WorldWideScience

Sample records for active regulatory processes

  1. Regulatory activities

    This publication, compiled in 8 chapters, presents the regulatory system developed by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (NRA) of the Argentine Republic. The following activities and developed topics in this document describe: the evolution of the nuclear regulatory activity in Argentina; the Argentine regulatory system; the nuclear regulatory laws and standards; the inspection and safeguards of nuclear facilities; the emergency systems; the environmental systems; the environmental monitoring; the analysis laboratories on physical and biological dosimetry, prenatal irradiation, internal irradiation, radiation measurements, detection techniques on nuclear testing, medical program on radiation protection; the institutional relations with national and international organization; the training courses and meeting; the technical information

  2. Rationales for regulatory activity

    Perhac, R.M. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1997-02-01

    The author provides an outline which touches on the types of concerns about risk evaluation which are addressed in the process of establishing regulatory guides. Broadly he says regulatory activity serves three broad constituents: (1) Paternalism (private risk); (2) Promotion of social welfare (public risks); (3) Protection of individual rights (public risks). He then discusses some of the major issues encountered in reaching a decision on what is an acceptable level of risk within each of these areas, and how one establishes such a level.

  3. Hastening the regulatory process

    The state of the Canadian oil industry was discussed during this power point presentation with particular emphasis on its production, exports, drilling, industry revenues and capital investment levels. The proposed projects in each of northern Alberta's oil sands deposits, the Athabasca, Peace River and Cold Lake were were announced, along with the inventory of major Alberta projects and the projection of oil sands capital investment. Since 1998, $9 billion has been invested and a further $33 billion has been announced for new or expanded oil sands projects. The year 2000 estimates for Canadian crude oil and natural gas production are 2.3 million barrels per day and 6.3 trillion cubic feet per year respectively. This represented a record year for production of both crude oil and natural gas. In 2000, more than 15,500 wells were drilled in Canada. A graph depicting Canadian crude oil supply forecasted a steady increase in supply from year 2000 to 2010. The Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers (CAPP) completed a review of the Alberta Energy and Utilities Board regulatory and enforcement processes. Both industry and government efforts are focusing on eliminating regulatory overlap and duplication. Some of the main areas of interest for exploration, drilling, production and pipeline facilities include the examination of regulatory processes for environmentally sensitive areas, rural municipalities with planning bylaws, aboriginal lands and additional fees. 8 figs

  4. Transparency of nuclear regulatory activities

    One of the main missions of nuclear regulators is to protect the public, and this cannot be completely achieved without public confidence. The more a regulatory process is transparent, the more such confidence will grow. Despite important cultural differences across countries, a number of common features characterise media and public expectations regarding any activity with an associated risk. A common understanding of transparency and main stakeholders' expectations in the field of nuclear safety were identified during this workshop, together with a number of conditions and practices aimed at improving the transparency of nuclear regulatory activities. These conditions and practices are described herein, and will be of particular interest to all those working in the nuclear regulatory field. Their implementation may, however, differ from one country to another depending on national context. (authors)

  5. International regulatory activities

    Different international regulatory activities are presented: recommendation on the protection of the public against exposure to radon in drinking water supplies, amendment to the legislation implementing the regulation on imports of agricultural products originating in third countries following the Chernobyl accident, resolution on the commission green paper towards a European strategy for the security of energy supply, declaration of mandatory nature of the international code for the safe carriage of packaged irradiated nuclear fuel, plutonium and high level radioactive wastes on board ships, adoption of action plan against nuclear terrorism. (N.C.)

  6. International regulatory activities

    Concerning International regulatory activities, we find for the european atomic energy community an entry into force of the lisbon treaty (2009), it amends the treaty on European union and replaces the treaty establishing the European Community by the new treaty on the functioning of the European Union; more, an amendment to council regulation on the conditions governing imports of agricultural products originating in third countries following the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power station (2009). About International atomic energy agency is reported an open-ended meeting of technical and legal experts for sharing of information on states implementation of the code of conduct on the safety and security of radioactive sources and its supplementary guidance on the import and export of radioactive sources (2010). (N.C.)

  7. Organization of nuclear regulatory activities

    The paper presents the structure, missions and organizational aspects of the CNCAN, the National Commission for the control of nuclear activities in Romania. The paper addresses the following main issues: 1.General aspects; 2.Organizational structure of the NRA in Romania; 3.General description of the Division for Nuclear Safety Assessments; 4.Specific activities; 5.Regulatory approaches and practices. Under the title of 'General aspects' the following three basic statements are highlighted: 1.CNCAN is a governmental organization responsible for the development of the regulatory framework, the control of its implementation and the licensing of nuclear facilities; 2.CNCAN is the national authority competent in exercising the regulatory activity, authorization and control in the nuclear field provided by the law No. 111/ 1996 republished in 1998; 3.The Commission exercises its functions independently of the ministries and other authorities of the public control administration being subordinated to the Romanian Government. The organizational structure is as follows: - President, the Managerial Council and the Advisory Council coordinating the four General Divisions that are responsible for: - Nuclear Safety with Division of Nuclear Safety Assessment and Division of Nuclear Objectives Surveillance; - Radiological Safety with Division of Radiological Safety Assessment and Division of Operational Radiation Protection; - Surveillance of Environmental Radioactivity with Division of Assessment and Analysis and Division of National Network; - Development and Resource with the Division of Economy and Division of Human Resources. In addition under direct coordination of the President operate the Division of Radiation Protection, Transport and Radioactive Waste and the Division of International Cooperation and Communication. Specific activities are listed describing among others the issues of: - Safety of nuclear installation; - Evaluation relating to licensing of nuclear

  8. Modelling Nonstationary Gene Regulatory Processes

    Marco Grzegorcyzk

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available An important objective in systems biology is to infer gene regulatory networks from postgenomic data, and dynamic Bayesian networks have been widely applied as a popular tool to this end. The standard approach for nondiscretised data is restricted to a linear model and a homogeneous Markov chain. Recently, various generalisations based on changepoint processes and free allocation mixture models have been proposed. The former aim to relax the homogeneity assumption, whereas the latter are more flexible and, in principle, more adequate for modelling nonlinear processes. In our paper, we compare both paradigms and discuss theoretical shortcomings of the latter approach. We show that a model based on the changepoint process yields systematically better results than the free allocation model when inferring nonstationary gene regulatory processes from simulated gene expression time series. We further cross-compare the performance of both models on three biological systems: macrophages challenged with viral infection, circadian regulation in Arabidopsis thaliana, and morphogenesis in Drosophila melanogaster.

  9. National legislative and regulatory activities

    OECD

    2006-01-01

    This article describes national nuclear legislative and regulatory activities in Australia, Brazil, France, Germany, Hungary, India, Ireland, Romania, the Slovak Republic, Slovenia, Sweden, and the Ukraine in 2005 and 2006.

  10. National legislative and regulatory activities

    OECD

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the national nuclear legislative and regulatory activities of Belgium, Brazil, Canada, France, Latvia, Moldova, Morocco, Norway, Romania, the Slovak Republic, Slovenia, Spain and Switzerland in 2006.

  11. National legislative and regulatory activities

    This paper presents different national legislative and regulatory activities of many countries, concerning the radiation protection, general legislation, transport and management of radioactive materials, regulations on nuclear trade. (A.L.B.)

  12. National legislative and regulatory activities

    Different national legislative and regulatory activities in the field of nuclear energy are exposed here; from the radiation protection and the safe use of nuclear energy, to the question of radioactive waste management, the nuclear area is seen through the national decrees, amendments orders and acts for eighteen countries. (N.C.)

  13. National legislative and regulatory activities

    This section of the Bulletin presents a summary of the recent national legislative and regulatory activities sorted by country and topic: - Algeria: Nuclear security. - France: Radioactive waste management; Nuclear safety and radiological protection; General legislation; International co-operation. - Germany: International trade. - Indonesia: Nuclear security, General legislation. - Ireland: Nuclear safety and radiological protection; General legislation. - Lithuania: Nuclear security; Nuclear safety and radiological protection. - Slovak Republic: International co-operation; Liability and compensation; Environmental protection. - Switzerland: Radioactive waste management. - United Arab Emirates: Liability and compensation. - United States: Radioactive waste management; Licensing and regulatory infrastructure

  14. National legislative and regulatory activities

    This section treats of the following National legislative and regulatory activities: 1 - Canada: Liability and compensation; 2 - France: Liability and compensation; Nuclear safety and radiological protection; 3 - Greece: Organisation and structure; 4 - Hungary: General legislation; 5 - India: Liability and compensation; 6 - Japan: Liability and compensation; 7 - Korea: Liability and compensation; 8 - Lithuania: General legislation; Transport of radioactive material; 9 - Slovak Republic: International co-operation; Liability and compensation; 10 - Slovenia: General legislation; 11 - Switzerland: Liability and compensation; 12 - United States: Radioactive waste management

  15. National legislative and regulatory activities

    The different national works and regulatory activities are: for Belarus, the statute on the state supervision in the field of nuclear safety and radiation protection (2008), amendment to the law on radiation protection of the public (2008), environmental impact assessment laws (2008), the statute on the discussion of questions of the public in the field of atomic energy(2009); for Belgium: decree regarding the minimum criteria for X-ray apparatus use in veterinary medicine (2009), decree of the Federal agency for nuclear control on the determination of exemption levels (2009); for Estonia: national development plan (2009), new radiation safety department (2009), amendment to the radiation protection act (2009); for Germany: ordinance on the shipment of radioactive waste or spent fuel (2009), amendments to acts and ordinances on the transport of dangerous goods (2009), amendments to the 1961 foreign trade and 1993 foreign trade ordinance (2009); for Italy: law no. 99 of 23. july 2009 including provisions on the resurgence of nuclear energy (2009); for Romania: decision on the prohibition of dangerous labour for children (2009), amendment to the regulations on the organisation and operation of C.N.C.A.N. (2009), decision on the repatriation of nuclear material to the Russian federation(2009), decision on the processing of uranium stocks (2009), general requirements on environmental impact assessment (2009); for Spain: regulation on the transboundary shipments of radioactive waste and spent fuel (2009), regulation on installation and use of X-ray devices for medical diagnostic purposes (2009); for United Arab Emirates: federal law on the peaceful use of nuclear energy (2009; for United States: final regulations criminalising unauthorized introduction of dangerous weapons (2009). (N.C.)

  16. The integration of optimization in the regulatory process

    The purpose of this paper is to describe how optimization fits in a complex regulatory regime aimed at protection of the public health and safety. The comments and observations about optimization in the regulatory process are based mainly on the authors' experience in a single agency, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The NRC regulates a broad spectrum of nuclear activities ranging from nuclear power reactors and the nuclear fuel cycle to the use of radioisotopes in industry, research and medicine

  17. National legislative and regulatory activities

    This section treats of the following National legislative and regulatory activities: 1 - Australia: General legislation - Bill to amend the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Act 1998; 2 - France: General legislation - Law No. 2015-992 of 17 August 2015 on the energy transition for green growth; ASN Report on the state of nuclear safety and radiation protection in France in 2014; 3 - Germany: Radioactive waste management - First Ordinance to amend the 2005 Gorleben Development Freeze Ordinance (2015); 4 - Greece: Radioactive waste management - Joint Ministerial Decision establishing the national policy on the management of spent fuel and radioactive waste; 5 - Lithuania: Nuclear safety and radiological protection - Revised requirements for modifications, Plan for enhancement of nuclear safety, New requirements for the commissioning of nuclear power plants, Revised requirements regulating the provision of information on abnormal events; Radioactive waste management - Revised requirements for acceptance criteria for near surface repository; Nuclear security - Revised requirements for physical protection; 6 - Romania: Licensing and regulatory infrastructure - Government Decision No. 600/2014 for approval of National Nuclear Safety and Security; International co-operation - Government Decision No. 525/2014 for approval of the Co-operation Agreement on the radioactive waste management between the French National Radioactive Waste Management Agency (ANDRA) and Nuclear Agency and Radioactive Waste (ANDR) Strategy; Memorandum of Understanding for Co-operation and Exchange of Information in Nuclear Regulatory Matters between the National Commission for Nuclear Activities Control (CNCAN) of Romania and the President of National Atomic Energy Agency (PAA) of Poland; Government Decision No. 540/2015 for approval of the Agreement between the Government of Romania and the Government of the People's Republic of China regarding co-operation in the peaceful

  18. National legislative and regulatory activities

    These columns treat of the legislative and regulatory activities of different OECD countries: Australia (environment protection and biodiversity conservation act and regulations, 1999-2000); Bulgaria (basic standards for radiation protection, 2000); France (decree on the standard tax charged on polluting activities due from operators of installations classified for environmental protection purposes, 2000; amendment of the orders on the transport of dangerous goods by road and by rail, 2000); Georgia (law on nuclear and radiation safety, 1998); Germany (amendments to nuclear legislation implementing EURATOM directives, 2000; amendment to the nuclear third party liability provisions of the atomic energy act, 2001; amendment to the foreign trade ordinance, 2000; ordinance on the treatment of foodstuffs with radiation, 2000; general administrative regulations on radioactivity limits in food and feeds); Ireland (European communities regulations on foodstuffs treated with ionizing radiations, 2000); Japan (law for nuclear sitting area development, 2000; Republic of Korea (amendments to the act on compensation for nuclear damage, 2001); Latvia (act on radiation safety and nuclear safety, 2000); Lithuania (resolution approving the decommissioning program for Unit 1, Ignalina NPP, 2001); Luxembourg (grand-ducal regulations on the protection of the public against the risks resulting from ionizing radiation, 2000; grand-ducal regulations relating to foods and food ingredients treated with ionizing radiation, 2000); Mexico (norm regarding selection, qualification and training requirements for staff of a NPP, 2000; norm regarding solid residue as radioactive waste, 2000); Mongolia (law on nuclear weapons free status and its implementing resolution, 2000); Netherlands (amendment to the nuclear energy act, 2000); Norway (act on radiation and use of radiation, 2000); Pakistan (nuclear authority ordinance, 2001); Poland (atomic energy act, 2000); Spain (royal decree on activities

  19. Regulatory control of food irradiation processes

    Ionizing radiation has a long history of successful use in treating a variety of nonfood products, but its application to foods is a new challenge. In order to meet this challenge, regulatory requirements and standards for the irradiation treatment of foods are needed. Many countries have already established rules and protocols for the use of ionizing radiation on a variety of food products and the food industry has recognized the need for standards for the irradiation treatment of foods, in many cases more stringent than those applied for other processes. While standardization and control of the irradiation process are imperative for its proper application to food, they are not the parameters that will govern the successful implementation and acceptance of food irradiation. The technology will be successful only if the public accepts it as a safe and useful process. Recent surveys show that dissemination of accurate and complete facts about irradiation is a key to public education about the technology. The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) agrees that public information is important and, while it feels that industry must play the primary role, it is participating in several public information activities. Many U.S. government agencies are involved in food irradiation, protecting the public from hazards associated with ionizing radiation technology, monitoring the safety and wholesomeness of the food supply, and developing and transferring the technology to the private sector. There are only a few approved uses of food irradiation in the U.S. at the present time and very little food is being processed using the technology. The regulatory agencies are requiring proper labeling and packaging, and effective quality control systems as prerequisites for the use of irradiation. Methods for detecting if a food has been irradiated are also under development, although they should not be a prerequisite for the application of the technology to foods. (author)

  20. National legislative and regulatory activities

    OECD

    2012-01-01

    Armenia Nuclear safety and radiological protection Brazil General legislation Canada Environmental protection France Radioactive waste management Georgia Nuclear safety and radiological protection Greece Nuclear safety Emergency preparedness and response India Licensing and regulatory infrastructure Liability and compensation Ireland Nuclear safety and radiological protection Japan Nuclear Regulation Authority Act Lithuania General legislation Licensing and regulatory infrastructure Nuclear s...

  1. National legislative and regulatory activities

    This section reviews the recent National legislative and regulatory activities: Algeria (Establishment of a nuclear security centre); Armenia (Amendment to the Law of the Republic of Armenia on the Safe Utilization of Atomic Energy for Peaceful Purposes); Brazil (creation of a Support Centre for Safety and Radiation Protection - Centro de Apoio a Seguranca Fisica Nuclear e Radiologica - CENASF); Canada (enacting of the Nuclear Terrorism Act,4 which amends the Criminal Code, creating four new Criminal Code offences related to nuclear terrorism; proposal to replace the existing Nuclear Liability Act with the increase of the amount of compensation available to address civil nuclear damage); France (National plan for the management of radioactive materials and waste - PNGMDR; Law No.2013-580 of 4 July 2013 authorising approval of the agreement between France and Monaco on the management of Monegasque radioactive waste in the French territory; Decree No.2013-675 of 25 July 2013 publishing an agreement of co-operation between France and Saudi Arabia for the development of nuclear energy for peaceful purposes); Germany (Act for retrieving radioactive waste from and decommissioning the Asse II Mine); Greece (Decree transposing Council Directive 2011/70/Euratom); Ireland (Adoption of European Communities Regulations on Carriage of Dangerous Goods by Road and Use of Transportable Pressure Equipment); Luxembourg (Transposition of Council Directive 2011/70/Euratom of 19 July 2011 establishing a Community framework for the responsible and safe management of spent fuel and radioactive waste); Poland (New requirements for employees concerning radiological protection; New detailed requirements for nuclear facility siting, design, commissioning and operation, organisational unit commissioning, periodical safety assessment, decommissioning and fund contributions; New regulation on subsidies related to nuclear safety and radiological protection; New requirements on transparency of

  2. National legislative and regulatory activities

    - International co-operation: Law ratifying the agreement between the International Atomic Energy Agency and Greece in the area of education and training; - Nuclear safety and radiological protection: Ministerial decision establishing requirements for nuclear safety and regulatory control of research reactors; Moldova - General legislation: New comprehensive law governing nuclear and radiological activities; United States - Issuance of the 'Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste'; - Ongoing activities: The Blue Ribbon Commission noted the need for near-term actions that can lay the groundwork for the next generation of nuclear waste policies and programmes included in its recommendations; - Physical protection of by-product material final rulemaking: On 19 March 2013, the NRC published a final rule amending its regulations to establish security requirements for the use and transport of category 1 and category 2 quantities of radioactive material; - Update on the NRC's response to the events at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear site regarding filtered vents and consideration of economic consequences

  3. Argentina's regulatory body: its communication activities

    Full text: The Nuclear Regulatory Authority of Argentina (ARN) is empowered to regulate and control the nuclear activity with regard to radiation and nuclear safety, physical protection and nuclear non-proliferation issues. It must also advise the Executive on issues under its purview. The objective of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority is to establish, develop and enforce a regulatory system applicable to all nuclear activities carried out in Argentina. Two of the goals of this regulatory system are to provide an appropriate standard of protection for individuals against the harmful effects of ionizing radiation, and to maintain a reasonable degree of radiological and nuclear safety in the nuclear activities performed in Argentina. The responsibility of the radiation protection community in performing the tasks to accomplish this goals is twofold. On one hand, it must ensure a high technical quality in performing these functions. It must also provide information on its activities which has to be accurate, comprehensive and understandable. The way a society understands the concept of 'risk' needs to be kept in mind. Risk perception is the subjective judgment that people make about the characteristics and severity of a risk. Cultural theory refers to theories of risk perception that focus on culture, rather than individual psychology as an explanation for differences in risk judgments. It is widely agreed that trust is a key factor in influencing people's perceptions of risk. It is understood there are two main ways trust may impact in risk perceptions: an activity is perceived as more risky if the people or agencies managing it are perceived as untrustworthy; and information presented by trusted sources is given more credibility than information from untrusted sources. One of the primary purposes of ARN's Communication Program is to provide a means whereby those engaged in radiation protection activities may communicate more readily with each other and the public and

  4. Review of NRC Regulatory processes and functions

    The Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) has spent much time over many years observing and examining the NRC licensing process. The Committee is, consequently, in a position to comment on the situation, and it believes this review will be helpful to those examining the regulatory process by discussing how it works, where it is weak, and the opportunities for improvement. The Committee's review may also help put current proposals and discussions in perspective

  5. Attribute Exploration of Gene Regulatory Processes

    Wollbold, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    This thesis aims at the logical analysis of discrete processes, in particular of such generated by gene regulatory networks. States, transitions and operators from temporal logics are expressed in the language of Formal Concept Analysis. By the attribute exploration algorithm, an expert or a computer program is enabled to validate a minimal and complete set of implications, e.g. by comparison of predictions derived from literature with observed data. Here, these rules represent temporal dependencies within gene regulatory networks including coexpression of genes, reachability of states, invariants or possible causal relationships. This new approach is embedded into the theory of universal coalgebras, particularly automata, Kripke structures and Labelled Transition Systems. A comparison with the temporal expressivity of Description Logics is made. The main theoretical results concern the integration of background knowledge into the successive exploration of the defined data structures (formal contexts). Applyi...

  6. A review of NRC regulatory processes and functions

    A reexamination by the ACRS of the Regulatory Process has been made. Objectives were to provide in a single source, ACRS' understanding of the Regulatory Process and to point out perceived weaknesses and to make appropriate recommendations for change

  7. National Legislative and Regulatory Activities

    OECD; Nuclear Energy Agency

    2007-01-01

    Brazil Resolution of the National Council on Energy Policy on the Resumption of Construction of a Thermonuclear Plant (2007) France Decree on Technical Enquiries in the Event of Incidents or Accidents Relating to Nuclear Activities (2007) Order on the Organisation of the General Directorate of Enterprises (GDE) within the Ministry of Industry (2007) Decree on the Listing of Basic Nuclear Installations (2007) Decree on Basic Nuclear Installations and Verifying the Nuclear Safety of Radioactive...

  8. National legislative and regulatory activities

    Laws in the field of nuclear industry are reported: resolution on the resumption of construction of a thermonuclear plant (Brazil); decrees on technical inquiries in the event of incidents or accidents relating nuclear activities, basic nuclear installations and verifying the nuclear safety of radioactive materials transport (France); implementation of EURATOM directive on the control of high activity sealed radioactive sources and orphan sources (Italy); amendment on the law on final disposal of high level radioactive waste (Japan); Grand Ducal regulations on the protection of the public against the risks resulting from ionizing radiations and information exchange with Belgium in the event of an accident (Luxembourg); regulations on the management and monitoring of nuclear safety equipment for civilian use and official reply of the state council to questions on the liabilities of compensation of damages resulting from nuclear accidents(people republic of China); orders in relation with nuclear safety for Romania; decree on the control of radioactive contamination in the shipment of scrap metal (Slovenia); law concerning the construction and operation of nuclear power plants and the sale of energy generated from those plants (Turkey). (N.C.)

  9. National legislative and regulatory activities

    Belarus: general legislation with amendments to laws on the use of atomic energy (2009) and criminal law on acts concerning the use of radioactive sources and administrative law for non criminal violations of radiation safety requirement (2009). Egypt: general legislation with law on activities in the nuclear and radiation field (2010). France: radioactive waste management with a decree establishing a committee on industrial co-ordination of radioactive waste (2010) and third part liability with a law on the recognition and indemnification of victims of nuclear tests conducted by France (2010). Germany: general legislation with a tenth amendment to the atomic energy act (2010), and act on environmental impact assessment (2009) concerning organisation and structure we find a revised version of statutes of the Radiation Protection Commission (2009), about radiation protection we find an act on the protection against non-ionizing radiation (2009), and for transport of radioactive materials we have an ordinance on the international transport of dangerous goods by road (2009). Ireland: In radiation protection we have an order to amend Regulations on active implantable medical devices (2010). Italy: general legislation we have a decree setting out rules for the sitting, construction and operation of nuclear installations (2010). Romania: general legislation with a law on the reorganisation of public authorities (2009). Slovak Republic: general legislation with an amendment of the atomic act (2009). spain: radioactive waste management with a law regulation limited investment companies quoted on the real estate market (2009). Ukraine: general legislation with an overview of recent amendments to laws in the field of nuclear energy (2009). (N.C.)

  10. National legislative and regulatory activities

    These columns summarize the recent changes made in the nuclear legislation and regulation of OECD countries: Argentina: Reorganization of the National Atomic Energy Commission (2001); Canada: Order aiming to increase security at major nuclear installations (2001); France: Establishment of the French Agency for Environmental Health Safety and the Institute for the Protection of Nuclear Safety (2001). Amendment of the Decree on the Holding Company of the Atomic Energy Commission (2001). Decree on the Special Commission for Major Nuclear Installations Classified as Secret (2001).Ordinance on the Implementation of EU Directives in the Field of Protection against Ionising Radiation (2001). Decree on Information of the Public (2001). Decree governing the Safety and Radiation Protection of Nuclear Installations and Activities used for Defence Purposes (2001). Order on Postal Deliveries of Radioactive Materials (2001). Order on the Carriage of Dangerous Goods by Road ('ADR Order') (2001). Order on the Transport of Dangerous Goods by Rail ('RID Order') (2001). Germany: Agreement on the phase-out of nuclear energy (2001). Ordinance implementing Euratom Directives on Radiation Protection (2001). Greece: Radiation Protection Regulations (2001). Italy: Amendment of the Decree implementing the Euratom basic radiation protection standards (2001) Implementation of the European Directive on the Quality of Water Intended for Human Consumption (2001). JAPAN: Revision of the Nuclear Disaster Prevention Guidelines (2000). Republic of Korea: Amendments to the Act on Compensation for Nuclear Damage (2001). Lithuania: Regulations for the Classification of Legal Acts Regulating Nuclear Safety (2001); Hygiene Standard 'Radiation Safety in Nuclear Power Plants' (2001). Guidelines governing the Procedure on Radiological Monitoring and Limitation of Releases of Radionuclides into the Environment from Nuclear Facilities (2001). Law on the Decommissioning Fund for the Ignalina Nuclear Power

  11. Regulatory research and development activities in Japan

    Shinichi Nakayama (JAEA, NSRC) presented the 'Regulatory Research and Development Activities in Japan'. A stepwise approach is being applied in Japan to site selection for geologic disposal. According to the Implementation Act of 2000, areas for candidate sites are to be narrowed down to finally identify the repository site. In 2002, the NSC has provided guidelines for the first step to select the preliminary investigation areas. Guidelines for the subsequent steps will be given in accordance with the progress of the disposal programme. The implementer, NWMO will submit the license application for regulatory approval after the repository site is identified, and NISA will judge the compliance with the regulatory law. The role of NISA is twofold; 1) to make a technical review on site selection, and to devise safety requirements and 2) to make technical judgements on safety assessment. Regulatory research is needed in both areas. The Agency needs to keep technical competence based on best available science and technology, and accumulates research resources to keep the competence. The purpose of the research to support technical review on site selection is to identify geologic conditions that may cause adverse effects on operational and post-closure safety and therefore to select important scenarios that are associated with large uncertainty and, hence, are critical from a safety point of view. The following study subjects are envisioned: - Long-term leaching characteristics of vitrified waste. - Long-term alteration of engineered barriers. - Re-saturation of groundwater in buffer materials and gas transport. - Effects of geological evolution on hydrogeology. These studies will provide scientific and technical basis to judge the robustness of implementer's safety assessment methodology. JAEA has been developing a probabilistic safety assessment tool to check independently the implementer's assessment. The study topics will be evolving to more design-and site

  12. Safety indicators in the nuclear regulatory process in South Africa

    In support of the approach adopted by the nuclear regulatory authority (National Nuclear Regulator - NNR) in South Africa, which combines risk, deterministic and process based thinking, the use of safety indicators is considered an important means of providing objective evidence of the success or failure of safety related activities or processes, as well as direct evidence of the status of safety factors relating to the plant, licensed site, the workforce, the public and the environment. The use of safety indicators helps to focus attention on weak areas and to provide information in a format which can be trended and which is readily reportable and comprehensible to the licensee management, public and different levels of the various regulatory and government organisations. The primary objectives of the system of safety goals and indicators is as follows: - To provide an objective measure of compliance of the licensed site with the safety case for the site, in terms of factors relating to plant health, workforce, public and environment, and trending thereof. - To provide an objective measure of the status of supporting safety related activities and safety factors. - To help focus resources on areas of concern in all licensing and safety assurance activities (inspection, assessment, pro-active work, guidelines etc), in a graded manner taking into account the status of relevant safety factors. - To facilitate reporting of the safety status of licensed facilities to different levels of the licensee and regulatory organisations. This paper describes the recent developments of safety goals and indicators as applied in the reactor licensing process in South Africa. The monitoring of a nuclear facility in terms of nuclear safety assurance involves a large volume of information from diverse sources and of different levels of significance. An indicator system linked to a compliance assurance programme and reporting and assessment system as described in this paper provides an

  13. Regulatory aspects on NORM/TENORM activities in Malaysia

    Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (NORM) processing industries in Malaysia include oil and gas production and mineral processing plants. These industries are controlled by the Atomic Energy Licensing Board of Malaysia (AELB) through the enforcement of Atomic Energy Licensing Act 1984 (Act 304). However, more regulations are necessary for the safe handling of NORM. NORM processing generates various types of NORM/TENORM residues that require proper management and disposal. As for low-level NORM residues from oil and gas production and mineral processing plants, landfill disposal is commonly used. However, wastes generated from decommissioning and decontamination of mineral processing plant is disposed in engineered cell at the disposal site. This paper outlines the regulatory aspects on NORM/TENORM activities in Malaysia. (author)

  14. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's decommissioning process

    The term 'Decommission' is defined in the U.S.. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (USNRC's) regulations at 10 CFR 20.1003 as to remove a facility or site safely from service and reduce residual radioactivity to a level that permits 1) release of the property for unrestricted use and termination of the license; or, 2) release of the property under restricted conditions and the termination of the license. USNRC's decommissioning program encompasses the decommissioning of all NRC licensed facilities, ranging from routine license terminations for sealed source users, to the oversight of complex sites and those on the Site Decommissioning Management Plan (SDMP), as well as power and non-power reactors. This paper describes the USNRC's decommissioning process for materials and reactor facilities and presents an overview of USNRC's decommissioning program activities. (author)

  15. Overall review on waste management in Finland - Current regulatory activities

    The Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety is a competent authority responsible for the surveillance of the safety of nuclear installations. Its regulatory duties include surveillance of waste management operations and facilities under construction as well as safety related appraisal of future waste management concepts. The current activities of the Centre in the waste management field are concentrated on formulation of criteria for reactor waste disposal, surveillance of the construction of an interim storage for spent fuel and evaluation of the technical concepts and the preliminary site selection process for spent fuel disposal

  16. ICT Support for Regulatory Compliance of Business Processes

    Governatori, Guido

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we propose an ITC (Information and Communication Technology) approach to support regulatory compliance for business processes, and we report on the development and evaluation of a business process compliance checker called Regorous, based on the compliance-by-design methodology proposed by Governatori and Sadiq

  17. Status of the PSA use in the Czech regulatory process

    A review of previous probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) activities initiated by regulatory body and preparation of the preliminary PSA study and final PSA study (released in January 1994) for the nuclear power plant Dukovany with WWER-440 type 213 reactor is described. A brief information about the NPP Temelin (with WWER-1000) PSA Study, shutdown and PSA risk monitor current activities for the NPP Dukovany, next PSA activities in 1994 and about planned PSA activities in future is attached. (author). 21 refs

  18. Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Selectively Suppress Sterol Regulatory Element-binding Protein-1 through Proteolytic Processing and Autoloop Regulatory Circuit*

    Takeuchi, Yoshinori; Yahagi, Naoya; Izumida, Yoshihiko; Nishi, Makiko; Kubota, Midori; Teraoka, Yuji; Yamamoto, Takashi; Matsuzaka, Takashi; Nakagawa, Yoshimi; Sekiya, Motohiro; Iizuka, Yoko; Ohashi, Ken; Osuga, Jun-ichi; Gotoda, Takanari; Ishibashi, Shun

    2010-01-01

    Sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP)-1 is a key transcription factor for the regulation of lipogenic enzyme genes in the liver. Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) selectively suppress hepatic SREBP-1, but molecular mechanisms remain largely unknown. To gain insight into this regulation, we established in vivo reporter assays to assess the activities of Srebf1c transcription and proteolytic processing. Using these in vivo reporter assays, we showed that the primary mechanism for P...

  19. The role and activities of the ISCT Regulatory Affairs Committee.

    Kelley, L

    2003-01-01

    The following article is written as part of a series of reviews addressing regulatory issues relevant to the field of cellular therapy. The first in the series describes the activities and mission of the Legal and Regulatory Affairs Committee of ISCT. PMID:12944232

  20. Implementation of a Quality Management System in regulatory inspection activities

    The Institute for Radioprotection and Dosimetry - IRD -, of the Brazilian National Nuclear Energy Commission, CNEN, started in 2001, the implementation of a quality management system (SGQ), in the inspection, testing and calibration activities. The SGQ was an institutional guideline and is inserted in a larger system of management of the IRD started in 1999, with the adoption of the National Quality Award criteria - PNQ, within the Project for Excellence in Technological Research of Associacao Brasileira das Instituicoes de Pesquisas Tecnologicas - ABIPTI (Brazilian Association of Technological Research institutions). The proposed quality management system and adopted at the IRD was developed and implemented in accordance with the requirements of NBR ISO/IEC 17025 - General requirements for the competence of testing and calibration laboratories, and ISO/IEC 17020 - General criteria for operation of various types of bodies performing inspections. For regulatory inspection activities, the quality system was implemented on three program inspection services of radiological protection led, respectively, by clinics and hospitals that operate radiotherapy services; industries that use nuclear gauges in their control or productive processes and power reactor operators (CNAAA) - just the environmental part. It was formed a pioneering team of inspectors for standardizing the processes, procedures and starting the implementation of the system in the areas. This work describes the implementation process steps, including difficulties, learning and advantages of the adoption of a quality management system in inspection activities

  1. Implications of the regulatory framework and activities on R and D supporting repository implementation

    In the context of geological disposal, the mission of the Belgian regulatory body is to ensure that the repository is developed, constructed, operated and closed in a safe manner, i.e. people and the environment are protected against the hazards of ionising radiation emitted by the radioactive waste, without imposing undue burdens on future generations. This mission involves several types of activities such as the establishment of regulatory requirements as well as of procedures and conditions for meeting these requirements for the various stages of the licensing process (IAEA, 2011). The roles of the regulatory body also include the oversight of the activities of the organisation in charge of waste disposal and the review of the safety case and of its updates throughout the whole process of developing and implementing the geological disposal programme. In order to fulfil its mission, the Belgian regulatory body (constituted by FANC and Bel V) carries out its own R and D programme. R and D work is essential for regulators as it allows maintaining and improving their scientific and technical skills, contributes to their independence and helps to build public confidence in the regulatory system. This paper gives an overview of the Belgian pre-licensing and licensing process. The paper then discusses the possible implications of the regulatory framework and activities (R and D, safety case reviews and issuance of regulatory advices) on the R and D programme developed by the implementer of a disposal programme. (authors)

  2. T regulatory cells and the immune aging process

    Jagger, Ann Titi; Shimojima, Yasuhiro; Goronzy, Jorg J.; Weyand, Cornelia M.

    2016-01-01

    Constant exposure to new and persisting antigens and the need to replace cellular attrition with newly build cells lead to profound remodeling of the immune system during the second half of life. The impact of the immunosenescence process varies amongst the different functional subsets represented within the immune system, and emerging data suggest that progressive aging significantly affects frequencies, subset distribution and functional competence of regulatory T cells (Treg). Given the central role of Treg cells in immune homeostasis, age-related loss of Treg function would be predicted to render the host susceptible to excessive immunity, encountered in elderly humans as a syndrome of chronic-smoldering inflammation. Conversely, age-dependent gain of Treg activity would expose the host to greater risk of immune failure, such as the rising risk of malignancies and infections in the aging population. Emerging data suggest that some Treg populations, specifically naturally occurring Tregs (nTreg), seem to accumulate with advancing age, whereas inducible Tregs (iTreg) appear to be less available in the older host. More studies are necessary to elucidate functional competence of old Tregs, with emphasis on comparing efficacy of young on old Tregs for defined functional domains. Mechanisms of declining Treg inducibility are not understood, but may provide an opportunity for targeted immunomodulation in the elderly. On the horizon is the potential to develop novel therapeutic interventions that target Tregs to make the elderly more efficient in fighting cancers and infections and dampen the risk for senescence-associated inflammation. PMID:24296590

  3. Managing the high level waste nuclear regulatory commission licensing process

    This paper reports that the process for obtaining Nuclear Regulatory Commission permits for the high level waste storage facility is basically the same process commercial nuclear power plants followed to obtain construction permits and operating licenses for their facilities. Therefore, the experience from licensing commercial reactors can be applied to the high level waste facility. Proper management of the licensing process will be the key to the successful project. The management of the licensing process was categorized into four areas as follows: responsibility, organization, communication and documentation. Drawing on experience from nuclear power plant licensing and basic management principles, the management requirement for successfully accomplishing the project goals are discussed

  4. Improving Regulatory Bodies’ Activities in Africa Through Regional Cooperation

    The Forum of Nuclear Regulatory Bodies in Africa (FNRBA) is presented as a good regional platform that plays key role in assisting the establishment of regulatory bodies and in enhancing and sustaining their activities. The FNRBA is founded on the aspirations of its members and the lessons learned from other similar regulatory networks. To achieve its objectives, the FNRBA needs more partners to learn and enhance its activities effectively, and particularly in the domain of radioactive sources control. The FNRBA is open to all nuclear regulatory bodies in the region and is voluntary. This cooperation makes use of the triangular cooperation mechanism that involves advanced and less advanced countries working together with assistance from the IAEA and other partners in development. (author)

  5. Examining Shifts in Medical Students' Microanalytic Motivation Beliefs and Regulatory Processes during a Diagnostic Reasoning Task

    Cleary, Timothy J.; Dong, Ting; Artino, Anthony R., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined within-group shifts in the motivation beliefs and regulatory processes of second-year medical students as they engaged in a diagnostic reasoning activity. Using a contextualized assessment methodology called self-regulated learning microanalysis, the authors found that the 71 medical student participants showed statistically…

  6. Overview of maintenance principles and regulatory supervision of maintenance activities at nuclear power plants in Slovakia

    The maintenance represents one of the most important tools to ensure safe and reliable operation of nuclear power plants. The emphasis of Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic to the maintenance issue is expressed by requirements in the regulations. The current practice of maintenance management in operated nuclear power plants in Slovak Republic is presented. Main aspects of maintenance, as maintenance programme, organization of maintenance, responsibilities for maintenance are described. Activities of nuclear regulatory authority in maintenance process are presented too. (author)

  7. Case law. Administrative decisions. National legislative and regulatory activities. International regulatory activities

    (Romania), act on administrative and property management of the civilian nuclear energy sector (Russian Federation), amendment of the atomic act (Slovak Republic), regulation on monitoring of radioactivity (Slovenia), regulations on the contents of the annual public report, regulations on the keeping of records, regulations on safety standards and regulatory practices (South Africa), amendment to the act and ordinance on nuclear activities (Sweden), council directive on the supervision and control of shipments of radioactive waste and spent fuel (European Union). (N.C.)

  8. The regulatory process for the decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    The objective of this publication is to provide general guidance to Member States for regulating the decommissioning of nuclear facilities within the established nuclear regulatory framework. The Guide should also be useful to those responsible for, or interested in, the decommissioning of nuclear facilities. The Guide describes in general terms the process to be used in regulating decommissioning and the considerations to be applied in the development of decommissioning regulations and guides. It also delineates the responsibilities of the regulatory body and the licensee in decommissioning. The provisions of this Guide are intended to apply to all facilities within the nuclear fuel cycle and larger industrial installations using long lived radionuclides. For smaller installations, however, less extensive planning and less complex regulatory control systems should be acceptable. The Guide deals primarily with decommissioning after planned shutdown. Most provisions, however, are also applicable to decommissioning after an abnormal event, once cleanup operations have been terminated. The decommissioning planning in this case must take account of the abnormal event. 28 refs, 1 fig

  9. System engineering in the Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensing process: Program architecture process and structure

    In October 1987, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) established the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses at Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio, Texas. The overall mission of the center is to provide a sustained level of high-quality research and technical assistance in support of NRC regulatory responsibilities under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA). A key part of that mission is to assist the NRC in the development of the program architecture - the systems approach to regulatory analysis for the NRC high-level waste repository licensing process - and the development and implementation of the computer-based Program Architecture Support System (PASS). This paper describes the concept of program architecture, summarizes the process and basic structure of the PASS relational data base, and describes the applications of the system

  10. Examining shifts in medical students' microanalytic motivation beliefs and regulatory processes during a diagnostic reasoning task.

    Cleary, Timothy J; Dong, Ting; Artino, Anthony R

    2015-08-01

    This study examined within-group shifts in the motivation beliefs and regulatory processes of second-year medical students as they engaged in a diagnostic reasoning activity. Using a contextualized assessment methodology called self-regulated learning microanalysis, the authors found that the 71 medical student participants showed statistically significant and relatively robust declines in their self-efficacy beliefs and strategic regulatory processes following negative feedback about their performance on the diagnostic reasoning task. Descriptive statistics revealed that changes in strategic thinking following negative corrective feedback were most characterized by shifts away from task-specific processes (e.g., integration, differentiating diagnoses) to non-task related factors. Implications and areas for future research are presented and discussed. PMID:25209963

  11. Safety and regulatory aspects of radiation processing facilities in India

    The number of gamma and electron radiation processing facilities (RPFs) is increasing all over the world. This is mainly due to their multifarious applications in the field of medicine, industry, agriculture and research. The most wide spread use of these facilities are for sterilisation of medical and pharmaceutical products, preservation of food stuffs, polymer synthesis and modifications, eradication of insect infestation and in the management of public health and environment. In India, at present, a total of nineteen gamma radiation-processing facilities (GRAPFs) are under operation for various purposes, four are under construction and several facilities have obtained site clearance for installation of GRAPF. There are five radiation processing accelerator (RPA) facilities operating in the country for other than food irradiation purposes. The ISOMED, the first commercial gamma radiation processing plant for sterilisation of medical products was commissioned at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Mumbai in 1974 by the Department of Atomic Energy (DAE), Government of India. The regulatory controls have been briefly outlined in this article

  12. Enhancing regulatory effectiveness by improving the process for identifying and resolving generic issues

    The Generic Issues Program first began formally in response to a Commission directive in October of 1976. In 1983, it became one of the first programs to make successful use of probabilistic risk information to aid in regulatory decision-making. In the 16 years since the program became quantitative, 836 issues have been processed. Of these, 106 reactor safety issues were prioritized as requiring further evaluation to determine the final resolution. Approximately a dozen generic issues remain unresolved. Although there is far less reactor licensing activity than in the 1970s, new issues continue to be identified from research and operational experience. These issues often involve complex and controversial questions of safety and regulation, and an efficient and effective means of addressing these issues is essential for regulatory effectiveness. Issues that involve a significant safety question require swift, effective, enforceable, and cost-effective regulatory actions. Issues that are of little safety significance must be quickly shown to be so and dismissed in an expeditious manner so as to avoid unnecessary expenditure of limited resources and to reduce regulatory uncertainty. Additionally, in the time since the generic issue program began, probabilistic risk assessment techniques have advanced significantly while agency resources have continued to diminish. Accordingly, the paper discusses the steps that have been taken to enhance the effectiveness and efficiency of the generic issue resolution process. Additionally, four resolved issues are discussed, along with key elements of a proposed new procedure for resolving potential generic issues

  13. Establishment of the nuclear regulatory framework for the process of decommissioning of nuclear installations in Mexico

    Today has not managed any process of decommissioning of nuclear installations in the country; however because of the importance of the subject and the actions to be taken to long term, the Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias (CNSNS) in Mexico, accordance with its objectives is developing a National Nuclear Regulatory Framework and defined requirements to ensure the implementation of appropriate safety standards when such activities are performed. In this regard, the national nuclear regulatory framework for nuclear installations and the particular case of nuclear power reactors is presented, as well as a proposed licensing process for the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde based on international regulations and origin country regulations of the existing reactors in nuclear facilities in accordance with the license conditions of operation to allow to define and incorporate such regulation. (Author)

  14. 45 CFR 73a.735-502 - Employees in regulatory activities.

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Employees in regulatory activities. 73a.735-502 Section 73a.735-502 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION... regulatory activities. (a) An employee in regulatory activities (“control activity” employee) may...

  15. Regulatory Requirements and Comparing Required Documents for the Drug Registration Process in Indonesia and Vietnam

    Praneeth Pidaparthi

    2016-01-01

    The regulatory authorities in Indonesia and Vietnam and their procedures for registration of a drug are discussed in this document. The Indonesia and Vietnam comes under ASEAN countries. The drug medication is essential and important in ASEAN region. The process of manufacturing a drug will not vary but the regulatory authorities and requirements will differ. The regulatory authority of any country has to ensure the quality of the product and safety of the patients. As the regulatory requirem...

  16. Regulatory Oversight of Nuclear Activities in the Multinational Context

    The national responsibility for the safety of nuclear installations is the fundamental principle endorsed by the Convention on Nuclear Safety. An important role for meeting this responsibility is assigned to the regulatory authority. In addition to fulfilling their national duties, the nuclear regulators must have a common global goal: jointly providing a consistently high level of safety at all nuclear power plants in the world, which ensures an extremely low probability of large radioactive release from a nuclear accident. This goal can be achieved only through an active multinational cooperation. It is necessary to develop harmonized safety requirements that can be approved with consensus and establish harmonized regulatory practices that give confidence that these requirements are actually met. With successful cooperation, it could be possible to licence in any country a nuclear power plant that has been licensed in another, without making other modifications than those that are found necessary due to the specific local conditions. Striving for standardized plant designs would have many safety benefits, such as adequate resources available for careful design of details and for independent safety analysis. Standardization would also make it possible to learn from experience and to address potential problems promptly at all similar plants. Successful regulatory cooperation would enable the use of the same manufacturing and construction standards for the systems, structures and components, which could then be purchased from any qualified manufacturer operating in the global markets. The paper discusses the current situation and future challenges in these areas. (author)

  17. Current role of the USNRC safety research program in support of the regulatory process

    The current role of the USNRC's safety research program is shown. Some aspects of this role in the wake of the TMI accident are discused as well as some historical perspective on the development of USNRC's program, its relationship with the NRC mission, an overview of the program activities and some recent research results, and finally the impact of the TMI accident in clarifiying needs for expedited and new research activities, including the need for a greatly enhanced use of probabilistic analysis techniques to improve the coherence of its regulatory process. (author)

  18. Foxp3 Processing by Proprotein Convertases and Control of Regulatory T Cell Function*

    de Zoeten, Edwin F.; Lee, Iris; Wang, Liqing; Chen, Chunxia; Ge, Guanghui; Wells, Andrew D.; Hancock, Wayne W.; Özkaynak, Engin

    2009-01-01

    Foxp3 is a 47-kDa transcription factor central to regulatory T cell (Treg) function. The importance of Foxp3+ Tregs in controlling self-reactive T cells and preventing autoimmunity is well established. Our analysis of Foxp3 expression in natural Tregs led to identification of a shorter 41-kDa Foxp3 species in activated Tregs, indicating that Foxp3 may be processed by proteolytic cleavage upon cell activation. Searches of murine and human Foxp3 sequences for potential c...

  19. A complex process - transforming scientific research into regulatory rules for environmental protection

    The protection of isolated wetlands from consumptive use withdrawals has been a policy in the South Florida Water Management District (SFWMD) for over 15 years. A guideline for protecting isolated wetlands was established in the mid-1980's for the consumptive water use permitting program administered by the SFWMD. The guideline specifies groundwater drawdown criteria associated with well field pumpage. In 1994, the SFWMD convened a panel of wetland scientists to review the existing groundwater drawdown criteria. The panel concluded there was insufficient information to determine if the criteria were either too restrictive or insufficient in protecting wetlands. The panel recommended that the SFWMD conduct research to answer related questions. Since that time, staff at the SFWMD have developed a research plan, selected 38 isolated wetland monitoring sites in seven study areas, collected over four years of data, and developed an integrated surface water and groundwater simulation model. However, the staff at the SFWMD has had difficulties in transforming the research results into regulatory rules. The nature of an isolated wetland is quite complicated. Its setting changes significantly from time to time depending on the variation of rainfall, hydro-geological conditions, and human activities. A regulatory rule requires simple and more easily measurable criteria. The regulatory staff need simple tools to evaluate many permit applications within a limited time frame. The tools used in the research process are often complicated and time consuming. This paper describes the wetland research, and the difficulties of transforming research results into regulatory rules. (author)

  20. Peak-valley-peak pattern of histone modifications delineates active regulatory elements and their directionality

    Pundir, Sachin; Bagger, Frederik O; Lauridsen, Felicia K B; Rapin, Nicolas; Porse, Bo T

    2016-01-01

    from four ENCODE cell lines and four hematopoietic differentiation stages, we identified several enhancers whose regulatory activity is stage specific and correlates positively with the expression of proximal genes in a particular stage. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that PVP patterns......Formation of nucleosome free region (NFR) accompanied by specific histone modifications at flanking nucleosomes is an important prerequisite for enhancer and promoter activity. Due to this process, active regulatory elements often exhibit a distinct shape of histone signal in the form of a peak...... that NFRs predicted by H3K4me1 and me3 patterns are associated with active enhancers and promoters, respectively. Furthermore, asymmetry in the height of peaks flanking the central valley can predict the directionality of stable transcription at promoters. Using PARE on ChIP-seq histone modifications...

  1. Study on the establishment of efficient plan for regulatory activities at NPPs

    In-operation regulatory activities at sites are very important and it should be improved to cope with accidents efficiently and quickly. In case of site survey and safety regulatory inspection regulatory system based on not regulatory headquarter but site regional office should be constructed. In other words, safety assurance and pending problem management considering site situation are needed. In this study, regulatory system at Nuclear Power Plant sites all over the world were reviewed and effective regulatory system of Korea are suggested to maximize the efficiency of license and regulatory manpower and consider the interest of local government and residents

  2. Peak-valley-peak pattern of histone modifications delineates active regulatory elements and their directionality.

    Pundhir, Sachin; Bagger, Frederik O; Lauridsen, Felicia B; Rapin, Nicolas; Porse, Bo T

    2016-05-19

    Formation of nucleosome free region (NFR) accompanied by specific histone modifications at flanking nucleosomes is an important prerequisite for enhancer and promoter activity. Due to this process, active regulatory elements often exhibit a distinct shape of histone signal in the form of a peak-valley-peak (PVP) pattern. However, different features of PVP patterns and their robustness in predicting active regulatory elements have never been systematically analyzed. Here, we present PARE, a novel computational method that systematically analyzes the H3K4me1 or H3K4me3 PVP patterns to predict NFRs. We show that NFRs predicted by H3K4me1 and me3 patterns are associated with active enhancers and promoters, respectively. Furthermore, asymmetry in the height of peaks flanking the central valley can predict the directionality of stable transcription at promoters. Using PARE on ChIP-seq histone modifications from four ENCODE cell lines and four hematopoietic differentiation stages, we identified several enhancers whose regulatory activity is stage specific and correlates positively with the expression of proximal genes in a particular stage. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that PVP patterns delineate both the histone modification landscape and the transcriptional activities governed by active enhancers and promoters, and therefore can be used for their prediction. PARE is freely available at http://servers.binf.ku.dk/pare. PMID:27095194

  3. The Report on Activities of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic. Annual Report 2012

    A brief account of activities carried out by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic (UJD SR) in 2012 is presented. These activities are reported under the headings: Foreword; (1) Legislative activities; (2) Regulatory Activities; (3) Nuclear safety of nuclear power plants; (4) Stress tests on the nuclear power plants; (5) Nuclear Materials in SR; (6) Building Authority; (7) Emergency planning and preparedness; (8) International activities; (9) Public communication; (10) Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic; (11) Attachments; (12) Abbreviations used.

  4. Notch1 regulated autophagy controls survival and suppressor activity of activated murine T-regulatory cells

    Marcel, Nimi; Sarin, Apurva

    2016-01-01

    Cell survival is one of several processes regulated by the Notch pathway in mammalian cells. Here we report functional outcomes of non-nuclear Notch signaling to activate autophagy, a conserved cellular response to nutrient stress, regulating survival in murine natural T-regulatory cells (Tregs), an immune subset controlling tolerance and inflammation. Induction of autophagy required ligand-dependent, Notch intracellular domain (NIC) activity, which controlled mitochondrial organization and survival of activated Tregs. Consistently, NIC immune-precipitated Beclin and Atg14, constituents of the autophagy initiation complex. Further, ectopic expression of an effector of autophagy (Atg3) or recombinant NIC tagged to a nuclear export signal (NIC-NES), restored autophagy and suppressor function in Notch1-/- Tregs. Furthermore, Notch1 deficiency in the Treg lineage resulted in immune hyperactivity, implicating Notch activity in Treg homeostasis. Notch1 integration with autophagy, revealed in these experiments, holds implications for Notch regulated cell-fate decisions governing differentiation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14023.001 PMID:27267497

  5. Current and future applications of PRA in regulatory activities

    Speis, T.P.; Murphy, J.A.; Cunningham, M.A. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)] [and others

    1995-04-01

    Probabilistic Risk Assessments (PRAs) have proven valuable in providing the regulators, the nuclear plant operators, and the reactor designers insights into plant safety, reliability, design and operation. Both the NRC Commissioners and the staff have grown to appreciate the valuable contributions PRAs can have in the regulatory arena, though I will admit the existence of some tendencies for strict adherence to the deterministic approach within the agency and the public at large. Any call for change, particularly one involving a major adjustment in approach to the regulation of nuclear power, will meet with a certain degree of resistance and retrenchment. Change can appear threatening and can cause some to question whether the safety mission is being fulfilled. This skepticism is completely appropriate and is, in fact, essential to a proper transition towards risk and performance-based approaches. Our task in the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research is to increase the PRA knowledge base within the agency and develop appropriate guidance and methods needed to support the transitioning process.

  6. Regulatory activities and their research and developmental support in the CSSR

    The first part of the paper deals with implementation of the regulations, and the gradual development of the regulatory organization and practice. This covers the first stage of the construction and operation of research reactors only, the second stage of the design, construction, commissioning and operation of the first prototype nuclear power plant and the present stage of the construction and commissioning of industrially developed nuclear power reactors. The development of regulatory documentation concerning safety codes of practice and guides and the main safety requirements for PNR nuclear power plants, the general licensing procedures and organization for the licensing of siting, construction and operation of nuclear power plants are described. Inspection practices applied during construction, commissioning and operation of nuclear power plants to verify that the licensing conditions and requirements are fulfilled are also dealt with. Some basic information about the co-ordination of CSAEC's nuclear safety regulatory activity with the regulatory activities of other governmental bodies dealing with general standardization, radiation and environmental protection, labour safety etc. is given. Finally, the functional and organizational structure of the Department of CSAEC dealing with its regulatory role is described. The supporting R and D activity is the subject of the second part of the paper. Some main results obtained in the development of methods and computer codes for reliability and safety assessment for the evaluation of abnormal operational occurrences and accidental conditions, and for the assessment of the environmental impact of nuclear power plant etc. and their application in the licensing process are presented. The paper also gives some information on the future research programme. (author)

  7. Risk analysis of process plants: approach of the Atomic Energy Regulatory Board

    The analysis of the probable consequences and effects of the hazardous chemicals used in the process plants plays a vital role in regulatory decision-making. This analysis is required in the entire life cycle of the process plant. This paper presents the detail of risk analysis required at various life cycle stages viz. siting, design, and operation of a process plant. It also describes the regulatory methodology and safety review process adopted by Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB) to ensure safety of the plant in its entire life cycle. (author)

  8. The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission regulatory process for decommissioning a uranium mining facility

    The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) regulates uranium mining in Canada. The CNSC regulatory process requires that a licence applicant plan for and commit to future decommissioning before irrevocable decisions are made, and throughout the life of a uranium mine. These requirements include conceptual decommissioning plans and the provision of financial assurances to ensure the availability of funds for decommissioning activities. When an application for decommissioning is submitted to the CNSC, an environmental assessment is required prior to initiating the licensing process. A case study is presented for COGEMA Resources Inc. (COGEMA), who is entering the decommissioning phase with the CNSC for the Cluff Lake uranium mine. As part of the licensing process, CNSC multidisciplinary staff assesses the decommissioning plan, associated costs, and the environmental assessment. When the CNSC is satisfied that all of its requirements are met, a decommissioning licence may be issued. (author)

  9. Application of best available science to the regulatory process

    The current grant is a continuation of a previous grant awarded to the Institute for Regulatory Science. In July, 1989, the functions of the Institute were transferred to the University of Maryland and the studies started at the Institute were continued at the University. The current grant started February 1, 1990. Therefore, much of the discussion in this progress report relies upon the grant funded at the Institute for Regulatory Science. This progress report covers the period from February 1, 1990 to January 31, 1991. The objective of the project is to assure that societal decisions are based on the best available science (BAS). A great deal of progress was made to establish relevant organizations for the development of consensus on relevant scientific information. During the next year, emphasis will be placed on Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), particularly as related to its reauthorization and mixed waste

  10. Legislation — quality improvement — the regulatory process

    Burge, Edward R

    1991-01-01

    Legislation governing the health professions has traditionally been drafted with differing regulations and provisions in statute for each profession. This legislation has often been the consequence of seniority or political lobbying, resulting in a disjointed regulatory system, where many professions performed similar procedures. Growing health care awareness by consumers has prompted a greater accountability by the professions. In Ontario, the government addressed this concern by formulating...

  11. The nuclear regulatory process in Canada experience and possible future direction

    The underlying principle in the Canadian licensing process is that the licensee (owner/operatopr) bears the responsibility for safety while the regulatory authority sets safety objectives and audits their achievement. As a consequence, Canadian Regulatory Requirements emphasize numerical safety goals, and minimize specific design or operational rules. This paper traces the evolution of this approach, and indicates direction for the future. (author)

  12. Prediction and Validation of Gene Regulatory Elements Activated During Retinoic Acid Induced Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation.

    Simandi, Zoltan; Horvath, Attila; Nagy, Peter; Nagy, Laszlo

    2016-01-01

    Embryonic development is a multistep process involving activation and repression of many genes. Enhancer elements in the genome are known to contribute to tissue and cell-type specific regulation of gene expression during the cellular differentiation. Thus, their identification and further investigation is important in order to understand how cell fate is determined. Integration of gene expression data (e.g., microarray or RNA-seq) and results of chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-based genome-wide studies (ChIP-seq) allows large-scale identification of these regulatory regions. However, functional validation of cell-type specific enhancers requires further in vitro and in vivo experimental procedures. Here we describe how active enhancers can be identified and validated experimentally. This protocol provides a step-by-step workflow that includes: 1) identification of regulatory regions by ChIP-seq data analysis, 2) cloning and experimental validation of putative regulatory potential of the identified genomic sequences in a reporter assay, and 3) determination of enhancer activity in vivo by measuring enhancer RNA transcript level. The presented protocol is detailed enough to help anyone to set up this workflow in the lab. Importantly, the protocol can be easily adapted to and used in any cellular model system. PMID:27403939

  13. Activated Sludge Process Overview

    B. Ahansazan; H. Afrashteh; N. Ahansazan; Z. Ahansazan

    2014-01-01

    In recent years the waste water ministerial regulations have led to a constant ascend in the purification performance demanded of waste water treatment plants. Because of this, the number of waste water treatment plants has been maturing, and technical complexity has also been growing. In order to hold the connected rising costs of capital expenditure and operation within bounds, sagacious process technology solutions have to be found. Besides having a deeper understanding of the individual p...

  14. Future nuclear regulatory challenges. A report by the NEA Committee on Nuclear Regulatory Activities

    Future challenges are considered that may arise from technical, socio-economic and political issues; organizational, management and human aspects; and international issues. The perceived challenges have been grouped into four categories, each covered by a chapter. Technical issues are addressed that many present regulatory challenges in the future: ageing nuclear power plants. External changes to industry are considered next that have an effect on regulators, privatization, cost reduction consequences, commercialization etc. It is followed by the impacts of internal changes: organizational, managerial, human-resources, licensing, staff training etc. Finally, international issues are discussed with potential regulatory impact. (R.P.)

  15. Neuroimaging of developmental psychopathologies: the importance of self-regulatory and neuroplastic processes in adolescence

    Spessot, Alexandra L; Plessen, Kerstin J; Peterson, Bradley S

    2004-01-01

    developmental and plastic processes during the transition from adolescence into adulthood. Tourette syndrome (TS), defined as the chronic presence of motor and vocal tics, has been increasingly conceptualized as a disorder of impaired self-regulatory control. This disordered control is thought to give rise to...... semicompulsory urges to perform the movements that constitute simple tics, complex tics, or compulsions. Neuroimaging studies suggest that the expression of the genetic diathesis to TS is influenced by genetic and nongenetic factors affecting activity-dependent reorganization of neuroregulatory systems, thereby...... influencing the phenotype, illness severity, and adult outcome of tic disorders. Similar developmental processes during adolescence likely determine the phenotype and natural history of a broad range of other complex neuropsychiatric disorders of childhood onset, and they likely contribute to the acquisition...

  16. Evolution of nuclear security regulatory activities in Brazil

    Mello, Luiz A. de; Monteiro Filho, Joselio S.; Belem, Lilia M.J.; Torres, Luiz F.B. [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Diretoria de Radioprotecao e Segurania Nuclear. Coordenacao de Salvaguardas e Protecao Fisica], e-mail: gpf@cnen.gov.br

    2009-07-01

    The changing of the world scenario in the last 15 years has increased worldwide the concerns about overall security and, as a consequence, about the nuclear and radioactive material as well as their associated facilities. Considering the new situation, in February 2004, the Brazilian National Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN), decided to create the Nuclear Security Office. This Office is under the Coordination of Nuclear Safeguards and Security, in the Directorate for Safety, Security and Safeguards (Regulatory Directorate). Before that, security regulation issues were dealt in a decentralized manner, within that Directorate, by different licensing groups in specific areas (power reactors, fuel cycle facilities, radioactive facilities, transport of nuclear material, etc.). This decision was made in order to allow a coordinated approach on the subject, to strengthen the regulation in nuclear/radioactive security, and to provide support to management in the definition of institutional security policies. The CNEN Security Office develops its work based in the CNEN Physical Protection Regulation for Nuclear Operational Units - NE-2.01, 1996, the Convention on the Physical Protection of Nuclear Material and the IAEA Nuclear Security Series . This paper aims at presenting the activities developed and the achievements obtained by this new CNEN office, as well as identifying the issues and directions for future efforts. (author)

  17. Evolution of nuclear security regulatory activities in Brazil

    The changing of the world scenario in the last 15 years has increased worldwide the concerns about overall security and, as a consequence, about the nuclear and radioactive material as well as their associated facilities. Considering the new situation, in February 2004, the Brazilian National Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN), decided to create the Nuclear Security Office. This Office is under the Coordination of Nuclear Safeguards and Security, in the Directorate for Safety, Security and Safeguards (Regulatory Directorate). Before that, security regulation issues were dealt in a decentralized manner, within that Directorate, by different licensing groups in specific areas (power reactors, fuel cycle facilities, radioactive facilities, transport of nuclear material, etc.). This decision was made in order to allow a coordinated approach on the subject, to strengthen the regulation in nuclear/radioactive security, and to provide support to management in the definition of institutional security policies. The CNEN Security Office develops its work based in the CNEN Physical Protection Regulation for Nuclear Operational Units - NE-2.01, 1996, the Convention on the Physical Protection of Nuclear Material and the IAEA Nuclear Security Series . This paper aims at presenting the activities developed and the achievements obtained by this new CNEN office, as well as identifying the issues and directions for future efforts. (author)

  18. Health physics self-assessment and the nuclear regulatory oversight process at a nuclear power plant

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has developed improvements in their Nuclear Power Plant inspection, assessment and enforcement practices. The objective of these changes was to link regulatory action with power plant performance through a risk- informed process which is intended to enhance objectivity. One of the Strategic Performance Areas of focus by the U.S. NRC is radiation safety. Two cornerstones, Occupational Radiation Safety and Public Radiation Safety, make up this area. These cornerstones are being evaluated through U.S. NRC Performance Indicators (PI) and baseline site inspections. Key to the U.S. NRC's oversight program is the ability of the licensee to implement a self-assessment program which pro-actively identifies potential problems and develops improvements to enhance management's effectiveness. The Health Physics Self-Assessment Program at San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station (SONGS) identifies radiation protection-related weakness or negative trends. The intended end result is improved performance through rapid problem identification, timely evaluation, corrective action and follow-up effectiveness reviews. A review of the radiation protection oversight process and the SONGS Health Physics Self-Assessment Program will be presented. Lessons learned and management tools, which evaluate workforce and Health Physics (HP) staff performance to improve radiological practices, are discussed. (author)

  19. Paramutation: a process for acquiring trans-generational regulatory states.

    Erhard, Karl F; Hollick, Jay B

    2011-04-01

    Basic tenets of Mendelian inheritance are violated by paramutations in which trans-homolog interactions lead to heritable changes in gene regulation and phenotype. First described in plants, similar behaviors have now been noted in diverse eukaryotes. Genetic and molecular studies of paramutations occurring in maize indicate that components of a small interfering RNA (siRNA) biogenesis pathway are required for the maintenance of meiotically heritable regulatory states. Although these findings lead to a hypothesis that siRNAs themselves mediate paramutation interactions, an assessment of existing data supports the opinion that siRNAs alone are insufficient. Recent evidence implies that transcription of paramutation-associated repeats and siRNA-facilitated chromatin changes at affected loci are involved in directing and maintaining the heritable changes in gene regulation that typify paramutations. PMID:21420347

  20. A new risk-informed design and regulatory process

    The overall purpose of the new approach, termed Risk-Informed Regulation, is to formulate a method of regulation that is logically consistent and devised so that both the reactor designer and regulator can work together in obtaining systems able to produce economical electricity safely. In this new system the traditional tools (deterministic and probabilistic analyses, tests and expert judgement) and treatments (defense-in-depth, conservatism) of safety regulation would still be employed, but the logic governing their use would be reversed from the current treatment. In the new treatment, probabilistic risk analysis (PRA) would be used as the paramount decision support tool, taking advantage of its ability to integrate all of the elements of system performance and to represent the uncertainties in the results. The latter is the most important reason for this choice, as the most difficult part of safety regulation is the treatment of uncertainties, not the assurance of expected performance. The scope of the PRA would be made as large as that of the reactor system, including all of its performance phenomena. The models and data of the PRA would be supported by deterministic analytical results, and data to the extent feasible. However, as in the current regulatory system, the models and data of the PRA would require being complemented by subjective judgements where the former were inadequate. All of these elements play important roles in the current decision-making structure; the main departure from current practice would be making all of these treatments explicit within the PRA, therefore, decreasing the frequency of sometimes arbitrary judgments. In the intended sense the PRA would be used as a vehicle for stating the beliefs of the designer and regulatory decision-maker; the foundation of their decisions. Thus, the PRA should be viewed as a Bayesian decision tool, and be used in order to take advantage of its capabilities in integration and inclusion of

  1. Modelling the conditional regulatory activity of methylated and bivalent promoters

    Budden, David M.; Hurley, Daniel G.; Edmund J Crampin

    2015-01-01

    Background Predictive modelling of gene expression is a powerful framework for the in silico exploration of transcriptional regulatory interactions through the integration of high-throughput -omics data. A major limitation of previous approaches is their inability to handle conditional interactions that emerge when genes are subject to different regulatory mechanisms. Although chromatin immunoprecipitation-based histone modification data are often used as proxies for chromatin accessibility, ...

  2. Regulatory Requirements and Comparing Required Documents for the Drug Registration Process in Indonesia and Vietnam

    Praneeth Pidaparthi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The regulatory authorities in Indonesia and Vietnam and their procedures for registration of a drug are discussed in this document. The Indonesia and Vietnam comes under ASEAN countries. The drug medication is essential and important in ASEAN region. The process of manufacturing a drug will not vary but the regulatory authorities and requirements will differ. The regulatory authority of any country has to ensure the quality of the product and safety of the patients. As the regulatory requirements differ it will be challenging for the companies to produce drugs which are submitted for approval for various countries. The regulatory documents comparing Indonesia and Vietnam that should be submitted for the drug registration in the respective countries are enclosed in this article.

  3. 2015 Summary Report on Industrial and Regulatory Engagement Activities

    Thomas, Kenneth David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    activities and future plans were made to Arizona Public Service, Exelon, Duke Energy, Pacific Gas & Electric, SCANA, Southern Nuclear, South Texas Project, STARS Alliance, Tennessee Valley Authority, and Xcel. Discussions were also held on the pathway goals and activities with major industry support organizations during FY 2102, including the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO), the Nuclear Information Technology Strategic Leadership (NITSL), the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI), and the Electric Power Research Institute. The Advanced II&C Pathway work was presented at five major industry conferences and Informal discussions were held with key NRC managers at industry conferences. In addition, discussions were held with NRC senior managers on digital regulatory issues through participation on the NEI Digital I&C Working Group. Meetings were held with major industry suppliers and consultants, to explore opportunities for collaboration and to provide a means of pilot project technology transfer. In the international area, discussions were held with Electricite’ de France (EdF) concerning possible collaboration in the area NPP configuration control using intelligent wireless devices.

  4. 2015 Summary Report on Industrial and Regulatory Engagement Activities

    activities and future plans were made to Arizona Public Service, Exelon, Duke Energy, Pacific Gas & Electric, SCANA, Southern Nuclear, South Texas Project, STARS Alliance, Tennessee Valley Authority, and Xcel. Discussions were also held on the pathway goals and activities with major industry support organizations during FY 2102, including the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO), the Nuclear Information Technology Strategic Leadership (NITSL), the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI), and the Electric Power Research Institute. The Advanced II&C Pathway work was presented at five major industry conferences and Informal discussions were held with key NRC managers at industry conferences. In addition, discussions were held with NRC senior managers on digital regulatory issues through participation on the NEI Digital I&C Working Group. Meetings were held with major industry suppliers and consultants, to explore opportunities for collaboration and to provide a means of pilot project technology transfer. In the international area, discussions were held with Electricite de France (EdF) concerning possible collaboration in the area NPP configuration control using intelligent wireless devices.

  5. Summary review of PSA topics in connection with Romanian regulatory body activities

    This presentation includes the Romanian regulatory body guide; PSA level 1 requirements; PSA level 1 project status; PSA level 2 support activities; Scenario for PSA activities; external and internal cooperation

  6. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's antitrust review process: an analysis of the impacts

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) antitrust process is reviewed and its impacts to small systems and applicant systems are studied. This process takes the form of a description of the NRC's antitrust review process as implemented, a generic categorization of potential impacts and individual case-by-case studies of four different utilities

  7. Conduct of regulatory review and assessment during the licensing process for nuclear power plants

    This Safety Guide was prepared as part of the Agency's programme, referred to as the NUSS programme, for establishing Codes of Practice and Safety Guides relating to nuclear power plants. It supplements the Code of Practice on Governmental Organization for the Regulation of Nuclear Power Plants (IAEA Safety Series No. 50-C-G) and is concerned with the review and assessment by the regulatory body of all information submitted in support of licence applications, in the various phases of the licensing process. The purpose of the Guide is to provide information, recommendations and guidance for the conduct of these activities. The scope of the review and assessment will encompass the safety aspects of siting, construction, commissioning, operation and decommissioning of each nuclear power plant

  8. The role of independent scientific and engineering analyses in the regulatory process

    Since it was established in 1987 by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses (CNWRA) has assisted NRC in fulfilling its responsibilities under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act related to a potential repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, and interim storage facilities for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. CNWRA attributes have assured its success in assisting NRC. These attributes include clearly defined roles and responsibilities, which encompass independent scientific and engineering analyses. Examples illustrate how these analyses have enhanced the regulatory process. (author)

  9. Status on the regulatory aspects in NORM/TENORM activities and waste in Malaysia

    In Malaysia, waste associated with TENORM are generated mostly in the tin mining and smelting, processing of minerals, and oil and gas industry. As one of a major tin producer in the world and the country current activities in oil production, the amount of waste generated in this kind of activities is quite substantial. Currently the government of Malaysia did not provide any provision in the law specifically for the exclusion of TENORM waste, however, the government did imposed the criteria for exclusion of this waste by adopting the guideline limit established by the IAEA safety series 26, which is very vital for the regulatory body i.e. Atomic Energy Licensing Board (AELB) to overcome the problems in managing some of waste related to TENORM industries. As one example, this guideline has been applied to one of the mineral processing industries in the country on decommissioning and disposing of their waste. Furthermore, due to economic reason and price of tin and its by-product is not viable and profitable so much, making this industry not significant in business and trade industries, several practices have been exempted from the regulatory control under the Atomic Energy Licensing Act, 1984. (author)

  10. Key regulatory and safety issues emerging NEA activities. Lessons Learned from Fukushima Dai-ichi NPS Accident - Key Regulatory and Safety Issues

    A presentation was provided on the key safety and regulatory issues and an update of activities undertaken by the NEA and its members in response to the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power stations (NPS) on 11 March 2011. An overview of the accident sequence and the consequences was provided that identified the safety functions that were lost (electrical power, core cooling, and primary containment) that lead to units 1, 2, and 3 being in severe accident conditions with large off-site releases. Key areas identified for which activities of the NEA and member countries are in progress include accident management; defence-in-depth; crisis communication; initiating events; operating experience; deterministic and probabilistic assessments; regulatory infrastructure; radiological protection and public health; and decontamination and recovery. For each of these areas, a brief description of the on-going and planned NEA activities was provided within the three standing technical committees of the NEA with safety and regulatory mandates (the Committee on Nuclear Regulatory Activities - CNRA, the Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations - CSNI, and the Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health - CRPPH). On-going activities of CNRA include a review of enhancement being made to the regulatory aspects for the oversight of on-site accident management strategies and processes in light of the lessons learned from the accident; providing guidance to regulators on crisis communication; and supporting the peer review of the safety assessments of risk-significant research reactor facilities in light of the accident. Within the scope of the CSNI mandate, activities are being undertaken to better understand accident progression; characteristics of new fuel designs; and a benchmarking study of fast-running software for estimating source term under severe accident conditions to support protective measure recommendations. CSNI also has ongoing work in human

  11. Synthesis of TP3 Fragment via One Pot Strategy and Its Immune Regulatory Activity

    WANG Li-feng; CHEN Jie; SHAN Hui-jie; LI Wei

    2005-01-01

    We have modified the previously described one-pot peptide synthesis method. The modified method has been successfully applied to the synthesis of TP3. Furthermore, the immune regulatory activity of TP3 has been characterized. The results show that the modified one-pot method can be used to synthesize the biological active peptide with the advantages of low cost and high productivity. Moreover, TP3 has a higher immune regulatory activity than TP5.

  12. Safety performance indicators used by the Russian Safety Regulatory Authority in its practical activities on nuclear power plant safety regulation

    The Sixth Department of the Nuclear, Industrial and Environmental Regulatory Authority of Russia, Scientific and Engineering Centre for Nuclear and Radiation Safety process, analyse and use the information on nuclear power plants (NPPs) operational experience or NPPs safety improvement. Safety performance indicators (SPIs), derived from processing of information on operational violations and analysis of annual NPP Safety Reports, are used as tools to determination of trends towards changing of characteristics of operational safety, to assess the effectiveness of corrective measures, to monitor and evaluate the current operational safety level of NPPs, to regulate NPP safety. This report includes a list of the basic SPIs, those used by the Russian safety regulatory authority in regulatory activity. Some of them are absent in list of IAEA-TECDOC-1141 ('Operational safety performance indicators for nuclear power plants'). (author)

  13. Redefining the transcriptional regulatory dynamics of classically and alternatively activated macrophages by deepCAGE transcriptomics

    Roy, S.

    2015-06-27

    Classically or alternatively activated macrophages (M1 and M2, respectively) play distinct and important roles for microbiocidal activity, regulation of inflammation and tissue homeostasis. Despite this, their transcriptional regulatory dynamics are poorly understood. Using promoter-level expression profiling by non-biased deepCAGE we have studied the transcriptional dynamics of classically and alternatively activated macrophages. Transcription factor (TF) binding motif activity analysis revealed four motifs, NFKB1_REL_RELA, IRF1,2, IRF7 and TBP that are commonly activated but have distinct activity dynamics in M1 and M2 activation. We observe matching changes in the expression profiles of the corresponding TFs and show that only a restricted set of TFs change expression. There is an overall drastic and transient up-regulation in M1 and a weaker and more sustainable up-regulation in M2. Novel TFs, such as Thap6, Maff, (M1) and Hivep1, Nfil3, Prdm1, (M2) among others, were suggested to be involved in the activation processes. Additionally, 52 (M1) and 67 (M2) novel differentially expressed genes and, for the first time, several differentially expressed long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) transcriptome markers were identified. In conclusion, the finding of novel motifs, TFs and protein-coding and lncRNA genes is an important step forward to fully understand the transcriptional machinery of macrophage activation.

  14. Transcription of Mammalian cis-Regulatory Elements Is Restrained by Actively Enforced Early Termination.

    Austenaa, Liv M I; Barozzi, Iros; Simonatto, Marta; Masella, Silvia; Della Chiara, Giulia; Ghisletti, Serena; Curina, Alessia; de Wit, Elzo; Bouwman, Britta A M; de Pretis, Stefano; Piccolo, Viviana; Termanini, Alberto; Prosperini, Elena; Pelizzola, Mattia; de Laat, Wouter; Natoli, Gioacchino

    2015-11-01

    Upon recruitment to active enhancers and promoters, RNA polymerase II (Pol II) generates short non-coding transcripts of unclear function. The mechanisms that control the length and the amount of ncRNAs generated by cis-regulatory elements are largely unknown. Here, we show that the adaptor protein WDR82 and its associated complexes actively limit such non-coding transcription. WDR82 targets the SET1 H3K4 methyltransferases and the nuclear protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) complexes to the initiating Pol II. WDR82 and PP1 also interact with components of the transcriptional termination and RNA processing machineries. Depletion of WDR82, SET1, or the PP1 subunit required for its nuclear import caused distinct but overlapping transcription termination defects at highly expressed genes and active enhancers and promoters, thus enabling the increased synthesis of unusually long ncRNAs. These data indicate that transcription initiated from cis-regulatory elements is tightly coordinated with termination mechanisms that impose the synthesis of short RNAs. PMID:26593720

  15. Regulation of Federal radioactive waste activities. Report to Congress on extending the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's licensing or regulatory authority to Federal radioactive waste storage and disposal activities

    The report contains two recommendations for extending the Commission's regulatory authority: (1) NRC licensing authority should be extended to cover all new DOE facilities for disposal of transuranic (TRU) waste and nondefense low-level waste. (2) A pilot program, focused on a few specific DOE waste management activities, should be established to test the feasibility of extending NRC regulatory authority on a consultative basis to DOE waste management activities not now covered by NRC's licensing authority or its extension as recommended in Recommendation 1

  16. Animal experimentation in Malta : regulatory processes and future perspectives

    Scerri, Charles

    2009-01-01

    Prior to Malta’s accession to the European Union (EU) in May 2004, new legislative processes regulating the use of animals for scientific research purposes were adopted in line with the provisions found under the European Union Council Directive 86/609/EEC. The scope of these regulations is to protect animals used or intended to be used in scientific experimental procedures which may cause pain, suffering, distress or lasting harm, using evaluation procedures that promote refinement, reductio...

  17. Regulatory control of food irradiation process for consumer protection

    The potential for food irradiation in the control of food-borne diseases is of particular importance in the developing countries of the Asian and Pacific region where considerable human resources are lost because of these diseases. Over the past few years there has been a growing interest in the irradiation process. To date, 29 irradiators, most of which were originally designed for sterilizing medical products, are being used for treating food and food ingredients. An additional 20 commercial/demonstration irradiators are either under construction or in advanced stages of planning. 3 refs, 4 tabs

  18. Regulatory network of inflammation downstream of proteinase-activated receptors

    Hurst Robert E

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protease-activated receptors (PAR are present in the urinary bladder, and their expression is altered in response to inflammation. PARs are a unique class of G protein-coupled that carry their own ligands, which remain cryptic until unmasked by proteolytic cleavage. Although the canonical signal transduction pathway downstream of PAR activation and coupling with various G proteins is known and leads to the rapid transcription of genes involved in inflammation, the effect of PAR activation on the downstream transcriptome is unknown. We have shown that intravesical administration of PAR-activating peptides leads to an inflammatory reaction characterized by edema and granulocyte infiltration. Moreover, the inflammatory response to intravesical instillation of known pro-inflammatory stimuli such as E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS, substance P (SP, and antigen was strongly attenuated by PAR1- and to a lesser extent by PAR2-deficiency. Results Here, cDNA array experiments determined inflammatory genes whose expression is dependent on PAR1 activation. For this purpose, we compared the alteration in gene expression in wild type and PAR1-/- mice induced by classical pro-inflammatory stimuli (LPS, SP, and antigen. 75 transcripts were considered to be dependent on PAR-1 activation and further annotated in silico by Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA and gene ontology (GO. Selected transcripts were target validated by quantitative PCR (Q-PCR. Among PAR1-dependent transcripts, the following have been implicated in the inflammatory process: b2m, ccl7, cd200, cd63, cdbpd, cfl1, dusp1, fkbp1a, fth1, hspb1, marcksl1, mmp2, myo5a, nfkbia, pax1, plaur, ppia, ptpn1, ptprcap, s100a10, sim2, and tnfaip2. However, a balanced response to signals of injury requires a transient cellular activation of a panel of genes together with inhibitory systems that temper the overwhelming inflammation. In this context, the activation of genes such as dusp1 and

  19. LWRS II&C Industry and Regulatory Engagement Activities for FY 11

    Ken Thomas

    2011-09-01

    To ensure broad industry support and coordination for the Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Controls (II&C) Systems Technologies research pathway, an engagement process will be continually pursued with nuclear asset owners, vendors, and suppliers, Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and the major industry support organizations of Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO), and Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI). Nuclear asset owner engagement is a necessary and enabling activity to obtain data and accurate characterization of long-term operational challenges, assess the suitability of proposed research for addressing long-term needs, and gain access to data and representative infrastructure and expertise needed to ensure success of the proposed research and development (R&D) activities. Engagement with vendors and suppliers will ensure that vendor expectations and needs can be translated into requirements that can be met through technology commercialization.

  20. Organization and practices on regulatory review in the licensing process of nuclear power plants in Spain

    The actual organisation, practices and experience of the JEN Nuclear Safety Department on the regulatory review in the licensing process of nuclear power plants in Spain, are presented. Topics to be covered are: The structure, organisation, staff and principal functional areas of the NSD, the academic qualifications and work experience of the NSD personnel, recruiting and training, the conduct of the regulatory review during the licensing process and working procedures, the manpower and coverage of the different technical areas, the principal problems and conclusions. (author)

  1. One hub-one process: a tool based view on regulatory network topology

    Sneppen Kim

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The relationship between the regulatory design and the functionality of molecular networks is a key issue in biology. Modules and motifs have been associated to various cellular processes, thereby providing anecdotal evidence for performance based localization on molecular networks. Results To quantify structure-function relationship we investigate similarities of proteins which are close in the regulatory network of the yeast Saccharomyces Cerevisiae. We find that the topology of the regulatory network only show weak remnants of its history of network reorganizations, but strong features of co-regulated proteins associated to similar tasks. These functional correlations decreases strongly when one consider proteins separated by more than two steps in the regulatory network. The network topology primarily reflects the processes that is orchestrated by each individual hub, whereas there is nearly no remnants of the history of protein duplications. Conclusion Our results suggests that local topological features of regulatory networks, including broad degree distributions, emerge as an implicit result of matching a number of needed processes to a finite toolbox of proteins.

  2. Unique expression, processing regulation, and regulatory network of peach (Prunus persica miRNAs

    Zhu Hong

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs have recently emerged as important gene regulators in plants. MiRNAs and their targets have been extensively studied in Arabidopsis and rice. However, relatively little is known about the characterization of miRNAs and their target genes in peach (Prunus persica, which is a complex crop with unique developmental programs. Results We performed small RNA deep sequencing and identified 47 peach-specific and 47 known miRNAs or families with distinct expression patterns. Together, the identified miRNAs targeted 80 genes, many of which have not been reported previously. Like the model plant systems, peach has two of the three conserved trans-acting siRNA biogenesis pathways with similar mechanistic features and target specificity. Unique to peach, three of the miRNAs collectively target 49 MYBs, 19 of which are known to regulate phenylpropanoid metabolism, a key pathway associated with stone hardening and fruit color development, highlighting a critical role of miRNAs in the regulation of peach fruit development and ripening. We also found that the majority of the miRNAs were differentially regulated in different tissues, in part due to differential processing of miRNA precursors. Up to 16% of the peach-specific miRNAs were differentially processed from their precursors in a tissue specific fashion, which has been rarely observed in plant cells. The miRNA precursor processing activity appeared not to be coupled with its transcriptional activity but rather acted independently in peach. Conclusions Collectively, the data characterizes the unique expression pattern and processing regulation of peach miRNAs and demonstrates the presence of a complex, multi-level miRNA regulatory network capable of targeting a wide variety of biological functions, including phenylpropanoid pathways which play a multifaceted spatial-temporal role in peach fruit development.

  3. Innate Immune Activity Conditions the Effect of Regulatory Variants upon Monocyte Gene Expression

    Fairfax, B. P.; Humburg, P.; Makino, S.; Naranbhai, V; Wong, D.; Lau, E; Jostins, L; Plant, K.; Andrews, R; McGee, C.; Knight, J.C.

    2014-01-01

    To systematically investigate the impact of immune stimulation upon regulatory variant activity, we exposed primary monocytes from 432 healthy Europeans to interferon-γ (IFN-γ) or differing durations of lipopolysaccharide and mapped expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs). More than half of cis-eQTLs identified, involving hundreds of genes and associated pathways, are detected specifically in stimulated monocytes. Induced innate immune activity reveals multiple master regulatory trans-eQTL...

  4. Emergent self-regulatory activity among young children during scientific inquiry: An analysis of six kindergarten children

    Lomangino, Adrienne Gelpi

    2000-10-01

    This qualitative investigation extends the study of self-regulation to examine young children's developing self-regulated learning competencies. The framework for this research draws upon social cognitive, developmental, and sociocultural perspectives on self-regulation and research on children's scientific thinking. Taking a multiple case study approach, this study examines six kindergarten children's emerging self-regulatory competencies during inquiry-based science instruction. Data were collected during two inquiry-based science programs of study, one pertaining to light and shadow and a second pertaining to motion on inclined planes. Data sources included: videotaped records of the instruction, transcriptions of the videotapes, interviews with the children and teacher, student work, and field notes. Taking an inductive approach to analysis, patterns in the children's activity were identified through a recursive process of defining and refining categories that characterized the children's verbal and behavioral activity. Each case study examines a child's behavior within each phase of the inquiry for evidence of emerging self-regulatory competence. Analysis revealed nascent forms of goal-setting and planning, monitoring, resource management, seeking social assistance, and evaluating. Monitoring activity occurred more frequently than planning or evaluating. For several children, animating materials served to promote motivation. Children's efforts to support peers' activity and monitor the meaning of ongoing discourse contrast with common assumptions about children's attention to others' thinking. Variations in self-regulatory activity were found across phases of instruction. The children exhibited interpersonal self-regulatory efforts, in which monitoring and control of the self was entwined with the activity of others. Joint participation also played a critical role in supporting the metacognitive demands of self-regulation and prompting metacognitive awareness

  5. The role of the US regulatory process in public acceptance of nuclear power

    This paper focuses, on NRC's regulatory responsibilities in relation to public acceptance of nuclear power. Since public attitudes in the United States may influence reaction to nuclear power in other nations, it is fair to say that the credibility of our regulatory program has international significance. Stated simply, unless the public is convinced that the regulatory process is effective in assuring safety, safeguarding nuclear facilities and materials, and protecting the environment, the use of nuclear power could be curtailed or even brought to a halt. Not only must the regulatory process be effective, it must at the same time be recognized by the public as being effective. Opinion polls in the United States have shown consistently that a majority of Americans believe it is important to develop nuclear power to help meet our future energy needs. The direction of public concern has shifted from year to year. Most recently, public apprehension has been expressed about the potential hazards of long-term storage of the high-level wastes from spent fuel reprocessing, and about the risks that nuclear materials and facilities may be subject to theft or diversion or sabotage. Uppermost in the public mind is the question whether the regulatory process can cope with these potential threats to public health and safety. The licensing process of the NRC is conducted in full public view. Issues of a generic nature are aired in rulemaking hearings, while each proposal to construct and operate a nuclear power plant or a facility such as fuel reprocessing plant is the subject of public hearings, which are held near the site of the proposed plant. During the last two years, we have noted that some persons who object to nuclear power plants have indicated that they believe that decisions to permit construction of such plants should be made at the State government level, rather than by a Federal agency. As a result, there now are movements to enact State laws and to set up State

  6. The regulatory perspective: Role of regulatory review of the safety case for preparing and performing the Swiss site selection process

    Swiss legislation requires for all types of radioactive waste the safe and permanent disposal in deep geological repositories within Switzerland by stipulating a step-by-step procedure for site selection and licensing of the disposal facilities. Each step requires safety considerations or safety analyses which are reviewed by the Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (ENSI, former HSK). The principle steps of radioactive waste disposal include: i) Demonstration of disposal feasibility for all types of radioactive waste in Switzerland. ii) Site selection process in three stages to narrow down the number of suitable sites to one for realisation ('Sectoral Plan for Geological Repositories'). iii) Construction, operation and closure of the repositories according to Swiss legislation in five steps [licence for geological investigations, general licence (decision-in-principle), construction licence, operation licence, closure order. Step i) was completed in 2006 when the Swiss Federal Council (Swiss federal government) approved the demonstration of disposal feasibility for high-level and long-lived intermediate level waste submitted by the implementer in 2002. The site selection process started in 2008 [Step ii)] according to a site selection concept (BFE, 2008) which was approved by the Federal Council after broad consultation. The process is organised and co-ordinated by the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE, in German BFE) and is carried out in accordance with the land use planning legislation. Safety is of highest priority in the site selection process, but socioeconomic aspects are also taken into account. The site selection procedure is based on a stepwise approach. In the first of three stages, six potential siting areas for L/ILW and three potential siting areas for HLW were proposed by the implementer (Nagra) for each repository type, based on safety criteria defined by the regulatory authority ENSI. ENSI has reviewed the documentation and has agreed with

  7. Activities of Nuclear Regulatory Authority and safety of nuclear facilities in the Slovak Republic in 1993

    A brief account of activities carried out by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic (NRA SR) in 1993 is presented. These activities are reported under the headings: (1) Introduction; (2) Regulatory activities at nuclear power plants units in operation; (2.1) Nuclear power plant SEP-EBO V-1; (4) Selected operation events and safety assessment in NPP SEP-EBO V-1; (2.2) Safety assessment of NPP SEP-EBO V-2; (3) Results of regulatory activities at the decommissioning of NPP A-1; (4) Regulatory activities at units under construction SEP-EMO - NPP Mochovce; (5) Further regulatory activities. (5.1) Preparation of designated personnel; (5.2) Inspection and accountancy of nuclear material; (5.3) Security provisions; (5.4) Accounted items and double use items; (5.5) Problem of radioactive wastes; (6.1) International co-operation activities of NRA; (6.2) Emergency planning; (6.3) International activities for quality enhancement of national supervision; (7) Conclusion

  8. Modelling non-stationary dynamic gene regulatory processes with the BGM model

    Grzegorczyk, Marco; Husmeier, Dirk; Rahnenfuehrer, Joerg

    2011-01-01

    Recently, a Bayesian network model for inferring non-stationary regulatory processes from gene expression time series has been proposed. The Bayesian Gaussian Mixture (BGM) Bayesian network model divides the data into disjunct compartments (data subsets) by a free allocation model, and infers networ

  9. Neuroimaging of developmental psychopathologies: the importance of self-regulatory and neuroplastic processes in adolescence

    Spessot, Alexandra L; Plessen, Kerstin J; Peterson, Bradley S

    2004-01-01

    developmental and plastic processes during the transition from adolescence into adulthood. Tourette syndrome (TS), defined as the chronic presence of motor and vocal tics, has been increasingly conceptualized as a disorder of impaired self-regulatory control. This disordered control is thought to give rise to...

  10. Exploring the Fluctuation of Motivation and Use of Self-Regulatory Processes during Learning with Hypermedia

    Moos, Daniel C.; Azevedo, Roger

    2008-01-01

    We collected think-aloud, pre-test, post-test, and motivation data from 43 undergraduates to examine the impact of conceptual scaffolds on the fluctuation of certain motivation constructs and use of self-regulatory processes during learning with hypermedia. Participants were randomly assigned to either the No Scaffolding (NS) or Conceptual…

  11. Self-Regulatory Processes Mediate the Intention-Behavior Relation for Adherence and Exercise Behaviors

    Bruin, de M.; Sheeran, P.; Kok, G.; Hiemstra, A.; Prins, J.M.; Hospers, H.J.; Breukelen, G.J.P.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Understanding the gap between people's intentions and actual health behavior is an important issue in health psychology. Our aim in this study was to investigate whether self-regulatory processes (monitoring goal progress and responding to discrepancies) mediate the intention-behavior re

  12. Self-regulatory processes mediate the intention-behavior relation for adherence and exercise behaviors

    M. de Bruin; P. Sheeran; G. Kok; A. Hiemstra; J.M. Prins; H.J. Hospers; G.J.P. van Breukelen

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Understanding the gap between people's intentions and actual health behavior is an important issue in health psychology. Our aim in this study was to investigate whether self-regulatory processes (monitoring goal progress and responding to discrepancies) mediate the intention-behavior re

  13. Regulatory Assistance, Stakeholder Outreach, and Coastal and Marine Spatial Planning Activities in Support of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Deployment

    Geerlofs, Simon H.; Copping, Andrea E.; Van Cleve, Frances B.; Blake, Kara M.; Hanna, Luke A.

    2011-09-30

    This fiscal year 2011 progress report summarizes activities carried out under DOE Water Power Task 2.1.7, Permitting and Planning. Activities under Task 2.1.7 address the concerns of a wide range of stakeholders with an interest in the development of the marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy industry, including regulatory and resource management agencies, tribes, nongovernmental organizations, and industry. Objectives for Task 2.1.7 are the following: • to work with stakeholders to streamline the MHK regulatory permitting process • to work with stakeholders to gather information on needs and priorities for environmental assessment of MHK development • to communicate research findings and directions to the MHK industry and stakeholders • to engage in spatial planning processes in order to further the development of the MHK industry. These objectives are met through three subtasks, each of which is described in this report: • 2.1.7.1—Regulatory Assistance • 2.1.7.2—Stakeholder Outreach • 2.1.7.3—Coastal and Marine Spatial Planning. As MHK industry partners work with the regulatory community and stakeholders to plan, site, permit, and license MHK technologies, they have an interest in a predictable, efficient, and transparent process. Stakeholders and regulators have an interest in processes that result in sustainable use of ocean space with minimal effects to existing ocean users. Both stakeholders and regulators have an interest in avoiding legal challenges by meeting the intent of federal, state, and local laws that govern siting and operation of MHK technologies. The intention of work under Task 2.1.7 is to understand and work to address these varied interests, reduce conflict, identify efficiencies, and ultimately reduce the regulatory costs, time, and potential environmental impacts associated with developing, siting, permitting, and deploying MHK systems.

  14. Using giant scarlet runner bean embryos to uncover regulatory networks controlling suspensor gene activity

    Kelli F. Henry

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the major unsolved issues in plant development is understanding the regulatory networks that control the differential gene activity that is required for the specification and development of the two major embryonic regions, the embryo proper and suspensor. Historically, the giant embryo of scarlet runner bean (SRB, Phaseolus coccineus, has been used as a model system to investigate the physiological events that occur early in embryogenesis – focusing on the question of what role the suspensor region plays. A major feature distinguishing SRB embryos from those of other plants is a highly enlarged suspensor containing at least 200 cells that synthesize growth regulators required for subsequent embryonic development. Recent studies have exploited the giant size of the SRB embryo to micro-dissect the embryo proper and suspensor regions in order to use genomics-based approaches to identify regulatory genes that may be involved in controlling suspensor and embryo proper differentiation, as well as the cellular processes that may be unique to each embryonic region. Here we review the current genomics resources that make SRB embryos a compelling model system for studying the early events required to program embryo development.

  15. The Chromatin-Modifying Enzyme Ezh2 Is Critical for the Maintenance of Regulatory T Cell Identity after Activation

    DuPage, Michel; Chopra, Gaurav; Quiros, Jason; Rosenthal, Wendy L.; Morar, Malika M.; Holohan, Dan; Zhang, Ruan; Turka, Laurence; Marson, Alexander; Bluestone, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg cells) are required for immune homeostasis. Chromatin remodeling is essential for establishing diverse cellular identities, but how the epigenetic program in Treg cells is maintained throughout the dynamic activation process remains unclear. Here we have shown that CD28 co-stimulation, an extracellular cue intrinsically required for Treg cell maintenance, induced the chromatin-modifying enzyme, Ezh2. Treg-specific ablation of Ezh2 resulted in spontaneous autoimmunity ...

  16. Peptidomics and processing of regulatory peptides in the fruit fly Drosophila

    Dennis Pauls

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available More than a decade has passed since the release of the Drosophila melanogaster genome and the first predictions of fruit fly regulatory peptides (neuropeptides and peptide hormones. Since then, mass spectrometry-based methods have fuelled the chemical characterisation of regulatory peptides, from 7 Drosophila peptides in the pre-genomic area to more than 60 today. We review the development of fruit fly peptidomics, and present a comprehensive list of the regulatory peptides that have been chemically characterised until today. We also summarise the knowledge on peptide processing in Drosophila, which has strongly profited from a combination of MS-based techniques and the genetic tools available for the fruit fly. This combination has a very high potential to study the functional biology of peptide signalling on all levels, especially with the ongoing developments in quantitative MS in Drosophila.

  17. Automatic reconstruction of a bacterial regulatory network using Natural Language Processing

    Collado-Vides Julio; Martínez-Flores Irma; Salgado Heladia; Rodríguez-Penagos Carlos

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Manual curation of biological databases, an expensive and labor-intensive process, is essential for high quality integrated data. In this paper we report the implementation of a state-of-the-art Natural Language Processing system that creates computer-readable networks of regulatory interactions directly from different collections of abstracts and full-text papers. Our major aim is to understand how automatic annotation using Text-Mining techniques can complement manual cu...

  18. Magnetohydrodynamic process in solar activity

    Jingxiu Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetohydrodynamics is one of the major disciplines in solar physics. Vigorous magnetohydrodynamic process is taking place in the solar convection zone and atmosphere. It controls the generating and structuring of the solar magnetic fields, causes the accumulation of magnetic non-potential energy in the solar atmosphere and triggers the explosive magnetic energy release, manifested as violent solar flares and coronal mass ejections. Nowadays detailed observations in solar astrophysics from space and on the ground urge a great need for the studies of magnetohydrodynamics and plasma physics to achieve better understanding of the mechanism or mechanisms of solar activity. On the other hand, the spectacular solar activity always serves as a great laboratory of magnetohydrodynamics. In this article, we reviewed a few key unresolved problems in solar activity studies and discussed the relevant issues in solar magnetohydrodynamics.

  19. Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research summary of advanced reactors activities, June 4, 2001

    Pre-application interactions with potential licensee applicants will help NRC prepare for future submittals, through the development of the infrastructure necessary for licensing application reviews. RES has the lead for non-LWR advanced reactor pre-application initiatives and longer-range new technology initiatives. An advanced reactor group has been formed in REAHFB, and is currently performing a pre-application review of Exelon's Pebble Bed Modular Reactor. Recent industry requests for future pre application interaction include General Atomics' Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR) and Westinghouse International Reactor Innovative and Secure (IRIS) design. RES advanced reactors activities also include participation as an observer in DOE's Generation IV initiative. Pre-Application review objectives include the development of regulatory guidance, licensing approach, and technology-basis expectations for licensing advanced designs, including identifying significant technology, design, safety, licensing and policy issues that would need to be addressed in the licensing process. The presentation described the pre-application process for the Exelon PBMR. NRC first identifies additional information following topical meetings with Exelon, and Exelon formally documents and submits required topical Information. The staff then develops a preliminary assessment and drafts a response which is followed by stakeholder input and comments at a public workshop. Preliminary assessments are discussed with ACRS and ACNW, and Commission papers are written which provide staff positions and recommendations on proposed policy decisions. Some of the significant areas for the PBMR include: Process Issues, Legal and Financial Issues; Regulatory Framework; Fuel Performance and Qualification; Traditional Engineering Design (e.g, Nuclear, Thermal-Fluid, Materials); Fuel Cycle Safety Areas; PRA, SSC Safety Classification; PBMR Prototype Testing

  20. Dynamic transcription factor activity profiles reveal key regulatory interactions during megakaryocytic and erythroid differentiation.

    Duncan, Mark T; Shin, Seungjin; Wu, Jia J; Mays, Zachary; Weng, Stanley; Bagheri, Neda; Miller, William M; Shea, Lonnie D

    2014-10-01

    The directed differentiation toward erythroid (E) or megakaryocytic (MK) lineages by the MK-E progenitor (MEP) could enhance the ex vivo generation of red blood cells and platelets for therapeutic transfusions. The lineage choice at the MEP bifurcation is controlled in large part by activity within the intracellular signal transduction network, the output of which determines the activity of transcription factors (TFs) and ultimately gene expression. Although many TFs have been implicated, E or MK differentiation is a complex process requiring multiple days, and the dynamics of TF activities during commitment and terminal maturation are relatively unexplored. Herein, we applied a living cell array for the large-scale, dynamic quantification of TF activities during MEP bifurcation. A panel of hematopoietic TFs (GATA-1, GATA-2, SCL/TAL1, FLI-1, NF-E2, PU.1, c-Myb) was characterized during E and MK differentiation of bipotent K562 cells. Dynamic TF activity profiles associated with differentiation towards each lineage were identified, and validated with previous reports. From these activity profiles, we show that GATA-1 is an important hub during early hemin- and PMA-induced differentiation, and reveal several characteristic TF interactions for E and MK differentiation that confirm regulatory mechanisms documented in the literature. Additionally, we highlight several novel TF interactions at various stages of E and MK differentiation. Furthermore, we investigated the mechanism by which nicotinamide (NIC) promoted terminal MK maturation using an MK-committed cell line, CHRF-288-11 (CHRF). Concomitant with its enhancement of ploidy, NIC strongly enhanced the activity of three TFs with known involvement in terminal MK maturation: FLI-1, NF-E2, and p53. Dynamic profiling of TF activity represents a novel tool to complement traditional assays focused on mRNA and protein expression levels to understand progenitor cell differentiation. PMID:24853077

  1. Transcriptional Regulatory Circuits Controlling Brown Fat Development and Activation

    Seale, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Brown and beige adipose tissue is specialized for heat production and can be activated to reduce obesity and metabolic dysfunction in animals. Recent studies also have indicated that human brown fat activity levels correlate with leanness. This has revitalized interest in brown fat biology and has driven the discovery of many new regulators of brown fat development and function. This review summarizes recent advances in our understanding of the transcriptional mechanisms that control brown an...

  2. Regulatory crosstalk by protein kinases on CFTR trafficking and activity

    Farinha, Carlos Miguel; Swiatecka-Urban, Agnieszka; Brautigan, David; Jordan, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) is a member of the ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily that functions as a cAMP-activated chloride ion channel in fluid-transporting epithelia. There is abundant evidence that CFTR activity (i.e. channel opening and closing) is regulated by protein kinases and phosphatases via phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. Here, we review recent evidence for the role of protein kinases in regulation of CFTR delivery to and retention in the plasma membrane. We review this information in a broader context of regulation of other transporters by protein kinases because the overall functional output of transporters involves the integrated control of both their number at the plasma membrane and their specific activity. While many details of the regulation of intracellular distribution of CFTR and other transporters remain to be elucidated, we hope that this review will motivate research providing new insights into how protein kinases control membrane transport to impact health and disease.

  3. Transportation package design certification process at the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission

    The Spent Fuel Project Office of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) certifies designs for Type B and fissile material transport packages. The Spent Fuel Project Office also conducts technical reviews for foreign-approved designs for import and export shipments. In an effort to improve efficiency and effectiveness, the Spent Fuel Project Office developed Standard Review Plans for transportation package design review and established internal policies and protocols to formalize the review process. The Standard Review Plans were developed to summarize the regulatory requirements for package approval, describe the procedures by which the staff determines that these requirements have been satisfied, and document the practices developed by the staff in previous reviews of package applications. The Standard Review Plans are used in conjunction with a Standard Format and Content Guide and other regulatory guidance documents developed by the NRC. Use of these documents is intended to assure high quality applications for package approval and to result in a technical review that is timely and consistent with regulatory requirements. A formalized review process was also developed that included work prioritization, scheduling, and review process templates. The development by IAEA of a standard format for applications for package approval and a review guide for competent authority approved designs and shipments based on Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material, TS-R-1, could be used to assist package designers and shippers involved with international transport of radioactive materials. The author also comments on participation in the IAEA TranSAS Mission to the United Kingdom with respect to the package design certification process. (author)

  4. Evaluation of regulatory processes affecting nuclear power plant early site approval and standardization

    This report presents the results of a survey and evaluation of existing federal, state and local regulatory considerations affecting siting approval of power plants in the United States. Those factors that may impede early site approval of nuclear power plants are identified, and findings related to the removal of these impediments and the general improvement of the approval process are presented. A brief evaluation of standardization of nuclear plant design is also presented

  5. The regulatory cascade that activates the Hrp regulon in Erwinia herbicola pv. gypsophilae.

    Nizan-Koren, R; Manulis, S; Mor, H; Iraki, N M; Barash, I

    2003-03-01

    The pathogenicity of Erwinia herbicola pv. gypsophilae (Ehg) is dependent on a plasmid (pPATH(Ehg)) that harbors the hrp gene cluster and additional virulence genes. The hrp regulatory cascade of Ehg comprises an hrpXY operon encoding a two-component system; hrpS encoding a transcriptional factor of the NtrC family and hrpL encoding an alternative sigma factor. Results obtained suggest the following signal transduction model for activating the Hrp regulon: phosphorylated HrpY activates hrpS, HrpS activates hrpL, and HrpL activates genes containing "hrp box" promoter. This model was supported by studies on the effects of mutations in the regulatory genes on pathogenicity and complementation analysis. Nonpolar mutations in hrpX did not affect virulence or transcription of downstream genes. Site-directed mutagenesis of the conserved aspartate 57 in HrpY suggested that its phosphorylation is crucial for activating the hrp regulatory cascade. Studies on the effects of mutations in the hrp regulatory genes on transcriptional activity of downstream genes or of their isolated promoters in planta showed dependency of hrpS expression on active HrpY, of hrpL expression on active HrpS, and of hrpN or hrpJ expression on active HrpL. These results were also partially supported by overexpression of regulatory genes under in vitro conditions. The hrpXY is constitutively expressed with high basal levels under repressive conditions, in contrast to hrpS and hrpL, which exhibit low basal expression levels and are environmentally regulated. PMID:12650456

  6. [ASSESSMENT OF EXTREME FACTORS OF SHIFT WORK IN ARCTIC CONDITIONS BY WORKERS WITH DIFFERENT REGULATORY PROCESSES].

    Korneeva, Ya A; Simonova, N N

    2016-01-01

    A man working on a shift basis in the Arctic, every day is under the influence of various extreme factors which are inevitable for oil and gas indudtry. To adapt to shift work employees use various resources of the individual. The purpose of research is the determination of personal resources of shift workers to overcome the adverse factors of the environment in the Arctic. The study involved 191 builder of main gas pipelines, working in shifts in the Tyumen region (the length of the shift 52 days of arrival) at the age of 23 to 59 (mean age 34.9 ± 8.1) years. Methods: psychological testing, questioning, observation, descriptive statistics, discriminant step by step analysis. There was revealed the correlation between the subjective assessment of the majority of adverse climatic factors in the regulatory process "assessment of results"; production factors--regulatory processes such as flexibility, autonomy, simulation, and the general level of self-regulation; social factors are more associated with the severity of such regulatory processes, flexibility and evaluation of results. PMID:27430072

  7. Radiation protection infrastructure and regulatory activities in Bangladesh

    The paper describes briefly and in general terms past and present activities regarding radiation protection and the proposed programmes, including setting up an infrastructure with a legal framework in Bangladesh. The peaceful applications of radioactive materials and ionizing radiations, including X rays, for socioeconomic development in diverse sectors have been increasing steadily in Bangladesh over the years. Since 1964, the Atomic Energy Commission has been the only organization in the country offering radiation protection services covering its own activities and, on request, those of some other national organizations, on a very limited scale. As there is no legal framework in the country for controlling and regulating the uses of ionizing radiation there are reports of considerable misuses, particularly in diagnostic X rays and in industry, leading to damage to public health and the environment. In order to ensure safe usage, radiation protection rules, regulations, etc., are to be formulated under the umbrella of a Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection Act, the promulgation of which has been long awaited. For the enforcement and implementation of the provisions of the Act and the rules, regulations, etc., framed thereunder, the creation of a radiation protection infrastructure with the establishment of an optimum organizational set-up having trained manpower, laboratory equipment and supporting facilities has been suggested. The active co-operation and support of the IAEA and other international communities in the implementation of the proposed radiation protection programmes in Bangladesh are strongly urged. (author). 3 refs, 2 figs, 1 tab

  8. CO2 - Intrinsic Product, Essential Substrate, and Regulatory Trigger of Microbial and Mammalian Production Processes.

    Blombach, Bastian; Takors, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Carbon dioxide formation mirrors the final carbon oxidation steps of aerobic metabolism in microbial and mammalian cells. As a consequence, [Formula: see text] dissociation equilibria arise in fermenters by the growing culture. Anaplerotic reactions make use of the abundant [Formula: see text] levels for refueling citric acid cycle demands and for enabling oxaloacetate-derived products. At the same time, CO2 is released manifold in metabolic reactions via decarboxylation activity. The levels of extracellular [Formula: see text] depend on cellular activities and physical constraints such as hydrostatic pressures, aeration, and the efficiency of mixing in large-scale bioreactors. Besides, local [Formula: see text] levels might also act as metabolic inhibitors or transcriptional effectors triggering regulatory events inside the cells. This review gives an overview about fundamental physicochemical properties of [Formula: see text] in microbial and mammalian cultures effecting cellular physiology, production processes, metabolic activity, and transcriptional regulation. PMID:26284242

  9. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Luxembourg

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General Regulatory Framework: 1. General; 2. Mining; 3. Radioactive substances, nuclear fuel and equipment; 4. Nuclear installations (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Emergency measures); 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiation protection; 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Non-proliferation and physical protection; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; II. General Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Minister of Health; Minister of Labour; Other Ministers competent); 2. Advisory bodies (Higher Health Council)

  10. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Iceland

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General Regulatory Regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances and equipment; 4. Nuclear installations; 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiation protection; 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Nuclear security; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear Third Party Liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Minister of Health and Social Security; Icelandic Radiation Protection Institute)

  11. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - New Zealand

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General regulatory regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive Substances and Equipment; 4. Nuclear installations; 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiation protection; 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Nuclear security; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities - National Radiation Laboratory - NRL; 2. Advisory bodies - Radiation Protection Advisory Council; 3. Public and semi-public agencies - Research institutes

  12. Innate immune activity conditions the effect of regulatory variants upon monocyte gene expression.

    Fairfax, Benjamin P; Humburg, Peter; Makino, Seiko; Naranbhai, Vivek; Wong, Daniel; Lau, Evelyn; Jostins, Luke; Plant, Katharine; Andrews, Robert; McGee, Chris; Knight, Julian C

    2014-03-01

    To systematically investigate the impact of immune stimulation upon regulatory variant activity, we exposed primary monocytes from 432 healthy Europeans to interferon-γ (IFN-γ) or differing durations of lipopolysaccharide and mapped expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs). More than half of cis-eQTLs identified, involving hundreds of genes and associated pathways, are detected specifically in stimulated monocytes. Induced innate immune activity reveals multiple master regulatory trans-eQTLs including the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), coding variants altering enzyme and receptor function, an IFN-β cytokine network showing temporal specificity, and an interferon regulatory factor 2 (IRF2) transcription factor-modulated network. Induced eQTL are significantly enriched for genome-wide association study loci, identifying context-specific associations to putative causal genes including CARD9, ATM, and IRF8. Thus, applying pathophysiologically relevant immune stimuli assists resolution of functional genetic variants. PMID:24604202

  13. Instream sand and gravel mining: Environmental issues and regulatory process in the United States

    Meador, M.R.; Layher, A.O.

    1998-01-01

    Sand and gravel are widely used throughout the U.S. construction industry, but their extraction can significantly affect the physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of mined streams. Fisheries biologists often find themselves involved in the complex environmental and regulatory issues related to instream sand and gravel mining. This paper provides an overview of information presented in a symposium held at the 1997 midyear meeting of the Southern Division of the American Fisheries Society in San Antonio, Texas, to discuss environmental issues and regulatory procedures related to instream mining. Conclusions from the symposium suggest that complex physicochemical and biotic responses to disturbance such as channel incision and alteration of riparian vegetation ultimately determine the effects of instream mining. An understanding of geomorphic processes can provide insight into the effects of mining operations on stream function, and multidisciplinary empirical studies are needed to determine the relative effects of mining versus other natural and human-induced stream alterations. Mining regulations often result in a confusing regulatory process complicated, for example, by the role of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, which has undergone numerous changes and remains unclear. Dialogue among scientists, miners, and regulators can provide an important first step toward developing a plan that integrates biology and politics to protect aquatic resources.

  14. Radiation processing activities at OGFL

    CONCAST group of Industries has set up the first Radiation Processing Plant in Eastern India as 'VIKIRAN' named as Organic Green Foods Ltd., situated at Dankuni (Durgapur Highway Express) 25 km away from central Kolkata on August 21, 2004. Shri Sanjay Sureka, Managing Director of Organic Green Foods Ltd., Kolkata belongs to the famous CONCAST Group of Industries operates the largest plant of West Bengal engaged in manufacturing of Steel Industry. The facility was aimed at improving the quality of healthcare products and devices as well as Laboratory, Spice, Herbal and Ayurvedic Products of large volumes on an industrial scale. The operation of VIKIRAN for the last ten years, has unambiguously proved that both the above objectives have been fully met and now radiation sterilization has emerged as an efficient and effective industrial process. The irradiator is a panoramic wet storage class-IV type. This Facility is designed for 1000 KCi activity of source and is suitable in medium and high dose range application. VIKIRAN offers radiation sterilization service to more than 100 manufacturers

  15. Guidance and methods for satisfying low specific activity material and surface contaminated object regulatory requirements

    The US Department of Transportation (DOT) and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) have prepared a comprehensive set of draft guidance for shippers and inspectors to use when applying the newly imposed regulatory requirements for low specific activity (LSA) material and surface contaminated objects (SCOs). These requirements represent significant departures in some areas from the manner in which these materials and objects were regulated by the earlier versions of the regulations. The proper interpretation and application of the regulatory criteria can require a fairly complex set of decisions be made. To assist those trying to apply these regulatory requirements, a detailed set of logic flow diagrams representing decisions related to multiple factors were prepared and included in the draft report for comment on Categorizing and Transporting Low Specific Activity Materials and Surface Contaminated Objects. These logic flow diagrams, as developed, are specific to the US regulations, but were readily adaptable to the IAEA regulations. The diagrams have been modified accordingly and tied directly to specific paragraphs in IAEA Safety Series No. 6. This paper provides the logic flow diagrams adapted to the IAEA regulations, and demonstrates how these diagrams can be used to assist consignors and inspectors in assessing compliance of shipments with the LSA material and SCO regulatory requirements

  16. EPA ACTIVITIES TO PREPARE FOR REGULATORY AND RISK ASSESSMENT APPLICATIONS OF GENOMICS INFORMATION

    Genomics will have significant implications for risk assessment and regulatory decision making. Since 2002, the U.S. EPA has undertaken a number of cross-Agency activities to further prepare itself to receive,interpret and apply genomics information for risk assessment and regul...

  17. Governing effect of regulatory proteins for Cl(-)/HCO3(-) exchanger 2 activity.

    Jeong, Yon Soo; Hong, Jeong Hee

    2016-05-01

    Anion exchanger 2 (AE2) has a critical role in epithelial cells and is involved in the ionic homeostasis such as Cl(-) uptake and HCO3(-) secretion. However, little is known about the regulatory mechanism of AE2. The main goal of the present study was to investigate potential regulators, such as spinophilin (SPL), inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate [IP3] receptors binding protein released with IP3 (IRBIT), STE20/SPS1-related proline/alanine-rich kinase (SPAK) kinase, and carbonic anhydrase XII (CA XII). We found that SPL binds to AE2 and markedly increased the Cl(-)/HCO3(-) exchange activity of AE2. Especially SPL 1-480 domain is required for enhancing AE2 activity. For other regulatory components that affect the fidelity of fluid and HCO3(-) secretion, IRBIT and SPAK had no effect on the activity of AE2 and no protein-protein interaction with AE2. It has been proposed that CA activity is closely associated with AE activity. In this study, we provide evidence that the basolateral membrane-associated CA isoform CA XII significantly increased the activity of AE2 and co-localized with AE2 to the plasma membrane. Collectively, SPL and CA XII enhanced the Cl(-)/HCO3(-) exchange activity of AE2. The modulating action of these regulatory proteins could serve as potential therapeutic targets for secretory diseases mediated by AE2. PMID:26716707

  18. Use of PSA in the regulatory process. Report of the specialist's meeting. Working material

    The objective of this meeting was to focus on the role of the regulator in relation to PSA, to give a picture of the present status, and near term plans, of the requirements placed on licensees and of the uses, formal and informal, made of PSA in regulatory decision making. One such use, in which there is currently much interest, is known as Risk-Based Regulation. This term has various connotations but essentially refers to a more flexible and efficient application of Technical Specifications in the interests of gains in both economy and safety. The position in many countries is one of change in the use of PSA by regulators, and hence any report can only give a snapshot in time. It has to be noted that a number of countries, with important nuclear power programmes, were not represented at the meeting, and so the overall picture is not as comprehensive as might have been hoped. The field of the discussion in the meeting was divided into three areas, progressed in three working groups, namely: Regulatory requirements related to PSA, Regulatory uses of PSA, and Risk-Based Regulation. The outcomes are covered in the next three sections. The fifth section of this report gives the overall conclusions of the meeting and the final section makes some recommendations for future IAEA activities in these areas. Refs, figs, tabs

  19. Regulatory In Vitro Diagnostics Landscape in Africa: Update on Regional Activities.

    McNerney, Ruth; Peeling, Rosanna W

    2015-10-15

    Improved diagnostic tests for tuberculosis case detection are urgently needed that are affordable, robust, and easy to use so that they can be implemented widely. The mandate of national regulatory authorities is to ensure the safety and effectiveness of diagnostics, protecting the population against unsafe products while expediting access to beneficial new devices. However, regulatory approval processes in the developing world are often complex, lengthy, and not transparent. Recent progress in building regulatory capacity using harmonized approaches will reduce duplication in clinical performance studies and manufacturing audits, facilitate information sharing through trust and mutual confidence building, and ultimately improve efficiency. These savings can be passed onto the consumers in the form of more affordable pricing and allowing new high-quality tests for tuberculosis to be introduced more quickly and without delay. PMID:26409274

  20. Actual operation and regulatory activities on steam generator replacement in Japan

    Saeki, Hitoshi [Kyushu Electric Power Co., Inc., Fukyoka (Japan)

    1997-02-01

    This paper summarizes the operating reactors in Japan, and the status of the steam generators in these plants. It reviews plans for replacement of existing steam generators, and then goes into more detail on the planning and regulatory steps which must be addressed in the process of accomplishing this maintenance. The paper also reviews the typical steps involved in the process of removal and replacement of steam generators.

  1. The role of learning environment on high school chemistry students' motivation and self-regulatory processes

    Judd, Jeffrey S.

    Changes to the global workforce and technological advancements require graduating high school students to be more autonomous, self-directed, and critical in their thinking. To reflect societal changes, current educational reform has focused on developing more problem-based, collaborative, and student-centered classrooms to promote effective self-regulatory learning strategies, with the goal of helping students adapt to future learning situations and become life-long learners. This study identifies key features that may characterize these "powerful learning environments", which I term "high self-regulating learning environments" for ease of discussion, and examine the environment's role on students' motivation and self-regulatory processes. Using direct observation, surveys, and formal and informal interviews, I identified perceptions, motivations, and self-regulatory strategies of 67 students in my high school chemistry classes as they completed academic tasks in both high and low self-regulating learning environments. With social cognitive theory as a theoretical framework, I then examined how students' beliefs and processes changed after they moved from low to a high self-regulating learning environment. Analyses revealed that key features such as task meaning, utility, complexity, and control appeared to play a role in promoting positive changes in students' motivation and self-regulation. As embedded cases, I also included four students identified as high self-regulating, and four students identified as low self-regulating to examine whether the key features of high and low self-regulating learning environments played a similar role in both groups. Analysis of findings indicates that key features did play a significant role in promoting positive changes in both groups, with high self-regulating students' motivation and self-regulatory strategies generally remaining higher than the low self-regulating students; this was the case in both environments. Findings

  2. 77 FR 70846 - Regulatory Guide 1.182, “Assessing and Managing Risk Before Maintenance Activities at Nuclear...

    2012-11-27

    ... 21, 2012 (77 FR 30030). Therefore, RG 1.182 is no longer needed, as the guidance in Regulatory Guide... COMMISSION Regulatory Guide 1.182, ``Assessing and Managing Risk Before Maintenance Activities at Nuclear... (Rev.) 0, ``Assessing and Managing Risk Before Maintenance Activities at Nuclear Power...

  3. Regulation of Mining and Mineral Processing Activities in South Africa

    In South Africa, the regulation of mining and mineral processing activities involving radioactive ores commenced in 1990. The paper provides an overview of the regulation of mining and mineral processing activities and the evolution of the authorization process from 1990 until recent times. Key developments in respect of controlling public exposure, occupational exposure, and environmental protection are provided. Future and present challenges are also identified with the resurgence of activities related to nuclear power generation linked to uranium mining. The centrality of nuclear and radiation safety requirements in the context of introducing improvements for effectively regulating mining are also cited and put forward. Reference is made to the role of the South African nuclear regulatory system and the impact of the nuclear safety and security regime. (author)

  4. Regulatory issues associated with exclusion, exemption, and clearance related to the mining and minerals processing industries

    The concepts of exclusion, exemption and clearance have been established in international recommendations and, standards for radiation protection and the management of radioactive waste in recent years. The consistent application of these concepts has given rise to various problems in different spheres of use. This is particularly the case in the mining and minerals processing industries dealing with materials exhibiting elevated concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides. This paper takes the South African mining industry as an example and highlights some of the issues that have arisen in applying these concepts within a regulatory control regime. (author)

  5. IMMUNOBIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY OF REGULATORY PEPTIDE FRACTIONS SYNTHESIZED BY NEUTROPHILS, AS TESTED IN A MACROPHAGE MODEL

    G. I. Vasilieva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents experimental data on regulatory effect of neutrophilokine helper fractions on the macrophage (Mph functional activity in the course of antiplague immunity formation. It has revealed that these fractions content biologically active, low-molecular weight peptides. They stimulate Mph killing activity by increasing phagosome-lysosome fusion, thus boosting transformation of monocytes to Mph, and causing redistribution of macrophage subpopulations in the total cellular pool. The helper effect of neutrophilokine fractions upon functional activity of MPh is more pronounced during secondary immune response.

  6. Network and Database Security: Regulatory Compliance, Network, and Database Security - A Unified Process and Goal

    Errol A. Blake

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Database security has evolved; data security professionals have developed numerous techniques and approaches to assure data confidentiality, integrity, and availability. This paper will show that the Traditional Database Security, which has focused primarily on creating user accounts and managing user privileges to database objects are not enough to protect data confidentiality, integrity, and availability. This paper is a compilation of different journals, articles and classroom discussions will focus on unifying the process of securing data or information whether it is in use, in storage or being transmitted. Promoting a change in Database Curriculum Development trends may also play a role in helping secure databases. This paper will take the approach that if one make a conscientious effort to unifying the Database Security process, which includes Database Management System (DBMS selection process, following regulatory compliances, analyzing and learning from the mistakes of others, Implementing Networking Security Technologies, and Securing the Database, may prevent database breach.

  7. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Slovak Republic

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General Regulatory Regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining Regime; 3. Radioactive Substances and Equipment; 4. Nuclear Installations (Licensing and Inspection, including Nuclear Safety; Emergency Response); 5. Trade in Nuclear Materials and Equipment; 6. Radiological Protection; 7. Radioactive Waste Management; 8. Non-proliferation and Physical Protection; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear Third Party Liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and Supervisory Authorities (Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic - UJD; Ministry of Health; Ministry of the Environment; Ministry of the Interior; Ministry of Economy; Ministry of Labour and National Labour Inspectorate); 2. Public and Semi-Public Agencies

  8. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Canada

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General regulatory regime: 1. Introduction (Licensing system; Offences, compliance and enforcement; Regulatory documents; Other relevant legislation); 2. Mining regime; 3. Nuclear substances and radiation devices; 4. Nuclear facilities; 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment (Exports, Other imports); 6. Radiation protection; 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Non-proliferation and nuclear security; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Governor in council; Minister of natural resources; Other Ministerial authorities; Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission - CNSC); 2. Public and semi-public agencies (National Research Council - NRC; Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council; Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. - AECL)

  9. Anticipated Activities in Maritime Work, Process Control, and Business Processes

    Andersen, Peter Bøgh

    2004-01-01

    Most activities are anticipated before they are executed. The paper presents methods for describing this anticipated state and the processes that may lead to a new state where the activities are executed. The method builds on linguistic case-theory....

  10. Using giant scarlet runner bean embryos to uncover regulatory networks controlling suspensor gene activity

    Henry, Kelli F.; Goldberg, Robert B.

    2015-01-01

    One of the major unsolved issues in plant development is understanding the regulatory networks that control the differential gene activity that is required for the specification and development of the two major embryonic regions, the embryo proper and suspensor. Historically, the giant embryo of scarlet runner bean (SRB), Phaseolus coccineus, has been used as a model system to investigate the physiological events that occur early in embryogenesis—focusing on the question of what role the susp...

  11. Panel discussion on 'the clearance of very low activity materials from regulatory control'

    'Full text:' Some activities on nuclear sites such as decommissioning generate large volumes of uncontaminated waste. What is an appropriate degree of rigour to apply to demonstrate that wastes are not contaminated, and are therefore suitable for release from regulatory control so they can be reused, recycled or disposed of in conventional waste facilities? Is there a level of demonstration that is practical to demonstrate on the scale required? If not, what are the practical alternatives for dealing with such wastes? (author)

  12. Evaluation of the safety culture in the regulatory activity in Camaguey province

    Previous studied accomplished in the country have permitted to evaluate the activity of the regulatory body in nuclear safety matter in part of the national territory. These studies did not encompass the Camaguey province. In the work are shown the results of the study in this part of the territory, accomplished as of the survey elaborated by the National Nuclear Safety Center using guides it ASCOT and other documents of the IAEA

  13. Radiochemical processing of activated targets

    The selection or development of an ''appropriate'' radiochemical processing scheme can be a complex and relatively difficult task. A variety of illustrative and alternative approaches to the various steps involved have been outlined. A few representative processing schemes have been examined in some detail. While these examples may serve to highlight the skills and versatility of the radiochemist, the most difficult aspect of radiochemical processing is frequently found in reconciling trade-offs. If the proper facilities are available, and the intended application and the limitations which that application impose on product quality are understood, a safe and reliable ''appropriate'' radiochemical processing scheme can almost always be developed. In the absence of such an understanding, even the best of facilities and technical skills are no guarantee of success

  14. Ukrainian regulatory authority policy for reducing the quantity of radiation sources requiring processing, storage and disposal in Ukraine

    The problem of the safe management of disused radiation sources generated from the use of radionuclides in industry, research and medicine is very important for Ukraine. The paper discusses some methods of solving this problem. These methods can be considered preventive and are aimed at developing and implementing an appropriate national regulatory policy in the sphere of activities with sealed sources. This policy includes a wide spectrum of measures, from political steps to the creation of a State computerized inventory system, and leads to a reduction of the quantity of radiation sources that require processing, storage and disposal in Ukraine. The content, purpose and phases of realization of each component of this policy in Ukraine are discussed. (author)

  15. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Poland

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General Regulatory Regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances, nuclear fuel and equipment (Licensing; Registration and monitoring of nuclear materials and radioactive sources; High activity sources); 4. Nuclear facilities (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Emergency response); 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiological protection; 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Non-proliferation and physical protection; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (The President of the National Atomic Energy Agency - Prezes Panstwowej Agencji Atomistyki (President of the PAA); Minister of Health; Minister of the Environment); 2. Advisory bodies (Council for Nuclear Safety and Radiological Protection); 3. Public and semi-public bodies (Radioactive Waste Management Plant); 4. Research institutes (Central Laboratory for Radiological Protection; National Centre for Nuclear Research; Institute of Nuclear Physics; Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology; Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion)

  16. Industrial Pollution Control and Efficient Licensing Processes: The Case of Swedish Regulatory Design

    Maria Pettersson

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Industrial pollution accounts for a large proportion of global pollution, and in the European Union, an integrated pollution and prevention approach based on individual performance standards has been implemented to regulate emissions from industrial plants. Crucial for the assessment of the licensing conditions are the Best Available Technique (BAT requirements, which should be set in accordance with the recently introduced Industrial Emissions Directive (IED. In this paper, we review and assess the licensing of industrial plants in one of the Member States, namely Sweden. Specifically, we discuss how the existing regulations (including the IED manage to address potential trade-offs between important regulatory design issues, such as flexibility, predictability and the need to provide continuous incentives for environmental improvements. The analysis indicates that while the EU regulations provide flexibility in terms of the choice of compliance measures, in Sweden, it enters an existing regulatory framework that adds a lot of uncertainty with respect to the outcome of the licensing processes. An important challenge for the implementation of the IED is to implement performance standards that lead to continuous incentives to improve environmental performance in industrial sectors without, at the same time, adding new uncertainties. While standards ideally should be both flexible and predictable, achieving one of these criteria may often come at the expense of the other.

  17. Development of joint regulatory guidance on the management of higher activity radioactive wastes on nuclear licensed sites - 16095

    In 2006 the UK Government's response (1) to recommendations by its Committee on Radioactive Waste Management (CoRWM) established, in England and Wales, that geological disposal, supported by safe and secure interim storage, is the preferred route for the long-term management of higher-activity radioactive waste (i.e. that which is not suitable for near-surface disposal). It also gave the responsibility for delivering the programme for a deep geological repository to the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA). The Scottish Government has a policy of long term, near site, near surface safe and secure interim storage. To support the open and transparent approach promised by Government, the Health and Safety Executive (HSE), the Environment Agency and the Scottish Environment Protection Agency (SEPA) are developing joint guidance on the management of higher-activity radioactive waste to explain regulatory objectives in securing safe and secure interim storage and the associated management of radioactive wastes. The guidance comes in two parts: - Guidance on the regulatory process; - Technical guidance modules. The guidance promotes a cradle to grave approach to radioactive waste management and by aligning the regulatory interests of environmental and safety regulators it delivers one of the Government's 'Better Regulation' objectives. This paper describes the process by which the joint guidance was produced with particular emphasis on stakeholder engagement. It describes the key features of the guidance, including the concept of the radioactive waste management case (RWMC). Finally the problems encountered with dissemination and implementation are discussed together with measures taken by the regulators to improve these aspects. (1) : UK Government and the devolved administrations, 'Response to the Report and Recommendations from the Committee on Radioactive Waste Management (CoRWM)', (PB 12303) October 2006. www

  18. Signal Processing under Active Monitoring

    Mostovyi, Oleksii

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes a method of signal preprocessing under active monitoring. Suppose we want to solve the inverse problem of getting the response of a medium to one powerful signal, which is equivalent to obtaining the transmission function of the medium, but do not have an opportunity to conduct such an experiment (it might be too expensive or harmful for the environment). Practically the problem can be reduced to obtaining the transmission function of the medium. In this case ...

  19. Magnetohydrodynamic process in solar activity

    Jingxiu Wang; Jie Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamics is one of the major disciplines in solar physics. Vigorous magnetohydrodynamic process is taking place in the solar convection zone and atmosphere. It controls the generating and structuring of the solar magnetic fields, causes the accumulation of magnetic non-potential energy in the solar atmosphere and triggers the explosive magnetic energy release, manifested as violent solar flares and coronal mass ejections. Nowadays detailed observations in solar astrophysics from s...

  20. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Ireland

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General regulatory regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances, nuclear fuel and equipment; 4. Nuclear installations; 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiation protection (Radiation protection standards; Emergency response); 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Non-proliferation and physical protection; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Minister for the Environment, Heritage and Local Government; Minister for Agriculture and Food; Minister for Communications, Marine and Natural Resources; Minister for Finance; Minister for Health and Children; Minister for Defence); 2. Public and semi-public agencies (Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland; Food Safety Authority of Ireland)

  1. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Slovenia

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General Regulatory Regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances, nuclear fuel and equipment; 4. Nuclear installations (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Emergency response); 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Safeguards for nuclear material; 7. Radiation protection; 8. Radioactive waste management; 9. Nuclear security; 10. Transport; 11. Nuclear third party liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Slovenian Nuclear Safety Administration - SNSA; Slovenian Radiation Protection Administration - SRPA); 2. Advisory bodies; 3. Public and semi-public agencies; 4. Technical support organisations - approved experts

  2. Foundations of regulatory activity in the sphere of WWER nuclear fuel usage in Ukraine

    Information about existing and prospective WWER type nuclear reactors in Ukraine is presented in this paper. Main laws, rules and regulations implemented for activity in the sphere of usage and licensing of nuclear fuel are briefly discussed. State control and state regulation in the field of nuclear power is conduced by an authorized regulatory body. Structure and tasks of Regulatory authority in the sphere of usage on nuclear power are described in order to clear the practice for licensing of nuclear fuel. The system for issuing of permissions for nuclear fuel usage and experience of its implementation is briefly discussed. There are presented some plans for implementation of new types of nuclear fuel for Ukrainian WWER-1000 reactors in cooperation with fuel suppliers. Nuclear Regulatory Authority of Ukraine is completed preparation and training for licensing of any new type of nuclear fuel. This means issuing of required permissions for the use of the new fuel type at individual stages of the fuel operation including, but not limited to, preparation and review of safety analysis documents. In the frame of this activity a methodology for performing an expert review of materials substantiating the introduction into operation of new types of fuel is developed

  3. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Norway

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General Regulatory Regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining Regime; 3. Radioactive Substances, Nuclear Fuel and Equipment; 4. Nuclear Installations (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Emergency response); 5. Trade in Nuclear Materials and Equipment (Trade governed by nuclear energy legislation; Trade governed by radiation protection legislation; Trade governed by export/import control legislation); 6. Radiation Protection; 7. Radioactive Waste Management; 8. Non-Proliferation and Physical Protection; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear Third Party Liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and Supervisory Authorities: A. Ministerial Level (Ministry of Health and Social Affairs; Ministry of Trade and Industry; Ministry of Foreign Affairs; Other Ministries); B. Subsidiary Level: (The Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority - NRPA; The Norwegian Nuclear Emergency Organisation); 2. Public and Semi-Public Agencies - Institute for Energy Technology - IFE

  4. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Hungary

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General regulatory regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances, nuclear fuel and equipment; 4. Nuclear installations (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Emergency response); 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiation protection; 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Nuclear security; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Atomic Energy Co-ordination Council; Hungarian Atomic Energy Authority - HAEA; Minister for Health; Minister for Local Government and Regional Development and Minister for Justice and Law Enforcement; Minister for Agriculture and Rural Development; Minister for Economy and Transport; Minister of Environment Protection and Water Management; Minister for Defence; Minister for Education; President of the Hungarian Mining and Geological Authority; Governmental Co-ordination Committee); 2. Advisory bodies (Scientific Board); 3. Public and semi-public agencies (Institute for Electric Power Research - VEIKI; Atomic Energy Research Institute - AEKI; Institute of Isotopes; Department of Physical Chemistry of the University of Pannon; Hungarian Power Companies Ltd - MVM Zrt.)

  5. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Spain

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General regulatory regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances, nuclear fuel and equipment; 4. Nuclear installations (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Protection of the environment against radiation effects; Emergency response); 5. Trading in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiation protection; 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Non-proliferation and physical protection (Safeguards and non-proliferation; Physical protection); 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Ministry of Industry, Tourism and Trade - MITYC; Ministry of the Interior - MIR; Ministry of Economy and the Exchequer - MEH; Ministry of the Environment and Rural and Marine Affairs - MARM); 2. Public and semi-public agencies (Nuclear Safety Council - CSN; Centre for Energy-related, Environmental and Technological Research - CIEMAT; National Energy Commission - CNE; 3. Public capital companies (Enusa Industrias Avanzadas, s.a. - ENUSA; Empresa Nacional de Residuos Radiactivos, s.a. - ENRESA)

  6. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Australia

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I) - General Regulatory Regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances and equipment; 4. Nuclear installations (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Protection of the environment against radiation effects); 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiation protection; 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Non-proliferation and physical protection (Bilateral safeguards agreements; International Atomic Energy Agency Safeguards Agreement; The South Pacific Nuclear Free Zone Treaty Act; The Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty Act; The Nuclear Non-Proliferation (Safeguards) Act); 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; II) - Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Minister for Health and Ageing; Minister for Foreign Affairs; Minister for the Environment, Heritage and the Arts; Minister for, Resources, Energy and Tourism); 2. Advisory bodies (Radiation Health and Safety Advisory Council; Advisory Committees); 3. Public and semi-public agencies (Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA); Australian Safeguards and Non-Proliferation Office; Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO); Supervising Scientist)

  7. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Denmark

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General Regulatory Regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances, nuclear fuel and equipment; 4. Nuclear installations (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Emergency response); 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiation protection; 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Nuclear security; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Minister of Health; Minister for the Environment/Minister of Transport and Energy; Minister of Justice; Minister of Defence; National Board of Health; Emergency Management Agency); 2. Advisory bodies (The Danish Ministry of Energy, Supply and Climate and the Danish Energy Agency); 3. Public and semi-public agencies (Risoe National Laboratory)

  8. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Netherlands

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General regulatory regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Fissionable materials, ores, radioactive materials and equipment (Fissionable materials and ores; Radioactive materials and equipment); 4. Nuclear installations (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Protection of the environment against radiation effects; Emergency response); 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiation protection (Protection of workers; Protection of the public; Protection of individuals undergoing medical exposure); 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Nuclear security; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Minister for Housing, Spatial Planning and the Environment; Minister for Economic Affairs; Minister for Social Affairs and Employment; Minister for Health, Welfare and Sports; Minister for Finance; Minister for Foreign Affairs); 2. Advisory body - Health Council of the Netherlands; 3. Public and semi-public agencies (Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group - NRG; Central Organisation for Radioactive Waste - COVRA)

  9. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Japan

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General Regulatory Regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances, nuclear fuel and equipment; 4. Nuclear installations (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Emergency response); 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiation protection; 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Nuclear security; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Cabinet Office; Minister of Economy, Trade and Industry - METI; Minister of Land, Infrastructure and Transport - MLIT; Minister of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology - MEXT); 2. Advisory bodies (Atomic Energy Commission - AEC; Nuclear Safety Commission - NSC; Radiation Council; Special Committee on Energy Policy; Other advisory bodies); 3. Public and Semi-Public Agencies (Japan Atomic Energy Agency - JAEA)

  10. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Portugal

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General regulatory regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances, nuclear fuel and equipment; 4. Nuclear installations (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Protection of the environment against radiation effects; Emergency response); 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiation protection; 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Non-proliferation and physical protection; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Ministry of Health; Minister of Science, Technology and Higher Education; Ministry of Economy and Innovation; Ministry of Environment and Territorial Planning; Other authorities); 2. Advisory bodies (Independent Commission for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety - CIPRSN; National Radiation Protection Commission - CNPCR; National Commission for Radiological Emergencies - CNER; Other advisory bodies); 3. Public and semi-public agencies

  11. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Turkey

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General regulatory regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances, nuclear fuel and equipment; 4. Nuclear installations; 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiation protection; 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Nuclear security; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Prime Minister; Ministry of Energy and Natural Resources; Ministry of Health; Ministry of the Environment and Forestry); 2. Public and semi-public agencies (Turkish Atomic Energy Authority - TAEK; General Directorate for Mineral Research and Exploration - MTA; ETI Mine Works General Management; Turkish Electric Generation and Transmission Corporation - TEAS; Turkish Electricity Distribution Corporation - TEDAS)

  12. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Finland

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General regulatory regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances, nuclear fuel and equipment; 4. Nuclear installations; (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Emergency response); 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiation protection; 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Nuclear security; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Ministry of Trade and Industry - KTM; Ministry of Social Affairs and Health; Ministry of the Interior; Ministry of the Environment; Ministry of Foreign Affairs); 2. Advisory bodies (Advisory Committee on Nuclear Energy; Advisory Committee on Nuclear Safety); 3. Public and semi-public agencies (Finnish Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority - STUK; State Nuclear Waste Management Fund)

  13. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Czech Republic

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General regulatory regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances, nuclear items and spent fuel (Ionising radiation sources; Nuclear items; Spent fuel); 4. Nuclear installations (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Emergency response; Decommissioning); 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiation protection; 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Non-proliferation and physical protection; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (State Office for Nuclear Safety - SUJB; Ministry of Industry and Trade; Ministry of the Interior; Ministry of the Environment); 2. Public and semi-public agencies (CEZ, a.s.; National Radiation Protection Institute - NRPI; Radioactive Waste Repository Authority - RAWRA; Diamo; Nuclear Physics Institute - NPI; National Institute for Nuclear, Chemical and Biological Protection; Nuclear Research Institute Rez, a.s. - NRI)

  14. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Mexico

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General regulatory regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances, nuclear fuel and equipment; 4. Nuclear installations (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Protection of the environment against radiation effects; Emergency response); 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiation protection; 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Non-proliferation and physical protection; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; 11. Nuclear terrorism; II. Institutional Framework - The federal government: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Ministry of Energy; Ministry of Health; Ministry of Labour and Social Security; Ministry of the Environment and Natural Resources; Ministry of Communications and Transport); 2. Public and semi-public agencies: (National Nuclear Safety and Safeguards Commission; National Nuclear Research Institute)

  15. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Greece

    In Greece, there are no nuclear power plants and nuclear energy is not considered as an option in the foreseeable future. There is, however, one nuclear research reactor (in extended shutdown since 2014) and one sub-critical assembly. Radioactive waste originating from medicine, research and industry is classified as low level. Although there is no framework act dealing comprehensively with the different aspects of nuclear energy, there are various laws, decrees and regulations of a more specific nature governing several aspects of nuclear activities. This paper gives information on the general regulatory regime (mining regime, radioactive substances, nuclear fuel and equipment, nuclear installations (licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety, emergency response, trade in nuclear materials and equipment, radiation protection, radioactive waste management, nuclear security, transport, nuclear third party liability) and on the institutional framework with the regulatory and supervisory authorities (Greek Atomic Energy Commission (EEAE))

  16. Improving regulatory effectiveness in federal/state siting actions: water supplies and the nuclear licensing process

    The Interstate Conference on Water Problems (ICWP) is a national association of State, intrastate, and interstate officials concerned with water resources administration and related matters. The Conference was established in 1959 as an outgrowth of regional conferences on water problems as recognized in the same year by action of the General Assembly of the States. This report was produced by the Interstate Conference on Water Problems in an effort to provide a compilation and summary of the views of selected States regarding relationships of water supplies to the nuclear power plant licensing process. This publication does not represent the official position of the U.S Water Resources Council, or the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, nor does it represent the position of any single state or the ICWP

  17. Regulatory and law framework of agricultural methanization and composting activities. User's guide

    After a presentation of the general context of organic waste management (its techniques, materials, legal and regulatory sources, i.e. European and French laws), this guide indicates the main regulatory and law aspects to those wishing to implement a project of methanization or composting of organic by-products in the agricultural sector. Several aspects are therefore discussed and presented in practical sheets. They concern the health and environment regulation, but not the professional risk prevention (explosion, fire, and so on). These aspects are the project setting up, input materials (animal by-products, organic materials coming from agricultural production or from out of it), waste collection and transport, process steps, organic product valorization, biogas valorization, solid and liquid release management

  18. Perilipin-mediated lipid droplet formation in adipocytes promotes sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 processing and triacylglyceride accumulation.

    Yu Takahashi

    Full Text Available Sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 (SREBP-1 has been thought to be a critical factor that assists adipogenesis. During adipogenesis SREBP-1 stimulates lipogenic gene expression, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ enhances perilipin (plin gene expression, resulting in generating lipid droplets (LDs to store triacylglycerol (TAG in adipocytes. Plin coats adipocyte LDs and protects them from lipolysis. Here we show in white adipose tissue (WAT of plin-/- mice that nuclear active SREBP-1 and its target gene expression, but not nuclear SREBP-2, significantly decreased on attenuated LD formation. When plin-/- mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs differentiated into adipocytes, attenuated LDs were formed and nuclear SREBP-1 decreased, but enforced plin expression restored them to their original state. Since LDs are largely derived from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER, alterations in the ER cholesterol content were investigated during adipogenesis of 3T3-L1 cells. The ER cholesterol greatly reduced in differentiated adipocytes. The ER cholesterol level in plin-/- WAT was significantly higher than that of wild-type mice, suggesting that increased LD formation caused a change in ER environment along with a decrease in cholesterol. When GFP-SREBP-1 fusion proteins were exogenously expressed in 3T3-L1 cells, a mutant protein lacking the S1P cleavage site was poorly processed during adipogenesis, providing evidence of the increased canonical pathway for SREBP processing in which SREBP-1 is activated by two cleavage enzymes in the Golgi. Therefore, LD biogenesis may create the ER microenvironment favorable for SREBP-1 activation. We describe the novel interplay between LD formation and SREBP-1 activation through a positive feedback loop.

  19. The Swiss Modification Process in Nuclear Power Plants Regulatory Regime - Regulator/Operator process and Experience Related to Events with Safety Impact

    Modifications at NPPs are one of the important processes in regulatory and operator tasks for safe operation. Experience shows that many of the most significant Swiss events have their origin in previous modifications. Failures were sometimes latent, over a long time. Important elements of the whole quality chain are the Quality Management Systems of the operators. The latter has also to control the activity of suppliers and manufacturers. The other important element is the regulation and the supervision by the regulatory body (RB), and their related organisations. The paper outlines the main Swiss regulatory guidelines and the RB impact, which depends on the safety impact of modifications and on the type of modifications (large or small, new technology or known standard technology). Experience shows that large modifications performed by qualified suppliers have resulted in few events, small modifications by plant personnel have led to significant events. Derived from these events, the following proposals are made: - Applying Human Factor principles should be an integral element of all modifications. Such principles should be defined in an IAEA safety guide or TECDOC. - Using operating experience should also be a standard element in the modification process. A powerful computerised intelligent search tool to extract the relevant information from large databases (e.g. IRS) should be developed by related organisations. In conclusion: The Swiss contribution should support international discussions on implementing operating experience feedback in the modification process. Condition: a 'powerful intelligent computerized tool' should be developed to find quickly and easily the important related 'lesson learned' e.g. in the IRS database. The existing tool is not helpful in this respect. This may help to reduce the risk of MINIMs recurrence and may lead to better design reviews and an improvement of acceptance or commissioning tests. Experience has showed that missing

  20. Regulatory T cells suppress systemic and mucosal immune activation to control intestinal inflammation.

    Izcue, Ana; Coombes, Janine L; Powrie, Fiona

    2006-08-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is the main interface where the body encounters exogenous antigens. It is crucial that the local response here is tightly regulated to avoid an immune reaction against dietary antigens and commensal flora while still mounting an efficient defense against pathogens. Faults in establishing intestinal tolerance can lead to disease, inducing local and often also systemic inflammation. Studies in human as well as in animal models suggest a role for regulatory T cells (Tregs) in maintaining intestinal homeostasis. Transfer of Tregs can not only prevent the development of colitis in animal models but also cure established disease, acting both systemically and at the site of inflammation. In this review, we discuss the major regulatory pathways, including transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta), interleukin-10 (IL-10), and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4), and their role in Treg-mediated control of systemic and mucosal responses. In addition, we give an overview of the known mechanisms of lymphocyte migration to the intestine and discuss how CD103 expression can influence the balance between regulatory and effector T cells. Further understanding of the factors that control the activity of Tregs in different immune compartments may facilitate the design of strategies to target regulation in a tissue-specific way. PMID:16903919

  1. The mass media role in acceptance activities of Slovak Republic's Nuclear Regulatory Authority

    Communication is the vital link between Nuclear Regulatory Authority and the public. If people do not know and understand the facts on which optimal a safety energy choice decisions should be based they cannot make informed decisions on how their own objectives can be met. The following ten commandments of communications are pointed out: be yourself; be comfortable and confident; be honest; be brief; be human; be personal; be positive and consistent; be attentive; be energetic; be committed and sincere. The important aspect is to test whether the nuclear energy in the Slovak Republic is acceptable according to mandatory rules and if its operation is regulated by the state through the independent institution - the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic (UJD). The media in Slovakia has on important power. Many organizations are therefore apprehensive when dealing with the press, radio and television. Many people would simply prefer not to get panicked when the dreaded microphones and cameras do appear. UJD considers the whole area of public relations as an essential component of its activity. UJD intends to offer the public true, systematic, qualified, understandable and independent information, regarding the safety of nuclear power plants, as well as regarding the methods and results of UJD work. Generally, public information is considered a significant contribution to the creation of confidence into the regulatory work. The paper presents the UJD communication program and relations with media as well as the preparedness of public information in case of emergency

  2. Nuclear Regulatory Commission activities to prepare for reviewing license applications and issuing licenses

    Uleck, R.B.; DeFino, C.V. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1991-12-31

    The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 (LLRWPAA) assigned States the responsibility to provide for disposal of commercial low-level radioactive waste (LLRW) by 1993. The LLRWPAA also required the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to establish procedures and develop the technical review capability to process license applications for new LLRW disposal facilities. Under the LLRWPAA, NRC is required, to the extent practicable, to complete its review of an LLRW disposal facility license application within 15 months of its submittal by a State. This provision of the LLRWPAA helps ensure that NRC, in addition to protecting public health and safety and the environment, facilitates States` achievement of LLRWPAA milestones for new facility development. A timely NRC review is needed for States to accomplish their objective of having new disposal facilities in operation on the dates prescribed in the LLRWPAA. To help assure NRC and States` compliance with the provisions of the LLRWPAA, NRC has developed a licensing review strategy that includes: (1) the further development of regulatory guidance, (2) enhancement of licensing review capability, and (3) prelicensing regulatory consultation with potential applicants.

  3. Exploring the impact of permitting and local regulatory processes on residential solar prices in the United States

    This article statistically isolates the impacts of city-level permitting and other local regulatory processes on residential PV prices in the United States. We combine data from two “scoring” mechanisms that independently capture local regulatory process efficiency with the largest dataset of installed PV prices in the United States. We find that variations in local permitting procedures can lead to differences in average residential PV prices of approximately $0.18/W between the jurisdictions with the least-favorable and most-favorable permitting procedures. Between jurisdictions with scores across the middle 90% of the range (i.e., 5th percentile to 95th percentile), the difference is $0.14/W, equivalent to a $700 (2.2%) difference in system costs for a typical 5-kW residential PV installation. When considering variations not only in permitting practices, but also in other local regulatory procedures, price differences grow to $0.64–$0.93/W between the least-favorable and most-favorable jurisdictions. Between jurisdictions with scores across the middle 90% of the range, the difference is equivalent to a price impact of at least $2500 (8%) for a typical 5-kW residential PV installation. These results highlight the magnitude of cost reduction that might be expected from streamlining local regulatory regimes. - Highlights: • We show local regulatory processes meaningfully affect U.S. residential PV prices. • We use regression analysis and two mechanisms for “scoring” regulatory efficiency. • Local permitting procedure variations can produce PV price differences of $0.18/W. • Broader regulatory variations can produce PV price differences of $0.64–$0.93/W. • The results suggest the cost-reduction potential of streamlining local regulations

  4. Regulatory inspection activities on nuclear power plant sites during construction in the United Kingdom

    The work of regulatory inspection of the construction of the plant on the site is performed not only by the inspector who has been allocated to inspection duties for that site but also by the specialist staff who are involved with the safety assessment of the plant. The coordination of this work is described in the paper and examples are given of inspection activities associated with the enforcement requirements of license conditions as well as those related to the inspection of the plant itself

  5. Regulatory T Cell Responses to High-Dose Methylprednisolone in Active Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    Alexis Mathian

    Full Text Available A slight increase in the proportion of circulating regulatory T (Treg cells has been reported in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE patients taking oral prednisone. The effects of intravenous (IV high dose methylprednisolone (MP on Tregs have not yet been described, especially in active SLE.We prospectively analyzed the proportion of circulating CD4+ Treg cell subsets defined as follows: (1 naïve Treg (nTreg FoxP3lowCD45RA+ cells; (2 effector Treg (eTreg FoxP3highCD45RA- cells; and (3 non-suppressive FoxP3lowCD45RA- cells (non-regulatory Foxp3low T cells. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells of patients with active SLE were analyzed before the first infusion of IV high dose MP (day 0 and the following days (day 1, day 2, ±day 3 and ±day 8. The activity of SLE was assessed by the SLEDAI score.Seventeen patients were included. Following MP infusions, the median (range percentage of eTregs significantly increased from 1.62% (0.53-8.43 at day 0 to 2.80% (0.83-14.60 at day 1 (p = 0.003 versus day 0, 4.64% (0.50-12.40 at day 2 (p = 0.06 versus day 1 and 7.50% (1.02-20.70 at day 3 (p = 0.008 versus day 2, and declined to baseline values at day 8. Expanding eTreg cells were actively proliferating, as they expressed Ki-67. The frequency of non-regulatory FoxP3low T cells decreased from 6.39% (3.20-17.70 at day 0 to 4.74% (1.03-9.72 at day 2 (p = 0.005; nTreg frequency did not change. All patients clinically improved immediately after MP pulses. The absence of flare after one year of follow up was associated with a higher frequency of eTregs at day 2.IV high dose MP induces a rapid, dramatic and transient increase in circulating regulatory T cells. This increase may participate in the preventive effect of MP on subsequent flares in SLE.

  6. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Sweden

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General regulatory regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances, nuclear fuel and equipment; 4. Nuclear installations (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Protection of the environment against radiation effects (The Environmental Code, Environmental impact statement, Permit under the Environmental Code)); 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiological protection; 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Non-proliferation and physical protection; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability (The Nuclear Liability Act; Chernobyl legislation); II. Institutional Framework: 1. Ministries with responsibilities concerning nuclear activities (Ministry of the Environment; Ministry of Enterprise, Energy and Communications; Ministry of Justice; Ministry of Foreign Affairs); 2. Swedish Radiation Safety Authority

  7. Development of a stable uranium recovery regulatory framework for uranium recovery activities in the United States

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has historically regulated operations at all uranium and thorium recovery facilities under the authority of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended. Uranium recovery facilities are those plants, or portions of facilities that process uranium- or thorium-bearing material primarily for its source material content. The uranium recovery industry expressed some concerns over several aspects of the NRC's practices, as described in the NRC's guidance documents. In April 1998, the National Mining Association submitted a report to the Commission, that identified specific concerns with NRC's current position and guidance regarding concurrent jurisdiction at uranium mills; dual regulatory authority at in situ leach facilities; the use of mill tailings impoundments for disposal of radioactive material other than 11e.(2) byproduct material; and the ability to process alternate feed material at uranium mills. The NRC staff addressed most of these concerns in two SECY (staff recommendations) papers that were concurrently provided to the Commission, along with a SECY paper on a draft rulemaking plan relating to these and other issues. The issues addressed in these papers included a new rulemaking, disposal of materials other than 11 e.(2) byproduct material, processing of materials other than natural ores, and improved efficiency for regulating in situ leach uranium facilities. The Commission issued final policy decisions on these issues and directions for NRC staff to implement those decisions in July 2000. (author)

  8. Regulatory oversight of uranium mines and mills

    Full text: The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) is the principal nuclear regulator in Canada. The CNSC is empowered through the Nuclear Safety and Control Act (NSCA) and associated regulations, to regulate the entire nuclear cycle which includes uranium mining and milling. The paper discusses the regulatory oversight of uranium mines and mills which include: - Who is CNSC, what is the CNSC's mission and CNSC background - Oversight Management System; - Regulatory Framework; - Expectations for Assessing Compliance; - QA Principles and Program Elements; - A Look to the Future; - Planning regulatory oversight activities; - Management System Documentation Review; - Regulatory Oversight Activities; - Following-up On Inspections; - Enforcing Compliance with Requirements; - Improving the Regulatory Oversight Process. (author)

  9. Improvements to the DOE low-level waste regulatory structure and process under recommendation 94-2 - progress to date

    Among the concerns expressed by the Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board (DNFSB) in its Recommendation 94-2 was the lack of a clearly defined and effective internal Department of Energy (DOE) regulatory oversight and enforcement process for ensuring that low-level radioactive waste management health, safety, and environmental requirements are met. Therefore, part of the response to the DNFSB concern is a task to clarify and strengthen the low-level waste management regulatory structure. This task is being conducted in two steps. First, consistent with the requirements of the current DOE waste management order and within the framework of the current organizational structure, interim clarification of a review process and the associated organizational responsibilities has been issued. Second, in coordination with the revision of the waste management order and consistent with the organizational responsibilities resulting from the strategic alignment of DOE, a rigorous, more independent regulatory oversight structure will be developed

  10. Improvements to the DOE low-level waste regulatory structure and process under recommendation 94-2 - progress to date

    Regnier, E.

    1995-12-31

    Among the concerns expressed by the Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board (DNFSB) in its Recommendation 94-2 was the lack of a clearly defined and effective internal Department of Energy (DOE) regulatory oversight and enforcement process for ensuring that low-level radioactive waste management health, safety, and environmental requirements are met. Therefore, part of the response to the DNFSB concern is a task to clarify and strengthen the low-level waste management regulatory structure. This task is being conducted in two steps. First, consistent with the requirements of the current DOE waste management order and within the framework of the current organizational structure, interim clarification of a review process and the associated organizational responsibilities has been issued. Second, in coordination with the revision of the waste management order and consistent with the organizational responsibilities resulting from the strategic alignment of DOE, a rigorous, more independent regulatory oversight structure will be developed.

  11. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Italy

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General regulatory regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances, nuclear fuel and equipment; 4. Nuclear installations (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Protection of the environment against radiation effects; Emergency response); 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment (General provisions; Patents); 6. Radiation Protection (Protection of workers; Protection of the public; Protection of the environment); 7. Radioactive Waste Management; 8. Non-proliferation and physical protection; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear Third Party Liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Interdepartmental Committee for Economic Planning; Nuclear Safety Agency; Prime Minister; Minister for Economic Development; Minister for Labour and Social Security; Minister for Health; Minister for the Environment; Minister for the Interior; Minister for Transport and Navigation; Minister for Foreign Trade (now incorporated in Ministry for Economic Development); Minister for Education; Treasury Minister; Minister for Universities and for Scientific and Technical Research; Minister for Foreign Affairs; State Advocate General); 2. Advisory bodies (Inter-ministerial Council for Consultation and Co-ordination; Coordinating Committee for Radiation Protection of Workers and the Public; Regional and Provincial Commissions for Public Health Protection

  12. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Belgium

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General Regulatory Regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Nuclear facilities (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Protection of the environment against radiation effects; Emergency response; Decommissioning); 4. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 5. Radiological protection; 6. Radioactive waste management; 7. Non-proliferation of nuclear weapons and physical protection of nuclear material (International aspects; National control and security measures); 8. Transport; 9. Nuclear third party liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Federal Agency for Nuclear Control - FANC; Federal Public Service for Home Affairs; Federal Public Service for Economy, SME's, Self-Employed and Energy; Federal Public Service for Employment, Labour and Social Dialogue; Federal Public Service for Defence; Federal Public Service for Foreign Affairs, Foreign Trade and Development Co-operation; Federal Public Planning Service for Science Policy); 2. Advisory bodies (Scientific Council for Ionizing Radiation of the Federal Agency for Nuclear Control; Superior Health Council; Superior Council for Safety, Hygiene and Enhancement of Workplaces; Advisory Committee for the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons; Commission for Electricity and Gas Regulation - CREG)

  13. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Austria

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I) - General Regulatory Regime - General Outline: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining Regime; 3. Radioactive Substances, Nuclear Fuel and Equipment; 4. Nuclear Installations (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Emergency response); 5. Trade in Nuclear Materials and Equipment; 6. Radiation Protection; 7. Radioactive Waste Management; 8. Non-Proliferation and Physical Protection; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear Third Party Liability; II) - Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and Supervisory Authorities: A. Federal Authorities - Bund (The Federal Chancellery; The Federal Minister for Women's Affairs and Consumer Protection; The Federal Minister of the Interior; The Federal Minister for Economic Affairs; The Federal Minister of Finance; The Federal Minister of Labour, Health and Social Affairs; The Federal Minister of Science and Transport; The Federal Minister of Justice; The Federal Minister for the Environment; The Federal Minister for Foreign Affairs) B. Regional Authorities - Laender; C. District Authorities - Bezirksverwaltungsbehorden; 2. Advisory Bodies (Forum for Nuclear Questions, Radiation Protection Commission - SSK); 3. Public and Semi-Public Agencies (The Seibersdorf Austrian Research Centre; The Graz Nuclear Institute; The Nuclear Institute of the Austrian Universities; The Institute of Risk Research, University of Vienna)

  14. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - United Kingdom

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General Regulatory Regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining Regime; 3. Radioactive Substances; 4. Nuclear Installations (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Protection of the environment against radiation effects; Emergency response); 5. Trade in Nuclear Materials and Equipment; 6. Radiation Protection; 7. Radioactive Waste Management; 8. Non-Proliferation and Physical Protection; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear Third Party Liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and Supervisory Authorities (Department of Trade and Industry - DTI; Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs and the Secretary of State for Health; Secretary of State for Transport; Secretary of State for Education); 2. Advisory Bodies (Medical Research Council - MRC; Nuclear Safety Advisory Committee; Radioactive Waste Management Advisory Committee); 3. Public and Semi-Public Agencies (United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority - UKAEA; Health and Safety Commission and Executive - HSC/HSE; National Radiological Protection Board - NRPB; Environment Agencies; British Nuclear Fuels plc. - BNFL; Amersham International plc.; The National Nuclear Corporation Ltd. - NNC; United Kingdom Nirex Ltd.; Magnox Electric plc.; British Energy Generation Ltd.; Scottish Electricity Generator Companies; British Energy Generation Ltd.; Regional Electricity Companies in England and Wales)

  15. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Switzerland

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General regulatory regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances, nuclear fuel and equipment (Nuclear fuels; Radioactive substances and equipment generating ionising radiation); 4. Nuclear installations (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Protection of the environment against radiation effects; Emergency response); 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiation protection; 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Non-proliferation and physical protection; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; 11. Environmental protection; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Federal Council; Federal Assembly; Federal Department of the Environment, Transport, Energy and Communications - DETEC; Federal Office of Energy - SFOE; Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate - IFSN; Federal Department of Home Affairs - FDHA; Federal Office of Public Health - FOPH; State Secretariat for Education and Research - SER; Other authorities); 2. Advisory bodies (Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Commission - KNS; Federal Commission for Radiological Protection and Monitoring of the Radioactivity in the Environment; Federal Emergency Organisation on Radioactivity); 3. Public and semi-public agencies (Paul-Scherrer Institute - PSI; Fund for the decommissioning of nuclear installations and for the waste disposal; National Co-operative for the

  16. Activities of OECD/NEA in the regulatory aspects of plant life management

    The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency has 28 Member countries. In 2004 the NEA issued its Strategic Plan covering the period 2005-2009. The plan identifies six sectorial arenas of work for the NEA, including as the first arena 'Nuclear Safety and Regulation'. In this arena the NEA operates through two senior standing technical committees. The Committee on Nuclear Regulatory Activities (CNRA) dealing with regulatory aspects, and the Committee on the Safety on Nuclear Installations (CSNI) dealing with technological aspects. Recognizing that there are many common areas of interest, the close relationship between the work of the CNRA and the CSNI and the need for close co-ordination and co-operation between the two committees, it was decided to develop a joint CSNI/CNRA strategic plan. In developing the join strategic plan it was important to recognise the current status of the nuclear power industry and, in particular, the main challenges that regulators and safety research will face in the next five years. These will likely determine the focus of CNRA and CSNI activities. One of these challenges is related to the aim of this International Symposium, which is the necessity to ensure safety over the plant life cycle

  17. Identification of active transcriptional regulatory elements from GRO-seq data.

    Danko, Charles G; Hyland, Stephanie L; Core, Leighton J; Martins, Andre L; Waters, Colin T; Lee, Hyung Won; Cheung, Vivian G; Kraus, W Lee; Lis, John T; Siepel, Adam

    2015-05-01

    Modifications to the global run-on and sequencing (GRO-seq) protocol that enrich for 5'-capped RNAs can be used to reveal active transcriptional regulatory elements (TREs) with high accuracy. Here, we introduce discriminative regulatory-element detection from GRO-seq (dREG), a sensitive machine learning method that uses support vector regression to identify active TREs from GRO-seq data without requiring cap-based enrichment (https://github.com/Danko-Lab/dREG/). This approach allows TREs to be assayed together with gene expression levels and other transcriptional features in a single experiment. Predicted TREs are more enriched for several marks of transcriptional activation—including expression quantitative trait loci, disease-associated polymorphisms, acetylated histone 3 lysine 27 (H3K27ac) and transcription factor binding—than those identified by alternative functional assays. Using dREG, we surveyed TREs in eight human cell types and provide new insights into global patterns of TRE function. PMID:25799441

  18. Unexpected T cell regulatory activity of anti-histone H1 autoantibody: Its mode of action in regulatory T cell-dependent and -independent manners

    Takaoka, Yuki [Department of Molecular Biotechnology, Graduate School of Advanced Sciences of Matter, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima (Japan); Kawamoto, Seiji, E-mail: skawa@hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Molecular Biotechnology, Graduate School of Advanced Sciences of Matter, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima (Japan); Katayama, Akiko [Department of Molecular Biotechnology, Graduate School of Advanced Sciences of Matter, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima (Japan); Nakano, Toshiaki [Liver Transplantation Program, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital-Kaohsiung Medical Center, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Yamanaka, Yasushi; Takahashi, Miki [Department of Molecular Biotechnology, Graduate School of Advanced Sciences of Matter, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima (Japan); Shimada, Yayoi; Chiang, Kuei-Chen [Kazusa Institute for Drug Discovery, Josai International University, Kisarazu (Japan); Ohmori, Naoya [Kazusa Institute for Drug Discovery, Josai International University, Kisarazu (Japan); Faculty of Nursing, Josai International University, Togane (Japan); Aki, Tsunehiro [Department of Molecular Biotechnology, Graduate School of Advanced Sciences of Matter, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima (Japan); Goto, Takeshi; Sato, Shuji [Kazusa Institute for Drug Discovery, Josai International University, Kisarazu (Japan); Faculty of Nursing, Josai International University, Togane (Japan); Goto, Shigeru [Liver Transplantation Program, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital-Kaohsiung Medical Center, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Iwao Hospital, Yufuin (Japan); Chen, Chao-Long [Liver Transplantation Program, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital-Kaohsiung Medical Center, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Ono, Kazuhisa [Department of Molecular Biotechnology, Graduate School of Advanced Sciences of Matter, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima (Japan)

    2013-02-08

    Highlights: ► Anti-histone H1 autoantibody (anti-H1) acts on T cells to inhibit their activation. ► Anti-H1 suppresses T cell activation in Treg cell-dependent and -independent manners. ► Suboptimal dose of anti-H1 enhances suppressor function of Treg cells. ► High dose of anti-H1 directly inhibits T cell receptor signaling. -- Abstract: Induction of anti-nuclear antibodies against DNA or histones is a hallmark of autoimmune disorders, but their actual contribution to disease predisposition remains to be clarified. We have previously reported that autoantibodies against histone H1 work as a critical graft survival factor in a rat model of tolerogeneic liver transplantation. Here we show that an immunosuppressive anti-histone H1 monoclonal antibody (anti-H1 mAb) acts directly on T cells to inhibit their activation in response to T cell receptor (TCR) ligation. Intriguingly, the T cell activation inhibitory activity of anti-H1 mAb under suboptimal dosages required regulatory T (Treg) cells, while high dose stimulation with anti-H1 mAb triggered a Treg cell-independent, direct negative regulation of T cell activation upon TCR cross-linking. In the Treg cell-dependent mode of immunosuppressive action, anti-H1 mAb did not induce the expansion of CD4{sup +}Foxp3{sup +} Treg cells, but rather potentiated their regulatory capacity. These results reveal a previously unappreciated T cell regulatory role of anti-H1 autoantibody, whose overproduction is generally thought to be pathogenic in the autoimmune settings.

  19. Unexpected T cell regulatory activity of anti-histone H1 autoantibody: Its mode of action in regulatory T cell-dependent and -independent manners

    Highlights: ► Anti-histone H1 autoantibody (anti-H1) acts on T cells to inhibit their activation. ► Anti-H1 suppresses T cell activation in Treg cell-dependent and -independent manners. ► Suboptimal dose of anti-H1 enhances suppressor function of Treg cells. ► High dose of anti-H1 directly inhibits T cell receptor signaling. -- Abstract: Induction of anti-nuclear antibodies against DNA or histones is a hallmark of autoimmune disorders, but their actual contribution to disease predisposition remains to be clarified. We have previously reported that autoantibodies against histone H1 work as a critical graft survival factor in a rat model of tolerogeneic liver transplantation. Here we show that an immunosuppressive anti-histone H1 monoclonal antibody (anti-H1 mAb) acts directly on T cells to inhibit their activation in response to T cell receptor (TCR) ligation. Intriguingly, the T cell activation inhibitory activity of anti-H1 mAb under suboptimal dosages required regulatory T (Treg) cells, while high dose stimulation with anti-H1 mAb triggered a Treg cell-independent, direct negative regulation of T cell activation upon TCR cross-linking. In the Treg cell-dependent mode of immunosuppressive action, anti-H1 mAb did not induce the expansion of CD4+Foxp3+ Treg cells, but rather potentiated their regulatory capacity. These results reveal a previously unappreciated T cell regulatory role of anti-H1 autoantibody, whose overproduction is generally thought to be pathogenic in the autoimmune settings

  20. Laboratory Exercise: Study of Digestive and Regulatory Processes through the Exploration of Fasted and Postprandial Blood Glucose

    Hopper, Mari K.; Maurer, Luke W.

    2013-01-01

    Digestive physiology laboratory exercises often explore the regulation of enzyme action rather than systems physiology. This laboratory exercise provides a systems approach to digestive and regulatory processes through the exploration of postprandial blood glucose levels. In the present exercise, students enrolled in an undergraduate animal…

  1. Learning by Preparing to Teach: Fostering Self-Regulatory Processes and Achievement during Complex Mathematics Problem Solving

    Muis, Krista R.; Psaradellis, Cynthia; Chevrier, Marianne; Di Leo, Ivana; Lajoie, Susanne P.

    2016-01-01

    We developed an intervention based on the learning by teaching paradigm to foster self-regulatory processes and better learning outcomes during complex mathematics problem solving in a technology-rich learning environment. Seventy-eight elementary students were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 conditions: learning by preparing to teach, or learning for…

  2. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - United States

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General Regulatory Regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances, nuclear fuel and equipment (Special nuclear material; Source material; By-product material; Agreement state programmes); 4. Nuclear installations (Initial licensing; Operation and inspection, including nuclear safety; Operating licence renewal; Decommissioning; Emergency response); 5. Radiological protection (Protection of workers; Protection of the public); 6. Radioactive waste management (High-level waste; Low-level waste; Disposal at sea; Uranium mill tailings; Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program - FUSRAP); 7. Non-proliferation and exports (Exports of source material, special nuclear material, production or utilisation facilities and sensitive nuclear technology; Exports of components; Exports of by-product material; Exports and imports of radiation sources; Conduct resulting in the termination of exports or economic assistance; Subsequent arrangements; Technology exports; Information and restricted data); 8. Nuclear security; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Nuclear Regulatory Commission - NRC; Department of Energy - DOE; Department of Labor - DOL; Department of Transportation - DOT; Environmental Protection Agency - EPA); 2. Public and semi-public agencies: A. Cabinet-level departments (Department of

  3. Environmental radiological aspects of mining and processing of beach sand minerals: regulatory perspective

    The coastal sands of India have large reserves of valuable minerals namely titanium bearing minerals (ilmenite, rutile, leucoxene), zircon, garnet, sillimanite and monazite (which is a source of thorium and uranium). In 1998, a Policy on Exploitation of Beach Sand Minerals (BSM) was notified by the Government of India in 1998 which encouraged the participation of companies outside Department of Atomic Energy in the field of beach sand mining and mineral separation. Since the beach sand minerals remain invariably associated with the radioactive mineral monazite, preferential separation of other heavy minerals results in enhancement of the monazite content in the left over sands generally referred to as tailings. Atomic Energy Regulatory Board took an independent assessment of all these facilities and a special Committee was constituted in 2004 with experts from AERB and BARC to evaluate the radiological safety aspects in these facilities. AERB evaluates the design of engineered trenches for storage of radioactive solid wastes, treatment methodology of gaseous and liquid wastes and prescribes limits on the activity content and quantity of gaseous, liquid and solid wastes such that there is no adverse impact on the environment. Independent Environmental Survey Laboratories of Bhabha Atomic Research Centre are stationed at these sites to carry out periodic surveillance of the surrounding environment, which includes bore well monitoring, environmental radiation monitoring, air, water, soil, and vegetation sample analysis. AERB reviews the periodic reports of ESL to assess the radiological impact from these facilities

  4. Changes in FDA enforcement activities following changes in federal administration: the case of regulatory letters released to pharmaceutical companies

    Nguyen Diane

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The United States (US Food and Drug Administration (FDA is responsible for the protection of the public health by assuring the safety, effectiveness and security of human drugs and biological products through the enforcement of the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act (FDCA and related regulations. These enforcement activities include regulatory letters (i.e. warning letters and notice of violation to pharmaceutical companies. A regulatory letter represents the FDA’s first official notification to a pharmaceutical company that the FDA has discovered a product or activity in violation of the FDCA. This study analyzed trends in the pharmaceutical-related regulatory letters released by the FDA during the period 1997–2011 and assessed differences in the average number and type of regulatory letters released during the last four federal administrations. Methods Data derived from the FDA webpage. Information about the FDA office releasing the letter, date, company, and drug-related violation was collected. Regulatory letters were classified by federal administration. Descriptive statistics were performed for the analysis. Results Between 1997 and 2011 the FDA released 2,467 regulatory letters related to pharmaceuticals. FDA headquarters offices released 50.6% and district offices 49.4% of the regulatory letters. The Office of Prescription Drug Promotion released the largest number of regulatory letters (850; 34.5% of the total, followed by the Office of Scientific Investigations (131; 5.3%, and the Office of Compliance (105; 4.3%. During the 2nd Clinton Administration (1997–2000 the average number of regulatory letters per year was 242.8 ± 45.6, during the Bush Administration (2001–2008 it was 120.4 ± 33.7, and during the first three years of the Obama administration (2009–2011 it was 177.7.0 ± 17.0. The average number of regulatory letters released by the Office of Prescription Drug Promotion also varied by

  5. Expression levels of microRNAs are not associated with their regulatory activities

    Wu Jiarui

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract MicroRNAs (miRNAs regulate their targets by triggering mRNA degradation or translational repression. The negative relationship between miRNAs and their targets suggests that the regulatory effect of a miRNA could be determined from the expression levels of its targets. Here, we investigated the relationship between miRNA activities determined by computational programs and miRNA expression levels by using data in which both mRNA and miRNA expression from the same samples were measured. We found that different from the intuitive expectation one might have, miRNA activity shows very weak correlation with miRNA expression, which indicates complex regulating mechanisms between miRNAs and their target genes. Reviewers This manuscript was reviewed by an anonymous reviewer and Dr Yuriy Gusev.

  6. Effects of self-regulatory strength depletion on muscular performance and EMG activation.

    Bray, Steven R; Martin Ginis, Kathleen A; Hicks, Audrey L; Woodgate, Jennifer

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of a self-regulatory strength depletion manipulation on performance of a physical endurance (isometric handgrip) task. In addition, the effect of depletion on EMG activity in the working forearm muscles during the endurance task was explored. Sedentary undergraduates (N=49) were randomly assigned to either a cognitive depletion condition (modified Stroop task) or a control (color word) group and completed two maximal isometric exercise endurance trials separated by the cognitive task. Participants in the depletion group showed significant (p<.05) degradations in performance and exhibited higher EMG activation on the second endurance trial (p<.05) compared to controls. Results are consistent with the limited strength model of self-regulation and are interpreted in light of the central fatigue hypothesis. PMID:17995906

  7. Regulatory guidance document

    NONE

    1994-05-01

    The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Program Management System Manual requires preparation of the OCRWM Regulatory Guidance Document (RGD) that addresses licensing, environmental compliance, and safety and health compliance. The document provides: regulatory compliance policy; guidance to OCRWM organizational elements to ensure a consistent approach when complying with regulatory requirements; strategies to achieve policy objectives; organizational responsibilities for regulatory compliance; guidance with regard to Program compliance oversight; and guidance on the contents of a project-level Regulatory Compliance Plan. The scope of the RGD includes site suitability evaluation, licensing, environmental compliance, and safety and health compliance, in accordance with the direction provided by Section 4.6.3 of the PMS Manual. Site suitability evaluation and regulatory compliance during site characterization are significant activities, particularly with regard to the YW MSA. OCRWM`s evaluation of whether the Yucca Mountain site is suitable for repository development must precede its submittal of a license application to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Accordingly, site suitability evaluation is discussed in Chapter 4, and the general statements of policy regarding site suitability evaluation are discussed in Section 2.1. Although much of the data and analyses may initially be similar, the licensing process is discussed separately in Chapter 5. Environmental compliance is discussed in Chapter 6. Safety and Health compliance is discussed in Chapter 7.

  8. Regulatory guidance document

    The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Program Management System Manual requires preparation of the OCRWM Regulatory Guidance Document (RGD) that addresses licensing, environmental compliance, and safety and health compliance. The document provides: regulatory compliance policy; guidance to OCRWM organizational elements to ensure a consistent approach when complying with regulatory requirements; strategies to achieve policy objectives; organizational responsibilities for regulatory compliance; guidance with regard to Program compliance oversight; and guidance on the contents of a project-level Regulatory Compliance Plan. The scope of the RGD includes site suitability evaluation, licensing, environmental compliance, and safety and health compliance, in accordance with the direction provided by Section 4.6.3 of the PMS Manual. Site suitability evaluation and regulatory compliance during site characterization are significant activities, particularly with regard to the YW MSA. OCRWM's evaluation of whether the Yucca Mountain site is suitable for repository development must precede its submittal of a license application to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Accordingly, site suitability evaluation is discussed in Chapter 4, and the general statements of policy regarding site suitability evaluation are discussed in Section 2.1. Although much of the data and analyses may initially be similar, the licensing process is discussed separately in Chapter 5. Environmental compliance is discussed in Chapter 6. Safety and Health compliance is discussed in Chapter 7

  9. Systems Level Analyses Reveal Multiple Regulatory Activities of CodY Controlling Metabolism, Motility and Virulence in Listeria monocytogenes

    Lior Lobel; Herskovits, Anat A.

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria sense and respond to many environmental cues, rewiring their regulatory network to facilitate adaptation to new conditions/niches. Global transcription factors that co-regulate multiple pathways simultaneously are essential to this regulatory rewiring. CodY is one such global regulator, controlling expression of both metabolic and virulence genes in Gram-positive bacteria. Branch chained amino acids (BCAAs) serve as a ligand for CodY and modulate its activity. Classically, CodY was c...

  10. Experience and regulatory activities on advanced instrumentation and control systems applied to nuclear power plants in Korea

    This paper describes the status for applying microprocessor-based systems to nuclear power plants in Korea and the regulatory activities performed by Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS). And this presents the development of safety and regulatory technology for advanced I and C systems that has been carried out as a part of the next generation reactor development program in Korea. (author). 3 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab

  11. Changes in FDA enforcement activities following changes in federal administration: the case of regulatory letters released to pharmaceutical companies

    Nguyen Diane; Seoane-Vazquez Enrique; Rodriguez-Monguio Rosa; Montagne Michael

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background The United States (US) Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is responsible for the protection of the public health by assuring the safety, effectiveness and security of human drugs and biological products through the enforcement of the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act (FDCA) and related regulations. These enforcement activities include regulatory letters (i.e. warning letters and notice of violation) to pharmaceutical companies. A regulatory letter represents the FDA’s fi...

  12. Legislative and Regulatory Control for the Safety of Radioactively Contaminated Scrap Metals Generated from Mining and Mineral Processing Facilities in South Africa

    In South Africa, enhanced levels of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) are associated with many mining and industrial processes. Significant amounts of waste materials are involved which can result in radiation exposure of the workers and the public particularly through the diversion of materials into the public domain. The following operations have been regulated in South Africa for the past twenty years: operating metallurgical plants utilizing NORM, underground mining operations, scrap recyclers and smelters, and rehabilitation and remediation activities involving the above sites. The radioactively contaminated scrap metal generated from the above mentioned facilities is available for recycling in amounts of thousands of tons. The South African government has, to a certain extent, responded to the above-mentioned challenges by introducing regulatory controls to the affected industries. The existing regulatory controls have, however, not provided absolute answers to all issues associated with the management of scrap. (author)

  13. Major Project Appraisal: Evaluation of Impact Assessment Methodologies in the Regulatory Review Process for the Northern Gateway Project

    Broadbent, Sean

    2014-01-01

    In Canada, there are six major oil pipeline projects either proposed or approved with an in-service date before 2020. The federal government has a regulatory process to evaluate the environmental, economic, and social impacts of proposed pipeline projects. This dissertation examines existing methods that project applicants use to evaluate pipeline impacts in the review process and recommends how current methodologies could be improved. The study uses the Northern Gateway Project as a case stu...

  14. Activation of counter-regulatory mechanisms in a rat renal acute rejection model

    Salomon Daniel R

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarray analysis provides a powerful approach to identify gene expression alterations following transplantation. In patients the heterogeneity of graft specimens, co-morbidity, co-medications and the challenges in sample collection and preparation complicate conclusions regarding the underlying mechanisms of graft injury, rejection and immune regulation. Results We used a rat kidney transplantation model with strict transplant and sample preparation procedures to analyze genome wide changes in gene expression four days after syngeneic and allogeneic transplantation. Both interventions were associated with substantial changes in gene expression. After allogeneic transplantation, genes and pathways related to transport and metabolism were predominantly down-regulated consistent with rejection-mediated graft injury and dysfunction. Up-regulated genes were primarily related to the acute immune response including antigen presentation, T-cell receptor signaling, apoptosis, interferon signaling and complement cascades. We observed a cytokine and chemokine expression profile consistent with activation of a Th1-cell response. A novel finding was up-regulation of several regulatory and protective genes after allogeneic transplantation, specifically IL10, Bcl2a1, C4bpa, Ctla4, HO-1 and the SOCS family. Conclusion Our data indicate that in parallel with the predicted activation of immune response and tissue injury pathways, there is simultaneous activation of pathways for counter regulatory and protective mechanisms that would balance and limit the ongoing inflammatory/immune responses. The pathophysiological mechanisms behind and the clinical consequences of alterations in expression of these gene classes in acute rejection, injury and dysfunction vs. protection and immunoregulation, prompt further analyses and open new aspects for therapeutic approaches.

  15. Survey of state regulatory activities on least cost planning for gas utilities

    Integrated resource planning involves the creation of a process in which supply-side and demand-side options are integrated to create a resource mix that reliably satisfies customers' short-term and long-term energy service needs at the lowest cost. Incorporating the concept of meeting customer energy service needs entails a recognition that customers' costs must be considered along with the utility's costs in the economic analysis of energy options. As applied to gas utilities, an integrated resource plan seeks to balance cost and reliability, and should not be interpreted simply as the search for lowest commodity costs. All state commissions were surveyed to assess the current status of gas planning and demand-side management and to identify significant regulatory issues faced by commissions during the next several years. The survey was to determine the extent to which they have undertaken least-cost planning for gas utilities. The survey included the following topics: (1) status of state PUC least-cost planning regulations and practices for gas utilities; (2) type and scope ofnatural gas DSM programs in effect, includeing fuel substitution; (3) economic tests and analysis methods used to evaluate DSM programs; (4) relationship between prudence reviews of gas utility purchasing practices and integrated resource planning; and (5) key regulatory issues facing gas utilities during the next five years. 34 refs., 6 figs., 10 tabs

  16. Review of regulatory activities associated with safety culture and management of safety at UK nuclear installations

    The management of health and safety and the culture of the people who participate in the process have been fundamental to the development of the United Kingdom's nuclear power programme. In the early years of development, the organizations and systems set up in companies which designed, manufactured, constructed and operated nuclear power stations were based upon the best practices needed to ensure, not only the operability of the plant, but also the safety of the workers at the power stations and the public. Over the years the nuclear industry in the UK has changed as has the regulatory body responsible for licensing. The economic environment within which the nuclear electricity generators operate has caused them to review their business and organizational structures. The UK nuclear industry has developed its approach to health and safety management and it is generally recognized that commercially successful companies have excellent health and safety records. This paper discusses the importance of effective health and safety management to the maintenance of high safety standards and the delivery of business goals. It also discusses the model that has been developed to help assess safety management in the changing UK nuclear industry. Finally, it comments upon regulatory developments in management of safety and safety culture. (author)

  17. Survey of state regulatory activities on least cost planning for gas utilities

    Goldman, C.A. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States) National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners, Washington, DC (United States)); Hopkins, M.E. (Fleming Group, Washington, DC (United States))

    1991-04-01

    Integrated resource planning involves the creation of a process in which supply-side and demand-side options are integrated to create a resource mix that reliably satisfies customers' short-term and long-term energy service needs at the lowest cost. Incorporating the concept of meeting customer energy service needs entails a recognition that customers' costs must be considered along with the utility's costs in the economic analysis of energy options. As applied to gas utilities, an integrated resource plan seeks to balance cost and reliability, and should not be interpreted simply as the search for lowest commodity costs. All state commissions were surveyed to assess the current status of gas planning and demand-side management and to identify significant regulatory issues faced by commissions during the next several years. The survey was to determine the extent to which they have undertaken least-cost planning for gas utilities. The survey included the following topics: (1) status of state PUC least-cost planning regulations and practices for gas utilities; (2) type and scope ofnatural gas DSM programs in effect, includeing fuel substitution; (3) economic tests and analysis methods used to evaluate DSM programs; (4) relationship between prudence reviews of gas utility purchasing practices and integrated resource planning; and (5) key regulatory issues facing gas utilities during the next five years. 34 refs., 6 figs., 10 tabs.

  18. Risk assessment of endocrine active chemicals: identifying chemicals of regulatory concern.

    Bars, Remi; Fegert, Ivana; Gross, Melanie; Lewis, Dick; Weltje, Lennart; Weyers, Arnd; Wheeler, James R; Galay-Burgos, Malyka

    2012-10-01

    The European regulation on plant protection products (1107/2009) (EC, 2009a), the revisions to the biocides Directive (COM[2009]267) (EC, 2009b), and the regulation concerning chemicals (Regulation (EC) No. 1907/2006 'REACH') (EC.2006) only support the marketing and use of chemical products on the basis that they do not induce endocrine disruption in humans or wildlife species. In the absence of agreed guidance on how to identify and evaluate endocrine activity and disruption within these pieces of legislation a European Centre for Ecotoxicology and Toxicology of Chemicals (ECETOC) task force was formed to provide scientific criteria that may be used within the context of these three legislative documents. The resulting ECETOC technical report (ECETOC, 2009a) and the associated workshop (ECETOC, 2009b) presented a science-based concept on how to identify endocrine activity and disrupting properties of chemicals for both human health and the environment. The synthesis of the technical report and the workshop report was published by the ECETOC task force (Bars et al., 2011a,b). Specific scientific criteria for the determination of endocrine activity and disrupting properties that integrate information from both regulatory (eco)toxicity studies and mechanistic/screening studies were proposed. These criteria combined the nature of the adverse effects detected in studies which give concern for endocrine toxicity with an understanding of the mode of action of toxicity so that adverse effects can be explained scientifically. A key element in the data evaluation is the consideration of all available information in a weight-of-evidence approach. However, to be able to discriminate chemicals with endocrine properties of low concern from those of higher concern (for regulatory purposes), the task force recognised that the concept needed further refinement. Following a discussion of the key factors at a second workshop of invited regulatory, academic and industry scientists

  19. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Germany

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General regulatory regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances, nuclear fuel and equipment (Definitions; Licensing requirements); 4. Nuclear installations (Licensing regime; Protection of the environment against radiation effects; Emergency response; Surveillance of installations and activities); 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiation protection (General; Principal elements of the Radiation Protection Ordinance; Additional radiation protection norms); 7. Radioactive waste management (Atomic Energy Act 2002; Radiation Protection Ordinance; International obligations); 8. Non-proliferation and physical protection (Non-proliferation regime; Physical protection regime); 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities: Federal authorities (Federal Minister for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety, Federal Minister for Education and Research, Federal Minister of Finance, Federal Minister of Transport, Building and Urban Affairs, Federal Minister for Economy and Technology, Federal Minister of Defence, Federal Office for Radiation Protection - BfS, Federal Office of Economics and Export Control); Authorities of the Laender; 2. Advisory bodies (Reactor Safety Commission - RSK; Radiation Protection Commission - SSK; Disposal Commission - ESK; Nuclear Technology

  20. CRIMINAL PROCESS AND OPERATIONAL AND INVESTIGATIVE ACTIVITY

    Meretukov G. M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors of the article examine the relationship between the criminal process and investigative activity taking into consideration the requirements of the Criminal Procedure Law and the Law on Investigative Activities in the Russian Federation. Such important issues as main tasks and principles of the criminal process and investigative activity are considered in the article. The authors analyze interrelations of some investigative actions and operational search as well as the order of introduction and usage of the results of the investigative activities at the stage of criminal case initializing and in the course of investigative activities. The authors also pay attention to the data which must be submitted in the report or memorandum on the prepared or being committed crime giving grounds for criminal case initializing

  1. Electroweak processes in external active media

    Kuznetsov, Alexander; Mikheev, Nickolay [Yaroslavl State P.G. Demidov Univ. (Russian Federation). Theoretical Physics Dept.

    2013-06-01

    Covers new effects of a pure magnetic field on electroweak processes. Focus lays on the calculation technique for electroweak processes in external active media - hot dense plasma. Useful reference for researchers and for graduate students. Expanding on the concept of the authors' previous book ''Electroweak Processes in External Electromagnetic Fields,'' this new book systematically describes the investigation methods for the effects of external active media, both strong electromagnetic fields and hot dense plasma, in quantum processes. Solving the solar neutrino puzzle in a unique experiment conducted with the help of the heavy-water detector at the Sudbery Neutrino Observatory, along with another neutrino experiments, brings to the fore electroweak physics in an active external medium. It is effectively demonstrated that processes of neutrino interactions with active media of astrophysical objects may lead, under some physical conditions, to such interesting effects as neutrino-driven shockwave revival in a supernova explosion, a ''cherry stone shooting'' mechanism for pulsar natal kick, and a neutrino pulsar. It is also shown how poor estimates of particle dispersion in external active media sometimes lead to confusion. The book will appeal to graduate and post-graduate students of theoretical physics with a prior understanding of Quantum Field Theory (QFT) and the Standard Model of Electroweak Interactions, as well as to specialists in QFT who want to know more about the problems of quantum phenomena in hot dense plasma and external electromagnetic fields.

  2. Managing Regulatory Body Competence

    In 2001, the IAEA published TECDOC 1254, which examined the way in which the recognized functions of a regulatory body for nuclear facilities results in competence needs. Using the systematic approach to training (SAT), TECDOC 1254 provided a framework for regulatory bodies for managing training and developing and their maintaining their competence. It has been successfully used by many regulators. The IAEA has also introduced a methodology and an assessment tool - Guidelines for Systematic Assessment of Regulatory Competence Needs (SARCoN) - which provides practical guidance on analysing the training and development needs of a regulatory body and, through a gap analysis, guidance on establishing competence needs and how to meet them. In 2009, the IAEA established a steering committee (supported by a bureau) with the mission to advise the IAEA on how it could best assist Member States to develop suitable competence management systems for their regulatory bodies. The committee recommended the development of a safety report on managing staff competence as an integral part of a regulatory body's management system. This Safety Report was developed in response to this request. It supersedes TECDOC 1254, broadens its application to regulatory bodies for all facilities and activities, and builds upon the experience gained through the application of TECDOC 1254 and SARCoN and the feedback received from Member States. This Safety Report applies to the management of adequate competence as needs change, and as such is equally applicable to the needs of States 'embarking' on a nuclear power programme. It also deals with the special case of building up the competence of regulatory bodies as part of the overall process of establishing an 'embarking' State's regulatory system

  3. Activities of OECD/NEA in the regulatory aspects of plant life management

    The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency has 28 Member countries. In 2004 the NEA issued its Strategic Plan covering the period 2005-2009. The plan identifies six sectorial arenas of work for the NEA, including as the first arena 'Nuclear Safety and Regulation'. In this arena the NEA operates through two senior standing technical committees. The Committee on Nuclear Regulatory Activities (CNRA) deals with regulatory aspects, and the Committee on the Safety on Nuclear Installations (CSNI) deals with technological aspects. Under the CSNI, the Working Group on the Integrity and Aging of Components and Structures (IAGE) is responsible for conducting studies, research projects and sharing information and reaching consensus on issues related to the integrity and aging of nuclear power plant. The IAGE Working Group has been actively working mainly in two areas: Aging management programmes, and External Hazards. Recently, as recognition of the worldwide nuclear 'renaissance', the mandate of the IAGE Working Group was changed to capture also the design aspects of SSCs. In the area of the aging management programmes, efforts have been devoted to address the environmental effects on the integrity of components, the reactor pressure vessel lifetime, passive components failure rates and structural behaviour, risk informed in service inspections and non destructive examinations, and the assessment of the containment integrity. In the area of external hazards, the work of the IAGE group has been focused on the seismic behaviour of SSC. This paper provides background on the Agency itself, the results of the joint CNRA/CSNI strategic plan in terms of the main challenges that regulators and the safety research community will face in the near term and the strategy that both committees follows to address these challenges and to identify and perform the work that will contribute to the resolution of these issues. It presents the accomplishments of the IAGE working group in addressing issues

  4. Antimutagenic and redox regulatory activities of curcumin in whole body γ - irradiated mice

    the aim of the current study is understanding the redox regulatory activity ( pro- and anti-oxidant properties) and mutagenic burden following whole body -irradiation with special reference to its control by curcumin in mice. the antimutagenic effects of curcumin; diferuloylmethane ( C21 H20 O6) were evaluated in vitro using chromosomal aberration assay in male mice,induced after-exposure to 3 Gy γ-rays that is a known mutagenic and carcinogenic agent, when curcumin was given at a dose of 400 mmol/kg body wt through gastric intubation for 5 following days either before-, after-or both before and after-exposure, the incidence of aberrant cells and aberration types (mostly chromatids, breaks and fragments) reduced with curcumin dosage as compared to irradiated group. the cellular biochemical changes were estimated using liver tissue damage marker enzymes: alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and γ -glutamyl transferase (GGT), pro-oxidant: xanthine oxidase (XO), lipid per oxidative indices: thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and hydroperoxide (HP. the non-enzymatic antioxidant : glutathione (GSH) and the enzymatic antioxidants: superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx). TBARS ,HP,XO and liver marker enzymes were increased significantly , whereas the levels of GSH and the enzymatic antioxidants were significantly depleted in -irradiated groups. curcumin-treatment either before-, after-or both before and after -irradiation has attenuated the liver toxic effects of radiation obvious by reducing the levels of tbars and HP and diminished the increases of the activity of XO and liver marker enzymes. it has also re sued the depletion of the non enzymatic -and the enzymatic-antioxidant status.conclusion:curcumin has anti-oxidant potential against -rays-induced chromosomal mutations and redox imbalance regulatory status

  5. Shoreline processes, stranded oil and cleanup activities

    The initial character of stranded oil is a function of a large number of interactive variables that include the volume and character of the oil as it reaches the shore zone, nearshore oceanographic conditions at the time of stranding, and the character of the zone substrate. The fate of stranded oil on the shoreline is a function of weathering processes, natural removal, and of treatment activities. The presentation will review each of the major components described above and will present summary models to describe relative rates of natural change for selected scenarios. The role of coastal processes will be considered and used to illustrate how shoreline dynamics can remove or bury stranded oil. Examples will be provided to show some of the characteristic processes that cause changes in the distribution of stranded oil. Some shoreline treatment activities involve disturbance and relocation or removal of beach substrate; the effects of such activities will be illustrated and evaluated

  6. Spherical carbons: Synthesis, characterization and activation processes

    Romero Anaya, Aroldo José; Ouzzine, Mohammed; Lillo Ródenas, María Ángeles; Linares Solano, Ángel

    2014-01-01

    Spherical carbons have been prepared through hydrothermal treatment of three carbohydrates (glucose, saccharose and cellulose). Preparation variables such as treatment time, treatment temperature and concentration of carbohydrate have been analyzed to obtain spherical carbons. These spherical carbons can be prepared with particle sizes larger than 10 μm, especially from saccharose, and have subsequently been activated using different activation processes (H3PO4, NaOH, KOH or physical activati...

  7. Transcription factors GAF and HSF act at distinct regulatory steps to modulate stress-induced gene activation

    Fuda, Nicholas J.; Mahat, Dig B.; Core, Leighton J.; Guertin, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    The coordinated regulation of gene expression at the transcriptional level is fundamental to development and homeostasis. Inducible systems are invaluable when studying transcription because the regulatory process can be triggered instantaneously, allowing the tracking of ordered mechanistic events. Here, we use precision run-on sequencing (PRO-seq) to examine the genome-wide heat shock (HS) response in Drosophila and the function of two key transcription factors on the immediate transcription activation or repression of all genes regulated by HS. We identify the primary HS response genes and the rate-limiting steps in the transcription cycle that GAGA-associated factor (GAF) and HS factor (HSF) regulate. We demonstrate that GAF acts upstream of promoter-proximally paused RNA polymerase II (Pol II) formation (likely at the step of chromatin opening) and that GAF-facilitated Pol II pausing is critical for HS activation. In contrast, HSF is dispensable for establishing or maintaining Pol II pausing but is critical for the release of paused Pol II into the gene body at a subset of highly activated genes. Additionally, HSF has no detectable role in the rapid HS repression of thousands of genes. PMID:27492368

  8. Process for encapsulating active agents in gels

    Yilmaz, G.; Jongboom, R.O.J.; Oosterhaven, J.

    2001-01-01

    The present invention relates to a process for encapsulating an active agent in a biopolymer in the form of a gel, comprising the steps of: a) forming a dispersion or solution of the biopolymer in water; and b) adding the active agent to the dispersion or solution obtained in step a); wherein the biopolymer is at least partially dissolved before and/or after addition of the active agent. The gels obtained with the present invention are particularly suitable for coating or impregnating packagi...

  9. Regulatory inspection activities related to inspection planning, plant maintenance and assessment of safety. Proceedings of an international workshop

    The NEA Committee on Nuclear Regulatory Activities (CNRA) believes that an essential factor in ensuring the safety of nuclear installations is the continuing exchange and analysis of technical information and data. To facilitate this exchange the Committee has established Working Groups and Groups of Experts in specialised topics. CNRA believes that safety inspections are a major element in the regulatory authority's efforts to ensure the safe operation of nuclear facilities. Considering the importance of these issues, the Committee has established a special Working Group on Inspection Practices (WGIP). The purpose of WGIP, is to facilitate the exchange of information and experience related to regulatory safety inspections between CNRA Member countries. This was the 3. international workshop held by the WGIP on regulatory inspection activities. The focus of this workshop was on 3 main topics; Inspection Planning, Plant Maintenance and Assessment of Safety. This document presents the proceedings from the workshop, including: workshop programme, results and conclusions, papers and presentations and the list of participants. The main purpose of the Workshop is to provide a forum of exchange of information on the regulatory inspection activities

  10. A regulatory adjustment process for the determination of the optimal percentage requirement in an electricity market with Tradable Green Certificates

    A system of Tradable Green Certificates (TGCs) is a market-based subsidy scheme designed to promote electricity generation from renewable energy sources such as wind power. Under a TGC system, the principal policy instrument is the “percentage requirement,” which stipulates the percentage of total electricity production (“green” plus “black”) that must be obtained from renewable sources. In this paper, we propose a regulatory adjustment process that a regulator can employ to determine the socially optimal percentage requirement, explicitly accounting for environmental damages resulting from black electricity generation. - Highlights: • A Tradable Green Certificate (TGC) system promotes energy production from renewable sources. • We consider an electricity oligopoly operated under a TGC system. • Welfare analysis must account for damages from “black” electricity production. • We characterize the welfare maximizing (optimal) “percentage requirement.” • We present a regulatory adjustment process that computes the optimal percentage requirement iteratively

  11. Activation of regulatory T cells during inflammatory response is not an exclusive property of stem cells.

    Jan-Hendrik Gosemann

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sepsis and systemic-inflammatory-response-syndrome (SIRS remain major causes for fatalities on intensive care units despite up-to-date therapy. It is well accepted that stem cells have immunomodulatory properties during inflammation and sepsis, including the activation of regulatory T cells and the attenuation of distant organ damage. Evidence from recent work suggests that these properties may not be exclusively attributed to stem cells. This study was designed to evaluate the immunomodulatory potency of cellular treatment during acute inflammation in a model of sublethal endotoxemia and to investigate the hypothesis that immunomodulations by cellular treatment during inflammatory response is not stem cell specific. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Endotoxemia was induced via intra-peritoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS in wild type mice (C3H/HeN. Mice were treated with either vital or homogenized amniotic fluid stem cells (AFS and sacrificed for specimen collection 24 h after LPS injection. Endpoints were plasma cytokine levels (BD™ Cytometric Bead Arrays, T cell subpopulations (flow-cytometry and pulmonary neutrophil influx (immunohistochemistry. To define stem cell specific effects, treatment with either vital or homogenized human-embryonic-kidney-cells (HEK was investigated in a second subset of experiments. Mice treated with homogenized AFS cells showed significantly increased percentages of regulatory T cells and Interleukin-2 as well as decreased amounts of pulmonary neutrophils compared to saline-treated controls. These results could be reproduced in mice treated with vital HEK cells. No further differences were observed between plasma cytokine levels of endotoxemic mice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results revealed that both AFS and HEK cells modulate cellular immune response and distant organ damage during sublethal endotoxemia. The observed effects support the hypothesis, that immunomodulations are not

  12. FOXP3+Helios+ Regulatory T Cells, Immune Activation, and Advancing Disease in HIV-Infected Children.

    Khaitan, Alka; Kravietz, Adam; Mwamzuka, Mussa; Marshed, Fatma; Ilmet, Tiina; Said, Swalehe; Ahmed, Aabid; Borkowsky, William; Unutmaz, Derya

    2016-08-15

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are functionally suppressive CD4 T cells, critical for establishing peripheral tolerance and controlling inflammatory responses. Previous reports of Tregs during chronic HIV disease have conflicting results with higher or lower levels compared with controls. Identifying true Tregs with suppressive activity proves challenging during HIV infection, as traditional Treg markers, CD25 and FOXP3, may transiently upregulate expression as a result of immune activation (IA). Helios is an Ikaros family transcription factor that marks natural Tregs with suppressive activity and does not upregulate expression after activation. Coexpression of FOXP3 and Helios has been suggested as a highly specific marker of "bona fide" Tregs. We evaluated Treg subsets by FOXP3 coexpressed with either CD25 or Helios and their association with HIV disease progression in perinatally infected HIV-positive children. Identifying Tregs by FOXP3 coexpression with Helios rather than CD25 revealed markedly higher Treg frequencies, particularly in HIV+ children. Regardless of antiretroviral therapy, HIV-infected children had a selective expansion of memory FOXP3+Helios+ Tregs. The rise in memory Tregs correlated with declining HIV clinical status, indicated by falling CD4 percentages and CD4:CD8 ratios and increasing HIV plasma viremia and IA. In addition, untreated HIV+ children exhibited an imbalance between the levels of Tregs and activated T cells. Finally, memory Tregs expressed IA markers CD38 and Ki67 and exhaustion marker, PD-1, that tightly correlated with a similar phenotype in memory CD4 T cells. Overall, HIV-infected children had significant disruptions of memory Tregs that associated with advancing HIV disease. PMID:27003495

  13. Use of PSA and PSC in the regulatory process in The Netherlands

    The paper presents the regulatory requirements, thinking, and plans regarding the use of plant specific PSAs in the Netherlands, the actual use of probabilistic safety criteria (PSC) in the existing regulations and the PSA based plant modifications and backfits. 1 fig., 6 tabs

  14. Improving regulatory effectiveness in Federal/State siting actions. Need for power: determinants in the state decisionmaking processes

    The Department of Energy's Nuclear Siting and Licensing Act of 1978 (S.2775; H.R.11704) proposes Federal/State coordination in need for facility decisionmaking for nuclear power stations. A prior study by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Office of State Programs, ''Improving Regulatory Effectiveness in Federal/State Siting Actions'', NUREG-0195, May 1977, considered the concept of need for power/facility. The present study expands the inquiry into need for power/facility by examining the decisionmaking criteria utilized by forty-four States in making a determination of need for power/facility. Specific criteria are identified along with the number of States which make those criteria a primary consideration or a secondary consideration in determining need for facility. Individual profiles of the studied States' decisionmaking criteria are provided. In addition, the study examines the different organizational and functional patterns found in the States' regulatory processes to certificate power stations. The coordination or lack of coordination of the issuance of associated environmental permits required for power stations is outlined for each State. Information concerning States' rate treatment of expenses associated with the construction and operation of a power station is provided. The relationship between the need for power decisionmaking process and the ratemaking process is explored

  15. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - France

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General Regulatory Framework: 1. General (The French nuclear power programme and its main players; French nuclear law); 2. Mining Regime; 3. Radioactive Substances and Nuclear Equipment (Regulatory diversity; Radioactive sources; Medical activities); 4. Trade in Nuclear Materials and Equipment (Basic nuclear installations - INB; Tax on basic nuclear installations, Additional taxes, Funding nuclear costs; Installations classified for environmental protection purposes (ICPE) using radioactive substances; Nuclear pressure equipment - ESPN; Defence-related nuclear installations and activities - IANID; Emergency plans); 5. Trade in Nuclear Materials and Equipment (General provisions; Patents); 6. Radiation protection (Protection of the public; Protection of workers; Radiation protection inspectors; Labour inspectors; Protection of individuals in a radiological emergency); 7. Radioactive Waste Management (General regulations; Radioactive waste regulations; Discharge of effluents); 8. Non-proliferation and physical protection (Materials not used for the nuclear deterrent; Materials used for the nuclear deterrent); 9. Transport (Licensing and notification regime: Transport of radioactive materials, Transport of nuclear materials, Transport of radioactive substances between member states of the European Union; Methods of transport: Land transport, Sea transport, Air transport, Transport by post); 10

  16. T Cell Epitope Immunotherapy Induces a CD4+ T Cell Population with Regulatory Activity

    Verhoef Adrienne

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Synthetic peptides, representing CD4+ T cell epitopes, derived from the primary sequence of allergen molecules have been used to down-regulate allergic inflammation in sensitised individuals. Treatment of allergic diseases with peptides may offer substantial advantages over treatment with native allergen molecules because of the reduced potential for cross-linking IgE bound to the surface of mast cells and basophils. Methods and Findings In this study we address the mechanism of action of peptide immunotherapy (PIT in cat-allergic, asthmatic patients. Cell-division-tracking dyes, cell-mixing experiments, surface phenotyping, and cytokine measurements were used to investigate immunomodulation in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs after therapy. Proliferative responses of PBMCs to allergen extract were significantly reduced after PIT. This was associated with modified cytokine profiles generally characterised by an increase in interleukin-10 and a decrease in interleukin-5 production. CD4+ cells isolated after PIT were able to actively suppress allergen-specific proliferative responses of pretreatment CD4neg PBMCs in co-culture experiments. PIT was associated with a significant increase in surface expression of CD5 on both CD4+ and CD8+ PBMCs. Conclusion This study provides evidence for the induction of a population of CD4+ T cells with suppressor/regulatory activity following PIT. Furthermore, up-regulation of cell surface levels of CD5 may contribute to reduced reactivity to allergen.

  17. Extensive evolutionary changes in regulatory element activity during human origins are associated with altered gene expression and positive selection.

    Yoichiro Shibata

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the molecular basis for phenotypic differences between humans and other primates remains an outstanding challenge. Mutations in non-coding regulatory DNA that alter gene expression have been hypothesized as a key driver of these phenotypic differences. This has been supported by differential gene expression analyses in general, but not by the identification of specific regulatory elements responsible for changes in transcription and phenotype. To identify the genetic source of regulatory differences, we mapped DNaseI hypersensitive (DHS sites, which mark all types of active gene regulatory elements, genome-wide in the same cell type isolated from human, chimpanzee, and macaque. Most DHS sites were conserved among all three species, as expected based on their central role in regulating transcription. However, we found evidence that several hundred DHS sites were gained or lost on the lineages leading to modern human and chimpanzee. Species-specific DHS site gains are enriched near differentially expressed genes, are positively correlated with increased transcription, show evidence of branch-specific positive selection, and overlap with active chromatin marks. Species-specific sequence differences in transcription factor motifs found within these DHS sites are linked with species-specific changes in chromatin accessibility. Together, these indicate that the regulatory elements identified here are genetic contributors to transcriptional and phenotypic differences among primate species.

  18. Creating a Comprehensive, Efficient, and Sustainable Nuclear Regulatory Structure: A Process Report from the U.S. Department of Energy's Material Protection, Control and Accounting Program

    With the congressionally mandated January 1, 2013 deadline for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Nuclear Material Protection, Control and Accounting (MPC and A) program to complete its transition of MPC and A responsibility to the Russian Federation, National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) management directed its MPC and A program managers and team leaders to demonstrate that work in ongoing programs would lead to successful and timely achievement of these milestones. In the spirit of planning for successful project completion, the NNSA review of the Russian regulatory development process confirmed the critical importance of an effective regulatory system to a sustainable nuclear protection regime and called for an analysis of the existing Russian regulatory structure and the identification of a plan to ensure a complete MPC and A regulatory foundation. This paper describes the systematic process used by DOE's MPC and A Regulatory Development Project (RDP) to develop an effective and sustainable MPC and A regulatory structure in the Russian Federation. This nuclear regulatory system will address all non-military Category I and II nuclear materials at State Corporation for Atomic Energy 'Rosatom,' the Federal Service for Ecological, Technological, and Nuclear Oversight (Rostechnadzor), the Federal Agency for Marine and River Transport (FAMRT, within the Ministry of Transportation), and the Ministry of Industry and Trade (Minpromtorg). The approach to ensuring a complete and comprehensive nuclear regulatory structure includes five sequential steps. The approach was adopted from DOE's project management guidelines and was adapted to the regulatory development task by the RDP. The five steps in the Regulatory Development Process are: (1) Define MPC and A Structural Elements; (2) Analyze the existing regulatory documents using the identified Structural Elements; (3) Validate the analysis with Russian colleagues and define the list of documents to be

  19. FraTAct for Transforming A Nescient Process Activity Into an Intelligent Process Activity

    Rafiqul Haque

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Existing business process technologies support defining only nescient activities. Currently there is no solution that underpins transforming a nescient activity into intelligent activity. In this paper, we address this shortcoming of the state of the art. We offer a framework ‘FraTAct’ for transforming regulation intensive nescient activities of a financial service business process into intelligent activities. Financial service industries has been experiencing enormous challenges since the last decade. A recent financial crisis has unearthed various weaknesses in terms of administering the financial service industries. In order to prevent the future crisis, the regulators are constantly formulating new rules and also forcing the financial service industry to enact financial regulations in their financial service based application which automates financial operations. A financial service application underpins the financial service business process that contains activities. A nescient activity within a financial service process is prone to the risk of producing an inconsistent outcome that results in severe legal consequences for a financial institute e.g., a bank. In order to avoid these legal consequences, a financial institute should develop their financial service processes by composing activities that should be intelligent to understand and comply with financial regulations. Intelligent activities will produce outcomes that are consistent to financial regulations. It will reduce the possibility of financial regulation noncompliance in financial service process based application.

  20. The additive effect of regulatory activities on top of intelligence in relation to academic performance in higher education

    Minnaert, A; Janssen, PJ

    1999-01-01

    This study investigated the additive, beneficial effect of regulatory activities on top of verbal, numerical, and diagrammatic intelligence in the prediction of academic performance. About 500 freshmen of different study domains participated in this research. The findings supported both the mixed an

  1. 76 FR 18165 - Request for Public Comments Concerning Regulatory Cooperation Activities That Would Help...

    2011-04-01

    ... Would Help Eliminate or Reduce Unnecessary Regulatory Divergences in North America That Disrupt U.S..., 2011. DATES: The comment period for notice published on March 3, 2011 (76 FR 11760), is extended to....-Canada Regulatory Cooperation Council. The notice published on March 3, 2011 (76 FR 11760)...

  2. Speech perception as an active cognitive process

    Shannon eHeald

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available One view of speech perception is that acoustic signals are transformed into representations for pattern matching to determine linguistic structure. This process can be taken as a statistical pattern-matching problem, assuming realtively stable linguistic categories are characterized by neural representations related to auditory properties of speech that can be compared to speech input. This kind of pattern matching can be termed a passive process which implies rigidity of processingd with few demands on cognitive processing. An alternative view is that speech recognition, even in early stages, is an active process in which speech analysis is attentionally guided. Note that this does not mean consciously guided but that information-contingent changes in early auditory encoding can occur as a function of context and experience. Active processing assumes that attention, plasticity, and listening goals are important in considering how listeners cope with adverse circumstances that impair hearing by masking noise in the environment or hearing loss. Although theories of speech perception have begun to incorporate some active processing, they seldom treat early speech encoding as plastic and attentionally guided. Recent research has suggested that speech perception is the product of both feedforward and feedback interactions between a number of brain regions that include descending projections perhaps as far downstream as the cochlea. It is important to understand how the ambiguity of the speech signal and constraints of context dynamically determine cognitive resources recruited during perception including focused attention, learning, and working memory. Theories of speech perception need to go beyond the current corticocentric approach in order to account for the intrinsic dynamics of the auditory encoding of speech. In doing so, this may provide new insights into ways in which hearing disorders and loss may be treated either through augementation or

  3. US Department of Energy wind turbine candidate site program: the regulatory process

    Greene, M.R.; York, K.R.

    1982-06-01

    Sites selected in 1979 as tentative sites for installation of a demonstration MOD-2 turbine are emphasized. Selection as a candidate site in this program meant that the US Department of Energy (DOE) designated the site as eligible for a DOE-purchased and installed meteorological tower. The regulatory procedures involved in the siting and installation of these meteorological towers at the majority of the candidate sites are examined. An attempt is also made, in a preliminary fashion, to identify the legal and regulatory procedures that would be required to put up a turbine at each of these candidate sites. The information provided on each of these sites comes primarily from utility representatives, supplemented by conversations with state and local officials. The major findings are summarized on the following: federal requirements, state requirements, local requirements, land ownership, wind rights, and public attitudes.

  4. Demonstration of ''regulatory'' process controls on the TSTA cryogenic distillation system

    Due to the nature of its fusion reaction, most of the DT used to fuel the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) will exit unreacted. This effluent will be purified by the fuel cleanup system so that the isotope separation system (ISS) will be fed only hydrogen isotopes and possibly some helium. The ISS will separate this feed into streams nominally composed of He/H2/HD, D2, DT, and T2. These products will be recycled through appropriate fueling systems back to the fusion reactor or returned to storage. The ISS will have to respond properly to feed conditions which change rapidly. Feed changes will propagate quickly through the entire cascade. It is apparent that an automatic control system will be required to respond to these changes and maintain product quality. It is convenient to divide such a distillation control system into 'regulatory' controls and composition controls. The 'regulatory' controls include liquid levels, flowrates, reboiler heats, and pressure. A system of regulatory controls has been devised and installed on the four-column cascade of cryogenic columns at the Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) at Los Alamos National Laboratory. This tritium-compatible ISS is designed for approximately 1/10 the ITER flowrate and is dedicated to fusion fuel studies. Details of the TSTA ISS have been published previously

  5. Development of regulatory guidance on safety reviews of nuclear power plants in Germany. A survey on accomplished and current PSA activities

    The paper describes the key points of the accomplished and current regulatory activities in order to revise PSA guide and the corresponding technical documents in Germany. The regulatory German PSA guide covers the fundamental requirements concerning the performance of PSAs in the frame of comprehensive safety reviews. The technical details regarding the performance of PSA are set out in two technical documents (PSA Methods and PSA Data) that have been developed by a working group of PSA experts (FAK PSA). Based on the experiences from the first series of PSRs, international experiences and the fact that PSR is mandatory since April 2002 revisions of all guides are underway. The first guide to be updated is the PSA guide together with the corresponding technical documents. The working programme and the revision process of FAK PSA was finished at the end of 2004 and the technical documents have recently been republished. (author)

  6. Rewiring drug-activated p53-regulatory network from suppressing to promoting tumorigenesis

    Wei Song; Jiguang Wang; Ying Yang; Naihe Jing; Xiangsun Zhang; Luonan Chen; Jiarui Wu

    2012-01-01

    Many of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes have been found to exert variable and even opposing roles in different kinds of tumors or at different stages of cancer development.Here we showed that tumorigenic potential of mouse embryonic carcinoma P19 cells cultured in adherent plates (attached-P19-cells) was suppressed by a chemotherapeutic agent,5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (ZdCyd),whereas the higher pro-tumorigenicity of P19 cells growing in suspension (detached-P19-cells) was generated by the ZdCyd treatment.Surprisingly,p53 activity was highly up-regulated by ZdCyd in both growing conditions.By our developed computational approaches,we revealed that there was a significant enrichment of apoptotic pathways in the ZdCyd-induced p53-dominant gene-regulatory network in attached P19 cells,whereas the pro-survival genes were significantly enriched in the ZdCyd-induced p53 network in detached P19 cells.The protein-protein interaction network of the ZdCyd-treated detached P19 cells was significantly different from that of ZdCyd-treated attached P19 cells.On the other hand,inhibition of pS3 expression by siRNA suppressed the ZdCyd-induced tumorigenesis of detached P19 cells,suggesting that the ZdCyd-activated p53 plays oncogenic function in detached P19 cells.Taken together,these results indicate a context-dependent role for the ZdCyd-activated p53-dominant network in tumorigenesis.

  7. Activation of consolidation processes of alumina ceramics

    Matrenin, S. V.; Zenin, B. S.; Tayukin, R. V.

    2016-02-01

    The methods for activating sintering ceramics based on Al2O3 by mechanical activation in the planetary mill, by adding in the mixture of nanopowders (NP) Al, Al2O3, and submicron powder TiO2, and by applying the technology of spark plasma sintering (SPS) are developed. It has been shown that adding the nanopowder up to 20 wt. % Al2O3 in a coarse powder α-Al2O3 activates the sintering process resulting in increased density and hardness of the sintered alumina ceramics. Substantial effect of increasing density of alumina ceramics due to adding the submicron powder TiO2 in the compound of initial powder mixtures has been established.

  8. Decommissioning: Regulatory activities and identification of key organizational and human factors safety issues

    In the late 1990's the Swedish government decided to shut down Unit 1 of the Barsebaeck nuclear power plant. This report documents some of the efforts made by the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate (SKI) to address human factors and organizational issues in nuclear safety during decommissioning of a nuclear facility. This report gives a brief review of the background to the decommissioning of Barsebaeck 1 and points out key safety issues that can arise during decommissioning. The main regulatory activities that were undertaken were requirements that the plant provide special safety reports on decommissioning focusing on first, the operation of both units until closure of Unit 1 and second, the operation of Unit 2 when Unit 1 was closed. In addition, SKI identified areas that might be affected by decommissioning and called these areas out for special attention. With regard to these areas of special attention, SKI required that the plant provide monthly reports on changing and emerging issues as well as self-assessments of the areas to be addressed in the special safety reports. Ten key safety issues were identified and evaluated with regard to different stages of decommissioning and with regard to the actions taken by Barsebaeck. Some key conclusions from SKI's experience in regulating a decommissioning nuclear power plant conclude the report

  9. Systematic approach to training. Experiences from the training activities of regulatory body personnel in STUK

    The report describes the experiences obtained of a training programme for nuclear power plant inspectors arranged in the 90's by the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority of Finland (STUK). In the implementation of the programme, a systematic method was used to analyse the training needs, to plan, develop and implement the training programme as well as to assess the programme's implementation and results. The method used, 'SAT Ae Systematic Approach to Training', is presented in 'Nuclear Power Plant Personnel Training and its Evaluation, A Guidebook', IAEA Technical Report Series No. 380, which is a publication of the International Atomic Energy Agency. It is recommended that this method be applied in the planning and implementation of nuclear power plant personnel training. The application of the method as a tool for developing the qualifications of nuclear power plant inspectors shows that the method is well suited for use in Finland. Until the 90's, STUK had no systematic approach to training activities. Some training was arranged internally, but training in most respects meant participation in external training events and international seminars. A more systematic approach was adopted in the early 90's. The main goal was to define basic competence profiles for inspectors working in different fields and to provide an internal basic training programme not available externally. The development of the training activities called for a profound renewal of the training function to ensure a systematic approach and high quality. The experiences gained in STUK are useful in co-operation with Eastern and Central European regulatory bodies; they can be utilized when the qualifications of personnel who carry out inspections are developed. This will extensively contribute to the safety of nuclear power plants. (orig.)

  10. Nitro-oleic acid modulates classical and regulatory activation of macrophages and their involvement in pro-fibrotic responses.

    Ambrozova, Gabriela; Martiskova, Hana; Koudelka, Adolf; Ravekes, Thorben; Rudolph, Tanja K; Klinke, Anna; Rudolph, Volker; Freeman, Bruce A; Woodcock, Steven R; Kubala, Lukas; Pekarova, Michaela

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation is an immune response triggered by microbial invasion and/or tissue injury. While acute inflammation is directed toward invading pathogens and injured cells, thus enabling tissue regeneration, chronic inflammation can lead to severe pathologies and tissue dysfunction. These processes are linked with macrophage polarization into specific inflammatory "M1-like" or regulatory "M2-like" subsets. Nitro-fatty acids (NO2-FAs), produced endogenously as byproducts of metabolism and oxidative inflammatory conditions, may be useful for treating diseases associated with dysregulated immune homeostasis. The goal of this study was to characterize the role of nitro-oleic acid (OA-NO2) in regulating the functional specialization of macrophages induced by bacterial lipopolysaccharide or interleukin-4, and to reveal specific signaling mechanisms which can account for OA-NO2-dependent modulation of inflammation and fibrotic responses. Our results show that OA-NO2 inhibits lipopolysaccharide-stimulated production of both pro-inflammatory and immunoregulatory cytokines (including transforming growth factor-β) and inhibits nitric oxide and superoxide anion production. OA-NO2 also decreases interleukin-4-induced macrophage responses by inhibiting arginase-I expression and transforming growth factor-β production. These effects are mediated via downregulation of signal transducers and activators of transcription, mitogen-activated protein kinase and nuclear factor-кB signaling responses. Finally, OA-NO2 inhibits fibrotic processes in an in vivo model of angiotensin II-induced myocardial fibrosis by attenuating expression of α-smooth muscle actin, systemic transforming growth factor-β levels and infiltration of both "M1-" and "M2-like" macrophage subsets into afflicted tissue. Overall, the electrophilic fatty acid derivative OA-NO2 modulates a broad range of "M1-" and "M2-like" macrophage functions and represents a potential therapeutic approach to target diseases

  11. Modeling Aspects Of Activated Sludge Processes Part I: Process Modeling Of Activated Sludge Facilitation And Sedimentation

    Process modeling of activated sludge flocculation and sedimentation reviews consider the activated sludge floc characteristics such as: morphology viable and non-viable cell ratio density and water content, bio flocculation and its kinetics were studied considering the characteristics of bio flocculation and explaining theory of Divalent Cation Bridging which describes the major role of cations in bio flocculation. Activated sludge flocculation process modeling was studied considering mass transfer limitations from Clifft and Andrew, 1981, Benefild and Molz 1983 passing Henze 1987, until Tyagi 1996 and G. Ibrahim et aI. 2002. Models of aggregation and breakage of flocs were studied by Spicer and Pratsinis 1996,and Biggs 2002 Size distribution of floes influences mass transfer and biomass separation in the activated sludge process. Therefore, it is of primary importance to establish the role of specific process operation factors, such as sludge loading dynamic sludge age and dissolved oxygen, on this distribution with special emphasis on the formation of primary particles

  12. Modeling of an Active Tablet Coating Process.

    Toschkoff, Gregor; Just, Sarah; Knop, Klaus; Kleinebudde, Peter; Funke, Adrian; Djuric, Dejan; Scharrer, Georg; Khinast, Johannes G

    2015-12-01

    Tablet coating is a common unit operation in the pharmaceutical industry, during which a coating layer is applied to tablet cores. The coating uniformity of tablets in a batch is especially critical for active coating, that is, coating that contains an active pharmaceutical ingredient. In recent years, discrete element method (DEM) simulations became increasingly common for investigating tablet coating. In this work, DEM was applied to model an active coating process as closely as possible, using measured model parameters and non-spherical particles. We studied how operational conditions (rotation speed, fill level, number of nozzles, and spray rate) influence the coating uniformity. To this end, simulation runs were planned and interpreted according to a statistical design of (simulation) experiments. Our general goal was to achieve a deeper understanding of the process in terms of residence times and dimensionless scaling laws. With that regard, the results were interpreted in light of analytical models. The results were presented at various detail levels, ranging from an overview of all variations to in-depth considerations. It was determined that the biggest uniformity improvement in a realistic setting was achieved by increasing the number of spray nozzles, followed by increasing the rotation speed and decreasing the fill level. PMID:26344941

  13. The regulatory action in the problem of radioactive sources processed as scrap

    The loss of control of a radioactive source can result in a radiological emergency, especially if that source is treated as scrap. This paper presents a case registered in Argentina about discovery of a radioactive source of Kr-85, 9.25 GBq, used in a computer for industrial measurement of thickness. The radioactive source, without registration or identification, was registered by a portal for detection of radioactive material in the middle of the scrap that entered daily in the oven of a important steel company. From there, the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (RNA) conducted an investigation to determine the origin of the radioactive source, and in parallel made, in the laboratories of measurement, identification of radioactive material inside the source. This led to a company in financial and judicial bankruptcy, which had not notified the RNA about this situation, and also possessed, according to records, other eleven sources with similar characteristics. Finally the actions and regulatory effort allowed the localization of all the radioactive sources of this company, and its storage and deposit in an authorised repository

  14. The Report on Activities of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic and on Safety of Nuclear Installations in the Slovak Republic in 2011

    A brief account of activities carried out by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic (UJD SR) in 2011 is presented. These activities are reported under the headings: Foreword; (1) Legislative activities; (2) Regulatory Activities; (3) Nuclear safety of nuclear power plants; (4) Nuclear Materials in SR; (5) Nuclear materials and physical protection of nuclear materials; (6) Scope of powers of the office building; (7) Emergency planning and preparedness; (8) International activities; (9) Public communication; (10) Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic; (11) UJD SR organization chart; The International Nuclear Event Scale (INES); (12) Abbreviations.

  15. PLZF(+) Innate T Cells Support the TGF-β-Dependent Generation of Activated/Memory-Like Regulatory T Cells.

    Kang, Byung Hyun; Park, Hyo Jin; Park, Hi Jung; Lee, Jae-Ii; Park, Seong Hoe; Jung, Kyeong Cheon

    2016-06-30

    PLZF-expressing invariant natural killer T cells and CD4 T cells are unique subsets of innate T cells. Both are selected via thymocyte-thymocyte interaction, and they contribute to the generation of activated/memory-like CD4 and CD8 T cells in the thymus via the production of IL-4. Here, we investigated whether PLZF(+) innate T cells also affect the development and function of Foxp3(+) regulatory CD4 T cells. Flow cytometry analysis of the thymus and spleen from both CIITA transgenic C57BL/6 and wild-type BALB/c mice, which have abundant PLZF(+) CD4 T cells and invariant natural killer T cells, respectively, revealed that Foxp3(+) T cells in these mice exhibited a CD103(+) activated/memory-like phenotype. The frequency of CD103(+) regulatory T cells was considerably decreased in PLZF(+) cell-deficient CIITA(Tg)Plzf(lu/lu) and BALB/c.CD1d(-/-) mice as well as in an IL-4-deficient background, such as in CIITA(Tg)IL-4(-/-) and BALB/c.lL-4(-/-) mice, indicating that the acquisition of an activated/memory-like phenotype was dependent on PLZF(+) innate T cells and IL-4. Using fetal thymic organ culture, we further demonstrated that IL-4 in concert with TGF-β enhanced the acquisition of the activated/memory-like phenotype of regulatory T cells. In functional aspects, the activated/memory-like phenotype of Treg cells was directly related to their suppressive function; regulatory T cells of CIITA(Tg)PIV(-/-) mice more efficiently suppressed ovalbumin-induced allergic airway inflammation compared with their counterparts from wild-type mice. All of these findings suggest that PLZF(+) innate T cells also augmented the generation of activated/memory-like regulation via IL-4 production. PMID:27101876

  16. Combinatorial binding leads to diverse regulatory responses: Lmd is a tissue-specific modulator of Mef2 activity.

    Paulo M F Cunha

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Understanding how complex patterns of temporal and spatial expression are regulated is central to deciphering genetic programs that drive development. Gene expression is initiated through the action of transcription factors and their cofactors converging on enhancer elements leading to a defined activity. Specific constellations of combinatorial occupancy are therefore often conceptualized as rigid binding codes that give rise to a common output of spatio-temporal expression. Here, we assessed this assumption using the regulatory input of two essential transcription factors within the Drosophila myogenic network. Mutations in either Myocyte enhancing factor 2 (Mef2 or the zinc-finger transcription factor lame duck (lmd lead to very similar defects in myoblast fusion, yet the underlying molecular mechanism for this shared phenotype is not understood. Using a combination of ChIP-on-chip analysis and expression profiling of loss-of-function mutants, we obtained a global view of the regulatory input of both factors during development. The majority of Lmd-bound enhancers are co-bound by Mef2, representing a subset of Mef2's transcriptional input during these stages of development. Systematic analyses of the regulatory contribution of both factors demonstrate diverse regulatory roles, despite their co-occupancy of shared enhancer elements. These results indicate that Lmd is a tissue-specific modulator of Mef2 activity, acting as both a transcriptional activator and repressor, which has important implications for myogenesis. More generally, this study demonstrates considerable flexibility in the regulatory output of two factors, leading to additive, cooperative, and repressive modes of co-regulation.

  17. Degradation of corticosteroids during activated sludge processing.

    Miyamoto, Aoi; Kitaichi, Yuko; Uchikura, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    Laboratory tests of the decomposition of corticosteroids during activated sludge processing were investigated. Corticosteroid standards were added to activated sludge, and aliquots were regularly taken for analysis. The corticosteroids were extracted from the samples using a solid-phase extraction method and analyzed LC-MS. Ten types of corticosteroids were measured and roughly classified into three groups: 1) prednisolone, triamcinolone, betamethasone, prednisolone acetate, and hydrocortisone acetate, which decomposed within 4 h; 2) flunisolide, betamethasone valerate, and budesonide of which more than 50% remained after 4 h, but almost all of which decomposed within 24 h; and 3) triamcinolone acetonide, and fluocinolone acetonide of which more than 50% remained after 24 h. The decomposed ratio was correlated with each corticosteroid's Log P, especially groups 2) and 3). PMID:24390495

  18. Regulatory activities related with the modification of the frequency of the programmed stoppings of the Argentine nuclear centrals

    The mandatory character documentation of the Argentinean nuclear power stations in Embalse and Atucha I, required the realization of a programmed stoppings every twelve months to execute that settled down in the maintenance and surveillance programs for each installation. Nucleoelectrica Argentina S.A., in it character of Responsible Entity of the operation of these power stations, requested to the Argentinean Nuclear Regulatory Authority, in 2003 and 2005 respectively, the authorization to change the period of the repetitive tests and of the preventive maintenance of the systems related with the safety, to extend them from twelve to eighteen months. The mentioned applications were founded in economic aspects and in inclining to a decrease in the doses of the workers that perform in the activities that are carried out in the programmed stops. The adopted position by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority to decide on these applications was based on the result of diverse evaluations that included the use of the Probabilistic Analysis of Safety specific of each power station, the operative experience resultant of the execution of the preventive maintenance program, and of the results of the repetitive tests and of the inspections in service. The regulatory decisions were different in each case. Indeed, the Embalse nuclear power station was authorized by the Regulatory Authority to modify from twelve to eighteen months the period among the realization of the repetitive tests and of the preventive maintenance, conditioned to the execution of some specific regulatory requirements. On the other hand, the Atucha I nuclear power station was not authorized to modify this period. In this presentation that is detailed the acted by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority in both cases, the used analysis tools, and the foundation of the adopted decisions. (Author)

  19. 15 CFR 400.31 - Manufacturing and processing activity; criteria.

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Manufacturing and processing activity... ZONES BOARD Manufacturing and Processing Activity-Reviews § 400.31 Manufacturing and processing activity....” When evaluating zone and subzone manufacturing and processing activity, either as proposed in...

  20. Impact of source term research on regulatory processes and NPP design

    Expectations of secondary containment have changed considerably over the past few years as new challenges have appeared. Far from eliminating the detailed analysis of accidents at the extremes of severity and probability scales, the use of PRA (probabilistic risk assessment) has focussed attention on the continuity of the risk spectrum. Containment itself has evolved from a passive system designed to respond to a single DBA (design basis accident) into an active system expected to survive a spectrum of far more severe challenges. To expect a single structure to contain radioactivity as well as act for the multiple barriers it may have to replace, is clearly 'optimistic'. Hence we are now faced with the options of doubling up the containment wall - a 2-barriers containment - or of recognizing that in certain circumstances a delayed and controlled leak may be preferable to the risk of catastrophic failure. If the resulting point on the probability and consequences curve is constant with a risk that falls as the size of the accident increases, then one can at least argue one is doing one's best. Licensors find a risk continuum difficult to work with for a variety of reasons, of which uncertainty is just one. As a result the nuclear community is trying to evolve a small number of bounding scenarios (or a small fault tree) leading to containment failure. Current research aims at reducing the very large uncertainties in estimated source term and their probabilities -handling of uncertainty is very important as is shown in the NUREG 1150. In fact, release of fission products involves a long sequence of processes each of which carries uncertainty. Risk uncertainty will be even greater since that includes the uncertainties attached to the various probabilities used. It is not surprising that the uncertainty attached to a source term can be very large when one realizes that it includes all the uncertainties involved in the modelling of the accident. (author). 16 refs

  1. GTP Cyclohydrolase I Expression, Protein, and Activity Determine Intracellular Tetrahydrobiopterin Levels, Independent of GTP Cyclohydrolase Feedback Regulatory Protein Expression

    Tatham, Amy L.; Crabtree, Mark J; Warrick, 1 Nicholas; Cai, Shijie; Alp, Nicholas J.; CHANNON, KEITH M

    2009-01-01

    GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH) is a key enzyme in the synthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), a required cofactor for nitricoxide synthases and aromatic amino acid hydroxylases. Alterations of GTPCH activity and BH4 availability play an important role in human disease. GTPCH expression is regulated by inflammatory stimuli, in association with reduced expression of GTP cyclohydrolase feedback regulatory protein (GFRP). However, the relative importance of GTPCH expression ...

  2. Three novel acetylation sites in the Foxp3 transcription factor regulate the suppressive activity of regulatory T cells

    Kwon, Hye-Sook; Lim, Hyung W; Wu, Jessica; Schnoelzer, Martina; Verdin, Eric; Ott, Melanie

    2012-01-01

    The Foxp3 transcription factor is the master regulator of regulatory T cell (Treg) differentiation and function. Its activity is regulated by reversible acetylation. Using mass spectrometry of immunoprecipitated proteins, we identify three novel acetylation sites in murine Foxp3 (K31, K262, and K267) and the corresponding sites in human FoxP3 proteins. Newly raised modification-specific antibodies against acetylated K31 and K267 confirm acetylation of these residues in murine Tregs. Mutant Fo...

  3. Schistosoma mansoni Larvae Do Not Expand or Activate Foxp3+ Regulatory T Cells during Their Migratory Phase

    Redpath, Stephen A.; van der Werf, Nienke; MacDonald, Andrew S; Maizels, Rick M.; Taylor, Matthew D.

    2015-01-01

    Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells play a key role in suppression of immune responses during parasitic helminth infection, both by controlling damaging immunopathology and by inhibiting protective immunity. During the patent phase of Schistosoma mansoni infection, Foxp3+ Treg cells are activated and suppress egg-elicited Th2 responses, but little is known of their induction and role during the early prepatent larval stage of infection. We quantified Foxp3+ Treg cell responses during the first 3...

  4. Interactive Effects of Working Memory Self-Regulatory Ability and Relevance Instructions on Text Processing

    Hamilton, Nancy Jo

    2012-01-01

    Reading is a process that requires the enactment of many cognitive processes. Each of these processes uses a certain amount of working memory resources, which are severely constrained by biology. More efficiency in the function of working memory may mediate the biological limits of same. Reading relevancy instructions may be one such method to…

  5. Activation of sterol regulatory element binding protein and NLRP3 inflammasome in atherosclerotic lesion development in diabetic pigs.

    Yu Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Aberrantly elevated sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP, the lipogenic transcription factor, contributes to the development of fatty liver and insulin resistance in animals. Our recent studies have discovered that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK phosphorylates SREBP at Ser-327 and inhibits its activity, represses SREBP-dependent lipogenesis, and thereby ameliorates hepatic steatosis and atherosclerosis in insulin-resistant LDLR(-/- mice. Chronic inflammation and activation of NLRP3 inflammasome have been implicated in atherosclerosis and fatty liver disease. However, whether SREBP is involved in vascular lipid accumulation and inflammation in atherosclerosis remains largely unknown. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The preclinical study with aortic pouch biopsy specimens from humans with atherosclerosis and diabetes shows intense immunostaining for SREBP-1 and the inflammatory marker VCAM-1 in atherosclerotic plaques. The cleavage processing of SREBP-1 and -2 and expression of their target genes are increased in the well-established porcine model of diabetes and atherosclerosis, which develops human-like, complex atherosclerotic plaques. Immunostaining analysis indicates an elevation in SREBP-1 that is primarily localized in endothelial cells and in infiltrated macrophages within fatty streaks, fibrous caps with necrotic cores, and cholesterol crystals in advanced lesions. Moreover, concomitant suppression of NAD-dependent deacetylase SIRT1 and AMPK is observed in atherosclerotic pigs, which leads to the proteolytic activation of SREBP-1 by diminishing the deacetylation and Ser-372 phosphorylation of SREBP-1. Aberrantly elevated NLRP3 inflammasome markers are evidenced by increased expression of inflammasome components including NLPR3, ASC, and IL-1β. The increase in SREBP-1 activity and IL-1β production in lesions is associated with vascular inflammation and endothelial dysfunction in atherosclerotic pig aorta, as demonstrated

  6. Correlated activity supports efficient cortical processing

    Chou Po Hung

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Visual recognition is a computational challenge that is thought to occur via efficient coding. An important concept is sparseness, a measure of coding efficiency. The prevailing view is that sparseness supports efficiency by minimizing redundancy and correlations in spiking populations. Yet, we recently reported that ‘choristers’, neurons that behave more similarly (have correlated stimulus preferences and spontaneous coincident spiking, carry more generalizable object information than uncorrelated neurons (‘soloists’ in macaque inferior temporal (IT cortex. The rarity of choristers (as low as 6% of IT neurons indicates that they were likely missed in previous studies. Here, we report that correlation strength is distinct from sparseness (choristers are not simply broadly tuned neurons, that choristers are located in non-granular output layers, and that correlated activity predicts human visual search efficiency. These counterintuitive results suggest that a redundant correlational structure supports efficient processing and behavior.

  7. Safety assessment of cosmetic products, with emphasis on the ocular area: regulatory aspects and validation processes

    Maythê de Lima Cancian

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Before marketing a cosmetic product, a series of biological assays, such as ocular irritation tests, must be conducted in order to prove that the product is safe. However, a few scientific articles mention the discussion and evolution of cosmetic products testing performed in the eyes area. The aim of this study was to review the available literature on the evolution of tests carried out with cosmetics, in the ocular area, as well as to describe the methodologies that have been used and that are currently accepted. In Brazil, tests performed on animals are still allowed. However, the international laws strongly recommend the use of alternative methods for evaluating the risk of cosmetic ingredients and products. Regulatory requirements involving the registration of these products also request safety support of them in human beings. To perform ocular tests in human beings, it is necessary to involve an ophthalmologist for conducting clinical protocols. These protocols signed by the expert physician are sent to the National Health Surveillance Agency in order to endorse the product manufacturer concerning its safety. The safety support of a cosmetic product is very important, taking into account that the consumer has free access to these products of widespread use in today's society.

  8. STAT6 Activation Confers upon T Helper Cells Resistance to Suppression by Regulatory T Cells

    Pillemer, Brendan B. L.; Qi, Zengbiao; Melgert, Barbro; Oriss, Timothy B.; Ray, Prabir; Ray, Anuradha

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies have highlighted characteristics of T regulatory cells (Tregs) that underlie their suppressive function. However, mechanisms that override their suppressive function in the context of an adaptive immune response are not well understood. In the lungs of mice undergoing allergic inflamm

  9. Cumulative effects of the regulatory action. Exercise of analysis of the CER consideration of the cumulative effects of regulation in the Rulemaking process in a Spanish NPP

    The NRC, through interaction with the American industry, is aware for several years the concern of the impact of the cumulative effect of regulatory actions. In response to this concern, put clear by the industry, the NRC Staff has carried out several initiatives review of some regulatory requirements, to ensure that regulation and the practices of the NRC does not result in an unnecessary regulatory burden. The above answers to what is coming commonly called the CER: consideration of the cumulative effects of regulation in the Rulemaking process.

  10. The consideration and representation of retention processes in performance assessment: a regulatory perspective

    Processes that prevent or delay the migration of radionuclides in the geosphere relative to ambient water velocity are called retention processes. These processes can be chemical (e.g., ion exchange, sorption, and mineral precipitation) or physical (e.g., matrix diffusion from fractures into rock matrix or filtration of colloidal particles). Such retention processes can significantly delay and reduce the rate at which radionuclides are released to the biosphere and, hence, reduce the dose to biota, including humans. In most countries, retention processes are considered important components of the safety case (e.g., radionuclide delay in the unsaturated and saturated zones). For example, retention processes are listed as principal factors in the U.S. Department of Energy Repository Safety Strategy for the proposed Yucca Mountain site, and significant performance was ascribed to the retention processes in recently completed performance assessments in Sweden and Finland. In this paper, we discuss the perspective from the United States and Swedish regulators on retention processes, with specific examples related to ion exchange (or sorption) and matrix diffusion. (authors)

  11. Photoprotection in changing times - UV filter efficacy and safety, sensitization processes and regulatory aspects.

    Stiefel, C; Schwack, W

    2015-02-01

    As excessive sun exposure is tightly associated with different pathological changes of the skin, for example premature skin ageing or the development of skin cancer, an appropriate protection of the skin against UV radiation is of particular importance. Sun protection products and UV filter substances have evolved continuously in the past few decades. New developments and improved technical conditions of production have led to increasingly effective and efficient products with broadband protection ability. Accordingly, legal requirements have also changed and expanded. Although certain trends exist to harmonize the regulation of sunscreens at a global level, there are still large differences how UV absorbers are approved, which testing methods are prescribed, and which general requirements sun protection products must fulfil. Modern UV filters provide efficient protection against UVA and UVB radiation, are heat and photostable, user-friendly, cost-effective, water resistant and non-toxic. As inorganic and organic UV filters are topically applied to the skin in relatively high concentrations (up to 25%), especially the assessment of their (photo)sensitization potential is of particular importance. Accordingly, skin sensitization is a key endpoint for the legally required safety assessment of cosmetic ingredients in Europe and many other countries. This review will summarize the current regulatory status of different approved UV filters, will describe their beneficial and adverse properties and will give an overview of how the efficacy of sunscreens can be evaluated. Finally, an insight into the basic mechanism of (photo)allergic reactions and existing skin sensitization test methods will be provided. PMID:25256657

  12. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - Republic of Korea

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General regulatory regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining regime; 3. Radioactive substances, nuclear fuel and equipment; 4. Nuclear installations (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Protection of the environment against radiation effects; Emergency response); 5. Trade in nuclear materials and equipment; 6. Radiation protection) (Protection of workers; Protection of the public); 7. Radioactive waste management; 8. Non-proliferation and physical protection; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear third party liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and supervisory authorities (Minister of Education, Science and Technology, including the Nuclear Energy Bureau; Minister of Knowledge Economy); 2. Advisory bodies (Atomic Energy Commission; Atomic Energy Safety Commission); 3. Public and semi-public agencies (Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute - KAERI; Korean Institute for Nuclear Safety - KINS; Korean Electric Power Company - KEPCO; Korean Hydro and Nuclear Power - KHNP)

  13. Safety-Related Contractor Activities at Nuclear Power Plants. New Challenges for Regulatory Oversight

    The use of contractors has been an integral and important part of the design, construction, operation, and maintenance of nuclear power plants. To ensure the safe and efficient completion of contracted tasks, each nuclear plant licensee has developed and refined formal contract management processes to meet their specific needs and plant requirements. Although these contract management processes have proven to be effective tools for the procurement of support and components tailored to the needs of nuclear power plants, contractor-related incidents and accidents have revealed some serious weaknesses with the implementation of these processes. Identifying and addressing implementation problems are becoming more complicated due to organizational and personnel changes affecting the nuclear power industry. The ability of regulators and licensees to effectively monitor and manage the safety-related performance of contractors will likely be affected by forthcoming organization and personnel changes due to: the aging of the workforce; the decline of the nuclear industry; and the deregulation of nuclear power. The objective of this report is to provide a review of current and potential future challenges facing safety-related contractor activities at nuclear power plants. The purpose is to assist SKI in establishing a strategy for the proactive oversight of contractor safety-related activities at Swedish nuclear power plants and facilities. The nature and role of contractors at nuclear plants is briefly reviewed in the first section of the report. The second section describes the essential elements of the contract management process. Although organizations have had decades of experience with the a contract management process, there remain a number of common implantation weaknesses that have lead to serious contractor-related incidents and accidents. These implementation weaknesses are summarized in the third section. The fourth section of the report highlights the

  14. Safety-Related Contractor Activities at Nuclear Power Plants. New Challenges for Regulatory Oversight

    Chockie, Alan [Chockie Group International, Inc., Seattle, WA (United States)

    2005-09-15

    The use of contractors has been an integral and important part of the design, construction, operation, and maintenance of nuclear power plants. To ensure the safe and efficient completion of contracted tasks, each nuclear plant licensee has developed and refined formal contract management processes to meet their specific needs and plant requirements. Although these contract management processes have proven to be effective tools for the procurement of support and components tailored to the needs of nuclear power plants, contractor-related incidents and accidents have revealed some serious weaknesses with the implementation of these processes. Identifying and addressing implementation problems are becoming more complicated due to organizational and personnel changes affecting the nuclear power industry. The ability of regulators and licensees to effectively monitor and manage the safety-related performance of contractors will likely be affected by forthcoming organization and personnel changes due to: the aging of the workforce; the decline of the nuclear industry; and the deregulation of nuclear power. The objective of this report is to provide a review of current and potential future challenges facing safety-related contractor activities at nuclear power plants. The purpose is to assist SKI in establishing a strategy for the proactive oversight of contractor safety-related activities at Swedish nuclear power plants and facilities. The nature and role of contractors at nuclear plants is briefly reviewed in the first section of the report. The second section describes the essential elements of the contract management process. Although organizations have had decades of experience with the a contract management process, there remain a number of common implantation weaknesses that have lead to serious contractor-related incidents and accidents. These implementation weaknesses are summarized in the third section. The fourth section of the report highlights the

  15. 78 FR 62322 - Hydropower Regulatory Efficiency Act of 2013; Notice of Rescheduled Two-Year Licensing Process...

    2013-10-16

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Hydropower Regulatory Efficiency Act of 2013; Notice of Rescheduled Two-Year... issuance of a license for hydropower development at non-powered dams and closed-loop pumped storage projects in compliance with section 6 of the Hydropower Regulatory Efficiency Act of 2013. The...

  16. Modeling Aspects of Activated Sludge Processes Part l l: Mathematical Process Modeling and Biokinetics of Activated Sludge Processes

    Mathematical process modeling and biokinetics of activated sludge process were reviewed considering different types of models. It has been evaluated the task group models of ASMI. and 2, and 3 versioned by Henze et al considering the conditions of each model and the different processes of which every model consists. It is revealed that ASMI contains some defects avoided in ASM3. Relied on homogeneity, Models can be classified into homogenous models characterized by taking the activated sludge process as one phase. In this type of models, the internal mass transfer inside the floes was neglected.. Hence, the kinetic parameter produces can be considered inaccurate. The other type of models is the heterogeneous model This type considers the mass transfer operations in addition to the biochemical reaction processes; hence, the resulted kinetic parameters can be considered more accurate than that of homogenous type

  17. Testing Regulatory Consistency

    Robert Breunig; Flavio M. Menezes

    2008-01-01

    We undertake an analysis of regulatory consistency using a database of publicly available regulatory decisions in Australia. We propose a simple exploratory model which allows us to test for regulatory consistency across jurisdictions and industries without detailed knowledge of the regulatory process. We compare two measures using our approach--the weighted average cost of capital and the proportion of firms’ revenue requirement claims disallowed by the regulator. We advocate use of the seco...

  18. Waste processing plant eco-auditing system for minimization of environmental risk: European Communities regulatory proposal

    This paper delineates a system of process control and monitoring checks to be applied to municipal-industrial waste processing and disposal plants to ensure their energy efficient, environmentally safe and reliable operation. In line with European Communities environmental protection strategies, this eco-auditing system requires the preparation of environmental impacts statements on a regular basis during plant operation, as well as, prior to plant start-up. Continuous plant environmental compatibility evaluations are to ascertain: material and energy inputs and outputs; the composition and amounts of exhaust gases released into the atmosphere and the integrity of treatment liquids; control and monitoring instrumentation reliability. The implementation of the auditing system is to be carried out under the supervision of authorized auditing personnel. Waste processing and disposal plants are to make maximum use of energy and materials recovery processes so as to minimize energy consumption and risk to the environment

  19. The adeno-associated virus major regulatory protein Rep78-c-Jun-DNA motif complex modulates AP-1 activity

    Multiple epidemiologic studies show that adeno-associated virus (AAV) is negatively associated with cervical cancer (CX CA), a cancer which is positively associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Mechanisms for this correlation may be by Rep78's (AAV's major regulatory protein) ability to bind the HPV-16 p97 promoter DNA and inhibit transcription, to bind and interfere with the functions of the E7 oncoprotein of HPV-16, and to bind a variety of HPV-important cellular transcription factors such as Sp1 and TBP. c-Jun is another important cellular factor intimately linked to the HPV life cycle, as well as keratinocyte differentiation and skin development. Skin is the natural host tissue for both HPV and AAV. In this article it is demonstrated that Rep78 directly interacts with c-Jun, both in vitro and in vivo, as analyzed by Western blot, yeast two-hybrid cDNA, and electrophoretic mobility shift-supershift assay (EMSA supershift). Addition of anti-Rep78 antibodies inhibited the EMSA supershift. Investigating the biological implications of this interaction, Rep78 inhibited the c-Jun-dependent c-jun promoter in transient and stable chloramphenicol acetyl-transferase (CAT) assays. Rep78 also inhibited c-Jun-augmented c-jun promoter as well as the HPV-16 p97 promoter activity (also c-Jun regulated) in in vitro transcription assays in T47D nuclear extracts. Finally, the Rep78-c-Jun interaction mapped to the amino-half of Rep78. The ability of Rep78 to interact with c-Jun and down-regulate AP-1-dependent transcription suggests one more mechanism by which AAV may modulate the HPV life cycle and the carcinogenesis process

  20. Regulatory Snapshots: integrative mining of regulatory modules from expression time series and regulatory networks.

    Joana P Gonçalves

    Full Text Available Explaining regulatory mechanisms is crucial to understand complex cellular responses leading to system perturbations. Some strategies reverse engineer regulatory interactions from experimental data, while others identify functional regulatory units (modules under the assumption that biological systems yield a modular organization. Most modular studies focus on network structure and static properties, ignoring that gene regulation is largely driven by stimulus-response behavior. Expression time series are key to gain insight into dynamics, but have been insufficiently explored by current methods, which often (1 apply generic algorithms unsuited for expression analysis over time, due to inability to maintain the chronology of events or incorporate time dependency; (2 ignore local patterns, abundant in most interesting cases of transcriptional activity; (3 neglect physical binding or lack automatic association of regulators, focusing mainly on expression patterns; or (4 limit the discovery to a predefined number of modules. We propose Regulatory Snapshots, an integrative mining approach to identify regulatory modules over time by combining transcriptional control with response, while overcoming the above challenges. Temporal biclustering is first used to reveal transcriptional modules composed of genes showing coherent expression profiles over time. Personalized ranking is then applied to prioritize prominent regulators targeting the modules at each time point using a network of documented regulatory associations and the expression data. Custom graphics are finally depicted to expose the regulatory activity in a module at consecutive time points (snapshots. Regulatory Snapshots successfully unraveled modules underlying yeast response to heat shock and human epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, based on regulations documented in the YEASTRACT and JASPAR databases, respectively, and available expression data. Regulatory players involved in

  1. Regulatory Snapshots: integrative mining of regulatory modules from expression time series and regulatory networks.

    Gonçalves, Joana P; Aires, Ricardo S; Francisco, Alexandre P; Madeira, Sara C

    2012-01-01

    Explaining regulatory mechanisms is crucial to understand complex cellular responses leading to system perturbations. Some strategies reverse engineer regulatory interactions from experimental data, while others identify functional regulatory units (modules) under the assumption that biological systems yield a modular organization. Most modular studies focus on network structure and static properties, ignoring that gene regulation is largely driven by stimulus-response behavior. Expression time series are key to gain insight into dynamics, but have been insufficiently explored by current methods, which often (1) apply generic algorithms unsuited for expression analysis over time, due to inability to maintain the chronology of events or incorporate time dependency; (2) ignore local patterns, abundant in most interesting cases of transcriptional activity; (3) neglect physical binding or lack automatic association of regulators, focusing mainly on expression patterns; or (4) limit the discovery to a predefined number of modules. We propose Regulatory Snapshots, an integrative mining approach to identify regulatory modules over time by combining transcriptional control with response, while overcoming the above challenges. Temporal biclustering is first used to reveal transcriptional modules composed of genes showing coherent expression profiles over time. Personalized ranking is then applied to prioritize prominent regulators targeting the modules at each time point using a network of documented regulatory associations and the expression data. Custom graphics are finally depicted to expose the regulatory activity in a module at consecutive time points (snapshots). Regulatory Snapshots successfully unraveled modules underlying yeast response to heat shock and human epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, based on regulations documented in the YEASTRACT and JASPAR databases, respectively, and available expression data. Regulatory players involved in functionally enriched

  2. An Exploration of Activity Scheduling and Rescheduling Processes

    Chen, Quizi

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this research is to examine processes of activity scheduling and rescheduling by experiments. Activity scheduling processes were examined by using a combination of mail surveys and telephone interviews. It was found that individuals’ schedules are hardly complete. Scheduled activities take place less than 50% of all executed activities. The incompleteness suggests that activity scheduling and execution are a concurrent process and the distiction between is vague. Activities w...

  3. The pharmaceutical vial capping process: Container closure systems, capping equipment, regulatory framework, and seal quality tests.

    Mathaes, Roman; Mahler, Hanns-Christian; Buettiker, Jean-Pierre; Roehl, Holger; Lam, Philippe; Brown, Helen; Luemkemann, Joerg; Adler, Michael; Huwyler, Joerg; Streubel, Alexander; Mohl, Silke

    2016-02-01

    Parenteral drug products are protected by appropriate primary packaging to protect against environmental factors, including potential microbial contamination during shelf life duration. The most commonly used CCS configuration for parenteral drug products is the glass vial, sealed with a rubber stopper and an aluminum crimp cap. In combination with an adequately designed and controlled aseptic fill/finish processes, a well-designed and characterized capping process is indispensable to ensure product quality and integrity and to minimize rejections during the manufacturing process. In this review, the health authority requirements and expectations related to container closure system quality and container closure integrity are summarized. The pharmaceutical vial, the rubber stopper, and the crimp cap are described. Different capping techniques are critically compared: The most common capping equipment with a rotating capping plate produces the lowest amount of particle. The strength and challenges of methods to control the capping process are discussed. The residual seal force method can characterize the capping process independent of the used capping equipment or CCS. We analyze the root causes of several cosmetic defects associated with the vial capping process. PMID:26654992

  4. Systems Level Analyses Reveal Multiple Regulatory Activities of CodY Controlling Metabolism, Motility and Virulence in Listeria monocytogenes.

    Lobel, Lior; Herskovits, Anat A

    2016-02-01

    Bacteria sense and respond to many environmental cues, rewiring their regulatory network to facilitate adaptation to new conditions/niches. Global transcription factors that co-regulate multiple pathways simultaneously are essential to this regulatory rewiring. CodY is one such global regulator, controlling expression of both metabolic and virulence genes in Gram-positive bacteria. Branch chained amino acids (BCAAs) serve as a ligand for CodY and modulate its activity. Classically, CodY was considered to function primarily as a repressor under rich growth conditions. However, our previous studies of the bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes revealed that CodY is active also when the bacteria are starved for BCAAs. Under these conditions, CodY loses the ability to repress genes (e.g., metabolic genes) and functions as a direct activator of the master virulence regulator gene, prfA. This observation raised the possibility that CodY possesses multiple functions that allow it to coordinate gene expression across a wide spectrum of metabolic growth conditions, and thus better adapt bacteria to the mammalian niche. To gain a deeper understanding of CodY's regulatory repertoire and identify direct target genes, we performed a genome wide analysis of the CodY regulon and DNA binding under both rich and minimal growth conditions, using RNA-Seq and ChIP-Seq techniques. We demonstrate here that CodY is indeed active (i.e., binds DNA) under both conditions, serving as a repressor and activator of different genes. Further, we identified new genes and pathways that are directly regulated by CodY (e.g., sigB, arg, his, actA, glpF, gadG, gdhA, poxB, glnR and fla genes), integrating metabolism, stress responses, motility and virulence in L. monocytogenes. This study establishes CodY as a multifaceted factor regulating L. monocytogenes physiology in a highly versatile manner. PMID:26895237

  5. Systems Level Analyses Reveal Multiple Regulatory Activities of CodY Controlling Metabolism, Motility and Virulence in Listeria monocytogenes.

    Lior Lobel

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria sense and respond to many environmental cues, rewiring their regulatory network to facilitate adaptation to new conditions/niches. Global transcription factors that co-regulate multiple pathways simultaneously are essential to this regulatory rewiring. CodY is one such global regulator, controlling expression of both metabolic and virulence genes in Gram-positive bacteria. Branch chained amino acids (BCAAs serve as a ligand for CodY and modulate its activity. Classically, CodY was considered to function primarily as a repressor under rich growth conditions. However, our previous studies of the bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes revealed that CodY is active also when the bacteria are starved for BCAAs. Under these conditions, CodY loses the ability to repress genes (e.g., metabolic genes and functions as a direct activator of the master virulence regulator gene, prfA. This observation raised the possibility that CodY possesses multiple functions that allow it to coordinate gene expression across a wide spectrum of metabolic growth conditions, and thus better adapt bacteria to the mammalian niche. To gain a deeper understanding of CodY's regulatory repertoire and identify direct target genes, we performed a genome wide analysis of the CodY regulon and DNA binding under both rich and minimal growth conditions, using RNA-Seq and ChIP-Seq techniques. We demonstrate here that CodY is indeed active (i.e., binds DNA under both conditions, serving as a repressor and activator of different genes. Further, we identified new genes and pathways that are directly regulated by CodY (e.g., sigB, arg, his, actA, glpF, gadG, gdhA, poxB, glnR and fla genes, integrating metabolism, stress responses, motility and virulence in L. monocytogenes. This study establishes CodY as a multifaceted factor regulating L. monocytogenes physiology in a highly versatile manner.

  6. Evolutionary dynamics and functional roles of regulatory systems in plants

    Berke, L.

    2015-01-01

    Transcription, the process of generating RNA copies of the genetic information stored in the DNA, is crucial for every organism. As with other essential processes in life, correct activation and repression of transcription is governed by complex regulatory mechanisms. These regulatory mechanisms ope

  7. Physical activity (PA) and the disablement process

    Schultz-Larsen, Kirsten; Rahmanfard, Naghmeh; Holst, Claus

    2012-01-01

    Few studies have explored the associations of reported PA (RPA) with the processes underlying the development of disability. The present study was performed to explore RPA among older persons and its association with onset of functional dependence and mortality. Among a probability sample of 1782...... community-living persons, aged 75-83 years, we evaluated the 1021 who reported no disability in basic activities of daily living. Participants were followed for a median of 8.34 years in public registers to determine onset of disability and mortality. RPA predicted mortality in older women (HR=1.77, 95%CI=1.......42-2.19) and men (HR=1.65, 95%CI=1.27-2.14) over long time intervals. The effect of RPA persisted among permanently disabled older women, after adjusting for age, baseline vulnerability and grade of disability. Low RPA was independently associated with risk of incident disability (HR=1.56, 95%CI=1.10-2.23) in...

  8. Cell surface engineering of renal cell carcinoma with glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored TIMP-1 blocks TGF- β 1 activation and reduces regulatory ID gene expression.

    Notohamiprodjo, Susan; Djafarzadeh, Roghieh; Rieth, Nicole; Hofstetter, Monika; Jaeckel, Carsten; Nelson, Peter J

    2012-12-01

    Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1) controls matrix metalloproteinase activity through 1:1stoichiometric binding. Human TIMP-1 fused to a glycosylphosphatidylinositol(GPI) anchor (TIMP-1 - GPI) shifts the activity of TIMP-1 from the extracellular matrix to the cell surface. TIMP-1 - GPI treated renal cell carcinoma cells show increased apoptosis and reduced proliferation.Transcriptomic profiling and regulatory pathway mapping were used to identify the potential mechanisms driving these effects. Significant changes in the DNA binding inhibitors, TGF- β 1/SMAD and BMP pathways resulted from TIMP-1 - GPI treatment. These events were linked to reduced TGF- β 1 signaling mediated by inhibition of proteolytic processing of latent TGF- β 1 by TIMP-1 - GPI. PMID:23667903

  9. Regulatory activities in the field of fire safety at nuclear power plants in the Russian Federation: Legislative infrastructure and licensing experience

    This paper discusses regulation of fire safety at nuclear power plants in Russia, including issues relating to the legislative infrastructure and licensing activities. The interaction of regulatory bodies in Russia (Gosatomnadzor and the State Fire Fighting Service of the Russian Ministry of Internal Affairs) on the issue of fire safety at nuclear power plants is discussed in detail. The legislative infrastructure for regulation of fire safety at nuclear power plants is described and ways of improving it are discussed, as well as the development of a new fire protection approach, fire protection programmes with acceptability criteria, and methodologies for analysing the effect of fires on nuclear power plant safety. The process for detecting and eliminating faults in the regulation and implementation of fire safety measures at nuclear power plants is also described. In addition, we take a new look at the activities of Gosatomnadzor - licensing, including fire safety at nuclear power plants

  10. Technical and regulatory review of the Rover nuclear fuel process for use on Fort St. Vrain fuel

    This report describes the results of an analysis for processing and final disposal of Fort St. Vrain (FSV) irradiated fuel in Rover-type equipment or technologies. This analysis includes an evaluation of the current Rover equipment status and the applicability of this technology in processing FSV fuel. The analyses are based on the physical characteristics of the FSV fuel and processing capabilities of the Rover equipment. Alternate FSV fuel disposal options are also considered including fuel-rod removal from the block, disposal of the empty block, or disposal of the entire fuel-containing block. The results of these analyses document that the current Rover hardware is not operable for any purpose, and any effort to restart this hardware will require extensive modifications and re-evaluation. However, various aspects of the Rover technology, such as the successful fluid-bed burner design, can be applied with modification to FSV fuel processing. The current regulatory climate and technical knowledge are not adequately defined to allow a complete analysis and conclusion with respect to the disposal of intact fuel blocks with or without the fuel rods removed. The primary unknowns include the various aspects of fuel-rod removal from the block, concentration of radionuclides remaining in the graphite block after rod removal, and acceptability of carbon in the form of graphite in a high level waste repository

  11. Measuring Cognitive and Metacognitive Regulatory Processes during Hypermedia Learning: Issues and Challenges

    Azevedo, Roger; Moos, Daniel C.; Johnson, Amy M.; Chauncey, Amber D.

    2010-01-01

    Self-regulated learning (SRL) with hypermedia environments involves a complex cycle of temporally unfolding cognitive and metacognitive processes that impact students' learning. We present several methodological issues related to treating SRL as an event and strengths and challenges of using online trace methodologies to detect, trace, model, and…

  12. CO2 – intrinsic product, essential substrate and regulatory trigger of microbial and mammalian production processes

    Bastian eBlombach; Ralf eTakors

    2015-01-01

    Carbon dioxide formation mirrors the final carbon oxidation steps of aerobic metabolism in microbial and mammalian cells. As a consequence CO2/HCO3- dissociation equilibria arise in fermenters by the growing culture. Anaplerotic reactions make use of the abundant CO2/HCO3- levels for refueling citric acid cycle demands and for enabling oxaloacetate derived products. At the same time CO2 is released manifold in metabolic reactions via decarboxylation activity. The levels of extracellular CO2/H...

  13. CO2 - intrinsic product, essential substrate and regulatory trigger of microbial and mammalian production processes

    Blombach, Bastian; Takors, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Carbon dioxide formation mirrors the final carbon oxidation steps of aerobic metabolism in microbial and mammalian cells. As a consequence, CO 2 / HCO 3 − dissociation equilibria arise in fermenters by the growing culture. Anaplerotic reactions make use of the abundant CO 2 / HCO 3 − levels for refueling citric acid cycle demands and for enabling oxaloacetate-derived products. At the same time, CO2 is released manifold in metabolic reactions via decarboxylation activity. The levels of extrace...

  14. Adversity and Regulatory Processes in Preschool Children: Impact on Psychosocial Adjustment

    Berzenski, Sara

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the development of self-regulation across preschool and early childhood, with an emphasis on identifying basic developmental processes, implications for adjustment, and contextual influences. Study 1 utilized a path analytic framework to assess longitudinal transactional relations between emotion and behavior regulation. Study 2 utilized a latent change analytic framework to assess the development of self-regulation and the influence of context...

  15. Regulatory aspects of cellular therapy product in Europe: JACIE accreditation in a processing facility.

    Caunday, Olivia; Bensoussan, Danièle; Decot, Véronique; Bordigoni, Pierre; Stoltz, Jean François

    2009-01-01

    In 1997, the Joint Accreditation Committee ISCT & EBMT (JACIE) was created. The following year, it approved the first edition of standards for haemopoietic progenitor cell collection, processing and transplantation. The purpose of the standards is to ensure a minimal level of quality, alertness and homogeneity in the implementation of autologous and allogeneic haemopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) programme in onco-hematology. The acquisition of accreditation is based upon the system of examination by trained medical professionals according to countries endorsements with the national regulation obligations applicable to HSCT. In 2008, the fourth edition has been launched. The range of application of the standards comprises both donors and recipients, and all phases of collection, processing, storage and administration of haemopoietic progenitor cells. Among the accredited processing facilities, a few have been integrated JACIE standards into their existing management quality system which is inspected by national health authority. In France, the comparison between JACIE standards and the good manufacturing practices of cellular therapy product reveals some common points and some differences to apply. PMID:20042804

  16. Panel discussion on 'the clearance of very low activity materials from regulatory control'

    Audet, M. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Lexa, D. [ARCS, Seibersdorf (Austria); McKee, P. [EcoMetrix, Brampton, Ontario (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    'Full text:' Some activities on nuclear sites such as decommissioning generate large volumes of uncontaminated waste. What is an appropriate degree of rigour to apply to demonstrate that wastes are not contaminated, and are therefore suitable for release from regulatory control so they can be reused, recycled or disposed of in conventional waste facilities? Is there a level of demonstration that is practical to demonstrate on the scale required? If not, what are the practical alternatives for dealing with such wastes? (author)

  17. Review of nuclear regulatory activities associated with safety culture and the management of safety in the United Kingdom

    This paper describes some of the key regulatory activities which have taken place in the United Kingdom in recent years in the areas of safety culture and management of safety. It explains how the UK's nuclear licensing regime, regulated and enforced by the Nuclear Installations Inspectorate, (NII), provides the framework for a viable safety management system and identifies a management of safety model which a NII Task Force has developed. It finally identifies further work which is being undertaken by the NII. (author). 4 refs, 2 figs

  18. Ribavirin Does Not Impair the Suppressive Activity of Foxp3+CD4+CD25+ Regulatory T Cells

    Lee, Jeewon; CHOI, YOON SEOK; Shin, Eui-Cheol

    2013-01-01

    Ribavirin is an antiviral drug used in combination with pegylated interferon-α (IFN-α) for the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Recently, ribavirin was reported to inhibit the suppressive activity of regulatory T (Treg) cells. In the present study, we re-evaluated the effect of ribavirin on Foxp3+CD4+CD25+ Treg cells from normal donors. First, we examined the expression of CTLA-4 and CD39, which are known to play a role in the suppressive function of Treg cells. We found that r...

  19. The Report on Activities of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic and on Safety of Nuclear Installations in the Slovak Republic in 2010

    A brief account of activities carried out by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic (UJD SR) in 2010 is presented. These activities are reported under the headings: Address of the Chairperson; (1) Legislative activities; (2) Issuance of authorizations, assessment, supervisory activities and enforcement; (3) Nuclear safety of nuclear power plants; (4) Nuclear materials and physical protection of nuclear materials; (5) Powers of the office building; (6) Emergency planning and preparedness; (7) International activities; (8) Public communication; (9) Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic; (10) Appendix: UJD SR organization chart; The International Nuclear Event Scale (INES); Abbreviations.

  20. Report on activities of Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic and safety of nuclear installations in the Slovak Republic in 2008. Annual report

    A brief account of activities carried out by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic (UJD SR) in 2008 is presented. These activities are reported under the headings: (1) Foreword; (2) Legislation; (3) Issuance of authorizations, assessment, supervisory activities and enforcement; (4) Nuclear safety of nuclear installations in the Slovak Republic; (5) Safety of other nuclear installations; (6) Management of radioactive waste; (7) Nuclear materials and physical protection of nuclear materials; (8) Activity of Building Office; (9) Emergency planning and preparedness; (10) International activities; (11) Public communication; (11) Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic; (12) UJD SR organization chart; (13) Abbreviations

  1. Flt3/Flt3L Participates in the Process of Regulating Dendritic Cells and Regulatory T Cells in DSS-Induced Colitis

    Jing-Wei Mao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The immunoregulation between dendritic cells (DCs and regulatory T cells (T-regs plays an important role in the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis (UC. Recent research showed that Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 (Flt3 and Flt3 ligand (Flt3L were involved in the process of DCs regulating T-regs. The DSS-induced colitis model is widely used because of its simplicity and many similarities with human UC. In this study, we observe the disease activity index (DAI and histological scoring, detect the amounts of DCs and T-regs and expression of Flt3/Flt3L, and investigate Flt3/Flt3L participating in the process of DCs regulating T-regs in DSS-induced colitis. Our findings suggest that the reduction of Flt3 and Flt3L expression may possibly induce colonic immunoregulatory imbalance between CD103+MHCII+DCs and CD4+CD25+FoxP3+T-regs in DSS-induced colitis. Flt3/Flt3L participates in the process of regulating DCS and T-regs in the pathogenesis of UC, at least, in the acute stage of this disease.

  2. The regulatory process, nuclear safety research and the fuel cycle in the United Kingdom

    The main legislation governing the safety of nuclear installations in the United Kingdom is the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 (HSWA) and the associated relevant statutory provisions of the Nuclear Installations Act 1965 (as amended). The HSWA sought to simplify and unify all industrial safety legislation and set in place the Health and Safety Commission (HSC) and its executive arm, the Health and Safety Executive (HSE). The Health and Safety Executive's Nuclear Safety Division (NSD) regulates the nuclear activities on such sites through HM Nuclear Installations Inspectorate (NII). Under the Nuclear Installations Act (NIA) no corporate body may use any site for the purpose of installing or operating any reactor, other than such a reactor comprised in a means of transport, or other prescribed installation unless the operator has been granted a nuclear site licence by the Health and Safety Executive. Nuclear fuel cycle facilities are examples of such prescribed installations. (J.P.N.)

  3. Hydrodynamic Limit For An Active Exclusion Process

    Clément, Erignoux

    2016-01-01

    Collective dynamics can be observed among many animal species, and have given rise in the last decades to an active and interdisciplinary field of study. Such behaviors are often modeled by active matter, in which each individual is self-driven and tends to update its velocity depending on the one of its neighbors. In a classical model introduced by Vicsek \\and al., as well as in numerous related active matter models, a phase transition between chaotic behavior at high temperature and global ...

  4. Establishment of the nuclear regulatory framework for the process of decommissioning of nuclear installations in Mexico; Establecimiento del marco regulador nuclear para el proceso de cierre de instalaciones nucleares en Mexico

    Salmeron V, J. A.; Camargo C, R.; Nunez C, A., E-mail: juan.salmeron@cnsns.gob.mx [Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias, Dr. Barragan 779, Col. Narvarte, 03020 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico)

    2015-09-15

    Today has not managed any process of decommissioning of nuclear installations in the country; however because of the importance of the subject and the actions to be taken to long term, the Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias (CNSNS) in Mexico, accordance with its objectives is developing a National Nuclear Regulatory Framework and defined requirements to ensure the implementation of appropriate safety standards when such activities are performed. In this regard, the national nuclear regulatory framework for nuclear installations and the particular case of nuclear power reactors is presented, as well as a proposed licensing process for the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde based on international regulations and origin country regulations of the existing reactors in nuclear facilities in accordance with the license conditions of operation to allow to define and incorporate such regulation. (Author)

  5. Research and regulatory review

    To enable the regulatory review to be effectively undertaken by the regulatory body, there is a need for it to have ready access to information generated by research activities. Certain advantages have been seen to be gained by the regulatory body itself directly allocating and controlling some portion of these activities. The princial reasons for reaching this conclusion are summarised and a brief description of the Inspectorates directly sponsored programme outlined. (author)

  6. A low T regulatory cell response may contribute to both viral control and generalized immune activation in HIV controllers.

    Peter W Hunt

    Full Text Available HIV-infected individuals maintaining undetectable viremia in the absence of therapy (HIV controllers often maintain high HIV-specific T cell responses, which has spurred the development of vaccines eliciting HIV-specific T cell responses. However, controllers also often have abnormally high T cell activation levels, potentially contributing to T cell dysfunction, CD4+ T cell depletion, and non-AIDS morbidity. We hypothesized that a weak T regulatory cell (Treg response might contribute to the control of viral replication in HIV controllers, but might also contribute to generalized immune activation, contributing to CD4+ T cell loss. To address these hypotheses, we measured frequencies of activated (CD38+ HLA-DR+, regulatory (CD4+CD25+CD127(dim, HIV-specific, and CMV-specific T cells among HIV controllers and 3 control populations: HIV-infected individuals with treatment-mediated viral suppression (ART-suppressed, untreated HIV-infected "non-controllers" with high levels of viremia, and HIV-uninfected individuals. Despite abnormally high T cell activation levels, controllers had lower Treg frequencies than HIV-uninfected controls (P = 0.014. Supporting the propensity for an unusually low Treg response to viral infection in HIV controllers, we observed unusually high CMV-specific CD4+ T cell frequencies and a strong correlation between HIV-specific CD4+ T cell responses and generalized CD8+ T cell activation levels in HIV controllers (P ≤ 0.001. These data support a model in which low frequencies of Tregs in HIV controllers may contribute to an effective adaptive immune response, but may also contribute to generalized immune activation, potentially contributing to CD4 depletion.

  7. Golden rice: scientific, regulatory and public information processes of a genetically modified organism.

    Moghissi, A Alan; Pei, Shiqian; Liu, Yinzuo

    2016-01-01

    Historically, agricultural development evolved in three phases. During the first phase the plants were selected on the basis of the availability of a plant with desirable properties at a specific location. The second phase provided the agricultural community with crossbreeding plants to achieve improvement in agricultural production. The evolution of biological knowledge has provided the ability to genetically engineer (GE) crops, one of the key processes within genetically modified organisms (GMO). This article uses golden rice, a species of transgenic Asian rice which contains a precursor of vitamin A in the edible part of the plant as an example of GE/GMO emphasizing Chinese experience in agricultural evolution. It includes a brief review of agricultural evolution to be followed by a description of golden rice development. Golden rice was created as a humanitarian project and has received positive comments by the scientific community and negative voices from certain environmental groups. In this article, we use the Best Available Science (BAS) Concept and Metrics for Evaluation of Scientific Claims (MESC) derived from it to evaluate claims and counter claims on scientific aspects of golden rice. This article concludes that opposition to golden rice is based on belief rather than any of its scientifically derived nutritional, safety or environmental properties. PMID:25603722

  8. A flexible regulatory framework

    Regulatory reform of the Finnish electricity market meant opening up potentially competitive parts of the electricity sector to competition and eliminating all unnecessary forms of regulation covering generation, wholesale supply, retail supply, and foreign trade in electricity. New types of control and regulatory mechanisms and institutions were set up for those parts of the electricity industry that were excluded from competition, such as network operations. Network activities now have to be licensed, whereas no licence is needed for generation or supply. A new sector-specific regulatory authority was established in 1995 to coincide with the implementation of the Electricity Market Act, known as the Electricity Market Authority. This is responsible for regulating network activities and retail supply to captive customers. The core function of the authority, which employs some 14 people, is to promote the smooth operation of the Finnish electricity market and to oversee the implementation of the Electricity Market Act and its provisions. Its most important duties are linked to overseeing the process by which network companies price their electricity. As price regulation no longer exists, all the companies in the electricity sector set their tariffs independently, even network companies. The job of controlling the pricing of network services is handed by the Electricity Market Authority, following the principles of competition control. Pricing control takes place ex post - after a pricing system has been adopted by a company and concentrates on individual cases and companies. There is no ex ante system of setting or approving prices and tariffs by the regulator. The tariffs and pricing of network services can be evaluated, however, by both the Electricity Market Authority and the Finnish Competition Authority, which have overlapping powers as regards the pricing of network activities. The Finnish regulatory framework can be described as a system of light

  9. Gene regulatory and metabolic adaptation processes of Dinoroseobacter shibae DFL12T during oxygen depletion.

    Laass, Sebastian; Kleist, Sarah; Bill, Nelli; Drüppel, Katharina; Kossmehl, Sebastian; Wöhlbrand, Lars; Rabus, Ralf; Klein, Johannes; Rohde, Manfred; Bartsch, Annekathrin; Wittmann, Christoph; Schmidt-Hohagen, Kerstin; Tielen, Petra; Jahn, Dieter; Schomburg, Dietmar

    2014-05-01

    Metabolic flexibility is the key to the ecological success of the marine Roseobacter clade bacteria. We investigated the metabolic adaptation and the underlying changes in gene expression of Dinoroseobacter shibae DFL12(T) to anoxic life by a combination of metabolome, proteome, and transcriptome analyses. Time-resolved studies during continuous oxygen depletion were performed in a chemostat using nitrate as the terminal electron acceptor. Formation of the denitrification machinery was found enhanced on the transcriptional and proteome level, indicating that D. shibae DFL12(T) established nitrate respiration to compensate for the depletion of the electron acceptor oxygen. In parallel, arginine fermentation was induced. During the transition state, growth and ATP concentration were found to be reduced, as reflected by a decrease of A578 values and viable cell counts. In parallel, the central metabolism, including gluconeogenesis, protein biosynthesis, and purine/pyrimidine synthesis was found transiently reduced in agreement with the decreased demand for cellular building blocks. Surprisingly, an accumulation of poly-3-hydroxybutanoate was observed during prolonged incubation under anoxic conditions. One possible explanation is the storage of accumulated metabolites and the regeneration of NADP(+) from NADPH during poly-3-hydroxybutanoate synthesis (NADPH sink). Although D. shibae DFL12(T) was cultivated in the dark, biosynthesis of bacteriochlorophyll was increased, possibly to prepare for additional energy generation via aerobic anoxygenic photophosphorylation. Overall, oxygen depletion led to a metabolic crisis with partly blocked pathways and the accumulation of metabolites. In response, major energy-consuming processes were reduced until the alternative respiratory denitrification machinery was operative. PMID:24648520

  10. Regulatory Assistance, Stakeholder Outreach, and Coastal and Marine Spatial Planning Activities In Support Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Deployment: Task 2.1.7 Permitting and Planning Fiscal Year 2012 Year-End Report

    Geerlofs, Simon H.; Hanna, Luke A.; Judd, Chaeli R.; Blake, Kara M.

    2012-09-01

    This fiscal year 2012 year-end report summarizes activities carried out under DOE Water Power task 2.1.7, Permitting and Planning. Activities under Task 2.1.7 address the concerns of a wide range of stakeholders with an interest in the development of the MHK industry, including regulatory and resource management agencies, tribes, NGOs, and industry. Objectives for 2.1.7 are the following: • To work with stakeholders to streamline the MHK regulatory permitting process. • To work with stakeholders to gather information on needs and priorities for environmental assessment of MHK development. • To communicate research findings and directions to the MHK industry and stakeholders. • To engage in spatial planning processes in order to further the development of the MHK industry. These objectives are met through three subtasks, each of which are described in this report: • 2.1.7.1—Regulatory Assistance • 2.1.7.2—Stakeholder Outreach • 2.1.7.3—Coastal and Marine Spatial Planning As the MHK industry works with the regulatory community and stakeholders to plan, site, permit and license MHK technologies they have an interest in a predictable, efficient, and transparent process. Stakeholders and regulators have an interest in processes that result in sustainable use of ocean space with minimal effects to existing ocean users. Both stakeholders and regulators have an interest in avoiding legal challenges by meeting the intent of federal, state, and local laws that govern siting and operation of MHK technologies. The intention of work under 2.1.7 is to understand these varied interests, explore mechanisms to reduce conflict, identify efficiencies, and ultimately identify pathways to reduce the regulatory costs, time, and potential environmental impacts associated with developing, siting, permitting, and deploying MHK systems.

  11. The Creation of a French Basic Nuclear Installation - Description of the Regulatory Process - 13293

    CEA is a French government-funded technological research organization. It has to build a medium-level waste interim storage facility because the geological repository will not be available until 2025. This interim storage facility, called DIADEM, has to be available in 2017. These wastes are coming from the research facilities for spent fuel reprocessing and the dismantling of the most radioactive parts of nuclear facilities. The CEA handles the waste management by inventorying the needs and updating them regularly. The conception of the facility is mainly based on this inventory. It provides quantity and characteristics of wastes and it gives the production schedule until 2035. Beyond mass and volume, main characteristics of these radioactive wastes are chemical nature, radioisotopes, radioactivity, radiation dose, the heat emitted, corrosive or explosive gas production, etc. These characteristics provide information to study the repository safety. DIADEM mainly consists of a concrete cell, isolated from the outside, wherein stainless steel welded containers are stored, stacked in a vertical position in the racks. DIADEM is scheduled to store three types of 8 mm-thick, stainless steel cylindrical containers with an outside diameter 498 mm and height from 620 to 2120 mm. DIADEM will be a basic nuclear installation (INB in French) because of overall activity of radioactive substances stored. The creation of a French basic nuclear installation is subject to authorization according to the French law No. 2006-686 of 13 June 2006 on Transparency and Security in the Nuclear Field. The authorization takes into account the technical and financial capacities of the licensee which must allow him to conduct his project in compliance with these interests, especially to cover the costs of decommissioning the installation and conduct remediation work, and to monitor and maintain its location site or, for radioactive waste disposal installations, to cover the definitive shut

  12. The Creation of a French Basic Nuclear Installation - Description of the Regulatory Process - 13293

    Mahe, Carole [CEA Marcoule - BP17171 - 30207 Bagnols-Sur-Ceze (France); Leroy, Christine [CEA Cadarache - 13108 Saint Paul-Lez-Durance (France)

    2013-07-01

    CEA is a French government-funded technological research organization. It has to build a medium-level waste interim storage facility because the geological repository will not be available until 2025. This interim storage facility, called DIADEM, has to be available in 2017. These wastes are coming from the research facilities for spent fuel reprocessing and the dismantling of the most radioactive parts of nuclear facilities. The CEA handles the waste management by inventorying the needs and updating them regularly. The conception of the facility is mainly based on this inventory. It provides quantity and characteristics of wastes and it gives the production schedule until 2035. Beyond mass and volume, main characteristics of these radioactive wastes are chemical nature, radioisotopes, radioactivity, radiation dose, the heat emitted, corrosive or explosive gas production, etc. These characteristics provide information to study the repository safety. DIADEM mainly consists of a concrete cell, isolated from the outside, wherein stainless steel welded containers are stored, stacked in a vertical position in the racks. DIADEM is scheduled to store three types of 8 mm-thick, stainless steel cylindrical containers with an outside diameter 498 mm and height from 620 to 2120 mm. DIADEM will be a basic nuclear installation (INB in French) because of overall activity of radioactive substances stored. The creation of a French basic nuclear installation is subject to authorization according to the French law No. 2006-686 of 13 June 2006 on Transparency and Security in the Nuclear Field. The authorization takes into account the technical and financial capacities of the licensee which must allow him to conduct his project in compliance with these interests, especially to cover the costs of decommissioning the installation and conduct remediation work, and to monitor and maintain its location site or, for radioactive waste disposal installations, to cover the definitive shut

  13. Low Activity Waste Feed Process Control Strategy

    The primary purpose of this document is to describe the overall process control strategy for monitoring and controlling the functions associated with the Phase 1B high-level waste feed delivery. This document provides the basis for process monitoring and control functions and requirements needed throughput the double-shell tank system during Phase 1 high-level waste feed delivery. This document is intended to be used by (1) the developers of the future Process Control Plan and (2) the developers of the monitoring and control system

  14. Low Activity Waste Feed Process Control Strategy

    STAEHR, T.W.

    2000-06-14

    The primary purpose of this document is to describe the overall process control strategy for monitoring and controlling the functions associated with the Phase 1B high-level waste feed delivery. This document provides the basis for process monitoring and control functions and requirements needed throughput the double-shell tank system during Phase 1 high-level waste feed delivery. This document is intended to be used by (1) the developers of the future Process Control Plan and (2) the developers of the monitoring and control system.

  15. National legislative and regulatory activities: Armenia, Brazil, Canada, France, Georgia, Greece, India, Ireland, Japan, Lithuania, Switzerland, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United States

    Armenia: Nuclear safety and radiological protection (Initiation of process relating to the life extension of nuclear power plant unit 2). Brazil: General legislation (Authorisation for the construction of nuclear submarines). Canada: Environmental protection (Changes to the federal environmental assessment law). France: Radioactive waste management (Changes to the National Plan for Management of Radioactive Materials and Waste). Georgia: Nuclear safety and radiological protection (New law on nuclear and radiation safety). Greece: Nuclear safety (Presidential decree on nuclear safety transposing European Council directive into national legislation); Emergency preparedness and response (Establishment of national plan for nuclear, radiological, biological and chemical threats). India: Licensing and regulatory infrastructure (Pending invitation for the IAEA's Integrated Regulatory Review Services to conduct a peer review); Liability and compensation (Committee on Subordinate Legislation Report on the Civil Liability for Nuclear Damage Rules, 2011). Ireland: Nuclear safety and radiological protection (Adoption of revised regulations regarding radiological protection). Japan: Nuclear Regulation Authority Act (Structure, Functions, New Nuclear Emergency Preparedness System). Lithuania: General legislation (New laws affecting Visaginas nuclear power plant project implementation); Licensing and regulatory infrastructure (Revised rules for issuing licenses and permits); Nuclear security (Revised physical protection requirements, New rules for the preparation of security plans); Radioactive waste management (Revised Rules of Procedure of Submission of Data on Activities Involving Radioactive Waste Disposal to the European Commission). Switzerland: General legislation (Draft energy strategy open for public comment until January 2013). Ukraine: Radioactive waste management (New law on development of a central repository); General legislation (Law providing for the location

  16. Industry perceptions of the impact of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission on nuclear power plant activities. Draft report

    Teams of senior managers from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) surveyed licensee staff members representing 13 nuclear power utilities from across the country to obtain their candid views of the effectiveness and impact of NRC regulatory activities. Licensee comments addressed the full scope of NRC activities and the impact of agency actions on licensee resources, staff performance, planning and scheduling, and organizational effectiveness. The principal themes of the survey respondents' comments are that (1) licensees acquiesce to NRC requests to avoid poor ratings on NRC Systematic Assessment of Licensee Performance (SALP) reports and the consequent financial and public perception problems that result, even if the requests require the expenditure of significant resources on matters of marginal safety significance, and (2) NRC so dominates licensee resources through its existing and changing formal and informal requirements that licensees believe that their plants, though not unsafe, would have better reliability, and may even achieve a higher degree of safety, if licensees were freer to manage their own resources. This draft report does not attempt to defend any NRC position; endorse or refute licensee perceptions; or explain any action taken by NRC in fulfilling its responsibilities to protect the health and safety of the public. Senior RC managers have made a preliminary evaluation of the information in this report and have made recommendations to address licensee concerns in some areas. The final evaluation and recommendations will be published at a later date as the final NUREG. (author)

  17. Thermally Activated Processes in Polymer Glasses

    V. Parihar; Drosdoff, D.; Widom, A.; Srivastava, Y. N.

    2005-01-01

    A derivation is given for the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann thermal activation law for the glassy state of a bulk polymer. Our microscopic considerations involve the entropy of closed polymer molecular chains (i.e. polymer closed strings). For thin film polymer glasses, one obtains open polymer strings in that the boundary surfaces serve as possible string endpoint locations. The Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann thermal activation law thereby holds true for a bulk polymer glass but is modified in the neighborho...

  18. Drinking Water Research Division's research activities in support of EPA's regulatory agenda

    The Safe Drinking Water Act and its Amendments will have a dramatic impact on the way in which one views the treatment and distribution of water in the U.S. The paper discusses the regulatory agenda, including proposed and promulgated regulations for volatile and synthetic organic contaminants, pesticides, lead, copper, inorganic contaminants, and radionuclides. In addition, the Surface Water Treatment and Coliform Rules are discussed in some detail. Tables are presented that list the Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCLs) and Maximum Contaminant Level Goals (MCLGs), as well as Best Available Technology (BAT) for reducing many of these contaminants to acceptable levels. Finally, a discussion of expected disinfection requirements and the regulation of disinfection by-products (DBP) is made. Treatment techniques for controlling DBPs are briefly described

  19. Report on activities of Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic and safety of nuclear installations in the Slovak Republic in 2009. Annual report

    A brief account of activities carried out by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic (UJD SR) in 2009 is presented. These activities are reported under the headings: (1) Foreword; (2) Legislation; (3) Issuance of authorizations, assessment, supervisory activities and enforcement; (4) Nuclear safety of nuclear installations in the Slovak Republic; (5) Safety of other nuclear installations; (6) Management of radioactive waste; (7) Nuclear materials and physical protection of nuclear materials; (8) Emergency planning and preparedness; (9) International activities; (10) Public communication; (11) Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic; (12) UJD SR organization chart; (13) Abbreviations.

  20. Report on activities of Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic and safety of nuclear installations in the Slovak Republic in 2007. Annual report

    A brief account of activities carried out by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic (UJD SR) in 2007 is presented. These activities are reported under the headings: (1) Foreword; (2) Legislation; (3) Issuance of authorizations, assessment, supervisory activities and enforcement; (4) Nuclear safety of nuclear installations in the Slovak Republic; (5) Safety of other nuclear installations; (6) Management of radioactive waste; (7) Nuclear materials; (8) Emergency planning and preparedness; (9) International activities; (10) Public communication; (11) Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic; (12) Abbreviations

  1. Speech perception as an active cognitive process

    Howard Charles Nusbaum

    2014-01-01

    One view of speech perception is that acoustic signals are transformed into representations for pattern matching to determine linguistic structure. This process can be taken as a statistical pattern-matching problem, assuming realtively stable linguistic categories are characterized by neural representations related to auditory properties of speech that can be compared to speech input. This kind of pattern matching can be termed a passive process which implies rigidity of processingd with few...

  2. Regulatory review of safety cases and safety assessments for near surface

    The activities of the ASAM Regulatory Review Working Group are presented. Regulatory review of the safety assessment is made. It includes the regulatory review of post-closure safety assessment; safety case development and confidence building. The ISAM methodology is reviewed and SA system description is presented. Recommendations on the review process management are given

  3. Treatment and conditioning processes for low and medium activity waste

    This chapter reports on experimental studies of precipitation and membrane processes, exchange processes, particular techniques, and immobilization methods. Topics considered include the separation of actinides and fission products from medium activity waste (MAW) concentrate, the decontamination of low activity liquid wastes from fuel fabrication plants by ultrafiltration, active liquid treatment by a combination of precipitation and membrane processes, the treatment of liquid wastes by flocculation, the denitration and chemical precipitation of MAW concentrate, inorganic ion-exchangers prepared via a sol-gel process, liquid waste treatment by electrical processes, the incorporation of low and medium activity wastes in cement, and the conditioning of highly radioactive residues by utilizing a drum-dryer

  4. Regulation for continuous improvements - the new regulatory strategy of SKI

    This paper describes the new regulatory objectives and strategy of the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate. Factors that have influenced the development of the regulatory strategy, including an international peer review, are discussed. In addition to general technical requirements for a defence in depth, the new strategy strongly focuses on the quality of plant safety management processes, to be monitored by process-oriented inspections. Also, quality assurance of regulatory activities is stressed. Experience gained so far shows that the regulatory approach chosen in Sweden promotes utility self assessment, quality of safety management and ownership of safety work within the utility staff. (author)

  5. Modulation of Pantothenate Kinase 3 Activity by Small Molecules that Interact with the Substrate/Allosteric Regulatory Domain

    Leonardi, Roberta; Zhang, Yong-Mei; Yun, Mi-Kyung; Zhou, Ruobing; Zeng, Fu-Yue; Lin, Wenwei; Cui, Jimmy; Chen, Taosheng; Rock, Charles O.; White, Stephen W.; Jackowski, Suzanne (SJCH)

    2010-09-27

    Pantothenate kinase (PanK) catalyzes the rate-controlling step in coenzyme A (CoA) biosynthesis. PanK3 is stringently regulated by acetyl-CoA and uses an ordered kinetic mechanism with ATP as the leading substrate. Biochemical analysis of site-directed mutants indicates that pantothenate binds in a tunnel adjacent to the active site that is occupied by the pantothenate moiety of the acetyl-CoA regulator in the PanK3 acetyl-CoA binary complex. A high-throughput screen for PanK3 inhibitors and activators was applied to a bioactive compound library. Thiazolidinediones, sulfonylureas and steroids were inhibitors, and fatty acyl-amides and tamoxifen were activators. The PanK3 activators and inhibitors either stimulated or repressed CoA biosynthesis in HepG2/C3A cells. The flexible allosteric acetyl-CoA regulatory domain of PanK3 also binds the substrates, pantothenate and pantetheine, and small molecule inhibitors and activators to modulate PanK3 activity.

  6. Regulatory proteins (inhibitors or activators) affect estimates of Msub(r) of enzymes and receptors by radiation inactivation

    The radiation-inactivation method allows the determination of the Msub(r) of enzymes and receptors by monitoring the decay of biological activity as a function of absorbed dose. The presence of regulatory or effector proteins (inhibitors or activators) associated with an enzyme or receptor, or released in the preparation after tissue homogenization, may affect the decay of biological activity. How the activity is affected, however, will depend on the type of inhibition (competitive or non-competitive), the inhibitor or activator concentration, the dissociation constant of the enzyme-effector system, and the effector Msub(r) relative to that of the enzyme. Since little is known on how effector proteins influence radiation inactivation of enzymes and receptors, we have considered a theoretical model in an effort to provide a framework for the interpretation of experimentally obtained data. Our model predicts that competitive and non-competitive inhibitors of enzymes could be distinguished by analysing irradiated samples with various substrate concentrations. Inhibitors will decrease whereas activators will increase the apparent target size of enzymes or receptors. (author)

  7. A program for activation analysis data processing

    An ALGOL program for activation analysis data handling is presented. The program may be used either for single channel spectrometry data or for multichannel spectrometry. The calculation of instrumental error and of analysis standard deviation is carried out. The outliers are tested, and the regression line diagram with the related observations are plotted by the program. (author)

  8. Effects of Goal Relations on Self-Regulated Learning in Multiple Goal Pursuits: Performance, the Self-Regulatory Process, and Task Enjoyment

    Lee, Hyunjoo

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of goal relations on self-regulation in the pursuit of multiple goals, focusing on self-regulated performance, the self-regulatory process, and task enjoyment. The effect of multiple goal relations on self-regulation was explored in a set of three studies. Goal relations were divided into…

  9. LPS induces KH-type splicing regulatory protein-dependent processing of microRNA-155 precursors in macrophages.

    Ruggiero, Tina; Trabucchi, Michele; De Santa, Francesca; Zupo, Simona; Harfe, Brian D; McManus, Michael T; Rosenfeld, M Geoff; Briata, Paola; Gherzi, Roberto

    2009-09-01

    The importance of post-transcriptional mechanisms for the regulation of the homoeostasis of the immune system and the response to challenge by microorganisms is becoming increasingly appreciated. We investigated the contribution of microRNAs (miRNAs) to macrophage activation induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We first observed that Dicer knockout in bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) increases the LPS-induced expression of some inflammation mediators. miRNA microarray analysis in BMDMs revealed that LPS significantly induces the expression of a single miRNA, miR-155, and this induction depends on enhanced miR-155 maturation from its precursors. The single-strand RNA-binding protein KH-type splicing regulatory protein (KSRP) binds to the terminal loop of miR-155 precursors and promotes their maturation. Both inhibition of miR-155 and KSRP knockdown enhance the LPS-induced expression of select inflammation mediators, and the effect of KSRP knockdown is reverted by mature miR-155. Our studies unveil the existence of an LPS-dependent post-transcriptional regulation of miR-155 biogenesis. Once induced, miR-155 finely tunes the expression of select inflammation mediators in response to LPS. PMID:19423639

  10. Modelling the Active Hearing Process in Mosquitoes

    Avitabile, Daniele; Homer, Martin; Jackson, Joe; Robert, Daniel; Champneys, Alan

    2011-11-01

    A simple microscopic mechanistic model is described of the active amplification within the Johnston's organ of the mosquito species Toxorhynchites brevipalpis. The model is based on the description of the antenna as a forced-damped oscillator coupled to a set of active threads (ensembles of scolopidia) that provide an impulsive force when they twitch. This twitching is in turn controlled by channels that are opened and closed if the antennal oscillation reaches a critical amplitude. The model matches both qualitatively and quantitatively with recent experiments. New results are presented using mathematical homogenization techniques to derive a mesoscopic model as a simple oscillator with nonlinear force and damping characteristics. It is shown how the results from this new model closely resemble those from the microscopic model as the number of threads approach physiologically correct values.

  11. Activation of a metabolic gene regulatory network downstream of mTOR complex 1

    Düvel, Katrin; Yecies, Jessica L.; Menon, Suchithra; Raman, Pichai; Lipovsky, Alex I.; Souza, Amanda L.; Triantafellow, Ellen; Ma, Qicheng; Gorski, Regina; Cleaver, Stephen; Heiden, Matthew G. Vander; MacKeigan, Jeffrey P.; Finan, Peter M.; Clish, Clary B; Murphy, Leon O.

    2010-01-01

    Aberrant activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is a common molecular event in a variety of pathological settings, including genetic tumor syndromes, cancer, and obesity. However, the cell intrinsic consequences of mTORC1 activation remain poorly defined. Through a combination of unbiased genomic, metabolomic, and bioinformatic approaches, we demonstrate that mTORC1 activation is sufficient to stimulate specific metabolic pathways, including glycolysis, the oxidati...

  12. Clearing a path for regulatory compliance: An update of NRC mixed waste activities

    Since the mid-1980's, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) have cooperated in seeking solutions to issues associated with the joint regulation of radioactive mixed waste. To date, these efforts have produced joint guidance documents on the definition and identification of mixed waste, siting guidelines for mixed waste disposal facilities, and conceptual design guidance for mixed waste disposal facilities. More recent efforts have concentrated on the development of joint guidance documents associated with mixed waste testing and storage. These documents are intended to provide acceptable procedures that can be used by the regulated community in complying with both agencies' requirements, while maintaining radiation exposures as low as reasonably achievable. In addition to guidance development, the agencies are jointly sponsoring the National Mixed Waste Profile. Through Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the agencies solicited information on the volumes, characteristics, and treatability of mixed waste from about 1300 commercial generators nationwide through a voluntary questionnaire. The profile should provide information needed by States, compact officials, private developers, and Federal agencies to help plan and develop adequate treatment and disposal facilities for commercial mixed waste. The same information will also be useful to the Department of Energy as it considers accepting commercial mixed waste for treatment and disposal. (author)

  13. Regulatory aspects and activities in the field of radioactive waste management in Bulgaria

    Bulgaria uses nuclear power for electricity generation and for a variety of nuclear applications in industry, research and medicine. Six WWER type Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) went into operation at Kozloduy between 1974 and 1991. Until 1988 spent fuel was transported back to the former Soviet Union, but since then has been stored on site. Operational low level waste is stored on site, but since 1993 a volume reduction strategy using supercompaction has been employed, which has reduced stored waste volumes by a factor of four. Institutional radioactive wastes are disposed at the Novi Han near surface repository, located 35 km from Sofia. It was commissioned in 1964 and is now about half full. Siting studies have begun for a new near surface repository that would accept both institutional and NPP waste. A legislative and regulatory framework, as well as organizational and institutional arrangements, are in place. A national strategy that includes provisions for compiling a national inventory of spent fuel and radioactive waste and provisions for funding spent fuel and radioactive waste management, has been developed. The paper elaborates on the current situation regarding radioactive waste management in Bulgaria. (author)

  14. Overcoming regulatory, political and operational challenges to boost Alaska E and P and pipeline activity

    This presentation addressed a range of issues associated with the development of the Alaska Highway Gas Pipeline, including fundamentals regarding North American gas supply and demand for power generation, industrial use and residential and commercial use; pipeline routing. It also addressed issues regarding the United States Energy Bill and Alaska readiness in terms of regulatory approvals and right-of-way applications, TransCanada readiness, and other key issues. Natural gas supply from the East Coast, Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin, United States Rockies, Gulf of Mexico and other localities in the United States were illustrated in a graph along with natural gas market prices and a comparison of recent NYMEX gas price forecasts. The author indicates that 10 to 15 billion cubic feet per day of new supply will be needed. The Mackenzie project continues to work towards an in-service date of 2009. However, a strong competitor and alternative to northern gas is liquefied natural gas (LNG). The issue of integrating Alaskan gas into the existing Alberta pipeline grid was also discussed along with technologies to improve pipeline costs and issues regarding First Nation consultations. TransCanada believes that Alaskan gas can be delivered to markets in the United States by 2012 if existing pipeline infrastructures are used as well as existing legislation in Canada. 4 figs

  15. Decay Heat Code Validation Activities at ORNL: Supporting Expansion of NRC Regulatory Guide 3.54

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has a long history of involvement in the development and validation of the ORIGEN series of isotope summation codes and nuclear data libraries, widely recognized and used to predict the decay heat for spent nuclear fuel. In particular, the ORIGEN-S code, the depletion/decay module of the SCALE code system, has been extensively validated using experimental isotopic assay data and decay heat measurements for commercial spent fuel. This work was used in the development of the technical basis for NRC Regulatory Guide 3.54 on spent fuel decay heat. The bulk of the experimental data used to validate spent fuel decay heat predictions are from programs of the 1970s and 1980s and consequently involve older-design fuel assemblies with a relatively low enrichment and burnup. This has led to a situation where the spent fuel now being discharged from operating reactors extends well beyond the regime of the experimental data and area of code applicability based on the data. The absence of validation data for modern fuel designs has potentially serious consequences for decay heat predictions in terms of added safety factors to account for larger uncertainties and lower volumetric transport and storage capacities

  16. Creating a comprehensive, efficient, and sustainable nuclear regulatory structure. A Process Report from the U.S. Department of Energy's Material Protection, Control and Accounting Program

    This paper describes the strategies and process used by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) nuclear Material Protection, Control and Accounting (MPC and A) Regulatory Development Project (RDP) to restructure its support for MPC and A regulations in the Russian Federation. The RDP adopted a project management approach to defining, implementing, and managing an effective nuclear regulatory structure. This approach included defining and developing the regulatory documents necessary to provide the Russian Federation with a comprehensive regulatory structure that supports an effective and sustainable MPC and A Program in Russia. This effort began in February 2005, included a series of three multi-agency meetings in April, June, and July, and culminated in August 2005 in a mutually agreed-upon plan to define and populate the nuclear regulatory system in the Russian Federation for non-military, weapons-usable material. This nuclear regulatory system will address all non-military Category I and II nuclear material at the Russian Federal Atomic Energy Agency (Rosatom), the Russian Agency for Industry (Rosprom), and the Federal Agency for Marine and River Transport (FAMRT) facilities; nuclear material in transport and storage; and nuclear material under the oversight of the Federal Environmental, Industrial and Nuclear Supervisory Service of Russia (Rostechnadzor). The Russian and U.S. MPC and A management teams approved the plan, and the DOE National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) NA-255, Office of Infrastructure and Sustainability (ONIS), is providing funding. The Regulatory Development Project is managed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) NNSA

  17. The regulatory process for uranium mines in Canada -general overview and radiation health and safety in uranium mine-mill facilities

    This presentation is divided into two main sections. In the first, the author explores the issues of radiation and tailings disposal, and then examines the Canadian nuclear regulatory process from the point of view of jurisdiction, objectives, philosophy and mechanics. The compliance inspection program is outlined, and the author discussed the relationships between the AECB and other regulatory agencies, the public and uranium mine-mill workers. The section concludes with an examination of the stance of the medical profession on nuclear issues. In part two, the radiological hazards for uranium miners are examined: radon daughters, gamma radiation, thoron daughters and uranium dust. The author touches on new regulations being drafted, the assessment of past exposures in mine atmospheres, and the regulatory approach at the surface exploration stage. The presentation concludes with the author's brief observations on the findings of other uranium mining inquiries and on future requirements in the industry's interests

  18. RMOD: a tool for regulatory motif detection in signaling network.

    Kim, Jinki; Yi, Gwan-Su

    2013-01-01

    Regulatory motifs are patterns of activation and inhibition that appear repeatedly in various signaling networks and that show specific regulatory properties. However, the network structures of regulatory motifs are highly diverse and complex, rendering their identification difficult. Here, we present a RMOD, a web-based system for the identification of regulatory motifs and their properties in signaling networks. RMOD finds various network structures of regulatory motifs by compressing the signaling network and detecting the compressed forms of regulatory motifs. To apply it into a large-scale signaling network, it adopts a new subgraph search algorithm using a novel data structure called path-tree, which is a tree structure composed of isomorphic graphs of query regulatory motifs. This algorithm was evaluated using various sizes of signaling networks generated from the integration of various human signaling pathways and it showed that the speed and scalability of this algorithm outperforms those of other algorithms. RMOD includes interactive analysis and auxiliary tools that make it possible to manipulate the whole processes from building signaling network and query regulatory motifs to analyzing regulatory motifs with graphical illustration and summarized descriptions. As a result, RMOD provides an integrated view of the regulatory motifs and mechanism underlying their regulatory motif activities within the signaling network. RMOD is freely accessible online at the following URL: http://pks.kaist.ac.kr/rmod. PMID:23874612

  19. RMOD: a tool for regulatory motif detection in signaling network.

    Jinki Kim

    Full Text Available Regulatory motifs are patterns of activation and inhibition that appear repeatedly in various signaling networks and that show specific regulatory properties. However, the network structures of regulatory motifs are highly diverse and complex, rendering their identification difficult. Here, we present a RMOD, a web-based system for the identification of regulatory motifs and their properties in signaling networks. RMOD finds various network structures of regulatory motifs by compressing the signaling network and detecting the compressed forms of regulatory motifs. To apply it into a large-scale signaling network, it adopts a new subgraph search algorithm using a novel data structure called path-tree, which is a tree structure composed of isomorphic graphs of query regulatory motifs. This algorithm was evaluated using various sizes of signaling networks generated from the integration of various human signaling pathways and it showed that the speed and scalability of this algorithm outperforms those of other algorithms. RMOD includes interactive analysis and auxiliary tools that make it possible to manipulate the whole processes from building signaling network and query regulatory motifs to analyzing regulatory motifs with graphical illustration and summarized descriptions. As a result, RMOD provides an integrated view of the regulatory motifs and mechanism underlying their regulatory motif activities within the signaling network. RMOD is freely accessible online at the following URL: http://pks.kaist.ac.kr/rmod.

  20. Commensal-induced regulatory T cells mediate protection against pathogen-stimulated NF-kappaB activation.

    Caitlin O'Mahony

    Full Text Available Host defence against infection requires a range of innate and adaptive immune responses that may lead to tissue damage. Such immune-mediated pathologies can be controlled with appropriate T regulatory (Treg activity. The aim of the present study was to determine the influence of gut microbiota composition on Treg cellular activity and NF-kappaB activation associated with infection. Mice consumed the commensal microbe Bifidobacterium infantis 35624 followed by infection with Salmonella typhimurium or injection with LPS. In vivo NF-kappaB activation was quantified using biophotonic imaging. CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T cell phenotypes and cytokine levels were assessed using flow cytometry while CD4+ T cells were isolated using magnetic beads for adoptive transfer to naïve animals. In vivo imaging revealed profound inhibition of infection and LPS induced NF-kappaB activity that preceded a reduction in S. typhimurium numbers and murine sickness behaviour scores in B. infantis-fed mice. In addition, pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion, T cell proliferation, and dendritic cell co-stimulatory molecule expression were significantly reduced. In contrast, CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T cell numbers were significantly increased in the mucosa and spleen of mice fed B. infantis. Adoptive transfer of CD4+CD25+ T cells transferred the NF-kappaB inhibitory activity. Consumption of a single commensal micro-organism drives the generation and function of Treg cells which control excessive NF-kappaB activation in vivo. These cellular interactions provide the basis for a more complete understanding of the commensal-host-pathogen trilogue that contribute to host homeostatic mechanisms underpinning protection against aberrant activation of the innate immune system in response to a translocating pathogen or systemic LPS.

  1. The changing regulatory environment

    The role and value of regulation in the energy sector was discussed, demonstrating how, despite common perception, regulation is an essential part of Canada's strategy to find and develop new opportunities. The future vision of regulation for industry participants was presented with particular focus on issues related to streamlining the regulatory process. As far as pipelines are concerned, regulatory actions are necessary to facilitate capacity increases and to ensure the line's integrity, safety and environmental record. Furthermore, regulation provides economic solutions where market forces cannot provide them, as for example where business has elements of monopoly. It arbitrates interests of landowners, business, consumers, and environmental groups. It looks for ways to ensure conditions under which competition can flourish. It acts as the guardian of citizens' rights in a democratic society by providing citizens with an opportunity to be heard on the building or expansion of pipelines and associated facilities. As citizens become more and more concerned about their property and the land that surrounds them, citizen involvement in decision making about how industry activity affects their quality of life will become correspondingly more important. Regulatory agencies are committed to facilitate this engagement by flexible hearing procedures and by making use of evolving communication and information technology

  2. First update to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's regulatory strategy for the high-level waste repository program

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff has updated its initial regulatory strategy for the High-Level Waste Repository Licensing Program. The update describes changes to the initial strategy and summarizes progress and future activities. This paper summarizes the first update of the regulatory strategy. In general the overall strategy of identifying and reducing uncertainties is unchanged. Identifying regulatory and institutional uncertainties is essentially complete, and therefore, the current and future emphasis is on reducing those regulatory and institutional uncertainties identified to date. The NRC staff has improved the methods of reducing regulatory uncertainties by (1) enhancing the technical basis preparation process for potential rulemakings and guidance and (2) designing a new guidance document, called a staff position, for clarifying regulatory uncertainties. For guiding the US DOE's reduction of technical uncertainties, the NRC staff will give more emphasis to prelicense application reviews and less emphasis on preparing staff technical positions

  3. Non-hypoxic activation of the negative regulatory feedback loop of prolyl-hydroxylase oxygen sensors.

    Tug, Suzan; Delos Reyes, Buena; Fandrey, Joachim; Berchner-Pfannschmidt, Utta

    2009-07-10

    Hypoxia inducible factors (HIF) coordinate cellular responses towards hypoxia. HIFs are mainly regulated by a group of prolyl-hydroxylases (PHDs) that in the presence of oxygen, target the HIFalpha subunit for degradation. Herein, we studied the role of nitric oxide (NO) in regulating PHD activities under normoxic conditions. In the present study we show that different NO-donors initially inhibited endogenous PHD2 activity which led to accumulation of HIF-1alpha subsequently to enhance HIF-1 dependent increased PHD2 promoter activity. Consequently PHD2 abundance and activity were strongly induced which caused downregulation of HIF-1alpha. Interestingly, upregulation of endogenous PHD2 activity by NO was not found in cells that lack an intact pVHL dependent degradation pathway. Recovery of PHD activity required intact cells and was not observed in cell extracts or recombinant PHD2. In conclusion induction of endogenous PHD2 activity by NO is dependent on a feedback loop initiated despite normoxic conditions. PMID:19427832

  4. ACTIVE FRONT STEERING DURING BRAKING PROCESS

    CHEN Deling; CHEN Li; YIN Chengliang; ZHANG Yong

    2008-01-01

    An active front steering (AFS) intervention control during braking for vehicle stability is presented. Based on the investigation of AFS mechanism, a simplified model of steering system is established and integrated with vehicle model. Then the AFS control on vehicle handling dynamics during braking is designed. Due to the difficulties associated with the sideslip angle measurement of vehicle, a state observer is designed to provide real time estimation. Thereafter, the controller with the feedback of both sideslip and yaw angle is implemented. To evaluate the system control, the proposed AFS controlled vehicle has been tested in the Hardware-in-the-loop-simulation (HILS) system and compared with that of conventional vehicle. Results show that AFS can improve vehicle lateral stability effectively without reducing the braking performance.

  5. α-Synuclein vaccination modulates regulatory T cell activation and microglia in the absence of brain pathology

    Christiansen, Josefine R; Olesen, Mads N; Otzen, Daniel E; Romero-Ramos, Marina; Sanchez-Guajardo, Vanesa

    2016-01-01

    have studied the changes induced by vaccination with α-synuclein in the CD4 T cell pool and its impact on brain microglia to understand the immune mechanisms behind successful vaccination strategies in Parkinson's disease animal models. METHODS: Mice were immunized with WT or nitrated α-synuclein at a......BACKGROUND: Passive and active immunization with α-synuclein has been shown to be neuroprotective in animal models of Parkinson's disease. We have previously shown that vaccination with α-synuclein, long before α-synuclein-induced brain pathology, prevents striatal degeneration by inducing...... regulatory T cell infiltration in parenchyma and antibody deposition on α-synuclein overexpressing neurons. However, the effect of peripheral α-synuclein on the immune system is unknown, as are the mechanistic changes induced in the CD4 T cell population during successful neuroprotective animal studies. We...

  6. [Life as regulatory activity and self-realization: debate surrounding the concept of biological regulation in Goldstein and Canguilhem].

    Ostachuk, Agustín

    2015-12-01

    The influence of Kurt Goldstein on the thinking of Georges Canguilhem extended throughout his entire work. This paper seeks to examine this relationship in order to conduct a study of the norm as a nexus or connection between the concept and life. Consequently, this work will be a reflection on the approach to life as a regulatory activity and self-realization. For this, it will be necessary to redefine the concepts of health and disease, and make a crossover between the two. At the end of this trajectory, it will be found that these concepts can explain the identity between the concept and life, which leads to the unexpected conclusion that the cure is ultimately self-healing. PMID:25807361

  7. HLA Class II Antibody Activation of Endothelial Cells Promotes Th17 and Disrupts Regulatory T Lymphocyte Expansion.

    Lion, J; Taflin, C; Cross, A R; Robledo-Sarmiento, M; Mariotto, E; Savenay, A; Carmagnat, M; Suberbielle, C; Charron, D; Haziot, A; Glotz, D; Mooney, N

    2016-05-01

    Kidney transplantation is the most successful treatment option for patients with end-stage renal disease, and chronic antibody-mediated rejection is the principal cause of allograft loss. Predictive factors for chronic rejection include high levels of HLA alloantibodies (particularly HLA class II) and activation of graft endothelial cells (ECs). The mechanistic basis for this association is unresolved. We used an experimental model of HLA-DR antibody stimulation of microvascular ECs to examine the mechanisms underlying the association between HLA class II antibodies, EC activation and allograft damage. Activation of ECs with the F(Ab')2 fragment of HLA-DR antibody led to phosphorylation of Akt, ERK and MEK and increased IL-6 production by ECs cocultured with allogeneic peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in an Akt-dependent manner. We previously showed that HLA-DR-expressing ECs induce polarization of Th17 and FoxP3(bright) regulatory T cell (Treg) subsets. Preactivation of ECs with anti-HLA-DR antibody redirected EC allogenicity toward a proinflammatory response by decreasing amplification of functional Treg and by further increasing IL-6-dependent Th17 expansion. Alloimmunized patient serum containing relevant HLA-DR alloantibodies selectively bound and increased EC secretion of IL-6 in cocultures with PBMCs. These data contribute to understanding of potential mechanisms of antibody-mediated endothelial damage independent of complement activation and FcR-expressing effector cells. PMID:26614587

  8. Regulatory aspects of NPP safety in Ukraine

    After a short overview of the Ukrainian nuclear power program, detailed information is presented describing the organisation, activity, responsibility and tasks of the Ukrainian regulatory authority, including its interactions with central executive authorities involved in nuclear and radiation safety. Main activities described include: inspection of nuclear installations i.e. in-service inspection of the equipment, licensing of NPPs especially when large-scale modernisation is concerned. Principles of the Regulatory Authority in consideration and assessment process of Safety Analysis report are listed as a legislative basis applied during the licensing process

  9. Sintering as a process of transport of activated volume

    Nikolić Nataša S.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Starting with the fact that sintering is the consequence of the process of transport of activated volume, it has been shown how the kinetics of the sintering process can be defined. The activated volume was in principle defined as a parameter which describes a system’s deffectivity on an atomic level.

  10. Moonlighting kinases with guanylate cyclase activity can tune regulatory signal networks

    Irving, Helen R.

    2012-02-01

    Guanylate cyclase (GC) catalyzes the formation of cGMP and it is only recently that such enzymes have been characterized in plants. One family of plant GCs contains the GC catalytic center encapsulated within the intracellular kinase domain of leucine rich repeat receptor like kinases such as the phytosulfokine and brassinosteroid receptors. In vitro studies show that both the kinase and GC domain have catalytic activity indicating that these kinase-GCs are examples of moonlighting proteins with dual catalytic function. The natural ligands for both receptors increase intracellular cGMP levels in isolated mesophyll protoplast assays suggesting that the GC activity is functionally relevant. cGMP production may have an autoregulatory role on receptor kinase activity and/or contribute to downstream cell expansion responses. We postulate that the receptors are members of a novel class of receptor kinases that contain functional moonlighting GC domains essential for complex signaling roles.

  11. Human Blood and Mucosal Regulatory T Cells Express Activation Markers and Inhibitory Receptors in Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    James D Lord

    Full Text Available FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs are critical for preventing intestinal inflammation. However, FOXP3+ T cells are paradoxically increased in the intestines of patients with the inflammatory bowel disease (IBD ulcerative colitis (UC or Crohn's disease (CD. We determined whether these FOXP3+ cells in IBD patients share or lack the phenotype of such cells from patients without IBD.We quantified and characterized FOXP3+ Treg populations, as well as FOXP3- CD4+ T cells, in the lamina propria lymphocytes (LPL of intestine surgically resected from patients with and without IBD, and in the blood of controls or Crohn's patients with or without disease activity.In all samples, a similar fraction of FOXP3+ cells expressed the "natural" Treg (nTreg marker Helios, suggesting that, in IBD, these cells are not entirely "induced" Tregs (iTregs derived from activated effector T cells. Helios+ and Helios- FOXP3+ T cells demonstrated similar expression of maturation markers, activation markers, and inhibitory molecules between IBD patients and controls, while FOXP3- cells paradoxically expressed more of the inhibitory receptors CD39, CTLA4, and PD-1 in inflamed mucosa. Greater expression of activation markers was also seen in both Helios+ and Helios- Tregs, relative to FOXP3- cells, in both IBD patients and controls, indicating that Tregs are effectively activated by antigen in IBD.Extensive immunophenotyping revealed that Helios+ and Helios- mucosal Tregs exist at a similar frequency, and have a similar expression of inhibitory molecules and activation markers in patients with IBD as in healthy controls.

  12. BAFF promotes regulatory T-cell apoptosis and blocks cytokine production by activating B cells in primary biliary cirrhosis

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is a chronic and slowly progressive cholestatic liver disease of autoimmune etiology. A number of questions regarding its etiology are unclear. CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) play a critical role in self-tolerance and, for unknown reasons, their relative number is reduced in PBC patients. B-cell-activating factor (BAFF) is a key survival factor during B-cell maturation and its concentration is increased in peripheral blood of PBC patients. It has been reported that activated B cells inhibit Treg cell proliferation and there are no BAFF receptors on Tregs. Therefore, we speculated that excessive BAFF may result in Treg reduction via B cells. To prove our hypothesis, we isolated Tregs and B cells from PBC and healthy donors. BAFF and IgM concentrations were then analyzed by ELISA and CD40, CD80, CD86, IL-10, and TGF-β expression in B cells and Tregs were measured by flow cytometry. BAFF up-regulated CD40, CD80, CD86, and IgM expression in B cells. However, BAFF had no direct effect on Treg cell apoptosis and cytokine secretion. Nonetheless, we observed that BAFF-activated B cells could induce Treg cell apoptosis and reduce IL-10 and TGF-β expression. We also showed that BAFF-activated CD4+ T cells had no effect on Treg apoptosis. Furthermore, we verified that bezafibrate, a hypolipidemic drug, can inhibit BAFF-induced Treg cell apoptosis. In conclusion, BAFF promotes Treg cell apoptosis and inhibits cytokine production by activating B cells in PBC patients. The results of this study suggest that inhibition of BAFF activation is a strategy for PBC treatment

  13. BAFF promotes regulatory T-cell apoptosis and blocks cytokine production by activating B cells in primary biliary cirrhosis

    Bo Zhang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC is a chronic and slowly progressive cholestatic liver disease of autoimmune etiology. A number of questions regarding its etiology are unclear. CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs play a critical role in self-tolerance and, for unknown reasons, their relative number is reduced in PBC patients. B-cell-activating factor (BAFF is a key survival factor during B-cell maturation and its concentration is increased in peripheral blood of PBC patients. It has been reported that activated B cells inhibit Treg cell proliferation and there are no BAFF receptors on Tregs. Therefore, we speculated that excessive BAFF may result in Treg reduction via B cells. To prove our hypothesis, we isolated Tregs and B cells from PBC and healthy donors. BAFF and IgM concentrations were then analyzed by ELISA and CD40, CD80, CD86, IL-10, and TGF-β expression in B cells and Tregs were measured by flow cytometry. BAFF up-regulated CD40, CD80, CD86, and IgM expression in B cells. However, BAFF had no direct effect on Treg cell apoptosis and cytokine secretion. Nonetheless, we observed that BAFF-activated B cells could induce Treg cell apoptosis and reduce IL-10 and TGF-β expression. We also showed that BAFF-activated CD4+ T cells had no effect on Treg apoptosis. Furthermore, we verified that bezafibrate, a hypolipidemic drug, can inhibit BAFF-induced Treg cell apoptosis. In conclusion, BAFF promotes Treg cell apoptosis and inhibits cytokine production by activating B cells in PBC patients. The results of this study suggest that inhibition of BAFF activation is a strategy for PBC treatment.

  14. BAFF promotes regulatory T-cell apoptosis and blocks cytokine production by activating B cells in primary biliary cirrhosis

    Zhang, Bo; Hu, Mintao [Department of Hepatology, Wuxi Infectious Diseases Hospital, Wuxi, Jiangsu (China); Zhang, Peng [Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Cao, Hong [Department of Hepatology, Wuxi Infectious Diseases Hospital, Wuxi, Jiangsu (China); Wang, Yongzhen [The Second Hospital of Nanjing, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Wang, Zheng; Su, Tingting [Department of Hepatology, Wuxi Infectious Diseases Hospital, Wuxi, Jiangsu (China)

    2013-05-10

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is a chronic and slowly progressive cholestatic liver disease of autoimmune etiology. A number of questions regarding its etiology are unclear. CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) play a critical role in self-tolerance and, for unknown reasons, their relative number is reduced in PBC patients. B-cell-activating factor (BAFF) is a key survival factor during B-cell maturation and its concentration is increased in peripheral blood of PBC patients. It has been reported that activated B cells inhibit Treg cell proliferation and there are no BAFF receptors on Tregs. Therefore, we speculated that excessive BAFF may result in Treg reduction via B cells. To prove our hypothesis, we isolated Tregs and B cells from PBC and healthy donors. BAFF and IgM concentrations were then analyzed by ELISA and CD40, CD80, CD86, IL-10, and TGF-β expression in B cells and Tregs were measured by flow cytometry. BAFF up-regulated CD40, CD80, CD86, and IgM expression in B cells. However, BAFF had no direct effect on Treg cell apoptosis and cytokine secretion. Nonetheless, we observed that BAFF-activated B cells could induce Treg cell apoptosis and reduce IL-10 and TGF-β expression. We also showed that BAFF-activated CD4+ T cells had no effect on Treg apoptosis. Furthermore, we verified that bezafibrate, a hypolipidemic drug, can inhibit BAFF-induced Treg cell apoptosis. In conclusion, BAFF promotes Treg cell apoptosis and inhibits cytokine production by activating B cells in PBC patients. The results of this study suggest that inhibition of BAFF activation is a strategy for PBC treatment.

  15. BAFF promotes regulatory T-cell apoptosis and blocks cytokine production by activating B cells in primary biliary cirrhosis

    Bo Zhang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC is a chronic and slowly progressive cholestatic liver disease of autoimmune etiology. A number of questions regarding its etiology are unclear. CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs play a critical role in self-tolerance and, for unknown reasons, their relative number is reduced in PBC patients. B-cell-activating factor (BAFF is a key survival factor during B-cell maturation and its concentration is increased in peripheral blood of PBC patients. It has been reported that activated B cells inhibit Treg cell proliferation and there are no BAFF receptors on Tregs. Therefore, we speculated that excessive BAFF may result in Treg reduction via B cells. To prove our hypothesis, we isolated Tregs and B cells from PBC and healthy donors. BAFF and IgM concentrations were then analyzed by ELISA and CD40, CD80, CD86, IL-10, and TGF-β expression in B cells and Tregs were measured by flow cytometry. BAFF up-regulated CD40, CD80, CD86, and IgM expression in B cells. However, BAFF had no direct effect on Treg cell apoptosis and cytokine secretion. Nonetheless, we observed that BAFF-activated B cells could induce Treg cell apoptosis and reduce IL-10 and TGF-β expression. We also showed that BAFF-activated CD4+ T cells had no effect on Treg apoptosis. Furthermore, we verified that bezafibrate, a hypolipidemic drug, can inhibit BAFF-induced Treg cell apoptosis. In conclusion, BAFF promotes Treg cell apoptosis and inhibits cytokine production by activating B cells in PBC patients. The results of this study suggest that inhibition of BAFF activation is a strategy for PBC treatment.

  16. Survey by senior NRC management to obtain veiwpoints on the safety impact of regulatory activities from representative utilities operating and constructing nuclear power plants

    A survey of licensee staff members representing the several organizational elements in different licensee corporate and plant staffs was conducted by senior NRC management to obtain licensee views on the potential safety consequences and impact of NRC regulatory activities. The comments received addressed the full scope of NRC activities and the negative impact of agency actions on licensee resources, staff performance, planning and scheduling, and organizational effectiveness. The findings of the survey is that the pace and nature of regulatory actions have created a potential safety problem which deserves further evaluation by the agency

  17. Cytokine Overproduction, T-Cell Activation, and Defective T-Regulatory Functions Promote Nephritis in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Marco Tucci

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Lupus nephritis (LN occurs in more than one-third of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Its pathogenesis is mostly attributable to the glomerular deposition of immune complexes and overproduction of T helper- (Th- 1 cytokines. In this context, the high glomerular expression of IL-12 and IL-18 exerts a major pathogenetic role. These cytokines are locally produced by both macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs which attract other inflammatory cells leading to maintenance of the kidney inflammation. However, other populations including T-cells and B-cells are integral for the development and worsening of renal damage. T-cells include many pathogenetic subsets, and the activation of Th-17 in keeping with defective T-regulatory (Treg cell function regards as further event contributing to the glomerular damage. These populations also activate B-cells to produce nephritogenic auto-antibodies. Thus, LN includes a complex pathogenetic mechanism that involves different players and the evaluation of their activity may provide an effective tool for monitoring the onset of the disease.

  18. Board composition, process, and activism: evidence within American firms

    Scott SCARBOROUGH; Jeffrey J. HAYNIE; Christopher SHOOK

    2010-01-01

    This study provided an empirical test of the effects of compositional and process variables on board activism. The attributes examined were functional area knowledge, independence, duality, and effort norms. The findings from this study provided support for the positive relationships between both functional area knowledge and effort norms and board activism. The strong relationship between effort norms and activism indicates the importance of process variables in board research and the need f...

  19. Quality Management Activities for Software Architecture and Software Architecture Process

    Hämäläinen, Niina

    2008-01-01

    Architecture processes are considerably new parts of organisations’ processes. These processes have the responsibility to aim at high quality and financially successful architectures. However, the activities which promote this aim are not clearly defined yet. This study reviews literature and practitioners’ experiences on quality management activities that could be suggested to promote the achievement of high quality software architectures and a good quality software a...

  20. Activated Sludge and other Aerobic Suspended Culture Processes.

    Li, Chunying; Wei, Li; Chang, Chein-Chi; Zhang, Yuhua; Wei, Dong

    2016-10-01

    This is a literature review for the year 2015 and contains information specifically associated with suspended growth processes including activated sludge, upflow anaerobic sludge blanket, and sequencing batch reactors. The review encompasses modeling and kinetics, nutrient removal, system design and operation. Compared to past reviews, many topics show increase in activity in 2015. These include, fate and effect of xenobiotics, industrial wastes treatment with sludge, and pretreatment for the activated sludge. These topics are referred to the degradation of constituents in activated sludge. Other sections include population dynamics, process microbiology give an insight into the activated sludge. The subsection in industrial wastes: converting sewage sludge into biogases was also mentioned. PMID:27620082

  1. A completely new design and regulatory process - A risk-based approach for new nuclear power plants. Annex 17

    In the de-regulated electric power market place that is developing in the USA, competition from alternative electric power sources has provided significant downward pressure on the costs of new construction projects. Studies by the Electric Power Research Institute have shown that, in the USA, the capital cost of new nuclear plants must be decreased by at least 35% to 40% relative to the cost of Advanced Light Water Reactors designed in the early 1990s in order to be competitive with capital costs of gas-fired electric power plants. The underlying reasons for the high capital costs estimated for some nuclear plants are (1) long construction times, (2) the high level of 'defense-in-depth' or safety margin, included throughout the design and licensing process, and (3) the use of out-dated design methods and information. Probabilistic Safety Assessments are being used to develop a more accurate assessment of real plant risk and to provide relief if it can be demonstrated that plant equipment is not providing a significant contribution to plant safety. Westinghouse addressed some of these cost drivers in the development of the AP-600 passive plant design. However, because of relatively inexpensive natural gas plant alternative, we need to reduce the costs even further. Therefore, the AP-600 design is now being up-rated to a 1000 MWe design, AP-1000. The development of AP1000 is described in another paper being presented at this meeting. Westinghouse is also managing a project, sponsored by the US Department of Energy, which is aimed at developing an all-new 'risk-based' approach to design and regulation. Methodologies being developed use risk-based information to the extent practical and 'defense-in-depth' only when necessary to address uncertainties in models and equipment performance. Early results, summarized in this paper, include (1) the initial framework for a new design and regulatory process and (2) a sample design analysis which shows that the Emergency Core

  2. Activation and Recruitment of Regulatory T Cells via Chemokine Receptor Activation in Trichinella spiralis-Infected Mice

    Ahn, Jeong-Bin; Kang, Shin Ae; Kim, Dong-Hee; Yu, Hak Sun

    2016-01-01

    As most infections by the helminth parasite elicit the recruitment of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T (Treg) cells, many scientists have suggested that these cells could be used for the treatment of immune-mediated inflammation and associated diseases. In order to investigate the distribution and alteration of activated Treg cells, we compared the expression levels of Treg cell activation markers in the ileum and gastrocnemius tissues 1, 2, and 4 weeks after infection. The number of Treg cells was monitore...

  3. Asynchronous combinatorial action of four regulatory factors activates Bcl11b for T cell commitment.

    Kueh, Hao Yuan; Yui, Mary A; Ng, Kenneth K H; Pease, Shirley S; Zhang, Jingli A; Damle, Sagar S; Freedman, George; Siu, Sharmayne; Bernstein, Irwin D; Elowitz, Michael B; Rothenberg, Ellen V

    2016-08-01

    During T cell development, multipotent progenitors relinquish competence for other fates and commit to the T cell lineage by turning on Bcl11b, which encodes a transcription factor. To clarify lineage commitment mechanisms, we followed developing T cells at the single-cell level using Bcl11b knock-in fluorescent reporter mice. Notch signaling and Notch-activated transcription factors collaborate to activate Bcl11b expression irrespectively of Notch-dependent proliferation. These inputs work via three distinct, asynchronous mechanisms: an early locus 'poising' function dependent on TCF-1 and GATA-3, a stochastic-permissivity function dependent on Notch signaling, and a separate amplitude-control function dependent on Runx1, a factor already present in multipotent progenitors. Despite their necessity for Bcl11b expression, these inputs act in a stage-specific manner, providing a multitiered mechanism for developmental gene regulation. PMID:27376470

  4. Introduction of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Activities to Reflect Lessons Learned from Fukushima Nuclear Accident

    The Charter requires the staff to highlight potential policy issues for the Commission and provide the Commission every 6 months an update on the review work conducted under the Charter. The recent status of NRC's activities and related program to reflect the lesson-learned from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant's severe accident are introduced in this paper. A wide variety of the U.S. NRC's activities to reflect lessons learned from the Fukushima nuclear accidents was investigated. From the investigation, it was found that most of NRC's activities, based on the Fukushima Near-Term Task Force (NTTF) recommendations, are being implemented in a comprehensive and systematic manner. The NRC staff initially prioritized the NTTF recommendations based on its judgment of the potential and relative safety enhancement which could be realized by each. As a result of the staff's prioritization and assessment process, the NTTF recommendations were prioritized into three tiers (i.e., Tier 1, 2 and 3). Tier 1 recommendations are which the staff determined should be started without unnecessary delay and for which sufficient resource flexibility, including availability of critical skill sets, exists. Tier 2 recommendations are which could not be initiated in the near term due to factors that include the need for further technical assessment and alignment, dependence on Tier 1 issues, or availability of critical skill sets. Tier 3 recommendations are that require further staff study to support a regulatory action, have an associated shorter term action that needs to be completed to inform the longer-term action, are dependent on the availability of critical skill sets, or are dependent on the resolution of NTTF Recommendation 1. Through the implementation of each tier activities, existing layers of defense in depth are expected to be gradually bolstered, and such a regulatory approach is much similar in the other countries. It was also found that

  5. Statistical modelling of masked gene regulatory pathway changes across microarray studies of interferon gamma activated macrophages

    Forster, Thorsten

    2014-01-01

    Interferon gamma (IFN-γ) regulation of macrophages plays an essential role in innate immunity and pathogenicity of viral infections by directing large and small genome-wide changes in the transcriptional program of macrophages. Smaller changes at the transcriptional level are difficult to detect but can have profound biological effects, motivating the hypothesis of this thesis that responses of macrophages to immune activation by IFN-γ include small quantitative changes that are m...

  6. Synergistic transcriptional activation by one regulatory protein in response to two metabolites

    Bundy, Becky M.; Collier, Lauren S.; Hoover, Timothy R.; Neidle, Ellen L.

    2002-01-01

    BenM is a LysR-type bacterial transcriptional regulator that controls aromatic compound degradation in Acinetobacter sp. ADP1. Here, in vitro transcription assays demonstrated that two metabolites of aromatic compound catabolism, benzoate and cis,cis-muconate, act synergistically to activate gene expression. The level of BenM-regulated benA transcription was significantly higher in response to both compounds than the combined levels due to each alone. These compounds also were more effective ...

  7. Familial autoinflammation with neutrophilic dermatosis reveals a regulatory mechanism of pyrin activation.

    Masters, Seth L; Lagou, Vasiliki; Jéru, Isabelle; Baker, Paul J; Van Eyck, Lien; Parry, David A; Lawless, Dylan; De Nardo, Dominic; Garcia-Perez, Josselyn E; Dagley, Laura F; Holley, Caroline L; Dooley, James; Moghaddas, Fiona; Pasciuto, Emanuela; Jeandel, Pierre-Yves; Sciot, Raf; Lyras, Dena; Webb, Andrew I; Nicholson, Sandra E; De Somer, Lien; van Nieuwenhove, Erika; Ruuth-Praz, Julia; Copin, Bruno; Cochet, Emmanuelle; Medlej-Hashim, Myrna; Megarbane, Andre; Schroder, Kate; Savic, Sinisa; Goris, An; Amselem, Serge; Wouters, Carine; Liston, Adrian

    2016-03-30

    Pyrin responds to pathogen signals and loss of cellular homeostasis by forming an inflammasome complex that drives the cleavage and secretion of interleukin-1β (IL-1β). Mutations in the B30.2/SPRY domain cause pathogen-independent activation of pyrin and are responsible for the autoinflammatory disease familial Mediterranean fever (FMF). We studied a family with a dominantly inherited autoinflammatory disease, distinct from FMF, characterized by childhood-onset recurrent episodes of neutrophilic dermatosis, fever, elevated acute-phase reactants, arthralgia, and myalgia/myositis. The disease was caused by a mutation in MEFV, the gene encoding pyrin (S242R). The mutation results in the loss of a 14-3-3 binding motif at phosphorylated S242, which was not perturbed by FMF mutations in the B30.2/SPRY domain. However, loss of both S242 phosphorylation and 14-3-3 binding was observed for bacterial effectors that activate the pyrin inflammasome, such as Clostridium difficile toxin B (TcdB). The S242R mutation thus recapitulated the effect of pathogen sensing, triggering inflammasome activation and IL-1β production. Successful therapy targeting IL-1β has been initiated in one patient, resolving pyrin-associated autoinflammation with neutrophilic dermatosis. This disease provides evidence that a guard-like mechanism of pyrin regulation, originally identified for Nod-like receptors in plant innate immunity, also exists in humans. PMID:27030597

  8. GTP cyclohydrolase I expression, protein, and activity determine intracellular tetrahydrobiopterin levels, independent of GTP cyclohydrolase feedback regulatory protein expression.

    Tatham, Amy L; Crabtree, Mark J; Warrick, Nicholas; Cai, Shijie; Alp, Nicholas J; Channon, Keith M

    2009-05-15

    GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH) is a key enzyme in the synthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), a required cofactor for nitricoxide synthases and aromatic amino acid hydroxylases. Alterations of GTPCH activity and BH4 availability play an important role in human disease. GTPCH expression is regulated by inflammatory stimuli, in association with reduced expression of GTP cyclohydrolase feedback regulatory protein (GFRP). However, the relative importance of GTPCH expression versus GTPCH activity and the role of GFRP in relation to BH4 bioavailability remain uncertain. We investigated these relationships in a cell line with tet-regulated GTPCH expression and in the hph-1 mouse model of GTPCH deficiency. Doxycycline exposure resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in GTPCH protein and activity, with a strong correlation between GTPCH expression and BH4 levels (r(2) = 0.85, p GFRP expression or protein levels. GFRP overexpression and knockdown in tet-GCH cells did not alter GTPCH activity or BH4 levels, and GTPCH-specific knockdown in sEnd.1 endothelial cells had no effect on GFRP protein. In mouse liver we observed a graded reduction of GTPCH expression, protein, and activity, from wild type, heterozygote, to homozygote littermates, with a striking linear correlation between GTPCH expression and BH4 levels (r(2) = 0.82, p GFRP expression nor protein differed between wild type, heterozygote, nor homozygote mice, despite the substantial differences in BH4. We suggest that GTPCH expression is the primary regulator of BH4 levels, and changes in GTPCH or BH4 are not necessarily accompanied by changes in GFRP expression. PMID:19286659

  9. Aromatic inhibitors derived from ammonia-pretreated lignocellulose hinder bacterial ethanologenesis by activating regulatory circuits controlling inhibitor efflux and detoxification

    David H. Keating

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Efficient microbial conversion of lignocellulosic hydrolysates to biofuels is a key barrier to the economically viable deployment of lignocellulosic biofuels. A chief contributor to this barrier is the impact on microbial processes and energy metabolism of lignocellulose-derived inhibitors, including phenolic carboxylates, phenolic amides (for ammonia-pretreated biomass, phenolic aldehydes, and furfurals. To understand the bacterial pathways induced by inhibitors present in ammonia-pretreated biomass hydrolysates, which are less well studied than acid-pretreated biomass hydrolysates, we developed and exploited synthetic mimics of ammonia-pretreated corn stover hydrolysate (ACSH. To determine regulatory responses to the inhibitors normally present in ACSH, we measured transcript and protein levels in an Escherichia coli ethanologen using RNA-seq and quantitative proteomics during fermentation to ethanol of synthetic hydrolysates containing or lacking the inhibitors. Our study identified four major regulators mediating these responses, the MarA/SoxS/Rob network, AaeR, FrmR, and YqhC. Induction of these regulons was correlated with a reduced rate of ethanol production, buildup of pyruvate, depletion of ATP and NAD(PH, and an inhibition of xylose conversion. The aromatic aldehyde inhibitor 5-hydroxymethylfurfural appeared to be reduced to its alcohol form by the ethanologen during fermentation whereas phenolic acid and amide inhibitors were not metabolized. Together, our findings establish that the major regulatory responses to lignocellulose-derived inhibitors are mediated by transcriptional rather than translational regulators, suggest that energy consumed for inhibitor efflux and detoxification may limit biofuel production, and identify a network of regulators for future synthetic biology efforts.

  10. Nuclear legislation: analytical study. Regulatory and institutional framework for nuclear activities

    Australia' s basic legislation in the nuclear field consists in five Acts passed by the Federal Parliament. These Acts are as follow: the South Pacific nuclear free zone treaty Act; the nuclear non-proliferation act; the Australian nuclear science and technology organisation act; the Australian nuclear science and technology organisation amendment act; the radiation protection and nuclear safety act. The two first Acts were prompted by the need for domestic legislation to implement Australia 's international obligations. The third arose from a long-standing recognition that the Atomic energy Act was inappropriate as the legislative basis for the activities of Australia 's national nuclear organisation. For its part the fourth Act introduced some necessary changes into the Australian nuclear science and technology organisation Act. Finally, the fifth act establishes a regime to regulate the operation of nuclear installations and the management of radiation sources, where the activities are undertaken by Commonwealth entities. Each of these Acts is discussed in more details in this work. (N.C.)

  11. A Survey of 6,300 Genomic Fragments for cis-Regulatory Activity in the Imaginal Discs of Drosophila melanogaster

    Aurélie Jory

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Over 6,000 fragments from the genome of Drosophila melanogaster were analyzed for their ability to drive expression of GAL4 reporter genes in the third-instar larval imaginal discs. About 1,200 reporter genes drove expression in the eye, antenna, leg, wing, haltere, or genital imaginal discs. The patterns ranged from large regions to individual cells. About 75% of the active fragments drove expression in multiple discs; 20% were expressed in ventral, but not dorsal, discs (legs, genital, and antenna, whereas ∼23% were expressed in dorsal but not ventral discs (wing, haltere, and eye. Several patterns, for example, within the leg chordotonal organ, appeared a surprisingly large number of times. Unbiased searches for DNA sequence motifs suggest candidate transcription factors that may regulate enhancers with shared activities. Together, these expression patterns provide a valuable resource to the community and offer a broad overview of how transcriptional regulatory information is distributed in the Drosophila genome.

  12. Regulatory management of NORM wastes from petroleum exploration activities in the Northern Territory

    During September 1996, history was made with what the authors believe to be the first Australian sub-seafloor disposal of NORM scale resulting from petroleum exploration activities. Approximately 800 kg of scale with a maximum 226RaT228Ra activity concentration of 600 kBq.kg-1 was disposed off via downhole well injection to and concrete capping of a dry exploration well. This scale material was removed from pipework which had measured external surface dose rates in excess of 30 μSv.hr-1. Subsequent disposals have occurred in accordance with strictly applied radiation protection requirements and in accordance with the legislative framework applicable to such activities in the offshore waters regulated by the Northern Territory in conjunction with the Commonwealth Government, which are briefly described. A summary of NORM disposals that have taken place to date in the Northern Territory is also provided. NORM scale accretes in pipework due to changes in the conditions of formation water associated with oil deposits. Radium isotopes and their decay products exist in the formation water of oil reservoirs, particularly in the Middle and Lower Jurassic formations which together account for 70% of the production operations around the world that experience the formation of radioactive scale. During the first major scale removal exercise it was found that scale build up in the pipes ranged between 11 mm and 42 mm reducing the internal diameter from a nominal 203 mm to 120 mm. The average production rate prior to descaling operations was around 1,700 m3 of crude per day, rising to around 2,500 m3 per day post-descaling. The effect of scale removal on productivity is the principle driving force for its removal. The Northern Territory Department of Mines and Energy and Territory Health Services reviewed all aspects of proposals and reached agreement with the client on all aspects prior to issuing approvals under the Petroleum (Submerged Lands) Act and the Radiation (Safety

  13. Self-Regulatory Processes Mediating between Career Calling and Perceived Employability and Life Satisfaction in Emerging Adults

    Praskova, Anna; Creed, Peter A.; Hood, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    We tested a cross-sectional, mediation model of career calling, in which career calling was associated positively with life satisfaction and perceptions of future employability, and these relationships were explained by the self-regulatory mechanisms of work effort, career strategies, and emotional regulation. Using a sample of 664 emerging adults…

  14. 77 FR 33253 - Regulatory Guide 8.24, Revision 2, Health Physics Surveys During Enriched Uranium-235 Processing...

    2012-06-05

    ...- 8040 on March 22, 2010 (75 FR 13599). This guide specifies the types and frequencies of surveys that... March 22, 2010, DG-8040 was published with a request for public comments (75 FR 13599). The public... COMMISSION Regulatory Guide 8.24, Revision 2, Health Physics Surveys During Enriched Uranium-235...

  15. Ginsenoside Rp1 Exerts Anti-inflammatory Effects via Activation of Dendritic Cells and Regulatory T Cells.

    Bae, Jingyu; Koo, Jihye; Kim, Soochan; Park, Tae-Yoon; Kim, Mi-Yeon

    2012-10-01

    Ginsenoside Rp1 (G-Rp1) is a saponin derivate that provides anti-metastatic activities through inhibition of the NF-κB pathway. In this study, we examined the effects of G-Rp1 on regulatory T cell (Treg) activation. After treatment of splenocytes with G-Rp1, Tregs exhibited upregulation of IL-10 expression, and along with dendritic cells (DCs), these Tregs showed increased cell number compared to other cell populations. The effect of G-Rp1 on Treg number was augmented in the presence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), which mimics pathological changes that occur during inflammation. However, depletion of DCs prevented the increase in Treg number in the presence of G-Rp1 and/or LPS. In addition, G-Rp1 promoted the differentiation of the memory types of CD4(+)Foxp3(+)CD62L(low) Tregs rather than the generation of new Tregs. In vivo experiments also demonstrated that Tregs and DCs from mice that were fed G-Rp1 for 7 d and then injected with LPS exhibited increased activation compared with those from mice that were injected with LPS alone. Expression of TGF-β and CTLA4 in Tregs was increased, and upregulation of IL-2 and CD80/ CD86 expression by DCs affected the suppressive function of Tregs through IL-2 receptors and CTLA4. These data demonstrate that G-Rp1 exerts anti-inflammatory effects by activating Tregs in vitro and in vivo. PMID:23717139

  16. Process of activation of a palladium catalyst system

    Sobolevskiy, Anatoly; Rossin, Joseph A.; Knapke, Michael J.

    2011-08-02

    Improved processes for activating a catalyst system used for the reduction of nitrogen oxides are provided. In one embodiment, the catalyst system is activated by passing an activation gas stream having an amount of each of oxygen, water vapor, nitrogen oxides, and hydrogen over the catalyst system and increasing a temperature of the catalyst system to a temperature of at least 180.degree. C. at a heating rate of from 1-20.degree./min. Use of activation processes described herein leads to a catalyst system with superior NOx reduction capabilities.

  17. Nuclear legislation. Analytical study: regulatory and institutional framework for nuclear activities

    This study is part of the series of analytical studies of the major aspects of nuclear legislation in OECD Member countries, prepared by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) with the co-operation of the appropriate services of countries concerned. The first study, published in 1967, dealt with national legislations concerning nuclear third party liability. Since then, several studies on other aspects of nuclear law (e.g., transport, radiation protection, trade, etc) in Member countries have been issued. Each study is based, to the extent possible, on a standardised plan of all countries, allowing an easier retrieval and comparison of the information contained. Periodical updates are also issued in order to help the reader keep abreast of amendments in national nuclear laws and regulations, such s the revision of the study on nuclear third party liability, in 1990. The reader will find a revised and expanded version of the 1983-1984 study reflecting new changes in nuclear law and encompassing new Member countries to the OECD since then. This new version reviews the body of regulations governing nuclear activities in the OECD area as well as the institutional framework in which such regulations are applied in each country. This study is based on information available to the NEA Secretariat as of May 1995, and neither the Secretariat nor national authorities concerned assume any liability for it. It is published under the responsibility of the Secretary-General of the OECD. (author)

  18. Below Regulatory Concern Owners Group: An evaluation of dry active waste sorting: Final report

    The objective of this research was to determine the accuracy of manual inspection of Dry Active Waste (DAW). Three studies were conducted at two nuclear power plants in which unmodified DAW waste streams of roughly 10,000 items each were inspected by technicians using pancake probes. Sorting performance was measured unobtrusively by intercepting the ''outflow'' from inspection stations. Verification of sorting accuracy was performed with a prototype, semi-automated sorting table employing a matrix of fixed plastic scintillation detectors. More than 30,000 items of trash were examined, classified, counted, and verified, and the composition of the ''inflow'' to the inspection stations was determined by reconstructing the ''outflow'' components, as determined during verification procedures. The results showed that between 1 and 19% of all items in each of the three DAW waste streams were contaminated at levels ≥100 ccpm. Sixty-two percent of the ''contaminated'' items in Study I, 87% of the contaminated items in Study II, and 97% of the contaminated items in Study III were detected. One-half to one percent of all items classified as <100 ccpm by technicians were actually ≥100 ccpm. False positive rates were very high in all three studies. The production rates and accuracy obtained on the semi-automated plastic scintillation sorting table used during the verification stages of this project greatly exceeded the rates for manual sorting. 9 figs., 13 tabs

  19. Acyl-homoserine Lactone from Saccharum × officinarum with Stereochemistry-Dependent Growth Regulatory Activity.

    Olher, Vanessa G A; Ferreira, Nagela P; Souza, Alan G; Chiavelli, Lucas U R; Teixeira, Aline F; Santos, Wanderley D; Santin, Silvana M O; Ferrarese Filho, Osvaldo; Silva, Cleuza C; Pomini, Armando M

    2016-05-27

    Acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs) are a class of compounds produced by Gram-negative bacteria that are used in a process of chemical communication called quorum sensing. Much is known about how bacteria use these chemical compounds to control the expression of important factors; however, there have been few reports about the presence and effects of AHLs in plants. In this study, the phytochemical study of leaves and culms of sugar cane (Saccharum × officinarum) led to the identification of N-(3-oxo-octanoyl)homoserine lactone. Since the absolute configuration of the natural product could not be determined, both R and S enantiomers of N-(3-oxo-octanoyl)homoserine lactone were synthesized and tested in sugar cane culms. The enantiomers caused changes in the mass and length of buds and roots when used at micromolar concentrations. Using the sugar cane RB96-6928 variety, the S enantiomer increased sprouting of roots more effectively than the R enantiomer. Furthermore, scanning electron microscopy showed that both the R and S enantiomers led to more stretched root cells compared with the control. PMID:27192014

  20. PEDAGOGICAL TOOLS IN PROVIDING INCLUSIVE ACTIVE LEARNING PROCESS

    Tupitsa, E.

    2014-01-01

    In the publication it is described pedagogical tools while providing inclusive active learning process of children with special educational needs; it is defined the key characteristics of the teacher as mediator; it is determined the main hints of cooperative learning

  1. Predictive Active Set Selection Methods for Gaussian Processes

    Henao, Ricardo; Winther, Ole

    2012-01-01

    We propose an active set selection framework for Gaussian process classification for cases when the dataset is large enough to render its inference prohibitive. Our scheme consists of a two step alternating procedure of active set update rules and hyperparameter optimization based upon marginal...... active set parameters that directly control its complexity. We also provide both theoretical and empirical support for our active set selection strategy being a good approximation of a full Gaussian process classifier. Our extensive experiments show that our approach can compete with state...... likelihood maximization. The active set update rules rely on the ability of the predictive distributions of a Gaussian process classifier to estimate the relative contribution of a datapoint when being either included or removed from the model. This means that we can use it to include points with potentially...

  2. Activation and Recruitment of Regulatory T Cells via Chemokine Receptor Activation in Trichinella spiralis-Infected Mice.

    Ahn, Jeong-Bin; Kang, Shin Ae; Kim, Dong-Hee; Yu, Hak Sun

    2016-04-01

    As most infections by the helminth parasite elicit the recruitment of CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) T (Treg) cells, many scientists have suggested that these cells could be used for the treatment of immune-mediated inflammation and associated diseases. In order to investigate the distribution and alteration of activated Treg cells, we compared the expression levels of Treg cell activation markers in the ileum and gastrocnemius tissues 1, 2, and 4 weeks after infection. The number of Treg cells was monitored using GFP-coded Foxp3 transgenic mice. In mice at 1 week after Trichinella spiralis infection, the number of activated Treg cells was higher than in the control group. In mice at 2 weeks after infection, there was a significant increase in the number of cells expressing Foxp3 and CTLA-4 when compared to the control group and mice at 1 week after infection. At 4 weeks after infection, T. spiralis was easily identifiable in nurse cells in mouse muscles. In the intestine, the expression of Gzmb and Klrg1 decreased over time and that of Capg remained unchanged for the first and second week, then decreased in the 4th week. However, in the muscles, the expression of most chemokine genes was increased due to T. spiralis infection, in particular the expression levels of Gzmb, OX40, and CTLA-4 increased until week 4. In addition, increased gene expression of all chemokine receptors in muscle, CXCR3, CCR4, CCR5, CCR9, and CCR10, was observed up until the 4th week. In conclusion, various chemokine receptors showed increased expressions combined with recruitment of Treg cells in the muscle tissue. PMID:27180574

  3. Relationship of T regulatory cells content, activity and serum autoantibodies level in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus receiving rituximab

    A V Torgashina

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To reveal changes of CD+CD25+FoxP3+ T-regulatory cells (T-reg number in pts with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE receiving rituximab and to assess relationship T reg content with changes of disease activity and serum autoantibodies level during treatment. Material and methods. 12 pts with definite SLE were included. Pts were examined before treatment, after 1, 3 and 6 months. Besides routine laboratory tests anti-double-stranded DNA antibodies, B lymphocytes and T reg cells number was evaluated with flow-cytometry. SLE activity was assessed with SLEDAI 2K scale. Rituximab 500 mg was administered every week iv during 4 weeks. 4 pts received combined treatment with cyclophosphan. Results. Mean age of pts was 30,5±9,8 years (Me 31 years, varied from 18 to 49 years, disease duration varied from 7 to 148 months. T reg number before treatment was not decreased and did not correlated with anti-DNA antibodies level. T reg markers (Foxp3+, CD25+, CD4+CD25+ changes and values of SLE activity on SLEDAI 2K after the end of treatment correlated with presence of clinical response to treatment with rituximab in 3 months. Binary logistic regression model including 4 above mentioned predictors in total allows predicting correctly clinical response to therapy in 83% of cases. Conclusion. Changes of CD25+, CD4+CD25+, CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ T-cells number immediately after the end of treatment with rituximab correlated with clinical effect of the treatment and determined subsequent response to anti-B cell therapy.

  4. XCL1 Enhances Regulatory Activities of CD4+CD25highCD127low/− T Cells in Human Allergic Asthma1

    Nguyen, Khoa D.; Fohner, Alison; Booker, Jerome D.; Dong, Chen; Krensky, Alan M.; Nadeau, Kari C.

    2008-01-01

    Chemokine-mediated recruitment of regulatory cell subsets to the airway during inflammation and enhancement of their activities are potential strategies for therapeutic development in allergic asthma (AA). In this study, we aim to explore the role of XCL1, a chemokine associated with immune suppression and allergy, on CD4+CD25highCD127low/− regulatory T cell (Treg) function in AA. Flow cytometry and PCR analysis showed a reduction in XCL1 and XCR1 expression in AA Treg compared with healthy c...

  5. Formal Verification of Effectiveness of Control Activities in Business Processes

    Arimoto, Yasuhito; Iida, Shusaku; Futatsugi, Kokichi

    It has been an important issue to deal with risks in business processes for achieving companies' goals. This paper introduces a method for applying a formal method to analysis of risks and control activities in business processes in order to evaluate control activities consistently, exhaustively, and to give us potential to have scientific discussion on the result of the evaluation. We focus on document flows in business activities and control activities and risks related to documents because documents play important roles in business. In our method, document flows including control activities are modeled and it is verified by OTS/CafeOBJ Method that risks about falsification of documents are avoided by control activities in the model. The verification is done by interaction between humans and CafeOBJ system with theorem proving, and it raises potential to discuss the result scientifically because the interaction gives us rigorous reasons why the result is derived from the verification.

  6. Report on activities of Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic and safety of nuclear installations in the Slovak Republic in 1997. Annual report 1997

    A brief account of activities carried out by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic (NRA SR) in 1997 is presented. These activities are reported under the headings: (1) Foreword; (2) Role of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic; (3) Supervisory and assessment activities in activities; (3.1) NPP V-1 Bohunice; (3.2) NPP V-2 Bohunice; (3.3) NPP Mochovce; (3.4) NPP A-1 Bohunice; (3.5) Radioactive wastes repository in Mochovce; (3.6) Interim spent fuel storage in Jaslovske Bohunice; (4) Nuclear materials and physical protection; (5) Radioactive wastes; (6) Quality assurance; (7) Personnel qualification and training; (8) Emergency management; (9) Legislation; (10) International co-operation; (11) Public information; (12) Conclusions; (13) Appendices

  7. Campylobacter jejuni adenosine triphosphate phosphoribosyltransferase is an active hexamer that is allosterically controlled by the twisting of a regulatory tail.

    Mittelstädt, Gerd; Moggré, Gert-Jan; Panjikar, Santosh; Nazmi, Ali Reza; Parker, Emily J

    2016-08-01

    Adenosine triphosphate phosphoribosyltransferase (ATP-PRT) catalyzes the first committed step of the histidine biosynthesis in plants and microorganisms. Here, we present the functional and structural characterization of the ATP-PRT from the pathogenic ε-proteobacteria Campylobacter jejuni (CjeATP-PRT). This enzyme is a member of the long form (HisGL ) ATP-PRT and is allosterically inhibited by histidine, which binds to a remote regulatory domain, and competitively inhibited by AMP. In the crystalline form, CjeATP-PRT was found to adopt two distinctly different hexameric conformations, with an open homohexameric structure observed in the presence of substrate ATP, and a more compact closed form present when inhibitor histidine is bound. CjeATP-PRT was observed to adopt only a hexameric quaternary structure in solution, contradicting previous hypotheses favoring an allosteric mechanism driven by an oligomer equilibrium. Instead, this study supports the conclusion that the ATP-PRT long form hexamer is the active species; the tightening of this structure in response to remote histidine binding results in an inhibited enzyme. PMID:27191057

  8. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) paralog dose governs T cell effector and regulatory functions

    Villarino, Alejandro; Laurence, Arian; Robinson, Gertraud W; Bonelli, Michael; Dema, Barbara; Afzali, Behdad; Shih, Han-Yu; Sun, Hong-Wei; Brooks, Stephen R; Hennighausen, Lothar; Kanno, Yuka; O'Shea, John J

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor STAT5 is fundamental to the mammalian immune system. However, the relationship between its two paralogs, STAT5A and STAT5B, and the extent to which they are functionally distinct, remain uncertain. Using mouse models of paralog deficiency, we demonstrate that they are not equivalent for CD4+ 'helper' T cells, the principal orchestrators of adaptive immunity. Instead, we find that STAT5B is dominant for both effector and regulatory (Treg) responses and, therefore, uniquely necessary for immunological tolerance. Comparative analysis of genomic distribution and transcriptomic output confirm that STAT5B has fargreater impact but, surprisingly, the data point towards asymmetric expression (i.e. paralog dose), rather than distinct functional properties, as the key distinguishing feature. Thus, we propose a quantitative model of STAT5 paralog activity whereby relative abundance imposes functional specificity (or dominance) in the face of widespread structural homology. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08384.001 PMID:26999798

  9. Dempster-Shafer theory applied to regulatory decision process for selecting safer alternatives to toxic chemicals in consumer products.

    Park, SJ; Ogunseitan, OA; Lejano, RP

    2014-01-01

    Regulatory agencies often face a dilemma when regulating chemicals in consumer products-namely, that of making decisions in the face of multiple, and sometimes conflicting, lines of evidence. We present an integrative approach for dealing with uncertainty and multiple pieces of evidence in toxics regulation. The integrative risk analytic framework is grounded in the Dempster-Shafer (D-S) theory that allows the analyst to combine multiple pieces of evidence and judgments from independent sourc...

  10. Improvement of enterprise activities based on process management

    Łuczak, Ja.

    2015-01-01

    Process management has been increasingly popular for several years now, yet most frequently it is limited to fragmentary actions, at times even to declarative activity. Few organizations have brought their management systems in conformity with the idea of process management; more frequently some particular actions within the range of process approach may be observed. Specialization allows efficient realizations of tasks; however, it separates individual organizational unities and amount...

  11. Process technology activities at the Software Engineering Institute

    Christie, A.M. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    This paper provides a brief overview of the rationale for, and direction of the software process technology work being pursued at the Software Engineering Institute. The paper then describes some of the activities that the SEI has recently been involved in. Finally, it relates in more detail an example of one specific effort; namely the development of a process modeling formalism and its use in process simulation.

  12. Integrative analysis of the transcriptome and targetome identifies the regulatory network of miR-16: an inhibitory role against the activation of hepatic stellate cells.

    Pan, Qin; Guo, Canjie; Sun, Chao; Fan, Jiangao; Fang, Chunhua

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic stellate cell (HSC) activation is the critical event of liver fibrosis. Abnormality of miR-16 expression induces their activation. However, the action model of miR-16 remains to be elucidated because of its multiple-targeted manner. Here, we report that miR-16 restoration exerted a wide-range impact on transcriptome (2,082 differentially expressed transcripts) of activated HSCs. Integrative analysis of both targetome (1,195 targets) and transcriptome uncovered the miR-16 regulatory network based upon bio-molecular interaction databases (BIND, BioGrid, Tranfac, and KEGG), cross database searching with iterative algorithm, Dijkstra's algorithm with greedy method, etc. Eight targets in the targetome (Map2k1, Bmpr1b, Nf1, Pik3r3, Ppp2r1a, Prkca, Smad2, and Sos2) served as key regulatory network nodes that mediate miR-16 action. A set of TFs (Sp1, Jun, Crebl, Arnt, Fos, and Nf1) was recognized to be the functional layer of key nodes, which mapped the signal of miR-16 to transcriptome. In result, the comprehensive action of miR-16 abrogated transcriptomic characteristics that determined the phenotypes of activated HSCs, including active proliferation, ECM deposition, and apoptosis resistance. Therefore, a multi-layer regulatory network based upon the integration of targetome and transcriptome may underlie the global action of miR-16, which suggesting it plays an inhibitory role in HSC activation. PMID:25227104

  13. Regulatory Authorities for Radiation Protection: A Comparison

    Full text: Concerning the law, some countries have basic legislation compatible with the BSS (Basic Safety Standard). Some countries are in the process of adopting such laws. In some countries, more than one law concerning radiation protection has been introduced, while in a few countries, the existing laws will be modified or amended soon in order to improve the position of the Regulatory Authority. In some countries the regulatory control is independent but in some cases the Ministry of Health is still in this control. There are also cases where the Regulatory Authority is located in Ministry of Health but legal mechanisms exist to ensure effective independence of the Regulatory Authority. The number of staff of the Regulatory Authority also differs from one country to another. In some cases Regulatory Authorities are actively involved in supporting services, for instance individual monitoring, which can be carried out by outside authorised laboratories. Notification, authorisation, inspection and enforcement is effective in some countries while in other countries those are in developing process. Concerning occupational exposure control, some countries have fully implemented individual monitoring and the other are partially operational. Workplace monitoring still needs some improvement. (author)

  14. International regulatory activities

    The 43 rd Session of the IAEA General Conference was held in Vienna from 27 September to 1 October 1999 with delegations from 11 member states and representatives of various international organisations in attendance. Resolutions were adopted inter alia in the following areas: nuclear radiation and waste safety; strengthening IAEA technical co-operation; strengthening the IAEA's safeguards system; safeguards in the democratic people's republic of Korea; non proliferation safeguards in the middle east; illicit trafficking in nuclear materials and nuclear inspections in Iraq. The second part deals with the regulation laying down detailed rules for the application of the 1990 regulation on imports of agricultural products originating in third countries following the Chernobyl accident and recommendation on a classification system for solid radioactive waste. (A.L.B.)

  15. Regulatory Cell Populations in Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis (RRMS) Patients: Effect of Disease Activity and Treatment Regimens.

    Rodi, Maria; Dimisianos, Nikolaos; de Lastic, Anne-Lise; Sakellaraki, Panagiota; Deraos, George; Matsoukas, John; Papathanasopoulos, Panagiotis; Mouzaki, Athanasia

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS) of autoimmune etiology that results from an imbalance between CNS-specific T effector cells and peripheral suppressive mechanisms mediated by regulatory cells (RC). In this research, we collected blood samples from 83 relapsing remitting MS (RRMS) patients and 45 healthy persons (HC), to assess the sizes of their RC populations, including CD4⁺CD25(high)Foxp3⁺ (nTregs), CD3⁺CD4⁺HLA(-)G⁺, CD3⁺CD8⁺CD28(-), CD3⁺CD56⁺, and CD56(bright) cells, and how RC are affected by disease activity (acute phase or remission) and types of treatment (methylprednisolone, interferon, or natalizumab). In addition, we isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and cultured them with peptides mapping to myelin antigens, to determine RC responsiveness to autoantigens. The results showed decreased levels of nTregs in patients in the acute phase ± methylprednisolone and in remission + natalizumab, but HC levels in patients in remission or receiving interferon. Patients + interferon had the highest levels of CD3⁺CD4⁺HLA(-)G⁺ and CD3⁺CD8⁺CD28(-) RC, and patients in the acute phase + methylprednisolone the lowest. Patients in remission had the highest levels of CD3⁺CD56⁺, and patients in remission + natalizumab the highest levels of CD56(bright) cells. Only nTregs responded to autoantigens in culture, regardless of disease activity or treatment. The highest suppressive activity was exhibited by nTregs from patients in remission. In conclusion, in RRMS disease activity and type of treatment affect different RC populations. nTregs respond to myelin antigens, indicating that it is possible to restore immunological tolerance through nTreg induction. PMID:27571060

  16. Regulatory Models and the Environment: Practice, Pitfalls, and Prospects

    Holmes, K. John; Graham, Judith A.; McKone, Thomas; Whipple, Chris

    2008-06-01

    Computational models support environmental regulatory activities by providing the regulator an ability to evaluate available knowledge, assess alternative regulations, and provide a framework to assess compliance. But all models face inherent uncertainties, because human and natural systems are always more complex and heterogeneous than can be captured in a model. Here we provide a summary discussion of the activities, findings, and recommendations of the National Research Council's Committee on Regulatory Environmental Models, a committee funded by the US Environmental Protection Agency to provide guidance on the use of computational models in the regulatory process. Modeling is a difficult enterprise even outside of the potentially adversarial regulatory environment. The demands grow when the regulatory requirements for accountability, transparency, public accessibility, and technical rigor are added to the challenges. Moreover, models cannot be validated (declared true) but instead should be evaluated with regard to their suitability as tools to address a specific question. The committee concluded that these characteristics make evaluation of a regulatory model more complex than simply comparing measurement data with model results. Evaluation also must balance the need for a model to be accurate with the need for a model to be reproducible, transparent, and useful for the regulatory decision at hand. Meeting these needs requires model evaluation to be applied over the"life cycle" of a regulatory model with an approach that includes different forms of peer review, uncertainty analysis, and extrapolation methods than for non-regulatory models.

  17. Active Shop Scheduling Of Production Process Based On RFID Technology

    Cuihua Chao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In industry 4.0 environment, intelligent technology is almost applied to all parts of the manufacturing process, such as process design, job shop scheduling, etc.. This paper presents an efficient approach to job shop scheduling actively by using RFID to collect real-time manufacturing data. Identified the workpiece by RFID which needs to be machined, it can “ask for” the resource actively for the following process. With these active asking-for strategy, a double genetically encoded improved genetic algorithm is proposed for achieving active job shop scheduling solution during the actual manufacturing process. A case was used to evaluate its effectiveness. Meanwhile, , it can effectively and actively carry out job shop scheduling and has much better convergence effect comparing with basic genetic algorithm. And the job shop scheduler in management center can use the proposed algorithm to get the satisfied scheduling result timely by reducing waiting time and making begin time earlier during transmission between manufacturing process, which makes the scheduling result feasible and accurate.

  18. Report on Activities of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic and on Safety of Nuclear Installations in the Slovak Republic in 2005. Annual report 2005

    A brief account of activities carried out by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic in 2005 is presented. These activities are reported under the headings: Foreword; (1) Vision, Mission and Principles of Activities; (2) Legislation; (3) Issuance of Authorisations, Safety Assessment and Enforcement; (4) Nuclear Safety of Nuclear Installations in the Slovak Republic; (4.1) Nuclear installations in operation in the Slovak Republic; (4.2) Nuclear Installations under construction in the Slovak Republic; (4.3) Decommissioning of nuclear installations in the Slovak Republic; (5) Spent Fuel and Radioactive Waste Management and Safety of other Nuclear Installations in the Slovak Republic; (5.1) Generation and minimisation of radioactive waste; (5.2) Management of radioactive waste; (5.3) Pre-disposal management of radioactive waste; (5.4) Disposal of radioactive waste; (5.5) Shipment of radioactive waste; (5.6) Safety of other nuclear installations in the Slovak Republic; (6) Personnel Qualification and Training; (7) Nuclear Materials and Physical Protection of Nuclear installations; (8) Emergency Preparedness; (9) International Co-operation; (10) Public Communication; (11) UJD SR; (11.1) UJD SR organizational chart; (11.2) UJD SR organizational chart; (11.3) Human resources and training; (11.4) Internal system of quality assurance; (11.5) Development of UJD SR regulatory activities; Appendix: Abbreviations; Development of UJD SR regulatory activities

  19. Regulatory regime and its influence in the nuclear safety

    Main elements of nuclear regulatory regime in general is presented. These elements are: national rules and safety regulations, system of nuclear facility licensing, activities of regulatory body. Regulatory body is needed to specify the national safety regulations, review and assess the safety documentation presented to support license application, make inspections to verify fulfilment of safety regulations and license conditions, monitor the quality of work processes of user organization, and to assess whether these processes provide a high safety level, promote high safety culture, promote maintenance and development of national infrastructure relevant to nuclear safety, etc

  20. The regulatory dynamic

    An outline of the activities and efforts expanded by the National Energy Board to adjust to the changing natural gas market was provided in this presentation. The author began by defining the role of the National Energy Board in energy markets. It must ensure the adoption of rules and procedures that result in a more competitive and efficient market. Light-handed regulatory techniques are the norm, and the National Energy Board is now committed to facilitating the availability and flow of information so that all parties know where opportunities exist, the terms offered to buy or sell goods and services, their quality and costs. It will specialize in providing new participants with information on the workings of the market, who the players are, the regulatory processes in place, and how, when and where the market can be accessed. The manner in which the Board deals with information was reviewed, providing examples along the way to clarify some points. Some of the documents produced by the National Energy Board are being reviewed with the intent of making them easier to read and understand. Audio streaming over the Internet is another avenue being pursued to ensure individuals can listen in real time to hearings without having to be present in the room. The National Energy Board is also exploring alternative dispute resolution techniques. Consultation with energy market participants represents another facet of these efforts to be more accessible and responsive

  1. Regulatory Control of Scrap Contaminated with NORM from Mining and Mineral Processing Facilities: A South African Experience

    Overview: In 1993, radioactive scrap was exported from South Africa to the United Kingdom and returned because of the presence of contamination. 38 sites contaminated with radioactive scale from scrap from gold mines. During 1993 only 3 Scrap facilities and 1 smelter obtained licences. Regulatory Challenges: Illegal mining - • Mines were formally not regulated; • During that time some mines used scrap and tailings residue to backfill sinkholes; • Most of these sinkholes are in areas that are outside the scope of regulation; • Illegal mining is currently taking place in these area for scrap and gold

  2. Use of probabilistic safety assessment in the regulatory process. Report of the technical committee meeting. Working material

    A Technical Committee Meeting (TCM) was organized between 5-8 December 1994 to discuss and review the international situation in connection with the use made, whether formally or informally, by regulatory bodies of probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) in the course of their work, and the related question of the use and value of adopting probabilistic safety criteria (PSC) as an aid to judging the results of PSAs. The document includes the output from the four working groups, as well as 11 papers from the 12 papers presented to the TCM. A separate abstract was prepared for each paper. Refs, figs, tabs

  3. Regulatory Interactions of Csr Components: the RNA Binding Protein CsrA Activates csrB Transcription in Escherichia coli

    Gudapaty, Seshagirirao; Suzuki, Kazushi; Wang, Xin; Babitzke, Paul; Romeo, Tony

    2001-01-01

    The global regulator CsrA (carbon storage regulator) of Escherichia coli is a small RNA binding protein that represses various metabolic pathways and processes that are induced in the stationary phase of growth, while it activates certain exponential phase functions. Both repression and activation by CsrA involve posttranscriptional mechanisms, in which CsrA binding to mRNA leads to decreased or increased transcript stability, respectively. CsrA also binds to a small untranslated RNA, CsrB, f...

  4. Aerobic storage under dynamic conditions in activated sludge processes

    Majone, M.; Dircks, K.

    1999-01-01

    In activated sludge processes, several plant configurations (like plug-flow configuration of the aeration tanks, systems with selectors, contact-stabilization processes or SBR processes) impose a concentration gradient of the carbon sources to the biomass. As a consequence, the biomass grows under...... main reference to its relevance on population dynamics in the activated sludge. Possible conceptual approaches to storage modelling are also presented, including both structured and unstructured modelling. (C) 1999 IAWQ Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved....... mechanisms can also contribute to substrate removal, depending on the microbial composition and the previous "history" of the biomass. In this paper the type and the extent of this dynamic response is discussed by review of experimental studies on pure cultures, mixed cultures and activated sludges and with...

  5. Regulatory Effect of Low-Intensity Optical Radiation on Oxygenation of Blood Irradiated In Vivo and Metabolic Processes

    Zalesskaya, G. A.; Laskina, O. V.

    2016-03-01

    For three series of blood samples, we have studied the effect of therapeutic doses of low-intensity optical radiation (LOR) on oxygenation parameters of blood irradiated in vivo, and also on the levels of some metabolites: lactate, glucose, cholesterol. The quality of blood oxygenation was assessed using three parameters: the partial pressure of oxygen pVO2, the oxygen saturation of hemoglobin SVO2, and the oxygen level in arterial and venous blood, varying under the influence of low-intensity optical radiation due to photodissociation of hemoglobin/ligand complexes. We have established that during photohemotherapy (PHT), including extracorporeal, supravascular, and intravenous blood irradiation, positive changes occur in the oxygenation parameters and the metabolite levels, while after the courses of PHT have been completed, the individual changes in such parameters in individual patients were both positive and negative. The regulatory effect of PHT was apparent in the tendency toward a decrease in high initial values and an increase in low initial values both for the oxygenation parameters and for the metabolites; but at the doses recommended for use, PHT had a regulatory but still not a normalizing effect.

  6. Active Cellular Mechanics and Information Processing in the Living Cell

    Rao, M.

    2014-07-01

    I will present our recent work on the organization of signaling molecules on the surface of living cells. Using novel experimental and theoretical approaches we have found that many cell surface receptors are organized as dynamic clusters driven by active currents and stresses generated by the cortical cytoskeleton adjoining the cell surface. We have shown that this organization is optimal for both information processing and computation. In connecting active mechanics in the cell with information processing and computation, we bring together two of the seminal works of Alan Turing.

  7. Lateralized frontal activity for Japanese phonological processing during child development

    Takaaki Goto

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Phonological awareness is essential for reading, and is common to all language systems, including alphabetic languages and Japanese. This cognitive factor develops during childhood, and is thought to be associated with shifts in brain activity. However, the nature of this neurobiological developmental shift is unclear for speakers of Japanese, which is not an alphabetical language. The present study aimed to reveal a shift in brain functions for processing phonological information in native-born Japanese children. We conducted a phonological awareness task and examined hemodynamic activity in 103 children aged 7 to 12 years. While younger children made mistakes and needed more time to sort phonological information in reverse order, older children completed the task quickly and accurately. Additionally, younger children exhibited increased activity in the bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, which may be evidence of immature phonological processing skills. Older children exhibited dominant activity in the left compared with the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, suggesting that they had already acquired phonological processing skills. We also found significant effects of age and lateralized activity on behavioral performance. During earlier stages of development, the degree of left lateralization appears to have a smaller effect on behavioral performance. Conversely, in later stages of development, the degree of left lateralization appears to have a stronger influence on behavioral performance. These initial findings regarding a neurobiological developmental shift in Japanese speakers suggest that common brain regions play a critical role in the development of phonological processing skills among different languages systems, such as Japanese and alphabetical languages.

  8. Low and medium activity solid wastes processing and encapsulation

    This work, carried out under contract with the European Atomic Energy Community, describes the techniques in use for waste management. The activity of low and medium activity solid wastes is from few curies to few tens of curies per cubic meter, they are produced by nuclear facilities and are often complex mixtures. Radioactive wastes are characterized and processing and conditioning are described. Leaching, stability, mechanical resistance and radiolysis of encapsulated wastes are examined. Handling, storage and disposal are treated

  9. Shared Enhancer Activity in the Limbs and Phallus and Functional Divergence of a Limb-Genital cis-Regulatory Element in Snakes.

    Infante, Carlos R; Mihala, Alexandra G; Park, Sungdae; Wang, Jialiang S; Johnson, Kenji K; Lauderdale, James D; Menke, Douglas B

    2015-10-12

    The amniote phallus and limbs differ dramatically in their morphologies but share patterns of signaling and gene expression in early development. Thus far, the extent to which genital and limb transcriptional networks also share cis-regulatory elements has remained unexplored. We show that many limb enhancers are retained in snake genomes, suggesting that these elements may function in non-limb tissues. Consistent with this, our analysis of cis-regulatory activity in mice and Anolis lizards reveals that patterns of enhancer activity in embryonic limbs and genitalia overlap heavily. In mice, deletion of HLEB, an enhancer of Tbx4, produces defects in hindlimbs and genitalia, establishing the importance of this limb-genital enhancer for development of these different appendages. Further analyses demonstrate that the HLEB of snakes has lost hindlimb enhancer function while retaining genital activity. Our findings identify roles for Tbx4 in genital development and highlight deep similarities in cis-regulatory activity between limbs and genitalia. PMID:26439399

  10. Activated sludge process based on artificial neural network

    张文艺; 蔡建安

    2002-01-01

    Considering the difficulty of creating water quality model for activated sludge system, a typical BP artificial neural network model has been established to simulate the operation of a waste water treatment facilities. The comparison of prediction results with the on-spot measurements shows the model, the model is accurate and this model can also be used to realize intelligentized on-line control of the wastewater processing process.

  11. Mission Risk Reduction Regulatory Change Management

    Scroggins, Sharon

    2007-01-01

    NASA Headquarters Environmental Management Division supports NASA's mission to pioneer the future in space exploration, scientific discovery, and aeronautics research by integrating environmental considerations into programs and projects early-on, thereby proactively reducing NASA's exposure to institutional, programmatic and operational risk. As part of this effort, NASA established the Principal Center for Regulatory Risk Analysis and Communication (RRAC PC) as a resource for detecting, analyzing, and communicating environmental regulatory risks to the NASA stakeholder community. The RRAC PC focuses on detecting emerging environmental regulations and other operational change drivers that may pose risks to NASA programs and facilities, and effectively communicating the potential risks. For example, regulatory change may restrict how and where certain activities or operations may be conducted. Regulatory change can also directly affect the ability to use certain materials by mandating a production phase-out or restricting usage applications of certain materials. Regulatory change can result in significant adverse impacts to NASA programs and facilities due to NASA's stringent performance requirements for materials and components related to human-rated space vehicles. Even if a regulation does not directly affect NASA operations, U.S. and international regulations can pose program risks indirectly through requirements levied on manufacturers and vendors of components and materials. For example, manufacturers can change their formulations to comply with new regulatory requirements. Such changes can require time-consuming and costly requalification certification for use in human spaceflight programs. The RRAC PC has implemented a system for proactively managing regulatory change to minimize potential adverse impacts to NASA programs and facilities. This presentation highlights the process utilized by the RRACPC to communicate regulatory change and the associated

  12. Process for encapsulating active agents obtaining a gel

    Yilmaz, G.; Jongboom, R.O.J.

    2001-01-01

    The present invention relates to a process for encapsulating an active agent in a biopolymer in the form of a gel, comprising the steps of: a) forming a dispersion or solution of the biopolymer in water; and b) adding the active agent to the dispersion or solution obtained in step a); wherein the biopolymer is at least partially dissolved before and/or after addition of the active agent. The gels obtained with the present invention are particularly suitable for coating or impregnating packagi...

  13. PASS-GP: Predictive active set selection for Gaussian processes

    Henao, Ricardo; Winther, Ole

    We propose a new approximation method for Gaussian process (GP) learning for large data sets that combines inline active set selection with hyperparameter optimization. The predictive probability of the label is used for ranking the data points. We use the leave-one-out predictive probability...... the active set selection strategy and marginal likelihood optimization on the active set. We make extensive tests on the USPS and MNIST digit classification databases with and without incorporating invariances, demonstrating that we can get state-of-the-art results (e.g.0.86% error on MNIST) with...

  14. Deficient regulatory T cell activity and low frequency of IL-17-producing T cells correlate with the extent of cardiomyopathy in human Chagas' disease.

    Paulo Marcos Matta Guedes

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Myocardium damage during Chagas' disease results from the immunological imbalance between pro- and production of anti-inflammatory cytokines and has been explained based on the Th1-Th2 dichotomy and regulatory T cell activity. Recently, we demonstrated that IL-17 produced during experimental T. cruzi infection regulates Th1 cells differentiation and parasite induced myocarditis. Here, we investigated the role of IL-17 and regulatory T cell during human Chagas' disease. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: First, we observed CD4(+IL-17(+ T cells in culture of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC from Chagas' disease patients and we evaluated Th1, Th2, Th17 cytokine profile production in the PBMC cells from Chagas' disease patients (cardiomyopathy-free, and with mild, moderate or severe cardiomyopathy cultured with T. cruzi antigen. Cultures of PBMC from patients with moderate and severe cardiomyopathy produced high levels of TNF-α, IFN-γ and low levels of IL-10, when compared to mild cardiomyopathy or cardiomyopathy-free patients. Flow cytometry analysis showed higher CD4(+IL-17(+ cells in PBMC cultured from patients without or with mild cardiomyopathy, in comparison to patients with moderate or severe cardiomyopathy. We then analyzed the presence and function of regulatory T cells in all patients. All groups of Chagas' disease patients presented the same frequency of CD4(+CD25(+ regulatory T cells. However, CD4(+CD25(+ T cells from patients with mild cardiomyopathy or cardiomyopathy-free showed higher suppressive activity than those with moderate and severe cardiomyopathy. IFN-γ levels during chronic Chagas' disease are inversely correlated to the LVEF (P = 0.007, r = -0.614, while regulatory T cell activity is directly correlated with LVEF (P = 0.022, r = 0.500. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: These results indicate that reduced production of the cytokines IL-10 and IL-17 in association with high levels of IFN-γ and TNF

  15. Impaired NK cells' activity and increased numbers of CD4 + CD25+ regulatory T cells in multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis patients.

    Fan, Renhua; Xiang, Yangen; Yang, Li; Liu, Yanke; Chen, Pingsheng; Wang, Lei; Feng, Wenjun; Yin, Ke; Fu, Manjiao; Xu, Yixin; Wu, Jialin

    2016-05-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) often causes persistent infection and chemotherapy failure, which brings heavy burden of society and family. Many immune cell subsets and regulatory mechanisms may operate throughout the various stages of infection. The presence of regulatory T cells (Tregs) is thought to be an important mechanism that TB successfully evades the immune system. Tregs play a central role in the prevention of autoimmunity and in the control of immune responses. The role of Tregs in MDR-TB infection and persistence is inadequately documented. The current study was designed to determine whether CD4 + CD25+ regulatory T cells may modulate innate immunity (such as NK cells) against human tuberculosis. Our results indicated that the numbers of CD4 + CD25+ Treg cells increased in MDR-TB patients' blood, and the cytokine production of IL-10 increased from MDR-patients compared with healthy subjects, along with the lower activity and low CD69 expression of NK cells in patients. These results suggested that immunity to MDR-TB patients induced circulating CD4 + CD25+ T regulatory cells expansion, which may be related to the persistence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) infection, and to the balance between effectors immune responses and suppression immune responses. PMID:27156613

  16. Murine CD4+CD25- cells activated in vitro with PMA/ionomycin and anti-CD3 acquire regulatory function and ameliorate experimental colitis in vivo

    Majowicz Anna; van der Marel Sander; te Velde Anje A; Meijer Sybren L; Petry Harald; van Deventer Sander J; Ferreira Valerie

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Induced regulatory T (iTreg) lymphocytes show promise for application in the treatment of allergic, autoimmune and inflammatory disorders. iTreg cells demonstrate advantages over natural Treg (nTreg) cells in terms of increased number of starting population and greater potential to proliferate. Different activation methods to generate iTreg cells result in iTreg cells that are heterogeneous in phenotype and mechanisms of suppression. Therefore it is of interest to explore ...

  17. Ambient and focal visual processing of naturalistic activity.

    Eisenberg, Michelle L; Zacks, Jeffrey M

    2016-01-01

    When people inspect a picture, they progress through two distinct phases of visual processing: an ambient, or exploratory, phase that emphasizes input from peripheral vision and rapid acquisition of low-frequency information, followed by a focal phase that emphasizes central vision, salient objects, and high-frequency information. Does this qualitative shift occur during dynamic scene viewing? If so, when? One possibility is that shifts to exploratory processing are triggered at subjective event boundaries. This shift would be adaptive, because event boundaries typically occur when activity features change and when activity becomes unpredictable. Here, we used a perceptual event segmentation task, in which people identified boundaries between meaningful units of activity, to test this hypothesis. In two studies, an eye tracker recorded eye movements and pupil size while participants first watched movies of actors engaged in everyday activities and then segmented them into meaningful events. Saccade amplitudes and fixation durations during the initial viewings suggest that event boundaries function much like the onset of a new picture during static picture presentation: Viewers initiate an ambient processing phase and then progress to focal viewing as the event progresses. These studies suggest that this shift in processing mode could play a role in the formation of mental representations of the current environment. PMID:27002550

  18. Optimized operation and design of alternating activated sludge processes

    Lukasse, L.J.S.; Keesman, K.J.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a simulation study with the scope to optimise the plant design and operation strategy of 2-reactors alternating activated sludge processes with only flow schedule and aeration on/off as control inputs. The methodology is to simulate the application of receding horizon optimal con

  19. Flow Velocity Measurement by Image Processing of Optically Activated Tracers

    Gharib, M.; Hernan, M. A.; Yavrouian, A. H.; Sarohia, V.

    1985-01-01

    A computerized flow visualization technique capable of quantifying the flow field automatically has been developed. This technique uses afterglowing effect of optically activated phosphorescent particles to retrieve vectorial information on each trace. By using this information, in conjunction with computer image processing, the flow field of a free surface transient vortex was investigated.

  20. Process cells dismantling of EUREX pant: previous activities

    In the '98-'99 period some process cells of the EUREX pant will be dismantled, in order to place there the liquid wastes conditioning plant 'CORA'. This report resumes the previous activities (plant rinsing campaigns and inactive Cell 014 dismantling), run in the past three years and the drawn experience

  1. Enhanced 3D face processing using an active vision system

    Lidegaard, Morten; Larsen, Rasmus; Kraft, Dirk; Jessen, Jeppe Barsøe; Beck, Richard; Savarimuthu, Thiusius Rajeeth; Gramkow, Claus; Neckelmann, Ole; Haustad, Jonas; Krüger, Norbert

    We present an active face processing system based on 3D shape information extracted by means of stereo information. We use two sets of stereo cameras with different field of views (FOV): One with a wide FOV is used for face tracking, while the other with a narrow FOV is used for face identificati...

  2. Enhanced Passive and Active Processing of Syllables in Musician Children

    Chobert, Julie; Marie, Celine; Francois, Clement; Schon, Daniele; Besson, Mireille

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the influence of musical expertise in 9-year-old children on passive (as reflected by MMN) and active (as reflected by discrimination accuracy) processing of speech sounds. Musician and nonmusician children were presented with a sequence of syllables that included standards and deviants in vowel frequency,…

  3. Activated Sludge and Other Aerobic Suspended Culture Processes

    Yung-Tse Hung

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available A review of the literature published in 2008, 2009 and 2010 relating to activated sludge treatment of wastewater is presented. The review considers information on the topics of modeling and kinetics; process microbiology; nitrogen and phosphorus removal; treatment and effects of xenobiotics; oxygen transfer; and solids separation.

  4. High mobility group box-1 protein inhibits regulatory T cell immune activity in liver failure in patients with chronic hepatitis B

    Lu-WenWang; Hui Chen; Zuo-Jiong Gong

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Liver failure in chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients is a severe, life-threatening condition. Intestinal endotoxemia plays a significant role in the progress to liver failure. High mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) protein is involved in the process of endotoxemia. Regulatory T (Treg) cells maintain immune tolerance and contribute to the immunological hyporesponsiveness against HBV infection. However, the roles of HMGB1 and Treg cells in the pathogenesis of liver failure in CHB patients, and whether HMGB1 affects the immune activity of Treg cells are poorly known at present, and so were explored in this study. METHODS: The levels of HMGB1 expression were detected by ELISA, real-time RT-PCR, and Western blotting, and the percentage of CD4+CD25+CD127low Treg cells among CD4+cells was detected by flow cytometry in liver failure patients with chronic HBV infection, CHB patients, and healthy controls. Then, CD4+CD25+CD127low Treg cells isolated from the peripheral blood mononuclear cells from CHB patients were stimulated with HMGB1 at different concentrations or at various intervals. The effect of HMGB1 on the immune activity of Treg cells was assessed by a suppression assay of the allogeneic mixed lymphocyte response. The levels of forkhead box P3 (Foxp3) expression in Treg cells treated with HMGB1 were detected by RT-PCR and Western blotting. RESULTS: A higher level of HMGB1 expression and a lower percentage of Treg cells within the population of CD4+ cells were found in liver failure patients than in CHB patients (82.6±20.1 μg/L vs. 34.2±13.7 μg/L; 4.55±1.34% vs. 9.52± 3.89%, respectively). The immune activity of Treg cells was significantly weakened and the levels of Foxp3 expression were reduced in a dose- or time-dependent manner when Treg cells were stimulated with HMGB1 in vitro. CONCLUSIONS: The high level of HMGB1 and the low percentage of Treg cells play an important role in the pathogenesis of liver failure in patients with chronic HBV infection

  5. Physical activity across the curriculum: year one process evaluation results

    Sullivan Debra K

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physical Activity Across the Curriculum (PAAC is a 3-year elementary school-based intervention to determine if increased amounts of moderate intensity physical activity performed in the classroom will diminish gains in body mass index (BMI. It is a cluster-randomized, controlled trial, involving 4905 children (2505 intervention, 2400 control. Methods We collected both qualitative and quantitative process evaluation data from 24 schools (14 intervention and 10 control, which included tracking teacher training issues, challenges and barriers to effective implementation of PAAC lessons, initial and continual use of program specified activities, and potential competing factors, which might contaminate or lessen program effects. Results Overall teacher attendance at training sessions showed exceptional reach. Teachers incorporated active lessons on most days, resulting in significantly greater student physical activity levels compared to controls (p Conclusion In the first year of the PAAC intervention, process evaluation results were instrumental in identifying successes and challenges faced by teachers when trying to modify existing academic lessons to incorporate physical activity.

  6. TLR-2 Activation Induces Regulatory T Cells and Long-Term Suppression of Asthma Manifestations in Mice

    Nawijn, Martijn C.; Motta, Alexandre C.; Gras, Renee; Shirinbak, Soheila; Maazi, Hadi; van Oosterhout, Antoon J. M.

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways characterized by variable airway obstruction and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). The T regulatory (Treg) cell subset is critically important for the regulation of immune responses. Adoptive transfer of Treg cells has been shown to be sufficie

  7. Competition between activating and inhibitory processes in photobiology

    Friedmann, Harry; Lubart, Rachel

    1996-01-01

    We discuss light-induced stimulation and inhibition of biological activity by means of three types of competing processes. In the visible region, these competing processes are the formation by photosensitization of reactive oxygen species (ROS) which stimulate the redox activity of the respiratory chain (RC) on the one hand, and intramolecular electronic- vibrational energy transfer from an endogenous photosensitizer to an enzyme of the RC, thereby bringing this enzyme into an inactive configuration and paralyzing the RC, on the other hand. Moreover, there is competition between stimulation of the redox activity of the RC by the ROS and a slower process where the enzymes of the RC react with the ROS, again paralyzing the RC. This paralysis of the RC plays a dominant role in photodynamic therapy, where exogenous photosensitizers together with a sufficiently large visible light-energy dose lead to overproduction of ROS. Finally, in the far-red region, there is competition between reactivation of the ATPase ion pumps in the cell membrane and inhibition of the enzymes in the RC as a result of vibrational overtone excitation. Photobioactivation is shown to lead to enhanced transient Ca2+ concentration increase (calcium oscillations) in the cytosol, thereby triggering further biological activity such as afflux of intercellular messengers which open gated ion channels in neighboring cells, producing calcium waves. Addition of ROS scavengers or quenchers such as SOD in the presence of catalase neutralizes photobiomodulation induced by visible light.

  8. 76 FR 33181 - Regulatory Review Schedule

    2011-06-08

    ... processes. (76 FR 18457, April 4, 2011). The Commission's regulatory review process establishes a detailed... National Indian Gaming Commission 25 CFR Chapter III Regulatory Review Schedule AGENCY: National Indian... Regulatory Review Schedule setting out detailed consultation schedules and review processes. NIGC divided...

  9. Canadian regulatory requirements and practices for qualification of computer codes used in safety analysis

    Code verification and validation are the key elements during any computer program development. Canadian regulatory framework provides requirements and guidelines for conducting code validation activities that are consistent with other jurisdictions. It also ensures that verification and validation process in support of the design and licensing of CANDU power reactors is compliant with regulatory expectations. The paper presents a new Canadian regulatory perspective for key software QA activities: code verification and validation. Also, the regulatory approved practices for planning, conducting and documentation produced to support verification and validation of computer codes are also discussed. (author)

  10. The regulatory control of radioactive sources in Argentina

    Argentina has been conducting nuclear activities for more than forty years, and had established a Regulatory Authority as early as in 1956. Procedures for compliance monitoring and enforcement have been in use in the regulatory control of radioactive sources, and regulatory standards and regulations were in force in Argentina before the accident in Goiania. The conclusions drawn from the Goiania accident encouraged the Argentine authorities to improve some regulatory procedures and helped to enhance the quality of the regulatory process. As a result, the effectiveness of the control of spent radioactive sources has gradually increased, and enforcement actions to prevent radioactive sources ending up in the public domain have improved. Lessons learned in Argentina from the accident in Goiania are presented as well as the main characteristics of an effective enforcement programme to prevent radiological accidents when radioactive sources are used for industrial, medical, research and teaching purposes. (author)

  11. Processing Chinese hand-radicals activates the medial frontal gyrus

    Qing-Lin Wu; Yu-Chen Chan; Joseph P. Lavallee; Hsueh-Chin Chen; Kuo-En Chang; Yao-Ting Sung

    2013-01-01

    Embodied semantics theory asserts that the meaning of action-related words is neural y represented through networks that overlap with or are identical to networks involved in sory-motor processing. While some studies supporting this theory have focused on Chinese cha-racters, less attention has been paid to their semantic radicals. Indeed, there is stil disagreement about whether these radicals are processed independently. The present study investigated whether radicals are processed separately and, if so, whether this processing occurs in sensory-motor gions. Materials consisted of 72 high-frequency Chinese characters, with 18 in each of four ries:hand-action verbs with and without hand-radicals, and verbs not related to hand actions, with and without hand-radicals. Twenty-eight participants underwent functional MRI scans while reading the characters. Compared to characters without hand-radicals, reading characters with hand-radicals activated the right medial frontal gyrus. Verbs involving hand-action activated the left inferior parietal lobule, possibly reflecting integration of information in the radical with the semantic meaning of the verb. The findings may be consistent with embodied semantics theory and suggest that neural representation of radicals is indispensable in processing Chinese characters.

  12. A decision support tool for the analysis of pricing, investment and regulatory processes in a decentralized electricity market

    After the liberalization of the electricity generation industry, capacity expansion decisions are made by multiple self-oriented power companies. Unlike the centralized environment, decision-making of market participants is now guided by price signal feedbacks and by an imperfect foresight of the future market conditions (and competitor actions) that they will face. In such an environment, decision makers need to better understand long-term dynamics of the supply and demand sides of the power market. In this study, a system dynamics model is developed, to better understand and analyze the decentralized and competitive electricity market dynamics in the long run. The developed simulation model oversees a 20-year planning horizon; it includes a demand module, a capacity expansion module, a power generation module, an accounting and finance module, various competitors, a regulatory body and a bidding mechanism. Many features, singularities and tools of decentralized markets, such as; capacity withholding, enforced divestment, long-term contracts, price-elastic demands, incentives/disincentives, are also incorporated into the model. Public regulators and power companies are potential users of the model, for learning and decision support in policy design and strategic planning. Results of scenario analysis are presented to illustrate potential use of the model. (author)

  13. Avoiding the Enumeration of Infeasible Elementary Flux Modes by Including Transcriptional Regulatory Rules in the Enumeration Process Saves Computational Costs.

    Christian Jungreuthmayer

    Full Text Available Despite the significant progress made in recent years, the computation of the complete set of elementary flux modes of large or even genome-scale metabolic networks is still impossible. We introduce a novel approach to speed up the calculation of elementary flux modes by including transcriptional regulatory information into the analysis of metabolic networks. Taking into account gene regulation dramatically reduces the solution space and allows the presented algorithm to constantly eliminate biologically infeasible modes at an early stage of the computation procedure. Thereby, computational costs, such as runtime, memory usage, and disk space, are extremely reduced. Moreover, we show that the application of transcriptional rules identifies non-trivial system-wide effects on metabolism. Using the presented algorithm pushes the size of metabolic networks that can be studied by elementary flux modes to new and much higher limits without the loss of predictive quality. This makes unbiased, system-wide predictions in large scale metabolic networks possible without resorting to any optimization principle.

  14. Report on activities of Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic and safety of nuclear installations in the Slovak Republic in 1995. Annual report

    A brief account of activities carried out by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic (NRA SR) in 1995 is presented. These activities are reported under the headings: (1) Foreword; (2) NPP V-1 Bohunice; (3) NPP V-2 Bohunice; (4) NPP EMO Mochovce; (5) Nuclear materials; ((6) NPP A-1 Bohunice; (7) Treatment; (8) Qualification and personnel training; (9) Emergency management; (10) Legislation; (11) Quality assurance; (12) International cooperation; (13) Public relations; (14) Organization structure of the NRA SR; (15) Conclusions; (16) Appendices

  15. Report on activities of Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic and safety of nuclear installations in the Slovak Republic in 1996. Annual report 1996

    A brief account of activities carried out by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic (NRA SR) in 1996 is presented. These activities are reported under the headings: (1) Foreword; (2) NPP V-1 Bohunice; (3) NPP V-2 Bohunice; (4) NPP Mochovce; (5) Nuclear materials; ((6) NPP A-1 Bohunice; (7) Treatment; (8) Qualification and personnel training; (9) Emergency management; (10) Legislation; (11) Quality assurance; (12) International cooperation; (13) Public relations; (14) Organization structure of the NRA SR; (15) Conclusions; (16) Appendices

  16. A comparison of United States and Japanese regulatory requirements at the time of Fukushima accident and updates of USNRC post-Fukushima activities

    This paper discusses the similarities and differences between the United States (US) and Japan on nuclear reactor regulations based on a Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) study after the Fukushima Dai-ichi accident. The US and Japan had many similarities in design basis requirements and guidance at the time of the event. There were also differences between the US and Japan in the approach to beyond design basis events and severe accidents. This paper also discusses the NRC's post-Fukushima activities and US industry’s responses. This paper will give the most recent updates on these activities and path forward. (author)

  17. RNA SURVEILLANCE– AN EMERGING ROLE FOR RNA REGULATORY NETWORKS IN AGING

    Montano, Monty; Long, Kimberly

    2010-01-01

    In this review, we describe recent advances in the field of RNA regulatory biology and relate these advances to aging science. We introduce a new term, RNA surveillance, an RNA regulatory process that is conserved in metazoans, and describe how RNA surveillance represents molecular cross-talk between two emerging RNA regulatory systems – RNA interference and RNA editing. We discuss how RNA surveillance mechanisms influence mRNA and microRNA expression and activity during lifespan. Additionall...

  18. Simple data processing for gamma spectroscopy in activation analysis

    A data processing system was developed for multielement neutron activation analysis. It uses a desk-top programmable calculator that is operated off line. The processing is divided into two main programs. The first one detects the peaks of a series of gamma spectra with a 0.1-keV accuracy. The second program performs the integration of peaks selected by the operator, including those for which he wants a detection limit. Peak intensities corrected for decay and dead time are calculated. This system has many advantages: easy use, great versatility, large possibilities for manual control, and low cost

  19. Enhancement of activated sludge disintegration and dewaterability by Fenton process

    Heng, G. C.; Isa, M. H.

    2016-06-01

    Municipal and industrial wastewater treatment plants produce large amounts of sludge. This excess sludge is an inevitable drawback inherent to the activated sludge process. In this study, the waste activated sludge was obtained from the campus wastewater treatment plant at Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS (UTP), Malaysia. Fenton pretreatment was optimized by using the response surface methodology (RSM) to study the effects of three operating conditions including the dosage of H2O2 (g H2O2/kg TS), the molar ratio of H2O2/Fe2+ and reaction time. The optimum operating variables to achieve MLVSS removal 65%, CST reduction 28%, sCOD 11000 mg/L and EPS 500 mg/L were: 1000 g H2O2/kg TS, H2O2/Fe2+ molar ratio 70 and reaction time 45 min. Fenton process was proved to be able to enhance the sludge disintegration and dewaterability.

  20. The waste isolation pilot plant regulatory compliance program

    The passage of the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act of 1992 (LWA) marked a turning point for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) program. It established a Congressional mandate to open the WIPP in as short a time as possible, thereby initiating the process of addressing this nation's transuranic (TRU) waste problem. The DOE responded to the LWA by shifting the priority at the WIPP from scientific investigations to regulatory compliance and the completion of prerequisites for the initiation of operations. Regulatory compliance activities have taken four main focuses: (1) preparing regulatory submittals; (2) aggressive schedules; (3) regulator interface; and (4) public interactions

  1. Significant Modules and Biological Processes between Active Components of Salvia miltiorrhiza Depside Salt and Aspirin

    Yuan Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to examine and compare the similarities and differences between active components of S. miltiorrhiza depside salt and aspirin using perspective of pharmacological molecular networks. Active components of S. miltiorrhiza depside salt and aspirin’s related genes were identified via the STITCH4.0 and GeneCards Database. A text search engine (Agilent Literature Search 2.71 and MCODE software were applied to construct network and divide modules, respectively. Finally, 32, 2, and 28 overlapping genes, modules, and pathways were identified between active components of S. miltiorrhiza depside salt and aspirin. A multidimensional framework of drug network showed that two networks reflected commonly in human aortic endothelial cells and atherosclerosis process. Aspirin plays a more important role in metabolism, such as the well-known AA metabolism pathway and other lipid or carbohydrate metabolism pathways. S. miltiorrhiza depside salt still plays a regulatory role in type II diabetes mellitus, insulin resistance, and adipocytokine signaling pathway. Therefore, this study suggests that aspirin combined with S. miltiorrhiza depside salt may be more efficient in treatment of CHD patients, especially those with diabetes mellitus or hyperlipidemia. Further clinical trials to confirm this hypothesis are still needed.

  2. Processed Vietnamese ginseng: Preliminary results in chemistry and biological activity

    Le, Thi Hong Van; Lee, Seo Young; Kim, Tae Ryong; Kim, Jae Young; Kwon, Sung Won; NGUYEN, NGOC KHOI; Park, Jeong Hill; Nguyen, Minh Duc

    2013-01-01

    Background This study was carried out to investigate the effect of the steaming process on chemical constituents, free radical scavenging activity, and antiproliferative effect of Vietnamese ginseng. Methods Samples of powdered Vietnamese ginseng were steamed at 120°C for various times and their extracts were subjected to chemical and biological studies. Results Upon steaming, contents of polar ginsenosides, such as Rb1, Rc, Rd, Re, and Rg1, were rapidly decreased, whereas less polar ginsenos...

  3. Refining the Neuberger Model: uracil processing by activated B cells

    Maul, Robert W.; Gearhart, Patricia J.

    2014-01-01

    During the immune response, B cells undergo a programmed mutagenic cascade to promote increased affinity and expanded antibody function. The two processes, somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class switch recombination (CSR), are initiated by the protein activation-induced deaminase (AID), which converts cytosine to uracil in the immunoglobulin loci. The presence of uracil in DNA promotes DNA mutagenesis though a subset of DNA repair proteins. Two distinct mechanisms have been proposed to control...

  4. Multimodal Hierarchical Dirichlet Process-based Active Perception

    Taniguchi, Tadahiro; Takano, Toshiaki; Yoshino, Ryo

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an active perception method for recognizing object categories based on the multimodal hierarchical Dirichlet process (MHDP). The MHDP enables a robot to form object categories using multimodal information, e.g., visual, auditory, and haptic information, which can be observed by performing actions on an object. However, performing many actions on a target object requires a long time. In a real-time scenario, i.e., when the time is limited, the robot has to determine t...

  5. Human T cells express CD25 and Foxp3 upon activation and exhibit effector/memory phenotypes without any regulatory/suppressor function

    Godder Kamar

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Foxp3 has been suggested to be a standard marker for murine Tregs whereas its role as marker for human Tregs is controversial. While some reports have shown that human Foxp3+ T cells had no regulatory function others have shown their role in the inhibition of T cell proliferation. Methods T cell activation was performed by means of brayostatin-1/ionomycin (B/I, mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR, and CD3/CD28 activation. T cell proliferation was performed using BrdU and CFSE staining. Flow cytometry was performed to determine Foxp3 expression, cell proliferation, viabilities and phenotype analyses of T cells. Results Both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells expressed Foxp3 upon activation in vitro. Expression of Foxp3 remained more stable in CD4+CD25+ T cells compared to that in CD8+CD25+ T cells. The CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T cells expressed CD44 and CD62L, showing their effector and memory phenotypes. Both FoxP3- responder T cells and CD4+FoxP3+ T cells underwent proliferation upon CD3/CD28 activation. Conclusion Expression of Foxp3 does not necessarily convey regulatory function in human CD4+CD25+ T cells. Increased FoxP3 on CD44+ effector and CD44+CD62L+ memory T cells upon stimulation suggest the activation-induced regulation of FoxP3 expression.

  6. Dempster-Shafer theory applied to regulatory decision process for selecting safer alternatives to toxic chemicals in consumer products.

    Park, Sung Jin; Ogunseitan, Oladele A; Lejano, Raul P

    2014-01-01

    Regulatory agencies often face a dilemma when regulating chemicals in consumer products-namely, that of making decisions in the face of multiple, and sometimes conflicting, lines of evidence. We present an integrative approach for dealing with uncertainty and multiple pieces of evidence in toxics regulation. The integrative risk analytic framework is grounded in the Dempster-Shafer (D-S) theory that allows the analyst to combine multiple pieces of evidence and judgments from independent sources of information. We apply the integrative approach to the comparative risk assessment of bisphenol-A (BPA)-based polycarbonate and the functionally equivalent alternative, Eastman Tritan copolyester (ETC). Our results show that according to cumulative empirical evidence, the estimated probability of toxicity of BPA is 0.034, whereas the toxicity probability for ETC is 0.097. However, when we combine extant evidence with strength of confidence in the source (or expert judgment), we are guided by a richer interval measure, (Bel(t), Pl(t)). With the D-S derived measure, we arrive at various intervals for BPA, with the low-range estimate at (0.034, 0.250), and (0.097,0.688) for ETC. These new measures allow a reasonable basis for comparison and a justifiable procedure for decision making that takes advantage of multiple sources of evidence. Through the application of D-S theory to toxicity risk assessment, we show how a multiplicity of scientific evidence can be converted into a unified risk estimate, and how this information can be effectively used for comparative assessments to select potentially less toxic alternative chemicals. PMID:23804574

  7. Brain activity related to integrative processes in visual object recognition

    Gerlach, Christian; Aaside, C T; Humphreys, G W;

    2002-01-01

    involvement of re-entrant activation from stored structural knowledge. Evidence in favor of this interpretation comes from the additional finding that activation of the anterior part of the left fusiform gyrus and a more anterior part of the right inferior temporal gyrus, areas previously associated with......We report evidence from a PET activation study that the inferior occipital gyri (likely to include area V2) and the posterior parts of the fusiform and inferior temporal gyri are involved in the integration of visual elements into perceptual wholes (single objects). Of these areas, the fusiform and...... perceptual and memorial processes can be dissociated on both functional and anatomical grounds. No evidence was obtained for the involvement of the parietal lobes in the integration of single objects....

  8. Controlled movement processing: superior colliculus activity associated with countermanded saccades.

    Paré, Martin; Hanes, Doug P

    2003-07-23

    We investigated whether the monkey superior colliculus (SC), an important midbrain structure for the regulation of saccadic eye movements, contains neurons with activity patterns sufficient to control both the cancellation and the production of saccades. We used a countermanding task to manipulate the probability that, after the presentation of a stop signal, the monkeys canceled a saccade that was planned in response to an eccentric visual stimulus. By modeling each animal's behavioral responses, with a race between GO and STOP processes leading up to either saccade initiation or cancellation, we estimated that saccade cancellation took on average 110 msec. Neurons recorded in the superior colliculus intermediate layers during this task exhibited the discharge properties expected from neurons closely involved in behavioral control. Both saccade- and fixation-related discharged differently when saccades were counter-manded instead of executed, and the time at which they changed their activity preceded the behavioral estimate of saccade cancellation obtained from the same trials by 10 and 13 msec, respectively. Furthermore, these intervals exceed the minimal amount of time needed for SC activity to influence eye movements. The additional observation that saccade-related neurons discharged significantly less when saccades were countermanded instead of executed suggests that saccades are triggered when these neurons reach a critical activation level. Altogether, these findings provide solid evidence that the superior colliculus contains the necessary neural signals to be directly involved in the decision process that regulates whether a saccade is to be produced. PMID:12878689

  9. FAME: Freeform Active Mirrors Experiment: manufacturing process development

    Challita, Zalpha; Hugot, Emmanuel; Venema, Lars; Schnetler, Hermine; Ferrari, Marc; Cuby, Jean-Gabriel

    2014-07-01

    Extreme freeform mirrors couple a non-axisymmetrical shape and an extreme asphericity, i.e. more than one millimeter of deviation from the best fit sphere. In astronomical instrumentation, such a large asphericity allows compact instruments, using less optical components. However, the lack of freeform mirrors manufacturing facilities is a real issue. We present the concept and development of an innovative manufacturing process based on plasticity forming which allow imprinting permanent deformations on mirrors, following a pre-defined mold. The aim of this activity, pursued in the frame of the OPTICON-FAME (Freeform Active Mirrors Experiment) project, is to demonstrate the suitability of this method for VIS/NIR/MIR applications. The process developed can operate on thin and flat polished initial substrates. Three study cases have been highlighted by FEA (Finite Element Analysis) and the real tests associated were performed on thin substrates in AISI420b stainless steel with 100 mm optical diameter. A comparison between FEA and tests is performed to study the evolution of the mechanical behaviour and the optical quality. The opto-mechanical results will allow a fine tuning of FEA parameters to optimize the residual form errors obtained through this process to converge toward an innovative and recurrent process.

  10. Human Blood and Mucosal Regulatory T Cells Express Activation Markers and Inhibitory Receptors in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Lord, James D.; Shows, Donna M.; Chen, Janice; Thirlby, Richard C.

    2015-01-01

    Background FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) are critical for preventing intestinal inflammation. However, FOXP3+ T cells are paradoxically increased in the intestines of patients with the inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) ulcerative colitis (UC) or Crohn’s disease (CD). We determined whether these FOXP3+ cells in IBD patients share or lack the phenotype of such cells from patients without IBD. Methods We quantified and characterized FOXP3+ Treg populations, as well as FOXP3- CD4+ T cells, in ...

  11. Impact of independent directors and the regulatory environment on bank merger prices: evidence from takeover activity in the 1990s

    Elijah Brewer; Jackson, William E.; Julapa Jagtiani

    2000-01-01

    This article examines the primary motivation of the bank merger waves in the 1990s. Our investigation of the factors that determine bid premiums paid for target banks focuses on the importance of the financial characteristics of the targets, composition of their boards of directors, and the regulatory environment. ; The value of the target bank to the acquiring bank should reflect its present discounted value of future net cash flows. Thus, at a minimum, the bid price should be a combination ...

  12. TLR-2 Activation Induces Regulatory T Cells and Long-Term Suppression of Asthma Manifestations in Mice

    Nawijn, Martijn C.; Motta, Alexandre C; Renée Gras; Soheila Shirinbak; Hadi Maazi; van Oosterhout, Antoon J. M.

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways characterized by variable airway obstruction and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). The T regulatory (Treg) cell subset is critically important for the regulation of immune responses. Adoptive transfer of Treg cells has been shown to be sufficient for the suppression of airway inflammation in experimental allergic asthma. Intervention strategies aimed at expanding the Treg cell population locally in the airways of sensitized individuals a...

  13. YY1 inhibits differentiation and function of regulatory T cells by blocking Foxp3 expression and activity

    Hwang, Soo Seok; Jang, Sung Woong; Kim, Min Kyung; Kim, Lark Kyun; Kim, Bong-Sung; Kim, Hyeong Su; Kim, Kiwan; Lee, Wonyong; Flavell, Richard A.; Lee, Gap Ryol

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells are essential for maintenance of immune homeostasis. Foxp3 is the key transcription factor for Treg-cell differentiation and function; however, molecular mechanisms for its negative regulation are poorly understood. Here we show that YY1 expression is lower in Treg cells than Tconv cells, and its overexpression causes a marked reduction of Foxp3 expression and abrogation of suppressive function of Treg cells. YY1 is increased in Treg cells under inflammatory conditio...

  14. Memory suppression is an active process that improves over childhood

    Pedro M Paz-Alonso

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available We all have memories that we prefer not to think about. The ability to suppress retrieval of unwanted memories has been documented in behavioral and neuroimaging research using the Think/No-Think (TNT paradigm with adults. Attempts to stop memory retrieval are associated with increased activation of lateral prefrontal cortex (PFC and concomitant reduced activation in medial temporal lobe (MTL structures. However, the extent to which children have the ability to actively suppress their memories is unknown. This study investigated memory suppression in middle childhood using the TNT paradigm. Forty children aged 8 to 12 and 30 young adults were instructed either to remember (Think or suppress (No-Think the memory of the second word of previously studied word-pairs, when presented with the first member as a reminder. They then performed two different cued recall tasks, testing their memory for the second word in each pair after the Think/No-Think phase using the same first studied word within the pair as a cue (intra-list cue and also an independent cue (extra-list cue. Children exhibited age-related improvements in memory suppression from age 8 to 12 in both memory tests, against a backdrop of overall improvements in declarative memory over this age range. These findings suggest that memory suppression is an active process that develops during late childhood, likely due to an age-related refinement in the ability to engage PFC to down-regulate activity in areas involved in episodic retrieval.

  15. Regulatory Anatomy

    Hoeyer, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    This article proposes the term “safety logics” to understand attempts within the European Union (EU) to harmonize member state legislation to ensure a safe and stable supply of human biological material for transplants and transfusions. With safety logics, I refer to assemblages of discourses, le...... arise. In short, I expose the regulatory anatomy of the policy landscape....

  16. Drilling to investigate processes in active tectonics and magmatism

    Shervais, J.; Evans, J.; Toy, V.; Kirkpatrick, J.; Clarke, A.; Eichelberger, J.

    2014-12-01

    Coordinated drilling efforts are an important method to investigate active tectonics and magmatic processes related to faults and volcanoes. The US National Science Foundation (NSF) recently sponsored a series of workshops to define the nature of future continental drilling efforts. As part of this series, we convened a workshop to explore how continental scientific drilling can be used to better understand active tectonic and magmatic processes. The workshop, held in Park City, Utah, in May 2013, was attended by 41 investigators from seven countries. Participants were asked to define compelling scientific justifications for examining problems that can be addressed by coordinated programs of continental scientific drilling and related site investigations. They were also asked to evaluate a wide range of proposed drilling projects, based on white papers submitted prior to the workshop. Participants working on faults and fault zone processes highlighted two overarching topics with exciting potential for future scientific drilling research: (1) the seismic cycle and (2) the mechanics and architecture of fault zones. Recommended projects target fundamental mechanical processes and controls on faulting, and range from induced earthquakes and earthquake initiation to investigations of detachment fault mechanics and fluid flow in fault zones. Participants working on active volcanism identified five themes: the volcano eruption cycle; eruption sustainability, near-field stresses, and system recovery; eruption hazards; verification of geophysical models; and interactions with other Earth systems. Recommended projects address problems that are transferrable to other volcanic systems, such as improved methods for identifying eruption history and constraining the rheological structure of shallow caldera regions. Participants working on chemical geodynamics identified four major themes: large igneous provinces (LIPs), ocean islands, continental hotspot tracks and rifts, and

  17. Final disposal of spent nuclear fuel - regulatory system and roles of different actors during the decision process

    In November 2006 Swedish Nuclear Fuels Co. applied for a license to build a plant for encapsulation of spent nuclear fuels at Oskarshamn, Sweden. The company also have plans to apply, in 2009, for a license to construct a underground repository for spent nuclear fuels. KASAM arranged a seminar in November 2006 in order to describe and discuss the licensing rules and regulations and the roles of different parties in the decision making. Another objective of the seminar was to point out possible ambiguities in this process. Another interesting question under discussion was in what ways the basic data for the decision should be produced. The seminar covered the part of the process beginning with the application for a license and ending with the government approval/rejection of the application. Most time was spent on the legal aspects of the process

  18. Final disposal of spent nuclear fuel - regulatory system and roles of different actors during the decision process

    2009-03-15

    In November 2006 Swedish Nuclear Fuels Co. applied for a license to build a plant for encapsulation of spent nuclear fuels at Oskarshamn, Sweden. The company also have plans to apply, in 2009, for a license to construct a underground repository for spent nuclear fuels. KASAM arranged a seminar in November 2006 in order to describe and discuss the licensing rules and regulations and the roles of different parties in the decision making. Another objective of the seminar was to point out possible ambiguities in this process. Another interesting question under discussion was in what ways the basic data for the decision should be produced. The seminar covered the part of the process beginning with the application for a license and ending with the government approval/rejection of the application. Most time was spent on the legal aspects of the process

  19. Government Regulatory

    Becker, Katie

    Government regulation of food products, food processing, and food preparation is imperative in bringing an unadulterated, nonmisleading, and safe food product to market and is relevant to all areas of food science, including engineering, processing, chemistry, and microbiology. The liability associated with providing consumers with an adulterated or substandard product cannot only tarnish a company's name and reputation, but also impose substantial financial repercussions on the company and those individuals who play an active role in the violation. In order for a company to fully comply with the relevant food laws (both federal and state), an intimate knowledge of food science is required. Individuals knowledgeable in food science play an integral role not only in implementing and counseling food companies/processors to ensure compliance with government regulations, but these individuals are also necessary to the state and federal governments that make and enforce the relevant laws and regulators.

  20. 76 FR 54408 - Regulatory Review Schedule

    2011-09-01

    ... Regulatory Review Schedule in the Federal Register setting out consultation schedules and review processes. (76 FR 18457, April 4, 2011). The Commission's regulatory review process established a tribal... National Indian Gaming Commission 25 CFR Chapter III Regulatory Review Schedule AGENCY: National...

  1. 76 FR 57683 - Regulatory Review Schedule

    2011-09-16

    ... Regulatory Review Schedule in the Federal Register setting out consultation schedules and review processes. (76 FR 18457, April 4, 2011). The Commission's regulatory review process established a Tribal... National Indian Gaming Commission 25 CFR Chapter III Regulatory Review Schedule AGENCY: National...

  2. Toxicogenomics in Regulatory Ecotoxicology

    The potential utility of toxicogenomics in toxicological research and regulatory activities has been the subject of scientific discussions, and as with any new technology, there is a wide range of opinion. The purpose of this feature article is to consider roles of toxicogenomic...

  3. Process for processing and conditioning radioactive effluents of low and medium activity

    Preferably continuous process for processing radioactive effluents of low and medium activity, comprising an effluent pre-treatment: precipitation of radioactive compounds to form a stable suspension that can be concentrated. Then a mix is made of 0.6 to 2 parts of cement by weight for one part by weight of suspension, from 0.5 to 5% by weight, in relation to the cement, of asbestos fibre and, if necessary, added water for the cement to set, this suspension containing from 15 to 75% by weight of dry extract and a suspension agent. The homogeneous mix achieved is poured into a container

  4. The insulin receptor activation process involves localized conformational changes.

    Baron, V; Kaliman, P; Gautier, N; Van Obberghen, E

    1992-11-15

    The molecular process by which insulin binding to the receptor alpha-subunit induces activation of the receptor beta-subunit with ensuing substrate phosphorylation remains unclear. In this study, we aimed at approaching this molecular mechanism of signal transduction and at delineating the cytoplasmic domains implied in this process. To do this, we used antipeptide antibodies to the following sequences of the receptor beta-subunit: (i) positions 962-972 in the juxtamembrane domain, (ii) positions 1247-1261 at the end of the kinase domain, and (iii) positions 1294-1317 and (iv) positions 1309-1326, both in the receptor C terminus. We have previously shown that insulin binding to its receptor induces a conformational change in the beta-subunit C terminus. Here, we demonstrate that receptor autophosphorylation induces an additional conformational change. This process appears to be distinct from the one produced by ligand binding and can be detected in at least three different beta-subunit regions: the juxtamembrane domain, the kinase domain, and the C terminus. Hence, the cytoplasmic part of the receptor beta-subunit appears to undergo an extended conformational change upon autophosphorylation. By contrast, the insulin-induced change does not affect the juxtamembrane domain 962-972 nor the kinase domain 1247-1261 and may be limited to the receptor C terminus. Further, we show that the hormone-dependent conformational change is maintained in a kinase-deficient receptor due to a mutation at lysine 1018. Therefore, during receptor activation, the ligand-induced change could precede ATP binding and receptor autophosphorylation. We propose that insulin binding leads to a transient receptor form that may allow ATP binding and, subsequently, autophosphorylation. The second conformational change could unmask substrate-binding sites and stabilize the receptor in an active conformation. PMID:1331080

  5. Time scales and dynamical processes in activity driven networks

    Perra, Nicola; Goncalves, Bruno; Pastor-Satorras, Romualdo; Vespignani, Alessandro

    2012-02-01

    Network science has undergone explosive growth in the last ten years. This growth has been driven by the recent availability of huge digital databases, which has facilitated the analysis and construction of large-scale networks from real data and the identification of statistical regularities and structural principles common to many systems. Network modeling has played an essential role in this endeavor; however models are chiefly constructed by considering as relevant ingredients only the connectivity and statistical properties of the networks, while disregarding the actual agents' behavior. Here we address this challenge by measuring the agents' interaction activity in real-world networks and defining a minimal model capable of reproducing the intrinsically additive nature of connectivity patterns obtained from time-aggregated network representations. Additionally, we demonstrate that processes such as epidemic and information spreading in highly dynamical networks can be better characterized in terms of agent social activity than by connectivity based approaches

  6. Leachate Treatment by Batch Decant Activated Sludge Process and Powdered Activated Carbon Addition

    Y Hashempur; R Rezaei Kalantary; Jaafarzadeh, N.; Jorfi, S.

    2009-01-01

    "n "nBackgrounds and Objectives: Direct biodegradation of landfill leachate is too difficult because of high concentrations of COD and NH3 and also the presence of toxic compounds. The main objective of this study was to application of Strurvite precipitation as a pretreatment stage, in order to remove inhibitors of biodegradation before the batch decant activated sludge process with addition of powdered activated carbon (PAC)."nMaterials and Methods: Strurvite precipitated leachate was intro...

  7. Role of sympathetic nerve activity in the process of fainting

    Satoshi eIwase

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Syncope is defined as a transient loss of consciousness and postural tone, characterized by rapid onset, short duration, and spontaneous recovery, and the process of syncope progression will be described with two types of sympathetic change. Simultaneous recordings of microneurographically recorded MSNA and continuous and noninvasive blood pressure measurement have disclose what is going on in the course of progression of the syncope. Vasovagal or neurally mediated syncope, three stages are identified in the course of syncope onset, oscillation, imbalance, and catastrophe phases. The vasovagal syncope is characterized by the sympathoexcitation, followed by vagal overcome via the Bezold-Jarisch reflex. Orthostatic syncope is caused by the response failure or lack of sympathetic nerve activity toward the orthostatic challenge followed by the fluid shift, and subsequent cerebral low perfusion. Four causes are considered for the compensatory failure, which triggers the orthostatic syncope; hypovolemia, increased pooling in the lower body, failure to activate the sympathetic activity, and failure of vasoconstriction against sympathetic vasoconstrictive stimulation. Many pathophysiological conditions were described in the viewpoint of 1 exaggerated sympathoexcitation and 2 failure to activate the sympathetic nerve. We conclude that the sympathetic nervous system can control the cardiovascular function, and its failure resulted syncope, however, responses of the system by microneurographically recorded MSNA would determine the pathophysiology of the onset and progression of syncope, explaining the treatment effect that could be achieved by the analysis of this mechanism.

  8. Biological Treatment of tannery wastewater using activated sludge process

    A study was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of Activated Sludge Process (ASP) for the treatment of tannery wastewater and to develop a simple design criteria under local conditions. A bench scale model comprising of an aeration tank and final clarifier was used for this purpose. The model was operated continuously for 267 days. Settled tannery wastewater was used as influent to the aeration tank. Five days Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD5) and Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) of the influent and effluent were measured to find process efficiency at various mixed liquor volatile suspended solids (MLVSS) and hydraulic detention time. The results of the study demonstrated that an efficiency of above 90% and 80% for BOD5 and COD, respectively could be obtained if the ASP is operated at an MLVSS concentration of 3500 mg/L keeping an aeration time of 12 hours. (author)

  9. The two positively acting regulatory proteins PHO2 and PHO4 physically interact with PHO5 upstream activation regions.

    Vogel, K.; Hörz, W; Hinnen, A

    1989-01-01

    The repressible acid phosphatase gene PHO5 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae requires the two positively acting regulatory proteins PHO2 and PHO4 for expression. pho2 or pho4 mutants are not able to derepress the PHO5 gene under low-Pi conditions. Here we show that both PHO2 and PHO4 bind specifically to the PHO5 promoter in vitro. Gel retardation assays using promoter deletions revealed two regions involved in PHO4 binding. Further characterization by DNase I footprinting showed two protected area...

  10. CsrA (BB0184) Is Not Involved in Activation of the RpoN-RpoS Regulatory Pathway in Borrelia burgdorferi

    Ouyang, Zhiming; Zhou, Jianli; Norgard, Michael V.

    2014-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi encodes a homologue of the bacterial carbon storage regulator A (CsrA). Recently, it was reported that CsrA contributes to B. burgdorferi infectivity and is required for the activation of the central RpoN-RpoS regulatory pathway. However, many questions concerning the function of CsrA in B. burgdorferi gene regulation remain unanswered. In particular, there are conflicting reports concerning the molecular details of how CsrA may modulate rpoS expression and, thus, how Csr...

  11. Detailed processes accompanying the decay of an active region

    High resolution (better than 1'') magnetograms obtained at the Sacramento Peak Vacuum Tower Telescope were used to study the decay of a small active region. The reduction process allows one to match intensity and magnetic pictures exactly. Some of the main results are: (i) The granulation massages a magnetic pore, probably inducing its fragmentation. The supergranules get rid of the decayed pieces transporting them away from the pore. (ii) Magnetic flux is removed from the photosphere through its submergence. (author). 5 figs., 10 refs

  12. Process for reduction of the volume of low activity waste

    The invention concerns a process for the reduction of the volume of low activity waste in a plant equipped with separate solid and liquid inputs, where the liquid is taken via a filter to a waste water container and the dry solids are taken to a solid container. Plant of this type should be used in hospitals and university clinics etc. It is an important aim of the invention to describe a process, which makes a particularly compact layout of such a plant possible. The solids are taken to a pulverizer and after passing through this, the dry material is separated from the process and taken to the solid container, while the wet material is dried in a flushing drying system and then also taken to the solid container. The humidity carried off with the hot air is condensed and the condensate is taken to the waste water container. The material taken to the solid container is compacted in a press, preferably adding glue. By separating the pulverized already dry solid material from the pulverized wet material, the plant itself can be made considerably smaller, as one does not have to take the whole volume of solids into account for further processing. (orig./HP)

  13. Kinetics of catalytically activated aggregation—fragmentation process

    We propose a catalytically activated aggregation—fragmentation model of three species, in which two clusters of species A can coagulate into a larger one under the catalysis of B clusters; otherwise, one cluster of species A will fragment into two smaller clusters under the catalysis of C clusters. By means of mean-field rate equations, we derive the asymptotic solutions of the cluster-mass distributions ak(t) of species A, which is found to depend strongly on the competition between the catalyzed aggregation process and the catalyzed fragmentation process. When the catalyzed aggregation process dominates the system, the cluster-mass distribution ak(t) satisfies the conventional scaling form. When the catalyzed fragmentation process dominates the system, the scaling description of ak(t) breaks down completely and the monodisperse initial condition of species A would not be changed in the long-time limit. In the marginal case when the effects of catalyzed aggregation and catalyzed fragmentation counteract each other, ak(t) takes the modified scaling form and the system can eventually evolve to a steady state. (condensed matter: structural, mechanical, and thermal properties)

  14. Rho family GTP binding proteins are involved in the regulatory volume decrease process in NIH3T3 mouse fibroblasts

    Pedersen, Stine F; Beisner, Kristine H; Willumsen, Berthe M;

    2002-01-01

    kinase inhibitor Y-27632 and the phosphatidyl-inositol 3 kinase (PI3K) inhibitor wortmannin. The maximal rates of swelling-activated K+ (86 Rb+ as tracer) and taurine ([3H]taurine as tracer) efflux after a 30 % reduction in extracellular osmolarity were increased about twofold in cells with maximal Rho......AV14 expression compared to wild-type cells, but were unaffected by Y-27632. The volume set points for activation of release of both osmolytes appeared to be reduced by RhoAV14 expression. The maximal taurine efflux rate constant was potentiated by the tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor Na(3)VO(4), and...... inhibited by the tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein. The magnitude of the swelling-activated Cl- current (I(Cl,swell) ) was higher in RhoAV14 than in wild-type cells after a 7.5 % reduction in extracellular osmolarity, but, in contrast to 86Rb+ and [3H]taurine efflux, similar in both strains after a 30...

  15. Citizen participation on regulatory boards.

    Chesney, J D

    1984-01-01

    This article examines the relationship between regulatory board function and citizen participation. The research indicates that public members generally prefer advisory boards, while provider members prefer quasi-judicial bodies. Implications of these findings for structuring citizen participation in the regulatory process are examined. PMID:6736596

  16. Antigen-presenting cells exposed to Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM, Bifidobacterium bifidum BI-98, and BI-504 reduce regulatory T cell activity

    Schmidt, Esben Gjerløff Wedebye; Claesson, Mogens Helweg; Jensen, Simon Skjøde;

    2010-01-01

    enteroantigen-presenting cells (APC) and CD4(+)CD25(+) T-regulatory cells (Tregs) in splenocyte-T cell proliferation assays. METHODS:: Splenocytes exposed to enteroantigen +/- probiotics were used to stimulate cultured CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells to which titrated numbers of Tregs were added. Cytokine assays were...... performed by use of neutralizing antibodies and ELISA. RESULTS:: Exposure of APCs to enteroantigens and the series of probiotic strains mentioned above did not influence the stimulatory capacity of APCs on proliferative enteroantigen-specific T cells. However, exposure to B. bifidum BI-98, BI-504 and L....... acidophilus NCFM consistently reduced the suppressive activity of Tregs. The suppressive activity was analyzed using fractionated components of the probiotics, and showed that a component of the cell wall is responsible for the decreased Treg activity in the system. The probiotic-induced suppression of Treg...

  17. Regulatory Control of Radiation Sources. Safety Guide

    This Safety Guide is intended to assist States in implementing the requirements established in Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-1, Legal and Governmental Infrastructure for Nuclear, Radiation, Radioactive Waste and Transport Safety, for a national regulatory infrastructure to regulate any practice involving radiation sources in medicine, industry, research, agriculture and education. The Safety Guide provides advice on the legislative basis for establishing regulatory bodies, including the effective independence of the regulatory body. It also provides guidance on implementing the functions and activities of regulatory bodies: the development of regulations and guides on radiation safety; implementation of a system for notification and authorization; carrying out regulatory inspections; taking necessary enforcement actions; and investigating accidents and circumstances potentially giving rise to accidents. The various aspects relating to the regulatory control of consumer products are explained, including justification, optimization of exposure, safety assessment and authorization. Guidance is also provided on the organization and staffing of regulatory bodies. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Legal framework for a regulatory infrastructure; 3. Principal functions and activities of the regulatory body; 4. Regulatory control of the supply of consumer products; 5. Functions of the regulatory body shared with other governmental agencies; 6. Organization and staffing of the regulatory body; 7. Documentation of the functions and activities of the regulatory body; 8. Support services; 9. Quality management for the regulatory system.

  18. Regulatory aspects of NPP safety

    In beginning, a history of legislative process regulating industrial utilisation of nuclear energy is given, including detailed list of decrees issued by the first regulatory body supervising Czech nuclear installations - Czechoslovak Atomic Energy Commission (CSKAE). Current status of nuclear regulations and radiation protection, especially in connection with Atomic Act (Act No 18/1997 Coll.), is described. The Atomic Act transfers into the Czech legal system a number of obligations following from the Vienna Convention on Civil Liability for Nuclear Damage and Joint Protocol relating to the Application of the Vienna and Paris Convention, to which the Czech Republic had acceded. Actual duties and competence of current nuclear regulatory body - State Office for Nuclear Safety (SUJB) - are given in detail. Execution of the State supervision of peaceful utilisation of nuclear energy and ionising radiation is laid out in several articles of the Act, which comprises: control activities of the SUJB, remedial measures, penalties. Material and human resources are sufficient for fulfilment of the basic functions for which SUJB is authorised by the law. For 1998, the SUJB allotted staff of 149, approximately 2/3 of that number are nuclear safety and radiation protection inspectors. The SUJB budget for 1998 is approximately 180 million Czech crowns (roughly 6 million US dollars). Inspection activity of SUJB is carried out in three different ways: routine inspections, planned specialised inspections, inspections as a response to a certain situation (ad-hoc inspections). Approach to the licensing of major plant upgrades and backfittings are mainly illustrated on the Temelin NPP licensing. Regulatory position and practices concerning review activities are presented. (author)

  19. Report on Activities of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic and on Safety of Nuclear Installations in the Slovak Republic in 2006. Annual Report 2006

    A brief account of activities carried out by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic in 2006 is presented. These activities are reported under the headings: Foreword; (1) Vision, Mission and Principles of Activities; (2) Legislation; (3) Issuance of Authorisations, Safety Assessment and Enforcement; (3.1) Issuance of Authorizations/Permissions; (3.2) Assessment and Inspections Activities; (3.3) Safety Assessment and Enforcement; (4) Nuclear Safety of Nuclear Installations in the Slovak Republic; (4.1) Nuclear installations in operation in the Slovak Republic; (4.2) Nuclear Installations under construction in the Slovak Republic; (4.3) Decommissioning of nuclear installations in the Slovak Republic; (5) Safety of Other Nuclear Installations; (5.1) Other Nuclear Installations in Operation; (5.2) Other Nuclear Installations under Construction; (5.3) Other Nuclear Installations under Decommissioning; (6) Management of Radioactive Waste; (6.1) Generation and minimisation of radioactive waste; (6.2) Management of radioactive waste; (6.3) Pre-disposal management of radioactive waste; (6.4) Disposal of radioactive waste; (6.5) Shipment of radioactive waste; (7) Nuclear Materials; (7.1) Accounting for and Control of Nuclear Materials; (7.2) Shipment of Nuclear Materials; (7.3) Illicit Trafficking of Nuclear Materials and Other Radioactive Material; (8) Emergency Planning and Preparedness; (9) International Activities; (9.1) European Affairs; (9.2) Membership in International Organisations; (9.3) Fulfilment of Obligations under International Contractual Instruments; (9.4) Bilateral Co-operation; (10) Public Communication; (11) UJD SR; (11.1) Economy Data; (11.2) Human resources and training; (11.3) Internal Management Quality System; (11.4) Development of UJD SR Regulatory Activities; (12) Abbreviations

  20. Cloud condensation nuclei activity and droplet activation kinetics of wet processed regional dust samples and minerals

    P. Kumar

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This study reports laboratory measurements of particle size distributions, cloud condensation nuclei (CCN activity, and droplet activation kinetics of wet generated aerosols from clays, calcite, quartz, and desert soil samples from Northern Africa, East Asia/China, and Northern America. The dependence of critical supersaturation, sc, on particle dry diameter, Ddry, is used to characterize particle-water interactions and assess the ability of Frenkel-Halsey-Hill adsorption activation theory (FHH-AT and Köhler theory (KT to describe the CCN activity of the considered samples. Wet generated regional dust samples produce unimodal size distributions with particle sizes as small as 40 nm, CCN activation consistent with KT, and exhibit hygroscopicity similar to inorganic salts. Wet generated clays and minerals produce a bimodal size distribution; the CCN activity of the smaller mode is consistent with KT, while the larger mode is less hydrophilic, follows activation by FHH-AT, and displays almost identical CCN activity to dry generated dust. Ion Chromatography (IC analysis performed on regional dust samples indicates a soluble fraction that cannot explain the CCN activity of dry or wet generated dust. A mass balance and hygroscopicity closure suggests that the small amount of ions (from low solubility compounds like calcite present in the dry dust dissolve in the aqueous suspension during the wet generation process and give rise to the observed small hygroscopic mode. Overall these results identify an artifact that may question the atmospheric relevance of dust CCN activity studies using the wet generation method.

    Based on the method of threshold droplet growth analysis, wet generated mineral aerosols display similar activation kinetics compared to ammonium sulfate calibration aerosol. Finally, a unified CCN activity framework that accounts for concurrent effects of solute and adsorption is developed to

  1. Radiation protection on EPR: comparative approach of the French and Finnish regulatory reviewing process and optimization at the design phase

    Taking the opportunity to evaluate the preliminary safety report of the French EPR reactor built in Flamanville, the IRSN proposes to assess the history of EPR, from the decision to implement studies in the 90's to the French and German cooperation, and finally to the construction of a unit in Finland and in France, and to make a synthesis of the assessment of radiation protection arrangements. This assessment presents the dose targets (calculated reference doses) planned by the nuclear operators in the design phase as well as the global radiation protection optimization process and a comparison of French and Finnish analyses. In France, for example, EDF performed a detailed optimization analysis of selected tasks known to have a major contribution to the annual average collective dose (thermal insulation, logistics, valve maintenance, opening/closing of the vessel, preparation and checks of steam generators, on-site spent fuel management, and waste management). The optimization process is based (in France) on an iterative method. A comparison between the EPR collective dose target and doses received in other pressurized water reactors that are close to the EPR design (Konvoi of German design, French existing units, etc.) is also presented. This synthesis was carried out by the IRSN, the expert body of the French nuclear safety authority, in association with Electricite de France (EDF), the French operator, and the authority for nuclear safety in Finland (STUK). It summarizes more than 15 years of studies and partnership, focusing on radiation protection, in the design phase of the EPR. (authors)

  2. Continuous activation of the CD122/STAT-5 signaling pathway during selection of antigen-specific regulatory T cells in the murine thymus.

    Jérémie D Goldstein

    Full Text Available Signaling events affecting thymic selection of un-manipulated polyclonal natural CD25(+foxp3(+ regulatory T cells (nTreg have not been established ex vivo. Here, we report a higher frequency of phosphorylated STAT-5 (pSTAT-5 in nTreg cells in the adult murine thymus and to a lesser extent in the periphery, compared to other CD4(+CD8(- subsets. In the neonatal thymus, the numbers of pSTAT-5(+ cells in CD25(+foxp3(- and nTreg cells increased in parallel, suggesting that pSTAT-5(+CD25(+foxp3(- cells might represent the precursors of foxp3(+ regulatory T cells. This "specific" pSTAT-5 expression detected in nTreg cells ex vivo was likely due to a very recent signal given by IL-2/IL-15 cytokines in vivo since (i it disappeared rapidly if cells were left unstimulated in vitro and (ii was also observed if total thymocytes were stimulated in vitro with saturating amounts of IL-2 and/or IL-15 but not IL-7. Interestingly, STAT-5 activation upon IL-2 stimulation correlated better with foxp3 and CD122 than with CD25 expression. Finally, we show that expression of an endogenous superantigen strongly affected the early Treg cell repertoire but not the proportion of pSTAT-5(+ cells within this repertoire. Our results reveal that continuous activation of the CD122/STAT-5 signaling pathway characterize regulatory lineage differentiation in the murine thymus.

  3. [Cloning and function identification of gene 'admA' and up-stream regulatory sequence related to antagonistic activity of Enterobacter cloacae B8].

    Zhu, Jun-Li; Li, De-Bao; Yu, Xu-Ping

    2012-04-01

    To reveal the antagonistic mechanism of B8 strain to Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, transposon tagging method and chromosome walking were deployed to clone antagonistic related fragments around Tn5 insertion site in the mutant strain B8B. The function of up-stream regulatory sequence of gene 'admA' involved in the antagonistic activity was further identified by gene knocking out technique. An antagonistic related left fragment of Tn5 insertion site, 2 608 bp in length, was obtained by tagging with Kan resistance gene of Tn5. A 2 354 bp right fragment of Tn5 insertion site was amplified with 2 rounds of chromosome walking. The length of the B contig around the Tn5 insertion site was 4 611 bp, containing 7 open reading frames (ORFs). Bioinformatic analysis revealed that these ORFs corresponded to the partial coding regions of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, two LysR family transcriptional regulators, hypothetical protein VSWAT3-20465 of Vibrionales and admA, admB, and partial sequence of admC gene of Pantoea agglomerans biosynthetic gene cluster, respectively. Tn5 was inserted in the up-stream of 200 bp or 894 bp of the sequence corresponding to anrP ORF or admA gene on B8B, respectively. The B-1 and B-2 mutants that lost antagonistic activity were selected by homeologuous recombination technology in association with knocking out plasmid pMB-BG. These results suggested that the transcription and expression of anrP gene might be disrupted as a result of the knocking out of up-stream regulatory sequence by Tn5 in B8B strain, further causing biosythesis regulation of the antagonistic related gene cluster. Thus, the antagonistic related genes in B8 strain is a gene family similar as andrimid biosynthetic gene cluster, and the upstream regulatory region appears to be critical for the antibiotics biosynthesis. PMID:22522167

  4. Viral Interferon Regulatory Factors

    Lee, Hye-Ra; Kim, Myung Hee; Lee, Jong-Soo; Liang, Chengyu; Jung, Jae U.

    2009-01-01

    Upon viral infection, the major defensive strategy employed by the host immune system is the activation of the interferon (IFN)-mediated antiviral pathway, which is overseen by IFN regulatory factors (IRFs). In order to complete their life cycles, viruses must find a way to modulate the host IFN-mediated immune response. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), a human tumor-inducing herpesvirus, has developed a unique mechanism for antagonizing cellular IFN-mediated antiviral activity...

  5. Improved cosmetic activity by optimizing the Lithospermum erythrorhizon extraction process.

    Kim, Ji Seon; Seo, Yong Chang; No, Ra Hwan; Lee, Hyeon Yong

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to expand the use of Lithospermum erythrorhizon, which is a good source of natural dye, in skin whitening and immune activation cosmetics. The goal was to provide cosmeceutical data about the extraction yield and shikonin contents of this plant by optimizing the ultrasonic extraction and high pressure extraction conditions. Under optimal extraction conditions, which consisted of 500 MPa for 60 min and 120 kHz for 90 min, 27.49 and 3.19 % (w/w) of the highest extraction yield and shikonin contents were obtained, compared to 16.32 and 1.81 % from a conventional ethanol extract (EE) control. Hyaluronidase inhibition activity was measured as 44.24 % after adding 1.0 mg/ml of ethanol extract, but it was as high as 64.19 % when using extract produced by ultrasonication with high pressure extraction (UE + HPE). The MMP-1 expression levels from skin fibroblast cells (CCD-986sk) treated with or without UV irradiation were also lowered by as much as 110.6 % after adding 1.0 mg/ml of the UE + HPE extract, relative to 126.9 % from the EE. After UVA exposure, prostaglandin E2 production from RAW 264.7 was also lower, at 110.6 %, which also indicates that the extract from the UE + HPE process enhanced skin immune activation activities. For the skin whitening activity, tyrosinase inhibitory activity was observed at 67.15 % in the HPE + UE extract, which was ca. 20 % higher than that of the EE extract (57.48 %). To reduce melanin production in Clone M-3 cells, 79.5 % of the melanin production was estimated after adding 1.0 mg/ml of the UE + HPE extract compared to that of the control (no treatment), which was similar to the 77.4 % result found in an ascorbic acid positive control. The highest shikonin secretion was conclusively obtained under the optimal conditions and resulted in a significant improvement of the cosmetic activities of L. erythrorhizon extracts. PMID:24287611

  6. Toxicity of carbon nanotubes to the activated sludge process

    The discharge of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) from industrial waste or disposal of such materials from commercial and/or domestic use will inevitably occur with increasing production and enter into wastewater treatment facilities with unknown consequences. Therefore, a better knowledge of the toxicity of CNTs to biological processes in wastewater treatment will be critical. This study examined the toxicity of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) on the microbial communities in activated sludge. A comparative study using the activated sludge respiration inhibition test was performed on both unsheared mixed liquor and sheared mixed liquor to demonstrate the potential toxicity posed by MWCNTs and to illustrate the extent of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in protecting the microorganisms from the toxicity of CNTs. Respiration inhibition was observed for both unsheared and sheared mixed liquor when MWCNTs were present, however, greater respiration inhibition was observed for the sheared mixed liquor. The toxicity observed by the respiration inhibition test was determined to be dose-dependent; the highest concentration of MWCNTs exhibited the highest respiration inhibition. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) images demonstrated direct physical contact between MWCNTs and activated sludge flocs.

  7. Regulatory activity of azabisphosphonate-capped dendrimers on human CD4+ T cell proliferation enhances ex-vivo expansion of NK cells from PBMCs for immunotherapy

    Caminade Anne-Marie

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adoptive cell therapy with allogenic NK cells constitutes a promising approach for the treatment of certain malignancies. Such strategies are currently limited by the requirement of an efficient protocol for NK cell expansion. We have developed a method using synthetic nanosized phosphonate-capped dendrimers allowing such expansion. We are showing here that this is due to a specific inhibitory activity towards CD4+ T cell which could lead to further medical applications of this dendrimer. Methods Mononuclear cells from human peripheral blood were used to investigate the immunomodulatory effects of nanosized phosphonate-capped dendrimers on interleukin-2 driven CD4+T cell expansion. Proliferation status was investigated using flow cytometry analysis of CFSE dilution and PI incorporation experiments. Magnetic bead cell sorting was used to address activity towards individual or mixed cell sub-populations. We performed equilibrium binding assay to assess the interaction of fluorescent dendrimers with pure CD4+ T cells. Results Phosphonate-capped dendrimers are inhibiting the activation, and therefore the proliferation; of CD4+ T cells in IL-2 stimulated PBMCs, without affecting their viability. This allows a rapid enrichment of NK cells and further expansion. We found that dendrimer acts directly on T cells, as their regulatory property is maintained when stimulating purified CD4+ T cells with anti-CD3/CD28 microbeads. Performing equilibrium binding assays using a fluorescent analogue, we show that the phosphonate capped-dendrimers are specifically interacting with purified CD4+ T cells. Ultimately, we found that our protocol prevents the IL-2 related expansion of regulatory T cells that would be deleterious for the activity of infused NK cells. Conclusion High yield expansion of NK cells from human PBMCs by phosphonate-capped dendrimers and IL-2 occurs through the specific inhibition of the CD4+ lymphocyte compartment. Given the

  8. Phosphorylation-dephosphorylation process as a probable mechanism for the diurnal regulatory changes of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in CAM plants.

    Brulfert, J; Vidal, J; Le Marechal, P; Gadal, P; Queiroz, O; Kluge, M; Kruger, I

    1986-04-14

    Day and night forms of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (EC 4.1.1.31) (PEPC) were extracted from leaves of the CAM plants Kalanchoe daigremontiana, K. tubiflora and K. blossfeldiana previously fed with [32P] labelled phosphate solution. A one-step immunochemical purification followed by SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography showed that, in all species, the night form of the enzyme was phosphorylated and not the day form. Limited acid hydrolysis of the night form and two-dimensional separation identified predominantly labelled phosphoserine and phosphothreonine. In vitro addition of exogenous acid phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.2) to desalted night form-containing extracts resulted within 30 min in a shift in PEPC enzymic properties similar to the in vivo changes from night to day form. It is suggested that phosphorylation-dephosphorylation of the enzyme could be the primary in vivo process which might explain the observed rhythmicity of enzymic properties. PMID:3707571

  9. Nitrogen in the Process of Waste Activated Sludge Anaerobic Digestion

    Suschka Jan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Primary or secondary sewage sludge in medium and large WWTP are most often processed by anaerobic digestion, as a method of conditioning, sludge quantity minimization and biogas production. With the aim to achieve the best results of sludge processing several modifications of technologies were suggested, investigated and introduced in the full technical scale. Various sludge pretreatment technologies before anaerobic treatment have been widely investigated and partially introduced. Obviously, there are always some limitations and some negative side effects. Selected aspects have been presented and discussed. The problem of nitrogen has been highlighted on the basis of the carried out investigations. The single and two step - mesophilic and thermophilic - anaerobic waste activated sludge digestion processes, preceded by preliminary hydrolysis were investigated. The aim of lab-scale experiments was pre-treatment of the sludge by means of low intensive alkaline and hydrodynamic disintegration. Depending on the pretreatment technologies and the digestion temperature large ammonia concentrations, up to 1800 mg NH4/dm3 have been measured. Return of the sludge liquor to the main sewage treatment line means additional nitrogen removal costs. Possible solutions are discussed.

  10. Different Head Environments in Tarantula Thick Filaments Support a Cooperative Activation Process

    Sulbarán, Guidenn; Biasutto, Antonio; Alamo, Lorenzo; Riggs, Claire; Pinto, Antonio; Méndez, Franklin; Craig, Roger; Padrón, Raúl

    2013-01-01

    Myosin filaments from many muscles are activated by phosphorylation of their regulatory light chains (RLCs). Structural analysis of relaxed tarantula thick filaments shows that the RLCs of the interacting free and blocked myosin heads are in different environments. This and other data suggested a phosphorylation mechanism in which Ser-35 of the free head is exposed and constitutively phosphorylated by protein kinase C, whereas the blocked head is hidden and unphosphorylated; on activation, my...

  11. Assessment of regulatory effectiveness. Peer discussions on regulatory practices

    This report arises from the seventh series of peer discussions on regulatory practices entitled 'Assessment of Regulatory Effectiveness'. The term 'regulatory effectiveness' covers the quality of the work and level of performance of a regulatory body. In this sense, regulatory effectiveness applies to regulatory body activities aimed at preventing safety degradation and ensuring that an acceptable level of safety is being maintained by the regulated operating organizations. In addition, regulatory effectiveness encompasses the promotion of safety improvements, the timely and cost effective performance of regulatory functions in a manner which ensures the confidence of the operating organizations, the general public and the government, and striving for continuous improvements to performance. Senior regulators from 22 Member States participated in two peer group discussions during March and May 1999. The discussions were focused on the elements of an effective regulatory body, possible indicators of regulatory effectiveness and its assessment. This report presents the outcome of these meetings and recommendations of good practices identified by senior regulators, which do not necessarily reflect those of the governments of the nominating Member States, the organizations they belong to, or the International Atomic Energy Agency. In order to protect people and the environment from hazards associated with nuclear facilities, the main objective of a nuclear regulatory body is to ensure that a high level of safety in the nuclear activities under its jurisdiction is achieved, maintained and within the control of operating organizations. Even if it is possible to directly judge objective safety levels at nuclear facilities, such safety levels would not provide an exclusive indicator of regulatory effectiveness. The way the regulatory body ensures the safety of workers and the public and the way it discharges its responsibilities also determine its effectiveness. Hence the

  12. Regulatory mechanisms for floral homeotic gene expression.

    Liu, Zhongchi; Mara, Chloe

    2010-02-01

    Proper regulation of floral homeotic gene (or ABCE gene) expression ensures the development of floral organs in the correct number, type, and precise spatial arrangement. This review summarizes recent advances on the regulation of floral homeotic genes, highlighting the variety and the complexity of the regulatory mechanisms involved. As flower development is one of the most well characterized developmental processes in higher plants, it facilitates the discovery of novel regulatory mechanisms. To date, mechanisms for the regulation of floral homeotic genes range from transcription to post-transcription, from activators to repressors, and from microRNA- to ubiquitin-mediated post-transcriptional regulation. Region-specific activation of floral homeotic genes is dependent on the integration of a flower-specific activity provided by LEAFY (LFY) and a region- and stage-specific activating function provided by one of the LFY cofactors. Two types of regulatory loops, the feed-forward and the feedback loop, provide properly timed gene activation and subsequent maintenance and refinement in proper spatial and temporal domains of ABCE genes. Two different microRNA/target modules may have been independently recruited in different plant species to regulate C gene expression. Additionally, competition among different MADS box proteins for common interacting partners may represent a mechanism in whorl boundary demarcation. Future work using systems approaches and the development of non-model plants will provide integrated views on floral homeotic gene regulation and insights into the evolution of morphological diversity in flowering plants. PMID:19922812

  13. The Hepatitis C Virus-induced NLRP3 Inflammasome Activates the Sterol Regulatory Element-binding Protein (SREBP) and Regulates Lipid Metabolism.

    McRae, Steven; Iqbal, Jawed; Sarkar-Dutta, Mehuli; Lane, Samantha; Nagaraj, Abhiram; Ali, Naushad; Waris, Gulam

    2016-02-12

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) relies on host lipids and lipid droplets for replication and morphogenesis. The accumulation of lipid droplets in infected hepatocytes manifests as hepatosteatosis, a common pathology observed in chronic hepatitis C patients. One way by which HCV promotes the accumulation of intracellular lipids is through enhancing de novo lipogenesis by activating the sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs). In general, activation of SREBPs occurs during cholesterol depletion. Interestingly, during HCV infection, the activation of SREBPs occurs under normal cholesterol levels, but the underlying mechanisms are still elusive. Our previous study has demonstrated the activation of the inflammasome complex in HCV-infected human hepatoma cells. In this study, we elucidate the potential link between chronic hepatitis C-associated inflammation and alteration of lipid homeostasis in infected cells. Our results reveal that the HCV-activated NLRP3 inflammasome is required for the up-regulation of lipogenic genes such as 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A synthase, fatty acid synthase, and stearoyl-CoA desaturase. Using pharmacological inhibitors and siRNA against the inflammasome components (NLRP3, apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD, and caspase-1), we further show that the activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome plays a critical role in lipid droplet formation. NLRP3 inflammasome activation in HCV-infected cells enables caspase-1-mediated degradation of insulin-induced gene proteins. This subsequently leads to the transport of the SREBP cleavage-activating protein·SREBP complex from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi, followed by proteolytic activation of SREBPs by S1P and S2P in the Golgi. Typically, inflammasome activation leads to viral clearance. Paradoxically, here we demonstrate how HCV exploits the NLRP3 inflammasome to activate SREBPs and host lipid metabolism, leading to liver disease pathogenesis associated with

  14. Inspection and enforcement by the regulatory body for nuclear power plants. A safety guide. A publication within the NUSS programme

    The purpose of this Safety Guide is to provide guidance on fulfilling the requirements for inspection and enforcement by the regulatory body, as set out in the Code on the Safety of Nuclear Power Plants; Governmental Organization. This Safety Guide deals with the responsibilities of the regulatory body, the organization of inspection programmes, the inspection resources of the regulatory body, methods of inspection, requirements on the applicant/licensee in regard to regulatory inspection, inspection reports, and regulatory action and enforcement. It is recognized that many of the provisions of this Safety Guide may be applicable to the regulations of other nuclear facilities and related activities including research reactors, fuel processing and manufacturing plants, irradiated fuel processing plants and radioactive waste management facilities. This Safety Guide does not deal specifically with the functions of a regulatory body responsible for such matters; however, the guidance presented here may be applied as appropriate to these activities. 11 refs, 1 fig

  15. Dual Control with Active Learning using Gaussian Process Regression

    Alpcan, Tansu

    2011-01-01

    In many real world problems, control decisions have to be made with limited information. The controller may have no a priori (or even posteriori) data on the nonlinear system, except from a limited number of points that are obtained over time. This is either due to high cost of observation or the highly non-stationary nature of the system. The resulting conflict between information collection (identification, exploration) and control (optimization, exploitation) necessitates an active learning approach for iteratively selecting the control actions which concurrently provide the data points for system identification. This paper presents a dual control approach where the information acquired at each control step is quantified using the entropy measure from information theory and serves as the training input to a state-of-the-art Gaussian process regression (Bayesian learning) method. The explicit quantification of the information obtained from each data point allows for iterative optimization of both identifica...

  16. Contagion processes on the static and activity driven coupling networks

    Lei, Yanjun; Guo, Quantong; Ma, Yifang; Li, Meng; Zheng, Zhiming

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of network structure and the spreading of epidemic are common coexistent dynamical processes. In most cases, network structure is treated either static or time-varying, supposing the whole network is observed in a same time window. In this paper, we consider the epidemic spreading on a network consisting of both static and time-varying structures. At meanwhile, the time-varying part and the epidemic spreading are supposed to be of the same time scale. We introduce a static and activity driven coupling (SADC) network model to characterize the coupling between static (strong) structure and dynamic (weak) structure. Epidemic thresholds of SIS and SIR model are studied on SADC both analytically and numerically with various coupling strategies, where the strong structure is of homogeneous or heterogeneous degree distribution. Theoretical thresholds obtained from SADC model can both recover and generalize the classical results in static and time-varying networks. It is demonstrated that weak structure...

  17. Quality assurance within regulatory bodies

    The IAEA directed extensive efforts during the years 1991 to 1995 to the integral revision of all NUSS quality assurance publications, which were approved and issued as Safety Series No.50-C/SG-Q, Quality Assurance for Safety in Nuclear Power Plants and other Nuclear Installations (1996). When these quality assurance publications were developed, their prime focus was on requirements against which work performed by the licensees could be measured and assessed by the regulatory bodies. In this way, they only helped to facilitate the functions of regulators. No requirements or recommendations were provided on how the regulators should ensure the effective implementation of their own activities. The present publication is a first attempt to collect, integrate and offer available experience to directly support performance of regulatory activities. It presents a comprehensive compilation on the application of quality assurance principles and methods by regulatory bodies to their activities. The aim is consistent good performance of regulatory activities through a systematic approach

  18. A Framework for Integrating Environmental Justice in Regulatory Analysis

    Onyemaechi C. Nweke

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available With increased interest in integrating environmental justice into the process for developing environmental regulations in the United States, analysts and decision makers are confronted with the question of what methods and data can be used to assess disproportionate environmental health impacts. However, as a first step to identifying data and methods, it is important that analysts understand what information on equity impacts is needed for decision making. Such knowledge originates from clearly stated equity objectives and the reflection of those objectives throughout the analytical activities that characterize Regulatory Impact Analysis (RIA, a process that is traditionally used to inform decision making. The framework proposed in this paper advocates structuring analyses to explicitly provide pre-defined output on equity impacts. Specifically, the proposed framework emphasizes: (a defining equity objectives for the proposed regulatory action at the onset of the regulatory process, (b identifying specific and related sub-objectives for key analytical steps in the RIA process, and (c developing explicit analytical/research questions to assure that stated sub-objectives and objectives are met. In proposing this framework, it is envisioned that information on equity impacts informs decision-making in regulatory development, and that this is achieved through a systematic and consistent approach that assures linkages between stated equity objectives, regulatory analyses, selection of policy options, and the design of compliance and enforcement activities.

  19. Activities of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic and safety of nuclear facilities in the Slovak Republic in 1994

    The report summarizes activities of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic (NRA SR) in 1994 and briefly presents results of the national expert supervision over nuclear safety facilities in the SR in 1994. In 1994, the NRA SR have performed a national supervision of following organizations: SE, a.s. - Jaslovske Bohunice Nuclear Power Plant (V-1 Nuclear Power Plant (V-1 NPP), V-2 Nuclear Power Plant (V-2 NPP), A-1 Nuclear Power Plant (A-1 NPP)); Mochovce Nuclear Power Plant; Radioactive waste repository, Mochovce); Organizations providing a specialized training of NPP personnel; Organizations providing specific deliveries and activities for the nuclear power industry; Organizations having an owner of nuclear materials; Organizations providing activities related to import of radioactive sources; Organizations using radioactive sources. Organization structure of the NRA SR is explained. In the presented Chapter 1 - Safety of nuclear power plants in the Slovak Republic - safety aspects of the Slovak NPPs are reported. The next activities are reported: nuclear materials and safeguards; radioactive waste; emergency planning and NRA SR's control and crisis centre; international activities to improve the national surveillance quality; other activities

  20. Electrical processes for the treatment of medium active liquid wastes

    Cross-flow electrokinetic dewatering has been developed on a lab-scale into an effective process for the treatment of such wastes as gravity-settled flocs, or sludges arising from fuel storage. The product may be concentrated to 25-42% solids while still remaining fluid, prior to immobilization - e.g. by addition of cement powder. Complete retention of activity in the concentrate was observed during the treatment of Harwell low-level waste sludges due to the high solids separation factor ( > 104). It is a low pressure, low temperature process - consuming only 0.03-0.13 kWh/L at permeation rates of 0.3-1.5 m/h (depending on the stream), corresponding to 1/67 - 1/15 that needed for evaporation. An advanced electrochemical ion-exchange system has been developed in which ionic material can be electrically adsorbed and eluted by polarity reversal > 1000 times, without any change in performance. Decontamination factors of about 2000 were achieved for Cs removal, up to 75% loading of the exchanger at flow rates of 8 bed volumes/h. Elution into water can give concentrates of >= 0.25 M - with consequent high volume reduction factors. Inorganic ion-exchangers have also demonstrated system selectivity for the removal of specific cations. Overall energy consumption is 3 (1/400 evaporation). Significant cost savings over conventional ion-exchange may accrue from the improved performance under electrical control, and the reduced volumes of waste requiring disposal. (author)