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Sample records for active hippocampal cultures

  1. Modulation of Network Activity in Dissociated Hippocampal Cultures by Enzymatic Digestion of Extracellular Matrix

    Mukhina I.V.; Vedunova М.V.; Sakharnova Т.А.; Dityatev А.E.

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the role of extracellular matrix in spontaneous neuronal network activity, we used microelectrode array technology and enzymatic treatment of hippocampal culture with hyaluronidase, which digests the major component of extracellular matrix, hyaluronic acid. Studies were performed using hippocampal cells that were dissociated from embryonic С57ВL6 mice (E18) and plated on microelectrode arrays (MEAs). Our findings revealed that hyaluronidase promoted seizure-like activity during...

  2. The influence of neuronal density and maturation on network activity of hippocampal cell cultures: a methodological study.

    Emilia Biffi

    Full Text Available It is known that cell density influences the maturation process of in vitro neuronal networks. Neuronal cultures plated with different cell densities differ in number of synapses per neuron and thus in single neuron synaptic transmission, which results in a density-dependent neuronal network activity. Although many authors provided detailed information about the effects of cell density on neuronal culture activity, a dedicated report of density and age influence on neuronal hippocampal culture activity has not yet been reported. Therefore, this work aims at providing reference data to researchers that set up an experimental study on hippocampal neuronal cultures, helping in planning and decoding the experiments. In this work, we analysed the effects of both neuronal density and culture age on functional attributes of maturing hippocampal cultures. We characterized the electrophysiological activity of neuronal cultures seeded at three different cell densities, recording their spontaneous electrical activity over maturation by means of MicroElectrode Arrays (MEAs. We had gather data from 86 independent hippocampal cultures to achieve solid statistic results, considering the high culture-to-culture variability. Network activity was evaluated in terms of simple spiking, burst and network burst features. We observed that electrical descriptors were characterized by a functional peak during maturation, followed by a stable phase (for sparse and medium density cultures or by a decrease phase (for high dense neuronal cultures. Moreover, 900 cells/mm(2 cultures showed characteristics suitable for long lasting experiments (e.g. chronic effect of drug treatments while 1800 cells/mm(2 cultures should be preferred for experiments that require intense electrical activity (e.g. to evaluate the effect of inhibitory molecules. Finally, cell cultures at 3600 cells/mm(2 are more appropriate for experiments in which time saving is relevant (e.g. drug screenings

  3. Seizure-like activity in hyaluronidase-treated dissociated hippocampal cultures

    Maria eVedunova

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The extracellular matrix (ECM plays an important role in use-dependent synaptic plasticity. Hyaluronic acid (HA is the backbone of the neural ECM, which has been shown to modulate -amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate (AMPA receptor mobility, paired-pulse depression, L-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channel (L-VDCC activity, long-term potentiation and contextual fear conditioning. To investigate the role of HA in the development of spontaneous neuronal network activity, we used microelectrode array recording and Ca2+ imaging in hippocampal cultures enzymatically treated with hyaluronidase. Our findings revealed an appearance of epileptiform activity 9 days after hyaluronidase treatment. The treatment transformed the normal network firing bursts and Ca2+ oscillations into long-lasting superbursts and superoscillations with durations of 11-100 seconds. The changes in Ca2+ transients in hyaluronidase-treated neurons were more prominent then in astrocytes and preceded changes in electrical activity. The Ca2+ superoscillations could be suppressed by applying the L-VDCC blocker diltiazem, whereas the neuronal firing superbursts could be additionally suppressed by an 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione as an antagonist of AMPA/kainate receptors. These results suggest that changes in the expression of HA can be epileptogenic and that hyaluronidase treatment in vitro provides a robust model for the dissection of the underlying mechanisms.

  4. The regulation of M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor desensitization by synaptic activity in cultured hippocampal neurons1

    Willets, Jonathon M.; Nelson, Carl P.; Nahorski, Stefan R; Challiss, R.A. John

    2007-01-01

    To better understand metabotropic/ionotropic integration in neurons we have examined the regulation of M1 muscarinic acetylcholine (mACh) receptor signalling in mature (> 14 days in vitro), synaptically-active hippocampal neurons in culture. Using a protocol where neurons are exposed to an EC50 concentration of the muscarinic agonist methacholine (MCh) prior to (R1), and following (R2) a desensitizing pulse of a high concentration of this agonist, we have found that the reduction in M1 mACh r...

  5. Loss of glutathione homeostasis associated with neuronal senescence facilitates TRPM2 channel activation in cultured hippocampal pyramidal neurons

    Belrose Jillian C

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glutathione (GSH plays an important role in neuronal oxidant defence. Depletion of cellular GSH is observed in neurodegenerative diseases and thereby contributes to the associated oxidative stress and Ca2+ dysregulation. Whether depletion of cellular GSH, associated with neuronal senescence, directly influences Ca2+ permeation pathways is not known. Transient receptor potential melastatin type 2 (TRPM2 is a Ca2+ permeable non-selective cation channel expressed in several cell types including hippocampal pyramidal neurons. Moreover, activation of TRPM2 during oxidative stress has been linked to cell death. Importantly, GSH has been reported to inhibit TRPM2 channels, suggesting they may directly contribute to Ca2+ dysregulation associated with neuronal senescence. Herein, we explore the relation between cellular GSH and TRPM2 channel activity in long-term cultures of hippocampal neurons. Results In whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings, we observe that TRPM2 current density increases in cultured pyramidal neurons over time in vitro. The observed increase in current density was prevented by treatment with NAC, a precursor to GSH synthesis. Conversely, treatment of cultures maintained for 2 weeks in vitro with L-BSO, which depletes GSH by inhibiting its synthesis, augments TRPM2 currents. Additionally, we demonstrate that GSH inhibits TRPM2 currents through a thiol-independent mechanism, and produces a 3.5-fold shift in the dose-response curve generated by ADPR, the intracellular agonist for TRPM2. Conclusion These results indicate that GSH plays a physiologically relevant role in the regulation of TRPM2 currents in hippocampal pyramidal neurons. This interaction may play an important role in aging and neurological diseases associated with depletion of GSH.

  6. Blockade by sigma site ligands of high voltage-activated Ca2+ channels in rat and mouse cultured hippocampal pyramidal neurones.

    Church, J; Fletcher, E. J.

    1995-01-01

    1. The effects of a series of structurally-dissimilar sigma site ligands were examined on high voltage-activated Ca2+ channel activity in two preparations of cultured hippocampal pyramidal neurones. 2. In mouse hippocampal neurones under whole-cell voltage-clamp, voltage-activated Ca2+ channel currents carried by barium ions (IBa) were reduced with the rank order (IC50 values in microM): 1S,2R-(-)-cis-N-methyl-N-[2-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)ethyl]- 2-(1-pyrrolidinyl)cyclohexylamine (7.8) > rimcazol...

  7. Addition of glutamate to serum free culture promotes recovery of electrical activity in adult hippocampal neurons in vitro

    Edwards, Darin; Das, Mainak; Molnar, Peter; Hickman, James J.

    2010-01-01

    A long-term cell culture system utilizing normal adult hippocampal neurons would represent an important tool that could be useful in research on the mature brain, neurological disorders and age-related neurological diseases. Historically, in vitro neuronal systems are derived from embryonic rather than mature brain tissue, a practice predicated upon difficulties in supporting regeneration, functional recovery and long-term survival of adult neurons in vitro. A few studies have shown that neur...

  8. Proteasome Inhibition Triggers Activity-Dependent Increase in the Size of the Recycling Vesicle Pool in Cultured Hippocampal Neurons

    Willeumier, Kristen; Pulst, Stefan M.; Schweizer, Felix E.

    2006-01-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome system, generally known for its function in protein degradation, also appears to play an important role in regulating membrane trafficking. A role for the proteasome in regulating presynaptic release and vesicle trafficking has been proposed for invertebrates, but it remains to be tested in mammalian presynaptic terminals. We used the fluorescent styrylpyridinium dye FM4-64 to visualize changes in the recycling pool of vesicles in hippocampal culture under pharmacolog...

  9. Ginsenoside Rb1 selectively inhibits the activity of L-type voltage-gated calcium channels in cultured rat hippocampal neurons

    Zhi-ying LIN; Li-min CHEN; Jing ZHANG; Xiao-dong PAN; Yuan-gui ZHU; Qin-yong YE; Hua-pin HUANG; Xiao-chun CHEN

    2012-01-01

    Aim:To investigate the effect of ginsenoside Rb1 on voltage-gated calcium currents in cultured rat hippocampal neurons and the modulatory mechanism.Methods:Cultured hippocampal neurons were prepared from Sprague Dawley rat embryos.Whole-cell configuration of the patchclamp technique was used to record the voltage-gated calcium currents (VGCCs)from the hippocampal neurons,and the effect of Rb1 was examined.Results:Rb1 (2-100 μmol/L)inhibited VGCCs in a concentration-dependent manner,and the current was mostly recovered upon wash-out.The specific L-type Ca2+ channel inhibitor nifedipine (10 μmol/L)occluded Rb1-induced inhibition on VGCCs.Neither the selective N-type Ca2+ channel blocker ω-conotoxin-GVlA (1 μmoVL),nor the selective P/Q-type Ca2+ channel blocker ωo-agatoxin IVA (30 nmol/L)diminished Rb1-sensitive VGCCs.Rb1 induced a leftward shift of the steady-state inactivation curve of Ica to a negative potential without affecting its activation kinetics or reversal potential in the I-V curve.The inhibitory effect of Rb1 was neither abolished by the adenylyl cyclase activator forskolin (10 μmol/L),nor by the PKA inhibitor H-89 (10 μmol/L).Conclusion:Ginsenoside Rb1 selectively inhibits the activity of L-type voltage-gated calcium channels,without affecting the N-type or P/Q-type Ca2+ channels in hippocampal neurons,cAMP-PKA signaling pathway is not involved in this effect.

  10. Hippocampal culture stimulus with 4-megahertz ultrasound

    Muratore, Robert; LaManna, Justine K.; Lamprecht, Michael R.; Morrison, Barclay, III

    2012-10-01

    Among current modalities, ultrasound uniquely offers both millisecond and millimeter accuracy in noninvasively stimulating brain tissue. In addition, by sweeping the ultrasound beam within the refractory period of the neuronal tissue, ultrasonic neuromodulation can be adapted to target extended or multiply connected regions with quasi-simultaneity. Towards the development of this safe brain stimulus technique, the response of rat hippocampal cultures to ultrasound was investigated. Hippocampal slices, 0.4-mm thick, were obtained from 8-day old Sprague Dawley rats and cultured for 6 days. The in vitro cultures were exposed to multiple 100-ms 4.04-MHz ultrasound pulses from a 42-mm diameter, 90-mm spherical cap transducer. Peak pressure ranged from 0 through about 77 kPa. Responses in the form of electrical potentials from a sixty channel electrode array were digitized and recorded. The DG and CA1 regions of the hippocampus exhibited similar ultrasonically-evoked field potentials.

  11. Seizure-like activity in hyaluronidase-treated dissociated hippocampal cultures

    Vedunova, Maria; Sakharnova, Tatiana; Mitroshina, Elena; Perminova, Maya; Pimashkin, Alexey; Zakharov, Yury; Dityatev, Alexander; Mukhina, Irina

    2013-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) plays an important role in use-dependent synaptic plasticity. Hyaluronic acid (HA) is the backbone of the neural ECM, which has been shown to modulate α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate (AMPA) receptor mobility, paired-pulse depression, L-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channel (L-VDCC) activity, long-term potentiation and contextual fear conditioning. To investigate the role of HA in the development of spontaneous neuronal network activity, we used m...

  12. Age-Dependent Glutamate Induction of Synaptic Plasticity in Cultured Hippocampal Neurons

    Ivenshitz, Miriam; Segal, Menahem; Sapoznik, Stav

    2006-01-01

    A common denominator for the induction of morphological and functional plasticity in cultured hippocampal neurons involves the activation of excitatory synapses. We now demonstrate massive morphological plasticity in mature cultured hippocampal neurons caused by a brief exposure to glutamate. This plasticity involves a slow, 70%-80% increase in…

  13. Agmatine increases proliferation of cultured hippocampal progenitor cells and hippocampal neurogenesis in chronically stressed mice

    Yun-feng LI; Hong-xia CHEN; Ying LIU; You-zhi ZHANG; Yan-qin LIU; Jin LI

    2006-01-01

    Aim:To explore the mechanism of agmatine's antidepressant action.Methods: Male mice were subjected to a variety of unpredictable stressors on a daily basis over a 24-d period.The open-field behaviors of the mice were displayed and recorded using a Videomex-V image analytic system automatically.For bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU;thymidine analog as a marker for dividing cells) labeling,the mice were injected with BrdU (100 mg/kg,ip,twice per d for 2 d),and the hippocampal neurogenesis in stressed mice was measured by immunohistochemistry.The proliferation of cultured hippocampal progenitor cells from neonatal rats was determined by colorimetric assay (cell counting kit-8) and 3H-thymidine incorporation assay.Results:After the onset of chronic stress,the locomotor activity of the mice in the open field significantly decreased,while coadministration of agmatine 10 mg/kg (po) blocked it.Furthermore,the number of BrdU-labeled cells in the hippocampal dentate gyrus significantly decreased in chronically stressed mice, which was also blocked by chronic coadministration with agmatine 10 mg/kg (po). Four weeks after the BrdU injection, some of the new born cells matured and became neurons, as determined by double labeling for BrdU and neuron specific enolase (NSE), a marker for mature neurons.In vitro treatment with agmatine 0.1-10 μmo1/L for 3 d significantly increased the proliferation of the cultured hippocampal progenitor cells in a dose-dependent manner.Conclusion:We have found that agmatine increases proliferation of hippocampal progenitor cells in vitro and the hippocampal neurogenesis in vivo in chronically stressed mice.This may be one of the important mechanisms involved in agmatine's antidepressant action.

  14. Long-Term Lithium Treatment Increases cPLA2 and iPLA2 Activity in Cultured Cortical and Hippocampal Neurons

    Vanessa de Jesus De-Paula

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Experimental evidence supports the neuroprotective properties of lithium, with implications for the treatment and prevention of dementia and other neurodegenerative disorders. Lithium modulates critical intracellular pathways related to neurotrophic support, inflammatory response, autophagy and apoptosis. There is additional evidence indicating that lithium may also affect membrane homeostasis. Objective: To investigate the effect of lithium on cytosolic phospholipase A2 (PLA2 activity, a key player on membrane phospholipid turnover which has been found to be reduced in blood and brain tissue of patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Methods: Primary cultures of cortical and hippocampal neurons were treated for 7 days with different concentrations of lithium chloride (0.02 mM, 0.2 mM and 2 mM. A radio-enzymatic assay was used to determine the total activity of PLA2 and two PLA2 subtypes: cytosolic calcium-dependent (cPLA2; and calcium-independent (iPLA2. Results: cPLA2 activity increased by 82% (0.02 mM; p = 0.05 and 26% (0.2 mM; p = 0.04 in cortical neurons and by 61% (0.2 mM; p = 0.03 and 57% (2 mM; p = 0.04 in hippocampal neurons. iPLA2 activity was increased by 7% (0.2 mM; p = 0.04 and 13% (2 mM; p = 0.05 in cortical neurons and by 141% (0.02 mM; p = 0.0198 in hippocampal neurons. Conclusion: long-term lithium treatment increases membrane phospholipid metabolism in neurons through the activation of total, c- and iPLA2. This effect is more prominent at sub-therapeutic concentrations of lithium, and the activation of distinct cytosolic PLA2 subtypes is tissue specific, i.e., iPLA2 in hippocampal neurons, and cPLA2 in cortical neurons. Because PLA2 activities are reported to be reduced in Alzheimer’s disease (AD and bipolar disorder (BD, the present findings provide a possible mechanism by which long-term lithium treatment may be useful in the prevention of the disease.

  15. Pilocarpine-induced seizure-like activity with increased BNDF and neuropeptide Y expression in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures

    Poulsen, Frantz Rom; Jahnsen, Henrik; Blaabjerg, Morten;

    2002-01-01

    exposed to 0.1 mM to 5 mM of pilocarpine for 4 h to 7 days. Other cultures were treated with pilocarpine for 7 days and left for 7-14 days in normal medium. Age-matched, non-treated cultures served as controls. Intracellular recordings from CA1 pyramidal cells revealed increased spontaneous activity in 31...... the muscarinic receptor antagonist atropine (100 microM). Regardless of dose and exposure time, the pilocarpine treatment induced very limited neuronal cell death, recorded as cellular propidium iodide uptake. Cultures exposed to 5 mM pilocarpine for up to 7 days displayed increased BDNF expression...

  16. Colchicine induces apoptosis in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures

    Kristensen, Bjarne W; Noer, Helle; Gramsbergen, Jan Bert;

    2003-01-01

    The microtubule-disrupting agent colchicine is known to be particular toxic for certain types of neurons, including the granule cells of the dentate gyrus. In this study we investigated whether colchicine could induce such neuron-specific degeneration in developing (1 week in vitro) and mature (3...... weeks in vitro) organotypic hippocampal slice cultures and whether the induced cell death was apoptotic and/or necrotic. When applied to 1-week-old cultures for 48 h, colchicine induced primarily apoptotic, but also a minor degree of necrotic cell death in the dentate granule cells, as investigated by...... cellular uptake of the fluorescent dye propidium iodide (PI), immunostaining for active caspase 3 and c-Jun/AP-1 (N) and fragmentation of nuclei as seen in Hoechst 33342 staining. All four markers appeared after 12 h of colchicine exposure. Two of them, active caspase 3 and c-Jun/AP-1 (N) displayed a...

  17. Functional clustering in hippocampal cultures: relating network structure and dynamics

    In this work we investigate the relationship between gross anatomic structural network properties, neuronal dynamics and the resultant functional structure in dissociated rat hippocampal cultures. Specifically, we studied cultures as they developed under two conditions: the first supporting glial cell growth (high glial group), and the second one inhibiting it (low glial group). We then compared structural network properties and the spatio-temporal activity patterns of the neurons. Differences in dynamics between the two groups could be linked to the impact of the glial network on the neuronal network as the cultures developed. We also implemented a recently developed algorithm called the functional clustering algorithm (FCA) to obtain the resulting functional network structure. We show that this new algorithm is useful for capturing changes in functional network structure as the networks evolve over time. The FCA detects changes in functional structure that are consistent with expected dynamical differences due to the impact of the glial network. Cultures in the high glial group show an increase in global synchronization as the cultures age, while those in the low glial group remain locally synchronized. We additionally use the FCA to quantify the amount of synchronization present in the cultures and show that the total level of synchronization in the high glial group is stronger than in the low glial group. These results indicate an interdependence between the glial and neuronal networks present in dissociated cultures

  18. Localized gene transfer into organotypic hippocampal slice cultures and acute hippocampal slices

    Casaccia-Bonnefil, P; Benedikz, Eirikur; Shen, H;

    1993-01-01

    Viral vectors derived from herpes simplex virus, type-1 (HSV), can transfer and express genes into fully differentiated, post-mitotic neurons. These vectors also transduce cells effectively in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures. Nanoliter quantities of a virus stock of HSVlac, an HSV vector...... effective and rapid. The titer of the HSVlac stocks was determined on NIH3T3 cells. Eighty-three percent of the beta-gal forming units successfully transduced beta-gal after microapplication to slice cultures. beta-Gal expression was detected as rapidly as 4 h after transduction into cultures of fibroblasts...... or hippocampal slices. The rapid expression of beta-gal by HSVlac allowed efficient transduction of acute hippocampal slices. Many genes have been transduced and expressed using HSV vectors; therefore, this microapplication method can be applied to many neurobiological questions....

  19. Temporal dependence of cysteine protease activation following excitotoxic hippocampal injury

    Berry, Jennifer N.; Sharrett-Field, Lynda; Butler, Tracy R.; Prendergast, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Excitotoxic insults can lead to intracellular signaling cascades that contribute to cell death, in part by activation of proteases, phospholipases, and endonucleases. Cysteine proteases, such as calpains, are calcium-activated enzymes which degrade cytoskeletal proteins, including microtubule-associated proteins, tubulin, and spectrin, among others. The current study used the organotypic hippocampal slice culture model to examine whether pharmacologic inhibition of cysteine protease activity ...

  20. Relationships between hippocampal activity and breathing patterns

    Harper, R M; Poe, G R; Rector, D M; Kristensen, Morten Pilgaard

    1998-01-01

    Single cell discharge, EEG activity, and optical changes accompanying alterations in breathing patterns, as well as the knowledge that respiratory musculature is heavily involved in movement and other behavioral acts, implicate hippocampal regions in some aspects of breathing control. The control...

  1. Ethanol induces MAP2 changes in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures

    Noraberg, J; Zimmer, J

    1998-01-01

    Microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) and neuron-specific protein (NeuN) immunostains were used to demonstrate neurotoxic effects in mature hippocampal slice cultures exposed to ethanol (50, 100, 200 mM) for 4 weeks. At the low dose the density of MAP2 immunostaining in the dentate molecular la...

  2. Calcium control of gene regulation in rat hippocampal neuronal cultures.

    Pinato, Giulietta; Pegoraro, Silvia; Iacono, Giovanni; Ruaro, Maria Elisabetta; Torre, Vincent

    2009-09-01

    Blockage of GABA-A receptors in hippocampal neuronal cultures triggers synchronous bursts of spikes initiating neuronal plasticity, partly mediated by changes of gene expression. By using specific pharmacological blockers, we have investigated which sources of Ca2+ entry primarily control changes of gene expression induced by 20 microM gabazine applied for 30 min (GabT). Intracellular Ca2+ transients were monitored with Ca2+ imaging while recording electrical activity with patch clamp microelectrodes. Concomitant transcription profiles were obtained using Affymetrix oligonucleotide microarrays and confirmed with quantitative RT-PCR. Blockage of NMDA receptors with 2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (APV) did not reduce significantly somatic Ca2+ transients, which, on the contrary, were reduced by selective blockage of L, N, and P/Q types voltage gated calcium channels (VGCCs). Therefore, we investigated changes of gene expression in the presence of blockers of NMDA receptors and L, N, and P/Q VGCCs. Our results show that: (i) among genes upregulated by GabT, there are genes selectively dependent on NMDA activation, genes selectively dependent on L-type VGCCs and genes dependent on the activation of both channels; (ii) the majority of genes requires the concomitant activation of NMDA receptors and Ca2+ entry through VGCCs; (iii) blockage of N and P/Q VGCCs has an effect similar but not identical to blockage of L-type VGCCs. PMID:19441076

  3. Epileptogenesis causes an N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor/Ca2+-dependent decrease in Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II activity in a hippocampal neuronal culture model of spontaneous recurrent epileptiform discharges

    Blair, Robert E.; Sombati, Sompong; Churn, Severn B.; DeLorenzo, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    Alterations in the function of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaM Kinase II) have been observed in both in vivo and in vitro models of epileptogenesis; however the molecular mechanism mediating the effects of epileptogenesis on CaM Kinase II have not been elucidated. This study was initiated to evaluate the molecular pathways involved in causing the long lasting decrease in CaM Kinase II activity in the hippocampal neuronal culture model of low Mg2+ induced spontaneous recurrent...

  4. Inhibition of glycine-activated current by melatonin in cultured rat hippocampal neurons%松果体素抑制大鼠海马神经元甘氨酸激活的全细胞电流

    程新萍; 开远忠; 吴旭; 刘雅静; 周江宁

    2012-01-01

    目的 研究松果体素对培养的大鼠海马神经元甘氨酸激活的全细胞电流(Igly)的调控.方法 在培养的大鼠海马神经元上,采用全细胞膜片钳技术,研究松果体素对甘氨酸激活的全细胞电流的调控.结果 松果体素以浓度依赖的方式可逆地抑制Igly,并且这种抑制作用是非竞争性的,松果体素的抑制作用没有特异的亚基选择性.结论 松果体素能以非竞争的方式直接抑制甘氨酸受体介导的电流,这种抑制作用可能对海马区域神经网络的兴奋性产生影响.%Aim To investigate the effect of melatonin on the glycine-activated current ( Igly ) in cultured rat hippocampal neurons. Method Whole-cell patch-clamp technique was used. Result Melatonin rapidly and reversibly inhibited the amplitude of glycine-activated current mediated by native glycine receptors and recombinant al-a2-a3-and alp-glycine receptors. In cultured rat hippocampal neurons, melatonin inhibited the glycine-activated current in a dose-dependentmanner. Furthermore, melatonin noncompetitively inhibited the Igly Conclusion Melatonin can directly depress GlyR-mediated currents in a non-competitive and subunit-independent manner, suggesting that melatonin may modulate glycinergic transmission and hippocampal network activity.

  5. Nicotine induces dendritic spine remodeling in cultured hippocampal neurons.

    Oda, Akira; Yamagata, Kanato; Nakagomi, Saya; Uejima, Hiroshi; Wiriyasermkul, Pattama; Ohgaki, Ryuichi; Nagamori, Shushi; Kanai, Yoshikatsu; Tanaka, Hidekazu

    2014-01-01

    Cholinergic neurons in the CNS are involved in synaptic plasticity and cognition. Both muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) influence plasticity and cognitive function. The mechanism underlying nAChR-induced plasticity, however, has remained elusive. Here, we demonstrate morphological changes in dendritic spines following activation of α4β2* nAChRs, which are expressed on glutamatergic pre-synaptic termini of cultured hippocampal neurons. Exposure of the neurons to nicotine resulted in a lateral enlargement of spine heads. This was abolished by dihydro-β-erythroidine, an antagonist of α4β2* nAChRs, but not by α-bungarotoxin, an antagonist of α7 nAChRs. Tetanus toxin or a mixture of 2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid and 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione, antagonists of NMDA- and AMPA-type glutamate receptors, blocked the nicotine-induced spine remodeling. In addition, nicotine exerted full spine-enlarging response in the post-synaptic neuron whose β2 nAChR expression was knocked down. Finally, pre-treatment with nicotine enhanced the Ca(2+)-response of the neurons to glutamate. These data suggest that nicotine influences the activity of glutamatergic neurotransmission through the activation of pre-synaptic α4β2 nAChRs, resulting in the modulation of spinal architecture and responsiveness. The present findings may represent one of the cellular mechanisms underlying cholinergic tuning of brain function. Activation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in brain influences plasticity and cognition. Here, activation of α4β2* nAChRs, which are expressed on glutamatergic presynaptic termini, results in the enlargement of dendritic spines through the modulation of the glutamatergic neurotransmission. The remodeled spinal architecture might be responsible for the change in responsiveness of neural circuitry, leading to cholinergic tuning of brain function. PMID:24117996

  6. Trimethyltin (TMT) neurotoxicity in organotypic rat hippocampal slice cultures

    Noraberg, J; Gramsbergen, J B; Fonnum, F;

    1998-01-01

    neurotoxicological studies, including further studies of neurotoxic mechanisms of TMT. Four-week-old cultures, derived from 7-day-old donor rats and grown in serum-free medium, were exposed to TMT (0.5-100 microM) for 24 h followed by 24 h in normal medium. TMT-induced neurodegeneration was then monitored by (a......) propidium iodide (PI) uptake, (b) lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) efflux into the culture medium, (c) cellular cobalt uptake as an index of calcium influx, (d) ordinary Nissl cell staining, and (e) immunohistochemical staining for microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP-2). Cellular degeneration as assessed by...... vivo cell stain observations of rats acutely exposed to TMT. The mean PI uptake of the cultures and the LDH efflux into the medium were highly correlated. The combined results obtained by the different markers indicate that the hippocampal slice culture method is a feasible model for further studies of...

  7. A calcium-permeable cGMP-activated cation conductance in hippocampal neurons

    Leinders-Zufall, T.; Rosenboom, H.; Barnstable, C. J.; Shepherd, G. M.; Zufall, F.

    1995-01-01

    Whole-cell patch clamp recordings detected a previously unidentified cGMP-activated membrane conductance in cultured rat hippocampal neurons. This conductance is nonselectively permeable for cations and is completely but reversibly blocked by external Cd2+. The Ca2+ permeability of the hippocampal cGMP-activated conductance was examined in detail, indicating that the underlying ion channels display a high relative permeability for Ca2+. The results indicate that hippocampal neurons contain a cGMP-activated membrane conductance that has some properties similar to the cyclic nucleotide-gated channels previously shown in sensory receptor cells and retinal neurons. In hippocampal neurons this conductance similarly could mediate membrane depolarization and Ca2+ fluxes in response to intracellular cGMP elevation.

  8. HIV-1 protein-mediated amyloidogenesis in rat hippocampal cell cultures

    Aksenov, M.Y.; Aksenova, M.V.; Mactutus, C. F.; Booze, R. M.

    2010-01-01

    Since the beginning of the highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) era, epidemiological evidence indicates an increasing incidence of Alzheimer's (AD)-like brain pathology in aging HIV patients. Emerging evidence warns of potential convergent mechanisms underlying HIV- and Aβ-mediated neurodegeneration. We found that HIV-1 Tat and gp 120 promote the secretion of Aβ 1–42 in primary rat fetal hippocampal cell cultures. Our results demonstrate that the variant of Tat expressed by the neurot...

  9. BDNF downregulates 5-HT(2A) receptor protein levels in hippocampal cultures

    Trajkovska, V; Santini, M A; Marcussen, Anders Bue;

    2009-01-01

    5-HT(2A) receptor protein levels in primary hippocampal neuronal and mature hippocampal organotypic cultures exposed to different BDNF concentrations for either 1, 3, 5 or 7 days. In vivo effects of BDNF on hippocampal 5-HT(2A) receptor levels were further corroborated in (BDNF +/-) mice with...... reduced BDNF levels. In primary neuronal cultures, 7 days exposure to 25 and 50ng/mL BDNF resulted in downregulation of 5-HT(2A), but not of 5-HT(1A), receptor protein levels. The BDNF-associated downregulation of 5-HT(2A) receptor levels was also observed in mature hippocampal organotypic cultures...

  10. The structural development of primary cultured hippocampal neurons on a graphene substrate.

    He, Zuhong; Zhang, Shasha; Song, Qin; Li, Wenyan; Liu, Dong; Li, Huawei; Tang, Mingliang; Chai, Renjie

    2016-10-01

    The potential of graphene-based nanomaterials as a neural interfacing material for neural repair and regeneration remains poorly understood. In the present study, the response to the graphene substrate by neurons was determined in a hippocampal culture model. The results revealed the growth and maturation of hippocampal cultures on graphene substrates were significantly improved compared to the commercial control. In details, graphene promoted growth cone growth and microtubule formation inside filopodia 24h after seeding as evidenced by a higher average number of filopodia emerging from growth cones, a longer average length of filopodia, and a larger growth cone area. Graphene also significantly boosted neurite sprouting and outgrowth. The dendritic length, the number of branch points, and the dendritic complex index were significantly improved on the graphene substrate during culture. Moreover, the spine density was enhanced and the maturation of dendritic spines from thin to stubby spines was significantly promoted on graphene at 21 days after seeding. Lastly, graphene significantly elevated the synapse density and synaptic activity in the hippocampal cultures. The present study highlights graphene's potential as a neural interfacing material for neural repair and regeneration and sheds light on the future biomedical applications of graphene-based nanomaterials. PMID:27395037

  11. Epileptogenesis causes an N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor/Ca2+-dependent decrease in Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II activity in a hippocampal neuronal culture model of spontaneous recurrent epileptiform discharges.

    Blair, Robert E; Sombati, Sompong; Churn, Severn B; Delorenzo, Robert J

    2008-06-24

    Alterations in the function of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaM kinase II) have been observed in both in vivo and in vitro models of epileptogenesis; however the molecular mechanism mediating the effects of epileptogenesis on CaM kinase II has not been elucidated. This study was initiated to evaluate the molecular pathways involved in causing the long-lasting decrease in CaM kinase II activity in the hippocampal neuronal culture model of low Mg2+-induced spontaneous recurrent epileptiform discharges (SREDs). We show here that the decrease in CaM kinase II activity associated with SREDs in hippocampal cultures involves a Ca2+/N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-dependent mechanism. Low Mg2+-induced SREDs result in a significant decrease in Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent substrate phosphorylation of the synthetic peptide autocamtide-2. Reduction of extracellular Ca2+ levels (0.2 mM in treatment solution) or the addition of dl-2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (APV) 25 microM blocked the low Mg2+-induced decrease in CaM kinase II-dependent substrate phosphorylation. Antagonists of the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)/kainic acid receptor or L-type voltage sensitive Ca2+ channel had no effect on the low Mg2+-induced decrease in CaM kinase II-dependent substrate phosphorylation. The results of this study demonstrate that the decrease in CaM kinase II activity associated with this model of epileptogenesis involves a selective Ca2+/NMDA receptor-dependent mechanism and may contribute to the production and maintenance of SREDs in this model. PMID:18495112

  12. Synaptic network activity induces neuronal differentiation of adult hippocampal precursor cells through BDNF signaling

    HarishBabu

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Adult hippocampal neurogenesis is regulated by activity. But how do neural precursor cells in the hippocampus respond to surrounding network activity and translate increased neural activity into a developmental program? Here we show that long-term potential (LTP-like synaptic activity within a cellular network of mature hippocampal neurons promotes neuronal differentiation of newly generated cells. In co-cultures of precursor cells with primary hippocampal neurons, LTP-like synaptic plasticity induced by addition of glycine in Mg2+-free media for 5 min, produced synchronous network activity and subsequently increased synaptic strength between neurons. Furthermore, this synchronous network activity led to a significant increase in neuronal differentiation from the co-cultured neural precursor cells. When applied directly to precursor cells, glycine and Mg2+-free solution did not induce neuronal differentiation. Synaptic plasticity-induced neuronal differentiation of precursor cells was observed in the presence of GABAergic neurotransmission blockers but was dependent on NMDA-mediated Ca2+ influx. Most importantly, neuronal differentiation required the release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF from the underlying substrate hippocampal neurons as well as TrkB receptor phosphorylation in precursor cells. This suggests that activity-dependent stem cell differentiation within the hippocampal network is mediated via synaptically evoked BDNF signaling.

  13. Physical Activity and Alzheimer's-Related Hippocampal Atrophy

    ... Plan National Alzheimer's Project Act (NAPA) About ADEAR Physical activity and Alzheimer’s-related hippocampal atrophy August 4, 2014 Physical activity may help prevent atrophy of the hippocampus, a ...

  14. Glutamate receptor antagonists and growth factors modulate dentate granule cell neurogenesis in organotypic, rat hippocampal slice cultures

    Poulsen, Frantz Rom; Blaabjerg, Morten; Montero, Maria;

    2005-01-01

    Generation of dentate granule cells and its modulation by glutamate receptor antagonists, growth factors and pilocarpine-induced seizure-like activity was investigated in rat hippocampal slice cultures derived from 1-week-old rats and grown for 2 weeks. Focussing on the dentate granule cell layer...

  15. Downregulation of Transketolase Activity Is Related to Inhibition of Hippocampal Progenitor Cell Proliferation Induced by Thiamine Deficiency

    Yanling Zhao; Yiying Wu; Haolu Hu; Jinghui Cai; Min Ning; Xiushi Ni; Chunjiu Zhong

    2014-01-01

    In animal experiments, hippocampal neurogenesis and the activity of thiamine-dependent transketolase decrease markedly under conditions of thiamine deficiency. To further investigate the effect of thiamine deficiency on the proliferation of hippocampal progenitor cells (HPCs) and the potential mechanisms involved in this effect, we cultured HPCs in vitro in the absence of thiamine and found that proliferation and transketolase activity were both significantly repressed. Furthermore, specific ...

  16. Ghrelin regulates cell cycle-related gene expression in cultured hippocampal neural stem cells.

    Chung, Hyunju; Park, Seungjoon

    2016-08-01

    We have previously demonstrated that ghrelin stimulates the cellular proliferation of cultured adult rat hippocampal neural stem cells (NSCs). However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms by which ghrelin regulates cell cycle progression. The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential effects of ghrelin on cell cycle regulatory molecules in cultured hippocampal NSCs. Ghrelin treatment increased proliferation assessed by CCK-8 proliferation assay. The expression levels of proliferating cell nuclear antigen and cell division control 2, well-known cell-proliferating markers, were also increased by ghrelin. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis revealed that ghrelin promoted progression of cell cycle from G0/G1 to S phase, whereas this progression was attenuated by the pretreatment with specific inhibitors of MEK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt, mammalian target of rapamycin, and janus kinase 2/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3. Ghrelin-induced proliferative effect was associated with increased expression of E2F1 transcription factor in the nucleus, as determined by Western blotting and immunofluorescence. We also found that ghrelin caused an increase in protein levels of positive regulators of cell cycle, such as cyclin A and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 2. Moreover, p27(KIP1) and p57(KIP2) protein levels were reduced when cell were exposed to ghrelin, suggesting downregulation of CDK inhibitors may contribute to proliferative effect of ghrelin. Our data suggest that ghrelin targets both cell cycle positive and negative regulators to stimulate proliferation of cultured hippocampal NSCs. PMID:27325242

  17. Spontaneous Plasticity of Multineuronal Activity Patterns in Activated Hippocampal Networks

    Atsushi Usami

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Using functional multineuron imaging with single-cell resolution, we examined how hippocampal networks by themselves change the spatiotemporal patterns of spontaneous activity during the course of emitting spontaneous activity. When extracellular ionic concentrations were changed to those that mimicked in vivo conditions, spontaneous activity was increased in active cell number and activity frequency. When ionic compositions were restored to the control conditions, the activity level returned to baseline, but the weighted spatial dispersion of active cells, as assessed by entropy-based metrics, did not. Thus, the networks can modify themselves by altering the internal structure of their correlated activity, even though they as a whole maintained the same level of activity in space and time.

  18. Hyperexcitability and cell loss in kainate-treated hippocampal slice cultures

    Benedikz, Eirikur; Casaccia-Bonnefil, P; Stelzer, A;

    1993-01-01

    Loss of hippocampal interneurons has been reported in patients with severe temporal lobe epilepsy and in animals treated with kainate. We investigated the relationship between KA induced epileptiform discharge and loss of interneurons in hippocampal slice cultures. Application of KA (1 microM) pr......-like immunoreactive (PV-I) interneurons preceded loss of somatostatin-like immunoreactive (SS-I) interneurons suggesting a different time course of KA neurotoxicity in these subpopulations of interneurons....

  19. Synaptic and extrasynaptic γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor clusters in rat hippocampal cultures during development

    Scotti, Alessandra L.; Reuter, Harald

    2001-01-01

    We have simultaneously measured the expression of postsynaptic γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptor clusters and of presynaptic boutons in neonatal rat hippocampal cultures between days 1 and 30. GABAA receptors were labeled with antibodies recognizing the extracellular domains of β2/3 and γ2 subunits. Boutons were visualized by activity-dependent uptake of the styryl dye FM4-64, or by antibodies against the presynaptic vesicular protein SV2 or the GABA-synt...

  20. Evaluation of neurotoxic and neuroprotective pathways affected by antiepileptic drugs in cultured hippocampal neurons.

    Morte, Maria I; Carreira, Bruno P; Falcão, Maria J; Ambrósio, António F; Soares-da-Silva, Patrício; Araújo, Inês M; Carvalho, Caetana M

    2013-12-01

    In this study we evaluated the neurotoxicity of eslicarbazepine acetate (ESL), and of its in vivo metabolites eslicarbazepine (S-Lic) and R-licarbazepine (R-Lic), as compared to the structurally-related compounds carbamazepine (CBZ) and oxcarbazepine (OXC), in an in vitro model of cultured rat hippocampal neurons. The non-related antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) lamotrigine (LTG) and sodium valproate (VPA) were also studied. We assessed whether AEDs modulate pro-survival/pro-apoptotic pathways, such as extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK1/2), Akt and stress activated protein kinase/c-Jun N-terminal kinase (SAPK/JNK). We found that neither ESL nor its metabolites, CBZ or LTG, up to 0.3mM, for 24h of exposure, decreased cell viability. OXC was the most toxic drug decreasing cell viability in a concentration-dependent manner, leading to activation of caspase-3 and PARP cleavage. VPA caused the appearance of the apoptotic markers, but did not alter cell viability. ESL, S-Lic and OXC decreased the levels of phospho-ERK1/2 and of phospho-Akt, when compared to basal levels, whereas CBZ decreased phospho-SAPK/JNK and phospho-Akt levels. LTG and VPA increased the phosphorylation levels of SAPK/JNK. These results suggest that ESL and its main metabolite S-Lic, as well as CBZ, LTG and VPA, are less toxic to hippocampal neurons than OXC, which was the most toxic agent. PMID:24055897

  1. Morphological assessment of neurite outgrowth in hippocampal neuron-astrocyte co-cultures.

    Giordano, Gennaro; Costa, Lucio G

    2012-05-01

    Neurite outgrowth is a fundamental event in brain development, as well as in regeneration of damaged neurons. Astrocytes play a major role in neuritogenesis, by expressing and releasing factors that facilitate neurite outgrowth, such as extracellular matrix proteins, and factors that can inhibit neuritogenesis, such as the chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan neurocan. In this unit we describe a noncontact co-culture system of hippocampal neurons and cortical (or hippocampal) astrocytes for measurement of neurite outgrowth. Hippocampal pyramidal neurons are plated on glass coverslips, which are inverted onto an astrocyte feeder layer, allowing exposure of neurons to astrocyte-derived factors without direct contact between these two cell types. After co-culture, neurons are stained and photographed, and processes are assessed morphologically using Metamorph software. This method allows exposing astrocytes to various agents before co-culture in order to assess how these exposures may influence the ability of astrocytes to foster neurite outgrowth. PMID:22549268

  2. Characterization of the in vitro propagation of epileptiform electrophysiological activity in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures coupled to 3D microelectrode arrays

    Pisciotta, Marzia; Morgavi, Giovanna; Jahnsen, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    Dynamic aspects of the propagation of epileptiform activity have so far received little attention. With the aim of providing new insights about the spatial features of the propagation of epileptic seizures in the nervous system, we studied in vitro the initiation and propagation of traveling......AnimalsAnimals, NewbornConvulsants/pharmacologyElectric Stimulation/methodsElectrophysiological Phenomena/drug effectsElectrophysiological Phenomena/physiology*Evoked Potentials/drug effectsEvoked Potentials/physiology*Hippocampus/anatomy & histologyHippocampus/drug effects...

  3. Contextual modulation of hippocampal activity during picture naming.

    Llorens, A; Dubarry, A-S; Trébuchon, A; Chauvel, P; Alario, F-X; Liégeois-Chauvel, C

    2016-08-01

    Picture naming is a standard task used to probe language processes in healthy and impaired speakers. It recruits a broad neural network of language related areas, among which the hippocampus is rarely included. However, the hippocampus could play a role during picture naming, subtending, for example, implicit learning of the links between pictured objects and their names. To test this hypothesis, we recorded hippocampal activity during plain picture naming, without memorization requirement; we further assessed whether this activity was modulated by contextual factors such as repetition priming and semantic interference. Local field potentials recorded from intracerebral electrodes implanted in the healthy hippocampi of epileptic patients revealed a specific and reliable pattern of activity, markedly modulated by repetition priming and semantic context. These results indicate that the hippocampus is recruited during picture naming, presumably in relation to implicit learning, with contextual factors promoting differential hippocampal processes, possibly subtended by different sub-circuitries. PMID:27380274

  4. A method for objectively quantifying propidium iodide exclusion in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures

    Happ, Denise F; Tasker, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHSCs) are an attractive in vitro model to examine mechanisms of neuronal injury, because the normal hippocampal architecture, function and cellular diversity are mostly preserved. The effects of exposure to excitotoxins such as N......-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) on cell viability can be determined by propidium iodide (PI) staining. NEW METHOD: We describe a simple method to objectively quantify cell death in NMDA exposed slice cultures using PI that provides a standardized means of quantifying cell death in hippocampal subfields without the need to...... induce maximal cell death in each slice. The method employs separation of subfields using simple landmarks and densitometric quantification of PI intensity in 10 template-oriented counting fields. RESULTS: We show that exposure to increasing concentrations of NMDA results in a dose-dependent increase in...

  5. P物质抑制培养大鼠海马大锥体细胞GABA-激活电流%Substance P depresses GABA-activated currents in cultured hippocampal pyramidal neurons of rats

    熊顺华; 李之望; 樊友珍; 王明江; 魏劲波

    2001-01-01

    研究主要探讨P物质(SP)对GABA-激活电流的调制。实验在培养的新生大鼠海马大锥体细胞上进行, 应用全细胞膜片箝技术记录GABA激活的内向电流。在被检的大锥体细胞中, 有72%(66/92)的神经元对GABA和SP同时敏感。预加SP后, GABA激活电流明显地被抑制, 此抑制作用是呈剂量依赖性的, 在预加10-8、10-7、10-6、10-5 mol/L SP后, GABA的激活电流分别降低18%、24.8%、25.9%和28%。用SP的拮抗剂spantide能阻断此种抑制作用, 在电极中灌注H7 (PKC抑制剂)能取消此抑制作用。上述结果提示: SP对GABA激活电流的抑制作用是SP作用于SP受体, 通过胞内第二信使, 使GABAA受体通道复合体胞内磷酸化所致。%The purpose of the present study was to explore whether substance P (SP) modulates the response mediated by GABAA receptors. Experiments were carried out on cultured hippocampal pyramidal neurons of rats. GABA-activated inward currents were recorded using the whole-cell-patch-clamp techique. The majority of the neurons examined (66/92, 72%) were sensitive to both GABA and SP. When the neurons were treated with SP prior to application of GABA, the GABA-activated current (IGABA) was inhibited markedly, which was concentration-dependent and could be blocked by spantide, an NK1 receptor antagonist. With 10-8, 10-7, 10-6 and 10-5 mol/L SP, IGABA was inhibited by 18%, 24.8%, 25.9% and 28% respectively. Intracellular application of H7, a potent inhibitor of PKC, abolished inhibition of IGABA by SP, suggesting that the inhibition of IGABA by SP may be a result of intracellular phosphorylation of the GABAA receptor.

  6. Recruitment of Perisomatic Inhibition during Spontaneous Hippocampal Activity In Vitro.

    Anna Beyeler

    Full Text Available It was recently shown that perisomatic GABAergic inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSPs originating from basket and chandelier cells can be recorded as population IPSPs from the hippocampal pyramidal layer using extracellular electrodes (eIPSPs. Taking advantage of this approach, we have investigated the recruitment of perisomatic inhibition during spontaneous hippocampal activity in vitro. Combining intracellular and extracellular recordings from pyramidal cells and interneurons, we confirm that inhibitory signals generated by basket cells can be recorded extracellularly, but our results suggest that, during spontaneous activity, eIPSPs are mostly confined to the CA3 rather than CA1 region. CA3 eIPSPs produced the powerful time-locked inhibition of multi-unit activity expected from perisomatic inhibition. Analysis of the temporal dynamics of spike discharges relative to eIPSPs suggests significant but moderate recruitment of excitatory and inhibitory neurons within the CA3 network on a 10 ms time scale, within which neurons recruit each other through recurrent collaterals and trigger powerful feedback inhibition. Such quantified parameters of neuronal interactions in the hippocampal network may serve as a basis for future characterisation of pathological conditions potentially affecting the interactions between excitation and inhibition in this circuit.

  7. Neuroprotective effects of anticonvulsants in rat hippocampal slice cultures exposed to oxygen/glucose deprivation

    Rekling, Jens C

    2003-01-01

    ). Hippocampal slice cultures were submitted to 1 h OGD and the resulting cell death was quantified 24 h later using a novel automated fluorescent scanning method. The classical anticonvulsants phenobarbital, phenytoin, ethosuximide, chlordiazepoxide and midazolam all significantly and dose-dependently reduced...

  8. Effects of GSM 1800 MHz on dendritic development of cultured hippo-campal neurons

    Wei NING; Shu-jun XU; Huai CHIANG; Zheng-ping XU; Su-ya ZHOU; Wei YANG; Jian-hong LUO

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the effects of global system for mobile communications (GSM)1800 MHz microwaves on dendritic filopodia, dendritic arborization, and spine maturation during development in cultured hippocampal neurons in rats. Methods: The cultured hippocampal neurons were exposed to GSM 1800 MHz microwaves with 2.4 and 0.8 W/kg, respectively, for 15 min each day from 6 days in vitro (DIV6) to DIV14. The subtle structures of dendrites were displayed by transfection with farnesylated enhanced green fluorescent protein (F-GFP) and GFP-actin on DIV5 into the hippocampal neurons. Results: There was a significant decrease in the density and mobility of dendritic filopodia at DIV8 and in the density of mature spines at DIV14 in the neurons exposed to GSM 1800 MHz microwaves with 2.4 W/kg. In addition, the average length of dendrites per neuron at DIV10 and DIV14 was decreased, while the dendritic arborization was unaltered in these neurons. However, there were no significant changes found in the neurons ex- posed to the GSM 1800 MHz microwaves with 0.8 W/kg. Conclusion: These data indicate that the chronic exposure to 2.4 W/kg GSM 1800 MHz micro- waves during the early developmental stage may affect dendritic development and the formation of excitatory synapses of hippocampal neurons in culture.

  9. Batroxobin Against Anoxic Damage of Rat Hippocampal Neurons in Culture: Morphological Changes and Hsp70 Expression

    2001-01-01

    @@Batroxobin,the thrombin-like enzyme,is used for therapeutic defibrination. We have found that batroxobin has good therapeutic effect in ischemic reperfusion rats and clinical practices in vivo. But we have not studied the neuroprotective effect of batroxobin on anoxic hippocampal neurons in vitro. The purpose of this study was to obtain further information on the mechanism of the batroxobin-induced neuroprotection and examine the neuroprotective effect on neurons exposed to anoxia. The effect of batroxobin on anoxic damages in cultured hippocampal neurons of neonatal rats was investigated by using morphological changes and heat shock protein 70Kd (Hsp70) immunoreactive expression as indicators. The results indicate that batroxobin, besides its defibrination, may have a direct neuroprotective effect on anoxic damage of hippocampal neurons.

  10. Oxygen consumption rates during three different neuronal activity states in the hippocampal CA3 network

    Huchzermeyer, Christine; Berndt, Nikolaus; Holzhütter, Hermann-Georg; Kann, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    The brain is an organ with high metabolic rate. However, little is known about energy utilization during different activity states of neuronal networks. We addressed this issue in area CA3 of hippocampal slice cultures under well-defined recording conditions using a 20% O2 gas mixture. We combined recordings of local field potential and interstitial partial oxygen pressure (pO2) during three different activity states, namely fast network oscillations in the gamma-frequency band (30 to 100 Hz)...

  11. Levetiracetam protects hippocampal neurons in culture against hypoxia-induced injury

    Joanna Śmigielska-Kuzia

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Many experimental studies indicate that some antiepileptic drugs possess neuroprotective properties in varied models of neuronal injury. Levetiracetam is a second-generation antiepileptic drug with a novel mechanism of action. In the present study, we evaluated the putative neuroprotective effect of levetiracetam on primary hippocampal cultures at seven day in vitro. Cell death was induced by incubation of neural cultures in hypoxic conditions over 24 hours. Neuronal injury was assessed by morphometric investigation of death/total ratio of neurons in light microscopy using Trypan blue staining and by evaluation of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH release in the culture medium. Our results indicate that pre-conditioning of hippocampal cultures with high concentrations of levetiracetam (100 μM and 300 μM protects neurons against hypoxia-induced death. Two-fold higher number of neurons remained viable as compared to control cultures without drug. Lack of neuroprotective action of the drug on hippocampal neural cultures was observed, when a low concentration (10 μM of levetiracetam was used. (Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica 2011, Vol. 49, No. 1, 148–152

  12. Apolipoprotein E isoform-dependent dendritic recovery of hippocampal neurons following activation of innate immunity

    Maezawa Izumi

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Innate immune activation, including a role for cluster of differentiation 14/toll-like receptor 4 co-receptors (CD14/TLR-4 co-receptors, has been implicated in paracrine damage to neurons in several neurodegenerative diseases that also display stratification of risk or clinical outcome with the common alleles of the apolipoprotein E gene (APOE: APOE2, APOE3, and APOE4. Previously, we have shown that specific stimulation of CD14/TLR-4 with lipopolysaccharide (LPS leads to greatest innate immune response by primary microglial cultures from targeted replacement (TR APOE4 mice and greatest p38MAPK-dependent paracrine damage to neurons in mixed primary cultures and hippocampal slice cultures derived from TR APOE4 mice. In contrast, TR APOE2 astrocytes had the highest NF-kappaB activity and no neurotoxicity. Here we tested the hypothesis that direct activation of CD14/TLR-4 in vivo would yield different amounts of paracrine damage to hippocampal sector CA1 pyramidal neurons in TR APOE mice. Methods We measured in vivo changes in dendrite length in hippocampal CA1 neurons using Golgi staining and determined hippocampal apoE levels by Western blot. Neurite outgrowth of cultured primary neurons in response to astrocyte conditioned medium was assessed by measuring neuron length and branch number. Results Our results showed that TR APOE4 mice had slightly but significantly shorter dendrites at 6 weeks of age. Following exposure to intracerebroventricular LPS, there was comparable loss of dendrite length at 24 hr among the three TR APOE mice. Recovery of dendrite length over the next 48 hr was greater in TR APOE2 than TR APOE3 mice, while TR APOE4 mice had failure of dendrite regeneration. Cell culture experiments indicated that the enhanced neurotrophic effect of TR APOE2 was LDL related protein-dependent. Conclusion The data indicate that the environment within TR APOE2 mouse hippocampus was most supportive of dendrite regeneration

  13. Dynamic inhibition of excitatory synaptic transmission by astrocyte-derived ATP in hippocampal cultures

    Koizumi, Schuichi; Fujishita, Kayoko; Tsuda, Makoto; Shigemoto-Mogami, Yukari; Inoue, Kazuhide

    2003-09-01

    Originally ascribed passive roles in the CNS, astrocytes are now known to have an active role in the regulation of synaptic transmission. Neuronal activity can evoke Ca2+ transients in astrocytes, and Ca2+ transients in astrocytes can evoke changes in neuronal activity. The excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate has been shown to mediate such bidirectional communication between astrocytes and neurons. We demonstrate here that ATP, a primary mediator of intercellular Ca2+ signaling among astrocytes, also mediates intercellular signaling between astrocytes and neurons in hippocampal cultures. Mechanical stimulation of astrocytes evoked Ca2+ waves mediated by the release of ATP and the activation of P2 receptors. Mechanically evoked Ca2+ waves led to decreased excitatory glutamatergic synaptic transmission in an ATP-dependent manner. Exogenous application of ATP does not affect postsynaptic glutamatergic responses but decreased presynaptic exocytotic events. Finally, we show that astrocytes exhibit spontaneous Ca2+ waves mediated by extracellular ATP and that inhibition of these Ca2+ responses enhanced excitatory glutamatergic transmission. We therefore conclude that ATP released from astrocytes exerts tonic and activity-dependent down-regulation of synaptic transmission via presynaptic mechanisms.

  14. ZD7288, a selective hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channel blocker, inhibits hippocampal synaptic plasticity

    Xiao-xue Zhang; Xiao-chun Min; Xu-lin Xu; Min Zheng; Lian-jun Guo

    2016-01-01

    The selective hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channel blocker 4-(N-ethyl-N-phenylamino)-1,2-dimeth-yl-6-(methylamino) pyrimidinium chloride (ZD7288) blocks the induction of long-term potentiation in the perforant path–CA3 region in rat hippocampusin vivo. To explore the mechanisms underlying the action of ZD7288, we recorded excitatory postsynaptic potentials in perforant path–CA3 synapses in male Sprague-Dawley rats. We measured glutamate content in the hippocampus and in cultured hip-pocampal neurons using high performance liquid chromatography, and determined intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) using Fura-2. ZD7288 inhibited the induction and maintenance of long-term potentiation, and these effects were mirrored by the nonspeciifc HCN channel blocker cesium. ZD7288 also decreased glutamate release in hippocampal tissue and in cultured hippocampal neurons. Further-more, ZD7288 attenuated glutamate-induced rises in [Ca2+]i in a concentration-dependent manner and reversed 8-Br-cAMP-mediated facilitation of these glutamate-induced [Ca2+]i rises. Our results suggest that ZD7288 inhibits hippocampal synaptic plasticity both gluta-mate release and resultant [Ca2+]i increases in rat hippocampal neurons.

  15. Deoxyschisandrin modulates synchronized Ca2+ oscillations and spontaneous synaptic transmission of cultured hippocampal neurons

    Min FU; Zhao-hui SUN; Min ZONG; Xiang-ping HE; Huan-cong ZUO; Zuo-ping XIE

    2008-01-01

    Aim: Deoxyschisandrin is one of the most effective composites of Schisandra chinensis, a famous Chinese medicine widely used as an antistress, anti-aging, and neurological performance-improving herb. In this study, we examined its spe- cific mechanisms of action on cultured hippocampal neurons. Methods: Hippoc- ampal neurons, primarily cultured for 9-11 d in vitro, were used for this study. DS were dissolved in DMSO and applied to calcium imaging and whole-cell patch clamp. Results: The application of 3 mg/L DS decreased the frequency of sponta- neous and synchronous oscillations of intracellular Ca2+ to 72%±2% (mean±SEM), and the spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents to 60%±3% (mean±SEM). The inhibitory concentraton 50% (IC50) for the effect of DS on calcium oscillations was 3.8 mg/L. DS also depressed the high voltage-gated Ca2+ channel and the voltage-gated Na+ channel currents at the same time point. It had no effect, however, on voltage-gated K+ and spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents. Conclusion: DS inhibited the spontaneous and synchronous oscillations of intra- cellular Ca2+ through the depression of influx of extracellular calcium and the initiation of action potential. By repressing the spontaneous neurotransmitter release, DS modulated the neuronal network activities.

  16. Achyranthes bidentata Blume extract promotes neuronal growth in cultured embryonic rat hippocampal neurons

    Xin Tang; Yiren Chen; Xiaosong Gu; Fei Ding

    2009-01-01

    We have prepared an aqueous extract of Achyranthes bidentata Blume,a commonly prescribed Chinese medicinal herb,and reported,in previous studies,that A.bidentata extract benefits nerve growth and prevents neuron apoptosis.In this study,we investigated the actions of ,4.bidentata extract on survival and growth of primarily cultured rat hippocampal neurons.The morphological observation revealed that neurite growth from hippocampal neurons was significantly enhanced by A.bidentata extract with similar effects to those induced by nerve growth factor (NGF),and the greatest neurite growth appeared on treatment with A.bidentata extract at 1 ttg/ml for 24 h.DNA microarray analysis indicated that there were 25 upregulated genes and 47 downregulated genes exhibiting significantly differential expression in hippocampal neurons treated with A.bidentata extract at 1 μg/ml for 6 h when compared to those in untreated hippocampal neurons.Real-time quantitative RT-PCR and Western blot analysis demonstrated that the expression of growth-associated protein-43 in hippocampal neurons was upregulated at both mRNA and protein levels after treatment with A.bidentata extract,and the optimal dosage of the extract was also 1 μg/ml.These data confirm that A.bidentata extract could promote in vitro hippocampal neuronal growth in a dose- and time-dependent manner.(C) 2009 National Natural Science Foundation of China and Chinese Academy of Sciences.Published by Elsevier Limited and Science in China Press.All rights reserved.

  17. Excitatory and inhibitory pathways modulate kainate excitotoxicity in hippocampal slice cultures

    Casaccia-Bonnefil, P; Benedikz, Eirikur; Rai, R;

    1993-01-01

    In organotypic hippocampal slice cultures, kainate (KA) specifically induces cell loss in the CA3 region while N-methyl-D-aspartate induces cell loss in the CA1 region. The sensitivity of slice cultures to KA toxicity appears only after 2 weeks in vitro which parallels the appearance of mossy fib...... fibers. KA toxicity is potentiated by co-application with the GABA-A antagonist, picrotoxin. These data suggest that the excitotoxicity of KA in slice cultures is modulated by both excitatory and inhibitory synapses....

  18. Membrane potential dynamics of axons in cultured hippocampal neurons probed by second-harmonic-generation imaging

    Nuriya, Mutsuo; Yasui, Masato

    2010-03-01

    The electrical properties of axons critically influence the nature of communication between neurons. However, due to their small size, direct measurement of membrane potential dynamics in intact and complex mammalian axons has been a challenge. Furthermore, quantitative optical measurements of axonal membrane potential dynamics have not been available. To characterize the basic principles of somatic voltage signal propagation in intact axonal arbors, second-harmonic-generation (SHG) imaging is applied to cultured mouse hippocampal neurons. When FM4-64 is applied extracellularly to dissociated neurons, whole axonal arbors are visualized by SHG imaging. Upon action potential generation by somatic current injection, nonattenuating action potentials are recorded in intact axonal arbors. Interestingly, however, both current- and voltage-clamp recordings suggest that nonregenerative subthreshold somatic voltage changes at the soma are poorly conveyed to these axonal sites. These results reveal the nature of membrane potential dynamics of cultured hippocampal neurons, and further show the possibility of SHG imaging in physiological investigations of axons.

  19. Effects of rhynchophylline on GluN1 and GluN2B expressions in primary cultured hippocampal neurons.

    He, Yan; Zeng, Sheng-Ya; Zhou, Shi-Wen; Qian, Gui-Sheng; Peng, Kang; Mo, Zhi-Xian; Zhou, Ji-Yin

    2014-10-01

    N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunits GluN1 and GluN2B in hippocampal neurons play key roles in anxiety. Our previous studies show that rhynchophylline, an active component of the Uncaria species, down-regulates GluN2B expression in the hippocampal CA1 area of amphetamine-induced rat. The effects of rhynchophylline on expressions of GluN1 and GluN2B in primary hippocampal neurons in neonatal rats in vitro were investigated. Neonatal hippocampal neurons were cultured with neurobasal-A medium. After incubation for 6h or 48 h with rhynchophylline (non-competitive NMDAR antagonist) and MK-801 (non-competitive NMDAR antagonist with anxiolytic effect, as the control drug) from day 6, neuron toxicity, mRNA and protein expressions of GluN1 and GluN2B were analyzed. GluN1 is mainly distributed on neuronal axons and dendritic trunks, cytoplasm and cell membrane near axons and dendrites. GluN2B is mainly distributed on the membrane, dendrites, and axon membranes. GluN1 and GluN2B are codistributed on dendritic trunks and dendritic spines. After 48 h incubation, a lower concentration of rhynchophylline (lower than 400 μmol/L) and MK-801 (lower than 200 μmol/L) have no toxicity on neonatal hippocampal neurons. Rhynchophylline up-regulated GluN1 mRNA expression at 6h and mRNA and protein expressions at 48h, but down-regulated GluN2B mRNA and protein expressions at 48 h. However, GluN1 and GluN2B mRNA expressions were down-regulated at 6h, and mRNA and protein expressions were both up-regulated by MK-801 at 48h. These findings show that rhynchophylline reciprocally regulates GluN1 and GluN2B expressions in hippocampal neurons, indicating a potential anxiolytic property for rhynchophylline. PMID:25110195

  20. Nucleofection and Primary Culture of Embryonic Mouse Hippocampal and Cortical Neurons

    Viesselmann, Christopher; Ballweg, Jason; Lumbard, Derek; Dent, Erik W.

    2011-01-01

    Hippocampal and cortical neurons have been used extensively to study central nervous system (CNS) neuronal polarization, axon/dendrite outgrowth, and synapse formation and function. An advantage of culturing these neurons is that they readily polarize, forming distinctive axons and dendrites, on a two dimensional substrate at very low densities. This property has made them extremely useful for determining many aspects of neuronal development. Furthermore, by providing glial conditioning for t...

  1. Evaluation of neurotoxic and neuroprotective pathways affected by antiepileptic drugs in cultured hippocampal neurons

    Morte, Maria I.; Carreira, Bruno P.; Falcão, Maria J.; Ambrosio, António M.; Soares-da-Silva, Patrício; Araújo, Inês M.; Carvalho, Caetana M.

    2013-01-01

    In this study we evaluated the neurotoxicity of eslicarbazepine acetate (ESL), and of its in vivo metabolites eslicarbazepine (S-Lic) and R-licarbazepine (R-Lic), as compared to the structurally-related compounds carbamazepine (CBZ) and oxcarbazepine (OXC), in an in vitro model of cultured rat hippocampal neurons. The non-related antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) lamotrigine (LTG) and sodium valproate (VPA) were also studied. We assessed whether AEDs modulate pro-survival/pro-apoptotic p...

  2. Rapid regulation of tonic GABA currents in cultured rat hippocampal neurons

    Ransom, Christopher B.; Tao, Wucheng; Wu, Yuanming; Spain, William J; Richerson, George B.

    2012-01-01

    Subacute and chronic changes in tonic GABAergic inhibition occur in human and experimental epilepsy. Less is known about how tonic inhibition is modulated over shorter time frames (seconds). We measured endogenous tonic GABA currents from cultured rat hippocampal neurons to evaluate how they are affected by 1) transient increases in extracellular GABA concentration ([GABA]), 2) transient postsynaptic depolarization, and 3) depolarization of presynaptic cells. Transient increases in [GABA] (1 ...

  3. Activity-dependent plasticity of hippocampal place maps.

    Schoenenberger, Philipp; O'Neill, Joseph; Csicsvari, Jozsef

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal neurons encode a cognitive map of space. These maps are thought to be updated during learning and in response to changes in the environment through activity-dependent synaptic plasticity. Here we examine how changes in activity influence spatial coding in rats using halorhodopsin-mediated, spatially selective optogenetic silencing. Halorhoposin stimulation leads to light-induced suppression in many place cells and interneurons; some place cells increase their firing through disinhibition, whereas some show no effect. We find that place fields of the unaffected subpopulation remain stable. On the other hand, place fields of suppressed place cells were unstable, showing remapping across sessions before and after optogenetic inhibition. Disinhibited place cells had stable maps but sustained an elevated firing rate. These findings suggest that place representation in the hippocampus is constantly governed by activity-dependent processes, and that disinhibition may provide a mechanism for rate remapping. PMID:27282121

  4. S-Nitrosoglutathione and glutathione act as NMDA receptor agonists in cultured hippocampal neurons

    Ting-yu CHIN; Sheau-huei CHUEH; Pao-luh TAO

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To characterize the effect of combined pre- and postnatal morphine exposure on Af-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDA) receptor signaling in hippocampal neurons of the offspring of morphine-addicted female rats. Methods: Cultured hippocampal neurons and synaptosomes were prepared from neonatal and 2-week-old offspring, respectively, of control or morphine-addicted female rats. The increase in the cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) of cultured cells was measured using Fura-2, and glutamate release from synaptosomes was measured enzymatically. Results: Both glutamate and NMDA caused a dose-dependent increase in the [Ca2+]i. The nitric oxide (NO) donor, S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO), but not 3-morpholinosydnonimine, sodium nitroprusside, and S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine, also induced a [Ca2+]i increase. GSNO and glutathione caused a dose-dependent increase in the [Ca2+]i with respective EC50 values of 56 and 414 μmol/L. Both effects were inhibited by Mg2+ or an NMDA receptor antagonist and were unaffected by the presence of a glutamate scavenger. The other glutathione derivatives, oxidized glutathione, S-methylglutathione, S-ethylglutathione, S-propylglutathione, and S-butylglutathione, the dipeptides, Glu-Cys and Cys-Gly, and the antioxidants, dithiothreitol and mercaptoethanol, failed to induce a [Ca2+]i increase. In addition, glutathione caused a dose-dependent increase in glutamate release from synaptosomes. The maximal responses and the EC50 values for the glutamate-, NMDA-, GSNO-, and glutathione-induced [Ca2+]i increases and the glutathione-induced glutamate release were indistinguishable in the neurons of the offspring from control and morphine-addicted female rats. Conclusion: GSNO and glutathione act as NMDA receptor agonists and, in contrast to hippocampal brain slice, combined pre- and postnatal morphine exposure does not modulate NMDA receptor signaling in the cultured hippocampal neurons.

  5. Biocompatibility of silicon-based arrays of electrodes coupled to organotypic hippocampal brain slice cultures

    Kristensen, Bjarne Winther; Noraberg, J; Thiébaud, P;

    2001-01-01

    In this study we examined the passive biocompatibility of a three-dimensional microelectrode array (MEA), designed to be coupled to organotypic brain slice cultures for multisite recording of electrophysiological signals. Hippocampal (and corticostriatal) brain slices from 1-week-old (and newborn......-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and the neurotoxin trimethyltin (TMT), as demonstrated by the cellular uptake of propidium iodide (PI), which was used as a reproducible and quantifiable marker for neuronal degeneration. We conclude that organotypic brain slice cultures can grow on silicon-based three-dimensional microelectrode...

  6. Hippocampal activity during the transverse patterning task declines with cognitive competence but not with age

    Leirer Vera M

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The hippocampus is a brain region that is particularly affected by age-related morphological changes. It is generally assumed that a loss in hippocampal volume results in functional deficits that contribute to age-related cognitive decline. In a combined cross-sectional behavioural and magnetoencephalography (MEG study we investigated whether hippocampal-associated neural current flow during a transverse patterning task - which requires learning relational associations between stimuli - correlates with age and whether it is modulated by cognitive competence. Results Better performance in several tests of verbal memory, verbal fluency and executive function was indeed associated with higher hippocampal neural activity. Age, however, was not related to the strength of hippocampal neural activity: elderly participants responded slower than younger individuals but on average produced the same neural mass activity. Conclusions Our results suggest that in non-pathological aging, hippocampal neural activity does not decrease with age but is rather related to cognitive competence.

  7. Low-intensity daily walking activity is associated with hippocampal volume in older adults.

    Varma, Vijay R; Chuang, Yi-Fang; Harris, Gregory C; Tan, Erwin J; Carlson, Michelle C

    2015-05-01

    Hippocampal atrophy is associated with memory impairment and dementia and serves as a key biomarker in the preclinical stages of Alzheimer's disease. Physical activity, one of the most promising behavioral interventions to prevent or delay cognitive decline, has been shown to be associated with hippocampal volume; specifically increased aerobic activity and fitness may have a positive effect on the size of the hippocampus. The majority of older adults, however, are sedentary and have difficulty initiating and maintaining exercise programs. A modestly more active lifestyle may nonetheless be beneficial. This study explored whether greater objectively measured daily walking activity was associated with larger hippocampal volume. We additionally explored whether greater low-intensity walking activity, which may be related to leisure-time physical, functional, and social activities, was associated with larger hippocampal volume independent of exercise and higher-intensity walking activity. Segmentation of hippocampal volumes was performed using Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain's Software Library (FSL), and daily walking activity was assessed using a step activity monitor on 92, nondemented, older adult participants. After controlling for age, education, body mass index, cardiovascular disease risk factors, and the Mini Mental State Exam, we found that a greater amount, duration, and frequency of total daily walking activity were each associated with larger hippocampal volume among older women, but not among men. These relationships were specific to hippocampal volume, compared with the thalamus, used as a control brain region, and remained significant for low-intensity walking activity, independent of moderate- to vigorous-intensity activity and self-reported exercise. This is the first study, to our knowledge, to explore the relationship between objectively measured daily walking activity and hippocampal volume in an older adult population. Findings

  8. A study of epileptogenic network structures in rat hippocampal cultures using first spike latencies during synchronization events

    Study of hypersynchronous activity is of prime importance for combating epilepsy. Studies on network structure typically reconstruct the network by measuring various aspects of the interaction between neurons and subsequently measure the properties of the reconstructed network. In sub-sampled networks such methods lead to significant errors in reconstruction. Using rat hippocampal neurons cultured on a multi-electrode array dish and a glutamate injury model of epilepsy in vitro, we studied synchronous activity in neuronal networks. Using the first spike latencies in various neurons during a network burst, we extract various recurring spatio-temporal onset patterns in the networks. Comparing the patterns seen in control and injured networks, we observe that injured networks express a wide diversity in their foci (origin) and activation pattern, while control networks show limited diversity. Furthermore, we note that onset patterns in glutamate injured networks show a positive correlation between synchronization delay and physical distance between neurons, while control networks do not. (paper)

  9. Concentration-dependent effects of fullerenol on cultured hippocampal neuron viability

    Zha YY

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Ying-ying Zha,1 Bo Yang,1 Ming-liang Tang,2 Qiu-chen Guo,1 Ju-tao Chen,1 Long-ping Wen,3 Ming Wang11CAS Key Laboratory of Brain Function and Disease, School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, 2Suzhou Institute of NanoTech and NanoBionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Suzhou, 3Laboratory of Nano-biology, School of Life Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, People's Republic of ChinaBackground: Recent studies have shown that the biological actions and toxicity of the water-soluble compound, polyhydroxyfullerene (fullerenol, are related to the concentrations present at a particular site of action. This study investigated the effects of different concentrations of fullerenol on cultured rat hippocampal neurons.Methods and results: Fullerenol at low concentrations significantly enhanced hippocampal neuron viability as tested by MTT assay and Hoechst 33342/propidium iodide double stain detection. At high concentrations, fullerenol induced apoptosis confirmed by Comet assay and assessment of caspase proteins.Conclusion: These findings suggest that fullerenol promotes cell death and protects against cell damage, depending on the concentration present. The concentration-dependent effects of fullerenol were mainly due to its influence on the reduction-oxidation pathway.Keywords: fullerenol, nanomaterial, neurotoxicity, neuroprotection, hippocampal neuron

  10. Inhibition by propofol (2,6 di-isopropylphenol) of the N-methyl-D-aspartate subtype of glutamate receptor in cultured hippocampal neurones.

    Orser, B. A.; Bertlik, M.; Wang, L. Y.; MacDonald, J. F.

    1995-01-01

    1. The effects of propofol (2,6 di-isopropylphenol) on responses to the selective glutamate receptor agonists, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and kainate, were investigated in cultured hippocampal neurones of the mouse. Whole cell and single channel currents were recorded by patch-clamp techniques. Drugs were applied with a multi-barrel perfusion system. 2. Propofol produced a reversible, dose-dependent inhibition of whole cell currents activated by NMDA. The concentration of propofol which indu...

  11. Glutamate induces the rapid formation of spine head protrusions in hippocampal slice cultures

    David A Richards; Mateos, José Maria; Hugel, Sylvain; De Paola, Vincenzo; CARONI, Pico; Gähwiler, Beat H.; McKinney, R. Anne

    2005-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity at neuronal connections has been well characterized functionally by using electrophysiological approaches, but the structural basis for this phenomenon remains controversial. We have studied the dynamic interactions between presynaptic and postsynaptic structures labeled with FM 4-64 and a membrane-targeted GFP, respectively, in hippocampal slices. Under conditions of reduced neuronal activity (1 μM tetrodotoxin), we observed extension of glutamate receptor-dependent proce...

  12. Hippocampal inactivation with TTX impairs long-term spatial memory retrieval and modifies brain metabolic activity.

    Conejo, Nélida María; Cimadevilla, José Manuel; González-Pardo, Héctor; Méndez-Couz, Marta; Arias, Jorge Luis

    2013-01-01

    Functional inactivation techniques enable studying the hippocampal involvement in each phase of spatial memory formation in the rat. In this study, we applied tetrodotoxin unilaterally or bilaterally into the dorsal hippocampus to evaluate the role of this brain structure in retrieval of memories acquired 28 days before in the Morris water maze. We combined hippocampal inactivation with the assessment of brain metabolism using cytochrome oxidase histochemistry. Several brain regions were considered, including the hippocampus and other related structures. Results showed that both unilateral and bilateral hippocampal inactivation impaired spatial memory retrieval. Hence, whereas subjects with bilateral hippocampal inactivation showed a circular swim pattern at the side walls of the pool, unilateral inactivation favoured swimming in the quadrants adjacent to the target one. Analysis of cytochrome oxidase activity disclosed regional differences according to the degree of hippocampal functional blockade. In comparison to control group, animals with bilateral inactivation showed increased CO activity in CA1 and CA3 areas of the hippocampus during retrieval, while the activity of the dentate gyrus substantially decreased. However, unilateral inactivated animals showed decreased CO activity in Ammon's horn and the dentate gyrus. This study demonstrated that retrieval recruits differentially the hippocampal subregions and the balance between them is altered with hippocampal functional lesions. PMID:23724089

  13. Inhibitory axons are targeted in hippocampal cell culture by anti-Caspr2 autoantibodies associated with limbic encephalitis

    Veronique Rogemond

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Contactin-associated protein-like 2 (Caspr2, also known as CNTNAP2, is a cell adhesion molecule that clusters voltage-gated potassium channels (Kv1.1/1.2 at the juxtaparanodes of myelinated axons and may regulate axonal excitability. As a component of the Kv1 complex, Caspr2 has been identified as a target in neuromyotonia and Morvan syndrome, but also in some cases of autoimmune limbic encephalitis. How anti-Caspr2 autoimmunity is linked with the central neurological symptoms is still elusive. In the present study, using anti-Caspr2 antibodies from seven patients affected by pure limbic encephalitis, we determined that IgGs in the cerebrospinal fluid of four out seven patients were selectively directed against the N-terminal Discoïdin and LamininG1 modules of Caspr2. Using live immunolabeling of cultured hippocampal neurons, we determined that serum IgGs in all patients strongly targeted inhibitory interneurons. Caspr2 was highly detected on GAD65-positive axons that are surrounding the cell bodies and at the VGAT-positive inhibitory presynaptic contacts. Functional assays indicated that LE autoantibodies may induce alteration of Gephyrin clusters at inhibitory synaptic contacts. Next, we generated a Caspr2-Fc chimera to reveal Caspr2 receptors on hippocampal neurons localized at the somato-dendritic compartment and post-synapse. Caspr2-Fc binding was strongly increased on TAG-1-transfected neurons and conversely, Caspr2-Fc did not bind hippocampal neurons from TAG-1-deficient mice. Our data indicate that Caspr2 may participate as a cell recognition molecule in the dynamics of inhibitory networks. This study provides new insight into the potential pathogenic effect of anti-Caspr2 autoantibodies in central hyperexcitability that may be related with perturbation of inhibitory interneuron activity.

  14. DIDS prevents ischemic membrane degradation in cultured hippocampal neurons by inhibiting matrix metalloproteinase release.

    Matthew E Pamenter

    Full Text Available During stroke, cells in the infarct core exhibit rapid failure of their permeability barriers, which releases ions and inflammatory molecules that are deleterious to nearby tissue (the penumbra. Plasma membrane degradation is key to penumbral spread and is mediated by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs, which are released via vesicular exocytosis into the extracellular fluid in response to stress. DIDS (4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid preserves membrane integrity in neurons challenged with an in vitro ischemic penumbral mimic (ischemic solution: IS and we asked whether this action was mediated via inhibition of MMP activity. In cultured murine hippocampal neurons challenged with IS, intracellular proMMP-2 and -9 expression increased 4-10 fold and extracellular latent and active MMP isoform expression increased 2-22 fold. MMP-mediated extracellular gelatinolytic activity increased ∼20-50 fold, causing detachment of 32.1±4.5% of cells from the matrix and extensive plasma membrane degradation (>60% of cells took up vital dyes and >60% of plasma membranes were fragmented or blebbed. DIDS abolished cellular detachment and membrane degradation in neurons and the pathology-induced extracellular expression of latent and active MMPs. DIDS similarly inhibited extracellular MMP expression and cellular detachment induced by the pro-apoptotic agent staurosporine or the general proteinase agonist 4-aminophenylmercuric acetate (APMA. Conversely, DIDS-treatment did not impair stress-induced intracellular proMMP production, nor the intracellular cleavage of proMMP-2 to the active form, suggesting DIDS interferes with the vesicular extrusion of MMPs rather than directly inhibiting proteinase expression or activation. In support of this hypothesis, an antagonist of the V-type vesicular ATPase also inhibited extracellular MMP expression to a similar degree as DIDS. In addition, in a proteinase-independent model of vesicular exocytosis, DIDS

  15. Abelson tyrosine kinase links PDGFbeta receptor activation to cytoskeletal regulation of NMDA receptors in CA1 hippocampal neurons

    Beazely Michael A

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have previously demonstrated that PDGF receptor activation indirectly inhibits N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA currents by modifying the cytoskeleton. PDGF receptor ligand is also neuroprotective in hippocampal slices and cultured neurons. PDGF receptors are tyrosine kinases that control a variety of signal transduction pathways including those mediated by PLCγ. In fibroblasts Src and another non-receptor tyrosine kinase, Abelson kinase (Abl, control PDGF receptor regulation of cytoskeletal dynamics. The mechanism whereby PDGF receptor regulates cytoskeletal dynamics in central neurons remains poorly understood. Results Intracellular applications of active Abl, but not heat-inactivated Abl, decreased NMDA-evoked currents in isolated hippocampal neurons. This mimics the effects of PDGF receptor activation in these neurons. The Abl kinase inhibitor, STI571, blocked the inhibition of NMDA currents by Abl. We demonstrate that PDGF receptors can activate Abl kinase in hippocampal neurons via mechanisms similar to those observed previously in fibroblasts. Furthermore, PDGFβ receptor activation alters the subcellular localization of Abl. Abl kinase is linked to actin cytoskeletal dynamics in many systems. We show that the inhibition of NMDA receptor currents by Abl kinase is blocked by the inclusion of the Rho kinase inhibitor, Y-27632, and that activation of Abl correlates with an increase in ROCK tyrosine phosphorylation. Conclusion This study demonstrates that PDGFβ receptors act via an interaction with Abl kinase and Rho kinase to regulated cytoskeletal regulation of NMDA receptor channels in CA1 pyramidal neurons.

  16. Excitatory Effects of Parvalbumin-Expressing Interneurons Maintain Hippocampal Epileptiform Activity via Synchronous Afterdischarges

    Ellender, Tommas J.; Raimondo, Joseph V.; Irkle, Agnese; Karri P Lamsa; Akerman, Colin J.

    2014-01-01

    Epileptic seizures are characterized by periods of hypersynchronous, hyperexcitability within brain networks. Most seizures involve two stages: an initial tonic phase, followed by a longer clonic phase that is characterized by rhythmic bouts of synchronized network activity called afterdischarges (ADs). Here we investigate the cellular and network mechanisms underlying hippocampal ADs in an effort to understand how they maintain seizure activity. Using in vitro hippocampal slice models from r...

  17. Low-intensity daily walking activity is associated with hippocampal volume in older adults

    Varma, Vijay R.; Chuang, Yi-Fang; Harris, Gregory C.; Tan, Erwin J.; Carlson, Michelle C.

    2014-01-01

    Hippocampal atrophy is associated with memory impairment and dementia and serves as a key biomarker in the preclinical stages of Alzheimer's disease. Physical activity, one of the most promising behavioral interventions to prevent or delay cognitive decline, has been shown to be associated with hippocampal volume; specifically increased aerobic activity and fitness may have a positive effect on the size of the hippocampus. The majority of older adults, however, are sedentary and have difficul...

  18. Corticosterone activates Erk1/2 mitogen-activated protein kinase in primary hippocampal cells through rapid nongenomic mechanism

    QI Aiqun; QIU Jian; XIAO Lin; CHEN Yizhang

    2005-01-01

    Nongenomic effects of glucocorticoids (GC) in various cell types have been well documented, but it still remains unknown whether the mechanism also works in hippocampus which is a crucial target of glucocorticoids in neural system during physiological and/or pathophysiological processes. We present here that corticosterone (B) could rapidly activate Erk1/2 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in primarily cultured hippocampal cells within minutes, with a bell-shaped time dependent curve which peaked at 15min and then went down to normal level in 30 min. This activation was blocked by protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor (Go6976), G protein inhibitor (GDPβs), and MEK(MAPK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase) inhibitor(PD98059), but not by protein kinase A (PKA) inbibitor (H89), tyrosine kinase inhibitor (genistein), and glucocorticoid receptor ( GR ) antagonist (RU38486). Thus, the rapid activation of Erk1/2 MAPK in primary hippocampal cells induced by B was likely mediated by a G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) pathway with involvement of PKC, which belonged to the nongenomic rather than genomic mechanism of GC' s effects.

  19. Mechanism underlying blockade of voltage-gated calcium channels by agmatine in cultured rat hippocampal neurons

    Jian-quan ZHENG; Xie-chuan WENG; Xiao-dan GAI; Jin LI; Wen-bin XIAO

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether agmatine could selectively block a given type of the voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCC) and whether related receptors are involved in the blocking effect of agmatine on VGCC. METHODS: The whole-cell patch recording technique was performed to record VGCC currents in the cultured neonatal rat hippocampal neurons. RESULTS: Verapamil (100 μmol/L), a selective blocker of L-type calcium channel, significantly inhibited VGCC current by 80 %± 7 %. Agmatine (100 μmol/L) could further depress the remained currents by 25 %±6 %. The α2-adrenoceptor antagonist yohimbine (10 μmol/L) and the I2 imidazoline receptor antagonist idazoxon (10 and 40 μmol/L) had no significant effect on VGCC currents when used respectively. When the mixture of yohimbine and agmatine was applied, VGCC currents were still depressed remarkably. However, the blocking effect of agmatine was decreased by 29 %± 8 % in the presence of idazoxon (10 μmol/L). The effect of idazoxon did not increase at a higher concentration (40 μmol/L). CONCLUSION: Agmatine could block the L- and other types of VGCC currents in the cultured rat hippocampal neurons. Blocking effect of agmatine on VGCC was partially related to I2 imidazoline receptor and had no relationship with α2-adrenoceptors.

  20. Cannabinoids inhibit network-driven synapse loss between hippocampal neurons in culture.

    Kim, Hee Jung; Waataja, Jonathan J; Thayer, Stanley A

    2008-06-01

    Dendritic pruning and loss of synaptic contacts are early events in many neurodegenerative diseases. These effects are dynamic and seem to differ mechanistically from the cell death process. Cannabinoids modulate synaptic activity and afford protection in some neurotoxicity models. We investigated the effects of cannabinoids on activity-induced changes in the number of synapses between rat hippocampal neurons in culture. Morphology and synapses were visualized by confocal imaging of neurons expressing DsRed2 and postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD95) fused to enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP). Reducing the extracellular Mg2+ concentration to 0.1 mM for 4 h induced intense synaptic activity, which decreased the number of PSD95-GFP puncta by 45 +/- 13%. Synapse loss was an early event, required activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, and was mediated by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. The cannabinoid receptor full agonist WIN55,212-2 [(R)-(+)-[2,3-dihydro-5-methyl-3-[(4-morpholinyl)-methyl] pyrrolo-[1,2,3-de]-1,4-benzoxazin-6-yl](1-napthalenyl)-methanone monomethanesulfonate] (EC(50) = 2.5 +/- 0.5 nM) and the partial agonist Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC; EC(50) = 9 +/- 3 nM) inhibited PSD loss in a manner reversed by the CB1 receptor antagonist rimonabant [N-piperidino-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-3-pyrazole-carboxamide]. The protection was mimicked by inhibition of presynaptic Ca2+ channels, and WIN55,212-2 did not prevent PSD loss elicited by direct application of glutamate, suggesting a presynaptic mechanism. Prolonged exposure to WIN55,212-2, but not THC, desensitized the protective effect. Treating cells that had undergone PSD loss with WIN55,212-2 reversed the loss and enabled recovery of a full compliment of synapses. The modulation of synaptic number by acute and prolonged exposure to cannabinoids may account for some of the effects of these drugs on the plasticity, survival, and function of neural networks. PMID

  1. Effect of New O-Superfamily Conotoxin on Voltage-Activated Currents of Hippocampal Neurons

    李湛; 何湘平; 戴秋云; 黄培堂; 谢佐平

    2004-01-01

    The effects of a new O-superfamily conotoxin, SO3, on sodium current (/Na), transient A-type potassium currents (/A), and delayed rectified potassium currents (/K), were examined in cultured rat hippocampal neurons using the whole-cell patch clamp technique. Addition of SO3 caused a concentration-dependent,rapidly developing, and reversible inhibition of voltage-activated currents. The IC50 values for the blockage of /Na, /A, and /K were calculated as 0.49, 33.9, and 7.6 μmol/L, respectively. The determined Hill coefficients were 1.7, 0.6, and 1.2, respectively. These results indicate that SO3 can selectively inhibit neuronal sodium and potassium currents.

  2. Effect of polybrominated diphenyl ether on development of cultured hippocampal neuron

    2008-01-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) is a persistently environmental pollutant ubiquitously found in wildlife and humans. Although concern on PBDE’s toxic effects is steadily increasing, its action on the central nervous system (CNS) remains largely unknown. To address this issue, the present study ex- amined the development inhibition of PBDE in neurons. The primary cultured hippocampal neurons of rat were exposed to the commercial decabromodiphenyl ether (deca-BDE), and the neurite length, bi- furcation, and synapse formation and maturation were evaluated, based on the confocal microscope imaging. The results showed that the development inhibition in neurons occurred at 15 μmol/L, indi- cating that PBDE is a potent neurotoxicant and it might obviously inhibit the development of cultured neurons.

  3. Effect of polybrominated diphenyl ether on development of cultured hippocampal neuron

    2008-01-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) is a persistently environmental pollutant ubiquitously found in wildlife and humans. Although concern on PBDE's toxic effects is steadily increasing, its action on the central nervous system (CNS) remains largely unknown. To address this issue, the present study examined the development inhibition of PBDE in neurons. The primary cultured hippocampal neurons of rat were exposed to the commercial decabromodiphenyl ether (deca-BDE), and the neurite length, bifurcation, and synapse formation and maturation were evaluated, based on the confocal microscope imaging. The results showed that the development inhibition in neurons occurred at 15 μmol/L, indicating that PBDE is a potent neurotoxicant and it might obviously inhibit the development of cultured neurons.

  4. Carbachol-induced rhythmic slow activity (theta) in cat hippocampal formation slices.

    Konopacki, J; Gołebiewski, H; Eckersdorf, B

    1992-04-24

    Application of the cholinergic agonist, carbachol, produced theta-like rhythmical waveforms, recorded in the stratum moleculare of the dentate gyrus in the cat hippocampal formation slices. This effect of carbachol was antagonized by atropine but not D-tubocurarine. These results provide first direct evidence that the hippocampal formation neuronal network in the cat is capable of producing synchronized slow wave activity when isolated from pulsed rhythmic inputs of the medial septum. PMID:1511270

  5. Brevican-containing perineuronal nets of extracellular matrix in dissociated hippocampal primary cultures.

    John, Nora; Krügel, Hans; Frischknecht, Renato; Smalla, Karl-Heinz; Schultz, Christian; Kreutz, Michael R; Gundelfinger, Eckart D; Seidenbecher, Constanze I

    2006-04-01

    Perineuronal nets (PNN) are specialized extracellular matrix structures enwrapping CNS neurons, which are important regulators for neuronal and synaptic functions. Brevican, a chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan, is an integral component of PNN. Here, we have investigated the appearance of these structures in hippocampal primary cultures. The expression profile of brevican in mixed cultures resembles the in vivo pattern with a strong upregulation of all isoforms during the second and 3rd weeks in culture. Brevican is primarily synthesized by co-cultured glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP-)-positive astrocytes and co-assembles with its interaction partners in PNN-like structures on neuronal somata and neurites as identified by counterstaining with the PNN marker Vicia villosa lectin. Both excitatory and inhibitory synapses are embedded into PNN. Furthermore, axon initial segments are strongly covered by a dense brevican coat. Altogether, we show that mature primary cultures can form PNN, and that basic features of these extracellular matrix structures may be studied in vitro. PMID:16503162

  6. Cellular mechanisms regulating activity-dependent release of native brain-derived neurotrophic factor from hippocampal neurons.

    Balkowiec, Agnieszka; Katz, David M

    2002-12-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a critical role in activity-dependent modifications of neuronal connectivity and synaptic strength, including establishment of hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP). To shed light on mechanisms underlying BDNF-dependent synaptic plasticity, the present study was undertaken to characterize release of native BDNF from newborn rat hippocampal neurons in response to physiologically relevant patterns of electrical field stimulation in culture, including tonic stimulation at 5 Hz, bursting stimulation at 25 and 100 Hz, and theta-burst stimulation (TBS). Release was measured using the ELISA in situ technique, developed in our laboratory to quantify secretion of native BDNF without the need to first overexpress the protein to nonphysiological levels. Each stimulation protocol resulted in a significant increase in BDNF release that was tetrodotoxin sensitive and occurred in the absence of glutamate receptor activation. However, 100 Hz tetanus and TBS, stimulus patterns that are most effective in inducing hippocampal LTP, were significantly more effective in releasing native BDNF than lower-frequency stimulation. For all stimulation protocols tested, removal of extracellular calcium, or blockade of N-type calcium channels, prevented BDNF release. Similarly, depletion of intracellular calcium stores with thapsigargin and treatment with dantrolene, an inhibitor of calcium release from caffeine-ryanodine-sensitive stores, markedly inhibited activity-dependent BDNF release. Our results indicate that BDNF release can encode temporal features of hippocampal neuronal activity. The dual requirement for calcium influx through N-type calcium channels and calcium mobilization from intracellular stores strongly implicates a role for calcium-induced calcium release in activity-dependent BDNF secretion. PMID:12451139

  7. An organotypic hippocampal slice culture model of excitotoxic injury induced spontaneous recurrent epileptiform discharges.

    Ziobro, Julie M; Deshpande, Laxmikant S; Delorenzo, Robert J

    2011-01-31

    Stroke is the major cause of acquired epilepsy in the adult population. The mechanisms of ischemia-induced epileptogenesis are not completely understood, but glutamate is associated with both ischemia-induced injury and epileptogenesis. The objective of this study was to develop an in vitro model of epileptogenesis induced by glutamate injury in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHSCs), as observed in stroke-induced acquired epilepsy. OHSCs were prepared from 1-week-old Sprague-Dawley rat pups. They were exposed to 3.5 mM glutamate for 35 minutes at 21 days in vitro. Field potential recordings and whole-cell current clamp electrophysiology were used to monitor the development of in vitro seizure events up to 19 days after injury. Propidium iodide uptake assays were used to examine acute cell death following injury. Glutamate exposure produced a subset of hippocampal neurons that died acutely and a larger population of injured but surviving neurons. These surviving neurons manifested spontaneous, recurrent epileptiform discharges in neural networks, characterized by paroxysmal depolarizing shifts and high frequency spiking in both field potential and intracellular recordings. This model also exhibited anticonvulsant sensitivity similar to in vivo models. Our study is the first demonstration of a chronic model of acquired epilepsy in OHSCs following a glutamate injury. This in vitro model of glutamate injury-induced epileptogenesis may help develop therapeutic strategies to prevent epileptogenesis after stroke and elucidate some of the mechanisms that underlie stroke-induced epilepsy in a more anatomically intact system. PMID:21111720

  8. Prototypical antipsychotic drugs protect hippocampal neuronal cultures against cell death induced by growth medium deprivation

    Williams Sylvain

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several clinical studies suggested that antipsychotic-based medications could ameliorate cognitive functions impaired in certain schizophrenic patients. Accordingly, we investigated the effects of various dopaminergic receptor antagonists – including atypical antipsychotics that are prescribed for the treatment of schizophrenia – in a model of toxicity using cultured hippocampal neurons, the hippocampus being a region of particular relevance to cognition. Results Hippocampal cell death induced by deprivation of growth medium constituents was strongly blocked by drugs including antipsychotics (10-10-10-6 M that display nM affinities for D2 and/or D4 receptors (clozapine, haloperidol, (±-sulpiride, domperidone, clozapine, risperidone, chlorpromazine, (+-butaclamol and L-741,742. These effects were shared by some caspases inhibitors and were not accompanied by inhibition of reactive oxygen species. In contrast, (--raclopride and remoxipride, two drugs that preferentially bind D2 over D4 receptors were ineffective, as well as the selective D3 receptor antagonist U 99194. Interestingly, (--raclopride (10-6 M was able to block the neuroprotective effect of the atypical antipsychotic clozapine (10-6 M. Conclusion Taken together, these data suggest that D2-like receptors, particularly the D4 subtype, mediate the neuroprotective effects of antipsychotic drugs possibly through a ROS-independent, caspase-dependent mechanism.

  9. The effects of temperature on vesicular supply and release in autaptic cultures of rat and mouse hippocampal neurons

    Pyott, Sonja J; Rosenmund, Christian

    2002-01-01

    Membrane fusion plays a central role in the synaptic vesicle cycle. While many of the pre- and postfusion events have been investigated at room temperature, few researchers have investigated these processes at more physiologically relevant temperatures. We have used autaptic cultures of hippocampal

  10. Apoptosis after irradiation of the rat cortical and hippocampal cells in culture

    Coffigny, H.; Lane, M.C. [CEA Fontenay-aux-Roses, Direction des Sciences du Vivant-DRR-LRO, 92 (France)

    1997-03-01

    During the development of the central nervous system many neurons are generated but over 50% die by natural apoptosis; this phenomenon occurred in neurons without or with wrong connections with their target cells. Children exposed in utero to Hiroshima or Nagasaki bombing presented microcephaly due to cell deaths and mental retardation. In animals, the number of apoptotic cells in the developing central nervous system increased as a function of the dose received. In vitro, we have shown that 1 Gy irradiation induced 50 % decrease of cortical and hippocampal cell survival. Nervous cells when seeded in a plate were round without processes. Neuritis outgrowth increased with culture time and physical contacts were established between cells. Our purpose is to test the importance of these contacts in the radio-induced apoptosis. (authors)

  11. Effects of cordycepin on the microglia-overactivation-induced impairments of growth and development of hippocampal cultured neurons.

    Jie Peng

    Full Text Available Microglial cells are normally activated in response to brain injury or immunological stimuli to protect central nervous system (CNS. However, over-activation of microglia conversely amplifies the inflammatory effects and mediates cellular degeneration, leading to the death of neurons. Recently, cordycepin, an active component found in Cordyceps militarisa known as a rare Chinese caterpillar fungus, has been reported as an effective drug for treating inflammatory diseases and cancer via unclear mechanisms. In this study, we attempted to identify the anti-inflammatory role of cordycepin and its protective effects on the impairments of neural growth and development induced by microglial over-activation. The results indicate that cordycepin could attenuate the lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced microglial activation, evidenced by the dramatically reduced release of TNF-α and IL-1β, as well as the down-regulation of mRNA levels of iNOS and COX-2 after cordycepin treatment. Besides, cordycepin reversed the LPS-induced activation of NF-κB pathway, resulting in anti-inflammatory effects. Furthermore, by employing the conditioned medium (CM, we found cordycepin was able to recover the impairments of neural growth and development in the primary hippocampal neurons cultured in LPS-CM, including cell viability, growth cone extension, neurite sprouting and outgrowth as well as spinogenesis. This study expands our knowledge of the anti-inflammatory function of cordycepin and paves the way for the biomedical applications of cordycepin in the therapies of neural injuries.

  12. Calcium-sensitive regulation of monoamine oxidase-A contributes to the production of peroxyradicals in hippocampal cultures: implications for Alzheimer disease-related pathology

    Li XinMin

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Calcium (Ca2+ has recently been shown to selectively increase the activity of monoamine oxidase-A (MAO-A, a mitochondria-bound enzyme that generates peroxyradicals as a natural by-product of the deamination of neurotransmitters such as serotonin. It has also been suggested that increased intracellular free Ca2+ levels as well as MAO-A may be contributing to the oxidative stress associated with Alzheimer disease (AD. Results Incubation with Ca2+ selectively increases MAO-A enzymatic activity in protein extracts from mouse hippocampal HT-22 cell cultures. Treatment of HT-22 cultures with the Ca2+ ionophore A23187 also increases MAO-A activity, whereas overexpression of calbindin-D28K (CB-28K, a Ca2+-binding protein in brain that is greatly reduced in AD, decreases MAO-A activity. The effects of A23187 and CB-28K are both independent of any change in MAO-A protein or gene expression. The toxicity (via production of peroxyradicals and/or chromatin condensation associated with either A23187 or the AD-related β-amyloid peptide, which also increases free intracellular Ca2+, is attenuated by MAO-A inhibition in HT-22 cells as well as in primary hippocampal cultures. Conclusion These data suggest that increases in intracellular Ca2+ availability could contribute to a MAO-A-mediated mechanism with a role in AD-related oxidative stress.

  13. Hippocampal activation during face-name associative memory encoding: blocked versus permuted design

    The contribution of the hippocampal subregions to episodic memory through the formation of new associations between previously unrelated items such as faces and names is established but remains under discussion. Block design studies in this area of research generally tend to show posterior hippocampal activation during encoding of novel associational material while event-related studies emphasize anterior hippocampal involvement. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to assess the involvement of anterior and posterior hippocampus in the encoding of novel associational material compared to the viewing of previously seen associational material. We used two different experimental designs, a block design and a permuted block design, and applied it to the same associative memory task to perform valid statistical comparisons. Our results indicate that the permuted design was able to capture more anterior hippocampal activation compared to the block design, which emphasized more posterior hippocampal involvement. These differences were further investigated and attributed to a combination of the polymodal stimuli we used and the experimental design. Activation patterns during encoding in both designs occurred along the entire longitudinal axis of the hippocampus, but with different centers of gravity. The maximal activated voxel in the block design was situated in the posterior half of the hippocampus while in the permuted design this was located in the anterior half. (orig.)

  14. Hippocampal activation during face-name associative memory encoding: blocked versus permuted design

    De Vogelaere, Frederick; Vingerhoets, Guy [Ghent University, Laboratory for Neuropsychology, Department of Neurology, Ghent (Belgium); Santens, Patrick; Boon, Paul [Ghent University Hospital, Department of Neurology, Ghent (Belgium); Achten, Erik [Ghent University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Ghent (Belgium)

    2010-01-15

    The contribution of the hippocampal subregions to episodic memory through the formation of new associations between previously unrelated items such as faces and names is established but remains under discussion. Block design studies in this area of research generally tend to show posterior hippocampal activation during encoding of novel associational material while event-related studies emphasize anterior hippocampal involvement. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to assess the involvement of anterior and posterior hippocampus in the encoding of novel associational material compared to the viewing of previously seen associational material. We used two different experimental designs, a block design and a permuted block design, and applied it to the same associative memory task to perform valid statistical comparisons. Our results indicate that the permuted design was able to capture more anterior hippocampal activation compared to the block design, which emphasized more posterior hippocampal involvement. These differences were further investigated and attributed to a combination of the polymodal stimuli we used and the experimental design. Activation patterns during encoding in both designs occurred along the entire longitudinal axis of the hippocampus, but with different centers of gravity. The maximal activated voxel in the block design was situated in the posterior half of the hippocampus while in the permuted design this was located in the anterior half. (orig.)

  15. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ is expressed in hippocampal neurons and its activation prevents β-amyloid neurodegeneration: role of Wnt signaling

    The molecular pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) involves the participation of the amyloid-β-peptide (Aβ), which plays a critical role in the neurodegeneration that triggers the disease. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated transcription factors, which are members of the nuclear receptor family. We report here that (1) PPARγ is present in rat hippocampal neurons in culture. (2) Activation of PPARγ by troglitazone and rosiglitazone protects rat hippocampal neurons against Aβ-induced neurodegeneration, as shown by the 3-[4,5 -2yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) reduction assay, immunofluorescence using an anti-heavy neurofilament antibody, and quantitative electron microscopy. (3) Hippocampal neurons treated with several PPARγ agonists, including troglitazone, rosiglitazone, and ciglitazone, prevent the excitotoxic Aβ-induced rise in bulk-free Ca2+. (4) PPARγ activation results in the modulation of Wnt signaling components, including the inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) and an increase of the cytoplasmic and nuclear β-catenin levels. We conclude that the activation of PPARγ prevents Aβ-induced neurodegeneration by a mechanism that may involve a cross talk between neuronal PPARγ and the Wnt signaling pathway. More important, the fact that the activation of PPARγ attenuated Aβ-dependent neurodegeneration opens the possibility to fight AD from a new therapeutic perspective

  16. Hippocampal activity mediates the relationship between circadian activity rhythms and memory in older adults.

    Sherman, Stephanie M; Mumford, Jeanette A; Schnyer, David M

    2015-08-01

    Older adults experience parallel changes in sleep, circadian rhythms, and episodic memory. These processes appear to be linked such that disruptions in sleep contribute to deficits in memory. Although more variability in circadian patterns is a common feature of aging and predicts pathology, little is known about how alterations in circadian activity rhythms within older adults influence new episodic learning. Following 10 days of recording sleep-wake patterns using actigraphy, healthy older adults underwent fMRI while performing an associative memory task. The results revealed better associative memory was related to more consistent circadian activity rhythms, independent of total sleep time, sleep efficiency, and level of physical activity. Moreover, hippocampal activity during successful memory retrieval events was positively correlated with associative memory accuracy and circadian activity rhythm (CAR) consistency. We demonstrated that the link between consistent rhythms and associative memory performance was mediated by hippocampal activity. These findings provide novel insight into how the circadian rhythm of sleep-wake cycles are associated with memory in older adults and encourage further examination of circadian activity rhythms as a biomarker of cognitive functioning. PMID:26205911

  17. Effect of Unpleasant Loud Noise on Hippocampal Activities during Picture Encoding: An fMRI Study

    Hirano, Yoshiyuki; Fujita, Masafumi; Watanabe, Kazuko; Niwa, Masami; Takahashi, Toru; Kanematsu, Masayuki; Ido, Yasushi; Tomida, Mihoko; Onozuka, Minoru

    2006-01-01

    The functional link between the amygdala and hippocampus in humans has not been well documented. We examined the effect of unpleasant loud noise on hippocampal and amygdaloid activities during picture encoding by means of fMRI, and on the correct response in humans. The noise reduced activity in the hippocampus during picture encoding, decreased…

  18. NRSF causes cAMP-sensitive suppression of sodium current in cultured hippocampal neurons

    Nadeau, H.; Lester, H. A.

    2002-01-01

    The neuron restrictive silencer factor (NRSF/REST) has been shown to bind to the promoters of many neuron-specific genes and is able to suppress transcription of Na(+) channels in PC12 cells, although its functional effect in terminally differentiated neurons is unknown. We constructed lentiviral vectors to express NRSF as a bicistronic message with green fluorescent protein (GFP) and followed infected hippocampal neurons in culture over a period of 1-2 wk. NRSF-expressing neurons showed a time-dependent suppression of Na(+) channel function as measured by whole cell electrophysiology. Suppression was reversed or prevented by the addition of membrane-permeable cAMP analogues and enhanced by cAMP antagonists but not affected by increasing protein expression with a viral enhancer. Secondary effects, including altered sensitivity to glutamate and GABA and reduced outward K(+) currents, were duplicated by culturing GFP-infected control neurons in TTX. The striking similarity of the phenotypes makes NRSF potentially useful as a genetic "silencer" and also suggests avenues of further exploration that may elucidate the transcription factor's in vivo role in neuronal plasticity.

  19. Nanoparticle targeting to neurons in a rat hippocampal slice culture model

    Richard P Kraig

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We have previously shown that CdSe/ZnS core/shell luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals or QDs (quantum dots coated with PEG [poly(ethylene glycol]-appended DHLA (dihydrolipoic acid can bind AcWG(PalVKIKKP9GGH6 (Palm1 through the histidine residues. The coating on the QD provides colloidal stability and this peptide complex uniquely allows the QDs to be taken up by cultured cells and readily exit the endosome into the soma. We now show that use of a polyampholyte coating [in which the neutral PEG is replaced by the negatively heterocharged CL4 (compact ligand], results in the specific targeting of the palmitoylated peptide to neurons in mature rat hippocampal slice cultures. There was no noticeable uptake by astrocytes, oligodendrocytes or microglia (identified by immunocytochemistry, demonstrating neuronal specificity to the overall negatively charged CL4 coating. In addition, EM (electron microscopy images confirm the endosomal egress ability of the Palm1 peptide by showing a much more disperse cytosolic distribution of the CL4 QDs conjugated to Palm1 compared with CL4 QDs alone. This suggests a novel and robust way of delivering neurotherapeutics to neurons.

  20. Hippocampal CA2 activity patterns change over time to a larger extent than between spatial contexts.

    Mankin, Emily A; Diehl, Geoffrey W; Sparks, Fraser T; Leutgeb, Stefan; Leutgeb, Jill K

    2015-01-01

    The hippocampal CA2 subregion has a different anatomical connectivity pattern within the entorhino-hippocampal circuit than either the CA1 or CA3 subregion. Yet major differences in the neuronal activity patterns of CA2 compared with the other CA subregions have not been reported. We show that standard spatial and temporal firing patterns of individual hippocampal principal neurons in behaving rats, such as place fields, theta modulation, and phase precession, are also present in CA2, but that the CA2 subregion differs substantially from the other CA subregions in its population coding. CA2 ensembles do not show a persistent code for space or for differences in context. Rather, CA2 activity patterns become progressively dissimilar over time periods of hours to days. The weak coding for a particular context is consistent with recent behavioral evidence that CA2 circuits preferentially support social, emotional, and temporal rather than spatial aspects of memory. PMID:25569350

  1. Increased cell viability and proliferation in post-hypoxic hippocampal tissue culture treated with Acalypha indica root extract

    Sophie Yolanda

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: This research was done to study the influence of Acalypha indica Linn root extract towards relative cell viability and proliferation as parameters of neurogenesis in post-hypoxic hippocampal tissue culture.Methods: Experimental in vitro study using 24 primary neuronal cell cultures obtained from adult Sprague Dawley rat exposed to hypoxia with 5% O2/5% CO2/N2 balance gas for 24 hours. Post-hypoxia, Acalypha indica Linn root extract was added at doses of 10, 15, and 20 mg/mL to 3 treatment groups. No treatment was given to the control group. Each group consists of 6 samples. After 90 hours of incubation, relative cell viability was measured by using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT examination, and cell proliferation was measured by using 5-bromo2’-deoxy-uridine (BrdU for cell proliferation. Data was analyzed using one way ANOVA parametric tests, then further analyzed with post-hoc analysis.Results: The relative cell viability of rat hippocampal tissue culture treated with Acalypha indica Linn root extract with dose of 10, 15, and 20 mg/mL was significantly higher than control (176.95%, 220.62%, and 386.02% vs. 100%. Cell proliferation of rat hippocampal tissue culture treated with Acalypha indica Linn root extract with dose of 10, 15, and 20 mg/mL was significantly higher than control (0.132, 0.117, 0.114 vs 0.096.Conclusion: Acalypha indica Linn root extract with doses of 10, 15, and 20 mg/mL can increase relative cell viability and proliferation in post-hypoxic hippocampal tissue culture. (Med J Indones 2011; 20:94-9Keywords: Acalypha indica Linn (akar kucing, cell proliferation, hypoxia, neurogenesis, relative cell viability

  2. BDNF-induced nitric oxide signals in cultured rat hippocampal neurons: time course, mechanism of generation, and effect on neurotrophin secretion

    Kolarow, Richard; Kuhlmann, Christoph R. W.; Munsch, Thomas; Zehendner, Christoph; Brigadski, Tanja; Luhmann, Heiko J.; Lessmann, Volkmar

    2014-01-01

    BDNF and nitric oxide signaling both contribute to plasticity at glutamatergic synapses. However, the role of combined signaling of both pathways at the same synapse is largely unknown. Using NO imaging with diaminofluoresceine in cultured hippocampal neurons we analyzed the time course of neurotrophin-induced NO signals. Application of exogenous BDNF, NT-4, and NT-3 (but not NGF) induced NO signals in the soma and in proximal dendrites of hippocampal neurons that were sensitive to NO synthase activity, TrkB signaling, and intracellular calcium elevation. The effect of NO signaling on neurotrophin secretion was analyzed in BDNF-GFP, and NT-3-GFP transfected hippocampal neurons. Exogenous application of the NO donor sodium-nitroprusside markedly inhibited neurotrophin secretion. However, endogenously generated NO in response to depolarization and neurotrophin stimulation, both did not result in a negative feedback on neurotrophin secretion. These results suggest that a negative feedback of NO signaling on synaptic secretion of neurotrophins operates only at high intracellular levels of nitric oxide that are under physiological conditions not reached by depolarization or BDNF signaling. PMID:25426021

  3. Hippocampal Sharp-Wave Ripples Influence Selective Activation of the Default Mode Network.

    Kaplan, Raphael; Adhikari, Mohit H; Hindriks, Rikkert; Mantini, Dante; Murayama, Yusuke; Logothetis, Nikos K; Deco, Gustavo

    2016-03-01

    The default mode network (DMN) is a commonly observed resting-state network (RSN) that includes medial temporal, parietal, and prefrontal regions involved in episodic memory [1-3]. The behavioral relevance of endogenous DMN activity remains elusive, despite an emerging literature correlating resting fMRI fluctuations with memory performance [4, 5]-particularly in DMN regions [6-8]. Mechanistic support for the DMN's role in memory consolidation might come from investigation of large deflections (sharp-waves) in the hippocampal local field potential that co-occur with high-frequency (>80 Hz) oscillations called ripples-both during sleep [9, 10] and awake deliberative periods [11-13]. Ripples are ideally suited for memory consolidation [14, 15], since the reactivation of hippocampal place cell ensembles occurs during ripples [16-19]. Moreover, the number of ripples after learning predicts subsequent memory performance in rodents [20-22] and humans [23], whereas electrical stimulation of the hippocampus after learning interferes with memory consolidation [24-26]. A recent study in macaques showed diffuse fMRI neocortical activation and subcortical deactivation specifically after ripples [27]. Yet it is unclear whether ripples and other hippocampal neural events influence endogenous fluctuations in specific RSNs-like the DMN-unitarily. Here, we examine fMRI datasets from anesthetized monkeys with simultaneous hippocampal electrophysiology recordings, where we observe a dramatic increase in the DMN fMRI signal following ripples, but not following other hippocampal electrophysiological events. Crucially, we find increases in ongoing DMN activity after ripples, but not in other RSNs. Our results relate endogenous DMN fluctuations to hippocampal ripples, thereby linking network-level resting fMRI fluctuations with behaviorally relevant circuit-level neural dynamics. PMID:26898464

  4. Hippocampal Sharp-Wave Ripples Influence Selective Activation of the Default Mode Network

    Kaplan, Raphael; Adhikari, Mohit H.; Hindriks, Rikkert; Mantini, Dante; Murayama, Yusuke; Logothetis, Nikos K.; Deco, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Summary The default mode network (DMN) is a commonly observed resting-state network (RSN) that includes medial temporal, parietal, and prefrontal regions involved in episodic memory [1, 2, 3]. The behavioral relevance of endogenous DMN activity remains elusive, despite an emerging literature correlating resting fMRI fluctuations with memory performance [4, 5]—particularly in DMN regions [6, 7, 8]. Mechanistic support for the DMN’s role in memory consolidation might come from investigation of large deflections (sharp-waves) in the hippocampal local field potential that co-occur with high-frequency (>80 Hz) oscillations called ripples—both during sleep [9, 10] and awake deliberative periods [11, 12, 13]. Ripples are ideally suited for memory consolidation [14, 15], since the reactivation of hippocampal place cell ensembles occurs during ripples [16, 17, 18, 19]. Moreover, the number of ripples after learning predicts subsequent memory performance in rodents [20, 21, 22] and humans [23], whereas electrical stimulation of the hippocampus after learning interferes with memory consolidation [24, 25, 26]. A recent study in macaques showed diffuse fMRI neocortical activation and subcortical deactivation specifically after ripples [27]. Yet it is unclear whether ripples and other hippocampal neural events influence endogenous fluctuations in specific RSNs—like the DMN—unitarily. Here, we examine fMRI datasets from anesthetized monkeys with simultaneous hippocampal electrophysiology recordings, where we observe a dramatic increase in the DMN fMRI signal following ripples, but not following other hippocampal electrophysiological events. Crucially, we find increases in ongoing DMN activity after ripples, but not in other RSNs. Our results relate endogenous DMN fluctuations to hippocampal ripples, thereby linking network-level resting fMRI fluctuations with behaviorally relevant circuit-level neural dynamics. PMID:26898464

  5. Effects of chronic prenatal ethanol exposure on locomotor activity, and hippocampal weight, neurons, and nitric oxide synthase activity of the young postnatal guinea pig.

    Gibson, M A; Butters, N S; Reynolds, J N; Brien, J F

    2000-01-01

    Decreased nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-catalyzed formation of NO from L-arginine may be involved in ethanol teratogenesis involving the hippocampus. This hypothesis was tested by determining the effects of chronic prenatal ethanol exposure on locomotor activity and on hippocampal weight, number of CA1 and CA3 pyramidal cells and dentate gyrus granule cells, and NOS activity of the postnatal guinea pig. Timed, pregnant guinea pigs received one of the following chronic oral regimens throughout gestation: 4 g ethanol/kg maternal body weight/day, isocaloric-sucrose/pair-feeding, or water. At postnatal day (PD) 10, spontaneous locomotor activity was measured. At PD 12, histological analysis was performed on the hippocampal formation, in which hippocampal CA1 and CA3 pyramidal cells and dentate gyrus granule cells were counted; body, brain, and hippocampal weights were measured; and hippocampal NOS enzymatic activity was determined using a radiometric assay. Chronic prenatal ethanol exposure produced hyperactivity, decreased the brain and hippocampal weights with no change in body weight, decreased the number of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells by 25-30%, and had no effect on hippocampal NOS activity compared with the two control groups. These data, together with our previous findings in the fetal guinea pig, demonstrate that chronic prenatal ethanol exposure decreases hippocampal NOS activity in near-term fetal life that temporally precedes the selective loss of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells in postnatal life. PMID:10758347

  6. Prenatal immune activation causes hippocampal synaptic deficits in the absence of overt microglia anomalies.

    Giovanoli, Sandra; Weber-Stadlbauer, Ulrike; Schedlowski, Manfred; Meyer, Urs; Engler, Harald

    2016-07-01

    Prenatal exposure to infectious or inflammatory insults can increase the risk of developing neuropsychiatric disorder in later life, including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and autism. These brain disorders are also characterized by pre- and postsynaptic deficits. Using a well-established mouse model of maternal exposure to the viral mimetic polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidilic acid [poly(I:C)], we examined whether prenatal immune activation might cause synaptic deficits in the hippocampal formation of pubescent and adult offspring. Based on the widely appreciated role of microglia in synaptic pruning, we further explored possible associations between synaptic deficits and microglia anomalies in offspring of poly(I:C)-exposed and control mothers. We found that prenatal immune activation induced an adult onset of presynaptic hippocampal deficits (as evaluated by synaptophysin and bassoon density). The early-life insult further caused postsynaptic hippocampal deficits in pubescence (as evaluated by PSD95 and SynGAP density), some of which persisted into adulthood. In contrast, prenatal immune activation did not change microglia (or astrocyte) density, nor did it alter their activation phenotypes. The prenatal manipulation did also not cause signs of persistent systemic inflammation. Despite the absence of overt glial anomalies or systemic inflammation, adult offspring exposed to prenatal immune activation displayed increased hippocampal IL-1β levels. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that age-dependent synaptic deficits and abnormal pro-inflammatory cytokine expression can occur during postnatal brain maturation in the absence of microglial anomalies or systemic inflammation. PMID:26408796

  7. APP Is a Context-Sensitive Regulator of the Hippocampal Presynaptic Active Zone.

    Laßek, Melanie; Weingarten, Jens; Wegner, Martin; Mueller, Benjamin F; Rohmer, Marion; Baeumlisberger, Dominic; Arrey, Tabiwang N; Hick, Meike; Ackermann, Jörg; Acker-Palmer, Amparo; Koch, Ina; Müller, Ulrike; Karas, Michael; Volknandt, Walter

    2016-04-01

    The hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are characterized by cognitive decline and behavioral changes. The most prominent brain region affected by the progression of AD is the hippocampal formation. The pathogenesis involves a successive loss of hippocampal neurons accompanied by a decline in learning and memory consolidation mainly attributed to an accumulation of senile plaques. The amyloid precursor protein (APP) has been identified as precursor of Aβ-peptides, the main constituents of senile plaques. Until now, little is known about the physiological function of APP within the central nervous system. The allocation of APP to the proteome of the highly dynamic presynaptic active zone (PAZ) highlights APP as a yet unknown player in neuronal communication and signaling. In this study, we analyze the impact of APP deletion on the hippocampal PAZ proteome. The native hippocampal PAZ derived from APP mouse mutants (APP-KOs and NexCreAPP/APLP2-cDKOs) was isolated by subcellular fractionation and immunopurification. Subsequently, an isobaric labeling was performed using TMT6 for protein identification and quantification by high-resolution mass spectrometry. We combine bioinformatics tools and biochemical approaches to address the proteomics dataset and to understand the role of individual proteins. The impact of APP deletion on the hippocampal PAZ proteome was visualized by creating protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks that incorporated APP into the synaptic vesicle cycle, cytoskeletal organization, and calcium-homeostasis. The combination of subcellular fractionation, immunopurification, proteomic analysis, and bioinformatics allowed us to identify APP as structural and functional regulator in a context-sensitive manner within the hippocampal active zone network. PMID:27092780

  8. APP Is a Context-Sensitive Regulator of the Hippocampal Presynaptic Active Zone

    Mueller, Benjamin F.; Rohmer, Marion; Baeumlisberger, Dominic; Arrey, Tabiwang N.; Hick, Meike; Ackermann, Jörg; Acker-Palmer, Amparo; Koch, Ina; Müller, Ulrike; Karas, Michael; Volknandt, Walter

    2016-01-01

    The hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) are characterized by cognitive decline and behavioral changes. The most prominent brain region affected by the progression of AD is the hippocampal formation. The pathogenesis involves a successive loss of hippocampal neurons accompanied by a decline in learning and memory consolidation mainly attributed to an accumulation of senile plaques. The amyloid precursor protein (APP) has been identified as precursor of Aβ-peptides, the main constituents of senile plaques. Until now, little is known about the physiological function of APP within the central nervous system. The allocation of APP to the proteome of the highly dynamic presynaptic active zone (PAZ) highlights APP as a yet unknown player in neuronal communication and signaling. In this study, we analyze the impact of APP deletion on the hippocampal PAZ proteome. The native hippocampal PAZ derived from APP mouse mutants (APP-KOs and NexCreAPP/APLP2-cDKOs) was isolated by subcellular fractionation and immunopurification. Subsequently, an isobaric labeling was performed using TMT6 for protein identification and quantification by high-resolution mass spectrometry. We combine bioinformatics tools and biochemical approaches to address the proteomics dataset and to understand the role of individual proteins. The impact of APP deletion on the hippocampal PAZ proteome was visualized by creating protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks that incorporated APP into the synaptic vesicle cycle, cytoskeletal organization, and calcium-homeostasis. The combination of subcellular fractionation, immunopurification, proteomic analysis, and bioinformatics allowed us to identify APP as structural and functional regulator in a context-sensitive manner within the hippocampal active zone network. PMID:27092780

  9. APP Is a Context-Sensitive Regulator of the Hippocampal Presynaptic Active Zone.

    Melanie Laßek

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD are characterized by cognitive decline and behavioral changes. The most prominent brain region affected by the progression of AD is the hippocampal formation. The pathogenesis involves a successive loss of hippocampal neurons accompanied by a decline in learning and memory consolidation mainly attributed to an accumulation of senile plaques. The amyloid precursor protein (APP has been identified as precursor of Aβ-peptides, the main constituents of senile plaques. Until now, little is known about the physiological function of APP within the central nervous system. The allocation of APP to the proteome of the highly dynamic presynaptic active zone (PAZ highlights APP as a yet unknown player in neuronal communication and signaling. In this study, we analyze the impact of APP deletion on the hippocampal PAZ proteome. The native hippocampal PAZ derived from APP mouse mutants (APP-KOs and NexCreAPP/APLP2-cDKOs was isolated by subcellular fractionation and immunopurification. Subsequently, an isobaric labeling was performed using TMT6 for protein identification and quantification by high-resolution mass spectrometry. We combine bioinformatics tools and biochemical approaches to address the proteomics dataset and to understand the role of individual proteins. The impact of APP deletion on the hippocampal PAZ proteome was visualized by creating protein-protein interaction (PPI networks that incorporated APP into the synaptic vesicle cycle, cytoskeletal organization, and calcium-homeostasis. The combination of subcellular fractionation, immunopurification, proteomic analysis, and bioinformatics allowed us to identify APP as structural and functional regulator in a context-sensitive manner within the hippocampal active zone network.

  10. Hippocampal activity during transient respiratory events in the freely behaving cat

    Poe, G R; Kristensen, Morten Pilgaard; Rector, D M;

    1996-01-01

    We measured dorsal hippocampal activity accompanying sighs and apnea using reflectance imaging and electrophysiologic measures in freely behaving cats. Reflected 660-nm light from a 1-mm2 area of CA1 was captured during sighs and apnea at 25 Hz through a coherent image conduit coupled to a charge...

  11. Fractal analysis of a voltage-dependent potassium channel from cultured mouse hippocampal neurons.

    Liebovitch, L S; Sullivan, J M

    1987-12-01

    The kinetics of ion channels have been widely modeled as a Markov process. In these models it is assumed that the channel protein has a small number of discrete conformational states and the kinetic rate constants connecting these states are constant. In the alternative fractal model the spontaneous fluctuations of the channel protein at many different time scales are represented by a kinetic rate constant k = At1-D, where A is the kinetic setpoint and D the fractal dimension. Single-channel currents were recorded at 146 mM external K+ from an inwardly rectifying, 120 pS, K+ selective, voltage-sensitive channel in cultured mouse hippocampal neurons. The kinetics of these channels were found to be statistically self-similar at different time scales as predicted by the fractal model. The fractal dimensions were approximately 2 for the closed times and approximately 1 for the open times and did not depend on voltage. For both the open and closed times the logarithm of the kinetic setpoint was found to be proportional to the applied voltage, which indicates that the gating of this channel involves the net inward movement of approximately one negative charge when this channel opens. Thus, the open and closed times and the voltage dependence of the gating of this channel are well described by the fractal model. PMID:2447974

  12. Adaptive top-down suppression of hippocampal activity and the purging of intrusive memories from consciousness.

    Benoit, Roland G; Hulbert, Justin C; Huddleston, Ean; Anderson, Michael C

    2015-01-01

    When reminded of unwanted memories, people often attempt to suppress these experiences from awareness. Prior work indicates that control processes mediated by the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) modulate hippocampal activity during such retrieval suppression. It remains unknown whether this modulation plays a role in purging an intrusive memory from consciousness. Here, we combined fMRI and effective connectivity analyses with phenomenological reports to scrutinize a role for adaptive top-down suppression of hippocampal retrieval processes in terminating mnemonic awareness of intrusive memories. Participants either suppressed or recalled memories of pictures depicting faces or places. After each trial, they reported their success at regulating awareness of the memory. DLPFC activation was greatest when unwanted memories intruded into consciousness and needed to be purged, and this increased engagement predicted superior control of intrusive memories over time. However, hippocampal activity was decreased during the suppression of place memories only. Importantly, the inhibitory influence of the DLPFC on the hippocampus was linked to the ensuing reduction in intrusions of the suppressed memories. Individuals who exhibited negative top-down coupling during early suppression attempts experienced fewer involuntary memory intrusions later on. Over repeated suppressions, the DLPFC-hippocampus connectivity grew less negative with the degree that they no longer had to purge unwanted memories from awareness. These findings support a role of DLPFC in countermanding the unfolding recollection of an unwanted memory via the suppression of hippocampal processing, a mechanism that may contribute to adaptation in the aftermath of traumatic experiences. PMID:25100219

  13. Tracking burst patterns in hippocampal cultures with high-density CMOS-MEAs

    Gandolfo, M.; Maccione, A.; Tedesco, M.; Martinoia, S.; Berdondini, L.

    2010-10-01

    In this work, we investigate the spontaneous bursting behaviour expressed by in vitro hippocampal networks by using a high-resolution CMOS-based microelectrode array (MEA), featuring 4096 electrodes, inter-electrode spacing of 21 µm and temporal resolution of 130 µs. In particular, we report an original development of an adapted analysis method enabling us to investigate spatial and temporal patterns of activity and the interplay between successive network bursts (NBs). We first defined and detected NBs, and then, we analysed the spatial and temporal behaviour of these events with an algorithm based on the centre of activity trajectory. We further refined the analysis by using a technique derived from statistical mechanics, capable of distinguishing the two main phases of NBs, i.e. (i) a propagating and (ii) a reverberating phase, and by classifying the trajectory patterns. Finally, this methodology was applied to signal representations based on spike detection, i.e. the instantaneous firing rate, and directly based on voltage-coded raw data, i.e. activity movies. Results highlight the potentialities of this approach to investigate fundamental issues on spontaneous neuronal dynamics and suggest the hypothesis that neurons operate in a sort of 'team' to the perpetuation of the transmission of the same information.

  14. Disrupting neural activity related to awake-state sharp wave-ripple complexes prevents hippocampal learning

    Miriam Shirin Nokia

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Oscillations in hippocampal local-field potentials reflect the crucial involvement of the hippocampus in memory trace formation: theta (4-8 Hz oscillations and ripples (~200 Hz occurring during sharp waves are thought to mediate encoding and consolidation, respectively. During sharp wave-ripple complexes (SPW-Rs, hippocampal cell firing closely follows the pattern that took place during the initial experience, most likely reflecting replay of that event. Disrupting hippocampal ripples using electrical stimulation either during training in awake animals or during sleep after training retards spatial learning. Here, adult rabbits were trained in trace eyeblink conditioning, a hippocampus-dependent associative learning task. A bright light was presented to the animals during the inter-trial interval, when awake, either during SPW-Rs or irrespective of their neural state. Learning was particularly poor when the light was presented following SPW-Rs. While the light did not disrupt the ripple itself, it elicited a theta-band oscillation, a state that does not usually coincide with SPW-Rs. Thus, it seems that consolidation depends on neuronal activity within and beyond the hippocampus taking place immediately after, but by no means limited to, hippocampal SPW-Rs.

  15. Comparison of neuroprotective effects of erythropoietin (EPO) and carbamylerythropoietin (CEPO) against ischemia-like oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) and NMDA excitotoxicity in mouse hippocampal slice cultures

    Montero, Maria; Rom Poulsen, Frantz; Noraberg, Jens;

    2007-01-01

    In addition to its well-known hematopoietic effects, erythropoietin (EPO) also has neuroprotective properties. However, hematopoietic side effects are unwanted for neuroprotection, underlining the need for EPO-like compounds with selective neuroprotective actions. One such compound, devoid of...... hematopoietic bioactivity, is the chemically modified, EPO-derivative carbamylerythropoietin (CEPO). For comparison of the neuroprotective effects of CEPO and EPO, we subjected organotypic hippocampal slice cultures to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) or N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) excitotoxicity. Hippocampal...

  16. Subthreshold Concentrations of Melatonin and Galantamine Improves Pathological AD-Hallmarks in Hippocampal Organotypic Cultures.

    Buendia, I; Parada, E; Navarro, E; León, R; Negredo, P; Egea, J; López, M G

    2016-07-01

    Melatonin is a neurohormone whose levels are significantly reduced or absent in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. In these patients, acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEI) are the major drug class used for their treatment; however, they present unwanted cholinergic side effects and have provided limited efficacy in clinic. Because combination therapy is being extensively used to treat different pathological diseases such as cancer or acquired immune deficiency syndrome, we posed this study to evaluate if melatonin in combination with an AChEI, galantamine, could provide beneficial properties in a novel in vitro model of AD. Thus, we subjected organotypic hippocampal cultures (OHCs) to subtoxic concentrations of β-amyloid (0.5 μM βA) plus okadaic acid (1 nM OA), for 4 days. This treatment increased by 95 % cell death, which was mainly apoptotic as shown by positive TUNEL staining. In addition, the combination of βA/OA increased Thioflavin S aggregates, hyperphosphorylation of Tau, oxidative stress (increased DCFDA fluorescence), and neuroinflammation (increased IL-1β and TNFα). Under these experimental conditions, melatonin (1-1000 nM) and galantamine (10-1000 nM), co-incubated with the toxic stimuli, caused a concentration-dependent neuroprotection; maximal neuroprotective effect was achieved at 1 μM of melatonin and galantamine. Most effective was the finding that combination of sub-effective concentrations of melatonin (1 nM) and galantamine (10 nM) provided a synergic anti-apoptotic effect and reduction of most of the AD-related pathological hallmarks observed in the βA/OA model. Therefore, we suggest that supplementation of melatonin in combination with lower doses of AChEIs could be an interesting strategy for AD patients. PMID:26081146

  17. Ethanol inhibition of N-methyl-D-aspartate-activated current in mouse hippocampal neurones: whole-cell patch-clamp analysis

    Peoples, Robert W.; White, Geoffrey; Lovinger, David M.; Weight, Forrest F

    1997-01-01

    The action of ethanol on N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-activated ion current was studied in mouse hippocampal neurones in culture using whole-cell patch-clamp recording.Ethanol inhibited NMDA-activated current in a voltage-independent manner, and did not alter the reversal potential of NMDA-activated current.Concentration–response analysis of NMDA- and glycine-activated current revealed that ethanol decreased the maximal response to both agonists without affecting their EC50 values.The polyamin...

  18. Modulation of inhibitory glycine receptors in cultured embryonic mouse hippocampal neurons by zinc, thiol containing redox agents and carnosine.

    Thio, L L; Zhang, H X

    2006-01-01

    Modulation of inhibitory glycine receptors by zinc (Zn(2+)) and endogenous redox agents such as glutathione may alter inhibition in the mammalian brain. Despite the abundance of Zn(2+) in the hippocampus and its ability to modulate glycine receptors, few studies have examined Zn(2+) modulation of hippocampal glycine receptors. Whether redox agents modulate hippocampal glycine receptors also remains unknown. This study examined Zn(2+) and redox modulation of glycine receptor-mediated currents in cultured embryonic mouse hippocampal neurons using whole-cell recordings. Zn(2+) concentrations below 10 microM potentiated currents elicited by low glycine, beta-alanine, and taurine concentrations by 300-400%. Zn(2+) concentrations above 300 microM produced nearly complete inhibition. Potentiating Zn(2+) concentrations shifted the dose-response curves for the three agonists to the left and decreased the Hill coefficient for glycine and beta-alanine but not taurine. Inhibiting Zn(2+) concentrations shifted the dose-response curves for glycine and beta-alanine to the right but reduced the maximum taurine response. Histidine residues may participate in potentiation because diethyl pyrocarbonate and pH 5.4 diminished Zn(2+) enhancement of glycine currents. pH 5.4 diminished Zn(2+) block of glycine currents, but diethyl pyrocarbonate did not. These findings indicate that separate sites mediate Zn(2+) potentiation and inhibition. The redox agents glutathione, dithiothreitol, tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine, and 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) did not alter glycine currents by a redox mechanism. However, glutathione and dithiothreitol interfered with the effects of Zn(2+) on glycine currents by chelating it. Carnosine had similar effects. Thus, Zn(2+) and thiol containing redox agents that chelate Zn(2+) modulate hippocampal glycine receptors with the mechanism of Zn(2+) modulation being agonist dependent. PMID:16515845

  19. Role of neuronal Ras activity in adult hippocampal neurogenesis and cognition

    Martina eManns

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Hippocampal neurogenesis in the adult mammalian brain is modulated by various signals like growth factors, hormones, neuropeptides, and neurotransmitters. All of these factors can (but not necessarily do converge on the activation of the G protein p21Ras. We used a transgenic mouse model (synRas mice expressing constitutively activated G12V-Harvey Ras selectively in differentiated neurons to investigate the possible effects onto neurogenesis. Ras activation in neurons attenuates hippocampal precursor cell generation at an early stage of the proliferative cascade before neuronal lineage determination occurs. Therefore it is unlikely that the transgenically activated Ras in neurons mediates this effect by a direct, intracellular signaling mechanism. Voluntary exercise restores neurogenesis up to wild type level presumably mediated by brain derived neurotrophic factor. Reduced neurogenesis is linked to impairments in spatial short-term memory and object recognition, the latter can be rescued by voluntary exercise, as well. These data support the view that new cells significantly increase complexity that can be processed by the hippocampal network when experience requires high demands to associate stimuli over time and/or space.

  20. Cerebellar and Hippocampal Activation During Eyeblink ConditioningDepends on the Experimental Paradigm: A MEG Study

    Peter Kirsch; Caroline Achenbach; Martina Kirsch; Matthias Heinzmann; Anne Schienle; Dieter Vaitl

    2003-01-01

    The cerebellum and the hippocampus are key structures for the acquisition of conditioned eyeblink responses. Whereas the cerebellum seems to be crucial for all types of eyeblink conditioning, the hippocampus appears to be involved only in complex types of learning. We conducted a differential conditioning study to explore the suitability of the design for magnetencephalography (MEG). In addition, we compared cerebellar and hippocampal activation during differential delay and trace conditionin...

  1. Hippocampal sub-regional shape and physical activity in older adults.

    Varma, Vijay R; Tang, Xiaoying; Carlson, Michelle C

    2016-08-01

    Hippocampal atrophy is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease pathology, and a target biomarker region for testing intervention efficacy. Over the last few decades, a growing body of evidence from animal and human models suggests that physical activity (PA) is associated with structural benefits to the hippocampus in older adults. Very few human studies, however have explored hippocampal sub-regional specificity of PA; this is significant considering that sub-regions of the hippocampus are associated with distinct cognitive tasks and are differentially affected by disease pathology. This study used objective and self-reported measures of daily walking activity and exercise, and surface-based regional shape analysis using high-field hippocampal sub-regional partitions to explore sub-region specific hippocampal associations in a sample of nondemented, community-dwelling older adults at elevated sociodemographic risk for cognitive decline. Vertex-wise surface areas, which may be more sensitive than global volume measures, were calculated using shape diffeomorphometry, and PA was assessed using step activity monitors and PA questionnaires. We found that daily walking activity in a participant's environment was associated in cross-section mainly with larger surface areas of the subiculum in women. Associations remained significant when controlling for self-reported exercise. Prior studies have found that PA related to exercise and aerobic fitness may be most closely associated with the anterior hippocampus, particularly the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. These novel findings are the first, to our knowledge, in human models to suggest that PA related to navigation that may not reach the level of moderate-intensity exercise may be associated with specific sub-regions of the hippocampus. These findings underscore the importance of better understanding the independent and related biological mechanisms and pathways by which increasing exercise as well as non

  2. Hippocampal Cannabinoid Transmission Modulates Dopamine Neuron Activity: Impact on Rewarding Memory Formation and Social Interaction

    Loureiro, Michael; Renard, Justine; Zunder, Jordan; Laviolette, Steven R

    2015-01-01

    Disturbances in cannabinoid type 1 receptor (CB1R) signaling have been linked to emotional and cognitive deficits characterizing neuropsychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia. Thus, there is growing interest in characterizing the relationship between cannabinoid transmission, emotional processing, and dopamine (DA)-dependent behavioral deficits. The CB1R is highly expressed in the mammalian nervous system, particularly in the hippocampus. Activation of the ventral hippocampal subregion ...

  3. Supramammillary serotonin reduction alters place learning and concomitant hippocampal, septal, and supramammillar theta activity in a Morris water maze

    Hernández-Pérez, J. Jesús; Gutiérrez-Guzmán, Blanca E.; López-Vázquez, Miguel Á.; Olvera-Cortés, María E.

    2015-01-01

    Hippocampal theta activity is related to spatial information processing, and high-frequency theta activity, in particular, has been linked to efficient spatial memory performance. Theta activity is regulated by the synchronizing ascending system (SAS), which includes mesencephalic and diencephalic relays. The supramamillary nucleus (SUMn) is located between the reticularis pontis oralis and the medial septum (MS), in close relation with the posterior hypothalamic nucleus (PHn), all of which are part of this ascending system. It has been proposed that the SUMn plays a role in the modulation of hippocampal theta-frequency; this could occur through direct connections between the SUMn and the hippocampus or through the influence of the SUMn on the MS. Serotonergic raphe neurons prominently innervate the hippocampus and several components of the SAS, including the SUMn. Serotonin desynchronizes hippocampal theta activity, and it has been proposed that serotonin may regulate learning through the modulation of hippocampal synchrony. In agreement with this hypothesis, serotonin depletion in the SUMn/PHn results in deficient spatial learning and alterations in CA1 theta activity-related learning in a Morris water maze. Because it has been reported that SUMn inactivation with lidocaine impairs the consolidation of reference memory, we asked whether changes in hippocampal theta activity related to learning would occur through serotonin depletion in the SUMn, together with deficiencies in memory. We infused 5,7-DHT bilaterally into the SUMn in rats and evaluated place learning in the standard Morris water maze task. Hippocampal (CA1 and dentate gyrus), septal and SUMn EEG were recorded during training of the test. The EEG power in each region and the coherence between the different regions were evaluated. Serotonin depletion in the SUMn induced deficient spatial learning and altered the expression of hippocampal high-frequency theta activity. These results provide evidence in

  4. Impairment of cognitive function and reduced hippocampal cholinergic activity in a rat model of chronic intermittent hypoxia

    Chunling Zhao; Yan Chen; Chunlai Zhang; Linya Lü; Qian Xu

    2011-01-01

    The present study established a rat model of chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) to simulate obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. CIH rats were evaluated for cognitive function using the Morris water maze, and neuronal pathology in the hippocampus was observed using hematoxylin-eosin staining. In addition, hippocampal choline acetyl transferase (ChAT) and nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) expression was determined by immunohistochemistry. Our results revealed necrotic hippocampal neurons, decreased ChAT and nAChR expression, as well as cognitive impairment in CIH rats. These results suggest that hippocampal neuronal necrosis and decreased cholinergic activity may be involved in CIH-induced cognitive impairment in rats.

  5. A comparative study of the actions of alkylpyridinium salts from a marine sponge and related synthetic compounds in rat cultured hippocampal neurones

    Riedel Gernot

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polymeric alkylpyridinium salts (poly-APS, are chemical defences produced by marine sponges including Reniera sarai. Poly-APS have previously been shown to effectively deliver macromolecules into cells. The efficiency of this closely follows the ability of poly-APS to form transient pores in membranes, providing strong support for a pore-based delivery mechanism. Recently, water soluble compounds have been synthesised that are structurally related to the natural polymers but bear a different number of pyridinium units. These compounds may share a number of bio-activities with poly-APS. Using electrophysiology, calcium imaging and 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene imaging, the pore forming properties of poly-APS and four related synthetic oligomers have been tested on primary cultured rat hippocampal neurones. Results Acute application of poly-APS (0.5 μg/ml, reduced membrane potential, input resistance and suppressed action potential firing. Poly-APS evoked inward cation currents with linear current-voltage relationships similar to actions of pore formers on other cell types. Poly-APS (0.005–5 μg/ml also produced Ca2+ transients in ~41% of neurones. The dose-dependence of poly-APS actions were complex, such that at 0.05 μg/ml and 5 μg/ml poly-APS produced varying magnitudes of membrane permeability depending on the order of application. Data from surface plasmon resonance analysis suggested accumulation of poly-APS in membranes and subsequent enhanced poly-APS binding. Even at 10–100 fold higher concentrations, none of the synthetic compounds produced changes in electrophysiological characteristics of the same magnitude as poly-APS. Of the synthetic oligomers tested compounds 1 (monomeric and tetrameric 4 (5–50 μg/ml induced small transient currents and 3 (trimeric and 4 (tetrameric produced significant Ca2+ transients in hippocampal neurones. Conclusion Poly-APS induced pore formation in hippocampal neurones and such

  6. MicroRNA-132 Interact with p250GAP/Cdc42 Pathway in the Hippocampal Neuronal Culture Model of Acquired Epilepsy and Associated with Epileptogenesis Process

    Huang, Hao; Zhou, Xin; Liu, Xi; Xu, Tao; Ma, Limin

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that epilepsy is the result of synaptic reorganization and pathological excitatory loop formation in the central nervous system; however, the mechanisms that regulate this process are not well understood. We proposed that microRNA-132 (miR-132) and p250GAP might play important roles in this process by activating the downstream Rho GTPase family. We tested this hypothesis using a magnesium-free medium-induced epileptic model of cultured hippocampal neurons. We investigated whether miR-132 regulates GTPase activity through p250GAP and found that Cdc42 was significantly activated in our experimental model. Silencing miR-132 inhibited the electrical excitability level of cultured epileptic neurons, whereas silencing p250GAP had an opposite effect. In addition, we verified the effect of miR-132 in vivo and found that silencing miR-132 inhibited the aberrant formation of dendritic spines and chronic spontaneous seizure in a lithium-pilocarpine-induced epileptic mouse model. Finally, we confirmed that silencing miR-132 has a neuroprotective effect on cultured epileptic neurons; however, this effect did not occur through the p250GAP pathway. Generally, silencing miR-132 may suppress spontaneous seizure activity through the miR-132/p250GAP/Cdc42 pathway by regulating the morphology and electrophysiology of dendritic spines; therefore, miR-132 may serve as a potential target for the development of antiepileptic drugs.

  7. MicroRNA-132 Interact with p250GAP/Cdc42 Pathway in the Hippocampal Neuronal Culture Model of Acquired Epilepsy and Associated with Epileptogenesis Process.

    Yuan, Jinxian; Huang, Hao; Zhou, Xin; Liu, Xi; Ou, Shu; Xu, Tao; Li, Ruohan; Ma, Limin; Chen, Yangmei

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that epilepsy is the result of synaptic reorganization and pathological excitatory loop formation in the central nervous system; however, the mechanisms that regulate this process are not well understood. We proposed that microRNA-132 (miR-132) and p250GAP might play important roles in this process by activating the downstream Rho GTPase family. We tested this hypothesis using a magnesium-free medium-induced epileptic model of cultured hippocampal neurons. We investigated whether miR-132 regulates GTPase activity through p250GAP and found that Cdc42 was significantly activated in our experimental model. Silencing miR-132 inhibited the electrical excitability level of cultured epileptic neurons, whereas silencing p250GAP had an opposite effect. In addition, we verified the effect of miR-132 in vivo and found that silencing miR-132 inhibited the aberrant formation of dendritic spines and chronic spontaneous seizure in a lithium-pilocarpine-induced epileptic mouse model. Finally, we confirmed that silencing miR-132 has a neuroprotective effect on cultured epileptic neurons; however, this effect did not occur through the p250GAP pathway. Generally, silencing miR-132 may suppress spontaneous seizure activity through the miR-132/p250GAP/Cdc42 pathway by regulating the morphology and electrophysiology of dendritic spines; therefore, miR-132 may serve as a potential target for the development of antiepileptic drugs. PMID:27579184

  8. Formaldehyde increases intracellular calcium concentration in primary cultured hippocampal neurons partly through NMDA receptors and T-type calcium channels

    Ye-Nan Chi; Xu Zhang; Jie Cai; Feng-Yu Liu; Guo-Gang Xing; You Wan

    2012-01-01

    Objective Formaldehyde at high concentrations is a contributor to air pollution.It is also an endogenous metabolic product in cells,and when beyond physiological concentrations,has pathological effects on neurons.Formaldehyde induces mis-folding and aggregation of neuronal tau protein,hippocampal neuronal apoptosis,cognitive impairment and loss of memory functions,as well as excitation of peripheral nociceptive neurons in cancer pain models.Intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) is an important intracellular messenger,and plays a key role in many pathological processes.The present study aimed to investigate the effect of formaldehyde on [Ca2+]i and the possible involvement of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) and T-type Ca2+ channels on the cell membrane.Methods Using primary cultured hippocampal neurons as a model,changes of [Ca2+]i in the presence of formaldehyde at a low concentration were detected by confocal laser scanning microscopy.Results Formaldehyde at 1 mmol/L approximately doubled [Ca2+]i.(2R)-amino-5-phosphonopentanoate (AP5,25 μtmol/L,an NMDAR antagonist) and mibefradil (MIB,1 μtmol/L,a T-type Ca2+ channel blocker),given 5 min after formaldehyde perfusion,each partly inhibited the formaldehyde-induced increase of [Ca2+]i,and this inhibitory effect was reinforced by combined application of AP5 and MIB.When applied 3 min before formaldehyde perfusion,AP5 (even at 50 μmol/L) did not inhibit the formaldehyde-induced increase of [Ca2+]i,but MIB (1 μmol/L) significantly inhibited this increase by 70%.Conclusion These results suggest that formaldehyde at a low concentration increases [Ca2+]i in cultured hippocampal neurons; NMDARs and T-type Ca2+ channels may be involved in this process.

  9. Social and cultural activities

    2008-01-01

    Club news : Record Club, Ski Club, Dancing Club, Orienteering Club, CERN Women's Club, Concerts Club, Russian Cultural Circle, Yachting Club. Conference : Voyage au coeur d'une flûte de champagne. Exhibition.

  10. Kynurenine pathway metabolites are associated with hippocampal activity during autobiographical memory recall in patients with depression.

    Young, Kymberly D; Drevets, Wayne C; Dantzer, Robert; Teague, T Kent; Bodurka, Jerzy; Savitz, Jonathan

    2016-08-01

    Inflammation-related changes in the concentrations of inflammatory mediators such as c-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin 1β (IL-1), and IL-6 as well as kynurenine metabolites are associated with major depressive disorder (MDD) and affect depressive behavior, cognition, and hippocampal plasticity in animal models. We previously reported that the ratios of kynurenic acid (KynA) to the neurotoxic metabolites, 3-hydroxykynurenine (3HK) and quinolinic acid (QA), were positively correlated with hippocampal volume in depression. The hippocampus is critical for autobiographical memory (AM) recall which is impaired in MDD. Here we tested whether the ratios, KynA/3HK and KynA/QA were associated with AM recall performance as well as hippocampal activity during AM recall. Thirty-five unmedicated depressed participants and 25 healthy controls (HCs) underwent fMRI scanning while recalling emotionally-valenced AMs and provided serum samples for the quantification of kynurenine metabolites, CRP, and cytokines (IL-1 receptor antagonist - IL-1RA; IL-6, tumor necrosis factor alpha - TNF, interferon gamma -IFN-γ, IL-10). KynA/3HK and KynA/QA were lower in the MDD group relative to the HCs. The concentrations of the CRP and the cytokines did not differ significantly between the HCs and the MDD group. Depressed individuals recalled fewer specific AMs and displayed increased left hippocampal activity during the recall of positive and negative memories. KynA/3HK was inversely associated with left hippocampal activity during specific AM recall in the MDD group. Further, KynA/QA was positively correlated with percent negative specific memories recalled in the MDD group and showed a non-significant trend toward a positive correlation with percent positive specific memories recalled in HCs. In contrast, neither CRP nor the cytokines were significantly associated with AM recall or activity of the hippocampus during AM recall. Conceivably, an imbalance in levels of KynA versus QA

  11. Acute restraint stress enhances hippocampal endocannabinoid function via glucocorticoid receptor activation.

    Wang, Meina; Hill, Matthew N; Zhang, Longhua; Gorzalka, Boris B; Hillard, Cecilia J; Alger, Bradley E

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to behavioural stress normally triggers a complex, multilevel response of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis that helps maintain homeostatic balance. Although the endocannabinoid (eCB) system (ECS) is sensitive to chronic stress, few studies have directly addressed its response to acute stress. Here we show that acute restraint stress enhances eCB-dependent modulation of GABA release measured by whole-cell voltage clamp of inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) in rat hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells in vitro. Both Ca(2+)-dependent, eCB-mediated depolarization-induced suppression of inhibition (DSI), and muscarinic cholinergic receptor (mAChR)-mediated eCB mobilization are enhanced following acute stress exposure. DSI enhancement is dependent on the activation of glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) and is mimicked by both in vivo and in vitro corticosterone treatment. This effect does not appear to involve cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), an enzyme that can degrade eCBs; however, treatment of hippocampal slices with the L-type calcium (Ca(2+)) channel inhibitor, nifedipine, reverses while an agonist of these channels mimics the effect of in vivo stress. Finally, we find that acute stress produces a delayed (by 30 min) increase in the hippocampal content of 2-arachidonoylglycerol, the eCB responsible for DSI. These results support the hypothesis that the ECS is a biochemical effector of glucocorticoids in the brain, linking stress with changes in synaptic strength. PMID:21890595

  12. Protease-activated receptor-1 negatively regulates proliferation of neural stem/progenitor cells derived from the hippocampal dentate gyrus of the adult mouse.

    Tanaka, Masayuki; Yoneyama, Masanori; Shiba, Tatsuo; Yamaguchi, Taro; Ogita, Kiyokazu

    2016-07-01

    Thrombin-activated protease-activated receptor (PAR)-1 regulates the proliferation of neural cells following brain injury. To elucidate the involvement of PAR-1 in the neurogenesis that occurs in the adult hippocampus, we examined whether PAR-1 regulated the proliferation of neural stem/progenitor cells (NPCs) derived from the murine hippocampal dentate gyrus. NPC cultures expressed PAR-1 protein and mRNA encoding all subtypes of PAR. Direct exposure of the cells to thrombin dramatically attenuated the cell proliferation without causing cell damage. This thrombin-induced attenuation was almost completely abolished by the PAR antagonist RWJ 56110, as well as by dabigatran and 4-(2-aminoethyl)benzenesulfonyl fluoride (AEBSF), which are selective and non-selective thrombin inhibitors, respectively. Expectedly, the PAR-1 agonist peptide (AP) SFLLR-NH2 also attenuated the cell proliferation. The cell proliferation was not affected by the PAR-1 negative control peptide RLLFT-NH2, which is an inactive peptide for PAR-1. Independently, we determined the effect of in vivo treatment with AEBSF or AP on hippocampal neurogenesis in the adult mouse. The administration of AEBSF, but not that of AP, significantly increased the number of newly-generated cells in the hippocampal subgranular zone. These data suggest that PAR-1 negatively regulated adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus by inhibiting the proliferative activity of the NPCs. PMID:27426918

  13. The emergence of spontaneous activity in neuronal cultures

    Orlandi, J. G.; Alvarez-Lacalle, E.; Teller, S.; Soriano, J.; Casademunt, J.

    2013-01-01

    In vitro neuronal networks of dissociated hippocampal or cortical tissues are one of the most attractive model systems for the physics and neuroscience communities. Cultured neurons grow and mature, develop axons and dendrites, and quickly connect to their neighbors to establish a spontaneously active network within a week. The resulting neuronal network is characterized by a combination of excitatory and inhibitory neurons coupled through synaptic connections that interact in a highly nonlinear manner. The nonlinear behavior emerges from the dynamics of both the neurons' spiking activity and synaptic transmission, together with biological noise. These ingredients give rise to a rich repertoire of phenomena that are still poorly understood, including the emergence and maintenance of periodic spontaneous activity, avalanches, propagation of fronts and synchronization. In this work we present an overview on the rich activity of cultured neuronal networks, and detail the minimal theoretical considerations needed to describe experimental observations.

  14. SNAP-29-mediated Modulation of Synaptic Transmission in Cultured Hippocampal Neurons*

    Pan, Ping-Yue; Cai, Qian; Lin, Lin; Lu, Pei-Hua; Duan, Shumin; Sheng, Zu-Hang

    2005-01-01

    Identifying the molecules that regulate both the recycling of synaptic vesicles and the SNARE components required for fusion is critical for elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying synaptic plasticity. SNAP-29 was initially isolated as a syntaxin-binding and ubiquitously expressed protein. Previous studies have suggested that SNAP-29 inhibits SNARE complex disassembly, thereby reducing synaptic transmission in cultured superior cervical ganglion neurons in an activity-dependent manner...

  15. Long-lasting changes in DNA methylation following short-term hypoxic exposure in primary hippocampal neuronal cultures.

    Iain Hartley

    Full Text Available While the effects of hypoxia on gene expression have been investigated in the CNS to some extent, we currently do not know what role epigenetics plays in the transcription of many genes during such hypoxic stress. To start understanding the role of epigenetic changes during hypoxia, we investigated the long-term effect of hypoxia on gene expression and DNA methylation in hippocampal neuronal cells. Primary murine hippocampal neuronal cells were cultured for 7 days. Hypoxic stress of 1% O2, 5% CO2 for 24 hours was applied on Day 3, conditions we found to maximize cellular hypoxic stress response without inducing cell death. Cells were returned to normoxia for 4 days following the period of hypoxic stress. On Day 7, Methyl-Sensitive Cut Counting (MSCC was used to identify a genome-wide methylation profile of the hippocampal cell lines to assess methylation changes resulting from hypoxia. RNA-Seq was also done on Day 7 to analyze changes in gene transcription. Phenotypic analysis showed that neuronal processes were significantly shorter after 1 day of hypoxia, but there was a catch-up growth of these processes after return to normoxia. Transcriptome profiling using RNA-Seq revealed 369 differentially expressed genes with 225 being upregulated, many of which form networks shown to affect CNS development and function. Importantly, the expression level of 59 genes could be correlated to the changes in DNA methylation in their promoter regions. CpG islands, in particular, had a strong tendency to remain hypomethylated long after hypoxic stress was removed. From this study, we conclude that short-term, sub-lethal hypoxia results in long-lasting changes to genome wide DNA methylation status and that some of these changes can be highly correlated with transcriptional modulation in a number of genes involved in functional pathways that have been previously implicated in neural growth and development.

  16. The PPARα Agonist Fenofibrate Preserves Hippocampal Neurogenesis and Inhibits Microglial Activation After Whole-Brain Irradiation

    Purpose: Whole-brain irradiation (WBI) leads to cognitive impairment months to years after radiation. Numerous studies suggest that decreased hippocampal neurogenesis and microglial activation are involved in the pathogenesis of WBI-induced brain injury. The goal of this study was to investigate whether administration of the peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) α agonist fenofibrate would prevent the detrimental effect of WBI on hippocampal neurogenesis. Methods and Materials: For this study, 129S1/SvImJ wild-type and PPARα knockout mice that were fed either regular or 0.2% wt/wt fenofibrate-containing chow received either sham irradiation or WBI (10-Gy single dose of 137Cs γ-rays). Mice were injected intraperitoneally with bromodeoxyuridine to label the surviving cells at 1 month after WBI, and the newborn neurons were counted at 2 months after WBI by use of bromodeoxyuridine/neuronal nuclei double immunofluorescence. Proliferation in the subgranular zone and microglial activation were measured at 1 week and 2 months after WBI by use of Ki-67 and CD68 immunohistochemistry, respectively. Results: Whole-brain irradiation led to a significant decrease in the number of newborn hippocampal neurons 2 months after it was performed. Fenofibrate prevented this decrease by promoting the survival of newborn cells in the dentate gyrus. In addition, fenofibrate treatment was associated with decreased microglial activation in the dentate gyrus after WBI. The neuroprotective effects of fenofibrate were abolished in the knockout mice, indicating a PPARα-dependent mechanism or mechanisms. Conclusions: These data highlight a novel role for PPARα ligands in improving neurogenesis after WBI and offer the promise of improving the quality of life for brain cancer patients receiving radiotherapy.

  17. Cell surface area regulation in neurons in hippocampal slice cultures is resistant to oxygen-glucose deprivation

    Natalya Shulyakova

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Natalya Shulyakova1,2, Jamie Fong2, Diana Diec2, Adrian Nahirny1,2, Linda R Mills1,21Department of Physiology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada, M5T 2S8; 2Toronto Western Hospital Research Institute, University Health Network, 11-430, 399 Bathurst St, Toronto, ON, Canada, M5T 2S8Background: Neurons swell in response to a variety of insults. The capacity to recover, ie, to shrink, is critical for neuronal function and survival. Studies on dissociated neurons have shown that during swelling and shrinking, neurons reorganize their plasma membrane; as neurons swell, in response to hypo-osmotic media, the bilayer area increases. Upon restoration of normo-osmotic media, neurons shrink, forming transient invaginations of the plasma membrane known as vacuole-like dilations (VLDs, to accommodate the decrease in the bilayer.Methods: Here we used confocal microscopy to monitor neuronal swelling and shrinking in the three-dimensional (3D environment of post-natal rat hippocampal slice cultures. To label neurons, we used biolistic transfection, to introduce enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP targeted to the cytoplasm; and a membrane targeted GFP (lckGFP, targeted to the plasma membrane.Results: Neurons in slice cultures swelled and shrank in response to hypo-osmotic to normo-osmotic media changes. Oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD caused sustained neuronal swelling; after reperfusion, some neurons recovered but in others, VLD recovery was stalled. OGD did not impair neuronal capacity to recover from a subsequent osmotic challenge.Conclusion: These results suggest cell surface area regulation (SAR is an intrinsic property of neurons, and that neuronal capacity for SAR may play an important role in the brain’s response to ischemic insults.Keywords: neurons, swelling, ischemia, cell surface area, hippocampal slice culture

  18. Lead Can Inhibit NMDA-, K+-, QA/KA-Induced Increases in Intracellular Free Ca2+ in Cultured Rat Hippocampal Neurons

    2002-01-01

    Objective To examine the effects of Pb2+ on N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-, K+- and quisqualate(QA)/kainite(KA)-induced increases in intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) in cultured fetal rat hippocampal neurons in order to explain the cognitive and learning deficits produced by this heavy metal. Methods Laser scanning confocal microscopy was used. Results The results clearly demonstrated that adding Pb2+ before or after NMDA/glycine stimulation selectively inhibited the stimulated increases in [Ca2+]i in a concentration-dependent manner. In contrast, Pb2+ treatment did not markedly affect increases in [Ca2+]i induced by an admixture of QA and KA. The minimal inhibitory effect of Pb2+ occurred at 1 μ mol/L, and more than seventy percent abolition of the NMDA-stimulated increase in [Ca2+]iwas observed at 100 μmol/L Pb2+. Evaluation of pb2+-induced increase in [Ca2+]i response to elevating extracellular concentrations of NMDA, glycine or calcium revealed that Pb2+ was a noncompetitive antagonist of both NMDA and glycine, and a competitive antagonist of Ca2+ at NMDA receptor channels. In addition, Pb2+ inhibited depolarization-evoked increases in [Ca2+]i mediated by K+ stimulation (30 μmol/L), indicating that Pb2+ also depressed the voltage-dependent calcium channels. Also, the results showed that Pb2+ appeared to be able to elevate the resting levels of [Ca2+]i in cultured neurons, implying a reason for pb2+-enhanced spontaneous release of several neurotransmitters reported in several previous studies. Conclusion Lead can inhibit NMDA-, K+-, QA/KA-inducod increases in intracellular [Ca2+]i in cultured hippocampal neurons.

  19. Role of hippocampal activity-induced transcription in memory consolidation.

    Eagle, Andrew L; Gajewski, Paula A; Robison, Alfred J

    2016-08-01

    Experience-dependent changes in the strength of connections between neurons in the hippocampus (HPC) are critical for normal learning and memory consolidation, and disruption of this process drives a variety of neurological and psychiatric diseases. Proper HPC function relies upon discrete changes in gene expression driven by transcription factors (TFs) induced by neuronal activity. Here, we describe the induction and function of many of the most well-studied HPC TFs, including cyclic-AMP response element binding protein, serum-response factor, AP-1, and others, and describe their role in the learning process. We also discuss the known target genes of many of these TFs and the purported mechanisms by which they regulate long-term changes in HPC synaptic strength. Moreover, we propose that future research in this field will depend upon unbiased identification of additional gene targets for these activity-dependent TFs and subsequent meta-analyses that identify common genes or pathways regulated by multiple TFs in the HPC during learning or disease. PMID:27180338

  20. Hippocampal electrical activity of adult rabbits during moderate passive hyperventilation

    The effects of a moderate passive hyperventilation (HV) were studied in immobilized un-anesthetized rabbits. Hypocapnia (PCO2 = 23.3 ± 2.8 mm Hg) and alkalosis (pH = 7.54 ± 0.07) were measured on arterial samples. PO2 remained stable. The following results were obtained. From the onset of HV, the mean discharge rate (F) of the pyramidal cells (CA1) was modified. Several types of cellular behaviours were defined according to whether F decreased (51 pc of the neurons), increased (39 pc) or remained stable (6 pc). The most marked effect was observed 15 min after HV onset when 87 pc of cells showed a discharge rate lower than in controls. Whatever F variations, the temporal organization of the action potentials remained unchanged in 71 pc of cases. The evoked response resulting from the stimulation of the commissural inputs corresponded with the activity of GABA inhibitory neurons (basket cells). The response threshold, amplitude and latency were not modified by HV. Only the facilitation process resulting from paired pulses was modified in its late stage. These results as well as those concerning unit activity do not support various assumption such as trouble of the neuronal energetic metabolism due to hypoxia, modification of ionic exchanges (Na+, K+, Ca++), or variations of neurotransmitter concentrations (especially GABA). The effects observed could be ascribed to modifications of neuronal membrane resting potential resulting from direct action of CO2 and alkalosis. (author)

  1. [Bacteriocidal activity of Streptomyces cultures].

    Polishchuk, L V; Bambura, O I; Luk'ianchuk, V V

    2012-01-01

    Bacteriocidal activity of metabolites synthesized by 17 plasmid-containing cultures of Streptomyces has been studied. These cultures were isolated from soils of Ukraine with different anthropogenic contamination. The cultures, in their majority (85.3%), synthesized bioactive metabolites, which suppressed growth of microorganisms of different taxonomical groups, pathogenic for people, animals or plants. None of 17 Streptomyces cultures was able to suppress growth of yeasts or Escherichia coli. All 17 investigated cultures of Streptomyces were polyresistant to antibiotics, which were used in medicine and veterinary: makrolide, aminoglycoside, beta-lactam and other groups. Resistance of 8 cultures to the antibiotic thiostrepton, which was widely used in some branches of science, was found. PMID:23088099

  2. Cortisol administration increases hippocampal activation to infant crying in males depending on childhood neglect.

    Bos, Peter A; Montoya, Estrella R; Terburg, David; van Honk, Jack

    2014-10-01

    Animal studies show that exposure to parental neglect alters stress regulation and can lead to neural hyposensitivity or hypersensitivity in response to cortisol, most pronounced in the hippocampus. Cortisol, the end product of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, has also been related to parenting more directly, for example, in both sexes, cortisol levels increase when listening to infants crying, possibly to activate and facilitate effective care behavior. Severe trauma is known to negatively affect the HPA-axis in humans; however, it is unknown whether normal variation in parental care in the healthy population can alter sensitivity of the hippocampus to cortisol. Here, we investigate whether variation in experienced neglect changes neural sensitivity to cortisol when humans listen to infant crying, which is an unequivocal signal relevant for care behavior. In a placebo-controlled, within-subject neuroimaging study, we administered 40 mg cortisol to 21 healthy young males without children and used a validated task for measuring neural responses to infant crying. The Dutch version of the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire was used to index participants' early exposure to abuse and neglect. The data show that cortisol markedly increased hippocampal activation toward crying infants, and this effect varied significantly with parental neglect, even in our nonclinical subject sample. Without exposure to severe trauma or neglect, reduced self-experienced quality of parental care in the normal range already substantially increased hippocampal responsivity to cortisol. Altered hippocampal sensitivity to cortisol might be a cross-species marker for the risk of developing later life psychopathology. PMID:24757127

  3. The Gαo Activator Mastoparan-7 Promotes Dendritic Spine Formation in Hippocampal Neurons

    Valerie T. Ramírez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mastoparan-7 (Mas-7, an analogue of the peptide mastoparan, which is derived from wasp venom, is a direct activator of Pertussis toxin- (PTX- sensitive G proteins. Mas-7 produces several biological effects in different cell types; however, little is known about how Mas-7 influences mature hippocampal neurons. We examined the specific role of Mas-7 in the development of dendritic spines, the sites of excitatory synaptic contact that are crucial for synaptic plasticity. We report here that exposure of hippocampal neurons to a low dose of Mas-7 increases dendritic spine density and spine head width in a time-dependent manner. Additionally, Mas-7 enhances postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95 clustering in neurites and activates Gαo signaling, increasing the intracellular Ca2+ concentration. To define the role of signaling intermediates, we measured the levels of phosphorylated protein kinase C (PKC, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK, and calcium-calmodulin dependent protein kinase IIα (CaMKIIα after Mas-7 treatment and determined that CaMKII activation is necessary for the Mas-7-dependent increase in dendritic spine density. Our results demonstrate a critical role for Gαo subunit signaling in the regulation of synapse formation.

  4. The Gαo Activator Mastoparan-7 Promotes Dendritic Spine Formation in Hippocampal Neurons

    Ramírez, Valerie T.; Ramos-Fernández, Eva; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.

    2016-01-01

    Mastoparan-7 (Mas-7), an analogue of the peptide mastoparan, which is derived from wasp venom, is a direct activator of Pertussis toxin- (PTX-) sensitive G proteins. Mas-7 produces several biological effects in different cell types; however, little is known about how Mas-7 influences mature hippocampal neurons. We examined the specific role of Mas-7 in the development of dendritic spines, the sites of excitatory synaptic contact that are crucial for synaptic plasticity. We report here that exposure of hippocampal neurons to a low dose of Mas-7 increases dendritic spine density and spine head width in a time-dependent manner. Additionally, Mas-7 enhances postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95) clustering in neurites and activates Gαo signaling, increasing the intracellular Ca2+ concentration. To define the role of signaling intermediates, we measured the levels of phosphorylated protein kinase C (PKC), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and calcium-calmodulin dependent protein kinase IIα (CaMKIIα) after Mas-7 treatment and determined that CaMKII activation is necessary for the Mas-7-dependent increase in dendritic spine density. Our results demonstrate a critical role for Gαo subunit signaling in the regulation of synapse formation. PMID:26881110

  5. Influence of Electroacupuncture on COX Activity of Hippocampal Mitochondria in Senescence- accelerated Mouse Prone 8 Mice

    Peng Jing; Zeng Fang; He Yu-heng; Tang Yong; Yin Hai-yan; Yu Shu-guang

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To observe the effect of electroacupuncture (EA) on cytochrome c oxidase (COX)activity of hippocampal mitochondria in senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8 (SAMP8) mice, and to explore the EA mechanism on Alzheimer disease (AD) in improving energy metabolic disorder. Methods: Twelve SAMP8 mice were randomly divided into a model group and an EA group, with six in each group. Six senescence-accelerated mouse resistance 1 (SAMR1) mice were prepared as blank group. Mice in the EA group received EA on Baihui (GV 20) and Yongquan (KI 1), once a day for 7 d as a course, altogether 3 courses with one day intervalbetween two courses. Mice in the model group and the blank group were manipulated and fixed as those in the EA group. After interventions, Morris water maze was employed to test spatial learning and memory ability to evaluate EA effect; spectrophotometry was used to detect the activity of hippocampal mitochondria COX. Results: Compared with the blank group, mean escape latenciesof the EA group and model group were prolonged significantly in Morris water maze tests (P Conclusion: It’s plausible that EA improves AD learning and memory ability by increasing mitochondria COX activity, protecting the structure and function, and improving energy metabolism.

  6. Excitatory effects of parvalbumin-expressing interneurons maintain hippocampal epileptiform activity via synchronous afterdischarges.

    Ellender, Tommas J; Raimondo, Joseph V; Irkle, Agnese; Lamsa, Karri P; Akerman, Colin J

    2014-11-12

    Epileptic seizures are characterized by periods of hypersynchronous, hyperexcitability within brain networks. Most seizures involve two stages: an initial tonic phase, followed by a longer clonic phase that is characterized by rhythmic bouts of synchronized network activity called afterdischarges (ADs). Here we investigate the cellular and network mechanisms underlying hippocampal ADs in an effort to understand how they maintain seizure activity. Using in vitro hippocampal slice models from rats and mice, we performed electrophysiological recordings from CA3 pyramidal neurons to monitor network activity and changes in GABAergic signaling during epileptiform activity. First, we show that the highest synchrony occurs during clonic ADs, consistent with the idea that specific circuit dynamics underlie this phase of the epileptiform activity. We then show that ADs require intact GABAergic synaptic transmission, which becomes excitatory as a result of a transient collapse in the chloride (Cl(-)) reversal potential. The depolarizing effects of GABA are strongest at the soma of pyramidal neurons, which implicates somatic-targeting interneurons in AD activity. To test this, we used optogenetic techniques to selectively control the activity of somatic-targeting parvalbumin-expressing (PV(+)) interneurons. Channelrhodopsin-2-mediated activation of PV(+) interneurons during the clonic phase generated excitatory GABAergic responses in pyramidal neurons, which were sufficient to elicit and entrain synchronous AD activity across the network. Finally, archaerhodopsin-mediated selective silencing of PV(+) interneurons reduced the occurrence of ADs during the clonic phase. Therefore, we propose that activity-dependent Cl(-) accumulation subverts the actions of PV(+) interneurons to perpetuate rather than terminate pathological network hyperexcitability during the clonic phase of seizures. PMID:25392490

  7. Methylxanthine-evoked perturbation of spontaneous and evoked activities in isolated newborn rat hippocampal networks.

    Ruangkittisakul, A; Sharopov, S; Kantor, C; Kuribayashi, J; Mildenberger, E; Luhmann, H J; Kilb, W; Ballanyi, K

    2015-08-20

    Treatment of apnea of prematurity with methylxanthines like caffeine, aminophylline or theophylline can evoke hippocampal seizures. However, it is unknown at which interstitial brain concentrations methylxanthines promote such neonatal seizures or interfere with physiological 'early network oscillations' (ENOs) that are considered as pivotal for maturation of hippocampal neural networks. We studied theophylline and caffeine effects on ENOs in CA3 neurons (CA3-ENOs) and CA3 electrical stimulation-evoked monosynaptic CA1 field potentials (CA1-FPs) in sliced and intact hippocampi, respectively, from 8 to 10-days-old rats. Submillimolar doses of theophylline and caffeine, blocking adenosine receptors and phosphodiesterase-4 (PDE4), did not affect CA3-ENOs, ENO-associated cytosolic Ca(2+) transients or CA1-FPs nor did they provoke seizure-like discharges. Low millimolar doses of theophylline (⩾1mM) or caffeine (⩾5mM), blocking GABAA and glycine receptors plus sarcoplasmic-endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPase (SERCA)-type Ca(2+) ATPases, evoked seizure-like discharges with no indication of cytosolic Ca(2+) dysregulation. Inhibiting PDE4 with rolipram or glycine receptors with strychnine had no effect on CA3-ENOs and did not occlude seizure-like events as tested with theophylline. GABAA receptor blockade induced seizure-like discharges and occluded theophylline-evoked seizure-like discharges in the slices, but not in the intact hippocampi. In summary, submillimolar methylxanthine concentrations do not acutely affect spontaneous CA3-ENOs or electrically evoked synaptic activities and low millimolar doses are needed to evoke seizure-like discharges in isolated developing hippocampal neural networks. We conclude that mechanisms of methylxanthine-related seizure-like discharges do not involve SERCA inhibition-related neuronal Ca(2+) dysregulation, PDE4 blockade or adenosine and glycine receptor inhibition, whereas GABA(A) receptor blockade may contribute partially. PMID

  8. Dampened hippocampal oscillations and enhanced spindle activity in an asymptomatic model of developmental cortical malformations

    Elena eCid

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Developmental cortical malformations comprise a large spectrum of histopathological brain abnormalities and syndromes. Their genetic, developmental and clinical complexity suggests they should be better understood in terms of the complementary action of independently timed perturbations (i.e. the multiple-hit hypothesis. However, understanding the underlying biological processes remains puzzling. Here we induced developmental cortical malformations in offspring, after intraventricular injection of methylazoxymethanol (MAM in utero in mice. We combined extensive histological and electrophysiological studies to characterize the model. We found that MAM injections at E14 and E15 induced a range of cortical and hippocampal malformations resembling histological alterations of specific genetic mutations and transplacental mitotoxic agent injections. However, in contrast to most of these models, intraventricularly MAM-injected mice remained asymptomatic and showed no clear epilepsy-related phenotype as tested in long-term chronic recordings and with pharmacological manipulations. Instead, they exhibited a non-specific reduction of hippocampal-related brain oscillations (mostly in CA1; including theta, gamma and HFOs; and enhanced thalamocortical spindle activity during non-REM sleep. These data suggest that developmental cortical malformations do not necessarily correlate with epileptiform activity. We propose that the intraventricular in utero MAM approach exhibiting a range of rhythmopathies is a suitable model for multiple-hit studies of associated neurological disorders.

  9. Reduced hippocampal and amygdala activity predicts memory distortions for trauma reminders in combat-related PTSD.

    Hayes, Jasmeet Pannu; LaBar, Kevin S; McCarthy, Gregory; Selgrade, Elizabeth; Nasser, Jessica; Dolcos, Florin; Morey, Rajendra A

    2011-05-01

    Neurobiological models of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) suggest that altered activity in the medial temporal lobes (MTL) during encoding of traumatic memories contribute to the development and maintenance of the disorder. However, there is little direct evidence in the PTSD literature to support these models. The goal of the present study was to examine MTL activity during trauma encoding in combat veterans using the subsequent memory paradigm. Fifteen combat veterans diagnosed with PTSD and 14 trauma-exposed control participants viewed trauma-related and neutral pictures while undergoing event-related fMRI. Participants returned one week after scanning for a recognition memory test. Region-of-interest (ROI) and voxel-wise whole brain analyses were conducted to examine the neural correlates of successful memory encoding. Patients with PTSD showed greater false alarm rates for novel lures than the trauma-exposed control group, suggesting reliance on gist-based representations in lieu of encoding contextual details. Imaging analyses revealed reduced activity in the amygdala and hippocampus in PTSD patients during successful encoding of trauma-related stimuli. Reduction in left hippocampal activity was associated with high arousal symptoms on the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS). The behavioral false alarm rate for traumatic stimuli co-varied with activity in the bilateral precuneus. These results support neurobiological theories positing reduced hippocampal activity under conditions of high stress and arousal. Reduction in MTL activity for successfully encoded stimuli and increased precuneus activity may underlie reduced stimulus-specific encoding and greater gist memory in patients with PTSD, leading to maintenance of the disorder. PMID:21047644

  10. Hippocampal expression of apoptotic protease activating factor-1 following diffuse axonal injury under mild hypothermia

    Peng Yang; Limin Zhang; Yunhe Zhang; Xifeng Zou; Qunxi Li; Yun Li; Jun Zhu; Jianmin Li; Aijun Fu; Qingjun Liu; Tong Chen; Zelin Sun; Zhiyong Zhang

    2011-01-01

    The influence of mild hypothermia on neural cell apoptosis remains poorly understood. Therefore, the present study established rat models of diffuse axonal injury (DAI) at 33 °C. Morris water maze results demonstrated significantly better learning and memory functions in DAI rats with hypothermia compared with DAI rats with normothermia. Expression of apoptotic protease activating factor-1 in the hippocampal CA1 region was significantly lower in the DAI hypothermia group compared with the DAI normothermia group. Expression of apoptotic protease activating factor-1 positively correlated with latency, but negatively correlated with platform location times and time of swimming in the quadrant area. Results suggested that post-traumatic mild hypothermia in a rat model of DAI could provide cerebral protection by attenuating expression of apoptotic protease activating factor-1.

  11. Prenatal immune activation alters hippocampal place cell firing characteristics in adult animals.

    Wolff, Amy R; Bilkey, David K

    2015-08-01

    Prenatal maternal immune activation (MIA) is a risk factor for several developmental neuropsychiatric disorders, including autism, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. Adults with these disorders display alterations in memory function that may result from changes in the structure and function of the hippocampus. In the present study we use an animal model to investigate the effect that a transient prenatal maternal immune activation episode has on the spatially-modulated firing activity of hippocampal neurons in adult animals. MIA was induced in pregnant rat dams with a single injection of the synthetic cytokine inducer polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (poly I:C) on gestational day 15. Control dams were given a saline equivalent. Firing activity and local field potentials (LFPs) were recorded from the CA1 region of the adult male offspring of these dams as they moved freely in an open arena. Most neurons displayed characteristic spatially-modulated 'place cell' firing activity and while there was no between-group difference in mean firing rate between groups, place cells had smaller place fields in MIA-exposed animals when compared to control-group cells. Cells recorded in MIA-group animals also displayed an altered firing-phase synchrony relationship to simultaneously recorded LFPs. When the floor of the arena was rotated, the place fields of MIA-group cells were more likely to shift in the same direction as the floor rotation, suggesting that local cues may have been more salient for these animals. In contrast, place fields in control group cells were more likely to shift firing position to novel spatial locations suggesting an altered response to contextual cues. These findings show that a single MIA intervention is sufficient to change several important characteristics of hippocampal place cell activity in adult offspring. These changes could contribute to the memory dysfunction that is associated with MIA, by altering the encoding of spatial context and by

  12. Comparison of excitotoxic profiles of ATPA, AMPA, KA and NMDA in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures

    Kristensen, Bjarne Winther; Noraberg, J; Zimmer, J

    2001-01-01

    ) values was found after 2 days of exposure: AMPA (3.7 mM)>NMDA (11 mM)=KA (13 mM)>ATPA (33 mM). Exposed to 30 microM ATPA, 3 microM AMPA and 10 microM NMDA, CA1 was the most susceptible subfield followed by fascia dentata and CA3. Using 8 microM KA, CA3 was the most susceptible subfield, followed by...... fascia dentata and CA1. In 100 microM concentrations, all four agonists induced the same, maximal PI uptake in all hippocampal subfields, corresponding to total neuronal degeneration. Using glutamate receptor antagonists, like GYKI 52466, NBQX and MK-801, inhibition data revealed that AMPA excitotoxicity...

  13. Dopamine receptor activation reorganizes neuronal ensembles during hippocampal sharp waves in vitro.

    Takeyuki Miyawaki

    Full Text Available Hippocampal sharp wave (SW/ripple complexes are thought to contribute to memory consolidation. Previous studies suggest that behavioral rewards facilitate SW occurrence in vivo. However, little is known about the precise mechanism underlying this enhancement. Here, we examined the effect of dopaminergic neuromodulation on spontaneously occurring SWs in acute hippocampal slices. Local field potentials were recorded from the CA1 region. A brief (1 min treatment with dopamine led to a persistent increase in the event frequency and the magnitude of SWs. This effect lasted at least for our recording period of 45 min and did not occur in the presence of a dopamine D1/D5 receptor antagonist. Functional multineuron calcium imaging revealed that dopamine-induced SW augmentation was associated with an enriched repertoire of the firing patterns in SW events, whereas the overall tendency of individual neurons to participate in SWs and the mean number of cells participating in a single SW were maintained. Therefore, dopaminergic activation is likely to reorganize cell assemblies during SWs.

  14. 3-Nitropropionic acid neurotoxicity in hippocampal slice cultures: developmental and regional vulnerability and dependency on glucose

    Noer, Helle; Kristensen, Bjarne W; Noraberg, Jens;

    2002-01-01

    : CA1 > CA3 > fascia dentata. In low glucose much lower concentrations of 3-NP (25 microM) triggered neurotoxicity. One-week-old cultures were less susceptible to 3-NP toxicity than 3-week-old cultures, but the dentate granule cells were relatively more affected in the immature cultures. We found no...

  15. Involvement of ClC-3 chloride/proton exchangers in controlling glutamatergic synaptic strength in cultured hippocampal neurons

    Raul Enrique Guzman

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available ClC-3 is a member of the CLC family of anion channels and transporters that localizes to early and late endosomes as well as to synaptic vesicles. Its genetic disruption in mouse models results in pronounced hippocampal and retinal neurodegeneration, suggesting that ClC-3 might be important for normal excitatory and/or inhibitory neurotransmission in central neurons. To characterize the role of ClC-3 in glutamate accumulation in synaptic vesicles we compared glutamatergic synaptic transmission in cultured hippocampal neurons from WT and Clcn3-/- mice. In Clcn3-/- neurons the amplitude and frequency of miniature as well as the amplitudes of action-potential evoked EPSCs were significantly increased as compared to WT neurons. The low-affinity competitive AMPA receptor antagonist -DGG reduced the quantal size of synaptic events more effectively in WT than in Clcn3-/- neurons, whereas no difference was observed for the high-affinity competitive non-NMDA antagonist NBQX. Paired pulse ratios of evoked EPSCs were significantly reduced, whereas the size of the readily releasable pool was not affected by the genetic ablation of ClC-3. Electron microscopy revealed increased volumes of synaptic vesicles in hippocampi of Clcn3-/- mice. Our findings demonstrate that ClC-3 controls fast excitatory synaptic transmission by regulating the amount of neurotransmitter as well as the release probability of synaptic vesicles. These results provide novel insights into the role of ClC-3 in synaptic transmission and identify excessive glutamate release as a likely basis of neurodegeneration in Clcn3-/-.

  16. Neural stem cell activation and glial proliferation in the hippocampal CA3 region of posttraumatic epileptic rats

    Yuanxiang Lin; Kun Lin; Dezhi Kang; Feng Wang

    2011-01-01

    The present study observed the dynamic expression of CD133, nuclear factor-κB and glial fibrillary acidic protein in the hippocampal CA3 area of the experimental posttraumatic epilepsy rats to investigate whether gliosis occurs after posttraumatic epilepsy. CD133 and nuclear factor-κB expression was increased at 1 day after posttraumatic epilepsy, peaked at 7 days, and gradually decreased up to 14 days, as seen by double-immunohistochemical staining. Glial fibrillary acidic protein/nuclear factor-κB double-labeled cells increased with time and peaked at 14 days after posttraumatic epilepsy. Results show that activation of hippocampal neural stem cells and glial proliferation after posttraumatic epilepsy-induced oxidative stress increases hippocampal glial cell density.

  17. Ripples make waves: binding structured activity and plasticity in hippocampal networks.

    Sadowski, Josef H L P; Jones, Matthew W; Mellor, Jack R

    2011-01-01

    Establishing novel episodic memories and stable spatial representations depends on an exquisitely choreographed, multistage process involving the online encoding and offline consolidation of sensory information, a process that is largely dependent on the hippocampus. Each step is influenced by distinct neural network states that influence the pattern of activation across cellular assemblies. In recent years, the occurrence of hippocampal sharp wave ripple (SWR) oscillations has emerged as a potentially vital network phenomenon mediating the steps between encoding and consolidation, both at a cellular and network level by promoting the rapid replay and reactivation of recent activity patterns. Such events facilitate memory formation by optimising the conditions for synaptic plasticity to occur between contingent neural elements. In this paper, we explore the ways in which SWRs and other network events can bridge the gap between spatiomnemonic processing at cellular/synaptic and network levels in the hippocampus. PMID:21961073

  18. Profiles of hippocampal neuron activity during auditory discrimination cognition in guinea pigs

    GAO Jie; LUO Jun; XIONG Ying; YANG Ce; WANG Yong-tang; SUI Jian-feng

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To clarify the firing characteristics of the hippocampal pyramidal cells and interneurons in the auditory discrimination cognition. Methods: Thirteen guinea pigs were studied by the paired (active cognition group, n=10) or unpaired (passive cognition group, n=3) training with 1 kHz (CS+)and 500 Hz tones (CS-) and the air puff (US) applied 250 ms after the CS+ onset. Results: In active group, 32 pyramidal cells showed exciting response to the CS+ tone, 16 cells inhibited response and 4 cells revealed no response to the high frequency tone and18 interneurons almost unchanged. In passive group, the pyramidal cells responded to the tone casually and 10 out of the 13 interneurons remained invariably. Conclusion: The result suggests that the pyramidal cells play a major role in coding auditory information by the networks, and the interneuons may modulate it via forward and feedback.

  19. Oxygen glucose deprivation in rat hippocampal slice cultures results in alterations in carnitine homeostasis and mitochondrial dysfunction.

    Thomas F Rau

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction characterized by depolarization of mitochondrial membranes and the initiation of mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis are pathological responses to hypoxia-ischemia (HI in the neonatal brain. Carnitine metabolism directly supports mitochondrial metabolism by shuttling long chain fatty acids across the inner mitochondrial membrane for beta-oxidation. Our previous studies have shown that HI disrupts carnitine homeostasis in neonatal rats and that L-carnitine can be neuroprotective. Thus, this study was undertaken to elucidate the molecular mechanisms by which HI alters carnitine metabolism and to begin to elucidate the mechanism underlying the neuroprotective effect of L-carnitine (LCAR supplementation. Utilizing neonatal rat hippocampal slice cultures we found that oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD decreased the levels of free carnitines (FC and increased the acylcarnitine (AC: FC ratio. These changes in carnitine homeostasis correlated with decreases in the protein levels of carnitine palmitoyl transferase (CPT 1 and 2. LCAR supplementation prevented the decrease in CPT1 and CPT2, enhanced both FC and the AC∶FC ratio and increased slice culture metabolic viability, the mitochondrial membrane potential prior to OGD and prevented the subsequent loss of neurons during later stages of reperfusion through a reduction in apoptotic cell death. Finally, we found that LCAR supplementation preserved the structural integrity and synaptic transmission within the hippocampus after OGD. Thus, we conclude that LCAR supplementation preserves the key enzymes responsible for maintaining carnitine homeostasis and preserves both cell viability and synaptic transmission after OGD.

  20. Prenatal alcohol exposure alters synaptic activity of adult hippocampal dentate granule cells under conditions of enriched environment.

    Kajimoto, Kenta; Valenzuela, C Fernando; Allan, Andrea M; Ge, Shaoyu; Gu, Yan; Cunningham, Lee Anna

    2016-08-01

    Prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) results in fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD), which is characterized by a wide range of cognitive and behavioral deficits that may be linked to impaired hippocampal function and adult neurogenesis. Preclinical studies in mouse models of FASD indicate that PAE markedly attenuates enrichment-mediated increases in the number of adult-generated hippocampal dentate granule cells (aDGCs), but whether synaptic activity is also affected has not been studied. Here, we utilized retroviral birth-dating coupled with whole cell patch electrophysiological recordings to assess the effects of PAE on enrichment-mediated changes in excitatory and inhibitory synaptic activity as a function of DGC age. We found that exposure to an enriched environment (EE) had no effect on baseline synaptic activity of 4- or 8-week-old aDGCs from control mice, but significantly enhanced the excitatory/inhibitory ratio of synaptic activity in 8-week-old aDGCs from PAE mice. In contrast, exposure to EE significantly enhanced the excitatory/inhibitory ratio of synaptic activity in older pre-existing DGCs situated in the outer dentate granule cell layer (i.e., those generated during embryonic development; dDGCs) in control mice, an effect that was blunted in PAE mice. These findings indicate distinct electrophysiological responses of hippocampal DGCs to behavioral challenge based on cellular ontogenetic age, and suggest that PAE disrupts EE-mediated changes in overall hippocampal network activity. These findings may have implications for future therapeutic targeting of hippocampal dentate circuitry in clinical FASD. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27009742

  1. Slowing of Hippocampal Activity Correlates with Cognitive Decline in Early Onset Alzheimer's Disease. An MEG Study with Virtual Electrodes.

    Engels, Marjolein M A; Hillebrand, Arjan; van der Flier, Wiesje M; Stam, Cornelis J; Scheltens, Philip; van Straaten, Elisabeth C W

    2016-01-01

    Pathology in Alzheimer's disease (AD) starts in the entorhinal cortex and hippocampus. Because of their deep location, activity from these areas is difficult to record with conventional electro- or magnetoencephalography (EEG/MEG). The purpose of this study was to explore hippocampal activity in AD patients and healthy controls using "virtual MEG electrodes". We used resting-state MEG recordings from 27 early onset AD patients [age 60.6 ± 5.4, 12 females, mini-mental state examination (MMSE) range: 19-28] and 26 cognitively healthy age- and gender-matched controls (age 61.8 ± 5.5, 14 females). Activity was reconstructed using beamformer-based virtual electrodes for 78 cortical regions and 6 hippocampal regions. Group differences in peak frequency and relative power in six frequency bands were identified using permutation testing. For the patients, spearman correlations between the MMSE scores and peak frequency or relative power were calculated. Moreover, receiver operator characteristic curves were plotted to estimate the diagnostic accuracy. We found a lower hippocampal peak frequency in AD compared to controls, which, in the patients, correlated positively with MMSE [r(25) = 0.61; p power correlated negatively with MMSE [r(25) = -0.54; p power was higher in AD across the cortex, and relative alpha and beta power was lower in more circumscribed areas. The average cortical relative theta power was the best discriminator between AD and controls (sensitivity 82%; specificity 81%). Using beamformer-based virtual electrodes, we were able to detect hippocampal activity in AD. In AD, this hippocampal activity is slowed, and correlates better with cognition than the (slowed) activity in cortical areas. On the other hand, the average cortical relative power in the theta band was shown to be the best diagnostic discriminator. We postulate that this novel approach using virtual electrodes can be used in future research to quantify functional interactions between the

  2. Activity-mediated plasticity of GABA equilibrium potential in rat hippocampal CA1 neurons.

    Yang, B; Tadavarty, R; Xu, J-Y; Sastry, B R

    2010-01-01

    The equilibrium potential (E(GABA)(-PSC)) for gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) A receptor mediated inhibitory postsynaptic currents (PSCs) in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons shifts when theta-burst stimulation (four pulses at 100 Hz in each burst in a train consisting of five bursts with an inter-burst interval of 200 ms, the train repeated thrice at 30-s intervals) is applied to the input. E(GABA)(-PSC) is regulated by K(+)/Cl(-) co-transporter (KCC2). GABA(B) receptors are implicated in modulating KCC2 levels. In the current study, the involvement of KCC2, as well as GABA(B) receptors, in theta-burst-mediated shifts in E(GABA)(-PSC) was examined. Whole-cell patch recordings were made from hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons (from 9 to 12 days old rats), in a slice preparation. Glutamatergic excitatory postsynaptic currents were blocked with dl-2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (50 microM) and 6,7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (20 microM). The PSC and the E(GABA)(-PSC) were stable when stimulated at 0.05 Hz. However, both changed following a 30-min stimulation at 0.5 or 1 Hz. Furosemide (500 microM) and KCC2 anti-sense in the recording pipette but not bumetanide (20 or 100 microM) or KCC2 sense, blocked the changes, suggesting KCC2 involvement. Theta-burst stimulation induced a negative shift in E(GABA)(-PSC), which was prevented by KCC2 anti-sense; however, KCC2 sense had no effect. CGP55845 (2 microM), a GABA(B) antagonist, applied in the superfusing medium, or GDP-beta-S in the recording pipette, blocked the shift in E(GABA)(-PSC). These results indicate that activity-mediated plasticity in E(GABA)(-PSC) occurs in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons and theta-burst-induced negative shift in E(GABA)(-PSC) requires KCC2, GABA(B) receptors and G-protein activation. PMID:19879261

  3. Neuroprotective effects of the AMPA antagonist PNQX in oxygen-glucose deprivation in mouse hippocampal slice cultures and global cerebral ischemia in gerbils

    Montero, Maria; Nielsen, Marianne; Rønn, Lars Christian B;

    2007-01-01

    PNQX (9-methyl-amino-6-nitro-hexahydro-benzo(F)quinoxalinedione) is a selective AMPA antagonist with demonstrated neuroprotective effects in focal ischemia in rats. Here we report corresponding effects in mouse hippocampal slice cultures subjected to oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) and in....... For comparison, other cultures were exposed to the NMDA antagonist MK-801 using the same protocol. Both PNQX and MK-801 displayed significant neuroprotective effects in all hippocampal subfields when present during and after OGD. When added just after OGD, only PNQX retained some neuroprotective...... effect. When added 2 h after OGD neither PNQX nor MK-801 had an effect. Transient global cerebral ischemia was induced in Mongolian gerbils by occlusion of both common carotid arteries for 4.5 min, with PNQX (10 mg/kg) being injected i.p. 30, 60 and 90 min after the insult. Subsequent analysis of brain...

  4. The alterations in biochemical signaling of hippocampal network activity in the autism brain The alterations in biochemical signaling of hippocampal network activity in the autism brain The alterations in biochemical signaling of hippocampal network activity in the autism brain

    田允; 黄继云; 王锐; 陶蓉蓉; 卢应梅; 廖美华; 陆楠楠; 李静; 芦博; 韩峰

    2012-01-01

    Autism is a highly heritable neurodevelopmental condition characterized by impaired social interaction and communication. However, the role of synaptic dysfunction during development of autism remains unclear. In the present study, we address the alterations of biochemical signaling in hippocampal network following induction of the autism in experimental animals. Here, the an- imal disease model and DNA array being used to investigate the differences in transcriptome or- ganization between autistic and normal brain by gene co--expression network analysis.

  5. Differential induction of heme oxygenase and other stress proteins in cultured hippocampal astrocytes and neurons by inorganic lead

    We examined the effects of exposure to inorganic lead (Pb2+) on the induction of stress proteins in cultured hippocampal neurons and astrocytes, with particular emphasis on the induction of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). In radiolabeled neuronal cultures, Pb2+ exposure had no significant effect on the synthesis of any protein at any concentration (up to 250 μM) or duration of exposure (up to 4 days). In radiolabeled astrocyte cultures, however, Pb2+ exposure (100 nM to 100 μM; 1-4 days) increased synthesis of proteins with approximate molecular weights of 23, 32, 45, 57, 72, and 90 kDa. Immunoblot experiments showed that Pb2+ exposure (100 nM to 10 μM, 1-14 days) induces HO-1 synthesis in astrocytes, but not in neurons; this is probably the 32-kDa protein. The other heme oxygenase isoform, HO-2, is present in both neurons and astrocytes, but is not inducible by Pb2+ at concentrations up to 100 μM. HO-1 can be induced by a variety of stimuli. We found that HO-1 induction in astrocytes is increased by combined exposure to Pb2+ and many other stresses, including heat, nitric oxide, H2O2, and superoxide. One of the stimuli that may induce HO-1 is oxidative stress. Lead exposure causes oxidative stress in many cell types, including astrocytes. Induction of HO-1 by Pb2+ is reduced by the hydroxyl radical scavengers dimethylthiourea (DMTU) and mannitol, but not by inhibitors of calmodulin, calmodulin-dependent protein kinases, protein kinase C, or extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK). Therefore, we conclude that oxidative stress is an important mechanism by which Pb2+ induces HO-1 synthesis in astrocytes

  6. Sequential expression of cyclooxygenase-2, glutamate receptor-2, and platelet activating factor receptor in rat hippocampal neurons after fluid percussion injury

    Zhiqiang Li; Qingming Shu; Lingzhi Li; Maolin Ge; Yongliang Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury causes gene expression changes in different brain regions. Occurrence and development of traumatic brain injury are closely related, involving expression of three factors, namely cyclooxygenase-2, glutamate receptor-2, and platelet activating factor receptor. However, little is known about the correlation of these three factors and brain neuronal injury. In this study, primary cultured rat hippocampal neurons were subjected to fluid percussion injury according to Scott’s method, with some modifications. RT-PCR and semi-quantitative immunocytochemical staining was used to measure the expression levels of cyclooxygenase-2, glutamate receptor-2, and platelet activating factor receptor. Our results found that cycloox-ygenase-2 expression were firstly increased post-injury, and then decreased. Both mRNA and protein expression levels reached peaks at 8 and 12 hours post-injury, respectively. Similar sequential changes in glutamate receptor 2 were observed, with highest levels mRNA and pro-tein expression at 8 and 12 hours post-injury respectively. On the contrary, the expressions of platelet activating factor receptor were firstly decreased post-injury, and then increased. Both mRNA and protein expression levels reached the lowest levels at 8 and 12 hours post-injury, respectively. Totally, our findings suggest that these three factors are involved in occurrence and development of hippocampal neuronal injury.

  7. Hippocampal EEG and motor activity in the cat: The role of eye movements and body acceleration

    Kamp, A.; Arnolds, D.E.A.T.; Lopes da Silva, F.H.; Boeijinga, P.; Aitink, W.

    1984-01-01

    In cat the relation between various behaviours and the spectral properties of the hippocampal EEG was investigated. Both EEG and behaviour were quantified and results were evaluated statistically. Significant relationships were found between the properties of the hippocampal EEG and motor acts (walk

  8. Aged garlic extract and its components protect cultured rat hippocampal neurons from amyloid β—protein—in—duced neuronal death

    ItoY; KosuY

    2002-01-01

    Aged garlic extract and its components such as S-allyl-L-cysteine (SAC) and sllixin have been shown to possess various biological effects including neurotrophic activity.We characterized the neuronal death induced by amyloid β-protein (Aβ),4-hydroxynoenal (HNE),tunicamycin(TM),and trophic factor-deprivation (TFD),and ivestigated whether these garlic compounds could prevent this in cultured PC12 cells and rat hippocampal neurons.Treatment with SAC protected these cells against Aβ- and TM-induced neuronal death.SAC also attenuated the processing of procaspase-12 induced by Aβ25-35 or TM.In contrast,allixin and its analogue,DHP,afforded no protection against Aβ-induced cell death.SAC afforded no protection against HNE- and TFD-induced cell death,which has been shown to be mediated by caspase-3 dependent pathway.These results suggest that SAC protect against the neuronal cell death that is triggered by ER dysfunction.

  9. Long-term heavy ketamine use is associated with spatial memory impairment and altered hippocampal activation

    Celia J A Morgan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Ketamine, a non-competitive N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist, is rising in popularity as a drug of abuse. Preliminary evidence suggests that chronic, heavy ketamine use may have profound effects on spatial memory but the mechanism of these deficits is as yet unclear. This study aimed to examine the neural mechanism by which heavy ketamine use impairs spatial memory processing. In a sample of 11 frequent ketamine users and 15 polydrug controls, matched for IQ, age and years in education. We used fMRI utilising an ROI approach to examine the neural activity of three regions known to support successful navigation; the hippocampus, parahippocampal gyrus and the caudate nucleus during a virtual reality task of spatial memory. Frequent ketamine users displayed spatial memory deficits, accompanied by and related to, reduced activation in both the right hippocampus and left parahippocampal gyrus during navigation from memory, and in the left caudate during memory updating, compared to controls. Ketamine users also exhibited schizotypal and dissociative symptoms that were related to hippocampal activation. Impairments in spatial memory observed in ketamine users are related to changes in medial temporal lobe activation. Disrupted medial temporal lobe function may be a consequence of chronic ketamine abuse and may relate to schizophrenia-like symptomatology observed in ketamine users.

  10. Methamphetamine exposure antagonizes N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated neurotoxicity in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures.

    Smith, Katherine J; Self, Rachel L; Butler, Tracy R; Mullins, Michael M; Ghayoumi, Layla; Holley, Robert C; Littleton, John M; Prendergast, Mark A

    2007-07-01

    Glutamatergic systems have been increasingly recognized as mediators of methamphetamine's (METH) pharmacological effects though little is known about the means by which METH interacts with glutamate receptors. The present studies examined effects of METH (0.1-100 microM) on [3H]MK-801 binding to membranes prepared from adult rat cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum, as well as the neurotoxicity produced by 24-h exposure to N-methyl-D-aspartate (5-10 microM; NMDA) employing organotypic hippocampal slice cultures of neonatal rat. Co-incubation of [3H]MK-801 with METH (0.1-100 microM) did not reduce dextromethorphan (1 mM)-displaceable ligand binding. Exposure of slice cultures to NMDA for 24-h produced increases in uptake of the non-vital fluorescent marker propidium iodide (PI) of 150-500% above control levels, most notably, in the CA1 region pyramidal cell layer. Co-exposure to METH (>1.0 microM) with NMDA (5 microM) reduced PI uptake by approximately 50% in each subregion, though the CA1 pyramidal cell layer was markedly more sensitive to the protective effects of METH exposure. In contrast, METH exposure did not reduce PI uptake stimulated by 24-h exposure to 10 microM NMDA. Co-exposure to the NMDA receptor antagonist D-2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (20 microM) prevented toxicity produced by exposure to 5 or 10 microM NMDA. These findings indicate that the pharmacological effects of short-term METH exposure involve inhibition of NMDA receptor-mediated neuronal signaling, not reflective of direct channel inhibition at an MK-801-sensitive site. PMID:17524372

  11. Organotypic hippocampal slice cultures for studies of brain damage, neuroprotection and neurorepair

    Noraberg, Jens; Poulsen, Frantz Rom; Blaabjerg, Morten;

    2005-01-01

    ), Alzheimer's disease (AD) and epilepsia. Studies of non-excitotoxic neurotoxic compounds and the experimental use of slice cultures in studies of HIV neurotoxicity, traumatic brain injury (TBI) and neurogenesis are included. For cerebral ischemia, experimental models with oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) and......-line biosensor monitoring, and time-lapse fluorescence microscopy are also presented....

  12. MPTP-meditated hippocampal dopamine deprivation modulates synaptic transmission and activity-dependent synaptic plasticity

    Parkinson's disease (PD)-like symptoms including learning deficits are inducible by 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP). Therefore, it is possible that MPTP may disturb hippocampal memory processing by modulation of dopamine (DA)- and activity-dependent synaptic plasticity. We demonstrate here that intraperitoneal (i.p.) MPTP injection reduces the number of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive neurons in the substantia nigra (SN) within 7 days. Subsequently, the TH expression level in SN and hippocampus and the amount of DA and its metabolite DOPAC in striatum and hippocampus decrease. DA depletion does not alter basal synaptic transmission and changes pair-pulse facilitation (PPF) of field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) only at the 30 ms inter-pulse interval. In addition, the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) is impaired whereas the duration of long-term depression (LTD) becomes prolonged. Since both LTP and LTD depend critically on activation of NMDA and DA receptors, we also tested the effect of DA depletion on NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic transmission. Seven days after MPTP injection, the NMDA receptor-mediated fEPSPs are decreased by about 23%. Blocking the NMDA receptor-mediated fEPSP does not mimic the MPTP-LTP. Only co-application of D1/D5 and NMDA receptor antagonists during tetanization resembled the time course of fEPSP potentiation as observed 7 days after i.p. MPTP injection. Together, our data demonstrate that MPTP-induced degeneration of DA neurons and the subsequent hippocampal DA depletion alter NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic transmission and activity-dependent synaptic plasticity. - Highlights: → I.p. MPTP-injection mediates death of dopaminergic neurons. → I.p. MPTP-injection depletes DA and DOPAC in striatum and hippocampus. → I.p. MPTP-injection does not alter basal synaptic transmission. → Reduction of LTP and enhancement of LTD after i.p. MPTP-injection. → Attenuation of NMDA-receptors mediated

  13. Transmembrane Agrin Regulates Dendritic Filopodia and Synapse Formation in Mature Hippocampal Neuron Cultures

    McCroskery, Seumas; Bailey, Allison; Lin, Lin; Daniels, Mathew P.

    2009-01-01

    The transmembrane isoform of agrin (Tm-agrin) is the predominant form expressed in the brain but its putative roles in brain development are not well understood. Recent reports have implicated Tm-agrin in the formation and stabilization of filopodia on neurites of immature central and peripheral neurons in culture. In maturing central neurons, dendritic filopodia are believed to facilitate synapse formation. In the present study we have investigated the role of Tm-agrin in regulation of dendr...

  14. Adaptive enhancement of learning protocol in hippocampal cultured networks grown on multielectrode arrays

    Alexey ePimashkin

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Learning in neuronal networks can be investigated using dissociated cultures on multielectrode arrays supplied with appropriate closed-loop stimulation. It was shown in previous studies that weakly respondent neurons on the electrodes can be trained to increase their evoked spiking rate within predefined time window after the stimulus. Such neurons can be associated with weak synaptic connections in nearby culture network. The stimulation leads to the increase in the connectivity and in the response. However, it was not possible to perform the learning protocol for the neurons on electrodes with relatively strong synaptic inputs and responding at higher rates. We proposed an adaptive closed-loop stimulation protocol capable to achieve learning even for the highly respondent electrodes. It means that the culture network can reorganize appropriately its synaptic connectivity to generate a desired response. We introduced an adaptive reinforcement condition accounted for response variability in control stimulation. It significantly enhanced the learning protocol to many responding electrode independently on its base response level. We also found that learning effect preserved after 4-6 hours after training.

  15. Ethanol enhances neurosteroidogenesis in hippocampal pyramidal neurons by paradoxical NMDA receptor activation.

    Tokuda, Kazuhiro; Izumi, Yukitoshi; Zorumski, Charles F

    2011-07-01

    Using an antibody against 5α-reduced neurosteroids, predominantly allopregnanolone, we found that immunostaining in the CA1 region of rat hippocampal slices was confined to pyramidal neurons. This neurosteroid staining was increased following 15 min administration of 60 mm but not 20 mm ethanol, and the enhancement was blocked by finasteride and dutasteride, selective inhibitors of 5α-reductase, a key enzyme required for allopregnanolone synthesis. Consistent with a prior report indicating that N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor (NMDAR) activation can promote steroid production, we observed that D-2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate (APV), a competitive NMDAR antagonist, blocked the effects of 60 mm ethanol on staining. We previously reported that 60 mm ethanol inhibits the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP), a cellular model for memory formation, in the CA1 region. In the present study, LTP inhibition by 60 mm ethanol was also overcome by both the 5α-reductase inhibitors and by APV. Furthermore, the effects of ethanol on neurosteroid production and LTP were mimicked by a low concentration of NMDA (1 μm), and the ability of NMDA to inhibit LTP and to enhance neurosteroid staining was reversed by finasteride and dutasteride, as well as by APV. These results indicate that ethanol paradoxically enhances GABAergic neurosteroid production by activation of unblocked NMDARs and that acute LTP inhibition by ethanol represents a form of NMDAR-mediated metaplasticity. PMID:21734282

  16. Maternal immune activation differentially impacts mature and adult-born hippocampal neurons in male mice.

    Zhang, Zhi; van Praag, Henriette

    2015-03-01

    Schizophrenia is associated with deficits in the hippocampus, a brain area important for learning and memory. The dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus develops both before and after birth. To study the relative contribution of mature and adult-born DG granule cells to disease etiology, we compared both cell populations in a mouse model of psychiatric illness resulting from maternal immune activation. Polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidilic acid (PolyIC, 5mg/kg) or saline was given on gestation day 15 to pregnant female C57Bl/6 mice. Male offspring (n=105), was administered systemic bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU, 50mg/kg) (n=52) or intracerebral retroviral injection into the DG (n=53), to label dividing cells at one month of age. Two months later behavioral tests were performed to evaluate disease phenotype. Immunohistochemistry and whole-cell patch clamping were used to assess morphological and physiological characteristics of DG cells. Three-month-old PolyIC exposed male offspring exhibited deficient pre-pulse inhibition, spatial maze performance and motor coordination, as well as increased depression-like behavior. Histological analysis showed reduced DG volume and parvalbumin positive interneuron number. Both mature and new hippocampal neurons showed modifications in intrinsic properties such as increased input resistance and lower current threshold, and decreased action potential number. Reduced GABAergic inhibitory transmission was observed only in mature DG neurons. Differential impairments in mature DG cells and adult-born new neurons may have implications for behavioral deficits associated with maternal immune activation. PMID:25449671

  17. Dynamic inhibition of excitatory synaptic transmission by astrocyte-derived ATP in hippocampal cultures

    Koizumi, Schuichi; Fujishita, Kayoko; Tsuda, Makoto; Shigemoto-Mogami, Yukari; Inoue, Kazuhide

    2003-01-01

    Originally ascribed passive roles in the CNS, astrocytes are now known to have an active role in the regulation of synaptic transmission. Neuronal activity can evoke Ca2+ transients in astrocytes, and Ca2+ transients in astrocytes can evoke changes in neuronal activity. The excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate has been shown to mediate such bidirectional communication between astrocytes and neurons. We demonstrate here that ATP, a primary mediator of intercellular Ca2+ signaling among astroc...

  18. Midazolam inhibits hippocampal long-term potentiation and learning through dual central and peripheral benzodiazepine receptor activation and neurosteroidogenesis

    Tokuda, Kazuhiro; O’Dell, Kazuko A.; Izumi, Yukitoshi; Charles F. Zorumski

    2010-01-01

    Benzodiazepines (BDZs) enhance γ-aminobutyric acid-A (GABAA) receptor inhibition by direct actions on central BDZ receptors (CBRs). Although some BDZs also bind mitochondrial receptors (translocator protein 18kDa, TSPO) and promote the synthesis of GABA-enhancing neurosteroids, the role of neurosteroids in the clinical effects of BDZs is unknown. In rat hippocampal slices, we compared midazolam, an anesthetic BDZ with clonazepam, an anticonvulsant/anxiolytic BDZ that activates CBRs selectivel...

  19. Interleukin-1β activates an Src family kinase to stimulate the plasma membrane Ca2+ pump in hippocampal neurons.

    Ghosh, Biswarup; Green, Matthew V; Krogh, Kelly A; Thayer, Stanley A

    2016-04-01

    The plasma membrane Ca(2+) ATPase (PMCA) plays a major role in clearing Ca(2+) from the neuronal cytoplasm. The cytoplasmic Ca(2+) clearance rate affects neuronal excitability, synaptic plasticity, and neurotransmission. Here, we examined the modulation of PMCA activity by PTKs in hippocampal neurons. PMCA-mediated Ca(2+) clearance slowed in the presence of pyrazolopyrimidine 2, an inhibitor of Src family kinases (SFKs), and accelerated in the presence of C2-ceramide, an activator of PTKs. Ca(2+) clearance kinetics were attenuated in cells expressing a dominant-negative Src mutant, suggesting that the pump is tonically stimulated by a PTK. Tonic stimulation was reduced in hippocampal neurons expressing short hairpin (sh)RNA directed to mRNA for Yes. shRNA-mediated knockdown of PMCA isoform 1 (PMCA1) removed tonic stimulation of Ca(2+) clearance, indicating that the kinase stimulates PMCA1. IL-1β accelerated Ca(2+) clearance in a manner blocked by an IL-1β receptor antagonist or by an inhibitor of neutral sphingomyelinase, the enzyme that produces ceramide. Thus IL-1β activates an SFK to stimulate the plasma membrane Ca(2+) pump, decreasing the duration of Ca(2+) transients in hippocampal neurons. PMID:26843596

  20. Popular Culture, Cultural Resistance, and Anticonsumption Activism: An Exploration of Culture Jamming as Critical Adult Education

    Sandlin, Jennifer A.

    2007-01-01

    This chapter examines popular culture as a site of cultural resistance. Specifically, it explores how "culture jamming," a cultural-resistance activity, can be a form of adult education. It examines adult education and learning as it intersects with both consumerism and popular culture. Focus is placed on a growing social movement of individuals…

  1. Active dendrites regulate the impact of gliotransmission on rat hippocampal pyramidal neurons.

    Ashhad, Sufyan; Narayanan, Rishikesh

    2016-06-01

    An important consequence of gliotransmission, a signaling mechanism that involves glial release of active transmitter molecules, is its manifestation as N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-dependent slow inward currents in neurons. However, the intraneuronal spatial dynamics of these events or the role of active dendrites in regulating their amplitude and spatial spread have remained unexplored. Here, we used somatic and/or dendritic recordings from rat hippocampal pyramidal neurons and demonstrate that a majority of NMDAR-dependent spontaneous slow excitatory potentials (SEP) originate at dendritic locations and are significantly attenuated through their propagation across the neuronal arbor. We substantiated the astrocytic origin of SEPs through paired neuron-astrocyte recordings, where we found that specific infusion of inositol trisphosphate (InsP3) into either distal or proximal astrocytes enhanced the amplitude and frequency of neuronal SEPs. Importantly, SEPs recorded after InsP3 infusion into distal astrocytes exhibited significantly slower kinetics compared with those recorded after proximal infusion. Furthermore, using neuron-specific infusion of pharmacological agents and morphologically realistic conductance-based computational models, we demonstrate that dendritically expressed hyperpolarization-activated cyclic-nucleotide-gated (HCN) and transient potassium channels play critical roles in regulating the strength, kinetics, and compartmentalization of neuronal SEPs. Finally, through the application of subtype-specific receptor blockers during paired neuron-astrocyte recordings, we provide evidence that GluN2B- and GluN2D-containing NMDARs predominantly mediate perisomatic and dendritic SEPs, respectively. Our results unveil an important role for active dendrites in regulating the impact of gliotransmission on neurons and suggest astrocytes as a source of dendritic plateau potentials that have been implicated in localized plasticity and place cell

  2. Adiponectin protects rat hippocampal neurons against excitotoxicity

    Qiu, Guang; Wan, Ruiqian; Hu, Jingping; Mattson, Mark P.; Spangler, Edward; Liu, Shan; Yau, Suk-yu; Lee, Tatia M. C.; Gleichmann, Marc; Ingram, Donald K.; So, Kwok-Fai; Zou, Sige

    2010-01-01

    Adiponectin exerts multiple regulatory functions in the body and in the hypothalamus primarily through activation of its two receptors, adiponectin receptor1 and adiponectin receptor 2. Recent studies have shown that adiponectin receptors are widely expressed in other areas of the brain including the hippocampus. However, the functions of adiponectin in brain regions other than the hypothalamus are not clear. Here, we report that adiponectin can protect cultured hippocampal neurons against ka...

  3. Phenolic Compounds Protect Cultured Hippocampal Neurons against Ethanol-Withdrawal Induced Oxidative Stress

    Marianna E. Jung

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Ethanol withdrawal is linked to elevated oxidative damage to neurons. Here we report our findings on the contribution of phenolic antioxidants (17β-estradiol, p-octyl-phenol and 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol to counterbalance sudden ethanol withdrawal-initiated oxidative events in hippocampus-derived cultured HT-22 cells. We showed that ethanol withdrawal for 4 h after 24-h ethanol treatment provoked greater levels of oxidative damage than the preceding ethanol exposure. Phenolic antioxidant treatment either during ethanol exposure or ethanol withdrawal only, however, dose-dependently reversed cellular oxidative damage, as demonstrated by the significantly enhanced cell viability, reduced malondialdehyde production and protein carbonylation, compared to untreated cells. Interestingly, the antioxidant treatment schedule had no significant impact on the observed neuroprotection. In addition, the efficacy of the three phenolic compounds was practically equipotent in protecting HT-22 cells in spite of predictions based on an in silico study and a cell free assay of lipid peroxidation. This finding implies that free-radical scavenging may not be the sole factor responsible for the observed neuroprotection and warrants further studies to establish, whether the HT-22 line is indeed a suitable model for in vitro screening of antioxidants against EW-related neuronal damage.

  4. The GABAA receptor agonist THIP is neuroprotective in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures

    Kristensen, Bjarne Winther; Noraberg, Jens; Zimmer, Jens

    2003-01-01

    The potential neuroprotective effects of the GABA(A) receptor agonists THIP (4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol) and muscimol, and the selective GluR5 kainate receptor agonist ATPA ((RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-tert-butylisoxazol-4-yl)propanoic acid), which activates GABAergic interneu...

  5. Transsynaptic neuronal loss induced in hippocampal slice cultures by a herpes simplex virus vector expressing the GluR6 subunit of the kainate receptor.

    Bergold, P J; Casaccia-Bonnefil, P; Zeng, X. L.; Federoff, H. J.

    1993-01-01

    Patients with severe temporal lobe epilepsy lose neurons within the CA3 and hilar regions of the hippocampus. Loss of CA3 and hilar neurons was also induced by transducing organotypic hippocampal slice cultures with a replication-defective herpes simplex virus (HSV) vector expressing the GluR6 kainate subtype of the glutamate receptor (HSVGluR6). In transduced fibroblasts, HSVGluR6 expressed a M(r) 115,000 protein that reacted with anti-GluR6 serum. After exposure of fibroblast to HSVGluR6, a...

  6. Protective effects of plant seed extracts against amyloid β-induced neurotoxicity in cultured hippocampal neurons

    Yoshinori Okada

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Alzheimer′s disease (AD is characterized by large deposits of amyloid β (Aβ peptide. Aβ is known to increase reactive oxygen species (ROS production in neurons, leading to cell death. In this study, we screened 15 plant seeds′ aqueous extracts (PSAE for inhibitory effects on Aβ (25-35-induced cell death using hippocampus neurons (HIPN. Materials and Methods: Fifteen chosen plants were nine medical herbs (Japanese honeywort, luffa, rapeseed, Chinese colza, potherb mustard, Japanese radish, bitter melon, red shiso, corn, and kaiware radish and six general commercial plants (common bean, komatsuna, Qing geng cai, bell pepper, kale, and lettuce. PSAE were measured for total phenolic content (TPC with the Folin-Ciocalteu method, and the 2-diphenyl-1-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH radical scavenging effect of each seed extract was measured. To find a protectant against Aβ-induced oxidative stress, we screened 15 PSAE using a 2′, 7′-dichlorofluorescein diacetate assay. To further unravel the anti-inflammatory effects of PSAE on Aβ-induced inflammation, PSAE were added to HIPN. The neuroprotective effects of the PSAE were evaluated by Cell Counting Kit-8 assay, measuring the cell viability in Aβ-induced HIPN. Results: TPC of 15 PSAE was in the range of 0.024-1.96 mg of chlorogenic acid equivalents/gram. The aqueous extracts showed antioxidant activities. Furthermore, intracellular ROS accumulation resulting from Aβ treatment was reduced when cells were treated with some PSAE. Kale, bitter melon, kaiware radish, red shiso, and corn inhibited tumor necrosis factor-alpha secretion by the Aβ-stimulated neurons and all samples except Japanese honeywort showed enhancement of cell survival. Conclusion: From these results, we suggest that some plant seed extracts offer protection against Aβ-mediated cell death.

  7. Impaired hippocampal activity at the goal zone on the place preference task in a DISC1 mouse model.

    Hayashi, Yuichiro; Sawa, Akira; Hikida, Takatoshi

    2016-05-01

    Learning deficit is a clinical feature of many mental disorders and is hypothesized to result from an inability to integrate information in neural systems. We showed that transgenic mice expressing a dominant-negative form of DISC1, a risk gene for neuropsychiatric disorders, exhibited impaired performance in a reward-place association task when combined with a mild isolation stress. CA1 cells in the mutant mice showed normal place cell properties, but their activity at the goal zone was diminished. This abnormality in hippocampal activity at the goal zone during the task may underlie the learning deficit observed in the DISC1 mutant mice. PMID:26497623

  8. ESTRADIOL-INDUCED ENHANCEMENT OF OBJECT MEMORY CONSOLIDATION INVOLVES HIPPOCAMPAL ERK ACTIVATION AND MEMBRANE-BOUND ESTROGEN RECEPTORS

    Fernandez, Stephanie M.; Michael C. Lewis; Pechenino, Angela S.; Harburger, Lauren L.; Orr, Patrick T.; Gresack, Jodi E.; Schafe, Glenn E.; Frick, Karyn M.

    2008-01-01

    The extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway is critical for various forms of learning and memory, and is activated by the potent estrogen, 17β-estradiol (E2). Here, we asked whether E2 modulates memory via ERK activation and putative membrane-bound estrogen receptors (ERs). Using ovariectomized mice, we first demonstrate that intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of 0.2 mg/kg E2 significantly increases dorsal hippocampal levels of phosphorylated ERK protein 1 hour after injection. Seco...

  9. Dissociation of dorsal hippocampal regional activation under the influence of stress in freely behaving rats

    Johannes Passecker

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Stress has deleterious effects on brain, body and behaviour in humans and animals alike. The present work investigated how 30-minute acute photic stress exposure impacts on spatial information processing in the main subregions of the dorsal hippocampal formation (CA1, CA3 and Dentate Gyrus, a brain structure prominently implicated in memory and spatial representation. Recordings were performed from spatially tuned hippocampal and dentate gyrus cells in rats while animals foraged in a square arena for food. The stress procedure induced a decrease in firing frequencies in CA1 and CA3 place cells while sparing locational characteristics. In contrast to the CA1-CA3 network, acute stress failed to induce major changes in the DG neuronal population. These data demonstrate a clear dissociation of the effects of stress on the main hippocampal sub-regions. Our findings further support the notion of decreased hippocampal excitability arising from stress in areas CA1 and CA3, but not in dentate gyrus.

  10. Increased neuroplasticity and hippocampal microglia activation in a mice model of rapid antidepressant treatment.

    Muzio, Luca; Brambilla, Valentina; Calcaterra, Lorenza; D'Adamo, Patrizia; Martino, Gianvito; Benedetti, Francesco

    2016-09-15

    The search for biomarkers of antidepressant effects focused on pathways regulating synaptic plasticity, and on activated inflammatory markers. Repeated Sleep Deprivation (SD) provides a model treatment to reverse-translate antidepressant effects from in vivo clinical psychiatry to model organisms. We studied the effects of repeated SD alone (ASD) or combined with exercise on a slow spinning wheel (SSW), in 116 C57BL/6J male mice divided in three groups (ASD, SSW, untreated). Forced Swimming Test (FST) was used to detect antidepressant-like effects. Unbiased evaluation of the transcriptional responses were obtained in the hippocampus by Illumina Bead Chip Array system, then confirmed with real time PCR. Spine densities in granular neurons of the dentate gyrus (DG) were assayed by standard Golgi staining. Activation of Microglial/Macrophages cells was evaluated by immunufluorescence analysis for Iba1. Rates of cell proliferation was estimated pulsing mice with the S-phase tracer 5-Iodo-2'-deoxyuridine (IdU). All SD procedures caused a decreasing of floating time at FST, and increased expression of the immediate early gene Arc/Arg3.1. In addition, SSW also increased expression of the Microglia/Macrophages genes Iba-1 and chemokine receptors Cx3cR1 and CxcR4, of the canonical Wnt signaling gene Wnt7a, and of dendritic spines in CA4 neurons of the DG. SSW up-regulated both the number of Iba1+ cells and rates of cell proliferation in the subgranular region of the DG. The antidepressant-like effects of SD dissociated both, from hippocampal neuroplasticity in the DG (not occurring after ASD), and from microglial activation (not preventing behavioral response when occurring). The increase in dendritic spine density in the DG after SD and exercise was associated with an up-regulation of Wnt 7a, and with activation of the innate immune system of the brain. Increased Arc/Arg3.1 suggests however increased neuroplasticity, which could be common to all fast-acting antidepressants

  11. The effects of bilateral hippocampal damage on fMRI regional activations and interactions during memory retrieval.

    Maguire, E A; Vargha-Khadem, F; Mishkin, M

    2001-06-01

    Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) we examined successful retrieval of real-world memories in a patient (Jon) with selective bilateral hippocampal pathology resulting from perinatal hypoxia compared with healthy control subjects. Jon activated the same brain regions during memory retrieval as control subjects, both medial and lateral on the left. In contrast to controls, Jon also activated many homologous regions on the right. In spite of having 50% volume loss bilaterally in his hippocampi, retrieval in Jon was associated with increased activation of the hippocampi. Furthermore, hippocampal activity, as with the controls, was differential, being most responsive to retrieval of autobiographical events compared with other memory types (autobiographical facts, public events, general knowledge). Jon made a distinction between events that the control subjects did not make, namely that some of the autobiographical and public events he clearly remembered, while others he found that he knew about but did not truly remember. His hippocampi and medial frontal cortex were significantly more active during retrieval of events for which he had clear and conscious recollection compared with those he knew as much about, including the context, but could not remember experiencing. Although Jon activates the same network of brain regions as the controls (albeit bilaterally), and with the same pattern of response in the hippocampus, the communication between regions differs from controls with regard to hippocampal-cortical connectivity. In controls there was increased effective connectivity between parahippocampal cortex and hippocampus, specifically during the retrieval of autobiographical events. In contrast, this increase was not apparent in Jon; rather, retrieval of autobiographical events elicited greater interaction between the hippocampus and retrosplenial cortex, and also increased interaction between retrosplenial and medial frontal cortex. This study

  12. HspB5/αB-crystallin increases dendritic complexity and protects the dendritic arbor during heat shock in cultured rat hippocampal neurons.

    Bartelt-Kirbach, Britta; Moron, Margarethe; Glomb, Maximilian; Beck, Clara-Maria; Weller, Marie-Pascale; Golenhofen, Nikola

    2016-10-01

    The small heat shock protein ΗspΒ5 (αB-crystallin) exhibits generally cytoprotective functions and possesses powerful neuroprotective capacity in the brain. However, little is known about the mode of action of ΗspΒ5 or other members of the HspB family particularly in neurons. To get clues of the neuronal function of HspBs, we overexpressed several HspBs in cultured rat hippocampal neurons and investigated their effect on neuronal morphology and stress resistance. Whereas axon length and synapse density were not affected by any HspB, dendritic complexity was enhanced by HspB5 and, to a lesser extent, by HspB6. Furthermore, we could show that this process was dependent on phosphorylation, since a non-phosphorylatable mutant of HspB5 did not show this effect. Rarefaction of the dendritic arbor is one hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases. To investigate if HspB5, which is upregulated at pathophysiological conditions, might be able to protect dendrites during such situations, we exposed HspB5 overexpressing neuronal cultures to heat shock. HspB5 prevented heat shock-induced rarefaction of dendrites. In conclusion, we identified regulation of dendritic complexity as a new function of HspB5 in hippocampal neurons. PMID:27085702

  13. Lithium ions in nanomolar concentration modulate glycine-activated chloride current in rat hippocampal neurons.

    Solntseva, E I; Bukanova, J V; Kondratenko, R V; Skrebitsky, V G

    2016-03-01

    Lithium salts are successfully used to treat bipolar disorder. At the same time, according to recent data lithium may be considered as a candidate medication for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders. The mechanisms of therapeutic action of lithium have not been fully elucidated. In particular, in the literature there are no data on the effect of lithium on the glycine receptors. In the present study we investigated the effect of Li(+) on glycine-activated chloride current (IGly) in rat isolated pyramidal hippocampal neurons using patch-clamp technique. The effects of Li(+) were studied with two glycine concentrations: 100 μM (EC50) and 500 μM (nearly saturating). Li(+) was applied to the cell in two ways: first, by 600 ms co-application with glycine through micropipette (short application), and, second, by addition to an extracellular perfusate for 10 min (longer application). Li(+) was used in the range of concentrations of 1 nM-1 mM. Short application of Li(+) caused two effects: (1) an acceleration of desensitization (a decrease in the time of half-decay, or "τ") of IGly induced by both 100 μM and 500 μM glycine, and (2) a reduction of the peak amplitude of the IGly, induced by 100 μM, but not by 500 μM glycine. Both effects were not voltage-dependent. Dose-response curves for both effects were N-shaped with two maximums at 100 nM and 1 mM of Li(+) and a minimum at 1 μM of Li(+). This complex form of dose-response may indicate that the process activated by high concentrations of lithium inhibits the process that is sensitive to low concentrations of lithium. Longer application of Li(+)caused similar effects, but in this case 1 μM lithium was effective and the dose-effect curves were not N-shaped. The inhibitory effect of lithium ions on glycine-activated current suggests that lithium in low concentrations is able to modulate tonic inhibition in the hippocampus. This important property of lithium should be considered when using this drug as a

  14. Increased stress reactivity is associated with reduced hippocampal activity and neuronal integrity along with changes in energy metabolism.

    Knapman, Alana; Kaltwasser, Sebastian F; Martins-de-Souza, Daniel; Holsboer, Florian; Landgraf, Rainer; Turck, Christoph W; Czisch, Michael; Touma, Chadi

    2012-02-01

    Patients suffering from major depression have repeatedly been reported to have dysregulations in hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity along with deficits in cognitive processes related to hippocampal and prefrontal cortex (PFC) malfunction. Here, we utilized three mouse lines selectively bred for high (HR), intermediate, or low (LR) stress reactivity, determined by the corticosterone response to a psychological stressor, probing the behavioral and functional consequences of increased vs. decreased HPA axis reactivity on the hippocampus and PFC. We assessed performance in hippocampus- and PFC-dependent tasks and determined the volume, basal activity, and neuronal integrity of the hippocampus and PFC using in vivo manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The hippocampal proteomes of HR and LR mice were also compared using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. HR mice were found to have deficits in the performance of hippocampus- and PFC-dependent tests and showed decreased N-acetylaspartate levels in the right dorsal hippocampus and PFC. In addition, the basal activity of the hippocampus, as assessed by manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging, was reduced in HR mice. The three mouse lines, however, did not differ in hippocampal volume. Proteomic analysis identified several proteins that were differentially expressed in HR and LR mice. In accordance with the notion that N-acetylaspartate levels, in part, reflect dysfunctional mitochondrial metabolism, these proteins were found to be involved in energy metabolism pathways. Thus, our results provide further support for the involvement of a dysregulated HPA axis and mitochondrial dysfunction in the etiology and pathophysiology of affective disorders. PMID:22288479

  15. Lead (Pb+2) impairs long-term memory and blocks learning-induced increases in hippocampal protein kinase C activity

    The long-term storage of information in the brain known as long-term memory (LTM) depends on a variety of intracellular signaling cascades utilizing calcium (Ca2+) and cyclic adenosine monophosphate as second messengers. In particular, Ca+2/phospholipid-dependent protein kinase C (PKC) activity has been proposed to be necessary for the transition from short-term memory to LTM. Because the neurobehavioral toxicity of lead (Pb+2) has been associated to its interference with normal Ca+2 signaling in neurons, we studied its effects on spatial learning and memory using a hippocampal-dependent discrimination task. Adult rats received microinfusions of either Na+ or Pb+2 acetate in the CA1 hippocampal subregion before each one of four training sessions. A retention test was given 7 days later to examine LTM. Results suggest that intrahippocampal Pb+2 did not affect learning of the task, but significantly impaired retention. The effects of Pb+2 selectively impaired reference memory measured in the retention test, but had no effect on the general performance because it did not affect the latency to complete the task during the test. Finally, we examined the effects of Pb+2 on the induction of hippocampal Ca+2/phospholipid-dependent PKC activity during acquisition training. The results showed that Pb+2 interfered with the learning-induced activation of Ca+2/phospholipid-dependent PKC on day 3 of acquisition. Overall, our results indicate that Pb+2 causes cognitive impairments in adult rats and that such effects might be subserved by interference with Ca+2-related signaling mechanisms required for normal LTM

  16. The developmental expression of fluorescent proteins in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures from transgenic mice and its use in the determination of excitotoxic neurodegeneration

    Noraberg, Jens; Jensen, Carsten V; Bonde, Christian;

    2007-01-01

    Transgenic mice, expressing fluorescent proteins in neurons and glia, provide new opportunities for real-time microscopic monitoring of degenerative and regenerative structural changes. We have previously validated and compared a number of quantifiable markers for neuronal damage and cell death...... changes, as well as the opportunity to monitor reversible changes or long-term effects in the event of minor damage. As a first step, we present: a) the developmental expression in organotypic hippocampal brain slice cultures of transgenic fluorescent proteins, useful for the visualisation of neuronal...... transgenic mouse strains which express fluorescent proteins in their neurons and/or astroglial cells. From the time of explantation, and subsequently for up to nine weeks in culture, the transgenic neuronal fluorescence displayed the expected characteristics of a developmental, in vivo-like increase...

  17. Basolateral amygdala noradrenergic influence enables enhancement of memory consolidation induced by hippocampal glucocorticoid receptor activation

    Roozendaal, Benno; Nguyen, Bichngoc T.; Power, Ann E.; McGaugh, James L.

    1999-01-01

    Previously, we reported that bilateral excitotoxic lesions of the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala (BLA) block the enhancing effects of posttraining systemic or intrahippocampal glucocorticoid administration on memory for inhibitory avoidance training. The present study further examined the basis of this permissive influence of the BLA on hippocampal memory functioning. Immediate posttraining unilateral infusions of the specific glucocorticoid receptor agonist RU 28362 (11β,17β-dihydroxy-6...

  18. Brain activity evidence for recognition without recollection after early hippocampal damage

    Düzel, E.; Vargha-Khadem, F; Heinze, H J; Mishkin, M.

    2001-01-01

    Amnesic patients with early and seemingly isolated hippocampal injury show relatively normal recognition memory scores. The cognitive profile of these patients raises the possibility that this recognition performance is maintained mainly by stimulus familiarity in the absence of recollection of contextual information. Here we report electrophysiological data on the status of recognition memory in one of the patients, Jon. Jon's recognition of studied words lacks the event-related potential (E...

  19. Brain activity evidence for recognition without recollection after early hippocampal damage

    Düzel, E.; Vargha-Khadem, F.; Heinze, H. J.; Mishkin, M.

    2001-01-01

    Amnesic patients with early and seemingly isolated hippocampal injury show relatively normal recognition memory scores. The cognitive profile of these patients raises the possibility that this recognition performance is maintained mainly by stimulus familiarity in the absence of recollection of contextual information. Here we report electrophysiological data on the status of recognition memory in one of the patients, Jon. Jon's recognition of studied words lacks the event-related potential (ERP) index of recollection, viz., an increase in the late positive component (500–700 ms), under conditions that elicit it reliably in normal subjects. On the other hand, a decrease of the ERP amplitude between 300 and 500 ms, also reliably found in normal subjects, is well preserved. This so-called N400 effect has been linked to stimulus familiarity in previous ERP studies of recognition memory. In Jon, this link is supported by the finding that his recognized and unrecognized studied words evoked topographically distinct ERP effects in the N400 time window. These data suggest that recollection is more dependent on the hippocampal formation than is familiarity, consistent with the view that the hippocampal formation plays a special role in episodic memory, for which recollection is so critical. PMID:11438748

  20. Brain activity evidence for recognition without recollection after early hippocampal damage.

    Düzel, E; Vargha-Khadem, F; Heinze, H J; Mishkin, M

    2001-07-01

    Amnesic patients with early and seemingly isolated hippocampal injury show relatively normal recognition memory scores. The cognitive profile of these patients raises the possibility that this recognition performance is maintained mainly by stimulus familiarity in the absence of recollection of contextual information. Here we report electrophysiological data on the status of recognition memory in one of the patients, Jon. Jon's recognition of studied words lacks the event-related potential (ERP) index of recollection, viz., an increase in the late positive component (500--700 ms), under conditions that elicit it reliably in normal subjects. On the other hand, a decrease of the ERP amplitude between 300 and 500 ms, also reliably found in normal subjects, is well preserved. This so-called N400 effect has been linked to stimulus familiarity in previous ERP studies of recognition memory. In Jon, this link is supported by the finding that his recognized and unrecognized studied words evoked topographically distinct ERP effects in the N400 time window. These data suggest that recollection is more dependent on the hippocampal formation than is familiarity, consistent with the view that the hippocampal formation plays a special role in episodic memory, for which recollection is so critical. PMID:11438748

  1. KCNQ/Kv7 channel activator flupirtine protects against acute stress-induced impairments of spatial memory retrieval and hippocampal LTP in rats.

    Li, C; Huang, P; Lu, Q; Zhou, M; Guo, L; Xu, X

    2014-11-01

    Spatial memory retrieval and hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) are impaired by stress. KCNQ/Kv7 channels are closely associated with memory and the KCNQ/Kv7 channel activator flupirtine represents neuroprotective effects. This study aims to test whether KCNQ/Kv7 channel activation prevents acute stress-induced impairments of spatial memory retrieval and hippocampal LTP. Rats were placed on an elevated platform in the middle of a bright room for 30 min to evoke acute stress. The expression of KCNQ/Kv7 subunits was analyzed at 1, 3 and 12 h after stress by Western blotting. Spatial memory was examined by the Morris water maze (MWM) and the field excitatory postsynaptic potential (fEPSP) in the hippocampal CA1 area was recorded in vivo. Acute stress transiently decreased the expression of KCNQ2 and KCNQ3 in the hippocampus. Acute stress impaired the spatial memory retrieval and hippocampal LTP, the KCNQ/Kv7 channel activator flupirtine prevented the impairments, and the protective effects of flupirtine were blocked by XE-991 (10,10-bis(4-Pyridinylmethyl)-9(10H)-anthracenone), a selective KCNQ channel blocker. Furthermore, acute stress decreased the phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) at Ser9 in the hippocampus, and flupirtine inhibited the reduction. These results suggest that the KCNQ/Kv7 channels may be a potential target for protecting both hippocampal synaptic plasticity and spatial memory retrieval from acute stress influences. PMID:25234320

  2. Long-term, repeated dose in vitro neurotoxicity of the glutamate receptor antagonist L-AP3, demonstrated in rat hippocampal slice cultures by using continuous propidium iodide incubation

    Kristensen, Bjarne W; Blaabjerg, Morten; Noraberg, Jens;

    2007-01-01

    Most in vitro models are only used to assess short-term effects of test compounds. However, as demonstrated here, hippocampal slice cultures can be used for long-term studies. The test compound used was the metabotropic glutamate receptor antagonist, L(+)-2-amino-3-phosphonopropionic acid (L-AP3...

  3. Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 4 Inhibits γ-Aminobutyric Acid-Activated Current in Hippocampal Pyramidal Neurons

    Hong, Zhiwen; Tian, Yujing; Qi, Mengwen; Li, Yingchun; Du, Yimei; Chen, Lei; Liu, Wentao; Chen, Ling

    2016-01-01

    The balance between excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitter systems is crucial for the modulation of neuronal excitability in the central nervous system (CNS). The activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) is reported to enhance the response of hippocampal glutamate receptors, but whether the inhibitory neurotransmitter system can be regulated by TRPV4 remains unknown. γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the CNS. Here, we show that application of transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) synthetic (GSK1016790A or 4α-PDD) or endogenous agonist (5,6-EET) inhibited GABA-activated current (IGABA) in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons, which was blocked by specific antagonists of TRPV4 and of GABAA receptors. GSK1016790A increased the phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (p-AMPK) and decreased the phosphorylated protein kinase B (p-Akt) protein levels, which was attenuated by removing extracellular calcium or by a calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase-β antagonist. GSK1016790A-induced decrease of p-Akt protein level was sensitive to an AMPK antagonist. GSK1016790A-inhibited IGABA was blocked by an AMPK antagonist or a phosphatidyl inositol 3 kinase (PI3K) agonist. GSK1016790A-induced inhibition of IGABA was also significantly attenuated by a protein kinase C (PKC) antagonist but was unaffected by protein kinase A or calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II antagonist. We conclude that activation of TRPV4 inhibits GABAA receptor, which may be mediated by activation of AMPK and subsequent down-regulation of PI3K/Akt signaling and activation of PKC signaling. Inhibition of GABAA receptors may account for the neuronal hyperexcitability caused by TRPV4 activation.

  4. Concurrent hippocampal induction of MHC II pathway components and glial activation with advanced aging is not correlated with cognitive impairment

    Sonntag William E

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Age-related cognitive dysfunction, including impairment of hippocampus-dependent spatial learning and memory, affects approximately half of the aged population. Induction of a variety of neuroinflammatory measures has been reported with brain aging but the relationship between neuroinflammation and cognitive decline with non-neurodegenerative, normative aging remains largely unexplored. This study sought to comprehensively investigate expression of the MHC II immune response pathway and glial activation in the hippocampus in the context of both aging and age-related cognitive decline. Methods Three independent cohorts of adult (12-13 months and aged (26-28 months F344xBN rats were behaviorally characterized by Morris water maze testing. Expression of MHC II pathway-associated genes identified by transcriptomic analysis as upregulated with advanced aging was quantified by qPCR in synaptosomal fractions derived from whole hippocampus and in hippocampal subregion dissections (CA1, CA3, and DG. Activation of astrocytes and microglia was assessed by GFAP and Iba1 protein expression, and by immunohistochemical visualization of GFAP and both CD74 (Ox6 and Iba1. Results We report a marked age-related induction of neuroinflammatory signaling transcripts (i.e., MHC II components, toll-like receptors, complement, and downstream signaling factors throughout the hippocampus in all aged rats regardless of cognitive status. Astrocyte and microglial activation was evident in CA1, CA3 and DG of intact and impaired aged rat groups, in the absence of differences in total numbers of GFAP+ astrocytes or Iba1+ microglia. Both mild and moderate microglial activation was significantly increased in all three hippocampal subregions in aged cognitively intact and cognitively impaired rats compared to adults. Neither induction of MHCII pathway gene expression nor glial activation correlated to cognitive performance. Conclusions These data demonstrate a

  5. Effect of acetylcholine receptors on the pain-related electrical activities in the hippocampal CA3 region of morphine-addicted rats

    Guan Zeng Li

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s:To determine the effect of acetylcholine (ACh, pilocarpine, and atropine on pain evoked responses of pain excited neurons (PEN and pain inhibited neurons (PIN in hippocampal CA3 region of morphine addicted rats. Materials and Methods:Female Wistar rats, weighing between 230-260 g were used in this study. Morphine addicted rats were generated by subcutaneous injection of increasing concentrations of morphine hydrochloride for six days. Trains of electrical impulses applied to the sciatic nerve were used as noxious stimulation and the evoked electrical activities of PEN or PIN in hippocampal CA3 area were recorded using extracellular electrophysiological recording techniques in hippocampal slices. The effect of acetylcholine receptor stimulation byACh, the muscarinic agonist pilocarpine, and the muscarinic antagonist atropine on the pain evoked responses of pain related electrical activities was analyzed in hippocampal CA3 area of morphine addicted rats. Results:Intra-CA3 microinjection of ACh (2 μg/1 μl or pilocarpine (2 μg/1 μl decreased the discharge frequency and prolonged the firing latency of PEN, but increased the discharge frequency and shortened the firing inhibitory duration (ID of PIN. The intra-CA3 administration of atropine (0.5 μg/1 μl produced opposite effect. The peak activity of cholinergic modulators was 2 to 4 min later in morphine addicted rats compared to peak activity previously observed in normal rats. Conclusion: ACh dependent modulation of noxious stimulation exists in hippocampal CA3 area of morphine addicted rats. Morphine treatment may shift the sensitivity of pain related neurons towards a delayed response to muscarinergic neurotransmission in hippocampal CA3 region.

  6. Methamphetamine exposure antagonizes N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated neurotoxicity in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures

    Smith, Katherine J.; Self, Rachel L.; Butler, Tracy R.; Mullins, Michael M.; Ghayoumi, Layla; Holley, Robert C.; Littleton, John M.; Prendergast, Mark A.

    2007-01-01

    Glutamatergic systems have been increasingly recognized as mediators of methamphetamine’s (METH) pharmacological effects though little is known about the means by which METH interacts with glutamate receptors. The present studies examined effects of METH (0.1–100 μM) on [3H]MK-801 binding to membranes prepared from adult rat cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum, as well as the neurotoxicity produced by 24-h exposure to N-methyl-D-aspartate (5–10 μM; NMDA) employing organotypic hippocampal slice...

  7. Toward a self-wired active reconstruction of the hippocampal trisynaptic loop: DG-CA3

    Gregory J. Brewer

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The mammalian hippocampus functions to encode and retrieve memories by transiently changing synaptic strengths, yet encoding in individual subregions for transmission between regions remains poorly understood. Toward the goal of better understanding the coding in the trisynaptic pathway from the dentate gyrus (DG to the CA3 and CA1, we report a novel microfabricated device that divides a micro-electrode array into two compartments of separate hippocampal network subregions connected by axons that grow through 3x10x400 μm tunnels. Gene expression by qPCR demonstrated selective enrichment of separate DG, CA3 and CA1 subregions. Reconnection of DG to CA3 altered burst dynamics associated with marked enrichment of GAD67 in DG and GFAP in CA3. Surprisingly, DG axon spike propagation was preferentially unidirectional to the CA3 region at 0.5 m/s with little reverse transmission. Therefore, select hippocampal subregions intrinsically self-wire in anatomically appropriate patterns and maintain their distinct subregion phenotype without external inputs

  8. Ethanol affects network activity in cultured rat hippocampus: mediation by potassium channels.

    Eduard Korkotian

    Full Text Available The effects of ethanol on neuronal network activity were studied in dissociated cultures of rat hippocampus. Exposure to low (0.25-0.5% ethanol concentrations caused an increase in synchronized network spikes, and a decrease in the duration of individual spikes. Ethanol also caused an increase in rate of miniature spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents. Higher concentrations of ethanol eliminated network spikes. These effects were reversible upon wash. The effects of the high, but not the low ethanol were blocked by the GABA antagonist bicuculline. The enhancing action of low ethanol was blocked by apamin, an SK potassium channel antagonist, and mimicked by 1-EBIO, an SK channel opener. It is proposed that in cultured hippocampal networks low concentration of ethanol is associated with SK channel activity, rather than the GABAergic receptor.

  9. Prior Activation of Inositol 1,4,5-Trisphosphate Receptors Suppresses the Subsequent Induction of Long-Term Potentiation in Hippocampal CA1 Neurons

    Fujii, Satoshi; Yamazaki, Yoshihiko; Goto, Jun-Ichi; Fujiwara, Hiroki; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the role of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) activated by preconditioning low-frequency afferent stimulation (LFS) in the subsequent induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) in CA1 neurons in hippocampal slices from mature guinea pigs. Induction of LTP in the field excitatory postsynaptic potential or the population…

  10. Propofol, but not etomidate, increases corticosterone levels and induces long-term alteration in hippocampal synaptic activity in neonatal rats.

    Xu, Changqing; Seubert, Christoph N; Gravenstein, Nikolaus; Martynyuk, Anatoly E

    2016-04-01

    Animal studies provide strong evidence that general anesthetics (GAs), administered during the early postnatal period, induce long-term cognitive and neurological abnormalities. Because the brain growth spurt in rodents is delayed compared to that in humans, a fundamental question is whether the postnatal human brain is similarly vulnerable. Sevoflurane and propofol, GAs that share positive modulation of the gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABAAR) function cause marked increase in corticosterone levels and induce long-term developmental alterations in synaptic activity in rodents. If synaptogenesis is affected, investigation of mechanisms of the synaptic effects of GAs is of high interest because synaptogenesis in humans continues for several years after birth. Here, we compared long-term synaptic effects of etomidate with those of propofol. Etomidate and propofol both positively modulate GABAAR activity, but in contrast to propofol, etomidate inhibits the adrenal synthesis of corticosterone. Postnatal day (P) 4, 5, or 6 rats received five injections of etomidate, propofol, or vehicle control during 5h of maternal separation. Endocrine effects of the anesthetics were evaluated by measuring serum levels of corticosterone immediately after anesthesia or maternal separation. The frequency and amplitude of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs) in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons were measured at P24-40 and P≥80. Only propofol caused a significant increase in serum corticosterone levels (F(4.26)=17.739, P<0.001). In contrast to increased frequency of mIPSCs in the propofol group (F(4.23)=8.731, p<0.001), mIPSC activity in the etomidate group was not different from that in the vehicle groups. The results of this study together with previously published data suggest that anesthetic-caused increase in corticosterone levels is required for GABAergic GAs to induce synaptic effects in the form of a long-term increase in the frequency of hippocampal m

  11. Low doses of alcohol potentiate GABA sub B inhibition of spontaneous activity of hippocampal CA1 neurons in vivo

    Criado, J.R.; Thies, R. (Univ. of Oklahoma, Oklahoma City (United States))

    1991-03-11

    Low doses of alcohol facilitate firing of hippocampal neurons. Such doses also enhance the inhibitory actions of GABA. Alcohol is known to potentiate inhibition via GABA{sub A} receptors. However, the effects of alcohol on GABA{sub B} receptor function are not understood. Spontaneous activity of single units was recorded from CA1 neurons of male rats anesthetized with 1.0% halothane. Electrical recordings and local application of drugs were done with multi-barrel pipettes. CA1 pyramidal neurons fired spontaneous bursts of action potentials. Acute alcohol decreased the interval between bursts, a mild excitatory action. Alcohol also more than doubled the period of complete inhibition produced by local application of both GABA and baclofen. These data suggest that GABA{sub B}-mediated inhibition is also potentiated by low doses of alcohol.

  12. The interplay of early-life stress, nutrition and immune activation programs adult hippocampal structure and function

    Lianne eHoeijmakers

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Early-life adversity increases the vulnerability to develop psychopathologies and cognitive decline later in life. This association is supported by clinical and preclinical studies. Remarkably, experiences of stress during this sensitive period, in the form of abuse or neglect but also early malnutrition or an early immune challenge elicit very similar long-term effects on brain structure and function. During early-life, both exogenous factors like nutrition and maternal care, as well as endogenous modulators, including stress hormones and mediator of immunological activity affect brain development. The interplay of these key elements and their underlying molecular mechanisms are not fully understood. We discuss here the hypothesis that exposure to early-life adversity (specifically stress, under/malnutrition and infection leads to life-long alterations in hippocampal-related cognitive functions, at least partly via changes in hippocampal neurogenesis. We further discuss how these different key elements of the early-life environment interact and affect one another and suggest that it is a synergistic action of these elements that shapes cognition throughout life. Finally, we consider different intervention studies aiming to prevent these early-life adversity induced consequences. The emerging evidence for the intriguing interplay of stress, nutrition and immune activity in the early-life programming calls for a more in depth understanding of the interaction of these elements and the underlying mechanisms. This knowledge will help to develop intervention strategies that will converge on a more complete set of changes induced by early-life adversity.

  13. Effect of bone marrow stromal cell transplantation to the hippocampal CA1 region on electroencephalographic activity in epileptic rats

    Hong Xu; Guowei Xu; Zhongtang Feng; Tinghua Wang; Jia Yang; Qingying Wu; Zhicheng Xiao

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Animal experiments have confirmed that bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC) transplantation can serve as a treatment for epilepsy.OBJECTIVE: BMSCs derived from green fluorescent protein (GFP) mice were transplanted into the hippocampal CA1 region of epileptic rats. The aim of the study was to record electroencephalogram (EEG), analyze survival and migration of BMSCs, and validate the effect of BMSC transplantation for the treatment of epilepsy.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: A randomized block design experiment was performed at the Institute of Neuroscience, Kunming Medical College from March 200.5 to February 2006.MATERIALS: Homozygous C57BL/6CrSIcTgN (acr-EGFP) OsbC 14-Y01 -FM 131 mice, 8-12 weeks of age, were selected for preparation of cell suspension. Sprague Dawley rats were selected for establishing epilepsy models.METHODS: Rats were randomly divided into 4 groups: control (n = 8), model (n = 8), normal saline (n = 24), and BMSC (n = 24). In the model, normal saline, and BMSC groups, epilepsy was established with penicillin (3×107 U/kg i.p. ×7 days). Rats in the BMSC group received a BMSC suspension derived fromgreen fluorescent protein mice into the right hippocampal CA1 region. Rats in the vehicle control group were injected with the same volume of normal saline into the hippocampal CA1 region.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The electroencephalogram was used to monitor brain activity. Survival and migration of the transplanted BMSCs was observed using fluorescence microscopy at 1, 2, and 4 weeks after transplantation.RESULTS: In BMSC group, fluorescent cells were observed at the transplantation site and in the adjacent tissue, as well as in the tissue surrounding the needle tract, indicating the migration of implanted cells. Fluorescent cells were not detected in the vehicle control group. The electroencephalogram of the control animals exhibited 7-9 Hz α waves, with a wave amplitude < 50 μ V. In the model and vehicle control groups, random spike

  14. Space activities and global popular music culture

    Wessels, Allison Rae; Collins, Patrick

    During the "space age" era, space activities appear increasingly as a theme in Western popular music, as they do in popular culture generally. In combination with the electronics and tele-communications revolution, "pop/rock" music has grown explosively during the space age to become an effectively global culture. From this base a number of trends are emerging in the pattern of influences that space activities have on pop music. The paper looks at the use of themes and imagery in pop music; the role of space technology in the modern "globalization" of pop music; and current and future links between space activities and pop music culture, including how public space programmes are affected by its influence on popular attitudes.

  15. Fluvoxamine alleviates seizure activity and downregulates hippocampal GAP-43 expression in pentylenetetrazole-kindled mice: role of 5-HT3 receptors.

    Alhaj, Momen W; Zaitone, Sawsan A; Moustafa, Yasser M

    2015-06-01

    Epilepsy has been documented to lead to many changes in the nervous system including cell loss and mossy fiber sprouting. Neuronal loss and aberrant neuroplastic changes in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus have been identified in the pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) kindling model. Antiseizure activity of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors has been reported in several studies. In the current study, the protective effect of fluvoxamine against PTZ-kindling was investigated in terms of seizure scores, neuronal loss, and regulation of hippocampal neuroplasticity. Further, the role of 5-HT3 receptors was determined. Kindling was induced by repeated injections of PTZ (35 mg/kg) thrice weekly, for a total of 13 injections. One hundred male albino mice were allocated into 10 groups: (1) saline, (2) PTZ, (3) diazepam (1 mg/kg)+PTZ, (4-6) fluvoxamine (5, 10 or 20 mg/kg)+PTZ, (7) ondansetron+fluvoxamine (20 mg/kg)+PTZ, (8) ondansetron+PTZ group, (9) ondansetron (2 mg/kg, i.p.)+saline, and (10) fluvoxamine (20 mg/kg)+saline. PTZ-kindled mice showed high seizure activity, hippocampal neuronal loss, and expression of growth-associated phosphoprotein (GAP-43) compared with saline-treated mice. Repeated administration of fluvoxamine (20 mg/kg) in PTZ-kindled mice suppressed seizure scores, protected against hippocampal neuronal loss, and downregulated GAP-43 expression, without producing any signs of the 5-HT syndrome in healthy rats. Importantly, pretreatment with a selective 5-HT3 receptor blocker (ondansetron) attenuated the aforementioned effects of fluvoxamine. In conclusion, the ameliorating effect of fluvoxamine on hippocampal neurons and neuroplasticity in PTZ-kindled mice was, at least in part, dependent on enhancement of hippocampal serotoninergic transmission at 5-HT3 receptors. PMID:25590967

  16. Estradiol-induced object memory consolidation in middle-aged female mice requires dorsal hippocampal ERK and PI3K activation

    Fan, Lu; Zhao, Zaorui; Orr, Patrick T.; Chambers, Cassie H.; Michael C. Lewis; Frick, Karyn M.

    2010-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that dorsal hippocampal extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation is necessary for 17β-estradiol (E2) to enhance novel object recognition in young ovariectomized mice (Fernandez et al., 2008). Here, we asked whether E2 has similar memory-enhancing effects in middle-aged and aged ovariectomized mice, and whether these effects depend on ERK and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt activation. We first demonstrated that intracerebroventricular (ICV) E2...

  17. Slowing of Hippocampal Activity Correlates with Cognitive Decline in Early Onset Alzheimer’s Disease. An MEG Study with Virtual Electrodes

    Engels, Marjolein M. A.; Hillebrand, Arjan; van der Flier, Wiesje M.; Stam, Cornelis J.; Scheltens, Philip; van Straaten, Elisabeth C. W.

    2016-01-01

    Pathology in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) starts in the entorhinal cortex and hippocampus. Because of their deep location, activity from these areas is difficult to record with conventional electro- or magnetoencephalography (EEG/MEG). The purpose of this study was to explore hippocampal activity in AD patients and healthy controls using “virtual MEG electrodes”. We used resting-state MEG recordings from 27 early onset AD patients [age 60.6 ± 5.4, 12 females, mini-mental state examination (MMSE) range: 19–28] and 26 cognitively healthy age- and gender-matched controls (age 61.8 ± 5.5, 14 females). Activity was reconstructed using beamformer-based virtual electrodes for 78 cortical regions and 6 hippocampal regions. Group differences in peak frequency and relative power in six frequency bands were identified using permutation testing. For the patients, spearman correlations between the MMSE scores and peak frequency or relative power were calculated. Moreover, receiver operator characteristic curves were plotted to estimate the diagnostic accuracy. We found a lower hippocampal peak frequency in AD compared to controls, which, in the patients, correlated positively with MMSE [r(25) = 0.61; p < 0.01] whereas hippocampal relative theta power correlated negatively with MMSE [r(25) = -0.54; p < 0.01]. Cortical peak frequency was also lower in AD in association areas. Furthermore, cortical peak frequency correlated positively with MMSE [r(25) = 0.43; p < 0.05]. In line with this finding, relative theta power was higher in AD across the cortex, and relative alpha and beta power was lower in more circumscribed areas. The average cortical relative theta power was the best discriminator between AD and controls (sensitivity 82%; specificity 81%). Using beamformer-based virtual electrodes, we were able to detect hippocampal activity in AD. In AD, this hippocampal activity is slowed, and correlates better with cognition than the (slowed) activity in cortical areas. On the

  18. Slowing of hippocampal activity correlates with cognitive decline in early-onset Alzheimer’s disease. An MEG study with virtual electrodes.

    Marjolein M.A. Engels

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Pathology in Alzheimer’s disease (AD starts in the entorhinal cortex and hippocampus. Because of their deep location, activity from these areas is difficult to record with conventional electro- or magnetoencephalography (EEG/MEG. The purpose of this study was to explore hippocampal activity in AD patients and healthy controls using virtual MEG electrodes.We used resting-state MEG recordings from 27 early-onset AD patients (age 60.6 ± 5.4, 12 females, Mini Mental State examination (MMSE range: 19-28 and 26 cognitively healthy age- and gender-matched controls (age 61.8 ± 5.5, 14 females. Activity was reconstructed using beamformer-based virtual electrodes for 78 cortical regions and 6 hippocampal regions. Group differences in peak frequency and relative power in six frequency bands were identified using permutation testing. For the patients, spearman correlations between the MMSE scores and peak frequency or relative power were calculated. Moreover, receiver operator characteristic curves were plotted to estimate the diagnostic accuracy.We found a lower hippocampal peak frequency in AD compared to controls, which, in the patients, correlated positively with MMSE (r(25 = .61; p < .01 whereas hippocampal relative theta power correlated negatively with MMSE (r(25 = -.54; p < .01. Cortical peak frequency was also lower in AD in association areas. Furthermore, cortical peak frequency correlated positively with MMSE (r(25 = .43; p < 0.05. In line with this finding, relative theta power was higher in AD across the cortex, and relative alpha and beta power was lower in more circumscribed areas. The average cortical relative theta power was the best discriminator between AD and controls (sensitivity 82%; specificity 81%. Using beamformer-based virtual electrodes, we were able to detect hippocampal activity in AD. In AD, this hippocampal activity is slowed, and correlates better with cognition than the (slowed activity in cortical areas. On the other

  19. Sericin can reduce hippocampal neuronal apoptosis by activating the Akt signal transduction pathway in a rat model of diabetes mellitus

    Zhihong Chen; Yaqiang He; Chengjun Song; Zhijun Dong; Zhejun Su; Jingfeng Xue

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, a rat model of type 2 diabetes mellitus was established by continuous peritoneal injection of streptozotocin. Following intragastric perfusion of sericin for 35 days, blood glucose levels significantly reduced, neuronal apoptosis in the hippocampal CA1 region decreased, hippocampal phosphorylated Akt and nuclear factor kappa B expression were enhanced, but Bcl-xL/Bcl-2 associated death promoter expression decreased. Results demonstrated that sericin can reduce hippocampal neuronal apoptosis in a rat model of diabetes mellitus by regulating abnormal changes in the Akt signal transduction pathway.

  20. Culture phenomenon analysis on the forest tour activity of China

    Jiang Minjin

    2006-01-01

    This paper analyzes culture and forest culture, the intension of culture and forest culture, combines the understanding of the main cultural factor with the forest tour activity of China, analyzes the compatible phenomenon of Chinese forest culture and traditional culture, and explores culture of forest tourist site containing the meaning in forest tour. The author thinks the tour of forest culture which will be the important component of forest tour in forest culture,This paper puts forward simple questions existing in exploitation and advantage of forest tour culture, and proposes some countermeasures.

  1. DIFFERENTIAL EFFECTS OF CAFFEINE, PICROTOXIN, AND PENTYLENETETRAZOL ON HIPPOCAMPAL AFTERDISCHARGE ACTIVITY AND WET DOG SHAKES (JOURNAL VERSION)

    The present experiment was conducted to identify changes in hippocampal after discharge (AD) parameters following administration of subconvulsant dosages (half of the convulsant dosage) of analeptics with known pharmacological action. Long Evans rats (N=104) with chronic bipolar ...

  2. NF-κB Mediated Regulation of Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis: Relevance to Mood Disorders and Antidepressant Activity

    Valeria Bortolotto; Bruna Cuccurazzu; Pier Luigi Canonico; Mariagrazia Grilli

    2014-01-01

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis is a peculiar form of process of neuroplasticity that in recent years has gained great attention for its potential implication in cognition and in emotional behavior in physiological conditions. Moreover, a vast array of experimental studies suggested that adult hippocampal neurogenesis may be altered in various neuropsychiatric disorders, including major depression, where its disregulation may contribute to cognitive impairment and/or emotional aspects associat...

  3. Sericin can reduce hippocampal neuronal apoptosis by activating the Akt signal transduction pathway in a rat model of diabetes mellitus☆

    Chen, Zhihong; He, Yaqiang; Song, Chengjun; Dong, Zhijun; Su, Zhejun; Xue, Jingfeng

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, a rat model of type 2 diabetes mellitus was established by continuous peritoneal injection of streptozotocin. Following intragastric perfusion of sericin for 35 days, blood glucose levels significantly reduced, neuronal apoptosis in the hippocampal CA1 region decreased, hippocampal phosphorylated Akt and nuclear factor kappa B expression were enhanced, but Bcl-xL/Bcl-2 associated death promoter expression decreased. Results demonstrated that sericin can reduce hippocampa...

  4. Hippocampal memory enhancing activity of pine needle extract against scopolamine-induced amnesia in a mouse model

    Lee, Jin-Seok; Kim, Hyeong-Geug; Lee, Hye-Won; Han, Jong-Min; Lee, Sam-Keun; Kim, Dong-Woon; Saravanakumar, Arthanari; Son, Chang-Gue

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the neuropharmacological effects of 30% ethanolic pine needle extract (PNE) on memory impairment caused by scopolamine injection in mice hippocampus. Mice were orally pretreated with PNE (25, 50, and 100 mg/kg) or tacrine (10 mg/kg) for 7 days, and scopolamine (2 mg/kg) was injected intraperitoneally, 30 min before the Morris water maze task on first day. To evaluate memory function, the Morris water maze task was performed for 5 days consecutively. Scopolamine increased the escape latency and cumulative path-length but decreases the time spent in target quadrant, which were ameliorated by pretreatment with PNE. Oxidant-antioxidant balance, acetylcholinesterase activity, neurogenesis and their connecting pathway were abnormally altered by scopolamine in hippocampus and/or sera, while those alterations were recovered by pretreatment with PNE. As lipid peroxidation, 4HNE-positive stained cells were ameliorated in hippocampus pretreated with PNE. Pretreatment with PNE increased the proliferating cells and immature neurons against hippocampal neurogenesis suppressed by scopolamine, which was confirmed by ki67- and DCX-positive stained cells. The expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and phosphorylated cAMP response element-binding protein (pCREB) in both protein and gene were facilitated by PNE pretreatment. These findings suggest that PNE could be a potent neuropharmacological drug against amnesia, and its possible mechanism might be modulating cholinergic activity via CREB-BDNF pathway. PMID:25974329

  5. Differential Left Hippocampal Activation during Retrieval with Different Types of Reminders: An fMRI Study of the Reconsolidation Process

    De Pino, Gabriela; Fernández, Rodrigo Sebastián; Villarreal, Mirta Fabiana; Pedreira, María Eugenia

    2016-01-01

    Consolidated memories return to a labile state after the presentation of cues (reminders) associated with acquisition, followed by a period of stabilization (reconsolidation). However not all cues are equally effective in initiating the process, unpredictable cues triggered it, predictable cues do not. We hypothesize that the different effects observed by the different reminder types on memory labilization-reconsolidation depend on a differential neural involvement during reminder presentation. To test it, we developed a declarative task and compared the efficacy of three reminder types in triggering the process in humans (Experiment 1). Finally, we compared the brain activation patterns between the different conditions using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) (Experiment 2). We confirmed that the unpredictable reminder is the most effective in initiating the labilization-reconsolidation process. Furthermore, only under this condition there was differential left hippocampal activation during its presentation. We suggest that the left hippocampus is detecting the incongruence between actual and past events and allows the memory to be updated. PMID:26991776

  6. Short-Range Temporal Interactions in Sleep; Hippocampal Spike Avalanches Support a Large Milieu of Sequential Activity Including Replay.

    J Matthew Mahoney

    Full Text Available Hippocampal neural systems consolidate multiple complex behaviors into memory. However, the temporal structure of neural firing supporting complex memory consolidation is unknown. Replay of hippocampal place cells during sleep supports the view that a simple repetitive behavior modifies sleep firing dynamics, but does not explain how multiple episodes could be integrated into associative networks for recollection during future cognition. Here we decode sequential firing structure within spike avalanches of all pyramidal cells recorded in sleeping rats after running in a circular track. We find that short sequences that combine into multiple long sequences capture the majority of the sequential structure during sleep, including replay of hippocampal place cells. The ensemble, however, is not optimized for maximally producing the behavior-enriched episode. Thus behavioral programming of sequential correlations occurs at the level of short-range interactions, not whole behavioral sequences and these short sequences are assembled into a large and complex milieu that could support complex memory consolidation.

  7. Short-Range Temporal Interactions in Sleep; Hippocampal Spike Avalanches Support a Large Milieu of Sequential Activity Including Replay.

    Mahoney, J Matthew; Titiz, Ali S; Hernan, Amanda E; Scott, Rod C

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal neural systems consolidate multiple complex behaviors into memory. However, the temporal structure of neural firing supporting complex memory consolidation is unknown. Replay of hippocampal place cells during sleep supports the view that a simple repetitive behavior modifies sleep firing dynamics, but does not explain how multiple episodes could be integrated into associative networks for recollection during future cognition. Here we decode sequential firing structure within spike avalanches of all pyramidal cells recorded in sleeping rats after running in a circular track. We find that short sequences that combine into multiple long sequences capture the majority of the sequential structure during sleep, including replay of hippocampal place cells. The ensemble, however, is not optimized for maximally producing the behavior-enriched episode. Thus behavioral programming of sequential correlations occurs at the level of short-range interactions, not whole behavioral sequences and these short sequences are assembled into a large and complex milieu that could support complex memory consolidation. PMID:26866597

  8. Changes in the proliferative activity of hippocampal neural stem cells from manganismus mice

    Guohe Tan; Boning Yang; Guofu Tan; Bo Liang; Jiangu Gong; Xiaodong Ge; Songchao Guo

    2007-01-01

    's region was recorded as the performance of spatial memory. At the final two days of the water maze tests, all the animals were daily intraperitoneally injected with 50 mg/kg BrdU three times successively, once every 4 hours. At 24 hours after the final BrdU injection, all the animals were sacrificed and perfused, and their brains were harvested, fixed and successively sliced at coronary plane on a freezing microtome. Distribution and number of BrdU-positive cells in the subgranular zone ofhippocampus of brains of experimental animas were detected respectively by immunohistochemistry for reflecting the proliferation of NSCs. Single-factor analysis of variance was used for comparing the difference of measurement data. Linear correlation analysis was used among the performance record in Morris water maze test, the number of BrdU-immunopositive cells and the dose of manganism.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Learning and memory ability and the number of hippocampal NSCs of mice in each group.RESULTS: ①Performance of mice in Morris water maze: In the place navigation test, there was a significant retarded learning in mice of high-dose manganism group from the 3rd day as compared with control group (P < 0.01). Till the 5th day, escape latency of mice in each manganism group was prolonged,and learning performance was significantly decreased (P < 0.05), while swimming speed did not affect above results. In the spatial probe test, the average frequency of middle- and high-dose manganism groups was 1.17±1.60 and 0.80±1.10, respectively, and decreased remarkably than that of control group which was 4.86 ±1.35 (P < 0.01), indicating memory ability was decreased; while the average frequency of low-dose manganism group did not differ obviously from that of control group (P =0.066) although it was 2.67 ± 3.27.The difference of swimming speed in each group was still of no statistic significance (P > 0.05). ②Effect of manganism on the number of NSCs: After counting, the average

  9. Back to the Future: Preserved Hippocampal Network Activity during Reverse Ambulation

    Maurer, Andrew P.; Lester, Adam W.; Burke, Sara N; Ferng, Jonathan J.; Barnes, Carol A.

    2014-01-01

    During movement, there is a transition of activity across the population, such that place-field centers ahead of the rat are sequentially activated in the order that they will be encountered. Although the mechanisms responsible for this sequence updating are unknown, two classes of models can be considered. The first class involves head-direction information for activating neurons in the order that their place fields will be traversed. An alternative model contends that motion and turn-relate...

  10. Activation of the hippocampal complex during tactile maze solving in congenitally blind subjects

    Gagnon, Léa; Schneider, Fabien C; Siebner, Hartwig R;

    2012-01-01

    hippocampus and parahippocampus, occipital cortex and fusiform gyrus. Blindfolded sighted controls did not show increased BOLD responses in these areas; instead they activated the caudate nucleus and thalamus. Both groups activated the precuneus during tactile maze navigation. We conclude that cross...

  11. Trafficking and surface expression of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channels in hippocampal neurons

    Y. Noam; Q. Zha; L. Phan; R.L. Wu; D.M. Chetkovich; W.J. Wadman; T.Z. Baram

    2010-01-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels mediate the hyperpolarization-activated current I(h) and thus play important roles in the regulation of brain excitability. The subcellular distribution pattern of the HCN channels influences the effects that they exert on the proper

  12. A Transcriptional Mechanism Integrating Inputs from Extracellular Signals to Activate Hippocampal Stem Cells

    Andersen, Jimena; Urbán, Noelia; Achimastou, Angeliki; Ito, Ayako; Simic, Milesa; Ullom, Kristy; Martynoga, Ben; Lebel, Mélanie; Göritz, Christian; Frisén, Jonas; Nakafuku, Masato; Guillemot, François

    2014-01-01

    Summary The activity of adult stem cells is regulated by signals emanating from the surrounding tissue. Many niche signals have been identified, but it is unclear how they influence the choice of stem cells to remain quiescent or divide. Here we show that when stem cells of the adult hippocampus receive activating signals, they first induce the expression of the transcription factor Ascl1 and only subsequently exit quiescence. Moreover, lowering Ascl1 expression reduces the proliferation rate...

  13. Late prenatal immune activation causes hippocampal deficits in the absence of persistent inflammation across aging

    Giovanoli, Sandra; Notter, Tina; Richetto, Juliet; Labouesse, Marie A.; Vuillermot, Stéphanie; Riva, Marco A; Meyer, Urs

    2015-01-01

    Background Prenatal exposure to infection and/or inflammation is increasingly recognized to play an important role in neurodevelopmental brain disorders. It has recently been postulated that prenatal immune activation, especially when occurring during late gestational stages, may also induce pathological brain aging via sustained effects on systemic and central inflammation. Here, we tested this hypothesis using an established mouse model of exposure to viral-like immune activation in late pr...

  14. Reduced hippocampal and amygdala activity predicts memory distortions for trauma reminders in combat-related PTSD

    Hayes, Jasmeet Pannu; LaBar, Kevin S.; McCarthy, Gregory; Selgrade, Elizabeth; Nasser, Jessica; Dolcos, Florin; Morey , Rajendra A.

    2010-01-01

    Neurobiological models of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) suggest that altered activity in the medial temporal lobes (MTL) during encoding of traumatic memories contribute to the development and maintenance of the disorder. However, there is little direct evidence in the PTSD literature to support these models. The goal of the present study was to examine MTL activity during trauma encoding in combat veterans using the subsequent memory paradigm. Fifteen combat veterans diagnosed with PT...

  15. Chronic hypoxia induces the activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway and stimulates hippocampal neurogenesis in wild-type and APPswe-PS1ΔE9 transgenic mice in vivo

    Varela-Nallar, Lorena; Rojas-Abalos, Macarena; Abbott, Ana C.; Moya, Esteban A.; Iturriaga, Rodrigo; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia modulates proliferation and differentiation of cultured embryonic and adult stem cells, an effect that includes β-catenin, a key component of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway. Here we studied the effect of mild hypoxia on the activity of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in the hippocampus of adult mice in vivo. The hypoxia-inducible transcription factor-1α (HIF-1α) was analyzed as a molecular control of the physiological hypoxic response. Exposure to chronic hypoxia (10% oxygen for 6–72 h) stimulated the activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. Because the Wnt/β-catenin pathway is a positive modulator of adult neurogenesis, we evaluated whether chronic hypoxia was able to stimulate neurogenesis in the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampal dentate gyrus. Results indicate that hypoxia increased cell proliferation and neurogenesis in adult wild-type mice as determined by Ki67 staining, Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation and double labeling with doublecortin (DCX). Chronic hypoxia also induced neurogenesis in a double transgenic APPswe-PS1ΔE9 mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), which shows decreased levels of neurogenesis in the SGZ. Our results show for the first time that exposure to hypoxia in vivo can induce the activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling cascade in the hippocampus, suggesting that mild hypoxia may have a therapeutic value in neurodegenerative disorders associated with altered Wnt signaling in the brain and also in pathological conditions in which hippocampal neurogenesis is impaired. PMID:24574965

  16. Slowing of hippocampal activity correlates with cognitive decline in early-onset Alzheimer’s disease. An MEG study with virtual electrodes.

    Engels, Marjolein M. A.; Arjan eHillebrand; van der Flier, Wiesje M; Stam, Cornelis J; Philip eScheltens; van Straaten, Elisabeth C. W.

    2016-01-01

    Pathology in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) starts in the entorhinal cortex and hippocampus. Because of their deep location, activity from these areas is difficult to record with conventional electro- or magnetoencephalography (EEG/MEG). The purpose of this study was to explore hippocampal activity in AD patients and healthy controls using virtual MEG electrodes.We used resting-state MEG recordings from 27 early-onset AD patients (age 60.6 ± 5.4, 12 females, Mini Mental State examination (MMSE) ran...

  17. Slowing of Hippocampal Activity Correlates with Cognitive Decline in Early Onset Alzheimer’s Disease. An MEG Study with Virtual Electrodes

    Engels, Marjolein M. A.; Hillebrand, Arjan; van der Flier, Wiesje M; Stam, Cornelis J; Scheltens, Philip; van Straaten, Elisabeth C. W.

    2016-01-01

    Pathology in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) starts in the entorhinal cortex and hippocampus. Because of their deep location, activity from these areas is difficult to record with conventional electro- or magnetoencephalography (EEG/MEG). The purpose of this study was to explore hippocampal activity in AD patients and healthy controls using “virtual MEG electrodes”. We used resting-state MEG recordings from 27 early onset AD patients [age 60.6 ± 5.4, 12 females, mini-mental state examination (MMSE) ...

  18. The Memory-Impairing Effects of Septal GABA Receptor Activation Involve GABAergic Septo-Hippocampal Projection Neurons

    Krebs-Kraft, Desiree L.; Wheeler, Marina G.; Parent, Marise B.

    2007-01-01

    Septal infusions of the [gamma]-aminobutyric acid (GABA)[subscript A] agonist muscimol impair memory, and the effect likely involves the hippocampus. GABA[subscript A] receptors are present on the perikarya of cholinergic and GABAergic septo-hippocampal (SH) projections. The current experiments determined whether GABAergic SH projections are…

  19. Dopamine D4 receptor activation increases hippocampal gamma oscillations by enhancing synchronization of fast-spiking interneurons.

    Richard Andersson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Gamma oscillations are electric activity patterns of the mammalian brain hypothesized to serve attention, sensory perception, working memory and memory encoding. They are disrupted or altered in schizophrenic patients with associated cognitive deficits, which persist in spite of treatment with antipsychotics. Because cognitive symptoms are a core feature of schizophrenia it is relevant to explore signaling pathways that potentially regulate gamma oscillations. Dopamine has been reported to decrease gamma oscillation power via D1-like receptors. Based on the expression pattern of D4 receptors (D4R in hippocampus, and pharmacological effects of D4R ligands in animals, we hypothesize that they are in a position to regulate gamma oscillations as well. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To address this hypothesis we use rat hippocampal slices and kainate-induced gamma oscillations. Local field potential recordings as well as intracellular recordings of pyramidal cells, fast-spiking and non-fast-spiking interneurons were carried out. We show that D4R activation with the selective ligand PD168077 increases gamma oscillation power, which can be blocked by the D4R-specific antagonist L745,870 as well as by the antipsychotic drug Clozapine. Pyramidal cells did not exhibit changes in excitatory or inhibitory synaptic current amplitudes, but inhibitory currents became more coherent with the oscillations after application of PD168077. Fast-spiking, but not non-fast spiking, interneurons, increase their action potential phase-coupling and coherence with regard to ongoing gamma oscillations in response to D4R activation. Among several possible mechanisms we found that the NMDA receptor antagonist AP5 also blocks the D4R mediated increase in gamma oscillation power. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that D4R activation affects fast-spiking interneuron synchronization and thereby increases gamma power by an NMDA receptor-dependent mechanism. This

  20. Intervention effects of ganoderma lucidum spores on epileptiform discharge hippocampal neurons and expression of neurotrophin-4 and N-cadherin.

    Shu-Qiu Wang

    Full Text Available Epilepsy can cause cerebral transient dysfunctions. Ganoderma lucidum spores (GLS, a traditional Chinese medicinal herb, has shown some antiepileptic effects in our previous studies. This was the first study of the effects of GLS on cultured primary hippocampal neurons, treated with Mg(2+ free medium. This in vitro model of epileptiform discharge hippocampal neurons allowed us to investigate the anti-epileptic effects and mechanism of GLS activity. Primary hippocampal neurons from <1 day old rats were cultured and their morphologies observed under fluorescence microscope. Neurons were confirmed by immunofluorescent staining of neuron specific enolase (NSE. Sterile method for GLS generation was investigated and serial dilutions of GLS were used to test the maximum non-toxic concentration of GLS on hippocampal neurons. The optimized concentration of GLS of 0.122 mg/ml was identified and used for subsequent analysis. Using the in vitro model, hippocampal neurons were divided into 4 groups for subsequent treatment i control, ii model (incubated with Mg(2+ free medium for 3 hours, iii GLS group I (incubated with Mg(2+ free medium containing GLS for 3 hours and replaced with normal medium and incubated for 6 hours and iv GLS group II (neurons incubated with Mg(2+ free medium for 3 hours then replaced with a normal medium containing GLS for 6 hours. Neurotrophin-4 and N-Cadherin protein expression were detected using Western blot. The results showed that the number of normal hippocampal neurons increased and the morphologies of hippocampal neurons were well preserved after GLS treatment. Furthermore, the expression of neurotrophin-4 was significantly increased while the expression of N-Cadherin was decreased in the GLS treated group compared with the model group. This data indicates that GLS may protect hippocampal neurons by promoting neurotrophin-4 expression and inhibiting N-Cadherin expression.

  1. Local Field Potentials Encode Place Cell Ensemble Activation during Hippocampal Sharp Wave Ripples.

    Taxidis, Jiannis; Anastassiou, Costas A; Diba, Kamran; Koch, Christof

    2015-08-01

    Whether the activation of spiking cell ensembles can be encoded in the local field potential (LFP) remains unclear. We address this question by combining in vivo electrophysiological recordings in the rat hippocampus with realistic biophysical modeling, and explore the LFP of place cell sequence spiking ("replays") during sharp wave ripples. We show that multi-site perisomatic LFP amplitudes, in the ∼150-200 Hz frequency band, reliably reflect spatial constellations of spiking cells, embedded within non-spiking populations, and encode activation of local place cell ensembles during in vivo replays. We find spatiotemporal patterns in the LFP, which remain consistent between sequence replays, in conjunction with the ordered activation of place cell ensembles. Clustering such patterns provides an efficient segregation of replay events from non-replay-associated ripples. This work demonstrates how spatiotemporal ensemble spiking is encoded extracellularly, providing a window for efficient, LFP-based detection and monitoring of structured population activity in vivo. PMID:26247865

  2. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Hippocampal Activation During Silent Mantra Meditation

    Engström, Maria; Pihlsgård, Johan; Lundberg, Peter; Axelsson Söderfeldt, Birgitta

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of the present study was to investigate whether moderately experienced meditators activate hippocampus and the prefrontal cortex during silent mantra meditation, as has been observed in earlier studies on subjects with several years of practice. Methods: Subjects with less than 2 years of meditation practice according to the Kundalini yoga or Acem tradition were examined by functional magnetic resonance imaging during silent mantra meditation, using an on-off block d...

  3. School Culture and Physical Activity: A Systematic Review

    Rickwood, Greg

    2013-01-01

    This review examines literature on aspects of school culture and students' physical activity participation. The following questions were addressed: (1) what aspects of school culture have been examined in relation to physical activity, (2) what is the weight of evidence concerning the relationships between school culture factors and physical…

  4. Activation of functional α7-containing nAChRs in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons by physiological levels of choline in the presence of PNU-120596.

    Bopanna I Kalappa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The level of expression of functional α7-containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons is believed to be very low compared to hippocampal CA1 interneurons, and for many years this expression was largely overlooked. However, high densities of expression of functional α7-containing nAChRs in CA1 pyramidal neurons may not be necessary for triggering important cellular and network functions, especially if activation of α7-containing nAChRs occurs in the presence of positive allosteric modulators such as PNU-120596. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: An approach previously developed for α7-containing nAChRs expressed in tuberomammillary neurons was applied to investigate functional CA1 pyramidal α7-containing nAChRs using rat coronal hippocampal slices and patch-clamp electrophysiology. The majority (∼71% of tested CA1 pyramidal neurons expressed low densities of functional α7-containing nAChRs as evidenced by small whole-cell responses to choline, a selective endogenous agonist of α7 nAChRs. These responses were potentiated by PNU-120596, a novel positive allosteric modulator of α7 nAChRs. The density of functional α7-containing nAChRs expressed in CA1 pyramidal neurons (and thus, the normalized net effect of activation, i.e., response net charge per unit of membrane capacitance per unit of time was estimated to be ∼5% of the density observed in CA1 interneurons. The results of this study demonstrate that despite low levels of expression of functional pyramidal α7-containing nAChRs, physiological levels of choline (∼10 µM are sufficient to activate these receptors and transiently depolarize and even excite CA1 pyramidal neurons in the presence of PNU-120596. The observed effects are possible because in the presence of 10 µM choline and 1-5 µM PNU-120596, a single opening of an individual pyramidal α7-containing nAChR ion channel appears to transiently depolarize (∼4 mV the

  5. Using activity theory to study cultural complexity in medical education.

    Frambach, Janneke M; Driessen, Erik W; van der Vleuten, Cees P M

    2014-06-01

    There is a growing need for research on culture, cultural differences and cultural effects of globalization in medical education, but these are complex phenomena to investigate. Socio-cultural activity theory seems a useful framework to study cultural complexity, because it matches current views on culture as a dynamic process situated in a social context, and has been valued in diverse fields for yielding rich understandings of complex issues and key factors involved. This paper explains how activity theory can be used in (cross-)cultural medical education research. We discuss activity theory's theoretical background and principles, and we show how these can be applied to the cultural research practice by discussing the steps involved in a cross-cultural study that we conducted, from formulating research questions to drawing conclusions. We describe how the activity system, the unit of analysis in activity theory, can serve as an organizing principle to grasp cultural complexity. We end with reflections on the theoretical and practical use of activity theory for cultural research and note that it is not a shortcut to capture cultural complexity: it is a challenge for researchers to determine the boundaries of their study and to analyze and interpret the dynamics of the activity system. PMID:24590549

  6. The Edible Marine Alga Gracilariopsis chorda Alleviates Hypoxia/Reoxygenation-Induced Oxidative Stress in Cultured Hippocampal Neurons.

    Mohibbullah, Md; Hannan, Md Abdul; Choi, Ji-Young; Bhuiyan, Mohammad Maqueshudul Haque; Hong, Yong-Ki; Choi, Jae-Suk; Choi, In Soon; Moon, Il Soo

    2015-09-01

    Age-related neurological disorders are of growing concern among the elderly, and natural products with neuroprotective properties have been attracting increasing attention as candidates for the prevention or treatment of neurological disorders induced by oxidative stress. In an effort to explore natural resources, we collected some common marine seaweed from the Korean peninsula and Indonesia and screened them for neuroprotective activity against hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R)-induced oxidative stress. Of the 23 seaweeds examined, the ethanol extract of Gracilariopsis chorda (GCE) provided maximum neuroprotection at an optimum concentration of 15 μg/mL, followed by Undaria pinnatifida. GCE increased cell viability after H/R, decreased the formation of reactive oxygen species (measured by 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate [DCF-DA] staining), and inhibited the double-stranded DNA breaks (measured by H2AX immunocytochemistry), apoptosis (measured by Annexin V/propidium iodide staining), internucleosomal DNA fragmentation (measured by DNA laddering), and dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential (measured by JC-1 staining). Using reverse-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography, we quantitated the arachidonic acid (AA) in GCE, which provides neuroprotection against H/R-induced oxidative stress. This neuroprotective effect of AA was comparable to that of GCE. These findings suggest that the neuroprotective effect of GCE against H/R-induced neuronal death is due, at least in part, to the AA content that suppresses neuronal apoptosis. PMID:26106876

  7. LXR activation protects hippocampal microvasculature in very old triple transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Sandoval-Hernández, Adrián G; Restrepo, Alejandro; Cardona-Gómez, Gloria P; Arboleda, Gonzalo

    2016-05-16

    The vascular hypothesis of Alzheimer's disease postulates that disruption of the brain microvasculature is important for the accumulation of amyloid beta and increased neuroinflammation. Liver X Receptor agonist, GW3965, has been demonstrated to successfully modulate neuroinflammation and lipid metabolism in murine models of AD. This is partially due to increased expression of ApoE levels and increased mobility of endothelial progenitor cells. This paper analyzes changes in the neurovascular unit and in astrocytes and microglia markers following oral administration of GW3965 in a very old triple transgenic AD mice (3xTg-AD mice). We found that astrogliosis, but not activation of microglia, decreased in very old (24 months) 3xTg-AD mice treated with GW965. In addition, GW3965 increased LRP1 levels in neuron-like cells and partially restored microvascular morphology by decreasing tortuosity and increasing length as shown by Lectin immunostaining. Interestingly, these changes were associated with decreased Aβ in blood vessels. In conclusion, short-term treatment of 3xTg-AD mice with GW3965 restored microvascular architecture which may be important in the cognitive improvement previously shown. PMID:27057732

  8. Neurotoxic effect of 2,5-hexanedione on neural progenitor cells and hippocampal neurogenesis

    2,5-Hexanedione (HD), a metabolite of n-hexane, causes central and peripheral neuropathy leading to motor neuron deficits. Although chronic exposure to n-hexane is known to cause gradual sensorimotor neuropathy, there are no reports on the effects of low doses of HD on neurogenesis in the central nervous system. In the current study, we explored HD toxicity in murine neural progenitor cells (NPC), primary neuronal culture and young adult mice. HD (500 nM∼50 μM) dose-dependently suppressed NPC proliferation and cell viability, and also increased the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). HD (10 or 50 mg/kg for 2 weeks) inhibited hippocampal neuronal and NPC proliferation in 6-week-old male ICR mice, as measured by BrdU incorporation in the dentate gyrus, indicating HD impaired hippocampal neurogenesis. In addition, elevated microglial activation was observed in the hippocampal CA3 region and lateral ventricles of HD-treated mice. Lastly, HD dose-dependently decreased the viability of primary cultured neurons. Based on biochemical and histochemical evidence from both cell culture and HD-treated animals, the neurotoxic mechanisms by which HD inhibits NPC proliferation and hippocampal neurogenesis may relate to its ability to elicit an increased generation of deleterious ROS.

  9. Hippocampal rhythmical slow activity following ibotenic acid lesions of the septal region. I. Relations to behavior and effects of atropine and urethane.

    Stewart, D J; Vanderwolf, C H

    1987-10-13

    The effects of intraseptal injections of various concentrations of ibotenic acid on hippocampal electrical activity were studied in freely moving and urethane-anesthetized rats. Ibotenic acid selectively abolished the atropine-sensitive form of hippocampal rhythmical slow activity (RSA) normally seen during urethane anesthesia. Large amplitude irregular activity (LIA) and RSA in the waking state were somewhat depressed as well. Despite this, clear RSA persisted in the waking state in association with locomotion or struggling (Type 1 behavior). As in normal rats, such RSA was resistant to systemic administration of atropine. Analysis of brain sections stained with gallocyanin or for acetylcholinesterase showed that ibotenic acid produced cell loss in the dorsal lateral septal nucleus and the septohippocampal nucleus. Cells in the medial septal and diagonal band nuclei were resistant to ibotenic acid. The results suggest that intrinsic septal circuitry is critically involved in the generation of the atropine-sensitive (presumably cholinergic) form of RSA. The mechanisms by which LIA and the two forms of RSA are generated in the hippocampus is discussed. PMID:3676823

  10. High-Speed Imaging Reveals Opposing Effects of Chronic Stress and Antidepressants on Neuronal Activity Propagation through the Hippocampal Trisynaptic Circuit

    Jens Stepan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Antidepressants (ADs are used as first-line treatment for most stress-related psychiatric disorders. The alterations in brain circuit dynamics that can arise from stress exposure and underlie therapeutic actions of ADs remain, however, poorly understood. Here, enabled by a recently developed voltage-sensitive dye imaging assay in mouse brain slices, we examined the impact of chronic stress and concentration-dependent effects of eight clinically used ADs (belonging to different chemical/functional classes on evoked neuronal activity propagations through the hippocampal trisynaptic circuitry (HTC: perforant path - dentate gyrus - area CA3 - area CA1. Exposure of mice to chronic social defeat stress led to markedly weakened activity propagations (“HTC-Waves”. In contrast, at concentrations in the low micromolar range, all ADs, which were bath applied to slices, caused an amplification of HTC-Waves in CA regions (invariably in area CA1. The fast-acting “antidepressant” ketamine, the mood stabilizer lithium, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF exerted comparable enhancing effects, whereas the antipsychotic haloperidol and the anxiolytic diazepam attenuated HTC-Waves. Collectively, we provide direct experimental evidence that chronic stress can depress neuronal signal flow through the HTC and demonstrate shared opposing effects of ADs. Thus, our study points to a circuit-level mechanism of ADs to counteract stress-induced impairment of hippocampal network function. However, the observed effects of ADs are impossible to depend on enhanced neurogenesis.