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Sample records for active magnetic regenerative

  1. Optimization of active magnetic regenerative refrigeration systems using Design of Experiments

    Roudaut, Julien; Bouchekara, Houssem; Kedous-Lebouc, Afef; Coulomb, Jean-Louis

    2009-01-01

    International audience This paper attends to demonstrate the usefulness of Design of Experiments (DOE) method in magnetic refrigeration (MR) understanding and optimization. A numerical DOE is applied to a simple 1D finite difference model describing an Active Magnetic Regenerative Refrigeration (AMRR) system. The heat transfer fluid is water, the regenerator consists of stacked gadolinium plates and the model is based on the assumption of an equivalent single plate. A two-level 27-3 fracti...

  2. Maximizing the temperature span of a solid state active magnetic regenerative refrigerator

    Highlights: • A fully solid state active magnetic regenerative refrigerator is proposed. • The temperature span is enhanced by increasing the number of magnetocaloric elements. • Numerical simulations show that the temperature span can reach 11.4 K at 303 K. • Optimization in terms of frequency, operating temperature and contact time. - Abstract: We here describe and numerically simulate a new solid state active magnetic regenerative refrigerator (AMRR) aiming bulk applications. This system uses magnetocaloric materials and materials whose thermal conductivity changes with the applied magnetic field (H). Similarly to common AMRRs, H is moved gradually from the hot to the cold reservoirs to produce a cascade of Brayton cycles. This cascade increases the temperature span and can thus be used in bulk applications where the conservation of a cold environment is demanded. Our results show that by using gadolinium as magnetocaloric material (MCM) and H = 1 T, one can increase the temperature span from 2.5 K up to 11.5 K, an enhancement of over 450%. The optimization of such solid state system is here presented also in terms of frequency, operating temperature and time of contact between the cold reservoir and the MCM

  3. Design optimization of a 0.1-ton/day active magnetic regenerative hydrogen liquefier

    Zhang, L.; Sherif, S. A.; DeGregoria, A. J.; Zimm, C. B.; Veziroglu, T. N.

    2000-04-01

    A design optimization procedure of a 0.1-ton/day active magnetic regenerative (AMR) hydrogen liquefier model is described. The liquefier is proposed for the industrial liquid hydrogen market with overall efficiency being the primary measure of performance. This performance is described here in terms of particle size, bed length, and inter-stage temperature. Efficiency comparable to larger gas cycle plants is predicted. The magnetic liquefier may be modified to operate as a two-stage magnetic refrigerator between 77 and 20 K with high efficiency. The paper describes an optimization method as applied to the design of a two-stage AMR hydrogen liquefier and presents the associated results. A five-parameter optimization process is performed since there are five changeable parameters; the low- and high-stage particle sizes, the low- and high-stage bed lengths, and the inter-stage temperature. Model results are presented and compared with experimental results of an actual liquefier.

  4. Investigation on the two-stage active magnetic regenerative refrigerator for liquefaction of hydrogen

    Park, Inmyong; Park, Jiho; Jeong, Sangkwon [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Youngkwon [Institute for Basic Science, Daejeon 305-811 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-29

    An active magnetic regenerative refrigerator (AMRR) is expected to be useful for hydrogen liquefaction due to its inherent high thermodynamic efficiency. Because the temperature of the cold end of the refrigerator has to be approximately liquid temperature, a large temperature span of the active magnetic regenerator (AMR) is indispensable when the heat sink temperature is liquid nitrogen temperature or higher. Since magnetic refrigerants are only effective in the vicinity of their own transition temperatures, which limit the temperature span of the AMR, an innovative structure is needed to increase the temperature span. The AMR must be a layered structure and the thermophysical matching of magnetic field and flow convection effects is very important. In order to design an AMR for liquefaction of hydrogen, the implementation of multi-layered AMR with different magnetic refrigerants is explored with multi-staging. In this paper, the performance of the multi-layered AMR using four rare-earth compounds (GdNi{sub 2}, Gd{sub 0.1}Dy{sub 0.9}Ni{sub 2}, Dy{sub 0.85}Er{sub 0.15}Al{sub 2}, Dy{sub 0.5}Er{sub 0.5}Al{sub 2}) is investigated. The experimental apparatus includes two-stage active magnetic regenerator containing two different magnetic refrigerants each. A liquid nitrogen reservoir connected to the warm end of the AMR maintains the temperature of the warm end around 77 K. High-pressure helium gas is employed as a heat transfer fluid in the AMR and the maximum magnetic field of 4 T is supplied by the low temperature superconducting (LTS) magnet. The temperature span with the variation of parameters such as phase difference between magnetic field and mass flow rate of magnetic refrigerants in AMR is investigated. The maximum temperature span in the experiment is recorded as 50 K and several performance issues have been discussed in this paper.

  5. Investigation on the two-stage active magnetic regenerative refrigerator for liquefaction of hydrogen

    An active magnetic regenerative refrigerator (AMRR) is expected to be useful for hydrogen liquefaction due to its inherent high thermodynamic efficiency. Because the temperature of the cold end of the refrigerator has to be approximately liquid temperature, a large temperature span of the active magnetic regenerator (AMR) is indispensable when the heat sink temperature is liquid nitrogen temperature or higher. Since magnetic refrigerants are only effective in the vicinity of their own transition temperatures, which limit the temperature span of the AMR, an innovative structure is needed to increase the temperature span. The AMR must be a layered structure and the thermophysical matching of magnetic field and flow convection effects is very important. In order to design an AMR for liquefaction of hydrogen, the implementation of multi-layered AMR with different magnetic refrigerants is explored with multi-staging. In this paper, the performance of the multi-layered AMR using four rare-earth compounds (GdNi2, Gd0.1Dy0.9Ni2, Dy0.85Er0.15Al2, Dy0.5Er0.5Al2) is investigated. The experimental apparatus includes two-stage active magnetic regenerator containing two different magnetic refrigerants each. A liquid nitrogen reservoir connected to the warm end of the AMR maintains the temperature of the warm end around 77 K. High-pressure helium gas is employed as a heat transfer fluid in the AMR and the maximum magnetic field of 4 T is supplied by the low temperature superconducting (LTS) magnet. The temperature span with the variation of parameters such as phase difference between magnetic field and mass flow rate of magnetic refrigerants in AMR is investigated. The maximum temperature span in the experiment is recorded as 50 K and several performance issues have been discussed in this paper

  6. 1-D transient numerical model of a regenerator in a novel sub Kelvin Active Magnetic Regenerative Refrigerator

    Jahromi, Amir E.; Miller, Franklin K.

    2016-03-01

    A sub Kelvin Active Magnetic Regenerative Refrigerator (AMRR) is being developed at the University of Wisconsin - Madison. This AMRR consists of two circulators, two regenerators, one superleak, one cold heat exchanger, and two warm heat exchangers. The circulators are novel non-moving part pumps that reciprocate a superfluid mixture of 4He-3He in the system. Heat from the mixture is removed within the two regenerators of this tandem system. An accurate model of the regenerators in this AMRR is necessary in order to predict the performance of these components, which in turn helps predicting the overall performance of the AMRR system. This work presents modeling methodology along with results from a 1-D transient numerical model of the regenerators of an AMRR capable of removing 2.5 mW at 850 mK at cyclic steady state.

  7. Experimental investigation of 20 K two-stage layered active magnetic regenerative refrigerator

    Park, Inmyong; Jeong, Sangkwon

    2015-12-01

    The performance of a two-stage layered AMRR is experimentally investigated. The test apparatus includes two-stage layered AMRs, low temperature superconducting (LTS) magnet which generates maximum magnetic field of 4 T, and the helium gas flow system. The helium compressor with the tandem rotary valve is employed to generate the oscillating flow of the helium gas minimizing the pressure swing effect. The mass flow rate of working fluid is controlled separately at the first and second stages of the AMR by solenoid valves. The mass flow rate of the AMRs is measured by the mass flow meter and the cryogenic hot-film sensor which is calibrated at cryogenic temperature range from 20 K to 77 K. In order to reduce the heat leak by shuttle heat transfer of the working fluid, void volumes have been implemented and connected to the cold ends of the AMR1 and AMR2. The temperature span of the AMR is recorded as 52 K and the performance of the AMR with the variation of the mass flow rate is analysed. The results show that the mass flow rate and the heat leak due to the shuttle heat transfer by oscillating working fluid are crucial factors in the AMR performance.

  8. Development of a He{sup 3}−He{sup 4} sub Kelvin active magnetic regenerative refrigerator (AMRR) with no moving parts

    Jahromi, A. E. [Ph.D. student, University of Wisconsin -1500 Engineering Drive, 1335 ERB, Madison, WI, 53706 (United States); Miller, F. K. [Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering, University of Wisconsin - 1500 Engineering Drive, 1341 ERB Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2014-01-29

    Current state of the art particle and photon detectors such as Transition Edge Sensors (TES) and Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (MKID) use large arrays of sensors or detectors for space science missions. As the size of these space science detectors increases, future astrophysics missions will require sub-Kelvin cooling over larger areas. This leads to not only increased cooling power requirements, but also a requirement for distributed sub-Kelvin cooling. We propose an active Magnetic Regenerative Refrigerator (AMRR) that uses a Superfluid Magnetic Pump (SMP) to circulate liquid He{sup 3}−He{sup 4} through a magnetic regenerator to provide the necessary cooling at sub-Kelvin temperatures. Such system will be capable of distributing the cooling load to a relatively large array of objects. One advantage of using a fluid for heat transfer in such systems is to isolate components such as the superconducting magnets from detectors that are sensitive to magnetic fields. Another advantage of the proposed tandem AMRR is that it does not need Gas Gap Heat Switches (GGHS) to transfer heat during various stages of the magnetic cooling. Our proposed system consists of four superconducting magnets, one superleak, and three heat exchangers. It will operate continuously with no moving parts and it will be capable of providing the necessary cooling at sub-Kelvin temperatures for future space science applications.

  9. Active Gas Regenerative Liquefier Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We offer a novel liquefier that has the potential to simultaneously increase thermodynamic efficiency and significantly reduce complexity. The ?active gas...

  10. Biocompatibility and Toxicity of Magnetic Nanoparticles in Regenerative Medicine

    H. Markides

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Regenerative medicine is a pioneering field aimed at restoring and regenerating the function of damaged cells, organs and tissues in order to establish normal function. It demands the cross communication of disciplines to develop effective therapeutic stem cell based therapies. Nanotechnology has been instrumental in the development and translation of basic research to the clinically relevant therapies. In particular, magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs have been applied to tag, track and activate stem cells offering an effective means of monitoring in vitro and in vivo behaviour. MNPs are comprised of an iron oxide core with a biocompatible biological polymer. Safety is an issue of constant concern and emphasises on the importance of investigating the issue of toxicity. Any indication of toxicity can ultimately limit the therapeutic efficiency of the therapy. Toxicity is highly dependent on the physical, chemical and structural properties of the MNP itself as well as dose and intended use. Few in vitro studies have reported adverse effects of MNP on cells at in vitro in therapeutic doses. However, long term in vivo studies have not been studied as extensively. This review aims to summarise current research in this topic highlighting commonly used toxicity assays to investigate this.

  11. Performance of a novel energy-regenerative active suspension system

    HUANG Da-shan; ZHANG Jin-qiu; LIU Yi-le; WANG Xing-ye

    2015-01-01

    A novel energy-regenerative active suspension (NEAS) system was designed to solve the problem of low energy recovery efficiency caused by frequent alternation of energy-recovery mode and active-control mode in a traditional energy-regenerative active suspension (TEAS) system. The energy recovery and active control could be implemented simultaneously in the NEAS. The transforming processes and the corresponding computational formulas of power conversion in the NEAS were provided. The simulation results show that the performances of energy recovery of the NEAS are improved, and the self-sustaining of power supply for the NEAS can be realized.

  12. Magnetically Targeted Stem Cell Delivery for Regenerative Medicine

    Jhon Cores

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells play a special role in the body as agents of self-renewal and auto-reparation for tissues and organs. Stem cell therapies represent a promising alternative strategy to regenerate damaged tissue when natural repairing and conventional pharmacological intervention fail to do so. A fundamental impediment for the evolution of stem cell therapies has been the difficulty of effectively targeting administered stem cells to the disease foci. Biocompatible magnetically responsive nanoparticles are being utilized for the targeted delivery of stem cells in order to enhance their retention in the desired treatment site. This noninvasive treatment-localization strategy has shown promising results and has the potential to mitigate the problem of poor long-term stem cell engraftment in a number of organ systems post-delivery. In addition, these same nanoparticles can be used to track and monitor the cells in vivo, using magnetic resonance imaging. In the present review we underline the principles of magnetic targeting for stem cell delivery, with a look at the logic behind magnetic nanoparticle systems, their manufacturing and design variants, and their applications in various pathological models.

  13. Design and experiment study of a semi-active energy-regenerative suspension system

    Shi, Dehua; Chen, Long; Wang, Ruochen; Jiang, Haobin; Shen, Yujie

    2015-01-01

    A new kind of semi-active energy-regenerative suspension system is proposed to recover suspension vibration energy, as well as to reduce the suspension cost and demands for the motor-rated capacity. The system consists of an energy-regenerative damper and a DC-DC converter-based energy-regenerative circuit. The energy-regenerative damper is composed of an electromagnetic linear motor and an adjustable shock absorber with three regulating levels. The linear motor just works as the generator to harvest the suspension vibration energy. The circuit can be used to improve the system’s energy-regenerative performance and to continuously regulate the motor’s electromagnetic damping force. Therefore, although the motor works as a generator and damps the isolation without an external power source, the motor damping force is controllable. The damping characteristics of the system are studied based on a two degrees of freedom vehicle vibration model. By further analyzing the circuit operation characteristics under different working modes, the double-loop controller is designed to track the desired damping force. The external-loop is a fuzzy controller that offers the desired equivalent damping. The inner-loop controller, on one hand, is used to generate the pulse number and the frequency to control the angle and the rotational speed of the step motor; on the other hand, the inner-loop is used to offer the duty cycle of the energy-regenerative circuit. Simulations and experiments are conducted to validate such a new suspension system. The results show that the semi-active energy-regenerative suspension can improve vehicle ride comfort with the controllable damping characteristics of the linear motor. Meanwhile, it also ensures energy regeneration.

  14. Design and experiment study of a semi-active energy-regenerative suspension system

    A new kind of semi-active energy-regenerative suspension system is proposed to recover suspension vibration energy, as well as to reduce the suspension cost and demands for the motor-rated capacity. The system consists of an energy-regenerative damper and a DC-DC converter-based energy-regenerative circuit. The energy-regenerative damper is composed of an electromagnetic linear motor and an adjustable shock absorber with three regulating levels. The linear motor just works as the generator to harvest the suspension vibration energy. The circuit can be used to improve the system’s energy-regenerative performance and to continuously regulate the motor’s electromagnetic damping force. Therefore, although the motor works as a generator and damps the isolation without an external power source, the motor damping force is controllable. The damping characteristics of the system are studied based on a two degrees of freedom vehicle vibration model. By further analyzing the circuit operation characteristics under different working modes, the double-loop controller is designed to track the desired damping force. The external-loop is a fuzzy controller that offers the desired equivalent damping. The inner-loop controller, on one hand, is used to generate the pulse number and the frequency to control the angle and the rotational speed of the step motor; on the other hand, the inner-loop is used to offer the duty cycle of the energy-regenerative circuit. Simulations and experiments are conducted to validate such a new suspension system. The results show that the semi-active energy-regenerative suspension can improve vehicle ride comfort with the controllable damping characteristics of the linear motor. Meanwhile, it also ensures energy regeneration. (paper)

  15. Novel magnetic indenter for rheological analysis of thin biological sheet for regenerative medicine

    Kageshima, Masami; Maruyama, Toshiro; Akama, Tomoya; Nakamura, Tomoyuki

    2016-07-01

    A novel method is proposed for analyzing the mechanical properties of a thin sheet of cells or extracellular matrix cultured for regenerative medicine. A steel sphere is mounted onto the center of the sheet sample, placed over a circular aperture, and a loading force is exerted via an electromagnet with well-regulated current while the displacement of the sample center is optically detected. Details of the instrument and its performance are described. Loading and unloading experiment with stepwise magnetic force revealed that creep response of each of the cell sheet and matrix sheet can be expressed as a combination of a quasi-instantaneous deformation and two delayed elastic responses having different retardation times. The retardation time exhibited an increasing trend with the loading force. Close analysis of loading-force dependence and reversibility of the derived mechanical parameters revealed that these deformation modes are not independent but flexibly switches to each other depending on load magnitude and loading history. The cell sheet sample exhibited remarkable irreversibility between loading and unloading responses, which is attributed to response of the live cells to the sustained loading.

  16. Performance characteristics of an irreversible regenerative magnetic Brayton refrigeration cycle using Gd0.74Tb0.26 as the working substance

    Diguet, Gildas; Lin, Guoxing; Chen, Jincan

    2012-10-01

    The cycle model of an irreversible regenerative magnetic Brayton refrigerator using Gd0.74Tb0.26 as the working substance is established. Based on the experimental characteristics of iso-field heat capacities of the material Gd0.74Tb0.26 at 0 T and 2 T, the corresponding iso-field entropies are calculated and the thermodynamic performance of an irreversible regenerative magnetic Brayton refrigeration cycle is investigated. The effects of the irreversibilities in the two adiabatic processes and non-perfect regenerative process of the magnetic Brayton refrigeration cycle on the cooling quantity, the heat quantity released to the hot reservoir, the net cooling quantity and the coefficient of performance are discussed in detail. Some significant results are obtained.

  17. A Preliminary Study of Energy Recovery in Vehicles by Using Regenerative Magnetic Shock Absorbers

    Road vehicles can expend a significant amount of energy in undesirable vertical motions that are induced by road bumps, and much of that is dissipated in conventional shock absorbers as they dampen the vertical motions. Presented in this paper are some of the results of a study aimed at determining the effectiveness of efficiently transforming that energy into electrical power by using optimally designed regenerative electromagnetic shock absorbers. In turn, the electrical power can be used to recharge batteries or other efficient energy storage devices (e.g., flywheels) rather than be dissipated. The results of the study are encouraging - they suggest that a significant amount of the vertical motion energy can be recovered and stored

  18. Enzymatically synthesized inorganic polymers as morphogenetically active bone scaffolds: application in regenerative medicine.

    Wang, Xiaohong; Schröder, Heinz C; Müller, Werner E G

    2014-01-01

    In recent years a paradigm shift in understanding of human bone formation has occurred that starts to change current concepts in tissue engineering of bone and cartilage. New discoveries revealed that fundamental steps in biomineralization are enzyme driven, not only during hydroxyapatite deposition, but also during initial bioseed formation, involving the transient deposition and subsequent transformation of calcium carbonate to calcium phosphate mineral. The principal enzymes mediating these reactions, carbonic anhydrase and alkaline phosphatase, open novel targets for pharmacological intervention of bone diseases like osteoporosis, by applying compounds acting as potential activators of these enzymes. It is expected that these new findings will give an innovation boost for the development of scaffolds for bone repair and reconstruction, which began with the use of bioinert materials, followed by bioactive materials and now leading to functional regenerative tissue units. These new developments have become possible with the discovery of the morphogenic activity of bioinorganic polymers, biocalcit, bio-polyphosphate and biosilica that are formed by a biogenic, enzymatic mechanism, a driving force along with the development of novel rapid-prototyping three-dimensional (3D) printing methods and bioprinting (3D cell printing) techniques that may allow a fabrication of customized implants for patients suffering in bone diseases in the future. PMID:25376489

  19. Renal primordia activate kidney regenerative events in a rat model of progressive renal disease.

    Barbara Imberti

    Full Text Available New intervention tools for severely damaged kidneys are in great demand to provide patients with a valid alternative to whole organ replacement. For repairing or replacing injured tissues, emerging approaches focus on using stem and progenitor cells. Embryonic kidneys represent an interesting option because, when transplanted to sites such as the renal capsule of healthy animals, they originate new renal structures. Here, we studied whether metanephroi possess developmental capacity when transplanted under the kidney capsule of MWF male rats, a model of spontaneous nephropathy. We found that six weeks post-transplantation, renal primordia developed glomeruli and tubuli able to filter blood and to produce urine in cyst-like structures. Newly developed metanephroi were able to initiate a regenerative-like process in host renal tissues adjacent to the graft in MWF male rats as indicated by an increase in cell proliferation and vascular density, accompanied by mRNA and protein upregulation of VEGF, FGF2, HGF, IGF-1 and Pax-2. The expression of SMP30 and NCAM was induced in tubular cells. Oxidative stress and apoptosis markedly decreased. Our study shows that embryonic kidneys generate functional nephrons when transplanted into animals with severe renal disease and at the same time activate events at least partly mimicking those observed in kidney tissues during renal regeneration.

  20. Regenerative (Regen) ECLSS Operations Water Balance

    Tobias, Barry

    2010-01-01

    In November 2008, the Water Regenerative System racks were launched aboard Space Shuttle flight, STS-126 (ULF2) and installed and activated on the International Space Station (ISS). These racks, consisting of the Water Processor Assembly (WPA) and Urine Processor Assembly (UPA), completed the installation of the Regenerative (Regen) ECLSS systems which includes the Oxygen Generator Assembly (OGA) that was launched 2 years prior. With the onset of active water management on the US segment of the ISS, a new operational concept was required, that of "water balance." Even more recently, in 2010 the Sabatier system came online which converts H2 and CO2 into water and methane. The Regen ECLSS systems accept condensation from the atmosphere, urine from crew, and processes that fluid via various means into potable water which is used for crew drinking, building up skip-cycle water inventory, and water for electrolysis to produce oxygen. Specification rates of crew urine output, condensate output, O2 requirements, toilet flush water and drinking needs are well documented and used as a general plan when Regen ECLSS came online. Spec rates are useful in long term planning, however, daily or weekly rates are dependent on a number of variables. The constantly changing rates created a new challenge for the ECLSS flight controllers, who are responsible for operating the ECLSS systems onboard ISS. This paper will review the various inputs to rate changes and inputs to planning events, including but not limited to; crew personnel makeup, Regen ECLSS system operability, vehicle traffic, water containment availability, and Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) capability. Along with the inputs that change the various rates, the paper will review the different systems, their constraints and finally the operational means by which flight controllers manage this new challenge of "water balance."

  1. Regenerative burner

    Davies, T.E.; Quinn, D.E.; Watson, J.E.

    1986-08-05

    A regenerative burner is described operable in fire and flue modes comprising: a burner shell having first and second internal chambers, the first chamber being disposed on the flame axis of the burner and the second chamber surrounding the radial perimeter of the first chamber; a gas permeable annular regenerative bed separating the first and second chambers such that gas flow between the first and second chambers must travel through the regenerative bed in a generally radial direction with respect to the flame axis; means for supplying combustion air to the second chamber when the burner is in the fire mode and for exhausting the products of combustion from the second chamber when the burner is in the flue mode; and means for supplying fuel in the vicinity of the flame axis for mixing with combustion air to support combustion when the burner is in the fire mode.

  2. Appearance of an inhibitory cell nuclear antigen in rat and human serum during variable degrees of hepatic regenerative activity

    1999-01-01

    AIM To determine whether proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is present in the peripheral circulation and whether PCNA levels correlate with enhanced regenerative activity.METHODS In animal studies, adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (n=3-4/ group) were sacrificed at 0, 12, 24, 36, 48, 72 and 96 hours following 70% partial hepatectomy. At each interval, sera were analyzed by Western blot for PCNA by two monoclonal antibodies (PC-10 and 19F-4). In human studies, sera from 4 patients with liver cirrhosis and 4 healthy controls were tested in a similar manner.RESULTS The PC-10 monoclonal antibody identified a protein with a molecular mass of 120 KD which remained stable in rat sera for 24 hours following partial hepatectomy, then increased 1.5-fold at 48 hours prior to returning to baseline at 96 hours after partial hepatectomy. However, it was not detected in the sera of patients with or without liver disease. In the 19F-4 monoclonal antibody, a protein with a molecular mass of approximately 46 KD was found. which was present in rat sera prior to partial hepatectomy and for 12 hours after surgery. Thereafter, levels fell by approximately 50% at 24 hours, 65% at 36 hours and 75% at 48 hours where they remained until 96 hours after partial hepatectomy. The decrease in levels correlated with the extent of partial hepatectomy. In human sera, the appearance of this inhibitory cell nuclear antigen (ICNA) was higher in the sera of patients with cirrhosis than in healthy controls.CONCLUSION The PC-10 monoclonal antibody can detect a protein in the circulation when active hepatic regenerative activity is taking place. The 19F-4 monoclonal antibody, however, identifies a protein in both rat and human sera that inversely correlates with hepatic regenerative activity. This protein which is tentatively referred to as inhibitory cell nuclear antigen (ICNA) may be used in documenting the extent of suppression of hepatic regeneration.

  3. Regenerative Zahnmedizin

    Steffen, R.; C. Moret; van Waes, H

    2011-01-01

    Bei der Behandlung von unreifen, nekrotischen Zähnen ist es zu einem Paradigmawechsel gekommen. Die regenerative, endodontische Behandlung solcher Zähne stützt sich auf die Erkenntnisse aus der biobasierten, regenerativen Forschung, um solche Zähne weiter reifen lassen zu können. Ergebnisse der Grundlagenforschung lassen vermuten, dass Stamm- und Vorläuferzellen aus Pulparesten, dem Periodont und der apikalen Papille zur Wiederbesiedlung von sterilisierten Pulpahöhlen beitragen können....

  4. Bioprinting in Regenerative Medicine.

    Monti, Manuela

    2016-01-01

    Prof. Turksen is a very well known scientist in the stem cell biology field and he is also internationally known for his fundamental studies on claudin-6. In addition to his research activity he is editor for the Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine series (Humana Press) and editor-in-chief of Stem Cell Reviews and Reports..... PMID:26972720

  5. Bioprinting in Regenerative Medicine

    Manuela Monti

    2016-01-01

    Prof. Turksen is a very well known scientist in the stem cell biology field and he is also internationally known for his fundamental studies on claudin-6. In addition to his research activity he is editor for the Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine series (Humana Press) and editor-in-chief of Stem Cell Reviews and Reports.....

  6. Bioprinting in Regenerative Medicine

    Manuela Monti

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Prof. Turksen is a very well known scientist in the stem cell biology field and he is also internationally known for his fundamental studies on claudin-6. In addition to his research activity he is editor for the Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine series (Humana Press and editor-in-chief of Stem Cell Reviews and Reports.....

  7. Buck-boost converter for simultaneous semi-active vibration control and energy harvesting for electromagnetic regenerative shock absorber

    Li, Peng; Zhang, Chongxiao; Kim, Junyoung; Yu, Liangyao; Zuo, Lei

    2014-04-01

    Regenerative semi-active suspensions can capture the previously dissipated vibration energy and convert it to usable electrical energy for powering on-board electronic devices, while achieve both the better ride comfort and improved road handling performance at the same time when certain control is applied. To achieve this objective, the power electronics interface circuit connecting the energy harvester and the electrical loads, which can perform simultaneous vibration control and energy harvesting function is in need. This paper utilized a buck-boost converter for simultaneous semi-active vibration control and energy harvesting with electromagnetic regenerative shock absorber, which utilizes a rotational generator to converter the vibration energy to electricity. It has been found that when the circuit works in discontinuous current mode (DCM), the ratio between the input voltage and current is only related to the duty cycle of the switch pulse width modulation signal. Using this property, the buck-boost converter can be used to perform semi-active vibration control by controlling the load connected between the terminals of the generator in the electromagnetic shock absorber. While performing the vibration control, the circuit always draw current from the shock absorber and the suspension remain dissipative, and the shock absorber takes no additional energy to perform the vibration control. The working principle and dynamics of the circuit has been analyzed and simulations were performed to validate the concept.

  8. Development of an active magnetic regenerator for space applications

    Chen, Weibo

    2014-07-01

    This paper discusses the design of a micromachined regenerator in an Active Magnetic Regenerative Refrigeration (AMRR) system for space applications. The AMRR system is designed to provide continuous remote/distributed cooling at about 2 K and reject heat at temperatures of about 15 K. This paper first discusses the general thermal and fluid performance requirements for an AMRR regenerator, a unique structured bed configuration that enables the regenerator to meet these requirements, and its thermal and fluid performance based on numerical analyses. The paper then discusses the general design consideration for the magnetic field driving the regenerator for optimal thermal performance, and the analysis processes to optimize the variation rate of the magnetic field in an actual superconducting magnet during the isothermal processes of the AMRR cycle to enhance the performance of an actual regenerator. The paper finally presents the thermal performance of the regenerator from such iterative design optimization processes.

  9. Active Magnetic Bearings – Magnetic Forces

    Kjølhede, Klaus

    2006-01-01

    Parameter identification procedures and model validation are major steps towards intelligent machines supported by active magnetic bearings (AMB). The ability of measuring the electromagnetic bearing forces, or deriving them from measuring the magnetic flux, strongly contributes to the model...... the work is the characterization of magnetic forces by using two experimental different experimental approaches. Such approaches are investigated and described in details. A special test rig is designed where the 4 poles - AMB is able to generate forces up to 1900 N. The high precision...... characterization of the magnetic forces are led by using different experimental tests: (I) by using hall sensors mounted directly on the poles (precise measurements of the magnetic flux) and by an auxiliary system, composed of strain gages and flexible beams attached to the rotor; (II) by measuring the input...

  10. Active Magnetic Bearings – Magnetic Forces

    Kjølhede, Klaus

    2006-01-01

    the work is the characterization of magnetic forces by using two experimental different experimental approaches. Such approaches are investigated and described in details. A special test rig is designed where the 4 poles - AMB is able to generate forces up to 1900 N. The high precision......Parameter identification procedures and model validation are major steps towards intelligent machines supported by active magnetic bearings (AMB). The ability of measuring the electromagnetic bearing forces, or deriving them from measuring the magnetic flux, strongly contributes to the model...... characterization of the magnetic forces are led by using different experimental tests: (I) by using hall sensors mounted directly on the poles (precise measurements of the magnetic flux) and by an auxiliary system, composed of strain gages and flexible beams attached to the rotor; (II) by measuring the input...

  11. Stellar magnetic activity

    The stellar emission in the chromospheric Ca II H+K lines is compared with the coronal soft X-ray emission, measuring the effects of non-radiative heating in the outer atmosphere at temperatures differing two orders of magnitude. The comparison of stellar flux densities in Ca II H+K and X-rays is extended to fluxes from the transition-region and the high-temperature chromosphere. The stellar magnetic field is probably generated in the differentially rotating convective envelope. The relation between rotation rate and the stellar level of activity measured in chromospheric, transition-region, and coronal radiative diagnostics is discovered. X-ray observations of the binary λ Andromedae are discussed. The departure of M-type dwarfs from the main relations, and the implications for the structure of the chromospheres of these stars are discussed. Variations of the average surface flux densities of the Sun during the 11-year activity cycle agree with flux-flux relations derived for other cool stars, suggesting that the interpretation of the stellar relations may be furthered by studying the solar analogue in more detail. (Auth.)

  12. Regenerative burner

    Gitman, G.M.

    1990-05-08

    This patent describes a method of combusting fuel in a furnace having a pair of regenerative burners, each burner having a combustion chamber. It comprises: supplying fuel and oxygen alternatively to each burner to create alternating firing burners wherein the oxygen is supplied from two sources providing first and second oxidizing gases having different oxygen concentrations and simultaneously alternating the application of negative pressure to the remaining non-firing burner to recover heat from flue gases exhausted by the regenerative bed of the non-firing burner to be used further to preheat at least part of the oxygen being supplied to the firing burner; mixing the fuel with a fraction of the oxygen under substoichiometric combustion condition to create products of incomplete combustion to form a hot, luminous flame core containing partially pyrolized fuel; and mixing the partially pyrolyzed fuel with a remaining fraction of the oxygen to complete combustion of the pyrolized fuel; and controlling the total flow of fuel and oxygen supplied to each burner to provide each burner with a desired flame stoichiometry.

  13. Numerical Modeling of Multi-Material Active Magnetic Regeneration

    Nielsen, Kaspar Kirstein; Engelbrecht, Kurt; Bahl, Christian Robert Haffenden;

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic refrigeration is a potentially environmentally-friendly alternative to vapour compression technology that is presented in this paper. The magnetocaloric effect in two magnetocaloric compounds in the La(Fe,Co,Si)13 series is presented in terms of their adiabatic temperature change and the...... specific heat as a function of temperature at constant magnetic field. A 2.5-dimensional numerical model of an active magnetic regenerative (AMR) refrigerator device is presented. The experimental AMR located at Risø DTU has been equipped with a parallel-plate based regenerator made of the two materials....... Experimental zero heat-load temperature spans are presented for different operating conditions and the results are compared to predictions of the numerical model. It is concluded that the model reproduces the experimental tendencies and when including thermal parasitic losses to ambient and the predictions...

  14. Regenerative engineering

    Laurencin, Cato T

    2013-01-01

    Regenerative Engineering: The Future of Medicine Saadiq F. El-Amin III , MD , PhD; Joylene W.L. Thomas, MD ; Ugonna N. Ihekweazu, MD ; Mia D. Woods, MS; and Ashim Gupta, MSCell Biology Gloria Gronowicz, PhD and Karen Sagomonyants, DMDStem Cells and Tissue Regeneration Kristen Martins-Taylor, PhD; Xiaofang Wang, MD , PhD; Xue-Jun Li, PhD; and Ren-He Xu, MD , PhDIntroduction to Materials Science Sangamesh G. Kumbar, PhD and Cato T. Laurencin, MD , PhDBiomaterials A. Jon Goldberg, PhD and Liisa T. Kuhn, PhDIn Vitro Assessment of Cell-Biomaterial Interactions Yong Wang, PhDHost Response to Biomate

  15. An active magnetic regenerator device

    2015-01-01

    A rotating active magnetic regenerator (AMR) device comprising two or more regenerator beds, a magnet arrangement and a valve arrangement. The valve arrangement comprises a plurality of valve elements arranged substantially immovably with respect to the regenerator beds along a rotational direction...

  16. A flexible numerical model to study an active magnetic refrigerator for near room temperature applications

    Aprea, Ciro; Maiorino, Angelo [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Salerno, Via Ponte Don Melillo 1, 84084 Fisciano (Salerno) (Italy)

    2010-08-15

    Magnetic refrigeration is an emerging technology based on the magnetocaloric effect in solid-state refrigerants. This technology offers a smaller global environmental impact than the refrigeration obtained by means of the classical vapor compression machines operating with fluids such as HFCs. The Active Magnetic Regenerative Refrigeration (AMRR) is currently the most studied ant tested magnetic cycle. It combines the regenerative properties of a high specific heat solid porous matrix with the ability of performing thermo-magnetic cycles thanks to the magnetocaloric property of the refrigerant; while a fluid pulsing through the regenerator works as a heat transfer medium. An active magnetic regenerator can provide larger temperature spans making up for the local small temperature variation of the refrigerant. In the present paper, a practical model for predicting the performance and efficiency of an AMRR cycle has been developed. The model evaluates both the refrigerant properties and the entire cycle of an AMR operating in conformity with a Brayton regenerative cycle. The magnetocaloric material of choice is gadolinium, while the heat transfer medium is liquid water. With this model can be predicted the refrigeration capacity, the power consumption and consequently the Coefficient of Performance. The results show a greater COP when compared to a classical vapor compression plant working between the same temperature levels. (author)

  17. A flexible numerical model to study an active magnetic refrigerator for near room temperature applications

    Magnetic refrigeration is an emerging technology based on the magnetocaloric effect in solid-state refrigerants. This technology offers a smaller global environmental impact than the refrigeration obtained by means of the classical vapor compression machines operating with fluids such as HFCs. The Active Magnetic Regenerative Refrigeration (AMRR) is currently the most studied ant tested magnetic cycle. It combines the regenerative properties of a high specific heat solid porous matrix with the ability of performing thermo-magnetic cycles thanks to the magnetocaloric property of the refrigerant; while a fluid pulsing through the regenerator works as a heat transfer medium. An active magnetic regenerator can provide larger temperature spans making up for the local small temperature variation of the refrigerant. In the present paper, a practical model for predicting the performance and efficiency of an AMRR cycle has been developed. The model evaluates both the refrigerant properties and the entire cycle of an AMR operating in conformity with a Brayton regenerative cycle. The magnetocaloric material of choice is gadolinium, while the heat transfer medium is liquid water. With this model can be predicted the refrigeration capacity, the power consumption and consequently the Coefficient of Performance. The results show a greater COP when compared to a classical vapor compression plant working between the same temperature levels.

  18. 耦合高压斯特林制冷效应的复合磁制冷循环的数值模拟∗%Numerical simulation of a hybrid magnetic refrigeration combined with high pressure Stirling regenerative refrigeration effect

    高新强; 沈俊; 和晓楠; 唐成春; 戴巍; 李珂; 公茂琼; 吴剑峰

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic refrigeration is a cooling method based on the magnetocaloric effect, which uses solid magnetocaloric materials as refrigerant, and helium, water or other fluid as heat transfer fluids. Stirling refrigeration is a kind of mature gas regenerative cooling method, using helium gas as the refrigerant. These refrigerations have similar cycling charac-teristics, and are both safe, environmantal-friendly and high efficient cooling methods. Therefore, a hybrid magnetic refrigerator combined with Stirling gas refrigeration effect is proposed and designed. In our previous works for hybrid magnetic refrigeration, numerical simulation and experimental performance of the low-pressure hybrid magnetic refrig-erator was carried out, and the cycling mechanism of hybrid magnetic refrigeration was also figured out. In this study, a numerical model for the high-pressure hybrid magnetic refrigeration cycle is established. The magnetic refrigeration materials are utilized as the regenerator matrix for both gas Stirling and active magnetic regenerative refrigeration in this model. Effects of gas Stirling and active magnetic regenerative refrigeration are combined to build a kind of high efficient refrigeration cycle. Ansys Fluent software is applied in this paper. Based on the physical model of hybrid refrig-erator and the theories of magnetocaloric effect and numerical calculation of regenerator, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of high-pressure hybrid magnetic refrigerator is established. This paper describes the internal heat transfer mechanism of Stirling and magnetic refrigeration effect in an active regenerator. Some parameters of the model such as working frequency and utilization are analyzed and the best phase angle is figured out in order to couple these two cooling effects positively. Simulation results show that Stirling and magnetic cooling effects can be coupled positively at phase angle of 60◦. Results also show that with increasing system pressure

  19. 78 FR 43889 - Synergizing Efforts in Standards Development for Cellular Therapies and Regenerative Medicine...

    2013-07-22

    ... Therapies and Regenerative Medicine Products; Public Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS... Development for Cellular Therapies and Regenerative Medicine Products.'' The purpose of the public workshop is... activities involving cellular therapies and regenerative medicine products. Date and Time: The...

  20. Regenerative potential and anti-bacterial activity of tetracycline loaded apatitic nanocarriers for the treatment of periodontitis

    Current treatment of periodontal infections includes mechanical debridement, administration of antibiotics and bone grafting. Oral administration of antibiotics results in undesirable side effects, while current modes of local administration are affected by problems concerning allergic response to the polymeric carrier agents. We have developed an osteoconductive drug delivery system composed of apatitic nanocarriers capable of providing sustained delivery of drugs in the periodontium. Calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA) nanocarriers of different Ca/P ratios were synthesized and characterized using the x-ray diffraction method, transmission electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and the BET gas isotherm method. Loading and release studies performed with tetracycline showed a sustained release of up to 88% in phosphate buffered saline over a period of five days. Antibacterial activity studies showed that the tetracycline loaded CDHA (TC-CDHA) nanocarriers were effective against S. aureus and E. coli bacteria. The biocompatibility of the TC-CDHA nanocarriers was demonstrated using an alamar blue assay and further characterized by cell uptake studies. Interestingly, cell uptake of drug loaded CDHA also increased the cellular proliferation of human periodontal ligament fibroblast cells. Hence, it can be concluded that the CDHA nanocarriers are ideal drug delivery agents and have bone regenerative potential for local periodontal applications. (paper)

  1. Regenerative partition structures

    Gnedin, Alexander; Pitman, Jim

    2004-01-01

    We consider Kingman's partition structures which are regenerative with respect to a general operation of random deletion of some part. Prototypes of this class are the Ewens partition structures which Kingman characterised by regeneration after deletion of a part chosen by size-biased sampling. We associate each regenerative partition structure with a corresponding regenerative composition structure, which (as we showed in a previous paper) can be associated in turn with a regenerative random...

  2. Globular adiponectin activates motility and regenerative traits of muscle satellite cells.

    Tania Fiaschi

    Full Text Available Regeneration of adult injured skeletal muscle is due to activation of satellite cells, a population of stem cells resident beneath the basal lamina. Thus, information on soluble factors affecting satellite cell activation, as well as migration towards injury and fusion into new myofibers are essential. Here, we show that globular adiponectin (gAd, positively affects several features of muscle satellite cells. gAd activates satellite cells to exit quiescence and increases their recruitment towards myotubes. gAd elicits in satellite cells a specific motility program, involving activation of the small GTPase Rac1, as well as expression of Snail and Twist transcription factors driving a proteolytic motility, useful to reach the site of injury. We show that satellite cells produce autocrine full length adiponectin (fAd, which is converted to gAd by activated macrophages. In turns, gAd concurs to attract to the site of injury both satellite cells and macrophages and induces myogenesis in muscle satellite cells. Thus, these findings add a further role for gAd in skeletal muscle, including the hormone among factors participating in muscle regeneration.

  3. Gradient Descent Learning for Utility Current Compensation using Active Regenerative PWM Filter

    R. Balamurugan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Harmonic analysis is a primary matter of power quality assessment. Its main intention is to check the utility whether it is delivering the loads without any deviations in voltages and currents. The problem is due to proliferation of Electronic converters and power electronics which gave birth to numerous new applications, offering unmatched comfort to the customers. Approach: Harmonics should be maintained within the limits said in standards like IEEE 519 and others such as IEEE 1159 for safeguarding the utility. This was provided by many mitigation technologies like passive, shunt and series filtering, active conditioners, but they were lack of some demerits like huge cost, many controllers and circuit components. So for controlling the harmonic loads the converter with four quadrant characteristics was implemented and this converter act as shunt active filter as well as rectifier simultaneously without any additional circuitry. For having better harmonic reduction in addition, many controllers like p-q Theorem based controller, Fuzzy and gradient descent based neural network is also used. Results: The simulation results gives the compared source current wave forms for various controllers with individual harmonic mitigations. Conclusion: The pure utility current is obtained by using this intelligent neural filter without any additional components and without any extra controllers than the conventional methods.

  4. Numerical analysis of a reciprocating active magnetic regenerator

    A time-dependent, two-dimensional mathematical model of a configuration system for magnetic refrigeration has been developed, based on a reciprocating active magnetic regenerator operating at room temperature. The model's geometry is made of parallel plates of magnetocaloric material separated by microchannels. Through the microchannels, the flow of a heat transfer fluid has also been simulated. Water has been used as heat transfer fluid and as magnetocaloric material we have used the benchmark material gadolinium. The heat transfer inside the regenerator and the fluid flow are modelled separately and the magnetocaloric effect is taken into account by the inclusion of a variable source term in the energy equation. The model simulates the steps of the active magnetic regenerative refrigeration cycle and evaluates the performance in terms of cooling load, COP, temperature span and pressure drop for the parallel-plate configuration. The model has been validated by comparing the numerical results with the results obtained from an experimental device made by a partner. This parametric study allows us to identify the most important characteristics that have a significant influence on the thermal behaviour of the active magnetic regenerator. Several simulation results are discussed and some optimal solutions are presented. - Highlights: • We have developed a 2D model of an active magnetic regenerator. • The MCE is included as a source term with data from experimental measurements. • A validation of the model with experimental data is included. • We analysed the temperature span, the cooling power, the COP and the pressure drop of the system

  5. Analyses of regenerative wave patterns in adult hair follicle populations reveal macro-environmental regulation of stem cell activity

    Plikus, Maksim V; Widelitz, Randall B; Maxson, Rob; Chuong, Cheng-ming

    2009-01-01

    The control of hair growth in the adult mammalian coat is a fascinating topic which has just begun to be explored with molecular genetic tools. Complex hair cycle domains and regenerative hair waves are present in normal adult (> 2 month) mice, but more apparent in mutants with cyclic alopecia phenotypes. Each hair cycle domain consists of initiation site(s), a propagating wave and boundaries. By analyzing the dynamics of hair growth, time required for regeneration after plucking, in situ hyb...

  6. Enhanced bifunctional activity of LaNiO3-based gas diffusion electrodes for regenerative fuel cells

    Silva, R A; Soares, C. O.; Carvalho, M. D.; C. M. Rangel; Pereira, M. I. da Silva

    2013-01-01

    Perovskites are of great interest when searching replacements for precious metals as catalyst for bifunctional oxygen electrodes involving the oxygen evolution(OER) and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) as is the case of regenerative fuel cells. In this work a full electrochemical study on the electrochemical properties of gas diffusion electrodes (GDEs) using LaNiO3-based catalysts, conducted in alkaline media, led to a study of cyclability and durability. The incorporation of GDEs in a low po...

  7. Diffusion in active magnetic colloids

    Properties of active colloids of circle swimmers are reviewed. As a particular example of active magnetic colloids the magnetotactic bacteria under the action of a rotating magnetic field is considered. The relation for a diffusion coefficient due to the random switching of the direction of rotation of their rotary motors is derived on the basis of the master equation. The obtained relation is confirmed by the direct numerical simulation of random trajectory of a magnetotactic bacterium under the action of the Poisson type internal noise due to the random switching of rotary motors. The results obtained are in qualitative and quantitative agreement with the available experimental results and allow one to determine the characteristic time between the switching events of a rotary motor of the bacterium. - Highlights: • Magnetotactic bacteria in a rotating field behaves as circle swimmers. • Diffusion coefficient of these swimmers due to the random switching of rotary motors is calculated. • Results are in good qualitative and quantitative agreement with available experimental results

  8. Magnetic Helicity Injection in Solar Active Regions

    Hong-Qi Zhang

    2006-01-01

    We present the evolution of magnetic field and its relationship with magnetic (current) helicity in solar active regions from a series of photospheric vector magnetograms obtained by Huairou Solar Observing Station, longitudinal magnetograms by MDI of SOHO and white light images of TRACE. The photospheric current helicity density is a quantity reflecting the local twisted magnetic field and is related to the remaining magnetic helicity in the photosphere, even if the mean current helicity density brings the general chiral property in a layer of solar active regions. As new magnetic flux emerges in active regions, changes of photospheric current helicity density with the injection of magnetic helicity into the corona from the subatmosphere can be detected, including changes in sign caused by the injection of magnetic helicity of opposite sign. Because the injection rate of magnetic helicity and photospheric current helicity density have different means in the solar atmosphere,the injected magnetic helicity is probably not proportional to the current helicity density remaining in the photosphere. The evidence is that rotation of sunspots does not synchronize exactly with the twist of photospheric transverse magnetic field in some active regions (such as, delta active regions). They represent different aspects of magnetic chirality. A combined analysis of the observational magnetic helicity parameters actually provides a relative complete picture of magnetic helicity and its transfer in the solar atmosphere.

  9. Connection between active longitudes and magnetic helicity

    Brandenburg, A

    2005-01-01

    A two-dimensional mean field dynamo model is solved where magnetic helicity conservation is fully included. The model has a negative radial velocity gradient giving rise to equatorward migration of magnetic activity patterns. In addition the model develops longitudinal variability with activity patches travelling in longitude. These patches may be associated with active longitudes.

  10. Tunable reflector with active magnetic metamaterials.

    Deng, Tianwei; Huang, Ruifeng; Tang, Ming-Chun; Tan, Peng Khiang

    2014-03-24

    We placed active magnetic metamaterials on metallic surface to implement a tunable reflector with excellent agile performance. By incorporating active elements into the unit cells of the magnetic metamaterial, this active magnetic metamaterial can be tuned to switch function of the reflector among a perfect absorber, a perfect reflector and a gain reflector. This brings about DC control lines to electrically tune the active magnetic metamaterial with positive loss, zero loss and even negative loss. The design, analytical and numerical simulation methods, and experimental results of the tunable reflector are presented. PMID:24663977

  11. Demagnetizing fields in active magnetic regenerators

    Nielsen, Kaspar Kirstein; Bahl, Christian R.H.; Smith, Anders

    2014-01-01

    A magnetic material in an externally applied magnetic field will in general experience a spatially varying internal magnetic field due to demagnetizing effects. When the performance of active magnetic regenerators (AMRs) is evaluated using numerical models the internal field is often assumed to be...... is in general both a function of the overall shape of the regenerator and its morphology (packed particles, parallel plates etc.) as well as the magnetization of the material. Due to the pronounced temperature dependence of the magnetization near the Curie temperature, the demagnetization field is...

  12. Superconducting magnet activities at CEN Saclay

    The activities in superconducting magnets at DPhPE/Saclay spread over a wide range from DC magnets mainly for particle and nuclear physics and also for other fields of research, pulsed magnets for particle accelerators and for a controlled fusion tokamak machine. The superconducting magnets designed during recent years involve a variety of conductor types, winding schemes, materials and cooling modes, including the use of superfluid helium. (author)

  13. Thermally activated magnetization reversal in magnetic tunnel junctions

    Zhou Guang-Hong; Wang Yin-Gang; Qi Xian-Jin; Li Zi-Quan; Chen Jian-Kang

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, the magnetization reversal of the ferromagnetic layers in the lrMn/CoFe/AlOx/CoFe magnetic tunnel junction has been investigated using bulk magnetometry. The films exhibit very complex magnetization processes and reversal mechanism. Thermal activation phenomena such as the training effect, the asymmetry of reversal, the loop broadening and the decrease of exchange field while holding the film at negative saturation have been observed on the hysteresis loops of the pinned ferromagnetic layer while not on those of the free ferromagnetic layer. The thermal activation phenomena observed can be explained by the model of two energy barrier distributions with different time constants.

  14. The Magnetic Free Energy in Active Regions

    Metcalf, Thomas R.; Mickey, Donald L.; LaBonte, Barry J.

    2001-01-01

    The magnetic field permeating the solar atmosphere governs much of the structure, morphology, brightness, and dynamics observed on the Sun. The magnetic field, especially in active regions, is thought to provide the power for energetic events in the solar corona, such as solar flares and Coronal Mass Ejections (CME) and is believed to energize the hot coronal plasma seen in extreme ultraviolet or X-rays. The question remains what specific aspect of the magnetic flux governs the observed variability. To directly understand the role of the magnetic field in energizing the solar corona, it is necessary to measure the free magnetic energy available in active regions. The grant now expiring has demonstrated a new and valuable technique for observing the magnetic free energy in active regions as a function of time.

  15. Microscale Regenerative Heat Exchanger

    Moran, Matthew E.; Stelter, Stephan; Stelter, Manfred

    2006-01-01

    The device described herein is designed primarily for use as a regenerative heat exchanger in a miniature Stirling engine or Stirling-cycle heat pump. A regenerative heat exchanger (sometimes called, simply, a "regenerator" in the Stirling-engine art) is basically a thermal capacitor: Its role in the Stirling cycle is to alternately accept heat from, then deliver heat to, an oscillating flow of a working fluid between compression and expansion volumes, without introducing an excessive pressure drop. These volumes are at different temperatures, and conduction of heat between these volumes is undesirable because it reduces the energy-conversion efficiency of the Stirling cycle.

  16. Bifurcations and intermittent magnetic activity

    The sequence of equilibria of two-dimensional reduced magnetohydrodynamics has been studied as a function of the tearing mode stability parameter Δ'. After a symmetry-breaking bifurcation occurring at Δ' ∼ 0, which originates a state with a small magnetic island, the system undergoes a second bifurcation, of tangent type, at Δ' ∼ 1. Above this value, no stationary solutions with small islands exist. The system rapidly develops an island of macroscopic size. This general property is proposed as a basic ingredient of the intermittent events observed in magnetically confined plasmas. (author)

  17. Bifurcations and intermittent magnetic activity

    Tebaldi, C.; Ottaviani, M.; Porcelli, F. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking

    1996-04-01

    The sequence of equilibria of two-dimensional reduced magnetohydrodynamics has been studied as a function of the tearing mode stability parameter {Delta}`. After a symmetry-breaking bifurcation occurring at {Delta}` {approx} 0, which originates a state with a small magnetic island, the system undergoes a second bifurcation, of tangent type, at {Delta}` {approx} 1. Above this value, no stationary solutions with small islands exist. The system rapidly develops an island of macroscopic size. This general property is proposed as a basic ingredient of the intermittent events observed in magnetically confined plasmas. (author).

  18. Observational Study of Solar Magnetic Active Phenomena

    Hongqi Zhang

    2006-06-01

    The electric current separated into two parts reflected the quantative properties of heterogeneity and chirality of magnetic field, and defined them as the shear and twist components of current. We analyze the basic configuration and evolution of superactive region NOAA 6580-6619-6659. It is found that the contribution of the twist component of current cannot be reflected in the normal analysis of the magnetic shear and gradient of the active regions. The observational evidence of kink magnetic ropes generated from the subatmosphere cannot be found completely in some super delta active regions.

  19. International program activities in magnetic fusion energy

    The following areas of our international activities in magnetic fusion are briefly described: (1) policy; (2) background; (3) strategy; (4) strategic considerations and concerns; (5) domestic program inplications, and (6) implementation. The current US activities are reviewed. Some of our present program needs are outlined

  20. Doppler-free magnetic optical activity

    Giraud-Cotton, S.; Kaftandjian, V.P.; Talin, B.

    1980-01-01

    The theory of Doppler-free magnetic optical activity associated with a single absorption line is presented. The transmission of tunable laser light, linearly polarized, through a dilute gaseous medium along a steady magnetic field is studied in the presence of a second counterpropagating saturating laser. The third order non linear susceptibility is calculated for a two-level system exhibiting a normal Zeeman effect, with arbitrary J values.

  1. Therapeutic potential of nanoceria in regenerative medicine

    Das, Soumen [Univ. of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States); Chigurupati, Srinivasulu [U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, MD (United States); Dowding, Janet [Univ. of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States); Munusamy, Prabhakaran [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Baer, Donald R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); McGinnis, James F. [Univ. of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Mattson, Mark P. [National Inst. on Aging Intramural Research Program, Bethesda, MD (United States); Self, William [Univ. of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States); Seal, Sudipta [Univ. of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine aim to achieve functional restoration of tissue or cells damaged through disease, aging or trauma. Advancement of tissue engineering requires innovation in the field of 3D scaffolding, and functionalization with bioactive molecules. Nanotechnology offers advanced materials with patterned nano-morphologies for cell growth and different molecular substrates which can support cell survival and functions. Cerium oxide nanoparticles (nanoceria) can control intracellular as well as extracellular reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Recent findings suggest that nanoceria can enhance long-term cell survival, enable cell migration and proliferation, and promote stem cell differentiation. Moreover, the self-regenerative property of nanoceria permits a small dose to remain catalytically active for extended time. This review summarizes the possibilities and applications of nanoceria in the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  2. Improved Regenerative Sorbent-Compressor Refrigerator

    Jones, Jack A.

    1992-01-01

    Conceptual regenerative sorbent-compressor refrigerator attains regeneration efficiency and, therefore, overall power efficiency and performance greater than conventional refrigerators. Includes two fluid loops. In one, CH2FCF3 (R134a) ciculates by physical adsorption and desorption in four activated-charcoal sorption compressors. In other, liquid or gas coolant circulated by pump. Wave of regenerative heating and cooling propagates cyclically like peristatic wave among sorption compressors and associated heat exchangers. Powered by electricity, oil, gas, solar heat, or waste heat. Used as air conditioners, refrigerators, and heat pumps in industrial, home, and automotive applications.

  3. Regenerative photonic therapy: Review

    Salansky, Natasha; Salansky, Norman

    2012-09-01

    After four decades of research of photobiomodulation phenomena in mammals in vitro and in vivo, a solid foundation is created for the use of photobiomodulation in regenerative medicine. Significant accomplishments are achieved in animal models that demonstrate opportunities for photo-regeneration of injured or pathological tissues: skin, muscles and nerves. However, the use of photobiomodulation in clinical studies leads to controversial results while negative or marginal clinical efficacy is reported along with positive findings. A thor ough analysis of requirements to the optical parameters (dosimetry) for high efficacy in photobimodulation led us to the conclusion that there are several misconceptions in the clinical applications of low level laser therapy (LLLT). We present a novel appr oach of regenerative photonic therapy (RPT) for tissue healing and regeneration that overcomes major drawbacks of LLLT. Encouraging clinical results on RPT efficacy are presented. Requirements for RPT approach and vision for its future development for tissue regeneration is discussed.

  4. Cluster magnetic fields from active galactic nuclei

    Sutter, P M; Yang, H -Y

    2009-01-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGN) found at the centers of clusters of galaxies are a possible source for weak cluster-wide magnetic fields. To evaluate this scenario, we present 3D adaptive mesh refinement MHD simulations of a cool-core cluster that include injection of kinetic, thermal, and magnetic energy via an AGN-powered jet. Using the MHD solver in FLASH 2, we compare several sub-resolution approaches that link the estimated accretion rate as measured on the simulation mesh to the accretion rate onto the central black hole and the resulting feedback. We examine the effects of magnetized outflows on the accretion history of the black hole and discuss the ability of these models to magnetize the cluster medium.

  5. Biomass Oxidation: Formyl C-H Bond Activation by the Surface Lattice Oxygen of Regenerative CuO Nanoleaves.

    Amaniampong, Prince N; Trinh, Quang Thang; Wang, Bo; Borgna, Armando; Yang, Yanhui; Mushrif, Samir H

    2015-07-27

    An integrated experimental and computational investigation reveals that surface lattice oxygen of copper oxide (CuO) nanoleaves activates the formyl C-H bond in glucose and incorporates itself into the glucose molecule to oxidize it to gluconic acid. The reduced CuO catalyst regains its structure, morphology, and activity upon reoxidation. The activity of lattice oxygen is shown to be superior to that of the chemisorbed oxygen on the metal surface and the hydrogen abstraction ability of the catalyst is correlated with the adsorption energy. Based on the present investigation, it is suggested that surface lattice oxygen is critical for the oxidation of glucose to gluconic acid, without further breaking down the glucose molecule into smaller fragments, because of C-C cleavage. Using CuO nanoleaves as catalyst, an excellent yield of gluconic acid is also obtained for the direct oxidation of cellobiose and polymeric cellulose, as biomass substrates. PMID:26119659

  6. Center for Neuroscience & Regenerative Medicine

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Center for Neuroscience and Regenerative Medicine (CNRM) was established as a collaborative intramural federal program involving the U.S. Department of Defense...

  7. Regenerative adsorption distillation system

    Ng, Kim Choon

    2013-12-26

    There is provided a regenerative adsorption distillation system comprising a train of distillation effects in fluid communication with each other. The train of distillation effects comprises at least one intermediate effect between the first and last distillation effects of the train, each effect comprising a vessel and a condensing tube for flow of a fluid therein. The system further comprises a pair of adsorption-desorption beds in vapour communication with the last effect and at least one intermediate effect, wherein the beds contain an adsorbent that adsorbs vapour from the last effect and transmits desorbed vapour into at least one of the intermediate effect.

  8. REGENERATIVE TRANSISTOR AMPLIFIER

    Kabell, L.J.

    1958-11-25

    Electrical circults for use in computers and the like are described. particularly a regenerative bistable transistor amplifler which is iurned on by a clock signal when an information signal permits and is turned off by the clock signal. The amplifier porforms the above function with reduced power requirements for the clock signal and circuit operation. The power requirements are reduced in one way by employing transformer coupling which increases the collector circuit efficiency by eliminating the loss of power in the collector load resistor.

  9. Nanotechnologies in regenerative medicine

    Kubinová, Šárka; Syková, Eva

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 19, 3-4 (2010), s. 144-156. ISSN 1364-5706 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA500390902; GA MŠk(CZ) LC554; GA AV ČR KAN201110651 Grant ostatní: GA ČR(CZ) 1M0538; GA ČR(CZ) GA203/09/1242; GA AV ČR(CZ) KAN200520804; EC FP6 project ENIMET(XE) LSHM-CT-2005-019063 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Keywords : Nanotechnology * regenerative medicine * nanofibers Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 1.051, year: 2010

  10. hiPSC-derived iMSCs: NextGen MSCs as an advanced therapeutically active cell resource for regenerative medicine.

    Sabapathy, Vikram; Kumar, Sanjay

    2016-08-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are being assessed for ameliorating the severity of graft-versus-host disease, autoimmune conditions, musculoskeletal injuries and cardiovascular diseases. While most of these clinical therapeutic applications require substantial cell quantities, the number of MSCs that can be obtained initially from a single donor remains limited. The utility of MSCs derived from human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) has been shown in recent pre-clinical studies. Since adult MSCs have limited capability regarding proliferation, the quantum of bioactive factor secretion and immunomodulation ability may be constrained. Hence, the alternate source of MSCs is being considered to replace the commonly used adult tissue-derived MSCs. The MSCs have been obtained from various adult and foetal tissues. The hiPSC-derived MSCs (iMSCs) are transpiring as an attractive source of MSCs because during reprogramming process, cells undergo rejuvination, exhibiting better cellular vitality such as survival, proliferation and differentiations potentials. The autologous iMSCs could be considered as an inexhaustible source of MSCs that could be used to meet the unmet clinical needs. Human-induced PSC-derived MSCs are reported to be superior when compared to the adult MSCs regarding cell proliferation, immunomodulation, cytokines profiles, microenvironment modulating exosomes and bioactive paracrine factors secretion. Strategies such as derivation and propagation of iMSCs in chemically defined culture conditions and use of footprint-free safer reprogramming strategies have contributed towards the development of clinically relevant cell types. In this review, the role of iPSC-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (iMSCs) as an alternate source of therapeutically active MSCs has been described. Additionally, we also describe the role of iMSCs in regenerative medical applications, the necessary strategies, and the regulatory policies that have to be enforced to render i

  11. Regenerative Medicine: Novel Approach in Burn Wound Healing

    Zare

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Context Burn wounds of the skin require a long period to healing, which very often is incomplete, with functional and esthetic consequences for the patients. Stem cells in the traumatized tissue represent the promoters of the healing process and are a primary focus for regenerative medicine, which aims to find and use the triggers for the activation of stem cells of sin tissue. Evidence Acquisition At present, tissue engineering, composite epithelial autografts, multipotent stem cells and combined gene delivery with stem cell therapy are the approaches used in regenerative medicine. Alongside, the development of 3D scaffolds or matrices is a promising adjunct, as studies investigate the multiple uses of these supports for wound repair. Results Application of cells to the burn wound could be performed, either by the bedside, as a non-invasive procedure, or in the operating room, with the use of a matrix, scaffold or dermal substitute. Cell spraying, although under use in clinical setting, is not yet supported by conclusive data. Magnetic resonance imaging, optical imaging and positron emission tomography are currently used to assess the viability and location of stem cells, after transplantation. Conclusions Stem cell therapies in wound care may lessen the morbidities associated with wound healing. An ideal method for the effective administration of stem cells for burn patients has not yet been elucidated. Further comparison of the local and systemic effects in burn patients, associated with each route of stem cell delivery, needs to be performed.

  12. Remote activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signalling pathway using functionalised magnetic particles.

    Michael Rotherham

    Full Text Available Wnt signalling pathways play crucial roles in developmental biology, stem cell fate and tissue patterning and have become an attractive therapeutic target in the fields of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Wnt signalling has also been shown to play a role in human Mesenchymal Stem Cell (hMSC fate, which have shown potential as a cell therapy in bone and cartilage tissue engineering. Previous work has shown that biocompatible magnetic nanoparticles (MNP can be used to stimulate specific mechanosensitive membrane receptors and ion channels in vitro and in vivo. Using this strategy, we determined the effects of mechano-stimulation of the Wnt Frizzled receptor on Wnt pathway activation in hMSC. Frizzled receptors were tagged using anti-Frizzled functionalised MNP (Fz-MNP. A commercially available oscillating magnetic bioreactor (MICA Biosystems was used to mechanically stimulate Frizzled receptors remotely. Our results demonstrate that Fz-MNP can activate Wnt/β-catenin signalling at key checkpoints in the signalling pathway. Immunocytochemistry indicated nuclear localisation of the Wnt intracellular messenger β-catenin after treatment with Fz-MNP. A Wnt signalling TCF/LEF responsive luciferase reporter transfected into hMSC was used to assess terminal signal activation at the nucleus. We observed an increase in reporter activity after treatment with Fz-MNP and this effect was enhanced after mechano-stimulation using the magnetic array. Western blot analysis was used to probe the mechanism of signalling activation and indicated that Fz-MNP signal through an LRP independent mechanism. Finally, the gene expression profiles of stress response genes were found to be similar when cells were treated with recombinant Wnt-3A or Fz-MNP. This study provides proof of principle that Wnt signalling and Frizzled receptors are mechanosensitive and can be remotely activated in vitro. Using magnetic nanoparticle technology it may be possible to modulate

  13. PEM regenerative fuel cells

    Swette, Larry L.; Laconti, Anthony B.; McCatty, Stephen A.

    1993-11-01

    This paper will update the progress in developing electrocatalyst systems and electrode structures primarily for the positive electrode of single-unit solid polymer proton exchange membrane (PEM) regenerative fuel cells. The work was done with DuPont Nafion 117 in complete fuel cells (40 sq cm electrodes). The cells were operated alternately in fuel cell mode and electrolysis mode at 80 C. In fuel cell mode, humidified hydrogen and oxygen were supplied at 207 kPa (30 psi); in electrolysis mode, water was pumped over the positive electrode and the gases were evolved at ambient pressure. Cycling data will be presented for Pt-Ir catalysts and limited bifunctional data will be presented for Pt, Ir, Ru, Rh, and Na(x)Pt3O4 catalysts as well as for electrode structure variations.

  14. Recent Activities in Magnetic Separation in Sweden

    Wang, Yanmin; Forssberg, Eric

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes some industrial applications of magnetic separation in Swedish mineral industry. Recent studies on magnetic treatment of minerals in Sweden are also presented. These studies involve selectivity of wet magnetic separation, wet magnetic recovery of mineral fines and ultrafines, sulphide processing by magnetic means, as well as dry magnetic purification of industrial minerals.

  15. Magnetic activity of planet-hosting stars

    Poppenhaeger, Katja

    2011-05-01

    Magnetic activity in cool stars is a widely observed phenomenon, however it is still far from being understood. How fundamental stellar parameters like mass and rotational period quantitatively cause a stellar magnetic field which manifests itself in features such as spots, flares and high-energy coronal emission is a lively area of research in solar and stellar astrophysics. Especially for planet-hosting stars, stellar activity profiles are very interesting as exoplanets are affected by high-energy radiation, both at the time of planet formation as well as during the further lifetime of a star-planet system. In extreme cases, the atmosphere of a planet very close to its host star can be strongly heated by the stellar X-ray and EUV emission and finally escape the planet's gravitational attraction, so that the atmosphere of the planet evaporates over time. Theoretically, planets can also affect their host star's magnetic activity. In analogy to processes in binary stars which lead to enhanced - both overall and periodically varying - activity levels, also giant planets might influence the stellar activity by tidal or magnetic interaction processes, however on a weaker level than in binaries. Some indications for such interactions exist from chromospheric measurements in stars with Hot Jupiters. In this thesis I investigate the magnetic activity of planet-hosting stars and especially possible effects from star-planet interactions with an emphasis on stellar coronae in X-rays. I tested a complete sample of all known planet-hosting stars within 30 pc distance from the Sun for correlations of stellar X-ray properties with planetary parameters. A significant correlation exists between the stellar X-ray luminosity and the product of planetary mass and inverse semimajor axis. However, this could be traced back to a selection effect introduced by planetary detection methods. For stars in the solar neighborhood, planets are mainly detected by radial velocity shifts in the

  16. Magnetic activity in accretion disc boundary layers

    Armitage, Philip J.

    2002-03-01

    We use three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations to study the structure of the boundary layer between an accretion disc and a non-rotating, unmagnetized star. Under the assumption that cooling is efficient, we obtain a narrow but highly variable transition region in which the radial velocity is only a small fraction of the sound speed. A large fraction of the energy dissipation occurs in high-density gas adjacent to the hydrostatic stellar envelope, and may therefore be reprocessed and largely hidden from view of the observer. As suggested by Pringle, the magnetic field energy in the boundary layer is strongly amplified by shear, and exceeds that in the disc by an order of magnitude. These fields may play a role in generating the magnetic activity, X-ray emission and outflows in disc systems where the accretion rate is high enough to overwhelm the stellar magnetosphere.

  17. New nanostructured biomaterials for regenerative medicine

    A. Sgambato

    2016-01-01

    Innovative approaches in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine based on decellularized extracellular matrix (ECM) scaffolds and tissues are quickly growing. ECM proteins are particularly adequate toward tissue regeneration applications, since they are natural biomaterials that can be bio-activated with signalling molecules able to influence cell fate, driving cell responses and tissue regeneration. Indeed, it is well recognized that cells perceive and respond to their microenvironment;...

  18. Regenerative Therapy for Retinal Disorders

    Narsis Daftarian

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Major advances in various disciplines of basic sciences including embryology, molecular and cell biology, genetics, and nanotechnology, as well as stem cell biology have opened new horizons for regenerative therapy. The unique characteristics of stem cells prompt a sound understanding for their use in modern regenerative therapies. This review article discusses stem cells, developmental stages of the eye field, eye field transcriptional factors, and endogenous and exogenous sources of stem cells. Recent studies and challenges in the application of stem cells for retinal pigment epithelial degeneration models will be summarized followed by obstacles facing regenerative therapy.

  19. Experimental Studies with an Active Magnetic Regenerating Refrigerator

    Eriksen, Dan; Engelbrecht, Kurt; Bahl, Christian;

    2015-01-01

    Experimental results for an active magnetic regenerator (AMR) are presented. The focus is on whether or not it pays off to partly substitute soft magnetic material with non-magnetic insulation in a flux-conducting core in the magnet system. Such a substitution reduces losses due to heat conductio...

  20. Photospheric Magnetic Free Energy Density of Solar Active Regions

    Zhang, Hongqi

    2016-01-01

    We present the photospheric energy density of magnetic fields in two solar active regions inferred from observational vector magnetograms, and compare it with the possible different defined energy parameters of magnetic fields in the photosphere. We analyze the magnetic fields in active region NOAA 6580-6619-6659 and 11158. It is noticed that the quantity 1/4pi Bn.Bp is an important energy parameter that reflects the contribution of magnetic shear on the difference between the potential magnetic field (Bp) and non-potential one (Bn), and also the contribution to the free magnetic energy near the magnetic neutral lines in the active regions. It is found that the photospheric mean magnetic energy density changes obviously before the powerful solar flares in the active region NOAA 11158, it is consistent with the change of magnetic fields in the lower atmosphere with flares.

  1. Regenerative Perspective in Modern Dentistry

    Mihnea Ioan Nicolescu

    2016-01-01

    This review aims to trace the contour lines of regenerative dentistry, to offer an introductory overview on this emerging field to both dental students and practitioners. The crystallized depiction of the concept is a translational approach, connecting dental academics to scientific research and clinical utility. Therefore, this review begins by presenting the general features of regenerative medicine, and then gradually introduces the specific aspects of major dental subdomains, highlighting...

  2. Regenerative cellular therapies for neurologic diseases.

    Levy, Michael; Boulis, Nicholas; Rao, Mahendra; Svendsen, Clive N

    2016-05-01

    The promise of stem cell regeneration has been the hope of many neurologic patients with permanent damage to the central nervous system. There are hundreds of stem cell trials worldwide intending to test the regenerative capacity of stem cells in various neurological conditions from Parkinson׳s disease to multiple sclerosis. Although no stem cell therapy is clinically approved for use in any human disease indication, patients are seeking out trials and asking clinicians for guidance. This review summarizes the current state of regenerative stem cell transplantation divided into seven conditions for which trials are currently active: demyelinating diseases/spinal cord injury, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, stroke, Parkinson׳s disease, Huntington׳s disease, macular degeneration and peripheral nerve diseases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: PSC and the brain. PMID:26239912

  3. Comparison of Analytical and Numerical Performance Predictions for a Regenerative Heat Exchanger in the International Space Station Node 3 Internal Active Thermal Control System

    Wise, Stephen A.; Holt, James M.; Turner, Larry D. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The complexity of International Space Station (ISS) systems modeling often necessitates the concurrence of various dissimilar, parallel analysis techniques to validate modeling. This was the case with a feasibility and performance study of the ISS Node 3 Regenerative Heat Exchanger (RHX). A thermo-hydraulic network model was created and analyzed in SINDA/FLUINT. A less complex, closed form solution of the system dynamics was created using Excel. The purpose of this paper is to provide a brief description of the modeling processes utilized, the results and benefits of each to the ISS Node 3 RHX study.

  4. Comparison of Analytical and Numerical Performance Predictions for an International Space Station Node 3 Internal Active Thermal Control System Regenerative Heat Exchanger

    Wise, Stephen A.; Holt, James M.

    2002-01-01

    The complexity of International Space Station (ISS) systems modeling often necessitates the concurrence of various dissimilar, parallel analysis techniques to validate modeling. This was the case with a feasibility and performance study of the ISS Node 3 Regenerative Heat Exchanger (RHX). A thermo-hydraulic network model was created and analyzed in SINDA/FLUINT. A less complex, closed form solution of the systems dynamics was created using an Excel Spreadsheet. The purpose of this paper is to provide a brief description of the modeling processes utilized, the results and benefits of each to the ISS Node 3 RHX study.

  5. Activity estimation in radioimmunotherapy using magnetic nanoparticles

    Rajabi, Hossein; Johari Daha, Fariba

    2015-01-01

    Objective Estimation of activity accumulated in tumor and organs is very important in predicting the response of radiopharmaceuticals treatment. In this study, we synthesized 177Lutetium (177Lu)-trastuzumab-iron oxide nanoparticles as a double radiopharmaceutical agent for treatment and better estimation of organ activity in a new way by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods 177Lu-trastuzumab-iron oxide nanoparticles were synthesized and all the quality control tests such as labeling yield, nanoparticle size determination, stability in buffer and blood serum up to 4 d, immunoreactivity and biodistribution in normal mice were determined. In mice bearing breast tumor, liver and tumor activities were calculated with three methods: single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), MRI and organ extraction, which were compared with each other. Results The good results of quality control tests (labeling yield: 61%±2%, mean nanoparticle hydrodynamic size: 41±15 nm, stability in buffer: 86%±5%, stability in blood serum: 80%±3%, immunoreactivity: 80%±2%) indicated that 177Lu-trastuzumab-iron oxide nanoparticles could be used as a double radiopharmaceutical agent in mice bearing tumor. Results showed that 177Lu-trastuzumab-iron oxide nanoparticles with MRI had the ability to measure organ activities more accurate than SPECT. Conclusions Co-conjugating radiopharmaceutical to MRI contrast agents such as iron oxide nanoparticles may be a good way for better dosimetry in nuclear medicine treatment. PMID:25937783

  6. Stem cell platforms for regenerative medicine.

    Nelson, Timothy J; Behfar, Atta; Yamada, Satsuki; Martinez-Fernandez, Almudena; Terzic, Andre

    2009-06-01

    The pandemic of chronic degenerative diseases associated with aging demographics mandates development of effective approaches for tissue repair. As diverse stem cells directly contribute to innate healing, the capacity for de novo tissue reconstruction harbors a promising role for regenerative medicine. Indeed, a spectrum of natural stem cell sources ranging from embryonic to adult progenitors has been recently identified with unique characteristics for regeneration. The accessibility and applicability of the regenerative armamentarium has been further expanded with stem cells engineered by nuclear reprogramming. Through strategies of replacement to implant functional tissues, regeneration to transplant progenitor cells or rejuvenation to activate endogenous self-repair mechanisms, the overarching goal of regenerative medicine is to translate stem cell platforms into practice and achieve cures for diseases limited to palliative interventions. Harnessing the full potential of each platform will optimize matching stem cell-based biologics with the disease-specific niche environment of individual patients to maximize the quality of long-term management, while minimizing the needs for adjunctive therapy. Emerging discovery science with feedback from clinical translation is therefore poised to transform medicine offering safe and effective stem cell biotherapeutics to enable personalized solutions for incurable diseases. PMID:19779576

  7. Deciphering Solar Magnetic Activity: On Grand Minima in Solar Activity

    McIntosh, Scott W

    2015-01-01

    The Sun provides the energy necessary to sustain our existence. While the Sun provides for us, it is also capable of taking away. The weather and climatic scales of solar evolution and the Sun-Earth connection are not well understood. There has been tremendous progress in the century since the discovery of solar magnetism - magnetism that ultimately drives the electromagnetic, particulate and eruptive forcing of our planetary system. There is contemporary evidence of a decrease in solar magnetism, perhaps even indicators of a significant downward trend, over recent decades. Are we entering a minimum in solar activity that is deeper and longer than a typical solar minimum, a "grand minimum"? How could we tell if we are? What is a grand minimum and how does the Sun recover? These are very pertinent questions for modern civilization. In this paper we present a hypothetical demonstration of entry and exit from grand minimum conditions based on a recent analysis of solar features over the past 20 years and their p...

  8. Regenerative strategies for craniofacial disorders

    Catharine Bradford Garland

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Craniofacial disorders present markedly complicated problems in reconstruction because of the complex interactions of the multiple, simultaneously affected tissues. Regenerative medicine holds promise for new strategies to improve treatment of these disorders. This review addresses current areas of unmet need in craniofacial reconstruction and emphasizes how craniofacial tissues differ from their analogs elsewhere in the body. We present a problem-based approach to illustrate current treatment strategies for various craniofacial disorders, to highlight areas of need, and to suggest regenerative strategies for craniofacial bone, fat, muscle, nerve, and skin. For some tissues, current approaches offer excellent reconstructive solutions using autologous tissue or prosthetic materials. Thus, new regenerative approaches would need to offer major advantages in order to be adopted. In other tissues, the unmet need is great, and we suggest the greatest regenerative need is for muscle, skin, and nerve. The advent of composite facial tissue transplantation and the development of regenerative medicine are each likely to add important new paradigms to our treatment of craniofacial disorders.

  9. A Model of Mercury's Magnetospheric Magnetic Field with Dependence on Magnetic Activity

    Korth, H.; Tsyganenko, N. A.; Johnson, C. L.; Philpott, L. C.; Anderson, B. J.; Solomon, S. C.; McNutt, R. L., Jr.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate knowledge of Mercury's magnetospheric magnetic field is required to characterize the planet's internal field and the structure of the magnetosphere. We present the first model of Mercury's magnetospheric magnetic field that includes a dependence on magnetic activity. The model consists of individual modules for magnetic fields of internal origin, approximated by a dipole of magnitude 190 nT RM3, where RM is Mercury's radius, offset northward by 479 km along the spin axis, and of external origin resulting from currents flowing on the magnetopause boundary and in the cross-tail current sheet. The magnetic field is confined within a magnetopause shape derived from Magnetometer observations by the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft and dependent on magnetic activity. The cross-tail current is prescribed having a disk shape near the planet and extending into a sheet at larger distances. The magnitude of the tail current, which also depends on magnetic activity, is fit to minimize the root-mean-square residual between the model magnetic field and the field within the magnetosphere observed by MESSENGER. The model was fit separately for magnetic field observations within distinct levels of magnetic activity. Linear fits of model parameters versus magnetic activity allows continuous scaling of the model to magnetic activity. The magnetic field contribution from each module is shielded individually by a scalar potential function, which was fit to minimize the root-mean-square normal magnetic field component at the magnetopause. The resulting model reproduces the dependence of the magnetospheric size and tail current intensity on magnetic activity, and allows more accurate characterization of the internal field.

  10. An active antenna for ELF magnetic fields

    Sutton, John F.; Spaniol, Craig

    1994-01-01

    The work of Nikola Tesla, especially that directed toward world-wide electrical energy distribution via excitation of the earth-ionosphere cavity resonances, has stimulated interest in the study of these resonances. Not only are they important for their potential use in the transmission of intelligence and electrical power, they are important because they are an integral part of our natural environment. This paper describes the design of a sensitive, untuned, low noise active antenna which is uniquely suited to modern earth-ionosphere cavity resonance measurements employing fast-Fourier transform techniques for near-real-time data analysis. It capitalizes on a little known field-antenna interaction mechanism. Recently, the authors made preliminary measurements of the magnetic fields in the earth-ionosphere cavity. During the course of this study, the problem of designing an optimized ELF magnetic field sensor presented itself. The sensor would have to be small, light weight (for portable use), and capable of detecting the 5-50 Hz picoTesla-level signals generated by the natural excitations of the earth-ionosphere cavity resonances. A review of the literature revealed that past researchers had employed very large search coils, both tuned and untuned. Hill and Bostick, for example, used coils of 30,000 turns wound on high permeability cores of 1.83 m length, weighing 40 kg. Tuned coils are unsuitable for modern fast-Fourier transform data analysis techniques which require a broad spectrum input. 'Untuned' coils connected to high input impedance voltage amplifiers exhibit resonant responses at the resonant frequency determined by the coil inductance and the coil distributed winding capacitance. Also, considered as antennas, they have effective areas equal only to their geometrical areas.

  11. Magnetic activity at Mars - Mars Surface Magnetic Observatory

    Vennerstrøm, Susanne; Menvielle, M.; Merayo, José M.G.;

    2012-01-01

    , and use this to provide an estimate of the expected magnetic disturbances at the Martian surface. Far from crustal anomaly regions the expected magnetic disturbances originating from currents associated with the induced magnetosphere are very weak at the day-side, but most likely larger on the night...... around medium intensity radial anomalies in the equatorial region appear to derive from local current loops or vortices around cusp-like radial fields, acting to partly cancel the crustal field. The radial perturbation is further found to depend on upstream solar wind dynamic pressure. We define a...

  12. Optical techniques in regenerative medicine

    Morgan, Stephen P

    2013-01-01

    In regenerative medicine, tissue engineers largely rely on destructive and time-consuming techniques that do not allow in situ and spatial monitoring of tissue growth. Furthermore, once the therapy is implanted in the patient, clinicians are often unable to monitor what is happening in the body. To tackle these barriers, optical techniques have been developed to image and characterize many tissue properties, fabricate tissue engineering scaffolds, and characterize the properties of the scaffolds. Optical Techniques in Regenerative Medicine illustrates how to use optical imaging techniques and

  13. Articular cartilage repair and the evolving role of regenerative medicine

    Pieter K Bos

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Pieter K Bos1, Marloes L van Melle1, Gerjo JVM van Osch1,21Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, the Netherlands; 2Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, the NetherlandsAbstract: Among the growing applications of regenerative medicine, clinical articular cartilage repair has now been used for 2 decades and forms a successful example of translational medicine. Cartilage is characterized by a limited intrinsic repair capacity following injury. Articular cartilage defects cause symptoms, are not spontaneously repaired, and are generally believed to result in early osteoarthritis. Marrow stimulation techniques, osteochondral transplantation, and cell-based therapies, such as autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI and use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, are used for tissue regeneration, symptom relief, and prevention of further joint degeneration. The exact incidence of cartilage defects and the natural outcome of joints with these lesions are unclear. Currently available cartilage repair techniques are designed for defect treatment in otherwise healthy joints and limbs, mostly in young adults. The natural history studies presented in this review estimated that the prevalence of cartilage lesions in this patient group ranges from 5% to 11%. The background and results from currently available randomized clinical trials of the three mostly used cartilage repair techniques are outlined in this review. Osteochondral transplantation, marrow stimulation, and ACI show improvement of symptoms with an advantage for cell-based techniques, but only a suggestion that risk for joint degeneration can be reduced. MSCs, characterized by their good proliferative capacity and the potential to differentiate into different mesenchymal lineages, form an attractive alternative cell source for cartilage regeneration. Moreover, MSCs provide a regenerative microenvironment by the secretion of bioactive factors. This trophic activity

  14. Pulse-driven magnetoimpedance sensor detection of cardiac magnetic activity.

    Shinsuke Nakayama

    Full Text Available This study sought to establish a convenient method for detecting biomagnetic activity in the heart. Electrical activity of the heart simultaneously induces a magnetic field. Detection of this magnetic activity will enable non-contact, noninvasive evaluation to be made. We improved the sensitivity of a pulse-driven magnetoimpedance (PMI sensor, which is used as an electric compass in mobile phones and as a motion sensor of the operation handle in computer games, toward a pico-Tesla (pT level, and measured magnetic fields on the surface of the thoracic wall in humans. The changes in magnetic field detected by this sensor synchronized with the electric activity of the electrocardiogram (ECG. The shape of the magnetic wave was largely altered by shifting the sensor position within 20 mm in parallel and/or perpendicular to the thoracic wall. The magnetic activity was maximal in the 4th intercostals near the center of the sterna. Furthermore, averaging the magnetic activity at 15 mm in the distance between the thoracic wall and the sensor demonstrated magnetic waves mimicking the P wave and QRS complex. The present study shows the application of PMI sensor in detecting cardiac magnetic activity in several healthy subjects, and suggests future applications of this technology in medicine and biology.

  15. Applications of magnetically active fibre reinforced composites

    Etches, Julie; Bond, Ian; Mellor, Philip

    2005-05-01

    As the application of fibre reinforced polymer composites (FRP) becomes more widespread there is a desire to add functionality beyond that of simple mechanical properties in order to facilitate the development of 'smart' materials. For example, the functionality being discussed in this paper is the imparting of significant magnetic properties to a FRP. This can take the form of soft magnetic performance for use in electrical machines or hard magnetic performance for novel forms of sensing or power generation. It has been demonstrated that by using hollow glass fibres as a reinforcement, magnetic material can be introduced into these fibres without significant effects on the structural behaviour of the FRP. The current studies have included the assessment of such a magnetic FRP in a variety of applications. The addition of hard magnetic materials, e.g. magnetite and barium ferrite, has been achieved through the use of nanopowders and the resulting FRP has been assessed for morphing structures applications. The magnitude of magnetic performance that can be currently achieved is controlled by the availability of suitable magnetic materials in fine powder form and the volume of magnetic material which can be incorporated within the fibres.

  16. Magnetic activity of surface plasmon resonance using dielectric magnetic materials fabricated on quartz glass substrate

    Narushima, Kazuki; Ashizawa, Yoshito; Brachwitz, Kerstin; Hochmuth, Holger; Lorenz, Michael; Grundmann, Marius; Nakagawa, Katsuji

    2016-07-01

    The magnetic activity of surface plasmons in Au/MFe2O4 (M = Ni, Co, and Zn) polycrystalline bilayer films fabricated on a quartz glass substrate was studied for future magnetic sensor applications using surface plasmon resonance. The excitation of surface plasmons and their magnetic activity were observed in all investigated Au/MFe2O4 films. The magnetic activity of surface plasmons of the polycrystalline Au/NiFe2O4 film was larger than those of the other polycrystalline Au/MFe2O4 films, the epitaxial NiFe2O4 film, and metallic films. The large magnetic activity of surface plasmons of the polycrystalline film is controlled by manipulating surface plasmon excitation conditions and magnetic properties.

  17. A magnetically active microfluidic device for chemiluminescence bioassays

    Zheng, Yi; Zhao, Shulin; Liu, Yi-Ming

    2011-01-01

    Highly active horseradish peroxidase functionalized magnetic nanoparticles were prepared and packed into a microfluidic channel, producing an in-line bioreactor that enabled a sensitive chemiluminescence assay of H2O2. The proposed magnetically active microfluidic device proved useful for chemiluminescence assays of biomedically interesting compounds.

  18. Active screening of magnetic field near power stations generator buses

    B.I. Kuznetsov

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study technique for a prototyping system of active screening of power-frequency magnetic field distortions near power station generator buses via controllable magnetic field sources is presented. Results of experimental research on a proto-typing active screening system with different control algorithms are given.

  19. Magnetic history of solar active regions

    An attempt was made to use recent magnetic observations to trace the history of a typical solar active region from birth to death. By comparing the short-term motions to the long-term spreading, it is demonstrated that the decay process is dominated, over periods ranging from days to months, by a random walk of field lines, with a diffusion constant of roughly 200 to 400 km2/sec. While the interaction between diffusion and differential rotation dictates the geometric pattern of the decaying region, the actual quantity of surviving flux appears to be less, and its ultimate annihilation more thorough, than would have been expected. This probably indicates a continued subsurface coupling between opposite polarity features. In addition, the long-range agreement between theory and observation is considerably improved by postulating the existence, in the middle latitudes of each hemisphere, of a systematic, poleward-moving meridional flow of about 3 m/sec. The outlook for being able to make continued progress towards the understanding of basic solar phenomena by further efforts in this direction is promising

  20. The Limit of Free Magnetic Energy in Active Regions

    Moore, Ron; Falconer, David; Sterling, Alphonse

    2012-01-01

    By measuring from active-region magnetograms a proxy of the free energy in the active region fs magnetic field, it has been found previously that (1) there is an abrupt upper limit to the free energy the field can hold that increases with the amount of magnetic field in the active region, the active region fs magnetic flux content, and (2) the free energy is usually near its limit when the field explodes in a CME/flare eruption. That is, explosive active regions are concentrated in a main-sequence path bordering the free-energy ]limit line in (flux content, free-energy proxy) phase space. Here, from measurement of Marshall Space Flight Center vector magnetograms, we find the magnetic condition that underlies the free ]energy limit and the accompanying main sequence of explosive active regions. Using a suitable free ]energy proxy measured from vector magnetograms of 44 active regions, we find that (1) in active regions at and near their free ]energy limit, the ratio of magnetic-shear free energy to the non ]free magnetic energy the potential field would have is approximately 1 in the core field, the field rooted along the neutral line, and (2) this ratio is progressively less in active regions progressively farther below their free ]energy limit. This shows that most active regions in which this core-field energy ratio is much less than 1 cannot be triggered to explode; as this ratio approaches 1, most active regions become capable of exploding; and when this ratio is 1 or greater, most active regions are compelled to explode. From these results we surmise the magnetic condition that determines the free ]energy limit is the ratio of the free magnetic energy to the non-free energy the active region fs field would have were it completely relaxed to its potential ]field configuration, and that this ratio is approximately 1 at the free-energy limit and in the main sequence of explosive active regions.

  1. Rethinking Regenerative Medicine: A Macrophage-Centered Approach

    Bryan N Brown

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Regenerative medicine, a multi-disciplinary approach that seeks to restore form and function to damaged or diseased tissues and organs, has evolved significantly during the past decade. By adapting and integrating fundamental knowledge from cell biology, polymer science, and engineering, coupled with an increasing understanding of the mechanisms which underlie the pathogenesis of specific diseases, regenerative medicine has the potential for innovative and transformative therapies for heretofore unmet medical needs. However, the translation of novel technologies from the benchtop to animal models and clinical settings is non-trivial and requires an understanding of the mechanisms by which the host will respond to these novel therapeutic approaches. The role of the innate immune system, especially the role of macrophages, in the host response to regenerative medicine based strategies has recently received considerable attention. Macrophage phenotype and function have been suggested as critical and determinant factors in downstream functional outcomes. The constructive and regulatory, and in fact essential, role of macrophages in positive outcomes represents a significant departure from the classical paradigms of host-biomaterial interactions, which typically consider activation of the host immune system as undesirable. It appears desirable that emerging regenerative medicine approaches should not only accommodate, but promote, the involvement of the immune system to facilitate positive outcomes. Herein, we describe the current understanding of macrophage phenotype as it pertains to regenerative medicine and suggest that improvement of our understanding of context-dependent macrophage polarization will lead to concurrent improvement in outcomes.

  2. Light-Activated Magnetic Compass in Birds

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Greiner, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Migrating birds fly thousand miles without having a map, or a GPS unit. But they may carry their own sensitive navigational tool, which allows them "see" the Earth’s magnetic field. Here we review the important physical and chemical constraints on a possible compass sensor and discuss the suggest......Migrating birds fly thousand miles without having a map, or a GPS unit. But they may carry their own sensitive navigational tool, which allows them "see" the Earth’s magnetic field. Here we review the important physical and chemical constraints on a possible compass sensor and discuss...... the suggestion that radical pairs in a photoreceptor cryptochrome might provide a biological realization for a magnetic compass. Finally, we review the current evidence supporting a role for radical pair reactions in the magnetic compass of birds....

  3. Regenerative Electrode Interfaces for Neural Prostheses.

    Thompson, Cort H; Zoratti, Marissa J; Langhals, Nicholas B; Purcell, Erin K

    2016-04-01

    Neural prostheses are electrode arrays implanted in the nervous system that record or stimulate electrical activity in neurons. Rapid growth in the use of neural prostheses in research and clinical applications has occurred in recent years, but instability and poor patency in the tissue-electrode interface undermines the longevity and performance of these devices. The application of tissue engineering strategies to the device interface is a promising approach to improve connectivity and communication between implanted electrodes and local neurons, and several research groups have developed new and innovative modifications to neural prostheses with the goal of seamless device-tissue integration. These approaches can be broadly categorized based on the strategy used to maintain and regenerate neurons at the device interface: (1) redesign of the prosthesis architecture to include finer-scale geometries and/or provide topographical cues to guide regenerating neural outgrowth, (2) incorporation of material coatings and bioactive molecules on the prosthesis to improve neuronal growth, viability, and adhesion, and (3) inclusion of cellular grafts to replenish the local neuron population or provide a target site for reinnervation (biohybrid devices). In addition to stabilizing the contact between neurons and electrodes, the potential to selectively interface specific subpopulations of neurons with individual electrode sites is a key advantage of regenerative interfaces. In this study, we review the development of regenerative interfaces for applications in both the peripheral and central nervous system. Current and future development of regenerative interfaces has the potential to improve the stability and selectivity of neural prostheses, improving the patency and resolution of information transfer between neurons and implanted electrodes. PMID:26421660

  4. Pulse-Driven Magnetoimpedance Sensor Detection of Cardiac Magnetic Activity

    Nakayama, Shinsuke; Sawamura, Kenta; Mohri, Kaneo; Uchiyama, Tsuyoshi

    2011-01-01

    This study sought to establish a convenient method for detecting biomagnetic activity in the heart. Electrical activity of the heart simultaneously induces a magnetic field. Detection of this magnetic activity will enable non-contact, noninvasive evaluation to be made. We improved the sensitivity of a pulse-driven magnetoimpedance (PMI) sensor, which is used as an electric compass in mobile phones and as a motion sensor of the operation handle in computer games, toward a pico-Tesla (pT) level...

  5. PRMT7 Preserves Satellite Cell Regenerative Capacity

    Roméo Sébastien Blanc

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Regeneration of skeletal muscle requires the continued presence of quiescent muscle stem cells (satellite cells, which become activated in response to injury. Here, we report that whole-body protein arginine methyltransferase PRMT7−/− adult mice and mice conditionally lacking PRMT7 in satellite cells using Pax7-CreERT2 both display a significant reduction in satellite cell function, leading to defects in regenerative capacity upon muscle injury. We show that PRMT7 is preferentially expressed in activated satellite cells and, interestingly, PRMT7-deficient satellite cells undergo cell-cycle arrest and premature cellular senescence. These defects underlie poor satellite cell stem cell capacity to regenerate muscle and self-renew after injury. PRMT7-deficient satellite cells express elevated levels of the CDK inhibitor p21CIP1 and low levels of its repressor, DNMT3b. Restoration of DNMT3b in PRMT7-deficient cells rescues PRMT7-mediated senescence. Our findings define PRMT7 as a regulator of the DNMT3b/p21 axis required to maintain muscle stem cell regenerative capacity.

  6. Regenerative memory in time-delayed neuromorphic photonic resonators

    Romeira, B.; Avó, R.; Figueiredo, José M. L.; Barland, S.; Javaloyes, J.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate a photonic regenerative memory based upon a neuromorphic oscillator with a delayed self-feedback (autaptic) connection. We disclose the existence of a unique temporal response characteristic of localized structures enabling an ideal support for bits in an optical buffer memory for storage and reshaping of data information. We link our experimental implementation, based upon a nanoscale nonlinear resonant tunneling diode driving a laser, to the paradigm of neuronal activity, the FitzHugh-Nagumo model with delayed feedback. This proof-of-concept photonic regenerative memory might constitute a building block for a new class of neuron-inspired photonic memories that can handle high bit-rate optical signals.

  7. Functional imaging for regenerative medicine

    Leahy, Martin; Thompson, Kerry; Zafar, Haroon; Alexandrov, Sergey; Foley, Mark; O’Flatharta, Cathal; Dockery, Peter

    2016-01-01

    In vivo imaging is a platform technology with the power to put function in its natural structural context. With the drive to translate stem cell therapies into pre-clinical and clinical trials, early selection of the right imaging techniques is paramount to success. There are many instances in regenerative medicine where the biological, biochemical, and biomechanical mechanisms behind the proposed function of stem cell therapies can be elucidated by appropriate imaging. Imaging techniques can...

  8. CMD kinetics and regenerative medicine

    Anjamrooz, Seyed Hadi

    2016-01-01

    The author’s theory of the cell memory disc (CMD) offers a radical and holistic picture of the cell from both functional and structural perspectives. Despite all of the attention that has been focused on different regenerative strategies, several serious CMD-based obstacles still remain that make current cell therapies inherently unethical, harmful, and largely ineffective from a clinical viewpoint. Accordingly, unless there is a real breakthrough in finding an alternative or complementary ap...

  9. Mathematical Modeling of Magnetic Regenerator Refrigeration Systems

    Salarvand, Navid

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Active magnetic regenerative refrigeration (AMRR) systems are designed based on magnetocaloric effect of some special solid materials, such as Gadolinium-Silicon-Germanium, Ferrum-Rhodium, etc. During the last three decades, a variety of cooling systems have been proposed using magnetic materials at room temperature. In this thesis, an AMRR system using FeRh as refrigerant is studied. For the simulation, a one-dimensional, time-varying mathematical model is developed. This model co...

  10. Functional imaging for regenerative medicine.

    Leahy, Martin; Thompson, Kerry; Zafar, Haroon; Alexandrov, Sergey; Foley, Mark; O'Flatharta, Cathal; Dockery, Peter

    2016-01-01

    In vivo imaging is a platform technology with the power to put function in its natural structural context. With the drive to translate stem cell therapies into pre-clinical and clinical trials, early selection of the right imaging techniques is paramount to success. There are many instances in regenerative medicine where the biological, biochemical, and biomechanical mechanisms behind the proposed function of stem cell therapies can be elucidated by appropriate imaging. Imaging techniques can be divided according to whether labels are used and as to whether the imaging can be done in vivo. In vivo human imaging places additional restrictions on the imaging tools that can be used. Microscopies and nanoscopies, especially those requiring fluorescent markers, have made an extraordinary impact on discovery at the molecular and cellular level, but due to their very limited ability to focus in the scattering tissues encountered for in vivo applications they are largely confined to superficial imaging applications in research laboratories. Nanoscopy, which has tremendous benefits in resolution, is limited to the near-field (e.g. near-field scanning optical microscope (NSNOM)) or to very high light intensity (e.g. stimulated emission depletion (STED)) or to slow stochastic events (photo-activated localization microscopy (PALM) and stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM)). In all cases, nanoscopy is limited to very superficial applications. Imaging depth may be increased using multiphoton or coherence gating tricks. Scattering dominates the limitation on imaging depth in most tissues and this can be mitigated by the application of optical clearing techniques that can impose mild (e.g. topical application of glycerol) or severe (e.g. CLARITY) changes to the tissue to be imaged. Progression of therapies through to clinical trials requires some thought as to the imaging and sensing modalities that should be used. Smoother progression is facilitated by the use of

  11. Magnetically Responsive Activated Carbons for Bio - and Environmental Applications

    Šafařík, Ivo; Horská, Kateřina; Popisková, K.; Šafaříková, Miroslava

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 3 (2012), s. 346-352. ISSN 2035-1755 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP503/11/2263; GA MŠk LH12190 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : Activated Carbon * Magnetic Modification * Magnetic Separation Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  12. Regenerative memory in time-delayed neuromorphic photonic systems

    Romeira, B; Figueiredo, José M L; Barland, S; Javaloyes, J

    2015-01-01

    We investigate a regenerative memory based upon a time-delayed neuromorphic photonic oscillator and discuss the link with temporal localized structures. Our experimental implementation is based upon a optoelectronic system composed of a nanoscale nonlinear resonant tunneling diode coupled to a laser that we link to the paradigm of neuronal activity, the FitzHugh-Nagumo model with delayed feedback.

  13. Regenerative fuel cell systems R and D

    Mitlitsky, F.; Myers, B.; Weisberg, A.H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., Livermore, CA (United States)

    1998-08-01

    Regenerative fuel cell (RFC) systems produce power and electrolytically regenerate their reactants using stacks of electrochemical cells. Energy storage systems with extremely high specific energy (> 400 Wh/kg) have been designed that use lightweight pressure vessels to contain the gases generated by reversible (unitized) regenerative fuel cells (URFCs). Progress is reported on the development, integration, and operation of rechargeable energy storage systems with such high specific energy. Lightweight pressure vessels that enable high specific energies have been designed with performance factors (burst pressure/internal volume/tank weight) > 50 km (2.0 million inches), and a vessel with performance factor of 40 km (1.6 million inches) was fabricated. New generations of both advanced and industry-supplied hydrogen tankage are under development. A primary fuel cell test rig with a single cell (46 cm{sup 2} active area) has been modified and operated reversibly as a URFC (for up to 2010 cycles on a single cell). This URFC uses bifunctional electrodes (oxidation and reduction electrodes reverse roles when switching from charge to discharge, as with a rechargeable battery) and cathode feed electrolysis (water is fed from the hydrogen side of the cell). Recent modifications also enable anode feed electrolysis (water is fed from the oxygen side of the cell). Hydrogen/halogen URFCs, capable of higher round-trip efficiency than hydrogen/oxygen URFCs, have been considered, and will be significantly heavier. Progress is reported on higher performance hydrogen/oxygen URFC operation with reduced catalyst loading.

  14. Magnetic refrigerator for hydrogen liquefaction

    Magnetic refrigeration which is based on the magnetocaloric effect of solids has the potential to achieve high thermal efficiency for hydrogen liquefaction. We have been developing a magnetic refrigerator for hydrogen liquefaction which cools down hydrogen gas from liquid natural gas temperature and liquefies at 20 K. The magnetic liquefaction system consists of two magnetic refrigerators: Carnot magnetic refrigerator (CMR) and active magnetic regenerator (AMR) device. CMR with Carnot cycle succeeded in liquefying hydrogen at 20K. Above liquefaction temperature, a regenerative refrigeration cycle should be necessary to precool hydrogen gas, because adiabatic temperature change of magnetic material is reduced due to a large lattice specific heat of magnetic materials. We have tested an AMR device as the precooling stage. It was confirmed for the first time that AMR cycle worked around 20 K.

  15. Magnetic refrigerator for hydrogen liquefaction

    Matsumoto, K; Kondo, T [Department of Physics, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan); Yoshioka, S; Kamiya, K; Numazawa, T [Tsukuba Magnet Laboratory, National Institute for Materials Science, 3-13 Sakura, Tsukuba 305-0003 (Japan)], E-mail: kmatsu@kenroku.kanazawa-u.ac.jp

    2009-02-01

    Magnetic refrigeration which is based on the magnetocaloric effect of solids has the potential to achieve high thermal efficiency for hydrogen liquefaction. We have been developing a magnetic refrigerator for hydrogen liquefaction which cools down hydrogen gas from liquid natural gas temperature and liquefies at 20 K. The magnetic liquefaction system consists of two magnetic refrigerators: Carnot magnetic refrigerator (CMR) and active magnetic regenerator (AMR) device. CMR with Carnot cycle succeeded in liquefying hydrogen at 20K. Above liquefaction temperature, a regenerative refrigeration cycle should be necessary to precool hydrogen gas, because adiabatic temperature change of magnetic material is reduced due to a large lattice specific heat of magnetic materials. We have tested an AMR device as the precooling stage. It was confirmed for the first time that AMR cycle worked around 20 K.

  16. Magnetism and Electricity Activity "Attracts" Student Interest

    Roman, Harry T.

    2010-01-01

    Electricity and magnetism are intimately linked, this relationship forming the basis of the modern electric utility system and the generation of bulk electrical energy. There is rich literature from which to teach students the basics, but nothing drives the point home like having them learn from firsthand experience--and that is what this…

  17. Experimental Contribution to High-Precision Characterization of Magnetic Forces in Active Magnetic Bearings

    Kjølhede, Klaus; Santos, Ilmar

    2007-01-01

    Parameter identification procedures and model validation are major steps toward intelligent machines supported by active magnetic bearings (AMB). The ability of measuring the electromagnetic bearing forces, or deriving them from measuring the magnetic flux, strongly contributes to the model valid...... normalized with respect to the instantaneous measured force obtained from the strain gauges signals)....... the magnetic forces is conducted using different experimental tests: (i) by using hall sensors mounted directly on the poles (precise measurements of the magnetic flux) and by an auxiliary system, composed of strain gages and flexible beams attached to the rotor (ii) by measuring the input current and...

  18. Experimental Contribution to High Precision Characterization of Magnetic Forces in Active Magnetic Bearings

    Kjølhede, Klaus; Santos, Ilmar

    2006-01-01

    Parameter identification procedures and model validation are major steps towards intelligent machines supported by active magnetic bearings (AMB). The ability of measuring the electromagnetic bearing forces, or deriving them from measuring the magnetic flux, strongly contributes to the model vali...... with respect to the instantaneous measured force obtained from the strain gauges signals)...... magnetic forces is conducted using different experimental tests: (a) by using hall sensors mounted directly on the poles (precise measurements of the magnetic flux) and by an auxiliary system, composed of strain gages and flexible beams attached to the rotor, (b) by measuring the input current and bearing...

  19. The influence of the magnetic field on the performance of an active magnetic regenerator (AMR)

    Bjørk, Rasmus; Engelbrecht, Kurt

    2011-01-01

    The influence of the time variation of the magnetic field, termed the magnetic field profile, on the performance of a magnetocaloric refrigeration device using the active magnetic regeneration (AMR) cycle is studied for a number of process parameters for both a parallel plate and packed bed...... regenerator using a numerical model. The cooling curve of the AMR is shown to be almost linear far from the Curie temperature of the magnetocaloric material. It is shown that a magnetic field profile that is 10% of the cycle time out of sync with the flow profile leads to a drop in both the maximum...

  20. Experimental Contribution to High Precision Characterization of Magnetic Forces in Active Magnetic Bearings

    Kjølhede, Klaus; Santos, Ilmar

    Parameter identification procedures and model validation are major steps towards intelligent machines supported by active magnetic bearings (AMB). The ability of measuring the electromagnetic bearing forces, or deriving them from measuring the magnetic flux, strongly contributes to the model vali...... with respect to the instantaneous measured force obtained from the strain gauges signals)...... magnetic forces is conducted using different experimental tests: (a) by using hall sensors mounted directly on the poles (precise measurements of the magnetic flux) and by an auxiliary system, composed of strain gages and flexible beams attached to the rotor, (b) by measuring the input current and bearing...

  1. Stellar magnetic activity – Star-Planet Interactions

    Poppenhaeger, K.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Stellar magnetic activity is an important factor in the formation and evolution of exoplanets. Magnetic phenomena like stellar flares, coronal mass ejections, and high-energy emission affect the exoplanetary atmosphere and its mass loss over time. One major question is whether the magnetic evolution of exoplanet host stars is the same as for stars without planets; tidal and magnetic interactions of a star and its close-in planets may play a role in this. Stellar magnetic activity also shapes our ability to detect exoplanets with different methods in the first place, and therefore we need to understand it properly to derive an accurate estimate of the existing exoplanet population. I will review recent theoretical and observational results, as well as outline some avenues for future progress.

  2. Tests of an Induced Activity Monitor in a magnetic environment

    Pangallo, M; Perrot, Anne Laure; Vincke, H; CERN. Geneva. TS Department

    2005-01-01

    The Induced Activity Monitors (IAM) dedicated to measure the gamma ambient dose equivalent rate (due to the photons from the activated materials) will be installed inside the LHC accelerator and in the experimental caverns. Some of these IAM detectors (plastic ionization chambers) will be located in areas were magnetic fields will be present. Therefore the response of such radiation detectors in a magnetic field environment has been experimentally and theoretically studied and the results are reported in this note. The tests were performed at CERN in the CMS H2 experimental area with conventional and superconductor magnets. The response of the IAM was studied for different orientations of its chamber with respect to the magnetic field lines and for different magnetic field intensities up to 3T. Moreover, FLUKA Monte Carlo Simulations were performed to fully understand the physical effects responsible for the various measurement results. The conclusions of this study will permit to choose the proper orientatio...

  3. Ceramic application for regenerative burner system

    Han, D.B.; Park, B.H.; Kim, Y.W.; Bae, W.S. [RIST, Pohang (Korea)

    1999-05-01

    Recently, regenerative burner system was developed and begins to be gradually used for better energy savings. Compared to conventional burner system, the regenerative one has the several merits such as higher fuel efficiency, light weight of apparatus, low harmful toxic gas and homogeneous heating zone, etc. The regenerative material, a very important component of the new regenerative burner system should possess the properties of low specific density, higher surface area and high specific heat capacity. Ceramics is the best regenerative material because of stable mechanical properties even at high temperature and better thermal properties and excellent chemical stability. In this study, alumina ball, alumina tube, 3-D ceramic foam and honeycomb as regenerative materials were tested and evaluated. The computer simulation was conducted and compared to the result of field test. This paper is aimed to introduce a new application of ceramics at high temperature. 7 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Magnetic Levitation Technique for Active Vibration Control

    Hoque, Emdadul; Mizuno, Takeshi

    2010-01-01

    A zero-power controlled magnetic levitation system has been presented in this chapter. The unique characteristic of the zero-power control system is that it can generate negative stiffness with zero control current in the steady-state which is realized in this chapter. The detail characteristics of the levitation system are investigated. Moreover, two major contributions, the stiffness adjustment and nonlinear compensation of the suspension system have been introduced elaborately. Often, ther...

  5. Magnetic structure of an activated filament in a flaring active region

    Sasso, C; Solanki, S K

    2013-01-01

    While the magnetic field in quiescent prominences has been widely investigated, less is known about the field in activated prominences. We introduce observational results on the magnetic field structure of an activated filament in a flaring active region. We study, in particular, its magnetic structure and line-of-sight flows during its early activated phase, shortly before it displays signs of rotation. We invert the Stokes profiles of the chromospheric He I 10830 A triplet and the photospheric Si I 10827 A line observed in this filament by the VTT on Tenerife. Using these inversion results we present and interpret the first maps of velocity and magnetic field obtained in an activated filament, both in the photosphere and the chromosphere. Up to 5 different magnetic components are found in the chromospheric layers of the filament, while outside the filament a single component is sufficient to reproduce the observations. Magnetic components displaying an upflow are preferentially located towards the centre of...

  6. Optimization of active magnetic bearings for automotive flywheel energy storage systems based on soft magnetic materials

    Wegleiter H.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available For active magnetically suspended rotors in mobile flywheel energy storage systems the lowest possible weight, smallest size and a low price is required. Since the flywheel is operated in vacuum and very little heat can be dissipated from the rotor, the bearing’s magnetic losses have to be as minimal as well. This paper compares the design and optimization of homopolar radial active magnetic bearings with 3 different types of laminated steel. The first type is a standard transformer steel, the second one is high flux cobalt steel and the third one is high flux cobalt steel with high tensile strength.

  7. Deciphering Solar Magnetic Activity: On Grand Minima in Solar Activity

    Scott William Mcintosh; Leamon, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    The Sun provides the energy necessary to sustain our existence. While the Sun provides for us, it is also capable of taking away. The weather and climatic scales of solar evolution and the Sun-Earth connection are not well understood. There has been tremendous progress in the century since the discovery of solar magnetism - magnetism that ultimately drives the electromagnetic, particulate and eruptive forcing of our planetary system. There is contemporary evidence of a decrease in solar magne...

  8. Deciphering solar magnetic activity: on grand minima in solar activity

    Mcintosh, Scott W.; Leamon, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    The Sun provides the energy necessary to sustain our existence. While the Sun provides for us, it is also capable of taking away. The weather and climatic scales of solar evolution and the Sun-Earth connection are not well understood. There has been tremendous progress in the century since the discovery of solar magnetism - magnetism that ultimately drives the electromagnetic, particulate and eruptive forcing of our planetary system. There is contemporary evidence of a decrease in solar magne...

  9. Mesenchymal stem cells in regenerative rehabilitation

    Nurkovic, Jasmin; Dolicanin, Zana; Mustafic, Fahrudin; Mujanovic, Rifat; Memic, Mensur; Grbovic, Vesna; Skevin, Aleksandra Jurisic; Nurkovic, Selmina

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Regenerative medicine and rehabilitation contribute in many ways to a specific plan of care based on a patient’s medical status. The intrinsic self-renewing, multipotent, regenerative, and immunosuppressive properties of mesenchymal stem cells offer great promise in the treatment of numerous autoimmune, degenerative, and graft-versus-host diseases, as well as tissue injuries. As such, mesenchymal stem cells represent a therapeutic fortune in regenerative medicine. The aim of this re...

  10. Stability of Markov regenerative switched linear systems

    Ogura, Masaki; Preciado, Victor M.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we give a necessary and sufficient condition for mean stability of switched linear systems having a Markov regenerative process as its switching signal. This class of switched linear systems, which we call Markov regenerative switched linear systems, contains Markov jump linear systems and semi-Markov jump linear systems as special cases. We show that a Markov regenerative switched linear system is $m$th mean stable if and only if a particular matrix is Schur stable, under the ...

  11. Researches on regenerative medicine-current state

    WANG Zheng-guo; Xiao, Kai

    2012-01-01

    【Abstract】 Since 1980s, the rapid development of tissue engineering and stem cell research has pushed re-generative medicine to a new fastigium, and regenerative medicine has become a noticeable research field in the international biology and medicine. In China, about 100 million patients need repair and regeneration treatment every year, while the number is much larger in the world. Regenerative medicine could provide effective salvation for these patients. Both Chinese ...

  12. Heat regenerative external combustion engine

    Duva, Anthony W.

    1993-10-01

    A heat regenerative external combustion engine is disclosed. The engine includes fuel inlet means which extends along the exhaust passage and/or combustion chamber in order to preheat the fuel, To provide for preheating by gases in both the combustion chamber and the exhaust passage, the combustion chamber is arranged annularly around the drive shaft and between the cylinders. This configuration also is advantageous in that it reduces the noise of combustion. The engine of the invention is particularly well-suited for use in a torpedo.

  13. Regenerative superheated steam turbine cycles

    Fuller, L. C.; Stovall, T. K.

    1980-01-01

    PRESTO computer program was developed to analyze performance of wide range of steam turbine cycles with special attention given to regenerative superheated steam turbine cycles. It can be used to model standard turbine cycles, including such features as process steam extraction, induction and feedwater heating by external sources, peaking, and high back pressure. Expansion line efficiencies, exhaust loss, leakages, mechanical losses, and generator losses are used to calculate cycle heat rate and generator output. Program provides power engineer with flexible aid for design and analysis of steam turbine systems.

  14. The connection between stellar activity cycles and magnetic field topology

    See, V.; Jardine, M.; Vidotto, A. A.; Donati, J.-F.; Boro Saikia, S.; Bouvier, J.; Fares, R.; Folsom, C. P.; Gregory, S. G.; Hussain, G.; Jeffers, S. V.; Marsden, S. C.; Morin, J.; Moutou, C.; do Nascimento, J. D.; Petit, P.; Waite, I. A.

    2016-08-01

    Zeeman Doppler imaging has successfully mapped the large-scale magnetic fields of stars over a large range of spectral types, rotation periods and ages. When observed over multiple epochs, some stars show polarity reversals in their global magnetic fields. On the Sun, polarity reversals are a feature of its activity cycle. In this paper, we examine the magnetic properties of stars with existing chromospherically determined cycle periods. Previous authors have suggested that cycle periods lie on multiple branches, either in the cycle period-Rossby number plane or the cycle period-rotation period plane. We find some evidence that stars along the active branch show significant average toroidal fields that exhibit large temporal variations while stars exclusively on the inactive branch remain dominantly poloidal throughout their entire cycle. This lends credence to the idea that different shear layers are in operation along each branch. There is also evidence that the short magnetic polarity switches observed on some stars are characteristic of the inactive branch while the longer chromospherically determined periods are characteristic of the active branch. This may explain the discrepancy between the magnetic and chromospheric cycle periods found on some stars. These results represent a first attempt at linking global magnetic field properties obtained form ZDI and activity cycles.

  15. Whirling Dervish Dynamos: Magnetic Activity in CV Secondaries

    Saar, Steven

    2003-07-01

    The mass-losing secondary stars of cataclysmic variables {CVs} are the most rapidly rotating cool dwarfs observable. Other rapid rotators show a maximal, "saturated" level of magnetic activity {e.g., X-ray emission}, but there are hints from contact binaries and young clusters that activity may be suppressed at the highest rotation rates. CV secondaries are thus important probes of magnetic dynamos at rotational extremes. Implications for CV evolution {e.g., the ``period gap", accretion variability} may also be profound. Unfortunately, study of CV secondaries is hampered by pesky accretion-related phenomena and reflection effects. As a result, little systematic work has been done. To explore activity in these stars, we therefore propose to study far-UV spectra of AM Her-type systems {which have no accretion disks} in deep photometric minima in which accretion is shut off. Magnetic-related emission from the secondary will be separated {in velocity} from residual accretion emission by observations near quadratures. Lower chromospheric irradiation due to the white dwarf primary will be removed by modeling, yielding the true level of magnetic activity on the secondary. We will compare the results to other dMe stars and draw implications for magnetic dynamos and activity at rotational extremes, and for CV evolution and behavior.

  16. Adsorption of Imidacloprid on Powdered Activated Carbon and Magnetic Activated Carbon

    Zahoor, M.; Mahramanlioglu, M.

    2011-01-01

    The adsorptive characteristics of imidacloprid on magnetic activated carbon (MAC12) in comparison to powdered activated carbon (PAC) were investigated. Adsorption of imidacloprid onto powdered activated carbon and magnetic activated carbon was studied as a function of time, initial imidacloprid concentration, temperature and pH. Pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order and intraparticle diffusion models for both carbons were used to describe the kinetic data. The adsorption equilibrium data we...

  17. Magnetic flare model of quasars and active galactic nuclei

    As a model of quasars and active galactic nuclei, we present the magnetic flare model which clarifies the connection between the primary energy source and the non-thermal phenomena. The behavior of the magnetic field generated in the accretion disk around a massive black hole is investigated in terms of the αω-dynamo and the magnetic buoyancy. The magnetic field is responsible not only for the angular momentum transfer but also for the vertical energy transfer owing to the magnetic buoyancy. Magnetic energy thus transferred should be released in the coronal region above the disk surface through its flare-like reconnection as in the solar flare. We expect that it will produce a variety of non-thermal activities characteristic to quasars and active galactic nuclei. We argue that the following scenario is compatible with various observations: A flare generates the relativistic shock behind which electrons are heated up to the relativistic energy. Subsequently, they produce X and γ rays by the inverse Compton scattering of low energy photons as well as emit from radio up to soft X photons by the synchrotron radiation. (author)

  18. Turning Regenerative Medicine Breakthrough Ideas and Innovations into Commercial Products.

    Bayon, Yves; Vertès, Alain A; Ronfard, Vincent; Culme-Seymour, Emily; Mason, Chris; Stroemer, Paul; Najimi, Mustapha; Sokal, Etienne; Wilson, Clayton; Barone, Joe; Aras, Rahul; Chiesi, Andrea

    2015-12-01

    The TERMIS-Europe (EU) Industry committee intended to address the two main critical issues in the clinical/commercial translation of Advanced Therapeutic Medicine Products (ATMP): (1) entrepreneurial exploitation of breakthrough ideas and innovations, and (2) regulatory market approval. Since January 2012, more than 12,000 publications related to regenerative medicine and tissue engineering have been accepted for publications, reflecting the intense academic research activity in this field. The TERMIS-EU 2014 Industry Symposium provided a reflection on the management of innovation and technological breakthroughs in biotechnology first proposed to contextualize the key development milestones and constraints of allocation of financial resources, in the development life-cycle of radical innovation projects. This was illustrated with the biofuels story, sharing similarities with regenerative medicine. The transition was then ensured by an overview of the key identified challenges facing the commercialization of cell therapy products as ATMP examples. Real cases and testimonies were then provided by a palette of medical technologies and regenerative medicine companies from their commercial development of cell and gene therapy products. Although the commercial development of ATMP is still at the proof-of-concept stage due to technology risks, changing policies, changing markets, and management changes, the sector is highly dynamic with a number of explored therapeutic approaches, developed by using a large diversity of business models, both proposed by the experience, pitfalls, and successes of regenerative medicine pioneers, and adapted to the constraint resource allocation and environment in radical innovation projects. PMID:26179129

  19. Investigation of magnetic active core sizes and hydrodynamic diameters of a magnetically fractionated ferrofluid

    In this work we address the question which relates between the size of the magnetically active core of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and the size of the overall particle in the solution (the so-called hydrodynamic diameter dhyd) exists. For this purpose we use two methods of examination that can deliver conclusions about the properties of MNP which are not accessible with normal microscopy. On the one hand, we use temperature dependent magnetorelaxation (TMRX) method, which enables direct access to the energy barrier distribution and by using additional hysteresis loop measurements can provide details about the size of the magnetically active cores. On the other hand, to determine the size of the overall particle in the solution, we use the magnetooptical relaxation of ferrofluids (MORFF) method, where the stimulation is done magnetically while the reading of the relaxation signal, however, is done optically. As a basis for the examinations in this work we use a ferrofluid that was developed for medicinal purposes and which has been fractioned magnetically to obtain differently sized fractions of MNPs. The two values obtained through these methods for each fraction shows the success in fractioning the original solution. Therefore, one can conclude a direct correlation between the size of the magnetically active core and the size of the complete particle in the solution from the experimental results. To calculate the size of the magnetically active core we found a temperature dependent anisotropy constant which was taken into account for the calculations. Furthermore, we found relaxation signals at 18 K for all fractions in these TMRX measurements, which have their origin in other magnetic effects than the Néel relaxation.

  20. Regenerative Rehabilitation – a New Future?

    Perez-Terzic, Carmen; Childers, Martin K.

    2014-01-01

    Modern rehabilitation medicine is propelled by newfound knowledge aimed at offering solutions for an increasingly aging population afflicted by chronic debilitating conditions. Considered a core component of future healthcare, the roll-out of regenerative medicine underscores a paradigm shift in patient management targeted at restoring physiologic function and restituting normative impact. Nascent regenerative technologies offer unprecedented prospects in achieving repair of degenerated, dise...

  1. Changes in Regenerative Capacity through Lifespan

    Maximina H. Yun

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Most organisms experience changes in regenerative abilities through their lifespan. During aging, numerous tissues exhibit a progressive decline in homeostasis and regeneration that results in tissue degeneration, malfunction and pathology. The mechanisms responsible for this decay are both cell intrinsic, such as cellular senescence, as well as cell-extrinsic, such as changes in the regenerative environment. Understanding how these mechanisms impact on regenerative processes is essential to devise therapeutic approaches to improve tissue regeneration and extend healthspan. This review offers an overview of how regenerative abilities change through lifespan in various organisms, the factors that underlie such changes and the avenues for therapeutic intervention. It focuses on established models of mammalian regeneration as well as on models in which regenerative abilities do not decline with age, as these can deliver valuable insights for our understanding of the interplay between regeneration and aging.

  2. Measurements of flux pumping activation of trapped field magnets

    Weinstein, Roy; Parks, Drew; Sawh, Ravi-Persad [Texas Center for Superconductivity, 202 Houston Science Center, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-5002 (United States); Davey, Kent [Physics Department, 617 Science and Research Building I, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-5005 (United States)

    2010-11-15

    Large grains of high temperature superconducting (HTS) material can be utilized as trapped field magnets (TFMs). Persistent currents are set up in the HTS when it is cooled in a magnetic field, or exposed to a magnetic field after cooling. TFMs have been improved over the past two decades by the efforts of a large number of worldwide research groups. However, applications using TFMs have lagged, in part due to the problem of high fields needed for activation. We describe herein experiments designed to observe the behaviour of TFM activation using repeated applications of low fields (called 'pumping'). Significant partial activation is obtained using a non-uniform pumping field (e.g., a small permanent magnet) which is higher in the centre of the HTS than at the periphery. Cooling in zero field followed by pumping with such a field results in trapping the full applied field, in comparison to half of the applied field being trapped by cooling in zero field followed by application of a uniform field. We find that for partial activation by cooling in a field and subsequent activation by pumping, the resulting fields are additive. We also conclude that for activation by fluxoid pumping, creep assists the process.

  3. Optimal thermoeconomic performance of an irreversible regenerative ferromagnetic Ericsson refrigeration cycle

    Xu, Zhichao; Guo, Juncheng; Lin, Guoxing; Chen, Jincan

    2016-07-01

    On the basis of the Langevin theory of classical statistical mechanics, the magnetization, entropy, and iso-field heat capacity of ferromagnetic materials are analyzed and their mathematical expressions are derived. An irreversible regenerative Ericsson refrigeration cycle by using a ferromagnetic material as the working substance is established, in which finite heat capacity rates of low and high temperature reservoirs, non-perfect regenerative heat of the refrigeration cycle, additional regenerative heat loss, etc. are taken into account. Based on the regenerative refrigeration cycle model, a thermoeconomic function is introduced as one objective function and optimized with respect to the temperatures of the working substance in the two iso-thermal processes. By means of numerical calculation, the effects of the effective factor of the heat exchangers in high/low temperature reservoir sides, efficiency of the regenerator, heat capacity rate of the low temperature reservoir, and applied magnetic field on the optimal thermoeconomic function as well as the corresponding cooling rate and coefficient of performance are revealed. The results obtained in this paper can provide some theoretical guidance for the optimal design of actual regenerative magnetic refrigerator cycle.

  4. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of higher brain activity

    Functional magnetic resonance images (fMRIs) exhibit small differences in the magnetic resonance signal intensity in positions corresponding to focal areas of brain activation. These signal are caused by variation in the oxygenation state of the venous vasculature. Using this non-invasive and dynamic method, it is possible to localize functional brain activation, in vivo, in normal individuals, with an accuracy of millimeters and a temporal resolution of seconds. Though a series of technical difficulties remain, fMRI is increasingly becoming a key method for visualizing the working brain, and uncovering the topographical organization of the human brain, and understanding the relationship between brain and the mind

  5. Simulation of magnetic active polymers for versatile microfluidic devices

    Gusenbauer, Markus; Fischbacher, Johann; Reichel, Franz; Exl, Lukas; Bance, Simon; Kataeva, Nadezhda; Binder, Claudia; Brückl, Hubert; Schrefl, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    We propose to use a compound of magnetic nanoparticles (20-100 nm) embedded in a flexible polymer (Polydimethylsiloxane PDMS) to filter circulating tumor cells (CTCs). The analysis of CTCs is an emerging tool for cancer biology research and clinical cancer management including the detection, diagnosis and monitoring of cancer. The combination of experiments and simulations lead to a versatile microfluidic lab-on-chip device. Simulations are essential to understand the influence of the embedded nanoparticles in the elastic PDMS when applying a magnetic gradient field. It combines finite element calculations of the polymer, magnetic simulations of the embedded nanoparticles and the fluid dynamic calculations of blood plasma and blood cells. With the use of magnetic active polymers a wide range of tunable microfluidic structures can be created. The method can help to increase the yield of needed isolated CTCs.

  6. Towards personalized regenerative cell therapy

    Lin, Lin; Bolund, Lars; Luo, Yonglun

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are adult stem cells with the capacity of self-renewal and multilineage differentiation, and can be isolated from several adult tissues. However, isolating MSCs from adult tissues for cell therapy is hampered by the invasive procedure, the rarity of the cells and their...... attenuated proliferation capacity when cultivated and expanded in vitro. Human MSCs derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC-MSCs) have now evolved as a promising alternative cell source for MSCs and regenerative medicine. Several groups, including ours, have reported successful derivation of...... functional iPSC-MSCs and applied these cells in MSC-based therapeutic testing. Still, the current experience and understanding of iPSC-MSCs with respect to production methods, safety and efficacy are primitive. In this review, we highlight the methodological progress in iPSC-MSC research, describing the...

  7. Regenerative Therapies for Diabetic Microangiopathy

    Roberto Bassi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperglycaemia occurring in diabetes is responsible for accelerated arterial remodeling and atherosclerosis, affecting the macro- and the microcirculatory system. Vessel injury is mainly related to deregulation of glucose homeostasis and insulin/insulin-precursors production, generation of advanced glycation end-products, reduction in nitric oxide synthesis, and oxidative and reductive stress. It occurs both at extracellular level with increased calcium and matrix proteins deposition and at intracellular level, with abnormalities of intracellular pathways and increased cell death. Peripheral arterial disease, coronary heart disease, and ischemic stroke are the main causes of morbidity/mortality in diabetic patients representing a major clinical and economic issue. Pharmacological therapies, administration of growth factors, and stem cellular strategies are the most effective approaches and will be discussed in depth in this comprehensive review covering the regenerative therapies of diabetic microangiopathy.

  8. Unitized regenerative fuel cell system

    Burke, Kenneth A. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A Unitized Regenerative Fuel Cell system uses heat pipes to convey waste heat from the fuel cell stack to the reactant storage tanks. The storage tanks act as heat sinks/sources and as passive radiators of the waste heat from the fuel cell stack. During charge up, i.e., the electrolytic process, gases are conveyed to the reactant storage tanks by way of tubes that include dryers. Reactant gases moving through the dryers give up energy to the cold tanks, causing water vapor in with the gases to condense and freeze on the internal surfaces of the dryer. During operation in its fuel cell mode, the heat pipes convey waste heat from the fuel cell stack to the respective reactant storage tanks, thereby heating them such that the reactant gases, as they pass though the respective dryers on their way to the fuel cell stacks retrieve the water previously removed.

  9. The influence of the magnetic field on the performance of an active magnetic regenerator (AMR)

    Bjørk, R

    2014-01-01

    The influence of the time variation of the magnetic field, termed the magnetic field profile, on the performance of a magnetocaloric refrigeration device using the active magnetic regeneration (AMR) cycle is studied for a number of process parameters for both a parallel plate and packed bed regenerator using a numerical model. The cooling curve of the AMR is shown to be almost linear far from the Curie temperature of the magnetocaloric material. It is shown that a magnetic field profile that is 10% of the cycle time out of sync with the flow profile leads to a drop in both the maximum temperature span and the maximum cooling capacity of 20-40\\% for both parallel plate and packed bed regenerators. The maximum cooling capacity is shown to depend very weakly on the ramp rate of the magnetic field. Reducing the temporal width of the high field portion of the magnetic field profile by 10% leads to a drop in maximum temperature span and maximum cooling capacity of 5-20%. An increase of the magnetic field from 1 T t...

  10. Understanding Mechanobiology: Physical Therapists as a Force in Mechanotherapy and Musculoskeletal Regenerative Rehabilitation.

    Thompson, William R; Scott, Alexander; Loghmani, M Terry; Ward, Samuel R; Warden, Stuart J

    2016-04-01

    Achieving functional restoration of diseased or injured tissues is the ultimate goal of both regenerative medicine approaches and physical therapy interventions. Proper integration and healing of the surrogate cells, tissues, or organs introduced using regenerative medicine techniques are often dependent on the co-introduction of therapeutic physical stimuli. Thus, regenerative rehabilitation represents a collaborative approach whereby rehabilitation specialists, basic scientists, physicians, and surgeons work closely to enhance tissue restoration by creating tailored rehabilitation treatments. One of the primary treatment regimens that physical therapists use to promote tissue healing is the introduction of mechanical forces, or mechanotherapies. These mechanotherapies in regenerative rehabilitation activate specific biological responses in musculoskeletal tissues to enhance the integration, healing, and restorative capacity of implanted cells, tissues, or synthetic scaffolds. To become future leaders in the field of regenerative rehabilitation, physical therapists must understand the principles of mechanobiology and how mechanotherapies augment tissue responses. This perspective article provides an overview of mechanotherapy and discusses how mechanical signals are transmitted at the tissue, cellular, and molecular levels. The synergistic effects of physical interventions and pharmacological agents also are discussed. The goals are to highlight the critical importance of mechanical signals on biological tissue healing and to emphasize the need for collaboration within the field of regenerative rehabilitation. As this field continues to emerge, physical therapists are poised to provide a critical contribution by integrating mechanotherapies with regenerative medicine to restore musculoskeletal function. PMID:26637643

  11. Measuring starspots on magnetically active stars with the VLTI

    Wittkowski, M; Hubrig, S; Posselt, B; Von der Lühe, O

    2002-01-01

    We present feasibility studies to directly image stellar surface features, which are caused by magnetic activity, with the Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI). We concentrate on late type magnetically active stars, for which the distribution of starspots on the surface has been inferred from photometric and spectroscopic imaging analysis. The study of the surface spot evolution during consecutive rotation cycles will allow first direct measurements (apart from the Sun) of differential rotation which is the central ingredient of magnetic dynamo processes. The VLTI will provide baselines of up to 200 m, and two scientific instruments for interferometric studies at near- and mid-infrared wavelengths. Imaging capabilities will be made possible by closure-phase techniques. We conclude that a realistically modeled cool surface spot can be detected on stars with angular diameters exceeding ~2 mas using the VLTI with the first generation instrument AMBER. The spot parameters can then be derived with reasonable...

  12. Stellar Magnetic Dynamos and Activity Cycles

    Wright, Nicholas J

    2013-01-01

    Using a new uniform sample of 824 solar and late-type stars with measured X-ray luminosities and rotation periods we have studied the relationship between rotation and stellar activity that is believed to be a probe of the underlying stellar dynamo. Using an unbiased subset of the sample we calculate the power law slope of the unsaturated regime of the activity -- rotation relationship as $L_X/L_{bol}\\propto Ro^\\beta$, where $\\beta=-2.70\\pm0.13$. This is inconsistent with the canonical $\\beta = -2$ slope to a confidence of 5$\\sigma$ and argues for an interface-type dynamo. We map out three regimes of coronal emission as a function of stellar mass and age, using the empirical saturation threshold and theoretical super-saturation thresholds. We find that the empirical saturation timescale is well correlated with the time at which stars transition from the rapidly rotating convective sequence to the slowly rotating interface sequence in stellar spin-down models. This may be hinting at fundamental changes in the ...

  13. Experimental results for a novel rotary active magnetic regenerator

    Engelbrecht, Kurt; Eriksen, Dan; Bahl, Christian; Bjørk, Rasmus; Geyti, Jørgen; Lozano, Jaime; Nielsen, Kaspar Kirstein; Saxild, Finn B.; Smith, Anders; Pryds, Nini

    2012-01-01

    Active magnetic regenerator (AMR) refrigerators represent an alternative to vapor compression technology and have great potential in realizing cooling devices with high efficiency, which are highly desirable for a broad range of applications. The technology relies on the magnetocaloric effect in a...

  14. Magnetic helicity and energy spectra of a solar active region

    Zhang, Hongqi; Sokoloff, D D

    2013-01-01

    We compute magnetic helicity and energy spectra of the solar active region NOAA 11158 during 11-15 February 2011 at 20 degr southern heliographic latitude using observational photospheric vector magnetograms. We adopt the isotropic representation of the Fourier-transformed two-point correlation tensor of the magnetic field. The sign of magnetic helicity turns out to be predominantly positive at all wavenumbers. This sign is consistent with what is theoretically expected for the southern hemisphere. The relative magnetic helicity is around 8% and strongest at intermediate wavenumbers of k ~ 0.4 Mm^{-1}, corresponding to a scale of 2 pi/k ~ 16 Mm. The same sign and a somewhat smaller value is also found for the relative current helicity evaluated in real space based on the vertical components of magnetic field and current density. The current helicity spectrum is estimated from the magnetic helicity spectrum and its modulus shows a k^{-5/3} spectrum at large wavenumbers. A similar power law is also obtained for...

  15. Dynamics of an active magnetic particle in a rotating magnetic field.

    Cēbers, A; Ozols, M

    2006-02-01

    The motion of an active (self-propelling) particle with a permanent magnetic moment under the action of a rotating magnetic field is considered. We show that below a critical frequency of the external field the trajectory of a particle is a circle. For frequencies slightly above the critical point the particle moves on an approximately circular trajectory and from time to time jumps to another region of space. Symmetry of the particle trajectory depends on the commensurability of the field period and the period of the orientational motion of the particle. We also show how our results can be used to study the properties of naturally occurring active magnetic particles, so-called magnetotactic bacteria. PMID:16605340

  16. Edge Adapted Wavelets, Solar Magnetic Activity, and Climate Change

    Johnson, Robert W

    2009-01-01

    The continuous wavelet transform is adapted to account for signal truncation through renormalization and by modifying the shape of the analyzing window. Comparison is made of the instant and integrated wavelet power with previous algorithms. The edge adapted and renormalized admissible wavelet transforms are used to estimate the level of solar magnetic activity from the sunspot record. The solar activity is compared to Oerlemans' temperature reconstruction and to the Central England Temperatu...

  17. Regenerative metamorphosis in hairs and feathers: follicle as a programmable biological printer

    Oh, Ji Won; Lin, Sung-Jan; Plikus, Maksim V.

    2015-01-01

    Present-day hairs and feathers are marvels of biological engineering perfected over 200 million years of convergent evolution. Prominently, both follicle types coevolved regenerative cycling, wherein active filament making (anagen) is intermitted by a phase of relative quiescence (telogen). Such regenerative cycling enables follicles to “reload” their morphogenetic program and make qualitatively different filaments in the consecutive cycles. Indeed, many species of mammals and birds undergo r...

  18. Dissemination of Regenerative Medicine - A comparison of the regulatory systems between Japan and Korea - (Japanese)

    KURATA Kenji; Choi, Youn-Hee

    2010-01-01

    Although Japan has surpassed Korea in terms of R&D activities in the area of regenerative medicine, Korea has been more successful in its commercialization. As one of the key reasons for this, the 'posture' of the Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency (PMDA) in Japan is often criticized. Rather than dwelling on the abstract, this paper chooses to focus on the set up and operation of actual systems that take into consideration the promotion of regenerative medicine in Japan. Analysis and ...

  19. Structure and Performance Analysis of Regenerative Electromagnetic Shock Absorber

    Longxin Zhen

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzed the structure and principle of a regenerative electromagnetic shock absorber in detail. The innovative shock absorber resembles linear generator in principle and can generate electric power through the relative reciprocating motion between coil assembly and permanent magnet assembly. At the same time, the damping can remove discomfort caused by road roughness. The regenerated electric power can be recovered through battery. Analysis of magnetic flux density of the permanent magnet array of the innovative shock absorber was performed using ANSYS software based on the structure parameters given in the paper,then the performance parameters of the shock absorber was determined . Analysis and calculation results prove the viability of this shock absorber.

  20. Solar Magnetism and the Activity Telescope at HSOS

    Hong-Qi Zhang; Ya-Nan Wang; Qi-Qian Hu; Jun-Sun Xue; Hai-Tian Lu; Hou-Kun Ni; Han-Liang Chen; Xiao-Jun Zhou; Qing-Sheng Zhu; Lü-Jun Yuan; Yong Zhu; Dong-Guang Wang; Yuan-Yong Deng; Ke-Liang Hu; Jiang-Tao Su; Jia-Ben Lin; Gang-Hua Lin; Shi-Mo Yang; Wei-Jun Mao

    2007-01-01

    A new solar telescope system is described, which has been operating at Huairou Solar Observing Station (HSOS), National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), since the end of 2005. This instrument, the Solar Magnetism and Activity Telescope (SMAT), comprises two telescopes which respectively make measurements of full solar disk vector magnetic field and Hα observation. The core of the full solar disk video vector magnetograph is a birefringent filter with 0.1(A) bandpass, installed in the tele-centric optical system of the telescope. We present some preliminary observational results of the full solar disk vector magnetograms and Hα filtergrams obtained with this telescope system.

  1. On a Flywheel-Based Regenerative Braking System for Regenerative Energy Recovery

    Hsu, Tai-Ran

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a unique flywheel-based regenerative energy recovery, storage and release system developed at the author's laboratory. It can recover and store regenerative energy produced by braking a motion generator with intermittent rotary velocity such as the rotor of a wind turbogenerator subject to intermittent intake wind and the axels of electric and hybrid gas-electric vehicles during frequent coasting and braking. Releasing of the stored regenerative energy in the flywheel is c...

  2. Human adipose tissue possesses a unique population of pluripotent stem cells with nontumorigenic and low telomerase activities: potential implications in regenerative medicine.

    Ogura, Fumitaka; Wakao, Shohei; Kuroda, Yasumasa; Tsuchiyama, Kenichiro; Bagheri, Mozhdeh; Heneidi, Saleh; Chazenbalk, Gregorio; Aiba, Setsuya; Dezawa, Mari

    2014-04-01

    In this study, we demonstrate that a small population of pluripotent stem cells, termed adipose multilineage-differentiating stress-enduring (adipose-Muse) cells, exist in adult human adipose tissue and adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (adipose-MSCs). They can be identified as cells positive for both MSC markers (CD105 and CD90) and human pluripotent stem cell marker SSEA-3. They intrinsically retain lineage plasticity and the ability to self-renew. They spontaneously generate cells representative of all three germ layers from a single cell and successfully differentiate into targeted cells by cytokine induction. Cells other than adipose-Muse cells exist in adipose-MSCs, however, do not exhibit these properties and are unable to cross the boundaries from mesodermal to ectodermal or endodermal lineages even under cytokine inductions. Importantly, adipose-Muse cells demonstrate low telomerase activity and transplants do not promote teratogenesis in vivo. When compared with bone marrow (BM)- and dermal-Muse cells, adipose-Muse cells have the tendency to exhibit higher expression in mesodermal lineage markers, while BM- and dermal-Muse cells were generally higher in those of ectodermal and endodermal lineages. Adipose-Muse cells distinguish themselves as both easily obtainable and versatile in their capacity for differentiation, while low telomerase activity and lack of teratoma formation make these cells a practical cell source for potential stem cell therapies. Further, they will promote the effectiveness of currently performed adipose-MSC transplantation, particularly for ectodermal and endodermal tissues where transplanted cells need to differentiate across the lineage from mesodermal to ectodermal or endodermal in order to replenish lost cells for tissue repair. PMID:24256547

  3. Low NO[sub x] regenerative burner

    Anon.

    1992-12-01

    A joint development project between British Gas and Hotwork Development has resulted in maintaining the efficiency of a regenerative burner but without the penalty of the higher NO[sub x] emissions normally associated with combustion air preheat. (author)

  4. 3D Biomaterial Microarrays for Regenerative Medicine

    Gaharwar, Akhilesh K.; Arpanaei, Ayyoob; Andresen, Thomas Lars;

    2015-01-01

    Three dimensional (3D) biomaterial microarrays hold enormous promise for regenerative medicine because of their ability to accelerate the design and fabrication of biomimetic materials. Such tissue-like biomaterials can provide an appropriate microenvironment for stimulating and controlling stem...

  5. Lattice Regenerative Cooling Methods (LRCM) Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ORBITEC proposes to develop and demonstrate a novel cooling concept called Lattice Regenerative Cooling Methods (LRCM) for future high thrust in-space propulsion...

  6. Chromospheric magnetic fields of an active region filament

    Xu, Z.; Solanki, S.; Lagg, A.

    2012-06-01

    Vector magnetic fields of an active region filament are co-spatially and co-temporally mapped in photosphere and upper chromosphere, by using spectro-polarimetric observations made by Tenerife Infrared Polarimeter (TIP II) at the German Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT). A Zeeman-based ME inversion is performed on the full Stokes vectors of both the photospheric Si I 1082.7 nm and the chromospheric He I 1083.0 nm lines. We found that the strong magnetic fields, with the field strength of 600 - 800 G in the He I line formation height, are not uncommon among AR filaments. But such strong magnetic field is not always found in AR filaments.

  7. Magnetic field structures in active compact radio sources

    The analysis of simultaneous multifrequency linear polarimetry data between 1.4 GHz and 90 GHz for about 20 active, compact radio sources at six epochs from 1977 December 10 1980 July is presented. In addition, monthly 8 Ghz polarization data on the same sources were examined. The general polarization characteristics of these sources can be well described in terms of magnetic fields which are largely turbulent and slightly anisotropic. The magnetic field symmetry axes are generally aligned with the source structural axes on the milli-arcsecond scale (OJ 287 is a notable exception.) Monte Carlo calculations indicate that observed polarization variations and in particular rotator polarization events can be produced in this model as a consequence of random walks generated through evolution of the turbulent magnetic field. 43 references

  8. Current overview on challenges in regenerative endodontics

    Ramta Bansal; Aditya Jain; Sunandan Mittal

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Regenerative endodontics provides hope of converting the non-vital tooth into vital once again. It focuses on substituting traumatized and pathological pulp with functional pulp tissue. Current regenerative procedures successfully produce root development but still fail to re-establish real pulp tissue and give unpredictable results. There are several drawbacks that need to be addressed to improve the quality and efficiency of the treatment. Aim: The aim of this review artic...

  9. SEE SAW BASED REGENERATIVE POWER SYSTEM

    Tribhuwan Singh; Shahzad Ali

    2016-01-01

    Research related to electrical vehicles is gaining importance due to the energy crisis. Using regenerative braking when braking, improves the efficiency of an electric vehicle as it recovers energy that could go to waste if mechanical brakes were used. A novel regenerative braking system for neighborhood electric vehicles was designed, prototyped and tested. The proposed system utilizes a seesaw system to capture energy whereas the conventional systems regenerate to the batteries. The user ha...

  10. Regenerative Medicine from Protocol to Patient

    Gustav Steinhoff

    2011-01-01

    The essentials of the upcoming and rapidly changing specialty of regenerative medicine, which has kindled high hopes among the clinical and scientific community as well as the society, are presented concisely in this book. Considering the multivariate sub-specialties within regenerative medicine, starting with cell biology and allied basic sciences through translational research to clinical application in various specialties of medicine, enormous efforts are mandatory to bring a comprehensive...

  11. Regenerative burner use on reheat furnaces

    Baggley, G.W. [Bloom Engineering Co. Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1995-06-01

    The environmental advantages of using regenerative burner technology on steel reheat furnaces are explored in this article, in particular improved fuel energy efficiencies and reduced pollution emissions, of nitrogen oxides and carbon monoxide. Experience of the use of regenerative burners in the United States and Japan, where they have achieved significant market penetration is also described, including a case history of a top-fired billet reheat furnace installed in the United States. (UK)

  12. Low NO sub x regenerative burner

    Hovis, J.E.; Finke, H.P.

    1991-01-08

    This patent describes improvements in a regenerative burner having a regenerative bed, a burner port and a fuel nozzle. The improvement comprises: a burner baffle having apertures therein for selectively directing combustion air and inducing combustion gas recirculation into a primary combustion zone for suppressing NO{sub x} emissions, the baffle and the fuel nozzle being positioned substantially adjacent the burner port and being substantially coplanar in a plane perpendicular to a burner axis.

  13. Regenerative nanomedicine: current perspectives and future directions

    Chaudhury K; Kumar V; Kandasamy J; RoyChoudhury S

    2014-01-01

    Koel Chaudhury, Vishu Kumar, Jayaprakash Kandasamy, Sourav RoyChoudhurySchool of Medical Science and Technology, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, West Bengal, IndiaAbstract: Nanotechnology has considerably accelerated the growth of regenerative medicine in recent years. Application of nanotechnology in regenerative medicine has revolutionized the designing of grafts and scaffolds which has resulted in new grafts/scaffold systems having significantly enhanced cellular and t...

  14. Double regenerative amplification of picosecond pulses

    Bai, Zhen-ao; Chen, Li-yuan; Bai, Zhen-xu; Chen, Meng; Li, Gang

    2012-04-01

    An double Nd:YAG regenerative amplification picosecond pulse laser is demonstrated under the semiconductor saturable absorption mirror(SESAM) mode-locking technology and regenerative amplification technology, using BBO crystal as PC electro-optic crystal. The laser obtained is 20.71ps pulse width at 10 KHz repetition rate, and the energy power is up to 4W which is much larger than the system without pre-amplification. This result will lay a foundation for the following amplification.

  15. Spacecraft Radiator Freeze Protection Using a Regenerative Heat Exchanger

    Ungar, Eugene K.; Schunk, Richard G.

    2011-01-01

    An active thermal control system architecture has been modified to include a regenerative heat exchanger (regenerator) inboard of the radiator. Rather than using a radiator bypass valve a regenerative heat exchanger is placed inboard of the radiators. A regenerator cold side bypass valve is used to set the return temperature. During operation, the regenerator bypass flow is varied, mixing cold radiator return fluid and warm regenerator outlet fluid to maintain the system setpoint. At the lowest heat load for stable operation, the bypass flow is closed off, sending all of the flow through the regenerator. This lowers the radiator inlet temperature well below the system set-point while maintaining full flow through the radiators. By using a regenerator bypass flow control to maintain system setpoint, the required minimum heat load to avoid radiator freezing can be reduced by more than half compared to a radiator bypass system.

  16. Regenerative Medicine for Neurological Disorders

    Dong-Hyuk Park

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The annual meeting of the American Society for Neural Therapy and Repair (ASNTR has always introduced us to top-notch and up-to-date approaches for regenerative medicine related to neuroscience, ranging from stem cell–based therapy to novel drugs. The 16th ASNTR meeting focused on a variety of different topics, including the unknown pathogenesis or mechanisms of specific neurodegenerative diseases, stem cell biology, and development of novel alternative medicines or devices. Newly developed stem cells, such as amniotic epithelial stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells, as well as well-known traditional stem cells, such as neural, embryonic, bone marrow mesenchymal, and human umbilical cord blood–derived stem cells, were reported. A number of commercialized stem cells were also covered at this meeting. Fetal neural tissues, such as ventral mesencephalon, striatum, and Schwann cells, were investigated for neurodegenerative diseases or spinal cord injury. A number of studies focused on novel methods for drug monitoring or graft tracking, and combination therapy with stem cells and medicine, such as cytokines or trophic factors. Finally, the National Institutes of Health guidelines for human stem cell research, clinical trials of commercialized stem cells without larger animal testing, and prohibition of medical tourism were big controversial issues that led to heated discussion.

  17. The Magnetic Classification of Solar Active Regions 1992 - 2015

    Jaeggli, Sarah A.; Norton, Aimee A.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this letter is to address a blind-spot in our knowledge of solar active region statistics. To the best of our knowledge there are no published results showing the variation of the Mount Wilson magnetic classifications as a function of solar cycle based on modern observations. We show statistics for all active regions reported in the daily Solar Region Summary from 1992 January 1 to 2015 December 31. We find that the $\\alpha$ and $\\beta$ class active regions (including all sub-g...

  18. FINE MAGNETIC FEATURES AND CHIRALITY IN SOLAR ACTIVE REGION NOAA 10930

    In this paper, we present fine magnetic features near the magnetic inversion line in the solar active region NOAA 10930. The high-resolution vector magnetograms obtained by Hinode allow detailed analyses around magnetic fibrils in the active region. The analyses are based on the fact that the electric current density can be divided into two components: the shear component caused by the magnetic inhomogeneity and the twist component caused by the magnetic field twist. The relationships between magnetic field, electric current density, and its two components are examined. It is found that the individual magnetic fibrils are dominated by the current density component caused by the magnetic inhomogeneity, while the large-scale magnetic region is generally dominated by the electric current component associated with the magnetic twist. The microstructure of the magnetic field in the solar atmosphere is far from the force-free field. The current mainly flows around the magnetic flux fibrils in the active regions.

  19. Towards age/rotation/magnetic activity relation with seismology

    Mathur Savita

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The knowledge of stellar ages directly impacts the characterization of a planetary system as it puts strong constraints on the moment when the system was born. Unfortunately, the determination of precise stellar ages is a very difficult task. Different methods can be used to do so (based on isochrones or chemical element abundances but they usually provide large uncertainties. During its evolution a star goes through processes leading to loss of angular momentum but also changes in its magnetic activity. Building rotation, magnetic, age relations would be an asset to infer stellar ages model independently. Several attempts to build empirical relations between rotation and age (namely gyrochronology were made with a focus on cluster stars where the age determination is easier and for young stars on the main sequence. For field stars, we can now take advantage of high-precision photometric observations where we can perform asteroseismic analyses to improve the accuracy of stellar ages. Furthermore, the variability in the light curves allow us to put strong constraints on the stellar rotation and magnetic activity. By combining these precise measurements, we are on the way of understanding and improving relations between magnetic activity, rotation, and age, in particular at different stages of stellar evolution. I will review the status on gyrochronology relationships based on observations of young cluster stars. Then I will focus on solar-like stars and describe the inferences on stellar ages, rotation, and magnetism that can be provided by high-quality photometric observations such as the ones of the Kepler mission, in particular through asteroseismic analyses.

  20. MAGNETIC FLUX PARADIGM FOR RADIO LOUDNESS OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    We argue that the magnetic flux threading the black hole (BH), rather than BH spin or Eddington ratio, is the dominant factor in launching powerful jets and thus determining the radio loudness of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Most AGNs are radio quiet because the thin accretion disks that feed them are inefficient in depositing magnetic flux close to the BH. Flux accumulation is more likely to occur during a hot accretion (or thick disk) phase, and we argue that radio-loud quasars and strong emission-line radio galaxies occur only when a massive, cold accretion event follows an episode of hot accretion. Such an event might be triggered by the merger of a giant elliptical galaxy with a disk galaxy. This picture supports the idea that flux accumulation can lead to the formation of a so-called magnetically choked accretion flow. The large observed range in radio loudness reflects not only the magnitude of the flux pressed against the BH, but also the decrease in UV flux from the disk, due to its disruption by the ''magnetosphere'' associated with the accumulated flux. While the strongest jets result from the secular accumulation of flux, moderate jet activity can also be triggered by fluctuations in the magnetic flux deposited by turbulent, hot inner regions of otherwise thin accretion disks, or by the dissipation of turbulent fields in accretion disk coronae. These processes could be responsible for jet production in Seyferts and low-luminosity AGNs, as well as jets associated with X-ray binaries.

  1. Exploring the efficiency potential for an active magnetic regenerator

    Eriksen, Dan; Engelbrecht, Kurt; Haffenden Bahl, Christian Robert;

    2016-01-01

    A novel rotary state of the art active magnetic regenerator refrigeration prototype was used in an experimental investigation with special focus on efficiency. Based on an applied cooling load, measured shaft power, and pumping power applied to the active magnetic regenerator, a maximum second......-law efficiency of 18% was obtained at a cooling load of 81.5 W, resulting in a temperature span of 15.5 K and a coefficient of performance of 3.6. A loss analysis is given, based on measured pumping power and shaft power together with theoretically estimated regenerator presssure drop. It is shown that......, especially for the pressure drop, significant improvements can be made to the machine. However, a large part of the losses may be attributed to regenerator irreversibilities. Considering these unchanged, an estimated upper limit to the second-law efficiency of 30% is given by eliminating parasitic losses and...

  2. Design and performance study of the active magnetic refrigerator for room-temperature application

    Zheng, Z.G.; Yu, H.Y.; Zhong, X.C.; Zeng, D.C.; Liu, Z.W. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, 381 Wushan Road, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

    2009-01-15

    A room-temperature magnetic refrigerator, consisting of permanent magnet, active magnetic refrigeration (AMR) cycle bed, pumps, hydraulic circuit, active magnetic double regenerator cycle (AM2RC) and control subsystems, has been designed. The magnetic field is supplied by NdFeB permanent magnets. The AMR bed made by stainless steel 304 encloses gadolinium particles as the magnetic working substance. Each part of the refrigerator is controlled by the programmable controller. The different standard heat exchangers are employed to expel heat. The cycle performance of this self-designed facility is analyzed using Langevin theory. The results provide useful data for future design and development of room-temperature magnetic refrigeration. (author)

  3. Condition monitoring of active magnetic bearing systems / Rupert Gouws

    Gouws, Rupert

    2007-01-01

    In this thesis, the author contextualises condition monitoring of active magnetic bearing (AMB) systems and proposes the real-time condition monitoring of AMB systems. Three real-time fault detection, diagnosis, correction and identification schemes for vibration forces on the rotor of a rotational AMB system are proposed. Two AMB systems were used to conduct this research. The one was a fully suspended 250 kW water cooling AMB pump from which historical fault data was obtained and the oth...

  4. Fault Diagnosis in a Centrifugal Pump Using Active Magnetic Bearings

    Nordmann Rainer; Aenis Martin

    2004-01-01

    The number of rotors running in active magnetic bearings (AMBs) has increased over the last few years. These systems offer a great variety of advantages compared to conventional systems. The aim of this article is to use the AMBs together with a developed built-in software for identification, fault detection, and diagnosis in a centrifugal pump. A single-stage pump representing the turbomachines is investigated. During full operation of the pump, the AMBs are used as actuators to generate def...

  5. The development of an axial active magnetic bearing / R. Gouws

    Gouws, Rupert

    2004-01-01

    In this dissertation, the author presents the operation and development of active magnetic bearings (AMBs) , with specific focus on axial M s . The project objective is the development of an axial AMB system. The electromagnetic design, inductive sensor design, dSpace controller model design and actuating amplifier design are aspects discussed in this dissertation. The physical model constitutes two electromagnets positioned above and beneath a 2 kg steel disc with an air gap o...

  6. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation activates specific regions in rat brain

    Ji, Ru-Rong; Schlaepfer, Thomas E.; Aizenman, Carlos D.; Epstein, Charles M.; Qiu, Dike; Huang, Justin C.; Rupp, Fabio

    1998-01-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a noninvasive technique to induce electric currents in the brain. Although rTMS is being evaluated as a possible alternative to electroconvulsive therapy for the treatment of refractory depression, little is known about the pattern of activation induced in the brain by rTMS. We have compared immediate early gene expression in rat brain after rTMS and electroconvulsive stimulation, a well-established animal model for electroconvulsive ther...

  7. On the filament motion in magnetic field of active regions

    The study of filament motion in magnetic field of active regions is fulfiled. Filament movement can possibly be presented as a drift in the crossed fields, but there exist fast movements that cannot be described as a drift. For very fast motion, with acceleration greater than that of free fall, it is sometimes necessary to assume, that the motion is carried out due to the filament's own electric current. A model, describing filament motion data, given by Mouradian M. is presented

  8. On the Magnetic Field Strength of Active Region Filaments

    Kuckein, C; Pillet, V Martinez; Casini, R; Sainz, R Manso; Shimizu, T

    2009-01-01

    We study the vector magnetic field of a filament observed over a compact Active Region Neutral Line. Spectropolarimetric data acquired with TIP-II (VTT, Tenerife, Spain) of the 10830 \\AA spectral region provide full Stokes vectors which were analyzed using three different methods: magnetograph analysis, Milne-Eddington inversions and PCA-based atomic polarization inversions. The inferred magnetic field strengths in the filament are of the order of 600 - 700 G by all these three methods. Longitudinal fields are found in the range of 100 - 200 G whereas the transverse components become dominant, with fields as large as 500 - 600 G. We find strong transverse fields near the Neutral Line also at photospheric levels. Our analysis indicates that strong (higher than 500 G, but below kG) transverse magnetic fields are present in Active Region filaments. This corresponds to the highest field strengths reliably measured in these structures. The profiles of the Helium 10830 \\AA lines observed in this Active Region filam...

  9. Edge Adapted Wavelets, Solar Magnetic Activity, and Climate Change

    Johnson, Robert W

    2009-01-01

    The continuous wavelet transform is adapted to account for signal truncation through renormalization and by modifying the shape of the analyzing window. Comparison is made of the instant and integrated wavelet power with previous algorithms. The edge adapted and renormalized admissible wavelet transforms are used to estimate the level of solar magnetic activity from the sunspot record. The solar activity is compared to Oerlemans' temperature reconstruction and to the Central England Temperature record. A correlation is seen for years between 1610 and 1990, followed by a strong deviation as the recently observed temperature increases.

  10. The Relationship between Magnetic Gradient and Magnetic Shear in Five Super Active Regions Producing Great Flares

    Hai-Min Wang; Hui Song; Ju Jing; Vasyl Yurchyshyn; Yuan-Yong Deng; Hong-Qi Zhang; David Falconer; Jing Li

    2006-01-01

    We study the magnetic structure of five well-known active regions that produced great flares (X5 or larger). The six flares under investigation are the X12 flare on 1991 June 9in AR 6659, the X5.7 flare on 2000 July 14 in AR 9077, the X5.6 flare on 2001 April 6 in AR 9415, the X5.3 flare on 2001 August 25 in AR 9591, the X17 flare on 2003 October 28 and the X10 flare on 2003 October 29, both in AR 10486. The last five events had corresponding LASCO observations and were all associated with Halo CMEs. We analyzed vector magnetograms from Big Bear Solar Observatory, Huairou Solar Observing Station, Marshall Space Flight Center and Mees Solar Observatory. In particular, we studied the magnetic gradient derived from line-of-sight magnetograms and magnetic shear derived from vector magnetograms, and found an apparent correlation between these two parameters at a level of about 90%. We found that the magnetic gradient could be a better proxy than the shear for predicting where a major flare might occur: all six flares occurred in neutral lines with maximum gradient. The mean gradient of the flaring neutral lines ranges from 0.14 to 0.50 G km-1, 2.3to 8 times the average value for all the neutral lines in the active regions. If we use magnetic shear as the proxy, the flaring neutral line in at least one, possibly two, of the six events would be mis-identified.

  11. MAGNETIC ACTIVITY CYCLES IN THE EXOPLANET HOST STAR {epsilon} ERIDANI

    Metcalfe, T. S.; Mathur, S. [Space Science Institute, 4750 Walnut Street, Suite 205, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States); Buccino, A. P.; Mauas, P. J. D.; Petrucci, R. [Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio (CONICET), C.C. 67 Sucursal 28, C1428EHA-Buenos Aires (Argentina); Brown, B. P. [Department of Astronomy and Center for Magnetic Self-Organization, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706-1582 (United States); Soderblom, D. R. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Dr., Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Henry, T. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA 30302 (United States); Hall, J. C. [Lowell Observatory, 1400 West Mars Hill Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States); Basu, S. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States)

    2013-02-01

    The active K2 dwarf {epsilon} Eri has been extensively characterized both as a young solar analog and more recently as an exoplanet host star. As one of the nearest and brightest stars in the sky, it provides an unparalleled opportunity to constrain stellar dynamo theory beyond the Sun. We confirm and document the 3-year magnetic activity cycle in {epsilon} Eri originally reported by Hatzes and coworkers, and we examine the archival data from previous observations spanning 45 years. The data show coexisting 3-year and 13-year periods leading into a broad activity minimum that resembles a Maunder minimum-like state, followed by the resurgence of a coherent 3-year cycle. The nearly continuous activity record suggests the simultaneous operation of two stellar dynamos with cycle periods of 2.95 {+-} 0.03 years and 12.7 {+-} 0.3 years, which, by analogy with the solar case, suggests a revised identification of the dynamo mechanisms that are responsible for the so-called 'active' and 'inactive' sequences as proposed by Boehm-Vitense. Finally, based on the observed properties of {epsilon} Eri, we argue that the rotational history of the Sun is what makes it an outlier in the context of magnetic cycles observed in other stars (as also suggested by its Li depletion), and that a Jovian-mass companion cannot be the universal explanation for the solar peculiarities.

  12. RegenBase: a knowledge base of spinal cord injury biology for translational research.

    Callahan, Alison; Abeyruwan, Saminda W; Al-Ali, Hassan; Sakurai, Kunie; Ferguson, Adam R; Popovich, Phillip G; Shah, Nigam H; Visser, Ubbo; Bixby, John L; Lemmon, Vance P

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) research is a data-rich field that aims to identify the biological mechanisms resulting in loss of function and mobility after SCI, as well as develop therapies that promote recovery after injury. SCI experimental methods, data and domain knowledge are locked in the largely unstructured text of scientific publications, making large scale integration with existing bioinformatics resources and subsequent analysis infeasible. The lack of standard reporting for experiment variables and results also makes experiment replicability a significant challenge. To address these challenges, we have developed RegenBase, a knowledge base of SCI biology. RegenBase integrates curated literature-sourced facts and experimental details, raw assay data profiling the effect of compounds on enzyme activity and cell growth, and structured SCI domain knowledge in the form of the first ontology for SCI, using Semantic Web representation languages and frameworks. RegenBase uses consistent identifier schemes and data representations that enable automated linking among RegenBase statements and also to other biological databases and electronic resources. By querying RegenBase, we have identified novel biological hypotheses linking the effects of perturbagens to observed behavioral outcomes after SCI. RegenBase is publicly available for browsing, querying and download.Database URL:http://regenbase.org. PMID:27055827

  13. Developments in the field of active magnetic bearings at EDF

    The studies carried out by EDF concerning the evaluation of the active magnetic bearing technology for their possible application to rotating machinery in electrical plants, and especially the 900 MW ''CP2'' turbogenerators which appear to have very little damping and vibrate noticeably during transients. Using a 4 tons test bench, the good quality of simulation applied to both permanent and transient conditions have been verified. Then, using a 10 tons test bench, the dimensioning concerns of the CP2 application were more precisely evaluated. It has been especially demonstrated that the accessible levels of force and damping were compatible with the application constraints. In a final 30 tons project, some innovative technological components have been used and the benefits from an optimization of the design of the magnetic parameters were determined. Specifications for a full-scale implementation have been therefore defined to enable the manufacturer to make a commercial offer. After a disappointing analysis of the offer, CP2 computations and studies were stopped but subsidiary studies were conducted: estimation of the damage risk under alternative bending of the CP2 rotors during their lifetime, prospective analysis of other possible applications of active magnetic bearings in power plants, development of a new vibratory test method through electromagnetic excitation. 5 figs., 6 refs

  14. Cell and biomolecule delivery for regenerative medicine

    Ian O Smith and Peter X Ma

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Regenerative medicine is an exciting field that aims to create regenerative alternatives to harvest tissues for transplantation. In this approach, the delivery of cells and biological molecules plays a central role. The scaffold (synthetic temporary extracellular matrix delivers cells to the regenerative site and provides three-dimensional environments for the cells. To fulfil these functions, we design biodegradable polymer scaffolds with structural features on multiple size scales. To enhance positive cell–material interactions, we design nano-sized structural features in the scaffolds to mimic the natural extracellular matrix. We also integrate micro-sized pore networks to facilitate mass transport and neo tissue regeneration. We also design novel polymer devices and self-assembled nanospheres for biomolecule delivery to recapitulate key events in developmental and wound healing processes. Herein, we present recent work in biomedical polymer synthesis, novel processing techniques, surface engineering and biologic delivery. Examples of enhanced cellular/tissue function and regenerative outcomes of these approaches are discussed to demonstrate the excitement of the biomimetic scaffold design and biologic delivery in regenerative medicine.

  15. Cell and biomolecule delivery for regenerative medicine

    Regenerative medicine is an exciting field that aims to create regenerative alternatives to harvest tissues for transplantation. In this approach, the delivery of cells and biological molecules plays a central role. The scaffold (synthetic temporary extracellular matrix) delivers cells to the regenerative site and provides three-dimensional environments for the cells. To fulfil these functions, we design biodegradable polymer scaffolds with structural features on multiple size scales. To enhance positive cell-material interactions, we design nano-sized structural features in the scaffolds to mimic the natural extracellular matrix. We also integrate micro-sized pore networks to facilitate mass transport and neo tissue regeneration. We also design novel polymer devices and self-assembled nanospheres for biomolecule delivery to recapitulate key events in developmental and wound healing processes. Herein, we present recent work in biomedical polymer synthesis, novel processing techniques, surface engineering and biologic delivery. Examples of enhanced cellular/tissue function and regenerative outcomes of these approaches are discussed to demonstrate the excitement of the biomimetic scaffold design and biologic delivery in regenerative medicine. (topical review)

  16. Optimisation Of An Integrated Planar Magnetic For Active Antenna Panels

    Strixner, E.; Godzik, S.; Drechsler, E., , Dr.

    2011-10-01

    The envisaged German Space Missions HRWS and TerraSAR-X follow-on have triggered the development of a new generation of low voltage DC power supplies for active antennas at Astrium GmbH. The basic approachis tointegrate all power, digital, RF electronics and RF radiators required for one antenna tile into one common unit. Due to the high number of electronic boxes needed for one antenna it is essential to optimise cost, volume, efficiency and weight. The development of an integrated planar magnetic for power conversion is one contribution to this overall optimisation process. The focus of this presentation is the development of an integrated planar magnetic used for a half-bridge forward converter with secondary side synchronous current doubler. The converter is supplied from a 100 V power bus and delivers a total average output power of 280W for the drain supply of the pulsed RF power stages.

  17. Active split-ring metamaterial slabs for magnetic resonance imaging

    Lopez, Marcos A; Freire, Manuel J; Behr, Volker C; Jakob, Peter M; Marques, Ricardo

    2011-01-01

    In this work, it is analyzed the ability of split-ring metamaterial slabs with zero/high permeability to reject/confine the radiofrequency magnetic field in magnetic resonance imaging systems. Using an homogenization procedure, split-ring slabs have been designed and fabricated to work in a 1.5T system. Active elements consisting of pairs of crossed diodes are inserted in the split-rings. With these elements, the permeability of the slabs can be automatically switched between a unity value when interacting with the strong excitation field of the transmitting body coil, and zero or high values when interacting with the weak field produced by protons in tissue. Experiments are shown for different configurations where these slabs can help to locally increase the signal-to-noise-ratio.

  18. Numerical modeling and analysis of the active magnetic regenerator

    Nielsen, Kaspar Kirstein

    In this thesis the active magnetic regenerator (AMR) is analyzed using various numerical tools and experimental devices. A 2-dimensional transient numerical model of the AMR is developed and implemented and it is used to investigate the in uence of a range of parameters on the performance of the...... investigated using the numerical AMR model. The results show indeed that the performance may be enhanced signicantly and it may thus be concluded that the performance of the AMR is dependent on a vast number of parameters (material composition, magnetic eld source, regenerator geometry, regenerator eciency...... AMR. The model simulates a regenerator made of parallel plates. The operating parameters, such as uid ow rates, thermal utilization, magnetocaloric properties etc. are varied as are geometric properties such as plate and channel thickness, regenerator length and porosity. In this way the performance...

  19. Towards age/rotation/magnetic activity relation with seismology

    Mathur, Savita

    2015-01-01

    The knowledge of stellar ages directly impacts the characterization of a planetary system as it puts strong constraints on the moment when the system was born. Unfortunately, the determination of precise stellar ages is a very difficult task. Different methods can be used to do so (based on isochrones or chemical element abundances) but they usually provide large uncertainties. During its evolution a star goes through processes leading to loss of angular momentum but also changes in its magnetic activity. Building rotation, magnetic, age relations would be an asset to infer stellar ages model independently. Several attempts to build empirical relations between rotation and age (namely gyrochronology) were made with a focus on cluster stars where the age determination is easier and for young stars on the main sequence. For field stars, we can now take advantage of high-precision photometric observations where we can perform asteroseismic analyses to improve the accuracy of stellar ages. Furthermore, the variab...

  20. MAGNETIC FLUX PARADIGM FOR RADIO LOUDNESS OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    Sikora, Marek [Copernicus Astronomical Center, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Bartycka 18, 00-716 Warsaw (Poland); Begelman, Mitchell C., E-mail: sikora@camk.edu.pl, E-mail: mitch@jila.colorado.edu [JILA, University of Colorado and National Institute of Standards and Technology, 440 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States)

    2013-02-20

    We argue that the magnetic flux threading the black hole (BH), rather than BH spin or Eddington ratio, is the dominant factor in launching powerful jets and thus determining the radio loudness of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Most AGNs are radio quiet because the thin accretion disks that feed them are inefficient in depositing magnetic flux close to the BH. Flux accumulation is more likely to occur during a hot accretion (or thick disk) phase, and we argue that radio-loud quasars and strong emission-line radio galaxies occur only when a massive, cold accretion event follows an episode of hot accretion. Such an event might be triggered by the merger of a giant elliptical galaxy with a disk galaxy. This picture supports the idea that flux accumulation can lead to the formation of a so-called magnetically choked accretion flow. The large observed range in radio loudness reflects not only the magnitude of the flux pressed against the BH, but also the decrease in UV flux from the disk, due to its disruption by the ''magnetosphere'' associated with the accumulated flux. While the strongest jets result from the secular accumulation of flux, moderate jet activity can also be triggered by fluctuations in the magnetic flux deposited by turbulent, hot inner regions of otherwise thin accretion disks, or by the dissipation of turbulent fields in accretion disk coronae. These processes could be responsible for jet production in Seyferts and low-luminosity AGNs, as well as jets associated with X-ray binaries.

  1. Activation of sweeping magnets in Tevatron II standardized target piles

    As designs of the primary targeting schemes for the new Tevatron II slow spill beams progress, it is becoming clear that a standardized form for these schemes is emerging. The general form consists of a production target (usually about 30 cm of beryllium having a diameter from 0.64 to 1.27 cm) followed by from one to three of the new Tevatron II H frame magnets recently developed by D. Eartly. These magnets sweep the unused primary proton beam onto a massive steel beam dump containing a core of material capable of dispersing the energy of the beam along with a hole for transmitting the secondary beam desired at experimental targets. Typical primary proton intensities at such production targets are planned to be in the range of 3 x 1012 to 5 x 1012 protons per spill. If one assumes such operation during a run of 4000 hours per year, 60 spills per hour, the integrated beam is seen to be approximately 1 x 1018 per year targetted at a rate of 7/0 x 1010 protons/sec during the run. It is clear, from experience, that such beam intensities require that the water used to cool the beam dump must be in a closed loop system both to protect personnel during operations from the external radiation exposure rate due to short lived radionuclides (e.g., 11C and 7Be) and to protect against release of significant activities of tritium into surface waters. It is not certain that a closed loop system is required for the sweeping magnets. This TM reports on a calculation designed to evaluate this potential problem, the expected dose rates external to such magnets, and the total activity which will be contained in them and the target

  2. Optimization of magnetic powdered activated carbon for aqueous Hg(II) removal and magnetic recovery.

    Faulconer, Emily K; von Reitzenstein, Natalia V Hoogesteijn; Mazyck, David W

    2012-01-15

    Activated carbon is known to adsorb aqueous Hg(II). MPAC (magnetic powdered activated carbon) has the potential to remove aqueous Hg to less than 0.2 μg/L while being magnetically recoverable. Magnetic recapture allows simple sorbent separation from the waste stream while an isolated waste potentially allows for mercury recycling. MPAC Hg-removal performance is verified by mercury mass balance, calculated by quantifying adsorbed, volatilized, and residual aqueous mercury. The batch reactor contained a sealed mercury-carbon contact chamber with mixing and constant N(2) (g) headspace flow to an oxidizing trap. Mercury adsorption was performed using spiked ultrapure water (100 μg/L Hg). Mercury concentrations were obtained using EPA method 245.1 and cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy. MPAC synthesis was optimized for Hg removal and sorbent recovery according to the variables: C:Fe, thermal oxidation temperature and time. The 3:1 C:Fe preserved most of the original sorbent surface area. As indicated by XRD patterns, thermal oxidation reduced the amorphous characteristic of the iron oxides but did not improve sorbent recovery and damaged porosity at higher oxidation temperatures. Therefore, the optimal synthesis variables, 3:1 C:Fe mass ratio without thermal oxidation, which can achieve 92.5% (± 8.3%) sorbent recovery and 96.3% (± 9%) Hg removal. The mass balance has been closed to within approximately ± 15%. PMID:22104766

  3. Regenerative medicine: learning from past examples.

    Couto, Daniela S; Perez-Breva, Luis; Cooney, Charles L

    2012-11-01

    Regenerative medicine products have characteristically shown great therapeutic potential, but limited market success. Learning from the past attempts at capturing value is critical for new and emerging regenerative medicine therapies to define and evolve their business models as new therapies emerge and others mature. We propose a framework that analyzes technological developments along with alternative business models and illustrates how to use both strategically to map value capture by companies in regenerative medicine. We analyze how to balance flexibility of the supply chain and clarity in the regulatory pathway for each business model and propose the possible pathways of evolution between business models. We also drive analogies between cell-based therapies and other healthcare products such as biologicals and medical devices and suggest how to strategically evolve from these areas into the cell therapy space. PMID:22697402

  4. Overcoming immunological barriers in regenerative medicine.

    Zakrzewski, Johannes L; van den Brink, Marcel R M; Hubbell, Jeffrey A

    2014-08-01

    Regenerative therapies that use allogeneic cells are likely to encounter immunological barriers similar to those that occur with transplantation of solid organs and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Decades of experience in clinical transplantation hold valuable lessons for regenerative medicine, offering approaches for developing tolerance-induction treatments relevant to cell therapies. Outside the field of solid-organ and allogeneic HSC transplantation, new strategies are emerging for controlling the immune response, such as methods based on biomaterials or mimicry of antigen-specific peripheral tolerance. Novel biomaterials can alter the behavior of cells in tissue-engineered constructs and can blunt host immune responses to cells and biomaterial scaffolds. Approaches to suppress autoreactive immune cells may also be useful in regenerative medicine. The most innovative solutions will be developed through closer collaboration among stem cell biologists, transplantation immunologists and materials scientists. PMID:25093888

  5. Optimization of magnetic powdered activated carbon for aqueous Hg(II) removal and magnetic recovery

    Faulconer, Emily K., E-mail: emily.faulconer@yahoo.com [Department of Environmental Engineering Sciences, University of Florida, 217 Black Hall, P.O. Box 116450, Gainesville, FL 32611-645 (United States); Hoogesteijn von Reitzenstein, Natalia V.; Mazyck, David W. [Department of Environmental Engineering Sciences, University of Florida, 217 Black Hall, P.O. Box 116450, Gainesville, FL 32611-645 (United States)

    2012-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermal oxidation of MPAC decreased the amorphous characteristic of iron oxides. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermal oxidation did not influence magnetic recovery or Hg removal performance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer At all thermal oxidation temperatures, the 3:1 MPAC achieved the highest Hg removal. - Abstract: Activated carbon is known to adsorb aqueous Hg(II). MPAC (magnetic powdered activated carbon) has the potential to remove aqueous Hg to less than 0.2 {mu}g/L while being magnetically recoverable. Magnetic recapture allows simple sorbent separation from the waste stream while an isolated waste potentially allows for mercury recycling. MPAC Hg-removal performance is verified by mercury mass balance, calculated by quantifying adsorbed, volatilized, and residual aqueous mercury. The batch reactor contained a sealed mercury-carbon contact chamber with mixing and constant N{sub 2} (g) headspace flow to an oxidizing trap. Mercury adsorption was performed using spiked ultrapure water (100 {mu}g/L Hg). Mercury concentrations were obtained using EPA method 245.1 and cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy. MPAC synthesis was optimized for Hg removal and sorbent recovery according to the variables: C:Fe, thermal oxidation temperature and time. The 3:1 C:Fe preserved most of the original sorbent surface area. As indicated by XRD patterns, thermal oxidation reduced the amorphous characteristic of the iron oxides but did not improve sorbent recovery and damaged porosity at higher oxidation temperatures. Therefore, the optimal synthesis variables, 3:1 C:Fe mass ratio without thermal oxidation, which can achieve 92.5% ({+-}8.3%) sorbent recovery and 96.3% ({+-}9%) Hg removal. The mass balance has been closed to within approximately {+-}15%.

  6. Control of active liquid crystals with a magnetic field.

    Guillamat, Pau; Ignés-Mullol, Jordi; Sagués, Francesc

    2016-05-17

    Living cells sense the mechanical features of their environment and adapt to it by actively remodeling their peripheral network of filamentary proteins, known as cortical cytoskeleton. By mimicking this principle, we demonstrate an effective control strategy for a microtubule-based active nematic in contact with a hydrophobic thermotropic liquid crystal. By using well-established protocols for the orientation of liquid crystals with a uniform magnetic field, and through the mediation of anisotropic shear stresses, the active nematic reversibly self-assembles with aligned flows and textures that feature orientational order at the millimeter scale. The turbulent flow, characteristic of active nematics, is in this way regularized into a laminar flow with periodic velocity oscillations. Once patterned, the microtubule assembly reveals its intrinsic length and time scales, which we correlate with the activity of motor proteins, as predicted by existing theories of active nematics. The demonstrated commanding strategy should be compatible with other viable active biomaterials at interfaces, and we envision its use to probe the mechanics of the intracellular matrix. PMID:27140604

  7. Platelet-rich plasma in regenerative medicine

    Guhta Ra Hara and Thaha Basu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Platelet-rich plasma (PRP contains at least seven growth factors including epidermal, plateletderived, transforming, vascular endothelial, fibroblast, insulin-like and keratinocyte growth factor. The therapeutic effect of PRP occurs because of the high concentration of these growth factors compared with those found in normal plasma. In recent years, PRP is widely used across many clinical fields, especially in regenerative medicine. This review aimed at presenting an overview of the applications of PRP in regenerative medicine. The mechanisms of PRP effects on healing are also stated in this review. [Biomed Res Ther 2014; 1(1.000: 25-31

  8. Photocatalytically active titanium dioxide nanopowders: Synthesis, photoactivity and magnetic separation

    Two approaches were used to obtain nanocrystalline titanium dioxide (TiO2) photocatalyst powders. Firstly, low-temperature synthesis method and secondly liquid flame spraying. The structural properties of the produced powders were determined with X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and nitrogen adsorption tests. The photocatalytic properties of the powders were studied with methylene blue (MB) discoloration tests. After discolorations tests, TiO2 was coagulated with magnetite particles using FeCl3·6 H2O at a fixed pH value. Magnetic separation of coagulated TiO2 and magnetite was carried out by a permanent magnet. The obtained results showed that the particle size of the powders synthesized at low-temperature was very small and the specific surface area high. The phase content of the powder was also shown to depend greatly on the acidity of the synthesis solution. Powder synthesized by liquid flame spraying was mixture of anatase and rutile phases with essentially larger particle size and lower specific surface area than those of low-temperature synthesized powders. The MB discoloration test showed that photocatalytic activity depends on the phase structure as well as the specific surface area of the synthesized TiO2 powder. The magnetic separation of TiO2–magnetite coagulate from solution proved to be efficient around pH:8

  9. Evolution of the Magnetic Field Distribution of Active Regions

    Dacie, Sally; van Driel-Gesztelyi, Lidia; Long, David; Baker, Deb; Janvier, Miho; Yardley, Stephanie; Pérez-Suárez, David

    2016-01-01

    Aims. Although the temporal evolution of active regions (ARs) is relatively well understood, the processes involved continue to be the subject of investigation. We study how the magnetic field of a series of ARs evolves with time to better characterise how ARs emerge and disperse. Methods. We examine the temporal variation in the magnetic field distribution of 37 emerging ARs. A kernel density estimation plot of the field distribution was created on a log-log scale for each AR at each time step. We found that the central portion of the distribution is typically linear and its slope was used to characterise the evolution of the magnetic field. Results. The slopes were seen to evolve with time, becoming less steep as the fragmented emerging flux coalesces. The slopes reached a maximum value of ~ -1.5 just before the time of maximum flux before becoming steeper during the decay phase towards the quiet Sun value of ~ -3. This behaviour differs significantly from a classical diffusion model, which produces a slope...

  10. Solar activity, magnetic storms and their effects on biological systems

    Full text: In the present time much attention is spent on the electromagnetic waves, solar radiation and magnetic storms on biological systems, including on person. However, there are few publications describing the mechanism of these influences on human. First of all it is necessary to point out that electromagnetic waves, the flow of particles in space and magnetic storms, acting on person human-all is connected with biophysical processes. So approach to influence of these factors on organism follows the processes of influence of these waves on bio system. Magnetic storms are phenomena continuously connected with solar activity. Investigation of cosmic space has intensified the practical importance of the problem of interaction with natural factors of external ambience. Much attention deserves the cosmic radiation, geomagnetic field, elements of climate and weathers. However the mechanism of bio tropic action of these factors is not enough studied. Beginning XXI century was already signified the successes in investigation of Mars. The Space shuttles 'Spirit' and 'Opportunity' successfully have carried out some work on examining and finding of water on Mars. A flight of person to Mars is being considered. One of the important mechanisms of influence on human organism is, in our opinion, the rising of the resonance at coincidence of frequencies and their more important factor is a phenomena of electromagnetic induction and forming the radicals in the organism

  11. Failure Mode and Effect Analysis of Active Magnetic Bearings

    K.P. Lijesh

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present research work Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA of an Active Magnetic Bearing (AMB has been presented. Various possible failures modes of AMBs and the corresponding effects of those failures on performance of AMBs have been identified. The identified failure modes of AMBs will facilitate designer to incorporate necessary design features that would prevent the occurrence of the failure. The severity, occurrence and detection of the failures modes are determined based on a rating scale of 1 to 5 to quantify the Risk Priority Number (RPN of the failure modes. The methods to eliminate or reduce the high-risk-failure modes are proposed.

  12. Improved modelling of a parallel plate active magnetic regenerator

    Engelbrecht, Kurt; Tušek, J.; Nielsen, Kaspar Kirstein;

    2013-01-01

    Much of the active magnetic regenerator (AMR) modelling presented in the literature considers only the solid and fluid domains of the regenerator and ignores other physical effects that have been shown to be important, such as demagnetizing fields in the regenerator, parasitic heat losses and fluid...... flow maldistribution in the regenerator. This paper studies the effects of these loss mechanisms and compares theoretical results with experimental results obtained on an experimental AMR device. Three parallel plate regenerators were tested, each having different demagnetizing field characteristics...

  13. Three-axis active magnetic attitude control asymptotical study

    Ovchinnikov, M. Yu.; Roldugin, D. S.; Penkov, V. I.

    2015-05-01

    Active magnetic attitude control system providing given inertial attitude is considered. Control algorithm is constructed on the basis of a planar motion model. It decreases attitude discrepancy. Alternative approach is based on the PD-controller design. System behavior is analyzed for specific motion cases and sometimes for specific inertia tensor (axisymmetrical satellite) using averaging technique. Overall satellite angular motion is covered. Necessary attitude is found to be accessible for some control parameters. Stability is proven and optimal algorithm parameters are obtained. Floquet-based analysis is performed to verify and broaden analytical results.

  14. Effects of flow balancing on active magnetic regenerator performance

    Eriksen, Dan; Engelbrecht, Kurt; Bahl, Christian;

    2016-01-01

    Experiments with a recently constructed rotary multi-bed active magnetic regnenerator (AMR) prototype have revealed strong impacts on the temperature span from variations in the resistances of the flow channels carrying heat transfer fluid in and out of the regenerator beds. In this paper we show...... through numerical modeling how unbalanced flow in the beds decreases the cooling power and COP for a dual bed device. Furthermore, it is shown how resistance variations in multi-bed devices give rise to unbalanced flow in the individual beds and how this decreases cooling powers and COPs of the machines...

  15. Dimensionless numerical model for simulation of active magnetic regenerator refrigerator

    Sarlah, A.; Poredos, A. [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, University of Ljubljana, Askerceva 6, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2010-09-15

    In order to obtain a better reliability, consistency and accuracy of results obtained with a numerical simulation of an AMRR (active magnetic regenerator refrigerator), a dimensionless numerical model was developed, which can equally be used for determination of regenerator's heat transfer coefficient and simulation of passive heat regenerators or AMRR operation. Regenerator's heat transfer coefficient {alpha}{sub f}, is a crucial input parameter in the simulation of AMRR operation and has a primal effect on the outcome of a solution. This paper deals with a derived dimensionless model and discusses errors involved when using different models for heat transfer coefficient and AMRR operation simulation. (author)

  16. Photometric magnetic-activity metrics tested with the Sun: Application to Kepler M dwarfs

    Mathur, S; Garcia, R A; Ceillier, T

    2014-01-01

    The Kepler mission has been providing high-quality photometric data leading to many breakthroughs in the exoplanet search and in stellar physics. Stellar magnetic activity results from the interaction between rotation, convection, and magnetic field. Constraining these processes is important if we want to better understand stellar magnetic activity. Using the Sun, we want to test a magnetic activity index based on the analysis of the photo- metric response and then apply it to a sample of M dwarfs observed by Kepler. We estimate a global stellar magnetic activity index by measuring the standard deviation of the whole time series, Sph. Because stellar variability can be related to convection, pulsations, or magnetism, we need to ensure that this index mostly takes into account magnetic effects. We define another stellar magnetic activity index as the average of the standard deviation of shorter subseries which lengths are determined by the rotation period of the star. This way we can ensure that the measured p...

  17. The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) Vector Magnetic Field Pipeline: SHARPs -- Space-weather HMI Active Region Patches

    Bobra, Monica G; Hoeksema, J Todd; Turmon, Michael J; Liu, Yang; Hayashi, Keiji; Barnes, Graham; Leka, K D

    2014-01-01

    A new data product from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) called Space-weather HMI Active Region Patches (SHARPs) is now available. SDO/HMI is the first space-based instrument to map the full-disk photospheric vector magnetic field with high cadence and continuity. The SHARP data series provide maps in patches that encompass automatically tracked magnetic concentrations for their entire lifetime; map quantities include the photospheric vector magnetic field and its uncertainty, along with Doppler velocity, continuum intensity, and line-of-sight magnetic field. Furthermore, keywords in the SHARP data series provide several parameters that concisely characterize the magnetic-field distribution and its deviation from a potential-field configuration. These indices may be useful for active-region event forecasting and for identifying regions of interest. The indices are calculated per patch and are available on a twelve-minute cadence. Quick-look data are avail...

  18. The Magnetic Classification of Solar Active Regions 1992-2015

    Jaeggli, S. A.; Norton, A. A.

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this Letter is to address a blindspot in our knowledge of solar active region (AR) statistics. To the best of our knowledge, there are no published results showing the variation of the Mount Wilson magnetic classifications as a function of solar cycle based on modern observations. We show statistics for all ARs reported in the daily Solar Region Summary from 1992 January 1 to 2015 December 31. We find that the α and β class ARs (including all sub-groups, e.g., βγ, βδ) make up fractions of approximately 20% and 80% of the sample, respectively. This fraction is relatively constant during high levels of activity however, an increase in the α fraction to about 35% and and a decrease in the β fraction to about 65% can be seen near each solar minimum and are statistically significant at the 2σ level. Over 30% of all ARs observed during the years of solar maxima were appended with the classifications γ and/or δ, while these classifications account for only a fraction of a percent during the years near the solar minima. This variation in the AR types indicates that the formation of complex ARs may be due to the pileup of frequent emergence of magnetic flux during solar maximum, rather than the emergence of complex, monolithic flux structures.

  19. Observational evidence for enhanced magnetic activity of superflare stars.

    Karoff, Christoffer; Knudsen, Mads Faurschou; De Cat, Peter; Bonanno, Alfio; Fogtmann-Schulz, Alexandra; Fu, Jianning; Frasca, Antonio; Inceoglu, Fadil; Olsen, Jesper; Zhang, Yong; Hou, Yonghui; Wang, Yuefei; Shi, Jianrong; Zhang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Superflares are large explosive events on stellar surfaces one to six orders-of-magnitude larger than the largest flares observed on the Sun throughout the space age. Due to the huge amount of energy released in these superflares, it has been speculated if the underlying mechanism is the same as for solar flares, which are caused by magnetic reconnection in the solar corona. Here, we analyse observations made with the LAMOST telescope of 5,648 solar-like stars, including 48 superflare stars. These observations show that superflare stars are generally characterized by larger chromospheric emissions than other stars, including the Sun. However, superflare stars with activity levels lower than, or comparable to, the Sun do exist, suggesting that solar flares and superflares most likely share the same origin. The very large ensemble of solar-like stars included in this study enables detailed and robust estimates of the relation between chromospheric activity and the occurrence of superflares. PMID:27009381

  20. Magnetic Activity Cycles in the Exoplanet Host Star epsilon Eridani

    Metcalfe, T S; Brown, B P; Mathur, S; Soderblom, D R; Henry, T J; Mauas, P J D; Petrucci, R; Hall, J C; Basu, S

    2012-01-01

    The active K2 dwarf epsilon Eri has been extensively characterized, both as a young solar analog and more recently as an exoplanet host star. As one of the nearest and brightest stars in the sky, it provides an unparalleled opportunity to constrain stellar dynamo theory beyond the Sun. We confirm and document the 3 year magnetic activity cycle in epsilon Eri originally reported by Hatzes and coworkers, and we examine the archival data from previous observations spanning 45 years. The data show coexisting 3 year and 13 year periods leading into a broad activity minimum that resembles a Maunder minimum-like state, followed by the resurgence of a coherent 3 year cycle. The nearly continuous activity record suggests the simultaneous operation of two stellar dynamos with cycle periods of 2.95+/-0.03 years and 12.7+/-0.3 years, which by analogy with the solar case suggests a revised identification of the dynamo mechanisms that are responsible for the so-called "active" and "inactive" sequences as proposed by Bohm-V...

  1. The Magnetic Classification of Solar Active Regions 1992 - 2015

    Jaeggli, Sarah A

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this letter is to address a blind-spot in our knowledge of solar active region statistics. To the best of our knowledge there are no published results showing the variation of the Mount Wilson magnetic classifications as a function of solar cycle based on modern observations. We show statistics for all active regions reported in the daily Solar Region Summary from 1992 January 1 to 2015 December 31. We find that the $\\alpha$ and $\\beta$ class active regions (including all sub-groups e.g. $\\beta\\gamma$, $\\beta\\delta$) make up fractions of approximately 20% and 80% of the sample respectively. This fraction is relatively constant during high levels of activity, however, an increase in the $\\alpha$ fraction to about 35% and and a decrease in the $\\beta$ fraction to about 65% can be seen near each solar minimum and is statistically significant at the 2-$\\sigma$ level. Over 30% of all active regions observed during the years of solar maxima were appended with the classifications $\\gamma$ and/or $\\del...

  2. ON MAGNETIC ACTIVITY BAND OVERLAP, INTERACTION, AND THE FORMATION OF COMPLEX SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS

    McIntosh, Scott W. [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307 (United States); Leamon, Robert J., E-mail: mscott@hao.ucar.edu [Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States)

    2014-11-20

    Recent work has revealed a phenomenological picture of the how the ∼11 yr sunspot cycle of the Sun arises. The production and destruction of sunspots is a consequence of the latitudinal-temporal overlap and interaction of the toroidal magnetic flux systems that belong to the 22 yr magnetic activity cycle and are rooted deep in the Sun's convective interior. We present a conceptually simple extension of this work, presenting a hypothesis on how complex active regions can form as a direct consequence of the intra- and extra-hemispheric interaction taking place in the solar interior. Furthermore, during specific portions of the sunspot cycle, we anticipate that those complex active regions may be particularly susceptible to profoundly catastrophic breakdown, producing flares and coronal mass ejections of the most severe magnitude.

  3. Inertia Wheel on Low-Noise Active Magnetic Suspension

    Carabelli, S.; Genta, G.; Silvagni, M.; Tonoli, A.

    2002-01-01

    Magnetic bearings are particularly suited for space applications for a number of reasons: - they are ideally suited for vacuum applications; - the lack of lubrication and wear enhances the reliability and guaranties a long maintenance-free operation - the low drag torque decreases power consumption and reduces the torque exerted on the stator of the machine. - the possibility of insulating actively the spacecraft from the excitation due to unbalance of the rotating system In the case of reaction wheels, a well designed magnetic suspension allows high speed operation with a very low power consumption and vibration level. Conversely, microgravity (and possibly vacuum) operation is an advantage for magnetic bearings. The absence of static forces allows to operate with low current levels, thus reducing electrical noise and allowing to reach even lower vibration levels than in Earth applications of magnetic bearings. Active magnetic bearings (AMB) allow to adapt the working characteristics of the system to the operating needs: it is possible to use the actuators to lock the system during launch (absence of grabbers) and to stiffen the suspension when the spacecraft is accelerated (impulsive phases), while working in conditions optimised for microgravity when this is needed. Magnetic suspension systems designed for microgravity environment cannot be correctly tested on the ground. Testing in ground conditions results in the need of grossly overdesigning the levitation device; furthermore, in some cases ground testing is completely impossible, if not by introducing devices which compensate for the Earth gravitational field. If the compensation for the gravitational force is supplied by the same actuators used for microgravity operation, the actuators and the power amplifiers must be overdesigned and in some cases the suspension can be altogether impossible. They work in conditions which are much different from nominal ones and, above all, it is impossible to reach the

  4. MAGNET

    B. Curé

    2012-01-01

      The magnet and its sub-systems were stopped at the beginning of the winter shutdown on 8th December 2011. The magnet was left without cooling during the cryogenics maintenance until 17th January 2012, when the cryoplant operation resumed. The magnet temperature reached 93 K. The vacuum pumping was maintained during this period. During this shutdown, the yearly maintenance was performed on the cryogenics, the vacuum pumps, the magnet control and safety systems, and the power converter and discharge lines. Several preventive actions led to the replacement of the electrovalve command coils, and the 20A DC power supplies of the magnet control system. The filters were cleaned on the demineralised water circuits. The oil of the diffusion pumps was changed. On the cryogenics, warm nitrogen at 343 K was circulated in the cold box to regenerate the filters and the heat exchangers. The coalescing filters have been replaced at the inlet of both the turbines and the lubricant trapping unit. The active cha...

  5. 2-dimensional numerical modeling of active magnetic regeneration

    Nielsen, Kaspar Kirstein; Pryds, Nini; Smith, Anders;

    2009-01-01

    Various aspects of numerical modeling of Active Magnetic Regeneration (AMR) are presented. Using a 2-dimensional numerical model for solving the unsteady heat transfer equations for the AMR system, a range of physical effects on both idealized and non-idealized AMR are investigated. The modeled...... system represents a linear, parallel-plate based AMR. The idealized version of the model is able to predict the theoretical performance of AMR in terms of cooling power and temperature span. This is useful to a certain extent, but a model reproducing experiments to a higher degree is desirable. Therefore...... physical effects such as thermal parasitic losses have been included. Furthermore, experimentally found magnetocaloric properties are used when available, since the commonly used mean field model can be too idealized and is not always able to determine the magnetocaloric effect accurately. In the present...

  6. Roles of superconducting magnetic bearings and active magnetic bearings in attitude control and energy storage flywheel

    Compared with conventional energy storage flywheel, the rotor of attitude control and energy storage flywheel (ACESF) used in space not only has high speed, but also is required to have precise and stable direction. For the presented superconducting magnetic bearing (SMB) and active magnetic bearing (AMB) suspended ACESF, the rotor model including gyroscopic couples is established originally by taking the properties of SMB and AMB into account, the forces of SMB and AMB are simplified by linearization within their own neighbors of equilibrium points. For the high-speed rigid discal rotor with large inertia, the negative effect of gyroscopic effect of rotor is prominent, the radial translation and tilting movement of rotor suspended by only SMB, SMB with equivalent PMB, or SMB together with PD controlled AMB are researched individually. These analysis results proved originally that SMB together with AMB can make the rotor be stable and make the radial amplitude of the vibration of rotor be small while the translation of rotor suspended by only SMB or SMB and PM is not stable and the amplitude of this vibration is large. For the stability of the high-speed rotor in superconducting ACESF, the AMB can suppress the nutation and precession of rotor effectively by cross-feedback control based on the separated PD type control or by other modern control methods.

  7. Deciphering solar magnetic activity. I. On the relationship between the sunspot cycle and the evolution of small magnetic features

    Sunspots are a canonical marker of the Sun's internal magnetic field which flips polarity every ∼22 yr. The principal variation of sunspots, an ∼11 yr variation, modulates the amount of the magnetic field that pierces the solar surface and drives significant variations in our star's radiative, particulate, and eruptive output over that period. This paper presents observations from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory and Solar Dynamics Observatory indicating that the 11 yr sunspot variation is intrinsically tied to the spatio-temporal overlap of the activity bands belonging to the 22 yr magnetic activity cycle. Using a systematic analysis of ubiquitous coronal brightpoints and the magnetic scale on which they appear to form, we show that the landmarks of sunspot cycle 23 can be explained by considering the evolution and interaction of the overlapping activity bands of the longer-scale variability.

  8. Effect of Magnetic Field on Enzyme Activities in Main Soils of Northeast China

    LIUXIAOYI; YIYANLI; 等

    1996-01-01

    Soil enzyme activities as affected by applied magnetic field were studied with three main soils (brown soil,black soil and albic soil) collected from Northeast China,Appropriate intensities of magnetic field could obviously enhance the activities of hydrogen peroxidases,invertases,amylases and phosphatases in the three soils,although the effect varied with types and water regimes of the soils.Increasing times of magnetic treatment could multiple its good effect on the activities of hydrogen peroxidases in soils.

  9. Thermal activation-induced sweep-rate dependence of magnetic switching astroid

    We examine the sweep-rate dependence of magnetic switching field, Hs, in submicron magnetic tunnel junctions where shape anisotropy is dominant. Experimental data support the use of a single-domain thermal activation model for description of activated magnetic reversal in junctions 0.2 by 0.5 μm or less in size. A scaling law is obtained for the thermal activation energy which varies as the cube of junction size. [copyright] 2001 American Institute of Physics

  10. Asymmetric magnetic disorder observed in thermally activated magnetization reversal of exchange-biased IrMn/CoFe films

    We report an asymmetry of magnetic disorder in exchange-biased IrMn(tIrMn=5–20 nm)/CoFe(50 nm) films observed by means of a Kerr microscope, capable of direct domain observation. From the correlation between the magnetization half-reversal time and applied magnetic field, we find that the magnetization switching in all the films occurs via a thermally activated reversal mechanism for both branches of hysteresis loops. Surprisingly, in the forward branch reversal where the applied magnetic field is antiparallel to the direction of exchange-bias field, degree of magnetic disorder decreases as exchange-bias field increases, which is definitely contrasted with the case of backward branch reversal. This result is likely ascribed to the fact that the local values of exchange-bias field and coercive field are oppositely fluctuating with each other in the film. - Highlights: ► Quite different “magnetic disorder” in the same structural-disordered system. ► Elucidation of magnetization reversal mechanism via direct domain observation. ► The simple model which explains the origin of asymmetric magnetic disorder.

  11. [Tissue engineered skin and regenerative wound repair].

    Han, Chun-mao; Wang, Xin-gang

    2013-04-01

    Various skin defects resulting from mechanical injury, burns, chronic ulcers, and resection of tumor etc. are very common in clinic. The traditional treatment measure, such as grafting of autologous split-thickness skin remains the gold standard. However, its limitations are obvious, such as shortage of donor sites, creation of new injury, and scar formation. To realize regenerative or scarless repair of tissue defects has always been the dream of human being. The advent of tissue engineered skin (TES) provides an ideal access to tissue regeneration. After decades of development, several kinds of TES products have been developed and used in clinic, with promising effects. However, a large number of basic scientific problems regarding TES, as well as difficulties in translation of basic research to bedside should be taken into serious consideration. This article presents a comprehensive overview of strategies of construction of TES, the role of TES in regenerative wound repair, and its opportunities and challenges. PMID:23985197

  12. Regenerative endodontics: A state of the art

    Rashmi Bansal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Scientific advances in the creation of restorative biomaterials, in vitro cell culture technology, tissue grafting, tissue engineering, molecular biology and the human genome project provide the basis for the introduction of new technologies into dentistry. Non-vital infected teeth have long been treated with root canal therapy (for mature root apex and apexification (for immature root apex, or doomed to extraction. Although successful, current treatments fail to re-establish healthy pulp tissue in these teeth. But, what if the non-vital tooth could be made vital once again? That is the hope offered by regenerative endodontics, an emerging field focused on replacing traumatized and diseased pulp with functional pulp tissue. Restoration of vitality of non-vital tooth is based on tissue engineering and revascularization procedures. The purpose of this article is to review these biological procedures and the hurdles that must be overcome to develop regenerative endodontic procedures.

  13. Regenerative Medicine from Protocol to Patient

    Gustav Steinhoff

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The essentials of the upcoming and rapidly changing specialty of regenerative medicine, which has kindled high hopes among the clinical and scientific community as well as the society, are presented concisely in this book. Considering the multivariate sub-specialties within regenerative medicine, starting with cell biology and allied basic sciences through translational research to clinical application in various specialties of medicine, enormous efforts are mandatory to bring a comprehensive text book of this nature. The authors deserve kudos for this. This book comprehensively describes and reviews the current progress in stem cell research and regenerative medicine, in five main parts: (I Biology of Tissue Regeneration; (II Stem Cell Science and Technology; (III Tissue Engineering, Biomaterials and Nanotechnology; (IV Regenerative Therapies; and (V Regulation and Ethics. It fully covers all the major components in the field. Each chapter, written by the experts in the respective areas of work, throws light on the intricacies in detail, making this book immensely useful for students, clinicians and scientists interested in regenerative medicine. However, there is still scope for further refinement of some chapters. In Part II Stem Cell Science and Technology, three important stem cell types- muscle stem cells (satellite cells, stem cells from the skin and hair follicles, and stem cells from the gut epithelium-may be added as three individual chapters which probably the authors could consider for the next edition, as these cell types represent unique stem cells that have distinct properties and replenish specifically muscle, skin, hair, and gut epithelium respectively. In the chapter on cardiac stem cells, a table summarizing the properties of the four different types of cardiac stem cells described in the text may give readers more clear comparison of the pros and cons on these cells and know their properties better. The future direction

  14. First lasing of the regenerative amplifier FEL

    The regenerative amplifier free-electron laser (RAFEL) is a high-gain RF-linac FEL capable of producing high optical power from a compact design. The combination of a high-gain and small optical feedback enables the FEL to reach saturation and produce a high optical power and high extraction efficiency without the risk of optical damage to the mirrors. This paper summarizes the first lasing of the regenerative amplifier FEL and describes recent experimental results. The highest optical energy achieved thus far at 16.3 μm is 1.7 J over a train of 900 micropulses. We infer pulse energy of 1.9 mJ in each 16 ps micropulse, corresponding to a peak power of 120 MW

  15. Micro-Scale Regenerative Heat Exchanger

    Moran, Matthew E.; Stelter, Stephan; Stelter, Manfred

    2004-01-01

    A micro-scale regenerative heat exchanger has been designed, optimized and fabricated for use in a micro-Stirling device. Novel design and fabrication techniques enabled the minimization of axial heat conduction losses and pressure drop, while maximizing thermal regenerative performance. The fabricated prototype is comprised of ten separate assembled layers of alternating metal-dielectric composite. Each layer is offset to minimize conduction losses and maximize heat transfer by boundary layer disruption. A grating pattern of 100 micron square non-contiguous flow passages were formed with a nominal 20 micron wall thickness, and an overall assembled ten-layer thickness of 900 microns. Application of the micro heat exchanger is envisioned in the areas of micro-refrigerators/coolers, micropower devices, and micro-fluidic devices.

  16. Formation of Solar Delta Active Regions:Twist and Writhe of Magnetic Ropes

    Hong-Qi Zhang

    2004-01-01

    We analyze the process of formation of delta configuration in some well-known super active regions based on photospheric vector magnetogram observations. It is found that the magnetic field in the initial developing stage of some delta active regions shows a potential-like configuration in the solar atmosphere,the magnetic shear develops mainly near the magnetic neutral line with magnetic islands of opposite polarities, and the large-scale photospheric twisted field forming gradually later. Some results are obtained: (1) The analysis of magnetic writhe of whole active regions cannot be limited in the strong field of sunspots, because the contribution of the fraction of decayed magnetic field is non-negligible. (2) The magnetic model of kink magnetic ropes, supposed to be generated in the subatmosphere,is not consistent with the evolution of large-scale twisted photospheric transverse magnetic field and not entirely consistent with the relationship with magnetic shear in some delta active regions. (3) The proposition is that the large-scale delta active regions are formed from contribution by small-scale non-potential magnetic flux bundles generated in the subatmosphere.

  17. Activity Analyses for Solar-Type Stars Observed With Kepler. I. Proxies of Magnetic Activity

    He, Han; Yun, Duo

    2016-01-01

    Light curves of solar-type stars often show gradual fluctuations due to rotational modulation by magnetic features (starspots and faculae) on stellar surfaces. Two quantitative measures of modulated light curves are employed as the proxies of magnetic activity for solar-type stars observed with Kepler telescope. The first is named autocorrelation index $i_{AC}$, which describes the degree of periodicity of the light curve, the second is the effective fluctuation range of the light curve $R_{eff}$, which reflects the depth of rotational modulation. The two measures are complementary and depict different aspects of magnetic activities on solar-type stars. By using the two proxies $i_{AC}$ and $R_{eff}$, we analyzed activity properties of two carefully selected solar-type stars observed with Kepler (Kepler ID: 9766237 and 10864581), which have distinct rotational periods (14.7 vs. 6.0 days). We also applied the two measures to the Sun for a comparative study. The result shows that both the measures can reveal cy...

  18. Nanotechnology in regenerative medicine: the materials side

    Engel López, Elisabeth; Michiardi, A; Navarro, M.; Lacroix, Damien Jerome; Planell Estany, Josep Anton

    2008-01-01

    Regenerative medicine is an emerging multidisciplinary field that aims to restore, maintain or enhance tissues and hence organ functions. Regeneration of tissues can be achieved by the combination of living cells, which will provide biological functionality, and materials, which act as scaffolds to support cell proliferation. Mammalian cells behave in vivo in response to the biological signals they receive from the surrounding environment, which is structured by nanometre-scaled components. T...

  19. Average Regression-Adjusted Controlled Regenerative Estimates

    Lewis, Peter A.W.; Ressler, Richard

    1991-01-01

    Proceedings of the 1991 Winter Simulation Conference Barry L. Nelson, W. David Kelton, Gordon M. Clark (eds.) One often uses computer simulations of queueing systems to generate estimates of system characteristics along with estimates of their precision. Obtaining precise estimates, espescially for high traffic intensities, can require large amounts of computer time. Average regression-adjusted controlled regenerative estimates result from combining the two techniques ...

  20. Application of Regenerative Medicine for Kidney Diseases

    Yokoo, Takashi; Fukui, Akira; Kobayashi, Eiji

    2007-01-01

    Following recent advancements of stem cell research, the potential for organ regeneration using somatic stem cells as an ultimate therapy for organ failure has increased. However, anatomically complicated organs such as the kidney and liver have proven more refractory to stem cell-based regenerative techniques. At present, kidney regeneration is considered to require one of two approaches depending on the type of renal failure, namely acute renal failure (ARF) and chronic renal failure (CRF).

  1. Regenerative ceramic burner has highest efficiency

    Gettings, M.

    1986-01-01

    Regenerative ceramic burners consisting of a double gas/air burner and utilising waste heat which is stored via regenerators are described. The system is capable of operating at 1400/sup 0/C, it removes about 85-90% of energy from hot waste gases and exhibits energy savings of 40-60% over cold nozzle mix burners and 20-25% over recuperative burners. (UK).

  2. Regenerative Endodontics: A Road Less Travelled

    Bansal, Ramta; Jain, Aditya; Mittal, Sunandan; Kumar, Tarun; Kaur, Dilpreet

    2014-01-01

    Although traditional approaches like root canal therapy and apexification procedures have been successful in treating diseased or infected root canals, but these modalities fail to re-establish healthy pulp tissue in treated teeth. Regeneration-based approaches aims to offer high levels of success by replacing diseased or necrotic pulp tissues with healthy pulp tissue to revitalize teeth. The applications of regenerative approaches in dental clinics have potential to dramatically improve pati...

  3. Fluorescent Cell Imaging in Regenerative Medicine

    Etai Sapoznik; Guoguang Niu; Yu Zhou; Murphy, Sean V.; Shay Soker

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescent protein imaging, a promising tool in biological research, incorporates numerous applications that can be of specific use in the field of regenerative medicine. To enhance tissue regeneration efforts, scientists have been developing new ways to monitor tissue development and maturation in vitro and in vivo. To that end, new imaging tools and novel fluorescent proteins have been developed for the purpose of performing deep-tissue high-resolution imaging. These new methods, such as i...

  4. Upconversion Nanoparticles for Bioimaging and Regenerative Medicine

    González-Béjar, María; Francés-Soriano, Laura; Pérez-Prieto, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Nanomaterials are proving useful for regenerative medicine in combination with stem cell therapy. Nanoparticles (NPs) can be administrated and targeted to desired tissues or organs and subsequently be used in non-invasive real-time visualization and tracking of cells by means of different imaging techniques, can act as therapeutic agent nanocarriers, and can also serve as scaffolds to guide the growth of new tissue. NPs can be of different chemical nature, such as gold, iron oxide, cadmium se...

  5. An improved theory for regenerative pump performance

    Meakhail, T.; Park, S.O.

    2005-03-15

    Owing to their low specific speed, regenerative pumps allow high heads with small flow rates and have performance curves with very stable features. This kind of pump is also smaller and simpler to construct than the other equivalent volumetric pumps, although it has fairly low efficiency. Over the past few years, regenerative pumps have been subject to more interest in various industrial applications. Previous mathematical models do not describe the flow characteristics very well as they are based on simplified assumptions. An improved model is proposed in this paper for the pump performance. The model can handle one inlet angle and two exit angles for the impeller blades and it can be used for the design of twisted blades that would increase the pump head and efficiency. A new feature of the pump characteristics based on the proposed model is discussed. It is shown that the proposed model yield results that are in good agreements with the experimental results. The new model also shows that the side-blade exit angle has a major effect on the performance of regenerative pump, which has not been accounted for in the previous theory. (Author)

  6. Regenerative endodontics-Creating new horizons.

    Dhillon, Harnoor; Kaushik, Mamta; Sharma, Roshni

    2016-05-01

    Trauma to the dental pulp, physical or microbiologic, can lead to inflammation of the pulp followed by necrosis. The current treatment modality for such cases is non-surgical root canal treatment. The damaged tissue is extirpated and the root canal system prepared. It is then obturated with an inert material such a gutta percha. In spite of advances in techniques and materials, 10%-15% of the cases may end in failure of treatment. Regenerative endodontics combines principles of endodontics, cell biology, and tissue engineering to provide an ideal treatment for inflamed and necrotic pulp. It utilizes mesenchymal stem cells, growth factors, and organ tissue culture to provide treatment. Potential treatment modalities include induction of blood clot for pulp revascularization, scaffold aided regeneration, and pulp implantation. Although in its infancy, successful treatment of damaged pulp tissue has been performed using principles of regenerative endodontics. This field is dynamic and exciting with the ability to shape the future of endodontics. This article highlights the fundamental concepts, protocol for treatment, and possible avenues for research in regenerative endodontics. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 104B: 676-685, 2016. PMID:26699211

  7. Regenerative magnetorheological dampers for vehicle suspensions

    Chen, Chao; Zou, Li; Liao, Wei-Hsin

    2015-04-01

    Magnetorheological (MR) dampers are promising for vehicle suspensions, by virtue of their adaptive properties. During the everyday use of vehicles, a lot of energy is wasted due to the energy dissipation by dampers under the road irregularities. On the other hand, extra batteries are required for the current MR damper systems. To reduce the energy waste and get rid of the dependence on extra batteries, in this paper, regenerative MR dampers are proposed for vehicle suspensions, which integrate energy harvesting and controllable damping functions. The wasted vibration energy can be converted into electrical energy and power the MR damper coil. A regenerative MR damper for vehicle suspensions is developed. Damping force and power generation characteristics of the regenerative MR damper were modeled and analyzed. Then the damper is applied to a 2 DOF suspension system for system simulation under various road conditions. Simulation results show that riding comfort can be significantly improved, while harvesting energy for other use in addition to supply power for the controlled MR damper.

  8. Mesenchymal stem cells in regenerative rehabilitation

    Nurkovic, Jasmin; Dolicanin, Zana; Mustafic, Fahrudin; Mujanovic, Rifat; Memic, Mensur; Grbovic, Vesna; Skevin, Aleksandra Jurisic; Nurkovic, Selmina

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Regenerative medicine and rehabilitation contribute in many ways to a specific plan of care based on a patient’s medical status. The intrinsic self-renewing, multipotent, regenerative, and immunosuppressive properties of mesenchymal stem cells offer great promise in the treatment of numerous autoimmune, degenerative, and graft-versus-host diseases, as well as tissue injuries. As such, mesenchymal stem cells represent a therapeutic fortune in regenerative medicine. The aim of this review is to discuss possibilities, limitations, and future clinical applications of mesenchymal stem cells. [Subjects and Methods] The authors have identified and discussed clinically and scientifically relevant articles from PubMed that have met the inclusion criteria. [Results] Direct treatment of muscle injuries, stroke, damaged peripheral nerves, and cartilage with mesenchymal stem cells has been demonstrated to be effective, with synergies seen between cellular and physical therapies. Over the past few years, several researchers, including us, have shown that there are certain limitations in the use of mesenchymal stem cells. Aging and spontaneous malignant transformation of mesenchymal stem cells significantly affect the functionality of these cells. [Conclusion] Definitive conclusions cannot be made by these studies because limited numbers of patients were included. Studies clarifying these results are expected in the near future. PMID:27390452

  9. Evolution of Magnetic Helicity and Energy Spectra of Solar Active Regions

    Zhang, Hongqi; Sokoloff, D D

    2015-01-01

    We adopt an isotropic representation of the Fourier-transformed two-point correlation tensor of the magnetic field for estimating magnetic energy and helicity spectra as well as current helicity spectra of individual active regions and the change of their spectral indices with the solar cycle. The departure of the spectral index of current helicity from 5/3 is analyzed, and it is found that it is lower than that of magnetic energy. There is no obvious relationship between the change of the normalized magnetic helicity and the integral scale of the magnetic field for individual active regions. The evolution of the spectral index reflects the development and distribution of various scales of magnetic structures in active regions. It is found that around solar maximum the magnetic energy and helicity spectra are steeper.

  10. Difficulties in the Translation of Functionalized Biomaterials into Regenerative Medicine Clinical Products

    Ratcliffe, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    There are many ways to influence cell activities, and biomaterials with functional groups attached is an attractive method that clearly has the ability to modulate cell behavior. The evidence is clear that biomaterials, with or without growth factors and cells, have resulted in numerous products for the regenerative medicine field. In contrast the functionalized biomaterial products remain in the development phase.