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Sample records for active flap control

  1. Active Control of Long Bridges Using Flaps

    Hansen, H. I.; Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    The main problem in designing ultra-long span suspension bridges is flutter. A solution to this problem might be to introduce an active flap control system to increase the flutter wind velocity. The investigated flap control system consists of flaps integrated in the bridge girder so each flap is...... different flap configurations for a bridge section model by using aerodynamic derivatives for a flat plate. The example shows that different flap configurations can either increase or decrease the flutter wind velocity. for optimal flap configurations flutter will not occur....

  2. Stability investigation of an airfoil section with active flap control

    Bergami, Leonardo; Gaunaa, Mac

    2010-01-01

    This work presents a method to determine flutter and divergence instability limits for a two-dimensional (2-D) airfoil section fitted with an actively controlled trailing edge flap. This flap consists of a deformable trailing edge, which deformation is governed by control algorithms based on measurements of either heave displacement, local angle of attack or aerodynamic pressure difference measured over the airfoil. The purpose of the controlled deformable flap is to reduce fluctuations in th...

  3. Control of Flap Vortices

    Greenblatt, David

    2005-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation was carried out on a semi-span wing model to assess the feasibility of controlling vortices emanating from outboard flaps and tip-flaps by actively varying the degree of boundary layer separation. Separation was varied by means of perturbations produced from segmented zero-efflux oscillatory blowing slots, while estimates of span loadings and vortex sheet strengths were obtained by integrating wing surface pressures. These estimates were used as input to inviscid rollup relations as a means of predicting changes to the vortex characteristics resulting from the perturbations. Surveys of flow in the wake of the outboard and tip-flaps were made using a seven-hole probe, from which the vortex characteristics were directly deduced. Varying the degree of separation had a marked effect on vortex location, strength, tangential velocity, axial velocity and size for both outboard and tip-flaps. Qualitative changes in vortex characteristics were well predicted by the inviscid rollup relations, while the failure to account for viscosity was presumed to be the main reason for observed discrepancies. Introducing perturbations near the outboard flap-edges or on the tip-flap exerted significant control over vortices while producing negligible lift excursions.

  4. Stability investigation of an airfoil section with active flap control

    Bergami, Leonardo; Gaunaa, Mac

    2010-01-01

    fatigue load alleviation. The structural model of the 2-D airfoil section contains three degrees of freedom: heave translation, pitch rotation and flap deflection. A potential flow model provides the aerodynamic forces and their distribution. The unsteady aerodynamics are described using an indicial...

  5. Active Flow Control on the Simplified Flapped Airfoil

    Matějka, Milan; Součková, Natálie; Popelka, Lukáš; Nožička, J.

    Berlin: CEAS Council of European Aerospace Societies, 2007, s. 237-241. ISSN 0070-4083. [CEAS European Air and Space Conference /1./. Berlin (DE), 10.09.2007-13.09.2007] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06031; GA AV ČR IAA2076403; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA200760614 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : active flow control * synthetic jet generator Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics

  6. Load alleviation potential of active flaps and individual pitch control in a full design load basis

    Barlas, Athanasios; Bergami, Leonardo; Hansen, Morten Hartvig;

    2015-01-01

    configuration is evaluated by comparing four setups: 1) baseline with collective pitch, 2) individual pitch control, 3) individual flap control and 4) individual flap control combined with individual pitch control. The CRTEF allows for a significant reduction of the lifetime fatigue on various load channels...

  7. A smart rotor configuration with linear quadratic control of adaptive trailing edge flaps for active load alleviation

    Bergami, Leonardo; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad

    2015-01-01

    The paper proposes a smart rotor configuration where adaptive trailing edge flaps (ATEFs) are employed for active alleviation of the aerodynamic loads on the blades of the NREL 5 MW reference turbine. The flaps extend for 20% of the blade length and are controlled by a linear quadratic (LQ...... effects of active flap control are assessed with aeroelastic simulations of the turbine in normal operation conditions, as prescribed by the International Electrotechnical Commission standard. The turbine lifetime fatigue damage equivalent loads provide a convenient summary of the results achieved with...

  8. Active Control of Separation From the Flap of a Supercritical Airfoil

    Melton, LaTunia Pack; Yao, Chung-Sheng; Seifert, Avi

    2006-01-01

    Zero-mass-flux periodic excitation was applied at several regions on a simplified high-lift system to delay the occurrence of flow separation. The NASA Energy Efficient Transport (EET) supercritical airfoil was equipped with a 15% chord simply hinged leading edge flap and a 25% chord simply hinged trailing edge flap. Detailed flow features were measured in an attempt to identify optimal actuator placement. The measurements included steady and unsteady model and tunnel wall pressures, wake surveys, arrays of surface hot-films, flow visualization, and particle image velocimetry (PIV). The current paper describes the application of active separation control at several locations on the deflected trailing edge flap. High frequency (F(+) approximately equal to 10) and low frequency amplitude modulation (F(+) sub AM approximately equal to 1) of the high frequency excitation were used for control. It was noted that the same performance gains were obtained with amplitude modulation and required only 30% of the momentum input required by pure sine excitation.

  9. Design of Hybrid Passive and Active Mechanisms for Control of Insect-Scale Flapping-Wing Robots

    Teoh, Zhi Ern

    2015-01-01

    Flying insects exhibit a remarkable ability to fly in environments that are small, cluttered and highly dynamic. Inspired by these animals, scientist have made great strides in understanding the aerodynamic mechanisms behind insect-scale flapping-wing flight. By applying these mechanisms together with recent advances in meso-scale fabrication techniques, engineers built an insect-scale flapping-wing robot and demonstrated hover by actively controlling the robot about its roll and pitch axes....

  10. Local correlations for flap gap oscillatory blowing active flow control technology

    Cătălin NAE

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Active technology for oscillatory blowing in the flap gap has been tested at INCAS subsonic wind tunnel in order to evaluate this technology for usage in high lift systems with active flow control. The main goal for this investigation was to validate TRL level 4 for this technology and to extend towards flight testing. CFD analysis was performed in order to identify local correlations with experimental data and to better formulate a design criteria so that a maximum increase in lift is possible under given geometrical constraints. Reference to a proposed metric for noise evaluation is also given. This includes basic 2D flow cases and also 2.5D configurations. In 2.5D test cases this work has been extended so that the proposed system may be selected as a mature technology in the JTI Clean Sky, Smart Fixed Wing Aircraft ITD. Complex post-processing of the experimental and CFD data was mainly oriented towards system efficiency and TRL evaluation for this active technology.

  11. Stall Inception Process and Prospects for Active Hub-Flap Control in Three-Stage Axial Flow Compressor

    Tomoya OKADA; Atsushi KAWAJIRI; Yutaka OHTA; Eisuke OUTA

    2008-01-01

    The possibility to apply the active hub-flap control method, which is a proven rotating stall control method for a single-stage compressor, to a 3-stage axial compressor is experimentally discussed, where complex rotating stall inception processes ate observed. The research compressor is a 3-stage one and could change the stagger angle settings for rotor blades and stator vanes. Sixteen rotor blade/stator vane configuration patterns were tested by changing stagger angle for the stator vanes. By measurement of surface-pressure fluctuation, stall inception proc-esses are investigated and the measured pressure fluctuation data is used as a predictive signal for rotating stall. The experimental results show that the stall detection system applied to active hub-flap control in a single-stage compressor could be usefully applied to that in a 3-stage compressor with a more complex stall inception process.

  12. HIGH EFFICIENCY STRUCTURAL FLOWTHROUGH ROTOR WITH ACTIVE FLAP CONTROL: VOLUME TWO: INNOVATION & COST OF ENERGY

    Zuteck, Michael D. [Zimitar, Inc.; Jackson, Kevin L. [Zimitar, Inc.; Santos, Richard A. [Zimitar, Inc.

    2015-05-16

    The Zimitar one-piece rotor primary structure is integrated, so balanced thrust and gravity loads flow through the hub region without transferring out of its composite material. Large inner rotor geometry is used since there is no need to neck down to a blade root region and pitch bearing. Rotor control is provided by a highly redundant, five flap system on each blade, sized so that easily handled standard electric linear actuators are sufficient.

  13. HIGH EFFICIENCY STRUCTURAL FLOWTHROUGH ROTOR WITH ACTIVE FLAP CONTROL: VOLUME THREE: MARKET & TEAM

    Zuteck, Michael D. [Zimitar, Inc.; Jackson, Kevin L. [Zimitar, Inc.; Santos, Richard A. [Zimitar, Inc.

    2015-05-16

    The Zimitar one-piece rotor primary structure is integrated, so balanced thrust and gravity loads flow through the hub region without transferring out of its composite material. Large inner rotor geometry is used since there is no need to neck down to a blade root region and pitch bearing. Rotor control is provided by a highly redundant, five flap system on each blade, sized so that easily handled standard electric linear actuators are sufficient.

  14. HIGH EFFICIENCY STRUCTURAL FLOWTHROUGH ROTOR WITH ACTIVE FLAP CONTROL: VOLUME ONE: PRELIMINARY DESIGN REPORT

    Zuteck, Michael D. [Zimitar, Inc.; Jackson, Kevin L. [Zimitar, Inc.; Santos, Richard A. [Zimitar, Inc.; Chow, Ray [Zimitar, Inc.; Nordenholz, Thomas R. [The California Maritime Academy; Wamble, John Lee [Zimitar, Inc.

    2015-05-16

    The Zimitar one-piece rotor primary structure is integrated, so balanced thrust and gravity loads flow through the hub region without transferring out of its composite material. Large inner rotor geometry is used since there is no need to neck down to a blade root region and pitch bearing. Rotor control is provided by a highly redundant, five flap system on each blade, sized so that easily handled standard electric linear actuators are sufficient.

  15. HIGH EFFICIENCY STRUCTURAL FLOWTHROUGH ROTOR WITH ACTIVE FLAP CONTROL: VOLUME ZERO: OVERVIEW AND COMMERCIAL PATH

    Zuteck, Michael D. [Zimitar, Inc.; Jackson, Kevin L. [Zimitar, Inc.; Santos, Richard A. [Zimitar, Inc.

    2015-05-16

    The Zimitar one-piece rotor primary structure is integrated, so balanced thrust and gravity loads flow through the hub region without transferring out of its composite material. Large inner rotor geometry is used since there is no need to neck down to a blade root region and pitch bearing. Rotor control is provided by a highly redundant, five flap system on each blade, sized so that easily handled standard electric linear actuators are sufficient.

  16. Vibration reduction in helicopter rotors using an actively controlled partial span trailing edge flap located on the blade

    Millott, T. A.; Friedmann, P. P.

    1994-01-01

    This report describes an analytical study of vibration reduction in a four-bladed helicopter rotor using an actively controlled, partial span, trailing edge flap located on the blade. The vibration reduction produced by the actively controlled flap (ACF) is compared with that obtained using individual blade control (IBC), in which the entire blade is oscillated in pitch. For both cases a deterministic feedback controller is implemented to reduce the 4/rev hub loads. For all cases considered, the ACF produced vibration reduction comparable with that obtained using IBC, but consumed only 10-30% of the power required to implement IBC. A careful parametric study is conducted to determine the influence of blade torsional stiffness, spanwise location of the control flap, and hinge moment correction on the vibration reduction characteristics of the ACF. The results clearly demonstrate the feasibility of this new approach to vibration reduction. It should be emphasized than the ACF, used together with a conventional swashplate, is completely decoupled from the primary flight control system and thus it has no influence on the airworthiness of the helicopter. This attribute is potentially a significant advantage when compared to IBC.

  17. Active control system for a rotor blade trailing-edge flap

    Duvernier, Marc; Reithler, Livier; Guerrero, Jean Y.; Rossi, Rinaldo A.

    2000-06-01

    Reducing the external noise is becoming a major issue for helicopter manufacturers. The idea beyond this goal is to reduce or even avoid the blade vortex interaction (BVI), especially during descent and flights over inhabited areas. This can be achieved by changing locally the lift of the blade. Several strategies to reach this goal are under investigation at EUROCOPTER such as the control of the local incidence of the blade by a direct lift flap. AEROSPATIALE MATRA Corporate Research Centre and AEROSPATIALE MATRA MISSILES proposed an actuator system able to answer EUROCOPTER's needs for moving a direct lift flap. The present paper describes the definition, manufacturing and testing of this new actuator system. This actuator is based on an electromagnetic patented actuation system developed by AEROSPATIALE MATRA MISSILES for missile and aeronautic applications. The particularity of this actuator is its ability to produce the desired force on its whole range of stroke. The flap is designed to be fitted on a DAUPHIN type blade produced by EUROCOPTER and the actuator system was designed to fit the room available within the blade and to produce the right amount of stroke and force within the required frequency range. Other constraints such as centrifugal loading were also taken into account. This paper describes briefly the specifications and the major characteristics of the actuating system and presents some results of its behavior on a representative composite test-bed manufactured by EUROCOPTER when subjected to realistic mechanical loads.

  18. Simultaneous BVI noise and vibration reduction in rotorcraft using actively-controlled flaps and including performance considerations

    Patt, Daniel A.

    This work presents the development and application of an active control approach for reduction of both vibration and noise induced by helicopter rotor blade vortex interaction (BVI). Control is implemented through single or dual actively controlled flaps (ACFs) on each blade. Low-speed helicopter flight is prone to severe BVI, resulting in elevated vibration and noise levels. Existing research has suggested that when some form of active control is used to reduce vibration, noise will increase and vice versa. The present research achieves simultaneous reduction of noise and vibration, and also investigates the physical sources of the observed reduction. The initial portion of this work focused on developing a tool for simulating helicopter noise and vibrations in the BVI flight regime. A method for predicting compressible unsteady blade surface pressure distribution on rotor blades was developed and combined with an enhanced free-wake model and an acoustic prediction tool with provisions for blade flexibility. These elements were incorporated within an aeroelastic analysis featuring fully coupled flap-lag-torsional blade dynamics. Subsequently, control algorithms were developed that were effective for reducing noise and vibration even in the nonlinear BVI flight regime; saturation limits were incorporated constraining flap deflections to specified limits. The resulting simulation was also validated with a wide range of experimental data, achieving excellent correlation. Finally, a number of active control studies were performed. Multi-component vibration reductions of 40--80% could be achieved, while incurring a small noise penalty. Noise was reduced using an onboard feedback microphone; reductions of 4--10 dB on the advancing side were observed on a plane beneath the rotor when using dual flaps. Finally, simultaneous noise and vibration reduction was studied. A reduction of about 5 dB in noise on the advancing side combined with a 60% reduction in vibration was

  19. A Miniature Controllable Flapping Wing Robot

    Arabagi, Veaceslav Gheorghe

    The agility and miniature size of nature's flapping wing fliers has long baffled researchers, inspiring biological studies, aerodynamic simulations, and attempts to engineer their robotic replicas. Flapping wing flight is characterized by complex reciprocating wing kinematics, transient aerodynamic effects, and very small body lengths. These characteristics render robotic flapping wing aerial vehicles ideal for surveillance and defense applications, search and rescue missions, and environment monitoring, where their ability to hover and high maneuverability is immensely beneficial. One of the many difficulties in creating flapping wing based miniature robotic aerial vehicles lies in generating a proper wing trajectory that would result in sufficient lift forces for hovering and maneuvering. Since design of a flapping wing system is a balance between overall weight and the number of actuated inputs, we take the approach of having minimal controlled inputs, allowing passive behavior wherever possible. Hence, we propose a completely passive wing pitch reversal design that relies on wing inertial dynamics, an elastic energy storage mechanism, and low Reynolds number aerodynamic effects. Theoretical models, compiling previous research on piezoelectric actuators, four-bar transmissions, and aerodynamics effects, are developed and used as basis for a complete numerical simulation. Limitations of the model are discussed in comparison to experimental results obtained from a working prototype of the proposed passive pitch reversal flapping wing mechanism. Given that the mechanism is under-actuated, methods to control lift force generation by actively varying system parameters are proposed, discussed, and tested experimentally. A dual wing aerial platform is developed based on the passive pitch reversal wing concept. Design considerations are presented, favoring controllability and structural rigidity of the final platform. Finite element analysis and experimental

  20. Managing Flap Vortices via Separation Control

    Greenblatt, David

    2006-01-01

    A pilot study was conducted on a flapped semi-span model to investigate the concept and viability of near-wake vortex management by means of boundary layer separation control. Passive control was achieved using a simple fairing and active control was achieved via zero mass-flux blowing slots. Vortex sheet strength, estimated by integrating surface pressures, was used to predict vortex characteristics based on inviscid rollup relations and vortices trailing the flaps were mapped using a seven-hole probe. Separation control was found to have a marked effect on vortex location, strength, tangential velocity, axial velocity and size over a wide range of angles of attack and control conditions. In general, the vortex trends were well predicted by the inviscid rollup relations. Manipulation of the separated flow near the flap edges exerted significant control over either outboard or inboard edge vortices while producing small lift and moment excursions. Unsteady surface pressures indicated that dynamic separation and attachment control can be exploited to perturb vortices at wavelengths shorter than a typical wingspan. In summary, separation control has the potential for application to time-independent or time-dependent wake alleviation schemes, where the latter can be deployed to minimize adverse effects on ride-quality and dynamic structural loading.

  1. Identification of Flap Motion Parameters for Vibration Reduction in Helicopter Rotors with Multiple Active Trailing Edge Flaps

    Uğbreve;ur Dalli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An active control method utilizing the multiple trailing edge flap configuration for rotorcraft vibration suppression and blade loads control is presented. A comprehensive model for rotor blade with active trailing edge flaps is used to calculate the vibration characteristics, natural frequencies and mode shapes of any complex composite helicopter rotor blade. A computer program is developed to calculate the system response, rotor blade root forces and moments under aerodynamic forcing conditions. Rotor blade system response is calculated using the proposed solution method and the developed program depending on any structural and aerodynamic properties of rotor blades, structural properties of trailing edge flaps and properties of trailing edge flap actuator inputs. Rotor blade loads are determined first on a nominal rotor blade without multiple active trailing edge flaps and then the effects of the active flap motions on the existing rotor blade loads are investigated. Multiple active trailing edge flaps are controlled by using open loop controllers to identify the effects of the actuator signal output properties such as frequency, amplitude and phase on the system response. Effects of using multiple trailing edge flaps on controlling rotor blade vibrations are investigated and some design criteria are determined for the design of trailing edge flap controller that will provide actuator signal outputs to minimize the rotor blade root loads. It is calculated that using the developed active trailing edge rotor blade model, helicopter rotor blade vibrations can be reduced up to 36% of the nominal rotor blade vibrations.

  2. Active flap control on an aeroelastic wind turbine airfoil in gust conditions using both a CFD and an engineering model

    In the past year, smart rotor technology has been studied significantly as solution to the ever growing turbines. Aeroservoelastic tools are used to asses and predict the behavior of rotors using trailing edge devices like flaps. In this paper an unsteady aerodynamic model (Beddoes-Leishman type) and an CFD model (URANS) are used to analyze the aeroservoelastic response of a 2D three degree of freedom rigid body wind turbine airfoil with a deforming trailing edge flap encountering deterministic gusts. Both uncontrolled and controlled simulations are used to asses the differences between the two models for 2D aerservoelastic simulations. Results show an increase in the difference between models for the y component if the deforming trailing edge flap is used as control device. Observed flap deflections are significantly larger in the URANS model in certain cases, while the same controller is used. The pitch angle and moment shows large differences in the uncontrolled case, which become smaller, but remain significant when the controller is applied. Both models show similar reductions in vertical displacement, with a penalty of a significant increase in pitch angle deflections

  3. Flapping propulsion with tip pitch control

    Huera-Huarte, Francisco; Gharib, Morteza

    2014-11-01

    The effect of flexibility in the propulsion performance and efficiency of oscillating pitching foils has received a large amount of attention in the past years. Scientists have used simplified robotic models that mimic the kinematics of flying and swimming animals, in order to get inspiration to build more efficient engineering systems. Compliance is one of the aspects that has received more attention, as it seems to be a common feature in nature's flyers and swimmers. Active or passive control elements are also common in nature. We will show how thrust generation in a pitching fin, can be greatly affected by controlling the tip pitch motion dynamically and independently of the fin itself. This is in fact a controlled local change of curvature of the end of the fin. A robotic system has been designed in a way that not only flapping amplitudes and frequencies can be controlled, but also the amplitudes and frequencies of the tip and the phase difference between the tip and the fin. We measured thrust forces and the vortex dynamics in the near wake of the system, by using planar DPIV (Digital Particle Image Velocimetry) in a wide variety of flapping situations with tip control. Funding from Spanish Ministry of Science through Grant DPI2012-37904 is gratefully acknowledged.

  4. Suspension Bridge Flutter for Girder with Separate Control Flaps

    Huynh, T.; Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    Active vibration control of long span suspension bridge flutter using separated control flaps (SFSC) has shown to increase effectively the critical wind speed of bridges. In this paper, an SFSC calculation based on modal equations of the vertical and torsional motions of the bridge girder includi...

  5. Smart dynamic rotor control using active flaps on a small-scale wind turbine: aeroelastic modeling and comparison with wind tunnel measurements

    Barlas, Thanasis K.; van Wingerden, W.; Hulskamp, A.W.;

    2013-01-01

    using the aeroelastic tool, load predictions are compared with the wind tunnel measurements, and similar control concepts are compared and evaluated in the numerical environment. Conclusions regarding evaluation of the performance of smart rotor concepts for wind turbines are drawn from this threefold......In this paper, the proof of concept of a smart rotor is illustrated by aeroelastic simulations on a small-scale rotor and comparison with wind tunnel experiments. The application of advanced feedback controllers using actively deformed flaps in the wind tunnel measurements is shown to alleviate...

  6. 14 CFR 23.697 - Wing flap controls.

    2010-01-01

    ... wing flap control lever settings corresponding to those positions must be positively located such that a definite change of direction of movement of the lever is necessary to select settings beyond...

  7. Active Control of Flow Separation on a High-Lift System with Slotted Flap at High Reynolds Number

    Khodadoust, Abdollah; Washburn, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    The NASA Energy Efficient Transport (EET) airfoil was tested at NASA Langley's Low- Turbulence Pressure Tunnel (LTPT) to assess the effectiveness of distributed Active Flow Control (AFC) concepts on a high-lift system at flight scale Reynolds numbers for a medium-sized transport. The test results indicate presence of strong Reynolds number effects on the high-lift system with the AFC operational, implying the importance of flight-scale testing for implementation of such systems during design of future flight vehicles with AFC. This paper describes the wind tunnel test results obtained at the LTPT for the EET high-lift system for various AFC concepts examined on this airfoil.

  8. Active Control of Suspension Bridges

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    In this paper some recent research on active control of very long suspension bridges, is presented. The presentation is based on research work at Aalborg University, Denmark. The active control system is based on movable flaps attached to the bridge girder. Wind load on bridges with or without...... flaps attached to the girder is briefly presented. A simple active control system is discussed. Results from wind tunnel experiments with a bridge section show that flaps can be used effectively to control bridge girder vibrations. Flutter conditions for suspension bridges with and without flaps are...

  9. Development and whirl tower test of the SMART active flap rotor

    Straub, Friedrich K.; Kennedy, Dennis K.; Stemple, Alan D.; Anand, V. R.; Birchette, Terry S.

    2004-07-01

    A full scale Smart Material Actuated Rotor Technology (SMART) system with piezoelectric actuated blade flaps was developed and whirl tower tested. The development effort included design, fabrication, and component testing of rotor blades, trailing edge flaps, piezoelectric actuators, switching power amplifiers, and the data/power system. Simulations and model scale wind tunnel tests have shown that this system can provide 80% vibration reduction, 10dB noise reduction for a helicopter passing overhead, and substantial aerodynamic performance gains. Whirl tower testing of the 34-foot diameter rotor demonstrated the functionality, robustness, and required authority of the active flap system. The program involved extensive development work and risk reduction tests which resulted in a robust, high performance actuator and a tightly integrated actuator, flap, and blade system. The actuator demonstrated excellent performance during bench testing and has accumulated over 60 million cycles under a spectrum of loading conditions. The flight worthy active flap rotor blades were based on a modified design of the FAA certified MD900 Explorer production rotor blade. Whirl tower testing was conducted with full rotor instrumentation and a 5-component balance. The rotor was tested for 13 hours under a range of conditions, including 7 hours of flap operation. Flap inputs included open loop static and dynamic commands. The flaps showed excellent authority with oscillatory thrust greater than 10% of the steady baseline thrust. Various flap actuation frequency sweeps were run to investigate the dynamics of the rotor and the flap system. Limited closed loop tests used hub accelerations and hub loads for feedback. Proving the integration, robust operation, and authority of the flap system were the key objectives met by the whirl tower test. This success depended on tailoring the piezoelectric materials and actuator to the application and meeting actuator/blade integration requirements

  10. Adaptive Trailing Edge Flaps for Active Load Alleviation in a Smart Rotor Configuration

    Bergami, Leonardo

    The work investigates the development of an active smart rotor concept from an aero-servo-elastic perspective. An active smart rotor is a wind turbine rotor that, through a combination of sensors, control units and actuators, is able to alleviate the fluctuating part of the aerodynamic loads it has...... to withstand. The investigation focuses on a specific actuator type: the Adaptive Trailing Edge Flap (ATEF), which introduces a continuous deformation of the aft part of the airfoil camber-line. An aerodynamic model that accounts for the steady and unsteady effects of the flap deflection on a 2D...... energy capture below rated conditions by using the flaps. Two model based control algorithms are developed to actively alleviate the fatigue loads on the smart rotor with ATEF. The first algorithm features a linear quadratic regulator with periodic disturbance rejection, and controls the deflection of...

  11. Active Aerodynamic Blade Distributed Flap Control Design Procedure for Load Reduction on the UpWind 5MW Wind Turbine

    Wilson, D.G.; Resor, B.R.; Berg, D.E.; Barlas, T.K.; Van Kuik, G.A.M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper develops a system identification approach and procedure that is employed for distributed control system design for large wind turbine load reduction applications. The primary goal of the study is to identify the process that can be used with multiple sensor inputs of varying types (such a

  12. ANALYSIS OF AN ELECTROSTRICTIVE STACK ACTUATORFOR ACTIVE TRAILING EDGE FLAPS

    2000-01-01

    Helicopter is a complex dynamic system with many rotating components. The rotor blades operate in a highly complex aerodynamic environment. The vibratory hub load, which is caused by cyclic variation of centrifugal and aerodynamic load of the rotating blades in flight, is transmitted to the fuselage, resulting in serious vibration and noise of the structure. It is one of the most important exciting sources in helicopters.  There has long been a desire to reduce helicopter vibration and to improve its performance. Control schemes adopted so far can be classified as either passive or active control technologies. The passive technologies include optimization of rotor hub, blade and the fuselage, hub or blade mounted passive vibration absorbers and anti-resonant vibration isolators. One of the major disadvantages with passive technologies is that they are designed to provide maximum vibration reduction at a specific frequency; therefore, their performance is degraded significantly with changes in the operating conditions of the rotor system.  With the development of computer science and active control technology, increasing efforts have been devoted to active control technologies to benefit helicopter vibration suppression in recent years. Earlier studies include Higher Harmonic Control (HHC)[1] and Individual Blade Control (IBC)[2], which is aimed to reduce the vibratory blade load by oscillating the blade in pitch motion using hydraulic actuators. It is successful in suppressing the vibration of the fuselage; however, its application is limited by serious energy consumption.  To overcome these difficulties, a new concept in helicopter vibration control is the smart rotor system. In this scheme, actuators are embedded in composite blades. They are used to activate the trailing edge flaps in higher harmonic pitch motion to adjust the lift force actively. Under the regulation of a control system, the vibratory hub load can be counteracted actively at

  13. Buffeting Response of Suspension Bridge Girder with Separate Control Flaps

    Huynh, Truc; Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    This paper presents the calculation of the root mean square (RMS) response of a suspension bridge using separate control flaps (SCF) in turbulence conditions. It is assumed that the mean wind velocity is not large enough to cause coupled vibrations and that single mode buffeting response is of...

  14. Design, manufacturing and testing of Controllable Rubber Trailing Edge Flaps

    Løgstrup Andersen, Tom; Aagaard Madsen, Helge; Barlas, Thanasis K;

    The overall goal for the INDUFLAP project was realization of a test facility for development and test of Controllable Rubber Trailing Edge Flaps (CRTEF) for wind turbines. This report covers experimental work at DTU Wind Energy including design, manufacture and test of different configurations of...

  15. Structural integrity design for an active helicopter rotor blade with piezoelectric flap actuators

    Lee, Jaehwan; Shin, SangJoon

    2011-04-01

    Helicopter uses a rotor system to generate lift, thrust and forces, and its aerodynamic environment is generally complex. Unsteady aerodynamic environment arises such as blade vortex interaction. This unsteady aerodynamic environment induces vibratory aerodynamic loads and high aeroacoustic noise. The aerodynamic load and aeroacoustic noise is at N times the rotor blade revolutions (N/rev). But conventional rotor control system composed of pitch links and swash plate is not capable of adjusting such vibratory loads because its control is restricted to 1/rev. Many active control methodologies have been examined to alleviate the problem. The blade using active control device manipulates the blade pitch angle with N/rev. In this paper, Active Trailing-edge Flap blade, which is one of the active control methods, is designed to reduce the unsteady aerodynamic loads. Active Trailing-edge Flap blade uses a trailing edge flap manipulated by an actuator to change camber line of the airfoil. Piezoelectric actuators are installed inside the blade to manipulate the trailing edge flap.

  16. Tanshinone IIA Pretreatment Renders Free Flaps against Hypoxic Injury through Activating Wnt Signaling and Upregulating Stem Cell-Related Biomarkers

    Zihan Xu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Partial or total flap necrosis after flap transplantation is sometimes clinically encountered in reconstructive surgery, often as a result of a period of hypoxia that exceeds the tolerance of the flap tissue. In this study, we determine whether tanshinone IIA (TSA pretreatment can protect flap tissue against hypoxic injury and improve its viability. Primary epithelial cells isolated from the dorsal skin of mice were pretreated with TSA for two weeks. Cell counting kit-8 and Trypan Blue assays were carried out to examine the proliferation of TSA-pretreated cells after exposure to cobalt chloride. Then, Polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis were used to determine the expression of β-catenin, GSK-3β, SOX2, and OCT4 in TSA-treated cells. In vivo, after mice were pretreated with TSA for two weeks, a reproducible ischemic flap model was implemented, and the area of surviving tissue in the transplanted flaps was measured. Immunohistochemistry was also conducted to examine the related biomarkers mentioned above. Results show that epidermal cells, pretreated with TSA, showed enhanced resistance to hypoxia. Activation of the Wnt signaling pathway in TSA-pretreated cells was characterized by the upregulation of β-catenin and the downregulation of GSK-3β. The expression of SOX2 and OCT4 controlled by Wnt signaling were also found higher in TSA pretreated epithelial cells. In the reproducible ischaemic flap model, pretreatment with TSA enhanced resistance to hypoxia and increased the area of surviving tissue in transplanted flaps. The expression of Wnt signaling pathway components, stem-cell related biomarkers, and CD34, which are involved in the regeneration of blood vessels, was also upregulated in TSA-pretreated flap tissue. The results show that TSA pretreatment protects free flaps against hypoxic injury and increases the area of surviving tissue by activating Wnt signaling and upregulating stem cell-related biomarkers.

  17. The Effect of the Active Ingredient Thymoquinone on Flap Viability in Random Pattern Flaps in Rats.

    Kocak, Omer Faruk; Bozan, Nazim; Oksuz, Mustafa; Yuce, Serdar; Demir, Canser Yılmaz; Bulut, Gulay; Ragbetli, Murat Cetin

    2016-08-01

    Thymoquinone (TQ) is a plant extract that has been shown to have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, angiogenic, antimicrobial, and anticarcinogenic effects. The aim of this study is to research how the use of TQ affects flap viability. 42 rats were placed into 6 groups, with 7 rats in each. A 3 × 10 cm McFarlane flap model was used on the test animals. The sham group had used neither surgical nor TQ treatment. The control group had surgery but no treatment afterwards. The preoperative TQ group was given oral doses of 2 mg/kg. TQ for 10 days preoperatively with no treatment after the surgical procedure. The postoperative TQ group received oral doses of 2 mg/kg TQ for 10 days after the surgical process. The preoperative + postoperative (pre + postoperative) TQ group was given oral doses of 2 mg/kg TQ for 10 days both preoperatively and postoperatively. Finally, the dimethylsulfoxide group received 10 mg/kg dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) for 10 days both preoperatively and postoperatively. Ten days after surgery the findings were evaluated. The average rates of necrosis were found to be 29.7 % in the control group, 19.18 % in the preoperative TQ group, 13.05 % in the postoperative TQ group, 8.42 % in the pre + postoperative TQ group, and 29.03 % in the DMSO group. The experimental groups had better area measurement, histopathological, and electron microscopic results than the control group (All; p < 0.05). We believe that, because of its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and angiogenic properties, thymoquinone is an agent that can prevent ischemia-reperfusion damage and, therefore, prevent necrosis. PMID:27072137

  18. Model predictive control of trailing edge flaps on a wind turbine blade

    Castaignet, Damien Bruno

    with three trailing edge flaps on one blade, located on DTU’s Risø Campus in Roskilde, Denmark. This thesis is divided into three parts: the controller design, results from simulations, and results from the experiments. The trailing edge flaps controller designed for this project is based on a frequency......, in Roskilde, Denmark. One blade of the turbine was equipped with three independent trailing edge flaps. In spite of the failure of several sensors and actuators, the test of the trailing edge flaps controller described in this thesis showed a consistent flapwise blade root fatigue load reduction. An average...

  19. Frequency-Weighted Model Predictive Control of Trailing Edge Flaps on a Wind Turbine Blade

    Castaignet, Damien; Couchman, Ian; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad; Buhl, Thomas; Wedel-Heinen, Jens Jakob

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the load reduction achieved with trailing edge flaps during a full-scale test on a Vestas V27 wind turbine. The trailing edge flap controller is a frequency-weighted linear model predictive control (MPC) where the quadratic cost consists of costs on the zero-phase filtered...... flapwise blade root moment and trailing edge flap deflection. Frequency-weighted MPC is chosen for its ability to handle constraints on the trailing edge flaps deflection, and to target at loads with given frequencies only. The controller is first tested in servo-aeroelastic simulations, before being...

  20. Localized, Non-Harmonic Active Flap Motions for Low Frequency In-Plane Rotor Noise Reduction

    Sim, Ben W.; Potsdam, Mark; Kitaplioglu, Cahit; LeMasurier, Philip; Lorber, Peter; Andrews, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    A first-of-its-kind demonstration of the use of localized, non-harmonic active flap motions, for suppressing low frequency, in-plane rotor noise, is reported in this paper. Operational feasibility is verified via testing of the full-scale AATD/Sikorsky/UTRC active flap demonstration rotor in the NFAC's 40- by 80-Foot anechoic wind tunnel. Effectiveness of using localized, non-harmonic active flap motions are compared to conventional four-per-rev harmonic flap motions, and also active flap motions derived from closed-loop acoustics implementations. All three approaches resulted in approximately the same noise reductions over an in-plane three-by-three microphone array installed forward and near in-plane of the rotor in the nearfield. It is also reported that using an active flap in this localized, non-harmonic manner, resulted in no more that 2% rotor performance penalty, but had the tendency to incur higher hub vibration levels.

  1. A Model Based Control methodology combining Blade Pitch and Adaptive Trailing Edge Flaps in a common framework

    This work investigates how adaptive trailing edge flaps and classical blade pitch can work in concert using a model-based state space control formulation. The trade-off between load reduction and actuator activity is decided by setting different weights in the objective function used by the model......-based controller. The combined control approach allow to achieve higher load alleviations, furthermore, in the presence of e.g. deterioration of an actuator, it enables an online re-tuning of the workload distribution of blade pitch and trailing edge flaps, thus potentially increasing the smart rotor reliability....

  2. A Model Based Control methodology combining Blade Pitch and Adaptive Trailing Edge Flaps in a common framework

    Henriksen, Lars Christian; Bergami, Leonardo; Andersen, Peter Bjørn

    2013-01-01

    This work investigates how adaptive trailing edge flaps and classical blade pitch can work in concert using a model-based state space control formulation. The trade-off between load reduction and actuator activity is decided by setting different weights in the objective function used by the model......-based controller. The combined control approach allow to achieve higher load alleviations, furthermore, in the presence of e.g. deterioration of an actuator, it enables an online re-tuning of the workload distribution of blade pitch and trailing edge flaps, thus potentially increasing the smart rotor reliability....

  3. Human exonuclease 1 (EXO1) activity characterization and its function on FLAP structures

    Keijzers, Guido; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Juel Rasmussen, Lene

    2015-01-01

    Human exonuclease 1 (EXO1) is involved in multiple DNA metabolism processes, including DNA repair and replication. Most of the fundamental roles of EXO1 have been described in yeast. Here, we report a biochemical characterization of human full-length EXO1. Prior to assay EXO1 on different DNA flap...... structures, we determined factors essential for the thermodynamic stability of EXO1. We show that enzymatic activity and stability of EXO1 on DNA is modulated by temperature. By characterization of EXO1 flap activity using various DNA flap substrates, we show that EXO1 has a strong capacity for degrading...... double stranded DNA and has a modest endonuclease or 5' flap activity. Furthermore, we report novel mechanistic insights into the processing of flap structures, showing that EXO1 preferentially cleaves one nucleotide inwards in a double stranded region of a forked and nicked DNA flap substrates...

  4. Design and development of an active Gurney flap for rotorcraft

    Freire Gómez, Jon; Booker, Julian D.; Mellor, Phil H.

    2013-03-01

    The EU's Green Rotorcraft programme will develop an Active Gurney Flap (AGF) for a full-scale helicopter main rotor blade as part of its `smart adaptive rotor blade' technology demonstrators. AGFs can be utilized to provide a localized and variable lift enhancement on the rotor, enabling a redistribution of loading on the rotor blade around the rotor azimuth. Further advantages include the possibility of using AGFs to allow a rotor speed reduction, which subsequently provides acoustic benefits. Designed to be integrable into a commercial helicopter blade, and thereby capable of withstanding real in-flight centrifugal loading, blade vibrations and aerodynamic loads, the demonstrator is expected to achieve a high technology readiness level (TRL). The AGF will be validated initially by a constant blade section 2D wind tunnel test and latterly by full blade 3D whirl tower testing. This paper presents the methodology adopted for the AGF concept topology selection, based on a series of both qualitative and quantitative performance criteria. Two different AGF candidate mechanisms are compared, both powered by a small commercial electromagnetic actuator. In both topologies, the link between the actuator and the control surface consists of two rotating torque bars, pivoting on flexure bearings. This provides the required reliability and precision, while making the design virtually frictionless. The engineering analysis presented suggests that both candidates would perform satisfactorily in a 2D wind tunnel test, but that equally, both have design constraints which limit their potential to be further taken into a whirl tower test under full scale centrifugal and inertial loads.

  5. Passive control of a dynamically pitching wind turbine airfoil under aeroelastic conditions using a Gurney flap

    Nikoueeyan, Pourya; Magstadt, Andrew; Strike, John; Hind, Michael; Naughton, Jonathan

    2014-11-01

    To reduce the cost of energy, wind turbine design has moved towards larger blades that are heavier and have lower relative structural stiffness compared to shorter blades. To address the lower blade stiffness, different flow control techniques have been considered. The Gurney flap, a small, low-cost and effective control method, is a promising control actuator. Wind tunnel testing has been performed on a DU97-W-300 10% flatback airfoil undergoing dynamic pitching relevant to flow conditions encountered by wind turbine blades. To mimic blade compliance, the airfoil is actively driven through a torsionally elastic element. Time-resolved surface pressure measurements have been acquired from which lift Cl and moment Cm coefficients were calculated. Changes in Cl and Cm in moderate and deep dynamic stall regimes for different Gurney flap heights were studied for different pitch drive conditions (amplitude and frequency). The results show the significant impact of compliance on the angle of attack (α) range experienced by the airfoil. Shifts in α range result in different hysteresis behavior in both Cl and Cm and demonstrate the effectiveness of the Gurney flap in modifying the aerodynamics of wind turbine blades experiencing dynamic pitching. This work supported by DOE and a gift from BP.

  6. Adaptive trailing edge flaps for active load alleviation in a smart rotor configuration

    Bergami, L.

    2013-08-15

    The work investigates the development of an active smart rotor concept from an aero-servo-elastic perspective. An active smart rotor is a wind turbine rotor that, through a combination of sensors, control units and actuators, is able to alleviate the fluctuating part of the aerodynamic loads it has to withstand. The investigation focuses on a specific actuator type: the Adaptive Trailing Edge Flap (ATEF), which introduces a continuous deformation of the aft part of the airfoil camber-line. An aerodynamic model that accounts for the steady and unsteady effects of the flap deflection on a 2D airfoil section is developed, and, considering both attached and separated flow conditions, is validated by comparison against Computational Fluid Dynamic solutions and a panel code method. The aerodynamic model is integrated in the BEM-based aeroelastic simulation code HAWC2, thus providing a tool able to simulate the response of a wind turbine equipped with ATEF. A load analysis of the NREL 5 MW reference turbine in its baseline configuration reveals that the highest contribution to the blade flapwise fatigue damage originates from normal operation above rated wind speed, and from loads characterized by frequencies below 1 Hz. The analysis also reports that periodic load variations on the turbine blade account for nearly 11 % of the blade flapwise lifetime fatigue damage, while the rest is ascribed to load variations from disturbances of stochastic nature. The study proposes a smart rotor configuration with flaps laid out on the outer 20 % of the blade span, from 77 % to 97% of the blade length. The configuration is first tested with a simplified cyclic control approach, which gives a preliminary indication of the load alleviation potential, and also reveals the possibility to enhance the rotor energy capture below rated conditions by using the flaps. Two model based control algorithms are developed to actively alleviate the fatigue loads on the smart rotor with ATEF. The first

  7. Deformable trailing edge flaps for modern megawatt wind turbine controllers using strain gauge sensors

    Andersen, Peter Bjørn; Henriksen, Lars Christian; Gaunaa, Mac;

    2010-01-01

    enabling the trailing edge to move independently and quickly along the spanwise position of the blade, local small flutuations in the aerodynamic forces can be alleviated by deformation of the airfoil flap. Strain gauges are used as input for the flap controller, and the effect of placing strain gauges at...

  8. Load alleviation potential of the Controllable Rubber Trailing Edge Flap (CRTEF) in the INDUFLAP project

    Barlas, Thanasis K.; Bergami, Leonardo; Hansen, Morten Hartvig; Pedersen, Mads Mølgaard; Thomsen, Kenneth; Aagaard Madsen, Helge

    The load alleviation potential of the Controllable Rubber Trailing Edge Flap (CRTEF) is verified on a full Design Load Base (DLB) setup using the aeroelastic code HAWC2, and by investigating a flap configuration for the NREL 5MW Reference Wind Turbine (RWT) model. The performance of the CRTEF...

  9. Primary control of a Mach scale swashplateless rotor using brushless DC motor actuated trailing edge flaps

    Saxena, Anand

    The focus of this research was to demonstrate a four blade rotor trim in forward flight using integrated trailing edge flaps instead of using a swashplate controls. A compact brushless DC motor was evaluated as an on-blade actuator, with the possibility of achieving large trailing edge flap amplitudes. A control strategy to actuate the trailing edge flap at desired frequency and amplitude was developed and large trailing edge flap amplitudes from the motor (instead of rotational motion) were obtained. Once the actuator was tested on the bench-top, a lightweight mechanism was designed to incorporate the motor in the blade and actuate the trailing edge flaps. A six feet diameter, four bladed composite rotor with motor-flap system integrated into the NACA 0012 airfoil section was fabricated. Systematic testing was carried out for a range of load conditions, first in the vacuum chamber followed by hover tests. Large trailing edge flap deflections were observed during the hover testing, and a peak to peak trailing edge flap amplitude of 18 degree was achieved at 2000 rotor RPM with hover tip Mach number of 0.628. A closed loop controller was designed to demonstrate trailing edge flap mean position and the peak to peak amplitude control. Further, a soft pitch link was designed and fabricated, to replace the stiff pitch link and thereby reduce the torsional stiffness of the blade to 2/rev. This soft pitch link allowed for blade root pitch motion in response to the trailing edge flap inputs. Blade pitch response due to both steady as well as sinusoidal flap deflections were demonstrated. Finally, tests were performed in Glenn L. Martin wind tunnel using a model rotor rig to assess the performance of motor-flap system in forward flight. A swashplateless trim using brushless DC motor actuated trailing edge flaps was achieved for a rotor operating at 1200 RPM and an advance ratio of 0.28. Also, preliminary exploration was carried out to test the scalability of the motor

  10. Development of Air Vehicle with Active Flapping and Twisting of Wing

    Sangyol Yoon; Lae-Hyong Kang; Sungho Jo

    2011-01-01

    This paper addresses mechanisms for active flapping and twisting of robotic wings and assesses flying effectiveness as a function of twist angle. Unlike the flapping motion of bird wings, insects generally make a twisting motion at the root of their wings while flapping, which makes it possible for them to hover in midair. This work includes the development of a Voice Coil Motor (VCM) because a flapping-wing air vehicle should be assembled with a compact actuator to decrease size and weight. A linkage mechanism is proposed to transform the linear motion of the VCM into the flapping and twisting motions of wings. The assembled flapping-wing air vehicle, whose weight is 2.86 g, produces an average positive vertical force proportional to the twist angle. The force saturates because the twist angle is mechanically limited. This work demonstrates the possibility of developing a flapping-wing air vehicle that can hover in midair using a mechanism that actively twists the roots of wings during flapping.

  11. Aeroservoelastic Pitch Control of Stall-Induced Flap/Lag Flutter of Wind Turbine Blade Section

    Tingrui Liu

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyze aeroelastic stability, especially flutter suppression for aeroelastic instability. Effects of aeroservoelastic pitch control for flutter suppression on wind turbine blade section subjected to combined flap and lag motions are rarely studied. The work is dedicated to solving destructive flapwise and edgewise instability of stall-induced flutter of wind turbine blade by aeroservoelastic pitch control. The aeroelastic governing equations combine a flap/lag str...

  12. A Roll Controlling Approach for a Simple Dual-Actuated Flapping Aerial Vehicle Model

    Labib Omar El-Farouk E.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aerial vehicles have been investigated recently in different contexts, due to their high potential of utilization in multiple application areas. Different mechanisms can be used for aerial vehicles actuation, such as the rotating multi-blade systems (Multi-Copters and more recently flapping wings. Flapping wing robots have attracted much attention from researchers in recent years. In this study, a simple dual-actuated flapping mechanism is proposed for actuating a flapping wing robot. The mechanism is designed, simulated and validated in both simulation and experiments. A roll controlling approach is proposed to control the roll angle of the robot via controlling the speeds of both motors actuating each of the wings. The results achieved are validated experimentally, and are promising opening the door for further investigation using our proposed system

  13. Investigation of the load reduction potential of two trailing edge flap controls using CFD

    Heinz, Joachim Christian; Sørensen, Niels N.; Zahle, Frederik

    2011-01-01

    In this work, a 2D aero‐servo‐elastic model of an airfoil section with 3 degrees of freedom (DOF) based on the 2D CFD solver EllipSys2D to calculate the aerodynamic forces is utilized to calculate the load reduction potential of an airfoil equipped with an adaptive trailing edge flap (ATEF) and...... subjected to a turbulent inflow signal. The employed airfoil model corresponds to a successfully tested prototype airfoil where piezoelectric actuators were used for the flapping. In the present investigation two possible control methods for the flap are compared in their ability to reduce the fluctuating...

  14. Performance of Swashplateless Ultralight Helicopter Rotor with Trailing-edge Flaps for Primary Flight Control

    Shen, Jin-Wei; Chopra, Inderjit

    2003-01-01

    The objective of present study is to evaluate the rotor performance, trailing-edge deflections and actuation requirement of a helicopter rotor with trailing-edge flap system for primary flight control. The swashplateless design is implemented by modifying a two-bladed teetering rotor of an production ultralight helicopter through the use of plain flaps on the blades, and by replacing the pitch link to fixed system control system assembly with a root spring. A comprehensive rotorcraft analysis based on UMARC is carried out to obtain the results for both the swashplateless and a conventional baseline rotor configuration. The predictions show swashplateless configuration achieve superior performance than the conventional rotor attributed from reduction of parasite drag by eliminating swashplate mechanic system. It is indicated that optimal selection of blade pitch index angle, flap location, length, and chord ratio reduces flap deflections and actuation requirements, however, has virtually no effect on rotor performance.

  15. Effectiveness of Boundary-layer Control, Obtained by Blowing over a Plain Rear Flap in Combination with a Forward Slotted Flap, in Deflecting a Slipstream Downward for Vertical Take-off

    Spreemann, Kenneth P

    1958-01-01

    The wing employed in this investigation had a 67-percent-chord slotted flap in combination with a 33-percent-chord plain rear flap equipped with a full-span blowing nozzle. The tests were conducted in a static-thrust facility at the Langley Aeronautical Laboratory. The investigation indicated that the plain rear flap alone with a low momentum coefficient for boundary-layer control provided larger turning angles than the combined slotted and plain flaps without boundary-layer control.

  16. A study of the pharmacologic control of blood flow to acute skin flaps using xenon washout. Part I

    This study was undertaken to understand the control mechanisms differentiating circulation to normal skin and acute skin flaps. The approach was to compare the effects of systemic vasoactive drugs on skin blood flow in rats in acute skin flaps and identical areas of control skin. With this model it was felt that systemic changes would affect both areas equally and any difference in response would be due to vascular control mechanisms unique to the flap. Xenon washout by percutaneous injection was chosen to measure blood flow. The results of over 8000 observations in these studies were: 1. Vasodilation enhances blood flow and flap survival. 2. Vasoconstriction decreases blood flow. 3. Depletion of sympathetic nerve terminals enhances blood flow and flap survival. 4. The acute flap is less sensitive to systemic alpha-agonists than control skin. 5. The acute flap is less sensitive to vasodilators acting at the receptor-site level than control skin. 6. Total sympathetic denervation does not occur. 7. Biologic increases in area of flap survival did occur in drug dose ranges predicted by xenon washout measurements in this model. These findings indicate that the vessels in an acutely raised skin flap have a greater vasospastic tone than is optimal for maximum nutrient blood flow. One explanation consistent with these findings is offered in which the mechanism responsible for this tone is the release of catecholamines from the sympathetic nerve terminals after the flap has been raised

  17. Wind Tunnel Experiments with Active Control of Bridge Section Model

    Hansen, Henriette I.; Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    This paper describes results of wind tunnel experiments with a bridge section model where movable flaps are integrated in the bridge girder so each flap is the streamlined part of the edge of the girder. This active control flap system is patented by COWIconsult and may be used to increase the...... flutter wind velocity for future ultra-long span suspension bridges. The purpose of the wind tunnel experiments is to investigate the principle to use this active flap control system. The bridge section model used in the experiments is therefore not a model of a specific bridge but it is realistic...... compared with a real bridge. Five flap configurations are investigated during the wind tunnel experiments and depending on the actual flap configuration it is possible to decrease or increase the flutter wind velocity for the model....

  18. Closed loop control of a flap exposed to harmonic aerodynamic actuation

    Velte, Clara Marika; Mikkelsen, Robert Flemming; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær;

    2012-01-01

    Wind tunnel testing of a two-dimensional aerofoil with a load reducing flap has been conducted under the influence of a closed-loop controller (PID). Upstream synthetic perturbations for well-defined testing of the controller were generated by instrumenting the wind tunnel with two fast turning...... vanes placed in front of the main test wing. These were situated symmetrically above and below the airfoil in a way that created a fast turning of the air flow without directly affecting the boundary layer on the test airfoil. The Reynolds number was Re=500.000. The PID-controlled flap was able to...

  19. Effects of leading-edge flap oscillation on unsteady delta wing flow and rock control

    Kandil, Osama A.; Salman, Ahmed A.

    1991-01-01

    The isolated and interdisciplinary problems of unsteady fluid dynamics and rigid-body dynamics and control of delta wings with and without leading-edge flap oscillation are considered. For the fluid dynamics problem, the unsteady, compressible, thin-layer Navier-Stokes (NS) equations, which are written relative to a moving frame of reference, are solved along with the unsteady, linearized, Navier-displacement (ND) equations. The NS equations are solved for the flowfield using an implicit finite-volume scheme. The ND equations are solved for the grid deformation, if the leading-edge flaps oscillate, using an ADI scheme. For the dynamics and control problem, the Euler equation of rigid-body rolling motion for a wing and its flaps are solved interactively with the fluid dynamics equations for the wing-rock motion and subsequently for its control. A four-stage Runge-Kutta scheme is used to explicitly integrate the dynamics equation.

  20. Blade-Mounted Flap Control for BVI Noise Reduction Proof-of-Concept Test

    Dawson, Seth; Hassan, Ahmed; Straub, Friedrich; Tadghighi, Hormoz

    1995-01-01

    This report describes a wind tunnel test of the McDonnell Douglas Helicopter Systems (MDHS) Active Flap Model Rotor at the NASA Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel. The test demonstrated that BVI noise reductions and vibration reductions were possible with the use of an active flap. Aerodynamic results supported the acoustic data trends, showing a reduction in the strength of the tip vortex with the deflection of the flap. Acoustic results showed that the flap deployment, depending on the peak deflection angle and azimuthal shift in its deployment schedule, can produce BVI noise reductions as much as 6 dB on the advancing and retreating sides. The noise reduction was accompanied by an increase in low frequency harmonic noise and high frequency broadband noise. A brief assessment of the effect of the flap on vibration showed that significant reductions were possible. The greatest vibration reductions (as much as 76%) were found in the four per rev pitching moment at the hub. Performance improvement cam results were inconclusive, as the improvements were predicted to be smaller than the resolution of the rotor balance.

  1. Visualization of flow separation and control by vortex generators on an single flap in landing configuration

    Matějka Milan

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on a suppression of the flow separation, which occurs on a deflected flap, by means of vortex generators (VG's. An airfoil NACA 63A421 with a simple flap and vane-type vortex generators were used. The investigation was carried out by using experimental and numerical methods. The data from the numerical simulation of the flapped airfoil without VG's control were used for the vortex generator design. Two sizes, two different shapes and various spacing of the vortex generators were tested. The flow past the airfoil was visualized through three methods, namely tuft filaments technique, oil and thermo camera visualization. The experiments were performed in closed circuit wind tunnels with closed and open test sections. The lift curves for both cases without and with vortex generators were acquired for a lift coefficient improvement determination. The improvement was achieved for several cases by means all of the applied methods.

  2. Aeroelastic Optimization of a 10 MW Wind Turbine Blade with Active Trailing Edge Flaps

    Barlas, Athanasios; Tibaldi, Carlo; Zahle, Frederik;

    2016-01-01

    This article presents the aeroelastic optimization of a 10MW wind turbine ‘smart blade’ equipped with active trailing edge flaps. The multi-disciplinary wind turbine analysis and optimization tool HawtOpt2 is utilized, which is based on the open-source framework Open-MDAO. The tool interfaces to...... several state-of-the art simulation codes, allowing for a wide variety of problem formulations and combinations of models. A simultaneous aerodynamic and structural optimization of a 10 MW wind turbine rotor is carried out with respect to material layups and outer shape. Active trailing edge flaps are...

  3. Kinematic control of aerodynamic forces on an inclined flapping wing with asymmetric strokes

    In the present study, we conduct an experiment using a one-paired dynamically scaled model of an insect wing, to investigate how asymmetric strokes with different wing kinematic parameters are used to control the aerodynamics of a dragonfly-like inclined flapping wing in still fluid. The kinematic parameters considered are the angles of attack during the mid-downstroke (αmd) and mid-upstroke (αmu), and the duration (Δτ) and time of initiation (τp) of the pitching rotation. The present dragonfly-like inclined flapping wing has the aerodynamic mechanism of unsteady force generation similar to those of other insect wings in a horizontal stroke plane, but the detailed effect of the wing kinematics on the force control is different due to the asymmetric use of the angle of attack during the up- and downstrokes. For example, high αmd and low αmu produces larger vertical force with less aerodynamic power, and low αmd and high αmu is recommended for horizontal force (thrust) production. The pitching rotation also affects the aerodynamics of a flapping wing, but its dynamic rotational effect is much weaker than the effect from the kinematic change in the angle of attack caused by the pitching rotation. Thus, the influences of the duration and timing of pitching rotation for the present inclined flapping wing are found to be very different from those for a horizontal flapping wing. That is, for the inclined flapping motion, the advanced and delayed rotations produce smaller vertical forces than the symmetric one and the effect of pitching duration is very small. On the other hand, for a specific range of pitching rotation timing, delayed rotation requires less aerodynamic power than the symmetric rotation. As for the horizontal force, delayed rotation with low αmd and high αmu is recommended for long-duration flight owing to its high efficiency, and advanced rotation should be employed for hovering flight for nearly zero horizontal force. The present study

  4. Role of induced vortex interaction in a semi-active flapping foil based energy harvester

    Wu, J.; Chen, Y. L.; Zhao, N.

    2015-09-01

    The role of induced vortex interaction in a semi-active flapping foil based energy harvester is numerically examined in this work. A NACA0015 airfoil, which acts as an energy harvester, is placed in a two-dimensional laminar flow. It performs an imposed pitching motion that subsequently leads to a plunging motion. Two auxiliary smaller foils, which rotate about their centers, are arranged above and below the flapping foil, respectively. As a consequence, the vortex interaction between the flapping foil and the rotating foil is induced. At a Reynolds number of 1100 and the position of the pitching axis at one-third chord, the effects of the distance between two auxiliary foils, the phase difference between the rotating motion and the pitching motion as well as the frequency of pitching motion on the power extraction performance are systematically investigated. It is found that compared to the single flapping foil, the efficiency improvement of overall power extraction for the flapping foil with two auxiliary foils can be achieved. Based on the numerical analysis, it is indicated that the enhanced power extraction, which is caused by the increased lift force, thanks to the induced vortex interaction, directly benefits the efficiency enhancement.

  5. Variable Camber Continuous Aerodynamic Control Surfaces and Methods for Active Wing Shaping Control

    Nguyen, Nhan T. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An aerodynamic control apparatus for an air vehicle improves various aerodynamic performance metrics by employing multiple spanwise flap segments that jointly form a continuous or a piecewise continuous trailing edge to minimize drag induced by lift or vortices. At least one of the multiple spanwise flap segments includes a variable camber flap subsystem having multiple chordwise flap segments that may be independently actuated. Some embodiments also employ a continuous leading edge slat system that includes multiple spanwise slat segments, each of which has one or more chordwise slat segment. A method and an apparatus for implementing active control of a wing shape are also described and include the determination of desired lift distribution to determine the improved aerodynamic deflection of the wings. Flap deflections are determined and control signals are generated to actively control the wing shape to approximate the desired deflection.

  6. Aeroservoelastic Pitch Control of Stall-Induced Flap/Lag Flutter of Wind Turbine Blade Section

    Tingrui Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to analyze aeroelastic stability, especially flutter suppression for aeroelastic instability. Effects of aeroservoelastic pitch control for flutter suppression on wind turbine blade section subjected to combined flap and lag motions are rarely studied. The work is dedicated to solving destructive flapwise and edgewise instability of stall-induced flutter of wind turbine blade by aeroservoelastic pitch control. The aeroelastic governing equations combine a flap/lag structural model and an unsteady nonlinear aerodynamic model. The nonlinear resulting equations are linearized by small perturbation about the equilibrium point. The instability characteristics of stall-induced flap/lag flutter are investigated. Pitch actuator is described by a second-order model. The aeroservoelastic control is analyzed by three types of optimal PID controllers, two types of fuzzy PID controllers, and neural network PID controllers. The fuzzy controllers are developed based on Sugeno model and intuition method with good results achieved. A single neuron PID control strategy with improved Hebb learning algorithm and a radial basic function neural network PID algorithm are applied and performed well in the range of extreme wind speeds.

  7. Numerical Investigation of Flow Control Feasibility with a Trailing Edge Flap

    This paper concerns a numerical study of employing an adaptive trailing edge flap to control the lift of an airfoil subject to unsteady inflow conditions. The periodically varying inflow is generated by two oscillating airfoils, which are located upstream of the controlled airfoil. To establish the control system, a standard PID controller is implemented in a finite volume based incompressible flow solver. An immersed boundary method is applied to treat the problem of simulating a deformable airfoil trailing edge. The flow field is solved using a 2D Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes finite volume solver. In order to more accurately simulate wall bounded flows around the immersed boundary, a modified boundary condition is introduced in the k- ω turbulence model. As an example, turbulent flow over a NACA 64418 airfoil with a deformable trailing edge is investigated. Results from numerical simulations are convincing and may give some highlights for practical implementations of trailing edge flap to a wind turbine rotor blade

  8. Pitching motion control of a butterfly-like 3D flapping wing-body model

    Suzuki, Kosuke; Minami, Keisuke; Inamuro, Takaji

    2014-11-01

    Free flights and a pitching motion control of a butterfly-like flapping wing-body model are numerically investigated by using an immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method. The model flaps downward for generating the lift force and backward for generating the thrust force. Although the model can go upward against the gravity by the generated lift force, the model generates the nose-up torque, consequently gets off-balance. In this study, we discuss a way to control the pitching motion by flexing the body of the wing-body model like an actual butterfly. The body of the model is composed of two straight rigid rod connected by a rotary actuator. It is found that the pitching angle is suppressed in the range of +/-5° by using the proportional-plus-integral-plus-derivative (PID) control for the input torque of the rotary actuator.

  9. Application of Sequential Quadratic Programming to Minimize Smart Active Flap Rotor Hub Loads

    Kottapalli, Sesi; Leyland, Jane

    2014-01-01

    In an analytical study, SMART active flap rotor hub loads have been minimized using nonlinear programming constrained optimization methodology. The recently developed NLPQLP system (Schittkowski, 2010) that employs Sequential Quadratic Programming (SQP) as its core algorithm was embedded into a driver code (NLP10x10) specifically designed to minimize active flap rotor hub loads (Leyland, 2014). Three types of practical constraints on the flap deflections have been considered. To validate the current application, two other optimization methods have been used: i) the standard, linear unconstrained method, and ii) the nonlinear Generalized Reduced Gradient (GRG) method with constraints. The new software code NLP10x10 has been systematically checked out. It has been verified that NLP10x10 is functioning as desired. The following are briefly covered in this paper: relevant optimization theory; implementation of the capability of minimizing a metric of all, or a subset, of the hub loads as well as the capability of using all, or a subset, of the flap harmonics; and finally, solutions for the SMART rotor. The eventual goal is to implement NLP10x10 in a real-time wind tunnel environment.

  10. Axial flow effects on robustness of vortical structures about actively deflected wings in flapping flight

    Medina, Albert; Kweon, Jihoon; Choi, Haecheon; Eldredge, Jeff D.

    2012-11-01

    Flapping wing flight has garnered much attention in the past decade driven by our desire to understand capabilities observed in nature and to develop agile small-scale aerial vehicles. Nature has demonstrated the breadth of maneuverability achievable by flapping wing flight. However, despite recent advances the role of wing flexibility remains poorly understood. In an effort to develop a deeper understanding of wing deflection effects and to explore novel approaches to increasing leading-edge vortex robustness, this three-dimensional computational study explores the aerodynamics of low aspect ratio plates, in hovering kinematics, with isolated flexion lines undergoing prescribed deflection. Major flexion lines, recognized as the primary avenue for deflection in biological fliers, are isolated here in two distinct configurations, resulting in deflection about the wing root and the wing tip, respectively. Of interest is the interaction between axial flow along the span and the vortical structures about the wing. It is proposed that the modes of deflection explored may provide a means of axial flow control for favorably promoting LEV robustness over a broad range of flapping conditions, and provide insight into the nature of flexibility in flapping wing flight. National Science Foundation, National Research Foundation of Korea.

  11. Stress optimization of leaf-spring crossed flexure pivots for an active Gurney flap mechanism

    Freire Gomez, Jon; Booker, Julian D; Mellor, Phil

    2015-01-01

    The EU’s Green Rotorcraft programme is pursuing the development of a functional and airworthy Active Gurney Flap (AGF) for a full-scale helicopter rotor blade. Interest in the development of this ‘smart adaptive rotor blade’ technology lies in its potential to provide a number of aerodynamic benefits, which would in turn translate into a reduction in fuel consumption and noise levels. The AGF mechanism selected employs leaf-spring crossed flexure pivots. These provide important advantages ove...

  12. Reduced In-Plane, Low Frequency Helicopter Noise of an Active Flap Rotor

    Sim, Ben W.; Janakiram, Ram D.; Barbely, Natasha L.; Solis, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    Results from a recent joint DARPA/Boeing/NASA/Army wind tunnel test demonstrated the ability to reduce in-plane, low frequency noise of the full-scale Boeing-SMART rotor using active flaps. Test data reported in this paper illustrated that acoustic energy in the first six blade-passing harmonics could be reduced by up to 6 decibels at a moderate airspeed, level flight condition corresponding to advance ratio of 0.30. Reduced noise levels were attributed to selective active flap schedules that modified in-plane blade airloads on the advancing side of the rotor, in a manner, which generated counteracting acoustic pulses that partially offset the negative pressure peaks associated with in-plane, steady thickness noise. These favorable reduced-noise operating states are a strong function of the active flap actuation amplitude, frequency and phase. The associated noise reductions resulted in reduced aural detection distance by up to 18%, but incurred significant vibratory load penalties due to increased hub shear forces. Small reductions in rotor lift-to-drag ratios, of no more than 3%, were also measured

  13. Swashplateless Helicopter Experimental Investigation: Primary Control with Trailing Edge Flaps Actuated with Piezobenders

    Copp, Peter

    Helicopter rotor primary control is conventionally carried out using a swashplate with pitch links. Eliminating the swashplate promises to reduce the helicopter's parasitic power in high speed forward flight, as well as may lead to a hydraulic-less vehicle. A Mach-scale swashplateless rotor is designed with integrated piezobender-actuated trailing edge flaps and systematically tested on the benchtop, in the vacuum chamber and on the hoverstand. The blade is nominally based on the UH-60 rotor with a hover tip Mach number of 0.64. The blade diameter is 66 inches requiring 2400 RPM for Mach scale simulation. The rotor hub is modified to reduce the blade fundamental torsional frequency to less than 2.0/rev by replacing the rigid pitch links with linear springs, which results in an increase of the blade pitching response to the trailing edge flaps. Piezoelectric multilayer benders provide the necessary bandwidth, stroke and stiffness to drive the flaps for primary control while fitting inside the blade profile and withstanding the high centrifugal forces. This work focuses on several key issues. A piezobender designed from a soft piezoelectric material, PZT-5K4, is constructed. The new material is used to construct multi-layer benders with increased stroke for the same stiffness relative to hard materials such as PZT-5H2. Each layer has a thickness of 10 mils. The soft material with gold electrodes requires a different bonding method than hard material with nickel electrodes. With this new bonding method, the measured stiffness matches precisely the predicted stiffness for a 12 layer bender with 1.26 inch length and 1.0 inch width with a stiffness of 1.04 lb/mil. The final in-blade bender has a length of 1.38 inches and 1.0 inch width with a stiffness of 0.325 lb/mil and stroke of 20.2 mils for an energy output of 66.3 lb-mil. The behavior of piezobenders under very high electric fields is investigated. High field means +18.9 kV/cm (limited by arcing in air) and -3.54k

  14. Continuous Trailing-Edge Flaps for Primary Flight Control of a Helicopter Main Rotor

    Thornburgh, Robert P.; Kreshock, Andrew R.; Wilbur, Matthew L.; Sekula, Martin K.; Shen, Jinwei

    2014-01-01

    The use of continuous trailing-edge flaps (CTEFs) for primary flight control of a helicopter main rotor is studied. A practical, optimized bimorph design with Macro-Fiber Composite actuators is developed for CTEF control, and a coupled structures and computational fluid dynamics methodology is used to study the fundamental behavior of an airfoil with CTEFs. These results are used within a comprehensive rotorcraft analysis model to study the control authority requirements of the CTEFs when utilized for primary flight control of a utility class helicopter. A study of the effect of blade root pitch index (RPI) on CTEF control authority is conducted, and the impact of structural and aerodynamic model complexity on the comprehensive analysis results is presented. The results show that primary flight control using CTEFs is promising; however, a more viable option may include the control of blade RPI, as well.

  15. Aerodynamics, sensing and control of insect-scale flapping-wing flight

    Shyy, Wei; Kang, Chang-kwon; Chirarattananon, Pakpong; Ravi, Sridhar; Liu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    There are nearly a million known species of flying insects and 13 000 species of flying warm-blooded vertebrates, including mammals, birds and bats. While in flight, their wings not only move forward relative to the air, they also flap up and down, plunge and sweep, so that both lift and thrust can be generated and balanced, accommodate uncertain surrounding environment, with superior flight stability and dynamics with highly varied speeds and missions. As the size of a flyer is reduced, the wing-to-body mass ratio tends to decrease as well. Furthermore, these flyers use integrated system consisting of wings to generate aerodynamic forces, muscles to move the wings, and sensing and control systems to guide and manoeuvre. In this article, recent advances in insect-scale flapping-wing aerodynamics, flexible wing structures, unsteady flight environment, sensing, stability and control are reviewed with perspective offered. In particular, the special features of the low Reynolds number flyers associated with small sizes, thin and light structures, slow flight with comparable wind gust speeds, bioinspired fabrication of wing structures, neuron-based sensing and adaptive control are highlighted. PMID:27118897

  16. Numerical Investigation of Flow Control Feasibility with a Trailing Edge Flap

    Zhu, Wei Jun; Shen, Wen Zhong; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2014-01-01

    This paper concerns a numerical study of employing an adaptive trailing edge flap to control the lift of an airfoil subject to unsteady inflow conditions. The periodically varying inflow is generated by two oscillating airfoils, which are located upstream of the controlled airfoil. To establish the...... solver. In order to more accurately simulate wall bounded flows around the immersed boundary, a modified boundary condition is introduced in the k- ω turbulence model. As an example, turbulent flow over a NACA 64418 airfoil with a deformable trailing edge is investigated. Results from numerical...... control system, a standard PID controller is implemented in a finite volume based incompressible flow solver. An immersed boundary method is applied to treat the problem of simulating a deformable airfoil trailing edge. The flow field is solved using a 2D Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes finite volume...

  17. Development of a resonant trailing-edge flap actuation system for helicopter rotor vibration control

    Kim, J.-S.; Wang, K. W.; Smith, E. C.

    2007-12-01

    A resonant trailing-edge flap actuation system for helicopter rotors is developed and evaluated experimentally. The concept involves deflecting each individual trailing-edge flap using a compact resonant piezoelectric actuation system. Each resonant actuation system yields high authority, while operating at a single frequency. By tailoring the natural frequencies of the actuation system (including the piezoelectric actuator and the related mechanical and electrical elements) to the required operating frequencies, one can increase the output authority. The robustness of the device can be enhanced by increasing the high authority bandwidth through electric circuitry design. Such a resonant actuation system (RAS) is analyzed for a full-scale piezoelectric induced-shear tube actuator, and bench-top testing is conducted to validate the concept. An adaptive feed-forward controller is developed to realize the electric network dynamics and adapt to phase variation. The control strategy is then implemented via a digital signal processor (DSP) system. Analysis is also performed to examine the rotor system dynamics in forward flight with piezoelectric resonant actuators, using a perturbation method to evaluate the system's time-varying characteristics. Numerical simulations reveal that the resonant actuator concept can be applied to forward flights as well as to hover conditions.

  18. A flow control mechanism in wing flapping with stroke asymmetry during insect forward flight

    Yongliang Yu; Binggang Tong

    2005-01-01

    A theoretical modeling approach as well as an unsteady analytical method is used to study aerodynamic characteristics of wing flapping with asymmetric stroke-cycles in connection with an oblique stroke plane during insect forward flight. It is revealed that the aerodynamic asymmetry between the downstroke and the upstroke due to stroke-asymmetrical flapping is a key to understand the flow physics of generation and modulation of the lift and the thrust. Predicted results for examples of given kinematics validate more specifically some viewpoints that the wing lift is more easily produced when the forward speed is higher and the thrust is harder, and the lift and the thrust are generated mainly during downstroke and upstroke, respectively. The effects of three controlling parameters, i.e. the angles of tilted stroke plane,the different downstroke duration ratios, and the different angles of attack in both down- and up-stroke, are further discussed. It is found that larger oblique angles of stroke planes generate larger thrust but smaller lift; larger downstroke duration ratios lead to larger thrust, while making little change in lift and input aerodynamic power; and again, a small increase of the angle of attack in downstroke or upstroke may cause remarkable changes in aerodynamic performance in the relevant stroke.

  19. Development of a piezoelectric actuator for trailing-edge flap control of rotor blades

    Straub, Friedrich K.; Ngo, Hieu T.; Anand, V.; Domzalski, David B.

    1999-06-01

    Piezoelectric actuator technology has now reached a level where macro-positioning applications in the context of smart structures can be considered. One application with high payoffs is vibration reduction, noise reduction, and performance improvements in helicopters. Integration of piezoelectric actuators in the rotor blade is attractive, since it attacks the problem at the source. The present paper covers the development of a piezoelectric actuator for trailing edge flap control on a 34-foot diameter helicopter main rotor. The design of an actuator using bi-axial stack columns, and its bench, shake, and spin testing are described. A series of enhancements lead to an improved version that, together with use of latest stack technology, meets the requirements. Next steps in this DARPA sponsored program are development of the actuator and full scale rotor system for wind tunnel testing in the NASA Ames 40 X 80 foot wind tunnel and flight testing on the MD Explorer.

  20. Effectiveness Using Circular Fibre Steel Flap Gate As a Control Structure Towards the Hydraulic Characteristics in Open Channel

    Adib, M. R. M.; Amirza, A. R. M.; Wardah, T.; Junaidah, A.

    2016-07-01

    Hydraulic control gate structure plays an important role in regulating the flow of water in river, canal or water reservoir. One of the most appropriate structures in term of resolving the problem of flood occured is the construction of circular fibre steel flap gate. Therefore, an experiment has been conducted by using an open channel model at laboratory. In this case, hydraulic jump and backwater were the method to determined the hydraulic characteristics of circular fibre steel flap gate in an open channel model. From the experiment, the opening angle of flap gate can receive discharges with the highest flow rate of 0.035 m3/s with opening angle was 47°. The type of jump that occurs at the slope of 1/200 for a distance of 5.0 m is a standing jump or undulating wave. The height of the backwater can be identified based on the differences of specific force which is specific force before jump, F1 and specific force after jump, F2 from the formation of backwater. Based on the research conducted, the tendency of incident backwater wave occurred was high in every distance of water control location from water inlet is flap slope and the slope of 1/300 which is 0.84 m/s and 0.75 m/s of celerity in open channel model.

  1. Wind tunnel test on airfoil Riso-B1-18 with an Active Trailing Edge Flap

    Bak, Christian; Gaunaa, Mac; Andersen, Peter Bjørn;

    2010-01-01

    A wind tunnel test of the wind turbine airfoil Risø-B1-18 equipped with an Active Trailing Edge Flap (ATEF) was carried out. The ATEF was 9% of the total chord, made of piezo electric actuators attached to the trailing edge of a non-deformable airfoil and actuated using an (electric) amplifier. The...

  2. High-Lift System for a Supercritical Airfoil: Simplified by Active Flow Control

    Melton, LaTunia Pack; Schaeffler, Norman W.; Lin, John C.

    2007-01-01

    Active flow control wind tunnel experiments were conducted in the NASA Langley Low-Turbulence Pressure Tunnel using a two-dimensional supercritical high-lift airfoil with a 15% chord hinged leading-edge flap and a 25% chord hinged trailing-edge flap. This paper focuses on the application of zero-net-mass-flux periodic excitation near the airfoil trailing edge flap shoulder at a Mach number of 0.1 and chord Reynolds numbers of 1.2 x 10(exp 6) to 9 x 10(exp 6) with leading- and trailing-edge flap deflections of 25 deg. and 30 deg., respectively. The purpose of the investigation was to increase the zero-net-mass-flux options for controlling trailing edge flap separation by using a larger model than used on the low Reynolds number version of this model and to investigate the effect of flow control at higher Reynolds numbers. Static and dynamic surface pressures and wake pressures were acquired to determine the effects of flow control on airfoil performance. Active flow control was applied both upstream of the trailing edge flap and immediately downstream of the trailing edge flap shoulder and the effects of Reynolds number, excitation frequency and amplitude are presented. The excitations around the trailing edge flap are then combined to control trailing edge flap separation. The combination of two closely spaced actuators around the trailing-edge flap knee was shown to increase the lift produced by an individual actuator. The phase sensitivity between two closely spaced actuators seen at low Reynolds number is confirmed at higher Reynolds numbers. The momentum input required to completely control flow separation on the configuration was larger than that available from the actuators used.

  3. ANALYSIS OF AN ELECTROSTRICTIVE STACK ACTUATOR FOR ACTIVE TRAILING EDGE FLAPS

    2000-01-01

    Stack actuator is a solid-state driving component of Active Tailing Edge Flap in smart rotor systems. It is a multi-layer serial structure of basic units composed of electrostrictive and adhesive layers. In this paper, a dynamic model of the actuator is derived based on the constitutive equation of electrostrictive material and the equation of motion. Theoretical analysis is made on the factors involved in the design of the actuator, which reveals that the electrostrictive layer and the adhesive layer should be optimized to compromise between displacement and frequency requirements. In the final part of the paper, the experiment of an ATEF system is introduced. The results show that the model is reasonable. It also suggests that the bending stiffness of elastic mechanism is an important factor in design, which should be carefully studied to provide satisfactory dynamic response of the ATEF system.

  4. Single-Point Remote Control of Flapping Motion in Clothespin-Shaped Bimetallic Palladium Complexes Based on the N(sp(2) )-N(sp(3) ) Interconversion in Amide Functionalities.

    Inoue, Ryo; Kawamorita, Soichiro; Naota, Takeshi

    2016-04-11

    The synthesis, structure, and flapping motion of clothespin-shaped binuclear trans-bis(salicylaldiminato)palladium(II) complexes (anti-1) with 4-azaheptamethylene linkers bearing amide (a-g), urethane (h), or urea (i) functionalities are described in this report. Various 2D (1) H NMR experiments and XRD analyses indicate that the amide- and urethane-linked anti-1 a,b,d-h complexes exist as equilibrated mixtures of major and minor conformers I and II in CDCl3 , whereas the complexes anti-1 c and i were observed as a single species. The mapping of NOESY cross-peaks between conformers I and II revealed that the equilibration of the major and minor conformers of anti-1 a,b,d-h proceeds by two pathways, namely a nonrotatory flapping motion of the coordinated blades and a nonflapping rotation of C-N bonds, whereas the equilibration of anti-1 c proceeds by simultaneous flapping and rotation motions. Kinetic studies carried out by means of (1) H-(1) H EXSY experiments revealed that 1) the ΔG(≠) 298K values for the flapping motion are controlled remotely by the steric and electronic effects of the RCON functionalities and 2) the activation parameters for the nonrotatory flapping process are identical to those for the nonflapping peptide rotation in the complexes anti-1 a,b,d-h, which indicates that the present multistep conformational transformation induced by the flapping motion is controlled by the rate-determining pyramidalization/depyramidalization (i.e., sp(2) /sp(3) interconversion) of the nitrogen atoms of the functionalities. The static and controllable molecular mobility of anti-1 bearing peptide linkers has been discussed by comparison with the dynamic behavior of its analogues anti-2-4 with flexible polymethylene linkers. PMID:26934178

  5. Wind-Tunnel Tests of a Bridge Model with Active Vibration Control

    Hansen, H. I.; Thoft-Christensen, Palle; Mendes, P. A.;

    The application of active control systems to reduce wind vibrations in bridges is a new area of research. This paper presents the results that were obtained on a set of wind tunnel tests of a bridge model equipped with active movable flaps. Based on the monitored position and motion of the deck......, the flaps are regulated by a control algorithm so that the wind forces exerted on them counteract the deck oscillations....

  6. Control of Vortex Shedding on an Airfoil using Mini Flaps at Low Reynolds Number

    Oshiyama, Daisuke; Numata, Daiju; Asai, Keisuke

    2015-11-01

    In this study, the effects of mini flaps (MFs) on a NACA0012 airfoil were investigated experimentally at low Reynolds number. MFs are small flat plates attached to the trailing edge of an airfoil perpendicularly. All the tests were conducted at the Tohoku-University Basic Aerodynamic Research Tunnel at the chord Reynolds number of 25,000. Aerodynamic forces were measured using a 3-component balance and the surface flow was visualized by luminescent oil film technique. The results of force measurement show that attachment of MFs enhances lift and the enhanced lift increases with MF height. On the other hand, the results of oil flow visualization show that attachment of MFs enlarges the separated region on the airfoil rather than diminishes it. To understand the physical mechanism of MFs for lift enhancement, the flow around the airfoil was visualized by the smoke-wire method and the wake profile behind the airfoil was measured using a hot wire anemometer. It was found that vortices shed periodically from the tip of the MFs and interact with the separated shear layer from the upper surface. This unsteady vortex shedding forms a low-pressure region on the upper surface, generating higher lift. These results suggest that the height of MFs controls the frequency of vortex shedding behind the MF, forcing the separated shear layer on the upper surface flow in unsteady manner.

  7. A high voltage DC-DC converter driving a Dielectric Electro Active Polymer actuator for wind turbine flaps

    Thummala, Prasanth; Zhang, Zhe; Andersen, Michael A. E.; Thomsen, Ole Cornelius

    2012-01-01

    The Dielectric Electro Active Polymer (DEAP) material is a very thin (~80 μm) silicone elastomer film with a compliant metallic electrode layer on both sides. The DEAP is fundamentally a capacitor that is capable of very high strain. The property that the polymer changes its shape, as a result of...... topology to obtain high voltage at low current, for driving the DEAP actuator. Simulation and experimental results for uni-directional flyback converter topology are shown....... flaps. With the DEAP based high power actuator, it is expected to make a reliable and light solution with superior controllability. The current DEAP technology requires high DC voltage in the range of kV to fully utilize the DEAP material as an actuator. In this paper we propose a flyback converter......The Dielectric Electro Active Polymer (DEAP) material is a very thin (~80 μm) silicone elastomer film with a compliant metallic electrode layer on both sides. The DEAP is fundamentally a capacitor that is capable of very high strain. The property that the polymer changes its shape, as a result of...

  8. Control of flight forces and moments by flapping wings of model bumblebee

    WU Jiang-hao; SUN Mao

    2008-01-01

    The control of flight forces and moments by flapping wings of a model bumblebee is studied using the method of computational fluid dynamics.Hovering flight is taken as the reference flight:Wing kinematic parameters are varied with respect to their values at hovering flight.Moments about(and forces along)x,y,z axes that pass the center of mass are computed.Changing stroke amplitude(or wingbeat frequency)mainly produces a vertical force.Changing mean stroke angle mainly produces a pitch moment.Changing wing angle of attack,when down-and upstrokes have equal change,mainly produces a vertical force,while when down-and upstrokes have opposite changes,mainly produces a horizontal force and a pitch moment.Changing wing rotation timing,when dorsal and ventral rotations have the same timing,mainly produces a vertical force,while when dorsal and ventral rotations have opposite timings,mainly produces a pitch moment and a horizontal force.Changing rotation duration has very small effect on forces and moments.Anti-symmetrically changing stroke amplitude(or wingbeat frequency)of the contralateral wings mainly produces a roll moment.Anti-symmetrically changing angles of attack of the contralateral wings,when down-and upstrokes have equal change,mainly produces a roll moment,while when down-and upstrokes have opposite changes,mainly produces a yaw moment.Anti-symmetrically changing wing rotation timing of the contralateral wings,when dorsal and ventral rotations have the same timing,mainly produces a roll moment and a side force,while when dorsal and ventral rotations have opposite timings,mainly produces a yaw moment.Vertical force and moments about the three axes can be separately controlled by separate kinematic variables.A very fast rotation can be achieved with moderate changes in wing kinematics.

  9. Active control for performance enhancement of electrically controlled rotor

    Lu Yang; Wang Chao

    2015-01-01

    Electrically controlled rotor (ECR) system has the potential to enhance the rotor perfor-mance by applying higher harmonic flap inputs. In order to explore the feasibility and effectiveness for ECR performance enhancement using closed-loop control method, firstly, an ECR rotor perfor-mance analysis model based on helicopter flight dynamic model is established, which can reflect the performance characteristics of ECR helicopter at high advance ratio. Based on the simulation platform, an active control method named adaptive T-matrix algorithm is adopted to explore the feasibility and effectiveness for ECR performance enhancement. The simulation results verify the effectiveness of this closed-loop control method. For the sample ECR helicopter, about 3%rotor power reduction is obtained with the optimum 2/rev flap inputs at the advance ratio of 0.34. And through analyzing the distributions of attack of angle and drag in rotor disk, the underlying physical essence of ECR power reduction is cleared. Furthermore, the influence of the key control parameters, including convergence factor and weighting matrix, on the effectiveness of closed-loop control for ECR performance enhancement is explored. Some useful results are summarized, which can be used to direct the future active control law design of ECR performance enhancement.

  10. Active control for performance enhancement of electrically controlled rotor

    Lu Yang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Electrically controlled rotor (ECR system has the potential to enhance the rotor performance by applying higher harmonic flap inputs. In order to explore the feasibility and effectiveness for ECR performance enhancement using closed-loop control method, firstly, an ECR rotor performance analysis model based on helicopter flight dynamic model is established, which can reflect the performance characteristics of ECR helicopter at high advance ratio. Based on the simulation platform, an active control method named adaptive T-matrix algorithm is adopted to explore the feasibility and effectiveness for ECR performance enhancement. The simulation results verify the effectiveness of this closed-loop control method. For the sample ECR helicopter, about 3% rotor power reduction is obtained with the optimum 2/rev flap inputs at the advance ratio of 0.34. And through analyzing the distributions of attack of angle and drag in rotor disk, the underlying physical essence of ECR power reduction is cleared. Furthermore, the influence of the key control parameters, including convergence factor and weighting matrix, on the effectiveness of closed-loop control for ECR performance enhancement is explored. Some useful results are summarized, which can be used to direct the future active control law design of ECR performance enhancement.

  11. Stress optimization of leaf-spring crossed flexure pivots for an active Gurney flap mechanism

    Freire Gómez, Jon; Booker, Julian D.; Mellor, Phil H.

    2015-04-01

    The EU's Green Rotorcraft programme is pursuing the development of a functional and airworthy Active Gurney Flap (AGF) for a full-scale helicopter rotor blade. Interest in the development of this `smart adaptive rotor blade' technology lies in its potential to provide a number of aerodynamic benefits, which would in turn translate into a reduction in fuel consumption and noise levels. The AGF mechanism selected employs leaf-spring crossed flexure pivots. These provide important advantages over bearings as they are not susceptible to seizing and do not require maintenance (i.e. lubrication or cleaning). A baseline design of this mechanism was successfully tested both in a fatigue rig and in a 2D wind tunnel environment at flight-representative deployment schedules. For full validation, a flight test would also be required. However, the severity of the in-flight loading conditions would likely compromise the mechanical integrity of the pivots' leaf-springs in their current form. This paper investigates the scope for stress reduction through three-dimensional shape optimization of the leaf-springs of a generic crossed flexure pivot. To this end, a procedure combining a linear strain energy formulation, a parametric leaf-spring profile definition and a series of optimization algorithms is employed. The resulting optimized leaf-springs are proven to be not only independent of the angular rotation at which the pivot operates, but also linearly scalable to leaf-springs of any length, minimum thickness and width. Validated using non-linear finite element analysis, the results show very significant stress reductions relative to pivots with constant cross section leaf-springs, of up to as much as 30% for the specific pivot configuration employed in the AGF mechanism. It is concluded that shape optimization offers great potential for reducing stress in crossed flexure pivots and, consequently, for extending their fatigue life and/or rotational range.

  12. A Mission-Adaptive Variable Camber Flap Control System to Optimize High Lift and Cruise Lift-to-Drag Ratios of Future N+3 Transport Aircraft

    Urnes, James, Sr.; Nguyen, Nhan; Ippolito, Corey; Totah, Joseph; Trinh, Khanh; Ting, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Boeing and NASA are conducting a joint study program to design a wing flap system that will provide mission-adaptive lift and drag performance for future transport aircraft having light-weight, flexible wings. This Variable Camber Continuous Trailing Edge Flap (VCCTEF) system offers a lighter-weight lift control system having two performance objectives: (1) an efficient high lift capability for take-off and landing, and (2) reduction in cruise drag through control of the twist shape of the flexible wing. This control system during cruise will command varying flap settings along the span of the wing in order to establish an optimum wing twist for the current gross weight and cruise flight condition, and continue to change the wing twist as the aircraft changes gross weight and cruise conditions for each mission segment. Design weight of the flap control system is being minimized through use of light-weight shape memory alloy (SMA) actuation augmented with electric actuators. The VCCTEF program is developing better lift and drag performance of flexible wing transports with the further benefits of lighter-weight actuation and less drag using the variable camber shape of the flap.

  13. Laser resurfacing of skin flaps: an experimental comparison

    Srdan Babovic

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The influence of Coherent Ultrapulse, TruPulse and Erbium: YAG laser skin resurfacing on survival of the skin flaps when performed simultaneously was evaluated. Material and methods. We used twelve female Yucatan minipigs in the study. Skin flaps including paniculus carnosus were raised on the animals’ back. The flaps were sutured into the defect under tension. We designed 4 experimental groups: Control-Flaps only, Group 2-Flaps + 4 immediate TruPulse laser passes, Group 3-Flaps + 2 immediate Coherent UltraPulse laser passes, Group 4-Flaps – immediate 50J/cm2 total fluence with Erbium: YAG laser. Results. Flap survival in Control group was 98.8%. There was no flap in Group 2 with complete survival. Survival of the flaps in Group 2 (Tru-Pulse ranged from 75-90%, with average flap survival area of 85.2%. In Group 3 (UltraPulse all 24 flaps had some area of necrosis. Flap survival in Group 3 ranged from 75-95%, with an average of 85.6%. In Group 4 (Erbium: YAG flap survival area ranged from 70-95%, with all 24 flaps with some area of necrosis, with average flap survival area of 87.3%. There is a significant statistical difference in flap survival area between groups 2, 3 and 4 versus Control (p<0.001. Conclusion. The results of our study suggest that laser resurfacing of skin flaps sutured under tension in the same operative session is detrimental for skin flap survival. We also found no significant difference in flap survival area between TruPulse, Coherent UltraPulse and Erbium: YAG laser treated flaps.

  14. Advanced load alleviation for wind turbines using adaptive trailing edge flaps: Sensoring and control

    Andersen, Peter Bjoern

    2010-02-15

    The purpose of wind turbines and their predecessors the windmill, is to convert the energy in the wind to usable energy forms. Whereas windmills of the past focused on the conversion of wind power to torque for grinding, pumping and winching, modern wind turbines convert the wind energy into electric power. They do so through incorporation of generators, which convert mechanical torque into electricity. Wind turbines are designed to keep the overall cost per produced Kilo Watt hour as low as possible. One way of improving the performance and lifetime of the wind turbine is through active flow control. Active control is often considered costly but if the lifespan of the components can be increased it could be justifiable. This thesis covers various aspects of 'smart control' such as control theory, sensoring, optimization, experiments and numerical modeling. (author)

  15. Development of an improved aeroelastic model for the investigation of vibration reduction in helicopter rotors using trailing edge flaps

    Myrtle, Timothy Fitzgerald

    1998-12-01

    This dissertation describes the development of an aeroelastic model of a helicopter rotor incorporating partial span trailing edge flaps on the blade and its application to the investigation of vibration reduction using active control. A new two-dimensional unsteady aerodynamic model for an airfoil/flap combination is described that includes compressibility and unsteady freestream effects. This new aerodynamic model is based on a rational function approximation (RFA) approach. In this approach, oscillatory response data obtained for a selected set of generalized airfoil and flap motions is used to generate an approximate aerodynamic transfer function which can be transformed to the time domain to form a state space aerodynamic model. In this dissertation, a method is described for adapting the conventional RFA approach to include unsteady freestream effects. Excellent agreement is demonstrated between the response of the new aerodynamic model and an exact incompressible solution to the unsteady freestream case. This model provides a complete description of the unsteady flap hinge moments due to airfoil and flap motion, allowing a complete and accurate characterization of control actuation requirements. The structural model utilizes an elastic blade model which includes fully coupled flap-lag-torsional dynamics and includes the effects of moderate deflections. The aeroelastic model is formulated in the time domain, with the coupled trim/response solution obtained using direct numerical integration in combination with autopilot type controller. A conventional higher harmonic control approach is used to investigate vibration reduction. Vibration control studies are performed which compare results using the new aerodynamic model and incompressible quasisteady Theodorsen aerodynamics. Significant differences were observed in the required deflections and control moments, indicating that compressibility and unsteady effects are necessary to properly characterize the

  16. Structural and mechanism design of an active trailing-edge flap blade

    Lee, Jae Hwan; Natarajan, Balakumaran; Eun, Won Jong;

    2013-01-01

    A conventional rotor control system restricted at 1/rev frequency component is unable to vary the hub vibratory loads and the aeroacoustic noise, which exist in high frequency components. Various active rotor control methodologies have been examined in the literature to alleviate the problem of e...

  17. Adaptive Trailing Edge Flaps for Active Load Alleviation in a Smart Rotor Configuration

    Bergami, Leonardo; Gaunaa, Mac; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad; Buhl, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Denne afhandling omhandler udviklingen af et aktivt smart rotor koncept fra et aeroservoelastisk perspektiv. En aktiv smart rotor er en vindmøllerotor som igennem en kombination af sensorer, reguleringsenhed og aktuatorer, aktivt kan reducere den fluktuerende del af de aerodynamiske kræfter møllen skal modstå. Undersøgelsen omhandler en specifik aktuator type: Adaptive Trailing Edge Flap (ATEF), der består af en kontinuert deformation af den bagerste del af vingeprofilernes tværsnitsform.Der ...

  18. Flap Edge Noise Reduction Fins

    Khorrami, Mehdi R. (Inventor); Choudhan, Meelan M. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A flap of the type that is movably connected to an aircraft wing to provide control of an aircraft in flight includes opposite ends, wherein at least a first opposite end includes a plurality of substantially rigid, laterally extending protrusions that are spaced apart to form a plurality of fluidly interconnected passageways. The passageways have openings adjacent to upper and lower sides of the flap, and the passageways include a plurality of bends such that high pressure fluid flows from a high pressure region to a low pressure region to provide a boundary condition that inhibits noise resulting from airflow around the end of the flap.

  19. Drag reduction, noise and vibration control on Gurney flaps and diverging trailing edges.

    Hage, W.; Bechert, D. W.; Meyer, R.

    1999-11-01

    Gurney flaps and divergent trailing edges change the Kutta condition on airfoils, thus producing higher lift. At lower Reynolds numbers (lift to drag ratio of an airfoil can be enhanced. Unfortunatley, however, the drag is also increased due to the form drag of that particular type of trailing edge. In addition, an absolute instability of the wake ensues (i.e., a Karman vortex street) imbedded in the turbulent wake flow. This causes enhanced vibration and noise levels. By an appropriate three-dimensional design of the trailing edge, the absolute instability of the wake can be eliminated. This reduces the drag of the device and removes the single frequency constituent of the fluctuations in the wake. Wind tunnel force measurements on a laminar glider wing and a transonic wing are presented as well as hot-wire measurements in the wake.

  20. Reduction of urease activity by interaction with the flap covering the active site.

    Macomber, Lee; Minkara, Mona S; Hausinger, Robert P; Merz, Kenneth M

    2015-02-23

    With the increasing appreciation for the human microbiome coupled with the global rise of antibiotic resistant organisms, it is imperative that new methods be developed to specifically target pathogens. To that end, a novel computational approach was devised to identify compounds that reduce the activity of urease, a medically important enzyme of Helicobacter pylori, Proteus mirabilis, and many other microorganisms. Urease contains a flexible loop that covers its active site; Glide was used to identify small molecules predicted to lock this loop in an open conformation. These compounds were screened against the model urease from Klebsiella aerogenes, and the natural products epigallocatechin and quercetin were shown to inhibit at low and high micromolar concentrations, respectively. These molecules exhibit a strong time-dependent inactivation of urease that was not due to their oxygen sensitivity. Rather, these compounds appear to inactivate urease by reacting with a specific Cys residue located on the flexible loop. Substitution of this cysteine by alanine in the C319A variant increased the urease resistance to both epigallocatechin and quercetin, as predicted by the computational studies. Protein dynamics are integral to the function of many enzymes; thus, identification of compounds that lock an enzyme into a single conformation presents a useful approach to define potential inhibitors. PMID:25594724

  1. 4,5-Diarylisoxazol-3-carboxylic acids: A new class of leukotriene biosynthesis inhibitors potentially targeting 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein (FLAP).

    Banoglu, Erden; Çelikoğlu, Erşan; Völker, Susanna; Olgaç, Abdurrahman; Gerstmeier, Jana; Garscha, Ulrike; Çalışkan, Burcu; Schubert, Ulrich S; Carotti, Andrea; Macchiarulo, Antonio; Werz, Oliver

    2016-05-01

    In this article, we report novel leukotriene (LT) biosynthesis inhibitors that may target 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein (FLAP) based on the previously identified isoxazole derivative (8). The design and synthesis was directed towards a subset of 4,5-diaryl-isoxazole-3-carboxylic acid derivatives as LT biosynthesis inhibitors. Biological evaluation disclosed a new skeleton of potential anti-inflammatory agents, exemplified by 39 and 40, which potently inhibit cellular 5-LO product synthesis (IC50 = 0.24 μM, each) seemingly by targeting FLAP with weak inhibition on 5-LO (IC50 ≥ 8 μM). Docking studies and molecular dynamic simulations with 5-LO and FLAP provide valuable insights into potential binding modes of the inhibitors. Together, these diaryl-isoxazol-3-carboxylic acids may possess potential as leads for development of effective anti-inflammatory drugs through inhibition of LT biosynthesis. PMID:26922224

  2. Effects of torsion frequencies on rotor performance and structural loads with trailing edge flap

    The effects of variation of blade torsion frequency on rotor performance and structural loads are investigated for a 1/rev active flap rotor and baseline rotor (no active control). The UH-60A four-bladed articulated main rotor is studied at a high-speed forward flight condition. The torsion frequencies are varied by modifying the spanwise torsional stiffness of the blade and/or the pitch link stiffness. First, a parametric/optimization study on the flap deployment schedule is carried out using lifting-line comprehensive analysis for the soft, baseline, and stiff rotor configurations, and then a higher fidelity coupled computational fluid dynamics–computational structural dynamics analysis is carried out for the optimal flap deployment. It is shown that with the soft rotor there is degradation in performance—of about 6% with respect to the baseline rotor in the case where the flaps are not activated, and of about 1% if flap deflections are applied. On the other hand, for the stiff rotor there is a slight improvement in performance of about 2.3% when the flaps are not activated, and no appreciable change in the case where active flap deflections are applied. It appears that the peak performance achievable with using active flaps on a baseline stiffness rotor cannot be further improved significantly by varying the torsional frequencies. Variation of torsion frequency does not appear to have a significant influence on blade torsion moments and pitch link loads, although the 1/rev flap activation examined has an important role. (paper)

  3. Development of a Wind Turbine Test Rig and Rotor for Trailing Edge Flap Investigation: Static Flap Angles Case

    One of the strategies used to improve performance and increase the life-span of wind turbines is active flow control. It involves the modification of the aerodynamic characteristics of a wind turbine blade by means of moveable aerodynamic control surfaces. Trailing edge flaps are relatively small moveable control surfaces placed at the trailing edge of a blade's airfoil that modify the lift of a blade or airfoil section. An instrumented wind turbine test rig and rotor were specifically developed to enable a wide-range of experiments to investigate the potential of trailing edge flaps as an active control technique. A modular blade based on the S833 airfoil was designed to allow accurate instrumentation and customizable settings. The blade is 1.7 meters long, had a constant 178mm chord and a 6° pitch. The modular aerodynamic parts were 3D printed using plastic PC-ABS material. The blade design point was within the range of wind velocities in the available large test facility. The wind facility is a large open jet wind tunnel with a maximum velocity of 11m/s in the test area. The capability of the developed system was demonstrated through an initial study of the effect of stationary trailing edge flaps on blade load and performance. The investigation focused on measuring the changes in flapwise bending moment and power production for different trailing edge flap spanwise locations and deflection angles. The relationship between the load reduction and deflection angle was linear as expected from theory and the highest reduction was caused by the flap furthest from the rotor center. Overall, the experimental setup proved to be effective in measuring small changes in flapwise bending moment within the wind turbine blade and will provide insight when (active) flap control is targeted

  4. Coronally Advanced Flap with Different Designs in the Treatment of Gingival Recession: A Comparative Controlled Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Zucchelli, Giovanni; Stefanini, M; Ganz, S; Mazzotti, Claudio; Mounssif, Ilham; Marzadori, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this parallel double-blind randomized controlled clinical trial was to describe a modified approach using the coronally advanced flap (CAF) with triangular design and to compare its efficacy, in terms of root coverage and esthetics, with a trapezoidal type of CAF. A sample of 50 isolated Miller Class I and II gingival recessions with at least 1 mm of keratinized tissue apical to the defects were treated with CAF. Of these recessions, 25 were randomly treated with trapezoidal CAF (control group) while the other 25 (test group) were treated with a modified triangular CAF. The clinical and esthetic evaluations, made by the patient and an independent periodontist, were performed 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year after the surgery. No statistically significant difference was demonstrated between the two CAF groups in terms of recession reduction, complete root coverage, or 6-month and 1-year patient esthetic scores. Better 3-month patient esthetic evaluations and better periodontist root coverage, color match, and contiguity assessments were reported after triangular CAF. Trapezoidal CAF was associated with greater incidence of keloid formation. Single-type gingival recessions can be successfully covered with both types of CAF. The triangular CAF should be preferred for esthetically demanding patients. PMID:27100801

  5. Early wound healing of laser in situ keratomileusis–like flaps after treatment with human corneal stromal stem cells

    Morgan, Siân R.; Dooley, Erin P.; Kamma-Lorger, Christina; Funderburgh, James L.; Funderburgh, Martha L.; Meek, Keith M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To use a well-established organ culture model to investigate the effects of corneal stromal stem cells on the optical and biomechanical properties of corneal wounds after laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK)–like flap creation. Setting School of Optometry and Vision Sciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff, Wales, United Kingdom. Design Experimental study. Methods The LASIK-like flaps were produced in sheep corneas. The flap beds were treated with corneal stromal stem cells and were then replaced and allowed to heal for different periods of up to 3 weeks in organ culture. The optical transmission of the cornea, the force required to detach the flap, and the presence of myofibroblasts near the flap bed were measured. Results Corneal stromal stem cell–treated flap beds were statistically significantly more transparent after 3 weeks in culture than the untreated controls. At 3 weeks, the mean force necessary to detach the flap was more than twice the force required for the respective control samples. Concurrently, there were 44% activated cells immediately below the flap margin of the controls compared with 29% in the same region of the corneal stromal stem cell–treated flaps. Conclusions In this system, the presence of corneal stromal stem cells at the wound margin significantly increased the adherence of LASIK-like flaps while maintaining corneal transparency. It is postulated that this is achieved by the deposition of extracellular connective tissue similar to that found in the normal cornea and by the paucity of activated keratocytes (myofibroblasts), which are known to scatter a significant amount of the incident light. Financial Disclosure No author has a financial or proprietary interest in any material or method mentioned. PMID:27026456

  6. Effects of Bezafibrate on the Survival of Random Skin Flaps in Rats.

    Lin, Bin; Lin, Yuting; Lin, Dingsheng; Cao, Bin

    2016-06-01

    Background Bezafibrate is widely used in clinics for its comparable angiogenic effect. Our research is to investigate the effect of bezafibrate on random skin flap survival. Materials and Methods The "McFarlane flap" rat models were established in 30 male Sprague-Dawley rats which were divided into two groups. The treatment group was given bezafibrate (400 mg/kg/day; gavage administration), and the control group received the vehicle. The flap surviving area was measured after 7 days, and the tissue samples were taken for histological analysis and edema measurement. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was determined using immunohistochemical methods. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and malondialdehyde (MDA) content were examined with kits. Results Seven days after the operation, the surviving area in the treatment group was larger than in the control group (p Bezafibrate improves the survival of random skin flaps effectively. PMID:26872027

  7. Forward flight of swallowtail butterfly with simple flapping motion

    Tanaka, Hiroto [School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, 60 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Shimoyama, Isao, E-mail: isao@i.u-tokyo.ac.j [Department of Mechano-Informatics, Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8656 (Japan)

    2010-06-15

    Unlike other flying insects, the wing motion of swallowtail butterflies is basically limited to flapping because their fore wings partly overlap their hind wings, structurally restricting the feathering needed for active control of aerodynamic force. Hence, it can be hypothesized that the flight of swallowtail butterflies is realized with simple flapping, requiring little feedback control of the feathering angle. To verify this hypothesis, we fabricated an artificial butterfly mimicking the wing motion and wing shape of a swallowtail butterfly and analyzed its flights using images taken with a high-speed video camera. The results demonstrated that stable forward flight could be realized without active feathering or feedback control of the wing motion. During the flights, the artificial butterfly's body moved up and down passively in synchronization with the flapping, and the artificial butterfly followed an undulating flight trajectory like an actual swallowtail butterfly. Without feedback control of the wing motion, the body movement is directly affected by change of aerodynamic force due to the wing deformation; the degree of deformation was determined by the wing venation. Unlike a veinless wing, a mimic wing with veins generated a much higher lift coefficient during the flapping flight than in a steady flow due to the large body motion.

  8. Forward flight of swallowtail butterfly with simple flapping motion

    Unlike other flying insects, the wing motion of swallowtail butterflies is basically limited to flapping because their fore wings partly overlap their hind wings, structurally restricting the feathering needed for active control of aerodynamic force. Hence, it can be hypothesized that the flight of swallowtail butterflies is realized with simple flapping, requiring little feedback control of the feathering angle. To verify this hypothesis, we fabricated an artificial butterfly mimicking the wing motion and wing shape of a swallowtail butterfly and analyzed its flights using images taken with a high-speed video camera. The results demonstrated that stable forward flight could be realized without active feathering or feedback control of the wing motion. During the flights, the artificial butterfly's body moved up and down passively in synchronization with the flapping, and the artificial butterfly followed an undulating flight trajectory like an actual swallowtail butterfly. Without feedback control of the wing motion, the body movement is directly affected by change of aerodynamic force due to the wing deformation; the degree of deformation was determined by the wing venation. Unlike a veinless wing, a mimic wing with veins generated a much higher lift coefficient during the flapping flight than in a steady flow due to the large body motion.

  9. Wind Tunnel Testing of Active Control System for Bridges

    Hansen, Henriette I.; Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    This paper describes preparation of wind tunnel testing of the principle of using flaps to control the motion of suspension bridges. The experiment will take place at the Instituto Superior Technico Lisbon, Portugal. The bridge section model is constructed of foam with an aluminium frame. The flaps...

  10. Application of smart materials to helicopter rotor active control

    Straub, Friedrich K.; Ealey, Mark A.; Schetky, Lawrence M.

    1997-05-01

    Helicopter design is limited by the compromise inherent in meeting hover and forward flight requirements, and the unsteady environment encountered in forward flight. Active control of helicopter rotors using smart material, in-blade actuation can overcome these barriers and provide substantial reductions in noise and vibrations and improved performance. The present study covers the blade/actuator integration and actuator development for a full scale system to demonstrate active control of noise and vibrations as well as inflight blade tracking on the MD Explorer helicopter. A piezoelectric multilayer stack actuator, driving a trailing edge flap, is used for active control. A shape memory alloy torsion actuator, driving a trailing edge trim tab, is used for inflight tracking. Overall, this DARPA sponsored program entails the design, development, and fabrication of the full scale active control rotor system. If successful, an entry in the NASA Ames 40 X 80 foot wind tunnel and flight tests are planned for a follow on program.

  11. Pedicled perforator flaps

    Demirtas, Yener; Ozturk, Nuray; Kelahmetoglu, Osman; Demir, Ahmet

    2009-01-01

    Described in this study is a surgical concept that supports the "consider and use a pedicled perforator flap whenever possible and indicated" approach to reconstruct a particular skin defect. The operation is entirely free-style; the only principle is to obtain a pedicled perforator flap to...... reconstruct the defect. The perforators are marked with a hand-held Doppler probe and multiple flaps are designed. The appropriate flap is elevated after identifying the perforator(s). Dissection of the perforator(s) or complete incision of the flap margins are not mandatory if the flap is mobilized...... adequately to cover the defect. Defects measuring 3 x 3 cm up to 20 x 20 cm at diverse locations were successfully reconstructed in 20 of 21 patients with 26 flaps. Pedicled perforator flaps offer us reliable and satisfactory results of reconstruction at different anatomic territories of the body. It sounds...

  12. Adaptive control of a millimeter-scale flapping-wing robot.

    Chirarattananon, Pakpong; Ma, Kevin Y; Wood, Robert J

    2014-06-01

    Challenges for the controlled flight of a robotic insect are due to the inherent instability of the system, complex fluid-structure interactions, and the general lack of a complete system model. In this paper, we propose theoretical models of the system based on the limited information available from previous work and a comprehensive flight controller. The modular flight controller is derived from Lyapunov function candidates with proven stability over a large region of attraction. Moreover, it comprises adaptive components that are capable of coping with uncertainties in the system that arise from manufacturing imperfections. We have demonstrated that the proposed methods enable the robot to achieve sustained hovering flights with relatively small errors compared to a non-adaptive approach. Simple lateral maneuvers and vertical takeoff and landing flights are also shown to illustrate the fidelity of the flight controller. The analysis suggests that the adaptive scheme is crucial in order to achieve millimeter-scale precision in flight control as observed in natural insect flight. PMID:24855052

  13. Micro Aerial Vehicle (MAV Flapping Motion Control Using an Immune Network with Different Immune Factors

    Liguo Weng

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a novel Neural‐Immunology/Memory Network to address the problem of motion control for flapping‐wing Micro Aerial Vehicles (MAVs. This network is inspired by the human memory system as well as the immune system, and it is effective in attenuating the system errors and other lumped system uncertainties. In contrast to most existing Neural Networks, the convergence of this proposed Neural‐Immunology/Memory Network can be theoretically proven. Both analyses and simulations that are based on different immune factors show that the proposed control method is effective in dealing with external disturbances, system nonlinearities, uncertainties and parameter variations.

  14. A Controllability Approach for Resonant Compliant Systems: Applied to a Flapping Wing Micro Air Vehicle

    Peters, H.J.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis studies a controllability approach for general resonant compliant systems. These systems exploit resonance to obtain a specific dynamic response at relatively low actuation power. This type of systems is often lightweight, is scalable and minimizes frictional losses through the use of co

  15. The Effect of Epigallocatechin Gallate on Flap Viability of Rat Perforator Abdominal Flaps.

    Aksakal, İbrahim Alper; Küçüker, İsmail; Önger, Mehmet Emin; Engin, Murat Sinan; Keleş, Musa Kemal; Demir, Ahmet

    2016-05-01

    Background Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) is a substance abundant in green tea. In this study, the effects of EGCG on perforator flap viability were investigated. Methods A total of 40 rats were assigned to four groups of 10 each. In each subject, a 4 × 6 cm abdominal skin flap was raised and adapted back onto its place. In the control group, no further procedures were taken. In the flap group, 40 mg/kg/d EGCG was injected into the flap. In the gavage group, 100 mg/kg/d EGCG was given through a feeding tube. In the intraperitoneal group, 50 mg/kg/d EGCG was injected intraperitoneally. On the 7th postoperative day, flaps were photographed and the viable areas were measured and compared via a one-way analysis of variance. Results The ratios of viable and contracted flap area were 9.15/12.01, 4.59/16.46, 11.56/11.20, and 11.65/10.77 cm(2) for the control, flap group, gavage group, and intraperitoneal group, respectively. While the flap group yielded the worst results in the sense of flap contraction and viability (p < 0.001), the gavage and intraperitoneal groups were significantly better than those of the control group (p = 0.03). Histologically, epidermal, papillary dermal, and capillary tissue volumes were evaluated. In comparison to the control group, the flap group yielded significantly increased epidermal and dermal volumes (p = 0.03), however, these values were significantly decreased (p = 0.04) in the gavage and intraperitoneal groups. Capillary volumes were significantly decreased in EGCG treatment groups (p < 0.01). Conclusion Our experiment has shown that oral and intraperitoneal administration of EGCG increases the perforator flap viability when compared with controls, while direct injection decreases the viability. PMID:26919381

  16. Vortexlet models of flapping flexible wings show tuning for force production and control

    Mountcastle, A M [Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University, Concord Field Station, Bedford, MA 01730 (United States); Daniel, T L, E-mail: mtcastle@u.washington.ed [Department of Biology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

    2010-12-15

    Insect wings are compliant structures that experience deformations during flight. Such deformations have recently been shown to substantially affect induced flows, with appreciable consequences to flight forces. However, there are open questions related to the aerodynamic mechanisms underlying the performance benefits of wing deformation, as well as the extent to which such deformations are determined by the boundary conditions governing wing actuation together with mechanical properties of the wing itself. Here we explore aerodynamic performance parameters of compliant wings under periodic oscillations, subject to changes in phase between wing elevation and pitch, and magnitude and spatial pattern of wing flexural stiffness. We use a combination of computational structural mechanics models and a 2D computational fluid dynamics approach to ask how aerodynamic force production and control potential are affected by pitch/elevation phase and variations in wing flexural stiffness. Our results show that lift and thrust forces are highly sensitive to flexural stiffness distributions, with performance optima that lie in different phase regions. These results suggest a control strategy for both flying animals and engineering applications of micro-air vehicles.

  17. Vortexlet models of flapping flexible wings show tuning for force production and control

    Insect wings are compliant structures that experience deformations during flight. Such deformations have recently been shown to substantially affect induced flows, with appreciable consequences to flight forces. However, there are open questions related to the aerodynamic mechanisms underlying the performance benefits of wing deformation, as well as the extent to which such deformations are determined by the boundary conditions governing wing actuation together with mechanical properties of the wing itself. Here we explore aerodynamic performance parameters of compliant wings under periodic oscillations, subject to changes in phase between wing elevation and pitch, and magnitude and spatial pattern of wing flexural stiffness. We use a combination of computational structural mechanics models and a 2D computational fluid dynamics approach to ask how aerodynamic force production and control potential are affected by pitch/elevation phase and variations in wing flexural stiffness. Our results show that lift and thrust forces are highly sensitive to flexural stiffness distributions, with performance optima that lie in different phase regions. These results suggest a control strategy for both flying animals and engineering applications of micro-air vehicles.

  18. Mechanics of Flapping Flight: Analytical Formulations of Unsteady Aerodynamics, Kinematic Optimization, Flight Dynamics, and Control

    Taneja, Jayant Kumar

    Electricity is an indispensable commodity to modern society, yet it is delivered via a grid architecture that remains largely unchanged over the past century. A host of factors are conspiring to topple this dated yet venerated design: developments in renewable electricity generation technology, policies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and advances in information technology for managing energy systems. Modern electric grids are emerging as complex distributed systems in which a portfolio of power generation resources, often incorporating fluctuating renewable resources such as wind and solar, must be managed dynamically to meet uncontrolled, time-varying demand. Uncertainty in both supply and demand makes control of modern electric grids fundamentally more challenging, and growing portfolios of renewables exacerbate the challenge. We study three electricity grids: the state of California, the province of Ontario, and the country of Germany. To understand the effects of increasing renewables, we develop a methodology to scale renewables penetration. Analyzing these grids yields key insights about rigid limits to renewables penetration and their implications in meeting long-term emissions targets. We argue that to achieve deep penetration of renewables, the operational model of the grid must be inverted, changing the paradigm from load-following supplies to supply-following loads. To alleviate the challenge of supply-demand matching on deeply renewable grids, we first examine well-known techniques, including altering management of existing supply resources, employing utility-scale energy storage, targeting energy efficiency improvements, and exercising basic demand-side management. Then, we create several instantiations of supply-following loads -- including refrigerators, heating and cooling systems, and laptop computers -- by employing a combination of sensor networks, advanced control techniques, and enhanced energy storage. We examine the capacity of each load

  19. Efficient flapping flight of pterosaurs

    Strang, Karl Axel

    In the late eighteenth century, humans discovered the first pterosaur fossil remains and have been fascinated by their existence ever since. Pterosaurs exploited their membrane wings in a sophisticated manner for flight control and propulsion, and were likely the most efficient and effective flyers ever to inhabit our planet. The flapping gait is a complex combination of motions that sustains and propels an animal in the air. Because pterosaurs were so large with wingspans up to eleven meters, if they could have sustained flapping flight, they would have had to achieve high propulsive efficiencies. Identifying the wing motions that contribute the most to propulsive efficiency is key to understanding pterosaur flight, and therefore to shedding light on flapping flight in general and the design of efficient ornithopters. This study is based on published results for a very well-preserved specimen of Coloborhynchus robustus, for which the joints are well-known and thoroughly described in the literature. Simplifying assumptions are made to estimate the characteristics that can not be inferred directly from the fossil remains. For a given animal, maximizing efficiency is equivalent to minimizing power at a given thrust and speed. We therefore aim at finding the flapping gait, that is the joint motions, that minimize the required flapping power. The power is computed from the aerodynamic forces created during a given wing motion. We develop an unsteady three-dimensional code based on the vortex-lattice method, which correlates well with published results for unsteady motions of rectangular wings. In the aerodynamic model, the rigid pterosaur wing is defined by the position of the bones. In the aeroelastic model, we add the flexibility of the bones and of the wing membrane. The nonlinear structural behavior of the membrane is reduced to a linear modal decomposition, assuming small deflections about the reference wing geometry. The reference wing geometry is computed for

  20. Experimental and computational studies of active flow control on a model truck-trailer

    Jahanmiri Mohsen

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Active flow control is probably the most challenging research area in vehicle aerodynamics. Being able to manipulate a flow field in order to achieve desired results beneficial to engineering is the only way to meet today’s demands for competitive and efficient solutions in the automotive industry. The current work studies the flow control on a semi detailed model truck by using detached-eddy simulations and wind tunnel experiments aiming at reducing the aerodynamic drag. This study combines both passive and active flow control applied on the rear end of the trailer. An indigenous fluidic actuator (loudspeaker in cavity with slots is used as a synthetic jet in the experiment. Both experiments and computations demonstrate that the active flow control works successfully and results in flow reattachment to the flaps. The numerical simulations show that the drag coefficient, CD decreased by 3.9% when AFC was activated compared to the baseline case without flaps. The corresponding decrease when AFC was deactivated (with flaps was only 0.7%. The experimental results show a decrease of CD by 3.1% for the case with activated AFC compared to the baseline case. When AFC was deactivated the corresponding decrease in CD was 1.8%. A detailed flow analysis made in computations and experiments is used to explain these results.

  1. Active Flow Control at Low Reynolds Numbers on a NACA 0015 Airfoil

    Melton, LaTunia Pack; Hannon, Judith; Yao, Chung-Sheng; Harris, Jerome

    2008-01-01

    Results from a low Reynolds number wind tunnel experiment on a NACA 0015 airfoil with a 30% chord trailing edge flap tested at deflection angles of 0, 20, and 40 are presented and discussed. Zero net mass flux periodic excitation was applied at the ap shoulder to control flow separation for flap deflections larger than 0. The primary objective of the experiment was to compare force and moment data obtained from integrating surface pressures to data obtained from a 5-component strain-gage balance in preparation for additional three-dimensional testing of the model. To achieve this objective, active flow control is applied at an angle of attack of 6 where published results indicate that oscillatory momentum coefficients exceeding 1% are required to delay separation. Periodic excitation with an oscillatory momentum coefficient of 1.5% and a reduced frequency of 0.71 caused a significant delay of separation on the airfoil with a flap deflection of 20. Higher momentum coefficients at the same reduced frequency were required to achieve a similar level of flow attachment on the airfoil with a flap deflection of 40. There was a favorable comparison between the balance and integrated pressure force and moment results.

  2. The platysma myocutaneous flap.

    Baur, Dale A; Williams, Jonathan; Alakaily, Xena

    2014-08-01

    Reconstructing defects of the oral mucosa or skin of the lower one-third of the face can be accomplished by a variety of techniques. This article presents two versions of the platysma myocutaneous flap, which is a reliable, axial pattern, pedicled flap capable of providing excellent one-stage reconstruction of such defects. As discussed herein, the superiorly based and posteriorly based versions of the flap have wide application in the oral and facial region. Also provided is a review of other uses of this flap in head and neck surgery. PMID:24958382

  3. Propeller TAP flap

    Thomsen, Jørn Bo; Bille, Camilla; Wamberg, Peter;

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine if a propeller thoracodorsal artery perforator (TAP) flap can be used for breast reconstruction. Fifteen women were reconstructed using a propeller TAP flap, an implant, and an ADM. Preoperative colour Doppler ultrasonography was used for patient selection to...... major complications needing additional surgery. One flap was lost due to a vascular problem. Breast reconstruction can be performed by a propeller TAP flap without cutting the descending branch of the thoracodorsal vessels. However, the authors would recommend that a small cuff of muscle is left around...

  4. Effects of primary rotor parameters on flapping dynamics

    Chen, R. T. N.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of flapping dynamics of four main rotor design features that influence the agility, stability, and operational safety of helicopters are studied. The parameters include flapping hinge offset, flapping hinge restraint, pitch-flap coupling, and blade lock number. First, the flapping equations of motion are derived that explicitly contain the design parameters. The dynamic equations are then developed for the tip-path plane, and the influence of individual and combined variations in the design parameters determined. The steady state flapping response is examined with respect to control input and aircraft angular rate which leads to a feedforward control law for control decoupling through cross feed, and a feedback control law to decouple the steady state flapping response. The condition for achieving perfect decoupling of the flapping response due to aircraft pitch and roll rates without using feedback control is also found for the hover case. It is indicated that the frequency of the regressing flapping mode of the rotor system can become low enough to require consideration in the assessment of handling characteristics.

  5. Preliminary Design and Evaluation of an Airfoil with Continuous Trailing-Edge Flap

    Shen, Jinwei; Thornburgh, Robert P.; Kreshock, Andrew R.; Wilbur, Matthew L.; Liu, Yi

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the preliminary design and evaluation of an airfoil with active continuous trailing-edge flap (CTEF) as a potential rotorcraft active control device. The development of structural cross-section models of a continuous trailing-edge flap airfoil is described. The CTEF deformations with MFC actuation are predicted by NASTRAN and UM/VABS analyses. Good agreement is shown between the predictions from the two analyses. Approximately two degrees of CTEF deflection, defined as the rotation angle of the trailing edge, is achieved with the baseline MFC-PZT bender. The 2D aerodynamic characteristics of the continuous trailing-edge flap are evaluated using a CFD analysis. The aerodynamic efficiency of a continuous trailing-edge flap is compared to that of a conventional discrete trailing-edge flap (DTEF). It is found that the aerodynamic characteristics of a CTEF are equivalent to those of a conventional DTEF with the same deflection angle but with a smaller flap chord. A fluid structure interaction procedure is implemented to predict the deflection of the continuous trailingedge flap under aerodynamic pressure. The reductions in CTEF deflection are overall small when aerodynamic pressure is applied: 2.7% reduction is shown with a CTEF deflection angle of two degrees and at angle of attack of six degrees. In addition, newly developed MFC-PMN actuator is found to be a good supplement to MFC-PZT when applied as the bender outside layers. A mixed MFC-PZT and MFC-PMN bender generates 3% more CTEF deformation than an MFC-PZT only bender and 5% more than an MFC-PMN only bender under aerodynamic loads.

  6. The rhombic bilobed flap, a simple, geometrically designed flap

    Yoshiaki Sakamoto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a combination of the common rhomboid flap and bilobed flap and provide an example of its use. The rhombic bilobed flap is simple to use and is associated with fewer complications, such as pin-cushioning and standing cone deformities, while minimizing the risk of skin necrosis and tension on the flap.

  7. Ontogeny of aerial righting and wing flapping in juvenile birds

    Evangelista, Dennis; Huynh, Tony; Krivitskiy, Igor; Dudley, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Mechanisms of aerial righting in juvenile Chukar Partridge (Alectoris chukar) were studied from hatching through 14 days post hatching (dph). Asymmetric movements of the wings were used from 1 to 8 dph to effect progressively more successful righting behaviour via body roll. Following 8 dph, wing motions transitioned to bilaterally symmetric flapping that yielded aerial righting via nose down pitch, along with substantial increases in vertical force production during descent. Ontogenetically, the use of such wing motions to effect aerial righting precedes both symmetric flapping and a previously documented behaviour in chukar (i.e., wing assisted incline running) hypothesized to be relevant to incipient flight evolution in birds. These findings highlight the importance of asymmetric wing activation and controlled aerial manoeuvres during bird development, and are potentially relevant to understanding the origins of avian flight.

  8. Ontogeny of aerial righting and wing flapping in juvenile birds.

    Evangelista, Dennis; Cam, Sharlene; Huynh, Tony; Krivitskiy, Igor; Dudley, Robert

    2014-08-01

    Mechanisms of aerial righting in juvenile chukar partridge (Alectoris chukar) were studied from hatching to 14 days-post-hatching (dph). Asymmetric movements of the wings were used from 1 to 8 dph to effect progressively more successful righting behaviour via body roll. Following 8 dph, wing motions transitioned to bilaterally symmetric flapping that yielded aerial righting via nose-down pitch, along with substantial increases in vertical force production during descent. Ontogenetically, the use of such wing motions to effect aerial righting precedes both symmetric flapping and a previously documented behaviour in chukar (i.e. wing-assisted incline running) hypothesized to be relevant to incipient flight evolution in birds. These findings highlight the importance of asymmetric wing activation and controlled aerial manoeuvres during bird development and are potentially relevant to understanding the origins of avian flight. PMID:25165451

  9. Reduction of helicopter blade-vortex interaction noise by active rotor control technology

    Yu, Yung H.; Gmelin, Bernd; Splettstoesser, Wolf; Philippe, Jean J.; Prieur, Jean; Brooks, Thomas F.

    Helicopter blade-vortex interaction noise is one of the most severe noise sources and is very important both in community annoyance and military detection. Research over the decades has substantially improved basic physical understanding of the mechanisms generating rotor blade-vortex interaction noise and also of controlling techniques, particularly using active rotor control technology. This paper reviews active rotor control techniques currently available for rotor blade-vortex interaction noise reduction, including higher harmonic pitch control, individual blade control, and on-blade control technologies. Basic physical mechanisms of each active control technique are reviewed in terms of noise reduction mechanism and controlling aerodynamic or structural parameters of a blade. Active rotor control techniques using smart structures/materials are discussed, including distributed smart actuators to induce local torsional or flapping deformations.

  10. Reduction of Helicopter Blade-Vortex Interaction Noise by Active Rotor Control Technology

    Yu, Yung H.; Gmelin, Bernd; Splettstoesser, Wolf; Brooks, Thomas F.; Philippe, Jean J.; Prieur, Jean

    1997-01-01

    Helicopter blade-vortex interaction noise is one of the most severe noise sources and is very important both in community annoyance and military detection. Research over the decades has substantially improved basic physical understanding of the mechanisms generating rotor blade-vortex interaction noise and also of controlling techniques, particularly using active rotor control technology. This paper reviews active rotor control techniques currently available for rotor blade vortex interaction noise reduction, including higher harmonic pitch control, individual blade control, and on-blade control technologies. Basic physical mechanisms of each active control technique are reviewed in terms of noise reduction mechanism and controlling aerodynamic or structural parameters of a blade. Active rotor control techniques using smart structures/materials are discussed, including distributed smart actuators to induce local torsional or flapping deformations, Published by Elsevier Science Ltd.

  11. Design of a high-lift experiment in water including active flow control

    Beutel, T.; Sattler, S.; El Sayed, Y.; Schwerter, M.; Zander, M.; Büttgenbach, S.; Leester-Schädel, M.; Radespiel, R.; Sinapius, M.; Wierach, P.

    2014-07-01

    This paper describes the structural design of an active flow-control experiment. The aim of the experiment is to investigate the increase in efficiency of an internally blown Coanda flap using unsteady blowing. The system uses tailor-made microelectromechanical (MEMS) pressure sensors to determine the state of the oncoming flow and an actuated lip to regulate the mass flow and velocity of a stream near a wall over the internally blown flap. Sensors and actuators are integrated into a highly loaded system that is extremely compact. The sensors are connected to a bus system that feeds the data into a real-time control system. The piezoelectric actuators using the d 33 effect at a comparable low voltage of 120 V are integrated into a lip that controls the blowout slot height. The system is designed for closed-loop control that efficiently avoids flow separation on the Coanda flap. The setup is designed for water-tunnel experiments in order to reduce the free-stream velocity and the system’s control frequency by a factor of 10 compared with that in air. This paper outlines the function and verification of the system’s main components and their development.

  12. Design of a high-lift experiment in water including active flow control

    This paper describes the structural design of an active flow-control experiment. The aim of the experiment is to investigate the increase in efficiency of an internally blown Coanda flap using unsteady blowing. The system uses tailor-made microelectromechanical (MEMS) pressure sensors to determine the state of the oncoming flow and an actuated lip to regulate the mass flow and velocity of a stream near a wall over the internally blown flap. Sensors and actuators are integrated into a highly loaded system that is extremely compact. The sensors are connected to a bus system that feeds the data into a real-time control system. The piezoelectric actuators using the d 33 effect at a comparable low voltage of 120 V are integrated into a lip that controls the blowout slot height. The system is designed for closed-loop control that efficiently avoids flow separation on the Coanda flap. The setup is designed for water-tunnel experiments in order to reduce the free-stream velocity and the system’s control frequency by a factor of 10 compared with that in air. This paper outlines the function and verification of the system’s main components and their development. (technical note)

  13. Leaf spring flapping hinge for wind turbines with device for control of blade angle. Blattfeder-Schlaggelenk fuer Windturbinen mit Vorrichtung zur Blattwinkelsteuerung

    Gasch, R.; Person, M.

    1985-05-30

    The device described combines the properties of a flapping hinge, a link for adjusting the blade angle and an elastic return spring. According to the invention, these properties are achieved by two links fixing the axis of flapping and, by winding up the leaf spring, producing adjustment of the blade angle.

  14. Flapping of Insectile Wings

    Huang, Yangyang; Kanso, Eva

    2015-11-01

    Insects use flight muscles attached at the base of the wings to produce impressive wing flapping frequencies. Yet the effects of muscle stiffness on the performance of insect wings remain unclear. Here, we construct an insectile wing model, consisting of two rigid wings connected at their base by an elastic torsional spring and submerged in an oscillatory flow. The wing system is free to rotate and flap. We first explore the extent to which the flyer can withstand roll perturbations, then study its flapping behavior and performance as a function of spring stiffness. We find an optimal range of spring stiffness that results in large flapping amplitudes, high force generation and good storage of elastic energy. We conclude by conjecturing that insects may select and adjust the muscle spring stiffness to achieve desired movement. These findings may have significant implications on the design principles of wings in micro air-vehicles.

  15. Efficiency in Controlling Activities

    Van Nguyen, Tuyen

    2015-01-01

    Controlling is essential for financial success of corporations. An efficient controlling system should be implemented in order to manage financial performance from income, expense to profitability. The purpose of the thesis is to provide insight knowledge towards corporate accounting management as well as to propose potential improvement for the existing controlling system of the case company, which is Bosch Rexroth Japan. The theoretical framework creates the knowledge foundation for re...

  16. Effects of hyperbaric oxygen and irradiation on experimental skin flaps in rats

    This study investigated the effects of hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) and irradiation (RT) on experimental skin flaps in rats under varying conditions. Animals were assigned at random to 1 of 15 groups that represented all possible ordering effects of HBO, RT, and flap, as well as controls that included flap-only, RT-only, and HBO-only groups. Cranially based skin flaps measuring 3 x 9 cm were elevated on the dorsum. The surviving length was evaluated with fluorescein dye 7 days after the operation. Depending on the treatment condition, HBO was given either 48 hours or 24 hours before flap elevation, or within 4 hours or 48 hours after flap elevation. Rats receiving RT (60Co) were given a single dose of 1000 rads to the dorsum. Results showed that all groups receiving HBO within 4 hours after flap elevation had significantly greater flap survival length, with as much as a 22% greater length of surviving flap. HBO given 48 hours before flap elevation also significantly improved flap survival over controls. RT appeared to have no immediate significant effect on flap survival. However, rats receiving RT, regardless of other factors, gained significantly less weight than did controls. Findings clearly indicate that, to be effective, HBO needs to be given as soon after surgery as possible

  17. Perforator Flaps for Perineal Reconstructions

    Niranjan, Niri S.

    2006-01-01

    Whenever there is soft tissue loss from the perineum there are many options for reconstruction. These include allowing the wound to heal by secondary intention and the use of local random or axial pattern flaps, regional flaps, or free flaps. The axial skin flap can be defined as a flap based on known constant vessels of the subcutaneous tissue and its vena comitantes. The perforator flap on the other hand is a randomly selected perforator consisting of an artery with vena comitantes, which p...

  18. Folding in and out: passive morphing in flapping wings.

    Stowers, Amanda K; Lentink, David

    2015-04-01

    We present a new mechanism for passive wing morphing of flapping wings inspired by bat and bird wing morphology. The mechanism consists of an unactuated hand wing connected to the arm wing with a wrist joint. Flapping motion generates centrifugal accelerations in the hand wing, forcing it to unfold passively. Using a robotic model in hover, we made kinematic measurements of unfolding kinematics as functions of the non-dimensional wingspan fold ratio (2-2.5) and flapping frequency (5-17 Hz) using stereo high-speed cameras. We find that the wings unfold passively within one to two flaps and remain unfolded with only small amplitude oscillations. To better understand the passive dynamics, we constructed a computer model of the unfolding process based on rigid body dynamics, contact models, and aerodynamic correlations. This model predicts the measured passive unfolding within about one flap and shows that unfolding is driven by centrifugal acceleration induced by flapping. The simulations also predict that relative unfolding time only weakly depends on flapping frequency and can be reduced to less than half a wingbeat by increasing flapping amplitude. Subsequent dimensional analysis shows that the time required to unfold passively is of the same order of magnitude as the flapping period. This suggests that centrifugal acceleration can drive passive unfolding within approximately one wingbeat in small and large wings. Finally, we show experimentally that passive unfolding wings can withstand impact with a branch, by first folding and then unfolding passively. This mechanism enables flapping robots to squeeze through clutter without sophisticated control. Passive unfolding also provides a new avenue in morphing wing design that makes future flapping morphing wings possibly more energy efficient and light-weight. Simultaneously these results point to possible inertia driven, and therefore metabolically efficient, control strategies in bats and birds to morph or recover

  19. Coronally positioned flap with or without acellular dermal matrix graft in the treatment of class II gingival recession defects: A randomized controlled clinical study

    Sunitha Jagannathachary

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the randomized controlled single blind study is to evaluate the treatment of Miller′s class II gingival recessions by coronally positioned flap (CPF with or without acellular dermal matrix allograft (ADMA. Ten patients with 20 sites with maxillary bilateral Miller′s class II facial recession defects were selected randomly into two groups of test (ADMA+CPF and control (CPF alone group with each group having 10 recession defects to be treated. The clinical parameters included plaque index (PI, gingival index (GI, probing pocket depth (PPD, clinical attachment level (CAL, recession height (RH, recession width (RW, height of the keratinized tissue (HKT, and thickness of the keratinized tissue (TKT. These measurements were recorded at baseline and after 6 months post-surgery. Statistical analysis was made by the paired "t" test for intragroup and intergroup comparison was done by the unpaired "t" test. The percentage of root coverage for both the experimental and control groups were 82.2% and 50%, respectively. The changes from baseline to 6 months were significant in both the groups for PD, CAL, and RH; however, for parameters such as RW, HKT, and TKT significance was seen only in the experimental group. On comparison between two groups, only TKT showed statistically significance. It can be concluded that the amount of root coverage obtained with ADMA + CPF was superior compared to CPF alone.

  20. Active control of convection

    Bau, H.H. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Using stability theory, numerical simulations, and in some instances experiments, it is demonstrated that the critical Rayleigh number for the bifurcation (1) from the no-motion (conduction) state to the motion state and (2) from time-independent convection to time-dependent, oscillatory convection in the thermal convection loop and Rayleigh-Benard problems can be significantly increased or decreased. This is accomplished through the use of a feedback controller effectuating small perturbations in the boundary data. The controller consists of sensors which detect deviations in the fluid`s temperature from the motionless, conductive values and then direct actuators to respond to these deviations in such a way as to suppress the naturally occurring flow instabilities. Actuators which modify the boundary`s temperature/heat flux are considered. The feedback controller can also be used to control flow patterns and generate complex dynamic behavior at relatively low Rayleigh numbers.

  1. Active Combustion Control Valve Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Over the past decade, research into active combustion control has yielded impressive results in suppressing thermoacoustic instabilities and widening the...

  2. Active weld control

    Powell, Bradley W.; Burroughs, Ivan A.

    1994-01-01

    Through the two phases of this contract, sensors for welding applications and parameter extraction algorithms have been developed. These sensors form the foundation of a weld control system which can provide action weld control through the monitoring of the weld pool and keyhole in a VPPA welding process. Systems of this type offer the potential of quality enhancement and cost reduction (minimization of rework on faulty welds) for high-integrity welding applications. Sensors for preweld and postweld inspection, weld pool monitoring, keyhole/weld wire entry monitoring, and seam tracking were developed. Algorithms for signal extraction were also developed and analyzed to determine their application to an adaptive weld control system. The following sections discuss findings for each of the three sensors developed under this contract: (1) weld profiling sensor; (2) weld pool sensor; and (3) stereo seam tracker/keyhole imaging sensor. Hardened versions of these sensors were designed and built under this contract. A control system, described later, was developed on a multiprocessing/multitasking operating system for maximum power and flexibility. Documentation for sensor mechanical and electrical design is also included as appendices in this report.

  3. Elbow Reconstruction Using Island Flap for Burn Patients

    Gi Yeun Hur

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Deep burns of the elbow lead to soft tissue necrosis and infection, with exposureof deep structures. Adequate wound coverage of this area requires thin, pliable, and durabletissue, while optimal functional recovery requires early coverage and functional rehabilitation.We have found 3 types of island flaps that provide reliable coverage for the elbow.Methods A retrospective study was performed on all patients who underwent flap coverageof an elbow defect at our hospital. The patients’ data including age, sex, cause of injury, wounddimensions, timing of flap coverage, postoperative elbow motion, and complications wereinvestigated.Results Between 2001 and 2012, 16 patients were treated at our hospital. The mean agewas 53.3 years. Three kinds of flaps were performed: 9 latissimus dorsi flaps, 4 lateral armflaps, and 4 radial forearm flaps. The average defect size was 183.5 cm2 (range, 28 to 670cm2. Wound coverage was performed at mean duration of 45.9 days (range, 14 to 91 days.The mean postoperative active elbow flexion was 98° (range, 85° to 115°. Partial flap failureoccurred in 1 latissimus dorsi flap. Minor complications included partial flap loss (11.8%,hematoma (23.5%, seroma (35.3%, and wound infection (5.9%.Conclusions Flap selection for elbow reconstruction is determined by the defect size andthe extent of the adjacent tissue injury. Elbow reconstruction using an island flap is a singlestaged,reliable, and relatively simple procedure that permits initiation of early rehabilitation,thereby improving a patient’s functional outcome.

  4. First dorsal metacarpal artery islanded flap: A useful flap for reconstruction of thumb pulp defects

    Satish Chetan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Thumb pulp defects are commonly due to avulsion injuries. It is very important to reconstruct these defects using sensate flaps as the thumb pulp needs to be sensate for implementing the various functions of the thumb. A very good option for coverage of these defects is the islanded first dorsal metacarpal artery flap. Our study was done over a period of 2 years and involved 9 consecutive cases of thumb pulp defects treated at our institution. The patients included 8 males and 1 female, ranging in age from 16 to 51 years old. The flap size ranged from 2 x 1.5 cm to 5 x 3 cm. We had only one complication in the form of partial flap necrosis, which fortunately healed following debridement without the need for a secondary procedure. All our cases were done under local anesthesia with tourniquet control. All the patients had good fine touch and average two-point discrimination of 6 mm, which was satisfactory. Our good results further reinforce the islanded first dorsal metacarpal artery flap as one the best flaps for sensate reconstruction of thumb pulp defects. It replaces the soft tissue loss at the thumb pulp with minimal donor site morbidity and with good return of thumb pulp sensation.

  5. Automaticity or active control

    Tudoran, Ana Alina; Olsen, Svein Ottar

    This study addresses the quasi-moderating role of habit strength in explaining action loyalty. A model of loyalty behaviour is proposed that extends the traditional satisfaction–intention–action loyalty network. Habit strength is conceptualised as a cognitive construct to refer to the psychologic......, respectively, between intended loyalty and action loyalty. At high levels of habit strength, consumers are more likely to free up cognitive resources and incline the balance from controlled to routine and automatic-like responses....

  6. The Evolution of Perforator Flaps

    Khan, Farah N.; Spiegel, Aldona J.

    2006-01-01

    Perforator flaps have recently become ubiquitous in the field of plastic surgery. To understand and appreciate their unique nature, it is necessary to compare and contrast them with the development of other types of flaps. A complete yet abridged version of the history of flap surgery is presented in this article. Beginning with Sushruta's Indian cheek flap method for nasal reconstruction, a trip through time and space is taken to highlight the milestones leading to the evolution of the perfo...

  7. Spectral analysis of blood perfusion in the free latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap and in normal skin

    To find the properties in the oscillatory components of the cutaneous blood flow on the successful free flap, a wavelet transform was applied to the laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) signals which were measured simultaneously on the surfaces of the free latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap and on the adjacent intact skin of the healthy limb, of 18 patients. The frequency interval from 0.0095 to 1.6 Hz was examined and was divided into five subintervals (I: 0.0095-0.021 Hz; II: 0.021-0.052 Hz; III: 0.052-0.145 Hz; IV: 0.145-0.6 Hz and V: 0.6-1.6 Hz) corresponding to endothelial metabolic, neurogenic, myogenic, respiratory and cardiac origins. The average amplitude and total power in the frequency range 0.0095-1.6 Hz as well as within subintervals I, II, IV and V were significantly lower for signals measured on the free flap than those obtained in the healthy limb. However in interval III, they were significantly higher. The normalized spectral amplitude and power in the free flap were significantly lower in only two intervals, I and II, yet in interval III they were significantly higher; no statistical significance was observed in intervals IV and V. The distinctive finding made in this study, aside from the decrease of endothelial metabolic processes and sympathetic control, was the significant increase of myogenic activity in the free flap. It is hoped that this work will contribute towards knowledge on blood circulation in free flaps and make the monitoring by LDF more reliable

  8. Pectoralis myocutaneous flap for salvage of necrotic wounds

    The authors have utilized six pectoralis major myocutaneous flaps in attempts to salvage extensive necrotic wounds of the pharynx and neck. The flap was employed in the following situations: massive necrosis of the entire neck skin with both carotid artery systems exposed, radiation necrosis of the neck skin with exposure of carotid artery, dehiscence of gastric pull-up from pharynx with resultant carotid exposure, failed trapezius flap in a radionecrotic oral cavity, and two cases of pharyngocutaneous fistula with extensive soft tissue necrosis. These flaps achieved healing in all cases. One death occurred 3 weeks following complete cutaneous healing secondary to a ruptured carotid pseudoaneurysm. One flap underwent total skin loss but the entirety of the muscle survived and the fistula was successfully closed with the back of the muscle being subsequently skin grafted. One case of dehiscence of the flap from oral mucosa resulted in a minor exposure of mandible with limited osteoradionecrosis controlled by topical means. This flap has performed extremely well in these precarious and difficult situations that previously may not have been salvageable. It has also been effective in abbreviating the required hospitalization and wound care. The authors conclude that the pectoralis myocutaneous flap should be the primary choice for the management of extensive postsurgical wound necrosis

  9. Pectoralis myocutaneous flap for salvage of necrotic wounds

    Price, J.C.; Davis, R.K.; Koltai, P.J.

    1985-02-01

    The authors have utilized six pectoralis major myocutaneous flaps in attempts to salvage extensive necrotic wounds of the pharynx and neck. The flap was employed in the following situations: massive necrosis of the entire neck skin with both carotid artery systems exposed, radiation necrosis of the neck skin with exposure of carotid artery, dehiscence of gastric pull-up from pharynx with resultant carotid exposure, failed trapezius flap in a radionecrotic oral cavity, and two cases of pharyngocutaneous fistula with extensive soft tissue necrosis. These flaps achieved healing in all cases. One death occurred 3 weeks following complete cutaneous healing secondary to a ruptured carotid pseudoaneurysm. One flap underwent total skin loss but the entirety of the muscle survived and the fistula was successfully closed with the back of the muscle being subsequently skin grafted. One case of dehiscence of the flap from oral mucosa resulted in a minor exposure of mandible with limited osteoradionecrosis controlled by topical means. This flap has performed extremely well in these precarious and difficult situations that previously may not have been salvageable. It has also been effective in abbreviating the required hospitalization and wound care. The authors conclude that the pectoralis myocutaneous flap should be the primary choice for the management of extensive postsurgical wound necrosis.

  10. Cross-leg flap: Its role in limb salvage

    Agarwal Pawan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pedicled cross-extremity flaps for lower limb wound coverage have been replaced by free tissue transfer in the last two decades. However, there are certain difficult situations where the free flap cannot be employed and alternative methods are needed. We describe our experience with cross-leg flap in 18 patients for the reconstruction of difficult leg defects in which no suitable recipient vessels were available for microvascular anastomosis in the vicinity of the defect. Materials and Methods: 18 patients (17 men and 1 woman with mean range 31.5 yrs(range 18-70 yrs grade III B tibial fractures were included in the study. fasciocuteneous cross leg flap was employed and extremities were immobilized by external Fixator. Results: Fifteen flaps were completely available with two had marginal necrosis and one supsficial epidermal necrosis.No complications were related to the donor site, flap, or by immobilization are noted. Each patient resumed essentially normal gait and activity without any stiffness of joints related with the flap or external fixator. Conclusion: The addition of external fixator stabilization aids greatly in wound care, as well as for general ease of the patient mobility and positioning. Cross-leg flap offers the possibility of salvaging limbs that are otherwise nonreconstructable.

  11. Flap effectiveness appraisal for winged re-entry vehicles

    de Rosa, Donato; Pezzella, Giuseppe; Donelli, Raffaele S.; Viviani, Antonio

    2016-05-01

    The interactions between shock waves and boundary layer are commonplace in hypersonic aerodynamics. They represent a very challenging design issue for hypersonic vehicle. A typical example of shock wave boundary layer interaction is the flowfield past aerodynamic surfaces during control. As a consequence, such flow interaction phenomena influence both vehicle aerodynamics and aerothermodynamics. In this framework, the present research effort describes the numerical activity performed to simulate the flowfield past a deflected flap in hypersonic flowfield conditions for a winged re-entry vehicle.

  12. Optimal placement of trailing-edge flaps for helicopter vibration reduction using response surface methods

    Viswamurthy, S. R.; Ganguli, Ranjan

    2007-03-01

    This study aims to determine optimal locations of dual trailing-edge flaps to achieve minimum hub vibration levels in a helicopter, while incurring low penalty in terms of required trailing-edge flap control power. An aeroelastic analysis based on finite elements in space and time is used in conjunction with an optimal control algorithm to determine the flap time history for vibration minimization. The reduced hub vibration levels and required flap control power (due to flap motion) are the two objectives considered in this study and the flap locations along the blade are the design variables. It is found that second order polynomial response surfaces based on the central composite design of the theory of design of experiments describe both objectives adequately. Numerical studies for a four-bladed hingeless rotor show that both objectives are more sensitive to outboard flap location compared to the inboard flap location by an order of magnitude. Optimization results show a disjoint Pareto surface between the two objectives. Two interesting design points are obtained. The first design gives 77 percent vibration reduction from baseline conditions (no flap motion) with a 7 percent increase in flap power compared to the initial design. The second design yields 70 percent reduction in hub vibration with a 27 percent reduction in flap power from the initial design.

  13. Development of Variable Camber Continuous Trailing Edge Flap System

    Urnes, Jim, Sr.; Nguyen, Nhan T.; Dykman, John

    2012-01-01

    This presentation describes the current status of the joint NASA/Boeing collaboration on the development of a variable camber continuous trailing edge flap system for use in wing shaping control for cruise drag reduction.

  14. Optimal design of wind turbine blades equipped with flaps

    Wiratama, I. Kade; Maheri, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    As a result of the significant growth of wind turbines in size, blade load control has become the main challenge for large wind turbines. Many advanced techniques have been investigated aiming at developing control devices to ease blade loading. Amongst them, trailing edge flaps have been proven as effective devices for load alleviation. The present study aims at investigating the potential benefits of flaps in enhancing the energy capture capabilities rather than blade load alleviation. A so...

  15. Surgical procedure of Free Flap. Main nursing care

    Manuel Molina López

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The free flap surgical technique is used to cover extensive skin loss areas and situations where no flap is available, or in axial zones. The great breackthrough in the field of reconstructive surgical techniques and the creation of new units where these complex techniques are used, means that the nursing staff who work in these hospital units are adquiring greater protagonism in caring for, and the subsequent success of this type of surgery in which the problems of collaboration in all the perioperative phases depend entirely on the nursing team.The collaborative nursing problems could be defined as real or potential health problems, where users need nursing staff to follow the treatment and control procedures prescribed by other professional, generally doctors, who control and are responsible for the final outcome.While planning collaborative objectives and activities it should be taken into account that the function of the nursing staff is twofold: on the one hand, the patient must be taken care of as prescribed by other professionals and, on the other hand, it should bring into play cognitive elements (knowledge and know-how and clinical judgment when executing these in controlling the patients evolution.In this article our intention is to give an interesting and comprehensive description of the free flap surgical technique, its pros and cons, and identify the principal collaborative problems which nursing will have to deal with in each one of the perioperative phases, the number and specific nature of such oblige nursing on many occasions, to update and/or acquire new skills.

  16. Experimental investigation on plain flap control characteristics in slipstream of small scale propeller%微小型螺旋桨滑流内舵面操纵特性实验研究

    吴大卫; 王亮; 李寒冰; 李书

    2011-01-01

    Mini vertical takeoff and landing ( VTOL) aircraft popularly control their attitudes by deflecting the control surface in propeller slipstream when hovering, but usually lack of enough control moment. This paper shows the systematic experiments about the assembly of static propellers with small scale and wing with plain flap. According to analyzing the data, this paper indicates that plain flap control characteristics can be modified by selecting optimal propeller geometric parameters and gives a series of conclusions about the configuration influence of wing with plain flap on control characteristics. The results can be referenced in designing phase for increasing the control power of these aircrafts.%微小型垂直起降飞行器悬停时往往采用螺旋桨滑流内舵面偏转进行姿态控制,但容易出现操纵力矩不足的问题.本文针对这一问题对微小型静推力状态螺旋桨与带舵面机翼的组合体进行了系统性的实验.通过对实验数据分析,本文指出通过优选螺旋桨几何参数可以改善操纵特性,并得出带舵面机翼不同构型对操纵特性影响的一系列结论,为如何改善此类飞行器悬停时的操纵特性提供了设计参考.

  17. Optical control of antibacterial activity

    Velema, Willem A.; van der Berg, Jan Pieter; Hansen, Mickel J.; Szymanski, Wiktor; Driessen, Arnold J. M.; Feringa, Ben L.

    2013-11-01

    Bacterial resistance is a major problem in the modern world, stemming in part from the build-up of antibiotics in the environment. Novel molecular approaches that enable an externally triggered increase in antibiotic activity with high spatiotemporal resolution and auto-inactivation are highly desirable. Here we report a responsive, broad-spectrum, antibacterial agent that can be temporally activated with light, whereupon it auto-inactivates on the scale of hours. The use of such a ‘smart’ antibiotic might prevent the build-up of active antimicrobial material in the environment. Reversible optical control over active drug concentration enables us to obtain pharmacodynamic information. Precisely localized control of activity is achieved, allowing the growth of bacteria to be confined to defined patterns, which has potential for the development of treatments that avoid interference with the endogenous microbial population in other parts of the organism.

  18. Papilla Preservation Flap as Aesthetic Consideration in Periodontal Flap Surgery

    Sandra Olivia; Natalina Natalina; Felix Hartono

    2013-01-01

    Flap surgery is treatment for periodontal disease with alveolar bone destruction. Surgical periodontal flap with conventional incision will result in gingival recession and loss of interdental papillae after treatment. Dilemma arises in areas required high aesthetic value or regions with a fixed denture. It is challenging to perform periodontal flap with good aesthetic results and minimal gingival recession. This case report aimed to inform and to explain the work procedures, clinical and rad...

  19. Heart rate and estimated energy expenditure of flapping and gliding in black-browed albatrosses.

    Sakamoto, Kentaro Q; Takahashi, Akinori; Iwata, Takashi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Yamamoto, Maki; Trathan, Philip N

    2013-08-15

    Albatrosses are known to expend only a small amount of energy during flight. The low energy cost of albatross flight has been attributed to energy-efficient gliding (soaring) with sporadic flapping, although little is known about how much time and energy albatrosses expend in flapping versus gliding during cruising flight. Here, we examined the heart rates (used as an instantaneous index of energy expenditure) and flapping activities of free-ranging black-browed albatrosses (Thalassarche melanophrys) to estimate the energy cost of flapping as well as time spent in flapping activities. The heart rate of albatrosses during flight (144 beats min(-1)) was similar to that while sitting on the water (150 beats min(-1)). In contrast, heart rate was much higher during takeoff and landing (ca. 200 beats min(-1)). Heart rate during cruising flight was linearly correlated with the number of wing flaps per minute, suggesting an extra energy burden of flapping. Albatrosses spend only 4.6±1.4% of their time flapping during cruising flight, which was significantly lower than during and shortly after takeoff (9.8±3.5%). Flapping activity, which amounted to just 4.6% of the time in flight, accounted for 13.3% of the total energy expenditure during cruising flight. These results support the idea that albatrosses achieve energy-efficient flight by reducing the time spent in flapping activity, which is associated with high energy expenditure. PMID:23661772

  20. Active control: Wind turbine model

    Bindner, H.

    1999-01-01

    This report is a part of the reporting of the work done in the project 'Active Control of Wind Turbines'. This project aim is to develop a simulation model for design of control systems for turbines with pitch control and to use that model to designcontrollers. This report describes the model...... developed for controller design and analysis. Emphasis has been put on establishment of simple models describing the dynamic behavior of the wind turbine in adequate details for controller design. This hasbeen done with extensive use of measurements as the basis for selection of model complexity and model....... The models are all formulated as linear differential equations. The models are validated throughcomparisons with measurements performed on a Vestas WD 34 400 kW wind turbine. It is shown from a control point of view simple linear models can be used to describe the dynamic behavior of a pitch...

  1. Fractional active disturbance rejection control.

    Li, Dazi; Ding, Pan; Gao, Zhiqiang

    2016-05-01

    A fractional active disturbance rejection control (FADRC) scheme is proposed to improve the performance of commensurate linear fractional order systems (FOS) and the robust analysis shows that the controller is also applicable to incommensurate linear FOS control. In FADRC, the traditional extended states observer (ESO) is generalized to a fractional order extended states observer (FESO) by using the fractional calculus, and the tracking differentiator plus nonlinear state error feedback are replaced by a fractional proportional-derivative controller. To simplify controller tuning, the linear bandwidth-parameterization method has been adopted. The impacts of the observer bandwidth ωo and controller bandwidth ωc on system performance are then analyzed. Finally, the FADRC stability and frequency-domain characteristics for linear single-input single-output FOS are analyzed. Simulation results by FADRC and ADRC on typical FOS are compared to demonstrate the superiority and effectiveness of the proposed scheme. PMID:26928516

  2. ABOUT CONTROLLING OF SCIENTIFIC ACTIVITY

    Mukhin V. V.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We have selected the new area of controlling - scientific activity controlling. We consider some problems of development in this field, primarily the problem of selection of key performance indicators. It’s been founded that administrative measures stimulated the pursuit of a number of articles published in scientific journals hinders the development of science. Methodological errors - emphasis on citation indexes, impact factors, etc. - lead to wrong management decisions. As the experience of the UK, an expertise should be applied in the management of science. The article briefly discusses some of the drawbacks of the system of scientific specialties. It is proposed to expand research on the science of science and scientific activity controlling. We have also discussed the problems of controlling in applied research organizations

  3. On the numerical simulation of flutter and its suppression by active control

    The classic problem of predicting the motion (flutter) of a rigid airfoil mounted on an elastic support in a steady freestream is revisited. In the classic approach, the equations of motion were linearized, the supports were linear springs, the motion was assumed to be periodic, the aerodynamic loads were predicted by Wagner's function, and the solution was obtained in the so-called frequency domain. In the present approach, the equations of motion are in their fully nonlinear form, the supports may be nonlinear springs, the motion is not assumed to be periodic, the loads are predicted by a general unsteady vorticity-panel method, and the solution is obtained in the so-called time domain. After it is demonstrated that the present approach predicts the onset of flutter and the post-flutter behavior for flat-plate as well as thick airfoils, the airfoil -is modified by the addition of a flap at the trailing edge. The flap is part of an actively controlled servomechanism, and it is demonstrated that flutter can be readily controlled with very little effort by a variety of feedback-control laws. In the present approach, emphasis is placed on considering the airfoil, its supports, the flowing air and the control/servo mechanism collectively to be a single dynamic system. All the equations of motion and control laws are solved simultaneously and interactively; thus, complete interactions among the various subsystems are captured. The present simulation of an oscillating airfoil provides some characteristics of the flutter phenomenon that were missed in previous studies: for example, it is shown that, in the absence of flaps, the motion in heave (the translational part of the motion) is responsible for adding energy to (exciting) the structural subsystem while the motion in pitch is responsible for extracting energy from (damping) the structural subsystem. Below the critical speed, there is more dissipation than excitation and hence all initial disturbances decay

  4. Sizing and control of trailing edge flaps on a smart rotor for maximum power generation in low fatigue wind regimes

    Smit, Jeroen; Bernhammer, Lars O.; Navalkar, Sachin T.;

    2016-01-01

    An extension of the spectrum of applicability of rotors with active aerodynamic devices is presented in this paper. Besides the classical purpose of load alleviation, a secondary objective is established: optimization of power capture. As a first step, wind speed regions that contribute little to...

  5. Sizing and Control of Trailing Edge Flaps on a Smart Rotor for Maximum Power Generation in Low Fatigue Wind Regimes

    Smit, Jeroen; Berghammer, Lars O.; Navalkar, Sachin;

    2014-01-01

    In this paper an extension of the spectrum of applicability of rotors with active aerody-namic devices is presented. Besides the classical purpose of load alleviation, a secondary objective is established: power capture optimization. As a _rst step, wind speed regions that contribute little to...

  6. Active Flow Control Using Sweeping Jet Actuators on a Semi-Span Wing Model

    Melton, LaTunia Pack; Koklu, Mehti

    2016-01-01

    Wind tunnel experiments were performed using active flow control on an unswept semispan wing model with a 30% chord trailing edge flap to aid in the selection of actuators for a planned high Reynolds number experiment. Two sweeping jet actuator sizes were investigated to determine the influence of actuator size on the active flow control system efficiency. Sweeping jet actuators with orifice sizes of 1 mm x 2 mm and 2 mm x 4 mm were selected because of the differences in actuator jet sweep angle. The parameters that were varied include actuator momentum, freestream velocity, and trailing edge flap deflection angle. Steady and unsteady pressure data, Particle Image Velocimetry data, and force and moment data were acquired to assess the performance of the two actuators. In addition to the wind tunnel experiments, benchtop studies of the actuators were performed to characterize the jets produced by each actuator. Benchtop investigations of the smaller actuator reveal that the jet exiting the actuator has a reduced sweep angle compared to published data for larger versions of this type of actuator. The larger actuator produces an oscillating jet that attaches to the external di?user walls at low supply pressures and produces the expected sweep angles. The AFC results using the smaller actuators show that while the actuators can control flow separation, the selected spacing of 3.3 cm may be too large due to the reduced sweep angle. In comparison, the spacing for the larger actuators, 6.6 cm, appears to be optimal for the Mach numbers investigated. Particle Image Velocimetry results are presented and show how the wall jets produced by the actuators cause the flow to attach to the flap surface.

  7. Flag flapping in a channel

    Alben, Silas; Shoele, Kourosh; Mittal, Rajat; Jha, Sourabh; Glezer, Ari

    2015-11-01

    We study the flapping of a flag in an inviscid channel flow. We focus especially on how quantities vary with channel spacing. As the channel walls move inwards towards the flag, heavier flags become more unstable, while light flags' stability is less affected. We use a vortex sheet model to compute large-amplitude flapping, and find that the flag undergoes a series of jumps to higher flapping modes as the channel walls are moved towards the flag. Meanwhile, the drag on the flag and the energy lost to the wake first rise as the walls become closer, then drop sharply as the flag moves to a higher flapping mode.

  8. Keystone flaps in coloured skin: Flap technology for the masses?

    Satish P Bhat

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Viscoelastic properties of skin in coloured ethnic groups are less favourable compared to Caucasians for executing Keystone flaps. Keystone flaps have so far been evaluated and reported only in Caucasians. The potential of Keystone flaps in a coloured ethnic group is yet unknown. Aim: This article reviews the experience to reconstruct skin defects presenting in a coloured ethnic group, by using Keystone flaps, with a review of existing literature. Design: Uncontrolled case series. Materials and Methods: This retrospective review involves 55 consecutive Keystone flaps used from 2009 to 2012, for skin defects in various locations. Patient demographic data, medical history, co-morbidity, surgical indication, defect features, complications, and clinical outcomes are evaluated and presented. Results: In this population group with Fitzpatrick type 4 and 5 skin, the average patient age was 35.73. Though 60% of flaps (33/55 in the series involved specific risk factors, only two flaps failed. Though seven flaps had complications, sound healing was achieved by suitable intervention giving a success rate of 96.36%. Skin grafts were needed in only four cases. Conclusions: Keystone flaps achieve primary wound healing for a wide spectrum of defects with an acceptable success rate in a coloured skin population with unfavorable biophysical properties. By avoiding conventional local flaps and at times even microsurgical flaps, good aesthetic outcome is achieved without additional skin grafts or extensive operative time. All advantages seen in previous studies were verified. These benefits can be most appreciated in coloured populations, with limited resources and higher proportion of younger patients and unfavorable defects.

  9. Adaptive feedback active noise control

    Kuo, Sen M.; Vijayan, Dipa

    Feedforward active noise control (ANC) systems use a reference sensor that senses a reference input to the controller. This signal is assumed to be unaffected by the secondary source and is a good measure of the undesired noise to be cancelled by the system. The reference sensor may be acoustic (e.g., microphone) or non-acoustic (e.g., tachometer, optical transducer). An obvious problem when using acoustic sensors is that the reference signal may be corrupted by the canceling signal generated by the secondary source. This problem is known as acoustic feedback. One way of avoiding this is by using a feedback active noise control (FANC) system which dispenses with the reference sensor. The FANC technique originally proposed by Olson and May employs a high gain negative feedback amplifier. This system suffered from the drawback that the error microphone had to be placed very close to the loudspeaker. The operation of the system was restricted to low frequency range and suffered from instability due to the possibility of positive feedback. Feedback systems employing adaptive filtering techniques for active noise control were developed. This paper presents the FANC system modeled as an adaptive prediction scheme.

  10. Dynamics of a pneumatic artificial muscle actuation system driving a trailing edge flap

    This study presents a time domain dynamic model of an antagonistic pneumatic artificial muscle (PAM) driven trailing edge flap (TEF) system for next generation active helicopter rotors. Active rotor concepts are currently being widely researched in the rotorcraft community as a means to provide a significant leap forward in performance through primary aircraft control, vibration mitigation and noise reduction. Recent work has shown PAMs to be a promising candidate for active rotor actuation due to their combination of high force, large stroke, light weight, and suitable bandwidth. When arranged into biologically inspired agonist/antagonist muscle pairs they can produce bidirectional torques for effectively driving a TEF. However, there are no analytical dynamic models in the literature that can accurately capture the behavior of such systems across the broad range of frequencies required for this demanding application. This work combines mechanical, pneumatic, and aerodynamic component models into a global flap system model developed for the Bell 407 rotor system. This model can accurately predict pressure, force, and flap angle response to pneumatic control valve inputs over a range of operating frequencies from 7 to 35 Hz (1/rev to 5/rev for the Bell 407) and operating pressures from 30 to 90 psi. (paper)

  11. Dynamics of a pneumatic artificial muscle actuation system driving a trailing edge flap

    Woods, Benjamin K. S.; Kothera, Curt S.; Wang, Gang; Wereley, Norman M.

    2014-09-01

    This study presents a time domain dynamic model of an antagonistic pneumatic artificial muscle (PAM) driven trailing edge flap (TEF) system for next generation active helicopter rotors. Active rotor concepts are currently being widely researched in the rotorcraft community as a means to provide a significant leap forward in performance through primary aircraft control, vibration mitigation and noise reduction. Recent work has shown PAMs to be a promising candidate for active rotor actuation due to their combination of high force, large stroke, light weight, and suitable bandwidth. When arranged into biologically inspired agonist/antagonist muscle pairs they can produce bidirectional torques for effectively driving a TEF. However, there are no analytical dynamic models in the literature that can accurately capture the behavior of such systems across the broad range of frequencies required for this demanding application. This work combines mechanical, pneumatic, and aerodynamic component models into a global flap system model developed for the Bell 407 rotor system. This model can accurately predict pressure, force, and flap angle response to pneumatic control valve inputs over a range of operating frequencies from 7 to 35 Hz (1/rev to 5/rev for the Bell 407) and operating pressures from 30 to 90 psi.

  12. Development of radiation injury model in musculocutaneous flaps used for breast reconstruction

    Purpose/Objective: Occasionally it becomes necessary to treat women who have undergone a mastectomy and immediate musculocutaneous flap breast reconstruction with radiation therapy for microscopically positive margins. Radiation therapy is known to have a wide range of deleterious effects on living tissue and, specifically composite flaps. Small vessel thrombosis, necrosis, lymphedema, fibroblast dysfunction, and severe contracture are just a few of these effects that may lead to flap compromise. An animal model of the TRAM flap has been described: however, a thorough review of the literature finds a few experimental studies on the effects of radiation on musculocutaneous flaps. This study is designed to produce a reproducible and quantitative model of radiation injury that can service as a basis for further investigation. Materials and Methods: Eleven adult male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent a standardized rectus abdominis musculocutaneous flap based on the superior epigastric artery. Two control rats had flaps raised but did not receive radiation. The flaps were allowed to heal six weeks and the remaining rats were randomized to three groups of three rats each. The first group received 2000 rads in five fractions, the second 3000 rads in ten fractions, and the third 3000 rads in 15 fractions. Radiation was delivered via a dual energy clinical linear accelerator centered over the flap. The rats were sacrificed at eight weeks from the last dose of radiation. The flaps were subjected to elasticity measuring by standard Instron tensiometer, total surface area measurements and standard histology stains, as well as elastin stains and Masson Trichrome stains. Results: The total area of the flap measured by Mocha analysis decreased in all rats from the initial 30 cm2. However, the decrease in irradiated flaps was greater when compared to non-irradiated controls and the degree of contracture increased as the amount of radiation increased. Control flaps averaged 16.27 cm2

  13. Novel Active Combustion Control Valve

    Caspermeyer, Matt

    2014-01-01

    This project presents an innovative solution for active combustion control. Relative to the state of the art, this concept provides frequency modulation (greater than 1,000 Hz) in combination with high-amplitude modulation (in excess of 30 percent flow) and can be adapted to a large range of fuel injector sizes. Existing valves often have low flow modulation strength. To achieve higher flow modulation requires excessively large valves or too much electrical power to be practical. This active combustion control valve (ACCV) has high-frequency and -amplitude modulation, consumes low electrical power, is closely coupled with the fuel injector for modulation strength, and is practical in size and weight. By mitigating combustion instabilities at higher frequencies than have been previously achieved (approximately 1,000 Hz), this new technology enables gas turbines to run at operating points that produce lower emissions and higher performance.

  14. Handling Qualities Results of an Initial Geared Flap Tilt Wing Piloted Simulation

    Guerrero, Lourdes M.; Corliss, Lloyd D.

    1991-01-01

    An exploratory simulation study of a novel approach to pitch control for a tilt wing aircraft was conducted in 1990 on the NASA-Ames Vertical Motion Simulator. The purpose of the study was to evaluate and compare the handling qualities of both a conventional and a geared flap tilt wing control configuration. The geared flap is an innovative control concept which has the potential for reducing or eliminating the horizontal pitch control tail rotor or reaction jets required by prior tilt wing designs. The handling qualities results of the geared flap control configuration are presented in this paper and compared to the conventional (programmed flap) tilt wing control configuration. This paper also describes the geared flap concept, the tilt wing aircraft, the simulation model, the simulation facility and experiment setup, and the pilot evaluation tasks and procedures.

  15. Active control of the noise

    The problems of acoustic noise are more and more preponderant in the measure in that the amount of equipment and industrial machinery is increased such as fans, transformers, compressors etc. the use of devices passive mechanics for the reduction of the noise is effective and very appreciated because its effects embrace a wide range of acoustic frequency. However, to low frequencies, such devices become too big and expensive besides that present a tendency to do not effective. The control of active noise, CAN, using the electronic generation anti-noise, constitutes an interesting solution to the problem because their operation principle allows achieving an appreciable reduction of the noise by means of the use of compact devices. The traditional techniques for the control of acoustic noise like barriers and silenced to attenuate it, are classified as passive and their works has been accepted as norm as for the treatment of problems of noise it refers. Such techniques are considered in general very effective in the attenuation of noise of wide band. However, for low frequency, the required passive structures are too big and expensive; also, their effectiveness diminishes flagrantly, that which makes them impractical in many applications. The active suppression is profiled like a practical alternative for the reduction of acoustic noise. The idea in the active treatment of the noise it contemplates the use of a device electro-acoustic, like a speaker for example that it cancels to the noise by the generation of sounds of Same width and of contrary phase (anti-noise). The cancellation phenomenon is carried out when the ant-noise combines acoustically with the noise, what is in the cancellation of both sounds. The effectiveness of the cancellation of the primary source of noise depends on the precision with which the width and the phase of the generated ant-noise are controlled. The active control of noise, ANC (activates noise control), it is being investigated for

  16. Small scale wind tunnel model investigation of hybrid high lift systems combining upper surface blowing with the internally blown flap

    Waites, W. L.; Chin, Y. T.

    1974-01-01

    A small-scale wind tunnel test of a two engine hybrid model with upper surface blowing on a simulated expandable duct internally blown flap was accomplished in a two phase program. The low wing Phase I model utilized 0.126c radius Jacobs/Hurkamp flaps and 0.337c radius Coanda flaps. The high wing Phase II model was utilized for continued studies on the Jacobs/Hurkamp flap. Principal study areas included: basic data both engines operative and with an engine out, control flap utilization, horizontal tail effectiveness, spoiler effectiveness, USB nacelle deflector study and USB/IBF pressure ratio effects.

  17. A Digital Controller for Active Aeroelastic Controls

    Ueda, Tetsuhiko; MUROTA, Katsuichi; 上田, 哲彦; 室田, 勝一

    1989-01-01

    A high-speed digital controller for aeroelastic controls was designed and made. The purpose was to minimize adverse phase lag which is inevitably produced by the CPU time of digital processing. The delay deteriorates control performances on rather rapid phenomena like aircraft flutter. With fix-point operation the controller realized 417 microseconds of throughput time including the A/D and D/A conversion. This corresponds to a high sampling rate of 2.4kHz. The controller furnishes two channe...

  18. Towards an industrial manufactured morphing trailing edge flap system for wind turbines

    Aagaard Madsen, Helge; Løgstrup Andersen, Tom; Bergami, Leonardo;

    2014-01-01

    tunnel experiment in 2009 with promising results. This led in 2011 to initiation of a new research project INDUFLAP with the main aim to transfer the flap technology to industry as concerns manufacturing and testing. Three industrial partners are participating in the project. Rehau (DE) and Dansk Gummi...... Industri (DK) work on flap manufacturing and Hydratech Industries (DK) is developing the powering system for the flaps and the control system. DTU is the coordinator of the project. Flap prototypes have been manufactured in a continuous thermoplastic extrusion process and a unique rotating test rig has...

  19. Aeroelastic Stability of a 2D Airfoil Section equipped with a Trailing Edge Flap

    Bergami, Leonardo

    Recent studies conclude that important reduction of the fatigue loads encountered by a wind turbine blade can be achieved using a deformable trailing edge control system. The focus of the current work is to determine the effect of this flap-like system on the aeroelastic stability of a 2D airfoil...... section. A simulation tool is implemented to predict the flow speed at which a flap equipped section may become unstable, either due to flutter or divergence. First, the stability limits of the airfoil without flap are determined, and, in the second part of the work, a deformable trailing edge flap is...

  20. Acetylcysteine in random skin flap in rats

    Abla Luiz Eduardo Felipe

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Analyze the ability of Acetylcysteine to reduce distal necrosis in a random skin flap, in the rat. METHODS: The present study utilized 28 adult male Wistar-EPM rats distributed, at random, in two groups of 14 animals. Control group rats (CG received distilled water and Acetylcysteine group animals (NACG received NAC (300 mg/kg by oral infusion, 15 minutes before flap elevation. On the seventh postoperative day, percentage of distal necrosis was determined and skin samples collected in order to allow determination of MDA levels. RESULTS: The mean necrotic area in CG group (control was 66 % and in NACG group (Acetylcysteine 52 %, a statistically significant difference according to the Mann-Whitney test (U calc = 25; U crit = 45. MDA levels were lower in the CG flap skin samples than in the NACG samples (U calc = 24; U crit = 45, the oposite being true in the normal skin samples (U calc = 10; U crit = 45. CONCLUSION: Acetylcysteine was effective, according to the model used, reducing the percentage of distal necrosis in NACG rats.

  1. Flap Conformations in HIV-1 Protease are Altered by Mutations

    Fanucci, Gail; Blackburn, Mandy; Veloro, Angelo; Galiano, Luis; Fangu, Ding; Simmerling, Carlos

    2009-03-01

    HIV-1 protease (PR) is an enzyme that is a major drug target in the treatment of AIDS. Although the structure and function of HIV-1 PR have been studied for over 20 years, questions remain regarding the conformations and dynamics of the β-hairpin turns (flaps) that cover the active site cavity. Distance measurements with pulsed EPR spectroscopy of spin labeled constructs of HIV-1 PR have been used to characterize the flap conformations in the apo and inhibitor bound states. From the most probably distances and the breadth of the distance distribution profiles from analysis of the EPR data, insights regarding the flap conformations and flexibility are gained. The EPR results clearly show how drug pressure selected mutations alter the average conformation of the flaps and the degree of opening of the flaps. Molecular dynamics simulations successfully regenerate the experimentally determined distance distribution profiles, and more importantly, provide structural models for full interpretation of the EPR results. By combining experiment and theory to understand the role that altered flap flexibility/conformations play in the mechanism of drug resistance, key insights are gained toward the rational development of new inhibitors of this important enzyme.

  2. Smart helicopter rotors optimization and piezoelectric vibration control

    Ganguli, Ranjan; Viswamurthy, Sathyamangalam Ramanarayanan

    2016-01-01

    Exploiting the properties of piezoelectric materials to minimize vibration in rotor-blade actuators, this book demonstrates the potential of smart helicopter rotors to achieve the smoothness of ride associated with jet-engined, fixed-wing aircraft. Vibration control is effected using the concepts of trailing-edge flaps and active-twist. The authors’ optimization-based approach shows the advantage of multiple trailing-edge flaps and algorithms for full-authority control of dual trailing-edge-flap actuators are presented. Hysteresis nonlinearity in piezoelectric stack actuators is highlighted and compensated by use of another algorithm. The idea of response surfaces provides for optimal placement of trailing-edge flaps. The concept of active twist involves the employment of piezoelectrically induced shear actuation in rotating beams. Shear is then demonstrated for a thin-walled aerofoil-section rotor blade under feedback-control vibration minimization. Active twist is shown to be significant in reducing vibra...

  3. Aspects of the influence of an oscillating mini-flap upon the near wake of an airfoil NACA 4412

    A NACA 4412 airfoil was tested, in a boundary layer wind tunnel, with the aim to study the effect of a Gurney mini-flap, as an active and passive flow control device submitted to a turbulent flow field. The main objective was the experimental determination of flow pattern characteristics downstream the airfoil in the near wake. The untwisted wing model used for the experiments had 80 cm wingspan and 50 cm chord, with airfoil NACA 4412. The mini-flap was located on the lower surface at a distance, from the trailing edge, of 8%c (c airfoil chord). The Reynolds number, based upon the wing chord and the mean free stream velocity was 326,000 and 489,000. The turbulence intensity was 1.8%. The model was located into the wind tunnel between two panels, in order to assure a close approximation to two-dimensional flow over the model. As an active control device a rotating mini-flaps, geared by an electromechanical system (which rotate to a 300) was constructed. The wake pattern and pressure values near the trailing edge were measured. The results obtained, for this mechanism, show us that the oscillating mini-flap change the wake flow pattern, alleviating the near wake turbulence and enhancing the vortex pair near the trailing edge at the mini-flap level and below that level, magnifying the effect described first by Liebeck. That effect grows with the oscillating frequency. Additionally, the wake alleviation probably affects also the far wake. All of these facts suggest us to continue with the experiments, trying to measure the pressure distribution around the airfoil in all the cases, obtaining the lift and drag characteristics.

  4. Smart Rotor Modeling: Aero-Servo-Elastic Modeling of a Smart Rotor with Adaptive Trailing Edge Flaps

    Bergami, Leonardo

    This book presents the formulation of an aero-servo-elastic model for a wind turbine rotor equipped with Adaptive Trailing Edge Flaps (ATEF), a smart rotor configuration. As the name suggests, an aero-servo-elastic model consists of three main components: an aerodynamic model, a structural model...... control the trailing edge flap deflection to actively reduce the fatigue loads on the structure. The performance of the smart rotor configuration and its control algorithms are finally quantified by aero-servo-elastic simulations of the smart rotor turbine operating in a standard turbulent wind field....... code HAWC2. The investigated smart rotor configuration mainly aims at alleviating the fatigue loads the turbine rotor has to withstand during normal operation. First, the characteristics of the prevailing loads are identified; then, two model-based control algorithms are outlined: the algorithms...

  5. The freestyle pedicle perforator flap

    Gunnarsson, Gudjon Leifur; Jackson, Ian T; Westvik, Tormod S; Thomsen, Jorn Bo

    2015-01-01

    not widely performed by the general plastic surgeons. The aim of this paper is to present the simplicity of pedicled perforator flap reconstruction of moderate-sized defects of the extremities and torso. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 34 patients reconstructed using 34 freestyle...... aspects in the context of current literature. RESULTS: The reconstructive goals were achieved in all cases without any total flap loss or major complications. Minor complications occurred in 7/34 (21 %) cases consisting of venous congestion leading to distal tip necrosis or epidermolysis; partial flap...... loss was significant in 4 cases, however never more than 10 % of the total flap size. Reconstruction was performed on the lower limb in 13 cases, upper limb in 12, and 9 cases were on the truncus. The angle of rotation was 90° in 21 cases and 180° in 13 cases. The most common indication was...

  6. Ornithopter Type Flapping Wings for Autonomous Micro Air Vehicles

    Sutthiphong Srigrarom

    2015-05-01

    resonance phenomenon of a two-degree of freedom elastic system, that is, the wing is supported by the springs for flapping and feathering motions. Being oscillated close to the resonance frequency of the system, only by the torque in flapping motion, the amplitude gained is a few times higher than that of normal case. The first prototype was made from acrylic using a laser cutting machine. The wings were made up of carbon rods and kite material Ripstop. First test showed that the wings were too heavy for the mechanism to work. The third prototype was a smaller single gear crank design which was fabricated using a 3D printer. Initial test proved that the second prototype could withstand the high frequency flapping and near resonance amplitude as designed. With remote control, the third prototype was able to take off, climb, cruise and land in flapping mode successfully.

  7. 2D numerical comparison of trailing edge flaps - UpWind WP1B3

    Buhl, Thomas; Andersen, Peter Bjørn; Barlas, T.K.

    This report covers the investigations and comparisons of trailing edge flaps carried out by Delft and Risø. The work is a part of the W1B3 work package of the UpWind EU-project. This report covers only 2D test cases with simple control of the trailing edge flap with the objective of keeping CL...

  8. Effects of hyperbaric oxygen preconditioning on ischemia-reperfusion inflammation and skin flap survival

    QI Zheng; GAO Chun-jin; WANG You-bin; MA Xue-mei; ZHAO Ling; LIU Fu-jia; LIU Xue-hua

    2013-01-01

    Background Hyperbaric oxygen preconditioning (HBO) is a new method of ischemia preconditioning.In this study,we examined its effects on skin flap survival and the mechanisms involved.Methods Thirty-six rats were divided into three groups:HBO preconditioning,control,and sham groups.An extended epigastric adipocutaneous flap based on the right superficial epigastric artery and vein was raised.A 3-hour period of flap ischemia was induced by clamping the pedicle vessels with a microvascular clamp.At the end of ischemia induction,the clamp was removed and the flap was resutured.Rats in the HBO preconditioning group were treated with HBO four times before surgery.Microcirculation in the skin flap was measured on postoperative days 1,3 and 5.The size of the flap was measured on postoperative day 5,before the animals were sacrificed.Samples of the skin flap were prepared and stained with hematoxylin and eosin.The levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-o,interleukin (IL)-1β,and IL-6 in the flap samples were measured.Results Surviving flap size was significantly higher in the HBO preconditioning group compared with controls,with a reduced inflammatory response and increased perfusion.IL-1,TNF-α,and IL-6 levels in the HBO preconditioning group were lower than in controls.Conclusions HBO preconditioning improved flap survival in this ischemia-reperfusion rat model.The mechanisms responsible for this effect may relate to attenuation of the inflammatory response and increased flap perfusion following HBO preconditioning.

  9. Active Spacecraft Potential Control Investigation

    Torkar, K.; Nakamura, R.; Tajmar, M.; Scharlemann, C.; Jeszenszky, H.; Laky, G.; Fremuth, G.; Escoubet, C. P.; Svenes, K.

    2016-03-01

    In tenuous plasma the floating potential of sunlit spacecraft reaches tens of volts, positive. The corresponding field disturbs measurements of the ambient plasma by electron and ion sensors and can reduce micro-channel plate lifetime in electron detectors owing to large fluxes of attracted photoelectrons. Also the accuracy of electric field measurements may suffer from a high spacecraft potential. The Active Spacecraft Potential Control (ASPOC) neutralizes the spacecraft potential by releasing positive charge produced by indium ion emitters. The method has been successfully applied on other spacecraft such as Cluster and Double Star. Two ASPOC units are present on each spacecraft. Each unit contains four ion emitters, whereby one emitter per instrument is operated at a time. ASPOC for the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission includes new developments in the design of the emitters and the electronics. New features include the use of capillaries instead of needles, new materials for the emitters and their internal thermal insulators, an extended voltage and current range of the electronics, both for ion emission and heating purposes, and a more capable control software. This enables lower spacecraft potentials, higher reliability, and a more uniform potential structure in the spacecraft's sheath compared to previous missions. Results from on-ground testing demonstrate compliance with requirements. Model calculations confirm the findings from previous applications that the plasma measurements will not be affected by the beam's space charge. Finally, the various operating modes to adapt to changing boundary conditions are described along with the main data products.

  10. Modified osteomyocutaneous iliac crest flaps transplantation.

    Liu, Jun; Song, Dajiang; Li, Jinsong; Xu, Jian; Lv, Hongbin

    2015-04-01

    The paper aims to improve the operative technique of osteomyocutaneous iliac crest flap harvesting, further minimise morbidity of donor site, and improve the effect of recipient site reconstruction. From March 2005 to March 2011, 55 cases of osteomyocutaneous iliac crest flap harvested by different methods were performed to reconstruct the defects of the extremities. Twenty-nine cases were reconstructed with a traditional deep circumflex iliac artery osteomusculocutaneous flap. Twenty-six cases were repaired with modified osteomyocutaneous iliac crest flaps. In 29 cases with a traditional DCIA osteomusculocutaneous flap, two cases showed the injured lateral femoral cutaneous nerve. Flapnecrosis was significant in two cases. Arterial compromise occurred in one case 5 days after operation completion and led to flap failure. Three flaps developed postoperative venous congestion, but only one flap received re-exploration. In the other two cases, some stitches were removed for decompression. All three flaps survived. In two cases, marginal flap necrosis occurred, but no secondary skin grafting was required. In 26 cases with modified flap transplantation, one case showed the injured lateral femoral cutaneous nerve. All flaps survived totally. Osseous integration was achieved in all 55 cases in 3 ∼ 9 months after operation. The modified osteomyocutaneous iliac crest flap technique enhances flap safety, provides the additional advantages of reducing donor-site morbidity, and improves the recipient-site contour. PMID:25001367

  11. Development of smart blade technology - trailing edge flaps

    Aagaard Madsen, Helge

    2014-01-01

    With blade lengths presently up to 80+ m there is a need for a supplement to the standard pitch system for control of power and loads. Distributed load control along the blade span with trailing edge flaps is a promising concept where numerical simulations have shown considerable load alleviation...

  12. Experience in Reconstruction for Small Digital Defects With Free Flaps.

    Hung, Min-Hsiang; Huang, Kuo-Feng; Chiu, Haw-Yen; Chao, Wai-Nang

    2016-03-01

    Traumatic injuries to the digits resulting in soft tissue or bone loss require reconstruction. Traditionally, local flaps, such as homodigital flaps, heterodigital flaps, pedicled flaps, or distant flaps, are used for digital resurfacing. However, free tissue transfers can be used in selected patients. In this study, we present the use of different free flaps including groin skin flaps, groin osteocutaneous flaps, groin chimeric flaps, second dorsal metacarpal artery flaps, and partial toe flaps for digital reconstruction. A total of 19 digits were treated with 16 free flaps in our hospital. Of the flaps used, 5 were free groin skin flaps, 4 were free partial toe flaps, 3 were free groin chimeric flaps, 2 were free groin osteocutaneous flaps, and 2 were free second dorsal metacarpal artery flaps. The average flap size was 4.7 × 2.0 cm (range, 1.5 × 1 to 5 × 4 cm), and the average operative time was 6.0 hours (range, 4-9 hours). All flaps survived without partial or total necrosis. In conclusion, the free flap is a reliable and safe alternative for digital reconstruction. Moreover, the free groin flap provides not only a chimeric pattern for multiple fingers coverage but also an osteocutaneous pattern for thumb lengthening. The free second dorsal metacarpal artery flap provides a tenocutaneous pattern for tendon reconstruction and soft tissue coverage simultaneously, and the free partial toe flap is an excellent alternative for pulp reconstruction in terms of aesthetic appearance and functional outcome. PMID:26808771

  13. Experimental Study of Wake / Flap Interaction Noise and the Reduction of Flap Side Edge Noise

    Hutcheson, Florence V.; Stead, Daniel J.; Plassman, Gerald E.

    2016-01-01

    The effects of the interaction of a wake with a half-span flap on radiated noise are examined. The incident wake is generated by bars of various widths and lengths or by a simplified landing gear model. Single microphone and phased array measurements are used to isolate the effects of the wake interaction on the noise radiating from the flap side edge and flap cove regions. The effects on noise of the wake generator's geometry and relative placement with respect to the flap are assessed. Placement of the wake generators upstream of the flap side edge is shown to lead to the reduction of flap side edge noise by introducing a velocity deficit and likely altering the instabilities in the flap side edge vortex system. Significant reduction in flap side edge noise is achieved with a bar positioned directly upstream of the flap side edge. The noise reduction benefit is seen to improve with increased bar width, length and proximity to the flap edge. Positioning of the landing gear model upstream of the flap side edge also leads to decreased flap side edge noise. In addition, flap cove noise levels are significantly lower than when the landing gear is positioned upstream of the flap mid-span. The impact of the local flow velocity on the noise radiating directly from the landing gear is discussed. The effects of the landing gear side-braces on flap side edge, flap cove and landing gear noise are shown.

  14. Chlorogenic Acid Enhances Abdominal Skin Flap Survival Based on Epigastric Artery in Nondiabetic and Diabetic Rats.

    Bagdas, Deniz; Etoz, Betul Cam; Gul, Zulfiye; Ozyigit, Musa Ozgur; Cinkilic, Nilufer; Inan, Sevda; Buyukcoskun, Naciye Isbil; Ozluk, Kasim; Gurun, Mine Sibel

    2016-08-01

    Previous studies showed that chlorogenic acid (CGA) accelerates wound healing via its antioxidant activity. We aimed to investigate the effect of CGA in an experimental epigastric abdominal skin flap model in nondiabetic and diabetic rats. Rats were firstly divided into 2 groups: nondiabetic and diabetic. Diabetes was induced by streptozotocin. Then, 4 subgroups were created for each group: vehicle as well as 0.2 mg/0.5 mL, 1 mg/0.5 mL, and 5 mg/0.5 mL CGA treatments. Right epigastric artery-based abdominal skin flaps were elevated and sutured back into their original position. Chlorogenic acid or vehicle was injected once into the femoral arteries by leaving the epigastric artery as the single artery feeding the flaps during the injection. On postoperative day 7, flap survivals were evaluated, and the rats were killed. Distal flap tissues were collected for histopathological and biochemical assays. Chlorogenic acid showed greater flap survival in both nondiabetic and diabetic rats. Capillary density was increased, and necrosis was reduced in the CGA-treated rats. Chlorogenic acid decreased malondialdehyde levels as well as increased reduced glutathione and superoxide dismutase levels in the flap tissues. This study showed that CGA significantly improved flap survival by its antioxidant activities with intra-arterial local injections. PMID:25356637

  15. Free thin paraumbilical perforator-based flaps.

    Koshima, I; Moriguchi, T; Soeda, S; Tanaka, H; Umeda, N

    1992-07-01

    A free paraumbilical perforator-based flap fed by a muscle perforator from the inferior deep epigastric artery and with no muscle was used in 13 patients. Among them, a free thin paraumbilical perforator-based flap with a thin layer of fat, to protect the subdermal plexus of the vessels, was used in seven patients. The dominant pedicle perforator of this thin flap is usually located around the umbilicus and a large flap can be obtained. Its critical length-to-breath ratio is considered to be 4:3. The advantages of this flap are a long and large vascular pedicle, rare postoperative abdominal herniation, little bulkiness of the flap, and a relatively large skin territory. The disadvantages are technical difficulties in dissection of the perforator and anatomical variation in the location of the perforator. We believe this flap largely overcomes the problems of the conventional rectus abdominis musculocutaneous flap. PMID:1386718

  16. Active interaction control for civil structures

    Wang, Luo-Jia

    1997-01-01

    This thesis presents a civil engineering approach to active control for civil structures. The proposed control technique, termed Active Interaction Control (AIC), utilizes dynamic interactions between different structures, or components of the same structure, to reduce the resonance response of the controlled or primary structure under earthquake excitations. The primary control objective of AIC is to minimize the maximum story drift of the primary structure. This is accomplished by timing th...

  17. Cooperative Control Method of Active and Semiactive Control: New Framework for Vibration Control

    Kazuhiko Hiramoto

    2014-01-01

    A new control design framework for vibration control, the cooperative control of active and semiactive control, is proposed in the paper. In the cooperative control, a structural system having both of an actuator and a semiactive control device, for example, MR damper and so forth, is defined as the control object. In the proposed control approach, the higher control performance is aimed by the cooperative control between the active control with the actuator and the semiactive control with th...

  18. Interaction of Two Flapping Flags in Axial Flow

    Gunter, Amy-Lee; Fayed, Mohamed; Abderrahmane, Hamid Ait; Paidoussis, Michael P.; Ng, Hoi Dick

    2010-11-01

    The flapping of two parallel flags in axial low turbulence flow is investigated experimentally inside a small scale wind tunnel test section. The variables of the problem are the size and flexural rigidity of the flags, and the distance that separates the two flags. The flow velocity represents the control parameter that governs the coupling and flapping mode of the flags. Two flapping modes, in-phase and out-of-phase modes, were observed in the experiment. Image processing technique was used and the time series of a given point on the flag edge was analyzed. The stability condition of the flags was obtained and compared to the recent theoretical models. The dynamics of the coupling between the two flags is also studied.

  19. An Experimental Investigation on Flapping Flexible Membrane Wings

    Hu, Hui; Abate, Gregg; Albertani, Roberto

    2008-11-01

    Thin and flexible membrane wings are unique to flying and gliding mammals, such as bats, flying squirrels and sugar gliders. These animals exhibit extraordinary flight capabilities with respect to maneuvering and agility that are not observed in other species of comparable size. In this study, comprehensive wind tunnel experiments are conducted to assess the effects of membrane flexibility (rigidity) on the aerodynamic performance of the flapping flexible membrane wings to quantify the benefits of using flexible membrane wings compared with conventional rigid wings for flapping-wing Micro-Air-Vehicle (MAV) applications. The present study is conducted from the viewpoint of aerospace engineers to try to leverage the unique feature of flexible membrane airfoils/wings found in bats and other flying/gliding mammals as an effective aerodynamic control method to explore the potential applications of such non-traditional, bio-inspired flexible membrane wings to flapping-wing MAVs to improve their flight agility and maneuverability.

  20. Interactions between butterfly scales and unsteady flows during flapping flight

    Jones, Robert; Lang, Amy

    2008-11-01

    Recent research has shown that the highly flexible wings of butterflies in flapping flight develop vortices along their leading and trailing edges. Butterfly scales (approximately 100 microns) have a shingled pattern and extend into the boundary layer. These scales could play a part in controlling separation in this 3-dimensional complex flow field. Biomimetic applications of butterfly scales may aid in the development of flapping wing micro air vehicles. In this study, we observed that the orientation of the scales may relate to the local flow field, and might move or shift during flight. Monarch butterflies were trained to fly in a low speed smoke tunnel for visualization. Scales were removed from the leading and trailing edges and specimens were photographed at 500 frames per second. Variation in flapping pattern and flight fitness are discussed.

  1. Global-local optimization of flapping kinematics in hovering flight

    Ghommem, Mehdi

    2013-06-01

    The kinematics of a hovering wing are optimized by combining the 2-d unsteady vortex lattice method with a hybrid of global and local optimization algorithms. The objective is to minimize the required aerodynamic power under a lift constraint. The hybrid optimization is used to efficiently navigate the complex design space due to wing-wake interference present in hovering aerodynamics. The flapping wing is chosen so that its chord length and flapping frequency match the morphological and flight properties of two insects with different masses. The results suggest that imposing a delay between the different oscillatory motions defining the flapping kinematics, and controlling the way through which the wing rotates at the end of each half stroke can improve aerodynamic power under a lift constraint. Furthermore, our optimization analysis identified optimal kinematics that agree fairly well with observed insect kinematics, as well as previously published numerical results.

  2. Management of osteoradionecrosis of the mandible with myocutaneous flaps

    Involvement of large areas of the mandible or the entire mandible with osteoradionecrosis may result in severe functional disability and cosmetic deformity. The use of a well-vascularized pectoralis major myocutaneous flap from outside the original field of irradiation has been successful in obtaining functional and cosmetic goals. Myocutaneous flaps provide bulk for contour and tissue support, and their rich vascular supply promotes healing of the heavily irradiated soft tissue and bone. Successful bone grafting for mandibular reconstruction may follow control of the osteoradionecrosis

  3. Management of osteoradionecrosis of the mandible with myocutaneous flaps

    Baker, S.R.

    1983-12-01

    Involvement of large areas of the mandible or the entire mandible with osteoradionecrosis may result in severe functional disability and cosmetic deformity. The use of a well-vascularized pectoralis major myocutaneous flap from outside the original field of irradiation has been successful in obtaining functional and cosmetic goals. Myocutaneous flaps provide bulk for contour and tissue support, and their rich vascular supply promotes healing of the heavily irradiated soft tissue and bone. Successful bone grafting for mandibular reconstruction may follow control of the osteoradionecrosis.

  4. Unsteady vortex-dominated flow around wings with oscillating leading-edge flaps

    Kandil, Osama A.; Salman, Ahmed A.

    1991-01-01

    Unsteady vortex-dominated flow around delta wings with oscillating leading-edge flaps represents an important classs of problems for supermaneuverability and flow control of advanced aircraft. The problem is solved using time accurate integration of the unsteady, compressible, thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations in conjunction with the unsteady, linearized, Navier-displacement equations. Starting with an initial configuration of the wing and its flaps, the Navier-Stokes equations are solved on an initial structured grid for the steady flow. The forced oscillation of the flaps is then applied, and the problem is solved accurately in time. The Navier-displacement equations are solved for the grid deformation and the Navier-Stokes equations are solved for the flowfield. Symmetric and anti-symmetric flaps oscillations are presented to study the effect of the flaps oscillation on the leading-edge vortical flow.

  5. Aerodynamic characteristics of the ventilated design for flapping wing micro air vehicle.

    Zhang, G Q; Yu, S C M

    2014-01-01

    Inspired by superior flight performance of natural flight masters like birds and insects and based on the ventilating flaps that can be opened and closed by the changing air pressure around the wing, a new flapping wing type has been proposed. It is known that the net lift force generated by a solid wing in a flapping cycle is nearly zero. However, for the case of the ventilated wing, results for the net lift force are positive which is due to the effect created by the "ventilation" in reducing negative lift force during the upstroke. The presence of moving flaps can serve as the variable in which, through careful control of the areas, a correlation with the decrease in negative lift can be generated. The corresponding aerodynamic characteristics have been investigated numerically by using different flapping frequencies and forward flight speeds. PMID:24683339

  6. Etanercept protects myocutaneous flaps from ischaemia reperfusion injury: An experimental study in a rat tram flap model.

    Ersoy, Burak; Çevik, Özge; Çilingir, Özlem Tuğçe

    2016-08-01

    Background Being an inevitable component of free tissue transfer, ischemia-reperfusion injury tends to contribute to flap failure. TNF-α is an important proinflammatory cytokine and a prominent mediator of the ischemia-reperfusion injury. Etanercept, a soluble TNF-α binding protein, has shown anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic effects in animal models of renal and myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury. We have designed an experimental study to investigate the effect of etanercept on myocutaneous ischemia-reperfusion injury on transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap model in rats. Methods Twenty-four male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 3 groups: In group 1 (sham), the TRAM flap was raised and sutured back without further intervention. In group 2 (control), the flap was raised and the ischemia-reperfusion protocol was followed. In group 3, etanercept (10 mg/kg, i.v.) was administered 10 minutes before reperfusion. At the end of the reperfusion period, biochemical and histolopathological evaluations were performed on serum and tissue samples. Results In the etanercept group the IMA and 8-OHdG levels (p = 0.005 and p = 0.004, respectively) were found significantly lower, and the GSH and SOD levels (p = 0.01 and p < 0.001, respectively) significantly higher in comparison to the control group. The histopathological analysis has revealed a lower degree of hyalinization, degenerated muscle fibers and nuclear change in the etanercept group compared to the control group. Conclusion The results of our experimental study indicate that etanercept offers protection against ischemia-reperfusion injury in skeletal muscle tissue, enhancing the TRAM flap viability. The ability of etanercept to induce ischemic tolerance suggests that it may be applicable in free-flap surgery. PMID:26950289

  7. Vibration reduction in helicopter rotors using an active control surface located on the blade

    Millott, T. A.; Friedmann, P. P.

    1992-01-01

    A feasibility study of vibration reduction in a four-bladed helicopter rotor using individual blade control (IBC), which is implemented by an individually controlled aerodynamic surface located on each blade, is presented. For this exploratory study, a simple offset-hinged spring restrained model of the blade is used with fully coupled flap-lag-torsional dynamics for each blade. Deterministic controllers based on local and global system models are implemented to reduce 4/rev hub loads using both an actively controlled aerodynamic surface on each blade as well as conventional IBC, where the complete blade undergoes cyclic pitch change. The effectiveness of the two approaches for simultaneous reduction of the 4/rev hub shears and hub moments is compared. Conventional IBC requires considerably more power to achieve approximately the same level of vibration reduction as that obtained by implementing IBC using an active control surface located on the outboard segment of the blade. The effect of blade torsional flexibility on the vibration reduction effectiveness of the actively controlled surface was also considered and it was found that this parameter has a very substantial influence.

  8. Microglial control of neuronal activity

    Catherine eBéchade

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Fine-tuning of neuronal activity was thought to be a neuron-autonomous mechanism until the discovery that astrocytes are active players of synaptic transmission. The involvement of astrocytes has changed our understanding of the roles of non-neuronal cells and shed new light on the regulation of neuronal activity. Microglial cells are the macrophages of the brain and they have been mostly investigated as immune cells. However recent data discussed in this review support the notion that, similarly to astrocytes, microglia are involved in the regulation of neuronal activity. For instance, in most, if not all, brain pathologies a strong temporal correlation has long been known to exist between the pathological activation of microglia and dysfunction of neuronal activity. Recent studies have convincingly shown that alteration of microglial function is responsible for pathological neuronal activity. This causal relationship has also been demonstrated in mice bearing loss-of-function mutations in genes specifically expressed by microglia. In addition to these long-term regulations of neuronal activity, recent data show that microglia can also rapidly regulate neuronal activity, thereby acting as partners of neurotransmission.

  9. Paradoxical effects of heme arginate on survival of myocutaneous flaps.

    Edmunds, Marie-Claire; Czopek, Alicja; Wigmore, Stephen J; Kluth, David C

    2014-01-01

    Ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI) contributes to partial flap and solid organ transplant failure. Heme-oxygenase 1 (HO-1) is an inducible, cytoprotective enzyme which protects against IRI in solid organ transplant models. Heme arginate (HA), a HO-1 inducer, is a promising, translatable, preconditioning agent. This study investigated the effects of preconditioning with HA on the clinical outcome of a myocutaneous IRI model. Forty male Lewis rats were randomized to intravenously receive 1) Control-NaCl, 2) HA, 3) HA and tin mesoporphyrin (SnMP), a HO-1 inhibitor; and 4) SnMP alone. Twenty-four hours later, an in situ transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap was performed under isoflurane anesthesia. Viability of flaps was measured clinically and by laser-Doppler perfusion scanning. In vitro work on human epidermal keratinocytes (HEKa) assessed the effects of HA, SnMP, and the iron chelator desferrioxamine on 1) cytotoxicity, 2) intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) concentration, and 3) ROS-mediated DNA damage. In contrast to our hypothesis, HA preconditioning produced over 30% more flap necrosis at 48 h compared with controls (P = 0.02). HA-containing treatments produced significantly worse flap perfusion at all postoperative time points. In vitro work showed that HA is cytotoxic to keratinocytes. This cytotoxicity was independent of HO-1 and was mediated by the generation of ROS by free heme. In contrast to solid organ data, pharmacological preconditioning with HA significantly worsened clinical outcome, thus indicating that this is not a viable approach in free flap research. PMID:24089372

  10. Effects of some pharmacological agents on the survival of unipedicled venous flaps: an experimental study.

    Askar, I; Saray, A; Gurlek, A; Sevin, K; Sabuncuoglu, B T

    2001-01-01

    Clinical and experimental studies have been conducted to improve the survival of venous flaps. As a result of these studies, although various survival mechanisms were raised, none obtained satisfactory information. Venous stasis, and the resultant venous thrombosis, is a factor that decreases the survival of venous flaps. In this study, we evaluated the effects of two antiinflammatory agents, etodolac and etofenamate, on the survival of unipedicled venous flaps. In this study, 35 male New Zealand white rabbits (3,500-4,000 g) (70 ears) were used. Perichondrocutaneous flaps, 3 x 4.5 cm in size, were designed and raised, keeping the central veins intact in the middle of venous flap. Central arteries and nerves were ligated and transected both proximally and distally, to prepare unipedicled venous flaps. A silicone sheet was placed between the cartilage tissue and flap, to prevent blood flow and revascularization beneath. The subjects were divided into seven groups, consisting of five rabbits (10 ears). In the negative control group (group I), the single vascular pedicle of venous flaps, central veins were ligated and flaps sutured into their own place as the composite graft. In the positive control group (group II), after venous flaps were prepared, normal saline, 0.2 mL, was given subcutaneously. In the first of five experimental groups (group III), unfractionated heparin (100 U/day) was given subcutaneously. In the second experimental group (group IV), etodolac (5 mg/kg/day) was given subcutaneously. In the third experimental group (group V), etophenamate (5 mg/kg/day) was given orally through a feeding tube. In the fourth experimental group (group VI), parnaparin (5 anti-Xa U/kg/day) was given subcutaneously. In the fifth experimental group (group VII), nadroparin (5 anti-Xa U/kg/day) was given subcutaneously, about 7 days postoperatively. At the eighth postoperative day, surviving areas of venous flaps were measured, and the results were evaluated by Kruskal

  11. Vibration control of active structures an introduction

    Preumont, Andre

    2002-01-01

    This text is an introduction to the dynamics of active structures and to the feedback control of lightly damped flexible structures. The emphasis is placed on basic issues and simple control strategies that work.

  12. Developing Internal Controls through Activities

    Barnes, F. Herbert

    2009-01-01

    Life events can include the Tuesday afternoon cooking class with the group worker or the Saturday afternoon football game, but in the sense that Fritz Redl thought of them, these activities are only threads in a fabric of living that includes all the elements of daily life: playing, working, school-based learning, learning through activities,…

  13. Jet-Engine Exhaust Nozzle With Thrust-Directing Flaps

    Wing, David J.

    1996-01-01

    Convergent/divergent jet-engine exhaust nozzle has cruciform divergent passage containing flaps that move to deflect flow of exhaust in either or both planes perpendicular to main fore-and-aft axis of undeflected flow. Prototype of thrust-vector-control nozzles installed in advanced, high-performance airplanes to provide large pitching (usually, vertical) and yawing (usually, horizontal) attitude-control forces independent of attitude-control forces produced by usual aerodynamic control surfaces.

  14. Determination of trim curves for a flapping-wing MAV

    Armanini, S.F.; Verboom, J.L.; De Croon, G.C.H.E.; De Visser, C.C.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a series of flight tests conducted in order to assess the steady-state flight characteristics and basic control behaviour of the DelFly, a flapping-wing micro aerial vehicle (FWMAV). Flights were conducted in an indoor motion tracking facility and included steady-l

  15. Smart rotor modeling aero-servo-elastic modeling of a smart rotor with adaptive trailing edge flaps

    Bergami, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    A smart rotor is a wind turbine rotor that, through a combination of sensors, control units and actuators actively reduces the variation of the aerodynamic loads it has to withstand. Smart rotors feature?promising load alleviation potential and might provide the technological breakthrough required by the next generation of large wind turbine rotors.The book presents the aero-servo-elastic model of a smart rotor with Adaptive Trailing Edge Flaps for active load alleviation and provides an insight on the rotor aerodynamic, structural and control modeling. A novel model for the unsteady aerodynam

  16. AdVEGF-All6A+ Preconditioning of Murine Ischemic Skin Flaps Is Comparable to Surgical Delay

    Gersch, Robert P.; Fourman, Mitchell S.; Phillips, Brett T.; Nasser, Ahmed; McClain, Steve A.; Khan, Sami U.; Dagum, Alexander B.; Bui, Duc T.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Surgical flap delay is commonly used in preconditioning reconstructive flaps to prevent necrosis. However, staged procedures are not ideal. Pharmacologic up-regulation of angiogenic and arteriogenic factors before flap elevation poses a nonsurgical approach to improve flap survival. Methods: Male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into control (n = 16), surgical delay (Delay), AdNull, AdEgr-1, and AdVEGF (n ≥ 9/group) groups. Delay rats had a 9 cm × 3 cm cranial based pedicle skin f...

  17. Investigation of the Effectiveness of Boundary-layer Control by Blowing over a Combination of Sliding and Plain Flaps in Deflecting a Propeller Slipstream Downward for Vertical Take-off

    Spreemann, Kenneth P; Kuhn, Richard E

    1956-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in order to determine the effectiveness of blowing a jet of air over the flaps of a wing equipped with a 50-percent-chord sliding flap and a 25-percent-chord plain flap in deflecting a propeller slipstream downward for vertical take-off and the results are presented herein. The effects of a leading-edge slat, ground proximity, end plate, and propeller position were also investigated. The tests were conducted in a static-thrust facility at the Langley Aeronautical Laboratory.

  18. Critical Appraisal of Nasolabial Flap for Reconstruction of Oral Cavity Defects in Cancer Patients

    Purpose: Re-evaluation of nasolabial flap in lip and oral cavity reconstruction and role of each of its variants in reconstructing various intermediate size defects was addressed. Patients and Methods: Case-series study was con-ducted in National Cancer Institute, Cairo University over the period from July 2005 - January 2009 which included 23 patients with clinically T-l N0, T-2 N0 invasive squamous cell carcinoma of buccal mucosa and the vermilion border of the lower lip. Immediately after surgical excision, one stage reconstruction of the defect was done using a type of nasolabial flap. All patients were followed and the median follow-up period was 7.5 month. Results: Twelve patients with the lower lip carcinoma and 11 patients with the carcinoma of buccal mucosa underwent surgical excision under frozen section control. 19 fasciocutaneous nasolabial flap and 4 facial artery musculomucosal flaps were used for reconstruction. Minor wound complications occurred in 2 flaps and one patient required secondary suture. Flap viability was reliable and was not affected by performance of a synchronous neck dissection. Functional results were satisfactory, cosmetic results were good in most of the patients and excellent when facial artery musculomucosal flap was used. Conclusion: The nasolabial flap is a reliable and minimally traumatic local flap for one stage reconstruction of medium size defects in the oral cavity. The abundant blood supply allowed its modification in order to cover larger defects or to obtain better cosmetic results. This versatility makes it more widely used thus minimizing the use of local tongue flaps and split thickness grafts for covering these medium size defects in cases of buccal mucosa cancer or affecting the other lip or commissure in cases of lip cancer. It has a high viability rate, low complication rate; it is quick and easy to perform in addition to its satisfactory functional and cosmetic results.

  19. SLIDING MODE CONTROL FOR ACTIVE AUTOMOBILE SUSPENSIONS

    1998-01-01

    Nonlinear control methods are presented based on theory of sliding mode control (SMC) or variable structure control (VSC) for application to active automobile suspensions. Requirements of reducing manufacturing cost and energy consumption of the active suspension system may be satisfiedby reasonable design of the sliding surface and hydraulic servo system. Emphasis is placed on the study of the discrete sliding mode control method (DSMC) applicable for a new sort of speed on-off solenoid valves of anti-dust capability and low price. Robustness and effectiveness of the feedback linearized controller in typical road conditions are demonstrated by numerical results fora quarter-car suspension model.

  20. The possibility for use of venous flaps in plastic surgery

    The use of venous flaps is controversial. The mechanism of perfusion of venous flaps is still not fully understood. The research was conducted on 56 white rats. In our experimental work we studied two different models of venous flaps: pedicled venous flap (PVF) and pedicled arterialized venous flap (PAVF). Our results showed that postoperative congestion was present in all flaps. However 66.7% of all pedicled venous flaps and 100% of all pedicled arterialized venous flaps eventually survived. Histological examination revealed that postoperatively the blood flow in the skin of the pedicled arterialized venous flap became «re-reversed» again; there were no differences between mechanism of survival of venous flaps and other flaps. On the 7-14th day in the skin of all flaps were processes of neoangiogenesis and proliferation. Hence the best scenario for the clinical use of venous flaps unfolds when both revascularization and skin coverage are required

  1. The possibility for use of venous flaps in plastic surgery

    Baytinger, V. F.; Kurochkina, O. S.; Selianinov, K. V.; Baytinger, A. V.; Dzyuman, A. N.

    2015-11-01

    The use of venous flaps is controversial. The mechanism of perfusion of venous flaps is still not fully understood. The research was conducted on 56 white rats. In our experimental work we studied two different models of venous flaps: pedicled venous flap (PVF) and pedicled arterialized venous flap (PAVF). Our results showed that postoperative congestion was present in all flaps. However 66.7% of all pedicled venous flaps and 100% of all pedicled arterialized venous flaps eventually survived. Histological examination revealed that postoperatively the blood flow in the skin of the pedicled arterialized venous flap became «re-reversed» again; there were no differences between mechanism of survival of venous flaps and other flaps. On the 7-14th day in the skin of all flaps were processes of neoangiogenesis and proliferation. Hence the best scenario for the clinical use of venous flaps unfolds when both revascularization and skin coverage are required.

  2. The possibility for use of venous flaps in plastic surgery

    Baytinger, V. F., E-mail: baitinger@mail.tomsknet.ru; Kurochkina, O. S., E-mail: kurochkinaos@yandex.ru; Selianinov, K. V.; Baytinger, A. V. [Research Institute of Microsurgery, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Dzyuman, A. N. [Siberian State Medical University, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-17

    The use of venous flaps is controversial. The mechanism of perfusion of venous flaps is still not fully understood. The research was conducted on 56 white rats. In our experimental work we studied two different models of venous flaps: pedicled venous flap (PVF) and pedicled arterialized venous flap (PAVF). Our results showed that postoperative congestion was present in all flaps. However 66.7% of all pedicled venous flaps and 100% of all pedicled arterialized venous flaps eventually survived. Histological examination revealed that postoperatively the blood flow in the skin of the pedicled arterialized venous flap became «re-reversed» again; there were no differences between mechanism of survival of venous flaps and other flaps. On the 7-14th day in the skin of all flaps were processes of neoangiogenesis and proliferation. Hence the best scenario for the clinical use of venous flaps unfolds when both revascularization and skin coverage are required.

  3. Active Flow Control on Bidirectional Rotors for Tidal MHK Applications

    Shiu, Henry [Research Engineer; van Dam, Cornelis P. [Professor

    2013-08-22

    A marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) tidal turbine extracts energy from tidal currents, providing clean, sustainable electricity generation. In general, all MHK conversion technologies are confronted with significant operational hurdles, resulting in both increased capital and operations and maintenance (O&M) costs. To counter these high costs while maintaining reliability, MHK turbine designs can be simplified. Prior study found that a tidal turbine could be cost-effectively simplified by removing blade pitch and rotor/nacelle yaw. Its rotor would run in one direction during ebb and then reverse direction when the current switched to flood. We dubbed such a turbine a bidirectional rotor tidal turbine (BRTT). The bidirectional hydrofoils of a BRTT are less efficient than conventional hydrofoils and capture less energy, but the elimination of the pitch and yaw systems were estimated to reduce levelized cost of energy by 7.8%-9.6%. In this study, we investigated two mechanisms for recapturing some of the performance shortfall of the BRTT. First, we developed a novel set of hydrofoils, designated the yy series, for BRTT application. Second, we investigated the use of active flow control via microtabs. Microtabs are small deployable/retractable tabs, typically located near the leading or trailing edge of an air/hydrofoil with height on the order of the boundary layer thickness (1% - 2% of chord). They deploy approximately perpendicularly to the foil surface and, like gurney flaps and plain flaps, globally affect the aerodynamics of the airfoil. By strategically placing microtabs and selectively deploying them based on the direction of the inflow, performance of a BRTT rotor can be improved while retaining bidirectional operation. The yy foils were computationally designed and analyzed. They exhibited better performance than the baseline bidirectional foil, the ellipse. For example, the yyb07cn-180 had 14.7% higher (l/d)max than an ellipse of equal thickness. The yyb07cn

  4. Active vibration control of lightweight floor systems

    Baader, J.; Fontana, M.

    2016-04-01

    Wide-span and lightweight floors are often prone to structural vibrations due to their low resonance frequency and poor material damping. Their dynamic behaviour can be improved using passive, semi-active or active vibration control devices. The following article proposes a novel method for the controller synthesis for active vibration control. An existing passive TMD (tuned mass damper) is modelled and equipped with an actuator in order to provide more efficient damping. Using an iterative optimization approach under constraints, an optimal controller is found which minimizes a quadratic cost function in frequency domain. A simulation of an existing test bench shows that the active vibration control device is able to provide increased damping compared to the passive TMD.

  5. The role of tip deflection on the thrust produced by rigid flapping fins

    Huera-Huarte, Francisco; Gharib, Morteza

    2015-11-01

    It is well known that flexibility plays an important role in the propulsion performance and efficiency of oscillating fin based propulsion systems. Compliance is one of the aspects that has received more attention, as it seems to be a common feature in nature's flyers and swimmers. Active control strategies are also common in nature. We will show how by deflecting only the last 10% of length of a rigid fin, at the tip, the thrust can be changed dramatically. This can be thought as an alternative to passive flexibility for controlling very efficiently the momentum transfer in the wake and therefore the thrust generation when flapping. A series of experiments have been carried with a robotic fin that allowed the control of its flapping kinematics as well as the control of the motions of its tip independently. We will be showing situations in which the tip was kept at a certain fixed position during a power stroke, and others in which it moved either in-phase or out-of-phase with the fin. The observed thrust and wake dynamics will be discussed for all these situations. The authors would like to acknowledge the financial support provided by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation and by the Spanish Ministerio de Economia y competitividad (MINECO) through grant DPI2012-37904. Visiting Associate in Aerospace, California Institute of Technology.

  6. Wind tunnel investigation of a high lift system with pneumatic flow control

    Victor, Pricop Mihai; Mircea, Boscoianu; Daniel-Eugeniu, Crunteanu

    2016-06-01

    Next generation passenger aircrafts require more efficient high lift systems under size and mass constraints, to achieve more fuel efficiency. This can be obtained in various ways: to improve/maintain aerodynamic performance while simplifying the mechanical design of the high lift system going to a single slotted flap, to maintain complexity and improve the aerodynamics even more, etc. Laminar wings have less efficient leading edge high lift systems if any, requiring more performance from the trailing edge flap. Pulsed blowing active flow control (AFC) in the gap of single element flap is investigated for a relatively large model. A wind tunnel model, test campaign and results and conclusion are presented.

  7. Active Control of Fan Noise

    Nobuhiko YAMASAKI; Hirotoshi TAJIMA

    2008-01-01

    In the wake-rotor interaction fan noise, a number of the interacting modes at the blade passing frequency (BPF)and its harmonics are generated which are prescribed by the number of stator and rotor blades etc. In the present study, the dominant mode is tried to be suppressed by the secondary sound from the loudspeaker actuators. One of the novel features of the present system is the adoption of the control board with the Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) hardware and the LabVIEW software to synchronize the circumferentially installed loudspeaker actuators with the relative location of rotational blades under arbitrary fan rotational speeds. The experiments were conducted under the conditions of three rotational speeds of 2004, 3150, and 4002 [rpm]. The reduction in the sound pressure level (SPL) was observed for all three rotational speeds. The sound pressure level at the BPF was reduced approximately 13 [dB] for 2004 [rpm] case, but not so large reduction was attained for other cases probably due to the inefficiency of the loudspeaker actuators at high frequencies

  8. Adjoint-based optimization of flapping plates hinged with a trailing-edge flap

    Min Xu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It is important to understand the impact of wing-morphing on aerodynamic performance in the study of flapping-wing flight of birds and insects. We use a flapping plate hinged with a trailing-edge flap as a simplified model for flexible/morphing wings in hovering. The trailing-edge flapping motion is optimized by an adjoint-based approach. The optimized configuration suggests that the trailing-edge flap can substantially enhance the overall lift. Further analysis indicates that the lift enhancement by the trailing-edge flapping is from the change of circulation in two ways: the local circulation change by the rotational motion of the flap, and the modification of vortex shedding process by the relative location between the trailing-edge flap and leading-edge main plate.

  9. Manually controlled neutron-activation system

    Johns, R. A.; Carothers, G. A.

    1982-01-01

    A manually controlled neutron activation system, the Manual Reactor Activation System, was designed and built and has been operating at one of the Savannah River Plant's production reactors. With this system, samples can be irradiated for up to 24 hours and pneumatically transferred to a shielded repository for decay until their activity is low enough for them to be handled at a radiobench. The Manual Reactor Activation System was built to provide neutron activation of solid waste forms for the Alternative Waste Forms Leach Testing Program. Neutron activation of the bulk sample prior to leaching permits sensitive multielement radiometric analyses of the leachates.

  10. DSP Control of Line Hybrid Active Filter

    Dan, Stan George; Benjamin, Doniga Daniel; Magureanu, R.;

    2005-01-01

    Active Power Filters have been intensively explored in the past decade. Hybrid active filters inherit the efficiency of passive filters and the improved performance of active filters, and thus constitute a viable improved approach for harmonic compensation. In this paper a parallel hybrid filter...... is studied for current harmonic compensation. The hybrid filter is formed by a single tuned Le filter and a small-rated power active filter, which are directly connected in series without any matching transformer. Thus the required rating of the active filter is much smaller than a conventional standalone...... active filter. Simulation and experimental results obtained in laboratory confirmed the validity and effectiveness of the control....

  11. Active Power Filter Using Predicted Current Control

    Xiaojie, Y.; Pivoňka, P.; Valouch, Viktor

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. 1 (2001), s. 41-50. ISSN 0001-7043 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2057903 Keywords : active power filter * control strategy Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  12. Davis flap: the glory still present

    El-Sabbagh, Ahmed Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Upper third defects of the ear are too large to be closed primarily without distorting the auricle. Full thickness defects can be reconstructed with local flaps. In this article, Davis flap was used to fill the upper third defects of the ear with some modifications. Patients and methods: Eight patients underwent reconstruction of full thickness auricular defects with Davis flaps from July 2012 to December 2014. The posterior surface of the flap and the raw area of conchal area were covered by full thickness graft taken from posterior surface of ear. Results: All flaps survived. No congestion was noted. The donor sites and skin grafts healed uneventfully. Conclusion: Davis flap is a simple and reproducible tool for reconstruction of upper third of ear. PMID:27274439

  13. Flexible flapping wings with self-organized microwrinkles.

    Tanaka, Hiroto; Okada, Hiroyuki; Shimasue, Yosuke; Liu, Hao

    2015-08-01

    Bio-inspired flapping wings with a wrinkled wing membrane were designed and fabricated. The wings consist of carbon fibre-reinforced plastic frames and a polymer film with microscale wrinkles inspired by bird feathers and the corrugations of insect wings. The flexural and tensile stiffness of the wrinkled film can be controlled by modifying the orientations and waveforms of the wrinkles, thereby expanding the design space of flexible wings for micro flapping-wing aerial robots. A self-organization phenomenon was exploited in the fabrication of the microwrinkles such that microscale wrinkles spanning a broad wing area were spontaneously created. The wavy shape of these self-organized wrinkles was used as a mould, and a Parylene film was deposited onto the mould to form a wrinkled wing film. The effect of the waveforms of the wrinkles on the film stiffness was investigated theoretically, computationally and experimentally. Compared with a flat film, the flexural stiffness was increased by two orders of magnitude, and the tensile stiffness was reduced by two orders of magnitude. To demonstrate the effect of the wrinkles on the actual deformation of the flapping wings and the resulting aerodynamic forces, the fabricated wrinkled wings were tested using a tethered electric flapping mechanism. Chordwise unidirectional wrinkles were found to prevent fluttering near the trailing edge and to produce a greater aerodynamic lift compared with a flat wing or a wing with spanwise wrinkles. Our results suggest that the fine stiffness control of the wing film that can be achieved by tuning the microwrinkles can improve the aerodynamic performance of future flapping-wing aerial robots. PMID:26119657

  14. Active Noise Control in Propeller Aircraft

    Johansson, Sven; Claesson, Ingvar

    2001-01-01

    A noisy environment dominated by low frequency noise can often be improved through the use of active noise control. This situation arises naturally in propeller aircraft where the propellers induce periodic low frequency noise inside the cabin. The cabin noise is typically rather high, and the passenger flight comfort could be improved considerably if this level were significantly reduced. This paper addresses same design aspects for multiple-reference active noise control systems based on th...

  15. Experimental skin flaps and nitric oxide

    Gribbe, Örjan

    2006-01-01

    Abstract. Surgical flaps are used in plastic surgery to reconstruct tissue defects due to trauma or cancer removal. Occasionally flaps are subjected to ischemia and reperfusion injury leading to flap failure. Nitric oxide (NO), a small gaseous molecule, has vast physiological importance as it participates in the regulation of blood pressure, blood flow, neurotransmission and immune response. NO is synthesized by the enzyme NO synthase (NOS), which exists in both constitutiv...

  16. Semi-active control of dynamically excited structures using active interaction control

    Zhang, Yunfeng

    2001-01-01

    This thesis presents a family of semi-active control algorithms termed Active Interaction Control (AIC) used for response control of dynamically excited structures. The AIC approach has been developed as a semi﷓active means of protecting building structures against large earthquakes. The AIC algorithms include the Active Interface Damping (AID), Optimal Connection Strategy (OCS), and newly developed Tuned Interaction Damping (TID) algorithms. All of the AIC algorithms are founded upon ...

  17. Wing flapping with minimum energy

    Jones, R. T.

    1980-01-01

    A technique employed by Prandtl and Munk is adapted for the case of a wing in flapping motion to determine its lift distribution. The problem may be reduced to one of minimizing induced drag for a specified and periodically varying bending moment at the wing root. It is concluded that two wings in close tandem arrangement, moving in opposite phase, would eliminate the induced aerodynamic losses calculated

  18. Active load control techniques for wind turbines.

    van Dam, C.P. (University of California, Davis, CA); Berg, Dale E.; Johnson, Scott J. (University of California, Davis, CA)

    2008-07-01

    This report provides an overview on the current state of wind turbine control and introduces a number of active techniques that could be potentially used for control of wind turbine blades. The focus is on research regarding active flow control (AFC) as it applies to wind turbine performance and loads. The techniques and concepts described here are often described as 'smart structures' or 'smart rotor control'. This field is rapidly growing and there are numerous concepts currently being investigated around the world; some concepts already are focused on the wind energy industry and others are intended for use in other fields, but have the potential for wind turbine control. An AFC system can be broken into three categories: controls and sensors, actuators and devices, and the flow phenomena. This report focuses on the research involved with the actuators and devices and the generated flow phenomena caused by each device.

  19. Active and passive vibration control of structures

    Spelsberg-Korspeter, Gottfried

    2014-01-01

    Active and Passive Vibration Control of Structures form an issue of very actual interest in many different fields of engineering, for example in the automotive and aerospace industry, in precision engineering (e.g. in large telescopes), and also in civil engineering. The papers in this volume bring together engineers of different background, and it fill gaps between structural mechanics, vibrations and modern control theory.  Also links between the different applications in structural control are shown.

  20. Active control of vibrations in pedestrian bridges

    Álvaro Cunha; Carlos Moutinho

    1999-01-01

    This paper, apart from making a brief general reference to vibration problems in pedestrian bridges, as well as to the form of modelling of dynamic pedestrian loads, presents the use of a predictive control strategy for the numerical simulation of the dynamic response of actively controlled structures of this type. The consideration of this control strategy permitted the development of a computational model, which was applied to the study of a pedestrian cable-stayed bridge, in order to show ...

  1. Inferior Gluteal Perforator Flaps for Breast Reconstruction

    Allen, Robert J.; LoTempio, Maria M.; Granzow, Jay W.

    2006-01-01

    Perforator flaps represent the latest in the evolution of soft tissue flaps. They allow the transfer of the patient's own skin and fat in a reliable manner with minimal donor-site morbidity. The powerful perforator flap concept allows transfer of tissue from numerous, well-described donor sites to almost any distant site with suitable recipient vessels. The inferior gluteal artery perforator (I-GAP) flap is one option that allows a large volume of tissue to be used for breast reconstruction w...

  2. Optimal propulsive flapping in Stokes flows

    Swimming fish and flying insects use the flapping of fins and wings to generate thrust. In contrast, microscopic organisms typically deform their appendages in a wavelike fashion. Since a flapping motion with two degrees of freedom is able, in theory, to produce net forces from a time-periodic actuation at all Reynolds numbers, we compute in this paper the optimal flapping kinematics of a rigid spheroid in a Stokes flow. The hydrodynamics for the force generation and energetics of the flapping motion is solved exactly. We then compute analytically the gradient of a flapping efficiency in the space of all flapping gaits and employ it to derive numerically the optimal flapping kinematics as a function of the shape of the flapper and the amplitude of the motion. The kinematics of optimal flapping are observed to depend weakly on the flapper shape and are very similar to the figure-eight motion observed in the motion of insect wings. Our results suggest that flapping could be a exploited experimentally as a propulsion mechanism valid across the whole range of Reynolds numbers. (paper)

  3. Optimal propulsive flapping in Stokes flows

    Was, Loic

    2014-01-01

    Swimming fish and flying insects use the flapping of fins and wings to generate thrust. In contrast, microscopic organisms typically deform their appendages in a wavelike fashion. Since a flapping motion with two degrees of freedom is able, in theory, to produce net forces from a time-periodic actuation at all Reynolds number, we compute in this paper the optimal flapping kinematics of a rigid spheroid in a Stokes flow. The hydrodynamics for the force generation and energetics of the flapping motion is solved exactly. We then compute analytically the gradient of a flapping efficiency in the space of all flapping gaits and employ it to derive numerically the optimal flapping kinematics as a function of the shape of the flapper and the amplitude of the motion. The kinematics of optimal flapping are observed to depend weakly on the flapper shape and are very similar to the figure-eight motion observed in the motion of insect wings. Our results suggest that flapping could be a exploited experimentally as a propul...

  4. Optimal propulsive flapping in Stokes flows.

    Was, Loïc; Lauga, Eric

    2014-03-01

    Swimming fish and flying insects use the flapping of fins and wings to generate thrust. In contrast, microscopic organisms typically deform their appendages in a wavelike fashion. Since a flapping motion with two degrees of freedom is able, in theory, to produce net forces from a time-periodic actuation at all Reynolds numbers, we compute in this paper the optimal flapping kinematics of a rigid spheroid in a Stokes flow. The hydrodynamics for the force generation and energetics of the flapping motion is solved exactly. We then compute analytically the gradient of a flapping efficiency in the space of all flapping gaits and employ it to derive numerically the optimal flapping kinematics as a function of the shape of the flapper and the amplitude of the motion. The kinematics of optimal flapping are observed to depend weakly on the flapper shape and are very similar to the figure-eight motion observed in the motion of insect wings. Our results suggest that flapping could be a exploited experimentally as a propulsion mechanism valid across the whole range of Reynolds numbers. PMID:24343130

  5. Basic Perforator Flap Hemodynamic Mathematical Model

    Tao, Youlun; Ding, Maochao; Wang, Aiguo; Zhuang, Yuehong; Chang, Shi-Min; Mei, Jin; Hallock, Geoffrey G.

    2016-01-01

    Background: A mathematical model to help explain the hemodynamic characteristics of perforator flaps based on blood flow resistance systems within the flap will serve as a theoretical guide for the future study and clinical applications of these flaps. Methods: There are 3 major blood flow resistance network systems of a perforator flap. These were defined as the blood flow resistance of an anastomosis between artery and artery of adjacent perforasomes, between artery and vein within a perforasome, and then between vein and vein corresponding to the outflow of that perforasome. From this, a calculation could be made of the number of such blood flow resistance network systems that must be crossed for all perforasomes within a perforator flap to predict whether that arrangement would be viable. Results: The summation of blood flow resistance networks from each perforasome in a given perforator flap could predict which portions would likely survive. This mathematical model shows how this is directly dependent on the location of the vascular pedicle to the flap and whether supercharging or superdrainage maneuvers have been added. These configurations will give an estimate of the hemodynamic characteristics for the given flap design. Conclusions: This basic mathematical model can (1) conveniently determine the degree of difficulty for each perforasome within a perforator flap to survive; (2) semiquantitatively allow the calculation of basic hemodynamic parameters; and (3) allow the assessment of the pros and cons expected for each pattern of perforasomes encountered clinically based on predictable hemodynamic observations.

  6. Control of nucleus accumbens activity with neurofeedback

    Greer, Stephanie M.; Trujillo, Andrew J.; Glover, Gary H.; Knutson, Brian

    2014-01-01

    The nucleus accumbens (NAcc) plays critical roles in healthy motivation and learning, as well as in psychiatric disorders (including schizophrenia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder). Thus, techniques that confer control of NAcc activity might inspire new therapeutic interventions. By providing second-to-second temporal resolution of activity in small subcortical regions, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) can resolve online changes in NAcc activity, which can then be pres...

  7. Adaptive control of active filter using DSP

    In order to reduce output-voltage ripple of power supply, an active filter is necessary. In this paper, the active filter with DSP is proposed. The waveform from active filter can be flexibly improved by DSP programming. The output-voltage ripple can be enough reduced by mixing frequency components of the input-voltage ripple. The result of adaptive control using LMS algorism is presented. The improvement by using filtered-X method is discussed. (author)

  8. Development of a smart trailing-edge flap actuator with multistage stroke amplifier for a rotor blade

    Lee, Taeoh; Chopra, Inderjit

    2000-06-01

    The present research experimentally investigates the feasibility of a trailing-edge flap mechanism actuated in a helicopter rotor by piezoelectric stacks in conjunction with a dual-stage mechanical stroke amplifier to actively control vibration. A new mechanical leverage amplification concept was developed to extend the capability of a simple lever-fulcrum stroke amplifier. A refined prototype actuator and flap mechanism were designed and fabricated using five piezostacks. The bench-top test of the actuator showed 73.7 mils of free stroke and uniform displacement output up to a frequency of 150 Hz. Spin testing was performed in the vacuum chamber to evaluate the performance in rotating environment, and the refined prototype actuator showed approximately 13% loss in actuation stroke at 710 g of full-scale centrifugal loading. In the Open-Jet wind tunnel testing to simulate the aerodynamic loading environment, the peak-to-peak flap deflections above 8 degrees for freestream velocity of 120 ft/sec were obtained at different excitation frequencies. It demonstrated the capability of the refined prototype actuator in rotating environment to potentially reduce helicopter vibration.

  9. Wind Turbine Rotors with Active Vibration Control

    Svendsen, Martin Nymann

    This thesis presents a framework for structural modeling, analysis and active vibration damping of rotating wind turbine blades and rotors. A structural rotor model is developed in terms of finite beam elements in a rotating frame of reference. The element comprises a representation of general...... that these are geometrically well separated. For active vibration control in three-bladed wind turbine rotors the present work presents a resonance-based method for groups of one collective and two whirling modes. The controller is based on the existing resonant format and introduces a dual system...... system. As in the method for non-rotating systems, an explicit procedure for optimal calibration of the controller gains is established. The control system is applied to an 86m wind turbine rotor by means of active strut actuator mechanisms. The prescribed additional damping ratios are reproduced almost...

  10. THE CONTROL AND EVALUATION OF PROMOTIONAL ACTIVITIES

    Felicia Sabou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper focused on importance and benefits of control and evaluation of marketing activities. The control of efficiency review the assessment of the resources for marketing activity, checking also the efficiency of the human resources, advertising, promotion activities and distribution activities. In the analyse of human resources the most important ratio are: the average of costumers visits on a day, the number of custom order received from 100 visits, the number of new customers from a period, the number of lost customers from a period, the marketing human expenditures from all the sales.The strategic control is made to check if the objectives and the company strategy are adapted to the marketing environment.