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Sample records for active recombinant cathepsin

  1. Expression and Purification of Active Recombinant Cathepsin C (Dipeptidyl Aminopeptidase I of Kuruma Prawn Marsupenaeus japonicus in Insect Cells

    Gao-Feng Qiu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Cathepsin C (CTSC is a lysosomal cysteine protease belonging to the papain superfamily. Our previous study showed that CTSC precursor (zymogen is localized exclusively in cortical rods (CRs of mature oocyte in the kuruma prawn Marsupenaeus japonicus, suggesting that CTSC might have roles on regulating release and/or formation of a jelly layer. In this study, enzymically active CTSC of the kuruma prawn was prepared by recombinant expression in the High Five insect cell line. The recombinant enzyme with a polyhistidine tag at its C-terminus was considered to be initially secreted into the culture medium as an inactive form of zymogen, because Western blot with anti-CTSC antibody detected a 51 kDa protein corresponding to CTSC precursor. After purification by affinity chromatography on nickel-iminodiacetic acid resin, the enzyme displayed three forms of 51, 31, and 30 kDa polypeptides. All of the forms can be recognized by antiserum raised against C-terminal polyhistidine tag, indicating that the 31 and 30 kDa forms were generated from 51 kDa polypeptide by removal of a portion of the N-terminus of propeptide. Following activation at pH 5.5 and 37∘C for 40 hours under native conditions, the recombinant CTSC (rCTSC exhibited increased activity against the synthetic substrate Gly-Phe-β-naphthylamide and optimal pH at around 5. The purified rCTSC will be useful for further characterization of its exact physiological role on CRs release and/or formation of a jelly layer in kuruma prawn.

  2. Profilin 1 as a target for cathepsin X activity in tumor cells.

    Urša Pečar Fonović

    Full Text Available Cathepsin X has been reported to be a tumor promotion factor in various types of cancer; however, the molecular mechanisms linking its activity with malignant processes are not understood. Here we present profilin 1, a known tumor suppressor, as a target for cathepsin X carboxypeptidase activity in prostate cancer PC-3 cells. Profilin 1 co-localizes strongly with cathepsin X intracellularly in the perinuclear area as well as at the plasma membrane. Selective cleavage of C-terminal amino acids was demonstrated on a synthetic octapeptide representing the profilin C-terminal region, and on recombinant profilin 1. Further, intact profilin 1 binds its poly-L-proline ligand clathrin significantly better than it does the truncated one, as shown using cathepsin X specific inhibitor AMS-36 and immunoprecipitation of the profilin 1/clathrin complex. Moreover, the polymerization of actin, which depends also on the binding of poly-L-proline ligands to profilin 1, was promoted by AMS-36 treatment of cells and by siRNA cathepsin X silencing. Our results demonstrate that increased adhesion, migration and invasiveness of tumor cells depend on the inactivation of the tumor suppressive function of profilin 1 by cathepsin X. The latter is thus designated as a target for development of new antitumor strategies.

  3. Effect of heavy metal cations on the activity of cathepsin D (in vitro study) Effect of heavy metal cations on the activity of cathepsin D (in vitro study)

    Alicja Karwowska; Radosław Łapiński; Marek Gacko; Ewa Grzegorczyk; Joanna Żurawska; Jan K. Karczewski

    2012-01-01

    We studied the effect of heavy metal cations: Fe 2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, Cd2+, Hg2+, Pb2+ on the activity of
    cathepsin D in human aorta homogenate and blood serum. The concentration of cations was 1 mmol/l. Hemoglobin
    was the cathepsin D substrate. The activity of cathepsin D was determined at pH 3.5. Only Hg2+ cations
    inhibit the activity of cathepsin D. Cations Hg2+ damage lysosomes and release cathepsin D from these organelles.We studied the effect of heavy metal c...

  4. Silver and Gold Nanoparticles Alter Cathepsin Activity In vitro

    Speshock, Janice L.; Braydich-Stolle, Laura K.; Szymanski, Eric R.; Hussain, Saber M.

    2011-12-01

    Nanomaterials are being incorporated into many biological applications for use as therapeutics, sensors, or labels. Silver nanomaterials are being utilized for biological implants and wound dressings as an antiviral material, whereas gold nanomaterials are being used as biological labels or sensors due to their surface properties and biocompatibility. Cytotoxicity data of these materials are becoming more prevalent; however, little research has been performed to understand how the introduction of these materials into cells affects cellular processes. Here, we demonstrate the impact that silver and gold nanoparticles have on cathepsin activity in vitro. Cathepsins are important cellular proteases that are imperative for proper immune system function. We have selected to examine gold and silver nanoparticles due to the increased use of these materials in biological applications. This manuscript depicts how both of these types of nanomaterials affect cathepsin activity, which could impact the host's immune system and its ability to respond to pathogens. Cathepsin B activity decreases in a dose-dependent manner with all nanoparticles tested. Alternatively, the impact of nanoparticles on cathepsin L activity depends greatly on the type and size of the material.

  5. Caught in the act: the crystal structure of cleaved cathepsin L bound to the active site of Cathepsin L.

    Sosnowski, Piotr; Turk, Dušan

    2016-04-01

    Cathepsin L is a ubiquitously expressed papain-like cysteine protease involved in the endosomal degradation of proteins and has numerous roles in physiological and pathological processes, such as arthritis, osteoporosis, and cancer. Insight into the specificity of cathepsin L is important for elucidating its physiological roles and drug discovery. To study interactions with synthetic ligands, we prepared a presumably inactive mutant and crystallized it. Unexpectedly, the crystal structure determined at 1.4 Å revealed that the cathepsin L molecule is cleaved, with the cleaved region trapped in the active site cleft of the neighboring molecule. Hence, the catalytic mutant demonstrated low levels of catalytic activity. PMID:26992470

  6. Effect of heavy metal cations on the activity of cathepsin D (in vitro study Effect of heavy metal cations on the activity of cathepsin D (in vitro study

    Alicja Karwowska

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We studied the effect of heavy metal cations: Fe 2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, Cd2+, Hg2+, Pb2+ on the activity of
    cathepsin D in human aorta homogenate and blood serum. The concentration of cations was 1 mmol/l. Hemoglobin
    was the cathepsin D substrate. The activity of cathepsin D was determined at pH 3.5. Only Hg2+ cations
    inhibit the activity of cathepsin D. Cations Hg2+ damage lysosomes and release cathepsin D from these organelles.We studied the effect of heavy metal cations: Fe 2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, Cd2+, Hg2+, Pb2+ on the activity of
    cathepsin D in human aorta homogenate and blood serum. The concentration of cations was 1 mmol/l. Hemoglobin
    was the cathepsin D substrate. The activity of cathepsin D was determined at pH 3.5. Only Hg2+ cations
    inhibit the activity of cathepsin D. Cations Hg2+ damage lysosomes and release cathepsin D from these organelles.

  7. Complex modulation of peptidolytic activity of cathepsin D by sphingolipids

    Žebrakovská, Iva; Máša, Martin; Srp, Jaroslav; Horn, Martin; Vávrová, K.; Mareš, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 1811, č. 12 (2011), s. 1097-1104. ISSN 1388-1981 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400550705 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : sphingolipid * phospholipid * inhibition * activation * cathepsin D * enzyme regulation Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 5.269, year: 2011

  8. The Effect of Washing and Inhibitor on Cathepsin Activity of Silver Carp

    2003-01-01

    The effect of washing and temperature on the activity of cathepsins of Silver carp was studied.The result showed that the activity of cathepsin L was higher than those of cathepsin B and H.The total catalysis activity of these three enzymes was the highest at 55℃ after washing.The inhibiting effect of soybean protein and potato starch on cathepsin L also had been studied,the results showed that soybean protein and potato starch could decrease activity of cathepsins L significantly.

  9. Effect of heavy metal cations on the activity of cathepsin D (in vitro study).

    Karwowska, Alicja; Łapiński, Radosław; Gacko, Marek; Grzegorczyk, Ewa; Żurawska, Joanna; Karczewski, Jan K

    2012-01-01

    We studied the effect of heavy metal cations: Fe²⁺, Cu²⁺, Zn²⁺, Cd²⁺, Hg²⁺, Pb²⁺ on the activity of cathepsin D in human aorta homogenate and blood serum. The concentration of cations was 1 mmol/l. Hemoglobin was the cathepsin D substrate. The activity of cathepsin D was determined at pH 3.5. Only Hg²⁺ cations inhibit the activity of cathepsin D. Cations Hg²⁺ damage lysosomes and release cathepsin D from these organelles. PMID:23042275

  10. Cathepsin activity and texture in Atlantic salmon muscle

    Sheng, Yuancheng

    2015-01-01

    Cathepsins, a family of lysosomal proteases, are believed to play a role in muscle tenderization. In the present study the activity of cathapsin B+L in Atlantic salmon muscle and a possible influence on the textural quality was studied. Total of 98 Atlantic salmon from 10 families were slaughtered and pre-rigor filleted. This salmon fillet texture was measured instrumentally at 5 days post-mortem. The cathapsin activities were measured on muscle samples frozen immediately after slaughter. Sta...

  11. Redefining the concept of protease-activated receptors: cathepsin S evokes itch via activation of Mrgprs

    Reddy, Vemuri B.; Sun, Shuohao; Azimi, Ehsan; Elmariah, Sarina B.; Dong, Xinzhong; Lerner, Ethan A.

    2015-01-01

    Sensory neurons expressing Mas-related G protein coupled receptors (Mrgprs) mediate histamine-independent itch. We show that the cysteine protease cathepsin S activates MrgprC11 and evokes receptor-dependent scratching in mice. In contrast to its activation of conventional protease-activated receptors, cathepsin S mediated activation of MrgprC11 did not involve the generation of a tethered ligand. We demonstrate further that different cysteine proteases selectively activate specific mouse and...

  12. BRCA1 loss activates cathepsin L–mediated degradation of 53BP1 in breast cancer cells

    Grotsky, David A.; González-Suárez, Ignacio; Novell Álvarez, Anna; Neumann, Martin; Yaddanapudi, Sree C.; Croke, Monica; Martínez Alonso, Montserrat; Redwood, Abena B.; Ortega-Martinez, Sylvia; Feng, Zhihui; Lerma, Enrique; Ramon y Cajal, Teresa; Zhang, Junran; Matias-Guiu, Xavier; Dusso, Adriana

    2013-01-01

    Loss of 53BP1 rescues BRCA1 deficiency and is associated with BRCA1-deficient and triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC) and with resistance to genotoxic drugs. The mechanisms responsible for decreased 53BP1 transcript and protein levels in tumors remain unknown. Here, we demonstrate that BRCA1 loss activates cathepsin L (CTSL)–mediated degradation of 53BP1. Activation of this pathway rescued homologous recombination repair and allowed BRCA1-deficient cells to bypass growth arrest. Importantly...

  13. Calpain and cathepsin activities in post mortem fish and meat muscles

    Cheret, Romuald; Delbarre Ladrat, Christine; De Lamballerie Anton, Marie; VERREZ-BAGNIS Veronique

    2007-01-01

    Post mortem tenderization is one of the most unfavourable quality changes in fish muscle and this contrasts with muscle of mammalian meats. The tenderization can be partly attributed to the acid lysosomal cathepsins and cytosolic neutral calcium-activated calpains. In this study, these proteases from fish and bovine muscles were quantified and compared. The cathepsin B and L activities were in more important amounts in sea bass white muscle than in bovine muscle. On the other hand, cathepsin ...

  14. Pharmacological and genetic evidence that cathepsin B is not the physiological activator of rodent prorenin.

    Percival, M David; Toulmond, Sylvie; Coulombe, Nathalie; Cromlish, Wanda; Desmarais, Sylvie; Liu, Susana; St-Jacques, René; Gauthier, Jacques Yves; Fournier, Jean-Francois

    2010-12-01

    Renin is the first enzyme in the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system which is the principal regulator of blood pressure and hydroelectrolyte balance. Previous studies suggest that cathepsin B is the activator of the prorenin zymogen. Here, we show no difference in plasma renin activity, or mean arterial blood pressure between wild-type and cathepsin B knockout mice. To account for potential gene compensation, a potent, selective, reversible cathepsin B inhibitor was developed to determine the role of cathepsin B on prorenin processing in rats. Pharmacological inhibition of cathepsin B in spontaneously hypertensive and double transgenic rats did not result in a reduction in renal mature renin protein levels or plasma renin activity. We conclude that cathepsin B does not play a significant role in this process in rodents. PMID:20868234

  15. Determination of cathepsin S abundance and activity in human plasma and implications for clinical investigation.

    Cox, Jennifer M; Troutt, Jason S; Knierman, Michael D; Siegel, Robert W; Qian, Yue-Wei; Ackermann, Bradley L; Konrad, Robert J

    2012-11-15

    There is strong experimental evidence associating cathepsin S with the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, with emerging data to support its role in diseases such as abdominal aortic aneurysm, obesity, and type 2 diabetes. To further our understanding of cathepsin S, we have developed a novel sandwich immunoassay to measure the mature form of cathepsin S in plasma (mean values from 12 healthy donors of 53±17ng/ml, range=39-102). We also developed a targeted liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) assay to measure in vitro cathepsin S activity to compare activity levels with the protein mass levels determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Interestingly, we observed that only 0.4 to 1.1% of circulating cathepsin S was enzymatically active. We subsequently demonstrated that the attenuated activity we observed resulted from binding between cathepsin S and its endogenous inhibitor cystatin C in plasma. These data were obtained through immunoprecipitation coupled with either Western blotting analysis or in-gel tryptic digestion and LC-MS/MS characterization of Coomassie-stained gel bands. Although many laboratories have explored the relationship between cathepsin S and cystatin C, this is the first study to demonstrate their association in human circulation, a finding that could prove to be important in furthering our understanding of cathepsin S biology. PMID:22922382

  16. Cysteine cathepsin activity suppresses osteoclastogenesis of myeloid-derived suppressor cells in breast cancer

    Edgington-Mitchell, L.E.; Rautela, J.; Duivenvoorden, H.M.; Jayatilleke, K.M.; Linden, W.A. van der; Verdoes, M.; Bogyo, M.; Parker, B.S.

    2015-01-01

    Cysteine cathepsin proteases contribute to many normal cellular functions, and their aberrant activity within various cell types can contribute to many diseases, including breast cancer. It is now well accepted that cathepsin proteases have numerous cell-specific functions within the tumor microenvi

  17. Bone Microenvironment Modulates Expression and Activity of Cathepsin B in Prostate Cancer

    Izabela Podgorski

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancers metastasize to bone leading to osteolysis. Here we assessed proteolysis of DOcollagen I (a bone matrix protein and, for comparison, DO-collagen IV, by living human prostate carcinoma cells in vitro. Both collagens were degraded, this degradation was reduced by inhibitors of matrix metallo, serine, cysteine proteases. Because secretion of the cysteine protease cathepsin B is increased in human breast fibroblasts grown on collagen I gels, we analyzed cathepsin B levels and secretion in prostate cells grown on collagen I gels. Levels and secretion were increased only in DU145 cells-cells that expressed the highest baseline levels of cathepsin B. Secretion of cathepsin B was also elevated in DU145 cells grown in vitro on human bone fragments. We further investigated the effect of the bone microenvironment on cathepsin B expression and activity in vivo in a SCID-human model of prostate bone metastasis. High levels of cathepsin B protein and activity were found in DU145, PC3, LNCaP bone tumors, although the PC3 and LNCaP cells had exhibited low cathepsin B expression in vitro. Our results suggest that tumor-stromal interactions in the context of the bone microenvironment can modulate the expression of the cysteine protease cathepsin B.

  18. Plasma cathepsin D isoforms and their active metabolites increase after myocardial infarction and contribute to plasma renin activity.

    Naseem, R Haris; Hedegard, Wade; Henry, Timothy D; Lessard, Jennifer; Sutter, Kathryn; Katz, Stephen A

    2005-03-01

    Plasma renin activity (PRA) is often found to increase after myocardial infarction (MI). Elevated PRA may contribute to increased myocardial angiotensin II that is responsible for maladaptive remodeling of the myocardium after MI. We hypothesized that MI would also result in cardiac release of cathepsin D, a ubiquitous lysosomal enzyme with high renin sequence homology. Cathepsin D release from damaged myocardial tissue could contribute to angiotensin formation by acting as an enzymatic alternate to renin. We assessed circulating renin and cathepsin D from both control and MI patient plasma (7-20 hours after MI) using shallow gradient focusing that allowed for independent measurement of both enzymes. Cathepsin D was increased significantly in the plasma after MI (P < 0.001). Furthermore, circulating active cathepsin D metabolites were also significantly elevated after MI (P < 0.04), and contained the majority of cathepsin D activity in plasma. Spiking control plasma with cathepsin D resulted in a variable but significant (P = 0.005) increase in PRA using a clinical assay. We conclude that 7-20 hours after MI, plasma cathepsin D is significantly elevated and most of the active enzymatic activity is circulating as plasma metabolites. Circulating cathepsin D can falsely increase clinical PRA determinations, and may also provide an alternative angiotensin formation pathway after MI. PMID:15739123

  19. Lack of cathepsin activities alter or prevent the development of lung granulomas in a mouse model of sarcoidosis

    Percival M David

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Remodeling of lung tissues during the process of granuloma formation requires significant restructuring of the extra-cellular matrix and cathepsins K, L and S are among the strongest extra-cellular matrix degrading enzymes. Cathepsin K is highly expressed in various pathological granulomatous infiltrates and all three enzymes in their active form are detected in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids from patients with sarcoidosis. Granulomatous inflammation is driven by T-cell response and cathepsins S and L are actively involved in the regulation of antigen presentation and T-cell selection. Here, we show that the disruption of the activities of cathepsins K, L, or S affects the development of lung granulomas in a mouse model of sarcoidosis. Methods Apolipoprotein E-deficient mice lacking cathepsin K or L were fed Paigen diet for 16 weeks and lungs were analyzed and compared with their cathepsin-expressing littermates. The role of cathepsin S in the development of granulomas was evaluated using mice treated for 8 weeks with a potent and selective cathepsin S inhibitor. Results When compared to wild-type litters, more cathepsin K-deficient mice had lung granulomas, but individually affected mice developed smaller granulomas that were present in lower numbers. The absence of cathepsin K increased the number of multinucleated giant cells and the collagen content in granulomas. Cathepsin L deficiency resulted in decreased size and number of lung granulomas. Apoe-/- mice treated with a selective cathepsin S inhibitor did not develop lung granulomas and only individual epithelioid cells were observed. Conclusions Cathepsin K deficiency affected mostly the occurrence and composition of lung granulomas, whereas cathepsin L deficiency significantly reduced their number and cathepsin S inhibition prevented the formation of granulomas.

  20. Vaccine potential of recombinant pro- and mature cathepsinL1 against fasciolosis gigantica in mice.

    Kueakhai, Pornanan; Changklungmoa, Narin; Chaichanasak, Pannigan; Jaikua, Wipaphorn; Itagaki, Tadashi; Sobhon, Prasert

    2015-10-01

    In Fasciola gigantica cathepsin L1 (CatL1) is a family of predominant proteases that is expressed in caecal epithelial cells and secreted into the excretory-secretory products (ES). CatL1 isotypes are expressed in both early and late stages of the life cycle and the parasites use them for migration and digestion. Therefore, CatL1 is a plausible target for vaccination against this parasite. Recombinant pro-F.gigantica CatL1 (rproFgCatL1) and recombinant mature F.gigantica CatL1 (rmatFgCatL1) were expressed in Escherichia coli BL21. The vaccination was performed in Imprinting Control Region (ICR) mice (n=10) by subcutaneous injection with 50μg of rproFgCatL1 and rmatFgCatL1 combined with Freund's adjuvant. Two weeks after the second boost, mice were infected with 15 metacercariae by the oral route. The level of protection of rproFgCatL1 and rmatFgCatL1 vaccines was estimated to be 39.1, 41.7% and 44.9, 47.2% when compared with non vaccinated-infected and adjuvant-infected controls, respectively. Antibodies in the immune sera of vaccinated mice were shown by immuno-blotting to react with the native FgCatL1 in the extract of newly excysted juveniles (NEJ), 4-week-old juveniles and the ES products of 4 week-old juveniles. By determining the levels of IgG1 and IgG2a in the immune sera, which are indicative of Th2 and Th1 immune response, respectively, it was found that both Th1 and Th2 responses were significantly increased in rproFgCatL1- and rmatFgCatL1-immunized groups compared with the control groups, with higher levels of Th2 (IgG1) than Th1 (IgG2a). The levels of serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine transaminase (ALT) in rmatFgCatL1-immunized group showed a significant decrease when compared to rproFgCatL1-immunized group, indicating that rmatFgCatL1-vaccinated mice had reduced liver parenchyma damage. The pathological lesions of liver in vaccinated groups were significantly decreased when compared with control groups. This study indicates that r

  1. Cysteine cathepsin activity suppresses osteoclastogenesis of myeloid-derived suppressor cells in breast cancer

    Edgington-Mitchell, Laura E.; Rautela, Jai; Duivenvoorden, Hendrika M.; Jayatilleke, Krishnath M.; Wouter A. van der Linden; Verdoes, Martijn; Bogyo, Matthew; Parker, Belinda S.

    2015-01-01

    Cysteine cathepsin proteases contribute to many normal cellular functions, and their aberrant activity within various cell types can contribute to many diseases, including breast cancer. It is now well accepted that cathepsin proteases have numerous cell-specific functions within the tumor microenvironment that function to promote tumor growth and invasion, such that they may be valid targets for anti-metastatic therapeutic approaches. Using activity-based probes, we have examined the activit...

  2. Olomoucine inhibits cathepsin L nuclear translocation, activates autophagy and attenuates toxicity of 6-hydroxydopamine.

    Fei, Xi-Feng; Qin, Zheng-Hong; Xiang, Bei; Li, Ling-Yun; Han, Feng; Fukunaga, Kohji; Liang, Zhong-Qin

    2009-04-01

    The finding of nuclear translocation of cathepsin L and its ability to process the CDP/Cux transcription factor uncovers an important role of cathepsin L in control of cell cycle progression. As the expression of certain cell cycle regulators is associated with nigral neuronal death, the present study was sought to investigate if nuclear translocation of cathepsin L and expression of certain cyclins were induced in DA neurons by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). The neuroprotective effects of the cell cycle inhibitor olomoucine against 6-OHDA-induced death of nigral neurons were examined. Using immunocytochemistry and real-time PCR we demonstrated that cyclin D1, cyclin B1 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) were aberrantly expressed in some dopaminergic neurons after 6-OHDA infusion. The nuclear translocation of cathepsin L and up-regulation of LC3, a protein involved in autophagy, were observed in nigral DA neurons. Olomoucine, a cyclin dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor, reduced contralateral rotations and the loss of TH-positive neurons in substantia nigra induced by lesion with 6-OHDA. Pretreatment of rats or primary DA neurons with olomoucine resulted in a partial blockade of nuclear translocation of cathepsin L. Olomoucine also increased the expression of punctate LC3 immunoreactivity, indicating activation of autophagy. These findings suggest that olomoucine may exert neuroprotective effects through inhibiting cathepsin L nuclear translocation and activating autophagy. PMID:19368812

  3. Cathepsin B, L, and D activities in colorectal carcinomas: relationship with clinico-pathological parameters.

    Adenis, A; Huet, G; Zerimech, F; Hecquet, B; Balduyck, M; Peyrat, J P

    1995-09-25

    Cathepsins, which are secreted by tumour and/or stromal cells, are thought to be involved in the degradative processes of tumour invasion and metastasis. The purpose of our study was to compare the cytosolic content of cathepsin B, L, and D in a series of matched malignant and adjacent normal colorectal tissues. Further we attempted to correlate these different proteinase values to classical clinico-pathological prognostic variables. Cathepsin B, L, and D activities were higher in tumour tissues than in normal mucosa (P B, L, and D activities either as a function of gender (except for cathepsin B values), age at time of surgery, tumour site, tumour differentiation, tumour stage (TNM or Astler-Coller staging system) or whether or not we found a mucinous component. Based on our data, cathepsin B seems to be the most discriminant parameter of the three proteinases that we studied, suggesting that cathepsin B expression may be of critical value in the progression of colorectal cancers. PMID:7585467

  4. Cathepsin B Activity Initiates Apoptosis via Digestive Protease Activation in Pancreatic Acinar Cells and Experimental Pancreatitis.

    Sendler, Matthias; Maertin, Sandrina; John, Daniel; Persike, Maria; Weiss, F Ulrich; Krüger, Burkhard; Wartmann, Thomas; Wagh, Preshit; Halangk, Walter; Schaschke, Norbert; Mayerle, Julia; Lerch, Markus M

    2016-07-01

    Pancreatitis is associated with premature activation of digestive proteases in the pancreas. The lysosomal hydrolase cathepsin B (CTSB) is a known activator of trypsinogen, and its deletion reduces disease severity in experimental pancreatitis. Here we studied the activation mechanism and subcellular compartment in which CTSB regulates protease activation and cellular injury. Cholecystokinin (CCK) increased the activity of CTSB, cathepsin L, trypsin, chymotrypsin, and caspase 3 in vivo and in vitro and induced redistribution of CTSB to a secretory vesicle-enriched fraction. Neither CTSB protein nor activity redistributed to the cytosol, where the CTSB inhibitors cystatin-B/C were abundantly present. Deletion of CTSB reduced and deletion of cathepsin L increased intracellular trypsin activation. CTSB deletion also abolished CCK-induced caspase 3 activation, apoptosis-inducing factor, as well as X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein degradation, but these depended on trypsinogen activation via CTSB. Raising the vesicular pH, but not trypsin inhibition, reduced CTSB activity. Trypsin inhibition did not affect apoptosis in hepatocytes. Deletion of CTSB affected apoptotic but not necrotic acinar cell death. In summary, CTSB in pancreatitis undergoes activation in a secretory, vesicular, and acidic compartment where it activates trypsinogen. Its deletion or inhibition regulates acinar cell apoptosis but not necrosis in two models of pancreatitis. Caspase 3-mediated apoptosis depends on intravesicular trypsinogen activation induced by CTSB, not CTSB activity directly, and this mechanism is pancreas-specific. PMID:27226576

  5. Role of endocytosis and cathepsin-mediated activation in Nipah virus entry

    The recent discovery that the Nipah virus (NiV) fusion protein (F) is activated by endosomal cathepsin L raised the question if NiV utilize pH- and protease-dependent mechanisms of entry. We show here that the NiV receptor ephrin B2, virus-like particles and infectious NiV are internalized from the cell surface. However, endocytosis, acidic pH and cathepsin-mediated cleavage are not necessary for the initiation of infection of new host cells. Our data clearly demonstrate that proteolytic activation of the NiV F protein is required before incorporation into budding virions but not after virus entry

  6. IGFBP-4 Anti-Angiogenic and Anti-Tumorigenic Effects Are Associated with Anti-Cathepsin B Activity

    María J Moreno

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 4 (IGFBP-4/IBP-4 has potent IGF-independent anti-angiogenic and antitumorigenic effects. In this study, we demonstrated that these activities are located in the IGFBP-4 C-terminal protein fragment (CIBP-4, a region containing a thyroglobulin type 1 (Tg1 domain. Proteins bearing Tg1 domains have been shown to inhibit cathepsins, lysosomal enzymes involved in basement membrane degradation and implicated in tumor invasion and angiogenesis. In our studies, CIBP-4 was shown to internalize and co-localize with lysosomal-like structures in both endothelial cells (ECs and glioblastoma U87MG cells. CIBP-4 also inhibited both growth factor-induced EC tubulogenesis in Matrigel and the concomitant increases in intracellular cathepsin B (CatB activity. In vitro assays confirmed CIBP-4 capacity to block recombinant CatB activity. Biodistribution analysis of intravenously injected CIBP-4-Cy5.5 in a glioblastoma tumor xenograft model indicated targeted accumulation of CIBP-4 in tumors. Most importantly, CIBP-4 reduced tumor growth in this animal model by 60%. Pleiotropic anti-angiogenic and anti-tumorigenic activities of CIBP-4 most likely underlie its observed therapeutic potential against glioblastoma.

  7. IGFBP-4 Anti-Angiogenic and Anti-Tumorigenic Effects Are Associated with Anti-Cathepsin B Activity1

    Moreno, María J; Ball, Marguerite; Rukhlova, Marina; Slinn, Jacqueline; L'Abbe, Denis; Iqbal, Umar; Monette, Robert; Hagedorn, Martin; O'Connor-McCourt, Maureen D; Durocher, Yves; Stanimirovic, Danica B

    2013-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 4 (IGFBP-4/IBP-4) has potent IGF-independent anti-angiogenic and antitumorigenic effects. In this study, we demonstrated that these activities are located in the IGFBP-4 C-terminal protein fragment (CIBP-4), a region containing a thyroglobulin type 1 (Tg1) domain. Proteins bearing Tg1 domains have been shown to inhibit cathepsins, lysosomal enzymes involved in basement membrane degradation and implicated in tumor invasion and angiogenesis. In our studies, CIBP-4 was shown to internalize and co-localize with lysosomal-like structures in both endothelial cells (ECs) and glioblastoma U87MG cells. CIBP-4 also inhibited both growth factor-induced EC tubulogenesis in Matrigel and the concomitant increases in intracellular cathepsin B (CatB) activity. In vitro assays confirmed CIBP-4 capacity to block recombinant CatB activity. Biodistribution analysis of intravenously injected CIBP-4-Cy5.5 in a glioblastoma tumor xenograft model indicated targeted accumulation of CIBP-4 in tumors. Most importantly, CIBP-4 reduced tumor growth in this animal model by 60%. Pleiotropic anti-angiogenic and anti-tumorigenic activities of CIBP-4 most likely underlie its observed therapeutic potential against glioblastoma. PMID:23633927

  8. Live imaging of cysteine-cathepsin activity reveals dynamics of focal inflammation, angiogenesis, and polyp growth.

    Elias Gounaris

    Full Text Available It has been estimated that up to 30% of detectable polyps in patients regress spontaneously. One major challenge in the evaluation of effective therapy of cancer is the readout for tumor regression and favorable biological response to therapy. Inducible near infra-red (NIR fluorescent probes were utilized to visualize intestinal polyps of mice hemizygous for a novel truncation of the Adenomatous Polyposis coli (APC gene. Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy in live mice allowed visualization of cathepsin activity in richly vascularized benign dysplastic lesions. Using biotinylated suicide inhibitors we quantified increased activities of the Cathepsin B & Z in the polyps. More than (3/4 of the probe signal was localized in CD11b(+Gr1(+ myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC and CD11b(+F4/80(+ macrophages infiltrating the lesions. Polyposis was attenuated through genetic ablation of cathepsin B, and suppressed by neutralization of TNFalpha in mice. In both cases, diminished probe signal was accounted for by loss of MDSC. Thus, in vivo NIR imaging of focal cathepsin activity reveals inflammatory reactions etiologically linked with cancer progression and is a suitable approach for monitoring response to therapy.

  9. Engineered staphylococcal protein A's IgG-binding domain with cathepsin L inhibitory activity

    Inhibitory peptide of papain-like cysteine proteases, affinity selected from a random disulfide constrained phage-displayed peptide library, was grafted to staphylococcal protein A's B domain. Scaffold protein was additionally modified in order to allow solvent exposed display of peptide loop. Correct folding of fusion proteins was confirmed by CD-spectroscopy and by the ability to bind the Fc-region of rabbit IgG, a characteristic of parent domain. The recombinant constructs inhibited cathepsin L with inhibitory constants in the low-micromolar range

  10. Cathepsin S Cleavage of Protease-Activated Receptor-2 on Endothelial Cells Promotes Microvascular Diabetes Complications.

    Kumar Vr, Santhosh; Darisipudi, Murthy N; Steiger, Stefanie; Devarapu, Satish Kumar; Tato, Maia; Kukarni, Onkar P; Mulay, Shrikant R; Thomasova, Dana; Popper, Bastian; Demleitner, Jana; Zuchtriegel, Gabriele; Reichel, Christoph; Cohen, Clemens D; Lindenmeyer, Maja T; Liapis, Helen; Moll, Solange; Reid, Emma; Stitt, Alan W; Schott, Brigitte; Gruner, Sabine; Haap, Wolfgang; Ebeling, Martin; Hartmann, Guido; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2016-06-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is a central pathomechanism in diabetes-associated complications. We hypothesized a pathogenic role in this dysfunction of cathepsin S (Cat-S), a cysteine protease that degrades elastic fibers and activates the protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR2) on endothelial cells. We found that injection of mice with recombinant Cat-S induced albuminuria and glomerular endothelial cell injury in a PAR2-dependent manner. In vivo microscopy confirmed a role for intrinsic Cat-S/PAR2 in ischemia-induced microvascular permeability. In vitro transcriptome analysis and experiments using siRNA or specific Cat-S and PAR2 antagonists revealed that Cat-S specifically impaired the integrity and barrier function of glomerular endothelial cells selectively through PAR2. In human and mouse type 2 diabetic nephropathy, only CD68(+) intrarenal monocytes expressed Cat-S mRNA, whereas Cat-S protein was present along endothelial cells and inside proximal tubular epithelial cells also. In contrast, the cysteine protease inhibitor cystatin C was expressed only in tubules. Delayed treatment of type 2 diabetic db/db mice with Cat-S or PAR2 inhibitors attenuated albuminuria and glomerulosclerosis (indicators of diabetic nephropathy) and attenuated albumin leakage into the retina and other structural markers of diabetic retinopathy. These data identify Cat-S as a monocyte/macrophage-derived circulating PAR2 agonist and mediator of endothelial dysfunction-related microvascular diabetes complications. Thus, Cat-S or PAR2 inhibition might be a novel strategy to prevent microvascular disease in diabetes and other diseases. PMID:26567242

  11. Comparative assessment of ELISAs using recombinant saposin-like protein 2 and recombinant cathepsin L-1 from Fasciola hepatica for the serodiagnosis of human Fasciolosis.

    Bruno Gottstein

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Two recombinant Fasciola hepatica antigens, saposin-like protein-2 (recSAP2 and cathepsin L-1 (recCL1, were assessed individually and in combination in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA for the specific serodiagnosis of human fasciolosis in areas of low endemicity as encountered in Central Europe. Antibody detection was conducted using ProteinA/ProteinG (PAG conjugated to alkaline phosphatase. Test characteristics as well as agreement with results from an ELISA using excretory-secretory products (FhES from adult stage liver flukes was assessed by receiver operator characteristic (ROC analysis, specificity, sensitivity, Youdens J and overall accuracy. Cross-reactivity was assessed using three different groups of serum samples from healthy individuals (n=20, patients with other parasitic infections (n=87 and patients with malignancies (n=121. The best combined diagnostic results for recombinant antigens were obtained using the recSAP2-ELISA (87% sensitivity, 99% specificity and 97% overall accuracy employing the threshold (cut-off to discriminate between positive and negative reactions that maximized Youdens J. The findings showed that recSAP2-ELISA can be used for the routine serodiagnosis of chronic fasciolosis in clinical laboratories; the use of the PAG-conjugate offers the opportunity to employ, for example, rabbit hyperimmune serum for the standardization of positive controls.

  12. Comparative assessment of ELISAs using recombinant saposin-like protein 2 and recombinant cathepsin L-1 from Fasciola hepatica for the serodiagnosis of human Fasciolosis.

    Gottstein, Bruno; Schneeberger, Marianne; Boubaker, Ghalia; Merkle, Bernadette; Huber, Cristina; Spiliotis, Markus; Müller, Norbert; Garate, Teresa; Doherr, Marcus G

    2014-06-01

    Two recombinant Fasciola hepatica antigens, saposin-like protein-2 (recSAP2) and cathepsin L-1 (recCL1), were assessed individually and in combination in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) for the specific serodiagnosis of human fasciolosis in areas of low endemicity as encountered in Central Europe. Antibody detection was conducted using ProteinA/ProteinG (PAG) conjugated to alkaline phosphatase. Test characteristics as well as agreement with results from an ELISA using excretory-secretory products (FhES) from adult stage liver flukes was assessed by receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis, specificity, sensitivity, Youdens J and overall accuracy. Cross-reactivity was assessed using three different groups of serum samples from healthy individuals (n=20), patients with other parasitic infections (n=87) and patients with malignancies (n=121). The best combined diagnostic results for recombinant antigens were obtained using the recSAP2-ELISA (87% sensitivity, 99% specificity and 97% overall accuracy) employing the threshold (cut-off) to discriminate between positive and negative reactions that maximized Youdens J. The findings showed that recSAP2-ELISA can be used for the routine serodiagnosis of chronic fasciolosis in clinical laboratories; the use of the PAG-conjugate offers the opportunity to employ, for example, rabbit hyperimmune serum for the standardization of positive controls. PMID:24922050

  13. GILT expression in B cells diminishes cathepsin S steady-state protein expression and activity

    Phipps-Yonas, Hannah; Semik, Vikki; Hastings, Karen Taraszka

    2012-01-01

    MHC class II-restricted Ag processing requires protein degradation in the endocytic pathway for the activation of CD4+ T cells. Gamma-interferon-inducible lysosomal thiol reductase (GILT) facilitates Ag processing by reducing protein disulfide bonds in this compartment. Lysosomal cysteine protease cathepsin S (CatS) contains disulfide bonds and mediates essential steps in MHC class II-restricted processing, including proteolysis of large polypeptides and cleavage of the invariant chain. We so...

  14. The diagnosis of human fascioliasis by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA using recombinant cathepsin L protease.

    Bibiana Gonzales Santana

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fascioliasis is a worldwide parasitic disease of domestic animals caused by helminths of the genus Fasciola. In many parts of the world, particularly in poor rural areas where animal disease is endemic, the parasite also infects humans. Adult parasites reside in the bile ducts of the host and therefore diagnosis of human fascioliasis is usually achieved by coprological examinations that search for parasite eggs that are carried into the intestine with the bile juices. However, these methods are insensitive due to the fact that eggs are released sporadically and may be missed in low-level infections, and fasciola eggs may be misclassified as other parasites, leading to problems with specificity. Furthermore, acute clinical symptoms as a result of parasites migrating to the bile ducts appear before the parasite matures and begins egg laying. A human immune response to Fasciola antigens occurs early in infection. Therefore, an immunological method such as ELISA may be a more reliable, easy and cheap means to diagnose human fascioliasis than coprological analysis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a panel of serum from Fasciola hepatica-infected patients and from uninfected controls we have optimized an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA which employs a recombinant form of the major F. hepatica cathepsin L1 as the antigen for the diagnosis of human fascioliasis. We examined the ability of the ELISA test to discern fascioliasis from various other helminth and non-helminth parasitic diseases. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: A sensitive and specific fascioliasis ELISA test has been developed. This test is rapid and easy to use and can discriminate fasciola-infected individuals from patients harbouring other parasites with at least 99.9% sensitivity and 99.9% specificity. This test will be a useful standardized method not only for testing individual samples but also in mass screening programs to assess the extent of human fascioliasis in

  15. Vaccine potential of recombinant cathepsinL1G against Fasciola gigantica in mice.

    Changklungmoa, Narin; Phoinok, Natthacha; Yencham, Chonthicha; Sobhon, Prasert; Kueakhai, Pornanan

    2016-08-15

    In this study, we characterized and investigated the vaccine potential of FgCatL1G against Fasciola gigantica infection in mice. Recombinant mature FgCatL1G (rmFgCatL1G) was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21. The vaccination was performed in Imprinting Control Region (ICR) mice (n=10) by subcutaneous injection with 50μg of rmFgCatL1G combined with Freund's adjuvant. Two weeks after the second boost, mice were infected with 15 metacercariae by the oral route. The percents of protection of rmFgCatL1G vaccine were estimated to be 56.5% and 58.3% when compared with non vaccinated-infected and adjuvant-infected controls, respectively. Antibodies in the immune sera of vaccinated mice were shown by immunoblot to react with the native FgCatL1s in the extract of all stages of parasites and rmFgCatL1H, recombinant pro - FgCatL1 (rpFgCatL1). By immunohistochemistry, the immune sera also reacted with FgCatL1s in the caecal epithelial cells of the parasites. The levels of IgG1 and IgG2a in the immune sera, which are indicative of Th2 and Th1 immune responses, were also increased with IgG1 predominating. The levels of serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (SGOT) and serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase (SGPT) in rmFgCatL1G-immunized group showed no significant difference from the control groups, but pathological lesions of livers in rmFgCatL1G-immunized group showed significant decrease when compared to the control groups. This study indicates that rmFgCatL1G has a vaccine potential against F. gigantica in mice, and this potential will be tested in larger livestock animals. PMID:27514897

  16. Utility of a Protein Fraction with Cathepsin L-Like Activity Purified from Cysticercus Fluid of Taenia solium in the Diagnosis of Human Cysticercosis

    Zimic, Mirko; Pajuelo, Mónica; Rueda, Daniel; López, César; Arana, Yanina; Castillo, Yesenia; Calderón, Maritza; Rodriguez, Silvia; Sheen, Patricia; Vinetz, Joseph M.; Gonzales, Armando; García, Héctor H.; Gilman, Robert H.

    2009-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis, an endemic parasitic disease in most developing countries, is caused by Taenia solium and compromises the human central nervous system. Cathepsin L-like proteases are secreted by several parasites including T. solium and constitute important antigens for immunodiagnostics. A protein fraction with cathepsin L-like activity was purified from the cysticercus fluid by size exclusion and ion exchange chromatography. Cathepsin L-like activity was measured fluorometrically by det...

  17. Increased expression and activity of nuclear cathepsin L in cancer cells suggests a novel mechanism of cell transformation.

    Goulet, Brigitte; Sansregret, Laurent; Leduy, Lam; Bogyo, Matthew; Weber, Ekkehard; Chauhan, Shyam S; Nepveu, Alain

    2007-09-01

    It is generally accepted that the role of cathepsin L in cancer involves its activities outside the cells once it has been secreted. However, cathepsin L isoforms that are devoid of a signal peptide were recently shown to be present in the nucleus where they proteolytically process the CCAAT-displacement protein/cut homeobox (CDP/Cux) transcription factor. A role for nuclear cathepsin L in cell proliferation could be inferred from the observation that the CDP/Cux processed isoform can accelerate entry into S phase. Here, we report that in many transformed cells the proteolytic processing of CDP/Cux is augmented and correlates with increased cysteine protease expression and activity in the nucleus. Taking advantage of an antibody that recognizes the prodomain of human cathepsin L, we showed that human cells express short cathepsin L species that do not contain a signal peptide, do not transit through the endoplasmic reticulum, are not glycosylated, and localize to the nucleus. We also showed that transformation by the ras oncogene causes rapid increases both in the production of short nuclear cathepsin L isoforms and in the processing of CDP/Cux. Using a cell-based assay, we showed that a cell-permeable inhibitor of cysteine proteases is able to delay the progression into S phase and the proliferation in soft agar of ras-transformed cells, whereas the non-cell-permeable inhibitor had no effect. Taken together, these results suggest that the role of cathepsin L in cancer might not be limited to its extracellular activities but may also involve its processing function in the nucleus. PMID:17855659

  18. A novel approach for reliable detection of cathepsin S activities in mouse antigen presenting cells.

    Steimle, Alex; Kalbacher, Hubert; Maurer, Andreas; Beifuss, Brigitte; Bender, Annika; Schäfer, Andrea; Müller, Ricarda; Autenrieth, Ingo B; Frick, Julia-Stefanie

    2016-05-01

    Cathepsin S (CTSS) is a eukaryotic protease mostly expressed in professional antigen presenting cells (APCs). Since CTSS activity regulation plays a role in the pathogenesis of various autoimmune diseases like multiple sclerosis, atherosclerosis, Sjögren's syndrome and psoriasis as well as in cancer progression, there is an ongoing interest in the reliable detection of cathepsin S activity. Various applications have been invented for specific detection of this enzyme. However, most of them have only been shown to be suitable for human samples, do not deliver quantitative results or the experimental procedure requires technical equipment that is not commonly available in a standard laboratory. We have tested a fluorogen substrate, Mca-GRWPPMGLPWE-Lys(Dnp)-DArg-NH2, that has been described to specifically detect CTSS activities in human APCs for its potential use for mouse samples. We have modified the protocol and thereby offer a cheap, easy, reproducible and quick activity assay to detect CTSS activities in mouse APCs. Since most of basic research on CTSS is performed in mice, this method closes a gap and offers a possibility for reliable and quantitative CTSS activity detection that can be performed in almost every laboratory. PMID:26899824

  19. Characterization of a Recombinant Cathepsin B-Like Cysteine Peptidase from Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Liviidae: A Putative Target for Control of Citrus Huanglongbing.

    Taíse Fernanda da Silva Ferrara

    Full Text Available Huanglonbing (HLB is one of the most destructive disease affecting citrus plants. The causal agent is associated with the phloem-limited bacterium Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas and the psyllid Diaphorina citri, vector of disease, that transmits the bacterium associated with HLB. The control of disease can be achieved by suppressing either the bacterium or the vector. Among the control strategies for HLB disease, one of the widely used consists in controlling the enzymes of the disease vector, Diaphorina citri. The insect Diaphorina citri belongs to the order Hemiptera, which frequently have cysteine peptidases in the gut. The importance of this class of enzymes led us to search for enzymes in the D. citri transcriptome for the establishment of alternatives strategies for HLB control. In this study, we reported the identification and characterization of a cathepsin B-like cysteine peptidase from D. citri (DCcathB. DCcathB was recombinantly expressed in Pichia pastoris, presenting a molecular mass of approximately 50 kDa. The enzyme hydrolyzed the fluorogenic substrate Z-F-R-AMC (Km = 23.5 μM and the selective substrate for cathepsin B, Z-R-R-AMC (Km = 6.13 μM. The recombinant enzyme was inhibited by the cysteine protease inhibitors E64 (IC50 = 0.014 μM and CaneCPI-4 (Ki = 0.05 nM and by the selective cathepsin B inhibitor CA-074 (IC50 = 0.095 nM. RT-qPCR analysis revealed that the expression of the DCcathB in nymph and adult was approximately 9-fold greater than in egg. Moreover, the expression of this enzyme in the gut was 175-fold and 3333-fold higher than in the remaining tissues and in the head, respectively, suggesting that DCcathB can be a target for HLB control.

  20. Characterization of a Recombinant Cathepsin B-Like Cysteine Peptidase from Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Liviidae): A Putative Target for Control of Citrus Huanglongbing.

    Ferrara, Taíse Fernanda da Silva; Schneider, Vanessa Karine; Kishi, Luciano Takeshi; Carmona, Adriana Karaoglanovic; Alves, Marcio Fernando Madureira; Belasque-Júnior, Jose; Rosa, José César; Hunter, Wayne Brian; Henrique-Silva, Flávio; Soares-Costa, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Huanglonbing (HLB) is one of the most destructive disease affecting citrus plants. The causal agent is associated with the phloem-limited bacterium Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas) and the psyllid Diaphorina citri, vector of disease, that transmits the bacterium associated with HLB. The control of disease can be achieved by suppressing either the bacterium or the vector. Among the control strategies for HLB disease, one of the widely used consists in controlling the enzymes of the disease vector, Diaphorina citri. The insect Diaphorina citri belongs to the order Hemiptera, which frequently have cysteine peptidases in the gut. The importance of this class of enzymes led us to search for enzymes in the D. citri transcriptome for the establishment of alternatives strategies for HLB control. In this study, we reported the identification and characterization of a cathepsin B-like cysteine peptidase from D. citri (DCcathB). DCcathB was recombinantly expressed in Pichia pastoris, presenting a molecular mass of approximately 50 kDa. The enzyme hydrolyzed the fluorogenic substrate Z-F-R-AMC (Km = 23.5 μM) and the selective substrate for cathepsin B, Z-R-R-AMC (Km = 6.13 μM). The recombinant enzyme was inhibited by the cysteine protease inhibitors E64 (IC50 = 0.014 μM) and CaneCPI-4 (Ki = 0.05 nM) and by the selective cathepsin B inhibitor CA-074 (IC50 = 0.095 nM). RT-qPCR analysis revealed that the expression of the DCcathB in nymph and adult was approximately 9-fold greater than in egg. Moreover, the expression of this enzyme in the gut was 175-fold and 3333-fold higher than in the remaining tissues and in the head, respectively, suggesting that DCcathB can be a target for HLB control. PMID:26717484

  1. Cystatin SN neutralizes the inhibitory effect of cystatin C on cathepsin B activity.

    Kim, J-T; Lee, S-J; Kang, M A; Park, J E; Kim, B-Y; Yoon, D-Y; Yang, Y; Lee, C-H; Yeom, Y I; Choe, Y-K; Lee, H G

    2013-01-01

    Cystatin SN (CST1) is one of the several salivary cystatins that form tight equimolar complexes with cysteine proteases, such as the cathepsins. High expression of CST1 is correlated with advanced pTNM stage in gastric cancer. However, the functional role of CST1 in tumorigenesis has not been elucidated. In this study, we showed that CST1 was highly expressed in colon tumor tissues, compared with nontumor regions. Increased cell proliferation and invasiveness were observed in HCT116 cell lines stably transfected with CST1 cDNA (HCT116-CST1) but not in CST3-transfected cells. We also demonstrated that CST1-overexpressing cell lines exhibited increased tumor growth as well as metastasis in a xenograft nude mouse model. Interestingly, CST1 interacted with cystatin C (CST3), a potent cathepsin B (CTSB) inhibitor, with a higher affinity than the interaction between CST3 and CTSB in the extracellular space of HCT116 cells. CTSB-mediated cellular invasiveness and proteolytic activities were strongly inhibited by CST3, but in the presence of CST1 CTSB activities recovered significantly. Furthermore, domain mapping of CST1 showed that the disulfide-bonded conformation, or conserved folding, of CST1 is important for its secretion and for the neutralization of CST3 activity. These results suggest that CST1 upregulation might be involved in colorectal tumorigenesis and acts by neutralizing the inhibition of CTSB proteolytic activity by CST3. PMID:24357805

  2. Impact of the Enhanced Permeability and Retention (EPR Effect and Cathepsins Levels on the Activity of Polymer-Drug Conjugates

    Amit K. Rajora

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Polymer-drug conjugates have demonstrated clinical potential in the context of anticancer therapy. However, such promising results have, to date, failed to translate into a marketed product. Polymer-drug conjugates rely on two factors for activity: (i the presence of a defective vasculature, for passive accumulation of this technology into the tumour tissue (enhanced permeability and retention (EPR effect and (ii the presence of a specific trigger at the tumour site, for selective drug release (e.g., the enzyme cathepsin B. Here, we retrospectively analyse literature data to investigate which tumour types have proved more responsive to polymer-drug conjugates and to determine correlations between the magnitude of the EPR effect and/or expression of cathepsin B. Lung, breast and ovarian cancers showed the highest response rate (30%, 47% and 41%, respectively for cathepsin-activated conjugates and 31%, 43%, 40%, across all conjugates. An analysis of literature data on cathepsin content in various tumour types showed that these tumour types had high cathepsin content (up to 3835 ng/mg for lung cancer, although marked heterogeneity was observed across different studies. In addition, these tumour types were also reported as having a high EPR effect. Our results suggest that a pre-screening of patient population could bring a more marked clinical benefit.

  3. Recombinant snake venom prothrombin activators

    Lövgren, Ann

    2012-01-01

    Three prothrombin activators; ecarin, which was originally isolated from the venom of the saw-scaled viper Echis carinatus, trocarin from the rough-scaled snake Tropidechis carinatus, and oscutarin from the Taipan snake Oxyuranus scutellatus, were expressed in mammalian cells with the purpose to obtain recombinant prothrombin activators that could be used to convert prothrombin to thrombin. We have previously reported that recombinant ecarin can efficiently generate thrombin without the need ...

  4. Analysis of cathepsin and furin proteolytic enzymes involved in viral fusion protein activation in cells of the bat reservoir host.

    Farah El Najjar

    Full Text Available Bats of different species play a major role in the emergence and transmission of highly pathogenic viruses including Ebola virus, SARS-like coronavirus and the henipaviruses. These viruses require proteolytic activation of surface envelope glycoproteins needed for entry, and cellular cathepsins have been shown to be involved in proteolysis of glycoproteins from these distinct virus families. Very little is currently known about the available proteases in bats. To determine whether the utilization of cathepsins by bat-borne viruses is related to the nature of proteases in their natural hosts, we examined proteolytic processing of several viral fusion proteins in cells derived from two fruit bat species, Pteropus alecto and Rousettus aegyptiacus. Our work shows that fruit bat cells have homologs of cathepsin and furin proteases capable of cleaving and activating both the cathepsin-dependent Hendra virus F and the furin-dependent parainfluenza virus 5 F proteins. Sequence analysis comparing Pteropus alecto furin and cathepsin L to proteases from other mammalian species showed a high degree of conservation; however significant amino acid variation occurs at the C-terminus of Pteropus alecto furin. Further analysis of furin-like proteases from fruit bats revealed that these proteases are catalytically active and resemble other mammalian furins in their response to a potent furin inhibitor. However, kinetic analysis suggests that differences may exist in the cellular localization of furin between different species. Collectively, these results indicate that the unusual role of cathepsin proteases in the life cycle of bat-borne viruses is not due to the lack of active furin-like proteases in these natural reservoir species; however, differences may exist between furin proteases present in fruit bats compared to furins in other mammalian species, and these differences may impact protease usage for viral glycoprotein processing.

  5. Single- and Double-Headed Chemical Probes for Detection of Active Cathepsin D in a Cancer Cell Proteome

    Nussbaumerová, Martina; Srp, Jaroslav; Máša, Martin; Hradilek, Martin; Šanda, Miloslav; Reiniš, Milan; Horn, Martin; Mareš, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 11 (2010), s. 1538-1541. ISSN 1439-4227 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400550705 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506; CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : cathepsin D * cancer * activity-based probes Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.945, year: 2010

  6. Cathepsin activities and membrane integrity of zebrafish (Danio rerio) oocytes after freezing to -196 degrees C using controlled slow cooling.

    Zhang, T; Rawson, D M; Tosti, L; Carnevali, O

    2008-04-01

    This study investigated enzymatic activity of cathepsins and the membrane integrity of zebrafish (Danio rerio) oocytes after freezing to -196 degrees C using controlled slow cooling. Stage III oocytes (>0.5mm), obtained through dissection of anaesthetised female fish and desegregation of ovarian cumulus, were exposed to 2M methanol or 2M DMSO (both prepared in Hank's medium) for 30min at 22 degrees C before being loaded into 0.5ml plastic straws and placed into a programmable cooler. After controlled slow freezing, samples were plunged into liquid nitrogen (LN) and held for at least 10min, and thawed by immersing straws into a 27 degrees C water bath for 10s. Thawed oocytes were washed twice in Hank's medium. Cathepsin activity and membrane integrity of oocytes were assessed both after cryoprotectant treatment at 22 degrees C and after freezing in LN. Cathepsin B and L colorimetric analyses were performed using substrates Z-Arg-ArgNNap and Z-Phe-Arg-4MbetaNA-HCl, respectively, and 2-naphthylamine and 4-methoxy-2-naphthylamine were used as standards. Cathepsin D activity was performed by analysing the level of hydrolytic action on haemoglobin. Oocytes membrane integrity was assessed using 0.2% Trypan blue staining for 5min. Analysis of cathepsin activities showed that whilst the activity of cathepsin B and D was not affected by 2M DMSO treatment, their activity was lowered when treated with 2M methanol. Following freezing to -196 degrees C, the activity of all cathepsins (B, D and L) was significantly decreased in both 2M DMSO and 2M methanol. Trypan blue staining showed that 63.0+/-11.3% and 72.7+/-5.2% oocytes membrane stayed intact after DMSO and methanol treatment for 30min at 22 degrees C, respectively, whilst 14.9+/-2.6% and 1.4+/-0.8% stayed intact after freezing in DMSO and methanol to -196 degrees C. The results indicate that cryoprotectant treatment and freezing modified the activities of lysosomal enzymes involved in oocyte maturation and yolk

  7. Recombinant snake venom prothrombin activators.

    Lövgren, Ann

    2013-01-01

    Three prothrombin activators; ecarin, which was originally isolated from the venom of the saw-scaled viper Echis carinatus, trocarin from the rough-scaled snake Tropidechis carinatus, and oscutarin from the Taipan snake Oxyuranus scutellatus, were expressed in mammalian cells with the purpose to obtain recombinant prothrombin activators that could be used to convert prothrombin to thrombin. We have previously reported that recombinant ecarin can efficiently generate thrombin without the need for additional cofactors, but does not discriminate non-carboxylated prothrombin from biologically active γ-carboxylated prothrombin. Here we report that recombinant trocarin and oscutarin could not efficiently generate thrombin without additional protein co-factors. We confirm that both trocarin and oscutarin are similar to human coagulation Factor X (FX), explaining the need for additional cofactors. Sequencing of a genomic fragment containing 7 out of the 8 exons coding for oscutarin further confirmed the similarity to human FX. PMID:23111318

  8. Cathepsin H indirectly regulates morphogenetic protein-4 (BMP-4) in various human cell lines

    Cathepsin H is a cysteine protease considered to play a major role in tumor progression, however, its precise function in tumorigenesis is unclear. Cathepsin H was recently proposed to be involved in processing of bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP-4) in mice. In order to clarify whether cathepsin H also regulates BMP-4 in humans, its impact on BMP-4 expression, processing and degradation was investigated in prostate cancer (PC-3), osteosarcoma (HOS) and pro-monocytic (U937) human cell lines. BMP-4 expression was founded to be regulated by cathepsin H using PCR array technology and confirmed by real time PCR. Immunoassays including Western blot and confocal microscopy were used to evaluate the influence of cathepsin H on BMP-4 processing. In contrast to HOS, the expression of BMP-4 mRNA in U937 and PC3 cells was significantly decreased by cathepsin H. The different regulation of BMP-4 synthesis could be associated with the absence of the mature 28 kDa cathepsin H form in HOS cells, where only the intermediate 30 kDa form was observed. No co-localization of BMP-4 and cathepsin H was observed in human cell lines and the multistep processing of BMP-4 was not altered in the presence of specific cathepsin H inhibitor. Isolated cathepsin H does not cleave mature recombinant BMP-4, neither with its amino- nor its endopeptidase activity. Our results exclude direct proteolytic processing of BMP-4 by cathepsin H, however, they provide support for its involvement in the regulation of BMP-4 expression

  9. Cathepsin D

    Fusek, M.; Mareš, Michael; Větvička, V.

    Amsterdam : Academic Press, 2013 - (Salvesen, G.), s. 54-63 ISBN 978-0-12-382219-2 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400550705 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : cathepsin D * protease * aspartic peptidase * apoptosis * cancer Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  10. IGFBP-4 Anti-Angiogenic and Anti-Tumorigenic Effects Are Associated with Anti-Cathepsin B Activity

    María J. Moreno; Marguerite Ball; Marina Rukhlova; Jacqueline Slinn; Denis L'Abbe; Umar Iqbal; Robert Monette; Martin Hagedorn; Maureen D O'Connor-McCourt; Yves Durocher; Stanimirovic, Danica B

    2013-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 4 (IGFBP-4/IBP-4) has potent IGF-independent anti-angiogenic and antitumorigenic effects. In this study, we demonstrated that these activities are located in the IGFBP-4 C-terminal protein fragment (CIBP-4), a region containing a thyroglobulin type 1 (Tg1) domain. Proteins bearing Tg1 domains have been shown to inhibit cathepsins, lysosomal enzymes involved in basement membrane degradation and implicated in tumor invasion and angiogenesis. In our stu...

  11. IGFBP-4 Anti-Angiogenic and Anti-Tumorigenic Effects Are Associated with Anti-Cathepsin B Activity1

    María J. Moreno; Ball, Marguerite; Rukhlova, Marina; Slinn, Jacqueline; L'Abbe, Denis; Iqbal, Umar; Monette, Robert; Hagedorn, Martin; O'Connor-McCourt, Maureen D.; Durocher, Yves; Stanimirovic, Danica B

    2013-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 4 (IGFBP-4/IBP-4) has potent IGF-independent anti-angiogenic and antitumorigenic effects. In this study, we demonstrated that these activities are located in the IGFBP-4 C-terminal protein fragment (CIBP-4), a region containing a thyroglobulin type 1 (Tg1) domain. Proteins bearing Tg1 domains have been shown to inhibit cathepsins, lysosomal enzymes involved in basement membrane degradation and implicated in tumor invasion and angiogenesis. In our stu...

  12. Cathepsins B and L activate Ebola but not Marburg virus glycoproteins for efficient entry into cell lines and macrophages independent of TMPRSS2 expression.

    Gnirss, Kerstin; Kühl, Annika; Karsten, Christina; Glowacka, Ilona; Bertram, Stephanie; Kaup, Franziska; Hofmann, Heike; Pöhlmann, Stefan

    2012-03-01

    Ebola (EBOV) and Marburg virus (MARV) cause severe hemorrhagic fever. The host cell proteases cathepsin B and L activate the Zaire ebolavirus glycoprotein (GP) for cellular entry and constitute potential targets for antiviral intervention. However, it is unclear if different EBOV species and MARV equally depend on cathepsin B/L activity for infection of cell lines and macrophages, important viral target cells. Here, we show that cathepsin B/L inhibitors markedly reduce 293T cell infection driven by the GPs of all EBOV species, independent of the type II transmembrane serine protease TMPRSS2, which cleaved but failed to activate EBOV-GPs. Similarly, a cathepsin B/L inhibitor blocked macrophage infection mediated by different EBOV-GPs. In contrast, MARV-GP-driven entry exhibited little dependence on cathepsin B/L activity. Still, MARV-GP-mediated entry was efficiently blocked by leupeptin. These results suggest that cathepsins B/L promote entry of EBOV while MARV might employ so far unidentified proteases for GP activation. PMID:22222211

  13. Human B lymphoblastoid cells contain distinct patterns of cathepsin activity in endocytic compartments and regulate MHC class II transport in a cathepsin S-independent manner.

    Lautwein, Alfred; Kraus, Marianne; Reich, Michael; Burster, Timo; Brandenburg, J; Overkleeft, Herman S; Schwarz, Gerold; Kammer, Winfried; Weber, Ekkehard; Kalbacher, Hubert; Nordheim, Alfred; Driessen, Christoph

    2004-05-01

    Endocytic proteolysis represents a major functional component of the major histocompatibility complex class II antigen-presentation machinery. Although transport and assembly of class II molecules in the endocytic compartment are well characterized, we lack information about the pattern of endocytic protease activity along this pathway. Here, we used chemical tools that visualize endocytic proteases in an activity-dependent manner in combination with subcellular fractionation to dissect the subcellular distribution of the major cathepsins (Cat) CatS, CatB, CatH, CatD, CatC, and CatZ as well as the asparagine-specific endoprotease (AEP) in human B-lymphoblastoid cells (BLC). Endocytic proteases were distributed in two distinct patterns: CatB and CatZ were most prominent in early and late endosomes but absent from lysosomes, and CatH, CatS, CatD, CatC, and AEP distributed between late endosomes and lysosomes, suggesting that CatB and CatZ might be involved in the initial proteolytic attack on a given antigen. The entire spectrum of protease activity colocalized with human leukocyte antigen-DM and the C-terminal and N-terminal processing of invariant chain (Ii) in late endosomes. CatS was active in all endocytic compartments. Surprisingly and in contrast with results from dendritic cells, inhibition of CatS activity by leucine-homophenylalanine-vinylsulfone-phenol prevented N-terminal processing of Ii but did not alter the subcellular trafficking or surface delivery of class II complexes, as deferred from pulse-chase analysis in combination with subcellular fractionation and biotinylation of cell-surface protein. Thus, BLC contain distinct activity patterns of proteases in endocytic compartments and regulate the intracellular transport and surface-delivery of class II in a CatS-independent manner. PMID:14966190

  14. Cathepsin L maturation and activity is impaired in macrophages harboring M. avium and M. tuberculosis.

    Nepal, Rajeev M; Mampe, Stephanie; Shaffer, Brian; Erickson, Ann H; Bryant, Paula

    2006-06-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected macrophages demonstrate diminished capacity to present antigens via class II MHC molecules. Since successful class II MHC-restricted antigen presentation relies on the actions of endocytic proteases, we asked whether the activities of cathepsins (Cat) B, S and L-three major lysosomal cysteine proteases-are modulated in macrophages infected with pathogenic Mycobacterium spp. Infection of murine bone marrow-derived macrophages with either Mycobacterium avium or M. tuberculosis had no obvious effect on Cat B or Cat S activity. In contrast, the activity of Cat L was altered in infected cells. Specifically, whereas the 24-kDa two-chain mature form of active Cat L predominated in uninfected cells, we observed an increase in the steady-state activity of the precursor single-chain (30 kDa) and 25-kDa two-chain forms of the enzyme in cells infected with either M. avium or M. tuberculosis. Pulse-chase analyses revealed that maturation of nascent, single-chain Cat L into the 25-kDa two-chain form was impaired in infected macrophages, and that maturation into the 24-kDa two-chain form did not occur. Consistent with these data, M. avium infection inhibited the IFNgamma-induced secretion of active two-chain Cat L by macrophages. Viable bacilli were not required to disrupt Cat L maturation, suggesting that a constitutively expressed mycobacterial component was responsible. The absence of the major active form of lysosomal Cat L in M. avium- and M. tuberculosis-infected macrophages may influence the types of T cell epitopes generated in these antigen-presenting cells, and/or the rate of class II MHC peptide loading. PMID:16636015

  15. Detection of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma by cathepsin B activity in nude mice.

    Wei Ma

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Despite great progress in treatment, the prognosis for patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC remains poor, highlighting the importance of early detection. Although upper endoscopy can be used for the screening of esophagus, it has limited sensitivity for early stage disease. Thus, development of new diagnosis approach to improve diagnostic capabilities for early detection of ESCC is an important need. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of using cathepsin B (CB as a novel imaging target for the detection of human ESCC by near-infrared optical imaging in nude mice. METHODS: Initially, we examined specimens from normal human esophageal tissue, intraepithelial neoplasia lesions, tumor in situ, ESCC and two cell lines including one human ESCC cell line (Eca-109 and one normal human esophageal epithelial cell line (HET-1A for CB expression by immunohistochemistry and western blot, respectively. Next, the ability of a novel CB activatable near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF probe detecting CB activity presented in Eca-109 cells was confirmed by immunocytochemistry. We also performed in vivo imaging of tumor bearing mice injected with the CB probe and ex vivo imaging of resected tumor xenografts and visceral organs using a living imaging system. Finally, the sources of fluorescence signals in tumor tissue and CB expression in visceral organs were identified by histology. RESULTS: CB was absent in normal human esophageal mucosa, but it was overexpressed in ESCC and its precursor lesions. The novel probe for CB activity specifically detected ESCC xenografts in vivo and in vitro. CONCLUSIONS: CB was highly upregulated in human ESCC and its precursor lesions. The elevated CB expression in ESCC allowed in vivo and in vitro detection of ESCC xenografts in nude mice. Our results support the usefulness of CB activity as a potential imaging target for the detection of human ESCC.

  16. Activation route of the Schistosoma mansoni cathepsin B1 drug target

    Jílková, Adéla; Horn, Martin; Řezáčová, Pavlína; Marešová, Lucie; Fajtová, Pavla; Brynda, Jiří; Vondrášek, Jiří; McKerrow, J. H.; Caffrey, C. R.; Mareš, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 1 (2015), s. 39. ISSN 1211-5894. [Discussions in Structural Molecular Biology. Annual Meeting of the Czech Society for Structural Biology /13./. 19.03.2015-21.03.2015, Nové Hrady] Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:68378050 Keywords : Schistosoma mansoni * cathepsin B1 * sulfated polysaccharides Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  17. Up-regulation of microglial cathepsin C expression and activity in lipopolysaccharide-induced neuroinflammation

    Fan Kai

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cathepsin C (Cat C functions as a central coordinator for activation of many serine proteases in inflammatory cells. It has been recognized that Cat C is responsible for neutrophil recruitment and production of chemokines and cytokines in many inflammatory diseases. However, Cat C expression and its functional role in the brain under normal conditions or in neuroinflammatory processes remain unclear. Our previous study showed that Cat C promoted the progress of brain demyelination in cuprizone-treated mice. The present study further investigated the Cat C expression and activity in lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced neuroinflammation in vivo and in vitro. Methods C57BL/6 J mice were intraperitoneally injected with either 0.9% saline or lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 5 mg/kg. Immunohistochemistry (IHC and in situ hybridization (ISH were used to analyze microglial activation, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, iNOS mRNAs expressions and cellular localization of Cat C in the brain. Nitrite assay was used to examine microglial activation in vitro; RT-PCR and ELISA were used to determine the expression and release of Cat C. Cat C activity was analyzed by cellular Cat C assay kit. Data were evaluated for statistical significance with paired t test. Results Cat C was predominantly expressed in hippocampal CA2 neurons in C57BL/6 J mice under normal conditions. Six hours after LPS injection, Cat C expression was detected in cerebral cortical neurons; whereas, twenty-four hours later, Cat C expression was captured in activated microglial cells throughout the entire brain. The duration of induced Cat C expression in neurons and in microglial cells was ten days and three days, respectively. In vitro, LPS, IL-1β and IL-6 treatments increased microglial Cat C expression in a dose-dependent manner and upregulated Cat C secretion and its activity. Conclusions Taken together, these data indicate that LPS and proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6 induce the

  18. Impact of cathepsins on the activation of proinsulin-reactive T cells in type 1 diabetes

    Zou, Fang

    2012-01-01

    Autoantigenic peptides resulting from self-proteins such as proinsulin are important players in the development of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D). Self-proteins can be processed by cathepsins (Cats) within endocytic compartments and loaded to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules for CD4+ T cell inspection. However, the processing and presentation of proinsulin by antigen-presenting cells (APC) in humans is only partially understood. Here we demonstrate that the processing...

  19. 6-Shogaol has anti-amyloidogenic activity and ameliorates Alzheimer's disease via CysLT1R-mediated inhibition of cathepsin B.

    Na, Ji-Young; Song, Kibbeum; Lee, Ju-Woon; Kim, Sokho; Kwon, Jungkee

    2016-08-12

    Although 6-shogaol, a constituent of ginger, has been reported to have anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant effects on neuronal cells, the effects of 6-shogaol on Alzheimer's disease (AD) have not yet been investigated. Here we aimed to determine whether 6-shogaol exerts neuroprotective effects against AD. Specifically, we investigated the effects of 6-shogaol on the cysteinyl leukotriene 1 receptor (CysLT1R), a major factor in AD pathogenesis. Moreover, we clarified the relationship between CysLT1R and cathepsin B, a cysteine protease. We used in vitro and in vivo models to determine whether 6-shogaol inhibits CysLT1R/cathepsin B in an amyloid-beta (Aβ; 1-42)-induced model of neurotoxicity. We first confirmed that CysLT1R and cathepsin B are upregulated by Aβ (1-42) and that CysLT1R activation induces cathepsin B. In contrast, we found that 6-shogaol-mediated inhibition of CysLT1R downregulates cathepsin B in both in vitro and in vivo models. Furthermore, we found that 6-shogaol-mediated inhibition of CysLT1R/cathepsin B reduces Aβ deposition in the brain and ameliorates behavioral deficits in APPSw/PS1-dE9 Tg mice. Our results indicate that 6-shogaol is a CysLT1R/cathepsin B inhibitor and is a novel potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of various neurodegenerative diseases, including AD. PMID:27286707

  20. Cathepsin D and MMP-9 activity increase following a high intensity exercise in hind limb muscles of young rats.

    Carmeli, Eli; Haimovitz, Tal; Nemcovsky, E Carlos

    2007-01-01

    The influence of an intensive exercise regime on cathepsin D and MMP-9 activity in hind limb muscles was investigated. We hypothesized that high-intensity exercise would increase the number of these proteins, indicating their involvement in the pathogenesis of exercise-induced muscle injury. Muscle fibers from the gastrocnemius and soleus were used from young (6-mo-old) female rats (n = 6) who completed 10 consecutive days of treadmill running at high intensity (34 m min(-1) gradually up to 40 min per day), compared with nonrunning, age and sex-matched rats (n = 6). After a high-intensity exercise regime, cathepsin D activity significantly increased in the gastrocnemius (from 6.6 x 10(-3) to 10.7 x 10(-3) or 61% nM tyrosine x mg-1 protein x min-1) and the soleus (from 5.9 x 10(-3) to 8.9 x 10(-3) or 66%). The activity level of mRNA MMP-9, expressed as ng mg(-1) protein, increased in both muscles subjected to intensity running. The results of this study suggest that high-intensity running results in an elevation in the activity of lysosomal enzymes involved in matrix protein degradation. PMID:17569248

  1. Regulation of cathepsin G reduces the activation of proinsulin-reactive T cells from type 1 diabetes patients.

    Fang Zou

    Full Text Available Autoantigenic peptides resulting from self-proteins such as proinsulin are important players in the development of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D. Self-proteins can be processed by cathepsins (Cats within endocytic compartments and loaded to major histocompatibility complex (MHC class II molecules for CD4(+ T cell inspection. However, the processing and presentation of proinsulin by antigen-presenting cells (APC in humans is only partially understood. Here we demonstrate that the processing of proinsulin by B cell or myeloid dendritic cell (mDC1-derived lysosomal cathepsins resulted in several proinsulin-derived intermediates. These intermediates were similar to those obtained using purified CatG and, to a lesser extent, CatD, S, and V in vitro. Some of these intermediates polarized T cell activation in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC from T1D patients indicative for naturally processed T cell epitopes. Furthermore, CatG activity was found to be elevated in PBMC from T1D patients and abrogation of CatG activity resulted in functional inhibition of proinsulin-reactive T cells. Our data suggested the notion that CatG plays a critical role in proinsulin processing and is important in the activation process of diabetogenic T cells.

  2. A major cathepsin B protease from the liver fluke Fasciola hepatica has atypical active site features and a potential role in the digestive tract of newly excysted juvenile parasites.

    Beckham, Simone A; Piedrafita, David; Phillips, Carolyn I; Samarawickrema, Nirma; Law, Ruby H P; Smooker, Peter M; Quinsey, Noelene S; Irving, James A; Greenwood, Deanne; Verhelst, Steven H L; Bogyo, Matthew; Turk, Boris; Coetzer, Theresa H; Wijeyewickrema, Lakshmi C; Spithill, Terry W; Pike, Robert N

    2009-07-01

    The newly excysted juvenile (NEJ) stage of the Fasciola hepatica lifecycle occurs just prior to invasion into the wall of the gut of the host, rendering it an important target for drug development. The cathepsin B enzymes from NEJ flukes have recently been demonstrated to be crucial to invasion and migration by the parasite. Here we characterize one of the cathepsin B enzymes (recombinant FhcatB1) from NEJ flukes. FhcatB1 has biochemical properties distinct from mammalian cathepsin B enzymes, with an atypical preference for Ile over Leu or Arg residues at the P(2) substrate position and an inability to act as an exopeptidase. FhcatB1 was active across a broad pH range (optimal activity at pH 5.5-7.0) and resistant to inhibition by cystatin family inhibitors from sheep and humans, suggesting that this enzyme would be able to function in extracellular environments in its mammalian hosts. It appears, however, that the FhcatB1 protease functions largely as a digestive enzyme in the gut of the parasite, due to the localization of a specific, fluorescently labeled inhibitor with an Ile at the P(2) position. Molecular modelling and dynamics were used to predict the basis for the unusual substrate specificity: a P(2) Ile residue positions the substrate optimally for interaction with catalytic residues of the enzyme, and the enzyme lacks an occluding loop His residue crucial for exopeptidase activity. The unique features of the enzyme, particularly with regard to its specificity and likely importance to a vital stage of the parasite's life cycle, make it an excellent target for therapeutic inhibitors or vaccination. PMID:19401154

  3. Molecular requirements for radiation-activated recombination

    Purpose/Objective: The major stumbling block to successful gene therapy today is poor gene transfer. We hypothesized that ionizing radiation might activate cellular recombination, and so improve stable gene transfer. We further hypothesized that known DNA-damage-repair proteins might also be important in radiation-activated recombination. Materials and Methods: The effect of irradiation on stable gene transfer efficiency was determined in human (A549 and 39F) and rodent (NIH/3T3) cell lines. Continuous low dose rate and multiple radiation fractions were also tested. Nuclear extracts were made and the effect of irradiation on inter-plasmid recombination/ligation determined. Multiple DNA damage-repair deficient cell lines were tested for radiation-activated recombination. Results: A significant radiation dose-dependent improvement in stable plasmid transfection (by as much as 1300 fold) is demonstrated in neoplastic and primary cells. An improvement in transient plasmid transfection is also seen, with as much as 85% of cells transiently expressing b-galactosidase (20-50 fold improvement). Stable transfection is only improved for linearized or nicked plasmids. Cells have improved gene transfer for at least 96 hours after irradiation. Both fractionated and continuous low dose rate irradiation are effective at improving stable gene transfer in mammalian cells, thus making relatively high radiation dose delivery clinically feasible. Inter-plasmid recombination is radiation dose dependent in nuclear extract assays, and the type of overhang (3', 5' or blunt end) significantly affects recombination efficiency and the type of product. The most common end-joining activity involves filling-in of the overhang followed by blunt end ligation. Adenovirus is a linear, double stranded DNA virus. We demonstrate that adenoviral infection efficiency is increased by irradiation. The duration of transgene expression is lengthened because the virus integrates with high efficiency (∼10

  4. Treatment with Recombinant Trichinella spiralis Cathepsin B-like Protein Ameliorates Intestinal Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury in Mice by Promoting a Switch from M1 to M2 Macrophages.

    Liu, Wei-Feng; Wen, Shi-Hong; Zhan, Jian-Hua; Li, Yun-Sheng; Shen, Jian-Tong; Yang, Wen-Jing; Zhou, Xing-Wang; Liu, Ke-Xuan

    2015-07-01

    Intestinal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury, in which macrophages play a key role, can cause high morbidity and mortality. The switch from classically (M1) to alternatively (M2) activated macrophages, which is dependent on the activation of STAT6 signaling, has been shown to protect organs from I/R injuries. In the current study, the effects of recombinant Trichinella spiralis cathepsin B-like protein (rTsCPB) on intestinal I/R injury and the potential mechanism related to macrophage phenotypes switch were investigated. In a mouse I/R model undergoing 60-min intestinal ischemia followed by 2-h or 7-d reperfusion, we demonstrated that intestinal I/R caused significant intestinal injury and induced a switch from M2 to M1 macrophages, evidenced by a decrease in levels of M2 markers (arginase-1 and found in inflammatory zone protein), an increase in levels of M1 markers (inducible NO synthase and CCR7), and a decrease in the ratio of M2/M1 macrophages. RTsCPB reversed intestinal I/R-induced M2-M1 transition and promoted M1-M2 phenotype switch evidenced by a significant decrease in M1 markers, an increase in M2 markers, and the ratio of M2/M1 macrophages. Meanwhile, rTsCPB significantly ameliorated intestinal injury and improved intestinal function and survival rate of animals, accompanied by a decrease in neutrophil infiltration and an increase in cell proliferation in the intestine. However, a selective STAT6 inhibitor, AS1517499, reversed the protective effects of rTsCPB by inhibiting M1 to M2 transition. These findings suggest that intestinal I/R injury causes a switch from M2 to M1 macrophages and that rTsCPB ameliorates intestinal injury by promoting STAT6-dependent M1 to M2 transition. PMID:25987744

  5. Cathepsin Protease Inhibition Reduces Endometriosis Lesion Establishment.

    Porter, Kristi M; Wieser, Friedrich A; Wilder, Catera L; Sidell, Neil; Platt, Manu O

    2016-05-01

    Endometriosis is a gynecologic disease characterized by the ectopic presence of endometrial tissue on organs within the peritoneal cavity, causing debilitating abdominal pain and infertility. Current treatments alleviate moderate pain symptoms associated with the disorder but exhibit limited ability to prevent new or recurring lesion establishment and growth. Retrograde menstruation has been implicated for introducing endometrial tissue into the peritoneal cavity, but molecular mechanisms underlying attachment and invasion are not fully understood. We hypothesize that cysteine cathepsins, a group of powerful extracellular matrix proteases, facilitate endometrial tissue invasion and endometriosis lesion establishment in the peritoneal wall and inhibiting this activity would decrease endometriosis lesion implantation. To test this, we used an immunocompetent endometriosis mouse model and found that endometriotic lesions exhibited a greater than 5-fold increase in active cathepsins compared to tissue from peritoneal wall or eutopic endometrium, with cathepsins L and K specifically implicated. Human endometriosis lesions also exhibited greater cathepsin activity than adjacent peritoneum tissue, supporting the mouse results. Finally, we tested the hypothesis that inhibiting cathepsin activity could block endometriosis lesion attachment and implantation in vivo. Intraperitoneal injection of the broad cysteine cathepsin inhibitor, E-64, significantly reduced the number of attached endometriosis lesions in our murine model compared to vehicle-treated controls demonstrating that cathepsin proteases contribute to endometriosis lesion establishment, and their inhibition may provide a novel, nonhormonal therapy for endometriosis. PMID:26482207

  6. Neutrophilic Cathepsin C Is Maturated by a Multistep Proteolytic Process and Secreted by Activated Cells during Inflammatory Lung Diseases.

    Hamon, Yveline; Legowska, Monika; Hervé, Virginie; Dallet-Choisy, Sandrine; Marchand-Adam, Sylvain; Vanderlynden, Lise; Demonte, Michèle; Williams, Rich; Scott, Christopher J; Si-Tahar, Mustapha; Heuzé-Vourc'h, Nathalie; Lalmanach, Gilles; Jenne, Dieter E; Lesner, Adam; Gauthier, Francis; Korkmaz, Brice

    2016-04-15

    The cysteine protease cathepsin C (CatC) activates granule-associated proinflammatory serine proteases in hematopoietic precursor cells. Its early inhibition in the bone marrow is regarded as a new therapeutic strategy for treating proteolysis-driven chronic inflammatory diseases, but its complete inhibition is elusive in vivo Controlling the activity of CatC may be achieved by directly inhibiting its activity with a specific inhibitor or/and by preventing its maturation. We have investigated immunochemically and kinetically the occurrence of CatC and its proform in human hematopoietic precursor cells and in differentiated mature immune cells in lung secretions. The maturation of proCatC obeys a multistep mechanism that can be entirely managed by CatS in neutrophilic precursor cells. CatS inhibition by a cell-permeable inhibitor abrogated the release of the heavy and light chains from proCatC and blocked ∼80% of CatC activity. Under these conditions the activity of neutrophil serine proteases, however, was not abolished in precursor cell cultures. In patients with neutrophilic lung inflammation, mature CatC is found in large amounts in sputa. It is secreted by activated neutrophils as confirmed through lipopolysaccharide administration in a nonhuman primate model. CatS inhibitors currently in clinical trials are expected to decrease the activity of neutrophilic CatC without affecting those of elastase-like serine proteases. PMID:26884336

  7. Sickle Cell Disease Activates Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells to Induce Cathepsins K and V Activity in Endothelial Cells

    Platt, Manu O.; Sindhuja Surapaneni; Keegan, Philip M.

    2012-01-01

    Sickle cell disease is a genetic disease that increases systemic inflammation as well as the risk of pediatric strokes, but links between sickle-induced inflammation and arterial remodeling are not clear. Cathepsins are powerful elastases and collagenases secreted by endothelial cells and monocyte-derived macrophages in atherosclerosis, but their involvement in sickle cell disease has not been studied. Here, we investigated how tumor necrosis alpha (TNFα) and circulating mononuclear cell adhe...

  8. Collagenolytic activities of the major secreted cathepsin L peptidases involved in the virulence of the helminth pathogen, Fasciola hepatica.

    Mark W Robinson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The temporal expression and secretion of distinct members of a family of virulence-associated cathepsin L cysteine peptidases (FhCL correlates with the entry and migration of the helminth pathogen Fasciola hepatica in the host. Thus, infective larvae traversing the gut wall secrete cathepsin L3 (FhCL3, liver migrating juvenile parasites secrete both FhCL1 and FhCL2 while the mature bile duct parasites, which are obligate blood feeders, secrete predominantly FhCL1 but also FhCL2. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we show that FhCL1, FhCL2 and FhCL3 exhibit differences in their kinetic parameters towards a range of peptide substrates. Uniquely, FhCL2 and FhCL3 readily cleave substrates with Pro in the P2 position and peptide substrates mimicking the repeating Gly-Pro-Xaa motifs that occur within the primary sequence of collagen. FhCL1, FhCL2 and FhCL3 hydrolysed native type I and II collagen at neutral pH but while FhCL1 cleaved only non-collagenous (NC, non-Gly-X-Y domains FhCL2 and FhCL3 exhibited collagenase activity by cleaving at multiple sites within the α1 and α2 triple helix regions (Col domains. Molecular simulations created for FhCL1, FhCL2 and FhCL3 complexed to various seven-residue peptides supports the idea that Trp67 and Tyr67 in the S2 subsite of the active sites of FhCL3 and FhCL2, respectively, are critical to conferring the unique collagenase-like activity to these enzymes by accommodating either Gly or Pro residues at P2 in the substrate. The data also suggests that FhCL3 accommodates hydroxyproline (Hyp-Gly at P3-P2 better than FhCL2 explaining the observed greater ability of FhCL3 to digest type I and II collagens compared to FhCL2 and why these enzymes cleave at different positions within the Col domains. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These studies further our understanding of how this helminth parasite regulates peptidase expression to ensure infection, migration and establishment in host tissues.

  9. Construction and transfection of sense/antisense eukaryotic expression vectors for human cathepsin L gene

    Maolin He; Anmin Chen

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To obtain sense/antisense eukaryotic expression vectors for human cathepsin L gene, and study the biological effects on human osteosarcoma cell line MG-63 after transfection. Methods: Cathepsin L gene sense/antisense eukaryotic expression vectors were constructed with recombinant technology and transfected into the human osteosarcoma cell line MG-63. The expression of cathepsin L gene mRNA was examined with RT-PCR and the expression of cathepsin L was examined with Western blot. Results: The sense/antisense recombinant eukaryotic expression vectors for cathepsin L were successfully constructed and transfected into MG-63 cell.Conclusion: Antisense cathepsin L gene can significantly inhibit the expression of cathepsin L mRNA and protein.

  10. Fibrinolytic Activity of Recombinant Mutant Streptokinase

    Mahboobeh Mobarrez

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Streptokinase is a bacterial protein produced by different beta hemolytic streptococci and widely used in thrombolytic treatment. The main disadvantage of using streptokinase is antibody formation which causes allergic reaction to neutralize effects of streptokinase therapy. Aim of this study was investigate of recombinant mutant streptokinase fibrinolytic activity.Materials and Methods: In this study recombinant mutant streptokinase without 42 amino acids from the C terminal region was purified by affinity S-Tag column chromatography and its fibrinolytic activity was studied.Results: The concentration of expressed and purified protein was 10 mg/ml. Its enzyme activity was assayed using zymography, radial caseinolytic activity and fibrin plate test methods and estimated quantitatively by casein digestion method compared to a commercial form.Conclusion: It was found that this product had the more volume and more enzymatic activity.

  11. Peroxisome Proliferator-activated Receptor γ Induces Apoptosis and Inhibits Autophagy of Human Monocyte-derived Macrophages via Induction of Cathepsin L: POTENTIAL ROLE IN ATHEROSCLEROSIS*

    Mahmood, Dler Faieeq Darweesh; Jguirim-Souissi, Imene; Khadija, El-Hadri; Blondeau, Nicolas; Diderot, Vimala; Amrani, Souliman; Slimane, Mohamed-Naceur; Syrovets, Tatiana; Simmet, Thomas; Rouis, Mustapha

    2011-01-01

    Macrophages play a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis. These cells express cathepsin L (CatL), a cysteine protease that has been implicated in atherogenesis and the associated arterial remodeling. In addition, macrophages highly express peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) γ, a transcription factor that regulates numerous genes important for lipid and lipoprotein metabolism, for glucose homeostasis, and inflammation. Hence, PPARγ might affect macrophage functi...

  12. Cathepsins mediate tumor metastasis

    Gong-Jun; Tan; Zheng-Ke; Peng; Jin-Ping; Lu; Fa-Qing; Tang

    2013-01-01

    Cathepsins are highly expressed in various human cancers, associated with tumor metastasis. It is superfamily, concluding A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, L, K, O, S, V, and W family members. As a group of lysosomal proteinases or endopeptidases, each member has a different function, playing different roles in distinct tumorigenic processes such as proliferation, angiogenesis, metastasis, and invasion. Cathepsins belong to a diverse number of enzyme subtypes, including cysteine proteases, serine proteases and aspartic proteases. The contribution of cathepsins to invasion in human cancers is well documented, although the precise mechanisms by which cathepsins exert their effects are still not clear. In the present review, the role of cathepsin family members in cancer is discussed.

  13. Cathepsin K: a unique collagenolytic cysteine peptidase.

    Novinec, Marko; Lenarčič, Brigita

    2013-09-01

    Cathepsin K has emerged as a promising target for the treatment of osteoporosis in recent years. Initially identified as a papain-like cysteine peptidase expressed in high levels in osteoclasts, the important role of this enzyme in bone metabolism was highlighted by the finding that mutations in the CTSK gene cause the rare recessive disorder pycnodysostosis, which is characterized by severe bone anomalies. At the molecular level, the physiological role of cathepsin K is reflected by its unique cleavage pattern of type I collagen molecules, which is fundamentally different from that of other endogenous collagenases. Several cathepsin K inhibitors have been developed to reduce the excessive bone matrix degradation associated with osteoporosis, with the frontrunner odanacatib about to successfully conclude Phase 3 clinical trials. Apart from osteoclasts, cathepsin K is expressed in different cell types throughout the body and is involved in processes of adipogenesis, thyroxine liberation and peptide hormone regulation. Elevated activity of cathepsin K has been associated with arthritis, atherosclerosis, obesity, schizophrenia, and tumor metastasis. Accordingly, its activity is tightly regulated via multiple mechanisms, including competitive inhibition by endogenous macromolecular inhibitors and allosteric regulation by glycosaminoglycans. This review provides a state-of-the-art description of the activity of cathepsin K at the molecular level, its biological functions and the mechanisms involved in its regulation. PMID:23629523

  14. xtraction and Characterization of Cathepsin Inhibitor from Milkfish

    Tati Nurhayati

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Proteolytic enzyme is distributed acros all organism including fish. Cysteine proteases are the largest group of proteolytic enzyme. Lysosomal cathepsin, one of cysteine protease enzyme, cause softening and degradation of myofibril protein and it’s activity is regulated by endogenous inhibitors. The purposes of this study were to optimize the extraction cathepsin inhibitors from the skin, muscles, and viscera of fish, to partially purify the cathepsin inhibitors of selected sources, and to study the characteristics of the cathepsin inhibitor. The cathepsin inhibitor could be extracted from muscle fish and partially purified using ammonium sulfate of 70%. The purified cathepsin inhibitor had optimum temperature at 40°C and the optimum at pH 8. Metal ions decreased the activity of the protease inhibitor, except 1 mM of metal ion Mn2+ and Na+.

  15. Tumor marker utility and prognostic relevance of cathepsin B, cathepsin L, urokinase-type plasminogen activator, plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1, CEA and CA 19-9 in colorectal cancer

    Cathepsin B and L (CATB, CATL), urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and its inhibitor PAI-1 play an important role in colorectal cancer invasion. The tumor marker utility and prognostic relevance of these proteases have not been evaluated in the same experimental setting and compared with that of CEA and CA-19-9. Protease, CEA and CA 19-9 serum or plasma levels were determined in 56 patients with colorectal cancer, 25 patients with ulcerative colitis, 26 patients with colorectal adenomas and 35 tumor-free control patients. Protease, CEA, CA 19-9 levels have been determined by ELISA and electrochemiluminescence immunoassay, respectively; their sensitivity, specificity, diagnostic accuracy have been calculated and correlated with clinicopathological staging. The protease antigen levels were significantly higher in colorectal cancer compared with other groups. Sensitivity of PAI-1 (94%), CATB (82%), uPA (69%), CATL (41%) were higher than those of CEA or CA 19-9 (30% and 18%, respectively). PAI-1, CATB and uPA demonstrated a better accuracy than CEA or CA 19-9. A combination of PAI-1 with CATB or uPA exhibited the highest sensitivity value (98%). High CATB, PAI-1, CEA and CA 19-9 levels correlated with advanced Dukes stages. CATB (P = 0.0004), CATL (P = 0.02), PAI-1 (P = 0.01) and CA 19-9 (P = 0.004) had a significant prognostic impact. PAI-1 (P = 0.001), CATB (P = 0.04) and CA 19-9 (P = 0.02) proved as independent prognostic variables. At the time of clinical detection proteases are more sensitive indicators for colorectal cancer than the commonly used tumor markers. Determinations of CATB, CATL and PAI-1 have a major prognostic impact in patients with colorectal cancer

  16. Dissecting the active site of the collagenolytic cathepsin L3 protease of the invasive stage of Fasciola hepatica.

    Ileana Corvo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A family of secreted cathepsin L proteases with differential activities is essential for host colonization and survival in the parasitic flatworm Fasciola hepatica. While the blood feeding adult secretes predominantly FheCL1, an enzyme with a strong preference for Leu at the S2 pocket of the active site, the infective stage produces FheCL3, a unique enzyme with collagenolytic activity that favours Pro at P2. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a novel unbiased multiplex substrate profiling and mass spectrometry methodology (MSP-MS, we compared the preferences of FheCL1 and FheCL3 along the complete active site cleft and confirm that while the S2 imposes the greatest influence on substrate selectivity, preferences can be indicated on other active site subsites. Notably, we discovered that the activity of FheCL1 and FheCL3 enzymes is very different, sharing only 50% of the cleavage sites, supporting the idea of functional specialization. We generated variants of FheCL1 and FheCL3 with S2 and S3 residues by mutagenesis and evaluated their substrate specificity using positional scanning synthetic combinatorial libraries (PS-SCL. Besides the rare P2 Pro preference, FheCL3 showed a distinctive specificity at the S3 pocket, accommodating preferentially the small Gly residue. Both P2 Pro and P3 Gly preferences were strongly reduced when Trp67 of FheCL3 was replaced by Leu, rendering the enzyme incapable of digesting collagen. In contrast, the inverse Leu67Trp substitution in FheCL1 only slightly reduced its Leu preference and improved Pro acceptance in P2, but greatly increased accommodation of Gly at S3. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data reveal the significance of S2 and S3 interactions in substrate binding emphasizing the role for residue 67 in modulating both sites, providing a plausible explanation for the FheCL3 collagenolytic activity essential to host invasion. The unique specificity of FheCL3 could be exploited in the design of

  17. Cathepsin L inactivates human trypsinogen whereas cathepsin L deletion reduces the severity of pancreatitis in mice

    Wartmann, Thomas; Mayerle, Julia; Kähne, Thilo; Sahin-Tóth, Miklós; Ruthenbürger, Manuel; Matthias, Rainer; Kruse, Anne; Reinheckel, Thomas; Peters, Christoph; Weiss, F. Ulrich; Sendler, Matthias; Hans-Lippert; Schulz, Hans-Ulrich; Aghdassi, Ali; Dummer, Annegret; Teller, Steffen; Halangk, Walter; Lerch, Markus M.

    2010-01-01

    Background & Aims Acute pancreatitis is characterized by an activation cascade of digestive enzymes in the pancreas. The first of these, trypsinogen, can be converted to active trypsin by the peptidase cathepsin B (CTSB). We investigated whether cathepsin L (CTSL), the second most abundant lysosomal cysteine proteinase, can also process trypsinogen to active trypsin and has a role in pancreatitis. Methods In CTSL-deficient (Ctsl−/−) mice, pancreatitis was induced by injection of cerulein or infusion of taurocholate into the pancreatic duct. Human tissue, pancreatic juice, mouse pancreatitis specimens, and recombinant enzymes were studied by enzyme assay, immunoblot, N-terminal sequencing, immunocytochemistry, and electron microscopy analyses. Isolated acini from Ctsl−/− and Ctsb−/− mice were studied. Results CTSL was expressed in human and mouse pancreas, where it colocalized with trypsinogen in secretory vesicles and lysosomes and was secreted into pancreatic juice. Severity of pancreatitis was reduced in Ctsl−/− mice, compared with wild-type controls, whereas apoptosis and intrapancreatic trypsin activity were increased in Ctsl−/− mice. CTSL induced cleavage of trypsinogen occurred 3 amino acids toward the C terminus from the CTSB activation site and resulted in a truncated, inactive form of trypsin and an elongated propeptide (TAP). This elongated TAP was not detected by ELISA but was effectively converted to an immunoreactive form by CTSB. Levels of TAP thus generated by CTSB were not associated with disease severity, although this is what the TAP-ELISA is used to determine in the clinic. Conclusions CTSL inactivates trypsinogen and counteracts the ability of CTSB to form active trypsin. In mouse models of pancreatitis, absence of CTSL induces apoptosis and reduces disease severity. PMID:19900452

  18. Nicotiana benthamiana cathepsin B displays distinct enzymatic features which differ from its human relative and aleurain-like protease.

    Niemer, Melanie; Mehofer, Ulrich; Verdianz, Maria; Porodko, Andreas; Schähs, Philipp; Kracher, Daniel; Lenarcic, Brigita; Novinec, Marko; Mach, Lukas

    2016-03-01

    The tobacco-related plant species Nicotiana benthamiana has recently emerged as a versatile expression platform for the rapid generation of recombinant biopharmaceuticals, but product yield and quality frequently suffer from unintended proteolysis. Previous studies have highlighted that recombinant protein fragmentation in plants involves papain-like cysteine proteinases (PLCPs). For this reason, we have now characterized two major N. benthamiana PLCPs in detail: aleurain-like protease (NbALP) and cathepsin B (NbCathB). As typical for PLCPs, the precursor of NbCathB readily undergoes autocatalytic activation when incubated at low pH. On the contrary, maturation of NbALP requires the presence of a cathepsin L-like PLCP as processing enzyme. While the catalytic features of NbALP closely resemble those of its mammalian homologue cathepsin H, NbCathB displays remarkable differences to human cathepsin B. In particular, NbCathB appears to be a far less efficient peptidyldipeptidase (removing C-terminal dipeptides) than its human counterpart, suggesting that it functions primarily as an endopeptidase. Importantly, NbCathB was far more efficient than NbALP in processing the human anti-HIV-1 antibody 2F5 into fragments observed during its production in N. benthamiana. This suggests that targeted down-regulation of NbCathB could improve the performance of this plant-based expression platform. PMID:26166069

  19. Human cathepsin L, a papain-like collagenase without proline specificity.

    Korenč, Matevž; Lenarčič, Brigita; Novinec, Marko

    2015-11-01

    Several members of the papain-like peptidase family have the ability to degrade collagen molecules by cleaving within the triple helix region of this difficult substrate. A common denominator of these peptidases is their ability to cleave substrates with Pro in the P2 position. In humans, cathepsin K is the best-known papain-like collagenase. Here, we investigate the collagenolytic activity of human cathepsin L, which is closely related to cathepsin K. We show that, despite lacking proline specificity, cathepsin L efficiently cleaves type I collagen within the triple helix region and produces a cleavage pattern similar to that of cathepsin K. We demonstrate that both enzymes have similar affinities for type I collagen and are able to release proteolytic fragments from insoluble collagen. Moreover, cathepsin K is only approximately fourfold more potent than cathepsin L in releasing fragments from reconstituted fibrils of FITC-labeled collagen. Replacing active site residues of cathepsin L with those from cathepsin K introduces cathepsin K-like specificity towards synthetic substrates and increases the collagenolytic activity of cathepsin L. Replacing three residues in the S2 subsite is sufficient to produce a mutant with collagenolytic activity on par with human cathepsin K. These results provide a basis for engineering collagenolytic activity into non-collagenolytic papain-like scaffolds. PMID:26306868

  20. The feasibility of enzyme targeted activation for amino acid/dipeptide monoester prodrugs of floxuridine; cathepsin D as a potential targeted enzyme.

    Tsume, Yasuhiro; Amidon, Gordon L

    2012-01-01

    The improvement of therapeutic efficacy for cancer agents has been a big challenge which includes the increase of tumor selectivity and the reduction of adverse effects at non-tumor sites. In order to achieve those goals, prodrug approaches have been extensively investigated. In this report, the potential activation enzymes for 5'-amino acid/dipeptide monoester floxuridine prodrugs in pancreatic cancer cells were selected and the feasibility of enzyme specific activation of prodrugs was evaluated. All prodrugs exhibited the range of 3.0-105.7 min of half life in Capan-2 cell homogenate with the presence and the absence of selective enzyme inhibitors. 5'-O-L-Phenylalanyl-L-tyrosyl-floxuridine exhibited longer half life only with the presence of pepstatin A. Human cathepsin B and D selectively hydrolized 5'-O-L-phenylalanyl-L-tyrosylfloxuridine and 5'-O-L-phenylalanyl-L-glycylfloxuridine compared to the other tested prodrugs. The wide range of growth inhibitory effect by floxuridine prodrugs in Capan-2 cells was observed due to the different affinities of prodrug promoieties to enzymes. In conclusion, it is feasible to design prodrugs which are activated by specific enzymes. Cathepsin D might be a good candidate as a target enzyme for prodrug activation and 5'-O-L-phenylalanyl-L-tyrosylfloxuridine may be the best candidate among the tested floxuridine prodrugs. PMID:22450679

  1. The Feasibility of Enzyme Targeted Activation for Amino Acid/Dipeptide Monoester Prodrugs of Floxuridine; Cathepsin D as a Potential Targeted Enzyme

    Gordon L. Amidon

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The improvement of therapeutic efficacy for cancer agents has been a big challenge which includes the increase of tumor selectivity and the reduction of adverse effects at non-tumor sites. In order to achieve those goals, prodrug approaches have been extensively investigated. In this report, the potential activation enzymes for 5¢-amino acid/dipeptide monoester floxuridine prodrugs in pancreatic cancer cells were selected and the feasibility of enzyme specific activation of prodrugs was evaluated. All prodrugs exhibited the range of 3.0–105.7 min of half life in Capan-2 cell homogenate with the presence and the absence of selective enzyme inhibitors. 5¢-O-L-Phenylalanyl-L-tyrosyl-floxuridine exhibited longer half life only with the presence of pepstatin A. Human cathepsin B and D selectively hydrolized 5¢-O-L-phenylalanyl-L-tyrosylfloxuridine and 5¢-O-L-phenylalanyl-L-glycylfloxuridine compared to the other tested prodrugs. The wide range of growth inhibitory effect by floxuridine prodrugs in Capan-2 cells was observed due to the different affinities of prodrug promoieties to enyzmes. In conclusion, it is feasible to design prodrugs which are activated by specific enzymes. Cathepsin D might be a good candidate as a target enzyme for prodrug activation and 5¢-O-L-phenylalanyl-L-tyrosylfloxuridine may be the best candidate among the tested floxuridine prodrugs.

  2. Chemical introduction of the green fluorescence: imaging of cysteine cathepsins by an irreversibly locked GFP fluorophore.

    Frizler, Maxim; Yampolsky, Ilia V; Baranov, Mikhail S; Stirnberg, Marit; Gütschow, Michael

    2013-09-21

    An activity-based probe, containing an irreversibly locked GFP-like fluorophore, was synthesized and evaluated as an inhibitor of human cathepsins and, as exemplified with cathepsin K, it proved to be suitable for ex vivo imaging and quantification of cysteine cathepsins by SDS-PAGE. PMID:23912233

  3. Cathepsin proteases in Toxoplasma gondii

    Dou, Zhicheng; Carruthers, Vern B.

    2011-01-01

    Cysteine proteases are important for the growth and survival of apicomplexan parasites that infect humans. The apicomplexan Toxoplasma gondii expresses five members of the C1 family of cysteine proteases, including one cathepsin L-like (TgCPL), one cathepsin B-like (TgCPB), and three cathepsin C-like (TgCPC1, 2 and 3) proteases. Recent genetic, biochemical and structural studies reveal that cathepsins function in microneme and rhoptry protein maturation, host cell invasion, replication, and n...

  4. Development of nitrile-based peptidic inhibitors of cysteine cathepsins.

    Frizler, Maxim; Stirnberg, Marit; Sisay, Mihiret Tekeste; Gütschow, Michael

    2010-01-01

    It is now becoming clear that several papain-like cysteine cathepsins are involved in the pathophysiology of diseases such as osteoporosis, autoimmune disorders, and cancer. Therefore, the development of potent and selective cathepsin inhibitors is an attractive subject for medicinal chemists. New advances have been made for nitrile-based inhibitors, leading to the identification of the cathepsin K inhibitor odanacatib and other candidates with potential for therapeutic use. This review summarizes the development of peptidic and peptidomimetic compounds with an electrophilic nitrile 'warhead' as inhibitors of the cysteine cathepsins B, S, L, C, and K. Peptide nitriles have been shown to reversibly react with the active site cysteine under formation of a covalent thioimidate adduct. The structural optimization with respect to the positions P3, P2, P1, P1', and P2' resulted in the identification of potent and selective inhibitors of the corresponding cathepsins. The underlying structure-activity relationships are discussed herein. PMID:20166952

  5. Expression of schistosomal cathepsin l1 in Escherichia coli and evaluation of its protective capacity in an animal challenge

    PA Miyasato

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomes utilize proteinases to accomplish several activities such as tissue penetration, tissue digestion and evasion of host immune responses. Cathepsin L is a cysteine proteinase of the papain superfamily detected in their gut lumen which indicates that this enzyme contributes to the proteolysis of ingested hemoglobin. Due to the roles played in the schistosome biology, proteolytic enzymes are considered potential targets for developing and guiding antischistosomal therapies. In the present work, the cathepsin L1 cDNA coding of Schistosoma mansoni was cloned into the pAE vector that provides high-level expression of heterologous proteins in Escherichia coli. The recombinant protein was expressed as inclusion bodies, purified under denaturing conditions through nickel-charged chromatography and used for experimental animal vaccination. ELISA was performed with the pooled sera. Although this protein was shown to be immunogenic, mice immunized with three doses of recombinant protein plus aluminum hydroxide as adjuvant were not protected against S. mansoni infection.

  6. Role of Cathepsins in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Survival in Human Macrophages.

    Pires, David; Marques, Joana; Pombo, João Palma; Carmo, Nuno; Bettencourt, Paulo; Neyrolles, Olivier; Lugo-Villarino, Geanncarlo; Anes, Elsa

    2016-01-01

    Cathepsins are proteolytic enzymes that function in the endocytic pathway, especially in lysosomes, where they contribute directly to pathogen killing or indirectly, by their involvement in the antigen presentation pathways. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is a facultative intracellular pathogen that survives inside the macrophage phagosomes by inhibiting their maturation to phagolysosomes and thus avoiding a low pH and protease-rich environment. We previously showed that mycobacterial inhibition of the proinflammatory transcription factor NF-κB results in impaired delivery of lysosomal enzymes to phagosomes and reduced pathogen killing. Here, we elucidate how MTB also controls cathepsins and their inhibitors, cystatins, at the level of gene expression and proteolytic activity. MTB induced a general down-regulation of cathepsin expression in infected cells, and inhibited IFNγ-mediated increase of cathepsin mRNA. We further show that a decrease in cathepsins B, S and L favours bacterial survival within human primary macrophages. A siRNA knockdown screen of a large set of cathepsins revealed that almost half of these enzymes have a role in pathogen killing, while only cathepsin F coincided with MTB resilience. Overall, we show that cathepsins are important for the control of MTB infection, and as a response, it manipulates their expression and activity to favour its intracellular survival. PMID:27572605

  7. Molecular cloning, expression analysis and enzymatic characterization of cathepsin K from olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus).

    Je, Ju Eun; Ahn, Sang Jung; Kim, Na Young; Seo, Jung Soo; Kim, Moo-Sang; Park, Nam Gyu; Kim, Joong Kyun; Chung, Joon Ki; Lee, Hyung Ho

    2009-12-01

    We assessed the putative physiological roles of cathepsin K from a flatfish, olive flounder. We cloned a cDNA encoding for cathepsin K (PoCtK), a cysteine protease of the papain family from olive flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus. The tissue-specific expression pattern of PoCtK, determined via real-time PCR analysis, revealed ubiquitous expression in normal tissues with high levels of expression in the spleen and bone marrow. However, PoCtK expression was significantly increased in the muscle and gill at 3-24 h post-injection with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The cDNA encoding for the mature enzyme of PoCtK was expressed in Escherichia coli using the pGEX-4T-1 expression vector system. Its activity was quantified via the cleavage of the synthetic peptide Z-Gly-Pro-Arg-MCA, zymography, and the collagen degradation assay. The optimum pH for the protease activity was 8, and the recombinant PoCtK enzyme degraded collagen types I, II, III, IV, and VI and acid-soluble collagen from olive flounder muscle in the presence of chondroitin 4-sulphate (C-4S). Therefore, our data indicate that cathepsin K may play a role in the immune system of fish skin and muscle, in addition to its principal bone-specific function as a collagenolytic enzyme. PMID:19666132

  8. Cathepsins are required for Toll-like receptor 9 responses

    Toll-like receptors (TLR) recognize a variety of microbial products and activate defense responses. Pathogen sensing by TLR2/4 requires accessory molecules, whereas little is known about a molecule required for DNA recognition by TLR9. After endocytosis of microbes, microbial DNA is exposed and recognized by TLR9 in lysosomes. We here show that cathepsins, lysosomal cysteine proteases, are required for TLR9 responses. A cell line Ba/F3 was found to be defective in TLR9 responses despite enforced TLR9 expression. Functional cloning with Ba/F3 identified cathepsin B/L as a molecule required for TLR9 responses. The protease activity was essential for the complementing effect. TLR9 responses were also conferred by cathepsin S or F, but not by cathepsin H. TLR9-dependent B cell proliferation and CD86 upregulation were apparently downregulated by cathepsin B/L inhibitors. Cathepsin B inhibitor downregulated interaction of CpG-B with TLR9 in 293T cells. These results suggest roles for cathepsins in DNA recognition by TLR9

  9. Cathepsin K induces platelet dysfunction and affects cell signaling in breast cancer - molecularly distinct behavior of cathepsin K in breast cancer

    Andrade, Sheila Siqueira; Gouvea, Iuri Estrada; Silva, Mariana Cristina C.; Castro, Eloísa Dognani; de Paula, Cláudia A. A.; Okamoto, Debora; Oliveira, Lilian; Peres, Giovani Bravin; Ottaiano, Tatiana; Facina, Gil; Nazário, Afonso Celso Pinto; Campos, Antonio Hugo J. F. M.; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar Julian; Juliano, Maria; da Silva, Ismael D. C. G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Breast cancer comprises clinically and molecularly distinct tumor subgroups that differ in cell histology and biology and show divergent clinical phenotypes that impede phase III trials, such as those utilizing cathepsin K inhibitors. Here we correlate the epithelial-mesenchymal-like transition breast cancer cells and cathepsin K secretion with activation and aggregation of platelets. Cathepsin K is up-regulated in cancer cells that proteolyze extracellular matrix and contributes t...

  10. Lysosomotropism of basic cathepsin K inhibitors contributes to increased cellular potencies against off-target cathepsins and reduced functional selectivity.

    Falgueyret, Jean-Pierre; Desmarais, Sylvie; Oballa, Renata; Black, W Cameron; Cromlish, Wanda; Khougaz, Karine; Lamontagne, Sonia; Massé, Frederic; Riendeau, Denis; Toulmond, Sylvie; Percival, M David

    2005-12-01

    The lysosomal cysteine protease cathepsin K is a target for osteoporosis therapy. The aryl-piperazine-containing cathepsin K inhibitor CRA-013783/L-006235 (1) displays greater than 4000-fold selectivity against the lysosomal/endosomal antitargets cathepsin B, L, and S. However, 1 and other aryl-piperazine-containing analogues, including balicatib (10), are approximately 10-100-fold more potent in cell-based enzyme occupancy assays than against each purified enzyme. This phenomenon arises from their basic, lipophilic nature, which results in lysosomal trapping. Consistent with its lysosomotropic nature, 1 accumulates in cells and in rat tissues of high lysosome content. In contrast, nonbasic aryl-morpholino-containing analogues do not exhibit lysosomotropic properties. Increased off-target activities of basic cathepsin K inhibitors were observed in a cell-based cathepsin S antigen presentation assay. No potency increases of basic inhibitors in a functional cathepsin K bone resorption whole cell assay were detected. Therefore, basic cathepsin K inhibitors, such as 1, suffer from reduced functional selectivities compared to those predicted using purified enzyme assays. PMID:16302795

  11. Chi activity during transduction-associated recombination.

    Dower, N. A.; Stahl, F. W.

    1981-01-01

    Chi is a genetic element that stimulates phage lambda recombination by the Escherichia coli recBC pathway during lytic infection [Stahl, F. W. (1979) Annu. Rev. Genet. 13, 7--24]. Herein we show that chi in lambda prophage influences exchange distribution in P1 phage-mediated transduction and in conjugation. This demonstration encourages the view that chi may influence genetic exchange in E. coli in the total absence of lambda.

  12. A distinctive repertoire of cathepsins is expressed by juvenile invasive Fasciola hepatica.

    Cancela, Martín; Acosta, Daniel; Rinaldi, Gabriel; Silva, Edileusa; Durán, Rosario; Roche, Leda; Zaha, Arnaldo; Carmona, Carlos; Tort, Jose F

    2008-10-01

    Secreted cysteine proteases are relevant actors in parasite biology, taking part in critical host colonization roles such as traversing tissue barriers, immune evasion and nutrient digestion. In the trematode Fasciola hepatica, the initial step to successful infection of the mammalian host is the excystment of metacercariae and the invasion through the intestinal wall by the newly excysted juveniles (NEJ). While the cathepsin L-like cysteine proteinases secreted by the adult fluke have been extensively characterized, the cataloguing and description of the cathepsins B and L reported in the invasive stages is only sketchy. To identify the cathepsins expressed during excystment and early invasion we constructed cDNA libraries encoding NEJ cathepsins B and L. We found two cathepsin L-like cysteine proteinases (CL3, CL4) and three cathepsins B (CB1, CB2, CB3) which are predominantly expressed in NEJ. Phylogenetic analysis showed that NEJ-expressed cathepsins L constitute a well-defined clade separate from the adult enzymes. Excystment induction resulted in a significant increment in activity towards cathepsin-specific fluorogenic substrates in metacercariae homogenates, consistent with the detection of precursor and mature forms of cathepsins B and L before and after induction. In NEJ culture supernatants, protein and relative activity profiles show subtle changes during the first 48 h, with prevalence of cathepsin L-like activity, although cathepsins CB3 and CL3 were detected by mass spectrometry. Noticeably, the hydrolysis of a substrate with proline in the P2 position was predominant, a property only shared with adult CL2 and vertebrate cathepsin K among the C1A subfamily of cysteine proteases. Collectively these mRNA, protein and enzymatic data demonstrate the existence of a NEJ-specific repertoire of cathepsins expressed early in invasion, distinct to those used by other trematodes, potentially relevant for specific vaccine and chemotherapy design. The diversity

  13. Expression of Cathepsins B, D, and G in Infantile Hemangioma

    Itinteang, Tinte; Chudakova, Daria A.; Jonathan C. Dunne; Davis, Paul F.; Tan, Swee T.

    2015-01-01

    Aims The role of the renin–angiotensin system (RAS) in the biology of infantile hemangioma (IH) represents an emerging paradigm, particularly the involvement of renin, angiotensin converting enzyme, and angiotensin II. This study investigated the expression of cathepsins B, D, and G, enzymes that may modulate the RAS, in IH. Materials and Methods The expression of cathepsins B, D, and G was examined using immunohistochemistry, enzyme activity assays, mass spectrometry, and NanoStri...

  14. Multiple biological activities of human recombinant interleukin 1.

    Dinarello, C A; Cannon, J. G.; Mier, J W; Bernheim, H. A.; LoPreste, G; Lynn, D L; Love, R N; Webb, A C; Auron, P. E.; Reuben, R C

    1986-01-01

    Complementary DNA coding for human monocyte interleukin 1 (IL-1), pI 7 form, was expressed in Escherichia coli. During purification, IL-1 activity on murine T cells was associated with the recombinant protein. Homogeneous human recombinant IL-1 (hrIL-1) was tested in several assays to demonstrate the immunological and inflammatory properties attributed to this molecule. hrIL-1 induced proliferative responses in a cloned murine T cell in the presence of suboptimal concentrations of mitogen, wh...

  15. A single diamagnetic catalyCEST MRI contrast agent that detects cathepsin B enzyme activity by using a ratio of two CEST signals

    Hingorani, Dina V.; Montano, Luis A.; Randtke, Edward A.; Lee, Yeon Sun; Cárdenas-Rodríguez, Julio; Pagel, Mark D.

    2016-01-01

    CatalyCEST MRI can detect enzyme activity by monitoring the change in chemical exchange with water after a contrast agent is cleaved by an enzyme. Often these molecules use paramagnetic metals and are delivered with an additional non-responsive reference molecule. To improve this approach for molecular imaging, a single diamagnetic agent with enzyme-responsive and enzyme-unresponsive CEST signals was synthesized and characterized. The CEST signal from the aryl amide disappeared after cleavage of a dipeptidyl ligand with cathepsin B, while a salicylic acid moiety was largely unresponsive to enzyme activity. The ratiometric comparison of the two CEST signals from the same agent allowed for concentration independent measurements of enzyme activity. The chemical exchange rate of the salicylic acid moiety was unchanged after enzyme catalysis, which further validated that this moiety was enzyme-unresponsive. The temperature dependence of the chemical exchange rate of the salicylic acid moiety was non-Arrhenius, suggesting a two-step chemical exchange mechanism for salicylic acid. The good detection sensitivity at low saturation power facilitates clinical translation, along with the potentially low toxicity of a non-metallic MRI contrast agent. The modular design of the agent constitutes a platform technology that expands the variety of agents that may be employed by catalyCEST MRI for molecular imaging. PMID:26633584

  16. Synthesis and Biochemical Evaluation of Thiochromanone Thiosemicarbazone Analogues as Inhibitors of Cathepsin L

    2012-01-01

    A series of 36 thiosemicarbazone analogues containing the thiochromanone molecular scaffold functionalized primarily at the C-6 position were prepared by chemical synthesis and evaluated as inhibitors of cathepsins L and B. The most promising inhibitors from this group are selective for cathepsin L and demonstrate IC50 values in the low nanomolar range. In nearly all cases, the thiochromanone sulfide analogues show superior inhibition of cathepsin L as compared to their corresponding thiochromanone sulfone derivatives. Without exception, the compounds evaluated were inactive (IC50 > 10000 nM) against cathepsin B. The most potent inhibitor (IC50 = 46 nM) of cathepsin L proved to be the 6,7-difluoro analogue 4. This small library of compounds significantly expands the structure–activity relationship known for small molecule, nonpeptidic inhibitors of cathepsin L. PMID:24900494

  17. Cathepsin L knockdown enhances curcumin-mediated inhibition of growth, migration, and invasion of glioma cells.

    Fei, Yao; Xiong, Yajie; Zhao, Yifan; Wang, Wenjuan; Han, Meilin; Wang, Long; Tan, Caihong; Liang, Zhongqin

    2016-09-01

    Curcumin can be used to prevent and treat cancer. However, its exact underlying molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. Cathepsin L, a lysosomal cysteine protease, is overexpressed in several cancer types. This study aimed to determine the role of cathepsin L in curcumin-mediated inhibition of growth, migration, and invasion of glioma cells. Results revealed that the activity of cathepsin L was enhanced in curcumin-treated glioma cells. Cathepsin L knockdown induced by RNA interference significantly promoted curcumin-induced cytotoxicity, apoptosis, and cell cycle arrest. The knockdown also inhibited the migration and invasion of glioma cells. Our results suggested that the inhibition of cathepsin L can enhance the sensitivity of glioma cells to curcumin. Therefore, cathepsin L may be a new target to enhance the efficacy of curcumin against cancers. PMID:27373979

  18. Activity of recombinant factor VIIa under different conditions in vitro

    Bladbjerg, Else-Marie; Jespersen, Jørgen

    2008-01-01

    Recombinant activated factor VII (NovoSeven; Novo Nordisk A/S, Måløv, Denmark) is an effective drug for treatment of bleeding in patients with haemophilia A or B and inhibitors. Little is known about physiological conditions influencing the efficacy of recombinant activated factor VII. We...... investigated the in-vitro effects of pH, temperature, and haemodilution on the activity of recombinant activated factor VII. Samples from eight healthy volunteers were spiked with recombinant activated factor VII (final concentration 1.7 microg/ml) and adjusted to pH 6.0, 6.5, 7.0, and 7.4 or analysed at 30...... activity in plasma. Significant effects of pH were observed for clotting time, clot formation time, maximum clot firmness, and factor VII coagulant activity in the direction of longer clot formation times and less firm clots with decreasing pH. Temperature had significant effects on clotting time, clot...

  19. Lipopolysaccharide-Mediated Induction of Concurrent IL-1β and IL-23 Expression in THP-1 Cells Exhibits Differential Requirements for Caspase-1 and Cathepsin B Activity.

    Wynick, Christopher; Petes, Carlene; Tigert, Alexander; Gee, Katrina

    2016-08-01

    The inflammasome is a multimeric protein complex required for interleukin (IL)-1β production. Upon lipopolysaccharide (LPS) triggering of toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 and subsequent ATP signaling, the NOD-like receptor containing-pyrin domain 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome is activated to cleave pro-caspase-1 into caspase-1, allowing the secretion of IL-1β. IL-1β is known to function with IL-23 in the regulation of IL-17-producing CD4(+) T cells, Th17 cells, in adaptive immunity. Recently, studies have shown that IL-1β and IL-23 together activate IL-17-producing innate lymphoid cells, demonstrating that the pair may exhibit additional effects on cell differentiation. Using an in vitro model of bacterial infection, LPS treatment of human monocytic cells, we investigated the molecular mechanisms involved in the co-expression of IL-1β and IL-23. We found that IL-1β is partially required for optimal LPS-induced IL-23 production. We also found that IL-23 production was partially dependent on ATP signaling via the P2X7 receptor, whereas IL-1β production required this signaling. Furthermore, we identified a novel role for cathepsin B activity in IL-23 production. Taken together, this study identifies differential requirements for the co-expression of IL-1β and IL-23. Due to their similar roles in Th17 differentiation, characterization of the regulatory mechanisms for LPS-induced IL-1β and IL-23 may reveal novel information into the pathology of the inflammatory response particularly during bacterial infection. PMID:27096899

  20. Peroxisome Proliferator-activated Receptor γ Induces Apoptosis and Inhibits Autophagy of Human Monocyte-derived Macrophages via Induction of Cathepsin L

    Mahmood, Dler Faieeq Darweesh; Jguirim-Souissi, Imene; Khadija, El-Hadri; Blondeau, Nicolas; Diderot, Vimala; Amrani, Souliman; Slimane, Mohamed-Naceur; Syrovets, Tatiana; Simmet, Thomas; Rouis, Mustapha

    2011-01-01

    Macrophages play a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis. These cells express cathepsin L (CatL), a cysteine protease that has been implicated in atherogenesis and the associated arterial remodeling. In addition, macrophages highly express peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) γ, a transcription factor that regulates numerous genes important for lipid and lipoprotein metabolism, for glucose homeostasis, and inflammation. Hence, PPARγ might affect macrophage function in the context of chronic inflammation such as atherogenesis. In the present study, we examined the effect of PPARγ activation on the expression of CatL in human monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDM). Activation of PPARγ by the specific agonist GW929 concentration-dependently increased the levels of CatL mRNA and protein in HMDM. By promoter analysis, we identified a functional PPAR response element-like sequence that positively regulates CatL expression. In addition, we found that PPARγ-induced CatL promotes the degradation of Bcl2 without affecting Bax protein levels. Consistently, degradation of Bcl2 could be prevented by a specific CatL inhibitor, confirming the causative role of CatL. PPARγ-induced CatL was found to decrease autophagy through reduction of beclin 1 and LC3 protein levels. The reduction of these proteins involved in autophagic cell death was antagonized either by the CatL inhibitor or by CatL knockdown. In conclusion, our data show that PPARγ can specifically induce CatL, a proatherogenic protease, in HMDM. In turn, CatL inhibits autophagy and induces apoptosis. Thus, the proatherogenic effect of CatL could be neutralized by apoptosis, a beneficial phenomenon, at least in the early stages of atherosclerosis. PMID:21700710

  1. Production of biologically active recombinant human lactoferrin in Aspergillus oryzae.

    Ward, P P; Lo, J Y; Duke, M; May, G S; Headon, D R; Conneely, O M

    1992-07-01

    We report the production of recombinant human lactoferrin in Aspergillus oryzae. Expression of human lactoferrin (hLF), a 78 kD glycoprotein, was achieved by placing the cDNA under the control of the A. oryzae alpha-amylase promoter and the 3' flanking region of the A. niger glucoamylase gene. Using this system, hLF is expressed and secreted into the growth medium at levels up to 25 mg/l. The recombinant lactoferrin is indistinguishable from human milk lactoferrin with respect to its size, immunoreactivity, and iron-binding capacity. The recombinant protein appears to be appropriately N-linked glycosylated and correctly processed at the N-terminus by the A. oryzae secretory apparatus. Lactoferrin is the largest heterologous protein and the first mammalian glycoprotein expressed in the Aspergillus system to date. Hence, this expression system appears suitable for the large-scale production and secretion of biologically active mammalian glycoproteins. PMID:1368268

  2. Effects of cysteine protease inhibitors on rabbit cathepsin D maturation

    To examine the effects of cysteine protease inhibitors on cathepsin D intracellular transport, proteolytic processing, and secretion, primary cultures of rabbit cardiac fibroblasts were grown to confluence and exposed to media containing leupeptin, E 64, or chloroquine. Cathepsin D maturation was then evaluated in pulse-chase biosynthetic labeling experiments. None of the three agents affected the charge modification of procathepsin D within the Golgi apparatus. However, all three agents interfered with the subsequent proteolytic processing of procathepsin D isoforms to active cathepsin D. Both leupeptin and E 64 caused the intracellular accumulation of large amounts of a Mr 51,000 processing intermediate. Trace amounts of this intermediate were also detected in chloroquine-treated cells. Combined activity assay and radioimmunoassay of cell lysates indicated that this partially processed form of cathepsin D possessed proteolytic activity. Whereas low medium concentrations of leupeptin (10-100 microM) but not E 64 appeared to stimulate procathepsin D secretion, neither agent appeared to have a major effect on the rate of proenzyme secretion at doses required to inhibit proteolytic maturation (1-10 mM). Furthermore, pretreatment of cells with 10 mM leupeptin appeared only to delay, but not prevent, the intracellular transport of cathepsin D to lysosomes. In contrast, chloroquine increased procathepsin D secretion in a dose-dependent manner, diverting the majority of newly synthesized procathepsin D from the intracellular protease(s) responsible for proteolytic processing. These results suggest that cysteine proteases participate in the proteolytic maturation of procathepsin D during the transport of newly synthesized enzyme to lysosomes, but cysteine protease-mediated proteolytic processing is not required for cathepsin D activation or lysosomal translocation

  3. Localization of nuclear cathepsin L and its association with disease progression and poor outcome in colorectal cancer.

    Sullivan, Shane

    2012-02-01

    Previous in vitro studies have identified a nuclear isoform of Cathepsin L. The aim of this study was to examine if nuclear Cathepsin L exists in vivo and examine its association with clinical, pathological and patient outcome data. Cellular localization (nuclear and cytoplasmic) and expression levels v of Cathespin L in 186 colorectal cancer cases using immunohistochemistry. The molecular weight and activity of nuclear and cytoplasmic Cathepsin L in vivo and in vitro were assessed by Western blotting and ELISA, respectively. Epithelial nuclear staining percentage (p = 0.04) and intensity (p = 0.006) increased with advancing tumor stage, whereas stromal cytoplasmic staining decreased (p = 0.02). Using multivariate statistical analysis, survival was inversely associated with staining intensity in the epithelial cytoplasm (p = 0.01) and stromal nuclei (p = 0.007). In different colorectal cell lines and in vivo tumors, pro- and active Cathepsin L isoforms were present in both the cytoplasm and nuclear samples, with pro-Cathepsin L at 50 kDa and active Cathepsin L at 25 kDa. Purified nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions from cell lines and tumors showed active Cathepsin L activity. The identification of nuclear Cathepsin L may play an important prognostic role in colorectal disease progression and patient outcome. Moreover, these findings suggest that altering active nuclear Cathepsin L may significantly influence disease progression.

  4. Synthesis and biochemical evaluation of benzoylbenzophenone thiosemicarbazone analogues as potent and selective inhibitors of cathepsin L.

    Parker, Erica N; Song, Jiangli; Kishore Kumar, G D; Odutola, Samuel O; Chavarria, Gustavo E; Charlton-Sevcik, Amanda K; Strecker, Tracy E; Barnes, Ashleigh L; Sudhan, Dhivya R; Wittenborn, Thomas R; Siemann, Dietmar W; Horsman, Michael R; Chaplin, David J; Trawick, Mary Lynn; Pinney, Kevin G

    2015-11-01

    Upregulation of cathepsin L in a variety of tumors and its ability to promote cancer cell invasion and migration through degradation of the extracellular matrix suggest that cathepsin L is a promising biological target for the development of anti-metastatic agents. Based on encouraging results from studies on benzophenone thiosemicarbazone cathepsin inhibitors, a series of fourteen benzoylbenzophenone thiosemicarbazone analogues were designed, synthesized, and evaluated for their inhibitory activity against cathepsins L and B. Thiosemicarbazone inhibitors 3-benzoylbenzophenone thiosemicarbazone 1, 1,3-bis(4-fluorobenzoyl)benzene thiosemicarbazone 8, and 1,3-bis(2-fluorobenzoyl)-5-bromobenzene thiosemicarbazone 32 displayed the greatest potency against cathepsin L with low IC50 values of 9.9 nM, 14.4 nM, and 8.1 nM, respectively. The benzoylbenzophenone thiosemicarbazone analogues evaluated were selective in their inhibition of cathepsin L compared to cathepsin B. Thiosemicarbazone analogue 32 inhibited invasion through Matrigel of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells by 70% at 10 μM. Thiosemicarbazone analogue 8 significantly inhibited the invasive potential of PC-3ML prostate cancer cells by 92% at 5 μM. The most active cathepsin L inhibitors from this benzoylbenzophenone thiosemicarbazone series (1, 8, and 32) displayed low cytotoxicity toward normal primary cells [in this case human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs)]. In an initial in vivo study, 3-benzoylbenzophenone thiosemicarbazone (1) was well-tolerated in a CDF1 mouse model bearing an implanted C3H mammary carcinoma, and showed efficacy in tumor growth delay. Low cytotoxicity, inhibition of cell invasion, and in vivo tolerability are desirable characteristics for anti-metastatic agents functioning through an inhibition of cathepsin L. Active members of this structurally diverse group of benzoylbenzophenone thiosemicarbazone cathepsin L inhibitors show promise as potential anti-metastatic, pre

  5. Heparin modulates the endopeptidase activity of Leishmania mexicana cysteine protease cathepsin L-Like rCPB2.8.

    Wagner A S Judice

    Full Text Available Cysteine protease B is considered crucial for the survival and infectivity of the Leishmania in its human host. Several microorganism pathogens bind to the heparin-like glycosaminoglycans chains of proteoglycans at host-cell surface to promote their attachment and internalization. Here, we have investigated the influence of heparin upon Leishmania mexicana cysteine protease rCPB2.8 activity.THE DATA ANALYSIS REVEALED THAT THE PRESENCE OF HEPARIN AFFECTS ALL STEPS OF THE ENZYME REACTION: (i it decreases 3.5-fold the k 1 and 4.0-fold the k -1, (ii it affects the acyl-enzyme accumulation with pronounced decrease in k 2 (2.7-fold, and also decrease in k 3 (3.5-fold. The large values of ΔG  =  12 kJ/mol for the association and dissociation steps indicate substantial structural strains linked to the formation/dissociation of the ES complex in the presence of heparin, which underscore a conformational change that prevents the diffusion of substrate in the rCPB2.8 active site. Binding to heparin also significantly decreases the α-helix content of the rCPB2.8 and perturbs the intrinsic fluorescence emission of the enzyme. The data strongly suggest that heparin is altering the ionization of catalytic (Cys(25-S(-/(His(163-Im(+ H ion pair of the rCPB2.8. Moreover, the interaction of heparin with the N-terminal pro-region of rCPB2.8 significantly decreased its inhibitory activity against the mature enzyme.Taken together, depending on their concentration, heparin-like glycosaminoglycans can either stimulate or antagonize the activity of cysteine protease B enzymes during parasite infection, suggesting that this glycoconjugate can anchor parasite cysteine protease at host cell surface.

  6. Mutant K-ras Regulates Cathepsin B Localization on the Surface of Human Colorectal Carcinoma Cells

    Dora Cavallo-Medved

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Cathepsin B protein and activity are known to localize to the basal plasma membrane of colon carcinoma cells following the appearance of K-ras mutations. Using immunofluorescence and subcellular fractionation techniques and two human colon carcinoma cell lines—one with a mutated K-ras allele (HCT 116 and a daughter line in which the mutated allele has been disrupted (HKh-2—we demonstrate that the localization of cathepsin B to caveolae on the surface of these carcinoma cells is regulated by mutant K-ras. In HCT 116 cells, a greater percentage of cathepsin B was distributed to the caveolae, and the secretion of cathepsin B and pericellular (membrane-associated and secreted cathepsin B activity were greater than observed in HKh-2 cells. Previous studies established the light chain of annexin II tetramer, p11, as a binding site for cathepsin B on the surface of tumor cells. The deletion of active K-ras in HKh-2 cells reduced the steady-state levels of p11 and caveolin-1 and the distribution of pl1 to caveolae. Based upon these results, we speculate that cathepsin B, a protease implicated in tumor progression, plays a functional role in initiating proteolytic cascades in caveolae as downstream components of this cascade (e.g., urokinase plasminogen activator and urokinase plasminogen activator receptor are also present in HCT 116 caveolae.

  7. A furanquinone from Paulownia tomentosa stem for a new cathepsin K inhibitor.

    Park, Youmie; Kong, Jae Yang; Cho, Heeyeong

    2009-10-01

    In the search for novel inhibitors of cathepsin K, a new furanquinone compound, methyl 5-hydroxy-dinaphtho[1,2-2'3']furan-7,12-dione-6-carboxylate (1a), showed in vitro inhibitory activities for cathepsin K. Compound 1a was isolated originally from Paulownia tomentosa stem and its derivatives were synthesized. Furanquinone compounds (1a, 1b, 1c and 1d) were also found to be capable of inhibiting cathepsin L, which is closely related to cathepsin K. The inhibitory activity of the parent compound 1a (IC50 = 21 microm) for cathepsin K was slightly higher than those of the other three derivatives that have a methoxy (1b), propoxy (1c) or acetoxy (1d) group (IC50 = 33-66 microm) in the 5-position of compound 1a. This implies that the 5-hydroxyl functional group of 1a may have favorable effects on the reduction potential which are related to the cathepsin K inhibitory activities of furanquinone compounds. Therefore, the cathepsin K inhibitory activity of a new furanquinone compound is proposed. PMID:19277969

  8. Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator following paediatric cataract surgery

    Mehta, J; ADAMS, G

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The use of recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (r-TPA) has been advocated in the treatment of postsurgical fibrinous membrane formation following cataract surgery in adults. Its use in paediatric cases is not well documented.
METHOD—A retrospective review of paediatric cataract extractions performed at Moorfields Eye Hospital between 1 January 1997 and 4 April 1999 was carried out.
RESULTS—Cataract extractions were performed in 37 patients, 22 in males 15 in females. Four (9.2...

  9. Three-dimensional cultures modeling premalignant progression of human breast epithelial cells: role of cysteine cathepsins.

    Mullins, Stefanie R; Sameni, Mansoureth; Blum, Galia; Bogyo, Matthew; Sloane, Bonnie F; Moin, Kamiar

    2012-12-01

    The expression of the cysteine protease cathepsin B is increased in early stages of human breast cancer.To assess the potential role of cathepsin B in premalignant progression of breast epithelial cells, we employed a 3D reconstituted basement membrane overlay culture model of MCF10A human breast epithelial cells and isogenic variants that replicate the in vivo phenotypes of hyper plasia(MCF10AneoT) and atypical hyperplasia (MCF10AT1). MCF10A cells developed into polarized acinar structures with central lumens. In contrast, MCF10AneoT and MCF10AT1 cells form larger structures in which the lumens are filled with cells. CA074Me, a cell-permeable inhibitor selective for the cysteine cathepsins B and L,reduced proliferation and increased apoptosis of MCF10A, MCF10AneoT and MCF10AT1 cells in 3D culture. We detected active cysteine cathepsins in the isogenic MCF10 variants in 3D culture with GB111, a cell-permeable activity based probe, and established differential inhibition of cathepsin B in our 3D cultures. We conclude that cathepsin B promotes proliferation and premalignant progression of breast epithelial cells. These findings are consistent with studies by others showing that deletion of cathepsin B in the transgenic MMTV-PyMT mice, a murine model that is predisposed to development of mammary cancer, reduces malignant progression. PMID:23667900

  10. Imaging Primary Mouse Sarcomas After Radiation Therapy Using Cathepsin-Activatable Fluorescent Imaging Agents

    Cuneo, Kyle C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Mito, Jeffrey K.; Javid, Melodi P. [Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Ferrer, Jorge M. [Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States); Kim, Yongbaek [Department of Clinical Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, W. David [The David H. Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States); Bawendi, Moungi G. [Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States); Brigman, Brian E. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Kirsch, David G., E-mail: david.kirsch@duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: Cathepsin-activated fluorescent probes can detect tumors in mice and in canine patients. We previously showed that these probes can detect microscopic residual sarcoma in the tumor bed of mice during gross total resection. Many patients with soft tissue sarcoma (STS) and other tumors undergo radiation therapy (RT) before surgery. This study assesses the effect of RT on the ability of cathepsin-activated probes to differentiate between normal and cancerous tissue. Methods and Materials: A genetically engineered mouse model of STS was used to generate primary hind limb sarcomas that were treated with hypofractionated RT. Mice were injected intravenously with cathepsin-activated fluorescent probes, and various tissues, including the tumor, were imaged using a hand-held imaging device. Resected tumor and normal muscle samples were harvested to assess cathepsin expression by Western blot. Uptake of activated probe was analyzed by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Parallel in vitro studies using mouse sarcoma cells were performed. Results: RT of primary STS in mice and mouse sarcoma cell lines caused no change in probe activation or cathepsin protease expression. Increasing radiation dose resulted in an upward trend in probe activation. Flow cytometry and immunofluorescence showed that a substantial proportion of probe-labeled cells were CD11b-positive tumor-associated immune cells. Conclusions: In this primary murine model of STS, RT did not affect the ability of cathepsin-activated probes to differentiate between tumor and normal muscle. Cathepsin-activated probes labeled tumor cells and tumor-associated macrophages. Our results suggest that it would be feasible to include patients who have received preoperative RT in clinical studies evaluating cathepsin-activated imaging probes.

  11. Role of cathepsin E in decidual macrophage of patients with recurrent miscarriage.

    Goto, Shinobu; Ozaki, Yasuhiko; Suzumori, Nobuhiro; Yasukochi, Atsushi; Kawakubo, Tomoyo; Furuno, Tadahide; Nakanishi, Mamoru; Yamamoto, Kenji; Sugiura-Ogasawara, Mayumi

    2014-05-01

    In a previous study, we reported that the cathepsin-cystatin system caused endometrial dysfunction in early pregnancy. Here, we investigated the existence and contribution of cathepsin E in early pregnancy in patients with recurrent miscarriage (RM). The effect of cathepsin deficiency on fertility and female reproductive organs were also analyzed in CatE(-/-) mice. Human studies were conducted in a hospital setting, with informed consent. Cervical mucus was collected from RM patients in early pregnancy (4-6 gestational weeks, n = 21), and the pregnancy outcome was compared prospectively. The cathepsin E expression in decidua of RM patients (n = 49) and normal pregnant women undergoing elective surgical abortion (n = 24) was measured using SDS-PAGE, and western blot analysis. Decidual macrophages were isolated from RM patients (n = 6) and stimulated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and interferon gamma (IFN-γ). Results from the mouse model showed that CatE(-/-) mice were fertile, but the litter number was significantly smaller. The uterus of CatE(-/-) mice showed granulation tissue. In human samples, protease activity of cathepsin E measured with Fluorescence-Quenching Substrate (KYS-1) in cervical mucus of patients who developed miscarriage was markedly decreased compared with patients without RM. The expression of cathepsin E in decidua, semi-quantified by SDS-PAGE, western blot analysis was significantly lower in RM patients compared with patients without RM. By double staining immunofluorescence, the staining of cathepsin E was observed in CD14 or CD68 positive cells in all deciduas. Upon stimulation with LPS and IFN-γ, the expression of cathepsin E in cell lysate of decidual macrophages was markedly reduced in RM patients compared with controls. The results suggested that decreased activity of cathepsin E produced by decidual macrophages might be responsible for the induction of miscarriages in some RM patients. PMID:24464956

  12. Cocaine potentiates cathepsin B secretion and neuronal apoptosis from HIV-infected macrophages.

    Zenón, Frances; Segarra, Annabell C; Gonzalez, Mariangeline; Meléndez, Loyda M

    2014-12-01

    Substance abuse is a risk factor for HIV infection and progression to AIDS. Recent evidence establishes that cocaine use promotes brain perivascular macrophage infiltration and microglia activation. The lysosomal protease cathepsin B is increased in monocytes from patients with HIV dementia and its secretion induces 10-15% of neurotoxicity. Here we asked if cocaine potentiates cathepsin B secretion from HIV-infected monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) and its effect in neuronal apoptosis. Samples of plasma, CSF, and post-mortem brain tissue from HIV positive patients that used cocaine were tested for cathepsin B and its inhibitors to determine the in vivo relevance of these findings. MDM were inoculated with HIV-1ADA, exposed to cocaine, and the levels of secreted and bioactive cathepsin B and its inhibitors were measured at different time-points. Cathepsin B expression (p cocaine treated MDM compared with HIV-infected cocaine negative controls. Increased levels of cystatin B expression was also found in supernatants from HIV-cocaine treated MDM (p cocaine users over non-drug users. Our results demonstrated that cocaine potentiates cathepsin B secretion in HIV-infected MDM and increase neuronal apoptosis. These findings provide new evidence that cocaine synergize with HIV-1 infection in increasing cathepsin B secretion and neurotoxicity. PMID:25209871

  13. Three faces of recombination activating gene 1 (RAG1) mutations.

    Patiroglu, Turkan; Akar, Himmet Haluk; Van Der Burg, Mirjam

    2015-12-01

    Severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) is a group of genetic disorder associated with development of T- and/or B-lymphocytes. Recombination-activating genes (RAG1/2) play a critical role on VDJ recombination process that leads to the production of a broad T-cell receptor (TCR) and B-cell receptor (BCR) repertoire in the development of T and B cells. RAG1/2 genes mutations result in various forms of primary immunodeficiency, ranging from classic SCID to Omenn syndrome (OS) to atypical SCID with such as granuloma formation and autoimmunity. Herein, we reported 4 patients with RAG1 deficiency: classic SCID was seen in two patients who presented with recurrent pneumonia and chronic diarrhoea, and failure to thrive. OS was observed in one patient who presented with chronic diarrhoea, skin rash, recurrent lower respiratory infections, and atypical SCID was seen in one patient who presented with Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) and had novel RAG1 mutation. PMID:26689875

  14. Expression of recombination-activating genes and T cell receptor gene recombination in the human T cell leukemia cell line

    ZOU Hong-yun; MA Li; MENG Min-jie; YAO Xin-sheng; LIN Ying; WU Zhen-qiang; HE Xiao-wei; WANG Ju-fang; WANG Xiao-ning

    2007-01-01

    Background Recent studies have suggested that mature T cells can change their specificity through reexpression of recombination-activating genes (RAG) and RAG-mediated V(D)J recombination. This process is named receptor revision and has been observed in mature peripheral T cells from transgenic mice and human donors. However, whether the receptor revision in mature T cells is a random or orientated process remains poorly understood. Here we used the Jurkat human T cell line, which represents a mature stage of T cell development, as a model to investigate the regulation of T cell receptor (TCR) gene recombination.Methods TCR Dβ-Jβ signal joint T cell receptor excision DNA circles (sjTRECs) were determined by nested and seminested PCR. Double-strand DNA breaks at recombination signal sequences (RSSs) in the TCRVβ chain locus were detected by ligation-mediated-PCR. Further analysis of the complementarity-determining region 3 (CDR3) size of the TCRVβ chain was examined by the TCR GeneScan technique.Results RAG1, RAG2, and three crucial components of the nonhomologous DNA end-joining (NHEJ) pathway were readily detected in Jurkat. Characteristics of junctional diversity of Dβ2-Jβ2 signal joints and ds RSS breaks associated with the Dβ25' and Dβ 23' sites were detected in DNA from Jurkat cells. CDR3 size and the gene sequences of the TCRVβ chain did not change during cell proliferation.Conclusions RAG1 and RAG2 and ongoing TCR gene recombination are coexpressed in Jurkat cells, but the ongoing recombination process may not play a role in modification of the TCR repertoire. However, the results suggest that Jurkat could be used as a model for studying the regulation of RAGs and V(D)J recombination and as a "special" model of the coexistence of TCR gene rearrangements and "negative" receptor revision.

  15. Cocaine potentiates cathepsin B secretion and neuronal apoptosis from HIV-infected macrophages

    Zenón, Frances; Segarra, Annabell C.; Gonzalez, Mariangeline; Meléndez, Loyda M.

    2014-01-01

    Substance abuse is a risk factor for HIV infection and progression to AIDS. Recent evidence establishes that cocaine use promotes brain perivascular macrophage infiltration and microglia activation. The lysosomal protease cathepsin B is increased in monocytes from patients with HIV dementia and its secretion induces 10-15% of neurotoxicity. Here we asked if cocaine potentiates cathepsin B secretion from HIV-infected monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) and its effect in neuronal apoptosis. Samp...

  16. Gene Targeting of the Cysteine Peptidase Cathepsin H Impairs Lung Surfactant in Mice

    Bühling, Frank; Kouadio, Martin; Caroline E Chwieralski; Kern, Ursula; Hohlfeld, Jens M.; Klemm, Nicole; Friedrichs, Nicole; Roth, Wera; Deussing, Jan M.; Peters, Christoph; Reinheckel, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Background The 11 human cysteine cathepsins are proteases mainly located in the endolysosomal compartment of all cells and within the exocytosis pathways of some secretory cell types. Cathepsin H (Ctsh) has amino- and endopeptidase activities. In vitro studies have demonstrated Ctsh involvement in the processing and secretion of the pulmonary surfactant protein B (SP-B). Furthermore, Ctsh is highly expressed in the secretory organelles of alveolar type II pneumocytes where the surfactant prot...

  17. 78 FR 27977 - Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Proposed Actions Under the NIH...

    2013-05-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA... Acid Molecules (NIH Guidelines) SUMMARY: The NIH Office of Biotechnology Activities (NIH OBA) proposes... by mail to the NIH Office of Biotechnology Activities, National Institutes of Health, 6705...

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    2010-05-24

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    2011-07-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA... Minor Action under the NIH Guidelines. SUMMARY: The Office of Biotechnology Activities (OBA) is updating... Biotechnology Activities, National Institutes of Health, 6705 Rockledge Drive, Suite 750, Bethesda,...

  20. Mining a cathepsin inhibitor library for new antiparasitic drug leads.

    Ang, Kenny K H; Ratnam, Joseline; Gut, Jiri; Legac, Jennifer; Hansell, Elizabeth; Mackey, Zachary B; Skrzypczynska, Katarzyna M; Debnath, Anjan; Engel, Juan C; Rosenthal, Philip J; McKerrow, James H; Arkin, Michelle R; Renslo, Adam R

    2011-01-01

    The targeting of parasite cysteine proteases with small molecules is emerging as a possible approach to treat tropical parasitic diseases such as sleeping sickness, Chagas' disease, and malaria. The homology of parasite cysteine proteases to the human cathepsins suggests that inhibitors originally developed for the latter may be a source of promising lead compounds for the former. We describe here the screening of a unique ∼ 2,100-member cathepsin inhibitor library against five parasite cysteine proteases thought to be relevant in tropical parasitic diseases. Compounds active against parasite enzymes were subsequently screened against cultured Plasmodium falciparum, Trypanosoma brucei brucei and/or Trypanosoma cruzi parasites and evaluated for cytotoxicity to mammalian cells. The end products of this effort include the identification of sub-micromolar cell-active leads as well as the elucidation of structure-activity trends that can guide further optimization efforts. PMID:21572521

  1. Study of a Novel Antiosteoporosis Screening Model Targeted on Cathepsin K

    JUN YANG; GUANG-DONG SHANG; YUE-QIN ZHANG

    2004-01-01

    To establish an effective assay to access the effects of natural products on cathepsin K for screening antiosteoporosis drugs. Methods To obtain the purified cathepsin K, we cloned the target fragment from the mRNA of human osteosacoma cell line MG63 and demonstrated its correctness through DNA sequencing. Cathepsin K was expressed in a high amount in E.coli after IPTG induction, and was purified to near homogenetity through resolution and column purification. The specificity of the protein was shown by Western blotting experiment. The biological activity of the components in the fermentation broth was assayed by their inhibitory effects on cathepsin K and its analog papain. Results With the inhibition of papain activity as a screen index, the fermentation samples of one thousand strains of fungi were tested and 9 strains among them showed strong inhibitory effects. The crude products of the fermentation broth were tested for their specific inhibitory effects on the purified human cathepsin K, the product of fungi 2358 shows the highest specificity against cathepsin K. Conclusions The compounds isolated from fungi 2358 show the highest biological activity and are worth further structure elucidation and function characterization.

  2. Purification and characterization of cathepsin B from the skeletal muscles of agama stellio stellio

    1. Cathepsin b from the muscles of Jordanian lizard Agama stellio stellio was purified to homogeneity by a series of column chromatography on DEAE-sephadex, thio propyl sepharose and sephadex G-100 2. The molecular weight of cathepsin B isolated was to be 31800 dalton by using SDS-PAGE, and 33000 dalton by gel filtration, and its isoelectric point was measured to be 4.2 by isoelectric focusing. 3. Cathepsin B had ph optimum of 5.5, required a thiol-reducing reagent for activation and was inhibited by thiol-protease inhibitors. 4. The Km and K cat values for Z-Phe-Arg-Mca were determined to be 0.161mM and 238 S-1. 5. Cathepsin B acted on oligopeptide substrates mainly as di peptidyl carboxypeptidase. (authors). 22 refs., 3 tabs., 2 figs

  3. Evidence supporting the use of recombinant activated factor VII in congenital bleeding disorders

    Johansson, Pär I; Ostrowski, Sisse R

    2010-01-01

    Recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa, NovoSeven) was introduced in 1996 for the treatment of hemophilic patients with antibodies against coagulation factor VIII or IX.......Recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa, NovoSeven) was introduced in 1996 for the treatment of hemophilic patients with antibodies against coagulation factor VIII or IX....

  4. Immunohistochemical localization of cathepsin D and a possible role of melanocytes during tail resorption in tadpoles of a tropical toad.

    Mahapatra, Cuckoo; Mahapatra, Pravati Kumari

    2012-07-01

    Programmed cell death during anuran tail resorption is primarily brought about by apoptosis. Cathepsin D, a lysosomal aspartyl protease, is involved in the death of tail tissues. Thus, anuran tail resorption presents an ideal model to study cathepsin-mediated cell death during vertebrate development. Present study describes the trend of specific activity of cathepsin D in the tail of different developmental stages and immunohistochemical localization of cathepsin D in the tail tissues of the common Asian toad, Duttaphrynus melanostictus. Cathepsin D was involved in programmed cell death in epidermis, muscle, spinal cord, and blood cells in the resorbing tail. Interestingly, it was also involved in the pre-resorbing tail before visible tail resorption which indicates initiation of cell death even before actually the tail resorbs. Melanocytes were found to be one of the causative agents in degrading tail tissues and were associated with the degradation of muscle, epidermis and spinal cord of the resorbing tail. PMID:22505219

  5. Endothelial cells and cathepsins: Biochemical and biomechanical regulation.

    Platt, Manu O; Shockey, W Andrew

    2016-03-01

    Cathepsins are mechanosensitive proteases that are regulated not only by biochemical factors, but are also responsive to biomechanical forces in the cardiovascular system that regulate their expression and activity to participate in cardiovascular tissue remodeling. Their elastinolytic and collagenolytic activity have been implicated in atherosclerosis, abdominal aortic aneurysms, and in heart valve disease, all of which are lined by endothelial cells that are the mechanosensitive monolayer of cells that sense and respond to fluid shear stress as the blood flows across the surfaces of the arteries and valve leaflets. Inflammatory cytokine signaling is integrated with biomechanical signaling pathways by the endothelial cells to transcribe, translate, and activate either the cysteine cathepsins to remodel the tissue or to express their inhibitors to maintain healthy cardiovascular tissue structure. Other cardiovascular diseases should now be included in the study of the cysteine cathepsin activation because of the additional biochemical cues they provide that merges with the already existing hemodynamics driving cardiovascular disease. Sickle cell disease causes a chronic inflammation including elevated TNFα and increased numbers of circulating monocytes that alter the biochemical stimulation while the more viscous red blood cells due to the sickling of hemoglobin alters the hemodynamics and is associated with accelerated elastin remodeling causing pediatric strokes. HIV-mediated cardiovascular disease also occurs earlier in than the broader population and the influence of HIV-proteins and antiretrovirals on endothelial cells must be considered to understand these accelerated mechanisms in order to identify new therapeutic targets for prevention. PMID:26458976

  6. Recombinant human migration inhibitory factor has adjuvant activity.

    Weiser, W Y; Pozzi, L M; Titus, R G; David, J R

    1992-01-01

    Recombinant human migration inhibitory factor (MIF), isolated through functional expression cloning in COS-1 cells, up-regulates expression of genes encoding HLA-DR and interleukin 1 beta (IL-1 beta) and elaboration of IL-1 beta by human monocyte-derived macrophages. Administration of soluble bovine serum albumin or human immunodeficiency virus 120-kDa glycoprotein (HIV gp120) to mice in the presence of recombinant MIF together with incomplete Freund's adjuvant induced a strong T-cell prolife...

  7. Myelostimulatory activity of recombinant human interleukin-2 in mice

    In a series of studies designed to extend our understanding of interleukin-2 (IL-2) and to study the effect of biologic response modifiers on bone marrow, we observed that administering recombinant human (rH) IL-2 to normal mice resulted in an increase in the frequency of colony-forming units-culture (CFU-C) in bone marrow. In addition, rH IL-2 was able to accelerate host recovery from cyclophosphamide (CTX)- or radiation-induced bone marrow depression and peripheral blood leukopenia. Not only can rH IL-2 accelerate, in a dose-dependent manner, the return of bone marrow, peripheral blood cellularity, and CFU-C frequency to normal levels following cytoreduction by CTX or irradiation, but it also significantly increases CFU-C frequency to greater than normal levels. Furthermore, rH IL-2 can significantly prolong survival of animals receiving a lethal dose of irradiation or CTX. Thus, multiple mechanisms are responsible for the synergistic therapeutic activity associated with rH IL-2 and CTX. rH IL-2 does not act only as an immunomodulatory agent in the presence or absence of suppressor T cells, but also accelerates host recovery from cytoreductive agents, resulting in decreased leukopenia and perhaps resistances to secondary infection. Thus, rH IL-2 plus chemotherapy may increase therapeutic activity against neoplastic disease, not only by adding immune stimulation to the direct antitumor effect of the drug but also by allowing delivery of higher, more effective doses of chemotherapy

  8. [Cathepsin K antagonists: preclinical and clinical data].

    Gamsjäger, Marion; Resch, Heinrich

    2015-02-01

    Cathepsin K, a cysteine protease, is an essential enzyme in degradation of collagen type I. Since cathepsin K is relatively specific to osteoclasts, it represents a promising candidate for drug development. In the past decades, efforts have been made in developing highly potent, selective and orally applicable cathepsin K inhibitors. In contrast to balicatib and relacatib, whose drug development programmes were stopped due to cutaneous side-effects related to limited drug specificity, the more specific cathepsin K inhibitors odanacatib (ODN) and ONO-5334 have entered clinical trials. Odanacatib progressively increases bone mineral density (BMD) and decreases bone resorption markers in postmenopausal women with low BMD. Its clinical efficacy and safety was confirmed by several clinical studies but indicates that odanacatib is characterized by a resolution-of-effect with increases in bone resorption and rapid decreases in BMD following treatment discontinuation. A phase III fracture prevention study in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis is currently in the final phase. PMID:25572547

  9. Molecular modeling approach to explore the role of cathepsin B from Hordeum vulgare in the degradation of Aβ peptides.

    Dhanavade, Maruti J; Parulekar, Rishikesh S; Kamble, Subodh A; Sonawane, Kailas D

    2016-01-01

    The pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease is the accumulation of Aβ peptides in human brains. These Aβ peptides can be degraded by several enzymes such as hACE, hECE, hIDE and cathepsin B. Out of which cathepsin B also belongs to the papain super family and has been found in human brains, it has a role in Aβ peptide degradation through limited proteolysis. The Aβ concentrations are maintained properly by its production and clearance via receptor-mediated cellular uptake and direct enzymatic degradation. However, the reduced production of Aβ degrading enzymes as well as their Aβ degrading activity in human brains initiate the process of accumulation of Aβ peptides. So it becomes essential to investigate the molecular interactions involved in the process of Aβ degradation in detail at the atomic level. Hence, homology modeling, molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation techniques have been used to explore the possible role of cathepsin B from Hordeum vulgare in the degradation of amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides. The homology model of cathepsin B from Hordeum vulgare shows good similarity with human cathepsin B. Molecular docking and MD simulation results revealed that the active site residues Cys32, HIS112, HIS113 are involved in the catalytic activity of cathepsin B. The sulfhydryl group of the Cys32 residue of cathepsin B from Hordeum vulgare cleaves the Aβ peptide from the carboxylic end of Glu11. Hence, this structural study might be helpful in designing alternative strategies for the treatment of AD. PMID:26568474

  10. Optical Imaging with a Cathepsin B Activated Probe for the Enhanced Detection of Esophageal Adenocarcinoma by Dual Channel Fluorescent Upper GI Endoscopy

    Peiman Habibollahi, Jose-Luiz Figueiredo, Pedram Heidari, Austin M Dulak, Yu Imamura, Adam J. Bass, Shuji Ogino, Andrew T Chan, Umar Mahmood

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite significant advances in diagnosis and treatment, the prognosis of esophageal adenocarcinoma remains poor highlighting the importance of early detection. Although white light (WL upper endoscopy can be used for screening of the esophagus, it has limited sensitivity for early stage disease. Thus, development of new imaging technology to improve the diagnostic capabilities of upper GI endoscopy for early detection of esophageal adenocarcinoma is an important unmet need. The goal of this study was to develop a method for the detection of malignant lesions in the esophagus using WL upper endoscopy combined with near infrared (NIR imaging with a protease activatable probe (Prosense750 selective for cathepsin B (CTSB. An orthotopic murine model for distal esophageal adenocarcinoma was generated through the implantation of OE-33 and OE-19 human esophageal adenocarcinoma lines in immunocompromised mice. The mice were imaged simultaneously for WL and NIR signal using a custom-built dual channel upper GI endoscope. The presence of tumor was confirmed by histology and target to background ratios (TBR were compared for both WL and NIR imaging. NIR imaging with ProSense750 significantly improved upon the TBRs of esophageal tumor foci, with a TBR of 3.64±0.14 and 4.50±0.11 for the OE-33 and OE-19 tumors respectively, compared to 0.88±0.04 and 0.81±0.02 TBR for WL imaging. The combination of protease probes with novel imaging devices has the potential to improve esophageal tumor detection by fluorescently highlighting neoplastic regions.

  11. Chemical constituents of the stem bark of Vochysia thyrsoidea Pohl. (Vochysiaceae) and evaluation of their cytotoxicity and inhibitory activity against cathepsins B and K; Constituintes quimicos das cascas do caule de Vochysia thyrsoidea Pohl. (Vochysiaceae) e avaliacao das atividades citotoxica e inibitoria frente as catepsinas B e K

    Sousa, Lorena Ramos Freitas de; Silva, Jame' s A. da; Vieira, Paulo Cezar [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (UFSCar), SP (Brazil). Departamento de Quimica; Costa, Maisa Borges; Santos, Mirley Luciene dos; Menezes, Antonio Carlos Severo, E-mail: amenezes@ueg.br [Universidade Estadual de Goias (UEG), Anapolis, GO (Brazil). Unidade Universitaria de Ciencias Exatas e Tecnologicas; Sbardelotto, Aline Borba; Pessoa, Claudia do O; Moraes, Manoel Odorico de [Universidade Federal do Ceara (UFC), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina. Dept. de Fisiologia e Farmacologia

    2014-04-15

    A new flavonoid, catechin-3-O-(3{sup -}O-trans-cinnamoyl)-α-rhamnopyranoside, along with known compounds, catechin-3-O-α-rhamnopyranoside, 3-oxo-urs-12-en-28-oic acid, 2,4,6-trimethoxybenzoic acid, 2-butyl-D-fructofuranoside and 1-butyl-D-fructofuranoside, has been isolated from the stem bark of V. thyrsoidea. These compounds were assayed for inhibition of protease activity (cathepsins B and K) and against cancer cell lines. Catechin-3-O-(3{sup -}O-trans-cinnamoyl)-α-rhamnopyranoside showed moderate inhibitory activity (IC{sub 50} = 62.02 µM) against cathepsin B while 2-butyl-D-fructofuranoside was the most potent against a strain of CNS (SF-295) and human leukemia (HL-60) with IC{sub 50} = 36.80 μM and IC{sub 50} = 25.37 μM, respectively (author)

  12. Gamma-interferon causes a selective induction of the lysosomal proteases, cathepsins B and L, in macrophages

    Lah, T. T.; Hawley, M.; Rock, K. L.; Goldberg, A. L.

    1995-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that acid-optimal cysteine proteinase(s) in the endosomal-lysosomal compartments, cathepsins, play a critical role in the proteolytic processing of endocytosed proteins to generate the antigenic peptides presented to the immune system on major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules. The presentation of these peptides and the expression of MHC class II molecules by macrophages and lymphocytes are stimulated by gamma-interferon (gamma-IFN). We found that treatment of human U-937 monocytes with gamma-IFN increased the activities and the content of the two major lysosomal cysteine proteinases, cathepsins B and L. Assays of protease activity, enzyme-linked immunosorbant assays (ELISA) and immunoblotting showed that this cytokine increased the amount of cathepsin B 5-fold and cathepsin L 3-fold in the lysosomal fraction. By contrast, the aspartic proteinase, cathepsin D, in this fraction was not significantly altered by gamma-IFN treatment. An induction of cathepsins B and L was also observed in mouse macrophages, but not in HeLa cells. These results suggest coordinate regulation in monocytes of the expression of cathepsins B and L and MHC class II molecules. Presumably, this induction of cysteine proteases contributes to the enhancement of antigen presentation by gamma-IFN.

  13. Relationship between Cathepsin B, Cathepsin D Expression and Biological Behaviour in Mucinous Colorectal Carcinoma

    王娅兰; 林晓

    2004-01-01

    @@ The proteolytic enzymes secreted by cancer cells are believed to play an important role in cancer invasion and metastasis. In this study, cathepsin B (CB)and cathepsin D (CD) were detected by method of immunohistochemistry in tissue specimens 48 samples of human colorectal carcinomas.

  14. Cathepsin B gene disruption induced Leishmania donovani proteome remodeling implies cathepsin B role in secretome regulation.

    Teklu Kuru Gerbaba

    Full Text Available Leishmania cysteine proteases are potential vaccine candidates and drug targets. To study the role of cathepsin B cysteine protease, we have generated and characterized cathepsin B null mutant L. donovani parasites. L. donovani cathepsin B null mutants grow normally in culture, but they show significantly attenuated virulence inside macrophages. Quantitative proteome profiling of wild type and null mutant parasites indicates cathepsin B disruption induced remodeling of L. donovani proteome. We identified 83 modulated proteins, of which 65 are decreased and 18 are increased in the null mutant parasites, and 66% (55/83 of the modulated proteins are L. donovani secreted proteins. Proteins involved in oxidation-reduction (trypanothione reductase, peroxidoxins, tryparedoxin, cytochromes and translation (ribosomal proteins are among those decreased in the null mutant parasites, and most of these proteins belong to the same complex network of proteins. Our results imply virulence role of cathepsin B via regulation of Leishmania secreted proteins.

  15. Cathepsin B and uPAR Knockdown Inhibits Tumor-induced Angiogenesis by Modulating VEGF Expression in Glioma

    MALLA, RAMA RAO; Gopinath, Sreelatha; Christopher S Gondi; Alapati, Kiranmai; Dinh, Dzung H.; Gujrati, Meena; Rao, Jasti S.

    2011-01-01

    Angiogenesis, which is the process of sprouting of new blood vessels from pre-existing vessels, is vital for tumor progression. Proteolytic remodeling of extracellular matrix is a key event in vessel sprouting during angiogenesis. Urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) and cathepsin B are both known to be overexpressed and implicated in tumor angiogenesis. In the present study, we observed that knockdown of uPAR and cathepsin B using puPAR (pU), pCathepsin B (pC), and a bicistronic c...

  16. Construction of an oral recombinant DNA vaccine from H pylori neutrophil activating protein and its immunogenicity

    Sun, Bo; Li, Zhao-Shen; Tu, Zhen-Xing; Xu, Guo-Ming; Du, Yi-qi

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To construct a live attenuated Salmonella typhimurium (S. typhimurium) strain harboring the H pylori neutrophil activating protein (HP-NAP) gene as an oral recombinant DNA vaccine, and to evaluate its immunogenicity.

  17. An Acidic Thermostable Recombinant Aspergillus nidulans Endoglucanase Is Active towards Distinct Agriculture Residues

    Marcio Jose Poças-Fonseca; Ildinete Silva-Pereira; Cynthia Maria Kyaw; Edivaldo Ximenes Ferreira Filho; Fabrícia Paula de Faria; Gilvan Caetano Duarte; Marciano Regis Rubini; Thiago Machado Mello-de-Sousa; Eveline Queiroz de Pinho Tavares

    2013-01-01

    Aspergillus nidulans is poorly exploited as a source of enzymes for lignocellulosic residues degradation for biotechnological purposes. This work describes the A. nidulans Endoglucanase A heterologous expression in Pichia pastoris, the purification and biochemical characterization of the recombinant enzyme. Active recombinant endoglucanase A (rEG A) was efficiently secreted as a 35 kDa protein which was purified through a two-step chromatography procedure. The highest enzyme activity was dete...

  18. Modulation of cathepsin G expression in severe atopic dermatitis following medium-dose UVA1 phototherapy

    Altmeyer Peter

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the last decade, medium-dose UVA1 phototherapy (50 J/cm2 has achieved great value within the treatment of severe atopic dermatitis (AD. The purpose of our study was to investigate to what extent UVA1 irradiation is able to modulate the status of protease activity by the use of a monoclonal antibody labeling cathepsin G. Methods In order to further elucidate the mechanisms by which medium-dose UVA1 irradiation leads to an improvement of skin status in patients with AD, biopsy specimens from 15 patients before and after treatment were analyzed immunohistochemically for proteolytic activation. Results Compared to lesional skin of patients with AD before UVA1 irradiation, the number of cells positive for cathepsin G within the dermal infiltrate decreased significantly after treatment. The decrease of cathepsin G+ cells was closely linked to a substantial clinical improvement in skin condition. Conclusions In summary, our findings demonstrated that medium-dose UVA1 irradiation leads to a modulation of the expression of cathepsin G in the dermal inflammatory infiltrate in patients with severe AD. Cathepsin G may attack laminin, proteoglycans, collagen I and insoluble fibronectin, to provoke proinflammatory events, to degrade the basement membrane, to destroy the tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases and to increase the endothelial permeability. Therefore, its down-regulation by UVA1 phototherapy may induce the reduction of skin inflammation as well as improvement of the skin condition.

  19. Hepatic steatosis inhibits autophagic proteolysis via impairment of autophagosomal acidification and cathepsin expression

    Highlights: → Acidification of autophagosome was blunted in steatotic hepatocytes. → Hepatic steatosis did not disturb fusion of isolated autophagosome and lysosome. → Proteinase activity of cathepsin B and L in autolysosomes was inhibited by steatosis. → Hepatic expression of cathepsin B and L was suppressed by steatosis. -- Abstract: Autophagy, one of protein degradation system, contributes to maintain cellular homeostasis and cell defense. Recently, some evidences indicated that autophagy and lipid metabolism are interrelated. Here, we demonstrate that hepatic steatosis impairs autophagic proteolysis. Though accumulation of autophagosome is observed in hepatocytes from ob/ob mice, expression of p62 was augmented in liver from ob/ob mice more than control mice. Moreover, degradation of the long-lived protein leucine was significantly suppressed in hepatocytes isolated from ob/ob mice. More than 80% of autophagosomes were stained by LysoTracker Red (LTR) in hepatocytes from control mice; however, rate of LTR-stained autophagosomes in hepatocytes were suppressed in ob/ob mice. On the other hand, clearance of autolysosomes loaded with LTR was blunted in hepatocytes from ob/ob mice. Although fusion of isolated autophagosome and lysosome was not disturbed, proteinase activity of cathepsin B and L in autolysosomes and cathepsin B and L expression of liver were suppressed in ob/ob mice. These results indicate that lipid accumulation blunts autophagic proteolysis via impairment of autophagosomal acidification and cathepsin expression.

  20. Hepatic steatosis inhibits autophagic proteolysis via impairment of autophagosomal acidification and cathepsin expression

    Inami, Yoshihiro [Department of Gastroenterology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Hongo 2-1-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Yamashina, Shunhei, E-mail: syamashi@juntendo.ac.jp [Department of Gastroenterology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Hongo 2-1-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Izumi, Kousuke [Department of Gastroenterology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Hongo 2-1-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Ueno, Takashi [Department of Biochemistry, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Hongo 2-1-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Tanida, Isei [Department of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Laboratory of Biomembranes, National Institute of Infectious Disease, Toyama 1-23-1, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-8640 (Japan); Ikejima, Kenichi; Watanabe, Sumio [Department of Gastroenterology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Hongo 2-1-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan)

    2011-09-09

    Highlights: {yields} Acidification of autophagosome was blunted in steatotic hepatocytes. {yields} Hepatic steatosis did not disturb fusion of isolated autophagosome and lysosome. {yields} Proteinase activity of cathepsin B and L in autolysosomes was inhibited by steatosis. {yields} Hepatic expression of cathepsin B and L was suppressed by steatosis. -- Abstract: Autophagy, one of protein degradation system, contributes to maintain cellular homeostasis and cell defense. Recently, some evidences indicated that autophagy and lipid metabolism are interrelated. Here, we demonstrate that hepatic steatosis impairs autophagic proteolysis. Though accumulation of autophagosome is observed in hepatocytes from ob/ob mice, expression of p62 was augmented in liver from ob/ob mice more than control mice. Moreover, degradation of the long-lived protein leucine was significantly suppressed in hepatocytes isolated from ob/ob mice. More than 80% of autophagosomes were stained by LysoTracker Red (LTR) in hepatocytes from control mice; however, rate of LTR-stained autophagosomes in hepatocytes were suppressed in ob/ob mice. On the other hand, clearance of autolysosomes loaded with LTR was blunted in hepatocytes from ob/ob mice. Although fusion of isolated autophagosome and lysosome was not disturbed, proteinase activity of cathepsin B and L in autolysosomes and cathepsin B and L expression of liver were suppressed in ob/ob mice. These results indicate that lipid accumulation blunts autophagic proteolysis via impairment of autophagosomal acidification and cathepsin expression.

  1. Cathepsin E Promotes Pulmonary Emphysema via Mitochondrial Fission

    Zhang, Xuchen; Shan, Peiying; Homer, Robert; Zhang, Yi; Petrache, Irina; Mannam, Praveen; Lee, Patty J.

    2014-01-01

    Emphysema is characterized by loss of lung elasticity and irreversible air space enlargement, usually in the later decades of life. The molecular mechanisms of emphysema remain poorly defined. We identified a role for a novel cathepsin, cathepsin E, in promoting emphysema by inducing mitochondrial fission. Unlike previously reported cysteine cathepsins, which have been implicated in cigarette smoke-induced lung disease, cathepsin E is a nonlysosomal intracellular aspartic protease whose funct...

  2. EKSTRAKSI DAN KARAKTERISASI PARSIAL EKSTRAK KASAR ENZIM KATEPSIN DARI IKAN PATIN [Extraction and Partial Characterization of Crude Enzymes Cathepsin from Catfish

    Muhammad Zakiyul Fikri*

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Decomposition of protein by enzymatic process will lead to changes in odor, texture, and appearance of fish. The enzymes that play a role in the enzymatic process is primarily proteolytic enzymes. Cathepsin is one of the proteolytic enzymes found in animal tissue that hydrolyzes peptide bonds of proteins. This study aims to extract the cathepsin, characterize the crude extract derived from catfish. The stages of this research consist of the extraction and characterization of the cathepsin from catfish. Result of the extraction was crude extract of cathepsin with activity of 0.278 U/mL. The enzyme had optimum temperature of 50°C, pH 6 and substrate concentration of 2%. The activity of the cathepsin was inhibited by metal ions of Fe3+, Cu2+, Ca2+, but increased by metal ions of Mg2+.

  3. Molecular mechanism of recombinant liver fatty acid binding protein's antioxidant activity

    Yan, Jing; Gong, Yuewen; She, Yi-Min; Wang, Guqi; Roberts, Michael S; Burczynski, Frank J.

    2009-01-01

    Hepatocytes expressing liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) are known to be more resistant to oxidative stress than those devoid of this protein. The mechanism for the observed antioxidant activity is not known. We examined the antioxidant mechanism of a recombinant rat L-FABP in the presence of a hydrophilic (AAPH) or lipophilic (AMVN) free radical generator. Recombinant L-FABP amino acid sequence and its amino acid oxidative products following oxidation were identified by MALDI quadrup...

  4. Vaccine testing of a recombinant activation-associated secreted protein (ASP1) from Ostertagia ostertagi

    Geldhof, Peter; Meyvis, Yves; Vercruysse, Jozef; Claerebout, Edwin

    2008-01-01

    Previous vaccination trials against the economically important cattle parasite Ostertagia ostertagi have indicated the protective capacity of activation-associated secreted proteins (ASPs). The further development of these antigens into a commercial vaccine will require their recombinant expression. The aim of the current study was to clone and express Oo-asp1 in a baculovirus expression system and to evaluate the protective capacity of the recombinant protein against an O. ostertagi challeng...

  5. 75 FR 69687 - Office of Biotechnology Activities Recombinant DNA Research: Proposed Actions Under the NIH...

    2010-11-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Office of Biotechnology Activities Recombinant DNA Research... Biotechnology Activities (OBA). The data to be considered for certifying a new host-vector system can be found... 301-496-9839 or sent by U.S. mail to the Office of Biotechnology Activities, National Institutes...

  6. CD4-independent human immunodeficiency virus infection involves participation of endocytosis and cathepsin B.

    Hiroaki Yoshii

    Full Text Available During a comparison of the infectivity of mNDK, a CD4-independent human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 strain, to various cell lines, we found that HeLa cells were much less susceptible than 293T and TE671 cells. Hybridoma cells between HeLa and 293T cells were as susceptible as 293T cells, suggesting that cellular factors enhance the mNDK infection in 293T cells. By screening a cDNA expression library in HeLa cells, cystatin C was isolated as an enhancer of the mNDK infection. Because cathepsin B protease, a natural ligand of cystatin C, was upregulated in HeLa cells, we speculated that the high levels of cathepsin B activities were inhibitory to the CD4-independent infection and that cystatin C enhanced the infection by impairing the excessive cathepsin B activity. Consistent with this idea, pretreatment of HeLa cells with 125 µM of CA-074Me, a cathepsin B inhibitor, resulted in an 8-fold enhancement of the mNDK infectivity. Because cathepsin B is activated by low pH in acidic endosomes, we further examined the potential roles of endosomes in the CD4-independent infection. Suppression of endosome acidification or endocytosis by inhibitors or by an Eps15 dominant negative mutant reduced the infectivity of mNDK in which CD4-dependent infections were not significantly impaired. Taken together, these results suggest that endocytosis, endosomal acidification, and cathepsin B activity are involved in the CD4-independent entry of HIV-1.

  7. Immunohistochemical study on expression of cathepsin in gastric carcinoma

    Wan Long Lin; Cong Jia Chen; Han Gao Zhou

    2000-01-01

    AIM To study the expression of cathepsin B in gastric carcinoma and its relationship with pathologic type.METHODS The cathepsin B expression in 54 specimens of human gastric adenocarcinoma was studied byimmunohistochemistry.RESULTS The cathepsin B expression was detected in 33/54 (61.1%) specimens of human gastriccarcinoma and in 3/54 (5.6%) of normal tissue (P<0.01). There was no obvious correlation between theexpression of cathepsin B and pathologic type of gastric adenocarcinoma.CONCLUSION There is a high expression of cathepsin B in human gastric adenocarcinoma.

  8. Transcriptional activities of mammalian genomes at sites of recombination with foreign DNA

    The nucleotide sequences of several sites of recombination between adenovirus DNA and hamster, mouse, or human cell DNAs were determined. These sites of recombination had been cloned from adenovirus type 2 (Ad2)- or type 12 (Ad12)-transformed cells, from Ad12-induced tumor cells, or from a symmetric recombinant between Ad12 DNA and human cell DNA. One important precondition for the generation of recombinants between host and foreign DNAs might be the establishment of a chromatin configuration that permits access of foreign DNA and of the recombination machinery to cellular DNA. Such favorable chromatin structures might arise during cellular DNA replication or transcription or both. As a first approach toward investigating these more complex problems of foreign DNA insertion. The authors determined transcriptional activities of cellular DNA sequences at viral junction sites. The results presented demonstrate that the cellular DNA sequences involved in linkage to viral DNA at five completely different sites in DNA from three different species are transcribed into RNAs even in cells which have not been transformed or infected by adenovirus. These results are consistent with the notion that at least some of the cellular DNA sequences at sites of insertion of adenovirus (foreign) DNA are transcriptionally active and thus provide an opportunity for recombination

  9. Purification and Determination of Inhibitory Activity of Recombinant Soyacystatin Against Papain and Fish Protease

    AKPINAR, Özlem

    2004-01-01

    Recombinant (r-) soyacystatin was characterized for its inhibitory activity against papain and compared to egg white cystatin. r-Soyacystatin expressed in E. coli was purified with phenyl-Sepharose and DEAE 4.33 fold as a recombinant protein. Egg white cystatin was purified by using affinity chromatography on cm-papain-Sepharose. Inhibitory activity of r-soyacystatin was similar to that of egg white cystatin. The amount required to inhibit 50% activity of papain used in the assay, 2 pg, was 0...

  10. Cathepsin L of the sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus-molecular characterization and transcriptional response to Vibrio splendidus infection.

    Yang, Jingwen; Liu, Huihui; Zheng, Gang; Xiang, Xiaowei; Lv, Zhenming; Wang, Tianming

    2016-02-01

    Cathepsin L, a lysosomal endopeptidase, has been noted for its involvement in the innate immune response in invertebrates. Here, the cathepsin L cDNA of the sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus (AjCatL) is identified from an EST library and then cloned by the rapid amplification of the cDNA ends (RACE) PCR. The full-length cDNA is 1678 bp long containing an open reading frame (ORF) of 1002 bp, an 80 bp 5' UTR and a 599 bp 3' UTR. The cDNA encodes 333 amino acid residues with a predicted molecular mass of 37.07 kDa and a theoretical isoelectric point (pI) of 5.01. The full-length AjCatL contains three active sites of eukaryotic thiol (cysteine) protease at positions 133-144, 278-288 and 295-314. Analysis of the predicted tertiary structure of prepro-CatL (17-333 aa) and mature-CatL (116-333 aa) reveals that the propeptide region (17-115 aa) blocks access to the substrate-binding cleft. Phylogenetic analysis shows that the AjCatL is clustered together with two other CatLs from Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. The enzymatic activity of AjCatL was verified using a substrate hydrolyzing assay with recombinant mAjCatL. Further analysis of real time-PCR demonstrates that the expression of AjCatL mRNA is significantly up-regulated in the coelomocytes in cases of infection with the common bacterial pathogen, Vibrio splendidus. This suggests that the AjCatL is likely to be involved in the immune response. PMID:26777896

  11. 75 FR 42114 - Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Proposed Action Under the NIH...

    2010-07-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA... transgenic rodent and a non-transgenic rodent). The NIH Office of Biotechnology Activities (OBA) received a... to the same email address or by fax to 301-496-9839 or mail to the Office of Biotechnology...

  12. 78 FR 12074 - Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Actions Under the NIH Guidelines...

    2013-02-21

    ... containing an HA from the Goose/Guangdong/1/96 lineage should become an HHS Select Agent (77 FR 63783... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA... recommendations of the RAC, the NIH Office of Biotechnology Activities (OBA) concluded that more specific...

  13. 76 FR 3150 - Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Action Under the NIH Guidelines for...

    2011-01-19

    ...). On July 20, 2010 the NIH Office of Biotechnology Activities (OBA) published a proposed action (75 FR... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA... contact OBA by e- mail at oba@od.nih.gov , telephone, 301-496-9838 or mail to the Office of...

  14. 76 FR 27653 - Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Action Under the NIH Guidelines for...

    2011-05-12

    ... Federal Register (75 FR 69687). No public comments were received regarding the proposal to certify K... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA.... lactis certified host-vector 1 system. In addition, the Office of Biotechnology Activities is...

  15. 75 FR 31795 - Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Amended Notice of Meeting

    2010-06-04

    ..., 2010 (75 FR 28811) is withdrawn. The discussion that was to be held at the June 16-17, 2010 meeting of... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA...-Curay, Acting Director, Office of Biotechnology Activities, National Institutes of Health. BILLING...

  16. 76 FR 62816 - Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA Research: Action Under the NIH Guidelines for...

    2011-10-11

    ... experts from NIH, CDC, and academia. These proposed changes were published in the Federal Register (76 FR... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Office of Biotechnology Activities; Recombinant DNA... Biotechnology Activities (OBA) is updating Appendix B of the NIH Guidelines to specify the risk group...

  17. Antibacterial Activity of Recombinant Pig Intestinal Parasite Cecropin P4 Peptide Secreted from Pichia pastoris.

    Song, Ki-Duk; Lee, Woon-Kyu

    2014-02-01

    Cecropins (Cec) are antibacterial peptides and their expression is induced in a pig intestinal parasite Ascaris suum by bacterial infection. To explore the usefulness of its activity as an antibiotic, CecP4 cDNA was prepared and cloned into the pPICZ B expression vector and followed by the integration into AOX1 locus in Pichia pastoris. The supernatants from cell culture were collected after methanol induction and concentrated for the test of antimicrobial activity. The recombinant P. patoris having CecP4 showed antimicrobial activity when tested against Staphyllococcus aureus in disc diffusion assay. We selected one of the CecP4 clones (CecP4-2) and performed further studies with it. The growth of recombinant P. pastoris was optimized using various concentration of methanol, and it was found that 2% methanol in the culture induced more antibacterial activity, compared to 1% methanol. We extended the test of antimicrobial activity by applying the concentrated supernatant of CecP4 culture to Pseudomonas aeruginosa and E. coli respectively. Recombinant CecP4 also showed antimicrobial activity against both Pseudomona and E. coli, suggesting the broad spectrum of its antimicrobial activity. After improvements for the scale-up, it will be feasible to use recombinant CecP4 for supplementation to the feed to control microbial infections in young animals, such as piglets. PMID:25049952

  18. Synthesis and characterization of biologically active recombinant elk and horse FSH.

    Fachal, María Victoria; Furlan, Mike; Clark, Rena; Card, Claire E; Chedrese, P Jorge

    2010-02-01

    The objective of this investigation was to clone and express the elk and horse common alpha-subunit and FSH beta-subunit cDNAs, and to produce recombinant FSH from both species in vitro. The RNAs extracted from elk and horse pituitary glands were reverse-transcribed and amplified by polymerase chain reaction. The cDNAs corresponding to both subunits of elk and horse were cloned into the expression vector pBudCE4.1 and transfected into CRL-9096 cells. Expression of both genes was determined in the transfected cells by Northern and Western blot analysis. Recombinant elk and horse FSH secreted in culture media were characterized by an in vitro bioassay and RIA. When the recombinant products were assessed as activity over mass of FSH measured by RIA, the horse product was 5.6 times more potent than the elk product. The recombinant products injected to immature female Wistar rats stimulated ovarian growth. The results suggest that the products obtained correspond to recombinant versions of the native elk and horse FSH. The availability of these recombinant products may aid in the development of more predictable and efficient techniques of ovarian stimulation in cervids, equids, and other species as well. PMID:19500922

  19. Crystal structure of cathepsin A, a novel target for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The structures of active cathepsin A and the inactive precursor are very similar. • The only major difference is the absence of a 40 residue activation domain. • The termini of the active catalytic core are held together by a disulfide bond. • Compound 1 reacts with the catalytic Ser150, building a tetrahedral intermediate. • Compound 2 is cleaved by the enzyme and a fragment remained bound. - Abstract: The lysosomal serine carboxypeptidase cathepsin A is involved in the breakdown of peptide hormones like endothelin and bradykinin. Recent pharmacological studies with cathepsin A inhibitors in rodents showed a remarkable reduction in cardiac hypertrophy and atrial fibrillation, making cathepsin A a promising target for the treatment of heart failure. Here we describe the crystal structures of activated cathepsin A without inhibitor and with two compounds that mimic the tetrahedral intermediate and the reaction product, respectively. The structure of activated cathepsin A turned out to be very similar to the structure of the inactive precursor. The only difference was the removal of a 40 residue activation domain, partially due to proteolytic removal of the activation peptide, and partially by an order–disorder transition of the peptides flanking the removed activation peptide. The termini of the catalytic core are held together by the Cys253–Cys303 disulfide bond, just before and after the activation domain. One of the compounds we soaked in our crystals reacted covalently with the catalytic Ser150 and formed a tetrahedral intermediate. The other compound got cleaved by the enzyme and a fragment, resembling one of the natural reaction products, was found in the active site. These studies establish cathepsin A as a classical serine proteinase with a well-defined oxyanion hole. The carboxylate group of the cleavage product is bound by a hydrogen-bonding network involving one aspartate and two glutamate side chains

  20. Crystal structure of cathepsin A, a novel target for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases

    Schreuder, Herman A., E-mail: herman.schreuder@sanofi.com; Liesum, Alexander, E-mail: alexander.liesum@sanofi.com; Kroll, Katja, E-mail: katja.kroll@sanofi.com; Böhnisch, Britta, E-mail: britta.boehnisch@sanofi.com; Buning, Christian, E-mail: christian.buning@sanofi.com; Ruf, Sven, E-mail: sven.ruf@sanofi.com; Sadowski, Thorsten, E-mail: thorsten.sadowski@sanofi.com

    2014-03-07

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The structures of active cathepsin A and the inactive precursor are very similar. • The only major difference is the absence of a 40 residue activation domain. • The termini of the active catalytic core are held together by a disulfide bond. • Compound 1 reacts with the catalytic Ser150, building a tetrahedral intermediate. • Compound 2 is cleaved by the enzyme and a fragment remained bound. - Abstract: The lysosomal serine carboxypeptidase cathepsin A is involved in the breakdown of peptide hormones like endothelin and bradykinin. Recent pharmacological studies with cathepsin A inhibitors in rodents showed a remarkable reduction in cardiac hypertrophy and atrial fibrillation, making cathepsin A a promising target for the treatment of heart failure. Here we describe the crystal structures of activated cathepsin A without inhibitor and with two compounds that mimic the tetrahedral intermediate and the reaction product, respectively. The structure of activated cathepsin A turned out to be very similar to the structure of the inactive precursor. The only difference was the removal of a 40 residue activation domain, partially due to proteolytic removal of the activation peptide, and partially by an order–disorder transition of the peptides flanking the removed activation peptide. The termini of the catalytic core are held together by the Cys253–Cys303 disulfide bond, just before and after the activation domain. One of the compounds we soaked in our crystals reacted covalently with the catalytic Ser150 and formed a tetrahedral intermediate. The other compound got cleaved by the enzyme and a fragment, resembling one of the natural reaction products, was found in the active site. These studies establish cathepsin A as a classical serine proteinase with a well-defined oxyanion hole. The carboxylate group of the cleavage product is bound by a hydrogen-bonding network involving one aspartate and two glutamate side chains

  1. Immunocapture of circulating Schistosoma mansoni cathepsin B antigen (Sm31) by anti-Sm31 polyclonal antibodies.

    González, Amelia Y; Sulbarán, Guidenn S; Ballen, Diana E; Cesari, Italo M

    2016-06-01

    Adult Schistosoma mansoni parasites have the capacity to degrade ingested host hemoglobin and other host plasma proteins by using a series of gut proteolytic enzymes, including cathepsin B; this enzyme is released to the host intravascular environment during regurgitations of adult worms. Cathepsin B becomes thus a circulating parasite component that has been shown to be specifically recognized as the Sm31 antigen by antibodies present in most S. mansoni infected patients. Taking advantage of this immunological property, we attempted here to immunocapture Sm31 from sera of infected patients using specific polyclonal rabbit antibodies raised against a highly enriched preparation of Sm31 and detect its intrinsic proteolytic activity using a previously described solid-phase procedure called Cysteine Protease Immuno Assay (CPIA). To produce highly specific anti-Sm31/cathepsin B antibodies, cathepsin B (Sm31 or SmCB) was enriched more than 3000-folds from an adult worm preparation using a series of conventional biochemical steps including ion exchange and affinity chromatography. Anti-cathepsin B antibodies were generated by immunizing rabbits with the enriched cathepsin B fraction; these antibodies recognized a band of Mr.~31kDa in Western-blot (WB) analysis of this fraction and were able to capture, in a modified CPIA procedure, Sm31/SmCB present in sera from infected Venezuelan patients living in low endemic areas for schistosomiasis. CPIA showed 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity; representing a new diagnostic tool to detect circulating Sm31 antigen in actual infections. PMID:26709076

  2. Upregulation of cathepsin D in the caudate nucleus of primates with experimental parkinsonism

    Flynn Claudia T

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Parkinson's disease there is progressive loss of dopamine containing neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta. The neuronal damage is not limited to the substantia nigra but progresses to other regions of brain, leading to loss of motor control as well as cognitive abnormalities. The purpose of this study was to examine causes of progressive damage in the caudate nucleus, which plays a major role in motor coordination and cognition, in experimental Parkinson's disease. Results Using chronic 1-methyl-4phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine treatment of rhesus monkeys to model Parkinson's disease, we found a upregulation of Cathepsin D, a lysosomal aspartic protease, in the caudate nucleus of treated monkeys. Immunofluorescence analysis of caudate nucleus brain tissue showed that the number of lysosomes increased concurrently with the increase in Cathepsin D in neurons. In vitro overexpression of Cathepsin D in a human neuroblastoma cell line led to a significant increase in the number of the lysosomes. Such expression also resulted in extralysosomal Cathepsin D and was accompanied by significant neuronal death associated with caspase activation. We examined apoptotic markers and found a strong correlation of Cathepsin D overexpression to apoptosis. Conclusions Following damage to the substantia nigra resulting in experimental Parkinson's disease, we have identified pathological changes in the caudate nucleus, a likely site of changes leading to the progression of disease. Cathepsin D, implicated in pathogenic mechanisms in other disorders, was increased, and our in vitro studies revealed its overexpression leads to cellular damage and death. This work provides important clues to the progression of Parkinson's, and provides a new target for strategies to ameliorate the progression of this disease.

  3. Impact of cathepsin B on the interstitial fluid proteome of murine breast cancers.

    Gomez-Auli, Alejandro; Hillebrand, Larissa Elisabeth; Biniossek, Martin Lothar; Peters, Christoph; Reinheckel, Thomas; Schilling, Oliver

    2016-03-01

    Carcinomas establish a molecular cross talk between malignant tumor cells and the activated non-malignant cells of the tumor stroma. This cell-cell communication in tumor-stroma interaction includes soluble, secreted proteins that act in a paracrine or autocrine manner. Proteases are crucial factors in tumor-stroma interaction by degrading or truncating secreted bioactive proteins. The cysteine protease cathepsin B is frequently overexpressed in several cancer types, including breast cancer. Its abundance often correlates with poor prognosis. In the murine polyoma virus middle T oncogene (PyMT) breast cancer model, cathepsin B is equally pro-tumorigenic. In this study, we investigate how cathepsin B shapes the secreted proteome of PyMT breast cancers. We employed a novel strategy to harvest tumor interstitial fluid (IF) in combination with chemical stable isotope tagging for quantitative proteomic comparison of IF stemming from PyMT tumors from wild-type mice, mice lacking cathepsin B, and mice over-expressing human cathepsin B. In three biological replicates, we achieve good proteome coverage (∼1700 proteins), with a large content (>70%) of secreted proteins. This characterizes IF as a robust source for the investigation of cancer secretomes. We also identified a large number of shed ectodomains, thus highlighting the importance of tumor-contextual cell surface proteolysis. Furthermore, IF contained >190 proteases and protease inhibitors, which span the entire range of absolute protein abundances; an observation testifying for an important role of proteolysis in tumor-stroma interaction. The cathepsin B genotype consistently affected proteins including alpha-1B-glycoprotein and major urinary proteins 11 and 8 (MUP8). Our study establishes tumor IF as a rich source for the investigation of secreted proteins in tumor biology and sheds light on complex proteolytic networks in the breast cancer secretome. PMID:26455267

  4. Purification and characterization of cathepsin D from herring muscle ( Clupea harengus )

    Nielsen, L.B.; Nielsen, Henrik Hauch

    2001-01-01

    Cathepsin D was purified and concentrated 469-fold from a homogenate of Clupea harengus muscle. The purified enzyme is a monomer with a molecular weight of 38 000-39 000. It is inhibited by pepstatin and has optimal activity at pH 2.5 with hemoglobin as the substrate. The isoelectric point is at ...

  5. Over-expression and characterization of active recombinant rat liver carnitine palmitoyltransferase II using baculovirus.

    Johnson, T M; Mann, W R; Dragland, C J; Anderson, R C; Nemecek, G M; Bell, P A

    1995-01-01

    The cDNA encoding rat liver carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT-II) was heterologously expressed using a recombinant baculovirus/insect cell system. Unlike Escherichia coli, the baculovirus-infected insect cells expressed mostly soluble active recombinant CPT-II (rCPT-II). CPT activity from crude lysates of recombinant baculovirus-infected insect cells was maximal between 50 and 72 h post-infection, with a peak specific activity of 100-200 times that found in the mock- or wild-type-infected control lysates. Milligram quantities (up to 1.8 mg/l of culture) of active rCPT-II were chromatographically purified from large-scale cultures of insect cells infected with the recombinant baculovirus. The rCPT-II was found to be: (1) similar in size to the native rat liver enzyme (approximately 70 kDa) as judged by SDS/PAGE; (2) immunoreactive with a polyclonal serum raised against rat liver CPT-II; and (3) not glycosylated. Kinetic analysis of soluble rCPT-II revealed Km values for carnitine and palmitoyl-CoA of 950 +/- 27 microM and 34 +/- 5.6 microM respectively. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:7626037

  6. Expression and activity of recombinant proaerolysin derived from Aeromonas hydrophila cultured from diseased channel catfish

    Proaerolysin-coding gene was cloned from the genomic DNA of A. hydrophila and heterologously expressed in E. coli. The purified recombinant proaerolysin was inactive and could be activated by treatment with proteases, furin and trypsin, and extra-cellular proteins (ECPs, the cell-free supernatant of...

  7. Recombinant activated protein C attenuates coagulopathy and inflammation when administered early in murine pneumococcal pneumonia

    M. Schouten; C. van 't Veer; J.J.T.H. Roelofs; B. Gerlitz; B.W. Grinnell; M. Levi; T. van der Poll

    2011-01-01

    Recombinant human activated protein C (APC), which has both anticoagulant and anti-inflammatory properties, improves survival of patients with severe sepsis. This beneficial effect is especially apparent in patients with pneumococcal pneumonia. Earlier treatment with APC in sepsis has been associate

  8. [Expression, purification of recombinant cationic peptide AIK in Escherichia coli and its antitumor activity].

    Fan, Fangfang; Sun, Huiying; Xu, Hui; Liu, Jiawei; Zhang, Haiyuan; Li, Yilan; Ning, Xuelian; Sun, Yue; Bai, Jing; Fu, Songbin; Zhou, Chunshui

    2015-12-01

    AIK is a novel cationic peptide with potential antitumor activity. In order to construct the AIK expression vector by Gateway technology, and establish an optimal expression and purification method for recombinant AIK, a set of primers containing AttB sites were designed and used to create the AttB-TEV-FLAG-AIR fusion gene by overlapping PCR. The resulting fusion gene was cloned into the donor vector pDONR223 by attB and attP mediated recombination (BP reaction), then, transferred into the destination vector pDESTl 5 by attL and attR mediated recombination (LR reaction). All the cloning was verified by both colony PCR and DNA sequencing. The BL21 F. coli transformed by the GST-AIR expression plasmid was used to express the GST-AIK fusion protein with IPTG induction and the induction conditions were optimized. GST-AIR fusion protein was purified by glutathione magnetic beads, followed by rTEV cleavage to remove GST tag and MTS assay to test the growth inhibition activity of the recombinant AIR on human leukemia HL-60 cells. We found that a high level of soluble expression of GST-AIK protein (more than 30% out of the total bacterial proteins) was achieved upon 0.1 mmol/L ITPG induction for 4 h at 37 °C in the transformed BL21 F. coli with starting OD₆₀₀ at 1.0. Through GST affinity purification and rTEV cleavage, the purity of the resulting recombinant AIK was greater than 95%. And the MTS assays on HL-60 cells confirmed that the recombinant AIK retains an antitumor activity at a level similar to the chemically synthesized AIK. Taken together, we have established a method for expression and purification of recombinant AIK with a potent activity against tumor cells, which will be beneficial for the large-scale production and application of recombinant AIK in the future. PMID:27093838

  9. Effect of copper on the recombination activity of extended defects in silicon

    The effect of copper atoms introduced by high-temperature diffusion on the recombination properties of dislocations and dislocation trails in p-type single-crystal silicon is studied by the electron-beam-induced current technique. It is shown that, in contrast to dislocations, dislocation trails exhibit an increase in recombination activity after the introduction of copper. Bright contrast appearance in the vicinity of dislocation trails is detected after the diffusion of copper and quenching of the samples. The contrast depends on the defect density in these trails

  10. Role of recombination activating genes in the generation of antigen receptor diversity and beyond.

    Nishana, Mayilaadumveettil; Raghavan, Sathees C

    2012-12-01

    V(D)J recombination is the process by which antibody and T-cell receptor diversity is attained. During this process, antigen receptor gene segments are cleaved and rejoined by non-homologous DNA end joining for the generation of combinatorial diversity. The major players of the initial process of cleavage are the proteins known as RAG1 (recombination activating gene 1) and RAG2. In this review, we discuss the physiological function of RAGs as a sequence-specific nuclease and its pathological role as a structure-specific nuclease. The first part of the review discusses the basic mechanism of V(D)J recombination, and the last part focuses on how the RAG complex functions as a sequence-specific and structure-specific nuclease. It also deals with the off-target cleavage of RAGs and its implications in genomic instability. PMID:23039142

  11. High-Level Expression of Recombinant Bovine Lactoferrin in Pichia pastoris with Antimicrobial Activity.

    Iglesias-Figueroa, Blanca; Valdiviezo-Godina, Norberto; Siqueiros-Cendón, Tania; Sinagawa-García, Sugey; Arévalo-Gallegos, Sigifredo; Rascón-Cruz, Quintín

    2016-01-01

    In this study, bovine lactoferrin (bLf), an iron-binding glycoprotein considered an important nutraceutical protein because of its several properties, was expressed in Pichia pastoris KM71-H under AOX1 promoter control, using pJ902 as the recombinant plasmid. Dot blotting analysis revealed the expression of recombinant bovine lactoferrin (rbLf) in Pichia pastoris. After Bach fermentation and purification by molecular exclusion, we obtained an expression yield of 3.5 g/L of rbLf. rbLf and predominantly pepsin-digested rbLf (rbLfcin) demonstrated antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli (E. coli) BL21DE3, Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) FRI137, and, in a smaller percentage, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Ps. Aeruginosa) ATCC 27833. The successful expression and characterization of functional rbLf expressed in Pichia pastoris opens a prospect for the development of natural antimicrobial agents produced recombinantly. PMID:27294912

  12. Cathepsins and cystatin C in atherosclerosis and obesity.

    Lafarge, Jean-Charles; Naour, Nadia; Clément, Karine; Guerre-Millo, Michèle

    2010-11-01

    Given the increasing prevalence of human obesity worldwide, there is an urgent need for a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms linking obesity to metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. Our knowledge is nevertheless limited regarding molecules linking adipose tissue to downstream complications. The importance of cathepsins was brought to light in this context. Through a large scale transcriptomic analysis, our group recently identified the gene encoding cathepsin S as one of the most deregulated gene in the adipose tissue of obese subjects and positively correlated with body mass index. Other members of the cathepsin family are expressed in the adipose tissue, including cathepsin K and cathepsin L. Given their implication in atherogenesis, these proteases could participate into the well established deleterious relationship between enlarged adipose tissue and increased cardiovascular risk. Here, we review the clinical and experimental evidence relevant to the role of cathepsins K, L and S and their most abundant endogenous inhibitor, cystatin C, in atherosclerosis and in obesity. PMID:20417681

  13. Cysteine and aspartic proteases cathepsins B and D determine the invasiveness of MCF10A neoT cells

    Background. Lysosomal cathepsins B and D have been reported to play a role in various processes leading to progression of malignant disease. In ras-transformed MCF10A neoT cells both enzymes show similar vesicular distribution in perinuclear and peripheral cytoplasmic regions. Results. The co-localization of cathepsins B and D in some vesicles as defined by confocal microscopy supports their co-ordinate activity in the proteolytic cascade. On the other hand, we showed that stefin A, an endogenous intracellular inhibitor of cysteine proteases, did not co-localize with cathepsin B and is presumably not involved in regulation of its enzymatic activity within the vesicles. Intracellular localization of both enzymes was confined to similar vesicles as the fluorescent degradation products of DQ-collagen IV either in individual cells or cell spheroids. The capability of these two enzymes to degrade collagen and other components of extracellular matrix is further supported by the results of Matrigel invasion assay. We showed that specific intracellular (CA-074 Me) and extracellular (CA-074) inhibitors of cathepsin B and pepstatin A, an inhibitor of cathepsin D, significantly reduced invasion of MCF10A neoT cells. Our results also show that in contrast to some other studies the activation peptide of pro-cathepsin D exhibited no mitogenic effect on MCF10A neoT, MCF-7 or HEK-293 cells. Conclusion. We conclude that lysosomal cysteine proteases cathepsins B and D predominantly participate in degradation of extracellular matrix and facilitate invasion of tumour cells. (author)

  14. Antitumor activity of recombinant interleukin 6 in mice

    1990-01-01

    IL-6 possesses multiple biologic activities that affect a broad range of cells including those directly involved in immune responses as well as cells important in the systemic response to infection or trauma. We now show that purified human rIL-6, when administered alone at relatively high doses that are comparable to therapeutic levels of IL- 2, mediated substantial reductions in the number of pulmonary and hepatic micrometastases from four distinct syngeneic tumors. Unlike IL- 2, IL-6 injec...

  15. Cathepsin D SNP associated with increased risk of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    Sanchez-Juan Pascual

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD originally resulted from the consumption of foodstuffs contaminated by bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE material, with 163 confirmed cases in the UK to date. Many thousands are likely to have been exposed to dietary infection and so it is important (for surveillance, epidemic modelling, public health and understanding pathogenesis to identify genetic factors that may affect individual susceptibility to infection. This study looked at a polymorphism in the cathepsin D gene (refSNP ID: rs17571 previously examined in Alzheimer's disease (AD. Methods Blood samples taken from 110 vCJD patients were tested for the C-T base change, and genotype data were compared with published frequencies for a control population using multiple logistic regression. Results There was a significant excess of the cathepsin D polymorphism TT genotype in the vCJD cohort compared to controls. The TT genotype was found to have a 9.75 fold increase in risk of vCJD compared to the CT genotype and a 10.92 fold increase compared to the CC genotype. Conclusion This mutation event has been observed to alter the protease activity of the cathepsin D protein and has been linked to an increase in amyloid beta plaque formation in AD. vCJD neuropathology is characterised by the presence of amyloid plaques, formed from the prion protein, and therefore alterations in the amyloid processing activity of cathepsin D may affect the neuropathogenesis of this disease.

  16. Odanacatib, a Cathepsin K Cysteine Protease Inhibitor, Kills Hookworm In Vivo

    Jon J. Vermeire

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Hookworm infection is chief among soil-transmitted helminthiases (STHs for the chronic morbidly inflicted. Deworming via mass drug administration (MDA programs most often employs single doses of benzimidazole drugs to which resistance is a constant threat. To discover new drugs, we employ a hamster model of hookworm infection with Ancylostoma ceylanicum and use albendazole (ABZ; 10 mg/kg orally as the gold standard therapy. We previously showed that a single oral 100 mg/kg dose of the cathepsin cysteine protease (CP inhibitor, K11777, offers near cure of infection that is associated with a 95% reduction in the parasite’s resident CP activity. We confirm these findings here and demonstrate that odanacatib (ODN, Merck’s cathepsin K inhibitor and post-clinical Phase III drug candidate for treatment of osteoporosis, decreases worm burden by 73% at the same dose with a 51% reduction in the parasite’s CP activity. Unlike K11777, ODN is a modest inhibitor of both mammalian cathepsin B and the predominant cathepsin B-like activity measureable in hookworm extracts. ODN’s somewhat unexpected efficacy, therefore, may be due to its excellent pharmacokinetic (PK profile which allows for sustained plasma exposure and, possibly, sufficient perturbation of hookworm cathepsin B activity to be detrimental to survival. Accordingly, identifying a CP inhibitor(s that combines the inhibition potency of K11777 and the PK attributes of ODN could lead to a drug that is effective at a lower dose. Achieving this would potentially provide an alternative or back-up to the current anti-hookworm drug, albendazole.

  17. Odanacatib, a Cathepsin K Cysteine Protease Inhibitor, Kills Hookworm In Vivo.

    Vermeire, Jon J; Suzuki, Brian M; Caffrey, Conor R

    2016-01-01

    Hookworm infection is chief among soil-transmitted helminthiases (STHs) for the chronic morbidly inflicted. Deworming via mass drug administration (MDA) programs most often employs single doses of benzimidazole drugs to which resistance is a constant threat. To discover new drugs, we employ a hamster model of hookworm infection with Ancylostoma ceylanicum and use albendazole (ABZ; 10 mg/kg orally) as the gold standard therapy. We previously showed that a single oral 100 mg/kg dose of the cathepsin cysteine protease (CP) inhibitor, K11777, offers near cure of infection that is associated with a 95% reduction in the parasite's resident CP activity. We confirm these findings here and demonstrate that odanacatib (ODN), Merck's cathepsin K inhibitor and post-clinical Phase III drug candidate for treatment of osteoporosis, decreases worm burden by 73% at the same dose with a 51% reduction in the parasite's CP activity. Unlike K11777, ODN is a modest inhibitor of both mammalian cathepsin B and the predominant cathepsin B-like activity measureable in hookworm extracts. ODN's somewhat unexpected efficacy, therefore, may be due to its excellent pharmacokinetic (PK) profile which allows for sustained plasma exposure and, possibly, sufficient perturbation of hookworm cathepsin B activity to be detrimental to survival. Accordingly, identifying a CP inhibitor(s) that combines the inhibition potency of K11777 and the PK attributes of ODN could lead to a drug that is effective at a lower dose. Achieving this would potentially provide an alternative or back-up to the current anti-hookworm drug, albendazole. PMID:27384569

  18. Synthesis of a sugar-based thiosemicarbazone series and structure-activity relationship versus the parasite cysteine proteases rhodesain, cruzain, and Schistosoma mansoni cathepsin B1.

    Fonseca, Nayara Cristina; da Cruz, Luana Faria; da Silva Villela, Filipe; do Nascimento Pereira, Glaécia Aparecida; de Siqueira-Neto, Jair Lage; Kellar, Danielle; Suzuki, Brian M; Ray, Debalina; de Souza, Thiago Belarmino; Alves, Ricardo José; Sales Júnior, Policarpo Ademar; Romanha, Alvaro José; Murta, Silvane Maria Fonseca; McKerrow, James H; Caffrey, Conor R; de Oliveira, Renata Barbosa; Ferreira, Rafaela Salgado

    2015-05-01

    The pressing need for better drugs against Chagas disease, African sleeping sickness, and schistosomiasis motivates the search for inhibitors of cruzain, rhodesain, and Schistosoma mansoni CB1 (SmCB1), the major cysteine proteases from Trypanosoma cruzi, Trypanosoma brucei, and S. mansoni, respectively. Thiosemicarbazones and heterocyclic analogues have been shown to be both antitrypanocidal and inhibitory against parasite cysteine proteases. A series of compounds was synthesized and evaluated against cruzain, rhodesain, and SmCB1 through biochemical assays to determine their potency and structure-activity relationships (SAR). This approach led to the discovery of 6 rhodesain, 4 cruzain, and 5 SmCB1 inhibitors with 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) of ≤ 10 μM. Among the compounds tested, the thiosemicarbazone derivative of peracetylated galactoside (compound 4i) was discovered to be a potent rhodesain inhibitor (IC50 = 1.2 ± 1.0 μM). The impact of a range of modifications was determined; removal of thiosemicarbazone or its replacement by semicarbazone resulted in virtually inactive compounds, and modifications in the sugar also diminished potency. Compounds were also evaluated in vitro against the parasites T. cruzi, T. brucei, and S. mansoni, revealing active compounds among this series. PMID:25712353

  19. Antibacterial Activity of Recombinant Pig Intestinal Parasite Cecropin P4 Peptide Secreted from Pichia pastoris

    Song, Ki-Duk; Lee, Woon-Kyu

    2014-01-01

    Cecropins (Cec) are antibacterial peptides and their expression is induced in a pig intestinal parasite Ascaris suum by bacterial infection. To explore the usefulness of its activity as an antibiotic, CecP4 cDNA was prepared and cloned into the pPICZ B expression vector and followed by the integration into AOX1 locus in Pichia pastoris. The supernatants from cell culture were collected after methanol induction and concentrated for the test of antimicrobial activity. The recombinant P. patoris...

  20. Systemic and Mucosal T-Lymphocyte Activation Induced by Recombinant Adenovirus Vaccines in Rhesus Monkeys▿

    Sun, Yue; Bailer, Robert T.; Rao, Srinivas S.; Mascola, John R.; Nabel, Gary J.; Koup, Richard A.; Letvin, Norman L.

    2009-01-01

    The administration of vectors designed to elicited cell-mediated immune responses may have other consequences that are clinically significant. To explore this possibility, we evaluated T-cell activation during the first 2 months after recombinant adenovirus serotype 5 (rAd5) prime or boost immunizations in rhesus monkeys. We also evaluated the kinetics of T-lymphocyte activation in both the systemic and the mucosal compartments after rAd5 administration in monkeys with preexisting immunity to...

  1. Differential effects of age on chicken heterophil functional activation by recombinant chicken interleukin-2

    Kogut, Michael; Rothwell, Lisa; Kaiser, Pete

    2002-01-01

    Interleukin-2 (IL-2) exercises an array of biological effects on many cells including the functional activation of cells of the innate immune response. Heterophils, the avian equivalent of the neutrophil, function as professional phagocytes to aid in regulation of innate host defenses. The objective of the present studies was to examine the effects of recombinant chicken IL-2 (rChIL-2) on functional activities of heterophils from chickens during the first 3 weeks after hatch. Peripheral blood...

  2. Anti-HBV activity of TRL mediated by recombinant adenovirus

    Wei-Dong Gong; Ya Zhao; Jun Yi; Jin Ding; Jun Liu; Cai-Fang Xue

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the inhibitive effect of hepatitis B virus (HBV)-TRL on HBV replication. METHODS: Based on previously constructed pcDNA3.1 (-)/TRL, TR, TRmut, HBV core protein (HBVc) and hEDN, interest gene sequences TRL, TR, HBVc and hEDN were inserted into adenovirus shuttle plasmid pDC316 respectively and co-transfected HEK293 cells with rescue plasmid pBHGlox(delta)E1,3Cre to acquire RAd/TRL, TR, HBVcand hEDN. And then RAds were identified, amplified and the titers in HEK293 cells were determined. RAd/TRL and TR were named as the experimental groups, and others were control ones. After HepG2.2.15 cells were infected, RAd/TRL expression was identified by indirect immunofluorescence staining. Supernatant HBV-DNA content was determined by fluorescent quantification PCR. Meanwhile, metabolism of HepG2.2.15 cells was evaluated by MTT colorimetry.RESULTS: RAd vectors with distinct interest gene sequence were successfully constructed. Effective expression of RAd/TRL in HepG2.2.15 cells resulted in a significant decrease of supernatant HBV-DNA content compared to RAd/TR (0.63±0.14 vs 1.60±0.47, P = 0.0266, <0.05) andother control groups (0.63±0.14 vs 8.50±2.78, 8.25±2.26,8.25±2.29, 8.50±1.51, 8.57±1.63, P<0.01). MTT assaysuggested that there were no significant differences in cell metabolic activity between groups (P>0.05).CONCLUSION: The construction and expression of RAd/TRL has been achieved and it could inhibit HBV replication successfully, which has laid the foundation for further research on anti-HBV activity in vivo.

  3. Characterization and biological activities of recombinant human plasminogen kringle 1-3 produced in Escherichia coli.

    You, Weon-Kyoo; So, Seung-Ho; Sohn, Young-Doug; Lee, Hyosil; Park, Doo-Hong; Chung, Soo-Il; Chung, Kwang-Hoe

    2004-07-01

    Angiogenesis, the formation of new capillaries from preexisting blood vessels, is involved in many pathological conditions, for example, tumorigenesis, diabetic retinopathy, and rheumatoid arthritis. Angiostatin, which contains the kringle 1-4 domains of plasminogen, is known to be a potent inhibitor of angiogenesis and a strong suppressor of various solid tumors. In this study, we expressed recombinant protein containing the kringle 1-3 domains of human plasminogen in Escherichia coli and investigated its biological activities. The protein was successfully refolded from inclusion bodies and purified at a 30% overall yield, as a single peak by HPLC. The purified recombinant protein had biochemical properties that were similar to those of the native form, which included molecular size, lysine-binding capacity, and immunoreactivity with a specific antibody. The recombinant protein was also found to strongly inhibit the proliferation of bovine capillary endothelial cells in vitro, and the formation of new capillaries on chick embryos. In addition, it suppressed the growth of primary Lewis lung carcinoma and B16 melanoma in an in vivo mouse model. Our findings suggest that the recombinant kringle 1-3 domains in a prokaryote expression system have anti-angiogenic activities, which may be useful in clinical and basic research in the field of angiogenesis. PMID:15177278

  4. Comparison of real time RT-PCR and flow cytometry methods for evaluation of biological activity of recombinant human erythropoietin

    Sepehrizadeh Z; Tabatabaei Yazdi M; Zarrini GH; Hashemi Bozchlou S; Khoshakhlagh P

    2008-01-01

    Background: Evaluation of bioactivity of recombinant erythropoietin is essential for pharmaceutical industry, quality control authorities and researchers. The purpose of this study was to compare real time RT-PCR and flow cytometry for the assay of biological activity of recombinant erythropoietin. Methods: Three concentrations of recombinant erythropoietin BRP (80, 40 and 20 IU/ml) were injected subcutaneously to mice. After 4 days the blood was collected and used for reticulocyte counts by ...

  5. Genetic and pharmacological evidence implicates cathepsins in Niemann-Pick C cerebellar degeneration.

    Chung, Chan; Puthanveetil, Prasanth; Ory, Daniel S; Lieberman, Andrew P

    2016-04-01

    Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC) disease, an autosomal recessive lipid trafficking disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations in the NPC1 gene, is characterized by progressive neurodegeneration resulting in cognitive impairment, ataxia and early death. Little is known about the cellular pathways leading to neuron loss. Here, we studied the effects of diminishing expression of cystatin B, an endogenous inhibitor of cathepsins B, H and L, on the development of NPC neuropathology. We show that decreased expression of cystatin B in patient fibroblasts enhances cathepsin activity. Deletion of the encoding Cstb gene in Npc1-deficient mice resulted in striking deleterious effects, particularly within the cerebellum where diffuse loss of Purkinje cells was observed in young mice. This severe pathology occurred through cell autonomous mechanisms that triggered Purkinje cell death. Moreover, our analyses demonstrated the mislocalization of lysosomal cathepsins within the cytosol of Npc1-deficient Purkinje cells. We provide evidence that this may be a consequence of damage to lysosomal membranes by reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to the leakage of lysosomal contents that culminates in apoptotic cell death. Consistent with this notion, toxicity from ROS was attenuated in an NPC cell model by cystatin B over-expression or pharmacological inhibition of cathepsin B. The observation that Npc1 and Cstb deletion genetically interact to potently enhance the degenerative phenotype of the NPC cerebellum provides strong support for the notion that lysosomal membrane permeabilization contributes to cerebellar degeneration in NPC disease. PMID:26908626

  6. Cathepsin B launches an apoptotic exit effort upon cell death-associated disruption of lysosomes.

    de Castro, M A G; Bunt, G; Wouters, F S

    2016-01-01

    The release of cathepsin proteases from disrupted lysosomes results in lethal cellular autodigestion. Lysosomal disruption-related cell death is highly variable, showing both apoptotic and necrotic outcomes. As the substrate spectrum of lysosomal proteases encompasses the apoptosis-regulating proteins of the Bcl-2 family, their degradation could influence the cell death outcome upon lysosomal disruption. We used Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based biosensors to image the real-time degradation of the Bcl-2-family members, Bcl-xl, Bax and Bid, in living cells undergoing lysosomal lysis and identified an early chain of proteolytic events, initiated by the release of cathepsin B, which directs cells toward apoptosis. In this apoptotic exit strategy, cathepsin B's proteolytic activity results in apoptosis-inducing Bid and removes apoptosis-preventing Bcl-xl. Cathepsin B furthermore appears to degrade a cystein protease that would otherwise have eliminated apoptosis-supporting Bax, indirectly keeping cellular levels of the Bax protein up. The concerted effort of these three early events shifts the balance of cell fate away from necrosis and toward apoptosis. PMID:27551506

  7. Caffeine suppresses the progression of human glioblastoma via cathepsin B and MAPK signaling pathway.

    Cheng, Yu-Chen; Ding, You-Ming; Hueng, Dueng-Yuan; Chen, Jang-Yi; Chen, Ying

    2016-07-01

    Glioblastoma has aggressive proliferative and invasive properties. We investigated the effect of caffeine on the invasion and the anti-cancer effect in human glioblastomas. Caffeine reduced the invasion in U-87MG, GBM8401 and LN229 cells. Caffeine decreased mRNA, protein expression, and activity of cathepsin B. Besides, mRNA and protein expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) was upregulated by caffeine treatment, whereas matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) was downregulated. The expression of Ki67, p-p38, phospforylated extracellular regulated protein kinases (p-ERK), and membranous integrin β1 and β3 was decreased by caffeine. The Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) inhibitor, Y27632, blocked the caffeine-mediated reduction of cathepsin B, phosphorylated focal adhesion kinase (p-FAK), and p-ERK, and invasion. Moreover, caffeine decreased the tumor size, cathepsin B and Ki67 expression in animal model. Caffeine reduced the invasion of glioma cells through ROCK-cathepsin B/FAK/ERK signaling pathway and tumor growth in orthotopic xenograft animal model, supporting the anti-cancer potential in glioma therapy. PMID:27260469

  8. Azadirachtin-induced apoptosis involves lysosomal membrane permeabilization and cathepsin L release in Spodoptera frugiperda Sf9 cells.

    Wang, Zheng; Cheng, Xingan; Meng, Qianqian; Wang, Peidan; Shu, Benshui; Hu, Qiongbo; Hu, Meiying; Zhong, Guohua

    2015-07-01

    Azadirachtin as a kind of botanical insecticide has been widely used in pest control. We previously reported that azadirachtin could induce apoptosis of Spodoptera litura cultured cell line Sl-1, which involves in the up-regulation of P53 protein. However, the detailed mechanism of azadirachtin-induced apoptosis is not clearly understood in insect cultured cells. The aim of the present study was to address the involvement of lysosome and lysosomal protease in azadirachtin-induced apoptosis in Sf9 cells. The result confirmed that azadirachtin indeed inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis. The lysosomes were divided into different types as time-dependent manner, which suggested that changes of lysosomes were necessarily physiological processes in azadirachtin-induced apoptosis in Sf9 cells. Interestingly, we noticed that azadirachtin could trigger lysosomal membrane permeabilization and cathepsin L releasing to cytosol. Z-FF-FMK (a cathepsin L inhibitor), but not CA-074me (a cathepsin B inhibitor), could effectively hinder the apoptosis induced by azadirachtin in Sf9 cells. Meanwhile, the activity of caspase-3 could also be inactivated by the inhibition of cathepsin L enzymatic activity induced by Z-FF-FMK. Taken together, our findings suggest that azadirachtin could induce apoptosis in Sf9 cells in a lysosomal pathway, and cathepsin L plays a pro-apoptosis role in this process through releasing to cytosol and activating caspase-3. PMID:25849458

  9. Radiative recombination from dark excitons in nanocrystals: Activation mechanisms and polarization properties

    Rodina, Anna V.; Efros, Alexander L.

    2016-04-01

    We analyze theoretically physical mechanisms responsible for the radiative recombination of the ground optically passive ("dark") exciton (DE), which dominates in photoluminescence (PL) of colloidal nanocrystals (NCs) at low temperatures. The DE becomes optically active due to its mixing with the bright excitons caused by an external magnetic field, dangling-bond spins or by acoustic and optical phonons. These activation mechanisms mix the DE with different bright excitons and, consequently, lead to different PL polarization properties, because they are determined by dipole orientations of the bright excitons, which the DE is coupled with. We show that the PL polarization properties of prolate and oblate shape NCs are different due to different activation mechanisms responsible for the DE recombination.

  10. Redox-based inactivation of cysteine cathepsins by compounds containing the 4-aminophenol moiety.

    Bojana Mirković

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Redox cycling compounds have been reported to cause false positive inhibition of proteases in drug discovery studies. This kind of false positives can lead to unusually high hit rates in high-throughput screening campaigns and require further analysis to distinguish true from false positive hits. Such follow-up studies are both time and resource consuming. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In this study we show that 5-aminoquinoline-8-ol is a time-dependent inactivator of cathepsin B with a k(inact/K(I of 36.7 ± 13.6 M(-1 s(-1 using enzyme kinetics. 5-Aminoquinoline-8-ol inhibited cathepsins H, L and B in the same concentration range, implying a non-specific mechanism of inhibition. Further analogues, 4-aminonaphthalene-1-ol and 4-aminophenol, also displayed time-dependent inhibition of cathepsin B with k(inact/K(I values of 406.4 ± 10.8 and 36.5 ± 1.3 M(-1 s(-1. No inactivation occurred in the absence of either the amino or the hydroxyl group, suggesting that the 4-aminophenol moiety is a prerequisite for enzyme inactivation. Induction of redox oxygen species (ROS by 4-aminophenols in various redox environments was determined by the fluorescent probe 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate. Addition of catalase to the assay buffer significantly abrogated the ROS signal, indicating that H(2O(2 is a component of the ROS induced by 4-aminophenols. Furthermore, using mass spectrometry, active site probe DCG-04 and isoelectric focusing we show that redox inactivation of cysteine cathepsins by 5-aminoquinoline-8-ol is active site directed and leads to the formation of sulfinic acid. CONCLUSIONS: In this study we report that compounds containing the 4-aminophenol moiety inactivate cysteine cathepsins through a redox-based mechanism and are thus likely to cause false positive hits in the screening assays for cysteine proteases.

  11. Structural Basis for Reversible and Irreversible Inhibition of Human Cathepsin L by their Respective dipeptidyl glyoxal and diazomethylketone Inhibitors

    R Shenoy; J Sivaraman

    2011-12-31

    Cathepsin L plays a key role in many pathophysiological conditions including rheumatoid arthritis, tumor invasion and metastasis, bone resorption and remodeling. Here we report the crystal structures of two analogous dipeptidyl inhibitor complexes which inhibit human cathepsin L in reversible and irreversible modes, respectively. To-date, there are no crystal structure reports of complexes of proteases with their glyoxal inhibitors or complexes of cathepsin L and their diazomethylketone inhibitors. These two inhibitors - inhibitor 1, an {alpha}-keto-{beta}-aldehyde and inhibitor 2, a diazomethylketone, have different groups in the S1 subsite. Inhibitor 1 [Z-Phe-Tyr (OBut)-COCHO], with a Ki of 0.6 nM, is the most potent, reversible, synthetic peptidyl inhibitor of cathepsin L reported to-date. The structure of the inhibitor 1 complex was refined up to 2.2 {angstrom} resolution. The structure of the complex of the inhibitor 2 [Z-Phe-Tyr (t-Bu)-diazomethylketone], an irreversible inhibitor that can inactivate cathepsin L at {micro}M concentrations, was refined up to 1.76 {angstrom} resolution. These two inhibitors have substrate-like interactions with the active site cysteine (Cys25). Inhibitor 1 forms a tetrahedral hemithioacetal adduct, whereas the inhibitor 2 forms a thioester with Cys25. The inhibitor 1 {beta}-aldehyde group is shown to make a hydrogen bond with catalytic His163, whereas the ketone carbonyl oxygen of the inhibitor 2 interacts with the oxyanion hole. tert-Butyl groups of both inhibitors are found to make several non-polar contacts with S' subsite residues of cathepsin L. These studies, combined with other complex structures of cathepsin L, reveal the structural basis for their potency and selectivity.

  12. The role of p53 in radiation activated recombination in human teratocarcinoma cells

    Purpose/Objective: We have previously demonstrated that ionizing radiation can activate a DNA recombination pathway in mammalian cells. In this project, we investigated the role of p53 in radiation activated recombination in ovarian tumor cell lines, and also the effect of p53 status on radiation sensitivity in this cell system. Materials and Methods: PA-1 teratocarcinoma cells, which express wild type p53, were transfected with an HPV16 E6 expression vector (PA-1/E6) which promotes p53 degradation, or transfected with a similar vector coding only for the neomycin phosphotransferase gene (PA-1/Neo). Approximately 3 weeks after this transfection, surviving cells were pooled and expanded. Nuclear extracts were made from each cell line three hours after cells were irradiated with doses ranging from 0 Gy to 10 Gy. Briefly, cells were lysed in sucrose buffer, and the nuclei and cytoplasm separated by centrifugation. Nuclei were lysed in low salt buffer followed by high salt buffer and centrifugation (as described by Johnson et al., Biotechniques 19:193-5, 1995). The ability of these nuclear extracts to rejoin or recombine EcoRI linearized pSV2neo was then determined. The effect of irradiation and P53 on stable transfection determined by assessing transfection of a Hygromycin marker vector (pSV2HPH). Radiation sensitivity was also determined. Results: Nuclear extracts from unirradiated cells had demonstrated end joining activity. PA-1/Neo had little end joining activity as measured by dimerization of linearized pSV2neo. Recutting of these dimers with EcoRI almost completely removed the dimer. PA-1/E6 demonstrated significantly more dimer formation (∼10 fold more) than PA-1/Neo. These dimers could only be reduced to ∼50% of PA-1/E6 control by redigestion with EcoRI. Nuclear extracts generated 3 hours after irradiation also had end joining activity. After 10Gy, PA-1/Neo demonstrated markedly elevated end joining activity to the level seen in unirradiated PA-1/E6. This

  13. Cathepsin L Plays a Major Role in Cholecystokinin Production in Mouse Brain Cortex and in Pituitary AtT-20 Cells: Protease Gene Knockout and Inhibitor Studies

    Beinfeld, Margery C.; Funkelstein, Lydiane; Foulon, Thierry; Cadel, Sandrine; Kitagawa, Kouki; Toneff, Thomas; Reinheckel, Thomas; Peters, Christoph; Hook, Vivian

    2009-01-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) is a peptide neurotransmitter whose production requires proteolytic processing of the proCCK precursor to generate active CCK8 neuropeptide in brain. This study demonstrates the significant role of the cysteine protease cathepsin L for CCK8 production. In cathepsin L knockout (KO) mice, CCK8 levels were substantially reduced in brain cortex by an average of 75%. To evaluate the role of cathepsin L in producing CCK in the regulated secretory pathway of neuroendocrine cells, pituitary AtT-20 cells that stably produce CCK were treated with the specific cathepsin L inhibitor, CLIK-148. CLIK-148 inhibitor treatment resulted in decreased amounts of CCK secreted from the regulated secretory pathway of AtT-20 cells. CLIK-148 also reduced cellular levels of CCK9 (Arg-CCK8), consistent with CCK9 as an intermediate product of cathepsin L, shown by the decreased ratio of CCK9/CCK8. The decreased CCK0/CCK8 ratio also suggests a shift in the production to CCK8 over CCK9 during inhibition of cathepsin L. During reduction of the PC1/3 processing enzyme by siRNA, the ratio of CCK9/CCK8 was increased, suggesting a shift to the cathepsin L pathway for production of CCK9. The changes in ratios of CCK9 compared to CCK8 are consistent with dual roles of the cathepsin L protease pathway that includes aminopeptidase B to remove NH2-terminal Arg or Lys, and the PC1/3 protease pathway. These results suggest that cathepsin L functions as a major protease responsible for CCK8 production in mouse brain cortex, and participates with PC1/3 for CCK8 production in pituitary cells. PMID:19589362

  14. Strategies for detection and quantification of cysteine cathepsins-evolution from bench to bedside.

    Hughes, Caroline S; Burden, Roberta E; Gilmore, Brendan F; Scott, Christopher J

    2016-03-01

    The cysteine cathepsins are a family of closely related thiol proteases, normally found in the endosomal and lysosomal compartments of cells. A growing body of evidence has clearly linked the dysregulated activity of these proteases with many diseases and pathological conditions, offering therapeutic, prognostic and diagnostic potential. However, these proteases are synthesised as inactive precursors and once activated, are controlled by factors such as pH and presence of endogenous inhibitors, meaning that overall protein and activity levels do not necessarily correlate. In order to fully appreciate the role and potential of these proteases, tools are required that can detect and quantify overall cathepsin activity. Two main strategies have evolved; synthetic substrates and protease-labelling with affinity-binding probes (or activity-based probes). This review examines recent innovations in these approaches as the field moves towards developing tools that could ultimately be used in patients for diagnostic or prognostic applications. PMID:26253694

  15. Intein-mediated Rapid Purification of Recombinant Human Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase Activating Polypeptide

    Rong-jie YU; An HONG; Yun DAI; Yuan GAO

    2004-01-01

    In order to obtain the recombinant human PACAP efficiently by intein-mediated single column purification, a gene encoding human PACAP was synthesized and cloned into Escherichia coli expression vector pKYB. The recombinant vector pKY-PAC was transferred into E. coli ER2566 cells and the target protein was over-expressed as a fusion to the N-terminus of a self-cleavable affinity tag. After the PACAPintein-CBD fusion protein was purified by chitin-affinity chromatography, the self-cleavage activity of the intein was induced by DTT and the rhPACAP was released from the chitin-bound intein tag. The activity of the rhPACAP to stimulate cyclic AMP accumulation was detected using the human pancreas carcinoma cells SW1990. Twenty-two milligrams of rhPACAP with the purity over 98% was obtained by single column purification from 1 liter of induced culture. The preliminary biological assay indicated that the rhPACAP, which has an extra Met at its N-terminus compared with the native human PACAP, had the similar activity of stimulating cAMP accumulation with the standard PACAP38 in the SW1990 cells. A new efficient production procedure of the active recombinant human PACAP was established.

  16. Recombination-activating gene 1 and 2 (RAG1 and RAG2) in flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus)

    Xianlei Wang; Xungang Tan; Pei-Jun Zhang; Yuqing Zhang; Peng Xu

    2014-12-01

    During the development of B and T lymphocytes, Ig and TCR variable region genes are assembled from germline V, D, and J gene segments by a site-specific recombination reaction known as V(D)J recombination. The process of somatic V(D)J recombination, mediated by the recombination-activating gene (RAG) products, is the most significant characteristic of adaptive immunity in jawed vertebrates. Flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) RAG1 and RAG2 were isolated by Genome Walker and RT-PCR, and their expression patterns were analysed by RT-PCR and in situ hybridization on sections. RAG1 spans over 7.0 kb, containing 4 exons and 3 introns, and the full-length ORF is 3207 bp, encoding a peptide of 1068 amino acids. The first exon lies in the 5′-UTR, which is an alternative exon. RAG2 full-length ORF is 1062 bp, encodes a peptide of 533 amino acids, and lacks introns in the coding region. In 6-month-old flounders, the expression of RAG1 and RAG2 was essentially restricted to the pronephros (head kidney) and mesonephros (truck kidney). Additionally, both of them were mainly expressed in the thymus. These results revealed that the thymus and kidney most likely serve as the primary lymphoid tissues in the flounder.

  17. Differential impact of cysteine cathepsins on genetic mouse models of de novo carcinogenesis: cathepsin B as emerging therapeutic target

    ThomasReinheckel

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Lysosomal cysteine cathepsins belong to a family of 11 human proteolytic enzymes. Some of them correlate with progression in a variety of cancers and therefore are considered as potential therapeutic targets. Until recently, the contribution of individual cathepsins to tumorigenesis and tumor progression remained unknown. By crossing various types of mouse cancer models with mice where specific cathepsins have been ablated, we contributed to this gap of knowledge and will summarize the results in this report. The employed models are the Rip1-Tag2 model for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, the K14-HPV16 model for squamous skin and cervical cancers, and the MMTV-PyMT model for metastasizing breast cancer, the KPC model for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, and the APCmin mice developing early stages of intestinal neoplasia. All models harbor mutations in relevant tumor suppressors and/or cell-type specific expression of potent oncogenes, which initiate de novo carcinogenesis in the targeted tissues. In all these models deletion of cathepsin B led to suppression of the aggressiveness of the respective cancer phenotype. Cathepsin B may network with other proteases as it was shown for cathepsin X/Z. In contrast, deletion of cathepsin L was beneficial in the RiP1-Tag2 model, but enhanced tumorigenesis in the APCmin, and the K14-HPV16 mice. A logical consequence of these results would be to further pursue selective inhibition of cathepsin B. Moreover, it became clear that cathepsins B and S derived from cells of the tumor microenvironment support cancer growth. Strikingly, delivery of broad spectrum cysteine cathepsin inhibitors in the tumor microenvironment disrupts the permissive ecosystem of the cancer and results in impaired growth or even in regression of the tumor. In addition, combination of cysteine cathepsin inhibition and standard chemotherapy improves the therapeutic response of the latter.

  18. The use of recombinant activated coagulation factor VII for spine surgery

    Weiskopf, Richard B.

    2004-01-01

    This article focuses on our current understanding of the role of activated coagulation factor VII (FVIIa) in coagulation, the current evidence regarding the efficacy and safety of recombinant FVIIa (rFVIIa), and thoughts regarding the use of rFVIIa in spine surgery. rFVIIa is approved in many countries (including the European Union and the USA) for patients with hemophilia and inhibitors (antibodies) to coagulation factors VIII or IX. High circulating concentrations of FVIIa, achieved by exog...

  19. A candidate gene approach to identify DNA markers associated with meat quality and production traits: investigation of several cathepsin genes in Italian heavy pigs.

    Speroni, Camilla

    2010-01-01

    The cathepsin enzymes represent an important family of lysosomal proteinases with a broad spectrum of functions in many, if not in all, tissues and cell types. In addition to their primary role during the normal protein turnover, they possess highly specific proteolytic activities, including antigen processing in the immune response and a direct role in the development of obesity and tumours. In pigs, the involvement of cathepsin enzymes in proteolytic processes have important effects duri...

  20. Cathepsin K inhibition reduces CTXII levels and joint pain in the guinea pig model of spontaneous osteoarthritis.

    McDougall, J J; Schuelert, N; Bowyer, J

    2010-10-01

    Cathepsin K is a cysteine proteinase which is believed to contribute to osteoarthritis (OA) pathogenesis. This brief report evaluates the effect of the novel selective cathepsin K inhibitor AZ12606133 on cartilage metabolism in the Dunkin-Hartley guinea pig model of spontaneous OA. In parallel, electrophysiological studies were performed to determine whether acute and chronic treatment with the cathepsin K inhibitor could alter joint nociception. Acute treatment of OA knees with AZ12606133 had no effect on joint afferent nerve activity; however, prolonged (1 month) administration of the cathepsin K inhibitor delivered via a chronically implanted osmotic pump significantly reduced mechanosensitivity in response to both non-noxious and noxious joint movements. Urinal concentrations of the cartilage breakdown products cross-linked C-telopeptides of type II collagen (CTXII) were also reduced by chronic cathepsin K inhibition. These data suggest that prolonged AZ12606133 administration can reduce cartilage turnover and joint nociception in the Dunkin-Hartley guinea pig model of spontaneous OA. PMID:20692355

  1. Monitoring compartment-specific substrate cleavage by cathepsins B, K, L, and S at physiological pH and redox conditions

    Brömme Dieter

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cysteine cathepsins are known to primarily cleave their substrates at reducing and acidic conditions within endo-lysosomes. Nevertheless, they have also been linked to extracellular proteolysis, that is, in oxidizing and neutral environments. Although the impact of reducing or oxidizing conditions on proteolytic activity is a key to understand physiological protease functions, redox conditions have only rarely been considered in routine enzyme activity assays. Therefore we developed an assay to test for proteolytic processing of a natural substrate by cysteine cathepsins which accounts for redox potentials and pH values corresponding to the conditions in the extracellular space in comparison to those within endo-lysosomes of mammalian cells. Results The proteolytic potencies of cysteine cathepsins B, K, L and S towards thyroglobulin were analyzed under conditions simulating oxidizing versus reducing environments with neutral to acidic pH values. Thyroglobulin, the precursor molecule of thyroid hormones, was chosen as substrate, because it represents a natural target of cysteine cathepsins. Thyroglobulin processing involves thyroid hormone liberation which, under physiological circumstances, starts in the extracellular follicle lumen before being continued within endo-lysosomes. Our study shows that all cathepsins tested were capable of processing thyroglobulin at neutral and oxidizing conditions, although these are reportedly non-favorable for cysteine proteases. All analyzed cathepsins generated distinct fragments of thyroglobulin at extracellular versus endo-lysosomal conditions as demonstrated by SDS-PAGE followed by immunoblotting or N-terminal sequencing. Moreover, the thyroid hormone thyroxine was liberated by the action of cathepsin S at extracellular conditions, while cathepsins B, K and L worked most efficiently in this respect at endo-lysosomal conditions. Conclusion The results revealed distinct cleavage patterns

  2. Activity of recombinant trypsin isoforms on human proteinase-activated receptors (PAR): mesotrypsin cannot activate epithelial PAR-1, -2, but weakly activates brain PAR-1

    Grishina, Zoryana; Ostrowska, Ewa; Halangk, Walter; Sahin-Tóth, Miklós; Reiser, Georg

    2005-01-01

    Trypsin-like serine proteinases trigger signal transduction pathways through proteolytic cleavage of proteinase-activated receptors (PARs) in many tissues. Three members, PAR-1, PAR-2 and PAR-4, are trypsin substrates, as trypsinolytic cleavage of the extracellular N terminus produces receptor activation. Here, the ability of the three human pancreatic trypsin isoforms (cationic trypsin, anionic trypsin and mesotrypsin (trypsin IV)) as recombinant proteins was tested on PARs.Using fura 2 [Ca2...

  3. A cardinal role for cathepsin d in co-ordinating the host-mediated apoptosis of macrophages and killing of pneumococci.

    Martin A Bewley

    Full Text Available The bactericidal function of macrophages against pneumococci is enhanced by their apoptotic demise, which is controlled by the anti-apoptotic protein Mcl-1. Here, we show that lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP and cytosolic translocation of activated cathepsin D occur prior to activation of a mitochondrial pathway of macrophage apoptosis. Pharmacological inhibition or knockout of cathepsin D during pneumococcal infection blocked macrophage apoptosis. As a result of cathepsin D activation, Mcl-1 interacted with its ubiquitin ligase Mule and expression declined. Inhibition of cathepsin D had no effect on early bacterial killing but inhibited the late phase of apoptosis-associated killing of pneumococci in vitro. Mice bearing a cathepsin D(-/- hematopoietic system demonstrated reduced macrophage apoptosis in vivo, with decreased clearance of pneumococci and enhanced recruitment of neutrophils to control pulmonary infection. These findings establish an unexpected role for a cathepsin D-mediated lysosomal pathway of apoptosis in pulmonary host defense and underscore the importance of apoptosis-associated microbial killing to macrophage function.

  4. Construction and expression of a recombinant antibody-targeted plasminogen activator

    Covalent linkage of tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) to a monoclonal antibody specific for the fibrin β chain (anti-fibrin 59D8) results in a thrombolytic agent that is more specific and more potent that t-PA alone. To provide a ready source of this hybrid molecule and to allow tailoring of the active moieties for optimal activity, the authors have engineered a recombinant version of the 59D8-t-PA conjugate. The rearranged 59D8 heavy chain gene was cloned and combined in the expression vector pSV2gpt with sequence coding for a portion of the γ2b constant region and the catalytic β chain of t-PA. This construct was transfected into heavy chain loss variant cells derived form the 59D8 hybridoma. Recombinant protein was purified by affinity chromatography and analyzed with electrophoretic transfer blots and radioimmunoassay. These revealed a 65-kDa heavy chain-t-PA fusion protein that is secreted in association with the 59D8 light chain in the form of a 170-kDa disulfide-linked dimer. Chromogenic substrate assays showed the fusion protein to have 70% of the peptidolytic activity of native t-PA and to activate plasminogen as efficiently as t-PA. IN a competitive binding assay, reconstituted antibody was shown to have a binding profile similar to that of native 59D8. Thus, by recombinant techniques, they have produced a hybrid protein capable of high affinity fibrin binding and plasminogen activation

  5. Plasma levels of cathepsins L, K, and V and risks of abdominal aortic aneurysms

    Lv, Bing-Jie; Lindholt, Jes S; Wang, Jing;

    2013-01-01

    Cathepsin L (CatL), cathepsin K (CatK), and cathepsin V (CatV) are potent elastases implicated in human arterial wall remodeling. Whether plasma levels of these cathepsins are altered in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) remains unknown....

  6. Activation and block of recombinant GABAA receptors by pentobarbitone: a single-channel study

    Akk, Gustav; Steinbach, Joe Henry

    2000-01-01

    Recombinant GABAA receptors (α1β2γ2L) were transiently expressed in HEK 293 cells. We have investigated activation and block of these receptors by pentobarbitone (PB) using cell-attached single-channel patch clamp.Clusters of single-channel activity elicited by 500 μM PB were analysed to estimate rate constants for agonist binding and channel gating. The minimal model able to describe the kinetic data involved two sequential binding steps, followed by channel opening. The estimated channel op...

  7. ATM increases activation-induced cytidine deaminase activity at downstream S regions during class-switch recombination.

    Khair, Lyne; Guikema, Jeroen E J; Linehan, Erin K; Ucher, Anna J; Leus, Niek G J; Ogilvie, Colin; Lou, Zhenkun; Schrader, Carol E; Stavnezer, Janet

    2014-05-15

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) initiates Ab class-switch recombination (CSR) in activated B cells resulting in exchanging the IgH C region and improved Ab effector function. During CSR, AID instigates DNA double-strand break (DSB) formation in switch (S) regions located upstream of C region genes. DSBs are necessary for CSR, but improper regulation of DSBs can lead to chromosomal translocations that can result in B cell lymphoma. The protein kinase ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is an important proximal regulator of the DNA damage response (DDR), and translocations involving S regions are increased in its absence. ATM phosphorylates H2AX, which recruits other DNA damage response (DDR) proteins, including mediator of DNA damage checkpoint 1 (Mdc1) and p53 binding protein 1 (53BP1), to sites of DNA damage. As these DDR proteins all function to promote repair and recombination of DSBs during CSR, we examined whether mouse splenic B cells deficient in these proteins would show alterations in S region DSBs when undergoing CSR. We find that in atm(-/-) cells Sμ DSBs are increased, whereas DSBs in downstream Sγ regions are decreased. We also find that mutations in the unrearranged Sγ3 segment are reduced in atm(-/-) cells. Our data suggest that ATM increases AID targeting and activity at downstream acceptor S regions during CSR and that in atm(-/-) cells Sμ DSBs accumulate as they lack a recombination partner. PMID:24729610

  8. Cre-dependent DNA recombination activates a STING-dependent innate immune response.

    Pépin, Geneviève; Ferrand, Jonathan; Höning, Klara; Jayasekara, W Samantha N; Cain, Jason E; Behlke, Mark A; Gough, Daniel J; G Williams, Bryan R; Hornung, Veit; Gantier, Michael P

    2016-06-20

    Gene-recombinase technologies, such as Cre/loxP-mediated DNA recombination, are important tools in the study of gene function, but have potential side effects due to damaging activity on DNA. Here we show that DNA recombination by Cre instigates a robust antiviral response in mammalian cells, independent of legitimate loxP recombination. This is due to the recruitment of the cytosolic DNA sensor STING, concurrent with Cre-dependent DNA damage and the accumulation of cytoplasmic DNA. Importantly, we establish a direct interplay between this antiviral response and cell-cell interactions, indicating that low cell densities in vitro could be useful to help mitigate these effects of Cre. Taking into account the wide range of interferon stimulated genes that may be induced by the STING pathway, these results have broad implications in fields such as immunology, cancer biology, metabolism and stem cell research. Further, this study sets a precedent in the field of gene-engineering, possibly applicable to other enzymatic-based genome editing technologies. PMID:27166376

  9. Discovery of an Active RAG Transposon Illuminates the Origins of V(D)J Recombination.

    Huang, Shengfeng; Tao, Xin; Yuan, Shaochun; Zhang, Yuhang; Li, Peiyi; Beilinson, Helen A; Zhang, Ya; Yu, Wenjuan; Pontarotti, Pierre; Escriva, Hector; Le Petillon, Yann; Liu, Xiaolong; Chen, Shangwu; Schatz, David G; Xu, Anlong

    2016-06-30

    Co-option of RAG1 and RAG2 for antigen receptor gene assembly by V(D)J recombination was a crucial event in the evolution of jawed vertebrate adaptive immunity. RAG1/2 are proposed to have arisen from a transposable element, but definitive evidence for this is lacking. Here, we report the discovery of ProtoRAG, a DNA transposon family from lancelets, the most basal extant chordates. A typical ProtoRAG is flanked by 5-bp target site duplications and a pair of terminal inverted repeats (TIRs) resembling V(D)J recombination signal sequences. Between the TIRs reside tail-to-tail-oriented, intron-containing RAG1-like and RAG2-like genes. We demonstrate that ProtoRAG was recently active in the lancelet germline and that the lancelet RAG1/2-like proteins can mediate TIR-dependent transposon excision, host DNA recombination, transposition, and low-efficiency TIR rejoining using reaction mechanisms similar to those used by vertebrate RAGs. We propose that ProtoRAG represents a molecular "living fossil" of the long-sought RAG transposon. PMID:27293192

  10. Multiple Rad5 activities mediate sister chromatid recombination to bypass DNA damage at stalled replication forks.

    Minca, Eugen C; Kowalski, David

    2010-06-11

    DNA damage that blocks replication is bypassed in order to complete chromosome duplication and preserve cell viability and genome stability. Rad5, a PCNA polyubiquitin ligase and DNA-dependent ATPase in yeast, is orthologous to putative tumor suppressors and controls error-free damage bypass by an unknown mechanism. To identify the mechanism in vivo, we investigated the roles of Rad5 and analyzed the DNA structures that form during damage bypass at site-specific stalled forks present at replication origins. Rad5 mediated the formation of recombination-dependent, X-shaped DNA structures containing Holliday junctions between sister chromatids. Mutants lacking these damage-induced chromatid junctions were defective in resolving stalled forks, restarting replication, and completing chromosome duplication. Rad5 polyubiquitin ligase and ATPase domains both contributed to replication fork recombination. Our results indicate that multiple activities of Rad5 function coordinately with homologous recombination factors to enable replication template switch events that join sister chromatids at stalled forks and bypass DNA damage. PMID:20541998

  11. Cre-dependent DNA recombination activates a STING-dependent innate immune response

    Pépin, Geneviève; Ferrand, Jonathan; Höning, Klara; Jayasekara, W. Samantha N.; Cain, Jason E.; Behlke, Mark A.; Gough, Daniel J.; G. Williams, Bryan R.; Hornung, Veit; Gantier, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Gene-recombinase technologies, such as Cre/loxP-mediated DNA recombination, are important tools in the study of gene function, but have potential side effects due to damaging activity on DNA. Here we show that DNA recombination by Cre instigates a robust antiviral response in mammalian cells, independent of legitimate loxP recombination. This is due to the recruitment of the cytosolic DNA sensor STING, concurrent with Cre-dependent DNA damage and the accumulation of cytoplasmic DNA. Importantly, we establish a direct interplay between this antiviral response and cell–cell interactions, indicating that low cell densities in vitro could be useful to help mitigate these effects of Cre. Taking into account the wide range of interferon stimulated genes that may be induced by the STING pathway, these results have broad implications in fields such as immunology, cancer biology, metabolism and stem cell research. Further, this study sets a precedent in the field of gene-engineering, possibly applicable to other enzymatic-based genome editing technologies. PMID:27166376

  12. Construction of an oral recombinant DNA vaccine from H pylori neutrophil activating protein and its immunogenicity

    Bo Sun; Zhao-Shen Li; Zhen-Xing Tu; Guo-Ming Xu; Yi-Qi Du

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To construct a live attenuated Salmonella typhimurium (S.typhimurium) strain harboring the H pylori neutrophil activating protein (HP-NAP) gene as an oral recombinant DNA vaccine, and to evaluate its immunogenicity.METHODS: By genetic engineering methods, the genomic DNA of H pylori was extracted as a template. The total length of the HP-NAP gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and cloned into pBT vector for sequencing and BLAST analysis, then subcloned into a eukaryotic expression vector pIRES followed by PCR identification and restriction enzyme digestion. The identified recombinant plasmid pIRES-NAP was transfected into COS-7 cells for target fusion protein expression, and its antigenicity was detected by Western blotting. Then the recombinant plasmid was transformed into a live attenuated S. typhimurium strain SL7207 as an oral vaccine strain, and its immunogenicity was evaluated with animal experiments.RESULTS: A 435 bp product was cloned using high homology with HP-NAP gene in GenBank (more than 98%). With identification by PCR and restriction enzyme digestion, a recompinant eukaryotic expression plasmid pIRES-NAP containing the HP-NAP gene of H pylori was successfully constructed. The expressed target protein had a specific reaction with H pylor(i) whole cell antibody and showed a single strip result detected by Western blotting. Oral immunization of mice with recombinant DNA vaccine strain SL7207 (pIRES-NAP) also induced a specific immune response.CONCLUSION: The successful construction of HP-NAP oral DNA vaccine with good immunogenicity may help to further investigate its immunoprotection effects and develop vaccine against H pylori infection.

  13. Changes of malonaldehyde, cathepsin D and α2-macroglobulin (α2M) after ionizing radiation injury

    Increases in levels of malonaldehyde in plasma, liver and kidney, and increases of tissue kallikrein in kidney and urine were found in Wistar rats after total body 60Co irradiation with lethal doses. Increased activities of cathepsin D in spleen was associated with a marked reduction of splenic weight. The levels of α2M and activities of αM in plasma were both increased with increasing radiation doses, but the increase of α2M levels in spleen was slower and lower than that in liver, kidney and skin. It seems that the effectiveness of α2M in the treatment of rats after total body irradiation might be related with its binding action with cathepsin D and other proteases in spleen and other radiosensitive tissues. One case of acute and two cases of chronic skin radiation injury were treated with α2M preparation, either with or without surgical operation. There were decrease in levels of malonaldehyde as well in activities of cathepsin D, and increase in activities of superoxide dismutase. It suggests that α2M preparation might be useful for both inhibiting excess proteases and scavenging oxygen free radicals

  14. Cathepsin K inhibitors increase distal femoral bone mineral density in rapidly growing rabbits

    Pennypacker, Brenda L; Oballa, Renata M; Levesque, Sonia; Kimmel, Donald B.; Duong, Le T.

    2013-01-01

    Background Selective and reversible inhibitors of human Cathepsin K (CatK), including odanacatib (ODN), have been developed as potential therapeutics for the treatment of osteoporosis. Inhibitors of human CatK show significantly less potency for the rodent enzymes compared with that for the human or rabbit enzymes; thus the Schenk model in growing rabbit was developed as a screening assay for the in vivo activity of CatK inhibitors in blocking bone resorption. Methods In this study, the effic...

  15. Natively Inhibited Trypanosoma brucei Cathepsin B Structure Determined by Using an X-ray Laser

    L. Redecke; Nass, K.; DePonte, D. P.; White, T A; Rehders, D.; Barty, A.; F. Stellato; Liang, M; Barends, T. R. M.; Boutet, S.; Williams, G J; Messerschmidt, M.; Seibert, M. M.; Aquila, A.; Arnlund, D.

    2012-01-01

    The Trypanosoma brucei cysteine protease cathepsin B (TbCatB), which is involved in host protein degradation, is a promising target to develop new treatments against sleeping sickness, a fatal disease caused by this protozoan parasite. The structure of the mature, active form of TbCatB has so far not provided sufficient information for the design of a safe and specific drug against T. brucei. By combining two recent innovations, in vivo crystallization and serial femtosecond crystallography, ...

  16. CNS-Expressed Cathepsin D Prevents Lymphopenia in a Murine Model of Congenital Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis

    Shevtsova, Zinayida; Garrido, Manuel; Weishaupt, Jochen; Saftig, Paul; Bähr, Mathias; Lühder, Fred; Kügler, Sebastian

    2010-01-01

    Deficiency in Cathepsin D (CtsD), the major cellular lysosomal aspartic proteinase, causes the congenital form of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCLs). CtsD-deficient mice show severe visceral lesions like lymphopenia in addition to their central nervous system (CNS) phenotype of ceroid accumulation, microglia activation, and seizures. Here we demonstrate that re-expression of CtsD within the CNS but not re-expression of CtsD in visceral organs prevented both central and visceral pathologies...

  17. Cathepsin F Cysteine Protease of the Human Liver Fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini

    Pinlaor, Porntip; Kaewpitoon, Natthawut; Laha, Thewarach; Sripa, Banchob; Kaewkes, Sasithorn; Morales, Maria E.; Mann, Victoria H.; Parriott, Sandi K.; Suttiprapa, Sutas; Robinson, Mark W.; To, Joyce; Dalton, John P.; Loukas, Alex; Brindley, Paul J.

    2009-01-01

    Background The liver fluke Opisthorchis viverrini is classified as a class I carcinogen due to the association between cholangiocarcinoma and chronic O. viverrini infection. During its feeding activity within the bile duct, the parasite secretes several cathepsin F cysteine proteases that may induce or contribute to the pathologies associated with hepatobiliary abnormalities. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we describe the cDNA, gene organization, phylogenetic relationships, immunolocali...

  18. Cysteine proteases as therapeutic targets: does selectivity matter? A systematic review of calpain and cathepsin inhibitors

    Marton Siklos; Manel BenAissa; Thatcher, Gregory R.J.

    2015-01-01

    Cysteine proteases continue to provide validated targets for treatment of human diseases. In neurodegenerative disorders, multiple cysteine proteases provide targets for enzyme inhibitors, notably caspases, calpains, and cathepsins. The reactive, active-site cysteine provides specificity for many inhibitor designs over other families of proteases, such as aspartate and serine; however, a) inhibitor strategies often use covalent enzyme modification, and b) obtaining selectivity within families...

  19. Decreased expression of APAF-1 and increased expression of cathepsin B in invasive pituitary adenoma

    Tanase C

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Cristiana Tanase,1 Radu Albulescu,1,2 Elena Codrici,1 Bogdan Calenic,1,3 Ionela Daniela Popescu,1 Simona Mihai,1 Laura Necula,1,4 Maria Linda Cruceru,5 Mihail Eugen Hinescu1,5 1“Victor Babes” National Institute of Pathology, Biochemistry-Proteomics Department, 2National Institute for Chemical Pharmaceutical R&D, 3“Carol Davila” University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Department of Biochemistry, 4Stefan S. Nicolau Institute of Virology, Cellular and Molecular Pathology, 5“Carol Davila” University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Cellular and Molecular Medicine Department, Bucharest, Romania Purpose: Apoptotic protease-activating factor-1 (APAF-1 and cathepsin B are important functional proteins in apoptosis; the former is involved in the intrinsic (mitochondrial pathway, while the latter is associated with both intrinsic and extrinsic pathways. Changes in the expression of apoptosome-related proteins could be useful indicators of tumor development since a priori defects in the mitochondrial pathway might facilitate the inception and progression of human neoplasms. Our aim was to evaluate the profiles of APAF-1 and cathepsin B in relation with other molecules involved in apoptosis/proliferation and to correlate them with the aggressive behavior of invasive pituitary adenomas. Materials and methods: APAF-1 and cathepsin B were assessed in tissue samples from 30 patients with pituitary adenomas, of which 16 were functional adenomas and 22 were invasive adenomas. Results: A positive relationship between high proliferation and invasiveness was observed in invasive pituitary adenomas when compared to their noninvasive counterparts (Ki-67 labeling index – 4.72% versus 1.75%. Decreased expression of APAF-1 was recorded in most of the invasive adenomas with a high proliferation index, while the cathepsin B level was elevated in this group. We have noticed a negative correlation between the low level of APAF-1 and invasiveness (63.63%; P<0.01; at the

  20. Expression of Cathepsin L in tumor cells and tumor-associated macrophages in patients with Ewing sarcoma family of tumors: A pilot study

    Bivas Biswas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cysteine protease Cathepsin L is involved in bone remodeling and expressed in activated macrophages. It is highly expressed in metastatic tumor tissue, especially with bone metastases. Aims: We evaluated immunohistochemical expression of Cathepsin L in tumor cells and tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs in chemo-naive Ewing sarcoma. Settings and Design: Retrospective evaluation of archived specimens of Ewing sarcoma. Materials and Methods: Immunohistochemical staining was performed on archived blocks of chemo-naive patients with Ewing sarcoma treated with uniform chemotherapy at our institute between January 2009 and November 2011. Statistical Analysis: Immunohistochemical expression was co-related with baseline demographics and survival. Results: During the study period, we had evaluable baseline samples from 62 patients with median age 15 years (range: 2-40; 26 (42% had metastases. Cathepsin L expression in tumor cells was observed in 8/62 (13% specimens. None of the baseline clinical characteristics correlated with Cathepsin L expression. Cathepsin L positivity was associated with poor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT (P = 0.05, but did not influence either event-free-survival (EFS or overall survival. Cathepsin L was expressed in TAMs in all specimens. Grade 3 TAMs (>10 TAMs/high power field was associated with better response to NACT (P = 0.05. On univariate analysis Grade 3 TAMs predicted superior EFS (median EFS 28.5 months in those with Grade 3 TAMs versus 14.8 months in those with grade ½ TAMs [P = 0.04]. Conclusions: Cathepsin L expression by immunohistochemistry was low in our patient cohort, and it did not affect the outcome. In addition, Grade 3 TAMs with Cathepsin L expression was associated with improved EFS.

  1. Stability of Recombinant Tissue Plasminogen Activator at −30 °C Over One Year

    Alkatheri, Abdulmalik

    2012-01-01

    Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) is used to restore patency and avoid inadvertent removal of peripheral and central venous catheters. rt-PA was reconstituted (1 mg/mL) then cryopreserved at −30 °C for 1, 2, 3, 6, 8, and 12 months and, then its stability was determined. After cryopreservation for one and two months, rt-PA kept more than 95% of its activity compared to standard samples, while cryopreservation for three months caused 8% loss of activity. However, after cryopreservation for six months or more, rt-PA retained only 87.5% or less activity compared to standard samples. Therefore, it is recommended that reconstituted rt-PA be cryopreserved at −30 °C for a maximum period of three months. PMID:24275785

  2. Immunostimulatory Activity of Recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG That Secretes Major Membrane Protein II of Mycobacterium leprae

    Makino, Masahiko; Maeda, Yumi; Inagaki, Katsuya

    2006-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that major membrane protein II (MMP-II) is one of the immunodominant antigens (Ags) of Mycobacterium leprae capable of activating T cells through Toll-like receptor 2. Based on the observation that Mycobacterium bovis BCG secreting a 30-kDa protein offered better protection against tuberculosis, we constructed a recombinant BCG strain (BCG-SM) that secretes MMP-II to improve the potency of BCG against leprosy. The secreted MMP-II protein from BCG-SM stimulated monoc...

  3. Does intravenous administration of recombinant tissue plasminogen activator for ischemic stroke can cause inferior myocardial infarction?

    Mostafa Almasi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rTPA is one of the main portions of acute ischemic stroke management, but unfortunately has some complications. Myocardial infarction (MI is a hazardous complication of administration of intravenous rTPA that has been reported recently. A 78-year-old lady was admitted for elective coronary artery bypass graft surgery. On the second day of admission, she developed acute left hemiparesis and intravenous rTPA was administered within 120 minutes. Three hours later, she has had chest pain. Rescue percutaneous coronary intervention was performed on right coronary artery due to diagnosis of inferior MI, and the symptoms were resolved.

  4. Expression, Purification and Activity Assay of Two New Recombinant Antagonists of Fibrinogen Receptor

    Jianbo Yang

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The gene sequence of Decorsin which is extracted from a kind of North American leeches was synthesized. Two recombinant proteins, Annexin V plus Decorsin (AnnV-D39 and Annexin V plus the carboxyl terminal 27 amino acid residues of Decorsin(AnnV-D27, were constructed. And a 10 amino acids linker peptide of GGGGSGGGGS was inserted between Annexin V and Decorsin in AnnV-D39. Using pET-28(a+ as an expressing vector, both two recombinant proteins were expressed in E. Coli BL21(DE3 with high efficiency as inclusion bodies. The expression products were purified by DEAE-Cellulose 52 and Sepharose CL-4B chromatography under denaturing condition. Platelet Aggregation Assay (PAA shows that AnnV-D39 has good anti-platelet aggregation activity. However, AnnV-D27 shows no such activities in any PAA test. AnnV-D39 shows good anti-platelet aggregation activity as a new antagonist of fibrinogen receptor, while Annv-D27 needs re-modification

  5. The Meiotic Recombination Activator PRDM9 Trimethylates Both H3K36 and H3K4 at Recombination Hotspots In Vivo.

    Powers, Natalie R; Parvanov, Emil D; Baker, Christopher L; Walker, Michael; Petkov, Petko M; Paigen, Kenneth

    2016-06-01

    In many mammals, including humans and mice, the zinc finger histone methyltransferase PRDM9 performs the first step in meiotic recombination by specifying the locations of hotspots, the sites of genetic recombination. PRDM9 binds to DNA at hotspots through its zinc finger domain and activates recombination by trimethylating histone H3K4 on adjacent nucleosomes through its PR/SET domain. Recently, the isolated PR/SET domain of PRDM9 was shown capable of also trimethylating H3K36 in vitro, raising the question of whether this reaction occurs in vivo during meiosis, and if so, what its function might be. Here, we show that full-length PRDM9 does trimethylate H3K36 in vivo in mouse spermatocytes. Levels of H3K4me3 and H3K36me3 are highly correlated at hotspots, but mutually exclusive elsewhere. In vitro, we find that although PRDM9 trimethylates H3K36 much more slowly than it does H3K4, PRDM9 is capable of placing both marks on the same histone molecules. In accord with these results, we also show that PRDM9 can trimethylate both K4 and K36 on the same nucleosomes in vivo, but the ratio of K4me3/K36me3 is much higher for the pair of nucleosomes adjacent to the PRDM9 binding site compared to the next pair further away. Importantly, H3K4me3/H3K36me3-double-positive nucleosomes occur only in regions of recombination: hotspots and the pseudoautosomal (PAR) region of the sex chromosomes. These double-positive nucleosomes are dramatically reduced when PRDM9 is absent, showing that this signature is PRDM9-dependent at hotspots; the residual double-positive nucleosomes most likely come from the PRDM9-independent PAR. These results, together with the fact that PRDM9 is the only known mammalian histone methyltransferase with both H3K4 and H3K36 trimethylation activity, suggest that trimethylation of H3K36 plays an important role in the recombination process. Given the known requirement of H3K36me3 for double strand break repair by homologous recombination in somatic cells, we

  6. The crystal structure of human dipeptidyl peptidase I (cathepsin C) in complex with the inhibitor Gly-Phe-CHN2

    Mølgaard, Anne; Arnau, Jose; Lauritzen, C.; Larsen, Sine; Petersen, Gitte; Pedersen, John

    2007-01-01

    hDDPI (human dipeptidyl peptidase I) is a lysosomal cysteine protease involved in zymogen activation of granule-associated proteases, including granzymes A and B from cytotoxic T-lymphocytes and natural killer cells, cathepsin G and neutrophil elastase, and mast cell tryptase and chymase. In the...

  7. Cathepsin-Mediated Alterations in TGFß-Related Signaling Underlie Disrupted Cartilage and Bone Maturation Associated With Impaired Lysosomal Targeting.

    Flanagan-Steet, Heather; Aarnio, Megan; Kwan, Brian; Guihard, Pierre; Petrey, Aaron; Haskins, Mark; Blanchard, Frederic; Steet, Richard

    2016-03-01

    Hypersecretion of acid hydrolases is a hallmark feature of mucolipidosis II (MLII), a lysosomal storage disease caused by loss of carbohydrate-dependent lysosomal targeting. Inappropriate extracellular action of these hydrolases is proposed to contribute to skeletal pathogenesis, but the mechanisms that connect hydrolase activity to the onset of disease phenotypes remain poorly understood. Here we link extracellular cathepsin K activity to abnormal bone and cartilage development in MLII animals by demonstrating that it disrupts the balance of TGFß-related signaling during chondrogenesis. TGFß-like Smad2,3 signals are elevated and BMP-like Smad1,5,8 signals reduced in both feline and zebrafish MLII chondrocytes and osteoblasts, maintaining these cells in an immature state. Reducing either cathepsin K activity or expression of the transcriptional regulator Sox9a in MLII zebrafish significantly improved phenotypes. We further identify components of the large latent TGFß complex as novel targets of cathepsin K at neutral pH, providing a possible mechanism for enhanced Smad2,3 activation in vivo. These findings highlight the complexity of the skeletal disease associated with MLII and bring new insight to the role of secreted cathepsin proteases in cartilage development and growth factor regulation. © 2015 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. PMID:26404503

  8. Technetium-99m-labeled recombinant tissue plasminogen activator for the imaging of emboli in vivo

    Takahashi, Akihiro; Itoh, Kazuo; Tsukamoto, Eriko; Furudate, Masayori; Kamiyama, Hiroyasu; Abe, Hiroshi (Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1993-07-01

    Tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) effectively lyses activate thrombus by direct action. Recombinant t-PA (rt-PA) was labeled with technetium-99m ([sup 99m]Tc) to investigate the in vivo binding to fibrin clots in a feline cerebral embolism model created by insertion of an artificial fibrin clot within the carotid artery. [sup 99m]Tc-rt-PA administered intravenously provided clearer imaging of clots after priming with cold rt-PA, with uptake peaking 5-10 minutes after the injection. [sup 99m]Tc-labeled human serum albumin was not retained at clot sites. Systemically administered [sup 99m]Tc-rt-PA binds to fibrin clots within carotid arteries in our feline model. Our results suggest that the interaction of intrinsic plasminogen activator inhibitors with extrinsically administered rt-PA may regulate the demonstration of a clot, although the precise mechanism is unclear. (author).

  9. Characterization and immunological activity of different forms of recombinant secreted Hc of botulinum neurotoxin serotype B products expressed in yeast

    Liu, Bo; Shi, DanYang; Chang, Shaohong; Gong, Xin; Yu, YunZhou; Sun, Zhiwei; Wu, Jun

    2015-01-01

    The recombinant Hc proteins of botulinum neurotoxins and tetanus toxin are exclusively produced by intracellular heterologous expression in Pichia pastoris for use in subunit vaccines; the same Hc proteins produced by secreted heterologous expression are hyper-glycosylated and immunologically inert. Here, several different recombinant secreted Hc proteins of botulinum neurotoxin serotype B (BHc) were expressed in yeast and we characterized and assessed their immunological activity in detail. ...

  10. Gene targeting of the cysteine peptidase cathepsin H impairs lung surfactant in mice.

    Frank Bühling

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The 11 human cysteine cathepsins are proteases mainly located in the endolysosomal compartment of all cells and within the exocytosis pathways of some secretory cell types. Cathepsin H (Ctsh has amino- and endopeptidase activities. In vitro studies have demonstrated Ctsh involvement in the processing and secretion of the pulmonary surfactant protein B (SP-B. Furthermore, Ctsh is highly expressed in the secretory organelles of alveolar type II pneumocytes where the surfactant proteins are processed. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Hence, we generated Ctsh null mice by gene targeting in embryonic stem cells to investigate the role of this protease in surfactant processing in vivo. The targeting construct contains a ß-galactosidase (lacZ reporter enabling the visualisation of Ctsh expression sites. Ctsh-deficiency was verified by northern blot, western blot, and measurement of the Ctsh aminopeptidase activity. Ctsh(-/- mice show no gross phenotype and their development is normal without growth retardation. Broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL from Ctsh(-/- mice contained lower levels of SP-B indicating reduced SP-B secretion. The BAL phospholipid concentration was not different in Ctsh(+/+ and Ctsh(-/- mice, but measurement of surface tension by pulsating bubble surfactometry revealed an impairment of the tension reducing function of lung surfactant of Ctsh(-/- mice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that cathepsin H is involved in the SP-B production and reduced SP-B levels impair the physical properties of the lung surfactant. However, Ctsh defiency does not reproduce the severe phenotype of SP-B deficient mice. Hence, other proteases of the secretory pathway of type II pneumocytes, i.e. cathepsins C or E, are still able to produce surfactant of sufficient quality in absence of Ctsh.

  11. Cathepsin S-cleavable, multi-block HPMA copolymers for improved SPECT/CT imaging of pancreatic cancer.

    Fan, Wei; Shi, Wen; Zhang, Wenting; Jia, Yinnong; Zhou, Zhengyuan; Brusnahan, Susan K; Garrison, Jered C

    2016-10-01

    exploitation of the cathepsin S activity in MPS tissues can be utilized to substantially lower non-target accumulation, suggesting this is a promising approach for the development of diagnostic and radiotherapeutic nanomedicine platforms. PMID:27372424

  12. Expression, Purification and Activity Assay of the Recombinant Protein of Catechol-O-Methyltransferase from Chinese White Shrimp (Fenneropenaeus chinensis

    Dian-Xiang Li

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: We have previously cloned a gene of Chinese white shrimp Catechol O-Methyltransferase (designated Fc-COMT and characterized the gene expression pattern. In this study, expression and purification as well as activity assay of the recombinant Fc-COMT was further conducted. Approach: Using pET-30a (+ as a prokaryotic expression vector, the recombinant Fc- COMT was expressed in the supernatant of Escherichia coli lysate and easily purified by His-Bind resin chromatography. SDS-PAGE analysis showed that the molecular mass of recombinant Fc-COMT was approximately 30,000 Da, in good agreement with the software-predicted molecular weight. The enzymatic activity of recombinant Fc-COMT was tested using Dihydroxybenzoic Acid (DHBAc as a substrate. Results: The methyl products of DHBAc, Vanillic Acid (VA and Isovanillic Acid (IVA, were detected in the enzymatic reaction mixture with recombinant Fc-COMT by High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (HPLC-MS. Conclusion: The recombinant Fc-COMT has catalytic activity of transferring methyl group from S-Adenosyl-L-Methionine (SAM to the 3’ hydroxyl or 4’ hydroxyl group of benzyl ring of DHBAc.

  13. The effect of liposome encapsulation on the pharmacokinetics of recombinant secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (rSLPI) therapy after local delivery to a guinea pig asthma model.

    Gibbons, Aileen

    2011-09-01

    Inhaled recombinant Secretory Leukocyte Protease Inhibitor (rSLPI) has shown potential for treatment of inflammatory lung conditions. Rapid inactivation of rSLPI by cathepsin L (Cat L) and rapid clearance from the lungs have limited clinical efficacy. Encapsulation of rSLPI within 1,2-Dioleoyl-sn-Glycero-3-[Phospho-L-Serine]:Cholesterol liposomes (DOPS-rSLPI) protects rSLPI against Cat L inactivation in vitro. We aimed to determine the effect of liposomes on rSLPI pharmacokinetics and activity in vitro and after local delivery to the airways in vivo.

  14. Activity and stability of recombinant human superoxide dismutase in buffer solutions and hypothermic perfusates.

    Senoo,Yoshimasa

    1988-06-01

    Full Text Available The stability of recombinant human superoxide dismutase (r-hSOD in buffer solutions was studied in solutions at various pH and temperatures. Additionally, we studied the effects of incubation with proteases, serum and two types of hypothermic perfusates. R-hSOD was stable in the pH range of 6-11 and at temperatures up to 80 degrees C for 30 min. R-hSOD activity was not affected by incubation with trypsin, aminopeptidase M or serum for 2 h. R-hSOD activity determined at various temperatures (4-37 degrees C did not vary remarkably. R-hSOD in hypothermic perfusates was stable at 4-37 degrees C for 24 h.

  15. Recombinant human diamine oxidase activity is not inhibited by ethanol, acetaldehyde, disulfiram, diethyldithiocarbamate or cyanamide.

    Bartko, Johann; Gludovacz, Elisabeth; Petroczi, Karin; Borth, Nicole; Jilma, Bernd; Boehm, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Human diamine oxidase (hDAO, EC 1.4.3.22) is the key enzyme in the degradation of extracellular histamine. Consumption of alcohol is a known trigger of mast cell degranulation in patients with mast cell activation syndrome. Ethanol may also interfere with enzymatic histamine degradation, but reports on the effects on DAO activity are controversial. There are also conflicting reports whether disulfiram, an FDA-approved agent in the treatment of alcohol dependence, inhibits DAO. We therefore investigated the inhibitory potential of ethanol and disulfiram and their metabolites on recombinant human DAO (rhDAO) in three different assay systems. Relevant concentrations of ethanol, acetaldehyde, and acetate did not inhibit rhDAO activity in an in vitro assay system using horseradish peroxidase (HRP) -mediated luminol oxidation. The aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH; EC 1.2.1.3) inhibitors cyanamide and its dimer dicyanamide also had no effect on DAO activity. In one assay system, the irreversible ALDH inhibitor disulfiram and its main metabolite diethyldithiocarbamate seemed to inhibit DAO activity. However, the decreased product formation was not due to a direct block of DAO activity but resulted from inhibition of peroxidase employed in the coupled system. Our in vitro data do not support a direct blocking effect of ethanol, disulfiram, and their metabolites on DAO activity in vivo. PMID:27401969

  16. Correlation between the glycan variations and defibrinogenating activities of acutobin and its recombinant glycoforms.

    Ying-Ming Wang

    Full Text Available Acutobin isolated from Deinagkistrodon acutus venom has been used to prevent or treat stroke in patients. This defibrinogenating serine protease is a 39 kDa glycoprotein containing terminal disialyl-capped N-glycans. After sialidase treatment, the enzyme showed similar catalytic activities toward chromogenic substrate, and cleaved the Aα chain of fibrinogen as efficiently as the native acutobin did. However, the level of fibrinogen degradation products in mice after i.p.-injection of desialylated-acutobin was significantly lower than the level after acutobin injection, suggesting that the disialyl moieties may improve or prolong the half-life of acutobin. Two recombinant enzymes with identical protein structures and similar amidolytic activities to those of native acutobin were expressed from HEK293T and SW1353 cells and designated as HKATB and SWATB, respectively. Mass spectrometric profiling showed that their glycans differed from those of acutobin. In contrast to acutobin, HKATB cleaved not only the Aα chain but also the Bβ and γ chains of human fibrinogens, while SWATB showed a reduced α-fibrinogenase activity. Non-denaturing deglycosylation of these proteases by peptide N-glycosidase F significantly reduced their fibrinogenolytic activities and thermal stabilities. The in vivo defibrinogenating effect of HKATB was inferior to that of acutobin in mice. Taken together, our results suggest that the conjugated glycans of acutobin are involved in its interaction with fibrinogen, and that the selection of cells optimally expressing efficient glycoforms and further glycosylation engineering are desirable before a recombinant product can replace the native enzyme for clinical use.

  17. Recombinant dengue type 1 virus NS5 protein expressed in Escherichia coli exhibits RNA-dependent RNA polymerase activity.

    Tan, B H; Fu, J; Sugrue, R J; Yap, E H; Chan, Y C; Tan, Y H

    1996-02-15

    The complete nonstructural NS5 gene of dengue type 1 virus, Singapore strain S275/90 (D1-S275/90) was expressed in Escherichia coli as a glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion protein (126 kDa). The GST-NS5 fusion protein was purified and the recombinant NS5 protein released from the fusion protein by thrombin cleavage. The recombinant NS5 had a predicted molecular weight of 100 kDa and reacted with antiserum against D1-S275/90 virus in Western blot analysis. The purified recombinant NS5 protein possessed RNA-dependent RNA polymerase activity which was inhibited (>99%) by antibodies against the recombinant NS5 protein. The polymerase product was shown to be a negative-stranded RNA molecule, of template size, which forms a double-stranded complex with the template RNA. PMID:8607261

  18. Involvement of cathepsin B in mitochondrial apoptosis by p-phenylenediamine under ambient UV radiation.

    Goyal, Shruti; Amar, Saroj Kumar; Dubey, Divya; Pal, Manish Kumar; Singh, Jyoti; Verma, Ankit; Kushwaha, Hari Narayan; Ray, Ratan Singh

    2015-12-30

    Paraphenylenediamine (PPD), a derivative of paranitroaniline has been most commonly used as an ingredient of oxidative hair dye and permanent tattoos. We have studied the phototoxic potential of PPD under ambient ultraviolet radiation. PPD is photodegraded and form a novel photoproduct under UV A exposure. PPD shows a concentration dependent decrease in cell viability of human Keratinocyte cells (HaCaT) through MTT and NRU test. Significant intracellular ROS generation was measured by DCFDA assay. It caused an oxidative DNA damage via single stranded DNA breaks, micronuclei and CPD formation. Both lysosome and mitochondria is main target for PPD induced apoptosis which was proved through lysosomal destabilization and release of cathepsin B by immunofluorescence, real time PCR and western blot analysis. Cathepsin B process BID to active tBID which induces the release of cytochrome C from mitochondria. Mitochondrial depolarization was reported through transmission electron microscopy. The cathepsin inhibitor reduced the release of cytochrome C in PPD treated cells. Thus study suggests that PPD leads to apoptosis via the involvement of lysosome and mitochondria both under ambient UV radiation. Therefore, photosensitizing nature of hair dye ingredients should be tested before coming to market as a cosmetic product for the safety of human beings. PMID:26223015

  19. Perlecan domain 1 recombinant proteoglycan augments BMP-2 activity and osteogenesis

    DeCarlo Arthur A

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many growth factors, such as bone morphogenetic protein (BMP-2, have been shown to interact with polymers of sulfated disacharrides known as heparan sulfate (HS glycosaminoglycans (GAGs, which are found on matrix and cell-surface proteoglycans throughout the body. HS GAGs, and some more highly sulfated forms of chondroitin sulfate (CS, regulate cell function by serving as co-factors, or co-receptors, in GF interactions with their receptors, and HS or CS GAGs have been shown to be necessary for inducing signaling and GF activity, even in the osteogenic lineage. Unlike recombinant proteins, however, HS and CS GAGs are quite heterogenous due, in large part, to post-translational addition, then removal, of sulfate groups to various positions along the GAG polymer. We have, therefore, investigated whether it would be feasible to deliver a DNA pro-drug to generate a soluble HS/CS proteoglycan in situ that would augment the activity of growth-factors, including BMP-2, in vivo. Results Utilizing a purified recombinant human perlecan domain 1 (rhPln.D1 expressed from HEK 293 cells with HS and CS GAGs, tight binding and dose-enhancement of rhBMP-2 activity was demonstrated in vitro. In vitro, the expressed rhPln.D1 was characterized by modification with sulfated HS and CS GAGs. Dose-enhancement of rhBMP-2 by a pln.D1 expression plasmid delivered together as a lyophilized single-phase on a particulate tricalcium phosphate scaffold for 6 or more weeks generated up to 9 fold more bone volume de novo on the maxillary ridge in a rat model than in control sites without the pln.D1 plasmid. Using a significantly lower BMP-2 dose, this combination provided more than 5 times as much maxillary ridge augmentation and greater density than rhBMP-2 delivered on a collagen sponge (InFuse™. Conclusions A recombinant HS/CS PG interacted strongly and functionally with BMP-2 in binding and cell-based assays, and, in vivo, the pln.247 expression plasmid

  20. Recombinant TCR ligand induces early TCR signaling and a unique pattern of downstream activation.

    Wang, Chunhe; Mooney, Jeffery L; Meza-Romero, Roberto; Chou, Yuan K; Huan, Jianya; Vandenbark, Arthur A; Offner, Halina; Burrows, Gregory G

    2003-08-15

    Recombinant TCR ligands (RTLs) consisting of covalently linked alpha(1) and beta(1) domains of MHC class II molecules tethered to specific antigenic peptides represent minimal TCR ligands. In a previous study we reported that the rat RTL201 construct, containing RT1.B MHC class II domains covalently coupled to the encephalitogenic guinea pig myelin basic protein (Gp-MBP(72-89)) peptide, could prevent and treat actively and passively induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in vivo by selectively inhibiting Gp-MBP(72-89) peptide-specific CD4(+) T cells. To evaluate the inhibitory signaling pathway, we tested the effects of immobilized RTL201 on T cell activation of the Gp-MBP(72-89)-specific A1 T cell hybridoma. Activation was exquisitely Ag-specific and could not be induced by RTL200 containing the rat MBP(72-89) peptide that differed by a threonine for serine substitution at position 80. Partial activation by RTL201 included a CD3zeta p23/p21 ratio shift, ZAP-70 phosphorylation, calcium mobilization, NFAT activation, and transient IL-2 production. In comparison, anti-CD3epsilon treatment produced stronger activation of these cellular events with additional activation of NF-kappaB and extracellular signal-regulated kinases as well as long term increased IL-2 production. These results demonstrate that RTLs can bind directly to the TCR and modify T cell behavior through a partial activation mechanism, triggering specific downstream signaling events that deplete intracellular calcium stores without fully activating T cells. The resulting Ag-specific activation of the transcription factor NFAT uncoupled from the activation of NF-kappaB or extracellular signal-regulated kinases constitutes a unique downstream activation pattern that accounts for the inhibitory effects of RTL on encephalitogenic CD4(+) T cells. PMID:12902496

  1. Biosynthesis and processing of cathepsin K in cultured human osteoclasts.

    Rieman, D J; McClung, H A; Dodds, R A; Hwang, S M; Holmes, M W; James, I E; Drake, F H; Gowen, M

    2001-03-01

    Cathepsin K (cat K) is the major cysteine protease expressed in osteoclasts and is thought to play a key role in matrix degradation during bone resorption. However, little is known regarding the synthesis, activation, or turnover of the endogenous enzyme in osteoclasts. In this study, we show that mature cat K protein and enzyme activity are localized within osteoclasts. Pulse-chase experiments revealed that, following the synthesis of pro cat K, intracellular conversion to the mature enzyme occurred in a time-dependent manner. Subsequently, the level of mature enzyme decreased. Little or no cat K was observed in the culture media at any timepoint. Pretreatment of osteoclasts with either chloroquine or monensin resulted in complete inhibition of the processing of newly synthesized cat K. In addition, pro cat K demonstrated susceptibility to treatment with N-glycosidase F, suggesting the presence of high-mannose-containing oligosaccharides. Treatment of osteoclasts with the PI3-kinase inhibitor, Wortmannin (WT), not only prevented the intracellular processing of cat K but also resulted in the secretion of proenzyme into the culture media. Taken together, these results suggest that the biosynthesis, processing, and turnover of cat K in human osteoclasts is constitutive and occurs in a manner similar to that of other known cysteine proteases. Furthermore, cat K is not secreted as a proenzyme, but is processed intracellularly, presumably in lysosomal compartments prior to the release of active enzyme into the resorption lacunae. PMID:11248658

  2. Silicatein α : Cathepsin L-Like Protein in Sponge Biosilica

    Shimizu, Katsuhiko; Cha, Jennifer; Stucky, Galen D.; Morse, Daniel E.

    1998-05-01

    Earth's biota produces vast quantities of polymerized silica at ambient temperatures and pressures by mechanisms that are not understood. Silica spicules constitute 75% of the dry weight of the sponge Tethya aurantia, making this organism uniquely tractable for analyses of the proteins intimately associated with the biosilica. Each spicule contains a central protein filament, shown by x-ray diffraction to exhibit a highly regular, repeating structure. The protein filaments can be dissociated to yield three similar subunits, named silicatein α , β , and γ . The molecular weights and amino acid compositions of the three silicateins are similar, suggesting that they are members of a single protein family. The cDNA sequence of silicatein α , the most abundant of these subunits, reveals that this protein is highly similar to members of the cathepsin L and papain family of proteases. The cysteine at the active site in the proteases is replaced by serine in silicatein α , although the six cysteines that form disulfide bridges in the proteases are conserved. Silicatein α also contains unique tandem arrays of multiple hydroxyls. These structural features may help explain the mechanism of biosilicification and the recently discovered activity of the silicateins in promoting the condensation of silica and organically modified siloxane polymers (silicones) from the corresponding silicon alkoxides. They suggest the possibility of a dynamic role of the silicateins in silicification of the sponge spicule and offer the prospect of a new synthetic route to silica and siloxane polymers at low temperature and pressure and neutral pH.

  3. Tankyrases Promote Homologous Recombination and Check Point Activation in Response to DSBs.

    Zita Nagy

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available DNA lesions are sensed by a network of proteins that trigger the DNA damage response (DDR, a signaling cascade that acts to delay cell cycle progression and initiate DNA repair. The Mediator of DNA damage Checkpoint protein 1 (MDC1 is essential for spreading of the DDR signaling on chromatin surrounding Double Strand Breaks (DSBs by acting as a scaffold for PI3K kinases and for ubiquitin ligases. MDC1 also plays a role both in Non-Homologous End Joining (NHEJ and Homologous Recombination (HR repair pathways. Here we identify two novel binding partners of MDC1, the poly (ADP-ribose Polymerases (PARPs TNKS1 and 2. We find that TNKSs are recruited to DNA lesions by MDC1 and regulate DNA end resection and BRCA1A complex stabilization at lesions leading to efficient DSB repair by HR and proper checkpoint activation.

  4. Tankyrases Promote Homologous Recombination and Check Point Activation in Response to DSBs.

    Nagy, Zita; Kalousi, Alkmini; Furst, Audrey; Koch, Marc; Fischer, Benoit; Soutoglou, Evi

    2016-02-01

    DNA lesions are sensed by a network of proteins that trigger the DNA damage response (DDR), a signaling cascade that acts to delay cell cycle progression and initiate DNA repair. The Mediator of DNA damage Checkpoint protein 1 (MDC1) is essential for spreading of the DDR signaling on chromatin surrounding Double Strand Breaks (DSBs) by acting as a scaffold for PI3K kinases and for ubiquitin ligases. MDC1 also plays a role both in Non-Homologous End Joining (NHEJ) and Homologous Recombination (HR) repair pathways. Here we identify two novel binding partners of MDC1, the poly (ADP-ribose) Polymerases (PARPs) TNKS1 and 2. We find that TNKSs are recruited to DNA lesions by MDC1 and regulate DNA end resection and BRCA1A complex stabilization at lesions leading to efficient DSB repair by HR and proper checkpoint activation. PMID:26845027

  5. Annealing effects on recombinative activity of nickel at direct silicon bonded interface

    Takuto Kojima

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available By performing capacitance transient analyses, the recombination activity at a (110/(100 direct silicon bonded (DSB interface contaminated with nickel diffused at different temperatures, as a model of grain boundaries in multicrystalline silicon, was studied. The trap level depth from the valence band, trap density of states, and hole capture cross section peaked at an annealing temperature of 300 °C. At temperatures ⩾400 °C, the hole capture cross section increased with temperature, but the density of states remained unchanged. Further, synchrotron-based X-ray analyses, microprobe X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF, and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES analyses were performed. The analysis results indicated that the chemical phase after the sample was annealed at 200 °C was a mixture of NiO and NiSi2.

  6. Failure of Recombinant Activated Factor VII in Treatment of Diffuse Alveolar Hemorrhage due to Cryoglobulinemic Vasculitis

    Dania Khoulani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH is a serious complication of the small vessel vasculitis syndromes and carries a high mortality. Recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa is used to treat bleeding in patients with hemophilia and antibodies to factor VIII or IX. It is increasingly being used in life-threatening hemorrhage in a variety of other settings in which conventional therapy is unsuccessful. Randomized controlled trials of rFVIIa in DAH are lacking. However, several case reports have described a complete or sustained control of DAH using rFVIIa after patients failed to respond to medical treatment. There are no case reports in the literature describing the use or the failure of rFVIIa in DAH associated with cryoglobulinemic vasculitis. We here report the failure of rFVIIa to control DAH in a patient with CD5+ B-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and cryoglobulinemic vasculitis.

  7. Construction of a plasmid coding for green fluorescent protein tagged cathepsin L and data on expression in colorectal carcinoma cells

    Tripti Tamhane

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The endo-lysosomal cysteine cathepsin L has recently been shown to have moonlighting activities in that its unexpected nuclear localization in colorectal carcinoma cells is involved in cell cycle progression (Tamhane et al., 2015 [1]. Here, we show data on the construction and sequence of a plasmid coding for human cathepsin L tagged with an enhanced green fluorescent protein (phCL-EGFP in which the fluorescent protein is covalently attached to the C-terminus of the protease. The plasmid was used for transfection of HCT116 colorectal carcinoma cells, while data from non-transfected and pEGFP-N1-transfected cells is also shown. Immunoblotting data of lysates from non-transfected controls and HCT116 cells transfected with pEGFP-N1 and phCL-EGFP, showed stable expression of cathepsin L-enhanced green fluorescent protein chimeras, while endogenous cathepsin L protein amounts exceed those of hCL-EGFP chimeras. An effect of phCL-EGFP expression on proliferation and metabolic states of HCT116 cells at 24 h post-transfection was observed.

  8. Functional properties of the recombinant kringle-2 domain of tissue plasminogen activator produced in Escherichia coli

    The kringle-2 domain (residues 176-262) of tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant peptide, which concentrated in cytoplasmic inclusion bodies, was isolated, solubilized, chemically refolded, and purified by affinity chromatography on lysine-Sepharose to apparent homogeneity. [35S]Cysteine-methionine-labeled polypeptide was used to study the interactions of kringle-2 with lysine, fibrin, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. The kringle-2 domain bound to lysine-Sepharose and to preformed fibrin with a Kd = 104 +/- 6.2 microM (0.86 +/- 0.012 binding site) and a Kd = 4.2 +/- 1.05 microM (0.80 +/- 0.081 binding site), respectively. Competition experiments and direct binding studies showed that the kringle-2 domain is required for the formation of the ternary t-PA-plasminogen-intact fibrin complex and that the association between the t-PA kringle-2 domain and fibrin does not require plasmin degradation of fibrin and exposure of new COOH-terminal lysine residues. We also observed that kringle-2 forms a complex with highly purified guanidine-activated plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, dissociable by 0.2 M epsilon-aminocaproic acid. The kringle-2 polypeptide significantly inhibited tissue plasminogen activator/plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 interaction. The kringle-2 domain bound to plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in a specific and saturable manner with a Kd = 0.51 +/- 0.055 microM (0.35 +/- 0.026 binding site). Therefore, the t-PA kringle-2 domain is important for the interaction of t-PA not only with fibrin, but also with plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and thus represents a key structure in the regulation of fibrinolysis

  9. Residue-specific annotation of disorder-to-order transition and cathepsin inhibition of a propeptide-like crammer from D. melanogaster.

    Tien-Sheng Tseng

    Full Text Available Drosophila melanogaster crammer is a novel cathepsin inhibitor involved in long-term memory formation. A molten globule-to-ordered structure transition is required for cathepsin inhibition. This study reports the use of alanine scanning to probe the critical residues in the two hydrophobic cores and the salt bridges of crammer in the context of disorder-to-order transition and cathepsin inhibition. Alanine substitution of the aromatic residues W9, Y12, F16, Y20, Y32, and W53 within the hydrophobic cores, and charged residues E8, R28, R29, and E67 in the salt bridges considerably decrease the ability of crammer to inhibit Drosophila cathepsin B (CTSB. Far-UV circular dichroism (CD, intrinsic fluorescence, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopies show that removing most of the aromatic and charged side-chains substantially reduces thermostability, alters pH-dependent helix formation, and disrupts the molten globule-to-ordered structure transition. Molecular modeling indicates that W53 in the hydrophobic Core 2 is essential for the interaction between crammer and the prosegment binding loop (PBL of CTSB; the salt bridge between R28 and E67 is critical for the appropriate alignment of the α-helix 4 toward the CTSB active cleft. The results of this study show detailed residue-specific dissection of folding transition and functional contributions of the hydrophobic cores and salt bridges in crammer, which have hitherto not been characterized for cathepsin inhibition by propeptide-like cysteine protease inhibitors. Because of the involvements of cathepsin inhibitors in neurodegenerative diseases, these structural insights can serve as a template for further development of therapeutic inhibitors against human cathepsins.

  10. Recombinant activated factor Ⅶ in hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis with disseminated intravascular coagulation

    ZHUANG Jun-ling; JIANG Qing-wei; XU Ying; WANG Shu-jie

    2011-01-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a lifethreatening disorder due to hyperinflammation resulting in infiltration of different organs with extensive hemophagocytosis. Severe coagulopathy was one of the main reasons for death in HLH. Over secretion of plasminogen activator by activated macrophages leads to hyperfibrinolysis. We reported a 36-year-old woman who was diagnosed as HLH probably secondary to lymphoma. Massive bleeding from gut and retroperitoneal area were not able to be controlled by conventional hemostatic treatments. This patient received one dose recombinant activated factor Ⅶ (rFVlla) 3.6 mg (70 μg/kg). Hemostatic effect was achieved in 0.5 hour and lasted 24 hours. Prothrombin time (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) were quickly corrected to normal ranges.Fibrinogen level elevated from 0.5 g/L before using rFVIla to 1.8 g/L 20 hours after. Although dexamethasone and etopside were administrated to treat HLH, this patient died from septic shock after persistent neutropenia. This suggests that rFVlla may be effective in the management of intractable hemorrhage in patients with HLH.