WorldWideScience

Sample records for active core fluctuations

  1. Fluctuation BES measurements with the ITER core CXRS prototype spectrometer

    Pokol, G.I., E-mail: pokol@reak.bme.hu [Institute of Nuclear Techniques, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, EURATOM Association, PO Box 91, H-1521, Budapest (Hungary); Zoletnik, S.; Dunai, D. [WIGNER RCP, RMKI, EURATOM Association, PO Box 91, H-1521, Budapest (Hungary); Marchuk, O. [Institut für Energieforschung – Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Jülich Gmbh, Association EURATOM-FZJ, member of Trilateral Euregio Cluster, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Baross, T. [WIGNER RCP, RMKI, EURATOM Association, PO Box 91, H-1521, Budapest (Hungary); Erdei, G. [Department of Atomic Physics, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, EURATOM Association, PO Box 91, H-1521, Budapest (Hungary); Grunda, G.; Kiss, I.G. [WIGNER RCP, RMKI, EURATOM Association, PO Box 91, H-1521, Budapest (Hungary); Kovacsik, A. [Institute of Nuclear Techniques, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, EURATOM Association, PO Box 91, H-1521, Budapest (Hungary); Hellermann, M. von; Lischtschenko, O. [Dutch-Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, Association EURATOM-FOM, Partner in the Trilateral Euregio Cluster and ITER-NL, PO Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Biel, W. [Institut für Energieforschung – Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Jülich Gmbh, Association EURATOM-FZJ, member of Trilateral Euregio Cluster, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Jaspers, R.J.E. [Science and Technology of Nuclear Fusion, Eindhoven University of Technology (Netherlands); Durkut, M. [TNO Science and Industry, Partner in ITER-NL, PO Box 155, 2600 AD Delft (Netherlands)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • We integrated a fluctuation beam emission measurement into the ITER CXRS prototype spectrometer. • The fluctuation BES measurement provided data at TEXTOR that agree well with the simulation based on the Simulation Of Spectra package. • The same simulation method has been used to evaluate the feasibility of a fluctuation BES measurement on the ITER DNB using the CXRS periscopes. -- Abstract: The ITER core CXRS diagnostic system collects the light emitted from the interaction of the diagnostic neutral beam with the core plasma and guides it via a mirror labyrinth through the upper port plug no. 3 towards a fiber bundle, which then transmits the light into a set of spectrometers for spectral analysis. In order to test the accessibility of the special parameter range required for the ITER measurement, a prototype spectrometer was built and operated successfully at the TEXTOR tokamak. In addition to the He/Be, C/Ne and H/D/T regular spectral channels, a fluctuation beam emission spectroscopy (BES) system has been integrated to measure core MHD activity, and validate corresponding ITER simulation results. The fluctuation system can be operated as an alternative to the spectral BES measurement, and has 8 spatial channels sampled at 2 MHz. In this paper, we present details of the fluctuation BES system and its interface to the ITER prototype spectrometer along with simulation and measurement results at TEXTOR. We show that the measurement fully confirms the simulation results on achievable photon current at the detector and on the signal to noise ratio.

  2. Core temperature fluctuations and redistributions at Fort St. Vrain HTGR

    Fort St. Vrain high temperature gas-cooled reactor in the USA has exhibited two types of anomalous behavior called core temperature fluctuations and redistributions during the rise-to-power test program. These originally unexpected phenomena pose an important technical issue to the design, research and development works for JAERI experimental VHTR consisting of prismatic block type fuel elements similar to those of Fort St. Vrain. This report reviews the fluctuation/redistribution problem encountered in Fort St. Vrain along with its resolution. (author)

  3. Activity driven fluctuations in living cells

    Fodor, É; Gov, N S; Visco, P; Weitz, D A; van Wijland, F

    2015-01-01

    We propose a model for the dynamics of a probe embedded in a living cell, where both thermal fluctuations and nonequilibrium activity coexist. The model is based on a confining harmonic potential describing the elastic cytoskeletal matrix, which undergoes random active hops as a result of the nonequilibrium rearrangements within the cell. We describe the probe's statistics and we bring forth quantities affected by the nonequilibrium activity. We find an excellent agreement between the predictions of our model and experimental results for tracers inside living cells. Finally, we exploit our model to arrive at quantitative predictions for the parameters characterizing nonequilibrium activity, such as the typical time scale of the activity and the amplitude of the active fluctuations.

  4. Extreme fluctuations of active Brownian motion

    Pietzonka, Patrick; Kleinbeck, Kevin; Seifert, Udo

    2016-05-01

    In active Brownian motion, an internal propulsion mechanism interacts with translational and rotational thermal noise and other internal fluctuations to produce directed motion. We derive the distribution of its extreme fluctuations and identify its universal properties using large deviation theory. The limits of slow and fast internal dynamics give rise to a kink-like and parabolic behavior of the corresponding rate functions, respectively. For dipolar Janus particles in two- and three-dimensions interacting with a field, we predict a novel symmetry akin to, but different from, the one related to entropy production. Measurements of these extreme fluctuations could thus be used to infer properties of the underlying, often hidden, network of states.

  5. The dynamics of core temperature fluctuations during sawtooth oscillations on TEXT-U

    Core electron temperature fluctuations are measured in a tokamak plasma where some degree of time resolution is achieved. There is a strong correlation between the turbulence level and the phase of the sawtooth oscillation. A global linear relationship between the temperature fluctuation amplitude and the electron temperature gradient scale length is found. The enhancement in fluctuations at the sawtooth crash is correlated to a steepening of the electron temperature gradient created as the sawtooth heat pulse propagates outward

  6. Core fluctuations and current profile dynamics in the MST reversed-field pinch

    First measurements of the current density profile, magnetic field fluctuations and electrostatic (e.s.) particle flux in the core of a high-temperature reversed-field pinch (RFP) are presented. We report three new results: (1) The current density peaks during the slow ramp phase of the sawtooth cycle and flattens promptly at the crash. Profile flattening can be linked to magnetic relaxation and the dynamo which is predicted to drive anti-parallel current in the core. Measured core magnetic fluctuations are observed to increases four-fold at the crash. Between sawtooth crashes, measurements indicate the particle flux driven by e.s. fluctuations is too small to account for the total radial particle flux. (2) Core magnetic fluctuations are observed to decrease at least twofold in plasmas where energy confinement time improves ten-fold. In this case, the radial particle flux is also reduced, suggesting core e.s. fluctuation-induced transport may play role in confinement. (3) The parallel current density increases in the outer region of the plasma during high confinement, as expected, due to the applied edge parallel electric field. However, the core current density also increases due to dynamo reduction and the emergence of runaway electrons. (author)

  7. Nonthermal Fluctuations and Mechanics of the Active Cell Nucleus

    Smith, K; Byrd, H; MacKintosh, F C; Kilfoil, M L

    2013-01-01

    We present direct measurements of fluctuations in the nucleus of yeast cells. While prior work has shown these fluctuations to be active and non-thermal in character, their origin and time dependence are not understood. We show that nuclear fluctuations can be quantitatively understood by uncorrelated, active force fluctuations driving a nuclear medium that is dominated by an uncondensed DNA solution, for which we perform rheological measurements on an in vitro model system under similar conditions to what is expected in the nucleus. We conclude that the eukaryotic nucleus of living cells is a nonequilibrium soft material whose fluctuations are actively driven, and are far from thermal in their time dependence.

  8. On the role of fluctuations at the boundary of Earth's solid core

    The fluctuation effects at the boundary between the internal solid and external liquid regions of the Earth's core are considered within the vitrification model. If the internal core is characterized by a relatively small static shear modulus and shear acoustic oscillations, this phase transition becomes slightly stepwise and can be accompanied by critical phenomena. The corresponding fluctuation corrections to the thermodynamic derivatives are calculated with arbitrary critical indices. The propagation and absorption of seismic waves, which become weakly anisotropic due to the anisotropic 'liquid' inclusions (which arise in the hysteretic boundary region due to the Earth's rotation and viscous stress effect), are considered. The resulting estimates are compared with the existing geophysical data.

  9. Late Holocene vegetation changes in relation with climate fluctuations and human activities in Languedoc (Southern France)

    J. Azuara; N. Combourieu-Nebout; V. Lebreton; F. Mazier; S. D. Müller; L. Dezileau

    2015-01-01

    Holocene climate fluctuations and human activities since the Neolithic have shaped present-day Mediterranean environments. Separating anthropogenic effects from climatic impacts to reconstruct Mediterranean paleoenvironments over the last millennia remains a challenging issue. High resolution pollen analyses were undertaken on two cores from the Palavasian lagoon system (Hérault, southern France). These records allow reconstruction of vegetation dynamics ove...

  10. Detection of Non-Equilibrium Fluctuations in Active Gels

    Bacanu, Alexandru; Broedersz, Chase; Gladrow, Jannes; Mackintosh, Fred; Schmidt, Christoph; Fakhri, Nikta

    Active force generation at the molecular scale in cells can result in stochastic non-equilibrium dynamics on mesoscpopic scales. Molecular motors such as myosin can drive steady-state stress fluctuations in cytoskeletal networks. Here, we present a non-invasive technique to probe non-equilibrium fluctuations in an active gel using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). SWNTs are semiflexible polymers with intrinsic fluorescence in the near infrared. Both thermal and active motor-induced forces in the network induce transverse fluctuations of SWNTs. We demonstrate that active driven shape fluctuations of the SWNTs exhibit dynamics that reflect the non-equilibrium activity, in particular the emergence of correlations between the bending modes. We discuss the observation of breaking of detailed balance in this configurational space of the SWNT probes. Supported by National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate Student Fellowship (NDSEG).

  11. Coupling of Rotational Motion with Shape Fluctuations of Core-shell Microgels Having Tunable Softness

    Bolisetty, S; Hoffmann, M.; Lekkala, S.; Hellweg, Th.; Ballauff, M.; Harnau, L.

    2009-01-01

    The influence of shape fluctuations on deformable thermosensitive microgels in aqueous solution is investigated by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and depolarized dynamic light scattering (DDLS). The systems under study consist of a solid core of polystyrene and a thermosensitive shell of cross-linked poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPA) without and with embedded palladium nanoparticles. PNIPA is soluble in water, but has a lower critical solution temperature at 32 C (LCST). Below the LCST the ...

  12. Motion of Euglena Gracilis: Active Fluctuations and Velocity Distribution

    Romanczuk, Pawel; Scholz, Dimitri; Lobaskin, Vladimir; Schimansky-Geier, Lutz

    2015-01-01

    We study the velocity distribution of unicellular swimming algae Euglena gracilis using optical microscopy and theory. To characterize a peculiar feature of the experimentally observed distribution at small velocities we use the concept of active fluctuations, which was recently proposed for the description of stochastically self-propelled particles [Romanczuk, P. and Schimansky-Geier, L., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 230601 (2011)]. In this concept, the fluctuating forces arise due to internal random performance of the propulsive motor. The fluctuating forces are directed in parallel to the heading direction, in which the propulsion acts. In the theory, we introduce the active motion via the depot model [Schweitzer et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 80, 23, 5044 (1998)]. We demonstrate that the theoretical predictions based on the depot model with active fluctuations are consistent with the experimentally observed velocity distributions. In addition to the model with additive active noise, we obtain theoretical results for a...

  13. Exploration of the spontaneous fluctuating activity of single enzyme molecules

    Schwabe, A.; Maarleveld, T.R.; Bruggeman, F.J.

    2013-01-01

    Single enzyme molecules display inevitable, stochastic fluctuations in their catalytic activity. In metabolism, for instance, the stochastic activity of individual enzymes is averaged out due to their high copy numbers per single cell. However, many processes inside cells rely on single enzyme activ

  14. Development of three-dimensional capabilities for modelling stationary fluctuations in nuclear reactor cores

    Highlights: • A numerical tool able to model the effect of stationary fluctuations in nuclear cores was developed. • This tool relies on the modelling of neutron transport, of fluid dynamics, and of heat transfer in the frequency domain. • The interdependence between the different physics fields is fully accounted for. • The capabilities of the tool are illustrated by video files highlighting in the time-domain the effect of inlet perturbations. - Abstract: This paper presents the development of a numerical tool meant at modelling the effect of stationary fluctuations in nuclear cores for systems cooled with either liquid water or boiling water. The originating fluctuations are defined for the variables describing the boundary conditions of the system, i.e. inlet velocity, inlet enthalpy, and outlet pressure. The tool then determines in the frequency domain the three-dimensional distributions within the core of the corresponding fluctuations in neutron flux, coolant density, coolant velocity, coolant enthalpy, and fuel temperature. The tool is thus based on the simultaneous modelling of neutron transport, fluid dynamics, and heat transfer in a truly integrated and fully coupled manner. The modelling of neutron transport relies on the two-group diffusion approximation and a spatial discretization based on finite differences. The modelling of fluid dynamics is performed using the Homogeneous Equilibrium Model, with a void fraction correction based on a pre-computed distribution of the static slip ratio (when two-phase flow conditions are encountered). Heat conduction in the fuel pins is also accounted for, and the heat transfer between the fuel pins and the coolant is modelled also using a pre-computed distribution of the heat transfer coefficient. The spatial discretization of the fluid dynamic and heat transfer problems is carried out using finite volumes. The tool, currently entirely Matlab based, requires minimal input data, mostly in form of the three

  15. Density Fluctuation Effects on Collective Neutrino Oscillations in O-Ne-Mg Core-Collapse Supernovae

    Cherry, John F; Carlson, Joe; Duan, Huaiyu; Fuller, George M; Qian, Yong-Zhong

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the effect of matter density fluctuations on supernova collective neutrino flavor oscillations. In particular, we use full multi-angle, 3-flavor, self-consistent simulations of the evolution of the neutrino flavor field in the envelope of an O-Ne-Mg core collapse supernova at shock break-out (neutrino neutronization burst) to study the effect of the matter density "bump" left by the He-burning shell. We find a seemingly counterintuitive increase in the overall electron neutrino survival probability created by this matter density feature. We discuss this behavior in terms of the interplay between the matter density profile and neutrino collective effects. While our results give new insights into this interplay, they also suggest an immediate consequence for supernova neutrino burst detection: it will be difficult to use a burst signal to extract information on fossil burning shells or other fluctuations of this scale in the matter density profile. Consistent with previous studies, our results al...

  16. Exploration of the spontaneous fluctuating activity of single enzyme molecules

    Schwabe, Anne; Maarleveld, Timo; Bruggeman, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Single enzyme molecules display inevitable, stochastic fluctuations in their catalytic activity. In metabolism, for instance, the stochastic activity of individual enzymes is averaged out due to their high copy numbers per single cell. However, many processes inside cells rely on single enzyme activity, such as transcription, replication, translation, and histone modifications. Here we introduce the main theoretical concepts of stochastic single-enzyme activity starting from the Michaelis–Men...

  17. Late Holocene vegetation changes in relation with climate fluctuations and human activity in Languedoc (southern France)

    J. Azuara; N. Combourieu-Nebout; V. Lebreton; F. Mazier; S. D. Müller; L. Dezileau

    2015-01-01

    Holocene climate fluctuations and human activity since the Neolithic have shaped present-day Mediterranean environments. Separating anthropogenic effects from climatic impacts to better understand Mediterranean paleoenvironmental changes over the last millennia remains a challenging issue. High-resolution pollen analyses were undertaken on two cores from the Palavasian lagoon system (Hérault, southern France). These records allow reconstruction of vegetation dynamics over th...

  18. Broken detailed balance in active fluctuations of semiflexible filaments

    Gladrow, Jannes; Fakhri, Nikta; Mackintosh, Fred C.; Schmidt, Christoph F.; Broedersz, Chase P.

    2015-03-01

    Non-equilibrium microscopic force generation in cells often results in stochastic steady-state fluctuations. In the cell cytoskeleton, for example, cytoplasmic myosins can drive vigorous conformational fluctuations of actin filaments and microtubules. We here present an analytical and numerical analysis of randomly driven shape fluctuations of semiflexible filaments in a viscoelastic environment. To detect and quantify non-equilibrium dynamics, we focus on the breaking of detailed balance in a conformational phase space subtended by eigenmodes of the beam equation. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal a non-zero circulatory flux in phase space induced by motor activity. Furthermore, we derived an analytical expression of nonequilibrium mode correlations that allows us to predict temporal effects of active molecular motors.

  19. Effects of turbulent temperature fluctuations on the core of Doppler line shapes

    Recent theoretical studies were made on Doppler line shapes emitted in plasma by taking into account low frequency hydrodynamic turbulence, resulting in fluctuations of temperature, fluid velocity, and density of the emitters on the line of sight. Whereas such a profile is Gaussian in absence of turbulence, it has been shown in a previous model that fluctuations of temperature modify the wings of the profile, leading in some cases to an asymptotically power law dependence of the wavelength detuning. As a consequence, the wing analysis of a Doppler line appears to be of a particular interest for turbulence investigations in magnetized fusion and astrophysical plasmas. In this work, we examine the effect of plasma temperature fluctuations on the entire line shape with a special emphasis on the central part, which is commonly exploited to obtain the emitter temperature. We use a previously developed model where the line shape is expressed in terms of the temperature fluctuation probability distribution function (PDF) and of the line brightness. Here this PDF is assumed to be a lognormal distribution and the brightness temperature dependence is calculated with the collisional-radiative code SOPHIA. For averaged emitter temperature larger than 10 eV, we show that the spectral line core is non Gaussian and sensitive to the shape of the temperature PDF. The consequences for line profile analysis are next investigated. In particular we show that the average temperature in the low frequency turbulent plasma can be identified from a central line shape analysis. In addition to the line wing analysis presented previously, this work brings new materials to study the plasma turbulence by spectroscopic means. This work is part of a collaboration between the Laboratoire de Physique des Interactions Ioniques et Moleculaires and the Departement de Recherches sur la Fusion controlee, CEA Cadarache. (author)

  20. Nonequilibrium Fluctuations, Travelling Waves, and Instabilities in Active Membranes

    Ramaswamy, Sriram; Toner, John; Prost, Jacques

    1999-01-01

    The stability of a flexible fluid membrane containing a distribution of mobile, active proteins (e.g. proton pumps) is shown to depend on the structure and functional asymmetry of the proteins. A stable active membrane is in a nonequilibrium steady state with height fluctuations whose statistical properties are governed by the protein activity. Disturbances are predicted to travel as waves at sufficiently long wavelength, with speed set by the normal velocity of the pumps. The unstable case i...

  1. Adipocyte size fluctuation, mechano-active lipid droplets and caveolae

    Le Lay, Soazig; Briand, Nolwenn; Dugail, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    Recent data indicate that cell size fluctuation, a key property in adipocyte pathophysiology primarily dependent on lipid storage, is linked to a novel function of lipid droplet organelles acting as mechano-active organelles to regulate cell membrane remodeling and caveolae dynamics.

  2. Additivity, density fluctuations, and nonequilibrium thermodynamics for active Brownian particles

    Chakraborti, Subhadip; Mishra, Shradha; Pradhan, Punyabrata

    2016-05-01

    Using an additivity property, we study particle-number fluctuations in a system of interacting self-propelled particles, called active Brownian particles (ABPs), which consists of repulsive disks with random self-propulsion velocities. From a fluctuation-response relation, a direct consequence of additivity, we formulate a thermodynamic theory which captures the previously observed features of nonequilibrium phase transition in the ABPs from a homogeneous fluid phase to an inhomogeneous phase of coexisting gas and liquid. We substantiate the predictions of additivity by analytically calculating the subsystem particle-number distributions in the homogeneous fluid phase away from criticality where analytically obtained distributions are compatible with simulations in the ABPs.

  3. Nonequilibrium fluctuations, traveling waves, and instabilities in active membranes.

    Ramaswamy, S; Toner, J; Prost, J

    2000-04-10

    The stability of a flexible fluid membrane containing a distribution of mobile, active proteins (e.g., proton pumps) is shown to depend on the structure and functional asymmetry of the proteins. A stable active membrane is in a nonequilibrium steady state with height fluctuations whose statistical properties are governed by the protein activity. Disturbances are predicted to travel as waves at sufficiently long wavelength, with speed set by the normal velocity of the pumps. The unstable case involves a spontaneous, pump-driven undulation of the membrane, with clumping of the proteins in regions of high activity. PMID:11019123

  4. Baseline brain activity fluctuations predict somatosensory perception in humans

    Boly, M.; Balteau, E.; Schnakers, C.; Degueldre, C.; Moonen, G.; Luxen, A.; Phillips, C.; Peigneux, P.; Maquet, P.; Laureys, S.

    2007-01-01

    In perceptual experiments, within-individual fluctuations in perception are observed across multiple presentations of the same stimuli, a phenomenon that remains only partially understood. Here, by means of thulium–yttrium/aluminum–garnet laser and event-related functional MRI, we tested whether variability in perception of identical stimuli relates to differences in prestimulus, baseline brain activity. Results indicate a positive relationship between conscious perception of low-intensity somatosensory stimuli and immediately preceding levels of baseline activity in medial thalamus and the lateral frontoparietal network, respectively, which are thought to relate to vigilance and “external monitoring.” Conversely, there was a negative correlation between subsequent reporting of conscious perception and baseline activity in a set of regions encompassing posterior cingulate/precuneus and temporoparietal cortices, possibly relating to introspection and self-oriented processes. At nociceptive levels of stimulation, pain-intensity ratings positively correlated with baseline fluctuations in anterior cingulate cortex in an area known to be involved in the affective dimension of pain. These results suggest that baseline brain-activity fluctuations may profoundly modify our conscious perception of the external world. PMID:17616583

  5. Baseline brain activity fluctuations predict somatosensory perception in humans

    Boly, M; Balteau, E.; Schnakers, C; Degueldre, C.; Moonen, G.; Luxen, A.; Phillips, C.; Peigneux, P; Maquet, P; Laureys, S.

    2007-01-01

    In perceptual experiments, within-individual fluctuations in perception are observed across multiple presentations of the same stimuli, a phenomenon that remains only partially understood. Here, by means of thulium–yttrium/aluminum–garnet laser and event-related functional MRI, we tested whether variability in perception of identical stimuli relates to differences in prestimulus, baseline brain activity. Results indicate a positive relationship between conscious perception of low-intensity so...

  6. Fluctuation driven active molecular transport in passive channel proteins

    Kosztin, Ioan

    2006-03-01

    Living cells interact with their extracellular environment through the cell membrane, which acts as a protective permeability barrier for preserving the internal integrity of the cell. However, cell metabolism requires controlled molecular transport across the cell membrane, a function that is fulfilled by a wide variety of transmembrane proteins, acting as either passive or active transporters. In this talk it is argued that, contrary to the general belief, in active cell membranes passive and spatially asymmetric channel proteins can act as active transporters by consuming energy from nonequilibrium fluctuations fueled by cell metabolism. This assertion is demonstrated in the case of the E. coli aquaglyceroporin GlpF channel protein, whose high resolution crystal structure is manifestly asymmetric. By calculating the glycerol flux through GlpF within the framework of a stochastic model, it is found that, as a result of channel asymmetry, glycerol uptake driven by a concentration gradient is enhanced significantly in the presence of non-equilibrium fluctuations. Furthermore, the enhancement caused by a ratchet-like mechanism is larger for the outward, i.e., from the cytoplasm to the periplasm, flux than for the inward one, suggesting that the same non-equilibrium fluctuations also play an important role in protecting the interior of the cell against poisoning by excess uptake of glycerol. Preliminary data on water and sugar transport through aquaporin and maltoporin channels, respectively, are indicative of the universality of the proposed nonequilibrium-fluctuation-driven active transport mechanism. This work was supported by grants from the Univ. of Missouri Research Board, the Institute for Theoretical Sciences and the Department of Energy (DOE Contract W-7405-ENG-36), and the National Science Foundation (FIBR-0526854).

  7. Volume Changes During Active Shape Fluctuations in Cells

    La Porta, Caterina A. M.; Taloni, Alessandro; Kardash, Elena; Salman, Oguz Umut; Truskinovsky, Lev; Zapperi, Stefano

    Cells modify their volume in response to changes in osmotic pressure but it is usually assumed that other active shape variations do not involve significant volume fluctuations. Here we report experiments demonstrating that water transport in and out of the cell is needed for the formation of blebs, commonly observed protrusions in the plasma membrane driven by cortex contraction. We develop and simulate a model of fluid-mediated membrane-cortex deformations and show that a permeable membrane is necessary for bleb formation which is otherwise impaired. Taken together, our experimental and theoretical results emphasize the subtle balance between hydrodynamics and elasticity in actively driven cell morphological changes.

  8. Volume changes during active shape fluctuations in cells

    Taloni, Alessandro; Salman, Oguz Umut; Truskinovsky, Lev; Zapperi, Stefano; La Porta, Caterina A M

    2015-01-01

    Cells modify their volume in response to changes in osmotic pressure but it is usually assumed that other active shape variations do not involve significant volume fluctuations. Here we report experiments demonstrating that water transport in and out of the cell is needed for the formation of blebs, commonly observed protrusions in the plasma membrane driven by cortex contraction. We develop and simulate a model of fluid mediated membrane-cortex deformations and show that a permeable membrane is necessary for bleb formation which is otherwise impaired. Taken together our experimental and theoretical results emphasize the subtle balance between hydrodynamics and elasticity in actively driven cell morphological changes.

  9. Active Cores in Deep Fields

    Müller, A

    2005-01-01

    Deep field observations are an essential tool to probe the cosmological evolution of galaxies. In this context, X-ray deep fields provide information about some of the most energetic cosmological objects: active galactic nuclei (AGN). Astronomers are interested in detecting sufficient numbers of AGN to probe the accretion history at high redshift. This talk gives an overview of the knowledge resulting from a highly complete soft X-ray selected sample collected with ROSAT, XMM-Newton and Chandra deep fields. The principal outcome based on X-ray luminosity functions and space density evolution studies is that low-luminosity AGN evolve in a dramatically different way from high-luminosity AGN: The most luminous quasars perform at significantly earlier cosmic times and are most numerous in a unit volume at cosmological redshift z~2. In contrast, low-luminosity AGN evolve later and their space density peaks at z~0.7. This finding is also interpreted as an anti-hierarchical growth of supermassive black holes in the ...

  10. Activation of Selected Core Muscles during Pressing

    Thomas W. Nesser; Neil Fleming; Matthew J. Gage

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Unstable surface training is often used to activate core musculature during resistance training. Unfortunately, unstable surface training is risky and leads to detraining. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine core muscle activation during stable surface ground-based lifts. Methods: Fourteen recreational trained and former NCAA DI athletes (weight 84.2 ± 13.3 kg; height 176.0 ± 9.5 cm; age 20.9 ± 2.0 years) volunteered for participation. Subjects completed two grou...

  11. Activation of Selected Core Muscles during Pressing

    Thomas W. Nesser

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Unstable surface training is often used to activate core musculature during resistance training. Unfortunately, unstable surface training is risky and leads to detraining. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine core muscle activation during stable surface ground-based lifts. Methods: Fourteen recreational trained and former NCAA DI athletes (weight 84.2 ± 13.3 kg; height 176.0 ± 9.5 cm; age 20.9 ± 2.0 years volunteered for participation. Subjects completed two ground-based lifts: overhead press and push-press. Surface EMG was recorded from 4 muscles on the right side of the body (Rectus Abdominus (RA, External Oblique (EO, Transverse Abdominus (TA, and Erector Spinae (ES. Results: Paired sample T-tests identified significant muscle activation differences between the overhead press and the push-press included ES and EO. Average and peak EMG for ES was significantly greater in push-press (P<0.01. Anterior displacement of COP was significantly greater in push-press compared to overhead press during the eccentric phase. Conclusion: The push-press was identified as superior in core muscle activation when compared to the overhead pressing exercise.Keywords: torso, stability, weight lifting, resistance training

  12. Quark matter nucleation at neutron star cores: relevance of energy-density fluctuations

    We study the deconfinement of hadronic matter into quark matter in a protoneutron star focusing on the effects of the finite size on the formation of just-deconfined color superconducting quark droplets embedded in the hadronic environment. We show that energy-density fluctuations are much more relevant for deconfinement than temperature and neutrino density fluctuations. We calculate the critical size spectrum of energy-density fluctuations that allows deconfinement as well as the nucleation rate of each critical bubble. We find that drops with any radii smaller than 800 fm can be formed at a huge rate when matter achieves the bulk transition limit of 5–6 times the nuclear saturation density. (author)

  13. Analytical Comparisons of Tree Ring Data, Greenland Ice Core Temperatures and Temperature Fluctuations of the Sargasso Sea

    Otto, James; Roberts, Jim; Dahiya, Jai

    2012-10-01

    Embedded in various events on Earth are data that allow us to map the temperature of the Earth over many years. In this work we have chosen the temperature fluctuations in the Sargasso sea, the changing patterns in tree ring growth and temperature fluctuations in Greenland ice core samples for comparison with a goal to understanding the patterns in global warming. Signatures have been identified that predate the Industrial Revolution, which had been blamed for much of global warming, that indicate that Earth temperatures have enjoyed numerous intervals of both global warming and global cooling. The intention of this work is not to stir controversy but to make comparisons of scientific data and processes rather than rely on popular opinion or deduction by ``experts'' in climatology to explain global warming.

  14. Gyrokinetic studies of core turbulence features in ASDEX Upgrade: Can gyrokinetic simulations match the fluctuation measurements?

    Banon Navarro, Alejandro

    2015-11-01

    Worldwide, gyrokinetic codes are used to predict the dominant micro-instabilities as well as the resulting anomalous transport in fusion experiments. A careful verification and validation of these codes is crucial to develop confidence in the model and improving the predictive capabilities of the numerical simulations. To date, the validation of gyrokinetic simulations versus experiments is mainly done at a macroscopic level, namely, by comparing turbulent heat fluxes. This is usually achieved by varying the profile gradients within the experimental error bars until a match with the experimental heat fluxes is obtained. However, since the turbulent fluxes are caused by plasma fluctuations on microscopic scales, it is also necessary to validate gyrokinetic codes on a microscopic level. We will describe a recent step in this direction by presenting simulation results with the gyrokinetic code GENE for an ASDEX Upgrade discharge. In particular, after flux-matched simulations are achieved, density fluctuations measured by means of Doppler reflectometry are compared with results of gyrokinetic simulations. We will also show that density and temperature fluctuation amplitudes and even the fluctuation spectra can be very sensitive to small changes in the profile gradients. This implies that a match of gyrokinetic simulations with experiment measurements for these quantities can be very difficult to achieve. However, it is observed that cross-phases between different quantities are robust to changes in this parameter, indicating that cross-phases could be a better observable for comparisons with experimental measurements.

  15. Modulation of Core Turbulent Density Fluctuations by Large-Scale Neoclassical Tearing Mode Islands in the DIII-D Tokamak

    Bardóczi, L.; Rhodes, T. L.; Carter, T. A.; Bañón Navarro, A.; Peebles, W. A.; Jenko, F.; McKee, G.

    2016-05-01

    We report the first observation of localized modulation of turbulent density fluctuations n ˜ (via beam emission spectroscopy) by neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) in the core of the DIII-D tokamak. NTMs are important as they often lead to severe degradation of plasma confinement and disruptions in high-confinement fusion experiments. Magnetic islands associated with NTMs significantly modify the profiles and turbulence drives. In this experiment n ˜ was found to be modulated by 14% across the island. Gyrokinetic simulations suggest that n ˜ could be dominantly driven by the ion temperature gradient instability.

  16. Linking human brain local activity fluctuations to structural and functional network architectures

    Baria, A.T.; Mansour, A; Huang, L.; Baliki, M. N.; Cecchi, G. A.; Mesulam, M M; A. V. Apkarian

    2013-01-01

    Activity of cortical local neuronal populations fluctuates continuously, and a large proportion of these fluctuations are shared across populations of neurons. Here we seek organizational rules that link these two phenomena. Using neuronal activity, as identified by functional MRI (fMRI) and for a given voxel or brain region, we derive a single measure of full bandwidth brain-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) fluctuations by calculating the slope, α, for the log-linear power spectrum. For th...

  17. Advances of reflectometry on Tore-Supra: from edge density profile to core density fluctuations

    A new generation of broadband reflectometers based on solid state components has been installed on Tore-Supra. With reflectometers covering the range 50 to 155 GHz, the whole plasma can be scanned. Two X-mode reflectometers (V and W band) are dedicated to density profile measurements. Diagnostics are operated routinely with an automatic algorithm to reconstruct the density profile. A fast acquisition mode is available to study short time evolution. For turbulence and transport studies, a third reflectometer operating between 105 and 155 GHz measures density fluctuations in the plasma centre. Sensitive to large scales, it can retrieve density perturbation due to MHD modes or broadband turbulence. Lastly, a doppler reflectometer, based on back scattering, is being installed for measuring the poloidal rotation and fluctuations amplitude at higher wave numbers. (authors)

  18. Structures of the fluctuation precursor in an active explosive ionospheric experiment

    Results are presented from processing the measurement data on low-frequency fluctuations from the North Star active explosive ionospheric experiment. The fluctuation precursor signal was processed by the wavelet analysis method. The structures revealed are identified as ion acoustic envelope solitons

  19. Structures of the fluctuation precursor in an active explosive ionospheric experiment

    Kovaleva, I. Kh.

    2007-05-01

    Results are presented from processing the measurement data on low-frequency fluctuations from the North Star active explosive ionospheric experiment. The fluctuation precursor signal was processed by the wavelet analysis method. The structures revealed are identified as ion acoustic envelope solitons.

  20. Stratigraphic analysis of lake level fluctuations in Lake Ohrid: an integration of high resolution hydro-acoustic data and sediment cores

    Lindhorst, K.; H. Vogel; S. Krastel; Wagner, B.; Hilgers, A.; Zander, A.; Schwenk, T.; Wessels, M.; Daut, G.

    2010-01-01

    Ancient Lake Ohrid is a steep sided, oligotrophic, karst lake of likely Pliocene age and often referred to as a hotspot of endemic biodiversity. This study aims on tracing significant lake level fluctuations at Lake Ohrid using high-resolution acoustic data in combination with lithological, geochemical, and chronological information from two sediment cores recovered from sub-aquatic terrace levels at ca. 32 and 55 m. According to our data, significant lake level fluctuations with prominent lo...

  1. Prediction of the Bandgap of a Core-Shell Microsphere via Light Intensity Fluctuations

    Moon Kyu Choi; Youngjin Choi

    2011-01-01

    It has been experimentally observed that in the case of microspheres irradiated by light, the absorption wavelength shift occurs, known as the blueshift, with changing shell materials (i.e., by decreasing the refractive index of the shell). In the present investigation, we want to demonstrate it numerically by using the boundary element method. The material used for the simulation is a core-shell (SiO2 and another material of a larger refractive index) microsphere and it is irradiated by unpo...

  2. Hydrophobic core flexibility modulates enzyme activity in HIV-1 protease

    Mittal, Seema; Cai, Yufeng; Nalam, Madhavi N.; Bolon, Daniel N. A.; Schiffer, Celia A.

    2012-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus Type-1 (HIV-1) protease is crucial for viral maturation and infectivity. Studies of protease dynamics suggest that the rearrangement of the hydrophobic core is essential for enzyme activity. Many mutations in the hydrophobic core are also associated with drug resistance and may modulate the core flexibility. To test the role of flexibility in protease activity, pairs of cysteines were introduced at the interfaces of flexible regions remote from the active site. Di...

  3. Late Holocene vegetation changes in relation with climate fluctuations and human activities in Languedoc (Southern France

    J. Azuara

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Holocene climate fluctuations and human activities since the Neolithic have shaped present-day Mediterranean environments. Separating anthropogenic effects from climatic impacts to reconstruct Mediterranean paleoenvironments over the last millennia remains a challenging issue. High resolution pollen analyses were undertaken on two cores from the Palavasian lagoon system (Hérault, southern France. These records allow reconstruction of vegetation dynamics over the last 4500 years. Results are compared with climatic, historical and archeological archives. A long-term aridification trend is highlighted during the Late Holocene and three superimposed arid events are recorded at 4600–4300, 2800–2400 and 1300–1100 cal BP. These periods of climatic instability coincide in time with the rapid climatic events depicted in the Atlantic Ocean (Bond et al., 2001. From the Bronze Age (4000 cal BP to the end of the Iron Age (around 2000 cal BP, the spread of evergreen taxa and loss of forest cover result from anthropogenic impact. The Antiquity is characterized by a major reforestation event related to the concentration of rural activities and populations in coastal plains leading to forest recovery in the mountains. A major regional deforestation occurred at the beginning of the High Middle Ages. Around 1000 cal BP, forest cover is minimal while cover of olive, chestnut and walnut expands in relation to increasing human influence. The present day vegetation dominated by Mediterranean shrubland and pines has been in existence since the beginning of the 20th century.

  4. Late Holocene vegetation changes in relation with climate fluctuations and human activities in Languedoc (Southern France)

    Azuara, J.; Combourieu-Nebout, N.; Lebreton, V.; Mazier, F.; Müller, S. D.; Dezileau, L.

    2015-09-01

    Holocene climate fluctuations and human activities since the Neolithic have shaped present-day Mediterranean environments. Separating anthropogenic effects from climatic impacts to reconstruct Mediterranean paleoenvironments over the last millennia remains a challenging issue. High resolution pollen analyses were undertaken on two cores from the Palavasian lagoon system (Hérault, southern France). These records allow reconstruction of vegetation dynamics over the last 4500 years. Results are compared with climatic, historical and archeological archives. A long-term aridification trend is highlighted during the Late Holocene and three superimposed arid events are recorded at 4600-4300, 2800-2400 and 1300-1100 cal BP. These periods of climatic instability coincide in time with the rapid climatic events depicted in the Atlantic Ocean (Bond et al., 2001). From the Bronze Age (4000 cal BP) to the end of the Iron Age (around 2000 cal BP), the spread of evergreen taxa and loss of forest cover result from anthropogenic impact. The Antiquity is characterized by a major reforestation event related to the concentration of rural activities and populations in coastal plains leading to forest recovery in the mountains. A major regional deforestation occurred at the beginning of the High Middle Ages. Around 1000 cal BP, forest cover is minimal while cover of olive, chestnut and walnut expands in relation to increasing human influence. The present day vegetation dominated by Mediterranean shrubland and pines has been in existence since the beginning of the 20th century.

  5. Late Holocene vegetation changes in relation with climate fluctuations and human activity in Languedoc (southern France)

    Azuara, J.; Combourieu-Nebout, N.; Lebreton, V.; Mazier, F.; Müller, S. D.; Dezileau, L.

    2015-12-01

    Holocene climate fluctuations and human activity since the Neolithic have shaped present-day Mediterranean environments. Separating anthropogenic effects from climatic impacts to better understand Mediterranean paleoenvironmental changes over the last millennia remains a challenging issue. High-resolution pollen analyses were undertaken on two cores from the Palavasian lagoon system (Hérault, southern France). These records allow reconstruction of vegetation dynamics over the last 4500 years. Results are compared with climatic, historical and archeological archives. A long-term aridification trend is highlighted during the late Holocene, and three superimposed arid events are recorded at 4600-4300, 2800-2400 and 1300-1100 cal BP. These periods of high-frequency climate variability coincide in time with the rapid climatic events observed in the Atlantic Ocean (Bond et al., 2001). From the Bronze Age (4000 cal BP) to the end of the Iron Age (around 2000 cal BP), the spread of sclerophyllous taxa and loss of forest cover result from anthropogenic impact. Classical Antiquity is characterized by a major reforestation event related to the concentration of rural activity and populations in coastal plains leading to forest recovery in the mountains. A major regional deforestation occurred at the beginning of the High Middle Ages. Around 1000 cal BP, forest cover is minimal while the cover of olive, chestnut and walnut expands in relation to increasing human influence. The present-day vegetation dominated by Mediterranean shrubland and pines has been in existence since the beginning of the 20th century.

  6. Topological defects in liquid crystalline matter: Strain transitions, simulations, and visualization of core structure and fluctuations

    Callan-Jones, Andrew

    Topological defects play several roles in the physics of liquid crystalline matter. Their presence is felt over many length scales, necessitating modeling strategies ranging from continuum level finite element analysis of cholesteric elastomers to molecular dynamics simulation of liquid nematics. We have first studied the effect of a strain applied to a cholesteric elastomer, focusing on the transition from the twisted phase to the nematic phase, and extended work by others by including the Frank penalty for director distortions. This leads to metastability of the twisted state above the transition, prompting us to consider nucleation of topological defects as way to remove the twist walls. We explored the consequences of this idea and obtained analytical and numerical agreement, concluding that inhomogeneities in the strain field due to the coexisting phases are small, making the nucleation problem very similar to earlier studies on cholesteric liquids unwound by a magnetic field. Molecular dynamics simulations of a temperature quench of a fluid of rod-like molecules based on the Gay-Berne potential provide a way to study multiscale phenomena associated with defects, such as the structure of the core and the interaction between defect motion and the underlying orientational degrees of freedom. Locating and then studying defects in a fluid, as opposed to in a lattice simulation, however, are inherently challenging problems because of the mobility of the molecules. We have collaborated with researchers in scientific visualization to develop methods that overcome limitations of an earlier discrete finding method. In particular, new measures for describing nematic ordering are introduced, making observation of features such as the defect type and the nature of the core readily done. The dramatic improvement in spatial and temporal resolution of defect behavior afforded by the visualization opens up a number of possible routes to follow in studying static and dynamic

  7. Core muscle activity, exercise preference, and perceived exertion during core exercise with elastic resistance versus machine

    Jonas Vinstrup; Emil Sundstrup; Mikkel Brandt; Jakobsen, Markus D.; Joaquin Calatayud; Andersen, Lars L.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To investigate core muscle activity, exercise preferences, and perceived exertion during two selected core exercises performed with elastic resistance versus a conventional training machine. Methods. 17 untrained men aged 26–67 years participated in surface electromyography (EMG) measurements of five core muscles during torso-twists performed from left to right with elastic resistance and in the machine, respectively. The order of the exercises was randomized and each exercise con...

  8. Marshall N. Rosenbluth Outstanding Doctoral Thesis Award Talk: Simultaneous Measurement of Electron Temperature and Density Fluctuations in the Core of DIII-D Plasmas

    White, A. E.

    2009-11-01

    Multi-field fluctuation measurements provide opportunities for rigorous comparison between experiment and nonlinear gyrokinetic turbulence simulations. A unique set of diagnostics on DIII-D allows for simultaneous study of local, long-wavelength (0 < kθρs< 0.5) electron temperature and density fluctuations in the core plasma (0.4 < ρ< 0.8). Previous experiments in L-mode indicate that normalized electron temperature fluctuation levels (40 < f < 400,kHz) increase with radius from ˜0.4% at ρ= 0.5 to ˜2% at ρ=0.8, similar to simultaneously measured density fluctuations. Electron cyclotron heating (ECH) is used to increase Te, which increases electron temperature fluctuation levels and electron heat transport in the experiments. In contrast, long wavelength density fluctuation levels change very little. The different responses are consistent with increased TEM drive relative to ITG-mode drive. A new capability at DIII-D is the measurement of phase angle between electron temperature and density fluctuations using coupled correlation electron cyclotron emission radiometer and reflectometer diagnostics. Linear and nonlinear GYRO runs have been used to design validation experiments that focus on measurements of the phase angle. GYRO shows that if Te and ∇Te increase 50% in a beam-heated L-mode plasma (ρ=0.5), then the phase angle between electron temperature and density fluctuations decreases 30%-50% and electron temperature fluctuation levels increase a factor of two more than density fluctuations. Comparisons between these predictions and experimental results will be presented.

  9. Isolated HIV-1 core is active for reverse transcription

    Harrich David; Stenzel Deborah; Warrilow David

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Whether purified HIV-1 virion cores are capable of reverse transcription or require uncoating to be activated is currently controversial. To address this question we purified cores from a virus culture and tested for the ability to generate authentic reverse transcription products. A dense fraction (approximately 1.28 g/ml) prepared without detergent, possibly derived from disrupted virions, was found to naturally occur as a minor sub-fraction in our preparations. Core-like particles...

  10. Systematic review of core muscle activity during physical fitness exercises.

    Martuscello, Jason M; Nuzzo, James L; Ashley, Candi D; Campbell, Bill I; Orriola, John J; Mayer, John M

    2013-06-01

    A consensus has not been reached among strength and conditioning specialists regarding what physical fitness exercises are most effective to stimulate activity of the core muscles. Thus, the purpose of this article was to systematically review the literature on the electromyographic (EMG) activity of 3 core muscles (lumbar multifidus, transverse abdominis, quadratus lumborum) during physical fitness exercises in healthy adults. CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, EMBASE, PubMed, SPORTdiscus, and Web of Science databases were searched for relevant articles using a search strategy designed by the investigators. Seventeen studies enrolling 252 participants met the review's inclusion/exclusion criteria. Physical fitness exercises were partitioned into 5 major types: traditional core, core stability, ball/device, free weight, and noncore free weight. Strength of evidence was assessed and summarized for comparisons among exercise types. The major findings of this review with moderate levels of evidence indicate that lumbar multifidus EMG activity is greater during free weight exercises compared with ball/device exercises and is similar during core stability and ball/device exercises. Transverse abdominis EMG activity is similar during core stability and ball/device exercises. No studies were uncovered for quadratus lumborum EMG activity during physical fitness exercises. The available evidence suggests that strength and conditioning specialists should focus on implementing multijoint free weight exercises, rather than core-specific exercises, to adequately train the core muscles in their athletes and clients. PMID:23542879

  11. What kind of noise is brain noise? Anomalous scaling behavior of the resting brain activity fluctuations.

    Daniel eFraiman

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The study of spontaneous fluctuations of brain activity, often referred as brain noise, is getting increasing attention in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI studies. Despite important efforts, much of the statistical properties of such fluctuations remain largely unknown. This work scrutinize these fluctuations looking at specific statistical properties which are relevant to clarify its dynamical origins. Here, three statistical features which clearly differentiate brain data from naive expectations for random processes are uncovered: First, the variance of the fMRI mean signal as a function of the number of averaged voxels remains constant across a wide range of observed clusters sizes. Second, the anomalous behavior of the variance is originated by bursts of synchronized activity across regions, regardless of their widely different sizes. Finally, the correlation length (i.e., the length at which the correlation strength between two regions vanishes as well as mutual information diverges with the cluster's size considered, such that arbitrarily large clusters exhibit the same collective dynamics than smaller ones. These three properties are known to be exclusive of complex systems exhibiting critical dynamics, where the spatio-temporal dynamics show these peculiar type of fluctuations. Thus, these findings are fully consistent with previous reports of brain critical dynamics, and are relevant for the interpretation of the role of fluctuations and variability in brain function in health and disease.

  12. Stratigraphic analysis of lake level fluctuations in Lake Ohrid: an integration of high resolution hydro-acoustic data and sediment cores

    Lindhorst, K.; H. Vogel; S. Krastel; Wagner, B.; Hilgers, A.; Zander, A.; Schwenk, T.; Wessels, M.; Daut, G.

    2010-01-01

    Ancient Lake Ohrid is a steep-sided, oligotrophic, karst lake that was tectonically formed most likely within the Pliocene and often referred to as a hotspot of endemic biodiversity. This study aims on tracing significant lake level fluctuations at Lake Ohrid using high-resolution acoustic data in combination with lithological, geochemical, and chronological information from two sediment cores recovered from sub-aquatic terrace levels at ca. 32 and 60 m water depth. According t...

  13. Stratigraphic analysis of lake level fluctuations in Lake Ohrid: an integration of high resolution hydro-acoustic data and sediment cores

    Lindhorst, K.; Vogel, Hendrik; S. Krastel; Wagner, B.; Hilgers, A.; Zander, A.; Schwenk, T.; Wessels, M.; Daut, G.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract. Ancient Lake Ohrid is a steep-sided, oligotrophic, karst lake that was tectonically formed most likely within the Pliocene and often referred to as a hotspot of endemic biodiversity. This study aims on tracing significant lake level fluctuations at Lake Ohrid using high-resolution acoustic data in combination with lithological, geochemical, and chronological information from two sediment cores recovered from sub-aquatic terrace levels at ca. 32 and 60m water dep...

  14. Isolated HIV-1 core is active for reverse transcription

    Harrich David

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Whether purified HIV-1 virion cores are capable of reverse transcription or require uncoating to be activated is currently controversial. To address this question we purified cores from a virus culture and tested for the ability to generate authentic reverse transcription products. A dense fraction (approximately 1.28 g/ml prepared without detergent, possibly derived from disrupted virions, was found to naturally occur as a minor sub-fraction in our preparations. Core-like particles were identified in this active fraction by electron microscopy. We are the first to report the detection of authentic strong-stop, first-strand transfer and full-length minus strand products in this core fraction without requirement for an uncoating activity.

  15. Isolated HIV-1 core is active for reverse transcription.

    Warrilow, David; Stenzel, Deborah; Harrich, David

    2007-01-01

    Whether purified HIV-1 virion cores are capable of reverse transcription or require uncoating to be activated is currently controversial. To address this question we purified cores from a virus culture and tested for the ability to generate authentic reverse transcription products. A dense fraction (approximately 1.28 g/ml) prepared without detergent, possibly derived from disrupted virions, was found to naturally occur as a minor sub-fraction in our preparations. Core-like particles were identified in this active fraction by electron microscopy. We are the first to report the detection of authentic strong-stop, first-strand transfer and full-length minus strand products in this core fraction without requirement for an uncoating activity. PMID:17956635

  16. Fluctuation analysis-based risk assessment for respiratory virus activity and air pollution associated asthma incidence.

    Liao, Chung-Min; Hsieh, Nan-Hung; Chio, Chia-Pin

    2011-08-15

    Asthma is a growing epidemic worldwide. Exacerbations of asthma have been associated with bacterial and viral respiratory tract infections and air pollution. We correlated the asthma admission rates with fluctuations in respiratory virus activity and traffic-related air pollution, namely particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter ≤ 10 μm (PM₁₀), nitrogen dioxide (NO₂), carbon monoxide (CO), sulfur dioxide (SO₂), and ozone (O₃). A probabilistic risk assessment framework was developed based on a detrended fluctuation analysis to predict future respiratory virus and air pollutant associated asthma incidence. Results indicated a strong association between asthma admission rate and influenza (r=0.80, pinfluenza to below 0.9. We concluded that fluctuation analysis based risk assessment provides a novel predictor of asthma incidence. PMID:21663946

  17. Long-range spatial correlations and fluctuation statistics of lightning activity rates in Brazil

    Ribeiro, H V; Alves, L G A; Lenzi, E K; Mendes, R S

    2013-01-01

    We report on a statistical analysis of the lightning activity rates in all Brazilian cities. We find out that the average of lightning activity rates exhibit a dependence on the latitude of the cities, displaying one peak around the Tropic of Capricorn and another one just before the Equator. We verify that the standard deviation of these rates is almost a constant function of the latitude and that the distribution of the fluctuations surrounding the average tendency is quite well described by a Gumbel distribution, which thus connects these rates to extreme processes. We also investigate the behavior of the lightning activity rates versus the longitude of the cities. For this case, the average rates exhibit an approximate plateau for a wide range of longitude values, the standard deviation is an approximate constant function of longitude, and the fluctuations are described by a Laplace distribution. We further characterize the spatial correlation of the lightning activity rates between pairs of cities, where...

  18. Physical activity, sleep duration and metabolic health in children fluctuate with the lunar cycle

    Sjödin, Anders Mikael; Hjorth, Mads Fiil; Damsgaard, Camilla Trab;

    2015-01-01

    glucose regulation and physical activity to improve glucose regulation, one could speculate that cardiometabolic risk factors might also be affected by the lunar phase. We retrospectively examined 795 Danish children, aged 8-11 years, with more than 13 000 24-h accelerometer recordings of activity and...... behaviour and the lunar cycle or confounders that may explain this, apparently leading to fluctuation in a number of cardiometabolic risk markers conjointly with lunar phases....

  19. Momentary Affective States Are Associated with Momentary Volume, Prospective Trends, and Fluctuation of Daily Physical Activity

    Kanning, Martina K.; Schoebi, Dominik

    2016-01-01

    Several interventions aiming to enhance physical activity in everyday life showed mixed effects. Affective constructs are thought to potentially support health behavior change. However, little is known about within-subject associations between momentary affect and subsequent physical activity in everyday life. This study analyzed the extent to which three dimensions of affective states (valence, calmness, and energetic arousal) were associated with different components of daily activity trajectories. Sixty-five undergraduates’ students (Age: M = 24.6; SD = 3.2; females: 57%) participated in this study. Physical activity was assessed objectively through accelerometers during 24 h. Affective states assessments were conducted randomly every 45 min using an e-diary with a six-item mood scale that was especially designed for ambulatory assessment. We conducted three-level multi-level analyses to investigate the extent to which momentary affect accounted for momentary volume, prospective trends, and stability vs. fluctuation of physical activity in everyday life. All three affect dimensions were significantly associated with momentary activity volumes and prospective trends over 45 min periods. Physical activity didn’t fluctuate freely, but featured significant autocorrelation across repeated measurements, suggesting some stability of physical activity across 5-min assessments. After adjusting for the autoregressive structure in physical activity assessments, only energetic arousal remained a significant predictor. Feeling energized and awake was associated with an increased momentary volume of activity and initially smaller but gradually growing decreases in subsequent activity within the subsequent 45 min. Although not related to trends in physical activity, higher valence predicted lower stability in physical activity across subsequent 45 min, suggesting more short-term fluctuations in daily activity the more participants reported positive affective valence. The

  20. Mitigation of Wind Power Fluctuation by Active Current Control of Variable Speed Wind Turbines

    Zhang, Yunqian; Chen, Zhe; Hu, Weihao; Cheng, Ming

    2013-01-01

    Wind shear and tower shadow are the sources of power fluctuation of grid connected wind turbines during continuous operation. This paper presents a simulation model of a MW-level doubly fed induction generator (DFIG) based variable speed wind turbine with a partial-scale back-to-back power...... converter in Simulink. A simple and effective method of wind power fluctuations mitigation by active current control of DFIG is proposed. It smoothes the generator output active power oscillations by adjusting the active current of the DFIG, such that the power oscillation is stored as the kinetic energy of...... the wind turbine. The simulations are performed on the NREL 1.5MW upwind reference wind turbine model. The simulation results are presented and discussed to demonstrate the validity of the proposed control method....

  1. Reliability of estimating active drag in swimming using the assisted towing method with fluctuating speed.

    Hazrati, Pendar; Sinclair, Peter James; Ferdinands, René Edouard; Mason, Bruce Robert

    2016-09-01

    The reliability of active drag values was examined using a method that compared free swim speed with measurements taken by towing swimmers slightly faster than their maximum swim speed, while allowing their intra-stroke speed fluctuations. Twelve national age and open level swimmers were tested on two alternate days (Day 1 and Day 2). All participants completed four maximum swim speed, three passive drag and five active drag trials on each of the days. The reliability was determined using within-participant intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC) within each day and between the days. The ICCs for Day 1 and Day 2 were 0.82 and 0.85, respectively, while the comparison of the mean active drag values between days was 0.93. The data showed that the assisted towing method (ATM) with fluctuating speed was only moderately reliable within a single test. However, this method was more reliable when using the average value of active drag from both days (ICC = 0.93). This study identified that the ATM method with fluctuating speed had moderate reliability within-participant trials on values in a single day but high reliability for the average active drag values across different days. PMID:27126742

  2. Hydrophobic Core Flexibility Modulates Enzyme Activity in HIV-1 Protease

    Mittal, Seema; Cai, Yufeng; Nalam, Madhavi N.L.; Bolon, Daniel N.A.; Schiffer, Celia A. (UMASS, MED)

    2012-09-11

    Human immunodeficiency virus Type-1 (HIV-1) protease is crucial for viral maturation and infectivity. Studies of protease dynamics suggest that the rearrangement of the hydrophobic core is essential for enzyme activity. Many mutations in the hydrophobic core are also associated with drug resistance and may modulate the core flexibility. To test the role of flexibility in protease activity, pairs of cysteines were introduced at the interfaces of flexible regions remote from the active site. Disulfide bond formation was confirmed by crystal structures and by alkylation of free cysteines and mass spectrometry. Oxidized and reduced crystal structures of these variants show the overall structure of the protease is retained. However, cross-linking the cysteines led to drastic loss in enzyme activity, which was regained upon reducing the disulfide cross-links. Molecular dynamics simulations showed that altered dynamics propagated throughout the enzyme from the engineered disulfide. Thus, altered flexibility within the hydrophobic core can modulate HIV-1 protease activity, supporting the hypothesis that drug resistant mutations distal from the active site can alter the balance between substrate turnover and inhibitor binding by modulating enzyme activity.

  3. In-core detector activation rate for a PWR assembly

    The in-core detector system is the principal source of information for determining relative assembly powers, and maximum fuel rod powers in a reactor core. The detector signals are used in conjunction with pre-calculated factors, and appropriate normalizations, to obtain measured power values. Considerable reliance is placed on the accuracy of in-core detector inferred power distributions in reactor operations, and in the verification of calculational methods. The objective of this study was to compare results from standard design codes for the in-core detector activation rate (and the fission rate distribution in an assembly), to results obtained from a detailed calculation performed with a continuous energy Monte Carlo program with ENDF/B-V nuclear data

  4. Cooperation between core promoter elements influences transcriptional activity in vivo.

    Colgan, J.; Manley, J L

    1995-01-01

    Core promoters for RNA polymerase II frequently contain either (or both) of two consensus sequence elements, a TATA box and/or an initiator (Inr). Using test promoters consisting of prototypical TATA and/or Inr elements, together with binding sites for sequence-specific activators, we have analyzed the function of TATA and Inr elements in vivo. In the absence of activators, the TATA element was significantly more active than the Inr, and the combination of elements was only slightly more effe...

  5. Magnetohydrodynamic behaviour during core transport barrier experiments with ion Bernstein wave heating in PBX-M: I ELMs, fluctuations and crash events

    Sesnic, S.; Kaita, R.; Batha, S. H.; Bell, R. E.; Bernabei, S.; Chance, M. S.; DeLa Luna, E.; Dunlap, J. L.; England, A. C.; Isler, R. C.; Jones, S.; Kaye, S. M.; Kesner, J.; Kugel, H. W.; LeBlanc, B.; Levinton, F. M.; Luckhardt, S. C.; Manickam, J.; Okabayashi, M.; Ono, M.; Paoletti, F.; Paul, S. F.; Post-Zwicker, A. P.; Sanchez Sanz, J.; Sauthoff, N. R.; Seki, T.; Takahashi, H.; Tighe, W.; Von Goeler, S.; Woskov, P.; Zolfaghari, A.

    1998-06-01

    If the ion Bernstein wave (IBW) heating power in an H mode discharge of the PBX-M experiment exceeds a threshold power of about 200 kW, a core transport barrier is created in the central region of the plasma. At lower neutral beam injection (NBI) powers, the core barrier is accompanied by an edge L mode. The high edge localized mode (ELM) repetition frequency (1 kHz) prevents the creation of a strong barrier, so the edge first has to make an H-to-L transition before a strong core transport barrier can be created. At higher NBI powers, the ELM repetition frequency is lowered to less than 200 Hz, which allows the immediate creation of a strong core barrier. Edge localized mode loss, which propagates radially first on a fast (non-diffusive) and then on a slow (diffusive) time-scale all the way to the plasma core, is strongly reduced in the core barrier region. Correlated with the reduced ELM loss, the fluctuations in the core barrier region are also strongly reduced, both during the ELM and during the quiet periods between the ELMs. There is strong evidence that the IBW induced poloidal flow shear is responsible for the stabilization of core turbulence and the creation of the core transport barrier. The large perpendicular E × B flow shear component of the measured toroidal velocity in co-injection neutral beam heated discharges seems to be largely cancelled by the ion diamagnetic drift shear produced by large ion pressure gradients in the core barrier region. The value of IBW induced poloidal flow has not been experimentally determined, but its numerical value is found to be a factor of 4 larger than either the toroidal velocity or the ion diamagnetic drift shear components, leaving only IBW induced flow shear as the most probable cause for the turbulence stabilization. The core turbulence suppression and the creation of the core transport barrier is also consistent with expectations from a comparison between the E × B flow shear rate and a rough estimate of the

  6. Magnetohydrodynamic behaviour during core transport barrier experiments with ion Bernstein wave heating in PBX-M: I ELMs fluctuations and crash events

    If the ion Bernstein wave (IBW) heating power in an H mode discharge of the PBX-M experiment exceeds a threshold power of about 200 kW, a core transport barrier is created in the central region of the plasma. At lower neutral beam injection (NBI) powers, the core barrier is accompanied by an edge L mode. The high edge localized mode (ELM) repetition frequency (1 kHz) prevents the creation of a strong barrier, so the edge first has to make an H-to-L transition before a strong core transport barrier can be created. At higher NBI powers, the ELM repetition frequency is lowered to less than 200 Hz, which allows the immediate creation of a strong core barrier. Edge localized mode loss, which propagates radially first on a fast (non-diffusive) and then on a slow (diffusive) time-scale all the way to the plasma core, is strongly reduced in the core barrier region. Correlated with the reduced ELM loss, the fluctuations in the core barrier region are also strongly reduced, both during the ELM and during the quite periods between the ELMs. There is strong evidence that the IBW induced poloidal flow shear is responsible for the stabilization of core turbulence and the creation of the core transport barrier. The large perpendicular E x B flow shear component of the measured toroidal velocity in co-injection neutral beam heated discharges seems to be largely cancelled by the ion diamagnetic drift shear produced by large ion pressure gradients in the core barrier region. The value of IBW induced poloidal flow has not been experimentally determined, but its numerical value is found to be a factor of 4 larger than either the toroidal velocity or the ion diamagnetic drift shear components, leaving only IBW induced flow shear as the most probable cause for the turbulence stabilization. The core turbulence suppression and the creation of the core transport barrier is also consistent with expectations from a comparison between the E x B flow shear rate and a rough estimate of the

  7. Explaining Civil Society Core Activism in Post-Soviet Latvia

    Lindén, Tove

    2008-01-01

    Civil society activism in traditional non-governmental organizations (NGOs) is seen as one of the cornerstones of a vibrant participatory liberal democracy in most Western democratic states. Whereas this issue has been explored from a variety of perspectives in a Western context, only limited research has been carried out in a post-Soviet context. This study presents unique survey data on civil society core activism in post-Soviet Latvia addressing the following two main questions: What are t...

  8. Reduction of aerodynamic load fluctuation on wind turbine blades through active flow control

    Velarde, John-Michael; Coleman, Thomas; Magstadt, Andrew; Aggarwal, Somil; Glauser, Mark

    2015-11-01

    The current set of experiments deals with implementing active flow control on a Bergey Excel 1, 1kW turbine. The previous work in our group demonstrated successfully that implementation of a simple closed-loop controller could reduce unsteady aerodynamic load fluctuation by 18% on a vertically mounted wing. Here we describe a similar flow control method adapted to work in the rotating frame of a 2.5m diameter wind turbine. Strain gages at the base of each blade measure the unsteady fluctuation in the blades and pressure taps distributed along the span of the blades feed information to the closed-loop control scheme. A realistic, unsteady flow field has been generated by placing a cylinder upstream of the turbine to induce shedding vortices at frequencies in the bandwidth of the first structural bending mode of the turbine blades. The goal of these experiments is to demonstrate closed-loop flow control as a means to reduce the unsteady fluctuation in the blades and increase the overall lifespan of the wind turbine.

  9. A Common Definition of the System Operators' Core Activities

    In this report a common definition of the system operator's core activities in the Nordic countries is identified and also a list of non-core activities is introduced. As a starting point the common tasks for system responsibility as identified by Nordel has been used for the work. The term TSO (Transmission System Operator) is employed as a common denominator in the report. It is found out that the TSOs carry out common core activities in the roles as a transmission operator, a system operator and a balance settlement responsible. The core activities for the TSO as a transmission network operator are: Maintain the adequate transmission system in the long run and network development plan on the national as well as on the Nordic level using sophisticated analysis and planning methods and tools. Plan the transmission network on the national as well as on the Nordic level utilising new investments, renewal and maintenance of existing network components so that the network is secure to operate and adequate transmission capacity is guaranteed. Aim at timely network expansions using enhanced information exchange between the Nordic TSOs, and on the national level between the TSO and distribution and regional network operators, large consumers and large producers. Secure the technical compatibility with networks across the border and within a country by establishing connection requirements on the national level and ensuring that the national requirements are compatible across the Nordic power system. The core activities for the TSO as a system operator are: Define common technical requirements for the secure system operation using common planning, operation, connection and data exchange procedures. Secure the system operation with the operational planning for the following year by using information exchange between TSOs enabling the TSOs to make the best possible forecast of the global grid situation in order to assess the flows in their network and the available

  10. Heating of active region cores: Impulsive or steady?

    Tripathi, Durgesh

    The question of active region heating has proven to be highly challenging since its discovery in 1940s. The recent observational facilities have shed new lights towards the understanding of this problem. In this paper we review some of the new measurements to study the heating mechanisms in the hot core loops of active regions using the observations recorded by Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation (SUMER) onboard SoHO and the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) aboard Hinode. These new measurements show that the properties of hot core loops are consistent with by impulsive heating -- low frequency nanoflare - scenario. However, the evidences are not strong enough to rule-out steady heating completely. Further measurement using better spectral resolution and temperature coverage is required, which will be provided by Interface Region Imaging Spectrometer (IRIS) and Solar-C in near future.

  11. Unbundling of HEP's core activities and the electricity price

    At the height of proposals and discussions with regard to unbundling of the core business activities of the electricity industry: electricity generation, transmission and distribution, the unbundling conditions and their impact on electricity prices are rarely mentioned. The purpose and the objective of the electricity market liberalisation and restructuring of HEP should be a lower electricity price at the doorstep of the final costumers. Based on earlier analyses it can be said that the average cost of the core activities, i.e. electricity generation, transmission and distribution, is above the average electricity sale price to final customers in the tariff system. Hereinafter it will be shown how much electricity costs and how the electricity price is formed. (author)

  12. Active to absorbing state phase transition in the presence of a fluctuating environment: feedback and universality

    We construct and analyze a simple reduced model to study the effects of the interplay between a density undergoing an active-to-absorbing state phase transition (AAPT) and a fluctuating environment in the form of a broken symmetry mode coupled to the density field in any arbitrary dimension. We show, by using perturbative renormalization group calculations, that both the effects of the environment on the density and the latter’s feedback on the environment influence the ensuing universal scaling behaviour of the AAPT at its extinction transition. Phenomenological implications of our results in the context of more realistic natural examples are discussed. (paper)

  13. Robustness of nuclear core activity reconstruction by data assimilation

    Bouriquet, Bertrand; Erhard, Patrick; Massart, Sébastien; Ponçot, Angélique; Ricci, Sophie; Thual, Olivier

    2010-01-01

    We apply a data assimilation techniques, inspired from meteorological applications, to perform an optimal reconstruction of the neutronic activity field in a nuclear core. Both measurements, and information coming from a numerical model, are used. We first study the robustness of the method when the amount of measured information decreases. We then study the influence of the nature of the instruments and their spatial repartition on the efficiency of the field reconstruction.

  14. Robustness of nuclear core activity reconstruction by data assimilation

    Bouriquet, Bertrand, E-mail: bertrand.bouriquet@cerfacs.f [Sciences de l' Univers au CERFACS, URA CERFACS/CNRS No. 1875, 42 avenue Gaspard Coriolis, F-31057 Toulouse Cedex 01 (France); Argaud, Jean-Philippe [Sciences de l' Univers au CERFACS, URA CERFACS/CNRS No. 1875, 42 avenue Gaspard Coriolis, F-31057 Toulouse Cedex 01 (France); Electricite de France, 1 avenue du General de Gaulle, F-92141 Clamart Cedex (France); Erhard, Patrick [Electricite de France, 1 avenue du General de Gaulle, F-92141 Clamart Cedex (France); Massart, Sebastien [Sciences de l' Univers au CERFACS, URA CERFACS/CNRS No. 1875, 42 avenue Gaspard Coriolis, F-31057 Toulouse Cedex 01 (France); Poncot, Angelique [Electricite de France, 1 avenue du General de Gaulle, F-92141 Clamart Cedex (France); Ricci, Sophie [Sciences de l' Univers au CERFACS, URA CERFACS/CNRS No. 1875, 42 avenue Gaspard Coriolis, F-31057 Toulouse Cedex 01 (France); Thual, Olivier [Sciences de l' Univers au CERFACS, URA CERFACS/CNRS No. 1875, 42 avenue Gaspard Coriolis, F-31057 Toulouse Cedex 01 (France); Universite de Toulouse, INPT, UPS, IMFT, Allee Camille Soula, F-31400 Toulouse (France)

    2011-02-11

    We apply a data assimilation technique, inspired from meteorological applications, to perform an optimal reconstruction of the neutronic activity field in a nuclear core. Both measurements and information coming from a numerical model are used. We first study the robustness of the method when the amount of measured information decreases. We then study the influence of the nature of the instruments and their spatial repartition on the efficiency of the field reconstruction.

  15. Thermal ignition revisited with molecular dynamics: role of fluctuations in activated collisions

    Sirmas, Nick

    2016-01-01

    The problem of thermal ignition in a homogeneous gas is revisited from a molecular dynamics perspective. The simple model assumes reactive particles of type A and B in a fixed domain that react to form type C products if an activation threshold for impact is surpassed. Such a reaction liberates kinetic energy to the product particles, representative of the heat release. The results are compared with those obtained from the continuum description with the reaction rate evaluated from kinetic theory assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium and Maxwell-Boltzmann statistics, in order to assess the role played by molecular fluctuations. Results show that at low activation energies, the ignition time obtained from the molecular dynamics is independent of domain size, with values exceeding what is expected from the continuum model for all values of heat release. The ignition time was found dependent on domain size for larger activation energies. Small domains of $N=100$ particles yielded longer ignition delays than p...

  16. Harvesting thermal fluctuations: Activation process induced by a nonlinear chain in thermal equilibrium

    We present a model in which the immediate environment of a bistable system is a molecular chain which in turn is connected to a thermal environment of the Langevin form. The molecular chain consists of masses connected by harmonic or by anharmonic springs. The distribution, intensity, and mobility of thermal fluctuations in these chains is strongly dependent on the nature of the springs and leads to different transition dynamics for the activated process. Thus, all else (temperature, damping, coupling parameters between the chain and the bistable system) being the same, the hard chain may provide an environment described as diffusion-limited and more effective in the activation process, while the soft chain may provide an environment described as energy-limited and less effective. The importance of a detailed understanding of the thermal environment toward the understanding of the activation process itself is thus highlighted. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  17. Research and application of active hollow core slabs in building systems for utilizing low energy sources

    Highlights: • A review on the development and modeling of active hollow core slab is presented. • The applications and performance evaluation of the slab in building are reviewed. • Finite element or finite difference method is often used in multidimensional model. • Performance evaluations of building using active slabs for ventilation are limited. • More works on the active hollow core slab are worthwhile. - Abstract: The society and the building professionals have paid much concern in recent years on building energy efficiency and the development and applications of low energy technologies for buildings/green buildings allowing the elimination, or at least reduction of dependence on electricity or fossil fuel while maintaining acceptable indoor environment. Utilizations of favorable diurnal temperature difference and ground thermal source for air conditioning are among these low energy technologies. Utilization of the hollow cores in the prefabricated slab for ventilation and the mass of the slab for thermal storage is widely used in building systems in Europe by exploiting the low energy source of the ambient air. These hollow core slabs aim at enlarging the heat transfer surface between the slab mass and the air in the core, which permits substantial heat flows even for relatively small temperature differences. This, in turn, allows the use of low energy cooling or heating sources, such as the ground, outside air or recovered process heat. In this paper, we present a comprehensive review of the research and application of active hollow core slabs in building systems for utilizing low energy sources. The principle and development of active hollow core slabs in building systems for leveling the indoor temperature fluctuation by ventilation air passing the cores are described. Calculation models of the active hollow core concrete slab as well as the practical applications and performance evaluation of the slab applied in building systems for air

  18. Activation barrier scaling for fluctuation induced switching in driven non-linear micromechanical oscillators

    We explore fluctuation induced switching in an underdamped micromechanical torsional oscillator driven far from equilibrium. Under a sufficiently strong periodic driving field, the oscillator possesses multiple stable dynamical states. Depending on whether the device is resonantly or parametrically driven, two different types of bifurcation occur. In the presence of noise, the oscillator is induced to switch from one dynamical state into the other. Near the bifurcation points, the activation barrier exhibits a power law dependence on the frequency detuning. The critical exponents are measured to be different for the two types of bifurcation. Both values are in agreement with theoretical predictions. Such scaling of the activation barrier close to the bifurcation point is expected to occur in all systems that are driven away from equilibrium

  19. Stratigraphic analysis of lake level fluctuations in Lake Ohrid: an integration of high resolution hydro-acoustic data and sediment cores

    K. Lindhorst

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Ancient Lake Ohrid is a steep sided, oligotrophic, karst lake of likely Pliocene age and often referred to as a hotspot of endemic biodiversity. This study aims on tracing significant lake level fluctuations at Lake Ohrid using high-resolution acoustic data in combination with lithological, geochemical, and chronological information from two sediment cores recovered from sub-aquatic terrace levels at ca. 32 and 55 m. According to our data, significant lake level fluctuations with prominent lowstands of ca. 60 and 35 m below the present water level occurred during MIS 6 and MIS 5, respectively. The effect of these lowstands on biodiversity in most coastal parts of the lake is negligible, due to only small changes in lake surface area, coastline, and habitat. In contrast, biodiversity in shallower areas was more severely affected due to disconnection of today sub-lacustrine springs from the main water body. Multichannel seismic data from deeper parts of the lake clearly imaged several clinoform structures stacked on top of each other. These stacked clinoforms indicate significantly lower lake levels prior to MIS 6 and a stepwise rise of water level with intermittent stillstands since its existence as water filled body, which might have caused enhanced expansion of endemic species within Lake Ohrid.

  20. Stratigraphic analysis of lake level fluctuations in Lake Ohrid: an integration of high resolution hydro-acoustic data and sediment cores

    K. Lindhorst

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Ancient Lake Ohrid is a steep-sided, oligotrophic, karst lake that was tectonically formed most likely within the Pliocene and often referred to as a hotspot of endemic biodiversity. This study aims on tracing significant lake level fluctuations at Lake Ohrid using high-resolution acoustic data in combination with lithological, geochemical, and chronological information from two sediment cores recovered from sub-aquatic terrace levels at ca. 32 and 60 m water depth. According to our data, significant lake level fluctuations with prominent lowstands of ca. 60 and 35 m below the present water level occurred during Marine Isotope Stage (MIS 6 and MIS 5, respectively. The effect of these lowstands on biodiversity in most coastal parts of the lake is negligible, due to only small changes in lake surface area, coastline, and habitat. In contrast, biodiversity in shallower areas was more severely affected due to disconnection of today sub-lacustrine springs from the main water body. Multichannel seismic data from deeper parts of the lake clearly image several clinoform structures stacked on top of each other. These stacked clinoforms indicate significantly lower lake levels prior to MIS 6 and a stepwise rise of water level with intermittent stillstands since its existence as water-filled body, which might have caused enhanced expansion of endemic species within Lake Ohrid.

  1. Stratigraphic analysis of lake level fluctuations in Lake Ohrid: an integration of high resolution hydro-acoustic data and sediment cores

    Lindhorst, K.; Vogel, H.; Krastel, S.; Wagner, B.; Hilgers, A.; Zander, A.; Schwenk, T.; Wessels, M.; Daut, G.

    2010-11-01

    Ancient Lake Ohrid is a steep-sided, oligotrophic, karst lake that was tectonically formed most likely within the Pliocene and often referred to as a hotspot of endemic biodiversity. This study aims on tracing significant lake level fluctuations at Lake Ohrid using high-resolution acoustic data in combination with lithological, geochemical, and chronological information from two sediment cores recovered from sub-aquatic terrace levels at ca. 32 and 60 m water depth. According to our data, significant lake level fluctuations with prominent lowstands of ca. 60 and 35 m below the present water level occurred during Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 6 and MIS 5, respectively. The effect of these lowstands on biodiversity in most coastal parts of the lake is negligible, due to only small changes in lake surface area, coastline, and habitat. In contrast, biodiversity in shallower areas was more severely affected due to disconnection of today sub-lacustrine springs from the main water body. Multichannel seismic data from deeper parts of the lake clearly image several clinoform structures stacked on top of each other. These stacked clinoforms indicate significantly lower lake levels prior to MIS 6 and a stepwise rise of water level with intermittent stillstands since its existence as water-filled body, which might have caused enhanced expansion of endemic species within Lake Ohrid.

  2. Fluctuations in Activity Demands Across Game Quarters in Professional and Semiprofessional Male Basketball.

    Scanlan, Aaron T; Tucker, Patrick S; Dascombe, Ben J; Berkelmans, Daniel M; Hiskens, Matthew I; Dalbo, Vincent J

    2015-11-01

    Examination of activity demands and stoppage durations across game periods provides useful insight concerning fatigue, tactical strategies, and playing pace in team sports such as basketball. Therefore, the aims of this study were to quantify and compare game activity fluctuations across quarters in professional and semiprofessional basketball players. Video-based time-motion analyses were conducted across multiple games. Frequencies, total durations (in seconds), total distances (in meters), and mean velocities (in meters per second) were calculated for low-intensity movement (≤3 m·s), high-intensity movement (>3 m·s), shuffling, and dribbling activity. Frequencies were determined for jumping and upper-body activity; stoppage durations were also calculated. Separate repeated-measures analysis of variance and Cohen's d were used to identify significant differences and quantify the effect sizes between game quarters for all outcome measures, respectively. Pearson correlation analyses were performed to determine the relationship between stoppage duration and all activity measures. The results showed significantly (p ≤ 0.05) reduced dribbling (3.09 ± 0.03 m·s vs. 2.81 ± 0.01 m·s) and total (2.22 ± 0.04 m·s vs. 2.09 ± 0.03 m·s) activity velocities during the third compared with the first quarter in professional players. Furthermore, effect size analyses showed greater decreases in high-intensity (professional: d = 1.7-5.4; semiprofessional: d = 0.3-1.7), shuffling (professional: d = 2.3-3.2; semiprofessional: d = 1.4-2.1), and total (professional: d = 1.0-4.9; semiprofessional: d = 0.3-0.8) activity and increases in dribbling (professional: d = 1.4-4.7; semiprofessional: d = 2.5-2.8) with game progression in professional players. In semiprofessional players, stoppage duration was significantly (p ≤ 0.05) related to various low-intensity (R = 0.64-0.72), high-intensity (R = 0.65-0.72), and total (R = 0.63-0.73) activity measures. Although not directly

  3. Density-matrix renormalization-group study of current and activity fluctuations near nonequilibrium phase transitions.

    Gorissen, Mieke; Hooyberghs, Jef; Vanderzande, Carlo

    2009-02-01

    Cumulants of a fluctuating current can be obtained from a free-energy-like generating function, which for Markov processes equals the largest eigenvalue of a generalized generator. We determine this eigenvalue with the density-matrix renormalization group for stochastic systems. We calculate the variance of the current in the different phases, and at the phase transitions, of the totally asymmetric exclusion process. Our results can be described in the terms of a scaling ansatz that involves the dynamical exponent z . We also calculate the generating function of the dynamical activity (total number of configuration changes) near the absorbing-state transition of the contact process. Its scaling properties can be expressed in terms of known critical exponents. PMID:19391693

  4. Robustness of nuclear core activity reconstruction by data assimilation

    The purpose of data assimilation methods is to merge measurements and information coming from a numerical model, in order to obtain an optimal estimation of the field of physical quantities of interest. We apply data assimilation techniques to perform an optimal reconstruction of the neutronic activity field in a nuclear core. This study is based on the standard 900 MWe PWR core, the measurement data come from the mobile fission chambers distributed in the fuel assemblies and the simulation code used is COCAGNE. One of the main advantages of data assimilation is that it takes into account every kind of heterogeneous information within the same framework. Moreover, this method has a formalism that allows adapting itself to instrument configuration changes. We exploit this last property here, to study the quality of the reconstructed activity field as a function of the number of available measurements. it was shown that the slope of the reconstruction quality is mainly governed by the distribution of the instruments. Depending on the chosen distribution, the decrease consists in two or three distinct phases. The ultimate stagnation phase in this decreasing is governed by both statistical effect and heterogeneity of instrument influence

  5. Therapeutic activity of modified U1 core spliceosomal particles

    Rogalska, Malgorzata Ewa; Tajnik, Mojca; Licastro, Danilo; Bussani, Erica; Camparini, Luca; Mattioli, Chiara; Pagani, Franco

    2016-01-01

    Modified U1 snRNAs bound to intronic sequences downstream of the 5′ splice site correct exon skipping caused by different types of mutations. Here we evaluate the therapeutic activity and structural requirements of these exon-specific U1 snRNA (ExSpeU1) particles. In a severe spinal muscular atrophy, mouse model, ExSpeU1, introduced by germline transgenesis, increases SMN2 exon 7 inclusion, SMN protein production and extends life span. In vitro, RNA mutant analysis and silencing experiments show that while U1A protein is dispensable, the 70K and stem loop IV elements mediate most of the splicing rescue activity through improvement of exon and intron definition. Our findings indicate that precise engineering of the U1 core spliceosomal RNA particle has therapeutic potential in pathologies associated with exon-skipping mutations. PMID:27041075

  6. CORE

    Krigslund, Jeppe; Hansen, Jonas; Hundebøll, Martin;

    2013-01-01

    different flows. Instead of maintaining these approaches separate, we propose a protocol (CORE) that brings together these coding mechanisms. Our protocol uses random linear network coding (RLNC) for intra- session coding but allows nodes in the network to setup inter- session coding regions where flows...... increase the benefits of XORing by exploiting the underlying RLNC structure of individual flows. This goes beyond providing additional reliability to each individual session and beyond exploiting coding opportunistically. Our numerical results show that CORE outperforms both forwarding and COPE......-like schemes in general. More importantly, we show gains of up to 4 fold over COPE-like schemes in terms of transmissions per packet in one of the investigated topologies....

  7. Active flow control for reduction of fluctuating aerodynamic forces of a blunt trailing edge profiled body

    Naghib-Lahouti, Arash, E-mail: anaghibl@uwo.c [Boundary Layer Wind Tunnel Laboratory, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, N6A 5B9 (Canada); Hangan, Horia [Boundary Layer Wind Tunnel Laboratory, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, N6A 5B9 (Canada)

    2010-12-15

    Vortex shedding in the wake of two-dimensional bluff bodies is usually accompanied by three dimensional instabilities. These instabilities result in streamwise and vertical vorticity components which occur at a certain spanwise wavelength. The spanwise wavelength of the instabilities ({lambda}{sub Z}) depends on several parameters, including profile geometry and Reynolds number. The objective of the present work is to study the three dimensional wake instabilities for a blunt trailing edge profiled body, comprised of an elliptical leading edge and a rectangular trailing edge, and to manipulate these instabilities to control the aerodynamic forces. Results of numerical simulations of flow around the body at Re(d) = 400, 600, and 1000, as well as planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) flow visualizations at Re(d) = 600 and 1000 are analyzed to determine the wake vorticity structure and {lambda}{sub Z}. Based on the findings of these analyses, an active flow control mechanism for attenuation of the fluctuating aerodynamic forces on the body is proposed. The flow control mechanism is comprised of a series of trailing edge injection ports distributed across the span, with a spacing equal to {lambda}{sub Z}. Injection of a secondary flow leads to amplification of the three dimensional instabilities and disorganization of the von Karman vortex street. Numerical simulations indicate that the flow control mechanism can attenuate the fluctuating aerodynamic forces at lower Reynolds numbers (Re(d) = 400 and 600) where {lambda}{sub Z} is constant in time. However, the control mechanism loses its effectiveness at Re(d) = 1000, due to the temporal variations of {lambda}{sub Z}.

  8. Using the ORIGEN-2 computer code for near core activation calculations

    The ORIGEN2 computer code is a useful tool for calculating radionuclide inventories resulting from irradiation of materials in a reactor. It is widely used to calculate activation products in irradiated metals that form the structural portion of fuel assemblies. The code is straightforward for materials within the active fuel region of a reactor core, which are subject to core average conditions. For materials outside the active core, ORIGEN2 cannot be used directly. However, ORIGEN2 can be used with the appropriate methodology to calculate the activation of materials in near core locations. This paper presents the background and a methodology for estimating radionuclide inventories in activated metals in near core locations

  9. Investigation of activity release during light water reactor core meltdown

    A test facility was developed for the determination of activity release and of aerosol characteristics under realistic light water reactor core melting conditions. It is composed of a high-frequency induction furnace, a ThO2 crucible system, and a collection apparatus consisting of membrane and particulate filters. Thirty-gram samples of a representative core material mixture (corium) were melted under air, argon, or steam at 0.8 to 2.2 bar. In air at 27000C, for example, the relative release was 0.4 to 0.7% for iron, chromium, and cobalt and 4 to 11% for tin, antimony, and manganese. Higher release values of 20 to 40% at lower temperatures (21500C, air) were found for selenium, cadmium, tellurium, and cesium. The size distribution of the aerosol particles was trimodal with maxima at diameters of 0.17, 0.30, and 0.73 μm. The result of a qualitative x-ray microanalysis was that the main elements of the melt were contained in each aerosol particle. Further investigations will include larger melt masses and the additional influence of concrete on the release and aerosol behavior

  10. X-ray polarization fluctuations induced by cloud eclipses in active galactic nuclei

    Marin, F

    2014-01-01

    Context: A fraction of active galactic nuclei (AGN) show dramatic X-ray spectral changes on the day-to-week time scales associated with variation in the line of sight of the cold absorber. Aims: We intend to model the polarization fluctuations arising from an obscuration event, thereby offering a method of determining whether flux variations are due to occultation or extreme intrinsic emission variability. Methods: Undertaking 1 - 100 keV polarimetric simulations with the Monte Carlo code STOKES, we simulated the journey of a variety of cold gas clouds in front of an extended primary source. We varied the hydrogen column density nH and size of the absorber, as well as the initial polarization state of the emitting source, to cover a wide range of scenarios. Results: For unpolarized primary fluxes, large (about 50deg) variations of the polarization position angle psi are expected before and after an occultation event, which is associated with very low residual polarization degrees (P lower than 1 per cent). In...

  11. Accumulation in Dasuopu ice core in Qinghai-Tibet Plateau and solar activity

    2000-01-01

    The time series of accumulation in recent 300 years correlated well with solar activity in Dasuopu ice core. Results of spectrum analysis on the accumulation time series of the Dasuopu ice core shows that there are some periods that coincide with the periods of solar activity. By comparing the long-time change trend of the accumulation in the Dasuopu ice core with various kinds of indexes of solar activity intensity, a negative correlation is found between the trend and solar activity.

  12. Nuclear core activity reconstruction using heterogeneous instruments with data assimilation

    Bouriquet Bertrand

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Evaluating the neutronic state (neutron flux, power… of the whole nuclear core is a very important topic that has strong implication for nuclear core management and for security monitoring. The core state is evaluated using measurements and calculations. Usually, parts of the measurements are used, and only one kind of instrument is taken into account. However, the core state evaluation should be more accurate when more measurements are collected in the core. But using information from heterogeneous sources is at glance a difficult task. This difficulty can be overcome by Data Assimilation techniques. Such a method allows to combine in a coherent framework the information coming from numerical model and the one coming from various types of observations. Beyond the inner advantage to use heterogeneous instruments, this leads to obtaining a significant increase of the quality of neutronic global state reconstruction with respect to individual use of measures. In order to describe this approach, we introduce here the basic principles of data assimilation (focusing on BLUE, Best Unbiased Linear Estimation. Then we present the configuration of the method within the nuclear core problematic. Finally, we present the results obtained on nuclear measurements coming from various instruments.

  13. Human migration activities drive the fluctuation of ARGs: Case study of landfills in Nanjing, eastern China.

    Sun, Mingming; Ye, Mao; Schwab, Arthur P; Li, Xu; Wan, Jinzhong; Wei, Zhong; Wu, Jun; Friman, Ville-Petri; Liu, Kuan; Tian, Da; Liu, Manqiang; Li, Huixin; Hu, Feng; Jiang, Xin

    2016-09-01

    Landfills are perfect sites to study the effect of human migration on fluctuation of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) as they are the final destination of municipal waste. For example, large-scale human migration during the holidays is often accompanied by changes in waste dumping having potential effects on ARG abundance. Three landfills were selected to examine fluctuation in the abundance of fifteen ARGs and Intl1 genes for 14 months in Nanjing, eastern China. Mass human migration, the amount of dumped waste and temperature exerted the most significant effects on bimonthly fluctuations of ARG levels in landfill sites. As a middle-sized cosmopolitan city in China, millions of college students and workers migrate during holidays, contributing to the dramatic increases in waste production and fluctuation in ARG abundances. In line with this, mass migration explained most of the variation in waste dumping. The waste dumping also affected the bioaccessibility of mixed-compound pollutants that further positively impacted the level of ARGs. The influence of various bioaccessible compounds on ARG abundance followed the order: antibiotics>nutrients>metals>organic pollutants. Concentrations of bioaccessible compounds were more strongly correlated with ARG levels compared to total compound concentrations. Improved waste classification and management strategies could thus help to decrease the amount of bioaccessible pollutants leading to more effective control for urban ARG dissemination. PMID:27179703

  14. Atypical gravito-electrostatic fluctuations in the presence of active ion-inertial dynamics

    Borah, B.; Haloi, A.; Karmakar, P. K.

    2016-02-01

    > The plasmas in space, cosmic and astrophysical environments are long known to consist of numerous massive ionic components contributing to various wave instability fluctuation phenomena. Indeed, the ion-inertial effects need to be incorporated into realistic analyses, rather than treating the gravitating ionic species traditionally as a Boltzmann distributed fluid. Herein, we present an atypical theoretical model setup to study gravito-electrostatic mode-fluctuations in self-gravitating inhomogeneous interstellar dust molecular clouds (DMCs) on the astrophysical fluid scales of space and time. The main goal is focused on investigating the influence of self-consistent dynamic ion-inertial effects on the stability. Methodological application of standard multiple scaling techniques reduces the basic plasma structure equations into a unique pair of decoupled Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equations for the weak fluctuations. In contrast, the fully nonlinear counterparts are shown to evolve as a new gravito-electrostatically coupled pair of the Sagdeev energy-integral equations. In both the perturbation regimes, excitation of two distinct eigenmode classes - electrostatic compressive solitons and self-gravitational rarefactive solitons with unusual and unique parametric features - is demonstrated and portrayed. The graphical shape analysis reflects new plasma conditions for such eigenspectral patterns to coevolve in realistic interstellar parameter windows hitherto remaining unexplored. It is seen that the inertial ions play a destabilizing influential role leading to enhanced fluctuations toward establishing a reorganized gravito-electrostatic equilibrium structure. Finally, we discuss the consistency of our results in the framework of existing inertialess ion theories, experimental findings and multiple space satellite-based observations, together with new implications.

  15. Massive molecular cloud cores and activities of star formation

    Zhou Wu-Fei; Wu Yue-Fang; Wei Yue; Ju Bing-Gang

    2005-01-01

    We have mapped 23 sources in the J=1-0 lines of 12CO, 13CO and C18O with the 13.7-m telescope at Qinghai station of Purple Mountain Observatory. The samples were chosen from the massive star formation regions whose single point lines have the broad-wing profile. The mapping shows that 12 clouds have cores and 5 outflows were identified with the 12CO J=1-0 lines. Among the 12 cores, systematic velocity shifts were found in 2 cores, and blue asymmetric double-peak profile of 12CO line was found in IRAS 19529+2704, indicating that it may be an infall candidate. Physical parameters of the cores and outflows were derived from the local thermodynamic equilibrium assumption. The masses range from ~ 9.4 × 102M⊙ to ~ 2.2 × 105M⊙. The hydrogen molecule densities range from ~ 3.4 × 102cm-3 to~ 1.2 × 104cm-3. The molecular outflows have masses larger than 3.5M⊙, and kinetic energies greater than 0.9× 1038J.The outflows have significantly greater masses and kinetic energies than those from low-mass young stellar objects(YSOs). For the cores, 2MASS data are available, dozens of 2MASS sources with different colour indices and brightness are often found around IRAS source, among which the reddest 2MASS source is always within the IRAS error ellipse thus probably corresponds to the IRAS source.

  16. Determination of heavy metals and other elements by Neutron Activation Analysis in sediment cores of laguna Mar Chiquita (Cordoba, Argentina)

    Laguna Mar Chiquita is one of the largest water bodies of South America. It is a big lake of saline waters, and its geographic localization is SOMS' S, 62 deg 30' W, about 150 km Northwest of Cordoba, Argentina. Due to its large variability of hydrological budget, surface and water levels produced periods of low stands (LLP) and high stands (HLP). This fluctuation of water level also produces substantial changes in the water salinity. The principal tributary of the Laguna Mar Chiquita is Dulce River and also receives water from two other rivers: Suquia and Xanaes. The Suquia River drains in a small satellite lake, the Laguna del Plata. The purpose of the present work was to investigate the sediment composition of the Laguna Mar Chiquita (2 sediment cores) and del Plata (one sediment core) by using Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) technique. The three 60 cm long sediment cores, sliced each 2 cm, were analyzed and 26 elements were determined (As, Ba, Br, Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Eu, Fe, Hf, La, Lu, Na, Nd, Rb, Sb, Sc, Se, Sm, Ta, Tb, Th, U, Yb, Zn e Zr). Other complementary techniques were utilized: macro elements (Al, Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, P, Si, Ti) were determined by X-ray fluorescence, and the mineralogical composition of the sediments was determined by X-ray diffraction. The results obtained did not show any indication of anthropic contribution in the sediment composition, and concentration of the majority of the elements analyzed is uniform along the entire profile of the analyzed core. Statistical analysis of elemental concentrations (Cluster Analysis) reflects that in Laguna del Plata the fine fractions of the sediments is dominated by detrital minerals, while in the Laguna Mar Chiquita, the neo formed minerals are the principal components. In both lakes, it was possible to identify compositional variations in the sediment segments, which may correspond to temporal fluctuations in the sedimentation conditions. The statistical analysis associated to sedimentation

  17. Robustness of Nuclear Core Activity Reconstruction by Data Assimilation

    Bouriquet, Bertrand; Argaud, Jean-Philippe; Erhard, Patrick; Massart, Sébastien; Ponçot, Angélique; Ricci, Sophie; Thual, Olivier

    Inspired from meteorological applications, data assimilation techniques can be used to perform an optimal reconstruction of the neutronic field in a nuclear reactor core. Measurements and simulation information, coming from a numerical model, are merged together to build a better estimation of the whole field. In this paper, we first study the robustness of the method when the amount of measured information varies. We then study the influence of the nature of the instruments and their spatial repartition on the efficiency of the field reconstruction. This study also highlights the instruments providing most information within a data assimilation procedure. The study of various network configurations of instruments in the nuclear core establishes that the influence of each instrument depends both on the individual instrumentation location as well as on the chosen network.

  18. Robustness of nuclear core activity reconstruction by data assimilation

    Inspired from meteorological applications, data assimilation techniques can be used to perform an optimal reconstruction of the neutronic field in a nuclear reactor core. Measurements and simulation information, coming from a numerical model, are merged together to build a better estimation of the whole field. In this paper, we first study the robustness of the method when the amount of measured information varies. We then study the influence of the nature of the instruments and their spatial repartition on the efficiency of the field reconstruction. This study also highlights the instruments providing most information within a data assimilation procedure. The study of various network configurations of instruments in the nuclear core establishes that the influence of each instrument depends both on the individual instrumentation location as well as on the chosen network. (author)

  19. Robustness of nuclear core activity reconstruction by data assimilation

    The purpose of this paper is the use data assimilation techniques, inspired from meteorological applications, to perform an optimal reconstruction of the neutronic field in a nuclear core. Both measurements, and information coming from a numerical model, are used in this purpose. We first study the robustness of the method when the amount of measured information varies. We then study the influence of the nature of the instruments and their spatial repartition on the efficiency of the field reconstruction. Such study allows, also enlightening the instruments providing the most information within a data assimilation procedure. The study of various network configurations of instruments in the nuclear core establishes that influence of the instruments depends both on the individual instrumentation location as well as on the chosen network. (author)

  20. Nucleus accumbens core lesions enhance two-way active avoidance

    Lichtenberg, Nina T.; Kashtelyan, Vadim; Burton, Amanda C.; Bissonette, Gregory B.; Roesch, Matthew R.

    2013-01-01

    The majority of work examining nucleus accumbens core (NAc) has focused on functions pertaining to behaviors guided by appetitive outcomes. These studies have pointed to NAc as being critical for motivating behavior toward desirable outcomes. For example, we have recently shown that lesions of NAc impaired performance on a reward-guided decision-making task that required rats to choose between differently valued rewards. Unfortunately, much less is known about the role that NAc plays in motiv...

  1. Small scale electron density fluctuations in a tokamak: statistical aspects and links with magnetohydrodynamic activity

    The installation and operation of coherent microwave diffusion diagnostics in the TFR tokamak are outlined. The original setup was modified to make diagnostic information accessible to the computer. Microfluctuations were studied using a statistical method. Toroidal propagation of drift waves was assessed using a method of correlation between two diffusion diagnostics. Then, using only one of the diagnostics, statistical analysis tools were employed to evaluate the rate of nonlinear quadratic coupling between three modes. Experimental links between electron density fluctuations and MHD phenomena are demonstrated

  2. Designing Class Activities to Meet Specific Core Training Competencies: A Developmental Approach

    Guth, Lorraine J.; McDonnell, Kelly A.

    2004-01-01

    This article presents a developmental model for designing and utilizing class activities to meet specific Association for Specialists in Group Work (ASGW) core training competencies for group workers. A review of the relevant literature about teaching group work and meeting core training standards is provided. The authors suggest a process by…

  3. Teaching the Common Core Math Standards with Hands-On Activities, Grades 6-8

    Muschla, Judith A.; Muschla, Gary Robert; Muschla, Erin

    2012-01-01

    The new Common Core State Standards for Mathematics have been formulated to provide students with instruction that will help them acquire a thorough knowledge of math at their grade level, which will in turn enable them to move on to higher mathematics with competence and confidence. "Hands-on Activities for Teaching the Common Core Math…

  4. Modulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 3 by hepatitis C virus core protein

    Ngo, HT; Pham, Long; Kim, JW;

    2013-01-01

    , approximately 100 cellular proteins were identified as HCV core-interacting partners. Of these candidates, mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 3 (MAPKAPK3) was selected for further characterization. MAPKAPK3 is a serine/threonine protein kinase that is activated by stress and growth...... inducers. Binding of HCV core to MAPKAPK3 was confirmed by in vitro pulldown assay and further verified by coimmunoprecipitation assay. HCV core protein interacted with MAPKAPK3 through amino acid residues 41 to 75 of core and the N-terminal half of kinase domain of MAPKAPK3. In addition, both RNA and......Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is highly dependent on cellular proteins for its own propagation. In order to identify the cellular factors involved in HCV propagation, we performed protein microarray assays using the HCV core protein as a probe. Of ~9,000 host proteins immobilized in a microarray...

  5. Differential influence of instruments in nuclear core activity evaluation by data assimilation

    Bouriquet, Bertrand, E-mail: bertrand.bouriquet@cerfacs.f [Sciences de l' Univers au CERFACS, URA CERFACS/CNRS No 1875, 42 avenue Gaspard Coriolis, F-31057 Toulouse Cedex 01 (France); Argaud, Jean-Philippe [Sciences de l' Univers au CERFACS, URA CERFACS/CNRS No 1875, 42 avenue Gaspard Coriolis, F-31057 Toulouse Cedex 01 (France); Electricite de France, 1 avenue du General de Gaulle, F-92141 Clamart Cedex (France); Erhard, Patrick [Electricite de France, 1 avenue du General de Gaulle, F-92141 Clamart Cedex (France); Massart, Sebastien [Sciences de l' Univers au CERFACS, URA CERFACS/CNRS No 1875, 42 avenue Gaspard Coriolis, F-31057 Toulouse Cedex 01 (France); Poncot, Angelique [Electricite de France, 1 avenue du General de Gaulle, F-92141 Clamart Cedex (France); Ricci, Sophie [Sciences de l' Univers au CERFACS, URA CERFACS/CNRS No 1875, 42 avenue Gaspard Coriolis, F-31057 Toulouse Cedex 01 (France); Thual, Olivier [Sciences de l' Univers au CERFACS, URA CERFACS/CNRS No 1875, 42 avenue Gaspard Coriolis, F-31057 Toulouse Cedex 01 (France); Universite de Toulouse, INPT, UPS, IMFT, Allee Camille Soula, F-31400 Toulouse (France)

    2011-01-21

    The global neutronic activity fields of a nuclear core can be reconstructed using data assimilation. Indeed, data assimilation allows to combine both measurements from instruments and information from a model, to evaluate the best possible neutronic activity within the core. We present and apply a specific procedure which evaluates the influence of measures by adding or removing instruments in a given measurement network (possibly empty). The study of various network configurations for the instruments in the nuclear core establishes that the influence of the instruments depends both on the independent instrumentation location and on the chosen network.

  6. Differential influence of instruments in nuclear core activity evaluation by data assimilation

    Bouriquet, Bertrand; Erhard, Patrick; Massart, Sébastien; Pon\\ccot, Angélique; Ricci, Sophie; Thual, Olivier

    2010-01-01

    The global activity fields of a nuclear core can be reconstructed using data assimilation. Data assimilation allows to combine measurements from instruments, and information from a model, to evaluate the best possible activity within the core. We present and apply a specific procedure which evaluates this influence by adding or removing instruments in a given measurement network (possibly empty). The study of various network configurations of instruments in the nuclear core establishes that influence of the instruments depends both on the independant instrumentation location and on the chosen network.

  7. Differential influence of instruments in nuclear core activity evaluation by data assimilation

    Bouriquet, Bertrand; Argaud, Jean-Philippe; Erhard, Patrick; Massart, Sébastien; Ponçot, Angélique; Ricci, Sophie; Thual, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    The global neutronic activity fields of a nuclear core can be reconstructed using data assimilation. Indeed, data assimilation allows to combine both measurements from instruments and information from a model, to evaluate the best possible neutronic activity within the core. We present and apply a specific procedure which evaluates the influence of measures by adding or removing instruments in a given measurement network (possibly empty). The study of various network configurations for the instruments in the nuclear core establishes that the influence of the instruments depends both on the independent instrumentation location and on the chosen network.

  8. Differential influence of instruments in nuclear core activity evaluation by data assimilation

    The global neutronic activity fields of a nuclear core can be reconstructed using data assimilation. Indeed, data assimilation allows to combine both measurements from instruments and information from a model, to evaluate the best possible neutronic activity within the core. We present and apply a specific procedure which evaluates the influence of measures by adding or removing instruments in a given measurement network (possibly empty). The study of various network configurations for the instruments in the nuclear core establishes that the influence of the instruments depends both on the independent instrumentation location and on the chosen network.

  9. Active-to-absorbing-state phase transition in the presence of fluctuating environments: weak and strong dynamic scaling.

    Sarkar, Niladri; Basu, Abhik

    2012-08-01

    We investigate the scaling properties of phase transitions between survival and extinction (active-to-absorbing-state phase transition, AAPT) in a model that by itself belongs to the directed percolation (DP) universality class, interacting with a spatiotemporally fluctuating environment having its own nontrivial dynamics. We model the environment by (i) a randomly stirred fluid, governed by the Navier-Stokes (NS) equation, and (ii) a fluctuating surface, described either by the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang (KPZ) or the Edward-Wilkinson (EW) equations. We show, by using a one-loop perturbative field theoretic setup that, depending upon the spatial scaling of the variance of the external forces that drive the environment (i.e., the NS, KPZ, or EW equations), the system may show weak or strong dynamic scaling at the critical point of active-to-absorbing-state phase transitions. In the former case AAPT displays scaling belonging to the DP universality class, whereas in the latter case the universal behavior is different. PMID:23005737

  10. Deep bore well water level fluctuations in the Koyna region, India: the presence of a low order dynamical system in a seismically active environment

    D. V. Ramana

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Water level fluctuations in deep bore wells in the vicinity of seismically active Koyna region in western India provides an opportunity to understand the causative mechanism underlying reservoir-triggered earthquakes. As the crustal porous rocks behave nonlinearly, their characteristics can be obtained by analysing water level fluctuations, which reflect an integrated response of the medium. A Fractal dimension is one such measure of nonlinear characteristics of porous rock as observed in water level data from the Koyna region. It is inferred in our study that a low nonlinear dynamical system with three variables can predict the water level fluctuations in bore wells.

  11. Time-domain filtered-x-Newton narrowband algorithms for active isolation of frequency-fluctuating vibration

    Li, Yan; He, Lin; Shuai, Chang-geng; Wang, Fei

    2016-04-01

    A time-domain filtered-x Newton narrowband algorithm (the Fx-Newton algorithm) is proposed to address three major problems in active isolation of machinery vibration: multiple narrowband components, MIMO coupling, and amplitude and frequency fluctuations. In this algorithm, narrowband components are extracted by narrowband-pass filters (NBPF) and independently controlled by multi-controllers, and fast convergence of the control algorithm is achieved by inverse secondary-path filtering of the extracted sinusoidal reference signal and its orthogonal component using L×L numbers of 2nd-order filters in the time domain. Controller adapting and control signal generation are also implemented in the time domain, to ensure good real-time performance. The phase shift caused by narrowband filter is compensated online to improve the robustness of control system to frequency fluctuations. A double-reference Fx-Newton algorithm is also proposed to control double sinusoids in the same frequency band, under the precondition of acquiring two independent reference signals. Experiments are conducted with an MIMO single-deck vibration isolation system on which a 200 kW ship diesel generator is mounted, and the algorithms are tested under the vibration alternately excited by the diesel generator and inertial shakers. The results of control over sinusoidal vibration excited by inertial shakers suggest that the Fx-Newton algorithm with NBPF have much faster convergence rate and better attenuation effect than the Fx-LMS algorithm. For swept, frequency-jumping, double, double frequency-swept and double frequency-jumping sinusoidal vibration, and multiple high-level harmonics in broadband vibration excited by the diesel generator, the proposed algorithms also demonstrate large vibration suppression at fast convergence rate, and good robustness to vibration with frequency fluctuations.

  12. Ecophysiology of novel core phylotypes in activated sludge wastewater treatment plants with nutrient removal

    McIlroy, Simon Jon; Awata, Takanori; Nierychlo, Marta;

    An in depth understanding of the ecology of activated sludge nutrient removal wastewater treatment systems requires detailed knowledge of the community composition and metabolic activities of individual members. Recent 16S rRNA gene amplicon surveys of activated sludge wastewater treatment plants...... with nutrient removal in Denmark indicate a core set of bacterial genera. These core genera are suggested to be responsible for the bulk of nutrient transformations underpinning the functions of these plants. While we know the basic in situ activities of some of these genera, there is little to no...

  13. Nitride stabilized PtNi core-shell nanocatalyst for high oxygen reduction activity.

    Kuttiyiel, Kurian A; Sasaki, Kotaro; Choi, Yongman; Su, Dong; Liu, Ping; Adzic, Radoslav R

    2012-12-12

    We describe a route to the development of novel PtNiN core-shell catalysts with low Pt content shell and inexpensive NiN core having high activity and stability for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The PtNiN synthesis involves nitriding Ni nanoparticles and simultaneously encapsulating it by 2-4 monolayer-thick Pt shell. The experimental data and the density functional theory calculations indicate nitride has the bifunctional effect that facilitates formation of the core-shell structures and improves the performance of the Pt shell by inducing both geometric and electronic effects. Synthesis of inexpensive NiN cores opens up possibilities for designing of various transition metal nitride based core-shell nanoparticles for a wide range of applications in energy conversion processes. PMID:23194259

  14. Fluctuation of microbial activities after influent load variations in a full-scale SBR. Recovery of the biomass after starvation

    Cabezas, Angela; Draper, Patricia; Etchebehere, Claudia [Universidad de la Republica, Montevideo (Uruguay). Catedra de Microbiologia, Facultad de Quimica y Facultad de Ciencias

    2009-10-15

    Due to variations in the production levels, a full-scale sequencing batch reactor (SBR) for post-treatment of tannery wastewater was exposed to low and high ammonia load periods. In order to study how these changes affected the N-removal capacity, the microbiology of the reactor was studied by a diverse set of techniques including molecular tools, activity tests, and microbial counts in samples taken along 3 years. The recover capacity of the biomass was also studied in a lab-scale reactor operated with intermittent aeration without feeding for 36 days. The results showed that changes in the feeding negatively affected the nitrifying community, but the nitrogen removal efficiencies could be restored after the concentration stress. Species substitution was observed within the nitrifying bacteria, Nitrosomonas europaea and Nitrobacter predominated initially, and after an ammonia overload period, Nitrosomonas nitrosa and Nitrospira became dominant. Some denitrifiers, with nirS related to Alicycliphilus, Azospirillum, and Marinobacter nirS, persisted during long-term reactor operation, but the community fluctuated both in composition and in abundance. This fluctuating community may better resist the continuous changes in the feeding regime. Our results showed that a nitrifying-denitrifying SBR could be operated with low loads or even without feeding during production shut down periods. (orig.)

  15. Human activity under high pressure: A case study on fluctuation scaling of air traffic controller's communication behaviors

    Wang, Yanjun; Zhang, Qiqian; Zhu, Chenping; Hu, Minghua; Duong, Vu

    2016-01-01

    Recent human dynamics research has unmasked astonishing statistical characteristics such as scaling behaviors in human daily activities. However, less is known about the general mechanism that governs the task-specific activities. In particular, whether scaling law exists in human activities under high pressure remains an open question. In air traffic management system, safety is the most important factor to be concerned by air traffic controllers who always work under high pressure, which provides a unique platform to study human activity. Here we extend fluctuation scaling method to study air traffic controller's communication activity by investigating two empirical communication datasets. Taken the number of controlled flights as the size-like parameter, we show that the relationships between the average communication activity and its standard deviation in both datasets can be well described by Taylor's power law, with scaling exponent α ≈ 0.77 ± 0.01 for the real operational data and α ≈ 0.54 ± 0.01 for the real-time training data. The difference between the exponents suggests that human dynamics under pressure is more likely dominated by the exogenous force. Our findings may lead to further understanding of human behavior.

  16. Electrosprayed core-shell polymer-lipid nanoparticles for active component delivery

    Eltayeb, Megdi; Stride, Eleanor; Edirisinghe, Mohan

    2013-11-01

    A key challenge in the production of multicomponent nanoparticles for healthcare applications is obtaining reproducible monodisperse nanoparticles with the minimum number of preparation steps. This paper focus on the use of electrohydrodynamic (EHD) techniques to produce core-shell polymer-lipid structures with a narrow size distribution in a single step process. These nanoparticles are composed of a hydrophilic core for active component encapsulation and a lipid shell. It was found that core-shell nanoparticles with a tunable size range between 30 and 90 nm and a narrow size distribution could be reproducibly manufactured. The results indicate that the lipid component (stearic acid) stabilizes the nanoparticles against collapse and aggregation and improves entrapment of active components, in this case vanillin, ethylmaltol and maltol. The overall structure of the nanoparticles produced was examined by multiple methods, including transmission electron microscopy and differential scanning calorimetry, to confirm that they were of core-shell form.

  17. Thermosensitive Cu2O-PNIPAM core-shell nanoreactors with tunable photocatalytic activity

    Jia, He; Angioletti-Uberti, Stefano; Henzler, Katja; Ott, Andreas; Lin, Xianzhong; Möser, Jannik; Kochovski, Zdravko; Schnegg, Alexander; Dzubiella, Joachim; Ballauff, Matthias; Lu, Yan

    2016-01-01

    We report a facile and novel method for the fabrication of Cu2O@PNIPAM core-shell nanoreactors using Cu2O nanocubes as the core. The PNIPAM shell not only effectively protects the Cu2O nanocubes from oxidation, but also improves the colloidal stability of the system. The Cu2O@PNIPAM core-shell microgels can work efficiently as photocatalyst for the decomposition of methyl orange under visible light. A significant enhancement in the catalytic activity has been observed for the core-shell microgels compared with the pure Cu2O nanocubes. Most importantly, the photocatalytic activity of the Cu2O nanocubes can be further tuned by the thermosensitive PNIPAM shell, as rationalized by our recent theory.

  18. The effect of active core exercise on fitness and foot pressure in Taekwondo club students

    Yoon, Seong-Deok; Sung, Dong-Hun; Park, Gi Duck

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The effects of core training using slings and Togus on the improvement of posture control in Taekwondo club students, that is, balance ability, were investigated. To that end, changes in the Taekwondo players’ balance ability resulting from active core training for eight weeks were examined through fitness and foot pressure. [Subjects] The present study was conducted with 13 male Taekwondo players of K University in Deagu, South Korea. Once the experiment process was explained, cons...

  19. Isolation of an Active Catalytic Core of Streptococcus downei MFe28 GTF-I Glucosyltransferase

    Monchois, Vincent; Arguello-Morales, Martha; Russell, Roy R. B.

    1999-01-01

    Truncated variants of GTF-I from Streptococcus downei MFe28 were purified by means of a histidine tag. Sequential deletions showed that the C-terminal domain was not directly involved in the catalytic process but was required for primer activation. A fully active catalytic core of only 100 kDa was isolated.

  20. The influence of conformational fluctuations on enzymatic activity: modelling the functional motion of {beta}-secretase

    Neri, M [SISSA and INFM, Via Beirut 2-4, I-34014 Trieste (Italy); Cascella, M [SISSA and INFM, Via Beirut 2-4, I-34014 Trieste (Italy); EPFL, Lausanne (Switzerland); Micheletti, C [SISSA and INFM, Via Beirut 2-4, I-34014 Trieste (Italy)

    2005-05-11

    Considerable insight into the functional activity of proteins and enzymes can be obtained by studying the low energy conformational distortions that the biopolymer can sustain. We carry out the characterization of these large scale structural changes for a protein of considerable pharmaceutical interest, the human {beta}-secretase. Starting from the crystallographic structure of the protein, we use the recently introduced {beta}-Gaussian model to identify, with negligible computational expenditure, the most significant distortions occurring in thermal equilibrium and the associated timescales. The application of this strategy helps us to gain considerable insight into the putative functional movements and, furthermore, allows us to identify a handful of key regions in the protein which have an important mechanical influence on the enzymatic activity despite being spatially distant from the active site. The results obtained within the Gaussian model are validated through an extensive comparison against an all-atom molecular dynamics simulation.

  1. The influence of conformational fluctuations on enzymatic activity: modelling the functional motion of β-secretase

    Considerable insight into the functional activity of proteins and enzymes can be obtained by studying the low energy conformational distortions that the biopolymer can sustain. We carry out the characterization of these large scale structural changes for a protein of considerable pharmaceutical interest, the human β-secretase. Starting from the crystallographic structure of the protein, we use the recently introduced β-Gaussian model to identify, with negligible computational expenditure, the most significant distortions occurring in thermal equilibrium and the associated timescales. The application of this strategy helps us to gain considerable insight into the putative functional movements and, furthermore, allows us to identify a handful of key regions in the protein which have an important mechanical influence on the enzymatic activity despite being spatially distant from the active site. The results obtained within the Gaussian model are validated through an extensive comparison against an all-atom molecular dynamics simulation

  2. Palynological record of tropical rain forest vegetation and sea level fluctuations since 140 ka from sediment core, south-eastern Arabian sea.

    Farooqui, A.; Pattan, J.N.; Parthiban, G.; Srivastava, J.; Ranjana

    Palyno-chronological study of a 552 cm deep sediment core from the south-eastern Arabian Sea covers a time span of ~ 140 ka. The age estimate is based on oxygen isotopic data of planktic foraminifera. Six zones were identified on the basis...

  3. Non-equilibrium fluctuations of a semi-flexible filament driven by active cross-linkers

    Weber, Ines; Schehr, Grégory; Santen, Ludger

    2016-01-01

    The cytoskeleton is an inhomogeneous network of semi-flexible filaments, which are involved in a wide variety of active biological processes. Although the cytoskeletal filaments can be very stiff and embedded in a dense and cross-linked network, it has been shown that, in cells, they typically exhibit significant bending on all length scales. In this work we propose a model of a semi-flexible filament deformed by different types of cross-linkers for which one can compute and investigate the bending spectrum. Our model allows to couple the evolution of the deformation of the semi-flexible polymer with the stochastic dynamics of linkers which exert transversal forces onto the filament. We observe a $q^{-2}$ dependence of the bending spectrum for some biologically relevant parameters and in a certain range of wavenumbers $q$. However, generically, the spatially localized forcing and the non-thermal dynamics both introduce deviations from the thermal-like $q^{-2}$ spectrum.

  4. Prompt Gamma Activation Analysis of the Nyírlugos obsidian core depot find

    Zsolt Kasztovszky

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The Nyírlugos obsidian core depot find is one of the most important lithic assemblages in the collection of the Hungarian National Museum (HNM. The original set comprised 12 giant obsidian cores, of which 11 are currently on the permanent archaeological exhibition of the HNM. One of the cores is known to be inDebrecen. The first publication attributed the hoard, on the strength of giant (flint blades known from the Early and Middle Copper Age Tiszapolgár and Bodrogkeresztúr cultures, to the Copper Age. In the light of recent finds it is more likely to belong to the Middle Neolithic period. The source area was defined as Tokaj Mts., about100 kmto the NW from Nyírlugos. The size and beauty of the exceptional pieces exclude any invasive analysis. Using Prompt Gamma Activation Analysis (PGAA, we can measure major chemical components and some key trace elements of stone artefacts with adequate accuracy to successfully determine provenance of obsidian. Recent methodological development also facilitated the study of relatively large objects like the Nyírlugos cores. The cores were individually measured by PGAA. The results show that the cores originate from the Carpathian 1 sources, most probably the Viničky variety (C1b. The study of the hoard as a batch is an important contribution to the assessment of prehistoric trade and allows us to reconsider the so-called Carpathian, especially Carpathian 1 (Slovakian sources.

  5. Fluctuation phenomena

    Fluctuation phenomena are the ''tip of the iceberg'' revealing the existence, behind even the most quiescent appearing macroscopic states, of an underlying world of agitated, ever-changing microscopic processes. While the presence of these fluctuations can be ignored in some cases, e.g. if one is satisfied with purely thermostatic description of systems in equilibrium, they are central to the understanding of other phenomena, e.g. the nucleation of a new phase following the quenching of a system into the co-existence region. This volume contains a collection of review articles, written by experts in the field, on the subject of fluctuation phenomena. Some of the articles are of a very general nature discussing the modern mathematical formulation of the problems involved, while other articles deal with specific topics such as kinetics of phase transitions and conductivity in solids. The juxtaposition of the variety of physical situations in which fluctuation phenomena play an important role is novel and should give the reader an insight into this subject

  6. The response of short-scale density fluctuations to the activity of beta-induced Alfvén eigenmodes during strong tearing modes on EAST tokamak

    Cao, G. M.; Li, Y. D.; Li, Q.; Sun, P. J.; Wu, G. J.; Hu, L. Q.; the EAST Team

    2015-08-01

    Beta-induced Alfvén eigenmodes (BAEs) during strong tearing modes (TMs) have been frequently observed in fast-electron plasmas of EAST tokamak. The dynamics of the short-scale ({k}\\perp {ρ }s~{1.5-4.3}) density fluctuations during the activity of BAEs with strong TMs has been preliminarily investigated by a tangential CO2 laser collective scattering system. The results suggest the active, but different, response of short-scale density fluctuations to the TMs and BAEs. In the low-frequency (0-10 kHz) part of density fluctuations, there are harmonic oscillations totally corresponding to those of TMs. In the medium-high frequency (10-250 kHz) part of density fluctuations, with the appearance of the BAEs, the medium-high frequency density fluctuations begin to be dominated by several quasi-coherent (QC) modes, and the frequencies of the QC modes seem to be related to the changes of both TMs and BAEs. These results would shed some light on the understanding of the multi-scale interaction physics.

  7. PeV Neutrinos Observed by IceCube from Cores of Active Galactic Nuclei

    Stecker, Floyd W.

    2013-01-01

    I show that the high energy neutrino flux predicted to arise from active galactic nuclei cores can explain the PeV neutrinos detected by IceCube without conflicting with the constraints from the observed extragalactic cosmic-ray and gamma-ray backgrounds.

  8. Effects of preterm birth on intrinsic fluctuations in neonatal cerebral activity examined using optical imaging.

    Yutaka Fuchino

    Full Text Available Medical advancements in neonatology have significantly increased the number of high-risk preterm survivors. However, recent long-term follow-up studies have suggested that preterm infants are at risk for behavioral, educational, and emotional problems. Although clear relationships have been demonstrated between preterm infants and developmental problems during childhood and adolescence, less is known about the early indications of these problems. Recently, numerous studies on resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC have demonstrated temporal correlations of activity between spatially remote cortical regions not only in healthy adults but also in neuropathological disorders and early childhood development. In order to compare RSFC of the cerebral cortex between preterm infants at term-equivalent ages and full-term neonates without any anatomical abnormality risk during natural sleep, we used an optical topography system, which is a recently developed extension of near-infrared spectroscopy. We clarified the presence of RSFC in both preterm infants and full-term neonates and showed differences between these groups. The principal differences were that on comparison of RSFC between the bilateral temporal regions, and bilateral parietal regions, RSFC was enhanced in preterm infants compared with full-term neonates; whereas on comparison of RSFC between the left temporal and left parietal regions, RSFC was enhanced in full-term neonates compared with preterm infants. We also demonstrated a difference between the groups in developmental changes of RSFC related to postmenstrual age. Most importantly, these findings suggested that preterm infants and full-term neonates follow different developmental trajectories during the perinatal period because of differences in perinatal experiences and physiological and structural development.

  9. Concurrent sympathetic activation and vagal withdrawal in hyperthyroidism: Evidence from detrended fluctuation analysis of heart rate variability

    Chen, Jin-Long; Shiau, Yuo-Hsien; Tseng, Yin-Jiun; Chiu, Hung-Wen; Hsiao, Tzu-Chien; Wessel, Niels; Kurths, Jürgen; Chu, Woei-Chyn

    2010-05-01

    Despite many previous studies on the association between hyperthyroidism and the hyperadrenergic state, controversies still exist. Detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) is a well recognized method in the nonlinear analysis of heart rate variability (HRV), and it has physiological significance related to the autonomic nervous system. In particular, an increased short-term scaling exponent α1 calculated from DFA is associated with both increased sympathetic activity and decreased vagal activity. No study has investigated the DFA of HRV in hyperthyroidism. This study was designed to assess the sympathovagal balance in hyperthyroidism. We performed the DFA along with the linear analysis of HRV in 36 hyperthyroid Graves’ disease patients (32 females and 4 males; age 30 ± 1 years, means ± SE) and 36 normal controls matched by sex, age and body mass index. Compared with the normal controls, the hyperthyroid patients revealed a significant increase ( P<0.001) in α1 (hyperthyroid 1.28±0.04 versus control 0.91±0.02), long-term scaling exponent α2 (1.05±0.02 versus 0.90±0.01), overall scaling exponent α (1.11±0.02 versus 0.89±0.01), low frequency power in normalized units (LF%) and the ratio of low frequency power to high frequency power (LF/HF); and a significant decrease ( P<0.001) in the standard deviation of the R-R intervals (SDNN) and high frequency power (HF). In conclusion, hyperthyroidism is characterized by concurrent sympathetic activation and vagal withdrawal. This sympathovagal imbalance state in hyperthyroidism helps to explain the higher prevalence of atrial fibrillation and exercise intolerance among hyperthyroid patients.

  10. Pattern reactivation co-varies with activity in the core recollection network during source memory.

    Leiker, Emily K; Johnson, Jeffrey D

    2015-08-01

    Neuroimaging studies of episodic memory have consistently demonstrated that memory retrieval involves reactivating patterns of neural activity that were present during encoding, and these effects are thought to reflect the qualitative retrieval (recollection) of information that is specific to the content of an episode. By contrast, recollection is also accompanied by other neural correlates that generalize across episodic content and are consequently referred to as the "core recollection network". The neural mechanism by which these specific and core effects interact to give rise to episodic memory retrieval is largely unknown. The current study addressed this issue by testing for correlations (connectivity) between pattern reactivation and activity in the core recollection network. Subjects encoded a series of words with different tasks and then completed a two-step source memory test, whereby they identified the task (source) previously associated with the word and the confidence of that judgment. Multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA) was used in combination with fMRI to first identify encoding-related neural patterns and then test for their reactivation during retrieval. Consistent with prior findings, the magnitude of reactivation increased with source-memory confidence. Moreover, individual-trial measures of reactivation exhibited positive correlations with activity in multiple regions of the core recollection network. Importantly, evidence of functional connectivity between pattern reactivation and a region of left posterior parietal cortex supports the role of this region in tracking the retrieval of episodic information in service of making subjective memory decisions. PMID:26004057

  11. Ionospheric anomaly due to seismic activities-III: correlation between night time VLF amplitude fluctuations and effective magnitudes of earthquakes in Indian sub-continent

    S. Ray

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of an analysis of year-long (2007 monitoring of night time data of the VLF signal amplitude from the Indian Navy station VTX at 18.2 kHz, received by the Indian Centre for Space Physics, Kolkata. We analyzed this data to find out the correlation, if any, between night time amplitude fluctuation and seismic events. We found, analyzing individual cases (with magnitudes >5 as well as statistical analysis (of all the events with effective magnitudes greater than 3.5, that night time fluctuation of the signal amplitude has the highest probability to be beyond the 2σ level about three days prior to seismic events. Thus, the night time fluctuation could be considered as a precursor to enhanced seismic activities.

  12. Error analysis in reactor-core neutron beam density measurements by gold-foil activation

    Prokof' ev, Y.A.; Bondarenko, L.N.; Rogok, E.V.; Spivak, P.E.

    1986-09-01

    The most accurate method for neutron density measurements, where the spectrum cut-off energy is appreciably lower than the gold cross-section resonance energy, is by gold-foil activation. The authors show that this method also makes it possible to measure core-beam neutron densities with high accuracy, even though this requires taking into account the gold-activation contribution of epithermal neutrons from 3.10/sup 4 -/b neutron capture at 4.8 eV and inserting the appropriate corrections in the measurement results. The activation method was experimentally used for precision measurement of the reactor-core beam density in the study of the beam neutron half-life. Data are presented which show that the additive error is within the +/-0.5 measurement error.

  13. Concrete core activation in the public health sector [in the Netherlands]; Betonkernactivering in de gezondheidszorg

    Nicolaas, H.J. [College bouw zorginstellingen, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2006-03-15

    Nursing homes, hospitals and residential care centres are all developing plans to take advantage of concrete core activation. Starting from the requirements for interior climate and HVAC technology in the health care sector, this article examines points that merit additional attention in the use of concrete core activation. The subjects touched on include the need for supplementary heating, how to deal with the ventilation, the influence of the building process, the consequences for acoustics, and the cost considerations of these systems. [Dutch] Zowel verpleeghuizen, ziekenhuizen en woonzorgcentra ontwikkelen plannen om van BetonKernActivering gebruik te maken. Uitgaande van de eisen die aan her binnenklimaat en de installatietechniek in de zorgsector worden gesteld, gaat dit artikel in op de punten die extra aandacht verdienen bij het toepassen van BKA. Onderwerpen zijn: noodzaak tot aanvullende verwarming, hoe om te gaan met ventilatie, de invloed op bet bouwproces, gevolgen voor de akoestiek en meer en minder kosten van dergelijke installaties.

  14. Palladium-platinum core-shell icosahedra with substantially enhanced activity and durability towards oxygen reduction

    Wang, Xue; Choi, Sang-Il; Roling, Luke T.; Luo, Ming; Ma, Cheng; Zhang, Lei; Chi, Miaofang; Liu, Jingyue; Xie, Zhaoxiong; Herron, Jeffrey A.; Mavrikakis, Manos; Xia, Younan

    2015-07-01

    Conformal deposition of platinum as ultrathin shells on facet-controlled palladium nanocrystals offers a great opportunity to enhance the catalytic performance while reducing its loading. Here we report such a system based on palladium icosahedra. Owing to lateral confinement imposed by twin boundaries and thus vertical relaxation only, the platinum overlayers evolve into a corrugated structure under compressive strain. For the core-shell nanocrystals with an average of 2.7 platinum overlayers, their specific and platinum mass activities towards oxygen reduction are enhanced by eight- and sevenfold, respectively, relative to a commercial catalyst. Density functional theory calculations indicate that the enhancement can be attributed to the weakened binding of hydroxyl to the compressed platinum surface supported on palladium. After 10,000 testing cycles, the mass activity of the core-shell nanocrystals is still four times higher than the commercial catalyst. These results demonstrate an effective approach to the development of electrocatalysts with greatly enhanced activity and durability.

  15. Surface-engineered core-shell nano-size ferrites and their antimicrobial activity

    Baraliya, Jagdish D., E-mail: jdbaraliya@yahoo.co.in; Joshi, Hiren H., E-mail: jdbaraliya@yahoo.co.in [Department of Physics, Saurashtra University, Rajkot - 360 005, Gujarat (India)

    2014-04-24

    We report the results of biological study on core-shell structured MFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (where M = Co, Mn, Ni) nanoparticles and influence of silica- DEG dual coating on their antimicrobial activity. Spherical MFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles were prepared via a Co-precipitation method. The microstructures and morphologies of these nanoparticles were studied by x-ray diffraction and FTIR. The antimicrobial activity study carried out in nutrient agar medium with addition of antimicrobial synthesis compound which is tested for its activity against different types of bacteria.

  16. Surface-engineered core-shell nano-size ferrites and their antimicrobial activity

    We report the results of biological study on core-shell structured MFe2O4 (where M = Co, Mn, Ni) nanoparticles and influence of silica- DEG dual coating on their antimicrobial activity. Spherical MFe2O4 nanoparticles were prepared via a Co-precipitation method. The microstructures and morphologies of these nanoparticles were studied by x-ray diffraction and FTIR. The antimicrobial activity study carried out in nutrient agar medium with addition of antimicrobial synthesis compound which is tested for its activity against different types of bacteria

  17. ISOTROPIC HEATING OF GALAXY CLUSTER CORES VIA RAPIDLY REORIENTING ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS JETS

    Active galactic nucleus (AGN) jets carry more than sufficient energy to stave off catastrophic cooling of the intracluster medium (ICM) in the cores of cool-core clusters. However, in order to prevent catastrophic cooling, the ICM must be heated in a near-isotropic fashion and narrow bipolar jets with Pjet = 1044–45 erg s–1, typical of radio AGNs at cluster centers, are inefficient in heating the gas in the transverse direction to the jets. We argue that due to existent conditions in cluster cores, the supermassive black holes (SMBHs) will, in addition to accreting gas via radiatively inefficient flows, experience short stochastic episodes of enhanced accretion via thin disks. In general, the orientation of these accretion disks will be misaligned with the spin axis of the black holes (BHs) and the ensuing torques will cause the BH's spin axis (and therefore the jet axis) to slew and rapidly change direction. This model not only explains recent observations showing successive generations of jet-lobes-bubbles in individual cool-core clusters that are offset from each other in the angular direction with respect to the cluster center, but also shows that AGN jets can heat the cluster core nearly isotropically on the gas cooling timescale. Our model does require that the SMBHs at the centers of cool-core clusters be spinning relatively slowly. Torques from individual misaligned disks are ineffective at tilting rapidly spinning BHs by more than a few degrees. Additionally, since SMBHs that host thin accretion disks will manifest as quasars, we predict that roughly 1-2 rich clusters within z < 0.5 should have quasars at their centers.

  18. Preparation, characterization and photocatalytic activity of TiO2/polyaniline core-shell nanocomposite

    Ali Olad; Sepideh Behboudi; Ali Akbar Entezami

    2012-10-01

    Polyaniline (PANI) as a promising conducting polymer has been used to prepare polyaniline/TiO2 (PANI/TiO2) nanocomposite with core-shell structure as photocatalyst. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles with an average crystal size of 21 nm were encapsulated by PANI via the in situ polymerization of aniline on the surface of TiO2 nanoparticles. FT–IR, UV-Vis-NIR, XRD, SEM and TEM techniques were used to characterize the PANI/TiO2 core-shell nanocomposite. Photocatalytic activity of PANI/TiO2 nanocomposite was investigated under both UV and visible light irradiations and compared with unmodified TiO2 nanoparticles. Results indicated deposition of PANI on the surface of TiO2 nanoparticles which improved the photocatalytic activity of pristine TiO2 nanoparticles.

  19. Primase activities constantly present in avian myeloblastosis virus core isolates: detection and basic characteristics

    RNA-synthesizing activities by its nature identical with primase activities )Pr-As) were found to be constantly present in avian myeloblastosis virus (AMV) core isolates. Their endogenous templates are molecules of the virus core-bound host cell DNA (AMV DNA) that have been recently recognized as a collection of still active early replicative structures. Like the Pr-As, the RNA-SAs are not inhibited bu α-amanitin nor by aphidicolin and they show a mutually competitive affinity for ATP and GTP. Their reaction products treated with DNase I are short RNAs similar in length to initiator RNAs (iRNAs), their precursors and degradation products. In AMV core proteins separated in isopycnic CsCl gradients, they are chiefly located in the density region of reverse transcriptase activities (RT-As) but with a distinct peak fraction. Like Pr-As, they are able to use poly(dR) as template and to form, in the presence of [α-32P]ATP, products that after DNase I treatment consist of poly(rA) molecules similar in length to iRNA monomers and multimers. Like the Pr-As, they are able to complement E. coli DNA polymerase 1 reactions. They occur in the analysed AMV core proteins as six distinct sedimentation species (PrA-SS). This, together with other relevant properties, indicates the presence of Pr-As associated with molecules of a primase-α DNA polymerase enzyme complex, its degradation products and 'free'primase monomers. (author)

  20. Conserved tryptophan in the core domain of transglutaminase is essential for catalytic activity

    Murthy, S. N. Prasanna; Iismaa, Siiri; Begg, Gillian; Freymann, Douglas M.; Graham, Robert M.; Lorand, Laszlo

    2002-01-01

    Transglutaminase 2 (TG2) is a distinctive member of the family of Ca2+-dependent enzymes recognized mostly by their abilities to catalyze the posttranslational crosslinking of proteins. TG2 uniquely binds and hydrolyzes GTP; binding GTP inhibits its crosslinking activity but allows it to function in signal transduction (hence the Gh designation). The core domain of TG2 (residues 139–471, rat) comprises the papain-like catalytic triad and the GTP-binding domain (residues 159–173) and contains ...

  1. Investigation of magnetic active core sizes and hydrodynamic diameters of a magnetically fractionated ferrofluid

    In this work we address the question which relates between the size of the magnetically active core of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and the size of the overall particle in the solution (the so-called hydrodynamic diameter dhyd) exists. For this purpose we use two methods of examination that can deliver conclusions about the properties of MNP which are not accessible with normal microscopy. On the one hand, we use temperature dependent magnetorelaxation (TMRX) method, which enables direct access to the energy barrier distribution and by using additional hysteresis loop measurements can provide details about the size of the magnetically active cores. On the other hand, to determine the size of the overall particle in the solution, we use the magnetooptical relaxation of ferrofluids (MORFF) method, where the stimulation is done magnetically while the reading of the relaxation signal, however, is done optically. As a basis for the examinations in this work we use a ferrofluid that was developed for medicinal purposes and which has been fractioned magnetically to obtain differently sized fractions of MNPs. The two values obtained through these methods for each fraction shows the success in fractioning the original solution. Therefore, one can conclude a direct correlation between the size of the magnetically active core and the size of the complete particle in the solution from the experimental results. To calculate the size of the magnetically active core we found a temperature dependent anisotropy constant which was taken into account for the calculations. Furthermore, we found relaxation signals at 18 K for all fractions in these TMRX measurements, which have their origin in other magnetic effects than the Néel relaxation.

  2. Behavior of magnetic field fluctuations during dynamo activity and its effect on energy confinement in a reversed-field pinch

    Fluctuations of magnetic fields and related magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) phenomena are investigated in the TPE-1RM15 reversed-field pinch experiment [Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion Research, 1986 (IAEA, Vienna, 1987), Vol. 2, p. 453]. Mode analysis of fluctuations measured by multichannel coils reveals that nonlinear interactions between m=1 and m=0 modes, such as nonlinear coupling and phase locking, play significant roles during a dynamo event (i.e., the flux genertion process in the sustainment phase), resulting in transition from an unstable state to a stable state. Behaviors of these fluctuations are found to be toroidally asymmetrical due to strong nonlinearity. Study of the current ramping experiment shows that the inverse of global energy confinement time depends on the squared fluctuation level offset linearly, which is consistent with the prediction of the transport model based on the diffusion of stochastic field lines. By examining the dependence of the resistive part of the loop voltage on the fluctuation level, the input power to the electrons and ions are estimated to be about 70% and 30% of the total input power, respectively

  3. Behavior of magnetic field fluctuations during dynamo activity and its effect on energy confinement in a reversed-field pinch

    Hattori, K.; Hirano, Y.; Shimada, T.; Yagi, Y.; Maejima, Y.; Hirota, I.; Ogawa, K.

    1991-11-01

    Fluctuations of magnetic fields and related magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) phenomena are investigated in the TPE-1RM15 reversed-field pinch experiment [Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion Research, 1986 (IAEA, Vienna, 1987), Vol. 2, p. 453]. Mode analysis of fluctuations measured by multichannel coils reveals that nonlinear interactions between m=1 and m=0 modes, such as nonlinear coupling and phase locking, play significant roles during a dynamo event (i.e., the flux genertion process in the sustainment phase), resulting in transition from an unstable state to a stable state. Behaviors of these fluctuations are found to be toroidally asymmetrical due to strong nonlinearity. Study of the current ramping experiment shows that the inverse of global energy confinement time depends on the squared fluctuation level offset linearly, which is consistent with the prediction of the transport model based on the diffusion of stochastic field lines. By examining the dependence of the resistive part of the loop voltage on the fluctuation level, the input power to the electrons and ions are estimated to be about 70% and 30% of the total input power, respectively.

  4. Fluctuations at low temperatures

    The London prize committee cites a number of my works under the common term 'fluctuations'. Research under the general heading of 'fluctuations' has followed a different course during different periods of my life. I am deeply indebted to many people who have contributed to and participated in the research projects that have been cited; among them there were my professors and my students. I would like to acknowledge them and to talk about these people in conjunction with the physical problems on which we worked, stressing that for me these people, their personality and my intellectual activities were inseparable. (orig.)

  5. NORM activity concentration in sediment cores from the Peninsular Malaysia East Coast Exclusive Economic Zone

    Study for distribution of Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM) i.e. 226Ra, 228Ra and 40K in the east coast of Peninsular Malaysia Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) was carried out as part of the national marine environment project. Sixteen marine sediment cores from selected locations within the EEZ were collected for determination of NORM activity concentrations using high-purity germanium (HPGe) gamma spectrometer. From the measurement, the activity concentration of 226Ra, 228Ra and 40K is ranged from 16 ± 4 Bq/kg to 46 ± 6 Bq/kg (total mean 30), 28 ± 7 Bq/kg to 87 ± 11 Bq/kg (total mean 56) and 171 ± 33 Bq/kg to 690 ± 89 Bq/kg (total mean 420), dry wt., respectively. The activity concentrations of radionuclides in most of the core were quite uniform suggesting that there were thorough vertical mixed of sediment throughout the core. The results obtained were also in good agreement with those previous reported from other countries in the region and therefore can be used to enhance present radioactivity database. The calculated external hazard values were ranged from 0.25 to 0.51 with the mean of 0.38 (less than unity) showed little risk of external hazard to the workers handling the sediments and it was likely low level of the mainland natural gamma-radiation in the east coast of Peninsular Malaysia. (author)

  6. Instrument measures dynamic pressure fluctuations

    Coats, J. W.; Penko, P. E.; Reshotko, M.

    1977-01-01

    Pressure probe instrument, incorporating "infinite line" principle, can be used to remotely measure dynamic pressure fluctuations in hot high-pressure environemnts too severe for sensors. System is designed and can be utilized for measurements in core of operating turbofan engine.

  7. Ice cores

    Svensson, Anders

    Ice cores from Antarctica, from Greenland, and from a number of smaller glaciers around the world yield a wealth of information on past climates and environments. Ice cores offer unique records on past temperatures, atmospheric composition (including greenhouse gases), volcanism, solar activity......, dustiness, and biomass burning, among others. In Antarctica, ice cores extend back more than 800,000 years before present (Jouzel et al. 2007), whereas. Greenland ice cores cover the last 130,000 years...

  8. The M1 gene is associated with differences in the temperature optimum of the transcriptase activity in reovirus core particles.

    Yin, P.; Cheang, M; Coombs, K M

    1996-01-01

    The reovirus core is a multienzyme complex that contains five different structural proteins and 10 segments of double-stranded RNA. The core is responsible for transcribing mRNA from the enclosed double-stranded RNA. The reovirus transcriptase has an unusual temperature profile, with optimum transcription occurring at approximately 50 degrees C and little activity occurring below 30 or above 60 degrees C. Purified reovirus serotype 1 Lang (T1L) cores transcribed most efficiently at 48 degrees...

  9. Trunk muscle co-activation using functional electrical stimulation modifies center of pressure fluctuations during quiet sitting by increasing trunk stiffness

    Milosevic, Matija; Masani, Kei; Wu, Noel; McConville, Kristiina M. V.; Popovic, Milos R.

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of functional electrical stimulation (FES) induced co-activation of trunk muscles during quiet sitting. We hypothesized that FES applied to the trunk muscles will increase trunk stiffness. The objectives of this study were to: 1) compare the center of pressure (COP) fluctuations during unsupported and FES-assisted quiet sitting - an experimental study and; 2) investigate how FES influences sitting balance - an analytical (simulati...

  10. Enhancement of canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling activity by HCV core protein promotes cell growth of hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    Jiao Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Hepatitis C virus (HCV core protein has been implicated as a potential oncogene or a cofactor in HCV-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Overactivation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling is a major factor in oncogenesis of HCC. However, the pathogenesis of HCV core-associated Wnt/β-catenin activation remains to be further characterized. Therefore, we attempted to determine whether HCV core protein plays an important role in regulating Wnt/β-catenin signaling in HCC cells. METHODOLOGY: Wnt/β-catenin signaling activity was investigated in core-expressing hepatoma cells. Protein and gene expression were examined by Western blot, immunofluorescence staining, RT-qPCR, and reporter assay. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: HCV core protein significantly enhances Tcf-dependent transcriptional activity induced by Wnt3A in HCC cell lines. Additionally, core protein increases and stabilizes β-catenin levels in hepatoma cell line Huh7 through inactivation of GSK-3β, which contributes to the up-regulation of downstream target genes, such as c-Myc, cyclin D1, WISP2 and CTGF. Also, core protein increases cell proliferation rate and promotes Wnt3A-induced tumor growth in the xenograft tumor model of human HCC. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: HCV core protein enhances Wnt/β-catenin signaling activity, hence playing an important role in HCV-associated carcinogenesis.

  11. Core-Shell Composite Hydrogels for Controlled Nanocrystal Formation and Release of Hydrophobic Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients.

    Badruddoza, Abu Zayed Md; Godfrin, P Douglas; Myerson, Allan S; Trout, Bernhardt L; Doyle, Patrick S

    2016-08-01

    Although roughly 40% of pharmaceuticals being developed are poorly water soluble, this class of drugs lacks a formulation strategy capable of producing high loads, fast dissolution kinetics, and low energy input. In this work, a novel bottom-up approach is developed for producing and formulating nanocrystals of poorly water-soluble active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) using core-shell composite hydrogel beads. Organic phase nanoemulsion droplets stabilized by polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and containing a model hydrophobic API (fenofibrate) are embedded in the alginate hydrogel matrix and subsequently act as crystallization reactors. Controlled evaporation of this composite material produces core-shell structured alginate-PVA hydrogels with drug nanocrystals (500-650 nm) embedded within the core. Adjustable loading of API nanocrystals up to 83% by weight is achieved with dissolution (of 80% of the drug) occurring in as little as 30 min. A quantitative model is also developed and experimentally validated that the drug release patterns of the fenofibrate nanocrystals can be modulated by controlling the thickness of the PVA shell and drug loading. Thus, these composite materials offer a "designer" drug delivery system. Overall, our approach enables a novel means of simultaneous controlled crystallization and formulation of hydrophobic drugs that circumvents energy intensive top-down processes in traditional manufacturing. PMID:27249402

  12. Summary on the activity of AERs Working Group on core monitoring (flux reconstruction, in-core measurements)

    Working Group C had a joint meeting with Group G in Balatonfuered, Hungary, 31 May-1 June, 2010. At the joint meeting 21 people from 10 AER member organisations of 4 countries - such as Russia, Czech Republic, Slovakia and Hungary - participated. In the 2 days of the program 15 papers were presented, 10 from these connected to the topic of working group C. The title of papers and the list of participants are attached. At the meeting the following topics were discussed:1-Gd fuel introduction and experiences;2-Reactor physical measurement and evaluation problems; 3-Code development and testing;4-In-core surveillance system developments. (Author)

  13. A neutron activation technique for the analysis of cryolite in core samples

    A short-lived, delayed neutron activation technique has been investigated to determine the content of cryolite (Na3AlF6) in core samples by the detection of fluorine through the fast neutron reaction 19F(n,α)16N. The resultant γ-rays in the energy range of 2.84-8.14 MeV, measured for pure cryolite and background samples, established that cryolite concentrations > 13.6 wt% in rock samples could be estimated with uncertainties of about ± 4.3 wt%. The results are very satisfactory for exploration purposes. (author)

  14. Evaluation of geochemical indicators for the genesis of core deposits by neutron activation analysis

    Neutron activation spectrometry has become an indispensable tool for geochemistry. As an example, its application in the investigation of the fractionation of rare-earth elements is reported. The Tb/Ca and Tb/Cl atomic ratios in Ca-minerals display whether they were formed as primary or secondary crystallizations under pegmatitic, hydrothermal or sedimentary conditions. In favourable cases even interactions of the core bearing solutions with country rocks can be recognized. Since fluorite and calcite often occur in paragenesis with other ore minerals they can be used as indicator minerals. Genetical informations derived for them can be applied to the ore deposit as a whole. (orig.)

  15. A new gravitational-wave signature of SASI activities in non-rotating supernova cores

    Kuroda, Takami; Kotake, Kei; Takiwaki, Tomoya

    2016-01-01

    We present results from fully relativistic three-dimensional core-collapse supernova (CCSN) simulations of a non-rotating 15 M_sun star using three different nuclear equations of state (EoSs). From our simulations covering up to ~350 ms after bounce, we show that the development of the standing accretion shock instability (SASI) differs significantly depending on the stiffness of nuclear EoS. Generally, the SASI activity occurs more vigorously in models with softer EoS. By evaluating the grav...

  16. Terrestrial Gravity Fluctuations

    Jan Harms

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Different forms of fluctuations of the terrestrial gravity field are observed by gravity experiments. For example, atmospheric pressure fluctuations generate a gravity-noise foreground in measurements with super-conducting gravimeters. Gravity changes caused by high-magnitude earthquakes have been detected with the satellite gravity experiment GRACE, and we expect high-frequency terrestrial gravity fluctuations produced by ambient seismic fields to limit the sensitivity of ground-based gravitational-wave (GW detectors. Accordingly, terrestrial gravity fluctuations are considered noise and signal depending on the experiment. Here, we will focus on ground-based gravimetry. This field is rapidly progressing through the development of GW detectors. The technology is pushed to its current limits in the advanced generation of the LIGO and Virgo detectors, targeting gravity strain sensitivities better than 10^–23 Hz^–1/2 above a few tens of a Hz. Alternative designs for GW detectors evolving from traditional gravity gradiometers such as torsion bars, atom interferometers, and superconducting gradiometers are currently being developed to extend the detection band to frequencies below 1 Hz. The goal of this article is to provide the analytical framework to describe terrestrial gravity perturbations in these experiments. Models of terrestrial gravity perturbations related to seismic fields, atmospheric disturbances, and vibrating, rotating or moving objects, are derived and analyzed. The models are then used to evaluate passive and active gravity noise mitigation strategies in GW detectors, or alternatively, to describe their potential use in geophysics. The article reviews the current state of the field, and also presents new analyses especially with respect to the impact of seismic scattering on gravity perturbations, active gravity noise cancellation, and time-domain models of gravity perturbations from atmospheric and seismic point sources. Our

  17. Terrestrial Gravity Fluctuations

    Harms, Jan

    2015-12-01

    Different forms of fluctuations of the terrestrial gravity field are observed by gravity experiments. For example, atmospheric pressure fluctuations generate a gravity-noise foreground in measurements with super-conducting gravimeters. Gravity changes caused by high-magnitude earthquakes have been detected with the satellite gravity experiment GRACE, and we expect high-frequency terrestrial gravity fluctuations produced by ambient seismic fields to limit the sensitivity of ground-based gravitational-wave (GW) detectors. Accordingly, terrestrial gravity fluctuations are considered noise and signal depending on the experiment. Here, we will focus on ground-based gravimetry. This field is rapidly progressing through the development of GW detectors. The technology is pushed to its current limits in the advanced generation of the LIGO and Virgo detectors, targeting gravity strain sensitivities better than 10^-23 Hz^-1/2 above a few tens of a Hz. Alternative designs for GW detectors evolving from traditional gravity gradiometers such as torsion bars, atom interferometers, and superconducting gradiometers are currently being developed to extend the detection band to frequencies below 1 Hz. The goal of this article is to provide the analytical framework to describe terrestrial gravity perturbations in these experiments. Models of terrestrial gravity perturbations related to seismic fields, atmospheric disturbances, and vibrating, rotating or moving objects, are derived and analyzed. The models are then used to evaluate passive and active gravity noise mitigation strategies in GW detectors, or alternatively, to describe their potential use in geophysics. The article reviews the current state of the field, and also presents new analyses especially with respect to the impact of seismic scattering on gravity perturbations, active gravity noise cancellation, and time-domain models of gravity perturbations from atmospheric and seismic point sources. Our understanding of

  18. Acetylcholinesterase: Enhanced Fluctuations and Alternative

    Bui, Jennifer M.; Tai, Kaihsu; Mccammon, J Andrew A.

    2004-05-21

    A 15 ns molecular dynamics simulation is reported for the complex of mouse acetylcholinesterase (mAChE) and the protein neurotoxin fasciculin-2. As compared to a 15 ns simulation of apo-mAChE, the structural fluctuations of the enzyme are substantially increased in magnitude for the enzyme in the complex. Fluctuations of part of the long omega loop (residues 69-96) are particularly enhanced. This loop forms one wall of the active site, and the enhanced fluctuations lead to additional routes of access to the active site.

  19. Underground economy and aggregate fluctuations

    Juan Carlos Conesa Roca; Carlos Díaz Moreno; José Enrique Galdón Sánchez

    2001-01-01

    This paper explores the role of underground economic activities as an explanation of differences in registered aggregate fluctuations. In order to do so, we introduce an underground economy sector in an otherwise standard Real Business Cycle model and calibrate it to the USA economy. We find that, at low frequencies, Europe fluctuates more than the USA, while its participation rate is smaller. The existence of underground activities rationalizes the negative relationship between participation...

  20. Physics of Fashion Fluctuations

    Donangelo, Raul; Hansen, Alex; Sneppen, Kim; Souza, Sergio R.

    2000-01-01

    We consider a market where many agents trade many different types of products with each other. We model development of collective modes in this market, and quantify these by fluctuations that scale with time with a Hurst exponent of about 0.7. We demonstrate that individual products in the model occationally become globally accepted means of exchange, and simultaneously become very actively traded. Thus collective features similar to money spontaneously emerge, without any a priori reason.

  1. REMOVING COOL CORES AND CENTRAL METALLICITY PEAKS IN GALAXY CLUSTERS WITH POWERFUL ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS OUTBURSTS

    Recent X-ray observations of galaxy clusters suggest that cluster populations are bimodally distributed according to central gas entropy and are separated into two distinct classes: cool core (CC) and non-cool core (NCC) clusters. While it is widely accepted that active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback plays a key role in offsetting radiative losses and maintaining many clusters in the CC state, the origin of NCC clusters is much less clear. At the same time, a handful of extremely powerful AGN outbursts have recently been detected in clusters, with a total energy ∼1061-1062 erg. Using two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations, we show that if a large fraction of this energy is deposited near the centers of CC clusters, which is likely common due to dense cores, these AGN outbursts can completely remove CCs, transforming them to NCC clusters. Our model also has interesting implications for cluster abundance profiles, which usually show a central peak in CC systems. Our calculations indicate that during the CC to NCC transformation, AGN outbursts efficiently mix metals in cluster central regions and may even remove central abundance peaks if they are not broad enough. For CC clusters with broad central abundance peaks, AGN outbursts decrease peak abundances, but cannot effectively destroy the peaks. Our model may simultaneously explain the contradictory (possibly bimodal) results of abundance profiles in NCC clusters, some of which are nearly flat, while others have strong central peaks similar to those in CC clusters. A statistical analysis of the sizes of central abundance peaks and their redshift evolution may shed interesting insights on the origin of both types of NCC clusters and the evolution history of thermodynamics and AGN activity in clusters.

  2. The Evolution of the EM Distribution in the Core of an Active Region

    Del Zanna, Giulio; Mason, Helen; Subramanian, Srividya; O'Dwyer, Brendan

    2014-01-01

    We study the spatial distribution and evolution of the slope of the Emission Measure between 1 and 3~MK in the core active region NOAA~11193, first when it appeared near the central meridian and then again when it re-appeared after a solar rotation. We use observations recorded by the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) aboard Hinode, with a new radiometric calibration. We also use observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) aboard Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). We present the first spatially resolved maps of the EM slope in the 1--3~MK range within the core of the AR using several methods, both approximate and from the Differential Emission Measure (DEM). A significant variation of the slope is found at different spatial locations within the active region. We selected two regions that were not affected too much by any line-of-sight lower temperature emission. We found that the EM had a power law of the form EM~$\\propto T^{b}$, with b = 4.4$\\pm0.4$, and 4.6$\\pm0.4$, during the first...

  3. CAN A LONG NANOFLARE STORM EXPLAIN THE OBSERVED EMISSION MEASURE DISTRIBUTIONS IN ACTIVE REGION CORES?

    All theories that attempt to explain the heating of the high-temperature plasma observed in the solar corona are based on short bursts of energy. The intensities and velocities measured in the cores of quiescent active regions, however, can be steady over many hours of observation. One heating scenario that has been proposed to reconcile such observations with impulsive heating models is the 'long nanoflare storm', where short-duration heating events occur infrequently on many sub-resolution strands; the emission of the strands is then averaged together to explain the observed steady structures. In this Letter, we examine the emission measure distribution predicted for such a long nanoflare storm by modeling an arcade of strands in an active region core. Comparisons of the computed emission measure distributions with recent observations indicate that the long nanoflare storm scenario implies greater than five times more 1 MK emission than is actually observed for all plausible combinations of loop lengths, heating rates, and abundances. We conjecture that if the plasma had 'super coronal' abundances, the model may be able to match the observations at low temperatures.

  4. Alterations in task-induced activity and resting-state fluctuations in visual and DMN areas revealed in long-term meditators.

    Berkovich-Ohana, Aviva; Harel, Michal; Hahamy, Avital; Arieli, Amos; Malach, Rafael

    2016-07-15

    Recently we proposed that the information contained in spontaneously emerging (resting-state) fluctuations may reflect individually unique neuro-cognitive traits. One prediction of this conjecture, termed the "spontaneous trait reactivation" (STR) hypothesis, is that resting-state activity patterns could be diagnostic of unique personalities, talents and life-styles of individuals. Long-term meditators could provide a unique experimental group to test this hypothesis. Using fMRI we found that, during resting-state, the amplitude of spontaneous fluctuations in long-term mindfulness meditation (MM) practitioners was enhanced in the visual cortex and significantly reduced in the DMN compared to naïve controls. Importantly, during a visual recognition memory task, the MM group showed heightened visual cortex responsivity, concomitant with weaker negative responses in Default Mode Network (DMN) areas. This effect was also reflected in the behavioral performance, where MM practitioners performed significantly faster than the control group. Thus, our results uncover opposite changes in the visual and default mode systems in long-term meditators which are revealed during both rest and task. The results support the STR hypothesis and extend it to the domain of local changes in the magnitude of the spontaneous fluctuations. PMID:27109713

  5. Pt monolayer shell on hollow Pd core electrocatalysts: Scale up synthesis, structure, and activity for the oxygen reduction reaction

    Vukmirovic Miomir B.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on synthesis, characterization and the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR kinetics of Pt monolayer shell on Pd(hollow, or Pd-Au(hollow core electrocatalysts. Comparison between the ORR catalytic activity of the electrocatalysts with hollow cores and those of Pt solid and Pt hollow nanoparticles has been obtained using the rotating disk electrode technique. Hollow nanoparticles were made using Ni or Cu nanoparticles as sacrificial templates. The Pt ORR specific and mass activities of the electrocatalysts with hollow cores were found considerably higher than those of the electrocatalysts with the solid cores. We attribute this enhanced Pt activity to the smooth surface morphology and hollow-induced lattice contraction, in addition to the mass-saving geometry of hollow particles.

  6. DIAGNOSING THE TIME DEPENDENCE OF ACTIVE REGION CORE HEATING FROM THE EMISSION MEASURE. II. NANOFLARE TRAINS

    The time dependence of heating in solar active regions can be studied by analyzing the slope of the emission measure distribution coolward of the peak. In a previous study we showed that low-frequency heating can account for 0% to 77% of active region core emission measures. We now turn our attention to heating by a finite succession of impulsive events for which the timescale between events on a single magnetic strand is shorter than the cooling timescale. We refer to this scenario as a 'nanoflare train' and explore a parameter space of heating and coronal loop properties with a hydrodynamic model. Our conclusions are (1) nanoflare trains are consistent with 86% to 100% of observed active region cores when uncertainties in the atomic data are properly accounted for; (2) steeper slopes are found for larger values of the ratio of the train duration Δ H to the post-train cooling and draining timescale Δ C, where Δ H depends on the number of heating events, the event duration and the time interval between successive events (τ C); (3) τ C may be diagnosed from the width of the hot component of the emission measure provided that the temperature bins are much smaller than 0.1 dex; (4) the slope of the emission measure alone is not sufficient to provide information about any timescale associated with heating—the length and density of the heated structure must be measured for Δ H to be uniquely extracted from the ratio Δ H/Δ C.

  7. DIAGNOSING THE TIME DEPENDENCE OF ACTIVE REGION CORE HEATING FROM THE EMISSION MEASURE. II. NANOFLARE TRAINS

    Reep, J. W.; Bradshaw, S. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Klimchuk, J. A., E-mail: jeffrey.reep@rice.edu, E-mail: stephen.bradshaw@rice.edu, E-mail: james.a.klimchuk@nasa.gov [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Solar Physics Lab., Code 671, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2013-02-20

    The time dependence of heating in solar active regions can be studied by analyzing the slope of the emission measure distribution coolward of the peak. In a previous study we showed that low-frequency heating can account for 0% to 77% of active region core emission measures. We now turn our attention to heating by a finite succession of impulsive events for which the timescale between events on a single magnetic strand is shorter than the cooling timescale. We refer to this scenario as a 'nanoflare train' and explore a parameter space of heating and coronal loop properties with a hydrodynamic model. Our conclusions are (1) nanoflare trains are consistent with 86% to 100% of observed active region cores when uncertainties in the atomic data are properly accounted for; (2) steeper slopes are found for larger values of the ratio of the train duration {Delta} {sub H} to the post-train cooling and draining timescale {Delta} {sub C}, where {Delta} {sub H} depends on the number of heating events, the event duration and the time interval between successive events ({tau} {sub C}); (3) {tau} {sub C} may be diagnosed from the width of the hot component of the emission measure provided that the temperature bins are much smaller than 0.1 dex; (4) the slope of the emission measure alone is not sufficient to provide information about any timescale associated with heating-the length and density of the heated structure must be measured for {Delta} {sub H} to be uniquely extracted from the ratio {Delta} {sub H}/{Delta} {sub C}.

  8. Microbial population, activity, and phylogenetic diversity in the subseafloor core sediment from the Sea of Okhotsk

    Inagaki, F.; Suzuki, M.; Takai, K.; Nealson, K. H.; Horikoshi, K.

    2002-12-01

    Subseafloor environments has already been recognized as the largest biosphere on the planet Earth, however, the microbial diversity and activity has been still poorly understood, even in their impacts on biogeochemical processes, tectonic settings, and paleoenvironmental events. We demonstrate here the evaluation of microbial community structure and active habitats in deeply buried cold marine sediments collected from the Sea of Okhotsk by a combined use of molecular ecological surveys and culturing assays. The piston core sediment (MD01-2412) was collected by IMAGES (International Marine Global Change Study) Project from the southeastern Okhotsk Sea, June 2001. The total recovered length was about 58m. The lithology of the core sediment was mainly constructed from pelagic clay (PC) and volcanic ash layers (Ash). We collected aseptically the most inside core parts from 16 sections at different depths for microbiological study. The direct count of DAPI-stained cells revealed that the cells in Ash samples were present 1.2 to 2.2 times higher than in PC samples. The quantitative-PCR of 16S rDNA between bacterial and archaeal rDNA suggested that the increased population density in Ash layers was caused by the bacterial components. We studied approximately 650 and 550 sequences from bacterial and archaeal rDNA clone libraries, respectively. The similarity and phylogenetic analyses revealed that the microbial community structures were apparently different between in Ash layers and PC samples. From bacterial rDNA clone libraries, the members within gamma-Proteobacteria such as genera Halomonas, Shewanella, Psychromonas and Methylosinus were predominantly detected in Ash layers whereas the Dehalococcoides group and delta-Proteobacteria were major bacterial components in PC samples. From archaeal libraries, the sequences from Ash and PC samples were affiliated into the clusters represented by the environmental sequences obtained from terrestrial and deep-sea environments

  9. Binding stability of peptides derived from 1ALA residue and 7GLY residues to sites near active center of fluctuating papain

    Nishiyama, Katsuhiko

    2012-05-01

    We investigated the binding stability of peptides derived from 1ALA residue and 7GLY residues to sites near active center of fluctuating papain via molecular dynamics and docking simulations. Replacing GLY residue in 8GLY with ALA residue had a positive effect on binding stability to the sites in some cases although the replacing had a negative effect on it in other cases. Furthermore the replacing had a negative effect on the chance of binding to the sites. Residue in peptide should be replaced on the basis of systematic exploration of its position.

  10. Radio/gamma-ray time delay in the parsec-scale cores of active galactic nuclei

    Pushkarev, A B; Lister, M L

    2010-01-01

    We report the detection of a non-zero time delay between radio emission measured by the VLBA at 15.4 GHz and gamma-ray radiation (gamma-ray leads radio) registered by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope for a sample of 183 radio and gamma-ray bright active galactic nuclei (AGNs). For the correlation analysis we used 100 MeV - 100 GeV gamma-ray photon fluxes, taken from monthly binned measurements from the first Fermi LAT catalog, and 15.4 GHz radio flux densities from the MOJAVE VLBA program. The correlation is most pronounced if the core flux density is used, strongly indicating that the gamma-ray emission is generated within the compact region of the 15 GHz VLBA core. Determining the Pearson's r and Kendall's tau correlation coefficients for different time lags, we find that for the majority of sources the radio/gamma-ray delay ranges from 1 to 8 months in the observer's frame and peaks at about 1.2 months in the source's frame. We interpret the primary source of the ...

  11. Core microbial functional activities in ocean environments revealed by global metagenomic profiling analyses.

    Ferreira, Ari J S

    2014-06-12

    Metagenomics-based functional profiling analysis is an effective means of gaining deeper insight into the composition of marine microbial populations and developing a better understanding of the interplay between the functional genome content of microbial communities and abiotic factors. Here we present a comprehensive analysis of 24 datasets covering surface and depth-related environments at 11 sites around the world\\'s oceans. The complete datasets comprises approximately 12 million sequences, totaling 5,358 Mb. Based on profiling patterns of Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COGs) of proteins, a core set of reference photic and aphotic depth-related COGs, and a collection of COGs that are associated with extreme oxygen limitation were defined. Their inferred functions were utilized as indicators to characterize the distribution of light- and oxygen-related biological activities in marine environments. The results reveal that, while light level in the water column is a major determinant of phenotypic adaptation in marine microorganisms, oxygen concentration in the aphotic zone has a significant impact only in extremely hypoxic waters. Phylogenetic profiling of the reference photic/aphotic gene sets revealed a greater variety of source organisms in the aphotic zone, although the majority of individual photic and aphotic depth-related COGs are assigned to the same taxa across the different sites. This increase in phylogenetic and functional diversity of the core aphotic related COGs most probably reflects selection for the utilization of a broad range of alternate energy sources in the absence of light.

  12. Core microbial functional activities in ocean environments revealed by global metagenomic profiling analyses.

    Ari J S Ferreira

    Full Text Available Metagenomics-based functional profiling analysis is an effective means of gaining deeper insight into the composition of marine microbial populations and developing a better understanding of the interplay between the functional genome content of microbial communities and abiotic factors. Here we present a comprehensive analysis of 24 datasets covering surface and depth-related environments at 11 sites around the world's oceans. The complete datasets comprises approximately 12 million sequences, totaling 5,358 Mb. Based on profiling patterns of Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COGs of proteins, a core set of reference photic and aphotic depth-related COGs, and a collection of COGs that are associated with extreme oxygen limitation were defined. Their inferred functions were utilized as indicators to characterize the distribution of light- and oxygen-related biological activities in marine environments. The results reveal that, while light level in the water column is a major determinant of phenotypic adaptation in marine microorganisms, oxygen concentration in the aphotic zone has a significant impact only in extremely hypoxic waters. Phylogenetic profiling of the reference photic/aphotic gene sets revealed a greater variety of source organisms in the aphotic zone, although the majority of individual photic and aphotic depth-related COGs are assigned to the same taxa across the different sites. This increase in phylogenetic and functional diversity of the core aphotic related COGs most probably reflects selection for the utilization of a broad range of alternate energy sources in the absence of light.

  13. Rare earth elements in core marine sediments of coastal East Malaysia by instrumental neutron activation analysis.

    Ashraf, Ahmadreza; Saion, Elias; Gharibshahi, Elham; Kamari, Halimah Mohamed; Kong, Yap Chee; Hamzah, Mohd Suhaimi; Elias, Md Suhaimi

    2016-01-01

    A study was carried out on the concentration of REEs (Dy, Sm, Eu,Yb, Lu, La and Ce) that are present in the core marine sediments of East Malaysia from three locations at South China Sea and one location each at Sulu Sea and Sulawesi Sea. The sediment samples were collected at a depth of between 49 and 109 m, dried, and crushed to powdery form. The entire core sediments prepared for Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) were weighted approximately 0.0500 g to 0.1000 g for short irradiation and 0.1500 g to 0.2000 g for long irradiation. The samples were irradiated with a thermal neutron flux of 4.0×10(12) cm(-2) s(-1) in a TRIGA Mark II research reactor operated at 750 kW. Blank samples and standard reference materials SL-1 were also irradiated for calibration and quality control purposes. It was found that the concentration of REEs varies in the range from 0.11 to 36.84 mg/kg. The chondrite-normalized REEs for different stations suggest that all the REEs are from similar origins. There was no significant REEs contamination as the enrichment factors normalized for Fe fall in the range of 0.42-2.82. PMID:26405840

  14. Fuzzy Decision Support for Tools Selection in the Core Front End Activities of New Product Development

    Achiche, S.; Appio, F.P.; McAloone, Tim C.;

    2013-01-01

    or analysis of the process to go from Opportunity Identification to Concept Generation; as a result, the FE process is often aborted or forced to be restarted. Koen’s Model for the FE is composed of five phases. In each of the phases, several tools can be used by designers/managers in order to......, etc. Hence, an economic evaluation of the cost of tool usage is critical, and there is furthermore a need to characterize them in terms of their influence on the FE. This paper focuses on decision support for managers/ designers in their process of assessing the cost of choosing/using tools in the...... core front end (CFE) activities identified by Koen, namely Opportunity Identification and Opportunity Analysis. This is achieved by first analyzing the influencing factors (firm context, industry context, macroenvironment) along with data collection from managers followed by the automatic construction...

  15. Core activities and career pathways of independent trainers-consultants in France

    Laurence Bonnafous

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents some of the key findings from a 2013 survey achieved with a representative sample of 101 independent trainers-consultants, members of a French trade union. These results highlight more particularly their socio-demographic characteristics, their core activities and four main career pathways identified. This survey was part of a two years action research, conducted in a partnership between this professional trade union and university laboratories in the field of adult education. The aim was to improve the understanding of this specific professional group, of its ongoing professionalization process and its visibility as one of the actors of the continuing education and vocational training (CVET system in France.

  16. High energy neutrinos from primary cosmic rays accelerated in the cores of active galaxies

    Stecker, F. W.; Done, C.; Salamon, M. H.; Sommers, P.

    1991-01-01

    The spectra and high-energy neutrino fluxes are calculated from photomeson production in active galactic nuclei (AGN) such as quasars and Seyfert galaxies using recent UV and X-ray observations to define the photon fields and an accretion-disk shock-acceleration model for producing ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays in the AGN. Collectively AGN should produce the dominant isotropic neutrino background between 10 exp 4 and 10 exp 10 GeV. Measurement of this background could be critical in determining the energy-generation mechanism, evolution, and distribution of AGN. High-energy background spectra and spectra from bright AGN such as NGC4151 and 3C273 are predicted which should be observable with present detectors. High energy AGN nus should produce a sphere of stellar disruption around their cores which could explain their observed broad-line emission regions.

  17. Distribution of 35 Elements in Peat Cores from Ombrotrophic Bogs Studied by Epithermal Neutron Activation Analysis

    Frontasyeva, M V

    2004-01-01

    In ombrotrophic bogs the surface peat layer is supplied with chemical substances only from the atmosphere. Peat cores from these bogs therefore can be used to study temporal trends in atmospheric deposition of pollutants. In this work epithermal neutron activation analysis was applied for the first time to study the distribution of 35 elements in peat profiles from ombrotrophic bogs. The selected examples were from Finnmark county in northern Norway: one pristine site far from any local pollution source, and another strongly affected by long-term operation of Russian copper-nickel smelters located close to the border. The elements are classified with respect to their behavior in the uppermost 40 cm of the peat, and similarities and differences between the two profiles are discussed. As compared with other more commonly used analytical techniques based on acid decomposition of the sample ENAA has the advantage of providing the total concentrations of the elements.

  18. Pt monolayer shell on hollow Pd core electrocatalysts: Scale up synthesis, structure, and activity for the oxygen reduction reaction

    Vukmirovic Miomir B.; Yu Zhang; Wang Jia X.; Buceta David; Wu Lijun; Adzic Radoslav R.

    2013-01-01

    We report on synthesis, characterization and the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) kinetics of Pt monolayer shell on Pd(hollow), or Pd-Au(hollow) core electrocatalysts. Comparison between the ORR catalytic activity of the electrocatalysts with hollow cores and those of Pt solid and Pt hollow nanoparticles has been obtained using the rotating disk electrode technique. Hollow nanoparticles were made using Ni or Cu nanoparticles as sacrificial templates. The Pt ...

  19. Scaling Properties of Biologically Active Scalar Concentration Fluctuations in the Atmospheric Surface Layer over a Managed Peatland

    Detto, Matteo; Baldocchi, Dennis; Katul, Gabriel G.

    2010-09-01

    The higher-order scalar concentration fluctuation properties are examined in the context of Monin-Obukhov similarity theory for a variety of greenhouse gases that have distinct and separate source/sink locations along an otherwise ideal micrometeorological field site. Air temperature and concentrations of water vapour, carbon dioxide and methane were measured at high frequency (10 Hz) above a flat and extensive peat-land soil in the San Joaquin-Sacramento Delta (California, USA) area, subjected to year-round grazing by beef cattle. Because of the heterogeneous distribution of the sources and sinks of CO2 and especially CH4 emitted by cattle, the scaling behaviour of the higher-order statistical properties diverged from predictions based on a balance between their production and dissipation rate terms, which can obtained for temperature and H2O during stationary conditions. We identify and label these departures as ‘exogenous’ because they depend on heterogeneities and non-stationarities induced by boundary conditions on the flow. Spectral analysis revealed that the exogenous effects show their signatures in regions with frequencies lower than those associated with scalar vertical transport by turbulence, though the two regions may partially overlap in some cases. Cospectra of vertical fluxes appear less influenced by these exogenous effects because of the modulating role of the vertical velocity at low frequencies. Finally, under certain conditions, the presence of such exogenous factors in higher-order scalar fluctuation statistics may be ‘fingerprinted’ by a large storage term in the mean scalar budget.

  20. Activities for Challenging Gifted Learners by Increasing Complexity in the Common Core

    McKeone, Alyssa; Caruso, Lenora; Bettle, Kailyn; Chase, Ashley; Bryson, Bridget; Schneider, Jean S.; Rule, Audrey C.

    2015-01-01

    Gifted learners need opportunities for critical and creative thinking to stretch their minds and imaginations. Strategies for increasing complexity in the four core areas of language arts, mathematics, science, and social studies were addressed using the Common Core and Iowa Core Standards through several methods. Descriptive adjective object…

  1. Nucleus accumbens core acetylcholine is preferentially activated during acquisition of drug- vs food-reinforced behavior.

    Crespo, Jose A; Stöckl, Petra; Zorn, Katja; Saria, Alois; Zernig, Gerald

    2008-12-01

    Acquisition of drug-reinforced behavior is accompanied by a systematic increase of release of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) rather than dopamine, the expected prime reward neurotransmitter candidate, in the nucleus accumbens core (AcbC), with activation of both muscarinic and nicotinic ACh receptors in the AcbC by ACh volume transmission being necessary for the drug conditioning. The present findings suggest that the AcbC ACh system is preferentially activated by drug reinforcers, because (1) acquisition of food-reinforced behavior was not paralleled by activation of ACh release in the AcbC whereas acquisition of morphine-reinforced behavior, like that of cocaine or remifentanil (tested previously), was, and because (2) local intra-AcbC administration of muscarinic or nicotinic ACh receptor antagonists (atropine or mecamylamine, respectively) did not block the acquisition of food-reinforced behavior whereas acquisition of drug-reinforced behavior had been blocked. Interestingly, the speed with which a drug of abuse distributed into the AcbC and was eliminated from the AcbC determined the size of the AcbC ACh signal, with the temporally more sharply delineated drug stimulus producing a more pronounced AcbC ACh signal. The present findings suggest that muscarinic and nicotinic ACh receptors in the AcbC are preferentially involved during reward conditioning for drugs of abuse vs sweetened condensed milk as a food reinforcer. PMID:18418362

  2. Inhibition of reverse transcriptase activity increases stability of the HIV-1 core.

    Yang, Yang; Fricke, Thomas; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies showed that HIV-1 reverse transcription occurs during or before uncoating, linking mechanistically reverse transcription with uncoating. Here we show that inhibition of reverse transcriptase (RT) during HIV-1 infection by pharmacologic or genetic means increased the stability of the HIV-1 core during infection. Interestingly, HIV-1 particles with increased core stability were resistant to the core-destabilizing effects of rhesus TRIM5α (TRIM5α(rh)). Collectively, this work implies that the surface of the HIV-1 core is dynamic and changes upon the ongoing processes within the core. PMID:23077298

  3. Change of magnetic properties due to fluctuations of hydrocarbon contaminated groundwater in unconsolidated sediments.

    Rijal, Moti L; Appel, Erwin; Petrovský, Eduard; Blaha, Ulrich

    2010-05-01

    Sediments affected by fluctuations of hydrocarbon contaminated groundwater were studied at a former military site. Due to remediation, groundwater table fluctuation (GWTF) extends over approximately one meter. Three cores were collected, penetrating through the GWTF zone. Magnetic parameters, sediment properties and hydrocarbon content were measured. We discovered that magnetic concentration parameters increased towards the top of the GWTF zone. Magnetite is responsible for this enhancement; rock magnetic parameters indicate that the newly formed magnetite is in a single domain rather than a superparamagnetic state. The presence of hydrocarbons is apparently essential for magnetite to form, as there is clearly less magnetic enhancement in the core, which is outside of the strongly contaminated area. From our results we conclude that the top of the fluctuation zone has the most intensive geomicrobiological activity probably responsible for magnetite formation. This finding could be relevant for developing methods for simply and quickly detecting oil spills. PMID:19954870

  4. The effects of core muscle activation on dynamic trunk position and knee abduction moments: implications for ACL injury.

    Jamison, Steve T; McNally, Michael P; Schmitt, Laura C; Chaudhari, Ajit M W

    2013-09-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury is one of the most common serious lower-extremity injuries experienced by athletes participating in field and court sports and often occurs during a sudden change in direction or pivot. Both lateral trunk positioning during cutting and peak external knee abduction moments have been associated with ACL injury risk, though it is not known how core muscle activation influences these variables. In this study, the association between core muscle pre-activation and trunk position as well as the association between core muscle pre-activation and peak knee abduction moment during an unanticipated run-to-cut maneuver were investigated in 46 uninjured individuals. Average co-contraction indices and percent differences between muscle pairs were calculated prior to initial contact for internal obliques, external obliques, and L5 extensors using surface electromyography. Outside tilt of the trunk was defined as positive when the trunk was angled away from the cutting direction. No significant associations were found between pre-activations of core muscles and outside tilt of the trunk. Greater average co-contraction index of the L5 extensors was associated with greater peak knee abduction moment (p=0.0107). Increased co-contraction of the L5 extensors before foot contact could influence peak knee abduction moment by stiffening the spine, limiting sagittal plane trunk flexion (a motion pattern previously linked to ACL injury risk) and upper body kinetic energy absorption by the core during weight acceptance. PMID:23891313

  5. Modeling active galactic nucleus feedback in cool-core clusters: The balance between heating and cooling

    We study the long-term evolution of an idealized cool-core galaxy cluster under the influence of momentum-driven active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback using three-dimensional high-resolution (60 pc) adaptive mesh refinement simulations. The feedback is modeled with a pair of precessing jets whose power is calculated based on the accretion rate of the cold gas surrounding the supermassive black hole (SMBH). The intracluster medium first cools into clumps along the propagation direction of the jets. As the jet power increases, gas condensation occurs isotropically, forming spatially extended structures that resemble the observed Hα filaments in Perseus and many other cool-core clusters. Jet heating elevates the gas entropy, halting clump formation. The cold gas that is not accreted onto the SMBH settles into a rotating disk of ∼1011 M ☉. The hot gas cools directly onto the disk while the SMBH accretes from its innermost region, powering the AGN that maintains a thermally balanced state for a few Gyr. The mass cooling rate averaged over 7 Gyr is ∼30 M ☉ yr–1, an order of magnitude lower than the classic cooling flow value. Medium resolution simulations produce similar results, while in low resolution runs, the cluster experiences cycles of gas condensation and AGN outbursts. Owing to its self-regulating mechanism, AGN feedback can successfully balance cooling with a wide range of model parameters. Our model also produces cold structures in early stages that are in good agreement with the observations. However, the long-lived massive cold disk is unrealistic, suggesting that additional physical processes are still needed.

  6. Preparation and photocatalytic activity of eccentric Au-titania core-shell nanoparticles by block copolymer templates.

    Li, Xue; Fu, Xiaoning; Yang, Hui

    2011-02-21

    A novel route for a preparation of eccentric Au-titania core-shell nanoparticles using gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with block copolymer shells as a template is reported. AuNPs with poly(2-vinyl pyridine)-block-poly(ethylene oxide) (PVP-b-PEO) block copolymer shells are first prepared by UV irradiation of the solution of PVP-b-PEO/HAuCl(4) complexes. Then the sol-gel reaction of titanium tetra-isopropoxide (TTIP) selectively on the surfaces of AuNPs leads to Au-titania core-shell composite nanoparticles. The eccentric Au-titania core-shell nanoparticles are obtained from the Au-titania core-shell composite nanoparticles by removal of organic interlayer by UV treatment. Photocatalytic activities of the resulting eccentric core-shell nanoparticles are investigated in terms of the degradation of methylene blue (MB). The results show that the eccentric core-shell structures endow the catalyst with greatly enhanced photocatalytic activity. PMID:21157597

  7. Core-shell nanocarriers with high paclitaxel loading for passive and active targeting

    Jin, Zhu; Lv, Yaqi; Cao, Hui; Yao, Jing; Zhou, Jianping; He, Wei; Yin, Lifang

    2016-06-01

    Rapid blood clearance and premature burst release are inherent drawbacks of conventional nanoparticles, resulting in poor tumor selectivity. iRGD peptide is widely recognized as an efficient cell membrane penetration peptide homing to αVβ3 integrins. Herein, core-shell nanocapsules (NCs) and iRGD-modified NCs (iRGD-NCs) with high drug payload for paclitaxel (PTX) were prepared to enhance the antitumor activities of chemotherapy agents with poor water solubility. Improved in vitro and in vivo tumor targeting and penetration were observed with NCs and iRGD-NCs; the latter exhibited better antitumor activity because iRGD enhanced the accumulation and penetration of NCs in tumors. The NCs were cytocompatible, histocompatible, and non-toxic to other healthy tissues. The endocytosis of NCs was mediated by lipid rafts in an energy-dependent manner, leading to better cytotoxicity of PTX against cancer cells. In contrast with commercial product, PTX-loaded NCs (PTX-NCs) increased area under concentration-time curve (AUC) by about 4-fold, prolonged mean resident time (MRT) by more than 8-fold and reduced the elimination rate constant by greater than 68-fold. In conclusion, the present nanocarriers with high drug-loading capacity represent an efficient tumor-targeting drug delivery system with promising potential for cancer therapy.

  8. The Effect of Trunk Stabilization Exercises with a Swiss Ball on Core Muscle Activation in the Elderly

    Kim, Seong Gil; Yong, Min Sik; Na, Sang Su

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of trunk stabilization exercise on the muscle EMG activations related to core stability. [Subjects and Methods] Fifteen elderly people in a geriatric hospital performed trunk stabilization exercises with a Swiss ball for 20 minutes five times per week for 8 weeks. Trunk muscle activations were measured using electromyography before and after the intervention. [Results] After the intervention, the muscle activations of the rect...

  9. Hepatitis C virus core protein regulates p300/CBP co-activation function. Possible role in the regulation of NF-AT1 transcriptional activity

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) core is a viral structural protein; it also participates in some cellular processes, including transcriptional regulation. However, the mechanisms of core-mediated transcriptional regulation remain poorly understood. Oncogenic virus proteins often target p300/CBP, a known co-activator of a wide variety of transcription factors, to regulate the expression of cellular and viral genes. Here we demonstrate, for the first time, that HCV core protein interacts with p300/CBP and enhances both its acetyl-transferase and transcriptional activities. In addition, we demonstrate that nuclear core protein activates the NH2-terminal transcription activation domain (TAD) of NF-AT1 in a p300/CBP-dependent manner. We propose a model in which core protein regulates the co-activation function of p300/CBP and activates NF-AT1, and probably other p300/CBP-regulated transcription factors, by a novel mechanism involving the regulation of the acetylation state of histones and/or components of the transcriptional machinery

  10. Inhibition of Reverse Transcriptase Activity Increases Stability of the HIV-1 Core

    Yang, Yang; Fricke, Thomas; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies showed that HIV-1 reverse transcription occurs during or before uncoating, linking mechanistically reverse transcription with uncoating. Here we show that inhibition of reverse transcriptase (RT) during HIV-1 infection by pharmacologic or genetic means increased the stability of the HIV-1 core during infection. Interestingly, HIV-1 particles with increased core stability were resistant to the core-destabilizing effects of rhesus TRIM5α (TRIM5αrh). Collectively, this work impl...

  11. Reactor core monitoring method

    Mori, Michitsugu [Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc. (Japan); Kanemoto, Shigeru; Enomoto, Mitsuhiro; Ebata, Shigeo

    1998-05-06

    The present invention provides a method of monitoring the state of coolant flow in a reactor of a BWR power plant. Namely, a plurality of local power region monitors (LPRM) are disposed to the inside of the reactor core for monitoring a power distribution. Signals of at least two optional LPRM detectors situated at positions different in axial or radial positions of the reactor core are obtained. General fluctuation components which nuclear hydrothermally fluctuate in overall reactor core are removed from the components of the signals. Then, correlational functions between these signals are determined. The state of coolant flow in the reactor is monitored based on the correlational function. When the axial flowing rate and radial flow interference are monitored, the accuracy upon monitoring axial and radial local behaviors of coolants can be improved by thus previously removing the general fluctuation components from signals of LPRM detectors and extracting local void information near to LPRM detectors at high accuracy. (I.S.)

  12. A new gravitational-wave signature of SASI activities in non-rotating supernova cores

    Kuroda, Takami; Takiwaki, Tomoya

    2016-01-01

    We present results from fully relativistic three-dimensional core-collapse supernova (CCSN) simulations of a non-rotating 15 M_sun star using three different nuclear equations of state (EoSs). From our simulations covering up to ~350 ms after bounce, we show that the development of the standing accretion shock instability (SASI) differs significantly depending on the stiffness of nuclear EoS. Generally, the SASI activity occurs more vigorously in models with softer EoS. By evaluating the gravitational-wave (GW) emission, we find a new GW signature on top of the previously identified one, in which the typical GW frequency increases with time due to an accumulating accretion to the proto-neutron star (PNS). The newly observed quasi-periodic signal appears in the frequency range from ~100 to 200 Hz and persists for ~150 ms before neutrino-driven convection dominates over the SASI. By analyzing the cycle frequency of the SASI sloshing and spiral modes as well as the mass accretion rate to the emission region, we ...

  13. EJC core component MLN51 interacts with eIF3 and activates translation.

    Chazal, Pierre-Etienne; Daguenet, Elisabeth; Wendling, Corinne; Ulryck, Nathalie; Tomasetto, Catherine; Sargueil, Bruno; Le Hir, Hervé

    2013-04-01

    The multiprotein exon junction complex (EJC), deposited by the splicing machinery, is an important constituent of messenger ribonucleoprotein particles because it participates to numerous steps of the mRNA lifecycle from splicing to surveillance via nonsense-mediated mRNA decay pathway. By an unknown mechanism, the EJC also stimulates translation efficiency of newly synthesized mRNAs. Here, we show that among the four EJC core components, the RNA-binding protein metastatic lymph node 51 (MLN51) is a translation enhancer. Overexpression of MLN51 preferentially increased the translation of intron-containing reporters via the EJC, whereas silencing MLN51 decreased translation. In addition, modulation of the MLN51 level in cell-free translational extracts confirmed its direct role in protein synthesis. Immunoprecipitations indicated that MLN51 associates with translation-initiating factors and ribosomal subunits, and in vitro binding assays revealed that MLN51, alone or as part of the EJC, interacts directly with the pivotal eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF3. Taken together, our data define MLN51 as a translation activator linking the EJC and the translation machinery. PMID:23530232

  14. SASI Activity in Three-Dimensional Neutrino-Hydrodynamics Simulations of Supernova Cores

    Hanke, F; Wongwathanarat, A; Marek, A; Janka, H -Th

    2013-01-01

    The relevance of the standing accretion shock instability (SASI) compared to neutrino-driven convection in three-dimensional (3D) supernova-core environments is still highly controversial. Studying a 27 Msun progenitor, we demonstrate, for the first time, that violent SASI activity can develop in 3D simulations with detailed neutrino transport despite the presence of convection. This result was obtained with the Prometheus-Vertex code with the same sophisticated neutrino treatment so far used only in 1D and 2D models. While buoyant plumes initially determine the nonradial mass motions in the postshock layer, bipolar shock sloshing with growing amplitude sets in during a phase of shock retraction and turns into a violent spiral mode whose growth is only quenched when the infall of the Si/SiO interface leads to strong shock expansion in response to a dramatic decrease of the mass accretion rate. In the phase of large-amplitude SASI sloshing and spiral motions, the postshock layer exhibits nonradial deformation ...

  15. Lattice-Strain Control of Exceptional Activity in Dealloyed Core-Shell Fuel Cell Catalysts

    Strasser, Peter

    2011-08-19

    We present a combined experimental and theoretical approach to demonstrate how lattice strain can be used to continuously tune the catalytic activity of the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) on bimetallic nanoparticles that have been dealloyed. The sluggish kinetics of the ORR is a key barrier to the adaptation of fuel cells and currently limits their widespread use. Dealloyed Pt-Cu bimetallic nanoparticles, however, have been shown to exhibit uniquely high reactivity for this reaction. We first present evidence for the formation of a core-shell structure during dealloying, which involves removal of Cu from the surface and subsurface of the precursor nanoparticles. We then show that the resulting Pt-rich surface shell exhibits compressive strain that depends on the composition of the precursor alloy. We next demonstrate the existence of a downward shift of the Pt d-band, resulting in weakening of the bond strength of intermediate oxygenated species due to strain. Finally, we combine synthesis, strain, and catalytic reactivity in an experimental/theoretical reactivity-strain relationship which provides guidelines for the rational design of strained oxygen reduction electrocatalysts. The stoichiometry of the precursor, together with the dealloying conditions, provides experimental control over the resulting surface strain and thereby allows continuous tuning of the surface electrocatalytic reactivity - a concept that can be generalized to other catalytic reactions.

  16. Unified nuclear core activity map reconstruction using heterogeneous instruments with data assimilation

    Bouriquet, Bertrand; Erhard, Patrick; Ponçot, Angélique

    2011-01-01

    Evaluating the neutronic state of the whole nuclear core is a very important topic that have strong implication for nuclear core management and for security monitoring. The core state is evaluated using measurements. Usually, part of the measurements are used, and only one kind of instruments are taken into account. However, the core state evaluation should be more accurate when more measurements are collected in the core. But using information from heterogeneous sources is at glance a difficult task. This difficulty can be overcome by Data Assimilation techniques. Such a method allows to combine in a coherent framework the information coming from model and the one coming from various type of observations. Beyond the inner advantage to use heterogeneous instruments, this leads to obtain a significant increasing of the quality of neutronic global state reconstruction with respect to individual use of measures. In order to present this approach, we will introduce here the basic principles of data assimilation f...

  17. The arginine residue within the C-terminal active core of Bombyx mori pheromone biosynthesis-activating neuropeptide (PBAN is essential for receptor binding and activation

    Takeshi eKawai

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In most lepidopteran insects, the biosynthesis of sex pheromones is regulated by pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide (PBAN. Bombyx mori PBAN (BomPBAN consists of 33 amino acid residues and contains a C-terminus FSPRLamide motif as the active core. Among neuropeptides containing the FXPRLamide motif, the arginine (Arg, R residue two positions from the C-terminus is highly conserved across several neuropeptides, which can be designated as RXamide peptides. The purpose of this study was to reveal the role of the Arg residue in the BomPBAN active core. We synthesized a ten-residue peptide corresponding to the C-terminal part of BomPBAN with a series of point mutants at the 2nd position (ie, Arg from the C-terminus, termed the C2 position, and measured their efficacy in stimulating Ca2+ influx in insect cells concomitantly expressing a fluorescent PBAN receptor chimera (PBANR-EGFP and loaded with the fluorescent Ca2+ indicator, Fura Red-AM. PBAN analogs with the C2 position replaced with alanine (Ala, A, aspartic acid (Asp, D, serine (Ser, S or L-2-aminooctanoic acid (Aoc decreased PBAN-like activity. RC2A (SKTRYFSPALamide and RC2D (SKTRYFSPDLamide had the lowest activity and could not inhibit the activity of PBAN C10 (SKTRYFSPRLamide. We also prepared Rhodamine Red-labeled PBAN analogs of the mutants and examined their ability to bind PBANR. In contrast to 100 nM Rhodamine Red-PBAN C10, none of the mutants at the same concentration exhibited PBANR binding. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the C2 Arg residue in BomPBAN is essential for PBANR binding and activation.

  18. Synthesis, Optical Properties, and Photocatalytic Activity of One-Dimensional CdS@ZnS Core-Shell Nanocomposites

    Wang, Le; Wei, Hongwei; Fan, Yingju; Liu, Xinzheng; Zhan, Jinhua

    2009-06-01

    One-dimensional (1D) CdS@ZnS core-shell nanocomposites were successfully synthesized via a two-step solvothermal method. Preformed CdS nanowires with a diameter of ca. 45 nm and a length up to several tens of micrometers were coated with a layer of ZnS shell by the reaction of zinc acetate and thiourea at 180 °C for 10 h. It was found that uniform ZnS shell was composed of ZnS nanoparticles with a diameter of ca. 4 nm, which anchored on the nanowires without any surface pretreatment. The 1D CdS@ZnS core-shell nanocomposites were confirmed by XRD, SEM, TEM, HR-TEM, ED, and EDS techniques. The optical properties and photocatalytic activities of the 1D CdS@ZnS core-shell nanocomposites towards methylene blue (MB) and 4-chlorophenol (4CP) under visible light (λ > 420 nm) were separately investigated. The results show that the ZnS shell can effectively passivate the surface electronic states of the CdS cores, which accounts for the enhanced photocatalytic activities of the 1D CdS@ZnS core-shell nanocomposites compared to that of the uncoated CdS nanowires.

  19. Synthesis, Optical Properties, and Photocatalytic Activity of One-Dimensional CdS@ZnS Core-Shell Nanocomposites

    Wang Le

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract One-dimensional (1D CdS@ZnS core-shell nanocomposites were successfully synthesized via a two-step solvothermal method. Preformed CdS nanowires with a diameter of ca. 45 nm and a length up to several tens of micrometers were coated with a layer of ZnS shell by the reaction of zinc acetate and thiourea at 180 °C for 10 h. It was found that uniform ZnS shell was composed of ZnS nanoparticles with a diameter of ca. 4 nm, which anchored on the nanowires without any surface pretreatment. The 1D CdS@ZnS core-shell nanocomposites were confirmed by XRD, SEM, TEM, HR-TEM, ED, and EDS techniques. The optical properties and photocatalytic activities of the 1D CdS@ZnS core-shell nanocomposites towards methylene blue (MB and 4-chlorophenol (4CP under visible light (λ > 420 nm were separately investigated. The results show that the ZnS shell can effectively passivate the surface electronic states of the CdS cores, which accounts for the enhanced photocatalytic activities of the 1D CdS@ZnS core-shell nanocomposites compared to that of the uncoated CdS nanowires.

  20. Teaching Core Content Embedded in a Functional Activity to Students with Moderate Intellectual Disability Using a Simultaneous Prompting Procedure

    Karl, Jennifer; Collins, Belva C.; Hager, Karen D.; Ault, Melinda Jones

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a simultaneous prompting procedure in teaching four secondary students with moderate intellectual disability to acquire and generalize core content embedded in a functional activity. Data gathered within the context of a multiple probe design revealed that all participants learned the…

  1. Synchronization, non-linear dynamics and low-frequency fluctuations: Analogy between spontaneous brain activity and networked single-transistor chaotic oscillators

    Minati, Ludovico, E-mail: lminati@ieee.org, E-mail: ludovico.minati@unitn.it, E-mail: lminati@istituto-besta.it [Scientific Department, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Neurologico Carlo Besta, Milan (Italy); Center for Mind/Brain Sciences, University of Trento, Trento (Italy); Chiesa, Pietro; Tabarelli, Davide; Jovicich, Jorge [Center for Mind/Brain Sciences, University of Trento, Trento (Italy); D' Incerti, Ludovico [Neuroradiology Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Neurologico Carlo Besta, Milan (Italy)

    2015-03-15

    In this paper, the topographical relationship between functional connectivity (intended as inter-regional synchronization), spectral and non-linear dynamical properties across cortical areas of the healthy human brain is considered. Based upon functional MRI acquisitions of spontaneous activity during wakeful idleness, node degree maps are determined by thresholding the temporal correlation coefficient among all voxel pairs. In addition, for individual voxel time-series, the relative amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations and the correlation dimension (D{sub 2}), determined with respect to Fourier amplitude and value distribution matched surrogate data, are measured. Across cortical areas, high node degree is associated with a shift towards lower frequency activity and, compared to surrogate data, clearer saturation to a lower correlation dimension, suggesting presence of non-linear structure. An attempt to recapitulate this relationship in a network of single-transistor oscillators is made, based on a diffusive ring (n = 90) with added long-distance links defining four extended hub regions. Similarly to the brain data, it is found that oscillators in the hub regions generate signals with larger low-frequency cycle amplitude fluctuations and clearer saturation to a lower correlation dimension compared to surrogates. The effect emerges more markedly close to criticality. The homology observed between the two systems despite profound differences in scale, coupling mechanism and dynamics appears noteworthy. These experimental results motivate further investigation into the heterogeneity of cortical non-linear dynamics in relation to connectivity and underline the ability for small networks of single-transistor oscillators to recreate collective phenomena arising in much more complex biological systems, potentially representing a future platform for modelling disease-related changes.

  2. Synchronization, non-linear dynamics and low-frequency fluctuations: Analogy between spontaneous brain activity and networked single-transistor chaotic oscillators

    In this paper, the topographical relationship between functional connectivity (intended as inter-regional synchronization), spectral and non-linear dynamical properties across cortical areas of the healthy human brain is considered. Based upon functional MRI acquisitions of spontaneous activity during wakeful idleness, node degree maps are determined by thresholding the temporal correlation coefficient among all voxel pairs. In addition, for individual voxel time-series, the relative amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations and the correlation dimension (D2), determined with respect to Fourier amplitude and value distribution matched surrogate data, are measured. Across cortical areas, high node degree is associated with a shift towards lower frequency activity and, compared to surrogate data, clearer saturation to a lower correlation dimension, suggesting presence of non-linear structure. An attempt to recapitulate this relationship in a network of single-transistor oscillators is made, based on a diffusive ring (n = 90) with added long-distance links defining four extended hub regions. Similarly to the brain data, it is found that oscillators in the hub regions generate signals with larger low-frequency cycle amplitude fluctuations and clearer saturation to a lower correlation dimension compared to surrogates. The effect emerges more markedly close to criticality. The homology observed between the two systems despite profound differences in scale, coupling mechanism and dynamics appears noteworthy. These experimental results motivate further investigation into the heterogeneity of cortical non-linear dynamics in relation to connectivity and underline the ability for small networks of single-transistor oscillators to recreate collective phenomena arising in much more complex biological systems, potentially representing a future platform for modelling disease-related changes

  3. Entanglement and quantum fluctuations

    Klyachko, Alexander A.; Shumovsky, Alexander S.

    2003-01-01

    We discuss maximum entangled states of quantum systems in terms of quantum fluctuations of all essential measurements responsible for manifestation of entanglement. Namely, we consider maximum entanglement as a property of states, for which quantum fluctuations come to their extreme.

  4. Effects of phase transition induced density fluctuations on pulsar dynamics

    Bagchi, Partha, E-mail: partha@iopb.res.in [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751005 (India); Das, Arpan, E-mail: arpan@iopb.res.in [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751005 (India); Layek, Biswanath, E-mail: layek@pilani.bits-pilani.ac.in [Department of Physics, Birla Institute of Technology and Science, Pilani - 333031 (India); Srivastava, Ajit M., E-mail: ajit@iopb.res.in [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751005 (India)

    2015-07-30

    We show that density fluctuations during phase transitions in pulsar cores may have non-trivial effects on pulsar timings, and may also possibly account for glitches and anti-glitches. These density fluctuations invariably lead to non-zero off-diagonal components of the moment of inertia, leading to transient wobbling of star. Thus, accurate measurements of pulsar timing and intensity modulations (from wobbling) may be used to identify the specific pattern of density fluctuations, hence the particular phase transition, occurring inside the pulsar core. Changes in quadrupole moment from rapidly evolving density fluctuations during the transition, with very short time scales, may provide a new source for gravitational waves.

  5. Synthesis of mesoporous silica hollow nanospheres with multiple gold cores and catalytic activity.

    Chen, Junchen; Xue, Zhaoteng; Feng, Shanshan; Tu, Bo; Zhao, Dongyuan

    2014-09-01

    The core-shell Au@resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) nanospheres with multiple cores have been successfully synthesized by a modified Stöber method. After coating mesoporous silica and the calcination, the Au@meso-SiO2 hollow nanospheres with multiple gold cores can be obtained, which have a high surface area (∼537 m(2)/g) and uniform pore size (∼2.5 nm). The Au@meso-SiO2 hollow nanospheres can be used as a catalyst for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol by NaBH4 into 4-aminophenol, and exhibit excellent catalytic performance. PMID:24935190

  6. Ortodontia como atividade de meio ou resultado? Orthodontics as a support or core activity?

    Erivaldo Ferreira Lopes

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho apresenta a Ortodontia como atividade de meio, abordando as obrigações profissionais e as formas de se evitar e de se defender de ações judiciais. A grande parte dos litígios entre pacientes e ortodontistas se dá pelo fato equivocado, que ainda perdura, de que muitos juristas consideram a Ortodontia uma especialidade de fim, quando, na verdade, sua prática está sujeita a fatores que a caracterizam como atividade de meio. A Ortodontia deve ser, portanto, considerada uma obrigação de meio, onde o profissional tem o dever de utilizar todos os meios possíveis para atingir as expectativas do paciente, sem, entretanto, ter a obrigação de atingir o resultado idealizado. O ortodontista deve ser responsabilizado somente quando incorrer em imprudência, negligência, imperícia ou em caso de propaganda enganosa. Para evitar litígios, o ortodontista deve ter uma boa conduta profissional, registrando e mantendo arquivadas todas as etapas do tratamento, efetuando diagnósticos diferenciados, baseados nas características individuais, e escolhendo e conduzindo adequadamente o plano de tratamento.This study presents Orthodontics as a support activity, approaching professional obligations and ways to avoid and defend against legal action. A considerable part of litigation between patients and orthodontists results from the mistaken fact, which still persists, that many scholars regard Orthodontics as a core activity. In reality, its practice is subjected to factors that characterize it as a support activity. Orthodontics must be, therefore, regarded as a support obligation, whereupon the professional has the obligation to make use of all means possible to meet the patient's expectations - without, however, having the obligation to achieve the idealized result. The orthodontist must be made responsible only upon acts of imprudence, negligence, malpractice, or in the case of false advertising. In order to avoid litigation

  7. Studying the measurement errors for the density of neutron beam from a reactor core by the gold foil activation method

    Applicability of the gold foil activation method for precise measurements of density of a neutron beam extracted from the reactor core is investigated experimentally. Comparison of density ratios of cold and hot beams is carried out to determine the error of measurements conducted with the use of gold foils and the detector with 6LiF target. Based on the analysis of the data obtained it is concluded that the total error of measurements using the activation method, comprising errors of determining cross section of gold activation Δσ=+-0.3% and absolute value of foil activity (also +- 0.3%) makes up +-0.7%

  8. Altered baseline brain activity in experts measured by amplitude of low frequency fluctuations (ALFF: a resting state fMRI study using expertise model of acupuncturists

    Minghao Dong

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available It is well established that expertise modulates evoked brain activity in response to specific stimuli. Recently, researchers have begun to investigate how expertise influences the resting brain. Among these studies, most focused on the connectivity features within/across regions, i.e. connectivity patterns/strength. However, little concern has been given to a more fundamental issue whether or not expertise modulates baseline brain activity. We investigated this question using amplitude of low-frequency (<0.08Hz fluctuation (ALFF as the metric of brain activity and a novel expertise model, i.e. acupuncturists, due to their robust proficiency in tactile perception and emotion regulation. After the psychophysical and behavioral expertise screening procedure, 23 acupuncturists and 23 matched non-acupuncturists (NA were enrolled. Our results explicated higher ALFF for acupuncturists in the left ventral medial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC and the contralateral hand representation of the primary somatosensory area (SI (corrected for multiple comparisons. Additionally, ALFF of VMPFC was negatively correlated with the outcomes of the emotion regulation task (corrected for multiple comparisons. We suggest that our study may reveal a novel connection between the neuroplasticity mechanism and resting state activity, which would upgrade our understanding of the central mechanism of learning. Furthermore, by showing that expertise can affect the baseline brain activity as indicated by ALFF, our findings may have profound implication for functional neuroimaging studies especially those involving expert models, in that difference in baseline brain activity may either smear the spatial pattern of activations for task data or introduce biased results into connectivity-based analysis for resting data.

  9. Study of photodynamic activity of Au@SiO2 core-shell nanoparticles in vitro.

    Meena, K S; Dhanalekshmi, K I; Jayamoorthy, K

    2016-06-01

    Metal-semiconductor core-shell type Au@SiO2 nanoparticles were prepared by Stober's method. They were characterized by absorption, XRD, HR-TEM and EDAX techniques. The resulting modified core-shell nanoparticles shows that the formation of singlet oxygen, which was confirmed by ESR technique. The photohemolysis studies were carried out under two different experimental conditions. It is observed that the photohemolysis increases with concentration as well as light dose. Cell viability of the core-shell nanoparticles against HeLa cell lines were studied by MTT assay method. The outcomes of the present study indicate that, the Au@SiO2 core-shell nanoparticles are extremely stable with a very high photodynamic efficiency under visible light illumination. PMID:27040225

  10. Low-background neutron activation analysis. A powerful tool for atmospheric mineral dust analysis in ice cores

    The application of instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) for multi-elemental analysis of samples of extremely reduced mass such as dust samples extracted from ice cores requires specific efforts towards the development of a 'low level counting' analytical technique. An analytical protocol specifically designed for this kind of samples, based on low-background INAA (LBNAA) is here presented. A first application of the method was successfully performed on samples from the new alpine firn core NextData-LYS12. Sub-ng detection limits were reached for many elements. According to this point the technique is also potentially suitable to be applied to polar ice core samples. (author)

  11. SASI ACTIVITY IN THREE-DIMENSIONAL NEUTRINO-HYDRODYNAMICS SIMULATIONS OF SUPERNOVA CORES

    Hanke, Florian; Mueller, Bernhard; Wongwathanarat, Annop; Marek, Andreas; Janka, Hans-Thomas, E-mail: fhanke@mpa-garching.mpg.de, E-mail: bjmuellr@mpa-garching.mpg.de, E-mail: annop@mpa-garching.mpg.de, E-mail: amarek@mpa-garching.mpg.de, E-mail: thj@mpa-garching.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2013-06-10

    The relevance of the standing accretion shock instability (SASI) compared to neutrino-driven convection in three-dimensional (3D) supernova-core environments is still highly controversial. Studying a 27 M{sub Sun} progenitor, we demonstrate, for the first time, that violent SASI activity can develop in 3D simulations with detailed neutrino transport despite the presence of convection. This result was obtained with the PROMETHEUS-VERTEX code with the same sophisticated neutrino treatment so far used only in one-dimensional and two-dimensional (2D) models. While buoyant plumes initially determine the nonradial mass motions in the postshock layer, bipolar shock sloshing with growing amplitude sets in during a phase of shock retraction and turns into a violent spiral mode whose growth is only quenched when the infall of the Si/SiO interface leads to strong shock expansion in response to a dramatic decrease of the mass accretion rate. In the phase of large-amplitude SASI sloshing and spiral motions, the postshock layer exhibits nonradial deformation dominated by the lowest-order spherical harmonics (l = 1, m = 0, {+-}1) in distinct contrast to the higher multipole structures associated with neutrino-driven convection. We find that the SASI amplitudes, shock asymmetry, and nonradial kinetic energy in three dimensions can exceed those of the corresponding 2D case during extended periods of the evolution. We also perform parameterized 3D simulations of a 25 M{sub Sun} progenitor, using a simplified, gray neutrino transport scheme, an axis-free Yin-Yang grid, and different amplitudes of random seed perturbations. They confirm the importance of the SASI for another progenitor, its independence of the choice of spherical grid, and its preferred growth for fast accretion flows connected to small shock radii and compact proto-neutron stars as previously found in 2D setups.

  12. High adenylyl cyclase activity and in vivo cAMP fluctuations in corals suggest central physiological role.

    Barott, K L; Helman, Y; Haramaty, L; Barron, M E; Hess, K C; Buck, J; Levin, L R; Tresguerres, M

    2013-01-01

    Corals are an ecologically and evolutionarily significant group, providing the framework for coral reef biodiversity while representing one of the most basal of metazoan phyla. However, little is known about fundamental signaling pathways in corals. Here we investigate the dynamics of cAMP, a conserved signaling molecule that can regulate virtually every physiological process. Bioinformatics revealed corals have both transmembrane and soluble adenylyl cyclases (AC). Endogenous cAMP levels in live corals followed a potential diel cycle, as they were higher during the day compared to the middle of the night. Coral homogenates exhibited some of the highest cAMP production rates ever to be recorded in any organism; this activity was inhibited by calcium ions and stimulated by bicarbonate. In contrast, zooxanthellae or mucus had >1000-fold lower AC activity. These results suggest that cAMP is an important regulator of coral physiology, especially in response to light, acid/base disturbances and inorganic carbon levels. PMID:23459251

  13. Improved microbial growth inhibition activity of bio-surfactant induced Ag–TiO2 core shell nanoparticles

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • TiO2 nanoparticles were synthesized by hydrolysis process and Ag nanoparticles were prepared by using hydrazine reduction method. • Ag–TiO2 core shell nanoparticles were synthesized by reverse micelle method. • Coatings of TiO2 shell leads to decrease the usage of silver particles and also it reduces the release of silver ions from the matrix. • Optimum ratio of TiO2 particles: Ag atoms are needed for better antibacterial activity. • Sodium alginate (Bio-copolymer) induced core shell nanoparticles results 100% cell growth inhibition toward Staphylococcus aureus. - Abstract: Surfactant induced silver–titanium dioxide core shell nanoparticles within the size range of 10–50 nm were applied in the antibacterial agent to inhibit the growth of bacterial cells. The single crystalline silver was located in the core part of the composite powder and the titanium dioxide components were uniformly distributed in the shell part. HRTEM and XRD results indicated that silver was completely covered by titanium dioxide and its crystal structure was not affected after being coated by titanium dioxide. The effect of silver–titanium dioxide nanoparticles in the inhibition of bacterial cell growth was studied by means of disk diffusion method. The inhibition zone results reveal that sodium alginate induced silver–titanium dioxide nanoparticles exhibit 100% more antibacterial activity than that with cetyltrimethylbromide or without surfactant. UV–vis spectroscopic analysis showed a large concentration of silver was rapidly released into phosphate buffer solution (PBS) within a period of 1 day, with a much smaller concentration being released after this 1-day period. It was concluded that sodium alginate induced silver–titanium dioxide core shell nanoparticles could enhance long term cell growth inhibition in comparison with cetyltrimethylbromide or without surfactant. The surfactant mediated core shell nanoparticles have

  14. Improved microbial growth inhibition activity of bio-surfactant induced Ag–TiO{sub 2} core shell nanoparticles

    Nithyadevi, D. [Department of Nanoscience and Technology, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore 641 046 (India); Kumar, P. Suresh [Thin Film and Nanomaterials Laboratory, Department of Physics, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore 641 046 (India); Mangalaraj, D., E-mail: dmraj800@yahoo.com [Department of Nanoscience and Technology, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore 641 046 (India); Ponpandian, N.; Viswanathan, C. [Department of Nanoscience and Technology, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore 641 046 (India); Meena, P. [Department of Physics, PSGR Krishnammal college for women, Coimbatore 641 004 (India)

    2015-02-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were synthesized by hydrolysis process and Ag nanoparticles were prepared by using hydrazine reduction method. • Ag–TiO{sub 2} core shell nanoparticles were synthesized by reverse micelle method. • Coatings of TiO{sub 2} shell leads to decrease the usage of silver particles and also it reduces the release of silver ions from the matrix. • Optimum ratio of TiO{sub 2} particles: Ag atoms are needed for better antibacterial activity. • Sodium alginate (Bio-copolymer) induced core shell nanoparticles results 100% cell growth inhibition toward Staphylococcus aureus. - Abstract: Surfactant induced silver–titanium dioxide core shell nanoparticles within the size range of 10–50 nm were applied in the antibacterial agent to inhibit the growth of bacterial cells. The single crystalline silver was located in the core part of the composite powder and the titanium dioxide components were uniformly distributed in the shell part. HRTEM and XRD results indicated that silver was completely covered by titanium dioxide and its crystal structure was not affected after being coated by titanium dioxide. The effect of silver–titanium dioxide nanoparticles in the inhibition of bacterial cell growth was studied by means of disk diffusion method. The inhibition zone results reveal that sodium alginate induced silver–titanium dioxide nanoparticles exhibit 100% more antibacterial activity than that with cetyltrimethylbromide or without surfactant. UV–vis spectroscopic analysis showed a large concentration of silver was rapidly released into phosphate buffer solution (PBS) within a period of 1 day, with a much smaller concentration being released after this 1-day period. It was concluded that sodium alginate induced silver–titanium dioxide core shell nanoparticles could enhance long term cell growth inhibition in comparison with cetyltrimethylbromide or without surfactant. The surfactant mediated core shell

  15. The Enzyme-mimic Activity of Ferric Nano-Core Residing in Ferritin and Its Biosensing Applications

    Tang, Zhiwen; Wu, Hong J.; Zhang, Youyu; Li, Zhaohui; Lin, Yuehe

    2011-11-15

    Ferritins are nano-scale globular protein cages encapsulating a ferric core. They widely exist in animals, plants, and microbes, playing indispensable roles in iron homeostasis. Interestingly, our study clearly demonstrates that ferritin has an enzyme-mimic activity derived from its ferric nano-core, but not the protein cage. Further study revealed that the mimic-enzyme activity of ferritin is more thermally stable and pH-tolerant compared with horseradish peroxidase. Considering the abundance of ferritin in numerous organisms, this finding may indicate a new role of ferritin in antioxidant and detoxification metabolisms. In addition, as a natural protein-caged nanoparticle with an enzyme-mimic activity, ferritin is readily conjugated with biomolecules to construct nano-biosensors, thus holds promising potential for facile and biocompatible labeling for sensitive and robust bioassays in biomedical applications.

  16. Link of volcanic activity and climate change in Altai studied in the ice core from Belukha Mountain

    N. S. Malygina

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In the present research we discuss a role of volcanic activity in Altai thermal regime. Here we analyses the sulfate and temperature data reconstructed from the natural paleoarchive – ice core from the Belukha Mountain saddle. Sulfate ice-core reconstructions can serve as volcanic markers. The both – sulfate and temperature reconstructions – are for the last 750 years. As the characteristic of volcanic activity we consider Volcanic Explosivity Index (VEI, Dust Veil Index (DVI and Ice core volcanic index (IVI. The analysis was done using wavelet analysis and analysis of wavelet cross coherence and phase. As the result, we conclude that observed increases in the values of the indexes VEI, DVI, IVI basically correspond to decreases of temperature and increases of sulfate concentrations. This confirms the dependence of changes in the thermal regime of the Altai from volcanic activity. But in the 1750–1850 years period there is a delay of the changes in temperature with respect to the changes in volcanic activity. We suggest that it can be due to the superposition of the influence of solar and volcanic activity on changes in the thermal regime of Altai.

  17. Preparation, characterization and photocatalytic activities of ZrWMoO{sub 8}/Ag composites with core-shell structure

    Liu Qinqin, E-mail: liu_qin_qin@126.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, 301 Xuefu Road, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu 212013 (China); Sun Shuai; Li Haohua; Yang Xiaofei; Shen Hao; Cheng Xiaonong; Dong Shubin [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, 301 Xuefu Road, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu 212013 (China)

    2012-11-15

    ZrWMoO{sub 8} rods with negative thermal expansion and ZrWMoO{sub 8}/Ag composites with core-shell structure were first proved to exhibit photocatalytic activity under UV-irradiation. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ZrWMoO{sub 8} rods with negative thermal expansion property were first studied for its photocatalytic activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ZrWMoO{sub 8}/Ag composites with core-shell structure were prepared using a simple reduction method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Improved photocatalytic activity was found in the ZrWMoO{sub 8}/Ag heterostructures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The ZrWMoO{sub 8}/Ag heterostructure promotes the separation of electron-hole pairs and enhances the photocatalytic activity. - Abstract: A novel photocatalytic ZrWMoO{sub 8}/Ag composite with core-shell structure was prepared. The composites were composed of ZrWMoO{sub 8} rods with negative thermal expansion (NTE) property as cores and Ag nanoparticles as shell. The resulting products were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and UV-visible spectrophotometer (UV-vis DRS). The results showed that ZrWMoO{sub 8} rods displayed not only negative thermal expansion but also photocatalytic efficiency toward Rhodamine B (RB) degradation under UV-irradiation. The as-prepared ZrWMoO{sub 8}/Ag composites exhibited a higher photocatalytic activity than that of pure ZrWMoO{sub 8}, thereby implying that the ZrWMoO{sub 8}/Ag interfaces promote the separation of photogenerated electron-hole pairs and enhance the photocatalytic activity.

  18. ATP alters current fluctuations of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator: evidence for a three-state activation mechanism

    1994-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis gene product cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a low conductance, cAMP-regulated Cl- channel. Removal of cytosolic ATP causes a cessation of cAMP-dependent kinase-phosphorylated CFTR channel activity that resumes upon ATP addition. (Anderson, M. P., H. A. Berger, D. R. Rich, R. J. Gregory, A. E. Smith, and M. J. Welsh. 1991. Cell. 67:775-784). The aim of this study was to quantify possible effects of ATP on CFTR gating. We analyzed multichannel ...

  19. Disturbed spontaneous brain activity pattern in patients with primary angle-closure glaucoma using amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation: a fMRI study

    Huang X

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Xin Huang,1,* Yu-Lin Zhong,1,* Xian-Jun Zeng,2 Fuqing Zhou,2 Xin-Hua Liu,1 Pei-Hong Hu,1 Chong-Gang Pei,1 Yi Shao,1 Xi-Jian Dai21Department of Ophthalmology, 2Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Nangchang, Jiangxi, People’s Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workObjective: The aim of this study is to use amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF as a method to explore the local features of spontaneous brain activity in patients with primary angle -closure glaucoma (PACG and ALFFs relationship with the behavioral performances.Methods: A total of twenty one patients with PACG (eight males and 13 females, and twenty one healthy subjects (nine males and twelve females closely matched in age, sex, and education, each underwent a resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging scan. The ALFF method was used to assess the local features of spontaneous brain activity. The correlation analysis was used to explore the relationships between the observed mean ALFF signal values of the different areas in PACG patients and the thickness of the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL. Results: Compared with the healthy subjects, patients with PACG had significant lower ALFF areas in the left precentral gyrus, bilateral middle frontal gyrus, bilateral superior frontal gyrus, right precuneus, and right angular gyrus, and higher areas in the right precentral gyrus. In the PACG group, there were significant negative correlations between the mean ALFF signal value of the right middle frontal gyrus and the left mean RNFL thickness (r=-0.487, P=0.033, and between the mean ALFF signal value of the left middle frontal gyrus and the right mean RNFL thickness (r=-0.504, P=0.020. Conclusion: PACG mainly involved in the dysfunction in the frontal lobe, which may reflect the underlying pathologic mechanism of PACG.Keywords: angle-closure glaucoma, amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation, functional

  20. Abnormal intrinsic brain activity in amnestic mild cognitive impairment revealed by amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation: a resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging study

    XI Qian; ZHAO Xiao-hu; WANG Pei-jun; GUO Qi-hao; HE Yong

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown that brain functional activity in the resting state is impaired in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients.However,alterations in intrinsic brain activity patterns in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) patients are poorly understood.This study aimed to explore the differences in regional intrinsic activities throughout the whole brain between aMCI patients and controls.Methods In the present study,resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was performed on 18 amnestic MCI (aMCI) patients,18 mild AD patients and 20 healthy elderly subjects.And amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF) method was used.Results Compared with healthy elderly subjects,aMCI patients showed decreased ALFF in the right hippocampus and parahippocampal cortex,left lateral temporal cortex,and right ventral medial prefrontal cortex (vMPFC) and increased ALFF in the left temporal-parietal junction (TPJ) and inferior parietal Iobule (IPL).Mild AD patients showed decreased ALFF in the left TPJ,posterior IPL (plPL),and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex compared with aMCI patients.Mild AD patients also had decreased ALFF in the right posterior cingulate cortex,right vMPFC and bilateral dorsal MPFC (dMPFC) compared with healthy elderly subjects.Conclusions Decreased intrinsic activities in brain regions closely related to episodic memory were found in aMCI and AD patients.Increased TPJ and IPL activity may indicate compensatory mechanisms for loss of memory function in aMCI patients.These findings suggest that the fMRI based on ALFF analysis may provide a useful tool in the study of aMCI patients.

  1. Math starters 5- to 10-minute activities aligned with the common core math standards, grades 6-12

    Muschla, Judith A; Muschla, Erin

    2013-01-01

    A revised edition of the bestselling activities guide for math teachers Now updated with new math activities for computers and mobile devices-and now organized by the Common Core State Standards-this book includes more than 650 ready-to-use math starter activities that get kids quickly focused and working as soon as they enter the classroom. Ideally suited for any math curriculum, these high-interest problems spark involvement in the day's lesson, help students build skills, and allow teachers to handle daily management tasks without wasting valuable instructional time. A newly updated edit

  2. A Common Definition of the System Operators' Core Activities[Electric Power Transmission System Operator

    NONE

    2006-02-15

    In this report a common definition of the system operator's core activities in the Nordic countries is identified and also a list of non-core activities is introduced. As a starting point the common tasks for system responsibility as identified by Nordel has been used for the work. The term TSO (Transmission System Operator) is employed as a common denominator in the report. It is found out that the TSOs carry out common core activities in the roles as a transmission operator, a system operator and a balance settlement responsible. The core activities for the TSO as a transmission network operator are: Maintain the adequate transmission system in the long run and network development plan on the national as well as on the Nordic level using sophisticated analysis and planning methods and tools. Plan the transmission network on the national as well as on the Nordic level utilising new investments, renewal and maintenance of existing network components so that the network is secure to operate and adequate transmission capacity is guaranteed. Aim at timely network expansions using enhanced information exchange between the Nordic TSOs, and on the national level between the TSO and distribution and regional network operators, large consumers and large producers. Secure the technical compatibility with networks across the border and within a country by establishing connection requirements on the national level and ensuring that the national requirements are compatible across the Nordic power system. The core activities for the TSO as a system operator are: Define common technical requirements for the secure system operation using common planning, operation, connection and data exchange procedures. Secure the system operation with the operational planning for the following year by using information exchange between TSOs enabling the TSOs to make the best possible forecast of the global grid situation in order to assess the flows in their network and the available

  3. 64Cu Core-labeled Nanoparticles with High Specific Activity via Metal-Free Click Chemistry

    Zeng, Dexing; Lee, Nam S.; Liu, Yongjian; Zhou, Dong; Dence, Carmen S.; Wooley, Karen L.; Katzenellenbogen, John A.; Welch, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    A novel strategy based on metal-free click chemistry was developed for the copper-64 radiolabeling of the core in shell-crosslinked nanoparticles (SCK-NPs). Compared with Cu(I)-catalyzed click chemistry, this metal-free strategy provides the following advantages for Cu-64 labeling of the core of SCK-NPs: (1) elimination of copper exchange between non-radioactive Cu in the catalyst and DOTA-chelated Cu-64; (2) elimination of the internal “click” reactions between the azide and acetylene groups...

  4. Temporal phasing of locomotor activity, heart rate rhythmicity, and core body temperature is disrupted in VIP receptor 2-deficient mice

    Hannibal, Jens; Hsiung, Hansen M; Fahrenkrug, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Neurons of the brain's biological clock located in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) generate circadian rhythms of physiology (core body temperature, hormone secretion, locomotor activity, sleep/wake, and heart rate) with distinct temporal phasing when entrained by the light/dark (LD......) cycle. The neuropeptide vasoactive intestinal polypetide (VIP) and its receptor (VPAC2) are highly expressed in the SCN. Recent studies indicate that VIPergic signaling plays an essential role in the maintenance of ongoing circadian rhythmicity by synchronizing SCN cells and by maintaining rhythmicity...... within individual neurons. To further increase the understanding of the role of VPAC2 signaling in circadian regulation, we implanted telemetric devices and simultaneously measured core body temperature, spontaneous activity, and heart rate in a strain of VPAC2-deficient mice and compared these...

  5. The removal of chlorophenoxy herbicides from drinking water by activated carbon adsorption and liquid core microcapsule perstraction

    Engels, Nora

    2012-01-01

    Drinking water quality reports have highlighted a persistent trend in pesticide detection in the Republic of Ireland. One of the main concerns of the drinking water industry is that consistent pesticide removal rates do not occur despite the existence of activated carbon (AC) treatment regimes in most plants. The present work examines the removal of three chlorophenoxy herbicides (MCPA, 2,4-D and dichlorprop) from aqueous solutions by AC adsorption and a novel liquid-core microcapsule perstra...

  6. Identification of a Small Molecular Anti - HIV - 1 Compound that Interferes with Formation of the Fusion - active gp41 Core

    2001-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV - 1 ) envelope glycoprotein gp41 plays a critical role in the fusion of viral and target cell membranes. The gp41 extracellular domain, which contains fusion peptide (FP), N - and C - terminal hydrophobic heptad repeats (NHR and CHR, respectively). Peptides derived from NHR and CHR regions,designated N- and C- peptides, respectively, can interact with each other to form a six - stranded coiled - coil domain, representing the fusion-active gp41 core. Our previous studies demonstrated that the C- peptides have potent inhibitory activity against HIV- 1 infection.These peptides inhibit HIV- 1 -mediated membrane fusion by binding to NHR regions for preventing the formation of fusion- active gp41 core. One of the C - peptides, T - 20, which is in the phase Ⅲ clinical trails, is expected to become the first peptide HIV fusion inhibitory drug in the near future. However, this peptide HIV fusion inhibitor lacks oral availability and is sensitive to the proteolytic digestion.Therefore, it is essential to develop small molecular non -peptide HIV fusion inhibitors having similar mechanism of action as the C- peptides. We have established an ELISA- based screening assay using a unique monoclonal antibody, NC- 1, which can specifically bind to a conformational epitope on the gp41 core domain. Using this screening assay, we have identified a small molecular anti- HIV- 1 compound,named ADS-Jl, which inhibits HIV- 1- mediated membrane fusion by blocking the interaction between the NHR and CHR regions to form the fusion - active gp41 core. This compound will be used as a lead to design and develop novel HIV fusion inhibitors as new drugs for the treatment of HIV infection and/or AIDS.

  7. Did concentration on core competencies drive merger and acquisition activities in the 1990s? Empirical evidence for Germany.

    Hussinger, Katrin

    2005-01-01

    In the context of increasing globalization of markets, merger and acquisition activities in the 1990s are said to be driven by reorganization processes with respect to concentration on firms? core competencies in order to increase or maintain market power in international markets. This paper empirically investigates a sample of German domestic mergers in the 1990s to detect the impact of technology and market relatedness on the choice of the merging partner. Results from a conditional logit m...

  8. Flows and Motions in Moss in the Core of a Flaring Active Region: Evidence for Steady Heating

    Brooks, David H

    2009-01-01

    We present new measurements of the time variability of intensity, Doppler and non-thermal velocities in coronal moss in the core of an active region that was observed by the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on Hinode in 2007, June. The measurements are derived from line profiles of the Fe12 195A line. Using the EIS 2" slit, we repeatedly scanned 150" by 150" in a few mins. This is the first time it has been possible to make such velocity measurements in the moss, and the data presented are the highest cadence spatially resolved maps of moss Doppler and non-thermal velocities ever obtained in the corona. The observed active region produced numerous C- and M- class flares with several occurring in the core close to the moss. The magnetic field was therefore clearly changing in the active region core, and so we ought to be able to detect dynamic signatures in the moss if they exist. Our measurements of moss intensities agree with previous studies in that a less than 15% variability is seen over a period of 16 hour...

  9. Sequence-directed nucleosome-depletion is sufficient to activate transcription from a yeast core promoter in vivo.

    Ichikawa, Yuichi; Morohashi, Nobuyuki; Tomita, Nobuyuki; Mitchell, Aaron P; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi; Shimizu, Mitsuhiro

    2016-07-22

    Nucleosome-depleted regions (NDRs) (also called nucleosome-free regions or NFRs) are often found in the promoter regions of many yeast genes, and are formed by multiple mechanisms, including the binding of activators and enhancers, the actions of chromatin remodeling complexes, and the specific DNA sequences themselves. However, it remains unclear whether NDR formation per se is essential for transcriptional activation. Here, we examined the relationship between nucleosome organization and gene expression using a defined yeast reporter system, consisting of the CYC1 minimal core promoter and the lacZ gene. We introduced simple repeated sequences that should be either incorporated in nucleosomes or excluded from nucleosomes in the site upstream of the TATA boxes. The (CTG)12, (GAA)12 and (TGTAGG)6 inserts were incorporated into a positioned nucleosome in the core promoter region, and did not affect the reporter gene expression. In contrast, the insertion of (CGG)12, (TTAGGG)6, (A)34 or (CG)8 induced lacZ expression by 10-20 fold. Nucleosome mapping analyses revealed that the inserts that induced the reporter gene expression prevented nucleosome formation, and created an NDR upstream of the TATA boxes. Thus, our results demonstrated that NDR formation dictated by DNA sequences is sufficient for transcriptional activation from the core promoter in vivo. PMID:27208777

  10. KAERI Activities on the Cooling Performance of Ex-vessel Core Catcher

    Ha, Kwang Soon; Park, Rae Joon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Wi, Kyung Jin [Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Thanh, Thuy Nguyen Thi [University of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    To improve the thermal margin for the severe accident measures in high-power reactors, engineered corium cooling systems involving boiling-induced two-phase natural circulation have been proposed for decay heat removal. A boiling-induced natural circulation flow is generated in a coolant path between a hot vessel wall and cold coolant reservoir. In general, an increase in the natural circulation mass flow rate of the coolant leads to an increase in the critical heat flux (CHF) on the hot wall, thus enhancing the thermal margin. Recently, a newly engineered corium cooling system, that is, an ex-vessel core catcher, has been considered as one of severe accident mitigation measures for an APR1400. The ex-vessel core catcher in an APR1400 is a passive corium cooling system consisting of an inclined engineered cooling channel made of a single channel between the body of the core catcher and the inside wall of the reactor cavity. If a severe accident in a nuclear power plant occurs and the reactor vessel fails, the molten corium ejected from the reactor vessel is relocated in the body of the ex-vessel core catcher. The water from the IRWST is supplied to the engineered cooling channel between the outside of the core catcher body and the reactor cavity wall. The supplied water in the inclined channel should sufficiently remove the decay heat transferred from the corium by boiling off as steam. A buoyancy-driven natural circulation flow through the cooling channel and down-comers is intended to provide effective long-term cooling, and to thermally stabilize the molten corium mixture in the core catcher body.. In general, an increase in the natural circulation mass flow rate of the coolant leads to an increase in the critical heat flux (CHF) on the hot wall, thus enhancing the thermal margin. Therefore, it should be ensured and quantified that the water coolant is circulated at a sufficiently high rate through the inclined cooling channel for decay heat removal to maintain

  11. A survey of core and support activities of communicable disease surveillance systems at operating-level CDCs in China

    Li Liming

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years, problems like insufficient coordination, low efficiency, and heavy working load in national communicable disease surveillance systems in China have been pointed out by many researchers. To strengthen the national communicable disease surveillance systems becomes an immediate concern. Since the World Health Organization has recommended that a structured approach to strengthen national communicable disease surveillance must include an evaluation to existing systems which usually begins with a systematic description, we conducted the first survey for communicable disease surveillance systems in China, in order to understand the situation of core and support surveillance activities at province-level and county-level centers for disease control and prevention (CDCs. Methods A nationwide survey was conducted by mail between May and October 2006 to investigate the implementation of core and support activities of the Notifiable Disease Reporting System (NDRS and disease-specific surveillance systems in all of the 31 province-level and selected 14 county-level CDCs in Mainland China The comments on the performance of communicable disease surveillance systems were also collected from the directors of CDCs in this survey. Results The core activities of NDRS such as confirmation, reporting and analysis and some support activities such as supervision and staff training were found sufficient in both province-level and county-level surveyed CDCs, but other support activities including information feedback, equipment and financial support need to be strengthened in most of the investigated CDCs. A total of 47 communicable diseases or syndromes were under surveillance at province level, and 20 diseases or syndromes at county level. The activities among different disease-specific surveillance systems varied widely. Acute flaccid paralysis (AFP, measles and tuberculosis (TB surveillance systems got relatively high recognition

  12. [Effects of Citric Acid on Activation and Methylation of Mercury in the Soils of Water-Level-Fluctuating Zone of the Three Gorges.Reservoir].

    Qin, Cai-qing; Liang, Li; You, Rui; Deng, Han; Wang, Ding-yong

    2015-12-01

    To investigate effects of the main component of vegetation root exudates-citric acid on activation and methylation of mercury in the soil of water-level-fluctuating zone (WLFZ) of the Three Gorges Reservoir area, simulation experiments were conducted by extracting and cultivating soil with different concentrations of citric acid. The results showed that after adding citric acid, the total mercury content in leaching solution before reaching peak were higher than that of the control, and increased with the increase of citric acid concentrations. The maximum amount of mercury complexes increased initially and then reached plateaus with the percentage against the total mercury in soil of 1.03%, 1.67%, 1.99%, 2.47%, 2.68%, 2.73% and 2.73% for different citric acid concentrations (0, 1, 2, 4, 5, 6 and 8 mmol · L⁻¹). In addition, concentrations of methylmercury ( MeHg) in soil remained stable in the first 3 hours, and then increased accompanying with the increasing rate rising with the concentration of citric acid ( besides the control group) . This result indicated that citric acid probably could promote the transformation process from inorganic mercury to MeHg in soil. which increased with the concentration of citric acid. PMID:27011985

  13. Development of O-mode reflectometer for density fluctuation measurement on JT-60U

    Oyama, Naoyuki; Shinohara, Kouji [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment

    2000-03-01

    The study of relation between turbulence and transport is very important to understand characteristics of the internal/edge transport barrier (ITB/ETB). Recently, core correlation reflectometer using X-mode propagation has been installed on JT-60U tokamak. In order to complement the reflectometer system as to the dependence of measured point on toroidal magnetic field, we have been designed 3ch O-mode reflectometer system. The 34 GHz fixed frequency reflectometer has been measured density fluctuations in the O-mode reflectometer system as a start. Clear change of the fluctuation spectra in low-frequency region, f < 40 kHz, at the H-L back transition and abrupt increase of density fluctuation in high-frequency region, f > 100 kHz, at starting X-point MARFE activity are observed. (author)

  14. EJC core component MLN51 interacts with eIF3 and activates translation

    Chazal, Pierre-Etienne; Daguenet, Elisabeth; Wendling, Corinne; Ulryck, Nathalie; Tomasetto, Catherine; Sargueil, Bruno; Le Hir, Hervé

    2013-01-01

    The multiprotein exon junction complex (EJC), deposited by the splicing machinery, is an important constituent of messenger ribonucleoprotein particles because it participates to numerous steps of the mRNA lifecycle from splicing to surveillance via nonsense-mediated mRNA decay pathway. By an unknown mechanism, the EJC also stimulates translation efficiency of newly synthesized mRNAs. Here, we show that among the four EJC core components, the RNA-binding protein metastatic lymph node 51 (MLN5...

  15. The core characteristics and nursing care activities in psychiatric intensive care units in Sweden

    Salzmann-Erikson, Martin; Lützén, Kim; Ivarsson, Ann-Britt; Eriksson, Henrik

    2008-01-01

    Internationally, research on psychiatric intensive care units (PICUs) commonly reportsresults from demographic studies such as criteria for admission, need for involuntary treatment, andthe occurrence of violent behaviour. A few international studies describe the caring aspect of thePICUs based specifically on caregivers’ experiences. The concept of PICU in Sweden is not clearlydefined. The aim of this study is to describe the core characteristics of a PICU in Sweden and todescribe the ...

  16. Mineral Physics Research on Earth's Core and UTeach Outreach Activities at UT Austin

    Lin, J.; Wheat, A. J.

    2011-12-01

    Comprehension of the alloying effects of major candidate light elements on the phase diagram and elasticity of iron addresses pressing issues on the composition, thermal structures, and seismic features of the Earth's core. Integrating this mineral physics research with the educational objectives of the CAREER award was facilitated by collaboration with the University of Texas at Austin's premier teaching program, UTeach. The UTeach summer outreach program hosts three one-week summer camps every year exposing K-12th graders to university level academia, emphasizing math and science initiatives and research. Each week of the camp either focuses on math, chemistry, or geology. Many of the students were underrepresented minorities and some required simultaneous translation; this is an effect of the demographics of the region, and caused some language barrier challenges. The students' opportunity to see first-hand what it is like to be on a university campus, as well as being in a research environment, such as the mineral physics lab, helps them to visualize themselves in academia in the future. A collection of displayable materials with information about deep-Earth research were made available to participating students and teachers to disseminate accurate scientific knowledge and enthusiasm. These items included a diamond anvil cell and diagrams of the diamond crystal structure, the layers of the Earth, and the phases of carbon to show that one element can have very different physical properties purely based on differences in structure. The students learned how advanced X-ray and optical laser spectroscopies are used to study properties of planetary materials in the diamond anvil cell. Stress was greatly placed on the basic mathematical relationship between force, area, and pressure, the fundamental principle involved with diamond anvil cell research. Undergraduate researchers from the lab participated in the presentations and hands-on experiments, and answered any

  17. One-pot synthesis of Pd-Pt@Pd core-shell nanocrystals with enhanced electrocatalytic activity for formic acid oxidation

    Yuan, Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Well-defined Pd-Pt@Pd core-shell nanocrystals with a Pd-Pt alloy core and a conformal Pd shell of ~2-3 nm were directly synthesized through a one-pot, aqueous solution approach without any preformed Pd or Pt seeds. These Pd-Pt@Pd core-shell nanocrystals show an enhanced electrocatalytic activity for formic acid oxidation compared with commercial Pd black. This journal is © 2014 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  18. Antimicrobial active silver nanoparticles and silver/polystyrene core-shell nanoparticles prepared in room-temperature ionic liquid

    Uniform silver nanoparticles and silver/polystyrene core-shell nanoparticles were successfully synthesized in a room temperature ionic liquid, 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([BMIM].BF4). [BMIM].BF4 plays a protective role to prevent the nanoparticles from aggregation during the preparation process. Transmission electron micrographs confirm that both silver nanoparticles and core-shell nanoparticles are regular spheres with the sizes in the range of 5-15 nm and 15-25 nm, respectively. The X-ray diffraction analysis reveals the face-centered cubic geometry of silver nanoparticles. The as-prepared nanoparticles were also characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. In addition, antimicrobial activities against E. coli and S. aureus were studied and the results show that both silver nanoparticles and core-shell nanoparticles possess excellent antimicrobial activities. The antimicrobial mechanism of the as-prepared nanoparticles was discussed.

  19. Core strengthening.

    Arendt, Elizabeth A

    2007-01-01

    Several recent studies have evaluated interventional techniques designed to reduce the risk of serious knee injuries, particularly noncontact anterior cruciate ligament injuries in female athletes. Maintenance of rotational control of the limb underneath the pelvis, especially in response to cutting and jumping activities, is a common goal in many training programs. Rotational control of the limb underneath the pelvis is mediated by a complex set of factors including the strength of the trunk muscles and the relationship between the core muscles. It is important to examine the interrelationship between lower extremity function and core stability. PMID:17472321

  20. Fluctuations and NA49

    A brief history of the study of fluctuations in high energy nuclear collisions at the CERN SPS by NA49 is presented. The ideas and the corresponding experimental data on fluctuations are discussed from the point of view of their sensitivity to the onset of deconfinement

  1. Particle density fluctuations

    Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Angelis, A.L.S.; Antonenko, V.; Arefiev, V.; Astakhov, V.; Avdeitchikov, V.; Awes, T.C.; Baba, P.V.K.S.; Badyal, S.K.; Bathe, S.; Batiounia, B.; Bernier, T.; Bhalla, K.B.; Bhatia, V.S.; Blume, C.; Bucher, D.; Buesching, H.; Carlen, L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Das, A.C.; Decowski, M.P.; Donni, P.; Dubey, A.K.; Dutta Majumdar, M.R.; Enosawa, K.; Fokin, S.; Frolov, V.; Ganti, M.S.; Garpman, S.; Gavrishcuk, O.; Geurts, F.J.M.; Glasow, R.; Guskov, B.; Gustafsson, H.A.; Gutbrod, H.H.; Hrivnacova, I.; Ippolitov, M.; Kalechofsky, H.; Kamermans, R.; Karadjev, K.; Karpio, K.; Kolb, B.W.; Kosarev, I.; Koutcheryaev, I.; Kugler, A.; Kulinich, P.; Kurata, M.; Lebedev, A.; Loehner, H.; Mahapatra, D.P.; Manko, V.; Martin, M.; Miake, Y.; Mishra, G.C.; Mohanty, B.; Morrison, D.; Mukhopadhayay, D.S.; Naef, H.; Nandi, B.K.; Nayak, S.K.; Nayak, T.K.; Nianine, A.; Nikitine, V.; Nikolaev, S.; Nishimura, S.; Nomokov, P.; Petracek, V.; Plasil, F.; Purschke, M.L.; Rak, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Rao, N.K.; Retiere, F.; Reygers, K.; Roland, G.; Rosselet, L.; Roufanov, I.; Rubio, J.M.; Sambyal, S.S.; Santo, R.; Sato, S.; Schlagheck, H.; Schmidt, H.-R.; Schutz, Y.; Shabratova, G.; Sibiriak, I.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Sinha, B.C.; Slavine, N.; Soederstroem, K.; Sood, G.; Soerensen, S.P.; Stankus, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stenlund, E.; Sumbera, M.; Svensson, T.; Trivedi, M.D.; Tsvetkov, A.; Tykarski, L.; Urbahn, J.; Eijinhoven, N. van; Niewenhuizen, G.J. van; Vinogradov, A.; Viyogi, Y.P.; Vodopianov, A.; Voeroes, S.; Wyslouch, B.; Young, G.R

    2003-03-10

    Event-by-event fluctuations in the multiplicities of charged particles and photons at SPS energies are discussed. Fluctuations are studied by controlling the centrality of the reaction and rapidity acceptance of the detectors. Results are also presented on the event-by-event study of correlations between the multiplicity of charged particles and photons to search for DCC-like signals.

  2. Particle density fluctuations

    Event-by-event fluctuations in the multiplicities of charged particles and photons at SPS energies are discussed. Fluctuations are studied by controlling the centrality of the reaction and rapidity acceptance of the detectors. Results are also presented on the event-by-event study of correlations between the multiplicity of charged particles and photons to search for DCC-like signals

  3. Spontaneous brain activity in type 2 diabetics revealed by amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations and its association with diabetic vascular disease: a resting-state FMRI study.

    Chun-Xia Wang

    Full Text Available To investigate correlations between altered spontaneous brain activity, diabetic vascular disease, and cognitive function for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI.Rs-fMRI was performed for T2DM patients (n = 26 and age-, gender-, and education-matched non-diabetic control subjects (n = 26. Amplitude of low frequency fluctuations (ALFF were computed from fMRI signals to measure spontaneous neuronal activity. Differences in the ALFF patterns between patients and controls, as well as their correlations with clinical variables, were evaluated.Compared with healthy controls, T2DM patients exhibited significantly decreased ALFF values mainly in the frontal and parietal lobes, the bilateral thalumi, the posterior lobe of the cerebellum, and increased ALFF values mainly in the visual cortices. Furthermore, lower ALFF values in the left subcallosal gyrus correlated with lower ankle-brachial index values (r = 0.481, p = 0.020, while lower ALFF values in the bilateral medial prefrontal gyri correlated with higher urinary albumin-creatinine ratio (r =  -0.418, p = 0.047. In addition, most of the regions with increased ALFF values in the visual cortices were found to negatively correlate with MoCA scores.These results confirm that ALFF are altered in many brain regions in T2DM patients, and this is associated with the presence of diabetic vascular disease and poor cognitive performance. These findings may provide additional insight into the neurophysiological mechanisms that mediate T2DM-related cognitive dysfunction, and may also serve as a reference for future research.

  4. Platinum-monolayer Electrocatalysts: Palladium Interlayer on IrCo Alloy Core Improves Activity in Oxygen-reduction Reaction

    Gong, K.; Chen, W.-F.; Sasaki, K.; Su, D.; Vukmirovic, M.B.; Zhou, W.; Izzo, E.L.; Perez-Acosta, C.; Hirunsit, P.; Balbuena, P.B.; Adzic, R.R.

    2010-11-15

    We describe the synthesis and electrocatalytic properties of a new low-Pt electrocatalyst consisting of an IrCo core, a Pd interlayer, and a surface Pt monolayer, emphasizing the interlayer's role in improving electrocatalytic activity for the oxygen-reduction reaction on Pt in HClO{sub 4} solution. We prepared the IrCo alloys by decomposing, at 800 C, hexacyanometalate, KCoIr(CN){sub 6}, adsorbed on the carbon surfaces. The synthesis of Ir{sub 3}Co/C involved heating a mix of metal salts and carbon in hydrogen at 500 C. Thereafter, we placed a palladium and/or platinum monolayer on them via the galvanic displacement of an underpotentially deposited copper monolayer. The electrocatalysts were characterized using structural- and electrochemical-techniques. For PtML/PdML/IrCo/C, we observed a Pt mass activity of 1.18 A/mg{sub (Pt)} and the platinum-group-metals mass of 0.16 A/mg{sub (Pt, Pd, Ir)}. In comparison, without a Pd interlayer, i.e., Pt{sub ML}/IrCo/C, the activities of 0.15 A/mg{sub (Pt)} and 0.036 A/mg{sub (Pt, Pd, Ir)} were considerably lower. We consider that the palladium interlayer plays an essential role in achieving high catalytic activity by adjusting the electronic interaction of the platinum monolayer with the IrCo core, so that it accelerates the kinetics of adsorption and desorption of the intermediates of oxygen reduction. A similar trend was observed for Pt{sub ML}/Pd{sub ML} and Pt{sub ML} deposited on Ir{sub 3}Co/C alloy core. We used density functional theory to interpret the observed phenomena.

  5. Specific activation of 2'-5'oligoadenylate synthetase gene promoter by hepatitis C virus-core protein: A potential for developing hepatitis C virus targeting gene therapy

    Ying Wang; Shan-Shan Mao; Qiong-Qiong He; Yuan Zi; Ji-Fang Wen; De-Yun Feng

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To examine whether 2'-5'oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS) gene promoter can be specifically activated by hepatitis C virus (HCV)-core protein.METHODS: Human embryo hepatic cell line L02 was transfected with pcDNA3.1-core plasmid and selected by G418. Expression of HCV-core was detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting. The OAS promoter sequence was amplified from the genomic DNA and inserted into pGL3-basic vector. The resultant pGL3-OAS-Luci plasmid was transiently transfected into L02/core cells and luciferase activity was assayed.RESULTS: L02/core cell line stably expressing HCV-core protein was established. The pGL3-OAS-Luci construct exhibited significant transcriptional activity in the L02/core cells but not in the L02 cells.CONCLUSION: HCV-core protein activates the OAS gene promoter specifically and effectively. Utilization of OAS gene promoter would be an ideal strategy for developing HCV-specific gene therapy.

  6. Spontaneous brain activity in chronic smokers revealed by fractional amplitude of low frequency fluctuation analysis: a resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging study

    Chu Shuilian; Xiao Dan; Wang Shuangkun; Peng Peng; Xie Teng; He Yong; Wang Chen

    2014-01-01

    Background Nicotine is primarily rsponsible for the highly addictive properties of cigarettes.Similar to other substances,nicotine dependence is related to many important brain regions,particular in mesolimbic reward circuit.This study was to further reveal the alteration of brain function activity during resting state in chronic smokers by fractional amplitude of low frequency fluctuation (fALFF) based on functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI),in order to provide the evidence of neurobiological mechanism of smoking.Methods This case control study involved twenty healthy smokers and nineteen healthy nonsmokers recruited by advertisement.Sociodemographic,smoking related characteristics and fMRI images were collected and the data analyzed.Results Compared with nonsmokers,smokers showed fALFF increased significantly in the left middle occipital gyrus,left limbic lobe and left cerebellum posterior lobe but decreases in the right middle frontal gyrus,right superior temporal gyrus,right extra nuclear,left postcentral gyrus and left cerebellum anterior lobe (cluster size >100 voxels).Compared with light smokers (pack years ≤20),heavy smokers (pack years >20) showed fALFF increased significantly in the right superior temporal gyrus,right precentral gyrus,and right occipital lobe/cuneus but decreased in the right/left limbic lobe/cingulate gyrus,right/left frontal lobe/sub gyral,right/left cerebellum posterior lobe (cluster size >50 voxels).Compared with nonsevere nicotine dependent smokers (Fagerstr(o)m test for nicotine dependence,score ≤6),severe nicotine dependent smokers (score >6) showed fALFF increased significantly in the right/left middle frontal gyrus,right superior frontal gyrus and left inferior parietal lobule but decreased in the left limbic lobe/cingulate gyrus (duster size >25 voxels).Conclusions In smokers during rest,the activity of addiction related regions were increased and the activity of smoking feeling,memory,related regions were

  7. IPPE activity on fast reactor core development for effective incineration of long-lived nuclear wastes

    For the CRP IPPE is proposed: Fast reactor design (based e.g. on BN-800 reactor core parameters) with sodium or some other coolant; inert matrix fuel with large amount of actinides (up to 50%), based on Fe+MgO inert matrix to improve safety related parameters. Special refueling scheme to flatten the power distribution. The following safety relevant neutronics parameters must be evaluated for the ULOF, UTOP and ULOHS accident analysis: Doppler coefficients (including breakdown by isotopes), coolant density reactivity coefficients; axial and radial expansion reactivity coefficients

  8. ANTI-TUMOR ACTIVITY AND IMMUNE RESPONSES INDUCED BY HUMAN CANCER-ASSOCIATED MUCIN CORE PEPTIDE

    Ma Yunguo; Yuan Mei; Fei Lihua; Li Li

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the immune responses induced by apomucin which is a mixture of mucin core peptide, in mice for elucidating the role of mucin core peptide in the modulation of cancers. Methods:Apomucin was isolated from human pancreatic cancer cell line SW1990. The mice were immunized with this apomucin (10μg/time×6) plus DETOX. Results: When immunized, all mice developed delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) after challenged with apomucin or synthetic peptide MUC-2 or MUC-3, while the mice immunized with apomucin alone did not develop DTH.No antibodies were detected by ELISA after immunization. When the spleen cells of vaccinated mice were cocultured with this apomucin (10-50μg/ml) and rhIL-2(50U/ml) in vitro, the proliferated lymphocytes showed cytotoxicity against human cancer cells, including colon cancer, gastric cancer, pancreatic cancer and leukemia as measured by Cr-51 release assay. Antibodies against MUC-2 and MUC-3 could block the cytotoxicity. Conclusion: It was identified that a vaccine combined of apomucin and immune adjuvant DETOX can induce cellular immune response and anti-tumor cytotoxicity in mice.

  9. U/Th ratios, 210Pb activity and geochemical variations in a coastal sediment core off Ratnagiri

    Subsection of a sediment core of 1m length collected from a water depth of 45 m off Ratnagiri, Maharashtra were analysed for U/Th isotopes as well as 210Pb activity by alpha spectrometry and few metals (Al, Fe, Mn and As) by Atomic absorption spectrometry respectively. The clay sedimentation rate of 2.1 mm/y is estimated from excess 210Pb method. The assessed 210Pb inventory of 40 dpm/cm2 in the sediment core is in balance with that expected from the overhead water column 210Pb precipitation from atmospheric fallout. Subsurface sediment aluminum content ranges from 5.2 to 7.5 % which clearly shows clayey nature of sediment. As and Mn as well as As/Al and Mn/Al show relatively lower values in upper 10 cm segment suggesting a low oxygenated bottom waters, which is supported by high values of uranium (2.4 to 5.5 ppm) in the sediment. Further evidence of low oxygenated environment comes from high U/Th weight ratios (0.3 to 1.39) in the core compared to the earth's crustal ratio of 0.25. This site therefore seems to act as a sink for uranium isotopes. (author)

  10. Active core profile and transport modification by application of Ion Bernstein Wave power in PBX-M

    Application of Ion Bernstein Wave Heating (IBWH) into the Princeton Beta Experiment-Modification (PBX-M) tokamak stabilizes sawtooth oscillations and generates peaked density profiles. A transport barrier, spatially correlated with the IBWH power deposition profile, is observed in the core of IBWH assisted neutral beam injection (NBI) discharges. A precursor to the fully developed barrier is seen in the soft x-ray data during edge localized mode (ELM) activity. Sustained IBWH operation is conducive to a regime where the barrier supports large triangledown ne, triangledown Te, triangledown vphi, and triangledown Ti, delimiting the confinement zone. This regime is reminiscent of the H(high)-mode but with a confinement zone moved inwards. The core region has better than H-mode confinement while the peripheral region is L(low)-mode-like. The peaked profile enhanced NBI core deposition and increases nuclear reactivity. An increase in central Ti results from χi reduction (compared to H-mode) and better beam penetration. Bootstrap current fractions of up to 0.32--0.35 locally and 0.28 overall were obtained when an additional NBI burst is applied to this plasma

  11. Disturbed spontaneous brain-activity pattern in patients with optic neuritis using amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study

    Huang X

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Xin Huang,1,2,* Feng-Qin Cai,3,* Pei-Hong Hu,1 Yu-Lin Zhong,1 Ying Zhang,1 Rong Wei,1 Chong-Gang Pei,1 Fu-Qing Zhou,3 Yi Shao1 1Department of Ophthalmology, Jiangxi Province Clinical Ophthalmology Institute, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Nanchang, 2Department of Ophthalmology, First People’s Hospital of Jiujiang, Jiujiang, 3Department of Radiology, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Nanchang, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Objective: To use the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF technique to investigate the local features of spontaneous brain activity in optic neuritis (ON and their relationship with behavioral performance.Materials and methods: Twelve patients with ON (four male, eight female and twelve age-, sex-, and education status-matched healthy controls (HCs (four male, eight female underwent resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI scans. The ALFF technique was used to assess local features of spontaneous brain activity. Correlation analysis was used to explore the relationship between the observed mean ALFF values of the different areas and visual evoked potentials (VEPs in patients with ON.Results: Compared with HCs, patients with ON had significantly decreased ALFF values in the posterior and anterior lobes of the right cerebellum, right putamen, right inferior frontal gyrus, right insula, right supramarginal gyrus, right inferior parietal lobule, left medial frontal gyrus, left superior temporal gyrus, bilateral anterior cingulate/medial frontal gyrus, and bilateral precuneus, and significantly increased ALFF values in the posterior lobes of the left and right cerebellum, right inferior temporal gyrus, right inferior temporal/fusiform gyrus, left parahippocampal gyrus, left fusiform gyrus, left calcarine fissure, left inferior parietal lobule, and left cuneus. We found negative correlations between the mean ALFF signal

  12. Hadronic Correlations and Fluctuations

    Koch, Volker

    2008-10-09

    We will provide a review of some of the physics which can be addressed by studying fluctuations and correlations in heavy ion collisions. We will discuss Lattice QCD results on fluctuations and correlations and will put them into context with observables which have been measured in heavy-ion collisions. Special attention will be given to the QCD critical point and the first order co-existence region, and we will discuss how the measurement of fluctuations and correlations can help in an experimental search for non-trivial structures in the QCD phase diagram.

  13. Diagnosing the time-dependence of active region core heating from the emission measure: II. Nanoflare trains

    Reep, Jeffrey W; Klimchuk, James A; 10.1088/0004-637X/764/2/193

    2013-01-01

    The time-dependence of heating in solar active regions can be studied by analyzing the slope of the emission measure distribution cool-ward of the peak. In a previous study we showed that low-frequency heating can account for 0% to 77% of active region core emission measures. We now turn our attention to heating by a finite succession of impulsive events for which the timescale between events on a single magnetic strand is shorter than the cooling timescale. We refer to this scenario as a "nanoflare train" and explore a parameter space of heating and coronal loop properties with a hydrodynamic model. Our conclusions are: (1) nanoflare trains are consistent with 86% to 100% of observed active region cores when uncertainties in the atomic data are properly accounted for; (2) steeper slopes are found for larger values of the ratio of the train duration $\\Delta_H$ to the post-train cooling and draining timescale $\\Delta_C$, where $\\Delta_H$ depends on the number of heating events, the event duration and the time ...

  14. Simulation of Thermopower Influence on Fuel Core of Power Rod in Nuclear Power Plant (NPP Active Zone

    I. S. Kulikov

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers problems of modern methods for  calculation of designs and materials of nuclear power. A model of numerical analysis for stress-strain state of fuel pins in the NPP active zone is proposed in the paper. The paper contains simulation concerning a fuel core section of a nuclear reactor heat-generating element with subsequent solution of a temperature and thermoelastic problem in computer program complex FEA ANSYS Workbench 11.0. All the obtained results have passed through checking procedure.

  15. Measuring shape fluctuations in biological membranes

    Monzel, C.; Sengupta, K.

    2016-06-01

    Shape fluctuations of lipid membranes have intrigued cell biologists and physicists alike. In the cellular context, their origin—thermal or active—and their physiological significance are open questions. These small incessant displacements, also called membrane undulations, have mostly been studied in model membranes and membranes of simple cells like erythrocytes. Thermal fluctuations of such membranes have been very well described both theoretically and experimentally; active fluctuations are a topic of current interest. Experimentally, membrane fluctuations are not easy to measure, the main challenge being to develop techniques which are capable of measuring very small displacements at very high speed, and preferably over a large area and long time. Scattering techniques have given access to fluctuations in membrane stacks and a variety of optical microscopy based techniques have been devised to study membrane fluctuations of unilamellar vesicles, erythrocytes and other cells. Among them are flicker spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, diffraction phase microscopy and reflection interference contrast microscopy. Each of these techniques has its advantages and limitations. Here we review the basic principles of the major experimental techniques used to measure bending or shape fluctuations of biomembranes. We report seminal results obtained with each technique and highlight how these studies furthered our understanding of physical properties of membranes and their interactions. We also discuss suggested role of membrane fluctuations in different biological processes.

  16. Scaling metabolic rate fluctuations

    Labra, Fabio A.; Marquet, Pablo A.; Bozinovic, Francisco

    2007-01-01

    Complex ecological and economic systems show fluctuations in macroscopic quantities such as exchange rates, size of companies or populations that follow non-Gaussian tent-shaped probability distributions of growth rates with power-law decay, which suggests that fluctuations in complex systems may be governed by universal mechanisms, independent of particular details and idiosyncrasies. We propose here that metabolic rate within individual organisms may be considered as an example of an emerge...

  17. The Combined Strength of Thermodynamics and Comparative Planetology: Application of Activity Models to Core Formation in Terrestrial Bodies

    Righter, K.; Pando, K. M.; Danielson, L. R.

    2015-01-01

    how large the effect of Si can be, these epsilon values correspond to activity coefficients (gamma) for As of 0.01 when XSi = 0, and up to gamma = 23 when XSi = 0.2. Combining these new results with previous determinations [5,6] of epsilon parameters for S and C for these elements allows us calculate activity of Ge, In, As, and Sb in Fe-Ni-Si-S-C-O metallic liquids. We apply this new model to sever-al terrestrial bodies such as Earth (Si-rich core), Mars (S-rich core), Moon (S-, C-, and Si-poor core), and Vesta, and examine the resulting core and mantle concentrations of these elements. Mantle concentrations of these four elements are well explained for Earth and Mars in models that call for mid-mantle equilibration between Si-bearing and S-bearing FeNi cores, respectively. Modeling results for the Moon and Vesta will also be presented.

  18. Film Growth Rates and Activation Energies for Core-Shell Nanoparticles Derived from a CVD Based Aerosol Process

    Frederik Weis

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Silica core-shell nanoparticles of about 60–120 nm with a closed outer layer of bismuth or molybdenum oxide of 1–10 nm were synthesized by an integrated chemical vapor synthesis/chemical vapor deposition process at atmospheric pressure. Film growth rates and activation energies were derived from transmission electron microscopy (TEM images for a deposition process based on molybdenum hexacarbonyl and triphenyl bismuth as respective coating precursors. Respective activation energies of 123 ± 10 and 155 ± 10 kJ/mol are in good agreement with the literature and support a deposition mechanism based on surface-induced removal of the precursor ligands. Clean substrate surfaces are thus prerequisite for conformal coatings. Integrated aerosol processes are solvent-free and intrinsically clean. In contrast, commercial silica substrate particles were found to suffer from organic residues which hinder shell formation, and require an additional calcination step to clean the surface prior to coating. Dual layer core-shell structures with molybdenum oxide on bismuth oxide were synthesized with two coating reactors in series and showed similar film growth rates.

  19. Nonequilibrium radiative properties in fluctuating plasmas1

    Rosmej, F. B., E-mail: frank.rosmej@upmc.fr [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, LULI, UMR 7605, Sorbonne Universites (France); Lisitsa, V. S. [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

    2011-06-15

    A general kinetic model was developed to simulate the radiative properties of nonstationary fluctuating plasmas and characterize the relationship between the nonstationary fluctuation time and the atomic relaxation times. The developed theory is applied to the radiative line emission in the case of instabilities in tokamaks. It is shown by exact time dependent simulations that involve explicitly LSJ-split excited states that the radiation emission in fluctuating plasma can be larger than in the corresponding stationary limits. For regular fluctuations like the sawtooth activity, also the startup phase of sawtooth activity can lead to higher emission compared to the time dependent regular phase. It is demonstrated that the sawtooth crash can be almost exactly followed by resonance line emission like H-like Lyman-alpha and He-like Helium-alpha of, e.g., argon impurity ions, whereas the effective charge state distribution lags seriously behind.

  20. Core Muscle Activation in One-Armed and Two-Armed Kettlebell Swing.

    Andersen, Vidar; Fimland, Marius S; Gunnarskog, Aril; Jungård, Georg-Andrè; Slåttland, Roy-Andrè; Vraalsen, Øyvind F; Saeterbakken, Atle H

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the electromyographic activity of rectus abdominis, oblique external, and lower and upper erector spinae at both sides of the truncus in 1-armed and 2-armed kettlebell swing. Sixteen healthy men performed 10 repetitions of both exercises using a 16-kg kettlebell in randomized order. For the upper erector spinae, the activation of the contralateral side during 1-armed swing was 24% greater than that of the ipsilateral side during 1-armed swing (p kettlebell swing with 1 arm resulted in greater neuromuscular activity for the contralateral side of the upper erector spinae and ipsilateral side of the rectus abdominis, and lower activation of the opposite side of the respective muscles. PMID:26473519

  1. The 3' region of the chicken hypersensitive site-4 insulator has properties similar to its core and is required for full insulator activity.

    Arumugam, Paritha I; Urbinati, Fabrizia; Velu, Chinavenmeni S; Higashimoto, Tomoyasu; Grimes, H Leighton; Malik, Punam

    2009-01-01

    Chromatin insulators separate active transcriptional domains and block the spread of heterochromatin in the genome. Studies on the chicken hypersensitive site-4 (cHS4) element, a prototypic insulator, have identified CTCF and USF-1/2 motifs in the proximal 250 bp of cHS4, termed the "core", which provide enhancer blocking activity and reduce position effects. However, the core alone does not insulate viral vectors effectively. The full-length cHS4 has excellent insulating properties, but its large size severely compromises vector titers. We performed a structure-function analysis of cHS4 flanking lentivirus-vectors and analyzed transgene expression in the clonal progeny of hematopoietic stem cells and epigenetic changes in cHS4 and the transgene promoter. We found that the core only reduced the clonal variegation in expression. Unique insulator activity resided in the distal 400 bp cHS4 sequences, which when combined with the core, restored full insulator activity and open chromatin marks over the transgene promoter and the insulator. These data consolidate the known insulating activity of the canonical 5' core with a novel 3' 400 bp element with properties similar to the core. Together, they have excellent insulating properties and viral titers. Our data have important implications in understanding the molecular basis of insulator function and design of gene therapy vectors. PMID:19746166

  2. The 3' region of the chicken hypersensitive site-4 insulator has properties similar to its core and is required for full insulator activity.

    Paritha I Arumugam

    Full Text Available Chromatin insulators separate active transcriptional domains and block the spread of heterochromatin in the genome. Studies on the chicken hypersensitive site-4 (cHS4 element, a prototypic insulator, have identified CTCF and USF-1/2 motifs in the proximal 250 bp of cHS4, termed the "core", which provide enhancer blocking activity and reduce position effects. However, the core alone does not insulate viral vectors effectively. The full-length cHS4 has excellent insulating properties, but its large size severely compromises vector titers. We performed a structure-function analysis of cHS4 flanking lentivirus-vectors and analyzed transgene expression in the clonal progeny of hematopoietic stem cells and epigenetic changes in cHS4 and the transgene promoter. We found that the core only reduced the clonal variegation in expression. Unique insulator activity resided in the distal 400 bp cHS4 sequences, which when combined with the core, restored full insulator activity and open chromatin marks over the transgene promoter and the insulator. These data consolidate the known insulating activity of the canonical 5' core with a novel 3' 400 bp element with properties similar to the core. Together, they have excellent insulating properties and viral titers. Our data have important implications in understanding the molecular basis of insulator function and design of gene therapy vectors.

  3. Fluctuation theorems for a molecular refrigerator.

    Kim, Kyung Hyuk; Qian, Hong

    2007-02-01

    We extend fluctuation theorems to a molecular refrigeration system that consists of Brownian particles in a heat bath under feedback control of their velocities. Such control can actively remove heat from the bath due to an entropy-pumping mechanism [Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 120602 (2004)]. The presence of entropy pumping in an underdamped Brownian system modifies both the Jarzynski equality and the fluctuation theorems. We discover that the entropy pumping has a dual role of work and heat. PMID:17358382

  4. Asset Price Fluctuation and Price Indices

    Shiratsuka, Shigenori

    1999-01-01

    Since the late 1980s, the Japanese economy has experienced tremendous rise and fall of asset prices and large fluctuations of real economic activity, while the general price level has remained relatively stable. Such developments have raised the question of whether monetary policy should target asset prices rather than conventional price indices. This paper focuses on how to make use of information inherent with asset price fluctuations in the monetary policy judgment. To this end, it investi...

  5. Determination of representative nitrogen contents for the activity calculation of core components with respect to the C-14 activity

    Kruse, Philipp [GNS Gesellschaft fuer Nuklear-Service mbH, Essen (Germany); Huettner, Frank [Vattenfall Europe Nuclear, Hamburg (Germany); Phlippen, Peter-Wilhelm [WTI GmbH, Juelich (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    For the final repository Konrad during operating and decommissioning phase, ten radionuclides and two radionuclide groups are restricted regarding their maximum storable activity quantities. One of the ten relevant radionuclides is C-14. The determination of the C-14 activities within activation calculations is currently performed with conservative assumptions. With the results of the presented analysis a method for a realistic determination of representative C-14 contents of irradiated steels is available now. The relevant N-14 contents as a source for the C-14 amount are lower than previously estimated.

  6. Pairing fluctuations in cuprate superconductors: Universal properties and trends

    The effects of thermal pairing fluctuations on the phase transition in extreme type 2 superconductors with pronounced uniaxial anisotropy are examined in zero magnetic field. Approaching Tc from below, there is the crossover from quasi-two-dimensional to three-dimensional xy-behavior, which belongs to the universality class of an uncharged superfluid. Because phase fluctuations destroy long-range order in strictly two-dimensional systems the fluctuation dominated regime is rather large. Approaching from above, the same crossover occurs, but in this regime the fluctuations in the magnitude of the pairing field dominate. Using the Gaussian approximation the authors obtain the relevant correlation lengths and show the importance of fluctuations and anisotropy. Invoking the universal properties of the xy-critical point the authors sketch various consequences of thermal fluctuations and review the experimental evidence of fluctuation effects. The primary focus is on the resulting universal properties in clean systems. The estimates for the correlation volumes and lengths of phase and amplitude fluctuations in the pair field are comparable to those in superfluid helium and clearly reveal the importance of fluctuations in cuprate superconductors and the inadequacy of mean-field treatments. Guided by the strong pairing fluctuations they explore the compatibility of Bose-Einstein condensation of hard-core Bosons on a lattice with the empirical trends in various properties of cuprate superconductors. The dependencies of zero-temperature London penetration depth, hole concentration, isotope and pressure coefficients turn out to be in remarkable agreement with the corresponding empirical trends

  7. The shifting study of the active core or a VHTR based on the TRISO packing fraction changing

    Silva, F.C.; Pereira, C.; Veloso, M.A.F., E-mail: claubia@nuclear.ufmg.br, E-mail: antonella@nuclear.ufmg.br, E-mail: dora@nuclear.ufmg.br [Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear. Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Costa, A.L. [Instituto Nacional de Ciencias e Tecnologia de Reatores Nucleares Inovadores (CNPq), Brasilia, DF (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    A simplified VHTR core was analyzed, loaded with a fuel mixture of uranium oxide together with reprocessed transuranic nuclides. The TRUs were reprocessed together with Pu, Am, Np and Cm (23.80%) from PWR spent fuel, and dissolved in depleted uranium (0.2% {sup 235}U) until obtain 15% LEU-fuel ({sup 235}U, {sup 239}Pu and {sup 241}Pu). The shifting study of the active core was based on changes in the TRISO particle. Five cases were analyzed changing the VM/VF ratio (moderator volume/ fuel volume) making changes in the TRISO packing fraction (tpf), where tpf represents the ratio of TRISO particle on the fuel pin. The fuels were evaluated during the burnup up to 100,000.0 MWd/THM, during 990 days and without reloads. Then, it evaluated the multiplication (k{sub eff}) at zero and full power, fuel temperature coefficient ({alpha}{sub TF}), moderator temperature coefficient ({alpha}{sub TM}), and fuel composition at BOL (begin of life) and EOL (end of life), using the code Winfrith Improved Multi-Group Scheme (WIMSD5). The results show an overall heavy metal decrease in relation to the total TRU, with some Pu and Np being transmuted in the VHTR core. The results also clearly show the advantage of using reprocessed fuel in VHTR. It decreases the impact of the final spent fuel deposition, minimizes the cost of new fuel using reprocessed fuel and depleted uranium and demonstrated the promising neutronic behavior of the new types of nuclear reactors. (author)

  8. Assessing Physical Activity as a Core Component in Cardiac Rehabilitation: A POSITION STATEMENT OF THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CARDIOVASCULAR AND PULMONARY REHABILITATION.

    Kaminsky, Leonard A; Brubaker, Peter H; Guazzi, Marco; Lavie, Carl J; Montoye, Alexander H K; Sanderson, Bonnie K; Savage, Patrick D

    2016-01-01

    Physical inactivity is a well-established major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. As such, physical activity counseling is 1 of the 10 core components of cardiac rehabilitation/secondary prevention programs recommended by the American Heart Association and the American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation (AACVPR). In addition, the ability to perform a physical activity assessment and report outcomes is 1 of the 10 core competencies of cardiac rehabilitation/secondary prevention professionals published by the AACVPR. Unfortunately, standardized procedures for physical activity assessment of cardiac rehabilitation patients have not been developed and published. Thus, the objective of this AACVPR statement is to provide an overview of physical activity assessment concepts and procedures and to provide a recommended approach for performing a standardized assessment of physical activity in all comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation programs following the core components recommendations. PMID:27307067

  9. 40 CFR 35.6225 - Activities eligible for funding under Core Program Cooperative Agreements.

    2010-07-01

    ... section: (1) Procedures for emergency response actions and longer-term remediation of environmental and... interaction in CERCLA implementation (including but not limited to general program management and supervision necessary for a recipient to implement CERCLA activities, and interagency coordination on all phases...

  10. Constitutively expressed ERF-VII transcription factors redundantly activate the core anaerobic response in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Bui, Liem T; Giuntoli, Beatrice; Kosmacz, Monika; Parlanti, Sandro; Licausi, Francesco

    2015-07-01

    Plant adaptation to hypoxic conditions is mediated by the transcriptional activation of genes involved in the metabolic reprogramming of plant cells to cope with reduced oxygen availability. Recent studies indicated that members of the group VII of the Ethylene Responsive Transcription Factor (ERFs) family act as positive regulators of this molecular response. In the current study, the five ERF-VII transcription factors of Arabidopsis thaliana were compared to infer a hierarchy in their role with respect to the anaerobic response. When the activity of each transcription factor was tested on a set of hypoxia-responsive promoters, RAP2.2, RAP2.3 and RAP2.12 appeared to be the most powerful activators. RAP2.12 was further dissected in transactivation assays in Arabidopsis protoplasts to identify responsible regions for transcriptional activation. An ultimate C-terminal motif was identified as sufficient to drive gene transcription. Finally, using realtime RT-PCR in single and double mutants for the corresponding genes, we confirmed that RAP2.2 and RAP2.12 exert major control upon the anaerobic response. PMID:26025519

  11. Modulation of muscle metaboreceptor activation upon sweating and cutaneous vascular responses to rising core temperature in humans.

    Amano, Tatsuro; Ichinose, Masashi; Inoue, Yoshimitsu; Nishiyasu, Takeshi; Koga, Shunsaku; Kondo, Narihiko

    2015-06-15

    The present study investigated the role of muscle metaboreceptor activation on human thermoregulation by measuring core temperature thresholds and slopes for sweating and cutaneous vascular responses during passive heating associated with central and peripheral mechanisms. Six male and eight female subjects inserted their lower legs into hot water (43°C) while wearing a water perfusion suit on the upper body (34°C). One minute after immersion, an isometric handgrip exercise--40% of maximum voluntary contraction-was conducted for 1.5 min in both control and experimental conditions, while postexercise occlusion was performed in the experimental condition only for 9 min. The postexercise forearm occlusion during passive heating consistently stimulated muscle metaboreceptors, as implicated by significantly elevated mean arterial blood pressure throughout the experimental period (P forearm muscle metaboreceptors increased sweating and cutaneous vascular responses during passive heating, and was associated with significant reductions in esophageal temperature threshold of sweating and cutaneous vasodilation (Δ threshold, sweating: 0.33 ± 0.05 and 0.16 ± 0.04°C, cutaneous vascular conductance: 0.38 ± 0.08 and 0.16 ± 0.05°C for control and experimental groups, respectively, P forearm accelerates sweating and cutaneous vasodilation during passive heating associated with a reduction in core temperature thresholds and may be related to central mechanisms controlling heat loss responses. PMID:25855304

  12. Ag@AgI, core@shell structure in agarose matrix as hybrid: synthesis, characterization, and antimicrobial activity.

    Ghosh, Somnath; Saraswathi, A; Indi, S S; Hoti, S L; Vasan, H N

    2012-06-01

    A novel in situ core@shell structure consisting of nanoparticles of Ag (Ag Nps) and AgI in agarose matrix (Ag@AgI/agarose) has been synthesized as a hybrid, in order to have an efficient antibacterial agent for repetitive usage with no toxicity. The synthesized core@shell structure is very well characterized by XRD, UV-visible, photoluminescence, and TEM. A detailed antibacterial studies including repetitive cycles are carried out on Gram-negative Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) bacteria in saline water, both in dark and on exposure to visible light. The hybrid could be recycled for the antibacterial activity and is nontoxic toward human cervical cancer cells (HeLa cells). The water insoluble Ag@AgI in agarose matrix forms a good coating on quartz, having good mechanical strength. EPR and TEM studies are carried out on the Ag@AgI/agarose and the bacteria, respectively, to elucidate a possible mechanism for killing of the bacteria. PMID:22582868

  13. Spin fluctuations and the

    V.M. Loktev

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available We analyze the spectral properties of a phenomenological model for a weakly doped two-dimensional antiferromagnet, in which the carriers move within one of the two sublattices where they were introduced. Such a constraint results in the free carrier spectra with the maxima at k=(± π/2 , ± π/2 observed in some cuprates. We consider the spectral properties of the model by taking into account fluctuations of the spins in the antiferromagnetic background. We show that such fluctuations lead to a non-pole-like structure of the single-hole Green's function and these fluctuations can be responsible for some anomalous "strange metal" properties of underdoped cuprates in the nonsuperconducting regime.

  14. The 20S proteasome core, active within apoptotic exosome-like vesicles, induces autoantibody production and accelerates rejection.

    Dieudé, Mélanie; Bell, Christina; Turgeon, Julie; Beillevaire, Deborah; Pomerleau, Luc; Yang, Bing; Hamelin, Katia; Qi, Shijie; Pallet, Nicolas; Béland, Chanel; Dhahri, Wahiba; Cailhier, Jean-François; Rousseau, Matthieu; Duchez, Anne-Claire; Lévesque, Tania; Lau, Arthur; Rondeau, Christiane; Gingras, Diane; Muruve, Danie; Rivard, Alain; Cardinal, Héloise; Perreault, Claude; Desjardins, Michel; Boilard, Éric; Thibault, Pierre; Hébert, Marie-Josée

    2015-12-16

    Autoantibodies to components of apoptotic cells, such as anti-perlecan antibodies, contribute to rejection in organ transplant recipients. However, mechanisms of immunization to apoptotic components remain largely uncharacterized. We used large-scale proteomics, with validation by electron microscopy and biochemical methods, to compare the protein profiles of apoptotic bodies and apoptotic exosome-like vesicles, smaller extracellular vesicles released by endothelial cells downstream of caspase-3 activation. We identified apoptotic exosome-like vesicles as a central trigger for production of anti-perlecan antibodies and acceleration of rejection. Unlike apoptotic bodies, apoptotic exosome-like vesicles triggered the production of anti-perlecan antibodies in naïve mice and enhanced anti-perlecan antibody production and allograft inflammation in mice transplanted with an MHC (major histocompatibility complex)-incompatible aortic graft. The 20S proteasome core was active within apoptotic exosome-like vesicles and controlled their immunogenic activity. Finally, we showed that proteasome activity in circulating exosome-like vesicles increased after vascular injury in mice. These findings open new avenues for predicting and controlling maladaptive humoral responses to apoptotic cell components that enhance the risk of rejection after transplantation. PMID:26676607

  15. Intentional activity and free will as core concepts in criminal law and psychology

    Bertelsen, Preben

    2012-01-01

    Whether or not intentional actions initiated and formed by free will exist, it can be shown that lack of belief in such behavior makes people behave less ethically and less law-abidingly (they cheat more). Therefore, this phenomenon—often called a necessary illusion—is crucial to moral as well as...... legal social-life-forming activities. However, societal coherence based on this kind of illusion is indeed very fragile, and thus we would be better off if we could prove that the quality of free will in intentional activity is more than a convenient illusion. This article presents an interdisciplinary...... model within the domain of criminal law and psychology explaining human intentional actions based on a scientific notion of free will as a real-world phenomenon....

  16. The fluctuating gap model

    Cao, Xiaobin

    2011-01-15

    The quasi-one-dimensional systems exhibit some unusual phenomenon, such as the Peierls instability, the pseudogap phenomena and the absence of a Fermi-Dirac distribution function line shape in the photoemission spectroscopy. Ever since the discovery of materials with highly anisotropic properties, it has been recognized that fluctuations play an important role above the three-dimensional phase transition. This regime where the precursor fluctuations are presented can be described by the so called fluctuating gap model (FGM) which was derived from the Froehlich Hamiltonian to study the low energy physics of the one-dimensional electron-phonon system. Not only is the FGM of great interest in the context of quasi-one-dimensional materials, liquid metal and spin waves above T{sub c} in ferromagnets, but also in the semiclassical approximation of superconductivity, it is possible to replace the original three-dimensional problem by a directional average over effectively one-dimensional problem which in the weak coupling limit is described by the FGM. In this work, we investigate the FGM in a wide temperature range with different statistics of the order parameter fluctuations. We derive a formally exact solution to this problem and calculate the density of states, the spectral function and the optical conductivity. In our calculation, we show that a Dyson singularity appears in the low energy density of states for Gaussian fluctuations in the commensurate case. In the incommensurate case, there is no such kind of singularity, and the zero frequency density of states varies differently as a function of the correlation lengths for different statistics of the order parameter fluctuations. Using the density of states we calculated with non-Gaussian order parameter fluctuations, we are able to calculate the static spin susceptibility which agrees with the experimental data very well. In the calculation of the spectral functions, we show that as the correlation increases, the

  17. The fluctuating gap model

    The quasi-one-dimensional systems exhibit some unusual phenomenon, such as the Peierls instability, the pseudogap phenomena and the absence of a Fermi-Dirac distribution function line shape in the photoemission spectroscopy. Ever since the discovery of materials with highly anisotropic properties, it has been recognized that fluctuations play an important role above the three-dimensional phase transition. This regime where the precursor fluctuations are presented can be described by the so called fluctuating gap model (FGM) which was derived from the Froehlich Hamiltonian to study the low energy physics of the one-dimensional electron-phonon system. Not only is the FGM of great interest in the context of quasi-one-dimensional materials, liquid metal and spin waves above Tc in ferromagnets, but also in the semiclassical approximation of superconductivity, it is possible to replace the original three-dimensional problem by a directional average over effectively one-dimensional problem which in the weak coupling limit is described by the FGM. In this work, we investigate the FGM in a wide temperature range with different statistics of the order parameter fluctuations. We derive a formally exact solution to this problem and calculate the density of states, the spectral function and the optical conductivity. In our calculation, we show that a Dyson singularity appears in the low energy density of states for Gaussian fluctuations in the commensurate case. In the incommensurate case, there is no such kind of singularity, and the zero frequency density of states varies differently as a function of the correlation lengths for different statistics of the order parameter fluctuations. Using the density of states we calculated with non-Gaussian order parameter fluctuations, we are able to calculate the static spin susceptibility which agrees with the experimental data very well. In the calculation of the spectral functions, we show that as the correlation increases, the quasi

  18. Health physics activities in support of the thermal shield removal/disposal and core support barrel repair at the St. Lucie Nuclear Power Plant

    The health physics activities related to the removal and disposal of a thermal shield at a nuclear power plant and subsequent repairs to the core support barrel required increased planning relative to a normal refueling/maintenance outage. The repair of the core support barrel was a first in the nuclear power industry. Pre-job planning was of great concern because of extremely high radiation levels associated with the irradiated stainless steel thermal shield and core support barrel. ALARA techniques used in the preparation of the thermal shield for removal and shipment to the disposal site are discussed

  19. Prospects and limitations of digital Shearography and Active Thermography in finding and rating flaws in CFRP sandwich parts with honeycomb core

    Gruber, J.; Mayr, G.; Hendorfer, G.

    2012-05-01

    This work shows the prospects and limitations of the non-destructive testing methods Digital Shearography and Active Thermography when applied to CFRP sandwich parts with honeycomb cores. Two specimens with different core materials (aluminum, NOMEX) and artificial flaws such as delaminations, disbonds and inclusions of foreign material, are tested with Digital Shearography and Pulse Thermography including Pulse Phase Thermography. Both methods provide a good ability for finding and rating the flaws.

  20. Advantage of use of activated flux-cored wire instead of solid wire with the mag welding process from the mechanical properties aspect

    N. Bajić; D. Bajić; D. Veljić; Rakin, M.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this paper is the analysis and evaluation of the quality of the new flux-cored wire designed for the MAG welding process that was developed and produced using special laboratory equipment. Experimental welding was performed with the new activated flux-cored wire and classic solid wire with changing of welding parameters and shielding gas composition (100 % CO2 and gas mixtures of Ar + CO2 + O2 ).

  1. Studies on the antioxidant activity of some thiazolidinedione, imidazolidinedione and rhodanine derivatives having a flavone core.

    Berczyński, Paweł; Kładna, Aleksandra; Piechowska, Teresa; Kruk, Irena; Bozdağ-Dündar, Oya; Aboul-Enein, Hassan Y; Ceylan-Unlusoy, Meltem; Ertan, Rahmiye

    2014-12-01

    A series of flavonyl-2,4-thiazolidinedione, imidazolidinedione and rhodanine derivatives were tested for their antioxidant activity as scavengers of oxygen free radicals. Free radical scavenging activities, including superoxide anion radical O2•, hydroxyl radical (HO(•)) and 2,2'-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl free radical have been evaluated using chemiluminescence, electron paramagnetic resonance and spin trapping with 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-1-oxide as a spin trap. Potassium superoxide in dimethylsulfoxide and 18-crown-6 ether were used for the production of O2•. Hydroxyl radical was generated using the Fenton reaction. Ten of the eleven examined compounds exhibited decrease in chemiluminescence, but there were large differences in the decrease, ranging from 16% to 89%; also, two of these compounds increased light emission by about 200%. On the contrary, all compounds tested exhibited 30-68% scavenging HO(•) and 25-96% scavenging the DPPH(•) radical respectively. Possible mechanisms are proposed to explain the results. PMID:24733694

  2. Effects of phase transition induced density fluctuations on pulsar dynamics

    Partha Bagchi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We show that density fluctuations during phase transitions in pulsar cores may have non-trivial effects on pulsar timings, and may also possibly account for glitches and anti-glitches. These density fluctuations invariably lead to non-zero off-diagonal components of the moment of inertia, leading to transient wobbling of star. Thus, accurate measurements of pulsar timing and intensity modulations (from wobbling may be used to identify the specific pattern of density fluctuations, hence the particular phase transition, occurring inside the pulsar core. Changes in quadrupole moment from rapidly evolving density fluctuations during the transition, with very short time scales, may provide a new source for gravitational waves.

  3. Short Wavelength Fluctuations and Electron Transport in TFTR

    Correlation between electron heat diffusivity and short wavelength (kri ∼ 5) fluctuation amplitude was observed in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) tokamak in the core of enhanced reversed shear (ERS) plasmas [1]. These fluctuations propagate in the ion diamagnetic drift direction with wave number comparable to wpe/c. Further analysis of these data yields the ratios ce/ci and ce/De, and their values are consistent with the picture that the electron transport is mainly induced by the short wavelength fluctuations in the plasma core where the long wavelength (kri approximately 1) fluctuations are absent. Although there is not enough information to identify these short wavelength modes, the values of ce is found to be comparable to theoretical predictions based on the current diffusive ballooning mode theory [2

  4. Proteomics Core

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Proteomics Core is the central resource for mass spectrometry based proteomics within the NHLBI. The Core staff help collaborators design proteomics experiments in...

  5. High Antimicrobial Activity and Low Human Cell Cytotoxicity of Core-Shell Magnetic Nanoparticles Functionalized with an Antimicrobial Peptide.

    Maleki, Hajar; Rai, Akhilesh; Pinto, Sandra; Evangelista, Marta; Cardoso, Renato M S; Paulo, Cristiana; Carvalheiro, Tiago; Paiva, Artur; Imani, Mohammad; Simchi, Abdolreza; Durães, Luísa; Portugal, António; Ferreira, Lino

    2016-05-11

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) functionalized with antimicrobial agents are promising infection-targeted therapeutic platforms when coupled with external magnetic stimuli. These antimicrobial nanoparticles (NPs) may offer advantages in fighting intracellular pathogens as well as biomaterial-associated infections. This requires the development of NPs with high antimicrobial activity without interfering with the biology of mammalian cells. Here, we report the preparation of biocompatible antimicrobial SPION@gold core-shell NPs based on covalent immobilization of the antimicrobial peptide (AMP) cecropin melittin (CM) (the conjugate is named AMP-NP). The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the AMP-NP for Escherichia coli was 0.4 μg/mL, 10-times lower than the MIC of soluble CM. The antimicrobial activity of CM depends on the length of the spacer between the CM and the NP. AMP-NPs are taken up by endothelial (between 60 and 170 pg of NPs per cell) and macrophage (between 18 and 36 pg of NPs per cell) cells and accumulate preferentially in endolysosomes. These NPs have no significant cytotoxic and pro-inflammatory activities for concentrations up to 200 μg/mL (at least 100 times higher than the MIC of soluble CM). Our results in membrane models suggest that the selectivity of AMP-NPs for bacteria and not eukaryotic membranes is due to their membrane compositions. The AMP-NPs developed here open new opportunities for infection-site targeting. PMID:27074633

  6. A Conserved GPG-Motif in the HIV-1 Nef Core Is Required for Principal Nef-Activities.

    Marta Martínez-Bonet

    Full Text Available To find out new determinants required for Nef activity we performed a functional alanine scanning analysis along a discrete but highly conserved region at the core of HIV-1 Nef. We identified the GPG-motif, located at the 121-137 region of HIV-1 NL4.3 Nef, as a novel protein signature strictly required for the p56Lck dependent Nef-induced CD4-downregulation in T-cells. Since the Nef-GPG motif was dispensable for CD4-downregulation in HeLa-CD4 cells, Nef/AP-1 interaction and Nef-dependent effects on Tf-R trafficking, the observed effects on CD4 downregulation cannot be attributed to structure constraints or to alterations on general protein trafficking. Besides, we found that the GPG-motif was also required for Nef-dependent inhibition of ring actin re-organization upon TCR triggering and MHCI downregulation, suggesting that the GPG-motif could actively cooperate with the Nef PxxP motif for these HIV-1 Nef-related effects. Finally, we observed that the Nef-GPG motif was required for optimal infectivity of those viruses produced in T-cells. According to these findings, we propose the conserved GPG-motif in HIV-1 Nef as functional region required for HIV-1 infectivity and therefore with a potential interest for the interference of Nef activity during HIV-1 infection.

  7. Fluctuations in the multifragmentation

    The method of scaled factorial moments, which measure dynamical fluctuations without the influence of Poissonian noise, is presented. Its application for the analysis of the multiparticle (multifragment) densities at small scales is also discussed. (K.A.) 39 refs., 5 figs

  8. FLUCTUATION RESULTS FRO PHENIX.

    MITCHELL, J.T.

    2005-04-21

    The PHENIX Experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider has made measurements of event-by-event fluctuations in the net charge, the mean transverse momentum, and the charged particle multiplicity as a function of collision energy, centrality, and transverse momentum in heavy ion collisions. The results of these measurements will be reviewed and discussed.

  9. Diagnostics for fluctuation measurements

    Donne, A. J. H.

    2000-01-01

    Transport of particles and heat in magnetic confinement devices is largely attributed to the presence of microscopic instabilities. To better understand the physical mechanisms underlying plasma transport processes it is necessary to diagnose the fluctuations in the various quantities along with the

  10. Monster Sawtooth Activity in Ohmically Heated HT-7 Plasma

    胡立群; 石跃江; 刘胜侠

    2001-01-01

    Experimental properties of monster sawtooth activities in ohmic HT-7 plasma are presented in this paper. The monster sawtooth activities belong to global fluctuations and are characterized with a series of large core collapses on SXR intensity traces with a long period, a large amplitude fluctuation and a large inversion radius. However, they emerge without apparent deterioration of plasma confinement and without major plasma disruption. During the events,long partial sawtooth collapses and abundant MHD phenomena are also observed.

  11. "Hot" Non-flaring Plasmas in Active Region Cores Heated by Single Nanoflares

    Barnes, Will Thomas; Cargill, Peter; Bradshaw, Stephen

    2016-05-01

    We use hydrodynamic modeling tools, including a two-fluid development of the EBTEL code, to investigate the properties expected of "hot" (i.e. between 106.7 and 107.2 K) non-flaring plasmas due to nanoflare heating in active regions. Here we focus on single nanoflares and show that while simple models predict an emission measure distribution extending well above 10 MK that is consistent with cooling by thermal conduction, many other effects are likely to limit the existence and detectability of such plasmas. These include: differential heating between electrons and ions, ionization non-equilibrium and, for short nanoflares, the time taken for the coronal density to increase. The most useful temperature range to look for this plasma, often called the "smoking gun" of nanoflare heating, lies between 1 MK and 10 MK. Signatures of the actual heating may be detectable in some instances.

  12. Active Sites Implanted Carbon Cages in Core-Shell Architecture: Highly Active and Durable Electrocatalyst for Hydrogen Evolution Reaction.

    Zhang, Huabin; Ma, Zuju; Duan, Jingjing; Liu, Huimin; Liu, Guigao; Wang, Tao; Chang, Kun; Li, Mu; Shi, Li; Meng, Xianguang; Wu, Kechen; Ye, Jinhua

    2016-01-26

    Low efficiency and poor stability are two major challenges we encounter in the exploration of non-noble metal electrocatalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) in both acidic and alkaline environment. Herein, the hybrid of cobalt encapsulated by N, B codoped ultrathin carbon cages (Co@BCN) is first introduced as a highly active and durable nonprecious metal electrocatalysts for HER, which is constructed by a bottom-up approach using metal organic frameworks (MOFs) as precursor and self-sacrificing template. The optimized catalyst exhibited remarkable electrocatalytic performance for hydrogen production from both both acidic and alkaline media. Stability investigation reveals the overcoating of carbon cages can effectively avoid the corrosion and oxidation of the catalyst under extreme acidic and alkaline environment. Electrochemical active surface area (EASA) evaluation and density functional theory (DFT) calculations revealed that the synergetic effect between the encapsulated cobalt nanoparticle and the N, B codoped carbon shell played the fundamental role in the superior HER catalytic performance. PMID:26649629

  13. THE IMPLICATIONS OF MARKETING ACTIVITY IN RISK ANALYSIS, CORE ELEMENT OF LENDING POLICY TO COMMERCIAL BANKS

    Magda Florin-Mihai

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In the present financial context first affected by the lack of trust generated by the important bankruptcies in the USA and secondly by the global economic crisis, financial institutions are more than ever focused on applying market research, customer segmentation procedures and based upon them adapted credit strategies. The process is based on the fundaments of the marketing mix, much more carefully than before in order to maximize efficiency and market position or to consolidate, increase market share by taking advantage of opportunities or diminishing the effects of the present unfavorable economic climate. Analysis procedures based on differential risk models can be identified, the starting point being precisely the involvement of marketing by the market segmentation process and the concepts of “customer centricity” and “client relationship management”, specific credit policies being based upon them. The present paper intends to bring forth the client segmentation criteria practiced by top Romanian commercial banks, as the right segmentation process will reflect on the typology of financing over time. Furthermore, client segmentation tends to influence banking management in order to administer the risks arising from the credit activities, as it is in strict connection to the elements and processes involved in determining a correct rating of the applicants for funding.

  14. Ionospheric anomaly due to seismic activities-III: correlation between night time VLF amplitude fluctuations and effective magnitudes of earthquakes in Indian sub-continent

    Ray, S.; Chakrabarti, S. K.; S. K. Mondal; Sasmal, S.

    2011-01-01

    We present the results of an analysis of year-long (2007) monitoring of night time data of the VLF signal amplitude from the Indian Navy station VTX at 18.2 kHz, received by the Indian Centre for Space Physics, Kolkata. We analyzed this data to find out the correlation, if any, between night time amplitude fluctuation and seismic events. We found, analyzing individual cases (with magnitudes >5) as well as statistical analysis (of all the events with effective magnitudes greater than 3.5), ...

  15. Fluctuating Potential Barrier System with Correlated Spatial Noises

    LI Jing-Hui

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we study a fluctuating potential barrier system with correlated spatial noises. Study shows that for this system, there is the resonant activation over the fluctuating potential barrier, and that the correlation between the different spatial noises can enhance (or weaken) the resonant activation.

  16. Core area and centre of activity of maned wolves, Chrysocyon brachyurus (Illiger (Mammalia, Canidae, submitted to supplemental feeding

    Joaquim de Araújo Silva

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Based on the finding of remains (tracks, scats, and hairs, an analysis was made of the core area and centre of activity of maned wolves, Chrysocyon brachyurus (Illiger, 1815, living in a private natural reserve in which ecotourism activities are developed and these animals are daily fed bovine meat. A total of 465 samples of remains were recorded. Using the fixed kernel method, the area encompassing all samples recorded was estimated at 25.7 km², yet 50% of all samples were found in an area of only 1.5 km², representing 5.8% of the total area covered. For estimating the core area of the animals, the frequency of occurrence of the samples was determined by superimposing a 50 x 50 m cell grid over a map of the area encompassing all recorded occurrences. Based on the cells containing more than six occurrences, the animals' core area was 0.99 km², which included the place where the animals are fed. The centre of activity was located only 0.50 km from this place. The high negative correlation (r = -0.93, p A área central e o centro de atividade de lobos-guará, Chrysocyon brachyurus (Illiger, 1815, foram determinados através de seus vestígios (fezes, pegadas e pêlos em uma reserva natural particular, onde esses animais estão sujeitos à alimentação artificial e sofrem influência de atividades turísticas. No total, foram registrados 465 vestígios, sendo que 65,8% corresponderam à estação seca. Através do método Kernel fixo, a área compreendida por todos os vestígios foi de 25,7 km², sendo que 50% encontravam-se em uma área de apenas 1,5 km², o que representou 5,8% do total da área amostrada. A área central de atividade dos animais foi obtida pelo cálculo da freqüência dos registros dos vestígios através da sobreposição de uma quadrícula subdividida em células de 50 x 50 m sobre a área que abrangia todos os registros. Considerando as células com mais de seis registros a área central de atividade atribuída aos

  17. Fluctuations in quantum devices

    H.Haken

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Logical gates can be formalized by Boolean algebra whose elementary operations can be realized by devices that employ the interactions of macroscopic numbers of elementary excitations such as electrons, holes, photons etc. With increasing miniaturization to the nano scale and below, quantum fluctuations become important and can no longer be ignored. Based on Heisenberg equations of motion for the creation and annihilation operators of elementary excitations, I determine the noise sources of composite quantum systems.

  18. Fluctuations in quantum devices

    Haken, H.

    2004-01-01

    Logical gates can be formalized by Boolean algebra whose elementary operations can be realized by devices that employ the interactions of macroscopic numbers of elementary excitations such as electrons, holes, photons etc. With increasing miniaturization to the nano scale and below, quantum fluctuations become important and can no longer be ignored. Based on Heisenberg equations of motion for the creation and annihilation operators of elementary excitations, I determine the noise sources of c...

  19. Enhancement of Alkaline Protease Activity and Stability via Covalent Immobilization onto Hollow Core-Mesoporous Shell Silica Nanospheres

    Abdelnasser Salah Shebl Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The stability and reusability of soluble enzymes are of major concerns, which limit their industrial applications. Herein, alkaline protease from Bacillus sp. NPST-AK15 was immobilized onto hollow core-mesoporous shell silica (HCMSS nanospheres. Subsequently, the properties of immobilized proteases were evaluated. Non-, ethane- and amino-functionalized HCMSS nanospheres were synthesized and characterized. NPST-AK15 was immobilized onto the synthesized nano-supports by physical and covalent immobilization approaches. However, protease immobilization by covalent attachment onto the activated HCMSS–NH2 nanospheres showed highest immobilization yield (75.6% and loading capacity (88.1 μg protein/mg carrier and was applied in the further studies. In comparison to free enzyme, the covalently immobilized protease exhibited a slight shift in the optimal pH from 10.5 to 11.0, respectively. The optimum temperature for catalytic activity of both free and immobilized enzyme was seen at 60 °C. However, while the free enzyme was completely inactivated when treated at 60 °C for 1 h the immobilized enzyme still retained 63.6% of its initial activity. The immobilized protease showed higher Vmax, kcat and kcat/Km, than soluble enzyme by 1.6-, 1.6- and 2.4-fold, respectively. In addition, the immobilized protease affinity to the substrate increased by about 1.5-fold. Furthermore, the enzyme stability in various organic solvents was significantly enhanced upon immobilization. Interestingly, the immobilized enzyme exhibited much higher stability in several commercial detergents including OMO, Tide, Ariel, Bonux and Xra by up to 5.2-fold. Finally, the immobilized protease maintained significant catalytic efficiency for twelve consecutive reaction cycles. These results suggest the effectiveness of the developed nanobiocatalyst as a candidate for detergent formulation and peptide synthesis in non-aqueous media.

  20. Hydrodynamics, flow, and flow fluctuations

    The matter formed in heavy-ion collisions has been shown to interact so strongly that it behaves like a relativistic fluid during its expansion. I show that initial-state fluctuations, due to the nucleonic structure of incoming nuclei, have a large effect of flow observables. I argue that these fluctuations do not reduce to eccentricity fluctuations. (author)

  1. A new method based on low background instrumental neutron activation analysis for major, trace and ultra-trace element determination in atmospheric mineral dust from polar ice cores.

    Baccolo, Giovanni; Clemenza, Massimiliano; Delmonte, Barbara; Maffezzoli, Niccolò; Nastasi, Massimiliano; Previtali, Ezio; Prata, Michele; Salvini, Andrea; Maggi, Valter

    2016-05-30

    Dust found in polar ice core samples present extremely low concentrations, in addition the availability of such samples is usually strictly limited. For these reasons the chemical and physical analysis of polar ice cores is an analytical challenge. In this work a new method based on low background instrumental neutron activation analysis (LB-INAA) for the multi-elemental characterization of the insoluble fraction of dust from polar ice cores is presented. Thanks to an accurate selection of the most proper materials and procedures it was possible to reach unprecedented analytical performances, suitable for ice core analyses. The method was applied to Antarctic ice core samples. Five samples of atmospheric dust (μg size) from ice sections of the Antarctic Talos Dome ice core were prepared and analyzed. A set of 37 elements was quantified, spanning from all the major elements (Na, Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, Ti, Mn and Fe) to trace ones, including 10 (La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Eu, Tb, Ho, Tm, Yb and Lu) of the 14 natural occurring lanthanides. The detection limits are in the range of 10(-13)-10(-6) g, improving previous results of 1-3 orders of magnitude depending on the element; uncertainties lies between 4% and 60%. PMID:27154827

  2. A Model for Lightcone Fluctuations due to Stress Tensor Fluctuations

    Bessa, C H G; Ford, L H; Ribeiro, C C H

    2016-01-01

    We study a model for quantum lightcone fluctuations in which vacuum fluctuations of the electric field and of the squared electric field in a nonlinear dielectric material produce variations in the flight times of probe pulses. When this material has a non-zero third order polarizability, the flight time variations arise from squared electric field fluctuations, and are analogous to effects expected when the stress tensor of a quantized field drives passive spacetime geometry fluctuations. We also discuss the dependence of the squared electric field fluctuations upon the geometry of the material, which in turn determines a sampling function for averaging the squared electric field along the path of the pulse. This allows us to estimate the probability of especially large fluctuations, which is a measure of the probability distribution for quantum stress tensor fluctuations.

  3. Antiviral Activity of Gold/Copper Sulfide Core/Shell Nanoparticles against Human Norovirus Virus-Like Particles.

    Jessica Jenkins Broglie

    Full Text Available Human norovirus is a leading cause of acute gastroenteritis worldwide in a plethora of residential and commercial settings, including restaurants, schools, and hospitals. Methods for easily detecting the virus and for treating and preventing infection are critical to stopping norovirus outbreaks, and inactivation via nanoparticles (NPs is a more universal and attractive alternative to other physical and chemical approaches. Using norovirus GI.1 (Norwalk virus-like particles (VLPs as a model viral system, this study characterized the antiviral activity of Au/CuS core/shell nanoparticles (NPs against GI.1 VLPs for the rapid inactivation of HuNoV. Inactivation of VLPs (GI.1 by Au/CuS NPs evaluated using an absorbance-based ELISA indicated that treatment with 0.083 μM NPs for 10 min inactivated ~50% VLPs in a 0.37 μg/ml VLP solution and 0.83 μM NPs for 10 min completely inactivated the VLPs. Increasing nanoparticle concentration and/or VLP-NP contact time significantly increased the virucidal efficacy of Au/CuS NPs. Changes to the VLP particle morphology, size, and capsid protein were characterized using dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy, and Western blot analysis. The strategy reported here provides the first reported proof-of-concept Au/CuS NPs-based virucide for rapidly inactivating human norovirus.

  4. Preparation and electrochemical properties of RuO2-containing activated carbon nanofiber composites with hollow cores

    RuO2-containing activated carbon nanofibers with hollow cores (PMRu-ACNFs) are prepared through one-step electrospinning using polyacrylonitrile (PAN), poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), and ruthenium(III) acetylacetonate followed by thermal treatment. The porous PMRu-ACNF composites exhibit an improved morphological structure and textual properties due to the increased surface area, unique nanotexture, and presence of several functional groups such RuO2 in the ACNFs. Electrochemical measurements of PMRu-ACNF reveal a maximum specific capacitance of 180 Fg−1 and high energy densities of 20-14 Whkg−1 in the power density range of 400 to 10,000 W kg−1 in aqueous KOH electrolyte. In contrast, the ACNF electrodes show a lower specific capacitance and the energy density rapidly drops to 2 Whkg−1 at power densities of 4,000 Wkg−1. Therefore, the PMRu-ACNF composite electrodes may be more suitable as supercapacitors than regular ACNFs are, due to the synergistic effect between the electric double-layer capacitance of porous ACNFs and the pseudocapacitance of RuO2

  5. SAS2H input for computing core activities of 4.5, 5.0, and 5.5 weight % 235U fuel for Sequoyah Nuclear Plant

    Sequoyah Nuclear Plant core activities at initial fuel enrichments of 4.5, 5.0, and 5.5 wt% 235U, required in nuclear safety evaluations, were computed by the SAS2H analysis sequence and the ORIGEN-S code within the SCALE-4.2 code system

  6. Scrape-off layer-induced beam density fluctuations and their effect on beam emission spectroscopy

    Moulton, D.; Marandet, Y.; Tamain, P.; Dif-Pradalier, G.

    2015-07-01

    A statistical model is presented to calculate the magnitude of beam density fluctuations generated by a turbulent scrape-off layer (SOL). It is shown that the SOL can induce neutral beam density fluctuations of a similar magnitude to the plasma density fluctuations in the core, potentially corrupting beam emission spectroscopy measurements. The degree of corruption is quantified by combining simulations of beam and plasma density fluctuations inside a simulated measurement window. A change in pitch angle from the separatrix to the measurement window is found to reduce the effect of beam fluctuations, whose largest effect is to significantly reduce the measured correlation time.

  7. A Fluctuating Torque

    Zamorano, Nelson; Gómez, Alfredo

    2013-04-01

    The existence of a fluctuating torque generates a wide variety of possible orbits. This situation contrasts with those examples where the torque vanishes and the angular momentum remains constant. Here we study a two dimensional example with a logarithmic effective potential V(x,y)= 12,,^2o,[ x^2 + (y/b)^2], with a small deviation from the axis symmetry given by the constant b with b propose it as a good pedagogical tool for reviewing the main concepts of newtonian dynamics.

  8. Gambling with Superconducting Fluctuations

    Foltyn, Marek; Zgirski, Maciej

    2015-08-01

    Josephson junctions and superconducting nanowires, when biased close to superconducting critical current, can switch to a nonzero voltage state by thermal or quantum fluctuations. The process is understood as an escape of a Brownian particle from a metastable state. Since this effect is fully stochastic, we propose to use it for generating random numbers. We present protocol for obtaining random numbers and test the experimentally harvested data for their fidelity. Our work is prerequisite for using the Josephson junction as a tool for stochastic (probabilistic) determination of physical parameters such as magnetic flux, temperature, and current.

  9. Fluctuation theorem in spintronics

    Microscopic reversibility is a key in deriving the Onsager relation. It even leads a new exact relationship that would be valid far from equilibrium, called fluctuation theorem (FT). The FT provides a precise statement for the second law of thermodynamics; and remarkably, reproduces the linear response theory. We consider the FT in the spin-dependent transport and derive universal relations among nonlinear spin and charge transport coefficients. We apply the relations to a quantum dot embedded in a two-terminal Aharonov-Bohm interferometer and check that the relations are satisfied.

  10. Post-processor for simulations of the ORIGEN program and calculation of the composition of the activity of a burnt fuel core by a BWR type reactor

    The composition calculation and the activity of nuclear materials subject to processes of burnt, irradiation and decay periods are of utility for diverse activities inside the nuclear industry, as they are it: the processes design and operations that manage radioactive material, the calculation of the inventory and activity of a core of burnt nuclear fuel, for studies of type Probabilistic Safety Analysis (APS), as well as for regulation processes and licensing of nuclear facilities. ORIGEN is a program for computer that calculates the composition and the activity of nuclear materials subject to periods of burnt, irradiation and decay. ORIGEN generates a great quantity of information whose processing and analysis are laborious, and it requires thoroughness to avoid errors. The automation of the extraction, conditioning and classification of that information is of great utility for the analyst. By means of the use of the post-processor presented in this work it is facilitated, it speeds up and wide the capacity of analysis of results, since diverse consultations with several classification options and filtrate of results can be made. As illustration of the utility of the post-processor, and as an analysis of interest for itself, it is also presented in this work the composition of the activity of a burned core in a BWR type reactor according to the following classification criteria: by type of radioisotope (fission products, activation products and actinides), by specie type (gassy, volatile, semi-volatile and not volatile), by element and by chemical group. The results show that the total activity of the studied core is dominated by the fission products and for the actinides, in proportion four to one, and that the gassy and volatile species conform a fifth part of the total activity of the core. (Author)

  11. Constructing a MoS2 QDs/CdS Core/Shell Flowerlike Nanosphere Hierarchical Heterostructure for the Enhanced Stability and Photocatalytic Activity

    Shijing Liang; Zhouming Zhou; Xiuqin Wu; Shuying Zhu; Jinhong Bi; Limin Zhou; Minghua Liu; Ling Wu

    2016-01-01

    MoS2 quantum dots (QDs)/CdS core/shell nanospheres with a hierarchical heterostructure have been prepared by a simple microwave hydrothermal method. The as-prepared samples are characterized by XRD, TEM, SEM, UV-VIS diffuse reflectance spectra (DRS) and N2-sorption in detail. The photocatalytic activities of the samples are evaluated by water splitting into hydrogen. Results show that the as-prepared MoS2 QDs/CdS core/shell nanospheres with a diameter of about 300 nm are composed of the shell...

  12. Fitness in fluctuating environments

    Tanase Nicola, Sorin; Nemenman, Ilya

    2011-03-01

    Often environments change faster than the time needed to evolve optimal phenotypes through cycles of mutation and selection. We focus on this case, but assume that environmental oscillations are slower than an individual's lifetime. This is relevant, for example, for bacterial populations confronted with daily environmental changes. We analyze a resource-limited competition between a mutant phenotype and the ancestor. Environmental dynamics is represented by periodically varying, off-phase parameters of the corresponding Lotka-Volterra model. For the very slow dynamics (but still faster than the fixation time scale) the strength and the sign of selection are functions of the birth/death rates averaged over all of the environmental states and independent of the period of the fluctuations. For faster fluctuations, selection depends on the particular sequence of the successive environmental states. In particular, a time reversal of the environmental dynamics can change the sign of the selection. We conclude that the fittest phenotype in a changing environment can be very different from both the optimal phenotype in the average environment, and the phenotype with the largest average fitness.

  13. Fractal Analysis of River Flow Fluctuations

    Movahed, M S; Hermanis, Evalds

    2006-01-01

    We use some fractal analysis methods to study river flow fluctuations. The result of the Multifractal Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (MF-DFA) shows that there are two crossover timescales in the fluctuation function. We discuss how the existence of the crossover timescales are related to a sinusoidal trend. The first crossover is due to the seasonal trend and the value of second ones is approximately equal to the well known cycle of sun activity. Using Fourier detrended fluctuation analysis, the sinusoidal trend is eliminated. The value of Hurst exponent of the runoff water of rivers without the sinusoidal trend show a long range correlation behavior. For the Daugava river the value of Hurst exponent is $0.52\\pm0.01$ and also we find that these fluctuations have multifractal nature. Comparing the MF-DFA results for the remaining data set of Daugava river to those for shuffled and surrogate series, we conclude that its multifractal nature is almost entirely due to the broadness of probability density function.

  14. Current status of studies on temperature fluctuation phenomena in LMFRs

    This paper describes the current status of studies being performed in PNC on temperature fluctuation phenomena occurring in fast reactors. The studies concentrate on four problems: thermal stratification, thermal striping, core-plenum interaction and free surface sloshing. Both experimental and analytical approaches to reveal these phenomena and to establish design and safety evaluation methods are presented together with future works. (author)

  15. Fluctuations and transport in the TCV scrape-off layer

    Garcia, Odd Erik; Horacek, J.; Pitts, R.A.;

    2007-01-01

    Fluctuations and particle transport in the scrape-off layer of TCV plasmas have been investigated by probe measurements and direct comparison with two-dimensional interchange turbulence simulations at the outer midplane. The experiments demonstrate that with increasing line-averaged core plasma d...

  16. Effect of Silicon on Activity Coefficients of Siderophile Elements (P, Au, Pd, As, Ge, Sb, and In) in Liquid Fe, with Application to Core Formation

    Righter, K.; Pando, K.; Danielson, L. R.; Humayun, M.; Righter, M.; Lapen, T.; Boujibar, A.

    2016-01-01

    Earth's core contains approximately 10 percent light elements that are likely a combination of S, C, Si, and O, with Si possibly being the most abundant. Si dissolved into Fe liquids can have a large effect on the magnitude of the activity coefficient of siderophile elements (SE) in Fe liquids, and thus the partitioning behavior of those elements between core and mantle. The effect of Si can be small such as for Ni and Co, or large such as for Mo, Ge, Sb, As. The effect of Si on many siderophile elements is unknown yet could be an important, and as yet unquantified, influence on the core-mantle partitioning of SE. Here we report new experiments designed to quantify the effect of Si on the partitioning of P, Au, Pd, and many other SE between metal and silicate melt. The results will be applied to Earth, for which we have excellent constraints on the mantle siderophile element concentrations.

  17. Activities of research-reactor-technology project in FNCA from FY2005 to FY2007. Sharing neutronics calculation technique for core management and utilization of research reactors

    RRT project (Research-Reactor-Technology Project) was carried out with the theme of 'sharing neutronics calculation technique for core management and utilization of research reactors' in the framework of FNCA (Forum for Nuclear Cooperation in Asia) from FY2005 to FY2007. The objective of the project was to improve and equalize the level of neutronics calculation technique for the reactor core management among participating countries to assure the safe and stable operation of research reactors and the promotion of the effective utilization. Neutronics calculation codes, namely SRAC code system and MVP code, were adopted as common codes. Participating countries succeeded in applying the common codes to analyzing the core of each domestic research reactor. Some participating countries succeeded in applying the common codes to analyzing for utilization of own research reactors. Activities of RRT project have improved and equalized the level of neutronics calculation technique among participating countries. (author)

  18. Detection of a high brightness temperature radio core in the active-galactic-nucleus-driven molecular outflow candidate NGC 1266

    Nyland, Kristina; Young, Lisa M. [Physics Department, New Mexico Tech, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Alatalo, Katherine [Department of Astronomy, Hearst Field Annex, University of California-Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Wrobel, J. M. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Morganti, Raffaella [Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy, Postbus 2, 7990 AA, Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Davis, Timothy A.; De Zeeuw, P. T. [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Deustua, Susana [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Bureau, Martin, E-mail: knyland@nmt.edu [Sub-department of Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Denys Wilkinson Building, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-20

    We present new high spatial resolution Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) H I absorption and Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) continuum observations of the active-galactic-nucleus-(AGN-)driven molecular outflow candidate NGC 1266. Although other well-known systems with molecular outflows may be driven by star formation (SF) in a central molecular disk, the molecular mass outflow rate of 13 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} in NGC 1266 reported by Alatalo et al. exceeds SF rate estimates from a variety of tracers. This suggests that an additional energy source, such as an AGN, may play a significant role in powering the outflow. Our high spatial resolution H I absorption data reveal compact absorption against the radio continuum core co-located with the putative AGN, and the presence of a blueshifted spectral component re-affirms that gas is indeed flowing out of the system. Our VLBA observations at 1.65 GHz reveal one continuum source within the densest portion of the molecular gas, with a diameter d < 8 mas (1.2 pc), a radio power P {sub rad} = 1.48 × 10{sup 20} W Hz{sup –1}, and a brightness temperature T {sub b} > 1.5 × 10{sup 7} K that is most consistent with an AGN origin. The radio continuum energetics implied by the compact VLBA source, as well as archival VLA continuum observations at lower spatial resolution, further support the possibility that the AGN in NGC 1266 could be driving the molecular outflow. These findings suggest that even low-level AGNs may be able to launch massive outflows in their host galaxies.

  19. Vortex fluctuations, negative Hall effect, and thermally activated resistivity in layered and thin-film superconductors in an external magnetic field

    The thermally activated resistivity, rxx, and the negative Hall resistivity, rxy are explained as two consequences of the same effect, namely the unbinding of vortex pairs in the vicinity of Tc. Both rxx and rxy exhibit a thermally activated behaviour. The activation energy depends logarithmically on the magnetic field. Our explanation suggests rxy ∝ raxx with a = 1 in accordance with recent measurements

  20. Observation of electron-temperature fluctuations triggered by supersonic gas puffing in the LHD

    Non-local transport and electron temperature fluctuations triggered by supersonic gas puffing (SSGP) in high-temperature helical plasmas in the Large Helical Device (LHD) are reported. After a short-pulse SSGP, the core electron temperature increased while the edge electron temperature decreased. SSGP triggered a longer core temperature increase than that triggered by a small impurity pellet injection. The temperature profile, which was relatively flat inside the half minor radius before SSGP, became parabolic after non-local transport was triggered. Fluctuations were excited in the electron temperature signals around the half minor radius. The frequency of these fluctuations increased from ∼ 400 Hz to ∼ 1 kHz within ∼ 0.1 s and the amplitude decreased correspondingly. The temperature fluctuations inside and outside of the half minor radius had opposite phases. Magnetic fluctuations resonating near the half minor radius were observed simultaneously with the electron temperature fluctuations. (author)

  1. Changes in density fluctuations associated with confinement transitions close to a rational edge rotational transform in the W7-AS stellarator

    Zoletnik, S,; Basse, Nils Plesner; Saffman, Mark; Svendsen, Winnie Edith; Endler, M; Hirsch, M,; Werner, A,; Fuchs, C

    2002-01-01

    spectra and radial profiles are compared., A slow and reproducible transition is induced by a small plasma current and the sequence of events leading to bad confinement is investigated. The laser scattering core plasma density fluctuation measurements are complemented by edge beam emission spectroscopy......-like activity move radially in the plasma. These changes occur gradually and controllably if the, magnetic configuration is steered by a small plasma current....

  2. Magnetic Co@g-C3N4 Core-Shells on rGO Sheets for Momentum Transfer with Catalytic Activity toward Continuous-Flow Hydrogen Generation.

    Duan, Shasha; Han, Guosheng; Su, Yongheng; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Liu, Yanyan; Wu, Xianli; Li, Baojun

    2016-06-28

    Magnetic core-shell structures provide abundant opportunities for the construction of multifunctional composites. In this article, magnetic core-shells were fabricated with Co nanoparticles (NPs) as cores and g-C3N4 as shells. In the fabrication process, the Co@g-C3N4 core-shells were anchored onto the rGO nanosheets to form a Co@g-C3N4-rGO composite (CNG-I). For hydrogen generation from the hydrolysis of NaBH4 or NH3BH3, the Co NP cores act as catalytic active sites. The g-C3N4 shells protect Co NPs cores from aggregating or growing. The connection between Co NPs and rGO was strengthened by the g-C3N4 shells to prevent them from leaching or flowing away. The g-C3N4 shells also work as a cocatalyst for hydrogen generation. The magnetism of Co NPs and the shape of rGO nanosheets achieve effective momentum transfer in the external magnetic field. In the batch reactor, a higher catalytic activity was obtained for CNG-I in self-stirring mode than in magneton stirring mode. In the continuous-flow process, stable hydrogen generation was carried out with CNG-I being fixed and propelled by the external magnetic field. The separation film is unnecessary because of magnetic momentum transfer. This idea of the composite design and magnetic momentum transfer will be useful for the development of both hydrogen generation and multifunctional composite materials. PMID:27276187

  3. Statistical fluctuations of the number of neutrons in a pile

    The theory of the statistical fluctuations in a pile is extended to the space dependent case, and gives the fluctuations of the number of neutrons in a cell of the core or reflector of the pile. This number changes through elementary processes occurring at random, which are, capture, source, fission and scattering. Of all these processes, fission is the only one which changes more than one neutron at a time and so is responsible of the deviation of the fluctuations from a Poisson law. The importance of this deviation depends on the dimensions of the cell compared to the slowing down length. When the dimensions are small, the fluctuations close to a Poisson law. (author)

  4. Stochastically fluctuations of the modernized fast pulsed reactor IBR-2

    Full Text : Stochastically fluctuations of the power of the IBR-2 reactor have been quite significant (20 percent), they affect the dynamics of the reactor, the process of regulation, starting on the work of the experimental equipment, etc. On the other hand, the presence of large fluctuations in power at the IBR-2M has had its advantages. Investigation of stochastic fluctuations has allowed to estimate some physical parameters of the nuclear reactor core, for example, the mean lifetime of prompt neutrons in the reactor, source of spontaneous neutrons, and absolute power of the reactor. The main results of the investigation impulse stochastically fluctuations of the IBR-2 periodic pulsed reactor after modernization have been presented. It has been shown that the experimental results have been close to the calculated ones

  5. Birefringent hollow core fibers

    Roberts, John

    2007-01-01

    applications, and places emphasis on the development of polarization maintaining (PM) HC-PCF. The polarization cross-coupling characteristics of PM HC-PCF are very different from those of conventional PM fibers. The former fibers have the advantage of suffering far less from stress-field fluctuations, but the......Hollow core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF), fabricated according to a nominally non-birefringent design, shows a degree of un-controlled birefringence or polarization mode dispersion far in excess of conventional non polarization maintaining fibers. This can degrade the output pulse in many...... increased overlap between the polarization modes at the glass interfaces. The interplay between these effects leads to a wavelength for optimum polarization maintenance, lambda(PM), which is detuned from the wavelength of highest birefringence. By a suitable fiber design involving antiresonance of the core...

  6. Dwelling Quietly in the Rich Club: Brain Network Determinants of Slow Cortical Fluctuations

    Gollo, Leonardo L; Hutchison, R Matthew; Heuvel, Martijn van den; Breakspear, Michael

    2016-01-01

    For more than a century, cerebral cartography has been driven by investigations of structural and morphological properties of the brain across spatial scales and the temporal/functional phenomena that emerge from these underlying features. The next era of brain mapping will be driven by studies that consider both of these components of brain organization simultaneously -- elucidating their interactions and dependencies. Using this guiding principle, we explored the origin of slowly fluctuating patterns of synchronization within the topological core of brain regions known as the rich club, implicated in the regulation of mood and introspection. We find that a constellation of densely interconnected regions that constitute the rich club (including the anterior insula, amygdala, and precuneus) play a central role in promoting a stable, dynamical core of spontaneous activity in the primate cortex. The slow time scales are well matched to the regulation of internal visceral states, corresponding to the somatic cor...

  7. Fluorescence fluctuation immunoassay.

    Elings, V B; Nicoli, D F; Briggs, J

    1983-01-01

    The homogeneous fluorescent immunoassay described above allows one to measure the brightness of fluorescently tagged carrier particles that are suspended in a background of free, unbound fluorescent sources. We have demonstrated the feasibility of our technique using a gentamicin competitive assay as well as idealized model systems. We have seen that the fluctuation-correlation method is able to discriminate against free background sources because each fluorescing particle in solution contributes to the correlation peak [Eq. (4)] with a weighting equal to the square of its respective intensity. Hence, a few very bright sources contribute disproportionately to the "signal" relative to many weak ones. To take advantage of this property, one would therefore design an assay that uses relatively larger carrier particles, each of which is capable of binding on the order of 10(3) to 10(4) tagged antibodies or antigens. Unfortunately, the nonlinear dependence of the correlation peak on the brightness of the fluorescing species causes the technique to be perturbed by carrier particle aggregation; the apparent bound fluorescence intensity increases with the extent of aggregation. The latter may be an unavoidable consequence of performing assays using raw blood serum, for example. The ultimate usefulness of this method will depend on its sensitivity and speed when applied to "real" assays of clinical significance. These characteristics will be influenced by a number of technical details. Given our limited experience with the method thus far, it would appear that its principal drawback is its relatively slow speed. In order to decrease the time needed for a reliable measurement, one must average the random fluctuations in the fluorescent intensity to zero more quickly. In principle, this can be accomplished by decreasing the shot noise by collecting a larger fraction of the fluorescent light, and increasing the sampling rate. The method requires rather complicated

  8. Bursting high-frequency fluctuation observed in biased plasma in TU-Heliac

    In the biased plasma in TU-Heliac, a steep density profile around the core plasma region suddenly collapsed, accompanied with a high-frequency bursting turbulent fluctuation (100 kHz −1. The density gradient and the fluctuation had a non-linear relation and indicated a hysteresis loop. (paper)

  9. Fluctuating pulled fronts and Pomerons

    I present a pedagogical discussion of the influence of particle number fluctuations on the high energy evolution in QCD. I emphasize the event-by-event description, and the correspondence with the problem of 'fluctuating pulled fronts' in statistical physics. I explain that the correlations generated by fluctuations reduce the phase-space for BFKL evolution up to saturation. Because of that, the evolution 'slows down', and the rate for the energy increase of the saturation momentum is considerably decreased. I also discuss the diagrammatic interpretation of the particle number fluctuations in terms of Pomeron loops

  10. Synthesis and Catalytic Activity of a Two-core Ruthenium Carbene Complex: a Unique Catalyst for Ring Closing Metathesis Reaction

    SHAO Ming-bo; WANG Jian-hui

    2011-01-01

    The reaction of a ruthenium carbide complex RuCl2(C:)(PCy3)2 with [H(Et2O)x]+[BF4]- at a molar ratio of 1:2 produced a two-core ruthenium carbene complex,{[RuCl(=HPCy3)(PCy3)]2(μ-Cl)3}+[BF4]-,in the form of a yellow-green crystalline solid in a yield of 94%.This two-core ruthenium complex is a selective catalyst for ring closing metathesis of unsubstituted terminal dienes.More importantly,no isomerized byproduct was observed for N-substrates when the two-core ruthenium complex was used as the catalyst at an elevated temperature(137 ℃),indicating that the complex is a chemo-selective catalyst for ring closing metathesis reactions.

  11. Intramolecular C-H bond activation and redox isomerization across two-electron mixed valence diiridium cores.

    Esswein, A. J.; Veige, A. S.; Piccoli, P. M. B.; Schultz, A. J.; Nocera, D. G.; MIT

    2008-03-24

    Metal-metal cooperativity enables the reaction of carbon-based substrates at diiridium two-electron mixed valence centers. Arylation of Ir{sub 2}{sup 0,II}(tfepma){sub 3}Cl{sub 2} (1) (tfepma = bis[(bistrifluoroethoxy)phosphino]methylamine) with RMgBr (R = C{sub 6}H{sub 5} and C{sub 6}D{sub 5}) is followed by C-H bond activation to furnish the bridging benzyne complex Ir{sub 2}II,II(tfepma){sub 3}({mu}-C{sub 6}H4)(C{sub 6}H{sub 5})H (2), as the kinetic product. At ambient temperature, 2 isomerizes to Ir{sub 2}{sup I,III}(tfepma){sub 3}({mu}-C{sub 6}H4)(C{sub 6}H{sub 5})H (3) (k{sub obs} = 9.57 {+-} 0.10 x 10{sup -5} s{sup -1} at 31.8 C, {Delta}H{sup {+-}} = 21.7 {+-} 0.3 kcal/mol, {Delta}S{sup {+-}} = -7.4 {+-} 0.9 eu), in which the benzyne moiety is conserved and the Ir{sup III} center is ligated by terminal hydride and phenyl groups. The same reaction course is observed for arylation of 1 with C{sub 6}D{sub 5}MgBr to produce 2-d{sub 10} and 3-d{sub 10} accompanied by an inverse isotope effect, k{sub h}/k{sub d} = 0.44 (k{sub obs} = 2.17 {+-} 0.10 x 10{sup -4} s{sup -1} in C{sub 6}D{sub 6} solution at 31.8 C, {Delta}H{sup {+-}} = 24.9 {+-} 0.7 kcal/mol, {Delta}S{sup {+-}} = -6.4 {+-} 2.4 eu). 2 reacts swiftly with hydrogen to provide Ir{sub 2}{sup II,II}(tfepma){sub 3}H{sub 4} as both the syn and anti isomers (4-syn and 4-anti, respectively). The hydrides of 4-syn were directly located by neutron diffraction analysis. X-ray crystallographic examination of 2, 2-d{sub 10}, 3, and 4-syn indicates that cooperative reactivity at the bimetallic diiridium core is facilitated by the ability of the two-electron mixed valence framework to accommodate the oxidation state changes and ligand rearrangements attendant to the reaction of the substrate.

  12. Novel of core-shell AlOOH/Cu nanostructures: Synthesis, characterization, antimicrobial activity and in vitro toxicity in Neuro-2a cells

    Bakina, O. V.; Fomenko, A. N.; Korovin, M. S.; Glazkova, E. A.; Svarovskaya, N. V.

    2016-08-01

    Core-shell micro/nanostructures were fabricated by the reaction of Al/Cu bimetallic nanoparticles with water. Al/Cu nanoparticles have been obtained using the method of simultaneous electrical explosion of a pair of the corresponding metal wires in an argon atmosphere. The nanoparticles are chemically active and interact with water at 60°C to form core-shell micro/nanostructures. The obtained products were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering and the nitrogen adsorption method. The antibacterial activity of the synthesized structures was investigated against E. coli and St. aureus. The toxic effect of these nanostructures against the Neuro-2a neuroblastoma cell line was investigated. AlOOH/Cu nanostructures are shown to inhibit cell proliferation. The AlOOH/Cu nanostructures are good candidates for medical applications.

  13. Fluctuation-Driven Neural Dynamics Reproduce Drosophila Locomotor Patterns.

    Andrea Maesani

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The neural mechanisms determining the timing of even simple actions, such as when to walk or rest, are largely mysterious. One intriguing, but untested, hypothesis posits a role for ongoing activity fluctuations in neurons of central action selection circuits that drive animal behavior from moment to moment. To examine how fluctuating activity can contribute to action timing, we paired high-resolution measurements of freely walking Drosophila melanogaster with data-driven neural network modeling and dynamical systems analysis. We generated fluctuation-driven network models whose outputs-locomotor bouts-matched those measured from sensory-deprived Drosophila. From these models, we identified those that could also reproduce a second, unrelated dataset: the complex time-course of odor-evoked walking for genetically diverse Drosophila strains. Dynamical models that best reproduced both Drosophila basal and odor-evoked locomotor patterns exhibited specific characteristics. First, ongoing fluctuations were required. In a stochastic resonance-like manner, these fluctuations allowed neural activity to escape stable equilibria and to exceed a threshold for locomotion. Second, odor-induced shifts of equilibria in these models caused a depression in locomotor frequency following olfactory stimulation. Our models predict that activity fluctuations in action selection circuits cause behavioral output to more closely match sensory drive and may therefore enhance navigation in complex sensory environments. Together these data reveal how simple neural dynamics, when coupled with activity fluctuations, can give rise to complex patterns of animal behavior.

  14. Fluctuations in anti-nRNP levels in patients with mixed connective tissue disease are related to disease activity as part of a polyclonal B cell response.

    Houtman, P M; Kallenberg, C. G.; Limburg, P C; Leeuwen, M.A. van; van Rijswijk, M H; The, T H

    1986-01-01

    In a follow up study of 11 patients with mixed connective tissue disease the levels of antibodies to nuclear ribonucleoprotein (nRNP) as measured by an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were related to clinical activity of disease. To assess the relation between anti-nRNP levels and disease activity the levels of total immunoglobulin G, IgM rheumatoid factor (IgM RF), and antibodies to an unrelated antigen (tetanus toxoid) were determined simultaneously. No significant changes in anti...

  15. Correlation of within-individual fluctuation of depressed mood with prefrontal cortex activity during verbal working memory task: optical topography study

    Sato, Hiroki; Aoki, Ryuta; Katura, Takusige; Matsuda, Ryoichi; Koizumi, Hideaki

    2011-12-01

    Previous studies showed that interindividual variations in mood state are associated with prefrontal cortex (PFC) activity. In this study, we focused on the depressed-mood state under natural circumstances and examined the relationship between within-individual changes over time in this mood state and PFC activity. We used optical topography (OT), a functional imaging technique based on near-infrared spectroscopy, to measure PFC activity for each participant in three experimental sessions repeated at 2-week intervals. In each session, the participants completed a self-report questionnaire of mood state and underwent OT measurement while performing verbal and spatial working memory (WM) tasks. The results showed that changes in the depressed-mood score between successive sessions were negatively correlated with those in the left PFC activation for the verbal WM task (ρ = -0.56, p mood changes. We thus demonstrated that PFC activity during a verbal WM task varies depending on the participant's depressed mood state, independent of trait factors. This suggests that using optical topography to measure PFC activity during a verbal WM task can be used as a potential state marker for an individual's depressed mood state.

  16. Magmatic and phreatomagmatic volcanic activity at Mt. Takahe, West Antarctica, based on tephra layers in the Byrd ice core and field observations at Mt. Takahe

    Palais, Julie M.; Kyle, Philip R.; McIntosh, William C.; Seward, Diane

    1988-12-01

    The morphology, grain size characteristics and composition of ash particles in 30 ka to 150 ka tephra layers from the Byrd ice core were examined to characterize the eruptions which produced them and to test the suggestion that they were erupted from Mt. Takahe, a shield volcano in Marie Byrd Land, West Antarctica. Volcanic deposits at Mt. Takahe were examined for evidence of recent activity which could correlate with the tephra layers in the ice core. Coarse- and fine-ash layers have been recognized in the Byrd ice core. The coarse-ash layers have a higher mass concentration than the fine-ash layers and are characterized by fresh glass shards > 50 μm diameter, many containing elongate pipe vesicles. The fine-ash layers have a lower mass concentration and contain a greater variety of particles, typically Takahe is the favored source for the tephra because: (a) chemical analyses of samples from the volcano are distinctive, being peralkaline trachyte, and similar in composition to the analyzed tephra; (b) Mt. Takahe is a young volcano (Takahe indicate styles of eruption similar to that inferred for the ice core tephra; and (d) Mt. Takahe is only about 350 km from the calculated site of tephra deposition. A speculative eruptive history for Mt. Takahe is established by combining observations from Mt. Takahe and the Byrd ice core tephra. Initial eruptions at Mt. Takahe were subglacial and then graded into alternating subaerial and subglacial activity. The tephra suggest alternating subaerial magmatic and hydrovolcanic eruptions from 30 to 20 ka B.P., followed by a sustained period of hydrovolcanic eruptions from 20 to 14 ka B.P., which peaked at 18 ka B.P.

  17. Daily rhythms of core temperature and locomotor activity indicate different adaptive strategies to cold exposure in adult and aged mouse lemurs acclimated to a summer-like photoperiod.

    Terrien, Jeremy; Zizzari, Philippe; Epelbaum, Jacques; Perret, Martine; Aujard, Fabienne

    2009-01-01

    Daily variations in core temperature (Tc) within the normothermic range imply thermoregulatory processes that are essential for optimal function and survival. Higher susceptibility towards cold exposure in older animals suggests that these processes are disturbed with age. In the mouse lemur, a long-day breeder, we tested whether aging affected circadian rhythmicity of Tc, locomotor activity (LA), and energy balance under long-day conditions when exposed to cold. Adult (N = 7) and aged (N = 5...

  18. Facile fabrication of novel SiO2/g-C3N4 core-shell nanosphere photocatalysts with enhanced visible light activity

    Lin, Bo; Xue, Chao; Yan, Xiaoqing; Yang, Guidong; Yang, Guang; Yang, Bolun

    2015-12-01

    Novel SiO2/g-C3N4 core-shell nanospheres were simply synthesized using heating method to anneal the mixture of silica dioxide nanospheres and molten cyanamide (CA) in nitrogen atmosphere. The effects of various initial mass ratios of SiO2 nanospheres and CA molecules on the catalyst structure, surface property and catalytic activity have been systematically investigated. The characterization results show that the as-obtained photocatalysts possess the ordered core-shell nanostructure, large mesoporous distribution and inflated BET specific surface areas. The photocatalytic activities of the SiO2/g-C3N4 composites were evaluated by decomposing the rhodamine B (RhB) dye under visible light irradiation. Compared with pure g-C3N4, all of the SiO2/g-C3N4 core-shell composites showed the improved photoactivity, and the optimal SiO2/g-C3N4 catalyst (SC-3) showed the highest activity with an RhB conversion of 94.3% after 150 min visible light irradiation, which is 3.5 times higher than that of pure g-C3N4. Meanwhile, the recycling test showed that the SC-3 sample owns outstanding stability and durability. The enhancement in both activity and stability can be assigned to the specific core-shell structure, inflated surface area, higher visible light adsorption and efficient charge separation originating from the closely contacted interfaces between SiO2 nanospheres and g-C3N4.

  19. Hollow Ag@Pd core-shell nanotubes as highly active catalysts for the electro-oxidation of formic acid

    Jiang, Yuanyuan; Lu, Yizhong; Han, Dongxue;

    2012-01-01

    Ag nanowires are prepared as templates by a polyol reduction process. Then Ag nanotubes coated with a thin layer of Pd are synthesized through sequential reduction accompanied with the galvanic displacement reaction. The products show a hollow core-shell nanotubular structure, as demonstrated by...

  20. Parameter Sensitivity Study of the Unreacted-Core Shrinking Model: A Computer Activity for Chemical Reaction Engineering Courses

    Tudela, Ignacio; Bonete, Pedro; Fullana, Andres; Conesa, Juan Antonio

    2011-01-01

    The unreacted-core shrinking (UCS) model is employed to characterize fluid-particle reactions that are important in industry and research. An approach to understand the UCS model by numerical methods is presented, which helps the visualization of the influence of the variables that control the overall heterogeneous process. Use of this approach in…

  1. The Use of Cultural Historical Activity Theory (CHAT) within a Constructivist Learning Environment to Develop Core Competencies in Social Work

    Fire, Nancy; Casstevens, W. J.

    2013-01-01

    Achieving foundation-level practice behaviors to develop social work core competencies involves integrating learning across a curriculum. This article focuses on two phases of foundation-level course redevelopment aimed to support graduate students in accomplishing this outcome. The first phase involved restructuring the course to become a…

  2. Constructing a MoS₂ QDs/CdS Core/Shell Flowerlike Nanosphere Hierarchical Heterostructure for the Enhanced Stability and Photocatalytic Activity.

    Liang, Shijing; Zhou, Zhouming; Wu, Xiuqin; Zhu, Shuying; Bi, Jinhong; Zhou, Limin; Liu, Minghua; Wu, Ling

    2016-01-01

    MoS₂ quantum dots (QDs)/CdS core/shell nanospheres with a hierarchical heterostructure have been prepared by a simple microwave hydrothermal method. The as-prepared samples are characterized by XRD, TEM, SEM, UV-VIS diffuse reflectance spectra (DRS) and N₂-sorption in detail. The photocatalytic activities of the samples are evaluated by water splitting into hydrogen. Results show that the as-prepared MoS₂ QDs/CdS core/shell nanospheres with a diameter of about 300 nm are composed of the shell of CdS nanorods and the core of MoS₂ QDs. For the photocatalytic reaction, the samples exhibit a high stability of the photocatalytic activity and a much higher hydrogen evolution rate than the pure CdS, the composite prepared by a physical mixture, and the Pt-loaded CdS sample. In addition, the stability of CdS has also been greatly enhanced. The effect of the reaction time on the formations of nanospheres, the photoelectric properties and the photocatalytic activities of the samples has been investigated. Finally, a possible photocatalytic reaction process has also been proposed. PMID:26891284

  3. Constructing a MoS2 QDs/CdS Core/Shell Flowerlike Nanosphere Hierarchical Heterostructure for the Enhanced Stability and Photocatalytic Activity

    Shijing Liang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available MoS2 quantum dots (QDs/CdS core/shell nanospheres with a hierarchical heterostructure have been prepared by a simple microwave hydrothermal method. The as-prepared samples are characterized by XRD, TEM, SEM, UV-VIS diffuse reflectance spectra (DRS and N2-sorption in detail. The photocatalytic activities of the samples are evaluated by water splitting into hydrogen. Results show that the as-prepared MoS2 QDs/CdS core/shell nanospheres with a diameter of about 300 nm are composed of the shell of CdS nanorods and the core of MoS2 QDs. For the photocatalytic reaction, the samples exhibit a high stability of the photocatalytic activity and a much higher hydrogen evolution rate than the pure CdS, the composite prepared by a physical mixture, and the Pt-loaded CdS sample. In addition, the stability of CdS has also been greatly enhanced. The effect of the reaction time on the formations of nanospheres, the photoelectric properties and the photocatalytic activities of the samples has been investigated. Finally, a possible photocatalytic reaction process has also been proposed.

  4. Fluctuations as stochastic deformation

    Kazinski, P. O.

    2008-04-01

    A notion of stochastic deformation is introduced and the corresponding algebraic deformation procedure is developed. This procedure is analogous to the deformation of an algebra of observables like deformation quantization, but for an imaginary deformation parameter (the Planck constant). This method is demonstrated on diverse relativistic and nonrelativistic models with finite and infinite degrees of freedom. It is shown that under stochastic deformation the model of a nonrelativistic particle interacting with the electromagnetic field on a curved background passes into the stochastic model described by the Fokker-Planck equation with the diffusion tensor being the inverse metric tensor. The first stochastic correction to the Newton equations for this system is found. The Klein-Kramers equation is also derived as the stochastic deformation of a certain classical model. Relativistic generalizations of the Fokker-Planck and Klein-Kramers equations are obtained by applying the procedure of stochastic deformation to appropriate relativistic classical models. The analog of the Fokker-Planck equation associated with the stochastic Lorentz-Dirac equation is derived too. The stochastic deformation of the models of a free scalar field and an electromagnetic field is investigated. It turns out that in the latter case the obtained stochastic model describes a fluctuating electromagnetic field in a transparent medium.

  5. Fluctuations in catalytic surface reactions

    Imbihl, R

    2003-01-01

    The internal reaction-induced fluctuations which occur in catalytic CO oxidation on a Pt field emitter tip have been studied using field electron microscopy (FEM) as a spatially resolving method. The structurally heterogeneous Pt tip consists of facets of different orientations with nanoscale dimensions. The FEM resolution of roughly 2 nm corresponds to a few hundred reacting adsorbed particles whose variations in the density are imaged as brightness fluctuations. In the bistable range of the reaction one finds fluctuation-induced transitions between the two stable branches of the reaction kinetics. The fluctuations exhibit a behaviour similar to that of an equilibrium phase transition, i.e. the amplitude diverges upon approaching the bifurcation point terminating the bistable range of the reaction. Simulations with a hybrid Monte Carlo/mean-field model reproduce the experimental observations. Fluctuations on different facets are typically uncorrelated but within a single facet a high degree of spatial cohere...

  6. Staggered Schemes for Fluctuating Hydrodynamics

    Balboa, F; Delgado-Buscalioni, R; Donev, A; Fai, T; Griffith, B; Peskin, C S

    2011-01-01

    We develop numerical schemes for solving the isothermal compressible and incompressible equations of fluctuating hydrodynamics on a grid with staggered momenta. We develop a second-order accurate spatial discretization of the diffusive, advective and stochastic fluxes that satisfies a discrete fluctuation-dissipation balance, and construct temporal discretizations that are at least second-order accurate in time deterministically and in a weak sense. Specifically, the methods reproduce the correct equilibrium covariances of the fluctuating fields to third (compressible) and second (incompressible) order in the time step, as we verify numerically. We apply our techniques to model recent experimental measurements of giant fluctuations in diffusively mixing fluids in a micro-gravity environment [A. Vailati et. al., Nature Communications 2:290, 2011]. Numerical results for the static spectrum of non-equilibrium concentration fluctuations are in excellent agreement between the compressible and incompressible simula...

  7. Optimizing performance by improving core stability and core strength.

    Hibbs, Angela E; Thompson, Kevin G; French, Duncan; Wrigley, Allan; Spears, Iain

    2008-01-01

    Core stability and core strength have been subject to research since the early 1980s. Research has highlighted benefits of training these processes for people with back pain and for carrying out everyday activities. However, less research has been performed on the benefits of core training for elite athletes and how this training should be carried out to optimize sporting performance. Many elite athletes undertake core stability and core strength training as part of their training programme, despite contradictory findings and conclusions as to their efficacy. This is mainly due to the lack of a gold standard method for measuring core stability and strength when performing everyday tasks and sporting movements. A further confounding factor is that because of the differing demands on the core musculature during everyday activities (low load, slow movements) and sporting activities (high load, resisted, dynamic movements), research performed in the rehabilitation sector cannot be applied to the sporting environment and, subsequently, data regarding core training programmes and their effectiveness on sporting performance are lacking. There are many articles in the literature that promote core training programmes and exercises for performance enhancement without providing a strong scientific rationale of their effectiveness, especially in the sporting sector. In the rehabilitation sector, improvements in lower back injuries have been reported by improving core stability. Few studies have observed any performance enhancement in sporting activities despite observing improvements in core stability and core strength following a core training programme. A clearer understanding of the roles that specific muscles have during core stability and core strength exercises would enable more functional training programmes to be implemented, which may result in a more effective transfer of these skills to actual sporting activities. PMID:19026017

  8. Development of a supramolecular ensemble of an AIEE active hexaphenylbenzene derivative and Ag@Cu2O core-shell NPs: an efficient photocatalytic system for C-H activation.

    Chopra, Radhika; Kumar, Manoj; Bhalla, Vandana

    2016-08-01

    A supramolecular ensemble having Ag@Cu2O core-shell nanoparticles stabilized by aggregates of a hexaphenylbenzene derivative has been developed which exhibits excellent photocatalytic efficiency in reactions involving preparation of imidazole and benzimidazole derivatives via C-H activation. PMID:27464360

  9. Study of thermal - hydraulic sensors signal fluctuations in PWR

    This thesis deals with signal fluctuations of thermal-hydraulic sensors in the main coolant primary of a pressurized water reactor. The aim of this work is to give a first response about the potentiality of use of these noise signals for the functionning monitoring. Two aspects have been studied: - the modelisation of temperature fluctuations of core thermocouples, by a Monte-Carlo method, gives the main characteristics of these signals and their domain of application. - the determination of eigenfrequency in the primary by an acoustic representation could permit the monitoring of local and global thermo-hydraulic conditions

  10. Investigation of the maximal values of the fuel surface temperatures in the active zone of the Dalat research reactor for operating core configuration of 89 fuel assembles and fundamental core configuration of 94 fuel assembles at limited power level of 550 kW

    Calculation for defining the maximal values of fuel surface temperature in active zone of the Dalat nuclear research reactor (DNRR) is one of the important items in Safety Analyses for the reactor. The operating core configuration of 89 VVR-M2 fuel assemblies and fundamental core configuration of 94 fuel assemblies are used. The reactor is on limited power level of 550 kW. The calculated results for different operating core configuration and fundamental core configuration of 94 fuel assemblies and the comparison with the experimental data received on the DNRR and other data are reasonable. (author)

  11. Velocity fluctuations in polar solar wind: a comparison between different solar cycles

    B. Bavassano

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The polar solar wind is a fast, tenuous and steady flow that, with the exception of a relatively short phase around the Sun's activity maximum, fills the high-latitude heliosphere. The polar wind properties have been extensively investigated by Ulysses, the first spacecraft able to perform in-situ measurements in the high-latitude heliosphere. The out-of-ecliptic phases of Ulysses cover about seventeen years. This makes possible to study heliospheric properties at high latitudes in different solar cycles. In the present investigation we focus on hourly- to daily-scale fluctuations of the polar wind velocity. Though the polar wind is a quite uniform flow, fluctuations in its velocity do not appear negligible. A simple way to characterize wind velocity variations is that of performing a multi-scale statistical analysis of the wind velocity differences. Our analysis is based on the computation of velocity differences at different time lags and the evaluation of statistical quantities (mean, standard deviation, skewness, and kurtosis for the different ensembles. The results clearly show that, though differences exist in the three-dimensional structure of the heliosphere between the investigated solar cycles, the velocity fluctuations in the core of polar coronal holes exhibit essentially unchanged statistical properties.

  12. Dynamics of Hydrophobic Core Phenylalanine Residues Probed by Solid-State Deuteron NMR

    Vugmeyster, Liliya; Ostrovsky, Dmitry; Villafranca, Toni; Sharp, Janelle; Xu, Wei; Lipton, Andrew S.; Hoatson, Gina; Vold, Robert L.

    2015-11-03

    We conducted a detailed investigation of the dynamics of two phenylalanine side chains in the hydrophobic core of the villin headpiece subdomain protein (HP36) in the hydrated powder state over the 298–80 K temperature range. We utilized static deuteron NMR measurements of longitudinal relaxation and line shapes supplemented with computational modeling. The temperature dependence of the relaxation times reveals the presence of two main mechanisms that can be attributed to the ring-flips, dominating at high temperatures, and small-angle fluctuations, dominating at low temperatures. The relaxation is non- exponential at all temperatures with the extent of non-exponentiality increasing from higher to lower temperatures. This behavior suggests a distribution of conformers with unique values of activation energies. The central values of the activation energies for the ring-flipping motions are among the smallest reported for aromatic residues in peptides and proteins and point to a very mobile hydrophobic core. The analysis of the widths of the distributions, in combination with the earlier results on the dynamics of flanking methyl groups (Vugmeyster et al., J. Phys. Chem. 2013, 117, 6129–6137), suggests that the hydrophobic core undergoes concerted fluctuations. There is a pronounced effect of dehydration on the ring-flipping motions, which shifts the distribution toward more rigid conformers. The cross-over temperature between the regions of dominance of the small-angle fluctuations and ring-flips shifts from 195 K in the hydrated protein to 278 K in the dry one. This result points to the role of solvent in the onset of the concerted fluctuations of the core and highlights aromatic residues as markers of the protein dynamical transitions.

  13. Spatial variability in photosynthetic and heterotrophic activity drives localized δ13C org fluctuations and carbonate precipitation in hypersaline microbial mats.

    Houghton, J; Fike, D; Druschel, G; Orphan, V; Hoehler, T M; Des Marais, D J

    2014-11-01

    Modern laminated photosynthetic microbial mats are ideal environments to study how microbial activity creates and modifies carbon and sulfur isotopic signatures prior to lithification. Laminated microbial mats from a hypersaline lagoon (Guerrero Negro, Baja California, Mexico) maintained in a flume in a greenhouse at NASA Ames Research Center were sampled for δ(13) C of organic material and carbonate to assess the impact of carbon fixation (e.g., photosynthesis) and decomposition (e.g., bacterial respiration) on δ(13) C signatures. In the photic zone, the δ(13) C org signature records a complex relationship between the activities of cyanobacteria under variable conditions of CO2 limitation with a significant contribution from green sulfur bacteria using the reductive TCA cycle for carbon fixation. Carbonate is present in some layers of the mat, associated with high concentrations of bacteriochlorophyll e (characteristic of green sulfur bacteria) and exhibits δ(13) C signatures similar to DIC in the overlying water column (-2.0‰), with small but variable decreases consistent with localized heterotrophic activity from sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). Model results indicate respiration rates in the upper 12 mm of the mat alter in situ pH and HCO3- concentrations to create both phototrophic CO2 limitation and carbonate supersaturation, leading to local precipitation of carbonate minerals. The measured activity of SRB with depth suggests they variably contribute to decomposition in the mat dependent on organic substrate concentrations. Millimeter-scale variability in the δ(13) C org signature beneath the photic zone in the mat is a result of shifting dominance between cyanobacteria and green sulfur bacteria with the aggregate signature overprinted by heterotrophic reworking by SRB and methanogens. These observations highlight the impact of sedimentary microbial processes on δ(13) C org signatures; these processes need to be considered when attempting to relate

  14. Fluctuations in peroxidase and catalase activities of resistant and susceptible black gram (Vigna mungo (L.) Hepper) genotypes elicited by Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) feeding

    Taggar, Gaurav Kumar; Gill, Ranjit Singh; Gupta, Anil Kumar; Sandhu, Jeet Singh

    2012-01-01

    Whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleryrodidae), is a serious pest of black gram, (Vigna mungo (L.) Hepper), an important legume pulse crop grown in north India. This research investigated the potential role of selected plant oxidative enzymes in resistance/susceptibility to whitefly in nine black gram genotypes. Oxidative enzyme activity was estimated spectrophotometrically from leaf samples collected at 30 and 50 d after sowing (DAS) from whitefly infested and uninfested plan...

  15. Core Muscle Activity during TRX Suspension Exercises with and without Kinesiology Taping in Adults with Chronic Low Back Pain: Implications for Rehabilitation

    Shirley S. M. Fong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to examine the effects of kinesiology taping (KT and different TRX suspension workouts on the amplitude of electromyographic (EMG activity in the core muscles among people with chronic low back pain (LBP. Each participant (total n=21 was exposed to two KT conditions: no taping and taping, while performing four TRX suspension exercises: (1 hamstring curl, (2 hip abduction in plank, (3 chest press, and (4 45-degree row. Right transversus abdominis/internal oblique (TrAIO, rectus abdominis (RA, external oblique (EO, and superficial lumbar multifidus (LMF activity was recorded with surface EMG and expressed as a percentage of the EMG amplitude recorded during a maximal voluntary isometric contraction of the respective muscles. Hip abduction in plank increased TrAIO, RA, and LMF EMG amplitude compared with other TRX positions (P0.05. Hip abduction in plank most effectively activated abdominal muscles, whereas the hamstring curl most effectively activated the paraspinal muscles. Applying KT conferred no immediate benefits in improving the core muscle activation during TRX training in adults with chronic LBP.

  16. Diversity of active microbial communities subjected to long-term exposure to chemical contaminants along a 40-year-old sediment core.

    Kaci, Assia; Petit, Fabienne; Fournier, Matthieu; Cécillon, Sébastien; Boust, Dominique; Lesueur, Patrick; Berthe, Thierry

    2016-03-01

    In estuarine ecosystems, metallic and organic contaminants are mainly associated with fine grain sediments which settle on mudflats. Over time, the layers of sediment accumulate and are then transformed by diagenetic processes mainly controlled by microbial activity, recording the history of the estuary's chemical contamination. In an environment of this specific type, we investigated the evolution of the chemical contamination and the structure of both total and active microbial communities, based on PhyloChip analysis of a 4.6-m core corresponding to a 40-year sedimentary record. While the archaeal abundance remained constant along the core, a decrease by one order of magnitude in the bacterial abundance was observed with depth. Both total and active microbial communities were dominated by Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Firmicutes in all sediment samples. Among Proteobacteria, alpha-Proteobacteria dominated both total (from 37 to 60 %) and metabolically active (from 19.7 to 34.6 %) communities, including the Rhizobiales, Rhodobacter, Caulobacterales, and Sphingomonadales orders. Co-inertia analysis revealed a relationship between polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, zinc and some polychlorobiphenyls concentrations, and the structure of total and active microbial communities in the oldest and most contaminated sediments (from 1970 to 1975), suggesting that long-term exposure to chemicals shaped the structure of the microbial community. PMID:25934230

  17. Concentration fluctuations in gas releases by industrial accidents. Final report

    Nielsen, M.; Chatwin, P.C.; Joergensen, H.E.; Mole, N.; Munro, R.J.; Ott, S.

    2002-05-01

    The COFIN project studied existing remote-sensing Lidar data on concentration fluctuations in atmospheric dispersion from continuous sources at ground level. Fluctuations are described by stochastic models developed by a combination of statistical analyses and surface-layer scaling. The statistical moments and probability density distribution of the fluctuations are most accurately determined in a frame of reference following the instantaneous plume centreline. The spatial distribution of these moments is universal with a gaussian core and exponential tails. The instantaneous plume width is fluctuating with a log-normal distribution. The position of the instantaneous plume centre-line is modelled by a normal distribution and a Langevin equation, by which the meander effect on the time-averaged plume width is predicted. Fixed-frame statistics are modelled by convolution of moving-frame statistics and the probability distribution for the plume centreline. The distance-neighbour function generalized for higher-order statistics has a universal exponential shape. Simulation tools for concentration fluctuations have been developed for either multiple correlated time series or multi-dimensional fields. These tools are based on Karhunen-Loeve expansion and Fourier transformations using iterative or correlation-distortion techniques. The input to the simulation is the probability distribution of the individual processes, assumed stationary, and the cross-correlations of all signal combinations. The use in practical risk assessment is illustrated by implementation of a typical heavy-gas dispersion model, enhanced for prediction and simulation of concentration fluctuations. (au)

  18. Enhanced Photocatalytic Activity of CdS-Decorated TiO2/Carbon Core-Shell Microspheres Derived from Microcrystalline Cellulose

    Xin Liu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The fabrication of reusable and biodegradation materials from renewable resources such as cellulose is essential for a sustainable world. The core-shell structured CdS-decorated TiO2/Carbon microspheres (CdS/TiO2/Carbon MS photocatalyst was synthesized with controlled hydrolysis and a novel sonochemical method. It was prepared by using crosslinked microcrystalline cellulose as the core, tetrabutyl titanate as the titania source and CdS as the photosensitizer. The morphology, chemical structure and properties of the obtained material were characterized by many means. Additionally, the photocatalytic activity of the CdS/TiO2/Carbon MS was evaluated by the photodegradation efficiency of Rhodamine B solution, which reached 95.24% under visible light irradiation. This study demonstrated the excellent photocatalytic performance of CdS/TiO2/Carbon MS, which might have promising applications in environmental treatments.

  19. Ice Cores

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Records of past temperature, precipitation, atmospheric trace gases, and other aspects of climate and environment derived from ice cores drilled on glaciers and ice...

  20. Non-Gaussian eccentricity fluctuations

    Grönqvist, Hanna; Ollitrault, Jean-Yves

    2016-01-01

    We study the fluctuations of the anisotropy of the energy density profile created in a high-energy collision at the LHC. We show that the anisotropy in harmonic $n$ has generic non-Gaussian fluctuations. We argue that these non-Gaussianities have a universal character for small systems such as p+Pb collisions, but not for large systems such as Pb+Pb collisions where they depend on the underlying non-Gaussian statistics of the initial density profile. We generalize expressions for the eccentricity cumulants $\\varepsilon_2\\{4\\}$ and $\\varepsilon_3\\{4\\}$ previously obtained within the independent-source model to a general fluctuating initial density profile.

  1. Mean First Passage Time for System with Fluctuating Potential Barrier and Coupled Noise

    LI Jing-Hui; HAN Yin-Xia

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we study the mean first passage time (MFPT) over a fluctuation potential barrier driven by a coupled noise. It is shown that the MFPT over the fluctuation potential barrier displays resonant activations as the function of the flipping rate of the fluctuation potential barrier, and as the function of the dichotomous noise transition rate.

  2. Statistical physics approaches to understanding physiological fluctuations

    Hu, Kun

    This dissertation investigates the influences of the circadian pacemaker on the temporal structures of fluctuations in the human heartbeat and other related physiological signals. The scale-invariant properties of these physiological fluctuations are demonstrated to possess significant circadian rhythms. These findings are relevant in understanding the daily patterns of adverse cardiac events reported by epidemiological studies. Part I of this dissertation introduces the daily pattern in the onset of adverse cardiac events, the circadian pacemaker, and experimental methods of assessing the circadian influences. This part also reviews scale-invariant properties of physiological fluctuations, and scaling analyses that are used to access long-range correlations (an important scale-invariant property). Part II focuses on the effects of trends and nonstationarities---the mean value, standard deviation, and correlation function of signals are not invariant over time. In the case that trends and nonstationarities are unrelated to the underlying mechanism of a signal, simulations and analytic derivations are conducted to explore how to quantify accurately the correlations embedded in the noisy signals that have trends and nonstationarities. Part III investigates dynamics of human motor activity---a physiological function highly correlated with cardiac dynamics. Results demonstrate that apparently random forearm motion possesses previously unrecognized dynamic patterns. These are characterized by similar distribution forms, long-range correlations, and nonlinear Fourier phase interactions across separate individuals and measurements. Part IV reports circadian influences on the dynamic properties of heartbeat fluctuations and activity signals. Correlation properties of heartbeat fluctuations are found to exhibit a significant circadian rhythm that is independent of behavior-related factors including sleep/wake cycles, and random or scheduled events. This circadian rhythm is

  3. Limitation and suppression of hot electron fluctuations in submicron semiconductor structures

    We present theoretical investigations of fluctuations of hot electrons in submicron active regions, where the dimensions 2 d of the region is comparable to the electron energy relaxation length Lε. The new physical phenomenon is reported; the fluctuations depend on the sample thickness, with 2dε a suppression of fluctuations arises in the range of fluctuation frequencies ω much less than T-1ε, Tε is the electron energy relaxation time. (author). 12 refs, 7 figs

  4. Posttranslational modification of E-cadherin by core fucosylation regulates Src activation and induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition-like process in lung cancer cells.

    Shao, Kang; Chen, Zhong Yi; Gautam, Suraj; Deng, Nian Hui; Zhou, You; Wu, Xing Zhong

    2016-02-01

    E-cadherin is often dysregulated in aggressive lung cancer, the mechanism of which cannot always be explained at the level of transcription. In 66 patients with lung cancer, immunohistochemical staining demonstrated that co-localization of E-cadherin and core fucose by Lens culinaris agglutinin was significantly less extensive in tumor than in nontumor tissue. Through gain and loss of fucosylation experiments in the giant lung carcinoma cell lines 95C and 95D, our results revealed that E-cadherin core fucosylation in 95C cells overexpressing α-1, 6-fucosyltransferase (Fut8) inhibited Fut8-95C cell migration, whereas knockdown of Fut8 in 95D cells enhanced migration of short-interfering RNA-targeting Fut8 (siFut8)-95D cells. The level of active Src (phosphorylated Src [Y416]) was significantly reduced in Fut8-95C cells, but elevated in siFut8-95D cells. In protein complexes immunoprecipitated from Fut8-95C cell lysates with anti-E-cadherin, less phosphorylated Src (Y416) and more β-catenin were observed, but immunoprecipitates from siFut8-95D cells, containing less core fucosylated E-cadherin, contained an elevated level of phospho-Src Y416. In Fut8-95C cells, phosphorylation of Akt (Y315, Y326) and GSK-3β (S9) was significantly reduced, but β-catenin (S37) phosphorylation was enhanced. Expression of N-cadherin and Snail1 was also reduced in Fut8-95C cells, but significantly increased in siFut8-95D cells. Intriguingly, when Src kinase activity was inhibited by treatment of cells with PP2 and SU6656, regulation of N-cadherin, Snail1 and cell migration by E-cadherin core fucosylation was abrogated in both Fut8-95C and siFut8-95D cells. Therefore, posttranslational modification of E-cadherin by less core fucosylation recruited and activated Src, and induced an epithelial-mesenchymal transition-like process in lung cancer cells. PMID:26443198

  5. The Fluctuation Niche in Plants

    Classical approaches to niche in coexisting plants have undervalued temporal fluctuations. We propose that fluctuation niche is an important dimension of the total niche and interacts with habitat and life-history niches to provide a better understanding of the multidimensional niche space where ecological interactions occur. To scale a fluctuation niche, it is necessary to relate environmental constrictions or species performance not only to the absolute values of the usual environmental and eco physiological variables but also to their variances or other measures of variability. We use Mediterranean plant communities as examples, because they present characteristic large seasonal and inter annual fluctuations in water and nutrient availabilities, along an episodic-constant gradient, and because the plant responses include a number of syndromes coupled to this gradient.

  6. Fluctuations and Instability in Sedimentation

    Guazzelli, Élisabeth

    2011-01-21

    This review concentrates on the fluctuations of the velocities of sedimenting spheres, and on the structural instability of a suspension of settling fibers. For many years, theoretical estimates and numerical simulations predicted the fluctuations of the velocities of spheres to increase with the size of the container, whereas experiments found no such variation. Two ideas have increased our understanding. First, the correlation length of the velocity fluctuations was found experimentally to be 20 interparticle separations. Second, in dilute suspensions, a vertical variation in the concentration due to the spreading of the front with the clear fluid can inhibit the velocity fluctuations. In a very dilute regime, a homogeneous suspension of fibers suffers a spontaneous instability in which fast descending fiber-rich columns are separated by rising fiber-sparse columns. In a semidilute regime, the settling is hindered, more so than for spheres. © 2011 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved.

  7. Synthesis, Optical Properties, and Photocatalytic Activity of One-Dimensional CdS@ZnS Core-Shell Nanocomposites

    Wang Le; Wei Hongwei; Fan Yingju; Liu Xinzheng; Zhan Jinhua

    2009-01-01

    Abstract One-dimensional (1D) CdS@ZnS core-shell nanocomposites were successfully synthesized via a two-step solvothermal method. Preformed CdS nanowires with a diameter of ca. 45 nm and a length up to several tens of micrometers were coated with a layer of ZnS shell by the reaction of zinc acetate and thiourea at 180 °C for 10 h. It was found that uniform ZnS shell was composed of ZnS nanoparticles with a diameter of ca. 4 nm, which anchored on the nanowires without any surface pretreat...

  8. [Effect of Low Molecular Weight Organic Acids on the Chemical Speciation and Activity of Mercury in the Soils of the Water-Level-Fluctuating Zone of the Three Gorges Reservoir].

    You, Rui; Liang, Li; Qin, Cai-qing; Deng, Han; Wang, Ding-yong

    2016-01-15

    To investigate the effect of low molecular weight organic acids ( LMWOA) on the ability of migration and the species of mercury in the soil of the Water-Level-Fluctuating Zone of the Three Gorges Reservoir, citric acid, tartaric acid and oxalic acid were dded into the soil to conduct simulation experiments. The results showed that the percentage of exchangeable mercury increased with the increase of the concentration of citric acid, but the value declined slightly as the concentration of tartaric acid and oxalic acid increased. While all three acids elevated the bioavailability of mercury, which increased with the increase of the concentration of acids. Vhen the concentration of citric acid reached 15 mmol x L(-1), the activation effect was the best. But for oxalic acid and citric acid, 10 mmol x L(-1) was the optimal concentration. In general, the effect of three organic acids on the activation of mercury in the soil followed the trend of citric acid > tartaric acid > oxalic acid. In the soil supplemented with 15 mmol x L(-1) citric acid, the change of mercury pecies was more and more striking with the prolonged incubation, and the conversion did not stop until 14 d, at that time the stomach cid dissolved mercury increased obviously, which was mainly converted from elemental mercury. PMID:27078955

  9. Mapping the Proton's Fluctuating Waistline

    Coleman-Smith, Christopher E.; Müller, Berndt

    2013-01-01

    We discuss a mechanism for the apparently universal scaling in the high-multiplicity tail of charged particle distributions for high energy nuclear collisions. We argue that this scaling behavior originates from rare fluctuations of the nucleon density. We discuss a pair of simple models of proton shape fluctuations. A "fat" proton with a size of 3 fm occurs with observable frequency. In light of this result, collective flow behavior in the ensuing nuclear interaction seems feasible. We discu...

  10. Universal theory of efficiency fluctuations

    Verley, Gatien; Willaert, Tim; Broeck, Christian Van den; Esposito, Massimiliano

    2014-01-01

    Using the fluctuation theorem supplemented with geometric arguments, we derive universal features of the (long-time) efficiency fluctuations for thermal and isothermal machines operating under steady or periodic driving, close or far from equilibrium. In particular, the long-time probability for observing a reversible efficiency in a given engine is identical to that for the same engine working under the time-reversed driving. When the driving is symmetric, this reversible efficiency becomes ...

  11. Fluctuation effects in phase segregation

    The excess specific heat observed above the phase separation temperature in solid mixtures of 3He and 4He is attributed to the fluctuations that represent the symmetry of the condensing state. In a 3He rich solid the fluctuations of the 4He rich phase are 2-dimensional while in an even mixture they are 3-dimensional, the characteristic length scale is approximately the interparticle spacing

  12. Phenomenology of Space Time Fluctuations

    Aloisio, R.; P. Blasi(INAF Arcetri); A. Galante(Univ. L'Aquila); Grillo, A. F.

    2004-01-01

    Quantum gravitational effects may induce stochastic fluctuations in the structure of space-time, to produce a characteristic foamy structure. It has been known for some time now that these fluctuations may have observable consequences for the propagation of cosmic ray particles over cosmological distances. While invoked as a possible explanation for the detection of the puzzling cosmic rays with energies in excess of the threshold for photopion production (the so-called super-GZK particles), ...

  13. Fluctuating Activity Of Artificial Radioisotopes Caused By Accident At Fukushima-I Nuclear Power Plant In Air At The South Of Vietnam

    March 11, 2011, a powerful earthquake in the history of Japan (9 degrees richter) occurred in Sendai city located on the east coast of Honshu. This disaster even more serious by the tsunami appeared in the east coast of Japan. A day later, the incident happened at the Fukushima-I nuclear power plant with complex evolution. A large number of radioisotopes have ejected air, and long range spread was recorded in almost all stations of the CTBTO in the northern hemisphere. Two weeks after the incident, radioactive anomalies were detected in the air at Da Lat, Ninh Thuan and Ho Chi Minh City. Results of monitoring the changes in the activity of the artificial radioisotopes 131I, 134Cs and 137Cs in aerosols are presented. Evolutions 137Cs/134Cs isotope ratios in aerosols in Da Lat, Ninh Thuan and Ho Chi Minh City have been evaluated and the average value close to their isotopic ratios in aerosols at JPP38 station. This means that the source of the artificial radioisotopes identified in the south of our country is due to Fukushima-1 accident caused. (author)

  14. Activity of Maly Aktru Glacier (Сentral Altai and changes tree line fluctuations in its basin for a historical period

    A. N. Nazarov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Major problems of dating of the glaciers activity from the wood residues found in moraines are discussed by the example of Maly Aktru Glacier. First of all, these are the underestimation of the glacier development features, the age of the sample itself and its content as well as losses of some outer rings. The study proves that disagreements between dendrochronological and radiocarbon ages of the samples are caused by manifestation of the Suess effect and contents of the wood cells. The reconstruction of June–July temperatures in the Aktru valley for two thousand years was used to reconstruct the altitudinal variability of the tree line thermal potential. Existence of a climatic optimum (I–IV A.D. had been revealed that brought to the higher position of the tree line in mid ages than its thermal potential could enable. On the basis of variability of growth indices for Siberian larch, it is shown that the medieval optimum stands out against a background of solely strong temperature depressions separating it from ancient and modern times, and the climate’s natural history is evidence that the current climate warming is an ordinary phenomenon.

  15. Palladium nanoparticles encapsulated in core-shell silica: A structured hydrogenation catalyst with enhanced activity for reduction of oxyanion water pollutants

    Wang, Yin

    2014-10-03

    Noble metal nanoparticles have been applied to mediate catalytic removal of toxic oxyanions and halogenated hydrocarbons in contaminated water using H2 as a clean and sustainable reductant. However, activity loss by nanoparticle aggregation and difficulty of nanoparticle recovery are two major challenges to widespread technology adoption. Herein, we report the synthesis of a core-shell-structured catalyst with encapsulated Pd nanoparticles and its enhanced catalytic activity in reduction of bromate (BrO3-), a regulated carcinogenic oxyanion produced during drinking water disinfection process, using 1 atm H2 at room temperature. The catalyst material consists of a nonporous silica core decorated with preformed octahedral Pd nanoparticles that were further encapsulated within an ordered mesoporous silica shell (i.e., SiO2@Pd@mSiO2). Well-defined mesopores (2.3 nm) provide a physical barrier to prevent Pd nanoparticle (6 nm) movement, aggregation, and detachment from the support into water. Compared to freely suspended Pd nanoparticles and SiO2@Pd, encapsulation in the mesoporous silica shell significantly enhanced Pd catalytic activity (by a factor of 10) under circumneutral pH conditions that are most relevant to water purification applications. Mechanistic investigation of material surface properties combined with Langmuir-Hinshelwood modeling of kinetic data suggest that mesoporous silica shell enhances activity by promoting BrO3- adsorption near the Pd active sites. The dual function of the mesoporous shell, enhancing Pd catalyst activity and preventing aggregation of active nanoparticles, suggests a promising general strategy of using metal nanoparticle catalysts for water purification and related aqueous-phase applications.

  16. Particle cross-field transport caused by magnetic fluctuations

    Electrostatic and magnetic fluctuations generally cause cross-field particle transport in confined plasmas. In magnetic fusion, core localized magnetic turbulence must be sufficiently low to obtain required energy confinement. It is shown as an example that growth rates of electromagnetic modes in a fusion relevant plasma should fall below about 10-3 inverse Alfven times at a density fluctuation level of 1%. Magnetic fluctuation induced diffusion is thus a serious concern for most magnetic confinement schemes. The scaling of particle confinement is such that the loss mechanism is weak in most current experiments. However, observed short energy confinement times, a few μs or Alfven times, in the Extrap T1 z-pinch experiments are shown to be consistent with the model. 6 refs

  17. Generalised tensor fluctuations and inflation

    Using an effective field theory approach to inflation, we examine novel properties of the spectrum of inflationary tensor fluctuations, that arise when breaking some of the symmetries or requirements usually imposed on the dynamics of perturbations. During single-clock inflation, time-reparameterization invariance is broken by a time-dependent cosmological background. In order to explore more general scenarios, we consider the possibility that spatial diffeomorphism invariance is also broken by effective mass terms or by derivative operators for the metric fluctuations in the Lagrangian. We investigate the cosmological consequences of the breaking of spatial diffeomorphisms, focussing on operators that affect the power spectrum of fluctuations. We identify the operators for tensor fluctuations that can provide a blue spectrum without violating the null energy condition, and operators for scalar fluctuations that lead to non-conservation of the comoving curvature perturbation on superhorizon scales even in single-clock inflation. In the last part of our work, we also examine the consequences of operators containing more than two spatial derivatives, discussing how they affect the sound speed of tensor fluctuations, and showing that they can mimic some of the interesting effects of symmetry breaking operators, even in scenarios that preserve spatial diffeomorphism invariance

  18. Multivariate fluctuation relations for currents

    This paper is devoted to multivariate fluctuation relations for all the currents flowing across an open system in contact with several reservoirs at different temperatures and chemical potentials, or driven by time-independent external mechanical forces. After some transient behavior, the open system is supposed to reach a nonequilibrium steady state that is controlled by the thermodynamic and mechanical forces, called the affinities. The time-reversal symmetry of the underlying Hamiltonian dynamics implies symmetry relations among the statistical properties of the fluctuating currents, depending on the values of the affinities. These multivariate fluctuation relations are not only compatible with the second law of thermodynamics, but they also imply remarkable relations between the linear or nonlinear response coefficients and the cumulants of the fluctuating currents. These relations include the Onsager and Casimir reciprocity relations, as well as their generalizations beyond linear response. Methods to deduce multivariate fluctuation relations are presented for classical, stochastic and quantum systems. In this way, multivariate fluctuation relations are obtained for energy or particle transport in the effusion of an ideal gas, heat transport in Hamiltonian systems coupled by Langevin stochastic forces to heat reservoirs, driven Brownian motion of an electrically charged particle subjected to an external magnetic field, and quantum electron transport in multi-terminal mesoscopic circuits where the link to the scattering approach is established. (paper)

  19. Multicomponent (Ce, Cu, Ni) oxides with cage and core-shell structures: tunable fabrication and enhanced CO oxidation activity

    Liu, Wei; Tang, Ke; Lin, Ming; June, Lay Ting Ong; Bai, Shi-Qiang; Young, David James; Li, Xu; Yang, Yan-Zhao; Hor, T. S. Andy

    2016-05-01

    Solvothermal synthesis of Cu2O cubes from Cu(OAc)2 in ethanol provided templates for tunable formation of novel multicomponent composites: hollow CeO2-Cu2O (1), core-shell NiO@Cu2O (2) and hollow CeO2-NiO-Cu2O (3). Composites 1-3 catalyze the oxidation of CO at a lower temperature than the parent Cu2O cubes.Solvothermal synthesis of Cu2O cubes from Cu(OAc)2 in ethanol provided templates for tunable formation of novel multicomponent composites: hollow CeO2-Cu2O (1), core-shell NiO@Cu2O (2) and hollow CeO2-NiO-Cu2O (3). Composites 1-3 catalyze the oxidation of CO at a lower temperature than the parent Cu2O cubes. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental section: materials and characterization; synthesis of materials; catalytic test. Tables S1-S3 and Fig. S1-S8. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr02383e

  20. DFT study of Fe-Ni core-shell nanoparticles: Stability, catalytic activity, and interaction with carbon atom for single-walled carbon nanotube growth

    Yang, Zhimin; Wang, Qiang, E-mail: wangqiang@njtech.edu.cn; Shan, Xiaoye; Zhu, Hongjun, E-mail: zhuhj@njtech.edu.cn [Department of Applied Chemistry, College of Science, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing 211816 (China); Li, Wei-qi [Department of Physics, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Chen, Guang-hui [Department of Chemistry, Shantou University, Shantou, Guangdong 515063 (China)

    2015-02-21

    Metal catalysts play an important role in the nucleation and growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). It is essential for probing the nucleation and growth mechanism of SWCNTs to fundamentally understand the properties of the metal catalysts and their interaction with carbon species. In this study, we systematically studied the stability of 13- and 55-atom Fe and Fe-Ni core-shell particles as well as these particles interaction with the carbon atoms using the density functional theory calculations. Icosahedral 13- and 55-atom Fe-Ni core-shell bimetallic particles have higher stability than the corresponding monometallic Fe and Ni particles. Opposite charge transfer (or distribution) in these particles leads to the Fe surface-shell displays a positive charge, while the Ni surface-shell exhibits a negative charge. The opposite charge transfer would induce different chemical activities. Compared with the monometallic Fe and Ni particles, the core-shell bimetallic particles have weaker interaction with C atoms. More importantly, C atoms only prefer staying on the surface of the bimetallic particles. In contrast, C atoms prefer locating into the subsurface of the monometallic particles, which is more likely to form stable metal carbides. The difference of the mono- and bimetallic particles on this issue may result in different nucleation and growth mechanism of SWCNTs. Our findings provide useful insights for the design of bimetallic catalysts and a better understanding nucleation and growth mechanism of SWCNTs.

  1. DFT study of Fe-Ni core-shell nanoparticles: Stability, catalytic activity, and interaction with carbon atom for single-walled carbon nanotube growth

    Metal catalysts play an important role in the nucleation and growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). It is essential for probing the nucleation and growth mechanism of SWCNTs to fundamentally understand the properties of the metal catalysts and their interaction with carbon species. In this study, we systematically studied the stability of 13- and 55-atom Fe and Fe-Ni core-shell particles as well as these particles interaction with the carbon atoms using the density functional theory calculations. Icosahedral 13- and 55-atom Fe-Ni core-shell bimetallic particles have higher stability than the corresponding monometallic Fe and Ni particles. Opposite charge transfer (or distribution) in these particles leads to the Fe surface-shell displays a positive charge, while the Ni surface-shell exhibits a negative charge. The opposite charge transfer would induce different chemical activities. Compared with the monometallic Fe and Ni particles, the core-shell bimetallic particles have weaker interaction with C atoms. More importantly, C atoms only prefer staying on the surface of the bimetallic particles. In contrast, C atoms prefer locating into the subsurface of the monometallic particles, which is more likely to form stable metal carbides. The difference of the mono- and bimetallic particles on this issue may result in different nucleation and growth mechanism of SWCNTs. Our findings provide useful insights for the design of bimetallic catalysts and a better understanding nucleation and growth mechanism of SWCNTs

  2. Fluctuation effects in bidirectional cargo transport

    Klein, Sarah; Santen, Ludger

    2014-01-01

    We discuss a theoretical model for bidirectional cargo transport in biological cells, which is driven by teams of molecular motors and subject to thermal fluctuations. The model describes explicitly the directed motion of the molecular motors on the filament. The motor-cargo coupling is implemented via linear springs. By means of extensive Monte Carlo simulations we show that the model describes the experimentally observed regimes of anomalous diffusion, i.e. subdiffusive behavior at short times followed by superdiffusion at intermediate times. The model results indicate that subdiffuse regime is induced by thermal fluctuations while the superdiffusive motion is generated by correlations of the motors' activity. We also tested the efficiency of bidirectional cargo transport in crowded areas by measuring its ability to pass barriers with increased viscosity. Our results show a remarkable gain of efficiency for high viscosities.

  3. Outcomes of polio eradication activities in Uttar Pradesh, India: the Social Mobilization Network (SM Net and Core Group Polio Project (CGPP

    Singh Vibha

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The primary strategy to interrupt transmission of wild poliovirus in India is to improve supplemental immunization activities and routine immunization coverage in priority districts with a focus on 107 high-risk blocks of western Uttar Pradesh and central Bihar. Villages or urban areas with a history of wild poliovirus transmission, or hard-to-reach or resistant populations are categorized as high-risk areas within blocks. The Social Mobilization Network (SM Net was formed in Uttar Pradesh in 2003 to support polio eradication efforts through improved planning, implementation and monitoring of social mobilization activities in those high-risk areas. In this paper, we examine the vaccination outcomes in districts of SM Net where the CORE Group works. Methods We carried out a secondary data analysis of routine monitoring information collected by the SM Net and the Government of India. These data include information about vaccination outcomes in SM Net areas and non-SM Net areas within the districts where the CORE Group operates. Statistical analysis was used to compare, between SM Net and non-SM Net areas, vaccination outcomes considered sensitive to social mobilization efforts of the SM Net. We employed Generalized Estimating Equations (GEE statistical method to account for Intra-cluster Correlation (ICC, and used 'Quasi-likelihood under the independence model criterion (QIC' as the model selection method. Results Vaccination outcomes in SM Net areas were as high as or higher than in non-SM Net areas. There was considerable variation in vaccination outcomes between districts. Conclusions While not conclusive, the results suggest that the social mobilization efforts of the SM Net and the CORE Group are helping to increase vaccination levels in high-risk areas of Uttar Pradesh. Vaccination outcomes in CORE Group areas were equal or higher than in non-CORE, non-SM Net areas. This occurred even though SM Net areas are those with

  4. Daylight photocatalytic activity of TiO2/SnO2 core/shell nanostructures: An experimental and density functional study

    Chetri, Pawan; Basyach, Priyanka; Choudhury, Amarjyoti

    2014-04-01

    TiO2/SnO2 core/shell nanostructures is prepared via a simple sol-gel process and compared with bare TiO2 nanoparticles. We carried out XRD, TEM and UV-Visible characterization for evaluating structural and optical properties. A better and promising day light photocatalytic activity is observed for TiO2/SnO2 in comparison to TiO2 in the degradation of methyl orange (MO). We have also done DFT calculation based VASP 5.2 to calculate Density of States of both the system. Finally, a correlation is established between theory and experiment.

  5. The commitment of Indra with the innovation as core of its activities; El compromiso de INDRA con la innovacion como clave de actividad de la empresa

    Martin de castro, G.; Lopez Saez, P.; Murcia Rivera, C.

    2007-07-01

    This paper shows the commitment of Indra, a Spanish firm which holds a position of outstanding leader in information technologies, with the innovation, that becomes the core of its activities, and which leads it into the collaboration with the University in R and D transfer processes. Indra is the biggest Spanish in the information technologies arena. It has 19.500 employees and a clear leadership in its market. In order to illustrate how it takes part in the R and D transfer processes, two specific cases of collaboration with Universidad Autonoma de Madrid (UAM) and Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (UPM) are provided. (Author) 6 refs.

  6. Core transfer

    Good news for all petroleum geoscientists, mining and environmental scientists, university researchers, and the like: Shell Oil Company has deeded its Midland core and sample repository to the Bureau of Economic Geology (BEG) at the University of Texas at Austin. The Midland repository includes more than 1 million linear meters of slab, whole core, and prepared cuttings. Data comprising one of the largest U.S. core collections—the geologic samples from wells drilled in Texas and 39 other states—are now public data and will be incorporated into the existing BEG database. Both Shell and the University of Texas at Austin are affiliated with the American Geological Institute, which assisted in arranging the transfer as part of its goal to establish a National Geoscience Data Repository System at regional centers across the United States.

  7. Fluctuations, Correlations and the Estimation of Concentrations inside Cells

    Pérez Ipiña, Emiliano; Ponce Dawson, Silvina

    2016-01-01

    Information transmission in cells occurs quite accurately even when concentration changes are “read” by individual binding sites. In this paper we study ligand number and site occupancy fluctuations when ligands diffuse and react going beyond the analyses that focus on their asymptotic decay. In this way we show that, for immobile binding sites, fluctuations in the number of bound molecules decay on a relatively fast scale before the asymptotic behavior kicks in. This result can explain the observed co-existence of highly fluctuating instantaneous transcriptional activities with accumulated mRNA concentrations that have relatively small noise levels. We also show that the initial stages of the decay in the bound molecule number fluctuations have one or two characteristic timescales depending on the concentration of free molecules. This transition can explain the changes in enzyme activity observed at the single molecule level. PMID:26962863

  8. Core BPEL

    Hallwyl, Tim; Højsgaard, Espen

    The Web Services Business Process Execution Language (WS-BPEL) is a language for expressing business process behaviour based on web services. The language is intentionally not minimal but provides a rich set of constructs, allows omission of constructs by relying on defaults, and supports language...... extensions. Combined with the fact that the language definition does not provide a formal semantics, it is an arduous task to work formally with the language (e.g. to give an implementation). In this paper we identify a core subset of the language, called Core BPEL, which has fewer and simpler constructs...

  9. High Wavenumber Density Fluctuation Measurement in the HT-7 Tokamak

    LI Yadong; LI Jiangang; ZHANG Xiaodong; ZHANG Tao; LIN Shiyao

    2009-01-01

    A three channel CO_2 laser forward scattering diagnostic system was set up to study the core plasma density fluctuation in the HT-7 tokamak.The range of the wavenumber measurement in the poloidal direction was kθ=12 cm~(-1) to 34 cm~(-1) and the wavenumber resolution was △k=2.5 cm~(-1).The wavenumber spectrum,the coexisting modes and the micro-instability eruption in experiments are presented.

  10. Sub-Kolmogorov-Scale Fluctuations in Fluid Turbulence

    Schumacher, Joerg

    2007-01-01

    We relate the intermittent fluctuations of velocity gradients in turbulence to a whole range of local dissipation scales generalizing the picture of a single mean dissipation length. The statistical distribution of these local dissipation scales as a function of Reynolds number is determined in numerical simulations of forced homogeneous isotropic turbulence with a spectral resolution never applied before which exceeds the standard one by at least a factor of eight. The core of the scale dist...

  11. Surface plasmon inhibited photo-luminescence activation in CdSe/ZnS core-shell quantum dots.

    Chen, Junsheng; Žídek, Karel; Abdellah, Mohamed; Al-Marri, Mohammed J; Zheng, Kaibo; Pullerits, Tõnu

    2016-06-29

    In a composite film of Cd x  Se y  Zn1-x  S1-y gradient core-shell quantum dots (QDs) and gold nanorods (NRs), the optical properties of the QDs are drastically affected by the plasmonic nanoparticles. We provide a careful study of the two-step formation of the film and its morphology. Subsequently we focus on QD luminescence photoactivation-a process induced by photochemical changes on the QD surface. We observe that even a sparse coverage of AuNRs can completely inhibit the photoactivation of the QDs' emission in the film. We demonstrate that the inhibition can be accounted for by a rapid energy transfer between QDs and AuNRs. Finally, we propose that the behavior of emission photoactivation can be used as a signature to distinguish between energy and electron transfer in the QD-based materials. PMID:27167726

  12. Oxygen-evolving Activity in Photosystem Ⅱ Core Complex of Photosynthetic Membrane in the Presence of Native Lipid

    YANG,Zhen-Le(阳振乐); WANG,Ze-Neng(王则能); LI,Liang-Bi(李良璧); KUANG,Ting-Yun(匡廷云)

    2002-01-01

    The techniques of oxygen electrode polarography and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy were employed to explore the involvement of digalactosyl diacylglycerol (DGDG) in functional and structural roles in the photosysten Ⅱ core com-plex (PSⅡCC). It was shown that DGDG exhibited the ability to stimulate the oxygen evolution in PSⅡCC, which was accompanied by the changes in the strucctures of PSⅡCC proteins.Tne results revealed that there existed hydrogen-bonding interactions between DGDG molecules and PSⅡCC proteins. It is most likely that the sites of PSⅡCC interaction with DGDG are in the extrinsic protein of 33 kDa.

  13. Atmospheric Methane in Ice Cores

    2005-01-01

    The reconstruction of air trapped in ice cores provides us the most direct information about atmospheric CH4 variations in the past history. Ice core records from the "Three Poles (Antarctica, Greenland and Tibetan Plateau)" reveal the detailed fluctuations of atmospheric CH4 concentration with time and are allowed to quantify the CH4 differences among latitudes. These data are indispensably in the farther study of the relationship between greenhouse gases and climatic change, and of the past changes in terrestrial CH4 emissions. Ice cores reconstruction indicates that atmospheric CH4 concentration has increased quickly since industrialization, and the present day's level of atmospheric CH4 (1800 ppbv) is unprecedented during the past Glacial-Interglacial climate cycles.

  14. Fluctuation analysis of rotational spectra

    The compound state rotational degree of freedom is ''damped'' in the sense that the electric quadrupole decay of a single quantum state with angular momentum I exhibits a spectrum of final states all having spin I-2. In actual experiments, the cascade of γ-rays associated with each of the members of the ensemble of compound nuclei uses each of the ''discrete'' transitions many more times than the ''continuum'' transitions. Relatively large and small fluctuations in the recorded coincidence spectrum ensue, respectively. The analysis of the fluctuations will be shown to be instrumental to gain insight into the phenomenon of rotational damping. For this purpose, two- and higher-fold coincidence spectra emitted from rotating nuclei are analyzed with respect to the count fluctuations. The coincidences from consecutive γ-rays emitted from discrete rotational bands generate ridges in the Eγ1.Eγ2 spectrum, and the fluctuation analysis of the ridges is based upon the ansatz of a random selection of transition energies from band to band. This ansatz is supported by a cranked mean-field calculation for the nucleus 168Yb, as well as by analyzing resolved bands in 168Yb and its neighbors. The fluctuation analysis of the central valley (Eγ1=Eγ2) is based upon the ansatz of fluctuations in the intensity of the transitions of Porter-Thomas type superposed on a smooth spectrum of transition energies. This ansatz is again supported by a mixed-band calculation. The mathematical treatment of count fluctuations is formulated in general (orig.)

  15. Sectoral Shifts and Cyclical Fluctuations Sectoral Shifts and Cyclical Fluctuations

    Richard Rogerson

    1991-03-01

    Full Text Available Sectoral Shifts and Cyclical Fluctuations This paper studies a two sector real business cycle model in which the sectors experience different trend rates of growth and labor mobility is costly. Predictions are derived concerning the correlation between sectoral reallocation of workers and the cycle. This correlation may be positive or negative depending upon whether the growing sector displays larger or smaller fluctuations than the shrinking sector. The post- World War II period has witnessed two major patterns of sectoral change in industrialized countries: movement out of agriculture and movement out of the industrial sector. The model's basic prediction is shown to be consistent with the observed pattern of reallocation.

  16. The nature of the solar activity during the Maunder Minimum revealed by the Guliya ice core record

    2000-01-01

    Whether the solar activity was very low, and especially whether the solar cycle existed, during the Maunder Minimum (1645-1715 AD), have been disputed for a long time. In this paper we use the Guliya NO3- data, which can reflect the solar activity, to analyze the characteristics of the solar activity during the Maunder Minimum. The results show that the solar activity was indeed low, and solar cycle displayed normal as present, i.e. about 11a, in that period. Moreover, it was found that the solar activity contains a 36-year periodic component probably, which might be related to the variations in the length of the sunspot cycle. This finding is of importance for the study of the relationship between the sun variability and the Earth climate change.

  17. Fluctuations in complex networks with variable dimensionality and heterogeneity

    Yoo, H.-H.; Lee, D.-S.

    2016-03-01

    Synchronizing individual activities is essential for the stable functioning of diverse complex systems. Understanding the relation between dynamic fluctuations and the connection topology of substrates is therefore important, but it remains restricted to regular lattices. Here we investigate the fluctuation of loads, assigned to the locally least-loaded nodes, in the largest-connected components of heterogeneous networks while varying their link density and degree exponents. The load fluctuation becomes finite when the link density exceeds a finite threshold in weakly heterogeneous substrates, which coincides with the spectral dimension becoming larger than 2 as in the linear diffusion model. The fluctuation, however, diverges also in strongly heterogeneous networks with the spectral dimension larger than 2. This anomalous divergence is shown to be driven by large local fluctuations at hubs and their neighbors, scaling linearly with degree, which can give rise to diverging fluctuations at small-degree nodes. Our analysis framework can be useful for understanding and controlling fluctuations in real-world systems.

  18. Co@Co3O4 core-shell particle encapsulated N-doped mesoporous carbon cage hybrids as active and durable oxygen-evolving catalysts.

    Li, Xinzhe; Fang, Yiyun; Wen, Lixin; Li, Feng; Yin, Guanlin; Chen, Wanmin; An, Xingcai; Jin, Jun; Ma, Jiantai

    2016-04-01

    Cobalt-based nanomaterials are promising candidates as efficient, affordable, and sustainable alternative electrocatalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER). However, the catalytic efficiency of traditional nanomaterials is still far below what is expected, because of their low stability in basic solutions and poor active site exposure yield. Here a unique hybrid nanomaterial comprising Co@Co3O4 core-shell nanoparticle (NP) encapsulated N-doped mesoporous carbon cages on reduced graphene oxide (denoted as Co@Co3O4@NMCC/rGO) is successfully synthesized via a carbonization and subsequent oxidation strategy of a graphene oxide (GO)-based metal-organic framework (MOF). Impressively, the special carbon cage structure is very important for not only leading to a large active surface area, enhanced mass/charge transport capability, and easy release of gas bubbles, but also preventing Co@Co3O4 NPs from aggregation and peeling off during prolonged electrochemical reactions. As a result, in alkaline media, the resulting hybrid materials catalyze the OER with a low onset potential of ∼1.50 V (vs. RHE) and an over-potential of only 340 mV to achieve a stable current density of 10 mA cm(-2) for at least 25 h. In addition, metallic Co cores in Co@Co3O4 provide an alternative way for electron transport and accelerate the OER rate. PMID:26914166

  19. Fabrication of Core-Shell Structural SiO2@H3[PM12O40] Material and Its Catalytic Activity

    Xin Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Through a natural tree grain template and sol-gel technology, the heterogeneous catalytic materials based on polyoxometalate compounds H3[PM12O40] encapsulating SiO2: SiO2@H3[PM12O40] (SiO2@PM12, M = W, Mo with core-shell structure had been prepared. The structure and morphology of the core-shell microspheres were characterized by the XRD, IR spectroscopy, UV-Vis absorbance, and SEM. These microsphere materials can be used as heterogeneous catalysts with high activity and stability for catalytic wet air oxidation of pollutant dyes safranine T (ST at room condition. The results show that the catalysts have excellent catalytic activity in treatment of wastewater containing 10 mg/L ST, and 94% of color can be removed within 60 min. Under different cycling runs, it is shown that the catalysts are stable under such operating conditions and the leaching tests show negligible leaching effect owing to the lesser dissolution.

  20. Recent advances in platinum monolayer electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction: Scale-up synthesis, structure and activity of Pt shells on Pd cores

    We have established a scale-up synthesis method to produce gram-quantities of Pt monolayer electrocatalysts. The core-shell structure of the Pt/Pd/C electrocatalyst has been verified using the HAADF-STEM Z-contrast images, STEM/EELS, and STEM/EDS line profile analysis. The atomic structure of this electrocatalyst and formation of a Pt monolayer on Pd nanoparticle surfaces were examined using in situ EXAFS. The Pt mass activity of the Pt/Pd/C electrocatalyst for ORR is considerably higher than that of commercial Pt/C electrocatalysts. The results with Pt monolayer electrocatalysts may significantly impact science of electrocatalysis and fuel-cell technology, as they have demonstrated an exceptionally effective way of using Pt that can resolve problems of other approaches, including electrocatalysts' inadequate activity and high Pt content.

  1. From cusps to cores: a stochastic model

    El-Zant, Amr; Combes, Francoise

    2016-01-01

    The cold dark matter model of structure formation faces apparent problems on galactic scales. Several threads point to excessive halo concentration, including central densities that rise too steeply with decreasing radius. Yet, random fluctuations in the gaseous component can 'heat' the centres of haloes, decreasing their densities. We present a theoretical model deriving this effect from first principles: stochastic variations in the gas density are converted into potential fluctuations that act on the dark matter; the associated force correlation function is calculated and the corresponding stochastic equation solved. Assuming a power law spectrum of fluctuations with maximal and minimal cutoff scales, we derive the velocity dispersion imparted to the halo particles and the relevant relaxation time. We further perform numerical simulations, with fluctuations realised as a Gaussian random field, which confirm the formation of a core within a timescale comparable to that derived analytically. Non-radial colle...

  2. Fluctuations in the multiparticle dynamics

    The appearance and properties of intermittent fluctuations in physical systems, in particular the formation of rare structures in transport phenomena are discussed. The distribution of fluctuations approaches a limiting log-normal statistical distribution. The log-normal distribution is introduced as a simple parametrization of the energy fluctuations leading to the subthreshold production of particles in nuclear collisions, and it is shown that it fits all available data both for total π0 production cross section as well as the π0 kinetic energy spectra for E/A < 90 MeV. It is suggested that the same universal distribution should also describe the subthreshold production of other hadrons like η and K. (author) 36 refs., 11 figs

  3. Fluctuational electrodynamics of hyperbolic metamaterials

    Guo, Yu

    2014-01-01

    We give a detailed account of equilibrium and non-equilibrium fluctuational electrodynamics of hyperbolic metamaterials. We show the unifying aspects of two different approaches; one utilizes the second kind of fluctuation dissipation theorem and the other makes use of the scattering method. We analyze the near-field of hyperbolic media at finite temperatures and show that the lack of spatial coherence can be attributed to the multi-modal nature of super-Planckian thermal emission. We also adopt the analysis to phonon-polaritonic super-lattice metamaterials and describe the regimes suitable for experimental verification of our predicted effects. The results reveal that far-field thermal emission spectra are dominated by epsilon-near-zero and epsilon-near-pole responses as expected from Kirchoff's laws. Our work should aid both theorists and experimentalists to study complex media and engineer equilibrium and non-equilibrium fluctuations for applications in thermal photonics.

  4. Kaon fluctuations from lattice QCD

    Noronha-Hostler, Jacquelyn; Gunther, Jana; Parotto, Paolo; Pasztor, Attila; Vazquez, Israel Portillo; Ratti, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    We show that it is possible to isolate a set of kaon fluctuations in lattice QCD. By means of the Hadron Resonance Gas (HRG) model, we calculate the actual kaon second-to-first fluctuation ratio, which receives contribution from primordial kaons and resonance decays, and show that it is very close to the one obtained for primordial kaons in the Boltzmann approximation. The latter only involves the strangeness and electric charge chemical potentials, which are functions of $T$ and $\\mu_B$ due to the experimental constraint on strangeness and electric charge, and can therefore be calculated on the lattice. This provides an unambiguous method to extract the kaon freeze-out temperature, by comparing the lattice results to the experimental values for the corresponding fluctuations.

  5. Fluctuation theorems for quantum processes

    Albash, Tameem; Marvian, Milad; Zanardi, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    We present fluctuation theorems and moment generating function equalities for generalized thermodynamic observables and quantum dynamics described by completely positive trace preserving (CPTP) maps, with and without feedback control. Our results include the quantum Jarzynski equality and Crooks fluctuation theorem, and clarify the special role played by the thermodynamic work and thermal equilibrium states in previous studies. We show that unitality replaces micro-reversibility as the condition for the physicality of the reverse process in our fluctuation theorems. We present an experimental application of our theory to the problem of extracting the system-bath coupling magnitude, which we do for a system of pairs of coupled superconducting flux qubits undergoing quantum annealing.

  6. A nano-disperse ferritin-core mimetic that efficiently corrects anemia without luminal iron redox activity.

    Powell, Jonathan J; Bruggraber, Sylvaine F A; Faria, Nuno; Poots, Lynsey K; Hondow, Nicole; Pennycook, Timothy J; Latunde-Dada, Gladys O; Simpson, Robert J; Brown, Andy P; Pereira, Dora I A

    2014-10-01

    The 2-5 nm Fe(III) oxo-hydroxide core of ferritin is less ordered and readily bioavailable compared to its pure synthetic analogue, ferrihydrite. We report the facile synthesis of tartrate-modified, nano-disperse ferrihydrite of small primary particle size, but with enlarged or strained lattice structure (~2.7Å for the main Bragg peak versus 2.6Å for synthetic ferrihydrite). Analysis indicated that co-precipitation conditions can be achieved for tartrate inclusion into the developing ferrihydrite particles, retarding both growth and crystallization and favoring stabilization of the cross-linked polymeric structure. In murine models, gastrointestinal uptake was independent of luminal Fe(III) reduction to Fe(II) and, yet, absorption was equivalent to that of ferrous sulphate, efficiently correcting the induced anemia. This process may model dietary Fe(III) absorption and potentially provide a side effect-free form of cheap supplemental iron. From the clinical editor: Small size tartrate-modified, nano-disperse ferrihydrite was used for efficient gastrointestinal delivery of soluble Fe(III) without the risk for free radical generation in murine models. This method may provide a potentially side effect-free form iron supplementation. PMID:24394211

  7. Development of core design and analysis technology for integral reactor; development of coolant activity and dose evaluation program

    Kang, Chang Sun; Kim, Byeong Soo; Go, Hyun Seok; Lee, Young Wook; Jang, Mee [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea)

    2002-03-01

    SMART, small- medium-sized integral reactor, is different from the customary electricity-generation PWR in design concepts and structures. The conventional coolant activity evaluation codes used in customary PWRs cannot be applied to SMART. In this study, SAEP(Specific Activity Evaluation Program) is developed that can be applied to both customary PWR and advanced reactor such as SMART. SAEP uses three methods(SAEP Ver.02, Ver.05, Ver.06) to evaluate coolant activity. They solve inhomogeneous linearly-coupled differential equations generated by considering nuclear system as N sub-components. Coolant activities of customary PWR are evaluated by use of SAEP. The results show good agreement with FSAR data. SAEP is used to evaluate coolant activities for SMART and the results are proposed in this study. These results show that SAEP is able to perform coolant activity evaluation for both customary PWR and advanced reactor such as SMART. In addition, with respect to radiation shielding optimization, conventional optimization methods and their characteristics related to radiation shielding are reviewed and analyzed. Strategies for proper usage of conventional methods are proposed to agree with the shielding design cases. 30 refs., 25 figs., 6 tabs. (Author)

  8. Work fluctuations and stochastic resonance

    We study Brownian particle motion in a double-well potential driven by an ac force. This system exhibits the phenomenon of stochastic resonance. Distribution of work done on the system over a drive period in the time asymptotic regime has been calculated. We show that fluctuations in the input energy or work done dominate the mean value. The mean value of work done over a period as a function of noise strength can also be used to characterize stochastic resonance in the system. We also discuss the validity of steady state fluctuation theorems in this particular system

  9. Fluctuation interactions of colloidal particles

    For like-charged colloidal particles, two mechanisms of attraction between them survive when the interparticle distance is larger than the Debye screening length. One of them is the conventional van der Waals attraction and the second is the attraction mechanism mediated by thermal fluctuations of particle position. The latter is related to the effective variable mass (Euler mass) of the particles produced by the fluid motion. The strongest attraction potential (up to the value of the temperature T) corresponds to the case of uncharged particles and a relatively large Debye screening length. In this case, the third attraction mechanism is involved. It is mediated by thermal fluctuations of the fluid density.

  10. Color confinement from fluctuating topology

    Kharzeev, Dmitri E

    2015-01-01

    QCD possesses a compact gauge group, and this implies a non-trivial topological structure of the vacuum. In this contribution to the Gribov-85 Memorial volume, we first discuss the origin of Gribov copies and their interpretation in terms of fluctuating topology in the QCD vacuum. We then describe the recent work with E. Levin that links the confinement of gluons and color screening to the fluctuating topology, and discuss implications for spin physics, high energy scattering, and the physics of quark-gluon plasma.

  11. Conductance fluctuations in a MOSFET

    We study the transport properties in a narrow MOSFET device, which consists of a two dimensional electronic waveguide, with an electric field applied in the transverse direction. Based on recent solutions of the Schroedinger equation for this system, we analyze the conductance fluctuations as a function of the electric field (the gate voltage), and of the Fermi energy. The statistical analysis of these fluctuations shows that the multichannel Poisson kernel description is valid also for this non-chaotic system. Besides the technological interest on MOSFET devices, it allows us to understand more fundamental quantities like the scattering properties of integrable systems. (author)

  12. Stronger enhancer II/core promoter activities of hepatitis B virus isolates of B2 subgenotype than those of C2 subgenotype.

    Qin, Yanli; Zhou, Xueshi; Jia, Haodi; Chen, Chaoyang; Zhao, Weifeng; Zhang, Jiming; Tong, Shuping

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotype C causes prolonged chronic infection and increased risk for liver cancer than genotype B. Our previous work revealed lower replication capacity of wild-type genotype C2 than B2 isolates. HBV DNA replication is driven by pregenomic RNA, which is controlled by core promoter (CP) and further augmented by enhancer I (ENI) and enhancer II (ENII). DNA fragments covering these regulatory elements were amplified from B2 and C2 isolates to generate luciferase reporter constructs. As ENII is fully embedded in CP, we inserted HBV DNA fragments in the sense orientation to determine their combined activities, and in the antisense orientation to measure enhancer activities alone. Genotype B2 isolates displayed higher ENI+ENII+CP, ENII+CP, and ENII activities, but not ENI or ENI+ENII activity, than C2 isolates. The higher ENII+CP activity was partly attributable to 4 positions displaying genotype-specific variability. Exchanging CP region was sufficient to revert the replication phenotypes of several B2 and C2 clones tested. These results suggest that a weaker ENII and/or CP at least partly accounts for the lower replication capacities of wild-type C2 isolates, which could drive the subsequent acquisition of CP mutations. Such mutations increase genome replication and are implicated in liver cancer development. PMID:27461034

  13. Measurement of the Effective Delayed Neutron Fraction in Three Different FR0-cores

    The effective delayed neutron fraction, βeff, has been measured in the three cores 3, 5 and 8 of the fast zero-power reactor FR0. The variance-to-mean method, in which the statistical fluctuations of the neutron density in the reactor is studied, was used. A 3He-gas scintillator was placed in the reflector and used as a neutron detector. It was made more sensitive to fast neutrons by surrounding it with polythene. Its efficiency, expressed as the number of counts per fission in the reactor, was determined using fission chambers with known efficiency placed in the core. The space distribution of the fission rate in the core was determined by foil activation technique. The experimental results were compared with theoretical βeff-values calculated with perturbation theory. The difference was about 3 % which is of the same order as the accuracy in the experimental values

  14. An analysis of reverberation fluctuation by mean square derivation

    2010-01-01

    A method for evaluating the fluctuation of the reverberation envelope is proposed and examined through simulation and real data in this paper.This method is different from the coefficient of variation which is only a function of the first and second order moment of the reverberation statistical model.By using the standard variance of the mean square derivate(MSD) of the reverberation envelope,the paper shows that the reverberation fluctuation is a function of the bandwidth of the emitted signal,and that a large value of the square variance means little fluctuation of the reverberation envelope.Theoretical studies show that the standard variance is proportional to the bandwidth of the emitted signal,so we conclude that less time width or larger bandwidth of the transmitted signal produces less fluctuation.Simulation and real active sonar data processing are used to verify this conclusion.

  15. Fluctuations of Bacteria-laden Microbeads in a Liquid

    Kara, Vural; Lissandrello, Charles; O'Connor, Joan; Romero Rodriguez, Jose Alberto; Li, Le; Ekinci, Kamil

    2015-11-01

    The motion of bacteria adhered on surfaces may lead to powerful approaches for novel diagnostic tests. Examples were recently shown using microcantilevers on which bacteria were adhered using surface chemistry. In these experiments, the presence of bacteria led to an increase in the fluctuations of the microcantilevers in the frequency range 1-100 Hz. After administering antibiotics, the fluctuations returned to their control value. Here, we build on these studies by monitoring the fluctuations of micro-beads with bacteria adhered on their surfaces. We coat the micro-beads with Poly D Lysine (PDL) in order to attach Escherichia coli. We measure the fluctuations of the beads in motility buffer media using an optical microscope with and without bacteria. We calculate the diffusion coefficients from the mean square displacements (MSD) and correlate these with the presence of bacteria on the beads. These studies lay the foundation for the development of a rapid antibiotic susceptibility test based on bacterial activity.

  16. Luminescence Studies of Age and Thermometric Properties in an Active Earthquake Zone: SAFOD Phase III Core Samples and Resetting Experiments

    Spencer, J. Q.; Hadizadeh, J.; Gratier, J. L.; Doan, M.

    2010-12-01

    This study is using luminescence emission from trapped charge within silicate minerals from SAFOD fault gouge samples to determine the age distribution of distinct deformation microstructures. Such age determination could help constrain some of the proposed micromechanical models for shear localization in fault gouge, in addition to providing more accurate time constraint on the seismic cycle itself. A limited number of studies have attempted to determine the absolute age of gouge components. Among these include the application of trapped charge dating techniques to fault gouge minerals, including electron spin resonance (ESR), thermoluminescence (TL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating methods. In all trapped-charge dating techniques, sample age is determined by assessing the amount of charge accumulated since the traps were vacated or reset to zero. The mechanism by which previous trapped-charge is reset in minerals in fault gouge is thought to be a combination of frictional heating and mechanical deformation, and these processes may be localized to grain surfaces. An added dating complexity specific to SAFOD samples is the high ambient temperature conditions, which acts as a barrier to charge storage in lower energy trapping sites. In this work luminescence experiments are being conducted on silicate minerals from whole-rock samples of consolidated fault gouge from the SAFOD Phase III core, and dynamically loaded samples of previously un-deformed Tarn granite. Initial studies indicate (i) the thermal and radiation history of the silicate lattice can be assessed with TL, (ii) trap resetting is evident in both TL and OSL data, (iii) a small charge-trapping window between drill hole ambient temperature of ~112°C and higher energy lattice excitation is evident from TL data, (iv) natural OSL data have low intensity but good luminescence characteristics, and (v) OSL equivalent dose (De) data from single-aliquot regenerative-dose (SAR) dating approaches

  17. In-core measuring instruments

    Purpose: To detect sounds generated in the reactor at high sensitivity and over in a wide frequency band and to accurately detect at which position boiling is generated. Constitution: In-core instruments are accommodated in a liquid of the same quality as the coolant in a guide tube corresponding to each of fuel assemblies. The measuring instruments are constituted by piezoelectric element, acoustic detector, thermoelectric couple, eddy-current type flowmeter and the like. When a boiling phenomenon appears in one of the fuel assemblies, the acoustic detector detects the temperature and the flow fluctuation of the coolant propagating the liquid, and sends out the output voltages of the same frequency from the M1 cable to the processing device. The processing device compares the output voltage signal with the memory of the acoustic signal in the normal state, and detects malfunction of the core to discriminate fuel assemblies in which boiling occurs. The fluctuations in the temperature and flow quantity due to the boiling phenomenon are detected by the eddy-current type flowmeter and thermoelectric couple, thus the malfunction of the core being detected rapidly. (Aizawa, K.)

  18. Spatial distribution of the neutron flux in the IEA-R1 reactor core obtained by means of foil activation

    A three-dimensional distribution of the neutron flux in IEA-R1 reactor, obtained by activating gold foils, is presented. The foils of diameter 8mm and thickness 0,013mm were mounted on lucite plates and located between the fuel element plates. Foil activities were measured using a 3x3 inches Nal(Tl) scintilation detector calibrated against a 4πβγ coincidence detector. Foil positions were chosen to minimize the errors of measurement; the overall estimated error on the measured flux is 5%. (Author)

  19. Linear modeling of glacier fluctuations

    Oerlemans, J.

    2012-01-01

    In this contribution a linear first-order differential equation is used to model glacier length fluctuations. This equation has two parameters describing the physical characteristics of a glacier: the climate sensitivity, expressing how the equilibrium glacier length depends on the climatic state, a

  20. Fluctuation Relation for Heat Engines

    Sinitsyn, N. A.

    2011-01-01

    We derive the exact equality, referred to as the fluctuation relation for heat engines (FRHE), that relates statistics of heat extracted from one of the two heat baths and the work per one cycle of a heat engine operation. Carnot's inequality of classical thermodynamics follows as a direct consequence of the FRHE.

  1. Firm default and aggregate fluctuations

    Jacobson, Tor; Linde, Jesper; Roszbach, Kasper

    2013-01-01

    This paper studies the relationship between macroeconomic fluctuations and corporate defaults while conditioning on industry affiliation and an extensive set of firm-specific factors. By using a panel data set for virtually all incorporated Swedish businesses over 1990-2009, a period which includes

  2. Child Labor and Aggregate Fluctuations

    Stéphane Pallage; Alice Fabre

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we build a dynamic general equilibrium model with heterogeneous agents to measure the welfare effect of banning child labor in an economy with aggregate fluctuations and idiosyncratic shocks to employment. We then design an unemployment insurance system that generates the endogenous elimination of child labor.

  3. Remanent magnetization stratigraphy of lunar cores

    Banerjee, S. K.; Gingrich, D.; Marvin, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    Depth dependent fluctuations have been observed in the natural remanent magnetizations (NRM) of drive cores and drill strings from Apollo 16 and 17 missions. Partial demagnetization of unstable secondary magnetizations and identification of characteristic error signals from a core which is known to have been recently disturbed allow us to identify and isolate the stable NRM stratigraphy in double drive core 60010/60009 and drill strings 60002-60004. The observed magnetization fluctuations persist after normalization to take into account depth dependent variations in the carriers of stable NRM. We tentatively ascribe the stable NRM stratigraphy to instantaneous records of past magnetic fields at the lunar surface and suggest that the stable NRM stratigraphy technique could develop as a new relative time-stratigraphic tool, to be used with other physical measurements such as relative intensity of ferromagnetic resonance and charged particle track density to study the evolution of the lunar regolith.

  4. Dual delivery of active antibactericidal agents and bone morphogenetic protein at sustainable high concentrations using biodegradable sheath-core-structured drug-eluting nanofibers.

    Hsu, Yung-Hen; Lin, Chang-Tun; Yu, Yi-Hsun; Chou, Ying-Chao; Liu, Shih-Jung; Chan, Err-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we developed biodegradable sheath-core-structured drug-eluting nanofibers for sustainable delivery of antibiotics (vancomycin and ceftazidime) and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein (rhBMP-2) via electrospinning. To prepare the biodegradable sheath-core nanofibers, we first prepared solutions of poly(d,l)-lactide-co-glycolide, vancomycin, and ceftazidime in 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-propanol and rhBMP-2 in phosphate-buffered solution. The poly(d,l)-lactide-co-glycolide/antibiotics and rhBMP-2 solutions were then fed into two different capillary tubes controlled by two independent pumps for coaxial electrospinning. The electrospun nanofiber morphology was observed under a scanning electron microscope. We further characterized the in vitro antibiotic release from the nanofibers via high-performance liquid chromatography and that of rhBMP-2 via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and alkaline phosphatase activity. We showed that the biodegradable coaxially electrospun nanofibers could release high vancomycin/ceftazidime concentrations (well above the minimum inhibition concentration [MIC]90) and rhBMP-2 for >4 weeks. These experimental results demonstrate that novel biodegradable nanofibers can be constructed with various pharmaceuticals and proteins for long-term drug deliveries. PMID:27574423

  5. Synthesis of polystyrene@(silver–polypyrrole) core/shell nanocomposite microspheres and study on their antibacterial activities

    Guo, Longhai; Ren, Shanshan; Qiu, Teng, E-mail: qiuteng@mail.buct.edu.cn; Wang, Leilei; Zhang, Jiangru; He, Lifan; Li, Xiaoyu, E-mail: lixy@mail.buct.edu.cn [Ministry of Education, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Key Laboratory of Carbon Fiber and Functional Polymer (China)

    2015-01-15

    We reported the synthesis of polystyrene@(silver–polypyrrole) (PS@(Ag–PPy)) nanocomposite microspheres with the well-defined core/shell structure, in which the functionalized PS microspheres by the sulfonic acid groups were employed as template. The diameter of the synthesized PS microsphere template and AgNP was 1.26 μm and 50 nm, respectively. In order to well control the redox reaction between Ag{sup +} and Py monomer and to avoid the accumulation of these AgNPs during synthesis process, the complexation of triethanolamine (TEA) and silver ion ([Ag(TEA){sub 2}]{sup +}) was employed as the oxidant, so that the generation rate of AgNPs was in turn decreased. Moreover, compared with the redox reaction between AgNO{sub 3} and Py, the introduction of [Ag(TEA){sub 2}]{sup +} ions resulted in the improved coverage and distribution of AgNPs around the surface of PS microspheres. Meanwhile, the loading amount of Ag–PPy nanocomposites on the final microspheres was adjustable. The increasing concentrations of Py monomer and [Ag(TEA){sub 2}]{sup +} ions resulted in the increase of Ag–PPy nanocomposite loading. The results of antibacterial experiment suggested that the synthesized PS@(Ag–PPy) composite microspheres showed the prominent antibacterial properties against both the Gram-negative bacteria of Escherichia coli and the Gram-positive bacteria of Staphylococcus aureus. For the bacteria with concentration at 1 × 10{sup 5} – 9×10{sup 5} cfu/mL, the microspheres can kill the bacteria above 3-log reduction with the concentration of PS@(Ag–PPy) composite microspheres at 50 μg/mL, in which the weight fraction of Py in the composite microspheres was above 10 wt%. When the weight fraction of Py in the composite microspheres was at 5 wt%, the 2-log reduction of in bacterial viability could also be obtained.Graphical Abstract.

  6. Synthesis of polystyrene@(silver–polypyrrole) core/shell nanocomposite microspheres and study on their antibacterial activities

    We reported the synthesis of polystyrene@(silver–polypyrrole) (PS@(Ag–PPy)) nanocomposite microspheres with the well-defined core/shell structure, in which the functionalized PS microspheres by the sulfonic acid groups were employed as template. The diameter of the synthesized PS microsphere template and AgNP was 1.26 μm and 50 nm, respectively. In order to well control the redox reaction between Ag+ and Py monomer and to avoid the accumulation of these AgNPs during synthesis process, the complexation of triethanolamine (TEA) and silver ion ([Ag(TEA)2]+) was employed as the oxidant, so that the generation rate of AgNPs was in turn decreased. Moreover, compared with the redox reaction between AgNO3 and Py, the introduction of [Ag(TEA)2]+ ions resulted in the improved coverage and distribution of AgNPs around the surface of PS microspheres. Meanwhile, the loading amount of Ag–PPy nanocomposites on the final microspheres was adjustable. The increasing concentrations of Py monomer and [Ag(TEA)2]+ ions resulted in the increase of Ag–PPy nanocomposite loading. The results of antibacterial experiment suggested that the synthesized PS@(Ag–PPy) composite microspheres showed the prominent antibacterial properties against both the Gram-negative bacteria of Escherichia coli and the Gram-positive bacteria of Staphylococcus aureus. For the bacteria with concentration at 1 × 105 – 9×105 cfu/mL, the microspheres can kill the bacteria above 3-log reduction with the concentration of PS@(Ag–PPy) composite microspheres at 50 μg/mL, in which the weight fraction of Py in the composite microspheres was above 10 wt%. When the weight fraction of Py in the composite microspheres was at 5 wt%, the 2-log reduction of in bacterial viability could also be obtained.Graphical Abstract

  7. Unprecedented photocatalytic activity of carbon coated/MoO3 core-shell nanoheterostructurs under visible light irradiation

    Ghaffar, Iqra; Warsi, Muhammad Farooq; Shahid, Muhammad; Shakir, Imran

    2016-05-01

    We reveal that nano-scale carbon layer deposited by hydrothermal process on molybdenum oxide (MoO3) nanowires surface significantly improve the light absorption range. Furthermore, the graphene-carbon coated MoO3 nanocopmosite (rGO/C-MoO3 nanocomposite) exhibits excellent chemical stability and enhanced photocatalytic activity for methylene blue in aqueous solution under visible light irradiation compared to the bare MoO3 nanowires and carbon coated MoO3 nanowires (C-MoO3 nanowires). The enhanced photocatalytic activity of rGO/C-MoO3 nanocomposite could be attributed to the extended light absorption range, better adsorptivity of dye molecules and efficient separation of photogenerated electrons and holes. Overall, this work provides new insights that the as synthesized rGO/C-MoO3 nanocomposite can be efficiently used as high performance photocatalysts to improve the environmental protection issues under visible light irradiation.

  8. Remote long-term registrations of sleep-wake rhythms, core body temperature and activity in marmoset monkeys

    Hoffmann, Kerstin; Coolen, Alex; Schlumbohm, Christina; Meerlo, Peter; Fuchs, Eberhard

    2012-01-01

    Initial studies in the day active marmoset monkey (Callithrix jacchus) indicate that the sleep-wake cycle of these non-human primates resembles that of humans and therefore conceivably represent an appropriate model for human sleep. The methods currently employed for sleep studies in marmosets are limited. The objective of this study was to employ and validate the use of specific remote monitoring system technologies that enable accurate long-term recordings of sleep-wake rhythms and the clos...

  9. Density fluctuations in simple stochastic reactor models

    A method to study density fluctuations in a nuclear reactor simultaneously taking into account intrinsic fluctuations usually modelled by a master equation and parametric noise usually modelled by stochastic kinetic equations is presented. The mean density and density-fluctuations variance are calculated for a simple point-reactor model in the presence of Gaussian white-noise fluctuations in the fission, capture and source event rates. They are also calculated in the case of dichotomous noise fluctuations in the source event rate. 'Crossed fluctuation' contributions to the density fluctuations are found that only appear when considering simultaneously intrinsic and parametric noise. These contributions allow distinction to be made between reactivity fluctuations due to fission-rate and capture-rate fluctuations. (author)

  10. Antioxidant activities of some new chromonyl-2,4-thiazolidinediones and chromonyl-2,4-imidazolidinediones having chromone cores.

    Berczyński, Paweł; Kładna, Aleksandra; Kruk, Irena; Piechowska, Teresa; Aboul-Enein, Hassan Y; Bozdağ-Dündar, Oya; Ceylan-Unlusoy, Meltem

    2013-11-01

    The antioxidant properties of 11 new synthesized chromonyl-2,4-thiazolidinediones and chromonyl-2,4-imidazolidinediones (CBs) were investigated. The antioxidant activities and mechanisms of the CBs interaction with reactive oxygen species (ROS) were clarified using various in vitro antioxidant assay methods including superoxide anion radical (O2(•-)), hydroxyl radical (HO(•)), 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl free radical (DPPH(•)) scavenging activity and the iron (II)-ferrozine complex formation. The potassium superoxide/18-crown-6 ether dissolved in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) was applied as a source of superoxide anion radical. Hydroxyl radicals were produced in the Fenton-like reaction Fe(II)+H2O2. Chemiluminescence, spectrophotometry, and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy using 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-1-oxide (DMPO) as spin trap were applied as the measurement techniques. The CBs examined that exhibited good free radical scavenging activity also showed strong total antioxidant power capacity. Possible mechanisms of antioxidation are proposed to explain the differences in the experimental results between the chromone derivatives with imidazolidine-2,4-dione ring and those with thiazolidine-2,4-dione ring. In conclusion, some of the new CBs are promising to be applied as inhibitors of free radicals. PMID:23860947

  11. Common Core: Victory Is Yours!

    Fink, Jennifer L. W.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses how to implement the Common Core State Standards in the classroom. She presents examples and activities that will leave teachers feeling "rosy" about tackling the new standards. She breaks down important benchmarks and shows how other teachers are doing the Core--and loving it!

  12. A multi-proxy lake core record from Lago Lungo, Rieti Basin, Lazio, Italy and its relation to human activities in the catchment during the last century

    Noble, Paula; Tunno, Irene; Mensing, Scott; Piovesan, Gianluca

    2016-04-01

    The lakes of the Rieti Basin have experienced extensive human modification dating back to pre-Roman times, yet lake archives indicate that the most profound changes to the aquatic ecosystem have occurred during the last century. Analysis of the upper ˜120 cm segment of a sediment core from Lago Lungo, dating back to ˜1830 CE, show changes in water quality and hydrologic inflow largely attributed to 20th century reclamation and land use activities. Lago Lungo is a shallow, small, eutrophic, hard water lake situated in an intermontaine alluvial plain ˜90 km NE of Rome. It is one of several remnant lakes in a poorly drained wetland area fed by numerous springs. Reclamation activities over the last century have substantially altered the drainage network affecting water delivery to the lakes and their connectivity. There are 3 interesting signals in the core. First, small Stephanodiscus species, associated with hypereutrophic conditions, appear after 1950, peak ˜1990, and may be attributed to increased use of chemical fertilizers and intensification of local agriculture. Elemental proxies from scanning XRF data (abundances of Ti, Si/Ti, and Ca) are consistent with increased eutrophication starting ˜1950. A decline in Stephanodicsus after 1990 reflects some improvement to the water quality following the lake's incorporation into a nature preserve and creation of a narrow vegetation buffer. Intermittent water quality measurements from 1982 onward corroborate the changes in trophic status interpreted from the core record. Second, a large change in the core stratigraphy, elemental geochemistry, and diatom composition occurs ˜1940 and is associated with several major reclamation efforts, including the rerouting of the Santa Susanna channel, which redirected large volumes of artesian inflows away from the lakes and estuarine system. Upstream, dams on the Turano and Salto rivers were also constructed, further affecting hydrological inflows into the basin. From ˜1900

  13. Effects of fluctuating glucose levels on neuronal cells in vitro.

    Russo, Vincenzo C; Higgins, Sandra; Werther, George A; Cameron, Fergus J

    2012-08-01

    There is increasing evidence for glucose fluctuation playing a role in the damaging effects of diabetes on various organs, including the brain. We aimed to study the effects of glycaemic variation (GV) upon mitochondrial activity using an in vitro human neuronal model. The metabolic disturbance of GV in neuronal cells, was mimicked via exposure of neuroblastoma cells SH-SY5Y to constant glucose or fluctuating (i.e. 6 h cycles) for 24 and 48 h. Mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity was determined via MTT assay. Cell mitochondrial activity (MTT) was moderately decreased in constant high glucose, but markedly decreased following 24 and 48 h of cyclical glucose fluctuations. Glucose transport determined via 2-deoxy-D-[1-(14)C] glucose uptake was regulated in an exaggerated manner in response to glucose variance, accompanied by modest changes in GLUT 1 mRNA abundance. Osmotic components of these glucose effects were investigated in the presence of the osmotic-mimics mannitol and L: -glucose. Both treatments showed that fluctuating osmolality did not result in a significant change in mitochondrial activity and had no effects on (14)Cglucose uptake, suggesting that adverse effects on mitochondrial function were specifically related to metabolically active glucose fluctuations. Apoptosis gene expression showed that both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways were modulated by glucose variance, with two major response clusters corresponding to (i) glucose stress-modulated genes, (ii) glucose mediated osmotic stress-modulated genes. Gene clustering analysis by STRING showed that most of the glucose stress-modulated genes were components of the intrinsic/mitochondrial apoptotic pathway including Bcl-2, Caspases and apoptosis executors. On the other hand the glucose mediated osmotic stress-modulated genes were mostly within the extrinsic apoptotic pathway, including TNF receptor and their ligands and adaptors/activators/initiators of apoptosis. Fluctuating glucose levels

  14. Calculation and analysis of thermal–hydraulics fluctuations in pressurized water reactors

    Highlights: • Single-phase thermal–hydraulics noise equations are originally derived in the frequency domain. • The fluctuations of all the coolant parameters are calculated, without any simplifying assumptions. • The radial distribution of the temperature fluctuations in the fuel, gap and cladding are taken into account. • The closed-loop calculations are performed by means of the point kinetics noise theory. • Both the space- and frequency-dependence of the thermal–hydraulics fluctuations are analyzed. - Abstract: Analysis of thermal–hydraulics fluctuations in pressurized water reactors (e.g., local and global temperature or density fluctuations, as well as primary and charging pumps fluctuations) has various applications in calculation or measurement of the core dynamical parameters (temperature or density reactivity coefficients) in addition to thermal–hydraulics surveillance and diagnostics. In this paper, the thermal–hydraulics fluctuations in PWRs are investigated. At first, the single-phase thermal–hydraulics noise equations (in the frequency domain) are originally derived, without any simplifying assumptions. The fluctuations of all the coolant parameters, as well as the radial distribution of the temperature fluctuations in the fuel, gap and cladding are taken into account. Then, the derived governing equations are discretized using the finite volume method (FVM). Based on the discretized equations and the proposed algorithm of solving, a single heated channel noise calculation code (SHC-Noise) is developed, by which the steady-state and fluctuating parameters of PWR fuel assemblies can be calculated. The noise sources include the inlet coolant temperature and velocity fluctuations, in addition to the power density noises. The developed SHC-Noise code is benchmarked in different cases and scenarios. Furthermore, to show the effects of the power feedbacks, the closed-loop calculations are performed by means of the point kinetics noise

  15. Development of KSTAR ECE imaging system for measurement of temperature fluctuations and edge density fluctuations

    Yun, G. S.; Lee, W.; Choi, M. J.; Kim, J. B.; Park, H. K. [Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang, Gyungbuk 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Domier, C. W.; Tobias, B.; Liang, T.; Kong, X.; Luhmann, N. C. Jr. [University of California, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Donne, A. J. H. [FOM Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands)

    2010-10-15

    The ECE imaging (ECEI) diagnostic tested on the TEXTOR tokamak revealed the sawtooth reconnection physics in unprecedented detail, including the first observation of high-field-side crash and collective heat transport [H. K. Park, N. C. Luhmann, Jr., A. J. H. Donneet al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 195003 (2006)]. An improved ECEI system capable of visualizing both high- and low-field sides simultaneously with considerably better spatial coverage has been developed for the KSTAR tokamak in order to capture the full picture of core MHD dynamics. Direct 2D imaging of other MHD phenomena such as tearing modes, edge localized modes, and even Alfven eigenmodes is expected to be feasible. Use of ECE images of the optically thin edge region to recover 2D electron density changes during L/H mode transitions is also envisioned, providing powerful information about the underlying physics. The influence of density fluctuations on optically thin ECE is discussed.

  16. Development of KSTAR ECE imaging system for measurement of temperature fluctuations and edge density fluctuations

    The ECE imaging (ECEI) diagnostic tested on the TEXTOR tokamak revealed the sawtooth reconnection physics in unprecedented detail, including the first observation of high-field-side crash and collective heat transport [H. K. Park, N. C. Luhmann, Jr., A. J. H. Donneet al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 195003 (2006)]. An improved ECEI system capable of visualizing both high- and low-field sides simultaneously with considerably better spatial coverage has been developed for the KSTAR tokamak in order to capture the full picture of core MHD dynamics. Direct 2D imaging of other MHD phenomena such as tearing modes, edge localized modes, and even Alfven eigenmodes is expected to be feasible. Use of ECE images of the optically thin edge region to recover 2D electron density changes during L/H mode transitions is also envisioned, providing powerful information about the underlying physics. The influence of density fluctuations on optically thin ECE is discussed.

  17. Phosphoproteomic analysis of protein kinase C signaling in Saccharomyces cerevisiae reveals Slt2 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-dependent phosphorylation of eisosome core components.

    Mascaraque, Victoria; Hernáez, María Luisa; Jiménez-Sánchez, María; Hansen, Rasmus; Gil, Concha; Martín, Humberto; Cid, Víctor J; Molina, María

    2013-03-01

    The cell wall integrity (CWI) pathway of the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been thoroughly studied as a paradigm of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. It consists of a classic MAPK module comprising the Bck1 MAPK kinase kinase, two redundant MAPK kinases (Mkk1 and Mkk2), and the Slt2 MAPK. This module is activated under a variety of stimuli related to cell wall homeostasis by Pkc1, the only member of the protein kinase C family in budding yeast. Quantitative phosphoproteomics based on stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture is a powerful tool for globally studying protein phosphorylation. Here we report an analysis of the yeast phosphoproteome upon overexpression of a PKC1 hyperactive allele that specifically activates CWI MAPK signaling in the absence of external stimuli. We found 82 phosphopeptides originating from 43 proteins that showed enhanced phosphorylation in these conditions. The MAPK S/T-P target motif was significantly overrepresented in these phosphopeptides. Hyperphosphorylated proteins provide putative novel targets of the Pkc1-cell wall integrity pathway involved in diverse functions such as the control of gene expression, protein synthesis, cytoskeleton maintenance, DNA repair, and metabolism. Remarkably, five components of the plasma-membrane-associated protein complex known as eisosomes were found among the up-regulated proteins. We show here that Pkc1-induced phosphorylation of the eisosome core components Pil1 and Lsp1 was not exerted directly by Pkc1, but involved signaling through the Slt2 MAPK module. PMID:23221999

  18. Inference of Heating Properties from "Hot" Non-flaring Plasmas in Active Region Cores I. Single Nanoflares

    Barnes, W T; Bradshaw, S J

    2016-01-01

    The properties expected of "hot" non-flaring plasmas due to nanoflare heating in active regions are investigated using hydrodynamic modeling tools, including a two-fluid development of the EBTEL code. Here we study a single nanoflare and show that while simple models predict an emission measure distribution extending well above 10 MK that is consistent with cooling by thermal conduction, many other effects are likely to limit the existence and detectability of such plasmas. These include: differential heating between electrons and ions, ionization non-equilibrium and, for short nanoflares, the time taken for the coronal density to increase. The most useful temperature range to look for this plasma, often called the "smoking gun" of nanoflare heating, lies between $10^{6.6}$ and $10^7$ K. Signatures of the actual heating may be detectable in some instances.

  19. Influence Of Tools Input/Output Requirements On Managers Core Front End Activities In New Product Development

    Appio, Francesco P.; Achiche, Sofiane; Minin, Alberto Di;

    2011-01-01

    use of such tools and the ways that new product development processes can change accordingly. The starting hypothesis that we test here, using 5 case studies in Italy and Denmark, is that managers have to fully understand the needed input requirements and be aware of potential of such tools, in order......The object of analysis of this explorative research is the Fuzzy Front End of Innovation in Product Development, described by those activities going from the opportunity identification to the concept definition. Business scholars have shown that confusion in terms of goals and different ideas about...... product development process is carried-out. First results show that managers have a low/very low awareness of tools’ inputs/outputs requirements. This gives life to the problem according to which managers cannot select appropriate tools if they do not know their basic characteristics, challenging the...

  20. Rapid climate fluctuations over the past millennium: evidence from a lacustrine record of Basomtso Lake, southeastern Tibetan Plateau

    Li, Kai; Liu, Xingqi; Herzschuh, Ulrike; Wang, Yongbo

    2016-04-01

    Abrupt climate changes and fluctuations over short time scales are superimposed on long-term climate changes. Understanding rapid climate fluctuations at the decadal time scale over the past millennium will enhance our understanding of patterns of climate variability and aid in forecasting climate changes in the future. In this study, climate changes on the southeastern Tibetan Plateau over the past millennium were determined from a 4.82-m-long sediment core from Basomtso Lake. At the centennial time scale, the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA), Little Ice Age (LIA) and Current Warm Period (CWP) are distinct in the Basomtso region. Rapid climate fluctuations inferred from five episodes with higher sediment input and likely warmer conditions, as well as seven episodes with lower sediment input and likely colder conditions, were well preserved in our record. These episodes with higher and lower sediment input are characterized by abrupt climate changes and short time durations. Spectral analysis indicates that the climate variations at the centennial scale on the southeastern Tibetan Plateau are influenced by solar activity during the past millennium.

  1. Fluctuations and confinement in ATF

    In the period immediately prior to the suspension of ATF operation in November, 1991, a great deal of emphasis was palced on investigations of the fundamental mechanisms controlling confinement in this device. At that time, measurements of the density fluctuations throughout the plasma volume indicated the existence of theoretically predicted dissipative trapped electron and resistive interchange instabilities. These identifications were supported by results of dynamic configuration scans of the magnetic fields during which the extent of the magnetic well, shear, and fraction of confined trapped particles were changed continuously. Interpretation of the data from these experiments has been an ongoing exercise. Most recently, analysis of discharges employing strong gas puffing to change density gradients and fluctuation levels have strengthened the view that dissipative trapped electron modes may be present but do not play a significant direct role in energy transport. The present paper summarizes the current understanding concerning the identification of instabilities and their relationship to confinement in ATF

  2. Fluctuating epidemics on adaptive networks

    Shaw, Leah B

    2008-01-01

    A model for epidemics on an adaptive network is considered. Nodes follow an SIRS (susceptible-infective-recovered-susceptible) pattern. Connections are rewired to break links from non-infected nodes to infected nodes and are reformed to connect to other non-infected nodes, as the nodes that are not infected try to avoid the infection. Monte Carlo simulation and numerical solution of a mean field model are employed. The introduction of rewiring affects both the network structure and the epidemic dynamics. Degree distributions are altered, and the average distance from a node to the nearest infective increases. The rewiring leads to regions of bistability where either an endemic or a disease-free steady state can exist. Fluctuations around the endemic state and the lifetime of the endemic state are considered. The fluctuations are found to exhibit power law behavior.

  3. Dissipative Dynamics of Quantum Fluctuations

    Benatti, F; Floreanini, R

    2015-01-01

    One way to look for complex behaviours in many-body quantum systems is to let the number $N$ of degrees of freedom become large and focus upon collective observables. Mean-field quantities scaling as $1/N$ tend to commute, whence complexity at the quantum level can only be inherited from complexity at the classical level. Instead, fluctuations of microscopic observables scale as $1/\\sqrt{N}$ and exhibit collective Bosonic features, typical of a mesoscopic regime half-way between the quantum one at the microscopic level and the classical one at the level of macroscopic averages. Here, we consider the mesoscopic behaviour emerging from an infinite quantum spin chain undergoing a microscopic dissipative, irreversible dynamics and from global states without long-range correlations and invariant under lattice translations and dynamics. We show that, from the fluctuations of one site spin observables whose linear span is mapped into itself by the dynamics, there emerge bosonic operators obeying a mesoscopic dissipa...

  4. Velocity fluctuations of fission fragment.

    Llanes Estrada, Felipe José; Martínez Carmona, Belén; Muñoz Martínez, José L.

    2016-01-01

    We propose event by event velocity fluctuations of nuclear fission fragments as an additional interesting observable that gives access to the nuclear temperature in an independent way from spectral measurements and relates the diffusion and friction coefficients for the relative fragment coordinate in Kramers-like models (in which some aspects of fission can be understood as the diffusion of a collective variable through a potential barrier). We point out that neutron emission by the heavy fr...

  5. The fluctuations of quadrangular flow

    Giacalone, Giuliano; Noronha-Hostler, Jacquelyn; Ollitrault, Jean-Yves

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS Collaboration has measured for the first time the fourth cumulant of quadrangular flow, $v_4\\{4\\}^4$. Unlike the fourth cumulants of elliptic and triangular flows, it presents a change of sign above 30\\% centrality. We show that this change of sign is predicted by event-by-event hydrodynamics. We argue that it results from the combined effects of a nonlinear hydrodynamic response, which couples quadrangular flow to elliptic flow, and elliptic flow fluctuations.

  6. Shielding vacuum fluctuations with graphene

    Ribeiro, Sofia; Scheel, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    The Casimir-Polder interaction of ground-state and excited atoms with graphene is investigated with the aim to establish whether graphene systems can be used as a shield for vacuum fluctuations of an underlying substrate. We calculate the zero-temperature Casimir-Polder potential from the reflection coefficients of graphene within the framework of the Dirac model. For both doped and undoped graphene we show limits at which graphene could be used effectively as a shield. Additional results are...

  7. Fluctuating asymmetry and psychometric intelligence.

    Furlow, F B; Armijo-Prewitt, T; Gangestad, S W; Thornhill, R.

    1997-01-01

    Little is known about the genetic nature of human psychometric intelligence (IQ), but it is widely assumed that IQ's heritability is at loci for intelligence per se. We present evidence consistent with a hypothesis that interindividual IQ differences are partly due to heritable vulnerabilities to environmental sources of developmental stress, an indirect genetic mechanism for the heritability of IQ. Using fluctuating asymmetry (FA) of the body (the asymmetry resulting from errors in the devel...

  8. Cyclical Fluctuations in Workplace Accidents

    Boone, J.; van Ours, J.C.

    2002-01-01

    This Paper presents a theory and an empirical investigation on cyclical fluctuations in workplace accidents. The theory is based on the idea that reporting an accident dents the reputation of a worker and raises the probability that he is fired. Therefore a country with a high or an increasing unemployment rate has a low (reported) workplace accident rate. The empirical investigation concerns workplace accidents in OECD countries. The analysis confirms that workplace accident rates are invers...

  9. Optimal supply against fluctuating demand

    Nobuyuki Sakai; Hisanori Kudoh

    2005-01-01

    Sornette et al. claimed that the optimal supply does not agree with the average demand, by analyzing a bakery model where a daily demand fluctuates with a uniform distribution. In this note, we extend the model to general probability distributions, and obtain the formula of the optimal supply for Gaussian distribution, which is more realistic. Our result is useful in a real market to earn the largest income on average.

  10. Optimal Supply against Fluctuating Demand

    SAKAI, Nobuyuki; Kudo, Hisanori

    2006-01-01

    Contrary to the common sense in economy, the optimal supply does not always agree with the average demand. This was pointed out by Sornette et al. (1999), who analyzed a bakery model where a daily demand fluctuates with a uniform distribution. In this note, we extend the model to general probability distributions, and obtain the formula of the optimal supply for Gaussian distribution, which is more realistic. Our result is useful in a real market to earn the largest income on average.

  11. Reversible Diffusion by Thermal Fluctuations

    Donev, A.; Fai, T. G.; Vanden-Eijnden, and E.

    2013-01-01

    A model for diffusion in liquids that couples the dynamics of tracer particles to a fluctuating Stokes equation for the fluid is investigated in the limit of large Schmidt number. In this limit, the concentration of tracers is shown to satisfy a closed-form stochastic advection-diffusion equation that is used to investigate the collective diffusion of hydrodynamically-correlated tracers through a combination of Eulerian and Lagrangian numerical methods. This analysis indicates that transport ...

  12. Quantum fluctuations stabilize skyrmion textures

    Roldán-Molina, A.; Santander, M. J.; Núñez, A.S.; Fernández Rossier, Joaquín

    2015-01-01

    We study the quantum spin waves associated to skyrmion textures. We show that the zero-point energy associated to the quantum spin fluctuations of a noncollinear spin texture produce Casimir-like magnetic fields. We study the effect of these Casimir fields on the topologically protected noncollinear spin textures known as skyrmions. In a Heisenberg model with Dzyalonshinkii-Moriya interactions, chosen so the classical ground state displays skyrmion textures, we calculate the spin-wave spectru...

  13. Boltzmann equation and hydrodynamic fluctuations.

    Colangeli, Matteo; Kröger, Martin; Ottinger, Hans Christian

    2009-11-01

    We apply the method of invariant manifolds to derive equations of generalized hydrodynamics from the linearized Boltzmann equation and determine exact transport coefficients, obeying Green-Kubo formulas. Numerical calculations are performed in the special case of Maxwell molecules. We investigate, through the comparison with experimental data and former approaches, the spectrum of density fluctuations and address the regime of finite Knudsen numbers and finite frequencies hydrodynamics. PMID:20364972

  14. Boltzmann equation and hydrodynamic fluctuations

    Colangeli, M.; Kroger, M.; Ottinger, H. C.

    2009-01-01

    We apply the method of invariant manifolds to derive equations of generalized hydrodynamics from the linearized Boltzmann equation and determine exact transport coefficients, obeying Green-Kubo formulas. Numerical calculations are performed in the special case of Maxwell molecules. We investigate, through the comparison with experimental data and former approaches, the spectrum of density fluctuations and address the regime of finite Knudsen numbers and finite frequencies hydrodynamics.

  15. Fluctuating-friction molecular motors

    Marrucci, Lorenzo; Paparo, Domenico; Kreuzer, Markus

    2001-01-01

    We show that the correlated stochastic fluctuation of the friction coefficient can give rise to long-range directional motion of a particle undergoing Brownian random walk in a constant periodic energy potential landscape. The occurrence of this motion requires the presence of two additional independent bodies interacting with the particle via friction and via the energy potential, respectively, which can move relative to each other. Such three-body system generalizes the classical Brownian r...

  16. Quantum friction and fluctuation theorems

    Intravaia, F.; Behunin, R. O.; Dalvit, D. A. R.

    2013-01-01

    We use general concepts of statistical mechanics to compute the quantum frictional force on an atom moving at constant velocity above a planar surface. We derive the zero-temperature frictional force using a non-equilibrium fluctuation-dissipation relation, and show that in the large-time, steady-state regime quantum friction scales as the cubic power of the atom's velocity. We also discuss how approaches based on Wigner-Weisskopf and quantum regression approximations fail to predict the corr...

  17. Hot ammonia around young O-type stars. III. High-mass star formation and hot core activity in W51 Main

    Goddi, C.; Ginsburg, A.; Zhang, Q.

    2016-04-01

    ), based on asymmetric spectral profiles (skewed toward the blueshifted component) in optically thick emission lines of NH3. The relatively large amount of hot molecular gas available for accretion (~20 M⊙ within about half an arcsecond or 2500 AU), along with strong outflow and maser activity, indicates that the main accretion center in the W51e2 complex is W51e2-E rather than W51e2-W. Finally, W51e2-NW and W51e8, although less dense (nH2 ~ 2 × 107 cm-3 and ~ 3 × 106 cm-3), are also hot cores (Tgas ~ 140 and 200 K) and contain a significant amount of molecular gas (Mgas ~ 30M⊙ and ~70 M⊙, respectively). We speculate that they may host high-mass YSOs either at a previous evolutionary stage or with a mass that is lower than W51e2-E and W51e2-W. Conclusions: Using high-angular resolution multilevel imaging of highly excited NH3 metastable lines, we characterized the physical and dynamical properties of four individual high-mass young stars forming in the W51 Main clump. The reduced NH3 data cubes as FITS files are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/589/A44

  18. Primordial fluctuations without scalar fields

    Magueijo, J

    2009-01-01

    We revisit the question of whether fluctuations in hydrodynamical, adiabatical matter could explain the observed structures in our Universe. We consider matter with variable equation of state $w=p_0/\\ep_0$ and a concomitant (under the adiabatic assumption) density dependent speed of sound, $c_s$. We find a limited range of possibilities for a set up when modes start inside the Hubble radius, then leaving it and freezing out. For expanding Universes, power-law $w(\\ep_0)$ models are ruled out (except when $c_s^2\\propto w \\ll 1$, requiring post-stretching the seeded fluctuations); but sharper profiles in $c_s$ do solve the horizon problem. Among these, a phase transition in $c_s$ is notable for leading to scale-invariant fluctuations if the initial conditions are thermal. For contracting Universes all power-law $w(\\ep_0)$ solve the horizon problem, but only one leads to scale-invariance: $w\\propto \\ep_0^2$ and $c_s\\propto \\ep_0$. This model bypasses a number of problems with single scalar field cyclic models (fo...

  19. Geomorphic response of an active metamorphic core-complex in a collisional orogen: Example from the Lunggar Shan, Southern Tibet

    We present structural and neotectonic mapping from the Lunggar Shan rift in southern Tibet. The Lunggar Shan is a N-trending mountain range ∼70 km long N-S and up to 40 km wide E-W. The Lunggar Shan is bounded on its east side by a low-angle (0) east-dipping detachment fault that juxtaposes mylonitic gneiss and variably deformed granites in its footwall against alluvial fans and Neogene gravels in its hangingwall. Foliations in the mylonitic footwall dip 40 m of throw on individual scarps. An intriguing observation is that an intrabasinal topographic high is actively developing near areas of inferred maximum extension, with lacustrine sediments being uplifted and eroded. This observation indicates that the rift basin initially developed as a typical half-graben system that underwent a transition from deposition, to uplift and erosion perhaps as a result of isostatic rebound of the footwall at depth, warping the overlying hangingwall basin. If correct, the Lunggar Shan may represent a modern analogue to the supradetachment basin model

  20. The preferentially magnified active nucleus in IRAS F10214+4724 - III. VLBI observations of the radio core

    Deane, R P; Garrett, M A; Heywood, I; Jarvis, M J; Klöckner, H -R; Marshall, P J; McKean, J P

    2013-01-01

    We report 1.7 GHz Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) observations of IRAS F10214+4724, a lensed z=2.3 obscured quasar with prodigious star formation. We detect what we argue to be the obscured active nucleus with an effective angular resolution of ~100 mas northward of the arc centre of curvature. This leads to a source plane inversion that places the European VLBI Network detection to within milli-arcseconds of the modelled cusp caustic, resulting in a very large magnification (\\mu ~70), over an order of magnitude larger than the CO (1-0) derived magnification of a spatially resolved JVLA map, using the same lens model. We estimate the quasar bolometric luminosity from a number of independent techniques and with our X-ray modelling find evidence that the AGN may be close to Compton-thick, with an intrinsic bolometric luminosity log(L_{bol,QSO} / L_sun) = 11.34 +- 0.27 dex. We make the first black hole mass estimate of IRAS F10214+4724 and find log(M_{BH}/M_sun) = 8.36 +- 0.56 which suggests a low black...

  1. Correlated interaction fluctuations in photosynthetic complexes

    Vlaming, Sebastiaan M

    2011-01-01

    The functioning and efficiency of natural photosynthetic complexes is strongly influenced by their embedding in a noisy protein environment, which can even serve to enhance the transport efficiency. Interactions with the environment induce fluctuations of the transition energies of and interactions between the chlorophyll molecules, and due to the fact that different fluctuations will partially be caused by the same environmental factors, correlations between the various fluctuations will occur. We argue that fluctuations of the interactions should in general not be neglected, as these have a considerable impact on population transfer rates, decoherence rates and the efficiency of photosynthetic complexes. Furthermore, while correlations between transition energy fluctuations have been studied, we provide the first quantitative study of the effect of correlations between interaction fluctuations and transition energy fluctuations, and of correlations between the various interaction fluctuations. It is shown t...

  2. Predicting growth fluctuation in network economy

    Maeno, Yoshiharu

    2011-01-01

    This study presents a method to predict the growth fluctuation of firms interdependent in a network economy. The risk of downward growth fluctuation of firms is calculated from the statistics on Japanese industry.

  3. Non-Cancellation of Quantum Geometry Fluctuations

    Parkinson, Victor

    2013-01-01

    Quantum vacuum fluctuations tend to be strongly anti-correlated, which reduces their observable effects. However, time dependence can upset the cancellation of these anti-correlated fluctuations and greatly enhance their effects. This form of non-cancellation is investigated for spacetime geometry fluctuations driven by the vacuum stress tensor fluctuations of the electromagnetic field. The time dependence can take the form of sinusoidal conformal metric perturbations or of time variation of the gravitational constant, both of which can arise from modifications of the gravitational action. We examine two observable quantities, luminosity fluctuations and redshift fluctuations, both of which can arise from stress tensor fluctuations. We find that both quantities can grow with increasing distance between a source and an observer. This secular growth raises the possibility of observing spacetime geometry fluctuation effects at length scales far longer than the Planck scale.

  4. CANOPEN Controller IP Core

    Caramia, Maurizio; Montagna, Mario; Furano, Gianluca; Winton, Alistair

    2010-08-01

    This paper will describe the activities performed by Thales Alenia Space Italia supported by the European Space Agency in the definition of a CAN bus interface to be used on Exomars. The final goal of this activity is the development of an IP core, to be used in a slave node, able to manage both the CAN bus Data Link and Application Layer totally in hardware. The activity has been focused on the needs of the EXOMARS mission where devices with different computational performances are all managed by the onboard computer through the CAN bus.

  5. A data set of worldwide glacier fluctuations

    P. W. Leclercq; Oerlemans, J.; H. J. Basagic; I. Bushueva; Cook, A. J.; Le Bris, R.

    2014-01-01

    Glacier fluctuations contribute to variations in sea level and historical glacier length fluctuations are natural indicators of past climate change. To study these subjects, longterm information of glacier change is needed. In this paper we present a data set of global long-term glacier length fluctuations. The data set is a compilation of available information on changes in glacier length worldwide, including both measured and reconstructed glacier length fluctuations. All 471 length series ...

  6. Statistical Fluctuations as Probes of Dense Matter

    Müller, Berndt

    2001-01-01

    The use of statistical fluctuations as probes of the microscopic dynamics of hot and dense hadronic matter is reviewed. Critical fluctuations near the critical point of QCD matter are predicted to enhance fluctuations in pionic observables. Chemical fluctuations, especially those of locally conserved quantum numbers, such as electric charge and baryon number, can probe the nature of the carriers of these quantum numbers in the dense medium.

  7. Formulation and preparation on Hanford Waste Treatment Plan direct feed low activity waste effluent management facility core simulant

    McCabe, Daniel J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Nash, Charles A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL; Adamson, Duane J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL

    2016-05-01

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream (LAW Melter Off-Gas Condensate, LMOGC) from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream during full WTP operations is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility. However, during the Direct Feed LAW (DFLAW) scenario, planned disposition of this stream is to evaporate it in a new evaporator in the Effluent Management Facility (EMF) and then return it to the LAW melter. It is important to understand the composition of the effluents from the melter and new evaporator so that the disposition of these streams can be accurately planned and accommodated. Furthermore, alternate disposition of the LMOGC stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would enable less integrated operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Alternate disposition would also eliminate this stream from recycling within WTP when it begins operations and would decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste, amongst the other problems such a recycle stream present. This LAW Melter Off-Gas Condensate stream will contain components that are volatile at melter temperatures and are problematic for the glass waste form, such as halides and sulfate. Because this stream will recycle within WTP, these components accumulate in the Melter Condensate stream, exacerbating their impact on the number of LAW glass containers that must be produced. Diverting the stream reduces the halides and sulfate in the recycled Condensate and is a key outcome of this work. This overall program examines the potential treatment and immobilization of this stream to enable alternative disposal. The objective of this task was to formulate and prepare a simulant of the LAW Melter

  8. Core-shell N-doped active carbon fiber@graphene composites for aqueous symmetric supercapacitors with high-energy and high-power density

    Xie, Qinxing; Bao, Rongrong; Xie, Chao; Zheng, Anran; Wu, Shihua; Zhang, Yufeng; Zhang, Renwei; Zhao, Peng

    2016-06-01

    Graphene wrapped nitrogen-doped active carbon fibers (ACF@GR) of a core-shell structure were successfully prepared by a simple dip-coating method using natural silk as template. Compared to pure silk active carbon, the as-prepared ACF@GR composites exhibit high specific surface area in a range of 1628-2035 m2 g-1, as well as superior energy storage capability, an extremely high single-electrode capacitance of 552.8 F g-1 was achieved at a current density of 0.1 A g-1 in 6 M KOH aqueous electrolyte. The assembled aqueous symmetric supercapacitors are capable of deliver both high energy density and high power density, for instance, 17.1 Wh kg-1 at a power density of 50.0 W kg-1, and 12.2 Wh kg-1 at 4.7 kW kg-1 with a retention rate of 71.3% for ACF@GR1-based supercapacitor.

  9. Carbon nanotubes/heteroatom-doped carbon core-sheath nanostructures as highly active, metal-free oxygen reduction electrocatalysts for alkaline fuel cells.

    Sa, Young Jin; Park, Chiyoung; Jeong, Hu Young; Park, Seok-Hee; Lee, Zonghoon; Kim, Kyoung Taek; Park, Gu-Gon; Joo, Sang Hoon

    2014-04-14

    A facile, scalable route to new nanocomposites that are based on carbon nanotubes/heteroatom-doped carbon (CNT/HDC) core-sheath nanostructures is reported. These nanostructures were prepared by the adsorption of heteroatom-containing ionic liquids on the walls of CNTs, followed by carbonization. The design of the CNT/HDC composite allows for combining the electrical conductivity of the CNTs with the catalytic activity of the heteroatom-containing HDC sheath layers. The CNT/HDC nanostructures are highly active electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction and displayed one of the best performances among heteroatom-doped nanocarbon catalysts in terms of half-wave potential and kinetic current density. The four-electron selectivity and the exchange current density of the CNT/HDC nanostructures are comparable with those of a Pt/C catalyst, and the CNT/HDC composites were superior to Pt/C in terms of long-term durability and poison tolerance. Furthermore, an alkaline fuel cell that employs a CNT/HDC nanostructure as the cathode catalyst shows very high current and power densities, which sheds light on the practical applicability of these new nanocomposites. PMID:24554521

  10. Hetero-metallic trigonal cage-shaped dimeric Ni3K core complex of L-proline ligand: Synthesis, structural, electrochemical and DNA binding and cleavage activities

    S Nagasubramanian; A Jayamani; V Thamilarasan; G Aravindan; V Ganesan; N Sengottuvelan

    2014-05-01

    Hetero-metallic trigonal cage-shaped dimeric Ni3K core complex of L-proline ligand has been synthesized and characterized. Single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis showed that the hetero-metallic Ni(II)-K(I) complex has a dimeric structure with nine coordinated potassium atoms and six coordinated nickel atoms. The cyclic voltammograms of the complex exhibited two successive quasireversible reduction waves at ($E^{1}_{pc} = −1.02$ V and $E^{2}_{pc} = −1.33$ V) and two successive irreversible oxidation waves ($E^{1}_{pa} = 0.95$ V and $E^{2}_{pa} = 1.45$ V) versus Ag/AgCl in DMF solution. Interaction of the complex with calf-thymus DNA (CT DNA) has been studied using spectroscopic techniques. The complex is an avid DNA binder with a binding constant of 3.6 × 108 M-1. The complex showed efficient oxidative cleavage of supercoiled pBR322 DNA in the presence of the reducing agent hydrogen peroxide involving hydroxyl radical (°OH) species. As evidenced from the control experiment, DNA cleavage in the presence of °OH radical was inhibited by quenchers, viz. DMSO and KI. The complex showed in vitro antimicrobial activity against four bacteria and two fungi and the activity is greater than that of the free ligand.

  11. Study on the characteristics of flow resistance under the condition of low frequency flow fluctuation

    The circulation of coolant in the cooling system of a nuclear reactor, under earthquake conditions, is a process of pulsating flow. When the fluctuating flow occurs in the loop, the fluid flow and heat transfer in the core are affected, making the study of flow fluctuation more important for practical applications. Characteristics of flow resistance are investigated experimentally on a horizontal rectangular channel and a circular tube with a periodically fluctuating flow. The results are compared with the flow resistance characteristics of the steady state, showing that there is a relatively large difference between the results under a steady flow and a transient flow. This article analyzes the influences of the flow fluctuation period and of the relative amplitude on the resistance characteristics of a circular tube flow. The results show that under the condition of flow fluctuation, a phase difference exists between flow rate and pressure drop. The results further show that the smaller the flow fluctuation period is, the larger the flow fluctuation relative amplitude will be, and the more influence the flow fluctuation will have on the fluid flow. Furthermore, an empirical correlation expressed as a function of the Reynolds number, the dimensionless frequency parameter, and the relative amplitude, is proposed for calculating a time-averaged friction coefficient. (author)

  12. 5th International Conference on Valence Fluctuations

    Malik, S

    1987-01-01

    During the Koln meeting (August 28-31, 1984), Irdia was chosen as the venue for the next International Conference on Valence Fluctuations. lhis was in recognition ard appreciation of the work done, both experimental ard theoretical, by the Irdian scientists in this area during the last decade. We decided to hold this Conference in the month of January, 1987 at Bangalore. lhe subject of Valence Fluctuations has kept itself alive ard active as it has provided many shocks ard suprises particularly among the Ce- ard U-based intermetallies. lhe richness of many interesting physical phenomena occurring in mixed valent materials, the flexibility of modifying their physical properties (by alloying, for example) ard the possibility of synthesizing a wide variety of new such materials seem to be the key factors in this regard. Barely six months before this Conference, an International Conference on Anomalous Rare Earths and Actinides (ICAREA) had been held at Grenoble (July, 1986) which also focussed on mixed valence a...

  13. The Noncommutative Bion Core

    Constable, N R; Tafjord, O Yu; Constable, Neil R.; Myers, Robert C.; Tafjord, Oyvind

    2000-01-01

    We examine new noncommutative solutions of the nonabelian theory on the world-volume of N coincident D-strings. These solutions can be interpreted in terms of noncommutative geometry as funnels describing the nonabelian D-string expanding out into an orthogonal D3-brane. These configurations are `dual' to the bion solutions in the abelian world-volume theory of the D3-brane. In the latter, an charge N magnetic monopole describes N D-strings attached to the D3-brane with a spike deformation of the world-volume. The noncommutative D-string solutions give a reliable account of physics at the core of the monopole, where the bion description is expected to breakdown. In the large N limit, we find good agreement between the two points of view, including the energy, couplings to background fields, and the shape of the funnel. We also study fluctuations traveling along the D-string, again obtaining agreement in the large N limit. At finite N, our results give a limit on the number of modes that can travel to infinity...

  14. Analysis of dynamic multiplicity fluctuations at PHOBOS

    Chai, Zhengwei; PHOBOS Collaboration; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Chai, Z.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Heintzelman, G. A.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Holynski, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Skulski, W.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J. L.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Wozniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wyslouch, B.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the analysis of the dynamic fluctuations in the inclusive charged particle multiplicity measured by PHOBOS for Au+Au collisions at surdsNN = 200GeV within the pseudo-rapidity range of -3 < η < 3. First the definition of the fluctuations observables used in this analysis is presented, together with the discussion of their physics meaning. Then the procedure for the extraction of dynamic fluctuations is described. Some preliminary results are included to illustrate the correlation features of the fluctuation observable. New dynamic fluctuations results will be available in a later publication.

  15. A suggested emergency medicine boot camp curriculum for medical students based on the mapping of Core Entrustable Professional Activities to Emergency Medicine Level 1 milestones

    Lamba S

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Sangeeta Lamba, Bryan Wilson, Brenda Natal, Roxanne Nagurka, Michael Anana, Harsh Sule Department of Emergency Medicine, Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ, USA Background: An increasing number of students rank Emergency Medicine (EM as a top specialty choice, requiring medical schools to provide adequate exposure to EM. The Core Entrustable Professional Activities (EPAs for Entering Residency by the Association of American Medical Colleges combined with the Milestone Project for EM residency training has attempted to standardize the undergraduate and graduate medical education goals. However, it remains unclear as to how the EPAs correlate to the milestones, and who owns the process of ensuring that an entering EM resident has competency at a certain minimum level. Recent trends establishing specialty-specific boot camps prepare students for residency and address the variability of skills of students coming from different medical schools. Objective: Our project’s goal was therefore to perform a needs assessment to inform the design of an EM boot camp curriculum. Toward this goal, we 1 mapped the core EPAs for graduating medical students to the EM residency Level 1 milestones in order to identify the possible gaps/needs and 2 conducted a pilot procedure workshop that was designed to address some of the identified gaps/needs in procedural skills. Methods: In order to inform the curriculum of an EM boot camp, we used a systematic approach to 1 identify gaps between the EPAs and EM milestones (Level 1 and 2 determine what essential and supplemental competencies/skills an incoming EM resident should ideally possess. We then piloted a 1-day, three-station advanced ABCs procedure workshop based on the identified needs. A pre-workshop test and survey assessed knowledge, preparedness, confidence, and perceived competence. A post-workshop survey evaluated the program, and a posttest combined with psychomotor skills test using three

  16. Fermionic influence on inflationary fluctuations

    Boyanovsky, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Motivated by apparent persistent large scale anomalies in the cosmic microwave background we study the influence of fermionic degrees of freedom on the dynamics of inflaton fluctuations as a possible source of violations of (nearly) scale invariance on cosmological scales. We obtain the nonequilibrium effective action of an inflaton-like scalar field with Yukawa interactions (YD ,M) to light fermionic degrees of freedom both for Dirac and Majorana fields in de Sitter space-time. The effective action leads to Langevin equations of motion for the fluctuations of the inflaton-like field, with self-energy corrections and a stochastic Gaussian noise. We solve the Langevin equation in the super-Hubble limit implementing a dynamical renormalization group resummation. For a nearly massless inflaton its power spectrum of super-Hubble fluctuations is enhanced, P (k ;η )=(H/2 π )2eγt[-k η ] with γt[-k η ]=1/6 π2 [∑i =1 NDYi,D 2+2 ∑j =1 NMYj,M 2]{ln2[-k η ]-2 ln [-k η ]ln [-k η0]} for ND Dirac and NM Majorana fermions, and η0 is the renormalization scale at which the inflaton mass vanishes. The full power spectrum is shown to be renormalization group invariant. These corrections to the super-Hubble power spectrum entail a violation of scale invariance as a consequence of the coupling to the fermionic fields. The effective action is argued to be exact in the limit of a large number of fermionic fields. A cancellation between the enhancement from fermionic degrees of freedom and suppression from light scalar degrees of freedom conformally coupled to gravity suggests the possibility of a finely tuned supersymmetry among these fields.

  17. Study of Molecular Conformation and Activity-Related Properties of Lipase Immobilized onto Core-Shell Structured Polyacrylic Acid-Coated Magnetic Silica Nanocomposite Particles.

    Esmaeilnejad-Ahranjani, Parvaneh; Kazemeini, Mohammad; Singh, Gurvinder; Arpanaei, Ayyoob

    2016-04-01

    A facile approach for the preparation of core-shell structured poly(acrylic acid) (PAA)-coated Fe3O4 cluster@SiO2 nanocomposite particles as the support materials for the lipase immobilization is reported. Low- or high-molecular-weight (1800 and 100 000, respectively) PAA molecules were covalently attached onto the surface of amine-functionalized magnetic silica nanoacomposite particles. The successful preparation of particles were verified by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), zeta potential measurement, and Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) techniques. Once lipase is covalently immobilized onto the particles with an average diameter of 210 ± 50 nm, resulting from high binding sites concentrations on the low- and high-molecular-weight PAA-coated particles, high lipase immobilization efficiencies (86.2% and 89.9%, respectively), and loading capacities (786 and 816 mg g(-1), respectively) are obtained. Results from circular dichroism (CD) analysis and catalytic activity tests reveal an increase in the β-sheet content of lipase molecules upon immobilization, along with an enhancement in their activities and stabilities. The lipases immobilized onto the low- and high-molecular-weight PAA-coated particles show maximum activities at 55 and 50 °C, respectively, which are ∼28% and ∼15% higher than that of the free lipase at its own optimum temperature (40 °C), respectively. The immobilized lipases exhibit excellent performance at broader temperature and pH ranges and high thermal and storage stabilities, as well as superior reusability. These prepared magnetic nanocomposite particles can be offered as suitable support materials for efficient immobilization of enzymes and improvement of the immobilized enzymes properties. PMID:26986897

  18. Sublogarithmic fluctuations for internal DLA

    Asselah, Amine; Gaudillière, Alexandre

    2013-01-01

    We consider internal diffusion limited aggregation in dimension larger than or equal to two. This is a random cluster growth model, where random walks start at the origin of the $d$-dimensional lattice, one at a time, and stop moving when reaching a site that is not occupied by previous walks. It is known that the asymptotic shape of the cluster is a sphere. When the dimension is two or more, we have shown in a previous paper that the inner (resp., outer) fluctuations of its radius is at most...

  19. Velocity fluctuations of fission fragments

    Llanes-Estrada, Felipe J; Martinez, Jose L Muñoz

    2015-01-01

    We propose event by event velocity fluctuations of nuclear fission fragments as an additional interesting observable that gives access to the nuclear temperature in an independent way from spectral measurements and relates the diffusion and friction coefficients for the relative fragment coordinate in Kramer-like models (in which some aspects of fission can be understood as the diffusion of a collective variable through a potential barrier). We point out that neutron emission by the heavy fragments can be treated in effective theory if corrections to the velocity distribution are needed.

  20. Fluctuations in Overlapping Generations Economies

    Tvede, Mich

    In the present paper stationary pure-exchange overlapping generations economies with l  goods per date and m consumers per generation are considered. It is shown that for an open and dense set of utility functions there exist endowment vectors such that n-cycles exist for n = l +1 and l  = m. The...... approach to existence of endogenous fluctuations is basic in the sense that the prime ingredients are the implicit function theorem and linear algebra. Moreover the approach is applied to show that for an open and dense set of utility functions there exist endowment vectors such that sunspot equilibria...

  1. Velocity fluctuations of fission fragments

    Llanes-Estrada, Felipe J.; Carmona, Belén Martínez; Martínez, Jose L. Muñoz

    2016-02-01

    We propose event by event velocity fluctuations of nuclear fission fragments as an additional interesting observable that gives access to the nuclear temperature in an independent way from spectral measurements and relates the diffusion and friction coefficients for the relative fragment coordinate in Kramers-like models (in which some aspects of fission can be understood as the diffusion of a collective variable through a potential barrier). We point out that neutron emission by the heavy fragments can be treated in effective theory if corrections to the velocity distribution are needed.

  2. Fluctuations in some climate parameters

    Erlykin, A D; Wolfendale, A W; 10.1016/j.jastp.2011.01.021

    2011-01-01

    There is argument as to the extent to which there has been an increase over the past few decades in the frequency of the extremes of climatic parameters, such as temperature, storminess, precipitation, etc, an obvious point being that Global Warming might be responsible. Here we report results on those parameters of which we have had experience during the last few years: Global surface temperature, Cloud Cover and the MODIS Liquid Cloud Fraction. In no case we have found indications that fluctuations of these parameters have increased with time.

  3. Effect of Fluctuating Temperatures on Forest Soil Nitrogen Minerealization

    LIAOLIPING; P.INESON

    1997-01-01

    Nitrogen mineralization in forest soil wa studied in laboratory by incubating undisturbed soil cores enclosed within PVC columns at different temperatures to compare the effect of flucttuating temperature with that of constant temperaature,and to find out whether soil nitrification shows linearity over time .The results showed that there was no significant difference between soil nitrification at fluctuating temperature and that at constant temperature,and suggested that it must be careful to make the conclusion that soil nitrification has linearity over time.

  4. From cusps to cores: a stochastic model

    El-Zant, Amr A.; Freundlich, Jonathan; Combes, Françoise

    2016-09-01

    The cold dark matter model of structure formation faces apparent problems on galactic scales. Several threads point to excessive halo concentration, including central densities that rise too steeply with decreasing radius. Yet, random fluctuations in the gaseous component can `heat' the centres of haloes, decreasing their densities. We present a theoretical model deriving this effect from first principles: stochastic variations in the gas density are converted into potential fluctuations that act on the dark matter; the associated force correlation function is calculated and the corresponding stochastic equation solved. Assuming a power-law spectrum of fluctuations with maximal and minimal cutoff scales, we derive the velocity dispersion imparted to the halo particles and the relevant relaxation time. We further perform numerical simulations, with fluctuations realized as a Gaussian random field, which confirm the formation of a core within a time-scale comparable to that derived analytically. Non-radial collective modes enhance the energy transport process that erases the cusp, though the parametrizations of the analytical model persist. In our model, the dominant contribution to the dynamical coupling driving the cusp-core transformation comes from the largest scale fluctuations. Yet, the efficiency of the transformation is independent of the value of the largest scale and depends weakly (linearly) on the power-law exponent; it effectively depends on two parameters: the gas mass fraction and the normalization of the power spectrum. This suggests that cusp-core transformations observed in hydrodynamic simulations of galaxy formation may be understood and parametrized in simple terms, the physical and numerical complexities of the various implementations notwithstanding.

  5. Suppression of vortex core precession in a swirling reacting flow

    Litvinov, I. V.; Nazarov, A. V.; Shtork, S. I.

    2016-03-01

    The influence of combustion effect on unsteady vortex structure in the form of precessing vortex core was studied using the non-intrusive method of laser Doppler anemometry and special procedure of extracting the non-axisymmetric mode of flow fluctuations. The studies show that combustion has a significant effect on the parameters of such a core, reducing the amplitude (vortex deviation from the burner center) and increasing precession frequency. At the same time, the acoustic sensors detect almost an order reduction in the level of pressure pulsations generated by the precessing vortex core. Moreover, distributions of tangential velocity fluctuations and cross-correlation analysis show that vortex precession is quite pronounced even under the combustion conditions, bringing a significant coherent component to distributions of velocity fluctuations.

  6. Radio Galaxies in Cooling Cores

    Eilek, J A

    2003-01-01

    A currently active radio galaxy sits at the center of almost every strong cooling core. What effect does it have on the cooling core? Could its effect be strong enough to offset the radiative cooling which should be occuring in these cores? In order to answer these questions we need to know how much energy the radio jet carries to the cooling core; but we have no way to measure the jet power directly. We therefore need to understand how the radio source evolves with time, and how it radiates, in order to use the data to determine the jet power. When some simple models are compared to the data, we learn that cluster-center radio galaxies probably are energetically important -- but not necessarily dominant -- in cooling cores.

  7. Currency speculation and dollar fluctuations

    Stephan Schulmeister

    1988-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study the reasons behind the wide fluctuations of the dollar exchange rate following the breakdown of the Bretton Woods system, for the most part unexplained by the prevailing exchange rate theories, are explored. To do so, the author investigates the exchange rate between the two most traded currencies, the dollar and the deutschemark, from 1973 to 1988. In the first part, the pattern of the daily exchange rate movements is examined to show that a sequence of upward and downward trends interrupted by non-directional movements is typical of exchange rate dynamics in the short run. Moreover, this pattern is systemically exploited through currency speculation, particularly through the use of “technical analysis”. In the second part, the author focuses on the medium-term, arguing that fluctuations can be explained as the result of interacting disequilibria in the goods and asset markets. Although currency speculation has been systemically profitable for most currencies, it should be considered to be destabilizing since the sequence of price runs caused large and persistent deviations of exchange rates from their equilibrium values (purchasing power parity.

  8. Currency speculation and dollar fluctuations

    S. SCHULMEISTER

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study the reasons behind the wide fluctuations of the dollar exchange rate following the breakdown of the Bretton Woods system, for the most part unexplained by the prevailing exchange rate theories, are explored. The author investigates the exchange rate between the two most traded currencies, the dollar and the deutschemark, from 1973 to 1988. In the first part, the pattern of the daily exchange rate movements is examined to show that a sequence of upward and downward trends interrupted by non-directional movements is typical of exchange rate dynamics in the short run. This pattern is systemically exploited through currency speculation, particularly through the use of “technical analysis”. In the second part, the author focuses on the medium-term, arguing that fluctuations can be explained as the result of interacting disequilibria in the goods and asset markets. Although currency speculation has been systemically profitable for most currencies, it should be considered to be destabilising since the sequence of price runs caused large and persistent deviations of exchange rates from their equilibrium values (purchasing power parity.  

  9. Structural Evolution of Co-Based Metal Organic Frameworks in Pyrolysis for Synthesis of Core-Shells on Nanosheets: Co@CoOx@Carbon-rGO Composites for Enhanced Hydrogen Generation Activity.

    Xing, Congcong; Liu, Yanyan; Su, Yongheng; Chen, Yinghao; Hao, Shuo; Wu, Xianli; Wang, Xiangyu; Cao, Huaqiang; Li, Baojun

    2016-06-22

    In this article, Co-based metal organic frameworks (MOFs) with two shapes were used as pyrolysis precursor to synthesize multilayer core-shells composites loaded on reduced graphene oxide (rGO) sheets. The core-shell structures were obtained by the formation of cores from metal ions and carbon shells from carbonization of ligands. Controllable oxidation of Co cores to CoOx shells generated multilayer core-shell structures anchored onto the surface of rGO sheets. The N-doped composites were obtained by adding poly vinylpyrrolidone. The multilayer core-shells composites exhibited superior catalytic activity toward hydrogen generation compared to their single layer counterparts. By using the N-doped multilayer composites, high hydrogen generation specific rate of 5560 mL min(-1) gCo(-1) was achieved at room temperature. The rGO sheets in composites improved their structure stability. These catalysts exhibited high stability after used five cycling. This synergistic strategy proposes simple, efficient, and versatile blue-prints for the fabrication of rGO composites from MOFs-based precursors. PMID:27243608

  10. THE THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK OF THE ECONOMIC FLUCTUATION IN TURKEY

    brahim ARSLAN

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available It is observed that the economic fluctuations have been shaped according to the variations of economic activities through the historical development of global economy. In the middle of the 18th century, with the invention of steam engine in England and with the invention of casting iron by smelting coke, there were important developments in industrial field. In 19th century in which the capital experienced its golden age, industrial capitalism rapidly increased firstly in England and then in USA, Germany and other European countries. In the light of these developments, in this study it is aimed to have a broader look to the conjuncture and also to state all the fluctuations in local, national and international levels that the economy faced in short and long run. Since the conjuncture is specific to industry and trade, the features of agriculture sector is different. However, economic fluctuations are usually witnessed in industrialized countries. Each of the economic fluctuation has the peculiarities specific to the economic conditions they are in.When the issue is assessed from the point of view of Turkey, the main reasons of the instability in Turkish economy is foreign dependency and inflation. The policies aiming to struggle against inflation have established the basis of the prepared stability programmes. However depending on the quality of the prepared programmes, the issue of ensuring price stability has become an important problem. In this study, the processes of formation of the economic fluctuations and the measures to be taken for these have been inquired.

  11. Inverse cubic law of index fluctuation distribution in Indian markets

    Pan, R K; Pan, Raj Kumar; Sinha, Sitabhra

    2006-01-01

    One of the principal statistical features characterizing the activity in financial markets is the distribution of fluctuations in market indicators such as the index. While the developed stock markets such as the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) have been found to show heavy-tailed fluctuation distribution, there have been claims that emerging markets behave differently. Here we investigate the distribution of several indices from the Indian financial market, one of the largest emerging markets in the world. We have used both tick-by-tick data from the National Stock Exchange (NSE) and daily closing data from both NSE and Bombay Stock Exchange (BSE). We find that the cumulative distribution of index fluctuations has long tails consistent with a power law having exponent $\\alpha \\approx 3$, independent of the time-scale of observation or the market index used for the analysis. This ``inverse cubic law'' is quantitatively similar to what has been observed in developed markets, thereby providing strong evidence th...

  12. Synthesis, molecular docking and evaluation of antifungal activity of Ni(II),Co(II) and Cu(II) complexes of porphyrin core macromolecular ligand.

    Singh, Urvashi; Malla, Ali Mohammad; Bhat, Imtiyaz Ahmad; Ahmad, Ajaz; Bukhari, Mohd Nadeem; Bhat, Sneha; Anayutullah, Syed; Hashmi, Athar Adil

    2016-04-01

    Porphyrin core dendrimeric ligand (L) was synthesized by Rothemund synthetic route in which p-hydroxy benzaldehyde and pyrrole were fused together. The prepared ligand was complexed with Ni(II), Cu(II) and Co(II) ions, separately. Both the ligand and its complexes were characterized by elemental analysis and spectroscopic studies (FT-IR, UV-Vis, (1)HNMR). Square planar geometries were proposed for Cu(II), Ni(II) and Co(II) ions in cobalt, Nickel and copper complexes, respectively on the basis of UV-Vis spectroscopic data. The ligand and its complex were screened on Candida albicans (ATCC 10231), Aspergillus fumigatus (ATCC 1022), Trichophyton mentagrophytes (ATCC 9533) and Pencillium marneffei by determining MICs and inhibition zones. The activity of the ligand and its complexes was found to be in the order: CuL ˃ CoL ≈ NiL ˃ L. Detection of DNA damage at the level of the individual eukaryotic cell was observed by commet assay. Molecular docking technique was used to understand the ligand-DNA interactions. From docking experiment, we conclude that copper complex interacts more strongly than rest two. PMID:26911647

  13. Active galactic nuclei cores in infrared-faint radio sources: Very long baseline interferometry observations using the Very Long Baseline Array

    Herzog, Andreas; Norris, Ray P; Spitler, Lee R; Deller, Adam T; Collier, Jordan D; Parker, Quentin A

    2015-01-01

    Infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS) form a new class of galaxies characterised by radio flux densities between tenths and tens of mJy and faint or absent infrared counterparts. It has been suggested that these objects are radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at significant redshifts (z >~ 2). Whereas the high redshifts of IFRS have been recently confirmed based on spectroscopic data, the evidence for the presence of AGNs in IFRS is mainly indirect. So far, only two AGNs have been unquestionably confirmed in IFRS based on very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations. In this work, we test the hypothesis that IFRS contain AGNs in a large sample of sources using VLBI. We observed 57 IFRS with the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) down to a detection sensitivity in the sub-mJy regime and detected compact cores in 35 sources. Our VLBA detections increase the number of VLBI-detected IFRS from 2 to 37 and provide strong evidence that most - if not all - IFRS contain AGNs. We find that IFRS have a marginal...

  14. Multifractal Solar EUV Intensity Fluctuations and their Implications for Coronal Heating Models

    Cadavid, Ana Cristina Cadavid; Lawrence, John K; Christian, Damian J; Jennings, Peter J; Rappazzo, A Franco

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the scaling properties of the long-range temporal evolution and intermittency of SDO/AIA intensity observations in four solar environments: active region core, a weak emission region, and two core loops. We use two approaches: the probability distribution function (PDF) of time series increments, and multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MF-DFA). Noise taints the results, so we focus on the 171 Angstrom waveband , which has the highest signal-to-noise ratio. The lags between pairs of wavebands distinguish between coronal versus transition region (TR) emission. In all physical regions studied, scaling in the range 15-45 min is multifractal, and the time series are anti-persistent on the average. The degree of anti-correlation in the TR time series is greater than for coronal emission. The multifractality stems from long term correlations in the data rather than the wide distribution of intensities. Observations in the 335 Angstrom waveband can be described in terms of a multifractal with ...

  15. On simultaneous s-cores/t-cores

    Aukerman, D; Kane, B.; Sze, L

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, the authors investigate the question of when a partition of n∈N is an s-core and also a t-core when s and t are not relatively prime. A characterization of all such s/t-cores is given, as well as a generating function dependent upon the polynomial generating functions for s/t-cores when s and t are relatively prime. Furthermore, characterizations and generating functions are given for s/t-cores which are self-conjugate and also for (e,r)/(e′,r)-cores.

  16. Water Density Fluctuations Relevant to Hydrophobic Hydration are Unaltered by Attractions

    Remsing, Richard C

    2014-01-01

    An understanding of density fluctuations in bulk water has made significant contributions to our understanding of the hydration and interactions of idealized, purely repulsive hydrophobic solutes. To similarly inform the hydration of realistic hydrophobic solutes that have dispersive interactions with water, here we characterize water density fluctuations in the presence of attractive fields that correspond to solute-water attractions. We find that when the attractive field acts only in the solute hydration shell, but not in the solute core, it does not significantly alter water density fluctuations in the solute core region. We further find that for a wide range of solute sizes and attraction strengths, the free energetics of turning on the attractive fields in bulk water are accurately captured by linear response theory. Our results also suggest strategies for more efficiently estimating hydration free energies of realistic solutes in bulk water and at interfaces.

  17. Fluctuating lake levels in humid climates: a suitable proxy of past precipitation?

    Theuerkauf, Martin; Küster, Mathias; Kaiser, Knut

    2016-04-01

    Precipitation is a fundamental climate parameter essentially in arid and semi-arid climates, but changes in precipitation may have influenced Holocene vegetation development and human occupation in humid climates as well. However, past precipitation is notoriously difficult to reconstruct because the proxies available are widely imprecise. For example, peatland proxies such as testate amoebae are suited to reconstruct wet and dry periods of the local environment but they are poorly suited to quantify precipitation. In contrast, lake levels potentially provide a closer link to the past precipitation. In our case study, isolated lakes in the Schorfheide area (NE-Germany), fed by groundwater and rain, show at present prominent water level fluctuations that are closely correlated to annual to decadal changes in precipitation. But are these lakes indeed suitable archives to reconstruct past precipitation? To answer this question we have cored two small lakes in that area (Warnitzsee, Briesensee) with water level fluctuations well above 3 m over the past 40 years. We took seven cores along two transects from the lake shore towards the centre in Lake Warnitzsee and one core near the shore in Lake Briesensee. Core lengths range from 2.5 m to 10 m. Analysis of the cores includes geochemical parameters and pollen analysis. Two cores were dated by radiocarbon ages. All cores show recurrent marked shifts in sediment composition with up to seven peat-gyttia alternations. These sediment shifts indicate that both lakes have strongly fluctuated over the Holocene, partly with a larger magnitude than today. However, whereas the modern fluctuation periods (low and high stands) occurred over years to a few decades, we so far could only detect past fluctuation periods that lasted centuries to millennia. Furthermore, the water level in Lake Warnitzsee possibly followed a long-term trend of high water levels in the early Holocene (10.500-9000 cal. BP), low water levels between 8000 and

  18. Impulse power stochastically fluctuations of the modernized fast pulsed reactor IBR-2

    Full text : Stochastically fluctuations of the power of the IBR-2 reactor have been quite significant, they affect the dynamics of the reactor, the process of regulation, starting on the work of the experimental equipment. On the other hand, the presence of large fluctuations in power at the IBR-2M has had its advantages. Investigation of stochastic fluctuations has allowed to estimate some physical parameters of the nuclear reactor core, for example, the mean lifetime of prompt neutrons in the reactor, source of spontaneous neutrons and absolute power of the reactor. The main results of the investigation impulse power stochastically fluctuations of the IBR-2 periodic pulsed reactor after modernization have been presented. It has been shown that the experimental results have been close to the calculated ones

  19. Project of magnetic fluctuation measurement by cross polarization scattering in the Tore Supra Tokamak

    Up to now the direct measurement of the magnetic fluctuations in the core of tokamak plasmas has been impossible. According to various turbulence models, the estimated level of B/B lies between 10-6 (residual magnetic fluctuations due to drift wave i.e. O(βn/n) where β is the toroidal beta) and 10-4 (obtained assuming that the heat transport is only due to magnetic turbulence). We describe in this paper a tentative diagnostic to measure these fluctuations. It is based on the cross polarization scattering: Magnetic fluctuations scatter an incident electromagnetic wave with a change in polarization. In section II the basic principle of the diagnostic is explained. In section III the experimental set up is described. It will be tested on the Tore Supra Tokamak at the end of 1990. (author) 2 refs., 2 figs

  20. Respiration and body movement analysis during sleep in bed using hetero-core fiber optic pressure sensors without constraint to human activity

    Nishyama, Michiko; Miyamoto, Mitsuo; Watanabe, Kazuhiro

    2011-01-01

    We describe respiration monitoring in sleep using hetero-core fiber optic pressure sensors. The proposed hetero-core fiber optic sensor is highly sensitive to macrobending as a result of the core diameter difference due to stable single-mode transmission. Pressure sensors based on hetero-core fiber optics were fabricated to have a high sensitivity to small pressure changes resulting from minute body motions, such as respiration, during sleep and large pressure changes, such as those caused by a rollover. The sensors are installed in a conventional bed. The pressure characteristic performance of all the fabricated hetero-core fiber optic pressure sensors is found to show a monotonic response with weight changes. A respiration monitoring test in seven subjects efficiently demonstrates the effective use of eight hetero-core pressure sensors installed in a bed. Additionally, even in the case of different body postures, such as lying on one's side, a slight body movement due to respiration is detected by the hetero-core pressure sensors.