WorldWideScience

Sample records for active galaxy centaurus

  1. An infrared jet in Centaurus A - A link to the extranuclear activity in distant radio galaxies?

    High-resolution NIR images of the visually obscured central region of Centaurus A (NGC 5128) were obtained with the University of Texas array camera on the AAT in June 1988, in order to investigate the effect of the active nucleus on the surrounding galaxy. The J (1.25 micron), H (1.65 micron), and K (2.2 micron) images of the central 40 arcsec of the galaxy revealed an emission feature extending about 10 arcsec northeast of the nucleus at the same position angle as the X-ray and radio jets. This jet is most prominent at the 1.25 micron wavelength, where its brightness was comparable to that of the nucleus. The observed properties of the infrared jet were found to be similar to those seen in distant radio sources. 31 refs

  2. The Suzaku observation of the nucleus of the radio loud active galaxy Centaurus A

    A Suzaku observation of the nucleus of the radio-loud AGN Centaurus A in 2005 has yielded a broadband spectrum spanning 0.3 to 250 keV. The hard X-rays are fit by two power laws, absorbed by columns of 1.5 and 7x1023 cm-2 respectively. The spectrum consistent with previous suggestions that the power-law components are X-ray emission from the sub-pc VLBI jet and from Bondi accretion at the core, or are consistent with a partial covering interpretation. The soft band is dominated by thermal emission from the diffuse plasma and is fit well by a two-temperature collisional ionization emission model, plus a third power-law component to account for scattered nuclear emission, kpc-scale jet emission, and emission from X-ray Binaries and other point sources. Narrow fluorescent emission lines from Fe, Si, S, Ar, Ca and Ni are detected. The width of the Fe Kα line yields a 200 light-day lower limit on the distance from the black hole to the line-emitting gas. K-shell absorption edges due to Fe, Ca, and S are detected. The high metallicity ([Fe/H]=+0.1) of the circumnuclear material suggests that the accreting material could not have originated in the metal-poor outer halo unless enrichment by local star formation has occurred. Relative element abundances are consistent with enrichment due to local star formation processes. (author)

  3. New low surface brightness dwarf galaxies in the Centaurus group

    Müller, Oliver; Binggeli, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    We conducted an extensive CCD search for faint, unresolved dwarf galaxies of very low surface brightness in the whole Centaurus group region encompassing the Cen A and M 83 subgroups lying at a distance of roughly 4 and 5 Mpc, respectively. The aim is to significantly increase the sample of known Centaurus group members down to a fainter level of completeness, serving as a basis for future studies of the 3D structure of the group. Following our previous survey of 60 square degrees covering the M 83 subgroup, we extended and completed our survey of the Centaurus group region by imaging another 500 square degrees area in the g and r bands with the wide-field Dark Energy Survey Camera at the 4m Blanco telescope at CTIO. The limiting central surface brightness reached for suspected Centaurus members is $\\mu_r \\approx 29$ mag arcsec$^{-2}$, corresponding to an absolute magnitude $M_r \\approx -9.5$. The images were enhanced using different filtering techniques. We found 41 new dwarf galaxy candidates, which togethe...

  4. Centaurus

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    (the Centaur; abbrev. Cen, gen. Centauri; area 1060 sq. deg.) A southern constellation which lies between Vela and Lupus, and surrounds Crux on three sides. It culminates at midnight in early April. Its origin dates back at least to ancient Greece, where it was identified with Chiron in Greek mythology. The brightest stars of Centaurus were cataloged by Ptolemy (c. AD 100-175) in the Almagest....

  5. The Centaurus cluster of galaxies. II. The bimodal-velocity structure

    This is the second paper in a series that describes an extensive study of the Centaurus cluster of galaxies. The paper concerns the bimodal velocity distribution of the galaxies in the cluster. The likely location of the two main cluster components is discussed. The data strongly favours the hypothesis that the two components lie within the same cluster. (UK)

  6. The early-type dwarf galaxy population of the Centaurus cluster

    Misgeld, I.; Hilker, M.; Mieske, S.

    2009-01-01

    We present a photometric study of the early-type dwarf galaxy population of the Centaurus cluster, aiming at investigating the galaxy luminosity function (LF) and galaxy scaling relations down to the regime of galaxies with M_V~-10 mag. On deep VLT/FORS1 V- and I-band images of the central part of the cluster, we identify cluster dwarf-galaxy candidates using both morphological and surface brightness selection criteria. Photometric and structural parameters of the candidates are derived from ...

  7. The Suzaku Observation of the Nucleus of the Radio-Loud Active Galaxy Centaurus A: Constraints on Abundances of the Accreting Material

    Markowitz, A; Watanabe, S; Nakazawa, K; Fukazawa, Y; Kokubun, M; Makishima, K; Awaki, H; Bamba, A; Isobe, N; Kataoka, J; Madejski, G; Mushotzky, R; Okajima, T; Ptak, A; Reeves, J N; Ueda, Y; Yamasaki, T; Yaqoob, T

    2007-01-01

    A Suzaku observation of the nucleus of the radio-loud AGN Centaurus A in 2005 has yielded a broadband spectrum spanning 0.3 to 250 keV. The net exposure times after screening were: 70 ks per X-ray Imaging Spectrometer (XIS) camera, 60.8 ks for the Hard X-ray Detector (HXD) PIN, and 17.1 ks for the HXD-GSO. The hard X-rays are fit by two power-laws of the same slope, absorbed by columns of 1.5 and 7 * 10^{23} cm^{-2} respectively. The spectrum is consistent with previous suggestions that the power-law components are X-ray emission from the sub-pc VLBI jet and from Bondi accretion at the core, but it is also consistent with a partial covering interpretation. The soft band is dominated by thermal emission from the diffuse plasma and is fit well by a two-temperature VAPEC model, plus a third power-law component to account for scattered nuclear emission, jet emission, and emission from X-ray Binaries and other point sources. Narrow fluorescent emission lines from Fe, Si, S, Ar, Ca and Ni are detected. The Fe K alp...

  8. Star Formation in Dwarf Galaxies of the Nearby Centaurus A Group

    Cote, Stephanie; Skillman, Evan D; Miller, Bryan W

    2009-01-01

    We present Halpha narrow-band imaging of 17 dwarf irregular galaxies (dIs) in the nearby Centaurus A Group. Although all large galaxies of the group have a current or recent enhanced star formation episode, the dIs have normal star formation rates and do not contain a larger fraction of dwarf starbursts than other nearby groups. Relative distances between dIs and larger galaxies of the group can be computed in 3D since most of them have now fairly accurately known distances. We find that the dI star formation rates do not depend on local environment, and in particular they do not show any correlation with the distance of the dI to the nearest large galaxy of the group. There is a clear morphology-density relation in the Centaurus A Group, similarly to the Sculptor and Local Groups, in the sense that dEs/dSphs tend to be at small distances from the more massive galaxies of the group, while dIs are on average at larger distances. We find four transition dwarfs in the Group, dwarfs that show characteristics of b...

  9. A very deep Chandra view of metals, sloshing and feedback in the Centaurus cluster of galaxies

    Sanders, J S; Taylor, G B; Russell, H R; Blundell, K M; Canning, R E A; Hlavacek-Larrondo, J; Walker, S A; Grimes, C K

    2016-01-01

    We examine deep Chandra X-ray observations of the Centaurus cluster of galaxies, Abell 3526. Applying a gradient magnitude filter reveals a wealth of structure, from filamentary soft emission on 100pc (0.5 arcsec) scales close to the nucleus to features 10s of kpc in size at larger radii. The cluster contains multiple high-metallicity regions with sharp edges. Relative to an azimuthal average, the deviations of metallicity and surface brightness are correlated, and the temperature is inversely correlated, as expected if the larger scale asymmetries in the cluster are dominated by sloshing motions. Around the western cold front are a series of ~7 kpc 'notches', suggestive of Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. The cold front width varies from 4 kpc down to close to the electron mean free path. Inside the front are multiple metallicity blobs on scales of 5-10 kpc, which could have been uplifted by AGN activity, also explaining the central metallicity drop and flat inner metallicity profile. Close to the nucleus are...

  10. NGC 5011C: an overlooked dwarf galaxy in the Centaurus A group

    Saviane, Ivo; 10.1086/512157

    2008-01-01

    (abridged) We report the discovery of a previously unnoticed member of the Centaurus A Group, NGC 5011C. While the galaxy is a well known stellar system listed with a NGC number its true identity remained hidden because of coordinate confusion and wrong redshifts in the literature. NGC 5011C attracted our attention since, at a putative distance of 45.3 Mpc, it would be a peculiar object having a very low surface brightness typical of a dwarf galaxy, and at the same time having the size of an early-type spiral or S0 galaxy. To confirm or reject this peculiarity, our immediate objective was to have the first reliable measurement of its recession velocity. The observations were carried out with EFOSC2 at the 3.6m ESO telescope. We found that NGC 5011C has indeed a low redshift of v_sun=647+/-96 km/sec and thus is a nearby dwarf galaxy rather than a member of the distant Centaurus cluster as believed for the past 23 years. Rough distance estimates based on photometric parameters also favor this scenario. As a byp...

  11. A very deep Chandra view of metals, sloshing and feedback in the Centaurus cluster of galaxies

    Sanders, J. S.; Fabian, A. C.; Taylor, G. B.; Russell, H. R.; Blundell, K. M.; Canning, R. E. A.; Hlavacek-Larrondo, J.; Walker, S. A.; Grimes, C. K.

    2016-03-01

    We examine deep Chandra X-ray observations of the Centaurus cluster of galaxies, Abell 3526. Applying a gradient magnitude filter reveals a wealth of structure, from filamentary soft emission on 100 pc (0.5 arcsec) scales close to the nucleus to features 10 s of kpc in size at larger radii. The cluster contains multiple high-metallicity regions with sharp edges. Relative to an azimuthal average, the deviations of metallicity and surface brightness are correlated, and the temperature is inversely correlated, as expected if the larger scale asymmetries in the cluster are dominated by sloshing motions. Around the western cold front are a series of ˜7 kpc `notches', suggestive of Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. The cold front width varies from 4 kpc down to close to the electron mean free path. Inside the front are multiple metallicity blobs on scales of 5-10 kpc, which could have been uplifted by AGN activity, also explaining the central metallicity drop and flat inner metallicity profile. Close to the nucleus are multiple shocks, including a 1.9-kpc-radius inner shell-like structure and a weak 1.1-1.4 Mach number shock around the central cavities. Within a 10 kpc radius are nine depressions in surface brightness, several of which appear to be associated with radio emission. The shocks and cavities imply that the nucleus has been repeatedly active on 5-10 Myr time-scales, indicating a tight balance between heating and cooling. We confirm the presence of a series of linear quasi-periodic structures. If they are sound waves, the ˜5 kpc spacing implies a period of 6 Myr, similar to the ages of the shocks and cavities. Alternatively, these structures may be Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities, their associated turbulence or amplified magnetic field layers.

  12. Fermi-LAT and Suzaku Observations of the Radio Galaxy Centaurus B

    Katsuta, Junichiro; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Tanaka, Y.T.; /Hiroshima U.; Stawarz, L.; /JAXA, Sagamihara /Jagiellonian U., Astron. Observ.; O' Sullivan, S.P.; /Australia, CSIRO, Epping; Cheung, C.C.; /NAS, Washington, D.C.; Kataoka, J.; /Waseda U., RISE; Funk, S.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Yuasa, T.; Odaka, H.; Takahashi, T.; /JAXA, Sagamihara; Svoboda, J.; /European Space Agency

    2012-08-17

    CentaurusB is a nearby radio galaxy positioned in the Southern hemisphere close to the Galactic plane. Here we present a detailed analysis of about 43 months accumulation of Fermi-LAT data and of newly acquired Suzaku X-ray data for Centaurus B. The source is detected at GeV photon energies, although we cannot completely exclude the possibility that it is an artifact due to incorrect modeling of the bright Galactic diffuse emission in the region. The LAT image provides a weak hint of a spatial extension of the {gamma} rays along the radio lobes, which is consistent with the lack of source variability in the GeV range. We note that the extension cannot be established statistically due to the low number of the photons. Surprisingly, we do not detect any diffuse emission of the lobes at X-ray frequencies, with the provided upper limit only marginally consistent with the previously claimed ASCA flux. The broad-band modeling shows that the observed {gamma}-ray flux of the source may be produced within the lobes, if the diffuse non-thermal X-ray emission component is not significantly below the derived Suzaku upper limit. This association would imply that efficient in-situ acceleration of the ultrarelativistic particles is occurring and that the lobes are dominated by the pressure from the relativistic particles. However, if the diffuse X-ray emission is much below the Suzaku upper limits, the observed {gamma}-ray flux is not likely to be produced within the lobes, but instead within the unresolved core of Centaurus B. In this case, the extended lobes could be dominated by the pressure of the magnetic field.

  13. NGC 5011C: An Overlooked Dwarf Galaxy in the Centaurus A Group

    Saviane, Ivo; Jerjen, Helmut

    2007-04-01

    A critical study of the properties of groups of galaxies can be done only once a complete census of group members is available. Despite extensive surveys, even nearby groups can lead to surprises. Indeed, we report the discovery of a previously unnoticed member of the Centaurus A Group, NGC 5011C. While the galaxy is a well-known stellar system listed with a NGC number, its true identity has remained hidden because of coordinate confusion and wrong redshifts in the literature. NGC 5011C attracted our attention since, at a putative distance of 45.3 Mpc, it would be a peculiar object with a very low surface brightness typical of a dwarf galaxy and, at the same time, a size typical of an early-type spiral or S0 galaxy. To confirm or reject this peculiarity, our immediate objective was to have the first reliable measurement of its recession velocity. The observations were carried out with EFOSC2 at the 3.6 m European Southern Observatory (ESO) telescope, and the spectra were obtained with the instrument in long-slit mode. The redshifts of both NGC 5011C and its neighbor NGC 5011B were computed by cross-correlating their spectra with that of a radial velocity standard star. We found that NGC 5011C indeed has a low redshift of vodot = 647 ± 96 km s-1 and thus is a nearby dwarf galaxy rather than a member of the distant Centaurus cluster, as believed for the past 23 years. Rough distance estimates based on photometric parameters also favor this scenario. As a by-product of our study we update the redshift for NGC 5011B to vodot = 3227 ± 50 km s-1. Applying population synthesis techniques, we find that NGC 5011B has a luminosity-weighted age of 4 ± 1 Gyr and a solar metallicity, and that the luminosity-weighted age and metallicity of NGC 5011C are 0.9 ± 0.1 Gyr and 1/5 solar. Finally, we estimate a stellar mass of NGC 5011C comparable to that of dwarf spheroidal galaxies in the Local Group. Based on observations made with European Southern Observatory telescopes at the

  14. New Galaxies Discovered in the First Blind HI Survey of the Centaurus A Group

    Banks, G D; Knezek, P M; Jerjen, H; Barnes, D; Bhathal, R; De Blok, W J G; Boyce, P J; Ekers, R D; Freeman, K C; Gibson, B K; Henning, P; Kilborn, V A; Koribalski, B S; Kraan-Korteweg, R C; Malin, D; Minchin, R F; Mould, J; Oosterloo, T A; Price, R M; Putman, M E; Ryder, S D; Sadler, E M; Staveley-Smith, L; Stewart, I; Stootman, F; Vaile, R A; Webster, R; Wright, A E

    1999-01-01

    We have commenced a 21-cm survey of the entire southern sky (\\delta < 0 degrees, -1200 km/s < v < 12700 km/s) which is ''blind'', i.e. unbiased by previous optical information. In the present paper we report on the results of a pilot project which is based on data from this all-sky survey. The project was carried out on an area of 600 square degrees centred on the nearby Centaurus A (Cen A) group of galaxies at a mean velocity of v ~ 500 km/s. This was recently the subject of a separate and thorough optical survey. We found 10 new group members to add to the 21 galaxies already known in the Cen A group: five of these are previously uncatalogued galaxies, while five were previously catalogued but not known to be associated with the group. We found optical counterparts for all the HI detections, most of them intrinsically very faint low surface brightness dwarfs. The new group members add approximately 6% to the HI mass of the group and 4% to its light. The HI mass function, derived from all the known ...

  15. Star formation history and evolution of gas-rich dwarf galaxies in the Centaurus A group

    Grossi, M; Pritzl, B J; Knezek, P M; Gallagher, J S; Minchin, R F; Freeman, K C

    2006-01-01

    We analyse the properties of three unusual dwarf galaxies in the Centaurus A group discovered with the HIPASS survey. From their optical morphology they appear to be low surface brightness dwarf spheroidals, yet they are gas-rich (M_{HI}/L_{B} > 1) with gas-mass-to-stellar light ratios larger than typical dwarf irregular galaxies. Therefore these systems appear different from any dwarfs of the Local Group. They should be favoured hosts for starburst, whereas we find a faint star formation region in only one object. We have obtained 21-cm data and Hubble Space Telescope photometry in V and I bands, and have constructed Colour Magnitude Diagrams (CMDs) to investigate their stellar populations and to set a constraint on their age. From the comparison of the observed and model CMDs we infer that all three galaxies are at least older than 2 Gyr (possibly even as old as 10 Gyr) and remain gas-rich because their star formation rates (SFRs) have been very low (< 10^{-3} M_{sun}/yr) throughout. In such systems, sta...

  16. Active Galaxies

    Kilerci Eser, Ece

    Galaxy formation and evolution is one of the main research themes of modern astronomy. Active galaxies such as Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) and Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies (ULIRGs) are important evolutionary stages of galaxies. The ULIRG stage is mostly associated with galaxy mergers and...... interactions. During the interactions of gas-rich galaxies, the gas inflows towards the centers of the galaxies and can trigger both star formation and AGN activity. The ULIRG stage includes rapid star formation activity and fast black hole growth that is enshrouded by dust. Once the AGN emission is...... one is related to the mass estimates of supermassive black holes (SMBHs). Mass estimates of SMBHs are important to understand the formation and evolution of SMBHs and their host galaxies. Black hole masses in Type 1 AGN are measured with the reverberation mapping (RM) technique. Reverberation mapping...

  17. Thermal plasma in the giant lobes of the radio galaxy Centaurus A

    O'Sullivan, S P; McClure-Griffiths, N M; Ekers, R D; Carretti, E; Robishaw, T; Mao, S A; Gaensler, B M; Bland-Hawthorn, J; Stawarz, L

    2013-01-01

    We present a Faraday rotation measure (RM) study of the diffuse, polarized, radio emission from the giant lobes of the nearest radio galaxy, Centaurus A. After removal of the smooth Galactic foreground RM component, using an ensemble of background source RMs located outside the giant lobes, we are left with a residual RM signal associated with the giant lobes. We find the most likely origin of this residual RM is from thermal material mixed throughout the relativistic lobe plasma. The alternative possibility of a thin-skin/boundary layer of magnetoionic material swept up by the expansion of the lobes is highly unlikely since it requires, at least, an order of magnitude enhancement of the swept up gas over the expected intragroup density on these scales. Strong depolarisation observed from 2.3 to 0.96 GHz also supports the presence of a significant amount of thermal gas within the lobes; although depolarisation solely due to RM fluctuations in a foreground Faraday screen on scales smaller than the beam cannot ...

  18. Discovery of a close pair of faint dwarf galaxies in the halo of Centaurus A

    Crnojević, D; Caldwell, N; Guhathakurta, P; McLeod, B; Seth, A; Simon, J; Strader, J; Toloba, E

    2014-01-01

    As part of the Panoramic Imaging Survey of Centaurus and Sculptor (PISCeS) we report the discovery of a pair of faint dwarf galaxies (CenA-MM-Dw1 and CenA-MM-Dw2) at a projected distance of $\\sim$90 kpc from the nearby elliptical galaxy NGC5128 (CenA). We measure a tip of the red giant branch distance to each dwarf, finding $D=3.63 \\pm 0.41$ Mpc for CenA-MM-Dw1 and $D=3.60 \\pm 0.41$ Mpc for CenA-MM-Dw2, both of which are consistent with the distance to NGC5128. A qualitative analysis of the color magnitude diagrams indicates stellar populations consisting of an old, metal-poor red giant branch ($\\gtrsim 12$ Gyr, [Fe/H]$\\sim-1.7$ to -1.9). In addition, CenA-MM-Dw1 seems to host an intermediate-age population as indicated by its candidate asymptotic giant branch stars. The derived luminosities ($M_V=-10.9\\pm0.3$ for CenA-MM-Dw1 and $-8.4\\pm0.6$ for CenA-MM-Dw2) and half-light radii ($r_{h}=1.4\\pm0.04$ kpc for CenA-MM-Dw1 and $0.36\\pm0.08$ kpc for CenA-MM-Dw2) are consistent with those of Local Group dwarfs. Cen...

  19. DISCOVERY OF A CLOSE PAIR OF FAINT DWARF GALAXIES IN THE HALO OF CENTAURUS A

    As part of the Panoramic Imaging Survey of Centaurus and Sculptor (PISCeS), we report the discovery of a pair of faint dwarf galaxies (CenA-MM-Dw1 and CenA-MM-Dw2) at a projected distance of ∼90 kpc from the nearby elliptical galaxy NGC 5128 (CenA). We measure a tip of the red giant branch distance to each dwarf, finding D = 3.63 ± 0.41 Mpc for CenA-MM-Dw1 and D = 3.60 ± 0.41 Mpc for CenA-MM-Dw2, both of which are consistent with the distance to NGC 5128. A qualitative analysis of the color-magnitude diagrams indicates stellar populations consisting of an old, metal-poor red giant branch (≳12 Gyr, [Fe/H] ∼ –1.7 to –1.9). In addition, CenA-MM-Dw1 seems to host an intermediate-age population as indicated by its candidate asymptotic giant branch stars. The derived luminosities (MV = –10.9 ± 0.3 for CenA-MM-Dw1 and –8.4 ± 0.6 for CenA-MM-Dw2) and half-light radii (rh = 1.4 ± 0.04 kpc for CenA-MM-Dw1 and 0.36 ± 0.08 kpc for CenA-MM-Dw2) are consistent with those of Local Group dwarfs. CenA-MM-Dw1's low central surface brightness (μ V, 0 = 27.3 ± 0.1 mag arcsec–2) places it among the faintest and most extended M31 satellites. Most intriguingly, CenA-MM-Dw1 and CenA-MM-Dw2 have a projected separation of only 3 arcmin (∼3 kpc): we are possibly observing the first, faint satellite of a satellite in an external group of galaxies

  20. ISO Images of Starbursts and Active Galaxies

    Mirabel, I F

    1999-01-01

    We present some highlights from the mid-infrared (5-16 micron) images of mergers of massive galaxies obtained with the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). We have observed: 1) ultraluminous infrared nuclei, 2) luminous dust-enshrouded extranuclear starbursts, and 3) active galaxy nuclei (AGNs). In this contribution we discuss the observations of Arp 299, a prototype for very luminous infrared galaxies, the Antennae which is a prototype of mergers, and Centaurus A which is the closest AGN to Earth. From these observations we conclude the following: 1) the most intense starbursts in colliding systems of galaxies and the most massive stars are dust-enshrouded in regions that appear inconspicuous at optical wavelengths, 2) the most intense nuclear infrared sources are a combination of AGN and starburst activity, 3) the hosts of radio loud AGNs that trigger giant double-lobe structures may be symbiotic galaxies composed of barred spirals inside ellipticals.

  1. Centaurus A - NGC 5128

    Israel, F.P.

    1998-01-01

    This review summarizes the state of the knowledge of the nearby (D = 3.4 Mpc) radio source Centaurus A and its host galaxy NGC 5128. The massive elliptical host galaxy appears to be moderately triaxial. It contains a strongly warped thin disk, rich in gas, dust and young stars, and roughly aligned with the minor axis of the elliptical galaxy. This and other evidence suggests that NGC 5128 has experienced a major merger at least once in its past. The subparsec nucleus is variable at radio and ...

  2. Wide angle redshift survey of the Hydra-Centaurus region

    Fairall, A.P. (Cap Town Univ. (ZA). Dept. of Astronomy); Vettolani, G. (Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Bologna (IT). Gruppo Ricerche Spaziali); Chincarini, G. (Osservatorio di Brera, Milan (IT))

    1989-05-01

    Radial velocities for 266 galaxies in the region of Hydra Centaurus have been obtained. Examination of this preliminary sample allows a qualitative description of the large-scale distribution of galaxies in the region.

  3. Planck revealed bulk motion of Centaurus A lobes

    De Paolis, F; Nucita, A A; Ingrosso, G; Kashin, A L; Khachatryan, H G; Mirzoyan, S; Yegorian, G; Jetzer, Ph; Qadir, A; Vetrugno, D

    2015-01-01

    Planck data towards the active galaxy Centaurus A are analyzed in the 70, 100 and 143 GHz bands. We find a temperature asymmetry of the northern radio lobe with respect to the southern one that clearly extends at least up to 5 degrees from the Cen A center and diminishes towards the outer regions of the lobes. That transparent parameter - the temperature asymmetry - thus has to carry a principal information, i.e. indication on the line-of-sight bulk motion of the lobes, while the increase of that asymmetry at smaller radii reveals the differential dynamics of the lobes as expected at ejections from the center.

  4. A wide angle redshift survey of the Hydra-Centaurus region

    Radial velocities for 266 galaxies in the region of Hydra Centaurus have been obtained. Examination of this preliminary sample allows a qualitative description of the large-scale distribution of galaxies in the region

  5. A Comparison of the Detailed Chemical Abundances of Globular Clusters in the Milky Way, Andromeda, and Centaurus A Galaxies

    Colucci, Janet E.; Bernstein, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    We present a homogeneous analysis of high resolution spectra of globular clusters in three massive galaxies: the Milky Way, M31, and NGC 5128. We measure detailed abundance ratios for alpha, light, Fe-peak, and neutron capture elements using our technique for analyzing the integrated light spectra of globular clusters. For many of the heavy elements we provide a first look at the detailed chemistry of old populations in an early type galaxy. We discuss similarities and differences between the galaxies and the potential implications for their star formation histories.

  6. A consequence of the asymmetry of jets in quasars and active nuclei of galaxies

    Shklovsky, I. S.

    The possibility that radio emission of quasars and radio galaxies is a result of ejections of plasmoids issuing from the supercritical accretion on massive black holes at the center of galaxies is discussed. Evidence from observations of Cygnus A, Centaurus A, and Fornax A are cited to suggest that one-sided and two-sided jets occur near the center of galaxies. The ejection of a jet is shown to be a nonsymetrical event, thus allowing the possibility that all jets are one-sided, with two-sided jets actually being evidence for one remnant jet in the company of another remnant or an active event. The recoil velocity acquired by a black hole because of the ejection of plasmoids is modeled numerically. The black hole is determined to necessarily escape from the parent galaxy, which then ceases being a compact source. Short-lived quasars are therefore extinguished when super-critically accreting regimes end.

  7. The Centaurus A Northern Middle Lobe as a Buoyant Bubble

    Saxton, C J; Bicknell, G V; Saxton, Curtis J.; Sutherland, Ralph S.; Bicknell, Geoffrey V.

    2001-01-01

    We model the northern middle radio lobe of Centaurus A (NGC 5128) as a buoyant bubble of plasma deposited by an intermittently active jet. The extent of the rise of the bubble and its morphology imply that the ratio of its density to that of the surrounding ISM is less than 10^{-2}, consistent with our knowledge of extragalactic jets and minimal entrainment into the precursor radio lobe. Using the morphology of the lobe to date the beginning of its rise through the atmosphere of Centaurus A, we conclude that the bubble has been rising for approximately 140Myr. This time scale is consistent with that proposed by Quillen et al. (1993) for the settling of post-merger gas into the presently observed large scale disk in NGC 5128, suggesting a strong connection between the delayed re-establishment of radio emission and the merger of NGC 5128 with a small gas-rich galaxy. This suggests a connection, for radio galaxies in general, between mergers and the delayed onset of radio emission. In our model, the elongated X-...

  8. Nuclear Water Maser Emission in Centaurus A

    Ott, Juergen; McCoy, Mark; Peck, Alison; Impellizzeri, Violette; Brunthaler, Andreas; Walter, Fabian; Edwards, Philip; Anderson, Crystal N; Henkel, Christian; Feain, Ilana; Mao, Minnie

    2013-01-01

    We report the detection of a 22GHz water maser line in the nearest (D~3.8Mpc) radio galaxy Centaurus A using the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA). The line is centered at a velocity of ~960kms-1, which is redshifted by about 400kms-1 from the systemic velocity. Such an offset, as well as the width of ~120kms-1, could be consistent with either a nuclear maser arising from an accretion disk of the central supermassive black hole, or for a jet maser that is emitted from the material that is shocked near the base of the jet in Centaurus\\,A. The best spatial resolution of our ATCA data constrains the origin of the maser feature within 10cm-3, which indicates substantial mass entrainment of surrounding gas into the propagating jet material.

  9. Centaurus A : Morphology and kinematics of the atomic hydrogen

    Struve, C.; Oosterloo, T. A.; Morganti, R.; Saripalli, L.

    2010-01-01

    We present new ATCA 21-cm line observations of the neutral hydrogen in the nearby radio galaxy Centaurus A. We image in detail (with a resolution down to 7 '', similar to 100 pc) the distribution of HI along the dust lane. Our data have better velocity resolution and better sensitivity than previous

  10. Infrared studies of active galaxies

    IRAS observations of extragalactic objects are analyzed, supplemented by optical spectroscopy and 10 μm photometry. The relationship between various forms of activity in the nuclei of spiral galaxies and their mid- to far-infrared spectral energy distributions is explored. It is shown that more than 70% of galaxies with F60/F25 ≤ 3 are Seyferts, while the remainder have bright optical emission lines in their nuclear spectra. It is argued that most Seyferts are powered by their active nuclei at 25 μm, while there is some indication that Seyferts with large F60/F25 flux ratios are undergoing starbursts in the vicinity of their nuclei. The properties of a sample of bright, extragalactic IRAS sources are studied. A catalog containing total infrared and blue fluxes, distance estimates, recession velocities, and morphological classifications for these objects is presented. The brightest sources at mid- to far-infrared wavelengths are nearby, normal spiral galaxies; galaxies with disturbed or irregular morphology (often known as interacting galaxies); type 2 Seyferts; and dust-embedded type 1 Seyferts. All of these sources are dominated by thermal emission from dust. The dust in the peculiar, irregular, and Seyfert galaxies is exposed to a higher mean intensity of radiation. Moreover, these IR-active galaxies tend to have strong, compact nuclear sources at 11 μm, whether or not they contain a known Seyfert nucleus. The distinctive spectral behavior of IR-luminous galaxies is shown to result from the presence of compact, dust-dominated IR nuclear sources, which are the predominant cause of IR luminosities above 1011 L of sun

  11. Nuclear Activity In Isolated Galaxies

    Hernandez-Ibarra, Francisco; Krongold, Yair; Del Olmo, Ascencion; Perea, Jaime; Gonzalez, Jesus

    2012-01-01

    We present a spectroscopic study of the incidence of AGN nuclear activity in two samples of isolated galaxies (Karachentseva, V.E. & Varela, J.). Our results show that the incidence of non-thermal nuclear activity is about 43% and 31% for galaxies with emission lines and for the total sample 40% and 27% respectively. For the first time we have a large number of bona-fide isolated galaxies (513 objects), with statistically significant number of all types. We find a clear relation between bulge mass and the incidence of nuclear activity in the sample with emission lines. This relation becomes flatter when we take into account the complete sample with no emission line galaxies. A large fration ($\\sim$70%) of elliptical galaxies or early type spirals have an active galactic nucleus and $\\sim$70% of them are LINERs. Only 3% of the AGN show the presence of broad lines (a not a single one can be classified as type 1 AGN). This is a remarkable result which is completely at odds with the unified model even if we c...

  12. Sub-parsec scale imaging of Centaurus A

    Müller, Cornelia; Ojhas, R; Böck, M; Fromm, C M; Ros, E; Rothschild, R E; Wilms, J

    2010-01-01

    At a distance of about 3.4 Mpc, the radio galaxy Centaurus A is the closest active galaxy. Therefore it is a key target for studying the innermost regions of active galactic nuclei (AGN). VLBI observations conducted within the framework of the TANAMI program enable us to study the central region of the Cen A jet with some of the highest linear resolutions ever achieved in an AGN. This region is the likely origin of the gamma-ray emission recently detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). TANAMI monitors a sample of radio and gamma-ray selected extragalactic jets south of -30 degrees declination at 8.4 GHz and 22.3 GHz with the Australian Long Baseline Array (LBA) and the transoceanic antennas Hartebeesthoek in South Africa, the 6 m Transportable Integrated Geodetic Observatory (TIGO) in Chile and the 9 m German Antarctic Receiving Station (GARS) in O'Higgins, Antarctica. The highest angular resolution achieved at 8.4 GHz in the case of Cen A is 0.59mas x 0.978mas (natural weighting) corresponding to a...

  13. Star formation efficiency in the outer filaments of Centaurus A

    Salomé, Q.; Salomé, P.; Combes, F.; Hamer, S.; Heywood, I.

    2015-12-01

    We present a multi-wavelength study of the northern filaments of Centaurus A (at a distance of ˜ 20 kpc from the galaxy center) based on FUV (GALEX), FIR (Herschel) and CO (SEST and ALMA) emission. We also searched for HCN and HCO^+ (ATCA) and observed optical emission lines (VLT/MUSE) in different places of the filament. An upper limit of the dense gas of L'_{HCN}inhibits star formation.

  14. Quasars and Active Galaxies: A Reading List.

    Fraknoi, Andrew

    1988-01-01

    Contains the annotated bibliographies of introductory books and sections of books, recent introductory articles, more advanced articles, and more advanced books dealing with quasars and active galaxies. (CW)

  15. Two Planes of Satellites in the Centaurus A Group

    Tully, R Brent; Karachentsev, Igor D; Karachentseva, Valentina E; Rizzi, Luca; Shaya, Edward J

    2015-01-01

    Tip of the red giant branch measurements based on Hubble Space Telescope and ground-based imaging have resulted in accurate distances to 29 galaxies in the nearby Centaurus A Group. All but two of the 29 galaxies lie in either of two thin planes roughly parallel with the supergalactic equator. The planes are only slightly tilted from the line-of-sight, leaving little ambiguity regarding the morphology of the structure. The planes have characteristic r.m.s. long axis dimensions of ~300 kpc and short axis dimensions of ~60 kpc, hence axial ratios ~0.2, and are separated in the short axis direction by 303 kpc.

  16. Two Planes of Satellites in the Centaurus A Group

    Tully, R. Brent; Libeskind, Noam I.; Karachentsev, Igor D.; Karachentseva, Valentina E.; Rizzi, Luca; Shaya, Edward J.

    2015-04-01

    Tip of the red giant branch measurements based on Hubble Space Telescope and ground-based imaging have resulted in accurate distances to 29 galaxies in the nearby Centaurus A Group. All but 2 of the 29 galaxies lie in either of two thin planes roughly parallel with the supergalactic equator. The planes are only slightly tilted from the line of sight, leaving little ambiguity regarding the morphology of the structure. The planes have characteristic rms long axis dimensions of ∼300 kpc and short axis dimensions of ∼60 kpc, hence axial ratios ∼0.2, and are separated in the short axis direction by 303 kpc.

  17. The Complex North Transition Region of Centaurus A: A Galactic Wind

    Neff, Susan G; Owen, Frazer N

    2015-01-01

    We present deep GALEX images of NGC 5128, the parent galaxy of Centaurus A. We detect a striking "weather ribbon" of Far-UV and H$\\alpha$ emission, which extends more than 35 kpc northeast of the galaxy. The ribbon is associated with a knotty ridge of radio/X-ray emission, and is an extension of the previously known string of optical emission-line filaments. Many phenomena in the region are too short-lived to have survived transit out from the inner galaxy; something must be driving them locally. We also detect Far-UV emission from the galaxy's central dust lane. Combining this with previous radio and Far-IR measurements, we infer an active starburst in the central galaxy, which is currently forming stars at $\\sim 2 M_{sun}$yr$^{-1}$, and has been doing so for 50-100Myr. If the wind from this starburst is enhanced by energy and mass driven out from the AGN, the powerful augmented wind can be the driver needed for the northern weather system. We argue that both the diverse weather system, and the enhanced radi...

  18. Large peculiar velocities in the Hydra-Centaurus supercluster

    Distances from the infrared Tully-Fisher relation have been obtained with the Parkes radio telescope for six clusters of galaxies in the Hydra-Centaurus supercluster. Three of these clusters show significant positive peculiar velocities of order 500 km/s in a comoving reference frame in which the observer is at rest with respect to the cosmic microwave background radiation. The net peculiar velocity of the sample suggests that Hydra-Centaurus tends to share the motion of the Local Group in this reference frame. The data also fit a model in which two mass concentrations, one at Virgo and one just beyond the centroid of the Parkes sample, perturb the Hubble flow. 54 references

  19. Large peculiar velocities in the Hydra-Centaurus supercluster

    Bothun, G.D.; Cornell, M.E.; Dawe, J.A.; Dickens, R.J.; Aaronson, M.

    1989-03-01

    Distances from the infrared Tully-Fisher relation have been obtained with the Parkes radio telescope for six clusters of galaxies in the Hydra-Centaurus supercluster. Three of these clusters show significant positive peculiar velocities of order 500 km/s in a comoving reference frame in which the observer is at rest with respect to the cosmic microwave background radiation. The net peculiar velocity of the sample suggests that Hydra-Centaurus tends to share the motion of the Local Group in this reference frame. The data also fit a model in which two mass concentrations, one at Virgo and one just beyond the centroid of the Parkes sample, perturb the Hubble flow. 54 references.

  20. The Complex North Transition Region of Centaurus A: Radio Structure

    Neff, Susan G; Owen, Frazer N

    2015-01-01

    We present deep radio images of the inner 50 kpc of Centaurus A, taken with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) at 90cm. We focus on the Transition Regions between the inner galaxy - including the active nucleus, inner radio lobes, and star-forming disk - and the outer radio lobes. We detect previously unknown extended emission around the Inner Lobes, including radio emission from the star-forming disk. We find that the radio-loud part of the North Transition Region, known as the North Middle Lobe, is significantly overpressured relative to the surrounding ISM. We see no evidence for a collimated flow from the Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) through this region. Our images show that the structure identified by Morganti et al. (1999) as a possible large-scale jet appears to be part of a narrow ridge of emission within the broader, diffuse, radio-loud region. This knotty radio ridge is coincident with other striking phenomena: compact X-ray knots, ionized gas filaments, and streams of young stars. Several s...

  1. The extended halo of Centaurus A: uncovering satellites, streams and substructures

    Crnojević, D; Spekkens, K; Caldwell, N; Guhathakurta, P; McLeod, B; Seth, A; Simon, J; Strader, J; Toloba, E

    2015-01-01

    We present the widest-field resolved stellar map to date of the closest ($D\\sim3.8$ Mpc) massive elliptical galaxy NGC 5128 (Centaurus A; Cen A), extending out to a projected galactocentric radius of $\\sim150$ kpc. The dataset is part of our ongoing Panoramic Imaging Survey of Centaurus and Sculptor (PISCeS) utilizing the Magellan/Megacam imager. We resolve a population of old red giant branch stars down to $\\sim1.5$ mag below the tip of the red giant branch, reaching surface brightness limits as low as $\\mu_{V,0}\\sim32$ mag arcsec$^{-2}$. The resulting spatial stellar density map highlights a plethora of previously unknown streams, shells, and satellites, including the first tidally disrupting dwarf around Cen A, which underline its active accretion history. We report 13 previously unknown dwarf satellite candidates, of which 9 are confirmed to be at the distance of Cen A (the remaining 4 are not resolved into stars), with magnitudes in the range $M_V=-7.2$ to $-13.0$, central surface brightness values of $\\...

  2. DISCOVERY OF NUCLEAR WATER MASER EMISSION IN CENTAURUS A

    We report the detection of a 22 GHz water maser line in the nearest (D ∼ 3.8 Mpc) radio galaxy Centaurus A (Cen A) using the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA). The line is centered at a velocity of ∼960 km s–1, which is redshifted by about 415 km s–1 from the systemic velocity. Such an offset, as well as the width of ∼120 km s–1, could be consistent with either a nuclear maser arising from an accretion disk of the central supermassive black hole (SMBH), or with a jet maser that is emitted from the material that is shocked near the base of the jet in Cen A. The best spatial resolution of our ATCA data constrains the origin of the maser feature within ☉, which classifies it as a kilomaser, and appears to be variable on timescales of months. A kilomaser can also be emitted by shocked gas in star-forming regions. Given the small projected distance from the core, the large offset from systemic velocity, and the smoothness of the line feature, we conclude that a jet maser line emitted by shocked gas around the base of the active galactic nucleus is the most likely explanation. For this scenario we can infer a minimum density of the radio jet of ∼> 10 cm–3, which indicates substantial mass entrainment of surrounding gas into the propagating jet material.

  3. Suzaku Observations of Metal Distributions in the Intracluster Medium of the Centaurus Cluster

    Sakuma, Eri; Sato, Kosuke; Sato, Takuya; Matsushita, Kyoko

    2011-01-01

    We report the first observations of metal distributions in the intracluster medium of the Centaurus cluster up to ~0.17 r_180 with Suzaku. Radial profiles of the O, Mg, Si, S, Ar, Ca, and Fe were determined at the outer region of the cluster, and their variations appear to be similar to each other. Within the cool core region (r0.07 r_180), all the abundances were almost constant at 0.5 solar. The derived MLRs were comparable to those of the other clusters. This suggests that the cD galaxy of the Centaurus cluster efficiently supplies more Fe than the other clusters.

  4. Nuclear Activity in Circumnuclear Ring Galaxies

    Aguero, M P; Dottori, H

    2016-01-01

    We have analyzed the frequency and properties of the nuclear activity in a sample of galaxies with circumnuclear rings and spirals (CNRs). This sample was compared with a control sample of galaxies with very similar global properties but without circumnuclear rings. We discuss the relevance of the results in regard to the AGN feeding processes and present the following results: (i) bright companion galaxies seem not to be important for the appearance of CNRs, which appear to be more related to intrinsic properties of the host galaxies or to minor merger processes; (ii) the proportion of strong bars in galaxies with an AGN and a CNR is somewhat higher than the expected ratio of strongly barred AGN galaxies from the results of Ho and co-workers; (iii) the incidence of Seyfert activity coeval with CNRs is clearly larger than the rate expected from the morphological distribution of the host galaxies; (iv) the rate of Sy 2 to Sy 1 type galaxies with CNRs is about three times larger than the expected ratio for gala...

  5. The Extended Halo of Centaurus A: Uncovering Satellites, Streams, and Substructures

    Crnojević, D.; Sand, D. J.; Spekkens, K.; Caldwell, N.; Guhathakurta, P.; McLeod, B.; Seth, A.; Simon, J. D.; Strader, J.; Toloba, E.

    2016-05-01

    We present the widest-field resolved stellar map to date of the closest (D∼ 3.8 Mpc) massive elliptical galaxy NGC 5128 (Centaurus A; Cen A), extending out to a projected galactocentric radius of ∼150 kpc. The data set is part of our ongoing Panoramic Imaging Survey of Centaurus and Sculptor (PISCeS) utilizing the Magellan/Megacam imager. We resolve a population of old red giant branch (RGB) stars down to ∼1.5 mag below the tip of the RGB, reaching surface brightness limits as low as {μ }V,0∼ 32 mag arcsec‑2. The resulting spatial stellar density map highlights a plethora of previously unknown streams, shells, and satellites, including the first tidally disrupting dwarf around Cen A (CenA-MM-Dw3), which underline its active accretion history. We report 13 previously unknown dwarf satellite candidates, of which 9 are confirmed to be at the distance of Cen A (the remaining 4 are not resolved into stars), with magnitudes in the range {M}V=-7.2 to ‑13.0, central surface brightness values of {μ }V,0=25.4{--}26.9 mag arcsec‑2, and half-light radii of {r}h=0.22{--}2.92 {{kpc}}. These values are in line with Local Group dwarfs but also lie at the faint/diffuse end of their distribution; interestingly, CenA-MM-Dw3 has similar properties to the recently discovered ultradiffuse galaxies in Virgo and Coma. Most of the new dwarfs are fainter than the previously known Cen A satellites. The newly discovered dwarfs and halo substructures are discussed in light of their stellar populations, and they are compared to those discovered by the PAndAS survey of M31. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  6. The outer filament of Centaurus A as seen by MUSE

    Santoro, F.; Oonk, J. B. R.; Morganti, R.; Oosterloo, T. A.; Tremblay, G.

    2015-03-01

    Context. Radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGN) are known to inject kinetic energy into the surrounding interstellar medium (ISM) of their host galaxy via plasma jets. Understanding the impact that these flows can have on the host galaxy helps to characterize a crucial phase in their evolution. Because of its proximity, Centaurus A is an excellent laboratory in which the physics of the coupling of jet mechanical energy to the surrounding medium may be investigated. About 15 kpc northeast of this galaxy, a particularly complex region is found: the so-called outer filament, where jet-cloud interactions have been proposed to occur. Aims: We investigate signatures of a jet-ISM interaction using optical integral-field observations of this region, expanding on previous results that were obtained on a more limited area. Methods: Using the Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) on the VLT during the science verification period, we observed two regions that together cover a significant fraction of the brighter emitting gas across the outer filament. Emission from a number of lines, among which Hβλ4861 Å, [ O iii ] λλ4959,5007 Å, Hαλ6563 Å, and [ N ii ] λλ6548,6584 Å, is detected in both regions. Results: The ionized gas shows a complex morphology with compact blobs, arc-like structures, and diffuse emission. Based on the kinematics, we identified three main components of ionized gas. Interestingly, their morphology is very different. The more collimated component is oriented along the direction of the radio jet. The other two components exhibit a diffuse morphology together with arc-like structures, which are also oriented along the radio jet direction. Furthermore, the ionization level of the gas, as traced by the [O iii]λ5007/Hβ ratio, is found to decrease from the more collimated component to the more diffuse components. Conclusions: The morphology and velocities of the more collimated component confirm the results of our previous study, which was

  7. AGN Zoo and Classifications of Active Galaxies

    Mickaelian, Areg M.

    2015-07-01

    We review the variety of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) classes (so-called "AGN zoo") and classification schemes of galaxies by activity types based on their optical emission-line spectrum, as well as other parameters and other than optical wavelength ranges. A historical overview of discoveries of various types of active galaxies is given, including Seyfert galaxies, radio galaxies, QSOs, BL Lacertae objects, Starbursts, LINERs, etc. Various kinds of AGN diagnostics are discussed. All known AGN types and subtypes are presented and described to have a homogeneous classification scheme based on the optical emission-line spectra and in many cases, also other parameters. Problems connected with accurate classifications and open questions related to AGN and their classes are discussed and summarized.

  8. Lithium in the Upper Centaurus Lupus and Lower Centaurus Crux Subgroups of Scorpius-Centaurus

    Bubar, Eric J; King, Jeremy R; Mamajek, Eric E; Stauffer, John R

    2011-01-01

    We utilize spectroscopically derived model atmosphere parameters and the \\ion{Li}{1} $\\lambda6104$ subordinate line and the $\\lambda6708$ doublet to derive lithium abundances for 12 members of the Upper-Centaurus Lupus (UCL) and Lower-Centaurus Crux (LCC) subgroups of the Scorpius Centaurus OB Association. The results indicate any intrinsic Li scatter in our 0.9-1.4 $M_{\\odot}$ stars is limited to ${\\sim}0.15$ dex, consistent with the lack of dispersion in ${\\ge}1.0$ $M_{\\odot}$ stars in the 100 Myr Pleiades and 30-50 Myr IC 2391 and 2602 clusters. Both ab initio uncertainty estimates and the derived abundances themselves indicate that the $\\lambda$6104 line yields abundances with equivalent or less scatter than is found from the $\\lambda$6708 doublet as a result of lower uncertainties for the subordinate feature, a result of low sensitivity to broadening in the subordinate feature. Because NLTE corrections are less susceptible to changes in surface gravity and/or metallicity for the 6104 {\\AA} line, the subo...

  9. Origin of the dipole anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background: beyond the Hydra-Centaurus supercluster

    Melnick, J.; Moles, M.

    1987-05-01

    The authors discuss the properties of a large concentration of galaxies located in the direction of the Centaurus cluster but at a much larger distance. They find that the majority of the faint galaxies in the region are clustered around cz approx. 14,000 kmsec and define a rich supercluster having a dynamical mass close to 2.5 x 10/sup 15/ M/sub sun/. They show that this mass is not sufficient to explain the peculiar velocity of approx. 600 kmsec of the Local Group with respect to the cosmic microwave background in the general direction of Centaurus. They find no luminous galaxies in the redshift range 6000-8000 kmsec in that direction. This implies that any mass overdensity related to the anisotropy of the Hubble flow must be either dark, hidden by the galactic plane or considerably more distant than 14,000 kmsec. 11 references, 2 figures, 2 tables

  10. Fugitive stars in active galaxies

    Zotos, Euaggelos E

    2016-01-01

    We investigate in detail the escape dynamics in an analytical gravitational model which describes the motion of stars in a quasar galaxy with a disk and a massive nucleus. We conduct a thorough numerical analysis distinguishing between regular and chaotic orbits as well as between trapped and escaping orbits, considering only unbounded motion for several energy levels. In order to distinguish safely and with certainty between ordered and chaotic motion we apply the Smaller ALingment Index (SALI) method. It is of particular interest to locate the escape basins through the openings around the collinear Lagrangian points $L_1$ and $L_2$ and relate them with the corresponding spatial distribution of the escape times of the orbits. Our exploration takes place both in the configuration $(x,y)$ and in the phase $(x,\\dot{x})$ space in order to elucidate the escape process as well as the overall orbital properties of the galactic system. Our numerical analysis reveals the strong dependence of the properties of the con...

  11. A Radio Search for UHE Particles from Centaurus A

    Ekers, Ron; Phillips, Chris; Reynolds, John; Protheroe, Ray; McFadden, Rebecca; James, Clancy; Roberts, Paul; Bray, Justin

    2011-04-01

    The origin of ultra-high energy (UHE) cosmic rays is a long-standing unsolved mystery in astrophysics. Recent results from the Pierre Auger Observatory hint that the radio galaxy Centaurus A is a possible source, but are limited by the fact that cosmic rays follow curved paths in magnetic fields. The detection of a UHE neutrino from Centaurus A would be definitive evidence in favour of it being a source, as the processes that accelerate cosmic rays are also expected to produce neutrinos, which travel in straight lines. Our collaboration employs the lunar Cherenkov technique for neutrino detection, in which we search for a nanosecond-scale pulse at ~GHz frequencies from the particle shower induced by a neutrino interacting in the upper layers of the Moon. The greatest difficulty in this technique is distinguishing such pulses from transient RFI. By observing simultaneously with Parkes and the ATCA, as we propose, we should be able to perfectly distinguish between a pulse from an interacting neutrino (visible to both telescopes) and a pulse from local RFI (visible to only one telescope).

  12. LITHIUM IN THE UPPER CENTAURUS LUPUS AND LOWER CENTAURUS CRUX SUBGROUPS OF SCORPIUS-CENTAURUS

    Bubar, Eric J. [Department of Biology and Physical Sciences, Marymount University, Arlington, VA 22207 (United States); Schaeuble, Marc; King, Jeremy R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29630-0978 (United States); Mamajek, Eric E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627-0171 (United States); Stauffer, John R. [Spitzer Science Center, Caltech, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2011-12-15

    We utilize spectroscopically derived model atmosphere parameters and the Li I {lambda}6104 subordinate line and the {lambda}6708 doublet to derive lithium abundances for 12 members of the Upper Centaurus Lupus and Lower Centaurus Crux subgroups of the Scorpius-Centaurus OB Association. The results indicate any intrinsic Li scatter in our 0.9-1.4 M{sub Sun} stars is limited to {approx}0.15 dex, consistent with the lack of dispersion in {>=}1.0 M{sub Sun} stars in the 100 Myr Pleiades and 30-50 Myr IC 2391 and 2602 clusters. Both ab initio uncertainty estimates and the derived abundances themselves indicate that the {lambda}6104 line yields abundances with equivalent or less scatter than is found from the {lambda}6708 doublet as a result of lower uncertainties for the subordinate feature, a result of low sensitivity to broadening in the subordinate feature. Because non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) corrections are less susceptible to changes in surface gravity and/or metallicity for the 6104 A line, the subordinate Li feature is preferred for deriving lithium abundances in young Li-rich stellar association stars with T{sub eff} {>=} 5200 K. At these temperatures, we find no difference between the Li abundances derived from the two Li I lines. For cooler stars, having temperatures at which main-sequence dwarfs show abundance patterns indicating overexcitation and overionization, the {lambda}6104-based Li abundances are {approx}0.4 dex lower than those derived from the {lambda}6708 doublet. The trends of the abundances from each feature with T{sub eff} suggest that this difference is due to (near)UV photoionization, which in NLTE preferentially ionizes Li atoms in the subordinate 2p state relative to the 2s resonance line state due to opacity effects. Consequently, this overionization of Li in the 2p state, apparently not adequately accounted for in NLTE corrections, weakens the {lambda}6104 feature in cooler stars. Accordingly, the {lambda}6708-based

  13. The Frequency of Active and Quiescent Galaxies with Companions

    Schmitt, H R

    2002-01-01

    We study the percentage of active, HII and quiescent galaxies with companions in the Palomar survey. We find that when we separate the galaxies by their morphological types (ellipticals or spirals), to avoid morphology-density effects, there is no difference in the percentage of galaxies with companions among the different activity types.

  14. A Supermassive Black Hole in a Nearby Galaxy

    2001-03-01

    not know, however, that this beautiful and spectacular appearance is due to an opaque dust lane that covers the central part of the galaxy. This dust is likely the remain of a cosmic merger between a giant elliptical galaxy, and a smaller spiral galaxy full of dust. Centaurus A is even more spectacular when observed with radio telescopes. It is in fact one of the brightest radio sources in the sky (its name indicates that it is the strongest radio source in the southern constellation Centaurus). At a distance of merely 11 million light-years, it is also the nearest radio galaxy. The radio emission from the very compact centre exhibits strong activity. It has for some time been suspected that this powerful energy release is due to accretion of material onto a massive black hole. The details of the centre have remained largely unknown, due to the dense dust lane that completely obscures the central part of the galaxy in optical light, cf. PR Photo 08a/01 . Observations of the dust emission in the mid-infrared spectral region were carried out with the ISOCAM camera onboard the ESA Infrared Space Observatory . They revealed a structure extending over 5 arcmin (16,500 light-years or 5 kpc), centred on the compact radio source, and very similar to that of a small barred galaxy. This bar may serve to funnel gas towards the active nucleus of the galaxy. Peering through the dust To look into the very centre of the galaxy, the observations must be carried out at wavelengths longer than those of visual light, e.g., in the infrared spectral region. This is because the dust absorbs much less the infrared radiation. Infrared observations of the innermost regions (of Centaurus A (on an arcsec scale) were recently done by a team of astronomers from Italy, UK and USA [1], by means of the multi-mode ISAAC instrument on the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) at Paranal Observatory. In fact, the team started their infrared studies of this galaxy already in 1997, using the NICMOS camera on

  15. Dual-Frequency VLBI Study of Centaurus A on Sub-Parsec Scales: The Highest-Resolution View of an Extragalactic Jet

    Mueller, C.; Kadler, M.; Ojha, R.; Wilms, J.; Boeck, M.; Edwards, P.; Fromm, C. M.; Hase, H.; Horiuchi, S.; Katz, U.; Lovell, J. E. J.; Ploetz, C.; Pursimo, T.; Richers, S.; Ros, E.; Rothschild, R. E.; Taylor, G. B.; Tingay, S. J.; Zensus, J. A.

    2011-01-01

    Centaurus A is the closest active galactic nucleus. High resolution imaging using Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) enables us to study the spectral and kinematic behavior of the radio jet-<:ounterjet system on sub-parsec scales, providing essential information for jet emission and formation models. Aims. Our aim is to study the structure and spectral shape of the emission from the central-parsec region of Cen A. Methods. As a target of the Southern Hemisphere VLBI monitoring program TANAMI (Tracking Active Galactic Nuclei with Millliarcsecond Interferometry), VLBI observations of Cen A are made regularly at 8.4 and 22.3 GHz with the Australian Long Baseline Array (LBA) and associated telescopes in Antarctica, Chile, and South Africa. Results. The first dual-frequency images of this source are presented along with the resulting spectral index map. An angular resolution of 0.4 mas x 0.7 mas is achieved at 8.4 GHz, corresponding to a linear scale of less than 0.013 pc. Hence, we obtain the highest resolution VLBI image of Cen A, comparable to previous space-VLBI observations. By combining with the 22.3 GHz image, we present the corresponding dual-frequency spectral index distribution along the sub-parsec scale jet revealing the putative emission regions for recently detected y-rays from the core region by Fermi/LAT. Conclusions. We resolve the innermost structure of the milliarcsecond scale jet and counter jet system of Cen A into discrete components. The simultaneous observations at two frequencies provide the highest resolved spectral index map of an AGN jet allowing us to identify up to four possible sites as the origin of the high energy emission. Key words. galaxies: active galaxies: individual (Centaurus A, NGC 5128) - galaxies: jets - techniques: high angular resolution

  16. RXTE monitoring of Centaurus A

    Benlloch, S; Wilms, J; Reynolds, C S; Heindl, W A; Staubert, R

    2001-01-01

    We report on the analysis from ~110 ks of X-ray observations of Centaurus A carried out with the Proportional Counter Array (PCA) and the High Energy X-ray Timing Experiment (HEXTE) instruments on Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) during three monitoring campaigns over the last 4 years (10 ks in 1996, 74 ks in 1998, and 25 ks in 2000). The joint PCA/HEXTE X-ray spectrum can be well described by a heavily absorbed power law with photon index 1.8 and a narrow iron line due to fluorescence of cold matter. The measured column depth decreased by about 30% between 1996 and 2000, while the detected 2-10 keV continuum flux remained constant between 1996 and 1998, but increased by 60% in 2000. Since in all three observations the iron line flux did not vary, a corresponding decrease in equivalent width was noted. No appreciable evidence for a reflection continuum in the spectrum was detected. We present the interpretation of the iron line strength through Monte Carlo computations of various geometries. No significant ...

  17. Emission Line Galaxies and Active Galactic Nuclei in WINGS clusters

    Marziani, P; Bettoni, D; Poggianti, B M; Moretti, A; Fasano, G; Fritz, J; Cava, A; Varela, J; Omizzolo, A

    2016-01-01

    We present the analysis of the emission line galaxies members of 46 low redshift (0.04 < z < 0.07) clusters observed by WINGS (WIde-field Nearby Galaxy cluster Survey, Fasano et al. 2006). Emission line galaxies were identified following criteria that are meant to minimize biases against non-star forming galaxies and classified employing diagnostic diagrams. We have examined the emission line properties and frequencies of star forming galaxies, transition objects and active galactic nuclei (AGNs: LINERs and Seyferts), unclassified galaxies with emission lines, and quiescent galaxies with no detectable line emission. A deficit of emission line galaxies in the cluster environment is indicated by both a lower frequency with respect to control samples, and by a systematically lower Balmer emission line equivalent width and luminosity (up to one order of magnitude in equivalent width with respect to control samples for transition objects) that implies a lower amount of ionised gas per unit mass and a lower s...

  18. Analysis of nuclear activity of ten polar ring galaxies

    Freitas-Lemes, P; Dors, O L; Faúndez-Abans, M

    2013-01-01

    The accumulation of mass from the interaction process that forms the polar ring galaxies is a factor that favors the conditions necessary to trigger nonthermal nuclear activities.. This fact encouraged the chemical analysis of ten polar ring galaxies. In order to verify the presence of an active nucleus in these galaxias, we built diagnostic diagrams using lines H{\\beta}, [OIII], [HI], H{\\alpha}, [NII], and [SII] and classified the type of nuclear activity. For galaxies that do not show shock, the parameters N2 and O3N2 were also determined. From this sample, we identified seven galaxies with an active nucleus and three that behave as HII regions. One galaxy with an active nucleus was classified as Seyfert. Although our data do not provide a statistically significant sample, we can speculate that polar ring galaxies are a setting conducive to trigger non-thermal nuclear activities.

  19. The role of active galactic nuclei in galaxy formation

    Thomas, P A

    2009-01-01

    We use Monte-Carlo Markov chain techniques to constrain acceptable parameter regions for the Munich L-Galaxies semi-analytic galaxy formation model. Feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN) is required to limit star-formation in the most massive galaxies. However, we show that the introduction of tidal stripping of dwarf galaxies as they fall into and merge with their host systems can lead to a reduction in the required degree of AGN feedback. In addition, the new model correctly reproduces both the metallicity of large galaxies and the fraction of intracluster light.

  20. Consequences of a possible jet-star interaction in the inner central parsec of Centaurus A

    Müller, C; Mannheim, K; Perucho, M; Ojha, R; Ros, E; Schulz, R; Wilms, J

    2015-01-01

    The jet-counterjet system of the closest radio-loud active galaxy Centaurus A (Cen A) can be studied with Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) on unprecedented small linear scales of ~0.018pc. These high-resolution observations provide essential information on jet emission and propagation within the inner parsec of an AGN jet. We present the results of a kinematic study performed within the framework of the Southern-hemisphere AGN monitoring program TANAMI. Over 3.5years, the evolution of the central-parsec jet structure of Cen A was monitored with VLBI. These observations reveal complex jet dynamics which are well explained by a spine-sheath structure supported by the downstream acceleration occurring where the jet becomes optically thin. Both moving and stationary jet features are tracked. A persistent local minimum in surface brightness suggests the presence of an obstacle interrupting the jet flow, which can be explained by the interaction of the jet with a star at a distance of ~0.4pc from the centra...

  1. TANAMI monitoring of Centaurus A: The complex dynamics within the inner parsec of an extragalactic jet

    Müller, C; Ojha, R; Perucho, M; Großberger, C; Ros, E; Wilms, J; Blanchard, J; Böck, M; Carpenter, B; Dutka, M; Edwards, P G; Hase, H; Horiuchi, S; Kreikenbohm, A; Lovell, J E J; Markowitz, A; Phillips, C; Plötz, C; Pursimo, T; Quick, J; Rothschild, R; Schulz, R; Steinbring, T; Stevens, J; Trüstedt, J; Tzioumis, A K

    2014-01-01

    Centaurus A is the closest radio-loud active galaxy. Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) enables us to study the jet-counterjet system on milliarcsecond (mas) scales, providing essential information for jet emission and propagation models. We study the evolution of the central parsec jet structure of Cen A over 3.5 years. The proper motion analysis of individual jet components allows us to constrain jet formation and propagation and to test the proposed correlation of increased high energy flux with jet ejection events. Cen A is an exceptional laboratory for such detailed study as its proximity translates to unrivaled linear resolution, where 1 mas corresponds to 0.018 pc. The first 7 epochs of high-resolution TANAMI VLBI observations at 8 GHz of Cen A are presented, resolving the jet on (sub-)mas scales. They show a differential motion of the sub-pc scale jet with significantly higher component speeds further downstream where the jet becomes optically thin. We determined apparent component speeds within...

  2. Consequences of a possible jet-star interaction in the inner central parsec of Centaurus A

    Mueller, C.; Kadler, M.; Mannheim, K.; Perucho, M.; Ojha, R.; Ros, E.; Schulz, R.; Wilms, J.

    The jet-counterjet system of the closest radio-loud active galaxy Centaurus A (Cen A) can be studied with Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) on unprecedented small linear scales of ~0.018 pc. These high-resolution observations provide essential information on jet emission and propagation within the inner parsec of an AGN jet. We present the results of a kinematic study performed within the framework of the Southern-hemisphere AGN monitoring program TANAMI. Over 3.5 years, the evolution of the central-parsec jet structure of Cen A was monitored with VLBI. These observations reveal complex jet dynamics which are well explained by a spine-sheath structure supported by the downstream acceleration occurring where the jet becomes optically thin. Both moving and stationary jet features are tracked. A persistent local minimum in surface brightness suggests the presence of an obstacle interrupting the jet flow, which can be explained by the interaction of the jet with a star at a distance of ~0.4 pc from the central black hole. We briefly discuss possible implications of such an interaction regarding the expected neutrino and high-energy emission and the effect on a putative planet.

  3. HST imaging of the dusty filaments and nucleus swirl in NGC4696 at the centre of the Centaurus Cluster

    Fabian, A C; Russell, H R; Pinto, C; Canning, R E A; Salome, P; Sanders, J S; Taylor, G B; Zweibel, E G; Conselice, C J; Combes, F; Crawford, C S; Ferland, G J; Gallagher, J S; Hatch, N A; Johnstone, R M; Reynolds, C S

    2016-01-01

    Narrow-band HST imaging has resolved the detailed internal structure of the 10 kpc diameter H alpha+[NII] emission line nebulosity in NGC4696, the central galaxy in the nearby Centaurus cluster, showing that the dusty, molecular, filaments have a width of about 60pc. Optical morphology and velocity measurements indicate that the filaments are dragged out by the bubbling action of the radio source as part of the AGN feedback cycle. Using the drag force we find that the magnetic field in the filaments is in approximate pressure equipartition with the hot gas. The filamentary nature of the cold gas continues inward, swirling around and within the Bondi accretion radius of the central black hole, revealing the magnetic nature of the gas flows in massive elliptical galaxies. HST imaging resolves the magnetic, dusty, molecular filaments at the centre of the Centaurus cluster to a swirl around and within the Bondi radius.

  4. Active galaxies viewed from the infrared

    The ability of infrared photons to penetrate dense clouds of interstellar dust has led to the potential for greater understanding of active galaxies. Areas in which this tool (as well as the study of continuum processes) is applicable are discussed. Starburst models must be developed that account for realistic triggering mechanisms, accurate tracks of stellar evolution, and the interaction of supernova remnants with themselves and the interstellar medium. It is noted that in combination with other measurements, infrared observations of the nonthermal continua of violently variable objects can trace the development of their spectral components. Infrared astronomy is also instrumental in the identification and classification of counterparts to members of complete samples of radio sources. 91 references

  5. The Rise and Fall of Galaxy Activity in Dark Matter Haloes

    Pasquali, Anna; Bosch, Frank C. van den; Mo, H. J.; Yang, Xiaohu; Somerville, Rachel

    2008-01-01

    We use a SDSS galaxy group catalogue to study the dependence of galaxy activity on stellar mass, halo mass, and group hierarchy (centrals vs. satellites). We split our galaxy sample in star-forming galaxies, galaxies with optical AGN activity and radio sources. We find a smooth transition in halo mass as the activity of central galaxies changes from star formation to optical AGN activity to radio emission. Star-forming centrals preferentially reside in haloes with M

  6. Properties of three gas-rich dwarfs in the Centaurus A group

    Grossi, M; Pritzl, B J; Knezek, P M; Minchin, R F; Freeman, K C; Saha, A

    2003-01-01

    We present HST/WFPC2 observations (F555W, F814W) and ATCA high resolution HI maps of three gas-rich dwarf galaxies in the Centaurus A group discovered in two blind 21-cm surveys (HIPASS, HIDEEP). We compare their individual properties and discuss their star formation history. Although we can not constrain the age of the oldest population from the diagrams very well, the presence of an extended population of red giant stars suggests that these systems were not formed recently. The presence of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars in two out of three dwarfs, sets a lower limit on the age of about 6 Gyr.

  7. Line and continuum variability in active galaxies

    Rashed, Y. E.; Eckart, A.; Valencia-S., M.; García-Marín, M.; Busch, G.; Zuther, J.; Horrobin, M.; Zhou, H.

    2015-12-01

    We compared optical spectroscopic and photometric data for 18 active galactic nuclei (AGN) galaxies over two to three epochs, with time intervals of typically 5 to 10 yr. We used the multi-object double spectrograph (MODS) at the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) and compared the spectra with data taken from the SDSS data base and the literature. We found variations in the forbidden oxygen lines as well as in the hydrogen recombination lines of these sources. For four of the sources we found that, within the calibration uncertainties, the variations in continuum and line spectra of the sources are very small. We argue that it is mainly the difference in black hole mass between the samples that is responsible for the different degree of continuum variability. In addition, we found that for an otherwise constant accretion rate the total line variability (dominated by the narrow line contributions) reverberates in a similar way to the continuum variability with a dependence ΔLline ∝ (ΔLcont)3/2. Because this dependence is predominantly expressed in the narrow line emission, the implication is that the part of the source that dominates the luminosity in the narrow line region must be very compact, with a diameter of the order of at least 10 light-years. A comparison with data from the literature shows that these findings describe the variability characteristics of a total of 61 broad and narrow line sources.

  8. The evolution of galaxy star formation activity in massive halos

    Popesso, P; Finoguenov,; Wilman, D; Salvato, M; Magnelli, B; Gruppioni, C; Pozzi, F; Rodighiero, G; Ziparo, F; Berta, S; Elbaz, D; Dickinson, M; Lutz, D; Altieri, B; Aussel, H; Cimatti, A; Fadda, D; Ilbert, O; Floch, E Le; Nordon, R; Poglitsch, A; Xu, C K

    2014-01-01

    There is now a large consensus that the current epoch of the Cosmic Star Formation History (CSFH) is dominated by low mass galaxies while the most active phase at 1~1, the most IR-luminous galaxies (LIRGs and ULIRGs) are preferentially located in groups, and this is consistent with a reversal of the star-formation rate vs .density anti-correlation observed in the nearby Universe. At these redshifts, group galaxies contribute 60-80% of the CSFH, i.e. much more than at lower redshifts. Below z~1, the comoving number and SFR densities of IR-emitting galaxies in groups decline significantly faster than those of all IR-emitting galaxies. Our results are consistent with a "halo downsizing" scenario and highlight the significant role of "environment" quenching in shaping the CSFH.

  9. AMIGA project: Active galaxies in a complete sample of isolated galaxies

    Sabater, J; Verdes-Montenegro, L; Lisenfeld, U; Sulentic, J; Verley, S

    2009-01-01

    The project AMIGA (Analysis of the interstellar Medium of Isolated GAlaxies) provides a statistically significant sample of the most isolated galaxies in the northern sky. Such a control sample is necessary to understand the role of the environment in evolution and galaxy properties like the interstellar medium (ISM), star formation and nuclear activity. The data is publicly released under a VO interface at http://amiga.iaa.es/. One of our main goals is the study of nuclear activity in non-interacting galaxies using different methods. We focus on the well known radiocontinuum-far infrared (FIR) correlation in order to findradio-excess galaxies which are candidates to host an active galactic nucleus (AGN) and FIR colours to find obscured AGN candidates. We looked for the existing information on nuclear activity in the V\\'eron-Cetty catalogue and in the NASA Extragalactic Database (NED). We also used the nuclear spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey which allow us to determine the possible presence of an AG...

  10. Star formation efficiency along the radio jet in Centaurus A

    Salomé, Quentin; Combes, Françoise; Hamer, Stephen; Heywood, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Centaurus A is the most nearby powerful AGN, widely studied at all wavelengths. Molecular gas has been found in the halo at a distance of ~20 kpc from the galaxy centre, associated with HI shells. The molecular gas lies inside some IR and UV bright star-forming filaments that have recently been observed in the direction of the radio jets. These archival data show that there is dust and very weak star formation on scales of hundreds of parsecs. On top of analysing combined archival data, we have performed searches of HCN(1-0) and HCO+(1-0) emission with ATCA at the interaction of the northern filaments and the HI shell of Cen A. Measuring the dense gas is another indicator of star formation efficiency inside the filaments. However, we only derived upper limits of 1.6x10^3 K.km/s.pc^2 at 3 sigma in the synthesised beam of 3.1". We also compared the CO masses with the SFR estimates in order to measure a star formation efficiency. Using a standard conversion factor leads to long depletion times (7 Gyr). We then c...

  11. Environmental effects in galaxies Molecular Gas, Star Formation, and Activity

    De Mello, D F; Maia, M A G; Mello, Duilia F. de; Wiklind, Tommy; Maia, Marcio A.G.

    2001-01-01

    In order to study whether there is any correlation between nuclear activities, gas content, and the environment where galaxies reside, we have obtained optical and millimetric spectra for a well-defined sample of intermediate Hubble type spirals in dense environments and in the field. We found that these spirals in dense environments have on average: less molecular gas per blue luminosity, higher atomic gas fraction, lower current star formation rate, and the same star formation efficiency as field galaxies. Although none of these results stand out as a single strong diagnostic, given their statistical significance, taken together they indicate a trend for diminished gas content and star formation activity in galaxies in high density environments. Our results suggest that galaxies in dense environments have either (i) consumed their molecular gas via star formation in the past or (ii) that dense environments leads to an inhibition of molecular gas from atomic phase. The similarities in star formation efficien...

  12. Star formation efficiency along the radio jet in Centaurus A

    Salomé, Q.; Salomé, P.; Combes, F.; Hamer, S.; Heywood, I.

    2016-02-01

    NGC 5128 (also known as Centaurus A) is the most nearby powerful AGN, widely studied at all wavelengths. Molecular gas has been found in the halo at a distance of ~ 20 kpc from the galaxy center, associated with H i shells, through CO line detection at SEST (Charmandaris et al. 2000, A&A, 356, L1). The molecular gas lies inside some IR and UV bright star-forming filaments that have recently been observed in the direction of the radio jets. These archival data from GALEX (FUV) and Herschel (IR) show that there is dust and very weak star formation (a few 10-5-10-4M⊙ yr-1) on scales of hundreds of parsecs. NGC 5128 is thus a perfect target for detailed studies of the star formation processes at the interface of the jet/gas interaction. On top of analysing combined archival data, we have performed searches of HCN(1-0) and HCO+(1-0) emission with ATCA at the interaction of the northern filaments and the northern H i shell of Centaurus A. Measuring the dense gas is another indicator of star formation efficiency inside the filaments. However, we only derived upper limits L'HCN MUSE data, we estimated the metallicity spread (0.4-0.8Z⊙) in an other region of the filament, that corresponds to gas-to-dust ratios of ~200-400. Assuming the same metallicity range in the CO-detected part of the filament, the CO/H2 conversion ratio is corrected for low metallicity by a factor between 1.4 and 3.2. Such a low-metallicity correction leads to even more massive clouds with higher depletion times (16 Gyr). We finally present ALMA observations that detect 3 unresolved CO(2-1) clumps of size < 37 × 21 pc and masses around 104M⊙. The velocity width of the CO emission line is ~ 10 km s-1, leading to a rather high virial parameter. This is a hint of a turbulent gas probably powered by kinetic energy injection from the AGN jet/wind and leading to molecular gas reservoir not forming star efficiently. This work shows the importance of high resolution data analysis to bring a new light on

  13. MUSE discovers perpendicular arcs in the inner filament of Centaurus A

    Hamer, S.; Salomé, P.; Combes, F.; Salomé, Q.

    2015-03-01

    Context. Evidence of active galactic nuclei (AGN) interaction with the intergalactic medium is observed in some galaxies and many cool core clusters. Radio jets are suspected to dig large cavities into the surrounding gas. In most cases, very large optical filaments (several kpc) are also seen all around the central galaxy. The origin of these filaments is still not understood. Star-forming regions are sometimes observed inside the filaments and are interpreted as evidence of positive feedback (AGN-triggered star formation). Aims: Centaurus A is a very nearby galaxy with huge optical filaments aligned with the AGN radio-jet direction. Here, we searched for line ratio variations along the filaments, kinematic evidence of shock-broadend line widths, and large-scale dynamical structures. Methods: We observed a 1' × 1' region around the so-called inner filament of Cen A with the Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) on the Very Large Telescope (VLT) during the Science Verification period. Results: (i) The brightest lines detected are the Hαλ6562.8, [NII]λ6583, [OIII]λ4959+5007 and [SII]λ6716+6731. MUSE shows that the filaments are made of clumpy structures inside a more diffuse medium aligned with the radio-jet axis. We find evidence of shocked shells surrounding the star-forming clumps from the line profiles, suggesting that the star formation is induced by shocks. The clump line ratios are best explained by a composite of shocks and star formation illuminated by a radiation cone from the AGN. (ii) We also report a previously undetected large arc-like structure: three streams running perpendicular to the main filament; they are kinematically, morphologically, and excitationally distinct. The clear difference in the excitation of the arcs and clumps suggests that the arcs are very likely located outside of the radiation cone and match the position of the filament only in projection. The three arcs are thus most consistent with neutral material swept along by a

  14. Star Formation in the Central Kiloparsec of Nearby Active Galaxies

    We investigate star formation (SF) activity in the central kpc of a sample of nearby Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs). AGN activities are expected to either trigger SF via accreting ISM to the central regions of the host galaxies or quench the SF via the energy feedback of the AGNs. To study the AGN-SF relation we select 113 nearby galaxies that host 8 GHz central radio sources. We use 8 GHz radio emission to represent the AGN activity and 8 micron dust emission in the central kpc regions of these galaxies to estimate the SF rate (SFR). The SFR is found to be correlated with the stellar mass for stellar mass greater than 1010 solar mass and looks scattered for stellar mass less than 1010 solar mass. There is no correlation between the specific SFR (SSFR) and the AGN activity for all sources. However, if we exclude the sources with the central stellar mass greater than 1010 solar mass, we find that the 8 GHz radio emission is well correlated with the SSFR. These results suggest that the AGN activity is significant in triggering SF activity only for small galaxies. Besides, we also select about 20 nearby AGN galaxies to investigate the radial variation of their surface specific star formation rate.

  15. Active galaxies can make axionic dark energy

    Dimopoulos, Konstantinos; Cormack, Sam

    2016-01-01

    AGN jets carry helical magnetic fields, which can affect dark matter if the latter is axionic. This preliminary study shows that, in the presence of strong helical magnetic fields, the nature of the axionic condensate may change and become dark energy. Such dark energy may affect galaxy formation and galactic dynamics, so this possibility should not be ignored when considering axionic dark matter.

  16. Chronos: A NIR spectroscopic galaxy survey. From the formation of galaxies to the peak of activity

    Ferreras, I; Dunlop, J S; Pasquali, A; La Barbera, F; Vazdekis, A; Khochfar, S; Cropper, M; Cimatti, A; Cirasuolo, M; Bower, R; Brinchmann, J; Burningham, B; Cappellari, M; Charlot, S; Conselice, C J; Daddi, E; Grebel, E K; Ivison, R; Jarvis, M J; Kawata, D; Kennicutt, R C; Kitching, T; Lahav, O; Maiolino, R; Page, M J; Peletier, R F; Pontzen, A; Silk, J; Springel, V; Sullivan, M; Trujillo, I; Wright, G

    2013-01-01

    Chronos is our response to ESA's call for white papers to define the science for the future L2, L3 missions. Chronos targets the formation and evolution of galaxies, by collecting the deepest NIR spectroscopic data, from the formation of the first galaxies at z~10 to the peak of formation activity at z~1-3. The strong emission from the atmospheric background makes this type of survey impossible from a ground-based observatory. The spectra of galaxies represent the equivalent of a DNA fingerprint, containing information about the past history of star formation and chemical enrichment. The proposed survey will allow us to dissect the formation process of galaxies including the timescales of quenching triggered by star formation or AGN activity, the effect of environment, the role of infall/outflow processes, or the connection between the galaxies and their underlying dark matter haloes. To provide these data, the mission requires a 2.5m space telescope optimised for a campaign of very deep NIR spectroscopy. A c...

  17. Nuclear Activity is more prevalent in Star-Forming Galaxies

    Rosario, D J; Lutz, D; Netzer, H; Bauer, F E; Berta, S; Magnelli, B; Popesso, P; Alexander, D; Brandt, W N; Genzel, R; Maiolino, R; Mullaney, J R; Nordon, R; Saintonge, A; Tacconi, L; Wuyts, S

    2013-01-01

    We explore the question of whether low and moderate luminosity Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs) are preferentially found in galaxies that are undergoing a transition from active star formation to quiescence. This notion has been suggested by studies of the UV-to-optical colors of AGN hosts, which find them to be common among galaxies in the so-called "Green Valley", a region of galaxy color space believed to be composed mostly of galaxies undergoing star-formation quenching. Combining the deepest current X-ray and Herschel. PACS far-infrared (FIR) observations of the two Chandra Deep Fields (CDFs) with redshifts, stellar masses and rest-frame photometry derived from the extensive and uniform multi-wavelength data in these fields, we compare the rest-frame U-V color distributions and SFR distributions of AGNs and carefully constructed samples of inactive control galaxies. The UV-to-optical colors of AGNs are consistent with equally massive inactive galaxies at redshifts out to z~2, but we show that such colors ar...

  18. Optical nuclear activity in the radio galaxy 3C 465

    De Robertis, M.M.; Yee, H.K.C. (York Univ., North York (Canada) Toronto Univ. (Canada))

    1990-07-01

    The presently discussed discovery of weak, high-ionization emission lines in the nuclei of radio galaxies which had been classified as quiescent absorption-line systems demonstrates that AGN-like activity does occur in the central galaxies of rich clusters. 3C 465-like objects can be considered the extreme low-luminosity end of active nuclei in the centers of rich clusters; the estimated magnitude of 3C 465's nuclear component, at -15.7, is consistent with the precipitous drop of the luminosities of quasars in clusters. 3C 465 appears to represent a new class of optically active objects. 48 refs.

  19. Optical nuclear activity in the radio galaxy 3C 465

    The presently discussed discovery of weak, high-ionization emission lines in the nuclei of radio galaxies which had been classified as quiescent absorption-line systems demonstrates that AGN-like activity does occur in the central galaxies of rich clusters. 3C 465-like objects can be considered the extreme low-luminosity end of active nuclei in the centers of rich clusters; the estimated magnitude of 3C 465's nuclear component, at -15.7, is consistent with the precipitous drop of the luminosities of quasars in clusters. 3C 465 appears to represent a new class of optically active objects. 48 refs

  20. Photometric properties of Local Volume dwarf galaxies

    Sharina, M. E.; Karachentsev, I. D.; Dolphin, A. E.; Karachentseva, V E; Tully, R. Brent; Karataeva, G. M.; Makarov, D. I.; Makarova, L. N.; Sakai, S.; Shaya, E. J.; Nikolaev, E. Yu.; Kuznetsov, A N

    2007-01-01

    We present surface photometry and metallicity measurements for 104 nearby dwarf galaxies imaged with the Advanced Camera for Surveys and Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 aboard the Hubble Space Telescope. In addition, we carried out photometry for 26 galaxies of the sample and for Sextans B on images of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Our sample comprises dwarf spheroidal, irregular and transition type galaxies located within ~10 Mpc in the field and in nearby groups: M81, Centaurus A, Sculpto...

  1. Atomic hydrogen properties of active galactic nuclei host galaxies: H I in 16 nuclei of galaxies (NUGA) sources

    We present a comprehensive spectroscopic imaging survey of the distribution and kinematics of atomic hydrogen (H I) in 16 nearby spiral galaxies hosting low luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGN), observed with high spectral and spatial resolution (resolution: ∼20'', ∼5 km s–1) using the NRAO Very Large Array (VLA). The sample contains a range of nuclear types ranging from Seyfert to star-forming nuclei, and was originally selected for the NUclei of GAlaxies project (NUGA)—a spectrally and spatially resolved interferometric survey of gas dynamics in nearby galaxies designed to identify the fueling mechanisms of AGN and the relation to host galaxy evolution. Here we investigate the relationship between the H I properties of these galaxies, their environment, their stellar distribution, and their AGN type. The large-scale H I morphology of each galaxy is classified as ringed, spiral, or centrally concentrated; comparison of the resulting morphological classification with the AGN type reveals that ring structures are significantly more common in low-ionization narrow emission-line regions (LINER) than in Seyfert host galaxies, suggesting a time evolution of the AGN activity together with the redistribution of the neutral gas. Dynamically disturbed H I disks are also more prevalent in LINER host galaxies than in Seyfert host galaxies. While several galaxies are surrounded by companions (some with associated H I emission), there is no correlation between the presence of companions and the AGN type (Seyfert/LINER).

  2. X-Ray bright active galactic nuclei in massive galaxy clusters - II. The fraction of galaxies hosting active nuclei

    Ehlert, S.; von der Linden, A.; Allen, S. W.;

    2013-01-01

    We present a measurement of the fraction of cluster galaxies hosting X-ray bright active galactic nuclei (AGN) as a function of clustercentric distance scaled in units of r500. Our analysis employs high-quality Chandra X-ray and Subaru optical imaging for 42 massive X-ray-selected galaxy cluster...... fields spanning the redshift range 0.2 z ..., both of which are also suppressed near cluster centres to a comparable extent. These results strongly support the idea that X-ray AGN activity and strong star formation are linked through their common dependence on available reservoirs of cold gas. © 2013 The Authors. Published by Oxford University...

  3. The Lost Dwarfs of Centaurus A and the Formation of its Dark Globular Clusters

    Bovill, Mia Sauda; Ricotti, Massimo; Taylor, Matthew A

    2016-01-01

    We present theoretical constraints for the formation of the newly discovered dark star clusters (DSCs) with high mass-to-light (M/L) ratios, from Taylor et al (2015). These compact stellar systems photometrically resemble globular clusters (GCs) but have dynamical M/L ratios of ~ 10 - 100, closer to the expectations for dwarf galaxies. The baryonic properties of the dark star clusters (DSCs) suggest their host dark matter halos likely virialized at high redshift with M > 10^8 M_sun. We use a new set of high-resolution N-body simulations of Centaurus A to determine if there is a set of z=0 subhalos whose properties are in line with these observations. While we find such a set of subhalos, when we extrapolate the dark matter density profiles into the inner 20 pc, no dark matter halo associated with Centaurus A in our simulations, at any redshift, can replicate the extremely high central mass densities of the DSCs. Among the most likely options for explaining 10^5 - 10^7 M_sun within 10 pc diameter subhalos is t...

  4. Faraday Rotation Structure on Kiloparsec Scales in the Giant Radio Lobes of Centaurus A

    Feain, Ilana; Murphy, Tara; Gaensler, Bryan; Macquart, J-P; Norris, Raymond; Cornwell, Tim; Johnston-Hollitt, Melanie; Ott, Juergen; Middelberg, Enno

    2009-01-01

    We present the results of an Australia Telescope Compact Array 1.4 GHz spectropolarimetric aperture synthesis survey of 34 square degrees centred on Centaurus A - NGC 5128. A catalogue of 1005 extragalactic compact radio sources in the field to a continuum flux density of 3 mJy/beam is provided along with a table of Faraday rotation measures (RMs) and linear polarised intensities for the 28 percent of sources with high signal-to-noise in linear polarisation. We use the ensemble of 281 background polarised sources as line-of-sight probes of the structure of the giant radio lobes of Centaurus A. This is the first time such a method has been applied to radio galaxy lobes and we explain how it differs from the conventional methods that are often complicated by depth and beam depolarisation effects. We use an RM structure function analysis and report the detection of a turbulent RM signal, with rms of 17 rad/m^2 and scale size 0.3 degrees, associated with the southern giant lobe. We cannot verify whether this sign...

  5. High-Mass Star Formation in the Outer Scutum-Centaurus Arm

    Armentrout, William P.; Anderson, Loren D.; Balser, Dana S.; Bania, Thomas M.; Dame, Thomas M.; Wenger, Trey

    2016-01-01

    The HII Region Discovery Survey (HRDS; Bania et al., 2010) has discovered nearly 1000 HII regions by detecting their radio recombination line (RRL) emission using the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) and the Arecibo Observatory. Observations of RRLs allow us to measure source velocities and determine positions within the Galaxy using a rotation curve model, but until recently our sample in the far outer Galaxy was incomplete. Using HI and CO data, Dame & Thaddeus (2011) identified an extension of the Scutum-Centaurus spiral arm, deemed the Outer Scutum-Centaurus arm, or OSC. This arm offers a new laboratory for the study of Galactic structure, high-mass star formation, and chemistry of the outer Galaxy. We searched for new Galactic HII regions in the OSC by targeting infrared-identified candidates that have an (l,b) location consistent with this arm. We have discovered 10 OSC HII regions thus far, using observations of: (1) VLA 9 GHz continuum to identify thermally emitting sources, (2) GBT RRLs to detect evolved HII regions, and (3) GBT NH3 to detect younger HII regions. Detected regions lie at an average Heliocentric distance of 20.0 ± 1.4 kpc and an average Galactocentric distance of 14.5 ± 1.4 kpc. The most distant region detected has a Heliocentric distance of 23.5 kpc and a Galactocentric distance of 17.0 kpc. These are the most distant known Galactic high-mass star formation regions. We will present the results of ongoing NH3 observations with the GBT, which will likely increase the sample of OSC HII regions further.

  6. Active galactic nucleus feedback in clusters of galaxies.

    Blanton, Elizabeth L; Clarke, T E; Sarazin, Craig L; Randall, Scott W; McNamara, Brian R

    2010-04-20

    Observations made during the last ten years with the Chandra X-ray Observatory have shed much light on the cooling gas in the centers of clusters of galaxies and the role of active galactic nucleus (AGN) heating. Cooling of the hot intracluster medium in cluster centers can feed the supermassive black holes found in the nuclei of the dominant cluster galaxies leading to AGN outbursts which can reheat the gas, suppressing cooling and large amounts of star formation. AGN heating can come in the form of shocks, buoyantly rising bubbles that have been inflated by radio lobes, and the dissipation of sound waves. PMID:20351250

  7. Active galaxies may harbour wormholes if dark matter is axionic

    Dimopoulos, Konstantinos

    2016-01-01

    AGN jets carry helical magnetic fields, which can affect dark matter if the latter is axionic. This preliminary study shows that the nature of the axionic condensate may change and instead of dark matter may behave more like exotic matter, which violates the null energy condition. If the central supermassive black hole of an active galaxy is laced with exotic matter then it may become a wormhole. In general, the presence of exotic matter may affect galaxy formation and galactic dynamics, so this possibility should not be ignored when considering axionic dark matter.

  8. Galaxy mergers and active nuclei. I. The luminosity function

    Galaxy mergers may boost the tidal disruption rate of stars near a massive central black hole in the nucleus of a galaxy, producing active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with nonthermal luminosities up to 1047 ergs s-1. We derive a bolometric luminosity function for AGNs based on this process. Our main assumptions are: (1) galaxies contain massive central black holes, and (2) the density structure of galactic nuclei is similar to that of the Milky Way. The merging rate is estimated from the two-point correlation function of galaxies. Our bolometric luminosity function can be compared with observed radio, optical, and X-ray luminosity functions by assuming that the energy emitted at these wavebands is proportional to bolometric luminosity. This assumption is based on the similarity between observed luminosity functions at high luminosities. The observed and theoretical functions have the same characteristics: at high luminosities they behave as a power law with index of about -1.4. The function flattens below L/sup direct-product/roughly-equal1044 ergs s-1. As an example we show that the model is capable of reproducing in detail the observed (bivariate) radio luminosity function. The luminosity coordinate of the break in the (bivariate) radio luminosity function at L/sup direct-product/ yields an estimate of the central black-hole mass as a function of (stellar) galactic luminosity. The space-density coordinate of the break indicates that the mean mass ratio of the interacting galaxies is larger than 20

  9. An imaging and spectroscopic study of the planetary nebulae in NGC 5128 (Centaurus A): Planetary nebulae catalogues

    Walsh, J. R.; Rejkuba, M.; Walton, N. A.

    2015-01-01

    Imaging and spectroscopic observations of planetary nebulae (PNe) in the nearest large elliptical galaxy NGC 5128 (Centaurus A), were obtained to find more PNe and measure their radial velocities. NTT imaging was obtained in 15 fields in NGC 5128 over an area of about 1 square degree with EMMI using [O III] and off-band filters. Newly detected sources, combined with literature PNe, were used as input for VLT FLAMES multi-fibre spectroscopy in MEDUSA mode. Spectra of the 4600-5100A region were...

  10. Line and Continuum Variability in Active Galaxies

    Rashed, Y E; Valencia-S., M; García-Marín, M; Busch, G; Zuther, J; Horrobin, M; Zhou, H

    2015-01-01

    We compared optical spectroscopic and photometric data for 18 AGN galaxies over 2 to 3 epochs, with time intervals of typically 5 to 10 years. We used the Multi-Object Double Spectrograph (MODS) at the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) and compared the spectra to data taken from the SDSS database and the literature. We find variations in the forbidden oxygen lines as well as in the hydrogen recombination lines of these sources. For 4 of the sources we find that, within the calibration uncertainties, the variations in continuum and line spectra of the sources are very small. We argue that it is mainly the difference in black hole mass between the samples that is responsible for the different degree of continuum variability. In addition we find that for an otherwise constant accretion rate the total line variability (dominated by the narrow line contributions) reverberates the continuum variability with a dependency $\\Delta L_{line} \\propto (\\Delta L_{cont.})^{\\frac{3}{2}}$. Since this dependency is prominently e...

  11. The PISCeS survey: the assembly of extended haloes in nearby galaxies

    Crnojevic, Denija; Sand, David J.

    2015-08-01

    I will present results from the wide-field Panoramic Imaging Survey of Centaurus and Sculptor (PISCeS): we investigate the resolved stellar haloes of two nearby galaxies (the spiral NGC253 and the elliptical Centaurus A, D~3.7 Mpc) out to a galactocentric radius of 150 kpc with Magellan/Megacam. The survey led to the discovery of new faint satellites and stunning streams/substructures in two environments substantially different from the Local Group, i.e. the loose Sculptor group of galaxies and the Centaurus A group dominated by an elliptical. These discoveries clearly testify the past and ongoing accretion processes shaping the haloes of these nearby galaxies. The detailed characterization of the stellar content, shape and gradients in the extended haloes of nearby galaxies serves as a crucial benchmark to interpret higher redshift objects and constrains theoretical models of galaxy formation and evolution.

  12. An atlas of Calcium triplet spectra of active galaxies

    Garcia-Rissmann, A; Asari, N V; Fernandes, R C; Schmitt, H; González-Delgado, R M; Storchi-Bergmann, T

    2005-01-01

    We present a spectroscopic atlas of active galactic nuclei covering the region around the 8498, 8542, 8662 Calcium triplet (CaT) lines. The sample comprises 78 objects, divided into 43 Seyfert 2s, 26 Seyfert 1s, 3 Starburst and 6 normal galaxies. The spectra pertain to the inner ~300 pc in radius, and thus sample the central kinematics and stellar populations of active galaxies. The data are used to measure stellar velocity dispersions (sigma_star) both with cross-correlation and direct fitting methods. These measurements are found to be in good agreement with each-other and with those in previous studies for objects in common. The CaT equivalent width is also measured. We find average values and sample dispersions of W_CaT of 4.6+/-2.0, 7.0 and 7.7+/-1.0 angstrons for Seyfert 1s, Seyfert 2s and normal galaxies, respectively. We further present an atlas of [SIII]\\lambda 9069 emission line profiles for a subset of 40 galaxies. These data are analyzed in a companion paper which addresses the connection between ...

  13. QSO Pairs across Active Galaxies: Evidence of Blueshifts?

    D. Basu

    2006-12-01

    Several QSO pairs have been reported and their redshifts determined, where the two objects in each pair are located across an active galaxy. The usually accepted explanation of such occurrences is that the pair is ejected from the parent galaxy. Currently interpreted redshifted spectra for both the QSOs imply that both the objects are receding from the observer. However, ejection can occur towards and away from the observer with equal probability. We argue that for a system with two QSOs lying across the parent galaxy, ejection should have occurred in opposite directions, whereby one object will be approaching us and the other will be receding from us. The former would exhibit a blueshifted spectrum. We analyse here a sample of four such pairs and show that the observed spectrum of one QSO in each pair can be interpreted as blueshifted. The other exhibits the usual redshifted spectrum. A scenario based on the ‘sling-shot’ mechanism of ejection is presented to explain the occurrences of the pairs in opposite sides of the active galaxies moving in opposite directions.

  14. Centaurus A: constraints on the nature of the giant lobe filaments from XMM-Newton observations

    Wykes, Sarka; Croston, Judith H

    2015-01-01

    We report on deep XMM-Newton observations of the vertex filament in the southern giant lobe of the Fanaroff-Riley class I radio galaxy Centaurus A. We find no X-ray excess from the filament region and place a 3 sigma upper limit on the 1 keV flux density of the filament of 9.6 nJy. This directly constrains the electron density and magnetic field strength in the filament. For the first time in an individual filament, we show that the excess in synchrotron emissivity cannot be produced purely by excess electrons: the filament magnetic field strength must be higher than in the giant lobes as a whole, and close to or above the equipartition value for the filament. The filaments are not significantly overpressured with respect to the surrounding lobe with a pressure provided by relativistic electrons.

  15. The star formation rates of active galactic nuclei host galaxies

    Ellison, Sara L.; Teimoorinia, Hossen; Rosario, David J.; Mendel, J. Trevor

    2016-05-01

    Using artificial neural network predictions of total infrared luminosities (LIR), we compare the host galaxy star formation rates (SFRs) of ˜21 000 optically selected active galactic nuclei (AGN), 466 low-excitation radio galaxies (LERGs) and 721 mid-IR-selected AGN. SFR offsets (ΔSFR) relative to a sample of star-forming `main-sequence' galaxies (matched in M⋆, z and local environment) are computed for the AGN hosts. Optically selected AGN exhibit a wide range of ΔSFR, with a distribution skewed to low SFRs and a median ΔSFR = -0.06 dex. The LERGs have SFRs that are shifted to even lower values with a median ΔSFR = -0.5 dex. In contrast, mid-IR-selected AGN have, on average, SFRs enhanced by a factor of ˜1.5. We interpret the different distributions of ΔSFR amongst the different AGN classes in the context of the relative contribution of triggering by galaxy mergers. Whereas the LERGs are predominantly fuelled through low accretion rate secular processes which are not accompanied by enhancements in SFR, mergers, which can simultaneously boost SFRs, most frequently lead to powerful, obscured AGN.

  16. The star formation rates of active galactic nuclei host galaxies

    Ellison, Sara L; Rosario, David J; Mendel, J Trevor

    2016-01-01

    Using artificial neural network (ANN) predictions of total infra-red luminosities (LIR), we compare the host galaxy star formation rates (SFRs) of ~21,000 optically selected active galactic nuclei (AGN), 466 low excitation radio galaxies (LERGs) and 721 mid-IR selected AGN. SFR offsets (Delta SFR) relative to a sample of star-forming `main sequence' galaxies (matched in M*, z and local environment) are computed for the AGN hosts. Optically selected AGN exhibit a wide range of Delta SFR, with a distribution skewed to low SFRs and a median Delta SFR = -0.06 dex. The LERGs have SFRs that are shifted to even lower values with a median Delta SFR = -0.5 dex. In contrast, mid-IR selected AGN have, on average, SFRs enhanced by a factor ~1.5. We interpret the different distributions of Delta SFR amongst the different AGN classes in the context of the relative contribution of triggering by galaxy mergers. Whereas the LERGs are predominantly fuelled through low accretion rate secular processes which are not accompanied ...

  17. Paired galaxies with different activity levels and their supernovae

    Nazaryan, T A; Hakobyan, A A; Adibekyan, V Zh; Kunth, D; Mamon, G A; Turatto, M; Aramyan, L S

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the influence of close neighbor galaxies on the properties of supernovae (SNe) and their host galaxies using 56 SNe located in pairs of galaxies with different levels of star formation (SF) and nuclear activity. The statistical study of SN hosts shows that there is no significant difference between morphologies of hosts in our sample and the larger general sample of SN hosts in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 8 (DR8). The mean distance of type II SNe from nuclei of hosts is greater by about a factor of 2 than that of type Ibc SNe. The distributions and mean distances of SNe are consistent with previous results compiled with the larger sample. For the first time it is shown that SNe Ibc are located in pairs with significantly smaller difference of radial velocities between components than pairs containing SNe Ia and II. We consider this as a result of higher star formation rate (SFR) of these closer systems of galaxies. SN types are not correlated with the luminosity ratio of ho...

  18. The evolution of star formation activity in galaxy groups

    Erfanianfar, G; Finoguenov, A; Wuyts, S; Wilman, D; Biviano, A; Ziparo, F; Salvato, M; Nandra, K; Lutz, D; Elbaz, D; Dickinson, M; Tanaka, M; Mirkazemi, M; Balogh, M L; Altieri, M B; Aussel, H; Bauer, F; Berta, S; Bielby, R M; Brandt, N; Cappelluti, N; Cimatti, A; Cooper, M; Fadda, D; Ilbert, O; Floch, E Le; Magnelli, B; Mulchaey, J S; Nordon, R; Newman, J A; Poglitsch, A; Pozzi, F

    2014-01-01

    We study the evolution of the total star formation (SF) activity, total stellar mass and halo occupation distribution in massive halos by using one of the largest X-ray selected sample of galaxy groups with secure spectroscopic identification in the major blank field surveys (ECDFS, CDFN, COSMOS, AEGIS). We provide an accurate measurement of SFR for the bulk of the star-forming galaxies using very deep mid-infrared Spitzer MIPS and far-infrared Herschel PACS observations. For undetected IR sources, we provide a well-calibrated SFR from SED fitting. We observe a clear evolution in the level of SF activity in galaxy groups. The total SF activity in the high redshift groups (0.5activity is declining more rapidly in the more massive halos than in the more common lower mass ...

  19. Early Australian Optical and Radio Observations of Centaurus A

    Robertson, Peter; Orchiston, Wayne; Slee, Bruce; Wendt, Harry; 10.1071/AS09071

    2010-01-01

    The discoveries of the radio source Centaurus A and its optical counterpart NGC 5128 were important landmarks in the history of Australian astronomy. NGC 5128 was first observed in August 1826 by James Dunlop during a survey of southern objects at the Parramatta Observatory, west of the settlement at Sydney Cove. The observatory had been founded a few years earlier by Thomas Brisbane, the new governor of the British colony of New South Wales. Just over 120 years later, John Bolton, Gordon Stanley and Bruce Slee discovered the radio source Centaurus A at the Dover Heights field station in Sydney, operated by CSIRO's Radiophysics Laboratory (the forerunner of the Australia Telescope National Facility). This paper will describe this early historical work and summarise further studies of Centaurus A by other Radiophysics groups up to 1960.

  20. Ultra Fast Outflows: Galaxy-Scale Active Galactic Nucleus Feedback

    Wagner, A. Y.; Umemura, M; Bicknell, G. V.

    2012-01-01

    We show, using global 3D grid-based hydrodynamical simulations, that Ultra Fast Outflows (UFOs) from Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) result in considerable feedback of energy and momentum into the interstellar medium (ISM) of the host galaxy. The AGN wind interacts strongly with the inhomogeneous, two-phase ISM consisting of dense clouds embedded in a tenuous hot hydrostatic medium. The outflow floods through the inter-cloud channels, sweeps up the hot ISM, and ablates and disperses the dense cl...

  1. The fraction of galaxies that contain active nuclei and their accretion rates

    Page, M. J.

    2001-12-01

    We investigate the relationship between the present-day optical luminosity function of galaxies and the X-ray luminosity function of Seyfert 1s to determine the fraction of galaxies that host Seyfert 1 nuclei and their Eddington ratios. The local type 1 active galactic nuclei (AGN) X-ray luminosity function is well reproduced if ~1 per cent of all galaxies are type 1 Seyferts which have Eddington ratios of ~10-3. However, in such a model the X-ray luminosity function is completely dominated by AGN in E and S0 galaxies, contrary to the observed mix of Seyfert host galaxies. To obtain a plausible mix of AGN host galaxy morphologies requires that the most massive black holes in E and S0 galaxies accrete with lower Eddington ratios, or have a lower incidence of Seyfert activity, than the central black holes of later-type galaxies.

  2. The quenching of the star formation activity in cluster galaxies

    Boselli, A; Fossati, M; Buat, V; Boissier, S; Boquien, M; Burgarella, D; Ciesla, L; Gavazzi, G; Serra, P

    2016-01-01

    We study the star formation quenching mechanism in cluster galaxies by fitting the SED of the Herschel Reference Survey, a complete volume-limited K-band-selected sample of nearby galaxies including objects in different density regions, from the core of the Virgo cluster to the general field. The SED are fitted using the CIGALE SED modelling code. The truncated activity of cluster galaxies is parametrised using a specific SFH with 2 free parameters, the quenching age QA and the quenching factor QF. These 2 parameters are crucial for the identification of the quenching mechanism which acts on long timescales if starvation while rapid and efficient if ram pressure. To be sensitive to an abrupt and recent variation of the star formation activity, we combine in a new way 20 UV to FIR photometric bands with 3 age-sensitive Balmer line absorption indices extracted from available medium-resolution integrated spectroscopy and with Halpha narrow band imaging data. The use of a truncated SFH significantly increases the...

  3. Misaligned Disks as Obscurers in Active Galaxies

    Lawrence, A.; Elvis, M.; /Edinburgh U., Inst. Astron. /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.

    2010-06-02

    We review critically the evidence concerning the fraction of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) which appear as Type 2 AGN, carefully distinguishing strict Type 2 AGN from both more lightly reddened Type 1 AGN, and from low excitation narrow line AGN, which may represent a different mode of activity. Low excitation AGN occur predominantly at low luminosities; after removing these, true Type 2 AGN represent 58{-+}5% of all AGN, and lightly reddened Type 1 AGN a further {approx}15%. Radio, IR, and volume-limited samples all agree in showing no change of Type 2 fraction with luminosity. X-ray samples do show a change with luminosity; we discuss possible reasons for this discrepancy. We test a very simple picture which produces this Type 2 fraction with minimal assumptions. In this picture, infall from large scales occurs in random directions, but must eventually align with the inner accretion flow, producing a severely warped disk on parsec scales. If the re-alignment is dominated by tilt, with minimal twist, a wide range of covering factors is predicted in individual objects, but with an expected mean fraction of Type 2 AGN of exactly 50%. This 'tilted disc' picture predicts reasonable alignment of observed nuclear structures on average, but with distinct misalignments in individual cases. Initial case studies of the few well resolved objects show that such misalignments are indeed present.

  4. A circumnuclear disk of atomic hydrogen in Centaurus A

    Morganti, R.; Oosterloo, T.; Struve, C.; Saripalli, L.

    2008-01-01

    We present new observations, performed with the Australia Telescope Compact Array, of the Hi absorption in the central regions of Centaurus A. For the first time, absorption is detected against the radio core at velocities blueshifted with respect to the systemic velocity. Moreover, the data show th

  5. Kinematic Interpretation of the Centaurus A Absorption-Line System

    Eckart, A.; Wild, W.; Ageorges, N.

    1999-01-01

    The location of the gas responsible for the absorption-line system toward the nucleus of Centaurus A is a puzzle. It is generally accepted that the line features close to the systemic velocity originate in the disk. The redshifted line features in particular, however, are usually thought to be due t

  6. Feedback of Active Galactic Nuclei in Seyfert 2 Galaxies

    En-Peng Zhang; Wei-Hao Bian; Chen Hu; Wei-Ming Mao; ALi Luo; Yong-Heng Zhao

    2008-01-01

    It is well accepted that feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) plays an important role in the coevolution of the supermassive black hole (SMBH) and its host galaxy,but the concrete mechanism of feedback remains unclear.A considerable body of evidence suggests that AGN feedback suppresses star formation in the host galaxy.We assemble a sample of Seyfert 2 galaxies with recent observational data of compact nuclear starbursts and estimate the gas surface density as a function of column density to illuminate the relation between feedback and AGN properties.Although there are some uncertainties,our data still imply the deviation from the star formation law (Kennicutt-Schmidt law).Further,they indicate that:(1) Feedback correlates with the Eddington ratio,rather than with the mass of SMBH,as a result of decreasing star formation efficiency.(2) The SMBH and the torus are probably undergoing coevolution.Conclusions presented here can be refined through future high resolution CO or HCN observations.

  7. Galaxy Zoo: the effect of bar-driven fueling on the presence of an active galactic nucleus in disc galaxies

    Galloway, Melanie A; Fortson, Lucy F; Cardamone, Carolin N; Schawinski, Kevin; Cheung, Edmond; Lintott, Chris J; Masters, Karen L; Melvin, Thomas; Simmons, Brooke D

    2015-01-01

    We study the influence of the presence of a strong bar in disc galaxies which host an active galactic nucleus (AGN). Using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and morphological classifications from the Galaxy Zoo 2 project, we create a volume-limited sample of 19,756 disc galaxies at $0.01galaxies have a higher overall percentage of bars (51.8%) than inactive galaxies exhibiting central star formation (37.1%). This difference is primarily due to known effects; that the presence of both AGN and galactic bars is strongly correlated with both the stellar mass and integrated colour of the host galaxy. We control for this effect by examining the difference in AGN fraction between barred and unbarred galaxies in fixed bins of mass and colour. Once this effect is accounted for, there remains a small but statistically significant increase that represents 16% of the average barred AGN fraction. Using the $L_{\\rm...

  8. EVIDENCE FOR WIDESPREAD ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS ACTIVITY AMONG MASSIVE QUIESCENT GALAXIES AT z ∼ 2

    We quantify the presence of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in a mass-complete (M * > 5 × 1010 M ☉) sample of 123 star-forming and quiescent galaxies at 1.5 ≤ z ≤ 2.5, using X-ray data from the 4 Ms Chandra Deep Field-South (CDF-S) survey. 41% ± 7% of the galaxies are detected directly in X-rays, 22% ± 5% with rest-frame 0.5-8 keV luminosities consistent with hosting luminous AGNs (L 0.5-8keV > 3 × 1042 erg s–1). The latter fraction is similar for star-forming and quiescent galaxies, and does not depend on galaxy stellar mass, suggesting that perhaps luminous AGNs are triggered by external effects such as mergers. We detect significant mean X-ray signals in stacked images for both the individually non-detected star-forming and quiescent galaxies, with spectra consistent with star formation only and/or a low-luminosity AGN in both cases. Comparing star formation rates inferred from the 2-10 keV luminosities to those from rest-frame IR+UV emission, we find evidence for an X-ray excess indicative of low-luminosity AGNs. Among the quiescent galaxies, the excess suggests that as many as 70%-100% of these contain low- or high-luminosity AGNs, while the corresponding fraction is lower among star-forming galaxies (43%-65%). Our discovery of the ubiquity of AGNs in massive, quiescent z ∼ 2 galaxies provides observational support for the importance of AGNs in impeding star formation during galaxy evolution.

  9. Silicate emissions in active galaxies - From LINERs to QSOs

    Sturm, E.; Schweitzer, M.; Lutz, D.; Contursi, A.; Genzel, R.; Lehnert, M. D.; Tacconi, L.J.; Veilleux, S.; Rupke, D. S.; Kim, D. -C.; Sternberg, A; Maoz, D.; Lord, S.; Mazzarella, J.; Sanders, D. B.

    2005-01-01

    We report the first detection of ~10 and ~18 micron silicate dust emissions in a low-luminosity active galactic nucleus (AGN), obtained in Spitzer-IRS 7-37 micron spectroscopy of the Type 1 LINER galaxy NGC3998. Silicate emissions in AGN have only recently been detected in several quasars. Our detection counters suggestions that silicate emissions are present only in the most luminous AGN. The silicate features may be signatures of a dusty ``obscuring torus'' viewed face-on as postulated for ...

  10. Dusty origin of the Broad Line Region in active galaxies

    Czerny, Bozena; Kaluzny, Janusz; Maity, Ishita

    2012-01-01

    The most characteristic property of active galaxies, including quasars, are prominent broad emission lines. I will discuss an interesting possibility that dust is responsible for this phenomenon. The dust is known to be present in quasars in the form of a dusty/molecular torus which results in complexity of the appearance of active galaxies. However, this dust is located further from the black hole than the Broad Line Region. We propose that the dust is present also closer in and it is actually responsible for formation of the broad emission lines. The argument is based on determination of the temperature of the disk atmosphere underlying the Broad Line Region: it is close to 1000 K, independently from the black hole mass and accretion rate of the object. The mechanism is simple and universal but leads to a considerable complexity of the active nucleus surrounding. The understanding the formation of BLR opens a way to use it reliably - in combination with reverberation measurement of its size - as standard ca...

  11. Is the cluster environment quenching the Seyfert activity in elliptical and spiral galaxies?

    de Souza, R. S.; Dantas, M. L. L.; Krone-Martins, A.; Cameron, E.; Coelho, P.; Hattab, M. W.; de Val-Borro, M.; Hilbe, J. M.; Elliott, J.; Hagen, A.; COIN Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    We developed a hierarchical Bayesian model (HBM) to investigate how the presence of Seyfert activity relates to their environment, herein represented by the galaxy cluster mass, M200, and the normalized cluster centric distance, r/r200. We achieved this by constructing an unbiased sample of galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, with morphological classifications provided by the Galaxy Zoo Project. A propensity score matching approach is introduced to control the effects of confounding variables: stellar mass, galaxy colour, and star formation rate. The connection between Seyfert-activity and environmental properties in the de-biased sample is modelled within an HBM framework using the so-called logistic regression technique, suitable for the analysis of binary data (e.g. whether or not a galaxy hosts an AGN). Unlike standard ordinary least square fitting methods, our methodology naturally allows modelling the probability of Seyfert-AGN activity in galaxies on their natural scale, i.e. as a binary variable. Furthermore, we demonstrate how an HBM can incorporate information of each particular galaxy morphological type in an unified framework. In elliptical galaxies our analysis indicates a strong correlation of Seyfert-AGN activity with r/r200, and a weaker correlation with the mass of the host cluster. In spiral galaxies these trends do not appear, suggesting that the link between Seyfert activity and the properties of spiral galaxies are independent of the environment.

  12. Properties of hot gas in halos of active galaxies and clusters of galaxies

    The importance of the inverse Compton effect in the X-ray emission of cluster galaxies is discussed; the X-ray origin problem from galaxy clusters (spectra and emission mechanisms) is studied. The insufficiency of the X-ray bremsstrahlung emission model in an isothermal gas is proved. The ionized halos in narrow-line galaxies (NLG) are studied; after some general points on NLG, one NLG is described and a brief view an emission mechanism models is given; a detailed study of the galaxy IC 5063 and its nebulosity is given: the ionized gas density is calculated together with the evaporation rate for such clouds

  13. Activity of aalactic nuclei and ring-like structures in normal galaxies

    Formation mekhanism of ring-like structures in normal galaxies is discussed. The above structures observed in normal galaxies are possibly formed by shock waves generated by recurrent activity of galactic nuclei. Specific features of ring-like structures are connected with parameters (ener--gy and period) characterizing the activity of nuclei, and with gas distribution type in central regions of galaxies as well

  14. The colour-magnitude relation of Globular Clusters in Centaurus and Hydra - Constraints on star cluster self-enrichment with a link to massive Milky Way GCs

    Fensch, J; Mueller-Seidlitz, J; Hilker, M

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the colour-magnitude relation of metal-poor globular clusters, the 'blue tilt', in the Hydra and Centaurus galaxy clusters and constrain the primordial conditions for star cluster self-enrichment. We analyse U,I photometry for about 2500 globular clusters in the central regions of Hydra and Centaurus, based on FORS1@VLT data. We convert the measured colour-magnitude relations into mass-metallicity space and obtain a scaling of Z \\propto M^{0.27 \\pm 0.05} for Centaurus GCs and Z \\propto M^{0.40 \\pm 0.06} for Hydra GCs, consistent with results in other environments. We find that the GC mass-metallicity relation already sets in at present-day masses of a few 10^5 solar masses and is well established in the luminosity range of massive MW clusters like omega Centauri. We compare the mass-metallicity relation with predictions from the star cluster self-enrichment model by Bailin & Harris (2009). For this we include effects of dynamical and stellar evolution and a physically well motivated primord...

  15. Ultraviolet Diagnostics for the Emission Line Gas in Active Galaxies

    Allen, M G; Tsvetanov, Z I

    1998-01-01

    Optical diagnostic diagrams are frequently ambiguous as a test of the photoionization or fast shock models of the narrow line regions of active galaxies. Here, we present a set of UV line ratio diagrams which can discriminate between pure shock and photoionization modes of excitation, and to some extent, also discriminate shocks with ionized precursors from photoionization. These diagrams use relatively bright emission lines and reddening insensitive ratios and provide a practical observational test for separating the excitation mechanisms of the narrow line regions of active galaxies. The most useful diagrams are those involving the various ionization stages of Carbon, [OIII]5007/H-beta vs. CIV 1550/ HeII 1640 and the purely UV ratio pair CII] 2326 / CIII] 1909 vs. CIV 1550 / CIII]909. Temperature sensitive FUV lines CIII 977 and NIII 991 also provide good discriminants. The models are compared to observations of nearby AGN, and also to high redshift objects where the UV lines are shifted into the optical.

  16. Formation, Evolution, and Revolution of Galaxies by SKA: Activities of SKA-Japan Galaxy Evolution Sub-SWG

    Takeuchi, Tsutomu T; Iono, Daisuke; Hirashita, Hiroyuki; Tee, Wei Leong; Wang, Wei-Hao; Momose, Rieko

    2016-01-01

    Formation and evolution of galaxies have been a central driving force in the studies of galaxies and cosmology. Recent studies provided a global picture of cosmic star formation history. However, what drives the evolution of star formation activities in galaxies has long been a matter of debate. The key factor of the star formation is the transition of hydrogen from atomic to molecular state, since the star formation is associated with the molecular phase. This transition is also strongly coupled with chemical evolution, because dust grains, i.e., tiny solid particles of heavy elements, play a critical role in molecular formation. Therefore, a comprehensive understanding of neutral-molecular gas transition, star formation and chemical enrichment is necessary to clarify the galaxy formation and evolution. Here we present the activity of SKA-JP galaxy evolution sub-science working group (subSWG) Our activity is focused on three epochs: z \\sim 0, 1, and z > 3. At z \\sim 0, we try to construct a unified picture o...

  17. Is the cluster environment quenching the Seyfert activity in elliptical and spiral galaxies?

    de Souza, R S; Krone-Martins, A; Cameron, E; Coelho, P; Hattab, M W; de Val-Borro, M; Hilbe, J M; Elliott, J; Hagen, A

    2016-01-01

    We developed a hierarchical Bayesian model (HBM) to investigate how the presence of Seyfert activity relates to their environment, herein represented by the galaxy cluster mass, $M_{200}$, and the normalized cluster centric distance, $r/r_{200}$. We achieved this by constructing an unbiased sample of galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, with morphological classifications provided by the Galaxy Zoo Project. A propensity score matching approach is introduced to control for the effects of confounding variables: stellar mass, galaxy colour, and star formation rate. The connection between Seyfert-activity and environmental properties in the de-biased sample is modelled within a HBM framework using the so-called logistic regression technique, suitable for the analysis of binary data (e.g., whether or not a galaxy hosts an AGN). Unlike standard ordinary least square fitting methods, our methodology naturally allows modelling the probability of Seyfert-AGN activity in galaxies on their natural scale, i.e. as a...

  18. Atomic-to-molecular gas phase transition triggered by the radio jet in Centaurus A

    Salomé, Quentin; Combes, Françoise; Hamer, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    NGC 5128 (Centaurus A) is one of the best example to study AGN-feedback in the local Universe. At 13.5 kpc from the galaxy, optical filaments with recent star formation are lying along the radio-jet direction. We used the Atacama Pathfinder EXperiment (APEX) to map the CO(2-1) emission all along the filament structure. Molecular gas mass of 8.2x10^7 Msun was found over the 4.2 kpc-structure which represents about 3% of the total gas mass of the NGC 5128 cold gas content. Two dusty mostly molecular structure are identified, following the optical filaments. The region corresponds to the crossing of the radio jet with the Northern HI shell, coming from a past galaxy merger. One filament is located at the border of the HI shell, while the other is entirely molecular, and devoid of HI gas. The molecular mass is comparable to the HI mass in the shell, suggesting a scenario where the atomic gas was shocked and transformed in molecular clouds by the radio jet. Comparison with combined FIR Herschel and UV GALEX estima...

  19. The physical characteristics of the gas in the disk of Centaurus a using the Herschel space observatory

    We search for variations in the disk of Centaurus A of the emission from atomic fine structure lines using Herschel PACS and SPIRE spectroscopy. In particular, we observe the [C II](158 μm), [N II](122 and 205 μm), [O I](63 and 145 μm), and [O III](88 μm) lines, which all play an important role in cooling the gas in photo-ionized and photodissociation regions (PDRs). We determine that the ([C II]+[O I]63)/F TIR line ratio, a proxy for the heating efficiency of the gas, shows no significant radial trend across the observed region, in contrast to observations of other nearby galaxies. We determine that 10%-20% of the observed [C II] emission originates in ionized gas. Comparison between our observations and a PDR model shows that the strength of the far-ultraviolet radiation field, G 0, varies between 101.75 and 102.75 and the hydrogen nucleus density varies between 102.75 and 103.75 cm–3, with no significant radial trend in either property. In the context of the emission line properties of the grand-design spiral galaxy M51 and the elliptical galaxy NGC 4125, the gas in Cen A appears more characteristic of that in typical disk galaxies rather than elliptical galaxies.

  20. The environment of AGNs and the activity degree of their surrounding galaxies

    Kollatschny, W; Zetzl, M

    2012-01-01

    Aims. We present results of a comprehensive spectral study on the large-scale environment of AGNs based on Sloan Spectroscopic Survey data. Methods. We analyzed the spectra of galaxies in the environment of AGN and other activity classes up to distances of 1 Mpc. Results. The mean H{\\alpha} and [OIII] {\\lambda}5007 line luminosities in the environmental galaxies within a projected radius of 1 Mpc are highest around Seyfert 1 galaxies, with decreasing luminosities for Seyfert 2 and HII galaxies, and lowest for absorption line galaxies. Furthermore, there is a trend toward H{\\alpha} and [OIII] luminosities in the environmental galaxies increasing as a function of proximity to the central emission line galaxies. There is another clear trend toward a neighborhood effect within a radius of 1000 kpc for the AGN and non-AGN types: Seyfert galaxies tend to have the highest probability of having another Seyfert galaxy in the neighborhood. HII galaxies tend to have the highest probability of having another HII galaxy i...

  1. Galaxy Zoo: the effect of bar-driven fuelling on the presence of an active galactic nucleus in disc galaxies

    Galloway, Melanie A.; Willett, Kyle W.; Fortson, Lucy F.; Cardamone, Carolin N.; Schawinski, Kevin; Cheung, Edmond; Lintott, Chris J.; Masters, Karen L.; Melvin, Thomas; Simmons, Brooke D.

    2015-04-01

    We study the influence of the presence of a strong bar in disc galaxies which host an active galactic nucleus (AGN). Using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and morphological classifications from the Galaxy Zoo 2 project, we create a volume-limited sample of 19 756 disc galaxies at 0.01 < z < 0.05 which have been visually examined for the presence of a bar. Within this sample, AGN host galaxies have a higher overall percentage of bars (51.8 per cent) than inactive galaxies exhibiting central star formation (37.1 per cent). This difference is primarily due to known effects: that the presence of both AGN and galactic bars is strongly correlated with both the stellar mass and integrated colour of the host galaxy. We control for this effect by examining the difference in AGN fraction between barred and unbarred galaxies in fixed bins of mass and colour. Once this effect is accounted for, there remains a small but statistically significant increase that represents 16 per cent of the average barred AGN fraction. Using the L_{[O III]}/MBH ratio as a measure of AGN strength, we show that barred AGNs do not exhibit stronger accretion than unbarred AGNs at a fixed mass and colour. The data are consistent with a model in which bar-driven fuelling does contribute to the probability of an actively growing black hole, but in which other dynamical mechanisms must contribute to the direct AGN fuelling via smaller, non-axisymmetric perturbations.

  2. Mass entrainment and turbulence-driven acceleration of ultra-high energy cosmic rays in Centaurus A

    Wykes, Sarka; Hardcastle, Martin J; Eilek, Jean A; Biermann, Peter L; Achterberg, Abraham; Bray, Justin D; Bicknell, Geoffrey V; Lazarian, Alex; Haverkorn, Marijke; Protheroe, Ray J; Bromberg, Omer

    2013-01-01

    Observations of the FR I radio galaxy Centaurus A in radio, X-ray and gamma-ray bands provide evidence for lepton acceleration up to several TeV and clues about hadron acceleration to tens of EeV. Synthesising the available observational constraints on the physical conditions and particle content in the jets, inner lobes and giant lobes of Centaurus A, we aim to evaluate its feasibility as an ultra-high-energy cosmic-ray source. We apply several methods of determining jet power and affirm the consistency of various power estimates of ~ 1 x 10^43 erg s^-1. Employing scaling relations based on the results of Laing & Bridle (2002), we estimate particle number densities in the jets, encompassing available radio through X-ray observations. Our model is compatible with the jets ingesting ~ 3 x 10^21 g s^-1 of matter via external entrainment from hot gas and ~ 7 x 10^22 g s^-1 via internal entrainment from jet-contained stars. This leads to an imbalance between the internal lobe pressure securable from radiating...

  3. ULTRAFAST OUTFLOWS: GALAXY-SCALE ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS FEEDBACK

    We show, using global three-dimensional grid-based hydrodynamical simulations, that ultrafast outflows (UFOs) from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) result in considerable feedback of energy and momentum into the interstellar medium (ISM) of the host galaxy. The AGN wind interacts strongly with the inhomogeneous, two-phase ISM consisting of dense clouds embedded in a tenuous, hot, hydrostatic medium. The outflow floods through the intercloud channels, sweeps up the hot ISM, and ablates and disperses the dense clouds. The momentum of the UFO is primarily transferred to the dense clouds via the ram pressure in the channel flow, and the wind-blown bubble evolves in the energy-driven regime. Any dependence on UFO opening angle disappears after the first interaction with obstructing clouds. On kpc scales, therefore, feedback by UFOs operates similarly to feedback by relativistic AGN jets. Negative feedback is significantly stronger if clouds are distributed spherically rather than in a disk. In the latter case, the turbulent backflow of the wind drives mass inflow toward the central black hole. Considering the common occurrence of UFOs in AGNs, they are likely to be important in the cosmological feedback cycles of galaxy formation.

  4. Ultrafast Outflows: Galaxy-scale Active Galactic Nucleus Feedback

    Wagner, A. Y.; Umemura, M.; Bicknell, G. V.

    2013-01-01

    We show, using global three-dimensional grid-based hydrodynamical simulations, that ultrafast outflows (UFOs) from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) result in considerable feedback of energy and momentum into the interstellar medium (ISM) of the host galaxy. The AGN wind interacts strongly with the inhomogeneous, two-phase ISM consisting of dense clouds embedded in a tenuous, hot, hydrostatic medium. The outflow floods through the intercloud channels, sweeps up the hot ISM, and ablates and disperses the dense clouds. The momentum of the UFO is primarily transferred to the dense clouds via the ram pressure in the channel flow, and the wind-blown bubble evolves in the energy-driven regime. Any dependence on UFO opening angle disappears after the first interaction with obstructing clouds. On kpc scales, therefore, feedback by UFOs operates similarly to feedback by relativistic AGN jets. Negative feedback is significantly stronger if clouds are distributed spherically rather than in a disk. In the latter case, the turbulent backflow of the wind drives mass inflow toward the central black hole. Considering the common occurrence of UFOs in AGNs, they are likely to be important in the cosmological feedback cycles of galaxy formation.

  5. ULTRAFAST OUTFLOWS: GALAXY-SCALE ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS FEEDBACK

    Wagner, A. Y.; Umemura, M. [Center for Computational Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-8577 (Japan); Bicknell, G. V., E-mail: ayw@ccs.tsukuba.ac.jp [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, ACT 2611 (Australia)

    2013-01-20

    We show, using global three-dimensional grid-based hydrodynamical simulations, that ultrafast outflows (UFOs) from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) result in considerable feedback of energy and momentum into the interstellar medium (ISM) of the host galaxy. The AGN wind interacts strongly with the inhomogeneous, two-phase ISM consisting of dense clouds embedded in a tenuous, hot, hydrostatic medium. The outflow floods through the intercloud channels, sweeps up the hot ISM, and ablates and disperses the dense clouds. The momentum of the UFO is primarily transferred to the dense clouds via the ram pressure in the channel flow, and the wind-blown bubble evolves in the energy-driven regime. Any dependence on UFO opening angle disappears after the first interaction with obstructing clouds. On kpc scales, therefore, feedback by UFOs operates similarly to feedback by relativistic AGN jets. Negative feedback is significantly stronger if clouds are distributed spherically rather than in a disk. In the latter case, the turbulent backflow of the wind drives mass inflow toward the central black hole. Considering the common occurrence of UFOs in AGNs, they are likely to be important in the cosmological feedback cycles of galaxy formation.

  6. Star Formation Activity in CLASH Brightest Cluster Galaxies

    Fogarty, Kevin; Connor, Thomas; Donahue, Megan; Moustakas, John

    2015-01-01

    The CLASH X-ray selected sample of 20 galaxy clusters contains ten brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) that exhibit significant ($>$5 $\\sigma$) extinction-corrected star formation rates (SFRs). Star formation activity is inferred from photometric estimates of UV and H$\\alpha$+[NII] emission in knots and filaments detected in CLASH HST observations. These measurements are supplemented with [OII], [OIII], and H$\\beta$ fluxes measured from spectra obtained with the SOAR telescope. Reddening-corrected UV-derived SFRs in these BCGs are broadly consistent with H$\\alpha$-derived SFRs. Five BCGs exhibit SFRs $>$10 M$_{\\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$ and an additional two have a SFR $>$ 100 M$_{\\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$. We confirm that photoionization from ongoing star formation powers the line emission nebulae in these BCGs, although in many BCGs there is also evidence for a LINER-like contribution. Using Chandra X-ray measurements, we infer that the star formation occurs exclusively in low-entropy cluster cores and exhibits a correlation ...

  7. The Nature of the Activity in Hickson Compact Groups of Galaxies

    Coziol, R; De Carvalho, R R; Capelato, H V; Coziol, Roger; Ribeiro, André L. B.; Carvalho, Reinaldo R. de; Capelato, Hugo V.

    1997-01-01

    We present the results of the spectral classification of the 82 brightest galaxies in a sample of 17 compact groups. We verify that the AGNs are preferentially located in the most early-type and luminous galaxies of the groups, as is usually observed in the field. But these AGNs also appear to be systematically concentrated towards the central parts of the groups. Our observations suggest a correlation between activity types, morphologies and densities of galaxies in the compact groups. This is consistent with a scenario in which galaxies of compact groups evolve by interacting with their environment and are currently in a quiet phase of their activity

  8. Star Formation Activity in CLASH Brightest Cluster Galaxies

    Fogarty, Kevin; Postman, Marc; Connor, Thomas; Donahue, Megan; Moustakas, John

    2015-11-01

    The CLASH X-ray selected sample of 20 galaxy clusters contains 10 brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) that exhibit significant (>5σ) extinction-corrected star formation rates (SFRs). Star formation activity is inferred from photometric estimates of UV and Hα+[N ii] emission in knots and filaments detected in CLASH Hubble Space Telescope ACS and WFC3 observations. UV-derived SFRs in these BCGs span two orders of magnitude, including two with a SFR ≳ 100 M⊙ yr-1. These measurements are supplemented with [O ii], [O iii], and Hβ fluxes measured from spectra obtained with the SOAR telescope. We confirm that photoionization from ongoing star formation powers the line emission nebulae in these BCGs, although in many BCGs there is also evidence of a LINER-like contribution to the line emission. Coupling these data with Chandra X-ray measurements, we infer that the star formation occurs exclusively in low-entropy cluster cores and exhibits a correlation with gas properties related to cooling. We also perform an in-depth study of the starburst history of the BCG in the cluster RXJ1532.9+3021, and create 2D maps of stellar properties on scales down to ˜350 pc. These maps reveal evidence for an ongoing burst occurring in elongated filaments, generally on ˜0.5-1.0 Gyr timescales, although some filaments are consistent with much younger (≲100 Myr) burst timescales and may be correlated with recent activity from the active galactic nucleus. The relationship between BCG SFRs and the surrounding intracluster medium gas properties provide new support for the process of feedback-regulated cooling in galaxy clusters and is consistent with recent theoretical predictions. Based on observations obtained at the Southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) telescope, which is a joint project of the Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia, e Inovação (MCTI) da República Federativa do Brasil, the U.S. National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO), the University of North Carolina at Chapel

  9. The Nearest OB Association: Scorpius-Centaurus (Sco OB2)

    Preibisch, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    We summarize observational results on the stellar population and star formation history of the Scorpius-Centaurus OB Association (Sco OB2), the nearest region of recent massive star formation. It consists of three subgroups, Upper Scorpius (US), Upper Centaurus-Lupus (UCL), and Lower Centaurus-Crux (LCC) which have ages of about 5, 17, and 16 Myr. In Upper Scorpius, numerous studies have recently revealed hundreds of low-mass association members, including dozens of brown dwarfs. The empirical mass function could be established over the full stellar mass range from 0.1 M_sun up to 20 M_sun, and was found to be consistent with recent determinations of the field initial mass function. A narrow range of ages around 5 Myr was found for the low-mass stars, the same age as had previously (and independently) been derived for the high-mass members. This supports earlier indications that the star formation process in US was triggered, and agrees with previous conjectures that the triggering event was a supernova- and ...

  10. The Rise and Fall of Galaxy Activity in Dark Matter Haloes

    Pasquali, Anna; Mo, H J; Yang, Xiaohu; Somerville, Rachel

    2008-01-01

    We use a SDSS galaxy group catalogue to study the dependence of galaxy activity on stellar mass, halo mass, and group hierarchy (centrals vs. satellites). We split our galaxy sample in star-forming galaxies, galaxies with optical AGN activity and radio sources. We find a smooth transition in halo mass as the activity of central galaxies changes from star formation to optical AGN activity to radio emission. Star-forming centrals preferentially reside in haloes with M<10^{12} Msun, central galaxies with optical-AGN activity typically inhabit haloes with M \\sim 10^{13} Msun, and centrals emitting in the radio mainly reside in haloes more massive than 10^{14} Msun. Although this seems to suggest that the environment (halo mass) determines the type of activity of its central galaxy, we find a similar trend with stellar mass: central star formers typically have stellar masses below 10^{10} Msun, while optical-AGN hosts and central radio sources have characteristic stellar masses of 10^{10.8} Msun and 10^{11.6} M...

  11. The Ghosts of Galaxies: Tidal Debris in Clusters

    Gregg, M D; Gregg, Michael D.; West, Michael J.

    2003-01-01

    Gravitational interactions in rich clusters can strip material from the outer parts of galaxies or even completely disrupt entire systems, giving rise to large scale, low surface brightness ghostly features stretching across intergalactic space. The nearby Coma and Centaurus clusters both have striking examples of galaxy ghosts, in the form of 100 kpc-long plumes of intergalactic debris. By searching HST archival images, we have found numerous other examples of galaxy ghosts in rich clusters at low redshift, evidence that galaxy destruction and recycling are ubiquitous, important in cluster formation and evolution, and continue to mold clusters at the present epoch. Many ghosts appear in X-ray bright clusters, perhaps signaling a connection with energetic subcluster mergers. The fate of such material has important ramifications for cluster evolution. Our new HST WFPC2 V & I images of a portion of the Centaurus plume reveal that it contains an excess of discrete objects with -12 < M_v < -6, consisten...

  12. Class I methanol megamasers: a potential probe of starburst activity and feedback in active galaxies

    Chen, X.; Ellingsen, S. P.; Zhang, J.-S.; Wang, J.-Z.; Shen, Z.-Q.; Wu, Q.-W.; Wu, Z.-Z.

    2016-06-01

    Previous observations have shown that the distribution of 36.2-GHz class I methanol megamaser (MM) emission in Arp 220 is highly correlated with the diffuse X-rays. On this basis it was suggested that methanol MM may be produced either by the effects of galactic-outflow-driven shocks and/or cosmic rays. Here we report the results of a single-dish survey undertaken with the Greenbank Telescope (GBT) to improve our understanding of the pumping conditions of extragalactic class I methanol masers and their relationship to starburst and feedback processes within the host galaxies, towards a sample which includes 16 galaxies which show both extended soft X-ray emission, and either OH or H2O MM emission. Large baseline ripples in the GBT spectra limited our results to tentative detections towards 11 of the target galaxies. Analysis of these tentative detections shows that there are significant correlations between the methanol intensity and the host-galaxy infrared, radio and OH MM emission, but no correlation with the X-ray and H2O MM emission. Some sources show methanol emission significantly offset from the systemic velocity of the galaxy (by up to 1000 km s-1) and we propose that these are associated with galactic-scale outflows from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) feedback. The combined observational properties suggest that class I methanol MMs are related to significant starburst and molecular outflow activity and hence may provide a potential probe of AGN feedback and starburst processes in the host galaxies.

  13. A large difference in the progenitor masses of active and passive galaxies in the EAGLE simulation

    Clauwens, Bart; Schaye, Joop

    2016-01-01

    Cumulative number density matching of galaxies is a method to observationally connect descendent galaxies to their typical main progenitors at higher redshifts and thereby to assess the evolution of galaxy properties. The accuracy of this method is limited due to galaxy merging and scatter in the stellar mass growth history of individual galaxies. Behroozi et al. (2013) have introduced a refinement of the method, based on abundance matching of observed galaxies to the Bolshoi dark-matter-only simulation. The EAGLE cosmological hydro-simulation is well suited to test this method, because it reproduces the observed evolution of the galaxy stellar mass function and has a representative sample of passive/active galaxies. We find agreement with the Behroozi et al. (2013) method for the complete sample of main progenitors of z = 0 galaxies, but we also find a strong dependence on the current star formation rate. Passive galaxies with a stellar mass up to 10^10.75 Msun have a completely different median mass history...

  14. Comparative Studies of Clustering Properties Between Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) Host Galaxies and Star-Forming Ones

    Using the volume-limited Main galaxy sample of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 6 (SDSS DR6), we have explored the difference of clustering properties between Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) host galaxies and star-forming galaxies. Our results preferentially show that AGN host galaxies have a lower fraction in isolated, close double and multiple systems than star-forming galaxies. (authors)

  15. The Evolution of Galaxies (via SF activity and gas content) versus Environment

    Cybulski, Ryan; Yun, Min Su

    2016-01-01

    My dissertation work concerns the accurate mapping of the large-scale structure (LSS), traced by galaxies, and the assessment of the dependence of fundamental galaxy properties (e.g. star-formation activity, color, and gas content) on their environment. Mapping of the LSS is done with two complementary techniques, and together they provide both a local measure of the density field and a more global characterization of the environment of a galaxy, thereby allowing for a more complete measure of a galaxy's environment. I have applied this LSS mapping technique to the entire Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectroscopic galaxy sample at zdissertation, with the overall theme of how galaxies are affected by their environment.

  16. The youngest and most active radio galaxies in the local universe: AT20G sources in the 6dF Galaxy Survey

    Sadler, Elaine M; Mahony, Elizabeth; Mauch, Tom; Murphy, Tara

    2013-01-01

    We study a sample of 202 radio sources from the Australia Telescope 20 GHz (AT20G) survey which are identified with nearby galaxies from the 6dF Galaxy Survey (6dFGS). Our sample includes many of the youngest and most active radio galaxies in the local universe, and around 65% of the sample are candidate Compact Steep-Spectrum (CSS) and Gigahertz-Peaked Spectrum (GPS) radio sources. The AT20G-6dFGS galaxies have a median redshift of z=0.058 and span a wide range in radio luminosity. The local radio luminosity function (RLF) of galaxies at 20 GHz roughly matches the local 1.4 GHz RLF for radio-loud active galaxies if we make a simple shift in radio spectral index. While most of the AT20G-6dFGS galaxies are massive ellipticals, at least 30% of the radio sources in our sample are hosted by galaxies with WISE infrared colours characteristic of spiral galaxies with ongoing star formation. We see a strong dichotomy in the WISE colours of the host galaxies of FR-1 and FR-2 radio sources in our sample, with the FR-1 ...

  17. Stellar and Dust Properties of Local Elliptical Galaxies: Clues to the Onset of Nuclear Activity

    Zhang, Yu; Ho, Luis C

    2008-01-01

    We study the stellar and dust properties of a well-defined sample of local elliptical galaxies to investigate the relationship between host galaxy properties and nuclear activity. We select a complete sample of 45 ellipticals from the Palomar spectroscopic survey of nearby galaxies, which includes 20 low-luminosity active galactic nuclei classified as LINERs and 25 inactive galaxies. Using a stellar population synthesis method, we compare the derived stellar population properties of the LINER versus the inactive subsamples. We also study the dust and stellar surface brightness distributions of the central regions of these galaxies using high-resolution images obtained with the {\\it Hubble Space Telescope}. Relative to the inactive subsample, ellipticals hosting LINERs share similar total optical and near-infrared luminosity, central stellar velocity dispersions, and nuclear stellar populations as judged from their luminosity-weighted ages and metallicities. LINERs, on the other hand, have a larger fraction of...

  18. Resolving the extended stellar haloes of nearby galaxies: the wide-field PISCeS survey

    Crnojevic, Denija; Sand, David J.; Caldwell, Nelson; Guhathakurta, Puragra; McLeod, Brian A.; Seth, Anil; Simon, Joshua D.; Strader, Jay; Toloba, Elisa

    2015-08-01

    I will present results from the wide-field Panoramic Imaging Survey of Centaurus and Sculptor (PISCeS): we investigate the resolved stellar haloes of two nearby galaxies (the spiral NGC253 and the elliptical Centaurus A, D~3.7 Mpc) out to a galactocentric radius of 150 kpc with Magellan/Megacam. The survey led to the discovery of ~20 faint satellites and stunning streams/substructures in two environments substantially different from the Local Group, i.e. the loose Sculptor group of galaxies and the Centaurus A group dominated by an elliptical. These discoveries clearly testify the past and ongoing accretion processes shaping the haloes of these nearby galaxies, and provide the first complete census of their satellite systems down to an unprecedented M_V<-8. This effectively enables the first direct comparison of external galaxies' resolved haloes to the PAndAS survey. The detailed characterization of the stellar content, shape and gradients in the extended haloes of NGC253, Centaurus A and in their satellites represent crucial constraints to theoretical models of galaxy formation and evolution.

  19. Disentangling the circumnuclear environs of Centaurus A: II. On the nature of the broad absorption line

    Espada, D; Matsushita, S; Sakamoto, K; Henkel, C; Iono, D; Israel, F P; Muller, S; Petitpas, G; Pihlstroem, Y; Taylor, G B; Trung, D V

    2010-01-01

    We report on atomic gas (HI) and molecular gas (as traced by CO(2-1)) redshifted absorption features toward the nuclear regions of the closest powerful radio galaxy, Centaurus A (NGC 5128). Our HI observations using the Very Long Baseline Array allow us to discern with unprecedented sub-parsec resolution HI absorption profiles toward different positions along the 21 cm continuum jet emission in the inner 0."3 (or 5.4 pc). In addition, our CO(2-1) data obtained with the Submillimeter Array probe the bulk of the absorbing molecular gas with little contamination by emission, not possible with previous CO single-dish observations. We shed light with these data on the physical properties of the gas in the line of sight, emphasizing the still open debate about the nature of the gas that produces the broad absorption line (~55 km/s). First, the broad H I line is more prominent toward the central and brightest 21 cm continuum component than toward a region along the jet at a distance ~ 20 mas (or 0.4 pc) further from...

  20. Observations of the giant radio lobes region of Centaurus A with SAS 3

    Marshall, F. J.; Clark, G. W.

    1981-01-01

    Observations of the X-ray flux from the extended radio lobes of the galaxy Centaurus A obtained with the SAS 3 observatory are reported. The 15 x 15 deg region that includes the lobes was mapped by superposing data from raster scans with the horizontal tubular collimator detectors, which have a 1.7 deg FWHM circular field of view. Data obtained is consistent with the presence of superposed emission from the point sources NGC 5128 and MX 1312-42, a previously unreported source detected by the Einstein Observatory IPC. Fluxes of 4.63 + or - 0.14 x 10 to the -10th and 4.6 + or - 0.6 x 10 to the -11th ergs/sq cm per sec were measured for NGC 5128 and MX 1312-42, respectively, with best fit power law spectra of indices 0.83 + or - 0.04 and 0.62 + or - 0.10 and hydrogen column densities of 1.23 + or - 0.10 x 10 to the 23rd and 9.7 + or - 15.0 x 10 to the 21st atoms/sq cm. Results imply an upper limit of 2.9 x 10 to the 11th for the X-ray emission from the extended radio lobes of Cen A between 2 and 10 keV, which indicates a lower limit to the magnetic field in the lobes of 1.6 x 10 to the -6th gauss.

  1. The Survey of Centaurus A's Baryonic Structures (SCABS). I. Survey Description and Initial Source Catalogues

    Taylor, Matthew A; Puzia, Thomas H; Mieske, Steffen; Eigenthaler, Paul; Bovill, Mia Sauda

    2016-01-01

    We present new, wide-field, optical ($u'g'r'i'z'$) Dark Energy Camera observations covering $\\sim21\\,{\\rm deg}^2$ centred on the nearby giant elliptical galaxy NGC5128 called "The Survey of Centaurus A's Baryonic Structures" (SCABS). The data reduction and analysis procedures are described including initial source detection, photometric and astrometric calibration, image stacking, and point-spread function modelling. We estimate 50 and 90 percent, field-dependent, point-source completeness limits of at least $u'=24.08$ and $23.62$ mag (AB), $g'=22.67$ and $22.27$ mag, $r'=22.46$ and $22.00$ mag, $i'=22.05$ and $21.63$ mag, and $z'=21.71$ and $21.34$ mag. Deeper imaging in the $u'$-, $i'$- and $z'$-bands provide the fainter limits for the inner $\\sim3\\,{\\rm deg}^2$ of the survey, and we find very stable photometric sensitivity across the entire field of view. Source catalogues are released in all filters including spatial, photometric, and morphological information for a total of $\\sim5\\times10^5-1.5\\times10^6...

  2. The Northern Middle Lobe of Centaurus A: Circumgalactic Gas in a Starburst Wind

    Neff, S. G.; Eilek, J. A.; Owen, F. N.; Schiminovich, D.; Seibert, M.; Thilker, D.

    2012-01-01

    We present deep ultraviolet (GALEX), radio continuum (VLA) and H-alpha (Magellan) images of the circumgalactic medium around Centaurus A (NGC5128). We focus on the Northern Middle Lobe (NML), a region extending more than 50kpc beyond the galaxy and known to host a collection of striking phenomena: emission line filaments, recent star formation, disrupted HI/molecular gas streams, and short-lived X-ray clouds. Far UV emission is tightly correlated with H-alpha emission for more than 50kpc, and loosely associated with a filament of X-ray clouds and with the radio continuum emission. The radio emission in the NML region does not appear to be an extension of the inner radio jet (10kpc) or a typical radio lobe. We speculate that the "weather" seen in the NML region is a short-lived phenomenon, caused by an outflow encountering cool gas deposited by one of the recent merger/encounter events which have characterized the history of NGC5128.

  3. Twelve and a Half Years of Observations of Centaurus A with RXTE

    Rothschild, Richard E; Rivers, Elizabeth; Suchy, Slawomir; Pottschmidt, Katja; Kadler, Matthias; Mueller, Cornelia; Wilms, Joern

    2011-01-01

    The Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer has observed the nearest radio galaxy, Centaurus A, in 13 intervals from 1966 August to 2009 February over the 3--200 keV band. Spectra accumulated over the 13 intervals were well described with an absorbed power law and iron line. Cut-off power laws and Compton reflection from cold matter did not provide a better description. For the 2009 January observation, we set a lower limit on the cut-off energy at over 2 MeV. The power spectral density function was generated from RXTE/ASM and PCA data, as well as an XMM-Newton long look, and clear evidence for a break at 18+10-7 days (68% conf.) was seen. Given Cen A's high black hole mass and very low value of Lx/LEdd, the break was a factor of 17+/-9 times higher than the break frequency predicted by the McHardy and co-workers' relation, which was empirically derived for a sample of objects, which are radio-quiet and accreting at relatively high values of Lbol/LEdd. We have interpreted our observations in the context of a clumpy molec...

  4. Ultra Fast Outflows: Galaxy-Scale Active Galactic Nucleus Feedback

    Wagner, A Y; Bicknell, G V

    2012-01-01

    We show, using global 3D grid-based hydrodynamical simulations, that Ultra Fast Outflows (UFOs) from Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) result in considerable feedback of energy and momentum into the interstellar medium (ISM) of the host galaxy. The AGN wind interacts strongly with the inhomogeneous, two-phase ISM consisting of dense clouds embedded in a tenuous hot hydrostatic medium. The outflow floods through the inter-cloud channels, sweeps up the hot ISM, and ablates and disperses the dense clouds. The momentum of the UFO is primarily transferred to the dense clouds via the ram pressure in the channel flow, and the wind-blown bubble evolves in the energy-driven regime. Any dependence on UFO opening angle disappears after the first interaction with obstructing clouds. On kpc scales, therefore, feedback by UFOs operates similarly to feedback by relativistic AGN jets. Negative feedback is significantly stronger if clouds are distributed spherically, rather than in a disc. In the latter case the turbulent backflow...

  5. MAXI and GLAST Studies of Jets in Active Galaxies

    Madejski, Greg; Kataoka, Jun; Sikora, Marek

    2008-10-13

    The recent launch of GLAST--coinciding with the MAXI workshop--opens a new era for studies of jet-dominated active galaxies, known as blazars. While the emission processes operating in various spectral bands in blazars are reasonably well understood, the knowledge of the details of the structure of the jet, location of the dissipation region with respect to the accreting black hole, and coupling of the jet to the accretion process are known only at a rudimentary level. Blazars are variable, and this provides an opportunity to use the variability in various bands--and in particular, the relationship of respective time series to each other--to explore the relative location of regions responsible for emission in the respective bands. Observationally, this requires well-sampled time series in as many spectral bands as possible. To this end, with its all-sky, sensitive monitoring capability, the recently launched GLAST, and MAXI, to be deployed in 2009, are the most promising instruments bound to provide good sampling in respectively the energetic gamma-ray, and the soft X-ray band. This paper highlights the inferences regarding blazar jets that can be gleaned from such joint observations.

  6. The Search for signals of technological activities in the galaxy

    Lemarchand, Guillermo A

    2010-01-01

    In this article an analysis of the fundamentals used to search for extraterrestrial artificial signals in the galaxy, which have been developing for more than five decades, is presented. It is shown that the key factor for the success of these research projects is given by the technological civilizations lifetimes. Assuming the Principle of Mediocrity, estimations are made to determine the minimum number of civilizations that may co-exist in the galaxy and the probability of detecting a signal from them.

  7. On the behaviour of the IR Ca II triplet in normal and active galaxies

    Ca II triplet in absorption at λλ8498,8542,8662 A is the strongest feature in the infrared spectrum of late-type stars and normal galaxies. Its strength has been found to be a good luminosity indicator for metal-rich stellar populations. We present high signal-to-noise near-IR spectroscopic data for the nuclear region of 42 normal and active galaxies. We have explored the behaviour of the Ca II triplet strength and found that it shows a small spread around a mean value of 7 A for our sample of normal galaxies. We also found that, in all the Seyfert type 2 galaxies measured and even in some Seyfert type 1, while the optical stellar features show substantial dilution, the strength of the IR Ca II triplet is equal to and in some cases larger than that in normal elliptical galaxies. (author)

  8. An actively accreting massive black hole in the dwarf starburst galaxy Henize 2-10.

    Reines, Amy E; Sivakoff, Gregory R; Johnson, Kelsey E; Brogan, Crystal L

    2011-02-01

    Supermassive black holes are now thought to lie at the heart of every giant galaxy with a spheroidal component, including our own Milky Way. The birth and growth of the first 'seed' black holes in the earlier Universe, however, is observationally unconstrained and we are only beginning to piece together a scenario for their subsequent evolution. Here we report that the nearby dwarf starburst galaxy Henize 2-10 (refs 5 and 6) contains a compact radio source at the dynamical centre of the galaxy that is spatially coincident with a hard X-ray source. From these observations, we conclude that Henize 2-10 harbours an actively accreting central black hole with a mass of approximately one million solar masses. This nearby dwarf galaxy, simultaneously hosting a massive black hole and an extreme burst of star formation, is analogous in many ways to galaxies in the infant Universe during the early stages of black-hole growth and galaxy mass assembly. Our results confirm that nearby star-forming dwarf galaxies can indeed form massive black holes, and that by implication so can their primordial counterparts. Moreover, the lack of a substantial spheroidal component in Henize 2-10 indicates that supermassive black-hole growth may precede the build-up of galaxy spheroids. PMID:21217688

  9. PHYSICAL PROPERTIES, STAR FORMATION, AND ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS ACTIVITY IN BALMER BREAK GALAXIES AT 0 < z < 1

    Diaz Tello, J.; Donzelli, C. [IATE, Observatorio Astronomico de Cordoba, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba (Argentina); Padilla, N. [Departamento de Astronomia y Astrofisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile (Chile); Fujishiro, N.; Yoshikawa, T. [Koyama Astronomical Observatory, Kyoto Sangyo University (Japan); Hanami, H. [Physics Section, Iwate University (Japan); Hatsukade, B., E-mail: jdiazt@oac.uncor.edu [Department of Astronomy, Kyoto University (Japan)

    2013-07-01

    We present a spectroscopic study with the derivation of the physical properties of 37 Balmer break galaxies, which have the necessary lines to locate them in star-forming-active galactic nuclei (AGNs) diagnostic diagrams. These galaxies span a redshift range from 0.045 to 0.93 and are somewhat less massive than similar samples of previous works. The studied sample has multiwavelength photometric data coverage from the ultraviolet to mid-infrared (MIR) Spitzer bands. We investigate the connection between star formation and AGN activity via optical, mass-excitation (MEx), and MIR diagnostic diagrams. Through optical diagrams, 31 (84%) star-forming galaxies, two (5%) composite galaxies, and three (8%) AGNs were classified, whereas from the MEx diagram only one galaxy was classified as AGN. A total of 19 galaxies have photometry available in all the IRAC/Spitzer bands. Of these, three AGN candidates were not classified as AGN in the optical diagrams, suggesting they are dusty/obscured AGNs, or that nuclear star formation has diluted their contributions. By fitting the spectral energy distribution of the galaxies, we derived the stellar masses, dust reddening E(B - V), ages, and UV star formation rates (SFRs). Furthermore, the relationship between SFR surface density ({Sigma}{sub SFR}) and stellar mass surface density per time unit ({Sigma}{sub M{sub */{tau}}}) as a function of redshift was investigated using the [O II] {lambda}3727, 3729, H{alpha} {lambda}6563 luminosities, which revealed that both quantities are larger for higher redshift galaxies. We also studied the SFR and specific SFR (SSFR) versus stellar mass and color relations, with the more massive galaxies having higher SFR values but lower SSFR values than less massive galaxies. These results are consistent with previous ones showing that, at a given mass, high-redshift galaxies have on average larger SFR and SSFR values than low-redshift galaxies. Finally, bluer galaxies have larger SSFR values than redder

  10. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Star formation in active and normal galaxies (Tsai+, 2015)

    Tsai, M.; Hwang, C.-Y.

    2015-11-01

    We selected 104 active galaxies from the lists of Melendez et al. (2010MNRAS.406..493M), Condon et al. 1991 (cat. J/ApJ/378/65), and Ho & Ulvestad 2001 (cat. J/ApJS/133/77). Most of the sources are identified as Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs), and a few of them are classified as Luminous InfraRed Galaxies (LIRGs). We obtained 3.6 and 8μm infrared images of these galaxies from the Spitzer Archive (http://sha.ipac.caltech.edu/applications/Spitzer/SHA/) and 8GHz images from the VLA archive (http://archive.nrao.edu/archive/archiveimage.html). We also selected a nearby AGN sub-sample containing 21 radio-selected AGNs for further spatial analysis. We selected 25 nearby AGNs exhibiting no detected radio emission in order to compare with the results of the radio-selected sources. For comparison, we also selected normal galaxies with distances less than 15Mpc from the catalog of Tully 1994 (see cat. VII/145). We only selected the galaxies that have Spitzer archive data and are not identified as AGNs in either the Veron-Cetty & Veron 2006 (see cat. VII/258) AGN catalog or in the NED database (http://ned.ipac.caltech.edu/). Our results for the radio-selected and the non-radio-selected active galaxies are listed in Table1, and those for the normal galaxies are listed in Table2. (2 data files).

  11. Embedded star formation in the extended narrow line region of Centaurus A: Extreme mixing observed by MUSE

    Santoro, F.; Oonk, J. B. R.; Morganti, R.; Oosterloo, T. A.; Tadhunter, C.

    2016-05-01

    We present a detailed study of the complex ionization structure in a small (~250 pc) extended narrow line region (ENLR) cloud near Centaurus A using the Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer. This cloud is located in the so-called outer filament of ionized gas (about 15 kpc from the nucleus) where jet-induced star formation has been suggested to occur by different studies. We find that, despite the small size, a mixture of ionization mechanisms is operating, resulting in considerable complexity in the spatial ionization structure. The area includes two H ii regions where star formation is occurring and another location where star formation must have ceased very recently. Interestingly, the extreme Balmer decrement of one of the star forming regions (Hα/Hβobs ~ 6) indicates that it is still heavily embedded in its natal cocoon of gas and dust. At all three locations a continuum counterpart is found with spectra matching those of O/B stars local to Centaurus A. The H ii regions are embedded in a larger gas complex which is photoionized by the radiation of the central active galactic nucleus (AGN), but the O/B stars affect the spatial ionization pattern in the ENLR cloud very locally. In particular, in the surroundings of the youngest star forming region, we can isolate a tight mixing sequence in the diagnostic diagram going from gas with ionization due to a pure stellar continuum to gas only photoionized by the AGN. These results emphasize the complexity and the mixture of processes occurring in star forming regions under the influence of an AGN radiation. This is relevant for our understanding of AGN-induced star formation suggested to occur in a number of objects, including this region of Centaurus A. They also illustrate that these young stars influence the gas over only a limited region.

  12. On the Host Galaxy of GRB 150101B and the Associated Active Galactic Nucleus

    Xie, Chen; Wang, Junfeng; Liu, Tong; Jiang, Xiaochuan

    2016-01-01

    We present a multi-wavelength analysis of the host galaxy of short-duration gamma-ray burst (GRB) 150101B. Follow-up optical and X-ray observations suggested that the host galaxy, 2MASX J12320498-1056010, likely harbors a low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGN). Our modeling of the spectral energy distribution (SED) has confirmed the nature of the AGN, making it the first reported GRB host that contains an AGN. We have also found the host galaxy is a massive elliptical galaxy with stellar population of $\\sim 5.7\\ Gyr$, one of the oldest among the short-duration GRB hosts. Our analysis suggests that the host galaxy can be classified as an X-ray bright, optically normal galaxy (XBONG), and the central AGN is likely dominated by a radiatively inefficient accretion flow (RIAF). Our work explores interesting connection that may exist between GRB and AGN activities of the host galaxy, which can help understand the host environment of the GRB events and the roles of AGN feedback.

  13. The nature and origin of Narrow Line AGN activity in a sample of isolated SDSS galaxies

    Coziol, R; Plauchu-Frayn, I; Islas-Islas, J M; Ortega-Minakata, R A; Larios, D M Neri; Andernach, H

    2011-01-01

    We discuss the nature and origin of the nuclear activity observed in a sample of 292 SDSS narrow-emission-line galaxies, considered to have formed and evolved in isolation. All these galaxies are spiral like and show some kind of nuclear activity. The fraction of Narrow Line AGNs (NLAGNs) and Transition type Objects (TOs; a NLAGN with circumnuclear star formation) is relatively high, amounting to 64% of the galaxies. There is a definite trend for the NLAGNs to appear in early-type spirals, while the star forming galaxies and TOs are found in later-type spirals. We verify that the probability for a galaxy to show an AGN characteristic increases with the bulge mass of the galaxy (Torre-Papaqui et al. 2011), and find evidence that this trend is really a by-product of the morphology, suggesting that the AGN phenomenon is intimately connected with the formation process of the galaxies. Consistent with this interpretation, we establish a strong connection between the astration rate--the efficiency with which the ga...

  14. HOST GALAXY PROPERTIES OF THE SWIFT BAT ULTRA HARD X-RAY SELECTED ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS

    We have assembled the largest sample of ultra hard X-ray selected (14-195 keV) active galactic nucleus (AGN) with host galaxy optical data to date, with 185 nearby (z * >10.5) have a 5-10 times higher rate of spiral morphologies than in SDSS AGNs or inactive galaxies. We also see enhanced far-infrared emission in BAT AGN suggestive of higher levels of star formation compared to the comparison samples. BAT AGNs are preferentially found in the most massive host galaxies with high concentration indexes indicative of large bulge-to-disk ratios and large supermassive black holes. The narrow-line (NL) BAT AGNs have similar intrinsic luminosities as the SDSS NL Seyferts based on measurements of [O III] λ5007. There is also a correlation between the stellar mass and X-ray emission. The BAT AGNs in mergers have bluer colors and greater ultra hard X-ray emission compared to the BAT sample as a whole. In agreement with the unified model of AGNs, and the relatively unbiased nature of the BAT sources, the host galaxy colors and morphologies are independent of measures of obscuration such as X-ray column density or Seyfert type. The high fraction of massive spiral galaxies and galaxy mergers in BAT AGNs suggest that host galaxy morphology is related to the activation and fueling of local AGN.

  15. Accretion/Jet Activity and Narrow [O III] Kinematics in Young Radio Galaxies

    Wu, Qingwen; Humphrey, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    We estimate black hole masses and Eddington ratios for a sample of 81 young radio galaxies (42 CSS +39 GPS). We find that the average black hole (BH) mass of these young radio galaxies is ~8.3, which is less than that of radio loud QSOs and low redshift radio galaxies. The CSS/GPS sources have relatively high Eddington ratios, with an average value of =-0.75, which are similar to those of narrow line Seyfert 1 galaxies (NLS1s). This suggests that young radio galaxies may not only be in the early stages of their radio activity, but also in the early stage of their accretion activity. We find that the young radio galaxies as a class deviate systematically from M_bh-\\sigma relation defined by nearby inactive galaxies, when using [O III] as a surrogate for stellar velocity dispersion, \\sigma_* . We also find that the deviation of the [O III] line width is correlated with the Eddington ratio and sources with Lbol/LEdd~1 have the largest deviations, which are similar to those of radio quiet QSOs/NLS1s (radio jets i...

  16. An Infrared Examination of Young Stars in Upper Centaurus Lupus

    Johnson, Chelen H.; Linahan, M.; Barge, J.; Rebull, L. M.; Aranda, D.; Canlas, N. G.; Donahoe, K. E.; Ernst, M. K.; Ford, S.; Fox, M. E.; Gutierrez, E.; Haecker, L. W.; Hibbs, C. A.; Maddaus, M. R.; Martin, T. A.; Ng, E.; Niedbalec, A. P.; O'Bryan, S. E.; Searls, E. F.; Zeidner, A. B.; Zegeye, D.

    2014-01-01

    Optical studies of the Upper Centaurus Lupus (UCL) region of the Scorpius-Centaurus (Sco-Cen) complex have found many young stellar objects. The nearby G/K/M Sco-Cen members have been estimated to be much younger 10 Myr) than similar star associations (Song, et al 2012). We have assembled infrared data for the objects thought to be members of UCL by mining various archives including the 2-Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS), the Spitzer Heritage Archive (SHA), specifically the Spitzer Enhanced Imaging Products Source List, and the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) all-sky source catalog. We created spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) with multiple wavelengths to identify infrared excesses and determine what fraction of these stars have circumstellar disks. Students from three high schools collaborated on this project, which is a follow-up project made possible through the NASA/IPAC Teacher Archive Research Project (NITARP; http://nitarp.ipac.caltech.edu).

  17. Resolving the extended stellar halos of nearby galaxies: the wide-field PISCeS survey

    Crnojević, D; Caldwell, N; Guhathakurta, P; McLeod, B; Seth, A; Simon, J D; Strader, J; Toloba, E

    2015-01-01

    In the wide-field Panoramic Imaging Survey of Centaurus and Sculptor (PISCeS), we investigate the resolved stellar halos of two nearby galaxies (the elliptical Centaurus A and the spiral Sculptor, D $\\sim3.7$ Mpc) out to a projected galactocentric radius of 150 kpc with Magellan/Megacam. The survey has led to the discovery of $\\sim$20 faint satellites to date, plus prominent streams and substructures in two environments that are substantially different from the Local Group, i.e. the Centaurus A group dominated by an elliptical and the loose Sculptor group of galaxies. These discoveries clearly attest to the importance of past and ongoing accretion processes in shaping the halos of these nearby galaxies, and provide the first census of their satellite systems down to an unprecedented $M_V<-8$. The detailed characterization of the stellar content, shape and gradients in the extended halos of Sculptor, Centaurus A, and their dwarf satellites provides key constraints on theoretical models of galaxy formation a...

  18. The radio halo and active galaxies in the Coma cluster

    The Cambridge Low-Frequency Synthesis Telescope has been used to map the Coma cluster at 151 MHz. Two new extended sources are found, associated with the cluster galaxies NGC4839 and NGC4849. The central halo radio source is shown not to have a simple symmetrical structure but to be distorted, with separate centres of brightening near the radio galaxies NGC4874 and IC4040. The structure cannot be accounted for by cluster-wide acceleration processes but implies a close connection with current radio galaxies and, in particular, models requiring diffusion of electrons out of radio sources seem to be favoured. The other large source, near Coma A, is detected and higher resolution data at 1407 MHz are used to clarify its structure. (author)

  19. Herschel Observed Stripe 82 Quasars and Their Host Galaxies: Connections between AGN Activity and host Galaxy Star Formation

    Dong, X. Y.; Wu, Xue-Bing

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we present a study of 207 quasars selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey quasar catalogs and the Herschel Stripe 82 survey. Quasars within this sample are high-luminosity quasars with a mean bolometric luminosity of 1046.4 erg s‑1. The redshift range of this sample is within z selected quasars that have been detected in all three Herschel-SPIRE bands, the quasar sample is complete yet highly biased. Based on the multi-wavelength photometric observation data, we conducted a spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting through UV to FIR. Parameters such as active galactic nucleus (AGN) luminosity, far-IR (FIR) luminosity, stellar mass, as well as many other AGN and galaxy properties are deduced from the SED fitting results. The mean star formation rate (SFR) of the sample is 419 M ⊙ yr‑1 and the mean gas mass is ∼1011.3 M ⊙. All of these results point to an IR luminous quasar system. Compared with star formation main sequence (MS) galaxies, at least 80 out of 207 quasars are hosted by starburst galaxies. This supports the statement that luminous AGNs are more likely to be associated with major mergers. The SFR increases with the redshift up to z = 2. It is correlated with the AGN bolometric luminosity, where {L}{{FIR}}\\propto {L}{{Bol}}0.46+/- 0.03. The AGN bolometric luminosity is also correlated with the host galaxy mass and gas mass. Yet the correlation between L FIR and L Bol has higher significant level, implies that the link between AGN accretion and the SFR is more primal. The M BH/M * ratio of our sample is 0.02, higher than the value 0.005 in the local universe. It might indicate an evolutionary trend of the M BH–M * scaling relation.

  20. A hybrid model for the evolution of galaxies and Active Galactic Nuclei in the infrared

    Cai, Zhen-Yi; Xia, Jun-Qing; De Zotti, Gianfranco; Negrello, Mattia; Gruppioni, Carlotta; Rigby, Emma; Castex, Guillaume; Delabrouille, Jacques; Danese, Luigi

    2013-01-01

    [Abridged] We present a comprehensive investigation of the cosmological evolution of the luminosity function (LF) of galaxies and active galactic nuclei (AGN) in the infrared (IR). Based on the observed dichotomy in the ages of stellar populations of early-type galaxies on one side and late-type galaxies on the other, the model interprets the epoch-dependent LFs at z \\geq 1.5 using a physical model for the evolution of proto-spheroidal galaxies and of the associated AGNs, while IR galaxies at z<1.5 are interpreted as being mostly late-type 'cold' (normal) and 'warm' (starburst) galaxies. As for proto-spheroids, in addition to the epoch-dependent LFs of stellar and AGN components separately, we have worked out the evolving LFs of these objects as a whole (stellar plus AGN component). The model provides a physical explanation for the observed positive evolution of both galaxies and AGNs up to z \\simeq 2.5 and for the negative evolution at higher redshifts, for the sharp transition from Euclidean to extremely...

  1. Shock heating in the group atmosphere of the radio galaxy B2 0838+32A

    Jetha, Nazirah N; Ponman, Trevor J; Sakelliou, Irini

    2008-01-01

    We present Chandra and radio observations, and analysis of Sloan Digital Sky Survey data, of the radio galaxy B2 0838+32A (4C 32.26) and its environment. The radio galaxy is at the centre of a nearby group that has often been identified with the cluster Abell 695, but we argue that the original Abell cluster is likely to be an unrelated and considerably more distant system. The radio source is a restarting radio galaxy and, using our Chandra data, we argue that the currently active lobes are expanding supersonically, driving a shock with Mach number $2.4^{+1.0}_{-0.5}$ into the inter-stellar medium. This would be only the third strong shock round a young radio source to be discovered, after Centaurus A and NGC 3801. However, in contrast to both these systems, the host galaxy of B2 0838+32A shows no evidence for a recent merger, while the AGN spectrum shows no evidence for the dusty torus that would imply a large reservoir of cold gas close to the central black hole. On the contrary, the AGN spectrum is of a t...

  2. Galaxy Formation

    Sparre, Martin

    Galaxy formation is an enormously complex discipline due to the many physical processes that play a role in shaping galaxies. The objective of this thesis is to study galaxy formation with two different approaches: First, numerical simulations are used to study the structure of dark matter and how...... galaxies form stars throughout the history of the Universe, and secondly it is shown that observations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) can be used to probe galaxies with active star formation in the early Universe. A conclusion from the hydrodynamical simulations is that the galaxies from the stateof...... important, since it helps constraining chemical evolution models at high redshift. A new project studying how the population of galaxies hosting GRBs relate to other galaxy population is outlined in the conclusion of this thesis. The core of this project will be to quantify how the stellar mass function of...

  3. The Far-Infrared Energy Distributions of Seyfert and Starburst Galaxies in the Local Universe: Infrared Space Observatory Photometry of the 12 Micron Active Galaxy Sample

    Spinoglio, Luigi; Andreani, Paola; Malkan, Matthew A.

    2002-06-01

    New far-infrared photometry with ISOPHOT aboard the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) is presented for 58 galaxies with homogeneous published data for another 32 galaxies, all belonging to the 12 μm galaxy sample-in total, 29 Seyfert 1 galaxies, 35 Seyfert 2 galaxies, and 12 starburst galaxies, or about half of the 12 μm active galaxy sample, plus 14 normal galaxies for comparison. ISO and Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) data are used to define color-color diagrams and spectral energy distributions (SEDs). Thermal dust emission at two temperatures (one cold at 15-30 K and one warm at 50-70 K) can fit the 60-200 μm SED, with a dust emissivity law proportional to the inverse square of the wavelength. Seyfert 1 galaxies and Seyfert 2 galaxies are indistinguishable longward of 100 μm, while, as already seen by IRAS, the former have flatter SEDs shortward of 60 μm. A mild anticorrelation is found between the [200-100] color and the ``60 μm excess.'' We infer that this is due to the fact that galaxies with a strong starburst component and thus a strong 60 μm flux have a steeper far-infrared turnover. In non-Seyfert galaxies, increasing the luminosity corresponds to increasing the star formation rate, which enhances the 25 and 60 μm emission. This shifts the peak emission from around 150 μm in the most quiescent spirals to shorter than 60 μm in the strongest starburst galaxies. To quantify these trends further, we identified with the IRAS colors three idealized infrared SEDs: pure quiescent disk emission, pure starburst emission, and pure Seyfert nucleus emission. Even between 100 and 200 μm, the quiescent disk emission remains much cooler than the starburst component. Seyfert galaxies have 100-200 μm SEDs ranging from pure disks to pure starbursts, with no apparent contribution from their active nuclei at those wavelengths. Based on observations with ISO, an ESA project with instruments funded by ESA Member States (especially the PI countries: France

  4. Bulges and disks in the local Universe. Linking the galaxy structure to star formation activity

    Morselli, L; Erfanianfar, G; Concas, A

    2016-01-01

    Galaxy morphology and star formation activity are strictly linked, in the way that bulge-dominated galaxies are in general quiescent, while disk dominated galaxies are actively star-forming. In this paper, we study the properties of bulges and disks as a function of the position of galaxies in the star formation rate (SFR) - stellar mass ($M_{\\star}$) plane. Our sample is built on the SDSS DR7 catalogue, and the bulge-disk decomposition is the one of Simard et al. (2011). We find that at a given stellar mass the Main Sequence (MS) is populated by galaxies with the lowest B/T ratios. The B/T on the MS increases with increasing stellar mass, thus confirming previous results in literature. In the upper envelop of the MS, the average B/T is higher than that of MS counterparts at fixed stellar mass. This indicates that starburst galaxies have a significant bulge component. In addition, bulges above the MS are characterised by blue colours, whereas, if on the MS or below it, they are mostly red and dead. The disks ...

  5. Effect of bars in AGN host galaxies and black hole activity

    Alonso, Sol; Lambas, Diego Garcia

    2012-01-01

    With the aim of assessing the effects of bars on active galactic nuclei (AGN), we present an analysis of host characteristics and nuclear activity of AGN galaxies with and without bars selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 (SDSS-DR7). By visual inspection of SDSS images we classified the hosts of face-on AGN spiral galaxies brighter than g < 16.5 into barred or unbarred. With the purpose of providing an appropriate quantification of the effects of bars, we also constructed a suitable control sample of unbarred AGN galaxies with similar redshift, magnitude, morphology, bulge sizes and local environment distributions. We find that the bar fraction, with respect to the full sample of spiral face-on AGN host galaxies, is 28.5%, in good agreement with previous works. Barred AGN host galaxies show an excess of young stellar populations dominated by red u-r and g-r colors, with respect to the control sample, suggesting that bars produce an important effect on galaxy properties of AGN hosts. Re...

  6. FRESH ACTIVITY IN OLD SYSTEMS: RADIO AGNs IN FOSSIL GROUPS OF GALAXIES

    We present the first systematic 1.4 GHz Very Large Array radio continuum survey of fossil galaxy group candidates. These are virialized systems believed to have assembled over a gigayear in the past through the merging of galaxy group members into a single, isolated, massive elliptical galaxy and featuring an extended hot X-ray halo. We use new photometric and spectroscopic data from Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 to determine that three of the candidates are clearly not fossil groups. Of the remaining 30 candidates, 67% contain a radio-loud (L1.4GHz > 1023 W Hz–1) active galactic nucleus (AGN) at the center of their dominant elliptical galaxy. We find a weak correlation between the radio luminosity of the AGN and the X-ray luminosity of the halo suggesting that the AGN contributes to energy deposition into the intragroup medium. We only find a correlation between the radio and optical luminosity of the central elliptical galaxy when we include X-ray-selected, elliptically dominated non-fossil groups, indicating a weak relationship between AGN strength and the mass assembly history of the groups. The dominant elliptical galaxy of fossil groups is on average roughly an order of magnitude more luminous than normal group elliptical galaxies in optical, X-ray, and radio luminosities and our findings are consistent with previous results that the radio-loud fraction in elliptical galaxies is linked to the stellar mass of a population. The current level of activity in fossil groups suggests that AGN fueling continues long after the last major merger. We discuss several possibilities for fueling the AGN at the present epoch.

  7. Backwards Spiral Galaxy

    1999-01-01

    Astronomers using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope have found a spiral galaxy that may rotate in the opposite direction from what was expected. A picture of the oddball galaxy is available at http://heritage.stsci.edu or http://oposite.stsci.edu/pubinfo/pr/2002/03 or http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/images/wfpc . It was taken in May 2001 by Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, designed and built by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The picture showed which side of galaxy NGC 4622 is closer to Earth; that information helped astronomers determine that the galaxy may be spinning clockwise. The image shows NGC 4622 and its outer pair of winding arms full of new stars, shown in blue. Astronomers are puzzled by the clockwise rotation because of the direction the outer spiral arms are pointing. Most spiral galaxies have arms of gas and stars that trail behind as they turn. But this galaxy has two 'leading' outer arms that point toward the direction of the galaxy's clockwise rotation. NGC 4622 also has a 'trailing' inner arm that is wrapped around the galaxy in the opposite direction. Based on galaxy simulations, a team of astronomers had expected that the galaxy was turning counterclockwise. NGC 4622 is a rare example of a spiral galaxy with arms pointing in opposite directions. Astronomers suspect this oddity was caused by the interaction of NGC 4622 with another galaxy. Its two outer arms are lopsided, meaning that something disturbed it. The new Hubble image suggests that NGC 4622 consumed a smaller companion galaxy. Galaxies, which consist of stars, gas, and dust, rotate very slowly. Our Sun, one of many stars in our Milky Way galaxy, completes a circuit around the Milky Way every 250 million years. NGC 4622 lies 111 million light-years away in the direction of the constellation Centaurus. The science team, consisting of Drs. Ron Buta and Gene Byrd from the University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, and Tarsh Freeman of Bevill State Community College in Alabama

  8. A New Galactic Wolf-Rayet Star in Centaurus

    Roman-Lopes, A.

    2011-01-01

    In this work I communicate the detection of a new Galactic Wolf-Rayet star (WR60a) in Centaurus. The H- and K-band spectra of WR60a, show strong carbon near-infrared emission lines, characteristic of Wolf-Rayet stars of the WC5-7 sub-type. Adopting mean absolute magnitude M$_K$ and mean intrinsic ($J-K_S$) and ($H-K_S$) colours, it was found that WR60a suffer a mean visual extinction of 3.8$\\pm$1.3 magnitudes, being located at a probable heliocentric distance of 5.2$\\pm$0.8 Kpc, which for the...

  9. The outer filament of Centaurus A as seen by MUSE

    Santoro, F; Morganti, R; Oosterloo, T A; Tremblay, G

    2015-01-01

    We investigate signatures of a jet-interstellar medium (ISM) interaction using optical integral-field observations of the so-called outer filament near Centaurus A, expanding on previous results obtained on a more limited area. Using the Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) on the VLT during science verification, we observed a significant fraction of the brighter emitting gas across the outer filament. The ionized gas shows complex morphology with compact blobs, arc-like structures and diffuse emission. Based on the kinematics, we identified three main components. The more collimated component is oriented along the direction of the radio jet. The other two components exhibit diffuse morphology together with arc-like structures also oriented along the radio jet direction. Furthermore, the ionization level of the gas is found to decrease from the more collimated component to the more diffuse components. The morphology and velocities of the more collimated component confirm our earlier results that the outer...

  10. Large peculiar velocities in the Hydra-Centaurus Supercluster

    The observation that six clusters forming part of the Hydra-Centaurus Supercluster and its extension on the opposite side of the galactic plane exhibit large peculiar velocities relative to the Hubble flow has led to an examination of the local volume bounded by 8000 km/sec redshift. The results obtained suggest clusters in this supercluster complex that may furnish the gravitational acceleration of the clusters in question: they are the Hydra and IC 4329 clusters on the north side of of the galactic plane, and the Indus cluster and NGC 6769 group on the south side. It seems odd that similarly large peculiar velocities have not been observed in similar mass concentrations. 22 refs

  11. Star formation and black hole accretion activity in rich local clusters of galaxies

    Bianconi, Matteo; Marleau, Francine R.; Fadda, Dario

    2016-04-01

    Context. We present a study of star formation and central black hole accretion activity of galaxies that are hosted in the two nearby (z ~ 0.2) rich galaxy clusters Abell 983 and 1731. Aims: We aim to quantify both the obscured and unobscured star formation rates, as well as the presence of active galactic nuclei (AGN) as a function of the environment in which the galaxy is located. Methods: We targeted the clusters with unprecedented deep infrared Spitzer observations (0.2 mJy at 24 micron), near-IR Palomar imaging and optical WIYN spectroscopy. The extent of our observations (~3 virial radii) covers the vast range of possible environments, from the very dense cluster centre to the very rarefied cluster outskirts and accretion regions. Results: The star-forming members of the two clusters present star formation rates that are comparable with those measured in coeval field galaxies. Analysis of the spatial arrangement of the spectroscopically confirmed members reveals an elongated distribution for A1731 with respect to the more uniform distribution of A983. The emerging picture is compatible with A983 being a fully evolved cluster, in contrast with the still actively accreting A1731. Conclusions: Analysis of the specific star formation rate reveals evidence of ongoing galaxy pre-processing along A1731's filament-like structure. Furthermore, the decrease in the number of star-forming galaxies and AGN towards the cluster cores suggests that the cluster environment is accelerating the ageing process of the galaxies and blocking further accretion of the cold gas that fuels both star formation and black hole accretion activity. The catalogue and the reduced images (FITS files) are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/588/A105

  12. The impact of galaxy interactions on AGN activity in zCOSMOS

    Silverman, J D; Jahnke, K; Andrae, R; Lilly, S; Elvis, M; Civano, F; Mainieri, V; Vignali, C; Zamorani, G; Nair, P; Fevre, O Le; de Ravel, L; Bardelli, S; Bongiorno, A; Bolzonella, M; Brusa, M; Cappelluti, N; Cappi, A; Caputi, K; Carollo, C M; Contini, T; Coppa, G; Cucciati, O; de la Torre, S; Franzetti, P; Garilli, B; Halliday, C; Hasinger, G; Iovino, A; Knobel, C; koekemoer, A; Kovac, K; Lamareille, F; Borgne, J -F Le; Brun, V Le; Maier, C; Mignoli, M; Pello, R; Montero, E Perez; Ricciardelli, E; Peng, Y; Scodeggio, M; Tanaka, M; Tasca, L; Tresse, L; Vergani, D; Zucca, E; Comastri, A; Finoguenov, A; Fu, H; Gilli, R; Hao, H; Ho, L; Salvato, M

    2011-01-01

    Close encounters between galaxies are expected to be a viable mechanism, as predicted by numerical simulations, by which accretion onto supermassive black holes can be initiated. To test this scenario, we construct a sample of 562 galaxies (M*>2.5x10^10 M_sun) in kinematic pairs over the redshift range 0.25 2x10^42 erg s^-1) detected by Chandra. We find a higher fraction of AGN in galaxies in pairs relative to isolated galaxies of similar stellar mass. Our result is primarily due to an enhancement of AGN activity, by a factor of 1.9 (observed) and 2.6 (intrinsic), for galaxies in pairs of projected separation less than 75 kpc and line-of-sight velocity offset less than 500 km s^-1. This study demonstrates that close kinematic pairs are conducive environments for black hole growth either indicating a causal physical connection or an inherent relation, such as, to enhanced star formation. In the Appendix, we describe a method to estimate the intrinsic fractions of galaxies (either in pairs or the field) hosting...

  13. THE CLUSTERING OF GALAXIES AROUND RADIO-LOUD ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    We examine the hypothesis that mergers and close encounters between galaxies can fuel active galactic nuclei (AGNs) by increasing the rate at which gas accretes toward the central black hole. We compare the clustering of galaxies around radio-loud AGNs with the clustering around a population of radio-quiet galaxies with similar masses, colors, and luminosities. Our catalog contains 2178 elliptical radio galaxies with flux densities greater than 2.8 mJy at 1.4 GHz from the Six Degree Field Galaxy Survey. We find tentative evidence that radio AGNs with more than 200 times the median radio power have, on average, more close (r < 160 kpc) companions than their radio-quiet counterparts, suggesting that mergers play a role in forming the most powerful radio galaxies. For ellipticals of fixed stellar mass, the radio power is neither a function of large-scale environment nor halo mass, consistent with the radio powers of ellipticals varying by orders of magnitude over billions of years

  14. THE CLUSTERING OF GALAXIES AROUND RADIO-LOUD ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    Worpel, Hauke [Monash Centre for Astrophysics, School of Mathematical Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Brown, Michael J. I.; Jones, D. Heath; Floyd, David J. E. [Monash Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Beutler, Florian [ICRAR, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Perth, WA 6009 (Australia)

    2013-07-20

    We examine the hypothesis that mergers and close encounters between galaxies can fuel active galactic nuclei (AGNs) by increasing the rate at which gas accretes toward the central black hole. We compare the clustering of galaxies around radio-loud AGNs with the clustering around a population of radio-quiet galaxies with similar masses, colors, and luminosities. Our catalog contains 2178 elliptical radio galaxies with flux densities greater than 2.8 mJy at 1.4 GHz from the Six Degree Field Galaxy Survey. We find tentative evidence that radio AGNs with more than 200 times the median radio power have, on average, more close (r < 160 kpc) companions than their radio-quiet counterparts, suggesting that mergers play a role in forming the most powerful radio galaxies. For ellipticals of fixed stellar mass, the radio power is neither a function of large-scale environment nor halo mass, consistent with the radio powers of ellipticals varying by orders of magnitude over billions of years.

  15. Star Formation and AGN Activity in Luminous and Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies

    Kartaltepe, Jeyhan

    2015-08-01

    In the local universe, Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies (ULIRGs, L_IR > 10^12 L⊙) are all interacting and merging systems. We explore the evolution of the morphological and nuclear properties of (U)LIRGs over cosmic time using a large sample of galaxies from Her- schel observations of the CANDELS fields (including GOODS, COSMOS, and UDS). In particular, we investigate whether the role of galaxy mergers has changed between z ˜ 2 and now using the extensive visual classification catalogs produced by the CANDELS team. The combination of a selection from Herschel, near the peak of IR emission, and rest-frame optical morphologies from CANDELS, provides the ideal comparison to nearby (U)LIRGs. We also use rest-frame optical emission line diagnostics, X-ray luminosity, and MIR colors to separate AGN from star-formation dominated galaxies. We then study the how role of galaxy mergers and the presence of AGN activity correspond to the galaxy’s position in the star formation rate - stellar mass plane. Are galaxies that have specific star formation rates elevated above the main sequence more likely to be mergers? We investigate how AGN identified with different methods correspond to different morphologies and merger stages as well as position on the star formation rate - stellar mass plane.

  16. Cosmic web and star formation activity in galaxies at z ∼ 1

    We investigate the role of the delineated cosmic web/filaments on star formation activity by exploring a sample of 425 narrow-band selected Hα emitters, as well as 2846 color-color selected underlying star-forming galaxies for a large-scale structure at z = 0.84 in the COSMOS field from the HiZELS survey. Using the scale-independent Multi-scale Morphology Filter algorithm, we are able to quantitatively describe the density field and disentangle it into its major components: fields, filaments, and clusters. We show that the observed median star formation rate (SFR), stellar mass, specific SFR, the mean SFR-mass relation, and its scatter for both Hα emitters and underlying star-forming galaxies do not strongly depend on different classes of environment, in agreement with previous studies. However, the fraction of Hα emitters varies with environment and is enhanced in filamentary structures at z ∼ 1. We propose mild galaxy-galaxy interactions as the possible physical agent for the elevation of the fraction of Hα star-forming galaxies in filaments. Our results show that filaments are the likely physical environments that are often classed as the 'intermediate' densities and that the cosmic web likely plays a major role in galaxy formation and evolution which has so far been poorly investigated.

  17. The rotation of the Galaxy within the solar circle

    Alvarez, H.; May, J.; Bronfman, L. (Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile))

    1990-01-01

    A rotation curve for the Galaxy within the solar circle is found using data from the fourth Galactic quadrant. The observations are consistent with a picture in which the Galaxy rotates with a circular velocity of 209 + or - 2 km/s between Galactocentric distances of 0.24 and 1.0 solar radius. Clouds associated with a part of the Carina spiral arm exhibit an average rotation velocity 12 km/s higher than expected, implying an apparent anomalous motion. An excess in velocity of about the same magnitude observed at the tangent direction of the Centaurus arm is attributed to streaming and internal motions of large molecular complexes. Similar phenomena found in the Sagittarius and Scutum arms by northern observers strongly support the hypothesis that Carina is the continuation of the Sagittarius arm and Centaurus is that of the Scutum arm. 30 refs.

  18. Spitzer and JCMT Observations of the Active Galactic Nucleus in the Sombrero Galaxy (NGC 4594)

    Bendo, G J; Calzetti, D; Cannon, J M; Dale, D A; Draine, B T; Engelbracht, C W; Gordon, K D; Helou, G; Hollenbach, D; Joseph, R D; Kennicutt, R C; Murphy, E J; Roussel, H; Sheth, K; Smith, J D T; Walter, F

    2006-01-01

    We present Spitzer 3.6-160 micron images, Spitzer mid-infrared spectra, and JCMT SCUBA 850 micron images of the Sombrero Galaxy (NGC 4594), an Sa galaxy with a 10^9 M_solar low luminosity active galactic nucleus (AGN). The brightest infrared sources in the galaxy are the nucleus and the dust ring. The spectral energy distribution of the AGN demonstrates that, while the environment around the AGN is a prominent source of mid-infrared emission, it is a relatively weak source of far-infrared emission, as had been inferred for AGN in previous research. The weak nuclear 160 micron emission and the negligible polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission from the nucleus also implies that the nucleus is a site of only weak star formation activity and the nucleus contains relatively little cool interstellar gas needed to fuel such activity. We propose that this galaxy may be representative of a subset of low ionization nuclear emission region galaxies that are in a quiescent AGN phase because of the lack of gas needed to...

  19. A CENSUS OF BROAD-LINE ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN NEARBY GALAXIES: COEVAL STAR FORMATION AND RAPID BLACK HOLE GROWTH

    We present the first quantified, statistical map of broad-line active galactic nucleus (AGN) frequency with host galaxy color and stellar mass in nearby (0.01 < z < 0.11) galaxies. Aperture photometry and z-band concentration measurements from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey are used to disentangle AGN and galaxy emission, resulting in estimates of uncontaminated galaxy rest-frame color, luminosity, and stellar mass. Broad-line AGNs are distributed throughout the blue cloud and green valley at a given stellar mass, and are much rarer in quiescent (red sequence) galaxies. This is in contrast to the published host galaxy properties of weaker narrow-line AGNs, indicating that broad-line AGNs occur during a different phase in galaxy evolution. More luminous broad-line AGNs have bluer host galaxies, even at fixed mass, suggesting that the same processes that fuel nuclear activity also efficiently form stars. The data favor processes that simultaneously fuel both star formation activity and rapid supermassive black hole accretion. If AGNs cause feedback on their host galaxies in the nearby universe, the evidence of galaxy-wide quenching must be delayed until after the broad-line AGN phase.

  20. Galactic mergers, starburst galaxies, quasar activity and massive binary black holes

    Many quasar-like objects show evidence for massive binary black holes. The recent discovery of a massive (5 X 106 Msolar mass) object in the centre of the local group dwarf elliptical M 32 greatly raises the probability of forming such binaries through galactic mergers. The author argues that the enhancement of all kinds of activity (quasar-like activity and star formation) in galaxies with companions is not so much a consequence of tidal interaction between the massive galaxies as the result of collisions with their dwarf satellites. (author)

  1. Effect of bars in AGN host galaxies and black hole activity

    Alonso, Sol; Coldwell, Georgina; Lambas, Diego Garcia

    2012-01-01

    With the aim of assessing the effects of bars on active galactic nuclei (AGN), we present an analysis of host characteristics and nuclear activity of AGN galaxies with and without bars selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 (SDSS-DR7). By visual inspection of SDSS images we classified the hosts of face-on AGN spiral galaxies brighter than g < 16.5 into barred or unbarred. With the purpose of providing an appropriate quantification of the effects of bars, we also constructed...

  2. COSMIC EVOLUTION OF BLACK HOLES AND SPHEROIDS. V. THE RELATION BETWEEN BLACK HOLE MASS AND HOST GALAXY LUMINOSITY FOR A SAMPLE OF 79 ACTIVE GALAXIES

    We investigate the cosmic evolution of the black hole (BH) mass-bulge luminosity relation using a sample of 52 active galaxies at z ∼ 0.36 and z ∼ 0.57 in the BH mass range of 107.4-109.1 M ☉. By consistently applying multicomponent spectral and structural decomposition to high-quality Keck spectra and high-resolution Hubble Space Telescope images, BH masses (M BH) are estimated using the Hβ broad emission line combined with the 5100 Å nuclear luminosity, and bulge luminosities (L bul) are derived from surface photometry. Comparing the resulting M BH – L bul relation to local active galaxies and taking into account selection effects, we find evolution of the form M BH/L bul∝(1 + z)γ with γ = 1.8 ± 0.7, consistent with BH growth preceding that of the host galaxies. Including an additional sample of 27 active galaxies with 0.5 < z < 1.9 taken from the literature and measured in a consistent way, we obtain γ = 0.9 ± 0.7 for the M BH – L bul relation and γ = 0.4 ± 0.5 for the M BH-total host galaxy luminosity (L host) relation. The results strengthen the findings from our previous studies and provide additional evidence for host galaxy bulge growth being dominated by disk-to-bulge transformation via minor mergers and/or disk instabilities

  3. The Relationship of Active Galactic Nuclei & Quasars With Their Local Galaxy Environment

    Strand, Natalie Erin

    2009-01-01

    We explore how the local environment is related to properties of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) of various luminosities. Recent simulations and observations are converging on the view that the extreme luminosity of quasars, the brightest of AGNs, is fueled in major mergers of gas-rich galaxies. In such a picture, quasars, the highest luminosity AGNs, are expected to be located in regions with a higher density of galaxies on small scales where mergers are more likely to take place. However, in this picture, the activity observed in low-luminosity AGNs is due to secular processes that are less dependent on the local galaxy density. To test this hypothesis, we compare the local photometric galaxy density on kiloparsec scales around spectroscopic type I and type II quasars to the local density around lower-luminosity spectroscopic type I and type II AGNs. To minimize projection effects and evolution in the photometric galaxy sample we use to characterize AGN environments, we place our random control sample at the ...

  4. The Evolution of Active Galactic Nuclei in Clusters of Galaxies from the Dark Energy Survey

    Bufanda, E; Jeltema, T E; Rykoff, E S; Rozo, E; Martini, P; Abbott, T M C; Abdalla, F B; Allam, S; Banerji, M; Benoit-Levy, A; Bertin, E; Brooks, D; Rosell, A Carnero; Kind, M Carrasco; Carretero, J; Cunha, C E; da Costa, L N; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Dietrich, J P; Evrard, A E; Neto, A Fausti; Flaugher, B; Frieman, J; Gerdes, D W; Goldstein, D A; Gruen, D; Gruendl, R A; Gutierrez, G; Honscheid, K; James, D J; Kuehn, K; Kuropatkin, N; Lima, M; Maia, M A G; Marshall, J L; Melchior, P; Miquel, R; Mohr, J J; Ogando, R; Plazas, A A; Romer, A K; Rooney, P; Sanchez, E; Santiago, B; Scarpine, V; Sevilla-Noarbe, I; Smith, R C; Soares-Santos, M; Sobreira, F; Suchyta, E; Tarle, G; Thomas, D; Tucker, D L; Walker, A R

    2016-01-01

    The correlation between active galactic nuclei (AGN) and environment provides important clues to AGN fueling and the relationship of black hole growth to galaxy evolution. In this paper, we analyze the fraction of galaxies in clusters hosting AGN as a function of redshift and cluster richness for X-ray detected AGN associated with clusters of galaxies in Dark Energy Survey (DES) Science Verification data. The present sample includes 33 AGN with L_X > 10^43 ergs s^-1 in non-central, host galaxies with luminosity greater than 0.5 L* from a total sample of 432 clusters in the redshift range of 0.10.7. This result is in good agreement with previous work and parallels the increase in star formation in cluster galaxies over the same redshift range. However, the AGN fraction in clusters is observed to have no significant correlation with cluster mass. Future analyses with DES Year 1 and 2 data will be able to clarify whether AGN activity is correlated to cluster mass and will tightly constrain the relationship betwe...

  5. HUBBLE REVEALS 'BACKWARDS' SPIRAL GALAXY

    2002-01-01

    Astronomers have found a spiral galaxy that may be spinning to the beat of a different cosmic drummer. To the surprise of astronomers, the galaxy, called NGC 4622, appears to be rotating in the opposite direction to what they expected. Pictures by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope helped astronomers determine that the galaxy may be spinning clockwise by showing which side of the galaxy is closer to Earth. A Hubble telescope photo of the oddball galaxy is this month's Hubble Heritage offering. The image shows NGC 4622 and its outer pair of winding arms full of new stars [shown in blue]. Astronomers are puzzled by the clockwise rotation because of the direction the outer spiral arms are pointing. Most spiral galaxies have arms of gas and stars that trail behind as they turn. But this galaxy has two 'leading' outer arms that point toward the direction of the galaxy's clockwise rotation. To add to the conundrum, NGC 4622 also has a 'trailing' inner arm that is wrapped around the galaxy in the opposite direction it is rotating. Based on galaxy simulations, a team of astronomers had expected that the galaxy was turning counterclockwise. NGC 4622 is a rare example of a spiral galaxy with arms pointing in opposite directions. What caused this galaxy to behave differently from most galaxies? Astronomers suspect that NGC 4622 interacted with another galaxy. Its two outer arms are lopsided, meaning that something disturbed it. The new Hubble image suggests that NGC 4622 consumed a small companion galaxy. The galaxy's core provides new evidence for a merger between NGC 4622 and a smaller galaxy. This information could be the key to understanding the unusual leading arms. Galaxies, which consist of stars, gas, and dust, rotate very slowly. Our Sun, one of many stars in our Milky Way Galaxy, completes a circuit around the Milky Way every 250 million years. NGC 4622 resides 111 million light-years away in the constellation Centaurus. The pictures were taken in May 2001 with Hubble

  6. Low-luminosity Active Galaxies and their Central Black Holes

    Dong, X; Dong, Xiaoyi; Robertis, Michael M. De

    2005-01-01

    Central black hole masses for 118 spiral galaxies representing morphological stages S0/a through Sc and taken from the large spectroscopic survey of Ho, Filippenko & Sargent (1997) are derived using 2MASS Ks data. Black hole (BH) masses are found using a calibrated black-hole - Ks bulge luminosity relation, while bulge luminosities are measured using GALFIT, a two-dimensional bulge/disk decomposition routine. The BH masses are correlated against a variety of nuclear and host-galaxy properties. Nuclear properties such as line width and line ratios show a very high degree of correlation with BH mass. The excellent correlation with line-width supports the view that the emission-line gas is in virial equilibrium with either the BH or bulge potential. The very good emission-line ratio correlations may indicate a change in ionizing continuum shape with BH mass in the sense that more massive BHs generate harder spectra. Apart from the inclination-corrected rotational velocity, no excellent correlations are found...

  7. Multiple tidal disruption flares in the active galaxy IC 3599

    Campana, S; Colpi, M; Lodato, G; D'Avanzo, P; Evans, P A; Moretti, A

    2015-01-01

    Tidal disruption events occur when a star passes too close to a massive black hole and it is totally ripped apart by tidal forces. Alternatively, if the star does not get close enough to the black hole to be totally disrupted, a less dramatic event might happen with the star surviving the encounter and loosing only a small fraction of its mass. In this situation if the stellar orbit is bound and highly eccentric, just like some stars in the centre of our own Galaxy, repeated flares should occur. When the star approaches the black hole tidal radius at periastron, matter might be stripped resulting in lower intensity outbursts recurring once every orbital period. We report on Swift observations of a recent bright flare from the galaxy IC 3599 hosting a middle-weight black hole, where a possible tidal disruption event was observed in the early 1990s. By light curve modelling and spectral fitting we can consistently account for the events as the non-disruptive tidal stripping of a star into a highly eccentric orb...

  8. Star formation activities in early-type brightest cluster galaxies

    Liu, F S; Meng, X M

    2012-01-01

    We identify a total of 120 early-type Brightest Cluster Galaxies (BCGs) at 0.1galaxy stellar mass). We also compare their statistical properties with a control sample selected from X-ray luminous c...

  9. Wind from the black-hole accretion disk driving a molecular outflow in an active galaxy.

    Tombesi, F; Meléndez, M; Veilleux, S; Reeves, J N; González-Alfonso, E; Reynolds, C S

    2015-03-26

    Powerful winds driven by active galactic nuclei are often thought to affect the evolution of both supermassive black holes and their host galaxies, quenching star formation and explaining the close relationship between black holes and galaxies. Recent observations of large-scale molecular outflows in ultraluminous infrared galaxies support this quasar-feedback idea, because they directly trace the gas from which stars form. Theoretical models suggest that these outflows originate as energy-conserving flows driven by fast accretion-disk winds. Proposed connections between large-scale molecular outflows and accretion-disk activity in ultraluminous galaxies were incomplete because no accretion-disk wind had been detected. Conversely, studies of powerful accretion-disk winds have until now focused only on X-ray observations of local Seyfert galaxies and a few higher-redshift quasars. Here we report observations of a powerful accretion-disk wind with a mildly relativistic velocity (a quarter that of light) in the X-ray spectrum of IRAS F11119+3257, a nearby (redshift 0.189) optically classified type 1 ultraluminous infrared galaxy hosting a powerful molecular outflow. The active galactic nucleus is responsible for about 80 per cent of the emission, with a quasar-like luminosity of 1.5 × 10(46) ergs per second. The energetics of these two types of wide-angle outflows is consistent with the energy-conserving mechanism that is the basis of the quasar feedback in active galactic nuclei that lack powerful radio jets (such jets are an alternative way to drive molecular outflows). PMID:25810204

  10. The structure of host galaxies of radio-loud quasars and possible triggering mechanisms for quasar activity

    Romanishin, W.; Hintzen, P. (Arizona State Univ., Tempe (USA); NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (USA))

    1989-06-01

    An image modeling program is used to analyze optical imaging data for a sample of radio-loud quasars with redshifts between 0.2 and 0.7. It is found that the host galaxies of these quasars tend to be more compact than normal ellipticals. The cooling flow cluster elliptical galaxies near these host galaxies are studied. It is suggested that these cooling flow galaxies are also compact due to star formation in their central regions. Two populations of quasars are identified. One, in which activity is triggered by galaxy mergers of interactions has predominately spiral galaxies and are radio quiet. The other, in which activity is triggered by star formation bursts induced by cooling flows, has predominately elliptical hosts and may be radio loud. 28 refs.

  11. The structure of host galaxies of radio-loud quasars and possible triggering mechanisms for quasar activity

    An image modeling program is used to analyze optical imaging data for a sample of radio-loud quasars with redshifts between 0.2 and 0.7. It is found that the host galaxies of these quasars tend to be more compact than normal ellipticals. The cooling flow cluster elliptical galaxies near these host galaxies are studied. It is suggested that these cooling flow galaxies are also compact due to star formation in their central regions. Two populations of quasars are identified. One, in which activity is triggered by galaxy mergers of interactions has predominately spiral galaxies and are radio quiet. The other, in which activity is triggered by star formation bursts induced by cooling flows, has predominately elliptical hosts and may be radio loud. 28 refs

  12. The structure of host galaxies of radio-loud quasars and possible triggering mechanisms for quasar activity

    Romanishin, W.; Hintzen, Paul

    1989-01-01

    An image modeling program is used to analyze optical imaging data for a sample of radio-loud quasars with redshifts between 0.2 and 0.7. It is found that the host galaxies of these quasars tend to be more compact than normal ellipticals. The cooling flow cluster elliptical galaxies near these host galaxies are studied. It is suggested that these cooling flow galaxies are also compact due to star formation in their central regions. Two populations of quasars are identified. One, in which activity is triggered by galaxy mergers of interactions has predominately spiral galaxies and are radio quiet. The other, in which activity is triggered by star formation bursts induced by cooling flows, has predominately elliptical hosts and may be radio loud.

  13. Where the active galaxies live: a panchromatic view of radio-AGN in the AKARI-NEP field

    Karouzos, Marios; Trichas, Markos

    2013-01-01

    We study the host galaxy properties of radio sources in the AKARI-North Ecliptic Pole (NEP) field, using an ensemble of multi-wavelength datasets. We identify both radio-loud and radio-quiet AGN and study their host galaxy properties by means of SED fitting. We investigate the relative importance of nuclear and star-formation activity in radio-AGN and assess the role of radio-AGN as efficient quenchers of star-formation in their host galaxies.

  14. Dual-frequency VLBI study of Centaurus A on sub-parsec scales

    Müller, Cornelia; Ojha, R; Wilms, J; Böck, M; Edwards, P G; Fromm, C M; Hase, H; Horiuchi, S; Katz, U; Lovell, J E J; Plötz, C; Pursimo, T; Richers, S; Ros, E; Rothschild, R E; Taylor, G B; Tingay, S J; Zensus, J A

    2011-01-01

    Centaurus A is the closest active galactic nucleus. High resolution imaging using Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) enables us to study the spectral and kinematic behavior of the radio jet-counterjet system on sub-parsec scales, providing essential information for jet emission and formation models. Our aim is to study the structure and spectral shape of the emission from the central-parsec region of Cen A. As a target of the Southern Hemisphere VLBI monitoring program TANAMI (Tracking Active Galactic Nuclei with Milliarcsecond Interferometry), VLBI observations of Cen A are made regularly at 8.4 and 22.3 GHz with the Australian Long Baseline Array (LBA) and associated telescopes in Antarctica, Chile, and South Africa. The first dual-frequency images of this source are presented along with the resulting spectral index map. An angular resolution of 0.4 mas x 0.7 mas is achieved at 8.4 GHz, corresponding to a linear scale of less than 0.013 pc. Hence, we obtain the highest resolution VLBI image of Cen A, ...

  15. J1216+0709: A Radio Galaxy with Three Episodes of AGN Jet Activity

    Singh, Veeresh; Ishwara-Chandra, C. H.; Kharb, Preeti; Srivastava, Shweta; Janardhan, P.

    2016-08-01

    We report the discovery of a “triple-double radio galaxy,” J1216+0709, detected in deep low-frequency Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) observations. J1216+0709 is only the third radio galaxy, after B0925+420 and Speca, with three pairs of lobes resulting from three different episodes of active galactic nucleus (AGN) jet activity. The 610 MHz GMRT image clearly displays an inner pair of lobes, a nearly coaxial middle pair of lobes, and a pair of outer lobes that is bent with respect to the axis of the inner pair of lobes. The total end-to-end projected sizes of the inner, middle, and outer lobes are 40″ (∼95 kpc), 1.‧65 (∼235 kpc), and 5.‧7 (∼814 kpc), respectively. Unlike the outer pair of lobes, both the inner and middle pairs of lobes exhibit asymmetries in arm lengths and flux densities, but in the opposite sense, i.e., the eastern sides are farther and also brighter than the western sides, thus, suggesting the possibility of the jet being intrinsically asymmetric rather than due to a relativistic beaming effect. The host galaxy is a bright elliptical (m r ∼ 16.56) with M SMBH ∼ 3.9 × 109 M ⊙ and a star formation rate of ∼{4.66}-1.61{{+4.65}} M ⊙ yr‑1. The host galaxy resides in a small group of three galaxies (m r ≤ 17.77) and is possibly going through an interaction with faint dwarf galaxies in the neighborhood, which may have triggered the recent episodes of AGN activity.

  16. On the behaviour of the IR Ca II triplet in normal and active galaxies

    Terlevich, Elena; Angeles I. Díaz; Terlevich, Roberto

    1990-01-01

    This is an electronic version of an article published in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. Terlevich, E., Díaz, A.I., Terlevich, R. On the behaviour of the IR Ca II triplet in normal and active galaxies. Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 242 (1990): 271-284

  17. The SAMI Galaxy Survey: Unveiling the nature of kinematically offset active galactic nuclei

    Allen, J T; Scott, N; Fogarty, L M R; Ho, I -T; Medling, A M; Leslie, S K; Bland-Hawthorn, J; Bryant, J J; Croom, S M; Goodwin, M; Green, A W; Konstantopoulos, I S; Lawrence, J S; Owers, M S; Richards, S N; Sharp, R

    2015-01-01

    We have observed two kinematically offset active galactic nuclei (AGN), whose ionised gas is at a different line-of-sight velocity to their host galaxies, with the SAMI integral field spectrograph (IFS). One of the galaxies shows gas kinematics very different to the stellar kinematics, indicating a recent merger or accretion event. We demonstrate that the star formation associated with this event was triggered within the last 100 Myr. The other galaxy shows simple disc rotation in both gas and stellar kinematics, aligned with each other, but in the central region has signatures of an outflow driven by the AGN. Other than the outflow, neither galaxy shows any discontinuity in the ionised gas kinematics at the galaxy's centre. We conclude that in these two cases there is no direct evidence of the AGN being in a supermassive black hole binary system. Our study demonstrates that selecting kinematically offset AGN from single-fibre spectroscopy provides, by definition, samples of kinematically peculiar objects, bu...

  18. Mid- to far infrared properties of star-forming galaxies and active galactic nuclei

    Magdis, G E; Helou, G; Farrah, D; Hurley, P; Alonso-Herrero, A; Bock, J; Burgarella, D; Chapman, S; Charmandaris, V; Cooray, A; Dai, Y S; Dale, D; Elbaz, D; Feltre, A; Hatziminaoglou, E; Huang, J-S; Morrison, G; Oliver, S; Page, M; Scott, D; Shi, Y

    2013-01-01

    We study the mid- to far-IR properties of a 24um-selected flux-limited sample (S24 > 5mJy) of 154 intermediate redshift (~0.15), infrared luminous galaxies, drawn from the 5MUSES survey. By combining existing mid-IR spectroscopy and new Herschel SPIRE submm photometry from the HerMES program, we derived robust total infrared luminosity (LIR) and dust mass (Md) estimates and infered the relative contribution of the AGN to the infrared energy budget of the sources. We found that the total infrared emission of galaxies with weak 6.2um PAH emission (EW0.2um more than 50% of the LIR arises from star formation. We also found that for galaxies detected in the 250-500um Herschel bands an AGN has a statistically insignificant effect on the temperature of the cold dust and the far-IR colours of the host galaxy, which are primarily shaped by star formation activity. For star-forming galaxies we reveal an anti-correlation between the LIR-to-rest-frame 8um luminosity ratio, IR8 = LIR\\L8, and the strength of PAH features. ...

  19. The host galaxies of active galactic nuclei with powerful relativistic jets

    Olguín-Iglesias, A.; León-Tavares, J.; Kotilainen, J. K.; Chavushyan, V.; Tornikoski, M.; Valtaoja, E.; Añorve, C.; Valdés, J.; Carrasco, L.

    2016-08-01

    We present deep near-infrared (NIR) images of a sample of 19 intermediate-redshift (0.3 1027 W Hz-1), previously classified as flat-spectrum radio quasars. We also compile host galaxy and nuclear magnitudes for blazars from literature. The combined sample (this work and compilation) contains 100 radio-loud AGN with host galaxy detections and a broad range of radio luminosities L1.4 GHz ˜ 1023.7-1028.3 W Hz-1, allowing us to divide our sample into high-luminosity blazars (HLBs) and low-luminosity blazars (LLBs). The host galaxies of our sample are bright and seem to follow the μe-Reff relation for ellipticals and bulges. The two populations of blazars show different behaviours in the MK,nuclear -MK,bulge plane, where a statistically significant correlation is observed for HLBs. Although it may be affected by selection effects, this correlation suggests a close coupling between the accretion mode of the central supermassive black hole and its host galaxy, which could be interpreted in terms of AGN feedback. Our findings are consistent with semi-analytical models where low-luminosity AGN emit the bulk of their energy in the form of radio jets, producing a strong feedback mechanism, and high-luminosity AGN are affected by galaxy mergers and interactions, which provide a common supply of cold gas to feed both nuclear activity and star formation episodes.

  20. Tracing the evolution of active galactic nuclei host galaxies over the last 9 Gyr of cosmic time

    Goulding, A. D.; Forman, W. R.; Jones, C.; Murray, S. S.; Paggi, A.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Huang, J.-S.; Kraft, R.; Willner, S. P. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Hickox, R. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States); Coil, A. L. [Department of Physics, Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, University of California at San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, San Diego, CA 92093 (United States); Cooper, M. C. [Center for Galaxy Evolution, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, 4129 Frederick Reines Hall, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Newman, J. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pittsburgh, 3941 O' Hara Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Weiner, B. J., E-mail: agoulding@cfa.harvard.edu [Steward Observatory, 933 North Cherry Street, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2014-03-01

    We present the results of a combined galaxy population analysis for the host galaxies of active galactic nuclei (AGN) identified at 0 < z < 1.4 within the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, Boötes, and DEEP2 surveys. We identified AGN in a uniform and unbiased manner at X-ray, infrared, and radio wavelengths. Supermassive black holes undergoing radiatively efficient accretion (detected as X-ray and/or infrared AGN) appear to be hosted in a separate and distinct galaxy population than AGN undergoing powerful mechanically dominated accretion (radio AGN). Consistent with some previous studies, radiatively efficient AGN appear to be preferentially hosted in modest star-forming galaxies, with little dependence on AGN or galaxy luminosity. AGN exhibiting radio-emitting jets due to mechanically dominated accretion are almost exclusively observed in massive, passive galaxies. Crucially, we now provide strong evidence that the observed host-galaxy trends are independent of redshift. In particular, these different accretion-mode AGN have remained as separate galaxy populations throughout the last 9 Gyr. Furthermore, it appears that galaxies hosting AGN have evolved along the same path as galaxies that are not hosting AGN with little evidence for distinctly separate evolution.

  1. Tracing the evolution of active galactic nuclei host galaxies over the last 9 Gyr of cosmic time

    We present the results of a combined galaxy population analysis for the host galaxies of active galactic nuclei (AGN) identified at 0 < z < 1.4 within the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, Boötes, and DEEP2 surveys. We identified AGN in a uniform and unbiased manner at X-ray, infrared, and radio wavelengths. Supermassive black holes undergoing radiatively efficient accretion (detected as X-ray and/or infrared AGN) appear to be hosted in a separate and distinct galaxy population than AGN undergoing powerful mechanically dominated accretion (radio AGN). Consistent with some previous studies, radiatively efficient AGN appear to be preferentially hosted in modest star-forming galaxies, with little dependence on AGN or galaxy luminosity. AGN exhibiting radio-emitting jets due to mechanically dominated accretion are almost exclusively observed in massive, passive galaxies. Crucially, we now provide strong evidence that the observed host-galaxy trends are independent of redshift. In particular, these different accretion-mode AGN have remained as separate galaxy populations throughout the last 9 Gyr. Furthermore, it appears that galaxies hosting AGN have evolved along the same path as galaxies that are not hosting AGN with little evidence for distinctly separate evolution.

  2. From starburst to quiescence: testing active galactic nucleus feedback in rapidly quenching post-starburst galaxies

    Yesuf, Hassen M.; Faber, S. M.; Trump, Jonathan R.; Koo, David C.; Fang, Jerome J.; Liu, F. S. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Wild, Vivienne [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews, KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Hayward, Christopher C. [Heidelberger Institut für Theoretische Studien, Schloss-Wolfsbrunnenweg 35, D-69118 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-09-10

    Post-starbursts are galaxies in transition from the blue cloud to the red sequence. Although they are rare today, integrated over time they may be an important pathway to the red sequence. This work uses Sloan Digital Sky Survey, the Galaxy Evolution Explorer, and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer observations to identify the evolutionary sequence from starbursts to fully quenched post-starbursts (QPSBs) in the narrow mass range log M(M {sub ☉}) = 10.3-10.7, and identifies 'transiting' post-starbursts (TPSBs) which are intermediate between these two populations. In this mass range, ∼0.3% of galaxies are starbursts, ∼0.1% are QPSBs, and ∼0.5% are the transiting types in between. The TPSBs have stellar properties that are predicted for fast-quenching starbursts and morphological characteristics that are already typical of early-type galaxies. The active galactic nucleus (AGN) fraction, as estimated from optical line ratios, of these post-starbursts is about three times higher (≳ 36% ± 8%) than that of normal star forming galaxies of the same mass, but there is a significant delay between the starburst phase and the peak of nuclear optical AGN activity (median age difference of ≳ 200 ± 100 Myr), in agreement with previous studies. The time delay is inferred by comparing the broadband near-NUV-to-optical photometry with stellar population synthesis models. We also find that starbursts and post-starbursts are significantly more dust obscured than normal star forming galaxies in the same mass range. About 20% of the starbursts and 15% of the TPSBs can be classified as 'dust-obscured galaxies' (DOGs), with a near-UV-to-mid-IR flux ratio of ≳ 900, while only 0.8% of normal galaxies are DOGs. The time delay between the starburst phase and AGN activity suggests that AGNs do not play a primary role in the original quenching of starbursts but may be responsible for quenching later low-level star formation by removing gas and dust during

  3. From Starburst to Quiescence: Testing Active Galactic Nucleus feedback in Rapidly Quenching Post-starburst Galaxies

    Yesuf, Hassen M.; Faber, S. M.; Trump, Jonathan R.; Koo, David C.; Fang, Jerome J.; Liu, F. S.; Wild, Vivienne; Hayward, Christopher C.

    2014-09-01

    Post-starbursts are galaxies in transition from the blue cloud to the red sequence. Although they are rare today, integrated over time they may be an important pathway to the red sequence. This work uses Sloan Digital Sky Survey, the Galaxy Evolution Explorer, and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer observations to identify the evolutionary sequence from starbursts to fully quenched post-starbursts (QPSBs) in the narrow mass range log M(M ⊙) = 10.3-10.7, and identifies "transiting" post-starbursts (TPSBs) which are intermediate between these two populations. In this mass range, ~0.3% of galaxies are starbursts, ~0.1% are QPSBs, and ~0.5% are the transiting types in between. The TPSBs have stellar properties that are predicted for fast-quenching starbursts and morphological characteristics that are already typical of early-type galaxies. The active galactic nucleus (AGN) fraction, as estimated from optical line ratios, of these post-starbursts is about three times higher (gsim 36% ± 8%) than that of normal star forming galaxies of the same mass, but there is a significant delay between the starburst phase and the peak of nuclear optical AGN activity (median age difference of >~ 200 ± 100 Myr), in agreement with previous studies. The time delay is inferred by comparing the broadband near-NUV-to-optical photometry with stellar population synthesis models. We also find that starbursts and post-starbursts are significantly more dust obscured than normal star forming galaxies in the same mass range. About 20% of the starbursts and 15% of the TPSBs can be classified as "dust-obscured galaxies" (DOGs), with a near-UV-to-mid-IR flux ratio of >~ 900, while only 0.8% of normal galaxies are DOGs. The time delay between the starburst phase and AGN activity suggests that AGNs do not play a primary role in the original quenching of starbursts but may be responsible for quenching later low-level star formation by removing gas and dust during the post-starburst phase.

  4. Galaxy Zoo: The properties of merging galaxies in the nearby Universe - local environments, colours, masses, star-formation rates and AGN activity

    Darg, D W; Lintott, C J; Schawinski, K; Sarzi, M; Bamford, S; Silk, J; Andreescu, D; Murray, P; Nichol, R C; Raddick, M J; Slosar, A; Szalay, A S; Thomas, D; Vandenberg, J

    2009-01-01

    Following the study of Darg et al. (2009; hereafter D09a) we explore the environments, optical colours, stellar masses, star-formation and AGN activity in a sample of 3003 merging galaxies drawn from the SDSS using the Galaxy Zoo project. While D09a found that the spiral-to-elliptical ratio in (major) mergers appeared higher than that of the global galaxy population, no significant differences are found between the environmental distributions of mergers and a randomly selected control sample. This makes the high occurrence of spirals in mergers unlikely to be an environmental effect and must, therefore, arise from differing time-scales of detectability for spirals and ellipticals. We find that merging galaxies have a wider spread in colour than the global galaxy population, with a significant blue tail resulting from intense star-formation in spiral mergers. Galaxies classed as star-forming using their emission-line properties have average star-formation rates approximately doubled by the merger process thoug...

  5. The giant lobes of Centaurus A observed at 118 MHz with the Murchison Widefield Array

    McKinley, B; Gaensler, B M; Feain, I J; Bernardi, G; Wayth, R B; Johnston-Hollitt, M; Offringa, A R; Arcus, W; Barnes, D G; Bowman, J D; Bunton, J D; Cappallo, R J; Corey, B E; Deshpande, A; deSouza, L; Emrich, D; Goeke, R; Greenhill, L J; Hazelton, B J; Herne, D; Hewitt, J N; Kaplan, D L; Kasper, J C; Kincaid, B B; Koenig, R; Kratzenberg, E; Lonsdale, C J; Lynch, M J; McWhirter, S R; Mitchell, D A; Morales, M F; Morgan, E; Oberoi, D; Ord, S M; Pathikulangara, J; Prabu, T; Remillard, R A; Rogers, A E E; Roshi, A; Salah, J E; Sault, R J; Shankar, N Udaya; Srivani, K S; Stevens, J; Subrahmanyan, R; Tingay, S J; Waterson, M; Webster, R L; Whitney, A R; Williams, A; Williams, C L; Wyithe, J S B

    2013-01-01

    We present new wide-field observations of Centaurus A (Cen A) and the surrounding region at 118 MHz with the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) 32-tile prototype, with which we investigate the spectral-index distribution of Cen A's giant radio lobes. We compare our images to 1.4 GHz maps of Cen A and compute spectral indices using temperature-temperature plots and spectral tomography. We find that the morphologies at 118 MHz and 1.4 GHz match very closely apart from an extra peak in the southern lobe at 118 MHz, which provides tentative evidence for the existence of a southern counterpart to the northern middle lobe of Cen A. Our spatially-averaged spectral indices for both the northern and southern lobes are consistent with previous analyses, however we find significant spatial variation of the spectra across the extent of each lobe. Both the spectral-index distribution and the morphology at low radio frequencies support a scenario of multiple outbursts of activity from the central engine. Our results are consi...

  6. An analysis of the Auger highest energy events close to the radiogalaxy Centaurus A

    Full text: The Pierre Auger Observatory was constructed to study the most energetic cosmic rays with energies higher than 1 EeV (1 EeV = 1018 eV). The Pierre Auger Collaboration has reported evidence for anisotropy in the distribution of the arrival directions of the cosmic rays at the highest energies (E > Eth = 55 EeV). These show a correlation with the local distribution of matter at a maximum distance of about 100 Mpc (1 pc ∼ 3.3light-years). In this context, the region with the largest over density of arrival directions is centered at galactic coordinates (l,b) = (46.6 deg, 17.7 deg) and it is only at 4 deg away from the location of the radiogalaxy Cen A and it is not far from the direction of the Centaurus cluster. Cen A is the closest Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) at 3.8 Mpc. Several events above the 55 EeV threshold lie close to the extended radio lobes of this AGN, leading to an excess of pairs at small angular separation ( Ψ < 11 deg) with respect to an isotropic distribution. We present here the details of a posteriori analysis of the Auger highest energy events distribution around Cen A, showing their impact on the autocorrelation function and comparisons with other regions of the sky. (author)

  7. A formation scenario of young stellar groups in the region of the Scorpio Centaurus OB association

    Ortega, V G; De la Reza, R; Bazzanella, B

    2009-01-01

    The main objective of this work is to investigate the role played by Lower Centaurus Crux (LCC) and Upper Centaurus Lupus (UCL), both subcomponents of the Scorpio Centaurus OB association (Sco-Cen), in the formation of the groups beta Pictoris, TW Hydrae and the eta Chamaeleontis cluster. The dynamical evolution of all the stellar groups involved and of the bubbles and shells blown by LCC and UCL are calculated and followed from the past to the present. This leads to a formation scenario in which (1) the groups beta Pictoris, TW Hydrae were formed in the wake of the shells created by LCC and UCL, (2) the young cluster eta Chamaeleontis was born as a consequence of the collision of the shells of LCC and UCL, and (3) the formation of Upper Scorpius (US), the other main subcomponent of the Sco-Cen association, may have been started by the same process that created eta Chamaeleontis.

  8. NEW MEMBERS OF THE SCORPIUS-CENTAURUS COMPLEX AND AGES OF ITS SUB-REGIONS

    Song, Inseok [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602-2451 (United States); Zuckerman, B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, 475 Portola Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States); Bessell, M. S. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Institute of Advanced Studies, The Australian National University, ACT 2611 (Australia)

    2012-07-15

    We have spectroscopically identified {approx}100 G-, K-, and M-type members of the Scorpius-Centaurus complex. To deduce the age of these young stars we compare their Li {lambda}6708 absorption line strengths against those of stars in the TW Hydrae association and {beta} Pictoris moving group. These line strengths indicate that Sco-Cen stars are younger than {beta} Pic stars whose ages of {approx}12 Myr have previously been derived from a kinematic traceback analysis. Our derived age, {approx}10 Myr, for stars in the Lower Centaurus Crux and Upper Centaurus Lupus subgroups of ScoCen is younger than previously published ages based on the moving cluster method and upper main-sequence fitting. The discrepant ages are likely due to an incorrect (or lack of) cross-calibration between model-dependent and model-independent age-dating methods.

  9. A Soft X-Ray Lag Detected in Centaurus A

    Tachibana, Yutaro; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Shidatsu, Megumi; Arimoto, Makoto; Yoshii, Taketoshi; Yatsu, Yoichi; Saito, Yoshihiko; Pike, Sean; Kawai, Nobuyuki

    2015-01-01

    We performed time lag analysis on the X-ray light curves of Centaurus A (Cen A) obtained by the Gas Slit Camera (GSC) aboard the Monitor of All-sky X-ray Image (MAXI) in three energy bands (2--4 keV, 4--10 keV, and 10--20 keV). We discovered a soft X-ray lag relative to higher energies (soft lag) on a time scale of days by employing the discrete correlation function (DCF) and the z-transformed discrete correlation function (ZDCF) method in a flare episode. A peak in the DCF and the ZDCF was observed at a soft lag of $\\sim 5$ days in 2--4 keV versus 4--10 keV and in 4--10 keV versus 10--20 keV, and $\\sim 10$ days in 2--4 keV versus 10--20 keV. We found it difficult to explain the observed X-ray variation with the one-zone synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) model, in which the soft lags reflect the different cooling times of the relativistic electrons in these three energy bands. Alternatively, if the X-ray variation was produced in a corona surrounding or along the inner part of the accretion disk, we can explain ...

  10. A New Galactic Wolf-Rayet Star in Centaurus

    Roman-Lopes, A

    2011-01-01

    In this work I communicate the detection of a new Galactic Wolf-Rayet star (WR60a) in Centaurus. The H- and K-band spectra of WR60a, show strong carbon near-infrared emission lines, characteristic of Wolf-Rayet stars of the WC5-7 sub-type. Adopting mean absolute magnitude M$_K$ and mean intrinsic ($J-K_S$) and ($H-K_S$) colours, it was found that WR60a suffer a mean visual extinction of 3.8$\\pm$1.3 magnitudes, being located at a probable heliocentric distance of 5.2$\\pm$0.8 Kpc, which for the related Galactic longitude (l=312) puts this star probably in the Carina-Sagittarius arm at about 5.9 kpc from the Galactic center. I searched for clusters in the vicinity of WR60a, and in principle found no previously known clusters in a search radius region of several tens arc-minutes. The detection of a well isolated WR star induced us to seek for some still unknown cluster, somewhere in the vicinity of WR60a. From inspection of 5.8$\\mu$m and 8.0$\\mu$m Spitzer/IRAC GLIMPSE images of the region around the new WR star, ...

  11. Imaging on PAPER: Centaurus A at 148 MHz

    Stefan, Irina I; Green, David A; Ali, Zaki; Aguirre, James E; Bradley, Richard F; DeBoer, Dave; Dexter, Matthew; Gugliucci, Nicole E; Harris, D E; Jacobs, Daniel C; MacMahon, Dave; Manley, Jason; Moore, David F; Parsons, Aaron R; Pober, Jonathan C; Walbrugh, William P

    2012-01-01

    We present observations taken with the Donald C. Backer Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization (PAPER) of the Centaurus A field in the frequency range 120 to 180 MHz. The resulting image has a dynamic range of 3000 and an r.m.s. of 0.5 Jy/beam. A spectral index map of Cen A is produced across the full band. The spectral index distribution is qualitatively consistent with electron reacceleration in regions of excess turbulence in the radio lobes, as previously identified morphologically. Hence, there appears to be an association of `severe weather' in radio lobes with energy input into the relativistic electron population. We perform a detailed comparison of the large scale radio and X-ray emission from the ROSAT All Sky Survey. While the ROSAT field has significant gradients and structures on 10 deg scales possibly unrelated to Cen A, two interesting correlations are seen between the radio and X-ray emission. First is an apparent `cavity' generated by the northern radio lobe on a scale of 5 deg...

  12. Star formation and black hole accretion activity in rich local clusters of galaxies

    Bianconi, Matteo; Fadda, Dario

    2016-01-01

    We present a study of the star formation and central black hole accretion activity of the galaxies hosted in the two nearby (z$\\sim$0.2) rich galaxy clusters Abell 983 and 1731. Aims: We are able to quantify both the obscured and unobscured star formation rates, as well as the presence of active galactic nuclei (AGN) as a function of the environment in which the galaxy is located. Methods: We targeted the clusters with unprecedented deep infrared Spitzer observations (0.2 mJy @ 24 micron), near-IR Palomar imaging and optical WIYN spectroscopy. The extent of our observations ($\\sim$ 3 virial radii) covers the vast range of possible environments, from the very dense cluster centre to the very rarefied cluster outskirts and accretion regions. Results: The star forming members of the two clusters present star formation rates comparable with those measured in coeval field galaxies. The analysis of the spatial arrangement of the spectroscopically confirmed members reveals an elongated distribution for A1731 with re...

  13. A GMRT Study of Seyfert Galaxies NGC4235 & NGC4594: Evidence of Episodic Activity ?

    Kharb, P; Singh, V; Gallimore, J F; Ishwara-Chandra, C H; Hota, Ananda

    2016-01-01

    Low frequency observations at 325 and 610 MHz have been carried out for two "radio-loud" Seyfert galaxies, NGC4235 and NGC4594 (Sombrero galaxy), using the Giant Meterwave Radio Telescope (GMRT). The 610 MHz total intensity and 325-610 MHz spectral index images of NGC4235 tentatively suggest the presence of a "relic" radio lobe, most likely from a previous episode of AGN activity. This makes NGC4235 only the second known Seyfert galaxy after Mrk6 to show signatures of episodic activity. Spitzer and Herschel infrared spectral energy distribution (SED) modelling using the clumpyDREAM code predicts star formation rates (SFR) that are an order of magnitude lower than those required to power the radio lobes in these Seyferts (~0.13-0.23 M_sun/yr compared to the required SFR of ~2.0-2.7 M_sun/yr in NGC4594 and NGC4235, respectively). This finding along with the detection of parsec and sub-kpc radio jets in both Seyfert galaxies, that are roughly along the same position angles as the radio lobes, strongly support th...

  14. Filaments in the southern giant lobe of Centaurus A: constraints on nature and origin from modelling and GMRT observations

    Wykes, Sarka; Hardcastle, Martin J; Achterberg, Abraham; Jones, Thomas W; Jerjen, Helmut; Orru, Emanuela; Lazarian, Alex; Shimwell, Timothy W; Wise, Michael W; Kronberg, Philipp P

    2014-01-01

    We present results from imaging of the radio filaments in the southern giant lobe of Centaurus A using data from GMRT observations at 325 and 235 MHz, and outcomes from filament modelling. The observations reveal a rich filamentary structure, largely matching the morphology at 1.4 GHz. We find no clear connection of the filaments to the jet. We seek to constrain the nature and origin of the vertex and vortex filaments associated with the lobe and their role in high-energy particle acceleration. We deduce that these filaments are at most mildly overpressured with respect to the global lobe plasma showing no evidence of large-scale efficient Fermi I-type particle acceleration, and persist for ~ 2-3 Myr. We demonstrate that the dwarf galaxy KK 196 (AM 1318-444) cannot account for the features, and that surface plasma instabilities, the internal sausage mode and radiative instabilities are highly unlikely. An internal tearing instability and the kink mode are allowed within the observational and growth time const...

  15. An imaging and spectroscopic study of the planetary nebulae in NGC 5128 (Centaurus A): Planetary nebulae catalogues

    Walsh, J R; Walton, N A

    2015-01-01

    Imaging and spectroscopic observations of planetary nebulae (PNe) in the nearest large elliptical galaxy NGC 5128 (Centaurus A), were obtained to find more PNe and measure their radial velocities. NTT imaging was obtained in 15 fields in NGC 5128 over an area of about 1 square degree with EMMI using [O III] and off-band filters. Newly detected sources, combined with literature PNe, were used as input for VLT FLAMES multi-fibre spectroscopy in MEDUSA mode. Spectra of the 4600-5100A region were analysed and velocities measured based on emission lines of [O III]4959,5007A and often H-beta. The chief results are catalogues of 1118 PN candidates and 1267 spectroscopically confirmed PNe in NGC 5128. The catalogue of PN candidates contains 1060 PNe discovered with EMMI imaging and 58 from literature surveys. The spectroscopic PN catalogue has FLAMES radial velocity and emission line measurements for 1135 PNe, of which 486 are new. Another 132 PN radial velocities are available from the literature. For 629 PNe observ...

  16. NuSTAR and XMM-Newton Observations of the Hard X-Ray Spectrum of Centaurus A

    Fuerst, F; Madsen, K K; Lanz, L; Rivers, E; Brightman, M; Arevalo, P; Balokovic, M; Beuchert, T; Boggs, S E; Christensen, F E; Craig, W W; Dauser, T; Farrah, D; Graefe, C; Hailey, C J; Harrison, F A; Kadler, M; King, A; Krauss, F; Madejski, G; Matt, G; Marinucci, A; Markowitz, A; Ogle, P; Ojha, R; Rothschild, R; Stern, D; Walton, D J; Wilms, J; Zhang, W

    2015-01-01

    We present simultaneous XMM-Newton and NuSTAR observations spanning 3-78 keV of the nearest radio galaxy, Centaurus A (Cen A), performed during a very high flux state. The accretion geometry around the central engine in Cen A is still debated, and we investigate possible configurations using detailed X-ray spectral modeling. NuSTAR imaged the central region of Cen A with subarcminute resolution at X-ray energies above 10 keV for the first time, but finds no evidence for an extended source or other off-nuclear point-sources. The XMM-Newton and NuSTAR spectra agree well and can be described with an absorbed power-law with a photon index {\\Gamma} = 1.815 +/- 0.005 and a fluorescent Fe K{\\alpha} line in good agreement with literature values. The spectrum does not require a high-energy exponential rollover, with a constraint of E_fold > 1MeV. A thermal Comptonization continuum describes the data well, with parameters that agree with values measured by INTEGRAL, in particular an electron temperature of kT_e ~ 220 k...

  17. A Census of Broad-Line Active Galactic Nuclei in Nearby Galaxies: Coeval Star Formation and Rapid Black Hole Growth

    Trump, Jonathan R; Fang, Jerome J; Faber, S M; Koo, David C; Kocevski, Dale D

    2012-01-01

    We present the first quantified, statistical map of broad-line active galactic nucleus (AGN) frequency with host galaxy color and stellar mass in nearby (0.01 < z < 0.11) galaxies. Aperture photometry and z-band concentration measurements from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) are used to dis- entangle AGN and galaxy emission, resulting in estimates of uncontaminated galaxy rest-frame color, luminosity, and stellar mass. Broad-line AGNs are distributed throughout the blue cloud and green valley at a given stellar mass, and are much rarer in quiescent (red sequence) galaxies. This is in contrast to the published host galaxy properties of weaker narrow-line AGNs, indicating that broad-line AGNs occur during a different phase in galaxy evolution. More luminous broad-line AGNs have bluer host galaxies, even at fixed mass, suggesting that the same processes that fuel nuclear activity also efficiently form stars. The data favor processes that simultaneously fuel both star formation activity and rapid superm...

  18. Constraints on Feedback in the local Universe: The relation between star formation and AGN activity in early type galaxies

    Vaddi, Sravani; Baum, Stefi A; Whitmore, Samantha; Ahmed, Rabeea; Pierce, Katherine; Leary, Sara

    2016-01-01

    We address the relation between star formation and AGN activity in a sample of 231 nearby ($0.0002galaxies by carrying out a multi-wavelength study using archival observations in the UV, IR and radio. Our results indicate that early type galaxies in the current epoch are rarely powerful AGNs, with $P<10^{22}\\,WHz^{-1}$ for a majority of the galaxies. Only massive galaxies are capable of hosting powerful radio sources while less massive galaxies are hosts to lower radio power sources. Evidence of ongoing star formation is seen in approximately 7% of the sample. The SFR of these galaxies is less than 0.1 $M_{\\odot}yr^{-1}$. They also tend to be radio faint ($P<10^{22}\\,WHz^{-1}$). There is a nearly equal fraction of star forming galaxies in radio faint ($P<10^{22}\\,WHz^{-1}$) and radio bright galaxies ($P\\geq10^{22}\\,WHz^{-1}$) suggesting that both star formation and radio mode feedback are constrained to be very low in our sample. We notice that our galaxy sample and the B...

  19. The Hidden Lives of Galaxies: An Information & Activity Booklet, Grades 9-12, 2000-2001. Imagine the Universe! Probing the Structure & Evolution of the Cosmos.

    Lochner, James C.; Williamson, Lisa; Fitzhugh, Ethel

    This National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) document presents activities on the properties of galaxies for additional curriculum support. The activities presented in this document include: (1) "How Big Is the Universe"; (2) "Identifying Galaxies"; (3) "Classifying Galaxies Using Hubble's Fork Diagram"; (4) "Identifying Unusual…

  20. AGN III - primordial activity in nuclei of late-type galaxies with pseudobulges

    Komberg, B V

    2013-01-01

    1. Based on observational data on evolution of quasars and galaxies of different types along with the results of numerical simulations we make a conclusion that on low redshifts ($z<0.5$) QSOI/II objects in massive elliptical and spiral galaxies with classical bulges cannot be in late single activity event (be "primordial"). Instead of it they have had events of activity earlier in their evolution. It means that their presence on low redshifts is connected with the recurrence phenomenon, sequential wet minor mergings, because timescale of the activity does not exceed several units of $10^7$ years. 2. We define a new class - "AGN III" as active galactic nuclei in isolated late-type spirals with low-mass rapidly rotating pseudobulges. We also state that only such objects can be in the primordial phase of activity at low redshifts. Black holes in such galaxies have masses $M_{BH}<10^7M_\\odot$ and also, probably very high spin. Such properties can explain their peculiar emission spectra. A good representati...

  1. Changing ionization conditions in SDSS galaxies with active galactic nuclei as a function of environment from pairs to clusters

    We study how active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity changes across environments from galaxy pairs to clusters using 143,843 galaxies with z < 0.2 from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Using a refined technique, we apply a continuous measure of AGN activity, characteristic of the ionization state of the narrow-line emitting gas. Changes in key emission-line ratios ([N II] λ6548/Hα, [O III] λ5007/Hβ) between different samples allow us to disentangle different environmental effects while removing contamination. We confirm that galaxy interactions enhance AGN activity. However, conditions in the central regions of clusters are inhospitable for AGN activity even if galaxies are in pairs. These results can be explained through models of gas dynamics in which pair interactions stimulate the transfer of gas to the nucleus and clusters suppress gas availability for accretion onto the central black hole.

  2. COSMIC EVOLUTION OF BLACK HOLES AND SPHEROIDS. V. THE RELATION BETWEEN BLACK HOLE MASS AND HOST GALAXY LUMINOSITY FOR A SAMPLE OF 79 ACTIVE GALAXIES

    Park, Daeseong; Woo, Jong-Hak [Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Bennert, Vardha N. [Physics Department, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, CA 93407 (United States); Treu, Tommaso [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Auger, Matthew W. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Malkan, Matthew A., E-mail: pds2001@astro.snu.ac.kr, E-mail: woo@astro.snu.ac.kr, E-mail: daeseong.park@uci.edu, E-mail: vbennert@calpoly.edu, E-mail: tt@physics.ucsb.edu, E-mail: malkan@astro.ucla.edu, E-mail: mauger@ast.cam.ac.uk [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the cosmic evolution of the black hole (BH) mass-bulge luminosity relation using a sample of 52 active galaxies at z ∼ 0.36 and z ∼ 0.57 in the BH mass range of 10{sup 7.4}-10{sup 9.1} M {sub ☉}. By consistently applying multicomponent spectral and structural decomposition to high-quality Keck spectra and high-resolution Hubble Space Telescope images, BH masses (M {sub BH}) are estimated using the Hβ broad emission line combined with the 5100 Å nuclear luminosity, and bulge luminosities (L {sub bul}) are derived from surface photometry. Comparing the resulting M {sub BH} – L {sub bul} relation to local active galaxies and taking into account selection effects, we find evolution of the form M {sub BH}/L {sub bul}∝(1 + z){sup γ} with γ = 1.8 ± 0.7, consistent with BH growth preceding that of the host galaxies. Including an additional sample of 27 active galaxies with 0.5 < z < 1.9 taken from the literature and measured in a consistent way, we obtain γ = 0.9 ± 0.7 for the M {sub BH} – L {sub bul} relation and γ = 0.4 ± 0.5 for the M {sub BH}-total host galaxy luminosity (L {sub host}) relation. The results strengthen the findings from our previous studies and provide additional evidence for host galaxy bulge growth being dominated by disk-to-bulge transformation via minor mergers and/or disk instabilities.

  3. Simulating the formation of disk galaxies: The impact of Jets from Active Galactic Nuclei

    Okamoto, Takashi; Bower, Richard G

    2007-01-01

    Recent semi-analytic models have highlighted the role of AGN jets in regulating the formation of galaxies. In this paper, we present a new implementation of feedback due to active galactic nuclei (AGN) in cosmological hydrodynamic simulations of galaxy formation in which AGN feedback is assumed to heat the halo gas through the production of jets. Combining a theoretical model of mass accretion onto black holes with a multiphase description of star-forming gas, we self-consistently follow evolution of both galaxies and their central black holes. The novelty in our model is that we consider the two distinct accretion modes: standard radiatively efficient thin accretion disks and radiatively inefficient accretion flows which we will generically refer to as RIAFs; motivated by the theoretical modelsfor jet production in accretion disks, we assume that only the RIAF is responsible for the production of powerful jets. The focus of this paper is to investigate the interplay between galaxies and their central black h...

  4. On the central abundances of Active Galactic Nuclei and Star-forming Galaxies

    Dors, O L; Hagele, G F; Rodrigues, I; Grebel, E K; Pilyugin, L S; Freitas-Lemes, P; Krabbe, A C

    2015-01-01

    We examine the relation between oxygen abundances in the narrow-line regions (NLRs) of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) estimated from the optical emission lines through the strong-line method (the theoretical calibration of Storchi-Bergmann et al.(1998)), via the direct Te-method, and the central intersect abundances in the host galaxies determined from the radial abundance gradients. We found that the Te-method underestimates the oxygen abundances by up to ~2 dex (with average value of ~0.8 dex) compared to the abundances derived through the strong-line method. This confirms the existence of the so-called "temperature problem" in AGNs. We also found that the abundances in the centres of galaxies obtained from their spectra trough the strong-line method are close to or slightly lower than the central intersect abundances estimated from the radial abundance gradient both in AGNs and Star-forming galaxies. The oxygen abundance of the NLR is usually lower than the maximum attainable abundance in galaxies (~2 times...

  5. Broad Hβ Emission-line Variability in a Sample of 102 Local Active Galaxies

    Runco, Jordan N.; Cosens, Maren; Bennert, Vardha N.; Scott, Bryan; Komossa, S.; Malkan, Matthew A.; Lazarova, Mariana S.; Auger, Matthew W.; Treu, Tommaso; Park, Daeseong

    2016-04-01

    A sample of 102 local (0.02 ≤ z ≤ 0.1) Seyfert galaxies with black hole masses MBH > 107M⊙ was selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and observed using the Keck 10 m telescope to study the scaling relations between MBH and host galaxy properties. We study profile changes of the broad Hβ emission line within the three to nine year time frame between the two sets of spectra. The variability of the broad Hβ emission line is of particular interest, not only because it is used to estimate MBH, but also because its strength and width are used to classify Seyfert galaxies into different types. At least some form of broad-line variability (in either width or flux) is observed in the majority (∼66%) of the objects, resulting in a Seyfert-type change for ∼38% of the objects, likely driven by variable accretion and/or obscuration. The broad Hβ line virtually disappears in 3/102 (∼3%) extreme cases. We discuss potential causes for these changing look active galactic nuclei. While similar dramatic transitions have previously been reported in the literature, either on a case-by-case basis or in larger samples focusing on quasars at higher redshifts, our study provides statistical information on the frequency of Hβ line variability in a sample of low-redshift Seyfert galaxies.

  6. Disentangling star formation and AGN activity in powerful infrared luminous radio galaxies at 1

    Drouart, Guillaume; De Breuck, Carlos; Fioc, Michel; Lehnert, Matthew; Seymour, Nick; Stern, Dan; Vernet, Joel

    2016-01-01

    High-redshift radio galaxies present signs of both star formation and AGN activity, making them ideal candidates to investigate the connection and coevolution of AGN and star formation in the progenitors of present-day massive galaxies. We make use of a sample of 11 powerful radio galaxies spanning 1galaxies form at very high-redshift, but experience episodic and important growth at 1

  7. The discovery of five new H2O megamasers in active galaxies

    Braatz, J. A.; Wilson, A. S.; Henkel, C.

    1994-01-01

    H2O megamasers with (isotropic) luminosities between 60 and 200 solar luminosity (H(sub 0) = 75 km/s/Mpc) have been detected in the Seyfert 2 galaxies Mrk 1, Mrk 1210, and NGC 5506 and in the LINERs NGC 1052 and NGC 2639. No megamasers have been found in Seyfert 1's. The galaxies have redshifts between 1500 and 4800 km/s and are the most distant H2O sources reported to date. NGC 1052 is also the first elliptical galaxy known to contain an H2O maser. The intensity distribution of an H2O five-point map obtained toward NGC 5506 shows that the H2O emission is pointlike compared to the 40 sec telescope beam. The lack of CO emission in NGC 1052 implies a conservative lower limit to the H2O brightness temperature of 1000 K, thus ruling out a thermal origin for the H2O emission. The success of this survey relative to other recent searches makes it evident that H2O megamasers are preferentially found in galaxies with active nuclei.

  8. Heating of dust in the broad-line regions of active galaxies and quasars

    In this paper we discuss the relevant energy sources which heat (and, in many cases, destroy) the dust grains in the emission-line clouds (ELCs) which give rise to the broad-line emission seen in active extragalactic objects. We compare the heating rates from the external radiation field, trapped line radiation, and the diffuse bound-free continua. We find that in hot clouds (T/sub e/ = 1.5 x 104 K) Lyα dominates the dust heating rate, while in cooler clouds (T/sub e/ = 1.0 x 104 K) the external radiation field dominates. In all cases, the dust residing in the broad-line clouds is quite hot (T>500 K). These results are discussed in light of the observed infrared properties of active galaxies and quasars, and the following conclusions are reached: (1) If the infrared emission of Seyfert 1 galaxies is primarily thermal in origin, then the redder near-IR colors distinguishing the Seyfert 1 galaxies from the Seyfert 2 galaxies may be understood in terms of the broad-line regions (BLR) concentrating hot dust within the inner parsec of the of the nucleus. (2) Substantial near-infrared dust emission may originate in the neutral regions of the ELCs with only minor accompanying reddening of the hydrogen Balmer lines, since dust confined to the neutral zone reddens only lines emitted from the back side of the cloud. (3) If the broad-line regions of the quasars are characterized by hotter temperatures than Seyfert 1 galaxies, dust may not be able to exist in this region, thereby explaining the apparent lack of thermal dust emission in quasars. (4) Because of the cooling times of the ELCs, near-IR variability due to changes in the dust temperature is dominated by light travel considerations. (5) The present calculations suggest that the dust-to-gas mass ratio in the BLRs of Seyfert 1 galaxies is substantially smaller than the value of 0.01 typically found in our Galaxy

  9. Detailed Analysis of Starburst and AGN Activity in Blue E/S0 Galaxies in RESOLVE

    Bittner, Ashley; Snyder, Elaine M.; Kannappan, Sheila; Norman, Dara J.; Norris, Mark A.; Moffett, Amanda J.; Hoversten, Erik A.; Stark, David; RESOLVE Team

    2016-01-01

    We identify a population of ~120 blue E/S0 galaxies among the ~1350 galaxies that are targeted for spectroscopy and have measured morphologies in the highly complete REsolved Spectroscopy Of a Local Volume (RESOLVE) survey. Blue E/S0s are identified as being early type objects morphologically classified between E and S0/a that fall on the blue sequence. Most (~85%) of our blue E/S0s have stellar masses sample. Using three variations of the M_BH -- sigma relation, this kinematic subsample is estimated to typically host central black holes within the range log M_BH = 4-6 M_sun. Following up on previous suggestions of nuclear activity in the blue E/S0 population, we investigate nuclear starburst and/or AGN activity occurring within the full sample. Preliminary results from cross-checking known AGN catalogs with the blue E/S0 sample have revealed nuclear activity in ~20 of these galaxies based on heterogeneous criteria (BPT line ratio analysis, spectral line broadening, etc.), some of which may not entirely distinguish starburst from AGN activity. In an attempt to break the degeneracy between AGN and starburst activity, we perform detailed spectral analysis for a few of the galaxies with kinematic data. We also consider the viability of alternate AGN detection methods based on L_Edd estimates calculated from the M_BH estimates. This research has been supported by the National Science Foundation through the CAP REU Program (ACI-1156614) and the RESOLVE Survey (AST-0955368) as well as the National Space Grant College and Fellowship Program and the NC Space Grant Consortium.

  10. CHANDRA OBSERVATIONS OF GALAXY ZOO MERGERS: FREQUENCY OF BINARY ACTIVE NUCLEI IN MASSIVE MERGERS

    We present the results from a Chandra pilot study of 12 massive galaxy mergers selected from Galaxy Zoo. The sample includes major mergers down to a host galaxy mass of 1011 M☉ that already have optical active galactic nucleus (AGN) signatures in at least one of the progenitors. We find that the coincidences of optically selected active nuclei with mildly obscured (NH ∼22 cm–2) X-ray nuclei are relatively common (8/12), but the detections are too faint (2-10keV ∼–13 erg s–1 cm–2) to reliably separate starburst and nuclear activity as the origin of the X-ray emission. Only one merger is found to have confirmed binary X-ray nuclei, though the X-ray emission from its southern nucleus could be due solely to star formation. Thus, the occurrences of binary AGNs in these mergers are rare (0%-8%), unless most merger-induced active nuclei are very heavily obscured or Compton thick.

  11. Dissecting Galaxies: Spatial and Spectral Separation of Emission Excited by Star Formation and AGN Activity

    Davies, Rebecca L; Kewley, Lisa J; Dopita, Michael A; Hampton, Elise J; Shastri, Prajval; Scharwachter, Julia; Sutherland, Ralph; Kharb, Preeti; Bhatt, Harish; Jin, Chichuan; Banfield, Julie; Zaw, Ingyin; James, Bethan; Juneau, Stephanie; Srivastava, Shweta

    2016-01-01

    The optical spectra of Seyfert galaxies are often dominated by emission lines excited by both star formation and AGN activity. Standard calibrations (such as for the star formation rate) are not applicable to such composite (mixed) spectra. In this paper, we describe how integral field data can be used to spectrally and spatially separate emission associated with star formation from emission associated with accretion onto an active galactic nucleus (AGN). We demonstrate our method using integral field data for two AGN host galaxies (NGC 5728 and NGC 7679) from the Siding Spring Southern Seyfert Spectroscopic Snapshot Survey (S7). The spectra of NGC 5728 and NGC 7679 form clear sequences of AGN fraction on standard emission line ratio diagnostic diagrams. We show that the emission line luminosities of the majority (> 85 per cent) of spectra along each AGN fraction sequence can be reproduced by linear superpositions of the emission line luminosities of one AGN dominated spectrum and one star formation dominated...

  12. A soft X-ray lag detected in Centaurus A

    Tachibana, Yutaro; Kawamuro, Taiki; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Shidatsu, Megumi; Arimoto, Makoto; Yoshii, Taketoshi; Yatsu, Yoichi; Saito, Yoshihiko; Pike, Sean; Kawai, Nobuyuki

    2016-06-01

    We performed time-lag analysis on the X-ray light curves of Centaurus A (Cen A) obtained by the Gas Slit Camera (GSC) aboard the Monitor of All-sky X-ray Image (MAXI) in three energy bands (2-4 keV, 4-10 keV, and 10-20 keV). We discovered a soft X-ray lag relative to higher energies (soft lag) on a timescale of days in a flaring episode by employing the discrete correlation function (DCF) and the z-transformed discrete correlation function (ZDCF) method. In the episode, a peak and a centroid in the DCF and the ZDCF was observed at a soft lag of ˜ 5 d in 2-4 keV versus 4-10 keV and in 4-10 keV versus 10-20 keV, and ˜ 10 d in 2-4 keV versus 10-20 keV. We found it difficult to explain the observed X-ray variation by a single energy injection with the one-zone synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) model, in which the soft lags in these three energy bands reflect the different cooling times of the relativistic electrons, by assuming the magnetic field and minimum Lorentz factor estimated from a broad-band spectral energy distribution. Alternatively, if the phenomenon is interpreted as cooling of Comptonizing electrons in a corona covering the accretion disk, the temperature of the corona producing the variable X-rays should be ˜ 10 keV for reconciliation with the soft lag in the energy range of 2-20 keV.

  13. A New Galactic Wolf-Rayet Star in Centaurus

    Roman-Lopes, A.

    2011-09-01

    I communicate the detection of a new Galactic Wolf-Rayet star (WR60a) in Centaurus. The H- and K-band spectra of WR60a show strong carbon near-infrared emission lines, characteristic of Wolf-Rayet stars of the WC5-7 subtype. Adopting mean absolute magnitude MK and mean intrinsic (J-Ks) and (H-Ks) colours, it was found that WR60a suffers a mean visual extinction of 3.8+/-1.3 magnitudes, being located at a probable heliocentric distance of 5.2+/-0.8 Kpc, which for the related Galactic longitude puts this star probably in the Carina-Sagittarius arm at about 5.9 kpc from the Galactic center. I searched for clusters in the vicinity of WR60a and in principle found no previously known clusters in a search radius region of several tens arcminutes. The detection of a well-isolated WR star induced us to seek for some still unknown cluster, somewhere in the vicinity of WR60a. From inspection of 5.8 microns and 8.0 microns Spitzer/IRAC GLIMPSE images of the region around the new WR star, strong mid-infrared extended emission at about 13.5 arcmin south-west of WR60a was found. The study of the H-KS colour distribution of point sources associated with the extended emission reveals the presence of a new Galactic cluster candidate probably formed by at least 85 stars.

  14. Herschel observed Stripe 82 quasars and their host galaxies: connections between the AGN activity and the host galaxy star formation

    Dong, Xiaoyi

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we present a study of 207 quasars selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey quasar catalogs and the Herschel Stripe 82 survey. Quasars within this sample are high luminosity quasars with a mean bolometric luminosity of $10^{46.4}$ erg s$^{-1}$. The redshift range of this sample is within $z<4$, with a mean value of $1.5\\pm0.78$. Because we only selected quasars that have been detected in all three Herschel-SPIRE bands, the quasar sample is complete yet highly biased. Based on the multi-wavelength photometric observation data, we conducted a spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting through UV to FIR. Parameters such as active galactic nucleus (AGN) luminosity, FIR luminosity, stellar mass, as well as many other AGN and galaxy properties are deduced from the SED fitting results. The mean star formation rate (SFR) of the sample is 419 $M_{\\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$ and the mean gas mass is $\\sim 10^{11.3}$ $M_{\\odot}$. All these results point to an IR luminous quasar system. Comparing with star format...

  15. RADIO ACTIVE GALAXY NUCLEI IN GALAXY CLUSTERS: HEATING HOT ATMOSPHERES AND DRIVING SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLE GROWTH OVER COSMIC TIME

    We estimate the average radio active galactic nucleus (AGN, mechanical) power deposited into the hot atmospheres of galaxy clusters over more than three quarters of the age of the Universe. Our sample was drawn from eight major X-ray cluster surveys and includes 685 clusters in the redshift range 0.1 44 erg s–1 exceeds the X-ray luminosity of 44% of the clusters, indicating that the accumulation of radio-AGN energy is significant in these clusters. Integrating the AGN mechanical power to redshift z = 2.0, using simple models for its evolution and disregarding the hierarchical growth of clusters, we find that the AGN energy accumulated per particle in low luminosity X-ray clusters exceeds 1 keV per particle. This result represents a conservative lower limit to the accumulated thermal energy. The estimate is comparable to the level of energy needed to 'preheat' clusters, indicating that continual outbursts from radio-AGN are a significant source of gas energy in hot atmospheres. Assuming an average mass conversion efficiency of η = 0.1, our result implies that the supermassive black holes that released this energy did so by accreting an average of ∼109 M ☉ over time, which is comparable to the level of growth expected during the quasar era.

  16. Mergers and binary systems of SMBH in the contexts of nuclear activity and galaxy evolution

    Lobanov, A. P.

    2004-01-01

    The dynamic evolution of binary systems of supermassive black holes (SMBH) may be a key factor affecting a large fraction of the observed properties of active galactic nuclei (AGN) and galaxy evolution. Different classes of AGN can be related in general to four evolutionary stages in a binary SMBH: 1) early merger stage; 2) wide pair stage; 3) close pair stage; and 4) pre-coalescence stage. This scheme can explain a variety of properties of AGN: radio and optical luminosity differences betwee...

  17. Local luminous infrared galaxies. III. Co-evolution of black hole growth and star formation activity?

    Alonso-Herrero, A.; Pereira-Santaella, M.; Rieke, George H.; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Wang, Yiping; Hernán-Caballero, Antonio; Rigopoulou, Dimitra

    2013-01-01

    Local luminous infrared (IR) galaxies (LIRGs) have both high star formation rates (SFR) and a high AGN (Seyfert and AGN/starburst composite) incidence. Therefore, they are ideal candidates to explore the co-evolution of black hole (BH) growth and star formation (SF) activity, not necessarily associated with major mergers. Here, we use Spitzer/IRS spectroscopy of a complete volume-limited sample of local LIRGs (distances of

  18. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Centaurus Cluster catalog (Chiboucas+, 2007)

    Chiboucas, K.; Mateo, M.

    2007-09-01

    Observations of A3526 (Centaurus, 12:48:51.8, -41:18:21, J2000.0) were acquired with the LCO 1m and a TEK 2K Camera having a field of view of 20.48' and scale size 0.6"/pix on 1993 13-20 May and 1997 1-8 May. (1 data file).

  19. Starburst or Seyfert? Adding a radio and far-infrared perspective to the investigation of activity in composite galaxies

    Hill, T L; Norris, R P; Reynolds, J E; Hunstead, R W; Hill, Tanya L.; Heisler, Charlene A.; Norris, Ray P.; Reynolds, John E.; Hunstead, Richard W.

    2001-01-01

    It was once common to regard Seyfert and starburst galaxies as completely different types of object, but there is growing recognition that these classifications refer to the extremes of a continuous spectrum of galaxy types. In a previous study we investigated a sample of galaxies with ambiguous optical emission-line ratios and concluded from near-infrared spectroscopic observations that the sample consisted of composite galaxies, containing both a starburst and an active galactic nucleus (AGN). We now extend our study using radio synthesis and long-baseline interferometer observations made with the Australia Telescope, together with far-infrared IRAS observations, to discuss the relative contribution of starburst and AGN components to the overall luminosity of the composite galaxies. We find that only a small fraction of the radio emission (90%) is probably due to the starburst component. We also show that an AGN contribution to the optical emission of as little as 10% is sufficient to account for the ambigu...

  20. Chandra Observations of Galaxy Zoo Mergers: Frequency of Binary Active Nuclei in Massive Mergers

    Teng, Stacy H.; Schawinski, Kevin; Urry, C. Megan; Darg, Dan W.; Kaviraj, Sugata; Oh, Kyuseok; Bonning, Erin W.; Cardamone, Carolin N.; Keel, William C.; Lintott, Chris J.; Simmons, Brooke D.; Treister, Ezequiel

    2012-01-01

    We present the results from a Chandra pilot study of 12 massive galaxy mergers selected from Galaxy Zoo. The sample includes major mergers down to a host galaxy mass of 1011 M that already have optical AGN signatures in at least one of the progenitors. We find that the coincidences of optically selected active nuclei with mildly obscured (N(sub H) approx < 1.1 10(exp 22)/sq cm) X-ray nuclei are relatively common (8/12), but the detections are too faint (< 40 counts per nucleus; (sub -10) keV approx < 1.2 10(exp -13) erg/s/sq cm) to reliably separate starburst and nuclear activity as the origin of the X-ray emission. Only one merger is found to have confirmed binary X-ray nuclei, though the X-ray emission from its southern nucleus could be due solely to star formation. Thus, the occurrences of binary AGN in these mergers are rare (0-8%), unless most merger-induced active nuclei are very heavily obscured or Compton thick.

  1. Cosmic Evolution of Black Holes and Spheroids. V. The Relation Between Black Hole Mass and Host Galaxy Luminosity for a Sample of 79 Active Galaxies

    Park, Daeseong; Bennert, Vardha N; Treu, Tommaso; Auger, Matthew W; Malkan, Matthew A

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the cosmic evolution of the black hole (BH) mass -- bulge luminosity relation using a sample of 52 active galaxies at $z \\sim 0.36$ and $z \\sim 0.57$ in the BH mass range of $10^{7.4-9.1} M_{\\odot}$. By consistently applying multi-component spectral and structural decomposition to high-quality Keck spectra and high-resolution HST images, BH masses ($M_{\\rm BH}$) are estimated using the H$\\beta$ broad emission line combined with the 5100 \\AA\\ nuclear luminosity, and bulge luminosities ($L_{\\rm bul}$) are derived from surface photometry. Comparing the resulting $M_{\\rm BH}-L_{\\rm bul}$ relation to local active galaxies and taking into account selection effects, we find evolution of the form $M_{\\rm BH} / L_{\\rm bul} \\propto (1+z)^{\\gamma}$ with $\\gamma=1.8\\pm0.7$, consistent with BH growth preceding that of the host galaxies. Including an additional sample of 27 active galaxies with $0.5

  2. Testing the two planes of satellites in the Centaurus Group

    Müller, Oliver; Pawlowski, Marcel S; Binggeli, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    The existence of satellite galaxy planes poses a major challenge for the standard picture of structure formation with non-baryonic dark matter. Recently Tully et al. (2015) reported the discovery of two almost parallel planes in the nearby Cen A group using mostly high-mass galaxies (M$_B$ $<$ -10 mag) in their analysis. Our team detected a large number of new group member candidates in the Cen A group (M\\"uller et al. 2016). This dwarf galaxy sample combined with other recent results from the literature enables us to test the galaxy distribution in the direction of the Cen A group and to determine the statistical significance of the geometric alignment. Taking advantage of the fact that the two galaxy planes lie almost edge-on along the line of sight, the newly found 13 group members by Crnojevic et al. (2014, 2016) and our 16 new Cen A group candidates (M\\"uller et al. 2016) can be assigned relative to the two planes. We use various statistical methods to test whether the distribution of galaxies follows...

  3. The Fermi Bubbles. I. Possible Evidence for Recent AGN Jet Activity in the Galaxy

    Guo, Fulai; Mathews, William G.

    2011-01-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope reveals two large gamma-ray bubbles in the Galaxy, which extend about 50 degrees (~ 10 kpc) above and below the Galactic center (GC) and are symmetric about the Galactic plane. Using axisymmetric hydrodynamic simulations with a self-consistent treatment of the dynamical cosmic ray (CR) - gas interaction, we show that the bubbles can be created with a recent active galactic nucleus (AGN) jet activity about 1 - 3 Myr ago, which was active for a duration of ~ ...

  4. LOCAL LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES. III. CO-EVOLUTION OF BLACK HOLE GROWTH AND STAR FORMATION ACTIVITY?

    Local luminous infrared (IR) galaxies (LIRGs) have both high star formation rates (SFR) and a high AGN (Seyfert and AGN/starburst composite) incidence. Therefore, they are ideal candidates to explore the co-evolution of black hole (BH) growth and star formation (SF) activity, not necessarily associated with major mergers. Here, we use Spitzer/IRS spectroscopy of a complete volume-limited sample of local LIRGs (distances of 7 M☉ using [Ne III] 15.56 μm and optical [O III] λ5007 gas velocity dispersions and literature stellar velocity dispersions. We find that in a large fraction of local LIRGs, the current SFR is taking place not only in the inner nuclear ∼1.5 kpc region, as estimated from the nuclear 11.3 μm PAH luminosities, but also in the host galaxy. We next use the ratios between the SFRs and BH accretion rates (BHAR) to study whether the SF activity and BH growth are contemporaneous in local LIRGs. On average, local LIRGs have SFR to BHAR ratios higher than those of optically selected Seyferts of similar active galactic nucleus (AGN) luminosities. However, the majority of the IR-bright galaxies in the revised-Shapley-Ames Seyfert sample behave like local LIRGs. Moreover, the AGN incidence tends to be higher in local LIRGs with the lowest SFRs. All of this suggests that in local LIRGs there is a distinct IR-bright star-forming phase taking place prior to the bulk of the current BH growth (i.e., AGN phase). The latter is reflected first as a composite and then as a Seyfert, and later as a non-LIRG optically identified Seyfert nucleus with moderate SF in its host galaxy.

  5. Investigating the Nuclear Activity of Barred Spiral Galaxies: The Case of NGC 1672

    Jenkins, L. P.; Brandt, W. N.; Colbert, E. J.; Koribalski, B.; Kuntz, K. D.; Levan, A. J.; Ojha, R.; Roberts, T. P.; Ward, M. J.; Zezas, A.

    2011-01-01

    We have performed an X-ray study of the nearby barred spiral galaxy NGC 1672, primarily to ascertain the effect of the bar on its nuclear activity. We use both Chandra and XMM-Newton observations to investigate its X-ray properties, together with supporting high-resolution optical imaging data from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) infrared imaging from the Spitzer Space Telescope, and Australia Telescope Compact Array ground-based radio data. We detect 28 X-ray sources within the D25 area of the galaxy; many are spatially correlated with star formation in the bar and spiral arms, and two are identified as background galaxies in the HST images. Nine of the X-ray sources are ultraluminous X-ray sources, with the three brightest (LX 5 * 10(exp 39) erg s(exp -1)) located at the ends of the bar. With the spatial resolution of Chandra, we are able to show for the first time that NGC 1672 possesses a hard (1.5) nuclear X-ray source with a 2-10 keV luminosity of 4 * 10(exp 38) erg s(exp -1). This is surrounded by an X-ray-bright circumnuclear star-forming ring, comprised of point sources and hot gas, which dominates the 2-10 keV emission in the central region of the galaxy. The spatially resolved multiwavelength photometry indicates that the nuclear source is a low-luminosity active galactic nucleus (LLAGN), but with star formation activity close to the central black hole. A high-resolution multiwavelength survey is required to fully assess the impact of both large-scale bars and smaller-scale phenomena such as nuclear bars, rings, and nuclear spirals on the fueling of LLAGN.

  6. Relativistic jet production and propagation in active galaxies

    Recent studies of the phenomena of active galactic nuclei are beginning to identify the most likely physical processes involved in the galactic nuclei cores which give rise to a fast moving plasma that emerges in directed beams and energizes radio sources. In particular, the formation of the beams appears to be a generic property of the flow pattern around collapsed objects, where there is a relativistically deep potential well. These beams are relevant to extended radio sources, superluminal variations in compact sources, and the injection of high-energy plasma into the intergalactic medium. There is a physical similarity, and not merely a superficial analogy, between the physical mechanisms of such objects as SS 433 and Sco X-1 and the processes in active galactic nuclei. The exploration of fluid dynamic and electrodynamic effects around black holes is envisaged as a fruitful line of inquiry in the present field of study

  7. The AMIGA sample of isolated galaxies. XI. Optical characterisation of nuclear activity

    Sabater, J; Leon, S; Best, P; Sulentic, J

    2012-01-01

    Context.- This paper is part of a series involving the AMIGA project (Analysis of the Interstellar Medium of Isolated GAlaxies) which identifies and studies a statistically-significant sample of the most isolated galaxies in the northern sky. Aims.- We present a catalogue of nuclear activity, traced by optical emission lines, in a well-defined sample of the most isolated galaxies in the local Universe, that will be used as a baseline for the study of the effect of the environment on nuclear activity. Methods.- We obtained spectral data from the 6th Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, and these were inspected in a semi-automatic way. We subtracted the underlying stellar populations from the spectra (using the software Starlight) and modelled the nuclear emission features. Standard emission-line diagnostics diagrams were applied, using a new classification scheme that takes into account censored data, to classify the type of nuclear emission. Results.- We provide a final catalogue of spectroscopic dat...

  8. Identifying clustering at high redshift through actively star-forming galaxies

    Davies, L J M; Stanway, E R; Husband, K; Lehnert, M D; Mannering, E J A

    2013-01-01

    Identifying galaxy clustering at high redshift (i.e. z > 1) is essential to our understanding of the current cosmological model. However, at increasing redshift, clusters evolve considerably in star-formation activity and so are less likely to be identified using the widely-used red sequence method. Here we assess the viability of instead identifying high redshift clustering using actively star-forming galaxies (SMGs associated with over-densities of BzKs/LBGs). We perform both a 2- and 3-D clustering analysis to determine whether or not true (3D) clustering can be identified where only 2D data are available. As expected, we find that 2D clustering signals are weak at best and inferred results are method dependant. In our 3D analysis, we identify 12 SMGs associated with an over-density of galaxies coincident both spatially and in redshift - just 8% of SMGs with known redshifts in our sample. Where an SMG in our target fields lacks a known redshift, their sightline is no more likely to display clustering than ...

  9. A Search for "Dwarf" Seyfert Nuclei; 5, Demographics of Nuclear Activity in Nearby Galaxies

    Ho, L C; Sargent, W L W; Ho, Luis C.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Sargent, Wallace L. W.

    1997-01-01

    We use the sample of emission-line nuclei derived from a recently completed optical spectroscopic survey of nearby galaxies to quantify the incidence of local (z = 0) nuclear activity. Consistent with previous studies, we find detectable amounts of ionized gas in the central few hundred parsecs of most (86%) galaxies. Half of the objects can be classified as H II or star-forming nuclei and the other half as some form of AGN, of which we distinguish three classes --- Seyfert nuclei, LINERs, and transition objects. The population of AGNs consequently is very large; approximately 43% of the galaxies in our survey can be regarded as "active." Most of the objects have much lower luminosities than AGNs commonly studied; the median luminosity of the narrow H-alpha line, after correcting for extinction, is only 2 x 10^39 erg/s. Our sample therefore occupies the extreme faint end of the AGN luminosity function. We detect signatures of a broad-line region, as revealed by visible broad H-alpha emission, in $\\sim$ 20% of...

  10. COLA. III. RADIO DETECTION OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS IN COMPACT MODERATE LUMINOSITY INFRARED GALAXIES

    We present results from 4.8 GHz Very Large Array (VLA) and global very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations of the northern half of the moderate FIR luminosity (median LIR = 1011.01 Lsun) COLA sample of star-forming galaxies. VLBI sources are detected in a high fraction (20/90) of the galaxies observed. The radio luminosities of these cores (∼1021 W Hz-1) are too large to be explained by radio supernovae or supernova remnants and we argue that they are instead powered by active galactic nuclei (AGNs). These sub-parsec scale radio cores are preferentially detected toward galaxies whose VLA maps show bright 100-500 parsec scale nuclear radio components. Since these latter structures tightly follow the FIR to radio-continuum correlation for star formation, we conclude that the AGN-powered VLBI sources are associated with compact nuclear starburst environments. The implications for possible starburst-AGN connections are discussed. The detected VLBI sources have a relatively narrow range of radio luminosity consistent with models in which intense compact Eddington-limited starbursts regulate the gas supply onto a central supermassive black hole. The high incidence of AGN radio cores in compact starbursts suggests little or no delay between the starburst phase and the onset of AGN activity.