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Sample records for activation coordinates multiple

  1. EBF contains a novel zinc coordination motif and multiple dimerization and transcriptional activation domains.

    Hagman, J; Gutch, M J; H. Lin; Grosschedl, R.

    1995-01-01

    Early B cell factor (EBF) was identified and cloned as a transcription factor expressed specifically in B lymphocytes and adipocytes. This protein was also identified as olfactory factor 1 (Olf-1) in olfactory neurons. In this study, we analyzed the structural requirements for DNA binding, homodimerization and transcriptional activation by EBF. A carboxyl-terminal region, containing a repeat of alpha-helices related to the helix-loop-helix motif, is important for dimerization of EBF in soluti...

  2. Modeling Students' Units Coordinating Activity

    Boyce, Steven James

    2014-01-01

    Primarily via constructivist teaching experiment methodology, units coordination (Steffe, 1992) has emerged as a useful construct for modeling students' psychological constructions pertaining to several mathematical domains, including counting sequences, whole number multiplicative conceptions, and fractions schemes. I describe how consideration of units coordination as a Piagetian (1970b) structure is useful for modeling units coordination across contexts. In this study, I extend teaching ...

  3. Neuromuscular synaptogenesis: coordinating partners with multiple functions.

    Darabid, Houssam; Perez-Gonzalez, Anna P; Robitaille, Richard

    2014-11-01

    The formation of highly efficient and reliable synapses at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) relies on dynamic molecular interactions. Studies of the development and maturation of the NMJ have focused on events that are dependent on synaptic activity and that require the coordinated actions of nerve- and muscle-derived molecules with different targets and effects. More recently, perisynaptic Schwann cells--the glial cells at NMJs--have become an important focus of research. These glia concomitantly contribute to pre- and postsynaptic maturation while undergoing maturation themselves. Thus, an intricate 'danse à trois’'regulates the maturation of the NMJ to form a highly efficient communication unit, in which fine glial processes lie in close proximity to a highly concentrated population of postsynaptic receptors and perfectly aligned presynaptic release sites. PMID:25493308

  4. Coordinating Multiple Representations in a Reform Calculus Textbook

    Chang, Briana L.; Cromley, Jennifer G.; Tran, Nhi

    2015-01-01

    Coordination of multiple representations (CMR) is widely recognized as a critical skill in mathematics and is frequently demanded in reform calculus textbooks. However, little is known about the prevalence of coordination tasks in such textbooks. We coded 707 instances of CMR in a widely used reform calculus textbook and analyzed the distributions…

  5. Trajectory Planning of Multiple Coordinating Robots Using Genetic Algorithms

    S. Sun; Morris, A.S.; Zalzala, A.M.S.

    1995-01-01

    The paper focuses on the problem of trajectory planning of multiple coordinating robots. When multiple robots collaborate to manipulate one object, a redundant system can follow. These can be described in Cartesian coordinate space by an nth order polynomial. This paper presents an optimisation method based on Genetic Algorithms. (GA'S)which chooses the parameters of the polynomial, such that the execution time and the drive torques for the robot joints are minimized. With the robot's dynamic...

  6. Dynamic coordinated control laws in multiple agent models

    Morgan, David S. [US Naval Research Laboratory, Plasma Physics Division, Code 6792, Nonlinear Systems Dynamics Section, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)]. E-mail: dmorgan@cantor.nrl.navy.mil; Schwartz, Ira B. [US Naval Research Laboratory, Plasma Physics Division, Code 6792, Nonlinear Systems Dynamics Section, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2005-06-06

    We present an active control scheme of a kinetic model of swarming. It has been shown previously that the global control scheme for the model, presented in [Systems Control Lett. 52 (2004) 25], gives rise to spontaneous collective organization of agents into a unified coherent swarm, via steering controls and utilizing long-range attractive and short-range repulsive interactions. We extend these results by presenting control laws whereby a single swarm is broken into independently functioning subswarm clusters. The transition between one coordinated swarm and multiple clustered subswarms is managed simply with a homotopy parameter. Additionally, we present as an alternate formulation, a local control law for the same model, which implements dynamic barrier avoidance behavior, and in which swarm coherence emerges spontaneously.

  7. Deductive Coordination of Multiple Geospatial Knowledge Sources

    Waldinger, R.; Reddy, M.; Culy, C.; Hobbs, J.; Jarvis, P.; Dungan, J. L.

    2002-12-01

    Deductive inference is applied to choreograph the cooperation of multiple knowledge sources to respond to geospatial queries. When no one source can provide an answer, the response may be deduced from pieces of the answer provided by many sources. Examples of sources include (1) The Alexandria Digital Library Gazetteer, a repository that gives the locations for almost six million place names, (2) The Cia World Factbook, an online almanac with basic information about more than 200 countries. (3) The SRI TerraVision 3D Terrain Visualization System, which displays a flight-simulator-like interactive display of geographic data held in a database, (4) The NASA GDACC WebGIS client for searching satellite and other geographic data available through OpenGIS Consortium (OGC) Web Map Servers, and (5) The Northern Arizona University Latitude/Longitude Distance Calculator. Queries are phrased in English and are translated into logical theorems by the Gemini Natural Language Parser. The theorems are proved by SNARK, a first-order-logic theorem prover, in the context of an axiomatic geospatial theory. The theory embodies a representational scheme that takes into account the fact that the same place may have many names, and the same name may refer to many places. SNARK has built-in procedures (RCC8 and the Allen calculus, respectively) for reasoning about spatial and temporal concepts. External knowledge sources may be consulted by SNARK as the proof is in progress, so that most knowledge need not be stored axiomatically. The Open Agent Architecture (OAA) facilitates communication between sources that may be implemented on different machines in different computer languages. An answer to the query, in the form of text or an image, is extracted from the proof. Currently, three-dimensional images are displayed by TerraVision but other displays are possible. The combined system is called Geo-Logica. Some example queries that can be handled by Geo-Logica include: (1) show the

  8. Coordinating Multiple Spacecraft Assets for Joint Science Campaigns

    Estlin, Tara; Chien, Steve; Castano, Rebecca; Gaines, Daniel; de Granville, Charles; Doubleday, Josh; Anderson, Robert C.; Knight, Russell; Bornstein, Benjamin; Rabideau, Gregg; Tang, Benyang

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes technology to support a new paradigm of space science campaigns. These campaigns enable opportunistic science observations to be autonomously coordinated between multiple spacecraft. Coordinated spacecraft can consist of multiple orbiters, landers, rovers, or other in-situ vehicles (such as an aerobot). In this paradigm, opportunistic science detections can be cued by any of these assets where additional spacecraft are requested to take further observations characterizing the identified event or surface feature. Such coordination will enable a number of science campaigns not possible with present spacecraft technology. Examples from Mars include enabling rapid data collection from multiple craft on dynamic events such as new Mars dark slope streaks, dust-devils or trace gases. Technology to support the identification of opportunistic science events and/or the re-tasking of a spacecraft to take new measurements of the event is already in place on several individual missions such as the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) Mission and the Earth Observing One (EO1) Mission. This technology includes onboard data analysis techniques as well as capabilities for planning and scheduling. This paper describes how these techniques can be cue and coordinate multiple spacecraft in observing the same science event from their different vantage points.

  9. Testing multiple coordination constraints with a novel bimanual visuomotor task.

    Helene M Sisti

    Full Text Available The acquisition of a new bimanual skill depends on several motor coordination constraints. To date, coordination constraints have often been tested relatively independently of one another, particularly with respect to isofrequency and multifrequency rhythms. Here, we used a new paradigm to test the interaction of multiple coordination constraints. Coordination constraints that were tested included temporal complexity, directionality, muscle grouping, and hand dominance. Twenty-two healthy young adults performed a bimanual dial rotation task that required left and right hand coordination to track a moving target on a computer monitor. Two groups were compared, either with or without four days of practice with augmented visual feedback. Four directional patterns were tested such that both hands moved either rightward (clockwise, leftward (counterclockwise, inward or outward relative to each other. Seven frequency ratios (3∶1, 2∶1, 3∶2, 1∶1, 2∶3. 1∶2, 1∶3 between the left and right hand were introduced. As expected, isofrequency patterns (1∶1 were performed more successfully than multifrequency patterns (non 1∶1. In addition, performance was more accurate when participants were required to move faster with the dominant right hand (1∶3, 1∶2 and 2∶3 than with the non-dominant left hand (3∶1, 2∶1, 3∶2. Interestingly, performance deteriorated as the relative angular velocity between the two hands increased, regardless of whether the required frequency ratio was an integer or non-integer. This contrasted with previous finger tapping research where the integer ratios generally led to less error than the non-integer ratios. We suggest that this is due to the different movement topologies that are required of each paradigm. Overall, we found that this visuomotor task was useful for testing the interaction of multiple coordination constraints as well as the release from these constraints with practice in the presence of

  10. Coordinated Voltage Control of Active Distribution Network

    Xie Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a centralized coordinated voltage control method for active distribution network to solve off-limit problem of voltage after incorporation of distributed generation (DG. The proposed method consists of two parts, it coordinated primal-dual interior point method-based voltage regulation schemes of DG reactive powers and capacitors with centralized on-load tap changer (OLTC controlling method which utilizes system’s maximum and minimum voltages, to improve the qualified rate of voltage and reduce the operation numbers of OLTC. The proposed coordination has considered the cost of capacitors. The method is tested using a radial edited IEEE-33 nodes distribution network which is modelled using MATLAB.

  11. Chemical activation of molecules during coordination

    Activation processes of N2, O2, NO molecules in transition metal complexes and electron reconstructions of coordination sphere of compounds, related with it, were considered on tha basis of single-parameter approximation of vibronic activation theory. A special attention is paid to CO molecule activation in carbonyl complexes of transition metals (V, Nb, Mo, W, Tc, Re, Ru and others) and lanthanides. The effect of metal oxidation degree, the nature of metal and ligand, complex structure on chemical activation processes is analyzed

  12. Update of technical coordinating committee activities

    Alvarado, R.A.

    1995-12-31

    The Technical Coordinating Committee has its origins in the earliest days of implementing the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act. Between 1982 and 1985, individuals in several of the states felt that coordination among the states would be beneficial to all by affording states a cost-effective method for sharing ideas, discussing alternatives, and presenting solutions to common problems. At the current time, the committee comprises members from each of the sited states. Various compacts, federal agencies, and industry groups participate in committee activities. The Low-Level Management Program provides support for the committee through the provision of logistical support and limited manpower allocation. Activities of the committee have recently focused on waste treatment and minimization technologies. The committee also has worked diligently to see the review of the 3RSTAT computer code completed. The committee has taken a position on various regulatory proposals the past year. The committee expects to continue its work until new sites are brought online.

  13. Attitude coordination for spacecraft formation with multiple communication delays

    Guo Yaohua

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Communication delays are inherently present in information exchange between spacecraft and have an effect on the control performance of spacecraft formation. In this work, attitude coordination control of spacecraft formation is addressed, which is in the presence of multiple communication delays between spacecraft. Virtual system-based approach is utilized in case that a constant reference attitude is available to only a part of the spacecraft. The feedback from the virtual systems to the spacecraft formation is introduced to maintain the formation. Using backstepping control method, input torque of each spacecraft is designed such that the attitude of each spacecraft converges asymptotically to the states of its corresponding virtual system. Furthermore, the backstepping technique and the Lyapunov–Krasovskii method contribute to the control law design when the reference attitude is time-varying and can be obtained by each spacecraft. Finally, effectiveness of the proposed methodology is illustrated by the numerical simulations of a spacecraft formation.

  14. A Hybrid Approach for Coordinated Formation Control of Multiple Surface Vessels

    Mingyu Fu; Jianfang Jiao

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates the coordination control of multiple marine vessels in different operational modes. Based on hybrid control theory, a novel coordinated formation control approach is proposed. The proposed method comprises several continuous state controllers and discrete event logics. Continuous controllers for coordinated formation, coordinated dynamic positioning and coordinated path following are designed, and an appropriate weighting function is given to switch between these contr...

  15. Coordinated research activities: Annual report and statistics for 2004

    Article III of the IAEA Statute authorises the Agency to encourage and assist research on, and development and practical application of, atomic energy for peaceful purposes throughout the world and to foster the exchange of scientific and technical information, as well as the exchange of scientists in the field of peaceful uses of atomic energy. The Agency's Coordinated Research Activities stimulate and coordinate the undertaking of research in selected nuclear fields by scientists in IAEA Member States. The research supported by the Agency is within the framework of the Agency's programmes, sub-programmes and projects that are listed in the approved Programme and Budget of the Agency. These Coordinated Research Activities are normally implemented through Coordinated Research Projects (CRPs) that bring together research institutes in both developing and developed Member States to collaborate on the research topic of interest. The Agency may also respond to proposals from institutes for participation in the research activities by awarding individual research contracts not related to a CRP. A small portion of available funds is used to finance individual projects, which deal with topics covered by the Agency's scientific programme. The Agency also supports Doctoral CRPs, which are designed to strengthen promotion of research on nuclear technologies in developing Member States through pair building between agreement holders and contract holders. These CRPs include a PhD training programme at the contract holders' institutions. Three doctoral CRPs currently implemented by the Human Health programme address the management of liver cancer using radionuclide methods, improvement of radiotherapy outcomes in AIDS cancer patients and isotopic and complementary tools for the study of micronutrient status and interactions in developing country populations exposed to multiple nutritional deficiencies. Further information on the Agency's coordinated research activities

  16. Coordinated research activities: Annual report and statistics for 2005

    Article III of the IAEA Statute authorises the Agency to encourage and assist research on, and development and practical application of, atomic energy for peaceful purposes throughout the world and to foster the exchange of scientific and technical information, as well as the exchange of scientists in the field of peaceful uses of atomic energy. The Agency's Coordinated Research Activities stimulate and coordinate the undertaking of research in selected nuclear fields by scientists in IAEA Member States. The research supported by the Agency is within the framework of the Agency's programmes, sub-programmes and projects that are listed in the approved Programme and Budget of the Agency. These Coordinated Research Activities are normally implemented through Coordinated Research Projects (CRPs) that bring together research institutes in both developing and developed Member States to collaborate on the research topic of interest. The Agency may also respond to proposals from institutes for participation in the research activities by awarding individual research contracts not related to a CRP. A small portion of available funds is used to finance individual projects, which deal with topics covered by the Agency's scientific programme. The Agency also supports Doctoral CRPs, which are designed to strengthen promotion of research on nuclear technologies in developing Member States through pair building between agreement holders and contract holders. These CRPs include a PhD training programme at the contract holders' institutions. Three doctoral CRPs currently implemented by the Human Health programme address the management of liver cancer using radionuclide methods, improvement of radiotherapy outcomes in AIDS cancer patients and isotopic and complementary tools for the study of micronutrient status and interactions in developing country populations exposed to multiple nutritional deficiencies. Further information on the Agency's Coordinated Research Activities contained

  17. A Study of ZigBee Network Topologies for Wireless Sensor Network with One Coordinator and Multiple Coordinators

    Shayma Wail Nourildean

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Wireless Sensor Networks have become a cheap and viable solution for a variety of applications, including monitoring of critical infrastructure (water supplies, power grids, traffic networks, agriculture, telecommunications systems etc., wildlife habitat monitoring, industrial quality control, disaster recovery situations, military applications and much more. The ZigBee network model is more suitable for battery capacity, bandwidth and computing power’s limitations of WSN. In the present investigation, the modeled system was simulated using OPNET Modeler v14 to obtain the results in order to study the performance of the system in terms of tree routing, mesh routing,  multiple coordinator system and if one of the coordinators was failed. The results showed that tree routing was more suitable for WSN than the mesh routing and mobility of end device was better in multiple coordinator system.

  18. Co-ordinating Product Developing Activities

    Terkelsen, Søren Bendix

    The paper contains a presentation of research methods to be used in case studies in product development and a presentation on how to deal with Design Co-ordination according to litterature......The paper contains a presentation of research methods to be used in case studies in product development and a presentation on how to deal with Design Co-ordination according to litterature...

  19. Drawing from memory: hand-eye coordination at multiple scales.

    Stephanie Huette

    Full Text Available Eyes move to gather visual information for the purpose of guiding behavior. This guidance takes the form of perceptual-motor interactions on short timescales for behaviors like locomotion and hand-eye coordination. More complex behaviors require perceptual-motor interactions on longer timescales mediated by memory, such as navigation, or designing and building artifacts. In the present study, the task of sketching images of natural scenes from memory was used to examine and compare perceptual-motor interactions on shorter and longer timescales. Eye and pen trajectories were found to be coordinated in time on shorter timescales during drawing, and also on longer timescales spanning study and drawing periods. The latter type of coordination was found by developing a purely spatial analysis that yielded measures of similarity between images, eye trajectories, and pen trajectories. These results challenge the notion that coordination only unfolds on short timescales. Rather, the task of drawing from memory evokes perceptual-motor encodings of visual images that preserve coarse-grained spatial information over relatively long timescales as well.

  20. Drawing from Memory: Hand-Eye Coordination at Multiple Scales

    Spivey, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Eyes move to gather visual information for the purpose of guiding behavior. This guidance takes the form of perceptual-motor interactions on short timescales for behaviors like locomotion and hand-eye coordination. More complex behaviors require perceptual-motor interactions on longer timescales mediated by memory, such as navigation, or designing and building artifacts. In the present study, the task of sketching images of natural scenes from memory was used to examine and compare perceptual-motor interactions on shorter and longer timescales. Eye and pen trajectories were found to be coordinated in time on shorter timescales during drawing, and also on longer timescales spanning study and drawing periods. The latter type of coordination was found by developing a purely spatial analysis that yielded measures of similarity between images, eye trajectories, and pen trajectories. These results challenge the notion that coordination only unfolds on short timescales. Rather, the task of drawing from memory evokes perceptual-motor encodings of visual images that preserve coarse-grained spatial information over relatively long timescales as well. PMID:23554894

  1. Drawing from memory: hand-eye coordination at multiple scales.

    Huette, Stephanie; Kello, Christopher T; Rhodes, Theo; Spivey, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    Eyes move to gather visual information for the purpose of guiding behavior. This guidance takes the form of perceptual-motor interactions on short timescales for behaviors like locomotion and hand-eye coordination. More complex behaviors require perceptual-motor interactions on longer timescales mediated by memory, such as navigation, or designing and building artifacts. In the present study, the task of sketching images of natural scenes from memory was used to examine and compare perceptual-motor interactions on shorter and longer timescales. Eye and pen trajectories were found to be coordinated in time on shorter timescales during drawing, and also on longer timescales spanning study and drawing periods. The latter type of coordination was found by developing a purely spatial analysis that yielded measures of similarity between images, eye trajectories, and pen trajectories. These results challenge the notion that coordination only unfolds on short timescales. Rather, the task of drawing from memory evokes perceptual-motor encodings of visual images that preserve coarse-grained spatial information over relatively long timescales as well. PMID:23554894

  2. Coordinate-targeted fluorescence nanoscopy with multiple off states

    Danzl, Johann G.; Sidenstein, Sven C.; Gregor, Carola; Urban, Nicolai T.; Ilgen, Peter; Jakobs, Stefan; Hell, Stefan W.

    2016-02-01

    Far-field super-resolution fluorescence microscopy discerns fluorophores residing closer than the diffraction barrier by briefly transferring them in different (typically ON and OFF) states before detection. In coordinate-targeted super-resolution variants, such as stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy, this state difference is created by the intensity minima and maxima of an optical pattern, causing all fluorophores to assume the off state, for instance, except at the minima. Although strong spatial confinement of the on state enables high resolution, it also subjects the fluorophores to excess intensities and state cycles at the maxima. Here, we address these issues by driving the fluorophores into a second off state that is inert to the excess light. By using reversibly switchable fluorescent proteins as labels, our approach reduces bleaching and enhances resolution and contrast in live-cell STED microscopy. Using two or more transitions to off states is a useful strategy for augmenting the power of coordinate-targeted super-resolution microscopy.

  3. Multi-agent System for Off-line Coordinated Motion Planning of Multiple Industrial Robots

    Shital S. Chiddarwar

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This article presents an agent based framework for coordinated motion planning of multiple robots. The emerging paradigm of agent based systems is implemented to address various issues related to safe and fast task execution when multiple robots share a common workspace. In the proposed agent based framework, each issue vital for coordinated motion planning of multiple robots and every robot participating in coordinated task is considered as an agent. The identified agents are interfaced with each other in order to incorporate the desired flexibility in the developed framework. This framework gives a complete strategy for determination of optimal trajectories of robots working in coordination with due consideration to their kinematic, dynamic and payload constraint. The complete architecture of the proposed framework and the detailed discussion on various modules are covered in this paper.

  4. Multiple-Vehicle Longitudinal Collision Mitigation by Coordinated Brake Control

    Xiao-Yun Lu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rear-end collision often leads to serious casualties and traffic congestion. The consequences are even worse for multiple-vehicle collision. Many previous works focused on collision warning and avoidance strategies of two consecutive vehicles based on onboard sensor detection only. This paper proposes a centralized control strategy for multiple vehicles to minimize the impact of multiple-vehicle collision based on vehicle-to-vehicle communication technique. The system is defined as a coupled group of vehicles with wireless communication capability and short following distances. The safety relationship can be represented as lower bound limit on deceleration of the first vehicle and upper bound on maximum deceleration of the last vehicle. The objective is to determine the desired deceleration for each vehicle such that the total impact energy is minimized at each time step. The impact energy is defined as the relative kinetic energy between a consecutive pair of vehicles (approaching only. Model predictive control (MPC framework is used to formulate the problem to be constrained quadratic programming. Simulations show its effectiveness on collision mitigation. The developed algorithm has the potential to be used for progressive market penetration of connected vehicles in practice.

  5. Multiple regulatory systems coordinate DNA replication with cell growth in Bacillus subtilis.

    Heath Murray

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In many bacteria the rate of DNA replication is linked with cellular physiology to ensure that genome duplication is coordinated with growth. Nutrient-mediated growth rate control of DNA replication initiation has been appreciated for decades, however the mechanism(s that connects these cell cycle activities has eluded understanding. In order to help address this fundamental question we have investigated regulation of DNA replication in the model organism Bacillus subtilis. Contrary to the prevailing view we find that changes in DnaA protein level are not sufficient to account for nutrient-mediated growth rate control of DNA replication initiation, although this regulation does require both DnaA and the endogenous replication origin. We go on to report connections between DNA replication and several essential cellular activities required for rapid bacterial growth, including respiration, central carbon metabolism, fatty acid synthesis, phospholipid synthesis, and protein synthesis. Unexpectedly, the results indicate that multiple regulatory systems are involved in coordinating DNA replication with cell physiology, with some of the regulatory systems targeting oriC while others act in a oriC-independent manner. We propose that distinct regulatory systems are utilized to control DNA replication in response to diverse physiological and chemical changes.

  6. Antibacterial activity of silver camphorimine coordination polymers.

    Cardoso, João M S; Galvão, Adelino M; Guerreiro, Soraia I; Leitão, Jorge H; Suarez, Ana C; Carvalho, M Fernanda N N

    2016-04-28

    Five new silver camphorimine complexes of general formula [Ag(NO3)(Y)L] were synthesized and fully characterized using spectroscopic and analytical techniques. The structure of [Ag(NO3)(OC10H14NC6H4NC10H14O)] () was analyzed using single crystal X-ray diffraction, showing that it arranges as a coordination polymer formed by sequential Ag(NO3) units bridged by the bi-camphor ligand (). The antimicrobial properties of the new complexes were screened using the disk diffusion method and their Minimal Inhibitory Concentrations (MIC) were assessed against selected bacterial strains of the Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus and the Gram-negative Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Burkholderia contaminans. The lowest MICs were observed for , with estimated values of 72, 20, 32 and 19 μg mL(-1) for S. aureus, E. coli, B. contaminans, and P. aeruginosa, respectively. In the case of S. aureus, similar MIC values were obtained for silver nitrate and compound . All five compounds were bactericidal when used in concentrations equal or above the MIC value, as found by enumerating the total colony forming units (CFUs) after incubation in their presence. PMID:27007331

  7. Multifractal fluctuations in joint angles during infant spontaneous kicking reveal multiplicativity-driven coordination

    Previous research has considered infant spontaneous kicking as a form of exploration. According to this view, spontaneous kicking provides information about motor degrees of freedom and may shape multijoint coordinations for more complex movement patterns such as gait. Recent work has demonstrated that multifractal, multiplicative fluctuations in exploratory movements index energy flows underlying perceptual-motor information. If infant spontaneous kicking is exploratory and occasions an upstream flow of information from the motor periphery, we expected not only that multiplicativity of fluctuations at the hip should promote multiplicativity of fluctuations at more distal joints (i.e., reflecting downstream effects of neural control) but also that multiplicativity at more distal joints should promote multiplicativity at the hip. Multifractal analysis demonstrated that infant spontaneous kicking in four typically developing infants for evidence of multiplicative fluctuations in multiple joint angles along the leg (i.e., hip, knee, and ankle) exhibited multiplicativity. Vector autoregressive modeling demonstrated that only one leg exhibited downstream effects but that both legs exhibited upstream effects. These results confirm the exploratory aspect of infant spontaneous kicking and suggest chaotic dynamics in motor coordination. They also resonate with existing models of chaos-controlled robotics and noise-based interventions for rehabilitating motor coordination in atypically developing patients.

  8. Coordinating Management Activities in Distributed Software Development Projects

    Bendeck, Fawsy; Goldmann, Sigrid; Holz, Harald; Kötting, Boris

    1999-01-01

    Coordinating distributed processes, especially engineering and software design processes, has been a research topic for some time now. Several approaches have been published that aim at coordinating large projects in general, and large software development processes in specific. However, most of these approaches focus on the technical part of the design process and omit management activities like planning and scheduling the project, or monitoring it during execution. In this paper, we focus o...

  9. Collective coordination of multi-agent systems guided by multiple leaders

    Hu Jiang-Ping; Yuan Hai-Wen

    2009-01-01

    A neighbour-based coordination scheme is proposed for a multi-agent system with multiple leaders. Under assumptions of the connectivity of the intereonnection topology and a simple first-order dynamics model for each mobile agent,the results show that all the agents will flock to the polytope region formed by the leaders.

  10. Cal Poly Coordination of Multiple CubeSats on the DNEPR Launch Vehicle

    Lee, Simon; Toorian, Armen; Clemens, Nash; Puig-Suari, Jordi; Twiggs, Bob

    2004-01-01

    California Polytechnic State University is coordinating the launch of multiple CubeSats on a DNEPR LV in the fall of 2004. This launch will include 14 CubeSats being developed by 7 U.S. and 4 international universities. At a cost of $40,000 per CubeSat, this launch will provide universities with affordable and reliable access to space. 5 standard CubeSat deployers (P-PODs) will transport and eject the CubeSats into orbit. This paper describes Cal Poly’s role in coordinating this launch includ...

  11. Residue-based Coordinated Selection and Parameter Design of Multiple Power System Stabilizers (PSSs)

    Su, Chi; Hu, Weihao; Fang, Jiakun; Chen, Zhe

    data from time domain simulations. Then a coordinated approach for multiple PSS selection and parameter design based on residue method is proposed and realized in MATLAB m-files. Particle swarm optimization (PSO) is adopted in the coordination process. The IEEE 39-bus New England system model as the......Residue method is a commonly used approach to design the parameters of a power system stabilizer (PSS). In this paper, a residue identification method is adopted to obtain the system residues for different input-output pairs, using the system identification toolbox in MATLAB with the measurement...

  12. Hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 coordinates multiple processes in a model of intestinal epithelial cell function.

    Yang, Rui; Kerschner, Jenny L; Harris, Ann

    2016-04-01

    Mutations in hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 transcription factors (HNF1α/β) are associated with diabetes. These factors are well studied in the liver, pancreas and kidney, where they direct tissue-specific gene regulation. However, they also have an important role in the biology of many other tissues, including the intestine. We investigated the transcriptional network governed by HNF1 in an intestinal epithelial cell line (Caco2). We used chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by direct sequencing (ChIP-seq) to identify HNF1 binding sites genome-wide. Direct targets of HNF1 were validated using conventional ChIP assays and confirmed by siRNA-mediated depletion of HNF1, followed by RT-qPCR. Gene ontology process enrichment analysis of the HNF1 targets identified multiple processes with a role in intestinal epithelial cell function, including properties of the cell membrane, cellular response to hormones, and regulation of biosynthetic processes. Approximately 50% of HNF1 binding sites were also occupied by other members of the intestinal transcriptional network, including hepatocyte nuclear factor 4A (HNF4A), caudal type homeobox 2 (CDX2), and forkhead box A2 (FOXA2). Depletion of HNF1 in Caco2 cells increases FOXA2 abundance and decreases levels of CDX2, illustrating the coordinated activities of the network. These data suggest that HNF1 plays an important role in regulating intestinal epithelial cell function, both directly and through interactions with other intestinal transcription factors. PMID:26855178

  13. Coordinated Formation Control of Multiple Autonomous Underwater Vehicles for Pipeline Inspection

    Xianbo Xiang

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the control problem of inspecting underwater pipeline on the seabed, with coordinated multiple autonomous underwater vehicles in a formation. Based on the leader-follower strategy, the dedicated nonlinear path following controller is rigorously built on Lyapunov-based design, driving a fleet of vehicles onto assigned parallel paths elevated and offset from the underwater pipeline, while keeping a triangle formation to capture complete 3D images for inspection. Due to the spatial-temporal decoupling characteristics of individual path following controller, the velocities of the followers can be adapted in the coordinated control level, only relying on the information of generalized along-path length from the leader, in order to build the desired formation. Thus, the communication variable broadcast from the leader is kept to a minimum, which is feasible under the severely constraints of acoustic communication bandwidth. Simulation results illustrate the efficiency of coordinated formation controller proposed for underwater pipeline inspection.

  14. Coordination of Multiple Biomimetic Autonomous Underwater Vehicles Using Strategies Based on the Schooling Behaviour of Fish

    Jonathan McColgan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomimetic Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (BAUVs are Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs that employ similar propulsion and steering principles as real fish. While the real life applicability of these vehicles has yet to be fully investigated, laboratory investigations have demonstrated that at low speeds, the propulsive mechanism of these vehicles is more efficient when compared with propeller based AUVs. Furthermore, these vehicles have also demonstrated superior manoeuvrability characteristics when compared with conventional AUVs and Underwater Glider Systems (UGSs. Further performance benefits can be achieved through coordination of multiple BAUVs swimming in formation. In this study, the coordination strategy is based on the schooling behaviour of fish, which is a decentralized approach that allows multiple AUVs to be self-organizing. Such a strategy can be effectively utilized for large spatiotemporal data collection for oceanic monitoring and surveillance purposes. A validated mathematical model of the BAUV developed at the University of Glasgow, RoboSalmon, is used to represent the agents within a school formation. The performance of the coordination algorithm is assessed through simulation where system identification techniques are employed to improve simulation run time while ensuring accuracy is maintained. The simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of implementing coordination algorithms based on the behavioural mechanisms of fish to allow a group of BAUVs to be considered self-organizing.

  15. Is CSMA Able to Coordinate Multiple Access in Vehicular Radio Channels Effectively?

    Mittag, J.; Hartenstein, H.

    2012-01-01

    The first generation of inter-vehicle communication networks will most likely be based on the IEEE 802.11p standard. That is, they are going to deploy Carrier Sense Multiple Access (CSMA) to coordinate channel access among neighboring vehicles. Recently, concerns have been raised that fast-fading propagation conditions, i.e. a time- and frequency-selective fading as reported by several measurement campaigns in highway environments, might challenge the effectiveness of CSMA. These concerns als...

  16. Coordinated Formation Control of Multiple Autonomous Underwater Vehicles for Pipeline Inspection

    Xianbo Xiang; Bruno Jouvencel; Olivier Parodi

    2010-01-01

    International audience This paper addresses the control problem of inspecting underwater pipeline on the seabed, with coordinated multiple autonomous underwater vehicles in a formation. Based on the leader-follower strategy, the dedicated nonlinear path following controller is rigorously built on Lyapunov-based design, driving a fleet of vehicles onto assigned parallel paths elevated and offset from the underwater pipeline, while keeping a triangle formation to capture complete 3D images f...

  17. GIT2 Acts as a Systems-Level Coordinator of Neurometabolic Activity and Pathophysiological Aging

    Martin, Bronwen; Chadwick, Wayne; Janssens, Jonathan; Premont, Richard T.; Schmalzigaug, Robert; Becker, Kevin G.; Lehrmann, Elin; Wood, William H.; Zhang, Yongqing; Siddiqui, Sana; Park, Sung-Soo; Cong, Wei-Na; Daimon, Caitlin M.; Maudsley, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Aging represents one of the most complicated and highly integrated somatic processes. Healthy aging is suggested to rely upon the coherent regulation of hormonal and neuronal communication between the central nervous system and peripheral tissues. The hypothalamus is one of the main structures in the body responsible for sustaining an efficient interaction between energy balance and neurological activity and therefore likely coordinates multiple systems in the aging process. We previously ide...

  18. Euro-VO - Coordination of Virtual Observatory activities in Europe

    Genova, Francoise; Arviset, Christophe; Lawrence, Andy; Pasian, Fabio; Solano, Enrique; Wambsganss, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    The European Virtual Observatory Euro-VO has been coordinating European VO activities through a series of projects co-funded by the European Commission over the last 15 years. The bulk of VO work in Europe is ensured by the national VO initiatives and those of intergovernmental agencies. VO activities at the European level coordinate the work in support of the three "pillars" of the Virtual Observatory: support to the scientific community, take-up by the data providers, and technological activities. Several Euro-VO projects have also provided direct support to selected developments and prototyping. This paper explains the methodology used by Euro-VO over the years. It summarizes the activities which were performed and their evolutions at different stages of the development of the VO, explains the Euro-VO role with respect to the international and national levels of VO activities, details the lessons learnt for best practices for the coordination of the VO building blocks, and the liaison with other European i...

  19. Coordinated research activities: Annual report and statistics for 2007

    In 2007, a total of Euro 6 606 194 were obligated for the Agency's Coordinated Research Activities (Euro 6 515 957 from the regular budget and Euro 90 237 from extrabudgetary resources). Most of the Coordinated Research Activities are carried out via Coordinated Research Projects (CRPs) which bring together research institutes in both developing and developed Member States to collaborate on research topics of common interest. At the end of 2007, work was being carried out on 115 CRPs, 37 in Major Programme 1 - Nuclear Power, Fuel Cycle and Nuclear Science, 71 in Major Programme 2 - Nuclear Techniques for Development and Environmental Protection, and 7 in Major Programme 3 - Nuclear Safety and Security. The total amount obligated for these activities in 2007 was 15% more than in 2006, largely due to the implementation of 28 new CRPs. At the end of 2007 work was being carried out under 976 contracts and 562 agreements with institutes in 110 Member States. 72% of the funds obligated for contracts in 2007 were in respect of institutions in developing countries, primarily in the areas of food and agriculture and human health. During 2007, 21% of the Chief Scientific Investigators participating in Agency CRPs were female researchers. Efforts will continue to increase the participation of women and younger researcher in the Coordinated Research Activities. The forty two completed CRPs evaluated in Appendix E resulted in 9 PhDs, one masters degree and in the publishing of about 800 articles and reports, scientific papers, proceedings of scientific conferences and contribution to international conferences, as well as 13 IAEA TECDOCs, and various scientific databases and websites. Detailed evaluation reports on the outputs, effectiveness, impact, recommended future action, and resulting publications of these completed CRPs are included in in Appendix E of this report. (author)

  20. Interference Coordination in Multiple Antenna Based LTE-Advanced Heterogeneous Systems

    Yuan Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available With picocells deployed in the coverage of a macrocell in heterogeneous networks (HetNets, the macrocell evolved NodeB (MeNB may receive interference signals from the picocell users, which results in more severe co-channel interference (CCI problem in the uplink. In this paper, the spatial uplink interference coordination is investigated in multiple antenna systems, according to which the receiver coding matrix is generated by MeNB to mitigate the CCI from picocell users. Two interference coordination (IC schemes are proposed based on whether the receiver coding matrix is full rank or not, named as full coding (IC-FC and part coding (IC-PC, respectively. The application of the proposed schemes is discussed in single picocell and multiple picocell scenarios. The CCI can be totally canceled in single picocell scenario, and an algorithm is developed in multiple picocell networks to mitigate the most severely interfering picocell. Link level and system level simulations are applied, and it is shown that significant performance gain is achieved by our proposed schemes over traditional IC receivers.

  1. Activities of coordinated dietetic program directors compared by educational background.

    Nyland, N K; Spears, M C; Myers, E F

    1989-12-01

    This study was designed to ascertain the activities performed by coordinated program directors, compare current activities with 5-year expectations, and identify differences in importance and time spent on 14 pertinent activities by directors with master's degrees and those with doctorates. Responses were collected by a descriptive survey of 64 directors, all of whom participated. Program directors with master's degrees considered public relations with affiliations, attending faculty meetings, student advisement, and reading professional materials significantly more important (p less than .05) than did directors with doctorates, who considered faculty evaluations and research significantly more important (p less than .01). Directors with doctorates spent significantly less time in teaching (p less than .05) than those with master's degrees. Responsibilities of directors in the 22 submitted descriptions were organized into five categories: program management, curricular affairs, policies impacting on programs, student advisement and counseling, and academic activities. In the ADA Standards of Education, responsibilities of directors include program assessment, planning, and evaluation; in this study, those responsibilities were placed in the program management category. Exhibition of leadership qualities, revision of curriculum, and counseling and recruitment of students were responsibilities most frequently included in the position descriptions; however, those responsibilities were in categories other than program management. The responsibilities could serve as a guide for the development of a position description and as criteria for the role of a coordinated program director. PMID:2592717

  2. Pinatubo Emulation in Multiple Models (POEMs): co-ordinated experiments in the ISA-MIP model intercomparison activity component of the SPARC Stratospheric Sulphur and it's Role in Climate initiative (SSiRC)

    Lee, Lindsay; Mann, Graham; Carslaw, Ken; Toohey, Matthew; Aquila, Valentina

    2016-04-01

    The World Climate Research Program's SPARC initiative has a new international activity "Stratospheric Sulphur and its Role in Climate" (SSiRC) to better understand changes in stratospheric aerosol and precursor gaseous sulphur species. One component of SSiRC involves an intercomparison "ISA-MIP" of composition-climate models that simulate the stratospheric aerosol layer interactively. Within PoEMS each modelling group will run a "perturbed physics ensemble" (PPE) of interactive stratospheric aerosol (ISA) simulations of the Pinatubo eruption, varying several uncertain parameters associated with the eruption's SO2 emissions and model processes. A powerful new technique to quantify and attribute sources of uncertainty in complex global models is described by Lee et al. (2011, ACP). The analysis uses Gaussian emulation to derive a probability density function (pdf) of predicted quantities, essentially interpolating the PPE results in multi-dimensional parameter space. Once trained on the ensemble, a Monte Carlo simulation with the fast Gaussian emulator enabling a full variance-based sensitivity analysis. The approach has already been used effectively by Carslaw et al., (2013, Nature) to quantify the uncertainty in the cloud albedo effect forcing from a 3D global aerosol-microphysics model allowing to compare the sensitivy of different predicted quantities to uncertainties in natural and anthropogenic emissions types, and structural parameters in the models. Within ISA-MIP, each group will carry out a PPE of runs, with the subsequent analysis with the emulator assessing the uncertainty in the volcanic forcings predicted by each model. In this poster presentation we will give an outline of the "PoEMS" analysis, describing the uncertain parameters to be varied and the relevance to further understanding differences identified in previous international stratospheric aerosol assessments.

  3. Resilience and Brittleness in a Nuclear Emergency Response Simulation: Focusing on Team Coordination Activity

    The current work presents results from a cognitive task analysis (CTA) of a nuclear disaster simulation. Audio-visual records were collected from an emergency room team composed of individuals from 26 different agencies as they responded to multiple scenarios in a simulated nuclear disaster. This simulation was part of a national emergency response training activity for a nuclear power plant located in a developing country. The objectives of this paper are to describe sources of resilience and brittleness in these activities, identify cues of potential improvements for future emergency simulations, and leveraging the resilience of the emergency response System in case of a real disaster. Multiple CTA techniques were used to gain a better understanding of the cognitive dimensions of the activity and to identify team coordination and crisis management patterns that emerged from the simulation training. (authors)

  4. Coordinated Multiple Spacecraft Attitude Control with Communication Time Delays and Uncertainties

    LI Guiming; LIU Liangdong

    2012-01-01

    In this paper,we consider the coordinated attitude control problem of spacecraft formation with communication delays,model and disturbance uncertainties,and propose novel synchronized control schemes.Since the attitude motion is essential in non-Euclidean space,thus,unlike the existing designs which describe the delayed relative attitude via linear algorithm,we treat the attitude error and the local relative attitude on the nonlinear manifold-Lie group,and attempt to obtain coupling attitude information by the natural quatemion multiplication.Our main focus is to address two problems:1) Propose a coordinated attitude controller to achieve the synchronized attitude maneuver,i.e.,synchronize multiple spacecraft attitudes and track a time-varying desired attitude; 2) With known model information,we achieve the synchronized attitude maneuver with disturbances under angular velocity constraints.Especially,if the formation does not have any uncertainties,the designer can simply set the controller via an appropriate choice of control gains to avoid system actuator saturation.Our controllers are proposed based on the Lyapunov-Krasovskii method and simulation of a spacecraft formation is conducted to demonstrate the effectiveness of theoretical results.

  5. Management and Coordination of Nuclear Security Activities in Kenya

    Over recent years the structure, format and content of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) standards have been developed further to become the global reference for the delivery of high standards of safety, radiation protection, radioactive waste management (RWM) and the safe transport of radioactive materials. Unlike safety, international standards for security do not exist. While nuclear safety deals with the design and operation of facilities and activities that prevent accidental release of radioactivity into the environment; security, however, embraces the need to protect materials and facilities from theft, misuse, attack or sabotage. In managing and coordinating nuclear security activities, these two factors have been taken into account to ensure that physical security of sources and combating of illicit trafficking of nuclear and radioactive materials. The regulatory authority, working together with relevant border and other national security organs, bilateral, the IAEA and other international organizations to contain the situation. (author)

  6. Case Studies on an Approach to Multiple Autonomous Vehicle Motion Coordination

    D.K. Liu; X. Wu; G. Paul; G. Dissanayake

    2006-01-01

    This paper conducts a series of case studies on a novel Simultaneous Path and Motion Planning (SiPaMoP) approach[1] to multiple autonomous or Automated Guided Vehicle (AGV) motion coordination in bidirectional networks. The SiPaMoP approach plans collision-free paths for vehicles based on the principle of shortest path by dynamically changing the vehicles' paths, traveling speeds or waiting times, whichever gives the shortest traveling time. It integrates path planning, collision avoidance and motion planning into a comprehensive model and optimizes the vehicles' path and motion to minimize the completion time of a set of tasks. Five case studies, i.e., head-on collision avoidance,catching-up collision avoidance, buffer node generation and collision avoidance, prioritybased motion coordination, and safety distance based planning, are presented. The results demonstrated that the method can effectively plan the path and motion for a team of autonomous vehicles or AGVs, and solve the problems of traffic congestion and collision under various conditions.

  7. The Telesupervised Adaptive Ocean Sensor Fleet (TAOSF) Architecture: Coordination of Multiple Oceanic Robot Boats

    Elfes, Alberto; Podnar, Gregg W.; Dolan, John M.; Stancliff, Stephen; Lin, Ellie; Hosler, Jeffrey C.; Ames, Troy J.; Higinbotham, John; Moisan, John R.; Moisan, Tiffany A.; Kulczycki, Eric A.

    2008-01-01

    Earth science research must bridge the gap between the atmosphere and the ocean to foster understanding of Earth s climate and ecology. Ocean sensing is typically done with satellites, buoys, and crewed research ships. The limitations of these systems include the fact that satellites are often blocked by cloud cover, and buoys and ships have spatial coverage limitations. This paper describes a multi-robot science exploration software architecture and system called the Telesupervised Adaptive Ocean Sensor Fleet (TAOSF). TAOSF supervises and coordinates a group of robotic boats, the OASIS platforms, to enable in-situ study of phenomena in the ocean/atmosphere interface, as well as on the ocean surface and sub-surface. The OASIS platforms are extended deployment autonomous ocean surface vehicles, whose development is funded separately by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). TAOSF allows a human operator to effectively supervise and coordinate multiple robotic assets using a sliding autonomy control architecture, where the operating mode of the vessels ranges from autonomous control to teleoperated human control. TAOSF increases data-gathering effectiveness and science return while reducing demands on scientists for robotic asset tasking, control, and monitoring. The first field application chosen for TAOSF is the characterization of Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs). We discuss the overall TAOSF architecture, describe field tests conducted under controlled conditions using rhodamine dye as a HAB simulant, present initial results from these tests, and outline the next steps in the development of TAOSF.

  8. Selection of head and whisker coordination strategies during goal-oriented active touch.

    Schroeder, Joseph B; Ritt, Jason T

    2016-04-01

    In the rodent whisker system, a key model for neural processing and behavioral choices during active sensing, whisker motion is increasingly recognized as only part of a broader motor repertoire employed by rodents during active touch. In particular, recent studies suggest whisker and head motions are tightly coordinated. However, conditions governing the selection and temporal organization of such coordinated sensing strategies remain poorly understood. We videographically reconstructed head and whisker motions of freely moving mice searching for a randomly located rewarded aperture, focusing on trials in which animals appeared to rapidly "correct" their trajectory under tactile guidance. Mice orienting after unilateral contact repositioned their whiskers similarly to previously reported head-turning asymmetry. However, whisker repositioning preceded head turn onsets and was not bilaterally symmetric. Moreover, mice selectively employed a strategy we term contact maintenance, with whisking modulated to counteract head motion and facilitate repeated contacts on subsequent whisks. Significantly, contact maintenance was not observed following initial contact with an aperture boundary, when the mouse needed to make a large corrective head motion to the front of the aperture, but only following contact by the same whisker field with the opposite aperture boundary, when the mouse needed to precisely align its head with the reward spout. Together these results suggest that mice can select from a diverse range of sensing strategies incorporating both knowledge of the task and whisk-by-whisk sensory information and, moreover, suggest the existence of high level control (not solely reflexive) of sensing motions coordinated between multiple body parts. PMID:26792880

  9. Coordinated activity of ventral tegmental neurons adapts to appetitive and aversive learning.

    Kim, Yunbok; Wood, Jesse; Moghaddam, Bita

    2012-01-01

    Our understanding of how value-related information is encoded in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) is based mainly on the responses of individual putative dopamine neurons. In contrast to cortical areas, the nature of coordinated interactions between groups of VTA neurons during motivated behavior is largely unknown. These interactions can strongly affect information processing, highlighting the importance of investigating network level activity. We recorded the activity of multiple single units and local field potentials (LFP) in the VTA during a task in which rats learned to associate novel stimuli with different outcomes. We found that coordinated activity of VTA units with either putative dopamine or GABA waveforms was influenced differently by rewarding versus aversive outcomes. Specifically, after learning, stimuli paired with a rewarding outcome increased the correlation in activity levels between unit pairs whereas stimuli paired with an aversive outcome decreased the correlation. Paired single unit responses also became more redundant after learning. These response patterns flexibly tracked the reversal of contingencies, suggesting that learning is associated with changing correlations and enhanced functional connectivity between VTA neurons. Analysis of LFP recorded simultaneously with unit activity showed an increase in the power of theta oscillations when stimuli predicted reward but not an aversive outcome. With learning, a higher proportion of putative GABA units were phase locked to the theta oscillations than putative dopamine units. These patterns also adapted when task contingencies were changed. Taken together, these data demonstrate that VTA neurons organize flexibly as functional networks to support appetitive and aversive learning. PMID:22238652

  10. Coordinated activity of ventral tegmental neurons adapts to appetitive and aversive learning.

    Yunbok Kim

    Full Text Available Our understanding of how value-related information is encoded in the ventral tegmental area (VTA is based mainly on the responses of individual putative dopamine neurons. In contrast to cortical areas, the nature of coordinated interactions between groups of VTA neurons during motivated behavior is largely unknown. These interactions can strongly affect information processing, highlighting the importance of investigating network level activity. We recorded the activity of multiple single units and local field potentials (LFP in the VTA during a task in which rats learned to associate novel stimuli with different outcomes. We found that coordinated activity of VTA units with either putative dopamine or GABA waveforms was influenced differently by rewarding versus aversive outcomes. Specifically, after learning, stimuli paired with a rewarding outcome increased the correlation in activity levels between unit pairs whereas stimuli paired with an aversive outcome decreased the correlation. Paired single unit responses also became more redundant after learning. These response patterns flexibly tracked the reversal of contingencies, suggesting that learning is associated with changing correlations and enhanced functional connectivity between VTA neurons. Analysis of LFP recorded simultaneously with unit activity showed an increase in the power of theta oscillations when stimuli predicted reward but not an aversive outcome. With learning, a higher proportion of putative GABA units were phase locked to the theta oscillations than putative dopamine units. These patterns also adapted when task contingencies were changed. Taken together, these data demonstrate that VTA neurons organize flexibly as functional networks to support appetitive and aversive learning.

  11. Peroxidase-like oxidative activity of a manganese-coordinated histidyl bolaamphiphile self-assembly

    Kim, Min-Chul; Lee, Sang-Yup

    2015-10-01

    A peroxidase-like catalyst was constructed through the self-assembly of histidyl bolaamphiphiles coordinated to Mn2+ ions. The prepared catalyst exhibited oxidation activity for the organic substrate o-phenylenediamine (OPD) in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The histidyl bolaamphiphiles of bis(N-alpha-amido-histidine)-1,7-heptane dicarboxylates self-assembled to make spherical structures in an aqueous solution. Subsequent association of Mn2+ ions with the histidyl imidazoles in the self-assembly produced catalytic active sites. The optimal Mn2+ ion concentration was determined and coordination of the Mn2+ ion with multiple histidine imidazoles was investigated using spectroscopy analysis. The activation energy of the produced catalysts was 55.0 kJ mol-1, which was comparable to other peroxidase-mimetic catalysts. A detailed kinetics study revealed that the prepared catalyst followed a ping-pong mechanism and that the turnover reaction was promoted by increasing the substrate concentration. Finally, application of the prepared catalyst for glucose detection was demonstrated through cascade enzyme catalysis. This study demonstrated a facile way to prepare an enzyme-mimetic catalyst through the self-assembly of an amphiphilic molecule containing amino acid segments.A peroxidase-like catalyst was constructed through the self-assembly of histidyl bolaamphiphiles coordinated to Mn2+ ions. The prepared catalyst exhibited oxidation activity for the organic substrate o-phenylenediamine (OPD) in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The histidyl bolaamphiphiles of bis(N-alpha-amido-histidine)-1,7-heptane dicarboxylates self-assembled to make spherical structures in an aqueous solution. Subsequent association of Mn2+ ions with the histidyl imidazoles in the self-assembly produced catalytic active sites. The optimal Mn2+ ion concentration was determined and coordination of the Mn2+ ion with multiple histidine imidazoles was investigated using spectroscopy

  12. Evidence of platelet activation in multiple sclerosis

    Alexander J Steven

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective A fatality in one multiple sclerosis (MS patient due to acute idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP and a near fatality in another stimulated our interest in platelet function abnormalities in MS. Previously, we presented evidence of platelet activation in a small cohort of treatment-naive MS patients. Methods In this report, 92 normal controls and 33 stable, untreated MS patients were studied. Platelet counts, measures of platelet activation [plasma platelet microparticles (PMP, P-selectin expression (CD62p, circulating platelet microaggragtes (PAg], as well as platelet-associated IgG/IgM, were carried out. In addition, plasma protein S activity was measured. Results Compared to controls, PMP were significantly elevated in MS (p Conclusion Platelets are significantly activated in MS patients. The mechanisms underlying this activation and its significance to MS are unknown. Additional study of platelet activation and function in MS patients is warranted.

  13. Using a co-ordinate measuring machine to align multiple element large optical systems

    Howick, Eleanor F.; Cochrane, David; Meier, David

    2007-09-01

    A high precision Co-ordinate Measuring Machine (CMM) is an ideal instrument for aligning mid to large (400 to 600 mm) diameter multiple element lens assemblies. The CMM has many advantages over simpler dial gauge and rotary table setups. For example, these traditional methods do not necessarily make it easy to separate the out-of-roundness of a lens or its mounting cell, from a misalignment of the lens and cell. With a CMM, the 'as made' geometry of both the lenses and their mounting cells can be determined before the mounting and alignment process begins. By considering the actual shape of the lenses and cells, adjustments can be made during the alignment process to ensure that the complete assembly meets the designer's tolerances. This paper discusses CMM alignment techniques used and experience gained while assembling large lens corrector assemblies (for example, the three element Prime Focus Unit for FMOS, the Subaru Fibre Multi-Object Spectrograph) destined for installation in astronomical telescopes.

  14. Ecosystemic needs assessment for children with developmental coordination disorder in elementary school: multiple case studies.

    Jasmin, Emmanuelle; Tétreault, Sylvie; Joly, Jacques

    2014-11-01

    This study explored the needs of children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD) from an ecosystemic viewpoint as part of a theory-driven program evaluation process. A multiple case study needs assessment was conducted. Participants included ten children with DCD, their parents (n = 12), teachers (n = 9), and service providers (n = 6). Data collection involved semi-structured interviews, validated questionnaires, and a review of the children's records. The results support the relevance of using an ecosystemic model to assess the needs of children with DCD in their life and social contexts. More specifically, the results highlight the need to provide additional services at school, such as occupational therapy and special education, as well as information and training regarding DCD for parents and teachers. The results also point to the relevant variables to consider in an intervention program based on theory-driven evaluations. This study shows how employing an ecosystemic frame of reference provides a better understanding of the needs of children with DCD. Future research should document the ecosystemic profiles and evolution of the needs of children with DCD with a larger sample from diverse socioeconomic backgrounds using a longitudinal study design. PMID:24649977

  15. Primary motor and sensory cortical areas communicate via spatiotemporally coordinated networks at multiple frequencies.

    Arce-McShane, Fritzie I; Ross, Callum F; Takahashi, Kazutaka; Sessle, Barry J; Hatsopoulos, Nicholas G

    2016-05-01

    Skilled movements rely on sensory information to shape optimal motor responses, for which the sensory and motor cortical areas are critical. How these areas interact to mediate sensorimotor integration is largely unknown. Here, we measure intercortical coherence between the orofacial motor (MIo) and somatosensory (SIo) areas of cortex as monkeys learn to generate tongue-protrusive force. We report that coherence between MIo and SIo is reciprocal and that neuroplastic changes in coherence gradually emerge over a few days. These functional networks of coherent spiking and local field potentials exhibit frequency-specific spatiotemporal properties. During force generation, theta coherence (2-6 Hz) is prominent and exhibited by numerous paired signals; before or after force generation, coherence is evident in alpha (6-13 Hz), beta (15-30 Hz), and gamma (30-50 Hz) bands, but the functional networks are smaller and weaker. Unlike coherence in the higher frequency bands, the distribution of the phase at peak theta coherence is bimodal with peaks near 0° and ±180°, suggesting that communication between somatosensory and motor areas is coordinated temporally by the phase of theta coherence. Time-sensitive sensorimotor integration and plasticity may rely on coherence of local and large-scale functional networks for cortical processes to operate at multiple temporal and spatial scales. PMID:27091982

  16. A software component platform for the coordination of multiple adaptations in dynamic environments

    Chefrour, Djalel

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to contribute to the development of methods and tools forthe adaptation of software components and for their coordination in dynamic environments.We propose to capture the mechanisms of adaptability in a generic component modelbased on reflexivity and object-oriented techniques. The components use an underlyingservice for monitoring the environment and a middleware for coordinating multipleadaptations. Coordination includes the management of dependencies between inte...

  17. Calculation of Boozer magnetic coordinates for multiple plasma regions (with either closed or open flux surfaces) connected by magnetic separatrices

    Magnetic coordinates (ψT=radial label of flux surfaces, θ=poloidal, and φ=toroidal angle) are introduced in toroidal magnetoplasma equilibria in order to straighten the field lines [described by: θ-ι(ψT)φ=constant on any flux surface, ι/(ψT) being the rotational transform]. The simplest method for analyzing the ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability expands the perturbed plasma displacement ξ-vector in magnetic coordinates and solves the normal mode equation through one-dimensional (1D) radial finite elements. This paper extends the calculation of (Boozer) magnetic coordinates to simply connected equilibria that embed a magnetic separatrix, with regular X-points (B-vector≠0), and reach the symmetry axis, with singular magnetic X-points (B-vector=0). These configurations include multiple plasma regions, whose outermost one (surrounding plasma) is not composed by toroidal surfaces closed around a single magnetic axis. Two examples are chosen: (i) flux-core-spheromak (FCS) configurations, where the surrounding plasma is a screw pinch, with open flux surfaces; (ii) Chandrasekhar-Kendall-Furth (CKF) configurations, where it is a toroidal shell, carved by multiple toroidal plasma regions. This paper shows that a proper ordering of the radial coordinate ψT, the requirement of continuity for θ and φ and an ι matching condition (between neighboring mesh points on opposite sides of the connecting separatrix) resolve the ambiguities in the definition of magnetic coordinates in both CKF and FCS cases. However, a few metric coefficients diverge at the separatrices; therefore, often numerical MHD stability codes do not use magnetic coordinates there, but adopt local two-dimensional (2D) finite elements. This paper instead investigates all the divergences, in order to allow for the asymptotic analysis of ξ-vector near the separatrices, with the purpose of maintaining the magnetic coordinate method and the 1D radial finite elements in the ideal MHD stability

  18. FLICA: A Framework for Leader Identification in Coordinated Activity

    Amornbunchornvej, Chainarong; Brugere, Ivan; Strandburg-Peshkin, Ariana; Farine, Damien; Crofoot, Margaret C.; Berger-Wolf, Tanya Y.

    2016-01-01

    Leadership is an important aspect of social organization that affects the processes of group formation, coordination, and decision-making in human societies, as well as in the social system of many other animal species. The ability to identify leaders based on their behavior and the subsequent reactions of others opens opportunities to explore how group decisions are made. Understanding who exerts influence provides key insights into the structure of social organizations. In this paper, we pr...

  19. Coordinated Path Following of Multiple UAVs for Time-Critical Missions in the Presence of Time-Varying Communication Topologies

    Aguiar, A. P.; Kaminer, I.; Ghabcheloo, R.; Pascoal, A. M.; Xargay, E.; Hovakimyan, N.; Cao, C; Dobrokhodov, V.

    2008-01-01

    We address the problem of steering multiple unmanned air vehicles (UAVs) along given paths (path-following) under strict temporal coordination constraints requiring, for example, that the vehicles arrive at their final destinations at exactly the same time. Pathfollowing relies on a nonlinear Lyapunov based control strategy derived at the kinematic level with the augmentation of existing autopilots with L1 adaptive output feedback control laws to obtain inner-outer loop control...

  20. Activation of Necroptosis in Multiple Sclerosis

    Dimitry Ofengeim

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS, a common neurodegenerative disease of the CNS, is characterized by the loss of oligodendrocytes and demyelination. Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α, a proinflammatory cytokine implicated in MS, can activate necroptosis, a necrotic cell death pathway regulated by RIPK1 and RIPK3 under caspase-8-deficient conditions. Here, we demonstrate defective caspase-8 activation, as well as activation of RIPK1, RIPK3, and MLKL, the hallmark mediators of necroptosis, in the cortical lesions of human MS pathological samples. Furthermore, we show that MS pathological samples are characterized by an increased insoluble proteome in common with other neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD, Parkinson’s disease (PD, and Huntington’s disease (HD. Finally, we show that necroptosis mediates oligodendrocyte degeneration induced by TNF-α and that inhibition of RIPK1 protects against oligodendrocyte cell death in two animal models of MS and in culture. Our findings demonstrate that necroptosis is involved in MS and suggest that targeting RIPK1 may represent a therapeutic strategy for MS.

  1. How Students Learn from Multiple Contexts and Definitions: Proper Time as a Coordination Class

    Levrini, Olivia; diSessa, Andrea A.

    2008-01-01

    This article provides an empirical analysis of a single classroom episode in which students reveal difficulties with the concept of proper time in special relativity but slowly make progress in improving their understanding. The theoretical framework used is "coordination class theory," which is an evolving model of concepts and conceptual change.…

  2. Relationships between physical activity, physical fitness, somatic fitness, and coordination along childhood and adolescence

    João Paulo Saraiva

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The two main goals of this review were to understand how the relationships between physical activity, physical fitness, somatic fitness, and coordination are established along the motor development of children and adolescents, and how they would influence their future lives. The web based bibliographic database B-On was searched for peer-reviewed publications during the last decade (2000 to 2009. Search criteria included all articles on relationships between any two of the above named factors. Although different methodological designs and variables were found as markers for the same factor, overall results suggested the existence of a clear positive relationship among physical activity, physical fitness, somatic fitness, and coordination from childhood to adolescence, with a special relevance for the relationship between physical activity and coordination. It was also noted a renewed interest on physical activity and motor coordination developmental characteristics and relationships as well as on their lifelong health effects.

  3. Retinal waves coordinate patterned activity throughout the developing visual system

    Ackman, James B.; Burbridge, Timothy J.; Crair, Michael C.

    2012-01-01

    The morphologic and functional development of the vertebrate nervous system is initially governed by genetic factors and subsequently refined by neuronal activity. However, fundamental features of the nervous system emerge before sensory experience is possible. Thus, activity-dependent development occurring before the onset of experience must be driven by spontaneous activity, but the origin and nature of activity in vivo remains largely untested. Here we use optical methods to demonstrate in...

  4. Multiple-Active Multiple-Passive Antenna Systems and Applications

    Tsakalaki, Elpiniki

    2013-01-01

    system capable of changing its transmission parameters via passive radiators attached to tunable loads, according to the structure of the RF propagation channel. The hybrid MAMP array structure can be tractably analyzed using the active element response vector (instead of the classical steering vector......) and the active element current vector (all being functions of the variable loading). The adaptive MAMP system targets at maximizing tight MIMO ergodic and outage rate bounds, relying on partial channel knowledge when tuning to a different loading state for optimizing the rate of communication. The...... proposed adaptive MAMP system can be limited to practical dimensions whereas the passive antennas require no extra RF hardware, thus meeting the cost, space, and power constrains of the users’ mobile terminals. The simulation results show that the adaptive MAMP system, thanks to its “adaptivity”, is able...

  5. Co-immobilization of multiple enzymes by metal coordinated nucleotide hydrogel nanofibers: improved stability and an enzyme cascade for glucose detection

    Liang, Hao; Jiang, Shuhui; Yuan, Qipeng; Li, Guofeng; Wang, Feng; Zhang, Zijie; Liu, Juewen

    2016-03-01

    Preserving enzyme activity and promoting synergistic activity via co-localization of multiple enzymes are key topics in bionanotechnology, materials science, and analytical chemistry. This study reports a facile method for co-immobilizing multiple enzymes in metal coordinated hydrogel nanofibers. Specifically, four types of protein enzymes, including glucose oxidase, Candida rugosa lipase, α-amylase, and horseradish peroxidase, were respectively encapsulated in a gel nanofiber made of Zn2+ and adenosine monophosphate (AMP) with a simple mixing step. Most enzymes achieved quantitative loading and retained full activity. At the same time, the entrapped enzymes were more stable against temperature variation (by 7.5 °C), protease attack, extreme pH (by 2-fold), and organic solvents. After storing for 15 days, the entrapped enzyme still retained 70% activity while the free enzyme nearly completely lost its activity. Compared to nanoparticles formed with AMP and lanthanide ions, the nanofiber gels allowed much higher enzyme activity. Finally, a highly sensitive and selective biosensor for glucose was prepared using the gel nanofiber to co-immobilize glucose oxidase and horseradish peroxidase for an enzyme cascade system. A detection limit of 0.3 μM glucose with excellent selectivity was achieved. This work indicates that metal coordinated materials using nucleotides are highly useful for interfacing with biomolecules.Preserving enzyme activity and promoting synergistic activity via co-localization of multiple enzymes are key topics in bionanotechnology, materials science, and analytical chemistry. This study reports a facile method for co-immobilizing multiple enzymes in metal coordinated hydrogel nanofibers. Specifically, four types of protein enzymes, including glucose oxidase, Candida rugosa lipase, α-amylase, and horseradish peroxidase, were respectively encapsulated in a gel nanofiber made of Zn2+ and adenosine monophosphate (AMP) with a simple mixing step. Most

  6. How students learn from multiple contexts and definitions: Proper time as a coordination class

    Olivia Levrini

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available This article provides an empirical analysis of a single classroom episode in which students reveal difficulties with the concept of proper time in special relativity but slowly make progress in improving their understanding. The theoretical framework used is “coordination class theory,” which is an evolving model of concepts and conceptual change. The paper will focus on showing to what extent and in what sense most of the conditions and events in the data corpus seem understandable from the point of view of coordination class theory. In addition, however, some extensions of the theory are implicated, although we argue that they are “natural” extensions, improvements that extend, but do not threaten, the core theory. In particular, we observe students articulately aligning different ways of determining proper time, and we conjecture, more generally, that such a process is strongly consistent with coordination class theory and likely to be productive in other cases of conceptual change. The empirical analysis is explicitly connected to the general issue of theories and theory development in studies of conceptual change.

  7. Coordinated sensing and active repair for self-healing

    Hurley, D. A.; Huston, D. R.

    2011-02-01

    Self-repairing structural systems have the potential for improved performance ranges and lifetimes over conventional systems. Self-healing materials are not a new phenomenon and have been used in automotive and aeronautical applications for over a century. The bulk of these systems operate by using damage to directly initiate a repair response without any supervisory coordination. Integrating sensing and supervisory control technologies with self-healing may improve the safety and reliability of critical components and structures. This project illustrates the benefit of an integrated sensing, control, and self-healing system using laboratory scale test beds. A thermoplastic polymer embedded with resistive heating wires acts as the self-healing material. Damage is detected using an electro-optical sensing scheme based on photoresistors and a PC handling control duties. As damage occurs it is detected, located, and characterized. The key to this project is the integration of sensor feedback to control healing so that repairs are executed, monitored, and completed on the basis of continuous sensor data. This proof-of-concept prototype can likely be expanded and improved with alternative sensor options, self-healing materials, and system architecture.

  8. Coordinated sensing and active repair for self-healing

    Self-repairing structural systems have the potential for improved performance ranges and lifetimes over conventional systems. Self-healing materials are not a new phenomenon and have been used in automotive and aeronautical applications for over a century. The bulk of these systems operate by using damage to directly initiate a repair response without any supervisory coordination. Integrating sensing and supervisory control technologies with self-healing may improve the safety and reliability of critical components and structures. This project illustrates the benefit of an integrated sensing, control, and self-healing system using laboratory scale test beds. A thermoplastic polymer embedded with resistive heating wires acts as the self-healing material. Damage is detected using an electro-optical sensing scheme based on photoresistors and a PC handling control duties. As damage occurs it is detected, located, and characterized. The key to this project is the integration of sensor feedback to control healing so that repairs are executed, monitored, and completed on the basis of continuous sensor data. This proof-of-concept prototype can likely be expanded and improved with alternative sensor options, self-healing materials, and system architecture

  9. High resolution multiple sampling ionization chamber (MUSIC) sensitive to position coordinates

    A new type of MUSIC sensitive to position coordinates is reported. The development of the first version of this type of chamber is based on the principles presented by Badhwar in 1973. The present detector will be used in experiments on fusion by using radioactive beams. This chamber due to the high resolution is suitable to identification and tracking of low Z particles. One of our goals, when we started this work, was to reduce as much as possible the Z value of particles that can be 'seen' by an ionization chamber. The resolution of the chamber was significantly improved by connecting the preamplifiers directly to the MUSIC's pads. These preamplifiers are able to work in vacuum and very low gas pressure. In this way the value of signal to noise ratio was increased by a factor of ∼10. The detector is of Frisch grid type, with the anode split into 10 active pads. It is the first model of a MUSIC with the field shared between the position grid and the anode pads. The Frisch grid was necessary because the detector is originally designed for very accurate energy measurements and particle identification. A drawing of this detector is shown. The detector itself consists of four main parts. The first one is the constant field-gradient cage, sandwiched in between the cathode and the Frisch grid. The second is the Frisch grid. The third is the position grid located under the Frisch grid. The last one is the plate with the anode pads. The cage is made of 100 μm Cu-Be wires. Every wire was tensioned with a weight representing half of its breaking limit. The Frisch grid was done on an aluminium frame, on which 20 μm W wires spaced 0.3 mm, were wound. For the position grid, 10 groups of 20 μm gold plated W wires have been used. Each group consisted of 5 wires spaced 0.9 mm and connected in parallel. The anode pads 7.8 x 60 mm2 were perpendicular to the beam direction. Each pad and each of the position wire groups were connected to a preamplifier. The energy resolution

  10. Coordinated research activities: Annual report and statistics for 2006

    In 2006, a total of Euro 5 622 290 from the regular budget and Euro 130 715 of extra budgetary contributions were awarded in support of Coordinated Research Projects (CRPs). The CRPs were in Major Programme 1 - Nuclear Power, Fuel Cycle and Nuclear Science, in Major Programme 2 - Nuclear Techniques for Development and Environmental Protection, and in Major Programme 3 - Nuclear Safety and Security. Compared with 2005, the amount awarded represented 20% lower financial support because of completion of 39 CRPs, but with only 19 new start-ups CRPs. Over 70% of the funds awarded for contracts were made to institutions in developing countries primarily in the areas of nuclear power, nuclear science, waste management, food and agriculture, human health, water resources and isotope hydrology, and nuclear safety and security. In numerical terms, at the end of 2006 there were 1385 contracts and agreements awarded to institutes in 108 Member States. The total number of contracts includes 772 research contracts and 107 technical contracts. In addition, 506 research agreements were awarded. Notwithstanding the Secretariat's efforts to increase the numbers of female Chief Scientific Investigators participating in CRPs, the percentage remained at 20%. Efforts continue to increase this figure. The completed CRPs resulted in one PhD, 5 master's degrees and 5 other theses and dissertations, and in the publishing of about 769 articles and reports, scientific papers, proceedings of scientific conferences and contribution to international conferences as well as 11 IAEA TECDOCs, a new scientific database and one website. Detailed reports on the outputs, effectiveness, impact, recommended future action, and resulting publications are listed in Appendix E of this report

  11. Multiple myeloma and physical activity: a scoping review

    Smith, L; McCourt, O.; Heinrich, M.; Paton, B.; Yong, K.; Wardle, J; Fisher, A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Multiple myeloma is the second most common haematological cancer. A growing body of literature is emerging that investigates the role physical activity plays in all stages of multiple myeloma (prevention and survivorship) and to date no attempt has been made to collate and understand this literature. Therefore, this scoping review aims to (1) outline what is already known about physical activity in all stages of multiple myeloma (2) map the literature on physical activity and mult...

  12. Statistical methods for analysis of coordination of chest wall motion using optical reflectance imaging of multiple markers

    Kenyon, C. M.; Ghezzo, R. H.; Cala, S. J.; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Pedotti, Antonio; Macklem, P. T.; Rochester, D. F.

    1994-07-01

    To analyze coordination of chest wall motion we have used principle component analysis (PCA) and multiple regression analysis (MRA) with respect to spirometry on the displacements of 93 optical reflective markers placed upon the chest wall (CW). Each marker is tracked at 10 Hz with an accuracy of 0.2 mm in each spatial dimension using the ELITE system (IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng. 11:943-949, 1985). PCA enables the degree of linear coordination between all of the markers to be assessed using the eigenvectors and eigenvalues of the covariance of the matrix of marker displacements in each dimension against time. Thus the number of linear degrees of freedom (DOF) which contribute more than a particular amount to the total variance can be determined and analyzed. MRA with respect to spirometrically measured lung volume changes enables identification of the CW points whose movement correlates best with lung volume. We have used this analysis to compare a quiet breathing sequence with one where tidal volume was increased fourfold involuntarily and show that the number of DOF with eigenvalues accounting for >5% of the covariance increased from 2 to 3. Also the point whose movement correlated best with lung volume changed from halfway down the lower costal margin to a more lateral point at the level of the bottom of the sternum. This quantification of CW coordination may be useful in analysis and staging of many respiratory disorders and is applicable to any nonrigid body motion where points can be tracked.

  13. New Geo-location Approach Based on Camera Coordinates and Common Points on Multiple Images

    Yu Jiaxiang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The accuracy of traditional unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV geo-location based on single image is too low to meet the needs of precise strike. In this paper, a new UAV geo-location method is presented. The mathematical models are constructed by linearization of the collinearity equations to iteratively compute the pose angles and focal length of the camera. At least three images of the target, along with at least three identifiable common points among the images, are needed for reckoning camera pose angles and focal length. The three dimensional (3D coordinates of ground target are calculated using forward intersection. The new method can get the target coordinates with no dependence on digital elevation model (DEM and the measured values of camera pose angles, therefore two of the three primary error sources in the traditional UAV target location approach are eliminated. Simulation and real image experiment results show that the accuracy of the estimated target location is close to that of the UAV position, and that target location error is within 5m circular error probable (CEP on condition that the UAV is navigated by differential global positioning systems (DGPS.Defence Science Journal, 2009, 59(1, pp.43-48, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.59.1483

  14. Anticancer Activities of Mononuclear Ruthenium(II) Coordination Complexes

    Motswainyana, William M.; Ajibade, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Ruthenium compounds are highly regarded as potential drug candidates. The compounds offer the potential of reduced toxicity and can be tolerated in vivo. The various oxidation states, different mechanism of action, and the ligand substitution kinetics of ruthenium compounds give them advantages over platinum-based complexes, thereby making them suitable for use in biological applications. Several studies have focused attention on the interaction between active ruthenium complexes and their po...

  15. Active neutron multiplicity counting of bulk uranium

    This paper describes a new nondestructive assay technique being developed to assay bulk uranium containing kilogram quantities of 235U. The new technique uses neutron multiplicity analysis of data collected with a coincidence counter outfitted with AmLi neutron sources. We have calculated the expected neutron multiplicity count rate and assay precision for this technique and will report on its expected performance as a function of detector design characteristics, 235U sample mass, AmLi source strength, and source-to-sample coupling. 11 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  16. Can Gymnastic Teacher Predict Leisure Activity Preference among Children with Developmental Coordination Disorders (DCD)?

    Engel-Yeger, Batya; Hanna-Kassis, Amany; Rosenblum, Sara

    2012-01-01

    The aims of the study were to analyze: (1) whether significant differences exist between children with typical development and children with developmental coordination disorders (DCD) in their preference to participate in leisure activities (2) whether the teacher estimation of activity form (TEAF) evaluation predicts participation preference.…

  17. Comparing Activity Patterns, Biological, and Family Factors in Children with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder

    Beutum, Monique Natalie; Cordier, Reinie; Bundy, Anita

    2013-01-01

    The association between motor proficiency and moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) suggests children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD) may be susceptible to inactivity-related conditions such as cardiovascular diseases. The aim of this study was to compare children with and without DCD on physical activity patterns, activity…

  18. Rapid and enhanced activation of microporous coordination polymers by flowing supercritical CO.sub.2

    Matzger, Adam J.; Liu, Baojian; Wong-Foy, Antek G.

    2016-07-19

    Flowing supercritical CO.sub.2 is used to activate metal organic framework materials (MOF). MOFs are activated directly from N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) thus avoiding exchange with a volatile solvent. Most MCPs display increased surface areas directly after treatment although those with coordinatively unsaturated metal centers benefit from additional heating.

  19. Physical Activity and Fitness in Children with Developmental Coordination Disorder: A Systematic Review

    Rivilis, Irina; Hay, John; Cairney, John; Klentrou, Panagiota; Liu, Jian; Faught, Brent E.

    2011-01-01

    Developmental coordination disorder (DCD) is a neurodevelopmental condition characterized by poor motor proficiency that interferes with a child's activities of daily living. Activities that most young children engage in such as running, walking, and jumping are important for the proper development of fitness and overall health. However, children…

  20. Muscle activity during functional coordination training: implications for strength gain and rehabilitation

    Jørgensen, Marie Birk; Andersen, Lars Louis; Kirk, Niels;

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate if different types, body positions, and levels of progression of functional coordination exercises can provide sufficiently high levels of muscle activity to improve strength of the neck, shoulder, and trunk muscles. Nine untrained women were familiarized...... coordination training can be performed with a muscle activity sufficient for strength gain. Functional coordination training may therefore be a good choice for prevention or rehabilitation of musculoskeletal pain or injury in the neck, shoulder, or trunk muscles.......The purpose of this study was to evaluate if different types, body positions, and levels of progression of functional coordination exercises can provide sufficiently high levels of muscle activity to improve strength of the neck, shoulder, and trunk muscles. Nine untrained women were familiarized...... with 7 functional coordination exercises 12 times during 4 weeks before testing. Surface electromyographic (EMG) activity was obtained from rectus abdominus, erector spinae, obliquus externus, and trapezius during the exercises with 2-4 levels of progression. Electromyography was normalized to the...

  1. Experiences in simulating and testing coordinated voltage control provided by multiple wind power plants

    Arlaban, T.; Alonso, O.; Ortiz, D. [Acciona Windpower S.A. (Spain); Peiro, J.; Rivas, R. [Red Electrica de Espana SAU (Spain); Quinonez-Varela, G.; Lorenzo, P. [Acciona Energia S.A. (Spain)

    2011-07-01

    This document presents some field tests performed in a transmission system node in order to check the adequacy of voltage control performance by multiple wind power plants, with an overall capacity of 395 MW. It briefly explains the Spanish TSO motivation towards new voltage control requirements and the necessity of performing such tests in order to set the most convenient voltage control parameters and to verify the stable operation. It presents how different the voltage control capability between modern wind turbines (DFIG) and older ones (SCIG) specifically retrofitted for voltage control is. (orig.)

  2. Multiple-robot drug delivery strategy through coordinated teams of microswimmers

    Kei Cheang, U; Kim, Min Jun, E-mail: mkim@coe.drexel.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Lee, Kyoungwoo [Department of Computer Science, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Julius, Anak Agung [Department of Electrical, Computer and Systems Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States)

    2014-08-25

    Untethered robotic microswimmers are very promising to significantly improve various types of minimally invasive surgeries by offering high accuracy at extremely small scales. A prime example is drug delivery, for which a large number of microswimmers is required to deliver sufficient dosages to target sites. For this reason, the controllability of groups of microswimmers is essential. In this paper, we demonstrate simultaneous control of multiple geometrically similar but magnetically different microswimmers using a single global rotating magnetic field. By exploiting the differences in their magnetic properties, we triggered different swimming behaviors from the microswimmers by controlling the frequency and the strength of the global field, for example, one swim and the other does not while exposed to the same control input. Our results show that the balance between the applied magnetic torque and the hydrodynamic torque can be exploited for simultaneous control of two microswimmers to swim in opposite directions, with different velocities, and with similar velocities. This work will serve to establish important concepts for future developments of control systems to manipulate multiple magnetically actuated microswimmers and a step towards using swarms of microswimmers as viable workforces for complex operations.

  3. Multiple-robot drug delivery strategy through coordinated teams of microswimmers

    Kei Cheang, U.; Lee, Kyoungwoo; Julius, Anak Agung; Kim, Min Jun

    2014-08-01

    Untethered robotic microswimmers are very promising to significantly improve various types of minimally invasive surgeries by offering high accuracy at extremely small scales. A prime example is drug delivery, for which a large number of microswimmers is required to deliver sufficient dosages to target sites. For this reason, the controllability of groups of microswimmers is essential. In this paper, we demonstrate simultaneous control of multiple geometrically similar but magnetically different microswimmers using a single global rotating magnetic field. By exploiting the differences in their magnetic properties, we triggered different swimming behaviors from the microswimmers by controlling the frequency and the strength of the global field, for example, one swim and the other does not while exposed to the same control input. Our results show that the balance between the applied magnetic torque and the hydrodynamic torque can be exploited for simultaneous control of two microswimmers to swim in opposite directions, with different velocities, and with similar velocities. This work will serve to establish important concepts for future developments of control systems to manipulate multiple magnetically actuated microswimmers and a step towards using swarms of microswimmers as viable workforces for complex operations.

  4. 'Unconventional' coordination chemistry by metal chelating fragments in a metalloprotein active site.

    Martin, David P; Blachly, Patrick G; Marts, Amy R; Woodruff, Tessa M; de Oliveira, César A F; McCammon, J Andrew; Tierney, David L; Cohen, Seth M

    2014-04-01

    The binding of three closely related chelators: 5-hydroxy-2-methyl-4H-pyran-4-thione (allothiomaltol, ATM), 3-hydroxy-2-methyl-4H-pyran-4-thione (thiomaltol, TM), and 3-hydroxy-4H-pyran-4-thione (thiopyromeconic acid, TPMA) to the active site of human carbonic anhydrase II (hCAII) has been investigated. Two of these ligands display a monodentate mode of coordination to the active site Zn(2+) ion in hCAII that is not recapitulated in model complexes of the enzyme active site. This unprecedented binding mode in the hCAII-thiomaltol complex has been characterized by both X-ray crystallography and X-ray spectroscopy. In addition, the steric restrictions of the active site force the ligands into a 'flattened' mode of coordination compared with inorganic model complexes. This change in geometry has been shown by density functional computations to significantly decrease the strength of the metal-ligand binding. Collectively, these data demonstrate that the mode of binding by small metal-binding groups can be significantly influenced by the protein active site. Diminishing the strength of the metal-ligand bond results in unconventional modes of metal coordination not found in typical coordination compounds or even carefully engineered active site models, and understanding these effects is critical to the rational design of inhibitors that target clinically relevant metalloproteins. PMID:24635441

  5. Managing nuclear knowledge: IAEA activities and international coordination. Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology (ANENT)

    This CD-ROM is attached to the booklet 'Managing nuclear knowledge: IAEA activities and international coordination. Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology (ANENT)'. It contains the background material with regard to ANENT in full text, including policy level papers, reports, presentation material made by Member States, and meeting summaries during the period 2002-2005. Further information on the current ANENT activities and related IAEA activities is available at 'http://anent-iaea.org' and 'http://iaea.org/inisnkm'

  6. Soluble porous coordination polymers by mechanochemistry: from metal-containing films/membranes to active catalysts for aerobic oxidation.

    Zhang, Pengfei; Li, Haiying; Veith, Gabriel M; Dai, Sheng

    2015-01-14

    Soluble porous coordination polymers from mechanochemical synthesis are presented through a coordination polymerization between highly contorted, rigid tetraphenol and a broad variety of transition metal ions. These polymers can be easily cast as metal-containing films or freestanding membranes. Importantly, as-made coordination polymers are highly active and stable in the aerobic oxidation of allylic C-H bonds. PMID:25389070

  7. CARE Coordinated Accelerator Research in Europe: integrating activity implemented as integrated infrastructure initiative

    Aleksan, R

    2009-01-01

    The main objective of the CARE project was to generate a structured and integrated European area in the field of accelerator research and related R&D. A set of integrating activities involving the largest European infrastructure laboratories and their user communities “active in accelerator R&D”, including industrial partners was established with the following general objectives: 1) To optimise the use of existing infrastructures for improving the European knowledge on accelerator physics  By promoting a coherent and coordinated utilization and development of infrastructures and to facilitate the access to accelerators and test facilities for carrying accelerator studies  By understanding accelerator operation and reliability issues 2) To tackle new or state-of-the-art technologies in a more co-ordinated and collaborative approach  By developing a coherent and coordinated accelerator R&D program in Europe and carrying out joint R&D projects allowing one to enhance the existing (or...

  8. Developmental Coordination Disorder, Gender, and Body Weight: Examining the Impact of Participation in Active Play

    Cairney, John; Kwan, Matthew Y. W.; Hay, John A.; Faught, Brent E.

    2012-01-01

    Background: To examine whether differences in participation in active play (PAP) can account for gender differences in the relationship between Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) and body weight/fat (BMI and percentage fat) in youth. Methods: A cross-sectional investigation of students in grades four through eight (n = 590). Height, weight…

  9. Multiple objective optimization for active sensor management

    Page, Scott F.; Dolia, Alexander N.; Harris, Chris J.; White, Neil M.

    2005-03-01

    The performance of a multi-sensor data fusion system is inherently constrained by the configuration of the given sensor suite. Intelligent or adaptive control of sensor resources has been shown to offer improved fusion performance in many applications. Common approaches to sensor management select sensor observation tasks that are optimal in terms of a measure of information. However, optimising for information alone is inherently sub-optimal as it does not take account of any other system requirements such as stealth or sensor power conservation. We discuss the issues relating to developing a suite of performance metrics for optimising multi-sensor systems and propose some candidate metrics. In addition it may not always be necessary to maximize information gain, in some cases small increases in information gain may take place at the cost of large sensor resource requirements. Additionally, the problems of sensor tasking and placement are usually treated separately, leading to a lack of coherency between sensor management frameworks. We propose a novel approach based on a high level decentralized information-theoretic sensor management architecture that unifies the processes of sensor tasking and sensor placement into a single framework. Sensors are controlled using a minimax multiple objective optimisation approach in order to address probability of target detection, sensor power consumption, and sensor survivability whilst maintaining a target estimation covariance threshold. We demonstrate the potential of the approach through simulation of a multi-sensor, target tracking scenario and compare the results with a single objective information based approach.

  10. Multiple Arkadia/RNF111 structures coordinate its Polycomb body association and transcriptional control.

    Sun, Huaiyu; Liu, Yijing; Hunter, Tony

    2014-08-01

    The RING domain protein Arkadia/RNF111 is a ubiquitin ligase in the transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) pathway. We previously identified Arkadia as a small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO)-binding protein with clustered SUMO-interacting motifs (SIMs) that together form a SUMO-binding domain (SBD). However, precisely how SUMO interaction contributes to the function of Arkadia was not resolved. Through analytical molecular and cell biology, we found that the SIMs share redundant function with Arkadia's M domain, a region distinguishing Arkadia from its paralogs ARKL1/ARKL2 and the prototypical SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase (STUbL) RNF4. The SIMs and M domain together promote both Arkadia's colocalization with CBX4/Pc2, a component of Polycomb bodies, and the activation of a TGFβ pathway transcription reporter. Transcriptome profiling through RNA sequencing showed that Arkadia can both promote and inhibit gene expression, indicating that Arkadia's activity in transcriptional control may depend on the epigenetic context, defined by Polycomb repressive complexes and DNA methylation. PMID:24912682

  11. Coordinate activation of inflammatory gene networksalveolar destruction and neonatal death in AKNA deficient mice

    Wenbin Ma; Woong-Kyung Suh; Hitoshi Okada; Tak W Mak; Yang Zhou; Michael R Blackburn; Hector Martinez-Valdez; Blanca Ortiz-Quintero; Roberto Rangel; Morgan R McKeller; Sara Herrera-Rodriguez; Eliseo F Castillo; Kimberly S Schluns; Mary Hall; Huiyuan Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Gene expression can be regulated by chromatin modifiers,transcription factors and proteins that modulate DNA architecture.Among the latter,AT-hook transcription factors have emerged as multifaceted regulators that can activate or repress broad A/T-rich gene networks.Thus,alterations of AT-hook genes could affect the transcription of multiple genes causing global cell dysfunction.Here we report that targeted deletions of mouse AKNA,a hypothetical AT-hook-like transcription factor,sensitize mice to pathogen-induced inflammation and cause sudden neonatal death.Compared with wild-type littermates,AKNA KO mice appeared weak,failedto thrive and most died by postnatal day 10.Systemic inflammation,predominantly in the lungs,was accompanied by enhanced leukocyte infiltration and alveolar destruction.Cytologic,immunohistochemical and molecular analyses revealed CD11b+Gr1+ neutrophils as major tissue infiltrators,neutrophilic granule protein,cathelin-related antimicrobial peptide and S100A8/9 as neutrophil-specific chemoattracting factors,interleukin-1β and interferon-γ as proinflammatory mediators,and matrix metalloprotease 9 as a plausible proteolytic trigger of alveolar damage.AKNA KO bone marrow transplants in wildtype recipients reproduced the severe pathogen-induced reactions and confirmed the involvement of neutrophils in acute inflammation.Moreover,promoter/reporter experiments showed that AKNA could act as a gene repressor.Our results support the concept of coordinated pathway-specific gene regulation functions modulating the intensity of inflammatory responses,reveal neutrophils as prominent mediators of acute inflammation and suggest mechanisms underlying the triggering of acute and potentially fatal immune reactions.

  12. Coordination environment of the active-site metal ion of liver alcohol dehydrogenase.

    Makinen, M W; Yim, M B

    1981-01-01

    The coordination environment of the catalytically active metal ion of horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase (alcohol:NAD+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.1) has been investigated by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) methods with use of the active-site-specific Co2+-reconstituted enzyme. The EPR absorption spectrum of the metal-substituted enzyme is characteristic of a rhombically distorted environment. The spectrum of the enzyme--NAD+ complex shows approximate axial symmetry of the metal ion site, i...

  13. The relationship between segmental coordination, agility and physical activity in adolescents

    Eliseo García Cantó; Juan José Pérez Soto; Pedro Luis Rodríguez García; Andrés Rosa Guillamón; Pedro Ángel López Miñarro; Francisco José López Villalba

    2015-01-01

    Motor competence (MC) may be related to youth physical activity (PA) level. In the last few years, MC has been studied as a possible determinant of children PA level, but has not been widely studied in adolescents. To analyze the relationship between MC and PA level 533 adolescents (271 men and 261 women) from the southeast of Spain were assessed. To register weekly PA was used the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) and for the MC, four coordination tests including throw and...

  14. Interrelationships Among Motor Coordination, Body Fat Percentage, and Physical Activity in Adolescent Girls

    Chagas Daniel das Virgens; Batista Luiz Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this study was to analyze the interrelationships among motor coordination, body fat percentage, and physical activity levels in adolescent girls. Methods. Sixty-eight girls aged 12-14 years participated in the study. Skinfold thickness was measured and the Körperkoordinationstest für Kinder test was administered. Participants completed a self-reporting questionnaire on physical activity. Bivariate and partial correlations were used to analyze the interrelationships among t...

  15. Inflammatory Cytokines and Physical Activity in Multiple Sclerosis

    Margarida Florindo

    2014-01-01

    Background. Besides the functional benefits, physical activity triggers a hormonal pattern of immunologic responses with an anti-inflammatory effect in individuals who suffer from multiple sclerosis. Purpose. To analyze the influence of physical activity on multiple sclerosis and identify the intensity threshold which triggers the anti-inflammatory physiological mechanism. Methodology. A systematic review was made on the databases Medline, PubMed, ScienceDirect, PloS, PEDro, and Web of Scienc...

  16. Falls and Physical Activity in Persons with Multiple Sclerosis

    Sosnoff, J. J.; Sandroff, B. M.; J. H. Pula; Morrison, S. M.; R. W. Motl

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. To examine the association between fall history and physical activity using an objective measure of physical activity (i.e., accelerometry) in persons with multiple sclerosis. Design. A community-based sample of 75 ambulatory persons with multiple sclerosis volunteered for the investigation. Participants self-reported fall history in the last year, underwent a neurological exam to determine Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score, and wore an accelerometer around the waist f...

  17. Active control of multiple resistive wall modes

    A two-dimensional array of saddle coils at Mc poloidal and Nc toroidal positions is used on the EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch (Brunsell P R et al 2001 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 43 1457) to study active control of resistive wall modes (RWMs). Spontaneous growth of several RWMs with poloidal mode number m = 1 and different toroidal mode number n is observed experimentally, in agreement with linear MHD modelling. The measured plasma response to a controlled coil field and the plasma response computed using the linear circular cylinder MHD model are in quantitative agreement. Feedback control introduces a linear coupling of modes with toroidal mode numbers n, n' that fulfil the condition |n - n'| = Nc. Pairs of coupled unstable RWMs are present in feedback experiments with an array of Mc x Nc = 4 x 16 coils. Using intelligent shell feedback, the coupled modes are generally not controlled even though the field is suppressed at the active coils. A better suppression of coupled modes may be achieved in the case of rotating modes by using the mode control feedback scheme with individually set complex gains. In feedback with a larger array of Mc x Nc = 4 x 32 coils, the coupling effect largely disappears, and with this array, the main internal RWMs n = -11, -10, +5, +6 are all simultaneously suppressed throughout the discharge (7-8 wall times). With feedback there is a two-fold extension of the pulse length, compared to discharges without feedback

  18. Reprogramming metabolism by histone methyltransferase NSD2 drives endocrine resistance via coordinated activation of pentose phosphate pathway enzymes.

    Wang, Junjian; Duan, Zhijian; Nugent, Zoann; Zou, June X; Borowsky, Alexander D; Zhang, Yanhong; Tepper, Clifford G; Li, Jian Jian; Fiehn, Oliver; Xu, Jianzhen; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Murphy, Leigh C; Chen, Hong-Wu

    2016-08-10

    Metabolic reprogramming such as the aerobic glycolysis or Warburg effect is well recognized as a common feature of tumorigenesis. However, molecular mechanisms underlying metabolic alterations for tumor therapeutic resistance are poorly understood. Through gene expression profiling analysis we found that histone H3K36 methyltransferase NSD2/MMSET/WHSC1 expression was highly elevated in tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer cell lines and clinical tumors. IHC analysis indicated that NSD2 protein overexpression was associated with the disease recurrence and poor survival. Ectopic expression of NSD2 wild type, but not the methylase-defective mutant, drove endocrine resistance in multiple cell models and xenograft tumors. Mechanistically, NSD2 was recruited to and methylated H3K36me2 at the promoters of key glucose metabolic enzyme genes. Its overexpression coordinately up-regulated hexokinase 2 (HK2) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), two key enzymes of glycolysis and the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP), as well as TP53-induced glycolysis regulatory phosphatase TIGAR. Consequently, NSD2-driven tamoxifen-resistant cells and tumors displayed heightened PPP activity, elevated NADPH production, and reduced ROS level, without significantly altered glycolysis. These results illustrate a coordinated, epigenetic activation of key glucose metabolic enzymes in therapeutic resistance and nominate methyltransferase NSD2 as a potential therapeutic target for endocrine resistant breast cancer. PMID:27164560

  19. Falls and Physical Activity in Persons with Multiple Sclerosis

    J. J. Sosnoff

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To examine the association between fall history and physical activity using an objective measure of physical activity (i.e., accelerometry in persons with multiple sclerosis. Design. A community-based sample of 75 ambulatory persons with multiple sclerosis volunteered for the investigation. Participants self-reported fall history in the last year, underwent a neurological exam to determine Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS score, and wore an accelerometer around the waist for 7 consecutive days to determine physical activity. Results. Overall, 37 persons (49.3% of the sample reported falling in the last year with 28 of the 37 falling more than once. Persons who fell in the last year had a significantly lower number of steps/day than nonfallers (3510 versus 4940 steps/day; P.05. Conclusions. Collectively, the findings suggest that fall history may have little impact on current physical activity levels in persons with multiple sclerosis.

  20. Falls and Physical Activity in Persons with Multiple Sclerosis

    Sosnoff, J. J.; Sandroff, B. M.; Pula, J. H.; Morrison, S. M.; Motl, R. W.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. To examine the association between fall history and physical activity using an objective measure of physical activity (i.e., accelerometry) in persons with multiple sclerosis. Design. A community-based sample of 75 ambulatory persons with multiple sclerosis volunteered for the investigation. Participants self-reported fall history in the last year, underwent a neurological exam to determine Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score, and wore an accelerometer around the waist for 7 consecutive days to determine physical activity. Results. Overall, 37 persons (49.3% of the sample) reported falling in the last year with 28 of the 37 falling more than once. Persons who fell in the last year had a significantly lower number of steps/day than nonfallers (3510 versus 4940 steps/day; P .05). Conclusions. Collectively, the findings suggest that fall history may have little impact on current physical activity levels in persons with multiple sclerosis. PMID:22966459

  1. Quality and coordination of care for patients with multiple conditions: results from an international survey of patient experience.

    Burgers, Jako S; Voerman, Gerlienke E; Grol, Richard; Faber, Marjan J; Schneider, Eric C

    2010-09-01

    Previous studies using clinical performance measures suggest that quality of care for patients with multiple chronic conditions is not worse than that for others. This article presents patient-reported experiences of health care among 8,973 of chronically ill adults from eight countries, using telephone survey data. We designed a ''morbidity score'' combining the number of conditions and reported health status. Respondents with high morbidity scores reported less favorable experience with coordination of care compared to those with low morbidity scores. They also reported lower ratings of overall quality of care. There were no differences in reported experience with the individual physicians. Comparing type of comorbidity, chronic lung, and mental health problems were associated with lower ratings than hypertension, heart disease, diabetes, arthritis, and cancer. The implications and limitations of this study are discussed in the context of health care reform. Pay-for-performance programs need to account for chronic conditions to avoid penalizing physicians who care for larger shares of such patients. PMID:20801976

  2. Third research coordination meeting on reference database for neutron activation analysis. Summary report

    The third meeting of the Co-ordinated Research Project on 'Reference Database for Neutron Activation Analysis' was held at the IAEA, Vienna from 17-19 November 2008. A summary of presentations made by participants is given, reports on specific tasks and subsequent discussions. With the aim of finalising the work of this CRP and in order to meet initial objectives, outputs were discussed and detailed task assignments agreed upon. (author)

  3. Managing nuclear knowledge: IAEA activities and international coordination. Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology (ANENT)

    This booklet summarizes the main activities being carried out by the IAEA with regard to the Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology (ANENT) and other related activities including those completed during the period 2002-2005. It briefly describes the background information on the events leading to the formation of the ANENT; the terms of reference formulated at the second Coordination Committee meeting held in Vietnam, October 2005; and objectives, strategy and other institutional and managerial policies reaffirmed by the members. The attached CD-ROM contains nearly all of the background material in full text, including policy level papers, reports, presentations made by Member States, and meeting summaries

  4. Integrating Multiple Space Ground Sensors to Track Volcanic Activity

    Chien, Steve; Davies, Ashley; Doubleday, Joshua; Tran, Daniel; Jones, Samuel; Kjartansson, Einar; Thorsteinsson, Hrobjartur; Vogfjord, Kristin; Guomundsson, Magnus; Thordarson, Thor; Mandl, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Volcanic activity can occur with little or no warning. Increasing numbers of space borne assets can enable coordinated measurements of volcanic events to enhance both scientific study and hazard response. We describe the use of space and ground measurements to target further measurements as part of a worldwide volcano monitoring system. We utilize a number of alert systems including the MODVOLC, GOESVOLC, US Air Force Weather Advisory, and Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC) alert systems. Additionally we use in-situ data from ground instrumentation at a number of volcanic sites, including Iceland.

  5. Multiple strategies to activate gold nanoparticles as antibiotics

    Zhao, Yuyun; Jiang, Xingyu

    2013-08-01

    Widespread antibiotic resistance calls for new strategies. Nanotechnology provides a chance to overcome antibiotic resistance by multiple antibiotic mechanisms. This paper reviews the progress in activating gold nanoparticles with nonantibiotic or antibiotic molecules to combat bacterial resistance, analyzes the gap between experimental achievements and real clinical application, and suggests some potential directions in developing antibacterial nanodrugs.

  6. Multiple Active Contours Driven by Particle Swarm Optimization for Cardiac Medical Image Segmentation

    I. Cruz-Aceves

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel image segmentation method based on multiple active contours driven by particle swarm optimization (MACPSO. The proposed method uses particle swarm optimization over a polar coordinate system to increase the energy-minimizing capability with respect to the traditional active contour model. In the first stage, to evaluate the robustness of the proposed method, a set of synthetic images containing objects with several concavities and Gaussian noise is presented. Subsequently, MACPSO is used to segment the human heart and the human left ventricle from datasets of sequential computed tomography and magnetic resonance images, respectively. Finally, to assess the performance of the medical image segmentations with respect to regions outlined by experts and by the graph cut method objectively and quantifiably, a set of distance and similarity metrics has been adopted. The experimental results demonstrate that MACPSO outperforms the traditional active contour model in terms of segmentation accuracy and stability.

  7. Co-ordinated research activities: Annual report and statistics for 2003

    Article III of the IAEA Statute authorises the Agency to encourage and assist research on, and development and practical application of, atomic energy for peaceful purposes throughout the world and to foster the exchange of scientific and technical information, as well as the exchange of scientists in the field of peaceful uses of atomic energy. The research supported by the Agency is within the framework of the Agency's programmes, sub-programmes and projects that are listed in the approved Programme and Budget of the Agency. These co-ordinated research activities are normally implemented through Co-ordinated Research Projects (CRPs) that bring together research institutes in both developing and developed Member States to collaborate on the research topic of interest. The Agency may also respond to proposals from institutes for participation in the research activities by awarding individual contracts not related to a CRP. A small portion of available funds is used to finance individual projects, which deal with topics covered by the Agency's scientific programme. The Agency also supports several Doctoral CRPs. This new, optional type of CRP has been designed to strengthen promotion of research on nuclear technologies in developing Member States through pair building between agreement holders and contract holders. These CRPs include a PhD training programme at the contract holders' institutions. Three doctoral CRPs are currently being carried out by the Human Health programme. Further information on the Agency's co-ordinated research activities, including current information on CRPs and programme areas supported, information on policies and procedures and the administration of the activities is contained in the Agency's website at http://www-crp.iaea.org. The co-ordinated research activities reported in this document are conducted in support of the following Agency programmes: Nuclear Power; Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Material Technologies; Analysis for Sustainable

  8. Coordinated trafficking of synaptic vesicle and active zone proteins prior to synapse formation

    Sabo Shasta L

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The proteins required for synaptic transmission are rapidly assembled at nascent synapses, but the mechanisms through which these proteins are delivered to developing presynaptic terminals are not understood. Prior to synapse formation, active zone proteins and synaptic vesicle proteins are transported along axons in distinct organelles referred to as piccolo-bassoon transport vesicles (PTVs and synaptic vesicle protein transport vesicles (STVs, respectively. Although both PTVs and STVs are recruited to the same site in the axon, often within minutes of axo-dendritic contact, it is not known whether or how PTV and STV trafficking is coordinated before synapse formation. Results Here, using time-lapse confocal imaging of the dynamics of PTVs and STVs in the same axon, we show that vesicle trafficking is coordinated through at least two mechanisms. First, a significant proportion of STVs and PTVs are transported together before forming a stable terminal. Second, individual PTVs and STVs share pause sites within the axon. Importantly, for both STVs and PTVs, encountering the other type of vesicle increases their propensity to pause. To determine if PTV-STV interactions are important for pausing, PTV density was reduced in axons by expression of a dominant negative construct corresponding to the syntaxin binding domain of syntabulin, which links PTVs with their KIF5B motor. This reduction in PTVs had a minimal effect on STV pausing and movement, suggesting that an interaction between STVs and PTVs is not responsible for enhancing STV pausing. Conclusions Our results indicate that trafficking of STVs and PTVs is coordinated even prior to synapse development. This novel coordination of transport and pausing might provide mechanisms through which all of the components of a presynaptic terminal can be rapidly accumulated at sites of synapse formation.

  9. Multiple and changing cycles of active stars II. Results

    Oláh, K; Granzer, T; Strassmeier, K G; Lanza, A F; Järvinen, S; Korhonen, H; Baliunas, S L; Soon, W; Messina, S; Cutispoto, G

    2009-01-01

    We study the time variations of the cycles of 20 active stars based on decades-long photometric or spectroscopic observations. A method of time-frequency analysis, as discussed in a companion paper, is applied to the data. Fifteen stars definitely show multiple cycles; the records of the rest are too short to verify a timescale for a second cycle. The cycles typically show systematic changes. For three stars, we found two cycles in each of them that are not harmonics, and which vary in parallel, indicating that a common physical mechanism arising from a dynamo construct. The positive relation between the rotational and cycle periods is confirmed for the inhomogeneous set of active stars. Stellar activity cycles are generally multiple and variable.

  10. Second Research Coordination Meeting on Reference Database for Neutron Activation Analysis. Summary Report

    The second meeting of the Co-ordinated Research Project on 'Reference Database for Neutron Activation Analysis'; was held at the IAEA, Vienna from 7-9 May, 2007. A summary of the presentations made by participants is given, along with reports on specifically assigned tasks and subsequent discussions. In order to meet the overall objectives of this CRP, the outputs have been reiterated and new task assignments made. The aims of the Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on 'Reference Database for Neutron Activation Analysis' are to improve the status of the database of nuclear constants for k0-NAA, to contribute to the quantification of nuclear structure and decay data, and to remove or reduce some of the discrepancies that exist between the integral constants and values derived from differential data. This CRP originated following the support of the International Nuclear Data Committee (INDC) which advises the Nuclear Data Section (NDS) on nuclear data issues. The INDC recommended in the Summary Report of their meeting of May 2002, INDC/P(02)-23, that a CRP on 'Reference Database for Neutron Activation Analysis' be initiated in 2005

  11. Advancing science and policy through a coordinated international study of physical activity and built environments

    Kerr, Jacqueline; Sallis, James F; Owen, Neville;

    2013-01-01

    National and international strategies to increase physical activity emphasize environmental and policy changes that can have widespread and long-lasting impact. Evidence from multiple countries using comparable methods is required to strengthen the evidence base for such initiatives. Because some...

  12. In vitro Antimicrobial and in vivo Cytotoxic Activity of Three Coordination Complexes Synthesized by Mixed Ligands

    M. Shamim Hossain

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Three coordination complexes of metals with mixed ligands [Mn(ED(2-ap2, A], [Fe(ED(2-ab2, B] and [Fe(ED(2-ap2, C] were tested for their antimicrobial activity by disc diffusion and serial dilution methods. All the complexes were active against various test pathogenic organisms. The maximum antibacterial and antifungal activities were shown by the manganese complex A. The minimum inhibitory concentration of the complex A was determined against four pathogenic bacteria Bacillus subtilis, Streptococcus-β-haemolyticus,Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhi and values were found between 16-32 μg ml-1. The manganese complex A also showed potent cytotoxic effect which is indicative of its probable effect on cancer cell lines.

  13. Social Activity and Cognitive Functioning Over Time: A Coordinated Analysis of Four Longitudinal Studies

    Cassandra L. Brown

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Social activity is typically viewed as part of an engaged lifestyle that may help mitigate the deleterious effects of advanced age on cognitive function. As such, social activity has been examined in relation to cognitive abilities later in life. However, longitudinal evidence for this hypothesis thus far remains inconclusive. The current study sought to clarify the relationship between social activity and cognitive function over time using a coordinated data analysis approach across four longitudinal studies. A series of multilevel growth models with social activity included as a covariate is presented. Four domains of cognitive function were assessed: reasoning, memory, fluency, and semantic knowledge. Results suggest that baseline social activity is related to some, but not all, cognitive functions. Baseline social activity levels failed to predict rate of decline in most cognitive abilities. Changes in social activity were not consistently associated with cognitive functioning. Our findings do not provide consistent evidence that changes in social activity correspond to immediate benefits in cognitive functioning, except perhaps for verbal fluency.

  14. SATB1 packages densely-looped, transciptionally-active chromatinfor coordinated expression of cytokine genes

    Cai, Shutao; Lee, Charles C.; Kohwi-Shigematsu, Terumi

    2006-05-23

    SATB1 is an important regulator of nuclear architecture that anchors specialized DNA sequences onto its cage-like network and recruits chromatin remodeling/modifying factors to control gene transcription. We studied the role of SATB1 in regulating the coordinated expression of Il5, Il4, and Il13 from the 200kb cytokine gene cluster region of mouse chromosome 11 during T-helper 2 (Th2)-cell activation. We show that upon cell activation, SATB1 is rapidly induced to form a unique transcriptionally-active chromatin structure that includes the cytokine gene region. Chromatin is folded into numerous small loops all anchored by SATB1, is histone H3 acetylated at lysine 9/14, and associated with Th2-specific factors, GATA3, STAT6, c-Maf, the chromatin-remodeling enzyme Brg-1, and RNA polymerase II across the 200kb region. Before activation, the chromatin displays some of these features, such as association with GATA3 and STAT6, but these were insufficient for cytokine gene expression. Using RNA interference (RNAi), we show that upon cell activation, SATB1 is not only required for chromatin folding into dense loops, but also for c-Maf induction and subsequently for Il4, Il5, and Il13 transcription. Our results show that SATB1 is an important determinant for chromatin architecture that constitutes a novel higher-order, transcriptionally-active chromatin structure upon Th2-cell activation.

  15. The IAEA coordinated research project: Production of Mo-99 using LEU fission or neutron activation

    Since late 2004, the IAEA has been planning and organizing a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) to assist countries interested in initiating indigenous, small-scale production of Mo-99 to meet local nuclear medicine requirements. The objective of the CRP is to provide interested countries with access to non-proprietary technologies and methods to produce Mo-99 using LEU foil or LEU mini-plate targets, or for the utilization of Mo-99 obtained by neutron activation of molybdenum trioxide target, e.g. through the use of gel generators. The work initiated with a significant consultancy meeting in Vienna directly following the RERTR 2004 International Meeting, and continued with a Mo-99 Potential Producers Workshop held in Buenos Aires, Argentina 17-20 May 2005. Five technology donor countries have been awarded IAEA Research Agreements, and five institutions in four countries have been awarded IAEA Research Contracts (a sixth institution is expected to be awarded a contract in the near future). The First Research Coordination Meeting (RCM) for this CRP will be held in Vienna December 6-9, 2005. The paper describes the background and history of the CRP, its planning and formulation, including the Buenos Aires workshop, plans for the first RCM, and the content of the project as well as the activities likely to take place over the next year. The results and experience gained from the CRP will help strengthen local capability for undertaking small scale Mo-99 production in participant countries. (author)

  16. Coordinated Action of Fast and Slow Reserves for Optimal Sequential and Dynamic Emergency Reserve Activation

    Salkuti, Surender Reddy; Bijwe, P. R.; Abhyankar, A. R.

    2016-04-01

    This paper proposes an optimal dynamic reserve activation plan after the occurrence of an emergency situation (generator/transmission line outage, load increase or both). An optimal plan is developed to handle the emergency situation, using coordinated action of fast and slow reserves, for secure operation with minimum overall cost. This paper considers the reserves supplied by generators (spinning reserves) and loads (demand-side reserves). The optimal backing down of costly/fast reserves and bringing up of slow reserves in each sub-interval in an integrated manner is proposed. The simulation studies are performed on IEEE 30, 57 and 300 bus test systems to demonstrate the advantage of proposed integrated/dynamic reserve activation plan over the conventional/sequential approach.

  17. Decipher the dynamic coordination between enzymatic activity and structural modulation at focal adhesions in living cells

    Lu, Shaoying; Seong, Jihye; Wang, Yi; Chang, Shiou-Chi; Eichorst, John Paul; Ouyang, Mingxing; Li, Julie Y.-S.; Chien, Shu; Wang, Yingxiao

    2014-07-01

    Focal adhesions (FAs) are dynamic subcellular structures crucial for cell adhesion, migration and differentiation. It remains an enigma how enzymatic activities in these local complexes regulate their structural remodeling in live cells. Utilizing biosensors based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), we developed a correlative FRET imaging microscopy (CFIM) approach to quantitatively analyze the subcellular coordination between the enzymatic Src activation and the structural FA disassembly. CFIM reveals that the Src kinase activity only within the microdomain of lipid rafts at the plasma membrane is coupled with FA dynamics. FA disassembly at cell periphery was linearly dependent on this raft-localized Src activity, although cells displayed heterogeneous levels of response to stimulation. Within lipid rafts, the time delay between Src activation and FA disassembly was 1.2 min in cells seeded on low fibronectin concentration ([FN]) and 4.3 min in cells on high [FN]. CFIM further showed that the level of Src-FA coupling, as well as the time delay, was regulated by cell-matrix interactions, as a tight enzyme-structure coupling occurred in FA populations mediated by integrin αvβ3, but not in those by integrin α5β1. Therefore, different FA subpopulations have distinctive regulation mechanisms between their local kinase activity and structural FA dynamics.

  18. Multiple LREK active contours for knee meniscus ultrasound image segmentation.

    Faisal, Amir; Ng, Siew-Cheok; Goh, Siew-Li; George, John; Supriyanto, Eko; Lai, Khin W

    2015-10-01

    Quantification of knee meniscus degeneration and displacement in an ultrasound image requires simultaneous segmentation of femoral condyle, meniscus, and tibial plateau in order to determine the area and the position of the meniscus. In this paper, we present an active contour for image segmentation that uses scalable local regional information on expandable kernel (LREK). It includes using a strategy to adapt the size of a local window in order to avoid being confined locally in a homogeneous region during the segmentation process. We also provide a multiple active contours framework called multiple LREK (MLREK) to deal with multiple object segmentation without merging and overlapping between the neighboring contours in the shared boundaries of separate regions. We compare its performance to other existing active contour models and show an improvement offered by our model. We then investigate the choice of various parameters in the proposed framework in response to the segmentation outcome. Dice coefficient and Hausdorff distance measures over a set of real knee meniscus ultrasound images indicate a potential application of MLREK for assessment of knee meniscus degeneration and displacement. PMID:25910057

  19. Multiple scattering Compton camera with neutron activation for material inspection

    We designed a multiple scattering Compton camera (MSCC) based on a lanthanum bromide (LaBr3:Ce) scintillator to detect neutron-activated prompt gamma-rays for material inspection. The system parameters such as detector thickness and inter-detector distances were optimized on the basis of figure of merit (FOM). The FOM was maximized when the inter-detector distance and detector thickness were 18 cm and 1.5 cm, respectively. Under the optimized conditions, energy spectra and spatial images were obtained to identify various substances, and the results matched well with theoretical data. The probability of multiple Compton scattering was higher than that of conventional Compton scattering at high energies (~MeV), which proved the effectiveness of MSCC to detect prompt gamma-rays. Simulations with realistic conditions showed the feasibility of using the MSCC investigate of materials in field applications

  20. Coordination of atmospheric dispersion activities for the real-time decision support system RODOS

    This projects task has been to coordinate activities among the RODOS Atmospheric Dispersion sub-group A participants, with the overall objective of developing and integrating an atmospheric transport and dispersion module for the joint European Real-time On-line DecisiOn Support system RODOS headed by FZK (formerly KfK), Germany. The project's final goal is the establishment of a fully operational, system-integrated atmospheric transport module for the RODOS system by year 2000, capable of consistent now- and forecasting of radioactive airborne spread over all types of terrain and on all scales of interest, including in particular complex terrain and the different scales of operation, such as the local, the national and the European scale. (au)

  1. Role of National Coordination for Effective Border Monitoring Activity: Malaysia's Experience

    Since 2005, Malaysia has embarked on several initiatives to enhance the country's capability in combating the illicit trafficking of nuclear and other radioactive materials at its identified strategic points of entry and exit. This concern is addressed through the installation of Radiation Portal Monitors (RPM) and the creation of its operational supporting systems, combining the availability of supporting nuclear and other radiation identification devices, resources, concept of operation and standard operating procedures. With RPM installations involving a complex set up at points of entry and exit with the presence of several law enforcement agencies with their existing dedicated roles, there is obviously a demand for a coordinated approach to ensure effective border monitoring activity in the country. (author)

  2. Co-ordinated Research Projects (CRPs): Annual report of activities and statistics for 2001

    Article III of the IAEA Statute authorises the Agency to encourage and assist research on, and development and practical application of, atomic energy for peaceful purposes throughout the world and to foster the exchange of scientific and technical information, as well as the exchange of scientists in the field of peaceful uses of atomic energy. The research supported by the Agency is within the framework of the Agency's programmes, sub-programmes and projects that are listed in the approved Programme and Budget of the Agency. The research work is normally implemented through Coordinated Research Projects (CRPs) that bring together research institutes in both developing and developed Member States to collaborate on the research topic of interest. In addition, the introduction of a new type of CRP (called Thematic CRP), meant to complement traditional CRPs, is currently being tested by the Human Health programme. This new, optional type of CRP is designed to strengthen promotion of research on nuclear technologies in developing Member States through CRPs that rest on pair building between agreement holders and contract holders and includes a PhD training programme at the contract holders' institutions. Further details of the administration of research contracts and general information on CRPs is contained in the Agency?s Website at http://www.iaea.org/programmes/ri/uc.html. The CRPs reported in this document are conducted in support of the following Agency programmes: Nuclear Power; Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Management Technology; Comparative Assessment for Sustainable Energy Development; Food and Agriculture; Human Health; Marine Environment and Water Resources; Applications of Physical and Chemical Sciences; Nuclear Safety; Radiation Safety; Radioactive Waste Safety; Co-ordination of Safety Activities; Safeguards. The Sub-programmes supported by the CRPs are listed. Results of research are available to all Member States, and are disseminated through national

  3. Physical activity and pediatric multiple sclerosis: Developing a research agenda.

    Yeh, E Ann; Kinnett-Hopkins, Dominique; Grover, Stephanie A; Motl, Robert W

    2015-11-01

    Three-quarters of children with multiple sclerosis (MS) experience fatigue or depression, and progressive neurocognitive decline may be seen as early as two years after MS diagnosis. Furthermore, a higher magnetic resonance imaging disease burden is seen in pediatric-onset MS compared with adult-onset MS. To date, limited knowledge exists regarding behavioral methods for managing symptoms and disease progression in pediatric MS. To that end, this paper builds an evidence-based argument for the possible symptomatic and disease-modifying effects of exercise and physical activity in pediatric MS. This will be accomplished through: (a) a review of pediatric MS and its consequences; (b) a brief overview of physical activity and its consequences in children and adults with MS; and (c) a selective review of research on the neurological benefits of physical activity in pediatric populations. This topical review concludes with a list of 10 questions to guide future research on physical activity and pediatric MS. The objective of this paper is the provision of a research interest, focus and agenda involving pediatric MS and its lifelong management though exercise and physical activity behavior. Such an agenda is critical as the effects and maintenance of physical activity and exercise track across the lifespan, particularly when developed in the early stages of life. PMID:26447061

  4. Coordinating and Evaluating of Multiple Key Performance Indicators for Manufacturing Equipment:Case Study of Distillation Column

    Li Zhu; Hongye Su; Shan Lu; Yue Wang; Quanling Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Manufacturing equipment takes the task of operation and directly effects on the manufacturing process. One single Key Performance Indicator (KPI) is mainly employed to evaluate equipment in most studies, neither inte-grating the KPIs into a completed evaluation system nor considering the impact and conflict among KPIs. In this paper, a KPI evaluation architecture is presented to define and analyze KPIs, and then a common structure for KPI to obtain the KPI set of manufacturing equipment is introduced. An available multi-KPI coordination model is proposed to discern and balance the relationship among multi-KPI. Final y, a case study is introduced to il ustrate the applicability of the coordination model by using multi-objective optimization strategy and an efficient solu-tion is obtained.

  5. Supervision and technical coordination of the German activities in the 2D/3D-project

    The German Federal Minister for Research and Technology, the Japanese Atomic Energy Bureau, represented by the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) and the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) made a contract to cooperate in the field of nuclear safety research with the aim to improve and to guarantee the safety of water-cooled nuclear reactors on an international basis by joint research activities in the 2D/3D-project. The necessity for these research activities results from gaps in the status of knowledge for a best-estimate analysis in emergency core cooling, from the legally established duty to minimize the radioactive emission to the environment as consequence of an incident, and from the effort to optimize the safeguard systems of nuclear reactors continuously and steadily. The activities which were performed in the frame of this project concentrated on the coordination of the experimental and theoretical work, as well as on the technical supervision with respect to an efficient attainment of the internationally aspired research aim and to an optimal adjustment with respect to the emergency core cooling problems of pressurized water reactors. (orig.)

  6. Thiol peroxidase-like activity of some intramolecularly coordinated diorganyl diselenides

    Sangit Kumar; Harkesh B Singh

    2005-11-01

    Several new diaryl diselenides having intramolecular coordinating groups have been synthesized by ortho-lithiation/Na2Se2 routes in good yield. Bis[2-(N-phenylferrocenecarboxamide)] diselenide (10), bis[2-(N-tert-butylferrocenecarboxamide)] diselenide (11), ()()-bis[2(--phenethylferrocenecarboxamide)] diselenide (12) were synthesized by the ortho-lithiation route. Bis[2-(N,N-dimethylaminomethylnaphthyl)] diselenide (13) was synthesized by lithium/bromide exchange reaction whereas bis(2,4-dinitrophenyl) diselenide (14) was prepared by the reaction of disodium diselenide with 2,4- dinitro-1-chlorobenzene. Thiol peroxidase-like activities of the diorganodiselenides have been evaluated by using H2O2 as substrate and PhSH as cosubstrate. Diselenides (13) and (14) with dimethylaminomethyl- or nitro-donor groups in close proximity to selenium, show much better thiol peroxidase-like activities compared to diselenides 10-12 with amide donor groups. Cyclic voltammetry study of diselenides 10-12 derived from redox-active ferrocenamide has been carried out.

  7. Eurocan plus report: feasibility study for coordination of national cancer research activities.

    2008-01-01

    The EUROCAN+PLUS Project, called for by the European Parliament, was launched in October 2005 as a feasibility study for coordination of national cancer research activities in Europe. Over the course of the next two years, the Project process organized over 60 large meetings and countless smaller meetings that gathered in total over a thousand people, the largest Europe-wide consultation ever conducted in the field of cancer research.Despite a strong tradition in biomedical science in Europe, fragmentation and lack of sustainability remain formidable challenges for implementing innovative cancer research and cancer care improvement. There is an enormous duplication of research effort in the Member States, which wastes time, wastes money and severely limits the total intellectual concentration on the wide cancer problem. There is a striking lack of communication between some of the biggest actors on the European scene, and there are palpable tensions between funders and those researchers seeking funds.It is essential to include the patients' voice in the establishment of priority areas in cancer research at the present time. The necessity to have dialogue between funders and scientists to establish the best mechanisms to meet the needs of the entire community is evident. A top priority should be the development of translational research (in its widest form), leading to the development of effective and innovative cancer treatments and preventive strategies. Translational research ranges from bench-to-bedside innovative cancer therapies and extends to include bringing about changes in population behaviours when a risk factor is established.The EUROCAN+PLUS Project recommends the creation of a small, permanent and independent European Cancer Initiative (ECI). This should be a model structure and was widely supported at both General Assemblies of the project. The ECI should assume responsibility for stimulating innovative cancer research and facilitating processes

  8. Active immunization therapies for Parkinson's disease and multiple system atrophy.

    Schneeberger, Achim; Tierney, Lanay; Mandler, Markus

    2016-02-01

    Vaccination is increasingly being investigated as a potential treatment for synucleinopathies, a group of neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson's disease, multiple system atrophy, and dementia with Lewy bodies associated with α-synuclein pathology. All lack a causal therapy. Development of novel, disease-altering treatment strategies is urgently needed. Vaccination has positioned itself as a prime strategy for addressing these diseases because it is broadly applicable, requires infrequent administration, and maintains low production costs for treating a large population or as a preventive measure. Current evidence points to a causal role of misfolded α-synuclein in the development and progression of synucleinopathies. In the past decade, significant progress in active immunization against α-synuclein has been shown both in preclinical animal models and in early clinical development. In this review, we describe the state-of-the-art in active immunization approaches to synucleinopathies, with a focus on advances in Parkinson's disease (PD) and multiple-system atrophy (MSA). We first review preclinical animal models, highlighting their progress in translation to the clinical setting. We then discuss current clinical applications, stressing different approaches taken to address α-synuclein pathology. Finally, we address challenges, trends, and future perspectives of current vaccination programs. © 2015 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. PMID:26260853

  9. CD4 T cell activation and disease activity at onset of multiple sclerosis

    Jensen, J; Langkilde, Annika Reynberg; Fenst, C; Nicolaisen, M. S.; Roed, H. G.; Christensen, M; Sellebjerg, F

    We studied CD4 T cell activation in patients with clinically isolated syndromes (CIS) suggesting an initial attack of multiple sclerosis. The percentage of blood CD26+ CD4 T cells was increased in these patients, and correlated with magnetic resonance imaging disease activity and clinical disease...

  10. Spike-field activity in parietal area LIP during coordinated reach and saccade movements

    Hagan, Maureen A.; Dean, Heather L.; Pesaran, Bijan

    2011-01-01

    The posterior parietal cortex is situated between visual and motor areas and supports coordinated visually guided behavior. Area LIP in the intraparietal sulcus contains representations of visual space and has been extensively studied in the context of saccades. However, area LIP has not been studied during coordinated movements, so it is not known whether saccadic representations in area LIP are influenced by coordinated behavior. Here, we studied spiking and local field potential (LFP) acti...

  11. Relationship between Coordination Structure and Biological Activity of Copper(Ⅱ) Nicotinate

    CHEN Qiang; LI Qing-Lu; HUANG Zhi-Jian; LI Jian-Sheng; LI Ru

    2006-01-01

    The copper(Ⅱ) complexes of pyridine-3-carboxylic acid (nicotinic acid) and pyridine-2-carboxylic acid (isonicotinic acid) were synthesized, and their structures were characterized by elemental analysis, infrared spectrum, powder X-ray diffraction and so on. The results show that under experimental conditions, the ligands of synthesized copper nicotinate and copper isonicotinate are coordinated simultaneity with copper(Ⅱ) via the nitrogen of pyridine group and an oxygen of carboxylic acid group to form bidentate chelates. The crystal of copper nicotinate with two six-membered chelate rings belongs to monoclinic system, while that of copper isonicotinate having two five-membered chelate rings is of triclinic system. The tests show that the biological activities, such as the improvement of feed utilization, growth, anti-oxidation ability of organism and disease-resistant power, are different when copper nicotinate, copper inicotinate, copper-lysine chelate, copper-methionine chelate and copper sulphate are added in pig's feed, respectively. Due to its higher biological activity, less pollution and lower toxicity,copper nicotinate has wide potential applications as a feed additive.

  12. Redox-active porous coordination polymer based on trinuclear pivalate: Temperature-dependent crystal rearrangement and redox-behavior

    Linking of trinuclear pivalate Fe2NiO(Piv)6 (Piv=O2CC(CH3)3) by 2,6-bis(4-pyridyl)-4-(1-naphthyl)pyridine (L) resulted in formation of 1D-porous coordination polymer Fe2NiO(Piv)6(L)·Solv, which was characterized in two forms: DMSO solvate Fe2NiO(Piv)6(L)(DMSO)·2.5DMSO (1) or water solvate Fe2NiO(Piv)6(L)(H2O) (2). X-ray structure of 1 was determined. Crystal lattice of 1 at 160 K contained open channels, filled by captured solvent, while temperature growth to 296 K led to the crystal lattice rearrangement and formation of closed voids. Redox-behavior of 2 was studied by cyclic voltammetry for a solid compound, deposited on glassy-carbon electrode. Redox-activity of L preserved upon incorporation in the coordination polymer. The presence of pores in desolvated sample Fe2NiO(Piv)6(L) was confirmed by the measurements of N2 and H2 adsorption at 77 K. Potential barriers of the different molecules diffusion through pores were estimated by the means of molecular mechanics. - Graphical abstract: Redox-behavior of 1D-porous coordination polymer Fe2NiO(Piv)6(L)(H2O) was studied by cyclic voltammetry in thin film, deposited on glassy-carbon electrode. Redox-activity of L preserved upon incorporation in the coordination polymer. Potential barriers of different molecules diffusion through pores were estimated by the means of molecular mechanics. - Highlights: • Porous 1D coordination polymer was synthesized. • Temperature growth led to pores closing due to crystal lattice rearrangement. • Redox-activity of ligand preserved upon incorporation into coordination polymer. • Redox-properties of solid coordination polymer were studied in thin film. • Diffusion barriers were evaluated by molecular mechanics

  13. Predicting and preventing the future: actively managing multiple sclerosis.

    Hutchinson, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS) has a highly variable clinical course but a number of demographic, clinical and MRI features can guide the clinician in the assessment of disease activity and likely disability outcome. It is also clear that the inflammatory activity in the first five years of relapsing-remitting MS results in the neurodegenerative changes seen in secondary progressive MS 10-15 years later. While conventional first-line disease modifying therapy has an effect on relapses, about one third of patients have a suboptimal response to treatment. With the advent of highly active second-line therapies with their evident marked suppression of inflammation, the clinician now has the tools to manage the course of relapsing-remitting MS more effectively. The development of treatment optimisation recommendations based on the clinical response to first-line therapies can guide the neurologist in more active management of the early course of relapsing-remitting MS, with the aim of preventing both acute inflammatory axonal injury and the neurodegenerative process which leads to secondary progressive MS.

  14. The European radioecology alliance: encouraging the coordination and integration of research activities in radioecology

    Real, A. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas - CIEMAT (Spain); European Radioecology Alliance Association, French Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety - IRSN, 31 Avenue de la Division Leclerc, BP 17, 92262 Fontenay-aux-Roses Cedex (France); Currivan, Lorraine [Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland - RPII (Ireland); Gariel, Jean-Christophe [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire - IRSN (France); Hardeman, Frank [SCK.CEN (Belgium); Howard, Brenda [Natural Environment Research Council - NERC, UK (United Kingdom); Lukashenko, Sergey [Kazakhstan Republic Institute of Nuclear Physics - NNCRK (Kazakhstan); Lund, Ingemar [Swedish Radiation Safety Authority - SSM (Sweden); Sabatier, Laure [Commissariat a l' energie atomique et aux energies alternatives - CEA (France); Sachs, Susanne [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf - HZDR (Germany); Salomaa, Sisko [Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority - STUK (Finland); Smith, James [University of Portsmouth - UoP (United Kingdom); Steiner, Martin [Federal Office for Radiation Protection - BfS (Germany); Strand, Per [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority - NRPA (Norway); Tschiersch, Jochen [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen - HMGU (Germany); Hinton, Thomas [Strategy for Allied Radioecology - STAR Coordinator, IRSN (France); Vandenhove, Hildegarde [COordination and iMplementation of a pan-European instrumenT for radioecology - COMET Coordinator, SCK.CEN (Belgium)

    2014-07-01

    The European Radioecology Alliance was established in 2009 with a firm conviction from its eight founding European organizations that joining forces would enhance the competence of radioecology science in Europe. The main objective of the Radioecology Alliance is to progressively strengthen the coordination and integration of research in the field of radioecology at national, European and international level. The integration of the European radioecology community will be a key aspect facing the upcoming EURATOM Horizon 2020 framework programme. In 2012, the Radioecology Alliance was officially constituted as an Association, and in June 2013 grew from 8 to 14 members from 10 different countries (Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, Ireland, Kazakhstan, Norway, Spain, Sweden and United Kingdom). Within the framework of the Radioecology Alliance, a Network of Excellence in Radioecology STAR (Strategy for Allied Radioecology) was created in 2011 with financial support of the EC FP7. More recently, the project COMET (Coordination and implementation of a pan-European instrument for radioecology) has been also funded by the EC to strengthen the pan-European research initiative on the radiation impact on man and the environment by facilitating the integration of the Research and Development activities in radioecology. The Radioecology Alliance, in close collaboration with STAR in the first phase, and more recently with COMET, has developed for the first time a Strategic Research Agenda (SRA) on Radioecology. The SRA identifies three challenges: (1) To predict human and wildlife exposure more robustly by quantifying the key processes that most influence radionuclide transfers; (2) To determine ecological consequences under realistic exposure conditions and (3) To improve human and environmental protection by integrating radioecology. Within these 3 challenges, 15 research lines have been identified. After a consultation process which included not only the scientific community

  15. The European radioecology alliance: encouraging the coordination and integration of research activities in radioecology

    The European Radioecology Alliance was established in 2009 with a firm conviction from its eight founding European organizations that joining forces would enhance the competence of radioecology science in Europe. The main objective of the Radioecology Alliance is to progressively strengthen the coordination and integration of research in the field of radioecology at national, European and international level. The integration of the European radioecology community will be a key aspect facing the upcoming EURATOM Horizon 2020 framework programme. In 2012, the Radioecology Alliance was officially constituted as an Association, and in June 2013 grew from 8 to 14 members from 10 different countries (Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, Ireland, Kazakhstan, Norway, Spain, Sweden and United Kingdom). Within the framework of the Radioecology Alliance, a Network of Excellence in Radioecology STAR (Strategy for Allied Radioecology) was created in 2011 with financial support of the EC FP7. More recently, the project COMET (Coordination and implementation of a pan-European instrument for radioecology) has been also funded by the EC to strengthen the pan-European research initiative on the radiation impact on man and the environment by facilitating the integration of the Research and Development activities in radioecology. The Radioecology Alliance, in close collaboration with STAR in the first phase, and more recently with COMET, has developed for the first time a Strategic Research Agenda (SRA) on Radioecology. The SRA identifies three challenges: (1) To predict human and wildlife exposure more robustly by quantifying the key processes that most influence radionuclide transfers; (2) To determine ecological consequences under realistic exposure conditions and (3) To improve human and environmental protection by integrating radioecology. Within these 3 challenges, 15 research lines have been identified. After a consultation process which included not only the scientific community

  16. 基于平行坐标的多视图协同可视分析方法%Coordinated Visual Analytics Method Based on Multiple Views with Parallel Coordinates

    陈谊; 蔡进峰; 石耀斌; 陈红倩

    2013-01-01

    平行坐标和散点图矩阵技术是多维数据可视化和可视分析的主要技术,然而在数据较为杂乱时,这些技术都存在局部信息无法清晰展现的缺陷.结合平行坐标和散点图矩阵等技术,提出了一种简单、快捷的多视图协同可视分析方法.该方法用在平行坐标中嵌入直方图等统计方法来解决局部可视化的缺陷,通过融合不同技术的优点,从不同的角度对多维数据进行可视化和可视分彳,从中挖掘出有价值的信息.将该方法应用到农药残留检测数据的分析中,取得了良好效果.%Parallel coordinates and scatter-plot matrix are the main visualization and visual analysis techniques for multidimensional data. However, these techniques have defects that local information can not be shown clearly when data set is large and complex. A simple and flexible visual analysis method called multiple coordinated views based on parallel and scatter-plot matrix was proposed. This method combined with the advantages of the parallel coordinates and scatter-plot matrix, and embedded some statistical analysis techniques such as histograms in Parallel Coordinates to compensate those defects. Users could analyze multidimensional data in different perspectives simultaneously, and mine valuable information from the multidimensional data set with this method. The results of application in the pesticide residue detection data set show that this method can implement visual analysis to multidimensional data flexibly and effectively.

  17. Mutant p53: multiple mechanisms define biologic activity in cancer

    Michael Paul Kim

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The functional importance of p53 as a tumor suppressor gene is evident through its pervasiveness in cancer biology. The p53 gene is the most commonly altered gene in human cancer; however, not all genetic alterations are biologically equivalent. The majority of p53 alterations involve missense mutations that result in the production of mutant p53 proteins. Such mutant p53 proteins lack normal p53 function and may acquire novel functions, often with deleterious effects. Here, we review characterized mechanisms of mutant p53 gain of function in multiple model systems. In addition, we review mutant p53 addiction as emerging evidence suggests that tumors may depend on sustained mutant p53 activity for continued growth. We also discuss the role of p53 in stromal elements and their contribution to tumor initiation and progression. Lastly, current genetic mouse models of mutant p53 are reviewed and their limitations discussed.

  18. Active Hydrogenation Catalyst with a Structured, Peptide-Based Outer-Coordination Sphere

    Jain, Avijita; Buchko, Garry W.; Reback, Matthew L.; O' Hagan, Molly J.; Ginovska-Pangovska, Bojana; Linehan, John C.; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2012-10-05

    The synthesis, catalytic activity, and structural features of a rhodium-based hydrogenation catalyst containing a phosphine ligand coupled to a 14-residue peptide are reported. Both CD and NMR spectroscopy show that the peptide adopts a helical structure in 1:1:1 TFE/MeCN/H2O that is maintained when the peptide is attached to the ligand and when the ligand is attached to the metal complex. The metal complex hydrogenates aqueous solutions of 3-butenol to 1-butanol at 360 ± 50 turnovers/Rh/h at 294 K. This peptide- based catalyst represents a starting point for developing and characterizing a peptide-based outer-coordination sphere that can be used to introduce enzyme-like features into molecular catalysts. This work was funded by the US DOE Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences, Geoscience and Biosciences Division (AJ, JCL and WJS), the Office of Science Early Career Research Program through the Office of Basic Energy Sciences (GWB, MLR and WJS). Part of the research was conducted at the W.R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Biolog-ical and Environmental Research (BER) program located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  19. Co-ordinated Research Projects (CRPs): Annual report of activities and statistics for 2002

    and technical publications (TECDOCs). In certain cases the research results are directly relevant to implementation of projects in the Agency's Technical Co-operation Programme. In terms of number of awards and degree of funding, CRPs constitute a significant activity within the Agency's programmes. 1003 contracts and agreements were awarded from the 1364 contract and agreement proposals received by the Agency during 2002. Annex I lists by country the number of proposals received and awards made. In 2002, $6 329 221 were awarded from the regular budget to institutes under contractual arrangements and to fund Research Co-ordination Meetings (RCMs). Additionally, $122 077 of extra-budgetary contributions was used to fund additional contracts and RCMs. Thus, total awards amounted to $6 451 298. Table 1 summarizes all awards by Programme in 2002. The average award per contract was $5 700

  20. Co-ordination and methodological guidance of information activities in the Czechoslovak nuclear programme in building the branch information system

    The work of the control unit is described which secures the optimal operation of the system, its internal functions and its linkage with other systems. The aim of coordination and methodological activity is to strengthen working and organizational links within the framework of the construction and operation of sector information systems, the establishment of cooperation relations and the elimination of duplicity. (M.D.)

  1. 20 CFR 641.335 - How should the Governor address the coordination of SCSEP services with activities funded under...

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How should the Governor address the... should the Governor address the coordination of SCSEP services with activities funded under title I of WIA? The Governor must seek the advice and recommendations from representatives of the State and...

  2. Neuronal activity related to eye-hand coordination in the primate premotor cortex.

    Jouffrais, C; Boussaoud, D

    1999-09-01

    To test the functional implications of gaze signals that we previously reported in the dorsal premotor cortex (PMd), we trained two rhesus monkeys to point to visual targets presented on a touch screen while controlling their gaze orientation. Each monkey had to perform four different tasks. To initiate a trial, the monkey had to put his hand on a starting position at the center of the touch screen and fixate a fixation point. In one task, the animal had to make a reaching movement to a peripheral target randomly presented at one of eight possible locations on a circle while maintaining fixation at the center of this virtual circle (central fixation + reaching). In the second task, the monkey maintained fixation at the location of the upcoming peripheral target and, later, reached to that location. After a delay, the target was turned on and the monkey made a reaching arm movement (target fixation + reaching). In the third task, the monkey made a saccade to the target without any arm movement (saccade). Finally, in the fourth task, the monkey first made a saccade to the target, then reached to it after a delay (saccade + reaching). This design allowed us to examine the contribution of the oculomotor context to arm-related neuronal activity in PMd. We analyzed the effects of the task type on neuronal activity and found that many cells showed a task effect during the signal (26/60; 43%), set (16/49; 33%) and/or movement (15/54; 28%) epochs, depending on the oculomotor history. These findings, together with previously published data, suggest that PMd codes limb-movement direction in a gaze-dependent manner and may, thus, play an important role in the brain mechanisms of eye-hand coordination during visually guided reaching. PMID:10473760

  3. Managing Nuclear Knowledge: IAEA Activities and International Coordination. Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology (ANENT)

    The important role which the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) plays in assisting Member States in the preservation and enhancement of nuclear knowledge and in facilitating international collaboration in this area has been recognized by the General Conference of the International Atomic Energy Agency in resolutions GC(46)/RES/11B, GC(47)/RES/10B, GC(48)/RES/13 and GC(50)/RES/13. The IAEA continues to support the enhancement and stabilization of nuclear education and training with the objective of securing the availability of qualified human resources for the nuclear sector. Its most important approaches are networking regional educational institutions and fostering cooperation to develop harmonized curricula, prepare and disseminate teaching materials. The Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology (ANENT), established by the IAEA in 2004, became operational in 2005. An ANENT website has been set up and is being expanded, such as developing a long-distance learning platform. Also, a reference curriculum for nuclear engineering is being developed with the cooperation of external partners.This booklet summarizes the main activities being carried out by the IAEA with regard to the Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology (ANENT) and other related activities including those completed during the period 2002–2005. It briefly describes the background information on the events leading to the formation of the ANENT; the terms of reference formulated at the second Coordination Committee meeting held in Vietnam, October 2005; and objectives, strategy and other institutional and managerial policies reaffirmed by the members. CD-ROM attached to the printed booklet containing nearly all of the background material in full text, including policy level papers, reports, presentations made by Member States, and meeting summaries

  4. Mechanisms for multiple activity modes of VTA dopamine neurons

    Andrew eOster

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Midbrain ventral segmental area (VTA dopaminergic neurons send numerous projections to cortical and sub-cortical areas, and diffusely release dopamine (DA to their targets. DA neurons display a range of activity modes that vary in frequency and degree of burst firing. Importantly, DA neuronal bursting is associated with a significantly greater degree of DA release than an equivalent tonic activity pattern. Here, we introduce a single compartmental, conductance-based computational model for DA cell activity that captures the behavior of DA neuronal dynamics and examine the multiple factors that underlie DA firing modes: the strength of the SK conductance, the amount of drive, and GABA inhibition. Our results suggest that neurons with low SK conductance fire in a fast firing mode, are correlated with burst firing, and require higher levels of applied current before undergoing depolarization block. We go on to consider the role of GABAergic inhibition on an ensemble of dynamical classes of DA neurons and find that strong GABA inhibition suppresses burst firing. Our studies suggest differences in the distribution of the SK conductance and GABA inhibition levels may indicate subclasses of DA neurons within the VTA. We further identify, that by considering alternate potassium dynamics, the dynamics display burst patterns that terminate via depolarization block, akin to those observed in vivo in VTA DA neurons and in substantia nigra pars compacta DA cell preparations under apamin application. In addition, we consider the generation of transient burst firing events that are NMDA-initiated or elicited by a sudden decrease of GABA inhibition, that is, disinhibition.

  5. Integrative analysis of large scale expression profiles reveals core transcriptional response and coordination between multiple cellular processes in a cyanobacterium

    Bhattacharyya-Pakrasi Maitrayee

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cyanobacteria are the only known prokaryotes capable of oxygenic photosynthesis. They play significant roles in global biogeochemical cycles and carbon sequestration, and have recently been recognized as potential vehicles for production of renewable biofuels. Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 has been extensively used as a model organism for cyanobacterial studies. DNA microarray studies in Synechocystis have shown varying degrees of transcriptome reprogramming under altered environmental conditions. However, it is not clear from published work how transcriptome reprogramming affects pre-existing networks of fine-tuned cellular processes. Results We have integrated 163 transcriptome data sets generated in response to numerous environmental and genetic perturbations in Synechocystis. Our analyses show that a large number of genes, defined as the core transcriptional response (CTR, are commonly regulated under most perturbations. The CTR contains nearly 12% of Synechocystis genes found on its chromosome. The majority of genes in the CTR are involved in photosynthesis, translation, energy metabolism and stress protection. Our results indicate that a large number of differentially regulated genes identified in most reported studies in Synechocystis under different perturbations are associated with the general stress response. We also find that a majority of genes in the CTR are coregulated with 25 regulatory genes. Some of these regulatory genes have been implicated in cellular responses to oxidative stress, suggesting that reactive oxygen species are involved in the regulation of the CTR. A Bayesian network, based on the regulation of various KEGG pathways determined from the expression patterns of their associated genes, has revealed new insights into the coordination between different cellular processes. Conclusion We provide here the first integrative analysis of transcriptome data sets generated in a cyanobacterium. This

  6. Circulating polymerase chain reaction chips utilizing multiple-membrane activation

    Wang, Chih-Hao; Chen, Yi-Yu; Liao, Chia-Sheng; Hsieh, Tsung-Min; Luo, Ching-Hsing; Wu, Jiunn-Jong; Lee, Huei-Huang; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2007-02-01

    This paper reports a new micromachined, circulating, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) chip for nucleic acid amplification. The PCR chip is comprised of a microthermal control module and a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-based microfluidic control module. The microthermal control modules are formed with three individual heating and temperature-sensing sections, each modulating a specific set temperature for denaturation, annealing and extension processes, respectively. Micro-pneumatic valves and multiple-membrane activations are used to form the microfluidic control module to transport sample fluids through three reaction regions. Compared with other PCR chips, the new chip is more compact in size, requires less time for heating and cooling processes, and has the capability to randomly adjust time ratios and cycle numbers depending on the PCR process. Experimental results showed that detection genes for two pathogens, Streptococcus pyogenes (S. pyogenes, 777 bps) and Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae, 273 bps), can be successfully amplified using the new circulating PCR chip. The minimum number of thermal cycles to amplify the DNA-based S. pyogenes for slab gel electrophoresis is 20 cycles with an initial concentration of 42.5 pg µl-1. Experimental data also revealed that a high reproducibility up to 98% could be achieved if the initial template concentration of the S. pyogenes was higher than 4 pg µl-1. The preliminary results of the current paper were presented at the 19th IEEE International Conference on Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (IEEE MEMS 2006), Istanbul, Turkey, 22-26 January, 2006.

  7. 3D Filament Network Segmentation with Multiple Active Contours

    Xu, Ting; Vavylonis, Dimitrios; Huang, Xiaolei

    2014-03-01

    Fluorescence microscopy is frequently used to study two and three dimensional network structures formed by cytoskeletal polymer fibers such as actin filaments and microtubules. While these cytoskeletal structures are often dilute enough to allow imaging of individual filaments or bundles of them, quantitative analysis of these images is challenging. To facilitate quantitative, reproducible and objective analysis of the image data, we developed a semi-automated method to extract actin networks and retrieve their topology in 3D. Our method uses multiple Stretching Open Active Contours (SOACs) that are automatically initialized at image intensity ridges and then evolve along the centerlines of filaments in the network. SOACs can merge, stop at junctions, and reconfigure with others to allow smooth crossing at junctions of filaments. The proposed approach is generally applicable to images of curvilinear networks with low SNR. We demonstrate its potential by extracting the centerlines of synthetic meshwork images, actin networks in 2D TIRF Microscopy images, and 3D actin cable meshworks of live fission yeast cells imaged by spinning disk confocal microscopy.

  8. Connecting multiple spatial scales to decode the population activity of grid cells.

    Stemmler, Martin; Mathis, Alexander; Herz, Andreas V M

    2015-12-01

    Mammalian grid cells fire when an animal crosses the points of an imaginary hexagonal grid tessellating the environment. We show how animals can navigate by reading out a simple population vector of grid cell activity across multiple spatial scales, even though neural activity is intrinsically stochastic. This theory of dead reckoning explains why grid cells are organized into discrete modules within which all cells have the same lattice scale and orientation. The lattice scale changes from module to module and should form a geometric progression with a scale ratio of around 3/2 to minimize the risk of making large-scale errors in spatial localization. Such errors should also occur if intermediate-scale modules are silenced, whereas knocking out the module at the smallest scale will only affect spatial precision. For goal-directed navigation, the allocentric grid cell representation can be readily transformed into the egocentric goal coordinates needed for planning movements. The goal location is set by nonlinear gain fields that act on goal vector cells. This theory predicts neural and behavioral correlates of grid cell readout that transcend the known link between grid cells of the medial entorhinal cortex and place cells of the hippocampus. PMID:26824061

  9. Redox-active porous coordination polymer based on trinuclear pivalate: Temperature-dependent crystal rearrangement and redox-behavior

    Lytvynenko, Anton S. [L.V. Pisarzhevskii Institute of Physical Chemistry, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Prospekt Nauki 31, Kiev 03028 (Ukraine); Kiskin, Mikhail A., E-mail: mkiskin@igic.ras.ru [N.S. Kurnakov Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninsky Prospect 31, GSP-1, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Dorofeeva, Victoria N.; Mishura, Andrey M.; Titov, Vladimir E.; Kolotilov, Sergey V. [L.V. Pisarzhevskii Institute of Physical Chemistry, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Prospekt Nauki 31, Kiev 03028 (Ukraine); Eremenko, Igor L.; Novotortsev, Vladimir M. [N.S. Kurnakov Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninsky Prospect 31, GSP-1, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-03-15

    Linking of trinuclear pivalate Fe{sub 2}NiO(Piv){sub 6} (Piv=O{sub 2}CC(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}) by 2,6-bis(4-pyridyl)-4-(1-naphthyl)pyridine (L) resulted in formation of 1D-porous coordination polymer Fe{sub 2}NiO(Piv){sub 6}(L)·Solv, which was characterized in two forms: DMSO solvate Fe{sub 2}NiO(Piv){sub 6}(L)(DMSO)·2.5DMSO (1) or water solvate Fe{sub 2}NiO(Piv){sub 6}(L)(H{sub 2}O) (2). X-ray structure of 1 was determined. Crystal lattice of 1 at 160 K contained open channels, filled by captured solvent, while temperature growth to 296 K led to the crystal lattice rearrangement and formation of closed voids. Redox-behavior of 2 was studied by cyclic voltammetry for a solid compound, deposited on glassy-carbon electrode. Redox-activity of L preserved upon incorporation in the coordination polymer. The presence of pores in desolvated sample Fe{sub 2}NiO(Piv){sub 6}(L) was confirmed by the measurements of N{sub 2} and H{sub 2} adsorption at 77 K. Potential barriers of the different molecules diffusion through pores were estimated by the means of molecular mechanics. - Graphical abstract: Redox-behavior of 1D-porous coordination polymer Fe{sub 2}NiO(Piv){sub 6}(L)(H{sub 2}O) was studied by cyclic voltammetry in thin film, deposited on glassy-carbon electrode. Redox-activity of L preserved upon incorporation in the coordination polymer. Potential barriers of different molecules diffusion through pores were estimated by the means of molecular mechanics. - Highlights: • Porous 1D coordination polymer was synthesized. • Temperature growth led to pores closing due to crystal lattice rearrangement. • Redox-activity of ligand preserved upon incorporation into coordination polymer. • Redox-properties of solid coordination polymer were studied in thin film. • Diffusion barriers were evaluated by molecular mechanics.

  10. Multiple Active Volcanoes in the Northeast Lau Basin

    Baker, E. T.; Resing, J. A.; Lupton, J. E.; Walker, S. L.; Embley, R. W.; Rubin, K. H.; Buck, N.; de Ronde, C. E.; Arculus, R. J.

    2010-12-01

    The northeast Lau Basin occupies a complex geological area between the Tafua arc front, the E-W trending Tonga Trench, and the Northeast Lau Spreading Center. These boundaries create multiple zones of extension and thus provide abundant opportunities for magma to invade the crust. The 25-km-long chain of “Mata” volcanoes lies near the center of this area, separated from both the arc front and the spreading ridge. In 2008 we discovered hydrothermal venting on the largest and most southerly of these volcanoes, W and E Mata. In 2010 we visited the 7 smaller volcanoes that form a 15-km-long arcuate sweep to the north from W and E Mata (the “North Matas”). We also revisited W and E Mata. Over each volcano we conducted CTD tows to map plumes and collect water samples. Based on the CTD results, camera tows searched for seafloor sources on three volcanoes. The N Mata volcanoes, extending from Mata Taha (1) in the south to Mata Fitu (7) in the north, lie within a prominent gap in the shallow bathymetry along the southern border of the Tonga trench. Northward from E Mata the Mata volcanoes degrade from large symmetrical cones to smaller and blocky volcanic edifices. Summit depths range from 1165 m (W Mata) to 2670 m (Mata Nima (5)). The most active volcano in the chain is the erupting W Mata, with an intense plume that extended 250 m above the summit. Hydrothermal temperature anomalies (Δθ, corrected for hydrographic masking effects) reached ˜1.7°C, with light-scattering values as high as 2-5 ΔNTU. The 2010 surveys now show that 6 of the 7 N Mata volcanoes are also hydrothermally active. Along the N Matas, Δθ and ΔNTU signals ranged from robust to weak, but distinct oxidation-reduction potential (aka Eh) anomalies confirmed active venting in each case. The most concentrated plumes were found near Mata Ua (2) and Mata Fitu (7), with Δθ and ΔNTU maxima of 0.1-0.17°C and 0.3, respectively. Despite the variability in plume strength, however, ΔNTU/Δθ ratios

  11. Activation of a water molecule coordinated to manganese: four study cases

    The daunting energy consumption of western societies calls for the development of renewable energies. Among them, hydrogen stands as a major candidate. The cleanest way of producing hydrogen is water electro- or photolysis. This reaction is carried out in natural photosynthesis by a manganese-oxo cluster, the functioning of which remains unknown. Insight into this mechanism would greatly help the search for low-cost water splitting catalysts. Our contribution to this field is the understanding of the fundamental processes that govern the activation of water by manganese complexes. This manuscript describes our attempts to generate electrochemically mononuclear manganese(IV) complexes bearing a fully deprotonated water molecule (oxo ligand). We have studied four different cases, which reflect different possible coordination spheres capable of stabilizing such species. In the first chapter, we will give a brief overview of the present energetic challenges faced by western societies. In the second chapter, we will present general considerations about manganese chemistry and a description of the structure and functioning of the water oxidizing enzyme. We will also describe the basic requirements for the splitting of water and present the goals of our work. In the third chapter, we will present the synthesis of a new family of tetradentate ligands, together with the synthesis and full characterization of the corresponding nickel(II) complexes. The first results obtained with the manganese analogue will also be shown. Chapter four presents the formation and the full characterization of a mononuclear manganese(IV)-oxo complex, by electrochemical oxidation of a manganese(II)-aqua complex. We will present different pathways to generate this species and show which intermediates are involved in this 2 e-, 2 H+ reaction. Chapter five describes the formation of a mononuclear manganese(IV) complex, by electrochemical oxidation of a manganese(III)-hydroxo complex. The manganese

  12. Dosimetric study of thoracic esophageal carcinoma radiotherapy using RapidArc combined with active breathing coordinator

    Objective: To compare and analyze the dosimetric characteristics of the intensity-modulated arc therapy (RapidArc) combined with active breathing coordinator (ABC) in the thoracic esophageal carcinoma radiation therapy. Methods: Ten thoracic esophageal carcinoma patients undergoing radiotherapy were selected for this study. The CT simulations were performed under three breath patterns respectively: moderate deep inspiration breath-hold (mDIBH) with ABC aid; Set the trigger threshold to 80% of the peak of the respiration curve; and free breathing (FB). Based on the corresponding CT image sets, three treatment plans were generated for each patient respectively: Arc-ABC (three small arcs), Arc-FB (consisted of two coplanar full arcs) and IMRT-FB plan. The following dosimetric parameters were compared among different plans: D2%, D98%, V95, homogeneity index (HI), conformal index (CI) the percentage of volume receiving dose of over x Gy (Vx), monitor unit (MU), control points and treatment time. Results: The planning target volume (PTV) of FB was 376 cm3 which decreased to 260 cm3 after using ABC. For mDIBH and FB patients, the total lung volumes were 5964.6 cm3 (35% more than FB) and 3838.8 cm3 respectively; the heart volumes were 524.4 cm3 and 642.7 cm3 respectively. No significant difference was observed among Arc-ABC, IMRT-FB and Arc-FB in terms of D2, D98, V95, CI and HI.For Arc-ABC plans,there were significant decreases of radiation dose in total-lung's V10, V20, V30, V40 and mean lung dose (F=4.38, 5.34, 4.07, 3.89, 4.28, P<0.05). Various dose decreases of heart V20, V3, V40, Dmean and spinal cord Dmax were observed,yet no statistically significant difference existed. The MUs and total control points of Arc-ABC plans were significantly lower than other plans (F=26.86, 12.56, P<0.05). Conclusions: When thoracic esophageal carcinoma patients were treated with radiotherapy, the combined utilization of RapidArc and ABC can potentially decrease the volume of

  13. Correlated coordination and redox activity of a hemilabile noninnocent ligand in nickel complexes

    Paretzki, A.; Bubrin, M.; Fiedler, Jan; Záliš, Stanislav; Kaim, W.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 18 (2014), s. 5414-5422. ISSN 0947-6539 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LD11086 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : coordination change * hemilabile ligands * nickel Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 5.731, year: 2014

  14. Development of a database for prompt γ-ray neutron activation analysis. Summary report of the second research coordination meeting

    This report summarizes the presentations, recommendations and conclusions of the Second Research Co-ordination Meeting on Development of a Database for Prompt γ-ray Neutron Activation Analysis. The purpose of this meeting was to review results achieved on the development of the database, discuss further developments and planning of the products ol this CRP. Actions to be taken were agreed upon with the aim to complete the project by the end of 2002. (author)

  15. Development of a database for prompt γ-ray neutron activation analysis. Summary report of the third research coordination meeting

    The main discussions and conclusions from the Third Co-ordination Meeting on the Development of a Database for Prompt γ-ray Neutron Activation Analysis are summarised in this report. All results were reviewed in detail, and the final version of the TECDOC and the corresponding software were agreed upon and approved for preparation. Actions were formulated with the aim of completing the final version of the TECDOC and associated software by May 2003. (author)

  16. SYNTHESIS, CHARACTERIZATION AND ANTITUMOR ACTIVITY OF A Ca (II COORDINATION POLYMER BASED ON 3-AMINO-2-PYRAZINECARBOXYLIC ACID

    XI-SHI TAI

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A new Ca(II coordination polymer has been obtained by reaction of Ca(ClO42·H2O with 3-amino-2-pyrazinecarboxylic acid in CH3CH2OH/H2O. It was characterized by IR, 1HNMR, thermal analysis and X-ray single crystal diffraction analysis. X-ray analysis reveals that each Ca(II center is seven-coordination with a N2O5 distorted pentagonal bipyramidal coordination environment. The Ca(II ions are linked through the O atoms of 3-amino-2-pyrazinecarboxylic acid ligands to form 1D chain structure. And then a 3D network structure is constructed by hydrogen bonds and π-π stacking. The antitumor activity of 3-amino-2-pyrazinecarboxylic acid ligand and its Ca(II coordination polymer against human intestinal adenocarcinoma HCT-8 cells, lung adenocarcinoma HCT-116 cells and human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells line have been investigated.

  17. Stimulus control of schedule-induced activity in pigeons during multiple schedules

    Buzzard, Janis H.; Hake, Don F.

    1984-01-01

    Stimulus control of schedule-induced general activity was demonstrated with pigeons using multiple schedules of response-independent food delivery. In Experiment 1, the introduction of food during a multiple variable-time 30-second variable-time 30-second schedule produced a tenfold increase in activity above the no-food baseline. Each pigeon developed stable differential activity rates during the components (correlated with red and green lights) of a multiple variable-time 30-second extincti...

  18. Intermolecular C-H activation with an Ir-METAMORPhos piano-stool complex--multiple reaction steps at a reactive ligand.

    Oldenhof, S; Lutz, M; van der Vlugt, J I; Reek, J N H

    2015-10-21

    Substrate activation by means of a reactive ligand is a topic of much interest. Herein we describe a stoichiometric anti-Markovnikov C-N bond formation involving ligand reactivity in multiple steps along the reaction coordinate, including ligand assisted substrate (de)protonation and C-N bond formation, as illustrated by a combined experimental, spectroscopic and computational study. This affords a highly unusual four-membered iridacycle bearing an exo-cyclic C=C double bond. PMID:26329519

  19. Multiple Rad5 activities mediate sister chromatid recombination to bypass DNA damage at stalled replication forks.

    Minca, Eugen C; Kowalski, David

    2010-06-11

    DNA damage that blocks replication is bypassed in order to complete chromosome duplication and preserve cell viability and genome stability. Rad5, a PCNA polyubiquitin ligase and DNA-dependent ATPase in yeast, is orthologous to putative tumor suppressors and controls error-free damage bypass by an unknown mechanism. To identify the mechanism in vivo, we investigated the roles of Rad5 and analyzed the DNA structures that form during damage bypass at site-specific stalled forks present at replication origins. Rad5 mediated the formation of recombination-dependent, X-shaped DNA structures containing Holliday junctions between sister chromatids. Mutants lacking these damage-induced chromatid junctions were defective in resolving stalled forks, restarting replication, and completing chromosome duplication. Rad5 polyubiquitin ligase and ATPase domains both contributed to replication fork recombination. Our results indicate that multiple activities of Rad5 function coordinately with homologous recombination factors to enable replication template switch events that join sister chromatids at stalled forks and bypass DNA damage. PMID:20541998

  20. Act as NARSTO Management Coordinator and Conduct Research In Support of NARSTO Activities

    Pennell, William T.

    2014-01-22

    This grant funded the position of NARSTO Management Coordinator. NARSTO was a public-private partnership with members from government, utilities, industry, and academe in Canada, the United States and Mexico. NARSTO planed and coordinated independently sponsored projects and tasks designed to identify and resolve policy-relevant science questions related to a) Anthropogenic and biogenic air-pollution sources and emissions, b) The complex physical and chemical processes affecting the accumulation of pollutants in the troposphere (including greenhouse gases and aerosols), c) The potential of certain pollutants to react and generate oxidants and fine particles in the troposphere, d) The development, intercomparison, and application of atmospheric models, e) The development of monitoring studies and methodologies needed to assess emission control effectiveness for selected greenhouse gases and aerosols, air pollutants and their precursors, and f) The attainment of the national air-quality and climate-stabilization goals and standards established by each member Nation

  1. The Coordinating Laboratories for monitoring of environmental radioactivity. History, activities, perspectives

    The article reviews the development of the monitoring of environmental radioactivity in the former Federal Republic of Germany and from 1990 onwards in re-unified Germany. This monitoring originated in the need to investigate the radioactive fallout from the testing of atomic bombs in the atmosphere in the 1950's and 1960's. Monitoring was intensified and became increasingly regulated by law as a response to the large scale use of atomic power and in accordance with the Euratom Treaty of 1957. The necessity of evaluating the radiological effects in old mining regions in some of the new Laender was recognised in 1990. Since then legislation and official monitoring have been extended to include this source of radiation exposure. Also described is the way in which those institutions now termed Coordinating Laboratories were involved in all of the developments mentioned above. They tested and developed sampling, analysis and measurement techniques, carried out research projects on the various contamination pathways, reported regularly on environmental radioactivity and radiation exposure, organised and evaluated interlaboratory comparisons, assisted in the setting up of the Federal Integrated Measurement and Information System (IMIS), and advised the appropriate Federal and Laender Ministries. Some of the Coordinating Laboratories also manage Federal Monitoring Networks. The Precautionary Radiation Protection Act stipulates these tasks and names the institutions appointed as Coordinating Laboratories. (orig.)

  2. Diffusion of Active Particles Subject both to Additive and Multiplicative Noises

    WANG Shao-Hua; YANG Ming; WU Da-Jin

    2011-01-01

    We consider a Langevin equation of active Brownian motion which contains a multiplicative as well as an additive noise term.We study the dependences of the effective diffusion coefficient Deff on both the additive and multiplicative noises.It is found that for fixed small additive noise intensity Deff varies non-monotonously with multiplicative noise intensity, with a minimum at a moderate value of multiplicative noise, and Deff increases monotonously, however, with the multiplicative noise intensity for relatively strong additive noise; for fixed multiplicative noise intensity Deff decreases with growing additive noise intensity until it approaches a constant.An explanation is also given of the different behavior of Deff as additive and multiplicative noises approach infinity,respectively.%@@ We consider a Langevin equation of active Brownian motion which contains a multiplicative as well as an additive noise term.We study the dependences of the effective diffusion coefficient Deff on both the additive and multiplicative noises.It is found that for fixed small additive noise intensity Deff varies non-monotonously with multiplicative noise intensity, with a minimum at a moderate value of multiplicative noise, and Deff increases monotonously, however, with the multiplicative noise intensity for relatively strong additive noise; for fixed multiplicative noise intensity Deff decreases with growing additive noise intensity until it approaches a constant.An explanation is also given of the different behavior of Deff as additive and multiplicative noises approach infinity, respectively.

  3. Active Power and DC-link Voltage Coordinative Control for Cascaded DC-AC Converter with Bidirectional Power Application

    Tian, Yanjun; Chen, Zhe; Deng, Fujin;

    2015-01-01

    Two stage cascaded converters are widely used in DC/AC hybrid systems to achieve the bidirectional power transmission. The topology of dual active bridge cascaded with inverter (DABCI) is commonly used in this application. This paper proposes a coordinative control method for DABCI and it’s able to...... reduce the DC-link voltage fluctuation between the DAB and inverter, then reduce the stress on the switching devices, as well as improve the system dynamic performance. In the proposed control method, the DAB and inverter are coordinated to control the DC-link voltage and the power, and this...... responsibility sharing control can effectively suppress the impact of the power variation on the DC-link voltage, without sacrificing stability. The proposed control method is also effective for DABCI in unidirectional power transmission. The effectiveness of the propose control has been validated by both...

  4. [The psychomotor test for research of eye-hand coordination at performance of monotonous activity on tracking target].

    Dorokhov, V B; Arsen'ev, G N; Tkachenko, O N; Zakharchenko, D V; Lavrova, T P; Dementienko, V V

    2011-01-01

    Visual-motor coordination is necessary for successful performance of everyday activities. Many tasks, such as driving or operating devices in the workplace, require a variety of coordination patterns with different levels of compatibility between the eyes and the hand. The psychomotor test was developed which makes it possible to analyze visual-motor coordination disorders caused by a decrease in the level of wakefulness. A small circular target (14 mm in diameter) was moving with a low constant velosity (12 mm/s) in a circular trajectory (80 mm in diameter) with a period of 20 s. Subjects were instructed to keep the mouse-driven cursor inside a target, overstepping the limits of the moving target was considered as an error. To test the attention level, an additional stimulus was introduced which appeared for 3 seconds with an interval of 15 to 40 s. When the stimulus appeared, it was required to touch it with the cursor and click the mouse button. Cursor trajectories have a temporal resolution of 120 Hz. Eye movements were recorded with a PC-based Eyegaze Development System (LC Technologies, USA) measuring corneal reflectance with a collection rate of 120 Hz. Monotonous character of the test performance induced drowsiness and led to errors 25-30 minutes after the beginning of the experiment. Changes in physiological vigilance level was evaluated with EEG recording. Analysis of the dynamic characteristics of smooth and saccadic eye movements and hand movements showed their high sensitivity to a decrease in efficiency of operator's activity caused by a drop in the level of wakefulness. It is suggested that further development of this approach to measuring eye-hand coordination will promote working out a contactless method for the express diagnostics of the critical levels of drowsiness as well as for the definition of professional characteristics of an operator. PMID:21961322

  5. Mixed ligand coordination polymers with flexible bis-imidazole linker and angular sulfonyldibenzoate: Crystal structure, photoluminescence and photocatalytic activity

    Four ternary coordination polymers (CPs) namely, ([Ni(SDB)(BITMB)(H2O)]·H2O)n (CP1), ([Cd(SDB)(BITMB) (H2O)]·(THF)(H2O))n (CP2), ([Zn2(SDB)2(BITMB)]·(THF)2)n (CP3) and ([Co2(SDB)2(BITMB)]·(Dioxane)3)n (CP4) composed of angular dicarboxylate SDB (4,4'-sulfonyldibenzoate) and N-donor BITMB (1,3-bis(imidazol-1-ylmethyl)-2,4,6-trimethyl benzene) have been synthesized by solvothermal reactions and characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction and other physico-chemical techniques. CP1 possesses one-dimensional ribbon type metal–organic motifs glued together by H-bonds and π⋯π interactions, whereas CP2–CP4, exhibit non-interpenetrated sql networks supported by weak supramolecular interactions. Structural diversity of these CPs can be attributed to the coordination geometry adopted by the metal nodes, versatile coordination modes of SDB and conformational flexibility of BITMB. Solid state luminescence properties of CP1–CP4 were explored. Photocatalytic performance of all CPs for the decomposition of metanil yellow by dilute hydrogen peroxide in the presence of visible light was also investigated. 25–83% dye removal from aqueous solutions in the presence of CP1–CP4 was observed. - Graphical abstract: Four new ternary transition metal CPs have been hydrothermally prepared and their structural aspects as well as photocatalytic activity for decolourization of metanil yellow (MY) dye have been investigated. - Highlights: • Four ternary coordination polymers containing Ni, Cd, Zn and Co center are prepared. • Crystal structure and thermal stability of all four CPs has been described. • PL and diffuse reflectance spectra of synthesized CPs have also been examined. • Band gap values suggest semiconducting behavior of prepared CPs. • Photocatalytic activity of CPs for oxidative degradation of metanil yellow is studied

  6. SYNTHESIS, STRUCTURE AND BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY OF N(4-ALLYL-3-THIOSEMICARBAZONES AND THEIR COORDINATION COMPOUNDS WITH SOME 3D METALS

    Vasilii GRAUR

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a review of different N(4-allyl-3-thiosemicarbazones and their coordination compounds described in literature. N(4-allyl-3-thiosemicarbazide can form corresponding thiosemicarbazones with aliphatic, aromatic and heteroaromatic carbonyl compounds. In the presence of transitional metal ions they can form coordination compounds of different structures. Both coordination compounds and proligands manifest antitumor, antibacterial, antiviral, and antimalarial activities. Copper(II coordination compounds with these ligands manifest better antitumor activity than corresponding proligands. SINTEZA, STRUCTURA ŞI ACTIVITATEA BIOLOGICĂ A N(4-ALIL-3-TIOSEMICARBAZONELOR ŞI A COMPUŞILOR COORDINATIVI AI UNOR METALE 3D CU ACEŞTI LIGANZILucrarea prezintă o revistă a N(4-alil-3-tiosemicarbazonelor şi a compuşilor coordinativi cu aceşti liganzi descrise în literatura de specialitate. N(4-alil-3-tiosemicarbazida formează tiosemicarbazone cu aldehide şi cetone alifatice, aro­matice şi heteroaromatice. În prezenţa ionilor de metale de tranziţie acestea pot forma compuşi coordinativi cu diferite structuri. N(4-alil-3-tiosemicarbazonele şi compuşii coordinativi manifestă activitate antitumorală, antibacterială, antivirală şi antimalarică. Compuşii coordinativi ai cuprului cu aceşti liganzi manifestă activitate antitumorală sporită în comparaţie cu N(4-alil-3-tiosemicarbazonele corespunzătoare. 

  7. Adhesion molecules levels in blood correlate with MRI activity and clinical activity in multiple sclerosis

    Research into pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS) has prompted efforts to identify immunological markers associated with disease activity. Adhesion molecules ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 are associated with inflammatory mediated blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction. In this study investigates the correlation between blood level of circulating ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) activity in different clinical phases of patients with MS. We show that RRMS and SPMS patients in clinically active phase with Gd-enhancing lesions in CNS had higher blood levels of cICAM-1 and cVCAM-1 compared these parameters levers of RRMS patients in remission stage. These results suggest that cICAM-1 and cVCAM-1 is a sensitive indicator of disease activity associated with BBB inflammatory dysfunction. Elevated blood level of cICAM-1 more strongly correlated with clinical activity and BBB damage, than cVCAM-1 and that could be used as biological marker of disease activity. Circulating VCAM-1 as an early indicator of BBB disturbance, may also serve as marker of beneficial activity in relapses phase of MS course. (authors)

  8. Coordination of the Nuclear and Cytoplasmic Activities of p53 in Response to DNA Damage

    Pu, Tian; Zhang, Xiao-Peng; Liu, Feng; Wang, Wei

    2010-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 plays a key role in the cellular response to various stresses. Most previous studies have focused on either the nuclear or cytoplasmic proapoptotic functions of p53, ignoring the combination of both functions. To explore how the two functions of p53 are coordinated in the DNA damage response via computer simulation, we construct a model for the p53 network comprising coupled positive and negative feedback loops involving p53, Mdm2, and Akt, as well as PUMA and Bax. In...

  9. Coordination of nuclear safety regulations and corporate compliance activities. Desirable implementation of the whistle-blower protection scheme in Japan

    Recently, scandals and incidents associated with development and utilization of nuclear energy have attracted social concerns widely. However, there are limitations in preventing nuclear operators from illegal or unethical conduct only through reinforcement and expanding the nuclear safety regulations. From this viewpoint, it has turned out a real issue to develop a desirable coordination between the regulatory system and corporate compliance activities to maintain and further improve nuclear safety. Whistle-blower protection scheme (as depicted 'Declaration to the Competent Minister' in The Law for the Regulation of Nuclear Source Material, Nuclear Fuel Material and Reactors') reveals itself as a promising scheme to promote such coordination of nuclear safety regulations and corporate compliance activities. This study demonstrates that introduction of whistle-blower protection system in the U.S. federal nuclear safety regulations has encouraged developments of Employee Concerns Programs as corporate allegation programs at the U.S. based utility companies, and thereby indicates concrete improvement proposals of whistle-blower protection system enforcement in nuclear safety regulation in Japan that encourages corporate compliance activities. The principal aspects are as follows; (1) Development of compensatory scheme for employees who were discriminated on ground of the declaration, and (2) Clear rulemaking for existing private corporate allegation programs to be compatible with the official whistle-blowing procedure by Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency, the Japanese safety regulatory authority. (author)

  10. Comparison of Cas9 activators in multiple species.

    Chavez, Alejandro; Tuttle, Marcelle; Pruitt, Benjamin W; Ewen-Campen, Ben; Chari, Raj; Ter-Ovanesyan, Dmitry; Haque, Sabina J; Cecchi, Ryan J; Kowal, Emma J K; Buchthal, Joanna; Housden, Benjamin E; Perrimon, Norbert; Collins, James J; Church, George

    2016-07-01

    Several programmable transcription factors exist based on the versatile Cas9 protein, yet their relative potency and effectiveness across various cell types and species remain unexplored. Here, we compare Cas9 activator systems and examine their ability to induce robust gene expression in several human, mouse, and fly cell lines. We also explore the potential for improved activation through the combination of the most potent activator systems, and we assess the role of cooperativity in maximizing gene expression. PMID:27214048

  11. Distribution of networks generating and coordinating locomotor activity in the neonatal rat spinal cord in vitro: a lesion study

    Kjaerulff, O; Kiehn, O

    1996-01-01

    ventral root recordings to monitor neuronal activity and tested the ability of various isolated parts of the caudal thoraciclumbar cord to generate rhythmic bursting in a combination of 5-HT and NMDA. In addition, pathways mediating left/right and rostrocaudal burst alternation were localized. We found...... decreased in the caudal direction, but the rhythm-generating network was found to be distributed over the entire lumbar region and to extend into the caudal thoracic region. The pathways mediating left/ right alternation exist primarily in the ventral commissure. As with the rhythmogenic ability......, these pathways were distributed along the lumbar enlargement. Both lateral and ventral funiculi were sufficient to coordinate activity in the rostral and caudal regions. We conclude that the networks organizing locomotor-related activity in the spinal cord of the newborn rat are distributed....

  12. Serial MRI studies using gadolinium DTPA in active multiple sclerosis

    It has been suggested that blood brain barrier (BBB) impairment is a necessary early event in the pathogenesis of the multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions. To evaluate such an hypothesis in vivo would require: (1) serial imaging studies using a modality with high sensitivity for detecting plaques; (2) a contrast enhancing agent which demonstrates BBB impairment. A serial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study was undertaken of a group of MS patients using the contrast agent gadolinium-DTPA. As it has been suggested that T1 and T2 relaxation times are longer in acute than chronic MS lesions, these were also measured. 3 refs.; 1 figure

  13. Angiogenic activity of sesamin through the activation of multiple signal pathways

    The natural product sesamin has been known to act as a potent antioxidant and prevent endothelial dysfunction. We here found that sesamin increased in vitro angiogenic processes, such as endothelial cell proliferation, migration, and tube formation, as well as neovascularization in an animal model. This compound elicited the activation of multiple angiogenic signal modulators, such as ERK, Akt, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), NO production, FAK, and p38 MAPK, but not Src. The MEK inhibitor PD98059 and the PI3K inhibitor Wortmannin specifically inhibited sesamin-induced activation of the ERK and Akt/eNOS pathways. These inhibitors reduced angiogenic events, with high specificity for MEK/ERK-dependent cell proliferation and migration and PI3K/Akt-mediated tube formation. Moreover, inhibition of p38 MAPK effectively inhibited sesamin-induced cell migration. The angiogenic activity of sesamin was not associated with VEGF expression. Furthermore, this compound did not induce vascular permeability and upregulated ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression, which are hallmarks of vascular inflammation. These results suggest that sesamin stimulates angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo through the activation of MEK/ERK-, PI3K/Akt/eNOS-, p125FAK-, and p38 MAPK-dependent pathways, without increasing vascular inflammation, and may be used for treating ischemic diseases and tissue regeneration.

  14. Multiple host kinases contribute to Akt activation during Salmonella infection.

    Bernhard Roppenser

    Full Text Available SopB is a type 3 secreted effector with phosphatase activity that Salmonella employs to manipulate host cellular processes, allowing the bacteria to establish their intracellular niche. One important function of SopB is activation of the pro-survival kinase Akt/protein kinase B in the infected host cell. Here, we examine the mechanism of Akt activation by SopB during Salmonella infection. We show that SopB-mediated Akt activation is only partially sensitive to PI3-kinase inhibitors LY294002 and wortmannin in HeLa cells, suggesting that Class I PI3-kinases play only a minor role in this process. However, depletion of PI(3,4 P2/PI(3-5 P3 by expression of the phosphoinositide 3-phosphatase PTEN inhibits Akt activation during Salmonella invasion. Therefore, production of PI(3,4 P2/PI(3-5 P3 appears to be a necessary event for Akt activation by SopB and suggests that non-canonical kinases mediate production of these phosphoinositides during Salmonella infection. We report that Class II PI3-kinase beta isoform, IPMK and other kinases identified from a kinase screen all contribute to Akt activation during Salmonella infection. In addition, the kinases required for SopB-mediated activation of Akt vary depending on the type of infected host cell. Together, our data suggest that Salmonella has evolved to use a single effector, SopB, to manipulate a remarkably large repertoire of host kinases to activate Akt for the purpose of optimizing bacterial replication in its host.

  15. Multiple Criteria Activity Selection for Ecotourism Planning in Igneada

    Ok, Kenan

    2006-01-01

    Forests have many ecotourism attractions. Ecotourism can be defined as an opportunity to promote the values in the protected areas and to finance for related stakeholders. However, ecotourism can be classified as a possible threat to ecosystems because of ecotourism's attractions are based on fragile ecological relations. Activity selection regarding ecological, social and economic dimensions is important in forest and tourism management. Ecotourism activities were selected using a multi...

  16. Sudden synchrony leaps accompanied by frequency multiplications in neuronal activity

    Ido Kanter

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A classical view of neural coding relies on temporal firing synchrony among functional groups of neurons; however the underlying mechanism remains an enigma. Here we experimentally demonstrate a mechanism where time-lags among neuronal spiking leap from several tens of milliseconds to nearly zero-lag synchrony. It also allows sudden leaps out of synchrony, hence forming short epochs of synchrony. Our results are based on an experimental procedure where conditioned stimulations were enforced on circuits of neurons embedded within a large-scale network of cortical cells in vitro and are corroborated by simulations of neuronal populations. The underlying biological mechanisms are the unavoidable increase of the neuronal response latency to ongoing stimulations and temporal or spatial summation required to generate evoked spikes. These sudden leaps in and out of synchrony may be accompanied by multiplications of the neuronal firing frequency, hence offering reliable information-bearing indicators which may bridge between the two principal neuronal coding paradigms.

  17. Multiple-Coincidence Active Neutron Interrogation of Fissionable Materials

    Using a beam of tagged 14.1 MeV neutrons to probe for the presence of fissionable materials, we have measured n-γ-γ coincidences from depleted uranium (DU). The multiple coincidence rate is substantially above that measured from lead, tungsten, and iron. The presence of coincidences involving delayed gammas in the DU time spectra provides a signature for fissionable materials that is distinct from non-fissionable ones. In addition, the information from the tagged neutron involved in the coincidence gives the position of the fissionable material in all three dimensions. The result is an imaging probe for fissionable materials that is more compact and that produces much less radiation than other solutions

  18. Electronic, optical, and computational studies of a redox-active napthalenediimide-based coordination polymer.

    Leong, Chanel F; Chan, Bun; Faust, Thomas B; Turner, Peter; D'Alessandro, Deanna M

    2013-12-16

    The new one-dimensional coordination framework (Zn(DMF)NO3)2(NDC)(DPMNI), where NDC = 2,6-naphthalenedicarboxylate and DPMNI = N,N'-bis(4-pyridylmethyl)-1,4,5,8-naphthalenetetracarboxydiimide, which has been crystallographically characterized, exhibits two redox-accessible states due to the successive reduction of the naphthalenediimide (NDI) ligand core. Solid-state electrochemical and vis-near-IR spectroelectrochemical measurements coupled with density functional theory (DFT) calculations enabled the origins of the optical transitions in the spectra of the monoradical anion and dianion states of the material to be assigned. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy revealed that the paramagnetic radical anion state of the DPMNI core could be accessed upon broad-spectrum white light irradiation of the material, revealing a long-lived excited state, possibly stabilized by charge delocalization which arises from extensive π-π* stacking interactions between alternating NDC and NDI aromatic cores which are separated by a distance of 3.580(2) Å. PMID:24283401

  19. Mixed ligand coordination polymers with flexible bis-imidazole linker and angular sulfonyldibenzoate: Crystal structure, photoluminescence and photocatalytic activity

    Bisht, Kamal Kumar; Rachuri, Yadagiri [Analytical Discipline and Centralized Instrument Facility, CSIR—Central Salt and Marine Chemicals Research Institute, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, G. B. Marg, Bhavnagar-364 002, Gujarat (India); Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research (AcSIR), CSIR—Central Salt and Marine Chemicals Research Institute, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, G. B. Marg, Bhavnagar-364 002, Gujarat (India); Parmar, Bhavesh [Analytical Discipline and Centralized Instrument Facility, CSIR—Central Salt and Marine Chemicals Research Institute, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, G. B. Marg, Bhavnagar-364 002, Gujarat (India); Suresh, Eringathodi, E-mail: esuresh@csmcri.org [Analytical Discipline and Centralized Instrument Facility, CSIR—Central Salt and Marine Chemicals Research Institute, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, G. B. Marg, Bhavnagar-364 002, Gujarat (India); Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research (AcSIR), CSIR—Central Salt and Marine Chemicals Research Institute, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, G. B. Marg, Bhavnagar-364 002, Gujarat (India)

    2014-05-01

    Four ternary coordination polymers (CPs) namely, ([Ni(SDB)(BITMB)(H{sub 2}O)]·H{sub 2}O){sub n} (CP1), ([Cd(SDB)(BITMB) (H{sub 2}O)]·(THF)(H{sub 2}O)){sub n} (CP2), ([Zn{sub 2}(SDB){sub 2}(BITMB)]·(THF){sub 2}){sub n} (CP3) and ([Co{sub 2}(SDB){sub 2}(BITMB)]·(Dioxane){sub 3}){sub n} (CP4) composed of angular dicarboxylate SDB (4,4'-sulfonyldibenzoate) and N-donor BITMB (1,3-bis(imidazol-1-ylmethyl)-2,4,6-trimethyl benzene) have been synthesized by solvothermal reactions and characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction and other physico-chemical techniques. CP1 possesses one-dimensional ribbon type metal–organic motifs glued together by H-bonds and π⋯π interactions, whereas CP2–CP4, exhibit non-interpenetrated sql networks supported by weak supramolecular interactions. Structural diversity of these CPs can be attributed to the coordination geometry adopted by the metal nodes, versatile coordination modes of SDB and conformational flexibility of BITMB. Solid state luminescence properties of CP1–CP4 were explored. Photocatalytic performance of all CPs for the decomposition of metanil yellow by dilute hydrogen peroxide in the presence of visible light was also investigated. 25–83% dye removal from aqueous solutions in the presence of CP1–CP4 was observed. - Graphical abstract: Four new ternary transition metal CPs have been hydrothermally prepared and their structural aspects as well as photocatalytic activity for decolourization of metanil yellow (MY) dye have been investigated. - Highlights: • Four ternary coordination polymers containing Ni, Cd, Zn and Co center are prepared. • Crystal structure and thermal stability of all four CPs has been described. • PL and diffuse reflectance spectra of synthesized CPs have also been examined. • Band gap values suggest semiconducting behavior of prepared CPs. • Photocatalytic activity of CPs for oxidative degradation of metanil yellow is studied.

  20. Dynamic activity of NF-κB in multiple trauma patients and protective effects of ulinastain

    Li, Jun; Li, Neng-Ping; GU Yong-feng; Yang, Xin; LU Xiao-bing; CONG Jian-nong; Ling, Yun; TANG Jiang-an; Yuan, Xiao-yan; Wang, Hu

    2012-01-01

    【Abstract】Objective: To investigate the dynamic activity of NF-κB at the early stage of injury in multiple trauma patients and the protective effects of ulinastain. Methods: From January 2008 to May 2010, patients with multiple traumas admitted to our emergency department were enrolled in this study. Their age varied from 20-55 years. All enrolled patients were assigned randomly into control group (26 cases of multiple injury without ulinastain treatment), ulinastain group (25 cas...

  1. Baking together-the coordination of actions in activities involving people with dementia.

    Majlesi, Ali Reza; Ekström, Anna

    2016-08-01

    This study explores interaction and collaboration between people with dementia and their spouses in relation to the performance of household chores with the focus on instruction as an interactional context to engage the person with dementia in collaboration to accomplish joint activities. Dementia is generally associated with pathological changes in people's cognitive functions such as diminishing memory functions, communicative abilities and also diminishing abilities to take initiative as well as to plan and execute tasks. Using video recordings of everyday naturally occurring activities, we analyze the sequential organization of actions (see Schegloff, 2007) oriented toward the accomplishment of a joint multi-task activity of baking. The analysis shows the specific ways of collaboration through instructional activities in which the person with dementia exhibits his competence and skills in accomplishing the given tasks through negotiating the instructions with his partner and carrying out instructed actions. Although the driving force of the collaboration seems to be a series of directive sequences only initiated by the partner throughout the baking activity, our analyses highlight how the person with dementia can actively use the material environment-including collaborating partners-to compensate for challenges and difficulties encountered in achieving everyday tasks. The sequential organization of instructions and instructed actions are in this sense argued to provide an interactional environment wherein the person with dementia can make contributions to the joint activity in an efficient way. While a collaborator has been described as necessary for a person with dementia to be able to partake in activities, this study shows that people with dementia are not only guided by their collaborators in joint activities but they can also actively use their collaborators in intricate compensatory ways. PMID:27531451

  2. Immune activation in multiple sclerosis and interferon-beta therapy

    Krakauer, Martin

    2007-01-01

    inflammation or secondary lymphatic organs. Chemokine receptors are differentially expressed in T cells in blood and cerebrospinal fluid, indicating their role for in T-cell-recruitment to the CNS. Interferon (IFN)-beta is a first-line treatment for MS. The mechanism of action is unclear, but probably includes...... changes in lymphocyte activation, cytokine secretion, and trafficking. The aim of the studies was to shed more light on T-cell immunology in MS and IFN-beta treatment, as well as identifying putative biomarkers of treatment response and/or disease activity. In one study we identified a Th-cell subset of...

  3. Coordinate increase of telomerase activity and c-Myc expression in Helicobacter pylori-associated gastric diseases

    Guo-Xin Zhang; Yan-Hong Gu; Zhi-Quan Zhao; Shun-Fu Xu; Hong-Ji Zhang; Hong-Di Wang; Bo Hao

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To detect the telomerase activity and c-Myc expression in gastric diseases and to examine the relation between these values and Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) as a risk factor for gastric cancer.METHODS: One hundred and seventy-one gastric samples were studied to detect telomerase activity using a telomerase polymerase chain reaction enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (PCR-ELTSA), and c-Myc expression using immunohistochemistry.RESULTS: The telomerase activity and c-Myc expression were higher in cancers (87.69% and 61.54%) than in noncancerous tissues. They were higher in chronic atrophic gastritis with severe intestinal metaplasia (52.38% and 47.62%) than in chronic atrophic gastritis with mild intestinal metaplasia (13.33% and 16.67%). Tn chronic atrophic gastritis with severe intestinal metaplasia, the telomerase activity and c-Myc expression were higher in cases with -H pylori infection (67.86% and 67.86%) than in those without infection (21.43%and 7.14%). c-Myc expression was higher in gastric cancer with H pylori infection (77.27%) than in that without infection (28.57%). The telomerase activity and c-Nyc expression were coordinately up-regulated in H pylori infected gastric cancer and chronic atrophic gastritis with severe intestinal metaplasia.CONCLUSION: H pylori infection may influence both telomerase activity and c-Myc expression in gastric diseases,especially in chronic atrophic gastritis.

  4. Multiple oncogene activation in a radiation carcinogenesis model

    There is evidence from animal systems to suggest that certain oncogenes may be activated by the direct action of the initiating carcinogen. Consistent activation by a point mutation of a single member of the ras oncogene family in different tumors produced by a single agent has been demonstrated. In contrast the c-myc and other oncogenes have been shown to be activated by a process involving chromosomal translocations, enhanced expression, and/or gene amplification. We have examined a panel of 12 late stage rat skin tumors for activation of oncogenes from the ras and myc complementation groups. These tumors were four squamous cell carcinomas, three poorly differentiated carcinomas (clear cell), one each of basal cell carcinoma, sebaceous carcinoma, sarcoma, fibroma, and mixed (largely squamous) histology carcinoma. The positive tumor DNAs were from three poorly differentiated clear cell carcinomas, a sebaceous carcinoma, a squamous cell carcinoma, and a sarcoma. DNA from one of the primary transfectants was positive in a second round of transfection. The transformed phenotype of the transfectants was confirmed by anchorage independent growth and tumorigenicity in nude mice. Southern blot analysis of DNA from primary and secondary transfectants, as well as from nude mouse tumors arising after injection of transfectant cells revealed the presence of rat derived restriction fragments homologous to the K-ras oncogene against the mouse background. Similar experiments using N- and H-ras probes, revealed only the endogenous mouse fragments in transfectant DNA. 11 refs., 1 tab

  5. Multiple nucleophilic elbows leading to multiple active sites in a single module esterase from Sorangium cellulosum

    Udatha, D.B.R.K. Gupta; Madsen, Karina Marie; Panagiotou, Gianni; Olsson, Lisbeth

    2015-01-01

    The catalytic residues in carbohydrate esterase enzyme families constitute a highly conserved triad: serine, histidine and aspartic acid. This catalytic triad is generally located in a very sharp turn of the protein backbone structure, called the nucleophilic elbow and identified by the consensus...... sequence GXSXG. An esterase from Sorangium cellulosum Soce56 that contains five nucleophilic elbows was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli and the function of each nucleophilic elbowed site was characterized. In order to elucidate the function of each nucleophilic elbow, site directed mutagenesis was...... used to generate variants with deactivated nucleophilic elbows and the functional promiscuity was analyzed. In silico analysis together with enzymological characterization interestingly showed that each nucleophilic elbow formed a local active site with varied substrate specificities and affinities. To...

  6. The Nucleus of the Solitary Tract and the coordination of respiratory and sympathetic activities

    DanielB.Zoccal

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that breathing introduces rhythmical oscillations in the heart rate and arterial pressure levels. Sympathetic oscillations coupled to the respiratory activity have been suggested as an important homeostatic mechanism optimizing tissue perfusion and blood gas uptake/delivery. This respiratory-sympathetic coupling is strengthened in conditions of blood gas challenges (hypoxia and hypercapnia) as a result of the synchronized activation of brainstem respiratory and sympathetic ne...

  7. The nucleus of the solitary tract and the coordination of respiratory and sympathetic activities

    Zoccal, Daniel B.; Furuya, Werner I.; Bassi, Mirian; Colombari, Débora S. A.; Colombari, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that breathing introduces rhythmical oscillations in the heart rate and arterial pressure levels. Sympathetic oscillations coupled to the respiratory activity have been suggested as an important homeostatic mechanism optimizing tissue perfusion and blood gas uptake/delivery. This respiratory-sympathetic coupling is strengthened in conditions of blood gas challenges (hypoxia and hypercapnia) as a result of the synchronized activation of brainstem respiratory and sympathetic ne...

  8. Symmetry of Mandibular Muscle Activity as an Index of Coordinative Strategy

    Moore, Christopher A.

    1993-01-01

    Electromyographic activity of bilateral mandibular muscle pairs in humans was studied during several tasks: mastication, voluntary oscillation of the jaw, and speech production, as a replication and extension of an earlier investigation by Moore, Smith, and Ringel (1988). The synchrony of activity within and across these paired muscles (masseter, medial pterygoid, and the anterior belly of the digastric) was evaluated by statistical comparison of zero-lag cross-correlation coefficients betwee...

  9. Importance of coordinated P.E. activities during teaching nursery school children to be healthy.

    ULBRICHOVÁ, Dagmar

    2011-01-01

    The present work monitors controlled physical activity for children of preschool age both in terms of pre-school and in terms of family environment. The aim is to monitor the current level of physical activity and highlight the fundamental relationship of health education and healthy development of preschool children. Total attendance was 28 children of preschool age. Because of the feedback I have also addressed the 200 participants (nursery school teachers, parents). Based on my findings sh...

  10. Large Roads Reduce Bat Activity across Multiple Species

    Justin Kitzes; Adina Merenlender

    2014-01-01

    Although the negative impacts of roads on many terrestrial vertebrate and bird populations are well documented, there have been few studies of the road ecology of bats. To examine the effects of large roads on bat populations, we used acoustic recorders to survey bat activity along ten 300 m transects bordering three large highways in northern California, applying a newly developed statistical classifier to identify recorded calls to the species level. Nightly counts of bat passes were analyz...

  11. Multiple biological activities of human recombinant interleukin 1.

    Dinarello, C A; Cannon, J. G.; Mier, J W; Bernheim, H. A.; LoPreste, G; Lynn, D L; Love, R N; Webb, A C; Auron, P. E.; Reuben, R C

    1986-01-01

    Complementary DNA coding for human monocyte interleukin 1 (IL-1), pI 7 form, was expressed in Escherichia coli. During purification, IL-1 activity on murine T cells was associated with the recombinant protein. Homogeneous human recombinant IL-1 (hrIL-1) was tested in several assays to demonstrate the immunological and inflammatory properties attributed to this molecule. hrIL-1 induced proliferative responses in a cloned murine T cell in the presence of suboptimal concentrations of mitogen, wh...

  12. Preliminary Evidence that Self-Efficacy Predicts Physical Activity in Multiple Sclerosis

    Motl, Robert W.; McAuley, Edward; Doerksen, Shawna; Hu, Liang; Morris, Katherine S.

    2009-01-01

    Individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS) are less physically active than nondiseased people. One method for increasing physical activity levels involves the identification of factors that correlate with physical activity and that are modifiable by a well designed intervention. This study examined two types of self-efficacy as cross-sectional and…

  13. Whole-Body MRI versus PET in assessment of multiple myeloma disease activity.

    Shortt, Conor P

    2009-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare FDG PET; whole-body MRI; and the reference standard, bone marrow aspiration and biopsy, to determine the best imaging technique for assessment of disease activity in multiple myeloma.

  14. Levels and Rates of Physical Activity in Older Adults with Multiple Sclerosis

    Klaren, Rachel E; Sebastiao, Emerson; Chiu, Chung-Yi; Kinnett-Hopkins, Dominique; McAuley, Edward; Motl, Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    There is much evidence supporting the safety and benefits of physical activity in adults with multiple sclerosis (MS) and recent evidence of beneficial effects on physical function in older adults with MS. However, there is very little known about physical activity participation in older adults with conditions such as MS. This study compared levels of physical activity (i.e., sedentary behavior, light physical activity (LPA), and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA)) and rates of mee...

  15. Co-activation Probability Estimation (CoPE): An approach for modeling functional co-activation architecture based on neuroimaging coordinates.

    Chu, Congying; Fan, Lingzhong; Eickhoff, Claudia R; Liu, Yong; Yang, Yong; Eickhoff, Simon B; Jiang, Tianzi

    2015-08-15

    Recent progress in functional neuroimaging has prompted studies of brain activation during various cognitive tasks. Coordinate-based meta-analysis has been utilized to discover the brain regions that are consistently activated across experiments. However, within-experiment co-activation relationships, which can reflect the underlying functional relationships between different brain regions, have not been widely studied. In particular, voxel-wise co-activation, which may be able to provide a detailed configuration of the co-activation network, still needs to be modeled. To estimate the voxel-wise co-activation pattern and deduce the co-activation network, a Co-activation Probability Estimation (CoPE) method was proposed to model within-experiment activations for the purpose of defining the co-activations. A permutation test was adopted as a significance test. Moreover, the co-activations were automatically separated into local and long-range ones, based on distance. The two types of co-activations describe distinct features: the first reflects convergent activations; the second represents co-activations between different brain regions. The validation of CoPE was based on five simulation tests and one real dataset derived from studies of working memory. Both the simulated and the real data demonstrated that CoPE was not only able to find local convergence but also significant long-range co-activation. In particular, CoPE was able to identify a 'core' co-activation network in the working memory dataset. As a data-driven method, the CoPE method can be used to mine underlying co-activation relationships across experiments in future studies. PMID:26037052

  16. Hedgehog signal activation coordinates proliferation and differentiation of fetal liver progenitor cells

    Hirose, Yoshikazu [Laboratory of Cell Growth and Differentiation, Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Itoh, Tohru, E-mail: itohru@iam.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Laboratory of Cell Growth and Differentiation, Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Miyajima, Atsushi [Laboratory of Cell Growth and Differentiation, Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan)

    2009-09-10

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling plays crucial roles in development and homeostasis of various organs. In the adult liver, it regulates proliferation and/or viability of several types of cells, particularly under injured conditions, and is also implicated in stem/progenitor cell maintenance. However, the role of this signaling pathway during the normal developmental process of the liver remains elusive. Although Sonic hedgehog (Shh) is expressed in the ventral foregut endoderm from which the liver derives, the expression disappears at the onset of the liver bud formation, and its possible recurrence at the later stages has not been investigated. Here we analyzed the activation and functional relevance of Hh signaling during the mouse fetal liver development. At E11.5, Shh and an activation marker gene for Hh signaling, Gli1, were expressed in Dlk{sup +} hepatoblasts, the fetal liver progenitor cells, and the expression was rapidly decreased thereafter as the development proceeded. In the culture of Dlk{sup +} hepatoblasts isolated from the E11.5 liver, activation of Hh signaling stimulated their proliferation and this effect was cancelled by a chemical Hh signaling inhibitor, cyclopamine. In contrast, hepatocyte differentiation of Dlk{sup +} hepatoblasts in vitro as manifested by the marker gene expression and acquisition of ammonia clearance activity was significantly inhibited by forced activation of Hh signaling. Taken together, these results demonstrate the temporally restricted manner of Hh signal activation and its role in promoting the hepatoblast proliferation, and further suggest that the pathway needs to be shut off for the subsequent hepatic differentiation of hepatoblasts to proceed normally.

  17. Mining Emerging Patterns for Recognizing Activities of Multiple Users in Pervasive Computing

    Gu, Tao; Wu, Zhanqing; Wang, Liang;

    2009-01-01

    sensor readings in a home environment, and propose a novel pattern mining approach to recognize both single-user and multi-user activities in a unified solution. We exploit Emerging Pattern – a type of knowledge pattern that describes significant changes between classes of data – for constructing our......Understanding and recognizing human activities from sensor readings is an important task in pervasive computing. Existing work on activity recognition mainly focuses on recognizing activities for a single user in a smart home environment. However, in real life, there are often multiple inhabitants...... live in such an environment. Recognizing activities of not only a single user, but also multiple users is essential to the development of practical context-aware applications in pervasive computing. In this paper, we investigate the fundamental problem of recognizing activities for multiple users from...

  18. Efficient multiple object tracking using mutually repulsive active membranes.

    Yi Deng

    Full Text Available Studies of social and group behavior in interacting organisms require high-throughput analysis of the motion of a large number of individual subjects. Computer vision techniques offer solutions to specific tracking problems, and allow automated and efficient tracking with minimal human intervention. In this work, we adopt the open active contour model to track the trajectories of moving objects at high density. We add repulsive interactions between open contours to the original model, treat the trajectories as an extrusion in the temporal dimension, and show applications to two tracking problems. The walking behavior of Drosophila is studied at different population density and gender composition. We demonstrate that individual male flies have distinct walking signatures, and that the social interaction between flies in a mixed gender arena is gender specific. We also apply our model to studies of trajectories of gliding Myxococcus xanthus bacteria at high density. We examine the individual gliding behavioral statistics in terms of the gliding speed distribution. Using these two examples at very distinctive spatial scales, we illustrate the use of our algorithm on tracking both short rigid bodies (Drosophila and long flexible objects (Myxococcus xanthus. Our repulsive active membrane model reaches error rates better than 5 x 10(-6 per fly per second for Drosophila tracking and comparable results for Myxococcus xanthus.

  19. First research coordination meeting on reference database for neutron activation analysis. Summary report

    Potential problems associated with nuclear data for neutron activation analysis were identified, the scope of the work to be undertaken was defined together with its priorities, and tasks were assigned to participants. Data testing and measurements refer to gamma spectrum peak evaluations, detector efficiency calibration, neutron spectrum characteristics and reference materials analysis. (author)

  20. Metal based isatin-derived sulfonamides: their synthesis, characterization, coordination behavior and biological activity.

    Chohan, Zahid H; Supuran, Claudiu T; Ben Hadda, Taibi; Nasim, Faiz-Ul-Hassan; Khan, Khalid M

    2009-06-01

    Some isatin derived sulfonamides and their transition metal [Co(II), Cu(II), Ni(II), Zn(II)] complexes have been synthesized and characterized. The structure of synthesized compounds and their nature of bonding have been inferred on the basis of their physical (magnetic susceptibility and conductivity measurements), analytical (elemental analyses) and spectral (IR, (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR) properties. An octahedral geometry has been suggested for Co(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) and square-planar for Cu(II) complexes. In order to assess the antibacterial and antifungal behavior, the ligands and their metal(II) complexes were screened for their in vitro antibacterial activity against four Gram-negative species, Escherichia coli, Shigella flexneri, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Salmonella typhi and two Gram-positive species, Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis and, for in vitro antifungal activity against Trichophyton longifusus, Candida albicans, Aspergillus flavus, Microsporum canis, Fusarium solani and Candida glaberata. In vitro cytotoxic properties of all the compounds were also studied against Artemia salina by brine shrimp bioassay. The results of average antibacterial/antifungal activity showed that zinc(II) complexes were found to be the most active against one or more bacterial/fungal strains as compared to the other metal complexes. PMID:18825557

  1. Systems Level Analyses Reveal Multiple Regulatory Activities of CodY Controlling Metabolism, Motility and Virulence in Listeria monocytogenes.

    Lobel, Lior; Herskovits, Anat A

    2016-02-01

    Bacteria sense and respond to many environmental cues, rewiring their regulatory network to facilitate adaptation to new conditions/niches. Global transcription factors that co-regulate multiple pathways simultaneously are essential to this regulatory rewiring. CodY is one such global regulator, controlling expression of both metabolic and virulence genes in Gram-positive bacteria. Branch chained amino acids (BCAAs) serve as a ligand for CodY and modulate its activity. Classically, CodY was considered to function primarily as a repressor under rich growth conditions. However, our previous studies of the bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes revealed that CodY is active also when the bacteria are starved for BCAAs. Under these conditions, CodY loses the ability to repress genes (e.g., metabolic genes) and functions as a direct activator of the master virulence regulator gene, prfA. This observation raised the possibility that CodY possesses multiple functions that allow it to coordinate gene expression across a wide spectrum of metabolic growth conditions, and thus better adapt bacteria to the mammalian niche. To gain a deeper understanding of CodY's regulatory repertoire and identify direct target genes, we performed a genome wide analysis of the CodY regulon and DNA binding under both rich and minimal growth conditions, using RNA-Seq and ChIP-Seq techniques. We demonstrate here that CodY is indeed active (i.e., binds DNA) under both conditions, serving as a repressor and activator of different genes. Further, we identified new genes and pathways that are directly regulated by CodY (e.g., sigB, arg, his, actA, glpF, gadG, gdhA, poxB, glnR and fla genes), integrating metabolism, stress responses, motility and virulence in L. monocytogenes. This study establishes CodY as a multifaceted factor regulating L. monocytogenes physiology in a highly versatile manner. PMID:26895237

  2. Systems Level Analyses Reveal Multiple Regulatory Activities of CodY Controlling Metabolism, Motility and Virulence in Listeria monocytogenes.

    Lior Lobel

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria sense and respond to many environmental cues, rewiring their regulatory network to facilitate adaptation to new conditions/niches. Global transcription factors that co-regulate multiple pathways simultaneously are essential to this regulatory rewiring. CodY is one such global regulator, controlling expression of both metabolic and virulence genes in Gram-positive bacteria. Branch chained amino acids (BCAAs serve as a ligand for CodY and modulate its activity. Classically, CodY was considered to function primarily as a repressor under rich growth conditions. However, our previous studies of the bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes revealed that CodY is active also when the bacteria are starved for BCAAs. Under these conditions, CodY loses the ability to repress genes (e.g., metabolic genes and functions as a direct activator of the master virulence regulator gene, prfA. This observation raised the possibility that CodY possesses multiple functions that allow it to coordinate gene expression across a wide spectrum of metabolic growth conditions, and thus better adapt bacteria to the mammalian niche. To gain a deeper understanding of CodY's regulatory repertoire and identify direct target genes, we performed a genome wide analysis of the CodY regulon and DNA binding under both rich and minimal growth conditions, using RNA-Seq and ChIP-Seq techniques. We demonstrate here that CodY is indeed active (i.e., binds DNA under both conditions, serving as a repressor and activator of different genes. Further, we identified new genes and pathways that are directly regulated by CodY (e.g., sigB, arg, his, actA, glpF, gadG, gdhA, poxB, glnR and fla genes, integrating metabolism, stress responses, motility and virulence in L. monocytogenes. This study establishes CodY as a multifaceted factor regulating L. monocytogenes physiology in a highly versatile manner.

  3. Summary of nuclear model calculations for the IAEA coordinated research programme on activation cross sections for fusion reactor technology

    We describe research performed for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Programme on activation cross sections for fusion reactor technology. Using the GNASH nuclear modeling code, we have investigated: (1) production cross sections of isomeric states, and isomer ratios, for the reactions 94Mo(n,p)94Nb, 109Ag(n,2n)108mAg, 151Eu(n,2n)150m Eu, 153Eu(n,2n)152g+m2Eu, 159Tb(n,2n)158Tb, 187Re(n,2n)186mRe, 179Hf(n,2n)178m2Hf, 193Ir(n,2n)192m2Ir; (2) systematical dependence of isomeric ratios on isomer spin and incident-energy; (3) preequilibrium spin effects on calculated isomer production; and (4) intercomparison and evaluation of nuclear model excitation functions of isomer production cross sections. (author). 16 refs, 8 figs, 1 tab

  4. ACTIVE POWER LOSSES IN LONG LINES DURING COORDINATED, LIMITING AND MALFUNCTION BEHAVIOR

    Rimsky V.X.

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Exact formulas for calculation of limiting values of transmitted capacity and efficiency of lines of a variable voltage with active loading on the reception end are resulted. Critical resistance and losses of capacity are determined depending on length Air-lines of an electricity transmission of a class of a voltage 500 … 750 kV. Emergency operation in the loaded electricity transmission is investigated.

  5. Managing nuclear knowledge: IAEA activities and international coordination. Including resource material full text CD-ROM

    The present CD-ROM summarizes some activities carried out by the Departments of Nuclear Energy and Nuclear Safety and Security in the area of nuclear knowledge management in the period 2003-2005. It comprises, as open resource, most of the relevant documents in full text, including policy level documents, reports, presentation material by Member States and meeting summaries. The collection starts with a reprint of the report to the IAEA General Conference 2004 on Nuclear Knowledge [GOV/2004/56-GC(48)/12] summarizing the developments in nuclear knowledge management since the 47th session of the General Conference in 2003 and covers Managing Nuclear Knowledge including safety issues and Information and Strengthening Education and Training for Capacity Building. It contains an excerpt on Nuclear Knowledge from the General Conference Resolution [GC(48)/RES/13] on Strengthening the Agency's Activities Related to Nuclear Science, Technology and Applications. On the CD-ROM itself, all documents can easily be accessed by clicking on their titles on the subject pages (also printed at the end of this Working Material). Part 1 of the CD-ROM covers the activities in the period 2003-2005 and part 2 presents a resource material full text CD-ROM on Managing Nuclear Knowledge issued in October 2003

  6. Antiurolithic activity of Origanum vulgare is mediated through multiple pathways

    Khan Aslam

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Origanum vulgare Linn has traditionally been used in the treatment of urolithiasis. Therefore, we investigated the crude extract of Origanum vulgare for possible antiurolithic effect, to rationalize its medicinal use. Methods The crude aqueous-methanolic extract of Origanum vulgare (Ov.Cr was studied using the in vitro and in vivo methods. In the in vitro experiments, supersaturated solution of calcium and oxalate, kidney epithelial cell lines (MDCK and urinary bladder of rabbits were used, whereas, in the in vivo studies, rat model of urolithiasis was used for the study of preventive and curative effect. Results In the in vitro experiments, Ov.Cr exhibited a concentration-dependent (0.25-4 mg/ml inhibitory effect on the slope of nucleation and aggregation and also decreased the number of calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals (COM produced in calcium oxalate metastable solutions. It also showed concentration-dependent antioxidant effect against DPPH free radical and lipid peroxidation induced in rat kidney tissue homogenate. Ov.Cr reduced the cell toxicity using MTT assay and LDH release in renal epithelial cells (MDCK exposed to oxalate (0.5 mM and COM (66 μg/cm2 crystals. Ov.Cr relaxed high K+ (80 mM induced contraction in rabbit urinary bladder strips, and shifted the calcium concentration-response curves (CRCs towards right with suppression of the maximum response similar to that of verapamil, a standard calcium channel blocker. In male Wistar rats receiving lithogenic treatment comprising of 0.75% ethylene glycol in drinking water given for 3 weeks along with ammonium chloride (NH4Cl for the first 5 days, Ov.Cr treatment (10-30 mg/kg prevented as well as reversed toxic changes including loss of body weight, polyurea, crystalluria, oxaluria, raised serum urea and creatinine levels and crystal deposition in kidneys compared to their respective controls. Conclusion These data indicating the antiurolithic activity in Ov

  7. Multiple wavelength observations of a solar active region

    The Solar Maximum Mission Satellite, the Sacramento Peak Vacuum Tower Telescope, the Very Large Array and the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope have been used to observe active region AR 2490 on two consecutive days at soft X-ray, ultraviolet, optical and radio wavelengths (2, 6, and 20 cm), with comparable angular resolution (2'' to 15'') and field of view (4' x 4'). The radio emissions at lambda = 6 cm and 20 cm show a double structure in which one component is associated with bright Hα plage, C IV and soft X-ray emission, and the other component is associated only with sunspots. No radiation at lambda = 2 cm is detected in this latter component. Coronal temperature and emission measure derived from X-ray lines indicate that the dominant radiation mechanism of the plage-associated component is due to thermal bremsstrahlung while the gyroresonance absorption coefficient must be invoked to account for the high brightness temperature (Tsub(b) approx. equal to 2 x 106 K) observed in the sunspot associated component. The high magnetic field strength needed (600 G at a level where T approx. equal to 2 x 106 K) is explained assuming a thin transition zone, in order to reach a high electron temperature close to the sunspot, where the magnetic fields are stronger. A higher temperature gradient above sunspots is also consistent with the absence of detectable C IV emission. (orig.)

  8. Multiplicative and Additive Modulation of Neuronal Tuning with Population Activity Affects Encoded Information.

    Arandia-Romero, Iñigo; Tanabe, Seiji; Drugowitsch, Jan; Kohn, Adam; Moreno-Bote, Rubén

    2016-03-16

    Numerous studies have shown that neuronal responses are modulated by stimulus properties and also by the state of the local network. However, little is known about how activity fluctuations of neuronal populations modulate the sensory tuning of cells and affect their encoded information. We found that fluctuations in ongoing and stimulus-evoked population activity in primate visual cortex modulate the tuning of neurons in a multiplicative and additive manner. While distributed on a continuum, neurons with stronger multiplicative effects tended to have less additive modulation and vice versa. The information encoded by multiplicatively modulated neurons increased with greater population activity, while that of additively modulated neurons decreased. These effects offset each other so that population activity had little effect on total information. Our results thus suggest that intrinsic activity fluctuations may act as a "traffic light" that determines which subset of neurons is most informative. PMID:26924437

  9. DMPD: Multiple signaling pathways leading to the activation of interferon regulatoryfactor 3. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Full Text Available 12213596 Multiple signaling pathways leading to the activation of interferon regulatoryfactor...(.html) (.csml) Show Multiple signaling pathways leading to the activation of interferon regulatoryfactor 3.... PubmedID 12213596 Title Multiple signaling pathways leading to the activation of... interferon regulatoryfactor 3. Authors Servant MJ, Grandvaux N, Hiscott J. Publication Biochem Pharmacol. 2

  10. Most Common Types of Physical Activity Self-Selected by People with Multiple Sclerosis

    Weikert, Madeline; Dlugonski, Deirdre; Balantrapu, Swathi; Motl, Robert W.

    2011-01-01

    The promotion of physical activity for people with multiple sclerosis (MS) would benefit from information about the common types of physical activity self-selected by this population. This study examined the most frequent types of physical activity self-reported by a large sample of people with MS. The data were collected as part of the baseline assessment of a longitudinal investigation of physical activity in relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS). The participants (N = 272) were sent a battery of q...

  11. Multiple monoaminergic modulation of posturo-locomotor network activity in the newborn rat spinal cord

    Lauriane eBeliez

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Studies devoted to understanding locomotor control have mainly addressed the functioning of the neural circuits controlling leg movements and relatively little is known of the operation of networks that activate trunk muscles in coordination with limb movements. The aim of the present work was (1 to identify the exogenous neurotransmitter cocktail that most strongly activates postural thoracic circuitry; (2 to investigate how the biogenic amines serotonin (5-HT, dopamine (DA and noradrenaline (NA modulate the coordination between limb and axial motor networks. Experiments were carried out on in vitro isolated spinal cord preparations from newborn rats. We recorded from ventral roots to monitor hindlimb locomotor and axial postural network activity. Each combination of the three amines with excitatory amino acids (EAAs elicited coordinated rhythmic motor activity at all segmental levels with specific characteristics. The variability in cycle period was similar with 5-HT and DA while it was significantly higher with NA. DA elicited motor bursts of smaller amplitude in thoracic segments compared to 5-HT and NA, while both DA and NA elicited motor bursts of higher amplitude than 5-HT in the lumbar and sacral segments. The amines modulated the phase relationships of bursts in various segments with respect to the reference lumbar segment. At the thoracic level there was a phase lag between all recorded segments in the presence of 5-HT, while DA and NA elicited synchronous bursting. At the sacral level, 5-HT and DA induced an intersegmental phase shift while relationships became phase-locked with NA. Various combinations of EAAs with two or even all three amines elicited rhythmic motor output that was more variable than with one amine alone. Our results provide new data on the coordinating processes between spinal cord networks, demonstrating that each amine has a characteristic signature regarding its specific effect on intersegmental phase

  12. A self-centering active probing technique for kinematic parameter identification and verification of articulated arm coordinate measuring machines

    A crucial task in the procedure of identifying the parameters of a kinematic model of an articulated arm coordinate measuring machine (AACMM) or robot arm is the process of capturing data. In this paper a capturing data method is analyzed using a self-centering active probe, which drastically reduces the capture time and the required number of positions of the gauge as compared to the usual standard and manufacturer methods. The mathematical models of the self-centering active probe and AACMM are explained, as well as the mathematical model that links the AACMM global reference system to the probe reference system. We present a self-calibration method that will allow us to determine a homogeneous transformation matrix that relates the probe's reference system to the AACMM last reference system from the probing of a single sphere. In addition, a comparison between a self-centering passive probe and self-centering active probe is carried out to show the advantages of the latter in the procedures of kinematic parameter identification and verification of the AACMM

  13. RUN COORDINATION

    Christophe Delaere

    2013-01-01

    The focus of Run Coordination during LS1 is to monitor closely the advance of maintenance and upgrade activities, to smooth interactions between subsystems and to ensure that all are ready in time to resume operations in 2015 with a fully calibrated and understood detector. After electricity and cooling were restored to all equipment, at about the time of the last CMS week, recommissioning activities were resumed for all subsystems. On 7 October, DCS shifts began 24/7 to allow subsystems to remain on to facilitate operations. That culminated with the Global Run in November (GriN), which   took place as scheduled during the week of 4 November. The GriN has been the first centrally managed operation since the beginning of LS1, and involved all subdetectors but the Pixel Tracker presently in a lab upstairs. All nights were therefore dedicated to long stable runs with as many subdetectors as possible. Among the many achievements in that week, three items may be highlighted. First, the Strip...

  14. RUN COORDINATION

    C. Delaere

    2013-01-01

    Since the LHC ceased operations in February, a lot has been going on at Point 5, and Run Coordination continues to monitor closely the advance of maintenance and upgrade activities. In the last months, the Pixel detector was extracted and is now stored in the pixel lab in SX5; the beam pipe has been removed and ME1/1 removal has started. We regained access to the vactank and some work on the RBX of HB has started. Since mid-June, electricity and cooling are back in S1 and S2, allowing us to turn equipment back on, at least during the day. 24/7 shifts are not foreseen in the next weeks, and safety tours are mandatory to keep equipment on overnight, but re-commissioning activities are slowly being resumed. Given the (slight) delays accumulated in LS1, it was decided to merge the two global runs initially foreseen into a single exercise during the week of 4 November 2013. The aim of the global run is to check that we can run (parts of) CMS after several months switched off, with the new VME PCs installed, th...

  15. The ClpP N-Terminus Coordinates Substrate Access with Protease Active Site Reactivity

    Energy-dependent protein degradation machines, such as the Escherichia coli protease ClpAP, require regulated interactions between the ATPase component (ClpA) and the protease component (ClpP) for function. Recent studies indicate that the ClpP N-terminus is essential in these interactions, yet the dynamics of this region remain unclear. Here, we use synchrotron hydroxyl radical footprinting and kinetic studies to characterize functionally important conformational changes of the ClpP N-terminus. Footprinting experiments show that the ClpP N-terminus becomes more solvent-exposed upon interaction with ClpA. In the absence of ClpA, deletion of the ClpP N-terminus increases the initial degradation rate of large peptide substrates 5-15-fold. Unlike ClpAP, ClpP?N exhibits a distinct slow phase of product formation that is eliminated by the addition of hydroxylamine, suggesting that truncation of the N-terminus leads to stabilization of the acyl-enzyme intermediate. These results indicate that (1) the ClpP N-terminus acts as a 'gate' controlling substrate access to the active sites, (2) binding of ClpA opens this 'gate', allowing substrate entry and formation of the acyl-enzyme intermediate, and (3) closing of the N-terminal 'gate' stimulates acyl-enzyme hydrolysis.

  16. Social Cognitive Correlates of Physical Activity in Inactive Adults with Multiple Sclerosis

    Dlugonski, Deirdre; Wojcicki, Thomas R.; McAuley, Edward; Motl, Robert W.

    2011-01-01

    Persons with multiple sclerosis (MS) are often physically inactive. This observation has prompted the search for modifiable constructs derived from established theories that act as correlates of physical activity. This study investigated self efficacy, outcome expectations, impediments, and goal setting as correlates of physical activity in…

  17. Telephone-Based Physical Activity Counseling for Major Depression in People with Multiple Sclerosis

    Bombardier, Charles H.; Ehde, Dawn M.; Gibbons, Laura E.; Wadhwani, Roini; Sullivan, Mark D.; Rosenberg, Dori E.; Kraft, George H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Physical activity represents a promising treatment for major depressive disorder (MDD) in people with multiple sclerosis (MS). We conducted a single-blind, two-arm randomized controlled trial comparing a 12-week physical activity counseling intervention delivered primarily by telephone (n = 44) to a wait-list control group (N = 48).…

  18. Legitimating New Forms of Organizing and New International Activities in the Eyes of Multiple Stakeholders

    Turcan, Romeo V.

    by its multiple stakeholders; and (2) what legitimation strategies it developed and adopted to legitimate itself in the eyes of its multiple stakeholders. Theoretically, the paper is grounded within legitimation theory. The empirical context is defined by a new, international NGO entering an established...... - as at the time of entry there were no precedents for the kind of forms of organizing and activities this venture was aiming to introduce to the market....

  19. An investigation into types of multiple intelligences and activities used in English classes at primary schools

    Şenbaş Filiz, Aslı

    2010-01-01

    The main purpose of the study was to investigate primary school students’ multiple intelligences according to their preferences and how the multiple intelligences differ in terms of grade level, gender, school and English classroom activities. This research was conducted in six primary schools in Çanakkale and provinces of Çanakkale with a total of 269 sixth and eighth grade students and 9 English Language teachers in spring 2008-2009 semester. There were 138 male and 131 female students. ...

  20. Development of a database for prompt γ-ray neutron activation analysis. Summary report of the first research coordination meeting

    This report summarizes the presentations, recommendations and conclusions of the First Research Co-ordination Meeting on Development of a Database for Prompt γ-ray Neutron Activation Analysis. Neutron-capture Prompt γ-ray Activation Analysis (PGAA) is a non-destructive radioanalytical method, capable of rapid or in-situ simultaneous multielement analysis of many elements of the Periodic Table, from hydrogen to uranium, in the same sample. Inaccuracy and incompleteness of the data available for use in PGAA are a significant handicap in the qualitative and quantitative analysis of capture-gamma spectra. The goal of this CRP is to replace the twenty-year-old data from a single laboratory with something fundamentally new: an evaluated database which includes a combination of evaluated nuclear physics data, physical theory, and recent measurements. The resulting database will be comparable in quality with that for radioactive decay. In addition, more accurate values of neutron capture cross-sections and γ-ray intensities that result from this database will improve the accuracy of radiation shielding calculations. (author)

  1. FGF coordinates air sac development by activation of the EGF ligand Vein through the transcription factor PntP2.

    Cruz, Josefa; Bota-Rabassedas, Neus; Franch-Marro, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    How several signaling pathways are coordinated to generate complex organs through regulation of tissue growth and patterning is a fundamental question in developmental biology. The larval trachea of Drosophila is composed of differentiated functional cells and groups of imaginal tracheoblasts that build the adult trachea during metamorphosis. Air sac primordium cells (ASP) are tracheal imaginal cells that form the dorsal air sacs that supply oxygen to the flight muscles of the Drosophila adult. The ASP emerges from the tracheal branch that connects to the wing disc by the activation of both Bnl-FGF/Btl and EGFR signaling pathways. Together, these pathways promote cell migration and proliferation. In this study we demonstrate that Vein (vn) is the EGF ligand responsible for the activation of the EGFR pathway in the ASP. We also find that the Bnl-FGF/Btl pathway regulates the expression of vn through the transcription factor PointedP2 (PntP2). Furthermore, we show that the FGF target gene escargot (esg) attenuates EGFR signaling at the tip cells of the developing ASP, reducing their mitotic rate to allow proper migration. Altogether, our results reveal a link between Bnl-FGF/Btl and EGFR signaling and provide novel insight into how the crosstalk of these pathways regulates migration and growth. PMID:26632449

  2. Electromyographic activity of hand muscles in a motor coordination game: effect of incentive scheme and its relation with social capital.

    Roberto Censolo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A vast body of social and cognitive psychology studies in humans reports evidence that external rewards, typically monetary ones, undermine intrinsic motivation. These findings challenge the standard selfish-rationality assumption at the core of economic reasoning. In the present work we aimed at investigating whether the different modulation of a given monetary reward automatically and unconsciously affects effort and performance of participants involved in a game devoid of visual and verbal interaction and without any perspective-taking activity. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Twelve pairs of participants were submitted to a simple motor coordination game while recording the electromyographic activity of First Dorsal Interosseus (FDI, the muscle mainly involved in the task. EMG data show a clear effect of alternative rewards strategies on subjects' motor behavior. Moreover, participants' stock of relevant past social experiences, measured by a specifically designed questionnaire, was significantly correlated with EMG activity, showing that only low social capital subjects responded to monetary incentives consistently with a standard rationality prediction. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings show that the effect of extrinsic motivations on performance may arise outside social contexts involving complex cognitive processes due to conscious perspective-taking activity. More importantly, the peculiar performance of low social capital individuals, in agreement with standard economic reasoning, adds to the knowledge of the circumstances that makes the crowding out/in of intrinsic motivation likely to occur. This may help in improving the prediction and accuracy of economic models and reconcile this puzzling effect of external incentives with economic theory.

  3. The Importance of Providing Multiple-Channel Sections in Dredging Activities to Improve Fish Habitat Environments

    Hung-Pin Chiu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available After Typhoon Morakot, dredging engineering was conducted while taking the safety of humans and structures into consideration, but partial stream reaches were formed in the multiple-channel sections in Cishan Stream because of anthropogenic and natural influences. This study mainly explores the distribution of each fish species in both the multiple- and single-channel sections in the Cishan Stream. Parts of the environments did not exhibit significant differences according to a one-way ANOVA comparing the multiple- and single-channel sections, but certain areas of the multiple-channel sections had more diverse habitats. Each fish species was widely distributed by non-metric multidimensional scaling in the multiple-channel sections as compared to those in the single-channel sections. In addition, according to the principal component analysis, each fish species has a preferred environment, and all of them have a wide choice of habitat environments in the multiple-channel sections. Finally, the existence of multiple-channel sections could significantly affect the existence of the fish species under consideration in this study. However, no environmental factors were found to have an influence on fish species in the single-channel sections, with the exception of Rhinogobius nantaiensis. The results show that providing multiple-channel sections in dredging activities could improve fish habitat environments.

  4. Environmental correlates of physical activity in multiple sclerosis: A cross-sectional study

    McAuley Edward; Motl Robert W; Doerksen Shawna E

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic neurological disease that is associated with physical inactivity. Understanding the factors that correlate with physical activity is important for developing effective physical activity promotion programs for this population. Thus, we conducted a cross-sectional study that examined the association between features of the built environment with self-reported and objectively measured physical activity behaviour in adults with MS. Methods ...

  5. Outcome Expectations and Physical Activity in Persons with Longstanding Multiple Sclerosis

    Morrison, Janet D.; Stuifbergen, Alexa K.

    2014-01-01

    Research suggests that persons with multiple sclerosis (MS) are much less physically active than the general population and that increased physical activity in persons with MS is associated with numerous benefits such as improvements in fatigue, mobility and quality of life (Motl & Pilutti, 2012). Potentially modifiable theory-based determinants of physical activity behavior need to be identified so that researchers may study their effectiveness in randomized clinical trials and clinicians ma...

  6. Parathyroid mitogenic activity in plasma from patients with familial multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1

    Hyperplasia of the parathyroid glands is a central feature of familial multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1. We used cultured bovine parathyroid cells to test for mitogenic activity in plasma from patients with this disorder. Normal plasma stimulated [3H]thymidine incorporation, on the average, to the same extent as it was stimulated in a plasma-free control culture. This contrasted with the results of the tests with plasma from patients with familial multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1, in which parathyroid mitogenic activity increased 2400 percent over the control value (P less than 0.001). Plasma from these patients also stimulated the proliferation of bovine parathyroid cells in culture, whereas plasma from normal subjects inhibited it. Parathyroid mitogenic activity in plasma from the patients with familial multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 was greater than that in plasma from patients with various other disorders, including sporadic primary hyperparathyroidism (with adenoma, hyperplasia, or cancer of the parathyroid), sporadic primary hypergastrinemia, sporadic pituitary tumor, familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia, and multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (P less than 0.05). Parathyroid mitogenic activity in the plasma of patients with familial multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 persisted for up to four years after total parathyroidectomy. The plasma also had far more mitogenic activity in cultures of parathyroid cells than did optimal concentrations of known growth factors or of any parathyroid secretagogue. This mitogenic activity had an apparent molecular weight of 50,000 to 55,000. We conclude that primary hyperparathyroidism in familial multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 may have a humoral cause

  7. Hepatobiliary fascioliasis with multiple aneurysms and active bleeding: A case report

    A 52-year-old woman visited our institution with upper abdominal pain which had lasted for the past two days. Laboratory tests revealed mild leukocytosis, decreased serum hemoglobin, and peripheral blood eosinophilia. CT scans showed multiple ill-defined, hypodense lesions in the peripheral areas of both hepatic lobes and active bleeding with a subcapsular hematoma in the right hepatic lobe. Angiography also showed active bleeding in the right hepatic lobe with multiple aneurysms, so a transarterial coil embolization was performed to stop the bleeding. The endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography revealed several moving flat flukes in the common bile duct, which were pathologically confirmed as Fasciola hepatica.

  8. Hepatobiliary fascioliasis with multiple aneurysms and active bleeding: A case report

    Choi, Soo Young; Kim Jae Woon; Jang, Jae Cheon [Dept. of Radiology, College of Medicine, Yeungnam University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    A 52-year-old woman visited our institution with upper abdominal pain which had lasted for the past two days. Laboratory tests revealed mild leukocytosis, decreased serum hemoglobin, and peripheral blood eosinophilia. CT scans showed multiple ill-defined, hypodense lesions in the peripheral areas of both hepatic lobes and active bleeding with a subcapsular hematoma in the right hepatic lobe. Angiography also showed active bleeding in the right hepatic lobe with multiple aneurysms, so a transarterial coil embolization was performed to stop the bleeding. The endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography revealed several moving flat flukes in the common bile duct, which were pathologically confirmed as Fasciola hepatica.

  9. A novel one-dimensional manganese(II) coordination polymer containing both dicyanamide and pyrazinamide ligands: Synthesis, spectroscopic investigations, X-ray studies and evaluation of biological activities

    Tabrizi, Leila; Chiniforoshan, Hossein; McArdle, Patrick

    2015-03-01

    A novel 1D coordination polymer {[Mn(μ1,5-dca)2(PZA)2](PZA)2}n, 1, has been synthesized and characterized by single crystal X-ray crystallography. The coordination mode of dicyanamide (dca) and pyrazinamide (PZA) ligands was inferred by IR spectroscopy. The compound 1 was evaluated for in vitro antimycobacterial and antitumor activities. It demonstrated better in vitro activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis than pyrazinamide and its MIC value was determined. Complex 1 was also screened for its in vitro antitumor activity towards LM3 and LP07 murine cancer cell lines. In addition, the antibacterial activity of complex 1 has been tested against Gram(+) and Gram(-) bacteria and it has shown promising broad range anti-bacterial activity.

  10. Hybrid coordination-network-engineering for bridging cascaded channels to activate long persistent phosphorescence in the second biological window

    Qin, Xixi; Li, Yang; Zhang, Ruili; Ren, Jinjun; Gecevicius, Mindaugas; Wu, Yiling; Sharafudeen, Kaniyarakkal; Dong, Guoping; Zhou, Shifeng; Ma, Zhijun; Qiu, Jianrong

    2016-02-01

    We present a novel “Top-down” strategy to design the long phosphorescent phosphors in the second biological transparency window via energy transfer. Inherence in this approach to material design involves an ingenious engineering for hybridizing the coordination networks of hosts, tailoring the topochemical configuration of dopants, and bridging a cascaded tunnel for transferring the persistent energy from traps, to sensitizers and then to acceptors. Another significance of this endeavour is to highlight a rational scheme for functionally important hosts and dopants, Cr/Nd co-doped Zn1-xCaxGa2O4 solid solutions. Such solid-solution is employed as an optimized host to take advantage of its characteristic trap site level to establish an electron reservoir and network parameters for the precipitation of activators Nd3+ and Cr3+. The results reveal that the strategy employed here has the great potential, as well as opens new opportunities for future new-wavelength, NIR phosphorescent phosphors fabrication with many potential multifunctional bio-imaging applications.

  11. Manned space flight activities and sensory-motor coordinations; Yujin uchu katsudo tono hito no kankaku undokei

    Koga, K. [Nagoya Univ., Nagoya (Japan). Research Inst. of Environmental Medicine

    1996-03-05

    With an objective to elucidate relationship between human functions related to gravity in space and the gravity, simultaneous measurement was carried out on impulsive eyeball motions and antigravity muscles. The measurement used a non-polarized electrode mounted on a prescribed position on skin. The subject is a spacecraft crew who was subjected to an experiment in space in 1992. Data obtained during the flight were analyzed, and the following findings were obtained: the eyeball motions are performed accurately in terms of space and time; potential time relative to the target appearance time showed greater variation than in control conditions on the ground; activities of trapezius muscle as an antigravity muscle were suppressed, and electric discharge from the muscle was small even if the head is moved; the eyeballs move in coordination with the head when viewing an object; microgravity environment showed a head motion with very little muscle discharge possible as in the case where the head is held unmoved; and difference in motion patterns between the antigravity muscles and non-antigravity muscles may exist as a possible cause of spacesickness in addition to the conventional sensory disagreement theory. 32 refs., 6 figs.

  12. Occupational therapy for multiple sclerosis.

    Steultjens, E.M.J.; Dekker, J.; Bouter, L.M.; Cardol, M.; Nes, J.C.M. van de; Ende, C.H.M. van den

    2003-01-01

    Background: Multiple sclerosis (MS) patients are referred to occupational therapy with complaints about fatigue, limb weakness, alteration of upper extremity fine motor coordination, loss of sensation and spasticity that causes limitations in performance of activities of daily living and social part

  13. Coordination and Multi-Tasking Using EMT

    Rabinovich, Zinovi; Pochter, Nir; Rosenschein, Jeffrey S.

    2008-01-01

    We introduce a multi-model variant of the EMT-based control algorithm. The new algorithm, MM-EMT, is capable of balancing several control tasks expressed using separate dynamic models with a common action space. Such multiple models are common in both single-agent environments, when the agent has multiple tasks to achieve, and in team activities, when agent actions affect both the local agent’s task as well as the overall team’s coordination. To demonstrate the behaviour that MM-EMT engenders...

  14. Practically Coordinating

    Durfee, Edmund H.

    1999-01-01

    To coordinate, intelligent agents might need to know something about themselves, about each other, about how others view themselves and others, about how others think others view themselves and others, and so on. Taken to an extreme, the amount of knowledge an agent might possess to coordinate its interactions with others might outstrip the agent's limited reasoning capacity (its available time, memory, and so on). Much of the work in studying and building multiagent systems has thus been dev...

  15. A Laboratory of Extremophiles: Iceland Coordination Action for Research Activities on Life in Extreme Environments (CAREX Field Campaign

    Robert Hänsch

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Existence of life in extreme environments has been known for a long time, and their habitants have been investigated by different scientific disciplines for decades. However, reports of multidisciplinary research are uncommon. In this paper, we report an interdisciplinary three-day field campaign conducted in the framework of the Coordination Action for Research Activities on Life in Extreme Environments (CAREX FP7EU program, with participation of experts in the fields of life and earth sciences. In situ experiments and sampling were performed in a 20 m long hot springs system of different temperature (57 °C to 100 °C and pH (2 to 4. Abiotic factors were measured to study their influence on the diversity. The CO2 and H2S concentration varied at different sampling locations in the system, but the SO2 remained the same. Four biofilms, mainly composed by four different algae and phototrophic protists, showed differences in photosynthetic activity. Varying temperature of the sampling location affects chlorophyll fluorescence, not only in the microbial mats, but plants (Juncus, indicating selective adaptation to the environmental conditions. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR, DNA microarray and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE-based analysis in laboratory showed the presence of a diverse microbial population. Even a short duration (30 h deployment of a micro colonizer in this hot spring system led to colonization of microorganisms based on ribosomal intergenic spacer (RISA analysis. Polyphasic analysis of this hot spring system was possible due to the involvement of multidisciplinary approaches.

  16. Activities of daily living and lesion position among multiple sclerosis patients by Bayes network

    Zhifang Pan; Hongtao Lu; Qi Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging is a highly sensitive approach for diagnosis of multiple sclerosis, and T2-weighted images can reveal lesions in the cerebral white matter, gray matter, and spinal cord. However, the lesions have a poor correlation with measurable clinical disability. In this study, we performed a large-scale epidemiological survey of 238 patients with multiple sclerosis in eleven districts by network member hospitals in Shanghai, China within 1 year. The involved patients were scanned for position and size of lesions by MRI. Results showed that lesions in the cerebrum, spinal cord, or supratentorial position had an impact on the activities of daily living in multiple sclerosis patients, as assessed by the Bayes network. On the other hand, brainstem lesions were very unlikely to influence the activities of daily living, and were not associated with the position of lesion, patient's gender, and patient's living place.

  17. Sport and Physical Activity in a High Security Spanish Prison: An Ethnographic Study of Multiple Meanings

    Martos-Garcia, Daniel; Devis-Devis, Jose; Sparkes, Andrew C.

    2009-01-01

    Drawing on data generated by a two-year ethnographic study in a high security Spanish prison, this article explores the multiple meanings given to the social practices of sport and physical activity. We provide details of the following key themes that emerged from the analysis: (a) escaping time; (b) perceived therapeutic benefits; (c) social…

  18. Connecting multiple spatial scales to decode the population activity of grid cells

    Stemmler, Martin; Mathis, Alexander; Andreas V. M Herz

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian grid cells fire when an animal crosses the points of an imaginary hexagonal grid tessellating the environment. We show how animals can navigate by reading out a simple population vector of grid cell activity across multiple spatial scales, even though neural activity is intrinsically stochastic. This theory of dead reckoning explains why grid cells are organized into discrete modules within which all cells have the same lattice scale and orientation. The lattice scale changes from m...

  19. Objectively Measured Physical Activity Is Associated with Brain Volumetric Measurements in Multiple Sclerosis

    Klaren, Rachel E; Hubbard, Elizabeth A.; Motl, Robert W.; Pilutti, Lara A.; Wetter, Nathan C.; Sutton, Bradley P.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Little is known about physical activity and its association with volumes of whole brain gray matter and white matter and deep gray matter structures in persons with multiple sclerosis (MS). Purpose. This study examined the association between levels of physical activity and brain volumetric measures from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in MS. Method. 39 persons with MS wore an accelerometer for a 7-day period and underwent a brain MRI. Normalized GM volume (NGMV), normalized WM v...

  20. Establishment of an international reference data library of nuclear activation cross sections. Summary report of the second research co-ordination meeting

    The present report contains the Summary of the Second IAEA Research Co-ordination Meeting of the Co-ordinated Research Programme on ''Establishment of an International Reference Data Library of Nuclear Activation Cross Sections''. The meeting was organized by the IAEA Nuclear Data Section with co-operation and assistance of local organizers from the Instituto de Fusion Nuclear de la Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Spain, from 13 to 16 May 1996. Summarized are the conclusions and recommendations of the meeting together with a list of actions and deadlines. Attached are the detailed agenda and list of participants. (author). 4 refs, 1 tab

  1. Normal shoulder muscular activation and co-ordination during a shoulder elevation task based on activities of daily living: an electromyographic study.

    Hawkes, David H; Alizadehkhaiyat, Omid; Fisher, Anthony C; Kemp, Graham J; Roebuck, Margaret M; Frostick, Simon P

    2012-01-01

    Studies of normal shoulder function have often failed to consider the inter-relationship between different muscle groups in activities relevant to daily life. Upper limb functional status was assessed in 12 healthy male volunteers using the Functional Impairment Test-Hand, Neck, Shoulder and Arm test (FIT-HaNSA). Electromyography was then used to study the activity and coordination of 13 muscles (10 by surface electrodes, 3 by fine-wire intramuscular electrodes) around the shoulder during a dynamic movement task based on the shelf-lifting task in FIT-HaNSA. Muscles were grouped for analysis into deltoid (anterior, middle, and posterior divisions), adductors (latissimus dorsi and teres major), rotator cuff (supraspinatus, infraspinatus, and subscapularis), and elbow flexor (brachioradialis, biceps brachii) groups. There were no significant inter-session effects. Using cross-correlation analysis to investigate the whole time-course of activation, there were highly significant positive correlations (p elbow flexor groups (p = 0.031). We conclude that the deltoid, adductor, and rotator cuff muscles all contribute to the muscular component of glenohumeral joint stability. Muscular stability can be adapted as required to meet task-specific demands. PMID:21674607

  2. A role based coordination model in agent systems

    ZHANG Ya-ying; YOU Jin-yuan

    2005-01-01

    Coordination technology addresses the construction of open, flexible systems from active and independent software agents in concurrent and distributed systems. In most open distributed applications, multiple agents need interaction and communication to achieve their overall goal. Coordination technologies for the Internet typically are concerned with enabling interaction among agents and helping them cooperate with each other.At the same time, access control should also be considered to constrain interaction to make it harmless. Access control should be regarded as the security counterpart of coordination. At present, the combination of coordination and access control remains an open problem. Thus, we propose a role based coordination model with policy enforcement in agent application systems. In this model, coordination is combined with access control so as to fully characterize the interactions in agent systems. A set of agents interacting with each other for a common global system task constitutes a coordination group. Role based access control is applied in this model to prevent unauthorized accesses. Coordination policy is enforced in a distributed manner so that the model can be applied to the open distributed systems such as Intemet. An Internet online auction system is presented as a case study to illustrate the proposed coordination model and finally the performance analysis of the model is introduced.

  3. Modifications of laccase activities of copper efflux oxidase, CueO by synergistic mutations in the first and second coordination spheres of the type I copper center.

    Kataoka, Kunishige; Kogi, Hiroki; Tsujimura, Seiya; Sakurai, Takeshi

    2013-02-15

    The redox potential of type I copper in the Escherichia coli multicopper oxidase CueO was shifted in the positive or negative direction as a result of the single, double, and triple mutations in the first and second coordination spheres: the formation of the NH···S(-)(Cys500 ligand) hydrogen bond, the breakdown of the NH(His443 ligand)···O(-)(Asp439) hydrogen bond, and the substitution of the Met510 ligand for the non-coordinating Leu or coordinating Gln. Laccase activities of CueO were maximally enhanced 140-fold by virtue of the synergistic effect of mild mutations at and at around the ligand groups to type I copper. PMID:23337502

  4. TECHNICAL COORDINATION

    Austin Ball

    Introduction Underground installation of the initial CMS detector is almost complete. During this CMS week the detector will reach the minimum necessary condition allowing closure for beam. Configuration for pixel, BCM and endcap ECAL installation will then follow, with the installation of one or both endcap ECAL beingdependent on the actual date when beams may be expected through point 5. As we approach the culmination of 9 years of assembly at Cessy, it is appropriate to pay tribute once again to the continuing dedication and flexibility of all the CERN, collaboration and contractor teams working at point 5, including recently our colleagues from AT/VAC. There is every indication that the legacy of their hard work will be a superb scientific instrument. Safety The final burst of assembly activity in the UXC before closing for beam will involve the familiar worksite risks of heavy manipulation, restricted workspaces, multiple activity and work at height, now amplified by the presence of the very fragile be...

  5. Dynamic activity of NF-κB in multiple trauma patients and protective effects of ulinastain

    LI Jun

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: To investigate the dynamic activity of NF-κB at the early stage of injury in multiple trauma patients and the protective effects of ulinastain. Methods: From January 2008 to May 2010, patients with multiple traumas admitted to our emergency department were enrolled in this study. Their age varied from 20-55 years. All enrolled patients were assigned randomly into control group (26 cases of multiple injury without ulinastain treatment, ulinastain group (25 cases of multiple injury with ulinastain treatment, and mild injury group (20 cases for basic control. The inclusion criteria for mild injury group were AIS-2005≤3, single wound, previously healthy inhospital patients without the history of surgical intervention. In addition to routine treatment, patients in ulinastain group were intravenously injected 200 000 IU of ulinastain dissolved in 100 ml of normal saline within 12 hours after injury and subsequently injected at the interval of every 8 hours for 7 days. NF-κB activity in monocytes and the level of TNF? IL-1, IL? in serum on admission (day 0, day 1, 2, 3, 4, and 7 were measured. Data were compared and analyzed between different groups. Results: NF-κB activity in monocytes and TNF? IL-1 and IL? of these patients reached peak levels at 24 hour after trauma, with gradual decrease to normal at 72 hour after trauma. NF-κB activity and levels of TNF? IL-1 and IL? were lower in ulinastain group than control one, without any significant difference between the two groups. The mean duration for systemic inflammatory response syndrome and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome was 7 d?.1 d and 10 d?.5 d in ulinastain group and control group respectively, and showed a significant difference. Conclusions: NF-κB activity in monocytes and the levels of inflammatory cytokines in multiply injured patients increased transiently at the early stage of trauma. Ulinastain may shorten the duration of systemic inflammatory

  6. The Use of Multiple Slate Devices to Support Active Reading Activities

    Chen, Nicholas Yen-Cherng

    2012-01-01

    Reading activities in the classroom and workplace occur predominantly on paper. Since existing electronic devices do not support these reading activities as well as paper, users have difficulty taking full advantage of the affordances of electronic documents. This dissertation makes three main contributions toward supporting active reading…

  7. Analysis and co-ordination of the activities concerning gasification of biomass. Summary country report, Denmark and Norway

    The analysis summarises the coordination of activities concerning the gasification of biomass in Denmark and Norway. The total quantity of available biomass for energy production in Denmark corresponds to ca. 115 PJ of which ca. 40% is utilized - and this constitutes ca. 6% of the country's total energy consumption. The resulting energy from biomass is currently mostly used for heating purposes utilizing small wood/straw household or farm stoves in addition to ca. 100 district heating systems. There is a tendency to use biomass fuels for electric power production as in the case of all major waste incineration plants and about 10 fully or partly wood/straw-fired cogeneration plants which are found within the range of 2 -20 MWe. A table shows details of all Danish biomass gasification plants and information is given on the types of biomass, under the titles of residue products and energy crops, most relevant to energy production in Denmark. Data is presented on the consumption of renewable energy in Denmark, recalculated in fuel equivalents, and Danish national energy policy and related legislation are described. Information on Norway's use of biomass as fuel is given under the headings of primary consumption, biomass sources and use, legislation, and brief evaluations of commercial gasification plants, pilot and demonstration plants, and laboratory plants and studies. It has recently been decided to speed up the development of small-scale gasification plants for combined heat and electricity production using biomass as fuel in Denmark. Total Norwegian energy consumption is 25% higher than Denmark's, and biomass fuels cover only 3.6% of this. (ARW) 32 refs

  8. Semi-active control of a cable-stayed bridge under multiple-support excitations

    代泽兵; 黄金枝; 王红霞

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a semi-active strategy for seismic protection of a benchmark cable-stayed bridge with consideration of multiple-support excitations. In this control strategy, Magnetorheological (MR) dampers are proposed as control devices, a LQG-clipped-optimal control algorithm is employed. An active control strategy, shown in previous researches to perform well at controlling the benchmark bridge when uniform earthquake motion was assumed, is also used in this study to control this benchmark bridge with consideration of multiple-support excitations. The performance of active control system is compared to that of the presented semi-active control strategy. Because the MR fluid damper is a controllable energy- dissipation device that cannot add mechanical energy to the structural system, the proposed control strategy is fail-safe in that bounded-input, bounded-output stability of the controlled structure is guaranteed. The numerical results demonstrated that the performance of the presented control design is nearly the same as that of the active control system; and that the MR dampers can effectively be used to control seismically excited cable-stayed bridges with multiple-support excitations.

  9. Activation of multiple chemotherapeutic prodrugs by the natural enzymolome of tumour-localised probiotic bacteria.

    Lehouritis, Panos; Stanton, Michael; McCarthy, Florence O; Jeavons, Matthieu; Tangney, Mark

    2016-01-28

    Some chemotherapeutic drugs (prodrugs) require activation by an enzyme for efficacy. We and others have demonstrated the ability of probiotic bacteria to grow specifically within solid tumours following systemic administration, and we hypothesised that the natural enzymatic activity of these tumour-localised bacteria may be suitable for activation of certain such chemotherapeutic drugs. Several wild-type probiotic bacteria; Escherichia coli Nissle, Bifidobacterium breve, Lactococcus lactis and Lactobacillus species, were screened against a panel of popular prodrugs. All strains were capable of activating at least one prodrug. E. coli Nissle 1917 was selected for further studies because of its ability to activate numerous prodrugs and its resistance to prodrug toxicity. HPLC data confirmed biochemical transformation of prodrugs to their toxic counterparts. Further analysis demonstrated that different enzymes can complement prodrug activation, while simultaneous activation of multiple prodrugs (CB1954, 5-FC, AQ4N and Fludarabine phosphate) by E. coli was confirmed, resulting in significant efficacy improvement. Experiments in mice harbouring murine tumours validated in vitro findings, with significant reduction in tumour growth and increase in survival of mice treated with probiotic bacteria and a combination of prodrugs. These findings demonstrate the ability of probiotic bacteria, without the requirement for genetic modification, to enable high-level activation of multiple prodrugs specifically at the site of action. PMID:26655063

  10. Effects of irradiation with conventional and multiple daily fractionation on serum amylase activity

    The behaviour of serum α-amylase activity was determined in patients with head and neck cancer treated by radiation therapy. The levels of serum α-analyse activity during conventional and multiple daily fractionation were compared. Starting from the second day of treatment an increase of serum α-amylase activity was observed. The increase and its duration depended on the total daily dose: after the first day of treatment a linear correlation between serum levels and total daily dose could be observed. The size of the amylase increase correlated to the proportion of salivary gland tissue included in the irradiated volume. (orig.)