenblick, John E. (Inventor); Peterson, Allen A. (Inventor); White, Maurice A. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    An active balance system is provided for counterbalancing vibrations of an axially reciprocating machine. The balance system includes a support member, a flexure assembly, a counterbalance mass, and a linear motor or an actuator. The support member is configured for attachment to the machine. The flexure assembly includes at least one flat spring having connections along a central portion and an outer peripheral portion. One of the central portion and the outer peripheral portion is fixedly mounted to the support member. The counterbalance mass is fixedly carried by the flexure assembly along another of the central portion and the outer peripheral portion. The linear motor has one of a stator and a mover fixedly mounted to the support member and another of the stator and the mover fixedly mounted to the counterbalance mass. The linear motor is operative to axially reciprocate the counterbalance mass. A method is also provided.

  7. Tuning of active vibration controllers for ACTEX by genetic algorithm

    Kwak, Moon K.; Denoyer, Keith K.

    1999-06-01

    This paper is concerned with the optimal tuning of digitally programmable analog controllers on the ACTEX-1 smart structures flight experiment. The programmable controllers for each channel include a third order Strain Rate Feedback (SRF) controller, a fifth order SRF controller, a second order Positive Position Feedback (PPF) controller, and a fourth order PPF controller. Optimal manual tuning of several control parameters can be a difficult task even though the closed-loop control characteristics of each controller are well known. Hence, the automatic tuning of individual control parameters using Genetic Algorithms is proposed in this paper. The optimal control parameters of each control law are obtained by imposing a constraint on the closed-loop frequency response functions using the ACTEX mathematical model. The tuned control parameters are then uploaded to the ACTEX electronic control electronics and experiments on the active vibration control are carried out in space. The experimental results on ACTEX will be presented.

  8. Cryogenic Ion Vibrational Spectroscopy of - CH Activation Intermediates

    Marsh, Brett; Garand, Etienne

    2013-06-01

    Despite the rather simple composition of alkanes the strength of their C-C and C-H bonds has made controlled, selective reaction of these compounds an unrealized goal of synthetic chemistry. The field was pioneered by Shilov and coworkers in 1969 when they observed the exchange of H and D in methane that was bubbled into an acidic solution of K_2PtCl_4. The Shilov reaction has since been extended to induce oxidation of methane selectively to methanol and has become the standard bearer of CH activation despite its limitations. The mechanism for the reaction, while inferred from kinetics studies, is still largely uncharacterized. Here, we present our work towards applying cryogenic ion vibrational spectroscopy (CIVS) to capture the intermediate species of this reaction with a focus on the σ-CH adduct formed between methane and Pt(II) complexes that is believed to be crucial to the selectivity and rate of this reaction.

  9. Extended aeroelastic analysis for helicopter rotors with prescribed hub motion and blade appended penduluum vibration absorbers

    Bielawa, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    The mathematical development for the expanded capabilities of the G400 rotor aeroelastic analysis was examined. The G400PA expanded analysis simulates the dynamics of all conventional rotors, blade pendulum vibration absorbers, and the higher harmonic excitations resulting from prescribed vibratory hub motions and higher harmonic blade pitch control. The methodology for modeling the unsteady stalled airloads of two dimensional airfoils is discussed. Formulations for calculating the rotor impedance matrix appropriate to the higher harmonic blade excitations are outlined. This impedance matrix, and the associated vibratory hub loads, are the rotor dynamic characteristic elements for use in the simplified coupled rotor/fuselage vibration analysis (SIMVIB). Updates to the development of the original G400 theory, program documentation, user instructions and information are presented.

  10. Performance of active vibration control technology: the ACTEX flight experiments

    Nye, T. W.; Manning, R. A.; Qassim, K.

    1999-12-01

    This paper discusses the development and results of two intelligent structures space-flight experiments, each of which could affect architecture designs of future spacecraft. The first, the advanced controls technology experiment I (ACTEX I), is a variable stiffness tripod structure riding as a secondary payload on a classified spacecraft. It has been operating well past its expected life since becoming operational in 1996. Over 60 on-orbit experiments have been run on the ACTEX I flight experiment. These experiments form the basis for in-space controller design problems and for concluding lifetime/reliability data on the active control components. Transfer functions taken during the life of ACTEX I have shown consistent predictability and stability in structural behavior, including consistency with those measurements taken on the ground prior to a three year storage period and the launch event. ACTEX I can change its modal characteristics by employing its dynamic change mechanism that varies preloads in portions of its structure. Active control experiments have demonstrated maximum vibration reductions of 29 dB and 16 dB in the first two variable modes of the system, while operating over a remarkable on-orbit temperature range of -80 °C to 129 °C. The second experiment, ACTEX II, was successfully designed, ground-tested, and integrated on an experimental Department of Defense satellite prior to its loss during a launch vehicle failure in 1995. ACTEX II also had variable modal behavior by virtue of a two-axis gimbal and added challenges of structural flexibility by being a large deployable appendage. Although the loss of ACTEX II did not provide space environment experience, ground testing resulted in space qualifying the hardware and demonstrated 21 dB, 14 dB, and 8 dB reductions in amplitude of the first three primary structural modes. ACTEX II could use either active and/or passive techniques to affect vibration suppression. Both experiments trailblazed