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Sample records for active noise control

  1. Active control of the noise

    The problems of acoustic noise are more and more preponderant in the measure in that the amount of equipment and industrial machinery is increased such as fans, transformers, compressors etc. the use of devices passive mechanics for the reduction of the noise is effective and very appreciated because its effects embrace a wide range of acoustic frequency. However, to low frequencies, such devices become too big and expensive besides that present a tendency to do not effective. The control of active noise, CAN, using the electronic generation anti-noise, constitutes an interesting solution to the problem because their operation principle allows achieving an appreciable reduction of the noise by means of the use of compact devices. The traditional techniques for the control of acoustic noise like barriers and silenced to attenuate it, are classified as passive and their works has been accepted as norm as for the treatment of problems of noise it refers. Such techniques are considered in general very effective in the attenuation of noise of wide band. However, for low frequency, the required passive structures are too big and expensive; also, their effectiveness diminishes flagrantly, that which makes them impractical in many applications. The active suppression is profiled like a practical alternative for the reduction of acoustic noise. The idea in the active treatment of the noise it contemplates the use of a device electro-acoustic, like a speaker for example that it cancels to the noise by the generation of sounds of Same width and of contrary phase (anti-noise). The cancellation phenomenon is carried out when the ant-noise combines acoustically with the noise, what is in the cancellation of both sounds. The effectiveness of the cancellation of the primary source of noise depends on the precision with which the width and the phase of the generated ant-noise are controlled. The active control of noise, ANC (activates noise control), it is being investigated for

  2. Adaptive feedback active noise control

    Kuo, Sen M.; Vijayan, Dipa

    Feedforward active noise control (ANC) systems use a reference sensor that senses a reference input to the controller. This signal is assumed to be unaffected by the secondary source and is a good measure of the undesired noise to be cancelled by the system. The reference sensor may be acoustic (e.g., microphone) or non-acoustic (e.g., tachometer, optical transducer). An obvious problem when using acoustic sensors is that the reference signal may be corrupted by the canceling signal generated by the secondary source. This problem is known as acoustic feedback. One way of avoiding this is by using a feedback active noise control (FANC) system which dispenses with the reference sensor. The FANC technique originally proposed by Olson and May employs a high gain negative feedback amplifier. This system suffered from the drawback that the error microphone had to be placed very close to the loudspeaker. The operation of the system was restricted to low frequency range and suffered from instability due to the possibility of positive feedback. Feedback systems employing adaptive filtering techniques for active noise control were developed. This paper presents the FANC system modeled as an adaptive prediction scheme.

  3. Active Noise Control in Propeller Aircraft

    Johansson, Sven; Claesson, Ingvar

    2001-01-01

    A noisy environment dominated by low frequency noise can often be improved through the use of active noise control. This situation arises naturally in propeller aircraft where the propellers induce periodic low frequency noise inside the cabin. The cabin noise is typically rather high, and the passenger flight comfort could be improved considerably if this level were significantly reduced. This paper addresses same design aspects for multiple-reference active noise control systems based on th...

  4. Active Noise Control in Forest Machines

    Forsgren, Fredrik

    2011-01-01

    Achieving a low noise level is of great interest to the forest machine industry. Traditionally this is obtained by using passive noise reduction, i.e. by using materials for sound isolation and sound absorption. Especially designs to attenuate low frequency noise tend to be bulky and impractical from an installation point of view. An alternative solution to the problem is to use active noise control (ANC). The basic principle of ANC is to generate an anti-noise signal designed to destructivel...

  5. Development of Active Noise Control System for Quieting Transformer Noise

    Lee, Bok Kyu; Song, Seik Young; Choi, Huo Yul [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Dae Hea; Lee, Hyuk Jae [Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute, Changwon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    The passive noise control technique made use of sound-absorbing or soundproofing materials, so it required a large area and high cost for installation and had a drawback of poor performance at low frequency. Compared to this, the Active Noise Control attenuates noise sound pressure by using secondary source which has same performance ay low-frequency. Furthermore, it is able to save space and expenses. - research on adaptive algorithms - evaluation of global attenuation of the control - computer simulation - real-time Active Noise Control System Hardware Implementation - ANC system setting in the noisy area.

  6. Active Noise Control for Vehicle Exhaust Noise Reduction

    李克强; 杨殿阁; 郑四发; 连小珉; 田中丈晴

    2003-01-01

    An active noise control (ANC) method was developed for exhaust noise reduction for medium-duty diesel trucks. A modified variable step size least mean squares (LMS) algorithm was used for the controller in a variable environment that considered the vehicle's acceleration characteristics. The variable step size time-based synchronized filtered-x LMS method (SFX-TB) used an adaptive algorithm that was more efficient than the conventional filtered-x LMS algorithm. The simulation and the experimental tests show that the control trackability and stability provided by the algorithm during acceleration enable the ANC system to effectively reduce the vehicle exhaust noise.

  7. Active Control of Fan Noise

    Nobuhiko YAMASAKI; Hirotoshi TAJIMA

    2008-01-01

    In the wake-rotor interaction fan noise, a number of the interacting modes at the blade passing frequency (BPF)and its harmonics are generated which are prescribed by the number of stator and rotor blades etc. In the present study, the dominant mode is tried to be suppressed by the secondary sound from the loudspeaker actuators. One of the novel features of the present system is the adoption of the control board with the Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) hardware and the LabVIEW software to synchronize the circumferentially installed loudspeaker actuators with the relative location of rotational blades under arbitrary fan rotational speeds. The experiments were conducted under the conditions of three rotational speeds of 2004, 3150, and 4002 [rpm]. The reduction in the sound pressure level (SPL) was observed for all three rotational speeds. The sound pressure level at the BPF was reduced approximately 13 [dB] for 2004 [rpm] case, but not so large reduction was attained for other cases probably due to the inefficiency of the loudspeaker actuators at high frequencies

  8. Active noise control for high frequencies

    Kaymak, E; Atherton, MA; Rotter, KRG; Millar, B.

    2006-01-01

    There are many applications that can benefit from Active Noise Control (ANC) such as in aircraft cabins and air conditioning ducts, i.e. in situations where technology interferes with human hearing in a harmful way or disrupts communication. Headsets with analogue ANC circuits have been used in the armed forces for attenuating frequencies below 1 kHz, which when combined with passive filtering offers protection across the whole frequency range of human hearing. A dental surgery is also a nois...

  9. Recent advances in active control of aircraft cabin noise

    Mathur, Gopal; Fuller, Christopher

    2002-11-01

    Active noise control techniques can provide significant reductions in aircraft interior noise levels without the structural modifications or weight penalties usually associated with passive techniques, particularly for low frequency noise. Our main objective in this presentation is to give a review of active control methods and their applications to aircraft cabin noise reduction with an emphasis on recent advances and challenges facing the noise control engineer in the practical application of these techniques. The active noise control method using secondary acoustic sources, e.g., loudspeakers, as control sources for tonal noise reduction is first discussed with results from an active noise control flight test demonstration. An innovative approach of applying control forces directly to the fuselage structure using piezoelectric actuators, known as active structural acoustic control (ASAC), to control cabin noise is then presented. Experimental results from laboratory ASAC tests conducted on a full-scale fuselage and from flight tests on a helicopter will be discussed. Finally, a hybrid active/passive noise control approach for achieving significant broadband noise reduction will be discussed. Experimental results of control of broadband noise transmission through an aircraft structure will be presented.

  10. Active Noise Control of the Heavy Truck Interior Cab

    2008-01-01

    In order to control the noise of the heavy truck interior cab effectively, the active noise control methods are employed. First, an interior noise field test for the heavy truck is performed, and frequencies of interior noise of this vehicle are analyzed. According to the spectrum analysis of acquired noise signal, it is found out that the main frequencies of interior noise are less than 800Hz. Then the least squares lattice (LSL) algorithm is used as signal processing algorithm of the controller and a closed-loop control DSP system, based on TMS 320VC5416, is developed. The residual signal at driver's ear is used as feedback signal. Lastly, the developed ANC system is loaded into the heavy truck cab, and controlling the noise at driver's ear for that truck at different driving speeds is attempted. The noise control test results indicate that the cab interior noise is reduced averagely by 0.9 dBA at different driving speeds.

  11. Perception Neural Networks for Active Noise Control Systems

    Wang Xiaoli

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In a response to a growing demand for environments of 70dB or less noise levels, many industrial sectors have focused with some form of noise control system. Active noise control (ANC has proven to be the most effective technology. This paper mainly investigates application of neural network on self-adaptation system in active noise control (ANC. An active silencing control system is made which adopts a motional feedback loudspeaker as not a noise controlling source but a detecting sensor. The working fundamentals and the characteristics of the motional feedback loudspeaker are analyzed in detail. By analyzing each acoustical path, identification based adaptive linear neural network is built. This kind of identifying method can be achieved conveniently. The estimated result of each sound channel matches well with its real sound character, respectively.

  12. Active Control of Aerodynamic Noise Sources

    Reynolds, Gregory A.

    2001-01-01

    Aerodynamic noise sources become important when propulsion noise is relatively low, as during aircraft landing. Under these conditions, aerodynamic noise from high-lift systems can be significant. The research program and accomplishments described here are directed toward reduction of this aerodynamic noise. Progress toward this objective include correction of flow quality in the Low Turbulence Water Channel flow facility, development of a test model and traversing mechanism, and improvement of the data acquisition and flow visualization capabilities in the Aero. & Fluid Dynamics Laboratory. These developments are described in this report.

  13. Active Noise Control Experiments using Sound Energy Flu

    Krause, Uli

    2015-03-01

    This paper reports on the latest results concerning the active noise control approach using net flow of acoustic energy. The test set-up consists of two loudspeakers simulating the engine noise and two smaller loudspeakers which belong to the active noise system. The system is completed by two acceleration sensors and one microphone per loudspeaker. The microphones are located in the near sound field of the loudspeakers. The control algorithm including the update equation of the feed-forward controller is introduced. Numerical simulations are performed with a comparison to a state of the art method minimising the radiated sound power. The proposed approach is experimentally validated.

  14. Active noise control in fuselage design

    Krakers, L.A.; Tooren, M.J.L. van; Beukers, A.; Berkhof, A.P.; Goeje, M.P. de

    2003-01-01

    To achieve comfortable noise levels inside the passenger cabin, sound damping measures have to be taken to improve the sound insulation properties of the bare airframe. Usually the sound insulation requirements of a passenger cabin are met after the mechanical design of the fuselage structure is alr

  15. Development of a Voice Activity Controlled Noise Canceller

    Aini Hussain

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a variable threshold voice activity detector (VAD is developed to control the operation of a two-sensor adaptive noise canceller (ANC. The VAD prohibits the reference input of the ANC from containing some strength of actual speech signal during adaptation periods. The novelty of this approach resides in using the residual output from the noise canceller to control the decisions made by the VAD. Thresholds of full-band energy and zero-crossing features are adjusted according to the residual output of the adaptive filter. Performance evaluation of the proposed approach is quoted in terms of signal to noise ratio improvements as well mean square error (MSE convergence of the ANC. The new approach showed an improved noise cancellation performance when tested under several types of environmental noise. Furthermore, the computational power of the adaptive process is reduced since the output of the adaptive filter is efficiently calculated only during non-speech periods.

  16. Active structural acoustic control of aircraft interior flow noise via the use of active trim panels

    Mahnken, Brian W.

    1996-01-01

    Modem jet aircraft interior noise can be categorized into two main types: tonal noise caused by engine imbalance or blade passage, and mid frequency broadband noise resulting from turbulent flow. This project addresses aircraft interior flow noise caused by a flow separation over the crown of the aircraft. The noise control approach is to mount piezoelectric actuators to the aircraft interior cockpit crown trim panel and use them to actively control aircraft interior noise with...

  17. Applications of active adaptive noise control to jet engines

    Shoureshi, Rahmat; Brackney, Larry

    1993-01-01

    During phase 2 research on the application of active noise control to jet engines, the development of multiple-input/multiple-output (MIMO) active adaptive noise control algorithms and acoustic/controls models for turbofan engines were considered. Specific goals for this research phase included: (1) implementation of a MIMO adaptive minimum variance active noise controller; and (2) turbofan engine model development. A minimum variance control law for adaptive active noise control has been developed, simulated, and implemented for single-input/single-output (SISO) systems. Since acoustic systems tend to be distributed, multiple sensors, and actuators are more appropriate. As such, the SISO minimum variance controller was extended to the MIMO case. Simulation and experimental results are presented. A state-space model of a simplified gas turbine engine is developed using the bond graph technique. The model retains important system behavior, yet is of low enough order to be useful for controller design. Expansion of the model to include multiple stages and spools is also discussed.

  18. Active control of road booming noise in automotive interiors.

    Oh, Shi-Hwan; Kim, Hyoun-suk; Park, Youngjin

    2002-01-01

    An active feedforward control system has been developed to reduce the road booming noise that has strong nonlinear characteristics. Four acceleration transducers were attached to the suspension system to detect reference vibration and two loudspeakers were used to attenuate the noise near the headrests of two front seats. A leaky constraint multiple filtered-X LMS algorithm with an IIR-based filter that has fast convergence speed and frequency selective controllability was proposed to increase the control efficiency in computing power and memory usage. During the test drive on the rough asphalt and turtle-back road at a constant speed of 60 km/h, we were able to achieve a reduction of around 6 dB of A-weighted sound pressure level in the road booming noise range with the proposed algorithm, which could not be obtained with the conventional multiple filtered-X LMS algorithm. PMID:11831793

  19. Active Flow Effectors for Noise and Separation Control

    Turner, Travis L.

    2011-01-01

    New flow effector technology for separation control and enhanced mixing is based upon shape memory alloy hybrid composite (SMAHC) technology. The technology allows for variable shape control of aircraft structures through actively deformable surfaces. The flow effectors are made by embedding shape memory alloy actuator material in a composite structure. When thermally actuated, the flow effector def1ects into or out of the flow in a prescribed manner to enhance mixing or induce separation for a variety of applications, including aeroacoustic noise reduction, drag reduction, and f1ight control. The active flow effectors were developed for noise reduction as an alternative to fixed-configuration effectors, such as static chevrons, that cannot be optimized for airframe installation effects or variable operating conditions and cannot be retracted for off-design or fail-safe conditions. Benefits include: Increased vehicle control, overall efficiency, and reduced noise throughout all f1ight regimes, Reduced flow noise, Reduced drag, Simplicity of design and fabrication, Simplicity of control through direct current stimulation, autonomous re sponse to environmental heating, fast re sponse, and a high degree of geometric stability. The concept involves embedding prestrained SMA actuators on one side of the chevron neutral axis in order to generate a thermal moment and def1ect the structure out of plane when heated. The force developed in the host structure during def1ection and the aerodynamic load is used for returning the structure to the retracted position. The chevron design is highly scalable and versatile, and easily affords active and/or autonomous (environmental) control. The technology offers wide-ranging market applications, including aerospace, automotive, and any application that requires flow separation or noise control.

  20. The passive and active noise control strategy in the aircraft interior noise

    Paonessa, A.

    1994-01-01

    The stringent comfort requirements that the airliners are providing to the aircraft manufacturers, also for the small regional commuter are increasing the attention of the aircraft designer to the aircraft interior noise performance. The research on the design methodologies is very much improved in the last years providing new materials and new system like the active noise control usefull to get a more comfortable interior and achieve a large competition on the market. In this paper a general...

  1. Implementation Considerations for Active Noise Control in Ventilation Systems

    Asteborg, Marcus; Svanberg, Niklas

    2006-01-01

    The most common method to attenuate noise in ventilation systems today is passive silencers. For these to efficiently attenuate frequencies below 400 Hz such silencers need to be large and a more neat solution to attenuate low frequencies is to use active noise control (ANC). The usage of ANC in ventilation systems is well known and there are several commercial products available. ANC is not, however, used on a wide basis due to its often high price and poor performance. Since the price is an...

  2. Application of Adaptive Filters to Active Noise Control

    PEI Bingnan; LI Chuanguang

    2001-01-01

    A modified LMS algorithm for noise-control is suggested after a mathematical model ofsound-cancellation is established, on the basis of thesound wave interference principle and the physicalmodel of progressive waves in a duct. Its applicationin controlling noise with the frequency range from 100to 800 Hz can be implemented by using the adaptivedigital signal processing technique. The experimentson a pink noise, a broadband noise and a noise takenfrom a tank were made, which show that there existsan attenuation of 11 dB at the frequency of 500 Hzor so, and that the proposed adaptive noise controltechnique is very effective and valid.

  3. Sound quality of low-frequency and car engine noises after active noise control

    Gonzalez, A.; Ferrer, M.; de Diego, M.; Piñero, G.; Garcia-Bonito, J. J.

    2003-08-01

    The ability of active noise control (ANC) systems to achieve a more pleasant sound has been evaluated by means of sound quality analysis of a real multi-channel active noise controller. Recordings of real car engine noises had been carried out using a Head acoustics TM binaural head simulator seated in a typical car seat, and these signals together with synthesized noise have been actively controlled in an enclosed room. The sound quality study has focused on the estimation of noise quality changes through the evaluation of the sense of comfort. Two methods have been developed: firstly, a predictive method based on psychoacoustic parameters (loudness, roughness, tonality and sharpness); and secondly, a subjective method using a jury test. Both results have been related to the spectral characteristics of the sounds before and after active control. It can be concluded from both analyses that ANC positively affects acoustic comfort. The engine noise mathematical comfort predictor is based on loudness and roughness (two psychoacoustic parameters directly influenced by ANC), and has satisfactorily predicted the improvements in the pleasantness of the sounds. As far as the subjective evaluation method is concerned, the jury test has showed that acoustic comfort is, in most cases, directly related to the sense of quietness. However, ANC has also been assessed negatively by the jury in the cases that it was unable to reduce the loudness, perhaps because of the low amplitudes of the original sounds. Finally, from what has been shown, it can be said that the subjective improvements strongly depends on the attenuation level achieved by the ANC system operation, as well as the spectral characteristics of the sounds before and after control.

  4. Active noise control to reduce the blade tone noise of centrifugal fans

    Koopmann, G. H.; Neise, W.; Chen, W.

    1988-07-01

    An active noise control method for suppressing the blade tones of centrifugal fans is presented which uses two secondary sound sources mounted into the cutoff region of the fan casing. Experiments were conducted for centrifugal fans with impeller diameters between 280 and 710 mm using two different designs for the secondary sources. The results indicate that the sound field inside the casing is dominated by the rotor locked pressure field, and that the blade tone noise measured in the far-field is generated by the unsteady pressures at the cutoff, which in turn are produced by the flow leaving the impeller.

  5. Smart materials and active noise and vibration control in vehicles

    Doppenberg, E.J.J.; Berkhoff, A.P.; Overbeek, M. van [TNO Institute of Applied Physics, Delft (Netherlands)

    2001-07-01

    Results are presented for the reduction of sound radiated from a structure using different control methodologies. Two approaches for active structural acoustic control are mentioned to reduce sound radiated by the structure: the acoustic approach or the vibro-acoustic approach. In both cases integrated actuators in structure materials are necessary to realise feasible products. Furthermore the development of an efficient shaker for Active Isolation techniques is described. The prototype of TNO TPD can produce a force of 400 N up to 250 Hz at a good performance-volume ratio. To enhance the robustness of the active control applications, the use of the subspace identification based control methods are developed. The robustness property of subspace identification methods forms the basis of an accurate model updating mechanism, using small size data batches. The performed simulations reveal excellent robustness performance under very general noise conditions or during operation of the control system. Furthermore the development of the techniques can be exploited to realise sound comfort requirements to enhance audible communications of vehicle related applications. To anticipate to these developments in the automotive industry, TNO has set up a Sound and Vibrations Research Centre with Twente University and a research program on Smart Panels with the Delft University. To investigate the potential markets and applications for sound comfort in the means of transportation, TNO-TPD and the Institute of Sound and Vibration Research in England (ISVR) have agreed on a cooperative venture to develop and realise 'active control of electroacoustics' (ACE). (orig.)

  6. Active Control of Fan Noise-Feasibility Study. Volume 1; Flyover System Noise Studies

    Kraft, Robert E.; Janardan, B. A.; Kontos, G. C.; Gliebe, P. R.

    1994-01-01

    A study has been completed to examine the potential reduction of aircraft flyover noise by the method of active noise control (ANC). It is assumed that the ANC system will be designed such that it cancels discrete tones radiating from the engine fan inlet or fan exhaust duct. Thus, without considering the engineering details of the ANC system design, tone levels are arbitrarily removed from the engine component noise spectrum and the flyover noise EPNL levels are compared with and without the presence of tones. The study was conducted for a range of engine cycles, corresponding to fan pressure ratios from 1.3 to 1.75. The major conclusions that can be drawn are that, for a fan pressure ratio of 1.75, ANC of tones gives about the same suppression as acoustic treatment without ANC, and for a fan pressure ratio of 1.45, ANC appears to offer less effectiveness than passive treatment. Additionally, ANC appears to be more effective at sideline and cutback conditions than at approach. Overall EPNL suppressions due to tone removal range from about 1 to 3 dB at takeoff engine speeds and from 1 to 5 db at approach speeds. Studies of economic impact of the installation of an ANC system for the four engine cases indicate increases of DOC ranging from 1 to 2 percent, favoring the lower fan pressure ratio engines. Further study is needed to confirm the results by examining additional engine data, particularly at low fan pressure ratios, and studying the details of the current results to obtain a more complete understanding. Further studies should also include determining the effects of combining passive and active treatment.

  7. Application of High Order X-LMS Filter for Active Noise Control

    N.V.K.Mahalakshmi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper active noise is controlled by using higher order X-LMS (least mean square filter. This technique is based on X-NLMS (normalized least mean square, also known as traditional acoustic noise cancellation (ANC scheme. It cancels the wideband noise from the corrupted speech signal. The active noise reducing headphone is probably the most successful application of active control of sound – the technology of cancelling sound with sound i.e., by using anti-noise signal. This report presents an outlined technical review of noise cancellation in headphones. The principles of passive noise attenuation are presented after which active attenuation is introduced showing how the two complement the attenuation performance. In real-time environment, the number of different applications in which adaptive techniques are being successfully used that are echo cancellation, equalization of dispersive channels, system identification, signal enhancement, noise cancelling and control.

  8. A study on transient enhancement for fault diagnosis based on an active noise control system

    Tian, X.; Gu, Fengshou; Zhen, Dong; Tran, Tung; Ball, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Active noise control (ANC) is a more effective technique used for acoustic noise cancelation in comparison with passive approaches which are difficult and expensive to implement, especially for cancelling the noise in the low frequency range. In the ANC system, an anti-noise signal is introduced to suppress the primary noise to produce a residual which is used for updating the adaptive filter coefficients. In this paper, a method of transient content enhancement for fault detection and diagno...

  9. Foundations of Active Control - Active Noise Reduction Helmets

    Elmkjær, Torsten Haaber Leth

    2008-01-01

    regularization. A simplification of this algorithm leads to the MC-αγΠ-NLMS algorithm that is an extended variant of the NLMS algorithm. Off-line simultaneous system identification capabilities of a complex system involving a total 4 secondary paths, 20 feedback paths and 4 control-performance paths is...... obvious input and output channel definition by a finite lumped-elements multi-channel system. Usually, no unique transfer function x exist as the system is not point-wise excited, but excited over an area as in the case of diffuse sound field illumination. A new method for acoustical signal processing...

  10. Study of active noise control system for a commercial HVAC unit

    Devineni, Naga

    Acoustic noise is a common problem in everyday life. If the appliances that are present in the work and living areas generate noise then it's a serious problem. One such appliance is the Heating, Ventilation and Air-conditioning system (HVAC) in which blower fan and compressor units are housed together. Operation of a HVAC system creates two kinds of noise. One is the noise due to the air flow and the other is the result of the compressor. Both of them exhibit different signal properties and need different strategies to control them. There has been previous efforts in designing noise control systems that can control noise from the HVAC system. These include passive methods which use sound absorption materials to attenuate noise and active methods which cancel noise by generating anti-noise. Passive methods are effective in limiting the high frequency noise, but are inefficient in controlling low frequency noise from the compressor. Compressor noise is one of the strong low frequency components that propagate through the walls, therefore there is need for deploying active signal processing methods that consider the signal properties into consideration to cancel the noise acoustically. The quasi periodic nature of the compressor noise is exploited in noise modeling which aids in implementing an adaptive linear prediction filter in estimating the anti noise [12]. In this thesis, a multi channel architecture has been studied for a specific HVAC system in order to improve noise cancellation by creating larger quiet zone. In addition to the multi-channel architecture, a real time narrow band Active Noise Control (ANC) was employed to cancel noise under practical conditions.

  11. Application of High Order X-LMS Filter for Active Noise Control

    N.V.K.Mahalakshmi; Sindhu, D; B. Ranjith Kumar; N.Santhisri; G. Sowjanya Rao

    2014-01-01

    In this paper active noise is controlled by using higher order X-LMS (least mean square) filter. This technique is based on X-NLMS (normalized least mean square), also known as traditional acoustic noise cancellation (ANC) scheme. It cancels the wideband noise from the corrupted speech signal. The active noise reducing headphone is probably the most successful application of active control of sound – the technology of cancelling sound with sound i.e., by using anti-noise signal. This report p...

  12. Reduction of helicopter blade-vortex interaction noise by active rotor control technology

    Yu, Yung H.; Gmelin, Bernd; Splettstoesser, Wolf; Philippe, Jean J.; Prieur, Jean; Brooks, Thomas F.

    Helicopter blade-vortex interaction noise is one of the most severe noise sources and is very important both in community annoyance and military detection. Research over the decades has substantially improved basic physical understanding of the mechanisms generating rotor blade-vortex interaction noise and also of controlling techniques, particularly using active rotor control technology. This paper reviews active rotor control techniques currently available for rotor blade-vortex interaction noise reduction, including higher harmonic pitch control, individual blade control, and on-blade control technologies. Basic physical mechanisms of each active control technique are reviewed in terms of noise reduction mechanism and controlling aerodynamic or structural parameters of a blade. Active rotor control techniques using smart structures/materials are discussed, including distributed smart actuators to induce local torsional or flapping deformations.

  13. Reduction of Helicopter Blade-Vortex Interaction Noise by Active Rotor Control Technology

    Yu, Yung H.; Gmelin, Bernd; Splettstoesser, Wolf; Brooks, Thomas F.; Philippe, Jean J.; Prieur, Jean

    1997-01-01

    Helicopter blade-vortex interaction noise is one of the most severe noise sources and is very important both in community annoyance and military detection. Research over the decades has substantially improved basic physical understanding of the mechanisms generating rotor blade-vortex interaction noise and also of controlling techniques, particularly using active rotor control technology. This paper reviews active rotor control techniques currently available for rotor blade vortex interaction noise reduction, including higher harmonic pitch control, individual blade control, and on-blade control technologies. Basic physical mechanisms of each active control technique are reviewed in terms of noise reduction mechanism and controlling aerodynamic or structural parameters of a blade. Active rotor control techniques using smart structures/materials are discussed, including distributed smart actuators to induce local torsional or flapping deformations, Published by Elsevier Science Ltd.

  14. Active Control of Fan Noise: Feasibility Study. Volume 4; Flyover System Noise Studies

    Kraft, R. E.; Janardan, B. A.; Gliebe, P. R.; Kontos, G. C.

    1996-01-01

    An extension of a prior study has been completed to examine the potential reduction of aircraft flyover noise by the method of active noise control (ANC). It is assumed that the ANC system will be designed such that it cancels discrete tones radiating from the engine fan inlet or fan exhaust duct, at least to the extent that they no longer protrude above the surrounding broadband noise levels. Thus, without considering the engineering details of the ANC system design, tone levels am arbitrarily removed from the engine component noise spectrum and the flyover noise EPNL levels are compared with and without the presence of tones. The study was conducted for a range of engine cycles, corresponding to fan pressure ratios of 1.3, 1.45, 1.6, and 1.75. This report is an extension of an effort reported previously. The major conclusions drawn from the prior study, which was restricted to fan pressure ratios of 1.45 and 1.75, are that, for a fan pressure ratio of 1.75, ANC of tones gives about the same suppression as acoustic treatment without ANC. For a fan pressure ratio of 1.45, ANC appears to offer less effectiveness from passive treatment. In the present study, the other two fan pressure ratios are included in a more detailed examination of the benefits of the ANC suppression levels. The key results of this extended study are the following observations: (1) The maximum overall benefit obtained from suppression of BPF alone was 2.5 EPNdB at high fan speeds. The suppression benefit increases with increase in fan pressure ratio (FPR), (2) The maximum overall benefit obtained from suppression of the first three harmonics was 3 EPNdB at high speeds. Suppression benefit increases with increase in FPR, (3) At low FPR, only about 1.0 EPNdB maximum reduction was obtained. Suppression is primarily from reduction of BPF at high FPR values and from the combination of tones at low FPR, (4) The benefit from ANC is about the same as the benefit from passive treatment at fan pressure

  15. Time-domain versus frequency-domain effort weighting in active noise control

    Friot, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Although Active Noise Control aims at reducing the noise at a set of error sensors, it is often designed by minimizing an error index that includes a weightedpenalty on the actuator inputs. In this way, the control tends to be more robust and the effort-weighting parameter allows the maximum voltages applied to the control sources to be monitored. Two similar effort-weighting techniques have been widely implemented in active control studies: optimal control can be computed using Tikhonov regu...

  16. Sequentially Adapted Parallel Feedforward Active Noise Control of Noisy Sinusoidal Signals

    Govind Kannan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A large class of acoustic noise sources has an underlying periodic process that generates a periodic noise component, and thus their acoustic noise can in general be modeled as the sum of a periodic signal and a randomly fluctuating signal (usually a broadband background noise. Active control of periodic noise (i.e., for a mixture of sinusoids is more effective than that of random noise. For mixtures of sinusoids in a background broadband random noise, conventional FXLMS-based single filter method does not reach the maximum achievable Noise Attenuation Level (NALmax⁡. In this paper, an alternative approach is taken and the idea of a parallel active noise control (ANC architecture for cancelling mixtures of periodic and random signals is presented. The proposed ANC system separates the noise into periodic and random components and generates corresponding antinoises via separate noise cancelling filters, and tends to reach NALmax⁡ consistently. The derivation of NALmax⁡ is presented. Both the separation and noise cancellation are based on adaptive filtering. Experimental results verify the analytical development by showing superior performance of the proposed method, over the single-filter approach, for several cases of sinusoids in white noise.

  17. Active control of noise radiation from vibrating structures

    Mørkholt, Jakob

    The thesis is concerned with the active control of randomly vibrating structures by means of feedback control, with particular emphasis on reducing the sound radiation from such structures. A time domain model of the structural and radiation dynamics of an actively controlled plate has been...... developed, based on the theory of radiation filters for estimating the sound radiation from multimodal vibrations. This model has then been used in simulations of optimal feedback control, with special emphasis of the stability margins of the optimal control scheme. Two different methods of designing...

  18. A new approach to control noise from entertainment facilities: Active control and measurement of amplified community noise

    Peppin, Richard J.; Casamajó, Joan

    2003-04-01

    While traffic noise is perhaps the most pervasive of community noises, much of the contribution now comes from amplified sound: live music, discos, theme parks, and exercise studios. Those producing the sound or music want it loud and those not interested want to be protected against noise. Noise limits at the receiving or producing property line must be met for the minimum community acceptance. However the time-, and perhaps the spatially-, varying sound in entertainment facilities is often constantly modified (and maybe monitored) near the source of the sound. Hence it is hard to relate and to control the sound at the property line. This paper presents a unique noise control device. It is based on the octave band ``transfer function'' between the sound produced in the entertainment area and the noise received at the property line. The overall insulation can be measured and is input to the instrument. When a noise level limit is exceeded at the receiver, due to the amplified interior noise at the facility, the sound output of the device is automatically controlled to reduce the noise. The paper provides details of the design and possible abatement scenarios with examples.

  19. Smart Materials and Active Noise and Vibration Control in Vehicles

    Doppenberg, E.J.J.; Berkhoff, A.P.; Overbeek, van M.

    2001-01-01

    The paper presents the results for the reduction of sound radiated from a structure using different control methodologies, and discusses two approaches for active structural acoustic control: the acoustic approach or the vibro-acoustic approach. Integrated actuators in structure material are necessa

  20. Integration of Bass Enhancement and Active Noise Control System in Automobile Cabin

    Liang Wang

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available With the advancement of digital signal processing technologies, consumers are more concerned with the quality of multimedia entertainment in automobiles. In order to meet this demand, an audio enhancement system is needed to improve bass reproduction and cancel engine noise in the cabins. This paper presents an integrated active noise control system that is based on frequency-sampling filters to track and extract the bass information from the audio signal, and a multifrequency active noise equalizer to tune the low-frequency engine harmonics to enhance the bass reproduction. In the noise cancellation mode, a maximum of 3 dB bass enhancement can be achieved with significant noise suppression, while higher bass enhancement can be achieved in the bass enhance mode. The results show that the proposed system is effective for solving both the bass audio reproduction and the noise control problems in automobile cabins.

  1. Active noise cancellation algorithms for impulsive noise

    Li, Peng; Yu, Xun

    2012-01-01

    Impulsive noise is an important challenge for the practical implementation of active noise control (ANC) systems. The advantages and disadvantages of popular filtered-X least mean square (FXLMS) ANC algorithm and nonlinear filtered-X least mean M-estimate (FXLMM) algorithm are discussed in this paper. A new modified FXLMM algorithm is also proposed to achieve better performance in controlling impulsive noise. Computer simulations and experiments are carried out for all three algorithms and th...

  2. The effect of structural-acoustic coupling on the active control of noise in vehicles

    Cheer, Jordan; Elliott, Stephen J.

    2011-01-01

    Active noise control systems offer a potential method of reducing the weight of passive acoustic treatment and, therefore, increasing vehicles’ fuel ef?ciency. These can be particularly cost-ef?cient if integrated with the entertainment system. A combined system is presented employing feedforward control of engine noise and feedback control of road noise, using a‘modal’ error signal. Due to the dependence of the feedback system on the modal response of the vehicle cabin, and the in?uence of s...

  3. Controlled Noise Seismology

    Hanafy, Sherif M.

    2015-08-19

    We use controlled noise seismology (CNS) to generate surface waves, where we continuously record seismic data while generating artificial noise along the profile line. To generate the CNS data we drove a vehicle around the geophone line and continuously recorded the generated noise. The recorded data set is then correlated over different time windows and the correlograms are stacked together to generate the surface waves. The virtual shot gathers reveal surface waves with moveout velocities that closely approximate those from active source shot gathers.

  4. Noise-driven activation in human intermittent control: a double-well potential model

    Zgonnikov, Arkady

    2014-01-01

    In controlling unstable systems humans switch intermittently between the passive and active behavior instead of controlling the system in a continuous manner. The notion of noise-driven control activation provides a richer alternative to the conventional threshold-based models of intermittent motor control. The present study represents the control activation as a random walk in a continuously changing double-well potential. The match between the proposed model and the previous data on human balancing of virtual stick prompts that the double-well approach can aid in explaining complex dynamics of human behavior in control processes.

  5. Source localization for active control of turbofan rotor-stator broadband noise

    Walker, Bruce E.

    2005-09-01

    In order to identify a reference signal source for an active noise cancellation system, cross-correlation techniques were used to localize broadband noise source regions on exit guide vanes of the NASA Glenn Research Center Advance Noise Control Fan (ANCF). Arrays of surface pressure sensors were imbedded in one guide vane and in the wall of the fan. Synchronous sampling was used with a multichannel data acquisition system to allow removal of periodic components from the signals. The signals were then cross-correlated to assess radiation directivity and the relationship between vane surface pressure and in-duct acoustic noise. The results of these measurements indicated that broadband unsteady pressures near the leading edge tip of the guide vane were well enough correlated with acoustic radiation that 2-3 dB active noise cancellation could be achieved using a simple gain-delay control algorithm and actuator array. After successful simulation in a wind tunnel environment the concept was incorporated on 15 guide vanes and tested in ANCF. Cross-correlation measurements were further used to evaluate system performance and to identify competing noises from rotating and stationary sources within the fan.

  6. Robust active noise control in the loadmaster area of a military transport aircraft.

    Kochan, Kay; Sachau, Delf; Breitbach, Harald

    2011-05-01

    The active noise control (ANC) method is based on the superposition of a disturbance noise field with a second anti-noise field using loudspeakers and error microphones. This method can be used to reduce the noise level inside the cabin of a propeller aircraft. However, during the design process of the ANC system, extensive measurements of transfer functions are necessary to optimize the loudspeaker and microphone positions. Sometimes, the transducer positions have to be tailored according to the optimization results to achieve a sufficient noise reduction. The purpose of this paper is to introduce a controller design method for such narrow band ANC systems. The method can be seen as an extension of common transducer placement optimization procedures. In the presented method, individual weighting parameters for the loudspeakers and microphones are used. With this procedure, the tailoring of the transducer positions is replaced by adjustment of controller parameters. Moreover, the ANC system will be robust because of the fact that the uncertainties are considered during the optimization of the controller parameters. The paper describes the necessary theoretic background for the method and demonstrates the efficiency in an acoustical mock-up of a military transport aircraft. PMID:21568404

  7. Active control of noise on the source side of a partition to increase its sound isolation

    Tarabini, Marco; Roure, Alain; Pinhede, Cedric

    2009-03-01

    This paper describes a local active noise control system that virtually increases the sound isolation of a dividing wall by means of a secondary source array. With the proposed method, sound pressure on the source side of the partition is reduced using an array of loudspeakers that generates destructive interference on the wall surface, where an array of error microphones is placed. The reduction of sound pressure on the incident side of the wall is expected to decrease the sound radiated into the contiguous room. The method efficiency was experimentally verified by checking the insertion loss of the active noise control system; in order to investigate the possibility of using a large number of actuators, a decentralized FXLMS control algorithm was used. Active control performances and stability were tested with different array configurations, loudspeaker directivities and enclosure characteristics (sound source position and absorption coefficient). The influence of all these parameters was investigated with the factorial design of experiments. The main outcome of the experimental campaign was that the insertion loss produced by the secondary source array, in the 50-300 Hz frequency range, was close to 10 dB. In addition, the analysis of variance showed that the active noise control performance can be optimized with a proper choice of the directional characteristics of the secondary source and the distance between loudspeakers and error microphones.

  8. Numerical Comparison of Active Acoustic and Structural Noise Control in a Stiffened Double Wall Cylinder

    Grosveld, Ferdinand W.

    1996-01-01

    The active acoustic and structural noise control characteristics of a double wall cylinder with and without ring stiffeners were numerically evaluated. An exterior monopole was assumed to acoustically excite the outside of the double wall cylinder at an acoustic cavity resonance frequency. Structural modal vibration properties of the inner and outer shells were analyzed by post-processing the results from a finite element analysis. A boundary element approach was used to calculate the acoustic cavity response and the coupled structural-acoustic interaction. In the frequency region of interest, below 500 Hz, all structural resonant modes were found to be acoustically slow and the nonresonant modal response to be dominant. Active sound transmission control was achieved by control forces applied to the inner or outer shell, or acoustic control monopoles placed just outside the inner or outer shell. A least mean square technique was used to minimize the interior sound pressures at the nodes of a data recovery mesh. Results showed that single acoustic control monopoles placed just outside the inner or outer shells resulted in better sound transmission control than six distributed point forces applied to either one of the shells. Adding stiffeners to the double wall structure constrained the modal vibrations of the shells, making the double wall stiffer with associated higher modal frequencies. Active noise control obtained for the stiffened double wall configurations was less than for the unstiffened cylinder. In all cases, the acoustic control monopoles controlled the sound transmission into the interior better than the structural control forces.

  9. Active Control of Fan Noise: Feasibility Study. Volume 6; Theoretical Analysis for Coupling of Active Noise Control Actuator Ring Sources to an Annular Duct with Flow

    Kraft, R. E.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this effort is to develop an analytical model for the coupling of active noise control (ANC) piston-type actuators that are mounted flush to the inner and outer walls of an annular duct to the modes in the duct generated by the actuator motion. The analysis will be used to couple the ANC actuators to the modal analysis propagation computer program for the annular duct, to predict the effects of active suppression of fan-generated engine noise sources. This combined program will then be available to assist in the design or evaluation of ANC systems in fan engine annular exhaust ducts. An analysis has been developed to predict the modes generated in an annular duct due to the coupling of flush-mounted ring actuators on the inner and outer walls of the duct. The analysis has been combined with a previous analysis for the coupling of modes to a cylindrical duct in a FORTRAN computer program to perform the computations. The method includes the effects of uniform mean flow in the duct. The program can be used for design or evaluation purposes for active noise control hardware for turbofan engines. Predictions for some sample cases modeled after the geometry of the NASA Lewis ANC Fan indicate very efficient coupling in both the inlet and exhaust ducts for the m = 6 spinning mode at frequencies where only a single radial mode is cut-on. Radial mode content in higher order cut-off modes at the source plane and the required actuator displacement amplitude to achieve 110 dB SPL levels in the desired mode were predicted. Equivalent cases with and without flow were examined for the cylindrical and annular geometry, and little difference was found for a duct flow Mach number of 0.1. The actuator ring coupling program will be adapted as a subroutine to the cylindrical duct modal analysis and the exhaust duct modal analysis. This will allow the fan source to be defined in terms of characteristic modes at the fan source plane and predict the propagation to the

  10. Active Vibration Control for Helicopter Interior Noise Reduction Using Power Minimization

    Mendoza, J.; Chevva, K.; Sun, F.; Blanc, A.; Kim, S. B.

    2014-01-01

    This report describes work performed by United Technologies Research Center (UTRC) for NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) under Contract NNL11AA06C. The objective of this program is to develop technology to reduce helicopter interior noise resulting from multiple gear meshing frequencies. A novel active vibration control approach called Minimum Actuation Power (MAP) is developed. MAP is an optimal control strategy that minimizes the total input power into a structure by monitoring and varying the input power of controlling sources. MAP control was implemented without explicit knowledge of the phasing and magnitude of the excitation sources by driving the real part of the input power from the controlling sources to zero. It is shown that this occurs when the total mechanical input power from the excitation and controlling sources is a minimum. MAP theory is developed for multiple excitation sources with arbitrary relative phasing for single or multiple discrete frequencies and controlled by a single or multiple controlling sources. Simulations and experimental results demonstrate the feasibility of MAP for structural vibration reduction of a realistic rotorcraft interior structure. MAP control resulted in significant average global vibration reduction of a single frequency and multiple frequency excitations with one controlling actuator. Simulations also demonstrate the potential effectiveness of the observed vibration reductions on interior radiated noise.

  11. An active structural acoustic control approach for the reduction of the structure-borne road noise

    Douville, Hugo; Berry, Alain; Masson, Patrice

    2002-11-01

    The reduction of the structure-borne road noise generated inside the cabin of an automobile is investigated using an Active Structural Acoustic Control (ASAC) approach. First, a laboratory test bench consisting of a wheel/suspension/lower suspension A-arm assembly has been developed in order to identify the vibroacoustic transfer paths (up to 250 Hz) for realistic road noise excitation of the wheel. Frequency Response Function (FRF) measurements between the excitation/control actuators and each suspension/chassis linkage are used to characterize the different transfer paths that transmit energy through the chassis of the car. Second, a FE/BE model (Finite/Boundary Elements) was developed to simulate the acoustic field of an automobile cab interior. This model is used to predict the acoustic field inside the cabin as a response to the measured forces applied on the suspension/chassis linkages. Finally, an experimental implementation of ASAC is presented. The control approach relies on the use of inertial actuators to modify the vibration behavior of the suspension and the automotive chassis such that its noise radiation efficiency is decreased. The implemented algorithm consists of a MIMO (Multiple-Input-Multiple-Output) feedforward configuration with a filtered-X LMS algorithm using an advanced reference signal (width FIR filters) using the Simulink/Dspace environment for control prototyping.

  12. Active control of multi-modal propagation of tonal noise in

    Laugesen, Søren

    1996-01-01

    The active control of tonal noise propagating in ducts at frequencies where many modes are able to propagate is considered. The final objective of the work reported is to cancel the prominent 450-500 Hz blade passing frequency of the rotary suction fans found in chimney stacks of power stations...... laboratory. The study of the full control system, which comprises thirty secondary sources and thirty-two error sensors, has revealed a number of new results, in particular with respect to the positioning of the sources and sensors along the length of the duct. Eventually, a reduction of the radiated power...

  13. Active3 noise reduction

    Noise reduction is a problem being encountered in a variety of applications, such as environmental noise cancellation, signal recovery and separation. Passive noise reduction is done with the help of absorbers. Active noise reduction includes the transmission of phase inverted signals for the cancellation. This paper is about a threefold active approach to noise reduction. It includes the separation of a combined source, which consists of both a noise and a signal part. With the help of interaction with the source by scanning it and recording its response, modeling as a nonlinear dynamical system is achieved. The analysis includes phase space analysis and global radial basis functions as tools for the prediction used in a subsequent cancellation procedure. Examples are given which include noise reduction of speech. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  14. Novel Algorithm for Active Noise Control Systems Based on Frequency Selective Filters

    Hong-liang ZHAO

    2010-01-01

    A novel algorithm for active noise control systems based on frequency selective filters (FSFANC)is presented in the paper.The FSFANC aims at the m lti-tonal noise attenuation problem.One FSFANC system copes with one of the tonal components,and several FSFANC systems can nun independently in parallel to cancel the selected multiple tones.The proposed algorithm adopts a simple structrue with only two coefficients that can be explained as the real and imaginary parts of the structure to modelthesecondary path,and estimates the secondary path by injecting sinusoidal identification signals.Theoretical analysis and laboratory experiments show that the proposed algorithm possesses some advantages,such as simpler stricture,less computational burden,greater stability,and fast canverging speed.

  15. Active Structural Acoustic Control of Interior Noise on a Raytheon 1900D

    Palumbo, Dan; Cabell, Ran; Sullivan, Brenda; Cline, John

    2000-01-01

    An active structural acoustic control system has been demonstrated on a Raytheon Aircraft Company 1900D turboprop airliner. Both single frequency and multi-frequency control of the blade passage frequency and its harmonics was accomplished. The control algorithm was a variant of the popular filtered-x LMS implemented in the principal component domain. The control system consisted of 21 inertial actuators and 32 microphones. The actuators were mounted to the aircraft's ring frames. The microphones were distributed uniformly throughout the interior at head height, both seated and standing. Actuator locations were selected using a combinatorial search optimization algorithm. The control system achieved a 14 dB noise reduction of the blade passage frequency during single frequency tests. Multi-frequency control of the first 1st, 2nd and 3rd harmonics resulted in 10.2 dB, 3.3 dB and 1.6 dB noise reductions respectively. These results fall short of the predictions which were produced by the optimization algorithm (13.5 dB, 8.6 dB and 6.3 dB). The optimization was based on actuator transfer functions taken on the ground and it is postulated that cabin pressurization at flight altitude was a factor in this discrepancy.

  16. Characterization of electro-acoustics impedance and its application to active noise control

    HOU Hong; YANG Jianhua

    2004-01-01

    Characteristics of radiation impedance and its inducing variation of electrical impedance for a controllable source have been investigated. An impedance-based error criterion has been proposed and its application to Active Noise Control is demonstrated through a coil driven loudspeaker. A general formula of radiation impedance is derived for two control strategies, according to the criterion of total acoustic power output. The radiation impedances of some commonly used sound sources are calculated. We discuss in detail the relation between variation of the input electrical impedance and radiation impedance for the two control strategies. The measured data of the input electrical impedance from a loudspeaker agree fairly well with theoretical analysis. An AC- bridge circuit is designed in order to measure the weak variation of electrical impedance resulted from radiation impedance. The bridge relative output is unique for a certain control strategy, from which an impedance-based error criterion is then proposed and the implementation of its application to an active control system is analyzed.Numerical results of such criterion are presented. An analogue control system is set up and experiments are carried out in a semi-anechoic chamber to verify the new control approach.

  17. Structural Acoustic Characteristics of Aircraft and Active Control of Interior Noise

    Fuller, C. R.

    1998-01-01

    The reduction of aircraft cabin sound levels to acceptable values still remains a topic of much research. The use of conventional passive approaches has been extensively studied and implemented. However performance limits of these techniques have been reached. In this project, new techniques for understanding the structural acoustic behavior of aircraft fuselages and the use of this knowledge in developing advanced new control approaches are investigated. A central feature of the project is the Aircraft Fuselage Test Facility at Va Tech which is based around a full scale Cessna Citation III fuselage. The work is divided into two main parts; the first part investigates the use of an inverse technique for identifying dominant fuselage vibrations. The second part studies the development and implementation of active and active-passive techniques for controlling aircraft interior noise.

  18. Filtered-X Affine Projection Algorithms for Active Noise Control Using Volterra Filters

    Sicuranza Giovanni L

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider the use of adaptive Volterra filters, implemented in the form of multichannel filter banks, as nonlinear active noise controllers. In particular, we discuss the derivation of filtered-X affine projection algorithms for homogeneous quadratic filters. According to the multichannel approach, it is then easy to pass from these algorithms to those of a generic Volterra filter. It is shown in the paper that the AP technique offers better convergence and tracking capabilities than the classical LMS and NLMS algorithms usually applied in nonlinear active noise controllers, with a limited complexity increase. This paper extends in two ways the content of a previous contribution published in Proc. IEEE-EURASIP Workshop on Nonlinear Signal and Image Processing (NSIP '03, Grado, Italy, June 2003. First of all, a general adaptation algorithm valid for any order of affine projections is presented. Secondly, a more complete set of experiments is reported. In particular, the effects of using multichannel filter banks with a reduced number of channels are investigated and relevant results are shown.

  19. Active vibration control on a quarter-car for cancellation of road noise disturbance

    Belgacem, Walid; Berry, Alain; Masson, Patrice

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, a methodology is presented for the cancellation of road noise, from the analysis of vibration transmission paths for an automotive suspension to the design of an active control system using inertial actuators on a suspension to reduce the vibrations transmitted to the chassis. First, experiments were conducted on a Chevrolet Epica LS automobile on a concrete test track to measure accelerations induced on the suspension by the road. These measurements were combined with experimental Frequency Response Functions (FRFs) measured on a quarter-car test bench to reconstruct an equivalent three dimensional force applied on the wheel hub. Second, FRFs measured on the test bench between the three-dimensional driving force and forces at each suspension/chassis linkage were used to characterize the different transmission paths of vibration energy to the chassis. Third, an experimental model of the suspension was constructed to simulate the configuration of the active control system, using the primary (disturbance) FRFs and secondary (control) FRFs also measured on the test bench. This model was used to optimize the configuration of the control actuators and to evaluate the required forces. Finally, a prototype of an active suspension was implemented and measurements were performed in order to assess the performance of the control approach. A 4.6 dB attenuation on transmitted forces was obtained in the 50-250 Hz range.

  20. Active control of counter-rotating open rotor interior noise in a Dornier 728 experimental aircraft

    Haase, Thomas; Unruh, Oliver; Algermissen, Stephan; Pohl, Martin

    2016-08-01

    The fuel consumption of future civil aircraft needs to be reduced because of the CO2 restrictions declared by the European Union. A consequent lightweight design and a new engine concept called counter-rotating open rotor are seen as key technologies in the attempt to reach this ambitious goals. Bearing in mind that counter-rotating open rotor engines emit very high sound pressures at low frequencies and that lightweight structures have a poor transmission loss in the lower frequency range, these key technologies raise new questions in regard to acoustic passenger comfort. One of the promising solutions for the reduction of sound pressure levels inside the aircraft cabin are active sound and vibration systems. So far, active concepts have rarely been investigated for a counter-rotating open rotor pressure excitation on complex airframe structures. Hence, the state of the art is augmented by the preliminary study presented in this paper. The study shows how an active vibration control system can influence the sound transmission of counter-rotating open rotor noise through a complex airframe structure into the cabin. Furthermore, open questions on the way towards the realisation of an active control system are addressed. In this phase, an active feedforward control system is investigated in a fully equipped Dornier 728 experimental prototype aircraft. In particular, the sound transmission through the airframe, the coupling of classical actuators (inertial and piezoelectric patch actuators) into the structure and the performance of the active vibration control system with different error sensors are investigated. It can be shown that the active control system achieves a reduction up to 5 dB at several counter-rotating open rotor frequencies but also that a better performance could be achieved through further optimisations.

  1. A study of the performance of an Olson type active noise controller and the possibility of the reduction of cabin noise

    Keith, S. E.; Scholaert, H. S. B.

    1981-03-01

    Designed to reduce sound levels by means of an electronic transducing system, the active noise controller is a basic feedback control system composed of a speaker, microphone, amplifier and control unit. Because the scheme can be effective in reducing low frequency noise, it is of particular interest to aircraft manufacturers since attenuation of low frequency noise to increase passenger comfort can be at once costly and cumbersome when conventional sound absorption methods are employed. Olson and May's pioneering work in the 1950's in developing an electronic sound absorber which appeared to be successful over small volumes in a unidirectional sound field is re-examined as well as more recent developments in an effort to test their suitability to the aircraft industry. The results suggest only limited possible use for all systems studied.

  2. Chain reconfiguration in active noise

    Samanta, Nairhita; Chakrabarti, Rajarshi

    2016-05-01

    In a typical single molecule experiment, the dynamics of an unfolded protein is studied by determining the reconfiguration time using long-range Förster resonance energy transfer, where the reconfiguration time is the characteristic decay time of the position correlation between two residues of the protein. In this paper we theoretically calculate the reconfiguration time for a single flexible polymer in the presence of active noise. The study suggests that though the mean square displacement grows faster, the chain reconfiguration is always slower in the presence of long-lived active noise with exponential temporal correlation. Similar behavior is observed for a worm-like semi-flexible chain and a Zimm chain. However it is primarily the characteristic correlation time of the active noise and not the strength that controls the increase in the reconfiguration time. In brief, such active noise makes the polymer move faster but the correlation loss between the monomers becomes slow.

  3. Chain reconfiguration in active noise

    In a typical single molecule experiment, the dynamics of an unfolded protein is studied by determining the reconfiguration time using long-range Förster resonance energy transfer, where the reconfiguration time is the characteristic decay time of the position correlation between two residues of the protein. In this paper we theoretically calculate the reconfiguration time for a single flexible polymer in the presence of active noise. The study suggests that though the mean square displacement grows faster, the chain reconfiguration is always slower in the presence of long-lived active noise with exponential temporal correlation. Similar behavior is observed for a worm-like semi-flexible chain and a Zimm chain. However it is primarily the characteristic correlation time of the active noise and not the strength that controls the increase in the reconfiguration time. In brief, such active noise makes the polymer move faster but the correlation loss between the monomers becomes slow. (paper)

  4. Active road noise reduction

    Vraničar, Primož

    2012-01-01

    Theoretical principle of noise cancellation can be realized in the ideal studio conditions, but when the experiment is put into actual space and realized, we can see that the sound only partly cancels itself, on some frequencies more and on some less. However, in construction engineering we are not only dealing with certain frequencies but with frequency spectrums, if not with the whole frequency field. It is relatively hard to control the noise in traffic. We are dealing with a larger freque...

  5. Development of adaptive IIR filtered-e LMS algorithm for active noise control

    SUN Xu; MENG Guang; TENG Pengxiao; CHEN Duanshi

    2003-01-01

    Compared to finite impulse response (FIR) filters, infinite impulse response (IIR)filters can match the system better with much fewer coefficients, and hence the computationload is saved and the performance improves. Therefore, it is attractive to use IIR filters insteadof FIR filters in active noise control (ANC). However, filtered-U LMS (FULMS) algorithm, theIIR filter-based algorithm commonly used so far cannot ensure global convergence. A new IIRfilter based adaptive algorithm, which can ensure global convergence with computation loadonly slightly increasing, is proposed in this paper. The new algorithm is called as filtered-eLMS algorithm since the error signal of which need to be filtered. Simulation results show thatthe FELMS algorithm presents better performance than the FULMS algorithm.

  6. Simultaneous BVI noise and vibration reduction in rotorcraft using actively-controlled flaps and including performance considerations

    Patt, Daniel A.

    This work presents the development and application of an active control approach for reduction of both vibration and noise induced by helicopter rotor blade vortex interaction (BVI). Control is implemented through single or dual actively controlled flaps (ACFs) on each blade. Low-speed helicopter flight is prone to severe BVI, resulting in elevated vibration and noise levels. Existing research has suggested that when some form of active control is used to reduce vibration, noise will increase and vice versa. The present research achieves simultaneous reduction of noise and vibration, and also investigates the physical sources of the observed reduction. The initial portion of this work focused on developing a tool for simulating helicopter noise and vibrations in the BVI flight regime. A method for predicting compressible unsteady blade surface pressure distribution on rotor blades was developed and combined with an enhanced free-wake model and an acoustic prediction tool with provisions for blade flexibility. These elements were incorporated within an aeroelastic analysis featuring fully coupled flap-lag-torsional blade dynamics. Subsequently, control algorithms were developed that were effective for reducing noise and vibration even in the nonlinear BVI flight regime; saturation limits were incorporated constraining flap deflections to specified limits. The resulting simulation was also validated with a wide range of experimental data, achieving excellent correlation. Finally, a number of active control studies were performed. Multi-component vibration reductions of 40--80% could be achieved, while incurring a small noise penalty. Noise was reduced using an onboard feedback microphone; reductions of 4--10 dB on the advancing side were observed on a plane beneath the rotor when using dual flaps. Finally, simultaneous noise and vibration reduction was studied. A reduction of about 5 dB in noise on the advancing side combined with a 60% reduction in vibration was

  7. Noise control mechanisms of inside aircraft

    Zverev, A. Ya.

    2016-07-01

    World trends in the development of methods and approaches to noise reduction in aircraft cabins are reviewed. The paper discusses the mechanisms of passive and active noise and vibration control, application of "smart" and innovative materials, new approaches to creating all fuselage-design elements, and other promising directions of noise control inside aircraft.

  8. A Control Source Structure of Single Loudspeaker and Rear Sound Interference for Inexpensive Active Noise Control

    Yasuhide Kobayashi

    2010-01-01

    phase-lag is imposed by the Swinbanks' source and the rear sound interference. Thirdly, effects on control performances of control source structures are examined by control experiments with robust controllers.

  9. Low noise control valve

    Noise is one of the problems associated with the use of any type of control valve in systems involving the flow of fluids. The advent of OSHA standards has prompted control valve manufacturers to design valves with special trim to lower the sound pressure level to meet these standards. However, these levels are in some cases too high, particularly when a valve must be located in or near an area where people are working at tasks requiring a high degree of concentration. Such locations are found around and near research devices and in laboratory-office areas. This paper describes a type of fluid control device presently being used at PPL as a bypass control valve in deionized water systems and designed to reduce sound pressure levels considerably below OSHA standards. Details of the design and construction of this constant pressure drop variable flow control valve are contained in the text and are shown in photographs and drawings. Test data taken are included

  10. The use of active vibration control for the reduction of ICE interior noise

    Schirmacher, R. [Mueller-BBM GmbH - Beratende Ingenieure fuer Akustik, Planegg (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    First generation ICE high speed trains show a disturbing low frequency noise of about 100 Hz audible inside the coaches. It is excited by unround wheels, propagates via the bogie to the body of the coach and is finally radiated as airborne sound. A mixed concept of active suspension at the bogie in connection with adaptive residual noise minimisation inside the passenger compartment is successfully applied to the problem. A prototype system utilizing piezo ceramic actuators was installed and tested on the rolling rig of Deutsche Bahn in Munich. The noise level reductions at single harmonics were more than 12 dB averaged over the whole compartment and more than 20 dB at single seats. Measurement results and practical experiences with the system are reported. (orig.)

  11. Control strategies for aircraft airframe noise reduction

    Li Yong; Wang Xunnian; Zhang Dejiu

    2013-01-01

    With the development of low-noise aircraft engine,airframe noise now represents a major noise source during the commercial aircraft's approach to landing phase.Noise control efforts have therefore been extensively focused on the airframe noise problems in order to further reduce aircraft overall noise.In this review,various control methods explored in the last decades for noise reduction on airframe components including high-lift devices and landing gears are summarized.We introduce recent major achievements in airframe noise reduction with passive control methods such as fairings,deceleration plates,splitter plates,acoustic liners,slat cove cover and side-edge replacements,and then discuss the potential and control mechanism of some promising active flow control strategies for airframe noise reduction,such as plasma technique and air blowing/suction devices.Based on the knowledge gained throughout the extensively noise control testing,a few design concepts on the landing gear,high-lift devices and whole aircraft are provided for advanced aircraft low-noise design.Finally,discussions and suggestions are given for future research on airframe noise reduction.

  12. Adjusting phenotypes by noise control.

    Kyung H Kim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetically identical cells can show phenotypic variability. This is often caused by stochastic events that originate from randomness in biochemical processes involving in gene expression and other extrinsic cellular processes. From an engineering perspective, there have been efforts focused on theory and experiments to control noise levels by perturbing and replacing gene network components. However, systematic methods for noise control are lacking mainly due to the intractable mathematical structure of noise propagation through reaction networks. Here, we provide a numerical analysis method by quantifying the parametric sensitivity of noise characteristics at the level of the linear noise approximation. Our analysis is readily applicable to various types of noise control and to different types of system; for example, we can orthogonally control the mean and noise levels and can control system dynamics such as noisy oscillations. As an illustration we applied our method to HIV and yeast gene expression systems and metabolic networks. The oscillatory signal control was applied to p53 oscillations from DNA damage. Furthermore, we showed that the efficiency of orthogonal control can be enhanced by applying extrinsic noise and feedback. Our noise control analysis can be applied to any stochastic model belonging to continuous time Markovian systems such as biological and chemical reaction systems, and even computer and social networks. We anticipate the proposed analysis to be a useful tool for designing and controlling synthetic gene networks.

  13. A multi-resolution filtered-x LMS algorithm based on discrete wavelet transform for active noise control

    Qiu, Z.; Lee, C.-M.; Xu, Z. H.; Sui, L. N.

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a new active control algorithm based on discrete wavelet transform (DWT) for both stationary and non-stationary noise control. First, the Mallat pyramidal algorithm is introduced to implement the DWT, which can decompose the reference signal into several sub-bands with multi-resolution and provides a perfect reconstruction (PR) procedure. To reduce the extra computational complexity introduced by DWT, an efficient strategy is proposed that updates the adaptive filter coefficients in the frequency domainDeepthi B.B using a fast Fourier transform (FFT). Based on the reference noise source, a 'Haar' wavelet is employed and by decomposing the noise signal into two sub-band (3-band), the proposed DWT-FFT-based FXLMS (DWT-FFT-FXLMS) algorithm has greatly reduced complexity and a better convergence performance compared to a time domain filtered-x least mean square (TD-FXLMS) algorithm. As a result of the outstanding time-frequency characteristics of wavelet analysis, the proposed DWT-FFT-FXLMS algorithm can effectively cancel both stationary and non-stationary noise, whereas the frequency domain FXLMS (FD-FXLMS) algorithm cannot approach this point.

  14. Development of Adjustable Absorption Acoustic Liner for Active Fan Noise Control

    小林, 紘; Kobayashi, Hiroshi

    2003-01-01

    Due to strong demands from communities adjacent to airports for the suppression aircraft noise, a new aircraft noise certification standard as set out in ICAO Chapter 4 was formulated and will come into effect in 2006 for new subsonic aircrafts. Currently, not only aircraft noise affecting communities surrounding airports but also aircraft noise at night, during climb and while cruising have become serious issues. In order to solve these issues, at NAL, new techniques and systems have been de...

  15. Adaptive Volterra filter with continuous lp-norm using a logarithmic cost for nonlinear active noise control

    Lu, Lu; Zhao, Haiquan

    2016-03-01

    The filtered-x least mean lp-norm (FxLMP) algorithm is proven to be useful for nonlinear active noise control (NANC) systems. However, its performance deteriorates when the impulsive noises are presented in NANC systems. To surmount this shortcoming, a new nonlinear adaptive algorithm based on Volterra expansion model (VFxlogLMP) is developed in this paper, which is derived by minimizing the lp-norm of logarithmic cost. It is found that the FxLMP and VFxlogLMP require to select an appropriate value of p according to the prior information on noise characteristics, which prohibit their practical applications. Based on VFxlogLMP algorithm, we proposed a continuous lp-norm algorithm with logarithmic cost (VFxlogCLMP), which does not need the parameter selection and thresholds estimation. Benefiting from the various error norms for 1≤p≤2, it remains the robustness of VFxlogLMP. Moreover, the convergence behavior of VFxlogCLMP for moving average secondary paths and stochastic input signals is performed. Compared to the existing algorithms, two versions of the proposed algorithms have much better convergence and stability in impulsive noise environments.

  16. Escape conditioning and low-frequency whole-body vibration - The effects of frequency, amplitude, and controls for noise and activation.

    Wike, E. L.; Wike, S. S.

    1972-01-01

    Seven experiments are reported on low-frequency whole-body vibration and rats' escape conditioning in a modified Skinner box. In the first three studies, conditioning was observed but was independent of frequency. In experiment four, the number of escape responses was directly related to vibration amplitude. Experiment five was a control for vibration noise and noise termination; experiments six and seven studied vibration-induced activation. Noise termination did not produce conditioning. In experiment six, subjects made more responses when responding led to termination than when it did not. In experiment seven, subjects preferred a bar which terminated vibration to one which did not.

  17. Increased noise level of purkinje cell activities minimizes impact of their modulation during sensorimotor control.

    Hoebeek, F.E.; Stahl, J.S.; Alphen, A.M. van; Schonewille, M.; Luo, C.; Rutteman, M.; Maagdenberg, A.M.J.M. van den; Molenaar, P.C.; Goossens, H.H.L.M.; Frens, M.A.; Zeeuw, C.I. de

    2005-01-01

    While firing rate is well established as a relevant parameter for encoding information exchanged between neurons, the significance of other parameters is more conjectural. Here, we show that regularity of neuronal spike activities affects sensorimotor processing in tottering mutants, which suffer fr

  18. Noise in the Library: Effects and Control.

    Eagan, Ann

    1991-01-01

    Describes the physiological and psychological effects of noise in libraries and suggests methods of controlling noise from telephones, computers, printers, and photocopiers. Hearing loss and stress-related problems are discussed, the effects of noise on performance are described, and planning is emphasized as a method of avoiding noise problems.…

  19. Noise Control in Space Shuttle Orbiter

    Goodman, Jerry R.

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic limits in habitable space enclosures are required to ensure crew safety, comfort, and habitability. Noise control is implemented to ensure compliance with the acoustic requirements. The purpose of this paper is to describe problems with establishing acoustic requirements and noise control efforts, and present examples of noise control treatments and design applications used in the Space Shuttle Orbiter. Included is the need to implement the design discipline of acoustics early in the design process, and noise control throughout a program to ensure that limits are met. The use of dedicated personnel to provide expertise and oversight of acoustic requirements and noise control implementation has shown to be of value in the Space Shuttle Orbiter program. It is concluded that to achieve acceptable and safe noise levels in the crew habitable space, early resolution of acoustic requirements and implementation of effective noise control efforts are needed. Management support of established acoustic requirements and noise control efforts is essential.

  20. Controlled exposure to diesel exhaust and traffic noise - Effects on oxidative stress and activation in mononuclear blood cells

    Hemmingsen, Jette Gjerke; Møller, Peter; Jantzen, Kim;

    2015-01-01

    Particulate air pollution increases risk of cancer and cardiopulmonary disease, partly through oxidative stress. Traffic-related noise increases risk of cardiovascular disease and may cause oxidative stress. In this controlled random sequence study, 18 healthy subjects were exposed for 3h to diesel...... exhaust (DE) at 276μg/m(3) from a passenger car or filtered air, with co-exposure to traffic noise at 48 or 75dB(A). Gene expression markers of inflammation, (interleukin-8 and tumor necrosis factor), oxidative stress (heme oxygenase (decycling-1)) and DNA repair (8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1)) were...... unaltered in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). No significant differences in DNA damage levels, measured by the comet assay, were observed after DE exposure, whereas exposure to high noise levels was associated with significantly increased levels of hOGG1-sensitive sites in PBMCs. Urinary levels...

  1. Fuselage panel noise attenuation by piezoelectric switching control

    Makihara, Kanjuro; Miyakawa, Takeya; Onoda, Junjiro; Minesugi, Kenji

    2010-08-01

    This paper describes a problem that we encountered in our noise attenuation project and our solution for it. We intend to attenuate low-frequency noise that transmits through aircraft fuselage panels. Our method of noise attenuation is implemented with a piezoelectric semi-active system having a selective switch instead of an active energy-supply system. The semi-active controller is based on the predicted sound pressure distribution obtained from acoustic emission analysis. Experiments and numerical simulations demonstrate that the semi-active method attenuates acoustic levels of not only the simple monochromatic noise but also of broadband noise. We reveal that tuning the electrical parameters in the circuit is the key to effective noise attenuation, to overcome the acoustic excitation problem due to sharp switching actions, as well as to control chattering problems. The results obtained from this investigation provide meaningful insights into designing noise attenuation systems for comfortable aircraft cabin environments.

  2. Fuselage panel noise attenuation by piezoelectric switching control

    This paper describes a problem that we encountered in our noise attenuation project and our solution for it. We intend to attenuate low-frequency noise that transmits through aircraft fuselage panels. Our method of noise attenuation is implemented with a piezoelectric semi-active system having a selective switch instead of an active energy-supply system. The semi-active controller is based on the predicted sound pressure distribution obtained from acoustic emission analysis. Experiments and numerical simulations demonstrate that the semi-active method attenuates acoustic levels of not only the simple monochromatic noise but also of broadband noise. We reveal that tuning the electrical parameters in the circuit is the key to effective noise attenuation, to overcome the acoustic excitation problem due to sharp switching actions, as well as to control chattering problems. The results obtained from this investigation provide meaningful insights into designing noise attenuation systems for comfortable aircraft cabin environments

  3. Estimation and global control of noise reflections

    Friot, Emmanuel

    2009-01-01

    In theory, active control could be used to reduce the unwanted noise reflections from surfaces such as a submarine hull or the walls of an anechoic room. In the recent years, a real-time algorithm has been developed to this effect at the Laboratoire de M\\'ecanique et d'Acoustique: the noise scattered by the surface is estimated through linear filtering of acoustic pressure signals provided by ordinary microphones and an adaptive feedforward algorithm minimizes the resulting error signals. The paper summarizes the theory underlying the control algorithm, which stems from the integral representation of the scattered pressure, and presents the successive experiments which have been conducted with it: control of terminal reflections in a duct, control of the noise scattered by a parallelepiped in an anechoic room, estimation of the noise reflections on the walls of a small room. It appears that an accurate identification of the linear filters that account for the surface scattering leads to an effective estimatio...

  4. Noise and Vibration Control of Combustion Engine Vehicles

    Winberg, Mathias

    2005-01-01

    Noise and vibrations have over the last two decades been regarded as significant environmental health problems. Regulations regarding acoustic as well as vibration levels have therefore become more stringent. This thesis embraces two different techniques to reduce unwanted noise and vibrations, spectral subtraction and active noise and vibration control. The applications treated for noise and vibration problems are mainly means of transportation driven by combustion engines as for example, he...

  5. Genetic noise control via protein oligomerization

    Ghim, C; Almaas, E

    2008-06-12

    Gene expression in a cell entails random reaction events occurring over disparate time scales. Thus, molecular noise that often results in phenotypic and population-dynamic consequences sets a fundamental limit to biochemical signaling. While there have been numerous studies correlating the architecture of cellular reaction networks with noise tolerance, only a limited effort has been made to understand the dynamical role of protein-protein associations. We have developed a fully stochastic model for the positive feedback control of a single gene, as well as a pair of genes (toggle switch), integrating quantitative results from previous in vivo and in vitro studies. In particular, we explicitly account for the fast protein binding-unbinding kinetics, RNA polymerases, and the promoter/operator sequences of DNA. We find that the overall noise-level is reduced and the frequency content of the noise is dramatically shifted to the physiologically irrelevant high-frequency regime in the presence of protein dimerization. This is independent of the choice of monomer or dimer as transcription factor and persists throughout the multiple model topologies considered. For the toggle switch, we additionally find that the presence of a protein dimer, either homodimer or heterodimer, may significantly reduce its intrinsic switching rate. Hence, the dimer promotes the robust function of bistable switches by preventing the uninduced (induced) state from randomly being induced (uninduced). The specific binding between regulatory proteins provides a buffer that may prevent the propagation of fluctuations in genetic activity. The capacity of the buffer is a non-monotonic function of association-dissociation rates. Since the protein oligomerization per se does not require extra protein components to be expressed, it provides a basis for the rapid control of intrinsic or extrinsic noise. The stabilization of phenotypically important toggle switches, and nested positive feedback loops in

  6. Condominium Design: Good and Bad Noise Control.

    Hargens, C. W.; Schutz, Victor K.

    This paper discusses pitfalls in condominium design and the incorpoation of related noise control problems into classroom situations. Two case studies are provided, and a list of architectural noise problems found in many condominiums is included. (CP)

  7. Holistic control of ship noise emissions

    Borelli Davide; Gaggero Tomaso; Rizzuto Enrico; Schenone Corrado

    2016-01-01

    The sustainability of anthropogenic activities at sea is recently gaining more and more attention. As regards shipping, emissions from ships into the environment of various nature (engine exhaust gases, anti-fouling paints leaching, ballast exchange, releases at sea of oil and other noxious liquid or solid cargoes, of sewage and of garbage) have been recognized as sources of pollution and therefore controlled and limited since a long time. The subject of noise emission...

  8. Feedback Control for Noise Reduction Program

    Tucker, Jerry H.

    2002-12-01

    As part of Langley Research Center's continuing noise reduction program, an active noise control system (ANC) is being developed to suppress noise inside an aircraft cabin. This interior noise reduction system consists of the following major components: 1. Several accelerometers. 2. An input amplifier. 3. A digital signal processor (DSP) system that includes an analog to digital converter (ADC) and a digital to analog converter (DAC). 4. A high voltage power amplifier. 5. PZT actuators. 6. Power supply and distribution. The accelerometers detect interior panel vibrations. The accelerometer signals are fed to the input amplifier where they are conditioned prior to being sent to the ADC. The DSP receives the digitized signals form the ADC, processes these signals, and sends the result to the DAC. The DAC's analog output is used as input to the high voltage power amplifier. The power amplifier drives the PZT actuators to cancel noise form 50 to 1,300 Hz. The specific area of concern for this work was development of a DSP system that could be used for an actual flight demonstration. It was decided to base the system on a commercially available DSP board, the Spectrum Digital eZdsp. This was complicated by the fact that the ADC and DAC capabilities available on the eZdsp board were not sufficient to meet the system specification. Designing and fabricating a special ADC and DAC daughter card for the eZdsp circumvented this problem. The DSP system hardware has been successfully tested and is currently being integrated into the complete noise reduction system. This work has been completed in collaboration with another ASEE Fellow, Dr.William Edmonson from Hampton University and was conducted under the direction of the principle investigator, Dr. Qamar A. Shams of the Instrumentation Systems Development Branch, as part of a continuing noise reduction program.

  9. Universal control induced by noise

    Arenz, Christian; Burgarth, Daniel; Facchi, Paolo; Giovannetti, Vittorio; Nakazato, Hiromichi; Pascazio, Saverio; Yuasa, Kazuya

    2016-06-01

    On the basis of the quantum Zeno effect, it has been recently shown [D. K. Burgarth et al., Nat. Commun. 5, 5173 (2014), 10.1038/ncomms6173] that a strong-amplitude-damping process applied locally on a part of a quantum system can have a beneficial effect on the dynamics of the remaining part of the system. Quantum operations that cannot be implemented without the dissipation become achievable by the action of the strong dissipative process. Here we generalize this idea by identifying decoherence-free subspaces (DFSs) as the subspaces in which the dynamics becomes more complex. Applying methods from quantum control theory, we characterize the set of reachable operations within the DFSs. We provide three examples that become fully controllable within the DFSs while the control over the original Hilbert space in the absence of dissipation is trivial. In particular, we show that the (classical) Ising Hamiltonian is turned into a Heisenberg Hamiltonian by strong collective decoherence, which provides universal quantum computation within the DFSs. Moreover, we perform numerical gate optimization to study how the process fidelity scales with the noise strength. As a by-product, a subsystem fidelity that can be applied in other optimization problems for open quantum systems is developed.

  10. 单极子声源平面空间有源降噪的最短距离%The Shortest Distance of Monopole Noise Sources in Plat Space under Active Noise Control

    姚加飞; 郭爽

    2014-01-01

    以单极子噪声源与单极子抗噪声源组成的声场为研究对象,得出用单极子抗噪声源控制单极子噪声源,使两声源所在的平面空间内的总声功率最小时两声源本身的声强的关系。并计算空间内任意一点的径向平均有功声强。得出最小径向平均有功声强与声源的频率和两声源的距离有关,在一定频率下,两声源距离越近,控制后的径向平均有功声强越小,距离一定的情况下,频率越小,径向平均有功声强越小。通过仿真实验进行验证,并最终得到某些低频噪声达到全空间消声时噪声源与抗噪声源的最短距离。%This article studies the sound fields of the monopole noise source and monopole anti-noise source. The relationship between the sound intensity of the noise source and the sound intensity of the anti-noise source under the condition of the least sound power in the plat sound field is obtained. In addition, the radial average active sound intensity at any point in the sound field is calculated, which is found to be related to the frequency of the sound source and the distance between the two sources. For a fixed frequency, the radial average active sound intensity decreases with the distance between the two sources increasing after the control. For the fixed distance between the two sources, the radial average active sound intensity decreases with the frequency decreasing after the control. Through the MATLAB simulation, the shortest distance between the noise source and anti-noise source when the sound intensities of some low-frequency noises in the whole space vanish is obtained.

  11. Active Control of Fan Noise: Feasibility Study. Volume 5; Numerical Computation of Acoustic Mode Reflection Coefficients for an Unflanged Cylindrical Duct

    Kraft, R. E.

    1996-01-01

    A computational method to predict modal reflection coefficients in cylindrical ducts has been developed based on the work of Homicz, Lordi, and Rehm, which uses the Wiener-Hopf method to account for the boundary conditions at the termination of a thin cylindrical pipe. The purpose of this study is to develop a computational routine to predict the reflection coefficients of higher order acoustic modes impinging on the unflanged termination of a cylindrical duct. This effort was conducted wider Task Order 5 of the NASA Lewis LET Program, Active Noise Control of aircraft Engines: Feasibility Study, and will be used as part of the development of an integrated source noise, acoustic propagation, ANC actuator coupling, and control system algorithm simulation. The reflection coefficient prediction will be incorporated into an existing cylindrical duct modal analysis to account for the reflection of modes from the duct termination. This will provide a more accurate, rapid computation design tool for evaluating the effect of reflected waves on active noise control systems mounted in the duct, as well as providing a tool for the design of acoustic treatment in inlet ducts. As an active noise control system design tool, the method can be used preliminary to more accurate but more numerically intensive acoustic propagation models such as finite element methods. The resulting computer program has been shown to give reasonable results, some examples of which are presented. Reliable data to use for comparison is scarce, so complete checkout is difficult, and further checkout is needed over a wider range of system parameters. In future efforts the method will be adapted as a subroutine to the GEAE segmented cylindrical duct modal analysis program.

  12. Noise screen for attitude control system

    Rodden, John J. (Inventor); Stevens, Homer D. (Inventor); Hong, David P. (Inventor); Hirschberg, Philip C. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    An attitude control system comprising a controller and a noise screen device coupled to the controller. The controller is adapted to control an attitude of a vehicle carrying an actuator system that is adapted to pulse in metered bursts in order to generate a control torque to control the attitude of the vehicle in response to a control pulse. The noise screen device is adapted to generate a noise screen signal in response to the control pulse that is generated when an input attitude error signal exceeds a predetermined deadband attitude level. The noise screen signal comprises a decaying offset signal that when combined with the attitude error input signal results in a net attitude error input signal away from the predetermined deadband level to reduce further control pulse generation.

  13. Genetic noise control via protein oligomerization

    Almaas Eivind

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene expression in a cell entails random reaction events occurring over disparate time scales. Thus, molecular noise that often results in phenotypic and population-dynamic consequences sets a fundamental limit to biochemical signaling. While there have been numerous studies correlating the architecture of cellular reaction networks with noise tolerance, only a limited effort has been made to understand the dynamic role of protein-protein interactions. Results We have developed a fully stochastic model for the positive feedback control of a single gene, as well as a pair of genes (toggle switch, integrating quantitative results from previous in vivo and in vitro studies. In particular, we explicitly account for the fast binding-unbinding kinetics among proteins, RNA polymerases, and the promoter/operator sequences of DNA. We find that the overall noise-level is reduced and the frequency content of the noise is dramatically shifted to the physiologically irrelevant high-frequency regime in the presence of protein dimerization. This is independent of the choice of monomer or dimer as transcription factor and persists throughout the multiple model topologies considered. For the toggle switch, we additionally find that the presence of a protein dimer, either homodimer or heterodimer, may significantly reduce its random switching rate. Hence, the dimer promotes the robust function of bistable switches by preventing the uninduced (induced state from randomly being induced (uninduced. Conclusion The specific binding between regulatory proteins provides a buffer that may prevent the propagation of fluctuations in genetic activity. The capacity of the buffer is a non-monotonic function of association-dissociation rates. Since the protein oligomerization per se does not require extra protein components to be expressed, it provides a basis for the rapid control of intrinsic or extrinsic noise. The stabilization of regulatory circuits

  14. Traffic noise control of a city

    Long exposure to noise due to traffic affects our health and comfort. A noise level up to 45 dB is acceptable for the buildings in the city. A traffic noise study was conducted in Karachi at places of high traffic flow. The noise level was between 75-85 dB. Residential and commercial buildings had sound level up to 79 dB. Reducing vehicle noise by using proper muffler and acoustic treatment should first control traffic noise. Then noise can be reduced by 10-15 dB by constructing barriers of wood or concrete along roadside. Barrier height for sound attenuation can be found from Fresnel Number. The barrier reduces noise better if width at the top is increased and an inward bend of 60 degree is placed at the top. Where feasible a 4-5 meter high concrete barrier is recommended otherwise the nearby buildings from the road should be insulated and acoustically treated. (author)

  15. Retrofitting reciprocating compressors for noise control

    The Alberta Energy Resources Conservation Board recently enacted their noise control directive ID 88-1. The effects of this regulation on the operation of an oil and gas facility are discussed, and a specific case history is presented to provide a disciplined strategy for noise attenuation retrofits. An investigation was carried out into sound sources at a reciprocating compressor gas plant, revealing several sound sources: engine exhaust stacks, engine exhaust silencer shells, direct-drive fan cooler inlets, direct drive fan cooler outlets, aerial cooler inlets and aerial cooler outlets. Details are presented of the investigative techniques and order-ranking of sources by decibel level. When controlling engine exhaust noise, silencers or mufflers are the preferred treatment. Choice of type (reactive or absorptive) and specification of acoustical performance of a silencer are discussed. The gas plant achieved noise reductions of 6-13 dB, measured at affected residences, through the use of engine exhaust silencers. 4 figs., 2 tabs

  16. Noise control of radiological monitoring equipment

    Although vacuum pumps on continuous air monitors (CAMs) do not produce noise levels above regulatory limits, engineering controls were used to establish a safer work environment. Operations performed in areas where CAMs are located are highly specialized and require precision work when handling nuclear materials, heavy metals, and inert gases. Traditional methods for controlling noise such as enclosing or isolating the source and the use of personal protection equipment were evaluated. An innovative solution was found by retrofitting CAMs with air powered multistage ejectors pumps. By allowing the air to expand in several chambers to create a vacuum, one can eliminate the noise hazard altogether. In facilities with adequate pressurized air, use of these improved ejector pumps may be a cost-effective replacement for noisy vacuum pumps. A workplace designed or engineered with noise levels as low as possible or as close to background adds to increased concentration, attention to detail, and increased production

  17. Measurement and control of occupational noise

    High level of environmental and occupational noise remain a problem all over the world. As problems and complaints increased dramatically by the end of the 19th and beginning of the 20th centuries focusing on the problem was intensified. In this thesis occupational noise levels at different places were measured and compared with the international permissible levels using the integrating sound level meter (Quest 2800). The calibration of the instrument was carried out before and after each measurement using the acoustic calibrator (Quest CA-12B calibrator). The method which was followed was measuring the sound pressure level of the different noise sources over a broad frequency band covering the audible frequency range using the (octave band filter, model OB-100), disregrading variation with time. Since the human ear is most sensitive in the 2-5 khz range of frequencies and least sensitive at extremely high and low frequencies the instrument was adjusted on the A weighting net work which varies with frequencies in a very similar way as that of the human ear. From the obtained results, some noise levels which were recorded were within the permissible levels i.e. below 90 dba and some noise levels were higher than the permissible limit as in janzour textile factory (95 dba), The welding workshop (120 dba), Benghazi Macaroni factory (100 dba), and near the air blowers at Zletin cement factory, Benghazi cement factory (97-10-dba) in these cases suggestions were made to minimize the problem. Concerning the noise control, four methods of noise control were tested, these methods were: reducing noise by sound absorbing material at Sirt local broadcasting radio, reducing noise by keeping a distance from the noise source, at the Boilers hall at REWDC, reducing noise by enclosures, at the compressors room at Zletin cement factory, and finally reducing noise by performing regular maintenance at Garabolli photo development centre. The percentage of noise reduction was 21%, 12

  18. Residential Noise Control Requirements for Powerline Communications Channel

    Guillen, Edward; Lopez, Julian; Padilla, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Noises on powerline communication channels such as coloured noise, narrow band noise, periodic impulsive noise and asynchronous impulsive noise affect PLC network throughput. However, these noises can be successfully controlled by band-pass and bandstop filters installed on strategic PLC network connection points. It's necessary to establish a model to probe if the noise measurements on this work can be applied on industrial environments and if the noise can affect PLC networks installed on n...

  19. A case study, noise control for a low frequency noise compliance situation

    Farquharson, James; Parent, Michel [CET FDI Acoustics Inc. (Canada)], email: jamesf@fdiacoustics.com, email: mitchp@fdiacoustics.com

    2011-07-01

    The current version of the energy resources conservation board (ERCB) Directive 038: noise control, has recently been modified to include assessment and regulation of low frequency noise. This has led to additional concerns and considerations in noise control measurement. This paper examines a specific example and introduces the low frequency noise assessment and consequent development of noise control measures. Prior to the new Directive 038 regulation, noise compliance in industrial facilities was determined by demonstrating that the sound level in residential areas was beneath a certain threshold, the permissible sound level, fixed by the ERCB. Noise mitigation measures aimed to reduce noise to a point where the overall sound level was below this threshold. With the introduction of low frequency noise considerations, industrials must take into account tonal noise in the low frequency spectrum, using A and C-weighted noise measurements, and third octave band frequency tones, resulting in a new approach for noise control development.

  20. Noise Control and Noise Evaluation in Aircraft Engines

    石井, 達哉; Ishii, Tatsuya

    2002-01-01

    Aircraft engine noise emitted for example by the jet exhaust, fan, compressor, turbine and combustor is the predominant factor in total aircraft noise during take-off and landing. As a result of enormous efforts to alleviate engine noise, noise levels have been improved by more than 20 dB compared to the first generation of airliners. However, the growing volume of air transport means that further noise reduction is still required. With this background, we decided to concentrate on two techni...

  1. Noise-control needs in the developing energy technologies

    Keast, D.N.

    1978-03-01

    The noise characteristics of existing energy conversion technologies, e.g., from obtaining and processing fossil fuels to power plants operations, and of developing energy technologies (wind, geothermal sources, solar energy or fusion systems) are discussed in terms of the effects of noise on humans, animals, structures, and equipment and methods for noise control. Regulations for noise control are described. Recommendations are made for further research on noise control and noise effects. (LCL)

  2. The Traffic Noise Index: A Method of Controlling Noise Nuisance.

    Langdon, F. J.; Scholes, W. E.

    This building research survey is an analysis of the social nuisance caused by urban motor ways and their noise. The Traffic Noise Index is used to indicate traffic noises and their effects on architectural designs and planning, while suggesting the need for more and better window insulation and acoustical barriers. Overall concern is for--(1)…

  3. Noise Pollution Control System in the Hospital Environment

    Figueroa Gallo, LM; Olivera, JM

    2016-04-01

    Problems related to environmental noise are not a new subject, but they became a major issue to solve because of the increasing, in complexity and intensity, of human activities due technological advances. Numerous international studies had dealt with the exposure of critical patients to noisy environment such as the Neonatal Intensive Care Units; their results show that there are difficulties in the organization in the developing brain, it can damage the delicate auditory structures and can cause biorhythm disorders, specially in preterm infants. The objective of this paper is to present the development and implementation of a control system that includes technical-management-training aspects to regulate the levels of specific noise sources in the neonatal hospitalization environment. For this purpose, there were applied different tools like: observations, surveys, procedures, an electronic control device and a training program for a Neonatal Service Unit. As a result, all noise sources were identified -some of them are eliminable-; all the service stable staff categories participated voluntarily; environmental noise measurements yielded values between 62.5 and 64.6 dBA and maximum were between 86.1 and 89.7 dBA; it was designed and installed a noise control device and the staff is being trained in noise reduction best practices.

  4. Structural Acoustic Prediction and Interior Noise Control Technology

    Mathur, G. P.; Chin, C. L.; Simpson, M. A.; Lee, J. T.; Palumbo, Daniel L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This report documents the results of Task 14, "Structural Acoustic Prediction and Interior Noise Control Technology". The task was to evaluate the performance of tuned foam elements (termed Smart Foam) both analytically and experimentally. Results taken from a three-dimensional finite element model of an active, tuned foam element are presented. Measurements of sound absorption and sound transmission loss were taken using the model. These results agree well with published data. Experimental performance data were taken in Boeing's Interior Noise Test Facility where 12 smart foam elements were applied to a 757 sidewall. Several configurations were tested. Noise reductions of 5-10 dB were achieved over the 200-800 Hz bandwidth of the controller. Accelerometers mounted on the panel provided a good reference for the controller. Configurations with far-field error microphones outperformed near-field cases.

  5. Modern Approach in Management and Noise Control in Urban Areas

    Hadzi-Nikolova, Marija

    2013-01-01

    PhD thesis presents identification and analysis of noise sources in the city of Stip (as a representative for a small urban center with a dynamic development, whose noise dispersion model can be applied in other similar urban centers). Methodology for modern technologies application in management and noise control in urban areas is developed based on generated noise maps and conflicting noise maps. For this porpose, two-year noise level monitoring on strategic measurement points was performed...

  6. Noise transmission properties and control strategies for composite structures

    Silcox, Richard J.; Beyer, Todd B.; Lester, Harold C.

    1991-01-01

    A study of several component technologies required to apply active control techniques to reduce interior noise in composite aircraft structures is described. The mechanisms of noise transmission in an all composite, large-scale, fuselage model are studied in an experimental program and found similar to mechanisms found in conventional aircraft construction. Two primary conditions of structural acoustic response are found to account for the dominant interior acoustic response. A preliminary study of active noise control in cylinders used piezoceramic actuators as force inputs for a simple aluminum fuselage model. These actuators provided effective control for the same two conditions of noise transmission found in the composite fuselage structure. The use of piezoceramic actuators to apply force inputs overcomes the weight and structural requirements of conventional shaker actuators. Finally, in order to accurately simulate these types of actuators in a cylindrical shell, two analytical models are investigated that apply either in-plane forces or bending moments along the boundaries of a finite patch. It is shown that the bending model may not be as effective as the force model for exciting the low order azimuthal modes that typically dominate the structural acoustic response in these systems. This result will affect the arrangement and distribution of actuators required for effective active control systems.

  7. Noise control technology for generator sets in enclosures

    Nailong ZHANG; Wentong YANG; Renyuan FEI

    2008-01-01

    Currently, noise pollution is an environmental problem all over the world. The health and life of human beings are affected by loud noise from high power gen-erator sets. To reduce such noise, a sound-attenuated enclosure is widely used for its high performance and con-venient usage. By installing equipment in an enclosure, noise is controlled and prevented from radiating. In this paper, noise control techniques for enclosures are pre-sented. Enclosure development trends are predicted.

  8. Research on the application of active sound barriers for the transformer noise abatement

    Hu Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sound barriers are a type of measure most commonly used in the noise abatement of transformers. In the noise abatement project of substations, the design of sound barriers is restrained by the portal frames which are used to hold up outgoing lines from the main transformers, which impacts the noise reduction effect. If active sound barriers are utilized in these places, the noise diffraction of sound barriers can be effectively reduced. At a 110kV Substation, an experiment using a 15-channel active sound barrier has been carried out. The result of the experiment shows that the mean noise reduction value (MNRV of the noise measuring points at the substation boundary are 1.5 dB (A. The effect of the active noise control system is impacted by the layout of the active noise control system, the acoustic environment on site and the spectral characteristic of the target area.

  9. Active noise cancellation in hearing devices

    2013-01-01

    Disclosed is a hearing device system comprising at least one hearing aid circuitry and at least one active noise cancellation unit, the at least one hearing aid circuitry comprises at least one input transducer adapted to convert a first audio signal to an electric audio signal; a signal processor...... connected to the at least one input transducer and adapted to process said electric audio signal by at least partially correcting for a hearing loss of a user; an output transducer adapted to generate from at least said processed electric audio signal a sound pressure in an ear canal of the user, whereby...... addition to said generated sound pressure, wherein the hearing device system further comprises a combiner unit adapted to combine the processed electric audio signal with the active noise cancellation signal, to obtain a combined signal and to provide the combined signal to the output transducer....

  10. Infinite non-causality in active cancellation of random noise

    Friot, E

    2005-01-01

    Active cancellation of broadband random noise requires the detection of the incoming noise with some time advance. In an duct for example this advance must be larger than the delays in the secondary path from the control source to the error sensor. In this paper it is shown that, in some cases, the advance required for perfect noise cancellation is theoretically infinite because the inverse of the secondary path, which is required for control, can include an infinite non-causal response. This is shown to be the result of two mechanisms: in the single-channel case (one control source and one error sensor), this can arise because of strong echoes in the control path. In the multi-channel case this can arise even in free field simply because of an unfortunate placing of sensors and actuators. In the present paper optimal feedforward control is derived through analytical and numerical computations, in the time and frequency domains. It is shown that, in practice, the advance required for significant noise attenua...

  11. The Feasibility of Noise Control in a Soft Drink Plant

    Fouladi Dehaghi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background “Noise” can be defined as any unwanted sound. Soft drink plants, which produce the raw materials used in most carbonated beverage factories, are sources of noise. Objectives This study investigated the noise pollution present in a soft drink CO2 gas injection plant, in order to present noise control measures. Materials and Methods The instructions specified by the canadian center for occupational health and safety (CCOHS were followed during the noise study, and a sound level meter, CEL.450 calibrated with CEL-110.2 based on ISO-9612 methods, was used to record the sound pressure level (SPL at each grid point. SPL was determined in weighting scales A and C. and a noise survey map of equivalent SPLs was drawn for each part. Each part of the floor area of the soft drink factory where SPL exceeded 85 dBA was identified from the noise survey map to determine the causes of high levels of noise. In order to reduce noise level in each part, the absorption coefficient, transmission loss, and noise reduction rate were calculated in the proposed control area. Results According to the study results, noise levels in a CO2 plant’s house and control room ranged from 88 to 102 dB and 79 to 82 dB (A, respectively. In order to reduce the amount of emitted noise in the CO2 plant house and control room, a noise control plan was implemented in each part of the facility; it was met with effective results. Conclusions The findings of this investigation have clearly revealed that plant workers are at risk of developing noise-induced hearing loss. However, after the implementation of a noise control plan in each part of the facility, the noise dose received by workers has significantly decreased. The need to implement a noise conservation program was established.

  12. Design and Simulation of Adaptive Active Noise Control System for Aircraft Helmet%飞行头盔主动噪声控制系统的设计及仿真研究

    唐红; 王明皓; 吴凤霞

    2011-01-01

    Aiming at solving low frequency noise existing in cockpit,a design for adaptive active noise control system of aircraft helmet is proposed. Based on it,the filtered-XLMS algoritbm is simulated and analysed using MATLAB.The result shows that the effect of reducing aircraft noise on low frequency is very satisfactory with the scheme.%针对飞机驾驶舱内存在着大量的低频噪声,提出一种应用于飞行员头盔的自适应有源噪声控制系统设计方案,并在此基础上,利用MATLAB对FXLMS算法进行了仿真和性能分析。结果表明,此方案对飞机噪声低频段具有很好的降噪效果。

  13. Active compressor engine silencer reduces exhaust noise

    An active industrial silencer on a compressor engine at a Tenneco Gas station has reduced low-frequency 'rumbling' noise by 8 dB during trials while lowering backpressure about 90$. This 8 dB reduction of the piston firing frequency corresponds to a more than 80% decrease in emitted acoustic power. The silencing unit, installed on one of six engines at the station near Eden, N.Y., continues in operation. Based on the results, the manufacturer is identifying additional compressor sites for further tests. This paper reviews this project

  14. Research on Noise Control for Ventilators with Resonance

    2006-01-01

    A study was carried out to control the noise produced by the ventilators at the Luling coalmine, which had caused serious noise pollution to the residents living around the mine for a long time. The main noise source was found to be the dynamic noise at the outlet of the diffuser. The frequency of its peak value was 250 Hz. A special brick with a resonant frequency of 250 Hz was designed to eliminate this noise. The diffusion of a lower frequency noise has been successfully controlled by the installation of a noise-eliminating tower above the diffuser outlet. The detection results show that the noise in the nearby residential area has been lowered to an average 55.3dB(A) in the daytime from 69.8dB(A) and to 48.4dB(A) at night from 65.8dB(A).

  15. A Calculation of hydrodynamic noise of control valve on instrumentation and control system using smart plant

    It has been calculated characteristics of the control valve Instrumentation and Control Systems using Smart Plant software. This calculation is done in order to control the valve that will be installed as part of the instrumentation and control systems to provide the performance according to the design. The characteristics that have been calculated are Reynolds number factors which are related to the flow regime in the valve. Critical pressure factor, Valve Hydrodynamic cavitation and noise index. In this paper the discussion will be limited to matters relating to Hydrodynamic noise generation process using model of the instrumentation and control system in the plant design in yellow cake PIPKPP activities in 2012. The results of the calculation of the noise on the valves design are in the range between 9.58~70.1 dBA. (author)

  16. Compressor noise control begins with design--Part 1

    This paper describes the typical methods used by oil and gas pipeline companies to reduce the noise level associated with their pump and compressor stations. The common method is for the design engineer to specify an acceptable noise level at a specified distance. Unfortunately, the results by this method are rarely acceptable because vendors have not considered the effects of sound propagation outside the station, the owners have not considered the cumulative effect of various machinery, and there is little methodology available to distinguish the individual components which might be contributing the acoustically unacceptable noise levels in a multi-component system. This article stresses balanced noise control designs using noise control engineering

  17. Air injection vacuum blower noise control

    Mose, Tyler L.A.; Faszer, Andrew C. [Noise Solutions Inc. (Canada)], email: tmose@noisesolutions.com, email: afaszer@noisesolutions.com

    2011-07-01

    Air injection vacuum blowers, with applications in waste removal, central vacuum systems, and aeration systems, are widely used when high vacuum levels are required. Noise generated by those blowers must be addressed for operator health and residential disturbance. This paper describes a project led by Noise Solutions Inc., to identify noise sources in a blower, and design and test a noise mitigation system. First the predominant noise sources in the blower must be determined, this is done with a sound level meter used to quantify the contribution of each individual noise source and the dominant tonal noise from the blower. Design of a noise abatement system must take into account constraints arising from blower mobile use, blower optimal performance, and the resulting overall vibration of the structure. The design was based on calculations from the sound attenuation of a reactive expansion chamber and two prototypes of custom silencers were then tested, showing a significant noise reduction both in total sound levels and tonal noise.

  18. Perforated fairings for landing gear noise control

    Boorsma, K.; Zhang, X; Molin, N.

    2008-01-01

    Landing gears of commercial aircraft make an important contribution to total aircraft noise in the approach configuration. Using fairings to shield components from high speed impingement reduces noise. Furthermore, perforating these fairings has been confirmed by flight tests to further enable noise reduction. Following a more fundamental study on the application of perforated fairings, a study has been performed to investigate and optimize the benefits of bleeding air through landing gear fa...

  19. Noise and control decoupling of Advanced LIGO suspensions

    Ground-based interferometric gravitational wave observatories such as Advanced LIGO must isolate their optics from ground vibrations with suspension systems to meet their stringent noise requirements. These suspensions typically have very high quality-factor resonances that require active damping. The sensor noise associated with this damping is a potential significant contributor to the sensitivity of these interferometers. This paper introduces a novel scheme for suspension damping that isolates much of this noise and permits greater amounts of damping. It also decouples the damping feedback design from the interferometer control. The scheme works by invoking a change from a local coordinate frame associated with each suspension, to a coordinate frame aligned with the interferometric readout. In this way, degrees of freedom invisible to the readout can employ effective, but noisy damping. The degree of freedom measured by the readout is then damped using low noise interferometer signals, eliminating the need to use the usual noisy sensors. Simulated and experimental results validate the concepts presented in this paper. (paper)

  20. Control source development for reduction of noise transmitted through a double panel structure

    Ho, Jen-Hsuan

    2014-01-01

    A double panel structure, which consists of two panels with air in between, is widely adopted in many applications such as aerospace, automotive industries, and buildings due to its low sound transmission at high frequencies, low heat transmission, and low weight. Nevertheless, the resonance of the cavity and the poor sound transmission loss at low frequencies limit the double panel’s noise control performance. Applying active structural acoustic control to the panels or active noise control ...

  1. Quality control in digital mammography: the noise components

    Leyton, Fernando [Universidade de Tarapaca, Arica (Chile). Centro de Estudios en Ciencias Radiologicas; Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Nogueira, Maria do Socorro, E-mail: mnogue@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Duran, Maria Paz [Clinica Alemana, Santiago (Chile). Dept. de Radiologia; Dantas, Marcelino, E-mail: marcelino@inb.gov.b [Industrias Nucleares do Brasil (INB), Caldas, MG (Brazil). Unidade de Tratamento de Minerios; Ubeda, Carlos, E-mail: cubeda@uta.c [Universidade de Tarapaca, Arica (Chile). Fac. de Ciencias de la Salud

    2011-07-01

    To measure the linearity of the detector and determine the noise components (quantum, electronic and structural noise) that contributed to losing image quality and to determine the signal noise ratio (SNR) and contrast noise ratio (CNR). This paper describes the results of the implementation of a protocol for quality control in digital mammography performed in two direct digital mammography equipment (Hologic, Selenia) in Santiago of Chile. Shows the results of linearity and noise analysis of the images which establishes the main cause of noise in the image of the mammogram to ensure the quality and optimize procedures. The study evaluated two digital mammography's Selenia, Hologic (DR) from Santiago, Chile. We conducted the assessment of linearity of the detector, the signal noise ratio, contrast noise ratio and was determined the contribution of different noise components (quantum, electronics and structural noise). Used different thicknesses used in clinical practice according to the protocol for quality control in digital mammography of Spanish society of medical physics and NHSBSP Equipment Report 0604 Version 3. The Selenia mammography software was used for the analysis of images and Unfors Xi detector for measuring doses. The mammography detector has a linear performance, the CNR and SNR did not comply with the Protocol for the thicknesses of 60 and 70 mm. The main contribution of the noise corresponds to the quantum noise, therefore it is necessary to adjust and optimize the mammography system. (author)

  2. External noise control in inherently stochastic biological systems.

    Zheng, Likun; Chen, Meng; Nie, Qing

    2012-11-01

    Biological systems are often subject to external noise from signal stimuli and environmental perturbations, as well as noises in the intracellular signal transduction pathway. Can different stochastic fluctuations interact to give rise to new emerging behaviors? How can a system reduce noise effects while still being capable of detecting changes in the input signal? Here, we study analytically and computationally the role of nonlinear feedback systems in controlling external noise with the presence of large internal noise. In addition to noise attenuation, we analyze derivatives of Fano factor to study systems' capability of differentiating signal inputs. We find effects of internal noise and external noise may be separated in one slow positive feedback loop system; in particular, the slow loop can decrease external noise and increase robustness of signaling with respect to fluctuations in rate constants, while maintaining the signal output specific to the input. For two feedback loops, we demonstrate that the influence of external noise mainly depends on how the fast loop responds to fluctuations in the input and the slow loop plays a limited role in determining the signal precision. Furthermore, in a dual loop system of one positive feedback and one negative feedback, a slower positive feedback always leads to better noise attenuation; in contrast, a slower negative feedback may not be more beneficial. Our results reveal interesting stochastic effects for systems containing both extrinsic and intrinsic noises, suggesting novel noise filtering strategies in inherently stochastic systems. PMID:23213267

  3. Flow and Noise Control: Review and Assessment of Future Directions

    Thomas, Russell H.; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Joslin, Ronald D.

    2002-01-01

    Technologies for developing radically new aerovehicles that would combine quantum leaps in cost, safety, and performance benefits with environmental friendliness have appeared on the horizon. This report provides both an assessment of the current state-of-the-art in flow and noise control and a vision for the potential gains to be made, in terms of performance benefit for civil and military aircraft and a unique potential for noise reduction, via future advances in flow and noise technologies. This report outlines specific areas of research that will enable the breakthroughs necessary to bring this vision to reality. Recent developments in many topics within flow and noise control are reviewed. The flow control overview provides succinct summaries of various approaches for drag reduction and improved maneuvering. Both exterior and interior noise problems are examined, including dominant noise sources, physics of noise generation and propagation, and both established and proposed concepts for noise reduction. Synergy between flow and noise control is a focus and, more broadly, the need to pursue research in a more concurrent approach involving multiple disciplines. Also discussed are emerging technologies such as nanotechnology that may have a significant impact on the progress of flow and noise control.

  4. 螺桨飞机舱内噪声地面模拟及其主动控制%Ground-simulation of Propeller Induced Airplane Cabin Noise and Its Active Control

    吴亚锋; 李江红; 戴杏珍

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents the analogized methods and the active controlexperiments of the cabin noise for a propeller airplane.In a Y7 test airplane,the cabin noise is analogized by an exciter to structure-borne noise and by a loudspeaker to air-borne noise.A multi-channel adaptive control system is developed and used to attenuate the analogized noise field and satisfied results are obtained in the controlled area.%本文介绍螺桨飞机舱内噪声的地面模拟方法和主动控制实验。在一架运七试验机上,激振器和扬声器分别被用来模拟由螺桨旋转在舱内引起的结构和气动噪声。一个多通道自适应控制系统被应用于该模拟声场的主动控制实验,并在控制区域取得了满意的降噪效果。

  5. Danish activities concerning noise in the environment (A)

    Ingerslev, Fritz

    The paper describes the administrative activities and the distribution between federal and local authorities. The importance of having a federal agency with highly qualified employees who can establish a superior national noise abatement strategy is stressed. The federal authority should represent...... the country in international collaboration. It is claimed that noise abatement will be diffuse and weak, if it is not based on a national strategy. The discussion of noise in the environment covers: external industrial noise, road traffic noise, and air traffic noise. The principles on which the...

  6. Cost effective noise control in the oil and gas industry

    Meredith, Dave [Kinetics Noise Control Inc. (United States)], email: dmeredith@kineticsnoise.com

    2011-07-01

    Infrastructures in the oil and gas industry are often sources of excessive noise and vibration. This paper focuses on the work of Kinetics Noise Control, Inc. (KNC), an independent consulting firm specialized in corrective noise and vibration control products, to ensure that their clients' operations meet government and industry regulations. Using examples of different projects that KNC has been involved with in the oil and gas industry, the author presents new designs and approaches for reducing noise pollution. Noise and vibration control strategy should be integral parts of the concept design phase and aim at meeting regulatory requirements without loss of overall efficiency. To do this, specific elements, such as an extensive analysis of noise and vibration sources, site environmental conditions, the acoustics of the infrastructures, and of the materials used must be taken into account.

  7. Hybrid Active/Passive Jet Engine Noise Suppression System

    Parente, C. A.; Arcas, N.; Walker, B. E.; Hersh, A. S.; Rice, E. J.

    1999-01-01

    A novel adaptive segmented liner concept has been developed that employs active control elements to modify the in-duct sound field to enhance the tone-suppressing performance of passive liner elements. This could potentially allow engine designs that inherently produce more tone noise but less broadband noise, or could allow passive liner designs to more optimally address high frequency broadband noise. A proof-of-concept validation program was undertaken, consisting of the development of an adaptive segmented liner that would maximize attenuation of two radial modes in a circular or annular duct. The liner consisted of a leading active segment with dual annuli of axially spaced active Helmholtz resonators, followed by an optimized passive liner and then an array of sensing microphones. Three successively complex versions of the adaptive liner were constructed and their performances tested relative to the performance of optimized uniform passive and segmented passive liners. The salient results of the tests were: The adaptive segmented liner performed well in a high flow speed model fan inlet environment, was successfully scaled to a high sound frequency and successfully attenuated three radial modes using sensor and active resonator arrays that were designed for a two mode, lower frequency environment.

  8. Stability of Controlled Hamilton Systems Excited by Gaussian White Noise

    SHANG Mei; GUO Yong-xin; MEI Feng-xiang

    2008-01-01

    A new method is introduced in this paper. This method can be used to study the stability of controlled holonomic Hamilton systems under disturbance of Gaussian white noise. At first, the motion equation of controlled holonomic Hamilton systems excited by Gaussian noise is formulated. A theory to stabilize the system is provided. Finally, one example is given to illustrate the application procedures.

  9. Adaptive Intelligent Ventilation Noise Control Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To address the NASA need for quiet on-orbit crew quarters (CQ), Physical Optics Corporation (POC) proposes to develop a new Adaptive Intelligent Ventilation Noise...

  10. Adaptive Intelligent Ventilation Noise Control Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To address NASA needs for quiet crew volumes in a space habitat, Physical Optics Corporation (POC) proposes to develop a new Adaptive Intelligent Ventilation Noise...

  11. Hybrid Feedforward-Feedback Noise Control Using Virtual Sensors

    Bean, Jacob; Fuller, Chris; Schiller, Noah

    2016-01-01

    Several approaches to active noise control using virtual sensors are evaluated for eventual use in an active headrest. Specifically, adaptive feedforward, feedback, and hybrid control structures are compared. Each controller incorporates the traditional filtered-x least mean squares algorithm. The feedback controller is arranged in an internal model configuration to draw comparisons with standard feedforward control theory results. Simulation and experimental results are presented that illustrate each controllers ability to minimize the pressure at both physical and virtual microphone locations. The remote microphone technique is used to obtain pressure estimates at the virtual locations. It is shown that a hybrid controller offers performance benefits over the traditional feedforward and feedback controllers. Stability issues associated with feedback and hybrid controllers are also addressed. Experimental results show that 15-20 dB reduction in broadband disturbances can be achieved by minimizing the measured pressure, whereas 10-15 dB reduction is obtained when minimizing the estimated pressure at a virtual location.

  12. Aeroacoustics of Flight Vehicles: Theory and Practice. Volume 2: Noise Control

    Hubbard, Harvey H. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    Flight vehicles and the underlying concepts of noise generation, noise propagation, noise prediction, and noise control are studied. This volume includes those chapters that relate to flight vehicle noise control and operations: human response to aircraft noise; atmospheric propagation; theoretical models for duct acoustic propagation and radiation; design and performance of duct acoustic treatment; jet noise suppression; interior noise; flyover noise measurement and prediction; and quiet aircraft design and operational characteristics.

  13. Barkhausen noise sensor with direct field control

    Stupakov, Oleksandr

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 1 (2013), s. 209-212. ISSN 1546-198X R&D Projects: GA ČR GP102/09/P108 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : Barkhausen noise * field measurement * magnetic non-destructive testing Subject RIV: JB - Sensor s, Measurment, Regulation Impact factor: 0.558, year: 2013

  14. Application of an active device for helicopter noise reduction in JAXA

    Important issues in noise problems for current helicopters are described. An active tab (AT) was developed as a new active device for noise/vibration reduction under research cooperation between Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and Kawada Industries, Inc. The wind tunnel test was conducted in order to investigate the effectiveness of the AT on the aeroacoustic characteristics of a helicopter. From the wind tunnel test, the capability of reducing blade vortex interaction (BVI) noise by an AT was verified. A new control law using instantaneous pressure change on a blade during BVI phenomena was introduced and applied to the wind tunnel testing. This new control law shows reasonable controllability for helicopter noise reduction. Furthermore, in order to analyze noise characteristics, the advanced computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code named JAXAov3d was developed in JAXA and extended to include CFD-CSD (computational structure dynamics) coupling by using the beam theory for blade deformation. (invited paper)

  15. INVITED PAPER: Application of an active device for helicopter noise reduction in JAXA

    Saito, Shigeru; Kobiki, Noboru; Tanabe, Yasutada

    2010-02-01

    Important issues in noise problems for current helicopters are described. An active tab (AT) was developed as a new active device for noise/vibration reduction under research cooperation between Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and Kawada Industries, Inc. The wind tunnel test was conducted in order to investigate the effectiveness of the AT on the aeroacoustic characteristics of a helicopter. From the wind tunnel test, the capability of reducing blade vortex interaction (BVI) noise by an AT was verified. A new control law using instantaneous pressure change on a blade during BVI phenomena was introduced and applied to the wind tunnel testing. This new control law shows reasonable controllability for helicopter noise reduction. Furthermore, in order to analyze noise characteristics, the advanced computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code named JAXA_ov3d was developed in JAXA and extended to include CFD-CSD (computational structure dynamics) coupling by using the beam theory for blade deformation.

  16. Application of an active device for helicopter noise reduction in JAXA

    Saito, Shigeru; Kobiki, Noboru; Tanabe, Yasutada [Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), 7-44-1 Jindaiji Higashi-machi, Chofu, Tokyo 182-8522 (Japan)], E-mail: ssaito@chofu.jaxa.jp

    2010-02-15

    Important issues in noise problems for current helicopters are described. An active tab (AT) was developed as a new active device for noise/vibration reduction under research cooperation between Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and Kawada Industries, Inc. The wind tunnel test was conducted in order to investigate the effectiveness of the AT on the aeroacoustic characteristics of a helicopter. From the wind tunnel test, the capability of reducing blade vortex interaction (BVI) noise by an AT was verified. A new control law using instantaneous pressure change on a blade during BVI phenomena was introduced and applied to the wind tunnel testing. This new control law shows reasonable controllability for helicopter noise reduction. Furthermore, in order to analyze noise characteristics, the advanced computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code named JAXA{sub o}v3d was developed in JAXA and extended to include CFD-CSD (computational structure dynamics) coupling by using the beam theory for blade deformation. (invited paper)

  17. Effect of individual blade control on noise radiation

    Swanson, S. M.; Jacklin, Stephen A.; Niesl, G.; Blaas, Achim; Kube, R.

    1995-01-01

    In a joint research program of NASA Ames Research Center, ZF Luftfahrttechnik, the German Aerospace Research Establishment (DLR), and EUROCOPTER Deutschland, a wind tunnel test was performed to evaluate the effects of Individual Blade Control (IBC) on rotor noise. This test was conducted in the 40x80 ft wind tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center, utilizing a full scale MBB-BO 105 four-bladed rotor system. Three microphones were installed for determination of the radiated noise, two of them on a moveable traverse below the advancing blade side and one in a fixed location below the retreating side. Acoustic results are presented for flight conditions with Blade-Vortex-Interaction (BVI) noise radiation. High noise level reductions were measured for single harmonic control inputs. In addition to the single harmonic inputs, multi-harmonic inputs were evaluated by superimposing 2/rev to 6/rev harmonics. For the first time the efficiency of sharp wavelets (60 deg and 90 deg width) on acoustic noise were measured. In order to achieve an adequate wavelet shape at the blade tip, corrections were made to account for the blade torsional behavior. In parallel with the acoustic measurements, vibratory loads were measured during the BVI flight condition to correlate the effects of IBC on noise and vibrations. It is shown how noise levels and vibrations are affected by specific IBC control inputs. In addition, correlations are made between noise levels and acoustic time histories with IBC phase and amplitude variations. For one IBC input mode with high noise reducing efficiency, a sweep of the moveable microphone traverse below the advancing side shows the effect on BVI noise directivity.

  18. Inter-noise 85; Proceedings of the Fourteenth International Conference on Noise Control Engineering, Munich, West Germany, September 18-20, 1985. Volumes 1 & 2

    Various papers on the problem of noise are presented. The general topics addressed include: sources of noise emission; physical phenomena associated with noise; noise control elements; and the generation, transmission, isolation, and reduction of vibrations. Individual subjects discussed include: regulation and technical standards of noise control; noise-induced health disturbances; principles of machine noise reduction; characteristics and prediction of factory sound propagation; reduction of structure-borne noise; noise prediction and planning; noise emission data of machines and equipment; noise emission from road vehicles; noise from general aviation aircraft; noise emission from jet aircraft during takeoff; damping and acoustical radiation efficiency of carbon fiber-reinforced carbon epoxy plates.

  19. Compressor noise control begins with design--Part 2

    Reduction of noise pollution at gas compressor stations associated with natural gas pipelines and distribution systems, has long been a complex problem. Specified noise levels of individual components tell nothing of the overall system when it is installed and placed in a site-specific setting. Further, testing for compliance performance guarantees is virtually impossible to conduct at a distant location because one cannot distinguish among various contributing noise sources. This paper develops a plan for calculating an estimate of sound generation from a compressor station and the methods for controlling and measuring sounds of individual components. It also classifies the types of noise and gives various methods of dealing with each noise type

  20. Control Quality of a Feedback Control System under Cyclostationary Noise in Power Line Communication

    Carrizo, Cesar; Kobayashi, Kentaro; Okada, Hiraku; Katayama, Masaaki

    This paper discusses a control system that employs a power line to transfer signals to control the motion of a single machine, and explores the influence of packet losses on the quality of the control. As an example of a controlled system, a controller with a rotary inverted pendulum as a controlled object, is considered. The feedback loop in between is the power line. The control performance is evaluated in the power line cyclostationary noise environment and compared against the performance in a stationary noise environment. As a result, it is confirmed that the power line and its cyclostationary noise features present an advantage against transmission in a channel with stationary noise.

  1. Environmental noise alters gastric myoelectrical activity: Effect of age

    James S Castle; Jin-Hong Xing; Mark R Warner; Mark A Korsten

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of age and acoustic stress on gastric myoelectrical activity (GMA) and autonomic nervous system function,METHODS: Twenty-one male subjects (age range 22-71years, mean 44 years) were recruited and exposed, in random order, to three auditory stimuli (Hospital noise,conversation babble and traffic noise) after a 20-min baseline. All periods lasted 20 min and were interspersed with a 10 min of recovery. GMA was obtained using a Synectics Microdigitrapper. Autonomic nerve function was assessed by monitoring blood pressure and heart rate using an automatic recording device.RESULTS: Dominant power tended to decrease with increase of age (P<0.05). The overall percentage of three cycle per minute (CPM) activity decreased during exposure to hospital noise (12.0%, P < 0.05), traffic noise (13.9%, P < 0.05), and conversation babble(7.1%). The subjects in the younger group (< 50 years)showed a consistent reduction in the percentage of 3CPM activity during hospital noise (22.9%, P < 0.05),traffic noise (19.0%, P < 0.05), and conversation babble(15.5%). These observations were accompanied by a significant increase in bradygastria: hospital noise (P< 0.05) and traffic noise (P < 0.05). In contrast, the subjects over 50 years of age did not exhibit a significant decrease in 3 CPM activity. Regardless of age, noise did not alter blood pressure or heart rate.CONCLUSION: GMA changes with age. Loud noise can alter GMA, especially in younger individuals. Our data indicate that even short-term exposure to noise may alter the contractility of the stomach.

  2. Legal and planning framework for the control of noise emissions

    An examination of the statutory basis for the control of noise emissions is presented. Principal pieces of United Kingdom legislation and some advisory notes have been produced within 6 extensive appendices. The paper briefly examines the controls in other EC countries before discussing the way in which planning controls in the United Kingdom relate to the jurisdiction of the court. (author)

  3. Legal and planning framework for the control of noise emissions

    An examination is offered of the statutory basis for the control of noise emissions. Principal pieces of legislation and some advisory notes have been produced within appendices. The paper briefly examines the controls in other EC countries before discussing the way in which planning controls relate to the jurisdiction of the court. (author)

  4. Noise, Worker Perception, and Worker Concentration in Timber Harvesting Activity

    Efi Yuliati Yovi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Timber harvesting activities are unquestionably related with high risk of work accidents and health disorders.Such activities were not only burdened the workers with heavy physical workloads due to uneasy workingenvironment, and massive work materials and tools, but also physiopsychologically burdened workers as theywere imposed with both mechanical and acoustic vibrations (noise produced by the chainsaw. However,  it is acommon practice that most of the workers still ignored the importance of the use of noise reduction devices suchas earmuff or ear plug.  This study was aimed to reveal the factual effects of noise on work concentration of theworkers to provide a scientific basis in supporting efforts in improving workers’ attitude.  The results confirmedthat chainsaw might produce noise during operation.  Noise intensities received by both right and left ears werenot significantly different, indicating that left-handed and normal workers received similar degree of noise inboth side of ears. Further, results also showed that there was a significant difference on the perception and workconcentration of chainsaw operators versus sedentary people to the noise.  These findings proved that hearingability of chainsaw operators had declined due to frequent noise exposure.Keywords: timber harvesting, physio-psychological disorder, noise, chainsaw

  5. Inter-noise 89 - Engineering for environmental noise control; Proceedings of the International Conference on Noise Control Engineering, Newport Beach, CA, Dec. 4-6, 1989. Vols. 1 & 2

    Maling, George C., Jr.

    Recent advances in noise analysis and control theory and technology are discussed in reviews and reports. Topics addressed include noise generation; sound-wave propagation; noise control by external treatments; vibration and shock generation, transmission, isolation, and reduction; multiple sources and paths of environmental noise; noise perception and the physiological and psychological effects of noise; instrumentation, signal processing, and analysis techniques; and noise standards and legal aspects. Diagrams, drawings, graphs, photographs, and tables of numerical data are provided.

  6. Performance Analysis of Transfer function Based Active Noise Cancellation Method Using Evolutionary Algorithm

    Prof. Vikas Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the exponential increase of noise pollution, the demand for noise controlling system is also increases. Basically two types of techniques are used for noise cancellation active and passive. But passive techniques are inactive for low frequency noise, hence there is an increasing demand of research and developmental work on active noise cancellation techniques. In this paper we introduce a new method in the active noise cancellation system. This new method is the transfer function based method which used Genetic and Particle swarm optimization (PSO algorithm for noise cancellation. This method is very simple and efficient for low frequency noise cancellation. Here we analysis the performance of this method in the presence of white Gaussian noise and compare the results of Particle swarm optimization (PSO and Genetic algorithm. Both algorithms are suitable for different environment, so we observe their performance in different fields. In this paper a comparative study of Genetic and Particle swarm optimization (PSO is described with proper results. It will go in depth what exactly transfer function method, how it work and advantages over neural network based method

  7. Control of noise - systems for compact HVAC units

    Pedersen, Steffen; Møller, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses noise control systems for implementation in compact HVAC units. The control of low-frequency noise presents different problems than at higher frequencies. This is mainly related to the long wavelength, which means that passive solutions require a significant volume of space...... systems affect the performance of implementations. The source pressure and the impedance of a centrifugal fan were measured, and a number of configurations for noise control were investigated. The performance of a simple analogue feedback control was tested in a physical prototype. An adaptive digital...... controller (feedback and feedforward using FXLMS with cancellation of feedback to reference) was simulated and implemented on a low-cost TI C55XX DSP platform....

  8. Design and control of noise-induced synchronization patterns

    Kurebayashi, Wataru; Hasegawa, Mikio; Nakao, Hiroya

    2015-01-01

    We propose a method for controlling synchronization patterns of limit-cycle oscillators by common noisy inputs, i.e., by utilizing noise-induced synchronization. Various synchronization patterns, including fully synchronized and clustered states, can be realized by using linear filters that generate appropriate common noisy signals from given noise. The optimal linear filter can be determined from the linear phase response property of the oscillators and the power spectrum of the given noise. The validity of the proposed method is confirmed by numerical simulations.

  9. Studying the Noise Control Engineering Protocols in Industry

    Hamid Golshah

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available Today, sound is one of the detrimental factors in the workplace and its harmful impact has been so important that scientists have named it “Noise Pollutions”. Hearing is one of the five senses of human being which is also a medium for communicating with other s and enjoying the pleasant feeling of listening to a piece of music. In spite of this, changes in the intensity and frequency of sound can make it annoying. Using Sound Level Meter to measure the dB of noise in the workplace and noise control principles will be discussed here.

  10. Noise controlled synchronization in potassium coupled neural models

    Postnov, Dmitry E; Ryazanova, Ludmila S; Zhirin, Roman A;

    2007-01-01

    The paper applies biologically plausible models to investigate how noise input to small ensembles of neurons, coupled via the extracellular potassium concentration, can influence their firing patterns. Using the noise intensity and the volume of the extracellular space as control parameters, we...... show that potassium induced depolarization underlies the formation of noise-induced patterns such as delayed firing and synchronization. These phenomena are associated with the appearance of new time scales in the distribution of interspike intervals that may be significant for the spatio...

  11. Process controlled data acquisition in the measurement of noise

    For the calibration of noise standards the output signal of a standard measuring system has to be recorded and averaged over large time intervals. The output signal is a low-frequency noise signal, which is recorded with a fast data acquisition system, using a Siemens on-line computer. This system is also used for data processing and for the evaluation of parameters to control the standard measuring system. (orig./RW)

  12. Tunable Interior Rotorcraft Noise Control Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — CRG has recently developed a new class of shape memory polymers (SMP) that are electrically activated, as opposed to the more mature thermally activated SMPs....

  13. Adjoint-based sensitivity and feedback control of noise emission

    Airiau, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    A LQR control is performed on a reduce order model built from Direct Numerical Simulation of an open cavity flow, for a 2D geometry, and in the aim of controlling noise emission. A -10 dB achievement is demonstrated

  14. Effects of Noise on Asymmetric Bidirectional Controlled Teleportation

    Nie, Yi-you; Sang, Ming-huang

    2016-07-01

    We present a scheme for asymmetric bidirectional controlled teleportation via a six-qubit cluster state in noisy environments, which includes the phase-damping and amplitude-damping channels. We analytically derive the fidelities of the asymmetric bidirectional controlled teleportation process in these two noise channels. We show that the fidelities only depend on the initial state and the noisy rate.

  15. Updating working memory in aircraft noise and speech noise causes different fMRI activations.

    Saetrevik, Bjørn; Sörqvist, Patrik

    2015-02-01

    The present study used fMRI/BOLD neuroimaging to investigate how visual-verbal working memory is updated when exposed to three different background-noise conditions: speech noise, aircraft noise and silence. The number-updating task that was used can distinguish between "substitution processes," which involve adding new items to the working memory representation and suppressing old items, and "exclusion processes," which involve rejecting new items and maintaining an intact memory set. The current findings supported the findings of a previous study by showing that substitution activated the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, the posterior medial frontal cortex and the parietal lobes, whereas exclusion activated the anterior medial frontal cortex. Moreover, the prefrontal cortex was activated more by substitution processes when exposed to background speech than when exposed to aircraft noise. These results indicate that (a) the prefrontal cortex plays a special role when task-irrelevant materials should be denied access to working memory and (b) that, when compensating for different types of noise, either different cognitive mechanisms are involved or those cognitive mechanisms that are involved are involved to different degrees. PMID:25352319

  16. Comparison of speech intelligibility in cockpit noise using SPH-4 flight helmet with and without active noise reduction

    Chan, Jeffrey W.; Simpson, Carol A.

    1990-01-01

    Active Noise Reduction (ANR) is a new technology which can reduce the level of aircraft cockpit noise that reaches the pilot's ear while simultaneously improving the signal to noise ratio for voice communications and other information bearing sound signals in the cockpit. A miniature, ear-cup mounted ANR system was tested to determine whether speech intelligibility is better for helicopter pilots using ANR compared to a control condition of ANR turned off. Two signal to noise ratios (S/N), representative of actual cockpit conditions, were used for the ratio of the speech to cockpit noise sound pressure levels. Speech intelligibility was significantly better with ANR compared to no ANR for both S/N conditions. Variability of speech intelligibility among pilots was also significantly less with ANR. When the stock helmet was used with ANR turned off, the average PB Word speech intelligibility score was below the Normally Acceptable level. In comparison, it was above that level with ANR on in both S/N levels.

  17. Voice communications in the cockpit noise environment: The role of active noise reduction

    Wheeler, Peter David

    The topic of voice communications in the cockpit noise environment of modern fast-jet aircraft and helicopters is addressed, and in particular, research undertaken in support of the development of a system for reducing the noise level at the operators' ear is described by acoustic cancellation within the ear defender, known as active noise reduction (ANR). The internal noise spectra of today's high performance fast-jet aircraft and military helicopters is described, and the complex interaction of acoustic noise transmission, speech, and microphone noise pick-up, which produces the total acoustic environment at the aircrews' ears, is discussed. Means of mathematically modelling the audio channel, quantifying the components identified above, and identifying areas of shortfall in performance are derived, leading to a procedure for the development of attenuation requirements, described as the communications audit. A model of the electroacoustic characteristics of the ANR ear defender assembly is presented and the sound field distribution within the ear defender/ear cavity, and its effect upon cancellation performance, is discussed. The extensive laboratory and flight testing of the ANR system that was undertaken is reviewed, paying particular attention to the measurement and analysis techniques employed in such testing. Finally, the performance characteristics of ANR are discussed and compared with the requirements previously established. Design limitations placed upon the system by the constraints of its area of application are described, and the scope for future improvements is considered.

  18. Controlling low frequency noise using a passive silencer

    DeGagne, D.C.; Faszer, A.C. [Noise Solutions Inc., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    Nearly 85 per cent of all the oil and natural gas recovered in Canada comes from Alberta where noise emissions from energy facilities are regulated by the Energy Resources Conservation Board (ERCB) and the Alberta Utilities Commission (AUC) through Noise Control Directive D-038. Operators of energy facilities in Alberta must meet the Permissible Sound Level (PSL) established for industrial facilities that are established for receptor locations such as nearby residences. Despite efforts to manage noise, complaints from nearby residents continue to occur even if the facility is in compliance. This is because high and mid frequency components can decay or be absorbed by air and ground conditions leaving mostly low frequency noise (LFN) at the residence. This paper explored the significance of LFN and how some facility operators are dealing with this problem. The impacts of LFN can range from creating a sensation of pressure in the ear, disturbing normal conversation, to creating secondary vibrating effects within homes. If severe enough, it can also result in potential behavioural dysfunction such as task performance deterioration, sleep disturbance and headaches. In 2006, Noise Solutions Inc. was approached by Hunt Oil Company regarding the installation of a new compressor at their Caroline site. The proposal posed a serious noise problem for the community which requested that the new compressor unit be developed without any additional noise impact on the area. Noise Solutions Inc. used a multi-phased approach to develop the most effective LFN silencer using best practical technology and materials. In an effort to fully attenuate both the high frequency noise (dBA) and the low frequency noise (dBC) of the new compressor unit, Noise Solutions and Hunt Oil agreed that a significant level of sound-suppression would be necessary. The entire noise-suppression unit was specially designed to compensate for the sheer size of the compressor building. The first step to

  19. Noise

    Noise is all around you, from televisions and radios to lawn mowers and washing machines. Normally, you ... sensitive structures of the inner ear and cause noise-induced hearing loss. More than 30 million Americans ...

  20. Noise Control in Gene Regulatory Networks with Negative Feedback.

    Hinczewski, Michael; Thirumalai, D

    2016-07-01

    Genes and proteins regulate cellular functions through complex circuits of biochemical reactions. Fluctuations in the components of these regulatory networks result in noise that invariably corrupts the signal, possibly compromising function. Here, we create a practical formalism based on ideas introduced by Wiener and Kolmogorov (WK) for filtering noise in engineered communications systems to quantitatively assess the extent to which noise can be controlled in biological processes involving negative feedback. Application of the theory, which reproduces the previously proven scaling of the lower bound for noise suppression in terms of the number of signaling events, shows that a tetracycline repressor-based negative-regulatory gene circuit behaves as a WK filter. For the class of Hill-like nonlinear regulatory functions, this type of filter provides the optimal reduction in noise. Our theoretical approach can be readily combined with experimental measurements of response functions in a wide variety of genetic circuits, to elucidate the general principles by which biological networks minimize noise. PMID:27095600

  1. Control of ground-borne noise and vibration

    Wilson, G. P.; Saurenman, H. J.; Nelson, J. T.

    1983-03-01

    Ground-borne noise and vibration created by train operations is one of the major environmental problems faced by rail transit systems. In the past 10-20 years there have been a number of developments in the control and prediction of ground-borne noise and vibration although it is evident that further research is needed. In this paper the focus is on two methods of controlling the vibration radiated by the transit structure. First is the use of floating slab trackbeds, a method that has proven to be very effective at reducing vibration at frequencies above the resonance frequency of the floating slab system. Second is to modify the design of transit car bogies such that the wheel/rail forces are reduced. Although this method is still in the exploratory phase it has been shown that proper design of the bogie suspension can significantly reduce the levels of ground-borne noise and vibration.

  2. Neural control of helicopter blade-vortex interaction noise

    Glaessel, Holger; Kloeppel, Valentin; Rudolph, Stephan

    2001-06-01

    Significant reduction of helicopter blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise is currently one of the most advanced research topics in the helicopter industry. This is due to the complex flow, the close aerodynamic and structural coupling, and the interaction of the blades with the trailing edge vortices. Analytical and numerical modeling techniques are therefore currently still far from a sufficient degree of accuracy to obtain satisfactory results using classical model based control concepts. Neural networks with a proven potential to learn nonlinear relationships implicitly encoded in a training data set are therefore an appropriate and complementary technique for the alternative design of a nonlinear controller for BVI noise reduction. For nonlinear and adaptive control different neural control strategies have been proposed. Two possible approaches, a direct and an indirect neural controller are described. In indirect neural control, the plant has to be identified first by training a network with measured data. The plant network is then used to train the controller network. On the other hand the direct control approach does not rely on an explicit plant model, instead a specific training algorithm (like reinforcement learning) uses the information gathered from interactions with the environment. In the investigation of the BVI noise phenomena, helicopter developers have undertaken substantial efforts in full scale flight tests and wind tunnel experiments. Data obtained in these experiments have been adequately preprocessed using wavelet analysis and filtering techniques and are then used in the design of a neural controller. Neural open-loop control and neural closed-loop control concepts for the BVI noise reduction problem are conceived, simulated and compared against each other in this work in the above mentioned framework.

  3. White noise improves learning by modulating activity in dopaminergic midbrain regions and right superior temporal sulcus.

    Rausch, Vanessa H; Bauch, Eva M; Bunzeck, Nico

    2014-07-01

    In neural systems, information processing can be facilitated by adding an optimal level of white noise. Although this phenomenon, the so-called stochastic resonance, has traditionally been linked with perception, recent evidence indicates that white noise may also exert positive effects on cognitive functions, such as learning and memory. The underlying neural mechanisms, however, remain unclear. Here, on the basis of recent theories, we tested the hypothesis that auditory white noise, when presented during the encoding of scene images, enhances subsequent recognition memory performance and modulates activity within the dopaminergic midbrain (i.e., substantia nigra/ventral tegmental area, SN/VTA). Indeed, in a behavioral experiment, we can show in healthy humans that auditory white noise-but not control sounds, such as a sinus tone-slightly improves recognition memory. In an fMRI experiment, white noise selectively enhances stimulus-driven phasic activity in the SN/VTA and auditory cortex. Moreover, it induces stronger connectivity between SN/VTA and right STS, which, in addition, exhibited a positive correlation with subsequent memory improvement by white noise. Our results suggest that the beneficial effects of auditory white noise on learning depend on dopaminergic neuromodulation and enhanced connectivity between midbrain regions and the STS-a key player in attention modulation. Moreover, they indicate that white noise could be particularly useful to facilitate learning in conditions where changes of the mesolimbic system are causally related to memory deficits including healthy and pathological aging. PMID:24345178

  4. Adaptive Feed-Forward Control of Low Frequency Interior Noise

    Kletschkowski, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    This book presents a mechatronic approach to Active Noise Control (ANC). It describes the required elements of system theory, engineering acoustics, electroacoustics and adaptive signal processing in a comprehensive, consistent and systematic manner using a unified notation. Furthermore, it includes a design methodology for ANC-systems, explains its application and describes tools to be used for ANC-system design. From the research point of view, the book presents new approaches to sound source localization in weakly damped interiors. One is based on the inverse finite element method, the other is based on a sound intensity probe with an active free field. Furthermore, a prototype of an ANC-system able to reach the physical limits of local (feed-forward) ANC is described. This is one example for applied research in ANC-system design. Other examples are given for (i) local ANC in a semi-enclosed subspace of an aircraft cargo hold and (ii) for the combination of audio entertainment with ANC.

  5. The Effect of fMRI (Noise) on Cognitive Control

    Hommel, Bernhard; Fischer, Rico; Colzato, Lorenza S.; van den Wildenberg, Wery P. M.; Cellini, Cristiano

    2012-01-01

    Stressful situations, the aversiveness of events, or increases in task difficulty (e.g., conflict) have repeatedly been shown to be capable of triggering attentional control adjustments. In the present study we tested whether the particularity of an fMRI testing environment (i.e., EPI noise) might result in such increases of the cognitive control…

  6. Noise and Sound Control in Open Plan Schools.

    Schellenberg, Ben

    This annotated bibliography includes summaries of 19 articles and reports dealing with noise control and acoustical design in school buildings. A brief introduction discusses the need for careful attention to acoustics in any school construction or remodeling project, with particular emphasis on the need for special acoustical measures in an open…

  7. Collisional activation with random noise in ion trap mass spectrometry

    McLuckey, S.A.; Goeringer, D.E.; Glish, G.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1992-07-01

    Random noise applied to the end caps of a quadrupole ion trap is shown to be an effective means for the collisional activation of trapped ions independent of mass/charge ratio and number of ions. This technique is compared and contrasted with conventional single-frequency collisional activation for the molecular ion of N,N-dimethylaniline, protonated cocaine, the molecular anion of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene, and doubly protonated neuromedin U-8. Collisional activation with noise tends to produce more extensive fragmentation than the conventional approach due to the fact that product ions are also kinetically excited in the noise experiment. The efficiency of the noise experiment in producing detectable product ions relative to the conventional approach ranges from being equivalent to being a factor of 3 less efficient. Furthermore, discrimination against low mass/charge product ions is apparent in the data from multiply charged biomolecules. Nevertheless, collisional activation with random noise provides a very simple means for overcoming problems associated with the dependence of single-frequency collisional activation on mass/charge ratio and the number of ions in the ion trap. 45 refs., 7 figs.

  8. Transparent sound screens. [and their noise control efficiency in buildings

    Bizo, F.; Draghici, R.

    1974-01-01

    Transparent sound screens consisting of glass (organic glass) plates placed at fixed angles with respect to the floor are considered. Noise levels in the screened area depend on the cumulative effect of direct, reverberated and refracted components of sound energy radiated by the source. This effect is analyzed on the analogy of the summation of electrical impedances. Inasmuch as under given circumstances sufficient noise control can be obtained, transparent screens seem to solve the problem of unimpeded supervision of installations in noisy workshops and power plants; in administrative buildings, computing centers, design bureaus, etc., they ensure acoustic comfort without space losses and without inspiring claustrophobia.

  9. Exoemissive noise activity of different metallic materials

    Bichevin, V.; Käämbre, H.; Sammelselg, V.; Kelle, H.; Asari, E.; Saks, O.

    1996-11-01

    A method is proposed for testing the exoemission activity of different metals, used as materials in high sensitivity electrometry (attoammetry). The presented test results allow us to select materials with weaker exoelectron spurious currents.

  10. Assuring robustness to noise in optimal quantum control experiments

    Closed-loop optimal quantum control experiments operate in the inherent presence of laser noise. In many applications, attaining high quality results [i.e., a high signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio for the optimized objective] is as important as producing a high control yield. Enhancement of the S/N ratio will typically be in competition with the mean signal, however, the latter competition can be balanced by biasing the optimization experiments towards higher mean yields while retaining a good S/N ratio. Other strategies can also direct the optimization to reduce the standard deviation of the statistical signal distribution. The ability to enhance the S/N ratio through an optimized choice of the control is demonstrated for two condensed phase model systems: second harmonic generation in a nonlinear optical crystal and stimulated emission pumping in a dye solution

  11. Thermally activated switching in the presence of non-Gaussian noise

    Billings, Lora; Dykman, Mark I.; Schwartz, Ira B.

    2008-01-01

    We study the effect of a non-Gaussian noise on interstate switching activated primarily by Gaussian noise. Even weak non-Gaussian noise can strongly change the switching rate. The effect is determined by all moments of the noise distribution. The explicit analytical results are compared with the results of simulations for an overdamped system driven by white Gaussian noise and a Poisson noise. Switching induced by a purely Poisson noise is also discussed.

  12. Region-based active contour with noise and shape priors

    Lecellier, François; Fadili, Jalal; Aubert, Gilles; Revenu, Marinette; Saloux, Eric

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we propose to combine formally noise and shape priors in region-based active contours. On the one hand, we use the general framework of exponential family as a prior model for noise. On the other hand, translation and scale invariant Legendre moments are considered to incorporate the shape prior (e.g. fidelity to a reference shape). The combination of the two prior terms in the active contour functional yields the final evolution equation whose evolution speed is rigorously derived using shape derivative tools. Experimental results on both synthetic images and real life cardiac echography data clearly demonstrate the robustness to initialization and noise, flexibility and large potential applicability of our segmentation algorithm.

  13. Effects of time delay and noise correlation on noise enhanced stability and resonant activation in a periodically modulated bistable system

    This work analyzes numerically the effects of delay time τ and cross-correlation strength between noises λ on the phenomena of noise enhanced stability (NES) and resonant activation (RA) in a periodically modulated bistable system. The simulation results indicate that: (i) multiplicative noise can produce the NES effect only for the larger λ, while additive noise always induces the NES effect; (ii) for the NES phenomenon induced by additive noise, there is a characteristic value of τ, below which the increasing of τ enhances it and above which the effect of τ reverses; however, the increasing of τ can only enhance the NES effect induced by multiplicative noise; (iii) increasing λ weakens the NES effect induced by additive noise and strengthens that induced by multiplicative noise; and (iv) the RA effect becomes more and more pronounced while the RA minimum of the mean first-passage time increases with the increase of λ or τ. (paper)

  14. Design of Low Noise 16-bit CMOS Digitally Controlled Oscillator

    Nitin Kumar

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a new differential delay cell is proposed and 16-bit Digital Controlled Oscillator (DCO based on proposed delay cell is designed. The 16-bit DCO consist of 4-stages differential delay cell in ring structure and a digital control scheme has been used to improved noise characteristics. The structure of the DCO utilizes dual delay path techniques to achieve high oscillation frequency and awide tuning range. The DCO circuit has been simulated in SPICE with 0.5μm technology operating with supply voltage of 5V. DCO achieved a controllable frequency range of [1.7324-4.8649] GHz with a tuningrange of 3.1325GHz (≈64%. The measured output noise is -161.2dB/Hz and the total harmonic distortion have been found 75.4865dB with 6666H control word. The phase noise in proposed DCO design is -179.4dB/Hz at a frequency of 1.7324GHz.

  15. BVI induced vibration and noise alleviation by active and passive approaches

    Liu, Li

    This dissertation describes the development of a comprehensive aeroelastic/aeroacoustic simulation capability for the modeling of vibration and noise in rotorcraft induced by blade-vortex interaction (BVI). Subsequently this capability is applied to study vibration and noise reduction, using active and passive control approaches. The active approach employed is the actively controlled partial span trailing edge flaps (ACF), implemented in single and dual, servo and plain flap configurations. The passive approach is based on varying the sweep and anhedral on the tip of the rotor. Two different modern helicopters are chosen as the baseline for the implementation of ACF approach, one resembling a four-bladed MBB BO-105 hingeless rotor and the other similar to a five-bladed MD-900 bearingless rotor. The structural model is based on a finite element approach capable of simulating composite helicopter blades with swept tips, and representing multiple load paths at the blade root which is a characteristic of bearingless rotors. An unsteady compressible aerodynamic model based on a rational function approximation (RFA) approach is combined with a free wake analysis which has been enhanced by improving the wake analysis resolution and modeling a dual vortex structure. These enhancements are important for capturing BVI effects. A method for predicting compressible unsteady blade surface pressure distribution on rotor blades has been developed, which is required by the acoustic analysis. A modified version of helicopter noise code WOPWOP with provisions for blade flexibility has been combined with the aeroelastic analysis to predict the BVI noise. Several variants of the higher harmonic control (HHC) algorithm have been applied for the active noise control, as well as the simultaneous vibration and noise control. Active control of BVI noise is accomplished using feedback from an onboard microphone. The simulation has been extensively validated against experimental data and

  16. Aeroacoustic control of landing gear noise using perforated fairings

    Boorsma, Koen

    2008-01-01

    A study was performed to investigate and optimize the application of perforated fairings for landing gear noise control. The sparse knowledge about this new subject has necessitated a more fundamental study involving a basic fairing-strut configuration, followed by wind tunnel tests on a simplified landing gear configuration incorporating perforated fairings. For the basic configuration, various exchangeable perforated half-cylindrical shells shrouding a circular cylinder we...

  17. Diffusion of Active Particles Subject both to Additive and Multiplicative Noises

    WANG Shao-Hua; YANG Ming; WU Da-Jin

    2011-01-01

    We consider a Langevin equation of active Brownian motion which contains a multiplicative as well as an additive noise term.We study the dependences of the effective diffusion coefficient Deff on both the additive and multiplicative noises.It is found that for fixed small additive noise intensity Deff varies non-monotonously with multiplicative noise intensity, with a minimum at a moderate value of multiplicative noise, and Deff increases monotonously, however, with the multiplicative noise intensity for relatively strong additive noise; for fixed multiplicative noise intensity Deff decreases with growing additive noise intensity until it approaches a constant.An explanation is also given of the different behavior of Deff as additive and multiplicative noises approach infinity,respectively.%@@ We consider a Langevin equation of active Brownian motion which contains a multiplicative as well as an additive noise term.We study the dependences of the effective diffusion coefficient Deff on both the additive and multiplicative noises.It is found that for fixed small additive noise intensity Deff varies non-monotonously with multiplicative noise intensity, with a minimum at a moderate value of multiplicative noise, and Deff increases monotonously, however, with the multiplicative noise intensity for relatively strong additive noise; for fixed multiplicative noise intensity Deff decreases with growing additive noise intensity until it approaches a constant.An explanation is also given of the different behavior of Deff as additive and multiplicative noises approach infinity, respectively.

  18. Scope for active noise abatement in vehicle diesel engines

    Summerauer, I.; Boesch, N.

    1984-04-01

    Noise reduction measures must be directed to the engine, the exhaust system, and the cooling system (fan) all of which contribute approximately 90% of the sound energy emitted from commercial diesel trucks. The noise generation processes were visualized and limiting conditions fixed by law were considered in establishing criteria for active solar noise abatement measures. A more effective silencer and better vibration damping on the surface of the silencer and exhaust pipes can reduce noise from the exhaust system. Acoustic emission generated by the fan and air flow can be reduced by decreasing flow velocity or by turning on the fan only when a full cooling output is required (10% of the time). Active measures are needed on the engine itself either at the point of the solid-borne sound transmission or at the point of the solid-borne vibrations. The predominant effect is on the engine casing; oil sump; air suction pipe or air charge line; the flywheel casing; and the clutch housing.

  19. Advance Noise Control Fan II: Test Rig Fan Risk Management Study

    Lucero, John

    2013-01-01

    Since 1995 the Advanced Noise Control Fan (ANCF) has significantly contributed to the advancement of the understanding of the physics of fan tonal noise generation. The 9'x15' WT has successfully tested multiple high speed fan designs over the last several decades. This advanced several tone noise reduction concepts to higher TRL and the validation of fan tone noise prediction codes.

  20. Noise influence on spike activation in a Hindmarsh–Rose small-world neural network

    Zhe, Sun; Micheletto, Ruggero

    2016-07-01

    We studied the role of noise in neural networks, especially focusing on its relation to the propagation of spike activity in a small sized system. We set up a source of information using a single neuron that is constantly spiking. This element called initiator x o feeds spikes to the rest of the network that is initially quiescent and subsequently reacts with vigorous spiking after a transitional period of time. We found that noise quickly suppresses the initiator’s influence and favors spontaneous spike activity and, using a decibel representation of noise intensity, we established a linear relationship between noise amplitude and the interval from the initiator’s first spike and the rest of the network activation. We studied the same process with networks of different sizes (number of neurons) and found that the initiator x o has a measurable influence on small networks, but as the network grows in size, spontaneous spiking emerges disrupting its effects on networks of more than about N = 100 neurons. This suggests that the mechanism of internal noise generation allows information transmission within a small neural neighborhood, but decays for bigger network domains. We also analyzed the Fourier spectrum of the whole network membrane potential and verified that noise provokes the reduction of main θ and α peaks before transitioning into chaotic spiking. However, network size does not reproduce a similar phenomena; instead we recorded a reduction in peaks’ amplitude, a better sharpness and definition of Fourier peaks, but not the evident degeneration to chaos observed with increasing external noise. This work aims to contribute to the understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of propagation of spontaneous spiking in neural networks and gives a quantitative assessment of how noise can be used to control and modulate this phenomenon in Hindmarsh‑Rose (H‑R) neural networks.

  1. Performance of PRD Welled Surfaces in T Shape Noise Barriers for Controlling Environmental Noise

    S Momen Bellah

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available "n "n "nBackgrounds and Objectives: There is a considerable notice in the use of noise barriers in recent years. Noise barriers as a control noise solution can increase the insertion loss to protect receivers. This paper presents the results of an investigation about the acoustic efficiency of primitive root sequence diffuser (PRD on environmental single T-shape barrier."nMaterials and Methods: A 2D boundary element method (BEM is used to predict the insertion loss of the tested barriers. The results of rigid and with quadratic residue diffuser (QRD coverage are also predicted for comparison."nResults: It is found that decreasing the design frequency of PRD shifts the frequency effects towards lower frequencies, and therefore the overall A-weighted insertion loss is improved. It is also found that using wire mesh with reasonably efficient resistivity on the top surface of PRD improves the efficiency of the reactive barriers; however utilizing wire meshes with flow resistivity higher than specific acoustic impedance of air on the PRD top of a diffuser barrier significantly reduces the performance of the barrier within the frequency bandwidth of the diffuser. The performance of PRD covered T-shape barrier at 200 Hz was found to be higher than that of its equivalent QRD barriers in both the far field and areas close to the ground. The amount of improvement compared made by PRD barrier compared with its equivalent rigid barrier at far field is about 2 to 3 dB, while this improvement relative to barrier model .QR4. can reach up to 4- 6 dB."nConclusion: Employing PRD on the top surface of T-shape barrier is found to improve the performance of barriers compared with using rigid and QRD coverage at the examined receiver locations.

  2. Active noise compensation for multichannel magnetocardiography in an unshielded environment

    Aarnink, W.A.M.; Bosch, van den, G.; Roelofs, T.-M.; Verbiesen, M.; Holland, H.J.; Brake, ter, H.J.M.; Rogalla, H.

    1995-01-01

    A multichannel high-T/sub c/-SQUID-based heart scanner for unshielded environments is under development, Outside a magnetically shielded room, sensitive SQUID measurements are possible using gradiometers. However, it is difficult to realize large-baseline gradiometers in high-T/sub c/ materials, Therefore, the authors developed two active noise compensation techniques. In the Total Field Compensation technique, a Helmholtz type coil set is placed around the sensors. One magnetometer is used a...

  3. Control of noise and structural vibration a MATLAB-based approach

    Mao, Qibo

    2013-01-01

    Control of Noise and Structural Vibration presents a MATLAB®-based approach to solving the problems of undesirable noise generation and transmission by structures and of undesirable vibration within structures in response to environmental or operational forces. The fundamentals of acoustics, vibration and coupling between vibrating structures and the sound fields they generate are introduced including a discussion of the finite element method for vibration analysis. Following this, the treatment of sound and vibration control begins, illustrated by example systems such as beams, plates and double plate structures. Sensor and actuator placement is explained as is the idea of modal sensor–actuators. The design of appropriate feedback systems includes consideration of basic stability criteria and robust active structural acoustic control. Single and multi-mode positive position feedback (PPF) control systems are also described in the context of loudspeaker–duct model with non-collocated loudspeaker–microp...

  4. Analysis of noise characteristics for the active pixels in CMOS image sensors for X-ray imaging

    Kim, Young Soo; Cho, Gyuseong; Bae, Jun-Hyung

    2006-09-01

    CMOS image sensors have poorer performance compared to conventional charge coupled devices (CCDs). Since CMOS Active Pixel Sensors (APSs) in general have higher temporal noise, higher dark current, smaller full well charge capacitance, and lower spectral response, they cannot provide the same wide dynamic range and superior signal to noise ratio as CCDs. In view of electronic noise, the main source for the CMOS APS is the pixel, along with other signal processing blocks such as row and column decoder, analog signal processor (ASP), analog-to-digital converter (ADC), and timing and control logic circuitry. Therefore, it is important and necessary to characterize noise of the active pixels in CMOS APSs, and we performed experimental measurements and comparisons with theoretical estimations. To derive noise source of the pixels, we designed and fabricated four types of CMOS active pixels, and each pixel is composed of a photodiode and three MOS transistors. The size of these pixels is 100 μm×100 μm. The test chip was fabricated using ETRI 0.8 μm (2P/2M) standard CMOS process. It was found that the dominant noise in CMOS active pixels is shot noise during integration under normal operating conditions. And, it was also seen that epitaxial type pixels have similar noise level compared to non-epitaxial type, and the noise of diffusion type pixel is larger than for a well type pixel on the same substrate type.

  5. Analysis of noise characteristics for the active pixels in CMOS image sensors for X-ray imaging

    CMOS image sensors have poorer performance compared to conventional charge coupled devices (CCDs). Since CMOS Active Pixel Sensors (APSs) in general have higher temporal noise, higher dark current, smaller full well charge capacitance, and lower spectral response, they cannot provide the same wide dynamic range and superior signal to noise ratio as CCDs. In view of electronic noise, the main source for the CMOS APS is the pixel, along with other signal processing blocks such as row and column decoder, analog signal processor (ASP), analog-to-digital converter (ADC), and timing and control logic circuitry. Therefore, it is important and necessary to characterize noise of the active pixels in CMOS APSs, and we performed experimental measurements and comparisons with theoretical estimations. To derive noise source of the pixels, we designed and fabricated four types of CMOS active pixels, and each pixel is composed of a photodiode and three MOS transistors. The size of these pixels is 100 μmx100 μm. The test chip was fabricated using ETRI 0.8 μm (2P/2M) standard CMOS process. It was found that the dominant noise in CMOS active pixels is shot noise during integration under normal operating conditions. And, it was also seen that epitaxial type pixels have similar noise level compared to non-epitaxial type, and the noise of diffusion type pixel is larger than for a well type pixel on the same substrate type

  6. Noise-controlled bistability in an excitable system with positive feedback

    Kromer, Justus A.; Pinto, Reynaldo D.; Lindner, Benjamin; Schimansky-Geier, Lutz

    2014-10-01

    We study the interplay between noise and a positive feedback mechanism in an excitable system that generates events. We show that such a system can exhibit a bistability in the dynamics of the event generation (states of low and high activity). The stability of the two states is determined by the strength of the noise such that a change of noise intensity permits complete control over the probabilities with which the two states are occupied. The bistability also has strong implications for the regularity of the event generation. While the irregularity of the interevent interval (short-time variability) and the asymptotic Fano factor of the event count (long-time variability) are limited if the system is only in one of the two states, we show that both measures of variability display giant values if both states are equally likely. The long-time variability is additionally amplified by long-range positive correlations of the interevent intervals.

  7. Comparison of various decentralised structural and cavity feedback control strategies for transmitted noise reduction through a double panel structure

    Ho, Jen-Hsuan; Berkhoff, Arthur

    2014-03-01

    This paper compares various decentralised control strategies, including structural and acoustic actuator-sensor configuration designs, to reduce noise transmission through a double panel structure. The comparison is based on identical control stability indexes. The double panel structure consists of two panels with air in between and offers the advantages of low sound transmission at high frequencies, low heat transmission, and low weight. The double panel structure is widely used, such as in the aerospace and automotive industries. Nevertheless, the resonance of the cavity and the poor sound transmission loss at low frequencies limit the double panel's noise control performance. Applying active structural acoustic control to the panels or active noise control to the cavity has been discussed in many papers. In this paper, the resonances of the panels and the cavity are considered simultaneously to further reduce the transmitted noise through an existing double panel structure. A structural-acoustic coupled model is developed to investigate and compare various structural control and cavity control methods. Numerical analysis and real-time control results show that structural control should be applied to both panels. Three types of cavity control sources are presented and compared. The results indicate that the largest noise reduction is obtained with cavity control by loudspeakers modified to operate as incident pressure sources.

  8. The effect of human activity noise on the acoustic quality in open plan office

    Dehlbæk, Tania Stenholt; Jeong, Cheol-Ho; Brunskog, Jonas;

    2016-01-01

    A disadvantage of open plan offices is the noise annoyance. Noise problems in open plan offices have been dealt with in several studies, and standards have been set up. Still, what has not been taken into account is the effect of human activity noise on acoustic conditions. In this study......, measurements of the general office noise levels and the room acoustic conditions according to ISO 3382-3 have been carried out in five open plan offices. Probability density functions of the sound pressure level have been obtained, and the human activity noise has been identified. Results showed a decrease in...... D2,S have an impact on the variation in the activity noise. At 1 kHz, the technical background noise influences human activity noise positively. In both octave bands, the human activity noise level varies significantly with the office type, from a call center to a lawyer’s office....

  9. Cooperating or Fighting with Control Noise in the Optimal Manipulation of Quantum Dynamics

    Shuang, F; Shuang, Feng; Rabitz, Herschel

    2004-01-01

    This paper investigates the impact of control field noise on the optimal manipulation of quantum dynamics. Simulations are performed on several multilevel quantum systems with the goal of population transfer in the presence of significant control noise. The noise enters as run-to-run variations in the control amplitude and phase with the observation being an ensemble average over many runs as is commonly done in the laboratory. A genetic algorithm with an improved elitism operator is used to find the optimal field that either fights against or cooperates with control field noise. When seeking a high control yield it is possible to find fields that successfully fight with the noise while attaining good quality stable results. When seeking modest control yields, fields can be found which are optimally shaped to cooperate with the noise and thereby drive the dynamics more efficiently. In general, noise reduces the coherence of the dynamics, but the results indicate that population transfer objectives can be met ...

  10. Amplitude noise in passively and actively operated masers

    A calculation of the power spectral density of amplitude fluctuations in masers is presented, which gives results in close agreement with others. The maximum of this power spectral density, which appears in specified conditions, for a Fourier frequency related to the Rabi frequency of atoms is observed for the first time both in a hydrogen and a rubidium maser. The given model is completed to include a coherent excitation, as required in passively operated masers. Two methods for the interrogation of the atoms are considered. In the first one, the maximum of the atomic emission line is probed and in the second one, the null of the atomic dispersion line is observed. The power spectral density of fractional frequency fluctuations of the slaved frequency generator is calculated in both cases, including the effect of thermal noise in the microwave cavity and of noise added by the microwave receiver. Optimum operating conditions are specified. The cavity pulling factor is specified for both methods of interrogation and the effect of noise in the control of the microwave cavity resonant frequency is considered. Finally a useful design criterion is given for passively operated masers

  11. Noise Reduction in Double‐Panel Structures by Cavity and Panel Resonance Control

    Ho, Jen-Hsuan; Berkhoff, Arthur

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation of the cavity and the panel resonance control in a double‐panel structure. The double‐panel structure, which consists of two panels with air in the gap, is widely adopted in many applications such as aerospace due to its light weight and effective transmission‐loss at high frequency. However, the resonance of the cavity and the poor transmission‐loss at low frequency limit its noise control performance. Applying active control forces on the panels or utili...

  12. Distinct noise-controlling roles of multiple negative feedback mechanisms in a prokaryotic operon system.

    Nguyen, L K; Kulasiri, D

    2011-03-01

    Molecular fluctuations are known to affect dynamics of cellular systems in important ways. Studies aimed at understanding how molecular systems of certain regulatory architectures control noise therefore become essential. The interplay between feedback regulation and noise has been previously explored for cellular networks governed by a single negative feedback loop. However, similar issues within networks consisting of more complex regulatory structures remain elusive. The authors investigate how negative feedback loops manage noise within a biochemical cascade concurrently governed by multiple negative feedback loops, using the prokaryotic tryptophan (trp) operon system in Escherechia coli as the model system. To the authors knowledge, this is the first study of noise in the trp operon system. They show that the loops in the trp operon system possess distinct, even opposing, noise-controlling effects despite their seemingly analogous feedback structures. The enzyme inhibition loop, although controlling the last reaction of the cascade, was found to suppress noise not only for the tryptophan output but also for other upstream components. In contrast, the Repression (Rep) loop enhances noise for all systems components. Attenuation (Att) poses intermediate effects by attenuating noise for the upstream components but promoting noise for components downstream of its target. Regarding noise at the output tryptophan, Rep and Att can be categorised as noise-enhancing loops whereas Enzyme Inhibition as a noise-reducing loop. These findings suggest novel implications in how cellular systems with multiple feedback mechanisms control noise. [Includes supplementary material]. PMID:21405203

  13. CONTROLLING RISK DUE TO NOISE ON FERRY BOAT

    Nikolic, Aleksandar; Nikolic, Emilija

    2013-01-01

    Environmental and occupational noise is common nuisance that affects the health of employees. Performed health checks of employees engaged by Company “Pomorski Saobraćaj” showed that 5% of examined sailors had hearing loss. The results were a trigger for starting experiment on noise risk assessment with objective to discover possibilities of noise pollution presence, precise significant noise sources and describe solutions for eliminating negative effects. Several measurements on five posi...

  14. Active Vibration Control of Axial Piston Machine using Higher Harmonic Least Mean Square Control of Swash Plate

    Kim, Taeho; Ivantysynova, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Noise emission is a major drawback of the positive displacement machine. The noise source can be divided into structure borne noise source (SBNS) and fluid borne noise source (FBNS). Passive techniques such as valve plate optimization have been used for noise reduction of axial piston machines. However, passive techniques are only effective for limited operating conditions or at least need compromises in design. In this paper, active vibration control of swash plate is investigated for vibrat...

  15. Optimizing noise control strategy in a forging workshop.

    Razavi, Hamideh; Ramazanifar, Ehsan; Bagherzadeh, Jalal

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a computer program based on a genetic algorithm is developed to find an economic solution for noise control in a forging workshop. Initially, input data, including characteristics of sound sources, human exposure, abatement techniques, and production plans are inserted into the model. Using sound pressure levels at working locations, the operators who are at higher risk are identified and picked out for the next step. The program is devised in MATLAB such that the parameters can be easily defined and changed for comparison. The final results are structured into 4 sections that specify an appropriate abatement method for each operator and machine, minimum allowance time for high-risk operators, required damping material for enclosures, and minimum total cost of these treatments. The validity of input data in addition to proper settings in the optimization model ensures the final solution is practical and economically reasonable. PMID:24934422

  16. The Effect of Non-Harmonic Active Twist Actuation on BVI Noise

    Fogarty, David E.; Wilbur, Matthew L.; Sekula, Martin K.

    2011-01-01

    The results of a computational study examining the effects of non-harmonic active-twist control on blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise for the Apache Active Twist Rotor are presented. Rotor aeroelastic behavior was modeled using the Comprehensive Analytical Model of Rotorcraft Aerodynamics and Dynamics code and the rotor noise was predicted using the acoustics code PSU-WOPWOP. The application of non-harmonic active-twist inputs to the main rotor blade system comprised three parameters: azimuthal location to start actuation, azimuthal duration of actuation, and magnitude of actuation. The acoustic analysis was conducted for a single low-speed flight condition of advance ratio mu=0.14 and shaft angle-of-attack, a(sub s)=+6deg. BVI noise levels were predicted on a flat plane of observers located 1.1 rotor diameters beneath the rotor. The results indicate significant reductions of up to 10dB in BVI noise using a starting azimuthal location for actuation of 90?, an azimuthal duration of actuation of 90deg, and an actuation magnitude of +1.5 ft-lb.

  17. Optimal control of a linear system with multiplicative noise at control parameter

    Smirnov, I. P.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate a control process described by a linear system of ordinary differential equations with a noise of special type acting to the control parameter. As the cost functional the probability of the final state vector to enter to a given set in the phase space is considered. Necessary conditions of optimality (of the Pontryagin maximum principle form) and existence theorems are developed. The initial control problem was trasformed to an auxiliary deterministic problem, the differentiabi...

  18. Subjective annoyance caused by indoor low-level and low frequency noise and control method

    DI Guo-qing; ZHANG Bang-jun; SHANG Qi

    2005-01-01

    The influence of low-level noise has not been widely noticed. This paper discovered that low-level and low frequency noise(Aweighted equivalent level Leq < 45 dB) causes higher probability of subjective annoyance. The fuzzy mathematic principle was applied to deal with the threshold level of subjective annoyance from noise in this study; there is preferable relationship between the indoor noise and noise annoyance at low frequency noise level. Study indicated at the same centered noise level, the change of annoyance probability is mainly caused by the change of the frequency spectrum characteristic of the indoor noise. Under low noise level environment, without change of the medium-low frequency noise, the slight increase of medium-high frequency noise level with the help of noise sheltering effect can significantly reduce the noise annoyance. This discovery brings a new resolution on how to improve the environmental quality of working or living places. A noise control model is given in this study according to the acoustic analysis.

  19. Three-Party Controlled Quantum Teleportation with Six-Photon Entangled States via Collective Noise Channel

    Two three-party controlled quantum teleportation protocols using six-photon entangled states are proposed for circumventing collective noise. It can be performed in collective-dephasing noise or collective-rotation noise with unitary successful probability. Due to the symmetry of the quantum channel, each participant can act as a sender, a receiver or a controller. Moreover, it can be generalized to multiparty controlled teleportation protocols. (authors)

  20. What kind of noise is brain noise? Anomalous scaling behavior of the resting brain activity fluctuations.

    Daniel eFraiman

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The study of spontaneous fluctuations of brain activity, often referred as brain noise, is getting increasing attention in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI studies. Despite important efforts, much of the statistical properties of such fluctuations remain largely unknown. This work scrutinize these fluctuations looking at specific statistical properties which are relevant to clarify its dynamical origins. Here, three statistical features which clearly differentiate brain data from naive expectations for random processes are uncovered: First, the variance of the fMRI mean signal as a function of the number of averaged voxels remains constant across a wide range of observed clusters sizes. Second, the anomalous behavior of the variance is originated by bursts of synchronized activity across regions, regardless of their widely different sizes. Finally, the correlation length (i.e., the length at which the correlation strength between two regions vanishes as well as mutual information diverges with the cluster's size considered, such that arbitrarily large clusters exhibit the same collective dynamics than smaller ones. These three properties are known to be exclusive of complex systems exhibiting critical dynamics, where the spatio-temporal dynamics show these peculiar type of fluctuations. Thus, these findings are fully consistent with previous reports of brain critical dynamics, and are relevant for the interpretation of the role of fluctuations and variability in brain function in health and disease.

  1. A noise control package for vibrating screens1),2)

    Lowe, M. Jenae; Yantek, David S.; Yang, Junyi; Schuster, Kevin C.; Mechling, Jessie J.

    2013-01-01

    Hearing loss was the second-most common illness reported to the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) in 2009. Furthermore, between 2000 and 2010, 30% of all noise-related injury complaints reported to MSHA were for coal preparation plant employees. Previous National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) studies have shown that vibrating screens are key noise sources to address in order to reduce coal preparation plant noise. In response, NIOSH researchers have developed...

  2. Acoustic noise radiated by PWM-controlled induction machine drives

    Lo, W.C.; Chan, C.C.; Zhu, Z Q; Xu, L.; Howe, D.; Chau, K. T.

    2000-01-01

    This paper investigates the acoustic noise radiated from two nominally identical induction motors when fed from sinusoidal, and asymmetric regular sampling subharmonic and space-vector pulsewidth modulation (PWM) converters. The theory for analyzing the noise spectrum is developed further to account for the interaction between the motor and the drive. It is shown that manufacturing tolerances can result in significant differences in the noise level emitted from nominally identical motors, and...

  3. Noise Control And Speech Intelligibility Improvement Of A Toll Plaza

    Mongeau, Luc; Bernhard, Robert J.; Feist, Jeffery P.

    2002-01-01

    Vehicular toll roads are one component of many municipal transportation systems. Open communication windows, often used in tollbooths, facilitate essential communication and monetary transactions. However, the vehicle noise generated outside the booth is easily transmitted into the booth via the open window. Personnel working at toll collection plazas are exposed to extended, continuous traffic noise. Sustained noise levels of this nature may cause hearing loss, induce fatigue or stress, and ...

  4. 'NASA Invention of the Year' Controls Noise and Vibration

    2007-01-01

    Developed at NASA's Langley Research Center, the Macro-Fiber Composite (MFC) is designed to control vibration, noise, and deflections in composite structural beams and panels. Smart Material Corporation specializes in the development of piezocomposite components, and licensed the MFC technology from Langley in 2002. To date, Smart Material Corporation has sold MFCs to over 120 customers, including such industry giants as Volkswagen, Toyota, Honda, BMW, General Electric, and the tennis company, HEAD. The company estimates that its customers have filed at least 100 patents for their various unique uses of the technology. In addition, the company's product portfolio has grown to include piezoceramic fibers and fiber composites, piezoceramic actuators and sensors, and test equipment for these products. It also offers a compact, lightweight power system for MFC testing and validation. Consumer applications already on the market include piezoelectric systems as part of audio speakers, phonograph cartridges and microphones, and recreational products requiring vibration control, such as skis, snowboards, baseball bats, hockey sticks, and tennis racquets.

  5. Improper activation of D1 and D2 receptors leads to excess noise in prefrontal cortex

    Michael eAvery

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The dopaminergic system has been shown to control the amount of noise in the prefrontal cortex (PFC and likely plays an important role in working memory and the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. We developed a model that takes into account the known receptor distributions of D1 and D2 receptors, the changes these receptors have on neuron response properties, as well as identified circuitry involved in working memory. Our model suggests that D1 receptor under-stimulation in supragranular layers gates internal noise into the PFC leading to cognitive symptoms as has been proposed in attention disorders, while D2 over-stimulation gates noise into the PFC by over-activation of cortico-striatal projecting neurons in infragranular layers. We apply this model in the context of a memory-guided saccade paradigm and show deficits similar to those observed in schizophrenic patients. We also show set-shifting impairments similar to those observed in rodents with D1 and D2 receptor manipulations. We discuss how the introduction of noise through changes in D1 and D2 receptor activation may account for many of the symptoms of schizophrenia depending on where this dysfunction occurs in the PFC.

  6. Active noise canceling system for mechanically cooled germanium radiation detectors

    Nelson, Karl Einar; Burks, Morgan T

    2014-04-22

    A microphonics noise cancellation system and method for improving the energy resolution for mechanically cooled high-purity Germanium (HPGe) detector systems. A classical adaptive noise canceling digital processing system using an adaptive predictor is used in an MCA to attenuate the microphonics noise source making the system more deployable.

  7. Automotive applications of rapid prototyping for active vibration control

    Bohn, C.; Svaricek, F. [Continental Gummi-Werke AG, Hannover (Germany); Karkosch, H.J.; Marienfeld, P.M. [ContiTech Vibration Control GmbH, Hannover (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    This paper presents some recent results of Continental's research and development activities in the area of active vibration control. First, a brief overview of different approaches to active noise and vibration control is given. This is followed by a discussion of the rapid controller prototyping process that is currently being introduced. Finally, some experimental results obtained in cooperation with an automobile manufacturer are presented. These results demonstrate that major noise and vibration attenuation can be achieved through active vibration control in automobiles. (orig.)

  8. Noise focusing and the emergence of coherent activity in neuronal cultures

    Orlandi, Javier G.; Soriano, Jordi; Alvarez-Lacalle, Enrique; Teller, Sara; Casademunt, Jaume

    2013-09-01

    At early stages of development, neuronal cultures in vitro spontaneously reach a coherent state of collective firing in a pattern of nearly periodic global bursts. Although understanding the spontaneous activity of neuronal networks is of chief importance in neuroscience, the origin and nature of that pulsation has remained elusive. By combining high-resolution calcium imaging with modelling in silico, we show that this behaviour is controlled by the propagation of waves that nucleate randomly in a set of points that is specific to each culture and is selected by a non-trivial interplay between dynamics and topology. The phenomenon is explained by the noise focusing effect--a strong spatio-temporal localization of the noise dynamics that originates in the complex structure of avalanches of spontaneous activity. Results are relevant to neuronal tissues and to complex networks with integrate-and-fire dynamics and metric correlations, for instance, in rumour spreading on social networks.

  9. Active control of transmitted sound in buildings

    Thompsett, Russell Harvey George

    The problem of noise from neighbours has increased dramatically over the last few years. Many of the noise complaints are due to the high level, low frequency noise from modern stereo equipment, and are often described in terms of the low frequency characteristics of the music; the repetitive, booming, bass beat. The objective of this research was to establish the feasibility of applying active noise control to alleviate this problem. The initial approach was to evaluate the possibility of exploiting the dominance of individual modes in the response of rooms at low frequency to effect global control. However, initial investigations using a modal model of the sound field revealed that this would be difficult due to the contribution of many acoustic modes excited off resonance. This conclusion was supported by measurements of acoustic room responses in typical buildings, illustrating a non-resonant characteristic. Consequently, attention was turned to the feasibility of using local active control systems to create zones of quiet by concentrating control at a specific location near the observers ears, for example in a seat headrest, or near the pillows of a bed. The lack of a reference signal in either approach requires the use of a feedback control strategy. With a typically non-resonant system, the predictability in the disturbance necessary for successful feedback control must be contained in the primary excitation, namely the music. Examples of different music styles were investigated and of those with the potential to be a nuisance surprisingly few were significantly more predictable than a random disturbance. As expected the most encouraging control performance simulations were found for modern dance music, with a strong repetitive beat. A real-time, local controller was demonstrated in the laboratory with such a disturbance signal and the properties of the quiet zone were measured. The subjective response when hearing the controller in operation was found to be

  10. Updating working memory in aircraft noise and speech noise causes different fMRI activations

    Sætrevik, Bjørn; Sörqvist, Patrik

    2014-01-01

    The present study used fMRI/BOLD neuroimaging to investigate how visual-verbal working memory is updated when exposed to three different background-noise conditions: speech noise, aircraft noise and silence. The number-updating task that was used can distinguish between “substitution processes,” which involve adding new items to the working memory representation and suppressing old items, and “exclusion processes,” which involve rejecting new items and maintaining an intact memory set. The cu...

  11. Industrial Noise Pollution and the Need for Applying Protocols for its Control and Decrease

    Parvin Nasiri

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available Industrialization has had many complications for human beings and has been a threat to social mental and physical health. Vibration induced noises in the workplace is one of the main devastating factor in producing hearing loss in workers. Recently, several investigations on the issue of noise pollution and noise dosimetry and also Noise induced hearing loss have been developed. In the current article we will have a look and sometimes reconsideration on the results and of these studies and will discuss the findings in regard to noise control and management in details.

  12. Dopamine Activation Preserves Visual Motion Perception Despite Noise Interference of Human V5/MT

    Yousif, Nada; Fu, Richard Z.; Abou-El-Ela Bourquin, Bilal; Bhrugubanda, Vamsee; Schultz, Simon R.

    2016-01-01

    When processing sensory signals, the brain must account for noise, both noise in the stimulus and that arising from within its own neuronal circuitry. Dopamine receptor activation is known to enhance both visual cortical signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) and visual perceptual performance; however, it is unknown whether these two dopamine-mediated phenomena are linked. To assess this, we used single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) applied to visual cortical area V5/MT to reduce the SNR focally and thus disrupt visual motion discrimination performance to visual targets located in the same retinotopic space. The hypothesis that dopamine receptor activation enhances perceptual performance by improving cortical SNR predicts that dopamine activation should antagonize TMS disruption of visual perception. We assessed this hypothesis via a double-blinded, placebo-controlled study with the dopamine receptor agonists cabergoline (a D2 agonist) and pergolide (a D1/D2 agonist) administered in separate sessions (separated by 2 weeks) in 12 healthy volunteers in a William's balance-order design. TMS degraded visual motion perception when the evoked phosphene and the visual stimulus overlapped in time and space in the placebo and cabergoline conditions, but not in the pergolide condition. This suggests that dopamine D1 or combined D1 and D2 receptor activation enhances cortical SNR to boost perceptual performance. That local visual cortical excitability was unchanged across drug conditions suggests the involvement of long-range intracortical interactions in this D1 effect. Because increased internal noise (and thus lower SNR) can impair visual perceptual learning, improving visual cortical SNR via D1/D2 agonist therapy may be useful in boosting rehabilitation programs involving visual perceptual training. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In this study, we address the issue of whether dopamine activation improves visual perception despite increasing sensory noise in the visual cortex

  13. FIACH: A biophysical model for automatic retrospective noise control in fMRI.

    Tierney, Tim M; Weiss-Croft, Louise J; Centeno, Maria; Shamshiri, Elhum A; Perani, Suejen; Baldeweg, Torsten; Clark, Christopher A; Carmichael, David W

    2016-01-01

    Different noise sources in fMRI acquisition can lead to spurious false positives and reduced sensitivity. We have developed a biophysically-based model (named FIACH: Functional Image Artefact Correction Heuristic) which extends current retrospective noise control methods in fMRI. FIACH can be applied to both General Linear Model (GLM) and resting state functional connectivity MRI (rs-fcMRI) studies. FIACH is a two-step procedure involving the identification and correction of non-physiological large amplitude temporal signal changes and spatial regions of high temporal instability. We have demonstrated its efficacy in a sample of 42 healthy children while performing language tasks that include overt speech with known activations. We demonstrate large improvements in sensitivity when FIACH is compared with current methods of retrospective correction. FIACH reduces the confounding effects of noise and increases the study's power by explaining significant variance that is not contained within the commonly used motion parameters. The method is particularly useful in detecting activations in inferior temporal regions which have proven problematic for fMRI. We have shown greater reproducibility and robustness of fMRI responses using FIACH in the context of task induced motion. In a clinical setting this will translate to increasing the reliability and sensitivity of fMRI used for the identification of language lateralisation and eloquent cortex. FIACH can benefit studies of cognitive development in young children, patient populations and older adults. PMID:26416652

  14. Noise Temperature Characteristics and Gain-control of Avalanche Photodiodes for Laser Radar

    CAI Xi-ping; SHANG Hong-Bo; BAI Ji-yuan; YANG Shuang; WANG Li-na

    2008-01-01

    Avalanche photodiodes(APDs) are promising light sensors with high quantum efficiency and low noise. It has been extensively used in radiation detection, laser radar and other weak signal detection fields. Unlike other photodiodes, APD is a very sensitive light detector with very high internal gain. The basic theory shows that the gain of APD is related to the temperature. The internal gain fluctuates with the variation of temperature. Investigated was the influence of the variation of the gain induced by the fluctuation of temperature on the output from APD for a very weak laser pulse input in laser radar. An active reverse-biased voltage compensation method is used to stabilize the gain of APD. An APD model is setup to simulate the detection of light pulse signal. The avalanche process, various noises and temperature's effect are all included in the model. Our results show that for the detection of weak light signal such as in laser radar, even a very small fluctuation of temperature could cause a great effect on APD's gain. The results show that the signal-to-noise ratio of the APD's output could be improved effectively with the active gain-control system.

  15. Inertia Wheel on Low-Noise Active Magnetic Suspension

    Carabelli, S.; Genta, G.; Silvagni, M.; Tonoli, A.

    2002-01-01

    Magnetic bearings are particularly suited for space applications for a number of reasons: - they are ideally suited for vacuum applications; - the lack of lubrication and wear enhances the reliability and guaranties a long maintenance-free operation - the low drag torque decreases power consumption and reduces the torque exerted on the stator of the machine. - the possibility of insulating actively the spacecraft from the excitation due to unbalance of the rotating system In the case of reaction wheels, a well designed magnetic suspension allows high speed operation with a very low power consumption and vibration level. Conversely, microgravity (and possibly vacuum) operation is an advantage for magnetic bearings. The absence of static forces allows to operate with low current levels, thus reducing electrical noise and allowing to reach even lower vibration levels than in Earth applications of magnetic bearings. Active magnetic bearings (AMB) allow to adapt the working characteristics of the system to the operating needs: it is possible to use the actuators to lock the system during launch (absence of grabbers) and to stiffen the suspension when the spacecraft is accelerated (impulsive phases), while working in conditions optimised for microgravity when this is needed. Magnetic suspension systems designed for microgravity environment cannot be correctly tested on the ground. Testing in ground conditions results in the need of grossly overdesigning the levitation device; furthermore, in some cases ground testing is completely impossible, if not by introducing devices which compensate for the Earth gravitational field. If the compensation for the gravitational force is supplied by the same actuators used for microgravity operation, the actuators and the power amplifiers must be overdesigned and in some cases the suspension can be altogether impossible. They work in conditions which are much different from nominal ones and, above all, it is impossible to reach the

  16. Improving postural control by applying mechanical noise to ankle muscle tendons.

    Borel, Liliane; Ribot-Ciscar, Edith

    2016-08-01

    The application of subthreshold mechanical vibrations with random frequencies (white mechanical noise) to ankle muscle tendons is known to increase muscle proprioceptive information and to improve the detection of ankle movements. The aim of the present study was to analyze the effect of this mechanical noise on postural control, its possible modulation according to the sensory strategies used for postural control, and the consequences of increasing postural difficulty. The upright stance of 20 healthy young participants tested with their eyes closed was analyzed during the application of four different levels of noise and compared to that in the absence of noise (control) in three conditions: static, static on foam, and dynamic (sinusoidal translation). The quiet standing condition was conducted with the eyes open and closed to determine the subjects' visual dependency to maintain postural stability. Postural performance was assessed using posturographic and motion analysis evaluations. The results in the static condition showed that the spectral power density of body sway significantly decreased with an optimal level of noise and that the higher the spectral power density without noise, the greater the noise effect, irrespective of visual dependency. Finally, noise application was ineffective in the foam and dynamic conditions. We conclude that the application of mechanical noise to ankle muscle tendons is a means to improve quiet standing only. These results suggest that mechanical noise stimulation may be more effective in more impaired populations. PMID:27021075

  17. Control of linear accelerator noise in the Los Alamos free-electron laser (FEL)

    The Los Alamos FEL requires tight control of the amplitudes and phases of the fields in two linear accelerator tanks to obtain stable lasing. The accelerator control loops must establish constant, stable, repeatable amplitudes and phases of the rf fields and must have excellent bandwidth to control high-frequency noise components. A model of the feedback loops has been developed that agrees well with measurements and allows easy substitution of components and circuits, thus reducing breadboarding requirements. The model permits both frequency and time-domain analysis. This paper describes the accelerator control scheme and our model and discusses the control of noise in feedback loops, showing how low-frequency-noise components (errors) can be corrected, but high-frequency-noise components (errors) are actually amplified by the feedback circuit. Measurements of noise in both open- and closed-loop modes are shown and comparison is made with results from the model calculations

  18. Jet Engine Noise Generation, Prediction and Control. Chapter 86

    Huff, Dennis L.; Envia, Edmane

    2004-01-01

    Aircraft noise has been a problem near airports for many years. It is a quality of life issue that impacts millions of people around the world. Solving this problem has been the principal goal of noise reduction research that began when commercial jet travel became a reality. While progress has been made in reducing both airframe and engine noise, historically, most of the aircraft noise reduction efforts have concentrated on the engines. This was most evident during the 1950 s and 1960 s when turbojet engines were in wide use. This type of engine produces high velocity hot exhaust jets during takeoff generating a great deal of noise. While there are fewer commercial aircraft flying today with turbojet engines, supersonic aircraft including high performance military aircraft use engines with similar exhaust flow characteristics. The Pratt & Whitney F100-PW-229, pictured in Figure la, is an example of an engine that powers the F-15 and F-16 fighter jets. The turbofan engine was developed for subsonic transports, which in addition to better fuel efficiency also helped mitigate engine noise by reducing the jet exhaust velocity. These engines were introduced in the late 1960 s and power most of the commercial fleet today. Over the years, the bypass ratio (that is the ratio of the mass flow through the fan bypass duct to the mass flow through the engine core) has increased to values approaching 9 for modern turbofans such as the General Electric s GE-90 engine (Figure lb). The benefits to noise reduction for high bypass ratio (HPBR) engines are derived from lowering the core jet velocity and temperature, and lowering the tip speed and pressure ratio of the fan, both of which are the consequences of the increase in bypass ratio. The HBPR engines are typically very large in diameter and can produce over 100,000 pounds of thrust for the largest engines. A third type of engine flying today is the turbo-shaft which is mainly used to power turboprop aircraft and helicopters

  19. Distinct promoter activation mechanisms modulate noise-driven HIV gene expression

    Chavali, Arvind K.; Wong, Victor C.; Miller-Jensen, Kathryn

    2015-12-01

    Latent human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections occur when the virus occupies a transcriptionally silent but reversible state, presenting a major obstacle to cure. There is experimental evidence that random fluctuations in gene expression, when coupled to the strong positive feedback encoded by the HIV genetic circuit, act as a ‘molecular switch’ controlling cell fate, i.e., viral replication versus latency. Here, we implemented a stochastic computational modeling approach to explore how different promoter activation mechanisms in the presence of positive feedback would affect noise-driven activation from latency. We modeled the HIV promoter as existing in one, two, or three states that are representative of increasingly complex mechanisms of promoter repression underlying latency. We demonstrate that two-state and three-state models are associated with greater variability in noisy activation behaviors, and we find that Fano factor (defined as variance over mean) proves to be a useful noise metric to compare variability across model structures and parameter values. Finally, we show how three-state promoter models can be used to qualitatively describe complex reactivation phenotypes in response to therapeutic perturbations that we observe experimentally. Ultimately, our analysis suggests that multi-state models more accurately reflect observed heterogeneous reactivation and may be better suited to evaluate how noise affects viral clearance.

  20. Contemporary theories of 1/f noise in motor control.

    Diniz, Ana; Wijnants, Maarten L; Torre, Kjerstin; Barreiros, João; Crato, Nuno; Bosman, Anna M T; Hasselman, Fred; Cox, Ralf F A; Van Orden, Guy C; Delignières, Didier

    2011-10-01

    1/f noise has been discovered in a number of time series collected in psychological and behavioral experiments. This ubiquitous phenomenon has been ignored for a long time and classical models were not designed for accounting for these long-range correlations. The aim of this paper is to present and discuss contrasted theoretical perspectives on 1/f noise, in order to provide a comprehensive overview of current debates in this domain. In a first part, we propose a formal definition of the phenomenon of 1/f noise, and we present some commonly used methods for measuring long-range correlations in time series. In a second part, we develop a theoretical position that considers 1/f noise as the hallmark of system complexity. From this point of view, 1/f noise emerges from the coordination of the many elements that compose the system. In a third part, we present a theoretical counterpoint suggesting that 1/f noise could emerge from localized sources within the system. In conclusion, we try to draw some lines of reasoning for going beyond the opposition between these two approaches. PMID:21196059

  1. Quantum control with noisy fields: computational complexity versus sensitivity to noise

    A closed quantum system is defined as completely controllable if an arbitrary unitary transformation can be executed using the available controls. In practice, control fields are a source of unavoidable noise, which has to be suppressed to retain controllability. Can one design control fields such that the effect of noise is negligible on the time-scale of the transformation? This question is intimately related to the fundamental problem of a connection between the computational complexity of the control problem and the sensitivity of the controlled system to noise. The present study considers a paradigm of control, where the Lie-algebraic structure of the control Hamiltonian is fixed, while the size of the system increases with the dimension of the Hilbert space representation of the algebra. We find two types of control tasks, easy and hard. Easy tasks are characterized by a small variance of the evolving state with respect to the operators of the control operators. They are relatively immune to noise and the control field is easy to find. Hard tasks have a large variance, are sensitive to noise and the control field is hard to find. The influence of noise increases with the size of the system, which is measured by the scaling factor N of the largest weight of the representation. For fixed time and control field the ability to control degrades as O(N) for easy tasks and as O(N2) for hard tasks. As a consequence, even in the most favorable estimate, for large quantum systems, generic noise in the controls dominates for a typical class of target transformations, i.e. complete controllability is destroyed by noise. (paper)

  2. Delayed feedback as a means of control of noise-induced motion

    Janson, N. B.; A. G. Balanov; Schoell, E.

    2003-01-01

    Time--delayed feedback is exploited for controlling noise--induced motion in coherence resonance oscillators. Namely, under the proper choice of time delay, one can either increase or decrease the regularity of motion. It is shown that in an excitable system, delayed feedback can stabilize the frequency of oscillations against variation of noise strength. Also, for fixed noise intensity, the phenomenon of entrainment of the basic oscillation period by the delayed feedback occurs. This allows ...

  3. Active control of smart structures : an overall approach

    Nestorović Tamara; Trajkov Miroslav

    2010-01-01

    The paper presents active control of smart structures within a focused frame of piezoelectric applications in active vibration and noise attenuation with potentials for the use in mechanical and civil engineering. An overall approach to active control of piezoelectric structures involves subsequent steps of modeling, control, simulation, experimental verification and implementation. Each of these steps is regarded in details. Different application examples showing the feasibility of the activ...

  4. Noise control, sound, and the vehicle design process

    Donavan, Paul

    2005-09-01

    For many products, noise and sound are viewed as necessary evils that need to be dealt with in order to bring the product successfully to market. They are generally not product ``exciters'' although some vehicle manufacturers do tune and advertise specific sounds to enhance the perception of their products. In this paper, influencing the design process for the ``evils,'' such as wind noise and road noise, are considered in more detail. There are three ingredients to successfully dealing with the evils in the design process. The first of these is knowing how excesses in noise effects the end customer in a tangible manner and how that effects customer satisfaction and ultimately sells. The second is having and delivering the knowledge of what is required of the design to achieve a satisfactory or even better level of noise performance. The third ingredient is having the commitment of the designers to incorporate the knowledge into their part, subsystem or system. In this paper, the elements of each of these ingredients are discussed in some detail and the attributes of a successful design process are enumerated.

  5. Control of noise in magnetic multilayers by spin torque

    Rebei, Adnan

    2012-02-01

    In this work we show that the stability of magnetic nanostructures can be enhanced by time-dependent spin momentum transfer. Building reliable magnetic devices at smaller scales need to address the issue of thermal noise. Using two commonly studied magnetic systems with multiple stable states at zero temperature as examples, we show that periodic spin torques can enhance the stability of the system and hence suppress the noise due to interwell transitions. In the case of weak periodic spin torques, stochastic resonance which is usually associated with ac magnetic fields is also manifested for non-conservative torques. In more complex systems with a relatively low energy barrier, it is shown that high frequency spin torques can inhibit interwell transitions and in effect suppress the telegraph noise due to the switching between neigboring states.

  6. Noise shielding using active acoustic metamaterials with electronically tunable acoustic impedance

    Mokrý, P.; Steiger, Kateřina; Václavík, J.; Psota, Pavel; Doleček, Roman; Márton, P.; Kodejška, M.; Černík, M.

    Toowong DC QLD 4066: The Australian Acoustical Society, 2014 - (Davy, J.; Don, C.; McMinn, T.; Dowsett, L.; Broner, N.; Burgess, M.), s. 1-9 ISBN 978-0-909882-04-4. [Internoise 2014 Conference. Melbourne (AU), 16.11.2014-19.11.2014] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1206; GA ČR GA13-10365S Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : Active Acoustic Metamaterial * Noise Shielding * Electronic Control of Acoustic Impedance Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering http://www.acoustics.asn.au/conference_proceedings/INTERNOISE2014/papers/p834.pdf

  7. Effect of Unpleasant Loud Noise on Hippocampal Activities during Picture Encoding: An fMRI Study

    Hirano, Yoshiyuki; Fujita, Masafumi; Watanabe, Kazuko; Niwa, Masami; Takahashi, Toru; Kanematsu, Masayuki; Ido, Yasushi; Tomida, Mihoko; Onozuka, Minoru

    2006-01-01

    The functional link between the amygdala and hippocampus in humans has not been well documented. We examined the effect of unpleasant loud noise on hippocampal and amygdaloid activities during picture encoding by means of fMRI, and on the correct response in humans. The noise reduced activity in the hippocampus during picture encoding, decreased…

  8. Contemporary theories of 1/f noise in motor control

    Diniz, A.; Wijnants, M.L.; Torre, K.; Barreiros, J.; Crato, N.; Bosman, A.M.T.; Hasselman, F.; Cox, R.F.A.; Orden, G.C. van; Delignieres, D.

    2011-01-01

    1/f noise has been discovered in a number of time series collected in psychological and behavioral experiments. This ubiquitous phenomenon has been ignored for a long time and classical models were not designed for accounting for these long-range correlations. The aim of this paper is to present and

  9. Active Fluid Borne Noise Reduction for Aviation Hydraulic Pumps

    Waitschat, Arne; Thielecke, Frank; Behr, Robert M.; Heise, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    The aviation environment holds challenging application constraints for efficient hydraulic system noise reduction devices. Besides strong limits on component weight and size, high safety and reliability standards demand simple solutions. Hence, basic silencers like inline expansion chambers and Helmholtz-Resonators are state-of-the-art aboard commercial aircrafts. Unfortunately, they do not meet today’s noise attenuation aims regarding passenger comfort and equipment durability. Significant a...

  10. Industrial Noise

    Mehran zolfaghari

    1996-01-01

    Various risk factors in industrial environments can affect hearing status and healthy in today’s modern society. Noise control and hearing conservation program is very crucial in preventing workers exposed to high levels of noise in the work places. In the current article we are going to discuss issues such as industrial noise control, noise characteristics and standards and techniques for noise control. Then the methods for individual hearing conservation and medical care will be described i...

  11. Noise-enhanced stability and double stochastic resonance of active Brownian motion

    Zeng, Chunhua; Zhang, Chun; Zeng, Jiakui; Liu, Ruifen; Wang, Hua

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we study the transient and resonant properties of active Brownian particles (ABPs) in the Rayleigh-Helmholtz (RH) and Schweitzer-Ebeling-Tilch (SET) models, which is driven by the simultaneous action of multiplicative and additive noise and periodic forcing. It is shown that the cross-correlation between two noises (λ) can break the symmetry of the potential to generate motion of the ABPs. In case of no correlation between two noises, the mean first passage time (MFPT) is a monotonic decrease depending on the multiplicative noise, however in case of correlation between two noises, the MFPT exhibits a maximum, depending on the multiplicative noise for both models, this maximum for MFPT identifies the noise-enhanced stability (NES) effect of the ABPs. By comparing with case of no correlation (λ =0.0 ), we find two maxima in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) depending on the cross-correlation intensity, i.e. the double stochastic resonance is shown in both models. For the RH model, the SNR exhibits two maxima depending on the multiplicative noise for small cross-correlation intensity, while in the SET model, it exhibits only a maximum depending on the multiplicative noise. Whether λ =0.0 or not, the MFPT is a monotonic decrease, and the SNR exhibits a maximum, depending on the additive noise in both models.

  12. Inexact fuzzy integer chance constraint programming approach for noise control within an urban environment

    Huang, Kai; Huang, Gordon; Dai, Liming; Fan, Yurui

    2016-08-01

    This article introduces an inexact fuzzy integer chance constraint programming (IFICCP) approach for identifying noise reduction strategy under uncertainty. The IFICCP method integrates the interval programming and fuzzy chance constraint programming approaches into a framework, which is able to deal with uncertainties expressed as intervals and fuzziness. The proposed IFICCP model can be converted into two deterministic submodels corresponding to the optimistic and pessimistic conditions. The modelling approach is applied to a hypothetical control measure selection problem for noise reduction. Results of the case study indicate that useful solutions for noise control practices can be acquired. Three acceptable noise levels for two communities are considered. For each acceptable noise level, several decision alternatives have been obtained and analysed under different fuzzy confidence levels, which reflect the trade-offs between environmental and economic considerations.

  13. Visual signal detection in structured backgrounds. II. Effects of contrast gain control, background variations, and white noise

    Eckstein, M. P.; Ahumada, A. J. Jr; Watson, A. B.

    1997-01-01

    Studies of visual detection of a signal superimposed on one of two identical backgrounds show performance degradation when the background has high contrast and is similar in spatial frequency and/or orientation to the signal. To account for this finding, models include a contrast gain control mechanism that pools activity across spatial frequency, orientation and space to inhibit (divisively) the response of the receptor sensitive to the signal. In tasks in which the observer has to detect a known signal added to one of M different backgrounds grounds due to added visual noise, the main sources of degradation are the stochastic noise in the image and the suboptimal visual processing. We investigate how these two sources of degradation (contrast gain control and variations in the background) interact in a task in which the signal is embedded in one of M locations in a complex spatially varying background (structured background). We use backgrounds extracted from patient digital medical images. To isolate effects of the fixed deterministic background (the contrast gain control) from the effects of the background variations, we conduct detection experiments with three different background conditions: (1) uniform background, (2) a repeated sample of structured background, and (3) different samples of structured background. Results show that human visual detection degrades from the uniform background condition to the repeated background condition and degrades even further in the different backgrounds condition. These results suggest that both the contrast gain control mechanism and the background random variations degrade human performance in detection of a signal in a complex, spatially varying background. A filter model and added white noise are used to generate estimates of sampling efficiencies, an equivalent internal noise, an equivalent contrast-gain-control-induced noise, and an equivalent noise due to the variations in the structured background.

  14. Multichannel control systems for the attenuation of interior road noise in vehicles

    Cheer, Jordan; Elliott, Stephen J.

    2015-08-01

    This paper considers the active control of road noise in vehicles, using either multichannel feedback control, with both headrest and floor positioned microphones providing feedback error signals, or multichannel feedforward control, in which reference signals are provided by the microphones on the vehicle floor and error signals are provided by the microphones mounted on the headrests. The formulation of these control problems is shown to be similar if the constraints of robust stability, limited disturbance enhancement and open-loop stability are imposed. A novel formulation is presented for disturbance enhancement in multichannel systems, which limits the maximum enhancement of each individual error signal. The performance of these two systems is predicted using plant responses and disturbance signals measured in a small city car. The reduction in the sum of the squared pressure signals at the four error microphones for both systems is found to be up to 8 dB at low frequencies and 3 dB on average, where the sound level is particularly high from 80 to 180 Hz. The performance of both systems is found to be robust to measured variations in the plant responses. The enhancements in the disturbance at higher frequencies are smaller for the feedback controller than for the feedforward controller, although the performance of the feedback controller is more significantly reduced by the introduction of additional delay in the plant response.

  15. A Kalman filter for feedback control of rotating external kink instabilities in the presence of noise

    The simulation and experimental optimization of a Kalman filter feedback control algorithm for n=1 tokamak external kink modes are reported. In order to achieve the highest plasma pressure limits in ITER, resistive wall mode stabilization is required [T. C. Hender et al., Nucl. Fusion 47, S128 (2007)] and feedback algorithms will need to distinguish the mode from noise due to other magnetohydrodynamic activity. The Kalman filter contains an internal model that captures the dynamics of a rotating, growing n=1 mode. This model is actively compared with real-time measurements to produce an optimal estimate for the mode's amplitude and phase. On the High Beta Tokamak-Extended Pulse experiment [T. H. Ivers et al., Phys. Plasmas 3, 1926 (1996)], the Kalman filter algorithm is implemented using a set of digital, field-programmable gate array controllers with 10 μs latencies. Signals from an array of 20 poloidal sensor coils are used to measure the n=1 mode, and the feedback control is applied using 40 poloidally and toroidally localized control coils. The feedback system with the Kalman filter is able to suppress the external kink mode over a broad range of phase angles between the sensed mode and applied control field. Scans of filter parameters show good agreement between simulation and experiment, and feedback suppression and excitation of the kink mode are enhanced in experiments when a filter made using optimal parameters from the scans is used.

  16. Electrical Maxwell Demon and Szilard Engine Utilizing Johnson Noise, Measurement, Logic and Control

    Kish, Laszlo Bela; Granqvist, Claes-Göran

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a purely electrical version of Maxwell's demon which does not involve mechanically moving parts such as trapdoors, etc. It consists of a capacitor, resistors, amplifiers, logic circuitry and electronically controlled switches and uses thermal noise in resistors (Johnson noise) to pump heat. The only types of energy of importance in this demon are electrical energy and heat. We also demonstrate an entirely electrical version of Szilard's engine, i.e., an information-controlled dev...

  17. THACO, a Test Facility for Characterizing the Noise Performance of Active Antenna Arrays

    Woestenburg, E E M; Ruiter, M; Ivashina, M V; Witvers, R H

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses an outdoor test facility for the noise characterization of active antenna arrays, using measurement results of array noise temperatures in the order of 50 K for a number of small aperture arrays. The measurement results are obtained by a Y-factor method with hot and a cold noise sources, with an absorber at room temperature as the hot load and the cold sky as the cold load. The effect of shielding the arrays by the test facility, with respect to noise and RFI from the environment, will also be discussed.

  18. Active absorber for damping audio-frequency noise emissions at wind power plants. Active vibration damping; Aktiver Tilger zur Unterdrueckung tonaler Schallemissionen an Windenergieanlagen. Aktive Schwingungstilgung

    Neugebauer, R.; Linke, M.; Kunze, H.; Ullrich, M. [Fraunhofer Institut fuer Werkzeugmaschinen und Umformtechnik (IWU), Chemnitz / Dresden (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Structural vibrations of a wind turbine's drive train are one of the main reasons for noise emissions. Mechanical vibrations are transferred through the structure and emitted as noise by large surfaces, e.g. tower and nacelle. Dominant vibration excitation is caused for example by the gear mesh. If the gear mesh frequency is coinciding with the frequency of a structural resonance, the emitted noise contains noticeable single tones. German immission control law requires a ''tonal penalty'' up to 6 dB, if the emitted noise contains annoying tones. To ensure compliance with immission limits those tones must be reduced or eliminated. For wind turbines running with variable speed an active vibration absorber has been developed, whose absorber frequency and damping is adapted corresponding to the alternating vibration excitation. (orig.)

  19. Resonant-Like Activation in a Bistable System with Noise and Time Delay

    NIE Lin-Ru; GONG Ai-Ling; MEI Dong-Cheng

    2009-01-01

    A bistable system with noise and time delay is investigated.Theoretical analysis and stochastic simulation show that:(i) In the case of a system driven only by multiplicative Gaussian white noise,the mean first-passage time for a particle to reach the other stable state from one stable state exhibits a minimum with respect to delay time,i.e.,a resonant-like activation (RA) phenomenon.(ii) In the action of additive and multiplicative noise,as the additive noise intensity increases,no matter whether a correlation between the two types of noise exists or not,the RA gradually disappears.(iii) The correlation strength between the two types of noise does not influence the existence of the RA.

  20. Electromyographic Activity in the EEG in Alzheimer's Disease: Noise or Signal?

    Karin van der Hiele

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Many efforts have been directed at negating the influence of electromyographic (EMG activity on the EEG, especially in elderly demented patients. We wondered whether these “artifacts” might reflect cognitive and behavioural aspects of dementia. In this pilot study, 11 patients with probable Alzheimer's disease (AD, 13 with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI and 13 controls underwent EEG registration. As EMG measures, we used frontal and temporal 50–70 Hz activity. We found that the EEGs of AD patients displayed more theta activity, less alpha reactivity, and more frontal EMG than controls. Interestingly, increased EMG activity indicated more cognitive impairment and more depressive complaints. EEG variables on the whole distinguished better between groups than EMG variables, but an EMG variable was best for the distinction between MCI and controls. Our results suggest that EMG activity in the EEG could be more than noise; it differs systematically between groups and may reflect different cerebral functions than the EEG.

  1. A noise filtering algorithm for the MFTF-B computer based control system

    An algorithm to reduce the message traffic in the MFTF-B computer based control system is described. The algorithm filters analog inputs to the control system. Its purpose is to distinguish between changes in the inputs due to noise and changes due to significant variations in the quantity being monitored. Noise is rejected while significant changes are reported to the control system data base, thus keeping the data base updated with a minimum number of messages. The algorithm is memory efficient, requiring only four bytes of storage per analog channel, and computationally simple, requiring only subtraction and comparison. Quantitative analysis of the algorithm is presented for the case of additive Gaussian noise. It is shown that the algorithm is stable and tends toward the mean value of the monitored variable over a wide variety of additive noise distributions

  2. Noise filtering algorithm for the MFTF-B computer based control system

    An algorithm to reduce the message traffic in the MFTF-B computer based control system is described. The algorithm filters analog inputs to the control system. Its purpose is to distinguish between changes in the inputs due to noise and changes due to significant variations in the quantity being monitored. Noise is rejected while significant changes are reported to the control system data base, thus keeping the data base updated with a minimum number of messages. The algorithm is memory efficient, requiring only four bytes of storage per analog channel, and computationally simple, requiring only subtraction and comparison. Quantitative analysis of the algorithm is presented for the case of additive Gaussian noise. It is shown that the algorithm is stable and tends toward the mean value of the monitored variable over a wide variety of additive noise distributions

  3. Transient finite element simulations and experiments on active control of sound transmission loss through plates

    Brink, Maarten Cornelis

    2008-01-01

    In this thesis the sound transmission loss of a plate has been investigated. It serves as an abstract model for the noise barrier between engine and passengers in a bus. A finite element simulation model has been developed to be able to predict the plate's noise reduction effect. To increase this reduction without adding too much mass, the integration of active noise control (ANC) has been investigated. The active system contained a controller, microphones and piezoelectric actuators. The inf...

  4. Introducing the Standard and Chart to Measure and Control the Motorcycle Noise Level

    S Farhang Dehghan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Sound of motorcycles plays an important role in noise pollution in big cities. This is due to the lack of national law or standards to control the noise of domestic and also imported motorcycles. This study tries to introduce a practical limit value in different stage of motorcycle life cycle by assessing their noise pollution. Materials and Methods: First the motorcycles noise standards at different countries were studied and they were compared with the results from noise level of 622 motorcycles in 3 different groups. The sample volume in each group corresponds to the amount of their annual production rate. Then using statistical tests, a limit was determined in which 90% of the domestic motorcycles can be covered. The limit is proposed as the standard for domestic motorcycle noise.Results: The limit for motorcycles of groups 1, 2 and 3were 84, 86 and 87 dB (A ,respectively in the TA stage. For the COP stage (Conformity of Production, the limit increases according to certain formula. In the end, a flowchart was proposed as a standard method for measuring the sound of motorcycles in the TA and COP stages was proposed.Conclusion: Noise level of the domestic motorcycles is at least 9 dB (A higher than the noise limit value of European motorcycle. If European limit value is considered for producing the national motorcycle, 90% of them will get out of production cycle and this would not be practical.

  5. Low noise frequency synthesizer with self-calibrated voltage controlled oscillator and accurate AFC algorithm

    A low noise phase locked loop (PLL) frequency synthesizer implemented in 65 nm CMOS technology is introduced. A VCO noise reduction method suited for short channel design is proposed to minimize PLL output phase noise. A self-calibrated voltage controlled oscillator is proposed in cooperation with the automatic frequency calibration circuit, whose accurate binary search algorithm helps reduce the VCO tuning curve coverage, which reduces the VCO noise contribution at PLL output phase noise. A low noise, charge pump is also introduced to extend the tuning voltage range of the proposed VCO, which further reduces its phase noise contribution. The frequency synthesizer generates 9.75–11.5 GHz high frequency wide band local oscillator (LO) carriers. Tested 11.5 GHz LO bears a phase noise of−104 dBc/Hz at 1 MHz frequency offset. The total power dissipation of the proposed frequency synthesizer is 48 mW. The area of the proposed frequency synthesizer is 0.3 mm2, including bias circuits and buffers. (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  6. Environmental noise levels affect the activity budget of the Florida manatee

    Miksis-Olds, Jennifer L.; Donaghay, Percy L.; Miller, James H.; Tyack, Peter L.

    2005-09-01

    Manatees inhabit coastal bays, lagoons, and estuaries because they are dependent on the aquatic vegetation that grows in shallow waters. Food requirements force manatees to occupy the same areas in which human activities are the greatest. Noise produced from human activities has the potential to affect these animals by eliciting responses ranging from mild behavioral changes to extreme aversion. This study quantifies the behavioral responses of manatees to both changing levels of ambient noise and transient noise sources. Results indicate that elevated environmental noise levels do affect the overall activity budget of this species. The proportion of time manatees spend feeding, milling, and traveling in critical habitats changed as a function of noise level. More time was spent in the directed, goal-oriented behaviors of feeding and traveling, while less time was spent milling when noise levels were highest. The animals also responded to the transient noise of approaching vessels with changes in behavioral state and movements out of the geographical area. This suggests that manatees detect and respond to changes in environmental noise levels. Whether these changes legally constitute harassment and produce biologically significant effects need to be addressed with hypothesis-driven experiments and long-term monitoring. [For Animal Bioacoustics Best Student Paper Award.

  7. Optimal Flight for Ground Noise Reduction in Helicopter Landing Approach: Optimal Altitude and Velocity Control

    Tsuchiya, Takeshi; Ishii, Hirokazu; Uchida, Junichi; Gomi, Hiromi; Matayoshi, Naoki; Okuno, Yoshinori

    This study aims to obtain the optimal flights of a helicopter that reduce ground noise during landing approach with an optimization technique, and to conduct flight tests for confirming the effectiveness of the optimal solutions. Past experiments of Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) show that the noise of a helicopter varies significantly according to its flight conditions, especially depending on the flight path angle. We therefore build a simple noise model for a helicopter, in which the level of the noise generated from a point sound source is a function only of the flight path angle. Using equations of motion for flight in a vertical plane, we define optimal control problems for minimizing noise levels measured at points on the ground surface, and obtain optimal controls for specified initial altitudes, flight constraints, and wind conditions. The obtained optimal flights avoid the flight path angle which generates large noise and decrease the flight time, which are different from conventional flight. Finally, we verify the validity of the optimal flight patterns through flight experiments. The actual flights following the optimal paths resulted in noise reduction, which shows the effectiveness of the optimization.

  8. Fault-tolerant controlled quantum secure direct communication over a collective quantum noise channel

    This work proposes controlled quantum secure direct communication (CQSDC) over an ideal channel. Based on the proposed CQSDC, two fault-tolerant CQSDC protocols that are robust under two kinds of collective noises, collective-dephasing noise and collective-rotation noise, respectively, are constructed. Due to the use of quantum entanglement of the Bell state (or logical Bell state) as well as dense coding, the proposed protocols provide easier implementation as well as better qubit efficiency than other CQSDC protocols. Furthermore, the proposed protocols are also free from correlation-elicitation attack and other well-known attacks. (paper)

  9. High precision measurement of transistor noise with automatic calibration under computer control

    The preliminary selection of transistors for use in low noise pre-amplifiers requires the measurement of the equivalent noise voltage under various operating conditions including the temperature. Available equipment often lacks the necessary precision and is difficult to calibrate, especially when the device temperature is varied. Such equipment requires skill and patience from the operator. The authors describe a micro-computer controlled equipment which can measure transistor noise in the frequency range 10Hz to 100kHz to a greater accuracy than that previously obtainable. The transistor temperature and operating conditions may be scanned automatically over a wide range. Each measurement is internally calibrated

  10. The effect of human activities and their associated noise on ungulate behavior.

    Casey L Brown

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The effect of anthropogenic noise on terrestrial wildlife is a relatively new area of study with broad ranging management implications. Noise has been identified as a disturbance that has the potential to induce behavioral responses in animals similar to those associated with predation risk. This study investigated potential impacts of a variety of human activities and their associated noise on the behavior of elk (Cervus elaphus and pronghorn (Antilocapra americana along a transportation corridor in Grand Teton National Park. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We conducted roadside scan surveys and focal observations of ungulate behavior while concurrently recording human activity and anthropogenic noise. Although we expected ungulates to be more responsive with greater human activity and noise, as predicted by the risk disturbance hypothesis, they were actually less responsive (less likely to perform vigilant, flight, traveling and defensive behaviors with increasing levels of vehicle traffic, the human activity most closely associated with noise. Noise levels themselves had relatively little effect on ungulate behavior, although there was a weak negative relationship between noise and responsiveness in our scan samples. In contrast, ungulates did increase their responsiveness with other forms of anthropogenic disturbance; they reacted to the presence of pedestrians (in our scan samples and to passing motorcycles (in our focal observations. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that ungulates did not consistently associate noise and human activity with an increase in predation risk or that they could not afford to maintain responsiveness to the most frequent human stimuli. Although reduced responsiveness to certain disturbances may allow for greater investment in fitness-enhancing activities, it may also decrease detections of predators and other environmental cues and increase conflict with humans.

  11. Distinct noise-controlling roles of multiple negative feedback mechanisms in a prokaryotic operon system

    Nguyen, Lan K.; D. Kulasiri

    2011-01-01

    Molecular fluctuations are known to affect dynamics of cellular systems in important ways. Studies aimed at understanding how molecular systems of certain regulatory architectures control noise therefore become essential. The interplay between feedback regulation and noise has been previously explored for cellular networks governed by a single negative feedback loop. However, similar issues within networks consisting of more complex regulatory structures remain elusive. The authors investigat...

  12. Noise Control Using Coconut Coir Fiber Sound Absorber with Porous Layer Backing and Perforated Panel

    Rozli Zulkifli; Zulkarnain; Mohd J.M. Nor

    2010-01-01

    Problem statement: Noise control was one of the major requirements to improve the living environment. One of the methods to do that is provided by sound absorber. Commonly, multi-layer sound absorbers are applied to absorb broadband noise that was composed of perforated plates, air space and porous material. However, multi-layers sound absorbers effectiveness depends on their construction. This study was conducted to investigate the potential of using coconut coir fiber as sound absorber. The...

  13. Noise-induced cooperative dynamics and its control in coupled neuron models

    Hauschildt, B.; Janson, N. B.; Balanov, A.; Schoell, E.

    2006-01-01

    We investigate feedback control of the cooperative dynamics of two coupled neural oscillators that is induced merely by external noise. The interacting neurons are modelled as FitzHugh-Nagumo systems with parameter values at which no autonomous oscillations occur, and each unit is forced by its own source of random fluctuations. Application of delayed feedback to only one of two subsystems is shown to be able to change coherence and timescales of noise induced oscillations either in the given...

  14. Real-time shot-noise-limited differential photodetection for atomic quantum control

    Ciurana, F Martin; Sewell, Robert J; Mitchell, M W

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate high-efficiency, shot-noise-limited differential photodetection with real-time signal conditioning, suitable for feedback-based quantum control of atomic systems. The detector system has quantum efficiency of 0.92, is shot-noise limited from 7.4 x 10^5 to 3.7 x 10^8 photons per pulse, and provides real-time voltage-encoded output at up to 2.3 Mpulses per second.

  15. Lead-Lag Control for Helicopter Vibration and Noise Reduction

    Gandhi, Farhan

    1995-01-01

    As a helicopter transitions from hover to forward flight, the main rotor blades experience an asymmetry in flow field around the azimuth, with the blade section tangential velocities increasing on the advancing side and decreasing on the retreating side. To compensate for the reduced dynamic pressure on the retreating side, the blade pitch angles over this part of the rotor disk are increased. Eventually, a high enough forward speed is attained to produce compressibility effects on the advancing side of the rotor disk and stall on the retreating side. The onset of these two phenomena drastically increases the rotor vibratory loads and power requirements, thereby effectively establishing a limit on the maximum achievable forward speed. The alleviation of compressibility and stall (and the associated decrease in vibratory loads and power) would potentially result in an increased maximum forward speed. In the past, several methods have been examined and implemented to reduce the vibratory hub loads. Some of these methods are aimed specifically at alleviating vibration at very high flight speeds and increasing the maximum flight speed, while others focus on vibration reduction within the conventional flight envelope. Among the later are several types passive as well as active schemes. Passive schemes include a variety of vibration absorbers such as mechanical springs, pendulums, and bifilar absorbers. These mechanism are easy to design and maintain, but incur significant weight and drag penalties. Among the popular active control schemes in consideration are Higher Harmonic Control (HHC) and Individual Blade Control (IBC). HHC uses a conventional swash plate to generate a multi-cyclic pitch input to the blade. This requires actuators capable of sufficiently high power and bandwidth, increasing the cost and weight of the aircraft. IBC places actuators in the rotating reference frame, requiring the use of slip rings capable of transferring enough power to the actuators

  16. Reduction of blade-vortex interaction noise using higher harmonic pitch control

    Brooks, Thomas F.; Booth, Earl R., Jr.; Jolly, J. Ralph, Jr.; Yeager, William T., Jr.; Wilbur, Matthew L.

    1989-01-01

    An acoustics test using an aeroelastically scaled rotor was conducted to examine the effectiveness of higher harmonic blade pitch control for the reduction of impulsive blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise. A four-bladed, 110 in. diameter, articulated rotor model was tested in a heavy gas (Freon-12) medium in Langley's Transonic Dynamics Tunnel. Noise and vibration measurements were made for a range of matched flight conditions, where prescribed (open-loop) higher harmonic pitch was superimposed on the normal (baseline) collective and cyclic trim pitch. For the inflow-microphone noise measurements, advantage was taken of the reverberance in the hard walled tunnel by using a sound power determination approach. Initial findings from on-line data processing for three of the test microphones are reported for a 4/rev (4P) collective pitch control for a range of input amplitudes and phases. By comparing these results to corresponding baseline (no control) conditions, significant noise reductions (4 to 5 dB) were found for low-speed descent conditions, where helicopter BVI noise is most intense. For other rotor flight conditions, the overall noise was found to increase. All cases show increased vibration levels.

  17. Reduction of blade-vortex interaction noise through higher harmonic pitch control

    Brooks, Thomas F.; Booth, Earl R., Jr.; Jolly, J. Ralph, Jr.; Yeager, William T., Jr.; Wilbur, Matthew L.

    1990-01-01

    An acoustics test using an aeroelastically scaled rotor was conducted to examine the effectiveness of higher harmonic blade pitch control for the reduction of impulsive blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise. A four-bladed, 110 in. diameter, articulated rotor model was tested in a heavy gas (Freon-12) medium in Langley's Transonic Dynamics Tunnel. Noise and vibration measurements were made for a range of matched flight conditions, where prescribed (open-loop) higher harmonic pitch was superimposed on the normal (baseline) collective and cyclic trim pitch. For the inflow-microphone noise measurements, advantage was taken of the reverberance in the hard walled tunnel by using a sound power determination approach. Initial findings from on-line data processing for three of the test microphones are reported for a 4/rev (4P) collective pitch control for a range of input amplitudes and phases. By comparing these results to corresponding baseline (no control) conditions, significant noise reductions (4 to 5 dB) were found for low-speed descent conditions, where helicopter BVI noise is most intense. For other rotor flight conditions, the overall noise was found to increase. All cases show increased vibration levels.

  18. PDE-based random-valued impulse noise removal based on new class of controlling functions.

    Wu, Jian; Tang, Chen

    2011-09-01

    This paper is concerned with partial differential equation (PDE)-based image denoising for random-valued impulse noise. We introduce the notion of ENI (the abbreviation for "edge pixels, noisy pixels, and interior pixels") that denotes the number of homogeneous pixels in a local neighborhood and is significantly different for edge pixels, noisy pixels, and interior pixels. We redefine the controlling speed function and the controlling fidelity function to depend on ENI. According to our two controlling functions, the diffusion and fidelity process at edge pixels, noisy pixels, and interior pixels can be selectively carried out. Furthermore, a class of second-order improved and edge-preserving PDE denoising models is proposed based on the two new controlling functions in order to deal with random-valued impulse noise reliably. We demonstrate the performance of the proposed PDEs via application to five standard test images, corrupted by random-valued impulse noise with various noise levels and comparison with the related second-order PDE models and the other special filtering methods for random-valued impulse noise. Our two controlling functions are extended to automatically other PDE models. PMID:21435980

  19. Assessing Measurement Noise Effect in Run-to-Run Process Control: Extends EWMA Controller by Kalman Filter

    Tzu-Wei Kuo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the Exponentially Weighted Moving Average (EWMA controller has become a popular control method in Run-to-Run (RtR process control, but the issue of measurement noise from metrology tools has not been addressed in RtR EWMA controllers yet. This paper utilizes a Kalman Filter (KF controller to deal with measurement noise in RtR process control and investigates the output properties for steady-state mean and variance, and for closed-loop stability. Five disturbance models modeling semiconductor process disturbances are investigated. These disturbance models consist of Deterministic Trend (DT, Random Walk with Drift (RWD, Integrated Moving Average process (IMA(1,1, AutoRegressive Moving Average (ARMA(1,1, and Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average (ARIMA(1,1,1.  Analytical results show that a KF controller can be considered as an extended version of a RtR EWMA controller. In particular, the EWMA controller is a special case of KF in a filtering form without the capability of measuring noise. Simulation results also show that the KF has a better ability to deal with measurement noise than the EWMA controller.

  20. Adaptive noise

    Viney, Mark; Reece, Sarah E.

    2013-01-01

    In biology, noise implies error and disorder and is therefore something which organisms may seek to minimize and mitigate against. We argue that such noise can be adaptive. Recent studies have shown that gene expression can be noisy, noise can be genetically controlled, genes and gene networks vary in how noisy they are and noise generates phenotypic differences among genetically identical cells. Such phenotypic differences can have fitness benefits, suggesting that evolution can shape noise ...

  1. H∞ Control for Nonlinear Stochastic Systems with Time-Delay and Multiplicative Noise

    Ming Gao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the infinite horizon H∞ control problem for a general class of nonlinear stochastic systems with time-delay and multiplicative noise. The exponential/asymptotic mean square H∞ control design of delayed nonlinear stochastic systems is presented by solving Hamilton-Jacobi inequalities. Two numerical examples are provided to show the effectiveness of the proposed design method.

  2. Efficiency in Controlling Activities

    Van Nguyen, Tuyen

    2015-01-01

    Controlling is essential for financial success of corporations. An efficient controlling system should be implemented in order to manage financial performance from income, expense to profitability. The purpose of the thesis is to provide insight knowledge towards corporate accounting management as well as to propose potential improvement for the existing controlling system of the case company, which is Bosch Rexroth Japan. The theoretical framework creates the knowledge foundation for re...

  3. Screening of Potential Landing Gear Noise Control Devices at Virginia Tech For QTD II Flight Test

    Ravetta, Patricio A.; Burdisso, Ricardo A.; Ng, Wing F.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Stoker, Robert W.

    2007-01-01

    In support of the QTD II (Quiet Technology Demonstrator) program, aeroacoustic measurements of a 26%-scale, Boeing 777 main landing gear model were conducted in the Virginia Tech Stability Tunnel. The objective of these measurements was to perform risk mitigation studies on noise control devices for a flight test performed at Glasgow, Montana in 2005. The noise control devices were designed to target the primary main gear noise sources as observed in several previous tests. To accomplish this task, devices to reduce noise were built using stereo lithography for landing gear components such as the brakes, the forward cable harness, the shock strut, the door/strut gap and the lower truck. The most promising device was down selected from test results. In subsequent stages, the initial design of the selected lower truck fairing was improved to account for all the implementation constraints encountered in the full-scale airplane. The redesigned truck fairing was then retested to assess the impact of the modifications on the noise reduction potential. From extensive acoustic measurements obtained using a 63-element microphone phased array, acoustic source maps and integrated spectra were generated in order to estimate the noise reduction achievable with each device.

  4. Innovative Control of Noise and Vibration of Industrial Equipments and Machines

    Owhor, Sampson Chisa,

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Noise and Vibration of industrial equipment is the grave factor influencing its production state, working conditions of staff and job safety. In course of technology development the more potent machines are used, it is quite often accompanied by an increase of vibration and noise level. This is experienced by equipment as it is transmitted to building structures, environment and through staffs. The system of equation advocated in this research work has been permitted to evaluate reduction of machine vibrations caused by unbalance movement of its members, thereby transmitting it onto the floor and the environment. A noise problem generally consists of three inter-related elements- the source, the receiver and the transmission path. This transmission path is usually the atmosphere through which the sound is propagated, but can include structural materials of any building containing the receiver. The development of innovative noise control treatments provides opportunities for applying basic physics and engineering procedures.

  5. Controlled Dephasing of Electrons by Non-Gaussian Shot Noise

    Neder, I.; Marquardt, F.; Heiblum, M.; Mahalu, D.; Umansky, V

    2006-01-01

    In a 'controlled dephasing' experiment [1-3], an interferometer loses its coherence due to entanglement with a controlled quantum system ('which path' detector). In experiments that were conducted thus far in mesoscopic systems only partial dephasing was achieved. This was due to weak interactions between many detector electrons and the interfering electron, resulting in a Gaussian phase randomizing process [4-10]. Here, we report the opposite extreme: a complete destruction of the interferen...

  6. ON THE APPLICATION OF PARTIAL BARRIERS FOR SPINNING MACHINE NOISE CONTROL: A THEORETICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH

    M. R. Monazzam, A. Nezafat

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Noise is one of the most serious challenges in modern community. In some specific industries, according to the nature of process, this challenge is more threatening. This paper describes a means of noise control for spinning machine based on experimental measurements. Also advantages and disadvantages of the control procedure are added. Different factors which may affect the performance of the barrier in this situation are also mentioned. To provide a good estimation of the control measure, a theoretical formula is also described and it is compared with the field data. Good agreement between the results of filed measurements and theoretical presented model was achieved. No obvious noise reduction was seen by partial indoor barriers in low absorbent enclosed spaces, since the reflection from multiple hard surfaces is the main dominated factor in the tested environment. At the end, the situation of the environment and standards, which are necessary in attaining the ideal results, are explained.

  7. Application of smart materials to helicopter rotor active control

    Straub, Friedrich K.; Ealey, Mark A.; Schetky, Lawrence M.

    1997-05-01

    Helicopter design is limited by the compromise inherent in meeting hover and forward flight requirements, and the unsteady environment encountered in forward flight. Active control of helicopter rotors using smart material, in-blade actuation can overcome these barriers and provide substantial reductions in noise and vibrations and improved performance. The present study covers the blade/actuator integration and actuator development for a full scale system to demonstrate active control of noise and vibrations as well as inflight blade tracking on the MD Explorer helicopter. A piezoelectric multilayer stack actuator, driving a trailing edge flap, is used for active control. A shape memory alloy torsion actuator, driving a trailing edge trim tab, is used for inflight tracking. Overall, this DARPA sponsored program entails the design, development, and fabrication of the full scale active control rotor system. If successful, an entry in the NASA Ames 40 X 80 foot wind tunnel and flight tests are planned for a follow on program.

  8. 强噪声环境下有源抗噪耳罩设计%Design of active anti-noise earmuffs in heavy noise environment

    孙科伟; 李建海; 杨海东; 宋博

    2013-01-01

    In view of problems of expensive and inconvenient to wear of existing active anti-noise earmuffs,an active anti-noise earmuff in heavy noise environment was designed.The earmuff takes TMS320VC5509 as processor,and adopts adaptive noise cancellation method and the normalized least mean square algorithm to enhance adaptive noise cancellation performance.Combined with passive noise reduction technology,the earmuff realizes purpose of noise cancellation in heavy noise environment.The experimental results show that anti-noise performance of the earmuffs is up to 30 dB.%针对现有的有源抗噪耳罩存在价格昂贵且佩戴不太方便的问题,设计了一种应用在强噪声环境下的有源抗噪耳罩.该耳罩以TMS320VC5509为主控芯片,采用自适应噪声抵消方案和归一化的最小均方算法提升耳罩的自适应噪声抵消性能,结合被动降噪技术,很好地实现了在强噪声环境下消除噪声的目的.测试结果表明,该耳罩在低频范围内抗噪性能最高可达到30 dB.

  9. Active control of convection

    Bau, H.H. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Using stability theory, numerical simulations, and in some instances experiments, it is demonstrated that the critical Rayleigh number for the bifurcation (1) from the no-motion (conduction) state to the motion state and (2) from time-independent convection to time-dependent, oscillatory convection in the thermal convection loop and Rayleigh-Benard problems can be significantly increased or decreased. This is accomplished through the use of a feedback controller effectuating small perturbations in the boundary data. The controller consists of sensors which detect deviations in the fluid`s temperature from the motionless, conductive values and then direct actuators to respond to these deviations in such a way as to suppress the naturally occurring flow instabilities. Actuators which modify the boundary`s temperature/heat flux are considered. The feedback controller can also be used to control flow patterns and generate complex dynamic behavior at relatively low Rayleigh numbers.

  10. Active Combustion Control Valve Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Over the past decade, research into active combustion control has yielded impressive results in suppressing thermoacoustic instabilities and widening the...

  11. The Physical Mechanism for Retinal Discrete Dark Noise: Thermal Activation or Cellular Ultraweak Photon Emission?

    Salari, Vahid; Scholkmann, Felix; Bokkon, Istvan; Shahbazi, Farhad; Tuszynski, Jack

    2016-01-01

    For several decades the physical mechanism underlying discrete dark noise of photoreceptors in the eye has remained highly controversial and poorly understood. It is known that the Arrhenius equation, which is based on the Boltzmann distribution for thermal activation, can model only a part (e.g. half of the activation energy) of the retinal dark noise experimentally observed for vertebrate rod and cone pigments. Using the Hinshelwood distribution instead of the Boltzmann distribution in the Arrhenius equation has been proposed as a solution to the problem. Here, we show that the using the Hinshelwood distribution does not solve the problem completely. As the discrete components of noise are indistinguishable in shape and duration from those produced by real photon induced photo-isomerization, the retinal discrete dark noise is most likely due to ‘internal photons’ inside cells and not due to thermal activation of visual pigments. Indeed, all living cells exhibit spontaneous ultraweak photon emission (UPE), mainly in the optical wavelength range, i.e., 350–700 nm. We show here that the retinal discrete dark noise has a similar rate as UPE and therefore dark noise is most likely due to spontaneous cellular UPE and not due to thermal activation. PMID:26950936

  12. A feedback control strategy for the airfoil system under non-Gaussian colored noise excitation.

    Huang, Yong; Tao, Gang

    2014-09-01

    The stability of a binary airfoil with feedback control under stochastic disturbances, a non-Gaussian colored noise, is studied in this paper. First, based on some approximated theories and methods the non-Gaussian colored noise is simplified to an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process. Furthermore, via the stochastic averaging method and the logarithmic polar transformation, one dimensional diffusion process can be obtained. At last by applying the boundary conditions, the largest Lyapunov exponent which can determine the almost-sure stability of the system and the effective region of control parameters is calculated. PMID:25273197

  13. A feedback control strategy for the airfoil system under non-Gaussian colored noise excitation

    The stability of a binary airfoil with feedback control under stochastic disturbances, a non-Gaussian colored noise, is studied in this paper. First, based on some approximated theories and methods the non-Gaussian colored noise is simplified to an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process. Furthermore, via the stochastic averaging method and the logarithmic polar transformation, one dimensional diffusion process can be obtained. At last by applying the boundary conditions, the largest Lyapunov exponent which can determine the almost-sure stability of the system and the effective region of control parameters is calculated

  14. A feedback control strategy for the airfoil system under non-Gaussian colored noise excitation

    Huang, Yong, E-mail: hy@njust.edu.cn, E-mail: taogang@njust.edu.cn; Tao, Gang, E-mail: hy@njust.edu.cn, E-mail: taogang@njust.edu.cn [School of Energy and Power Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, 200 XiaoLingwei Street, Nanjing 210094 (China)

    2014-09-01

    The stability of a binary airfoil with feedback control under stochastic disturbances, a non-Gaussian colored noise, is studied in this paper. First, based on some approximated theories and methods the non-Gaussian colored noise is simplified to an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process. Furthermore, via the stochastic averaging method and the logarithmic polar transformation, one dimensional diffusion process can be obtained. At last by applying the boundary conditions, the largest Lyapunov exponent which can determine the almost-sure stability of the system and the effective region of control parameters is calculated.

  15. Optimal control of light propagation through multiple-scattering media in the presence of noise

    Yilmaz, Hasan; Mosk, Allard P

    2013-01-01

    We study the control of coherent light propagation through multiple-scattering media in the presence of measurement noise. In our experiments, we use a two-step optimization procedure to find the optimal incident wavefront. We conclude that the degree of optimal control of coherent light propagation through a multiple-scattering medium is only determined by the number of photoelectrons detected per single speckle spot. The prediction of our model agrees well with the experimental results. Our results offer opportunities for imaging applications through scattering media such as biological tissue in the shot noise limit.

  16. Noise control of counterflow cooling towers%逆流式冷却塔的噪声治理

    费朝阳; 陈长征; 周勃

    2011-01-01

    根据逆流式冷却塔辐射噪声的实测频谱图,分析了冷却塔的主要噪声来源和频谱特征.分别从吸声、消声和隔声等方面制定了降噪方案,取得了良好的降噪效果.%Based on the measured radiation noise frequency spectrogram, analyses the main noise source and noise spectrum characteristics of cooling tower.Makes a noise control scheme from the aspects of sound absorption, attenuation and insulation.The effect of the noise control is satisfactory.

  17. Arbitrary quantum control of qubits in the presence of universal noise

    Green, Todd J; Uys, Hermann; Biercuk, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    In this manuscript we address the problem of deriving \\emph{analytic} expressions for calculating universal decoherence-induced errors in qubits undergoing arbitrary, unitary, time-dependent quantum-control protocols. For a qubit undergoing unitary decoherence the evolution of a qubit state in the presence of time-varying semiclassical fields may be treated geometrically. We show that the fidelity of an arbitrary control operation may then be expressed to arbitrary order in terms of experimentally relevant spectral characteristics of the noise and the control over all Cartesian directions and accounting for noise cross-correlations. We formulate \\emph{control matrices} in the time domain to capture the effects of piecewise-constant control, and convert them to generalized Fourier-domain filter functions. Such generalized filter functions may therefore be derived for complex temporally modulated control protocols, accounting for susceptibility to rotations of the qubit state vector in three dimensions. Taken t...

  18. Could one single dichotomous noise cause resonant activation for exit time over potential barrier?

    Li Jing-Hui

    2008-01-01

    This paper studies the mean first passage time (or exit time, or escape time) over the non-fluctuating potential barrier for a system driven only by a dichotomous noise. It finds that the dichotomous noise can make the particles escape over the potential barrier, in some circumstances; but in other circumstances, it can not. In the case that the particles escape over the potential barrier, a resonant activation phenomenon for the mean first passage time over the potential barrier is obtained.

  19. Algorithms to Solve Stochastic H2/H∞ Control with State-Dependent Noise

    Ming Gao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with the algorithms which solve H2/H∞ control problems of stochastic systems with state-dependent noise. Firstly, the algorithms for the finite and infinite horizon H2/H∞ control of discrete-time stochastic systems are reviewed and studied. Secondly, two algorithms are proposed for the finite and infinite horizon H2/H∞ control of continuous-time stochastic systems, respectively. Finally, several numerical examples are presented to show the effectiveness of the algorithms.

  20. Active weld control

    Powell, Bradley W.; Burroughs, Ivan A.

    1994-01-01

    Through the two phases of this contract, sensors for welding applications and parameter extraction algorithms have been developed. These sensors form the foundation of a weld control system which can provide action weld control through the monitoring of the weld pool and keyhole in a VPPA welding process. Systems of this type offer the potential of quality enhancement and cost reduction (minimization of rework on faulty welds) for high-integrity welding applications. Sensors for preweld and postweld inspection, weld pool monitoring, keyhole/weld wire entry monitoring, and seam tracking were developed. Algorithms for signal extraction were also developed and analyzed to determine their application to an adaptive weld control system. The following sections discuss findings for each of the three sensors developed under this contract: (1) weld profiling sensor; (2) weld pool sensor; and (3) stereo seam tracker/keyhole imaging sensor. Hardened versions of these sensors were designed and built under this contract. A control system, described later, was developed on a multiprocessing/multitasking operating system for maximum power and flexibility. Documentation for sensor mechanical and electrical design is also included as appendices in this report.

  1. Design and performance of a low noise, 128-channel ASIC preamplifier for readout of active matrix flat-panel imaging arrays

    Design architecture and performance measurements of a low noise, 128-channel application-specific-integrated-circuit (ASIC) preamplifier are reported. The ASIC was designed for readout of active matrix flat-panel imager (AMFPI) arrays. Such arrays, which presently can be made as large as 41 cmx41 cm and with pixel-to-pixel pitches down to ∼70 μm, require large numbers of low noise, high density, custom integrated readout circuits. The design of this new chip is specifically tailored for research and development of active matrix flat-panel arrays for various medical imaging applications. The design architecture includes the following features: (1) Programmable signal gain which allows acquisition of a wide range of signal sizes from various array designs so as to optimize the signal-to-noise ratio; (2) Correlated double sampling (CDS) which significantly reduces certain noise components; (3) Pipelined readout (simultaneously sampling and multiplexing signals) which reduces image acquisition time; (4) Programmable bandwidth controls which balance noise and acquisition speed; and (5) Two selectable modes of output multiplexing (64:1, 16:1) for slow or fast readout. In this paper, detailed measurements of various performance parameters are presented. These measurements include noise characteristics, the relationship between bandwidth and noise, signal response linearity, channel-to-channel and pipeline cross-talk, signal gain and gain variation across channels, and the effect of sampling methods on noise. These characterizations indicate that the performance of the ASIC has achieved the original design goals

  2. Reward Pays the Cost of Noise Reduction in Motor and Cognitive Control.

    Manohar, Sanjay G; Chong, Trevor T-J; Apps, Matthew A J; Batla, Amit; Stamelou, Maria; Jarman, Paul R; Bhatia, Kailash P; Husain, Masud

    2015-06-29

    Speed-accuracy trade-off is an intensively studied law governing almost all behavioral tasks across species. Here we show that motivation by reward breaks this law, by simultaneously invigorating movement and improving response precision. We devised a model to explain this paradoxical effect of reward by considering a new factor: the cost of control. Exerting control to improve response precision might itself come at a cost--a cost to attenuate a proportion of intrinsic neural noise. Applying a noise-reduction cost to optimal motor control predicted that reward can increase both velocity and accuracy. Similarly, application to decision-making predicted that reward reduces reaction times and errors in cognitive control. We used a novel saccadic distraction task to quantify the speed and accuracy of both movements and decisions under varying reward. Both faster speeds and smaller errors were observed with higher incentives, with the results best fitted by a model including a precision cost. Recent theories consider dopamine to be a key neuromodulator in mediating motivational effects of reward. We therefore examined how Parkinson's disease (PD), a condition associated with dopamine depletion, alters the effects of reward. Individuals with PD showed reduced reward sensitivity in their speed and accuracy, consistent in our model with higher noise-control costs. Including a cost of control over noise explains how reward may allow apparent performance limits to be surpassed. On this view, the pattern of reduced reward sensitivity in PD patients can specifically be accounted for by a higher cost for controlling noise. PMID:26096975

  3. Automaticity or active control

    Tudoran, Ana Alina; Olsen, Svein Ottar

    This study addresses the quasi-moderating role of habit strength in explaining action loyalty. A model of loyalty behaviour is proposed that extends the traditional satisfaction–intention–action loyalty network. Habit strength is conceptualised as a cognitive construct to refer to the psychologic......, respectively, between intended loyalty and action loyalty. At high levels of habit strength, consumers are more likely to free up cognitive resources and incline the balance from controlled to routine and automatic-like responses....

  4. Active Control of Suspension Bridges

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    In this paper some recent research on active control of very long suspension bridges, is presented. The presentation is based on research work at Aalborg University, Denmark. The active control system is based on movable flaps attached to the bridge girder. Wind load on bridges with or without...... flaps attached to the girder is briefly presented. A simple active control system is discussed. Results from wind tunnel experiments with a bridge section show that flaps can be used effectively to control bridge girder vibrations. Flutter conditions for suspension bridges with and without flaps are...

  5. Stabilization of Barkhausen noise readings by controlling a surface field waveform

    Stupakov, Oleksandr

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 1 (2014), s. 1-8. ISSN 0957-0233 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-18993S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : magnetic Barkhausen noise * surface field measurement * digital feedback control * non-destructive testing Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.433, year: 2014

  6. dc SQUID electronics based on adaptive noise cancellation and a high open-loop gain controller

    A low-noise SQUID readout electronics with a high slew rate and an automatic gain control feature has been developed. Flux noise levels of 5x10-7Φ0/√Hz at 1 kHz and 2x10-6Φ0/√Hz at 1 Hz have been measured with this readout scheme. The system tolerates sinusoidal disturbances having amplitudes up to 140 Φ0 at 1 kHz without loosing lock. The electronics utilizes a cooled GaAs FET to control the cancellation of the voltage noise of the room temperature amplifier, a PI3/2 controller to provide a high open-loop gain at low frequencies, and a square-wave flux and offset voltage modulation to enable automatic control of the noise reduction. The cutoff frequency of the flux-locked-loop is 300 kHz and the feedback gain is more than 130 dB at 10 Hz. (orig.)

  7. Dynamic Programming Principle for Stochastic Control Problems driven by General L\\'{e}vy Noise

    Goldys, Ben; Wu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    We extend the proof of the dynamic programming principle (DPP) for standard stochastic optimal control problems driven by general L\\'{e}vy noises. Under appropriate assumptions, it is shown that the DPP still holds when the state process fails to have any moments at all.

  8. Cyclic pitch for the control of wind turbine noise amplitude modulation

    Bertagnolio, Franck; Aagaard Madsen, Helge; Fischer, Andreas;

    2014-01-01

    Using experimental data acquired during a wind turbine measurement campaign, it is shown that amplitude modulation of aerodynamic noise can be generated by the rotating blades in conjunction with the atmospheric wind shear. As an attempt to alleviate this phenomenon, a control strategy is designed...

  9. Blade-Mounted Flap Control for BVI Noise Reduction Proof-of-Concept Test

    Dawson, Seth; Hassan, Ahmed; Straub, Friedrich; Tadghighi, Hormoz

    1995-01-01

    This report describes a wind tunnel test of the McDonnell Douglas Helicopter Systems (MDHS) Active Flap Model Rotor at the NASA Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel. The test demonstrated that BVI noise reductions and vibration reductions were possible with the use of an active flap. Aerodynamic results supported the acoustic data trends, showing a reduction in the strength of the tip vortex with the deflection of the flap. Acoustic results showed that the flap deployment, depending on the peak deflection angle and azimuthal shift in its deployment schedule, can produce BVI noise reductions as much as 6 dB on the advancing and retreating sides. The noise reduction was accompanied by an increase in low frequency harmonic noise and high frequency broadband noise. A brief assessment of the effect of the flap on vibration showed that significant reductions were possible. The greatest vibration reductions (as much as 76%) were found in the four per rev pitching moment at the hub. Performance improvement cam results were inconclusive, as the improvements were predicted to be smaller than the resolution of the rotor balance.

  10. Assessment of the need for noise control research on electric power transformers and reactors. Report No. 4289

    Keast, D. N.; Gordon, C. G.

    1980-08-01

    This study was conducted to identify and quantify the needs (if any) for noise control research applicable to electric utility transformers and reactors to comply with quantitative state noise regulations. The study was accomplished by analyzing available published data, by studying a sample of utility substation drawings, and by assessing various noise-control design approaches. No experimental work was done. The study was restricted to outdoor substations. A model was prepared to predict noise from existing US substations. A sample of 658 substation designs from five utilities was analyzed to refine the above model and to provide a detailed analysis of the configurations, capacities, and noise-control features of present US substations. A typical substation was defined. Advanced transformer designs (low-loss core, amorphous core, SF/sub 6/-cooled, vapor-cooled, superconducting) for future substations were reviewed to estimate their noise impacts. Noise abatement options were assessed to define where future noise-control research would be appropriate. It was concluded that: at present, about 5% of the electric utility substations in the US, require an average of 14 dBA of noise reduction to comply with existing noise regulations; estimated cost of compliance is about $200 million; and transformer noise is the dominant problem; current technology can provide the necessary noise control, but it is very costly. Additional research and demonstration programs are recommended to reduce the cost of retrofit noise control treatments for existing substations. It is essential that the electric utility industry be involved in guiding this research.

  11. Low-noise humidity controller for imaging water mediated processes in atomic force microscopy

    Gaponenko, I.; Gamperle, L.; Herberg, K.; Muller, S. C.; Paruch, P.

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate the construction of a novel low-noise continuous flow humidity controller and its integration with a commercial variable-temperature atomic force microscope fluid cell, allowing precise control of humidity and temperature at the sample during nanoscale measurements. Based on wet and dry gas mixing, the design allows a high mechanical stability to be achieved by means of an ultrasonic atomiser for the generation of water-saturated gas, improving upon previous bubbler-based architectures. Water content in the flow is measured both at the inflow and outflow of the fluid cell, enabling the monitoring of water condensation and icing, and allowing controlled variation of the sample temperature independently of the humidity. To benchmark the performance of the controller, the results of detailed noise studies and time-based imaging of the formation of ice layers on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite are shown.

  12. Noise and public health.

    Lipscomb, D M; Roettger, R W

    1976-01-01

    Environmental noise has increased to the point that it affects large numbers of people. The most consistently demonstrated health effect of exposure to noise is hearing impairment. Other effects, such as stress reaction, irritability, fatigue and disturbances to physiologic function have been seen in laboratory research but are highly individualized and restricted to such specific populations as industrial workers. Rising background sound levels in communities due to increased traffic flow, industralization, work saving machinery, and other noise sources have caused community noise levels to become dangerously high. This factor is complicated by exposure to high sound level recreational activities with greater frequency and for longer periods. Recognizing the existence of the problem, governmental agencies have begun to identify the scope of the problem, to designate standards and regulations controlling noise sources, and to regulate allowable noise exposure for workers. PMID:10297834

  13. AN ADAPTIVE OPTIMAL KALMAN FILTER FOR STOCHASTIC VIBRATION CONTROL SYSTEM WITH UNKNOWN NOISE VARIANCES

    Li Shu; Zhuo Jiashou; Ren Qingwen

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, an optimal criterion is presented for adaptive Kalman filter in a control sys tem with unknown variances of stochastic vibration by constructing a function of noise variances and minimizing the function. We solve the model and measure variances by using DFP optimal method to guarantee the results of Kalman filter to be optimized. Finally, the control of vibration can be implemented by LQG method.

  14. Reward pays the cost of noise reduction in motor and cognitive control

    Manohar, SG; Chong, TT; Apps, MA; Batla, A; Stamelou, M.; Jarman, PR; Bhatia, KP; Husain, M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Speed-accuracy trade-off is an intensively studied law governing almost all behavioral tasks across species. Here we show that motivation by reward breaks this law, by simultaneously invigorating movement and improving response precision. We devised a model to explain this paradoxical effect of reward by considering a new factor: the cost of control. Exerting control to improve response precision might itself come at a cost—a cost to attenuate a proportion of intrinsic neural noise. A...

  15. The Coanda effect in gas-dynamic noise control. [pressure reduction by silencers

    Vasilescu, G.

    1974-01-01

    The principle types of silencers are discussed for gas dynamic noise of free steam and gas expansions, as well as the results of research in gas dynamics of jets and applied acoustics. Gas dynamic noise attenuation by means of the Coanda effect is due to fluid decompression in a Coanda ejector of the external type, where a structural change takes place in the acoustic frequency spectrum and in its direction, as well as a substantial decrease in the fluid's velocity, temperature and concentration. This process is continued in the second phase with absorption of the acoustic waves by means of an active structure.

  16. Stabilization of Barkhausen noise readings by controlling a surface field waveform

    Insufficient reproducibility and measured results that are difficult to interpret are the main obstacles to widespread practical implementation of the magnetic Barkhausen noise technique as a useful non-destructive tool. This work gives a clear experimental proof that precise control of the surface magnetic field stabilizes the subsurface Barkhausen noise readout with respect to the magnetizing yoke lift-off. The surface magnetic fields above the sample were measured at two different distances by Hall sensors; the real sample field was obtained by linear extrapolation of these surface field waveforms to the sample face. This extrapolated field waveform was then adjusted to the standard triangular/sinusoidal shapes with a multi-parameter digital feedback procedure. The Barkhausen noise signal was measured locally with a bobbin coil placed on the same surface area where the magnetic field was measured. (paper)

  17. An Ultra-High Stability, Low-Noise Laser Current Driver with Digital Control

    Erickson, Christopher J; Doermann, Greg; Durfee, Dallin S

    2008-01-01

    We present a low-noise, high modulation-bandwidth design for a laser current driver with excellent long term stability. The driver improves upon the commonly-used Hall-Libbrecht design. The current driver can be operated remotely by way of a micro-processing unit, which controls the current set point digitally. This allows precise repeatability and improved accuracy and stability. It also allows the driver to be placed near the laser for reduced noise and for lower phase lag when using the modulation input. We present the theory of operation for our driver in detail, and give a thorough characterization of its stability, noise, set point accuracy and repeatability, temperature dependence, transient response, and modulation bandwidth.

  18. An ultrahigh stability, low-noise laser current driver with digital control

    Erickson, Christopher J.; Van Zijll, Marshall; Doermann, Greg; Durfee, Dallin S.

    2008-07-01

    We present a low-noise, high modulation-bandwidth design for a laser current driver with excellent long-term stability. The driver improves upon the commonly used Hall-Libbrecht design. The current driver can be operated remotely by way of a microprocessing unit, which controls the current set point digitally. This allows precise repeatability and improved accuracy and stability. It also allows the driver to be placed near the laser for reduced noise and for lower phase lag when using the modulation input. We present the theory of operation for our driver in detail, and give a thorough characterization of its stability, noise, set-point accuracy and repeatability, temperature dependence, transient response, and modulation bandwidth.

  19. A Low Phase Noise CMOS Quadrature Voltage Control Oscillator Using Clock Gated Technique

    Jothi Baskar A

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This project presents the low phase noise cmos quadrature voltage control oscillator using clock gating technique. Here the colpitts vco is used to split the capacitance in the Qvco circuit producing quadrature output. The startup condition in the oscillator is improved by using enhancement [12].This QVCO performs the operation anti phase injection locking fordevice reuse [8]. The new clock gating technique is used to reduce the power with thepower supply 1.5v. The QVCO uses a 0.5mwith phase error of 0.4 and exhibits a phase noise of -118dBc/HZ at 1MHZ offset at the centre frequency of 500MHZ. Index terms: current switching, clock gating, phase noise, Qvco

  20. 真空泵站的噪声控制%Noise Control of Vacuum Pumps Station

    殷宝琴; 丁梅; 王敏; 郑文明; 杜红玲; 和海军

    2000-01-01

    The paper describes the overall scheme and design principle for noise control of a pumps station on basis of measuring and analyzing of the noise pollution of Roots Vacuum Pumps with two vanes.The constructions and the features of exhaust noise silencers of the vacuum pumps and other measures for reducing the noise of the pumps station are respectively presented.Application of the design to practical production and operation showed that obvious reduction of noise had been achieved.%在对两叶罗茨真空泵噪声测试分析的基础上,给出了泵站噪声控制的总体方案及设计原则,并对真空泵排气消声器及其它降噪措施的结构和特点分别进行了介绍。经实际应用及生产运行证明,降噪效果明显。

  1. Online identification of active absorbers in automotive vibration control

    Buttelmann, M.; Lohmann, B.; Vinogradski, M.; Nedeljkovic, N. [Bremen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Automatisierungstechnik; Marienfeld, P. [ContiTech Vibration Control GmbH, Hannover (Germany); Svaricek, F. [Continental Gummi-Werke AG, Hannover (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    In the past, engine-related noise and vibration in the vehicle cabin was exclusively reduced by passive absorption. Today, modern actuators and control systems make an active noise reduction possible by introducing counteracting vibration at 180 degrees phase lag. Within a cooperation of the Institute of Automation Systems and Continental AG, an approach using active absorbers at the engine mounts is investigated. As the dynamic behaviour of the active absorbers and other elements in the secondary path are time-variant (depending on temperature, age and other factors), an online identification is carried out. By this, the implemented feedforward control strategy is supported on a precise and frequently updated model of the secondary path. The chosen approaches to online and offline identification are presented together with first results achieved in online identification and with the overall control system. (orig.)

  2. Reduced In-Plane, Low Frequency Helicopter Noise of an Active Flap Rotor

    Sim, Ben W.; Janakiram, Ram D.; Barbely, Natasha L.; Solis, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    Results from a recent joint DARPA/Boeing/NASA/Army wind tunnel test demonstrated the ability to reduce in-plane, low frequency noise of the full-scale Boeing-SMART rotor using active flaps. Test data reported in this paper illustrated that acoustic energy in the first six blade-passing harmonics could be reduced by up to 6 decibels at a moderate airspeed, level flight condition corresponding to advance ratio of 0.30. Reduced noise levels were attributed to selective active flap schedules that modified in-plane blade airloads on the advancing side of the rotor, in a manner, which generated counteracting acoustic pulses that partially offset the negative pressure peaks associated with in-plane, steady thickness noise. These favorable reduced-noise operating states are a strong function of the active flap actuation amplitude, frequency and phase. The associated noise reductions resulted in reduced aural detection distance by up to 18%, but incurred significant vibratory load penalties due to increased hub shear forces. Small reductions in rotor lift-to-drag ratios, of no more than 3%, were also measured

  3. Hybrid feedforward-feedback active noise reduction for hearing protection and communication.

    Ray, Laura R; Solbeck, Jason A; Streeter, Alexander D; Collier, Robert D

    2006-10-01

    A hybrid active noise reduction (ANR) architecture is presented and validated for a circumaural earcup and a communication earplug. The hybrid system combines source-independent feedback ANR with a Lyapunov-tuned leaky LMS filter (LyLMS) improving gain stability margins over feedforward ANR alone. In flat plate testing, the earcup demonstrates an overall C-weighted total noise reduction of 40 dB and 30-32 dB, respectively, for 50-800 Hz sum-of-tones noise and for aircraft or helicopter cockpit noise, improving low frequency (noise reduction provided by the ANR earplug of 46-48 dB for sum-of-tones 80-2000 Hz and 40-41 dB from 63 to 3000 Hz for UH-60 helicopter noise, with negligible degradation in attenuation during speech communication. For both hearing protectors, a stability metric improves by a factor of 2 to several orders of magnitude through hybrid ANR. PMID:17069300

  4. Bilateral use of active middle ear implants: speech discrimination results in noise.

    Wolf-Magele, Astrid; Koci, Viktor; Schnabl, Johannes; Zorowka, Patrick; Riechelmann, Herbert; Sprinzl, Georg Mathias

    2016-08-01

    Binaural sound reception has advantages over unilateral perception, including better localization and sound quality as well as speech and tone reception in both quiet and noisy environments. Up to now, most active middle ear implant (AMEI) users have been unilaterally implanted, but patient demand for an implant on the other side is increasing. Ten bilaterally-AMEI implanted native German-speaking adults were included in the study. The Oldenburg sentence test was used to measure speech reception thresholds in noise. The subject's signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) at a speech reception score of 50 % was calculated for different noise conditions. SRT was measured as a function of noise condition (nc) and listening condition (lc)-for example, SRT (lc, nc), with nc from S0N0, S0N-90, or S0N90 and lc from left, right or both. For each noise condition, the squelch effect and the binaural summation effect were calculated. Patients in this study demonstrated improvement with bilateral AMEIs compared to right or left AMEI only in all three tested listening conditions. Statistical significance was found in the S0N0 condition to favor usage of bilateral AMI versus either the right or left side only. The benefits of binaural hearing are well known, also in normal-hearing individuals. In the future every bilateral implantation should be a part of the clinical routine. Bilateral implantation can help to reduce problems in background noise and restore directional hearing. PMID:26385811

  5. A decision-support tool for the control of urban noise pollution.

    Suriano, Marcia Thais; de Souza, Léa Cristina Lucas; da Silva, Antonio Nelson Rodrigues

    2015-07-01

    Improving the quality of life is increasingly seen as an important urban planning goal. In order to reach it, various tools are being developed to mitigate the negative impacts of human activities on society. This paper develops a methodology for quantifying the population's exposure to noise, by proposing a classification of urban blocks. Taking into account the vehicular flow and traffic composition of the surroundings of urban blocks, we generated a noise map by applying a computational simulation. The urban blocks were classified according to their noise range and then the population was estimated for each urban block, by a process which was based on the census tract and the constructed area of the blocks. The acoustical classes of urban blocks and the number of inhabitants per block were compared, so that the population exposed to noise levels above 65 dB(A) could be estimated, which is the highest limit established by legislation. As a result, we developed a map of the study area, so that urban blocks that should be priority targets for noise mitigation actions can be quickly identified. PMID:26132260

  6. Noise exposure immediately activates cochlear mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling

    Alagramam, Kumar N.; Ruben Stepanyan; Samson Jamesdaniel; Daniel H.-C. Chen; Rickie R Davis

    2014-01-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is a major public health issue worldwide. Uncovering the early molecular events associated with NIHL would reveal mechanisms leading to the hearing loss. Our aim is to investigate the immediate molecular responses after different levels of noise exposure and identify the common and distinct pathways that mediate NIHL. Previous work showed mice exposed to 116 decibels sound pressure level (dB SPL) broadband noise for 1 h had greater threshold shifts than the m...

  7. Active control of radiated sound using nearfield pressure sensing

    CHEN Ke'an; YIN Xuefei

    2004-01-01

    Based on nearfield sound pressure sensing to pick up error information, an approach for constructing active acoustic structure to effectively reduce radiated sound power at low frequency is proposed. The idea is that a nearfield pressure after active control is used as error signals and transformed into an objective function in adaptive active control process.Firstly sound power expression using near-field pressure radiated from a flexible structure is derived, and then three kind of nearfield pressure based active control strategies, I.e. Minimization of radiated sound power, minimization of sound power for dominant radiation modes and minimization of sound power for modified dominant radiation modes are respectively presented and applied to active control of radiated single and broadband noise. Finally computer simulations on sound power reduction under three strategies are conducted and it is shown that the proposed active control strategies are invalid and considerable reduction in radiated sound power can be achieved.

  8. A low-phase-noise digitally controlled crystal oscillator for DVB TV tuners

    Zhao Wei; Lu Lei; Tang Zhangwen, E-mail: zwtang@fudan.edu.c [State Key Laboratory of ASIC and System, Fudan University, Shanghai 201203 (China)

    2010-07-15

    This paper presents a 25-MHz fully-integrated digitally controlled crystal oscillator (DCXO) with automatic amplitude control (AAC). The DCXO is based on Colpitts topology for one-pin solution. The AAC circuit is introduced to optimize the phase noise performance. The automatic frequency control is realized by a 10-bit thermometer-code segmental tapered MOS capacitor array, ensuring a {approx} 35 ppm tuning range and {approx} 0.04 ppm frequency step. The measured phase noise results are -139 dBc/Hz at 1 kHz and -151 dBc/Hz at 10 kHz frequency offset, respectively. The chip consumes 1 mA at 1.8V supply and occupies 0.4 mm{sup 2} in a 0.18-{mu}m CMOS process.

  9. A low-phase-noise digitally controlled crystal oscillator for DVB TV tuners

    Wei, Zhao; Lei, Lu; Zhangwen, Tang

    2010-07-01

    This paper presents a 25-MHz fully-integrated digitally controlled crystal oscillator (DCXO) with automatic amplitude control (AAC). The DCXO is based on Colpitts topology for one-pin solution. The AAC circuit is introduced to optimize the phase noise performance. The automatic frequency control is realized by a 10-bit thermometer-code segmental tapered MOS capacitor array, ensuring a ~ 35 ppm tuning range and ~ 0.04 ppm frequency step. The measured phase noise results are -139 dBc/Hz at 1 kHz and -151 dBc/Hz at 10 kHz frequency offset, respectively. The chip consumes 1 mA at 1.8V supply and occupies 0.4 mm2 in a 0.18-μm CMOS process.

  10. A low-phase-noise digitally controlled crystal oscillator for DVB TV tuners

    This paper presents a 25-MHz fully-integrated digitally controlled crystal oscillator (DCXO) with automatic amplitude control (AAC). The DCXO is based on Colpitts topology for one-pin solution. The AAC circuit is introduced to optimize the phase noise performance. The automatic frequency control is realized by a 10-bit thermometer-code segmental tapered MOS capacitor array, ensuring a ∼ 35 ppm tuning range and ∼ 0.04 ppm frequency step. The measured phase noise results are -139 dBc/Hz at 1 kHz and -151 dBc/Hz at 10 kHz frequency offset, respectively. The chip consumes 1 mA at 1.8V supply and occupies 0.4 mm2 in a 0.18-μm CMOS process.

  11. Applied acoustics concepts, absorbers, and silencers for acoustical comfort and noise control alternative solutions, innovative tools, practical examples

    Fuchs, Helmut V

    2013-01-01

    The author gives a comprehensive overview of materials and components for noise control and acoustical comfort. Sound absorbers must meet acoustical and architectural requirements, which fibrous or porous material alone can meet. Basics and applications are demonstrated, with representative examples for spatial acoustics, free-field test facilities and canal linings. Acoustic engineers and construction professionals will find some new basic concepts and tools for developments in order to improve acoustical comfort. Interference absorbers, active resonators and micro-perforated absorbers of different materials and designs complete the list of applications.

  12. Human ECG signal parameters estimation during controlled physical activity

    Maciejewski, Marcin; Surtel, Wojciech; Dzida, Grzegorz

    2015-09-01

    ECG signal parameters are commonly used indicators of human health condition. In most cases the patient should remain stationary during the examination to decrease the influence of muscle artifacts. During physical activity, the noise level increases significantly. The ECG signals were acquired during controlled physical activity on a stationary bicycle and during rest. Afterwards, the signals were processed using a method based on Pan-Tompkins algorithms to estimate their parameters and to test the method.

  13. Comparison of various decentralised structural and cavity feedback control strategies for transmitted noise reduction through a double panel structure

    Ho, Jen-Hsuan; Berkhoff, A.P.

    2014-01-01

    This paper compares various decentralised control strategies, including structural and acoustic actuator-sensor configuration designs, to reduce noise transmission through a double panel structure. The comparison is based on identical control stability indexes. The double panel structure consists of

  14. The Noise Pollution of Internal Engine and Its Control%车船用内燃发动机噪声污染及其控制

    刘燕燕; 吴杰长; 郭文勇

    2000-01-01

    In order to meet theincreasing environmental demands, it's necessary to take measures to control noise produced by the internal engine. In this paper, the noise pollution sources of internal engine and theirs conventional control methods are analyzed. Based on the author' s study, the novel active noise control method developed with morden computer technology and cybernetics theory is introdhced.%分析了内燃机的噪声源和传统的无源降噪方法,结合作者的研究工作介绍了一种随计算机技术和现代控制理论发展起来的主动消声新技术-有源降噪。

  15. Prediction control of active power filters

    王莉娜; 罗安

    2003-01-01

    A prediction method to obtain harmonic reference for active power filter is presented. It is a new use ofthe adaptive predictive filter based on FIR. The delay inherent in digital controller is successfully compensated by u-sing the proposed method, and the computing load is not very large compared with the conventional method. Moreo-ver, no additional hardware is needed. Its DSP-based realization is also presented, which is characterized by time-va-riant rate sampling, quasi synchronous sampling, and synchronous operation among the line frequency, PWM gener-ating and sampling in A/D unit. Synchronous operation releases the limitation on PWM modulation ratio and guar-antees that the electrical noises resulting from the switching operation of IGBTs do not interfere with the sampledcurrent. The simulation and experimental results verify the satisfactory performance of the proposed method.

  16. Localized, Non-Harmonic Active Flap Motions for Low Frequency In-Plane Rotor Noise Reduction

    Sim, Ben W.; Potsdam, Mark; Kitaplioglu, Cahit; LeMasurier, Philip; Lorber, Peter; Andrews, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    A first-of-its-kind demonstration of the use of localized, non-harmonic active flap motions, for suppressing low frequency, in-plane rotor noise, is reported in this paper. Operational feasibility is verified via testing of the full-scale AATD/Sikorsky/UTRC active flap demonstration rotor in the NFAC's 40- by 80-Foot anechoic wind tunnel. Effectiveness of using localized, non-harmonic active flap motions are compared to conventional four-per-rev harmonic flap motions, and also active flap motions derived from closed-loop acoustics implementations. All three approaches resulted in approximately the same noise reductions over an in-plane three-by-three microphone array installed forward and near in-plane of the rotor in the nearfield. It is also reported that using an active flap in this localized, non-harmonic manner, resulted in no more that 2% rotor performance penalty, but had the tendency to incur higher hub vibration levels.

  17. Carbon Nanotube Thin Films for Active Noise Cancellation, Solar Energy Harvesting, and Energy Storage in Building Windows

    Hu, Shan

    This research explores the application of carbon nanotube (CNT) films for active noise cancellation, solar energy harvesting and energy storage in building windows. The CNT-based components developed herein can be integrated into a solar-powered active noise control system for a building window. First, the use of a transparent acoustic transducer as both an invisible speaker for auxiliary audio playback and for active noise cancellation is accomplished in this work. Several challenges related to active noise cancellation in the window are addressed. These include secondary path estimation and directional cancellation of noise so as to preserve auxiliary audio and internal sounds while preventing transmission of external noise into the building. Solar energy can be harvested at a low rate of power over long durations while acoustic sound cancellation requires short durations of high power. A supercapacitor based energy storage system is therefore considered for the window. Using CNTs as electrode materials, two generations of flexible, thin, and fully solid-state supercapacitors are developed that can be integrated into the window frame. Both generations consist of carbon nanotube films coated on supporting substrates as electrodes and a solid-state polymer gel layer for the electrolyte. The first generation is a single-cell parallel-plate supercapacitor with a working voltage of 3 Volts. Its energy density is competitive with commercially available supercapacitors (which use liquid electrolyte). For many applications that will require higher working voltage, the second-generation multi-cell supercapacitor is developed. A six-cell device with a working voltage as high as 12 Volts is demonstrated here. Unlike the first generation's 3D structure, the second generation has a novel planar (2D) architecture, which makes it easy to integrate multiple cells into a thin and flexible supercapacitor. The multi-cell planar supercapacitor has energy density exceeding that of

  18. Reduction of Helicopter BVI Noise, Vibration, and Power Consumption Through Individual Blade Control

    Jacklin, Stephen A.; Blaas, Achim; Teves, Dietrich; Kube, Roland; Warmbrodt, William (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    A wind tunnel test was conducted with a full-scale BO 105 helicopter rotor to evaluate the potential of open-loop individual blade control (IBC) to improve rotor performance, to reduce blade vortex interaction (BVI) noise, and to alleviate helicopter vibrations. The wind tunnel test was an international collaborative effort between NASA/U.S. Army AFDD, ZF Luftfahrttechnik, Eurocopter Deutschland, and the German Aerospace Laboratory (DLR) and was conducted under the auspices of the U.S./German MOU on Rotorcraft Aeromechanics. In this test the normal blade pitch links of the rotor were replaced by servo-actuators so that the pitch of each blade could be controlled independently of the other blades. The specially designed servoactuators and IBC control system were designed and manufactured by ZF Luftfahrttechnik, GmbH. The wind tunnel test was conducted in the 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel at the NASA Ames Research Center. An extensive amount of measurement information was acquired for each IBC data point. These data include rotor performance, static and dynamic hub forces and moments, rotor loads, control loads, inboard and outboard blade pitch motion, and BVI noise data. The data indicated very significant (80 percent) simultaneous reductions in both BVI noise and hub vibrations could be obtained using multi-harmonic input at the critical descent (terminal approach) condition. The data also showed that performance improvements of up to 7 percent could be obtained using 2P input at high-speed forward flight conditions.

  19. Sound Control in the Physic Lab in the Polyacryl Company and Studying the Noise Reduction by Means of Different Absorbents

    Harandi

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available Studying noise effect at the workplace has more various aspects than other factors. So it is not surprising that its adverse impact on the physical and mental state of the society has been detected to some extent. There is a significant correlation between the hearing loss and the noise pollution of the workplaces. The most important ways to lessen and control the impact of noise are: substituting the noisy equipments with ones that produce less noise, correcting noise sources and isolating the sound source. In the current study we tried to control the noise level by using various sound absorbents and measured sound level by using these different substances. The results of these measurements have reported in the current article in details.

  20. Arbitrary quantum control of qubits in the presence of universal noise

    We address the problem of deriving analytic expressions for calculating universal decoherence-induced errors in qubits undergoing arbitrary, unitary, time-dependent quantum control protocols. We show that the fidelity of a control operation may be expressed in terms of experimentally relevant spectral characteristics of the noise and of the control, over all Cartesian directions. We formulate control matrices in the time domain to capture the effects of piecewise-constant control, and convert them to generalized Fourier-domain filter functions. These generalized filter functions may be derived for complex temporally modulated control protocols, accounting for susceptibility to rotations of the qubit state vector in three dimensions. Taken together, we show that this framework provides a computationally efficient means to calculate the effects of universal noise on arbitrary quantum control protocols, producing results comparable with those obtained via time-consuming simulations of Bloch vector evolution. As a concrete example, we apply our method to treating the problem of dynamical decoupling incorporating realistic control pulses of arbitrary duration or form, including the replacement of simple π-pulses with complex dynamically corrected gates. (paper)

  1. Arbitrary quantum control of qubits in the presence of universal noise

    Green, Todd J.; Sastrawan, Jarrah; Uys, Hermann; Biercuk, Michael J.

    2013-09-01

    We address the problem of deriving analytic expressions for calculating universal decoherence-induced errors in qubits undergoing arbitrary, unitary, time-dependent quantum control protocols. We show that the fidelity of a control operation may be expressed in terms of experimentally relevant spectral characteristics of the noise and of the control, over all Cartesian directions. We formulate control matrices in the time domain to capture the effects of piecewise-constant control, and convert them to generalized Fourier-domain filter functions. These generalized filter functions may be derived for complex temporally modulated control protocols, accounting for susceptibility to rotations of the qubit state vector in three dimensions. Taken together, we show that this framework provides a computationally efficient means to calculate the effects of universal noise on arbitrary quantum control protocols, producing results comparable with those obtained via time-consuming simulations of Bloch vector evolution. As a concrete example, we apply our method to treating the problem of dynamical decoupling incorporating realistic control pulses of arbitrary duration or form, including the replacement of simple π-pulses with complex dynamically corrected gates.

  2. Optical control of antibacterial activity

    Velema, Willem A.; van der Berg, Jan Pieter; Hansen, Mickel J.; Szymanski, Wiktor; Driessen, Arnold J. M.; Feringa, Ben L.

    2013-11-01

    Bacterial resistance is a major problem in the modern world, stemming in part from the build-up of antibiotics in the environment. Novel molecular approaches that enable an externally triggered increase in antibiotic activity with high spatiotemporal resolution and auto-inactivation are highly desirable. Here we report a responsive, broad-spectrum, antibacterial agent that can be temporally activated with light, whereupon it auto-inactivates on the scale of hours. The use of such a ‘smart’ antibiotic might prevent the build-up of active antimicrobial material in the environment. Reversible optical control over active drug concentration enables us to obtain pharmacodynamic information. Precisely localized control of activity is achieved, allowing the growth of bacteria to be confined to defined patterns, which has potential for the development of treatments that avoid interference with the endogenous microbial population in other parts of the organism.

  3. Reduction of the Radiating Sound of a Submerged Finite Cylindrical Shell Structure by Active Vibration Control

    Seung-Bok Choi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work, active vibration control of an underwater cylindrical shell structure was investigated, to suppress structural vibration and structure-borne noise in water. Finite element modeling of the submerged cylindrical shell structure was developed, and experimentally evaluated. Modal reduction was conducted to obtain the reduced system equation for the active feedback control algorithm. Three Macro Fiber Composites (MFCs were used as actuators and sensors. One MFC was used as an exciter. The optimum control algorithm was designed based on the reduced system equations. The active control performance was then evaluated using the lab scale underwater cylindrical shell structure. Structural vibration and structure-borne noise of the underwater cylindrical shell structure were reduced significantly by activating the optimal controller associated with the MFC actuators. The results provide that active vibration control of the underwater structure is a useful means to reduce structure-borne noise in water.

  4. Noise-induced effects in an active medium with periodic boundary conditions

    Slepnev, A. V.; Shepelev, I. A.; Vadivasova, T. E.

    2014-01-01

    A model of an active medium with periodic boundary conditions in which the elementary cell is represented by a FitzHugh-Nagumo oscillator has been studied. Depending on the system parameters, the elementary cell can occur in either auto-oscillatory or excitable state. In both cases, an autonomous medium in the absence of noise performs sustained oscillations and exhibits the phenomenon of multistability. A method for diagnostics of the character of medium with the aid of external noise is proposed, specific features in behavior of the system near the point of transition from the excitable to auto-oscillatory state are considered, and the phenomena of coherent resonance and noise-induced switching are described.

  5. Active reduction of the dominant clear tone component of the noise pollution from power plant chimneys

    An investigation of a system for active reduction of an irritating dominant clear tone emitted as a part of the noise pollution from a power plant chimney is described. Experiments were carried out on a scale model with diameters 3-4 times less than the actual chimney. Reduction of 25-30 decibels was achieved in relation to the clear tone in the frequency range in connection with which it could be expected that the noise-muffling system would work. The system was also seen to be able to follow the expected variation in the noise signals and to be stable during a longer period of time. The theories on which the experiment was based, the experimental setup and measurement methods and results are presented. (AB)

  6. A Low Phase Noise CMOS Quadrature Voltage Control Oscillator Using Clock Gated Technique

    Jothi Baskar A; Kalpana R

    2015-01-01

    This project presents the low phase noise cmos quadrature voltage control oscillator using clock gating technique. Here the colpitts vco is used to split the capacitance in the Qvco circuit producing quadrature output. The startup condition in the oscillator is improved by using enhancement [12].This QVCO performs the operation anti phase injection locking fordevice reuse [8]. The new clock gating technique is used to reduce the power with thepower supply 1.5v. The QVCO uses a ...

  7. Active Self-Testing Noise Measurement Sensors for Large-Scale Environmental Sensor Networks

    Federico Domínguez

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale noise pollution sensor networks consist of hundreds of spatially distributed microphones that measure environmental noise. These networks provide historical and real-time environmental data to citizens and decision makers and are therefore a key technology to steer environmental policy. However, the high cost of certified environmental microphone sensors render large-scale environmental networks prohibitively expensive. Several environmental network projects have started using off-the-shelf low-cost microphone sensors to reduce their costs, but these sensors have higher failure rates and produce lower quality data. To offset this disadvantage, we developed a low-cost noise sensor that actively checks its condition and indirectly the integrity of the data it produces. The main design concept is to embed a 13 mm speaker in the noise sensor casing and, by regularly scheduling a frequency sweep, estimate the evolution of the microphone’s frequency response over time. This paper presents our noise sensor’s hardware and software design together with the results of a test deployment in a large-scale environmental network in Belgium. Our middle-range-value sensor (around €50 effectively detected all experienced malfunctions, in laboratory tests and outdoor deployments, with a few false positives. Future improvements could further lower the cost of our sensor below €10.

  8. A reconfigurable CBP/LP active RC filter with noise-shaping technique for wireless receivers

    A reconfigurable complex band-pass (CBP)/low-pass (LP) active-RC filter with a noise-shaping technique for wireless receivers is presented. Its bandwidth is reconfigurable among 500 kHz, 1 MHz and 4 MHz in LP mode and 1 MHz, 2 MHz and 8 MHz in CBP mode with 3 MHz center frequency. The Op-Amps used in the filter are realized in cell arrays in order to obtain scalable power consumption among the different operation modes. Furthermore, the filter can be configured into the 1st order, 2nd order or 3rd order mode, thus achieving a flexible filtering property. The noise-shaping technique is introduced to suppress the flicker noise contribution. The filter has been implemented in 180 nm CMOS and consumes less than 3 mA in the 3rd 8 MHz-bandwidth CBP mode. The spot noise at 100 Hz can be reduced by 14.4 dB at most with the introduced noise-shaping technique. (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  9. Fractional active disturbance rejection control.

    Li, Dazi; Ding, Pan; Gao, Zhiqiang

    2016-05-01

    A fractional active disturbance rejection control (FADRC) scheme is proposed to improve the performance of commensurate linear fractional order systems (FOS) and the robust analysis shows that the controller is also applicable to incommensurate linear FOS control. In FADRC, the traditional extended states observer (ESO) is generalized to a fractional order extended states observer (FESO) by using the fractional calculus, and the tracking differentiator plus nonlinear state error feedback are replaced by a fractional proportional-derivative controller. To simplify controller tuning, the linear bandwidth-parameterization method has been adopted. The impacts of the observer bandwidth ωo and controller bandwidth ωc on system performance are then analyzed. Finally, the FADRC stability and frequency-domain characteristics for linear single-input single-output FOS are analyzed. Simulation results by FADRC and ADRC on typical FOS are compared to demonstrate the superiority and effectiveness of the proposed scheme. PMID:26928516

  10. Active control: Wind turbine model

    Bindner, H.

    1999-01-01

    This report is a part of the reporting of the work done in the project 'Active Control of Wind Turbines'. This project aim is to develop a simulation model for design of control systems for turbines with pitch control and to use that model to designcontrollers. This report describes the model...... developed for controller design and analysis. Emphasis has been put on establishment of simple models describing the dynamic behavior of the wind turbine in adequate details for controller design. This hasbeen done with extensive use of measurements as the basis for selection of model complexity and model....... The models are all formulated as linear differential equations. The models are validated throughcomparisons with measurements performed on a Vestas WD 34 400 kW wind turbine. It is shown from a control point of view simple linear models can be used to describe the dynamic behavior of a pitch...

  11. Comparison of Auditory Brainstem Response in Noise Induced Tinnitus and Non-Tinnitus Control Subjects

    Ghassem Mohammadkhani

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Tinnitus is an unpleasant sound which can cause some behavioral disorders. According to evidence the origin of tinnitus is not only in peripheral but also in central auditory system. So evaluation of central auditory system function is necessary. In this study Auditory brainstem responses (ABR were compared in noise induced tinnitus and non-tinnitus control subjects.Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional, descriptive and analytic study is conducted in 60 cases in two groups including of 30 noise induced tinnitus and 30 non-tinnitus control subjects. ABRs were recorded ipsilateraly and contralateraly and their latencies and amplitudes were analyzed.Results: Mean interpeak latencies of III-V (p= 0.022, I-V (p=0.033 in ipsilatral electrode array and mean absolute latencies of IV (p=0.015 and V (p=0.048 in contralatral electrode array were significantly increased in noise induced tinnitus group relative to control group. Conclusion: It can be concluded from that there are some decrease in neural transmission time in brainstem and there are some sign of involvement of medial nuclei in olivery complex in addition to lateral lemniscus.

  12. ABOUT CONTROLLING OF SCIENTIFIC ACTIVITY

    Mukhin V. V.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We have selected the new area of controlling - scientific activity controlling. We consider some problems of development in this field, primarily the problem of selection of key performance indicators. It’s been founded that administrative measures stimulated the pursuit of a number of articles published in scientific journals hinders the development of science. Methodological errors - emphasis on citation indexes, impact factors, etc. - lead to wrong management decisions. As the experience of the UK, an expertise should be applied in the management of science. The article briefly discusses some of the drawbacks of the system of scientific specialties. It is proposed to expand research on the science of science and scientific activity controlling. We have also discussed the problems of controlling in applied research organizations

  13. Aircraft noise effects on sleep: a systematic comparison of EEG awakenings and automatically detected cardiac activations

    Polysomnography is the gold standard for investigating noise effects on sleep, but data collection and analysis are sumptuous and expensive. We recently developed an algorithm for the automatic identification of cardiac activations associated with cortical arousals, which uses heart rate information derived from a single electrocardiogram (ECG) channel. We hypothesized that cardiac activations can be used as estimates for EEG awakenings. Polysomnographic EEG awakenings and automatically detected cardiac activations were systematically compared using laboratory data of 112 subjects (47 male, mean ± SD age 37.9 ± 13 years), 985 nights and 23 855 aircraft noise events (ANEs). The probability of automatically detected cardiac activations increased monotonically with increasing maximum sound pressure levels of ANEs, exceeding the probability of EEG awakenings by up to 18.1%. If spontaneous reactions were taken into account, exposure–response curves were practically identical for EEG awakenings and cardiac activations. Automatically detected cardiac activations may be used as estimates for EEG awakenings. More investigations are needed to further validate the ECG algorithm in the field and to investigate inter-individual differences in its ability to predict EEG awakenings. This inexpensive, objective and non-invasive method facilitates large-scale field studies on the effects of traffic noise on sleep

  14. Rotor blade vortex interaction noise

    Yu, Yung H.

    2000-02-01

    Blade-vortex interaction noise-generated by helicopter main rotor blades is one of the most severe noise problems and is very important both in military applications and community acceptance of rotorcraft. Research over the decades has substantially improved physical understanding of noise-generating mechanisms, and various design concepts have been investigated to control noise radiation using advanced blade planform shapes and active blade control techniques. The important parameters to control rotor blade-vortex interaction noise and vibration have been identified: blade tip vortex structures and its trajectory, blade aeroelastic deformation, and airloads. Several blade tip design concepts have been investigated for diffusing tip vortices and also for reducing noise. However, these tip shapes have not been able to substantially reduce blade-vortex interaction noise without degradation of rotor performance. Meanwhile, blade root control techniques, such as higher-harmonic pitch control (HHC) and individual blade control (IBC) concepts, have been extensively investigated for noise and vibration reduction. The HHC technique has proved the substantial blade-vortex interaction noise reduction, up to 6 dB, while vibration and low-frequency noise have been increased. Tests with IBC techniques have shown the simultaneous reduction of rotor noise and vibratory loads with 2/rev pitch control inputs. Recently, active blade control concepts with smart structures have been investigated with the emphasis on active blade twist and trailing edge flap. Smart structures technologies are very promising, but further advancements are needed to meet all the requirements of rotorcraft applications in frequency, force, and displacement.

  15. Small-noise asymptotics of Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equations and bifurcations of stochastic optimal control problems

    D. Grass; T. Kiseleva; F. Wagener

    2015-01-01

    We derive small-noise approximations of the value function of stochastic optimal control problems over an unbounded domain and use these to perform a bifurcation analysis of these problems. The corresponding zero-noise problems may feature indifference (shock, Skiba) points, that is, points of non-d

  16. A bulk-controlled ring-VCO with 1/f-noise reduction for frequency ΔΣ modulator

    Tuan Vu, CAO; Wisland, Dag T.; Lande, Tor Sverre;

    The paper introduces a bulk-controlled ring-VCO with a tail transistor utilizing flicker-noise (1/f-noise) reduction techniques for a frequency-based DeltaSigma modulator (FDSM). This VCO converts an analog input voltage to phase information under various bias conditions ranging from sub-threshol...

  17. Diffusion dynamics in external noise-activated non-equilibrium open system-reservoir coupling environment

    Wang Chun-Yang

    2013-01-01

    The diffusion process in an extemal noise-activated non-equilibrium open system-reservoir coupling environment is studied by analytically solving the generalized Langevin equation.The dynamical property of the system near the barrier top is investigated in detail by numerically calculating the quantities such as mean diffusion path,invariance,barrier passing probability,and so on.It is found that,comparing with the unfavorable effect of internal fluctuations,the external noise activation is sometimes beneficial to the diffusion process.An optimal strength of external activation or correlation time of the internal fluctuation is expected for the diffusing particle to have a maximal probability to escape from the potential well.

  18. Kalman filter based fault diagnosis of networked control system with white noise

    Yanwei WANG; Ying ZHENG

    2005-01-01

    The networked control system NCS is regarded as a sampled control system with output time-variant delay.White noise is considered in the model construction of NCS.By using the Kalman filter theory to compute the filter parameters,a Kalman filter is constructed for this NCS.By comparing the output of the filter and the practical system,a residual is generated to diagnose the sensor faults and the actuator faults.Finally,an example is given to show the feasibility of the approach.

  19. Noise performance of frequency- and phase-locked CW magnetrons operated as current-controlled oscillators.

    Tahir, I.; Dexter, A.; Carter, Richard G.

    2005-01-01

    Low-power continuous wave ``cooker'' magnetrons driven from industrial-quality switch-mode power supplies have been frequency locked by driving them as current-controlled oscillators in a phase-lock loop (PLL). The noise performance of these frequency-locked oscillators is reported as a function of heater power. The injection of -30- to -40-dB signals derived from the reference oscillator of the PLL into the magnetron's output waveguide while the anode current is controlled by the PLL is show...

  20. Periodic shunted arrays for the control of noise radiation in an enclosure

    Casadei, Filippo; Dozio, Lorenzo; Ruzzene, Massimo; Cunefare, Kenneth A.

    2010-08-01

    This work presents numerical and experimental investigations of the application of a periodic array of resistive-inductive (RL) shunted piezoelectric patches for the attenuation of broadband noise radiated by a flexible plate in an enclosed cavity. A 4×4 lay-out of piezoelectric patches is bonded to the surface of a rectangular plate fully clamped to the top face of a rectangular cavity. Each piezo-patch is shunted through a single RL circuit, and all shunting circuits are tuned at the same frequency. The response of the resulting periodic structure is characterized by frequency bandgaps where vibrations and associated noise are strongly attenuated. The location and extent of induced bandgaps are predicted by the application of Bloch theorem on a unit cell of the periodic assembly, and they are controlled by proper selection of the shunting circuit impedance. A coupled piezo-structural-acoustic finite element model is developed to evaluate the noise reduction performance. Strong attenuation of multiple panel-controlled modes is observed over broad frequency bands. The proposed concept is tested on an aluminum plate mounted in a wooden box and driven by a shaker. Experimental results are presented in terms of pressure responses recorded using a grid of microphones placed inside the acoustic box.

  1. LETTER: Self-organized pattern formation and noise-induced control based on particle computations

    Rohlf, Thimo; Bornholdt, Stefan

    2005-12-01

    We propose a new non-equilibrium model for spatial pattern formation based on local information transfer. Unlike most standard models of pattern formation it is not based on the Turing instability or initially laid down morphogen gradients. Information is transmitted through the system via particle-like excitations whose collective dynamics results in pattern formation and control. Here, a simple problem of domain formation is addressed by means of this model in an implementation as stochastic cellular automata, and then generalized to a system of coupled dynamical networks. One observes stable pattern formation, even in the presence of noise and cell flow. Noise contributes through the production of quasi-particles to de novo pattern formation as well as to robust control of the domain boundary position. Pattern proportions are scale independent as regards system size. The dynamics of pattern formation is stable over large parameter ranges, with a discontinuity at vanishing noise and a second-order phase transition at increased cell flow.

  2. Rotor noise

    Schmitz, F. H.

    1991-01-01

    The physical characteristics and sources of rotorcraft noise as they exist today are presented. Emphasis is on helicopter-like vehicles, that is, on rotorcraft in nonaxial flight. The mechanisms of rotor noise are reviewed in a simple physical manner for the most dominant sources of rotorcraft noise. With simple models, the characteristic time- and frequency-domain features of these noise sources are presented for idealized cases. Full-scale data on several rotorcraft are then reviewed to allow for the easy identification of the type and extent of the radiating noise. Methods and limitations of using scaled models to test for several noise sources are subsequently presented. Theoretical prediction methods are then discussed and compared with experimental data taken under very controlled conditions. Finally, some promising noise reduction technology is reviewed.

  3. An Engineering Approach to Management of Occupational and Community Noise Exposure at NASA Lewis Research Center

    Cooper, Beth A.

    1997-01-01

    Workplace and environmental noise issues at NASA Lewis Research Center are effectively managed via a three-part program that addresses hearing conservation, community noise control, and noise control engineering. The Lewis Research Center Noise Exposure Management Program seeks to limit employee noise exposure and maintain community acceptance for critical research while actively pursuing engineered controls for noise generated by more than 100 separate research facilities and the associated services required for their operation.

  4. Noise Response Data Reveal Novel Controllability Gramian for Nonlinear Network Dynamics

    Kashima, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Control of nonlinear large-scale dynamical networks, e.g., collective behavior of agents interacting via a scale-free connection topology, is a central problem in many scientific and engineering fields. For the linear version of this problem, the so-called controllability Gramian has played an important role to quantify how effectively the dynamical states are reachable by a suitable driving input. In this paper, we first extend the notion of the controllability Gramian to nonlinear dynamics in terms of the Gibbs distribution. Next, we show that, when the networks are open to environmental noise, the newly defined Gramian is equal to the covariance matrix associated with randomly excited, but uncontrolled, dynamical state trajectories. This fact theoretically justifies a simple Monte Carlo simulation that can extract effectively controllable subdynamics in nonlinear complex networks. In addition, the result provides a novel insight into the relationship between controllability and statistical mechanics. PMID:27264780

  5. The Data Acquisition and Control Systems of the Jet Noise Laboratory at the NASA Langley Research Center

    Jansen, B. J., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    The features of the data acquisition and control systems of the NASA Langley Research Center's Jet Noise Laboratory are presented. The Jet Noise Laboratory is a facility that simulates realistic mixed flow turbofan jet engine nozzle exhaust systems in simulated flight. The system is capable of acquiring data for a complete take-off assessment of noise and nozzle performance. This paper describes the development of an integrated system to control and measure the behavior of model jet nozzles featuring dual independent high pressure combusting air streams with wind tunnel flow. The acquisition and control system is capable of simultaneous measurement of forces, moments, static and dynamic model pressures and temperatures, and jet noise. The design concepts for the coordination of the control computers and multiple data acquisition computers and instruments are discussed. The control system design and implementation are explained, describing the features, equipment, and the experiences of using a primarily Personal Computer based system. Areas for future development are examined.

  6. Predicting the Inflow Distortion Tone Noise of the NASA Glenn Advanced Noise Control Fan with a Combined Quadrupole-Dipole Model

    Koch, L. Danielle

    2012-01-01

    A combined quadrupole-dipole model of fan inflow distortion tone noise has been extended to calculate tone sound power levels generated by obstructions arranged in circumferentially asymmetric locations upstream of a rotor. Trends in calculated sound power level agreed well with measurements from tests conducted in 2007 in the NASA Glenn Advanced Noise Control Fan. Calculated values of sound power levels radiated upstream were demonstrated to be sensitive to the accuracy of the modeled wakes from the cylindrical rods that were placed upstream of the fan to distort the inflow. Results indicate a continued need to obtain accurate aerodynamic predictions and measurements at the fan inlet plane as engineers work towards developing fan inflow distortion tone noise prediction tools.

  7. Quantum governor: Automatic quantum control and reduction of the influence of noise without measuring

    The problem of automatically protecting a quantum system against noise in a closed circuit is analyzed. A general scheme is developed built from two steps. First, a distillation step is induced in which undesired components are removed to another degree of freedom of the system. Later a recovering step is employed in which the system gains back its initial density. An optimal-control method is used to generate the distilling operator. The scheme is demonstrated by a simulation of a two-level bit influenced by white noise. Undesired deviations from the target were shown to be reduced by at least two orders of magnitude on average. The relations between the quantum version of the classical Watt's governor and the field of quantum information are also discussed

  8. The Quantum Governor: Automatic quantum control and reduction of the influence of noise without measuring

    Kallush, S

    2005-01-01

    The problem of automatically protecting a quantum system against noise in a closed circuit is analyzed. A general scheme is developed built from two steps. At first, a distillation step is induced in which undesired components are removed to another degree of freedom of the system. Later a recovering step is employed which the system gains back its initial density. An Optimal-Control method is used to generate the distilling operator. The scheme is demonstrated by a simulation of a two level byte influenced by white noise. Undesired deviations from the target were shown to be reduced by at least two orders of magnitude on average. The relations between the quantum version of the classical Watt's Governor and the field of quantum information are also discussed.

  9. Body Control in American Cyberspace: A Study on Don Delillo’s White Noise

    Ruzbeh Babaee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Don DeLillo’s White Noise (1984 is a cyberpunk narrative commenting on dystopia of late capitalism by illustrating the instability of the apparently safe and perfect life of a small town in North America. The dystopian society in white Noise is not a hierarchal world or a world in another time and space, as it is common in most dystopian narratives. It is a world that we may experience in our daily life. This study attempts to demonstrate that DeLillo criticizes the condition of the late twentieth century in which human beings are entrapped and become disembodied in cyberspace. This study also reveals that human beings live in a state of suspension in cyberspace. Furthermore, it is of great significance for this study to show that cyberspace is a control system that manipulates human beings through their bodies in the contemporary world.

  10. Noise tolerant selection by gaze-controlled pan and zoom in 3D

    Hansen, Dan Witzner; Jensen, Henrik Skovsgaard; Hansen, John Paulin;

    2008-01-01

    -size displays. We show that it is possible to make robust selection even with a large number of selectable items on the screen and noisy gaze trackers. A test with 48 subjects demonstrated that users who have never tried gaze interaction before could rapidly adapt to the navigation principles of StarGazer. We...... this had a negative impact on efficiency. However, the user remained in control and the noise did not seem to effect the error rate. Additionally, three subjects tested the effects of temporally adding noise to simulate latency in the gaze tracker. Even with a significant latency (about 200 ms) the...... subjects were able to type at acceptable rates. In a second test, seven subjects were allowed to adjust the zooming speed themselves. They achieved typing rates of more than eight words per minute without using language modeling. We conclude that the StarGazer application is an intuitive 3D interface for...

  11. Noise coupling between through-silicon vias and active devices for 20/14-nm technology nodes

    Runiu FANG

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Although a through-silicon via (TSV is widely used in three-dimensional integrated circuit systems, one of its major design challenges is noise coupling between TSVs and active devices. This paper investigates noise coupling between TSVs and active devices for 20/14-nm technology nodes. The effect of variations of structural parameters on noise coupling was examined using a three-dimensional full-wave electromagnetic field solver and its result was explained. Additionally, transient analysis on coupling noise was conducted with Synopsys TCAD. Furthermore, a combined strategy employing doped signal TSVs and ‘bare’ ground TSVs was proposed and compared with conventional signal/ground schemes. Demonstrated to improve noise isolation effectively, the proposed strategy is inherently advantageous to circuits of advanced technology nodes compared with other noise isolation schemes, for it demands no modification of the original circuit design, placement and routing.

  12. NOISE REGULATION

    Cristina Voican; Constantin Stanescu

    2012-01-01

    Noise regulation includes statutes or guidelines relating to sound transmission established by national, state or provincial and municipal levels of government. After the watershed passage of the United States Noise Control Act of 1972, other local and state governments passed further regulations. Although the UK and Japan enacted national laws in 1960 and 1967 respectively, these laws were not at all comprehensive or fully enforceable as to address generally rising ambient noise, enforceable...

  13. Activation barrier scaling and crossover for noise-induced switching in a micromechanical parametric oscillator

    Chan, H. B.; Stambaugh, C.

    2006-01-01

    We explore fluctuation-induced switching in a parametrically-driven micromechanical torsional oscillator. The oscillator possesses one, two or three stable attractors depending on the modulation frequency. Noise induces transitions between the coexisting attractors. Near the bifurcation points, the activation barriers are found to have a power law dependence on frequency detuning with critical exponents that are in agreement with predicted universal scaling relationships. At large detuning, w...

  14. Noise characterization of a pulse train generated by actively mode-locked lasers

    Eliyahu, Danny; Salvatore, Randal A.; Yariv, Amnon

    1996-01-01

    We analyze the entire power spectrum of pulse trains generated by a continuously operating actively mode-locked laser in the presence of noise. We consider the effect of amplitude, pulse-shape, and timing-jitter fluctuations that are characterized by stationary processes. Effects of correlations between different parameters of these fluctuations are studied also. The nonstationary timing-jitter fluctuations of passively mode-locked lasers and their influence on the power spectrum is discussed...

  15. Improved Broadband Liner Optimization Applied to the Advanced Noise Control Fan

    Nark, Douglas M.; Jones, Michael G.; Sutliff, Daniel L.; Ayle, Earl; Ichihashi, Fumitaka

    2014-01-01

    The broadband component of fan noise has grown in relevance with the utilization of increased bypass ratio and advanced fan designs. Thus, while the attenuation of fan tones remains paramount, the ability to simultaneously reduce broadband fan noise levels has become more desirable. This paper describes improvements to a previously established broadband acoustic liner optimization process using the Advanced Noise Control Fan rig as a demonstrator. Specifically, in-duct attenuation predictions with a statistical source model are used to obtain optimum impedance spectra over the conditions of interest. The predicted optimum impedance information is then used with acoustic liner modeling tools to design liners aimed at producing impedance spectra that most closely match the predicted optimum values. Design selection is based on an acceptance criterion that provides the ability to apply increased weighting to specific frequencies and/or operating conditions. Constant-depth, double-degree of freedom and variable-depth, multi-degree of freedom designs are carried through design, fabrication, and testing to validate the efficacy of the design process. Results illustrate the value of the design process in concurrently evaluating the relative costs/benefits of these liner designs. This study also provides an application for demonstrating the integrated use of duct acoustic propagation/radiation and liner modeling tools in the design and evaluation of novel broadband liner concepts for complex engine configurations.

  16. Modeling of Broadband Liners Applied to the Advanced Noise Control Fan

    Nark, Douglas M.; Jones, Michael G.; Sutliff, Daniel L.

    2015-01-01

    The broadband component of fan noise has grown in relevance with an increase in bypass ratio and incorporation of advanced fan designs. Therefore, while the attenuation of fan tones remains a major factor in engine nacelle acoustic liner design, the simultaneous reduction of broadband fan noise levels has received increased interest. As such, a previous investigation focused on improvements to an established broadband acoustic liner optimization process using the Advanced Noise Control Fan (ANCF) rig as a demonstrator. Constant-depth, double-degree of freedom and variable-depth, multi-degree of freedom liner designs were carried through design, fabrication, and testing. This paper addresses a number of areas for further research identified in the initial assessment of the ANCF study. Specifically, incident source specification and uncertainty in some aspects of the predicted liner impedances are addressed. This information is incorporated in updated predictions of the liner performance and comparisons with measurement are greatly improved. Results illustrate the value of the design process in concurrently evaluating the relative costs/benefits of various liner designs. This study also provides further confidence in the integrated use of duct acoustic propagation/radiation and liner modeling tools in the design and evaluation of novel broadband liner concepts for complex engine configurations.

  17. Hanbury-Brown Twiss noise correlation with time controlled quasi-particles in ballistic quantum conductors

    Glattli, D. C.; Roulleau, P.

    2016-02-01

    We study the Hanbury Brown and Twiss correlation of electronic quasi-particles injected in a quantum conductor using current noise correlations and we experimentally address the effect of finite temperature. By controlling the relative time of injection of two streams of electrons it is possible to probe the fermionic antibunching, performing the electron analog of the optical Hong Ou Mandel (HOM) experiment. The electrons are injected using voltage pulses with either sine-wave or Lorentzian shape. In the latter case, we propose a set of orthogonal wavefunctions, describing periodic trains of multiply charged electron pulses, which give a simple interpretation to the HOM shot noise. The effect of temperature is then discussed and experimentally investigated. We observe a perfect electron anti-bunching for a large range of temperature, showing that, as recently predicted, thermal mixing of the states does not affect anti-bunching properties, a feature qualitatively different from dephasing. For single charge Lorentzian pulses, we provide experimental evidence of the prediction that the HOM shot noise variation versus the emission time delay is remarkably independent of the temperature.

  18. Diagnosis and control of machine induced noise and vibration in steel construction

    Most high-rise buildings constructed of steel or steel reinforced concrete have to install various vital equipment. Among these equipment machinery noise is especially annoying for accommodation close to them. In attempting to control the machine-induced structure-borne noise and vibration, the methodology by employing mobility functions to identify the dominant frequency band of vibrational power flow transmission and to assess the isolation effectiveness of isolators is established. The proposed method of diagnosis procedure is applied to the structure-borne vibration power flow transmission for a steel construction parking tower. After proper check and replacement of the isolators of the power unit platform of the mechanical parking tower, the improvement results in a substantial structure-borne noise reduction of 16 dB(NC). The unique parts of the paper include the establishment of the relation of mobility functions with respect to four-pole parameters for a coupled machine/mount/foundation system. Also expressions to represent the vibrational input power, the output power and the transmitted power in relation to mobility functions are clarified

  19. Novel Active Combustion Control Valve

    Caspermeyer, Matt

    2014-01-01

    This project presents an innovative solution for active combustion control. Relative to the state of the art, this concept provides frequency modulation (greater than 1,000 Hz) in combination with high-amplitude modulation (in excess of 30 percent flow) and can be adapted to a large range of fuel injector sizes. Existing valves often have low flow modulation strength. To achieve higher flow modulation requires excessively large valves or too much electrical power to be practical. This active combustion control valve (ACCV) has high-frequency and -amplitude modulation, consumes low electrical power, is closely coupled with the fuel injector for modulation strength, and is practical in size and weight. By mitigating combustion instabilities at higher frequencies than have been previously achieved (approximately 1,000 Hz), this new technology enables gas turbines to run at operating points that produce lower emissions and higher performance.

  20. Noises Cancelling Adaptive Methods in Control Telemetry Systems of Oil Electrical Submersible Pumps

    Ustun, Ozgur; Yilmaz, Murat; Ali Zada, Parviz; Tuncay, R. Nejat

    2015-01-01

    The main ideas of this paper are that only some from more than 10 MATLAB Adaptive Methods library may be useful and can be recommended to filter out High-Noises in similar Control Telemetry Channels of Electric Power Components like ESP Systems: only four of applied have shown successfully good results in the early prediction of the ESP motor real insulation disruption (like Sign-error, Sign-data and Sign-sign filters). The best among the ten analyzed adaptive filter algorithms was recognized...

  1. Electrical Maxwell demon and Szilard engine utilizing Johnson noise, measurement, logic and control.

    Kish, Laszlo Bela; Granqvist, Claes-Göran

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a purely electrical version of Maxwell's demon which does not involve mechanically moving parts such as trapdoors, etc. It consists of a capacitor, resistors, amplifiers, logic circuitry and electronically controlled switches and uses thermal noise in resistors (Johnson noise) to pump heat. The only types of energy of importance in this demon are electrical energy and heat. We also demonstrate an entirely electrical version of Szilard's engine, i.e., an information-controlled device that can produce work by employing thermal fluctuations. The only moving part is a piston that executes work, and the engine has purely electronic controls and it is free of the major weakness of the original Szilard engine in not requiring removal and repositioning the piston at the end of the cycle. For both devices, the energy dissipation in the memory and other binary informatics components are insignificant compared to the exponentially large energy dissipation in the analog part responsible for creating new information by measurement and decision. This result contradicts the view that the energy dissipation in the memory during erasure is the most essential dissipation process in a demon. Nevertheless the dissipation in the memory and information processing parts is sufficient to secure the Second Law of Thermodynamics. PMID:23077525

  2. Dependence of regular background noise of VLF radiation and thunder-storm activity on solar wind proton density

    Correlation of the intensity of slowly changing regular background noise within 9.7 kHz frequency in Yakutsk (L = 3) and of the solar wind density protons was determined. This result explains the reverse dependence of the intensity of the regular background noise on the solar activity, 27-day frequency, increase before and following geomagnetic storms, absence of relation with Kp index of geomagnetic activity. Conclusion is made that growth of density of the solar wind protons results in increase of the regular background noise and thunderstorm activity

  3. Factors that limit control effectiveness in self-excited noise driven combustors

    Crawford, Jackie H., III

    This thesis considers what limits control effectiveness in self-excited, noise driven, combustors using a full Strouhal number thermo-acoustic model with the ultimate aim of learning how to design combustors to be responsive to feedback control of combustion instabilities. The inclusion of time delays in the volumetric heat release perturbation models create unique behavioral characteristics which are not properly reproduced within current low Strouhal number thermo-acoustic models used for feedback control. New analysis tools using probability density functions are introduced in this thesis which enable exact expressions for the statistics of a time delayed system. Additionally, preexisting tools from applied mathematics and control theory for spectral analysis of time delay systems are introduced to the combustion community. These new analysis tools can be used to extend sensitivity function analysis used in control theory to explain limits to control effectiveness in self-excited combustors. The control effectiveness of self-excited combustors with actuator constraints are found to be most sensitive to the location of non-minimum phase zeros. Modeling the non-minimum phase zeros correctly require accurate volumetric heat release perturbation models. Designs that removes non-minimum phase zeros are more likely to have poles in the right hand complex plane. As a result, unstable combustors are inherently more responsive to feedback control.

  4. Long-term transportation noise annoyance is associated with subsequent lower levels of physical activity.

    Foraster, Maria; Eze, Ikenna C; Vienneau, Danielle; Brink, Mark; Cajochen, Christian; Caviezel, Seraina; Héritier, Harris; Schaffner, Emmanuel; Schindler, Christian; Wanner, Miriam; Wunderli, Jean-Marc; Röösli, Martin; Probst-Hensch, Nicole

    2016-05-01

    Noise annoyance (NA) might lead to behavioral patterns not captured by noise levels, which could reduce physical activity (PA) either directly or through impaired sleep and constitute a noise pathway towards cardiometabolic diseases. We investigated the association of long-term transportation NA and its main sources (aircraft, road, and railway) at home with PA levels. We assessed 3842 participants (aged 37-81) that attended the three examinations (SAP 1, 2, and 3 in years 1991, 2001 and 2011, respectively) of the population-based Swiss cohort on Air Pollution and Lung and Heart Diseases in Adults (SAPALDIA). Participants reported general 24-h transportation NA (in all examinations) and source-specific NA at night (only SAP 3) on an ICBEN-type 11-point scale. We assessed moderate, vigorous, and total PA from a short-questionnaire (SAP 3). The main outcome was moderate PA (active/inactive: cut-off≥150min/week). We used logistic regression including random effects by area and adjusting for age, sex, socioeconomic status, and lifestyles (main model) and evaluated potential effect modifiers. We analyzed associations with PA at SAP 3 a) cross-sectionally: for source-specific and transportation NA in the last year (SAP 3), and b) longitudinally: for 10-y transportation NA (mean of SAP 1+2), adjusting for prior PA (SAP 2) and changes in NA (SAP 3-2). Reported NA (score≥5) was 16.4%, 7.5%, 3%, and 1.1% for 1-year transportation, road, aircraft, and railway at SAP 3, respectively. NA was greater in the past, reaching 28.5% for 10-y transportation NA (SAP 1+2). The 10-y transportation NA was associated with a 3.2% (95% CI: 6%-0.2%) decrease in moderate PA per 1-NA rating point and was related to road and aircraft NA at night in cross-sectional analyses. The longitudinal association was stronger for women, reported daytime sleepiness or chronic diseases and it was not explained by objectively modeled levels of road traffic noise at SAP 3. In conclusion, long-term NA

  5. A low noise reference generator in Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors for STAR

    In order to reduce the number of cables and gain a lower material budget, this paper presents an on-chip reference generator to provide the clamping voltage in monolithic active pixel sensors (MAPS) for the STAR experiment. It is realized by a regulator utilizing a buffer and a serial RC network. The proposed circuits can achieve good stability, low power dissipation and low noise. Moreover, the output voltage is adjustable to compensate the influence of the process. A prototype has been implemented in a 0.35 μm CMOS process. Its die area is 327 μm x 119 μm. The power dissipation is 677 μW. The measured results show that 5.3% of the noise in MAPS is induced by the reference generator.

  6. Risk Sensitive, Nonlinear Optimal Control: Iterative Linear Exponential-Quadratic Optimal Control with Gaussian Noise

    Farshidian, Farbod; Buchli, Jonas

    2015-01-01

    In this contribution, we derive ILEG, an iterative algorithm to find risk sensitive solutions to nonlinear, stochastic optimal control problems. The algorithm is based on a linear quadratic approximation of an exponential risk sensitive nonlinear control problem. ILEG allows to find risk sensitive policies and thus generalizes previous algorithms to solve nonlinear optimal control based on iterative linear-quadratic methods. Depending on the setting of the parameter controlling the risk sensi...

  7. Noise Control Using Coconut Coir Fiber Sound Absorber with Porous Layer Backing and Perforated Panel

    Rozli Zulkifli

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Noise control was one of the major requirements to improve the living environment. One of the methods to do that is provided by sound absorber. Commonly, multi-layer sound absorbers are applied to absorb broadband noise that was composed of perforated plates, air space and porous material. However, multi-layers sound absorbers effectiveness depends on their construction. This study was conducted to investigate the potential of using coconut coir fiber as sound absorber. The effects of porous layer backing and perforated plate on sound absorption coefficient of sound absorber using coconut coir fiber were studied. Approach: Car boot liners made from woven cotton cloth were used as type of porous layer in the study. This material has been used widely in automotive industry. Perforated plate used was machined with perforation ratio of 0.20, thickness of 1 mm and holed diameter of 2 mm. The samples were tested at the acoustic lab of the Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, University Kebangsaan Malaysia, according to ASTM E 1050-98 international standards for noise absorption coefficient. Results: The experiment data indicates that porous layer backing can improve noise absorption coefficient at low and high frequencies with significant increasing. 20 mm thick layer coconut coir fiber with porous layer backing exhibit peak value at frequencies between 2750-2825 Hz with maximum value of 0.97. The experimental results also found that the coconut coir fiber with perforated plate gives higher value for lower frequencies range from 600-2400 Hz. The optimum value for coconut coir fiber with perforated panel is around 0.94-0.95 for the frequency range 2600-2700 Hz. Conclusion: Noise absorption coefficient of coconut coir fiber was increased at all frequency when they were backing with Woven Cotton Cloth (WCC. At low frequency, the NAC have significant increasing. This is because WCC have higher flow resistivity than coconut coir

  8. A Digital Controller for Active Aeroelastic Controls

    Ueda, Tetsuhiko; MUROTA, Katsuichi; 上田, 哲彦; 室田, 勝一

    1989-01-01

    A high-speed digital controller for aeroelastic controls was designed and made. The purpose was to minimize adverse phase lag which is inevitably produced by the CPU time of digital processing. The delay deteriorates control performances on rather rapid phenomena like aircraft flutter. With fix-point operation the controller realized 417 microseconds of throughput time including the A/D and D/A conversion. This corresponds to a high sampling rate of 2.4kHz. The controller furnishes two channe...

  9. Self-organized critical noise amplification in human closed loop control

    Felix Patzelt

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available When humans perform closed loop control tasks like in upright standing or while balancing a stick, their behavior exhibits non-Gaussian fluctuations with long-tailed distributions. The origin of these fluctuations is not known. Here, we investigate if they are caused by selforganized critical noise amplification which emerges in control systems when an unstable dynamics becomes stabilized by an adaptive controller that has finite memory. Starting from this theory, we formulate a realistic model of adaptive closed loop control by including constraints on memory and delays. To test this model, we performed psychophysical experiments where humans balanced an unstable target on a screen. It turned out that the model reproduces the long tails of the distributions together with other characteristic features of the human control dynamics. Fine-tuning the model to match the experimental dynamics identifies parameters characterizing a subject’s control system which can be independently tested. Our results suggest that the nervous system involved in closed loop motor control nearly optimally estimates system parameters on-line from very short epochs of past observations.

  10. Open-loop control of noise amplification in a separated boundary layer flow

    Boujo, Edouard; Gallaire, François

    2014-01-01

    Linear optimal gains are computed for the subcritical two-dimensional separated boundary-layer flow past a bump. Very large optimal gain values are found, making it possible for small-amplitude noise to be strongly amplified and to destabilize the flow. The optimal forcing is located close to the summit of the bump, while the optimal response is the largest in the shear layer. The largest amplification occurs at frequencies corresponding to eigenvalues which first become unstable at higher Reynolds number. Nonlinear direct numerical simulations show that a low level of noise is indeed sufficient to trigger random flow unsteadiness, characterized here by large-scale vortex shedding. Next, a variational technique is used to compute efficiently the sensitivity of optimal gains to steady control (through source of momentum in the flow, or blowing/suction at the wall). A systematic analysis at several frequencies identifies the bump summit as the most sensitive region for control with wall actuation. Based on thes...

  11. A flexible and high-performance bidirectional optical amplifier with all optical gain control using ASE noise path through multi-port circulators

    An Vu Tran; Chang-Joon Chae; Rodney S. Tucker

    2003-01-01

    We report a flexible all-optical gain controlled bidirectional optical amplifier. The device achieves constant gain and low noise figure over a large input power range. Moreover, the device removes Rayleigh backscattered light and amplifier noise.

  12. Further studies of static to flight effects on fan tone noise using inlet distortion control for source identification

    Hodder, B. K.

    1976-01-01

    Current experimental investigations have linked static inflow distortion phenomena such as the ground vortex, atmospheric turbulence, and teststand structure interference to the generation of fan tone noise at the blade passing frequency. Since such distortions do not exist in flight, it is important to remove them from the static test environment and thereby improve the static-to-flight tone-noise correlation. In the course of providing evidence for this position, a recent investigation used a distortion control inlet with a modern day turbofan engine to assess atmospheric turbulence effects. Although the initial results were encouraging, they were incomplete. The present investigation continues this work and shows more completely the effect of atmospheric turbulence on tone-noise generation. Further, use is made of the distortion control inlet to identify other competing tone-noise sources in the test engine such as a rotor-core stator interaction which was confirmed by engine modifications.

  13. Activation process in excitable systems with multiple noise sources: Large number of units

    Franović, Igor; Perc, Matjaž; Todorović, Kristina; Kostić, Srdjan; Burić, Nikola

    2015-12-01

    We study the activation process in large assemblies of type II excitable units whose dynamics is influenced by two independent noise terms. The mean-field approach is applied to explicitly demonstrate that the assembly of excitable units can itself exhibit macroscopic excitable behavior. In order to facilitate the comparison between the excitable dynamics of a single unit and an assembly, we introduce three distinct formulations of the assembly activation event. Each formulation treats different aspects of the relevant phenomena, including the thresholdlike behavior and the role of coherence of individual spikes. Statistical properties of the assembly activation process, such as the mean time-to-first pulse and the associated coefficient of variation, are found to be qualitatively analogous for all three formulations, as well as to resemble the results for a single unit. These analogies are shown to derive from the fact that global variables undergo a stochastic bifurcation from the stochastically stable fixed point to continuous oscillations. Local activation processes are analyzed in the light of the competition between the noise-led and the relaxation-driven dynamics. We also briefly report on a system-size antiresonant effect displayed by the mean time-to-first pulse.

  14. The Gain Stability and Output Signal-to-noise Ratio Analysis of the Negative Feedback Control in Genetic Circuits

    Liu, S; Chen, C.

    2012-01-01

    Negative feedback genetic circuits (NFGC) are key regulatory motif of cellular robustness with the capability of reducing noise in genetic interaction network. NFGC have the same control theory frame as negative feedback amplifier circuits (NFAC). NFAC can enhance gain stability and output signal-to-noise ratio (OSNR) of output signal (voltage). Whether NFGC possess these two advantages or not is still unclear. We have investigated the advantages of NFGC through using feedback depth analysis ...

  15. Flow-induced noise control behind bluff bodies with various leading edges using the surface perturbation technique

    Lu, Z. B.; Halim, D.; Cheng, L.

    2016-05-01

    The present paper is devoted to an investigation on the flow-induced noise control downstream of bluff bodies with various leading edges using the surface perturbation technique. Four typical leading edges used in various engineering applications were studied in this work: the semi-circular, square, 30° symmetric trapezoid and 30° asymmetric trapezoid leading edges. The surface perturbation was created by piezo-ceramic actuators embedded underneath the surface of a bluff body placed in a cross flow. To suppress the flow-induced noise downstream bluff bodies with those leading edges, the surface perturbation technique was implemented. Based on the experiments, a noise reduction in the duct of more than 14.0 dB has been achieved for all leading-edge cases. These results indicated that the vortex shedding and its flow-induced noise have been successfully suppressed by the proposed control scheme. The flow structure alteration around the bluff bodies and the shear layer shift phenomenon observed on the trailing edges were then investigated for interpreting the control mechanism for this flow-induced noise suppression, which were based on the vortex shedding strength suppression and vortex shedding frequency shift phenomenon. The effective control position for various leading edges was also studied for developing optimal control strategies for practical engineering applications.

  16. Activation process in excitable systems with multiple noise sources: Large number of units

    Franović, Igor; Todorović, Kristina; Kostić, Srđan; Burić, Nikola

    2015-01-01

    We study the activation process in large assemblies of type II excitable units whose dynamics is influenced by two independent noise terms. The mean-field approach is applied to explicitly demonstrate that the assembly of excitable units can itself exhibit macroscopic excitable behavior. In order to facilitate the comparison between the excitable dynamics of a single unit and an assembly, we introduce three distinct formulations of the assembly activation event. Each formulation treats different aspects of the relevant phenomena, including the threshold-like behavior and the role of coherence of individual spikes. Statistical properties of the assembly activation process, such as the mean time-to-first pulse and the associated coefficient of variation, are found to be qualitatively analogous for all three formulations, as well as to resemble the results for a single unit. These analogies are shown to derive from the fact that global variables undergo a stochastic bifurcation from the stochastically stable fix...

  17. Active Spacecraft Potential Control Investigation

    Torkar, K.; Nakamura, R.; Tajmar, M.; Scharlemann, C.; Jeszenszky, H.; Laky, G.; Fremuth, G.; Escoubet, C. P.; Svenes, K.

    2016-03-01

    In tenuous plasma the floating potential of sunlit spacecraft reaches tens of volts, positive. The corresponding field disturbs measurements of the ambient plasma by electron and ion sensors and can reduce micro-channel plate lifetime in electron detectors owing to large fluxes of attracted photoelectrons. Also the accuracy of electric field measurements may suffer from a high spacecraft potential. The Active Spacecraft Potential Control (ASPOC) neutralizes the spacecraft potential by releasing positive charge produced by indium ion emitters. The method has been successfully applied on other spacecraft such as Cluster and Double Star. Two ASPOC units are present on each spacecraft. Each unit contains four ion emitters, whereby one emitter per instrument is operated at a time. ASPOC for the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission includes new developments in the design of the emitters and the electronics. New features include the use of capillaries instead of needles, new materials for the emitters and their internal thermal insulators, an extended voltage and current range of the electronics, both for ion emission and heating purposes, and a more capable control software. This enables lower spacecraft potentials, higher reliability, and a more uniform potential structure in the spacecraft's sheath compared to previous missions. Results from on-ground testing demonstrate compliance with requirements. Model calculations confirm the findings from previous applications that the plasma measurements will not be affected by the beam's space charge. Finally, the various operating modes to adapt to changing boundary conditions are described along with the main data products.

  18. Noise and noise disturbances from wind power plants - Tests with interactive control of sound parameters for more comfortable and less perceptible sounds

    In experimental pilot studies, a methodology has been worked out for interactively varying sound parameters in wind power plants. In the tests, 24 persons varied the center frequency of different band-widths, the frequency of a sinus-tone and the amplitude-modulation of a sinus-tone in order to create as comfortable a sound as possible. The variations build on the noise from the two wind turbines Bonus and Wind World. The variations were performed with a constant dba level. The results showed that the majority preferred a low-frequency tone (94 Hz and 115 Hz for Wind World and Bonus, respectively). The mean of the most comfortable amplitude-modulation varied between 18 and 22 Hz, depending on the ground frequency. The mean of the center-frequency for the different band-widths varied from 785 to 1104 Hz. In order to study the influence of the wind velocity on the acoustic character of the noise, a long-time measurement program has been performed. A remotely controlled system has been developed, where wind velocity, wind direction, temperature and humidity are registered simultaneously with the noise. Long-time registrations have been performed for four different wing turbines

  19. Technology approach to aero engine noise reduction

    Neise, W.; Enghardt, L. [Deutsches Zentrum fur Luft-und Raumfahrt -DLR, Institute of Propulsion Technology, Turbulence Research Div., Berlin (Germany)

    2003-07-01

    Transportation noise is one of the most pressing environmental problems of modern societies. Aircraft noise is second only to road traffic noise in drawing complaints from the public about noise pollution. Therefore intensive research efforts are necessary on the national levels as well as the European level to reduce the noise load around airports. The most effective and economical way to reach this goal is noise reduction at the source. The aero engines of today's transport aircraft are the dominant noise sources for most flight conditions, although air-frame noise does play an important role for landing aircraft. In this paper noise reduction studies for aero engines are described in which DLR are involved. The topics discussed are low noise fan design, active noise control using wall-flush loudspeakers as secondary sources, ANC using active stators as secondary sources, ANC using flow induced secondary sources at the rotor tips, reduction of low-pressure turbine noise, and flight tests for validation of add-on noise reduction devices. (authors)

  20. Long-distance continuous-variable quantum key distribution by controlling excess noise

    Huang, Duan; Huang, Peng; Lin, Dakai; Zeng, Guihua

    2016-01-01

    Quantum cryptography founded on the laws of physics could revolutionize the way in which communication information is protected. Significant progresses in long-distance quantum key distribution based on discrete variables have led to the secure quantum communication in real-world conditions being available. However, the alternative approach implemented with continuous variables has not yet reached the secure distance beyond 100 km. Here, we overcome the previous range limitation by controlling system excess noise and report such a long distance continuous-variable quantum key distribution experiment. Our result paves the road to the large-scale secure quantum communication with continuous variables and serves as a stepping stone in the quest for quantum network.

  1. Controllable single accumulated state-sequential acquisition with low signal noise ratio

    JI Jiang; HUANG KaiZhi; JIN Liang; ZHANG LiZhi; ZHANG Meng

    2009-01-01

    The sequential estimation (SE) algorithm has a poor performance in the environment with a low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and a high bit error rate (BER), especially for unknown initial acquisition sequence. This paper summarizes the conventional sequence acquisition model, and discovers its several prob-persedly. To solve these problems, the paper presents a new algorithm, CSAS-SA (controllable single accumulated state-sequential acquisition). This algorithm accumulates the sequence innovation to a single appointed sequence state and makes the useful information accumulated effectively. Through simulation, CSAS-SA has a higher probability of success acquisition. When SNR equals -3 dB, the performance can be improved by 70%.

  2. A low noise charge sensitive preamplifier with switch control feedback resistance

    2008-01-01

    In this paper,the design and analysis of a new low noise charge sensitive preamplifier for silicon strip,Si(Li),CdZnTe and CsI detectors etc.with switch control feedback resistance were described,the entire system to be built using the CMOS transistors.The circuit configuration of the CSP proposed in this paper can be adopted to develop CMOS-based Application Specific Integrated Circuit further for Front End Electronics of read-out system of nuclear physits,particle physics and astrophysics research,etc.This work is an implemented design that we succeed after a simulation to obtain a rise time less than 3ns.the output resistance less than94Ω and the linearity almost good.

  3. Sensitivity and open-loop control of stochastic response in a noise amplifier flow: the backward-facing step

    Boujo, Edouard

    2014-01-01

    The two-dimensional backward-facing step flow is a canonical example of noise amplifier flow: global linear stability analysis predicts that it is stable, but perturbations can undergo large amplification in space and time as a result of non-normal effects. This amplification potential is best captured by optimal transient growth analysis, optimal harmonic forcing, or the response to sustained noise. In view of reducing disturbance amplification in these globally stable open flows, a variational technique is proposed to evaluate the sensitivity of stochastic amplification to steady control. Existing sensitivity methods are extended in two ways to achieve a realistic representation of incoming noise: (i) perturbations are time-stochastic rather than time-harmonic, (ii) perturbations are localised at the inlet rather than distributed in space. This allows for the identification of regions where small-amplitude control is the most effective, without actually computing any controlled flows. In particular, passive...

  4. Does exposure to noise from human activities compromise sensory information from cephalopod statocysts?

    Solé, Marta; Lenoir, Marc; Durfort, Mercè; López-Bejar, Manel; Lombarte, Antoni; van der Schaar, Mike; André, Michel

    2013-10-01

    Many anthropogenic noise sources are nowadays contributing to the general noise budget of the oceans. The extent to which sound in the sea impacts and affects marine life is a topic of considerable current interest both to the scientific community and to the general public. Cepaholopods potentially represent a group of species whose ecology may be influenced by artificial noise that would have a direct consequence on the functionality and sensitivity of their sensory organs, the statocysts. These are responsible for their equilibrium and movements in the water column. Controlled Exposure Experiments, including the use of a 50-400Hz sweep (RL=157±5dB re 1μPa with peak levels up to SPL=175dB re 1μPa) revealed lesions in the statocysts of four cephalopod species of the Mediterranean Sea, when exposed to low frequency sounds: (n=76) of Sepia officinalis, (n=4) Octopus vulgaris, (n=5) Loligo vulgaris and (n=2) Illex condietii. The analysis was performed through scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) electron microscopical techniques of the whole inner structure of the cephalopods' statocyst, especially on the macula and crista. All exposed individuals presented the same lesions and the same incremental effects over time, consistent with a massive acoustic trauma observed in other species that have been exposed to much higher intensities of sound: Immediately after exposure, the damage was observed in the macula statica princeps (msp) and in the crista sensory epithelium. Kinocilia on hair cells were either missing or were bent or flaccid. A number of hair cells showed protruding apical poles and ruptured lateral plasma membranes, most probably resulting from the extrusion of cytoplasmic material. Hair cells were also partially ejected from the sensory epithelium, and spherical holes corresponding to missing hair cells were visible in the epithelium. The cytoplasmic content of the damaged hair cells showed obvious changes, including the presence of numerous vacuoles

  5. Contralateral parahippocampal gamma-band activity determines noise-like tinnitus laterality: a region of interest analysis.

    Vanneste, S; Heyning, P Van de; Ridder, D De

    2011-12-29

    Tinnitus is described as an auditory perception in the absence of any external sound source. Tinnitus loudness has been correlated to sustained high frequency gamma-band activity in auditory cortex. It remains unknown whether unilateral tinnitus is always generated in the left auditory cortex, irrespective of the side on which the tinnitus is perceived, or in the contralateral auditory cortex. In order to solve this enigma source localized electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings of a homogenous group of unilateral left and right-sided tinnitus patients presenting with noise-like tinnitus was analyzed. Based on a region of interest analysis, the most important result of this study is that tinnitus lateralization depended on the gamma-band activity of the contralateral parahippocampal area. As for the auditory cortex no differences were found between left-sided and right-sided tinnitus patients. However, in comparison to a control group both left and right-sided tinnitus patients had an increased gamma-band activity in both the left and right primary and secondary auditory cortex. Thus whereas in tinnitus the primary and secondary auditory cortices of both sides are characterized by increased gamma-band activity, the side on which the tinnitus is perceived relates to gamma-band activity in the contralateral parahippocampal area. PMID:21920411

  6. Attitude control with active actuator saturation prevention

    Forbes, James Richard

    2015-02-01

    Spacecraft attitude control in the presence of actuator saturation is considered. The attitude controller developed has two components: a proportional component and an angular velocity component. The proportional control has a special form that depends on the attitude parameterization. The angular velocity control is realized by a strictly positive real system with its own input nonlinearity. The strictly positive real system can filter noise in the angular velocity measurement. With this control architecture the torques applied to the body are guaranteed to be below a predetermined value, thus preventing saturation of the actuators. The closed-loop equilibrium point corresponding to the desired attitude is shown to be asymptotically stable. Additionally, the control law does not require specific knowledge of the body's inertia properties, and is therefore robust to such modelling errors.

  7. Noise suppression by noise

    Vilar, J. M. G.; Rubí Capaceti, José Miguel

    2001-01-01

    We have analyzed the interplay between an externally added noise and the intrinsic noise of systems that relax fast towards a stationary state, and found that increasing the intensity of the external noise can reduce the total noise of the system. We have established a general criterion for the appearance of this phenomenon and discussed two examples in detail.

  8. Development of a Pseudo-Uniform Structural Quantity for the Active Control of Structural Radiation

    Fisher, Jeffrey; Blotter, Jon

    2010-01-01

    Active noise control has been a highly researched field over the past few decades but the active control of the radiating structures has recently excited interest. Multiple structural quantities and their relationships to acoustic radiation are investigated. This paper also looks at the control of a new structural quantity developed taking advantage of the principle of Rayleigh’s integral and radiated power being strongly dependent on volume velocity. The benefit of this new quantity is that ...

  9. Impacts of chronic anthropogenic noise from energy-sector activity on abundance of songbirds in the boreal forest.

    Bayne, Erin M; Habib, Lucas; Boutin, Stan

    2008-10-01

    The effects of human activities in forests are often examined in the context of habitat conversion. Changes in habitat structure and composition are also associated with increases in the activity of people with vehicles and equipment, which results in increases in anthropogenic noise. Anthropogenic noise may reduce habitat quality for many species, particularly those that rely on acoustic signals for communication. We compared the density and occupancy rate of forest passerines close to versus far from noise-generating compressor stations and noiseless well pads in the boreal forest of Alberta, Canada. Using distance-based sampling, we found that areas near noiseless energy facilities had a total passerine density 1.5 times higher than areas near noise-producing energy sites. The White-throated Sparrow (Zonotrichia albicollis), Yellow-rumped Warbler (Dendroica coronata), and Red-eyed Vireo (Vireo olivaceus) were less dense in noisy areas. We used repeat sampling to estimate occupancy rate for 23 additional species. Seven had lower conditional or unconditional occupancy rates near noise-generating facilities. One-third of the species examined showed patterns that supported the hypothesis that abundance is influenced by anthropogenic noise. An additional 4 species responded negatively to edge effects. To mitigate existing noise impacts on birds would require approximately $175 million. The merits of such an effort relative to other reclamation actions are discussed. Nevertheless, given the $100 billion energy-sector investment planned for the boreal forest in the next 10 years, including noise suppression technology at the outset of construction, makes noise mitigation a cost-effective best-management practice that might help conserve high-quality habitat for boreal birds. PMID:18616740

  10. Active Vibration Control of the Smart Plate Using Artificial Neural Network Controller

    Mohit

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The active vibration control (AVC of a rectangular plate with single input and single output approach is investigated using artificial neural network. The cantilever plate of finite length, breadth, and thickness having piezoelectric patches as sensors/actuators fixed at the upper and lower surface of the metal plate is considered for examination. The finite element model of the cantilever plate is utilized to formulate the whole strategy. The compact RIO and MATLAB simulation software are exercised to get the appropriate results. The cantilever plate is subjected to impulse input and uniform white noise disturbance. The neural network is trained offline and tuned with LQR controller. The various training algorithms to tune the neural network are exercised. The best efficient algorithm is finally considered to tune the neural network controller designed for active vibration control of the smart plate.

  11. Using prophylactic antioxidants to prevent noise-induced hearing damage in young adults: a protocol for a double-blind, randomized controlled trial

    Gilles, Annick; Ihtijarevic, Berina; Wouters, Kristien; Van De Heyning, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Background During leisure activities young people are often exposed to excessive noise levels resulting in an increase of noise-induced symptoms such as hearing loss, tinnitus and hyperacusis. Noise-induced tinnitus is often perceived after loud music exposure and provides an important marker for overexposure as a temporary threshold shift that is often not experienced by the individual itself. As oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathogenesis of noise-induced hearing loss, the ...

  12. NASA/AHS rotorcraft noise reduction program - NASA Langley Acoustics Division contributions

    Martin, Ruth M.

    1989-01-01

    An account is given of the contributions made by NASA-Langley's rotorcraft noise research programs over the last five years. Attention has been given to the broadband and blade-vortex interaction noise sources; both analytical and empirical noise-prediction codes have been developed and validated for several rotor noise sources, and the 'Rotonet' comprehensive system-noise prediction capability has been instituted. Among the technologies explored for helicopter noise reduction have been higher harmonic control and active vibration-suppression.

  13. Nonlinear Stochastic H∞ Control with Markov Jumps and (x,u,v-Dependent Noise: Finite and Infinite Horizon Cases

    Li Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with the H∞ control problem for nonlinear stochastic Markov jump systems with state, control, and external disturbance-dependent noise. By means of inequality techniques and coupled Hamilton-Jacobi inequalities, both finite and infinite horizon H∞ control designs of such systems are developed. Two numerical examples are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed design method.

  14. Effects of solar activity and geomagnetic field on noise in CALIOP profiles above the South Atlantic Anomaly

    V. Noel

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available By documenting noise levels in 6.5 yr of nighttime measurements by the spaceborne lidar CALIOP above the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA, we show they contain information about the evolution of upwelling high-energy radiation levels in the area. We find the amount of noisy profiles is influenced by the 11 yr cycle of solar activity, fluctuates by ±5% between 2006 and 2013, and is anticorrelated with solar activity with a 1 yr lag. The size of the SAA grows as solar activity decreases, and an overall westward shift of the SAA region is detectable. We predict SAA noise levels will increase anew after 2014, and will affect future spaceborne lidar missions most near 2020. In other areas, supposedly unaffected by incoming sunlight, nighttime noise levels are much weaker but follow the same 11 yr cycle, superimposed with a one-year cycle that affects both hemispheres similarly and could be attributed to geomagnetic activity.

  15. William W. Lang's days at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Bolt, Beranek and Newman, founding of the Institute of Noise Control Engineering and his efforts at creating a national noise policy

    Beranek, Leo L.

    2005-09-01

    William Lang entered acoustics through his master's degree program at MIT and through becoming the second full-time employee at Bolt Beranek and Newman. Bill stimulated the start of the Institute of Noise Control Engineering and this paper covers the early days of that organization and his contribution to its success. Finally, covered are his efforts to promote a national noise policy.

  16. Anti-noise Technique of Control System%控制系统的抗噪声技术

    罗耀东; 徐义亨

    2001-01-01

    The anti-noise technique in industrial process control system is introduced.The reasons caused noise such as electric coupling,magnetic coupling,electric-magnetic noise and resistance coupling are presented.The anti-noise technique such as cable selection, grounding,digital filter and watchdog are presented too.If the anti-noise problems are solved properly,it will be significant help for debugging and running of control system.%叙述工业过程控制系统的抗噪声技术;阐述形成噪声的原因,包括电容性耦合、电感性耦合、电磁辐射耦合和公共阻抗耦合;还阐述了抑制噪声的各种方法,包括噪声源的抑制、电缆的选型、接地、数字滤波和看门狗技术。正确地解决噪声问题,将大大有助于控制系统的调整和运行。

  17. Resonant Activation in a Stochastic Hodgkin-Huxley Model: Interplay between noise and suprathreshold driving effect

    Pankratova, Evgeniya; Polovinkin, A.V.; Mosekilde, Erik

    2005-01-01

    The paper considers an excitable Hodgkin-Huxley system subjected to a strong periodic forcing in the presence of random noise. The influence of the forcing frequency on the response of the system is examined in the realm of suprathreshold amplitudes. Our results confirm that the presence of noise...... minimum as functions of the forcing frequency. The destructive influence of noise on the interspike interval can also be reduced. With driving signals in a certain frequency range, the system can show stable periodic spiking even for relatively large noise intensities. Outside this frequency range, noise...

  18. Active interaction control for civil structures

    Wang, Luo-Jia

    1997-01-01

    This thesis presents a civil engineering approach to active control for civil structures. The proposed control technique, termed Active Interaction Control (AIC), utilizes dynamic interactions between different structures, or components of the same structure, to reduce the resonance response of the controlled or primary structure under earthquake excitations. The primary control objective of AIC is to minimize the maximum story drift of the primary structure. This is accomplished by timing th...

  19. A Real-time Auto-detection Method for Random Telegraph Signal (RTS) Noise Detection in CMOS Active pixel sensors

    CMOS Active pixel sensors (CMOS APS) are attractive for use in the innermost layers of charged particle trackers, due to their good tradeoffs among the key performances. However, CMOS APS can be greatly influenced by random telegraph signal (RTS) noise, which can cause particle tracking or energy calculation failures. In-depth research of pixels' RTS behavior stimulates the interest of the methods for RTS noise detection, reconstruction and parameters extraction. In this paper, a real-time auto-detection method is proposed, using real-time Gaussian noise standard deviation as the detection threshold. Experimental results show that, compared with current methods using signal standard deviation as the thresholds, the proposed method is more sensitive in multi-level RTS detection and more effective in the case of RTS noise degradation

  20. Resistive wall mode active control physics design for KSTAR

    Park, Y. S.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Bak, J. G.; Bialek, J. M.; Berkery, J. W.; Lee, S. G.; Oh, Y. K.

    2014-01-01

    As KSTAR H-mode operation approaches the region where the resistive wall mode (RWM) can be unstable, an important issue for future long pulse, high beta plasma operation is to evaluate RWM active feedback control performance using a planned active/passive RWM stabilization system on the device. In particular, an optimal design of feedback sensors allows mode stabilization up to the highest achievable βN close to the ideal with-wall limit, βNwall, with reduced control power requirements. The computed ideal n = 1 mode structure from the DCON code has been input to the VALEN-3D code to calculate the projected performance of an active RWM control system in the KSTAR three-dimensional conducting structure device geometry. Control performance with the midplane locked mode detection sensors, off-midplane saddle loops, and magnetic pickup coils is examined. The midplane sensors measuring the radial component of the mode perturbation is found to be strongly affected by the wall eddy current. The off-axis saddle loops with proper compensation of the prompt applied field are computed to provide stabilization at βN up to 86% of βNwall but the low RWM amplitude computed in the off-axis regions near the sensors can produce a low signal-to-noise ratio. The required control power and bandwidth are also estimated with varied noise levels in the feedback sensors. Further improvements have been explored by examining a new RWM sensor design motivated by the off-midplane poloidal magnetic field sensors in NSTX. The new sensors mounted off of the copper passive stabilizer plates near the device midplane show a clear advantage in control performance corresponding to achieving 99% of βNwall without the need of compensation of the prompt field. The result shows a significant improvement of RWM feedback stabilization using the new sensor set which motivates a future feedback sensor upgrade.

  1. Resistive wall mode active control physics design for KSTAR

    As KSTAR H-mode operation approaches the region where the resistive wall mode (RWM) can be unstable, an important issue for future long pulse, high beta plasma operation is to evaluate RWM active feedback control performance using a planned active/passive RWM stabilization system on the device. In particular, an optimal design of feedback sensors allows mode stabilization up to the highest achievable βN close to the ideal with-wall limit, βNwall, with reduced control power requirements. The computed ideal n = 1 mode structure from the DCON code has been input to the VALEN-3D code to calculate the projected performance of an active RWM control system in the KSTAR three-dimensional conducting structure device geometry. Control performance with the midplane locked mode detection sensors, off-midplane saddle loops, and magnetic pickup coils is examined. The midplane sensors measuring the radial component of the mode perturbation is found to be strongly affected by the wall eddy current. The off-axis saddle loops with proper compensation of the prompt applied field are computed to provide stabilization at βN up to 86% of βNwall but the low RWM amplitude computed in the off-axis regions near the sensors can produce a low signal-to-noise ratio. The required control power and bandwidth are also estimated with varied noise levels in the feedback sensors. Further improvements have been explored by examining a new RWM sensor design motivated by the off-midplane poloidal magnetic field sensors in NSTX. The new sensors mounted off of the copper passive stabilizer plates near the device midplane show a clear advantage in control performance corresponding to achieving 99% of βNwall without the need of compensation of the prompt field. The result shows a significant improvement of RWM feedback stabilization using the new sensor set which motivates a future feedback sensor upgrade

  2. Cooperative Control Method of Active and Semiactive Control: New Framework for Vibration Control

    Kazuhiko Hiramoto

    2014-01-01

    A new control design framework for vibration control, the cooperative control of active and semiactive control, is proposed in the paper. In the cooperative control, a structural system having both of an actuator and a semiactive control device, for example, MR damper and so forth, is defined as the control object. In the proposed control approach, the higher control performance is aimed by the cooperative control between the active control with the actuator and the semiactive control with th...

  3. Numerical Investigation of Jet Noise Prediction in Exhaust Nozzle by Passive Control Techniques

    Alagu sundaram.A

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The project mainly focuses on the reduction of jet noise emission in the exhaust nozzle of TURBOFAN ENGINES. Reduction of noise in the exhaust system is done by attaching chevrons with particular parameters in the nozzle exit. Numerical investigations have been carried out on chevron nozzles to assess the importance of chevron parameters such as the number of chevrons like (chevron count, chevron penetration and the mixing characteristics of co flow jet. Chevron count is the pertinent parameter for noise reduction at low nozzle pressure ratios, whereas at high nozzle pressure ratios, chevron penetration is crucial. The results illustrate that by careful selection of chevron parameters substantial noise reduction can be achieved. The sound pressure level (SPL can be calculated from that we determined the noise level at nozzle exit section. After assessing the chevron parameters we are going to modify the chevron shapes in order to get maximum noise reduction along with very negligible thrust loss. Modification of chevron is based on aspect of increasing the mixing of cold jet and the hot jet in order to decrease the noise emission. ANSYS-Fluent is a commercial CFD code which will be used for performing the simulation and the simulation configuration contains three different velocities (100,150,200 with two different nozzle model(plain & chevron nozzle. The simulation results are evaluated to find out nozzle noise level in the engine exhaust system.

  4. Robust fuzzy control subject to state variance and passivity constraints for perturbed nonlinear systems with multiplicative noises.

    Chang, Wen-Jer; Huang, Bo-Jyun

    2014-11-01

    The multi-constrained robust fuzzy control problem is investigated in this paper for perturbed continuous-time nonlinear stochastic systems. The nonlinear system considered in this paper is represented by a Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy model with perturbations and state multiplicative noises. The multiple performance constraints considered in this paper include stability, passivity and individual state variance constraints. The Lyapunov stability theory is employed to derive sufficient conditions to achieve the above performance constraints. By solving these sufficient conditions, the contribution of this paper is to develop a parallel distributed compensation based robust fuzzy control approach to satisfy multiple performance constraints for perturbed nonlinear systems with multiplicative noises. At last, a numerical example for the control of perturbed inverted pendulum system is provided to illustrate the applicability and effectiveness of the proposed multi-constrained robust fuzzy control method. PMID:25281584

  5. A model for signal processing and predictive control of semi-active structural control system

    M-H Shih; W-P Sung; Ching-Jong Wang

    2009-06-01

    The theory for structural control has been well developed and applied to perform excellent energy dissipation using dampers. Both active and semi-active control systems may be used to decide on the optimal switch point of the damper based on the current and past structural responses to the excitation of external forces. However, numerous noises may occur when the control signals are accessed and transported thus causing a delay of the damper. Therefore, a predictive control technique that integrates an improved method of detecting the control signal based on the direction of the structural motion, and a calculator for detecting the velocity using the least-square polynomial regression is proposed in this research. Comparisons of the analytical data and experimental results show that this predictor is effective in switching the moving direction of the semi-active damper. This conclusion is further verified using the component and shaking table test with constant amplitude but various frequencies, and the El Centro earthquake test. All tests confirm that this predictive control technique is effective to alleviate the time delay problem of semi-active dampers. This predictive control technique promotes about 30% to 40% reduction of the structural displacement response and about 35% to 45% reduction of the structural acceleration response.

  6. Microglial control of neuronal activity

    Catherine eBéchade

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Fine-tuning of neuronal activity was thought to be a neuron-autonomous mechanism until the discovery that astrocytes are active players of synaptic transmission. The involvement of astrocytes has changed our understanding of the roles of non-neuronal cells and shed new light on the regulation of neuronal activity. Microglial cells are the macrophages of the brain and they have been mostly investigated as immune cells. However recent data discussed in this review support the notion that, similarly to astrocytes, microglia are involved in the regulation of neuronal activity. For instance, in most, if not all, brain pathologies a strong temporal correlation has long been known to exist between the pathological activation of microglia and dysfunction of neuronal activity. Recent studies have convincingly shown that alteration of microglial function is responsible for pathological neuronal activity. This causal relationship has also been demonstrated in mice bearing loss-of-function mutations in genes specifically expressed by microglia. In addition to these long-term regulations of neuronal activity, recent data show that microglia can also rapidly regulate neuronal activity, thereby acting as partners of neurotransmission.

  7. Curve Squeal of Train Wheels, Part 3: Active Control

    HECKL, MARIA A.; HUANG, X. Y.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a new method to annul the squeal noise that is produced by trains traversing a curve. The method is a special form of active control, applied to suppress the bending oscillations of a squealing wheel. It is essentially a feedback system with the following components: sensor, narrowband filter, phase-shifter, amplifier and actuator. The control signal driving the actuator has only a single frequency (set at the filter), and that frequency typically corresponds to one of the bending modes of the wheel. Two versions of the feedback system are considered. In the first version, the actuator exerts a control force on the wheel, and in the second version, the actuator imposes a velocity on the rail. A mathematical model is presented and predictions are made for the performance of both versions. The coupling of the different wheel modes by the control system is discussed. A model rig is described which was used for a practical demonstration of this form of active control. Differences from more conventional forms of active control are pointed out.

  8. Temperature Control and Noise Reduction in our Compact ADR System for TES Microcalorimeter Operation

    Hishi, U.; Fujimoto, R.; Kamiya, K.; Kotake, M.; Ito, H.; Kaido, T.; Tanaka, K.; Hattori, K.

    2016-03-01

    We have been developing a compact adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator, keeping ground application and future missions in mind. A salt pill fabricated in-house, a superconducting magnet with a passive magnetic shield around it, and a mechanical heat switch are mounted in a dedicated helium cryostat. The detector stage temperature is regulated by PID control of the magnet current, with a dI/dt term added to compensate the temperature rise due to parasitic heat. The temperature fluctuation of the detector stage is 1-2 \\upmu Krms, and the hold time was extended by about 15 % thanks to the dI/dt term. Bundle shields of the harnesses between the cryostat and the analog electronics boxes were connected to the chassis at both ends, and the analog electronics boxes were grounded to the cryostat through the bundle shields. This reduced the readout noise to 16 pA/√{Hz} in the 10-60 kHz range. Using this system, an energy resolution of 3.8 ± 0.2 eV (FWHM) was achieved at 5.9 keV.

  9. Temperature Control and Noise Reduction in our Compact ADR System for TES Microcalorimeter Operation

    Hishi, U.; Fujimoto, R.; Kamiya, K.; Kotake, M.; Ito, H.; Kaido, T.; Tanaka, K.; Hattori, K.

    2016-08-01

    We have been developing a compact adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator, keeping ground application and future missions in mind. A salt pill fabricated in-house, a superconducting magnet with a passive magnetic shield around it, and a mechanical heat switch are mounted in a dedicated helium cryostat. The detector stage temperature is regulated by PID control of the magnet current, with a dI/dt term added to compensate the temperature rise due to parasitic heat. The temperature fluctuation of the detector stage is 1-2 \\upmu Krms, and the hold time was extended by about 15 % thanks to the dI/dt term. Bundle shields of the harnesses between the cryostat and the analog electronics boxes were connected to the chassis at both ends, and the analog electronics boxes were grounded to the cryostat through the bundle shields. This reduced the readout noise to 16 pA/√{Hz} in the 10-60 kHz range. Using this system, an energy resolution of 3.8 ± 0.2 eV (FWHM) was achieved at 5.9 keV.

  10. Vibration control of active structures an introduction

    Preumont, Andre

    2002-01-01

    This text is an introduction to the dynamics of active structures and to the feedback control of lightly damped flexible structures. The emphasis is placed on basic issues and simple control strategies that work.

  11. Effects of scanner acoustic noise on intrinsic brain activity during auditory stimulation

    Yakunina, Natalia [Kangwon National University, Institute of Medical Science, School of Medicine, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of); Kangwon National University Hospital, Neuroscience Research Institute, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Eun Kyoung [Kangwon National University Hospital, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Su [Kangwon National University Hospital, Department of Otolaryngology, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of); Kangwon National University, School of Medicine, Department of Otolaryngology, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of); Min, Ji-Hoon [University of Michigan, Department of Biopsychology, Cognition, and Neuroscience, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Kim, Sam Soo [Kangwon National University Hospital, Neuroscience Research Institute, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of); Kangwon National University, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Eui-Cheol [Kangwon National University Hospital, Neuroscience Research Institute, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of); Kangwon National University, School of Medicine, Department of Otolaryngology, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Although the effects of scanner background noise (SBN) during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have been extensively investigated for the brain regions involved in auditory processing, its impact on other types of intrinsic brain activity has largely been neglected. The present study evaluated the influence of SBN on a number of intrinsic connectivity networks (ICNs) during auditory stimulation by comparing the results obtained using sparse temporal acquisition (STA) with those using continuous acquisition (CA). Fourteen healthy subjects were presented with classical music pieces in a block paradigm during two sessions of STA and CA. A volume-matched CA dataset (CAm) was generated by subsampling the CA dataset to temporally match it with the STA data. Independent component analysis was performed on the concatenated STA-CAm datasets, and voxel data, time courses, power spectra, and functional connectivity were compared. The ICA revealed 19 ICNs; the auditory, default mode, salience, and frontoparietal networks showed greater activity in the STA. The spectral peaks in 17 networks corresponded to the stimulation cycles in the STA, while only five networks displayed this correspondence in the CA. The dorsal default mode and salience networks exhibited stronger correlations with the stimulus waveform in the STA. SBN appeared to influence not only the areas of auditory response but also the majority of other ICNs, including attention and sensory networks. Therefore, SBN should be regarded as a serious nuisance factor during fMRI studies investigating intrinsic brain activity under external stimulation or task loads. (orig.)

  12. Effects of scanner acoustic noise on intrinsic brain activity during auditory stimulation

    Although the effects of scanner background noise (SBN) during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have been extensively investigated for the brain regions involved in auditory processing, its impact on other types of intrinsic brain activity has largely been neglected. The present study evaluated the influence of SBN on a number of intrinsic connectivity networks (ICNs) during auditory stimulation by comparing the results obtained using sparse temporal acquisition (STA) with those using continuous acquisition (CA). Fourteen healthy subjects were presented with classical music pieces in a block paradigm during two sessions of STA and CA. A volume-matched CA dataset (CAm) was generated by subsampling the CA dataset to temporally match it with the STA data. Independent component analysis was performed on the concatenated STA-CAm datasets, and voxel data, time courses, power spectra, and functional connectivity were compared. The ICA revealed 19 ICNs; the auditory, default mode, salience, and frontoparietal networks showed greater activity in the STA. The spectral peaks in 17 networks corresponded to the stimulation cycles in the STA, while only five networks displayed this correspondence in the CA. The dorsal default mode and salience networks exhibited stronger correlations with the stimulus waveform in the STA. SBN appeared to influence not only the areas of auditory response but also the majority of other ICNs, including attention and sensory networks. Therefore, SBN should be regarded as a serious nuisance factor during fMRI studies investigating intrinsic brain activity under external stimulation or task loads. (orig.)

  13. Developing Internal Controls through Activities

    Barnes, F. Herbert

    2009-01-01

    Life events can include the Tuesday afternoon cooking class with the group worker or the Saturday afternoon football game, but in the sense that Fritz Redl thought of them, these activities are only threads in a fabric of living that includes all the elements of daily life: playing, working, school-based learning, learning through activities,…

  14. A controllable noise-like operation regime in a Yb-doped dispersion-mapped fiber ring laser

    Zaytsev, A. K.; Lin, C. H.; You, Y. J.; Tsai, F. H.; Wang, C. L.; Pan, C. L.

    2013-04-01

    We report the generation of tunable high-energy noise-like pulses with a super-broadband spectrum from a Yb-doped dispersion-mapped fiber ring laser. Self-starting noise-like operation can be maintained over a relatively large range of pumping powers (4-13 W). The corresponding output power varies from 0.1 to 1.45 W. The maximum 3 dB spectral bandwidth of the noise-like pulses is about 48.2 nm while the output energy is as high as 47 nJ, limited by optical damage of the components. The central wavelength of the noise-like pulses can be tuned easily over ˜12 nm. The bandwidth and duration of the generated wave packets can also be controlled. The use of a negative dispersion-delay line and spectral filter are found to be important for generating such high-power noise-like operation. Experimental results are in good agreement with theoretical simulations.

  15. Proceedings of noise-con 91

    This volume covers the following topics related to noise control: control of mine ventilation fans; physical phenomena; gas turbine exhaust system silencing; computer models for estimating electric utility environmental noise; noise from rotary coal car unloading; noise analysis

  16. Reduction of the Radiating Sound of a Submerged Finite Cylindrical Shell Structure by Active Vibration Control

    Seung-Bok Choi; Juncheol Jeon; Jung Woo Sohn; Heung Soo Kim

    2013-01-01

    In this work, active vibration control of an underwater cylindrical shell structure was investigated, to suppress structural vibration and structure-borne noise in water. Finite element modeling of the submerged cylindrical shell structure was developed, and experimentally evaluated. Modal reduction was conducted to obtain the reduced system equation for the active feedback control algorithm. Three Macro Fiber Composites (MFCs) were used as actuators and sensors. One MFC was used as an excite...

  17. Optimizing Noise Attenuation in Aircraft Exhaust Ducts Employing Passive and Active Absorbing Splitters and Struts Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA requires accurate numerical simulation of high bypass nacelle acoustics and the development of advanced nacelle absorption techniques to reduce engine noise...

  18. STUDY ON NOISE LEVEL GENERATED BY HUMAN ACTIVITIES IN SIBIU CITY, ROMANIA

    Cristina STANCA-MOISE

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I have proposed an analysis and monitoring of the noise sources in the open spaces of air traffic, rail and car in Sibiu. From centralizing data obtained from the analysis of the measurements performed with equipment noise levels, we concluded that the noise and vibration produced by means of Transportation (air, road, rail can affect human health if they exceed limits. Noise is present and part of our lives and always a source of pollution as any of modern man is not conscious.

  19. A flicker noise/IM3 cancellation technique for active mixer using negative impedance

    Cheng, Wei; Annema, Anne Johan; Wienk, Gerard J.M.; Nauta, Bram

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to simultaneously cancel flicker noise and IM3 in Gilbert-type mixers, utilizing negative impedances. For proof of concept, two prototype double-balanced mixers in 0.16- m CMOS are fabricated. The first demonstration mixer chip was optimized for full IM3 cancellation and partial flicker noise cancellation; this chip achieves 9-dB flicker noise suppression, improvements of 10 dB for IIP3, 5 dB for conversion gain, and 1 dB for input P1 dB while the thermal noise...

  20. Enhanced models for stellar Doppler noise reveal hints of a 13-year activity cycle of 55 Cancri

    Baluev, Roman V.

    2015-01-01

    We consider the impact of Doppler noise models on the statistical robustness of the exoplanetary radial velocity fits. We show that the traditional model of the Doppler noise with an additive jitter can generate large non-linearity effects, decreasing the reliability of the fit, especially in the cases when a correlated Doppler noise is involved. We introduce a regularization of the additive noise model that can gracefully eliminate its singularities together with the associated non-linearity effects. We apply this approach to Doppler time series data of several exoplanetary systems. It demonstrates that our new regularized noise model yields orbital fits that have either increased or at least the same statistical robustness, in comparison with the simple additive jitter. Various statistical uncertainties in the parametric estimations are often reduced, while planet detection significance is often increased. Concerning the 55 Cnc five-planet system, we show that its Doppler data contain significant correlated (`red') noise. Its correlation time-scale is in the range from days to months, and its magnitude is much larger than the effect of the planetary N-body perturbations in the radial velocity (these perturbations thus appear undetectable). Characteristics of the red noise depend on the spectrograph/observatory, and also show a cyclic time variation in phase with the public Ca II H&K and photometry measurements. We interpret this modulation as a hint of the long-term activity cycle of 55 Cnc, similar to the solar 11-yr cycle. We estimate the 55 Cnc activity period by 12.6± ^{2.5}_{1.0} yr, with the nearest minimum presumably expected in 2014 or 2015.

  1. METHODS OF PROVIDING NOISE IMMUNITY IN AUTOMOBILE ANTI-THEFT SYSTEM CONTROL

    Frolov, V.; Kovtunov, J.; Kubata, V.

    2013-01-01

    In modern ani-theft systems they use frequency and phase modulation. Since the width of the signal is limited, it is possible to intercept the signal and then switch off the alarm at the right time.To ensure the noise immunity and secrecy manufacturers use more sophisticated codes using the methods of cryptography. Significant increase in noise immunity in modern ani-theft systems is possible using broadband signals.

  2. The interference characteristics of platform and towed body noise in shallow water for active/passive towed array sonar

    LI Qihu; LI Shuqiu; SUN Changyu; YU Huabing

    2007-01-01

    The interference characteristics of towed platform noise resulted from propeller and towed body for active/passive towed array is analyzed. It is shown that, in shallow water environment, the direct wave and bottom/sea surface reflected wave will seriously affect the performance of sonar system. The formula for calculating the direction of arrival (DOA) of interference in terms of various parameters, such as array depth, length of tow cable, is derived.The effect of interference noise for the detection performance of sonar system is described.The results of system simulation provide the method for reducing the effect of these kind of interferences.

  3. SLIDING MODE CONTROL FOR ACTIVE AUTOMOBILE SUSPENSIONS

    1998-01-01

    Nonlinear control methods are presented based on theory of sliding mode control (SMC) or variable structure control (VSC) for application to active automobile suspensions. Requirements of reducing manufacturing cost and energy consumption of the active suspension system may be satisfiedby reasonable design of the sliding surface and hydraulic servo system. Emphasis is placed on the study of the discrete sliding mode control method (DSMC) applicable for a new sort of speed on-off solenoid valves of anti-dust capability and low price. Robustness and effectiveness of the feedback linearized controller in typical road conditions are demonstrated by numerical results fora quarter-car suspension model.

  4. Optimal Bounded Control for Stationary Response of Strongly Nonlinear Oscillators under Combined Harmonic and Wide-Band Noise Excitations

    Yongjun Wu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the stochastic optimal bounded control for minimizing the stationary response of strongly nonlinear oscillators under combined harmonic and wide-band noise excitations. The stochastic averaging method and the dynamical programming principle are combined to obtain the fully averaged Itô stochastic differential equations which describe the original controlled strongly nonlinear system approximately. The stationary joint probability density of the amplitude and phase difference of the optimally controlled systems is obtained from solving the corresponding reduced Fokker-Planck-Kolmogorov (FPK equation. An example is given to illustrate the proposed procedure, and the theoretical results are verified by Monte Carlo simulation.

  5. 城市噪声污染及其治理研究%Study on the Urban Noise Pollution and Its Control

    李建武

    2015-01-01

    分析了噪声污染的主要来源,阐述了城市噪声污染对人类的影响,提出了治理城市噪声污染问题的措施。%This paper analyzes the main sources of noise pollution, expounds the effects of urban noise pollution on humans, and puts forward some measures for controlling the urban noise pollution.

  6. Urban Environment Noise Analyzing and Control Countermeasure of Nanning City%南宁市环境噪声分析及污染防治对策

    刘宝庆

    2011-01-01

    介绍了2009年南宁市环境噪声污染现状,分析了环境噪声污染的原因,最后提出了环境噪声污染防治对策.%Discussing urban environment noise state of Nanning city in 2009, the article analyzes the reasons of noise pollution and puts forward control countermeasure of noise pollution.

  7. Efficient laser noise reduction by locking to an actively stabilized fiber interferometer with 10 km arm imbalance

    Li, Dawei; Li, Shanglin; Li, Zhengbin; Zhao, Jianye

    2016-01-01

    We report a laser noise reduction method by locking it to an actively stabilized fiber-based Mach Zehnder interferometer with 10 km optical fiber to achieve large arm imbalance. An acousto optic modulator is used for interferometer stabilization and heterodyne detection. The out-of-loop frequency noise is reduced by more than 90 dB for Fourier frequency at 1 Hz. This structure presents an efficient laser noise reduction method both at high Fourier frequency and low Fourier frequency. The signal of stabilized laser is transferred via a 10 km fiber link with a fractional frequency stability of 1.12 times 10-16 at 1 s. Compared with the fractional frequency stability of that when the interferometer is not stabilized, more than one order of magnitude is improved.

  8. Wavelet filter based de-noising of weak neutron flux signal for dynamic control rod reactivity measurement

    Park, Moon Ghu; Bae Sung Man; Lee, Chang Sup [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-10-01

    The measurement and validation of control rod bank (group) worths are typically required by the start-up physics test standard programs for Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR). Recently, the method of DCRM{sup TM} (Dynamic Control rod Reactivity Measurement) technique is developed by KEPRI and will be implemented in near future. The method is based on the fast and complete bank insertion within the short period of time which makes the range of the reactivity variation very large from the below of the background gamma level to the vicinity of nuclear heating point. The weak flux signal below background gamma level is highly noise contaminated, which invokes the large reactivity fluctuation. This paper describes the efficient noise filtering method with wavelet filters. The performance of developed method is demonstrated with the measurement data at YGN-3 cycle 7.

  9. Design of a 1 _s real-time low-noise data acquisition for power converters control loop

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)712364; Arpaia, Pasquale; Cerqueira Bastos, Miguel; Martino, Michele

    2015-01-01

    The proof of principle of a real-time data acquisition system to be integrated into a digital control loop for controlling the power converters of the Compact LInear Collider is presented. The system is based on an ultra low noise analogue front-end with 1:1 ppm RMS noise (referred to input), and about 1 _s of real-time delay. After the analogue conditioning, a fully-differential analogue-todigital converter is foreseen. The requirements of this system, directly derived from the accelerator performance, are discussed and translated into design specification. The results obtained by means of Pspice simulations are reported in order to prove that the design is feasible with the proposed architecture. Finally, the results of the experimental validation of the prototype, currently under design, will be included in the final paper.

  10. Coexistence of Resonant Activation and Noise Enhanced Stability in a Model of Tumor-Host Interaction: Statistics of Extinction Times

    We study a Langevin equation derived from the Michaelis-Menten (MM) phenomenological scheme for catalysis accompanying a spontaneous replication of molecules, which may serve as a simple model of cell-mediated immune surveillance against cancer. We examine how two different and statistically independent sources of noise - dichotomous multiplicative noise and additive Gaussian white noise - influence the population's extinction time. This quantity is identified as the mean first passage time of the system across the zero population state. We observe the effects of resonant activation (RA) and noise-enhanced stability (NES) and we report the evidence for competitive co-occurrence of both phenomena in a given regime of noise parameters. We discuss the statistics of first passage times in this regime and the role of different pseudo-potential profiles on the RA and NES phenomena. The RA/NES coexistence region brings an interesting interpretation for the growth kinetics of cancer cells population, as the NES effect enhancing the stability of the tumoral state becomes strongly reduced by the RA phenomenon. (author)

  11. Flow Field Simulation and Noise Control of a Twin-Screw Engine-Driven Supercharger

    Tao Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available With the advantages of good low-speed torque capability and excellent instant response performance, twin-screw superchargers have great potential in the automobile market, but the noise of these superchargers is the main factor that discourages their use. Therefore, it is important to study their noise mechanism and methods of reducing it. This study included a transient numerical simulation of a twin-screw supercharger flow field with computational fluid dynamics software and an analysis of the pressure field of the running rotor. The results showed that overcompression was significant in the compression end stage of the supercharger, resulting in a surge in airflow to a supersonic speed and the production of shock waves that resulted in loud noise. On the basis of these findings, optimization of the supercharger is proposed, including expansion of the supercharger exhaust orifice and creation of a slot along the direction of the rotor spiral normal line at the exhaust port, so as to reduce the compression end pressure, improve the exhaust flow channel, and weaken the source of the noise. Experimental results showed that the noise level value of the improved twin-screw supercharger was significantly lower at the same speed than the original model, with an average decrease of about 5 dB (A.

  12. Noise levels in the learning-teaching activities in a dental medicine school

    Matos, Andreia; Carvalho, Antonio P. O.; Fernandes, Joao C. S.

    2002-11-01

    The noise levels made by different clinical handpieces and laboratory engines are considered to be the main descriptors of acoustical comfort in learning spaces in a dental medicine school. Sound levels were measured in five types of classrooms and teaching laboratories at the University of Porto Dental Medicine School. Handpiece noise measurements were made while instruments were running free and during operations with cutting tools (tooth, metal, and acrylic). Noise levels were determined using a precision sound level meter, which was positioned at ear level and also at one-meter distance from the operator. Some of the handpieces were brand new and the others had a few years of use. The sound levels encountered were between 60 and 99 dB(A) and were compared with the noise limits in A-weighted sound pressure level for mechanical equipments installed in educational buildings included in the Portuguese Noise Code and in other European countries codes. The daily personal noise exposure levels (LEP,d) of the students and professors were calculated to be between 85 and 90 dB(A) and were compared with the European legal limits. Some noise limits for this type of environment are proposed and suggestions for the improvement of the acoustical environment are given.

  13. A Mode Propagation Database Suitable for Code Validation Utilizing the NASA Glenn Advanced Noise Control Fan and Artificial Sources

    Sutliff, Daniel L.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center's Advanced Noise Control Fan (ANCF) was developed in the early 1990s to provide a convenient test bed to measure and understand fan-generated acoustics, duct propagation, and radiation to the farfield. A series of tests were performed primarily for the use of code validation and tool validation. Rotating Rake mode measurements were acquired for parametric sets of: (i) mode blockage, (ii) liner insertion loss, (iii) short ducts, and (iv) mode reflection.

  14. Sounds and Noises. A Position Paper on Noise Pollution.

    Chapman, Thomas L.

    This position paper focuses on noise pollution and the problems and solutions associated with this form of pollution. The paper is divided into the following five sections: Noise and the Ear, Noise Measurement, III Effects of Noise, Acoustics and Action, and Programs and Activities. The first section identifies noise and sound, the beginnings of…

  15. Active vibration control of lightweight floor systems

    Baader, J.; Fontana, M.

    2016-04-01

    Wide-span and lightweight floors are often prone to structural vibrations due to their low resonance frequency and poor material damping. Their dynamic behaviour can be improved using passive, semi-active or active vibration control devices. The following article proposes a novel method for the controller synthesis for active vibration control. An existing passive TMD (tuned mass damper) is modelled and equipped with an actuator in order to provide more efficient damping. Using an iterative optimization approach under constraints, an optimal controller is found which minimizes a quadratic cost function in frequency domain. A simulation of an existing test bench shows that the active vibration control device is able to provide increased damping compared to the passive TMD.

  16. Tools for noise characterization in Virgo

    Several software tools were used to perform on-line and of-line noise analysis as a support to commissioning activities, to monitor the rate of glitches, the occurrence of non stationary noise, the presence of environmental contamination, the behavior of narrow spectral features and the coherence with auxiliary channels. We report about the use of these tools to study the main sources of identified noise: broadband, spectral lines and glitches. Plans for the upgrade of the tools will be presented, for example for lines identification purpose to let the scientists in control room do noise characterization in an easier way.

  17. Tools for noise characterization in Virgo

    Accadia, T; Belletoile, A [Laboratoire d' Annecy-le-Vieux de Physique des Particules (LAPP), IN2P3/CNRS, Universite de Savoie, F-74941 Annecy-le-Vieux (France); Ballardin, G [European Gravitational Observatory (EGO), I-56021 Cascina (PI) (Italy); Barsuglia, M; Bouhou, B [AstroParticule et Cosmologie (APC), CNRS: UMR7164-IN2P3-Observatoire de Paris-Universite Denis Diderot-Paris 7 - CEA : DSM/IRFU (France); Bonnand, R [Laboratoire des Materiaux Avances (LMA), IN2P3/CNRS, F-69622 Villeurbanne, Lyon (France); Acernese, F; Antonucci, F; Astone, P; Barone, F; Bauer, Th S; Beker, M G; Birindelli, S; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Blom, M; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Boschi, V; Bosi, L, E-mail: elena.cuoco@ego-gw.i

    2010-08-01

    Several software tools were used to perform on-line and of-line noise analysis as a support to commissioning activities, to monitor the rate of glitches, the occurrence of non stationary noise, the presence of environmental contamination, the behavior of narrow spectral features and the coherence with auxiliary channels. We report about the use of these tools to study the main sources of identified noise: broadband, spectral lines and glitches. Plans for the upgrade of the tools will be presented, for example for lines identification purpose to let the scientists in control room do noise characterization in an easier way.

  18. Do public inquiries for noise control serve a useful purpose?--An acoustic consultant's view.

    Flindell, I H

    2003-01-01

    In the United Kingdom, before the introduction of the various town and country planning acts and associated regulations, landowners were free to use their land in any way they wished, subject only to limitations imposed by lease or covenant and the avoidance of nuisance or trespass against neighbours. Any disputes arising would be resolved by negotiation or via a court of law. Under current planning laws and regulations, local authorities are empowered to impose special conditions or even to refuse development to prevent excessive nuisance, but the resulting noise management solutions are not always optimum from either the noise maker's or the noise exposed's points of view. In addition, the planning system has almost no effect on existing noise. Public inquiries provide a useful mechanism for the investigation of appeals against local authority decisions, or where the government has decided that issues of strategic or national importance need to be fully explored in a public forum. In practice, and largely because of individual disagreement, public inquiries can result in excessive delays while all interested parties are allowed to have their say. There seems to be an increasing consensus that the general inadequacy of existing methods of assessing noise impact is at least partly to blame. The new European Environmental Noise Directive represents a step change towards the imposition of one-size-fits-all regulatory or administrative procedures which should eventually contribute towards the reduction of public inquiry delays, but on the other hand, any weakening of the general principle of basing decisions on 'informed flexibility' will probably have significant negative consequences over the longer term. PMID:12631434

  19. Body Control in American Cyberspace: A Study on Don Delillo’s White Noise

    Ruzbeh Babaee; Wan Roselezam Bt Wan Yahya; Ida Baizura Binti Bahar

    2014-01-01

    Don DeLillo’s White Noise (1984) is a cyberpunk narrative commenting on dystopia of late capitalism by illustrating the instability of the apparently safe and perfect life of a small town in North America. The dystopian society in white Noise is not a hierarchal world or a world in another time and space, as it is common in most dystopian narratives. It is a world that we may experience in our daily life. This study attempts to demonstrate that DeLillo criticizes the condition of the late twe...

  20. Effects of loud noise and loud music on brain activity in man

    Syka, Josef; Tintěra, J.; Jilek, Milan

    Cambridge: NOPHER, 2000, s. 14. [An International Symposium on noise induced hearing loss. Cambridge (GB), 07.07.2000-10.07.2000] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5039906 Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  1. A High Performance Approach to Local Active Noise Reduction in Noisy Cabins Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Spacecraft cabin is noisy and uncomfortable. Sometimes, the noise level can exceed 80 dBA. There are 2 challenges to meet the above needs. One is to generate an...

  2. Noise Parameters of CW Radar Sensors Used in Active Defense Systems

    Jeník, V.; Hudec, P.; Pánek, Petr

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 2 (2012), s. 632-639. ISSN 1210-2512 Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : radar * phase noise Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 0.687, year: 2012

  3. DSP Control of Line Hybrid Active Filter

    Dan, Stan George; Benjamin, Doniga Daniel; Magureanu, R.;

    2005-01-01

    Active Power Filters have been intensively explored in the past decade. Hybrid active filters inherit the efficiency of passive filters and the improved performance of active filters, and thus constitute a viable improved approach for harmonic compensation. In this paper a parallel hybrid filter...... is studied for current harmonic compensation. The hybrid filter is formed by a single tuned Le filter and a small-rated power active filter, which are directly connected in series without any matching transformer. Thus the required rating of the active filter is much smaller than a conventional standalone...... active filter. Simulation and experimental results obtained in laboratory confirmed the validity and effectiveness of the control....

  4. Manually controlled neutron-activation system

    Johns, R. A.; Carothers, G. A.

    1982-01-01

    A manually controlled neutron activation system, the Manual Reactor Activation System, was designed and built and has been operating at one of the Savannah River Plant's production reactors. With this system, samples can be irradiated for up to 24 hours and pneumatically transferred to a shielded repository for decay until their activity is low enough for them to be handled at a radiobench. The Manual Reactor Activation System was built to provide neutron activation of solid waste forms for the Alternative Waste Forms Leach Testing Program. Neutron activation of the bulk sample prior to leaching permits sensitive multielement radiometric analyses of the leachates.

  5. Associations of genetic variations in EYA4, GRHL2 and DFNA5 with noise-induced hearing loss in Chinese population: a case- control study

    Zhang, Xuhui; Liu, Yi; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Zhangping; Yang, Luoxian; Wang, Xuchu; Jiang, CaiXia; Wang, Qiang; Xia, Yuyong; Chen, Yanjuan; Wu, Ou; Zhu, Yimin

    2015-01-01

    Background Both environmental and genetic factors are attributable to the incidence of noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). The purpose of this study was to examine the associations between genetic variations in the EYA4, GRHL2 and DFNA5 genes and the risk to noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) in a Chinese population. Methods A case–control study was conducted with 476 NIHL workers and 475 normal hearing workers matched with gender, years of noise exposure, and intensity of noise exposure. Twelv...

  6. The Effect of Different Kinds of Noise on the Quality of Sleep Under the Controlled Conditions

    KUWANO, S.; MIZUNAMI, T.; NAMBA, S.; MORINAGA, M.

    2002-02-01

    Many laboratory and field studies of the effect of noise on sleep have been performed where subjects sleep whole nights. It was suggested from our former studies that the most serious effect of noise on sleep is disturbance in falling asleep and that people have to make efforts to try to sleep in noisy situations. In this study, the effort to fall asleep was used as an index of sleep and the effect of various physical properties of sounds was examined. Subjects were asked to try to sleep listening to sounds presented with a mini-disk and they were allowed to switch off the sound after 1 h if they could not sleep. The results suggest that (1) whether subjects can sleep within 1 h after they start to try to sleep is a good index of the effect of noise on sleep and that LAeqis a good index of the effect of noise on sleep except for the sounds which have meanings such as songs and people's talk.

  7. Integration of noise control into the product design process : a case study : the Silent Aircraft Initiative

    Faszer, A. [Noise Solutions Inc., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2007-07-01

    The Silent Aircraft Initiative (SAI) is a study being conducted by the Cambridge-MIT Institute to discover ways to significantly reduce aircraft noise. Part of the study focuses on developing aircraft and engine designs that meet the SAI objectives. This presentation included several illustrations of the favoured configuration of a blended wing design, with 4 engines located on the upper surface of a shallow wing which shields engine noise. This presentation described various engine parts such as the low specific thrust turbofan, the variable area nozzle and the acoustic treatment in the intake and exhaust turbomachinery that minimizes noise. The requirements for market viability of the aircraft were discussed as well as the technical challenges in terms of its propulsion systems; structural analysis; mechanical design; low speed aerodynamic performance; cabin layout; and maintenance considerations. It was concluded that the SAI has achieved a credible conceptual aircraft design given the high risk of the technologies used. The project has met objectives of a functionally silent and fuel efficient aircraft. The new conceptual aircraft has potential for fuel burn of 149 pax-miles per imperial gallon and noise of 63 dBA near the perimeter of airports. 1 tab., 48 figs.

  8. Feedforward and Feedback Control in Apraxia of Speech: Effects of Noise Masking on Vowel Production

    Maas, Edwin; Mailend, Marja-Liisa; Guenther, Frank H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study was designed to test two hypotheses about apraxia of speech (AOS) derived from the Directions Into Velocities of Articulators (DIVA) model (Guenther et al., 2006): the feedforward system deficit hypothesis and the feedback system deficit hypothesis. Method: The authors used noise masking to minimize auditory feedback during…

  9. Active Power Filter Using Predicted Current Control

    Xiaojie, Y.; Pivoňka, P.; Valouch, Viktor

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. 1 (2001), s. 41-50. ISSN 0001-7043 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2057903 Keywords : active power filter * control strategy Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  10. Noise Pollution

    ... Overview » Title IV - Noise Pollution Title IV - Noise Pollution The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments added a ... abatement 7642 Authorization of appropriations What is Noise Pollution? The traditional definition of noise is “unwanted or ...

  11. EEG/ERP adaptive noise canceller design with controlled search space (CSS) approach in cuckoo and other optimization algorithms.

    Ahirwal, M K; Kumar, Anil; Singh, G K

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the migration of adaptive filtering with swarm intelligence/evolutionary techniques employed in the field of electroencephalogram/event-related potential noise cancellation or extraction. A new approach is proposed in the form of controlled search space to stabilize the randomness of swarm intelligence techniques especially for the EEG signal. Swarm-based algorithms such as Particles Swarm Optimization, Artificial Bee Colony, and Cuckoo Optimization Algorithm with their variants are implemented to design optimized adaptive noise canceler. The proposed controlled search space technique is tested on each of the swarm intelligence techniques and is found to be more accurate and powerful. Adaptive noise canceler with traditional algorithms such as least-mean-square, normalized least-mean-square, and recursive least-mean-square algorithms are also implemented to compare the results. ERP signals such as simulated visual evoked potential, real visual evoked potential, and real sensorimotor evoked potential are used, due to their physiological importance in various EEG studies. Average computational time and shape measures of evolutionary techniques are observed 8.21E-01 sec and 1.73E-01, respectively. Though, traditional algorithms take negligible time consumption, but are unable to offer good shape preservation of ERP, noticed as average computational time and shape measure difference, 1.41E-02 sec and 2.60E+00, respectively. PMID:24407307

  12. Active Optical Control of Quasi-Static Aberrations for ATST

    Johnson, L. C.; Upton, R.; Rimmele, T. R.; Hubbard, R.; Barden, S. C.

    2012-12-01

    The Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST) requires active control of quasi-static telescope aberrations in order to achieve the image quality set by its science requirements. Four active mirrors will be used to compensate for optical misalignments induced by changing gravitational forces and thermal gradients. These misalignments manifest themselves primarily as low-order wavefront aberrations that will be measured by a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor. When operating in closed-loop with the wavefront sensor, the active optics control algorithm uses a linear least-squares reconstructor incorporating force constraints to limit force applied to the primary mirror while also incorporating a neutral-point constraint on the secondary mirror to limit pointing errors. The resulting system compensates for astigmatism and defocus with rigid-body motion of the secondary mirror and higher-order aberrations with primary mirror bending modes. We demonstrate this reconstruction method and present simulation results that apply the active optics correction to aberrations generated by finite-element modeling of thermal and gravitational effects over a typical day of ATST operation. Quasi-static wavefront errors are corrected to within limits set by wavefront sensor noise in all cases with very little force applied to the primary mirror surface and minimal pointing correction needed.

  13. Semi-active control of dynamically excited structures using active interaction control

    Zhang, Yunfeng

    2001-01-01

    This thesis presents a family of semi-active control algorithms termed Active Interaction Control (AIC) used for response control of dynamically excited structures. The AIC approach has been developed as a semi﷓active means of protecting building structures against large earthquakes. The AIC algorithms include the Active Interface Damping (AID), Optimal Connection Strategy (OCS), and newly developed Tuned Interaction Damping (TID) algorithms. All of the AIC algorithms are founded upon ...

  14. Active load control techniques for wind turbines.

    van Dam, C.P. (University of California, Davis, CA); Berg, Dale E.; Johnson, Scott J. (University of California, Davis, CA)

    2008-07-01

    This report provides an overview on the current state of wind turbine control and introduces a number of active techniques that could be potentially used for control of wind turbine blades. The focus is on research regarding active flow control (AFC) as it applies to wind turbine performance and loads. The techniques and concepts described here are often described as 'smart structures' or 'smart rotor control'. This field is rapidly growing and there are numerous concepts currently being investigated around the world; some concepts already are focused on the wind energy industry and others are intended for use in other fields, but have the potential for wind turbine control. An AFC system can be broken into three categories: controls and sensors, actuators and devices, and the flow phenomena. This report focuses on the research involved with the actuators and devices and the generated flow phenomena caused by each device.

  15. Customer Service Call Center Indoor Noise Control%客服呼叫中心室内噪声控制

    许俊

    2014-01-01

    分析客服呼叫中心室内噪声的来源,结合工程实际情况进行模拟实验分析,提出室内噪声控制的综合解决方案。为今后投产的客服呼叫中心营造尽可能舒适、宽松的工作环境,提高客服员工的工作效率,保证客户服务的质量。%It analyzes the source of indoor noise in customer service cal center, makes simulative experiment and analysis and gets inte-grated solution on indoor noise control, to build comfortable working environment for the future customer service cal center.

  16. Noise Control of Gas Power Plants%燃气发电厂噪声控制探讨

    邓勇; 龚凤海

    2013-01-01

    通过对燃气电厂生产工艺、燃气电厂噪声控制阶段划分、各阶段主要工作及其关键点、容易出现的问题的探讨,希望能为解决燃气电厂噪声污染提供一定的帮助。%The article discusses the following issues: the production process of gas power plants, the phases of gas power plant noise control, main work at all stages and key points, recurring problems. Hope that these discussions can help resolve gas power plant noise pollution.

  17. Dynamic characteristics of an active coastal spreading area using ambient noise measurements—Anchor Bay, Malta

    Galea, Pauline; D'Amico, Sebastiano; Farrugia, Daniela

    2014-11-01

    Anchor Bay and surrounding regions are located on the northwest coast of the island of Malta, Central Mediterranean. The area is characterized by a coastal cliff environment having an outcropping layer of hard coralline limestone (UCL) resting on a thick (up to 50 m) layer of clays and marls (Blue Clay, BC). This configuration gives rise to coastal instability effects, in particular lateral spreading phenomena and rock falls. Previous and ongoing studies have identified both lateral spreading rates and vertical motions of several millimetres per year. The area is an interesting natural laboratory as coastal detachment processes in a number of different stages can be identified and are easily accessible. We investigate the site dynamic characteristics of this study area by recording ambient noise time-series at more than 30 points, over an area of 0.07 km2, using a portable three-component seismograph. The time-series are processed to give both horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratio graphs (H/V) as well as frequency-dependent polarisation analysis. The H/V graphs illustrate and quantify aspects of site resonance effects due both to underlying geology as well as to mechanical resonance of partly or wholly detached blocks. The polarization diagrams indicate the degree of linearity and predominant directions of vibrational effects. H/V curves closer to the cliff edge show complex responses at higher frequencies, characteristic of the dynamic behaviour of individual detached blocks. Particle motion associated with the higher frequencies shows strongly directional polarization and a high degree of linearity at well-defined frequencies, indicative of normal-mode vibration. The stable plateau areas, on the other hand, show simple, single-peak H/V curves representative of the underlying stratification and no predominant polarization direction. These results, which will be compared with those from other experiments in the area, have important implications for the

  18. Active control of vibrations in pedestrian bridges

    Álvaro Cunha; Carlos Moutinho

    1999-01-01

    This paper, apart from making a brief general reference to vibration problems in pedestrian bridges, as well as to the form of modelling of dynamic pedestrian loads, presents the use of a predictive control strategy for the numerical simulation of the dynamic response of actively controlled structures of this type. The consideration of this control strategy permitted the development of a computational model, which was applied to the study of a pedestrian cable-stayed bridge, in order to show ...

  19. Active and passive vibration control of structures

    Spelsberg-Korspeter, Gottfried

    2014-01-01

    Active and Passive Vibration Control of Structures form an issue of very actual interest in many different fields of engineering, for example in the automotive and aerospace industry, in precision engineering (e.g. in large telescopes), and also in civil engineering. The papers in this volume bring together engineers of different background, and it fill gaps between structural mechanics, vibrations and modern control theory.  Also links between the different applications in structural control are shown.

  20. Effect of noise exposure (85 dB ) on testicular adrenocortical steroidogenic key enzymes, acid and alkaline phosphatase activities of sex organs in mature albino rats

    2000-01-01

    Changes in the activities of △5-3β-hydroysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD) in testis and adrenal gland, 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase in testis, acid and alkaline phosphatase in testis, prostate and seminal vesicle were observed in noise exposed mature rats at the intensity of 85 dB for 8 h/day for 45 days. The results indicated that noise exposed group showed a significant diminution in the activities of androgenic key enzymes △5-3β and 17β-HSD, acid phosphatase in testis, prostate and seminal vesicle. There was a significant elevation in the activities of adrenal △5-3β-HSD, alkaline phosphatase in testis and other accessory sex organ in noise exposed group. Gonadosomatic, prostatosomatic and seminal vesiculo-somatic indexes were decreased significantly in noise exposed group. Therefore, it is evident that noise exposure at 85dB exerts a deleterious effect on testicular and adrenocortical activities.

  1. Gaps-in-noise detection and gender identification from noise-vocoded vowel segments: Comparing performance of active musicians to non-musicians.

    Donai, Jeremy J; Jennings, Mariah B

    2016-05-01

    This study evaluated performance on a gender identification and temporal resolution task among active musicians and age-matched non-musicians. Brief duration (i.e., 50 and 100 ms) vowel segments produced by four adult male and four adult female speakers were spectro-temporally degraded using various parameters and presented to both groups for gender identification. Gap detection thresholds were measured using the gaps-in-noise (GIN) test. Contrary to the stated hypothesis, a significant difference in gender identification was not observed between the musician and non-musician listeners. A significant difference, however, was observed on the temporal resolution task, with the musician group achieving approximately 2 ms shorter gap detection thresholds on the GIN test compared to the non-musician counterparts. These results provide evidence supporting the potential benefits of musical training on temporal processing abilities, which have implications for the processing of speech in degraded listening environments and the enhanced processing of the fine-grained temporal aspects of the speech signal. The results also support the GIN test as an instrument sensitive to temporal processing differences among active musicians and non-musicians. PMID:27250197

  2. Control of nucleus accumbens activity with neurofeedback

    Greer, Stephanie M.; Trujillo, Andrew J.; Glover, Gary H.; Knutson, Brian

    2014-01-01

    The nucleus accumbens (NAcc) plays critical roles in healthy motivation and learning, as well as in psychiatric disorders (including schizophrenia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder). Thus, techniques that confer control of NAcc activity might inspire new therapeutic interventions. By providing second-to-second temporal resolution of activity in small subcortical regions, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) can resolve online changes in NAcc activity, which can then be pres...

  3. Adaptive control of active filter using DSP

    In order to reduce output-voltage ripple of power supply, an active filter is necessary. In this paper, the active filter with DSP is proposed. The waveform from active filter can be flexibly improved by DSP programming. The output-voltage ripple can be enough reduced by mixing frequency components of the input-voltage ripple. The result of adaptive control using LMS algorism is presented. The improvement by using filtered-X method is discussed. (author)

  4. Optical Sensor/Actuator Locations for Active Structural Acoustic Control

    Padula, Sharon L.; Palumbo, Daniel L.; Kincaid, Rex K.

    1998-01-01

    Researchers at NASA Langley Research Center have extensive experience using active structural acoustic control (ASAC) for aircraft interior noise reduction. One aspect of ASAC involves the selection of optimum locations for microphone sensors and force actuators. This paper explains the importance of sensor/actuator selection, reviews optimization techniques, and summarizes experimental and numerical results. Three combinatorial optimization problems are described. Two involve the determination of the number and position of piezoelectric actuators, and the other involves the determination of the number and location of the sensors. For each case, a solution method is suggested, and typical results are examined. The first case, a simplified problem with simulated data, is used to illustrate the method. The second and third cases are more representative of the potential of the method and use measured data. The three case studies and laboratory test results establish the usefulness of the numerical methods.

  5. Controlling excess noise in fiber-optics continuous-variable quantum key distribution

    We describe a continuous-variable coherent-states quantum-key distribution system working at 1550 nm, and entirely made of standard fiber optics and telecommunications components, such as integrated-optics modulators, couplers and fast InGaAs photodiodes. The setup is composed of an emitter randomly modulating a coherent state in the complex plane with a doubly Gaussian distribution, and a receiver based on a shot-noise limited time-resolved homodyne detector. By using a reverse reconciliation protocol, the device can transfer a raw key rate up to 1 Mbit/s, with a proven security against Gaussian or non-Gaussian attacks. The dependence of the secret information rate of the present fiber setup is studied as a function of the line transmission and excess noise

  6. Nonlinear noise cancellation

    Strauch, Paul E

    1997-01-01

    Noise or interference is often assumed to be a random process. Conventional linear filtering, control or prediction techniques are used to cancel or reduce the noise. However, some noise processes have been shown to be nonlinear and deterministic. These nonlinear deterministic noise processes appear to be random when analysed with second order statistics. As nonlinear processes are widespread in nature it may be beneficial to exploit the coherence of the nonlinear deterministic no...

  7. Wind Turbine Rotors with Active Vibration Control

    Svendsen, Martin Nymann

    This thesis presents a framework for structural modeling, analysis and active vibration damping of rotating wind turbine blades and rotors. A structural rotor model is developed in terms of finite beam elements in a rotating frame of reference. The element comprises a representation of general...... that these are geometrically well separated. For active vibration control in three-bladed wind turbine rotors the present work presents a resonance-based method for groups of one collective and two whirling modes. The controller is based on the existing resonant format and introduces a dual system...... system. As in the method for non-rotating systems, an explicit procedure for optimal calibration of the controller gains is established. The control system is applied to an 86m wind turbine rotor by means of active strut actuator mechanisms. The prescribed additional damping ratios are reproduced almost...

  8. Noise and Fano-Factor Control in AC-Driven Aharonov-Casher Ring

    Phillips A. H.; Ibrahim N. A.; Zein W. A.

    2011-01-01

    The spin dependent current and Fano factor of Aharonov-Casher semiconducting ring is investigated under the effect of microwave, infrared, ultraviolet radiation and magnetic field. Both the average current and the transport noise (Fano factor) characteristics are expressed in terms of the tunneling probability for the respective scattering channels. For spin transport induced by microwave and infrared radiation, a random oscillatory behavior of the Fano factor is observed. Th...

  9. Controlling excess noise in fiber optics continuous variables quantum key distribution

    Lodewyck, Jérôme; Debuisschert, Thierry; Tualle-Brouri, Rosa; Grangier, Philippe

    2005-01-01

    5 pages, 4 figures International audience We describe a continuous variables coherent states quantum key distribution system working at 1550 nm, and entirely made of standard fiber optics and telecom components, such as integrated-optics modulators, couplers and fast InGaAs photodiodes. The setup is composed of an emitter randomly modulating a coherent state in the complex plane with a doubly Gaussian distribution, and a receiver based on a shot noise limited time-resolved homodyne dete...

  10. Controlling the signal-to-noise ratio in optical parametric image amplification

    We analyse a scheme for phase-sensitive amplification of an optical image without using Fourier-transforming lenses, as carried out in a recent experiment. Our analysis shows that the scheme works well with a broadband amplifier, which ensures that the output image is a faithful copy of the object. In addition, when the area of the pixel detector is close to the minimum imaging resolution, both a large output signal-to-noise ratio and noiseless amplification can be realized

  11. THE CONTROL AND EVALUATION OF PROMOTIONAL ACTIVITIES

    Felicia Sabou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper focused on importance and benefits of control and evaluation of marketing activities. The control of efficiency review the assessment of the resources for marketing activity, checking also the efficiency of the human resources, advertising, promotion activities and distribution activities. In the analyse of human resources the most important ratio are: the average of costumers visits on a day, the number of custom order received from 100 visits, the number of new customers from a period, the number of lost customers from a period, the marketing human expenditures from all the sales.The strategic control is made to check if the objectives and the company strategy are adapted to the marketing environment.

  12. Active noise reduction at the rear axle drive; Aktive Geraeuschminderung am Hinterachsgetriebe

    Eulert, Sebastian; Luehrs, Georg [Volkswagen AG, Kassel (Germany); Braeunig, Jan; Bucht, Andre; Kunze, Holger [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Werkzeugmaschinen und Umformtechnik, Dresden (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    In this article we present the results of a research project of Volkswagen AG and Fraunhofer IWU. It shows new approaches in the development of active mass dampers for transmission applications. The proposed active controlled system enables to reduce the interior sound pressure level of the rear axle gear mesh order by more than 5 dB. By detailed pre-examination of the drivetrain vibrations and transfer paths we gained new insights into the phenomenon of rear axle gear whine. In order to develop solutions to realise the damping of the vibrations we designed and constructed a test bench which consists of the main components of the rear axle unit and its bearings. The vibration phenomenon was replicated by synthetic excitation. Thus we could acquire an adequate control concept combined with a corresponding actuator and experimentally established control parameters. Validations on an experimental vehicle under synthetic excitation and finally under real driving conditions adduced the evidence for the functionality of the proposed system. (orig.)

  13. 大型燃煤电厂噪声综合治理%Comprehensive Control of Noise in Large-Scale Coal-Fired Power Plants

    马涛

    2016-01-01

    目前电厂噪声达标排放的要求日趋严格,电厂噪声的治理已显得尤为重要。针对大型燃煤电厂的噪声问题,通过研究噪声防治的基本途径,分析燃煤电厂噪声源的特点,分区提出噪声综合防治措施,为大型燃煤电厂噪声治理提供参考。%At present, noise emission standards for power plants become stricter , and the noise control of power plants is particularly important .In order to solve the noise problem of large-scale coal-fired power plants , the basic approaches to control noise are studied and the characteristics of the main noise sources in coal-fired power plants are analyzed .The comprehensive measures of noise control are put forward in different areas of coal-fired power plants .This study could provide some advice for the noise control of large-scale coal-fired power plants .

  14. Noise reduction of dental drill noise

    Rotter, KRGR; Atherton, MA; Kaymak, E; Millar, BJ

    2008-01-01

    Dental drills produce a characteristic noise that is uncomfortable for patients and is also known to be harmful to dentists under prolonged exposure. It is therefore desirable to protect the patient and dentist whilst allowing two-way communication, which will require a headphone - type system. Re-establishing good communication between the dentist and patient will be achieved through a combination of three noise cancellation technologies, namely, Passive Noise Control (PNC), Adaptive Filteri...

  15. Reprint of : Hanbury-Brown Twiss noise correlation with time controlled quasi-particles in ballistic quantum conductors

    Glattli, D. C.; Roulleau, P.

    2016-08-01

    We study the Hanbury Brown and Twiss correlation of electronic quasi-particles injected in a quantum conductor using current noise correlations and we experimentally address the effect of finite temperature. By controlling the relative time of injection of two streams of electrons it is possible to probe the fermionic antibunching, performing the electron analog of the optical Hong Ou Mandel (HOM) experiment. The electrons are injected using voltage pulses with either sine-wave or Lorentzian shape. In the latter case, we propose a set of orthogonal wavefunctions, describing periodic trains of multiply charged electron pulses, which give a simple interpretation to the HOM shot noise. The effect of temperature is then discussed and experimentally investigated. We observe a perfect electron anti-bunching for a large range of temperature, showing that, as recently predicted, thermal mixing of the states does not affect anti-bunching properties, a feature qualitatively different from dephasing. For single charge Lorentzian pulses, we provide experimental evidence of the prediction that the HOM shot noise variation versus the emission time delay is remarkably independent of the temperature.

  16. A low-power and low-phase-noise LC digitally controlled oscillator featuring a novel capacitor bank

    A monolithic low-power and low-phase-noise digitally controlled oscillator (DCO) based on a symmetric spiral inductor with center-tap and novel capacitor bank was implemented in a 0.18 μm CMOS process with six metal layers. A third new way to change capacitance is proposed and implemented in this work. Results show that the phase noise at 1 MHz offset frequency is below -122.5 dBc/Hz while drawing a current of only 4.8 mA from a 1.8 V supply. Also, the DCO can work at low supply voltage conditions with a 1.6 V power supply and 4.1 mA supply current for the DCO's core circuit, achieving a phase-noise of -21.5 dBc/Hz at offset of 1 MHz. It demonstrates that the supply pushing of DCO is less than 10 MHz/V. (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  17. Adaptive Piezoelectric Absorber for Active Vibration Control

    Sven Herold

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Passive vibration control solutions are often limited to working reliably at one design point. Especially applied to lightweight structures, which tend to have unwanted vibration, active vibration control approaches can outperform passive solutions. To generate dynamic forces in a narrow frequency band, passive single-degree-of-freedom oscillators are frequently used as vibration absorbers and neutralizers. In order to respond to changes in system properties and/or the frequency of excitation forces, in this work, adaptive vibration compensation by a tunable piezoelectric vibration absorber is investigated. A special design containing piezoelectric stack actuators is used to cover a large tuning range for the natural frequency of the adaptive vibration absorber, while also the utilization as an active dynamic inertial mass actuator for active control concepts is possible, which can help to implement a broadband vibration control system. An analytical model is set up to derive general design rules for the system. An absorber prototype is set up and validated experimentally for both use cases of an adaptive vibration absorber and inertial mass actuator. Finally, the adaptive vibration control system is installed and tested with a basic truss structure in the laboratory, using both the possibility to adjust the properties of the absorber and active control.

  18. Active control for performance enhancement of electrically controlled rotor

    Lu Yang; Wang Chao

    2015-01-01

    Electrically controlled rotor (ECR) system has the potential to enhance the rotor perfor-mance by applying higher harmonic flap inputs. In order to explore the feasibility and effectiveness for ECR performance enhancement using closed-loop control method, firstly, an ECR rotor perfor-mance analysis model based on helicopter flight dynamic model is established, which can reflect the performance characteristics of ECR helicopter at high advance ratio. Based on the simulation platform, an active control method named adaptive T-matrix algorithm is adopted to explore the feasibility and effectiveness for ECR performance enhancement. The simulation results verify the effectiveness of this closed-loop control method. For the sample ECR helicopter, about 3%rotor power reduction is obtained with the optimum 2/rev flap inputs at the advance ratio of 0.34. And through analyzing the distributions of attack of angle and drag in rotor disk, the underlying physical essence of ECR power reduction is cleared. Furthermore, the influence of the key control parameters, including convergence factor and weighting matrix, on the effectiveness of closed-loop control for ECR performance enhancement is explored. Some useful results are summarized, which can be used to direct the future active control law design of ECR performance enhancement.

  19. Active control for performance enhancement of electrically controlled rotor

    Lu Yang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Electrically controlled rotor (ECR system has the potential to enhance the rotor performance by applying higher harmonic flap inputs. In order to explore the feasibility and effectiveness for ECR performance enhancement using closed-loop control method, firstly, an ECR rotor performance analysis model based on helicopter flight dynamic model is established, which can reflect the performance characteristics of ECR helicopter at high advance ratio. Based on the simulation platform, an active control method named adaptive T-matrix algorithm is adopted to explore the feasibility and effectiveness for ECR performance enhancement. The simulation results verify the effectiveness of this closed-loop control method. For the sample ECR helicopter, about 3% rotor power reduction is obtained with the optimum 2/rev flap inputs at the advance ratio of 0.34. And through analyzing the distributions of attack of angle and drag in rotor disk, the underlying physical essence of ECR power reduction is cleared. Furthermore, the influence of the key control parameters, including convergence factor and weighting matrix, on the effectiveness of closed-loop control for ECR performance enhancement is explored. Some useful results are summarized, which can be used to direct the future active control law design of ECR performance enhancement.

  20. 广州市内环路交通噪声模拟与降噪措施评估研究%The simulation of Guangzhou Inner Ring Road traffic noise and evaluation of noise control measures

    王大蕾; 蔡铭; 邹竞芳

    2013-01-01

    On the basis of single-vehicle noise emission model, considering the noise attenuation of distance and sound barriers,the computation model of elevated road traffic noise was developed to simulate the traffic noise distribution of Guangzhou Inner Ring Road. The noise distribution was rendering in map based on the geographical information system (GIS). The denoising effects of three noise control measures (speed limit,traffic control and sound barrier construction) were evaluated with East Huanshi Road as example. Results showed that the noise pollution in inner ring road was serious in daytime; the noise exposure of building close to road was 65-70 dB,and the window position of these buildings bearing the noise of 70-75 dB. The noise pollution was serious in East Huanshi Road,railway station section,Chungshan First Road,South Bank Road,West Huanshi Road,these place were the high noise complaints areas. The noise pollution in these area was drop down a level at night,it conformed the limit value (55 dB) of environmental noise standard for urban area (GB 3096-93). Sound barrier construction was a perfect noise control measures for it could reduce the traffic noise without impacting road and vehicle running conditions.%基于单车辆噪声排放模型,考虑距离衰减及声屏障的遮挡作用,建立了高架道路交通噪声模拟模型,计算了广州市内环路的交通噪声分布,并基于地理信息系统(GIS)绘制了内环路的交通噪声地图.同时,以环市东路路段为例,评估了限速、限行及加装声屏障等降噪措施的降噪效果.结果表明:(1)内环路昼间的噪声污染较严重,靠近道路的第1排建筑物大部分处于65~70 dB的噪声环境之下,面对路面的建筑物的开窗位置,噪声达到70~75 dB.噪声较严重的地区为环市东路路段、火车站路段、中山一路路段、南岸路路段、环市西路路段等,这些地区都可能成为内环路噪声投诉事件的高发地区.相同地区

  1. Unperceivable noise to active light touch effects on fast postural sway.

    Kimura, Tetsuya; Kouzaki, Motoki; Masani, Kei; Moritani, Toshio

    2012-01-01

    Human postural sway during quiet standing is reduced when a fingertip lightly touches a stable surface. The tactile feedback information from the fingertip has been considered responsible for this effect of light touch. Studies have shown that a noise-like minute stimulation to the sensory system can improve the system's weak signal detection. In the present study, we investigated whether a noise-like unperceivable vibration on the fingertip enhances its tactile sensation and facilitates the effect of light touch during quiet standing. Thirteen volunteers maintained quiet standing while lightly touching a touch surface with the index fingertip. Based on each subject's vibrotactile threshold (VT), a noise-like vibration was applied to the touch surface at amplitudes under (0.5VT) or at VT (1.0VT), in addition to the normal light touch condition (no vibration, 0VT). The results showed that the mean velocities of the foot center of pressure (CoP) in both the anteroposterior (AP) and mediolateral (ML) directions were significantly reduced at 0.5VT compared to 0VT and 1.0VT (P0.05). Frequency analysis of CoP revealed that the power of high-frequency fluctuation (1-10Hz) was significantly reduced at 0.5VT (P0.05). These results indicate that an unperceivable noise-like vibration can facilitate the effect of light touch on postural stability, by further reducing fast postural sway. PMID:22075223

  2. Active control of ionized boundary layers

    Mendes, R V

    1997-01-01

    The challenging problems, in the field of control of chaos or of transition to chaos, lie in the domain of infinite-dimensional systems. Access to all variables being impossible in this case and the controlling action being limited to a few collective variables, it will not in general be possible to drive the whole system to the desired behaviour. A paradigmatic problem of this type is the control of the transition to turbulence in the boundary layer of fluid motion. By analysing a boundary layer flow for an ionized fluid near an airfoil, one concludes that active control of the transition amounts to the resolution of an generalized integro-differential eigenvalue problem. To cope with the required response times and phase accuracy, electromagnetic control, whenever possible, seems more appropriate than mechanical control by microactuators.

  3. Noise emission as on-line monitoring method for process and production control

    The authors demonstrate the materials physics principles of noise emission (NE) and group the various NE sources into continuous ones and transient ones, i.e. burst type. In crack-type defects, the detection limit of NE depends largely from crack growth rate and surface area. The authors present some NE applications from the fields of engineering and sciences, and industries like monitoring of spot welding in car body sheets, determination of wear in the turning of metallic materials, and NE as a monitoring method in pressure testing or cyclical loading of components in nuclear technology. (orig./DG)

  4. Span of Control and Span of Activity

    Oriana Bandiera; Andrea Prat; Raffaella Sadun; Julie Wulf

    2012-01-01

    For both practitioners and researchers, span of control plays an important role in defining and understanding the role of the CEO. In this paper, we combine organizational chart information for a sample of 65 companies with detailed data on how their CEOs allocate their work time, which we define as their span of activity. Span of activity provides a direct measure of the CEO's management style, including the attention devoted to specific subordinates and functions, the time devoted to indivi...

  5. Capital Control, Debt Financing and Innovative Activity

    Czarnitzki, Dirk; Kraft, Kornelius

    2009-01-01

    "The present paper discusses the effects of dispersed versus concentrated capital ownership on investment into innovative activity. While the market for equity capital might exert insufficient control on top managements’ behavior, this weakness may be mitigated by a suitable degree of debt financing. We report the results of an empirical study on the determinants of innovative activity measured by patent applications. Using a large sample of German manufacturing firms, we find that companies ...

  6. Noise control of dipole source by using micro-perforated panel housing

    Xi, Q.; Choy, Y. S.; Cheng, L.; Tang, S. K.

    2016-02-01

    Mitigating low-frequency noise in a small ducted fan system such as hairdryer is still a technical challenge. Traditional duct lining with porous materials work ineffectively due to the limitation of its thickness and length of small domestic product with ducted fans. This study presents a passive approach to directly suppress the sound radiation from the fan housed by a short microperforated panel covered with a shallow cavity backing. The noise suppression is achieved by the sound cancellation between sound fields from a fan of a dipole nature and sound radiation from a vibrating panel via vibro-acoustic coupling and by sound absorption in micro-perforations to widen the stopband. A two-dimensional theoretical model, capable of dealing with strong coupling among the vibrating micro-perforated panel, sound radiation from the dipole source, sound fields inside the cavity and the duct is developed. Through modal analysis, it is found that the even modes of the panel vibration are very important to cancel the sound radiation from the dipole source. Experimental validation is conducted with a loudspeaker to simulate the dipole source, and good agreement between the predicted and measured insertion loss (IL) is achieved.

  7. Mitigation of calorimeter noise.

    Santi, P. A. (Peter A.); Bracken, D. S. (David S.); Smith, M. K. (Morag K.)

    2004-01-01

    One of the main factors that limit the sensitivity of calorimeters is the noise in the calorimeter response. A previous study into the sources of noise in a Wheatstone bridge calorimeter used by Department of Energy (DOE) facilities has shown that the control system for maintaining the water bath at a constant temperature was an important contributor to the noise in the system. In order to minimize the contribution that the control system makes to the noise in the calorimeter response, a new control system for the calorimeter has been developed. An experimental and analytical study has been performed to determine the effectiveness of this new control system in reducing the response noise in a Wheatstone bridge calorimeter. The results of this study are presented along with their implications for future work in minimizing the equilibrium noise of calorimeters.

  8. Active Vibration Control of Piezolaminated Smart Beams

    V. Balamurugan

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the active vibration control of beam like structures with distributed piezoelectric sensor and actuator layers bonded on top and bottom surfaces of the beam. A finite element model based on Euler-Bernoulli beam theory has been developed. The contribution of the piezoelectric sensor and actuator layers on the mass and stiffness of the beam is considered. Three types of classical control strategies, namely direct proportional feedback, constant-gain negative velocity feedback and Lyapunov feedback and an optimal control strategy, linear quadratic regulator (LQR scheme are applied to study their control effectiveness. Also, the control performance with different types of loading, such as impulse loading, step loading, harmonic and random loading is studied

  9. A Dynamic Absorber With Active Vibration Control

    Huang, S.-J.; Lian, R.-J.

    1994-12-01

    The design and construction of a dynamic absorber incorporating active vibration control is described. The absorber is a two-degrees-of-freedom spring — lumped mass system sliding on a guide pillar, with two internal vibration disturbance sources. Both the main mass and the secondary absorber mass are acted on by DC servo motors, respectively, to suppress the vibration amplitude. The state variable technique is used to model this dynamic system and a decoupling PID control method is used. First, the discrete time state space model is identified by using the commercial software MATLAB. Then the decoupling controller of this multi-input/multi-output system is derived from the identified model. Finally the results of some experiments are presented. The experimental results show that the system is effective in suppressing vibration. Also, the performance of this control strategy for position tracking control is evaluated based on experimental data.

  10. Automotive applications of active vibration control: a control engineering point of view; Aktive Schwingungskompensation im Kfz aus regelungstechnischer Sicht

    Svaricek, F.; Bohn, C.; Haertel, V. [Continental AG, Hannover (Germany). Strategische Technologie; Karkosch, H.J. [ContiTech Vibration Control GmbH, Hannover (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    Modern control applications will become increasingly important in the area of vehicle riding comfort. An attractive future application in this area is the use of active vibration control in engine mounting concepts, particularly since conventional engine mounts are approaching their inherent limitations. This paper gives an overview of the active control of engine-induced vibrations. After a brief introduction to the requirements that a modern engine mounting concept needs to fulfill, an overview of the history of active noise and vibration control is given. This is followed by a discussion of feedforward and feedback control concepts that have been successfully applied to active noise and vibration control. The paper concludes with a detailed description of an active vibration control system with active absorbers that is used to compensate periodic, engine-induced chassis vibrations. (orig.) [German] Moderne Steuer- und Regelungsverfahren werden im Kraftfahrzeug auch im Komfortbereich eine zunehmende Bedeutung erlangen. Der Bereich der Aggregatelagerung von Kraftfahrzeugen koennte in den naechsten Jahren als weitere Anwendungen hinzukommen, da hier die konventionelle Lagerungstechnik immer mehr an ihre Grenzen stoesst. Der vorliegende Beitrag gibt hierzu einen Ueberblick ueber die aktive Kompensation von Aggregateschwingungen. Nach einer kurzen Darstellung der Anforderungen und Aufgaben einer modernen Aggregatelagerung wird zunaechst ein Blick auf die Geschichte der aktiven Schall- und Schwingungskompensation geworfen. Anschliessend werden Steuer- und Regelungskonzepte vorgestellt und diskutiert, die in der Literatur erfolgreich bei Aufgaben der aktiven Schall- und Schwingungskompensation eingesetzt wurden. Der Beitrag schliesst mit der detaillierten Darstellung des Aufbaus und der Wirkungsweise eines aktiven Tilgersystems zur Kompensation von periodischen Aggregateschwingungen. (orig.)

  11. Ambient seismic noise monitoring of active landslides and rock columns prone to failure

    Carrière, Simon; Valentin, Johann; Larose, Eric; Jongmans, Denis; Baillet, Laurent; Bottelin, Pierre; Franz, Martin; Michoud, Clément; Jaboyedoff, Michel

    2015-04-01

    Ambient seismic noise can be used to monitor the integrity of unstable slopes and rock columns prone to failure. To that end, we record continuously seismic waveforms in the fields using 1D or 3D short period seismic sensors together with autonomous and telemetered data loggers that can be operated in severe environmental conditions. When monitoring landslides made of unconsolidated materials (such as clay), we propose to monitor the relative seismic velocity changes using the Coda Wave Interferometry technique operated on the coda of daily ambient seismic noise correlations (Passive Image Interferometry). When monitoring the rupture of a rock column, we propose to track the evolution of the polarization and natural frequencies of the first resonant modes of the structures. In both cases, experimental results suggest potential precursory signals some days before the failure. We also observe a clear dependence of the seismic properties of the soil and environmental conditions such as temperature and hydrology. Bibliography : G. Mainsant, E. Larose, C. Brönnimann, D. Jongmans, C. Michoud, M. Jaboyedoff : Ambient seismic noise monitoring of a clay landslide : toward failure prediction, J. Geophys. Res. 117, F01030 (2012). P. Bottelin, C. Lévy, L. Baillet, D. Jongmans, P. Gueguen, Modal and thermal analysis of les arches unstable rock column (vercors massif, french alps), Geophys. J. Int. 194 (2013) 849-858.

  12. Modeling the impact of common noise inputs on the network activity of retinal ganglion cells.

    Vidne, Michael; Ahmadian, Yashar; Shlens, Jonathon; Pillow, Jonathan W; Kulkarni, Jayant; Litke, Alan M; Chichilnisky, E J; Simoncelli, Eero; Paninski, Liam

    2012-08-01

    Synchronized spontaneous firing among retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), on timescales faster than visual responses, has been reported in many studies. Two candidate mechanisms of synchronized firing include direct coupling and shared noisy inputs. In neighboring parasol cells of primate retina, which exhibit rapid synchronized firing that has been studied extensively, recent experimental work indicates that direct electrical or synaptic coupling is weak, but shared synaptic input in the absence of modulated stimuli is strong. However, previous modeling efforts have not accounted for this aspect of firing in the parasol cell population. Here we develop a new model that incorporates the effects of common noise, and apply it to analyze the light responses and synchronized firing of a large, densely-sampled network of over 250 simultaneously recorded parasol cells. We use a generalized linear model in which the spike rate in each cell is determined by the linear combination of the spatio-temporally filtered visual input, the temporally filtered prior spikes of that cell, and unobserved sources representing common noise. The model accurately captures the statistical structure of the spike trains and the encoding of the visual stimulus, without the direct coupling assumption present in previous modeling work. Finally, we examined the problem of decoding the visual stimulus from the spike train given the estimated parameters. The common-noise model produces Bayesian decoding performance as accurate as that of a model with direct coupling, but with significantly more robustness to spike timing perturbations. PMID:22203465

  13. MODELING MERCURY CONTROL WITH POWDERED ACTIVATED CARBON

    The paper presents a mathematical model of total mercury removed from the flue gas at coal-fired plants equipped with powdered activated carbon (PAC) injection for Mercury control. The developed algorithms account for mercury removal by both existing equipment and an added PAC in...

  14. DNA-based control of protein activity.

    Engelen, W; Janssen, B M G; Merkx, M

    2016-03-01

    DNA has emerged as a highly versatile construction material for nanometer-sized structures and sophisticated molecular machines and circuits. The successful application of nucleic acid based systems greatly relies on their ability to autonomously sense and act on their environment. In this feature article, the development of DNA-based strategies to dynamically control protein activity via oligonucleotide triggers is discussed. Depending on the desired application, protein activity can be controlled by directly conjugating them to an oligonucleotide handle, or expressing them as a fusion protein with DNA binding motifs. To control proteins without modifying them chemically or genetically, multivalent ligands and aptamers that reversibly inhibit their function provide valuable tools to regulate proteins in a noncovalent manner. The goal of this feature article is to give an overview of strategies developed to control protein activity via oligonucleotide-based triggers, as well as hurdles yet to be taken to obtain fully autonomous systems that interrogate, process and act on their environments by means of DNA-based protein control. PMID:26812623

  15. Noise control reconstruction for an air conditioning system%某空调系统噪声改造

    刘滨

    2015-01-01

    Taking a noise control reconstruction project in a library for example,the air conditioning system in a building should not only meet the requirement of environmental parameters such as temperature,humidity and wind speed,but also meet the requirement of indoor and outdoor acoustic standard.Through the field environmental testing and analysis,puts forward the reform scheme.The test results show that after the reconstruction the noise is controlled effectively,and meets the owners’requirements.%以某图书馆噪声改造为例,说明空调系统不仅要满足室内空气温、湿度和风速等环境参数的要求,而且还应满足室内、外允许噪声标准的要求。通过现场声环境测试和分析,提出了改造方案。改造后的测试结果表明,噪声值得到了有效控制,满足了业主的要求。

  16. Orthonormal filters for identification in active control systems

    Mayer, Dirk

    2015-12-01

    Many active noise and vibration control systems require models of the control paths. When the controlled system changes slightly over time, adaptive digital filters for the identification of the models are useful. This paper aims at the investigation of a special class of adaptive digital filters: orthonormal filter banks possess the robust and simple adaptation of the widely applied finite impulse response (FIR) filters, but at a lower model order, which is important when considering implementation on embedded systems. However, the filter banks require prior knowledge about the resonance frequencies and damping of the structure. This knowledge can be supposed to be of limited precision, since in many practical systems, uncertainties in the structural parameters exist. In this work, a procedure using a number of training systems to find the fixed parameters for the filter banks is applied. The effect of uncertainties in the prior knowledge on the model error is examined both with a basic example and in an experiment. Furthermore, the possibilities to compensate for the imprecise prior knowledge by a higher filter order are investigated. Also comparisons with FIR filters are implemented in order to assess the possible advantages of the orthonormal filter banks. Numerical and experimental investigations show that significantly lower computational effort can be reached by the filter banks under certain conditions.

  17. A state feedback electro-acoustic transducer for active control of acoustic impedance

    Samejima, Toshiya

    2003-03-01

    In this paper, a new control system in which the acoustic impedance of an electro-acoustic transducer diaphragm can be actively varied by modifying design parameters is presented and its effectiveness is theoretically investigated. The proposed control system is based on a state-space description of the control system derived from an electrical equivalent circuit of an electro-acoustic transducer to which a differentiating circuit is connected, and is designed using modern control theory. The optimal quadratic regulator is used in the control system design, with its quadratic performance index formulated for producing desired acoustic impedance. Computer simulations indicate that the acoustic impedance of the diaphragm can be significantly varied over a wide frequency range that includes the range below the resonance frequency of the electro-acoustic transducer. A computer model of the proposed control system is used to illustrate its application to semi-active noise control in a duct. It is demonstrated that the proposed control system provides substantial reductions in the noise radiating from the outlet of the duct, both in the stiffness control range and in the mass control range.

  18. Discussion on Domestic Rural Noise Pollution Status and Its Control Measures%论我国农村噪声污染现状与治理方向

    席欧; 曾亚梅; 沈毅; 魏显威; 王彦琴; 袁旻忞

    2015-01-01

    对自2005年至今的国内大量公路建设项目环评、竣工环保验收和道路交通噪声研究过程中积累的噪声监测数据进行统计分析。形成对中国农村噪声污染现状的基本判断,识别出主要的噪声污染源为交通噪声。以问卷调查的形式了解农村居民对噪声问题的关注度,从环境监测机制,现行降噪措施效果和特点、实施情况等几个方面分析目前农村声环境污染防治存在的主要问题,并提出几点改进农村噪声污染治理的建议。%Based on statistical analysis of a large number of environmental assessments and completion check-up of do-mestic highway construction projects, and the accumulation of traffic noise monitoring data in the research process since 2005, the essential judgment of the current situation of noise pollution in domestic rural areas was obtained. The main pollu-tion source of noise was recognized to be the traffic noise. The attention-degree of rural residents to the noise pollution prob-lem was investigated by questionnaire and interview. The main problems in rural noise pollution control were discussed in the aspects of the environmental monitoring mechanism, the effect and characteristics of the present measures of noise reduc-tion, the implementation of the noise control measures, etc. Some improvement suggestions of rural noise pollution control were put forward.

  19. Noise Pollution

    ... EPA Home Air and Radiation Noise Pollution Noise Pollution This page has moved. You should be immediately ... gov/clean-air-act-overview/title-iv-noise-pollution Local Navigation Air & Radiation Home Basic Information Where ...

  20. A real-time data acquisition and control of gradient coil noise for fMRI identification of hearing disorder in children with history of ear infection.

    Lee, Jaeseung; Holte, James; Ritenour, E Russell

    2013-02-01

    Early ear infection and trauma, from birth to age 12 are known to have a significant effect on sensory and cognitive development. This effect can be demonstrated through the fMRI study of children who have a history of ear infection compared to a control group. A second research question is the extent to which brain plasticity at an early age can reduce the impact of infection on hearing and cognitive development. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) provides a mapping of brain activity in cognitive and sensory regions by recording the oxygenation state of the local cerebral blood flow. The gradient coils of fMRI scanners generate intense acoustic noise (GCN) - to which the subject is in close proximity - in the range of 90 to 140 db SPL during the imaging process. Clearly this noise will impress its signature on low level brain response patterns. An Active Noise Canceller (ANC) system can suppress the effect of GCN on the subject's perception of a phonetic stimulus at the phoneme, word or phrase level. Due to a superimposition of the frequency and time domain components of the test signal and GCN for MR test, the ANC filtering system performs its function in real time - we must capture the brain's response to the test signal AFTER the noise has been removed. This goal is achieved through the application of field programmable gate array (FPGA) technology of NI LabVIEW. The presentation (in the noisy fMRI environment) of test words and phrases to hearing impaired children can identify sources of distortion to their perceptual processes associated with GCN. Once this distortion has been identified, learning strategies may be introduced to replace the hearing function distorted by early infection as well as the short term effect of GCN. The study of speech cognition without the confounding effect of GCN and with the varying level of GCN for a repeated test signal at later age can be allowed to a measure of recovery through brain plasticity. PMID:23482910