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Sample records for active biopolymer network

  1. Active biopolymer networks generate scale-free but euclidean clusters

    Sheinman, M; Alvarado, J; Koenderink, G H; MacKintosh, F C

    2014-01-01

    We report analytical and numerical modelling of active elastic networks, motivated by experiments on crosslinked actin networks contracted by myosin motors. Within a broad range of parameters, the motor-driven collapse of active elastic networks leads to a critical state. We show that this state is qualitatively different from that of the random percolation model. Intriguingly, it possesses both euclidean and scale-free structure with Fisher exponent smaller than $2$. Remarkably, an indistinguishable Fisher exponent and the same euclidean structure is obtained at the critical point of the random percolation model after absorbing all enclaves into their surrounding clusters. We propose that in the experiment the enclaves are absorbed due to steric interactions of network elements. We model the network collapse, taking into account the steric interactions. The model shows how the system robustly drives itself towards the critical point of the random percolation model with absorbed enclaves, in agreement with th...

  2. Heterogeneous Force Chains in Cellularized Biopolymer Network

    Liang, Long; Jones, Christopher; Sun, Bo; Jiao, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Biopolymer Networks play an important role in coordinating and regulating collective cellular dynamics via a number of signaling pathways. Here, we investigate the mechanical response of a model biopolymer network due to the active contraction of embedded cells. Specifically, a graph (bond-node) model derived from confocal microscopy data is used to represent the network microstructure, and cell contraction is modeled by applying correlated displacements at specific nodes, representing the fo...

  3. Heterogeneous Force Chains in Cellularized Biopolymer Network

    Liang, Long; Jones, Christopher Allen Rucksack; Sun, Bo; Jiao, Yang

    Biopolymer Networks play an important role in coordinating and regulating collective cellular dynamics via a number of signaling pathways. Here, we investigate the mechanical response of a model biopolymer network due to the active contraction of embedded cells. Specifically, a graph (bond-node) model derived from confocal microscopy data is used to represent the network microstructure, and cell contraction is modeled by applying correlated displacements at specific nodes, representing the focal adhesion sites. A force-based stochastic relaxation method is employed to obtain force-balanced network under cell contraction. We find that the majority of the forces are carried by a small number of heterogeneous force chains emerged from the contracting cells. The force chains consist of fiber segments that either possess a high degree of alignment before cell contraction or are aligned due to the reorientation induced by cell contraction. Large fluctuations of the forces along different force chains are observed. Importantly, the decay of the forces along the force chains is significantly slower than the decay of radially averaged forces in the system, suggesting that the fibreous nature of biopolymer network structure could support long-range mechanical signaling between cells.

  4. SOAX: A software for quantification of 3D biopolymer networks

    Xu, Ting; Vavylonis, Dimitrios; Tsai, Feng-Ching; Koenderink, Gijsje H.; Nie, Wei; Yusuf, Eddy; I-Ju Lee; Wu, Jian-Qiu; Huang, Xiaolei

    2015-03-01

    Filamentous biopolymer networks in cells and tissues are routinely imaged by confocal microscopy. Image analysis methods enable quantitative study of the properties of these curvilinear networks. However, software tools to quantify the geometry and topology of these often dense 3D networks and to localize network junctions are scarce. To fill this gap, we developed a new software tool called ``SOAX'', which can accurately extract the centerlines of 3D biopolymer networks and identify network junctions using Stretching Open Active Contours (SOACs). It provides an open-source, user-friendly platform for network centerline extraction, 2D/3D visualization, manual editing and quantitative analysis. We propose a method to quantify the performance of SOAX, which helps determine the optimal extraction parameter values. We quantify several different types of biopolymer networks to demonstrate SOAX's potential to help answer key questions in cell biology and biophysics from a quantitative viewpoint.

  5. Inelastic mechanics of sticky biopolymer networks

    Wolff, Lars; Fernandez, Pablo; Kroy, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    We propose a physical model for the nonlinear inelastic mechanics of sticky biopolymer networks with potential applications to inelastic cell mechanics. It consists in a minimal extension of the glassy wormlike chain (GWLC) model, which has recently been highly successful as a quantitative mathematical description of the viscoelastic properties of biopolymer networks and cells. To extend its scope to nonequilibrium situations, where the thermodynamic state variables may evolve dynamically, th...

  6. Inelastic mechanics of sticky biopolymer networks

    We propose a physical model for the nonlinear inelastic mechanics of sticky biopolymer networks with potential applications to inelastic cell mechanics. It consists of a minimal extension of the glassy wormlike chain (Gwlc) model, which has recently been highly successful as a quantitative mathematical description of the viscoelastic properties of biopolymer networks and cells. To extend its scope to nonequilibrium situations, where the thermodynamic state variables may evolve dynamically, the Gwlc is furnished with an explicit representation of the kinetics of breaking and reforming sticky bonds. In spite of its simplicity, the model exhibits many experimentally established nontrivial features such as power-law rheology, stress stiffening, fluidization and cyclic softening effects.

  7. Mechanically Induced Helix-Coil Transition in Biopolymer Networks

    Courty, Sebastien; Gornall, Joanne L.; Terentjev, Eugene M.

    2005-01-01

    The quasi-equilibrium evolution of the helical fraction occurring in a biopolymer network (gelatin gel) under an applied stress has been investigated by observing modulation in its optical activity. Its variation with the imposed chain extension is distinctly non-monotonic and corresponds to the transition of initially coiled strands to induced left-handed helices. The experimental results are in qualitative agreement with theoretical predictions of helices induced on chain extension. This ne...

  8. Coupled actin-lamin biopolymer networks and protecting DNA

    Zhang, Tao; Rocklin, D. Zeb; Mao, Xiaoming; Schwarz, J. M.

    The mechanical properties of cells are largely determined by networks of semiflexible biopolymers forming the cytoskeleton. Similarly, the mechanical properties of cell nuclei are also largely determined by networks of semiflexible biopolymers forming the nuclear cytoskeleton. In particular, a network of filamentous lamin sits just inside the inner nuclear membrane to presumably protect the heart of the cell nucleus--the DNA. It has been demonstrated over the past decade that the actin cytoskeletal biopolymer network and the lamin biopolymer network are coupled via a sequence of proteins bridging the outer and inner nuclear membranes, known as the LINC complex. We, therefore, probe the consequences of such a coupling in a model biopolymer network system via numerical simulations to understand the resulting deformations in the lamin network in response to perturbations in the actin cytoskeletal network. We find, for example, that the force transmission across the coupled system can depend sensitively on the concentration of LINC complexes. Such study could have implications for mechanical mechanisms of the regulation of transcription since DNA couples to lamin via lamin-binding domains so that deformations in the lamin network may result in deformations in the DNA.

  9. Mechanical response of biopolymer double networks

    Carroll, Joshua; Das, Moumita

    We investigate a double network model of articular cartilage (AC) and characterize its equilibrium mechanical response. AC has very few cells and the extracellular matrix mainly determines its mechanical response. This matrix can be thought of as a double polymer network made of collagen and aggrecan. The collagen fibers are stiff and resist tension and compression forces, while aggrecans are flexible and control swelling and hydration. We construct a microscopic model made of two interconnected disordered polymer networks, with fiber elasticity chosen to qualitatively mimic the experimental system. We study the collective mechanical response of this double network as a function of the concentration and stiffness of the individual components as well as the strength of the connection between them using rigidity percolation theory. Our results may provide a better understanding of mechanisms underlying the mechanical resilience of AC, and more broadly may also lead to new perspectives on the mechanical response of multicomponent soft materials. This work was partially supported by a Cottrell College Science Award.

  10. Nanoparticle diffusometry for quantitative assessment of submicron structure in food biopolymer networks

    Kort, de, S.J.; Duynhoven, van, J.P.M.; VanAs, H.; Mariette, F

    2015-01-01

    At the submicron scale, food biopolymer networks can be visualized by a wide array of microscopic techniques, but these methods are mostly invasive and require careful image analysis in order to quantify network features. 'Nanoparticle diffusometry' provides a non-invasive alternative to infer quantitative submicron structural information about biopolymer networks. In this approach, spectroscopy-based methods are used to monitor hindered diffusion of nanoparticles due to network obstructions....

  11. Nanoparticle diffusometry for quantitative assessment of submicron structure in food biopolymer networks: A review

    Kort, de, S.J.; Duynhoven, van, J.P.M.; As, van, C.J.; Mariette, F

    2015-01-01

    At the submicron scale, food biopolymer networks can be visualized by a wide array of microscopic techniques, but these methods are mostly invasive and require careful image analysis in order to quantify network features. ‘Nanoparticle diffusometry’ provides a non-invasive alternative to infer quantitative submicron structural information about biopolymer networks. In this approach, spectroscopy-based methods are used to monitor hindered diffusion of nanoparticles due to network obstructions....

  12. Stiffening of semiflexible biopolymers and cross-linked networks

    Van Dillen, T; Van der Giessen, E

    2006-01-01

    We study the mechanical stiffening behavior in two-dimensional (2D) cross-linked networks of semiflexible biopolymer filaments under simple shear. Filamental constituents immersed in a fluid undergo thermally excited bending motions. Pulling out these undulations results in an increase in the axial stiffness. We analyze this stiffening behavior of 2D semiflexible filaments in detail: we first investigate the average, {static} force-extension relation by considering the initially present undulated configuration that is pulled straight under a tensile force, and compare this result with the average response in which undulation dynamics is allowed during pulling, as derived earlier by MacKintosh and coworkers. We will show that the resulting mechanical behavior is rather similar, but with the axial stiffness being a factor 2 to 4 larger in the dynamic model. Furthermore, we study the stretching contribution in case of extensible filaments and show that, for 2D filaments, the mechanical response is dominated by {...

  13. Estimating the 3D Pore Size Distribution of Biopolymer Networks from Directionally Biased Data

    Lang, Nadine R.; Münster, Stefan; Metzner, Claus; Krauss, Patrick; Schürmann, Sebastian; Lange, Janina; Aifantis, Katerina E.; Friedrich, Oliver; Fabry, Ben

    2013-01-01

    The pore size of biopolymer networks governs their mechanical properties and strongly impacts the behavior of embedded cells. Confocal reflection microscopy and second harmonic generation microscopy are widely used to image biopolymer networks; however, both techniques fail to resolve vertically oriented fibers. Here, we describe how such directionally biased data can be used to estimate the network pore size. We first determine the distribution of distances from random points in the fluid ph...

  14. Nonlinear and heterogeneous elasticity of multiply-crosslinked biopolymer networks

    Amuasi, H. E.; Heussinger, C.; Vink, R. L. C.; Zippelius, A.

    2015-08-01

    We simulate randomly crosslinked networks of biopolymers, characterizing linear and nonlinear elasticity under different loading conditions (uniaxial extension, simple shear, and pure shear). Under uniaxial extension, and upon entering the nonlinear regime, the network switches from a dilatant to contractile response. Analogously, under isochoric conditions (pure shear), the normal stresses change their sign. Both effects are readily explained with a generic weakly nonlinear elasticity theory. The elastic moduli display an intermediate super-stiffening regime, where moduli increase much stronger with applied stress σ than predicted by the force-extension relation of a single wormlike-chain ({G}{wlc}∼ {σ }3/2). We interpret this super-stiffening regime in terms of the reorientation of filaments with the maximum tensile direction of the deformation field. A simple model for the reorientation response gives an exponential stiffening, G∼ {{{e}}}σ , in qualitative agreement with our data. The heterogeneous, anisotropic structure of the network is reflected in correspondingly heterogeneous and anisotropic elastic properties. We provide a coarse-graining scheme to quantify the local anisotropy, the fluctuations of the elastic moduli, and the local stresses as a function of coarse-graining length. Heterogeneities of the elastic moduli are strongly correlated with the local density and increase with applied strain.

  15. Layer-by-layer micromolding of natural biopolymer scaffolds with intrinsic microfluidic networks

    A three-dimensional (3D) microfluidic network plays an important role in engineering thick organs. However, most of the existing methods are limited to mechanically robust synthetic biomaterials and only planar or simple microfluidic networks have been incorporated into soft natural biopolymers. Here we presented an automatic layer-by-layer micromolding strategy to reproducibly fabricate 3D microfluidic porous scaffolds directly from the aqueous solution of soft natural biopolymers. Process parameters such as the liquid volume for each layer and contact displacement were investigated to produce a structurally stable 3D microfluidic scaffold. Microscopic characterization demonstrated that the microfluidic channels were interconnected in 3D and successfully functioned as a convective pathway to transport a polymer solution. Endothelial cells grew relatively well in the porous microfluidic channels. It is envisioned that this method could provide an alternative way to reproducibly build complex 3D microfluidic networks into extracellular matrix-like scaffolds for the fabrication of soft vascularized organs. (paper)

  16. Quantitative Characterization of the Microstructure and Transport Properties of Biopolymer Networks

    Jiao, Yang

    2012-01-01

    Biopolymer networks are of fundamental importance to many biological processes in normal and tumorous tissues. In this paper, we employ the panoply of theoretical and simulation techniques developed for characterizing heterogeneous materials to quantify the microstructure and effective diffusive transport properties (diffusion coefficient $D_e$ and mean survival time $\\tau$) of collagen type I networks at various collagen concentrations. In particular, we compute the pore-size probability density function $P(\\delta)$ for the networks and present a variety of analytical estimates of the effective diffusion coefficient $D_e$ for finite-sized diffusing particles. The Hashin-Strikman upper bound on the effective diffusion coefficient $D_e$ and the pore-size lower bound on the mean survival time $\\tau$ are used as benchmarks to test our analytical approximations and numerical results. Moreover, we generalize the efficient first-passage-time techniques for Brownian-motion simulations in suspensions of spheres to th...

  17. Frequency-dependent micromechanics of cellularized biopolymer networks

    Jones, Chris; Kim, Jihan; McIntyre, David; Sun, Bo

    Mechanical interactions between cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM) influence many cellular behaviors such as growth, differentiation, and migration. These are dynamic processes in which the cells actively remodel the ECM. Reconstituted collagen gel is a common model ECM for studying cell-ECM interactions in vitro because collagen is the most abundant component of mammalian ECM and gives the ECM its material stiffness. We embed micron-sized particles in collagen and use holographic optical tweezers to apply forces to the particles in multiple directions and over a range of frequencies up to 10 Hz. We calculate the local compliance and show that it is dependent on both the direction and frequency of the applied force. Performing the same measurement on many particles allows us to characterize the spatial inhomogeneity of the mechanical properties and shows that the compliance decreases at higher frequencies. Performing these measurements on cell-populated collagen gels shows that cellular remodeling of the ECM changes the mechanical properties of the collagen and we investigate whether this change is dependent on the local strain and distance from nearby cells.

  18. Uncoupling shear and uniaxial elastic moduli of semiflexible biopolymer networks: compression-softening and stretch-stiffening

    van Oosten, Anne S. G.; Vahabi, Mahsa; Licup, Albert J.; Sharma, Abhinav; Galie, Peter A.; Mackintosh, Fred C.; Janmey, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Gels formed by semiflexible filaments such as most biopolymers exhibit non-linear behavior in their response to shear deformation, e.g., with a pronounced strain stiffening and negative normal stress. These negative normal stresses suggest that networks would collapse axially when subject to shear stress. This coupling of axial and shear deformations can have particularly important consequences for extracellular matrices and collagenous tissues. Although measurements of uniaxial moduli have been made on biopolymer gels, these have not directly been related to the shear response. Here, we report measurements and simulations of axial and shear stresses exerted by a range of hydrogels subjected to simultaneous uniaxial and shear strains. These studies show that, in contrast to volume-conserving linearly elastic hydrogels, the Young’s moduli of networks formed by the biopolymers are not proportional to their shear moduli and both shear and uniaxial moduli are strongly affected by even modest degrees of uniaxial strain.

  19. Biopolymers Regulate Silver Nanoparticle under Microwave Irradiation for Effective Antibacterial and Antibiofilm Activities

    Velusamy, Palaniyandi; Su, Chia-Hung; Venkat Kumar, Govindarajan; Adhikary, Shritama; Pandian, Kannaiyan; Gopinath, Subash C. B.; Chen, Yeng; Anbu, Periasamy

    2016-01-01

    In the current study, facile synthesis of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) and sodium alginate capped silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) was examined using microwave radiation and aniline as a reducing agent. The biopolymer matrix embedded nanoparticles were synthesized under various experimental conditions using different concentrations of biopolymer (0.5, 1, 1.5, 2%), volumes of reducing agent (50, 100, 150 μL), and duration of heat treatment (30 s to 240 s). The synthesized nanoparticles were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy for identification of AgNPs synthesis, crystal nature, shape, size, and type of capping action. In addition, the significant antibacterial efficacy and antibiofilm activity of biopolymer capped AgNPs were demonstrated against different bacterial strains, Staphylococcus aureus MTCC 740 and Escherichia coli MTCC 9492. These results confirmed the potential for production of biopolymer capped AgNPs grown under microwave irradiation, which can be used for industrial and biomedical applications. PMID:27304672

  20. Biopolymers Regulate Silver Nanoparticle under Microwave Irradiation for Effective Antibacterial and Antibiofilm Activities.

    Palaniyandi Velusamy

    Full Text Available In the current study, facile synthesis of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC and sodium alginate capped silver nanoparticles (AgNPs was examined using microwave radiation and aniline as a reducing agent. The biopolymer matrix embedded nanoparticles were synthesized under various experimental conditions using different concentrations of biopolymer (0.5, 1, 1.5, 2%, volumes of reducing agent (50, 100, 150 μL, and duration of heat treatment (30 s to 240 s. The synthesized nanoparticles were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy for identification of AgNPs synthesis, crystal nature, shape, size, and type of capping action. In addition, the significant antibacterial efficacy and antibiofilm activity of biopolymer capped AgNPs were demonstrated against different bacterial strains, Staphylococcus aureus MTCC 740 and Escherichia coli MTCC 9492. These results confirmed the potential for production of biopolymer capped AgNPs grown under microwave irradiation, which can be used for industrial and biomedical applications.

  1. Quantitative characterization of the microstructure and transport properties of biopolymer networks

    Biopolymer networks are of fundamental importance to many biological processes in normal and tumorous tissues. In this paper, we employ the panoply of theoretical and simulation techniques developed for characterizing heterogeneous materials to quantify the microstructure and effective diffusive transport properties (diffusion coefficient De and mean survival time τ) of collagen type I networks at various collagen concentrations. In particular, we compute the pore-size probability density function P(δ) for the networks and present a variety of analytical estimates of the effective diffusion coefficient De for finite-sized diffusing particles, including the low-density approximation, the Ogston approximation and the Torquato approximation. The Hashin–Strikman upper bound on the effective diffusion coefficient De and the pore-size lower bound on the mean survival time τ are used as benchmarks to test our analytical approximations and numerical results. Moreover, we generalize the efficient first-passage-time techniques for Brownian-motion simulations in suspensions of spheres to the case of fiber networks and compute the associated effective diffusion coefficient De as well as the mean survival time τ, which is related to nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation times. Our numerical results for De are in excellent agreement with analytical results for simple network microstructures, such as periodic arrays of parallel cylinders. Specifically, the Torquato approximation provides the most accurate estimates of De for all collagen concentrations among all of the analytical approximations we consider. We formulate a universal curve for τ for the networks at different collagen concentrations, extending the work of Torquato and Yeong (1997 J. Chem. Phys. 106 8814). We apply rigorous cross-property relations to estimate the effective bulk modulus of collagen networks from a knowledge of the effective diffusion coefficient computed here. The use of cross

  2. Complex Coacervate Core Micelles with Spectroscopic Labels for Diffusometric Probing of Biopolymer Networks.

    Bourouina, Nadia; de Kort, Daan W; Hoeben, Freek J M; Janssen, Henk M; Van As, Henk; Hohlbein, Johannes; van Duynhoven, John P M; Kleijn, J Mieke

    2015-11-24

    We present the design, preparation, and characterization of two types of complex coacervate core micelles (C3Ms) with cross-linked cores and spectroscopic labels and demonstrate their use as diffusional probes to investigate the microstructure of percolating biopolymer networks. The first type consists of poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) and poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(methacrylic acid) (PEO-b-PMAA), labeled with ATTO 488 fluorescent dyes. We show that the size of these probes can be tuned by choosing the length of the PEO-PMAA chains. ATTO 488-labeled PEO113-PMAA15 micelles are very bright with 18 dye molecules incorporated into their cores. The second type is a (19)F-labeled micelle, for which we used PAH and a (19)F-labeled diblock copolymer tailor-made from poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(acrylic acid) (mPEO79-b-PAA14). These micelles contain approximately 4 wt % of (19)F and can be detected by (19)F NMR. The (19)F labels are placed at the end of a small spacer to allow for the necessary rotational mobility. We used these ATTO- and (19)F-labeled micelles to probe the microstructures of a transient gel (xanthan gum) and a cross-linked, heterogeneous gel (κ-carrageenan). For the transient gel, sensitive optical diffusometry methods, including fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, and super-resolution single nanoparticle tracking, allowed us to measure the diffusion coefficient in networks with increasing density. From these measurements, we determined the diameters of the constituent xanthan fibers. In the heterogeneous κ-carrageenan gels, bimodal nanoparticle diffusion was observed, which is a signpost of microstructural heterogeneity of the network. PMID:26535962

  3. Biopolymer extraction

    Lin, Y; Al-Zuhairy, S.; Pronk, M.; M. C. M. van Loosdrecht

    2015-01-01

    In a prior art reactor set up dense aggregates of microorganisms are formed, typically in or embedded in an extracellular matrix. Such may relate to granules, to sphere like entities having a higher viscosity than water, globules, a biofilm, etc. The dense aggregates comprise extracellular polymeric substances, or biopolymers, in particular linear polysaccharides, The present invention is in the field of extraction of a biopolymer from a granular sludge, a biopolymer obtained by said method, ...

  4. Morphological, thermal and annealed microhardness characterization of gelatin based interpenetrating networks of polyacrylonitrile: A hard biopolymer

    Sangita Rajvaidya; R Bajpai; A K Bajpai

    2005-10-01

    The present paper reports the preparation of full IPNs of gelatin and polyacrylonitrile. Various compositions of gluteraldehyde crosslinked gelatin and N,N′-methylene-bis-acrylamide crosslinked PAN were characterized by SEM and DSC techniques. The IPNs were also thermally pretreated by the annealing process. The effects of annealing temperature on the microhardness of IPNs were studied using the Vickers method. SEM indicates the homogeneous morphological features for IPN. The role of gelatin, AN and crosslinker on the developed hard biopolymer has been described with the help of DSC thermograms and microhardness measurements of annealed specimens and good correlation is observed.

  5. Biopolymers Regulate Silver Nanoparticle under Microwave Irradiation for Effective Antibacterial and Antibiofilm Activities

    Velusamy, Palaniyandi; Su, Chia-Hung; Venkat Kumar, Govindarajan; Adhikary, Shritama; Pandian, Kannaiyan; Gopinath, Subash C. B.; Chen, Yeng; Anbu, Periasamy

    2016-01-01

    In the current study, facile synthesis of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) and sodium alginate capped silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) was examined using microwave radiation and aniline as a reducing agent. The biopolymer matrix embedded nanoparticles were synthesized under various experimental conditions using different concentrations of biopolymer (0.5, 1, 1.5, 2%), volumes of reducing agent (50, 100, 150 μL), and duration of heat treatment (30 s to 240 s). The synthesized nanoparticles were analy...

  6. Resolution of sub-element length scales in Brownian dynamics simulations of biopolymer networks with geometrically exact beam finite elements

    Müller, Kei W.; Meier, Christoph; Wall, Wolfgang A.

    2015-12-01

    Networks of crosslinked biopolymer filaments such as the cytoskeleton are the subject of intense research. Oftentimes, mechanics on the scale of single monomers (∼ 5 nm) govern the mechanics of the entire network (∼ 10 μm). Until now, one either resolved the small scales and lost the big (network) picture or focused on mechanics above the single-filament scale and neglected the molecular architecture. Therefore, the study of network mechanics influenced by the entire spectrum of relevant length scales has been infeasible so far. We propose a method that reconciles both small and large length scales without the otherwise inevitable loss in either numerical efficiency or geometrical (molecular) detail. Both explicitly modeled species, filaments and their crosslinkers, are discretized with geometrically exact beam finite elements of Simo-Reissner type. Through specific coupling conditions between the elements of the two species, mechanical joints can be established anywhere along a beam's centerline, enabling arbitrary densities of chemical binding sites. These binding sites can be oriented to model the monomeric architecture of polymers. First, we carefully discuss the method and then demonstrate its capabilities by means of a series of numerical examples.

  7. Anti-complementary Activities of Exo- and Endo-biopolymer Produced by Submerged Mycelial Culture of Eight Different Mushrooms

    Yang, Byung-Keun; Gu, Young-Ah; Jeong, Yong-Tae; Song, Chi-Hyun

    2007-01-01

    The Elfvingia applanata (EA), Hericium erinaceum (HE),Grifola frondosa (GF), Pholiota nameko (PN), Pleurotus eryngii (PE), Trametes suaveolens (TS), Fomes fomentarius (FF), and Inonotus obliquus (IO) could produce the endo- (EN) and exo-biopolymer (EX) in submerged culture. The highest anti-complementary activity of the EN was exhibited by PN (49.1%), followed by HE (38.6%), TS (37.0%),and FF (33.0%),whereas the high activity of the EX was found with GF (59.8%),followed by HE (36.3%),TS (30.8...

  8. Active biopolymers in green non-conventional media: a sustainable tool for developing clean chemical processes.

    Lozano, Pedro; Bernal, Juana M; Nieto, Susana; Gomez, Celia; Garcia-Verdugo, Eduardo; Luis, Santiago V

    2015-12-21

    The greenness of chemical processes turns around two main axes: the selectivity of catalytic transformations, and the separation of pure products. The transfer of the exquisite catalytic efficiency shown by enzymes in nature to chemical processes is an important challenge. By using appropriate reaction systems, the combination of biopolymers with supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) and ionic liquids (ILs) resulted in synergetic and outstanding platforms for developing (multi)catalytic green chemical processes, even under flow conditions. The stabilization of biocatalysts, together with the design of straightforward approaches for separation of pure products including the full recovery and reuse of enzymes/ILs systems, are essential elements for developing clean chemical processes. By understanding structure-function relationships of biopolymers in ILs, as well as for ILs themselves (e.g. sponge-like ionic liquids, SLILs; supported ionic liquids-like phases, SILLPs, etc.), several integral green chemical processes of (bio)catalytic transformation and pure product separation are pointed out (e.g. the biocatalytic production of biodiesel in SLILs, etc.). Other developments based on DNA/ILs systems, as pathfinder studies for further technological applications in the near future, are also considered. PMID:26497761

  9. Biopolymer-prebiotic carbohydrate blends and their effects on the retention of bioactive compounds and maintenance of antioxidant activity.

    Silva, Eric Keven; Zabot, Giovani L; Cazarin, Cinthia B B; Maróstica, Mário R; Meireles, M Angela A

    2016-06-25

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of inulin (IN), a prebiotic carbohydrate without superficial activity, as an encapsulating matrix of lipophilic bioactive compounds. For achieving the encapsulation, IN was associated with biopolymers that present superficial activity: modified starch (HiCap), whey protein isolate (WPI) and gum acacia (GA). Encapsulation was performed through emulsification assisted by ultrasound followed by freeze-drying (FD) process to dry the emulsions. All blends retained geranylgeraniol. GA-IN blend yielded the highest geranylgeraniol retention (96±2wt.%) and entrapment efficiency (94±3wt.%), whilst WPI-IN blend yielded the highest encapsulation efficiency (88±2wt.%). After encapsulation, composition of geranylgeraniol in the annatto seed oil was maintained (23.0±0.5g/100g of oil). Such findings indicate that the method of encapsulation preserved the active compound. All blends were also effective for maintaining the antioxidant activity of the oil through ORAC and DPPH analyses. PMID:27083804

  10. Actively stressed marginal networks

    Sheinman, M; MacKintosh, F C

    2012-01-01

    We study the effects of motor-generated stresses in disordered three dimensional fiber networks using a combination of a mean-field, effective medium theory, scaling analysis and a computational model. We find that motor activity controls the elasticity in an anomalous fashion close to the point of marginal stability by coupling to critical network fluctuations. We also show that motor stresses can stabilize initially floppy networks, extending the range of critical behavior to a broad regime of network connectivities below the marginal point. Away from this regime, or at high stress, motors give rise to a linear increase in stiffness with stress. Finally, we demonstrate that our results are captured by a simple, constitutive scaling relation highlighting the important role of non-affine strain fluctuations as a susceptibility to motor stress.

  11. Biopolymer Elasticity

    Sinha, S

    2003-01-01

    In recent years molecular elasticity has emerged as an active area of research: there are experiments that probe mechanical properties of single biomolecules such as DNA and Actin, with a view to understanding the role of elasticity of these polymers in biological processes such as transcription and protein-induced DNA bending. Single molecule elasticity has thus emerged as an area where there is a rich cross-fertilization of ideas between biologists, chemists and theoretical physicists. In this article we present a perspective on this field of research.

  12. Surface-active biopolymers from marine bacteria for potential biotechnological applications

    Karina Sałek

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Surface-active agents are amphiphilic chemicals that are used in almost every sector of modern industry, the bulk of which are produced by organo-chemical synthesis. Those produced from biological sources (biosurfactants and bioemulsifiers, however, have gained increasing interest in recent years due to their wide structural and functional diversity, lower toxicities and high biodegradability, compared to their chemically-synthesised counterparts. This review aims to present a general overview on surface-active agents, including their classification, where new types of these biomolecules may lay awaiting discovery, and some of the main bottlenecks for their industrial-scale production. In particular, the marine environment is highlighted as a largely untapped source for discovering new types of surface-active agents. Marine bacteria, especially those living associated with micro-algae (eukaryotic phytoplankton, are a highly promising source of polymeric surface-active agents with potential biotechnological applications. The high uronic acids content of these macromolecules has been linked to conferring them with amphiphilic qualities, and their high structural diversity and polyanionic nature endows them with the potential to exhibit a wide range of functional diversity. Production yields (e.g. by fermentation for most microbial surface-active agents have often been too low to meet the volume demands of industry, and this principally remains as the most important bottleneck for their further commercial development. However, new developments in recombinant and synthetic biology approaches can offer significant promise to alleviate this bottleneck. This review highlights a particular biotope in the marine environment that offers promise for discovering novel surface-active biomolecules, and gives a general overview on specific areas that researchers and the industry could focus work towards increasing the production yields of microbial surface-active

  13. Surface-active biopolymers from marine bacteria for potential biotechnological applications

    Karina Sałek; Tony Gutierrez

    2016-01-01

    Surface-active agents are amphiphilic chemicals that are used in almost every sector of modern industry, the bulk of which are produced by organo-chemical synthesis. Those produced from biological sources (biosurfactants and bioemulsifiers), however, have gained increasing interest in recent years due to their wide structural and functional diversity, lower toxicities and high biodegradability, compared to their chemically-synthesised counterparts. This review aims to present a general overvi...

  14. Broken Detailed Balance of Filament Dynamics in Active Networks

    Gladrow, J.; Fakhri, N.; MacKintosh, F. C.; Schmidt, C. F.; Broedersz, C. P.

    2016-06-01

    Myosin motor proteins drive vigorous steady-state fluctuations in the actin cytoskeleton of cells. Endogenous embedded semiflexible filaments such as microtubules, or added filaments such as single-walled carbon nanotubes are used as novel tools to noninvasively track equilibrium and nonequilibrium fluctuations in such biopolymer networks. Here, we analytically calculate shape fluctuations of semiflexible probe filaments in a viscoelastic environment, driven out of equilibrium by motor activity. Transverse bending fluctuations of the probe filaments can be decomposed into dynamic normal modes. We find that these modes no longer evolve independently under nonequilibrium driving. This effective mode coupling results in nonzero circulatory currents in a conformational phase space, reflecting a violation of detailed balance. We present predictions for the characteristic frequencies associated with these currents and investigate how the temporal signatures of motor activity determine mode correlations, which we find to be consistent with recent experiments on microtubules embedded in cytoskeletal networks.

  15. Biopolymer Surfactant Interactions

    Sreejith, Lisa; Nair, S.M.; George, Jinu

    2010-01-01

    The effect of sodium chloride on micellar property of CTAB in biopolymer gelatin were systematically studied. It was found that, micellisation and transition is favoured by increase in concentration of sodium chloride, however, without affecting the conformation of gelatin. The main findings from the present investigation refer to the stabilizing role of salt in presence of a biopolymer, gelatin, in micellar media. Increase in viscosity and gel

  16. The influence of hydrolysis induced biopolymers from recycled aerobic sludge on specific methanogenic activity and sludge filterability in an anaerobic membrane bioreactor.

    Buntner, D; Spanjers, H; van Lier, J B

    2014-03-15

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the impact of excess aerobic sludge on the specific methanogenic activity (SMA), in order to establish the maximum allowable aerobic sludge loading. In batch tests, different ratios of aerobic sludge to anaerobic inoculum were used, i.e. 0.03, 0.05, 0.10 and 0.15, showing that low ratios led to an increased SMA. However, the ratio 0.15 caused more than 20% SMA decrease. In addition to the SMA tests, the potential influence of biopolymers and extracellular substances, that are generated as a result of excess aerobic sludge hydrolysis, on membrane performance was determined by assessing the fouling potential of the liquid broth, taking into account parameters such as specific resistance to filtration (SRF) and supernatant filterability (SF). Addition of aerobic sludge to the anaerobic biomass resulted in a high membrane fouling potential. The increase in biopolymers could be ascribed to aerobic sludge hydrolysis. A clear positive correlation between the concentration of the colloidal fraction of biopolymer clusters (cBPC) and the SRF was observed and a negative correlation between the cBPC and the SF measured at the end of the above described SMA tests. The latter implies that sludge filtration resistance increases when more aerobic sludge is hydrolyzed, and thus more cBPC is released. During AnMBR operation, proteins significantly contributed to sludge filterability decrease expressed as SRF and SF, whereas the carbohydrate fraction of SMP was of less importance due to low concentrations. On the contrary, carbohydrates seemed to improve filterability and diminish SRF of the sludge. Albeit, cBPC increase caused an increase in mean TMP during the AnMBR operation, confirming that cBPC is positively correlated to membrane fouling. PMID:24284260

  17. Recent advances and future challenges in the explanation and exploitation of the network glass transition of high sugar/biopolymer mixtures.

    Kasapis, Stefan

    2008-02-01

    Through the years, the concept of glassy phenomena evolved from non-science to a highly specialized subject following the appreciation that structural properties or product defects could be rationalized on the basis of this amorphous vitreous transition. Special reference will be made in this review to sugar glasses in the presence of biopolymers which, increasingly, are used to innovate (e.g., replace gelatin) in confections, ice cream, boiled down sweets, etc. Keeping in mind that the subject cuts across several conventional fields, this manuscript is written with several objectives in view. I deemed it necessary to provide a historic itinerary of the nature of the rubber-to-glass transition in association with the concepts of plasticizing and unfreezable water. That should facilitate comprehension and hopefully encourage young scientists to take an interest in the field that continues to offer considerable challenges, as well as opportunities. Second, the food scientist is exposed to the "sophisticated" synthetic polymer approach pioneered by J.D. Ferry and his colleagues via the WLF equation/free volume theoretical framework. Extension of this school of thought to biomaterials introduces the concept of mechanical or network glass transition temperature, which is contrasted to data obtained using differential scanning calorimetry. Applications of the network T(g) as a relevant indicator for evaluating the stability criteria and the quality-control aspects of foodstuffs are also discussed. All along, information available in the literature is critically presented ranging from the misuse of the WLF equation to a recent challenge to the theory mounted by the coupling model, which addresses in some detail the physics of interactions and the cooperativity of molecular mobility at the vicinity of T(g). PMID:18274972

  18. Active Versus Passive Academic Networking

    Goel, Rajeev K.; Grimpe, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines determinants of networking by academics. Using information from a unique large survey of German researchers, the key contribution focuses on the active versus passive networking distinction. Is active networking by researchers a substitute or a complement to passive networking......? Other contributions include examining the role of geographic factors in networking and whether research bottlenecks affect a researcher's propensity to network. Are the determinants of European conference participation by German researchers different from conferences in rest of the world? Results show...... that some types of passive academic networking are complementary to active networking, while others are substitute. Further, we find differences in factors promoting participation in European conferences versus conferences in rest of the world. Finally, publishing bottlenecks as a group generally do...

  19. Biopolymer organization upon confinement

    Biopolymers in vivo are typically subject to spatial restraints, either as a result of molecular crowding in the cellular medium or of direct spatial confinement. DNA in living organisms provides a prototypical example of a confined biopolymer. Confinement prompts a number of biophysics questions. For instance, how can the high level of packing be compatible with the necessity to access and process the genomic material? What mechanisms can be adopted in vivo to avoid the excessive geometrical and topological entanglement of dense phases of biopolymers? These and other fundamental questions have been addressed in recent years by both experimental and theoretical means. A review of the results, particularly of those obtained by numerical studies, is presented here. The review is mostly devoted to DNA packaging inside bacteriophages, which is the best studied example both experimentally and theoretically. Recent selected biophysical studies of the bacterial genome organization and of chromosome segregation in eukaryotes are also covered. (topical review)

  20. PREPARATION AND PROPERTIES OF EXTRACELLULAR BIOPOLYMER FLOCCULANT

    2007-01-01

    The biopolymer flocculant (named PS-2) producing by Pseudomonas fluorescens was investigated. The PS-2 had high efficiency with small dosage, when dealing with kaolin suspension, formed larger floc, with big sedimentation rate, over a wide range of temperatures. Distributing of flocculating activity test showed that the biopolymer flocculant was an extracellular product. The composition analysis of purified biopolymer flocculant showed that it composed mainly of polysaccharide and nucleic acid. The content of polysaccharide was 86.7%, which determined by using phenol-vitriol method, and the content of nucleic acid was 7.8%, which determined by UV absorption method. The biopolymer flocculant as a powder form showed much better stability than that as a supernatant. The character of biopolymer flocculant was stable even it was heated to 100℃ when it in acidic condition. The optimal conditions to flocculate kaolin suspension were as follows: pH 8~12, flocculant dosage 1mL/L, and Ca2+ as the optimal cation.

  1. PREPARATION AND PROPERTIES OF EXTRACELLULAR BIOPOLYMER FLOCCULANT

    LI Chunxiang; LIU Binbin; XIONG Jinshui; YAN Jingchun

    2007-01-01

    The biopolymer flocculant (named PS-2) producing by Pseudomonas fluorescens was investigated. The PS-2 had high efficiency with small dosage, when dealing with kaolin suspension,formed larger floc, with big sedimentation rate, over a wide range of temperatures. Distributing of flocculating activity test showed that the biopolymer flocculant was an extracellular product. The composition analysis of purified biopolymer flocculant showed that it composed mainly of polysaccharide and nucleic acid. The content of polysaccharide was 86.7%, which determined by using phenol-vitriol method, and the content of nucleic acid was 7.8%, which determined by UV absorption method. The biopolymer flocculant as a powder form showed much better stability than that as a supernatant. The character of biopolymer flocculant was stable even it was heated to 100 ℃ when it in acidic condition. The optimal conditions to flocculate kaolin suspension were as follows:pH 8~12, flocculant dosage 1mL/L, and Ca2+ as the optimal cation.

  2. Radiation chemistry of biopolymers

    Studies have been made on biopolymers in the solid state (direct effect) and in dilute aqueous solution (indirect effect). In vivo the state of biopolymers lies somewhere between fluid and solid, and to understand the radiation effects, one must interpolate between the two extremes. Evidence is quite strong that hydroxyl radicals are involved in mammalian and bacterial cell killing. The structure of DNA and many proteins is now clearly defined. With this knowledge and with the development of fast reaction techniques, the sites of reaction of the primary aqueous radicals and the reaction mechanisms in these biopolymers are well understood. The identification of the radiation products has been hampered by lack of sensitive analytical methodologies. Recent developments in analytical techniques, such as capillary gas chromatography (GC), mass spectrometry (MS), and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), have provided means of monitoring small changes in amino acids and DNA bases, and of detecting radiation products formed in low yields. The focus of this chapter is indirect effects of the primary aqueous radicals in forming organic radicals in biopolymers and on the mechanisms of termination of these radicals to produce damage and radiation products

  3. Synchronization in active networks

    Pereira da Silva, Tiago

    2007-01-01

    In nature one commonly finds interacting complex oscillators which by the coupling scheme form small and large networks, e.g. neural networks. Surprisingly, the oscillators can synchronize, still preserving the complex behavior. Synchronization is a fundamental phenomenon in coupled nonlinear oscillators. Synchronization can be enhanced at different levels, that is, the constraints on which the synchronization appears. Those can be in the trajectory amplitude, requiring the amplitudes of both...

  4. Resources Management in Active Networks

    2003-01-01

    In an active network, users can insert customized active codes into active nodes to execute. Thus it needs more resources than those required by conventional networks, and these resources must be effectively monitored and managed. Management policies in existing OSs are too complicated to apply to simple active packets. In this paper, we present new resources management policies that are mainly adoped to manage CPU, storage and transmission bandwidth. Namely, we use SPF algorithm to schedule and process active packets, and import an interval queue method to allocate transmission bandwidth, and use feedback mechanism to control congestion. At the same time, we design some experiments on prototype systems with and without resources management policies respectively. The experiments results show that management policies presented by us can effectively manage resources in active nodes and can improve the performance of active networks.

  5. Fiber networks amplify active stress

    Ronceray, Pierre; Broedersz, Chase; Lenz, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale force generation is essential for biological functions such as cell motility, embryonic development, and muscle contraction. In these processes, forces generated at the molecular level by motor proteins are transmitted by disordered fiber networks, resulting in large-scale active stresses. While these fiber networks are well characterized macroscopically, this stress generation by microscopic active units is not well understood. Here we theoretically study force transmission in th...

  6. Security Protocol for Active Networks

    Cheng, L.; Galis, A.

    2006-01-01

    Active packets carrying management and control code have a dynamic nature and support dynamic routing. Thus, active packets must be protected in an end-to-end and hop-to-hop fashion. In this paper, we present a novel approach, known as security protocol for active networks (SPAN), which enables an active packet to be securely transmitted during (instead of after) Security Association (SA) and management negotiations along a new execution path

  7. Production of novel microbial biopolymers

    Microorganisms are well known to produce a wide variety of biobased polymers. These biopolymers have found a wide range of commercial uses, including food, feed, and consumer and industrial products. The production and possible uses of several novel biopolymers from both bacteria and fungi will be d...

  8. Networking activism: implications for Greece

    Pantelis Vatikiotis

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The outbreak of December 2008 against police brutality through a wave of demonstrations and street protests in Athens, which was strongly advocated by protest activities and practices across the world, addresses several issues in relation to the transformative potentials of mediated collective action. The paper critically evaluates different accounts of December events, probing then into thevery networking of that movement. From this perspective, it points out another aspect of the local-global interplay in protest culture along new mediating practices (beyond the creation of transnational publics, that of the implications of transnational networking for local social activism and identification, addressing relevant questions in the Greek context.

  9. Effects of polyacrylamide, biopolymer, and biochar on decomposition of soil organic matter and 14C-labeled plant residues as determined by enzyme activities

    Mahmoud Awad, Yasser; Ok, Young Sik; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2014-05-01

    Application of polymers for the improvement of aggregate structure and reduction of soil erosion may alter the availability and decomposition of plant residues. In this study, we assessed the effects of anionic polyacrylamide (PAM), synthesized biopolymer (BP), and biochar (BC) on the decomposition of 14C-labeled maize residue in sandy and sandy loam soils. Specifically, PAM and BP with or without 14C-labeled plant residue were applied at 400 kg ha-1, whereas BC was applied at 5000 kg ha-1, after which the soils were incubated for 80 days at 22 oC. Initially, plant residue decomposition was much higher in untreated sandy loam soil than in sandy soil. Nevertheless, the stimulating effects of BP and BC on the decomposition of plant residue were more pronounced in sandy soil, where it accounted for 13.4% and 23.4% of 14C input, respectively, whereas in sandy loam soil, the acceleration of plant residue decomposition by BP and BC did not exceed 2.6% and 14.1%, respectively, compared to untreated soil with plant residue. The stimulating effects of BP and BC on the decomposition of plant residue were confirmed based on activities of β-cellobiohydrolase, β-glucosidase, and chitinase in both soils. In contrast to BC and BP, PAM did not increase the decomposition of native or added C in both soils.

  10. Optimal network topologies for information transmission in active networks

    Baptista, M. S.; de Carvalho, J. X.; Hussein, M.S.

    2008-01-01

    This work clarifies the relation between network circuit (topology) and behavior (information transmission and synchronization) in active networks, e.g. neural networks. As an application, we show how to determine a network topology that is optimal for information transmission. By optimal, we mean that the network is able to transmit a large amount of information, it possesses a large number of communication channels, and it is robust under large variations of the network coupling configurati...

  11. Networking activism: implications for Greece

    Pantelis Vatikiotis

    2011-01-01

    The outbreak of December 2008 against police brutality through a wave of demonstrations and street protests in Athens, which was strongly advocated by protest activities and practices across the world, addresses several issues in relation to the transformative potentials of mediated collective action. The paper critically evaluates different accounts of December events, probing then into thevery networking of that movement. From this perspective, it points out another aspect of the local-glob...

  12. How Sleep Activates Epileptic Networks?

    Peter Halász

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The relationship between sleep and epilepsy has been long ago studied, and several excellent reviews are available. However, recent development in sleep research, the network concept in epilepsy, and the recognition of high frequency oscillations in epilepsy and more new results may put this matter in a new light. Aim. The review address the multifold interrelationships between sleep and epilepsy networks and with networks of cognitive functions. Material and Methods. The work is a conceptual update of the available clinical data and relevant studies. Results and Conclusions. Studies exploring dynamic microstructure of sleep have found important gating mechanisms for epileptic activation. As a general rule interictal epileptic manifestations seem to be linked to the slow oscillations of sleep and especially to the reactive delta bouts characterized by A1 subtype in the CAP system. Important link between epilepsy and sleep is the interference of epileptiform discharges with the plastic functions in NREM sleep. This is the main reason of cognitive impairment in different forms of early epileptic encephalopathies affecting the brain in a special developmental window. The impairment of cognitive functions via sleep is present especially in epileptic networks involving the thalamocortical system and the hippocampocortical memory encoding system.

  13. Semiconducting photoactive biopolymers

    Full text: The melanins are a unique class of biological, polymeric 'soft solid'. They are found throughout the biosphere in mainly pigmentary and photoprotective roles. In humans, phaomelanin and eumelanin give our hair its colour, and are the molecules that are secreted in our skin to protect us from the sun. Melanins also perform more complex functions in the eye and inner ear, and are even found in the brain stem. Their roles in these locations are not well understood. The melanins are unique amongst biopolymers in that they exhibit intrinsic semiconductivity and photoconductivity. They are also broadband absorbers in the UV and visible, having characteristic band gaps of ∼1.2-1.8 eV. In my talk, I will explain how (and why) these biologically unique properties come about. I will broadly discuss the electronics of melanin-like molecules in terms of 3-D non-local electron transport in disordered, π-conjugated heteropolymer systems. I will also comment on how such insights could be important in our attempts to understand their biological functionality. Finally, I will present exciting new data which demonstrates photo-induced charge injection from synthetic polyindolequinone melanin, into the conduction band of semiconducting nanoporous titanium dioxide. These findings indicate that melanins may be useful photovoltaic materials, and indeed, may herald the arrival of a new class of biopolymeric 'electronic soft solid'

  14. SDN-Based Active Content Networking

    Tai-Won Um; Gyu Myoung Lee; Jinsul Kim

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a Software Defined Networking- (SDN-) based active content networking architecture for future media environments. The proposed architecture aims to provide customized delivery of various types of media content in order to satisfy users’ demand and service requirements. To this end, we have developed an active content processing model which provides in-network content processing through service objects that are integral parts of active content. The main benefits provided by...

  15. Proton conduction in biopolymer exopolysaccharide succinoglycan

    Kweon, Jin Jung [Department of Physics, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32310 (United States); Lee, Kyu Won; Kim, Hyojung; Lee, Cheol Eui, E-mail: rscel@korea.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Seunho [Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology and UBITA, Konkuk University, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Chanho [Naraebio Research Laboratories, 177 Dangha-ri, Bongdam-eup, Hawseong-si 445-892 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-07

    Protonic currents play a vital role in electrical signalling in living systems. It has been suggested that succinoglycan plays a specific role in alfalfa root nodule development, presumably acting as the signaling molecules. In this regard, charge transport and proton dynamics in the biopolymer exopolysaccharide succinoglycan have been studied by means of electrical measurements and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. In particular, a dielectric dispersion in the system has revealed that the electrical conduction is protonic rather electronic. Besides, our laboratory- and rotating-frame {sup 1}H NMR measurements have elucidated the nature of the protonic conduction, activation of the protonic motion being associated with a glass transition.

  16. Proton conduction in biopolymer exopolysaccharide succinoglycan

    Protonic currents play a vital role in electrical signalling in living systems. It has been suggested that succinoglycan plays a specific role in alfalfa root nodule development, presumably acting as the signaling molecules. In this regard, charge transport and proton dynamics in the biopolymer exopolysaccharide succinoglycan have been studied by means of electrical measurements and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. In particular, a dielectric dispersion in the system has revealed that the electrical conduction is protonic rather electronic. Besides, our laboratory- and rotating-frame 1H NMR measurements have elucidated the nature of the protonic conduction, activation of the protonic motion being associated with a glass transition.

  17. Radioactivity measuring system of labelled biopolymers

    System for determining the radioactivity of labelled biopolymers, comprising a bank of containers filled with aqueous solutions of biological samples containing biopolymers. This system features an electric drive to move the bank of containers step by step; a device for the acid precipitation of the biopolymers which sends determined amounts of co-precipitant and diatom suspension in an acid solution to the containers containing a biological sample; a system for taking precipitated samples from the containers; a system for filtering the precipitated biopolymers carrying out successive filterings; placing the deposit into suspension; dissolving the biopolymers and sending the labelled mixture labelled by the scintillation labeller to the detection chamber

  18. Biocompatibility of plasma nanostructured biopolymers

    Kasálková-Slepičková, N.; Slepička, P.; Bačáková, Lucie; Sajdl, P.; Švorčík, V.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 307, Jul 15 (2013), s. 642-646. ISSN 0168-583X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : biopolymer * plasma treatment * biocompatibility Subject RIV: JJ - Other Materials Impact factor: 1.186, year: 2013

  19. Dynamics of forced biopolymer translocation

    Lehtola, V V; Kaski, K; 10.1209/0295-5075/85/58006

    2009-01-01

    We present results from our simulations of biopolymer translocation in a solvent which explain the main experimental findings. The forced translocation can be described by simple force balance arguments for the relevant range of pore potentials in experiments and biological systems. Scaling of translocation time with polymer length varies with pore force and friction. Hydrodynamics affects this scaling and significantly reduces translocation times.

  20. Stochastic cycle selection in active flow networks.

    Woodhouse, Francis G; Forrow, Aden; Fawcett, Joanna B; Dunkel, Jörn

    2016-07-19

    Active biological flow networks pervade nature and span a wide range of scales, from arterial blood vessels and bronchial mucus transport in humans to bacterial flow through porous media or plasmodial shuttle streaming in slime molds. Despite their ubiquity, little is known about the self-organization principles that govern flow statistics in such nonequilibrium networks. Here we connect concepts from lattice field theory, graph theory, and transition rate theory to understand how topology controls dynamics in a generic model for actively driven flow on a network. Our combined theoretical and numerical analysis identifies symmetry-based rules that make it possible to classify and predict the selection statistics of complex flow cycles from the network topology. The conceptual framework developed here is applicable to a broad class of biological and nonbiological far-from-equilibrium networks, including actively controlled information flows, and establishes a correspondence between active flow networks and generalized ice-type models. PMID:27382186

  1. Stochastic cycle selection in active flow networks

    Woodhouse, Francis G; Fawcett, Joanna B; Dunkel, Jörn

    2016-01-01

    Active biological flow networks pervade nature and span a wide range of scales, from arterial blood vessels and bronchial mucus transport in humans to bacterial flow through porous media or plasmodial shuttle streaming in slime molds. Despite their ubiquity, little is known about the self-organization principles that govern flow statistics in such non-equilibrium networks. Here we connect concepts from lattice field theory, graph theory, and transition rate theory to understand how topology controls dynamics in a generic model for actively driven flow on a network. Our combined theoretical and numerical analysis identifies symmetry-based rules that make it possible to classify and predict the selection statistics of complex flow cycles from the network topology. The conceptual framework developed here is applicable to a broad class of non-biological far-from-equilibrium networks, including actively controlled information flows, and establishes a new correspondence between active flow networks and generalized ...

  2. Environmental Activism, Social Networks and the Internet

    Sullivan, J.; Xie Lei

    2009-01-01

    Social networks and the internet both have a substantial individual effect on environmental activism in China. In this article, we speculate that social linking patterns between environmental actors, which often facilitate activism on the ground, may also exist in cyberspace in the form of an online network. The article addresses the following empirical questions. Does such an online network exist? If so, who are the constituent actors? Are these the same actors observed on the ground? In add...

  3. Dynamics of active actin networks

    Koehler, Simone

    2014-03-01

    Local mechanical and structural properties of a eukaryotic cell are determined by its cytoskeleton. To adapt to their environment, cells rely on constant self-organized rearrangement processes of their actin cytoskeleton. To shed light on the principles underlying these dynamic self-organization processes we investigate a minimal reconstituted active system consisting of actin filaments, crosslinking molecules and molecular motor filaments. Using quantitative fluorescence microscopy and image analysis, we show, that these minimal model systems exhibit a generic structure formation mechanism. The competition between force generation by molecular motors and the stabilization of the network by crosslinking proteins results in a highly dynamic reorganization process which is characterized by anomalous transport dynamics with a superdiffusive behavior also found in intracellular dynamics. In vitro, these dynamics are governed by chemical and physical parameters that alter the balance of motor and crosslinking proteins, such as pH. These findings can be expected to have broad implications in our understanding of cytoskeletal regulation in vivo.

  4. Shaping Neuronal Network Activity by Presynaptic Mechanisms.

    Ayal Lavi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal microcircuits generate oscillatory activity, which has been linked to basic functions such as sleep, learning and sensorimotor gating. Although synaptic release processes are well known for their ability to shape the interaction between neurons in microcircuits, most computational models do not simulate the synaptic transmission process directly and hence cannot explain how changes in synaptic parameters alter neuronal network activity. In this paper, we present a novel neuronal network model that incorporates presynaptic release mechanisms, such as vesicle pool dynamics and calcium-dependent release probability, to model the spontaneous activity of neuronal networks. The model, which is based on modified leaky integrate-and-fire neurons, generates spontaneous network activity patterns, which are similar to experimental data and robust under changes in the model's primary gain parameters such as excitatory postsynaptic potential and connectivity ratio. Furthermore, it reliably recreates experimental findings and provides mechanistic explanations for data obtained from microelectrode array recordings, such as network burst termination and the effects of pharmacological and genetic manipulations. The model demonstrates how elevated asynchronous release, but not spontaneous release, synchronizes neuronal network activity and reveals that asynchronous release enhances utilization of the recycling vesicle pool to induce the network effect. The model further predicts a positive correlation between vesicle priming at the single-neuron level and burst frequency at the network level; this prediction is supported by experimental findings. Thus, the model is utilized to reveal how synaptic release processes at the neuronal level govern activity patterns and synchronization at the network level.

  5. Complex networks in brain electrical activity

    Ruffini, G; Grau, C; Marco, J; Ray, C

    2005-01-01

    We analyze the complex networks associated with brain electrical activity. Multichannel EEG measurements are first processed to obtain 3D voxel activations using the tomographic algorithm LORETA. Then, the correlation of the current intensity activation between voxel pairs is computed to produce a voxel cross-correlation coefficient matrix. Using several correlation thresholds, the cross-correlation matrix is then transformed into a network connectivity matrix and analyzed. To study a specific example, we selected data from an earlier experiment focusing on the MMN brain wave. The resulting analysis highlights significant differences between the spatial activations associated with Standard and Deviant tones, with interesting physiological implications. When compared to random data networks, physiological networks are more connected, with longer links and shorter path lengths. Furthermore, as compared to the Deviant case, Standard data networks are more connected, with longer links and shorter path lengths--i....

  6. Competing activation mechanisms in epidemics on networks

    Castellano, Claudio

    2011-01-01

    In stark contrast to previous common wisdom that epidemic activity and thresholds in heterogeneous networks are dominated by the elements with the largest number of connections (the hubs), recent research has pointed out the role of the most efficient spreaders, located at the innermost, dense core of the network, in sustaining epidemic processes. Here we show that the mechanism responsible of epidemic spreading depends on the dynamical pattern of the epidemic process. For epidemics with a transient state, activity is essentially boosted by the innermost core of the network. On the contrary, epidemics allowing a steady state present a dual scenario, where either the vertex with the largest connectivity independently sustains activity and propagates it to the rest of the system, or, alternatively, the innermost core of the network collectively turns into the active state, maintaining it on a global scale. Which one of these two mechanisms actually governs the dynamics depends on the network features. In uncorr...

  7. Understanding anisotropy and architecture in ice-templated biopolymer scaffolds

    Pawelec, K. M.; Husmann, A.; Best, S. M.; Cameron, R. E.

    2014-01-01

    Biopolymer scaffolds have great therapeutic potential within tissue engineering due to their large interconnected porosity and biocompatibility. Using an ice-templated technique, where collagen is concentrated into a porous network by ice nucleation and growth, scaffolds with anisotropic pore architecture can be created, mimicking natural tissues like cardiac muscle and bone. This paper describes a systematic set of experiments undertaken to understand the effect of local temperatures on arch...

  8. IP Tracing and Active Network Response

    Sobh, Tarek S.; Khalil, Awad H.

    2014-01-01

    Active security is mainly concerned with performing one or more security functions when a host in a communication network is subject to an attack. Such security functions include appropriate actions against attackers. To properly afford active security actions a set of software subsystems should be integrated together so that they can automatically detect and appropriately address any vulnerability in the underlying network. This work presents integrated model for active security response mod...

  9. BIOPOLYMERS FOR APPLICATION IN PHOTONICS

    Rau, Ileana; Kajzar, Francois

    2014-01-01

    The possibilities of utilization of biopolymers, the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in particular, are reviewed and discussed. The ways of their functionalization with photoresponsive molecules to get desired properties are described and illustrated on several examples as well as the processing of materials into thin films. Their roomand photo-thermal stability, studied by spectroscopic techniques is reported, together with optical damage thresholds. Physical properties, and more particularly li...

  10. Raft Instability of Biopolymer Gels

    Borukhov, I.; Bruinsma, R.F.

    2002-01-01

    Following recent X-ray diffraction experiments by Wong, Li, and Safinya on biopolymer gels, we apply Onsager excluded volume theory to a nematic mixture of rigid rods and strong ``$\\pi/2$'' cross-linkers obtaining a long-ranged, highly anisotropic depletion attraction between the linkers. This attraction leads to breakdown of the percolation theory for this class of gels, to breakdown of Onsager's second-order virial method, and to formation of heterogeneities in the form of raft-like ribbons.

  11. Biocompatibility of plasma nanostructured biopolymers

    Slepičková Kasálková, N. [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic); Slepička, P., E-mail: petr.slepicka@vscht.cz [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic); Bačáková, L. [Institute of Physiology, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic 142 20 Prague (Czech Republic); Sajdl, P. [Department of Power Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic); Švorčík, V. [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2013-07-15

    Many areas of medicine such as tissue engineering requires not only mastery of modification techniques but also thorough knowledge of the interaction of cells with solid state substrates. Plasma treatment can be used to effective modification, nanostructuring and therefore can significantly change properties of materials. In this work the biocompatibility of the plasma nanostructured biopolymers substrates was studied. Changes in surface chemical structure were studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The morphology pristine and modified samples were determined using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The surface wettability was determined by goniometry from contact angle. Biocompatibility was determined by in vitro tests, the rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) were cultivated on the pristine and plasma modified biopolymer substrates. Their adhesion, proliferation, spreading and homogeneous distribution on polymers was monitored. It was found that the plasma treatment leads to rapid decrease of contact angle for all samples. Contact angle decreased with increasing time of modification. XPS measurements showed that plasma treatment leads to changes in ratio of polar and non-polar groups. Plasma modification was accompanied by a change of surface morphology. Biological tests found that plasma treatment have positive effect on cells adhesion and proliferation cells and affects the size of cell’s adhesion area. Changes in plasma power or in exposure time influences the number of adhered and proliferated cells and their distribution on biopolymer surface.

  12. Biocompatibility of plasma nanostructured biopolymers

    Many areas of medicine such as tissue engineering requires not only mastery of modification techniques but also thorough knowledge of the interaction of cells with solid state substrates. Plasma treatment can be used to effective modification, nanostructuring and therefore can significantly change properties of materials. In this work the biocompatibility of the plasma nanostructured biopolymers substrates was studied. Changes in surface chemical structure were studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The morphology pristine and modified samples were determined using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The surface wettability was determined by goniometry from contact angle. Biocompatibility was determined by in vitro tests, the rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) were cultivated on the pristine and plasma modified biopolymer substrates. Their adhesion, proliferation, spreading and homogeneous distribution on polymers was monitored. It was found that the plasma treatment leads to rapid decrease of contact angle for all samples. Contact angle decreased with increasing time of modification. XPS measurements showed that plasma treatment leads to changes in ratio of polar and non-polar groups. Plasma modification was accompanied by a change of surface morphology. Biological tests found that plasma treatment have positive effect on cells adhesion and proliferation cells and affects the size of cell’s adhesion area. Changes in plasma power or in exposure time influences the number of adhered and proliferated cells and their distribution on biopolymer surface

  13. Active Intrusion Detection for Wireless Multihop Networks

    do Carmo, Rodrigo Daniel

    2014-01-01

    This work focuses on network security and introduces an active-probing technique for intrusion detection in wireless multihop networks. Wireless networks have been the revolution of personal communications of the past decades. Millions of devices with wireless capabilities are sold to end customers every year: smartphones that enable access to the Internet almost everywhere, computers with wireless connections, personal watches, sports shoes, digital cameras, and even lenses with wirel...

  14. Autonomous valve for detection of biopolymer degradation

    Keller, Stephan Urs; Noeth, Nadine-Nicole; Fetz, Stefanie; Grünefeld, Marco; Geschke, Oliver; Boisen, Anja; Haefliger, D.

    2009-01-01

    We present a polymer microvalve that allows the detection of biopolymer degradation without the need of external energy. The valve is based on a polymer container filled with a colored marker solution and closed by a thin lid. This structure is covered by a film of poly(L-lactide) and degradation of the biopolymer triggers the release of the color which is detected visually. The autonomous valve has potential for the fast testing of biopolymer degradation under various environmental condition...

  15. Earthquake networks based on similar activity patterns.

    Tenenbaum, Joel N; Havlin, Shlomo; Stanley, H Eugene

    2012-10-01

    Earthquakes are a complex spatiotemporal phenomenon, the underlying mechanism for which is still not fully understood despite decades of research and analysis. We propose and develop a network approach to earthquake events. In this network, a node represents a spatial location while a link between two nodes represents similar activity patterns in the two different locations. The strength of a link is proportional to the strength of the cross correlation in activities of two nodes joined by the link. We apply our network approach to a Japanese earthquake catalog spanning the 14-year period 1985-1998. We find strong links representing large correlations between patterns in locations separated by more than 1000 kilometers, corroborating prior observations that earthquake interactions have no characteristic length scale. We find network characteristics not attributable to chance alone, including a large number of network links, high node assortativity, and strong stability over time. PMID:23214652

  16. Thermal Degradation and Damping Characteristic of UV Irradiated Biopolymer

    Anika Zafiah M. Rus

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Biopolymer made from renewable material is one of the most important groups of polymer because of its versatility in application. In this study, biopolymers based on waste vegetable oil were synthesized and cross-link with commercial polymethane polyphenyl isocyanate (known as BF. The BF was compressed by using hot compression moulding technique at 90°C based on the evaporation of volatile matter, known as compress biopolymer (CB. Treatment with titanium dioxide (TiO2 was found to affect the physical property of compressed biopolymer composite (CBC. The characterization of thermal degradation, activation energy, morphology structure, density, vibration, and damping of CB were determined after UV irradiation exposure. This is to evaluate the photo- and thermal stability of the treated CB or CBC. The vibration and damping characteristic of CBC samples is significantly increased with the increasing of UV irradiation time, lowest thickness, and percentages of TiO2 loading at the frequency range of 15–25 Hz due to the potential of the sample to dissipate energy during the oscillation harmonic system. The damping property of CBC was improved markedly upon prolonged exposure to UV irradiation.

  17. Introduction of Microbial Biopolymers in Soil Treatment for Future Environmentally-Friendly and Sustainable Geotechnical Engineering

    Ilhan Chang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Soil treatment and improvement is commonly performed in the field of geotechnical engineering. Methods and materials to achieve this such as soil stabilization and mixing with cementitious binders have been utilized in engineered soil applications since the beginning of human civilization. Demand for environment-friendly and sustainable alternatives is currently rising. Since cement, the most commonly applied and effective soil treatment material, is responsible for heavy greenhouse gas emissions, alternatives such as geosynthetics, chemical polymers, geopolymers, microbial induction, and biopolymers are being actively studied. This study provides an overall review of the recent applications of biopolymers in geotechnical engineering. Biopolymers are microbially induced polymers that are high-tensile, innocuous, and eco-friendly. Soil–biopolymer interactions and related soil strengthening mechanisms are discussed in the context of recent experimental and microscopic studies. In addition, the economic feasibility of biopolymer implementation in the field is analyzed in comparison to ordinary cement, from environmental perspectives. Findings from this study demonstrate that biopolymers have strong potential to replace cement as a soil treatment material within the context of environment-friendly construction and development. Moreover, continuing research is suggested to ensure performance in terms of practical implementation, reliability, and durability of in situ biopolymer applications for geotechnical engineering purposes.

  18. Active Network Supports for Mobile IP

    LU Yueming; QIAN Depei; XU Bin; WANG Lei

    2001-01-01

    The basic mobile IP protocol is difficult to implement on the traditional IP network and not flexible and efficient under certain conditions. For example, firewalls or boundary routers may drop packets sent by mobile nodes for security reasons. Traditional networking devices such as routers cannot dynamically load and unload extended services to achieve different qualities of services. In this paper, a new scheme of using the active network to support the mobile IP is presented. The Softnet, a prototype of active networks based on mobile agents,is introduced. The active network is characterized by the programmability of its intermediatenodes and therefore presents dynamic and flexible behaviors. Special services can be dynamically deployed onto the active nodes in the Softnet. This property is definitely required in implementing the mobile IP protocols. The Softnet supports not only the basic mobile IP protocol but also other extended mobile IP protocols. Virtual networks for mobile IP services are dynamically formed by mobile agents in the Softnet to provide different qualities of services.

  19. Biopolymer protected silver nanoparticles on the support of carbon nanotube as interface for electrocatalytic applications

    Satyanarayana, M.; Kumar, V. Sunil; Gobi, K. Vengatajalabathy

    2016-04-01

    In this research, silver nanoparticles (SNPs) are prepared on the surface of carbon nanotubes via chitosan, a biopolymer linkage. Here chitosan act as stabilizing agent for nanoparticles and forms a network on the surface of carbon nanotubes. Synthesized silver nanoparticles-MWCNT hybrid composite is characterized by UV-Visible spectroscopy, XRD analysis, and FESEM with EDS to evaluate the structural and chemical properties of the nanocomposite. The electrocatalytic activity of the fabricated SNP-MWCNT hybrid modified glassy carbon electrode has been evaluated by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance analysis. The silver nanoparticles are of size ˜35 nm and are well distributed on the surface of carbon nanotubes with chitosan linkage. The prepared nanocomposite shows efficient electrocatalytic properties with high active surface area and excellent electron transfer behaviour.

  20. Biopolymer mass spectrometer with cryogenic particle detectors

    A novel type of biopolymer mass spectrometer is proposed for massive proteins, polypeptides and DNA-fragments by replacing standard ionizing detectors with cryogenic particle detectors. The detection efficiency in ionizing detectors decreases rapidly with increasing biopolymer mass owing to the biopolymer's decreasing velocity. Cryogenic particle detectors, however, record the total kinetic energy deposited by the accelerated biopolymer. In a given electric acceleration field, this kinetic energy is independent of mass and depends only on the biopolymer's charged state. Using the intrinsic properties of cryogenic particle detectors and their specific fabrication techniques, a mass spectrometer has been designed specifically for high-throughput DNA-sequencing. The calculated DNA-fragment separation rate would be increased by several orders of magnitude as compared to standard gel-electrophoresis DNA-sequencers. (orig.)

  1. Adaptive intelligent power systems: Active distribution networks

    Electricity networks are extensive and well established. They form a key part of the infrastructure that supports industrialised society. These networks are moving from a period of stability to a time of potentially major transition, driven by a need for old equipment to be replaced, by government policy commitments to cleaner and renewable sources of electricity generation, and by change in the power industry. This paper looks at moves towards active distribution networks. The novel transmission and distribution systems of the future will challenge today's system designs. They will cope with variable voltages and frequencies, and will offer more flexible, sustainable options. Intelligent power networks will need innovation in several key areas of information technology. Active control of flexible, large-scale electrical power systems is required. Protection and control systems will have to react to faults and unusual transient behaviour and ensure recovery after such events. Real-time network simulation and performance analysis will be needed to provide decision support for system operators, and the inputs to energy and distribution management systems. Advanced sensors and measurement will be used to achieve higher degrees of network automation and better system control, while pervasive communications will allow networks to be reconfigured by intelligent systems

  2. Care transition and network activation in Portugal

    Santana, Silvina; M. Viana

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To report on the use of a user-centred model and methodology to assess the quality of care transition and network activation action, in light of an ongoing home supported discharge procedure for stroke patients in Portugal. Theory In Portugal, the health care system presents weaknesses resulting from a remarkable diversity of entry points, inadequate use of scarce and expensive resources and difficult information flow between institutions and professionals. The social care network is ...

  3. Film forming microbial biopolymers for commercial applications--a review.

    Vijayendra, S V N; Shamala, T R

    2014-12-01

    Microorganisms synthesize intracellular, structural and extracellular polymers also referred to as biopolymers for their function and survival. These biopolymers play specific roles as energy reserve materials, protective agents, aid in cell functioning, the establishment of symbiosis, osmotic adaptation and support the microbial genera to function, adapt, multiply and survive efficiently under changing environmental conditions. Viscosifying, gelling and film forming properties of these have been exploited for specific significant applications in food and allied industries. Intensive research activities and recent achievements in relevant and important research fields of global interest regarding film forming microbial biopolymers is the subject of this review. Microbial polymers such as pullulan, kefiran, bacterial cellulose (BC), gellan and levan are placed under the category of exopolysaccharides (EPS) and have several other functional properties including film formation, which can be used for various applications in food and allied industries. In addition to EPS, innumerable bacterial genera are found to synthesis carbon energy reserves in their cells known as polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs), microbial polyesters, which can be extruded into films with excellent moisture and oxygen barrier properties. Blow moldable biopolymers like PHA along with polylactic acid (PLA) synthesized chemically in vitro using lactic acid (LA), which is produced by LA bacteria through fermentation, are projected as biodegradable polymers of the future for packaging applications. Designing and creating of new property based on requirements through controlled synthesis can lead to improvement in properties of existing polysaccharides and create novel biopolymers of great commercial interest and value for wider applications. Incorporation of antimicrobials such as bacteriocins or silver and copper nanoparticles can enhance the functionality of polymer films especially in food packaging

  4. Spontaneous Plasticity of Multineuronal Activity Patterns in Activated Hippocampal Networks

    Atsushi Usami

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Using functional multineuron imaging with single-cell resolution, we examined how hippocampal networks by themselves change the spatiotemporal patterns of spontaneous activity during the course of emitting spontaneous activity. When extracellular ionic concentrations were changed to those that mimicked in vivo conditions, spontaneous activity was increased in active cell number and activity frequency. When ionic compositions were restored to the control conditions, the activity level returned to baseline, but the weighted spatial dispersion of active cells, as assessed by entropy-based metrics, did not. Thus, the networks can modify themselves by altering the internal structure of their correlated activity, even though they as a whole maintained the same level of activity in space and time.

  5. Reconstructing Causal Biological Networks through Active Learning.

    Cho, Hyunghoon; Berger, Bonnie; Peng, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Reverse-engineering of biological networks is a central problem in systems biology. The use of intervention data, such as gene knockouts or knockdowns, is typically used for teasing apart causal relationships among genes. Under time or resource constraints, one needs to carefully choose which intervention experiments to carry out. Previous approaches for selecting most informative interventions have largely been focused on discrete Bayesian networks. However, continuous Bayesian networks are of great practical interest, especially in the study of complex biological systems and their quantitative properties. In this work, we present an efficient, information-theoretic active learning algorithm for Gaussian Bayesian networks (GBNs), which serve as important models for gene regulatory networks. In addition to providing linear-algebraic insights unique to GBNs, leading to significant runtime improvements, we demonstrate the effectiveness of our method on data simulated with GBNs and the DREAM4 network inference challenge data sets. Our method generally leads to faster recovery of underlying network structure and faster convergence to final distribution of confidence scores over candidate graph structures using the full data, in comparison to random selection of intervention experiments. PMID:26930205

  6. Reconstructing Causal Biological Networks through Active Learning.

    Hyunghoon Cho

    Full Text Available Reverse-engineering of biological networks is a central problem in systems biology. The use of intervention data, such as gene knockouts or knockdowns, is typically used for teasing apart causal relationships among genes. Under time or resource constraints, one needs to carefully choose which intervention experiments to carry out. Previous approaches for selecting most informative interventions have largely been focused on discrete Bayesian networks. However, continuous Bayesian networks are of great practical interest, especially in the study of complex biological systems and their quantitative properties. In this work, we present an efficient, information-theoretic active learning algorithm for Gaussian Bayesian networks (GBNs, which serve as important models for gene regulatory networks. In addition to providing linear-algebraic insights unique to GBNs, leading to significant runtime improvements, we demonstrate the effectiveness of our method on data simulated with GBNs and the DREAM4 network inference challenge data sets. Our method generally leads to faster recovery of underlying network structure and faster convergence to final distribution of confidence scores over candidate graph structures using the full data, in comparison to random selection of intervention experiments.

  7. Autonomous valve for detection of biopolymer degradation

    Keller, Stephan Urs; Noeth, Nadine-Nicole; Fetz, Stefanie; Grünefeld, Marco; Geschke, Oliver; Boisen, Anja; Haefliger, D.

    We present a polymer microvalve that allows the detection of biopolymer degradation without the need of external energy. The valve is based on a polymer container filled with a colored marker solution and closed by a thin lid. This structure is covered by a film of poly(L-lactide) and degradation...... of the biopolymer triggers the release of the color which is detected visually. The autonomous valve has potential for the fast testing of biopolymer degradation under various environmental conditions or by specific enzymes....

  8. Biopolymer colloids for controlling and templating inorganic synthesis

    Preiss, Laura C; Katharina Landfester; Rafael Muñoz-Espí

    2014-01-01

    Biopolymers and biopolymer colloids can act as controlling agents and templates not only in many processes in nature, but also in a wide range of synthetic approaches. Inorganic materials can be either synthesized ex situ and later incorporated into a biopolymer structuring matrix or grown in situ in the presence of biopolymers. In this review, we focus mainly on the latter case and distinguish between the following possibilities: (i) biopolymers as controlling agents of nucleation and growth...

  9. Italian retail gasoline activities: inadequate distribution network

    It is common belief that competition in the Italian retail gasoline activities is hindered by oil companies' collusive behaviour. However, when developing a broader analysis of the sector, low efficiency and scarce competition could results as the consequences coming from an inadequate distribution network and from the recognition of international markets and focal point

  10. Production of biopolymers by Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from marine source

    Nazia Jamil

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Two bacterial strains, Pseudomonas aeruginosa CMG607w and CMG1421 produce commercially important biopolymers. CMG607w isolated from the sediments of Lyari outfall to Arabian Sea synthesize the mcl-polyhydroxyalkanoates from various carbon sources. The production of PHAs was directly proportional to the incubation periods. Other strain CMG1421, a dry soil isolate, produced high viscous water absorbing extracellular acidic polysaccharide when it was grown aerobically in the minimal medium containing glucose or fructose or sucrose as sole source of carbon. The biopolymer had the ability to absorb water 400 times more than its dry weight. This property was superior to that of currently used non-degradable synthetic water absorbents. It acted as salt filter and had rheological and stabilizing activity as well.

  11. Electrochemistry of organic, bioactive compounds and biopolymers

    Fojta, Miroslav; Navrátil, Tomáš

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 146, č. 5 (2015), s. 721-721. ISSN 0026-9247 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 ; RVO:61388955 Keywords : electrochemistry * biopolymers Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 1.222, year: 2014

  12. System for measuring radioactivity of labelled biopolymers

    A system is described for measuring radioactivity of labelled biopolymers, comprising: a set of containers adapted for receiving aqueous solutions of biological samples containing biopolymers which are subsequently precipitated in said containers on particles of diatomite in the presence of a coprecipitator, then filtered, dissolved, and mixed with a scintillator; radioactivity measuring means including a detection chamber to which is fed the mixture produced in said set of containers; an electric drive for moving said set of containers in a stepwise manner; means for proportional feeding of said coprecipitator and a suspension of diatomite in an acid solution to said containers which contain the biological sample for forming an acid precipitation of biopolymers; means for the removal of precipitated samples from said containers; precipitated biopolymer filtering means for successively filtering the precipitate, suspending the precipitate, dissolving the biopolymers mixed with said scintillator for feeding of the mixture to said detection chamber; a system of pipelines interconnecting said above-recited means; and said means for measuring radioactivity of labelled biopolymers including, a measuring cell arranged in a detection chamber and communicating with said means for filtering precipitated biopolymers through one pipeline of said system of pipelines; a program unit electrically connected to said electric drive, said means for acid precipatation of biopolymers, said means for the removal of precipitated samples from said containers, said filtering means, and said radioactivity measuring device; said program unit adapted to periodically switch on and off the above-recited means and check the sequence of the radioactivity measuring operations; and a control unit for controlling the initiation of the system and for selecting programs

  13. Mixed Biopolymer Systems Based on Starch

    Takahiro Noda; Karim, Alias A.; Md. Jahurul Haque Akanda; Amid Mehrnoush; Sahena Ferdosh; M. Abd Elgadir; Md. Zaidul Islam Sarker

    2012-01-01

    A binary mixture of starch–starch or starch with other biopolymers such as protein and non-starch polysaccharides could provide a new approach in producing starch-based food products. In the context of food processing, a specific adjustment in the rheological properties plays an important role in regulating production processing and optimizing the applicability, stability, and sensory of the final food products. This review examines various biopolymer mixtures based on starch and the influenc...

  14. Simple Growth Models of Rigid Multifilament Biopolymers

    Stukalin, Evgeny B.; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.

    2004-01-01

    The growth dynamics of rigid biopolymers, consisting of $N$ parallel protofilaments, is investigated theoretically using simple approximate models. In our approach, the structure of a polymer's growing end and lateral interactions between protofilaments are explicitly taken into account, and it is argued that only few conformations are important for biopolymer's growth. As a result, exact analytic expressions for growth velocity and dispersion are obtained for {\\it any} number of protofilamen...

  15. Pathological tau disrupts ongoing network activity.

    Menkes-Caspi, Noa; Yamin, Hagar G; Kellner, Vered; Spires-Jones, Tara L; Cohen, Dana; Stern, Edward A

    2015-03-01

    Pathological tau leads to dementia and neurodegeneration in tauopathies, including Alzheimer's disease. It has been shown to disrupt cellular and synaptic functions, yet its effects on the function of the intact neocortical network remain unknown. Using in vivo intracellular and extracellular recordings, we measured ongoing activity of neocortical pyramidal cells during various arousal states in the rTg4510 mouse model of tauopathy, prior to significant cell death, when only a fraction of the neurons show pathological tau. In transgenic mice, membrane potential oscillations are slower during slow-wave sleep and under anesthesia. Intracellular recordings revealed that these changes are due to longer Down states and state transitions of membrane potentials. Firing rates of transgenic neurons are reduced, and firing patterns within Up states are altered, with longer latencies and inter-spike intervals. By changing the activity patterns of a subpopulation of affected neurons, pathological tau reduces the activity of the neocortical network. PMID:25704951

  16. Position paper on active countermeasures for computer networks.

    Van Randwyk, Jamie A.

    2003-07-01

    Computer security professionals have used passive network countermeasures for several years in order to secure computer networks. Passive countermeasures such as firewalls and intrusion detection systems are effective but their use alone is not enough to protect a network. Active countermeasures offer new ways of protecting a computer network. Corporations and government entities should adopt active network countermeasures as a means of protecting their computer networks.

  17. Networking activities in technology-based entrepreneurial teams

    Neergaard, Helle

    2005-01-01

    Based on social network theoy, this article investigates the distribution of networking roles and responsibilities in entrepreneurial founding teams. Its focus is on the team as a collection of individuals, thus allowing the research to address differences in networking patterns. It identifies six...... central networking activities and shows that not all founding team members are equally active 'networkers'. The analyses show that team members prioritize different networking activities and that one member in particular has extensive networking activities whereas other memebrs of the team are more...

  18. Evolutionary optimization of biopolymers and sequence structure maps

    Reidys, C.M.; Kopp, S.; Schuster, P. [Institut fuer Molekulare Biotechnologie, Jena (Germany)

    1996-06-01

    Searching for biopolymers having a predefined function is a core problem of biotechnology, biochemistry and pharmacy. On the level of RNA sequences and their corresponding secondary structures we show that this problem can be analyzed mathematically. The strategy will be to study the properties of the RNA sequence to secondary structure mapping that is essential for the understanding of the search process. We show that to each secondary structure s there exists a neutral network consisting of all sequences folding into s. This network can be modeled as a random graph and has the following generic properties: it is dense and has a giant component within the graph of compatible sequences. The neutral network percolates sequence space and any two neutral nets come close in terms of Hamming distance. We investigate the distribution of the orders of neutral nets and show that above a certain threshold the topology of neutral nets allows to find practically all frequent secondary structures.

  19. Pathological tau disrupts ongoing network activity

    Menkes-Caspi, Noa; Yamin, Hagar G; Kellner, Vered; Spires-Jones, Tara L; Cohen, Dana; Stern, Edward A.

    2015-01-01

    Pathological tau leads to dementia and neurodegeneration in tauopathies, including Alzheimer's disease. It has been shown to disrupt cellular and synaptic functions, yet its effects on the function of the intact neocortical network remain unknown. Using in vivo intracellular and extracellular recordings, we measured ongoing activity of neocortical pyramidal cells during various arousal states in the rTg4510 mouse model of tauopathy, prior to significant cell death, when only a fraction of the...

  20. [Legal aspects of networking of medical activities].

    Preissler, Reinhold

    2005-04-01

    Medical networks lack a legal definition. From the viewpoint of social law, this term means a form of organization of joint-service providers in a non-specified composition for the undertaking of medical care activities; from the point of view of occupational law, this consists of a loose form of joint practice. Such medical network can conclude treatment contracts with the patients and exchange patients' medical records. A practice network can take over services as contract partner of hospitals or other institutions, in the interest of improved competition chances within the integrated care system. The joining of a third partner is basically left open by the MBO, however according to SGB V this is possible only after approval by all contract partners. In advance of a planned medical care center, is it recommended to found a physician network as starting model. Before single practices fuse into a single enterprise, management-, tax-, legal-, as well as psychological aspects must be considered. PMID:15957655

  1. Biopolymer and Cation Release in Aerobic and Anaerobic Digestion and the Consequent Impact on Sludge Dewatering and Conditioning Properties

    Rust, Mary Elizabeth

    1998-01-01

    Sludge dewatering and chemical conditioning requirements were examined from the perspective of biopolymer and cation release from activated sludge flocs. Both aerobic and anaerobic digestion processes were considered from two different activated sludge sources at a temperature of 20° C. Polymer demand and specific resistance to filtration increased with an increase in total soluble biopolymer concentration for all temperature ranges. In anaerobic digestion,...

  2. Coordinated Voltage Control of Active Distribution Network

    Xie Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a centralized coordinated voltage control method for active distribution network to solve off-limit problem of voltage after incorporation of distributed generation (DG. The proposed method consists of two parts, it coordinated primal-dual interior point method-based voltage regulation schemes of DG reactive powers and capacitors with centralized on-load tap changer (OLTC controlling method which utilizes system’s maximum and minimum voltages, to improve the qualified rate of voltage and reduce the operation numbers of OLTC. The proposed coordination has considered the cost of capacitors. The method is tested using a radial edited IEEE-33 nodes distribution network which is modelled using MATLAB.

  3. RanGen: A random network generator for activity-on-the-node networks

    Demeulemeester, Erik; Vanhoucke, M; Herroelen, Willy

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we describe RanGen, a random network generator for generating activity-on-the-node networks and accompanying data for different classes of project scheduling problems. The objective is to construct random networks which satisfy preset values of the parameters used to control the hardness of a problem instance. Both parameters which are related to the network topology and resource-related parameters are implemented. The network generator meets the shortcomings of former network ...

  4. Drag Reduction of Biopolymer Flows

    R.J. Poole

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Drag reduction of rigid and semi-rigid biopolymers-scleroglucan (0.005 and 0.01% w/w and xanthan gum (0.0124 and 0.07% w/w-in a circular pipe and a concentric annular pipe (radius ratio κ = 0.5 have been investigated experimentally. The objective here is to assess and study the behaviour of these polymers and compare to the drag reduction by flexible polymers available in the literature. Pressure-drop, mean axial and complete Reynolds normal stress data measurements on the polymer solutions were conducted using laser Doppler anemometry. Measurements were also performed on the Newtonian solvent (water for comparison. Rheological characterization of the polymers conducted over a wide range of concentrations (0.005-0.75% w/w showed increased shear-thinning ability of the polymer solutions with increasing solution concentration. The pressure-drop measurements indicate that the effectiveness of these polymers as drag-reducing agents is only mildly dependent on the Reynolds number. Qualitative assessment of the turbulent peak values in the circular pipe flow shows behaviour resembling that of low drag-reducing (DR≤40% flexible polymer solutions data available in the literature such as carboxymethylcellulose with increases in u'+ and decreases both in w'+ and v'+ generally when compared to that of the Newtonian flow at the same Reynolds number. The peak values of the turbulent fluctuation levels (normalized with UB in the annular pipe, however, shows a decreasing trend of the axial component below 40% drag reduction. Above this drag-reduction limit, the peak levels seemed to increase, generally, with drag reduction. Decrease in both w'/UB and v'/UB when compared to that of the Newtonian flow are observed at the same Reynolds number for all drag-reducing flows, similar to what is observed in the pipe-flow study.

  5. Activating and inhibiting connections in biological network dynamics

    Knight Rob

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many studies of biochemical networks have analyzed network topology. Such work has suggested that specific types of network wiring may increase network robustness and therefore confer a selective advantage. However, knowledge of network topology does not allow one to predict network dynamical behavior – for example, whether deleting a protein from a signaling network would maintain the network's dynamical behavior, or induce oscillations or chaos. Results Here we report that the balance between activating and inhibiting connections is important in determining whether network dynamics reach steady state or oscillate. We use a simple dynamical model of a network of interacting genes or proteins. Using the model, we study random networks, networks selected for robust dynamics, and examples of biological network topologies. The fraction of activating connections influences whether the network dynamics reach steady state or oscillate. Conclusion The activating fraction may predispose a network to oscillate or reach steady state, and neutral evolution or selection of this parameter may affect the behavior of biological networks. This principle may unify the dynamics of a wide range of cellular networks. Reviewers Reviewed by Sergei Maslov, Eugene Koonin, and Yu (Brandon Xia (nominated by Mark Gerstein. For the full reviews, please go to the Reviewers' comments section.

  6. Fabrication of biopolymer cantilevers using nanoimprint lithography

    Keller, Stephan Sylvest; Feidenhans'l, Nikolaj Agentoft; Fisker-Bødker, Nis;

    2011-01-01

    The biodegradable polymer poly(l-lactide) (PLLA) was introduced for the fabrication of micromechanical devices. For this purpose, thin biopolymer films with thickness around 10 μm were spin-coated on silicon substrates. Patterning of microcantilevers is achieved by nanoimprint lithography. A major...... challenge was the high adhesion between PLLA and silicon stamp. Optimized stamp fabrication and the deposition of a 125 nm thick fluorocarbon anti-stiction coating on the PLLA allowed the fabrication of biopolymer cantilevers. Resonance frequency measurements were used to estimate the Young’s modulus of the...... device material....

  7. Statistical mechanics of stretching of biopolymers

    We developed a simple model of polymers on a triangular lattice to study the force-induced transitions related to biopolymers. Using an exact enumeration technique, we calculate various thermodynamic quantities associated with it. We show here, by including different parameters, e.g. bending and paring interactions in the model system, that one can understand the qualitative differences in the force–extension curves exhibited by different biopolymers. Our study also shows that the solvent plays an important role in the unfolding of proteins

  8. Alignment and nonlinear elasticity in biopolymer gels

    Feng, Jingchen; Levine, Herbert; Mao, Xiaoming; Sander, Leonard M.

    2015-04-01

    We present a Landau-type theory for the nonlinear elasticity of biopolymer gels with a part of the order parameter describing induced nematic order of fibers in the gel. We attribute the nonlinear elastic behavior of these materials to fiber alignment induced by strain. We suggest an application to contact guidance of cell motility in tissue. We compare our theory to simulation of a disordered lattice model for biopolymers. We treat homogeneous deformations such as simple shear, hydrostatic expansion, and simple extension, and obtain good agreement between theory and simulation. We also consider a localized perturbation which is a simple model for a contracting cell in a medium.

  9. V(2)O(5) nanowires with an intrinsic iodination activity leading to the formation of self-assembled melanin-like biopolymers

    F. Natalio; R. André; S.A. Pihan; M. Humanes; R. Wever; W. Tremel

    2011-01-01

    V2O5 nanowires act as biomimetic catalysts resembling vanadium haloperoxidases (V-HPO). The nanowires display iodinating activity as confirmed by a colorimetric assay using thymol blue (TB), UV/Vis spectrophotometry and mass spectrometry (FD-MS). In the presence of dopamine these nanowires catalyze

  10. Research on Dispensing Mechanism of Active Code in Active Network

    WANG Jian-guo; LI Zeng-zhi; KOU Ya-nan

    2003-01-01

    The dispensing mechanism of active code is the key technology in active network. Conventional capsule and programmable switch approaches have their own shortcomings. DCCAN mechanism presented in this paper overcomes their shortcomings. In this paper, capsule and programmable switch approaches are introduced and their shortcomings are analyzed. The principle of DCCAN mechanism is described. The theoretical analyses in transmission bandwidth based on DCCAN mechanism and capsule approach are described, and key factors which affect the transmission bandwidth based on DCCAN mechanism are also discussed. At the same time, the theoretical analyses in latency based on DCCAN mechanism and capsule approach are described. The using condition of DCCAN mechanism is also discussed.

  11. Sum Product Networks for Activity Recognition.

    Amer, Mohamed R; Todorovic, Sinisa

    2016-04-01

    This paper addresses detection and localization of human activities in videos. We focus on activities that may have variable spatiotemporal arrangements of parts, and numbers of actors. Such activities are represented by a sum-product network (SPN). A product node in SPN represents a particular arrangement of parts, and a sum node represents alternative arrangements. The sums and products are hierarchically organized, and grounded onto space-time windows covering the video. The windows provide evidence about the activity classes based on the Counting Grid (CG) model of visual words. This evidence is propagated bottom-up and top-down to parse the SPN graph for the explanation of the video. The node connectivity and model parameters of SPN and CG are jointly learned under two settings, weakly supervised, and supervised. For evaluation, we use our new Volleyball dataset, along with the benchmark datasets VIRAT, UT-Interactions, KTH, and TRECVID MED 2011. Our video classification and activity localization are superior to those of the state of the art on these datasets. PMID:26390445

  12. Finding quasi-optimal network topologies for information transmission in active networks

    Baptista, M. S.; de Carvalho, J. X.; Hussein, M.S.

    2008-01-01

    This work clarifies the relation between network circuit (topology) and behaviour (information transmission and synchronization) in active networks, e.g. neural networks. As an application, we show how one can find network topologies that are able to transmit a large amount of information, possess a large number of communication channels, and are robust under large variations of the network coupling configuration. This theoretical approach is general and does not depend on the particular dyna...

  13. Network governance of active employment policy

    Damgaard, Bodil; Torfing, Jacob

    2010-01-01

    The recent reform of the Danish governance system in the field of active employment policy has been subject to fierce criticism, as many commentators fear that it is the beginning of the end of the Danish Model of active stakeholder involvement. Drawing on both quantitative and qualitative data, ....... Furthermore, the tight metagovernance of the LECs does not seem to straightjacket the LECs as there is a considerable scope for local policy making which makes it worthwhile for the social partners to participate in the local networks.......The recent reform of the Danish governance system in the field of active employment policy has been subject to fierce criticism, as many commentators fear that it is the beginning of the end of the Danish Model of active stakeholder involvement. Drawing on both quantitative and qualitative data......, this study aims to analyse the impact of the governance reform by assessing the initial experiences with the Local Employment Councils (LECs). The analysis shows that the LECs are relatively well-functioning and contribute to an effective and democratic governance of local employment policy...

  14. Production of biopolymer composites by particle bonding

    This report describes a new technology to produce biopolymer composites at room temperature. During the process, micrometer-scale raw material is coated with zein that has strong adhesive property, which is then compressed to form a rigid material. Since this technology does not require purificati...

  15. Production of biopolymer composites by particle bonding

    This article describes a new process, particle-bonding technology, to produce biopolymer composites from agricultural commodities. In this technology, matrix-protein complexes are formed by the interaction of micrometer-scale matrix material with an adhesive protein, zein. This spontaneous process m...

  16. Polymers and biopolymers related to neutron scattering

    The STRACASOL work showed that the availability of new experimental and theoretical tools brought about some important changes in the physics of polymers. There are still full of challenging problems in polymers and biopolymers, which will require a long and patient effort of understanding. A pleasant cooperation among the relevant different fields and an appropriate sample preparation will conquer difficulties expected. (author)

  17. Exploring Modifications of Cotton with Biopolymers

    Biopolymers including starch, alginate, and chitosan were grafted on to both nonwoven and woven cotton fabrics to examine their hemostatic and antimcrobial properties. The development of cotton-based health care fabrics that promote blood clotting and prevent microbial growth have wide applicability...

  18. The cross-linking influence of electromagnetic radiation on water-soluble polyacrylan compositions with biopolymers

    B. Grabowska

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of examinations of the cross-linking influence of electromagnetic radiation - in a microwave range – on polyacrylancompositions with biopolymers, are presented in the hereby paper. The cross-linking process of the tested compositions was determined on the basis of the FT-IR spectroscopic methods. It was shown that microwave operations can lead to the formation of new cross-linkedstructures with strong covalent bonds. The adsorption process and formation of active centres in polymer molecules as well as in highsilica sand were found due to microwave radiations. In this process hydroxyl groups (-OH - present in a polymer - and silane groups (Si- O-H - present in a matrix - are mainly taking part. Spectroscopic and strength tests performed for the system: biopolymer binding agent – matrix indicate that the microwave radiation can be applied for hardening moulding sands with biopolymer binders.

  19. Biopolymer colloids for controlling and templating inorganic synthesis

    Laura C. Preiss

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Biopolymers and biopolymer colloids can act as controlling agents and templates not only in many processes in nature, but also in a wide range of synthetic approaches. Inorganic materials can be either synthesized ex situ and later incorporated into a biopolymer structuring matrix or grown in situ in the presence of biopolymers. In this review, we focus mainly on the latter case and distinguish between the following possibilities: (i biopolymers as controlling agents of nucleation and growth of inorganic materials; (ii biopolymers as supports, either as molecular supports or as carrier particles acting as cores of core–shell structures; and (iii so-called “soft templates”, which include on one hand stabilized droplets, micelles, and vesicles, and on the other hand continuous scaffolds generated by gelling biopolymers.

  20. Resource Discovery in Activity-Based Sensor Networks

    Bucur, Doina; Bardram, Jakob

    This paper proposes a service discovery protocol for sensor networks that is specifically tailored for use in humancentered pervasive environments. It uses the high-level concept of computational activities (as logical bundles of data and resources) to give sensors in Activity-Based Sensor Networks...... (ABSNs) knowledge about their usage even at the network layer. ABSN redesigns classical network-level service discovery protocols to include and use this logical structuring of the network for a more practically applicable service discovery scheme. Noting that in practical settings activity-based sensor...... patches are localized, ABSN designs a completely distributed, hybrid discovery protocol which is proactive in a neighbourhood zone and reactive outside, tailored so that any query among the sensors of one activity is routed through the network with minimum overhead, guided by the bounds of that activity...

  1. Network Patch Cables Demystified: A Super Activity for Computer Networking Technology

    Brown, Douglas L.

    2004-01-01

    This article de-mystifies network patch cable secrets so that people can connect their computers and transfer those pesky files--without screaming at the cables. It describes a network cabling activity that can offer students a great hands-on opportunity for working with the tools, techniques, and media used in computer networking. Since the…

  2. Maximisation of intermittent distributed generation in active networks

    L.F. Ochoa, C.J. Dent, G.P. Harrison, A. Padilha-Feltrin

    2008-01-01

    Worldwide interest in renewable energy combined with technology advances has increased the connection of intermittent distributed generation to distribution networks. To allow maximum penetration of such developments without compromising the normal operation of the network requires several technical issues to be assessed. In this context, active management of the network, i.e., the integration of assets and network participants through the real-time use of control and communication systems, w...

  3. A New Distributed P2P Network Architecture Basing on Active Network Technology

    HUANGDaoying; HUANGJianhua; LIZupeng; ZHANGAnlin

    2005-01-01

    Gnutella (a pure distributed peer-to-peer network) topology nodes exhibit both typical power-law and small-world property, but the original protocol simply uses flooding algorithm to query peer's information andnot uses the property to improve its search efficiency, so there exists poor scalability problem. A new distributedpeer-to-peer network model called ADP2PN (Active distributed peer-to-peer network) was proposed by applying active network technology and stratifying the Gnutella network model, and could effectively resolve the problem. In this paper, the architecture and query routing protocol about ADP2PN model were presented and their rationality and validity were analyzed.

  4. Reconstructing Causal Biological Networks through Active Learning

    Cho, Hyunghoon; Berger, Bonnie; Peng, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Reverse-engineering of biological networks is a central problem in systems biology. The use of intervention data, such as gene knockouts or knockdowns, is typically used for teasing apart causal relationships among genes. Under time or resource constraints, one needs to carefully choose which intervention experiments to carry out. Previous approaches for selecting most informative interventions have largely been focused on discrete Bayesian networks. However, continuous Bayesian networks are ...

  5. Astroglial networks scale synaptic activity and plasticity

    Pannasch, Ulrike; Vargová, Lydia; Reingruber, Jürgen; Ezan, Pascal; Holcman, David; Giaume, Christian; Syková, Eva; Rouach, Nathalie

    2011-01-01

    Astrocytes dynamically interact with neurons to regulate synaptic transmission. Although the gap junction proteins connexin 30 (Cx30) and connexin 43 (Cx43) mediate the extensive network organization of astrocytes, their role in synaptic physiology is unknown. Here we show, by inactivating Cx30 and Cx43 genes, that astroglial networks tone down hippocampal synaptic transmission in CA1 pyramidal neurons. Gap junctional networking facilitates extracellular glutamate and potassium removal during...

  6. ROSA: Realistic Open Security Architecture for active networks

    Calderón, María; Bagnulo, Marcelo; Alarcos, Bernardo; Sedano, Marifeli

    2002-01-01

    Active network technology enables fast deployment of new network services tailored to the specific needs of end users, among other features. Nevertheless, security is still a main concern when considering the industrial adoption of this technology. In this article we describe an open security architecture for active network platforms that follow the discrete approach. The proposed solution provides all the required security features, and it also grants proper scalability of ...

  7. Biopolymer Green Lubricant for Sustainable Manufacturing

    Shih-Chen Shi; Fu-I Lu

    2016-01-01

    We report on the preparation of a biopolymer thin film by hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC), which can be used as a dry green lubricant in sustainable manufacturing. The thin films were characterized through scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy; the films showed desirable levels of thickness, controllability, and uniformity. Tribology tests also showed desirable tribological and antiwear behaviors, caused by the formation of transfer layers. ...

  8. Rheology of Biopolymer Solutions and Gels

    David R. Picout

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheological techniques and methods have been employed for many decades in the characterization of polymers. Originally developed and used on synthetic polymers, rheology has then found much interest in the field of natural (bio polymers. This review concentrates on introducing the fundamentals of rheology and on discussing the rheological aspects and properties of the two major classes of biopolymers: polysaccharides and proteins. An overview of both their solution properties (dilute to semi-dilute and gel properties is described.

  9. Rheology of Biopolymer Solutions and Gels

    Picout, David R.; Ross-Murphy, Simon B.

    2003-01-01

    Rheological techniques and methods have been employed for many decades in the characterization of polymers. Originally developed and used on synthetic polymers, rheology has then found much interest in the field of natural (bio) polymers. This review concentrates on introducing the fundamentals of rheology and on discussing the rheological aspects and properties of the two major classes of biopolymers: polysaccharides and proteins. An overview of both their solution properties (dilute to semi...

  10. Compression tests of castor oil biopolymer

    Amauri Bravo Ferneda; Romeu Rony Cavalcante da Costa; Volnei Tita; Sérgio Persival Baroncini Proença; Jonas de Carvalho; Benedito de Moraes Purquerio

    2006-01-01

    Many methods have been developed to test and evaluate the mechanical properties of the biopolymer from castor oil employed in implants and osteo-repositions, among other things. Most of the methods are performed under quasi-static and cyclic loads (creep and relaxation tests) and under high strain rate, uniaxial compression conditions. This paper presents and discusses the development and applicability of a simple load-application apparatus, devised to reduce shear and barrelling effects on s...

  11. Biopolymer hairpin loops sustained by polarons

    Chakrabarti, B.; Piette, B. M. A. G.; Zakrzewski, W. J.

    2012-08-01

    We show that polarons can sustain looplike configurations in flexible biopolymers and that the size of the loops depend on both the flexural rigidity of the polymer and the electron-phonon coupling constant. In particular we show that for single stranded DNA (ssDNA) and polyacetylene such loops can have as few as seven monomers. We also show that these configurations are very stable under thermal fluctuations and so could facilitate the formation of hairpin loops of ssDNA.

  12. Long-range charge transfer in biopolymers

    Astakhova, T. Yu; Likhachev, V. N.; Vinogradov, G. A.

    2012-11-01

    The results of theoretical and experimental studies on the charge transfer in biopolymers, namely, DNA and peptides, are presented. Conditions that ensure the efficient long-range charge transport (by several tens of nanometres) are considered. The known theoretical models of charge transfer mechanisms are discussed and the scopes of their application are analyzed. Attention is focused on the charge transport by the polaron mechanism. The bibliography includes 262 references.

  13. DEVELOPMENT AND EVALUATION OF PIROXICAM LOADED BIOPOLYMER BASED TRANSDERMAL FILM

    Kulkarni Parthasarathi Keshavarao

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to formulate biopolymer based transdermal film loaded with Piroxicam (PX. Transdermal films were prepared by using sodium locust bean gum (LBG and Sodium alginate (SA as biopolymers by varying the blend ratios by solution casting method. The drug loaded membranes were evaluated for thickness, tensile behaviours, content uniformity; transdermal permeation of PX through rat abdominal skin was determined by Franz diffusion cell. In vitro skin permeation profile of optimized formulation was compared with that of PX conventional gel. Carrageen induced rat paw edema model was used to investigate the in vivo performances. Menthol (3% and glycerin (3% are used as permeation enhancer and plasticizer, respectively. PX was found to be compatible and stable with the prepared formulation as confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR and Differential Scanning Calorimetric (DSC, studies. In-vitro release studies revels effectiveness after 24 h when compared with the conventional gel. The film does not show any signs of edema, erythema or ulceration. From the in-vitro skin permeation and anti inflammatory activity data it can be concluded that the developed optimized formulation (F3 has good potential to achieve the transdermal drug delivery of PX for effective therapy.

  14. Tourist activated networks: Implications for dynamic packaging systems in tourism

    Zach, Florian; Gretzel, Ulrike; Fesenmaier, Daniel R.

    2008-01-01

    structure. The results indicate that the tourist activated network for the destination is rather sparse and that there are clearly differences in core and peripheral nodes. The findings illustrate the structure of a tourist activated network and provide implications for technology design and tourism...

  15. Molecular entanglement and electrospinnability of biopolymers.

    Kong, Lingyan; Ziegler, Gregory R

    2014-01-01

    Electrospinning is a fascinating technique to fabricate micro- to nano-scale fibers from a wide variety of materials. For biopolymers, molecular entanglement of the constituent polymers in the spinning dope was found to be an essential prerequisite for successful electrospinning. Rheology is a powerful tool to probe the molecular conformation and interaction of biopolymers. In this report, we demonstrate the protocol for utilizing rheology to evaluate the electrospinnability of two biopolymers, starch and pullulan, from their dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)/water dispersions. Well-formed starch and pullulan fibers with average diameters in the submicron to micron range were obtained. Electrospinnability was evaluated by visual and microscopic observation of the fibers formed. By correlating the rheological properties of the dispersions to their electrospinnability, we demonstrate that molecular conformation, molecular entanglement, and shear viscosity all affect electrospinning. Rheology is not only useful in solvent system selection and process optimization, but also in understanding the mechanism of fiber formation on a molecular level. PMID:25226274

  16. Time scales and dynamical processes in activity driven networks

    Perra, Nicola; Goncalves, Bruno; Pastor-Satorras, Romualdo; Vespignani, Alessandro

    2012-02-01

    Network science has undergone explosive growth in the last ten years. This growth has been driven by the recent availability of huge digital databases, which has facilitated the analysis and construction of large-scale networks from real data and the identification of statistical regularities and structural principles common to many systems. Network modeling has played an essential role in this endeavor; however models are chiefly constructed by considering as relevant ingredients only the connectivity and statistical properties of the networks, while disregarding the actual agents' behavior. Here we address this challenge by measuring the agents' interaction activity in real-world networks and defining a minimal model capable of reproducing the intrinsically additive nature of connectivity patterns obtained from time-aggregated network representations. Additionally, we demonstrate that processes such as epidemic and information spreading in highly dynamical networks can be better characterized in terms of agent social activity than by connectivity based approaches

  17. Network-dependent modulation of brain activity during sleep

    Watanabe, T.; Kan, S.; Koike, T.; Misaki, M; Konishi, S.; Miyauchi, S; Miyahsita, Y.; Masuda, N.

    2014-01-01

    Brain activity dynamically changes even during sleep. A line of neuroimaging studies has reported changes in functional connectivity and regional activity across different sleep stages such as slow-wave sleep (SWS) and rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep. However, it remains unclear whether and how the large-scale network activity of human brains changes within a given sleep stage. Here, we investigated modulation of network activity within sleep stages by applying the pairwise maximum entropy mod...

  18. The glass transition process in humid biopolymers. DSC study

    Thermal properties of native and denatured biopolymers with quite different chemical and steric structure (globular and fibrillar proteins, DNA, starches) were studied by means of differential scanning calorimetry in a wide range of temperatures and concentrations of water. It was shown that both native and denatured humid biopolymers are glassy systems. The glass transition temperature of these systems strongly depends on percentage of water, with water being simultaneously an intrinsic element of systems' ordered structure and a plasticizer of its amorphous state. On the base of the absolute values of heat capacities for biopolymer-water systems as a whole, heat capacities for biopolymers themselves were calculated as functions on water concentration at fixed temperatures. The S-shaped change of heat capacity observed on diagrams of state both for native and denatured biopolymers is the manifestation of biopolymers' passing through the vitrification region, as it occurs for denatured samples at heating

  19. A Novel Active Network Architecture Based on Extensible Services Router

    2003-01-01

    Active networks are a new kind of packet-switched networks in which packets have code fragments that are executed on the intermediary nodes (routers). The code can extend or modify the foundation architecture of a network. In this paper, the authors present a novel active network architecture combined with advantages of two major active networks technology based on extensible services router. The architecture consists of extensible service router, active extensible components server and key distribution center (KDC). Users can write extensible service components with programming interface. At the present time, we have finished the extensible services router prototype system based on Highly Efficient Router Operating System (HEROS), active extensible components server and KDC prototype system based on Linux.

  20. Competing dynamic phases of active polymer networks

    Freedman, Simon; Banerjee, Shiladitya; Dinner, Aaron R.

    Recent experiments on in-vitro reconstituted assemblies of F-actin, myosin-II motors, and cross-linking proteins show that tuning local network properties can changes the fundamental biomechanical behavior of the system. For example, by varying cross-linker density and actin bundle rigidity, one can switch between contractile networks useful for reshaping cells, polarity sorted networks ideal for directed molecular transport, and frustrated networks with robust structural properties. To efficiently investigate the dynamic phases of actomyosin networks, we developed a coarse grained non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation of model semiflexible filaments, molecular motors, and cross-linkers with phenomenologically defined interactions. The simulation's accuracy was verified by benchmarking the mechanical properties of its individual components and collective behavior against experimental results at the molecular and network scales. By adjusting the model's parameters, we can reproduce the qualitative phases observed in experiment and predict the protein characteristics where phase crossovers could occur in collective network dynamics. Our model provides a framework for understanding cells' multiple uses of actomyosin networks and their applicability in materials research. Supported by the Department of Defense (DoD) through the National Defense Science & Engineering Graduate Fellowship (NDSEG) Program.

  1. Flexibility and Balancing in Active Distribution Networks

    Kordheili, Reza Ahmadi

    sources in low voltage (LV) network affects the traditional behavior of these systems, as it leads to reverse power flow, from the customers to the upper network. Such reverse power flow brings new challenges to the system, while it also brings new potentials for transmission system operator (TSO) and...... distribution system operator (DSO) to use the reverse power flow for balancing purposes. The first objective of this research is to quantify and analyze the impact of PV panels and EVs on LV network, and to determine the maximum capacity of LV network for hosting PV panels and EVs. Details of the studies are...... economic incentives for customers to consider RESs as a proper energy source. The other main contribution of this thesis is to propose a new aggregation technique for residential distribution networks, considering small energy sources and electric vehicles. Besides, this thesis proposes a modified LFC...

  2. BIODEGRADABILITY AND MECHANICAL BEHAVIOUR OF SUGAR PALM STARCH BASED BIOPOLYMER

    J. Sahari; S. M. Sapuan; Zainudin, E. S.; Maleque, M A

    2014-01-01

    A new Sugar Palm Starch (SPS) based biopolymer was successfully developed using glycerol as plasticizer. The effect of glycerol concentration (viz., 15, 20, 30 and 40 by weight percent) to the mechanical properties of plasticized SPS biopolymer was investigated. From this investigation, it was found that the 30% glycerol concentrated biopolymer showed the highest flexural strength and impact with the value of 0.13 MPa and 6.13 kJ/m2 respectively. Later, the above 30% gl...

  3. Thermal Degradation and Damping Characteristic of UV Irradiated Biopolymer

    Anika Zafiah M. Rus; Nik Normunira Mat Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Biopolymer made from renewable material is one of the most important groups of polymer because of its versatility in application. In this study, biopolymers based on waste vegetable oil were synthesized and cross-link with commercial polymethane polyphenyl isocyanate (known as BF). The BF was compressed by using hot compression moulding technique at 90°C based on the evaporation of volatile matter, known as compress biopolymer (CB). Treatment with titanium dioxide (TiO2) was found to affect t...

  4. Thermal deformation of moulding sands with biopolymer binders

    K. Major-Gabryś; St. M. Dobosz; J. Jakubski

    2010-01-01

    Investigations concerning an application of biopolymer materials as binders for moulding sands are presented in the paper. Theseinvestigations constitute the continuation of examinations related to applications of various biopolymers as binding agents. The results ofstrength tests, obtained for the investigated sands (with the PLA2 biopolymer binder) prepared in a self-hardening sands technology andair as well as microwave hardened, are presented. Examinations of sand thermal deformations bas...

  5. Finding quasi-optimal network topologies for information transmission in active networks.

    Baptista, Murilo S; de Carvalho, Josué X; Hussein, Mahir S

    2008-01-01

    This work clarifies the relation between network circuit (topology) and behaviour (information transmission and synchronization) in active networks, e.g. neural networks. As an application, we show how one can find network topologies that are able to transmit a large amount of information, possess a large number of communication channels, and are robust under large variations of the network coupling configuration. This theoretical approach is general and does not depend on the particular dynamic of the elements forming the network, since the network topology can be determined by finding a Laplacian matrix (the matrix that describes the connections and the coupling strengths among the elements) whose eigenvalues satisfy some special conditions. To illustrate our ideas and theoretical approaches, we use neural networks of electrically connected chaotic Hindmarsh-Rose neurons. PMID:18941516

  6. Sustainably Sourced, Thermally Resistant, Radiation Hard Biopolymer

    Pugel, Diane

    2011-01-01

    This material represents a breakthrough in the production, manufacturing, and application of thermal protection system (TPS) materials and radiation shielding, as this represents the first effort to develop a non-metallic, non-ceramic, biomaterial-based, sustainable TPS with the capability to also act as radiation shielding. Until now, the standing philosophy for radiation shielding involved carrying the shielding at liftoff or utilizing onboard water sources. This shielding material could be grown onboard and applied as needed prior to different radiation landscapes (commonly seen during missions involving gravitational assists). The material is a bioplastic material. Bioplastics are any combination of a biopolymer and a plasticizer. In this case, the biopolymer is a starch-based material and a commonly accessible plasticizer. Starch molecules are composed of two major polymers: amylase and amylopectin. The biopolymer phenolic compounds are common to the ablative thermal protection system family of materials. With similar constituents come similar chemical ablation processes, with the potential to have comparable, if not better, ablation characteristics. It can also be used as a flame-resistant barrier for commercial applications in buildings, homes, cars, and heater firewall material. The biopolymer is observed to undergo chemical transformations (oxidative and structural degradation) at radiation doses that are 1,000 times the maximum dose of an unmanned mission (10-25 Mrad), indicating that it would be a viable candidate for robust radiation shielding. As a comparison, the total integrated radiation dose for a three-year manned mission to Mars is 0.1 krad, far below the radiation limit at which starch molecules degrade. For electron radiation, the biopolymer starches show minimal deterioration when exposed to energies greater than 180 keV. This flame-resistant, thermal-insulating material is non-hazardous and may be sustainably sourced. It poses no hazardous

  7. Significance of collective motions in biopolymers and neutron scattering

    Importance of collective variable description of conformational dynamics of biopolymers and the vital role that neutron inelastic scattering phenomena would play in its experimental determination are discussed. (author)

  8. Significance of collective motions in biopolymers and neutron scattering

    Go, Nobuhiro [Kyoto Univ. (Japan)

    1996-05-01

    Importance of collective variable description of conformational dynamics of biopolymers and the vital role that neutron inelastic scattering phenomena would play in its experimental determination are discussed. (author)

  9. Reduction Method for Active Distribution Networks

    Raboni, Pietro; Chen, Zhe

    2013-01-01

    On-line security assessment is traditionally performed by Transmission System Operators at the transmission level, ignoring the effective response of distributed generators and small loads. On the other hand the required computation time and amount of real time data for including Distribution Net...... comparing the results obtained in PSCAD® with the detailed network model and with the reduced one. Moreover the control schemes of a wind turbine and a photovoltaic plant included in the detailed network model are described....... Networks also would be too large. In this paper an adaptive aggregation method for subsystems with power electronic interfaced generators and voltage dependant loads is proposed. With this tool may be relatively easier including distribution networks into security assessment. The method is validated by...

  10. Modeling the Relationship Between Social Network Activity, Inactivity, and Growth

    Ribeiro, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Online Social Networks (OSNs) are multi-billion dollar enterprises. Surprisingly, little is known about the mechanisms that drive them to growth, stability, or death. This study sheds light on these mechanisms. We are particularly interested in OSNs where current subscribers can invite new users to join the network (e.g., Facebook, LinkedIn). Measuring the relationship between subscriber activity and network growth of a large OSN over five years, we formulate three hypotheses that together describe the observed OSN subscriber behavior. We then provide a model (and extensions) that simultaneously satisfies all three hypotheses. Our model provides deep insights into the dynamics of subscriber activity, inactivity, and network growth rates, even predicting four types of OSNs with respect to subscriber activity evolution. Finally, we present activity data of nearly thirty OSN websites, measured over five years, and show that the observed activity is well described by one of the four activity time series predicted...

  11. Google matrix of the world network of economic activities

    Kandiah, Vivek; Escaith, Hubert; Shepelyansky, Dima L.

    2015-07-01

    Using the new data from the OECD-WTO world network of economic activities we construct the Google matrix G of this directed network and perform its detailed analysis. The network contains 58 countries and 37 activity sectors for years 1995 and 2008. The construction of G, based on Markov chain transitions, treats all countries on equal democratic grounds while the contribution of activity sectors is proportional to their exchange monetary volume. The Google matrix analysis allows to obtain reliable ranking of countries and activity sectors and to determine the sensitivity of CheiRank-PageRank commercial balance of countries in respect to price variations and labor cost in various countries. We demonstrate that the developed approach takes into account multiplicity of network links with economy interactions between countries and activity sectors thus being more efficient compared to the usual export-import analysis. The spectrum and eigenstates of G are also analyzed being related to specific activity communities of countries.

  12. Structure and Properties of Polysaccharide Based BioPolymer Gels

    Prud'Homme, Robert K.

    2000-03-01

    Nature uses the pyranose ring as the basic building unit for a wideclass of biopolymers. Because of their biological origin these biopolymers naturally find application as food additives, rheology modifiers. These polymers range from being rigid skeletal material, such as cellulose that resist dissolution in water, to water soluble polymers, such as guar or carrageenan. The flexibility of the basic pyranose ring structure to provide materials with such a wide range of properties comes from the specific interactions that can be engineered by nature into the structure. We will present several examples of specific interactions for these systems: hydrogen bonding, hydrophobic interactions, and specific ion interactions. The relationship between molecular interations and rheology will be emphasized. Hydrogen bonding mediated by steric interference is used to control of solubility of starch and the rheology of guar gels. A more interesting example is the hydrogen bonding induced by chemical modification in konjac glucomannan that results in a gel that melts upon cooling. Hydrogen bonding interactions in xanthan lead to gel formation at very low polymer concentrations which is a result of the fine tuning of the polymer persistence length and total contour length. Given the function of xanthan in nature its molecular architecture has been optimized. Hydrophobic interactions in methylcellulose show a reverse temperature dependence arising from solution entropy. Carrageenan gelation upon the addition of specific cations will be addressed to show the interplay of polymer secondary structure on chemical reactivity. And finally the cis-hydroxyls on galactomannans permit crosslinking by a variety of metal ions some of which lead to "living gels" and some of which lead to permanently crosslinked networks.

  13. Synthetic reverberating activity patterns embedded in networks of cortical neurons

    Vardi, R.; Wallach, A.; Kopelowitz, E.; Abeles, M.; Marom, S.; Kanter, I.

    2012-03-01

    Synthetic reverberating activity patterns are experimentally generated by stimulation of a subset of neurons embedded in a spontaneously active network of cortical cells in vitro. The neurons are artificially connected by means of a conditional stimulation matrix, forming a synthetic local circuit with a predefined programmable connectivity and time delays. Possible uses of this experimental design are demonstrated, analyzing the sensitivity of these deterministic activity patterns to transmission delays and to the nature of ongoing network dynamics.

  14. Creative elements: network-based predictions of active centres in proteins, cellular and social networks

    Csermely, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Active centres and hot spots of proteins have a paramount importance in enzyme action, protein complex formation and drug design. Recently a number of publications successfully applied the analysis of residue networks to predict active centres in proteins. Most real-world networks show a number of properties, such as small-worldness or scale-free degree distribution, which are rather general features of networks from molecules to the society. Based on extensive analogies I propose that the existing findings and methodology enable us to detect active centres in cells, social networks and ecosystems. Members of these active centres are creative elements of the respective networks, which may help them to survive unprecedented, novel challenges, and play a key role in the development, survival and evolvability of complex systems.

  15. Neuron network activity scales exponentially with synapse density

    Brewer, G. J.; Boehler, M D; Pearson, R. A.; DeMaris, A A; Ide, A. N.; Wheeler, B C

    2008-01-01

    Neuronal network output in the cortex as a function of synapse density during development has not been explicitly determined. Synaptic scaling in cortical brain networks seems to alter excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs to produce a representative rate of synaptic output. Here, we cultured rat hippocampal neurons over a three-week period to correlate synapse density with the increase in spontaneous spiking activity. We followed the network development as synapse formation and spike rat...

  16. Strong, Thermally Superinsulating Biopolymer-Silica Aerogel Hybrids by Cogelation of Silicic Acid with Pectin.

    Zhao, Shanyu; Malfait, Wim J; Demilecamps, Arnaud; Zhang, Yucheng; Brunner, Samuel; Huber, Lukas; Tingaut, Philippe; Rigacci, Arnaud; Budtova, Tatiana; Koebel, Matthias M

    2015-11-23

    Silica aerogels are excellent thermal insulators, but their brittle nature has prevented widespread application. To overcome these mechanical limitations, silica-biopolymer hybrids are a promising alternative. A one-pot process to monolithic, superinsulating pectin-silica hybrid aerogels is presented. Their structural and physical properties can be tuned by adjusting the gelation pH and pectin concentration. Hybrid aerogels made at pH 1.5 exhibit minimal dust release and vastly improved mechanical properties while remaining excellent thermal insulators. The change in the mechanical properties is directly linked to the observed "neck-free" nanoscale network structure with thicker struts. Such a design is superior to "neck-limited", classical inorganic aerogels. This new class of materials opens up new perspectives for novel silica-biopolymer nanocomposite aerogels. PMID:26447457

  17. Detecting eavesdropping activity in fiber optic networks

    MacDonald, Gregory G.

    The secure transmission of data is critical to governments, military organizations, financial institutions, health care providers and other enterprises. The primary method of securing in-transit data is though data encryption. A number of encryption methods exist but the fundamental approach is to assume an eavesdropper has access to the encrypted message but does not have the computing capability to decrypt the message in a timely fashion. Essentially, the strength of security depends on the complexity of the encryption method and the resources available to the eavesdropper. The development of future technologies, most notably quantum computers and quantum computing, is often cited as a direct threat to traditional encryption schemes. It seems reasonable that additional effort should be placed on prohibiting the eavesdropper from coming into possession of the encrypted message in the first place. One strategy for denying possession of the encrypted message is to secure the physical layer of the communications path. Because the majority of transmitted information is over fiber-optic networks, it seems appropriate to consider ways of enhancing the integrity and security of the fiber-based physical layer. The purpose of this research is to investigate the properties of light, as they are manifested in single mode fiber, as a means of insuring the integrity and security of the physical layer of a fiber-optic based communication link. Specifically, the approach focuses on the behavior of polarization in single mode fiber, as it is shown to be especially sensitive to fiber geometry. Fiber geometry is necessarily modified during the placement of optical taps. The problem of detecting activity associated with the placement of an optical tap is herein approached as a supervised machine learning anomaly identification task. The inputs include raw polarization measurements along with additional features derived from various visualizations of the raw data (the inputs are

  18. Radiolysis of DNA and other biopolymers

    Studies of radiolysis of biopolymers serve the dual purposes of giving information on (a) chemical mechanisms by which radiation modifies life processes and (b) structure-function relationships in macromolecules. Conditions in living cells are such that both direct and indirect depositions of energy in biopolymers are possible. Direct effects in chromatin components result in formation of specific radical products, many highly reactive. In irradiated DNA the cationic radical, Gua+, and the anionic radical, Thy-, make large contributions to the electron spin resonance (ESR) spectrum. Secondary reactions of the cationic radicals are largely unknown. Indirect effects occur when energy is deposited in water or other components in a solution, and radiolysis products such as e/sub aq/- and hydroxy radicals react with the biopolymer under investigation. Conversion of hydroxy radicals to the less reactive inorganic radical-anion Br2- has made it possible to determine the role of tyrosine in functional and structural integrity of several proteinase inhibitors. Both e/sub aq/- and hydroxy radicals react rapidly with DNA, but only hydroxy radicals initiates reactions which damage DNA. Radiolysis of double-stranded DNA leads to an increase in optical absorption. The hydroxy radicals is believed to attack the deoxyribose moiety, causing strand breaks and partial denaturation, thus reducing the hypochromic effect. After the DNA is partially denatured, or single-stranded, hydroxy radicals attacks the bases also. Three kinds of strand breaks have been observed; (1) immediate, (2) those appearing post-irradiation, and (3) those appearing on post-irradiation treatment with alkali. Radiolysis of chromatin results in DNA strand breaks, base damage, and protein-DNA cross links. Yields for strand breaks and base damage are lower in chromatin than in purified DNA, and lower still in intact cells

  19. Ideal-Chain Collapse in Biopolymers

    Neumann, R M

    2000-01-01

    A conceptual difficulty in the Hooke's-law description of ideal Gaussian polymer-chain elasticity is sometimes apparent in analyses of experimental data or in physical models designed to simulate the behavior of biopolymers. The problem, the tendency of a chain to collapse in the absence of external forces, is examined in the following examples: DNA-stretching experiments, gel electrophoresis, and protein folding. We demonstrate that the application of a statistical-mechanically derived repulsive force, acting between the chain ends, whose magnitude is proportional to the absolute temperature and inversely proportional to the scalar end separation removes this difficulty.

  20. Monitoring Biopolymer Degradation by Taylor Dispersion Analysis.

    Chamieh, Joseph; Biron, Jean Philippe; Cipelletti, Luca; Cottet, Hervé

    2015-12-14

    This work aims at demonstrating the interest of modern Taylor dispersion analysis (TDA), performed in narrow internal diameter capillary, for monitoring biopolymer degradations. Hydrolytic and enzymatic degradations of dendrigraft poly-l-lysine taken as model compounds have been performed and monitored by TDA at different degradation times. Different approaches for the data processing of the taylorgrams are compared, including simple integration of the taylorgram, curve fitting with a finite number of Gaussian peaks, cumulant-like method and Constrained Regularized Linear Inversion approach. Valuable information on the kinetics of the enzymatic/hydrolytic degradation reactions and on the degradation process can be obtained by TDA. PMID:26633075

  1. Biopolymer based nanocomposites reinforced with graphene nanoplatelets

    Botta, L.; Scaffaro, R.; Mistretta, M. C.; La Mantia, F. P.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, biopolymer based nanocomposites filled with graphene nanoplatelets (GnP) were prepared by melt compounding in a batch mixer. The polymer used as matrix was a commercial biodegradable polymer-blend of PLA and a copolyester (BioFlex®). The prepared materials were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), rheological and mechanical measurements. Moreover, the effect of the GnP amount on the investigated properties was evaluated. The results indicated that the incorporation of GnP increased the stiffness of the biopolymeric matrix.

  2. Multiplex networks with heterogeneous activities of the nodes

    Cellai, Davide

    2015-01-01

    In multiplex networks with a large number of layers, the nodes can have different activities, indicating the total number of layers in which the nodes are present. Here we model multiplex networks with heterogeneous activity of the nodes and we study their robustness properties. We introduce a percolation model where nodes need to belong to the giant component only on the layers where they are active (i.e. their degree on that layer is larger than zero). We show that when there are enough nodes active only in one layer, the multiplex becomes more resilient and the transition becomes continuous. We find that multiplex networks with a power-law distribution of node activities are more fragile if the distribution of activity is broader. We also show that while positive correlations between node activity and degree can enhance the robustness of the system, the phase transition may become discontinuous, making the system highly unpredictable.

  3. Formulation of indomethacin emulsion using biopolymer of Prunus avium

    Shivangi Verma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the investigation was to formulate Indomethacin Emulsion using Bio-polymer as Emulsifier. Different batches of emulsions were prepared by varying concentration of biopolymer prunus avium. Based evaluation of the prepared polymers, a conclusion can be drawn that in the Prunus avium bio-material can serve as a promising film forming agent for formulating various drug.

  4. Formulation of indomethacin emulsion using biopolymer of Prunus avium

    Shivangi Verma; Prashant Dabral; Vinod Rana; Kumud Upadhaya; Bhardwaj

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the investigation was to formulate Indomethacin Emulsion using Bio-polymer as Emulsifier. Different batches of emulsions were prepared by varying concentration of biopolymer prunus avium. Based evaluation of the prepared polymers, a conclusion can be drawn that in the Prunus avium bio-material can serve as a promising film forming agent for formulating various drug.

  5. Biopolymer capped silver nanoparticles with potential for multifaceted applications.

    Vanamudan, Ageetha; Sudhakar, P Padmaja

    2016-05-01

    A sustainable, green and low cost method for the synthesis of silver nanoparticles at room temperature has been developed using guargum as a reducing and stabilizing agent. The synthesized silver nanoparticles (GAg) were characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy, FTIR, EDS, Raman, XRD and TEM. The interaction of the functional groups present in the biopolymer Guargum (G) with the silver nanoparticles (GAg) were responsible for the nanoparticle surface to function as active substrates for Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopic (SERS) detection of cationic and anionic dyes. The catalytic degradation of a copper phthalocyanine based dye- Reactive blue - 21(RB-21), an azo dye- Reactive red 141(RR-141) and a xanthene dye- Rhodamine - 6G(Rh-6G) as well as binary mixtures of the three dyes was evaluated using the synthesized nanoparticles. The catalyst also caused a significant reduction in Total Organic Carbon (TOC) suggesting the formation of smaller degraded products. PMID:26800899

  6. Evaluating Maximum Wind Energy Exploitation in Active Distribution Networks

    Siano, Pierluigi; Chen, Peiyuan; Chen, Zhe;

    2010-01-01

    The increased spreading of distributed and renewable generation requires moving towards active management of distribution networks. In this paper, in order to evaluate maximum wind energy exploitation in active distribution networks, a method based on a multi-period optimal power flow (OPF......) analysis is proposed. Active network management schemes such as coordinated voltage control, energy curtailment and power factor control are integrated in the method in order to investigate their impacts on the maximization of wind energy exploitation. Some case studies, using real data from a Danish...... distribution system, confirmed the effectiveness of the proposed method in evaluating the optimal applications of active management schemes to increase wind energy harvesting without costly network reinforcement for the connection of wind generation....

  7. Contagion processes on the static and activity driven coupling networks

    Lei, Yanjun; Guo, Quantong; Ma, Yifang; Li, Meng; Zheng, Zhiming

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of network structure and the spreading of epidemic are common coexistent dynamical processes. In most cases, network structure is treated either static or time-varying, supposing the whole network is observed in a same time window. In this paper, we consider the epidemic spreading on a network consisting of both static and time-varying structures. At meanwhile, the time-varying part and the epidemic spreading are supposed to be of the same time scale. We introduce a static and activity driven coupling (SADC) network model to characterize the coupling between static (strong) structure and dynamic (weak) structure. Epidemic thresholds of SIS and SIR model are studied on SADC both analytically and numerically with various coupling strategies, where the strong structure is of homogeneous or heterogeneous degree distribution. Theoretical thresholds obtained from SADC model can both recover and generalize the classical results in static and time-varying networks. It is demonstrated that weak structure...

  8. 3D-Printed Biopolymers for Tissue Engineering Application

    Xiaoming Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available 3D printing technology has recently gained substantial interest for potential applications in tissue engineering due to the ability of making a three-dimensional object of virtually any shape from a digital model. 3D-printed biopolymers, which combine the 3D printing technology and biopolymers, have shown great potential in tissue engineering applications and are receiving significant attention, which has resulted in the development of numerous research programs regarding the material systems which are available for 3D printing. This review focuses on recent advances in the development of biopolymer materials, including natural biopolymer-based materials and synthetic biopolymer-based materials prepared using 3D printing technology, and some future challenges and applications of this technology are discussed.

  9. BIODEGRADABILITY AND MECHANICAL BEHAVIOUR OF SUGAR PALM STARCH BASED BIOPOLYMER

    J. Sahari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A new Sugar Palm Starch (SPS based biopolymer was successfully developed using glycerol as plasticizer. The effect of glycerol concentration (viz., 15, 20, 30 and 40 by weight percent to the mechanical properties of plasticized SPS biopolymer was investigated. From this investigation, it was found that the 30% glycerol concentrated biopolymer showed the highest flexural strength and impact with the value of 0.13 MPa and 6.13 kJ/m2 respectively. Later, the above 30% glycerol biopolymer was undergone through weathering and biodegradation test. The biodegradability test showed 78.09% of tensile strength lost after 72 h of weathering testing period. Meanwhile, the weight loss (% of the same biopolymer was 63.58% after 72 h of biodegradation test.

  10. Stock Price Change Rate Prediction by Utilizing Social Network Activities

    Shangkun Deng; Takashi Mitsubuchi; Akito Sakurai

    2014-01-01

    Predicting stock price change rates for providing valuable information to investors is a challenging task. Individual participants may express their opinions in social network service (SNS) before or after their transactions in the market; we hypothesize that stock price change rate is better predicted by a function of social network service activities and technical indicators than by a function of just stock market activities. The hypothesis is tested by accuracy of predictions as well as pe...

  11. Epidemic spreading and immunization in node-activity networks

    Wu, Qingchu; Chen, Shufang

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we study the epidemic spreading in node-activity networks, where an individual participates in social networks with a certain rate h. There are two cases for h: the state-independent case and the state-dependent case. We investigate the epidemic threshold as a function of h compared to the static network. Our results suggest the epidemic threshold cannot be exactly predicted by using the analysis approach in the static network. In addition, we further propose a local information-based immunization protocol on node-activity networks. Simulation analysis shows that the immunization can not only eliminate the infectious disease, but also change the epidemic threshold via increasing the immunization parameter.

  12. Active system area networks for data intensive computations. Final report

    None

    2002-04-01

    The goal of the Active System Area Networks (ASAN) project is to develop hardware and software technologies for the implementation of active system area networks (ASANs). The use of the term ''active'' refers to the ability of the network interfaces to perform application-specific as well as system level computations in addition to their traditional role of data transfer. This project adopts the view that the network infrastructure should be an active computational entity capable of supporting certain classes of computations that would otherwise be performed on the host CPUs. The result is a unique network-wide programming model where computations are dynamically placed within the host CPUs or the NIs depending upon the quality of service demands and network/CPU resource availability. The projects seeks to demonstrate that such an approach is a better match for data intensive network-based applications and that the advent of low-cost powerful embedded processors and configurable hardware makes such an approach economically viable and desirable.

  13. Critical Transitions in Social Network Activity

    Kuehn, Christian; Martens, Erik Andreas; Romero, Daniel M

    2014-01-01

    priori unknown events in society are present in social networks is an exciting open problem, to which at present only highly speculative answers can be given. Here, we instead provide a first step towards tackling a simpler question by focusing on a priori known events and analyse a social media data set...... a priori known events are preceded by variance and autocorrelation growth. Our findings thus clearly establish the necessary starting point to further investigate the relationship between abstract mathematical theory and various classes of critical transitions in social networks....... with a focus on classical variance and autocorrelation warning signs. Our results thus pertain to one absolutely fundamental question: Can the stochastic warning signs known from other areas also be detected in large-scale social media data? We answer this question affirmatively as we find that several...

  14. Activator-inhibitor systems on heterogeneous ecological networks

    Nicolaides, C.; Cueto-Felgueroso, L.; Juanes, R.

    2012-12-01

    The consideration of activator-inhibitor systems as complex networks has broadened our knowledge of non-equilibrium reaction-diffusion processes in heterogeneous systems. For example, the Turing mechanism represents a classical model for the formation of self-organized spatial structures in non-equilibrium activator-inhibitor systems. The study of Turing patterns in networks with heterogeneous connectivity has revealed that, contrary to other models and systems, the segregation process takes place mainly in vertices of low degree. In this paper, we study the formation of vegetation patterns in semiarid ecosystems from the perspective of a heterogeneous interacting ecological network. The structure of ecological networks yields fundamental insight into the ecosystem self-organization. Using simple rules for the short-range activation and global inhibition, we reconstruct the observed power-law distribution of vegetation patch size that has been observed in semiarid ecosystems like the Kalahari transect.

  15. pH-induced contrast in viscoelasticity imaging of biopolymers

    Understanding contrast mechanisms and identifying discriminating features is at the heart of diagnostic imaging development. This paper focuses on how pH influences the viscoelastic properties of biopolymers to better understand the effects of extracellular pH on breast tumour elasticity imaging. Extracellular pH is known to decrease as much as 1 pH unit in breast tumours, thus creating a dangerous environment that increases cellular mutatation rates and therapeutic resistance. We used a gelatin hydrogel phantom to isolate the effects of pH on a polymer network with similarities to the extracellular matrix in breast stroma. Using compressive unconfined creep and stress relaxation measurements, we systematically measured the viscoelastic features sensitive to pH by way of time-domain models and complex modulus analysis. These results are used to determine the sensitivity of quasi-static ultrasonic elasticity imaging to pH. We found a strong elastic response of the polymer network to pH, such that the matrix stiffness decreases as pH was reduced; however, the viscous response of the medium to pH was negligible. While physiological features of breast stroma such as proteoglycans and vascular networks are not included in our hydrogel model, observations in this study provide insight into viscoelastic features specific to pH changes in the collagenous stromal network. These observations suggest that the large contrast common in breast tumours with desmoplasia may be reduced under acidic conditions, and that viscoelastic features are unlikely to improve discriminability.

  16. Neural Network-Based Active Control for Offshore Platforms

    周亚军; 赵德有

    2003-01-01

    A new active control scheme, based on neural network, for the suppression of oscillation in multiple-degree-of-freedom (MDOF) offshore platforms, is studied in this paper. With the main advantages of neural network, i.e. the inherent robustness, fault tolerance, and generalized capability of its parallel massive interconnection structure, the active structural control of offshore platforms under random waves is accomplished by use of the BP neural network model. The neural network is trained offline with the data generated from numerical analysis, and it simulates the process of Classical Linear Quadratic Regular Control for the platform under random waves. After the learning phase, the trained network has learned about the nonlinear dynamic behavior of the active control system, and is capable of predicting the active control forces of the next time steps. The results obtained show that the active control is feasible and effective, and it finally overcomes time delay owing to the robustness, fault tolerance, and generalized capability of artificial neural network.

  17. Recognizing Multi-user Activities using Body Sensor Networks

    Gu, Tao; Wang, Liang; Chen, Hanhua;

    2011-01-01

    The advances of wireless networking and sensor technology open up an interesting opportunity to infer human activities in a smart home environment. Existing work in this paradigm focuses mainly on recognizing activities of a single user. In this work, we address the fundamental problem of recogni......The advances of wireless networking and sensor technology open up an interesting opportunity to infer human activities in a smart home environment. Existing work in this paradigm focuses mainly on recognizing activities of a single user. In this work, we address the fundamental problem...... of recognizing activities of multiple users using a wireless body sensor network, and propose a scalable pattern mining approach to recognize both single- and multi-user activities in a unified framework. We exploit Emerging Pattern—a discriminative knowledge pattern which describes significant changes among...... activity classes of data—for building activity models and design a scalable, noise-resistant, Emerging Pattern based Multi-user Activity Recognizer (epMAR) to recognize both single- and multi-user activities. We develop a multi-modal, wireless body sensor network for collecting real-world traces in a smart...

  18. Nanocomposite Apatite-biopolymer Materials and Coatings for Biomedical Applications

    L.F. Sukhodub

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The microoverview paper describes synthesis and characterization of novel third generation composite biomaterials and coatings which correspond to the second structural level of human bone tissue (HBT organization obtained at Sumy state university “Bionanocomposite” laboratory. To obtain such composites an animal collagen is usually used, which is not potentially safe for medical applications. That is why investigations were started using some other biopolymers to obtain composites close to the second level in the structural hierarchy of HBT. Proposed natural polymers (Na alginate, chitosan are the most perspective because they have bacteriostatic properties for a vast number of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, high biocompatibility towards the connective tissue, low toxicity, an ability to improve regenerative processes during wounds healing, degradation ability with the creation of chemotaxic activity towards fibroblasts and osteoblasts. The formation of nanosized (25-75 nm calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (cdHA particles in the polymer scaffold approaches the derived material to the biogenic bone tissue, which can provide its more effective implantation. The influence of the imposition of static magnetic field on brushite (CaHPO4·2H2O crystallization was also investigated. It was shown that changing the magnetic field configuration could greatly affect crystallinity and texture of the derived particles. To increase the biocompatibility of existing medical implants (Ti–6Al 4V, Ti Ni, Mg the technology for obtaining bioactive coatings with corresponding mechanical, structural and morphology characteristics is developed in our laboratory. In this direction coatings based on cdHA in combination with biopolymer matrices (Na alginate, chitosan, are obtained in “soft” conditions using a thermal substrate technology. This technology was proposed by Japan scientists [1] and was sufficiently improved by us [2] in order to obtain coatings in

  19. Turing patterns in network-organized activator-inhibitor systems

    Nakao, Hiroya; Mikhailov, Alexander S.

    2010-07-01

    Turing instability in activator-inhibitor systems provides a paradigm of non-equilibrium self-organization; it has been extensively investigated for biological and chemical processes. Turing instability should also be possible in networks, and general mathematical methods for its treatment have been formulated previously. However, only examples of regular lattices and small networks were explicitly considered. Here we study Turing patterns in large random networks, which reveal striking differences from the classical behaviour. The initial linear instability leads to spontaneous differentiation of the network nodes into activator-rich and activator-poor groups. The emerging Turing patterns become furthermore strongly reshaped at the subsequent nonlinear stage. Multiple coexisting stationary states and hysteresis effects are observed. This peculiar behaviour can be understood in the framework of a mean-field theory. Our results offer a new perspective on self-organization phenomena in systems organized as complex networks. Potential applications include ecological metapopulations, synthetic ecosystems, cellular networks of early biological morphogenesis, and networks of coupled chemical nanoreactors.

  20. Connectivity, excitability and activity patterns in neuronal networks

    Extremely synchronized firing patterns such as those observed in brain diseases like epilepsy may result from excessive network excitability. Although network excitability is closely related to (excitatory) connectivity, a direct measure for network excitability remains unavailable. Several methods currently exist for estimating network connectivity, most of which are related to cross-correlation. An example is the conditional firing probability (CFP) analysis which calculates the pairwise probability (CFPi,j) that electrode j records an action potential at time t = τ, given that electrode i recorded a spike at t = 0. However, electrode i often records multiple spikes within the analysis interval, and CFP values are biased by the on-going dynamic state of the network. Here we show that in a linear approximation this bias may be removed by deconvoluting CFPi,j with the autocorrelation of i (i.e. CFPi,i), to obtain the single pulse response (SPRi,j)—the average response at electrode j to a single spike at electrode i. Thus, in a linear system SPRs would be independent of the dynamic network state. Nonlinear components of synaptic transmission, such as facilitation and short term depression, will however still affect SPRs. Therefore SPRs provide a clean measure of network excitability. We used carbachol and ghrelin to moderately activate cultured cortical networks to affect their dynamic state. Both neuromodulators transformed the bursting firing patterns of the isolated networks into more dispersed firing. We show that the influence of the dynamic state on SPRs is much smaller than the effect on CFPs, but not zero. The remaining difference reflects the alteration in network excitability. We conclude that SPRs are less contaminated by the dynamic network state and that mild excitation may decrease network excitability, possibly through short term synaptic depression. (papers)

  1. Cultured Neural Networks: Optimization of Patterned Network Adhesiveness and Characterization of their Neural Activity

    W. L. C. Rutten

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available One type of future, improved neural interface is the “cultured probe”. It is a hybrid type of neural information transducer or prosthesis, for stimulation and/or recording of neural activity. It would consist of a microelectrode array (MEA on a planar substrate, each electrode being covered and surrounded by a local circularly confined network (“island” of cultured neurons. The main purpose of the local networks is that they act as biofriendly intermediates for collateral sprouts from the in vivo system, thus allowing for an effective and selective neuron–electrode interface. As a secondary purpose, one may envisage future information processing applications of these intermediary networks. In this paper, first, progress is shown on how substrates can be chemically modified to confine developing networks, cultured from dissociated rat cortex cells, to “islands” surrounding an electrode site. Additional coating of neurophobic, polyimide-coated substrate by triblock-copolymer coating enhances neurophilic-neurophobic adhesion contrast. Secondly, results are given on neuronal activity in patterned, unconnected and connected, circular “island” networks. For connected islands, the larger the island diameter (50, 100 or 150 μm, the more spontaneous activity is seen. Also, activity may show a very high degree of synchronization between two islands. For unconnected islands, activity may start at 22 days in vitro (DIV, which is two weeks later than in unpatterned networks.

  2. Stimulus information stored in lasting active and hidden network states is destroyed by network bursts.

    Dranias, Mark R; Westover, M Brandon; Cash, Sidney; VanDongen, Antonius M J

    2015-01-01

    In both humans and animals brief synchronizing bursts of epileptiform activity known as interictal epileptiform discharges (IEDs) can, even in the absence of overt seizures, cause transient cognitive impairments (TCI) that include problems with perception or short-term memory. While no evidence from single units is available, it has been assumed that IEDs destroy information represented in neuronal networks. Cultured neuronal networks are a model for generic cortical microcircuits, and their spontaneous activity is characterized by the presence of synchronized network bursts (SNBs), which share a number of properties with IEDs, including the high degree of synchronization and their spontaneous occurrence in the absence of an external stimulus. As a model approach to understanding the processes underlying IEDs, optogenetic stimulation and multielectrode array (MEA) recordings of cultured neuronal networks were used to study whether stimulus information represented in these networks survives SNBs. When such networks are optically stimulated they encode and maintain stimulus information for as long as one second. Experiments involved recording the network response to a single stimulus and trials where two different stimuli were presented sequentially, akin to a paired pulse trial. We broke the sequential stimulus trials into encoding, delay and readout phases and found that regardless of which phase the SNB occurs, stimulus-specific information was impaired. SNBs were observed to increase the mean network firing rate, but this did not translate monotonically into increases in network entropy. It was found that the more excitable a network, the more stereotyped its response was during a network burst. These measurements speak to whether SNBs are capable of transmitting information in addition to blocking it. These results are consistent with previous reports and provide baseline predictions concerning the neural mechanisms by which IEDs might cause TCI. PMID:25755638

  3. Stimulus information stored in lasting active and hidden network states is destroyed by network bursts.

    Mark R Dranias

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In both humans and animals brief synchronizing bursts of epileptiform activity known as interictal epileptiform discharges (IEDs can, even in the absence of overt seizures, cause transient cognitive impairments (TCI that include problems with perception or short-term memory. While no evidence from single units is available, it has been assumed that IEDs destroy information represented in neuronal networks. Cultured neuronal networks are a model for generic cortical microcircuits, and their spontaneous activity is characterized by the presence of synchronized network bursts (SNBs, which share a number of properties with IEDs, including the high degree of synchronization and their spontaneous occurrence in the absence of an external stimulus. As a model approach to understanding the processes underlying IEDs, optogenetic stimulation and multielectrode array recordings of cultured neuronal networks were used to study whether stimulus information represented in these networks survives SNBs. When such networks are optically stimulated they encode and maintain stimulus information for as long as one second. Experiments involved recording the network response to a single stimulus and trials where two different stimuli were presented sequentially, akin to a paired pulse trial. We broke the sequential stimulus trials into encoding, delay and readout phases and found that regardless of which phase the SNB occurs, stimulus-specific information was impaired. SNBs were observed to increase the mean network firing rate, but this did not translate monotonically into increases in network entropy. It was found that the more excitable a network, the more stereotyped its response was during a network burst. These measurements speak to whether SNBs are capable of transmitting information in addition to blocking it. These results are consistent with previous reports and provide baseline predictions concerning the neural mechanisms by which IEDs might cause TCI.

  4. Critical Transitions in Social Network Activity

    Kuehn, Christian; Romero, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    A large variety of complex systems in ecology, climate science, biomedicine and engineering have been observed to exhibit tipping points, where the internal dynamical state of the system abruptly changes. For example, such critical transitions may result in the sudden change of ecological environments and climate conditions. Data and models suggest that some of these drastic events may be preceded by detectable early-warning signs. This view is also corroborated by abstract mathematical theory for generic bifurcations in stochastic multi-scale systems. Whether early-warnings are also present in social networks that anticipate \\textit{a-priori unknown} events in society is an open problem to which only highly speculative answers can be given at present. Here, we focus on \\textit{a-priori known} events and analyze a social network data set with a focus on classical variance and autocorrelation warning signs. We find that several a-priori known events are preceded by variance and autocorrelation growth as predic...

  5. Probing mechanics and activity of cytoskeletal networks using carbon nanotubes

    Fakhri, Nikta

    2013-03-01

    We use single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) as multi-scale micro-probes to monitor transport and fluctuations in cytoskeletal networks. SWNTs are nanometer-diameter hollow carbon filaments with micrometer lengths and a tunable bending stiffness. Their persistence length varies between 20-100 microns. We study the motion of individual SWNTs in reconstituted actin networks by near-infrared fluorescence microscopy. At long times, SWNTs reptate through the networks. At short times, SWNTs sample the spectrum of thermal fluctuations in the networks. We can calculate complex shear moduli from recorded fluctuations and observe power-law scaling in equilibrium actin networks. In the non-equilibrium cytoskeleton of cells we have targeted SWNTs to kinesin motors and thereby to their microtubule tracks. We observe both transport along the tracks as well as active fluctuations of the tracks themselves. Human Frontier Science Program Cross-Disciplinary Fellow

  6. Regulation of burstiness by network-driven activation

    García-Pérez, Guillermo; Serrano, M Ángeles

    2014-01-01

    We prove that complex networks of interactions have the capacity to regulate and buffer unpredictable fluctuations in production events. We show that non-bursty network-driven activation dynamics can effectively regulate the level of burstiness in the production of nodes, which can be enhanced or reduced. Burstiness can be induced even when the endogenous inter-event time distribution of nodes' production is non-bursty. We found that hubs tend to be less controllable than low degree nodes, which are more susceptible to the networked regulatory effects. Our results have important implications for the analysis and engineering of bursty activity in a range of systems, from telecommunication networks to transcription and translation of genes into proteins in cells.

  7. Development of Budesonide Loaded Biopolymer Based Dry Powder Inhaler: Optimization, In Vitro Deposition, and Cytotoxicity Study

    Mali, Ashwin J.; Pawar, Atmaram P.; Ravindra N. Purohit

    2014-01-01

    The progress in the development of DPI technology has boosted the use of sensitive drug molecules for lung diseases. However, delivery of these molecules from conventional DPI to the active site still poses a challenge with respect to deposition efficiency in the lung. At same time, serious systemic side effects of drugs have become a cause for concern. The developed budesonide loaded biopolymer based controlled release DPI had shown maximum in vitro lung deposition with least toxicity. The s...

  8. Active Engine Mounting Control Algorithm Using Neural Network

    Fadly Jashi Darsivan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes the application of neural network as a controller to isolate engine vibration in an active engine mounting system. It has been shown that the NARMA-L2 neurocontroller has the ability to reject disturbances from a plant. The disturbance is assumed to be both impulse and sinusoidal disturbances that are induced by the engine. The performance of the neural network controller is compared with conventional PD and PID controllers tuned using Ziegler-Nichols. From the result simulated the neural network controller has shown better ability to isolate the engine vibration than the conventional controllers.

  9. Active Learning for Node Classification in Assortative and Disassortative Networks

    Moore, Cristopher; Zhu, Yaojia; Rouquier, Jean-Baptiste; Lane, Terran

    2011-01-01

    In many real-world networks, nodes have class labels, attributes, or variables that affect the network's topology. If the topology of the network is known but the labels of the nodes are hidden, we would like to select a small subset of nodes such that, if we knew their labels, we could accurately predict the labels of all the other nodes. We develop an active learning algorithm for this problem which uses information-theoretic techniques to choose which nodes to explore. We test our algorithm on networks from three different domains: a social network, a network of English words that appear adjacently in a novel, and a marine food web. Our algorithm makes no initial assumptions about how the groups connect, and performs well even when faced with quite general types of network structure. In particular, we do not assume that nodes of the same class are more likely to be connected to each other---only that they connect to the rest of the network in similar ways.

  10. AMETH laboratories network activities; Activites du reseau de Laboratoires AMETH

    Marimbordes, T.; Ould El Moctar, A.; Peerhossaini, H. [Nantes Univ., Ecole Polytechnique, UMR CNRS 6607, Lab. de Thermocinetique, 44 (France)] [and others

    2000-07-01

    The AMETH laboratories are a network for the improvement of thermal exchanges for one or two phases. This meeting of the 15 november 2000, dealt with the activities of this network of laboratories in the following topics: thermal-hydrodynamic instabilities and control of the limit layer; transfers with change in the liquid-vapor phase; transfers with change in the solid-liquid phase. Ten papers were presented. (A.L.B.)

  11. End-to-end security in active networks

    I. Brown

    2001-01-01

    Active network solutions have been proposed to many of the problems caused by the increasing heterogeneity of the Internet. These ystems allow nodes within the network to process data passing through in several ways. Allowing code from various sources to run on routers introduces numerous security concerns that have been addressed by research into safe languages, restricted execution environments, and other related areas. But little attention has been paid to an even more critical question: t...

  12. Using Proximity to Predict Activity in Social Networks

    Lerman, Kristina; Intagorn, Suradej; Kang, Jeon-Hyung; Ghosh, Rumi

    2011-01-01

    The structure of a social network contains information useful for predicting its evolution. Nodes that are "close" in some sense are more likely to become linked in the future than more distant nodes. We show that structural information can also help predict node activity. We use proximity to capture the degree to which two nodes are "close" to each other in the network. In addition to standard proximity metrics used in the link prediction task, such as neighborhood overlap, we introduce new ...

  13. An experimental investigation of electrical conductivities in biopolymers

    H Mallick; A Sarkar

    2000-08-01

    Gum arabica obtained from acacia plant is a conducting biopolymer. Experiments are carried out on this natural gum arabica. In the present study TGA, ion transference number, transient ionic current, thermal analysis, frequency and temperature variation of a.c. conductivity, Arrhenius plot and volt–ampere characteristics of specimens are carried out. The total electrical conductivity of these biopolymers are comparable to that of synthetic polymers doped with inorganic salts. The ion transference number of these biopolymers show their superionic nature of electrical conduction. The overall conduction mechanism seems to be protonic in nature rather than electronic one.

  14. Use of irradiation technique for obtaining and modification of biopolymers

    A review of papers concerning application of radiation techniques to the biopolymers production is presented. The nature of electron and gamma irradiation influence on polymers is outlined. Advantages of the method from the point of view of biocompatibility and biofunctionality of biopolymers are underlined. Among them the most important are the following: chemical purity of products, high efficiency of the method, expanded influence on polymers' structure, usefulness in the graft copolymerization, ability of avoiding enhanced temperature during polymerization and sterility of products. Examples of biopolymers obtained or modified by means of irradiation techniques are gathered. (author). 35 refs

  15. Dual production of biopolymers from bacteria.

    Sukan, Artun; Roy, Ipsita; Keshavarz, Tajalli

    2015-08-01

    Rapid depletion of natural resources with continued demands of an increasing population and high consumption rates of today's world will cause serious problems in the future. This, along with environmental concerns, has directed research towards finding alternatives in variety of sectors including sustainable and environmentally friendly consumer goods. Biopolymers of bacterial origin, with their vast range of applications, biodegradability and eco-friendly manufacturing processes, are one of the alternatives for a more sustainable future. However, the cost of their production is a drawback. Simultaneous production processes have always been an option for researchers in order to reduce cost, but the variable requirements of microorganisms to produce both different and valuable products are a hindering factor. This review will look at some examples and identify ideas towards developing a successful strategy for simultaneous production of bio-products. PMID:25933521

  16. Analysis of disorder in biopolymer fibers

    X-ray diffraction patterns from oriented polycrystalline fibers of some biopolymers show that the molecules are disordered within the microcrystallites. Quantifying the disorder in such specimens is a necessary step for the use of their diffraction patterns for accurate structure determination. Theory and algorithms for calculating diffraction patterns from such fibers have recently been described. Here the application of these methods to determining the kind and degree of disorder in two polynucleotide fibers is described. The more ordered system shows random screw disorder accompanied by small lattice distortions, and the more disordered system shows larger lattice distortions and significant rotational disorder. These results show the potential of these methods for determining disorder in polycrystalline fibers; uniqueness of the solutions and implications for structure determination are discussed. (orig.)

  17. Manipulating Biopolymer Dynamics by Anisotropic Nanoconfinement

    Zhang, Shao-Qing

    2007-01-01

    How the geometry of nano-sized confinement affects dynamics of biomaterials is interesting yet poorly understood. An elucidation of structural details upon nano-sized confinement may benefit manufacturing pharmaceuticals in biomaterial sciences and medicine. The behavior of biopolymers in nano-sized confinement is investigated using coarse-grained models and molecular simulations. Particularly, we address the effects of shapes of a confinement on protein folding dynamics by measuring folding rates and dissecting structural properties of the transition states in nano-sized spheres and ellipsoids. We find that when the form of a confinement resembles the geometrical properties of the transition states, the rates of folding kinetics are most enhanced. This knowledge of shape selectivity in identifying optimal conditions for reactions will have a broad impact in nanotechnology and pharmaceutical sciences.

  18. Pattern Formation on Networks: from Localised Activity to Turing Patterns.

    McCullen, Nick; Wagenknecht, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Networks of interactions between competing species are used to model many complex systems, such as in genetics, evolutionary biology or sociology and knowledge of the patterns of activity they can exhibit is important for understanding their behaviour. The emergence of patterns on complex networks with reaction-diffusion dynamics is studied here, where node dynamics interact via diffusion via the network edges. Through the application of a generalisation of dynamical systems analysis this work reveals a fundamental connection between small-scale modes of activity on networks and localised pattern formation seen throughout science, such as solitons, breathers and localised buckling. The connection between solutions with a single and small numbers of activated nodes and the fully developed system-scale patterns are investigated computationally using numerical continuation methods. These techniques are also used to help reveal a much larger portion of of the full number of solutions that exist in the system at different parameter values. The importance of network structure is also highlighted, with a key role being played by nodes with a certain so-called optimal degree, on which the interaction between the reaction kinetics and the network structure organise the behaviour of the system. PMID:27273339

  19. Pattern Formation on Networks: from Localised Activity to Turing Patterns

    McCullen, Nick; Wagenknecht, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    Networks of interactions between competing species are used to model many complex systems, such as in genetics, evolutionary biology or sociology and knowledge of the patterns of activity they can exhibit is important for understanding their behaviour. The emergence of patterns on complex networks with reaction-diffusion dynamics is studied here, where node dynamics interact via diffusion via the network edges. Through the application of a generalisation of dynamical systems analysis this work reveals a fundamental connection between small-scale modes of activity on networks and localised pattern formation seen throughout science, such as solitons, breathers and localised buckling. The connection between solutions with a single and small numbers of activated nodes and the fully developed system-scale patterns are investigated computationally using numerical continuation methods. These techniques are also used to help reveal a much larger portion of of the full number of solutions that exist in the system at different parameter values. The importance of network structure is also highlighted, with a key role being played by nodes with a certain so-called optimal degree, on which the interaction between the reaction kinetics and the network structure organise the behaviour of the system.

  20. STUDY OF THE STRUCTURE OF WOOD-RELATED BIOPOLYMERS BY SORPTION METHODS

    Jelena Chirkova

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The potentialities of different vapour sorption methods are analized for the investigation of the microstructure of wood sorbents (wood, cellulose and lignin as a particular case of biopolymers. There are two important distinctions in the sorption behaviour of biopolymers from traditional rigid sorbents, namely, the dependence of the characteristics of the porous structure on the thermodynamic properties of the sorbate, and the manifestation of the sorption hysteresis over the whole region of the sorption–desorption isotherm. The reason for these distinctions is the low rigidity (low values of modulus of elasticity of biopolymers, hence, their considerable deformability under the action of sorption forces, resulting in the cleavage of interstructural bonds. This process, manifesting itself phenomenologically as swelling, depends on the activity of the sorbate and results in the appearance of porosity and a new surface. The criterion for the activity of the sorbate is close values of the solubility parameters of the polymer and the sorbate. Inert substances are adsorbed on the surface of large morphological formations and characterise the intact structure of the sorbent, while active sorbates cause the swelling of these formations and penetrate them, which enables a study of the microstructure of sorbents. In the desorption process, the cleaved bonds are restored, blocking a part of the sorbate in the polymer’s structure, which results in the appearance of sorption hysteresis, not connected directly with the porous structure of the sorbent.

  1. Active transport and cluster formation on 2D networks

    Greulich, Philip

    2009-01-01

    We introduce a model for active transport on inhomogeneous networks embedded in a diffusive environment and investigate the formation of particle clusters. In the presence of a hard-core interaction, cluster sizes exhibit an algebraically decaying distribution in a large parameter regime, indicating the existence of clusters on all scales. The results are compared with a diffusion limited aggregation model and active transport on a regular network. For both models we observe aggregation of particles to clusters which are characterized by a finite size-scale if the relevant time-scales and particle densities are considered.

  2. Managing CSCL Activity through networking models

    Luis Casillas

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at managing activity carried out in Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL environments. We apply an approach that gathers and manages the knowledge underlying huge data structures, resulting from collaborative interaction among participants and stored as activity logs. Our method comprises a variety of important issues and aspects, such as: deep understanding of collaboration among participants in workgroups, definition of an ontology for providing meaning to isolated data manifestations, discovering of knowledge structures built in huge amounts of data stored in log files, and development of high-semantic indicators to describe diverse primitive collaborative acts, and binding these indicators to formal descriptions defined in the collaboration ontology; besides our method includes gathering collaboration indicators from web forums using natural language processing (NLP techniques.

  3. Laser-induced periodic surface structuring of biopolymers

    Pérez, Susana; Rebollar, Esther; Oujja, Mohamed; Martín, Margarita; Castillejo, Marta

    2013-03-01

    We report here on a systematic study about the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) on biopolymers. Self-standing films of the biopolymers chitosan, starch and the blend of chitosan with the synthetic polymer poly (vinyl pyrrolidone), PVP, were irradiated in air with linearly polarized laser beams at 193, 213 and 266 nm, with pulse durations in the range of 6-17 ns. The laser-induced periodic surface structures were topographically characterized by atomic force microscopy and the chemical modifications induced by laser irradiation were inspected via Raman spectroscopy. Formation of LIPSS parallel to the laser polarization direction, with periods similar to the laser wavelength, was observed at efficiently absorbed wavelengths in the case of the amorphous biopolymer chitosan and its blend with PVP, while formation of LIPSS is prevented in the crystalline starch biopolymer.

  4. End-of-life of starch-polyvinyl alcohol biopolymers.

    Guo, M; Stuckey, D C; Murphy, R J

    2013-01-01

    This study presents a life cycle assessment (LCA) model comparing the waste management options for starch-polyvinyl alcohol (PVOH) biopolymers including landfill, anaerobic digestion (AD), industrial composting and home composting. The ranking of biological treatment routes for starch-PVOH biopolymer wastes depended on their chemical compositions. AD represents the optimum choice for starch-PVOH biopolymer containing N and S elements in global warming potential (GWP(100)), acidification and eutrophication but not on the remaining impact categories, where home composting was shown to be a better option due to its low energy and resource inputs. For those starch-PVOH biopolymers with zero N and S contents home composting delivered the best environmental performance amongst biological treatment routes in most impact categories (except for GWP(100)). The landfill scenario performed generally well due largely to the 100-year time horizon and efficient energy recovery system modeled but this good performance is highly sensitive to assumptions adopted in landfill model. PMID:23131650

  5. Sequence-Dependent Effects on the Properties of Semiflexible Biopolymers

    Zicong, Bela

    2008-01-01

    Using path integral technique, we show exactly that for a semiflexible biopolymer in constant extension ensemble, no matter how long the polymer and how large the external force, the effects of short range correlations in the sequence-dependent spontaneous curvatures and torsions can be incorporated into a model with well-defined mean spontaneous curvature and torsion as well as a renormalized persistence length. Moreover, for a long biopolymer with large mean persistence length, the sequence-dependent persistence lengths can be replaced by their mean. However, for a short biopolymer or for a biopolymer with small persistence lengths, inhomogeneity in persistence lengths tends to make physical observables very sensitive to details and therefore less predictable.

  6. High Accuracy Human Activity Monitoring using Neural network

    Sharma, Annapurna; Chung, Wan-Young

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the designing of a neural network for the classification of Human activity. A Triaxial accelerometer sensor, housed in a chest worn sensor unit, has been used for capturing the acceleration of the movements associated. All the three axis acceleration data were collected at a base station PC via a CC2420 2.4GHz ISM band radio (zigbee wireless compliant), processed and classified using MATLAB. A neural network approach for classification was used with an eye on theoretical and empirical facts. The work shows a detailed description of the designing steps for the classification of human body acceleration data. A 4-layer back propagation neural network, with Levenberg-marquardt algorithm for training, showed best performance among the other neural network training algorithms.

  7. Radiotracer experiments with biopolymers and bio-compatible polymers

    The applications of biopolymer and biocompatible polymer employing radiotracers have been reviewed. Two different aspects have been studied. Environmentally benign methodologies for the removal, immobilization, separation or speciation of heavy, toxic elements and clinically important radionuclides have been developed using biopolymer and bio-compatible polymer as well. The complex formation ability of a bio-compatible polymer, polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), with clinically important radionuclides have been tested which have tremendous importance in radiopharmaceutical sciences. (author)

  8. Selected topics of influence of ionizing radiation on biopolymers

    In the paper problems of ionizing radiation influence on biopolymers properties have been presented. Particularly the examples of polymers applications in medical implantology, their classification into the groups according to ionizing radiation resistance and changes in structure and properties of polymers proceeding under radiation influence have been described. Important in authors opinion problems related to exploitation history of implanted biopolymers being earlier exposed to sterilization radiation have been touched. (author)

  9. Sequence-Dependent Effects on the Properties of Semiflexible Biopolymers

    Zhou, Zicong; Joos, Bela

    2008-01-01

    Using path integral technique, we show exactly that for a semiflexible biopolymer in constant extension ensemble, no matter how long the polymer and how large the external force, the effects of short range correlations in the sequence-dependent spontaneous curvatures and torsions can be incorporated into a model with well-defined mean spontaneous curvature and torsion as well as a renormalized persistence length. Moreover, for a long biopolymer with large mean persistence length, the sequence...

  10. Network effect of knowledge spillover: Scale-free networks stimulate R&D activities and accelerate economic growth

    Konno, Tomohiko

    2016-09-01

    We study how knowledge spillover networks affect research and development (R&D) activities and economic growth. For this purpose, we extend a Schumpeterian growth model to the one on networks that depict the knowledge spillover relationships of R&D. We show that scale-free networks stimulate R&D activities and accelerate economic growth.

  11. Activity-dependent neuronal model on complex networks.

    de Arcangelis, Lucilla; Herrmann, Hans J

    2012-01-01

    Neuronal avalanches are a novel mode of activity in neuronal networks, experimentally found in vitro and in vivo, and exhibit a robust critical behavior: these avalanches are characterized by a power law distribution for the size and duration, features found in other problems in the context of the physics of complex systems. We present a recent model inspired in self-organized criticality, which consists of an electrical network with threshold firing, refractory period, and activity-dependent synaptic plasticity. The model reproduces the critical behavior of the distribution of avalanche sizes and durations measured experimentally. Moreover, the power spectra of the electrical signal reproduce very robustly the power law behavior found in human electroencephalogram (EEG) spectra. We implement this model on a variety of complex networks, i.e., regular, small-world, and scale-free and verify the robustness of the critical behavior. PMID:22470347

  12. Performance analysis of a security architecture for active networks in Java

    Alarcos, Bernardo; Hoz, Enrique de la; Sedano, Marifeli; Calderón, María

    2003-01-01

    Active network technology supports the deployment and execution on the fly of new active services, without interrupting the network operation. Active networks are composed of special nodes (named Active Router) that are able to execute active code to offer the active services. This technology introduces some security threats that must be solved using a security architecture. We have developed a security architecture (ROSA) for an active network platform (SARA). Java has been used as pro...

  13. Impact of Network Activity on the Spread of Infectious Diseases through the German Pig Trade Network

    Lebl, Karin; Lentz, Hartmut H. K.; Pinior, Beate; Selhorst, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The trade of livestock is an important and growing economic sector, but it is also a major factor in the spread of diseases. The spreading of diseases in a trade network is likely to be influenced by how often existing trade connections are active. The activity α is defined as the mean frequency of occurrences of existing trade links, thus 0 < α ≤ 1. The observed German pig trade network had an activity of α = 0.11, thus each existing trade connection between two farms was, on average, active at about 10% of the time during the observation period 2008–2009. The aim of this study is to analyze how changes in the activity level of the German pig trade network influence the probability of disease outbreaks, size, and duration of epidemics for different disease transmission probabilities. Thus, we want to investigate the question, whether it makes a difference for a hypothetical spread of an animal disease to transport many animals at the same time or few animals at many times. A SIR model was used to simulate the spread of a disease within the German pig trade network. Our results show that for transmission probabilities <1, the outbreak probability increases in the case of a decreased frequency of animal transports, peaking range of α from 0.05 to 0.1. However, for the final outbreak size, we find that a threshold exists such that finite outbreaks occur only above a critical value of α, which is ~0.1, and therefore in proximity of the observed activity level. Thus, although the outbreak probability increased when decreasing α, these outbreaks affect only a small number of farms. The duration of the epidemic peaks at an activity level in the range of α = 0.2–0.3. Additionally, the results of our simulations show that even small changes in the activity level of the German pig trade network would have dramatic effects on outbreak probability, outbreak size, and epidemic duration. Thus, we can conclude and recommend that the network activity

  14. Photonic network R and D activities in Japan

    Kitayama, Ken-ichi; Miki, Tetsuya; Morioka, Toshio; Tsushima, Hideaki; Koga, Masafumi; Mori, Kazuyuki; Araki, Soichiro; Sato, Ken-ichi; Onaka, Hiroshi; Namiki, Shu; Aovama, Tomonori

    2005-11-01

    R and D activities on photonic networks in Japan are presented. First, milestones in current, ongoing R and D programs supported by Japanese government agencies are introduced, including long-distance and WDM fiber transmission, wavelength routing, optical burst switching, and control plane technology for IP backbone networks. Their goal was set to evolve a legacy telecommunications network to IP over WDM networks by introducing technologies for WDM and wavelength routing. We then discuss the perspectives of so-called PHASE II R and D programs for photonic networks over the next five years until 2010, by focusing on the report which has been recently issued by the Photonic Internet Forum (PIF), a consortium that has major carriers, telecom vendors, and Japanese academics as members. The PHASE II R and D programs should serve to establish a photonic platform to provide abundant bandwidth on demand, at any time on a real-time basis through the customer's initiative, to promote bandwidth-rich applications, such as grid computing, real-time digital-cinema streaming, medical and educational applications, and network storage in e-commerce.

  15. Active low intrusion hybrid monitor for wireless sensor networks

    Marlon Navia; Campelo, Jose C.; Alberto Bonastre; Rafael Ors; Capella, Juan V.; Juan J. Serrano

    2015-01-01

    Several systems have been proposed to monitor wireless sensor networks (WSN). These systems may be active (causing a high degree of intrusion) or passive (low observability inside the nodes). This paper presents the implementation of an active hybrid (hardware and software) monitor with low intrusion. It is based on the addition to the sensor node of a monitor node (hardware part) which, through a standard interface, is able to receive the monitoring information sent by a piece of software ex...

  16. Biopolymers production with carbon source from the wastes of a beer brewery industry

    Wong, Phoeby Ai Ling

    The main purpose of this study was to assess the potential and feasibility of malt wastes, and other food wastes, such as soy wastes, ice-cream wastes, confectionery wastes, vinegar wastes, milk waste and sesame oil, in the induction of biosynthesis of PHA, in the cellular assembly of novel PHA with improved physical and chemical properties, and in the reduction of the cost of PHA production. In the first part of the experiments, a specific culture of Alcaligenes latus DSM 1124 was selected to ferment several types of food wastes as carbon sources into biopolymers. In addition, the biopolymer production, by way of using malt waste, of microorganisms from municipal activated sludge was also investigated. In the second part, the experiments focused on the synthesis of biopolymer with a higher molecular mass via the bacterial strain, which was selected and isolated from sesame oil, identified as Staphylococcus epidermidis . Molecular weight and molecular weight distribution of PHB were studied by GPC. Molecular weight of PHB produced from various types of food wastes by Alcaligenes latus was higher than using synthetic sucrose medium as nutrient, however, it resulted in the reverse by Staphylococcus epidermidis. Thermal properties of biopolymers were studied by DSC and TG. Using malt wastes as nutrients by Alcaligenes latus gave a higher melting temperature. Using sucrose, confectionery and sesame oil as nutrients by Staphylococcus epidermidis gave higher melting temperature. Optimization was carried out for the recovery of microbial PHB from Alcaligenes latus. Results showed that molecular weight can be controlled by changing the hypochlorite concentration, the ratio of chloroform to hypochlorite solution and the extraction time. In addition, the determination of PHB content by thermogravimetric analysis method with wet cell was the first report in our study. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  17. Engineering bacterial biopolymers for the biosorption of heavy metals; new products and novel formulations

    Bioremediation of heavy metal pollution remains a major challenge in environmental biotechnology. One of the approaches considered for application involves biosorption either to biomass or to isolated biopolymers. Many bacterial polysaccharides have been shown to bind heavy metals with varying degrees of specificity and affinity. While various approaches have been adopted to generate polysaccharide variants altered in both structure and activity, metal biosorption has not been examined. Polymer engineering has included structural modification through the introduction of heterologous genes of the biosynthetic pathway into specific mutants, leading either to alterations in polysaccharide backbone or side chains, or to sugar modification. In addition, novel formulations can be designed which enlarge the family of available bacterial biopolymers for metal-binding and subsequent recovery. An example discussed here is the use of amphipathic bioemulsifiers such as emulsan, produced by the oil-degrading Acinetobacter lwoffii RAG-1, that forms stable, concentrated (70%), oil-in-water emulsions (emulsanosols). In this system metal ions bind primarily at the oil/water interface, enabling their recovery and concentration from relatively dilute solutions. In addition to the genetic modifications described above, a new approach to the generation of amphipathic bioemulsifying formulations is based on the interaction of native or recombinant esterase and its derivatives with emulsan and other water-soluble biopolymers. Cation-binding emulsions are generated from a variety of hydrophobic substrates. The features of these and other systems will be discussed, together with a brief consideratiton of possible applications. (orig.)

  18. Assessing the Risk Situation of Network Security for Active Defense

    ZHANG Xiang; YAO Shuping; TANG Chenghua

    2006-01-01

    The risk situation assessment and forecast technique of network security is a basic method of active defense techniques. In order to assess the risk of network security two methods were used to define the index of risk and forecast index in time series, they were analytical hierarchy process (AHP) and support vector regression (SVR). The module framework applied the methods above was also discussed. Experiment results showed the forecast values were so close to actual values and so it proved the approach is correct.

  19. Dynamic Elasticity Model of Resilin Biopolymers

    Hu, Xiao; Duki, Solomon

    2013-03-01

    Resilin proteins are `super elastic rubbers' in the flight and jumping systems of most insects, and can extend and retract millions of times. Natural resilin exhibits high resilience (> 95%) under high-frequency conditions, and could be stretched to over 300% of its original length with a low elastic modulus of 0.1-3 MPa. However, insight into the underlying molecular mechanisms responsible for resilin elasticity remains undefined. We report on the dynamic structure transitions and functions of full length resilin from fruit fly (D. melanogaster CG15920) and its different functional domains. A dynamic computational model is proposed to explain the super elasticity and energy conversion mechanisms of resilin, providing important insight into structure-function relationships for resilins, as well as other elastomeric proteins. A strong beta-turn transition was experimentally identified in the full length resilin and its non-elastic domains (Exon III). Changes in periodic long-range order were demonstrated during this transition, induced either by thermal or mechanical inputs, to confirm the universality of proposed mechanism. Further, this model offers new options for designing protein-based biopolymers with tunable material applications.

  20. Formatting and ligating biopolymers using adjustable nanoconfinement

    Berard, Daniel J.; Shayegan, Marjan; Michaud, Francois; Henkin, Gil; Scott, Shane; Leslie, Sabrina

    2016-07-01

    Sensitive visualization and conformational control of long, delicate biopolymers present critical challenges to emerging biotechnologies and biophysical studies. Next-generation nanofluidic manipulation platforms strive to maintain the structural integrity of genomic DNA prior to analysis but can face challenges in device clogging, molecular breakage, and single-label detection. We address these challenges by integrating the Convex Lens-induced Confinement (CLiC) technique with a suite of nanotopographies embedded within thin-glass nanofluidic chambers. We gently load DNA polymers into open-face nanogrooves in linear, concentric circular, and ring array formats and perform imaging with single-fluorophore sensitivity. We use ring-shaped nanogrooves to access and visualize confinement-enhanced self-ligation of long DNA polymers. We use concentric circular nanogrooves to enable hour-long observations of polymers at constant confinement in a geometry which eliminates the confinement gradient which causes drift and can alter molecular conformations and interactions. Taken together, this work opens doors to myriad biophysical studies and biotechnologies which operate on the nanoscale.

  1. Ni2+ doping DNA: a semiconducting biopolymer

    DNA is a one-dimensional nanowire in nature, and it may not be used in nanodevices due to its low conductivity. In order to improve the conducting property of DNA, divalent Ni2+ are incorporated into the base pairs of DNA at pH≥8.5 and nickel DNA (Ni-DNA) is formed. Conducting scanning probe microscopy (SPM) analysis reveals that the Ni-DNA is a semiconducting biopolymer and the Schottky barrier of Ni-DNA reduces to 2 eV. Meanwhile, electrochemical analysis by cyclic voltammetry and AC impedance shows that the conductance of Ni-DNA is better than that of native DNA by a factor of approximately 20-fold. UV spectroscopy and DNA base pair mismatch analyses show that the conducting mechanism of Ni-DNA is due to electrons hopping through the π-π stacking of DNA base pairs. This biomaterial is a designable one-dimensional semiconducting polymer for usage in nanodevices

  2. Proton Conductivity Studies on Biopolymer Electrolytes

    Proton conducting solid biopolymer electrolyte membranes consisting of methyl cellulose (MC) and different wt.% of ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3) were prepared by solution cast technique. Impedance spectroscopy was carried out to study electrical characteristics of bulk materials. The ionic conductivity of the prepared samples was calculated using the bulk resistance (Rb) obtained from impedance spectroscopy plot. The highest ionic conductivity obtained was 1.17x10-4 Scm-1 for the sample with composition ratio of MC(50): NH4NO3(50). To enhance the ionic conductivity, propylene carbonate (PC) and ethylene carbonate (EC) plasticizers were introduced. It was found that the ionic conductivity of polymer electrolyte membranes increased with the increase in plasticizers concentration. The ionic conductivities of solid polymer electrolytes based on MC-NH4NO3-PC was enhanced up to 4.91x10-3 Scm-1 while for the MC-NH4NO3-EC system, the highest conductivity was 1.74x10-2 Scm-1. The addition of more plasticizer however decreases in mechanical stability of the membranes.

  3. Perception Neural Networks for Active Noise Control Systems

    Wang Xiaoli

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In a response to a growing demand for environments of 70dB or less noise levels, many industrial sectors have focused with some form of noise control system. Active noise control (ANC has proven to be the most effective technology. This paper mainly investigates application of neural network on self-adaptation system in active noise control (ANC. An active silencing control system is made which adopts a motional feedback loudspeaker as not a noise controlling source but a detecting sensor. The working fundamentals and the characteristics of the motional feedback loudspeaker are analyzed in detail. By analyzing each acoustical path, identification based adaptive linear neural network is built. This kind of identifying method can be achieved conveniently. The estimated result of each sound channel matches well with its real sound character, respectively.

  4. On the origin of stiffening in biopolymers

    van der Giessen, E.; Koeman, T.; van Dillen, T.; Onck, P.R.; Fratzl, P; Landis, WJ; Wang, R; Silver, FH

    2005-01-01

    Strain stiffening of protein networks is explored by means of a finite strain analysis of a two-dimensional network model of cross-linked semiflexible filaments. The results show that stiffening is caused by non-affine network rearrangements that govern a transition from a bending dominated response

  5. 3D Filament Network Segmentation with Multiple Active Contours

    Xu, Ting; Vavylonis, Dimitrios; Huang, Xiaolei

    2014-03-01

    Fluorescence microscopy is frequently used to study two and three dimensional network structures formed by cytoskeletal polymer fibers such as actin filaments and microtubules. While these cytoskeletal structures are often dilute enough to allow imaging of individual filaments or bundles of them, quantitative analysis of these images is challenging. To facilitate quantitative, reproducible and objective analysis of the image data, we developed a semi-automated method to extract actin networks and retrieve their topology in 3D. Our method uses multiple Stretching Open Active Contours (SOACs) that are automatically initialized at image intensity ridges and then evolve along the centerlines of filaments in the network. SOACs can merge, stop at junctions, and reconfigure with others to allow smooth crossing at junctions of filaments. The proposed approach is generally applicable to images of curvilinear networks with low SNR. We demonstrate its potential by extracting the centerlines of synthetic meshwork images, actin networks in 2D TIRF Microscopy images, and 3D actin cable meshworks of live fission yeast cells imaged by spinning disk confocal microscopy.

  6. Optimal stimulus scheduling for active estimation of evoked brain networks

    Kafashan, MohammadMehdi; Ching, ShiNung

    2015-12-01

    Objective. We consider the problem of optimal probing to learn connections in an evoked dynamic network. Such a network, in which each edge measures an input-output relationship between sites in sensor/actuator-space, is relevant to emerging applications in neural mapping and neural connectivity estimation. Approach. We show that the problem of scheduling nodes to a probe (i.e., stimulate) amounts to a problem of optimal sensor scheduling. Main results. By formulating the evoked network in state-space, we show that the solution to the greedy probing strategy has a convenient form and, under certain conditions, is optimal over a finite horizon. We adopt an expectation maximization technique to update the state-space parameters in an online fashion and demonstrate the efficacy of the overall approach in a series of detailed numerical examples. Significance. The proposed method provides a principled means to actively probe time-varying connections in neuronal networks. The overall method can be implemented in real time and is particularly well-suited to applications in stimulation-based cortical mapping in which the underlying network dynamics are changing over time.

  7. Passive and Active Monitoring on a High Performance Research Network

    The bold network challenges described in ''Internet End-to-end Performance Monitoring for the High Energy and Nuclear Physics Community'' presented at PAM 2000 have been tackled by the intrepid administrators and engineers providing the network services. After less than a year, the BaBar collaboration has collected almost 100 million particle collision events in a database approaching 165TB (Tera=1012). Around 20TB has been exported via the Internet to the BaBar regional center at IN2P3 in Lyon, France, for processing and around 40 TB of simulated events have been imported to SLAC from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). An unforseen challenge has arisen due to recent events and highlighted security concerns at DoE funded labs. New rules and regulations suggest it is only a matter of time before many active performance measurements may not be possible between many sites. Yet, at the same time, the importance of understanding every aspect of the network and eradicating packet loss for high throughput data transfers has become apparent. Work at SLAC to employ passive monitoring using netflow and OC3MON is underway and techniques to supplement and possibly replace the active measurements are being considered. This paper will detail the special needs and traffic characterization of a remarkable research project, and how the networking hurdles have been resolved (or not) to achieve the required high data throughput. Results from active and passive measurements will be compared, and methods for achieving high throughput and the effect on the network will be assessed along with tools that directly measure throughput and applications used to actually transfer data

  8. Generalized activity equations for spiking neural network dynamics

    Michael A Buice

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Much progress has been made in uncovering the computational capabilities of spiking neural networks. However, spiking neurons will always be more expensive to simulate compared to rate neurons because of the inherent disparity in time scales - the spike duration time is much shorter than the inter-spike time, which is much shorter than any learning time scale. In numerical analysis, this is a classic stiff problem. Spiking neurons are also much more difficult to study analytically. One possible approach to making spiking networks more tractable is to augment mean field activity models with some information about spiking correlations. For example, such a generalized activity model could carry information about spiking rates and correlations between spikes self-consistently. Here, we will show how this can be accomplished by constructing a complete formal probabilistic description of the network and then expanding around a small parameter such as the inverse of the number of neurons in the network. The mean field theory of the system gives a rate-like description. The first order terms in the perturbation expansion keep track of covariances.

  9. Communities in Neuronal Complex Networks Revealed by Activation Patterns

    Costa, Luciano da Fontoura

    2008-01-01

    Recently, it has been shown that the communities in neuronal networks of the integrate-and-fire type can be identified by considering patterns containing the beginning times for each cell to receive the first non-zero activation. The received activity was integrated in order to facilitate the spiking of each neuron and to constrain the activation inside the communities, but no time decay of such activation was considered. The present article shows that, by taking into account exponential decays of the stored activation, it is possible to identify the communities also in terms of the patterns of activation along the initial steps of the transient dynamics. The potential of this method is illustrated with respect to complex neuronal networks involving four communities, each of a different type (Erd\\H{o}s-R\\'eny, Barab\\'asi-Albert, Watts-Strogatz as well as a simple geographical model). Though the consideration of activation decay has been found to enhance the communities separation, too intense decays tend to y...

  10. Effect of sugarcane biopolymer gel injected in rabbit vocal fold

    Rodrigo Augusto de Souza Leão

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Alterations in the vocal folds that involve volume reduction and glottal closure failure result in exaggerated air escape during speech. For such situations, the use of implants or grafts of different materials has been proposed. OBJECTIVE: To define the effect of sugarcane biopolymer gel when implanted in the vocal folds of rabbits. METHODS: This was an experimental study. The vocal folds of rabbits injected with sugarcane biopolymer and saline solution were histologically evaluated after 21 and 90 days. RESULTS: Mild to moderate inflammation and increased volume were observed in all vocal folds injected with biopolymer, when compared to controls. There were no cases of necrosis or calcification. DISCUSSION: This study showed higher inflammatory reaction in cases than in controls and biopolymer biointegration to the vocal fold. This fibrogenic response with absence of epithelial repercussions suggests that the biopolymer in its gel form can be bioactive and preserve the normal vibratory function of the epithelium. CONCLUSION: We show that in spite of producing an inflammatory reaction in vocal fold tissues, the material remained in vocal fold throughout the study period.

  11. Force spectroscopy of complex biopolymers with heterogeneous elasticity.

    Valdman, David; Lopez, Benjamin J; Valentine, Megan T; Atzberger, Paul J

    2013-01-21

    Cellular biopolymers can exhibit significant compositional heterogeneities as a result of the non-uniform binding of associated proteins, the formation of microstructural defects during filament assembly, or the imperfect bundling of filaments into composite structures of variable diameter. These can lead to significant variations in the local mechanical properties of biopolymers along their length. Existing spectral analysis methods assume filament homogeneity and therefore report only a single average stiffness for the entire filament. However, understanding how local effects modulate biopolymer mechanics in a spatially resolved manner is essential to understanding how binding and bundling proteins regulate biopolymer stiffness and function in cellular contexts. Here, we present a new method to determine the spatially varying material properties of individual complex biopolymers from the observation of passive thermal fluctuations of the filament conformation. We develop new statistical mechanics-based approaches for heterogeneous filaments that estimate local bending elasticities as a function of the filament arc-length. We validate this methodology using simulated polymers with known stiffness distributions, and find excellent agreement between derived and expected values. We then determine the bending elasticity of microtubule filaments of variable composition generated by repeated rounds of tubulin polymerization using either GTP or GMPCPP, a nonhydrolyzable GTP analog. Again, we find excellent agreement between mechanical and compositional heterogeneities. PMID:24049545

  12. Imperfection sensitivity of pressured buckling of biopolymer spherical shells

    Zhang, Lei; Ru, C. Q.

    2016-06-01

    Imperfection sensitivity is essential for mechanical behavior of biopolymer shells [such as ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) and spherical viruses] characterized by high geometric heterogeneity. In this work, an imperfection sensitivity analysis is conducted based on a refined shell model recently developed for spherical biopolymer shells of high structural heterogeneity and thickness nonuniformity. The influence of related parameters (including the ratio of radius to average shell thickness, the ratio of transverse shear modulus to in-plane shear modulus, and the ratio of effective bending thickness to average shell thickness) on imperfection sensitivity is examined for pressured buckling. Our results show that the ratio of effective bending thickness to average shell thickness has a major effect on the imperfection sensitivity, while the effect of the ratio of transverse shear modulus to in-plane shear modulus is usually negligible. For example, with physically realistic parameters for typical imperfect spherical biopolymer shells, the present model predicts that actual maximum external pressure could be reduced to as low as 60% of that of a perfect UCA spherical shell or 55%-65% of that of a perfect spherical virus shell, respectively. The moderate imperfection sensitivity of spherical biopolymer shells with physically realistic imperfection is largely attributed to the fact that biopolymer shells are relatively thicker (defined by smaller radius-to-thickness ratio) and therefore practically realistic imperfection amplitude normalized by thickness is very small as compared to that of classical elastic thin shells which have much larger radius-to-thickness ratio.

  13. Obtention of gelatin biopolymers by ionizing radiation

    The gelatin (Gel) is a biocompatible and biodegradable biopolymer, which naturally forms semi-solid colloids or hydrogels in aqueous solutions. As a hydrophilic polymer, the Gel has structural and physico-mechanical properties that distinguish it from synthetic hydrophilic polymers. The study of these properties led to the development of the present work. Thus, Gel-based films and hydrogels were developed using ionizing radiation technology by different techniques: irradiation with 60Co, electron beam (EB) and/or pulsed EB. The Gel based-films enriched with different additives, such as glycerol (GLY), polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), acrylamide and/or vegetal fiber, were irradiated with doses from 10 to 60 kGy, depending on the additive; some parameters like mechanical properties, color, and water absorption were analyzed. In the radio-induced synthesis of GEL nanohydrogels, polyethylene glycol (PEG) and the mixture (MIX) of additives, PEG and GEL, the size, molar mass and surface morphology of the nanohydrogels were analyzed. There was a significant increase of gel fraction with increase of the radiation dose for the GEL/fiber samples. The GEL based-films with 10% PVA irradiated at 20 kGy showed the highest puncture strength. The addition of antioxidant BHT affected on some GEL based-films properties on applied conditions. Regarding the nanohydrogels, there was a decrease of hydrodynamic radius of MIX irradiated with 60Co from 68 ± 25 nm (2 kGy) to 35 ± 4 nm (5 kGy). The radiation proved to be a convenient tool in the modification of polymeric materials for both, GEL films and hydrogels. (author)

  14. Microgrids in Active Network Management-Part I

    Palizban, Omid; Kauhaniemia, Kimmo; Guerrero, Josep M.

    2014-01-01

    The microgrid concept has been closely investigated and implemented by numerous experts worldwide. The first part of this paper describes the principles of microgrid design, considering the operational concepts and requirements arising from participation in active network management. Over the las......, energy storage systems, and market participation in both island and grid-connection operation. Finally, control techniques and the principles of energy-storage systems are summarized in a comprehensive flowchart.......The microgrid concept has been closely investigated and implemented by numerous experts worldwide. The first part of this paper describes the principles of microgrid design, considering the operational concepts and requirements arising from participation in active network management. Over the last...

  15. Activity clocks: spreading dynamics on temporal networks of human contact

    Gauvin, Laetitia; Cattuto, Ciro; Barrat, Alain

    2013-01-01

    Dynamical processes on time-varying complex networks are key to un- derstanding and modeling a broad variety of processes in socio-technical systems. Here we focus on empirical temporal networks of human proxim- ity and we aim at understanding the factors that, in simulation, shape the arrival time distribution of simple spreading processes. Abandoning the notion of wall-clock time in favour of node-specific clocks based on activ- ity exposes robust statistical patterns in the arrival times across different social contexts. Using randomization strategies and generative models constrained by data, we show that these patterns can be understood in terms of heterogeneous inter-event time distributions coupled with hetero- geneous numbers of events per edge. We also show, both empirically and by using a synthetic dataset, that significant deviations from the above behavior can be caused by the presence of edge classes with strong activity correlations.

  16. Time-resolved microrheology of actively remodeling actomyosin networks

    Silva, Marina Soares e.; Stuhrmann, Björn; Betz, Timo; Koenderink, Gijsje H.

    2014-07-01

    Living cells constitute an extraordinary state of matter since they are inherently out of thermal equilibrium due to internal metabolic processes. Indeed, measurements of particle motion in the cytoplasm of animal cells have revealed clear signatures of nonthermal fluctuations superposed on passive thermal motion. However, it has been difficult to pinpoint the exact molecular origin of this activity. Here, we employ time-resolved microrheology based on particle tracking to measure nonequilibrium fluctuations produced by myosin motor proteins in a minimal model system composed of purified actin filaments and myosin motors. We show that the motors generate spatially heterogeneous contractile fluctuations, which become less frequent with time as a consequence of motor-driven network remodeling. We analyze the particle tracking data on different length scales, combining particle image velocimetry, an ensemble analysis of the particle trajectories, and finally a kymograph analysis of individual particle trajectories to quantify the length and time scales associated with active particle displacements. All analyses show clear signatures of nonequilibrium activity: the particles exhibit random motion with an enhanced amplitude compared to passive samples, and they exhibit sporadic contractile fluctuations with ballistic motion over large (up to 30 μm) distances. This nonequilibrium activity diminishes with sample age, even though the adenosine triphosphate level is held constant. We propose that network coarsening concentrates motors in large clusters and depletes them from the network, thus reducing the occurrence of contractile fluctuations. Our data provide valuable insight into the physical processes underlying stress generation within motor-driven actin networks and the analysis framework may prove useful for future microrheology studies in cells and model organisms.

  17. Activated sludge process based on artificial neural network

    张文艺; 蔡建安

    2002-01-01

    Considering the difficulty of creating water quality model for activated sludge system, a typical BP artificial neural network model has been established to simulate the operation of a waste water treatment facilities. The comparison of prediction results with the on-spot measurements shows the model, the model is accurate and this model can also be used to realize intelligentized on-line control of the wastewater processing process.

  18. Optimal FEC Rate for Media Streaming in Active Networks

    Jurca, Dan; Frossard, Pascal

    2004-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of optimal channel rate allocation for media streaming in active networks, where intermediate nodes are able to perform basic FEC decoding/encoding operations. FEC performance is analyzed in the case of hop-by-hop FEC protection, and compared with an end-to-end FEC scenario, in order to demonstrate the benefits of FEC operations in the intermediate nodes. An optimization problem is formulated, based on a distortion model for video streaming over lossy channels...

  19. Platelet Serotonin Transporter Function Predicts Default-Mode Network Activity

    Christian Scharinger; Ulrich Rabl; Christian H. Kasess; Meyer, Bernhard M.; Tina Hofmaier; Kersten Diers; Lucie Bartova; Gerald Pail; Wolfgang Huf; Zeljko Uzelac; Beate Hartinger; Klaudius Kalcher; Thomas Perkmann; Helmuth Haslacher; Andreas Meyer-Lindenberg

    2014-01-01

    Background The serotonin transporter (5-HTT) is abundantly expressed in humans by the serotonin transporter gene SLC6A4 and removes serotonin (5-HT) from extracellular space. A blood-brain relationship between platelet and synaptosomal 5-HT reuptake has been suggested, but it is unknown today, if platelet 5-HT uptake can predict neural activation of human brain networks that are known to be under serotonergic influence. Methods A functional magnetic resonance study was performed in 48 healthy...

  20. Modeling and Visualization of Human Activities for Multicamera Networks

    Aswin C. Sankaranarayanan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Multicamera networks are becoming complex involving larger sensing areas in order to capture activities and behavior that evolve over long spatial and temporal windows. This necessitates novel methods to process the information sensed by the network and visualize it for an end user. In this paper, we describe a system for modeling and on-demand visualization of activities of groups of humans. Using the prior knowledge of the 3D structure of the scene as well as camera calibration, the system localizes humans as they navigate the scene. Activities of interest are detected by matching models of these activities learnt a priori against the multiview observations. The trajectories and the activity index for each individual summarize the dynamic content of the scene. These are used to render the scene with virtual 3D human models that mimic the observed activities of real humans. In particular, the rendering framework is designed to handle large displays with a cluster of GPUs as well as reduce the cognitive dissonance by rendering realistic weather effects and illumination. We envision use of this system for immersive visualization as well as summarization of videos that capture group behavior.

  1. Ultrananocrystalline diamond thin films functionalized with therapeutically active collagen networks.

    Huang, H.; Chen, M.; Bruno, P.; Lam, R.; Robinson, E.; Gruen, D.; Ho, D.; Materials Science Division; Northwestern Univ.

    2009-01-01

    The fabrication of biologically amenable interfaces in medicine bridges translational technologies with their surrounding biological environment. Functionalized nanomaterials catalyze this coalescence through the creation of biomimetic and active substrates upon which a spectrum of therapeutic elements can be delivered to adherent cells to address biomolecular processes in cancer, inflammation, etc. Here, we demonstrate the robust functionalization of ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) with type I collagen and dexamethasone (Dex), an anti-inflammatory drug, to fabricate a hybrid therapeutically active substrate for localized drug delivery. UNCD oxidation coupled with a pH-mediated collagen adsorption process generated a comprehensive interface between the two materials, and subsequent Dex integration, activity, and elution were confirmed through inflammatory gene expression assays. These studies confer a translational relevance to the biofunctionalized UNCD in its role as an active therapeutic network for potent regulation of cellular activity toward applications in nanomedicine.

  2. Surface enhaced raman scattering (SERS) with biopolymer encapsulated silver nanosubstrates for rapid detection of foodborne pathogens

    A biopolymer encapsulated with silver nanoparticles was prepared using polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) solution, silver nitrate, and trisodium citrate. Biopolymer based nanosubstrates were deposited on a mica sheet for SERS. Fresh cultures of Salmonella Typhimurium, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus a...

  3. Optically controlled multiple switching operations of DNA biopolymer devices

    Hung, Chao-You; Tu, Waan-Ting; Lin, Yi-Tzu [Institute of Photonics Technologies, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Fruk, Ljiljana [Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3RA (United Kingdom); Hung, Yu-Chueh, E-mail: ychung@ee.nthu.edu.tw [Institute of Photonics Technologies, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Department of Electrical Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2015-12-21

    We present optically tunable operations of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) biopolymer devices, where a single high-resistance state, write-once read-many-times memory state, write-read-erase memory state, and single low-resistance state can be achieved by controlling UV irradiation time. The device is a simple sandwich structure with a spin-coated DNA biopolymer layer sandwiched by two electrodes. Upon irradiation, the electrical properties of the device are adjusted owing to a phototriggered synthesis of silver nanoparticles in DNA biopolymer, giving rise to multiple switching scenarios. This technique, distinct from the strategy of doping of pre-formed nanoparticles, enables a post-film fabrication process for achieving optically controlled memory device operations, which provides a more versatile platform to fabricate organic memory and optoelectronic devices.

  4. Optically controlled multiple switching operations of DNA biopolymer devices

    We present optically tunable operations of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) biopolymer devices, where a single high-resistance state, write-once read-many-times memory state, write-read-erase memory state, and single low-resistance state can be achieved by controlling UV irradiation time. The device is a simple sandwich structure with a spin-coated DNA biopolymer layer sandwiched by two electrodes. Upon irradiation, the electrical properties of the device are adjusted owing to a phototriggered synthesis of silver nanoparticles in DNA biopolymer, giving rise to multiple switching scenarios. This technique, distinct from the strategy of doping of pre-formed nanoparticles, enables a post-film fabrication process for achieving optically controlled memory device operations, which provides a more versatile platform to fabricate organic memory and optoelectronic devices

  5. Optically controlled multiple switching operations of DNA biopolymer devices

    Hung, Chao-You; Tu, Waan-Ting; Lin, Yi-Tzu; Fruk, Ljiljana; Hung, Yu-Chueh

    2015-12-01

    We present optically tunable operations of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) biopolymer devices, where a single high-resistance state, write-once read-many-times memory state, write-read-erase memory state, and single low-resistance state can be achieved by controlling UV irradiation time. The device is a simple sandwich structure with a spin-coated DNA biopolymer layer sandwiched by two electrodes. Upon irradiation, the electrical properties of the device are adjusted owing to a phototriggered synthesis of silver nanoparticles in DNA biopolymer, giving rise to multiple switching scenarios. This technique, distinct from the strategy of doping of pre-formed nanoparticles, enables a post-film fabrication process for achieving optically controlled memory device operations, which provides a more versatile platform to fabricate organic memory and optoelectronic devices.

  6. A study of epidemic spreading on activity-driven networks

    Zou, Yijiang; Deng, Weibing; Li, Wei; Cai, Xu

    2016-03-01

    The epidemic spreading was explored on activity-driven networks (ADNs), accounting for the study of dynamics both on and of the ADN. By employing the susceptible-infected-susceptible (SIS) model, two aspects were considered: (1) the infection rate of susceptible agent (depending on the number of its infected neighbors) evolves due to the temporal structure of ADN, rather than being a constant number; (2) the susceptible and infected agents generate unequal links while being activated, namely, the susceptible agent gets few contacts with others in order to protect itself. Results show that, in both cases, the larger epidemic threshold and smaller outbreak size were obtained.

  7. Collective versus hub activation of epidemic phases on networks

    Ferreira, Silvio C; Pastor-Satorras, Romualdo

    2015-01-01

    We consider a general criterion to discern the nature of the threshold in epidemic models on scale-free (SF) networks. Comparing the epidemic lifespan of the nodes with largest degrees with the infection time between them, we propose a general dual scenario, in which the epidemic transition is either ruled by a hub activation process, leading to a null threshold in the thermodynamic limit, or given by a collective activation process, corresponding to a standard phase transition with a finite threshold. We validate the proposed criterion applying it different to epidemic models, with waning immunity or heterogeneous infection rates.

  8. ESONET - European Seas Observatory NETwork. Network of Excellence (NoE). Periodic activity report : revision #1

    PUILLAT Ingrid; Rolin, Jean-francois; Person, Roland

    2008-01-01

    The Network of Excellence ESONET started on 1st March 2007. The kick off meeting was held in Brest on 21-22-23 March 2007. Long term monitoring of environmental processes related to ecosystem life and evolution, global changes and geohazards, is now recognized as a necessary by the scientific community. To better understand geophysical, biogeochemical, oceanographic and biological active phenomena scientists need long time series of data coming from the deep sea and the seafloor at key pro...

  9. Technical and economic impacts of active management on distribution network

    With the deregulation of energy market and the appeal for environment protection, more and more distributed generation (DG) is embedded in the distribution network. However the approach of connecting DG in most cases is based on a so-called ''fit and forget'' policy and the capacity of DG is limited rigidly by distribution network operator (DNO) to avoid the negative effects of high level penetration. Therefore active management (AM) is put forward as an effective method to network reinforcement for the connection and operation of DG. In this paper, the concept and principle of AM are introduced, and several indices are proposed to evaluate both technical and economic impacts of AM on distribution network with DG. To simplify the simulation fuzzy C-means clustering (FCM) algorithm is introduced. The test results on a sample system represent that AM will lead to decrease of power generation of DG, but it can reduce energy losses and improve voltage profile effectively. Furthermore, AM will take great economic incentives to DG developer as well as DNO with reasonable policy. (author)

  10. IONOSPHERIC CORRECTION METHOD FOR PRECISE POSITIONING WITH GPS ACTIVE NETWORK

    GAOShan; CHENWu; HUCong-wei; CHENYong-qi; DINGXiao-li

    2005-01-01

    The ionospheric delay error is a major error source which degrades the positioning accuracy in network real time kinematic (RTK) positioning over a long distance. Different approaches are proposed to estimate GPS errors based on GPS reference network, such as virtual reference stations (VRSs) and network corrections. A new method is used to model the ionospheric total electronic content (TEC) distribution in space. Unlike most ionospheric models, only the ionospheric delays along the satellite tracks are modelled. Therefore, the models are of high precise resolution of the ionospheric TEC distribution in both spatial and temporal scales. A new algorithm is used to solve the equation singularity problem. Experiments demonstrate that the new ionospheric correction method can be used to describe the ionospheric variation at a low latitude area where ionospheric activities are strong. Also, the accuracy of the ionospheric model is enough to support centimeter-level positioning within the network. As ionospheric models are satellite-based models (each satellite has one model), the model parameters can be easily incorporated with the existing differential GPS Radio Technical Commission for Maritime Service (DGPS RTCM) 104 format.

  11. Taurine activates GABAergic networks in the neocortex of immature mice

    Bogdan Aurel Sava

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Although it has been suggested that taurine is the main endogenous neurotransmitter acting on glycine receptors, the implications of glycine receptor-mediated taurine actions on immature neocortical networks have not been addressed yet. To investigate the influence of taurine on the excitability of neuronal networks in the immature neocortex, we performed whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from visually identified pyramidal neurons and interneurons in coronal slices from C57Bl/6 and GAD67-GFP transgenic mice (postnatal days 2-4. In 46 % of the pyramidal neurons bath-application of taurine at concentrations ≥ 300 mM significantly enhanced the frequency of postsynaptic currents (PSCs by 744.3 ± 93.8 % (n = 120 cells. This taurine-induced increase of PSC frequency was abolished by 0.2 mM tetrodotoxine, 1 mM strychnine or 3 mM gabazine, but was unaffected by the glutamatergic antagonists 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX and (± R(--3-(2-carboxypiperazine-4-yl-propyl-1-phosphonic acid (CPP, suggesting that taurine specifically activates GABAergic network activity projecting to pyramidal neurons. Cell-attached recordings revealed that taurine enhanced the frequency of action potentials in pyramidal neurons, indicating an excitatory action of the GABAergic PSCs. In order to identify the presynaptic targets of taurine we demonstrate that bath application of taurine induced in GAD67-GFP labeled interneurons an inward current that is mainly mediated by glycine receptors and can generate action potentials in these cells. We conclude from these results that taurine can enhance network excitability in the immature neocortex by selectively activating GABAergic interneurons via interactions with glycine receptors.

  12. Flash co-pyrolysis of biomass: The influence of biopolymers

    Cornelissen, Tom; Jans, M.; STALS, Mark; KUPPENS, Tom; Thewys, Theo; JANSSENS, Gerrit; Pastijn, H.; Yperman, Jan; REGGERS, Guy; SCHREURS, Sonja; Carleer, Robert

    2009-01-01

    A high water content is one of the major drawbacks for the utilisation of bio-oil. One technology which shows the potential to satisfy the demand for bio-oil with a reduced water content is the flash co-pyrolysis of biomass with biopolymers. The influence of biopolymers on the pyrolysis yield of a biomass waste stream is investigated with a semi-continuous home-built pyrolysis reactor. Polylactic acid (PLA), corn starch, polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB), Biopearls, Eastar, Solanyl and potato starch ...

  13. Nonlinearities of biopolymer gels increase the range of force transmission.

    Xu, Xinpeng; Safran, Samuel A

    2015-09-01

    We present a model of biopolymer gels that includes two types of elastic nonlinearities, stiffening under extension and softening (due to buckling) under compression, to predict the elastic anisotropy induced by both external as well as internal (e.g., due to cell contractility) stresses in biopolymer gels. We show how the stretch-induced anisotropy and the strain-stiffening nonlinearity increase both the amplitude and power-law range of transmission of internal, contractile, cellular forces, and relate this to recent experiments. PMID:26465519

  14. Liquid crystalline biopolymers: A new arena for liquid crystal research

    This paper gives a brief introduction to liquid crystals on the basis of biopolymers and reviews literature on liquid crystalline behaviour of biopolymers both in vitro and in vivo in relation to their implications in the fields of biology, medicine and material science. Knowledge in the field of biological liquid crystals is crucial for understanding complex phenomena at supramolecular level which will give information about processes involved in biological organization and function. The understanding of the interaction of theses crystals with electric, magnetic, optical and thermal fields will uncover mechanisms of near quantum-energy detection capabilities of biosystems

  15. Nonlinearities of biopolymer gels increase the range of force transmission

    Xu, Xinpeng; Safran, Samuel A.

    2015-09-01

    We present a model of biopolymer gels that includes two types of elastic nonlinearities, stiffening under extension and softening (due to buckling) under compression, to predict the elastic anisotropy induced by both external as well as internal (e.g., due to cell contractility) stresses in biopolymer gels. We show how the stretch-induced anisotropy and the strain-stiffening nonlinearity increase both the amplitude and power-law range of transmission of internal, contractile, cellular forces, and relate this to recent experiments.

  16. Solid state NMR of biopolymers and synthetic polymers

    Solid state NMR has been invaluable in evaluating the structure, phase separation, and dynamics of polymers. Because polymers are generally used in the solid state, solid state NMR is especially powerful because it provides information about the materials in their native state. This review gives a general overview of solid state NMR, concentrating on solid state 13 C and 2 H NMR. It then focuses on two examples: the biopolymer spider silka and the engineering material polyurethane. It illustrates how solid state NMR can provide new information about synthetic and bio-polymers. (author)

  17. Models of the solvent-accessible surface of biopolymers

    Smith, R.E.

    1996-09-01

    Many biopolymers such as proteins, DNA, and RNA have been studied because they have important biomedical roles and may be good targets for therapeutic action in treating diseases. This report describes how plastic models of the solvent-accessible surface of biopolymers were made. Computer files containing sets of triangles were calculated, then used on a stereolithography machine to make the models. Small (2 in.) models were made to test whether the computer calculations were done correctly. Also, files of the type (.stl) required by any ISO 9001 rapid prototyping machine were written onto a CD-ROM for distribution to American companies.

  18. The surface properties of biopolymer-coated fruit: A review

    Diana Cristina Moncayo Martinez

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Environmental conservation concerns have led to research and development regarding biodegradable materials from biopolymers, leading to new formulations for edible films and coatings for preserving the quality of fresh fruit and vegetables. Determining fruit skin surface properties for a given coating solution has led to predicting coating efficiency. Wetting was studied by considering spreading, adhesion and cohesion and measuring the contact angle, thus optimising the coating formulation in terms of biopolymer, plasticiser, surfactant, antimicrobial and antioxidant concentration. This work reviews the equations for determining fruit surface properties by using polar and dispersive interaction calculations and by determining the contact angle.

  19. On Optimal Link Activation with Interference Cancellation in Wireless Networking

    Yuan, Di; Chen, Lei; Karipidis, Eleftherios; Larsson, Erik G

    2011-01-01

    Optimizing link activation is a fundamental aspect in performance engineering of wireless networks. The solution of this combinatorial problem is the key element in scheduling and cross-layer resource management. Previous works on link activation assume single-user detection receivers, which treat interference in the same way as noise. In this paper, we assume multiuser detection receivers, which can decode and cancel strongly interfering signals. As a result, in contrast to classical spatial reuse, links being close to each other are more likely to be active simultaneously. We provide both theoretical and numerical studies of optimal link activation in this novel setup. We consider two problem settings, depending on whether interference cancellation is performed in parallel, i.e., in a single stage, or successively, i.e., in multiple stages. We prove that the problems are NP-hard and develop compact integer linear programming formulations that enable us to approach the global optimum for the purpose of asses...

  20. Application of neural networks to seismic active control

    An exploratory study on seismic active control using an artificial neural network (ANN) is presented in which a singledegree-of-freedom (SDF) structural system is controlled by a trained neural network. A feed-forward neural network and the backpropagation training method are used in the study. In backpropagation training, the learning rate is determined by ensuring the decrease of the error function at each training cycle. The training patterns for the neural net are generated randomly. Then, the trained ANN is used to compute the control force according to the control algorithm. The control strategy proposed herein is to apply the control force at every time step to destroy the build-up of the system response. The ground motions considered in the simulations are the N21E and N69W components of the Lake Hughes No. 12 record that occurred in the San Fernando Valley in California on February 9, 1971. Significant reduction of the structural response by one order of magnitude is observed. Also, it is shown that the proposed control strategy has the ability to reduce the peak that occurs during the first few cycles of the time history. These promising results assert the potential of applying ANNs to active structural control under seismic loads

  1. Innovation diffusion on time-varying activity driven networks

    Rizzo, Alessandro; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Since its introduction in the 1960s, the theory of innovation diffusion has contributed to the advancement of several research fields, such as marketing management and consumer behavior. The 1969 seminal paper by Bass [F.M. Bass, Manag. Sci. 15, 215 (1969)] introduced a model of product growth for consumer durables, which has been extensively used to predict innovation diffusion across a range of applications. Here, we propose a novel approach to study innovation diffusion, where interactions among individuals are mediated by the dynamics of a time-varying network. Our approach is based on the Bass' model, and overcomes key limitations of previous studies, which assumed timescale separation between the individual dynamics and the evolution of the connectivity patterns. Thus, we do not hypothesize homogeneous mixing among individuals or the existence of a fixed interaction network. We formulate our approach in the framework of activity driven networks to enable the analysis of the concurrent evolution of the interaction and individual dynamics. Numerical simulations offer a systematic analysis of the model behavior and highlight the role of individual activity on market penetration when targeted advertisement campaigns are designed, or a competition between two different products takes place.

  2. Eleven years of net network research activity - inr contributions

    The European Network on Neutron Techniques Standardization for Structural Integrity (NeT) was established in 2002, grouping institutions from industry, research and academic media. Coordinated by the European Commission.s Joint Research Centre, the main mission of this network is to develop experimental and numerical techniques and standards for the reliable characterisation of residual stresses in structural welds. Each problem is tackled by creating a dedicated Task Group which manages measurement and modelling round robin studies and undertakes a thorough analysis and interpretation of the results. Over forty institutions are active NeT partners, their specific involvement and contributions being summarised in this paper. The Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti (INR) is one of NeT founders and its contribution is related to numerical modelling, specimen analysis, material characterisation, data analysis or SANS support. This is also emphasised throughout this paper, together with the specific NeT research topics presentation. (authors)

  3. Modeling Temporal Activity Patterns in Dynamic Social Networks

    Raghavan, Vasanthan; Galstyan, Aram; Tartakovsky, Alexander G

    2013-01-01

    The focus of this work is on developing probabilistic models for user activity in social networks by incorporating the social network influence as perceived by the user. For this, we propose a coupled Hidden Markov Model, where each user's activity evolves according to a Markov chain with a hidden state that is influenced by the collective activity of the friends of the user. We develop generalized Baum-Welch and Viterbi algorithms for model parameter learning and state estimation for the proposed framework. We then validate the proposed model using a significant corpus of user activity on Twitter. Our numerical studies show that with sufficient observations to ensure accurate model learning, the proposed framework explains the observed data better than either a renewal process-based model or a conventional uncoupled Hidden Markov Model. We also demonstrate the utility of the proposed approach in predicting the time to the next tweet. Finally, clustering in the model parameter space is shown to result in dist...

  4. Platelet serotonin transporter function predicts default-mode network activity.

    Christian Scharinger

    Full Text Available The serotonin transporter (5-HTT is abundantly expressed in humans by the serotonin transporter gene SLC6A4 and removes serotonin (5-HT from extracellular space. A blood-brain relationship between platelet and synaptosomal 5-HT reuptake has been suggested, but it is unknown today, if platelet 5-HT uptake can predict neural activation of human brain networks that are known to be under serotonergic influence.A functional magnetic resonance study was performed in 48 healthy subjects and maximal 5-HT uptake velocity (Vmax was assessed in blood platelets. We used a mixed-effects multilevel analysis technique (MEMA to test for linear relationships between whole-brain, blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD activity and platelet Vmax.The present study demonstrates that increases in platelet Vmax significantly predict default-mode network (DMN suppression in healthy subjects independent of genetic variation within SLC6A4. Furthermore, functional connectivity analyses indicate that platelet Vmax is related to global DMN activation and not intrinsic DMN connectivity.This study provides evidence that platelet Vmax predicts global DMN activation changes in healthy subjects. Given previous reports on platelet-synaptosomal Vmax coupling, results further suggest an important role of neuronal 5-HT reuptake in DMN regulation.

  5. Temporary seismic networks on active volcanoes of Kamchatka (Russia)

    Jakovlev, Andrey; Koulakov, Ivan; Abkadyrov, Ilyas; Shapiro, Nikolay; Kuznetsov, Pavel; Deev, Evgeny; Gordeev, Evgeny; Chebrov, Viktor

    2016-04-01

    We present details of four field campaigns carried out on different volcanoes of Kamchatka in 2012-2015. Each campaign was performed in three main steps: (i) installation of the temporary network of seismic stations; (ii) autonomous continuous registration of three component seismic signal; (III) taking off the network and downloading the registered data. During the first campaign started in September 2012, 11 temporary stations were installed over the Avacha group of volcanoes located 30 km north to Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky in addition to the seven permanent stations operated by the Kamchatkan Branch of the Geophysical Survey (KBGS). Unfortunately, with this temporary network we faced with two obstacles. The first problem was the small amount of local earthquakes, which were detected during operation time. The second problem was an unexpected stop of several stations only 40 days after deployment. Nevertheless, after taking off the network in August 2013, the collected data appeared to be suitable for analysis using ambient noise. The second campaign was conducted in period from August 2013 to August 2014. In framework of the campaign, 21 temporary stations were installed over Gorely volcano, located 70 km south to Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky. Just in time of the network deployment, Gorely Volcano became very seismically active - every day occurred more than 100 events. Therefore, we obtain very good dataset with information about thousands of local events, which could be used for any type of seismological analysis. The third campaign started in August 2014. Within this campaign, we have installed 19 temporary seismic stations over Tolbachik volcano, located on the south side of the Klyuchevskoy volcano group. In the same time on Tolbachik volcano were installed four temporary stations and several permanent stations operated by the KBGS. All stations were taking off in July 2015. As result, we have collected a large dataset, which is now under preliminary analysis

  6. Separation of no-carrier-added 66,67Ga from bulk cobalt by a biopolymer

    Heavy ion activation of natural cobalt foil with 80.5MeV 12C results in the formation of no-carrier-added 66,67As radionuclides, along with their corresponding decay products, 66,67Ge and 66,67Ga in the matrix. Attempt has been made to separate the no-carrier-added gallium radionuclides from the target matrix cobalt using a biopolymer, Fe doped calcium alginate (Fe-CA) beads. A complete separation was achieved by adsorbing 66,67Ga and lesser amount of bulk Co at pH3 followed by washing the beads with 0.4M NaNO. (author)

  7. Pulse radiolysis and laser flash photolysis studies of synthetic and biopolymers

    The research work of pulse radiolysis and laser flash photolysis of synthetic and biopolymers which has been recently developed in the author's laboratory, is reviewed. The content of the paper is as follows; (1) radiation-induced ionic polymerization (2) photo-induced ionic polymerization (3) radiation-induced ionic polymerization in the presence of electron acceptor (4) laser photolysis study of copolymer of phenyl vinyl ketone and 2-vinylnaphthalene (5) photoviscosity of photochromic polymer (6) pulse radiolysis study of the reaction between active oxygen and hemoproteins (7) laser photolysis study of ferrous carbon monoxide complex of horseradish peroxidase. (auth.)

  8. ''Green'' Biopolymers for Improved Decontamination of Metals from Surfaces: Sorptive Characterization and Coating Properties.. Annual report to be submitted to DOE Program Managers for posting on web page

    The proposed research aims to develop a fundamental understanding of important biological and physical chemical parameters for effective decontamination of metal surfaces using environmentally benign aqueous-based biopolymer solutions. Understanding how heavy metal-chelating biopolymers coat and interact with contaminated surfaces will benefit the development of novel, safe, easy-to-apply decontamination methodologies for removal of radionuclides and heavy metals. The benefits of these methodologies will include the following: decreased exposure hazards for workers; decreased secondary waste generation; increased efficiency of decontamination; positive public appeal and development of novel, nature-friendly business opportunities; and lower cost of cleanup to the government. We propose to use aqueous biopolymer solutions to coat a contaminated metal surface (i.e., steel), solubilize the heavy metals (e.g., uranium) from the surface, and bind the heavy metals into the biopolymer. The biopolymer coating (containing the immobilized hazardous metal contaminants) will then be removed as a viscous film, as a dry powder, or by washing. This ''apply, wait, and remove'' procedure will reduce the amount of worker time spent in decontamination activities

  9. Wireless sensor networks for active vibration control in automobile structures

    Mieyeville, Fabien; Ichchou, Mohamed; Scorletti, Gérard; Navarro, David; Du, Wan

    2012-07-01

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) are nowadays widely used in monitoring and tracking applications. This paper presents the feasibility of using WSNs in active vibration control strategies. The method employed here involves active-structural acoustic control using piezoelectric sensors distributed on a car structure. This system aims at being merged with a WSN whose head node collects data and processes control laws so as to command piezoelectric actuators wisely placed on the structure. We will study the feasibility of implementing WSNs in active vibration control and introduce a complete design methodology to optimize hardware/software and control law synergy in mechatronic systems. A design space exploration will be conducted so as to identify the best WSN platform and the resulting impact on control.

  10. Wireless sensor networks for active vibration control in automobile structures

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) are nowadays widely used in monitoring and tracking applications. This paper presents the feasibility of using WSNs in active vibration control strategies. The method employed here involves active-structural acoustic control using piezoelectric sensors distributed on a car structure. This system aims at being merged with a WSN whose head node collects data and processes control laws so as to command piezoelectric actuators wisely placed on the structure. We will study the feasibility of implementing WSNs in active vibration control and introduce a complete design methodology to optimize hardware/software and control law synergy in mechatronic systems. A design space exploration will be conducted so as to identify the best WSN platform and the resulting impact on control. (paper)

  11. Sensor Activation and Radius Adaptation (SARA) in Heterogeneous Sensor Networks

    Bartolini, Novella; la Porta, Thomas; Petrioli, Chiara; Silvestri, Simone

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we address the problem of prolonging the lifetime of wireless sensor networks (WSNs) deployed to monitor an area of interest. In this scenario, a helpful approach is to reduce coverage redundancy and therefore the energy expenditure due to coverage. We introduce the first algorithm which reduces coverage redundancy by means of Sensor Activation and sensing Radius Adaptation (SARA)in a general applicative scenario with two classes of devices: sensors that can adapt their sensing range (adjustable sensors) and sensors that cannot (fixed sensors). In particular, SARA activates only a subset of all the available sensors and reduces the sensing range of the adjustable sensors that have been activated. In doing so, SARA also takes possible heterogeneous coverage capabilities of sensors belonging to the same class into account. It specifically addresses device heterogeneity by modeling the coverage problem in the Laguerre geometry through Voronoi-Laguerre diagrams. SARA executes quickly and is guarante...

  12. Production of a Biopolymer at Reactor Scale: A Laboratory Experience

    Genc, Rukan; Rodriguez-Couto, Susana

    2011-01-01

    Undergraduate students of biotechnology became familiar with several aspects of bioreactor operation via the production of xanthan gum, an industrially relevant biopolymer, by "Xanthomonas campestris" bacteria. The xanthan gum was extracted from the fermentation broth and the yield coefficient and productivity were calculated. (Contains 2 figures.)

  13. Advancing Analytical Methods for Characterization of Anionic Carbohydrate Biopolymers

    Langeslay, Derek Joseph

    2013-01-01

    The focus of this dissertation is on the development of improved analytical methods for the characterization of anionic carbohydrate biopolymers. Our goal is to extract important information from complex mixtures of heterogeneous polysaccharides by characterizing their substituent oligosaccharides in terms of monosaccharide composition and primary and secondary structure. This work focuses on the application of two major analytical platforms: spectroscopy and chromatography. The development ...

  14. Electronic parameters of MIS Schottky diodes with DNA biopolymer interlayer

    Güllü Ömer

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we prepared an ideal Cu/DNA/n-InP biopolymer-inorganic Schottky sandwich device formed by coating a n- lP semiconductor wafer with a biopolymer DNA. The Cu/DNA/n-InP contact showed a good rectifying behavior. The ideality factor value of 1.08 and the barrier height (Φb value of 0.70 eV for the Cu/DNA/n-InP device were determined from the forward ias I-V characteristics. It was seen that the Φb value of 0.70 eV obtained for the Cu/DNA/n-InP contact was significantly larger tan the value of 0.48 eV of conventional Cu/n-InP Schottky diodes. Modification of the interfacial potential barrier of Cu/n-InP iode was achieved using a thin interlayer of DNA biopolymer. This was attributed to the fact that DNA biopolymer interlayer increased the effective barrier height by influencing the space charge region of InP.

  15. Micromechanical sensors for the measurement of biopolymer degradation

    Keller, Stephan Sylvest; Gammelgaard, Lene; Jensen, M P;

    2011-01-01

    We present microcantilever-based sensors for the characterization of biopolymer degradation by enzymes. Thin films of Poly(L-lactide) (PLLA) were spray-coated onto SU-8 cantilevers with well-known material properties and dimensions. The micromechanical sensors were immersed in solutions of...

  16. Production and certain properties of biopolymers used in drilling

    Dedusenko, G.Y.; Gvozdyak, R.I.; Kolodkova, N.M.; Matyshevskaya, M.S.; Mayko, I.I.

    1977-01-01

    Biopolymers, belonging to modified polysaccharides, obtained by the action of Xanthomonas campestris bacteria on glucose and containing its substances, are used as the main component in clayless polymer muds. As a result of research performed at the laboratory of phytopathogenic bacteria in the IMV AN USSR, the producent strain of polysaccharide has been revealed and the nutritive medium chosen. Results are given of an analysis of the best Soviet samples of biopolymers created in the IMV AN USSR, produced using various strains of Xanthomonas bacteria. Rheological properties of aqueous dispersions of the biopolymer Keltsan are studied. The flow curves are recorded on the Fann rotation viscosimeter. The research performed enables determination that for fermentation can be used the bacteria Xanthomonas campestris, X. begonia, and X. molvacearum; and bacteria belonging to X. Campestris used to produce a sample batch of biopolymer, yielding the greatest amount of polysaccharide. The work results in development of a nutritive medium based on available Soviet materials, promoting formation of polysaccharide.

  17. Biopolymers in controlled release devices for agricultural applications.

    The use of biopolymers such as starch for agricultural applications including controlled release devices is growing due the environmental benefits. Recently, concerns have grown about the worldwide spread of parasitic mites (Varroa destructor) that infect colonies of honey bees (Apis mellifera L.). ...

  18. Biopolymers produced from gelatin and other sustainable resources using polyphenols

    Several researchers have recently demonstrated the feasibility of producing biopolymers from the reaction of polyphenolics with gelatin in combination with other proteins (e.g. whey) or with carbohydrates (e.g. chitosan and pectin). These combinations would take advantage of the unique properties o...

  19. Biopolymer-based material used in optical image correlation

    Mysliwiec, J.; Kochalska, Anna; Miniewicz, A.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 11 (2008), s. 1902-1906. ISSN 0003-6935 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : biopolymer * DNA * optical correlation Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 1.763, year: 2008

  20. Environmental Monitoring Networks Optimization Using Advanced Active Learning Algorithms

    Kanevski, Mikhail; Volpi, Michele; Copa, Loris

    2010-05-01

    The problem of environmental monitoring networks optimization (MNO) belongs to one of the basic and fundamental tasks in spatio-temporal data collection, analysis, and modeling. There are several approaches to this problem, which can be considered as a design or redesign of monitoring network by applying some optimization criteria. The most developed and widespread methods are based on geostatistics (family of kriging models, conditional stochastic simulations). In geostatistics the variance is mainly used as an optimization criterion which has some advantages and drawbacks. In the present research we study an application of advanced techniques following from the statistical learning theory (SLT) - support vector machines (SVM) and the optimization of monitoring networks when dealing with a classification problem (data are discrete values/classes: hydrogeological units, soil types, pollution decision levels, etc.) is considered. SVM is a universal nonlinear modeling tool for classification problems in high dimensional spaces. The SVM solution is maximizing the decision boundary between classes and has a good generalization property for noisy data. The sparse solution of SVM is based on support vectors - data which contribute to the solution with nonzero weights. Fundamentally the MNO for classification problems can be considered as a task of selecting new measurement points which increase the quality of spatial classification and reduce the testing error (error on new independent measurements). In SLT this is a typical problem of active learning - a selection of the new unlabelled points which efficiently reduce the testing error. A classical approach (margin sampling) to active learning is to sample the points closest to the classification boundary. This solution is suboptimal when points (or generally the dataset) are redundant for the same class. In the present research we propose and study two new advanced methods of active learning adapted to the solution of

  1. Placement Optimization of the Active Filters in the Industrial Networks

    Tlustý, J.; Švec, J.; Sýkora, T.; Doležal, J.; Škramlík, Jiří; Valouch, Viktor

    Košice : Technická univerzita v Košiciach, 2005, s. 1-10. ISBN 80-8073-305-8. [International Scientific Symposium ELEKTROENERGETIKA 2005 /3./. Stará Lesná - High Tatras (SK), 21.09.2005-23.09.2005] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA102/03/1551; GA ČR(CZ) GA102/03/0241 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20570509 Keywords : active filters * industrial networks Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electric al Engineering

  2. Kohonen Neural Network Stress Detection Using Only Electrodermal Activity Features

    BORNOIU, I.-V.

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a method for identifying human stress levels by using a Kohonen neural network. The study focuses on differentiating between a relaxed and a stressed state and it presents a series of parameters (skin conductance response signal power, skin conductance response signal frequency, skin conductance level gradient, response rise time and response amplitude extracted only from the electrodermal activity signal. A very strict recording protocol was used to minimize the artifacts caused by the bad connection between electrodes and skin. A stress inducing method is presented that can be used to replicate results in laboratory conditions.

  3. Active traffic management on road networks: a macroscopic approach.

    Kurzhanskiy, Alex A; Varaiya, Pravin

    2010-10-13

    Active traffic management (ATM) is the ability to dynamically manage recurrent and non-recurrent congestion based on prevailing traffic conditions in order to maximize the effectiveness and efficiency of road networks. It is a continuous process of (i) obtaining and analysing traffic measurement data, (ii) operations planning, i.e. simulating various scenarios and control strategies, (iii) implementing the most promising control strategies in the field, and (iv) maintaining a real-time decision support system that filters current traffic measurements to predict the traffic state in the near future, and to suggest the best available control strategy for the predicted situation. ATM relies on a fast and trusted traffic simulator for the rapid quantitative assessment of a large number of control strategies for the road network under various scenarios, in a matter of minutes. The open-source macrosimulation tool Aurora ROAD NETWORK MODELER is a good candidate for this purpose. The paper describes the underlying dynamical traffic model and what it takes to prepare the model for simulation; covers the traffic performance measures and evaluation of scenarios as part of operations planning; introduces the framework within which the control strategies are modelled and evaluated; and presents the algorithm for real-time traffic state estimation and short-term prediction. PMID:20819824

  4. Oxidation of alginate and pectate biopolymers by cerium(IV) in perchloric and sulfuric acid solutions: A comparative kinetic and mechanistic study.

    Fawzy, Ahmed

    2016-03-15

    The kinetics of oxidation of alginate (Alg) and pectate (Pec) carbohydrate biopolymers was studied by spectrophotometry in aqueous perchloric and sulfuric acid solutions at fixed ionic strengths and temperature. In both acids, the reactions showed a first order dependence on [Ce(IV)], whereas the orders with respect to biopolymer concentrations are less than unity. In perchloric acid, the reactions exhibited less than unit orders with respect to [H(+)] whereas those proceeded in sulfuric acid showed negative fractional-first order dependences on [H(+)]. The effect of ionic strength and dielectric constant was studied. Probable mechanistic schemes for oxidation reactions were proposed. In both acids, the final oxidation products were characterized as mono-keto derivatives of both biopolymers. The activation parameters with respect to the slow step of the mechanisms were computed and discussed. The rate laws were derived and the reaction constants involved in the different steps of the mechanisms were calculated. PMID:26794772

  5. Effect of temperature on the AC impedance of protein and carbohydrate biopolymers

    S Muthulakshmi; S Iyyapushpam; D Pathinettam Padiyan

    2014-12-01

    The influence of temperature on the electrical behaviour of protein biopolymer papain and carbohydrate biopolymers like gum acacia, gum tragacanth and guar gum has been investigated using AC impedance technique. The observed semi-circles represent the material’s bulk electrical property that indicate the single relaxation process in the biopolymers. An increase in bulk electrical conductivity in the biopolymers with temperature is due to the hopping of charge carriers between the trapped sites. The depression parameter reveals the electrical equivalent circuit for the biopolymers. The AC electrical conductivity in the biopolymers follows the universal power law. From this, it is observed that the AC conductivity is frequency dependent and the biopolymer papain obeys large polaron tunnelling model, gum acacia and gum guar obey ion or electron tunnelling model, and gum tragacanth obeys the correlated barrier hopping model of conduction mechanisms.

  6. Genetic and logic networks with the signal-inhibitor-activator structure are dynamically robust

    LI Fangting; TAN Ning

    2006-01-01

    The proteins, DNA and RNA interaction networks govern various biological functions in living cells, these networks should be dynamically robust in the intracellular and environmental fluctuations. Here, we use Boolean network to study the robust structure of both genetic and logic networks. First, SOS network in bacteria E. coli, which regulates cell survival and repair after DNA damage, is shown to be dynamically robust. Comparing with cell cycle network in budding yeast and flagella network in E. coli, we find the signal-inhibitor-activator (SIA) structure in transcription regulatory networks. Second, under the dynamical rule that inhibition is much stronger than activation, we have searched 3-node non-self-loop logical networks that are dynamically robust, and that if the attractive basin of a final attractor is as large as seven, and the final attractor has only one active node, then the active node acts as inhibitor, and the SIA and signal-inhibitor (SI) structures are fundamental architectures of robust networks. SIA and SI networks with dynamic robustness against environment uncertainties may be selected and maintained over the course of evolution, rather than blind trial-error testing and be ing an accidental consequence of particular evolutionary history. SIA network can perform a more complex process than SI network, andSIA might be used to design robust artificial genetic network. Our results provide dynamical support for why the inhibitors and SIA/SI structures are frequently employed in cellular regulatory networks.

  7. Change in the fouling propensity of sludge in membrane bioreactors (MBR) in relation to the accumulation of biopolymer clusters

    Wang, XM; Li, XY; Sun, FY

    2011-01-01

    A membrane bioreactor (MBR) and an activated sludge process (ASP) were operated side by side to evaluate the change of sludge supernatant characteristics and the evolution of the sludge fouling propensity. The MBR sludge had a higher organic concentration and more biopolymer clusters (BPC) in the supernatant compared with ASP. BPC increased in both concentration and size in the MBR. The results show that the change in the liquid-phase property had a profound effect on the sludge fouling prope...

  8. Stock price change rate prediction by utilizing social network activities.

    Deng, Shangkun; Mitsubuchi, Takashi; Sakurai, Akito

    2014-01-01

    Predicting stock price change rates for providing valuable information to investors is a challenging task. Individual participants may express their opinions in social network service (SNS) before or after their transactions in the market; we hypothesize that stock price change rate is better predicted by a function of social network service activities and technical indicators than by a function of just stock market activities. The hypothesis is tested by accuracy of predictions as well as performance of simulated trading because success or failure of prediction is better measured by profits or losses the investors gain or suffer. In this paper, we propose a hybrid model that combines multiple kernel learning (MKL) and genetic algorithm (GA). MKL is adopted to optimize the stock price change rate prediction models that are expressed in a multiple kernel linear function of different types of features extracted from different sources. GA is used to optimize the trading rules used in the simulated trading by fusing the return predictions and values of three well-known overbought and oversold technical indicators. Accumulated return and Sharpe ratio were used to test the goodness of performance of the simulated trading. Experimental results show that our proposed model performed better than other models including ones using state of the art techniques. PMID:24790586

  9. Optimal Bidding Strategy for Renewable Microgrid with Active Network Management

    Seung Wan Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Active Network Management (ANM enables a microgrid to optimally dispatch the active/reactive power of its Renewable Distributed Generation (RDG and Battery Energy Storage System (BESS units in real time. Thus, a microgrid with high penetration of RDGs can handle their uncertainties and variabilities to achieve the stable operation using ANM. However, the actual power flow in the line connecting the main grid and microgrid may deviate significantly from the day-ahead bids if the bids are determined without consideration of the real-time adjustment through ANM, which will lead to a substantial imbalance cost. Therefore, this study proposes a formulation for obtaining an optimal bidding which reflects the change of power flow in the connecting line by real-time adjustment using ANM. The proposed formulation maximizes the expected profit of the microgrid considering various network and physical constraints. The effectiveness of the proposed bidding strategy is verified through the simulations with a 33-bus test microgrid. The simulation results show that the proposed bidding strategy improves the expected operating profit by reducing the imbalance cost to a greater degree compared to the basic bidding strategy without consideration of ANM.

  10. In vitro neuronal network activity in NMDA receptor encephalitis

    Jantzen Sabine U

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anti-NMDA-encephalitis is caused by antibodies against the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR and characterized by a severe encephalopathy with psychosis, epileptic seizures and autonomic disturbances. It predominantly occurs in young women and is associated in 59% with an ovarian teratoma. Results We describe effects of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF from an anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR encephalitis patient on in vitro neuronal network activity (ivNNA. In vitro NNA of dissociated primary rat cortical populations was recorded by the microelectrode array (MEA system. The 23-year old patient was severely affected but showed an excellent recovery following multimodal immunomodulatory therapy and removal of an ovarian teratoma. Patient CSF (pCSF taken during the initial weeks after disease onset suppressed global spike- and burst rates of ivNNA in contrast to pCSF sampled after clinical recovery and decrease of NMDAR antibody titers. The synchrony of pCSF-affected ivNNA remained unaltered during the course of the disease. Conclusion Patient CSF directly suppresses global activity of neuronal networks recorded by the MEA system. In contrast, pCSF did not regulate the synchrony of ivNNA suggesting that NMDAR antibodies selectively regulate distinct parameters of ivNNA while sparing their functional connectivity. Thus, assessing ivNNA could represent a new technique to evaluate functional consequences of autoimmune encephalitis-related CSF changes.

  11. Photonic Network R&D Activities in Japan-Current Activities and Future Perspectives

    Kitayama, Ken-Ichi; Miki, Tetsuya; Morioka, Toshio; Tsushima, Hideaki; Koga, Masafumi; Mori, Kazuyuki; Araki, Soichiro; Sato, Ken-Ichi; Onaka, Hiroshi; Namiki, Shu; Aoyama, Tomonori

    2005-10-01

    R&D activities on photonic networks in Japan are presented. First, milestones in current ongoing R&D programs supported by Japanese government agencies are introduced, including long-distance and wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) fiber transmission, wavelength routing, optical burst switching (OBS), and control-plane technology for IP backbone networks. Their goal was set to evolve a legacy telecommunications network to IP-over-WDM networks by introducing technologies for WDM and wavelength routing. We then discuss the perspectives of so-called PHASE II R&D programs for photonic networks over the next 5 years until 2010, by focusing on the report that has been recently issued by the Photonic Internet Forum (PIF), a consortium that has major carriers, telecom vendors, and Japanese academics as members. The PHASE II R&D programs should serve to establish a photonic platform to provide abundant bandwidth on demand, at any time on a real-time basis, through the customer's initiative to promote bandwidth-rich applications, such as grid computing, real-time digital-cinema streaming, medical and educational applications, and network storage in e-commerce.

  12. Influence Activation Model: A New Perspective in Social Influence Analysis and Social Network Evolution

    Yang, Yang; Chawla, Nitesh V.; Lichtenwalter, Ryan N.; Dong, Yuxiao

    2016-01-01

    What drives the propensity for the social network dynamics? Social influence is believed to drive both off-line and on-line human behavior, however it has not been considered as a driver of social network evolution. Our analysis suggest that, while the network structure affects the spread of influence in social networks, the network is in turn shaped by social influence activity (i.e., the process of social influence wherein one person's attitudes and behaviors affect another's). To that end,...

  13. Influence Activation Model: A New Perspective in Social Influence Analysis and Social Network Evolution

    Yang, Yang; Lichtenwalter, Ryan N; Dong, Yuxiao

    2016-01-01

    What drives the propensity for the social network dynamics? Social influence is believed to drive both off-line and on-line human behavior, however it has not been considered as a driver of social network evolution. Our analysis suggest that, while the network structure affects the spread of influence in social networks, the network is in turn shaped by social influence activity (i.e., the process of social influence wherein one person's attitudes and behaviors affect another's). To that end, we develop a novel model of network evolution where the dynamics of network follow the mechanism of influence propagation, which are not captured by the existing network evolution models. Our experiments confirm the predictions of our model and demonstrate the important role that social influence can play in the process of network evolution. As well exploring the reason of social network evolution, different genres of social influence have been spotted having different effects on the network dynamics. These findings and ...

  14. Detection of silent cells, synchronization and modulatory activity in developing cellular networks.

    Hjorth, Johannes J J; Dawitz, Julia; Kroon, Tim; Pires, Johny; Dassen, Valerie J; Berkhout, Janna A; Emperador Melero, Javier; Nadadhur, Aish G; Alevra, Mihai; Toonen, Ruud F; Heine, Vivi M; Mansvelder, Huibert D; Meredith, Rhiannon M

    2016-04-01

    Developing networks in the immature nervous system and in cellular cultures are characterized by waves of synchronous activity in restricted clusters of cells. Synchronized activity in immature networks is proposed to regulate many different developmental processes, from neuron growth and cell migration, to the refinement of synapses, topographic maps, and the mature composition of ion channels. These emergent activity patterns are not present in all cells simultaneously within the network and more immature "silent" cells, potentially correlated with the presence of silent synapses, are prominent in different networks during early developmental periods. Many current network analyses for detection of synchronous cellular activity utilize activity-based pixel correlations to identify cellular-based regions of interest (ROIs) and coincident cell activity. However, using activity-based correlations, these methods first underestimate or ignore the inactive silent cells within the developing network and second, are difficult to apply within cell-dense regions commonly found in developing brain networks. In addition, previous methods may ignore ROIs within a network that shows transient activity patterns comprising both inactive and active periods. We developed analysis software to semi-automatically detect cells within developing neuronal networks that were imaged using calcium-sensitive reporter dyes. Using an iterative threshold, modulation of activity was tracked within individual cells across the network. The distribution pattern of both inactive and active, including synchronous cells, could be determined based on distance measures to neighboring cells and according to different anatomical layers. PMID:26097169

  15. Water flow based geometric active deformable model for road network

    Leninisha, Shanmugam; Vani, Kaliaperumal

    2015-04-01

    A width and color based geometric active deformable model is proposed for road network extraction from remote sensing images with minimal human interception. Orientation and width of road are computed from a single manual seed point, from which the propagation starts both right and left hand directions of the starting point, which extracts the interconnected road network from the aerial or high spatial resolution satellite image automatically. Here the propagation (like water flow in canal with defined boundary) is restricted with color and width of the road. Road extraction is done for linear, curvilinear (U shape and S shape) roads first, irrespective of width and color. Then, this algorithm is improved to extract road with junctions in a shape of L, T and X along with center line. Roads with small break or disconnected roads are also extracts by a modified version of this same algorithm. This methodology is tested and evaluated with various remote sensing images. The experimental results show that the proposed method is efficient and extracting roads accurately with less computation time. However, in complex urban areas, the identification accuracy declines due to the various sizes of obstacles, over bridges, multilane etc.

  16. Artificial Neural Network Characteristic For Neutron Activation Analysis

    Neutron activation analysis (NAA) is one of analysis methods for identification of elements from material. Irradiated unknown material could be identified by gamma spectrum pattern analysis. The recognition process will be done easily if we have a smart system. One of the smart system choices was artificial neural network (ANN). The gamma spectrum emitted from radioactive nuclide has specific pattern, therefore smart system will try to classify the input data. Firstly, Hp-Ge detector detects gamma radiation from material, then the gamma radiations is counted by multi channel analysis instrument (MCA). The smart system based ANN system was tested to identify 50 material, in which the system has been trained by using one data only for each classifications. The result showed that the ANN appreciates 100% identification capability or has a good performance

  17. On Calculating Activity Slack in Stochastic Project Networks

    Gary Mitchell

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Identifying critical tasks in a project network is easily done when task times are deterministic, but doing so under stochastic task times is problematic. The few methods that have been proposed contain serious drawbacks which lead to identifying critical tasks incorrectly, leaving project managers without the means to (1 identify and rank the most probable sources of project delays, (2 assess the magnitude of each source of schedule risk, and (3 identify which tasks represent the best opportunities for successfully addressing schedule risk? Approach: In this study we considered the problem of identifying the sources of schedule risk in a stochastic project network. We developed general expressions for determining a task’s late starting and ending time distributions. We introduced the concept of stochastic slack and develop a number of metrics that help a project manager directly identify and estimate the magnitude of sources of schedule risk. Finally, we compared critical tasks identified using the activity criticality index to those found using stochastic slack metrics. Results: We have demonstrated that a task may have non-zero probability of negative stochastic slack and that expected total slack for a task may be negative. We also found that while the activity criticality index is effective for calculating the probability that a task is on a critical path, the stochastic slack based metrics discussed in this paper are better predictors of the extent to which a delay in a task will result in a project delay. Conclusion/Recommendations: Project managers should consider using stochastic slack based metrics for assessing project risk and establishing the most likely project schedule outcomes. Given the calculation complexity associated with theoretically exact stochastic slack metrics, effective heuristics are required.

  18. Early network activity propagates bidirectionally between hippocampus and cortex.

    Barger, Zeke; Easton, Curtis R; Neuzil, Kevin E; Moody, William J

    2016-06-01

    Spontaneous activity in the developing brain helps refine neuronal connections before the arrival of sensory-driven neuronal activity. In mouse neocortex during the first postnatal week, waves of spontaneous activity originating from pacemaker regions in the septal nucleus and piriform cortex propagate through the neocortex. Using high-speed Ca(2+) imaging to resolve the spatiotemporal dynamics of wave propagation in parasagittal mouse brain slices, we show that the hippocampus can act as an additional source of neocortical waves. Some waves that originate in the hippocampus remain restricted to that structure, while others pause at the hippocampus-neocortex boundary and then propagate into the neocortex. Blocking GABAergic neurotransmission decreases the likelihood of wave propagation into neocortex, whereas blocking glutamatergic neurotransmission eliminates spontaneous and evoked hippocampal waves. A subset of hippocampal and cortical waves trigger Ca(2+) waves in astrocytic networks after a brief delay. Hippocampal waves accompanied by Ca(2+) elevation in astrocytes are more likely to propagate into the neocortex. Finally, we show that two structures in our preparation that initiate waves-the hippocampus and the piriform cortex-can be electrically stimulated to initiate propagating waves at lower thresholds than the neocortex, indicating that the intrinsic circuit properties of those regions are responsible for their pacemaker function. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 76: 661-672, 2016. PMID:26385616

  19. Size-dependent regulation of synchronized activity in living neuronal networks

    Yamamoto, Hideaki; Kubota, Shigeru; Chida, Yudai; Morita, Mayu; Moriya, Satoshi; Akima, Hisanao; Sato, Shigeo; Hirano-Iwata, Ayumi; Tanii, Takashi; Niwano, Michio

    2016-07-01

    We study the effect of network size on synchronized activity in living neuronal networks. Dissociated cortical neurons form synaptic connections in culture and generate synchronized spontaneous activity within 10 days in vitro. Using micropatterned surfaces to extrinsically control the size of neuronal networks, we show that synchronized activity can emerge in a network as small as 12 cells. Furthermore, a detailed comparison of small (˜20 cells), medium (˜100 cells), and large (˜400 cells) networks reveal that synchronized activity becomes destabilized in the small networks. A computational modeling of neural activity is then employed to explore the underlying mechanism responsible for the size effect. We find that the generation and maintenance of the synchronized activity can be minimally described by: (1) the stochastic firing of each neuron in the network, (2) enhancement in the network activity in a positive feedback loop of excitatory synapses, and (3) Ca-dependent suppression of bursting activity. The model further shows that the decrease in total synaptic input to a neuron that drives the positive feedback amplification of correlated activity is a key factor underlying the destabilization of synchrony in smaller networks. Spontaneous neural activity plays a critical role in cortical information processing, and our work constructively clarifies an aspect of the structural basis behind this.

  20. Kinetic Study of Lead Adsorption to Composite Biopolymer Adsorbent.

    Seki; Suzuki

    1999-03-15

    A kinetic study of lead adsorption to composite biopolymer adsorbents was carried out. Spherical and membranous adsorbents containing two biopolymers, humic acid and alginic acid, were used for lead adsorption in dilute acidic solutions. The shrinking core model derived by M. G. Rao and A. K. Gupta (Chem. Eng. J. 24, 181, 1982) was applied to describe the rate process of lead adsorption to spherical adsorbents (average radii of 0.12, 0.15, and 0.16 cm). Furthermore, the shrinking core model was modified and adapted for description of the rate process of lead adsorption to membranous adsorbent (average thickness of 0.0216 cm). The adsorption rate process for the both cases was well described and average apparent lead diffusion coefficients of about 6 x 10(-6) and 7 x 10(-6) cm2 s-1 were found for the spherical and membranous adsorbents, respectively. Copyright 1999 Academic Press. PMID:10049553

  1. Biopolymer chitin: extraction and characterization; Biopolimero quitina: extracao e caracterizacao

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    The biopolymers are materials made from renewable sources such as soybean, corn, cane sugar, cellulose and chitin. Chitin is the most abundant biopolymer found in nature, after cellulose. The chemical structure of chitin is distinguished by the hydroxyl group, of structure from cellulose, located at position C-2, which in the chitin is replaced by acetamine group. The objective of this study was to develop the chitin from exoskeletons of Litopenaeus vannamei shrimp, which are discarded as waste, causing pollutions, environmental problems and thus obtain better utilization of these raw materials. It also, show the extraction process and deacetylation of chitosan. The extraction of chitin followed steps of demineralization, desproteinization and deodorization. Chitin and chitosan were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and the thermals properties were analyzed by thermogravimetry (TG/DTG). (author)

  2. Electronic parameters of MIS Schottky diodes with DNA biopolymer interlayer

    Güllü Ömer; Türüt Abdulmecit

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we prepared an ideal Cu/DNA/n-InP biopolymer-inorganic Schottky sandwich device formed by coating a n- lP semiconductor wafer with a biopolymer DNA. The Cu/DNA/n-InP contact showed a good rectifying behavior. The ideality factor value of 1.08 and the barrier height (Φb) value of 0.70 eV for the Cu/DNA/n-InP device were determined from the forward ias I-V characteristics. It was seen that the Φb value of 0.70 eV obtained for the Cu/DNA/n-InP contact was significantly larger tan t...

  3. Mobility Enhancement of Red Blood Cells with Biopolymers

    Tahara, Daiki; Oikawa, Noriko; Kurita, Rei

    2016-03-01

    Adhesion of red blood cells (RBC) to substrates are one of crucial problems for a blood clot. Here we investigate the mobility of RBC between two glass substrates in saline with polymer systems. We find that RBCs are adhered to the glass substrate with PEG, however the mobility steeply increases with fibrinogen and dextran, which are biopolymers. We also find that the mobility affects an aggregation dynamics of RBCs, which is related with diseases such as influenza, blood clot and so on. The Brownian motion helps to increase probability of contact with each other and to find a more stable condition of the aggregation. Thus the biopolymers play important roles not only for preventing the adhesion but also for the aggregation.

  4. Impact Behaviour of Modified Biopolymer Droplet on Urea Surface

    S. Yon Norasyikin; K. KuZilati; Zakaria, M; S. Suriati

    2014-01-01

    The droplet impact behaviour provides the particle coating characterization during the coating process of controlled release fertiliser. To have a good coating uniformity around the urea granules, it is necessary to enhance the wettabitily properties between the coating material and urea surface. In this study, modified biopolymer is used as the coating material for the controlled release fertilizer. Various compositions of starch:urea:borate were prepared and evaluated for the wettability pr...

  5. Biopolymer-based nanosystem for ferric ion removal from water

    Bodnár Magdolna; Hajdu István (1981-) (vegyész); Rőthi Eszter; Harmati Nóra; Csikós Zsuzsanna; Hartmann, John F.; Balogh Csaba; Kelemen Béla; Tamás János (1959-) (környezetgazdálkodási agrármérnök); Borbély János (1950-) (vegyész)

    2013-01-01

    The removal of ferric ions from aqueous solutions by a nanoparticle-enhanced ultrafiltration techniquewas investigated. Biodegradable poly-gamma-glutamic acid (c-PGA), a linear biopolymer, and itscross-linked nanoparticles were used to complex the metal ions by forming nanosized spherical particleswith more or less deformability. These polymer?metal ion particles were then removed by membraneseparation. Two ultrafiltration techniques were studied with the aim of developing a nanoparticleenhan...

  6. Quantum effective potential, electron transport and conformons in biopolymers

    In the Kirchhoff model of a biopolymer, conformation dynamics can be described in terms of solitary waves, for certain special cross-section asymmetries. Applying this to the problem of electron transport, we show that the quantum effective potential arising due to the bends and twists of the polymer enables us to formalize and quantify the concept of a conformon that has been hypothesized in biology. Its connection to the soliton solution of the cubic nonlinear Schroedinger equation emerges in a natural fashion

  7. Structural evolution of superconductor nanowires in biopolymer gels

    A simple synthesis of superconductor nanowires is carried out by rational design of the synthetic protocol. This technique is based on the selection of a component (in this case BaCO3) that remains invariant throughout the synthesis. A biopolymer matrix ensures antisintering of BaCO3 nanoparticles, leading to single-crystal outgrowth of the superconductor in this most technologically useful of morphologies. (Abstract Copyright [2008], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  8. Natural biopolymers: novel templates for the synthesis of nanostructures

    Padalkar, Sonal; Capadona, Jephrey R.; Rowan, Suart J.; Weder, Christoph; Won, Yu-Ho; Stanciu, Lia A.; Moon, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Biological systems such as proteins, viruses, and DNA have been most often reported to be used as templates for the synthesis of functional nanomaterials, but the properties of widely available biopolymers, such as cellulose, have been much less exploited for this purpose. Here, we report for the first time that cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) have the capacity to assist in the synthesis of metallic nanoparticle chains. A cationic surfactant, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), was critical t...

  9. The surface properties of biopolymer-coated fruit: A review

    Diana Cristina Moncayo Martinez; Gustavo Buitrago Hurtado; Néstor Ariel Algecira Enciso

    2012-01-01

    Environmental conservation concerns have led to research and development regarding biodegradable materials from biopolymers, leading to new formulations for edible films and coatings for preserving the quality of fresh fruit and vegetables. Determining fruit skin surface properties for a given coating solution has led to predicting coating efficiency. Wetting was studied by considering spreading, adhesion and cohesion and measuring the contact angle, thus optimising the coating formulation in...

  10. Anti-synchronization Between Coupled Networks with Two Active Forms

    This paper studies anti-synchronization and its control between two coupled networks with nonlinear signal's connection and the inter-network actions. If anti-synchronization does not exist between two such networks, adaptive controllers are designed to anti-synchronize them. Different node dynamics and nonidentical topological structures are considered and useful criteria for anti-synchronization between two networks are given. Numerical examples are presented to show the efficiency of our derived results. (general)

  11. Characterization of functional biopolymers under various external stimuli

    Maleki, Atoosa

    2008-07-01

    Polymers are large molecules composed of repeating structural units connected by covalent chemical bonds. Biopolymers are a class of polymers produced by living organisms, which exhibit both biocompatible and biodegradable properties. The behavior of a biopolymer in solution is strongly dependent on the chemical and physical structure of the polymer chain, as well as external environmental conditions. To improve biopolymers in the direction of higher performance and better functionality, understanding of their physicochemical behavior and their response to external stimuli are of great importance. Rheology, rheo-small angle light scattering, dynamic light scattering, small angle neutron scattering, and asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation were utilized in this thesis to investigate the properties of hydroxyethyl cellulose and its hydrophobically modified analogue, as well as dextran, hyaluronan, and mucin under different conditions such as temperature, solvent, mechanical stress and strain, and radiation. Different novel hydrogels were prepared by using various chemical cross-linking agents. Specific features of these macromolecules provide them to be used as 'functional' materials, e.g., sensors, actuators, personal care products, enhanced oil recovery, and controlled drug delivery systems (author)

  12. Disordered, stretched, and semiflexible biopolymers in two dimensions.

    Zhou, Zicong; Joós, Béla

    2009-12-01

    We study the effects of intrinsic sequence-dependent curvature for a two-dimensional semiflexible biopolymer with short-range correlation in intrinsic curvatures. We show exactly that when not subjected to any external force, such a system is equivalent to a system with a well-defined intrinsic curvature and a proper renormalized persistence length. We find the exact expression for the distribution function of the equivalent system. However, we show that such an equivalent system does not always exist for the polymer subjected to an external force. We find that under an external force, the effect of sequence disorder depends upon the averaging order, the degree of disorder, and the experimental conditions, such as the boundary conditions. Furthermore, a short to moderate length biopolymer may be much softer or has a smaller apparent persistent length than what would be expected from the "equivalent system." Moreover, under a strong stretching force and for a long biopolymer, the sequence disorder is immaterial for elasticity. Finally, the effect of sequence disorder may depend upon the quantity considered. PMID:20365194

  13. Electrical, structural, thermal and electrochemical properties of corn starch-based biopolymer electrolytes.

    Liew, Chiam-Wen; Ramesh, S

    2015-06-25

    Biopolymer electrolytes containing corn starch, lithium hexafluorophosphate (LiPF6) and ionic liquid, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate (BmImPF6) are prepared by solution casting technique. Temperature dependence-ionic conductivity studies reveal Vogel-Tamman-Fulcher (VTF) relationship which is associated with free volume theory. Ionic liquid-based biopolymer electrolytes show lower glass transition temperature (Tg) than ionic liquid-free biopolymer electrolyte. X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies demonstrate higher amorphous region of ionic liquid-added biopolymer electrolytes. In addition, the potential stability window of the biopolymer electrolyte becomes wider and stable up to 2.9V. Conclusively, the fabricated electric double layer capacitor (EDLC) shows improved electrochemical performance upon addition of ionic liquid into the biopolymer electrolyte. The specific capacitance of EDLC based on ionic liquid-added polymer electrolyte is relatively higher than that of ionic liquid-free polymer electrolyte as depicted in cyclic voltammogram. PMID:25839815

  14. Both novelty and expertise increase action observation network activity

    Sook-Lei eLiew

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Our experiences with others affect how we perceive their actions. In particular, activity in bilateral premotor and parietal cortices during action observation, collectively known as the action observation network (AON, is modulated by one’s expertise with the observed actions or individuals. However, conflicting reports suggest that AON activity is greatest both for familiar and unfamiliar actions. The current study examines the effects of different types and amounts of experience (e.g., visual, interpersonal, personal on AON activation. fMRI was used to scan 16 healthy participants without prior experience with individuals with amputations (novices, 11 experienced occupational therapists (OTs who had varying amounts of experience with individuals with amputations, and one individual born with below-elbow residual limbs (participant CJ, as they viewed video clips of goal-matched actions performed by an individual with residual limbs and by an individual with hands. Participants were given increased visual exposure to actions performed by both effectors midway through the scanning procedure. Novices demonstrated a large AON response to the initial viewing of an individual with residual limbs compared to one with hands, but this signal was attenuated after they received visual exposure to both effectors. In contrast, OTs, who had moderate familiarity with residual limbs, demonstrated a lower AON response upon initial viewing—similar to novices after they received visual exposure. At the other extreme, CJ, who has extreme familiarity with residual limbs both visually and motorically, shows a largely increased left-lateralized AON response, exceeding that of novices and experienced OTs, when viewing the residual limb compared to hand actions. These results suggest that a nuanced model of AON engagement is needed to explain how cases of both extreme experience (CJ and extreme novelty (novices can result in the greatest AON activity.

  15. The Effects of Biopolymer Encapsulation on Total Lipids and Cholesterol in Egg Yolk during in Vitro Human Digestion

    Si-Kyung Lee

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of biopolymer encapsulation on the digestion of total lipids and cholesterol in egg yolk using an in vitro human digestion model. Egg yolks were encapsulated with 1% cellulose, pectin, or chitosan. The samples were then passed through an in vitro human digestion model that simulated the composition of mouth saliva, stomach acid, and the intestinal juice of the small intestine by using a dialysis tubing system. The change in digestion of total lipids was monitored by confocal fluorescence microscopy. The digestion rate of total lipids and cholesterol in all egg yolk samples dramatically increased after in vitro human digestion. The digestion rate of total lipids and cholesterol in egg yolks encapsulated with chitosan or pectin was reduced compared to the digestion rate of total lipids and cholesterol in other egg yolk samples. Egg yolks encapsulated with pectin or chitosan had lower free fatty acid content, and lipid oxidation values than samples without biopolymer encapsulation. Moreover, the lipase activity decreased, after in vitro digestion, in egg yolks encapsulated with biopolymers. These results improve our understanding of the effects of digestion on total lipids and cholesterol in egg yolk within the gastrointestinal tract.

  16. Neutron scattering studies of dynamic crossover phenomena in a coupled system of biopolymer and its hydration water

    We have observed a Fragile-to-Strong Dynamic Crossover (FSC) phenomenon of the α-relaxation time and self-diffusion constant in hydration water of three biopolymers: lysozyme, B-DNA and RNA. The mean squared displacement (MSD) of hydrogen atoms is measured by Elastic Neutron Scattering (ENS) experiments. The α-relaxation time is measured by Quasi-Elastic Neutron Scattering (QENS) experiments and the self-diffusion constant by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) experiments. We discuss the active role of the FSC of the hydration water in initiating the dynamic crossover phenomenon (so-called glass transition) in the biopolymer. The latter transition controls the flexibility of the biopolymer and sets the low temperature limit of its biofunctionality. Finally, we show an MD simulation of a realistic hydrated powder model of lysozyme and demonstrate the agreement of the MD simulation with the experimental data on the FSC phenomenon in the plot of logarithm of the α-relaxation time vs. 1/T.

  17. Determination of Activation Functions in A Feedforward Neural Network by using Genetic Algorithm

    Oğuz ÜSTÜN

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, activation functions of all layers of the multilayered feedforward neural network have been determined by using genetic algorithm. The main criteria that show the efficiency of the neural network is to approximate to the desired output with the same number nodes and connection weights. One of the important parameter to determine this performance is to choose a proper activation function. In the classical neural network designing, a network is designed by choosing one of the generally known activation function. In the presented study, a table has been generated for the activation functions. The ideal activation function for each node has been chosen from this table by using the genetic algorithm. Two dimensional regression problem clusters has been used to compare the performance of the classical static neural network and the genetic algorithm based neural network. Test results reveal that the proposed method has a high level approximation capacity.

  18. Active Low Intrusion Hybrid Monitor for Wireless Sensor Networks

    Navia, Marlon; Campelo, Jose C.; Bonastre, Alberto; Ors, Rafael; Capella, Juan V.; Serrano, Juan J.

    2015-01-01

    Several systems have been proposed to monitor wireless sensor networks (WSN). These systems may be active (causing a high degree of intrusion) or passive (low observability inside the nodes). This paper presents the implementation of an active hybrid (hardware and software) monitor with low intrusion. It is based on the addition to the sensor node of a monitor node (hardware part) which, through a standard interface, is able to receive the monitoring information sent by a piece of software executed in the sensor node. The intrusion on time, code, and energy caused in the sensor nodes by the monitor is evaluated as a function of data size and the interface used. Then different interfaces, commonly available in sensor nodes, are evaluated: serial transmission (USART), serial peripheral interface (SPI), and parallel. The proposed hybrid monitor provides highly detailed information, barely disturbed by the measurement tool (interference), about the behavior of the WSN that may be used to evaluate many properties such as performance, dependability, security, etc. Monitor nodes are self-powered and may be removed after the monitoring campaign to be reused in other campaigns and/or WSNs. No other hardware-independent monitoring platforms with such low interference have been found in the literature. PMID:26393604

  19. Active Low Intrusion Hybrid Monitor for Wireless Sensor Networks.

    Navia, Marlon; Campelo, Jose C; Bonastre, Alberto; Ors, Rafael; Capella, Juan V; Serrano, Juan J

    2015-01-01

    Several systems have been proposed to monitor wireless sensor networks (WSN). These systems may be active (causing a high degree of intrusion) or passive (low observability inside the nodes). This paper presents the implementation of an active hybrid (hardware and software) monitor with low intrusion. It is based on the addition to the sensor node of a monitor node (hardware part) which, through a standard interface, is able to receive the monitoring information sent by a piece of software executed in the sensor node. The intrusion on time, code, and energy caused in the sensor nodes by the monitor is evaluated as a function of data size and the interface used. Then different interfaces, commonly available in sensor nodes, are evaluated: serial transmission (USART), serial peripheral interface (SPI), and parallel. The proposed hybrid monitor provides highly detailed information, barely disturbed by the measurement tool (interference), about the behavior of the WSN that may be used to evaluate many properties such as performance, dependability, security, etc. Monitor nodes are self-powered and may be removed after the monitoring campaign to be reused in other campaigns and/or WSNs. No other hardware-independent monitoring platforms with such low interference have been found in the literature. PMID:26393604

  20. A quantitative analysis of contractility in active cytoskeletal protein networks.

    Bendix, Poul M; Koenderink, Gijsje H; Cuvelier, Damien; Dogic, Zvonimir; Koeleman, Bernard N; Brieher, William M; Field, Christine M; Mahadevan, L; Weitz, David A

    2008-04-15

    Cells actively produce contractile forces for a variety of processes including cytokinesis and motility. Contractility is known to rely on myosin II motors which convert chemical energy from ATP hydrolysis into forces on actin filaments. However, the basic physical principles of cell contractility remain poorly understood. We reconstitute contractility in a simplified model system of purified F-actin, muscle myosin II motors, and alpha-actinin cross-linkers. We show that contractility occurs above a threshold motor concentration and within a window of cross-linker concentrations. We also quantify the pore size of the bundled networks and find contractility to occur at a critical distance between the bundles. We propose a simple mechanism of contraction based on myosin filaments pulling neighboring bundles together into an aggregated structure. Observations of this reconstituted system in both bulk and low-dimensional geometries show that the contracting gels pull on and deform their surface with a contractile force of approximately 1 microN, or approximately 100 pN per F-actin bundle. Cytoplasmic extracts contracting in identical environments show a similar behavior and dependence on myosin as the reconstituted system. Our results suggest that cellular contractility can be sensitively regulated by tuning the (local) activity of molecular motors and the cross-linker density and binding affinity. PMID:18192374

  1. Active Low Intrusion Hybrid Monitor for Wireless Sensor Networks

    Marlon Navia

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Several systems have been proposed to monitor wireless sensor networks (WSN. These systems may be active (causing a high degree of intrusion or passive (low observability inside the nodes. This paper presents the implementation of an active hybrid (hardware and software monitor with low intrusion. It is based on the addition to the sensor node of a monitor node (hardware part which, through a standard interface, is able to receive the monitoring information sent by a piece of software executed in the sensor node. The intrusion on time, code, and energy caused in the sensor nodes by the monitor is evaluated as a function of data size and the interface used. Then different interfaces, commonly available in sensor nodes, are evaluated: serial transmission (USART, serial peripheral interface (SPI, and parallel. The proposed hybrid monitor provides highly detailed information, barely disturbed by the measurement tool (interference, about the behavior of the WSN that may be used to evaluate many properties such as performance, dependability, security, etc. Monitor nodes are self-powered and may be removed after the monitoring campaign to be reused in other campaigns and/or WSNs. No other hardware-independent monitoring platforms with such low interference have been found in the literature.

  2. Measurement of Cadmium Ion in the Presence of Metal-Binding Biopolymers in Aqueous Sample

    Jian Pu; Kensuke Fukushi

    2013-01-01

    In aqueous environment, water-soluble polymers are effectively used to separate free metal ions from metal-polymer complexes. The feasibilities of four different analytical techniques, cadmium ion-selective electrode, dialysis sack, chelate disk cartridge, and ultrafiltration, in distinguishing biopolymer-bound and nonbound cadmium in aqueous samples were investigated. And two different biopolymers were used, including bovine serum albumin (BSA) and biopolymer solution extracted from cultivat...

  3. Hydrogels from Biopolymer Hybrid for Biomedical, Food, and Functional Food Applications

    Robert C. Spiro; Fang Yan; Lin Shu Liu; Joseph Kost

    2012-01-01

    Hybrid hydrogels from biopolymers have been applied for various indications across a wide range of biomedical, pharmaceutical, and functional food industries. In particular, hybrid hydrogels synthesized from two biopolymers have attracted increasing attention. The inclusion of a second biopolymer strengthens the stability of resultant hydrogels and enriches its functionalities by bringing in new functional groups or optimizing the micro-environmental conditions for certain biological and bioc...

  4. A Novel Approach for Entrapment of Biopolymers in Silica Matrix by Sol-gel Technique

    Yu.Shchipunov

    2007-01-01

    1 Results The entrapment of biopolymers into silica by the sol-gel technique meets with incompatibility of inorganic and bioorganic components. The aim was to develop a compatible procedure biomimicking the biomineralization processes in the living nature. A suggested solution in Ref.[1-2] for the biopolymer entrapment into silica matrix is based on a novel silica precursor. The developed approach is distinguished from the common technique for fabrication of hybrid biopolymer-silica nanocomposite materi...

  5. Electrophoretically prepared hybrid materials for biopolymer hydrogel and layered ceramic nanoparticles

    Gwak, Gyeong-Hyeon; Choi, Ae-Jin; Bae, Yeoung-Seuk; Choi, Hyun-Jin; Oh, Jae-Min

    2016-01-01

    Background In order to obtain biomaterials with controllable physicochemical properties, hybrid biomaterials composed of biocompatible biopolymers and ceramic nanoparticles have attracted interests. In this study, we prepared biopolymer/ceramic hybrids consisting of various natural biopolymers and layered double hydroxide (LDH) ceramic nanoparticles via an electrophoretic method. We studied the structures and controlled-release properties of these materials. Results and discussion X-ray diffr...

  6. Analyzing the biopolymer folding rates and pathways using kinetic cluster method

    Zhang, Wenbing; Chen, Shi-Jie

    2003-01-01

    A kinetic cluster method enables us to analyze biopolymer folding kinetics with discrete rate-limiting steps by classifying biopolymer conformations into pre-equilibrated clusters. The overall folding kinetics is determined by the intercluster transitions. Due to the complex energy landscapes of biopolymers, the intercluster transitions have multiple pathways and can have kinetic intermediates (local free-energy minima) distributed on the intercluster pathways. We focus on the RNA secondary s...

  7. Model Integrating Fuzzy Argument with Neural Network Enhancing the Performance of Active Queue Management

    Nguyen Kim Quoc

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The bottleneck control by active queue management mechanisms at network nodes is essential. In recent years, some researchers have used fuzzy argument to improve the active queue management mechanisms to enhance the network performance. However, the projects using the fuzzy controller depend heavily on professionals and their parameters cannot be updated according to changes in the network, so the effectiveness of this mechanism is not high. Therefore, we propose a model combining the fuzzy controller with neural network (FNN to overcome the limitations above. Results of the training of the neural networks will find the optimal parameters for the adaptive fuzzy controller well to changes of the network. This improves the operational efficiency of the active queue management mechanisms at network nodes.

  8. Networking in Sport Management: Ideas and Activities to Enhance Student Engagement and Career Development

    Alan S. Kornspan; Michael A. Duve

    2013-01-01

    The primary purpose of this paper is to present information regarding the development of networking skills to enhance the career development of sport management students. Specifically, literature is reviewed which supports the importance of networking in the attainment of employment and career advancement in the sport industry. This is followed by an overview of emerging networking activities that allow opportunities for sport management students to expand their network. Sport industry career...

  9. A Heuristic Reputation Based System to Detect Spam activities in a Social Networking Platform, HRSSSNP

    Thakur, Manoj Rameshchandra; Sanyal, Sugata

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of the social networking platform has drastically affected the way individuals interact. Even though most of the effects have been positive, there exist some serious threats associated with the interactions on a social networking website. A considerable proportion of the crimes that occur are initiated through a social networking platform [5]. Almost 33% of the crimes on the internet are initiated through a social networking website [5]. Moreover activities like spam messages...

  10. Regulatory network of inflammation downstream of proteinase-activated receptors

    Hurst Robert E

    2007-03-01

    nfkbia seems to counter-balance the inflammatory response to PAR activation by limiting prolonged activation of p38 MAPK and increased cytokine production. In contrast, transcripts such as arf6 and dcnt1 that are involved in the mechanism of PAR re-sensitization would tend to perpetuate the inflammatory reaction in response to common pro-inflammatory stimuli. Conclusion The combination of cDNA array results and genomic networks reveals an overriding participation of PAR1 in bladder inflammation, provides a working model for the involvement of downstream signaling, and evokes testable hypotheses regarding the transcriptome downstream of PAR1 activation. It remains to be determined whether or not mechanisms targeting PAR1 gene silencing or PAR1 blockade will ameliorate the clinical manifestation of cystitis.

  11. Improvements in or relating to systems for measuring radioactivity of labelled biopolymers

    A system for measuring radioactivity of labelled biopolymers, comprises a set of containers for containing aqueous solutions of biological samples containing biopolymers; an electric drive for setting the set of containers in stepwise motion: means for acid precipitation of biopolymers arranged to provide feeding of preset volumes of a coprecipitator and a suspension of diatomite in an acid solution to the containers: means for removal of suspensions, filtering, suspending the precipitate, dissolving the biopolymers and consecutively feeding the mixture and a scintillator to a detection chamber, and a measuring cell arranged in the detection chamber. The sequence of operations is controlled automatically. (author)

  12. Fabrication and characterization of an inkjet-printed DNA biopolymer-based UV photodetector

    Lombardi, J. P.; Aga, Roberto S.; Heckman, Emily M.; Bartsch, Carrie M.

    2015-10-01

    An ultraviolet (UV) photodetector utilizing an inkjet printable , UV photoconducting biopolymer was fabricated and the performance of the photodetector was characterized for varying thickness layers of the biopolymer. The biopolymer was formed of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), the Clevios P formulation of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)- poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS), and hexadecyltrimethyl-ammonium chloride (CTMA); this was then combined with phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl (PCBM) to form the printable, UV photoconducting biopolymer. Using a 260-nm source, the highest measured responsivity of the photodetectors is 1.2 mA/W at 20 V bias.

  13. Dynamical state of the network determines the efficacy of single neuron properties in shaping the network activity

    Ajith Sahasranamam; Ioannis Vlachos; Ad Aertsen; Arvind Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Spike patterns are among the most common electrophysiological descriptors of neuron types. Surprisingly, it is not clear how the diversity in firing patterns of the neurons in a network affects its activity dynamics. Here, we introduce the state-dependent stochastic bursting neuron model allowing for a change in its firing patterns independent of changes in its input-output firing rate relationship. Using this model, we show that the effect of single neuron spiking on the network dynamics is ...

  14. Networking in Sport Management: Ideas and Activities to Enhance Student Engagement and Career Development

    Alan S. Kornspan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary purpose of this paper is to present information regarding the development of networking skills to enhance the career development of sport management students. Specifically, literature is reviewed which supports the importance of networking in the attainment of employment and career advancement in the sport industry. This is followed by an overview of emerging networking activities that allow opportunities for sport management students to expand their network. Sport industry career fairs and career conferences that students can attend are discussed. Additionally, sport industry professional associations that students can become involved with are presented. This is then followed with information related to the development of sport management clubs and various events that can be promoted to enhance the networking process. Specifically, activities provided by university faculty to enhance the educational experience of sport management students are detailed. Finally, a sample schedule of semester activities focused on student engagement and networking activities is provided.

  15. The IAEA Data Centre Network. Data Evaluation Activities

    The Atomic and Molecular (A+M) Data Unit of the International Atomic Energy Agency works to establish databases and a knowledge base of atomic, molecular and plasma-surface interaction (PSI) processes that are important for fusion energy research. Activities for database development include IAEA Coordinated Research Projects (CRP), Technical Meetings, Consultant Meetings and a number of collaborations. New data produced through these activities is published in journals and in IAEA reports and is included in the numerical database ALADDIN that is freely accessible to all fusion researchers. Since 1978 the A+M Data Unit has supported the International Atomic and Molecular Data Centre Network (DCN) where a number of institutions coordinate the production, exchange, compilation, dissemination and evaluation of fusion relevant data. Until recently, data centre activities were focused on producing, compiling and disseminating new data sets in response to demands for non-existing data from the fusion community. With the rapid advances in computing capabilities and in on-line search functions theoretical data sets are being generated and accessed with more ease. As a result, there have been increasing requests from the user community for evaluation of the quality of available data sets, and at their most recent meeting the DCN acknowledged the great need to increase data evaluation activities. The DCN meeting and a subsequent smaller Consultancy meeting (at NIFS in Feb 2012) identified important issues that must be addressed to support data evaluation and, in the longer run, the development of a comprehensive internationally recommended standard library for A+M (+PSI) data for fusion. One key issue is the assessment of uncertainty of theoretical data when, as is very often the case, direct comparison with experimental data is not possible. (Theoretical cross-section data may be finely resolved with respect to incoming and outgoing states whereas measured cross-sections are

  16. Finding influential spreaders from human activity beyond network location

    Min, Byungjoon; Makse, Hernán A

    2015-01-01

    Most centralities proposed for identifying influential spreaders on social networks to either spread a message or to stop an epidemic require the full topological information of the network on which spreading occurs. In practice, however, collecting all connections between agents in social networks can be hardly achieved. As a result, such metrics could be difficult to apply to real social networks. Consequently, a new approach for identifying influential people without the explicit network information is demanded in order to provide an efficient immunization or spreading strategy, in a practical sense. In this study, we seek a possible way for finding influential spreaders by using the social mechanisms of how social connections are formed in real networks. We find that a reliable immunization scheme can be achieved by asking people how they interact with each other. From these surveys we find that the probabilistic tendency to connect to a hub has the strongest predictive power for influential spreaders amo...

  17. Tourist activated networks: Implications for dynamic bundling and en-route recommendations

    Zach, Florian; Gretzel, Ulrike

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses tourist-activated networks as a concept to inform technological applications supporting dynamic bundling and en route recommendations. Empirical data were collected from travelers who visited a regional destination in the US and then analyzed with respect to its network...... structure. The results indicate that the tourist-activated network for the destination is rather sparse and that there are clearly differences in core and peripheral nodes. The findings illustrate the structure of a tourist-activated network and provide implications for technology design and tourism...

  18. Flocculation performance of a cationic biopolymer derived from a cellulosic source in mild aqueous solution.

    Liimatainen, Henrikki; Sirviö, Juho; Sundman, Ola; Visanko, Miikka; Hormi, Osmo; Niinimäki, Jouko

    2011-10-01

    The flocculation behavior of cationic, quaternary ammonium groups containing cellulosic biopolymers, CDACs, synthesized by cationizing dialdehyde cellulose in mild aqueous solution was studied in a kaolin suspension. In particular, the role of CDAC dosage and solution pH, NaCl concentration, and temperature were clarified. In addition, the initial apparent charge densities (CDs), particle sizes, ζ-potential, and stability of CDs were determined. CDACs possessed a high flocculation activity in neutral and acidic solutions, but a significant decrease was observed in alkaline solutions (pH >9). This was also seen as a decline in the apparent CD and particle size of the CDACs in alkaline conditions. The measurements also indicated that the apparent CD decreased to a constant level of 3 mmol/g in aqueous solutions. However, no notable decrease in flocculation performance was obtained after several days of storage. Moreover, the variation of NaCl concentration and temperature did not affect the flocculation activity. PMID:21862324

  19. Characterization of carboxy methylcellulose doped with DTAB as new types of biopolymer electrolytes

    A S Samsudin; M I N Isa

    2012-12-01

    The investigation of new solid biopolymer electrolyte (BEs) system based on carboxy methylcellulose (CMC) is creating opportunity for new types of electrochemical devices, which may themselves, in turn, revolutionize many industrial areas. Biodegradable carboxy methylcellulose (CMC) doped with dodecyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (DTAB) as BEs were prepared via solution-casting method. Upon addition of 35 wt. % of DTAB, highest ionic conductivity of 7.72 × 10-4 Scm-1 was achieved due to its higher amorphous region compared to other samples prepared. This result had been further proven in FTIR study. Temperature dependence relationship obeys the Arrhenius rule from which the activation energy, a, for ionic conductivity and activation energy for relaxation process, , were evaluated. The divergent values between a for ionic conductivity and relaxation process shows that the ions hop by jumping over a potential barrier.

  20. Large area resonant feedback random lasers based on dye-doped biopolymer films.

    Consoli, Antonio; Mariano da Silva, Danilo; Wetter, Niklaus Ursus; López, Cefe

    2015-11-16

    We report resonant feedback random lasing from dye-doped biopolymer films, consisting of a deoxyribonucleic acid-cetyltrimethylammonium (DNA-CTMA) complex doped with DCM dye. In the proposed devices, the optical feedback for random lasing is given by scattering centers randomly positioned along the edges of the active area. Scattering elements are either titanium dioxide nanoparticles or random defects at the interface between active polymer and air. Different emission spectra are observed, depending on the geometry of the excited area. A single random resonator with dimensions of 2.6 mm x 0.65 mm is fabricated and random emission with resonant feedback is obtained by uniformly pumping the full device. PMID:26698477

  1. Cycle-by-cycle assembly of respiratory network activity is dynamic and stochastic

    Carroll, Michael S.; Ramirez, Jan-Marino

    2012-01-01

    Rhythmically active networks are typically composed of neurons that can be classified as silent, tonic spiking, or rhythmic bursting based on their intrinsic activity patterns. Within these networks, neurons are thought to discharge in distinct phase relationships with their overall network output, and it has been hypothesized that bursting pacemaker neurons may lead and potentially trigger cycle onsets. We used multielectrode recording from 72 experiments to test these ideas in rhythmically ...

  2. Data on the distribution of physical activities in the Shenzhen greenway network with volunteered geographic information.

    Liu, Kun; Siu, Kin Wai Michael; Gong, Yong Xi; Gao, Yuan; Lu, Dan

    2016-09-01

    This data presents the distribution of physical activities in the Shenzhen greenway network (GN) in January, April and July, 2014. The volunteered geographic on physical activity is overlaid with the greenways data, to describe the distribution of physical activities in the greenways. The data are summarized to show the distribution characteristics geographically from different aspects in Shenzhen, China. Data were used to explore the effect of the Shenzhen GN on supporting physical activities, "Where do networks really work? The effects of Shenzhen greenway network on supporting physical activities" (Liu et al., 2016) [2]. PMID:27257616

  3. Introduction of soft X-ray spectromicroscopy as an advanced technique for plant biopolymers research.

    Chithra Karunakaran

    Full Text Available Soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy coupled with nano-scale microscopy has been widely used in material science, environmental science, and physical sciences. In this work, the advantages of soft X-ray absorption spectromicroscopy for plant biopolymer research were demonstrated by determining the chemical sensitivity of the technique to identify common plant biopolymers and to map the distributions of biopolymers in plant samples. The chemical sensitivity of soft X-ray spectroscopy to study biopolymers was determined by recording the spectra of common plant biopolymers using soft X-ray and Fourier Transform mid Infrared (FT-IR spectroscopy techniques. The soft X-ray spectra of lignin, cellulose, and polygalacturonic acid have distinct spectral features. However, there were no distinct differences between cellulose and hemicellulose spectra. Mid infrared spectra of all biopolymers were unique and there were differences between the spectra of water soluble and insoluble xylans. The advantage of nano-scale spatial resolution exploited using soft X-ray spectromicroscopy for plant biopolymer research was demonstrated by mapping plant cell wall biopolymers in a lentil stem section and compared with the FT-IR spectromicroscopy data from the same sample. The soft X-ray spectromicroscopy enables mapping of biopolymers at the sub-cellular (~30 nm resolution whereas, the limited spatial resolution in the micron scale range in the FT-IR spectromicroscopy made it difficult to identify the localized distribution of biopolymers. The advantages and limitations of soft X-ray and FT-IR spectromicroscopy techniques for biopolymer research are also discussed.

  4. Citation Networks as Indicators of Journalism Research Activity.

    Tankard, James W., Jr.; And Others

    One method of identifying important areas and books within a field is through citation counts--noting the number of times a work is referred to in the literature. These counts can be supplemented with citation networks, in which links between articles are formed by such methods as direct citation and cocitation. Citation counts and networks were…

  5. Adaptive Relay Activation in the Network Coding Protocols

    Pahlevani, Peyman; Roetter, Daniel Enrique Lucani; Fitzek, Frank

    2015-01-01

    State-of-the-art Network coding based routing protocols exploit the link quality information to compute the transmission rate in the intermediate nodes. However, the link quality discovery protocols are usually inaccurate, and introduce overhead in wireless mesh networks. In this paper, we present...

  6. An Activation Force-based Affinity Measure for Analyzing Complex Networks

    Jun Guo; Hanliang Guo; Zhanyi Wang

    2011-01-01

    Affinity measure is a key factor that determines the quality of the analysis of a complex network. Here, we introduce a type of statistics, activation forces, to weight the links of a complex network and thereby develop a desired affinity measure. We show that the approach is superior in facilitating the analysis through experiments on a large-scale word network and a protein-protein interaction (PPI) network consisting of ∼5,000 human proteins. The experiment on the word network verifies tha...

  7. Enhancement of visual responsiveness by spontaneous local network activity in vivo.

    Haider, Bilal; Duque, Alvaro; Hasenstaub, Andrea R; Yu, Yuguo; McCormick, David A

    2007-06-01

    Spontaneous activity within local circuits affects the integrative properties of neurons and networks. We have previously shown that neocortical network activity exhibits a balance between excitatory and inhibitory synaptic potentials, and such activity has significant effects on synaptic transmission, action potential generation, and spike timing. However, whether such activity facilitates or reduces sensory responses has yet to be clearly determined. We examined this hypothesis in the primary visual cortex in vivo during slow oscillations in ketamine-xylazine anesthetized cats. We measured network activity (Up states) with extracellular recording, while simultaneously recording postsynaptic potentials (PSPs) and action potentials in nearby cells. Stimulating the receptive field revealed that spiking responses of both simple and complex cells were significantly enhanced (>2-fold) during network activity, as were spiking responses to intracellular injection of varying amplitude artificial conductance stimuli. Visually evoked PSPs were not significantly different in amplitude during network activity or quiescence; instead, spontaneous depolarization caused by network activity brought these evoked PSPs closer to firing threshold. Further examination revealed that visual responsiveness was gradually enhanced by progressive membrane potential depolarization. These spontaneous depolarizations enhanced responsiveness to stimuli of varying contrasts, resulting in an upward (multiplicative) scaling of the contrast response function. Our results suggest that small increases in ongoing balanced network activity that result in depolarization may provide a rapid and generalized mechanism to control the responsiveness (gain) of cortical neurons, such as occurs during shifts in spatial attention. PMID:17409168

  8. Biopolymer nanostructures induced by plasma irradiation and metal sputtering

    Slepička, P.; Juřík, P.; Malinský, Petr; Macková, Anna; Kasálková-Slepičková, N.; Švorčík, V.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 332, 7-10 (2014), s. 7-10. ISSN 0168-583X. [21st International Conference on Ion Beam Analysis (IBA). Seattle, 23.06.2013-28.06.2013] R&D Projects: GA ČR ga13-06609S; GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/10/1106 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : Biopolymer * plasma * surface morphology * RBS * Ripple pattern Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.124, year: 2014

  9. Enhanced brightness from all solution processable biopolymer LED

    Pradeep, C.; Namboothiry, M. A. G.; Vallabhan, C. P. G.; Radhakrishnan, P.; Nampoori, V. P. N.

    2015-08-01

    Biopolymer light emitting diodes were fabricated by using all solution processable polymers incorporating biomaterials such as deoxyribonucleic acid lipid complex as an electron blocking layer. Light emission is from a blend of fluorene based copolymers. The devices with electron blocking layer exhibited higher brightness and luminous efficiency. The increased luminance of the multilayer polymer LED is attributed to the contribution from DNA:CTMA as electron blocking layer and PFN, a derivative of polyfluorene, as electron injection layer. Our results show four fold increase in luminance values when DNA is used as electron blocking layer.

  10. Flexible design of band gaps in the biopolymer photonic crystals

    One-dimensional photonic crystals (PC) are fabricated in dichromate-sensitized biopolymer as volume holograms. The flexibility of the PC band gap (BG) parameters was investigated. The spectral position of a BG can be varied by changing the exposure for two concentrations of sensitizer during the fabrication process. The spectral measurements show that the BG centre shifts towards longer wavelengths with decreasing exposure and concentration of the sensitizer. A tuning of the position of the BG for about 120 nm was obtained.

  11. Fibrillar biopolymers (Human hair) photoluminescence spectra form research

    25 different fibrillar biopolymers samples have been studied and the experimental photoluminescence spectra have been obtained under the similar conditions. The FBP PL spectra form analysis have been carried out. The method to expand the composite FBR spectra form into the individual components based on the similar nature of the glow centers assumption for the different samples is described. The elementary glow lines characteristics are obtained (half-width and maximum positions). All experimental PL spectra are expanded into four elementary lines with the satisfactory accuracy.

  12. Quantized biopolymer translocation through nanopores: departure from simple scaling

    Melchionna, Simone; Fyta, Maria; Kaxiras, Efthimios; Succi, Sauro

    2009-01-01

    We discuss multiscale simulations of long biopolymer translocation through wide nanopores that can accommodate multiple polymer strands. The simulations provide clear evidence of folding quantization, namely, the translocation proceeds through multi-folded configurations characterized by a well-defined integer number of folds. As a consequence, the translocation time acquires a dependence on the average folding number, which results in a deviation from the single-exponent power-law characterizing single-file translocation through narrow pores. The mechanism of folding quantization allows polymers above a threshold length (approximately $1,000$ persistence lengths for double-stranded DNA) to exhibit cooperative behavior and as a result to translocate noticeably faster.

  13. Bio-Polymer Hairpin Loops Sustained by Polarons

    Chakrabarti, B; Zakrzewski, W J

    2012-01-01

    We show that polarons can sustain loop-like configurations in flexible bio-polymers and that the size of the loops depend on both the flexural rigidity of the polymer and the electron-phonon coupling constant. In particular we show that for single stranded DNA (ssDNA) such loops can have as little as 10 base pairs. For polyacetylene the shortest loop must have at least 12 nodes. We also show that these configurations are very stable under thermal fluctuations and can facilitate the formation of hairpin-loops of ssDNA.

  14. Bio-Polymer Hairpin Loops Sustained by Polarons

    Chakrabarti, B.; Piette, B.; Zakrzewski, W.J.Z.

    2012-01-01

    We show that polarons can sustain loop-like configurations in flexible bio-polymers and that the size of the loops depend on both the flexural rigidity of the polymer and the electron-phonon coupling constant. In particular we show that for single stranded DNA (ssDNA) such loops can have as little as 10 base pairs. For polyacetylene the shortest loop must have at least 12 nodes. We also show that these configurations are very stable under thermal fluctuations and can facilitate the formation ...

  15. Development of flax oil-based biopolymer for biocomposites

    Li, X; Panigrahi, S.; Kushwaha, R; Dhakal, Hom

    2009-01-01

    Flax oil is the main goal of growing flaxseed. Flax oil has been used for nutrition, food, paint binder, putty, and wood finish. However, synthetic resin from flax oil has not been developed. In this paper we will develop a biopolymer derived from flax oil and the goal is to use it as a resin to produce a viable, biodegradable composite using natural fiber as reinforcement. First, the functionalization of the triglyceride group of the flax oil fatty acids with polymerizable chemical groups wa...

  16. Social network activation: the role of health discussion partners in recovery from mental illness.

    Perry, Brea L; Pescosolido, Bernice A

    2015-01-01

    In response to health problems, individuals may strategically activate their social network ties to help manage crisis and uncertainty. While it is well-established that social relationships provide a crucial safety net, little is known about who is chosen to help during an episode of illness. Guided by the Network Episode Model, two aspects of consulting others in the face of mental illness are considered. First, we ask who activates ties, and what kinds of ties and networks they attempt to leverage for discussing health matters. Second, we ask about the utility of activating health-focused network ties. Specifically, we examine the consequences of network activation at time of entry into treatment for individuals' quality of life, social satisfaction, ability to perform social roles, and mental health functioning nearly one year later. Using interview data from the longitudinal Indianapolis Network Mental Health Study (INMHS, N = 171), we focus on a sample of new patients with serious mental illness and a group with less severe disorders who are experiencing their first contact with the mental health treatment system. Three findings stand out. First, our results reveal the nature of agency in illness response. Whether under a rational choice or habitus logic, individuals appear to evaluate support needs, identifying the best possible matches among a larger group of potential health discussants. These include members of the core network and those with prior mental health experiences. Second, selective activation processes have implications for recovery. Those who secure adequate network resources report better outcomes than those who injudiciously activate network ties. Individuals who activate weaker relationships and those who are unsupportive of medical care experience poorer functioning, limited success in fulfilling social roles, and lower social satisfaction and quality of life later on. Third, the evidence suggests that social networks matter above and

  17. Evaluation of Techniques to Detect Significant Network Performance Problems using End-to-End Active Network Measurements

    Cottrell, R.Les; Logg, Connie; Chhaparia, Mahesh; /SLAC; Grigoriev, Maxim; /Fermilab; Haro, Felipe; /Chile U., Catolica; Nazir, Fawad; /NUST, Rawalpindi; Sandford, Mark

    2006-01-25

    End-to-End fault and performance problems detection in wide area production networks is becoming increasingly hard as the complexity of the paths, the diversity of the performance, and dependency on the network increase. Several monitoring infrastructures are built to monitor different network metrics and collect monitoring information from thousands of hosts around the globe. Typically there are hundreds to thousands of time-series plots of network metrics which need to be looked at to identify network performance problems or anomalous variations in the traffic. Furthermore, most commercial products rely on a comparison with user configured static thresholds and often require access to SNMP-MIB information, to which a typical end-user does not usually have access. In our paper we propose new techniques to detect network performance problems proactively in close to realtime and we do not rely on static thresholds and SNMP-MIB information. We describe and compare the use of several different algorithms that we have implemented to detect persistent network problems using anomalous variations analysis in real end-to-end Internet performance measurements. We also provide methods and/or guidance for how to set the user settable parameters. The measurements are based on active probes running on 40 production network paths with bottlenecks varying from 0.5Mbits/s to 1000Mbit/s. For well behaved data (no missed measurements and no very large outliers) with small seasonal changes most algorithms identify similar events. We compare the algorithms' robustness with respect to false positives and missed events especially when there are large seasonal effects in the data. Our proposed techniques cover a wide variety of network paths and traffic patterns. We also discuss the applicability of the algorithms in terms of their intuitiveness, their speed of execution as implemented, and areas of applicability. Our encouraging results compare and evaluate the accuracy of our

  18. Micro-Heterogeneity of Cellulosic Fiber Biopolymer Prepared from Corn Hulls

    Z-trim is a zero calorie cellulosic fiber biopolymer produced from corn hulls. The micro-structural heterogeneities of Z-trim biopolymer were investigated by monitoring the thermally driven displacements of well-dispersed micro-spheres via video fluorescence microscopy named multiple-particle track...

  19. Effect of Graphene Nanoplatelets on the Physical and Antimicrobial Properties of Biopolymer-Based Nanocomposites

    Roberto Scaffaro

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this work, biopolymer-based nanocomposites with antimicrobial properties were prepared via melt-compounding. In particular, graphene nanoplatelets (GnPs as fillers and an antibiotic, i.e., ciprofloxacin (CFX, as biocide were incorporated in a commercial biodegradable polymer blend of poly(lactic acid (PLA and a copolyester (BioFlex®. The prepared materials were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and rheological and mechanical measurements. Moreover, the effect of GnPs on the antimicrobial properties and release kinetics of CFX was evaluated. The results indicated that the incorporation of GnPs increased the stiffness of the biopolymeric matrix and allowed for the tuning of the release of CFX without hindering the antimicrobial activity of the obtained materials.

  20. Weak temporal signals can synchronize and accelerate the transition dynamics of biopolymers under tension

    Kim, Won Kyu; Sung, Wokyung

    2012-01-01

    In addition to thermal noise, which is essential to promote conformational transitions in biopolymers, cellular environment is replete with a spectrum of athermal fluctuations that are produced from a plethora of active processes. To understand the effect of athermal noise on biological processes, we studied how a small oscillatory force affects the thermally induced folding and unfolding transition of an RNA hairpin, whose response to constant tension had been investigated extensively in both theory and experiments. Strikingly, our molecular simulations performed under overdamped condition show that even at a high (low) tension that renders the hairpin (un)folding improbable, a weak external oscillatory force at a certain frequency can synchronously enhance the transition dynamics of RNA hairpin and increase the mean transition rate. Furthermore, the RNA dynamics can still discriminate a signal with resonance frequency even when the signal is mixed among other signals with nonresonant frequencies. In fact, o...

  1. Chitosan: a propitious biopolymer for drug delivery.

    Duttagupta, Dibyangana S; Jadhav, Varsha M; Kadam, Vilasrao J

    2015-01-01

    Scientists have always been interested in the use of natural polymers for drug delivery. Chitosan, being a natural cationic polysaccharide has received a great deal of attention in the past few years. It is obtained by deacetylation of chitin and is regarded as the second most ubiquitous polymer subsequent to cellulose on earth. Unlike other natural polymers, the cationic charge possessed by chitosan is accountable for imparting interesting physical and chemical properties. Chitosan has been widely exploited for its mucoadhesive character, permeation enhancing properties and controlled release of drugs. Moreover it's non-toxic, biocompatible and biodegradable properties make it a good candidate for novel drug delivery system. This review provides an insight on various chitosan based formulations for drug delivery. Some of the current applications of chitosan in areas like ophthalmic, nasal, buccal, sublingual, gastro-retentive, pulmonary, transdermal, colon-specific and vaginal drug delivery have been discussed. In addition, active targeting of drugs to tumor cells using chitosan has been described. Lastly a brief section covering the safety aspects of chitosan has also been reviewed. PMID:25761010

  2. Saving Energy by Delegating Network Activity to Home Gateways

    Bolla, Raffaele; Chiappero, Marco; Khan, Rafiullah; Repetto, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    Today, an ever-increasing number of devices has networking capability. The main implication of this fact is that such devices are often left fully powered yet idle just to maintain their network presence, hence leading to large energy waste. This ultimately results in higher electricity cost for consumers. This paper tackles an effective mechanism to reduce energy waste of consumer electronics, by boosting the usage of lowpower states available in most devices. The main concept is to delegate...

  3. Taurine activates GABAergic networks in the neocortex of immature mice

    Bogdan Aurel Sava; Rongqing eChen; Haiyan eSun; Luhmann, Heiko J.; Werner eKilb

    2014-01-01

    Although it has been suggested that taurine is the main endogenous neurotransmitter acting on glycine receptors, the implications of glycine receptor-mediated taurine actions on immature neocortical networks have not been addressed yet. To investigate the influence of taurine on the excitability of neuronal networks in the immature neocortex, we performed whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from visually identified pyramidal neurons and interneurons in coronal slices from C57Bl/6 and GAD67-GFP ...

  4. Taurine activates GABAergic networks in the neocortex of immature mice

    Sava, Bogdan A.; Chen, Rongqing; Sun, Haiyan; Luhmann, Heiko J.; Kilb, Werner

    2014-01-01

    Although it has been suggested that taurine is the main endogenous neurotransmitter acting on glycine receptors, the implications of glycine receptor-mediated taurine actions on immature neocortical networks have not been addressed yet. To investigate the influence of taurine on the excitability of neuronal networks in the immature neocortex, we performed whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from visually identified pyramidal neurons and interneurons in coronal slices from C57Bl/6 and GAD67-gree...

  5. Biopolymer nanoparticles from heat-treated electrostatic protein-polysaccharide complexes: factors affecting particle characteristics.

    Jones, Owen Griffith; McClements, David Julian

    2010-03-01

    Biopolymer nanoparticles can be formed by heating globular protein-ionic polysaccharide electrostatic complexes above the thermal denaturation temperature of the protein. This study examined how the size and concentration of biopolymer particles formed by heating beta-lactoglobulin-pectin complexes could be manipulated by controlling preparation conditions: pH, ionic strength, protein concentration, holding time, and holding temperature. Biopolymer particle size and concentration increased with increasing holding time (0 to 30 min), decreasing holding temperature (90 to 70 degrees C), increasing protein concentration (0 to 2 wt/wt%), increasing pH (4.5 to 5), and increasing salt concentration (0 to 50 mol/kg). The influence of these factors on biopolymer particle size was attributed to their impact on protein-polysaccharide interactions, and on the kinetics of nucleation and particle growth. The knowledge gained from this study will facilitate the rational design of biopolymer particles with specific physicochemical and functional attributes. PMID:20492252

  6. Sustained activity in hierarchical modular neural networks: self-organized criticality and oscillations

    Sheng-Jun Wang

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral cortical brain networks possess a number of conspicuous features of structure and dynamics. First, these networks have an intricate, non-random organization. They are structured in a hierarchical modular fashion, from large-scale regions of the whole brain, via cortical areas and area subcompartments organized as structural and functional maps to cortical columns, and finally circuits made up of individual neurons. Second, the networks display self-organized sustained activity, which is persistent in the absence of external stimuli. At the systems level, such activity is characterized by complex rhythmical oscillations over a broadband background, while at the cellular level, neuronal discharges have been observed to display avalanches, indicating that cortical networks are at the state of self-organized criticality. We explored the relationship between hierarchical neural network organization and sustained dynamics using large-scale network modeling. It was shown that sparse random networks with balanced excitation and inhibition can sustain neural activity without external stimulation. We find that a hierarchical modular architecture can generate sustained activity better than random networks. Moreover, the system can simultaneously support rhythmical oscillations and self-organized criticality, which are not present in the respective random networks. The underlying mechanism is that each dense module cannot sustain activity on its own, but displays self-organized criticality in the presence of weak perturbations. The hierarchical modular networks provide the coupling among subsystems with self-organized criticality. These results imply that the hierarchical modular architecture of cortical networks plays an important role in shaping the ongoing spontaneous activity of the brain, potentially allowing the system to take advantage of both the sensitivityof critical state and predictability and timing of oscillations for efficient

  7. INTERRELATION PERSONALITY CHARACTERISTICS OF USERS OF SOCIAL NETWORKS IN THE INTERNET WITH THE FEATURES OF THEIR NETWORK ACTIVITY

    Ryabikina Z. I.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Modern psychological science of the individual does not have deep enough meaningful data about the processes associated with the virtualization of being a personality. The need for scientific understanding of the phenomenology of the growing impact of virtualization on the personality of the society, its existence and co-existence, as well as identifying patterns of its focus on the reinforcement of its subjectivity in the virtual co-existence makes the relevance of research. The article presents the results of empirical studies on the relationship of personality characteristics by the nature of its activity in the social network of the Internet. The criteria of activity of the personality, as well as indicators of subjectivity in activity of the personality in the social network are determined. It is established that users with different levels of activity and the level of subjectivity, have different personality characteristics. Manifestations of "the deficit of character" as a prerequisite, depending on the individual social networks, anxiety and passivity, lowering of self-actualization, etc. are formulated and described, as well as "the benefits of character" that determine the activity of the individual network (direction of self-actualization, the search for additional spaces being that person converts in accordance with its internal sense. The results expand existing psychological representations about the quality of activity of the personality in the social network. They contribute to the practice of theoretical constructs of subject-existential approach to the study of personality as being the subject of virtual space and co-existence with the Others

  8. An application of multilayer neural network on hepatitis disease diagnosis using approximations of sigmoid activation function

    Onursal Çetin; Feyzullah Temurtaş; Şenol Gülgönül

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Implementation of multilayer neural network (MLNN) with sigmoid activation function for the diagnosis of hepatitis disease.Methods: Artificial neural networks (ANNs) are efficient tools currently in common use for medical diagnosis. In hardware based architectures activation functions play an important role in ANN behavior. Sigmoid function is the most frequently used activation function because of its smooth response. Thus, sigmoid function and its close approximations were implem...

  9. School-based friendship networks and children’s physical activity: A spatial analytical approach

    Macdonald-Wallis, Kyle; Jago, Russell; Page, Angie S; Brockman, Rowan; Thompson, Janice L

    2011-01-01

    Despite the known health benefits, the majority of children do not meet physical activity guidelines, with past interventions to increase physical activity yielding little success. Social and friendship networks have been shown to influence obesity, smoking and academic achievement, and peer-led interventions have successfully reduced the uptake of adolescent smoking. However, the role of social networks on physical activity is not clear. This paper investigates the extent to which friendship...

  10. Friendship networks and physical activity and sedentary behavior among youth: a systematized review

    Sawka, Keri Jo; McCormack, Gavin R; Nettel-Aguirre, Alberto; Hawe, Penelope; Doyle-Baker, Patricia K.

    2013-01-01

    Background Low levels of physical activity and increased participation in sedentary leisure-time activities are two important obesity-risk behaviors that impact the health of today’s youth. Friend’s health behaviors have been shown to influence individual health behaviors; however, current evidence on the specific role of friendship networks in relation to levels of physical activity and sedentary behavior is limited. The purpose of this review was to summarize evidence on friendship networks...

  11. Frequency Count Attribute Oriented Induction of Corporate Network Data for Mapping Business Activity

    Tanutama Lukas

    2014-01-01

    Companies increasingly rely on Internet for effective and efficient business communication. As Information Technology infrastructure backbone for business activities, corporate network connects the company to Internet and enables its activities globally. It carries data packets generated by the activities of the users performing their business tasks. Traditionally, infrastructure operations mainly maintain data carrying capacity and network devices performance. It would be advantageous if a c...

  12. Social networks, social interactions, and activity-travel behavior: a framework for microsimulation

    Theo Arentze; Harry Timmermans

    2008-01-01

    We argue that the social networks and activity-travel patterns of people interact and coevolve over time. Through social interaction, people exchange information about activity-travel choice alternatives and adapt their latent and overt preferences for alternatives to each other. At the same time, social networks are not static: new social links emerge and existing social links may dissolve in time, depending on activity-travel schedules and the attributes of persons. In this paper we propose...

  13. Simulating ensembles of nonlinear continuous time dynamical systems via active ultra wideband wireless network

    Dmitriev, Alexander S.; Yemelyanov, Ruslan Yu.; Gerasimov, Mark Yu.; Itskov, Vadim V.

    2016-06-01

    The paper deals with a new multi-element processor platform assigned for modelling the behaviour of interacting dynamical systems, i.e., active wireless network. Experimentally, this ensemble is implemented in an active network, the active nodes of which include direct chaotic transceivers and special actuator boards containing microcontrollers for modelling the dynamical systems and an information display unit (colored LEDs). The modelling technique and experimental results are described and analyzed.

  14. P and S wave responses of bacterial biopolymer formation in unconsolidated porous media

    Noh, Dong-Hwa; Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan B.; Kwon, Tae-Hyuk; Muhunthan, Balasingam

    2016-04-01

    This study investigated the P and S wave responses and permeability reduction during bacterial biopolymer formation in unconsolidated porous media. Column experiments with fine sands, where the model bacteria Leuconostoc mesenteroides were stimulated to produce insoluble biopolymer, were conducted while monitoring changes in permeability and P and S wave responses. The bacterial biopolymer reduced the permeability by more than 1 order of magnitude, occupying ~10% pore volume after 38 days of growth. This substantial reduction was attributed to the bacterial biopolymer with complex internal structures accumulated at pore throats. S wave velocity (VS) increased by more than ~50% during biopolymer accumulation; this indicated that the bacterial biopolymer caused a certain level of stiffening effect on shear modulus of the unconsolidated sediment matrix at low confining stress conditions. Whereas replacing pore water by insoluble biopolymer was observed to cause minimal changes in P wave velocity (VP) due to the low elastic moduli of insoluble biopolymer. The spectral ratio analyses revealed that the biopolymer formation caused a ~50-80% increase in P wave attenuation (1/QP) at the both ultrasonic and subultrasonic frequency ranges, at hundreds of kHz and tens of kHz, respectively, and a ~50-60% increase in S wave attenuation (1/QS) in the frequency band of several kHz. Our results reveal that in situ biopolymer formation and the resulting permeability reduction can be effectively monitored by using P and S wave attenuation in the ultrasonic and subultrasonic frequency ranges. This suggests that field monitoring using seismic logging techniques, including time-lapse dipole sonic logging, may be possible.

  15. An artificial neural network to estimate physical activity energy expenditure and identify physical activity type from an accelerometer

    Staudenmayer, John; Pober, David; Crouter, Scott; Bassett, David; Freedson, Patty

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to develop and test two artificial neural networks (ANN) to apply to physical activity data collected with a commonly used uniaxial accelerometer. The first ANN model estimated physical activity metabolic equivalents (METs), and the second ANN identified activity type. Subjects (n = 24 men and 24 women, mean age = 35 yr) completed a menu of activities that included sedentary, light, moderate, and vigorous intensities, and each activity was performed for 10 mi...

  16. The social networks as a new phenomenon of leisure time activities for children and youth.

    ŽÍDKOVÁ, Petra

    2013-01-01

    This bachelor thesis called "Social networks as a new phenomenon leisure activities for children and youth," explores the phenomenon of social networking, describes their views on the impact on children and young people in practical research describes the place of social networks in the lives of children and high school students. The theoretical part deals more generally the issue of the information society and assesses views on the transformation of society under the influence of new informa...

  17. Adaptive RBF Neural Network Control for Three-Phase Active Power Filter

    Juntao Fei; Zhe Wang

    2013-01-01

    An adaptive radial basis function (RBF) neural network control system for three‐phase active power filter (APF) is proposed to eliminate harmonics. Compensation current is generated to track command current so as to eliminate the harmonic current of non‐linear load and improve the quality of the power system. The asymptotical stability of the APF system can be guaranteed with the proposed adaptive neural network strategy. The parameters of the neural network can be adaptively updated to achie...

  18. Production networks, profits, and innovative activity: Evidence from Malaysia and Thailand

    Wignaraja, Ganeshan; Krüger, Jens; Tuazon, Anna Mae

    2013-01-01

    Cross-border production networks have been playing an increasingly important role in the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) countries’ trade in recent years, but micro-level studies are rare. This paper uses firm-level data from the two most active ASEAN countries in production networks (Thailand and Malaysia) and examines the effect of participating in production networks on profits and technological capabilities of firms. The empirical results show that participating in produc...

  19. Selective uptake of palladium by biopolymer microcapsules enclosing insoluble ferrocyanides

    The selective uptake properties of Pd2+ ions on biopolymer microcapsules enclosing insoluble copper ferrocyanides (KNiFC-MC, KCuFC-MC) and the recovery of Pd have been studied by column and batch methods, respectively. Alginate biopolymer was used as the solid inert support. The size of the microcapsules was estimated to be about 0.5-1 mm. The uptake rate of Pd2+ on above microcapsules was relatively fast and the uptake equilibrium was attained within 1 d. KCuFC-MC shows high acid resistance up to 7.0 M HNO3. The break point of 1% breakthrough at 25 and 40degC were estimated to be 46 cm3 (bed volumes (BV)=13.9) and 40 cm3 (BV=13.3), respectively. The elution property of Pd was examined by passing 1.0 M thiourea through the column loaded with Pd. Not only Pd but also Fe was simultaneously eluted by the complexation with thiourea. Thus, alginate microcapsules enclosing insoluble ferrocyanides are effective for selective uptake of Pd. It's required to develop the methods for recovery of Pd. (author)

  20. Direct adhesive measurements between wood biopolymer model surfaces.

    Gustafsson, Emil; Johansson, Erik; Wågberg, Lars; Pettersson, Torbjörn

    2012-10-01

    For the first time the dry adhesion was measured for an all-wood biopolymer system using Johnson-Kendall-Roberts (JKR) contact mechanics. The polydimethylsiloxane hemisphere was successfully surface-modified with a Cellulose I model surface using layer-by-layer assembly of nanofibrillated cellulose and polyethyleneimine. Flat surfaces of cellulose were equally prepared on silicon dioxide substrates, and model surfaces of glucomannan and lignin were prepared on silicon dioxide using spin-coating. The measured work of adhesion on loading and the adhesion hysteresis was found to be very similar between cellulose and all three wood polymers, suggesting that the interaction between these biopolymers do not differ greatly. Surface energy calculations from contact angle measurements indicated similar dispersive surface energy components for the model surfaces. The dispersive component was dominating the surface energy for all surfaces. The JKR work of adhesion was lower than that calculated from contact angle measurements, which partially can be ascribed to surface roughness of the model surfaces and overestimation of the surface energies from contact angle determinations. PMID:22924973

  1. Effects of Vertex Activity and Self-organized Criticality Behavior on a Weighted Evolving Network

    Effects of vertex activity have been analyzed on a weighted evolving network. The network is characterized by the probability distribution of vertex strength, each edge weight and evolution of the strength of vertices with different vertex activities. The model exhibits self-organized criticality behavior. The probability distribution of avalanche size for different network sizes is also shown. In addition, there is a power law relation between the size and the duration of an avalanche and the average of avalanche size has been studied for different vertex activities

  2. Effects of Vertex Activity and Self-organized Criticality Behavior on a Weighted Evolving Network

    ZHANG Gui-Qing; YANG Qiu-Ying; CHEN Tian-Lun

    2008-01-01

    Effects of vertex activity have been analyzed on a weighted evolving network. The network is characterized by the probability distribution of vertex strength, each edge weight and evolution of the strength of vertices with different vertex activities. The model exhibits self-organized criticality behavior. The probability distribution of avalanche size for different network sizes is also shown. In addition, there is a power law relation between the size and the duration of an avalanche and the average of avalanche size has been studied for different vertex activities.

  3. Coupling Strength and System Size Induce Firing Activity of Globally Coupled Neural Network

    WEI Du-Qu; LUO Xiao-Shu; ZOU Yan-Li

    2008-01-01

    We investigate how firing activity of globally coupled neural network depends on the coupling strength C and system size N.Network elements are described by space-clamped FitzHugh-Nagumo (SCFHN) neurons with the values of parameters at which no firing activity occurs.It is found that for a given appropriate coupling strength,there is an intermediate range of system size where the firing activity of globally coupled SCFHN neural network is induced and enhanced.On the other hand,for a given intermediate system size level,there ex/sts an optimal value of coupling strength such that the intensity of firing activity reaches its maximum.These phenomena imply that the coupling strength and system size play a vital role in firing activity of neural network.

  4. Modelling temporal networks of human face-to-face contacts with public activity and individual reachability

    Zhang, Yi-Qing; Cui, Jing; Zhang, Shu-Min; Zhang, Qi; Li, Xiang

    2016-02-01

    Modelling temporal networks of human face-to-face contacts is vital both for understanding the spread of airborne pathogens and word-of-mouth spreading of information. Although many efforts have been devoted to model these temporal networks, there are still two important social features, public activity and individual reachability, have been ignored in these models. Here we present a simple model that captures these two features and other typical properties of empirical face-to-face contact networks. The model describes agents which are characterized by an attractiveness to slow down the motion of nearby people, have event-triggered active probability and perform an activity-dependent biased random walk in a square box with periodic boundary. The model quantitatively reproduces two empirical temporal networks of human face-to-face contacts which are testified by their network properties and the epidemic spread dynamics on them.

  5. Intrinsic network activity in tinnitus investigated using functional MRI.

    Leaver, Amber M; Turesky, Ted K; Seydell-Greenwald, Anna; Morgan, Susan; Kim, Hung J; Rauschecker, Josef P

    2016-08-01

    Tinnitus is an increasingly common disorder in which patients experience phantom auditory sensations, usually ringing or buzzing in the ear. Tinnitus pathophysiology has been repeatedly shown to involve both auditory and non-auditory brain structures, making network-level studies of tinnitus critical. In this magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study, two resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC) approaches were used to better understand functional network disturbances in tinnitus. First, we demonstrated tinnitus-related reductions in RSFC between specific brain regions and resting-state networks (RSNs), defined by independent components analysis (ICA) and chosen for their overlap with structures known to be affected in tinnitus. Then, we restricted ICA to data from tinnitus patients, and identified one RSN not apparent in control data. This tinnitus RSN included auditory-sensory regions like inferior colliculus and medial Heschl's gyrus, as well as classically non-auditory regions like the mediodorsal nucleus of the thalamus, striatum, lateral prefrontal, and orbitofrontal cortex. Notably, patients' reported tinnitus loudness was positively correlated with RSFC between the mediodorsal nucleus and the tinnitus RSN, indicating that this network may underlie the auditory-sensory experience of tinnitus. These data support the idea that tinnitus involves network dysfunction, and further stress the importance of communication between auditory-sensory and fronto-striatal circuits in tinnitus pathophysiology. Hum Brain Mapp 37:2717-2735, 2016. © 2016 The Authors Human Brain Mapping Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27091485

  6. Structural plasticity of GABAergic axons is regulated by network activity and GABAA receptor activation

    Anne eSchuemann

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Coordinated changes at excitatory and inhibitory synapses are essential for normal brain development and function. It is well established that excitatory neurons undergo structural changes, but our knowledge about inhibitory structural plasticity is rather scarce. Here we present a quantitative analysis of the dynamics of GABAergic boutons in the dendritic region of the hippocampal CA1 area using time-lapse two-photon imaging in organotypic hippocampal cultures from GAD65-GFP mice. We show that ~20% of inhibitory boutons are not stable. They are appearing, disappearing and reappearing at specific locations along the inhibitory axon and reflect immature or incomplete synapses. Furthermore, we observed that persistent boutons show large volume fluctuations over several hours, suggesting that presynaptic content of inhibitory synapses is not constant. Our data show that inhibitory boutons are highly dynamic structures and suggest that inhibitory axons are continuously probing potential locations for inhibitory synapse formation by redistributing presynaptic material along the axon.In addition, we found that neuronal activity affects the exploratory dynamics of inhibitory axons. Blocking network activity rapidly reduces the number of transient boutons, whereas enhancing activity reduces the number of persistent inhibitory boutons, possibly reflecting enhanced competition between boutons along the axon. The latter effect requires signaling through GABAA receptors. We propose that activity-dependent regulation of bouton dynamics contributes to inhibitory synaptic plasticity.

  7. Production, characterization and technological properties of biopolymer produced by Agrobacterium radiobacter k84
    Produção, caracterização e propriedades tecnológicas de um biopolímero produzido por Agrobacterium radiobacter k84

    Raúl Jorge Hernan Castro Gómez; Marciane Magnani; Caroline Maria Calliari

    2011-01-01

    In this study, a biopolymer composed of carbohydrates (35%), protein (15%) and minerals (40%) was obtained through fermentation using sugar cane molasses as the sole carbon source for Agrobacterium radiobacter k84. The process yield was 10 gL-1 of biopolymer, which showed high solubility in water, neutral pH in aqueous solution and low water activity (0.52). The analysis in Scanning Electron Microscopy revealed microstructure characteristic of an amorphous solid, with particles of irregular s...

  8. Immobilisation of no-carrier-added 93mMo on a biopolymer calcium alginate. A candidate radiopharmaceutical

    No-carrier-added 93mMo radionuclide with high specific activity is a potential candidate radionuclide in the field of nuclear medicine due to its suitable half-life and gamma energy with significant intensity. In the present paper, we report the immobilization of radioisotopically and radiochemically pure no-carrier-added (nca) 93mMo onto calcium alginate biopolymer. The experiment has been performed to examine the possibility of polymeric delivery of 93mMo radionuclide by measuring the adsorption of 93mMo on calciumalginate beads. Maximum adsorption was found at pH 2. (author)

  9. Internet发展方向之一:主动网络%Active Networks: A Promising Direction in Internet

    陈晓林; 李冀; 陆桑璐; 陈贵海; 谢立

    2002-01-01

    The architecture of traditional networks has limited the development of new protocols and applications and the evolution of Internet infrastructure.The emergence of active networks provides a possible approach.Active network is a programmable network in which user can insert customized programs into the switches of the networks.As a kind of novel network architecture,active networks are advantageous in creating and tailoring new network services and improving the flexibility of networks,which makes it one of the promising directions in the Internet.In this paper,we discuss the background,principles and architecture of active networks,as well as the applied fields and the problems to be solved in the future.

  10. AST: Activity-Security-Trust driven modeling of time varying networks

    Wang, Jian; Xu, Jiake; Liu, Yanheng; Deng, Weiwen

    2016-01-01

    Network modeling is a flexible mathematical structure that enables to identify statistical regularities and structural principles hidden in complex systems. The majority of recent driving forces in modeling complex networks are originated from activity, in which an activity potential of a time invariant function is introduced to identify agents’ interactions and to construct an activity-driven model. However, the new-emerging network evolutions are already deeply coupled with not only the explicit factors (e.g. activity) but also the implicit considerations (e.g. security and trust), so more intrinsic driving forces behind should be integrated into the modeling of time varying networks. The agents undoubtedly seek to build a time-dependent trade-off among activity, security, and trust in generating a new connection to another. Thus, we reasonably propose the Activity-Security-Trust (AST) driven model through synthetically considering the explicit and implicit driving forces (e.g. activity, security, and trust) underlying the decision process. AST-driven model facilitates to more accurately capture highly dynamical network behaviors and figure out the complex evolution process, allowing a profound understanding of the effects of security and trust in driving network evolution, and improving the biases induced by only involving activity representations in analyzing the dynamical processes. PMID:26888717

  11. AST: Activity-Security-Trust driven modeling of time varying networks

    Wang, Jian; Xu, Jiake; Liu, Yanheng; Deng, Weiwen

    2016-02-01

    Network modeling is a flexible mathematical structure that enables to identify statistical regularities and structural principles hidden in complex systems. The majority of recent driving forces in modeling complex networks are originated from activity, in which an activity potential of a time invariant function is introduced to identify agents’ interactions and to construct an activity-driven model. However, the new-emerging network evolutions are already deeply coupled with not only the explicit factors (e.g. activity) but also the implicit considerations (e.g. security and trust), so more intrinsic driving forces behind should be integrated into the modeling of time varying networks. The agents undoubtedly seek to build a time-dependent trade-off among activity, security, and trust in generating a new connection to another. Thus, we reasonably propose the Activity-Security-Trust (AST) driven model through synthetically considering the explicit and implicit driving forces (e.g. activity, security, and trust) underlying the decision process. AST-driven model facilitates to more accurately capture highly dynamical network behaviors and figure out the complex evolution process, allowing a profound understanding of the effects of security and trust in driving network evolution, and improving the biases induced by only involving activity representations in analyzing the dynamical processes.

  12. "Who Do You Talk to about Your Teaching?": Networking Activities among University Teachers

    Pataraia, Nino; Falconer, Isobel; Margaryan, Anoush; Littlejohn, Allison; Fincher, Sally

    2014-01-01

    As the higher education environment changes, there are calls for university teachers to change and enhance their teaching practices to match. Networking practices are known to be deeply implicated in studies of change and diffusion of innovation, yet academics' networking activities in relation to teaching have been little studied. This paper…

  13. WLAN Security-Active Attack of WLAN Secure Network

    Anil Kumar Singh

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In Wireless Local Area Network data transfer from one node to another node via air in the form of radio waves. There is no physical medium for transferring the data like traditional LAN. Because of its susceptible nature WLAN can open the door for the intruders and attackers that can come from any direction. Security is the most important element in WLAN. MAC address filtering is one of the security methods for securing the WLAN. But it is also vulnerable. In this paper we will demonstrate how hackers exploit the WLAN vulnerability (Identity theft of legitimate user to access the Wireless Local Area Network.

  14. Noise influence on spike activation in a Hindmarsh–Rose small-world neural network

    Zhe, Sun; Micheletto, Ruggero

    2016-07-01

    We studied the role of noise in neural networks, especially focusing on its relation to the propagation of spike activity in a small sized system. We set up a source of information using a single neuron that is constantly spiking. This element called initiator x o feeds spikes to the rest of the network that is initially quiescent and subsequently reacts with vigorous spiking after a transitional period of time. We found that noise quickly suppresses the initiator’s influence and favors spontaneous spike activity and, using a decibel representation of noise intensity, we established a linear relationship between noise amplitude and the interval from the initiator’s first spike and the rest of the network activation. We studied the same process with networks of different sizes (number of neurons) and found that the initiator x o has a measurable influence on small networks, but as the network grows in size, spontaneous spiking emerges disrupting its effects on networks of more than about N = 100 neurons. This suggests that the mechanism of internal noise generation allows information transmission within a small neural neighborhood, but decays for bigger network domains. We also analyzed the Fourier spectrum of the whole network membrane potential and verified that noise provokes the reduction of main θ and α peaks before transitioning into chaotic spiking. However, network size does not reproduce a similar phenomena; instead we recorded a reduction in peaks’ amplitude, a better sharpness and definition of Fourier peaks, but not the evident degeneration to chaos observed with increasing external noise. This work aims to contribute to the understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of propagation of spontaneous spiking in neural networks and gives a quantitative assessment of how noise can be used to control and modulate this phenomenon in Hindmarsh‑Rose (H‑R) neural networks.

  15. Labelling the complexes biopolymer - N,N-di-(2-chlorethyl)-paraphenylenediamine with iodine 131

    The distribution of complexes of certain biopolymers with N,N-di-(2-chlorethyl)-paraphenylenediamine in rats, rabbits and hamsters organs is studied. Labelling is performed with iodine 131. All animals received lugol solution prior to the labelled product administration for blocking the thyroid gland. The distribution of the activity (30 μCi per animal) is investigated by animals scanning and organs radiometry. Free iodine accumulation was not found in the organs investigated. Proteins were retained considerably longer in some organs. The highest activity was found 24 hours after albumin's injection in lungs, lymph nodes and adrenal glands and remained relatively high only in the lymph nodes thereafter. There was high activity after injection of albumin complex in all organs investigated and particularly in adrenals, lymph nodes, kidneys and liver. The activity dropped to the control levels 48 hours later. 24 hours after administration of tyrosinase complex there was high activity in tymus, kidney and liver. After 72 hours the activity remained high only in the tymus; the gland's weight dropped by 40%. High activity was found in the tymus after intravenous injection of the complex but not after this of the tyrosinase. The distribution of the ribonuclease complex was more uniform than that of the other labelled complexes. There was not complexes accumulation in the neoplasms (melanoma and transplantated Joshida tumor). (A.B.)

  16. Biopolymer Materials Based Carboxymethyl Cellulose as a Proton Conducting Biopolymer Electrolyte for Application in Rechargeable Proton Battery

    This paper presents the discovery on proton conducting biopolymer electrolyte (BPE) by incorporating various NH4Br composition (wt%) with biopolymer materials carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) which has been prepared via solution casting method. The biopolymer–salt complex formation has been analyzed through Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, Thermo Gravimetric Analysis (TGA), impedance and transference number measurement (TNM). The highest ionic conductivity at ambient temperature is 1.12 × 10−4 S cm−1 for sample containing 25 wt% NH4Br. It has been shown that the conducting element in this work are predominantly due to proton (H+) which was confirmed via FTIR and TNM analysis. Rechargeable proton conducting BPE battery have been fabricated with the configuration of Zn + ZnSO4.7H2O/BPE/MnO2 and produced a maximum open circuit potential (OCP) of 1.36 V at ambient temperature and showed good rechargeability. This work implies that the possible practical application of the present electrolytes as a new invention in the fabrication of electrochemical devices

  17. Fast demand response in support of the active distribution network

    MacDougall, P.; Heskes, P.; Crolla, P.; Burt, G.; Warmer, C.

    2013-01-01

    Demand side management has traditionally been investigated for "normal" operation services such as balancing and congestion management. However they potentially could be utilized for Distributed Network Operator (DNO) services. This paper investigates and validates the use of a supply and demand res

  18. Phosphorylation networks regulating JNK activity in diverse genetic backgrounds

    Bakal, Chris; Linding, Rune; Llense, Flora;

    2008-01-01

    Cellular signaling networks have evolved to enable swift and accurate responses, even in the face of genetic or environmental perturbation. Thus, genetic screens may not identify all the genes that regulate different biological processes. Moreover, although classical screening approaches have suc...

  19. Cross-Layer Active Predictive Congestion Control Protocol for Wireless Sensor Networks

    Yinfeng Wu

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available In wireless sensor networks (WSNs, there are numerous factors that may cause network congestion problems, such as the many-to-one communication modes, mutual interference of wireless links, dynamic changes of network topology and the memory-restrained characteristics of nodes. All these factors result in a network being more vulnerable to congestion. In this paper, a cross-layer active predictive congestion control scheme (CL-APCC for improving the performance of networks is proposed. Queuing theory is applied in the CL-APCC to analyze data flows of a single-node according to its memory status, combined with the analysis of the average occupied memory size of local networks. It also analyzes the current data change trends of local networks to forecast and actively adjust the sending rate of the node in the next period. In order to ensure the fairness and timeliness of the network, the IEEE 802.11 protocol is revised based on waiting time, the number of the node‟s neighbors and the original priority of data packets, which dynamically adjusts the sending priority of the node. The performance of CL-APCC, which is evaluated by extensive simulation experiments. is more efficient in solving the congestion in WSNs. Furthermore, it is clear that the proposed scheme has an outstanding advantage in terms of improving the fairness and lifetime of networks.

  20. NetDecoder: a network biology platform that decodes context-specific biological networks and gene activities

    da Rocha, Edroaldo Lummertz; Ung, Choong Yong; McGehee, Cordelia D.; Correia, Cristina; Li, Hu

    2016-01-01

    The sequential chain of interactions altering the binary state of a biomolecule represents the ‘information flow’ within a cellular network that determines phenotypic properties. Given the lack of computational tools to dissect context-dependent networks and gene activities, we developed NetDecoder, a network biology platform that models context-dependent information flows using pairwise phenotypic comparative analyses of protein–protein interactions. Using breast cancer, dyslipidemia and Alzheimer's disease as case studies, we demonstrate NetDecoder dissects subnetworks to identify key players significantly impacting cell behaviour specific to a given disease context. We further show genes residing in disease-specific subnetworks are enriched in disease-related signalling pathways and information flow profiles, which drive the resulting disease phenotypes. We also devise a novel scoring scheme to quantify key genes—network routers, which influence many genes, key targets, which are influenced by many genes, and high impact genes, which experience a significant change in regulation. We show the robustness of our results against parameter changes. Our network biology platform includes freely available source code (http://www.NetDecoder.org) for researchers to explore genome-wide context-dependent information flow profiles and key genes, given a set of genes of particular interest and transcriptome data. More importantly, NetDecoder will enable researchers to uncover context-dependent drug targets. PMID:26975659

  1. NetDecoder: a network biology platform that decodes context-specific biological networks and gene activities.

    da Rocha, Edroaldo Lummertz; Ung, Choong Yong; McGehee, Cordelia D; Correia, Cristina; Li, Hu

    2016-06-01

    The sequential chain of interactions altering the binary state of a biomolecule represents the 'information flow' within a cellular network that determines phenotypic properties. Given the lack of computational tools to dissect context-dependent networks and gene activities, we developed NetDecoder, a network biology platform that models context-dependent information flows using pairwise phenotypic comparative analyses of protein-protein interactions. Using breast cancer, dyslipidemia and Alzheimer's disease as case studies, we demonstrate NetDecoder dissects subnetworks to identify key players significantly impacting cell behaviour specific to a given disease context. We further show genes residing in disease-specific subnetworks are enriched in disease-related signalling pathways and information flow profiles, which drive the resulting disease phenotypes. We also devise a novel scoring scheme to quantify key genes-network routers, which influence many genes, key targets, which are influenced by many genes, and high impact genes, which experience a significant change in regulation. We show the robustness of our results against parameter changes. Our network biology platform includes freely available source code (http://www.NetDecoder.org) for researchers to explore genome-wide context-dependent information flow profiles and key genes, given a set of genes of particular interest and transcriptome data. More importantly, NetDecoder will enable researchers to uncover context-dependent drug targets. PMID:26975659

  2. Deep convolutional and LSTM recurrent neural networks for multimodal wearable activity recognition

    Francisco Javier Ordóñez; Daniel Roggen

    2016-01-01

    Human activity recognition (HAR) tasks have traditionally been solved using engineered features obtained by heuristic processes. Current research suggests that deep convolutional neural networks are suited to automate feature extraction from raw sensor inputs. However, human activities are made of complex sequences of motor movements, and capturing this temporal dynamics is fundamental for successful HAR. Based on the recent success of recurrent neural networks for time series domains, we pro...

  3. Neural networks with periodic and monotonic activation functions: a comparative study in classification problems

    Romero Merino, Enrique; Sopena, Josep Maria; Alquézar Mancho, René; Moliner, Joan L.

    2000-01-01

    This article discusses a number of reasons why the use of non-monotonic functions as activation functions can lead to a marked improvement in the performance of a neural network. Using a wide range of benchmarks we show that a multilayer feed-forward network using sine activation functions (and an appropriate choice of initial parameters) learns much faster than one incorporating sigmoid functions - as much as 150-500 times faster - when both types are trained with backpr...

  4. Physical layer security in wireless networks with passive and active eavesdroppers

    Chorti, Arsenia; Perlaza, Samir M.; Han, Zhu; Poor, H. Vincent

    2012-01-01

    Security is becoming an increasingly important issue in wireless communications, to which physical layer approaches can contribute by providing addition resources for securing confidential messages. In this paper, the resilience of multiuser networks to passive and active eavesdropping is investigated. In particular, average secrecy capacities are evaluated in scenarios involving a base station and several terminals, some of which constitute passive or active eavesdroppers. Network resources ...

  5. Sensemaking in collaborative networks: Creating and balancing activities in open business models

    Peronard, Jean-Paul; Brix, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to advance research on open business models as activity systems (Zott and Amit, 2010) in collaborative networks. We utilize Bradley’s (1995) theory of exchange behavior to discuss how new joint activities can be explored as well as how existing activities can be...

  6. An Optimal CDS Construction Algorithm with Activity Scheduling in Ad Hoc Networks.

    Penumalli, Chakradhar; Palanichamy, Yogesh

    2015-01-01

    A new energy efficient optimal Connected Dominating Set (CDS) algorithm with activity scheduling for mobile ad hoc networks (MANETs) is proposed. This algorithm achieves energy efficiency by minimizing the Broadcast Storm Problem [BSP] and at the same time considering the node's remaining energy. The Connected Dominating Set is widely used as a virtual backbone or spine in mobile ad hoc networks [MANETs] or Wireless Sensor Networks [WSN]. The CDS of a graph representing a network has a significant impact on an efficient design of routing protocol in wireless networks. Here the CDS is a distributed algorithm with activity scheduling based on unit disk graph [UDG]. The node's mobility and residual energy (RE) are considered as parameters in the construction of stable optimal energy efficient CDS. The performance is evaluated at various node densities, various transmission ranges, and mobility rates. The theoretical analysis and simulation results of this algorithm are also presented which yield better results. PMID:26221627

  7. Cognitive Approach Based User Node Activity Monitoring for Intrusion Detection in Wireless Networks

    G Sunilkumar

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive networks are the solution for the problems existing on the current networks. Users maintain integrity of the networks and user node activity monitoring is required for provision of security. Cognitive Networks discussed in this paper not only monitor user node activity but also take preventive measures if user node transactions are malicious. The intelligence in cognitive engine is realized using self-organizing maps (CSOMs. Gaussian and Mexican Hat neighbor learning functions have been evaluated to realize CSOMs. Experimental study proves the efficiency of Gaussian Learning function is better for cognition engine. The cognition engine realized is evaluated for malicious node detection in dynamic networks. The proposed concept results in better Intrusion detection rate as compared to existing approaches.

  8. Ripples make waves: binding structured activity and plasticity in hippocampal networks.

    Sadowski, Josef H L P; Jones, Matthew W; Mellor, Jack R

    2011-01-01

    Establishing novel episodic memories and stable spatial representations depends on an exquisitely choreographed, multistage process involving the online encoding and offline consolidation of sensory information, a process that is largely dependent on the hippocampus. Each step is influenced by distinct neural network states that influence the pattern of activation across cellular assemblies. In recent years, the occurrence of hippocampal sharp wave ripple (SWR) oscillations has emerged as a potentially vital network phenomenon mediating the steps between encoding and consolidation, both at a cellular and network level by promoting the rapid replay and reactivation of recent activity patterns. Such events facilitate memory formation by optimising the conditions for synaptic plasticity to occur between contingent neural elements. In this paper, we explore the ways in which SWRs and other network events can bridge the gap between spatiomnemonic processing at cellular/synaptic and network levels in the hippocampus. PMID:21961073

  9. Information content of neural networks with self-control and variable activity

    Bollé, D.; Amari, S. I.; Dominguez Carreta, D. R. C.; Massolo, G.

    2001-02-01

    A self-control mechanism for the dynamics of neural networks with variable activity is discussed using a recursive scheme for the time evolution of the local field. It is based upon the introduction of a self-adapting time-dependent threshold as a function of both the neural and pattern activity in the network. This mechanism leads to an improvement of the information content of the network as well as an increase of the storage capacity and the basins of attraction. Different architectures are considered and the results are compared with numerical simulations.

  10. A Network Model for Integrated Telecommunication Management Activities

    SOIDRIDINE Moussa Moindze

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Technological developments in recent years have transformed the telecommunications environments in more complexes, distributed, heterogeneous and dynamic systems difficult to manage. Traditional management approaches show their limits to these new architectures. One possible approach to manage these environments is to develop novels models and open management systems. In this work, we proposed a new generic model with six layers for open systems development. We then proposed a flexible management system based on an open paradigm to the integrated management of next generation networks and services. We first studied the open source systems management to present out their strengths and weaknesses. The generic layered model that we propose allows integrating new management functions. And finally we have developed and implemented a system for remote configuration management of network devices

  11. NEGOTIATION METHODS FOR COLLABORATIVE ACTIVITIES IN NETWORK ENTERPRISES

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides a collaboration support for small and medium enterprises within a Network Enterprises which cannot or do not want to fulfill a major contract alone. In that case, in order to better meet a higher external demand, the managers are willing to subcontract parts of their contracts even to competitors. This approach is illustrated by a business-to-business interaction, being proposed a scenario where partners are autonomous gas stations grouped in a virtual enterprise (VE). In ...

  12. A Web-Based, Social Networking Physical Activity Intervention for Insufficiently Active Adults Delivered via Facebook App: Randomized Controlled Trial

    Maher, Carol; Ferguson, Monika; Vandelanotte, Corneel; Plotnikoff, Ronald C; Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse de; Thomas, Samantha; Nelson-Field, Karen; Olds, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Background Online social networks offer considerable potential for delivery of socially influential health behavior change interventions. Objective To determine the efficacy, engagement, and feasibility of an online social networking physical activity intervention with pedometers delivered via Facebook app. Methods A total of 110 adults with a mean age of 35.6 years (SD 12.4) were recruited online in teams of 3 to 8 friends. Teams were randomly allocated to receive access to a 50-day online s...

  13. Comparative study on the effects of negatively-charged biopolymers on chitosan-based gels for the development of instantaneous gels

    Polymeric electrolytic complexes are solutions of charged/ionized chains. These solutions of positive and negative charge can be combined to make instantaneous networks bonded by electrostatic interactions, a gel network. These electrostatic interaction allows for easy application in injectable gels as the network can be temporarily distributed with the application of force and reformed on the relief of it. Possible applications for these injectable gels include drug delivery and wound-healing. κ-Carrageenan, dextran sulfate, alginate, and chitosan are polyelectrolytic biocompatible polymers which are widely studied and used for a variety of biomedical applications. Gel networks are made by combining a negatively-charged (κ-Carrageenan, dextran sulfate, or alginate) and positively charged (chitosan) solutions. The strong electrostatic interaction between the opposite charges from the gel network and the inherent biocompatibility of the polymers allow future biomedical applications. Quat 188-modified chitosan has additional sites for electrostatic bonding, can be dissolved in neutral, basic, and acidic pH, and has shown inherent antibacterial activity. The objectives of this study are the following: to formulate chitosan-based gels mixing solutions of chitosan with solutions of either κ-Carrageenan, dextran sulfate, or alginate, study the gelation of the gels as function of time and pH (4, 7, and 9) using UV-Vis, characterize the chitosan-based gels through DSC and DMA, characterize the physiological degradation of the chitosan-based gels, and compare results with those from Quat 188-modified chitosan-based gels. Polyelectrolytic solutions of chitosan and negatively-charged biopolymer of similar viscosities were mixed. It was determined from the UV-Vis spectroscopy of the chitosan-carrageenan gels under pH7 buffer that the increase of concentration by a factor of 5 for 0.006M-0.0095M and 1.25 for 0.0095M-0.0150M Chitosan-Carrageenan gels improved gelation by the

  14. A differential vapor-pressure equipment for investigations of biopolymer interactions

    Andersen, Kim B; Koga, Y.; Westh, Peter

    , particularly a "gas-phase titration" routine for changing the cell composition, makes it effective for the investigations of several types of biopolymer interactions. These include isothermal studies of net affinities such as the adsorption of water to proteins or membranes, the preferential interaction of...... biopolymers with the components of a mixed solvent. the partitioning of solutes between a membrane and the aqueous bulk and the weak. specific binding of ligands to macromolecules. Furthermore, a temperature-scanning mode allows real-time elucidation of such interactions at thermally induced conformational...... changes in biopolymers. Selected examples of these applications are presented and discussed....

  15. Hierarchical brain networks active in approach and avoidance goal pursuit

    Jeffrey Martin Spielberg

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Effective approach/avoidance goal pursuit is critical for attaining long-term health and well-being. Research on the neural correlates of key goal pursuit processes (e.g., motivation has long been of interest, with lateralization in prefrontal cortex being a particularly fruitful target of investigation. However, this literature has often been limited by a lack of spatial specificity and has not delineated the precise aspects of approach/avoidance motivation involved. Additionally, the relationships among brain regions (i.e., network connectivity vital to goal pursuit remain largely unexplored. Specificity in location, process, and network relationship is vital for moving beyond gross characterizations of function and identifying the precise cortical mechanisms involved in motivation. The present paper integrates research using more spatially specific methodologies (e.g., functional magnetic resonance imaging with the rich psychological literature on approach/avoidance to propose an integrative network model that takes advantage of the strengths of each of these literatures.

  16. Detecting the Biopolymer Behavior of Graphene Nanoribbons in Aqueous Solution.

    Wijeratne, Sithara S; Penev, Evgeni S; Lu, Wei; Li, Jingqiang; Duque, Amanda L; Yakobson, Boris I; Tour, James M; Kiang, Ching-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Graphene nanoribbons (GNR), can be prepared in bulk quantities for large-area applications by reducing the product from the lengthwise oxidative unzipping of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNT). Recently, the biomaterials application of GNR has been explored, for example, in the pore to be used for DNA sequencing. Therefore, understanding the polymer behavior of GNR in solution is essential in predicting GNR interaction with biomaterials. Here, we report experimental studies of the solution-based mechanical properties of GNR and their parent products, graphene oxide nanoribbons (GONR). We used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to study their mechanical properties in solution and showed that GNR and GONR have similar force-extension behavior as in biopolymers such as proteins and DNA. The rigidity increases with reducing chemical functionalities. The similarities in rigidity and tunability between nanoribbons and biomolecules might enable the design and fabrication of GNR-biomimetic interfaces. PMID:27503635

  17. Impact Behaviour of Modified Biopolymer Droplet on Urea Surface

    S. Yon Norasyikin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The droplet impact behaviour provides the particle coating characterization during the coating process of controlled release fertiliser. To have a good coating uniformity around the urea granules, it is necessary to enhance the wettabitily properties between the coating material and urea surface. In this study, modified biopolymer is used as the coating material for the controlled release fertilizer. Various compositions of starch:urea:borate were prepared and evaluated for the wettability properties. The wettability properties measured are the maximum spreading diameter, dynamic contact angle and surface tension. The high speed Charged Couple Device (CCD camera was used to capture the images of this droplet impact behaviour. From this analysis, it is indicated that a composition of starch:urea:borate (50:15:2.5 has the best wettability characteristic and thus are suitable to be used as a coating material.

  18. Topologically ordered magnesium-biopolymer hybrid composite structures.

    Oosterbeek, Reece N; Seal, Christopher K; Staiger, Mark P; Hyland, Margaret M

    2015-01-01

    Magnesium and its alloys are intriguing as possible biodegradable biomaterials due to their unique combination of biodegradability and high specific mechanical properties. However, uncontrolled biodegradation of magnesium during implantation remains a major challenge in spite of the use of alloying and protective coatings. In this study, a hybrid composite structure of magnesium metal and a biopolymer was fabricated as an alternative approach to control the corrosion rate of magnesium. A multistep process that combines metal foam production and injection molding was developed to create a hybrid composite structure that is topologically ordered in all three dimensions. Preliminary investigations of the mechanical properties and corrosion behavior exhibited by the hybrid Mg-polymer composite structures suggest a new potential approach to the development of Mg-based biomedical devices. PMID:24659540

  19. Interpretation of fluorescence correlation spectra of biopolymer solutions.

    Phillies, George D J

    2016-05-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is regularly used to study diffusion in non-dilute "crowded" biopolymer solutions, including the interior of living cells. For fluorophores in dilute solution, the relationship between the FCS spectrum G(t) and the diffusion coefficient D is well-established. However, the dilute-solution relationship between G(t) and D has sometimes been used to interpret FCS spectra of fluorophores in non-dilute solutions. Unfortunately, the relationship used to interpret FCS spectra in dilute solutions relies on an assumption that is not always correct in non-dilute solutions. This paper obtains the correct form for interpreting FCS spectra of non-dilute solutions, writing G(t) in terms of the statistical properties of the fluorophore motions. Approaches for applying this form are discussed. PMID:26756528

  20. Quercetin as natural stabilizing agent for bio-polymer

    Morici, Elisabetta; Arrigo, Rossella; Dintcheva, Nadka Tzankova

    2014-05-01

    The introduction of antioxidants in polymers is the main way to prevent or delay the degradation process. In particular natural antioxidants receive attention in the food industry also because of their presumed safety. In this work bio-polymers, i.e. a commercial starch-based polymer (Mater-Bi®) and a bio-polyester (PLA), and a bio-polyether (PEO) were additivated with quercetin, a natural flavonoid antioxidants, in order to formulate bio-based films for ecosustainable packaging and outdoor applications. The photo-oxidation behavior of unstabilized and quercetin stabilized films was analyzed and compared with the behavior of films additivated with a commercial synthetic light stabilizer. The quercetin is able to slow down the photo-degradation rate of all bio-polymeric films investigated in similar way to the synthetic stabilizer.

  1. Quercetin as natural stabilizing agent for bio-polymer

    The introduction of antioxidants in polymers is the main way to prevent or delay the degradation process. In particular natural antioxidants receive attention in the food industry also because of their presumed safety. In this work bio-polymers, i.e. a commercial starch-based polymer (Mater-Bi®) and a bio-polyester (PLA), and a bio-polyether (PEO) were additivated with quercetin, a natural flavonoid antioxidants, in order to formulate bio-based films for ecosustainable packaging and outdoor applications. The photo-oxidation behavior of unstabilized and quercetin stabilized films was analyzed and compared with the behavior of films additivated with a commercial synthetic light stabilizer. The quercetin is able to slow down the photo-degradation rate of all bio-polymeric films investigated in similar way to the synthetic stabilizer

  2. Multiscale modeling of biopolymer translocation through a nanopore

    Fyta, M G; Kaxiras, E; Succi, S; Fyta, Maria; Melchionna, Simone; Kaxiras, Efthimios; Succi, Sauro

    2007-01-01

    We employ a multiscale approach to model the translocation of biopolymers through nanometer size pores. Our computational scheme combines microscopic Langevin molecular dynamics (MD) with a mesoscopic lattice Boltzmann (LB) method for the solvent dynamics, explicitly taking into account the interactions of the molecule with the surrounding fluid. Both dynamical and statistical aspects of the translocation process were investigated, by simulating polymers of various initial configurations and lengths. For a representative molecule size, we explore the effects of important parameters that enter in the simulation, paying particular attention to the strength of the molecule-solvent coupling and of the external electric field which drives the translocation process. Finally, we explore the connection between the generic polymers modeled in the simulation and DNA, for which interesting recent experimental results are available.

  3. Biopolymer nanostructures induced by plasma irradiation and metal sputtering

    Slepička, P., E-mail: petr.slepicka@vscht.cz [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic); Juřík, P. [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic); Malinský, P.; Macková, A. [Nuclear Physics Institute, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Rez, Prague 25068 (Czech Republic); Faculty of Science, J.E. Purkyně University, Ústí nad Labem (Czech Republic); Kasálková, N. Slepičková; Švorčík, V. [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2014-08-01

    Modification based on polymer surface exposure to plasma treatment exhibits an easy and cheap technique for polymer surface nanostructuring. The influence of argon plasma treatment on biopolymer poly(L-lactide acid (PLLA) will be presented in this paper. The combination of Ar{sup +} ion irradiation, consequent sputter metallization (platinum) and thermal annealing of polymer surface will be summarized. The surface morphology was studied using atomic force microscopy. The Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy were used as analytical methods. The combination of plasma treatment with consequent thermal annealing and/or metal sputtering led to the change of surface morphology and its elemental ratio. The surface roughness and composition has been strongly influenced by the modification parameters and metal layer thickness. By plasma treatment of polymer surface combined with consequent annealing or metal deposition can be prepared materials applicable both in tissue engineering as cell carriers, but also in integrated circuit manufacturing.

  4. Probing biopolymer conformation by metallization with noble metals

    We propose a novel method for the simple visual (colorimetric) and spectroscopic monitoring of the conformational state of a biopolymer. We present an experimental example of the detection of the change in the conformation of a giant DNA molecule. This methodology is based on the difference in the manner of metallization with noble metals on a polymer scaffold depending on its conformation. Spectroscopic analysis of the metallization of DNA by metallic silver or gold provides information on the critical concentration of DNA binder, at which the folding transition from the elongated into the compact state occurs, together with the dimension and morphology of a compact DNA condensate. This method may be suitable for use in a rapid screening procedure for the high-throughput analysis of large chemical libraries to evaluate their ability to induce DNA compaction, protein folding and similar important processes

  5. Parallel multiscale modeling of biopolymer dynamics with hydrodynamic correlations

    Fyta, Maria; Kaxiras, Efthimios; Melchionna, Simone; Bernaschi, Massimo; Succi, Sauro

    2007-01-01

    We employ a multiscale approach to model the translocation of biopolymers through nanometer size pores. Our computational scheme combines microscopic Molecular Dynamics (MD) with a mesoscopic Lattice Boltzmann (LB) method for the solvent dynamics, explicitly taking into account the interactions of the molecule with the surrounding fluid. We describe an efficient parallel implementation of the method which exhibits excellent scalability on the Blue Gene platform. We investigate both dynamical and statistical aspects of the translocation process by simulating polymers of various initial configurations and lengths. For a representative molecule size, we explore the effects of important parameters that enter in the simulation, paying particular attention to the strength of the molecule-solvent coupling and of the external electric field which drives the translocation process. Finally, we explore the connection between the generic polymers modeled in the simulation and DNA, for which interesting recent experimenta...

  6. The Force-Velocity Relation for Growing Biopolymers

    Carlsson, A E

    2000-01-01

    The process of force generation by the growth of biopolymers is simulated via a Langevin-dynamics approach. The interaction forces are taken to have simple forms that favor the growth of straight fibers from solution. The force-velocity relation is obtained from the simulations for two versions of the monomer-monomer force field. It is found that the growth rate drops off more rapidly with applied force than expected from the simplest theories based on thermal motion of the obstacle. The discrepancies amount to a factor of three or more when the applied force exceeds 2.5kT/a, where a is the step size for the polymer growth. These results are explained on the basis of restricted diffusion of monomers near the fiber tip. It is also found that the mobility of the obstacle has little effect on the growth rate, over a broad range.

  7. Biopolymer nanostructures induced by plasma irradiation and metal sputtering

    Modification based on polymer surface exposure to plasma treatment exhibits an easy and cheap technique for polymer surface nanostructuring. The influence of argon plasma treatment on biopolymer poly(L-lactide acid (PLLA) will be presented in this paper. The combination of Ar+ ion irradiation, consequent sputter metallization (platinum) and thermal annealing of polymer surface will be summarized. The surface morphology was studied using atomic force microscopy. The Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy were used as analytical methods. The combination of plasma treatment with consequent thermal annealing and/or metal sputtering led to the change of surface morphology and its elemental ratio. The surface roughness and composition has been strongly influenced by the modification parameters and metal layer thickness. By plasma treatment of polymer surface combined with consequent annealing or metal deposition can be prepared materials applicable both in tissue engineering as cell carriers, but also in integrated circuit manufacturing

  8. Quercetin as natural stabilizing agent for bio-polymer

    Morici, Elisabetta [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica, Gestionale, Informatica, Meccanica, Università di Palermo, 90128 Palermo (Italy); Arrigo, Rossella; Dintcheva, Nadka Tzankova [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile, Ambientale, Aerospaziale, dei Materiali, Università di Palermo, 90128 Palermo (Italy)

    2014-05-15

    The introduction of antioxidants in polymers is the main way to prevent or delay the degradation process. In particular natural antioxidants receive attention in the food industry also because of their presumed safety. In this work bio-polymers, i.e. a commercial starch-based polymer (Mater-Bi®) and a bio-polyester (PLA), and a bio-polyether (PEO) were additivated with quercetin, a natural flavonoid antioxidants, in order to formulate bio-based films for ecosustainable packaging and outdoor applications. The photo-oxidation behavior of unstabilized and quercetin stabilized films was analyzed and compared with the behavior of films additivated with a commercial synthetic light stabilizer. The quercetin is able to slow down the photo-degradation rate of all bio-polymeric films investigated in similar way to the synthetic stabilizer.

  9. Biopolymer electrolytes based on blend of kappa-carrageenan and cellulose derivatives for potential application in dye sensitized solar cell

    In this work, carboxymethyl kappa-carrageenan was used as the principle host for developing new biopolymer electrolytes based on the blend of carboxymethyl kappa-carrageenan/carboxymethyl cellulose. The blending of carboxymethyl cellulose into carboxymethyl kappa-carragenan was found to be a promising strategy to improve the material properties such as conductive properties. The electrolyte samples were characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, dynamic mechanical analysis, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, ionic transference number measurement and linear sweep voltammetry in order to investigate their structural, thermal and electrochemical properties. Impedance study showed that the ionic conductivity increased with the increment of ammonium iodide concentration. The highest room temperature ionic conductivity achieved was 2.41 × 10−3 S cm−1 at 30 wt% of the salt. The increment of conductivity was due to the increase of formation of transient cross-linking between the carboxymethyl kappa-carrageenan/carboxymethyl cellulose chains and the doping salt as indicated the Tg trend. The conductivity was also attributed by the increase in the number of charge carriers in the biopolymer electrolytes system. The interactions between polymers and salt were confirmed by FTIR study. The transference number measurements showed that the conductivity was predominantly ionic. Temperature dependent conductivity study showed that conductivity increased with the reciprocal of temperature. The conductivity-temperature plots suggested that the conductivity obeyed the Vogel–Tammann–Fulcher relation and the activation energy for the best conducting sample was 0.010 eV. This system was used for the fabrication of dye sensitized solar cells, FTO/TiO2-dye/CMKC/CMCE-NH4I + I2/Pt. The fabricated cell showed response under light intensity of 100 mW cm−2 with efficiency of 0.13% indicating that the blend biopolymer system has

  10. Development and in vitro evaluation of biopolymers as a delivery system against periodontopathogen microorganisms.

    Rodriguez-Garcia, Aida; Galan-Wong, Luis J; Arevalo-Niño, Katiushka

    2010-01-01

    Periodontal disease is the major cause of tooth loss in adults. Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans are considered key pathogens in periodontitis. The treatment consists of oral hygiene education, instrumentation for removal of calculus (scaling), chemotherapy and periodontal surgery. Several agents are commercially available; these chemicals can alter oral microbiota and have undesirable side-effects such as vomiting, diarrhea and tooth staining. Hence, the search for alternative products continues and natural phytochemicals isolated from plants used as traditional medicine and the use of biomaterials are considered good alternatives. Chitosan and pullulan are polymers that have been proposed due to their favorable properties such as biocompatibility, biodegradability, and adhesion ability. They can be used as local delivery systems of active principles of plant extracts. Thymus vulgaris, Matricaria chamomilla, Croton lechleri, Calendula officinalis L. and Juliana adstringens Schl. are known to have medicinal activity, and they are used in Mexican traditional medicine. Their extracts were tested in vitro for antimicrobial activity against P. gingivalis and A. actinomycetemcomitans, using agar diffusion and microdilution methods. The antimicrobial activity of films from biopolymers with plant extracts was evaluated by measuring the zones of inhibition against the tested organisms. The aim of this study was to develop bioadhesive films from chitosan and pullulan with added plant extracts and determine the antimicrobial activity of films against periodontal pathogens. PMID:21053691

  11. Load sharing in the growth of bundled biopolymers

    To elucidate the nature of load sharing in the growth of multiple biopolymers, we perform stochastic simulations of the growth of biopolymer bundles against obstacles under a broad range of conditions and varying assumptions. The obstacle motion due to thermal fluctuations is treated explicitly. We assume the ‘perfect Brownian ratchet’ model, in which the polymerization rate equals the free-filament rate as soon as the filament-obstacle distance exceeds the monomer size. Accurate closed-form formulas are obtained for the case of a rapidly moving obstacle. We find the following: (1) load sharing is usually sub-perfect in the sense that polymerization is slower than for a single filament carrying the same average force; (2) the sub-perfect behavior becomes significant at a total force proportional to the logarithm or the square root of the number of filaments, depending on the alignment of the filaments; (3) for the special case of slow barrier diffusion and low opposing force, an enhanced obstacle velocity for an increasing number of filaments is possible; (4) the obstacle velocity is very sensitive to the alignment of the filaments in the bundle, with a staggered alignment being an order of magnitude faster than an unstaggered one at forces of only 0.5 pN per filament for 20 filaments; (5) for large numbers of filaments, the power is maximized at a force well below 1 pN per filament; (6) for intermediate values of the obstacle diffusion coefficient, the shape of the force velocity relation is very similar to that for rapid obstacle diffusion. (paper)

  12. A decaying factor accounts for contained activity in neuronal networks with no need of hierarchical or modular organization

    Amancio, Diego R; Costa, Luciano da F

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms responsible for contention of activity in systems represented by networks are crucial in various phenomena, as in diseases such as epilepsy that affects the neuronal networks, and for information dissemination in social networks. The first models to account for contained activity included triggering and inhibition processes, but they cannot be applied to social networks where inhibition is clearly absent. A recent model showed that contained activity can be achieved with no need of inhibition processes provided that the network is subdivided in modules (communities). In this paper, we introduce a new concept inspired in the Hebbian theory through which activity contention is reached by incorporating a dynamics based on a decaying activity in a random walk mechanism preferential to the node activity. Upon selecting the decay coefficient within a proper range, we observed sustained activity in all the networks tested, viz. random, Barabasi-Albert and geographical networks. The generality of this ...

  13. Bi-directional astrocytic regulation of neuronal activity within a network

    Alexey V Semyanov

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The concept of a tripartite synapse holds that astrocytes can affect both the pre- and postsynaptic compartments through the Ca2+-dependent release of gliotransmitters. Because astrocytic Ca2+ transients usually last for a few seconds, we assumed that astrocytic regulation of synaptic transmission may also occur on the scale of seconds. Here, we considered the basic physiological functions of tripartite synapses and investigated astrocytic regulation at the level of neural network activity. The firing dynamics of individual neurons in a spontaneous firing network was described by the Hodgkin-Huxley model. The neurons received excitatory synaptic input driven by the Poisson spike train with variable frequency. The mean field concentration of the released neurotransmitter was used to describe the presynaptic dynamics. The amplitudes of the excitatory postsynaptic currents (PSCs obeyed the gamma distribution law. In our model, astrocytes depressed the presynaptic release and enhanced the postsynaptic currents. As a result, low frequency synaptic input was suppressed while high frequency input was amplified. The analysis of the neuron spiking frequency as an indicator of network activity revealed that tripartite synaptic transmission dramatically changed the local network operation compared to bipartite synapses. Specifically, the astrocytes supported homeostatic regulation of the network activity by increasing or decreasing firing of the neurons. Thus, the astrocyte activation may modulate a transition of neural network into bistable regime of activity with two stable firing levels and spontaneous transitions between them.

  14. Synaptic network activity induces neuronal differentiation of adult hippocampal precursor cells through BDNF signaling

    HarishBabu

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Adult hippocampal neurogenesis is regulated by activity. But how do neural precursor cells in the hippocampus respond to surrounding network activity and translate increased neural activity into a developmental program? Here we show that long-term potential (LTP-like synaptic activity within a cellular network of mature hippocampal neurons promotes neuronal differentiation of newly generated cells. In co-cultures of precursor cells with primary hippocampal neurons, LTP-like synaptic plasticity induced by addition of glycine in Mg2+-free media for 5 min, produced synchronous network activity and subsequently increased synaptic strength between neurons. Furthermore, this synchronous network activity led to a significant increase in neuronal differentiation from the co-cultured neural precursor cells. When applied directly to precursor cells, glycine and Mg2+-free solution did not induce neuronal differentiation. Synaptic plasticity-induced neuronal differentiation of precursor cells was observed in the presence of GABAergic neurotransmission blockers but was dependent on NMDA-mediated Ca2+ influx. Most importantly, neuronal differentiation required the release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF from the underlying substrate hippocampal neurons as well as TrkB receptor phosphorylation in precursor cells. This suggests that activity-dependent stem cell differentiation within the hippocampal network is mediated via synaptically evoked BDNF signaling.

  15. Voltage Estimation in Active Distribution Grids Using Neural Networks

    Pertl, Michael; Heussen, Kai; Gehrke, Oliver;

    2016-01-01

    observability of distribution systems has to be improved. To increase the situational awareness of the power system operator data driven methods can be employed. These methods benefit from newly available data sources such as smart meters. This paper presents a voltage estimation method based on neural networks......The power flow in distribution grids is becoming more complicated as reverse power flows and undesired voltage rises might occur under particular circumstances due to integration of renewable energy sources, increasing the occurrence of critical bus voltages. To identify these critical feeders the...

  16. Labor Mobility, Social Network Effects, and Innovative Activity

    Kaiser, Ulrich; Kongsted, H.C.; Rønde, Thomas

    relationship is stronger if workers join from innovative firms. We also find evidence for positive feedback from workers who leave for an innovative firm, presumably because the worker who left stays in contact with their former colleagues. This implies that the positive feedback (“social network effects......”) that has been found by other studies not only exists but even outweighs the disruption and loss of knowledge occurring to the previous employer from the worker leaving. Summing up the effects of joining and leaving workers, we find ample evidence for mobility to be associated with an increase in total...

  17. WLAN Security-Active Attack of WLAN Secure Network

    Anil Kumar Singh; Bharat Mishra

    2011-01-01

    In Wireless Local Area Network data transfer from one node to another node via air in the form of radio waves. There is no physical medium for transferring the data like traditional LAN. Because of its susceptible nature WLAN can open the door for the intruders and attackers that can come from any direction. Security is the most important element in WLAN. MAC address filtering is one of the security methods for securing the WLAN. But it is also vulnerable. In this paper we will demonstrate ho...

  18. Biopolymers under large external forces and mean-field RNA virus evolutionary dynamics

    Ahsan, Syed Amir

    The modeling of the mechanical response of single-molecules of DNA and RNA under large external forces through statistical mechanical methods is central to this thesis with a small portion devoted to modeling the evolutionary dynamics of positive-sense single-stranded RNA viruses. In order to develop and test models of biopolymer mechanics and illuminate the mechanisms underlying biological processes where biopolymers undergo changes in energy on the order of the thermal energy, , entails measuring forces and lengths on the scale of piconewtons (pN) and nanometers (nm), respectively. A capacity achieved in the past two decades at the single-molecule level through the development of micromanipulation techniques such as magnetic and optical tweezers, atomic force microscopy, coupled with advances in micro- and nanofabrication. The statistical mechanical models of biopolymers developed in this dissertation are dependent upon and the outcome of these advancements and resulting experiments. The dissertation begins in chapter 1 with an introduction to the structure and thermodynamics of DNA and RNA, highlighting the importance and effectiveness of simple, two-state models in their description as a prelude to the emergence of two-state models in the research manuscripts. In chapter 2 the standard models of the elasticity of polymers and of a polymer gel are reviewed, characterizing the continuum and mean-field models, including the scaling behavior of DNA in confined spaces. The research manuscript presented in the last section of chapter 2 (section 2.5), subsequent to a review of a Flory gel and in contrast to it, is a model of the elasticity of RNA as a gel, with viral RNA illustrating an instance of such a network, and shown to exhibit anomalous elastic behavior, a negative Poisson ratio, and capable of facilitating viral RNA encapsidation with further context provided in section 5.1. In chapter 3 the experimental methods and behavior of DNA and RNA under mechanical

  19. The ATLAS Women's Network: one year of activities

    Paula Eerola

    The idea for an ATLAS Women's Network was born during the ATLAS overview week in October 2005, when a few of us discussed our experiences and were pondering about what we could do. We felt that it was important to increase the visibility of women working in ATLAS in order to make a better and more effective use of the ATLAS human resources, that is, make sure that women are duly included at all levels. Furthermore, it is our belief that making ATLAS a better working environment for female collaborators and other female co-workers will benefit both us and the collaboration as a whole. On the individual level, all of us thought that we could benefit from peer support and experience sharing, and an ATLAS Women's Network could facilitate this by developing contacts between the ATLAS Women in ATLAS Institutes worldwide. Finally, we thought that it was important to increase the number of women studying physics and working in the field of physics research by identifying gender barriers in the career paths of women i...

  20. Nuclear power plant maintenance optimisation SENUF network activity

    During providing scientific and technical support to TACIS and PHARE nuclear safety programs a large amount of knowledge related to Russian design reactor systems has accumulated and led to creation of a new Network concerning Nuclear Safety in Central and Eastern Europe called ''Safety of Eastern European type Nuclear Facilities'' (SENUF). SENUF contributes to bring together all stakeholders of TACIS and PHARE: beneficiaries, end users, Eastern und Western nuclear industries, and thus, to favour fruitful technical exchanges and feedback of experience. At present the main focus of SENUF is the nuclear power plant maintenance as substantial element of plant operational safety as well as life management. A Working Group has been established on plant maintenance. One of its major tasks in 2004 is to prepare a status report on advanced strategies to optimise maintenance. Optimisation projects have an interface with the plant's overall life management program. Today, almost all plants involved in SENUF network have an explicit policy to extend their service life, thus, component ageing management, modernization and refurbishment actions became much more important. A database is also under development, which intends to help sharing the available knowledge and specific equipment and tools. (orig.)

  1. Hierarchical self-organization of cytoskeletal active networks

    The structural reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton is facilitated through the action of motor proteins that crosslink the actin filaments and transport them relative to each other. Here, we present a combined experimental-computational study that probes the dynamic evolution of mixtures of actin filaments and clusters of myosin motors. While on small spatial and temporal scales the system behaves in a very noisy manner, on larger scales it evolves into several well distinct patterns such as bundles, asters and networks. These patterns are characterized by junctions with high connectivity, whose formation is possible due to the organization of the motors in ‘oligoclusters’ (intermediate-size aggregates). The simulations reveal that the self-organization process proceeds through a series of hierarchical steps, starting from local microscopic moves and ranging up to the macroscopic large scales where the steady-state structures are formed. Our results shed light on the mechanisms involved in processes such as cytokinesis and cellular contractility, where myosin motors organized in clusters operate cooperatively to induce the structural organization of cytoskeletal networks. (paper)

  2. Human Activities in Natura 2000 Sites: A Highly Diversified Conservation Network

    Tsiafouli, Maria A.; Apostolopoulou, Evangelia; Mazaris, Antonios D.; Kallimanis, Athanasios S; Drakou, Evangelia G.; Pantis, John D.

    2013-01-01

    The Natura 2000 network was established across the European Union’s (EU) Member States with the aim to conserve biodiversity, while ensuring the sustainability of human activities. However, to what kind and to what extent Natura 2000 sites are subject to human activities and how this varies across Member States remains unspecified. Here, we analyzed 111,269 human activity records from 14,727 protected sites in 20 Member States. The frequency of occurrence of activities differs among countries...

  3. A topological study of repetitive co-activation networks in in vitro cortical assemblies

    To address the issue of extracting useful information from large data-set of large scale networks of neurons, we propose an algorithm that involves both algebraic-statistical and topological tools. We investigate the electrical behavior of in vitro cortical assemblies both during spontaneous and stimulus-evoked activity coupled to Micro-Electrode Arrays (MEAs). Our goal is to identify core sub-networks of repetitive and synchronous patterns of activity and to characterize them. The analysis is performed at different resolution levels using a clustering algorithm that reduces the network dimensionality. To better visualize the results, we provide a graphical representation of the detected sub-networks and characterize them with a topological invariant, i.e. the sequence of Betti numbers computed on the associated simplicial complexes. The results show that the extracted sub-populations of neurons have a more heterogeneous firing rate with respect to the entire network. Furthermore, the comparison of spontaneous and stimulus-evoked behavior reveals similarities in the identified clusters of neurons, indicating that in both conditions similar activation patterns drive the global network activity. (paper)

  4. Dynamical Behaviors of Multiple Equilibria in Competitive Neural Networks With Discontinuous Nonmonotonic Piecewise Linear Activation Functions.

    Nie, Xiaobing; Zheng, Wei Xing

    2016-03-01

    This paper addresses the problem of coexistence and dynamical behaviors of multiple equilibria for competitive neural networks. First, a general class of discontinuous nonmonotonic piecewise linear activation functions is introduced for competitive neural networks. Then based on the fixed point theorem and theory of strict diagonal dominance matrix, it is shown that under some conditions, such n -neuron competitive neural networks can have 5(n) equilibria, among which 3(n) equilibria are locally stable and the others are unstable. More importantly, it is revealed that the neural networks with the discontinuous activation functions introduced in this paper can have both more total equilibria and locally stable equilibria than the ones with other activation functions, such as the continuous Mexican-hat-type activation function and discontinuous two-level activation function. Furthermore, the 3(n) locally stable equilibria given in this paper are located in not only saturated regions, but also unsaturated regions, which is different from the existing results on multistability of neural networks with multiple level activation functions. A simulation example is provided to illustrate and validate the theoretical findings. PMID:25826814

  5. Modelling of cortical and thalamic 600 Hz activity by means of oscillatory networks.

    Milde, Thomas; Haueisen, Jens; Witte, Herbert; Leistritz, Lutz

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate information processing in the primary somatosensory system with the help of oscillatory network modelling. Specifically, we consider interactions in the oscillatory 600Hz activity between the thalamus and the cortical Brodmann areas 3b and 1. This type of cortical activity occurs after electrical stimulation of peripheral nerves such as the median nerve. Our measurements consist of simultaneous 31-channel MEG and 32-channel EEG recordings and individual 3D MRI data. We perform source localization by means of a multi-dipole model. The dipole activation time courses are then modelled by a set of coupled oscillators, described by linear second-order ordinary delay differential equations (DDEs). In particular, a new model for the thalamic activity is included in the oscillatory network. The parameters of the DDE system are successfully fitted to the data by a nonlinear evolutionary optimization method. To activate the oscillatory network, an individual input function is used, based on measurements of the propagated stimulation signal at the biceps. A significant feedback from the cortex to the thalamus could be detected by comparing the network modelling with and without feedback connections. Our finding in humans is supported by earlier animal studies. We conclude that this type of rhythmic brain activity can be modelled by oscillatory networks in order to disentangle feed forward and feedback information transfer. PMID:19497365

  6. Frequency Count Attribute Oriented Induction of Corporate Network Data for Mapping Business Activity

    Tanutama Lukas

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Companies increasingly rely on Internet for effective and efficient business communication. As Information Technology infrastructure backbone for business activities, corporate network connects the company to Internet and enables its activities globally. It carries data packets generated by the activities of the users performing their business tasks. Traditionally, infrastructure operations mainly maintain data carrying capacity and network devices performance. It would be advantageous if a company knows what activities are running in its network. The research provides a simple method of mapping the business activity reflected by the network data. To map corporate users’ activities, a slightly modified Attribute Oriented Induction (AOI approach to mine the network data was applied. The frequency of each protocol invoked were counted to show what the user intended to do. The collected data was samples taken within a certain sampling period. Samples were taken due to the enormous data packets generated. Protocols of interest are only Internet related while intranet protocols are ignored. It can be concluded that the method could provide the management a general overview of the usage of its infrastructure and lead to efficient, effective and secure ICT infrastructure.

  7. Frequency Count Attribute Oriented Induction of Corporate Network Data for Mapping Business Activity

    Tanutama, Lukas

    2014-03-01

    Companies increasingly rely on Internet for effective and efficient business communication. As Information Technology infrastructure backbone for business activities, corporate network connects the company to Internet and enables its activities globally. It carries data packets generated by the activities of the users performing their business tasks. Traditionally, infrastructure operations mainly maintain data carrying capacity and network devices performance. It would be advantageous if a company knows what activities are running in its network. The research provides a simple method of mapping the business activity reflected by the network data. To map corporate users' activities, a slightly modified Attribute Oriented Induction (AOI) approach to mine the network data was applied. The frequency of each protocol invoked were counted to show what the user intended to do. The collected data was samples taken within a certain sampling period. Samples were taken due to the enormous data packets generated. Protocols of interest are only Internet related while intranet protocols are ignored. It can be concluded that the method could provide the management a general overview of the usage of its infrastructure and lead to efficient, effective and secure ICT infrastructure.

  8. Photoluminescence intensity enhancement in SWNT aqueous suspensions due to reducing agent doping: Influence of adsorbed biopolymer

    Kurnosov, N. V.; Leontiev, V. S.; Linnik, A. S.; Lytvyn, O. S.; Karachevtsev, V. A.

    2014-06-01

    The influence of biopolymer wrapped around nanotube on the enhancement of the semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) photoluminescence (PL) in aqueous suspension which increases due to the reducing agent dithiothreitol (DTT) doping effect was revealed. The greatest enhancement of PL was observed for SWNTs covered with double- or single stranded DNA (above 170%) and DTT weak influence was revealed for SWNTs:polyC suspension (∼45%). The magnitude of the PL enhancement depends also on nanotube chirality and sample aging. The behavior of PL from SWNTs covered with various polymers is explained by the different biopolymers ordering on the nanotube surface. The ordered polymer conformation on the nanotube weakens the reducing agent doping effect. The method of reducing agent doping of nanotube:biopolymer aqueous suspension can serve as a sensitive luminescent probe of the biopolymer ordering on the carbon nanotube and can be used to increase the sensitivity of luminescent biosensors.

  9. FINAL REPORT. "GREEN" BIOPOLYMERS FOR IMPROVED DECONTAMINATION OF METALS FROM SURFACES: SORPTIVE CHARACTERIZATION AND COATING PROPERTIES

    The proposed research aimed to develop a fundamental understanding of important biological and physical chemical parameters for effective decontamination of metal surfaces using environmentally benign aqueous-based biopolymer solutions. Understanding how heavy metal-chelating bio...

  10. "GREEN" BIOPOLYMERS FOR IMPROVED DECONTAMINATION OF METALS FROM SURFACES: SORPTIVE CHARACTERIZATION AND COATING PROPERTIES

    The proposed research aims to develop a fundamental understanding of important biological and physical chemical parameters for effective decontamination of metal surfaces using environmentally benign aqueous-based biopolymer solutions. Understanding how heavy metal- chelating bio...

  11. Biopolymer Electrolyte Based on Derivatives of Cellulose from Kenaf Bast Fiber

    Mohd Saiful Asmal Rani

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A cellulose derivative, carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC, was synthesized by the reaction of cellulose from kenaf bast fiber with monochloroacetic acid. A series of biopolymer electrolytes comprised of the synthesized CMC and ammonium acetate (CH3COONH4 were prepared by the solution-casting technique. The biopolymer-based electrolyte films were characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy to investigate the formation of the CMC–CH3COONH4 complexes. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was conducted to obtain their ionic conductivities. The highest conductivity at ambient temperature of 5.77 × 10−4 S cm−1 was obtained for the electrolyte film containing 20 wt% of CH3COONH4. The biopolymer electrolyte film also exhibited electrochemical stability up to 2.5 V. These results indicated that the biopolymer electrolyte has great potential for applications to electrochemical devices, such as proton batteries and solar cells.

  12. Single walled carbon nanotubes functionally adsorbed to biopolymers for use as chemical sensors

    Johnson, Jr., Alan T.; Gelperin, Alan; Staii, Cristian

    2011-07-12

    Chemical field effect sensors comprising nanotube field effect devices having biopolymers such as single stranded DNA functionally adsorbed to the nanotubes are provided. Also included are arrays comprising the sensors and methods of using the devices to detect volatile compounds.

  13. Binary and Ternary Mixtures of Biopolymers and Water: Viscosity, Refractive Index, and Density

    Silva, Bárbara Louise L. D.; Costa, Bernardo S.; Garcia-Rojas, Edwin E.

    2016-08-01

    Biopolymers have been the focus of intense research because of their wide applicability. The thermophysical properties of solutions containing biopolymers have fundamental importance for engineering calculations, as well as for thermal load calculations, energy expenditure, and development of new products. In this work, the thermophysical properties of binary and ternary solutions of carboxymethylcellulose and/or high methoxylation pectin and water at different temperatures have been investigated taking into consideration different biopolymer concentrations. The experimental data related to the thermophysical properties were correlated to obtain empirical models that can describe the temperature-concentration combined effect on the density, refractive index, and dynamic viscosity. From data obtained from the experiments, the density, refractive index, and dynamic viscosity increase with increasing biopolymer concentration and decrease with increasing temperature. The polynomial models showed a good fit to the experimental data and high correlation coefficients (R2ge 0.98) for each studied system.

  14. Numerical simulation of conformational variability in biopolymer translocation through wide nanopores

    Fyta, Maria; Bernaschi, Massimo; Kaxiras, Efthimios; Succi, Sauro

    2009-01-01

    Numerical results on the translocation of long biopolymers through mid-sized and wide pores are presented. The simulations are based on a novel methodology which couples molecular motion to a mesoscopic fluid solvent. Thousands of events of long polymers (up to 8000 monomers) are monitored as they pass through nanopores. Comparison between the different pore sizes shows that wide pores can host a larger number of multiple biopolymer segments, as compared to smaller pores. The simulations provide clear evidence of folding quantization in the translocation process as the biopolymers undertake multi-folded configurations, characterized by a well-defined integer number of folds. Accordingly, the translocation time is no longer represented by a single-exponent power law dependence on the length, as it is the case for single-file translocation through narrow pores. The folding quantization increases with the biopolymer length, while the rate of translocated beads at each time step is linearly correlated to the numb...

  15. About possible mechanisms of current transfer in the bio-polymer - semiconductor heterostructure

    Earlier by the bio-polymer films deposition on silicon the bio-polymer - semiconductor heterostructures were created. The influence of silicon surface atoms on self-organization processes in these bio-molecules were studied. Particularly the silicon - bio-cholesterol aqueous solution and the silicon - bio-chlorophyll aqueous solution spectral photo-sensitivity were considered. In this case the of photo-response broadening in the spectral photo-sensitivity short-wave part of these systems have been observed. The similar broadening is explained by both the passivation of surface recombination centers by OH-groups and the anti-reflecting properties of aqueous solutions. Besides it is possible the additional charge carriers generation caused by quasi-inter-zone transfers in the bio-polymers depending on electron-conformation properties of macromolecules. In the paper the possible mechanisms of current transfer in the bio-polymer - semiconductor heterostructure are discussed

  16. Ion-ion reactions for charge reduction of biopolymer at atmospheric pressure ambient

    Yue Ming Zhou; Jian Hua Ding; Xie Zhang; Huan Wen Chen

    2007-01-01

    Extractive electrospray ionization source (EESI) was adapted for ion-ion reaction, which was demonstrated by using a linear quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer for the first ion-ion reaction of biopolymers in the atmospheric pressure ambient.

  17. Hydrogels from Biopolymer Hybrid for Biomedical, Food, and Functional Food Applications

    Robert C. Spiro

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid hydrogels from biopolymers have been applied for various indications across a wide range of biomedical, pharmaceutical, and functional food industries. In particular, hybrid hydrogels synthesized from two biopolymers have attracted increasing attention. The inclusion of a second biopolymer strengthens the stability of resultant hydrogels and enriches its functionalities by bringing in new functional groups or optimizing the micro-environmental conditions for certain biological and biochemical processes. This article presents approaches that have been used by our groups to synthesize biopolymer hybrid hydrogels for effective uses for immunotherapy, tissue regeneration, food and functional food applications. The research has achieved some challenging results, such as stabilizing physical structure, increasing mucoadhesiveness, and the creation of an artificial extracellular matrix to aid in guiding tissue differentiation.

  18. Accurate Wavelet Neural Network for Efficient Controlling of an Active Magnetic Bearing System

    Youssef Harkouss

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The synthesis of a command by the neural network has an excellent advantage over the classical one such as PID. This study presented a fast and accurate Wavelet Neural Network (WNN approach for efficient controlling of an Active Magnetic Bearing (AMB system. Approach: The proposed approach combined neural network with the wavelet theory. Wavelet theory may be exploited in deriving a good initialization for the neural network and thus improved convergence of the learning algorithm. Results: We tested two control systems based on three types of neural controllers: Multiplayer Perceptron (MLP controller, RBF Neural Network (RBFNN controller and WNN controller. The simulation results show that the proposed WNN controller provides better performance comparing with standard PID controller, MLP and RBFNN controllers. Conclusion: The proposed WNN approach was shown to be useful in controlling nonlinear dynamic mechanical system, such as the AMB system used in this study.

  19. A GA-based PID active queue management control design for TCP/IP networks

    In this paper, a genetic algorithm-based (GA-based) proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller as an active queue manager for Internet routers is proposed to reduce packet loss and improve network utilization in TCP/IP networks. Based on the window-based nonlinear dynamics, the TCP network was modeled as a time-delayed system with a saturated input due to the limitations of packet-dropping probability and the effects of propagation delays in TCP networks. An improved genetic algorithm is employed to derive optimal or near optimal PID control gains such that a performance index of integrated-absolute error (IAE) in terms of the error between the router queue length and the desired queue length is minimized. The performance of the proposed control scheme was evaluated in various network scenarios via a series of numerical simulations. The simulation results confirm that the proposed scheme outperforms other AQM schemes

  20. Analysis and synthesis of distributed-lumped-active networks by digital computer

    1973-01-01

    The use of digital computational techniques in the analysis and synthesis of DLA (distributed lumped active) networks is considered. This class of networks consists of three distinct types of elements, namely, distributed elements (modeled by partial differential equations), lumped elements (modeled by algebraic relations and ordinary differential equations), and active elements (modeled by algebraic relations). Such a characterization is applicable to a broad class of circuits, especially including those usually referred to as linear integrated circuits, since the fabrication techniques for such circuits readily produce elements which may be modeled as distributed, as well as the more conventional lumped and active ones.

  1. Biopolymer chitosan: Properties, interactions and its use in the treatment of textiles

    Jocić Dragan; Topalović Tatjana

    2004-01-01

    The biopolymer chitosan is obtained by the deacetylation of chitin, the second most abundant polysaccharide in nature, after cellulose. It is becoming an increasingly important biopolymer because it offers unique physico-chemical and biological properties. Due to its solubility, chitosan allows processing from aqueous solutions. This review provides information on important chitosan properties, as well as on some interactions that are of special interest for chitosan application. It summarize...

  2. Quantized current blockade and hydrodynamic correlations in biopolymer translocation through nanopores: evidence from multiscale simulations

    Bernaschi, Massimo; Succi, Sauro; Fyta, Maria; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    2008-01-01

    We present a detailed description of biopolymer translocation through a nanopore in the presence of a solvent, using an innovative multi-scale methodology which treats the biopolymer at the microscopic scale as combined with a self-consistent mesoscopic description for the solvent fluid dynamics. We report evidence for quantized current blockade depending on the folding configuration and offer detailed information on the role of hydrodynamic correlations in speeding-up the translocation process.

  3. Biopolymer mediated sol-gel synthesis of LuBa2Cu3O7-δ

    The use of biopolymer templates to control crystallization of superconducting phases is a recent phenomenon which is generating a lot of interest both from the superconductor community and more widely in materials chemistry circles. The high temperature superconducting material LuBa2Cu3O7-δ has been synthesized successfully using the biopolymer dextran, leading to a greatly improved synthesis time of 48 h in comparison to the previous solid state synthesis timescale of over 500 h.

  4. Biopolymer Electrolyte Based on Derivatives of Cellulose from Kenaf Bast Fiber

    Mohd Saiful Asmal Rani; Siti Rudhziah; Azizan Ahmad; Nor Sabirin Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    A cellulose derivative, carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC), was synthesized by the reaction of cellulose from kenaf bast fiber with monochloroacetic acid. A series of biopolymer electrolytes comprised of the synthesized CMC and ammonium acetate (CH3COONH4) were prepared by the solution-casting technique. The biopolymer-based electrolyte films were characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy to investigate the formation of the CMC–CH3COONH4 complexes. Electrochemical impedance spectros...

  5. The estimation of harmfulness for environment of moulding sand with biopolymer binder based on polylactide

    K. Major-Gabryś

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The article takes into consideration technological and ecological aspects of IV generation moulding sands. Investigations concerning anapplication of biopolymer materials as binders for moulding sands are presented in the paper. These investigations are the continuation ofexaminations related to applications of various biopolymers as binding agents and to the properties of the moulding sands with biopolymerbinders. In the paper there are the researches concerning analyzing gases emitted from moulding sands during heating.

  6. The estimation of harmfulness for environment of moulding sand with biopolymer binder based on polylactide

    K. Major-Gabryś; St.M. Dobosz; J. Jakubski

    2011-01-01

    The article takes into consideration technological and ecological aspects of IV generation moulding sands. Investigations concerning anapplication of biopolymer materials as binders for moulding sands are presented in the paper. These investigations are the continuation ofexaminations related to applications of various biopolymers as binding agents and to the properties of the moulding sands with biopolymerbinders. In the paper there are the researches concerning analyzing gases emitted from ...

  7. Ethanol affects network activity in cultured rat hippocampus: mediation by potassium channels.

    Eduard Korkotian

    Full Text Available The effects of ethanol on neuronal network activity were studied in dissociated cultures of rat hippocampus. Exposure to low (0.25-0.5% ethanol concentrations caused an increase in synchronized network spikes, and a decrease in the duration of individual spikes. Ethanol also caused an increase in rate of miniature spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents. Higher concentrations of ethanol eliminated network spikes. These effects were reversible upon wash. The effects of the high, but not the low ethanol were blocked by the GABA antagonist bicuculline. The enhancing action of low ethanol was blocked by apamin, an SK potassium channel antagonist, and mimicked by 1-EBIO, an SK channel opener. It is proposed that in cultured hippocampal networks low concentration of ethanol is associated with SK channel activity, rather than the GABAergic receptor.

  8. Active Vibration Control of the Smart Plate Using Artificial Neural Network Controller

    Mohit

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The active vibration control (AVC of a rectangular plate with single input and single output approach is investigated using artificial neural network. The cantilever plate of finite length, breadth, and thickness having piezoelectric patches as sensors/actuators fixed at the upper and lower surface of the metal plate is considered for examination. The finite element model of the cantilever plate is utilized to formulate the whole strategy. The compact RIO and MATLAB simulation software are exercised to get the appropriate results. The cantilever plate is subjected to impulse input and uniform white noise disturbance. The neural network is trained offline and tuned with LQR controller. The various training algorithms to tune the neural network are exercised. The best efficient algorithm is finally considered to tune the neural network controller designed for active vibration control of the smart plate.

  9. Active Build-Model Random Forest Method for Network Traffic Classification

    Alhamza Munther

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Network traffic classification continues to be an interesting subject among numerous networking communities. This method introduces multi-beneficial solutions in different avenues, such as network security, network management, anomaly detection, and quality-of-service. In this paper, we propose a supervised machine learning method that efficiently classifies different types of applications using the Active Build-Model Random Forest (ABRF method. This method constructs a new build model for the original Random Forest (RF method to decrease processing time. This build model includes only the active trees (i.e., trees with high accuracy, whereas the passive trees are excluded from the forest. The passive trees were excluded without any negative effect on classification accuracy. Results show that the ABRF method decreases the processing time by up to 37.5% compared with the original RF method. Our model has an overall accuracy of 98.66% based on the benchmark dataset considered in this paper.

  10. Nanoscale charge transport in cytochrome c3/DNA network: Comparative studies between redox-active molecules

    Yamaguchi, Harumasa; Che, Dock-Chil; Hirano, Yoshiaki; Suzuki, Masayuki; Higuchi, Yoshiki; Matsumoto, Takuya

    2015-09-01

    The redox-active molecule of a cytochrome c3/DNA network exhibits nonlinear current-voltage (I-V) characteristics with a threshold bias voltage at low temperature and zero-bias conductance at room temperature. I-V curves for the cytochrome c3/DNA network are well matched with the Coulomb blockade network model. Comparative studies of the Mn12 cluster, cytochrome c, and cytochrome c3, which have a wide variety of redox potentials, indicate no difference in charge transport, which suggests that the conduction mechanism is not directly related to the redox states. The charge transport mechanism has been discussed in terms of the newly-formed electronic energy states near the Fermi level, induced by the ionic interaction between redox-active molecules with the DNA network.

  11. Hierarchical self-organization of cytoskeletal active networks

    Gordon, Daniel; Keasar, Chen; Farago, Oded

    2012-01-01

    The structural reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton is facilitated through the action of motor proteins that crosslink the actin filaments and transport them relative to each other. Here, we present a combined experimental-computational study that probes the dynamic evolution of mixtures of actin filaments and clusters of myosin motors. While on small spatial and temporal scales the system behaves in a very noisy manner, on larger scales it evolves into several well distinct patterns such as bundles, asters, and networks. These patterns are characterized by junctions with high connectivity, whose formation is possible due to the organization of the motors in "oligoclusters" (intermediate-size aggregates). The simulations reveal that the self-organization process proceeds through a series of hierarchical steps, starting from local microscopic moves and ranging up to the macroscopic large scales where the steady-state structures are formed. Our results shed light into the mechanisms involved in processes li...

  12. Microscopic theory of the glassy dynamics of passive and active network materials.

    Wang, Shenshen; Wolynes, Peter G

    2013-03-28

    Signatures of glassy dynamics have been identified experimentally for a rich variety of materials in which molecular networks provide rigidity. Here we present a theoretical framework to study the glassy behavior of both passive and active network materials. We construct a general microscopic network model that incorporates nonlinear elasticity of individual filaments and steric constraints due to crowding. Based on constructive analogies between structural glass forming liquids and random field Ising magnets implemented using a heterogeneous self-consistent phonon method, our scheme provides a microscopic approach to determine the mismatch surface tension and the configurational entropy, which compete in determining the barrier for structural rearrangements within the random first order transition theory of escape from a local energy minimum. The influence of crosslinking on the fragility of inorganic network glass formers is recapitulated by the model. For active network materials, the mapping, which correlates the glassy characteristics to the network architecture and properties of nonequilibrium motor processes, is shown to capture several key experimental observations on the cytoskeleton of living cells: Highly connected tense networks behave as strong glass formers; intense motor action promotes reconfiguration. The fact that our model assuming a negative motor susceptibility predicts the latter suggests that on average the motorized processes in living cells do resist the imposed mechanical load. Our calculations also identify a spinodal point where simultaneously the mismatch penalty vanishes and the mechanical stability of amorphous packing disappears. PMID:23556772

  13. A fast learning algorithm of neural network with tunable activation function

    SHEN Yanjun; WANG Bingwen

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a modified structure of a neural network with tunable activation function and provides a new learning algorithm for the neural network training. Simulation results of XOR problem, Feigenbaum function, and Henon map show that the new algorithm has better performance than BP (back propagation) algorithm in terms of shorter convergence time and higher convergence accuracy. Further modifications of the structure of the neural network with the faster learning algorithm demonstrate simpler structure with even faster convergence speed and better convergence accuracy.

  14. Synaptic GABA release prevents GABA transporter type-1 reversal during excessive network activity

    Savtchenko, L.; Megalogeni, M.; Rusakov, D. A.; Walker, M. C.; Pavlov, I.

    2015-01-01

    GABA transporters control extracellular GABA, which regulates the key aspects of neuronal and network behaviour. A prevailing view is that modest neuronal depolarization results in GABA transporter type-1 (GAT-1) reversal causing non-vesicular GABA release into the extracellular space during intense network activity. This has important implications for GABA uptake-targeting therapies. Here we combined a realistic kinetic model of GAT-1 with experimental measurements of tonic GABAA receptor cu...

  15. Central European MetEor NeTwork: Current status and future activities

    Srba, J.; Koukal, J.; Ferus, M.; Lenža, L.; Gorková, S.; Civiš, S.; Simon, J.; Csorgei, T.; Jedlièka, M.; Korec, M.; Kaniansky, S.; Polák, J.; Spurný, M.; Brázdil, T.; Mäsiar, J.; Zima, M.; Delinèák, P.; Popek, M.; Bahýl, V.; Piffl, R.; Èechmánek, M.

    2016-06-01

    The Central European video Meteor Network (CEMeNt) established in 2010 is a platform for cross-border cooperation in the field of video meteor observations between Czech Republic and Slovakia. During five years of operation the CEMeNt network went through an extensive development. In total, 37 video systems were working on 20 permanent stations located in Czech Republic and Slovakia during 2015. In this paper we summarize CEMeNt current status and introduce some future activities.

  16. Friendship Network Characteristics Are Associated with Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior in Early Adolescence

    Jennifer Marks; Kayla de la Haye; Barnett, Lisa M.; Steven Allender

    2015-01-01

    Introduction There is limited understanding of the association between peer social networks and physical activity (PA), sedentary and screen-related behaviors. This study reports on associations between personal network characteristics and these important health behaviors for early adolescents. Methods Participants were 310 students, aged 11–13 years, from fifteen randomly selected Victorian primary schools (43% response rate). PA and sedentary behaviors were collected via accelerometer and s...

  17. Functional Language Networks in Sedentary and Physically Active Older Adults

    Zlatar, Zvinka Z.; Towler, Stephen; Keith M McGregor; Dzierzewski, Joseph M.; Bauer, Andrew; Phan, Stephanie; Cohen, Matthew; Marsiske, Michael; Manini, Todd M; Crosson, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have identified consistent age-related changes during various cognitive tasks, such that older individuals display more positive and less negative task-related activity than young adults. Recently, evidence shows that chronic physical exercise may alter aging-related changes in brain activity; however, the effect of exercise has not been studied for the neural substrates of language function. Additionally, the potential mechanisms by which ...

  18. Drug target identification using network analysis: Taking active components in Sini decoction as an example.

    Chen, Si; Jiang, Hailong; Cao, Yan; Wang, Yun; Hu, Ziheng; Zhu, Zhenyu; Chai, Yifeng

    2016-01-01

    Identifying the molecular targets for the beneficial effects of active small-molecule compounds simultaneously is an important and currently unmet challenge. In this study, we firstly proposed network analysis by integrating data from network pharmacology and metabolomics to identify targets of active components in sini decoction (SND) simultaneously against heart failure. To begin with, 48 potential active components in SND against heart failure were predicted by serum pharmacochemistry, text mining and similarity match. Then, we employed network pharmacology including text mining and molecular docking to identify the potential targets of these components. The key enriched processes, pathways and related diseases of these target proteins were analyzed by STRING database. At last, network analysis was conducted to identify most possible targets of components in SND. Among the 25 targets predicted by network analysis, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) was firstly experimentally validated in molecular and cellular level. Results indicated that hypaconitine, mesaconitine, higenamine and quercetin in SND can directly bind to TNF-α, reduce the TNF-α-mediated cytotoxicity on L929 cells and exert anti-myocardial cell apoptosis effects. We envisage that network analysis will also be useful in target identification of a bioactive compound. PMID:27095146

  19. The role of printing parameters and scaffold biopolymer properties in the efficacy of a new hybrid nano-bioprinting system

    Buyukhatipoglu, Kivilcim; Jo, Wonjin; Sun Wei; Clyne, Alisa Morss, E-mail: asm67@drexel.ed [Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics, Drexel University, 3141 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

    2009-09-15

    We created a hybrid nano-bioprinting system, which combines the initial patterning capabilities of direct cell writing with the active patterning capabilities of superparamagnetic nanoparticles. Biofabrication conditions, including printing parameters and scaffold biopolymer properties, may affect cell viability, nanoparticle manipulation and patterning capabilities. Nanoparticles were printed under varied conditions either in the biopolymer or loaded inside cells. Cell viability, alginate viscosity, nanoparticle movement and printing resolution were measured. We now show that while nanoparticles decreased cell viability, nozzle size had no significant effect. High printing pressure decreased cell viability, but viability loss was not accentuated by nanoparticles. High nanoparticle concentrations increased alginate viscosity at higher alginate concentrations. Nanoparticle velocity in response to a magnetic field was a function of nanoparticle diameter and scaffold viscosity, which agreed with a mathematical model of nanoparticle movement. Finally, the nano-bioprinting system resolution and patterning precision were not affected by nanoparticles in the prepolymer solution. These data suggest that nanoparticle incorporation in solid freeform fabrication does not change biofabrication parameters unless high nanoparticle concentrations are used. Future work includes developing vascularized tissue engineering constructs using the nano-bioprinting system.

  20. The role of printing parameters and scaffold biopolymer properties in the efficacy of a new hybrid nano-bioprinting system

    We created a hybrid nano-bioprinting system, which combines the initial patterning capabilities of direct cell writing with the active patterning capabilities of superparamagnetic nanoparticles. Biofabrication conditions, including printing parameters and scaffold biopolymer properties, may affect cell viability, nanoparticle manipulation and patterning capabilities. Nanoparticles were printed under varied conditions either in the biopolymer or loaded inside cells. Cell viability, alginate viscosity, nanoparticle movement and printing resolution were measured. We now show that while nanoparticles decreased cell viability, nozzle size had no significant effect. High printing pressure decreased cell viability, but viability loss was not accentuated by nanoparticles. High nanoparticle concentrations increased alginate viscosity at higher alginate concentrations. Nanoparticle velocity in response to a magnetic field was a function of nanoparticle diameter and scaffold viscosity, which agreed with a mathematical model of nanoparticle movement. Finally, the nano-bioprinting system resolution and patterning precision were not affected by nanoparticles in the prepolymer solution. These data suggest that nanoparticle incorporation in solid freeform fabrication does not change biofabrication parameters unless high nanoparticle concentrations are used. Future work includes developing vascularized tissue engineering constructs using the nano-bioprinting system.

  1. Rayleigh Scattering of Moessbauer Radiation (RSMR) data, hydration effects and glass-like dynamical model of biopolymers

    Specific features of the Rayleigh Scattering of Moessbauer Radiation (RSMR) technique in the study of biological systems are described. Experimental data show that the temperature and hydration degree are the principal parameters which influence intramolecular mobility in biopolymers. Data on temperature dependencies of elastic fraction, f, and spectrum line-shape do not fit neither Debye or Einstein models of solids nor the free diffusion in liquids and demand for their explanation a multimode approximation (i.e. a wide spectrum of correlation times, at T=293 K from 10-6s to 10-12-10-13s). On the basis of RSMR, low temperature specific heat and X-ray dynamic analysis data and from the general conditions that information macromolecule must be in a non-equilibrium state (an independent confirmation of this fact comes from the kinetic model of protein folding) a glass-like dynamical model of biopolymers is formulated. A possible interpretation of RSMR data shows that fluctuatively prepared tunneling between quasiequilibrium positions (QEP) can prevail activated transitions up to a room temperature. (orig.)

  2. Associations between Aspects of Friendship Networks, Physical Activity, and Sedentary Behaviour among Adolescents

    Keri Jo Sawka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Adolescent friendships have been linked to physical activity levels; however, network characteristics have not been broadly examined. Method. In a cross-sectional analysis of 1061 adolescents (11–15 years, achieving 60 minutes/day of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA and participating in over 2 hours/day of sedentary behaviour were determined based on friendship network characteristics (density; proportion of active/sedentary friends; betweenness centrality; popularity; clique membership and perceived social support. Results. Adolescents with no friendship nominations participated in less MVPA. For boys and girls, a ten percent point increase in active friends was positively associated with achievement of 60 minutes/day of MVPA (OR 1.11; 95% CI 1.02–1.21, OR 1.14; 95% CI 1.02–1.27, resp.. For boys, higher social support from friends was negatively associated with achieving 60 minutes/day of MVPA (OR 0.63; 95% CI 0.42–0.96. Compared with low density networks, boys in higher density networks were more likely to participate in over 2 hours/day of sedentary behaviour (OR 2.93; 95% CI 1.32–6.49. Social support from friends also modified associations between network characteristics and MVPA and sedentary behaviour. Conclusion. Different network characteristics appeared to have different consequences. The proportion of active close friends was associated with MVPA, while network density was associated with sedentary behaviour. This poses challenges for intervention design.

  3. Clay nanotube-biopolymer composite scaffolds for tissue engineering

    Naumenko, Ekaterina A.; Guryanov, Ivan D.; Yendluri, Raghuvara; Lvov, Yuri M.; Fakhrullin, Rawil F.

    2016-03-01

    Porous biopolymer hydrogels doped at 3-6 wt% with 50 nm diameter/0.8 μm long natural clay nanotubes were produced without any cross-linkers using the freeze-drying method. The enhancement of mechanical strength (doubled pick load), higher water uptake and thermal properties in chitosan-gelatine-agarose hydrogels doped with halloysite was demonstrated. SEM and AFM imaging has shown the even distribution of nanotubes within the scaffolds. We used enhanced dark-field microscopy to visualise the distribution of halloysite nanotubes in the implantation area. In vitro cell adhesion and proliferation on the nanocomposites occur without changes in viability and cytoskeleton formation. In vivo biocompatibility and biodegradability evaluation in rats has confirmed that the scaffolds promote the formation of novel blood vessels around the implantation sites. The scaffolds show excellent resorption within six weeks after implantation in rats. Neo-vascularization observed in newly formed connective tissue placed near the scaffold allows for the complete restoration of blood flow. These phenomena indicate that the halloysite-doped scaffolds are biocompatible as demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo. The chitosan-gelatine-agarose doped clay nanotube nanocomposite scaffolds fabricated in this work are promising candidates for tissue engineering applications.Porous biopolymer hydrogels doped at 3-6 wt% with 50 nm diameter/0.8 μm long natural clay nanotubes were produced without any cross-linkers using the freeze-drying method. The enhancement of mechanical strength (doubled pick load), higher water uptake and thermal properties in chitosan-gelatine-agarose hydrogels doped with halloysite was demonstrated. SEM and AFM imaging has shown the even distribution of nanotubes within the scaffolds. We used enhanced dark-field microscopy to visualise the distribution of halloysite nanotubes in the implantation area. In vitro cell adhesion and proliferation on the nanocomposites occur

  4. Elastic modulus of biopolymer matrix in nacre measured using coupled atomic force microscopy bending and inverse finite element techniques

    A novel approach combining the atomic force microscopy probing of nacre biopolymer strand and the inverse finite element analysis has been used to directly measure the elastic modulus of nacre biopolymer matrix. An elastic modulus of 11 ± 3 GPa was determined for the first time from the direct measurement of the nacre biopolymer matrix. This property is essential for a fundamental understanding of the roles that the biopolymer matrix plays in nacre's strengthening and toughening, and provides guidelines in selecting engineering polymers for biomimetic materials design and fabrication. Such coupled experimental and modeling techniques should find more applications in studying the mechanical behavior of biological materials. Highlights: → Modulus of nacre biopolymer was directly measured using AFM and inverse FEM. → An elastic modulus of 10.57 ± 2.56 GPa was determined for nacre biopolymer matrix. → New approach developed in this study is useful for testing of biological materials.

  5. A Hierarchical Approach to Real-time Activity Recognition in Body Sensor Networks

    Wang, Liang; Gu, Tao; Tao, Xianping;

    2012-01-01

    algorithm to detect gestures at the sensor node level, and then propose a pattern based real-time algorithm to recognize complex, high-level activities at the portable device level. We evaluate our algorithms over a real-world dataset. The results show that the proposed system not only achieves good......Real-time activity recognition in body sensor networks is an important and challenging task. In this paper, we propose a real-time, hierarchical model to recognize both simple gestures and complex activities using a wireless body sensor network. In this model, we rst use a fast and lightweight...... performance (an average utility of 0.81, an average accuracy of 82.87%, and an average real-time delay of 5.7 seconds), but also signicantly reduces the network communication cost by 60.2%....

  6. Real-time Human Activity Recognition using a Body Sensor Network

    Wang, Liang; Gu, Tao; Chen, Hanhua;

    2010-01-01

    . In this model, we first use a fast, lightweight template matching algorithm to detect gestures at the sensor node level, and then use a discriminative pattern based real-time algorithm to recognize high-level activities at the portable device level. We evaluate our algorithms over a real-world dataset......Real-time activity recognition using body sensor networks is an important and challenging task and it has many potential applications. In this paper, we propose a realtime, hierarchical model to recognize both simple gestures and complex activities using a wireless body sensor network....... The results show that the proposed system not only achieves good performance (an average precision of 94.9%, an average recall of 82.5%, and an average real-time delay of 5.7 seconds), but also significantly reduces the network communication cost by 60.2%....

  7. A Web-Based, Social Networking Physical Activity Intervention for Insufficiently Active Adults Delivered via Facebook App: Randomized Controlled Trial

    Ferguson, Monika; Vandelanotte, Corneel; Plotnikoff, Ron; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; Thomas, Samantha; Nelson-Field, Karen; Olds, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Background Online social networks offer considerable potential for delivery of socially influential health behavior change interventions. Objective To determine the efficacy, engagement, and feasibility of an online social networking physical activity intervention with pedometers delivered via Facebook app. Methods A total of 110 adults with a mean age of 35.6 years (SD 12.4) were recruited online in teams of 3 to 8 friends. Teams were randomly allocated to receive access to a 50-day online social networking physical activity intervention which included self-monitoring, social elements, and pedometers (“Active Team” Facebook app; n=51 individuals, 12 teams) or a wait-listed control condition (n=59 individuals, 13 teams). Assessments were undertaken online at baseline, 8 weeks, and 20 weeks. The primary outcome measure was self-reported weekly moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA). Secondary outcomes were weekly walking, vigorous physical activity time, moderate physical activity time, overall quality of life, and mental health quality of life. Analyses were undertaken using random-effects mixed modeling, accounting for potential clustering at the team level. Usage statistics were reported descriptively to determine engagement and feasibility. Results At the 8-week follow-up, the intervention participants had significantly increased their total weekly MVPA by 135 minutes relative to the control group (P=.03), due primarily to increases in walking time (155 min/week increase relative to controls, Psocial networking physical activity intervention with pedometers can produce sizable short-term physical activity changes. Future work is needed to determine how to maintain behavior change in the longer term, how to reach at-need populations, and how to disseminate such interventions on a mass scale. Trial Registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR): ACTRN12614000488606; https://www

  8. Managing nuclear knowledge: IAEA activities and international coordination. Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology (ANENT)

    This CD-ROM is attached to the booklet 'Managing nuclear knowledge: IAEA activities and international coordination. Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology (ANENT)'. It contains the background material with regard to ANENT in full text, including policy level papers, reports, presentation material made by Member States, and meeting summaries during the period 2002-2005. Further information on the current ANENT activities and related IAEA activities is available at 'http://anent-iaea.org' and 'http://iaea.org/inisnkm'

  9. The Self-Pleasantness Judgment Modulates the Encoding Performance and the Default Mode Network Activity

    Perrone-Bertolotti, Marcela; Cerles, Melanie; Ramdeen, Kylee T.; Boudiaf, Naila; Pichat, Cedric; Hot, Pascal; Baciu, Monica

    2016-01-01

    In this functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study, we evaluated the effect of self-relevance on cerebral activity and behavioral performance during an incidental encoding task. Recent findings suggest that pleasantness judgments reliably induce self-oriented (internal) thoughts and increase default mode network (DMN) activity. We hypothesized that this increase in DMN activity would relate to increased memory recognition for pleasantly-judged stimuli (which depend on internally-orien...

  10. Activity patterns of cultured neural networks on micro electrode arrays

    Rutten, W.L.C.; Pelt, van J.

    2001-01-01

    A hybrid neuro-electronic interface is a cell-cultured micro electrode array, acting as a neural information transducer for stimulation and/or recording of neural activity in the brain or the spinal cord (ventral motor region or dorsal sensory region). It consists of an array of micro electrodes on

  11. Improved training of neural networks for the nonlinear active control of sound and vibration.

    Bouchard, M; Paillard, B; Le Dinh, C T

    1999-01-01

    Active control of sound and vibration has been the subject of a lot of research in recent years, and examples of applications are now numerous. However, few practical implementations of nonlinear active controllers have been realized. Nonlinear active controllers may be required in cases where the actuators used in active control systems exhibit nonlinear characteristics, or in cases when the structure to be controlled exhibits a nonlinear behavior. A multilayer perceptron neural-network based control structure was previously introduced as a nonlinear active controller, with a training algorithm based on an extended backpropagation scheme. This paper introduces new heuristical training algorithms for the same neural-network control structure. The objective is to develop new algorithms with faster convergence speed (by using nonlinear recursive-least-squares algorithms) and/or lower computational loads (by using an alternative approach to compute the instantaneous gradient of the cost function). Experimental results of active sound control using a nonlinear actuator with linear and nonlinear controllers are presented. The results show that some of the new algorithms can greatly improve the learning rate of the neural-network control structure, and that for the considered experimental setup a neural-network controller can outperform linear controllers. PMID:18252535

  12. Natural additives and agricultural wastes in biopolymer formulations for food packaging

    Valdés, Arantzazu; Mellinas, Ana Cristina; Ramos, Marina; Garrigós, María Carmen; Jiménez, Alfonso

    2014-02-01

    The main directions in food packaging research are targeted towards improvements in food quality and food safety. For this purpose, food packaging providing longer product shelf-life, as well as the monitoring of safety and quality based upon international standards, is desirable. New active packaging strategies represent a key area of development in new multifunctional materials where the use of natural additives and/or agricultural wastes is getting increasing interest. The development of new materials, and particularly innovative biopolymer formulations, can help to address these requirements and also with other packaging functions such as: food protection and preservation, marketing and smart communication to consumers. The use of biocomposites for active food packaging is one of the most studied approaches in the last years on materials in contact with food. Applications of these innovative biocomposites could help to provide new food packaging materials with improved mechanical, barrier, antioxidant and antimicrobial properties. From the food industry standpoint, concerns such as the safety and risk associated with these new additives, migration properties and possible human ingestion and regulations need to be considered. The latest innovations in the use of these innovative formulations to obtain biocomposites are reported in this review. Legislative issues related to the use of natural additives and agricultural wastes in food packaging systems are also discussed.

  13. Process for encapsulating active agents in gels

    Yilmaz, G.; Jongboom, R.O.J.; Oosterhaven, J.

    2001-01-01

    The present invention relates to a process for encapsulating an active agent in a biopolymer in the form of a gel, comprising the steps of: a) forming a dispersion or solution of the biopolymer in water; and b) adding the active agent to the dispersion or solution obtained in step a); wherein the biopolymer is at least partially dissolved before and/or after addition of the active agent. The gels obtained with the present invention are particularly suitable for coating or impregnating packagi...

  14. Oxygen consumption rates during three different neuronal activity states in the hippocampal CA3 network

    Huchzermeyer, Christine; Berndt, Nikolaus; Holzhütter, Hermann-Georg; Kann, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    The brain is an organ with high metabolic rate. However, little is known about energy utilization during different activity states of neuronal networks. We addressed this issue in area CA3 of hippocampal slice cultures under well-defined recording conditions using a 20% O2 gas mixture. We combined recordings of local field potential and interstitial partial oxygen pressure (pO2) during three different activity states, namely fast network oscillations in the gamma-frequency band (30 to 100 Hz)...

  15. Tristable and multiple bistable activity in complex random binary networks of two-state units

    Christ, Simon; Schimansky-Geier, Lutz

    2016-01-01

    We study complex networks of stochastic two-state units. Our aim is to model discrete stochastic excitable dynamics with a rest and an excited state. These two states are assumed to possess different waiting time distributions. The rest state is treated as an activation process with an exponentially distributed life time, whereas the latter in the excited state shall have a constant mean which may originate from any distribution. The activation rate of any single unit is determined by its neighbors according to a random complex network structure. In order to treat this problem in an analytical way, we use a heterogeneous mean-field approximation yielding a set of equations general valid for uncorrelated random networks. Based on this derivation we focus on random binary networks where the network is solely comprised of nodes with either of two degrees. The ratio between the two degrees is shown to be a crucial parameter. Dependent on the composition of the network the steady states show the usual transition f...

  16. Operation Optimization Based on the Power Supply and Storage Capacity of an Active Distribution Network

    Wenpeng Yu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to the interconnection and active management of Distributed Generation (DG and Energy Storage Systems (ESSs, the traditional electrical distribution network has become an Active Distribution Network (ADN, posing challenges to the operation optimization of the network. The power supply and storage capacity indexes of a Local Autonomy Control Region (LACR, which consists of DGs, ESSs and the network, are proposed in this paper to quantify the power regulating range of a LACR. DG/ESS and the network are considered as a whole in the model of the indexes, considering both network constraints and power constraints of the DG/ESS. The index quantifies the maximum LACR power supplied to or received from ADN lines. Similarly, power supply and storage capacity indexes of the ADN line are also proposed to quantify the maximum power exchanged between ADN lines. Then a practical algorithm to calculate the indexes is presented, and an operation optimization model is proposed based on the indexes to maximum the economic benefit of DG/ESS. In the optimization model, the power supply reliability of the ADN line is also considered. Finally, the indexes of power supply and storage capacity and the optimization are demonstrated in a case study.

  17. Memory effects induce structure in social networks with activity-driven agents

    Activity-driven modelling has recently been proposed as an alternative growth mechanism for time varying networks,displaying power-law degree distribution in time-aggregated representation. This approach assumes memoryless agents developing random connections with total disregard of their previous contacts. Thus, such an assumption leads to time-aggregated random networks that do not reproduce the positive degree-degree correlation and high clustering coefficient widely observed in real social networks. In this paper, we aim to study the incidence of the agents' long-term memory on the emergence of new social ties. To this end, we propose a dynamical network model assuming heterogeneous activity for agents, together with a triadic-closure step as main connectivity mechanism. We show that this simple mechanism provides some of the fundamental topological features expected for real social networks in their time-aggregated picture. We derive analytical results and perform extensive numerical simulations in regimes with and without population growth. Finally, we present an illustrative comparison with two case studies, one comprising face-to-face encounters in a closed gathering, while the other one corresponding to social friendship ties from an online social network. (paper)

  18. Update on the activities of the GGOS Bureau of Networks and Observations

    Pearlman, Michael R.; Pavlis, Erricos C.; Ma, Chopo; Noll, Carey; Thaller, Daniela; Richter, Bernd; Gross, Richard; Neilan, Ruth; Mueller, Juergen; Barzaghi, Ricardo; Bergstrand, Sten; Saunier, Jerome; Tamisiea, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The recently reorganized GGOS Bureau of Networks and Observations has many elements that are associated with building and sustaining the infrastructure that supports the Global Geodetic Observing System (GGOS) through the development and maintenance of the International Terrestrial and Celestial Reference Frames, improved gravity field models and their incorporation into the reference frame, the production of precision orbits for missions of interest to GGOS, and many other applications. The affiliated Service Networks (IVS, ILRS, IGS, IDS, and now the IGFS and the PSMSL) continue to grow geographically and to improve core and co-location site performance with newer technologies. Efforts are underway to expand GGOS participation and outreach. Several groups are undertaking initiatives and seeking partnerships to update existing sites and expand the networks in geographic areas void of coverage. New satellites are being launched by the Space Agencies in disciplines relevant to GGOS. Working groups now constitute an integral part of the Bureau, providing key service to GGOS. Their activities include: projecting future network capability and examining trade-off options for station deployment and technology upgrades, developing metadata collection and online availability strategies; improving coordination and information exchange with the missions for better ground-based network response and space-segment adequacy for the realization of GGOS goals; and standardizing site-tie measurement, archiving, and analysis procedures. This poster will present the progress in the Bureau's activities and its efforts to expand the networks and make them more effective in supporting GGOS.

  19. Increased activity of pre-motor network does not change the excitability of motoneurons during protracted scratch initiation

    Guzulaitis, Robertas; Alaburda, Aidas; Hounsgaard, Jørn Dybkjær

    2013-01-01

    and pre-motor network activity in the time interval from the start of sensory stimulation until the onset of scratch activity. Our results suggest that increased activity in the pre-motor network facilitates the onset of scratch episodes but does not change the excitability of motoneurons at the onset...

  20. Optimal Recognition Method of Human Activities Using Artificial Neural Networks

    Oniga Stefan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is an exhaustive analysis of the various factors that may influence the recognition rate of the human activity using wearable sensors data. We made a total of 1674 simulations on a publically released human activity database by a group of researcher from the University of California at Berkeley. In a previous research, we analyzed the influence of the number of sensors and their placement. In the present research we have examined the influence of the number of sensor nodes, the type of sensor node, preprocessing algorithms, type of classifier and its parameters. The final purpose is to find the optimal setup for best recognition rates with lowest hardware and software costs.