WorldWideScience

Sample records for active flap rotor

  1. Identification of Flap Motion Parameters for Vibration Reduction in Helicopter Rotors with Multiple Active Trailing Edge Flaps

    Uğbreve;ur Dalli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An active control method utilizing the multiple trailing edge flap configuration for rotorcraft vibration suppression and blade loads control is presented. A comprehensive model for rotor blade with active trailing edge flaps is used to calculate the vibration characteristics, natural frequencies and mode shapes of any complex composite helicopter rotor blade. A computer program is developed to calculate the system response, rotor blade root forces and moments under aerodynamic forcing conditions. Rotor blade system response is calculated using the proposed solution method and the developed program depending on any structural and aerodynamic properties of rotor blades, structural properties of trailing edge flaps and properties of trailing edge flap actuator inputs. Rotor blade loads are determined first on a nominal rotor blade without multiple active trailing edge flaps and then the effects of the active flap motions on the existing rotor blade loads are investigated. Multiple active trailing edge flaps are controlled by using open loop controllers to identify the effects of the actuator signal output properties such as frequency, amplitude and phase on the system response. Effects of using multiple trailing edge flaps on controlling rotor blade vibrations are investigated and some design criteria are determined for the design of trailing edge flap controller that will provide actuator signal outputs to minimize the rotor blade root loads. It is calculated that using the developed active trailing edge rotor blade model, helicopter rotor blade vibrations can be reduced up to 36% of the nominal rotor blade vibrations.

  2. Localized, Non-Harmonic Active Flap Motions for Low Frequency In-Plane Rotor Noise Reduction

    Sim, Ben W.; Potsdam, Mark; Kitaplioglu, Cahit; LeMasurier, Philip; Lorber, Peter; Andrews, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    A first-of-its-kind demonstration of the use of localized, non-harmonic active flap motions, for suppressing low frequency, in-plane rotor noise, is reported in this paper. Operational feasibility is verified via testing of the full-scale AATD/Sikorsky/UTRC active flap demonstration rotor in the NFAC's 40- by 80-Foot anechoic wind tunnel. Effectiveness of using localized, non-harmonic active flap motions are compared to conventional four-per-rev harmonic flap motions, and also active flap motions derived from closed-loop acoustics implementations. All three approaches resulted in approximately the same noise reductions over an in-plane three-by-three microphone array installed forward and near in-plane of the rotor in the nearfield. It is also reported that using an active flap in this localized, non-harmonic manner, resulted in no more that 2% rotor performance penalty, but had the tendency to incur higher hub vibration levels.

  3. Adaptive Trailing Edge Flaps for Active Load Alleviation in a Smart Rotor Configuration

    Bergami, Leonardo

    The work investigates the development of an active smart rotor concept from an aero-servo-elastic perspective. An active smart rotor is a wind turbine rotor that, through a combination of sensors, control units and actuators, is able to alleviate the fluctuating part of the aerodynamic loads it has...... to withstand. The investigation focuses on a specific actuator type: the Adaptive Trailing Edge Flap (ATEF), which introduces a continuous deformation of the aft part of the airfoil camber-line. An aerodynamic model that accounts for the steady and unsteady effects of the flap deflection on a 2D...... energy capture below rated conditions by using the flaps. Two model based control algorithms are developed to actively alleviate the fatigue loads on the smart rotor with ATEF. The first algorithm features a linear quadratic regulator with periodic disturbance rejection, and controls the deflection of...

  4. Development and whirl tower test of the SMART active flap rotor

    Straub, Friedrich K.; Kennedy, Dennis K.; Stemple, Alan D.; Anand, V. R.; Birchette, Terry S.

    2004-07-01

    A full scale Smart Material Actuated Rotor Technology (SMART) system with piezoelectric actuated blade flaps was developed and whirl tower tested. The development effort included design, fabrication, and component testing of rotor blades, trailing edge flaps, piezoelectric actuators, switching power amplifiers, and the data/power system. Simulations and model scale wind tunnel tests have shown that this system can provide 80% vibration reduction, 10dB noise reduction for a helicopter passing overhead, and substantial aerodynamic performance gains. Whirl tower testing of the 34-foot diameter rotor demonstrated the functionality, robustness, and required authority of the active flap system. The program involved extensive development work and risk reduction tests which resulted in a robust, high performance actuator and a tightly integrated actuator, flap, and blade system. The actuator demonstrated excellent performance during bench testing and has accumulated over 60 million cycles under a spectrum of loading conditions. The flight worthy active flap rotor blades were based on a modified design of the FAA certified MD900 Explorer production rotor blade. Whirl tower testing was conducted with full rotor instrumentation and a 5-component balance. The rotor was tested for 13 hours under a range of conditions, including 7 hours of flap operation. Flap inputs included open loop static and dynamic commands. The flaps showed excellent authority with oscillatory thrust greater than 10% of the steady baseline thrust. Various flap actuation frequency sweeps were run to investigate the dynamics of the rotor and the flap system. Limited closed loop tests used hub accelerations and hub loads for feedback. Proving the integration, robust operation, and authority of the flap system were the key objectives met by the whirl tower test. This success depended on tailoring the piezoelectric materials and actuator to the application and meeting actuator/blade integration requirements

  5. Structural integrity design for an active helicopter rotor blade with piezoelectric flap actuators

    Lee, Jaehwan; Shin, SangJoon

    2011-04-01

    Helicopter uses a rotor system to generate lift, thrust and forces, and its aerodynamic environment is generally complex. Unsteady aerodynamic environment arises such as blade vortex interaction. This unsteady aerodynamic environment induces vibratory aerodynamic loads and high aeroacoustic noise. The aerodynamic load and aeroacoustic noise is at N times the rotor blade revolutions (N/rev). But conventional rotor control system composed of pitch links and swash plate is not capable of adjusting such vibratory loads because its control is restricted to 1/rev. Many active control methodologies have been examined to alleviate the problem. The blade using active control device manipulates the blade pitch angle with N/rev. In this paper, Active Trailing-edge Flap blade, which is one of the active control methods, is designed to reduce the unsteady aerodynamic loads. Active Trailing-edge Flap blade uses a trailing edge flap manipulated by an actuator to change camber line of the airfoil. Piezoelectric actuators are installed inside the blade to manipulate the trailing edge flap.

  6. Application of Sequential Quadratic Programming to Minimize Smart Active Flap Rotor Hub Loads

    Kottapalli, Sesi; Leyland, Jane

    2014-01-01

    In an analytical study, SMART active flap rotor hub loads have been minimized using nonlinear programming constrained optimization methodology. The recently developed NLPQLP system (Schittkowski, 2010) that employs Sequential Quadratic Programming (SQP) as its core algorithm was embedded into a driver code (NLP10x10) specifically designed to minimize active flap rotor hub loads (Leyland, 2014). Three types of practical constraints on the flap deflections have been considered. To validate the current application, two other optimization methods have been used: i) the standard, linear unconstrained method, and ii) the nonlinear Generalized Reduced Gradient (GRG) method with constraints. The new software code NLP10x10 has been systematically checked out. It has been verified that NLP10x10 is functioning as desired. The following are briefly covered in this paper: relevant optimization theory; implementation of the capability of minimizing a metric of all, or a subset, of the hub loads as well as the capability of using all, or a subset, of the flap harmonics; and finally, solutions for the SMART rotor. The eventual goal is to implement NLP10x10 in a real-time wind tunnel environment.

  7. Reduced In-Plane, Low Frequency Helicopter Noise of an Active Flap Rotor

    Sim, Ben W.; Janakiram, Ram D.; Barbely, Natasha L.; Solis, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    Results from a recent joint DARPA/Boeing/NASA/Army wind tunnel test demonstrated the ability to reduce in-plane, low frequency noise of the full-scale Boeing-SMART rotor using active flaps. Test data reported in this paper illustrated that acoustic energy in the first six blade-passing harmonics could be reduced by up to 6 decibels at a moderate airspeed, level flight condition corresponding to advance ratio of 0.30. Reduced noise levels were attributed to selective active flap schedules that modified in-plane blade airloads on the advancing side of the rotor, in a manner, which generated counteracting acoustic pulses that partially offset the negative pressure peaks associated with in-plane, steady thickness noise. These favorable reduced-noise operating states are a strong function of the active flap actuation amplitude, frequency and phase. The associated noise reductions resulted in reduced aural detection distance by up to 18%, but incurred significant vibratory load penalties due to increased hub shear forces. Small reductions in rotor lift-to-drag ratios, of no more than 3%, were also measured

  8. Adaptive trailing edge flaps for active load alleviation in a smart rotor configuration

    Bergami, L.

    2013-08-15

    The work investigates the development of an active smart rotor concept from an aero-servo-elastic perspective. An active smart rotor is a wind turbine rotor that, through a combination of sensors, control units and actuators, is able to alleviate the fluctuating part of the aerodynamic loads it has to withstand. The investigation focuses on a specific actuator type: the Adaptive Trailing Edge Flap (ATEF), which introduces a continuous deformation of the aft part of the airfoil camber-line. An aerodynamic model that accounts for the steady and unsteady effects of the flap deflection on a 2D airfoil section is developed, and, considering both attached and separated flow conditions, is validated by comparison against Computational Fluid Dynamic solutions and a panel code method. The aerodynamic model is integrated in the BEM-based aeroelastic simulation code HAWC2, thus providing a tool able to simulate the response of a wind turbine equipped with ATEF. A load analysis of the NREL 5 MW reference turbine in its baseline configuration reveals that the highest contribution to the blade flapwise fatigue damage originates from normal operation above rated wind speed, and from loads characterized by frequencies below 1 Hz. The analysis also reports that periodic load variations on the turbine blade account for nearly 11 % of the blade flapwise lifetime fatigue damage, while the rest is ascribed to load variations from disturbances of stochastic nature. The study proposes a smart rotor configuration with flaps laid out on the outer 20 % of the blade span, from 77 % to 97% of the blade length. The configuration is first tested with a simplified cyclic control approach, which gives a preliminary indication of the load alleviation potential, and also reveals the possibility to enhance the rotor energy capture below rated conditions by using the flaps. Two model based control algorithms are developed to actively alleviate the fatigue loads on the smart rotor with ATEF. The first

  9. HIGH EFFICIENCY STRUCTURAL FLOWTHROUGH ROTOR WITH ACTIVE FLAP CONTROL: VOLUME THREE: MARKET & TEAM

    Zuteck, Michael D. [Zimitar, Inc.; Jackson, Kevin L. [Zimitar, Inc.; Santos, Richard A. [Zimitar, Inc.

    2015-05-16

    The Zimitar one-piece rotor primary structure is integrated, so balanced thrust and gravity loads flow through the hub region without transferring out of its composite material. Large inner rotor geometry is used since there is no need to neck down to a blade root region and pitch bearing. Rotor control is provided by a highly redundant, five flap system on each blade, sized so that easily handled standard electric linear actuators are sufficient.

  10. HIGH EFFICIENCY STRUCTURAL FLOWTHROUGH ROTOR WITH ACTIVE FLAP CONTROL: VOLUME TWO: INNOVATION & COST OF ENERGY

    Zuteck, Michael D. [Zimitar, Inc.; Jackson, Kevin L. [Zimitar, Inc.; Santos, Richard A. [Zimitar, Inc.

    2015-05-16

    The Zimitar one-piece rotor primary structure is integrated, so balanced thrust and gravity loads flow through the hub region without transferring out of its composite material. Large inner rotor geometry is used since there is no need to neck down to a blade root region and pitch bearing. Rotor control is provided by a highly redundant, five flap system on each blade, sized so that easily handled standard electric linear actuators are sufficient.

  11. HIGH EFFICIENCY STRUCTURAL FLOWTHROUGH ROTOR WITH ACTIVE FLAP CONTROL: VOLUME ONE: PRELIMINARY DESIGN REPORT

    Zuteck, Michael D. [Zimitar, Inc.; Jackson, Kevin L. [Zimitar, Inc.; Santos, Richard A. [Zimitar, Inc.; Chow, Ray [Zimitar, Inc.; Nordenholz, Thomas R. [The California Maritime Academy; Wamble, John Lee [Zimitar, Inc.

    2015-05-16

    The Zimitar one-piece rotor primary structure is integrated, so balanced thrust and gravity loads flow through the hub region without transferring out of its composite material. Large inner rotor geometry is used since there is no need to neck down to a blade root region and pitch bearing. Rotor control is provided by a highly redundant, five flap system on each blade, sized so that easily handled standard electric linear actuators are sufficient.

  12. HIGH EFFICIENCY STRUCTURAL FLOWTHROUGH ROTOR WITH ACTIVE FLAP CONTROL: VOLUME ZERO: OVERVIEW AND COMMERCIAL PATH

    Zuteck, Michael D. [Zimitar, Inc.; Jackson, Kevin L. [Zimitar, Inc.; Santos, Richard A. [Zimitar, Inc.

    2015-05-16

    The Zimitar one-piece rotor primary structure is integrated, so balanced thrust and gravity loads flow through the hub region without transferring out of its composite material. Large inner rotor geometry is used since there is no need to neck down to a blade root region and pitch bearing. Rotor control is provided by a highly redundant, five flap system on each blade, sized so that easily handled standard electric linear actuators are sufficient.

  13. A smart rotor configuration with linear quadratic control of adaptive trailing edge flaps for active load alleviation

    Bergami, Leonardo; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad

    2015-01-01

    The paper proposes a smart rotor configuration where adaptive trailing edge flaps (ATEFs) are employed for active alleviation of the aerodynamic loads on the blades of the NREL 5 MW reference turbine. The flaps extend for 20% of the blade length and are controlled by a linear quadratic (LQ...... effects of active flap control are assessed with aeroelastic simulations of the turbine in normal operation conditions, as prescribed by the International Electrotechnical Commission standard. The turbine lifetime fatigue damage equivalent loads provide a convenient summary of the results achieved with...

  14. Adaptive Trailing Edge Flaps for Active Load Alleviation in a Smart Rotor Configuration

    Bergami, Leonardo; Gaunaa, Mac; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad; Buhl, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Denne afhandling omhandler udviklingen af et aktivt smart rotor koncept fra et aeroservoelastisk perspektiv. En aktiv smart rotor er en vindmøllerotor som igennem en kombination af sensorer, reguleringsenhed og aktuatorer, aktivt kan reducere den fluktuerende del af de aerodynamiske kræfter møllen skal modstå. Undersøgelsen omhandler en specifik aktuator type: Adaptive Trailing Edge Flap (ATEF), der består af en kontinuert deformation af den bagerste del af vingeprofilernes tværsnitsform.Der ...

  15. Vibration reduction in helicopter rotors using an actively controlled partial span trailing edge flap located on the blade

    Millott, T. A.; Friedmann, P. P.

    1994-01-01

    This report describes an analytical study of vibration reduction in a four-bladed helicopter rotor using an actively controlled, partial span, trailing edge flap located on the blade. The vibration reduction produced by the actively controlled flap (ACF) is compared with that obtained using individual blade control (IBC), in which the entire blade is oscillated in pitch. For both cases a deterministic feedback controller is implemented to reduce the 4/rev hub loads. For all cases considered, the ACF produced vibration reduction comparable with that obtained using IBC, but consumed only 10-30% of the power required to implement IBC. A careful parametric study is conducted to determine the influence of blade torsional stiffness, spanwise location of the control flap, and hinge moment correction on the vibration reduction characteristics of the ACF. The results clearly demonstrate the feasibility of this new approach to vibration reduction. It should be emphasized than the ACF, used together with a conventional swashplate, is completely decoupled from the primary flight control system and thus it has no influence on the airworthiness of the helicopter. This attribute is potentially a significant advantage when compared to IBC.

  16. Smart dynamic rotor control using active flaps on a small-scale wind turbine: aeroelastic modeling and comparison with wind tunnel measurements

    Barlas, Thanasis K.; van Wingerden, W.; Hulskamp, A.W.;

    2013-01-01

    using the aeroelastic tool, load predictions are compared with the wind tunnel measurements, and similar control concepts are compared and evaluated in the numerical environment. Conclusions regarding evaluation of the performance of smart rotor concepts for wind turbines are drawn from this threefold......In this paper, the proof of concept of a smart rotor is illustrated by aeroelastic simulations on a small-scale rotor and comparison with wind tunnel experiments. The application of advanced feedback controllers using actively deformed flaps in the wind tunnel measurements is shown to alleviate...

  17. Smart rotor modeling aero-servo-elastic modeling of a smart rotor with adaptive trailing edge flaps

    Bergami, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    A smart rotor is a wind turbine rotor that, through a combination of sensors, control units and actuators actively reduces the variation of the aerodynamic loads it has to withstand. Smart rotors feature?promising load alleviation potential and might provide the technological breakthrough required by the next generation of large wind turbine rotors.The book presents the aero-servo-elastic model of a smart rotor with Adaptive Trailing Edge Flaps for active load alleviation and provides an insight on the rotor aerodynamic, structural and control modeling. A novel model for the unsteady aerodynam

  18. Active control system for a rotor blade trailing-edge flap

    Duvernier, Marc; Reithler, Livier; Guerrero, Jean Y.; Rossi, Rinaldo A.

    2000-06-01

    Reducing the external noise is becoming a major issue for helicopter manufacturers. The idea beyond this goal is to reduce or even avoid the blade vortex interaction (BVI), especially during descent and flights over inhabited areas. This can be achieved by changing locally the lift of the blade. Several strategies to reach this goal are under investigation at EUROCOPTER such as the control of the local incidence of the blade by a direct lift flap. AEROSPATIALE MATRA Corporate Research Centre and AEROSPATIALE MATRA MISSILES proposed an actuator system able to answer EUROCOPTER's needs for moving a direct lift flap. The present paper describes the definition, manufacturing and testing of this new actuator system. This actuator is based on an electromagnetic patented actuation system developed by AEROSPATIALE MATRA MISSILES for missile and aeronautic applications. The particularity of this actuator is its ability to produce the desired force on its whole range of stroke. The flap is designed to be fitted on a DAUPHIN type blade produced by EUROCOPTER and the actuator system was designed to fit the room available within the blade and to produce the right amount of stroke and force within the required frequency range. Other constraints such as centrifugal loading were also taken into account. This paper describes briefly the specifications and the major characteristics of the actuating system and presents some results of its behavior on a representative composite test-bed manufactured by EUROCOPTER when subjected to realistic mechanical loads.

  19. Effects of torsion frequencies on rotor performance and structural loads with trailing edge flap

    The effects of variation of blade torsion frequency on rotor performance and structural loads are investigated for a 1/rev active flap rotor and baseline rotor (no active control). The UH-60A four-bladed articulated main rotor is studied at a high-speed forward flight condition. The torsion frequencies are varied by modifying the spanwise torsional stiffness of the blade and/or the pitch link stiffness. First, a parametric/optimization study on the flap deployment schedule is carried out using lifting-line comprehensive analysis for the soft, baseline, and stiff rotor configurations, and then a higher fidelity coupled computational fluid dynamics–computational structural dynamics analysis is carried out for the optimal flap deployment. It is shown that with the soft rotor there is degradation in performance—of about 6% with respect to the baseline rotor in the case where the flaps are not activated, and of about 1% if flap deflections are applied. On the other hand, for the stiff rotor there is a slight improvement in performance of about 2.3% when the flaps are not activated, and no appreciable change in the case where active flap deflections are applied. It appears that the peak performance achievable with using active flaps on a baseline stiffness rotor cannot be further improved significantly by varying the torsional frequencies. Variation of torsion frequency does not appear to have a significant influence on blade torsion moments and pitch link loads, although the 1/rev flap activation examined has an important role. (paper)

  20. Smart Rotor Modeling: Aero-Servo-Elastic Modeling of a Smart Rotor with Adaptive Trailing Edge Flaps

    Bergami, Leonardo

    This book presents the formulation of an aero-servo-elastic model for a wind turbine rotor equipped with Adaptive Trailing Edge Flaps (ATEF), a smart rotor configuration. As the name suggests, an aero-servo-elastic model consists of three main components: an aerodynamic model, a structural model...... control the trailing edge flap deflection to actively reduce the fatigue loads on the structure. The performance of the smart rotor configuration and its control algorithms are finally quantified by aero-servo-elastic simulations of the smart rotor turbine operating in a standard turbulent wind field....... code HAWC2. The investigated smart rotor configuration mainly aims at alleviating the fatigue loads the turbine rotor has to withstand during normal operation. First, the characteristics of the prevailing loads are identified; then, two model-based control algorithms are outlined: the algorithms...

  1. Effects of primary rotor parameters on flapping dynamics

    Chen, R. T. N.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of flapping dynamics of four main rotor design features that influence the agility, stability, and operational safety of helicopters are studied. The parameters include flapping hinge offset, flapping hinge restraint, pitch-flap coupling, and blade lock number. First, the flapping equations of motion are derived that explicitly contain the design parameters. The dynamic equations are then developed for the tip-path plane, and the influence of individual and combined variations in the design parameters determined. The steady state flapping response is examined with respect to control input and aircraft angular rate which leads to a feedforward control law for control decoupling through cross feed, and a feedback control law to decouple the steady state flapping response. The condition for achieving perfect decoupling of the flapping response due to aircraft pitch and roll rates without using feedback control is also found for the hover case. It is indicated that the frequency of the regressing flapping mode of the rotor system can become low enough to require consideration in the assessment of handling characteristics.

  2. Flap motion of helicopter rotors with novel, dynamic stall model

    Han Wei

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a nonlinear flapping equation for large inflow angles and flap angles is established by analyzing the aerodynamics of helicopter blade elements. In order to obtain a generalized flap equation, the Snel stall model was first applied to determine the lift coefficient of the helicopter rotor. A simulation experiment for specific airfoils was then conducted to verify the effectiveness of the Snel stall model as it applies to helicopters. Results show that the model requires no extraneous parameters compared to the traditional stall model and is highly accurate and practically applicable. Based on the model, the relationship between the flapping angle and the angle of attack was analyzed, as well as the advance ratio under the dynamic stall state.

  3. Development of a Wind Turbine Test Rig and Rotor for Trailing Edge Flap Investigation: Static Flap Angles Case

    One of the strategies used to improve performance and increase the life-span of wind turbines is active flow control. It involves the modification of the aerodynamic characteristics of a wind turbine blade by means of moveable aerodynamic control surfaces. Trailing edge flaps are relatively small moveable control surfaces placed at the trailing edge of a blade's airfoil that modify the lift of a blade or airfoil section. An instrumented wind turbine test rig and rotor were specifically developed to enable a wide-range of experiments to investigate the potential of trailing edge flaps as an active control technique. A modular blade based on the S833 airfoil was designed to allow accurate instrumentation and customizable settings. The blade is 1.7 meters long, had a constant 178mm chord and a 6° pitch. The modular aerodynamic parts were 3D printed using plastic PC-ABS material. The blade design point was within the range of wind velocities in the available large test facility. The wind facility is a large open jet wind tunnel with a maximum velocity of 11m/s in the test area. The capability of the developed system was demonstrated through an initial study of the effect of stationary trailing edge flaps on blade load and performance. The investigation focused on measuring the changes in flapwise bending moment and power production for different trailing edge flap spanwise locations and deflection angles. The relationship between the load reduction and deflection angle was linear as expected from theory and the highest reduction was caused by the flap furthest from the rotor center. Overall, the experimental setup proved to be effective in measuring small changes in flapwise bending moment within the wind turbine blade and will provide insight when (active) flap control is targeted

  4. Performance of Swashplateless Ultralight Helicopter Rotor with Trailing-edge Flaps for Primary Flight Control

    Shen, Jin-Wei; Chopra, Inderjit

    2003-01-01

    The objective of present study is to evaluate the rotor performance, trailing-edge deflections and actuation requirement of a helicopter rotor with trailing-edge flap system for primary flight control. The swashplateless design is implemented by modifying a two-bladed teetering rotor of an production ultralight helicopter through the use of plain flaps on the blades, and by replacing the pitch link to fixed system control system assembly with a root spring. A comprehensive rotorcraft analysis based on UMARC is carried out to obtain the results for both the swashplateless and a conventional baseline rotor configuration. The predictions show swashplateless configuration achieve superior performance than the conventional rotor attributed from reduction of parasite drag by eliminating swashplate mechanic system. It is indicated that optimal selection of blade pitch index angle, flap location, length, and chord ratio reduces flap deflections and actuation requirements, however, has virtually no effect on rotor performance.

  5. Development of an improved aeroelastic model for the investigation of vibration reduction in helicopter rotors using trailing edge flaps

    Myrtle, Timothy Fitzgerald

    1998-12-01

    This dissertation describes the development of an aeroelastic model of a helicopter rotor incorporating partial span trailing edge flaps on the blade and its application to the investigation of vibration reduction using active control. A new two-dimensional unsteady aerodynamic model for an airfoil/flap combination is described that includes compressibility and unsteady freestream effects. This new aerodynamic model is based on a rational function approximation (RFA) approach. In this approach, oscillatory response data obtained for a selected set of generalized airfoil and flap motions is used to generate an approximate aerodynamic transfer function which can be transformed to the time domain to form a state space aerodynamic model. In this dissertation, a method is described for adapting the conventional RFA approach to include unsteady freestream effects. Excellent agreement is demonstrated between the response of the new aerodynamic model and an exact incompressible solution to the unsteady freestream case. This model provides a complete description of the unsteady flap hinge moments due to airfoil and flap motion, allowing a complete and accurate characterization of control actuation requirements. The structural model utilizes an elastic blade model which includes fully coupled flap-lag-torsional dynamics and includes the effects of moderate deflections. The aeroelastic model is formulated in the time domain, with the coupled trim/response solution obtained using direct numerical integration in combination with autopilot type controller. A conventional higher harmonic control approach is used to investigate vibration reduction. Vibration control studies are performed which compare results using the new aerodynamic model and incompressible quasisteady Theodorsen aerodynamics. Significant differences were observed in the required deflections and control moments, indicating that compressibility and unsteady effects are necessary to properly characterize the

  6. CALCULATION OF HELICOPTER ROTOR FLAPPING ANGLES AND COMPARISON WITH MEASURED DATA

    2000-01-01

    Helicopter rotor flapping angles from hover to low-speed forward flight are calculated and compared with the measured data in this paper. The analytical method is based on a second order lifting-line/full-span free wake model as well as a fully coupled rotor trim model. It is shown that, in order to accurately predict the lateral flapping angle at low advance ratio, it is necessary to use free wake analysis to account for the highly non-uniform inflow induced by the distorted wake geometry at rotor disc plane.

  7. Primary control of a Mach scale swashplateless rotor using brushless DC motor actuated trailing edge flaps

    Saxena, Anand

    The focus of this research was to demonstrate a four blade rotor trim in forward flight using integrated trailing edge flaps instead of using a swashplate controls. A compact brushless DC motor was evaluated as an on-blade actuator, with the possibility of achieving large trailing edge flap amplitudes. A control strategy to actuate the trailing edge flap at desired frequency and amplitude was developed and large trailing edge flap amplitudes from the motor (instead of rotational motion) were obtained. Once the actuator was tested on the bench-top, a lightweight mechanism was designed to incorporate the motor in the blade and actuate the trailing edge flaps. A six feet diameter, four bladed composite rotor with motor-flap system integrated into the NACA 0012 airfoil section was fabricated. Systematic testing was carried out for a range of load conditions, first in the vacuum chamber followed by hover tests. Large trailing edge flap deflections were observed during the hover testing, and a peak to peak trailing edge flap amplitude of 18 degree was achieved at 2000 rotor RPM with hover tip Mach number of 0.628. A closed loop controller was designed to demonstrate trailing edge flap mean position and the peak to peak amplitude control. Further, a soft pitch link was designed and fabricated, to replace the stiff pitch link and thereby reduce the torsional stiffness of the blade to 2/rev. This soft pitch link allowed for blade root pitch motion in response to the trailing edge flap inputs. Blade pitch response due to both steady as well as sinusoidal flap deflections were demonstrated. Finally, tests were performed in Glenn L. Martin wind tunnel using a model rotor rig to assess the performance of motor-flap system in forward flight. A swashplateless trim using brushless DC motor actuated trailing edge flaps was achieved for a rotor operating at 1200 RPM and an advance ratio of 0.28. Also, preliminary exploration was carried out to test the scalability of the motor

  8. Design and performance prediction of swashplateless helicopter rotors with trailing edge flaps and tabs

    Falls, Jaye

    This work studies the design of trailing edge controls for swashplateless helicopter primary control, and examines the impact of those controls on the performance of the rotor. The objective is to develop a comprehensive aeroelastic analysis for swashplateless rotors in steady level flight. The two key issues to be solved for this swashplateless control concept are actuation of the trailing edge controls and evaluating the performance of the swashplateless rotor compared to conventionally controlled helicopters. Solving the first requires simultaneous minimization of trailing flap control angles and hinge moments to reduce actuation power. The second issue requires not only the accurate assessment of swashplateless rotor power, but also similar or improved performance compared to conventional rotors. The analysis consists of two major parts, the structural model and the aerodynamic model. The inertial contributions of the trailing edge flap and tab are derived and added to the system equations in the structural model. Two different aerodynamic models are used in the analysis, a quasi-steady thin airfoil theory that includes arbitrary hinge positions for the flap and the tab, and an unsteady lifting line model with airfoil table lookup based on wind tunnel test data and computational fluid dynamics simulation. The design aspect of the problem is investigated through parametric studies of the trailing edge flap and tab for a Kaman-type conceptual rotor and a UH-60A swashplateless variant. The UH-60A model is not changed except for the addition of a trailing edge flap to the rotor blade, and the reduction of pitch link stiffness to imitate a soft root spring. Study of the uncoupled blade response identifies torsional stiffness and flap hinge stiffness as important design features of the swashplateless rotor. Important trailing edge flap and tab design features including index angle, aerodynamic overhang, chord and length are identified through examination of coupled

  9. Active Control of Long Bridges Using Flaps

    Hansen, H. I.; Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    The main problem in designing ultra-long span suspension bridges is flutter. A solution to this problem might be to introduce an active flap control system to increase the flutter wind velocity. The investigated flap control system consists of flaps integrated in the bridge girder so each flap is...... different flap configurations for a bridge section model by using aerodynamic derivatives for a flat plate. The example shows that different flap configurations can either increase or decrease the flutter wind velocity. for optimal flap configurations flutter will not occur....

  10. Active control for performance enhancement of electrically controlled rotor

    Lu Yang; Wang Chao

    2015-01-01

    Electrically controlled rotor (ECR) system has the potential to enhance the rotor perfor-mance by applying higher harmonic flap inputs. In order to explore the feasibility and effectiveness for ECR performance enhancement using closed-loop control method, firstly, an ECR rotor perfor-mance analysis model based on helicopter flight dynamic model is established, which can reflect the performance characteristics of ECR helicopter at high advance ratio. Based on the simulation platform, an active control method named adaptive T-matrix algorithm is adopted to explore the feasibility and effectiveness for ECR performance enhancement. The simulation results verify the effectiveness of this closed-loop control method. For the sample ECR helicopter, about 3%rotor power reduction is obtained with the optimum 2/rev flap inputs at the advance ratio of 0.34. And through analyzing the distributions of attack of angle and drag in rotor disk, the underlying physical essence of ECR power reduction is cleared. Furthermore, the influence of the key control parameters, including convergence factor and weighting matrix, on the effectiveness of closed-loop control for ECR performance enhancement is explored. Some useful results are summarized, which can be used to direct the future active control law design of ECR performance enhancement.

  11. Active control for performance enhancement of electrically controlled rotor

    Lu Yang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Electrically controlled rotor (ECR system has the potential to enhance the rotor performance by applying higher harmonic flap inputs. In order to explore the feasibility and effectiveness for ECR performance enhancement using closed-loop control method, firstly, an ECR rotor performance analysis model based on helicopter flight dynamic model is established, which can reflect the performance characteristics of ECR helicopter at high advance ratio. Based on the simulation platform, an active control method named adaptive T-matrix algorithm is adopted to explore the feasibility and effectiveness for ECR performance enhancement. The simulation results verify the effectiveness of this closed-loop control method. For the sample ECR helicopter, about 3% rotor power reduction is obtained with the optimum 2/rev flap inputs at the advance ratio of 0.34. And through analyzing the distributions of attack of angle and drag in rotor disk, the underlying physical essence of ECR power reduction is cleared. Furthermore, the influence of the key control parameters, including convergence factor and weighting matrix, on the effectiveness of closed-loop control for ECR performance enhancement is explored. Some useful results are summarized, which can be used to direct the future active control law design of ECR performance enhancement.

  12. Effects of a trailing edge flap on the aerodynamics and acoustics of rotor blade-vortex interactions

    Charles, B. D.; Tadghighi, H.; Hassan, A. A.

    1992-01-01

    The use of a trailing edge flap on a helicopter rotor has been numerically simulated to determine if such a device can mitigate the acoustics of blade vortex interactions (BVI). The numerical procedure employs CAMRAD/JA, a lifting-line helicopter rotor trim code, in conjunction with RFS2, an unsteady transonic full-potential flow solver, and WOPWOP, an acoustic model based on Farassat's formulation 1A. The codes were modified to simulate trailing edge flap effects. The CAMRAD/JA code was used to compute the far wake inflow effects and the vortex wake trajectories and strengths which are utilized by RFS2 to predict the blade surface pressure variations. These pressures were then analyzed using WOPWOP to determine the high frequency acoustic response at several fixed observer locations below the rotor disk. Comparisons were made with different flap deflection amplitudes and rates to assess flap effects on BVI. Numerical experiments were carried out using a one-seventh scale AH-1G rotor system for flight conditions simulating BVI encountered during low speed descending flight with and without flaps. Predicted blade surface pressures and acoustic sound pressure levels obtained have shown good agreement with the baseline no-flap test data obtained in the DNW wind tunnel. Numerical results indicate that the use of flaps is beneficial in reducing BVI noise.

  13. Development of a piezoelectric actuator for trailing-edge flap control of rotor blades

    Straub, Friedrich K.; Ngo, Hieu T.; Anand, V.; Domzalski, David B.

    1999-06-01

    Piezoelectric actuator technology has now reached a level where macro-positioning applications in the context of smart structures can be considered. One application with high payoffs is vibration reduction, noise reduction, and performance improvements in helicopters. Integration of piezoelectric actuators in the rotor blade is attractive, since it attacks the problem at the source. The present paper covers the development of a piezoelectric actuator for trailing edge flap control on a 34-foot diameter helicopter main rotor. The design of an actuator using bi-axial stack columns, and its bench, shake, and spin testing are described. A series of enhancements lead to an improved version that, together with use of latest stack technology, meets the requirements. Next steps in this DARPA sponsored program are development of the actuator and full scale rotor system for wind tunnel testing in the NASA Ames 40 X 80 foot wind tunnel and flight testing on the MD Explorer.

  14. Stress optimization of leaf-spring crossed flexure pivots for an active Gurney flap mechanism

    Freire Gomez, Jon; Booker, Julian D; Mellor, Phil

    2015-01-01

    The EU’s Green Rotorcraft programme is pursuing the development of a functional and airworthy Active Gurney Flap (AGF) for a full-scale helicopter rotor blade. Interest in the development of this ‘smart adaptive rotor blade’ technology lies in its potential to provide a number of aerodynamic benefits, which would in turn translate into a reduction in fuel consumption and noise levels. The AGF mechanism selected employs leaf-spring crossed flexure pivots. These provide important advantages ove...

  15. A flight-dynamic helicopter mathematical model with a single flap-lag-torsion main rotor

    Takahashi, Marc D.

    1990-01-01

    A mathematical model of a helicopter system with a single main rotor that includes rigid, hinge-restrained rotor blades with flap, lag, and torsion degrees of freedom is described. The model allows several hinge sequences and two offsets in the hinges. Quasi-steady Greenberg theory is used to calculate the blade-section aerodynamic forces, and inflow effects are accounted for by using three-state nonlinear dynamic inflow model. The motion of the rigid fuselage is defined by six degrees of freedom, and an optional rotor rpm degree of freedom is available. Empennage surfaces and the tail rotor are modeled, and the effect of main-rotor downwash on these elements is included. Model trim linearization, and time-integration operations are described and can be applied to a subset of the model in the rotating or nonrotating coordinate frame. A preliminary validation of the model is made by comparing its results with those of other analytical and experimental studies. This publication presents the results of research compiled in November 1989.

  16. Development of a smart trailing-edge flap actuator with multistage stroke amplifier for a rotor blade

    Lee, Taeoh; Chopra, Inderjit

    2000-06-01

    The present research experimentally investigates the feasibility of a trailing-edge flap mechanism actuated in a helicopter rotor by piezoelectric stacks in conjunction with a dual-stage mechanical stroke amplifier to actively control vibration. A new mechanical leverage amplification concept was developed to extend the capability of a simple lever-fulcrum stroke amplifier. A refined prototype actuator and flap mechanism were designed and fabricated using five piezostacks. The bench-top test of the actuator showed 73.7 mils of free stroke and uniform displacement output up to a frequency of 150 Hz. Spin testing was performed in the vacuum chamber to evaluate the performance in rotating environment, and the refined prototype actuator showed approximately 13% loss in actuation stroke at 710 g of full-scale centrifugal loading. In the Open-Jet wind tunnel testing to simulate the aerodynamic loading environment, the peak-to-peak flap deflections above 8 degrees for freestream velocity of 120 ft/sec were obtained at different excitation frequencies. It demonstrated the capability of the refined prototype actuator in rotating environment to potentially reduce helicopter vibration.

  17. Aeromechanical Evaluation of Smart-Twisting Active Rotor

    Lim, Joon W.; Boyd, D. Douglas, Jr.; Hoffman, Frauke; van der Wall, Berend G.; Kim, Do-Hyung; Jung, Sung N.; You, Young H.; Tanabe, Yasutada; Bailly, Joelle; Lienard, Caroline; Delrieux, Yves

    2014-01-01

    An investigation of Smart-Twisting Active Rotor (STAR) was made to assess potential benefits of the current active twist rotor concept for performance improvement, vibration reduction, and noise alleviation. The STAR rotor is a 40% Mach-scaled, Bo105 rotor with an articulated flap-lag hinge at 3.5%R and no pre-cone. The 0-5 per rev active twist harmonic inputs were applied for various flight conditions including hover, descent, moderate to high speed level flights, and slowed rotor high advance ratio. For the analysis, the STAR partners used multiple codes including CAMRAD II, S4, HOST, rFlow3D, elsA, and their associated software. At the high thrust level in hover, the 0 per rev active twist with 80% amplitude increased figure of merit (FM) by 0.01-0.02 relative to the baseline. In descent, the largest BVI noise reduction was on the order of 2 to 5 dB at the 3 per rev active twist. In the high speed case (mu = 0.35), the 2 per rev actuation was found to be the most effective in achieving a power reduction as well as a vibration reduction. At the 2 per rev active twist, total power was reduced by 0.65% at the 60 deg active twist phase, and vibration was reduced by 47.6% at the 45 deg active twist phase. The use of the 2 per rev active twist appears effective for vibration reduction. In the high advance ratio case (mu = 0.70), the 0 per rev actuation appeared to have negligible impact on performance improvement. In summary, computational simulations successfully demonstrated that the current active twist concept provided a significant reduction of the maximum BVI noise in descent, a significant reduction of the vibration in the high speed case, a small improvement on rotor performance in hover, and a negligible impact on rotor performance in forward flight.

  18. Nonlinear Equations for Bending of Rotating Beams with Application to Linear Flap-Lag Stability of Hingeless Rotors

    Hodges, D. H.; Ormiston, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    The nonlinear partial differential equations for the flapping and lead-lag degrees of freedom of a torisonally rigid, rotating cantilevered beam are derived. These equations are linearized about an equilibrium condition to study the flap-lag stability characteristics of hingeless helicopter rotor blades with zero twist and uniform mass and stiffness in the hovering flight condition. The results indicate that these configurations are stable because the effect of elastic coupling more than compensates for the destabilizing flap-lag Coriolis and aerodynamic coupling. The effect of higher bending modes on the lead-lag damping was found to be small and the common, centrally hinged, spring restrained, rigid blade approximation for elastic rotor blades was shown to be resonably satisfactory for determining flap-lag stability. The effect of pre-cone was generally stabilizing and the effects of rotary inertia were negligible.

  19. Design and development of an active Gurney flap for rotorcraft

    Freire Gómez, Jon; Booker, Julian D.; Mellor, Phil H.

    2013-03-01

    The EU's Green Rotorcraft programme will develop an Active Gurney Flap (AGF) for a full-scale helicopter main rotor blade as part of its `smart adaptive rotor blade' technology demonstrators. AGFs can be utilized to provide a localized and variable lift enhancement on the rotor, enabling a redistribution of loading on the rotor blade around the rotor azimuth. Further advantages include the possibility of using AGFs to allow a rotor speed reduction, which subsequently provides acoustic benefits. Designed to be integrable into a commercial helicopter blade, and thereby capable of withstanding real in-flight centrifugal loading, blade vibrations and aerodynamic loads, the demonstrator is expected to achieve a high technology readiness level (TRL). The AGF will be validated initially by a constant blade section 2D wind tunnel test and latterly by full blade 3D whirl tower testing. This paper presents the methodology adopted for the AGF concept topology selection, based on a series of both qualitative and quantitative performance criteria. Two different AGF candidate mechanisms are compared, both powered by a small commercial electromagnetic actuator. In both topologies, the link between the actuator and the control surface consists of two rotating torque bars, pivoting on flexure bearings. This provides the required reliability and precision, while making the design virtually frictionless. The engineering analysis presented suggests that both candidates would perform satisfactorily in a 2D wind tunnel test, but that equally, both have design constraints which limit their potential to be further taken into a whirl tower test under full scale centrifugal and inertial loads.

  20. Application of smart materials to helicopter rotor active control

    Straub, Friedrich K.; Ealey, Mark A.; Schetky, Lawrence M.

    1997-05-01

    Helicopter design is limited by the compromise inherent in meeting hover and forward flight requirements, and the unsteady environment encountered in forward flight. Active control of helicopter rotors using smart material, in-blade actuation can overcome these barriers and provide substantial reductions in noise and vibrations and improved performance. The present study covers the blade/actuator integration and actuator development for a full scale system to demonstrate active control of noise and vibrations as well as inflight blade tracking on the MD Explorer helicopter. A piezoelectric multilayer stack actuator, driving a trailing edge flap, is used for active control. A shape memory alloy torsion actuator, driving a trailing edge trim tab, is used for inflight tracking. Overall, this DARPA sponsored program entails the design, development, and fabrication of the full scale active control rotor system. If successful, an entry in the NASA Ames 40 X 80 foot wind tunnel and flight tests are planned for a follow on program.

  1. Development of a resonant trailing-edge flap actuation system for helicopter rotor vibration control

    Kim, J.-S.; Wang, K. W.; Smith, E. C.

    2007-12-01

    A resonant trailing-edge flap actuation system for helicopter rotors is developed and evaluated experimentally. The concept involves deflecting each individual trailing-edge flap using a compact resonant piezoelectric actuation system. Each resonant actuation system yields high authority, while operating at a single frequency. By tailoring the natural frequencies of the actuation system (including the piezoelectric actuator and the related mechanical and electrical elements) to the required operating frequencies, one can increase the output authority. The robustness of the device can be enhanced by increasing the high authority bandwidth through electric circuitry design. Such a resonant actuation system (RAS) is analyzed for a full-scale piezoelectric induced-shear tube actuator, and bench-top testing is conducted to validate the concept. An adaptive feed-forward controller is developed to realize the electric network dynamics and adapt to phase variation. The control strategy is then implemented via a digital signal processor (DSP) system. Analysis is also performed to examine the rotor system dynamics in forward flight with piezoelectric resonant actuators, using a perturbation method to evaluate the system's time-varying characteristics. Numerical simulations reveal that the resonant actuator concept can be applied to forward flights as well as to hover conditions.

  2. Reduction of helicopter blade-vortex interaction noise by active rotor control technology

    Yu, Yung H.; Gmelin, Bernd; Splettstoesser, Wolf; Philippe, Jean J.; Prieur, Jean; Brooks, Thomas F.

    Helicopter blade-vortex interaction noise is one of the most severe noise sources and is very important both in community annoyance and military detection. Research over the decades has substantially improved basic physical understanding of the mechanisms generating rotor blade-vortex interaction noise and also of controlling techniques, particularly using active rotor control technology. This paper reviews active rotor control techniques currently available for rotor blade-vortex interaction noise reduction, including higher harmonic pitch control, individual blade control, and on-blade control technologies. Basic physical mechanisms of each active control technique are reviewed in terms of noise reduction mechanism and controlling aerodynamic or structural parameters of a blade. Active rotor control techniques using smart structures/materials are discussed, including distributed smart actuators to induce local torsional or flapping deformations.

  3. Reduction of Helicopter Blade-Vortex Interaction Noise by Active Rotor Control Technology

    Yu, Yung H.; Gmelin, Bernd; Splettstoesser, Wolf; Brooks, Thomas F.; Philippe, Jean J.; Prieur, Jean

    1997-01-01

    Helicopter blade-vortex interaction noise is one of the most severe noise sources and is very important both in community annoyance and military detection. Research over the decades has substantially improved basic physical understanding of the mechanisms generating rotor blade-vortex interaction noise and also of controlling techniques, particularly using active rotor control technology. This paper reviews active rotor control techniques currently available for rotor blade vortex interaction noise reduction, including higher harmonic pitch control, individual blade control, and on-blade control technologies. Basic physical mechanisms of each active control technique are reviewed in terms of noise reduction mechanism and controlling aerodynamic or structural parameters of a blade. Active rotor control techniques using smart structures/materials are discussed, including distributed smart actuators to induce local torsional or flapping deformations, Published by Elsevier Science Ltd.

  4. Aeroelastic Optimization of a 10 MW Wind Turbine Blade with Active Trailing Edge Flaps

    Barlas, Athanasios; Tibaldi, Carlo; Zahle, Frederik;

    2016-01-01

    This article presents the aeroelastic optimization of a 10MW wind turbine ‘smart blade’ equipped with active trailing edge flaps. The multi-disciplinary wind turbine analysis and optimization tool HawtOpt2 is utilized, which is based on the open-source framework Open-MDAO. The tool interfaces to...... several state-of-the art simulation codes, allowing for a wide variety of problem formulations and combinations of models. A simultaneous aerodynamic and structural optimization of a 10 MW wind turbine rotor is carried out with respect to material layups and outer shape. Active trailing edge flaps are...

  5. ANALYSIS OF AN ELECTROSTRICTIVE STACK ACTUATORFOR ACTIVE TRAILING EDGE FLAPS

    2000-01-01

    Helicopter is a complex dynamic system with many rotating components. The rotor blades operate in a highly complex aerodynamic environment. The vibratory hub load, which is caused by cyclic variation of centrifugal and aerodynamic load of the rotating blades in flight, is transmitted to the fuselage, resulting in serious vibration and noise of the structure. It is one of the most important exciting sources in helicopters.  There has long been a desire to reduce helicopter vibration and to improve its performance. Control schemes adopted so far can be classified as either passive or active control technologies. The passive technologies include optimization of rotor hub, blade and the fuselage, hub or blade mounted passive vibration absorbers and anti-resonant vibration isolators. One of the major disadvantages with passive technologies is that they are designed to provide maximum vibration reduction at a specific frequency; therefore, their performance is degraded significantly with changes in the operating conditions of the rotor system.  With the development of computer science and active control technology, increasing efforts have been devoted to active control technologies to benefit helicopter vibration suppression in recent years. Earlier studies include Higher Harmonic Control (HHC)[1] and Individual Blade Control (IBC)[2], which is aimed to reduce the vibratory blade load by oscillating the blade in pitch motion using hydraulic actuators. It is successful in suppressing the vibration of the fuselage; however, its application is limited by serious energy consumption.  To overcome these difficulties, a new concept in helicopter vibration control is the smart rotor system. In this scheme, actuators are embedded in composite blades. They are used to activate the trailing edge flaps in higher harmonic pitch motion to adjust the lift force actively. Under the regulation of a control system, the vibratory hub load can be counteracted actively at

  6. Continuous Trailing-Edge Flaps for Primary Flight Control of a Helicopter Main Rotor

    Thornburgh, Robert P.; Kreshock, Andrew R.; Wilbur, Matthew L.; Sekula, Martin K.; Shen, Jinwei

    2014-01-01

    The use of continuous trailing-edge flaps (CTEFs) for primary flight control of a helicopter main rotor is studied. A practical, optimized bimorph design with Macro-Fiber Composite actuators is developed for CTEF control, and a coupled structures and computational fluid dynamics methodology is used to study the fundamental behavior of an airfoil with CTEFs. These results are used within a comprehensive rotorcraft analysis model to study the control authority requirements of the CTEFs when utilized for primary flight control of a utility class helicopter. A study of the effect of blade root pitch index (RPI) on CTEF control authority is conducted, and the impact of structural and aerodynamic model complexity on the comprehensive analysis results is presented. The results show that primary flight control using CTEFs is promising; however, a more viable option may include the control of blade RPI, as well.

  7. Cooperative Self-Propulsion of Active and Passive Rotors

    Fily, Yaouen; Baskaran, Aparna; Marchetti, M. Cristina

    2011-01-01

    Using minimal models for low Reynolds number passive and active rotors in a fluid, we characterize the hydrodynamic interactions among rotors and the resulting dynamics of a pair of interacting rotors. This allows us to treat in a common framework passive or externally driven rotors, such as magnetic colloids driven by a rotating magnetic field, and active or internally driven rotors, such as sperm cells confined at boundaries. The hydrodynamic interaction of passive rotors is known to contai...

  8. Wind Turbine Rotors with Active Vibration Control

    Svendsen, Martin Nymann

    This thesis presents a framework for structural modeling, analysis and active vibration damping of rotating wind turbine blades and rotors. A structural rotor model is developed in terms of finite beam elements in a rotating frame of reference. The element comprises a representation of general...... that these are geometrically well separated. For active vibration control in three-bladed wind turbine rotors the present work presents a resonance-based method for groups of one collective and two whirling modes. The controller is based on the existing resonant format and introduces a dual system...... system. As in the method for non-rotating systems, an explicit procedure for optimal calibration of the controller gains is established. The control system is applied to an 86m wind turbine rotor by means of active strut actuator mechanisms. The prescribed additional damping ratios are reproduced almost...

  9. Active Flow Control on Bidirectional Rotors for Tidal MHK Applications

    Shiu, Henry [Research Engineer; van Dam, Cornelis P. [Professor

    2013-08-22

    A marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) tidal turbine extracts energy from tidal currents, providing clean, sustainable electricity generation. In general, all MHK conversion technologies are confronted with significant operational hurdles, resulting in both increased capital and operations and maintenance (O&M) costs. To counter these high costs while maintaining reliability, MHK turbine designs can be simplified. Prior study found that a tidal turbine could be cost-effectively simplified by removing blade pitch and rotor/nacelle yaw. Its rotor would run in one direction during ebb and then reverse direction when the current switched to flood. We dubbed such a turbine a bidirectional rotor tidal turbine (BRTT). The bidirectional hydrofoils of a BRTT are less efficient than conventional hydrofoils and capture less energy, but the elimination of the pitch and yaw systems were estimated to reduce levelized cost of energy by 7.8%-9.6%. In this study, we investigated two mechanisms for recapturing some of the performance shortfall of the BRTT. First, we developed a novel set of hydrofoils, designated the yy series, for BRTT application. Second, we investigated the use of active flow control via microtabs. Microtabs are small deployable/retractable tabs, typically located near the leading or trailing edge of an air/hydrofoil with height on the order of the boundary layer thickness (1% - 2% of chord). They deploy approximately perpendicularly to the foil surface and, like gurney flaps and plain flaps, globally affect the aerodynamics of the airfoil. By strategically placing microtabs and selectively deploying them based on the direction of the inflow, performance of a BRTT rotor can be improved while retaining bidirectional operation. The yy foils were computationally designed and analyzed. They exhibited better performance than the baseline bidirectional foil, the ellipse. For example, the yyb07cn-180 had 14.7% higher (l/d)max than an ellipse of equal thickness. The yyb07cn

  10. Stability investigation of an airfoil section with active flap control

    Bergami, Leonardo; Gaunaa, Mac

    2010-01-01

    This work presents a method to determine flutter and divergence instability limits for a two-dimensional (2-D) airfoil section fitted with an actively controlled trailing edge flap. This flap consists of a deformable trailing edge, which deformation is governed by control algorithms based on measurements of either heave displacement, local angle of attack or aerodynamic pressure difference measured over the airfoil. The purpose of the controlled deformable flap is to reduce fluctuations in th...

  11. Design of piezostack-driven trailing-edge flap actuator for helicopter rotors

    Lee, Taeoh; Chopra, Inderjit

    2001-02-01

    A piezoelectric actuator is investigated to activate a trailing-edge flap mechanism for helicopter vibration suppression. This paper presents the development of a piezostack-based actuator with a new stroke amplification mechanism. A double-lever amplification concept is introduced, which is a dual-stage lever-fulcrum stroke amplifier that extends the capability of the conventional lever-fulcrum mechanism. Both the design and fabrication of the on-blade trailing-edge flap actuator are addressed. The first prototype actuator was designed and fabricated using two piezostack segments. An amplification factor of 19.4 and constant response covering up to 8/rev (52.3 Hz) were measured under non-rotating conditions, and a consistent actuator displacement of up to 600g of centrifugal loading was experimentally obtained for the vacuum spin testing. A major design refinement resulted in the second prototype actuator that uses five piezostack segments. The bench-top testing of the second prototype actuator showed 1.87 mm (73.7 mil) of free stroke, and uniform performance of up to 150 Hz. In vacuum spin testing, the second prototype actuator showed approximately 13% loss in actuation stroke at 700g of centrifugal loading, and no further degradation at 115% overloading condition. The double-lever amplification mechanism with piezostack actuation showed the potential for operation in a rotating environment.

  12. Simultaneous BVI noise and vibration reduction in rotorcraft using actively-controlled flaps and including performance considerations

    Patt, Daniel A.

    This work presents the development and application of an active control approach for reduction of both vibration and noise induced by helicopter rotor blade vortex interaction (BVI). Control is implemented through single or dual actively controlled flaps (ACFs) on each blade. Low-speed helicopter flight is prone to severe BVI, resulting in elevated vibration and noise levels. Existing research has suggested that when some form of active control is used to reduce vibration, noise will increase and vice versa. The present research achieves simultaneous reduction of noise and vibration, and also investigates the physical sources of the observed reduction. The initial portion of this work focused on developing a tool for simulating helicopter noise and vibrations in the BVI flight regime. A method for predicting compressible unsteady blade surface pressure distribution on rotor blades was developed and combined with an enhanced free-wake model and an acoustic prediction tool with provisions for blade flexibility. These elements were incorporated within an aeroelastic analysis featuring fully coupled flap-lag-torsional blade dynamics. Subsequently, control algorithms were developed that were effective for reducing noise and vibration even in the nonlinear BVI flight regime; saturation limits were incorporated constraining flap deflections to specified limits. The resulting simulation was also validated with a wide range of experimental data, achieving excellent correlation. Finally, a number of active control studies were performed. Multi-component vibration reductions of 40--80% could be achieved, while incurring a small noise penalty. Noise was reduced using an onboard feedback microphone; reductions of 4--10 dB on the advancing side were observed on a plane beneath the rotor when using dual flaps. Finally, simultaneous noise and vibration reduction was studied. A reduction of about 5 dB in noise on the advancing side combined with a 60% reduction in vibration was

  13. Rotor Vibration Reduction via Active Hybrid Bearings

    Nicoletti, Rodrigo; Santos, Ilmar

    2002-01-01

    The use of fluid power to reduce and control rotor vibration in rotating machines is investigated. An active hybrid bearing is studied, whose main objective is to reduce wear and vibration between rotating and stationary machinery parts. By injecting pressurised oil into the oil film, through...... orifices machined in the bearing pads, one can alter the machine dynamic characteristics, thus enhancing its operational range. A mathematical model of the rotor-bearing system, as well as of the hydraulic system, is presented. Numerical results of the system frequency response show good agreement with...

  14. Stall Inception Process and Prospects for Active Hub-Flap Control in Three-Stage Axial Flow Compressor

    Tomoya OKADA; Atsushi KAWAJIRI; Yutaka OHTA; Eisuke OUTA

    2008-01-01

    The possibility to apply the active hub-flap control method, which is a proven rotating stall control method for a single-stage compressor, to a 3-stage axial compressor is experimentally discussed, where complex rotating stall inception processes ate observed. The research compressor is a 3-stage one and could change the stagger angle settings for rotor blades and stator vanes. Sixteen rotor blade/stator vane configuration patterns were tested by changing stagger angle for the stator vanes. By measurement of surface-pressure fluctuation, stall inception proc-esses are investigated and the measured pressure fluctuation data is used as a predictive signal for rotating stall. The experimental results show that the stall detection system applied to active hub-flap control in a single-stage compressor could be usefully applied to that in a 3-stage compressor with a more complex stall inception process.

  15. Active Vibration Control of Rotor-Bearing Systems

    Blanco-Ortega, Andres; Silva-Navaro, Gerardo; Beltran-Carbajal, Francisco; Vela-Valdes, Luis Gerardo

    2010-01-01

    The active vibration control of a Jeffcott-like rotor through dynamic stiffness control and acceleration scheduling is addressed. The control approach consists of a servomechanism able to move one of the supporting bearings in such a way that the effective rotor length is controlled. As a consequence, the rotor stiffness and natural frequency are modified according to an off-line and smooth trajectory planning of the rotor speed/acceleration in order to reduce the unbalance response when pass...

  16. Design optimization for active twist rotor blades

    Mok, Ji Won

    This dissertation introduces the process of optimizing active twist rotor blades in the presence of embedded anisotropic piezo-composite actuators. Optimum design of active twist blades is a complex task, since it involves a rich design space with tightly coupled design variables. The study presents the development of an optimization framework for active helicopter rotor blade cross-sectional design. This optimization framework allows for exploring a rich and highly nonlinear design space in order to optimize the active twist rotor blades. Different analytical components are combined in the framework: cross-sectional analysis (UM/VABS), an automated mesh generator, a beam solver (DYMORE), a three-dimensional local strain recovery module, and a gradient based optimizer within MATLAB. Through the mathematical optimization problem, the static twist actuation performance of a blade is maximized while satisfying a series of blade constraints. These constraints are associated with locations of the center of gravity and elastic axis, blade mass per unit span, fundamental rotating blade frequencies, and the blade strength based on local three-dimensional strain fields under worst loading conditions. Through pre-processing, limitations of the proposed process have been studied. When limitations were detected, resolution strategies were proposed. These include mesh overlapping, element distortion, trailing edge tab modeling, electrode modeling and foam implementation of the mesh generator, and the initial point sensibility of the current optimization scheme. Examples demonstrate the effectiveness of this process. Optimization studies were performed on the NASA/Army/MIT ATR blade case. Even though that design was built and shown significant impact in vibration reduction, the proposed optimization process showed that the design could be improved significantly. The second example, based on a model scale of the AH-64D Apache blade, emphasized the capability of this framework to

  17. Sizing and control of trailing edge flaps on a smart rotor for maximum power generation in low fatigue wind regimes

    Smit, Jeroen; Bernhammer, Lars O.; Navalkar, Sachin T.;

    2016-01-01

    An extension of the spectrum of applicability of rotors with active aerodynamic devices is presented in this paper. Besides the classical purpose of load alleviation, a secondary objective is established: optimization of power capture. As a first step, wind speed regions that contribute little to...

  18. Sizing and Control of Trailing Edge Flaps on a Smart Rotor for Maximum Power Generation in Low Fatigue Wind Regimes

    Smit, Jeroen; Berghammer, Lars O.; Navalkar, Sachin;

    2014-01-01

    In this paper an extension of the spectrum of applicability of rotors with active aerody-namic devices is presented. Besides the classical purpose of load alleviation, a secondary objective is established: power capture optimization. As a _rst step, wind speed regions that contribute little to...

  19. Toward comparing experiment and theory for corroborative research on hingeless rotor stability in forward flight (an experimental and analytical investigation of isolated rotor-flap-lag stability in forward flight)

    Gaonkar, G.

    1986-01-01

    For flap-lag stability of isolated rotors, experimental and analytical investigations are conducted in hover and forward flight on the adequacy of a linear quasisteady aerodynamics theory with dynamic inflow. Forward flight effects on lag regressing mode are emphasized. Accordingly, a soft inplane hingeless rotor with three blades is tested at advance ratios as high as 0.55 and at shaft angles as high as 20 degrees. The 1.62 m model rotor is untrimmed with an essentially unrestricted tilt of the tip path plane. In combination with lag natural frequencies, collective pitch settings and flap-lag coupling parameters, the data base comprises nearly 1200 test points (damping and frequency) in forward flight and 200 test points in hover. By computerized symbolic manipulation, a linear analytical model is developed in substall to predict stability margins with mode identificaton. To help explain the correlation between theory and data it also predicts substall and stall regions of the rotor disk from equilibrium values. The correlation shows both the strengthts and weaknesses of the theory in substall.

  20. ANALYSIS OF AN ELECTROSTRICTIVE STACK ACTUATOR FOR ACTIVE TRAILING EDGE FLAPS

    2000-01-01

    Stack actuator is a solid-state driving component of Active Tailing Edge Flap in smart rotor systems. It is a multi-layer serial structure of basic units composed of electrostrictive and adhesive layers. In this paper, a dynamic model of the actuator is derived based on the constitutive equation of electrostrictive material and the equation of motion. Theoretical analysis is made on the factors involved in the design of the actuator, which reveals that the electrostrictive layer and the adhesive layer should be optimized to compromise between displacement and frequency requirements. In the final part of the paper, the experiment of an ATEF system is introduced. The results show that the model is reasonable. It also suggests that the bending stiffness of elastic mechanism is an important factor in design, which should be carefully studied to provide satisfactory dynamic response of the ATEF system.

  1. SMART Rotor Development and Wind-Tunnel Test

    Lau, Benton H.; Straub, Friedrich; Anand, V. R.; Birchette, Terry

    2009-01-01

    Boeing and a team from Air Force, NASA, Army, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, University of California at Los Angeles, and University of Maryland have successfully completed a wind-tunnel test of the smart material actuated rotor technology (SMART) rotor in the 40- by 80-foot wind-tunnel of the National Full-Scale Aerodynamic Complex at NASA Ames Research Center, figure 1. The SMART rotor is a full-scale, five-bladed bearingless MD 900 helicopter rotor modified with a piezoelectric-actuated trailing-edge flap on each blade. The development effort included design, fabrication, and component testing of the rotor blades, the trailing-edge flaps, the piezoelectric actuators, the switching power amplifiers, the actuator control system, and the data/power system. Development of the smart rotor culminated in a whirl-tower hover test which demonstrated the functionality, robustness, and required authority of the active flap system. The eleven-week wind tunnel test program evaluated the forward flight characteristics of the active-flap rotor, gathered data to validate state-of-the-art codes for rotor noise analysis, and quantified the effects of open- and closed-loop active-flap control on rotor loads, noise, and performance. The test demonstrated on-blade smart material control of flaps on a full-scale rotor for the first time in a wind tunnel. The effectiveness and the reliability of the flap actuation system were successfully demonstrated in more than 60 hours of wind-tunnel testing. The data acquired and lessons learned will be instrumental in maturing this technology and transitioning it into production. The development effort, test hardware, wind-tunnel test program, and test results will be presented in the full paper.

  2. Dynamic response of active twist rotor blades

    Cesnik, Carlos E. S.; Shin, Sang Joon; Wilbur, Matthew L.

    2001-02-01

    Dynamic characteristics of active twist rotor (ATR) blades are investigated analytically and experimentally in this paper. The ATR system is intended for vibration and potentially for noise reductions in helicopters through individual blade control. An aeroelastic model is developed to identify frequency response characteristics of the ATR blade with integral, generally anisotropic, strain actuators embedded in its composite construction. An ATR prototype blade was designed and manufactured to experimentally study the vibration reduction capabilities of such systems. Several bench and hover tests were conducted and those results are presented and discussed here. Selected results on sensitivity of the ATR system to collective setting (i.e. blade loading), blade rpm (i.e. centrifugal force and blade station velocity), and media density (i.e. altitude) are presented. They indicated that the twist actuation authority of the ATR blade is independent of the collective setting up to approximately 10P, and dependent on rotational speed and altitude near the torsional resonance frequency due to its dependency on the aerodynamic damping. The proposed model captures very well the physics and sensitivities to selected test parameters of the ATR system. The numerical result of the blade torsional loads show an average error of 20% in magnitude and virtually no difference in phase for the blade frequency response. Overall, the active blade model is in very good agreement with the experiments and can be used to analyze and design future active helicopter blade systems.

  3. Coupled CFD/CSD Analysis of an Active-Twist Rotor in a Wind Tunnel with Experimental Validation

    Massey, Steven J.; Kreshock, Andrew R.; Sekula, Martin K.

    2015-01-01

    An unsteady Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes analysis loosely coupled with a comprehensive rotorcraft code is presented for a second-generation active-twist rotor. High fidelity Navier-Stokes results for three configurations: an isolated rotor, a rotor with fuselage, and a rotor with fuselage mounted in a wind tunnel, are compared to lifting-line theory based comprehensive rotorcraft code calculations and wind tunnel data. Results indicate that CFD/CSD predictions of flapwise bending moments are in good agreement with wind tunnel measurements for configurations with a fuselage, and that modeling the wind tunnel environment does not significantly enhance computed results. Actuated rotor results for the rotor with fuselage configuration are also validated for predictions of vibratory blade loads and fixed-system vibratory loads. Varying levels of agreement with wind tunnel measurements are observed for blade vibratory loads, depending on the load component (flap, lag, or torsion) and the harmonic being examined. Predicted trends in fixed-system vibratory loads are in good agreement with wind tunnel measurements.

  4. Dynamics and interactions of active rotors

    de Leoni, M. (Massimiliano); Liverpool, T. B.

    2010-01-01

    We consider a simple model of an internally driven self-rotating object; a rotor, confined to two dimensions by a thin film of low Reynolds number fluid. We undertake a detailed study of the hydrodynamic interactions between a pair of rotors and find that their effect on the resulting dynamics is a combination of fast and slow motions. We analyse the slow dynamics using an averaging procedure to take account of the fast degrees of freedom. Analytical results are compared with numerical simula...

  5. Smart helicopter rotors optimization and piezoelectric vibration control

    Ganguli, Ranjan; Viswamurthy, Sathyamangalam Ramanarayanan

    2016-01-01

    Exploiting the properties of piezoelectric materials to minimize vibration in rotor-blade actuators, this book demonstrates the potential of smart helicopter rotors to achieve the smoothness of ride associated with jet-engined, fixed-wing aircraft. Vibration control is effected using the concepts of trailing-edge flaps and active-twist. The authors’ optimization-based approach shows the advantage of multiple trailing-edge flaps and algorithms for full-authority control of dual trailing-edge-flap actuators are presented. Hysteresis nonlinearity in piezoelectric stack actuators is highlighted and compensated by use of another algorithm. The idea of response surfaces provides for optimal placement of trailing-edge flaps. The concept of active twist involves the employment of piezoelectrically induced shear actuation in rotating beams. Shear is then demonstrated for a thin-walled aerofoil-section rotor blade under feedback-control vibration minimization. Active twist is shown to be significant in reducing vibra...

  6. Human exonuclease 1 (EXO1) activity characterization and its function on FLAP structures

    Keijzers, Guido; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Juel Rasmussen, Lene

    2015-01-01

    Human exonuclease 1 (EXO1) is involved in multiple DNA metabolism processes, including DNA repair and replication. Most of the fundamental roles of EXO1 have been described in yeast. Here, we report a biochemical characterization of human full-length EXO1. Prior to assay EXO1 on different DNA flap...... structures, we determined factors essential for the thermodynamic stability of EXO1. We show that enzymatic activity and stability of EXO1 on DNA is modulated by temperature. By characterization of EXO1 flap activity using various DNA flap substrates, we show that EXO1 has a strong capacity for degrading...... double stranded DNA and has a modest endonuclease or 5' flap activity. Furthermore, we report novel mechanistic insights into the processing of flap structures, showing that EXO1 preferentially cleaves one nucleotide inwards in a double stranded region of a forked and nicked DNA flap substrates...

  7. Boeing Smart Rotor Full-scale Wind Tunnel Test Data Report

    Kottapalli, Sesi; Hagerty, Brandon; Salazar, Denise

    2016-01-01

    A full-scale helicopter smart material actuated rotor technology (SMART) rotor test was conducted in the USAF National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames. The SMART rotor system is a five-bladed MD 902 bearingless rotor with active trailing-edge flaps. The flaps are actuated using piezoelectric actuators. Rotor performance, structural loads, and acoustic data were obtained over a wide range of rotor shaft angles of attack, thrust, and airspeeds. The primary test objective was to acquire unique validation data for the high-performance computing analyses developed under the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency (DARPA) Helicopter Quieting Program (HQP). Other research objectives included quantifying the ability of the on-blade flaps to achieve vibration reduction, rotor smoothing, and performance improvements. This data set of rotor performance and structural loads can be used for analytical and experimental comparison studies with other full-scale rotor systems and for analytical validation of computer simulation models. The purpose of this final data report is to document a comprehensive, highquality data set that includes only data points where the flap was actively controlled and each of the five flaps behaved in a similar manner.

  8. Wind Turbine Rotors with Active Vibration Control

    Svendsen, Martin Nymann; Krenk, Steen; Høgsberg, Jan Becker

    2011-01-01

    I denne afhandling præsenteres en metoderamme for modellering, analyse og aktiv vibrationsdæmpning af roterende vindmølleblade og rotorer. En strukturel model udvikles i form af rumlige bjælkelementer i en roterende referenceramme. Elementet indeholder en repræsentation af generelle, varierende tværsnitsegenskaber og antager små tværsnitsflytninger og rotationer, hvorved de tilhørende elastiske led og inertialled bliver lineære. Formuleringen beskriver på konsistent vis alle inertialled, inkl...

  9. SMART wind turbine rotor. Design and field test

    Berg, Jonathan Charles [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Resor, Brian Ray [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Paquette, Joshua A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); White, Jonathan Randall [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The Wind Energy Technologies department at Sandia National Laboratories has developed and field tested a wind turbine rotor with integrated trailing-edge flaps designed for active control of rotor aerodynamics. The SMART Rotor project was funded by the Wind and Water Power Technologies Office of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and was conducted to demonstrate active rotor control and evaluate simulation tools available for active control research. This report documents the design, fabrication, and testing of the SMART Rotor. This report begins with an overview of active control research at Sandia and the objectives of this project. The SMART blade, based on the DOE / SNL 9-meter CX-100 blade design, is then documented including all modifications necessary to integrate the trailing edge flaps, sensors incorporated into the system, and the fabrication processes that were utilized. Finally the test site and test campaign are described.

  10. SMART wind turbine rotor. Data analysis and conclusions

    Berg, Jonathan Charles [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Barone, Matthew Franklin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Yoder, Nathanael C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The Wind Energy Technologies department at Sandia National Laboratories has developed and field tested a wind turbine rotor with integrated trailing-edge flaps designed for active control of the rotor aerodynamics. The SMART Rotor project was funded by the Wind and Water Power Technologies Office of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and was conducted to demonstrate active rotor control and evaluate simulation tools available for active control research. This report documents the data post-processing and analysis performed to date on the field test data. Results include the control capability of the trailing edge flaps, the combined structural and aerodynamic damping observed through application of step actuation with ensemble averaging, direct observation of time delays associated with aerodynamic response, and techniques for characterizing an operating turbine with active rotor control.

  11. Stress optimization of leaf-spring crossed flexure pivots for an active Gurney flap mechanism

    Freire Gómez, Jon; Booker, Julian D.; Mellor, Phil H.

    2015-04-01

    The EU's Green Rotorcraft programme is pursuing the development of a functional and airworthy Active Gurney Flap (AGF) for a full-scale helicopter rotor blade. Interest in the development of this `smart adaptive rotor blade' technology lies in its potential to provide a number of aerodynamic benefits, which would in turn translate into a reduction in fuel consumption and noise levels. The AGF mechanism selected employs leaf-spring crossed flexure pivots. These provide important advantages over bearings as they are not susceptible to seizing and do not require maintenance (i.e. lubrication or cleaning). A baseline design of this mechanism was successfully tested both in a fatigue rig and in a 2D wind tunnel environment at flight-representative deployment schedules. For full validation, a flight test would also be required. However, the severity of the in-flight loading conditions would likely compromise the mechanical integrity of the pivots' leaf-springs in their current form. This paper investigates the scope for stress reduction through three-dimensional shape optimization of the leaf-springs of a generic crossed flexure pivot. To this end, a procedure combining a linear strain energy formulation, a parametric leaf-spring profile definition and a series of optimization algorithms is employed. The resulting optimized leaf-springs are proven to be not only independent of the angular rotation at which the pivot operates, but also linearly scalable to leaf-springs of any length, minimum thickness and width. Validated using non-linear finite element analysis, the results show very significant stress reductions relative to pivots with constant cross section leaf-springs, of up to as much as 30% for the specific pivot configuration employed in the AGF mechanism. It is concluded that shape optimization offers great potential for reducing stress in crossed flexure pivots and, consequently, for extending their fatigue life and/or rotational range.

  12. Active Vibration Reduction Of Rigid Rotor Supported By Journal Bearings

    Ondrouch, Jan; Ferfecki, Petr; Poruba, Z.

    Gliwice: Politechnika Slaska, 2009, s. 85-90. ISBN 978-83-60102-52-7. [International Seminar of Applied Mechanics /13./. Wisla (PL), 29.05.2009-31.05.2009] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : rotor system * hydrodynamic bearing * active vibration reduction Subject RIV: JR - Other Machinery

  13. Development of Air Vehicle with Active Flapping and Twisting of Wing

    Sangyol Yoon; Lae-Hyong Kang; Sungho Jo

    2011-01-01

    This paper addresses mechanisms for active flapping and twisting of robotic wings and assesses flying effectiveness as a function of twist angle. Unlike the flapping motion of bird wings, insects generally make a twisting motion at the root of their wings while flapping, which makes it possible for them to hover in midair. This work includes the development of a Voice Coil Motor (VCM) because a flapping-wing air vehicle should be assembled with a compact actuator to decrease size and weight. A linkage mechanism is proposed to transform the linear motion of the VCM into the flapping and twisting motions of wings. The assembled flapping-wing air vehicle, whose weight is 2.86 g, produces an average positive vertical force proportional to the twist angle. The force saturates because the twist angle is mechanically limited. This work demonstrates the possibility of developing a flapping-wing air vehicle that can hover in midair using a mechanism that actively twists the roots of wings during flapping.

  14. Optimization of an Active Twist Rotor Blade Planform for Improved Active Response and Forward Flight Performance

    Sekula, Martin K; Wilbur, Matthew L.

    2014-01-01

    A study was conducted to identify the optimum blade tip planform for a model-scale active twist rotor. The analysis identified blade tip design traits which simultaneously reduce rotor power of an unactuated rotor while leveraging aeromechanical couplings to tailor the active response of the blade. Optimizing the blade tip planform for minimum rotor power in forward flight provided a 5 percent improvement in performance compared to a rectangular blade tip, but reduced the vibration control authority of active twist actuation by 75 percent. Optimizing for maximum blade twist response increased the vibration control authority by 50 percent compared to the rectangular blade tip, with little effect on performance. Combined response and power optimization resulted in a blade tip design which provided similar vibration control authority to the rectangular blade tip, but with a 3.4 percent improvement in rotor performance in forward flight.

  15. Structural and mechanism design of an active trailing-edge flap blade

    Lee, Jae Hwan; Natarajan, Balakumaran; Eun, Won Jong;

    2013-01-01

    A conventional rotor control system restricted at 1/rev frequency component is unable to vary the hub vibratory loads and the aeroacoustic noise, which exist in high frequency components. Various active rotor control methodologies have been examined in the literature to alleviate the problem of e...

  16. Vibration reduction in helicopter rotors using an active control surface located on the blade

    Millott, T. A.; Friedmann, P. P.

    1992-01-01

    A feasibility study of vibration reduction in a four-bladed helicopter rotor using individual blade control (IBC), which is implemented by an individually controlled aerodynamic surface located on each blade, is presented. For this exploratory study, a simple offset-hinged spring restrained model of the blade is used with fully coupled flap-lag-torsional dynamics for each blade. Deterministic controllers based on local and global system models are implemented to reduce 4/rev hub loads using both an actively controlled aerodynamic surface on each blade as well as conventional IBC, where the complete blade undergoes cyclic pitch change. The effectiveness of the two approaches for simultaneous reduction of the 4/rev hub shears and hub moments is compared. Conventional IBC requires considerably more power to achieve approximately the same level of vibration reduction as that obtained by implementing IBC using an active control surface located on the outboard segment of the blade. The effect of blade torsional flexibility on the vibration reduction effectiveness of the actively controlled surface was also considered and it was found that this parameter has a very substantial influence.

  17. The Effect of the Active Ingredient Thymoquinone on Flap Viability in Random Pattern Flaps in Rats.

    Kocak, Omer Faruk; Bozan, Nazim; Oksuz, Mustafa; Yuce, Serdar; Demir, Canser Yılmaz; Bulut, Gulay; Ragbetli, Murat Cetin

    2016-08-01

    Thymoquinone (TQ) is a plant extract that has been shown to have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, angiogenic, antimicrobial, and anticarcinogenic effects. The aim of this study is to research how the use of TQ affects flap viability. 42 rats were placed into 6 groups, with 7 rats in each. A 3 × 10 cm McFarlane flap model was used on the test animals. The sham group had used neither surgical nor TQ treatment. The control group had surgery but no treatment afterwards. The preoperative TQ group was given oral doses of 2 mg/kg. TQ for 10 days preoperatively with no treatment after the surgical procedure. The postoperative TQ group received oral doses of 2 mg/kg TQ for 10 days after the surgical process. The preoperative + postoperative (pre + postoperative) TQ group was given oral doses of 2 mg/kg TQ for 10 days both preoperatively and postoperatively. Finally, the dimethylsulfoxide group received 10 mg/kg dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) for 10 days both preoperatively and postoperatively. Ten days after surgery the findings were evaluated. The average rates of necrosis were found to be 29.7 % in the control group, 19.18 % in the preoperative TQ group, 13.05 % in the postoperative TQ group, 8.42 % in the pre + postoperative TQ group, and 29.03 % in the DMSO group. The experimental groups had better area measurement, histopathological, and electron microscopic results than the control group (All; p < 0.05). We believe that, because of its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and angiogenic properties, thymoquinone is an agent that can prevent ischemia-reperfusion damage and, therefore, prevent necrosis. PMID:27072137

  18. Adaptive flight control surfaces, wings, rotors, and active aerodynamics

    Barrett, Ronald M.; Brozoski, Fred

    1996-05-01

    This study outlines active flight control materials, structural arrangements, and several new active flight control methods for rotorcraft, airplanes and missiles. A system-level comparison shows that flight control actuator systems using materials like piezoceramics have approximately double the mass-specific energy and 4 to 6 times the volume specific energy of conventional actuators. New fabrication techniques centered on the principal of directional attachment allow wings and rotor blades to become twist active. Using these new methods, directionally attached piezoelectric (DAP) actuator elements were built into graphite-epoxy sandwich structures. When compared to conventionally attached piezoelectric (CAP) elements, twist deflections (important for flight control) of DAP plates were an order of magnitude greater. By using such twist-active elements in a torque-plate configuration, an active helicopter rotor was built. This Froude-scaled solid state rotor was whirl-stand tested and showed steady blade pitch deflections in excess of plus or minus 8 degrees with good correlation between theory and experiment rates up to 42 Hz (which corresponded to 2.5/rev) and no degradation in deflection as RPM was increased. DAP elements were also used in high aspect ratio subsonic and supersonic wings, demonstrating static twist deflections of plus or minus 2 degrees and plus or minus 6 degrees respectively, with good correlation between experiment and finite element results. The final section compares all-moving active stabilator structural arrangements and pitch deflections, which range up to plus or minus 12 degrees, generating lift coefficient changes in excess of plus or minus 0.8.

  19. Stability investigation of an airfoil section with active flap control

    Bergami, Leonardo; Gaunaa, Mac

    2010-01-01

    fatigue load alleviation. The structural model of the 2-D airfoil section contains three degrees of freedom: heave translation, pitch rotation and flap deflection. A potential flow model provides the aerodynamic forces and their distribution. The unsteady aerodynamics are described using an indicial...

  20. 加装格尼襟翼的自转旋翼气动特性研究%Study on Aerodynamic Characteristics of Auto-rotating Rotors with Gurney Flaps

    崔钊; 韩东; 李建波; 姬乐强; 朱清华

    2012-01-01

    为了研究格尼襟翼对自转旋翼气动特性的影响,首先建立了翼型加装格尼襟翼的二维气动特性计算模型,分析了NACA0012翼型及该翼型加装1%、2%弦长高度格尼襟翼的气动特性,理论计算结果与试验结果的对比表明了本计算模型的正确性.基于叶素理论建立了自转旋翼动力学模型,采用Pitt-Peters动态入流模型捕捉自转旋翼诱导速度沿桨盘的非均匀分布特性.最后进行了自转旋翼加装不同高度格尼襟翼的气动特性分析,结果表明:翼型加装1%弦长高度的格尼襟翼后,在20 m/s到35m/s的来流速度下,自转旋翼的阻力平均减小可达26%;加装高度为2%弦长的格尼襟翼后,在20m/s到35 m/s的来流速度下,自转旋翼的阻力平均减小达17%.自转旋翼的气动效率得到明显提高.%In order to investigate the aerodynamic characteristics of auto-rotating rotors equipped with Gurney flaps, a numerical model of airfoils equipped with Gurney flaps is established. The aerodynamic characteristics of airfoil NACA0012 with Gurney flaps of the height of 1 % and 2% of chord are calculated respectively. The validity of the model is also provided by the test data. The aerodynamic model of auto-rotating rotors is established based on the blade element theory, with a Pitt-Peters dynamic inflow model to capture the non-uniform induced velocity distribution on the rotor disk. The aerodynamic characteristics of auto-rotating rotors equipped with Gurney flaps with different heights are analyzed. The results show that from 20 m/s to 35 m/s forward flight velocity, the average drag reduction of auto-rotating rotors is up to 26% with the 1 % chord height Gurney flap, and the average drag reduction of auto-rotating rotor is up to 17% with the 2% chord height Gurney flap. Thus, the aerodynamic efficiency of the autogiro rotor is improved significantly with Gurney flaps.

  1. Active vibration control of a rotor-bearing system based on dynamic stiffness

    Andrés Blanco Ortega; Francisco Beltrán Carbajal; Gerardo Silva Navarro; Marco Antonio Oliver Salazar

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an active vibration control scheme to reduce unbalance induced synchronous vibration in rotorbearing systems supported on two ball bearings, one of which can be automatically moved to control the effective rotor length and, as an immediate consequence, the rotor stiffness. This dynamic stiffness control scheme, based on frequency analysis, speed control and acceleration scheduling, is used to avoid resonant vibration of a rotor system when it passes (runup or coast down) t...

  2. SMART Wind Turbine Rotor: Data Analysis and Conclusions

    Berg, Jonathan C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Barone, Matthew F. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Yoder, Nathanael C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-01-29

    This report documents the data post-processing and analysis performed to date on the field test data. Results include the control capability of the trailing edge flaps, the combined structural and aerodynamic damping observed through application of step actuation with ensemble averaging, direct observation of time delays associated with aerodynamic response, and techniques for characterizing an operating turbine with active rotor control.

  3. Active flap control on an aeroelastic wind turbine airfoil in gust conditions using both a CFD and an engineering model

    In the past year, smart rotor technology has been studied significantly as solution to the ever growing turbines. Aeroservoelastic tools are used to asses and predict the behavior of rotors using trailing edge devices like flaps. In this paper an unsteady aerodynamic model (Beddoes-Leishman type) and an CFD model (URANS) are used to analyze the aeroservoelastic response of a 2D three degree of freedom rigid body wind turbine airfoil with a deforming trailing edge flap encountering deterministic gusts. Both uncontrolled and controlled simulations are used to asses the differences between the two models for 2D aerservoelastic simulations. Results show an increase in the difference between models for the y component if the deforming trailing edge flap is used as control device. Observed flap deflections are significantly larger in the URANS model in certain cases, while the same controller is used. The pitch angle and moment shows large differences in the uncontrolled case, which become smaller, but remain significant when the controller is applied. Both models show similar reductions in vertical displacement, with a penalty of a significant increase in pitch angle deflections

  4. Role of induced vortex interaction in a semi-active flapping foil based energy harvester

    Wu, J.; Chen, Y. L.; Zhao, N.

    2015-09-01

    The role of induced vortex interaction in a semi-active flapping foil based energy harvester is numerically examined in this work. A NACA0015 airfoil, which acts as an energy harvester, is placed in a two-dimensional laminar flow. It performs an imposed pitching motion that subsequently leads to a plunging motion. Two auxiliary smaller foils, which rotate about their centers, are arranged above and below the flapping foil, respectively. As a consequence, the vortex interaction between the flapping foil and the rotating foil is induced. At a Reynolds number of 1100 and the position of the pitching axis at one-third chord, the effects of the distance between two auxiliary foils, the phase difference between the rotating motion and the pitching motion as well as the frequency of pitching motion on the power extraction performance are systematically investigated. It is found that compared to the single flapping foil, the efficiency improvement of overall power extraction for the flapping foil with two auxiliary foils can be achieved. Based on the numerical analysis, it is indicated that the enhanced power extraction, which is caused by the increased lift force, thanks to the induced vortex interaction, directly benefits the efficiency enhancement.

  5. Analysis on Dynamic Performance for Active Magnetic Bearing—Rotor System

    YANHui-yan; WANGXi-ping; 等

    2001-01-01

    In the application of active magnetic bearings(AMB),one of the key problems to be solved is the safety and stabiltiy in the sense of rotor dynamics,The project related to the present paper deals with the method for analyzing bearing rotor systems with high rotation speed and specially supported by active magnetic bearings,and studies its rotor dynamics performance,including calculation of the natural frequencies with their distribution characteristics,and the critical speeds of the system.one of the targets of this project is to formulate a theory and method valid for the analysis of the dynamic performance of the active magntic bearing-rotor systemby combining the traditional theory and method of rotor dynamics with the analytical theory and design method based on modern control theory of the AMB system.

  6. Design and experimental results for a turbine with jet flap stator and jet flap

    Bettner, J. L.; Blessing, J. O.

    1973-01-01

    The overall performance and detailed stator performance of a negative hub reaction turbine design featuring a moderately low solidity jet flap stator and a jet flap rotor were determined. Testing was conducted over a range of turbine expansion ratios at design speed. At each expansion ratio, the stator jet flow and rotor jet flow ranged up to about 7 and 8 percent, respectively, of the turbine inlet flow. The performance of the jet flap stator/jet flap rotor turbine was compared with that of a turbine which used the same jet flap rotor and a conventional, high solidity plan stator. The effect on performance of increased axial spacing between the jet stator and rotor was also investigated.

  7. Characteristic analysis of rotor dynamics and experiments of active magnetic bearing for HTR-10GT

    A 10 MW high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTR-10) was constructed by the Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology (INET) at Tsinghua University of China. The helium turbine and generator system of 10 MW high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTR-10GT) is the second phase for the HTR-10 project. It is to set up a direct helium cycle to replace the current steam cycle. The active magnetic bearing (AMB) instead of ordinary mechanical bearing was chosen to support the rotor in the HTR-10GT. This rotor is vertically mounted to hold the turbine machine, compressors and the power generator together. The rotor's length is 7 m, its weight is about 1500 kg and the rotating speed is 15,000 rpm. The structure of the rotor is so complicated that dynamic analysis of the rotor becomes difficult. One of the challenging problems is to exceed natural frequencies with enough stability and safety during reactor start up, power change and shutdown. The dynamic analysis of the rotor is the base for the design of control system. It is important for the rotor to exceed critical speeds. Some kinds of softwares and methods, such as MSC.Marc, Ansys, and the transfer matrix method (TMM), are compared to fully analyze rotor dynamics characteristic in this paper. The modal analysis has been done for the HTR-10GT rotor. MSC.Marc was finally selected to analyze the vibration mode and the natural frequency of the rotor. The effects of AMB stiffness on the critical speeds of the rotor were studied. The design characteristics of the AMB control system for the HTR-10GT were studied and the related experiment to exceed natural frequencies was introduced. The experimental results demonstrate the system functions and validate the control scheme, which will be used in the HTR-10GT project

  8. Characteristic analysis of rotor dynamics and experiments of active magnetic bearing for HTR-10GT

    A 10 MW high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTR-10) was constructed by the Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology (INET) at Tsinghua University of China. The helium turbine and generator system of 10 MW high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTR-10GT) is the second phase for the HTR-10 project. It is to set up a direct helium cycle to replace the current steam cycle. The active magnetic bearing (AMB) instead of ordinary mechanical bearing was chosen to support the rotor in the HTR-10GT. This rotor is vertically mounted to hold the turbine machine, compressors and the power generator together. The rotor's length is 7 m, its weight is about 1500 kg and the rotating speed is 15000 r/min. The structure of the rotor is so complicated that dynamic analysis of the rotor becomes difficult. One of the challenging problems is to exceed natural frequencies with enough stability and safety during reactor start up, power change and shutdown. The dynamic analysis of the rotor is the base for the design of control system. It is important for the rotor to exceed critical speeds. Some kinds of software and methods, such as MSC.Marc, Ansys, and the Transfer Matrix Method, are compared to fully analyze rotor dynamics characteristic in this paper. The modal analysis has been done for the HTR-10GT rotor. MSC.Marc was finally selected to analyze the vibration mode and the natural frequency of the rotor. The effects of AMB stiffness on the critical speeds of the rotor were studied. The design characteristics of the AMB control system for the HTR-10GT were studied and the related experiment to exceed natural frequencies was introduced. The experimental results demonstrate the system functions and validate the control scheme, which will be used in the HTR-10GT project. (authors)

  9. Development of an active twist rotor blade with distributed actuation and orthotropic material

    Wierach, Peter; Riemenschneider, Johannes; Keye, Stefan

    2005-05-01

    Individual blade control (IBC) as well as higher harmonic control (HHC) for helicopter rotors promises to be a method to increase flight performance and to reduce vibration and noise. For those controls, an additional twist actuation of the rotor blade is needed. The developed concept comprises the implementation of distributed piezoelectric actuation into the rotor blade skin. In order to maximize the twist within given constraints, as torsional rigidity and given actuator design, the concept takes advantage of an orthotropic rotor blade skin. That way, a combination of shear actuation with orthotropic coupling generates more twist than each one of these effects alone. Previous approaches with distributed actuation used actuators operating in +/-45° direction with quasi-isotropic composites. A FE-Model of the blade was developed and validated using a simplified demonstrator. The objective of this study was to identify the effects of various geometric and material parameters to optimize the active twist performance of the blades. The whole development was embedded in an iterative process followed by an objective assessment. For this purpose a detailed structural model on the basis of the BO105 model rotor blade was developed, to predict the performance with respect to rotor dynamics, stability, aerodynamics and acoustics. Rotor dynamic simulations provided an initial overview of the active twist rotor performance. In comparison to the BO105 baseline rotor a noise reduction of 3 dB was predicted for an active twist of 0.8° at the blade tip. Additionally, a power reduction of 2.3% at 87m/s based on a 2.5 to BO105 was computed. A demonstrator blade with a rotor radius of 2m has been designed and manufactured. This blade will be tested to prove, that the calculated maximum twist can also be achieved under centrifugal loads.

  10. Tanshinone IIA Pretreatment Renders Free Flaps against Hypoxic Injury through Activating Wnt Signaling and Upregulating Stem Cell-Related Biomarkers

    Zihan Xu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Partial or total flap necrosis after flap transplantation is sometimes clinically encountered in reconstructive surgery, often as a result of a period of hypoxia that exceeds the tolerance of the flap tissue. In this study, we determine whether tanshinone IIA (TSA pretreatment can protect flap tissue against hypoxic injury and improve its viability. Primary epithelial cells isolated from the dorsal skin of mice were pretreated with TSA for two weeks. Cell counting kit-8 and Trypan Blue assays were carried out to examine the proliferation of TSA-pretreated cells after exposure to cobalt chloride. Then, Polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis were used to determine the expression of β-catenin, GSK-3β, SOX2, and OCT4 in TSA-treated cells. In vivo, after mice were pretreated with TSA for two weeks, a reproducible ischemic flap model was implemented, and the area of surviving tissue in the transplanted flaps was measured. Immunohistochemistry was also conducted to examine the related biomarkers mentioned above. Results show that epidermal cells, pretreated with TSA, showed enhanced resistance to hypoxia. Activation of the Wnt signaling pathway in TSA-pretreated cells was characterized by the upregulation of β-catenin and the downregulation of GSK-3β. The expression of SOX2 and OCT4 controlled by Wnt signaling were also found higher in TSA pretreated epithelial cells. In the reproducible ischaemic flap model, pretreatment with TSA enhanced resistance to hypoxia and increased the area of surviving tissue in transplanted flaps. The expression of Wnt signaling pathway components, stem-cell related biomarkers, and CD34, which are involved in the regeneration of blood vessels, was also upregulated in TSA-pretreated flap tissue. The results show that TSA pretreatment protects free flaps against hypoxic injury and increases the area of surviving tissue by activating Wnt signaling and upregulating stem cell-related biomarkers.

  11. Structural and aerodynamic considerations of an active piezoelectric trailing-edge tab on a helicopter rotor

    Murray, Gabriel Jon

    This dissertation is concerned with an active tab for use on a rotorcraft for noise and vibration reduction. The tab is located at the trailing edge of the airfoil. The tab consists of a shim sandwiched by layers of the piezoelectric actuators, macro fiber composites, of varying length. This configuration is similar to a bimorph. The modus operandi is similar to that of a trailing edge flap. The actuators deform the tab, bending it to achieve a tip displacement. This provides a change in the lift, moment, and drag coefficients of the airfoil. By actuating the system at 3/rev to 5/rev, reductions in noise and vibration can be realized. The system was examined and designed around using the UH-60 Blackhawk as the model rotorcraft. The tab is envisioned to operate between 65% to 85% of the main rotor span. The tab's chordwise dimensions considered were 20% and 15% of the blade chord. In order to assess the potential of the tab to change the lift and moment coefficients of the airfoil-tab system, a steady computational fluid dynamics study was conducted. The results were generated via the University of Maryland's Transonic Unsteady Navier-Stokes code. Various tab deflection angles, Mach numbers, and angle-of-attack values were computed. These results were compared to a trailing edge flap of similar size. The comparison shows that the tab produces lift and moment increments similar to that of the trailing edge flap. The design of the tab---composed of both active piezoelectric actuators and passive materials---was conducted using finite element analysis. The objectives were to maximize the tip deflection due to the actuators, while minimizing the deformation due to inertial and aerodynamic forces and loads. The inertial loads (acceleration terms) come from both blade motion, such as flapping and pitch, as well as the rotation of the rotor (centrifugal force). All of these previously mentioned terms cause the tab to undergo undesirable deflections. The original concept

  12. Coupled CFD/CSD Computation of Airloads of an Active-Twist Rotor

    Massey, Steven J.; Kreshock, Andrew R.; Sekula, Martin K

    2013-01-01

    An unsteady Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes analysis loosely coupled with a comprehensive rotorcraft code for blade trim and aeroelastic effects is presented for a second-generation Active-Twist Rotor. Mesh and temporal sensitives of computed airloads are evaluated. In the final paper, computed airloads will be compared with wind tunnel data for the Active-Twist Rotor test that is currently underway.

  13. Vibration characterization of an active magnetic bearing supported rotor / J. Bean

    Bean, Jaco

    2011-01-01

    The McTronX Research group at the Potchefstroom campus of the North-West University, aims to establish a knowledge base on active magnetic bearing (AMB) systems. Up to date, the group has established a firm knowledge base on various topics related to AMB systems. A recent focus was the design and development of a high speed AMB supported rotor system called the rotor delevitation system (RDS) to analyse rotor drops. During the testing phase of the RDS, the machine exhibited vibrations, of whi...

  14. Design of Hybrid Passive and Active Mechanisms for Control of Insect-Scale Flapping-Wing Robots

    Teoh, Zhi Ern

    2015-01-01

    Flying insects exhibit a remarkable ability to fly in environments that are small, cluttered and highly dynamic. Inspired by these animals, scientist have made great strides in understanding the aerodynamic mechanisms behind insect-scale flapping-wing flight. By applying these mechanisms together with recent advances in meso-scale fabrication techniques, engineers built an insect-scale flapping-wing robot and demonstrated hover by actively controlling the robot about its roll and pitch axes....

  15. Active Control of Separation From the Flap of a Supercritical Airfoil

    Melton, LaTunia Pack; Yao, Chung-Sheng; Seifert, Avi

    2006-01-01

    Zero-mass-flux periodic excitation was applied at several regions on a simplified high-lift system to delay the occurrence of flow separation. The NASA Energy Efficient Transport (EET) supercritical airfoil was equipped with a 15% chord simply hinged leading edge flap and a 25% chord simply hinged trailing edge flap. Detailed flow features were measured in an attempt to identify optimal actuator placement. The measurements included steady and unsteady model and tunnel wall pressures, wake surveys, arrays of surface hot-films, flow visualization, and particle image velocimetry (PIV). The current paper describes the application of active separation control at several locations on the deflected trailing edge flap. High frequency (F(+) approximately equal to 10) and low frequency amplitude modulation (F(+) sub AM approximately equal to 1) of the high frequency excitation were used for control. It was noted that the same performance gains were obtained with amplitude modulation and required only 30% of the momentum input required by pure sine excitation.

  16. Magnetostatic analysis of a rotor system supported by radial active magnetic bearings

    Ferfecki P.

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The development and the design of a radial active magnetic bearing (AMB reflects a complex process of the multidisciplinary rotor dynamics, electromagnetism and automatic control analysis. Modelling is performed by application of the physical laws from different areas, e.g. Newton's laws of motion and Maxwell's equations. The new approach in the numerical modelling of radial AMB and design methodology allowing automatic generation of primary dimensions of the radial AMB is proposed. Instead of the common way of computation of electromagnetic forces by linearizing at the centre position of the rotor with respect to rotor displacement and coil current, the finite element computation of electromagnetic forces is used. The heteropolar radial AMB consisting of eight pole shoes was designed by means of the built up algorithms for rotor system with two discs fixed on the cantilever shaft. A study of the influence of the nonlinear magnetization characteristics of a rotor and stator material on the equilibrium position of a rotor system is carried out. The performed numerical study shows that results obtained from the analytical nonlinear relation for electromagnetic forces can be considerably different from forces computed with magnetostatic finite element analysis.

  17. Active Flow Control on the Simplified Flapped Airfoil

    Matějka, Milan; Součková, Natálie; Popelka, Lukáš; Nožička, J.

    Berlin: CEAS Council of European Aerospace Societies, 2007, s. 237-241. ISSN 0070-4083. [CEAS European Air and Space Conference /1./. Berlin (DE), 10.09.2007-13.09.2007] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06031; GA AV ČR IAA2076403; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA200760614 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : active flow control * synthetic jet generator Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics

  18. Control system design for flexible rotors supported by actively lubricated bearings

    Nicoletti, Rodrigo; Santos, Ilmar

    2008-01-01

    and keeping the lengths of the two eigenvalues constant in the real-imaginary plane. The methodology is applied to an industrial gas compressor supported by active tilting-pad journal bearings. The unbalance response functions and mode shapes of the flexible rotor with and without active control are...... displacement and velocity of the shaft at the bearing positions....

  19. Active magnetic bearing-supported rotor with misaligned cageless backup bearings: A dropdown event simulation model

    Halminen, Oskari; Kärkkäinen, Antti; Sopanen, Jussi; Mikkola, Aki

    2015-01-01

    Active magnetic bearings (AMB) offer considerable benefits compared to regular mechanical bearings. On the other hand, they require backup bearings to avoid damage resulting from a failure in the component itself, or in the power or control system. During a rotor-bearing contact event - when the magnetic field has disappeared and the rotor drops on the backup bearings - the structure of the backup bearings has an impact on the dynamic actions of the rotor. In this paper, the dynamics of an active magnetic bearing-supported rotor during contact with backup bearings is studied with a simulation model. Modeling of the backup bearings is done using a comprehensive cageless ball bearing model. The elasticity of the rotor is described using the finite element method (FEM) and the degrees of freedom (DOF) of the system are reduced using component mode synthesis. Verification of the misaligned cageless backup bearings model is done by comparing the simulation results against the measurement results. The verified model with misaligned cageless backup bearings is found to correspond to the features of a real system.

  20. Evaluation of the Effectiveness of an Active Magnetic Damper (AMD) in Damping Subsynchronous Vibrations in a Flexible Rotor

    Mendoza, Hector

    2000-01-01

    Subsynchronous vibrations such as those caused by rotor instability represent one of the most harrowing scenarios of rotor vibration. They are related to a great diversity of destabilizing forces and some of them are not well understood yet. Therefore, special attention must be paid to this type of vibration. Active Magnetic Bearings (AMBs) monitor the position of the shaft and change the dynamics of the system accordingly to keep the rotor in a desired position, offering the possibility of...

  1. Preliminary results of the first static calibration of the RSRA helicopter active-isolator rotor balance system

    Acree, C. W., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The helicopter version of the Rotor Systems Research Aircraft (RSRA) is designed to make simultaneous measurements of all rotor forces and moments in flight analogous to a wind tunnel balance. Loads are measured by a combination of load cells, strain gages, and hydropneumatic active isolators which use pressure gages to measure loads. Complete evaluation of system performance required calibration of the rotor force and moment measuring system when installed in the aircraft. Measurement system responses to rotor loads obtained during the first static calibration of the RSRA helicopter are plotted and discussed. Plots of the raw transducer data are included.

  2. Stability and coupling dynamic behavior of nonlinear journal active electromagnetic bearing rotor system

    2008-01-01

    The stability and coupling dynamic behavior of a journal active electromagnetic bearing rotor system are analyzed.The gyroscopic effect is considered in the rotor model.The system equations are formulated by combining equations for rotor motion and decentralized proportional integral differential (PID) controllers.A method combining the predictor-corrector mechanism and the Netwon-Raphson method is presented to calculate the critical speed at the corresponding Hopf bifurcation point of the system.For periodic motions,a continuation method combining the predictor-corrector mechanism and shooting method is presented.Non-linear unbalanced periodic motions and their stability margins are obtained using the shooting method and established continuation method for periodic motions.With the change of control parameters,the system local stability and bifurcation behaviors are obtained using the Floquet theory.The numerical examples show that the schemes not only significantly save computing cost,but also have high precision.

  3. Active control of counter-rotating open rotor interior noise in a Dornier 728 experimental aircraft

    Haase, Thomas; Unruh, Oliver; Algermissen, Stephan; Pohl, Martin

    2016-08-01

    The fuel consumption of future civil aircraft needs to be reduced because of the CO2 restrictions declared by the European Union. A consequent lightweight design and a new engine concept called counter-rotating open rotor are seen as key technologies in the attempt to reach this ambitious goals. Bearing in mind that counter-rotating open rotor engines emit very high sound pressures at low frequencies and that lightweight structures have a poor transmission loss in the lower frequency range, these key technologies raise new questions in regard to acoustic passenger comfort. One of the promising solutions for the reduction of sound pressure levels inside the aircraft cabin are active sound and vibration systems. So far, active concepts have rarely been investigated for a counter-rotating open rotor pressure excitation on complex airframe structures. Hence, the state of the art is augmented by the preliminary study presented in this paper. The study shows how an active vibration control system can influence the sound transmission of counter-rotating open rotor noise through a complex airframe structure into the cabin. Furthermore, open questions on the way towards the realisation of an active control system are addressed. In this phase, an active feedforward control system is investigated in a fully equipped Dornier 728 experimental prototype aircraft. In particular, the sound transmission through the airframe, the coupling of classical actuators (inertial and piezoelectric patch actuators) into the structure and the performance of the active vibration control system with different error sensors are investigated. It can be shown that the active control system achieves a reduction up to 5 dB at several counter-rotating open rotor frequencies but also that a better performance could be achieved through further optimisations.

  4. Dynamics of a pneumatic artificial muscle actuation system driving a trailing edge flap

    Woods, Benjamin K. S.; Kothera, Curt S.; Wang, Gang; Wereley, Norman M.

    2014-09-01

    This study presents a time domain dynamic model of an antagonistic pneumatic artificial muscle (PAM) driven trailing edge flap (TEF) system for next generation active helicopter rotors. Active rotor concepts are currently being widely researched in the rotorcraft community as a means to provide a significant leap forward in performance through primary aircraft control, vibration mitigation and noise reduction. Recent work has shown PAMs to be a promising candidate for active rotor actuation due to their combination of high force, large stroke, light weight, and suitable bandwidth. When arranged into biologically inspired agonist/antagonist muscle pairs they can produce bidirectional torques for effectively driving a TEF. However, there are no analytical dynamic models in the literature that can accurately capture the behavior of such systems across the broad range of frequencies required for this demanding application. This work combines mechanical, pneumatic, and aerodynamic component models into a global flap system model developed for the Bell 407 rotor system. This model can accurately predict pressure, force, and flap angle response to pneumatic control valve inputs over a range of operating frequencies from 7 to 35 Hz (1/rev to 5/rev for the Bell 407) and operating pressures from 30 to 90 psi.

  5. Dynamics of a pneumatic artificial muscle actuation system driving a trailing edge flap

    This study presents a time domain dynamic model of an antagonistic pneumatic artificial muscle (PAM) driven trailing edge flap (TEF) system for next generation active helicopter rotors. Active rotor concepts are currently being widely researched in the rotorcraft community as a means to provide a significant leap forward in performance through primary aircraft control, vibration mitigation and noise reduction. Recent work has shown PAMs to be a promising candidate for active rotor actuation due to their combination of high force, large stroke, light weight, and suitable bandwidth. When arranged into biologically inspired agonist/antagonist muscle pairs they can produce bidirectional torques for effectively driving a TEF. However, there are no analytical dynamic models in the literature that can accurately capture the behavior of such systems across the broad range of frequencies required for this demanding application. This work combines mechanical, pneumatic, and aerodynamic component models into a global flap system model developed for the Bell 407 rotor system. This model can accurately predict pressure, force, and flap angle response to pneumatic control valve inputs over a range of operating frequencies from 7 to 35 Hz (1/rev to 5/rev for the Bell 407) and operating pressures from 30 to 90 psi. (paper)

  6. Contributions to the dynamics of helicopters with active rotor controls

    Malpica, Carlos A.

    This dissertation presents an aeromechanical closed loop stability and response analysis of a hingeless rotor helicopter with a Higher Harmonic Control (HHC) system for vibration reduction. The analysis includes the rigid body dynamics of the helicopter and blade flexibility. The gain matrix is assumed to be fixed and computed off-line. The discrete elements of the HHC control loop are rigorously modeled, including the presence of two different time scales in the loop. By also formulating the coupled rotor-fuselage dynamics in discrete form, the entire coupled helicopter-HHC system could be rigorously modeled as a discrete system. The effect of the periodicity of the equations of motion is rigorously taken into account by converting the system into an equivalent system with constant coefficients and identical stability properties using a time lifting technique. The most important conclusion of the present study is that the discrete elements in the HHC loop must be modeled in any HHC analysis. Not doing so is unconservative. For the helicopter configuration and HHC structure used in this study, an approximate continuous modeling of the HHC system indicates that the closed loop, coupled helicopter-HHC system remains stable for optimal feedback control configurations which the more rigorous discrete analysis shows can result in closed loop instabilities. The HHC gains must be reduced to account for the loss of gain margin brought about by the discrete elements. Other conclusions of the study are: (i) the HHC is effective in quickly reducing vibrations, at least at its design condition, although the time constants associated with the closed loop transient response indicate closed loop bandwidth to be 1 rad/sec on average, thus overlapping with FCS or pilot bandwidths, and raising the issue of potential interactions; (ii) a linearized model of helicopter dynamics is adequate for HHC design, as long as the periodicity of the system is correctly taken into account, i

  7. On the role of prediction tools for adaptive rotor system developments

    Kube, R.; Klöppel, V.

    2001-02-01

    Within the guide concept AROSYS (Adaptive Rotor Systems), the partners Eurocopter Deutschland (ECD), EADS München and Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR) developed active control technologies for helicopters. A trailing edge flap, direct twist and adaptive profile geometry system is investigated to reduce the rotor-induced vibrations and noise emissions and to expand the helicopter flight envelope. The advantageous effects of a profile geometry adaption in the form of a dynamical nose droop could be shown within the scope of unsteady Navier-Stokes simulations. Wind tunnel tests with the piezoelectric actuated trailing edge flap demonstrated the reliability and efficiency of the system. Its potential for vibration and noise reduction is compared with that of the direct twist concept and assessed on the basis of numerical rotor simulations.

  8. Blade-Mounted Flap Control for BVI Noise Reduction Proof-of-Concept Test

    Dawson, Seth; Hassan, Ahmed; Straub, Friedrich; Tadghighi, Hormoz

    1995-01-01

    This report describes a wind tunnel test of the McDonnell Douglas Helicopter Systems (MDHS) Active Flap Model Rotor at the NASA Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel. The test demonstrated that BVI noise reductions and vibration reductions were possible with the use of an active flap. Aerodynamic results supported the acoustic data trends, showing a reduction in the strength of the tip vortex with the deflection of the flap. Acoustic results showed that the flap deployment, depending on the peak deflection angle and azimuthal shift in its deployment schedule, can produce BVI noise reductions as much as 6 dB on the advancing and retreating sides. The noise reduction was accompanied by an increase in low frequency harmonic noise and high frequency broadband noise. A brief assessment of the effect of the flap on vibration showed that significant reductions were possible. The greatest vibration reductions (as much as 76%) were found in the four per rev pitching moment at the hub. Performance improvement cam results were inconclusive, as the improvements were predicted to be smaller than the resolution of the rotor balance.

  9. Wind tunnel test on airfoil Riso-B1-18 with an Active Trailing Edge Flap

    Bak, Christian; Gaunaa, Mac; Andersen, Peter Bjørn;

    2010-01-01

    A wind tunnel test of the wind turbine airfoil Risø-B1-18 equipped with an Active Trailing Edge Flap (ATEF) was carried out. The ATEF was 9% of the total chord, made of piezo electric actuators attached to the trailing edge of a non-deformable airfoil and actuated using an (electric) amplifier. The...

  10. Rotor blade vortex interaction noise

    Yu, Yung H.

    2000-02-01

    Blade-vortex interaction noise-generated by helicopter main rotor blades is one of the most severe noise problems and is very important both in military applications and community acceptance of rotorcraft. Research over the decades has substantially improved physical understanding of noise-generating mechanisms, and various design concepts have been investigated to control noise radiation using advanced blade planform shapes and active blade control techniques. The important parameters to control rotor blade-vortex interaction noise and vibration have been identified: blade tip vortex structures and its trajectory, blade aeroelastic deformation, and airloads. Several blade tip design concepts have been investigated for diffusing tip vortices and also for reducing noise. However, these tip shapes have not been able to substantially reduce blade-vortex interaction noise without degradation of rotor performance. Meanwhile, blade root control techniques, such as higher-harmonic pitch control (HHC) and individual blade control (IBC) concepts, have been extensively investigated for noise and vibration reduction. The HHC technique has proved the substantial blade-vortex interaction noise reduction, up to 6 dB, while vibration and low-frequency noise have been increased. Tests with IBC techniques have shown the simultaneous reduction of rotor noise and vibratory loads with 2/rev pitch control inputs. Recently, active blade control concepts with smart structures have been investigated with the emphasis on active blade twist and trailing edge flap. Smart structures technologies are very promising, but further advancements are needed to meet all the requirements of rotorcraft applications in frequency, force, and displacement.

  11. Load alleviation potential of active flaps and individual pitch control in a full design load basis

    Barlas, Athanasios; Bergami, Leonardo; Hansen, Morten Hartvig;

    2015-01-01

    configuration is evaluated by comparing four setups: 1) baseline with collective pitch, 2) individual pitch control, 3) individual flap control and 4) individual flap control combined with individual pitch control. The CRTEF allows for a significant reduction of the lifetime fatigue on various load channels...

  12. Modal Tilt/Translate Control and Stability of a Rigid Rotor with Gyroscopics on Active Magnetic Bearings

    Timothy Dimond

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Most industrial rotors supported in active magnetic bearings (AMBs are operated well below the first bending critical speed. Also, they are usually controlled using proportional, integral and derivative controllers, which are set up as modally uncoupled parallel and tilt rotor axes. Gyroscopic effects create mode splitting and a speed-dependent plant. Two AMBs with four axes of control must simultaneously control and stabilize the rotor/AMB system. Various analyses have been published considering this problem for different rotor/AMB configurations. There has not been a fully dimensionless analysis of these rigid rotor AMB systems. This paper will perform this analysis with a modal PD controller in terms of translation mode and tilt mode dimensionless eigenvalues and eigenvectors. The number of independent system parameters is significantly reduced. Dimensionless PD controller gains, the ratio of rotor polar to transverse moments of inertia and a dimensionless speed ratio are used to evaluate a fully general system stability rigid rotor analysis. An objective of this work is to quantify the effects of gyroscopics on rigid rotor AMB systems. These gyroscopic forces reduce the system stability margin. The paper is also intended to help provide a common framework for communication between rotating machinery designers and controls engineers

  13. Magnetostatic analysis of a rotor system supported by radial active magnetic bearings

    Ferfecki P.

    2009-01-01

    The development and the design of a radial active magnetic bearing (AMB) reflects a complex process of the multidisciplinary rotor dynamics, electromagnetism and automatic control analysis. Modelling is performed by application of the physical laws from different areas, e.g. Newton's laws of motion and Maxwell's equations. The new approach in the numerical modelling of radial AMB and design methodology allowing automatic generation of primary dimensions of the radial AMB is proposed. Instead ...

  14. Dynamics of inert spheres in active suspensions of micro-rotors.

    Yeo, Kyongmin; Lushi, Enkeleida; Vlahovska, Petia M

    2016-07-01

    Inert particles suspended in active fluids of self-propelled particles are known to often exhibit enhanced diffusion and novel coherent structures. Here we numerically investigate the dynamical behavior and self-organization in a system consisting of passive and actively rotating spheres of the same size. The particles interact through direct collisions and the fluid flows generated as they move. In the absence of passive particles, three states emerge in a binary mixture of spinning spheres depending on particle fraction: a dilute gas-like state where the rotors move chaotically, a phase-separated state where like-rotors move in lanes or vortices, and a jammed state where crystals continuously assemble, melt and move (K. Yeo, E. Lushi, and P. M. Vlahovska, Phys. Rev. Lett., 2015, 114, 188301). Passive particles added to the rotor suspension modify the system dynamics and pattern formation: while states identified in the pure active suspension still emerge, they occur at different densities and mixture proportions. The dynamical behavior of the inert particles is also non-trivially dependent on the system composition. PMID:27265340

  15. Development of an aeroelastic stability boundary for a rotor in autorotation

    Trchalík, J.; Gillies, E.A.; Thomson, D. G.

    2008-01-01

    For the present study, a mathematical model AMRA was created to simulate the aeroelastic behaviour of a rotor during autorotation. Our model: Aeroelastic Model of a Rotor in Autorotation (AMRA) captures transverse bending and teeter, torsional twist and lag-wise motion of the rotor blade and hence it is used to investigate couplings between blade flapping, torsion and rotor speed. Lagrange’s method was used for the modelling of blade flapping and chord-wise bendi...

  16. Numerical analysis of the first static calibration of the RSRA helicopter active-isolator rotor balance system

    Acree, C. W., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The helicopter version of the Rotor Systems Research Aircraft (RSRA) is designed to make simultaneous measurements of all rotor forces and moments in a manner analogous to a wind-tunnel balance. Loads are measured by a combination of load cells, strain gages, and hydropneumatic active isolators with built-in pressure gages. Complete evaluation of system performance requires calibration of the rotor force- and moment-measurement system when installed in the aircraft. Derivations of calibration corrections for various combinations of calibration data are discussed.

  17. Local correlations for flap gap oscillatory blowing active flow control technology

    Cătălin NAE

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Active technology for oscillatory blowing in the flap gap has been tested at INCAS subsonic wind tunnel in order to evaluate this technology for usage in high lift systems with active flow control. The main goal for this investigation was to validate TRL level 4 for this technology and to extend towards flight testing. CFD analysis was performed in order to identify local correlations with experimental data and to better formulate a design criteria so that a maximum increase in lift is possible under given geometrical constraints. Reference to a proposed metric for noise evaluation is also given. This includes basic 2D flow cases and also 2.5D configurations. In 2.5D test cases this work has been extended so that the proposed system may be selected as a mature technology in the JTI Clean Sky, Smart Fixed Wing Aircraft ITD. Complex post-processing of the experimental and CFD data was mainly oriented towards system efficiency and TRL evaluation for this active technology.

  18. Preliminary modal analysis and structure design of an HTR-10 PCU rotor with an active magnetic bearing

    A 10 MW high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTR-10) was constructed by INET at Tsinghua University of China. The second phase of the HTR-10 project is to set up a direct helium cycle to replace the current steam cycle. An Active Magnetic Bearing (AMB) was chosen to support the rotor. This rotor is vertically mounted to hold the turbine machine, compressors and the power generator together. The rotor's length is 7 m, its weight is about 1000 kg and the rotating speed is 15,000 r/min. One of the challenging problems is to exceed natural frequencies with enough stability and safety during reactor start up, power change and shutdown. Some kinds of FEM software and methods, such as MSC.Marc, Ansys, and the Transfer Matrix Method, are compared to fully analyze rotor dynamics characteristic. The modal analysis and preliminary structure design have been done for the HTR-10 phase II rotor. MSC.Marc was finally selected to analyze the vibration mode and the natural frequency of the rotor. The effects of AMB stiffness on the critical speeds of the rotor were studied. These results offer the basis for design of the AMB control system, and also provide research data for large magnetic bearings. (author)

  19. Comparison of individual pitch and smart rotor control strategies for load reduction

    Load reduction is increasingly seen as an essential part of controller and wind turbine design. On large multi-MW wind turbines that experience high levels of wind shear and turbulence across the rotor, individual pitch control and smart rotor control are being considered. While individual pitch control involves adjusting the pitch of each blade individually to reduce the cyclic loadings on the rotor, smart rotor control involves activating control devices distributed along the blades to alter the local aerodynamics of the blades. Here we investigate the effectiveness of using a DQ-axis control and a distributed (independent) control for both individual pitch and trailing edge flap smart rotor control. While load reductions are similar amongst the four strategies across a wide range of variables, including blade root bending moments, yaw bearing and shaft, the pitch actuator requirements vary. The smart rotor pitch actuator has reduced travel, rates, accelerations and power requirements than that of the individual pitch controlled wind turbines. This benefit alone however would be hard to justify the added design complexities of using a smart rotor, which can be seen as an alternative to upgrading the pitch actuator and bearing. In addition, it is found that the independent control strategy is apt at roles that the collective pitch usually targets, such as tower motion and speed control, and it is perhaps here, in supplementing other systems, that the future of the smart rotor lies

  20. Frequency Response Analysis of an Actively Lubricated Rotor/Tilting-Pad Bearing System

    Nicoletti, Rodrigo; Santos, Ilmar

    2005-01-01

    In the present paper the dynamic response of a rotor supported by an active lubricated tilting-pad bearing is investigated in the frequency domain. The theoretical part of the investigation is based on a mathematical model obtained by means of rigid body dynamics. The oil film forces are inserted...... active lubricated tilting-pad bearing. By applying a simple proportional controller it is possible to reach 30% reduction of the resonance peak associated with the first rigid body mode shape of the system. One of the most important consequences of such a vibration reduction in rotating machines is the...

  1. A Model Based Control methodology combining Blade Pitch and Adaptive Trailing Edge Flaps in a common framework

    This work investigates how adaptive trailing edge flaps and classical blade pitch can work in concert using a model-based state space control formulation. The trade-off between load reduction and actuator activity is decided by setting different weights in the objective function used by the model......-based controller. The combined control approach allow to achieve higher load alleviations, furthermore, in the presence of e.g. deterioration of an actuator, it enables an online re-tuning of the workload distribution of blade pitch and trailing edge flaps, thus potentially increasing the smart rotor reliability....

  2. A Model Based Control methodology combining Blade Pitch and Adaptive Trailing Edge Flaps in a common framework

    Henriksen, Lars Christian; Bergami, Leonardo; Andersen, Peter Bjørn

    2013-01-01

    This work investigates how adaptive trailing edge flaps and classical blade pitch can work in concert using a model-based state space control formulation. The trade-off between load reduction and actuator activity is decided by setting different weights in the objective function used by the model......-based controller. The combined control approach allow to achieve higher load alleviations, furthermore, in the presence of e.g. deterioration of an actuator, it enables an online re-tuning of the workload distribution of blade pitch and trailing edge flaps, thus potentially increasing the smart rotor reliability....

  3. A study of autogiro rotor-blade oscillations in the plane of the rotor disk

    Wheatley, John B

    1936-01-01

    An analysis of the factors governing the oscillation of an autogiro rotor blade in the plane of the rotor disk showed that the contribution of the air forces to the resultant motion was small and that the oscillation is essentially a direct effect of the rotor-blade flapping motion. A comparison of calculated oscillations with those measured in flight on three different rotors disclosed that the calculations gave satisfactory agreement with experiment. The calculated air forces on the rotor blade appear to be larger than the experimental ones, but this discrepancy can be attributed to the deficiencies in the strip analysis.

  4. Frequency Response Analysis of an Actively Lubricated Rotor/Tilting-Pad Bearing System

    Nicoletti, Rodrigo; Santos, Ilmar

    In the present paper, the dynamic response of a rotor supported by an active lubricated tilting-pad bearing is investigated in the frequency domain. The theoretical part of the investigation is based on a mathematical model obtained by means of rigid body dynamics. The oil film forces are inserted...... into the model by using two different approaches: (a) linearized active oil film forces and the assumption that the hydrodynamic forces and the active hydraulic forces can be decoupled; (b) equivalent dynamic coefficients of the active oil film and the solution of the modified Reynolds' equation for...... the active lubrication. The second approach based on the equivalent dynamic coefficients leads to more accurate results since it includes the frequency dependence of the active hydraulic forces. Theoretical and experimental results reveal the feasibility of reducing resonance peaks by using the active...

  5. Control of Flap Vortices

    Greenblatt, David

    2005-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation was carried out on a semi-span wing model to assess the feasibility of controlling vortices emanating from outboard flaps and tip-flaps by actively varying the degree of boundary layer separation. Separation was varied by means of perturbations produced from segmented zero-efflux oscillatory blowing slots, while estimates of span loadings and vortex sheet strengths were obtained by integrating wing surface pressures. These estimates were used as input to inviscid rollup relations as a means of predicting changes to the vortex characteristics resulting from the perturbations. Surveys of flow in the wake of the outboard and tip-flaps were made using a seven-hole probe, from which the vortex characteristics were directly deduced. Varying the degree of separation had a marked effect on vortex location, strength, tangential velocity, axial velocity and size for both outboard and tip-flaps. Qualitative changes in vortex characteristics were well predicted by the inviscid rollup relations, while the failure to account for viscosity was presumed to be the main reason for observed discrepancies. Introducing perturbations near the outboard flap-edges or on the tip-flap exerted significant control over vortices while producing negligible lift excursions.

  6. Frequency Response Analysis of an Actively Lubricated Rotor/Tilting-Pad Bearing System

    Nicoletti, Rodrigo; Santos, Ilmar

    2004-01-01

    In the present paper, the dynamic response of a rotor supported by an active lubricated tilting-pad bearing is investigated in the frequency domain. The theoretical part of the investigation is based on a mathematical model obtained by means of rigid body dynamics. The oil film forces are inserted...... lubricated tilting-pad bearing. By applying a simple proportional controller, it is possible to reach 30% reduction of the resonance peak associated with the first rigid body mode shape of the system. One of the most important consequences of such a vibration reduction in rotating machines is the feasibility...

  7. Study on the application of active balancing device to solve the vibration problem for the rotor with bending fault

    He Lidong; Shen Wei; Gao Jinji; Zhou Weihua

    2006-01-01

    The rotor with bending faults that occurrs on the rotating machinery usually vibrates seriously. This paper investigates to apply the active balancing device on a flexible rotor with bending faults to solve the vibration problem. Two problems are studied by finite element method firstly: Where the balance actuator is fixed on the shaft and how much the balancing capacity of the active balancing device is needed. The experiment is then carried out on the test rig, which consists of a flexible rotor with bending faults. The test results indicate that the bending rotor peak vibration response can be decreased from 550μm to 40μm below by using the active balancing device. The peak vibration response decreases approximately by 93%. The synchronous vibration due to the rotor bending faults can be controlled effectively by using active balancing device. The active balancing device is especially adapted to solve the problem caused by thermal distortion with time-variation and randomness, which is varied with working conditions, thus it has good practical value in practice.

  8. Active twist control methodology for vibration reduction of a helicopter with dissimilar rotor system

    In this work, an active vibration reduction of hingeless composite rotor blades with dissimilarity is investigated using the active twist concept and the optimal control theory. The induced shear strain on the actuation mechanism by the piezoelectric constant d15 from the PZN–8% PT-based single-crystal material is used to achieve more active twisting to suppress the extra vibrations. The optimal control algorithm is based on the minimization of an objective function comprised of quadratic functions of vibratory hub loads and voltage control harmonics. The blade-to-blade dissimilarity is modeled using the stiffness degradation of composite blades. The optimal controller is applied to various possible dissimilarities arising from different damage patterns of composite blades. The governing equations of motion are derived using Hamilton's principle. The effects of composite materials and smart actuators are incorporated into the comprehensive aeroelastic analysis system. Numerical results showing the impact of addressing the blade dissimilarities on hub vibrations and voltage inputs required to suppress the vibrations are demonstrated. It is observed that all vibratory shear forces are reduced considerably and the major harmonics of moments are reduced significantly. However, the controller needs further improvement to suppress 1/rev moment loads. A mechanism to achieve vibration reduction for the dissimilar rotor system has also been identified

  9. Stability Analysis of the Slowed-Rotor Compound Helicopter Configuration

    Floros, Matthew W.; Johnson, Wayne

    2007-01-01

    The stability and control of rotors at high advance ratio are considered. Teetering, articulated, gimbaled, and rigid hub types are considered for a compound helicopter (rotor and fixed wing). Stability predictions obtained using an analytical rigid flapping blade analysis, a rigid blade CAMRAD II model, and an elastic blade CAMRAD II model are compared. For the flapping blade analysis, the teetering rotor is the most stable, showing no instabilities up to an advance ratio of 3 and a Lock number of 18. A notional elastic blade model of a teetering rotor is unstable at an advance ratio of 1.5, independent of pitch frequency. Analysis of the trim controls and blade flapping shows that for small positive collective pitch, trim can be maintained without excessive control input or flapping angles.

  10. Axial flow effects on robustness of vortical structures about actively deflected wings in flapping flight

    Medina, Albert; Kweon, Jihoon; Choi, Haecheon; Eldredge, Jeff D.

    2012-11-01

    Flapping wing flight has garnered much attention in the past decade driven by our desire to understand capabilities observed in nature and to develop agile small-scale aerial vehicles. Nature has demonstrated the breadth of maneuverability achievable by flapping wing flight. However, despite recent advances the role of wing flexibility remains poorly understood. In an effort to develop a deeper understanding of wing deflection effects and to explore novel approaches to increasing leading-edge vortex robustness, this three-dimensional computational study explores the aerodynamics of low aspect ratio plates, in hovering kinematics, with isolated flexion lines undergoing prescribed deflection. Major flexion lines, recognized as the primary avenue for deflection in biological fliers, are isolated here in two distinct configurations, resulting in deflection about the wing root and the wing tip, respectively. Of interest is the interaction between axial flow along the span and the vortical structures about the wing. It is proposed that the modes of deflection explored may provide a means of axial flow control for favorably promoting LEV robustness over a broad range of flapping conditions, and provide insight into the nature of flexibility in flapping wing flight. National Science Foundation, National Research Foundation of Korea.

  11. Initial Aerodynamic and Acoustic Study of an Active Twist Rotor Using a Loosely Coupled CFD/CSD Method

    Boyd, David D. Jr.

    2009-01-01

    Preliminary aerodynamic and performance predictions for an active twist rotor for a HART-II type of configuration are performed using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, OVERFLOW2, and a computational structural dynamics (CSD) code, CAMRAD -II. These codes are loosely coupled to compute a consistent set of aerodynamics and elastic blade motions. Resultant aerodynamic and blade motion data are then used in the Ffowcs-Williams Hawkins solver, PSU-WOPWOP, to compute noise on an observer plane under the rotor. Active twist of the rotor blade is achieved in CAMRAD-II by application of a periodic torsional moment couple (of equal and opposite sign) at the blade root and tip at a specified frequency and amplitude. To provide confidence in these particular active twist predictions for which no measured data is available, the rotor system geometry and computational set up examined here are identical to that used in a previous successful Higher Harmonic Control (HHC) computational study. For a single frequency equal to three times the blade passage frequency (3P), active twist is applied across a range of control phase angles at two different amplitudes. Predicted results indicate that there are control phase angles where the maximum mid-frequency noise level and the 4P non -rotating hub vibrations can be reduced, potentially, both at the same time. However, these calculated reductions are predicted to come with a performance penalty in the form of a reduction in rotor lift-to-drag ratio due to an increase in rotor profile power.

  12. Influence of backup bearings and support structure dynamics on the behavior of rotors with active supports

    Flowers, George T.

    1995-01-01

    Progress made in the current year is listed, and the following papers are included in the appendix: Steady-State Dynamic Behavior of an Auxiliary Bearing Supported Rotor System; Dynamic Behavior of a Magnetic Bearing Supported Jet Engine Rotor with Auxiliary Bearings; Dynamic Modelling and Response Characteristics of a Magnetic Bearing Rotor System with Auxiliary Bearings; and Synchronous Dynamics of a Coupled Shaft/Bearing/Housing System with Auxiliary Support from a Clearance Bearing: Analysis and Experiment.

  13. A Study of Active Rotor-Blade Vibration Control using Electro-Magnetic Actuation - Part II: Experiment

    Christensen, Rene Hardam; Santos, Ilmar

    2004-01-01

    mistuning, can easily be generated by substitution or rearranging the blades. Six sets of electro-magnetic actuators are applied to the system in order to control the blades as well as the rotor vibrations. Four sets of actuators are mounted in the rotating disc acting directly onto each one of the blades....... The remaining two sets of actuators are applied to act directly onto the hub, working as an active radial bearing controlling the rotor lateral movement. The rig is equipped with sensors measuring blade and rotor vibrations. Actuators and sensors are connected to a digital signal processor running the...... control algorithm. Measurement signals and actuator control signals from the sensors and actuators fixed in the rotating disc are transmitted to the control unit through a slip-ring device. Various measured responses of both the controlled and the non-controlled system with identical blades and with...

  14. Helicopter Fuselage Active Flow Control in the Presence of a Rotor

    Martin, Preston B; Overmeyer, Austin D.; Tanner, Philip E.; Wilson, Jacob S.; Jenkins, Luther N.

    2014-01-01

    This work extends previous investigations of active flow control for helicopter fuselage drag and download reduction to include the effects of the rotor. The development of the new wind tunnel model equipped with fluidic oscillators is explained in terms of the previous test results. Large drag reductions greater than 20% in some cases were measured during powered testing without increasing, and in some cases decreasing download in forward flight. As confirmed by Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), the optimum actuator configuration that provided a decrease in both drag and download appeared to create a virtual (fluidic) boat-tail fairing instead of attaching flow to the ramp surface. This idea of a fluidic fairing shifts the focus of 3D separation control behind bluff bodies from controlling/reattaching surface boundary layers to interacting with the wake flow.

  15. New design of hingeless helicopter rotor improves stability

    Ormiston, R. A.; Bousman, W. G.; Hodges, D. H.; Peters, D. A.

    1975-01-01

    Cantilever blades are attached directly to rotor hub, thereby substantially reducing cost and complexity and increasing reliability of helicopter rotor. Combination of structural flap-lag coupling and pitch-lag coupling provides damping of 6 to 10%, depending on magnitude of coupling parameters.

  16. Adaptive Control of Active Balancing System for a Fast Speed-varying Jeffcott Rotor with Actuator Time Delay

    HU Bing; FANG Zhi-chu

    2008-01-01

    Due to actuator time delay existing in an adaptive control of the active balancing system for a fastspeed-varying Jeffcott rotor, if an unsynchronized control force (correction imbalance) is applied to the system,it may lead to degradation in control efficiency and instability of the control system. In order to avoid theseshortcomings, a simple adaptive controller was designed for a strictly positive real rotor system with actuatortime delay, then a Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional was constructed after an appropriate transform of this sys-tem model, the stability conditions of this adaptive control system with actuator time delay were derived. Afteradding a filter function, the active balancing system for the fast speed-varying Jeffcott rotor with actuator timedelay can easily be converted to a strictly positive real system, and thus it can use the above adaptive controllersatisfying the stability conditions. Finally, numerical simulations show that the adaptive controller proposedworks very well to perform the active balancing for the fast speed-varying Jeffcott rotor with actuator timedelay.

  17. 主动电磁轴承系统的动力学性能分析%Analysis on Dynamic Performance for Active Magnetic Bearing-Rotor System

    严慧燕; 汪希平; 朱礼进; 张直明; 万金贵

    2001-01-01

    In the application of active magnetic bearings (AMB), one of the key problems to be solved is the safety and stability in the sense of rotor dynamics. The project related to the present paper deals with the method for analyzing bearing rotor systems with high rotation speed and specially supported by active magnetic bearings, and studies its rotor dynamics performance, including calculation of the natural frequencies with their distribution characteristics, and the critical speeds of the system. One of the targets of this project is to formulate a theory and method valid for the analysis of the dynamic performance of the active magnetic bearing-rotor system by combining the traditional theory and method of rotor dynamics with the analytical theory and design method based on modern control theory of the AMB system.

  18. An exploratory investigation of the flight dynamics effects of rotor rpm variations and rotor state feedback in hover

    Chen, Robert T. N.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an analytical study conducted to investigate airframe/engine interface dynamics, and the influence of rotor speed variations on the flight dynamics of the helicopter in hover, and to explore the potential benefits of using rotor states as additional feedback signals in the flight control system. The analytical investigation required the development of a parametric high-order helicopter hover model, which included heave/yaw body motion, the rotor speed degree of freedom, rotor blade motion in flapping and lead-lag, inflow dynamics, a drive train model with a flexible rotor shaft, and an engine/rpm governor. First, the model was used to gain insight into the engine/drive train/rotor system dynamics and to obtain an improved simple formula for easy estimation of the dominant first torsional mode, which is important in the dynamic integration of the engine and airframe system. Then, a linearized version of the model was used to investigate the effects of rotor speed variations and rotor state feedback on helicopter flight dynamics. Results show that, by including rotor speed variations, the effective vertical damping decreases significantly from that calculated with a constant speed assumption, thereby providing a better correlation with flight test data. Higher closed-loop bandwidths appear to be more readily achievable with rotor state feedback. The results also indicate that both aircraft and rotor flapping responses to gust disturbance are significantly attenuated when rotor state feedback is used.

  19. Reduction of urease activity by interaction with the flap covering the active site.

    Macomber, Lee; Minkara, Mona S; Hausinger, Robert P; Merz, Kenneth M

    2015-02-23

    With the increasing appreciation for the human microbiome coupled with the global rise of antibiotic resistant organisms, it is imperative that new methods be developed to specifically target pathogens. To that end, a novel computational approach was devised to identify compounds that reduce the activity of urease, a medically important enzyme of Helicobacter pylori, Proteus mirabilis, and many other microorganisms. Urease contains a flexible loop that covers its active site; Glide was used to identify small molecules predicted to lock this loop in an open conformation. These compounds were screened against the model urease from Klebsiella aerogenes, and the natural products epigallocatechin and quercetin were shown to inhibit at low and high micromolar concentrations, respectively. These molecules exhibit a strong time-dependent inactivation of urease that was not due to their oxygen sensitivity. Rather, these compounds appear to inactivate urease by reacting with a specific Cys residue located on the flexible loop. Substitution of this cysteine by alanine in the C319A variant increased the urease resistance to both epigallocatechin and quercetin, as predicted by the computational studies. Protein dynamics are integral to the function of many enzymes; thus, identification of compounds that lock an enzyme into a single conformation presents a useful approach to define potential inhibitors. PMID:25594724

  20. 4,5-Diarylisoxazol-3-carboxylic acids: A new class of leukotriene biosynthesis inhibitors potentially targeting 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein (FLAP).

    Banoglu, Erden; Çelikoğlu, Erşan; Völker, Susanna; Olgaç, Abdurrahman; Gerstmeier, Jana; Garscha, Ulrike; Çalışkan, Burcu; Schubert, Ulrich S; Carotti, Andrea; Macchiarulo, Antonio; Werz, Oliver

    2016-05-01

    In this article, we report novel leukotriene (LT) biosynthesis inhibitors that may target 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein (FLAP) based on the previously identified isoxazole derivative (8). The design and synthesis was directed towards a subset of 4,5-diaryl-isoxazole-3-carboxylic acid derivatives as LT biosynthesis inhibitors. Biological evaluation disclosed a new skeleton of potential anti-inflammatory agents, exemplified by 39 and 40, which potently inhibit cellular 5-LO product synthesis (IC50 = 0.24 μM, each) seemingly by targeting FLAP with weak inhibition on 5-LO (IC50 ≥ 8 μM). Docking studies and molecular dynamic simulations with 5-LO and FLAP provide valuable insights into potential binding modes of the inhibitors. Together, these diaryl-isoxazol-3-carboxylic acids may possess potential as leads for development of effective anti-inflammatory drugs through inhibition of LT biosynthesis. PMID:26922224

  1. Sources of helicopter rotor hub inplane shears

    Kottapalli, Sesi

    1993-01-01

    Sources of helicopter rotor hub inplane shears are identified using simplified equations and the full aeroelastic analysis code, CAMRAD/JA (Johnson, 1988). Analytical results are obtained for an articulated rotor operating at moderate thrust and high airspeed. It is found that the blade chordwise inplane shear, which includes the aerodynamic component, the Coriolis contribution, and the inertial component, and the hub inplane shears are strongly dependent on the out-of-plane response. The sources of helicopter rotor hub inplane shears lie not only in the inplane response but depend on the flap and elastic flatwise responses/modes.

  2. Cyclic Control Optimization for a Smart Rotor

    Bergami, Leonardo; Henriksen, Lars Christian

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents a method to determine cyclic control trajectories for a smart rotor undergoing periodic-deterministic load variations. The control trajectories result from a constrained optimization problem, where the cost function to minimize is given by the variation of the blade root flapwise...... bending moment within a rotor revolution. The method is applied to a rotor equipped with trailing edge flaps, and capable of individual blade pitching. Results show that the optimized cyclic control significantly alleviates the load variations from periodic disturbances; the combination of both cyclic...

  3. Numerical simulation of actuation behavior of active fiber composites in helicopter rotor blade application

    Paik, Seung Hoon; Kim, Ji Yeon; Shin, Sang Joon; Kim, Seung Jo

    2004-07-01

    Smart structures incorporating active materials have been designed and analyzed to improve aerospace vehicle performance and its vibration/noise characteristics. Helicopter integral blade actuation is one example of those efforts using embedded anisotropic piezoelectric actuators. To design and analyze such integrally-actuated blades, beam approach based on homogenization methodology has been traditionally used. Using this approach, the global behavior of the structures is predicted in an averaged sense. However, this approach has intrinsic limitations in describing the local behaviors in the level of the constituents. For example, the failure analysis of the individual active fibers requires the knowledge of the local behaviors. Microscopic approach for the analysis of integrally-actuated structures is established in this paper. Piezoelectric fibers and matrices are modeled individually and finite element method using three-dimensional solid elements is adopted. Due to huge size of the resulting finite element meshes, high performance computing technology is required in its solution process. The present methodology is quoted as Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of the smart structure. As an initial validation effort, present analytical results are correlated with the experiments from a small-scaled integrally-actuated blade, Active Twist Rotor (ATR). Through DNS, local stress distribution around the interface of fiber and matrix can be analyzed.

  4. Singular value decomposition of optically-mapped cardiac rotors and fibrillatory activity

    Our progress of understanding how cellular and structural factors contribute to arrhythmia is hampered in part because of controversies as to whether a fibrillating heart is driven by a single, several, or multiple number of sources, whether they are focal or reentrant and how to localize them. Here we demonstrate how a novel usage of the neutral singular value decomposition (SVD) method enables the extraction of the governing spatial and temporal modes of excitation from a rotor and fibrillatory waves. Those modes highlight patterns and regions of organization in the midst of the otherwise seemingly random propagating excitation waves. We apply the method to experimental models of cardiac fibrillation in rabbit hearts. We show that SVD analysis is able to enhance the classification of the heart electrical patterns into regions harboring drivers in the form of fast reentrant activity and other regions of by-standing activity. This enhancement is accomplished without any prior assumptions regarding the spatial, temporal or spectral properties of those drivers. The analysis corroborates that the dominant mode has the highest activation rate and further reveals a new feature: a transfer of modes from the driving to passive regions resulting in a partial reaction of the passive region to the driving region. (paper)

  5. A Study of Active Rotor-Blade Vibration Control using Electro-Magnetic Actuation - Part I: Theory

    Christensen, Rene Hardam; Santos, Ilmar

    This is the first paper in a two-part study on active rotor-blade vibration control. Blade faults are a major problem in bladed machines, such as turbines and compressors. Moreover, increasing demands for higher efficiency, lower weight and higher speed imply that blades become even more...... onto the shaft if the system has identical tuned blades. Time-periodic modal state feedback controllers are designed based on the modal model and numerical simulations are provided to show the efficiency of the designed active controllers for a tuned as well as a mistuned rotor-blade system....... susceptible to vibrational problems. Passive damping methods, such as frictional damping, are typically used for this kind of machines, working very well at the specific design conditions. However, when the running conditions exceed the design specification, then passive damping devices become inefficient...

  6. Active Magnetic Bearings used as an Actuator for Rotor Health Monitoring in Conjunction with Conventional Support Bearings

    Bash, Travis Joel

    2005-01-01

    This thesis describes the test rig and results from a project expanding the field of rotor health monitoring by using Active Magnetic Bearings (AMBs) as actuators for applying a variety of known force inputs to a spinning. Similar to modal analysis and other nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques which apply input signals to static structures in order to monitor responses; this approach allows for the measurement of both input and output response in a rotating system for evaluation. How...

  7. Active Aerodynamic Load Reduction on a Rotorcraft Fuselage With Rotor Effects: A CFD Validation Effort

    Allan, Brian G.; Schaeffler, Norman W.; Jenkins, Luther N.; Yao, Chung-Sheng; Wong, Oliver D.; Tanner, Philip E.

    2015-01-01

    A rotorcraft fuselage is typically designed with an emphasis on operational functionality with aerodynamic efficiency being of secondary importance. This results in a significant amount of drag during high-speed forward flight that can be a limiting factor for future high-speed rotorcraft designs. To enable higher speed flight, while maintaining a functional fuselage design (i.e., a large rear cargo ramp door), the NASA Rotary Wing Project has conducted both experimental and computational investigations to assess active flow control as an enabling technology for fuselage drag reduction. This paper will evaluate numerical simulations of a flow control system on a generic rotorcraft fuselage with a rotor in forward flight using OVERFLOW, a structured mesh Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes flow solver developed at NASA. The results are compared to fuselage forces, surface pressures, and PN flow field data obtained in a wind tunnel experiment conducted at the NASA Langley 14-by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel where significant drag and download reductions were demonstrated using flow control. This comparison showed that the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes flow solver was unable to predict the fuselage forces and pressure measurements on the ramp for the baseline and flow control cases. While the CFD was able to capture the flow features, it was unable to accurately predict the performance of the flow control.

  8. Variable Parameters PD Control and Stability of a High Rate Rigid Rotor-Journal Active Magnetic Bearing System

    LUO Kai

    2005-01-01

    Stability is a key problem that means whether a high rate rotor-active magnetic bearings system works reliably or not. Aiming at a bearings system described with nonlinear equations, this paper built a linear model according to the system behavior. Considering realization of the control system and behavior of a high rate rotor system (magnetic force is far smaller than input force produced by mass eccentricity) this paper proposes a design method of variable parameters PD control algorithm that can be used universally. The control system was simplified and a mass of adjusting work of control parameters was reduced. Analysis and simulation indicated that the bearings system could get a wider stable region of harmonic motion, and proved that the algorithm is robust and advanced. The control system can be realized because the winding electric currents are positive. The method is convenient for operation and can easily be used for engineering practice.

  9. Post-buckled precompressed (PBP) solid state adaptive rotor

    Barrett, Ronald M.; Barnhart, Ryan

    2010-04-01

    This paper is centered on a new actuation philosophy executed on an old rotor design. An adaptive rotor employing twist-active piezoelectric root actuators was used as a testbed to investigate the new branch of structural mechanics devoted to low- and zero-net passive stiffness (ZNPS) structures. One of the more common methods to achieve zero net passive stiffnesses in structures is to employ "negative" springs: that is, mechanisms which when combined with the baseline structure null the passive stiffness of the total structural element. This paper outlines the application of such a system via a Post-Buckled Precompression (PBP) technique at the end of a twist-active piezoelectric rotor blade actuator. The basic performance of the system is handily modeled by using laminated plate theory techniques. A dual cantilevered spring system was used to increasingly null the passive stiffness of the root actuator along the feathering axis of the rotor blade. As the precompression levels were increased, it was shown that corresponding blade pitch levels also increased. The PBP cantilever spring system was designed so as to provide a high level of stabilizing pitch-flap coupling and inherent resistance to rotor propeller moments. Experimental testing showed pitch deflections increasing from just 8° peak-to-peak deflections at 650 V/mm field strength to more than 26° at the same field strength with design precompression levels. Dynamic testing showed the corner frequency of the linear system coming down from 63 Hz (3.8/rev) to 53Hz (3.2/rev). Thrust coefficients manipulation levels were shown to increase from 0.01 to 0.028 with increasing precompression levels. The paper concludes with an overall assessment of the actuator design and conclusions on overall feasibility.

  10. Active Control of Parametric Vibrations in Coupled Rotor-Blade Systems

    Christensen, Rene Hardam; Santos, Ilmar

    2003-01-01

    In rotor-blade systems basis as well as parametric vibration modes will appear due to the vibration coupling among flexible rotating blades and hub rigid body motion. Parametric vibration will typically occur when the hub operates at a constant angular velocity. Operating at constant velocity the...

  11. ACTIVE VIBRATION REDUCTION OF RIGID ROTOR BY KINEMATIC EXCITATION OF BUSHES OF JOURNAL BEARINGS

    Ondrouch, Jan; Ferfecki, Petr; Poruba, Z.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 2 (2009), s. 107-110. ISSN 0543-5846 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : bearing * controller * rotor system * vibration reduction Subject RIV: JR - Other Machinery Impact factor: 0.439, year: 2009

  12. A high voltage DC-DC converter driving a Dielectric Electro Active Polymer actuator for wind turbine flaps

    Thummala, Prasanth; Zhang, Zhe; Andersen, Michael A. E.; Thomsen, Ole Cornelius

    2012-01-01

    The Dielectric Electro Active Polymer (DEAP) material is a very thin (~80 μm) silicone elastomer film with a compliant metallic electrode layer on both sides. The DEAP is fundamentally a capacitor that is capable of very high strain. The property that the polymer changes its shape, as a result of...... topology to obtain high voltage at low current, for driving the DEAP actuator. Simulation and experimental results for uni-directional flyback converter topology are shown....... flaps. With the DEAP based high power actuator, it is expected to make a reliable and light solution with superior controllability. The current DEAP technology requires high DC voltage in the range of kV to fully utilize the DEAP material as an actuator. In this paper we propose a flyback converter......The Dielectric Electro Active Polymer (DEAP) material is a very thin (~80 μm) silicone elastomer film with a compliant metallic electrode layer on both sides. The DEAP is fundamentally a capacitor that is capable of very high strain. The property that the polymer changes its shape, as a result of...

  13. Pedicled perforator flaps

    Demirtas, Yener; Ozturk, Nuray; Kelahmetoglu, Osman; Demir, Ahmet

    2009-01-01

    Described in this study is a surgical concept that supports the "consider and use a pedicled perforator flap whenever possible and indicated" approach to reconstruct a particular skin defect. The operation is entirely free-style; the only principle is to obtain a pedicled perforator flap to...... reconstruct the defect. The perforators are marked with a hand-held Doppler probe and multiple flaps are designed. The appropriate flap is elevated after identifying the perforator(s). Dissection of the perforator(s) or complete incision of the flap margins are not mandatory if the flap is mobilized...... adequately to cover the defect. Defects measuring 3 x 3 cm up to 20 x 20 cm at diverse locations were successfully reconstructed in 20 of 21 patients with 26 flaps. Pedicled perforator flaps offer us reliable and satisfactory results of reconstruction at different anatomic territories of the body. It sounds...

  14. Optimal placement of trailing-edge flaps for helicopter vibration reduction using response surface methods

    Viswamurthy, S. R.; Ganguli, Ranjan

    2007-03-01

    This study aims to determine optimal locations of dual trailing-edge flaps to achieve minimum hub vibration levels in a helicopter, while incurring low penalty in terms of required trailing-edge flap control power. An aeroelastic analysis based on finite elements in space and time is used in conjunction with an optimal control algorithm to determine the flap time history for vibration minimization. The reduced hub vibration levels and required flap control power (due to flap motion) are the two objectives considered in this study and the flap locations along the blade are the design variables. It is found that second order polynomial response surfaces based on the central composite design of the theory of design of experiments describe both objectives adequately. Numerical studies for a four-bladed hingeless rotor show that both objectives are more sensitive to outboard flap location compared to the inboard flap location by an order of magnitude. Optimization results show a disjoint Pareto surface between the two objectives. Two interesting design points are obtained. The first design gives 77 percent vibration reduction from baseline conditions (no flap motion) with a 7 percent increase in flap power compared to the initial design. The second design yields 70 percent reduction in hub vibration with a 27 percent reduction in flap power from the initial design.

  15. Separators for flywheel rotors

    Bender, Donald A.; Kuklo, Thomas C.

    1998-01-01

    A separator forms a connection between the rotors of a concentric rotor assembly. This separator allows for the relatively free expansion of outer rotors away from inner rotors while providing a connection between the rotors that is strong enough to prevent disassembly. The rotor assembly includes at least two rotors referred to as inner and outer flywheel rings or rotors. This combination of inner flywheel ring, separator, and outer flywheel ring may be nested to include an arbitrary number of concentric rings. The separator may be a segmented or continuous ring that abuts the ends of the inner rotor and the inner bore of the outer rotor. It is supported against centrifugal loads by the outer rotor and is affixed to the outer rotor. The separator is allowed to slide with respect to the inner rotor. It is made of a material that has a modulus of elasticity that is lower than that of the rotors.

  16. Unbalanced Magnetic Pull Effect on Stiffness Models of Active Magnetic Bearing due to Rotor Eccentricity in Brushless DC Motor Using Finite Element Method

    Bangcheng Han

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We firstly report on an investigation into the unbalanced magnetic pull (UMP effect on the static stiffness models of radial active magnetic bearing (RAMB in brushless DC motor (BDCM in no-loaded and loaded conditions using the finite element method (FEM. The influences of the UMP on the force-control current, force-position, current stiffness, and position stiffness of RAMB are clarified in BDCM with 100 kW rated power. We found the position stiffness to be more susceptible to UMP. The primary source of UMP is the permanent magnets of BDCM. In addition, the performance of RAMB is affected by the UMP ripples during motor commutation and also periodically affected by the angular position of rotor. The characteristic curves of RAMB force versus control current (or rotor position and angular position of rotor affected by the UMP are given. The method is useful in design and optimization of RAMB in magnetically suspended BDCMs.

  17. Dynamic Gust Load Analysis for Rotors

    Yuting Dai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic load of helicopter rotors due to gust directly affects the structural stress and flight performance for helicopters. Based on a large deflection beam theory, an aeroelastic model for isolated helicopter rotors in the time domain is constructed. The dynamic response and structural load for a rotor under the impulse gust and slope-shape gust are calculated, respectively. First, a nonlinear Euler beam model with 36 degrees-of-freedoms per element is applied to depict the structural dynamics for an isolated rotor. The generalized dynamic wake model and Leishman-Beddoes dynamic stall model are applied to calculate the nonlinear unsteady aerodynamic forces on rotors. Then, we transformed the differential aeroelastic governing equation to an algebraic one. Hence, the widely used Newton-Raphson iteration algorithm is employed to simulate the dynamic gust load. An isolated helicopter rotor with four blades is studied to validate the structural model and the aeroelastic model. The modal frequencies based on the Euler beam model agree well with published ones by CAMRAD. The flap deflection due to impulse gust with the speed of 2m/s increases twice to the one without gust. In this numerical example, results indicate that the bending moment at the blade root is alleviated due to elastic effect.

  18. Theoretical performances of double Gurney Flap equipped the VAWTs

    Horia DUMITRESCU

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A Gurney flap is simply a flat plate attached perpendicularly to the lower surface of an airfoil or wing trailing edge. A T-strip or double Gurney flap is attached to both the upper and lower surfaces. T-strips are used to modify the lifting characteristics of the baseline airfoil for vertical axis wind rotor turbines. Generally, T-strips have been used during developmental flight test as simple add-on “fixes” to improve the performances of existing aircraft vertical tails. This paper aims to investigate the performances of VAWTs equipped with T-strip on blades trailing edge.

  19. The platysma myocutaneous flap.

    Baur, Dale A; Williams, Jonathan; Alakaily, Xena

    2014-08-01

    Reconstructing defects of the oral mucosa or skin of the lower one-third of the face can be accomplished by a variety of techniques. This article presents two versions of the platysma myocutaneous flap, which is a reliable, axial pattern, pedicled flap capable of providing excellent one-stage reconstruction of such defects. As discussed herein, the superiorly based and posteriorly based versions of the flap have wide application in the oral and facial region. Also provided is a review of other uses of this flap in head and neck surgery. PMID:24958382

  20. Propeller TAP flap

    Thomsen, Jørn Bo; Bille, Camilla; Wamberg, Peter;

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine if a propeller thoracodorsal artery perforator (TAP) flap can be used for breast reconstruction. Fifteen women were reconstructed using a propeller TAP flap, an implant, and an ADM. Preoperative colour Doppler ultrasonography was used for patient selection to...... major complications needing additional surgery. One flap was lost due to a vascular problem. Breast reconstruction can be performed by a propeller TAP flap without cutting the descending branch of the thoracodorsal vessels. However, the authors would recommend that a small cuff of muscle is left around...

  1. Prediction of BVI Noise for an Active Twist Rotor Using a Loosely Coupled CFD/CSD Method and Comparison to Experimental Data

    Fogarty, David E.; Wilbur, Matthew L.; Sekula, Martin K.; Boyd, David Douglas, Jr.

    2012-01-01

    Numerical predictions of the acoustic characteristics of an Active Twist Rotor (ATR), using two methods to compute the rotor blade aerodynamics and elastic blade motion are compared to experimental data from a wind tunnel test in the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) in 2000. The first method, a loosely coupled iterative method, utilizes the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code OVERFLOW 2 and the Computational Structural Dynamics (CSD) code CAMRAD II. The second method utilizes the CAMRAD II free-wake model only. The harmonic active-twist control to the main rotor blade system is identified with three parameters - harmonic actuation frequency, actuation amplitude, and control phase angle. The resulting aerodynamics and blade motion data from the two methods are then used in the acoustics code PSU-WOPWOP to predict acoustic pressure on a spherical array of equally spaced observers surrounding the rotor. This spherical distribution of pressure is used to compute the sound power level representing baseline and actuated conditions. Sound power levels for three categories of noise are defined as - blade-vortex interaction sound power level (BVIPWL), low frequency sound power level (LFPWL), and overall sound power level, OAPWL. Comparisons with measured data indicate the CFD/CSD analysis successfully captures the trends in sound power levels and the effects of active-twist control at advance ratios of 0.14 and 0.17. The free-wake model predictions show inconsistent sound power levels relative to the trends in the experimental and CFD data. This paper presents the first ever comparison between CFD/CSD acoustic predictions for an active-twist rotor and experimental measurements.

  2. A physics based investigation of Gurney flaps for enhancement of rotorcraft flight characteristics

    Min, Byung-Young

    Helicopters are versatile vehicles that can vertically take off and land, hover, and perform maneuver at very low forward speeds. These characteristics make them unique for a number of civilian and military applications. However, the radial and azimuthal variation of dynamic pressure causes rotors to experience adverse phenomena such as transonic shocks and 3-D dynamic stall. Adverse interactions such as blade vortex interaction and rotor-airframe interaction may also occur. These phenomena contribute to noise and vibrations. Finally, in the event of an engine failure, rotorcraft tends to descend at high vertical velocities causing structural damage and loss of lives. A variety of techniques have been proposed for reducing the noise and vibrations. These techniques include on-board control (OBC) devices, individual blade control (IBC), and higher harmonic control (HHC). Addition of these devices adds to the weight, cost, and complexity of the rotor system, and reduces the reliability of operations. Simpler OBC concepts will greatly alleviate these drawbacks and enhance the operating envelope of vehicles. In this study, the use of Gurney flaps is explored as an OBC concept using a physics based approach. A three dimensional Navier-Stokes solver developed by the present investigator is coupled to an existing free wake model of the wake structure. The method is further enhanced for modeling of Blade-Vortex-Interactions (BVI). Loose coupling with an existing comprehensive structural dynamics analysis solver (DYMORE) is implemented for the purpose of rotor trim and modeling of aeroelastic effects. Results are presented for Gurney flaps as an OBC concept for improvements in autorotation, rotor vibration reduction, and BVI characteristics. As a representative rotor, the HART-II model rotor is used. It is found that the Gurney flap increases propulsive force in the driving region while the drag force is increased in the driven region. It is concluded that the deployable

  3. The rhombic bilobed flap, a simple, geometrically designed flap

    Yoshiaki Sakamoto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a combination of the common rhomboid flap and bilobed flap and provide an example of its use. The rhombic bilobed flap is simple to use and is associated with fewer complications, such as pin-cushioning and standing cone deformities, while minimizing the risk of skin necrosis and tension on the flap.

  4. Handling Qualities Results of an Initial Geared Flap Tilt Wing Piloted Simulation

    Guerrero, Lourdes M.; Corliss, Lloyd D.

    1991-01-01

    An exploratory simulation study of a novel approach to pitch control for a tilt wing aircraft was conducted in 1990 on the NASA-Ames Vertical Motion Simulator. The purpose of the study was to evaluate and compare the handling qualities of both a conventional and a geared flap tilt wing control configuration. The geared flap is an innovative control concept which has the potential for reducing or eliminating the horizontal pitch control tail rotor or reaction jets required by prior tilt wing designs. The handling qualities results of the geared flap control configuration are presented in this paper and compared to the conventional (programmed flap) tilt wing control configuration. This paper also describes the geared flap concept, the tilt wing aircraft, the simulation model, the simulation facility and experiment setup, and the pilot evaluation tasks and procedures.

  5. A Fuzzy Logic System For Ground Based Structural Health Monitoring of a Helicopter Rotor Using Modal Data

    Ganguli, Ranjan

    2001-01-01

    A fuzzy logic system (FLS) is developed for ground based health monitoring of a helicopter rotor blade. Structural damage is modeled as a loss of stiffness at the damaged location that can result from delamination. Composite materials, which are widely used for fabricating rotor blades, are susceptible to such delaminations from barely visible impact damage. The rotor blade is modeled as an elastic beam undergoing transverse (flap) and inplane (lag) bending, axial and torsion deformations. A ...

  6. Investigation of Vertical Drag and Periodic Airloads Acting on Flat Panels in a Rotor Slipstream

    Makofski, Robert A; Menkick, George F

    1956-01-01

    Tests have been conducted on the Langley helicopter test tower to determine the vertical drag and pressure distributions on flat panels mounted below a helicopter rotor. Calculations of the vertical drag by use of a strip-analysis procedure outlined in the paper and the assumption of a fully contracted wake agreed well with the experimental results over the range from 0.2 to 0.64 rotor radius beneath the plane of zero flapping. The pressure increase caused by the passage of the blade over the panel is a maximum at about the 0.8 radius spanwise station. At this station, the pressure decreases from 10 times the disk loading per blade at 0.05 radius beneath the rotor plane of zero flapping to one-half of the disk loading per blade at 0.64 radius beneath the plane of zero flapping.

  7. Wind energy conversion. Volume VI. Nonlinear response of wind turbine rotor

    Chopra, I.

    1978-09-01

    The nonlinear equations of motor for a rigid rotor restrained by three flexible springs representing, respectively, the flapping, lagging, and feathering motions are derived using Lagrange's equations, for arbitrary angular rotations. These are reduced to a consistent set of nonlinear equations using nonlinear terms up to third order. The complete analysis is divided into three parts, A, B, and C. Part A consists of forced response of two-degree flapping-lagging rotor under the excitation of pure gravitational field (i.e., no aerodynamic forces). In Part B, the effect of aerodynamic forces on the dynamic response of two-degree flapping-lagging rotor is investigated. In Part C, the effect of third degree of motion, feathering, is considered.

  8. Hydrodynamic Effects on Modeling and Control of a High Temperature Active Magnetic Bearing Pump with a Canned Rotor

    Melin, Alexander M [ORNL; Kisner, Roger A [ORNL; Fugate, David L [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Embedding instrumentation and control Embedding instrumentation and control (I\\&C) at the component level in nuclear power plants can improve component performance, lifetime, and resilience by optimizing operation, reducing the constraints on physical design, and providing on-board prognostics and diagnostics. However, the extreme environments that many nuclear power plant components operate in makes embedding instrumentation and control at the component level difficult. Successfully utilizing embedded I\\&C requires developing a deep understanding of the system's dynamics and using that knowledge to overcome material and physical limitations imposed by the environment. In this paper, we will develop a coupled dynamic model of a high temperature (700 $^\\circ$C) canned rotor pump that incorporates rotordynamics, hydrodynamics, and active magnetic bearing dynamics. Then we will compare two control design methods, one that uses a simplified decoupled model of the system and another that utilizes the full coupled system model. It will be seen that utilizing all the available knowledge of the system dynamics in the controller design yield an order of magnitude improvement in the magnitude of the magnetic bearing response to disturbances at the same level of control effort, a large reduction in the settling time of the system, and a smoother control action.

  9. Investigation of Maximum Blade Loading Capability of Lift-Offset Rotors

    Yeo, Hyeonsoo; Johnson, Wayne

    2013-01-01

    Maximum blade loading capability of a coaxial, lift-offset rotor is investigated using a rotorcraft configuration designed in the context of short-haul, medium-size civil and military missions. The aircraft was sized for a 6600-lb payload and a range of 300 nm. The rotor planform and twist were optimized for hover and cruise performance. For the present rotor performance calculations, the collective pitch angle is progressively increased up to and through stall with the shaft angle set to zero. The effects of lift offset on rotor lift, power, controls, and blade airloads and structural loads are examined. The maximum lift capability of the coaxial rotor increases as lift offset increases and extends well beyond the McHugh lift boundary as the lift potential of the advancing blades are fully realized. A parametric study is conducted to examine the differences between the present coaxial rotor and the McHugh rotor in terms of maximum lift capabilities and to identify important design parameters that define the maximum lift capability of the rotor. The effects of lift offset on rotor blade airloads and structural loads are also investigated. Flap bending moment increases substantially as lift offset increases to carry the hub roll moment even at low collective values. The magnitude of flap bending moment is dictated by the lift-offset value (hub roll moment) but is less sensitive to collective and speed.

  10. Flapping of Insectile Wings

    Huang, Yangyang; Kanso, Eva

    2015-11-01

    Insects use flight muscles attached at the base of the wings to produce impressive wing flapping frequencies. Yet the effects of muscle stiffness on the performance of insect wings remain unclear. Here, we construct an insectile wing model, consisting of two rigid wings connected at their base by an elastic torsional spring and submerged in an oscillatory flow. The wing system is free to rotate and flap. We first explore the extent to which the flyer can withstand roll perturbations, then study its flapping behavior and performance as a function of spring stiffness. We find an optimal range of spring stiffness that results in large flapping amplitudes, high force generation and good storage of elastic energy. We conclude by conjecturing that insects may select and adjust the muscle spring stiffness to achieve desired movement. These findings may have significant implications on the design principles of wings in micro air-vehicles.

  11. Rotor noise

    Schmitz, F. H.

    1991-01-01

    The physical characteristics and sources of rotorcraft noise as they exist today are presented. Emphasis is on helicopter-like vehicles, that is, on rotorcraft in nonaxial flight. The mechanisms of rotor noise are reviewed in a simple physical manner for the most dominant sources of rotorcraft noise. With simple models, the characteristic time- and frequency-domain features of these noise sources are presented for idealized cases. Full-scale data on several rotorcraft are then reviewed to allow for the easy identification of the type and extent of the radiating noise. Methods and limitations of using scaled models to test for several noise sources are subsequently presented. Theoretical prediction methods are then discussed and compared with experimental data taken under very controlled conditions. Finally, some promising noise reduction technology is reviewed.

  12. Aeroelastic optimization of an advanced geometry helicopter rotor

    Ganguli, Ranjan; Chopra, Inderjit

    1992-01-01

    Sensitivity derivatives of blade loads and aeroelastic stability of a helicopter rotor in forward flight are calculated as an integral part of a basic aeroelastic analysis using a direct analytical approach. Design variables include nonstructural mass and its placement, chordwise offset of blade center of gravity and aerodynamic center from the elastic axis, blade bending stiffnesses (flap, lag, torsion), and tip geometry (sweep, anhedral, pretwist and planform taper). By means of a sensitivity study, the importance of different design variables on oscillatory hub loads and damping of blade modes is examined. Aeroelastic and sensitivity analyses of the rotor based on a finite element method in space and time are linked with automated optimization algorithms to perform optimization studies of rotor blades. Optimum design solutions, calculated for a four-bladed, soft-inplane hingeless rotor achieved a reduction of 25-60 percent of all 4/rev loads.

  13. Perforator Flaps for Perineal Reconstructions

    Niranjan, Niri S.

    2006-01-01

    Whenever there is soft tissue loss from the perineum there are many options for reconstruction. These include allowing the wound to heal by secondary intention and the use of local random or axial pattern flaps, regional flaps, or free flaps. The axial skin flap can be defined as a flap based on known constant vessels of the subcutaneous tissue and its vena comitantes. The perforator flap on the other hand is a randomly selected perforator consisting of an artery with vena comitantes, which p...

  14. On the use of first order rotor dynamics in multiblade coordinates. [for compound helicopter

    Hohenemser, K. H.; Yin, S. K.

    1974-01-01

    This paper is directed to the question of how to represent most efficiently rotor/body coupling in a linear flight dynamics analysis. Rigid body pitch, roll and vertical motions are considered for the rotor/body coupling studies. Flapping stability limits, eigenvalues, transient responses to control step inputs, to step gusts and to random gusts are determined for a hypothetical hingeless compound helicopter operating up to .8 advance ratio. Data are obtained for the basic helicopter and for the craft with two simple control feedback systems. While complete periodic system modeling is necessary for determining flapping stability limits and vibrations, constant system modeling using first order dynamics in each of the multiblade rotor coordinates was found to be adequate for rotor-craft stability and response computations.

  15. THE EXPERIMENTAL TESTING OF AN ACTIVE MAGNETIC BEARING/ROTOR SYSTEM UNDERGOING BASE EXCITATION

    Clements, Joshua Ryan

    2000-01-01

    Active Magnetic Bearings (AMB) are a relatively recent innovation in bearing technology. Unlike conventional bearings, which rely on mechanical forces originating from fluid films or physical contact to support bearing loads, AMB systems utilize magnetic fields to levitate and support a shaft in an air-gap within the bearing stator. This design has many benefits over conventional bearings. The potential capabilities that AMB systems offer are allowing this new technology to be considered f...

  16. Whirl flutter analysis of a horizontal-axis wind turbine with a two-bladed teetering rotor

    Janetzke, D. C.; Kaza, K. R. V.

    1981-01-01

    Whirl flutter and the effect of pitch-flap coupling on teetering motion of a wind turbine were investigated. The equations of motion are derived for an idealized five-degree-of-freedom mathematical model of a horizontal-axis wind turbine with a two-bladed teetering rotor. The model accounts for the out-of-plane bending motion of each blade, the teetering motion of the rotor, and both the pitching and yawing motions of the rotor support. Results show that the design is free from whirl flutter. Selected results are presented indicating the effect of variations in rotor support damping, rotor support stiffness, and pitch-flap coupling on pitching, yawing, teetering, and blade bending motions.

  17. A VORTEX MODEL OF A HELICOPTER ROTOR

    Valentin BUTOESCU

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A vortex model of a helicopter rotor is presented. Each blade of the rotor has three degrees of freedom: flapping, lagging and feathering. The motions after each degree of freedom are also known for all blades. The blade is modelled as a thin vortex surface. The wakes are free fluid surfaces. A system of five equations are obtained: the first one is the integral equation of the lifting surface (rotor, the next three describe the wakes motion, and the last one relates the vortex strength on the wakes and the variation of vorticity on the rotor. A numerical solution of this system is presented. To avoid the singularities that can occur due to the complexity of vortex system, a desingularized model of the vortex core was adopted. A Mathcad worksheet containing the method has been written.The original contribution of the work. The calculation method of the motion of the wakes free vortex system, the development of the vortex cores in time and a new method to approximate the aerodynamic influence of remoted wake regions.

  18. Elbow Reconstruction Using Island Flap for Burn Patients

    Gi Yeun Hur

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Deep burns of the elbow lead to soft tissue necrosis and infection, with exposureof deep structures. Adequate wound coverage of this area requires thin, pliable, and durabletissue, while optimal functional recovery requires early coverage and functional rehabilitation.We have found 3 types of island flaps that provide reliable coverage for the elbow.Methods A retrospective study was performed on all patients who underwent flap coverageof an elbow defect at our hospital. The patients’ data including age, sex, cause of injury, wounddimensions, timing of flap coverage, postoperative elbow motion, and complications wereinvestigated.Results Between 2001 and 2012, 16 patients were treated at our hospital. The mean agewas 53.3 years. Three kinds of flaps were performed: 9 latissimus dorsi flaps, 4 lateral armflaps, and 4 radial forearm flaps. The average defect size was 183.5 cm2 (range, 28 to 670cm2. Wound coverage was performed at mean duration of 45.9 days (range, 14 to 91 days.The mean postoperative active elbow flexion was 98° (range, 85° to 115°. Partial flap failureoccurred in 1 latissimus dorsi flap. Minor complications included partial flap loss (11.8%,hematoma (23.5%, seroma (35.3%, and wound infection (5.9%.Conclusions Flap selection for elbow reconstruction is determined by the defect size andthe extent of the adjacent tissue injury. Elbow reconstruction using an island flap is a singlestaged,reliable, and relatively simple procedure that permits initiation of early rehabilitation,thereby improving a patient’s functional outcome.

  19. Source localization for active control of turbofan rotor-stator broadband noise

    Walker, Bruce E.

    2005-09-01

    In order to identify a reference signal source for an active noise cancellation system, cross-correlation techniques were used to localize broadband noise source regions on exit guide vanes of the NASA Glenn Research Center Advance Noise Control Fan (ANCF). Arrays of surface pressure sensors were imbedded in one guide vane and in the wall of the fan. Synchronous sampling was used with a multichannel data acquisition system to allow removal of periodic components from the signals. The signals were then cross-correlated to assess radiation directivity and the relationship between vane surface pressure and in-duct acoustic noise. The results of these measurements indicated that broadband unsteady pressures near the leading edge tip of the guide vane were well enough correlated with acoustic radiation that 2-3 dB active noise cancellation could be achieved using a simple gain-delay control algorithm and actuator array. After successful simulation in a wind tunnel environment the concept was incorporated on 15 guide vanes and tested in ANCF. Cross-correlation measurements were further used to evaluate system performance and to identify competing noises from rotating and stationary sources within the fan.

  20. The Evolution of Perforator Flaps

    Khan, Farah N.; Spiegel, Aldona J.

    2006-01-01

    Perforator flaps have recently become ubiquitous in the field of plastic surgery. To understand and appreciate their unique nature, it is necessary to compare and contrast them with the development of other types of flaps. A complete yet abridged version of the history of flap surgery is presented in this article. Beginning with Sushruta's Indian cheek flap method for nasal reconstruction, a trip through time and space is taken to highlight the milestones leading to the evolution of the perfo...

  1. Analysis and control of the transient aeroelastic response of rotors during shipboard engagement and disengagement operations

    Keller, Jonathan Allen

    2001-11-01

    An analysis has been developed to predict the transient aeroelastic response of a helicopter rotor system during shipboard engagement and disengagement operations. The coupled flap-lag-torsion equations of motion were developed using Hamilton's Principle and discretized spatially using the finite element method. Aerodynamics were simulated using nonlinear quasi-steady or time domain nonlinear unsteady models. The ship airwake environment was simulated with simple deterministic airwake distributions, results from experimental measurements or numerical predictions. The transient aeroelastic response of the rotor blades was then time-integrated along a specified rotor speed profile. The control of the rotor response for an analytic model of the H-46 Sea Knight rotor system was investigated with three different passive control techniques. Collective pitch scheduling was only successful in reducing the blade flapping response in a few isolated cases. In the majority of cases, the blade transient response was increased. The use of a discrete flap damper in the very low rotor speed region was also investigated. Only by raising the flap stop setting and using a flap damper four times the strength of the lag damper could the downward flap deflections be reduced. However, because the flap stop setting was raised the upward flap deflections were often increased. The use of extendable/retractable, gated leading-edge spoilers in the low rotor speed region was also investigated. Spoilers covering the outer 15% R of the rotor blade were shown to significantly reduce both the upward and downward flap response without increasing rotor torque. Previous aeroelastic analyses developed at the University of Southampton and at Penn State University were completed with flap-torsion degrees of freedom only. The addition of the lag degree of freedom was shown to significantly influence the blade response. A comparison of the two aerodynamic models showed that the nonlinear quasi

  2. Mechanisms of Active Aerodynamic Load Reduction on a Rotorcraft Fuselage With Rotor Effects

    Schaeffler, Norman W.; Allan, Brian G.; Jenkins, Luther N.; Yao, Chung-Sheng; Bartram, Scott M.; Mace, W. Derry; Wong, Oliver D.; Tanner, Philip E.

    2016-01-01

    The reduction of the aerodynamic load that acts on a generic rotorcraft fuselage by the application of active flow control was investigated in a wind tunnel test conducted on an approximately 1/3-scale powered rotorcraft model simulating forward flight. The aerodynamic mechanisms that make these reductions, in both the drag and the download, possible were examined in detail through the use of the measured surface pressure distribution on the fuselage, velocity field measurements made in the wake directly behind the ramp of the fuselage and computational simulations. The fuselage tested was the ROBIN-mod7, which was equipped with a series of eight slots located on the ramp section through which flow control excitation was introduced. These slots were arranged in a U-shaped pattern located slightly downstream of the baseline separation line and parallel to it. The flow control excitation took the form of either synthetic jets, also known as zero-net-mass-flux blowing, and steady blowing. The same set of slots were used for both types of excitation. The differences between the two excitation types and between flow control excitation from different combinations of slots were examined. The flow control is shown to alter the size of the wake and its trajectory relative to the ramp and the tailboom and it is these changes to the wake that result in a reduction in the aerodynamic load.

  3. Vibration active control of tilting pad journal bearing rotor system based on the active lubrication%基于主动润滑可倾瓦轴承转子系统的振动主动控制

    刘宏; 宫晓春; 王晋麟

    2011-01-01

    研究一类可倾瓦支承的单盘非对称转子系统的振动主动控制问题.首先建立了系统的非线性动力学方程,针对主动润滑控制系统设计了BP神经网络PID控制器对转子系统进行振动主动控制.通过计算分析可知,采用基于BP-PID的主动润滑系统能够很好的抑制系统的振幅,使系统在很高的转速时才发生油膜失稳,拓宽转子系统稳定运转的转速范围,在转子系统发生油膜失稳时系统的振幅也能够得到极大程度的控制.%The vibration active control of an unsymmetrical rotor supported by two tilting pad journal bearings is investigated in this paper. Firstly, the nonlinear governing equation of the rotor system is formulated. Then the BP neural network PID controller is designed with regard to the active lubricated control system is applied to suppress the vibration of the concerning rotor system. After calculation and analysis the persuasive results are obtained. The vibration amplitude of the rotor system is greatly reduced by means of the active lubricated control system through the BP neural network PID controller. The whip instability of the controlled system occurs at a very high rotational speed and the stable operation range is greatly broadened. The vibration amplitude can be significantly suppressed by the active lubricated control system when the rotor runs up against the whip instability.

  4. Blood Pump Having a Magnetically Suspended Rotor

    Antaki, James F. (Inventor); Paden, Bradley (Inventor); Burgreen, Gregory (Inventor); Groom, Nelson J. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A blood pump preferably has a magnetically suspended rotor that rotates within a housing. The rotor may rotate about a stator disposed within the housing. Radial magnetic bearings may be defined within the stator and the rotor in order to suspend the rotor. The radial magnetic bearings may be passive magnetic bearings that include permanent magnets disposed within the stator and the rotor or active magnetic bearings. The pump may further include an axial magnetic bearing that may be either a passive or an active magnetic bearing. A motor that drives the rotor may be disposed within the housing in order to more easily dissipate heat generated by the motor. A primary flow path is defined between the rotor and the stator, and a secondary flow path is defined between the stator and the rotor. Preferably, a substantial majority of blood passes through the primary flow path. The secondary flow path is large enough so that it provides adequate flushing of the secondary flow path while being small enough to permit efficient operation of the radial magnet bearings across the secondary flow path.

  5. Cross-leg flap: Its role in limb salvage

    Agarwal Pawan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pedicled cross-extremity flaps for lower limb wound coverage have been replaced by free tissue transfer in the last two decades. However, there are certain difficult situations where the free flap cannot be employed and alternative methods are needed. We describe our experience with cross-leg flap in 18 patients for the reconstruction of difficult leg defects in which no suitable recipient vessels were available for microvascular anastomosis in the vicinity of the defect. Materials and Methods: 18 patients (17 men and 1 woman with mean range 31.5 yrs(range 18-70 yrs grade III B tibial fractures were included in the study. fasciocuteneous cross leg flap was employed and extremities were immobilized by external Fixator. Results: Fifteen flaps were completely available with two had marginal necrosis and one supsficial epidermal necrosis.No complications were related to the donor site, flap, or by immobilization are noted. Each patient resumed essentially normal gait and activity without any stiffness of joints related with the flap or external fixator. Conclusion: The addition of external fixator stabilization aids greatly in wound care, as well as for general ease of the patient mobility and positioning. Cross-leg flap offers the possibility of salvaging limbs that are otherwise nonreconstructable.

  6. Influence of Back-Up Bearings and Support Structure Dynamics on the Behavior of Rotors With Active Supports

    Flowers, George T.

    1996-01-01

    This report presents a synopsis of the research work. Specific accomplishments are itemized below: (1) Experimental facilities have been developed. This includes a magnetic bearing test rig and an auxiliary bearing test rig. In addition, components have been designed, constructed, and tested for use with a rotordynamics test rig located at NASA Lewis Research Center. (2) A study of the rotordynamics of an auxiliary bearing supported T-501 engine model was performed. (3) An experimental/simulation study of auxiliary bearing rotordynamics has been performed. (4) A rotordynamical model for a magnetic bearing supported rotor system, including auxiliary bearing effects has been developed and simulation studies performed.(5) A finite element model for a foil bearing has been developed and studies of a rotor supported by foil bearings have been performed. (6) Two students affiliated with this project have graduated with M.S. degrees.

  7. Molecular Rotors as Switches

    Kang L. Wang

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The use of a functional molecular unit acting as a state variable provides an attractive alternative for the next generations of nanoscale electronics. It may help overcome the limits of conventional MOSFETd due to their potential scalability, low-cost, low variability, and highly integratable characteristics as well as the capability to exploit bottom-up self-assembly processes. This bottom-up construction and the operation of nanoscale machines/devices, in which the molecular motion can be controlled to perform functions, have been studied for their functionalities. Being triggered by external stimuli such as light, electricity or chemical reagents, these devices have shown various functions including those of diodes, rectifiers, memories, resonant tunnel junctions and single settable molecular switches that can be electronically configured for logic gates. Molecule-specific electronic switching has also been reported for several of these device structures, including nanopores containing oligo(phenylene ethynylene monolayers, and planar junctions incorporating rotaxane and catenane monolayers for the construction and operation of complex molecular machines. A specific electrically driven surface mounted molecular rotor is described in detail in this review. The rotor is comprised of a monolayer of redox-active ligated copper compounds sandwiched between a gold electrode and a highly-doped P+ Si. This electrically driven sandwich-type monolayer molecular rotor device showed an on/off ratio of approximately 104, a read window of about 2.5 V, and a retention time of greater than 104 s. The rotation speed of this type of molecular rotor has been reported to be in the picosecond timescale, which provides a potential of high switching speed applications. Current-voltage spectroscopy (I-V revealed a temperature-dependent negative differential resistance (NDR associated with the device. The analysis of the device

  8. Variability of extreme flap loads during turbine operation

    Ronold, K.O. [Det Norske Veritas, Hoevik (Norway); Larsen, G.C. [Risoe National Lab., Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Dept., Roskilde (Denmark)

    1999-03-01

    The variability of extreme flap loads is of utmost importance for design of wind-turbine rotor blades. The flap loads of interest consist of the flap-wise bendin moment response at the blade root whose variability in the short-term, for a given wind climate, can be represented by a stationary process. A model for the short-term bending moment process is presented, and the distribution of its associated maxima is derived. A model for the wind climate is given in terms of the probability distributions for the 10-minute mean wind speed and the standard deviation of the arbitrary wind speed. This is used to establish the distribution of the largest flap-wise bending moment in a specific reference period, and it is outlined how a characteristic bending moment for use in design can be extracted from this distribution. The application of the presented distribution models is demonstrated by a numerical example for a site-specific wind turbine. (au)

  9. Dynamic Analysis of a Helicopter Rotor by Dymore Program

    Doğan, Vedat; Kırca, Mesut

    The dynamic behavior of hingeless and bearingless blades of a light commercial helicopter which has been under design process at ITU (İstanbul Technical University, Rotorcraft Research and Development Centre) is investigated. Since the helicopter rotor consists of several parts connected to each other by joints and hinges; rotors in general can be considered as an assembly of the rigid and elastic parts. Dynamics of rotor system in rotation is complicated due to coupling of elastic forces (bending, torsion and tension), inertial forces, control and aerodynamic forces on the rotor blades. In this study, the dynamic behavior of the rotor for a real helicopter design project is analyzed by using DYMORE. Blades are modeled as elastic beams, hub as a rigid body, torque tubes as rigid bodies, control links as rigid bodies plus springs and several joints. Geometric and material cross-sectional properties of blades (Stiffness-Matrix and Mass-Matrix) are calculated by using VABS programs on a CATIA model. Natural frequencies and natural modes of the rotating (and non-rotating) blades are obtained by using DYMORE. Fan-Plots which show the variation of the natural frequencies for different modes (Lead-Lag, Flapping, Feathering, etc.) vs. rotor RPM are presented.

  10. Papilla Preservation Flap as Aesthetic Consideration in Periodontal Flap Surgery

    Sandra Olivia; Natalina Natalina; Felix Hartono

    2013-01-01

    Flap surgery is treatment for periodontal disease with alveolar bone destruction. Surgical periodontal flap with conventional incision will result in gingival recession and loss of interdental papillae after treatment. Dilemma arises in areas required high aesthetic value or regions with a fixed denture. It is challenging to perform periodontal flap with good aesthetic results and minimal gingival recession. This case report aimed to inform and to explain the work procedures, clinical and rad...

  11. Heart rate and estimated energy expenditure of flapping and gliding in black-browed albatrosses.

    Sakamoto, Kentaro Q; Takahashi, Akinori; Iwata, Takashi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Yamamoto, Maki; Trathan, Philip N

    2013-08-15

    Albatrosses are known to expend only a small amount of energy during flight. The low energy cost of albatross flight has been attributed to energy-efficient gliding (soaring) with sporadic flapping, although little is known about how much time and energy albatrosses expend in flapping versus gliding during cruising flight. Here, we examined the heart rates (used as an instantaneous index of energy expenditure) and flapping activities of free-ranging black-browed albatrosses (Thalassarche melanophrys) to estimate the energy cost of flapping as well as time spent in flapping activities. The heart rate of albatrosses during flight (144 beats min(-1)) was similar to that while sitting on the water (150 beats min(-1)). In contrast, heart rate was much higher during takeoff and landing (ca. 200 beats min(-1)). Heart rate during cruising flight was linearly correlated with the number of wing flaps per minute, suggesting an extra energy burden of flapping. Albatrosses spend only 4.6±1.4% of their time flapping during cruising flight, which was significantly lower than during and shortly after takeoff (9.8±3.5%). Flapping activity, which amounted to just 4.6% of the time in flight, accounted for 13.3% of the total energy expenditure during cruising flight. These results support the idea that albatrosses achieve energy-efficient flight by reducing the time spent in flapping activity, which is associated with high energy expenditure. PMID:23661772

  12. Integrated design of smart rotor and robust control system

    Sahasrabudhe, Vineet; Chen, Peter C.; Thompson, Peter M.; Aponso, Bimal L.

    1998-07-01

    Vibration and noise are two long-standing problems that have limited the expansion of military and commercial applications of rotorcraft. The source of these interrelated phenomena is the main rotor, which operates in an unsteady and complex aerodynamic environment. The trailing edge flap concept for smart blade control has been investigated by several researchers for possible use in noise and vibration reduction, and shows promise. The flaps are actuated using piezo-stack, bimorph or magnetostrictive actuators. It is however still unclear if there is a single actuation mechanism that addresses both noise and vibration reduction, while still having enough control authority available to act as an extra control effector in its own right. The uncertainty about the actuation mechanism, about the precise amount of flap deflection available, and about the accuracy of current constitutive models of the actuators lead to significant difficulties in analyzing the potential of the concept for helicopter applications. In this study we propose and execute an innovative approach to the above problem that consists of modeling the smart actuation mechanism using a simple low order linear model that matches test data (with an associated variation or uncertainty). We use this model in association with a helicopter flight dynamic model for carrying out an optimization of flap sizing and placement for minimum fixed frame vibration. Finally, we use the model to carry out an analysis of the effectiveness of the flap in reducing inter-axis coupling, and as a redundant control effector in case of primary actuator failure.

  13. A Study of Active Rotor-Blade Vibration Control using Electro-Magnetic Actuation - Part I: Theory

    Christensen, Rene Hardam; Santos, Ilmar

    2004-01-01

    actuators fixed directly in the blades. However, due to the impracticability and problems by fixing actuators in the rotating blades, it is for practical application of great interest to study whether the vibrations can be controlled using shaft-based actuators, i.e. electro-magnetic bearings. In this...... framework, the present paper gives a theoretical contribution into the controllability and observability analysis of rotor-blade systems with the aim of investigating this field. The analysis is based on time-variant modal analysis, due to the time-periodic dynamical characteristics of this kind of system...

  14. Transonic airfoil design for helicopter rotor applications

    Hassan, Ahmed A.; Jackson, B.

    1989-01-01

    Despite the fact that the flow over a rotor blade is strongly influenced by locally three-dimensional and unsteady effects, practical experience has always demonstrated that substantial improvements in the aerodynamic performance can be gained by improving the steady two-dimensional charateristics of the airfoil(s) employed. The two phenomena known to have great impact on the overall rotor performance are: (1) retreating blade stall with the associated large pressure drag, and (2) compressibility effects on the advancing blade leading to shock formation and the associated wave drag and boundary-layer separation losses. It was concluded that: optimization routines are a powerful tool for finding solutions to multiple design point problems; the optimization process must be guided by the judicious choice of geometric and aerodynamic constraints; optimization routines should be appropriately coupled to viscous, not inviscid, transonic flow solvers; hybrid design procedures in conjunction with optimization routines represent the most efficient approach for rotor airfroil design; unsteady effects resulting in the delay of lift and moment stall should be modeled using simple empirical relations; and inflight optimization of aerodynamic loads (e.g., use of variable rate blowing, flaps, etc.) can satisfy any number of requirements at design and off-design conditions.

  15. Flag flapping in a channel

    Alben, Silas; Shoele, Kourosh; Mittal, Rajat; Jha, Sourabh; Glezer, Ari

    2015-11-01

    We study the flapping of a flag in an inviscid channel flow. We focus especially on how quantities vary with channel spacing. As the channel walls move inwards towards the flag, heavier flags become more unstable, while light flags' stability is less affected. We use a vortex sheet model to compute large-amplitude flapping, and find that the flag undergoes a series of jumps to higher flapping modes as the channel walls are moved towards the flag. Meanwhile, the drag on the flag and the energy lost to the wake first rise as the walls become closer, then drop sharply as the flag moves to a higher flapping mode.

  16. Keystone flaps in coloured skin: Flap technology for the masses?

    Satish P Bhat

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Viscoelastic properties of skin in coloured ethnic groups are less favourable compared to Caucasians for executing Keystone flaps. Keystone flaps have so far been evaluated and reported only in Caucasians. The potential of Keystone flaps in a coloured ethnic group is yet unknown. Aim: This article reviews the experience to reconstruct skin defects presenting in a coloured ethnic group, by using Keystone flaps, with a review of existing literature. Design: Uncontrolled case series. Materials and Methods: This retrospective review involves 55 consecutive Keystone flaps used from 2009 to 2012, for skin defects in various locations. Patient demographic data, medical history, co-morbidity, surgical indication, defect features, complications, and clinical outcomes are evaluated and presented. Results: In this population group with Fitzpatrick type 4 and 5 skin, the average patient age was 35.73. Though 60% of flaps (33/55 in the series involved specific risk factors, only two flaps failed. Though seven flaps had complications, sound healing was achieved by suitable intervention giving a success rate of 96.36%. Skin grafts were needed in only four cases. Conclusions: Keystone flaps achieve primary wound healing for a wide spectrum of defects with an acceptable success rate in a coloured skin population with unfavorable biophysical properties. By avoiding conventional local flaps and at times even microsurgical flaps, good aesthetic outcome is achieved without additional skin grafts or extensive operative time. All advantages seen in previous studies were verified. These benefits can be most appreciated in coloured populations, with limited resources and higher proportion of younger patients and unfavorable defects.

  17. Genetics Home Reference: Rotor syndrome

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Rotor syndrome Rotor syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Print All Open All Close All Description Rotor syndrome is a relatively mild condition characterized by ...

  18. Stability and control issues associated with lightly loaded rotors autorotating in high advance ratio flight

    Rigsby, James Michael

    Interest in high speed rotorcraft has directed attention toward the slowed-rotor, high advance ratio compound autogyro concept as evidenced by the current DARPA Heliplane project. The behavior of partially unloaded rotors, autorotating at high advance ratio is not well understood and numerous technical issues must be resolved before the vehicle can be realized. Autorotation in helicopters usually indicates an emergency loss of power. For the concept vehicle autorotation is the normal working state of the rotor. The necessity for a reduction in rotor speed with increasing flight speed results in high advance ratio operation where the retreating side of the rotor is dominated by the reverse flow region. Further, rotor speed changes also affect the rotor dynamics and the associated hub moments generated by cyclic flapping. The result is rotor characteristics that vary widely depending on advance ratio. In the present work, rotor behavior is characterized in terms of issues relevant to the control system conceptual design and the rotor impact on the intrinsic vehicle flight dynamics characteristics. A series of trim, stability, and control analyses, based on features inherent in the concept vehicle, are performed. Trends are identified through parametric variation of rotor operating conditions, augmented by inclusion of the sensitivities to blade mass and blade stiffness properties. In this research, non-linear models, including the rotor speed degree of freedom, were created and analyzed with FLIGHTLAB(TM) rotorcraft modeling software. Performance analysis for rotors trimmed to autorotate with zero average hub pitching and rolling moments indicates reduced rotor thrust is achieved primarily through rotor speed reduction at lower shaft incidence angle, and imposing hub moment trim constraints results in a thrust increment sign reversal with collective pitch angle above advance ratio mu ˜ 1.0. Swashplate control perturbations from trim indicate an increase in control

  19. A Miniature Controllable Flapping Wing Robot

    Arabagi, Veaceslav Gheorghe

    The agility and miniature size of nature's flapping wing fliers has long baffled researchers, inspiring biological studies, aerodynamic simulations, and attempts to engineer their robotic replicas. Flapping wing flight is characterized by complex reciprocating wing kinematics, transient aerodynamic effects, and very small body lengths. These characteristics render robotic flapping wing aerial vehicles ideal for surveillance and defense applications, search and rescue missions, and environment monitoring, where their ability to hover and high maneuverability is immensely beneficial. One of the many difficulties in creating flapping wing based miniature robotic aerial vehicles lies in generating a proper wing trajectory that would result in sufficient lift forces for hovering and maneuvering. Since design of a flapping wing system is a balance between overall weight and the number of actuated inputs, we take the approach of having minimal controlled inputs, allowing passive behavior wherever possible. Hence, we propose a completely passive wing pitch reversal design that relies on wing inertial dynamics, an elastic energy storage mechanism, and low Reynolds number aerodynamic effects. Theoretical models, compiling previous research on piezoelectric actuators, four-bar transmissions, and aerodynamics effects, are developed and used as basis for a complete numerical simulation. Limitations of the model are discussed in comparison to experimental results obtained from a working prototype of the proposed passive pitch reversal flapping wing mechanism. Given that the mechanism is under-actuated, methods to control lift force generation by actively varying system parameters are proposed, discussed, and tested experimentally. A dual wing aerial platform is developed based on the passive pitch reversal wing concept. Design considerations are presented, favoring controllability and structural rigidity of the final platform. Finite element analysis and experimental

  20. Research on measurement and control of helicopter rotor response using blade-mounted accelerometers 1991-92

    Ham, Norman D.; Mckillip, Robert M., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Preliminary wind tunnel tests of the hill-size Model 412/IBC rotor at the Ames Research Center, NASA, are described. Blade flapping motion was excited by swash plate oscillation, and the flapping response was measured using blade-mounted accelerometers and compared with flapping motion inferred form blade strain measurements. The recorded open-loop accelerometer signals were used as input to the flapping-IBC system in the laboratory. The resulting controller cyclic pitch outputs are compared with the original cyclic pitch excitation inputs, and the potential effectiveness of the controller in suppressing the original excitation is evaluated. Control of blade flapping excites blade lagging, and vice versa; the paper describes a theoretical investigation of these coupling effects.

  1. Flexible rotor dynamics analysis

    Shen, F. A.

    1973-01-01

    A digital computer program was developed to analyze the general nonaxisymmetric and nonsynchronous transient and steady-state rotor dynamic performance of a bending- and shear-wise flexible rotor-bearing system under various operating conditions. The effects of rotor material mechanical hysteresis, rotor torsion flexibility, transverse effects of rotor axial and torsional loading and the anisotropic, in-phase and out-of-phase bearing stiffness and damping force and moment coefficients were included in the program to broaden its capability. An optimum solution method was found and incorporated in the computer program. Computer simulation of experimental data was made and qualitative agreements observed. The mathematical formulations, computer program verification, test data simulation, and user instruction was presented and discussed.

  2. Active Control of Flow Separation on a High-Lift System with Slotted Flap at High Reynolds Number

    Khodadoust, Abdollah; Washburn, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    The NASA Energy Efficient Transport (EET) airfoil was tested at NASA Langley's Low- Turbulence Pressure Tunnel (LTPT) to assess the effectiveness of distributed Active Flow Control (AFC) concepts on a high-lift system at flight scale Reynolds numbers for a medium-sized transport. The test results indicate presence of strong Reynolds number effects on the high-lift system with the AFC operational, implying the importance of flight-scale testing for implementation of such systems during design of future flight vehicles with AFC. This paper describes the wind tunnel test results obtained at the LTPT for the EET high-lift system for various AFC concepts examined on this airfoil.

  3. A bistable mechanism for chord extension morphing rotors

    Johnson, Terrence; Frecker, Mary; Gandhi, Farhan

    2009-03-01

    Research efforts have shown that helicopter rotor blade morphing is an effective means to improve flight performance. Previous example of rotor blade morphing include using smart-materials for trailing deflection and rotor blade twist and tip twist, the development of a comfortable airfoil using compliant mechanisms, the use of a Gurney flap for air-flow deflection and centrifugal force actuated device to increase the span of the blade. In this paper we explore the use of a bistable mechanism for rotor morphing, specifically, blade chord extension using a bistable arc. Increasing the chord of the rotor blade is expected to generate more lift-load and improve helicopter performance. Bistable or "snap through" mechanisms have multiple stable equilibrium states and are a novel way to achieve large actuation output stroke. Bistable mechanisms do not require energy input to maintain a stable equilibrium state as both states do not require locking. In this work, we introduce a methodology for the design of bistable arcs for chord morphing using the finite element analysis and pseudo-rigid body model, to study the effect of different arc types, applied loads and rigidity on arc performance.

  4. Effect of AFT Rotor on the Inter-Rotor Flow of an Open Rotor Propulsion System

    Slaboch, Paul E.; Stephens, David B.; Van Zante, Dale E.

    2016-01-01

    The effects of the aft rotor on the inter-rotor flow field of an open rotor propulsion rig were examined. A Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) dataset that was acquired phase locked to the front rotor position has been phase averaged based on the relative phase angle between the forward and aft rotors. The aft rotor phase was determined by feature tracking in raw PIV images through an image processing algorithm. The effect of the aft rotor potential field on the inter-rotor flow were analyzed and shown to be in good agreement with Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations. It was shown that the aft rotor had no substantial effect on the position of the forward rotor tip vortex but did have a small effect on the circulation strength of the vortex when the rotors were highly loaded.

  5. Synchronization and Collective Dynamics in a Carpet of Microfluidic Rotors

    Uchida, Nariya; Golestanian, Ramin

    2009-01-01

    We study synchronization of an array of rotors on a substrate that are coupled by hydrodynamic interaction. The rotors that are modeled by an effective rigid body, are driven by an internal torque and exerts an active force on the surrounding fluid. The long-ranged nature of the hydrodynamic interaction between the rotors causes a rich pattern of dynamical behaviors including phase ordering and turbulent spiral waves. The model provides a novel example of coupled oscillators with long-range i...

  6. Bursting calcium rotors in cultured cardiac myocyte monolayers

    Bub, Gil; Glass, Leon; Publicover, Nelson G.; Shrier, Alvin

    1998-01-01

    Rotating waves (rotors) of cellular activity were observed in nonconfluent cultures of embryonic chick heart cells by using a macroscopic imaging system that detected fluorescence from intracellular Ca2+. Unlike previous observations of rotors or spiral waves in other systems, the rotors did not persist but exhibited a repetitive pattern of spontaneous onset and offset leading to a bursting rhythm. Similar dynamics were observed in a cellular automaton model of excitable media that incorporat...

  7. A study on double flap of Wells turbine for wave power conversion

    A numerical investigation was performed to determine the effect of airfoil on the optimum flap height using NACA 0021 wells turbine. The five double flaps which have 0.5% chord height difference were selected. A Navier-Stokes code, FLUENT, was used to calculate the flow field of the Wells turbine. The basic feature of the Wells turbine is that even though the cyclic airflow produces oscillating axial forces on the airfoil blades, the tangential force on the rotor is always in the same direction. Geometry used to define the 3-D numerical grid is based upon that of an experimental test rig. This paper tries to analyze the optimum double flap of Wells turbine with the numerical analysis

  8. Helicopter Rotor Antenna

    Pogorzelski, Ronald J.; Cable, Vaughn P.

    2001-01-01

    This effort was directed toward demonstration of the efficacy of a concept for mitigation of the rotor blade modulation problem in helicopter communications. An antenna is envisioned with radiating elements mounted on the rotor and rotating with it. The rf signals are coupled to the radio stationary with respect to the airframe via a coupler of unique design. The coupler has an rf cavity within which a mode is established and the field distribution of this mode is sampled by probes rotating with the radiating elements. In this manner the radiated pattern is "despun" with respect to the rotor. Theoretical analysis has indicated that this arrangement will be less susceptible to rotor blade modulation that would be a conventional fixed mounted antenna. A small coupler operating at S-band was designed, fabricated, and mounted on a mockup representative of a helicopter body. A small electric motor was installed to rotate the rotor portion of the coupler along with a set of radiating elements during testing. This test article was be evaluated using the JPL Mesa Antenna Measurement Facility to establish its ability to mitigate rotor blade modulation. It was found that indeed such a coupler will result in a despun pattern and that such a pattern can be effective in mitigation of rotor blade modulation.

  9. Open Rotor Aeroacoustic Modeling

    Envia, Edmane

    2012-01-01

    Owing to their inherent fuel efficiency, there is renewed interest in developing open rotor propulsion systems that are both efficient and quiet. The major contributor to the overall noise of an open rotor system is the propulsor noise, which is produced as a result of the interaction of the airstream with the counter-rotating blades. As such, robust aeroacoustic prediction methods are an essential ingredient in any approach to designing low-noise open rotor systems. To that end, an effort has been underway at NASA to assess current open rotor noise prediction tools and develop new capabilities. Under this effort, high-fidelity aerodynamic simulations of a benchmark open rotor blade set were carried out and used to make noise predictions via existing NASA open rotor noise prediction codes. The results have been compared with the aerodynamic and acoustic data that were acquired for this benchmark open rotor blade set. The emphasis of this paper is on providing a summary of recent results from a NASA Glenn effort to validate an in-house open noise prediction code called LINPROP which is based on a high-blade-count asymptotic approximation to the Ffowcs-Williams Hawkings Equation. The results suggest that while predicting the absolute levels may be difficult, the noise trends are reasonably well predicted by this approach.

  10. Open Rotor Aeroacoustic Modelling

    Envia, Edmane

    2012-01-01

    Owing to their inherent fuel efficiency, there is renewed interest in developing open rotor propulsion systems that are both efficient and quiet. The major contributor to the overall noise of an open rotor system is the propulsor noise, which is produced as a result of the interaction of the airstream with the counter-rotating blades. As such, robust aeroacoustic prediction methods are an essential ingredient in any approach to designing low-noise open rotor systems. To that end, an effort has been underway at NASA to assess current open rotor noise prediction tools and develop new capabilities. Under this effort, high-fidelity aerodynamic simulations of a benchmark open rotor blade set were carried out and used to make noise predictions via existing NASA open rotor noise prediction codes. The results have been compared with the aerodynamic and acoustic data that were acquired for this benchmark open rotor blade set. The emphasis of this paper is on providing a summary of recent results from a NASA Glenn effort to validate an in-house open noise prediction code called LINPROP which is based on a high-blade-count asymptotic approximation to the Ffowcs-Williams Hawkings Equation. The results suggest that while predicting the absolute levels may be difficult, the noise trends are reasonably well predicted by this approach.

  11. Flap Conformations in HIV-1 Protease are Altered by Mutations

    Fanucci, Gail; Blackburn, Mandy; Veloro, Angelo; Galiano, Luis; Fangu, Ding; Simmerling, Carlos

    2009-03-01

    HIV-1 protease (PR) is an enzyme that is a major drug target in the treatment of AIDS. Although the structure and function of HIV-1 PR have been studied for over 20 years, questions remain regarding the conformations and dynamics of the β-hairpin turns (flaps) that cover the active site cavity. Distance measurements with pulsed EPR spectroscopy of spin labeled constructs of HIV-1 PR have been used to characterize the flap conformations in the apo and inhibitor bound states. From the most probably distances and the breadth of the distance distribution profiles from analysis of the EPR data, insights regarding the flap conformations and flexibility are gained. The EPR results clearly show how drug pressure selected mutations alter the average conformation of the flaps and the degree of opening of the flaps. Molecular dynamics simulations successfully regenerate the experimentally determined distance distribution profiles, and more importantly, provide structural models for full interpretation of the EPR results. By combining experiment and theory to understand the role that altered flap flexibility/conformations play in the mechanism of drug resistance, key insights are gained toward the rational development of new inhibitors of this important enzyme.

  12. How far is smart rotor research and what steps need to be taken to build a full-scale prototype?

    Bernhammer, L.O.; Van Kuik, G.A.M.; De Breuker, R.

    2014-01-01

    During the last decade research on the field of smart rotor has advanced significantly. Fundamental aerodynamics, structural and control concepts have been established and simulators created for distributed flaps on wind turbine blades, which are considered the most promising option. Also a proof of

  13. Flap Edge Noise Reduction Fins

    Khorrami, Mehdi R. (Inventor); Choudhan, Meelan M. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A flap of the type that is movably connected to an aircraft wing to provide control of an aircraft in flight includes opposite ends, wherein at least a first opposite end includes a plurality of substantially rigid, laterally extending protrusions that are spaced apart to form a plurality of fluidly interconnected passageways. The passageways have openings adjacent to upper and lower sides of the flap, and the passageways include a plurality of bends such that high pressure fluid flows from a high pressure region to a low pressure region to provide a boundary condition that inhibits noise resulting from airflow around the end of the flap.

  14. Helicopter rotor dynamics and aeroelasticity - Some key ideas and insights

    Friedmann, Peretz P.

    1990-01-01

    Four important current topics in helicopter rotor dynamics and aeroelasticity are discussed: (1) the role of geometric nonlinearities in rotary-wing aeroelasticity; (2) structural modeling, free vibration, and aeroelastic analysis of composite rotor blades; (3) modeling of coupled rotor/fuselage areomechanical problems and their active control; and (4) use of higher-harmonic control for vibration reduction in helicopter rotors in forward flight. The discussion attempts to provide an improved fundamental understanding of the current state of the art. In this way, future research can be focused on problems which remain to be solved instead of producing marginal improvements on problems which are already understood.

  15. Rotor-state feedback in the design of flight control laws for a hovering helicopter

    Takahashi, Marc D.

    1994-01-01

    The use of rigid-body and rotor-state feedback gains in the design of helicopter flight control laws was investigated analytically on a blade element, articulated rotor, helicopter model. The study was conducted while designing a control law to meet an existing military rotorcraft handling qualities design specification (ADS-33C) in low-speed flight. A systematic approach to meet this specification was developed along with an assessment of the function of these gains in the feedback loops. Using the results of this assessment, the pitch and roll crossover behavior was easily modified by adjusting the body attitude and rotor-flap feedback gains. Critical to understanding the feedback gains is that the roll and pitch rate dynamics each have second-order behavior, not the classic first-order behavior, which arises from a quasi-static rotor, six degree-of-freedom model.

  16. The Effect of Composite Flexures on Aeroelastic Stability of a Hingeless Rotor Blade

    Shi; Qinghua

    2007-01-01

    The effects of ply orientation angle of composite flexures on stability of hingeless rotor blade system are studied.The composite hingeless rotor blade system is simplified as a hub,a flap flexure and a lag flexure.pitch bearing and main blade.The kinematics formulations are inferred by employing the moderate deflection beam theory.The shear deformation and warping related to torsion are considered.The quasi-steady strip theory with dynamic inflow effects is applied to obtain the aerodynamic loads acting on the blade.Based on these.the set of finite element formulations of a hingeless rotor blade system is worked out.The numerical results show that the ply angle of the composite flexures has great effects on the aeroelastic stability of rotor blade.

  17. A review of progress and challenges in flapping foil power generation

    Young, John; Lai, Joseph C. S.; Platzer, Max F.

    2014-05-01

    Power may be extracted from a flowing fluid in a variety of ways. Turbines using one or more oscillating foils are under increasingly active investigation, as an alternative to rotary wind turbines and river, oceanic and tidal current water turbines, although industrial development is at a very nascent stage. Such flapping foil turbines promise some key potential advantages, including lower foil velocities (and hence lower noise and wildlife impact), and more effective small-scale and shallow water operation. The role of a number of parameters is investigated, including foil kinematics (modes, frequencies, amplitudes and time histories of motion), foil and system geometry (shape, configuration and structural flexibility), and flow physics effects (Reynolds number and turbulence, shear flows and ground effect). Details of the kinematics are shown to have the single largest influence on power output and efficiency (measured as the ratio of power output to that available and accessible in the fluid stream). The highest levels of power and efficiency are associated with very large foil pitch angles (upwards of 70°) and angles of attack (30-40°), such that the flow is massively separated for much of the flapping cycle, in contrast to rotary turbines which rely on attached flow over as much of the rotor disk as possible. This leads to leading edge vortices comparable in size to the foil chord, and the evolution and interaction of these vortices with the foil as it moves play a central role in determining performance. The other parameters also influence the vortex behaviour, but in general to a lesser degree. Numerous gaps in the research literature and outstanding issues are highlighted.

  18. Reducing rotor weight

    Cheney, M.C. [PS Enterprises, Inc., Glastonbury, CT (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The cost of energy for renewables has gained greater significance in recent years due to the drop in price in some competing energy sources, particularly natural gas. In pursuit of lower manufacturing costs for wind turbine systems, work was conducted to explore an innovative rotor designed to reduce weight and cost over conventional rotor systems. Trade-off studies were conducted to measure the influence of number of blades, stiffness, and manufacturing method on COE. The study showed that increasing number of blades at constant solidity significantly reduced rotor weight and that manufacturing the blades using pultrusion technology produced the lowest cost per pound. Under contracts with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and the California Energy Commission, a 400 kW (33m diameter) turbine was designed employing this technology. The project included tests of an 80 kW (15.5m diameter) dynamically scaled rotor which demonstrated the viability of the design.

  19. Rotor internal friction instability

    Bently, D. E.; Muszynska, A.

    1985-01-01

    Two aspects of internal friction affecting stability of rotating machines are discussed. The first role of internal friction consists of decreasing the level of effective damping during rotor subsynchronous and backward precessional vibrations caused by some other instability mechanisms. The second role of internal frication consists of creating rotor instability, i.e., causing self-excited subsynchronous vibrations. Experimental test results document both of these aspects.

  20. Application of system identification to analytic rotor modeling from simulated and wind tunnel dynamic test data, part 2

    Hohenemser, K. H.; Banerjee, D.

    1977-01-01

    An introduction to aircraft state and parameter identification methods is presented. A simplified form of the maximum likelihood method is selected to extract analytical aeroelastic rotor models from simulated and dynamic wind tunnel test results for accelerated cyclic pitch stirring excitation. The dynamic inflow characteristics for forward flight conditions from the blade flapping responses without direct inflow measurements were examined. The rotor blades are essentially rigid for inplane bending and for torsion within the frequency range of study, but flexible in out-of-plane bending. Reverse flow effects are considered for high rotor advance ratios. Two inflow models are studied; the first is based on an equivalent blade Lock number, the second is based on a time delayed momentum inflow. In addition to the inflow parameters, basic rotor parameters like the blade natural frequency and the actual blade Lock number are identified together with measurement bias values. The effect of the theoretical dynamic inflow on the rotor eigenvalues is evaluated.

  1. The freestyle pedicle perforator flap

    Gunnarsson, Gudjon Leifur; Jackson, Ian T; Westvik, Tormod S; Thomsen, Jorn Bo

    2015-01-01

    not widely performed by the general plastic surgeons. The aim of this paper is to present the simplicity of pedicled perforator flap reconstruction of moderate-sized defects of the extremities and torso. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 34 patients reconstructed using 34 freestyle...... aspects in the context of current literature. RESULTS: The reconstructive goals were achieved in all cases without any total flap loss or major complications. Minor complications occurred in 7/34 (21 %) cases consisting of venous congestion leading to distal tip necrosis or epidermolysis; partial flap...... loss was significant in 4 cases, however never more than 10 % of the total flap size. Reconstruction was performed on the lower limb in 13 cases, upper limb in 12, and 9 cases were on the truncus. The angle of rotation was 90° in 21 cases and 180° in 13 cases. The most common indication was...

  2. Managing Flap Vortices via Separation Control

    Greenblatt, David

    2006-01-01

    A pilot study was conducted on a flapped semi-span model to investigate the concept and viability of near-wake vortex management by means of boundary layer separation control. Passive control was achieved using a simple fairing and active control was achieved via zero mass-flux blowing slots. Vortex sheet strength, estimated by integrating surface pressures, was used to predict vortex characteristics based on inviscid rollup relations and vortices trailing the flaps were mapped using a seven-hole probe. Separation control was found to have a marked effect on vortex location, strength, tangential velocity, axial velocity and size over a wide range of angles of attack and control conditions. In general, the vortex trends were well predicted by the inviscid rollup relations. Manipulation of the separated flow near the flap edges exerted significant control over either outboard or inboard edge vortices while producing small lift and moment excursions. Unsteady surface pressures indicated that dynamic separation and attachment control can be exploited to perturb vortices at wavelengths shorter than a typical wingspan. In summary, separation control has the potential for application to time-independent or time-dependent wake alleviation schemes, where the latter can be deployed to minimize adverse effects on ride-quality and dynamic structural loading.

  3. Modified osteomyocutaneous iliac crest flaps transplantation.

    Liu, Jun; Song, Dajiang; Li, Jinsong; Xu, Jian; Lv, Hongbin

    2015-04-01

    The paper aims to improve the operative technique of osteomyocutaneous iliac crest flap harvesting, further minimise morbidity of donor site, and improve the effect of recipient site reconstruction. From March 2005 to March 2011, 55 cases of osteomyocutaneous iliac crest flap harvested by different methods were performed to reconstruct the defects of the extremities. Twenty-nine cases were reconstructed with a traditional deep circumflex iliac artery osteomusculocutaneous flap. Twenty-six cases were repaired with modified osteomyocutaneous iliac crest flaps. In 29 cases with a traditional DCIA osteomusculocutaneous flap, two cases showed the injured lateral femoral cutaneous nerve. Flapnecrosis was significant in two cases. Arterial compromise occurred in one case 5 days after operation completion and led to flap failure. Three flaps developed postoperative venous congestion, but only one flap received re-exploration. In the other two cases, some stitches were removed for decompression. All three flaps survived. In two cases, marginal flap necrosis occurred, but no secondary skin grafting was required. In 26 cases with modified flap transplantation, one case showed the injured lateral femoral cutaneous nerve. All flaps survived totally. Osseous integration was achieved in all 55 cases in 3 ∼ 9 months after operation. The modified osteomyocutaneous iliac crest flap technique enhances flap safety, provides the additional advantages of reducing donor-site morbidity, and improves the recipient-site contour. PMID:25001367

  4. Summary of Full-Scale Blade Displacement Measurements of the UH- 60A Airloads Rotor

    Abrego, Anita I.; Meyn, Larry; Burner, Alpheus W.; Barrows, Danny A.

    2016-01-01

    Blade displacement measurements using multi-camera photogrammetry techniques were acquired for a full-scale UH-60A rotor, tested in the National Full-Scale Aerodynamic Complex 40-Foot by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel. The measurements, acquired over the full rotor azimuth, encompass a range of test conditions that include advance ratios from 0.15 to 1.0, thrust coefficient to rotor solidity ratios from 0.01 to 0.13, and rotor shaft angles from -10.0 to 8.0 degrees. The objective was to measure the blade displacements and deformations of the four rotor blades and provide a benchmark blade displacement database to be utilized in the development and validation of rotorcraft prediction techniques. An overview of the blade displacement measurement methodology, system development, and data analysis techniques are presented. Sample results based on the final set of camera calibrations, data reduction procedures and estimated corrections that account for registration errors due to blade elasticity are shown. Differences in blade root pitch, flap and lag between the previously reported results and the current results are small. However, even small changes in estimated root flap and pitch can lead to significant differences in the blade elasticity values.

  5. Assessment Report on Innovative Rotor Blades (MAREWINT WP1,D1.3)

    McGugan, Malcolm; Leble, Vladimir; Pereira, Gilmar Ferreira

    The offshore wind energy industry faces many challenges in the short to medium term if it is to meet the ambitions of the global community for sustainable energy supply in the future. Not least among these challenges is the issue of rotor blades. Innovative design for “smart” rotor blades with...... innovative concept development for wind turbine blades. This covers models and experiments with damage measurement systems embedded within the composite material/structure and numerical methods investigating the effects of leading and trailing edge flaps on modifying the aerodynamic loads on the operating...

  6. THE RESEARCH OF VIBRATIONS LEVELS ONTO THE DAMAGE OF THE TURBOGENERATOR ENGINE ROTORS

    Adamovic, Zivoslav; Radovanovic, Ljiljaan

    2009-01-01

    The amplitude of vibrations and the phase angles and their changes when the rotor of turbogenerator has cracks are researched in this paper. This paper deals with two kinds of generator rotors damage. In the first case of damage of turbogenerator rotor, the cracks appeared at the end of the cogs of the rotors active part. In the second case cracks occurred in the middle of the cross section of the shaft, on the exciting side at the end of the shaft.

  7. A Simulation Study of the Rotor Vibration in a Journal Bearing

    Tůma, Jiří; Bilošová, Alena; Šimek, Jiří; Svoboda, Rudolf

    2008-01-01

    The paper deals with the rotor vibration in journal bearings to prepare a model for verifying the rotor vibration active control. The rotor is maintained in equilibrium position by forces generated in oil film. Bearing forces can be modelled as a spring and damper system. The main goal of the simulation study is to verify the model principle and to estimate parameters by comparing simulation results with experimental data, namely the instability of motion. Test stand with rotor supported in t...

  8. Experience in Reconstruction for Small Digital Defects With Free Flaps.

    Hung, Min-Hsiang; Huang, Kuo-Feng; Chiu, Haw-Yen; Chao, Wai-Nang

    2016-03-01

    Traumatic injuries to the digits resulting in soft tissue or bone loss require reconstruction. Traditionally, local flaps, such as homodigital flaps, heterodigital flaps, pedicled flaps, or distant flaps, are used for digital resurfacing. However, free tissue transfers can be used in selected patients. In this study, we present the use of different free flaps including groin skin flaps, groin osteocutaneous flaps, groin chimeric flaps, second dorsal metacarpal artery flaps, and partial toe flaps for digital reconstruction. A total of 19 digits were treated with 16 free flaps in our hospital. Of the flaps used, 5 were free groin skin flaps, 4 were free partial toe flaps, 3 were free groin chimeric flaps, 2 were free groin osteocutaneous flaps, and 2 were free second dorsal metacarpal artery flaps. The average flap size was 4.7 × 2.0 cm (range, 1.5 × 1 to 5 × 4 cm), and the average operative time was 6.0 hours (range, 4-9 hours). All flaps survived without partial or total necrosis. In conclusion, the free flap is a reliable and safe alternative for digital reconstruction. Moreover, the free groin flap provides not only a chimeric pattern for multiple fingers coverage but also an osteocutaneous pattern for thumb lengthening. The free second dorsal metacarpal artery flap provides a tenocutaneous pattern for tendon reconstruction and soft tissue coverage simultaneously, and the free partial toe flap is an excellent alternative for pulp reconstruction in terms of aesthetic appearance and functional outcome. PMID:26808771

  9. Computer experiments in preparation of system identification from transient rotor model tests, part 2

    Hohenemser, K. H.; Yin, S. K.

    1974-01-01

    System identification methods which can extract model rotor paramenters with reasonable accuracy from noise polluted blade flapping transient measurements were developed. Usually parameter identification requires data on the state variables, that is on deflections and on rate of deflections. The small size of rotor models makes it, however, difficult to measure more than the blade flapping deflections. For the computer experiments it was, therefore, assumed that only noisy deflection measurements are available. Parameter identifications were performed for one and two unknown parameters. Both rotating coordinates and multiblade coordinates were used. It was found that data processing with a digital filter allowed by numerical differentiation a sufficiently accurate determination of the rates of deflection and of the accelerations to obtain reasonable parameter estimates with a simple linear estimator.

  10. The Influence of Rotor Unbalance on Turbocharger Rotor Dynamics

    Knotek Jiří

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the influence of an unbalance on turbocharger rotor dynamics. The structural model of the turbocharger rotor and the hydrodynamic model of the journal floating ring bearing are described and assembled in multibody dynamics software. Moreover, the paper presents various results describing rotor dynamics where the influence of an unbalance is discussed.

  11. The Influence of Rotor Unbalance on Turbocharger Rotor Dynamics

    Knotek Jiří; Novotný Pavel; Maršálek Ondřej; Raffai Peter; Dlugoš Jozef

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the influence of an unbalance on turbocharger rotor dynamics. The structural model of the turbocharger rotor and the hydrodynamic model of the journal floating ring bearing are described and assembled in multibody dynamics software. Moreover, the paper presents various results describing rotor dynamics where the influence of an unbalance is discussed.

  12. Experimental Study of Wake / Flap Interaction Noise and the Reduction of Flap Side Edge Noise

    Hutcheson, Florence V.; Stead, Daniel J.; Plassman, Gerald E.

    2016-01-01

    The effects of the interaction of a wake with a half-span flap on radiated noise are examined. The incident wake is generated by bars of various widths and lengths or by a simplified landing gear model. Single microphone and phased array measurements are used to isolate the effects of the wake interaction on the noise radiating from the flap side edge and flap cove regions. The effects on noise of the wake generator's geometry and relative placement with respect to the flap are assessed. Placement of the wake generators upstream of the flap side edge is shown to lead to the reduction of flap side edge noise by introducing a velocity deficit and likely altering the instabilities in the flap side edge vortex system. Significant reduction in flap side edge noise is achieved with a bar positioned directly upstream of the flap side edge. The noise reduction benefit is seen to improve with increased bar width, length and proximity to the flap edge. Positioning of the landing gear model upstream of the flap side edge also leads to decreased flap side edge noise. In addition, flap cove noise levels are significantly lower than when the landing gear is positioned upstream of the flap mid-span. The impact of the local flow velocity on the noise radiating directly from the landing gear is discussed. The effects of the landing gear side-braces on flap side edge, flap cove and landing gear noise are shown.

  13. Chlorogenic Acid Enhances Abdominal Skin Flap Survival Based on Epigastric Artery in Nondiabetic and Diabetic Rats.

    Bagdas, Deniz; Etoz, Betul Cam; Gul, Zulfiye; Ozyigit, Musa Ozgur; Cinkilic, Nilufer; Inan, Sevda; Buyukcoskun, Naciye Isbil; Ozluk, Kasim; Gurun, Mine Sibel

    2016-08-01

    Previous studies showed that chlorogenic acid (CGA) accelerates wound healing via its antioxidant activity. We aimed to investigate the effect of CGA in an experimental epigastric abdominal skin flap model in nondiabetic and diabetic rats. Rats were firstly divided into 2 groups: nondiabetic and diabetic. Diabetes was induced by streptozotocin. Then, 4 subgroups were created for each group: vehicle as well as 0.2 mg/0.5 mL, 1 mg/0.5 mL, and 5 mg/0.5 mL CGA treatments. Right epigastric artery-based abdominal skin flaps were elevated and sutured back into their original position. Chlorogenic acid or vehicle was injected once into the femoral arteries by leaving the epigastric artery as the single artery feeding the flaps during the injection. On postoperative day 7, flap survivals were evaluated, and the rats were killed. Distal flap tissues were collected for histopathological and biochemical assays. Chlorogenic acid showed greater flap survival in both nondiabetic and diabetic rats. Capillary density was increased, and necrosis was reduced in the CGA-treated rats. Chlorogenic acid decreased malondialdehyde levels as well as increased reduced glutathione and superoxide dismutase levels in the flap tissues. This study showed that CGA significantly improved flap survival by its antioxidant activities with intra-arterial local injections. PMID:25356637

  14. Free thin paraumbilical perforator-based flaps.

    Koshima, I; Moriguchi, T; Soeda, S; Tanaka, H; Umeda, N

    1992-07-01

    A free paraumbilical perforator-based flap fed by a muscle perforator from the inferior deep epigastric artery and with no muscle was used in 13 patients. Among them, a free thin paraumbilical perforator-based flap with a thin layer of fat, to protect the subdermal plexus of the vessels, was used in seven patients. The dominant pedicle perforator of this thin flap is usually located around the umbilicus and a large flap can be obtained. Its critical length-to-breath ratio is considered to be 4:3. The advantages of this flap are a long and large vascular pedicle, rare postoperative abdominal herniation, little bulkiness of the flap, and a relatively large skin territory. The disadvantages are technical difficulties in dissection of the perforator and anatomical variation in the location of the perforator. We believe this flap largely overcomes the problems of the conventional rectus abdominis musculocutaneous flap. PMID:1386718

  15. Dynamic rotor mode in antiferromagnetic nanoparticles

    Lefmann, Kim; Jacobsen, H.; Garde, J.;

    2015-01-01

    measured neutron data and reveal that thermally activated spin canting gives rise to an unusual type of coherent magnetic precession mode. This "rotor" mode can be seen as a high-temperature version of superparamagnetism and is driven by exchange interactions between the two magnetic sublattices. The...... frequency of the rotor mode behaves in fair agreement with a simple analytical model, based on a high-temperature approximation of the generally accepted Hamiltonian of the system. The extracted model parameters, such as the magnetic interaction and the axial anisotropy, are in excellent agreement with...

  16. Efficient flapping flight of pterosaurs

    Strang, Karl Axel

    In the late eighteenth century, humans discovered the first pterosaur fossil remains and have been fascinated by their existence ever since. Pterosaurs exploited their membrane wings in a sophisticated manner for flight control and propulsion, and were likely the most efficient and effective flyers ever to inhabit our planet. The flapping gait is a complex combination of motions that sustains and propels an animal in the air. Because pterosaurs were so large with wingspans up to eleven meters, if they could have sustained flapping flight, they would have had to achieve high propulsive efficiencies. Identifying the wing motions that contribute the most to propulsive efficiency is key to understanding pterosaur flight, and therefore to shedding light on flapping flight in general and the design of efficient ornithopters. This study is based on published results for a very well-preserved specimen of Coloborhynchus robustus, for which the joints are well-known and thoroughly described in the literature. Simplifying assumptions are made to estimate the characteristics that can not be inferred directly from the fossil remains. For a given animal, maximizing efficiency is equivalent to minimizing power at a given thrust and speed. We therefore aim at finding the flapping gait, that is the joint motions, that minimize the required flapping power. The power is computed from the aerodynamic forces created during a given wing motion. We develop an unsteady three-dimensional code based on the vortex-lattice method, which correlates well with published results for unsteady motions of rectangular wings. In the aerodynamic model, the rigid pterosaur wing is defined by the position of the bones. In the aeroelastic model, we add the flexibility of the bones and of the wing membrane. The nonlinear structural behavior of the membrane is reduced to a linear modal decomposition, assuming small deflections about the reference wing geometry. The reference wing geometry is computed for

  17. Adjustable ETHD lubrication applied to the improvement of dynamic performance of flexible rotors supported by active TPJB

    Salazar, Jorge Andrés González; Cerda Varela, Alejandro Javier; Santos, Ilmar

    2013-01-01

    pressurized oil directly into the bearing clearance through a nozzle placed in a radial bore at the middle of the pad and connected to a high pressure supply unit by servovalves. The theoretical model is based on a finite element model, where the active TPJB with adjustable lubrication is included using...

  18. Suspension Bridge Flutter for Girder with Separate Control Flaps

    Huynh, T.; Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    Active vibration control of long span suspension bridge flutter using separated control flaps (SFSC) has shown to increase effectively the critical wind speed of bridges. In this paper, an SFSC calculation based on modal equations of the vertical and torsional motions of the bridge girder includi...

  19. SMART Wind Turbine Rotor: Design and Field Test

    Berg, Jonathan C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Resor, Brian R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Paquette, Joshua A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); White, Jonathan R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-01-29

    This report documents the design, fabrication, and testing of the SMART Rotor. This work established hypothetical approaches for integrating active aerodynamic devices (AADs) into the wind turbine structure and controllers.

  20. Rotor dynamic state and parameter identification from simulated forward flight transients, part 1

    Hohenemser, K. H.; Banerjee, D.; Yin, S. K.

    1976-01-01

    State and parameter identifications from simulated forward flight blade flapping measurements are presented. The transients were excited by progressing cyclic pitch stirring or by hub stirring with constant stirring acceleration. Rotor dynamic inflow models of varying degree of sophistication were used from a one parameter inflow model (equivalent Lock number) to an eight parameter inflow model. The maximum likelihood method with assumed fixed measurement error covariance matrix was applied. The rotor system equations for both fixed hub and tilting hub are given. The identified models were verified by comparing true responses with predicted responses. An optimum utilization of the simulated measurement data can be defined. From the numerical results it can be anticipated that brief periods of either accelerated cyclic pitch stirring or of hub stirring are sufficient to extract with adequate accuracy up to 8 rotor dynamic inflow parameters plus the blade Lock number from the transients.

  1. Investigation of Rotor Performance and Loads of a UH-60A Individual Blade Control System

    Yeo, Hyeonsoo; Romander, Ethan A.; Norman, Thomas R.

    2011-01-01

    Wind tunnel measurements of performance, loads, and vibration of a full-scale UH-60A Black Hawk main rotor with an individual blade control (IBC) system are compared with calculations obtained using the comprehensive helicopter analysis CAMRAD II and a coupled CAMRAD II/OVERFLOW 2 analysis. Measured data show a 5.1% rotor power reduction (8.6% rotor lift to effective-drag ratio increase) using 2/rev IBC actuation with 2.0 amplitude at = 0.4. At the optimum IBC phase for rotor performance, IBC actuator force (pitch link force) decreased, and neither flap nor chord bending moments changed significantly. CAMRAD II predicts the rotor power variations with the IBC phase reasonably well at = 0.35. However, the correlation degrades at = 0.4. Coupled CAMRAD II/OVERFLOW 2 shows excellent correlation with the measured rotor power variations with the IBC phase at both = 0.35 and = 0.4. Maximum reduction of IBC actuator force is better predicted with CAMRAD II, but general trends are better captured with the coupled analysis. The correlation of vibratory hub loads is generally poor by both methods, although the coupled analysis somewhat captures general trends.

  2. Characterization of rotor spun knitting yarn at high rotor speeds

    Investigations have been made to explore the effects of rotor speeds on quality param of yarn such as single yarn strength, elongation, mass riation, total imperfections and hairiness. Rotor yarn samples were spun at Reiter R-40 by using Pakistani cotton at different rotor speeds i.e., 70,000, 80,000, 90,000 and 100,000 rpm with 600 tpm twist. Linear densities of these samples were kept as 40, 35 and 30 tex. Determination of yarn strength, elongation, mass variation, total imperfections and hairiness was carried out on Uster Tensorapid-4 and Uster Tester-4 according to ISO standard test methods. Based on experimental results it was found that rotor speed had marginal effect on yarn strength and coefficient of mass variation up to 90,000 rpm. However, elongation and total imperfection index brought down progressively with augmented rotor speeds. Slight improvement in hairiness was observed at increased rotor speeds. (author)

  3. The possibility for use of venous flaps in plastic surgery

    The use of venous flaps is controversial. The mechanism of perfusion of venous flaps is still not fully understood. The research was conducted on 56 white rats. In our experimental work we studied two different models of venous flaps: pedicled venous flap (PVF) and pedicled arterialized venous flap (PAVF). Our results showed that postoperative congestion was present in all flaps. However 66.7% of all pedicled venous flaps and 100% of all pedicled arterialized venous flaps eventually survived. Histological examination revealed that postoperatively the blood flow in the skin of the pedicled arterialized venous flap became «re-reversed» again; there were no differences between mechanism of survival of venous flaps and other flaps. On the 7-14th day in the skin of all flaps were processes of neoangiogenesis and proliferation. Hence the best scenario for the clinical use of venous flaps unfolds when both revascularization and skin coverage are required

  4. The possibility for use of venous flaps in plastic surgery

    Baytinger, V. F.; Kurochkina, O. S.; Selianinov, K. V.; Baytinger, A. V.; Dzyuman, A. N.

    2015-11-01

    The use of venous flaps is controversial. The mechanism of perfusion of venous flaps is still not fully understood. The research was conducted on 56 white rats. In our experimental work we studied two different models of venous flaps: pedicled venous flap (PVF) and pedicled arterialized venous flap (PAVF). Our results showed that postoperative congestion was present in all flaps. However 66.7% of all pedicled venous flaps and 100% of all pedicled arterialized venous flaps eventually survived. Histological examination revealed that postoperatively the blood flow in the skin of the pedicled arterialized venous flap became «re-reversed» again; there were no differences between mechanism of survival of venous flaps and other flaps. On the 7-14th day in the skin of all flaps were processes of neoangiogenesis and proliferation. Hence the best scenario for the clinical use of venous flaps unfolds when both revascularization and skin coverage are required.

  5. The possibility for use of venous flaps in plastic surgery

    Baytinger, V. F., E-mail: baitinger@mail.tomsknet.ru; Kurochkina, O. S., E-mail: kurochkinaos@yandex.ru; Selianinov, K. V.; Baytinger, A. V. [Research Institute of Microsurgery, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Dzyuman, A. N. [Siberian State Medical University, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-17

    The use of venous flaps is controversial. The mechanism of perfusion of venous flaps is still not fully understood. The research was conducted on 56 white rats. In our experimental work we studied two different models of venous flaps: pedicled venous flap (PVF) and pedicled arterialized venous flap (PAVF). Our results showed that postoperative congestion was present in all flaps. However 66.7% of all pedicled venous flaps and 100% of all pedicled arterialized venous flaps eventually survived. Histological examination revealed that postoperatively the blood flow in the skin of the pedicled arterialized venous flap became «re-reversed» again; there were no differences between mechanism of survival of venous flaps and other flaps. On the 7-14th day in the skin of all flaps were processes of neoangiogenesis and proliferation. Hence the best scenario for the clinical use of venous flaps unfolds when both revascularization and skin coverage are required.

  6. Numerical Investigation of Flow Control Feasibility with a Trailing Edge Flap

    This paper concerns a numerical study of employing an adaptive trailing edge flap to control the lift of an airfoil subject to unsteady inflow conditions. The periodically varying inflow is generated by two oscillating airfoils, which are located upstream of the controlled airfoil. To establish the control system, a standard PID controller is implemented in a finite volume based incompressible flow solver. An immersed boundary method is applied to treat the problem of simulating a deformable airfoil trailing edge. The flow field is solved using a 2D Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes finite volume solver. In order to more accurately simulate wall bounded flows around the immersed boundary, a modified boundary condition is introduced in the k- ω turbulence model. As an example, turbulent flow over a NACA 64418 airfoil with a deformable trailing edge is investigated. Results from numerical simulations are convincing and may give some highlights for practical implementations of trailing edge flap to a wind turbine rotor blade

  7. Aerodynamic Optimization of Vertical Axis Wind Turbine with Trailing Edge Flaps

    Ertem, Sercan; Ferreira, Carlos; Gaunaa, Mac;

    2016-01-01

    Vertical Axis Wind Turbines (VAWT) are competitive concepts for very large scale (1020 MW) floating offshore applications. Rotor circulation control (loading control) opens a wide design space to enhance the aerodynamic and operational features of VAWT. The modified linear derivation of the...... Actuator Cylinder Model (Mod-Lin ACM) is used as the aerodynamic model to assess VAWT performance throughout the work. As the first step, optimum aerodynamic loadings of a VAWT with infinite number of blades are studied. Next, for the case of finite number of blades, direct and inverse optimization...... approaches are used. The direct method is coupled with a hybrid numerical optimizer to serve as a global method for designing flap sequences. The effectiveness of trailing edge flap on VAWT is investigated for three aerodynamic objectives which lead to improved power efficiency, rated power control and peak...

  8. Rotor blade dynamic design

    Pritchard, Jocelyn I.; Adelman, Howard M.; Mantay, Wayne R.

    1989-01-01

    The rotor dynamic design considerations are essentially limitations on the vibratory response of the blades which in turn limit the dynamic excitation of the fuselage by forces and moments transmitted to the hub. Quantities which are associated with the blade response and which are subject to design constraints are discussed. These include blade frequencies, vertical and inplane hub shear, rolling and pitching moments, and aeroelastic stability margin.

  9. Forward flight of swallowtail butterfly with simple flapping motion

    Tanaka, Hiroto [School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, 60 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Shimoyama, Isao, E-mail: isao@i.u-tokyo.ac.j [Department of Mechano-Informatics, Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8656 (Japan)

    2010-06-15

    Unlike other flying insects, the wing motion of swallowtail butterflies is basically limited to flapping because their fore wings partly overlap their hind wings, structurally restricting the feathering needed for active control of aerodynamic force. Hence, it can be hypothesized that the flight of swallowtail butterflies is realized with simple flapping, requiring little feedback control of the feathering angle. To verify this hypothesis, we fabricated an artificial butterfly mimicking the wing motion and wing shape of a swallowtail butterfly and analyzed its flights using images taken with a high-speed video camera. The results demonstrated that stable forward flight could be realized without active feathering or feedback control of the wing motion. During the flights, the artificial butterfly's body moved up and down passively in synchronization with the flapping, and the artificial butterfly followed an undulating flight trajectory like an actual swallowtail butterfly. Without feedback control of the wing motion, the body movement is directly affected by change of aerodynamic force due to the wing deformation; the degree of deformation was determined by the wing venation. Unlike a veinless wing, a mimic wing with veins generated a much higher lift coefficient during the flapping flight than in a steady flow due to the large body motion.

  10. Forward flight of swallowtail butterfly with simple flapping motion

    Unlike other flying insects, the wing motion of swallowtail butterflies is basically limited to flapping because their fore wings partly overlap their hind wings, structurally restricting the feathering needed for active control of aerodynamic force. Hence, it can be hypothesized that the flight of swallowtail butterflies is realized with simple flapping, requiring little feedback control of the feathering angle. To verify this hypothesis, we fabricated an artificial butterfly mimicking the wing motion and wing shape of a swallowtail butterfly and analyzed its flights using images taken with a high-speed video camera. The results demonstrated that stable forward flight could be realized without active feathering or feedback control of the wing motion. During the flights, the artificial butterfly's body moved up and down passively in synchronization with the flapping, and the artificial butterfly followed an undulating flight trajectory like an actual swallowtail butterfly. Without feedback control of the wing motion, the body movement is directly affected by change of aerodynamic force due to the wing deformation; the degree of deformation was determined by the wing venation. Unlike a veinless wing, a mimic wing with veins generated a much higher lift coefficient during the flapping flight than in a steady flow due to the large body motion.

  11. Lessons from Rotor 37

    J.D.Denton

    1997-01-01

    NASA rotor 37 was used as a blind test case for turbomachinery CFD by the Turbomachinery Committee of the IGTI.The rotor is a transonic compressor with a tip speed of 454 m/s(1500ft/s)and a relatively high pressure ratio of 2.1.It was tested in isolation with a circumferentially uniform inlet flow so that the flow through it should be steady apart from and effects of passage to passage geometry variation and mechanical vibration.As such it represents the simplest possible type of test for three-dimensional turbomachinery flow solvers.Howerver,the rotor still presents a real challenge to 3D viscous flow solvers because the shock wave-boudary layer interaction is strong and the effects of viscosity are dominant in determining the flow deviation and hence the pressure ration.Eleven blind solutions were submittewd and in addition a non-blind solution was used to prepare for the exercies.This paper reviews the flow in the test case and the comparisons of the CFD solutions with the test data.Lessons for both the Flow physics in transonic fans and for the application of CFD to such machines are pointed out.

  12. Flapping propulsion with tip pitch control

    Huera-Huarte, Francisco; Gharib, Morteza

    2014-11-01

    The effect of flexibility in the propulsion performance and efficiency of oscillating pitching foils has received a large amount of attention in the past years. Scientists have used simplified robotic models that mimic the kinematics of flying and swimming animals, in order to get inspiration to build more efficient engineering systems. Compliance is one of the aspects that has received more attention, as it seems to be a common feature in nature's flyers and swimmers. Active or passive control elements are also common in nature. We will show how thrust generation in a pitching fin, can be greatly affected by controlling the tip pitch motion dynamically and independently of the fin itself. This is in fact a controlled local change of curvature of the end of the fin. A robotic system has been designed in a way that not only flapping amplitudes and frequencies can be controlled, but also the amplitudes and frequencies of the tip and the phase difference between the tip and the fin. We measured thrust forces and the vortex dynamics in the near wake of the system, by using planar DPIV (Digital Particle Image Velocimetry) in a wide variety of flapping situations with tip control. Funding from Spanish Ministry of Science through Grant DPI2012-37904 is gratefully acknowledged.

  13. Dynamics of Anisotropically Supported Rotors

    Agnes Muszynska; Hatch, Charles T.; Donald E. Bently

    1997-01-01

    The paper discusses dynamic effects occurring in machinery rotors supported in bearings and pedestals with laterally different characteristics. In the considered rotor model the anisotropy of radial stiffness and tangential (“cross”) stiffness components are included. Within certain ranges of the rotative speed the support anisotropy leads to the specific, excited-by-unbalance rotor lateral synchronous vibrations in a form of backward (reverse) precession. In addition, one section of the roto...

  14. Dynamical properties of granular rotors

    Cleuren, Bart; Eichhorn, Ralf

    2008-01-01

    The stochastic motion of an arbitrarily shaped rotor, free to rotate around a fixed axis as a result of dissipative collisions with a surrounding thermalized gas, is investigated. A Boltzmann master equation is derived, starting from the elementary gas–rotor collisions. Analytical expressions for the moments of the rotational speed and the rotational temperature are obtained in the form of a series expansion, using the mass ratio of the gas particle and the rotor as the expansion parameter. W...

  15. Homopolar motor with dual rotors

    Hsu, John S.

    1998-01-01

    A homopolar motor (10) has a field rotor (15) mounted on a frame (11) for rotation in a first rotational direction and for producing an electromagnetic field, and an armature rotor (17) mounted for rotation on said frame (11) within said electromagnetic field and in a second rotational direction counter to said first rotational direction of said field rotor (15). The two rotors (15, 17) are coupled through a 1:1 gearing mechanism (19), so as to travel at the same speed but in opposite directions. This doubles the output voltage and output power, as compared to a motor in which only the armature is rotated. Several embodiments are disclosed.

  16. Variable Speed Rotor System Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Variable speed rotors will give helicopters several advantages: higher top speed, greater fuel efficiency, momentary emergency over-power, resonance detuning...

  17. Adjoint-based optimization of flapping plates hinged with a trailing-edge flap

    Min Xu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It is important to understand the impact of wing-morphing on aerodynamic performance in the study of flapping-wing flight of birds and insects. We use a flapping plate hinged with a trailing-edge flap as a simplified model for flexible/morphing wings in hovering. The trailing-edge flapping motion is optimized by an adjoint-based approach. The optimized configuration suggests that the trailing-edge flap can substantially enhance the overall lift. Further analysis indicates that the lift enhancement by the trailing-edge flapping is from the change of circulation in two ways: the local circulation change by the rotational motion of the flap, and the modification of vortex shedding process by the relative location between the trailing-edge flap and leading-edge main plate.

  18. Swashplateless Helicopter Experimental Investigation: Primary Control with Trailing Edge Flaps Actuated with Piezobenders

    Copp, Peter

    Helicopter rotor primary control is conventionally carried out using a swashplate with pitch links. Eliminating the swashplate promises to reduce the helicopter's parasitic power in high speed forward flight, as well as may lead to a hydraulic-less vehicle. A Mach-scale swashplateless rotor is designed with integrated piezobender-actuated trailing edge flaps and systematically tested on the benchtop, in the vacuum chamber and on the hoverstand. The blade is nominally based on the UH-60 rotor with a hover tip Mach number of 0.64. The blade diameter is 66 inches requiring 2400 RPM for Mach scale simulation. The rotor hub is modified to reduce the blade fundamental torsional frequency to less than 2.0/rev by replacing the rigid pitch links with linear springs, which results in an increase of the blade pitching response to the trailing edge flaps. Piezoelectric multilayer benders provide the necessary bandwidth, stroke and stiffness to drive the flaps for primary control while fitting inside the blade profile and withstanding the high centrifugal forces. This work focuses on several key issues. A piezobender designed from a soft piezoelectric material, PZT-5K4, is constructed. The new material is used to construct multi-layer benders with increased stroke for the same stiffness relative to hard materials such as PZT-5H2. Each layer has a thickness of 10 mils. The soft material with gold electrodes requires a different bonding method than hard material with nickel electrodes. With this new bonding method, the measured stiffness matches precisely the predicted stiffness for a 12 layer bender with 1.26 inch length and 1.0 inch width with a stiffness of 1.04 lb/mil. The final in-blade bender has a length of 1.38 inches and 1.0 inch width with a stiffness of 0.325 lb/mil and stroke of 20.2 mils for an energy output of 66.3 lb-mil. The behavior of piezobenders under very high electric fields is investigated. High field means +18.9 kV/cm (limited by arcing in air) and -3.54k

  19. Davis flap: the glory still present

    El-Sabbagh, Ahmed Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Upper third defects of the ear are too large to be closed primarily without distorting the auricle. Full thickness defects can be reconstructed with local flaps. In this article, Davis flap was used to fill the upper third defects of the ear with some modifications. Patients and methods: Eight patients underwent reconstruction of full thickness auricular defects with Davis flaps from July 2012 to December 2014. The posterior surface of the flap and the raw area of conchal area were covered by full thickness graft taken from posterior surface of ear. Results: All flaps survived. No congestion was noted. The donor sites and skin grafts healed uneventfully. Conclusion: Davis flap is a simple and reproducible tool for reconstruction of upper third of ear. PMID:27274439

  20. Experimental skin flaps and nitric oxide

    Gribbe, Örjan

    2006-01-01

    Abstract. Surgical flaps are used in plastic surgery to reconstruct tissue defects due to trauma or cancer removal. Occasionally flaps are subjected to ischemia and reperfusion injury leading to flap failure. Nitric oxide (NO), a small gaseous molecule, has vast physiological importance as it participates in the regulation of blood pressure, blood flow, neurotransmission and immune response. NO is synthesized by the enzyme NO synthase (NOS), which exists in both constitutiv...

  1. Wing flapping with minimum energy

    Jones, R. T.

    1980-01-01

    A technique employed by Prandtl and Munk is adapted for the case of a wing in flapping motion to determine its lift distribution. The problem may be reduced to one of minimizing induced drag for a specified and periodically varying bending moment at the wing root. It is concluded that two wings in close tandem arrangement, moving in opposite phase, would eliminate the induced aerodynamic losses calculated

  2. Optimal propulsive flapping in Stokes flows

    Swimming fish and flying insects use the flapping of fins and wings to generate thrust. In contrast, microscopic organisms typically deform their appendages in a wavelike fashion. Since a flapping motion with two degrees of freedom is able, in theory, to produce net forces from a time-periodic actuation at all Reynolds numbers, we compute in this paper the optimal flapping kinematics of a rigid spheroid in a Stokes flow. The hydrodynamics for the force generation and energetics of the flapping motion is solved exactly. We then compute analytically the gradient of a flapping efficiency in the space of all flapping gaits and employ it to derive numerically the optimal flapping kinematics as a function of the shape of the flapper and the amplitude of the motion. The kinematics of optimal flapping are observed to depend weakly on the flapper shape and are very similar to the figure-eight motion observed in the motion of insect wings. Our results suggest that flapping could be a exploited experimentally as a propulsion mechanism valid across the whole range of Reynolds numbers. (paper)

  3. Optimal propulsive flapping in Stokes flows

    Was, Loic

    2014-01-01

    Swimming fish and flying insects use the flapping of fins and wings to generate thrust. In contrast, microscopic organisms typically deform their appendages in a wavelike fashion. Since a flapping motion with two degrees of freedom is able, in theory, to produce net forces from a time-periodic actuation at all Reynolds number, we compute in this paper the optimal flapping kinematics of a rigid spheroid in a Stokes flow. The hydrodynamics for the force generation and energetics of the flapping motion is solved exactly. We then compute analytically the gradient of a flapping efficiency in the space of all flapping gaits and employ it to derive numerically the optimal flapping kinematics as a function of the shape of the flapper and the amplitude of the motion. The kinematics of optimal flapping are observed to depend weakly on the flapper shape and are very similar to the figure-eight motion observed in the motion of insect wings. Our results suggest that flapping could be a exploited experimentally as a propul...

  4. Inferior Gluteal Perforator Flaps for Breast Reconstruction

    Allen, Robert J.; LoTempio, Maria M.; Granzow, Jay W.

    2006-01-01

    Perforator flaps represent the latest in the evolution of soft tissue flaps. They allow the transfer of the patient's own skin and fat in a reliable manner with minimal donor-site morbidity. The powerful perforator flap concept allows transfer of tissue from numerous, well-described donor sites to almost any distant site with suitable recipient vessels. The inferior gluteal artery perforator (I-GAP) flap is one option that allows a large volume of tissue to be used for breast reconstruction w...

  5. Basic Perforator Flap Hemodynamic Mathematical Model

    Tao, Youlun; Ding, Maochao; Wang, Aiguo; Zhuang, Yuehong; Chang, Shi-Min; Mei, Jin; Hallock, Geoffrey G.

    2016-01-01

    Background: A mathematical model to help explain the hemodynamic characteristics of perforator flaps based on blood flow resistance systems within the flap will serve as a theoretical guide for the future study and clinical applications of these flaps. Methods: There are 3 major blood flow resistance network systems of a perforator flap. These were defined as the blood flow resistance of an anastomosis between artery and artery of adjacent perforasomes, between artery and vein within a perforasome, and then between vein and vein corresponding to the outflow of that perforasome. From this, a calculation could be made of the number of such blood flow resistance network systems that must be crossed for all perforasomes within a perforator flap to predict whether that arrangement would be viable. Results: The summation of blood flow resistance networks from each perforasome in a given perforator flap could predict which portions would likely survive. This mathematical model shows how this is directly dependent on the location of the vascular pedicle to the flap and whether supercharging or superdrainage maneuvers have been added. These configurations will give an estimate of the hemodynamic characteristics for the given flap design. Conclusions: This basic mathematical model can (1) conveniently determine the degree of difficulty for each perforasome within a perforator flap to survive; (2) semiquantitatively allow the calculation of basic hemodynamic parameters; and (3) allow the assessment of the pros and cons expected for each pattern of perforasomes encountered clinically based on predictable hemodynamic observations.

  6. Optimal propulsive flapping in Stokes flows.

    Was, Loïc; Lauga, Eric

    2014-03-01

    Swimming fish and flying insects use the flapping of fins and wings to generate thrust. In contrast, microscopic organisms typically deform their appendages in a wavelike fashion. Since a flapping motion with two degrees of freedom is able, in theory, to produce net forces from a time-periodic actuation at all Reynolds numbers, we compute in this paper the optimal flapping kinematics of a rigid spheroid in a Stokes flow. The hydrodynamics for the force generation and energetics of the flapping motion is solved exactly. We then compute analytically the gradient of a flapping efficiency in the space of all flapping gaits and employ it to derive numerically the optimal flapping kinematics as a function of the shape of the flapper and the amplitude of the motion. The kinematics of optimal flapping are observed to depend weakly on the flapper shape and are very similar to the figure-eight motion observed in the motion of insect wings. Our results suggest that flapping could be a exploited experimentally as a propulsion mechanism valid across the whole range of Reynolds numbers. PMID:24343130

  7. Internal rotor friction instability

    Walton, J.; Artiles, A.; Lund, J.; Dill, J.; Zorzi, E.

    1990-01-01

    The analytical developments and experimental investigations performed in assessing the effect of internal friction on rotor systems dynamic performance are documented. Analytical component models for axial splines, Curvic splines, and interference fit joints commonly found in modern high speed turbomachinery were developed. Rotor systems operating above a bending critical speed were shown to exhibit unstable subsynchronous vibrations at the first natural frequency. The effect of speed, bearing stiffness, joint stiffness, external damping, torque, and coefficient of friction, was evaluated. Testing included material coefficient of friction evaluations, component joint quantity and form of damping determinations, and rotordynamic stability assessments. Under conditions similar to those in the SSME turbopumps, material interfaces experienced a coefficient of friction of approx. 0.2 for lubricated and 0.8 for unlubricated conditions. The damping observed in the component joints displayed nearly linear behavior with increasing amplitude. Thus, the measured damping, as a function of amplitude, is not represented by either linear or Coulomb friction damper models. Rotordynamic testing of an axial spline joint under 5000 in.-lb of static torque, demonstrated the presence of an extremely severe instability when the rotor was operated above its first flexible natural frequency. The presence of this instability was predicted by nonlinear rotordynamic time-transient analysis using the nonlinear component model developed under this program. Corresponding rotordynamic testing of a shaft with an interference fit joint demonstrated the presence of subsynchronous vibrations at the first natural frequency. While subsynchronous vibrations were observed, they were bounded and significantly lower in amplitude than the synchronous vibrations.

  8. MACROSCOPIC ROTORS AND GRAVITATIONAL EFFECTS

    Ritter, R.

    1981-01-01

    Astronomical bodies have, in the past, provided essentially the only macroscopic basis for studies of gravitation by means of rotations. Now new technology provides the possibility that laboratory rotors may be made more precise than astronomical ones. This article surveys the properties of some of both types of rotors and describes several laboratory experiments for tests of General Relativity.

  9. The properties of isolated and coupled Savonius rotors

    Bowden, G. J.; McAleese, S. A.

    Some measurments on the Queensland optimum S-shaped rotor are presented. In particular it is shown that the efficiency of the turbine is about 18 percent, which is lower than the figure of about 23 percent given by earlier workers. In addition, detailed measurements of the pulsating wind-flow around a Savonius rotor are presented. These results were obtained using (1) tell-tales and a stroboscope, (2) a hot-wire anemometer (0-5 kHz response), and (3) a turbulence meter. This data can be used to suggest that 'active coupling' between Savonius rotors might be useful in 'redirecting' the wind-flow more efficiently. In particular, it is shown that if two counter-rotating rotors are placed side by side in a wind-tunnel, a natural phase locking occurs.

  10. Evaluation of Rotor Structural and Aerodynamic Loads using Measured Blade Properties

    Jung, Sung N.; You, Young-Hyun; Lau, Benton H.; Johnson, Wayne; Lim, Joon W.

    2012-01-01

    The structural properties of Higher harmonic Aeroacoustic Rotor Test (HART I) blades have been measured using the original set of blades tested in the wind tunnel in 1994. A comprehensive rotor dynamics analysis is performed to address the effect of the measured blade properties on airloads, blade motions, and structural loads of the rotor. The measurements include bending and torsion stiffness, geometric offsets, and mass and inertia properties of the blade. The measured properties are correlated against the estimated values obtained initially by the manufacturer of the blades. The previously estimated blade properties showed consistently higher stiffnesses, up to 30% for the flap bending in the blade inboard root section. The measured offset between the center of gravity and the elastic axis is larger by about 5% chord length, as compared with the estimated value. The comprehensive rotor dynamics analysis was carried out using the measured blade property set for HART I rotor with and without HHC (Higher Harmonic Control) pitch inputs. A significant improvement on blade motions and structural loads is obtained with the measured blade properties.

  11. [The super extended sub-mental flap or combo sub-mental flap].

    Martin, D

    2014-08-01

    The author presents a technical variation of the sub-mental flap including in a conventional pedicled flap both sub-mental axes and their anastomoses on the midline. The assessment of the first flaps raised according to this method confirms the improvement of the distal blood supply. It allows the possibility to harvest "super extended" flaps reaching the contralateral auricular lobula. This variation can be considered as an axial flap which only the tip, located beyond the mandibular angle, is at random. The evolution of the sub-mental flap from its original description to this variation called "combo sub-mental flap" is then presented. Its reliability and the technical simplification it provides will have to be assessed in the future. PMID:24840945

  12. Secondary onlay free flap reconstruction of glossectomy defects following initial successful flap restoration.

    Rihani, Jordan; Lee, Thomas; Ducic, Yadranko

    2013-08-01

    Patients who undergo tongue reconstruction over time may develop gradual worsening of dysarthria and dysphagia secondary to flap atrophy. At our institution, these patients undergo a secondary flap onlay procedure for augmentation of the neotongue. We review a total of 11 patients with total glossectomy defect who underwent secondary tongue augmentation with secondary onlay free flap consisting of radial forearm free flap (n = 6) and rectus free flap (n = 5). There was improvement in swallowing in 7 of 11 patients. Five (45.4%) patients achieved gastric tube independence. Seven (63.6%) patients achieved a varying degree of oral intake. All patients achieved tracheostomy independence. Dysarthria was improved in all patients. There were no flap failures. Therefore, a secondary onlay flap technique is feasible and may improve dysphagia and dysarthria to achieve gastric tube and tracheostomy independence in total glossectomy patients with delayed tongue atrophy. PMID:23625797

  13. Application of optimization methods to helicopter rotor blade design

    Chattopadhyay, A.; Walsh, J. L.

    1990-01-01

    A procedure for the minimum weight design of helicopter rotor blades with constraints on multiple coupled flap-lag natural frequencies, autorotational inertia, and centrifugal stress is presented. Optimum designs are obtained for blades with both rectangular and tapered planforms and are compared within a reference blade. The effects of higher-frequency constraints and stress constraints on the optimum blade designs are assessed. The results indicate that there is an increase in blade weight and a significant change in the design variable distributions with an increase in the number of frequency constraints. The inclusion of stress constraints has different effects on the wall thickness distributions of rectangular and tapered blades, but tends to increase the magnitude of the nonstructural segment weight distributions for both blade types.

  14. Blade lock for a rotor disk and rotor blade assembly

    Moore, Jerry H. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A rotor disk 18 and rotor blade 26 assembly is disclosed having a blade lock 66 which retains the rotor blade against axial movement in an axially extending blade retention slot 58. Various construction details are developed which shield the dead rim region D.sub.d and shift at least a portion of the loads associated with the locking device from the dead rim. In one detailed embodiment, a projection 68 from the live rim D.sub.1 of the disk 18 is adapted by slots 86 to receive blade locks 66.

  15. Effects of Bezafibrate on the Survival of Random Skin Flaps in Rats.

    Lin, Bin; Lin, Yuting; Lin, Dingsheng; Cao, Bin

    2016-06-01

    Background Bezafibrate is widely used in clinics for its comparable angiogenic effect. Our research is to investigate the effect of bezafibrate on random skin flap survival. Materials and Methods The "McFarlane flap" rat models were established in 30 male Sprague-Dawley rats which were divided into two groups. The treatment group was given bezafibrate (400 mg/kg/day; gavage administration), and the control group received the vehicle. The flap surviving area was measured after 7 days, and the tissue samples were taken for histological analysis and edema measurement. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was determined using immunohistochemical methods. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and malondialdehyde (MDA) content were examined with kits. Results Seven days after the operation, the surviving area in the treatment group was larger than in the control group (p Bezafibrate improves the survival of random skin flaps effectively. PMID:26872027

  16. Thumb Reconstruction Using Foucher’s Flap

    Kola, Nardi

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Extensive pulp defects of the thumb, with the exposure of tendon or bone, are challenging reconstructive problems. Surgical treatment includes the use of local, regional, and free flaps. AIM: This paper is focused in Foucher’s neuro vascular flap. First DMCA or Foucher’s pedicle flap is a successful thumb reconstruction method, especially in patients not disturbed by its cosmetic appearance. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The first dorsal metacarpal artery (FDMCA) arises from the radial artery in the first intermetacarpal space, just distal to the tendon of the extensor pollicis longus. Pulp area of the thumb is the area where Foucher’s flap is more utilizable. This technique has other applications such as first web reconstruction, thumb lengthening, and following resection of tumors on the dorsum of the hand. RESULTS: We have in study 7 cases with work related trauma in two years period of time, between 2012 and 2014. We had only one partial flap survival and all the other flaps survived entirely. We have also taken in consideration subjective satisfaction with a range score from 4 to 10, cold intolerance, flap area and donor site sensibility with a range score from low to medium to normal. CONCLUSION: Careful pedicle discovery, secured elevation, pedicle strangulation prevention are very important for flap survival.

  17. Analysis of tail effects in flapping flight

    Tay, W.B.; Bijl, H.; Van Oudheusden, B.W.

    2011-01-01

    Numerical simulations have been performed to examine the interference effects between an upstream flapping airfoil and a downstream stationary airfoil in a tandem configuration at a Reynolds number of 1000, which is around the regime of small flapping micro aerial vehicles. The object

  18. 14 CFR 29.1509 - Rotor speed.

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Rotor speed. 29.1509 Section 29.1509....1509 Rotor speed. (a) Maximum power-off (autorotation). The maximum power-off rotor speed must be... minimum power-off rotor speed must be established so that it is not less than 105 percent of the...

  19. 14 CFR 27.921 - Rotor brake.

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Rotor brake. 27.921 Section 27.921... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Rotor Drive System § 27.921 Rotor brake. If there is a means to control the rotation of the rotor drive system independently of the engine, any limitations...

  20. 14 CFR 27.1509 - Rotor speed.

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Rotor speed. 27.1509 Section 27.1509... Rotor speed. (a) Maximum power-off (autorotation). The maximum power-off rotor speed must be established... minimum power-off rotor speed must be established so that it is not less than 105 percent of the...

  1. 14 CFR 29.921 - Rotor brake.

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Rotor brake. 29.921 Section 29.921... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Rotor Drive System § 29.921 Rotor brake. If there is a means to control the rotation of the rotor drive system independently of the engine, any limitations...

  2. Performance tests on helical Savonius rotors

    Kamoji, M.A.; Kedare, S.B. [Department of Energy Science and Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay (India); Prabhu, S.V. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay (India)

    2009-03-15

    Conventional Savonius rotors have high coefficient of static torque at certain rotor angles and a negative coefficient of static torque from 135 to 165 and from 315 to 345 in one cycle of 360 . In order to decrease this variation in static torque from 0 to 360 , a helical Savonius rotor with a twist of 90 is proposed. In this study, tests on helical Savonius rotors are conducted in an open jet wind tunnel. Coefficient of static torque, coefficient of torque and coefficient of power for each helical Savonius rotor are measured. The performance of helical rotor with shaft between the end plates and helical rotor without shaft between the end plates at different overlap ratios namely 0.0, 0.1 and 0.16 is compared. Helical Savonius rotor without shaft is also compared with the performance of the conventional Savonius rotor. The results indicate that all the helical Savonius rotors have positive coefficient of static torque at all the rotor angles. The helical rotors with shaft have lower coefficient of power than the helical rotors without shaft. Helical rotor without shaft at an overlap ratio of 0.0 and an aspect ratio of 0.88 is found to have almost the same coefficient of power when compared with the conventional Savonius rotor. Correlation for coefficient of torque and power is developed for helical Savonius rotor for a range of Reynolds numbers studied. (author)

  3. Rotor for a pyrolysis centrifuge reactor

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to a rotor for a pyrolysis centrifuge reactor, said rotor comprising a rotor body having a longitudinal centre axis, and at least one pivotally mounted blade being adapted to pivot around a pivot axis under rotation of the rotor body around the longitudinal centre axis...

  4. Blood flow autoregulation in pedicled flaps

    Bonde, Christian T; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik; Elberg, Jens J

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Clinical work on the blood perfusion in skin and muscle flaps has suggested that some degree of blood flow autoregulation exists in such flaps. An autoregulatory mechanism would enable the flap to protect itself from changes in the perfusion pressure. The purpose of the present study...... was to evaluate if, and to what extent, a tissue flap could compensate a reduction in blood flow due to an acute constriction of the feed artery. Further, we wanted to examine the possible role of smooth muscle L-type calcium channels in the autoregulatory mechanism by pharmacological intervention...... with the L-type calcium channel blocker nimodipine and the vasodilator papaverine. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Pedicled flaps were raised in pigs. Flow in the pedicle was reduced by constriction of the feed artery (n=34). A transit time flow probe measured the effect on blood flow continuously. Following...

  5. Fasciocutaneous flap for vaginal and perineal reconstruction

    A skin and fascia flap from the medial thigh is proposed for vaginal and perineal reconstruction. Dissection, vascular injection, and radiographs of 20 fresh cadaver limbs uniformly demonstrated the presence of a communicating suprafascial vascular plexus in the medial thigh. Three to four nonaxial vessels were consistently found to enter the proximal plexus from within 5 cm of the perineum. Preservation of these vessels permitted reliable elevation of a 9 X 20 cm fasciocutaneous flap without using the gracilis muscle as a vascular carrier. Fifteen flaps in 13 patients were used for vaginal replacement and coverage of vulvectomy, groin, and ischial defects. Depending on the magnitude of the defect, simultaneous and independent elevation of the gracilis muscle provided additional vascularized coverage as needed. Our experience indicates that the medial thigh fasciocutaneous flap is a durable, less bulky, and potentially sensate alternative to the gracilis musculocutaneous flap for vaginal and perineal reconstruction

  6. Fasciocutaneous flap for vaginal and perineal reconstruction

    Wang, T.N.; Whetzel, T.; Mathes, S.J.; Vasconez, L.O.

    1987-07-01

    A skin and fascia flap from the medial thigh is proposed for vaginal and perineal reconstruction. Dissection, vascular injection, and radiographs of 20 fresh cadaver limbs uniformly demonstrated the presence of a communicating suprafascial vascular plexus in the medial thigh. Three to four nonaxial vessels were consistently found to enter the proximal plexus from within 5 cm of the perineum. Preservation of these vessels permitted reliable elevation of a 9 X 20 cm fasciocutaneous flap without using the gracilis muscle as a vascular carrier. Fifteen flaps in 13 patients were used for vaginal replacement and coverage of vulvectomy, groin, and ischial defects. Depending on the magnitude of the defect, simultaneous and independent elevation of the gracilis muscle provided additional vascularized coverage as needed. Our experience indicates that the medial thigh fasciocutaneous flap is a durable, less bulky, and potentially sensate alternative to the gracilis musculocutaneous flap for vaginal and perineal reconstruction.

  7. The clinical application of anterolateral thigh flap.

    Lee, Yao-Chou; Chiu, Haw-Yen; Shieh, Shyh-Jou

    2011-01-01

    The anterolateral thigh flap can provide a large skin paddle nourished by a long and large-caliber pedicle and can be harvested by two-team work. Most importantly, the donor-site morbidity is minimal. However, the anatomic variations decreased its popularity. By adapting free-style flap concepts, such as preoperative mapping of the perforators and being familiar with retrograde perforator dissection, this disadvantage had been overcome gradually. Furthermore, several modifications widen its clinical applications: the fascia lata can be included for sling or tendon reconstruction, the bulkiness could be created by including vastus lateralis muscle or deepithelization of skin flap, the pliability could be increased by suprafascial dissection or primary thinning, the pedicle length could be lengthening by proximally eccentric placement of the perforator, and so forth. Combined with these technical and conceptual advancements, the anterolateral thigh flap has become the workhorse flap for soft-tissue reconstructions from head to toe. PMID:22567234

  8. Facial artery flaps in facial oncoplastic reconstruction.

    Fabrizio, Tommaso

    2013-10-01

    The face is one of the common sites for cutaneous cancer localization. It is well known that the face is the localization of more than 50% of skin cancers. Nowadays, the principles of modern "oncoplasty" recommend the complete excision of the cancer and the reconstruction with respect to cosmetic features of the face in terms of good color, good softness, and good texture of the flaps, utilized in cancer repair. The oncological and cosmetic results of facial reconstruction are strictly linked and the modern plastic and reconstructive surgeon must respect both oncological and cosmetic aspects. For that reason the best solution in facial cancer repair is the utilization of locoregional flaps based on the tributary vessels of the facial artery. In consideration of the dimension of recipient area to repair, the retroangular flap (RAF) or the submental flap could be used. This article is voted to illustrate a very large and long-term casuistry dedicated to these flaps. PMID:24037925

  9. IDENTIFICATION OF CRACKED ROTOR BY WAVELET TRANSFORM

    邹剑; 陈进; 蒲亚鹏

    2002-01-01

    The dynamic equation of cracked rotor in rotational frame was modelled, the numerical simulation solutions of the cracked rotor and the uncracked rotor were obtained. By the wavelet transform, the time-frequency properties of the cracked rotor and the uncracked rotor were discussed, the difference of the time-frequency properties between the cracked rotor and the uncracked rotor was compared. A new detection algorithm using wavelet transform to identify crack was proposed. The experiments verify the availability and validity of the wavelet transform in identification of crack.

  10. Exotic wakes of flapping fins

    Schnipper, Teis

    downstream neighbour. When this neighbour is a second flag close by, they synchronise in frequency and the leader experiences a reduced drag compared to that on the lone flag. In case the follower is replaced by a flapping plate, upstream synchronisation and drag reduction is again found over a wide range of...... frequencies. Drag reductions up to a factor 3 are measured. Many results presented are obtained through flow visualisations. A great effort is made to produce visualisations of primarily high scientific quality, but often also with a certain aesthetic appeal....

  11. A study of the use of the supraclavicular artery flap for resurfacing of head, neck, and upper torso defects

    Telang Parag

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The head and neck region is an aesthetically demanding area to resurface because of its high visibility. Tissue defects in this area often require distant flaps or free flaps to achieve an aesthetically acceptable result. The use of the Supraclavicular artery flap represents an extremely versatile and useful option for the resurfacing of head, neck and upper torso defects. Furthermore, islanding the flap gives it a wide arc of rotation and the color and texture match is superior to that of free flaps harvested from distant sites. In our study, we used the flap (both unexpanded and expanded predominantly for resurfacing neck defects resulting from the release of post-burn contractures. However, its applicability in other indications would also be similar. Except one, all our flaps survived almost completely and the post-operative morbidity was very low. We conclude that the supraclavicular artery flap not only provides a reasonably good color and texture match but also maintains the multi-directional activity in the neck region.

  12. Laser resurfacing of skin flaps: an experimental comparison

    Srdan Babovic

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The influence of Coherent Ultrapulse, TruPulse and Erbium: YAG laser skin resurfacing on survival of the skin flaps when performed simultaneously was evaluated. Material and methods. We used twelve female Yucatan minipigs in the study. Skin flaps including paniculus carnosus were raised on the animals’ back. The flaps were sutured into the defect under tension. We designed 4 experimental groups: Control-Flaps only, Group 2-Flaps + 4 immediate TruPulse laser passes, Group 3-Flaps + 2 immediate Coherent UltraPulse laser passes, Group 4-Flaps – immediate 50J/cm2 total fluence with Erbium: YAG laser. Results. Flap survival in Control group was 98.8%. There was no flap in Group 2 with complete survival. Survival of the flaps in Group 2 (Tru-Pulse ranged from 75-90%, with average flap survival area of 85.2%. In Group 3 (UltraPulse all 24 flaps had some area of necrosis. Flap survival in Group 3 ranged from 75-95%, with an average of 85.6%. In Group 4 (Erbium: YAG flap survival area ranged from 70-95%, with all 24 flaps with some area of necrosis, with average flap survival area of 87.3%. There is a significant statistical difference in flap survival area between groups 2, 3 and 4 versus Control (p<0.001. Conclusion. The results of our study suggest that laser resurfacing of skin flaps sutured under tension in the same operative session is detrimental for skin flap survival. We also found no significant difference in flap survival area between TruPulse, Coherent UltraPulse and Erbium: YAG laser treated flaps.

  13. Pudendal thigh flap for repair of rectovaginal fistula.

    Sathappan, S; Rica, M A I

    2006-08-01

    The pudendal thigh flap or the Singapore flap is a versatile flap that can be used in the repair of recto-vaginal fistulae. Apart from the potential problem of hair growth, this neurovascular flap proves to be surprisingly simple in technique, robust and has a high potential for normal or near-normal function. PMID:17240589

  14. Early wound healing of laser in situ keratomileusis–like flaps after treatment with human corneal stromal stem cells

    Morgan, Siân R.; Dooley, Erin P.; Kamma-Lorger, Christina; Funderburgh, James L.; Funderburgh, Martha L.; Meek, Keith M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To use a well-established organ culture model to investigate the effects of corneal stromal stem cells on the optical and biomechanical properties of corneal wounds after laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK)–like flap creation. Setting School of Optometry and Vision Sciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff, Wales, United Kingdom. Design Experimental study. Methods The LASIK-like flaps were produced in sheep corneas. The flap beds were treated with corneal stromal stem cells and were then replaced and allowed to heal for different periods of up to 3 weeks in organ culture. The optical transmission of the cornea, the force required to detach the flap, and the presence of myofibroblasts near the flap bed were measured. Results Corneal stromal stem cell–treated flap beds were statistically significantly more transparent after 3 weeks in culture than the untreated controls. At 3 weeks, the mean force necessary to detach the flap was more than twice the force required for the respective control samples. Concurrently, there were 44% activated cells immediately below the flap margin of the controls compared with 29% in the same region of the corneal stromal stem cell–treated flaps. Conclusions In this system, the presence of corneal stromal stem cells at the wound margin significantly increased the adherence of LASIK-like flaps while maintaining corneal transparency. It is postulated that this is achieved by the deposition of extracellular connective tissue similar to that found in the normal cornea and by the paucity of activated keratocytes (myofibroblasts), which are known to scatter a significant amount of the incident light. Financial Disclosure No author has a financial or proprietary interest in any material or method mentioned. PMID:27026456

  15. Total endoscopic free flap harvest of a serratus anterior fascia flap for microsurgical lower leg reconstruction

    Erdmann, Alfons

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available [english] Background: A tremendous number of free flaps have been developed in the past. As the surgical result depends not only on a successful flap transfer but also on the harvest, this paper details the procedures for undertaking the first total endoscopic harvest of a serratus fascia flap for free flap transplantation to the lower leg. Patient and methods: In September 2012 we performed the first total endoscopic serratus anterior fascia free flap harvest. The incision of 2.5 cm length was made 10 cm in front of anterior muscle border of the latissimus dorsi at level with the midthorax. After insertion of a flexible laparoscopic single port system we started CO gas insufflation. We used this setting to meticulously prepare a neo cavity between atissimus dorsi and M. serratus anterior. The vessels were dissected and the thoraco-dorsal nerve was separated. With a second auxiliary incision we used a clamp to support the raising of the fascia flap from the underlying muscle. Finally we clipped the vessels to the latissimus dorsi muscle and the flap vessels at the Arteria and Vena axillaris. The flap was extracted via the 2.5 cm incision.Results: We were able to perform a total endoscopic harvest of a serratus fascia flap for free flap reconstruction of soft tissues. With this new operative technique we were able to avoid a long skin incision, which in our view lowers the morbidity at the harvest area.Conclusion: We describe a new method for the total endoscopic harvest of the serratus fascia flap for free flap transfer. The flap was harvested within reasonable time and following surgery leaves the patient with minimal donor site morbidity compared to the open technique.

  16. Wind Tunnel Evaluation of a Model Helicopter Main-Rotor Blade With Slotted Airfoils at the Tip

    Noonan, Kevin W.; Yeager, William T., Jr.; Singleton, Jeffrey D.; Wilbur, Matthew L.; Mirick, Paul H.

    2001-01-01

    Data for rotors using unconventional airfoils are of interest to permit an evaluation of this technology's capability to meet the U.S. Army's need for increased helicopter mission effectiveness and improved safety and survivability. Thus, an experimental investigation was conducted in the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) to evaluate the effect of using slotted airfoils in the rotor blade tip region (85 to 100 percent radius) on rotor aerodynamic performance and loads. Four rotor configurations were tested in forward flight at advance ratios from 0.15 to 0.45 and in hover in-ground effect. The hover tip Mach number was 0.627, which is representative of a design point of 4000-ft geometric altitude and a temperature of 95 F. The baseline rotor configuration had a conventional single-element airfoil in the tip region. A second rotor configuration had a forward-slotted airfoil with a -6 deg slat, a third configuration had a forward-slotted airfoil with a -10 slat, and a fourth configuration had an aft-slotted airfoil with a 3 deg flap (trailing edge down). The results of this investigation indicate that the -6 deg slat configuration offers some performance and loads benefits over the other three configurations.

  17. Hydrodynamic schooling of flapping swimmers

    Becker, Alexander D.; Masoud, Hassan; Newbolt, Joel W.; Shelley, Michael; Ristroph, Leif

    2015-10-01

    Fish schools and bird flocks are fascinating examples of collective behaviours in which many individuals generate and interact with complex flows. Motivated by animal groups on the move, here we explore how the locomotion of many bodies emerges from their flow-mediated interactions. Through experiments and simulations of arrays of flapping wings that propel within a collective wake, we discover distinct modes characterized by the group swimming speed and the spatial phase shift between trajectories of neighbouring wings. For identical flapping motions, slow and fast modes coexist and correspond to constructive and destructive wing-wake interactions. Simulations show that swimming in a group can enhance speed and save power, and we capture the key phenomena in a mathematical model based on memory or the storage and recollection of information in the flow field. These results also show that fluid dynamic interactions alone are sufficient to generate coherent collective locomotion, and thus might suggest new ways to characterize the role of flows in animal groups.

  18. LAVA Applications to Open Rotors

    Kiris, Cetin C.; Housman, Jeff; Barad, Mike; Brehm, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Outline: LAVA (Launch Ascent Vehicle Aerodynamics); Introduction; Acoustics Related Applications; LAVA Applications to Open Rotor; Structured Overset Grids; Cartesian Grid with Immersed Boundary; High Speed Case; High Speed Case with Plate Low Speed Case.

  19. Design of composite flywheel rotor

    Yue BAI; Qingjia GAO; Haiwen LI; Yihui WU; Ming XUAN

    2008-01-01

    A design method for a flywheel rotor com-posed of a composite rim and a metal hub is proposed by studying the connection between the rotor and the driving machine. The influence of some factors such as the rotor material, configuration, connection, and frac-ture techniques on energy density is analyzed. The results show that the ratio of the inner radius to outer radius of the rim is the key factor, and is determined by the rim material. Optimizing the hub can further efficiently improve energy density. The composite flywheel rotor is produced and its rotation stress has been tested at the speed of 20 krpm. The emulation results are consistent with testing results, which proves that the introduced design method is useful.

  20. ATEFlap aerodynamic model, a dynamic stall model including the effects of trailing edge flap deflection

    Bergami, L.; Gaunaa, M.

    2012-02-15

    The report presents the ATEFlap aerodynamic model, which computes the unsteady lift, drag and moment on a 2D airfoil section equipped with Adaptive Trailing Edge Flap. The model captures the unsteady response related to the effects of the vorticity shed into the wake, and the dynamics of flow separation a thin-airfoil potential flow model is merged with a dynamic stall model of the Beddoes-Leishmann type. The inputs required by the model are steady data for lift, drag, and moment coefficients as function of angle of attack and flap deflection. Further steady data used by the Beddoes- Leishmann dynamic stall model are computed in an external preprocessor application, which gives the user the possibility to verify, and eventually correct, the steady data passed to the aerodynamic model. The ATEFlap aerodynamic model is integrated in the aeroelastic simulation tool HAWC2, thus al- lowing to simulate the response of a wind turbine with trailing edge flaps on the rotor. The algorithms used by the preprocessor, and by aerodynamic model are presented, and modifications to previous implementations of the aerodynamic model are briefly discussed. The performance and the validity of the model are verified by comparing the dynamic response computed by the ATEFlap with solutions from CFD simulations. (Author)

  1. The DelFly design, aerodynamics, and artificial intelligence of a flapping wing robot

    de Croon, G C H E; Remes, B D W; Ruijsink, R; De Wagter, C

    2016-01-01

    This book introduces the topics most relevant to autonomously flying flapping wing robots: flapping-wing design, aerodynamics, and artificial intelligence. Readers can explore these topics in the context of the "Delfly", a flapping wing robot designed at Delft University in The Netherlands. How are tiny fruit flies able to lift their weight, avoid obstacles and predators, and find food or shelter? The first step in emulating this is the creation of a micro flapping wing robot that flies by itself. The challenges are considerable: the design and aerodynamics of flapping wings are still active areas of scientific research, whilst artificial intelligence is subject to extreme limitations deriving from the few sensors and minimal processing onboard. This book conveys the essential insights that lie behind success such as the DelFly Micro and the DelFly Explorer. The DelFly Micro, with its 3.07 grams and 10 cm wing span, is still the smallest flapping wing MAV in the world carrying a camera, whilst the DelFly Expl...

  2. Fibrin glue for Gundersen flap surgery

    Chung HW

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Hsi-Wei Chung,1 Jodhbir S Mehta1–31Singapore National Eye Centre, Singapore; 2Tissue Engineering and Stem Cell Group, Singapore Eye Research Institute, Singapore; 3Department of Clinical Sciences, Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School, SingaporePurpose: To evaluate the feasibility of fibrin glue in Gundersen flap surgery.Design: Prospective case series.Study subjects: Seven eyes of seven subjects who had undergone Gundersen flap surgery from 2009 to 2011 at the Singapore National Eye Centre, Singapore.Methods: Review of case records for outcomes after Gundersen flap surgery.Main outcome measures: Surgical success was defined as achieving a stable ocular surface. Complications to be noted included flap retraction or exposure of underlying corneal surface.Results: Surgical success was achieved in all eyes with significant reduction in ocular surface inflammation. No retractions were noted and recovery was uncomplicated.Conclusion: Fibrin glue application is a viable alternative to sutures in Gundersen flap surgery. It reduces surgical downtime, gives faster ocular surface rehabilitation, and offers similar outcomes to conventional conjunctival flap surgery.Keywords: Gundersen, conjunctival flap, fibrin glue

  3. Ontogeny of aerial righting and wing flapping in juvenile birds

    Evangelista, Dennis; Huynh, Tony; Krivitskiy, Igor; Dudley, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Mechanisms of aerial righting in juvenile Chukar Partridge (Alectoris chukar) were studied from hatching through 14 days post hatching (dph). Asymmetric movements of the wings were used from 1 to 8 dph to effect progressively more successful righting behaviour via body roll. Following 8 dph, wing motions transitioned to bilaterally symmetric flapping that yielded aerial righting via nose down pitch, along with substantial increases in vertical force production during descent. Ontogenetically, the use of such wing motions to effect aerial righting precedes both symmetric flapping and a previously documented behaviour in chukar (i.e., wing assisted incline running) hypothesized to be relevant to incipient flight evolution in birds. These findings highlight the importance of asymmetric wing activation and controlled aerial manoeuvres during bird development, and are potentially relevant to understanding the origins of avian flight.

  4. Ontogeny of aerial righting and wing flapping in juvenile birds.

    Evangelista, Dennis; Cam, Sharlene; Huynh, Tony; Krivitskiy, Igor; Dudley, Robert

    2014-08-01

    Mechanisms of aerial righting in juvenile chukar partridge (Alectoris chukar) were studied from hatching to 14 days-post-hatching (dph). Asymmetric movements of the wings were used from 1 to 8 dph to effect progressively more successful righting behaviour via body roll. Following 8 dph, wing motions transitioned to bilaterally symmetric flapping that yielded aerial righting via nose-down pitch, along with substantial increases in vertical force production during descent. Ontogenetically, the use of such wing motions to effect aerial righting precedes both symmetric flapping and a previously documented behaviour in chukar (i.e. wing-assisted incline running) hypothesized to be relevant to incipient flight evolution in birds. These findings highlight the importance of asymmetric wing activation and controlled aerial manoeuvres during bird development and are potentially relevant to understanding the origins of avian flight. PMID:25165451

  5. Quantum rotor in nanostructured superconductors

    Lin, Shi-Hsin; Milošević, M. V.; Covaci, L.; Jankó, B.; Peeters, F.M.

    2014-01-01

    Despite its apparent simplicity, the idealized model of a particle constrained to move on a circle has intriguing dynamic properties and immediate experimental relevance. While a rotor is rather easy to set up classically, the quantum regime is harder to realize and investigate. Here we demonstrate that the quantum dynamics of quasiparticles in certain classes of nanostructured superconductors can be mapped onto a quantum rotor. Furthermore, we provide a straightforward experimental procedure...

  6. Higher harmonic control analysis for vibration reduction of helicopter rotor systems

    Nguyen, Khanh Q.

    1994-01-01

    operating in a transition flight regime and for an articulated rotor operating at the level-flight boundary (high speed and high thrust conditions) indicate that blade parameters including flap, lag, torsion stiffness distributions, linear pretwist, chordwise offset of center-of-mass from elastic axis and chordwise offset of elastic axis from aerodynamic center can be selected to minimize the actuator power requirements for HHC.

  7. Use of Martius flap in the complex female urethral surgery

    Kasyan, George; Tupikina, Nataliya; Pushkar, Dmitry

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Objectives were to evaluate safety and patient reported perception of the Martius fibroadipose flap for complex female urethra reconstruction. Material and methods Patients operated with a Martius flap were contacted again via telephone to rate their self–perception on cosmetic appearance, pain or numbness of the flap harvest site. Results 37 women (mean age of 46.8 yrs.) were operated with Martius flaps. Complications were limited to bleeding from the flap bed in 19% (7/37); hem...

  8. The plane problem of the flapping wing

    Birnbaum, Walter

    1954-01-01

    In connection with an earlier report on the lifting vortex sheet which forms the basis of the following investigations this will show how the methods developed there are also suitable for dealing with the air forces for a wing with a circulation variable with time. The theory of a propulsive wing flapping up and down periodically in the manner of a bird's wing is developed. This study shows how the lift and its moment result as a function of the flapping motion, what thrust is attainable, and how high is the degree of efficiency of this flapping propulsion unit if the air friction is disregarded.

  9. Neural Anatomy of the Anterolateral Thigh Flap

    Luenam, Suriya; Prugsawan, Krit; Kosiyatrakul, Arkaphat; Chotanaphuti, Thanainit; Sriya, Piyanee

    2015-01-01

    The anterolateral thigh (ALT) flap is one of the commonly used sensate flaps for intra-oral, hand, and foot reconstruction. The objective of this study was to describe the anatomic location of the sensory nerves supplying the ALT flap in relation to the surface landmarks and with the vascular pedicles. The dissections were carried out in 28 embalmed specimens. An axial line from the anterior superior iliac spine to the superolateral border of the patella and two circles with radii of 5 and 10...

  10. Dynamic response of a piezoelectric flapping wing

    Kumar, Alok; Khandwekar, Gaurang; Venkatesh, S.; Mahapatra, D. R.; Dutta, S.

    2015-03-01

    Piezo-composite membranes have advantages over motorized flapping where frequencies are high and certain coupling between bending and twisting is useful to generate lift and forward flight. We draw examples of fruit fly and bumble bee. Wings with Piezo ceramic PZT coating are realized. The passive mechanical response of the wing is characterized experimentally and validated using finite element simulation. Piezoelectric actuation with uniform electrode coating is characterized and optimal frequencies for flapping are identified. The experimental data are used in an empirical model and advanced ratio for a flapping insect like condition for various angular orientations is estimated.

  11. Blended Cutout Flap for Reduction of Jet-Flap Interaction Noise

    Czech, Michael J (Inventor); Thomas, Russell H. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An aircraft system includes a wing and a trailing edge device coupled to the wing. The trailing edge device is movable relative to the wing, and includes a leading edge and a trailing edge having a center flap portion and a plurality of outer edge portions integrally combined with the center flap portion such that the center flap portion is shorter in width than that of outer edge portions.

  12. BVI induced vibration and noise alleviation by active and passive approaches

    Liu, Li

    This dissertation describes the development of a comprehensive aeroelastic/aeroacoustic simulation capability for the modeling of vibration and noise in rotorcraft induced by blade-vortex interaction (BVI). Subsequently this capability is applied to study vibration and noise reduction, using active and passive control approaches. The active approach employed is the actively controlled partial span trailing edge flaps (ACF), implemented in single and dual, servo and plain flap configurations. The passive approach is based on varying the sweep and anhedral on the tip of the rotor. Two different modern helicopters are chosen as the baseline for the implementation of ACF approach, one resembling a four-bladed MBB BO-105 hingeless rotor and the other similar to a five-bladed MD-900 bearingless rotor. The structural model is based on a finite element approach capable of simulating composite helicopter blades with swept tips, and representing multiple load paths at the blade root which is a characteristic of bearingless rotors. An unsteady compressible aerodynamic model based on a rational function approximation (RFA) approach is combined with a free wake analysis which has been enhanced by improving the wake analysis resolution and modeling a dual vortex structure. These enhancements are important for capturing BVI effects. A method for predicting compressible unsteady blade surface pressure distribution on rotor blades has been developed, which is required by the acoustic analysis. A modified version of helicopter noise code WOPWOP with provisions for blade flexibility has been combined with the aeroelastic analysis to predict the BVI noise. Several variants of the higher harmonic control (HHC) algorithm have been applied for the active noise control, as well as the simultaneous vibration and noise control. Active control of BVI noise is accomplished using feedback from an onboard microphone. The simulation has been extensively validated against experimental data and

  13. Propeller Flap Reconstruction in Post Oncological Thigh Defect: "The Move in Flap".

    Nambi, G I; Salunke, Abhijeet Ashok

    2015-06-01

    Reconstruction of soft tissue defects of the limb after tumor resection is challenging question for oncosurgeons. The management differs from reconstruction of post traumatic defects due to the complexity of the primary surgery and subsequent radiation. The conventional propeller flap is based on a perforator which is located close to the defect; but in present case the perforator was located far away from the defect. So we describe it as "Move in flap" as the flap rotated a large volume of soft tissue lying between the defect and the perforator. We present a case of post oncological thigh defect with reconstruction using a propeller flap based on distal anteromedial perforator. PMID:26405422

  14. Influence of the rotor slit depth on the performance of the solid-rotor induction motor

    Aho, T.; Nerg, J.; Pyrhoenen, J. [Lappeenranta Univ. of Tech., Dept. of Electrical Engineering (Finland)

    2005-07-01

    The polyphase induction motor with solid iron rotor offers undoubted advantages in terms of construction simplicity and strength over conventional induction motors when the elevated rotation speed is needed. In this paper a three-phase induction motor with slitted solid-rotor is analyzed using two-dimensional finite-element method. Different rotor designs are studied in order to find out the influence of the rotor slit depth on the motor performance characteristics. It was found that the rotor slits should reach very deep inside the rotor. The depth of the rotor slitting is restricted by the saturation of the rotor material between the slits. Also the mechanical strength of the rotor material limits the depth of the rotor slitting. It is shown that in order to reduce the mechanical stress and the saturation of the rotor material between the slits the slitting should be made in such a way that every second slit is deeper than the other. (orig.)

  15. The range of a rotor walk

    Florescu, Laura; Levine, Lionel; Peres, Yuval

    2014-01-01

    In a \\emph{rotor walk} the exits from each vertex follow a prescribed periodic sequence. On an infinite Eulerian graph embedded periodically in $\\R^d$, we show that any simple rotor walk, regardless of rotor mechanism or initial rotor configuration, visits at least on the order of $t^{d/(d+1)}$ distinct sites in $t$ steps. We prove a shape theorem for the rotor walk on the comb graph with i.i.d.\\ uniform initial rotors, showing that the range is of order $t^{2/3}$ and the asymptotic shape of ...

  16. Periodic and Chaotic Flapping of Insectile Wings

    Huang, Yangyang

    2015-01-01

    Insects use flight muscles attached at the base of the wings to produce impressive wing flapping frequencies. The maximum power output of these flight muscles is insufficient to maintain such wing oscillations unless there is good elastic storage of energy in the insect flight system. Here, we explore the intrinsic self-oscillatory behavior of an insectile wing model, consisting of two rigid wings connected at their base by an elastic torsional spring. We study the wings behavior as a function of the total energy and spring stiffness. Three types of behavior are identified: end-over-end rotation, chaotic motion, and periodic flapping. Interestingly, the region of periodic flapping decreases as energy increases but is favored as stiffness increases. These findings are consistent with the fact that insect wings and flight muscles are stiff. They further imply that, by adjusting their muscle stiffness to the desired energy level, insects can maintain periodic flapping mechanically for a range of operating condit...

  17. Postirradiation flap infection about the oral cavity

    Postirradiation alteration of oral flora is well documented in the literature. Infection as a complication leading to partial or complete loss of a flap used to reconstruct a defect in the oral cavity is a worrisome outcome. We describe how a flap that was judged clinically to be viable became overwhelmingly infected with the Klebsiella oxytoca, an oral cavity pathogen encountered in this patient following irradiation. Local and systemic changes led to detachment of the flap. This complication may be explained, in view of the absence of venous congestion or arterial ischemia both clinically and pathologically, by the proven contamination of the flap by the Klebsiella pathogen. Local factors resulted in lower resistance and subsequent overwhelming infection. Discussion of the case, review of pertinent literature, and proposed solutions are presented

  18. A dynamical system for interacting flapping swimmers

    Oza, Anand; Ramananarivo, Sophie; Ristroph, Leif; Shelley, Michael

    2015-11-01

    We present the results of a theoretical investigation into the dynamics of interacting flapping swimmers. Our study is motivated by the recent experiments of Becker et al., who studied a one-dimensional array of self-propelled flapping wings that swim within each other's wakes in a water tank. They discovered that the system adopts certain ``schooling modes'' characterized by specific spatial phase relationships between swimmers. To rationalize these phenomena, we develop a discrete dynamical system in which the swimmers are modeled as heaving airfoils that shed point vortices during each flapping cycle. We then apply our model to recent experiments in the Applied Math Lab, in which two tandem flapping airfoils are free to choose both their speed and relative positions. We expect that our model may be used to understand how schooling behavior is influenced by hydrodynamics in more general contexts. Thanks to the NSF for its support.

  19. Behind the performance of flapping flyers

    Ramananarivo, Sophie; Thiria, Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    Saving energy and enhancing performance are secular preoccupations shared by both nature and human beings. In animal locomotion, flapping flyers or swimmers rely on the flexibility of their wings or body to passively increase their efficiency using an appropriate cycle of storing and releasing elastic energy. Despite the convergence of many observations pointing out this feature, the underlying mechanisms explaining how the elastic nature of the wings is related to propulsive efficiency remain unclear. Here we use an experiment with a self-propelled simplified insect model allowing to show how wing compliance governs the performance of flapping flyers. Reducing the description of the flapping wing to a forced oscillator model, we pinpoint different nonlinear effects that can account for the observed behavior ---in particular a set of cubic nonlinearities coming from the clamped-free beam equation used to model the wing and a quadratic damping term representing the fluid drag associated to the fast flapping mo...

  20. An analytic modeling and system identification study of rotor/fuselage dynamics at hover

    Hong, Steven W.; Curtiss, H. C., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    A combination of analytic modeling and system identification methods have been used to develop an improved dynamic model describing the response of articulated rotor helicopters to control inputs. A high-order linearized model of coupled rotor/body dynamics including flap and lag degrees of freedom and inflow dynamics with literal coefficients is compared to flight test data from single rotor helicopters in the near hover trim condition. The identification problem was formulated using the maximum likelihood function in the time domain. The dynamic model with literal coefficients was used to generate the model states, and the model was parametrized in terms of physical constants of the aircraft rather than the stability derivatives, resulting in a significant reduction in the number of quantities to be identified. The likelihood function was optimized using the genetic algorithm approach. This method proved highly effective in producing an estimated model from flight test data which included coupled fuselage/rotor dynamics. Using this approach it has been shown that blade flexibility is a significant contributing factor to the discrepancies between theory and experiment shown in previous studies. Addition of flexible modes, properly incorporating the constraint due to the lag dampers, results in excellent agreement between flight test and theory, especially in the high frequency range.

  1. An analytical investigation of the performance of wind-turbines with gyrocopter-like rotors

    Kentfield, J.A.C.; Brophy, D.C. [Univ. of Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

    1997-12-31

    The performance was predicted of a wind-turbine, intended for electrical power generation, the rotor of which is similar in configuration to the rotor of an autogyro or gyrocopter as originated by Cierva. Hence the rotor axis of spin is tilted downwind, for maximum power production, by an angle of 40{degrees} to 50{degrees} relative to the vertical with power regulation by modulation of the tilt angle. Because the rotor of a Cierva turbine generates lift the simple, non-twisted, fixed-pitch blades {open_quotes}fly{close_quotes} and are self supporting thereby eliminating flap-wise bending moments when the blades are hinged at their roots. It was found from the analysis that it is possible to reduce tower bending moments substantially relative to a conventional horizontal axis turbine of equal power output and also, for equal maximum hub heights and blade tip altitudes, a Cierva turbine is capable, at a prescribed wind speed, of a greater power output than a conventional horizontal axis machine.

  2. Terfenol-D driven flaps for helicopter vibration reduction

    Fenn, Ralph C.; Downer, James R.; Bushko, Dariusz A.; Gondhalekar, Vijay; Ham, Norman D.

    1996-02-01

    The utility of helicopter aviation is limited by the high vibration levels caused by the interaction of each rotor blade with the wake of preceding blades. Existing full-blade actuation using a swashplate has various problems such as insufficient bandwidth, limitations in the number of harmonics controlled, high maintenance, and lack of spanwise lift variation. These problems are avoided by the proposed flap operated, individual blade control system, which uses magnetostrictive actuation technology. Terfenol-D actuation has many advantages over competing technologies such as hydraulic systems, electric motors, and piezoelectric elements. These benefits include all-electric operation, simplicity and reliability, low mass, low voltage, and insensitivity to centripetal acceleration. A blade mounted Terfenol-D actuator was developed for the high-weight-penalty helicopter application. The optimum coil to Terfenol-D volume ratio was derived that gives the highest mechanical power output for a small actuator envelope and mass. A fixed ability to dissipate coil resistive losses is assumed. The magnetostrictive actuation system will weigh less than 1% of gross vehicle weight, and use only 0.7% of cruise power. Other required subsystems of the vibration reduction system are available from commercial sources or are described in the literature. Helicopter vibration reduction greater than 90% is predicted because of superior actuator performance and individual blade control. This magnetostrictive actuator technology will also produce future helicopter systems having lower noise and higher performance. Such advances will significantly improve the utility and competitiveness of helicopters for civilian and military transportation.

  3. Mandibular reconstruction in irradiated patients utilizing myosseous-cutaneous flaps

    Myosseous-cutaneous flaps were used for mandibular reconstruction in 16 irradiated patients. Three of six sternomastoid-clavicle flaps failed (all in conjunction with a neck dissection), as did one of 10 pectoralis major-anterior-fifth rib flaps. One trapezius-scapular flap was used and it succeeded. We found the blood supply of the sternomastoid-clavicle flap too tenuous for use in conjunction with a neck dissection. The trapezius-scapular flap had too short an arc of rotation to be used for defects other than those in the horizontal ramus. In addition, this flap required a change of position and created an undesirable functional deformity. The pectoralis major-fifth rib flap, in contrast, could be used for a variety of defects, in conjunction with a neck dissection, and did not require a change of position during operation. We found it to be the most versatile and dependable of the flaps employed in this series

  4. The Effect of Epigallocatechin Gallate on Flap Viability of Rat Perforator Abdominal Flaps.

    Aksakal, İbrahim Alper; Küçüker, İsmail; Önger, Mehmet Emin; Engin, Murat Sinan; Keleş, Musa Kemal; Demir, Ahmet

    2016-05-01

    Background Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) is a substance abundant in green tea. In this study, the effects of EGCG on perforator flap viability were investigated. Methods A total of 40 rats were assigned to four groups of 10 each. In each subject, a 4 × 6 cm abdominal skin flap was raised and adapted back onto its place. In the control group, no further procedures were taken. In the flap group, 40 mg/kg/d EGCG was injected into the flap. In the gavage group, 100 mg/kg/d EGCG was given through a feeding tube. In the intraperitoneal group, 50 mg/kg/d EGCG was injected intraperitoneally. On the 7th postoperative day, flaps were photographed and the viable areas were measured and compared via a one-way analysis of variance. Results The ratios of viable and contracted flap area were 9.15/12.01, 4.59/16.46, 11.56/11.20, and 11.65/10.77 cm(2) for the control, flap group, gavage group, and intraperitoneal group, respectively. While the flap group yielded the worst results in the sense of flap contraction and viability (p < 0.001), the gavage and intraperitoneal groups were significantly better than those of the control group (p = 0.03). Histologically, epidermal, papillary dermal, and capillary tissue volumes were evaluated. In comparison to the control group, the flap group yielded significantly increased epidermal and dermal volumes (p = 0.03), however, these values were significantly decreased (p = 0.04) in the gavage and intraperitoneal groups. Capillary volumes were significantly decreased in EGCG treatment groups (p < 0.01). Conclusion Our experiment has shown that oral and intraperitoneal administration of EGCG increases the perforator flap viability when compared with controls, while direct injection decreases the viability. PMID:26919381

  5. Preliminary Design and Evaluation of an Airfoil with Continuous Trailing-Edge Flap

    Shen, Jinwei; Thornburgh, Robert P.; Kreshock, Andrew R.; Wilbur, Matthew L.; Liu, Yi

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the preliminary design and evaluation of an airfoil with active continuous trailing-edge flap (CTEF) as a potential rotorcraft active control device. The development of structural cross-section models of a continuous trailing-edge flap airfoil is described. The CTEF deformations with MFC actuation are predicted by NASTRAN and UM/VABS analyses. Good agreement is shown between the predictions from the two analyses. Approximately two degrees of CTEF deflection, defined as the rotation angle of the trailing edge, is achieved with the baseline MFC-PZT bender. The 2D aerodynamic characteristics of the continuous trailing-edge flap are evaluated using a CFD analysis. The aerodynamic efficiency of a continuous trailing-edge flap is compared to that of a conventional discrete trailing-edge flap (DTEF). It is found that the aerodynamic characteristics of a CTEF are equivalent to those of a conventional DTEF with the same deflection angle but with a smaller flap chord. A fluid structure interaction procedure is implemented to predict the deflection of the continuous trailingedge flap under aerodynamic pressure. The reductions in CTEF deflection are overall small when aerodynamic pressure is applied: 2.7% reduction is shown with a CTEF deflection angle of two degrees and at angle of attack of six degrees. In addition, newly developed MFC-PMN actuator is found to be a good supplement to MFC-PZT when applied as the bender outside layers. A mixed MFC-PZT and MFC-PMN bender generates 3% more CTEF deformation than an MFC-PZT only bender and 5% more than an MFC-PMN only bender under aerodynamic loads.

  6. Crystal structure of type I 3-dehydroquinate dehydratase of Aquifex aeolicus suggests closing of active site flap is not essential for enzyme action.

    Devi, Aribam Swarmistha; Ebihara, Akio; Kuramitsu, Seiki; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Kumarevel, Thirumananseri; Ponnuraj, Karthe

    2013-03-01

    Structural analyses of enzymes involved in biosynthetic pathways that are present in micro-organisms, but absent from mammals (for example Shikimate pathway) are important in developing anti-microbial drugs. Crystal structure of the Shikimate pathway enzyme, type I 3-dehydroquinate dehydratase (3-DHQase) from the hyperthermophilic bacterium Aquifex aeolicus was solved both as an apo form and in complex with a ligand. The complex structure revealed an interesting structural difference when compared to other ligand-bound type I 3-DHQases suggesting that closure of the active site loop is not essential for catalysis. This provides new insights into the catalytic mechanism of type I 3-DHQases. PMID:23396056

  7. Rotor-to-stator Partial Rubbing and Its Effects on Rotor Dynamic Response

    Muszynska, Agnes; Franklin, Wesley D.; Hayashida, Robert D.

    1991-01-01

    Results from experimental and analytical studies on rotor to stationary element partial rubbings at several locations and their effects on rotor dynamic responses are presented. The mathematical model of a rubbing rotor is given. The computer program provides numerical results which agree with experimentally obtained rotor responses.

  8. The dog-ear flap as an alternative for breast reconstruction in patients who have already undergone a DIEAP flap.

    Colebunders, Britt; Depypere, Bernard; Van Landuyt, Koenraad

    2016-05-01

    Breast reconstruction in patients who have previously undergone deep inferior epigastric artery perforator flap (DIEAP) reconstruction or abdominoplasty is often challenging. Depending on patients' body habitus, several second-choice flaps have been described such as the transverse upper gracilis (TUG) flap, profundus femoris artery perforator (PFAP) flap, superior gluteal artery perforator (SGAP) flap, and lumbar artery perforator (LAP) flap. Patients who have undergone a DIEAP flap reconstruction or abdominoplasty occasionally present with dog ears on both sides of the abdominal scar. The adipose tissue and skin of these dog ears are supplied by perforators of the deep circumflex iliac artery (DCIA). The DCIA flap was first described in 1979 by Taylor. We introduce this abdominal "dog-ear" flap for autologous breast reconstruction. PMID:26951847

  9. Dorsal hand coverage with free serratus fascia flap

    Fotopoulos, Peter; Holmer, Per; Leicht, Pernille;

    2003-01-01

    serratus fascia flap, the connective tissue over the serratus muscle, for dorsal hand coverage. The flap consists of thin and well-vascularized pliable tissue, with gliding properties excellent for covering exposed tendons. It is based on the branches of the thoracodorsal artery, which are raised in the...... flap, leaving the long thoracic nerve intact on the serratus muscle. Coverage of the flap with split-thickness skin graft is done immediately. The free serratus fascia flap is an ideal flap for dorsal hand coverage when the extensor tendons are exposed, especially because of low donor-site morbidity....

  10. Maxillofacial reconstruction with nasolabial and facial artery musculomucosal flaps.

    Braasch, Daniel Cameron; Lam, Din; Oh, Esther S

    2014-08-01

    The nasolabial and facial artery musculomucosal (FAMM) flaps are predictable methods to reconstruct perioral and intraoral defects with vascularized tissue. The nasolabial flap can be harvested as an axial or random patterned flap, whereas the FAMM flap is truly an axial patterned flap, with either a superior or an inferior base. Both flaps have been widely used to provide predictable results, with low morbidity. Future studies are needed to further prove their use in compromised patients, including patients with a history of head and neck radiation and neck dissections. PMID:25086694

  11. The Internal Pudendal Artery Perforator Thigh Flap: A New Freestyle Pedicle Flap for the Ischial Region

    Ichiro Hashimoto, MD

    2014-05-01

    Conclusions: The perforator vessels of the internal pudendal artery are very close to the ischial tuberosity. Blood flow to the flap is reliable when careful debridement of the pressure sore is performed. The iPap thigh flap is a new option for soft-tissue defects in the ischial region, including ischial pressure sores.

  12. Rescue of Primary Incomplete Microkeratome Flap with Secondary Femtosecond Laser Flap in LASIK

    E. A. Razgulyaeva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available For laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK retreatments with a previous unsuccessful mechanical microkeratome-assisted surgery, some surgical protocols have been described as feasible, such as relifting of the flap or the creation of a new flap and even the change to a surface ablation procedure (photorefractive keratectomy (PRK. This case shows the use of femtosecond technology for the creation of a secondary flap to perform LASIK in a cornea with a primary incomplete flap obtained with a mechanical microkeratome. As we were unable to characterize the interface of the first partial lamellar cut, a thick flap was planned and created using a femtosecond laser platform. As the primary cut was very thick in the nasal quadrant, a piece of loose corneal tissue appeared during flap lifting which was fitted in its position and not removed. Despite this condition and considering the regularity of the new femtosecond laser cut, the treatment was uneventful. This case report shows the relevance of a detailed corneal analysis with an advanced imaging technique before performing a secondary flap in a cornea with a primary incomplete flap. The femtosecond laser technology seems to be an excellent tool to manage such cases successfully.

  13. Lower Extremity Reconstruction Using Vastus Lateralis Myocutaneous Flap versus Anterolateral Thigh Fasciocutaneous Flap

    Min Jae Lee

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background The anterolateral thigh (ALT perforator flap has become a popular option fortreating soft tissue defects of lower extremity reconstruction and can be combined witha segment of the vastus lateralis muscle. We present a comparison of the use of the ALTfasciocutaneous (ALT-FC and myocutaneous flaps.Methods We retrospectively reviewed patients in whom free-tissue transfer was performedbetween 2005 and 2011 for the reconstruction of lower extremity soft-tissue defects. Twentyfourpatients were divided into two groups: reconstruction using an ALT-FC flap (12 cases andreconstruction using a vastus lateralis myocutaneous (VL-MC flap (12 cases. Postoperativecomplications, functional results, cosmetic results, and donor-site morbidities were studied.Results Complete flap survival was 100% in both groups. A flap complication was noted inone case (marginal dehiscence of the ALT-FC group, and no complications were noted in theVL-MC group. In both groups, one case of partial skin graft loss occurred at the donor site,and debulking surgeries were needed for two cases. There were no significant differences inthe mean scores for either functional or cosmetic outcomes in either group.Conclusions The VL-MC flap is able to fill occasional dead space and has comparable survivalrates to ALT-FC with minimal donor-site morbidity. Additionally, the VL-MC flap is easily elevatedwithout myocutaneous perforator injury.

  14. The Diver with a Rotor

    Bharadwaj, Sudarsh; Dullin, Holger R; Leung, Karen; Tong, William

    2015-01-01

    We present and analyse a simple model for the twisting somersault. The model is a rigid body with a rotor attached which can be switched on and off. This makes it simple enough to devise explicit analytical formulas whilst still maintaining sufficient complexity to preserve the shape-changing dynamics essential for twisting somersaults in springboard and platform diving. With `rotor on' and with `rotor off' the corresponding Euler-type equations can be solved, and the essential quantities characterising the dynamics, such as the periods and rotation numbers, can be computed in terms of complete elliptic integrals. Thus we arrive at explicit formulas for how to achieve a dive with m somersaults and n twists in a given total time. This can be thought of as a special case of a geometric phase formula due to Cabrera 2007.

  15. Quantum rotor in nanostructured superconductors

    Lin, Shi-Hsin; Milošević, M. V.; Covaci, L.; Jankó, B.; Peeters, F. M.

    2014-04-01

    Despite its apparent simplicity, the idealized model of a particle constrained to move on a circle has intriguing dynamic properties and immediate experimental relevance. While a rotor is rather easy to set up classically, the quantum regime is harder to realize and investigate. Here we demonstrate that the quantum dynamics of quasiparticles in certain classes of nanostructured superconductors can be mapped onto a quantum rotor. Furthermore, we provide a straightforward experimental procedure to convert this nanoscale superconducting rotor into a regular or inverted quantum pendulum with tunable gravitational field, inertia, and drive. We detail how these novel states can be detected via scanning tunneling spectroscopy. The proposed experiments will provide insights into quantum dynamics and quantum chaos.

  16. A comparative molecular dynamics study on BACE1 and BACE2 flap flexibility.

    Kumalo, H M; Soliman, Mahmoud E

    2016-10-01

    Beta-amyloid precursor protein cleavage enzyme1 (BACE1) and beta-amyloid precursor protein cleavage enzyme2 (BACE2), members of aspartyl protease family, are close homologs and have high similarity in their protein crystal structures. However, their enzymatic properties are different, which leads to different clinical outcomes. In this study, we performed sequence analysis and all-atom molecular dynamic (MD) simulations for both enzymes in their ligand-free states in order to compare their dynamical flap behaviors. This is to enhance our understanding of the relationship between sequence, structure and the dynamics of this protein family. Sequence analysis shows that in BACE1 and BACE2, most of the ligand-binding sites are conserved, indicative of their enzymatic property as aspartyl protease members. The other conserved residues are more or less unsystematically localized throughout the structure. Herein, we proposed and applied different combined parameters to define the asymmetric flap motion; the distance, d1, between the flap tip and the flexible region; the dihedral angle, φ, to account for the twisting motion and the TriCα angle, θ2 and θ1. All four combined parameters were found to appropriately define the observed "twisting" motion during the flaps different conformational states. Additional analysis of the parameters indicated that the flaps can exist in an ensemble of conformations, i.e. closed, semi-open and open conformations for both systems. However, the behavior of the flap tips during simulations is different between BACE1 and BACE2. The BACE1 active site cavity is more spacious as compared to that of BACE2. The analysis of 10S loop and 113S loop showed a similar trend to that of flaps, with the BACE1 loops being more flexible and less stable than those of BACE2. We believe that the results, methods and perspectives highlighted in this report would assist researchers in the discovery of BACE inhibitors as potential Alzheimer's disease therapies

  17. A bio-inspired study on tidal energy extraction with flexible flapping wings

    Previous research on the flexible structure of flapping wings has shown an improved propulsion performance in comparison to rigid wings. However, not much is known about this function in terms of power efficiency modification for flapping wing energy devices. In order to study the role of the flexible wing deformation in the hydrodynamics of flapping wing energy devices, we computationally model the two-dimensional flexible single and twin flapping wings in operation under the energy extraction conditions with a large Reynolds number of 106. The flexible motion for the present study is predetermined based on a priori structural result which is different from a passive flexibility solution. Four different models are investigated with additional potential local distortions near the leading and trailing edges. Our simulation results show that the flexible structure of a wing is beneficial to enhance power efficiency by increasing the peaks of lift force over a flapping cycle, and tuning the phase shift between force and velocity to a favourable trend. Moreover, the impact of wing flexibility on efficiency is more profound at a low nominal effective angle of attack (AoA). At a typical flapping frequency f * = 0.15 and nominal effective AoA of 10°, a flexible integrated wing generates 7.68% higher efficiency than a rigid wing. An even higher increase, around six times that of a rigid wing, is achievable if the nominal effective AoA is reduced to zero degrees at feathering condition. This is very attractive for a semi-actuated flapping energy system, where energy input is needed to activate the pitching motion. The results from our dual-wing study found that a parallel twin-wing device can produce more power compared to a single wing due to the strong flow interaction between the two wings. (paper)

  18. A bio-inspired study on tidal energy extraction with flexible flapping wings.

    Liu, Wendi; Xiao, Qing; Cheng, Fai

    2013-09-01

    Previous research on the flexible structure of flapping wings has shown an improved propulsion performance in comparison to rigid wings. However, not much is known about this function in terms of power efficiency modification for flapping wing energy devices. In order to study the role of the flexible wing deformation in the hydrodynamics of flapping wing energy devices, we computationally model the two-dimensional flexible single and twin flapping wings in operation under the energy extraction conditions with a large Reynolds number of 106. The flexible motion for the present study is predetermined based on a priori structural result which is different from a passive flexibility solution. Four different models are investigated with additional potential local distortions near the leading and trailing edges. Our simulation results show that the flexible structure of a wing is beneficial to enhance power efficiency by increasing the peaks of lift force over a flapping cycle, and tuning the phase shift between force and velocity to a favourable trend. Moreover, the impact of wing flexibility on efficiency is more profound at a low nominal effective angle of attack (AoA). At a typical flapping frequency f * = 0.15 and nominal effective AoA of 10°, a flexible integrated wing generates 7.68% higher efficiency than a rigid wing. An even higher increase, around six times that of a rigid wing, is achievable if the nominal effective AoA is reduced to zero degrees at feathering condition. This is very attractive for a semi-actuated flapping energy system, where energy input is needed to activate the pitching motion. The results from our dual-wing study found that a parallel twin-wing device can produce more power compared to a single wing due to the strong flow interaction between the two wings. PMID:23981650

  19. Dielectric anomaly in coupled rotor systems

    Shima, Hiroyuki; Nakayama, Tsuneyoshi

    2004-01-01

    The correlated dynamics of coupled quantum rotors carrying electric dipole moment is theoretically investigated. The energy spectra of coupled rotors as a function of dipolar interaction energy is analytically solved. The calculated dielectric susceptibilities of the system show the peculiar temperature dependence different from that of isolated rotors.

  20. 14 CFR 29.1565 - Tail rotor.

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Tail rotor. 29.1565 Section 29.1565 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS....1565 Tail rotor. Each tail rotor must be marked so that its disc is conspicuous under normal...

  1. Dielectric anomaly in coupled rotor systems

    Shima, Hiroyuki; Nakayama, Tsuneyoshi

    2004-01-01

    The correlated dynamics of coupled quantum rotors carrying electric dipole moment is theoretically investigated. The energy spectra of coupled rotors as a function of dipolar interaction energy are analytically solved. The calculated dielectric susceptibilities of the system show a peculiar temperature dependence different from that of isolated rotors.

  2. 14 CFR 27.1565 - Tail rotor.

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Tail rotor. 27.1565 Section 27.1565 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS... Tail rotor. Each tail rotor must be marked so that its disc is conspicuous under normal daylight...

  3. Computer program for flexible rotor dynamics analysis

    Shen, F. A.

    1974-01-01

    Program analyzes general nonaxisymmetric and nonsynchronous transient and steady-state rotor dynamic performance of bending- and shear-wise flexible rotor-bearing system under various operating conditions. Program can be used as analytical study tool for general transient spin-speed and/or non-axisymmetric rotor motion.

  4. Toward regular arrays of molecular rotors

    Michl, Josef; Kaleta, Jiří; Kaletová, Eva; Mašát, Milan; Younes, Ali; Wen, Jin; Cipolloni, Marco; Dron, P.; Zhao, K.; Shen, Y.; Shoemaker, R. K.; Rogers, C. T.

    Praha : Czech Chemical Society, 2013. s. 39-39. [Liblice 2013. Advances in Organic, Bioorganic and Pharmaceutical Chemistry /48./. 01.11.2013-03.11.2013, Špindlerův Mlýn] EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 227756 - DIPOLAR ROTOR ARRAY Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : molecular rotor * inter-rotor interactions Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  5. Extended thoracodorsal artery perforator flap for breast reconstruction.

    Angrigiani, Claudio; Rancati, Alberto; Escudero, Ezequiel; Artero, Guillermo

    2015-12-01

    A total of 45 patients underwent partial or total autologous breast reconstruction after skin-sparing mastectomy, skin-reducing mastectomy, and quadrantectomy using a thoracodorsal artery perforator (TDAP) flap. The detailed surgical technique with its variations is explained in this report. The propeller, flip-over, conventional perforator, and muscle-sparing flaps have been described and evaluated. The flaps were partially or completely de-epithelialized. The conventional TDAP can be enlarged or "extended" as the traditional latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous (LD-MC) flap by incorporating the superior and inferior fat compartments. It can be referred to as the "extended TDAP flap". This technique augments the flap volume. In addition, this flap can serve as a scaffold for lipofilling to obtain autologous breast reconstruction in medium to large cases. There were two complete failures due to technical errors during flap elevation. Distal partial tissue suffering was observed in four flaps. These flaps were longer than usual; they reached the midline of the back. It is advisable to discard the distal medial quarter of the flap when it is designed up to the midline to avoid steatonecrosis or fibrosis. A retrospective analysis of the 39 flaps that survived completely revealed a satisfactory result in 82% of the cases. The main disadvantage of this procedure is the final scar. The TDAP flap is a reliable and safe method for partial or total breast autologous reconstruction. PMID:26645006

  6. Investigation of Rotor Radial Rotating Error upon AMB System

    WANG Kai; LI Yan

    2006-01-01

    This paper first suggests the use of the Fourier frequency transmission method of two dimensions function (2D FFT) to analyze radial rotating errors that occurred in a rotor. Based on this method a magnetic rotor is measured. The authors point out that the main cause to affect radial rotating accuracy of the rotating shaft at a high speed is the dynamic imbalance of the shaft itself. Finally the feed-forward control scheme is suggested to improve the accuracy of the shaft in an active magnetic bearing (AMB) system.

  7. Resonant vibration control of three-bladed wind turbine rotors

    Krenk, Steen; Svendsen, Martin Nymann; Høgsberg, Jan Becker

    2012-01-01

    Rotors with blades, as in wind turbines, are prone to vibrations due to the flexibility of the blades and the support. In the present paper a theory is developed for active control of a combined set of vibration modes in three-bladed rotors. The control system consists of identical collocated...... actuator-sensor pairs on each of the blades, and targets aset of three modes constituting a collective mode with identical motion of all the blades, and two independent whirling modes, in which a relative motion pattern moves forward or backward over the rotor. The natural frequency of the collective mode...... is typically lower than the frequency of the whirling modes due to support flexibility. The control signals from the blades are combined into a mean signal, addressing the collective mode, and three components from which the mean signal has be subtracted, addressing the pair of whirling modes. The...

  8. User`s Guide for the NREL Teetering Rotor Analysis Program (STRAP)

    Wright, A D

    1992-08-01

    The following report gives the reader an overview of instructions on the proper use of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (formerly the Solar Energy Research Institute, or SERI) teetering Rotor Analysis Program (STRAP version 2.20). STRAP is a derivative of the Force and Loads Analysis program (FLAP). It is intended as a tool for prediction of rotor and blade loads and response for only two-bladed teetering hub wind turbines. The effects of delta-3, undersling, hub mass, and wind turbulence are accounted for. The objectives of the report are to give an overview of the code and also show the methods of data input and correct code execution steps in order to model an example two-bladed teetering hub turbine. A large portion of the discussion (Sections 6.0, 7.0, and 8.0) is devoted to the subject of inputting and running the code for wind turbulence effects. The ability to include turbulent wind effects is perhaps the biggest change in the code since the release of FLAP version 2.01 in 1988. This report is intended to be a user`s guide. It does not contain a theoretical discussion on equations of motion, assumptions, underlying theory, etc. It is intended to be used in conjunction with Wright, Buhl, and Thresher (1988).

  9. Rotor disk cooling and rim sealing to prevent hot gas ingestion. Rotor reikyaku to hot gas no seal

    Hamabe, K. (Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan))

    1993-03-01

    In designing a high-temperature gas turbine disc, it is necessary to know pressure distribution around a disc, which correlates with flows inside and outside the disc. With design conditions becoming very stringent for efficiency improvement as a background, this paper describes latest trends in technologies on heat transfer around a disc and hot gas sealing while introducing reports on various studies. Generally speaking, fundamental researches on rotors without mainstreams have conventionally been carried out mainly in Europe and the U.S.A. Researches have become active recently on entrainment of mainstream gas where there is a mainstream that renders practical problems. The number of research papers is increasing sharply that relate to rotor shapes closer to those used in practical turbines incorporating moving and static blades, and high rotation Reynolds numbers. Further, studies using numerical analysis are on the increase, and rotor cooling studies are advancing remarkably in recent years. 36 refs., 10 figs.

  10. Modified cup flap for volar oblique fingertip amputations

    Ahmadli, A.

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We describe a modified volar “V-Y cup” flap for volar fingertip defects that do not exceed more than half of the distal phalanx for better aesthetic and functional outcome. In seven cases out of eight, the flap was elevated with a subdermal pedicle, whereas in one case, the flap was elevated as an island on the bilateral neurovascular bundle. The fingertips have been evaluated for sensibility using standard tests, hook nail deformity and patient satisfaction. Seven flaps have survived completely. The flap with skeletonized bilateral digital neurovascular bundle has shown signs of venous insufficiency on the 5 postoperative day with consecutive necrosis. Suturing the distal edges of the flap in a “cupping” fashion provided a normal pulp contour. The modified flap can be used for defects as mentioned above. Subdermally dissected pedicle-based flap is safe and easy to elevate. The aesthetic and functional outcomes have been reported to be satisfactory.

  11. Attitude Control of Small Quad-rotor Based on Active Disturbance Rejection Control Theory%基于自抗扰理论的小型四旋翼飞行器姿态控制

    张广昱; 袁昌盛

    2014-01-01

    针对四旋翼飞行器的强耦合性、非线性、易受外界干扰等控制难点,研究利用自抗扰控制器对四旋翼飞行器进行姿态控制的技术问题。通过牛顿-欧拉方程建立四旋翼飞行器动力学模型,将不确定性、耦合及参数摄动等干扰作为“总和干扰”,利用扩张状态观测器进行估计并动态反馈补偿,再利用非线性反馈抑制补偿残差,进行四旋翼飞行器姿态控制仿真实验。结果表明:在存在模型参数摄动和外界扰动的情况下,扩张状态观测器很好地实时估计和补偿了四旋翼飞行器的总和干扰,基于自抗扰的四旋翼飞行器姿态控制系统具有较好的动态品质、稳态精度以及较强的鲁棒性。%To solve the attitude control problem of small quad-rotor according to its complex coupling ,non-linear and serious internal/external disturbance feature ,a control scheme based on active disturbance rejection control technique is proposed .The dynamic model is established with Newton-Euler equations ,and the uncertainty , coupling and parameter perturbation are considered as total disturbance .Extended state observer is used to esti-mate and compensate the total disturbance .The non-linear state error feedback is used to restrain the compen-sate error ,and did simulation experiment of attitude control for small quad-rotor .The result of the simulation shows that the extended state observer of the active disturbance rejection control technique can estimate/com-pensate disturbance well under circumstance of parameter perturbation and disturbance .The attitude controller based on active disturbance rejection control theory shows good dynamic quality ,steady-state accuracy and strong robustness .

  12. The forked flap repair for hypospadias

    Anil Chadha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Despite the abundance of techniques for the repair of Hypospadias, its problems still persist and a satisfactory design to correct the penile curvature with the formation of neourethra from the native urethral tissue or genital or extragenital tissues, with minimal postoperative complications has yet to evolve. Aim: Persisting with such an endeavor, a new technique for the repair of distal and midpenile hypospadias is described. Materials and Methods: The study has been done in 70 cases over the past 11 years. The "Forked-Flap" repair is a single stage method for the repair of such Hypospadias with chordee. It takes advantage of the rich vascular communication at the corona and capitalizes on the established reliability of the meatal based flip-flap. The repair achieves straightening of the curvature of the penis by complete excision of chordee tissue from the ventral surface of the penis beneath the urethral plate. The urethra is reconstructed using the native plate with forked flap extensions and genital tissue relying on the concept of meatal based flaps. Water proofing by dartos tissue and reinforcement by Nesbit′s prepucial tissue transfer completes the one stage procedure. Statistical Analysis: An analysis of 70 cases of this single stage technique of repair of penile hypospadias with chordee, operated at 3 to 5 years of age over the past 11 years is presented. Results and Conclusion: The Forked Flap gives comparable and replicable results; except for a urethrocutaneous fistula rate of 4% no other complications were observed.

  13. Deltopectoral Flap in the Era of Microsurgery

    R. C. L. Chan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Our study aimed to review the role of deltopectoral (DP flap as a reconstructive option for defects in the head and neck region in the microvascular era. Methods. All patients who received DP flap reconstruction surgery at the Department of Surgery, Queen Mary Hospital, between 1999 and 2011 were recruited. Demographic data, indications for surgery, defect for reconstruction, and surgical outcomes were analyzed. Results. Fifty-four patients were included. All but two patients were operated for reconstruction after tumour resection. The remaining two patients were operated for necrotizing fasciitis and osteoradionecrosis. The majority of DP flaps were used to cover neck skin defect (63.0%. Other reconstructed defects included posterior pharyngeal wall (22.2%, facial skin defect (11.1%, and tracheal wall (3.7%. All donor sites were covered with partial thickness skin graft. Two patients developed partial flap necrosis at the tip and were managed conservatively. The overall flap survival rate was 96.3%. Conclusions. Albeit the technical advancements in microvascular surgery, DP still possesses multiple advantages (technical simplicity, reliable axial blood supply, large size, thinness, and pliability which allows it to remain as a useful, reliable, and versatile surgical option for head and neck reconstruction.

  14. 232Th, a rigid rotor

    We undertake the present work to treat 232Th with a soft rotor formula used recently by C. Bihari et. al for γ-band and modified by J.B. Gupta et. al. It describes energy in terms of moment of inertia and softness parameter

  15. Topological dynamics in supramolecular rotors.

    Palma, Carlos-Andres; Björk, Jonas; Rao, Francesco; Kühne, Dirk; Klappenberger, Florian; Barth, Johannes V

    2014-08-13

    Artificial molecular switches, rotors, and machines are set to establish design rules and applications beyond their biological counterparts. Herein we exemplify the role of noncovalent interactions and transient rearrangements in the complex behavior of supramolecular rotors caged in a 2D metal-organic coordination network. Combined scanning tunneling microscopy experiments and molecular dynamics modeling of a supramolecular rotor with respective rotation rates matching with 0.2 kcal mol(-1) (9 meV) precision, identify key steps in collective rotation events and reconfigurations. We notably reveal that stereoisomerization of the chiral trimeric units entails topological isomerization whereas rotation occurs in a topology conserving, two-step asynchronous process. In supramolecular constructs, distinct displacements of subunits occur inducing a markedly lower rotation barrier as compared to synchronous mechanisms of rigid rotors. Moreover, the chemical environment can be instructed to control the system dynamics. Our observations allow for a definition of mechanical cooperativity based on a significant reduction of free energy barriers in supramolecules compared to rigid molecules. PMID:25078022

  16. 14 CFR 25.1511 - Flap extended speed.

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flap extended speed. 25.1511 Section 25... Limitations § 25.1511 Flap extended speed. The established flap extended speed V FE must be established so that it does not exceed the design flap speed V F chosen under §§ 25.335(e) and 25.345, for...

  17. Pharyngo oesophageal strictures and its reconstruction by delto pectoral flaps

    Guha, Goutam; S Gupta; Chakraborty, S

    2005-01-01

    Delto pectoral flap is a thin and pliable cutaneous axial flap suitable for the reconstruction of pharynx and upper oesophagus. Corrosive stricture of the pharyngo oesophageal area can very well be reconstructed by deltopectoral flap. Oesophageal reconstruction by viscera like stomach or colon often produces anastomic stricture at the upper anastomic site with hypopharynx or upper oesophagus. Delto pectoral flap can also be used to reconstruct this anastomotic stricture. Postoperative swallow...

  18. The Use of the Juri Temporo-Parieto-Occipital Flap

    Juri, Jose; Valotta, Marìa Fernanda

    2005-01-01

    The temporo-parieto-occipital flap, introduced in 1969, was the first large monopedicled flap performed in the scalp for reconstructive and aesthetic purposes. Its versatility for correction of many areas of the scalp relies on its wide arch of rotation, based in the flap's pedicle, which is the superficial temporal artery and vein. The axial pattern of the flap is explained by the unique kind of vascularization present in the scalp, based on a profuse intraparietal blood flow with multiple a...

  19. The submental island flap for reconstruction of facial defects.

    Prabhune K; Patni S; Gomes D.; Bhathena H; Kavarana N

    1998-01-01

    The procedure of facial resurfacing dictates that there should be an excellent colour and texture match between the facial and the transposed skin. Cervical flaps e.g. platysma flap are commonly used for reconstruction of facial defects but, with disadvantages like limited mobility, unacceptable donor site and unpredictable outcomes. The submental island flap is a new addition to the armamentorium of the Plastic Surgeon. It is an axial pattern flap based on the submental branch of facial arte...

  20. Perforator plus flaps: Optimizing results while preserving function and esthesis

    Mehrotra Sandeep

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The tenuous blood supply of traditional flaps for wound cover combined with collateral damage by sacrifice of functional muscle, truncal vessels, or nerves has been the bane of reconstructive procedures. The concept of perforator plus flaps employs dual vascular supply to flaps. By safeguarding perforators along with supply from its base, robust flaps can be raised in diverse situations. This is achieved while limiting collateral damage and preserving nerves, vessels, and functioning muscle with better function and aesthesis. Materials and Methods: The perforator plus concept was applied in seven different clinical situations. Functional muscle and fasciocutaneous flaps were employed in five and adipofascial flaps in two cases, primarily involving lower extremity defects and back. Adipofascial perforator plus flaps were employed to provide cover for tibial fracture in one patients and chronic venous ulcer in another. Results: All flaps survived without any loss and provided long-term stable cover, both over soft tissue and bone. Functional preservation was achieved in all cases where muscle flaps were employed with no clinical evidence of loss of power. There was no sensory loss or significant oedema in or distal to the flap in both cases where neurovascular continuity was preserved during flap elevation. Fracture union and consolidation were satisfactory. One patient had minimal graft loss over fascia which required application of stored grafts with subsequent take. No patient required re-operation. Conclusions: Perforator plus concept is holistic and applicable to most flap types in varied situations. It permits the exercise of many locoregional flap options while limiting collateral functional damage. Aesthetic considerations are also addressed while raising adipofascial flaps because of no appreciable donor defects. With quick operating times and low failure risk, these flaps can be a better substitute to traditional flaps and at

  1. The aerodynamic and structural study of flapping wing vehicles

    Zhou, Liangchen

    2013-01-01

    This thesis reports on the aerodynamic and structural study carried out on flapping wings and flapping vehicles. Theoretical and experimental investigation of aerodynamic forces acting on flapping wings in simple harmonic oscillations is undertaken in order to help conduct and optimize the aerodynamic and structural design of flapping wing vehicles. The research is focused on the large scale ornithopter design of similar size and configuration to a hang glider. By means of Theodorsen’s th...

  2. Rotor damage detection by using piezoelectric impedance

    Qin, Y.; Tao, Y.; Mao, Y. F.

    2016-04-01

    Rotor is a core component of rotary machinery. Once the rotor has the damage, it may lead to a major accident. Thus the quantitative rotor damage detection method based on piezoelectric impedance is studied in this paper. With the governing equation of piezoelectric transducer (PZT) in a cylindrical coordinate, the displacement along the radius direction is derived. The charge of PZT is calculated by the electric displacement. Then, by the use of the obtained displacement and charge, an analytic piezoelectric impedance model of the rotor is built. Given the circular boundary condition of a rotor, annular elements are used as the analyzed objects and spectral element method is used to set up the damage detection model. The Electro-Mechanical (E/M) coupled impedance expression of an undamaged rotor is deduced with the application of a low-cost impedance test circuit. A Taylor expansion method is used to obtain the approximate E/M coupled impedance expression for the damaged rotor. After obtaining the difference between the undamaged and damaged rotor impedance, a rotor damage detection method is proposed. This method can directly calculate the change of bending stiffness of the structural elements, it follows that the rotor damage can be effectively detected. Finally, a preset damage configuration is used for the numerical simulation. The result shows that the quantitative damage detection algorithm based on spectral element method and piezoelectric impedance proposed in this paper can identify the location and the severity of the damaged rotor accurately.

  3. Flap effectiveness appraisal for winged re-entry vehicles

    de Rosa, Donato; Pezzella, Giuseppe; Donelli, Raffaele S.; Viviani, Antonio

    2016-05-01

    The interactions between shock waves and boundary layer are commonplace in hypersonic aerodynamics. They represent a very challenging design issue for hypersonic vehicle. A typical example of shock wave boundary layer interaction is the flowfield past aerodynamic surfaces during control. As a consequence, such flow interaction phenomena influence both vehicle aerodynamics and aerothermodynamics. In this framework, the present research effort describes the numerical activity performed to simulate the flowfield past a deflected flap in hypersonic flowfield conditions for a winged re-entry vehicle.

  4. 14 CFR 23.1511 - Flap extended speed.

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flap extended speed. 23.1511 Section 23.1511 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... Information § 23.1511 Flap extended speed. (a) The flap extended speed V FE must be established so that it...

  5. Peroperative evaluation of vascularity of various flaps by fluorescein technique

    Bhattacharya V

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The viability of any pedicled flap depends upon its vascularity. When a flap is dissected it becomes relatively ischaemic. Ultimately, the viability of the flap depends on the vessels incorporated in the pedicle and their perfusion capacity. There are different techniques to evaluate the blood supply of a flap. Aims: This study deals with experimental and clinical efficiency of fluorescein dye technique to evaluate the vascularity of flaps of various compositions. Materials and Methods: The experimental study was conducted on rats to standardize the technique. Thereafter clinical evaluation was conducted for different flaps namely fasciocutaneous, skeletonized perforator based fasciocutaneous, adipofascial, fasciocutaneous flap with adipofascial extension, fasciocutaneous flap with fascial extension and fasciocutaneous flap with split fascial extension. Conclusions: The paper deals in detail with the technique and method of documentation of a fluorescein study on flaps both experimentally and clinically. The appearance of fluorescein on both the surfaces and distal margin of the flap confirmed the adequacy of vascularity soon after dissection of the flaps. It was found to be an easy, safe and reliable objective method.

  6. Fibula free flap splitting for mandible reconstruction: A technical note

    López-Arcas, José María; M. Burgueño; Del Castillo, J. L.

    2009-01-01

    Conformation of the fibula flap to passively adapt to the remaining mandible may be indeed challenging. A review of the ‘axial splitting’ technique for fibula free flaps is presented with a novel method of osteosynthesis. Adequate mandibular angle shape is achieved by performing this type of osteotomy with a minimal use of titanium hardware for flap insetting.

  7. Unilateral Breast Reconstruction Using Bilateral Inferior Gluteal Artery Perforator Flaps

    Toshihiko Satake, MD

    2015-03-01

    Conclusions: Use of bilateral IGAP flaps for breast reconstruction helps to avoid asymmetry of the inferior buttock volume and shape. Bilateral flaps provide sufficient tissue volume and allow for reconstruction of a breast comparable to the unaffected side. In patients with moderate-to-high projection breast whose abdominal tissue cannot be used for reconstruction, IGAP flaps may be a suitable alternative.

  8. Prospective evaluation of outcome measures in free-flap surgery.

    Kelly, John L

    2004-08-01

    Free-flap failure is usually caused by venous or arterial thrombosis. In many cases, lack of experience and surgical delay also contribute to flap loss. The authors prospectively analyzed the outcome of 57 free flaps over a 28-month period (January, 1999 to April, 2001). The setting was a university hospital tertiary referral center. Anastomotic technique, ischemia time, choice of anticoagulant, and the grade of surgeon were recorded. The type of flap, medications, and co-morbidities, including preoperative radiotherapy, were also documented. Ten flaps were re-explored (17 percent). There were four cases of complete flap failure (6.7 percent) and five cases of partial failure (8.5 percent). In patients who received perioperative systemic heparin or dextran, there was no evidence of flap failure (p = .08). The mean ischemia time was similar in flaps that failed (95 +\\/- 29 min) and in those that survived (92 +\\/- 34 min). Also, the number of anastomoses performed by trainees in flaps that failed (22 percent), was similar to the number in flaps that survived (28 percent). Nine patients received preoperative radiotherapy, and there was complete flap survival in each case. This study reveals that closely supervised anastomoses performed by trainees may have a similar outcome to those performed by more senior surgeons. There was no adverse effect from radiotherapy or increased ischemia time on flap survival.

  9. Double papilla flap technique for dual purpose

    P Mohan Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Marginal tissue recession exposes the anatomic root on the teeth, which gives rise to -common patient complaints. It is associated with sensitivity, tissue irritation, cervical abrasions, and esthetic concerns. Various types of soft tissue grafts may be performed when recession is deep and marginal tissue health cannot be maintained. Double papilla flap is an alternative technique to cover isolated recessions and correct gingival defects in areas of insufficient attached gingiva, not suitable for a lateral sliding flap. This technique offers the advantages of dual blood supply and denudation of interdental bone only, which is less susceptible to permanent damage after surgical exposure. It also offers the advantage of quicker healing in the donor site and reduces the risk of facial bone height loss. This case report presents the advantages of double papilla flap in enhancing esthetic and functional outcome of the patient.

  10. Collective Flow Enhancement by Tandem Flapping Wings

    Gravish, Nick; Peters, Jacob M.; Combes, Stacey A.; Wood, Robert J.

    2015-10-01

    We examine the fluid-mechanical interactions that occur between arrays of flapping wings when operating in close proximity at a moderate Reynolds number (Re ≈100 - 1000 ). Pairs of flapping wings are oscillated sinusoidally at frequency f , amplitude θM, phase offset ϕ , and wing separation distance D*, and outflow speed v* is measured. At a fixed separation distance, v* is sensitive to both f and ϕ , and we observe both constructive and destructive interference in airspeed. v* is maximized at an optimum phase offset, ϕmax, which varies with wing separation distance, D*. We propose a model of collective flow interactions between flapping wings based on vortex advection, which reproduces our experimental data.

  11. Numerical linearized MHD model of flapping oscillations

    Korovinskiy, D. B.; Ivanov, I. B.; Semenov, V. S.; Erkaev, N. V.; Kiehas, S. A.

    2016-06-01

    Kink-like magnetotail flapping oscillations in a Harris-like current sheet with earthward growing normal magnetic field component Bz are studied by means of time-dependent 2D linearized MHD numerical simulations. The dispersion relation and two-dimensional eigenfunctions are obtained. The results are compared with analytical estimates of the double-gradient model, which are found to be reliable for configurations with small Bz up to values ˜ 0.05 of the lobe magnetic field. Coupled with previous results, present simulations confirm that the earthward/tailward growth direction of the Bz component acts as a switch between stable/unstable regimes of the flapping mode, while the mode dispersion curve is the same in both cases. It is confirmed that flapping oscillations may be triggered by a simple Gaussian initial perturbation of the Vz velocity.

  12. Damping in flapping flight and its implications for manoeuvring, scaling and evolution.

    Hedrick, Tyson L

    2011-12-15

    Flying animals exhibit remarkable degrees of both stability and manoeuvrability. Our understanding of these capabilities has recently been improved by the identification of a source of passive damping specific to flapping flight. Examining how this damping effect scales among different species and how it affects active manoeuvres as well as recovery from perturbations provides general insights into the flight of insects, birds and bats. These new damping models offer a means to predict manoeuvrability and stability for a wide variety of flying animals using prior reports of the morphology and flapping motions of these species. Furthermore, the presence of passive damping is likely to have facilitated the evolution of powered flight in animals by providing a stability benefit associated with flapping. PMID:22116750

  13. Dorso-palmar triangular finger flap-A new advancement flap for cover of finger amputations-A preliminary report

    Mishra Satyanarayan

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A triangular V-Y type advancement flap on the finger has been designed, which advances skin from over the whole circumference of the finger, which includes both palmar and dorsal skin. The flap is sensate too. It is indicated for finger and thumb amputations proximal to the body of the nail. Six flaps were raised with five successes and one partial necrosis. This is a preliminary report on a new flap.

  14. Dynamic Calibration of the NASA Ames Rotor Test Apparatus Steady/Dynamic Rotor Balance

    Peterson, Randall L.; vanAken, Johannes M.

    1996-01-01

    The NASA Ames Rotor Test Apparatus was modified to include a Steady/Dynamic Rotor Balance. The dynamic calibration procedures and configurations are discussed. Random excitation was applied at the rotor hub, and vibratory force and moment responses were measured on the steady/dynamic rotor balance. Transfer functions were computed using the load cell data and the vibratory force and moment responses from the rotor balance. Calibration results showing the influence of frequency bandwidth, hub mass, rotor RPM, thrust preload, and dynamic loads through the stationary push rods are presented and discussed.

  15. The transversely split gracilis twin free flaps

    Upadhyaya Divya

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The gracilis muscle is a Class II muscle that is often used in free tissue transfer. The muscle has multiple secondary pedicles, of which the first one is the most consistent in terms of position and calibre. Each pedicle can support a segment of the muscle thus yielding multiple small flaps from a single, long muscle. Although it has often been split longitudinally along the fascicles of its nerve for functional transfer, it has rarely been split transversely to yield multiple muscle flaps that can be used to cover multiple wounds in one patient without subjecting him/her to the morbidity of multiple donor areas .

  16. Flap-edge aeroacoustic measurements and predictions

    Brooks, Thomas F.; Humphreys, William M.

    2003-03-01

    An aeroacoustic model test has been conducted to investigate the mechanisms of sound generation on high-lift wing configurations. This paper presents an analysis of flap side-edge noise, which is often the most dominant source. A model of a main element wing section with a half-span flap was tested at low speeds of up to a Mach number of 0.17, corresponding to a wing chord Reynolds number of approximately 1.7 million. Results are presented for flat (or blunt), flanged, and round flap-edge geometries, with and without boundary-layer tripping, deployed at both moderate and high flap angles. The acoustic database is obtained from a small aperture directional array (SADA) of microphones, which was constructed to electronically steer to different regions of the model and to obtain farfield noise spectra and directivity from these regions. The basic flap-edge aerodynamics is established by static surface pressure data, as well as by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations and simplified edge flow analyses. Distributions of unsteady pressure sensors over the flap allow the noise source regions to be defined and quantified via cross-spectral diagnostics using the SADA output. It is found that shear layer instability and related pressure scatter is the primary noise mechanism. For the flat edge flap, two noise prediction methods based on unsteady-surface-pressure measurements are evaluated and compared to measured noise. One is a new causality spectral approach developed here. The other is a new application of an edge-noise scatter prediction method. The good comparisons for both approaches suggest that the prediction models capture much of the physics. Areas of disagreement appear to reveal when the assumed edge noise mechanism does not fully define the noise production. For the different edge conditions, extensive spectra and directivity are presented. The complexity of the directivity results demonstrate the strong role of edge source geometry and frequency in

  17. Flap Edge Aeroacoustic Measurements and Predictions

    Brooks, Thomas F.; Humphreys, William M., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    An aeroacoustic model test has been conducted to investigate the mechanisms of sound generation on high-lift wing configurations. This paper presents an analysis of flap side-edge noise, which is often the most dominant source. A model of a main element wing section with a half-span flap was tested at low speeds of up to a Mach number of 0.17, corresponding to a wing chord Reynolds number of approximately 1.7 million. Results are presented for flat (or blunt), flanged, and round flap-edge geometries, with and without boundary-layer tripping, deployed at both moderate and high flap angles. The acoustic database is obtained from a Small Aperture Directional Array (SADA) of microphones, which was constructed to electronically steer to different regions of the model and to obtain farfield noise spectra and directivity from these regions. The basic flap-edge aerodynamics is established by static surface pressure data, as well as by Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) calculations and simplified edge flow analyses. Distributions of unsteady pressure sensors over the flap allow the noise source regions to be defined and quantified via cross-spectral diagnostics using the SADA output. It is found that shear layer instability and related pressure scatter is the primary noise mechanism. For the flat edge flap, two noise prediction methods based on unsteady surface pressure measurements are evaluated and compared to measured noise. One is a new causality spectral approach developed here. The other is a new application of an edge-noise scatter prediction method. The good comparisons for both approaches suggest that much of the physics is captured by the prediction models. Areas of disagreement appear to reveal when the assumed edge noise mechanism does not fully define the noise production. For the different edge conditions, extensive spectra and directivity are presented. Significantly, for each edge configuration, the spectra for different flow speeds, flap angles, and

  18. A Survey of Theoretical and Experimental Coaxial Rotor Aerodynamic Research

    Coleman, Colin P.

    1997-01-01

    The recent appearance of the Kamov Ka-50 helicopter and the application of coaxial rotors to unmanned aerial vehicles have renewed international interest in the coaxial rotor configuration. This report addresses the aerodynamic issues peculiar to coaxial rotors by surveying American, Russian, Japanese, British, and German research. (Herein, 'coaxial rotors' refers to helicopter, not propeller, rotors. The intermeshing rotor system was not investigated.) Issues addressed are separation distance, load sharing between rotors, wake structure, solidity effects, swirl recovery, and the effects of having no tail rotor. A general summary of the coaxial rotor configuration explores the configuration's advantages and applications.

  19. Darmstadt Rotor No. 2, II: Design of Leaning Rotor Blades

    Jörg Bergner; Dietmar K. Hennecke; Martin Hoeger; Karl Engel

    2003-01-01

    For Darmstadt University of Technology's axial singlestage transonic compressor rig, a new three-dimensional aft-swept rotor was designed and manufactured at MTU Aero Engines in Munich, Germany. The application of carbon fiber–reinforced plastic made it possible to overcome structural constraints and therefore to further increase the amount of lean and sweep of the blade. The aim of the design was to improve the mechanical stability at operation that is close to stall.

  20. Darmstadt Rotor No. 2, II: Design of Leaning Rotor Blades

    Jörg Bergner

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available For Darmstadt University of Technology's axial singlestage transonic compressor rig, a new three-dimensional aft-swept rotor was designed and manufactured at MTU Aero Engines in Munich, Germany. The application of carbon fiber–reinforced plastic made it possible to overcome structural constraints and therefore to further increase the amount of lean and sweep of the blade. The aim of the design was to improve the mechanical stability at operation that is close to stall.

  1. Salvage of Intraoperative Deep Inferior Epigastric Perforator Flap Venous Congestion with Augmentation of Venous Outflow: Flap Morbidity and Review of the Literature

    Oscar Ochoa, MD

    2013-10-01

    Conclusions: Arterial and venous anatomies play unique roles in flap reliability. DIEP flap venous congestion must be treated expeditiously with venous augmentation to relieve venous congestion and mitigate flap morbidity.

  2. [The gracilis muscle as musculocutaneous flap. Evaluation of 20 cases].

    Gholam, D; Trevidic, P; Kleimann, P; Hautefeuille, P; Nicoletis, C

    1991-01-01

    The use of gracilis as muscular or myocutaneous flap is very well-known. The authors report 20 cases of gracilis flap including 13 reconstructions of the vaginal cavity following extended abdomino-perineal resection. Some technical points concerning the localization of the cutaneous part of the flap and the pedicle dissection are discussed. The use of gracilis flap is still limited in surgical teams following extended abdomino-perineal resection, nevertheless it is a very useful flap because of its low morbidity, the shortening of patient hospitalization and the very satisfying aesthetic result of the neo-vaginal cavity. PMID:1726389

  3. Propeller thoracodorsal artery perforator flap for breast reconstruction

    Angrigiani, Claudio; Escudero, Ezequiel; Artero, Guillermo; Gercovich, Gustavo; Deza, Ernesto Gil

    2014-01-01

    Background The thoracodorsal artery perforator (TDAP) flap has been described for breast reconstruction. This flap requires intramuscular dissection of the pedicle. A modification of the conventional TDAP surgical technique for breast reconstruction is described, utilizing instead a propeller TDAP flap. The authors present their clinical experience with the propeller TDAP flap in breast reconstruction alone or in combination with expanders or permanent implants. Methods From January 2009 to February 2013, sixteen patients had breast reconstruction utilizing a propeller TDAP flap. Retrospective analysis of patient characteristics, clinical indications, procedure and outcomes were performed. The follow-up period ranged from 4 to 48 months. Results Sixteen patients had breast reconstruction using a TDAP flap with or without simultaneous insertion of an expander or implant. All flaps survived, while two cases required minimal resection due to distal flap necrosis, healing by second intention. There were not donor-site seromas, while minimal wound dehiscence was detected in two cases. Conclusions The propeller TDAP flap appears to be safe and effective for breast reconstruction, resulting in minimal donor site morbidity. The use of this propeller flap emerges as a true alternative to the traditional TDAP flap. PMID:25207210

  4. The double opposing myomucosal cheek flap in hard palate reconstruction.

    Pabiszczak, Maciej; Banaszewski, Jacek; Pastusiak, Tomasz; Buczkowska, Agata; Wierzbicka, Małgorzata

    2015-01-01

    Limited defects in the oral cavity can be treated with local and pedicled cheek flaps. It allows to preserve the functions of the resected organ. Large defects in the midline of the hard palate can be reconstructed with double opposing myomucosal cheek flaps. The aim of this study was to discuss the methodology of the flap harvest and to show our experiences of treatment in a group of 15 patients with oral cavity cancer. In 1 patient the double opposing myomucosal cheek flap was harvested due to the wider local defect. The small size of the flap with ability to use the double opposing cheek flap in more extended defects as well as short duration of the surgery procedure can lead to reduced risk of postoperative complications. Finally, cheek flaps form an effective method of treatment of defects in the oral cavity. PMID:26388355

  5. Results of instrumental and operative implementation of T-Flap

    Marcelli, M.; Madonia, A.; Piermattei, V.; Mainardi, U.

    2012-04-01

    The development of new technologies for the study of the ocean processes is one of the most innovative aspects of oceanographic research that increasingly requires a large amount of data for an integrated approach to in situ observations, forecasting models and remotely sensed data. At now the marine measurement technologies are too expensive for an extensive utilization. The T-Flap technology (Temperature-Fluorescence LAunchable Probe) meets these needs by providing low cost and user-friendly in situ measuring of physical and bio-optical variables of water bodies, as opposed to traditional methods. Many experimental laboratory tests were carried out in order to increase the instrumental sensitivity of the fluorimetric sensor for the detection of chlorophyll a concentration. To test the selected components (LEDs, diodes, filters) and their new configurations, an optical circuit has been realized consisting on three prototypes of the measuring cell. Fluorescence excitation and detection efficiency of the new electro-optical assemblages were also tested by the comparison between the voltage output signals and spectroscopic in vivo fluorescence measures both of natural seawater samples and marine cultures at different concentrations. The upgraded sensors were tested during different oceanographic surveys performed in the last years both in the Tyrrhenian Sea and Adriatic Sea. The technological achievements were applied in different operative conditions: profiler along the water column (not expendable) and stand alone (in continuous surface acquisitions along tracks, in continuous acquisition on a buoy). In this work we present the results of the latest research activities on T-Flap evolution. In addition preliminary results about new sensors currently under development are shown, such as CDOM (Cromophoric Dissolved Organic Matter) fluorimetric sensor, based on T-Flap fluorescence technology, and conductivity sensor.

  6. Surgical procedure of Free Flap. Main nursing care

    Manuel Molina López

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The free flap surgical technique is used to cover extensive skin loss areas and situations where no flap is available, or in axial zones. The great breackthrough in the field of reconstructive surgical techniques and the creation of new units where these complex techniques are used, means that the nursing staff who work in these hospital units are adquiring greater protagonism in caring for, and the subsequent success of this type of surgery in which the problems of collaboration in all the perioperative phases depend entirely on the nursing team.The collaborative nursing problems could be defined as real or potential health problems, where users need nursing staff to follow the treatment and control procedures prescribed by other professional, generally doctors, who control and are responsible for the final outcome.While planning collaborative objectives and activities it should be taken into account that the function of the nursing staff is twofold: on the one hand, the patient must be taken care of as prescribed by other professionals and, on the other hand, it should bring into play cognitive elements (knowledge and know-how and clinical judgment when executing these in controlling the patients evolution.In this article our intention is to give an interesting and comprehensive description of the free flap surgical technique, its pros and cons, and identify the principal collaborative problems which nursing will have to deal with in each one of the perioperative phases, the number and specific nature of such oblige nursing on many occasions, to update and/or acquire new skills.

  7. First dorsal metacarpal artery islanded flap: A useful flap for reconstruction of thumb pulp defects

    Satish Chetan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Thumb pulp defects are commonly due to avulsion injuries. It is very important to reconstruct these defects using sensate flaps as the thumb pulp needs to be sensate for implementing the various functions of the thumb. A very good option for coverage of these defects is the islanded first dorsal metacarpal artery flap. Our study was done over a period of 2 years and involved 9 consecutive cases of thumb pulp defects treated at our institution. The patients included 8 males and 1 female, ranging in age from 16 to 51 years old. The flap size ranged from 2 x 1.5 cm to 5 x 3 cm. We had only one complication in the form of partial flap necrosis, which fortunately healed following debridement without the need for a secondary procedure. All our cases were done under local anesthesia with tourniquet control. All the patients had good fine touch and average two-point discrimination of 6 mm, which was satisfactory. Our good results further reinforce the islanded first dorsal metacarpal artery flap as one the best flaps for sensate reconstruction of thumb pulp defects. It replaces the soft tissue loss at the thumb pulp with minimal donor site morbidity and with good return of thumb pulp sensation.

  8. The fractional symmetric rigid rotor

    Herrmann, Richard

    2006-01-01

    Based on the Riemann fractional derivative the Casimir operators and multipletts for the fractional extension of the rotation group SO(n) are calculated algebraically. The spectrum of the corresponding fractional symmetric rigid rotor is discussed. It is shown, that the rotational, vibrational and $\\gamma$-unstable limits of the standard geometric collective models are particular limits of this spectrum. A comparison with the ground state band spectra of nuclei shows an agreement with experim...

  9. Material sampling for rotor evaluation

    Decisions regarding continued operation of aging rotating machinery must often be made without adequate knowledge of rotor material conditions. Physical specimens of the material are not generally available due to lack of an appropriate sampling technique or the high cost and inconvenience of obtaining such samples. This is despite the fact that examination of such samples may be critical to effectively assess the degradation of mechanical properties of the components in service or to permit detailed examination of microstructure and surface flaws. Such information permits a reduction in the uncertainty of remaining life estimates for turbine rotors to avoid unnecessarily premature and costly rotor retirement decisions. This paper describes the operation and use of a recently developed material sampling device which machines and recovers an undeformed specimen from the surface of rotor bores or other components for metallurgical analysis. The removal of the thin, wafer-like sample has a negligible effect on the structural integrity of these components, due to the geometry and smooth surface finish of the resulting shallow depression. Samples measuring approximately 0.03 to 0.1 inches (0.76 to 2.5 mm) thick by 0.5 to 1.0 inch (1.3 to 2.5 cm) in diameter can be removed without mechanical deformation or thermal degradation of the sample or the remaining component material. The device is operated remotely from a control console and can be used externally or internally on any surface for which there is at least a three inch (7.6 cm) working clearance. Application of the device in two case studies of turbine-generator evaluations are presented

  10. Welding of turbine rotor materials.

    Richter, Tomáš

    2012-01-01

    In the Visual - Weld and Sysweld programs, a simplified simulation of the welding process of the turbine rotor made of 27NiCrMoV 15-6 substance was performed. The numerical analysis took place at the equal temperature of preheating and it covered both minimal and maximal percent chemical composition. The simulation proved that the percent deviations of elements in the substance change the speed necessary for reaching of the bainitic structure. Simulation results were verified by a practical e...

  11. The "open book" flap: a heterodigital cross-finger skin flap and adipofascial flap for coverage of a circumferential soft tissue defect of a digit.

    Tadiparthi, S; Akali, A; Felberg, L

    2009-02-01

    A case of circumferential digital skin loss with exposed tendons from the proximal phalanx to the distal interphalangeal joint is presented. This was treated with a two-layer heterodigital cross-finger ("open book") flap from the adjacent digit, utilising a skin-only cross-finger flap to cover the palmar defect and an adipofascial flap to cover the dorsal defect. PMID:19129359

  12. Spectral analysis of blood perfusion in the free latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap and in normal skin

    To find the properties in the oscillatory components of the cutaneous blood flow on the successful free flap, a wavelet transform was applied to the laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) signals which were measured simultaneously on the surfaces of the free latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap and on the adjacent intact skin of the healthy limb, of 18 patients. The frequency interval from 0.0095 to 1.6 Hz was examined and was divided into five subintervals (I: 0.0095-0.021 Hz; II: 0.021-0.052 Hz; III: 0.052-0.145 Hz; IV: 0.145-0.6 Hz and V: 0.6-1.6 Hz) corresponding to endothelial metabolic, neurogenic, myogenic, respiratory and cardiac origins. The average amplitude and total power in the frequency range 0.0095-1.6 Hz as well as within subintervals I, II, IV and V were significantly lower for signals measured on the free flap than those obtained in the healthy limb. However in interval III, they were significantly higher. The normalized spectral amplitude and power in the free flap were significantly lower in only two intervals, I and II, yet in interval III they were significantly higher; no statistical significance was observed in intervals IV and V. The distinctive finding made in this study, aside from the decrease of endothelial metabolic processes and sympathetic control, was the significant increase of myogenic activity in the free flap. It is hoped that this work will contribute towards knowledge on blood circulation in free flaps and make the monitoring by LDF more reliable

  13. Clinical application of free omental flap transfer

    Harii, K.

    1978-04-01

    In the field of reconstruction surgery, the greater omentum has been used as a transposed flap for the treatment of chronic lymphedema, radionecrosis, and so forth. Its transferable range was limited by the length of its pedicle. Microvascular anastomosis allows for free transplantation of this organ and has vastly expanded its usefulness.

  14. Neural Anatomy of the Anterolateral Thigh Flap.

    Luenam, Suriya; Prugsawan, Krit; Kosiyatrakul, Arkaphat; Chotanaphuti, Thanainit; Sriya, Piyanee

    2015-06-01

    The anterolateral thigh (ALT) flap is one of the commonly used sensate flaps for intra-oral, hand, and foot reconstruction. The objective of this study was to describe the anatomic location of the sensory nerves supplying the ALT flap in relation to the surface landmarks and with the vascular pedicles. The dissections were carried out in 28 embalmed specimens. An axial line from the anterior superior iliac spine to the superolateral border of the patella and two circles with radii of 5 and 10 cm centered on the midpoint of the former line were used for the surface landmarks. At the intersection point of the axial line and the 10-cm circle, the main lateral femoral cutaneous nerve (LFCN) and its anterior branch were located within 1 and 2.4 cm, respectively. At the intersection point of the axial line and the 5-cm circle, the anterior branch of the LFCN was located within 2.8 cm. The anterior branch of the LFCN can be detected within 3 cm from the central perforator pedicle in all specimens. The posterior branch of the LFCN, superior perforator nerve, and median perforator nerve were found in more variable locations. The findings from our study provide additional information for clinical use in the planning of sensate ALT flap harvest. PMID:26078503

  15. Aerohydrodynamics of flapping-wing propulsors

    Rozhdestvensky, K.V.; Ryzhov, V.A. [Saint-Petersburg State Marine Technical University (Russian Federation). Dept. of Applied Mathematics and Mathematical Modeling

    2003-11-01

    It is the objective of this survey to review research and development results of flapping-wing propulsors and of vehicles equipped with them. Given the complex and multi-disciplinary character of the problem, a wide range of questions is considered in order to provide a general idea of the state-of-the-art. The main attention is directed at the aerohydrodynamics of flapping-wing propulsors. The major relevant mathematical models and the corresponding numerical results are presented together with the experimental data obtained up to the present time. Also, the physical and the design factors are discussed, which affect the aerohydrodynamic characteristics of flapping wings and that therefore have to be accounted for in the modem mathematical models. Experimental data and numerical modeling results are compared to determine domains of validity of the latter for the aerohydrodynamic design of full-scale air and marine vehicles. Also, existing engineering solutions for vehicles with flapping-wing propulsors are presented and prospective directions for future investigations are outlined. (author)

  16. Late complication of Boari bladder flap

    Berzeg, Semin; Beyersdorff, Dirk; Kopka, Lars [Department of Radiology, Charite Campus Mitte, Schumannstrasse 20/21, 10117 Berlin (Germany); Baumgart, Egbert; Lenk, Severin [Department of Urology, Charite Campus Mitte, Schumannstrasse 20/21, 10117 Berlin (Germany)

    2003-07-01

    A very rare late complication of Boari bladder flap repair with development of pseudodiverticulum and recurrent genitourinary tract infection secondary to vesicoureteral reflux is presented. Radiologic evaluation of the patient comprised intravenous pyelography (IVP), micturating cystourethrogram, cystoscopy, and multislice computed tomography (MSCT). (orig.)

  17. Late complication of Boari bladder flap

    A very rare late complication of Boari bladder flap repair with development of pseudodiverticulum and recurrent genitourinary tract infection secondary to vesicoureteral reflux is presented. Radiologic evaluation of the patient comprised intravenous pyelography (IVP), micturating cystourethrogram, cystoscopy, and multislice computed tomography (MSCT). (orig.)

  18. Flapping wing aerodynamics: from insects to vertebrates.

    Chin, Diana D; Lentink, David

    2016-04-01

    More than a million insects and approximately 11,000 vertebrates utilize flapping wings to fly. However, flapping flight has only been studied in a few of these species, so many challenges remain in understanding this form of locomotion. Five key aerodynamic mechanisms have been identified for insect flight. Among these is the leading edge vortex, which is a convergent solution to avoid stall for insects, bats and birds. The roles of the other mechanisms - added mass, clap and fling, rotational circulation and wing-wake interactions - have not yet been thoroughly studied in the context of vertebrate flight. Further challenges to understanding bat and bird flight are posed by the complex, dynamic wing morphologies of these species and the more turbulent airflow generated by their wings compared with that observed during insect flight. Nevertheless, three dimensionless numbers that combine key flow, morphological and kinematic parameters - the Reynolds number, Rossby number and advance ratio - govern flapping wing aerodynamics for both insects and vertebrates. These numbers can thus be used to organize an integrative framework for studying and comparing animal flapping flight. Here, we provide a roadmap for developing such a framework, highlighting the aerodynamic mechanisms that remain to be quantified and compared across species. Ultimately, incorporating complex flight maneuvers, environmental effects and developmental stages into this framework will also be essential to advancing our understanding of the biomechanics, movement ecology and evolution of animal flight. PMID:27030773

  19. Periodic and chaotic flapping of insectile wings

    Huang, Y.; Kanso, E.

    2015-11-01

    Insects use flight muscles attached at the base of the wings to produce impressive wing flapping frequencies. The maximum power output of these flight muscles is insufficient to maintain such wing oscillations unless there is good elastic storage of energy in the insect flight system. Here, we explore the intrinsic self-oscillatory behavior of an insectile wing model, consisting of two rigid wings connected at their base by an elastic torsional spring. We study the wings behavior as a function of the total energy and spring stiffness. Three types of behavior are identified: end-over-end rotation, chaotic motion, and periodic flapping. Interestingly, the region of periodic flapping decreases as energy increases but is favored as stiffness increases. These findings are consistent with the fact that insect wings and flight muscles are stiff. They further imply that, by adjusting their muscle stiffness to the energy level at which they are operating, insects can maintain periodic flapping mechanically for a range of operating conditions.

  20. Binding of single walled carbon nanotube to WT and mutant HIV-1 proteases: analysis of flap dynamics and binding mechanism.

    Meher, Biswa Ranjan; Wang, Yixuan

    2012-09-01

    Most of the currently treated HIV-1 protease (HIV-PR) inhibitors have been prone to suffer from the mutations associated drug resistance. Therefore, it is necessary to search for potent alternatives against the drug resistance. In the current study we have tested the single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) as an inhibitor in wild type (WT) as well as in three primary mutants (I50V(PR), V82A(PR) and I84V(PR)) of the HIV-1-PR through docking the SWCNT in the active site region, and then performed all-atom MD simulations for the complexes. The conformational dynamics of HIV-PR with a 20 ns trajectory reveals that the SWCNT can effectively bind to the HIV-1-PR active site and regulate the flap dynamics such as maintaining the flap-flap closed. To gain an insight into the binding affinity, we also performed the MM-PBSA based binding free energy calculations for the four HIV-PR/SWCNT complexes. It was observed that, although the binding between the SWCNT and the HIV-PR decreases due to the mutations, the SWCNTs bind to the HIV-PRs 3-5 folds stronger than the most potent HIV-1-PR inhibitor, TMC114. Remarkably, the significant interactions with binding energy higher than 1kcal/mol focus on the flap and active regions, which favors closing flap-flap and deactivating the active residues of the HIV-PR. The flap dynamics and binding strength information for HIV-PR and SWCNTs can help design SWCNT-based HIV-1-PR inhibitors. PMID:23142620

  1. The Retrograde Ulnar Dorsal Flap: Surgical Technique and Experience as Island Flap in Coverage of Hand Defects.

    Vergara-Amador, Enrique

    2015-09-01

    Flaps from the forearm are often used to reconstruct soft-tissue defects in the hand. The retrograde ulnar dorsal flap has the advantage that it does not sacrifice a major vascular axis. The anatomic bases of this flap are the proximal and distal branch of the ulnar dorsal artery. The distal branch is partially accompanied with the dorsal branch of the ulnar nerve, and arrives under the abductor digiti quinti muscle making anastomoses with the deep branch of the ulnar artery. The proximal branch reaching the proximal third of the forearm, and anastomose with perforating branches of the ulnar artery. I used this island flap in 12 patients with coverage defects on the hand. The biggest flap was 13×6 cm. Only 1 flap had partial necrosis which did not lead to problems. The retrograde ulnar dorsal flap is a flap designed with reverse flow from the distal branch of the ulnar dorsal artery, and which does not sacrifice the ulnar artery. The donor defect on the forearm ulnar side had a greater esthetic acceptance. Knowing other distal anastomoses, described by other authors later, dorsal at the base of the fourth interdigital space grant greater security to the retrograde ulnar dorsal flap. It is worth highlighting the importance of preserving the adipofascial tissue around the pedicle. Experience with this flap permits us to state that it is a safe and reproducible flap to cover any defect on the dorsal of the hand as well as the first web space. PMID:26079665

  2. Assessing safety of negative-pressure wound therapy over pedicled muscle flaps: A retrospective review of gastrocnemius muscle flap.

    Lance, Samuel; Harrison, Lindsey; Orbay, Hakan; Boudreault, David; Pereira, Gavin; Sahar, David

    2016-04-01

    The use of negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT) for management of open wounds and immobilization of split-thickness skin grafts (STSGs) over wounds has been well described. However, there is a concern for potential compromise of flap viability when NPWT is used for skin grafts over pedicled muscle flaps. We have used NPWT to immobilize STSGs in eight patients who underwent a pedicled gastrocnemius muscle flap operation in our department. We applied a negative pressure of -75 mmHg on the muscle flaps for 5 days postoperatively. All wounds healed successfully, with a 97.5 ± 5.5% mean STSG uptake. No flap necrosis was observed. In our series, the use of NPWT for fixation of STSGs over pedicled gastrocnemius muscle flap was effective and had no negative impact on flap viability. PMID:26732293

  3. Vibration Analysis of Hollow Tapered Shaft Rotor

    P. M. G. Bashir Asdaque; Behera, R. K.

    2014-01-01

    Shafts or circular cross-section beams are important parts of rotating systems and their geometries play important role in rotor dynamics. Hollow tapered shaft rotors with uniform thickness and uniform bore are considered. Critical speeds or whirling frequency conditions are computed using transfer matrix method and then the results were compared using finite element method. For particular shaft lengths and rotating speeds, response of the hollow tapered shaft-rotor system is determined for t...

  4. The Dynamics of Rotor with Rubbing

    Jerzy T. Sawicki; Joe Padovan; Rabih Al-Khatib

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents the description of some phenomena associated with dynamic behavior of rotors interacting with stationary components. Numerical simulations show rotor vibration spectrum rich in subharmonic, quasi-periodic, and chaotic vibrations. The nonlinear calculation techniques are applied to demonstrate the changes of the vibration patterns for different operating conditions. Some conclusions are discussed with regard to unique characteristics of rub-induced rotor response, initial c...

  5. Rotor fatigue monitoring data acquisition system

    Smith, Scott M.

    1993-01-01

    The 40 by 80 Foot Wind Tunnel of the National Full Scale Aerodynamics Complex (NFAC) had a requirement to monitor rotor fatigue during a test. This test subjected various rotor components to stress levels higher than their structural fatigue limits. A data acquisition system was developed to monitor the cumulative fatigue damage of rotor components using National Instruments hardware and LabVIEW software. A full description of the data acquisition system including its configuration and salient features, is presented in this paper.

  6. Optimum Power Output Control of a Wind Turbine Rotor

    S. Wijewardana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An active and optimum controller is applied to regulate the power output from a wind turbine rotor. The controller is synthesized in two steps. The first step defines the equilibrium operation point and ensures that the desired equilibrium point is stable. The stability of the equilibrium point is guaranteed by a control law that is synthesized by applying the methodology of model predictive control (MPC. The method of controlling the turbine involves pitching the turbine blades. In the second step the blade pitch angle demand is defined. This involves minimizing the mean square error between the actual and desired power coefficient. The actual power coefficient of the wind turbine rotor is evaluated assuming that the blade is capable of stalling, using blade element momentum theory. This ensures that the power output of the rotor can be reduced to any desired value which is generally not possible unless a nonlinear stall model is introduced to evaluate the blade profile coefficients of lift and drag. The relatively simple and systematic nonlinear modelling and MPC controller synthesis approach adopted in this paper clearly highlights the main features on the controller that is capable of regulating the power output of the wind turbine rotor.

  7. Unsteady Flow Variability Driven by Rotor-stator Interaction at Rotor Exit

    ZHAO Ben; YANG Ce; CHEN Shan; QI Mingxu; ZHOU Mi

    2012-01-01

    Numerical investigation of the unsteady flow variability driven by rotor-stator interaction in a transonic axial compressor is performed.Two models with close and far axial gap between rotor and stator rows are studied in the simulation.Particular attention is attached to the analysis of mechanisms involved in driving rotor wake oscillation,rotor wake skewing and flow angle fluctuation at rotor exit.The results show that smaller axial gap is favorable to enhance the interaction in the region between two adjacent rows,and the fluctuation of the static pressure difference between two sides of rotor wake is improved by potential field from down stator,which is the driving force for rotor wake oscillation.The interaction between rotor and stator is weakened by increasing axial distance,rotor wake shifts to suction side of rotor blade with 5%-10% of rotor pitch,the absolute value of flow angle at rotor exit is less than that in the case of close interspace for every time step,and the fluctuation amplitude is also decreased.

  8. Optimization of wind turbine rotors

    Nygaard, Tor Anders

    1999-07-01

    The Constrained Steepest Descent method has been applied to the optimization of wind turbine rotors through the development of a numerical model. The model consists of an optimization kernel, an aerodynamic model, a structural dynamic model of a rotating beam, and a cost model for the wind turbine. The cost of energy is minimized directly by varying the blade design, the rotational speed and the resulting design of the drive-train and tower. The aerodynamic model is a combination of a fast engineering model based on strip-theory and two and three-dimensional Euler solvers. The two-dimensional Euler solver is used for generation of pre-stall airfoil data. Comparisons with experimental data verify that the engineering model effectively approximates non-stalled flow, except at the blade tip. The three-dimensional Euler solver is in good agreement with the experimental data at the tip, and is therefore a useful supplement for corrections of the tip-loss model, and evaluation of an optimized design. The structural dynamic model evaluates stresses and deformations for the blade. It is based on constitutive relations for a slender beam that are solved with the equations of motions using a finite-difference method. The cost model evaluates the design change of the wind turbine and the resulting costs that occur when a change in blade design modifies the blade mass and the overall forces. The cost model is based on engineering design rules for the drive-train and tower. The model was applied using a Danish 600 kW wind turbine as a reference. Two rotors were optimized using traditional NACA airfoils and a new low-lift airfoil family developed specifically for wind turbine purposes. The cost of energy decreased four percent for the NACA rotor, and seven percent for the low-lift rotor. Optimizations with a high number of degrees of freedom show that a designer has considerable flexibility in choosing some primary parameters such as rated power and rotor diameter, if the rest

  9. Energy from Swastika-Shaped Rotors

    McCulloch M. E.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available It is suggested here that a swastika-shaped rotor exposed to waves will rotate in the di- rection its arms are pointing (towards the arm-tips due to a sheltering effect. A formula is derived to predict the motion obtainable from swastika rotors of different sizes given the ocean wave height and phase speed and it is suggested that the rotor could provide a new, simpler method of wave energy generation. It is also proposed that the swastika rotor could generate energy on a smaller scale from sound waves and Brownian motion, and potentially the zero point field.

  10. Rotor thermal stress monitoring in steam turbines

    Antonín, Bouberle; Jan, Jakl; Jindřich, Liška

    2015-11-01

    One of the issues of steam turbines diagnostics is monitoring of rotor thermal stress that arises from nonuniform temperature field. The effort of steam turbine operator is to operate steam turbine in such conditions, that rotor thermal stress doesn't exceed the specified limits. If rotor thermal stress limits are exceeded for a long time during machine operation, the rotor fatigue life is shortened and this may lead to unexpected machine failure. Thermal stress plays important role during turbine cold startup, when occur the most significant differences of temperatures through rotor cross section. The temperature field can't be measured directly in the entire rotor cross section and standardly the temperature is measured by thermocouple mounted in stator part. From this reason method for numerical solution of partial differential equation of heat propagation through rotor cross section must be combined with method for calculation of temperature on rotor surface. In the first part of this article, the application of finite volume method for calculation of rotor thermal stress is described. The second part of article deals with optimal trend generation of thermal flux, that could be used for optimal machine loading.

  11. Bifurcation analysis of a preloaded Jeffcott rotor

    A model of two-degrees-of-freedom Jeffcott rotor system with bearing clearance subjected of an out-of-balance excitation is considered. The influence of preloading and viscous damping of the snubber ring is introduced in the mathematical description. A programme of numerical simulations is conducted to show how the preloading and viscous damping change the dynamics of the rotor system. Bifurcation diagrams and Lyapunov exponents are constructed to explore stability. It is shown that dynamics of the rotor system can be effectively controlled by varying the preloading and the damping both of the rotor and the snubber ring. In the most considered cases preloading stabilises the dynamic responses

  12. Bifurcation analysis of a preloaded Jeffcott rotor

    Karpenko, Evgueni V.; Pavlovskaia, Ekaterina E.; Wiercigroch, Marian E-mail: m.wiercigroch@eng.abdn.ac.uk

    2003-01-01

    A model of two-degrees-of-freedom Jeffcott rotor system with bearing clearance subjected of an out-of-balance excitation is considered. The influence of preloading and viscous damping of the snubber ring is introduced in the mathematical description. A programme of numerical simulations is conducted to show how the preloading and viscous damping change the dynamics of the rotor system. Bifurcation diagrams and Lyapunov exponents are constructed to explore stability. It is shown that dynamics of the rotor system can be effectively controlled by varying the preloading and the damping both of the rotor and the snubber ring. In the most considered cases preloading stabilises the dynamic responses.

  13. Elastic multiple-mass model for rotordynamic analysis of flexible electrical rotors

    Werner, U. [Siemens AG, Nuernberg (Germany). Industry, Drive Technologies, Large Drives, Products R and D

    2011-12-15

    The paper presents an elastic multiple-mass model for rotordynamic analysis of flexible electrical rotors supported in sleeve bearings, considering mechanical unbalances and electromagnetic forces. This model has been especially developed for flexible electrical rotors, which operate near below or near above the first critical bending speed of the rotor. Using this simplified model, a static rotor active part eccentricity can be simulated and the orbital movement of the rotor can be calculated. Additionally, the influence of different balancing concepts - elastic balancing versus rigid balancing - on the shaft vibrations is analyzed. To verify the model, a finite element analysis was performed, which indicates a satisfactory match. On the one hand, the aim of the paper is to derive an elastic multiple-mass model for rotordynamic analysis of flexible electrical rotors for special boundary conditions. On the other hand, the aim is to show the mathematical coherences - based on a simplified model - between the rotordynamics, the oil film characteristics of the sleeve bearings, the elasticity of the rotor structure, the electromagnetics and the balancing concept. (orig.)

  14. Recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the scalp treated with serial free flaps

    Ikander, Peder; Sørensen, Jens Ahm

    2015-01-01

    dorsi flaps and one anterolateral thigh flap. No total flap loss was seen, but partial flap necrosis called for secondarily reconstruction. The final result was cosmetically acceptable and the patient is of good health. In conclusion, serial free microvascular flaps may be used with good results when...

  15. Aerodynamic and acoustic integral characteristics of porous rotors

    Benedik, Gašper; Eberlinc, Matjaž; Hočevar, Marko; Širok, Brane

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes porous rotors manufactured from open cell aluminium foam. Rotor construction and theoretical description of fluid flow through rotating porous material are presented. Nine porous rotors made of materials with three different average pore sizes, with or without inducer, three rotor heights and two inlet diameters were selected and compared to a classical rotor with blades. Measurements involved two parts, measurement of pressure drop on non-rotating rotors while integral f...

  16. Orienting coupled quantum rotors by ultrashort laser pulses

    Shima, Hiroyuki; Nakayama, Tsuneyoshi

    2004-01-01

    We point out that the non-adiabatic orientation of quantum rotors, produced by ultrashort laser pulses, is remarkably enhanced by introducing dipolar interaction between the rotors. This enhanced orientation of quantum rotors is in contrast with the behavior of classical paired rotors, in which dipolar interactions prevent the orientation of the rotors. We demonstrate also that a specially designed sequence of pulses can most efficiently enhances the orientation of quantum paired rotors.

  17. Orienting coupled quantum rotors by ultrashort laser pulses

    Shima, Hiroyuki; Nakayama, Tsuneyoshi

    2004-01-01

    We pointed out that the nonadiabatic orientation of quantum rotors, produced by ultrashort laser pulses, is remarkably enhanced by introducing dipolar interaction between the rotors. This enhanced orientation of quantum rotors is in contrast with the behavior of classical paired rotors, in which dipolar interactions prevent the orientation of the rotors. We demonstrate also that a specially designed sequence of pulses can most efficiently enhance the orientation of quantum paired rotors.

  18. Minimum weight design of helicopter rotor blades with frequency constraints

    Chattopadhyay, Aditi; Walsh, Joanne L.

    1989-01-01

    The minimum weight design of helicopter rotor blades subject to constraints on fundamental coupled flap-lag natural frequencies has been studied in this paper. A constraint has also been imposed on the minimum value of the blade autorotational inertia to ensure that the blade has sufficient inertia to autorotate in case of an engine failure. The program CAMRAD has been used for the blade modal analysis and the program CONMIN has been used for the optimization. In addition, a linear approximation analysis involving Taylor series expansion has been used to reduce the analysis effort. The procedure contains a sensitivity analysis which consists of analytical derivatives of the objective function and the autorotational inertia constraint and central finite difference derivatives of the frequency constraints. Optimum designs have been obtained for blades in vacuum with both rectangular and tapered box beam structures. Design variables include taper ratio, nonstructural segment weights and box beam dimensions. The paper shows that even when starting with an acceptable baseline design, a significant amount of weight reduction is possible while satisfying all the constraints for blades with rectangular and tapered box beams.

  19. Dynamic rotor mode in antiferromagnetic nanoparticles

    Lefmann, Kim; Jacobsen, H.; Garde, J.;

    2015-01-01

    We present experimental, numerical, and theoretical evidence for an unusual mode of antiferromagnetic dynamics in nanoparticles. Elastic neutron scattering experiments on 8-nm particles of hematite display a loss of diffraction intensity with temperature, the intensity vanishing around 150 K....... However, the signal from inelastic neutron scattering remains above that temperature, indicating a magnetic system in constant motion. In addition, the precession frequency of the inelastic magnetic signal shows an increase above 100 K. Numerical Langevin simulations of spin dynamics reproduce all...... measured neutron data and reveal that thermally activated spin canting gives rise to an unusual type of coherent magnetic precession mode. This "rotor" mode can be seen as a high-temperature version of superparamagnetism and is driven by exchange interactions between the two magnetic sublattices. The...

  20. Pedicle versus free flap reconstruction in patients receiving intraoperative brachytherapy.

    Geiger, Erik J; Basques, Bryce A; Chang, Christopher C; Son, Yung; Sasaki, Clarence T; McGregor, Andrew; Ariyan, Stephan; Narayan, Deepak

    2016-08-01

    Introduction This study compared complication rates between pedicle flaps and free flaps used for resurfacing of intraoperative brachytherapy (IOBT) implants placed following head and neck tumour extirpation to help clarify the ideal reconstructive procedure for this scenario. Patients and methods A retrospective review of reconstructions with IOBT at our institution was conducted. Patient and treatment details were recorded, as were the number and type of flap complications, including re-operations. Logistic regressions compared complications between flap groups. Results Fifty free flaps and 55 pedicle flaps were included. On multivariate analysis, free flap reconstruction with IOBT was significantly associated with both an increased risk of having any flap complication (OR = 2.9, p = 0.037) and with need for operative revision (OR = 3.5, p = 0.048) compared to pedicle flap reconstruction. Conclusions In the setting of IOBT, free flaps are associated with an increased risk of having complications and requiring operative revisions. PMID:26983038

  1. STUDY OF VARIOUS MODIFICATIONS OF REVERSE SURAL ARTERY FLAP

    Jainath

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A BS T R ACT : Soft tissue reconstruction of distal third leg, heel and ankle reg ion is a challenging problem because of poor vascularity and limited mobility of skin. The reverse sural artery with ideal flap thickness, minimal donor site morbidity, lack of functional muscle loss, short recovery time, wide arc of rotation and safe vasc ularity makes it a preferable flap for covering such defects. AIMS A N D OBJECTIVES : To study various modifications of distally based reverse sural artery flap to suit the defects and for better survival of flaps. RESULTS : It is a retrospective study conduct ed in our institute to cover the distal leg and foot defects.60 cases of distal leg defects exposing vital structure who underwent reverse sural artery flap coverage were included in the study .5 of the 60 flaps had complete flap necrosis and another11 fla ps had partial necrosis.73.4% of the flaps survived during the follow up period of 1 years with good functional outcome. CONCLUSIONS : Reverse sural artery flap with its modifications is a good flap for the defects of distal leg, heel and ankle defects

  2. Robot-Assisted Free Flap in Head and Neck Reconstruction

    Han Gyeol Song

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background  Robots have allowed head and neck surgeons to extirpate oropharyngealtumors safely without the need for lip-split incision or mandibulotomy. Using robots inoropharyngealreconstruction is newbut essentialfor oropharyngeal defectsthatresultfromrobotic tumor excision. We report our experience with robotic free-flap reconstruction ofhead and neck defectsto exemplify the necessity forrobotic reconstruction.Methods  We investigated head and neck cancer patients who underwent ablation surgeryand free-flap reconstruction by robot. Between July 1, 2011 andMarch 31, 2012, 5 caseswereperformed and patient demographics, location of tumor, pathologic stage, reconstructionmethods, flap size, recipient vessel, necessary pedicle length, and operation time wereinvestigated.Results  Among five free-flap reconstructions, four were radial forearm free flaps and onewas an anterolateral thigh free-flap. Four flaps used the superior thyroid artery and oneflap used a facial artery as the recipient vessel. The average pedicle length was 8.8 cm. Flapinsetting and microanastomosis were achieved using a specially manufactured roboticinstrument. The total operation timewas 1,041.0 minutes(range, 814 to 1,132 minutes, andcomplicationsincluding flap necrosis, hematoma, andwound dehiscence did not occur.Conclusions  Thisstudy demonstratesthe clinically applicable use ofrobotsin oropharyngealreconstruction, especially using a free flap. A robot can assist the operator in insettingthe flap at a deep portion of the oropharynx without the need to perform a traditionalmandibulotomy. Robot-assisted reconstruction may substitute for existing surgical methodsand is accepted asthemost up-to-datemethod.

  3. Effect of flapping trajectories on the dragonfly aerodynamics

    2006-01-01

    The effects of translational, figure-eight and double-figure-eight flapping trajectories on the dragonfly aerodynamics were numerically studied by solving the Navier-Stokes equations. There is a common characteristic regarding the lift/drag force coefficients that the downstroke flapping provides the lift forces while the upstroke flapping creates the thrust forces for different flapping trajectories. The maximum lift force coefficient exceeds five for the translational trajectory. It is greater than six for the figure-eight and double-figure-eight flapping trajectories, which is sufficiently larger than unity under the steady state flight condition. The ellipse and double-figure-eight flapping trajectories yield the decrease of the lift force, while the figure-eight flapping trajectory yields higher lift force as well as the thrust force than the translational flapping one. During the insect flight, the wing flapping status should be changed instantaneously to satisfy various requirements. Study of the flapping trajectories on the insect aerodynamics is helpful for the design of the Micro-air-vehicles (MAVs).

  4. Reconstruction of the Lower Extremity Using Free Flaps

    Min Jo Kang

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background The aim of lower-extremity reconstruction has focused on wound coverage andfunctional recovery. However, there are limitations in the use of a local flap in cases of extensivedefects of the lower-extremities. Therefore, free flap is a useful option in lower-extremityreconstruction.Methods We performed a retrospective review of 49 patients (52 cases who underwentlower-extremity reconstruction at our institution during a 10-year period. In these patients,we evaluated causes and sites of defects, types of flaps, recipient vessels, types of anastomosis,survival rate, and complications.Results There were 42 men and 10 women with a mean age of 32.7 years (range, 3-72years. The sites of defects included the dorsum of the foot (19, pretibial area (17, ankle(7, heel (5 and other sites (4. The types of free flap included latissimus dorsi muscle flap(10, scapular fascial flap (6, anterolateral thigh flap (6, and other flaps (30. There werefour cases of vascular complications, out of which two flaps survived after intervention. Theoverall survival of the flaps was 96.2% (50/52. There were 19 cases of other complications atrecipient sites such as partial graft loss (8, partial flap necrosis (6 and infection (5. However,these complications were not notable and were resolved with skin grafts.Conclusions The free flap is an effective method of lower-extremity reconstruction. Goodoutcomes can be achieved with complete debridement and the selection of appropriaterecipient vessels and flaps according to the recipient site.

  5. Darmstadt Rotor No. 2, II: Design of Leaning Rotor Blades

    Bergner J.; Hennecke K. D.; Hoeger M.; Engel K.

    2003-01-01

    For Darmstadt University of Technology's axial singlestage transonic compressor rig, a new three-dimensional aft-swept rotor was designed and manufactured at MTU Aero Engines in Munich, Germany. The application of carbon fiber–reinforced plastic made it possible to overcome structural constraints and therefore to further increase the amount of lean and sweep of the blade. The aim of the design was to improve the mechanical stability at operation that is close to stall.To avoid the hazard of r...

  6. Recent developments in the dynamics of advanced rotor systems

    Johnson, W.

    1985-01-01

    The problems that were encountered in the dynamics of advanced rotor systems are described. The methods for analyzing these problems are discussed, as are past solutions of the problems. To begin, the basic dynamic problems of rotors are discussed: aeroelastic stability, rotor and airframe loads, and aircraft vibration. Next, advanced topics that are the subject of current research are described: vibration control, dynamic upflow, finite element analyses, and composite materials. Finally, the dynamics of various rotorcraft configurations are considered: hingeless rotors, bearingless rotors, rotors with circulation control, coupled rotor/engine dynamics, articulated rotors, and tilting proprotor aircraft.

  7. NASA rotor system research aircraft flight-test data report: Helicopter and compound configuration

    Erickson, R. E.; Kufeld, R. M.; Cross, J. L.; Hodge, R. W.; Ericson, W. F.; Carter, R. D. G.

    1984-01-01

    The flight test activities of the Rotor System Research Aircraft (RSRA), NASA 740, from June 30, 1981 to August 5, 1982 are reported. Tests were conducted in both the helicopter and compound configurations. Compound tests reconfirmed the Sikorsky flight envelope except that main rotor blade bending loads reached endurance at a speed about 10 knots lower than previously. Wing incidence changes were made from 0 to 10 deg.

  8. Aerodynamic flight performance in flap-gliding birds and bats.

    Muijres, Florian T; Henningsson, Per; Stuiver, Melanie; Hedenström, Anders

    2012-08-01

    Many birds use a flight mode called undulating or flap-gliding flight, where they alternate between flapping and gliding phases, while only a few bats make use of such a flight mode. Among birds, flap-gliding is commonly used by medium to large species, where it is regarded to have a lower energetic cost than continuously flapping flight. Here, we introduce a novel model for estimating the energetic flight economy of flap-gliding animals, by determining the lift-to-drag ratio for flap-gliding based on empirical lift-to-drag ratio estimates for continuous flapping flight and for continuous gliding flight, respectively. We apply the model to flight performance data of the common swift (Apus apus) and of the lesser long-nosed bat (Leptonycteris yerbabuenae). The common swift is a typical flap-glider while-to the best of our knowledge-the lesser long-nosed bat does not use flap-gliding. The results show that, according to the model, the flap-gliding common swift saves up to 15% energy compared to a continuous flapping swift, and that this is primarily due to the exceptionally high lift-to-drag ratio in gliding flight relative to that in flapping flight for common swifts. The lesser long-nosed bat, on the other hand, seems not to be able to reduce energetic costs by flap-gliding. The difference in relative costs of flap-gliding flight between the common swift and the lesser long-nosed bat can be explained by differences in morphology, flight style and wake dynamics. The model presented here proves to be a valuable tool for estimating energetic flight economy in flap-gliding animals. The results show that flap-gliding flight that is naturally used by common swifts is indeed the most economic one of the two flight modes, while this is not the case for the non-flap-gliding lesser long-nosed bat. PMID:22726811

  9. Temporal-based pericranial flaps for orbitofrontal Dural repair: A technical note and Review of the literature

    Esther Dupépé

    2016-03-01

    Conclusions: A temporal-based pericranial flap represents an alternative vascularized pedicle flap to the classic frontal-based pericranial flap used in orbitofrontal dural repair. In certain clinical settings, the temporal-based flap may be preferable.

  10. Laser Velocimeter For Use On Helicopter Rotor

    Dunagan, Stephen E.

    1995-01-01

    Laser velocimeter developed to measure flow of air in vicinity of one of blades of helicopter rotor. Image-rotating optic transforms laser beams to rotating reference frame. Transformed beams stationary with respect to rotor blade; enabling continuous monitoring of velocity of flow at some point in reference frame attached to blade, provided that blade did not vibrate.

  11. Variable-Tilt Helicopter Rotor Mast

    Kelley, Henry L.

    1995-01-01

    Variable-tilt helicopter rotor mast proposed to improve helicopter performance and reduce vibration, especially at upper end of forward-speed range of helicopters. Achieved by use of universal coupling in main rotor mast or by tilting entire engine-and-transmission platform. Performance, energy efficiency, and safety enhanced.

  12. Degloving injury from a helicopter rotor strike.

    Nelson, J M; Sawyer, M A

    1995-12-01

    The incidence of helicopter accidents has decreased, but lethality remains considerable. Rotor strikes are deadlier than crash-related injuries. We describe a degloving injury caused by a helicopter tail rotor strike managed with rapid resuscitation and early split-thickness skin grafting. PMID:8775394

  13. 14 CFR 33.34 - Turbocharger rotors.

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Turbocharger rotors. 33.34 Section 33.34 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS... rotors. Each turbocharger case must be designed and constructed to be able to contain fragments of...

  14. Experimental determination of modal parameters for rotors

    In the present paper an experimental method of determining modal parameters (eigenvalues and natural shapes of vibration) of rotor friction bearing systems is described. The method was applied at a simple rotor test stand (Laval shaft). It may possibly be used for larger turborotors, too, if a corresponding opportunity is given for excitation. (orig.)

  15. Innovative multi rotor wind turbine designs

    Kale, S.A.; Sapali, S.N. [College of Engineering. Mechanical Engineering Dept, Pune (India)

    2012-07-01

    Among the renewable energy sources, today wind energy is the most recognized and cost effective. Developers and researchers in this sector are optimistic and continuously working innovatively to improve the technology. The wind power obtained is proportional to the swept area of wind turbine. The swept area is increased by using a single rotor of large diameter or multi rotors in array. The rotor size is growing continuously with mature technology. Multi rotor technology has a long history and the multi rotor concept persists in a variety of modern innovative systems but the concept has fallen out of consideration in mainstream design from the perception that is complex and unnecessary as very large single rotor units are now technically feasible. This work addresses the evaluation of different multi rotor wind turbine systems. These innovative wind turbines are evaluated on the basis of feasibility, technological advantages, security of expected power performance, cost, reliability, impact of innovative system, comparison with existing wind turbine design. The findings of this work will provide guidelines for the practical and economical ways for further research on the multi rotor wind turbines. (Author)

  16. Nonlinear Analysis Of Rotor Dynamics

    Day, William B.; Zalik, Richard

    1988-01-01

    Study explores analytical consequences of nonlinear Jeffcott equations of rotor dynamics. Section 1: Summary of previous studies. Section 2: Jeffcott Equations. Section 3: Proves two theorems that provide inequalities on coefficients of differential equations and magnitude of forcing function in absence of side force. Section 4: Numerical investigation of multiple-forcing-function problem by introducing both side force and mass imbalance. Section 5: Examples of numberical solutions of complex generalized Jeffcott equation with two forcing functions of different frequencies f1 and f2. Section 6: Boundedness and stability of solutions.Section 7: Concludes report reviewing analytical results and significance.

  17. Multiple piece turbine rotor blade

    Jones, Russell B; Fedock, John A

    2013-05-21

    A multiple piece turbine rotor blade with a shell having an airfoil shape and secured between a spar and a platform with the spar including a tip end piece. a snap ring fits around the spar and abuts against the spar tip end piece on a top side and abuts against a shell on the bottom side so that the centrifugal loads from the shell is passed through the snap ring and into the spar and not through a tip cap dovetail slot and projection structure.

  18. 磁悬浮轴承-转子系统非线性行为的控制%Control of Nonlinear Behaviors of an Active Magnetic Bearing - Rotor System

    孙保苍; 梁荣生; 陈威

    2011-01-01

    利用状态反馈法,对磁悬浮轴承-转子系统的振动进行控制.通过理论推导,证明在原点附近,可近似地将受控系统分解为两个渐近稳定的子系统之和.借助数值仿真对转子受控前后的运动响应进行分析,以验证该控制方案的有效性.通过比较发现,提出的状态反馈控制方案不但能控制转子的周期运动,而且对该系统的概周期运动和混沌运动也能进行有效控制.%In this paper, the nonlinear dynamical behaviors of an active magnetic beating-rotor system are investigated.In order to control the vibration of the system, a state feedback method is adopted.It is theoretically proved that the controlled system can be approximately divided into two asymptotically stable subsystems near the origin.Based on this conclusion, kinematic responses to both controlled and uncontrolled systems are analyzed by numerical simulations to verify the validity of the control scheme.Mutual comparison of the results of both systems reveals that the state feedback control scheme presented here can effectively control not only periodic vibrations, but also quasi-periodic and chaotic vibrations.

  19. Treatment of lumbosacral decubitus ulcers by Lymberg flap

    The lymberg flap was used for the treatment of lumbosacral decubitus and irradiation-induced ulcer successfully in 6 lesion of 5 cases. The results were evaluated, and characteristics and indication of the method were discussed. The procedure of the method: A rhomboid flap with a side lenghth, equal to that of the lesion and with an angle of 600, was cut out, and transplanted to cover the lesion. The wound of a donor was sutured by extending the surrounding area. Of characteristics of this method, a flap can be produced in a desired shape; tension lies little on the flap; and a small area is needed for the flap. However, in recurrence, the first wound may cause circulation disturbance in a flap. Large wounds of donors sometimes cannont be closed. Therefore, a fresh case with relatively small lesions is an indication to this method. (Ueda, J.)

  20. Pumping by flapping in a viscoelastic fluid

    Pak, On Shun

    2010-01-01

    In a world without inertia, Purcell's scallop theorem states that in a Newtonian fluid a time-reversible motion cannot produce any net force or net flow. Here we consider the extent to which the nonlinear rheological behavior of viscoelastic fluids can be exploited to break the constraints of the scallop theorem in the context of fluid pumping. By building on previous work focusing on force generation, we consider a simple, biologically-inspired geometrical example of a flapper in a polymeric (Oldroyd-B) fluid, and calculate asymptotically the time-average net fluid flow produced by the reciprocal flapping motion. The net flow occurs at fourth order in the flapping amplitude, and suggests the possibility of transporting polymeric fluids using reciprocal motion in simple geometries even in the absence of inertia. The induced flow field and pumping performance are characterized and optimized analytically. Our results may be useful in the design of micro-pumps handling complex fluids.

  1. Dynamics of Flapping Flag in Axial Flow

    Abderrahmane, Hamid Ait; Fayed, Mohamed; Gunter, Amy-Lee; Paidoussis, Michael P.; Ng, Hoi Dick

    2010-11-01

    We investigate experimentally the phenomenon of the flapping of a flag, placed within a low turbulent axial flow inside a small scale wind tunnel test section. Flags of different sizes and flexural rigidities were used. Image processing technique was used and the time series of a given point on the edge of the flag was analyzed. The stability condition of the flag was obtained and compared to the recent theoretical models and numerical simulations. Afterwards, the nonlinear dynamics of the flapping was investigated using nonlinear time series method. The nonlinear dynamics is depicted in phase space and the correlation dimension of the attractors is determined. On the basis of observations made in this study, some conclusions on the existing models were drawn.

  2. CATERPILLAR ADVANCEMENT FOR PARTIALLY NECROSED DELTOPECTORAL FLAP

    Anand Narayan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Development of electric lamp by Thomas Elva Edison had significant impact on human civilization. With increasing production of electrical energy to meet ongoing demands of increased frequency of electrical injuries. Despite increased awareness of potential dangers, elect ricity is responsible for many fatalities all over the world. Electrical burn accounts for ~3% of all burn related injuries. Estimated 3, 000 annual admittions to burn units. Electrical burn have bimodal distribution ~1/3 children <6 yrs ( E lectric cords & wall outlets ~2/3 miners, construction, & electrical workers. Our case is one that of a 12 year old male child having electrical injury over face and neck with exposed angle of mandible which was covered by Deltopectoral flap with caterpillar advancement of flap.

  3. Advanced disk-type LP turbine rotors

    This paper addresses the application of these design considerations. After twenty years experience with disk-type rotors, the Siemens/KWU ten-disk rotor for low-speed nuclear LP turbines was developed in 1969. Full volumetric disk hub inspections after 83,000 service hours did not reveal any stress corrosion cracking. In the meantime, this rotor design has been further improved. In 1987, two advanced eight-disk rotors went into operation at the Connecticut Yankee station. This rotor design together with the advanced LP turbine blading has been delivered to the Unterweser station. First test results indicated a remarkably improved thermodynamic performance. Avoidance of stress corrosion cracking can be accomplished by a combination of various measures: Proper keyway design; Low metal temperature; Low tensile stressing (by design); Low yield strength; High fracture toughness; Low surface stresses (by manufacturing); Proper steam/water cycle chemistry

  4. Dynamics and stability of turbocharger rotors

    Schweizer, Bernhard [University of Kassel (Germany). Department of Mechanical Engineering, Multibody Systems

    2010-09-15

    The paper discusses the bifurcation and stability behavior of (automotive) turbochargers with full-floating ring bearings. Turbocharger rotors exhibit a highly nonlinear behavior due to the nonlinearities introduced by the floating ring bearings. A flexible multibody model of the rotor/bearing system is presented. Numerical run-up simulations are compared with corresponding test rig measurements. The nonlinear oscillation effects are thoroughly investigated by means of simulated and measured rotor vibrations. The influence of various system parameters on the bifurcation behavior of the rotor/bearing system is analyzed. The article examines rotors supported in full-floating ring bearings with plain circular bearing geometry in the inner and outer oil gap. By recapitulating the well-known oil whirl and oil whip phenomena for single and double oil film bearings, the paper gives an overview on the fundamental dynamic effects occurring in turbocharger systems. (orig.)

  5. Substantially parallel flux uncluttered rotor machines

    Hsu, John S.

    2012-12-11

    A permanent magnet-less and brushless synchronous system includes a stator that generates a magnetic rotating field when sourced by polyphase alternating currents. An uncluttered rotor is positioned within the magnetic rotating field and is spaced apart from the stator. An excitation core is spaced apart from the stator and the uncluttered rotor and magnetically couples the uncluttered rotor. The brushless excitation source generates a magnet torque by inducing magnetic poles near an outer peripheral surface of the uncluttered rotor, and the stator currents also generate a reluctance torque by a reaction of the difference between the direct and quadrature magnetic paths of the uncluttered rotor. The system can be used either as a motor or a generator

  6. Computational Analysis of Multi-Rotor Flows

    Yoon, Seokkwan; Lee, Henry C.; Pulliam, Thomas H.

    2016-01-01

    Interactional aerodynamics of multi-rotor flows has been studied for a quadcopter representing a generic quad tilt-rotor aircraft in hover. The objective of the present study is to investigate the effects of the separation distances between rotors, and also fuselage and wings on the performance and efficiency of multirotor systems. Three-dimensional unsteady Navier-Stokes equations are solved using a spatially 5th order accurate scheme, dual-time stepping, and the Detached Eddy Simulation turbulence model. The results show that the separation distances as well as the wings have significant effects on the vertical forces of quadroror systems in hover. Understanding interactions in multi-rotor flows would help improve the design of next generation multi-rotor drones.

  7. Open Rotor - Analysis of Diagnostic Data

    Envia, Edmane

    2011-01-01

    NASA is researching open rotor propulsion as part of its technology research and development plan for addressing the subsonic transport aircraft noise, emission and fuel burn goals. The low-speed wind tunnel test for investigating the aerodynamic and acoustic performance of a benchmark blade set at the approach and takeoff conditions has recently concluded. A high-speed wind tunnel diagnostic test campaign has begun to investigate the performance of this benchmark open rotor blade set at the cruise condition. Databases from both speed regimes will comprise a comprehensive collection of benchmark open rotor data for use in assessing/validating aerodynamic and noise prediction tools (component & system level) as well as providing insights into the physics of open rotors to help guide the development of quieter open rotors.

  8. USB noise reduction by nozzle and flap modifications

    Hayden, R. E.

    1976-01-01

    The development of concepts for reducing upper surface blown flap noise at the source through flap modifications and special nozzles is reviewed. In particular, recent results obtained on the aerodynamic and acoustic performance of flaps with porous surfaces near the trailing edge and multi-slotted nozzles are reviewed. Considerable reduction (6-10 db) of the characteristic low frequency peak is shown. The aerodynamic performance is compared with conventional systems, and prospects for future improvements are discussed.

  9. Medial circumflex femoral artery flap for ischial pressure sore

    Palanivelu S

    2009-01-01

    A new axial pattern flap based on the terminal branches of the medial circumflex femoral artery is described for coverage of ischial pressure sore. Based on the terminal branches of the transverse branch of medial circumflex femoral artery, which exit through the gap between the quadratus femoris muscle above and the upper border of adductor magnus muscle below, this fascio cutaneous flap is much smaller than the posterior thigh flap but extremely useful to cover ischeal pressure sores. The s...

  10. Fenestration of bone flap during decompressive craniotomy for subdural hematoma

    Ha Son Nguyen; Ninh Doan; Christopher Wolfla; Glen Pollock

    2016-01-01

    Background: Persistent/recurrent extra-axial hemorrhage may occur after decompression of a subdural hematoma (SDH) followed by an immediate replacement of bone flap. A fenestration of the bone flap may encourage extra-axial fluid absorption; however, the literature has not explored this technique. Methods: Forty-four consecutive patients who underwent surgical decompression of SDH with immediate replacement of bone flap were divided into two groups: Fenestration (F), n = 33, and no fenest...

  11. Design of Insect-Scale Flapping Wing Vehicles

    Ahmed Nabawy, Mostafa Ramadan

    2015-01-01

    This thesis contributes to the state of the art in integrated design of insect-scale piezoelectric actuated flapping wing vehicles through the development of novel theoretical models for flapping wing aerodynamics and piezoelectric actuator dynamics, and integration of these models into a closed form design process.A comprehensive literature review of available engineered designs of miniature rotary and flapping wing vehicles is provided. A novel taxonomy based on wing and actuator kinematics...

  12. Control of Rotor-Blade Coupled Vibrations Using Shaft-Based Actuation

    Christensen, Rene H.; Santos, Ilmar

    When implementing active control into bladed rotating machines aiming at reducing blade vibrations, it can be shown that blade as well as rotor vibrations can in fact be controlled by the use of only shaft-based actuation. Thus the blades have to be deliberately mistuned. This paper investigates....... The dependency of the controllability and observability on varying rotational speed and mode shape interaction phenomena between parametric and basis mode shape components are also analysed. Numerical results reveal a limitation of the achievable controllability and observability, once quantitative...... the dynamical characteristics of a mistuned bladed rotor and shows how, why and when a bladed rotor becomes controllable and observable if properly mistuned. As part of such investigation modal controllability and observability of a tuned as well as a mistuned coupled rotor-blade system are analysed...

  13. Rotor speed estimation for indirect stator flux oriented induction motor drive based on MRAS scheme

    Youssef Agrebi

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a conventional indirect stator flux oriented controlled (ISFOC induction motor drive is presented. In order to eliminate the speed sensor, an adaptation algorithm for tuning the rotor speed is proposed. Based on the model reference adaptive system (MRAS scheme, the rotor speed is tuned to obtain an exact ISFOC induction motor drive. The reference and adjustable models, developed in stationary stator reference frame, are used in the MRAS scheme to estimate induction rotor peed from measured terminal voltages and currents. The IP gains speed controller and PI gains current controller are calculated and tuned at each sampling time according to the new estimated rotor speed. The proposed algorithm has been tested by numerical simulation, showing the capability of driving active load; and stability is preserved. Experimental results obtained with a general-purpose 1-kW induction machine are presented showing the effectiveness of the proposed approach in terms of dynamic performance.

  14. STUDY ON CATASTROPHIC MECHANISM FOR ROTOR DROP TRANSIENT VIBRATION FOLLOWING MAGNETIC BEARING FAILURE

    方之楚

    2002-01-01

    The nonlinear and transient vibration of a rotor, which dropped onto back-up bearings when its active magnetic bearings were out of order, was investigated. After strictly deriving its equations of motion and performing numerical simulations, the timehistories of rotating speed of the dropping rotor, and normal force at the rubbing contact point as well as the frequency spectrum of the vibration displacement of back-up bearings are fully analyzed. It is found that the strong and unsteady forced bending vibration of the unbalanced and damped rotor decelerating through its first bending vibtation of the unbalanced and damped rotor decelerating through its first critical speed as well as chattering at high frequencies caused by the nonlinearity at the rubbing contact point between the journal and back-up bearings may lead to the catastrophic damage of the system.

  15. Locomotion of a flapping flexible plate

    Hua, Ru-Nan; Zhu, Luoding; Lu, Xi-Yun

    2013-12-01

    The locomotion of a flapping flexible plate in a viscous incompressible stationary fluid is numerically studied by an immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method for the fluid and a finite element method for the plate. When the leading-edge of the flexible plate is forced to heave sinusoidally, the entire plate starts to move freely as a result of the fluid-structure interaction. Mechanisms underlying the dynamics of the plate are elucidated. Three distinct states of the plate motion are identified and can be described as forward, backward, and irregular. Which state to occur depends mainly on the heaving amplitude and the bending rigidity of the plate. In the forward motion regime, analysis of the dynamic behaviors of the flapping flexible plate indicates that a suitable degree of flexibility can improve the propulsive performance. Moreover, there exist two kinds of vortex streets in the downstream of the plate which are normal and deflected wake. Further the forward motion is compared with the flapping-based locomotion of swimming and flying animals. The results obtained in the present study are found to be consistent with the relevant observations and measurements and can provide some physical insights into the understanding of the propulsive mechanisms of swimming and flying animals.

  16. Acetylcysteine in random skin flap in rats

    Abla Luiz Eduardo Felipe

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Analyze the ability of Acetylcysteine to reduce distal necrosis in a random skin flap, in the rat. METHODS: The present study utilized 28 adult male Wistar-EPM rats distributed, at random, in two groups of 14 animals. Control group rats (CG received distilled water and Acetylcysteine group animals (NACG received NAC (300 mg/kg by oral infusion, 15 minutes before flap elevation. On the seventh postoperative day, percentage of distal necrosis was determined and skin samples collected in order to allow determination of MDA levels. RESULTS: The mean necrotic area in CG group (control was 66 % and in NACG group (Acetylcysteine 52 %, a statistically significant difference according to the Mann-Whitney test (U calc = 25; U crit = 45. MDA levels were lower in the CG flap skin samples than in the NACG samples (U calc = 24; U crit = 45, the oposite being true in the normal skin samples (U calc = 10; U crit = 45. CONCLUSION: Acetylcysteine was effective, according to the model used, reducing the percentage of distal necrosis in NACG rats.

  17. Pedicled and free TRAM flaps in breast reconstructions : a comparative study

    Edsander-Nord, Åsa

    2000-01-01

    The transverse rectus abdominis musculocutaneous (TRAM) flap is frequently used when autologous tissue is desired for breast reconstruction, and it can be transferred pedicled or free. The pedicled TRAM flap is elevated as a lower transverse abdominal flap with the rectus abdominis muscle attached in the epigastric area, by which means the deep superior epigastric vessels nourish the flap. The flap is tunneled to its new position on the thoracic wall. The free TRAM flap c...

  18. Propeller Perforator Flaps in Distal Lower Leg:Evolution and Clinical Applications

    Georgescu, Alexandru V.

    2012-01-01

    Simple or complex defects in the lower leg, and especially in its distal third, continue to be a challenging task for reconstructive surgeons. A variety of flaps were used in the attempt to achieve excellence in form and function. After a long evolution of the reconstructive methods, including random pattern flaps, axial pattern flaps, musculocutaneous flaps and fasciocutaneous flaps, the reappraisal of the works of Manchot and Salmon by Taylor and Palmer opened the era of perforator flaps. T...

  19. Design, Fabrication and Testing Of Flapping Wing Micro Air Vehicle

    K. P. Preethi Manohari Sai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Flapping flight has the potential to revolutionize micro air vehicles (MAVs due to increased aerodynamic performance, improved maneuverability and hover capabilities. The purpose of this project is to design and fabrication of flapping wing micro air vehicle. The designed MAV will have a wing span of 40cm. The drive mechanism will be a gear mechanism to drive the flapping wing MAV, along with one actuator. Initially, a preliminary design of flapping wing MAV is drawn and necessary calculation for the lift calculation has been done. Later a CAD model is drawn in CATIA V5 software. Finally we tested by Flying.

  20. Thoracodorsal artery perforator flap for upper limb reconstruction

    Thoracodorsal artery perforator flap (TAP) is a feasible option to reconstruct defects in upper limb where only skin and subcutaneous tissue is required. Methods: This case series was carried out at department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Combined Military Hospital Rawalpindi. A total of 5 patients with upper limb defects were reconstructed with thoracodorsal artery musculocutaneous perforator flaps. Among them, 3 were pedicled and two free TAP flaps. All flaps except one pedicled flap were raised on a single perforator pedicle. Recipient sites were one axilla, two shoulder regions and two hands. The soft tissue defects in the patients had resulted from burns, trauma, wide local excision of synovial sarcoma and surgery for hidradenitis suppurativa. Preoperative hand held Doppler ultrasound was used to locate and mark the perforator. Results: All flaps survived without significant complications. All flaps were hyperemic in the immediate postoperative period. We designed and raised all the five flaps on eccentrically placed perforators. All the raised perforators originated from the descending branch of the thoracodorsal artery. The donor sites were closed primarily with linear scars in all cases except one, in which partial closure was accomplished with split thickness skin grafting (STSG). Conclusion: The thoracodorsal artery perforator flap has great potential for reconstructing large, relatively shallow, defects of upper limb because of its suitable skin quality, texture and appropriate thickness, as well as hidden donor site, a reliable pedicle and sparing of muscle unit. (author)

  1. Medial circumflex femoral artery flap for ischial pressure sore

    Palanivelu S

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A new axial pattern flap based on the terminal branches of the medial circumflex femoral artery is described for coverage of ischial pressure sore. Based on the terminal branches of the transverse branch of medial circumflex femoral artery, which exit through the gap between the quadratus femoris muscle above and the upper border of adductor magnus muscle below, this fascio cutaneous flap is much smaller than the posterior thigh flap but extremely useful to cover ischeal pressure sores. The skin redundancy below the gluteal fold allows a primary closure of the donor defect. It can also be used in combination with biceps femoris muscle flap.

  2. Monocortical Deep Circumflex Iliac Artery Flap in Jaw Reconstruction.

    Moon, Seong-Yong

    2015-06-01

    Conventionally deep circumflex iliac artery (DCIA) flap had been harvested as bicortical form. However, several complications and adverse effects occurred such as abnormal hip contour, hernia, severe bleeding tendency, gait disturbance, and hypoesthesia. All the 9 patients required reconstruction of the jaw with microvascular free flaps after radical resection. Monocortical bone segment was harvested from the anterior iliac crest, and the amount of bone harvested was from 47 to 90 mm (mean, 63 ± 14.6). Monocortical deep circumflex iliac artery flap has sufficient advantages in donor-site morbidity, which is one of the factors to choose flap. PMID:26080179

  3. Cervicopectoral flap in head and neck cancer surgery

    Sivrioglu Nazan S

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reconstruction of the head and neck after adequate resection of primary tumor and neck dissection is a challenge. It should be performed at one sitting in advanced tumors. Defects caused by the resection should be closed with flaps which match in color, texture and hair bearing characteristics with the face. Cervicopectoral flap is a one such flap from chest and neck skin mainly used to cover the cheek defects. Methods This study included twelve patients presenting with cancer of the head and neck to Izmir Ataturk Training Hospital and Adnan Menderes University Hospital. Tumor resection and neck dissection was performed in one session by the same surgeon. A single incision was made and a medially based cervicopectoral fascio-cutaneous flap was used for surgical exposure in neck dissection and for closure of defects after tumor resection. Results There was no major complication. Two flaps had partial superficial epidermolysis at the suture line. Good aesthetic and functional results were achieved. Conclusion The cervicopectoral flap is an excellent alternative for the reconstruction of head and neck. Harvesting and application of the flap is rapid and safe. Only a single incision is sufficient for dissection and flap elevation. This flap achieves perfect surgical exposure, makes neck dissection easy and allows one to perform both tumor resection and neck dissection in one session.

  4. Oropharyngeal reconstruction with a pedicled submandibular gland flap.

    Mashrah, Mubarak A; Zhou, Shang-Hui; Abdelrehem, Ahmed; Ma, Chunyue; Xu, Liqun; He, Yue; Zhang, Chen-Ping

    2016-05-01

    Locoregional flaps are widely used for reconstruction of small and medium defects in the oral cavity. The submandibular gland flap is a pedicled flap, which derives its blood supply from the facial artery, based on the submandibular gland. We describe the use of the flap in 20 patients who required oropharyngeal reconstruction with a pedicled submandibular gland flap after resection of a tumour between July 2012 and October 2014. Patients with squamous cell carcinoma were excluded. All flaps were pedicled on the facial vessels (inferiorly in 17 patients and superiorly in 3). The indications were: reconstruction of intraoral mucosal defects (n=13), filling the parapharyngeal dead space (n=6), and obliteration of the mastoid (n=1). All the flaps atrophied, but with no clinical effect. One patient developed partial loss of the flap, and one early leakage. There were no cases of xerostomia, and no signs of recurrence during the postoperative follow-up period of 3-26 months. The flap is useful, as it is simple and reliable for reconstruction of small to medium oropharyngeal defects in carefully selected cases, and gives good cosmetic and functional results. PMID:26388070

  5. Angiographic findings before and after transplantation of split myocutaneous flaps

    Prerequisite for successful split-skin flap transplants of myocutaneous flaps is the presence of adequate adjacent afferent and efferent vessels, thus making an arteriography of the receiving region mandatory during surgery preparation. In 20 or 29 patients in whom a split myocutaneous flap was transplanted to the lower leg, angiography revealed 22 pathological or other therapy-relevant findings. Besides the afferent vessels it is basically necessary to visualise the peripheral efferent pathways in order to prevent that vascular anastomosis to the split-skin flap obstructs the blood supply of the leg. (orig.)

  6. Development of a morphing flap using shape memory alloy actuators: the aerodynamic characteristics of a morphing flap

    The discontinuous contour of a wing with conventional flaps diminishes the aerodynamic performance of an aircraft. A wing with a continuous contour does not experience extreme flow stream fluctuations during flight, and consequently has good aerodynamic characteristics. In this study, a morphing flap using shape memory alloy actuators is proposed, designed and fabricated, and its aerodynamic characteristics are investigated using aerodynamic analyses and wind tunnel tests. The ribs of the morphing flap are designed and fabricated with multiple elements joined together in a way that allows relative rotations of adjacent elements and forms a smooth contour of the morphing flap. The aerodynamic analyses of this multiple-element morphing-flap wing are performed using XFLR pro; its aerodynamic performance is compared with that of a mechanical-flap wing, and is measured through wind-tunnel tests. (papers)

  7. A soft rotor concept - design, verification and potentials

    Rasmussen, F.; Thirstrup Petersen, J. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark)

    1999-03-01

    This paper contains results from development and testing of a two-bladed soft rotor for an existing 15 kW flexible wind turbine. The new concept is characterised as a free yawing down wind turbine with nacelle tilting flexibility and a two-bladed teetering rotor with three-point supported flexible blades with built-in structural couplings. The power and the loads are controlled by active stall and active coning. The concept has been developed by extensive application of aero-elastic predictions, numerical optimisation and stability analysis in order to obtain optimal aero-elastic response and minimal loads. The flexible blades and the principle of active coning allow the blades to deflect with the wind to such an extent that the loads are reduced to between 25 and 50% of the loads for a similar rigid rotor. All conceptual design principles have been focused on application to large MW turbines, and aero-elastic predictions for an upscale 1 MW version show that this would have approximately identical characteristisc, without being particularly optimised for the actual size. (au)

  8. Computational studies of the effects of active and passive circulation enhancement concepts on wind turbine performance

    Tongchitpakdee, Chanin

    With the advantage of modern high speed computers, there has been an increased interest in the use of first-principles based computational approaches for the aerodynamic modeling of horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT). Since these approaches are based on the laws of conservation (mass, momentum, and energy), they can capture much of the physics in great detail. The ability to accurately predict the airloads and power output can greatly aid the designers in tailoring the aerodynamic and aeroelastic features of the configuration. First-principles based analyses are also valuable for developing active means (e.g., circulation control), and passive means (e.g., Gurney flaps) of reducing unsteady blade loads, mitigating stall, and for efficient capture of wind energy leading to more electrical power generation. In this present study, the aerodynamic performance of a wind turbine rotor equipped with circulation enhancement technology (trailing edge blowing or Gurney flaps) is investigated using a three-dimensional unsteady viscous flow analysis. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Phase VI horizontal axis wind turbine is chosen as the baseline configuration. Prior to its use in exploring these concepts, the flow solver is validated with the experimental data for the baseline case under yawed flow conditions. Results presented include radial distribution of normal and tangential forces, shaft torque, root flap moment, surface pressure distributions at selected radial locations, and power output. Results show that good agreement has been for a range of wind speeds and yaw angles, where the flow is attached. At high wind speeds, however, where the flow is fully separated, it was found that the fundamental assumptions behind this present methodology breaks down for the baseline turbulence model (Spalart-Allmaras model), giving less accurate results. With the implementation of advanced turbulence model, Spalart-Allmaras Detached Eddy Simulation (SA-DES), the

  9. Vascular Complications After Radiotherapy in Head and Neck Free Flap Reconstruction: Clinical Outcome Related to Vascular Biology.

    Tall, Jael; Björklund, Tinna Christersdottir; Skogh, Ann-Charlott Docherty; Arnander, Claes; Halle, Martin

    2015-09-01

    Radiotherapy as a risk factor for free flap failure has been widely debated. The purpose of this study was to investigate vascular complications in free flap surgery at a center advocating preoperative radiotherapy. On the basis of previous experimental studies, we also aimed to investigate temporal aspects of vascular complications in both arteries and veins. Furthermore, we aimed to study the effect of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), because irradiated microvascular recipient vessels are associated with impaired fibrinolysis.A retrospective review was conducted for 344 consecutive head and neck microvascular reconstructions. Radiotherapy was administered previously in 283 (82%) of the cases, median dose 64 Gy. Flap outcome, vascular complications, and salvage attempts were identified, along with time elapsed from completed radiotherapy, described as early (15 weeks) reconstructions.Total flap loss was more common in irradiated cases (P = 0.035), among which flap failure increased with time elapsed from the last radiotherapy session to surgery (P = 0.021). Among 30 registered vascular complications, venous thrombosis was the most common type and increased in delayed, compared to early, reconstructions (P = 0.012). Increased salvage rates were observed when tPA was administered intraoperatively (P = 0.015).The present study indicates that previous radiotherapy is a risk factor for head and neck free flap failure, especially in delayed reconstructions. This may be linked to previous findings of impaired fibrinolysis in irradiated microvascular recipient veins, which is further supported by the beneficial effect of tPA during salvage surgery. We emphasize the importance of early reconstruction after radiotherapy and suggest that there is a role for fibrinolytic agents during free flap salvage surgery in previously irradiated subjects. PMID:25003403

  10. Active Control of Suspension Bridges

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    In this paper some recent research on active control of very long suspension bridges, is presented. The presentation is based on research work at Aalborg University, Denmark. The active control system is based on movable flaps attached to the bridge girder. Wind load on bridges with or without...... flaps attached to the girder is briefly presented. A simple active control system is discussed. Results from wind tunnel experiments with a bridge section show that flaps can be used effectively to control bridge girder vibrations. Flutter conditions for suspension bridges with and without flaps are...

  11. Helicopter Rotor Sailing by Non-Smooth Dynamics Co-Simulation

    Fancello Matteo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the application of a co-simulation approach for the simulation of frictional contact in general-purpose multibody dynamics to a rotorcraft dynamics problem. The proposed approach is based on the co-simulation of a main problem, which is described and solved as a set of differential algebraic equations, with a subproblem that is characterized by nonsmooth dynamics events and solved using a timestepping technique. The implementation and validation of the formulation is presented. The method is applied to the analysis of the droop and anti-flap contacts of helicopter rotor blades. Simulations focusing on the problem of blade sailing are conducted to understand the behavior and assess the validity of the method. For this purpose, the results obtained using a contact model based on Hertzian reaction forces at the interface are compared with those of the proposed approach.

  12. Free combined composite flaps using the lateral circumflex femoral system for repair of massive defects of the head and neck regions: an introduction to the chimeric flap principle.

    Koshima, I; Yamamoto, H; Hosoda, M; Moriguchi, T; Orita, Y; Nagayama, H

    1993-09-01

    Chimeric composite flaps combined using microanastomoses consist of two or more flaps or tissues, each with an isolated pedicle and a single vascular source. Free combined chimeric flaps using the lateral circumflex femoral system were used to treat massive composite defects of the head and neck in 10 cases. A combined anterolateral thigh flap and vascularized iliac bone graft based on the lateral circumflex femoral system and the deep circumflex iliac system was the most commonly used combination. An anteromedial thigh flap and a paraumbilical perforator-based flap were also combined with this principal combination. The advantages of this chimeric flap over other osteocutaneous flaps are: (1) The flap is relatively thin and the pedicle vessels are up to 10 cm longer and are wider than those of other flaps for easier harvesting of the flap. (2) It is unnecessary to reposition the patient. (3) The vascular pedicle to the skin can be separated from that of the bone. (4) The donor site is not close to the recipient site. (5) The donor scar is in an unexposed area. (6) The skin territory of this flap is extremely wide. (7) A combined anterolateral and anteromedial thigh flap and vascularized iliac bone graft can be easily obtained as an extended combined osteocutaneous flap. (8) Other neighboring skin flaps, such as a groin flap, a paraumbilical perforator-based flap, or a medial thigh flap, can be combined with this chimeric flap because several major muscle branches to be anastomosed derive from the lateral circumflex femoral system. Chimeric composite flaps using the lateral circumflex femoral system are considered suitable for the repair of massive composite defects of the head and neck. PMID:8341739

  13. Comparative study of visual acuity and aberrations after intralase femtosecond LASIK: small corneal flap versus big corneal flap

    Ya-Li; Zhang; Lei; Liu; Chang-Xia; Cui; Ming; Hu; Zhao-Na; Li; Li-Jun; Cao; Xiu-Hua; Jing; Guo-Ying; Mu

    2014-01-01

    AIM:To study the effects of different flap sizes on visual acuity, refractive outcomes, and aberrations after femtosecond laser for laser keratomileusis (LASIK). ·METHODS: In each of the forty patients enrolled, 1 eye was randomly assigned to receive treatment with a 8.1mm diameter corneal flap, defined as the small flap, while the other eye was treated with a 8.6mm diameter corneal flap, defined as the big flap. Refractive errors, visual acuity, and higher -order aberrations were compared between the two groups at week 1, month 1 and 3 postoperatively. · RESULTS: The postoperative refractive errors and visual acuity all conformed to the intended goal. Postoperative higher -order aberrations were increased, especially in spherical aberration (Z12) and vertical coma (Z7). There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups in terms of postoperative refractive errors, visual acuity, root mean square of total HOAs (HO -RMS), trefoil 30° (Z6), vertical coma (Z7), horizontal coma (Z8), trefoil 0° (Z9), and spherical aberration (Z12) at any point during the postoperative follow-up. ·CONCLUSION: Both the small and big flaps are safe and effective procedures to correct myopia, provided the exposure stroma meets the excimer laser ablations. The personalized size corneal flap is feasible, as we can design the size of corneal flap based on the principle that the corneal flap diameter should be equal to or greater than the sum of the maximum ablation diameter and apparatus error.

  14. A propeller flap for single-stage nose reconstruction in selected patients: supratrochlear artery axial propeller flap.

    Cordova, Adriana; D'Arpa, Salvatore; Massimiliano, Tripoli; Toia, Francesca; Moschella, Francesco

    2014-06-01

    The paramedian forehead flap is the gold standard technique for nose reconstruction. It requires two different surgical operations which prolonged the postoperative dressing and care. We present our 5-year experience with a propeller flap based on the supratrochlear artery, which allows one-stage transfer of the forehead skin to the nose without the need for pedicle division. This technique is indicated in a selected group of patients who are not suitable for multiple-stage reconstructions because they have concurrent medical conditions, reduced mobility, or live far away from specialized medical centers. We have renamed this procedure as supratrochlear artery axial propeller flap, from the acronym STAAP flap, to stress the axial, well known and constant, vascularization of the flap. In the past 5 years, we have been performing 25 STAAP flaps; full-thickness nasal reconstruction was performed in 11 cases. The patients were 16 males and 9 females, with a mean age of 79.5 years. All patients had multiple comorbidities. Complete flap survival was observed in 23 cases and healing was complete in 7 days. In two cases, there was a partial distal necrosis of the flap treated conservatively. Cosmetic results were good and the patient's satisfaction was significant. These results indicate that the STAAP flap is a reliable and useful technique in selected cases, as old or noncompliant patients who benefit from a one-stage technique of nose reconstruction. PMID:24918712

  15. 14 CFR 27.1461 - Equipment containing high energy rotors.

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Equipment containing high energy rotors. 27... Equipment containing high energy rotors. (a) Equipment containing high energy rotors must meet paragraph (b), (c), or (d) of this section. (b) High energy rotors contained in equipment must be able to...

  16. 14 CFR 27.547 - Main rotor structure.

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Main rotor structure. 27.547 Section 27.547... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Strength Requirements Main Component Requirements § 27.547 Main rotor structure. (a) Each main rotor assembly (including rotor hubs and blades) must be designed as prescribed...

  17. 14 CFR 27.661 - Rotor blade clearance.

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Rotor blade clearance. 27.661 Section 27... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Rotors § 27.661 Rotor blade clearance. There must be enough clearance between the rotor blades and other parts of the structure...

  18. 14 CFR 29.411 - Ground clearance: tail rotor guard.

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ground clearance: tail rotor guard. 29.411... System Loads § 29.411 Ground clearance: tail rotor guard. (a) It must be impossible for the tail rotor to contact the landing surface during a normal landing. (b) If a tail rotor guard is required to...

  19. 14 CFR 29.1461 - Equipment containing high energy rotors.

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Equipment containing high energy rotors. 29... § 29.1461 Equipment containing high energy rotors. (a) Equipment containing high energy rotors must meet paragraph (b), (c), or (d) of this section. (b) High energy rotors contained in equipment must...

  20. 14 CFR 29.547 - Main and tail rotor structure.

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Main and tail rotor structure. 29.547... Requirements § 29.547 Main and tail rotor structure. (a) A rotor is an assembly of rotating components, which includes the rotor hub, blades, blade dampers, the pitch control mechanisms, and all other parts...

  1. 14 CFR 33.92 - Rotor locking tests.

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Rotor locking tests. 33.92 Section 33.92... STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.92 Rotor locking tests. If continued rotation is prevented by a means to lock the rotor(s), the engine must be subjected to a test that...

  2. 14 CFR 29.661 - Rotor blade clearance.

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Rotor blade clearance. 29.661 Section 29... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Rotors § 29.661 Rotor blade clearance. There must be enough clearance between the rotor blades and other parts of the structure...

  3. 14 CFR 25.1461 - Equipment containing high energy rotors.

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Equipment containing high energy rotors. 25... § 25.1461 Equipment containing high energy rotors. (a) Equipment containing high energy rotors must meet paragraph (b), (c), or (d) of this section. (b) High energy rotors contained in equipment must...

  4. 14 CFR 27.411 - Ground clearance: tail rotor guard.

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ground clearance: tail rotor guard. 27.411... System Loads § 27.411 Ground clearance: tail rotor guard. (a) It must be impossible for the tail rotor to contact the landing surface during a normal landing. (b) If a tail rotor guard is required to...

  5. Rotor-Flying Manipulator: Modeling, Analysis, and Control

    Bin Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Equipping multijoint manipulators on a mobile robot is a typical redesign scheme to make the latter be able to actively influence the surroundings and has been extensively used for many ground robots, underwater robots, and space robotic systems. However, the rotor-flying robot (RFR is difficult to be made such redesign. This is mainly because the motion of the manipulator will bring heavy coupling between itself and the RFR system, which makes the system model highly complicated and the controller design difficult. Thus, in this paper, the modeling, analysis, and control of the combined system, called rotor-flying multijoint manipulator (RF-MJM, are conducted. Firstly, the detailed dynamics model is constructed and analyzed. Subsequently, a full-state feedback linear quadratic regulator (LQR controller is designed through obtaining linearized model near steady state. Finally, simulations are conducted and the results are analyzed to show the basic control performance.

  6. Performance Analysis of the Flapping Wing Propulsion Based on a New Experimentally Validated Aeroelastic Model

    Pourtakdoust, Seid H.; Aliabadi, Saeed Karimain

    Flapping micro air vehicle (FMAV) is considered to exhibit much better performance at low speeds and small sizes compared to fixed-wing MAVs. To maximize the potential and capabilities of FMAVs also to produce adequate design implications, a new aeroelastic model of a typical flexible FMAV is being developed utilizing Euler-Bernoulli torsion beam and quasi steady aerodynamic model. The new model accounts for all natural existing complex interactions between the mass, inertia, elastic properties, aerodynamic loading, flapping amplitude and frequency of the FMAV as well as the effects of several geometric and design parameters. To validate the proposed theoretical model, a typical FMAV as well as instrumented test stand for the online measurement of forces, flapping angle and power consumption have been constructed. The experimental results are initially utilized to validate the flight dynamic model, and several appropriate conclusions are drawn. The model is subsequently used to demonstrate the flapping propulsion characteristics of the FMAV via simulation. Using dimensionless parameters, a set of new generalized curves have been deduced. The results indicate that by proper adjustment of the wing stiffness parameter as a function of the reduced frequency, the FMAV will attain its optimum propulsive efficiency. This fact raises additional new ideas for further research in this area by utilizing intelligent variable stiffness materials and/or or active morphing technology for the sustained, high-performance flight of FMAVs. The generalized model can also be used to conduct a performance and stability analysis of FMAVs and to design and optimize flapping-wing structures.

  7. Deltoid muscular flap transfer for the treatment of irreparable rotator cuff tears

    Justus Gille

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcome of deltoid muscle flap transfer for the treatment of irreparable rotator cuff tears. In a retrospective study 20 consecutive patients were evaluated. The index procedure took place between 2000 and 2003. Fifteen patients were male, mean age was 62 years. Inclusion criterion was a rotator cuff defect Bateman grade IV. Exclusion criteria were smaller defects, shoulder instability and fractures of the injured shoulder. An open reconstruction with acromioplasty and a pedicled delta flap was performed. Follow up period was mean 42 months. Follow-up included clinical examination, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI and the Constant and Simple (CS shoulder tests. According to the Constant shoulder test the results were good in 13 patients, fair in 5 and unsatisfactory in 2. The pre-operative Constant Score improved from mean 25.7 points (±5.3 to 72.3 (±7.8 at follow-up. The mean values for the subcategories of CS increased significantly from 3.9 to 14.4 points for pain and from 4.2 to 15.9 points for activities daily routine (p0.05. Results of the Simple Shoulder Test showed a significant increase of the mean values from pre-operative 4.3 to 14.7 points post-operatively. MRI showed a subacromial covering of the defect in all cases, all flaps where intact on MRI but always the flap showed marked fatty degeneration. In conclusion, the delta flap is a simple method for the repair of large defects of the rotator cuff leading to satisfying medium results.

  8. Application of Out-of-Plane Warping to Control Rotor Blade Twist

    VanWeddingen, Yannick; Bauchau, Olivier; Kottapalli, Sesi; Ozbay, Serkan; Mehrotra, Yogesh

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this ongoing study is to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of a blade actuation system to dynamically change the twist, and/or the camber, of an airfoil section and, consequently, alter the in-flight aerodynamic loading on the blade for efficient flight control. The required analytical and finite element tools are under development to enable an accurate and comprehensive aeroelastic assessment of the current Full-Blade Warping and 3D Warping Actuated Trailing Edge Flap concepts. The feasibility of the current concepts for swashplateless rotors and higher harmonic blade control is also being investigated. In particular, the aim is to complete the following objectives, some of which have been completed (as noted below) and others that are currently ongoing: i) Develop a Vlasov finite element model and validate against the ABAQUS shell models (completed). ii) Implement the 3D warping actuation concept within the comprehensive analysis code DYMORE. iii) Perform preliminary aeroelastic simulations of blades using DYMORE with 3D warping actuation: a) Investigate the blade behavior under 1 per/rev actuation. Determine whether sufficient twist can be generated and sustained to achieve primary blade control. b) Investigate the behavior of a trailing edge flap configuration under higher harmonic excitations. Determine how much twist can be obtained at the harmonics 2-5 per/rev. iv) Determine actuator specifications such as the power required, load and displacements, and identify the stress and strain distributions in the actuated blades. In general, the completion of Item ii) above will give an additional research capability in rotorcraft dynamics analyses, i.e., the capability to calculate the rotor blade twist due to warping, something that is not currently available in any of the existing comprehensive rotorcraft analyses.

  9. Quasi-static rotor morphing concepts for rotorcraft performance improvements

    Mistry, Mihir

    The current research is focused on two separate quasi-static rotor morphing concepts: Variable span and variable camber. Both concepts were analyzed from the perspective of the performance improvements they allow for, as well as their design requirements. The goal of this body of work is to develop a comprehensive understanding of the benefits and implementation challenges of both systems. For the case of the variable span rotor concept, the effects on aircraft performance were evaluated for a UH-60A type aircraft. The parametric analysis included the performance effects of the rotor span and rotor speed variation, both individually as well as in combination. The design space considered the effect of three different gross weights (16000 lbs, 18300 lbs and 24000 lbs), for a window of +/-11% variation of the rotor speed and a range between +17% to --16% of radius variation (about the baseline) for a range of altitudes. The results of the analysis showed that variable span rotors by themselves are capable of reducing the power requirement of the helicopter by up to 20% for high altitude and gross weight conditions. However, when combined with rotor speed variation, it was possible to reduce the overall power required by the aircraft by up to 30%. Complimentary to the performance analysis, an analytical study of actuation concepts for a variable span rotor was also conducted. This study considered the design of two active actuation systems: Hydraulic pistons and threaded rods (jackscrews), and two passive systems which employed the use of an internal spring type restraining device. For all the configurations considered, it was determined that the design requirements could not be satisfied when considering the constraints defined. The performance improvements due to a variable camber system were evaluated for a BO-105 type rotor in hover. The design space considered included three different thrust levels (4800 lbs, 5500 lbs and 6400 lbs) for a range of altitudes and

  10. Folding in and out: passive morphing in flapping wings.

    Stowers, Amanda K; Lentink, David

    2015-04-01

    We present a new mechanism for passive wing morphing of flapping wings inspired by bat and bird wing morphology. The mechanism consists of an unactuated hand wing connected to the arm wing with a wrist joint. Flapping motion generates centrifugal accelerations in the hand wing, forcing it to unfold passively. Using a robotic model in hover, we made kinematic measurements of unfolding kinematics as functions of the non-dimensional wingspan fold ratio (2-2.5) and flapping frequency (5-17 Hz) using stereo high-speed cameras. We find that the wings unfold passively within one to two flaps and remain unfolded with only small amplitude oscillations. To better understand the passive dynamics, we constructed a computer model of the unfolding process based on rigid body dynamics, contact models, and aerodynamic correlations. This model predicts the measured passive unfolding within about one flap and shows that unfolding is driven by centrifugal acceleration induced by flapping. The simulations also predict that relative unfolding time only weakly depends on flapping frequency and can be reduced to less than half a wingbeat by increasing flapping amplitude. Subsequent dimensional analysis shows that the time required to unfold passively is of the same order of magnitude as the flapping period. This suggests that centrifugal acceleration can drive passive unfolding within approximately one wingbeat in small and large wings. Finally, we show experimentally that passive unfolding wings can withstand impact with a branch, by first folding and then unfolding passively. This mechanism enables flapping robots to squeeze through clutter without sophisticated control. Passive unfolding also provides a new avenue in morphing wing design that makes future flapping morphing wings possibly more energy efficient and light-weight. Simultaneously these results point to possible inertia driven, and therefore metabolically efficient, control strategies in bats and birds to morph or recover

  11. Quantifying Blood Flow in the DIEP Flap: An Ultrasonographic Study

    Pennington, David G.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The maximum weight of tissue that a single perforator can perfuse remains an important question in reconstructive microsurgery. An empirically based equation, known as the flap viability index (FVI), has been established to determine what weight of tissue will survive on one or more perforators. The equation is FVI = Sum d(n)^4/W, where d is the internal diameter of each perforator and W is the final weight of the flap. It has been shown that if FVI exceeds 10, total flap survival is likely, but if under 10, partial flap necrosis is probable. The aim of this study was to measure absolute flow rates in deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flap pedicles and assess correlation with the determinants of the FVI, perforator diameter and flap weight. Methods: Color Doppler ultrasound was used to quantify arterial flow in 10 consecutive DIEP flap pedicles 24 hours after anastomosis. Results: In single-perforator DIEP flaps, flow rate was highly correlated with perforator diameter (r = 0.82, P = 0.01). Mean arterial flow rate was significantly reduced in DIEP flaps with 2 or more perforators (6 vs 38 cm3/min; P perforator size is a critical factor in optimizing blood flow in perforator-based free tissue transfer. Further research is required to understand the flow dynamics of perforator flaps based on multiple perforators. However, surgeons should be cognizant that a single large perforator may have substantially higher flow rates than multiple small perforators. Routine FVI calculation is recommended to ensure complete flap survival. PMID:25426345

  12. A Method to Transit the Rotor-to-Stator Rubbing to Normal Motion Using the Phase Characteristic

    Jieqiong Xu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A method is proposed to transit the rotor-to-stator rubbing to no-rub motion through active auxiliary bearing. The key point of this technique is to express the attractive domain of no-rub motion based on the phase characteristic and to represent the desired status. The feedback actuation is applied by an active auxiliary bearing to drive the rotor approaching the desired status. After that, the control actuation is turned off. Although the desired status is still in rubbing, it is in the attractive domain of no-rub motion, and the response of the rotor is automatically attracted to no-rub motion.

  13. The application of island myocutaneous flap for challenging wounds on cervico-thoracic region

    XING Xin; XUE Chun-yu; LI Li; HUAN Jing-ning; GUO En-tan

    2006-01-01

    Objective:To introduce the experiences in the application of island myocutaneous flap for challenging wound on cervico-thoracic region. Methods: Different myocutaneous flaps were selected according to the location, peculiarity and etiological factor of wound. There were 28 cases of island pectoralis major island myocutanuous flaps, 34 cases of latissimus dorsi island myocutaneous flaps, 19 cases of trapizius island myocutaneous flaps and 17 cases of rectus abdominis island myocutaneous flaps in this report. Results: All 98 patients with challenging wound on cervico-thoracic region were successfully treated with this method without complications, and obtained functional and cosmetic effectiveness. Conclusion:Challenging wounds in cervico-nuchal region can be repaired with pertoralis major island myocutaneous flap, latissimus dorsi island myocutaneous flap and trapizius island myocutaneous flap, while challenging wounds in thoracic region can be repaired with latissimus dorsi island myocutaneous flap and rectus abdominis island myocutaneous flap. Satisfactory functional and cosmetic results can be obtained.

  14. Rotor theories by Professor Joukowsky: Momentum theories

    van Kuik, G. A. M.; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Okulov, V. L.

    2015-01-01

    This paper is the first of two papers on the history of rotor aerodynamics with special emphasis on the role of Joukowsky. The present one focuses on the development of the momentum theory while the second one surveys the development of vortex theory for rotors. Joukowsky has played a major role in...... Momentum still is the basis of current rotor design codes. He applied some assumptions limiting the validity to moderate and high tip speed ratios. Sorensen and van Kuik published a solution for wind turbines with very low tip speed ratios, which is now expanded to propellers as well, with one remaining...

  15. Discrete analog computing with rotor-routers.

    Propp, James

    2010-09-01

    Rotor-routing is a procedure for routing tokens through a network that can implement certain kinds of computation. These computations are inherently asynchronous (the order in which tokens are routed makes no difference) and distributed (information is spread throughout the system). It is also possible to efficiently check that a computation has been carried out correctly in less time than the computation itself required, provided one has a certificate that can itself be computed by the rotor-router network. Rotor-router networks can be viewed as both discrete analogs of continuous linear systems and deterministic analogs of stochastic processes. PMID:20887076

  16. Thick-osteochondral Flap Deepening Trochleoplasty for Patellar Instability

    Donel, Simon; Ali, Khameinei; Smith, Dr. Tobi; McNamara, Iain

    2016-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: In patients with patellar instability and severe trochlear dysplasia, trochleoplasty has become increasingly used as part of the surgical management. The aim to report the mid-term results of this trochleoplasty including the sports and exercise activities of the cohort. Our hypothesis was that the operation would improve knee function and lead to an increase in sports participation in the patients. Materials and Methods: Between 1995 and 2010 the thick-flap deepening trochleoplasty was performed in 90 patients (107 knees) with severe trochlear dysplasia. Data was collected prospectively pre-operatively, at 6 weeks and 1-year follow-up. A standard pre-operative clinical assessment that included assessment of patellar apprehension , patellar tracking and patellofemoral crepitus. Post-operative outcome scores were performed by postal questionnaire and collected between June and December 2013, to determine the clinical and functional outcomes, including sports and exercise participation at a minimum of 2 years, with complete data available in 92%. Results: With a minimum follow-up of 2 years, average of 6 years (range 2 to 19 years). The Kujala score had a median and interquartile range (IQR) of 63 (47-75) pre-operatively rising to 79 (68-91) at 1 year follow-up and 84 (73-92) at final follow-up (pbadminton), participation increased from 16 (18%) to 22 (24%), whereas non-twisting sports (e.g. running, swimming, cycling) increased from 24 (27%) to 47 (52%) of whom 14 (16%) used walking as exercise. Conclusion: The thick-flap deepening trochleoplasty improves the clinical and functional outcomes for patients with symptomatic patellar instability with severe trochlear dysplasia. These results improve over time and beyond the 1 year clinical follow-up. However trochleoplasty does not lead to a significant improvement in sports participation at a competitive level. It does improve the sports and exercise patient participation, principally in non

  17. Multiple piece turbine rotor blade

    Kimmel, Keith D.; Plank, William L.

    2016-07-19

    A spar and shell turbine rotor blade with a spar and a tip cap formed as a single piece, the spar includes a bottom end with dovetail or fir tree slots that engage with slots on a top end of a root section, and a platform includes an opening on a top surface for insertion of the spar in which a shell made from an exotic high temperature resistant material is secured between the tip cap and the platform. The spar is tapered to form thinner walls at the tip end to further reduce the weight and therefore a pulling force due to blade rotation. The spar and tip cap piece is made from a NiAL material to further reduce the weight and the pulling force.

  18. [Free rectus abdominis muscle perforating artery flaps for reconstruction of the head and neck defects].

    Koshima, I; Handa, T; Satoh, Y; Akisada, K; Orita, Y; Yamamoto, H

    1995-01-01

    During the past eight years, tissue defects of the head and neck region in a total of 45 patients were repaired with free rectus abdominis muscle perforating artery flaps. These flaps are subclassified into (1) reduced musculocutaneous flaps, (2) thin reduced musculocutaneous flaps, (3) paraumbilical perforator-based flaps, and (4) thin paraumbilical perforator-based flaps. The advantages of these flaps are as follows. Since the flaps involve no or only a small portion of the rectus abdominis muscle, (1) the muscle can be left intact on the abdominal wall, and (2) a thin flap can be easily created by simple defatting of the flap. These flaps overcome the major disadvantages of the conventional rectus abdominis musculocutaneous flap, i.e., bulkiness of the flap and frequent postoperative abdominal herniation. The territory of the thin flaps is within 10 cm around the perforator. These flaps are suitable for defects in the head and neck region, because simultaneous flap elevation is possible at the time of tumor resection. Paraumbilical perforator-based flaps are suitable for young females and elderly patients. PMID:7897566

  19. Response of rat skin flaps to sinusoidal electromagnetic fields

    Electrical stimulation to heal bone fractures has been used clinically since the early 1970s. As a result of treatment with either direct current or electromagnetic fields, there was an indication that the electrical signals enhanced the ingrowth of blood vessels into the treated area. This possibility was one of the reasons for the initial studies on the influence of pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs) on healing of skin flaps. These investigations reported a decrease in the amount of necrosis of a skin flap after PEMF treatment. The skin flap model was chosen in these studies, as it is generally accepted for the investigation of the influence of different treatments on wound healing. The skin flap is a partially detached portion of the skin which retains part of its blood supply. However, if the flap is too long for its width, part of it will die after the transfer. Flap necrosis, therefore, represents a difficult clinical problem, especially in classes where a large area has to be covered. In the present study the authors address whether enhanced skin flap survival after treatment with PEMF is signal specific, that is , whether one could obtain similar results using various sinusoidal electromagnetic fields (SEMFs). Specifically, they investigated the influence on skin flap survival of SEMFs with different frequencies but the same maximum of dB/dt

  20. Clinical study of dorsal ulnar artery flap in hand reconstruction

    Khan Manal

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Soft tissue defects of hand with exposed tendons, joints, nerves and bone represent a challenge to plastic surgeons. Such defects necessitate early flap coverage to protect underlying vital structures, preserve hand functions and to allow for early rehabilitation. Becker and Gilbert described flap based on the dorsal branch of the ulnar artery for defects around the wrist. We evaluated the use of a dorsal ulnar artery island flap in patients with soft tissue defects of hand. Twelve patients of soft tissue defects of hand underwent dorsal ulnar artery island flap between August 2006 and May 2008. In 10 male and 2 female patients this flap was used to reconstruct defects of the palm, dorsum of hand and first web space. Ten flaps survived completely. Marginal necrosis occurred in two flaps. In one patient suturing was required after debridement and in other patient wound healed by secondary intention. The final outcome was satisfactory. Donor areas which were skin grafted, healed with acceptable cosmetic results. The dorsal ulnar artery island flap is convenient, reliable, and easy to manage and is a single-stage technique for reconstructing soft tissue defects of the palm, dorsum of hand and first web space. Donor site morbidity is minimal, either closed primarily or covered with split thickness skin graft.