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Sample records for activated reactive evaporation

  1. Elaboration of titanium nitride coatings by activated reactive evaporation

    As titanium nitride is a very interesting and promising material for the protection against wear and corrosion of metals and alloys with a low fusion point, and notably steels, this research thesis reports the study of the elaboration of a TiN coating by activated reactive evaporation. In a first part, the author describes deposition processes based on evaporation and their characteristics. He explains the choice of the studied process. He discusses published data and results related to the titanium-nitrogen system. He describes the apparatus and reports the operation mode adjustment, and reports the study of the influence of operating conditions (substrate temperature, nitrogen pressure, evaporation rate, possible use of a discharge) on growth kinetics and on coating properties. A reaction mechanism is then proposed to describe and explain the obtained results

  2. Characterisation of CdO thin films deposited by activated reactive evaporation

    Ramakrishna Reddy, K. T.; Sravani, C.; Miles, R. W.

    1998-02-01

    The paper describes the preparation of cadmium oxide thin films produced by "activated reactive evaporation" onto heated glass substrates. The structural, electrical and optical properties of the deposited films were investigated and the effect of substrate temperature on the different physical properties of the films investigated. Highly conducting, polycrystalline CdO films with good transmittances were prepared by controlling the deposition temperature. These layers can be used to produce CdO/CdTe solar cells with efficiencies > 7%.

  3. Transparent conductive indium oxide film deposited on low temperature substrates by activated reactive evaporation.

    Marcovitch, O; Klein, Z; Lubezky, I

    1989-07-15

    High quality conductive coatings for the visible region were prepared on low temperature glass substrates. The conductive layer was an indium oxide film deposited by the activated reactive evaporation technique using a glow discharge hollow cathode ion gun. An antireflective layer of MgF(2) was deposited over the conductive layer. The average transmission in the visible region of the coated glass with sheet resistance of coating was durable and passed a series of environmental tests according to MIL-C-675C. PMID:20555600

  4. Transparent conductive indium oxide film deposited on low temperature substrates by activated reactive evaporation

    High quality conductive coatings for the visible region were prepared on low temperature glass substrates. The conductive layer was an indium oxide film deposited by the activated reactive evaporation technique using a glow discharge hollow cathode ion gun. An antireflective layer of MgFz was deposited over the conductive layer. The average transmission in the visible region of the coated glass with sheet resistance of 15 Ω/sq was greater than 90%. The coating was durable and passed a series of environmental tests according to MIL-C-675C

  5. Characterization of activated reactive evaporated MoO3 thin films for gas sensor applications

    Thin films of molybdenum trioxide (MoO3) were prepared by activated reactive evaporation technique on Pyrex glass substrates. The influence of oxygen partial pressure, substrate temperature and glow power on the structure, surface morphology and optical properties of MoO3 thin films was studied. The MoO3 films deposited in an oxygen partial pressure of 1x10-3 Torr, glow power of 10 W and substrate temperature of 573 K exhibited predominantly a (0 k 0) orientation corresponding to the orthorhombic layered structure of α-MoO3. The evaluated optical band gap was 3.24 eV. The sensing property of these MoO3 films for gases like NH3 and CO was also studied to see the applicability for environmental monitoring. We have observed that the MoO3 thin films of α-phase are capable of detecting NH3 and CO gases at concentrations lower than 10 ppm in dry air

  6. Low temperature, fast deposition of metallic titanium nitride films using plasma activated reactive evaporation

    Titanium and titanium nitride thin films were deposited on silica glass and W substrates at a high coating growth rate by plasma-activated reactive evaporation (ARE). The crystal structure, preferred orientation and grain size of the coatings were determined by x-ray diffraction (XRD) technique using Cu-Kα x rays. The analysis of the coating morphology was performed by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). The composition of the films was analyzed by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and electron-probe microanalysis (EPMA). The titanium and titanium nitride condensates were collected on a carbon-coated collodion film then characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in order to study the structures of the deposits at very short deposition times. The resistivity of the films was measured by using the four-point-probe method. The titanium coatings were found to consist of very fine particles (40 nm in grain size) and to exhibit a strong (002) texture. The titanium nitride coatings were substoichiometric (TiNx,xx coatings obtained at low temperature and a high growth rate in this work exhibited a rather high electrical conductivity

  7. Ge-doped SiO2 thin films produced by helicon activated reactive evaporation

    Ge-doped SiO2 thin films for optical waveguide application were produced at low temperature by using an improved helicon plasma assisted reactive evaporation technique. Pure Si and Ge materials were simultaneously evaporated from two separated crucibles by using e-beams into high-density oxygen plasma to form the oxide films on a substrate. The film density was enhanced by supplying an r.f. bias to the substrate. Nearly H-free Ge-doped SiO2 thin films with very high atomic density (∼0.66x1023 cm-3), good adhesion and very low surface roughness were produced. The influence of deposition conditions, mainly the helicon r.f. power and substrate bias, on the properties of the films was studied by using surface profilometer, ellipsometer, atomic force microscope, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, and field emission scanning electron microscope

  8. Room temperature growth of high crystalline quality Cu3N thin films by modified activated reactive evaporation

    Highlights: • Copper nitride (Cu3N) thin films have been prepared by a novel MARE technique • Highly crystalline Cu3N films were grown on glass substrates at room temperature • Preferential growth along a particular plane is mostly dependent on the RF power • Effect of deposition pressure and annealing on physical properties has been studied - Abstract: Highly crystalline copper nitride (Cu3N) thin films have been deposited on glass substrates at room temperature by a novel and commercially viable growth technique, known as modified activated reactive evaporation (MARE). The effects of change in radio frequency (RF) power and deposition pressure on the structural and optical properties of the films have been investigated. RF power plays a significant role for the preferential growth of these films along a particular plane whereas the deposition pressure has comparatively lesser impact on the same. However, the lattice parameter, film thickness and optical band gap are found to be strongly dependent on the deposition pressure. The MARE grown Cu3N films undergo complete decomposition into metallic Cu upon vacuum annealing at 400 °C which makes them promising candidates to be used in write once optical recording media

  9. Room temperature growth of high crystalline quality Cu{sub 3}N thin films by modified activated reactive evaporation

    Sahoo, Guruprasad, E-mail: guruprasad@physics.iitm.ac.in [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Meher, S.R. [School of Advanced Sciences, Vellore Institute of Technology University, Vellore 632014 (India); Jain, Mahaveer K. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Copper nitride (Cu{sub 3}N) thin films have been prepared by a novel MARE technique • Highly crystalline Cu{sub 3}N films were grown on glass substrates at room temperature • Preferential growth along a particular plane is mostly dependent on the RF power • Effect of deposition pressure and annealing on physical properties has been studied - Abstract: Highly crystalline copper nitride (Cu{sub 3}N) thin films have been deposited on glass substrates at room temperature by a novel and commercially viable growth technique, known as modified activated reactive evaporation (MARE). The effects of change in radio frequency (RF) power and deposition pressure on the structural and optical properties of the films have been investigated. RF power plays a significant role for the preferential growth of these films along a particular plane whereas the deposition pressure has comparatively lesser impact on the same. However, the lattice parameter, film thickness and optical band gap are found to be strongly dependent on the deposition pressure. The MARE grown Cu{sub 3}N films undergo complete decomposition into metallic Cu upon vacuum annealing at 400 °C which makes them promising candidates to be used in write once optical recording media.

  10. Reactive evaporation of anomalous blue VO2

    Thin films of vanadium dioxide exhibit a thermally induced semiconductor-to-metal phase transition near 670 C. In most deposition conditions, the transition is accompanied by large changes in optical properties at infrared wavelengths, but with only slight visible contrast. Recently, reactive evaporation at high temperatures and in stringent process conditions of so-called blue VO2 has been reported [G. A. Nyberg and R. A. Buhrman, J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 2, 301 (1984)]. These films exhibit a striking blue-to-red transition in transmitted light. In this paper, a new technique for thin-film growth of anomalous vanadium dioxide will be presented. The primary steps in the process are the reactive evaporation of vanadium oxide at ambient temperature followed by anneal in flowing oxygen. Optical and microstructural data for material deposited on sapphire and fused quartz substrates will be compared to standard vanadium oxide

  11. Formation of CuO on thermal and laser-induced oxidation of Cu3N thin films prepared by modified activated reactive evaporation

    Sahoo, Guruprasad; Jain, Mahaveer K.

    2015-03-01

    Copper oxide (CuO) thin films were prepared by direct oxidation of modified activated reactive evaporated copper nitride (Cu3N) thin films in air ambience. When annealed in air at higher temperatures, Cu3N films undergo complete decomposition and the residual Cu gets easily bonded with the atmospheric oxygen to form CuO. Annealing provides required activation energy for the formation of CuO. The formation of fairly crystallized CuO was confirmed by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy studies. However, the crystallite size of CuO films is smaller than their corresponding Cu3N phase. The surface morphology of the CuO films obtained through this method shows grains of non-uniform size distribution. Furthermore, Raman spectra on the as-grown Cu3N films were taken by varying the laser power. At higher laser power, microscopic CuO dots are formed due to laser-induced oxidation. It is proposed that p-type CuO can be easily grown over suitably prepared n-type Cu3N by local heating or laser irradiation in air.

  12. Properties Of Electrochromic Nickel Oxide Coatings Produced By Reactive Evaporation

    Bange, Klaus; Baucke, Friedrich G.; Metz, Bernard

    1989-03-01

    Single films of nickel oxide deposited by reactive evaporation and all-solid-state devices (ASSDs) containing such films have been investigated. The as-deposited nickel oxide films were analysed by standard surface and thin film-sensitive methods (AES, ESCA, RBS, NRA), and the findings were correlated with deposition parameters. The electrochromism of single layers was characterized by cyclic voltammetry and photospectrometry and compared with optical and electrical data of electrochromic all-solid-state devices.

  13. Properties of electrochromic nickel oxide coatings produced by reactive evaporation

    Single films of nickel oxide deposited by reactive evaporation and all-solid-state devices (ASSDs) containing such films have been investigated. The as-deposited nickel oxide films were analysed by standard surface and thin film-sensitive methods (AES, ESCA, RBS, NRA), and the findings were correlated with deposition parameters. The electrochromism of single layers was characterized by cyclic voltammetry and photospectrometry and compared with optical and electrical data of electrochromic all-solid-state devices

  14. Preparation and microstructural characterization of TiC and Ti0.6W0.4/TiC0.6 composite thin films obtained by activated reactive evaporation

    Titanium carbide-based coatings were deposited on W substrates at a high coating growth rate by activated reactive evaporation at 500 and 600 deg. C in a L560 Leybold system using propene as reactive atmosphere. The crystal structure, lattice parameter, preferred orientation, and grain size of the coatings were determined by x-ray diffraction technique using Cu Kα. The analysis of the coating morphology was performed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the composition of the films was analyzed by Auger electron spectroscopy and electron-probe microanalysis. Experimental results suggested that temperature was one of the most important parameters in the fabrication of stoichiometric TiC coatings. Thus, TiC coatings were obtained at 600 deg. C, whereas TiC0.6 nonstoichiometric coatings codeposited with a free Ti phase were obtained at 500 deg. C, giving rise to the formation of a composite thin film. After annealing at 1000 deg. C, the stoichiometric films remained stable, but a crack pattern was formed over the entire coating surface. In addition, Ti0.6W0.4/TiC0.6 composite thin coatings were obtained for the films synthesized at 500 deg. C. The formation of a Ti0.6W0.4 ductile phase in the presence of a TiC0.6 phase was responsible to avoid the coating cracking

  15. Photoconductivity in reactively evaporated copper indium selenide thin films

    Copper indium selenide thin films of composition CuInSe2 with thickness of the order of 130 nm are deposited on glass substrate at a temperature of 423 ±5 K and pressure of 10−5 mbar using reactive evaporation, a variant of Gunther's three temperature method with high purity Copper (99.999%), Indium (99.999%) and Selenium (99.99%) as the elemental starting materials. X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies shows that the films are polycrystalline in nature having preferred orientation of grains along the (112) plane. The structural type of the film is found to be tetragonal with particle size of the order of 32 nm. The structural parameters such as lattice constant, particle size, dislocation density, number of crystallites per unit area and strain in the film are also evaluated. The surface morphology of CuInSe2 films are studied using 2D and 3D atomic force microscopy to estimate the grain size and surface roughness respectively. Analysis of the absorption spectrum of the film recorded using UV-Vis-NIR Spectrophotometer in the wavelength range from 2500 nm to cutoff revealed that the film possess a direct allowed transition with a band gap of 1.05 eV and a high value of absorption coefficient (α) of 106 cm−1 at 570 nm. Photoconductivity at room temperature is measured after illuminating the film with an FSH lamp (82 V, 300 W). Optical absorption studies in conjunction with the good photoconductivity of the prepared p-type CuInSe2 thin films indicate its suitability in photovoltaic applications

  16. Calculation of Reactive-evaporation Rates of Chromia

    Holcomb, G.R.

    2008-04-01

    A methodology is developed to calculate Cr-evaporation rates from Cr2O3 with a flat planar geometry. Variables include temperature, total pressure, gas velocity, and gas composition. The methodology was applied to solid-oxide, fuel cell conditions for metallic interconnects and to advanced-steam turbines conditions. The high velocities and pressures of the advanced steam turbine led to evaporation predictions as high as 5.18 9 10-8 kg/m2/s of CrO2(OH)2(g) at 760 °C and 34.5 MPa. This is equivalent to 0.080 mm per year of solid Cr loss. Chromium evaporation is expected to be an important oxidation mechanism with the types of nickel-base alloys proposed for use above 650 °C in advanced-steam boilers and turbines. It is shown that laboratory experiments, with much lower steam velocities and usually much lower total pressure than found in advanced steam turbines, would best reproduce chromium-evaporation behavior with atmospheres that approach either O2 + H2O or air + H2O with 57% H2O.

  17. Evaporators

    Knudsen, Hans Jørgen Høgaard

    1996-01-01

    Type of evaporators. Regulation. Thermal dimensioning. Determination of pressure loss and heat transfer coefficients.......Type of evaporators. Regulation. Thermal dimensioning. Determination of pressure loss and heat transfer coefficients....

  18. Epitaxial growth of beta-SiC on TiCx by reactive evaporation

    A parametric growth study was performed to determine optimum conditions for epitaxial growth of β-SiC on TiCx by reactive evaporation. The growth sources were E-beam evaporated Si and acetylene. The polycrystalline to epitaxial growth transition temperature was determined to be about 1,250C, and the optimum epitaxial growth temperature was about 1,400C. All β-SiC epilayers exhibited an n-type carrier concentration of about 2 x 1018, independent of growth conditions, due to the high concentration of nitrogen in the acetylene. The Ti concentration ([Ti]) at the β-SiC/TiC epitaxial interface was graded, due to Ti diffusion during epitaxial growth. The as-grown [Ti] profile at the β-SiC/TiCx interface was stable at 500C. However, the [Ti] profile, ion implanted into a β-SiC epilayer, changed appreciably at 500C

  19. Electrical properties of silver selenide thin films prepared by reactive evaporation

    M C Santhosh Kumar; B Pradeep

    2002-10-01

    The electrical properties of silver selenide thin films prepared by reactive evaporation have been studied. Samples show a polymorphic phase transition at a temperature of 403 ± 2 K. Hall effect study shows that it has a mobility of 2000 cm2V–1s–1 and carrier concentration of 1018 cm–3 at room temperature. The carriers are of -type. X-ray diffraction study indicates that the as-prepared films are polycrystalline in nature. The lattice parameters were found to be = 4.353 Å, = 6.929 Å and = 7.805 Å.

  20. Production and characterization of thin film group IIIB, IVB and rare earth hydrides by reactive evaporation

    Provo, James L., E-mail: jlprovo@verizon.net [Consultant, J.L. Provo Consulting, Trinity, Florida 34655-7179 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    A recent short history of reactive evaporation by D. M. Mattox [History Corner—A Short History of Reactive Evaporation, SVC Bulletin (Society of Vacuum Coaters, Spring 2014), p. 50–51] describes various methods for producing oxides, nitrides, carbides, and some compounds, but hydrides were not mentioned. A study was performed in the mid-1970s at the General Electric Company Neutron Devices Department in Largo, FL, by the author to study preparation of thin film hydrides using reactive evaporation and to determine their unique characteristics and properties. Films were produced of scandium (Sc), yttrium (Y), titanium (Ti), zirconium (Zr), and the rare earth praseodymium (Pr), neodymium (Nd), gadolinium (Gd), dysprosium (Dy), and erbium (Er) hydrides by hot crucible filament and electron beam evaporation in atmospheres of deuterium and tritium gases. All-metal vacuum systems were used and those used with tritium were dedicated for this processing. Thin film test samples 1000 nm thick were prepared on 1.27 cm diameter molybdenum disk substrates for each occluder (i.e., an element that can react with hydrogen to form a hydride) material. Loading characteristics as determined by gas-to-metal atomic ratios, oxidation characteristics as determined by argon–sputter Auger analysis, film structure as determined by scanning electron microscope analysis, and film stress properties as determined by a double resonator technique were used to define properties of interest. Results showed hydrogen-to-metal atomic ratios varied from 1.5 to 2.0 with near maximum loading for all but Pr and Nd occluders which correlated with the oxidation levels observed, with all occluder oxidation levels being variable due to vacuum system internal processing conditions and the materials used. Surface oxide levels varied from ∼80 Å to over 1000 Å. For most films studied, results showed that a maximum loading ratio of near 2.0 and a minimum surface oxide level of ∼80 Å could be

  1. Production and characterization of thin film group IIIB, IVB and rare earth hydrides by reactive evaporation

    A recent short history of reactive evaporation by D. M. Mattox [History Corner—A Short History of Reactive Evaporation, SVC Bulletin (Society of Vacuum Coaters, Spring 2014), p. 50–51] describes various methods for producing oxides, nitrides, carbides, and some compounds, but hydrides were not mentioned. A study was performed in the mid-1970s at the General Electric Company Neutron Devices Department in Largo, FL, by the author to study preparation of thin film hydrides using reactive evaporation and to determine their unique characteristics and properties. Films were produced of scandium (Sc), yttrium (Y), titanium (Ti), zirconium (Zr), and the rare earth praseodymium (Pr), neodymium (Nd), gadolinium (Gd), dysprosium (Dy), and erbium (Er) hydrides by hot crucible filament and electron beam evaporation in atmospheres of deuterium and tritium gases. All-metal vacuum systems were used and those used with tritium were dedicated for this processing. Thin film test samples 1000 nm thick were prepared on 1.27 cm diameter molybdenum disk substrates for each occluder (i.e., an element that can react with hydrogen to form a hydride) material. Loading characteristics as determined by gas-to-metal atomic ratios, oxidation characteristics as determined by argon–sputter Auger analysis, film structure as determined by scanning electron microscope analysis, and film stress properties as determined by a double resonator technique were used to define properties of interest. Results showed hydrogen-to-metal atomic ratios varied from 1.5 to 2.0 with near maximum loading for all but Pr and Nd occluders which correlated with the oxidation levels observed, with all occluder oxidation levels being variable due to vacuum system internal processing conditions and the materials used. Surface oxide levels varied from ∼80 Å to over 1000 Å. For most films studied, results showed that a maximum loading ratio of near 2.0 and a minimum surface oxide level of ∼80 Å could be

  2. Designing a new highly active liquid evaporator - 16075

    The Highly Active Liquid Effluent Storage (HALES) plant stores, concentrates and conditions Highly Active Liquor (HAL) in evaporators for buffer storage in Highly Active Storage Tanks (HAST). Highly Active (HA) evaporators play a pivotal role in the delivery of reprocessing, historic clean up and hazard reduction missions across the Sellafield site. In addition to the engineering projects implemented to extend the life expectation of the current evaporator fleet, the UK Nuclear Decommissioning Agency (NDA) is sponsoring the construction of a new HA evaporator (Evaporator D) on the Sellafield site. The design and operation of the new HA evaporator is based on existing/recent HA evaporator technology but learning from past operational experience. Operational experience has been a key area where the existing plant operators have influenced both the new design itself and the requirements for commissioning and training. Many of the learning experiences require relatively simple engineering design modifications such as a new internal washing provision and transfer line blockage recovery systems, they are never-the-less expected to significantly improve the flexibility and operational capability of the new evaporator. Issues that the project delivery team has addressed as part of the development of the design and construction have included: - Minimising interruptions and/or changes to the normal operations of interfacing plants during construction, commissioning and operation of the new facility. - Modularization of the plant, enabling fabrication of the majority of the plant equipment off-site within a workshop (as opposed to on-site) environment improving Quality Assurance and reducing on-Site testing needs. - Drawing out the balance between operational and corrosion resistance improvements with actual design and delivery needs. - Provision of a new facility reliant on the infrastructure of an existing and ageing facility and the competing demands of the related safety

  3. Estimating evaporative vapor generation from automobiles based on parking activities

    A new approach is proposed to quantify the evaporative vapor generation based on real parking activity data. As compared to the existing methods, two improvements are applied in this new approach to reduce the uncertainties: First, evaporative vapor generation from diurnal parking events is usually calculated based on estimated average parking duration for the whole fleet, while in this study, vapor generation rate is calculated based on parking activities distribution. Second, rather than using the daily temperature gradient, this study uses hourly temperature observations to derive the hourly incremental vapor generation rates. The parking distribution and hourly incremental vapor generation rates are then adopted with Wade–Reddy's equation to estimate the weighted average evaporative generation. We find that hourly incremental rates can better describe the temporal variations of vapor generation, and the weighted vapor generation rate is 5–8% less than calculation without considering parking activity. - Highlights: • We applied real parking distribution data to estimate evaporative vapor generation. • We applied real hourly temperature data to estimate hourly incremental vapor generation rate. • Evaporative emission for Florence is estimated based on parking distribution and hourly rate. - A new approach is proposed to quantify the weighted evaporative vapor generation based on parking distribution with an hourly incremental vapor generation rate

  4. Concentration by evaporation of low and medium activity radioactive effluents

    Evaporation is one of the radioactive effluent treatments used, enabling a purified distillate to be obtained and giving excellent decontamination factors for all the radionuclides present, if the pH conditions are correctly chosen and in the absence of volatile solvents. SGN has acquired a wide experience in the concentration of radioactive effluents and possesses a specific know-how in the field of droplet abatement and demisting for this application. The report describes the evaporation system optimized for the treatment of low and medium activity effluents, developed by SGN, which includes a special highly performant scrubbing column and, if necessary an additional lamella separator for droplet abatement. It also presents the ACEREN evaporator offered by SGN under CEA licence and based on the principle of a thin film natural evaporation at low temperature, without condensation of vapors

  5. Concentration by evaporation of low and medium activity radioactive effluents

    Evaporation is one of the radioactive effluent treatments used, enabling a purified distillate to be obtained and giving excellent decontamination factors for all the radionuclides present, if the pH conditions are correctly chosen and in the absence of volatile solvents. SGN has acquired a wide experience in the concentration of radioactive effluents and possesses a specific know-how in the field of droplet abatement and demisting for this application. The report describes the evaporation system optimized for the treatment of low and medium activity effluents, developed by SGN, which includes the combination of a special highly performant scrubbing column and a lamella separator for droplet abatement. It also present the ACEREN evaporator offered by SGN under CEA licence and based on the principle of a thin film natural evaporation at low temperature, without condensation of vapours

  6. Realization of PbS thin films by reactive evaporation technique for possible opto-electronic applications

    A, Abhilash; Nair, Aparna S.; S, Rajasree; E, Hiba Rahman; Pradeep, B.

    2015-06-01

    Stoichiometric Lead sulphide (PbS) thin films were successfully prepared on glass substrates by reactive evaporation technique. Elemental evaporation of lead and sulphur taken in different sources onto substrates held at temperature of 400±5K employed in the present study. The structural as well as compositional studies compromises compound formation. Electrical transport properties and optical co-efficient were evaluated from appropriate characterization techniques.

  7. Preparation of Indium Tin Oxide films deposited by reactive evaporation at different substrate-temperature and the properties

    2007-01-01

    The Indium Tin Oxide films have been prepared at different substrate-temperature on glass substrates by reactive evaporation of In-Sn alloy with an oxygen pressure of 1.3 × 10-1 Pa and a deposition rate of 10-2 nm/s. The best ITO films obtained cm2v-1s-1. The influence of the substrate-temperature on the structural, optical and electrical properties of the obtained films has been investigated.

  8. Properties of ZrO2 amd HfO2 coatings obtained by thermal reactive evaporation

    Zirconia (ZrO2) and hafnia (HfO2) were obtained by reactive thermal evaporation with a high deposition rate. Films physical properties were investigated. The layers were deposited onto nickel and also onto NiCoCrAlY-nickel substrates. It was found that this plug layer enhances both oxide adherence and its dielectrical properties, yelding interesting electrical insulation. Elsewhere, X-rays patterns displayed polycrystalline structure. These ceramics were applied in thermal sensors and could be used as corrosion-resistant layers or coating materials. (orig.)

  9. Characterization of Ta{2}O{5} thin films prepared by reactive evaporation

    Asghar, M. H.; Placido, F.; Naseem, S.

    2006-11-01

    Reactively evaporated thin films of tantalum oxide are prepared on glass substrate, using electron beam heating, for optical applications. Firstly, the deposition was carried out at 0.20 nm/s, with substrate temperature of 200 circC, and oxygen flow rate was varied from 0.0 to 30.0 sccm to study the effect of flow rate on optical constants. The optical constants evaluated by using transmission data of the samples, with curve fitting, show a strong dependence on oxygen flow rate. Oxygen flow rate of 10.0 sccm has been found to give reasonably high index (n:2.11 at λ =500 nm) and low absorption of the order of 10-3 in most part of the desired spectrum (380 850 nm). However, for oxygen flow rates below 10.0 sccm and above 20.0 sccm the films have exhibited low index and comparatively high absorption. In the next step, deposition rates were varied from 0.10 0.30 nm/s with steps of 0.01, keeping oxygen flow rate and substrate temperature constant at 10.0 sccm and 200 circC respectively, to optimize the film properties. A variation in refractive index and extinction coefficient values is observed with varying deposition rates. An increase in refractive index (n:2.125 at λ =500 nm) with reduced absorption (“k” of the order of 10-4) is achieved over the entire spectrum for the film deposited at 0.10 nm/s. The film was found to be highly adherent to the substrate as revealed by qualitative adhesive tape peel test. Keeping in view the application of the work, calculation of optical constants was extended up to 1100 nm for the sample deposited at 0.10 nm/s. The results have shown nearly constant optical constant values over the extended range making the film useful over a broad spectral region. AFM studies show that the surface is extremely smooth and compact, giving average and rms roughness values of 5.51 and 7.174 Å respectively, for the studied area of 2.5 μ ×2.5 μ. XRD and SEM studies carried out for structural analysis show that the film is generally amorphous

  10. Cardiovascular Reactivity, Stress, and Physical Activity

    Chun-Jung eHuang

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Psychological stress has been proposed as a major contributor to the progression of cardiovascular disease (CVD. Acute mental stress can activate the sympathetic-adrenal-medullary (SAM axis, eliciting the release of catecholamines (NE and EPI resulting in the elevation of heart rate (HR and blood pressure (BP. Combined stress (psychological and physical can exacerbate these cardiovascular responses, which may partially contribute to the elevated risk of CVD and increased proportionate mortality risks experienced by some occupations (e.g., firefighting and law enforcement. Studies have supported the benefits of physical activity on physiological and psychological health, including the cardiovascular response to acute stress. Aerobically trained individuals exhibit lower sympathetic nervous system (e.g., HR reactivity and enhanced cardiovascular efficiency (e.g., lower vascular reactivity and decreased recovery time in response to physical and/or psychological stress. In addition, resistance training has been demonstrated to attenuate cardiovascular responses and improve mental health. This review will examine stress-induced cardiovascular reactivity and plausible explanations for how exercise training and physical fitness (aerobic and resistance exercise can attenuate cardiovascular responses to stress. This enhanced functionality may facilitate a reduction in the incidence of stroke and myocardial infarction. Finally, this review will also address the interaction of obesity and physical activity on cardiovascular reactivity and CVD.

  11. Structural, electrical and optical properties of thermochromic VO{sub 2} thin films obtained by reactive electron beam evaporation

    Leroy, J.; Bessaudou, A., E-mail: annie.bessaudou@xlim.fr; Cosset, F.; Crunteanu, A.

    2012-05-01

    We present the structural and physical characterization of vanadium dioxide (VO{sub 2}) thin films prepared by reactive electron beam evaporation from a vanadium target under oxygen atmosphere. We correlate the experimental parameters (substrate temperature, oxygen flow) with the films structural properties under a radiofrequency incident power fixed to 50 W. Most of the obtained layers exhibit monocrystalline structures matching that of the monoclinic VO{sub 2} phase. The temperature dependence of the electrical resistivity and optical transmission for the obtained films show that they present thermoelectric and thermochromic properties, with a phase transition temperature around 68 Degree-Sign C. The results show that for specific experimental conditions the VO{sub 2} layers exhibit sharp changes in electrical and optical properties across the phase transition.

  12. Strong pinning in very fast grown reactive co-evaporated GdBa2Cu3O7 coated conductors

    J. L. MacManus-Driscoll

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We report on compositional tuning to create excellent field-performance of Jc in “self-doped,” GdBa2Cu3O7−y (GdBCO coated conductors grown by ultrafast reactive co-evaporation. In order to give excess liquid and Gd2O3, the overall compositions were all Ba-poor and Cu-rich compared to GdBCO. The precise composition was found to be critical to the current carrying performance. The most copper-rich composition had an optimum self-field Jc of 3.2 MA cm−2. A more Gd-rich composition had the best in-field performance because of the formation of low coherence, splayed Gd2O3 nanoparticles, giving Jc (77 K, 1 T of over 1 MA cm−2 and Jc (77 K, 5 T of over 0.1 MA cm−2.

  13. Thin film phosphor materials for future display devices: rare earth doped thin film phosphor grown by reactive evaporation method

    A reactive evaporation system consisting of an electron-beam, a resistive heater, a lamp heater and a gas source was built. Transparent rare earth (RE) doped phosphor thin films have been grown using this system. RE metal were vaporized by electron-beam bombardment and were allowed to react with O2 gas to obtained oxide-based films and SO2 gas to obtain oxysulfide based films. RE dopant was simultaneously supplied from a resistive heated boat containing (RE)Cl3 powder. Photoluminescence together with XRD results show that the samples were crystallized and suggest that the RE3+ ions substitute the cations in the host lattices and form good luminescence centers. (Author)

  14. Plasma synthesis of titanium nitride, carbide and carbonitride nanoparticles by means of reactive anodic arc evaporation from solid titanium

    Plasma methods using the direct evaporation of a transition metal are well suited for the cost-efficient production of ceramic nanoparticles. In this paper, we report on the development of a simple setup for the production of titanium-ceramics by reactive anodic arc evaporation and the characterization of the aerosol as well as the nanopowder. It is the first report on TiCXN1 − X synthesis in a simple anodic arc plasma. By means of extensive variations of the gas composition, it is shown that the composition of the particles can be tuned from titanium nitride over a titanium carbonitride phase (TiCXN1 − X) to titanium carbide as proven by XRD data. The composition of the plasma gas especially a very low concentration of hydrocarbons around 0.2 % of the total plasma gas is crucial to tune the composition and to avoid the formation of free carbon. Examination of the particles by HR-TEM shows that the material consists mostly of cubic single crystalline particles with mean sizes between 8 and 27 nm

  15. YBCO films grown by reactive co-evaporation on simplified IBAD-MgO coated conductor templates

    We demonstrate coated conductors fabricated by reactive co-evaporation of YBa2Cu3Oy (YBCO) by cyclic deposition and reaction (RCE-CDR) on ion-beam-assisted-deposition- (IBAD-) textured templates simplified by the elimination of the epitaxial buffer layer. Hastelloy substrates, both polished and unpolished, were used as a starting material for the IBAD templates. Y2O3 bed layers were then deposited followed by IBAD-textured MgO and a thin homoepitaxial MgO layer. The MgO-terminated templates were used for direct deposition of YBCO by RCE-CDR. Critical current densities obtained for the undoped YBCO material are comparable to the best values measured previously with the use of LaMnO3 or SrTiO3 epitaxial buffer layers and state-of-the-art coated conductor results. The structural characterization data indicate a well oriented YBCO film with a robust template. Electrical measurements also indicate no weak links and a typical magnetic field behavior of undoped YBCO, characterized by a low density of naturally occurring strong pinning centers and correlations along the ab direction.

  16. Measuring low radium activity concentration in water with RAD7 by means of evaporation

    Kappke, Jaqueline; Marussig, Camila G.T.; Paschuk, Sergei; Zambianchi Junior, Pedro; Correa, Janine N.; Perna, Allan Felipe Nunes; Martin, Aline, E-mail: jaquelinekappke@gmail.com, E-mail: mila_garciatb@hotmail.com, E-mail: spaschuk@gmail.com, E-mail: zambianchi@utfpr.edu.br, E-mail: janine_nicolosi@hotmail.com, E-mail: allan_perna@hotmail.com, E-mail: nocamartin@hotmail.com [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Preliminary activity measurements of low radium concentration in mineral water by using RAD7 equipment showed high values of statistical errors. Therefore, the need to develop a new protocol for measuring and proofing the evaporation test for radium measurements in water is in place. This study evaluates the possibility of using RAD7 equipment to measure Ra-226 activity in equilibrium with Rn-222 present in water samples. The technique involves evaporation process so as to increase the Ra-226 concentration in the sample in a controlled manner and thus reduce statistical errors. Two samples were compared, 10 L sample of distilled water and a 7.75 L sample of known concentration (0.1 Bq/L). The evaporation was carried out starting with different initial volumes for both samples: 500 mL, 1000 mL, 2000 mL, 4000 mL and a 250 mL sample not subject to evaporation. All samples reached a final volume of approximately 250 mL. After evaporation, the samples were stored for 30 days until secular equilibrium was achieved between Ra-226 and Rn-222. The values obtained, by using RAD7 detector, for distilled water, as expected, are near zero averaging 0.021 ± 0.016 Bq/L. The average value found in the water of known concentration was 0.099 ± 0.011 Bq/L, also close to the expected 0.1 Bq/L. The conclusion is that the application of an evaporation process is efficient and the proposed methodology is a proven alternative to decrease the statistical errors. (author)

  17. Measuring low radium activity concentration in water with RAD7 by means of evaporation

    Preliminary activity measurements of low radium concentration in mineral water by using RAD7 equipment showed high values of statistical errors. Therefore, the need to develop a new protocol for measuring and proofing the evaporation test for radium measurements in water is in place. This study evaluates the possibility of using RAD7 equipment to measure Ra-226 activity in equilibrium with Rn-222 present in water samples. The technique involves evaporation process so as to increase the Ra-226 concentration in the sample in a controlled manner and thus reduce statistical errors. Two samples were compared, 10 L sample of distilled water and a 7.75 L sample of known concentration (0.1 Bq/L). The evaporation was carried out starting with different initial volumes for both samples: 500 mL, 1000 mL, 2000 mL, 4000 mL and a 250 mL sample not subject to evaporation. All samples reached a final volume of approximately 250 mL. After evaporation, the samples were stored for 30 days until secular equilibrium was achieved between Ra-226 and Rn-222. The values obtained, by using RAD7 detector, for distilled water, as expected, are near zero averaging 0.021 ± 0.016 Bq/L. The average value found in the water of known concentration was 0.099 ± 0.011 Bq/L, also close to the expected 0.1 Bq/L. The conclusion is that the application of an evaporation process is efficient and the proposed methodology is a proven alternative to decrease the statistical errors. (author)

  18. Leakage of high active liquid waste into the thermowell of HALW evaporator (2/4). Investigation of the causes

    Leakage of high active liquid waste into the thermowell of High Active Liquid Waste (HALW) Evaporator was confirmed when thermometer were replacement in Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant. We estimated that the cause of leakage was tunnel corrosion at the bottom cap of the thermowell due to high temperature at the bottom of the evaporator. This paper deals with the investigation of causes. (author)

  19. Autonomous Active and Reactive Power Distribution Strategy in Islanded Microgrids

    Wu, Dan; Tang, Fen; Guerrero, Josep M.; Vasquez, Juan Carlos; Chen, Guoliang; Sun, Libing

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes an autonomous active and reactive power distribution strategy that can be applied directly on current control mode (CCM) inverters, being compatible as well with conventional droop-controlled voltage control mode (VCM) converters. In a microgrid, since renewable energy sources (RES) units regulate different active power, the proposed reactive power distribution is adaptively controlled according to the active power distribution among energy storage systems (ESS) and RES un...

  20. Autonomous Active and Reactive Power Distribution Strategy in Islanded Microgrids

    Wu, Dan; Tang, Fen; Guerrero, Josep M.;

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes an autonomous active and reactive power distribution strategy that can be applied directly on current control mode (CCM) inverters, being compatible as well with conventional droop-controlled voltage control mode (VCM) converters. In a microgrid, since renewable energy sources...... (RES) units regulate different active power, the proposed reactive power distribution is adaptively controlled according to the active power distribution among energy storage systems (ESS) and RES units. The virtual impedance is implemented in order to improve the reactive power sharing in a...... distributed way. Real-time hardware-in-the-loop results are presented to verify the proposed control strategy....

  1. Laboratory Evaporation Testing Of Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Low Activity Waste Off-Gas Condensate Simulant

    Adamson, Duane J.; Nash, Charles A.; McCabe, Daniel J.; Crawford, Charles L.; Wilmarth, William R.

    2014-01-27

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream, LAW Off-Gas Condensate, from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility again. Alternate disposition of this stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would enable de-coupled operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Eliminating this stream from recycling within WTP would also decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of canistered glass waste forms. This LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream contains components that are volatile at melter temperatures and are problematic for the glass waste form. Because this stream recycles within WTP, these components accumulate in the Condensate stream, exacerbating their impact on the number of LAW glass containers that must be produced. Approximately 32% of the sodium in Supplemental LAW comes from glass formers used to make the extra glass to dilute the halides to be within acceptable concentration ranges in the LAW glass. Diverting the stream reduces the halides in the recycled Condensate and is a key outcome of this work. Additionally, under possible scenarios where the LAW vitrification facility commences operation prior to the WTP Pretreatment facility, identifying a disposition path becomes vitally important. This task examines the impact of potential future disposition of this stream in the Hanford tank farms, and investigates auxiliary evaporation to enable another disposition path. Unless an auxiliary evaporator is used, returning the stream to the tank farms would require evaporation in the 242-A evaporator. This stream is expected to be unusual because it will be very high in corrosive species that are volatile in the melter

  2. Laboratory Evaporation Testing Of Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Low Activity Waste Off-Gas Condensate Simulant

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream, LAW Off-Gas Condensate, from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility again. Alternate disposition of this stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would enable de-coupled operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Eliminating this stream from recycling within WTP would also decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of canistered glass waste forms. This LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream contains components that are volatile at melter temperatures and are problematic for the glass waste form. Because this stream recycles within WTP, these components accumulate in the Condensate stream, exacerbating their impact on the number of LAW glass containers that must be produced. Approximately 32% of the sodium in Supplemental LAW comes from glass formers used to make the extra glass to dilute the halides to be within acceptable concentration ranges in the LAW glass. Diverting the stream reduces the halides in the recycled Condensate and is a key outcome of this work. Additionally, under possible scenarios where the LAW vitrification facility commences operation prior to the WTP Pretreatment facility, identifying a disposition path becomes vitally important. This task examines the impact of potential future disposition of this stream in the Hanford tank farms, and investigates auxiliary evaporation to enable another disposition path. Unless an auxiliary evaporator is used, returning the stream to the tank farms would require evaporation in the 242-A evaporator. This stream is expected to be unusual because it will be very high in corrosive species that are volatile in the melter

  3. Leakage of high active liquid waste into the thermowell of HALW evaporator (3/4). Causes of the high temperature at the bottom of high active liquid waste evaporator and countermeasures

    Cause of High Active Liquid Waste (HALW) leakage was estimated as a local corrosion due to high temperature at the bottom of the evaporator. Therefore, we investigated the cause of high bottom temperature and its countermeasures. (author)

  4. Active and reactive power in stochastic resonance for energy harvesting

    Kubota, Madoka; Takahashi, Ryo(Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Shimane University, Matsue, 690-8504, Japan); Hikihara, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    A power allocation to active and reactive power in stochastic resonance is discussed for energy harvesting from mechanical noise. It is confirmed that active power can be increased at stochastic resonance, in the same way of the relationship between energy and phase at an appropriate setting in resonance.

  5. C-Reactive Protein Activates Complement in Infarcted Human Myocardium

    Nijmeijer, Remco; Lagrand, Wim K.; Lubbers, Yvonne T. P.; Visser, Cees A.; Meijer, Chris J.L.M.; Niessen, Hans W. M.; Hack, C. Erik

    2003-01-01

    Circulating levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) constitute a cardiovascular risk marker. Immunohistochemical studies have revealed co-localization of CRP and activated complement in human infarcted myocardium suggesting CRP to enhance inflammation in ischemic myocardium by inducing local complement activation. The aim was to establish whether CRP activates complement in infarcted human myocardium and to assess the relationship between this activation and the duration of infarction. Myocardial ...

  6. Leakage of high active liquid waste into the thermowell of HALW evaporator (4/4). Repair work for leakage prevention

    Leakage of high active liquid waste into the thermowell of High Active Liquid Waste (HALW) Evaporator was confirmed when thermometers were replaced in Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant. We estimate that the cause of the leakage is tunnel corrosion at the bottom cap of the thermowell due to high temperature at the bottom of the evaporator. This paper deals with the repair work for the leakage prevention. (author)

  7. Properties of annealed indium-rich In sub 2 O sub 3 film deposited by plasma enhanced reactive evaporation (PERE) technique

    Indium rich In sub 3 O sub 3 film is grown by plasma enhanced reactive evaporation (PERE) technique. The film is deposited onto glass and silicon substrate at ∼ 300 degree C. The flowrates of N sub 2 O in He as the reacting gases are 47.65 sccm and 11.65 sccm respectively. Film thicknesses of ∼ 5000 A are obtained, as measured from Tolansky and ellipsometric methods. The optical, electrical and structural properties of the film are studied at different annealing temperatures in the 100 degree C to 500 degree C range in oxygen for one hour. The refractive index calculated at a wavelength of 632.8 nm is measured by 4-point probe, is ∼ 20 Ω/□. The structure of the film as illustrated from XRD analysis shows predominant (110) In and (222) In sub 2 O sub 3 peaks, where the former decreases with increasing annealing temperatures

  8. Cardiovascular reactivity, stress, and physical activity

    Chun-Jung eHuang; Webb, Heather E.; Zourdos, Michael C.; Acevedo, Edmund O.

    2013-01-01

    Psychological stress has been proposed as a major contributor to the progression of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Acute mental stress can activate the sympathetic-adrenal-medullary (SAM) axis, eliciting the release of catecholamines (NE and EPI) resulting in the elevation of heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP). Combined stress (psychological and physical) can exacerbate these cardiovascular responses, which may partially contribute to the elevated risk of CVD and increased proportionate...

  9. Adaptive Compensation of Reactive Power With Shunt Active Power Filters

    Blaabjerg, Frede; Asiminoaei, Lucian; Hansen, Steffan;

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes an adaptive method for compensating the reactive power with an active power filter (APF), which is initially rated for mitigation of only the harmonic currents given by a nonlinear industrial load. It is proven that, if the harmonic currents do not load the APF at the rated...

  10. Re-activation characteristics of preserved aerobic granular sludge

    ZHANG Li-li; ZHANG Bo; HUANG Yu-feng; CAI Wei-min

    2005-01-01

    In some industrial plants, wastewater was intermittently or seasonally generated. There may be periods during which wastewater treatment facilities have to be set into an idle phase over several weeks. When wastewater was generated again, the activated sludge flocs may have disintegrated. In this experiment, re-activation characteristics of aerobic granular sludge starved for 2 months were investigated.Specific oxygen utilization rate(SOUR) was used as an indicator to evaluate the metabolic activity of the sludge. The results revealed that aerobic granular sludge could be stored up to two months without running the risk of losing the integrity of the granules and metabolic potentials. The apparent color of aerobic granules stored at room temperature gradually turned from brownish-yellowish to gray brown.They appeared brownish-yellowish again 2 weeks after re-activation. The velocity and strength of granules after 2-month idle period could achieved. A stable effluent COD concentration of less than 150 mg/L was achieved during the re-activation process.

  11. Redox-active media for permeable reactive barriers

    In this paper, three classes of redox-active media are described and evaluated in terms of their long-term effectiveness in treating TCE-contaminated groundwater in permeable reactive zones. Zero-valent iron, in the form of recycled cast iron filings, the first class, has received considerable attention as a reactive media and has been used in about a dozen pilot- and full-scale subsurface wall installations. Criteria used in selecting commercial sources of granular iron, will be discussed. Two other classes of redox-active media that have not yet seen wide use in pilot- or full-scale installations will also be described: Fe(II) minerals and bimetallic systems. Fe(II) minerals, including magnetite (Fe3O4), and ferrous sulfide (troilite, FeS), are redox-active and afford TCE reduction rates and product distributions that suggest that they react via a reductive mechanism similar to that which operates in the FeO system. Fe(II) species within the passive oxide layer coating the iron metal may act as electron transfer mediators, with FeO serving as the bulk reductant. Bimetallic systems, the third class of redox-active media, are commonly prepared by plating a second metal onto zero-valent iron (e.g., Ni/Fe and Pd/Fe) and have been shown to accelerate solvent degradation rates relative to untreated iron metal. The long-term effectiveness of this approach, however, has not yet been determined in groundwater treatability tests. The results of a Ni-plated iron column study using site groundwater indicate that a change in reduction mechanism (to catalytic dehydrohalogenation/hydrogenation) accounts for the observed rate enhancement. A significant loss in media reactivity was observed over time, attributable to Ni catalyst deactivation or poisoning. Zero-valent iron systems have not shown similar losses in reactivity in long-term laboratory, pilot or field investigations

  12. Anticipating Human Activities Using Object Affordances for Reactive Robotic Response.

    Koppula, Hema S; Saxena, Ashutosh

    2016-01-01

    An important aspect of human perception is anticipation, which we use extensively in our day-to-day activities when interacting with other humans as well as with our surroundings. Anticipating which activities will a human do next (and how) can enable an assistive robot to plan ahead for reactive responses. Furthermore, anticipation can even improve the detection accuracy of past activities. The challenge, however, is two-fold: We need to capture the rich context for modeling the activities and object affordances, and we need to anticipate the distribution over a large space of future human activities. In this work, we represent each possible future using an anticipatory temporal conditional random field (ATCRF) that models the rich spatial-temporal relations through object affordances. We then consider each ATCRF as a particle and represent the distribution over the potential futures using a set of particles. In extensive evaluation on CAD-120 human activity RGB-D dataset, we first show that anticipation improves the state-of-the-art detection results. We then show that for new subjects (not seen in the training set), we obtain an activity anticipation accuracy (defined as whether one of top three predictions actually happened) of 84.1, 74.4 and 62.2 percent for an anticipation time of 1, 3 and 10 seconds respectively. Finally, we also show a robot using our algorithm for performing a few reactive responses. PMID:26656575

  13. Characterization of thin films of a-SiOx (1.1reactive evaporation of SiO

    Thin films of a-SiOx with values of x ranging from 1.13 to 1.89 were prepared by reactive evaporation of SiO in a controlled oxygen environment. The oxygen pressure in the deposition chamber was varied so as to obtain films with different values of x. The films were studied by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and optical spectrophotometry. An attempt was made to analyse the Si 2p core-level spectra in terms of five chemically shifted components corresponding to basic Si bonding units Si-(Si4-nOn) with n 0,1,...,4. The concentration of these bonding units as a function of oxygen concentration was in reasonable agreement with the random-bonding model, with the exception that the Si-(Si3O) component was almost completely suppressed for all stoichiometries. Films with x2) as the values of x increase. For the films with the largest value of x (= 1.89), the refractive index is smaller than that of fused silica. The density of these films was estimated to be smaller than that of fused silica by about 13%

  14. Characterization of thin films of a-SiO{sub x} (1.1reactive evaporation of SiO

    Durrani, S M A [Centre for Applied Physical Sciences, Research Institute, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Al-Kuhaili, M F [Physics Department, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Khawaja, E E [Centre for Applied Physical Sciences, Research Institute, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)

    2003-12-03

    Thin films of a-SiO{sub x} with values of x ranging from 1.13 to 1.89 were prepared by reactive evaporation of SiO in a controlled oxygen environment. The oxygen pressure in the deposition chamber was varied so as to obtain films with different values of x. The films were studied by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and optical spectrophotometry. An attempt was made to analyse the Si 2p core-level spectra in terms of five chemically shifted components corresponding to basic Si bonding units Si-(Si{sub 4-n}O{sub n}) with n 0,1,...,4. The concentration of these bonding units as a function of oxygen concentration was in reasonable agreement with the random-bonding model, with the exception that the Si-(Si{sub 3}O) component was almost completely suppressed for all stoichiometries. Films with x<1.65 consisted of elemental Si and oxides of silicon, while those with x {>=} 1.65 were almost free of Si. Films containing Si have higher refractive indices and degrees of absorption in the visible region compared with those which were free of Si. The optical properties of the films approach those of fused silica (SiO{sub 2}) as the values of x increase. For the films with the largest value of x (= 1.89), the refractive index is smaller than that of fused silica. The density of these films was estimated to be smaller than that of fused silica by about 13%.

  15. Spectroscopic investigations of Cr, CrN and TiCr anti-multipactor coatings grown by cathodic-arc reactive evaporation

    Cr, CrN, TiCr coatings have been investigated as potential anti-multipactor coatings. The coatings were synthesized by cathodic-arc reactive evaporation in Ar-N2 atmosphere where the ion energy is controlled by substrate biasing. Chemical state analysis and surface composition were studied by X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS), whereas bulk composition and depth profile were studied by glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GDOES). The surface morphology was studied by optical profilometry (OP) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The compositions of the coatings were CrN and Ti40Cr60 and they were homogeneous in depth. Surface oxidation was higher in Ti40Cr60 than in CrN. Coatings deposited at high negative bias show lower deposition rate and had lower surface roughness than those obtained at low bias. Secondary electron emission yield (SEY) was higher for CrN than for Ti40Cr60, both before and after low-energy Ar+ ion bombardment. The SEY of Ti40Cr60 (1.17 maximum) was clearly smaller than the others. The maximum yield, σ m, and the first crossover electron energy, E 1, are the most important parameters, and (E 1/σ m)1/2 is a good figure of merit. This quantity was approximately 3 eV1/2 for Cr and CrN and 4 eV1/2 for Ti40Cr. After Ar+ ion bombardment, the average value improved significantly to 8.9 eV1/2 for Cr and CrN and 10.2 eV1/2 for Ti40Cr60. The radio-frequency multipactor performance of these materials was simulated using the experimentally determined SEY parameters

  16. Physical activity and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein.

    Plaisance, Eric P; Grandjean, Peter W

    2006-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains one of the leading causes of death and disability in developed countries around the world despite the documented success of lifestyle and pharmacological interventions. This illustrates the multifactorial nature of atherosclerosis and the use of novel inflammatory markers as an adjunct to risk factor reduction strategies. As evidence continues to accumulate that inflammation is involved in all stages of the development and progression of atherosclerosis, markers of inflammation such as high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP) may provide additional information regarding the biological status of the atherosclerotic lesion. Recent investigations suggest that physical activity reduces CRP levels. Higher levels of physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness are consistently associated with 6-35% lower CRP levels. Longitudinal training studies that have demonstrated reductions in CRP concentrations range from 16% to 41%, an effect that may be independent of baseline levels of CRP, body composition or weight loss. The average change in CRP associated with physical activity appears to be at least as good, if not better, than currently prescribed pharmacological interventions in similar populations. The primary purpose of this review will be to present evidence from both cross-sectional and longitudinal investigations that physical activity lowers CRP levels in a dose-response manner. Finally, this review will examine factors such as body composition, sex, blood sample timing, diet and smoking, which may influence the CRP response to physical activity. PMID:16646631

  17. Flavonoids: Hemisynthesis, Reactivity, Characterization and Free Radical Scavenging Activity

    Paul Henri Ducrot

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Phenolic compounds form one of the main classes of secondary metabolites. They display a large range of structures and they are responsible for the major organoleptic characteristics of plant-derived-foods and beverages, particularly color and taste properties and they also contribute to the nutritional qualities of fruits and vegetables. Phenolic compounds are also highly unstable compounds which undergo numerous enzymatic and chemical reactions during postharvest food storage and processing thus adding to the complexity of plant polyphenol composition. Among these compounds flavonoids constitute one of the most ubiquitous groups of all plant phenolics. Owing to their importance in food organoleptic properties and in human health, a better understanding of their structures, their reactivity and chemical properties in addition to the mechanisms generating them appears essential to predict and control food quality. The purpose of this work is an overview of our findings concerning the hemisynthesis, the reactivity and the enzymatic oxidation of some flavonoids and shed light on the mechanisms involved in some of these processes and the structures of the resulting products. The free radical scavenging activity of some of the synthesized compounds is also presented and a structure-activity relationship is discussed. The first part of this review concerns the synthesis and structural characterization of modified monomeric flavanols. The use of these compounds as precursor for the preparation of natural and modified dimeric procyanidin derivatives was then explored through different coupling reactions. The full characterization of the synthesized compounds was achieved by concerted use of NMR and ESI-MS techniques. The free radical scavenging activity of some of the synthesized compounds was investigated. The second part of this review concerns the enzymatic oxidation of several flavonols by Trametes versicolor laccase. Most of the major oxidation

  18. On Variable Reverse Power Flow-Part I: Active-Reactive Optimal Power Flow with Reactive Power of Wind Stations

    Aouss Gabash

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available It has recently been shown that using battery storage systems (BSSs to provide reactive power provision in a medium-voltage (MV active distribution network (ADN with embedded wind stations (WSs can lead to a huge amount of reverse power to an upstream transmission network (TN. However, unity power factors (PFs of WSs were assumed in those studies to analyze the potential of BSSs. Therefore, in this paper (Part-I, we aim to further explore the pure reactive power potential of WSs (i.e., without BSSs by investigating the issue of variable reverse power flow under different limits on PFs in an electricity market model. The main contributions of this work are summarized as follows: (1 Introducing the reactive power capability of WSs in the optimization model of the active-reactive optimal power flow (A-R-OPF and highlighting the benefits/impacts under different limits on PFs. (2 Investigating the impacts of different agreements for variable reverse power flow on the operation of an ADN under different demand scenarios. (3 Derivation of the function of reactive energy losses in the grid with an equivalent-π circuit and comparing its value with active energy losses. (4 Balancing the energy curtailment of wind generation, active-reactive energy losses in the grid and active-reactive energy import-export by a meter-based method. In Part-II, the potential of the developed model is studied through analyzing an electricity market model and a 41-bus network with different locations of WSs.

  19. Evaluation of cooling performance of thermally activated building system with evaporative cooling source for typical United States climates

    Feng, Jingjuan; Bauman, Fred

    2013-01-01

    Thermally activated building systems (TABS) are gaining popularity as a potentially energy efficient strategy for conditioning buildings. These systems can use large surfaces for heat exchange, and the temperature of the cooling water can be only a few degrees lower than the room air temperature. This small temperature difference allows the use of alternative cooling sources, for example, indirect/direct evaporative cooling, to possibly eliminate refrigerant cooling to reduce energy consumpti...

  20. Enhanced reactivity of mechanically-activated nano-scale gasless reactive materials consolidated via the cold-spray technique

    Bacciochini, Antoine; Radulescu, Matei; Meydanoglu, Onur; Charron-Tousignant, Yannick; van Dyke, Jason; Jodoin, Bertrand; Nganbe, Michel; Yandouzi, Mohamed; Lee, Julian J.

    2011-06-01

    It has been speculated that gasless reactive systems can sustain supersonic detonations waves, provided the local decomposition rate is sufficiently fast and the initial density is sufficiently close to the theoretical maximal density. The present study presents a novel method to prepare nano-scale energetic materials with high reactivity, vanishing porosity, structural integrity and arbitrary shape. The experiments have focused on the Ni-Al system. To increase the reactivity, an initial mechanical activation was achieved by the technique of ball milling. The consolidation of the materials used the supersonic cold gas spray technique, where the particles are accelerated to high speeds and consolidated via plastic deformation upon impact, forming activated nano-composites in arbitrary shapes with close to zero porosity. This technique permits to retain the micro-structures in the powders and prevents any reactions during the consolidation phase. Deflagration tests of the obtained samples showed an increase in the deflagration rate by up to two orders of magnitude.

  1. Catalytic Role Of Palladium And Relative Reactivity Of Substituted Chlorines During Adsorption And Treatment Of PCBs On Reactive Activated Carbon

    The adsorption-mediated dechlorination of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) is a unique feature of reactive activated cabon (RAC). Here, we address the RAC system, containing a tunable amount of Fe as a primary electron donor coupled with Pd as an electrochemical catalyst to pote...

  2. Enhanced capacitive properties of commercial activated carbon by re-activation in molten carbonates

    Lu, Beihu; Xiao, Zuoan; Zhu, Hua; Xiao, Wei; Wu, Wenlong; Wang, Dihua

    2015-12-01

    Simple, affordable and green methods to improve capacitive properties of commercial activated carbon (AC) are intriguing since ACs possess a predominant role in the commercial supercapacitor market. Herein, we report a green reactivation of commercial ACs by soaking ACs in molten Na2CO3-K2CO3 (equal in mass ratios) at 850 °C combining the merits of both physical and chemical activation strategies. The mechanism of molten carbonate treatment and structure-capacitive activity correlations of the ACs are rationalized. Characterizations show that the molten carbonate treatment increases the electrical conductivity of AC without compromising its porosity and wettability of electrolytes. Electrochemical tests show the treated AC exhibited higher specific capacitance, enhanced high-rate capability and excellent cycle performance, promising its practical application in supercapacitors. The present study confirms that the molten carbonate reactivation is a green and effective method to enhance capacitive properties of ACs.

  3. Flash evaporator systems test

    Dietz, J. B.

    1976-01-01

    A flash evaporator heat rejection system representative of that proposed for the space shuttle orbiter underwent extensive system testing at the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) to determine its operational suitability and to establish system performance/operational characteristics for use in the shuttle system. During the tests the evaporator system demonstrated its suitability to meet the shuttle requirements by: (1) efficient operation with 90 to 95% water evaporation efficiency, (2) control of outlet temperature to 40 + or - 2 F for partial heat load operation, (3) stability of control system for rapid changes in Freon inlet temperature, and (4) repeated dormant-to-active device operation without any startup procedures.

  4. Active and reactive power control of a current-source PWM-rectifier using space vectors

    Salo, M.; Tuusa, H. [Tampere University of Technology (Finland). Department of Electrical Engineering, Power Electronics

    1997-12-31

    In this paper the current-source PWM-rectifier with active and reactive power control is presented. The control system is realized using space vector methods. Also, compensation of the reactive power drawn by the line filter is discussed. Some simulation results are shown. (orig.) 8 refs.

  5. Enhanced electrocatalytic activity of vacuum thermal evaporated CuxS counter electrode for quantum dot-sensitized solar cells

    Highlights: • Vacuum thermal evaporation (VTE) is used to fabricate CuxS counter electrode (CE). • QDSCs with VTE-CuxS CEs show a high efficiency of 3.16 ± 0.05% under one sun. • The electrocatalytic activity of VTE-CuxS CE is higher than Pt and Brass-Cu2S CEs. • VTE-CuxS CE exhibits good stability in polysulfide electrolyte. - Abstract: Vacuum thermal evaporated CuxS (VTE-CuxS) film on fluorine-doped tin oxide substrate has been investigated as counter electrode (CE) for quantum dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSCs) with polysulfide electrolyte. The photovoltaic parameters of QDSCs show an obvious dependence on the annealing time of CuxS film, and the maximum power conversion efficiency of 3.16 ± 0.05% under one sun illumination (100 mW cm−2, AM 1.5 G) was obtained when the VTE-CuxS CE was annealed at 270 °C for 300 s (VTE-CuxS-300s CE). Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, Tafel polarization, and cyclic voltammetry measurements have been employed to investigate the electrocatalytic activity of VTE-CuxS-300s CE. The electrocatalytic activity of the VTE-CuxS-300s CE is much higher than that of Pt CE, and is slightly higher than that of Cu2S CE in situ prepared on brass sheet. In particular, VTE-CuxS-300s CE holds high diffusion velocity of S2−/Sn2− in polysulfide electrolyte, and the stability of its electrocatalytic activity in polysulfide electrolyte is better than that of Pt and Brass-Cu2S CEs obviously

  6. Evaporating firewalls

    Van Raamsdonk, Mark

    2014-11-01

    In this note, we begin by presenting an argument suggesting that large AdS black holes dual to typical high-energy pure states of a single holographic CFT must have some structure at the horizon, i.e. a fuzzball/firewall, unless the procedure to probe physics behind the horizon is state-dependent. By weakly coupling the CFT to an auxiliary system, such a black hole can be made to evaporate. In a case where the auxiliary system is a second identical CFT, it is possible (for specific initial states) that the system evolves to precisely the thermofield double state as the original black hole evaporates. In this case, the dual geometry should include the "late-time" part of the eternal AdS black hole spacetime which includes smooth spacetime behind the horizon of the original black hole. Thus, if a firewall is present initially, it evaporates. This provides a specific realization of the recent ideas of Maldacena and Susskind that the existence of smooth spacetime behind the horizon of an evaporating black hole can be enabled by maximal entanglement with a Hawking radiation system (in our case the second CFT) rather than prevented by it. For initial states which are not finely-tuned to produce the thermofield double state, the question of whether a late-time infalling observer experiences a firewall translates to a question about the gravity dual of a typical high-energy state of a two-CFT system.

  7. DMPD: NF-kappaB activation by reactive oxygen species: fifteen years later. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Full Text Available 16723122 NF-kappaB activation by reactive oxygen species: fifteen years later. Gloi...svg) (.html) (.csml) Show NF-kappaB activation by reactive oxygen species: fifteen years later. PubmedID 167...23122 Title NF-kappaB activation by reactive oxygen species: fifteen years later.

  8. Superior decoupled control of active and reactive power for three-phase voltage source converters

    RAHBARIMAGHAM, HESAM; AMIRI, ERFAN MAALI; VAHIDI, Behrooz; GHAREHPETIAN, GEVORG BABAMALEK; Abedi, Mehrdad

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an active-reactive power control strategy for voltage source converters (VSCs) based on derivation of the direct and quadrature components of the VSC output current. The proposed method utilizes a multivariable proportional-integral controller and provides almost completely decoupled control capability of the active and reactive power with almost full disturbance rejection due to step changes in the power exchanged between the VSC and the grid. It also imposes fast transie...

  9. 242-A evaporator hazards assessment

    This document establishes the technical basis in support of Emergency Planning activities for the 242-A Evaporator, on the Hanford Site. Through this document the technical basis for the development of facility specific Emergency Action Levels and the Emergency Planning Zone is demonstrated. The evaporator sues a conventional, forced-circulation, vacuum evaporation system to concentrate radioactive waste solutions. This concentration results in the reduction in waste volume and reduces the number of double-shelled tanks required to store the waste

  10. Group evaporation

    Shen, Hayley H.

    1991-01-01

    Liquid fuel combustion process is greatly affected by the rate of droplet evaporation. The heat and mass exchanges between gas and liquid couple the dynamics of both phases in all aspects: mass, momentum, and energy. Correct prediction of the evaporation rate is therefore a key issue in engineering design of liquid combustion devices. Current analytical tools for characterizing the behavior of these devices are based on results from a single isolated droplet. Numerous experimental studies have challenged the applicability of these results in a dense spray. To account for the droplets' interaction in a dense spray, a number of theories have been developed in the past decade. Herein, two tasks are examined. One was to study how to implement the existing theoretical results, and the other was to explore the possibility of experimental verifications. The current theoretical results of group evaporation are given for a monodispersed cluster subject to adiabatic conditions. The time evolution of the fluid mechanic and thermodynamic behavior in this cluster is derived. The results given are not in the form of a subscale model for CFD codes.

  11. Developing mononuclear copper-active-oxygen complexes relevant to reactive intermediates of biological oxidation reactions.

    Itoh, Shinobu

    2015-07-21

    Active-oxygen species generated on a copper complex play vital roles in several biological and chemical oxidation reactions. Recent attention has been focused on the reactive intermediates generated at the mononuclear copper active sites of copper monooxygenases such as dopamine β-monooxygenase (DβM), tyramine β-monooxygenase (TβM), peptidylglycine-α-hydroxylating monooxygenase (PHM), and polysaccharide monooxygenases (PMO). In a simple model system, reaction of O2 and a reduced copper(I) complex affords a mononuclear copper(II)-superoxide complex or a copper(III)-peroxide complex, and subsequent H(•) or e(-)/H(+) transfer, which gives a copper(II)-hydroperoxide complex. A more reactive species such as a copper(II)-oxyl radical type species could be generated via O-O bond cleavage of the peroxide complex. However, little had been explored about the chemical properties and reactivity of the mononuclear copper-active-oxygen complexes due to the lack of appropriate model compounds. Thus, a great deal of effort has recently been made to develop efficient ligands that can stabilize such reactive active-oxygen complexes in synthetic modeling studies. In this Account, I describe our recent achievements of the development of a mononuclear copper(II)-(end-on)superoxide complex using a simple tridentate ligand consisting of an eight-membered cyclic diamine with a pyridylethyl donor group. The superoxide complex exhibits a similar structure (four-coordinate tetrahedral geometry) and reactivity (aliphatic hydroxylation) to those of a proposed reactive intermediate of copper monooxygenases. Systematic studies based on the crystal structures of copper(I) and copper(II) complexes of the related tridentate supporting ligands have indicated that the rigid eight-membered cyclic diamine framework is crucial for controlling the geometry and the redox potential, which are prerequisites for the generation of such a unique mononuclear copper(II)-(end-on)superoxide complex

  12. Pattern reactivation co-varies with activity in the core recollection network during source memory.

    Leiker, Emily K; Johnson, Jeffrey D

    2015-08-01

    Neuroimaging studies of episodic memory have consistently demonstrated that memory retrieval involves reactivating patterns of neural activity that were present during encoding, and these effects are thought to reflect the qualitative retrieval (recollection) of information that is specific to the content of an episode. By contrast, recollection is also accompanied by other neural correlates that generalize across episodic content and are consequently referred to as the "core recollection network". The neural mechanism by which these specific and core effects interact to give rise to episodic memory retrieval is largely unknown. The current study addressed this issue by testing for correlations (connectivity) between pattern reactivation and activity in the core recollection network. Subjects encoded a series of words with different tasks and then completed a two-step source memory test, whereby they identified the task (source) previously associated with the word and the confidence of that judgment. Multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA) was used in combination with fMRI to first identify encoding-related neural patterns and then test for their reactivation during retrieval. Consistent with prior findings, the magnitude of reactivation increased with source-memory confidence. Moreover, individual-trial measures of reactivation exhibited positive correlations with activity in multiple regions of the core recollection network. Importantly, evidence of functional connectivity between pattern reactivation and a region of left posterior parietal cortex supports the role of this region in tracking the retrieval of episodic information in service of making subjective memory decisions. PMID:26004057

  13. Production of active lysozyme films by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation at 355 nm

    Purice, Andreea; Schou, Jørgen; Kingshott, P.; Dinescu, M.

    decomposition and the protein activity is preserved. The film deposition rate for 1 wt% lysozyme shows a clear maximum of about 1 ng/cm(2) per shot for a moderate fluence of 2 J/cm(2), which is about one-half of the deposition rate from a pressed (100%) lysozyme target. (c) 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights...

  14. Oxidative activation of dihydropyridine amides to reactive acyl donors

    Funder, Erik Daa; Trads, Julie Brender; Gothelf, Kurt Vesterager

    2015-01-01

    Amides of 1,4-dihydropyridine (DHP) are activated by oxidation for acyl transfer to amines, alcohols and thiols. In the reduced form the DHP amide is stable towards reaction with amines at room temperature. However, upon oxidation with DDQ the acyl donor is activated via a proposed pyridinium...

  15. Ultra-large current transport in thick SmBa2Cu3O7−x films grown by reactive co-evaporation

    Highlights: • Transport properties of 5 μm thick SmBa2Cu3O7−x thin films were investigated. • Laser scanning microscopy was used to demonstrate local transport properties. • Temperature variable laser scanning microscopy shows correlation between structural and transport properties. • Optical measurements described nature of current transport properties in the coated conductors. - Abstract: Structural and transport properties of high performance SmBa2Cu3O7−x coated conductors produced by a dual-chamber co-evaporation are presented. The 5 μm-thick SmBCO coated conductors grown on IBAD-MgO based Hastelloy metal templates show critical currents larger than 1020–1560 A/cm at 77 K and self-field. The current transport characteristics of the conductors are investigated by room-temperature thermoelectric microscopy and low-temperature bolometric microscopy. The local thermoelectric images show the tilted grains, grain boundaries, and microstructural defects on the surface of the coated conductors. The bias current-dependent bolometric response at low temperature displays the current of the local flux flow dissipation as an increasing bias. Furthermore, we measured micro-Raman scattering microscopic imaging on oxygen-related peaks of the conductors. Comparing the Raman signal images with the low temperature optical scanning maps, it is remarkable that the structural disorders represented by oxygen-related Raman peaks are closely related to the low temperature bolometric abnormalities. From this result, a nature of the dissipative current distribution in coated conductors is revealed. The scanning optical microscopic study will provide a promising method for quality assurance of coated conductors

  16. Review of Active and Reactive Power Sharing Strategies in Hierarchical Controlled Microgrids

    Han, Yang; Li, Hong; Shen, Pan;

    2016-01-01

    Microgrids consist of multiple parallel-connected distributed generation (DG) units with coordinated control strategies, which are able to operate in both grid-connected and islanded mode. Microgrids are attracting more and more attention since they can alleviate the stress of main transmission...... systems, reduce feeder losses, and improve system power quality. When the islanded microgrids are concerned, it is important to maintain system stability and achieve load power sharing among the multiple parallel-connected DG units. However, the poor active and reactive power sharing problems due to the...... paper for active power sharing. Moreover, nonlinear and unbalanced loads could further affect the reactive power sharing when regulating the active power, and it is difficult to share the reactive power accurately only by using the enhanced virtual impedance method. Therefore, the hierarchical control...

  17. Corrosion barriers for silver-based telescope mirrors: comparative study of plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition and reactive evaporation of aluminum oxide

    Fryauf, David M.; Phillips, Andrew C.; Kobayashi, Nobuhiko P.

    2015-10-01

    Astronomical telescopes continue to demand high-endurance high-reflectivity silver (Ag) mirrors that can withstand years of exposure in Earth-based observatory environments. We present promising results of improved Ag mirror robustness using plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) of aluminum oxide (AlOx) as a top barrier layer. Transparent AlOx is suitable for many optical applications; therefore, it has been the initial material of choice for this study. Two coating recipes developed with electron beam ion-assisted deposition (e-beam IAD) of materials including yttrium fluoride, titanium nitride, oxides of yttrium, tantalum, and silicon are used to provide variations in basic Ag mirror structures to compare the endurance of reactive e-beam IAD barriers with PEALD barriers. Samples undergo high temperature/high humidity environmental testing in a controlled environment of 80% humidity at 80°C for 10 days. Environmental testing shows visible results suggesting that the PEALD AlOx barrier offers robust protection against chemical corrosion and moisture permeation. Ag mirror structures were further characterized by reflectivity/absorption before and after deposition of AlOx barriers.

  18. Determination of laser-evaporated uranium dioxide by neutron activation analysis

    Safety analyses of nuclear reactors require information about the loss of fuel which may occur at high temperatures. In this study, the surface of a uranium dioxide target was heated rapidly by a laser. The uranium surface was vaporized into a vacuum. The uranium bearing species condensed on a graphite disk placed in the pathway of the expanding uranium vapor. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray analysis showed very little droplet ejection directly from the laser target surface. Neutron activation analysis was used to measure the amount of uranium deposited. The surface temperature was measured by a fast-response automatic optical pyrometer. The maximum surface temperature ranged from 2400 to 37000K. The Hertz-Langmuir formula, in conjunction with the measured surface temperature transient, was used to calculate the theoretical amount of uranium deposited. There was good agreement between theory and experiment above the melting point of 31200K. Below the melting point much more uranium was collected than was expected theoretically. This was attributed to oxidation of the surface. 29 refs., 16 figs., 7 tabs

  19. Structural ordering, morphology and optical properties of amorphous Al{sub x}In{sub 1−x}N thin films grown by plasma-assisted dual source reactive evaporation

    Alizadeh, M., E-mail: alizadeh_kozerash@yahoo.com [Low Dimensional Materials Research Centre (LDMRC), Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Ganesh, V. [Low Dimensional Materials Research Centre (LDMRC), Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Mehdipour, H. [Plasma Nanoscience @ Complex Systems, The University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia); Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran 11155-9161 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nazarudin, N.F.F.; Goh, B.T.; Shuhaimi, A. [Low Dimensional Materials Research Centre (LDMRC), Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Rahman, S.A., E-mail: saadah@um.edu.my [Low Dimensional Materials Research Centre (LDMRC), Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2015-05-25

    Highlights: • In-rich and Al-rich Al{sub x}In{sub 1−x}N films were grown by plasma-aided reactive evaporation. • The A{sub 1}(LO) phonon mode of the Al-rich films exhibits two-mode behavior. • The band gap of the films was tuned from 1.08 to 2.50 eV. • A bowing parameter of 4.3 eV was calculated for the grown Al{sub x}In{sub 1−x}N films. • The morphology was changed from clusters to uniformly shaped grains by decreasing x. - Abstract: Amorphous aluminum indium nitride (Al{sub x}In{sub 1−x}N) thin films were deposited on quartz substrates by plasma-assisted dual source reactive evaporation system. In-rich (x = 0.10 and 0.18) and Al-rich (x = 0.60 and 0.64) films were prepared by simply varying an AC voltage applied to indium wire. The X-ray-diffraction patterns revealed a small broad peak assigned to Al{sub 0.10}In{sub 0.90}N (0 0 2) plane, but no perceivable peaks assigned to crystalline Al{sub x}In{sub 1−x}N were observed for the films with x = 0.18, 0.60 and 0.64. The morphology of the film was changed from clusters of small grains to uniformly shaped particles with decrease of x. The band gap energy of the films increased from 1.08 eV to 2.50 eV as the Al composition varied from 0.1 to 0.64. Also, Raman results indicated that E{sub 2}(high) and A{sub 1}(LO) peaks of the Al{sub x}In{sub 1−x}N films are remarkably blue-shifted by increasing x and the A{sub 1}(LO) phonon mode of the Al-rich films exhibits two-mode behavior. A bowing parameter of 4.3 eV was obtained for AlInN films. The extrapolated value from bowing equation was 0.85 eV for band gap energy of InN.

  20. Instantaneous Active and Reactive Power Measuring Method in Three Phase Power System

    A. TAHRI

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an electronic means of measuring the instantaneous active and reactive power absorbed by any electrical equipment. The measurements are based on the Clark (a-b and Park (d-q transformations. The system is useful to teach electrical machines in Park’s coordinates and it allows also the study and control of some power electronics converters that are connected to three phase power network, such as static VAR compensator. The principle of the measuring method of the active and reactive power is described, and analyzed for different tests. The effectiveness of the proposed measuring method is confirmed by experimental investigation employing a test system.

  1. Metabolic activation of chemical carcinogens to reactive electrophiles

    Ionizing radiations and ultraviolet light constitute the principal known physical carcinogens. Likewise, a great variety and large number of chemicals and over 50 DNA and RNA viruses comprise the known chemical and viral carcinogens. These three categories of carcinogenic agents include the great majority of extrinsic agents known to induce cancer in mammals. Man is clearly susceptible to the action of physical and chemical carcinogens and, indeed, was the first species in which the activities of some of these agents were demonstated. It seems certain that viral carcinogenic information is involved in the etiology of at least some human tumors, but ethical and methodological problems have made it difficult to obtain unequivocal data. Given the long availability of experimental carcinogens of these three classes, there is surprisingly little known of their interrelationships in the production of cancer in experimental animals. The objective of this brief review is to present some salient aspects of experimental chemical carcinogenesis and an analysis of how some of these features relate to the mechanisms of action of radiation carcinogens

  2. Structure-reactivity relationships between fluorescent chromophores and antioxidant activity of grain and sweet sorghum seeds

    Polyphenolic structures, such as tannins, are the putative cause of a variety of seed functions including bird/insect resistance and antioxidant activity. Structure-reactivity relationships are necessary to understand the influence of polyphenolic chromophore structures on the tannin content and fr...

  3. Effect of mechanical activation on structure changes and reactivity in further chemical modification of lignin.

    Zhao, Xiaohong; Zhang, Yanjuan; Hu, Huayu; Huang, Zuqiang; Yang, Mei; Chen, Dong; Huang, Kai; Huang, Aimin; Qin, Xingzhen; Feng, Zhenfei

    2016-10-01

    Lignin was treated by mechanical activation (MA) in a customized stirring ball mill, and the structure and reactivity in further esterification were studied. The chemical structure and morphology of MA-treated lignin and the esterified products were analyzed by chemical analysis combined with UV/vis spectrometer, FTIR,NMR, SEM and particle size analyzer. The results showed that MA contributed to the increase of aliphatic hydroxyl, phenolic hydroxyl, carbonyl and carboxyl groups but the decrease of methoxyl groups. Moreover, MA led to the decrease of particle size and the increase of specific surface area and roughness of surface in lignin. The reactivity of lignin was enhanced significantly for the increase of hydroxyl content and the improvement of mass transfer in chemical reaction caused by the changes of molecular structure and morphological structure. The process of MA is green and simple, and is an effective method for enhancing the reactivity of lignin. PMID:27344951

  4. Shape-Dependent Surface Reactivity and Antimicrobial Activity of Nano-Cupric Oxide.

    Gilbertson, Leanne M; Albalghiti, Eva M; Fishman, Zachary S; Perreault, François; Corredor, Charlie; Posner, Jonathan D; Elimelech, Menachem; Pfefferle, Lisa D; Zimmerman, Julie B

    2016-04-01

    Shape of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) can be used as a design handle to achieve controlled manipulation of physicochemical properties. This tailored material property approach necessitates the establishment of relationships between specific ENM properties that result from such manipulations (e.g., surface area, reactivity, or charge) and the observed trend in behavior, from both a functional performance and hazard perspective. In this study, these structure-property-function (SPF) and structure-property-hazard (SPH) relationships are established for nano-cupric oxide (n-CuO) as a function of shape, including nanospheres and nanosheets. In addition to comparing these shapes at the nanoscale, bulk CuO is studied to compare across length scales. The results from comprehensive material characterization revealed correlations between CuO surface reactivity and bacterial toxicity with CuO nanosheets having the highest surface reactivity, electrochemical activity, and antimicrobial activity. While less active than the nanosheets, CuO nanoparticles (sphere-like shape) demonstrated enhanced reactivity compared to the bulk CuO. This is in agreement with previous studies investigating differences across length-scales. To elucidate the underlying mechanisms of action to further explain the shape-dependent behavior, kinetic models applied to the toxicity data. In addition to revealing different CuO material kinetics, trends in observed response cannot be explained by surface area alone. The compiled results contribute to further elucidate pathways toward controlled design of ENMs. PMID:26943499

  5. Elevated C-reactive protein and self-reported disease activity in systemic lupus erythematosus

    Eudy, AM; Vines, AI; Dooley, MA; Cooper, GS; Parks, CG

    2014-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP), a biomarker of inflammation, has been associated with increased disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis. However, the association in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) remains unclear. We examined the association of CRP with self-reported disease activity in the Carolina Lupus Study and described differences by sociodemographic characteristics. The study included baseline and three-year follow-up data on 107 African-American and 69 Caucasian SLE patients enrolled at...

  6. A Hybrid Estimator for Active/Reactive Power Control of Single-Phase Distributed Generation Systems with Energy Storage

    Pahlevani, Majid; Eren, Suzan; Guerrero, Josep M.;

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a new active/reactive power closed-loop control system for a hybrid renewable energy generation system used for single-phase residential/commercial applications. The proposed active/reactive control method includes a hybrid estimator, which is able to quickly and accurately...

  7. Effects of C-reactive protein and pentosan polysulphate on human complement activation.

    Klegeris, Andis; Singh, Edith A; McGeer, Patrick L

    2002-07-01

    Complement (C) activation is believed to play an adverse role in several chronic degenerative disease processes, including atherosclerosis, myocardial infarction and Alzheimer's disease. We developed several in vitro quantitative assays to evaluate processes which activate C in human serum, and to assess candidates which might block that activation. Binding of C-reactive protein (CRP) to immobilized cell surfaces was used as a tissue-based method of activation, while immunoglobulin G in solution was used as a surrogate antibody method. Activation was assessed by deposition of C fragments on fixed cell surfaces, or by capture of C5b-9 from solution. We observed that several cell lines, including SH-SY5Y, U-937, THP-1 and ECV304, bound CRP and activated C following attachment of cells to a plastic surface by means of air drying. Treatment of human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells with the reactive oxygen intermediates generated by xanthine (Xa) - xanthine oxidase (XaOx) prior to air drying or by hydrogen peroxide solutions after air drying, enhanced C activation, possibly through oxidation of the cell lipid membrane. Several C inhibitors were tested for their effectiveness in blocking these systems. Pentosan polysulphate (PPS), an orally active agent, blocked C activation in the same concentration range of 1-1000 microg/ml as heparin, dextran sulphate, compstatin and fucoidan. PPS may have practical application as a C inhibitor. PMID:12100726

  8. EVALUATING DEGREE OF ACTIVE POWER LOSSES REDUCTION IN THE ELECTRIC POWER LINES WITH REACTIVE POWER COMPENSATION

    V. N. Radkevich

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers evaluation procedure for the degree of active power losses reduction in the power transmission lines under 1 kV and 6–10 kV of the systems of electric power supply of industrial enterprises with compensating installations mounted at the side of the customer. The capacitor installations conform to the applied voltage level and factor in dielectric losses in the capacitors. The voltage at the compensating device terminal changes from 0.95 to 1.05 of the capacitors nominal voltage. The study did not account for reactive power losses in the line, nor did it for its charge capacity, conditioned by relative shortness of the cable lines generally operating in the mains of industrial enterprises. For this reason, the quantities of reactive power being consumed and generated by the transmission line are negligible and do not significantly affect the reactive power flux. The researchers obtain functional relations that allow estimating the degree of power loss reduction in the transmission line factoring in its explicit initial data. They perform mathematical analysis of the obtained functional relations and study the function by means of derivatives. The function extremum points are found as well as the intervals of its increment and decrement. A graphical research of the obtained functional relation is performed. It is ascertained that reduction of the active power losses is contingent on the line and the capacitor-installation engineering factors, the electrical energy consumer reactive load value as well as the voltage applied to the capacitor installation. The functional relations presented in the article can be employed in scoping calculation necessary for decision making on the reactive power compensation in systems of the industrial facilities electric power supply. Their account will allow a more accurate estimate of technical and economic effect of the capacitor bank installation in the electrical mains under 1 kV and 6

  9. Simulation and reliability analysis of shunt active power filter based on instantaneous reactive power theory

    CUI Yu-long; LIU Hong; WANG Jing-qin; SUN Shu-guang

    2007-01-01

    This paper first discusses the operating principle ofinstantaneous reactive power theory. Then, the theory is introduced into shunt active power filter and its control scheme is studied. Finally, Matlab/Simulink power system toolbox is used to simulate the system. In the simulation model, as the most common harmonic source, 3-phase thyfistor bridge rectifier circuit is constructed.The simulation results before and after the shunt active filter was switched to the system corresponding to different firing angles of the thyristors are presented and analyzed, which demonstrate the practicability and reliability of the proposed shunt active filter scheme.

  10. Active and Reactive Power Control of a Doubly Fed Induction Generator

    Zerzouri Nora

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Wind turbine WT occupies gradually a large part in world energy market, Doubly fed induction generator DFIG is mostly used in WT, it allow highly flexible active and reactive power generation control. This paper presents dynamic modeling and simulation of a doubly fed induction generator based on grid-side and rotor-side converter control. The DFIG, grid-side converter, rotor-side converter, and its controllers are performed in MATLAB/Simulink software. Dynamic response in grid connected mode for variable speed wind operation is investigated. Simulation results on a 3 MW DFIG system are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed control strategy during variations of active and reactive power, rotor speed, and converter dc link voltage.

  11. Serum Adenosine deaminase activity and C-reactive protein levels in unstable angina

    Rani Surekha

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In unstable angina (USA patients, immunological responses contributing to inflammation play a vital role in plaque rupture and thrombosis causing stroke. In the present study an attempt is made to estimate the levels of adenosine deaminase activity, an immunoenzyme marker and C-reactive protein, a marker of inflammation in USA patients. 45 patients presenting USA and 50 age and sex matched healthy controls were included in the study. Serum ADA activity was measured spectrophotometrically at 630nm and serum C-reactive protein was detected using Avitex CRP kit, which is a rapid latex agglutination test. The Mean ADA levels were 41.15 ± 11.04 in patients and 20.71±5.63 in controls and 66.6% of patients and none of the controls were positive to CRP. The present study observed the importance of ADA as a serum marker in addition to CRP for assessing the immune response in USA patients.

  12. Performance evaluation of an active solar cooling system utilizing low cost plastic collectors and an evaporatively-cooled absorption chiller

    Lof, G. O.; Westhoff, M. A.; Karaki, S.

    1984-02-01

    During the summer of 1982, air conditioning in Solar House 3 at Colorado State University was provided by an evaporatively-cooled absorption chiller. The single-effect lithium bromide chiller is an experimental three-ton unit from which heat is rejected by direct evaporative cooling of the condenser and absorber walls, thereby eliminating the need for a separate cooling tower. Domestic hot water was also provided by use of a double-walled heat exchanger and 80-gal hot water tank. A schematic of the system is given. Objectives of the project were: (1) evaluation of system performance over the course of one cooling season in Fort Collins, Colorado; (2) optimization of system operation and control; (3) development of a TRNSYS compatible model of the chiller; and (4) determination of cooling system performance in several U.S. climates by use of the model.

  13. C-reactive protein increases plasminogen activator inhibitor–1 expression in human endothelial cells

    Chen, Changyi; Nan, Bicheng; Lin, Peter; Yao, Qizhi

    2007-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is an inflammatory marker which predicts cardiovascular disease. However, it is not fully understood whether CRP has direct effects on endothelial functions and gene expression. The purpose of current study was to determine the effects and molecular mechanisms of CRP on the expression of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) in human endothelial cells. Human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAEC) were treated with CRP at clinically relevant concentrations for d...

  14. Continuous Wavelet and Hilbert-Huang Transforms Applied for Analysis of Active and Reactive Power Consumption

    Avdakovic Samir; Bosovic Adnan

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of power consumption presents a very important issue for power distribution system operators. Some power system processes such as planning, demand forecasting, development, etc.., require a complete understanding of behaviour of power consumption for observed area, which requires appropriate techniques for analysis of available data. In this paper, two different time-frequency techniques are applied for analysis of hourly values of active and reactive power consumption from one real ...

  15. C reactive protein and prealbumin as markers of disease activity in shigellosis.

    Khan, W. A.; Salam, M A; Bennish, M. L.

    1995-01-01

    To evaluate serum C reactive protein (CRP) and prealbumin concentrations as markers of disease activity in shigellosis this study serially measured serum concentrations of CRP and prealbumin in 39 patients infected with Shigella spp, and a comparison group of 10 patients infected with Vibrio cholerae serotype 01. On admission, patients with shigellosis had significantly higher median concentrations of CRP (109 v 5 mg/l; p < 0.01) and significantly lower median concentrations of prealbumin (16...

  16. The Removal of Composite Reactive Dye from Dyeing Unit Effluent Using Sewage Sludge Derived Activated Carbon

    REDDY, Sajjala SREEDHAR

    2006-01-01

    Activated carbon was prepared from dried municipal sewage sludge and batch mode adsorption experiments were conducted to study its potential to remove composite reactive dye from dyeing unit effluent. Adsorption parameters for the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms were determined and the effects of effluent pH, adsorbent dosage, contact time and initial dye concentration were studied. The toxicity characteristic leaching protocol (TCLP) was used to assess the acceptability of sewage ...

  17. Active and reactive power transmission loss allocation to bilateral contracts through game theory techniques

    NAFISI, HAMED; ROUDSARI, HOSSEIN MAHDINIA; HOSSEINIAN, Seyed Hossein; ABYANEH, HOSSEIN ASKARIAN; DISFANI, VAHID RASOULI

    2015-01-01

    Transmission loss has a considerable effect in overall power generation. For fairly distributing the charge of losses to generators and consumers in a deregulated power system, the allocation of this loss is very important. Game-theoretic methods seem fairer for share determination of each participant of a coalition with no discrimination. In this paper, the active and reactive power transmission losses are allocated to bilateral transactions simultaneously through load flow calculations and ...

  18. The spatial distribution of the reactive iodine species IO from simultaneous active and passive DOAS observations

    K. Seitz; J. Buxmann; D. Pöhler; Sommer, T.; J. Tschritter; C. O'Dowd; U. Platt

    2009-01-01

    We present investigations of the reactive iodine species (RIS) IO, OIO and I2 in a coastal region from a field campaign simultaneously employing active long path differential optical absorption spectroscopy (LP-DOAS) as well as passive multi-axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS). The campaign took place at the Martin Ryan Institute (MRI) in Carna, County Galway at the Irish West Coast about 6 km south-east of the atmospheric research station Mace ...

  19. The spatial distribution of the reactive iodine species IO from simultaneous active and passive DOAS observations

    K. Seitz; J. Buxmann; D. Pöhler; Sommer, T.; J. Tschritter; T. Neary; C. O'Dowd; U. Platt

    2010-01-01

    We present investigations of the reactive iodine species (RIS) IO, OIO and I2 in a coastal region from a field campaign simultaneously employing active long path differential optical absorption spectroscopy (LP-DOAS) as well as passive multi-axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS). The campaign took place at the Martin Ryan Institute (MRI) in Carna, County Galway at the Irish West Coast about 6 km south-east of the atmospheric research station Mace ...

  20. Horst Meyer and Quantum Evaporation

    Balibar, S.

    2016-06-01

    With their 1963 article in Cryogenics Horst Meyer and his collaborators triggered intense research activity on the evaporation of superfluid helium. Discussing this subject with him in 1975 was enlightening. Fifty years later, the analogy between the photoelectric effect and the evaporation of superfluid helium in the low temperature limit is not yet clear, although remarkable progress has been made in its observation and its understanding. This special issue of the Journal of Low Temperature Physics is an opportunity to recall the history of quantum evaporation, and to express my gratitude to Horst Meyer. It describes quickly most of the experimental and theoretical works which have been published on quantum evaporation during the last 50 years, but it is not a comprehensive review of this fascinating subject.

  1. FIELD EVAPORATION OF IRON AND NIOBIUM IN NEON AND HYDROGEN

    Wada, M; Akaiwa, N.; Irumata, S.; Mori, T.

    1986-01-01

    Field evaporation of iron and niobium in neon and in hydrogen was examined between 20 K and 200 K with an FIM. From the temperature dependence of the evaporation field and the field dependence of the evaporation rate, the activation energy for the evaporation was estimated and the effect of hydrogen was discussed.

  2. Cortical Regions Recruited for Complex Active-Learning Strategies and Action Planning Exhibit Rapid Reactivation during Memory Retrieval

    Voss, Joel L.; Galvan, Ashley; Gonsalves, Brian D.

    2011-01-01

    Memory retrieval can involve activity in the same sensory cortical regions involved in perception of the original event, and this neural "reactivation" has been suggested as an important mechanism of memory retrieval. However, it is still unclear if fragments of experience other than sensory information are retained and later reactivated during…

  3. Platelet activation, function, and reactivity in atherosclerotic carotid artery stenosis: a systematic review of the literature.

    Kinsella, J A

    2012-09-27

    An important proportion of transient ischemic attack or ischemic stroke is attributable to moderate or severe (50-99%) atherosclerotic carotid stenosis or occlusion. Platelet biomarkers have the potential to improve our understanding of the pathogenesis of vascular events in this patient population. A detailed systematic review was performed to collate all available data on ex vivo platelet activation and platelet function\\/reactivity in patients with carotid stenosis. Two hundred thirteen potentially relevant articles were initially identified; 26 manuscripts met criteria for inclusion in this systematic review. There was no consistent evidence of clinically informative data from urinary or soluble blood markers of platelet activation in patients with symptomatic moderate or severe carotid stenosis who might be considered suitable for carotid intervention. Data from flow cytometry studies revealed evidence of excessive platelet activation in patients in the early, sub-acute, or late phases after transient ischemic attack or stroke in association with moderate or severe carotid stenosis and in asymptomatic moderate or severe carotid stenosis compared with controls. Furthermore, pilot data suggest that platelet activation may be increased in recently symptomatic than in asymptomatic severe carotid stenosis. Excessive platelet activation and platelet hyperreactivity may play a role in the pathogenesis of first or subsequent transient ischemic attack or stroke in patients with moderate or severe carotid stenosis. Larger longitudinal studies assessing platelet activation status with flow cytometry and platelet function\\/reactivity in symptomatic vs. asymptomatic carotid stenosis are warranted to improve our understanding of the mechanisms responsible for transient ischemic attack or stroke.

  4. Association of Serum C-Reactive Protein Levels With Lupus Disease Activity in the Absence of Measurable Interferon-α and a C-Reactive Protein Gene Variant

    Enocsson, Helena; Sjöwall, Christopher; Kastbom, Alf; Skogh, Thomas; Eloranta, Maija-Leena; Rönnblom, Lars; Wetterö, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The type I interferon (IFN) system is important in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We previously demonstrated an inhibitory effect of IFNα on interleukin 6 (IL-6) induced C-reactive protein (CRP) in vitro, hypothetically explaining the poor correlation between disease activity and CRP levels in SLE. Herein we investigated disease activity, IL-6 and CRP in relation to a CRP gene polymorphism and IFN. Methods: Sera from 155 SLE patients and 100 controls were ...

  5. Distributed Operation of Interlinked AC Microgrids with Dynamic Active and Reactive Power Tuning

    Nutkani, Inam Ullah; Loh, Poh Chiang; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2013-01-01

    Microgrids are small grids formed by clustering modern generating sources, storage systems, and loads together. Being independent, the formed microgrids can, in principle, operate at their own preferred voltages and frequencies. Tying them to the mains grid or another microgrid would therefore...... operating at different voltages and frequencies. The proposed scheme allows sources in the microgrids to concentrate more on active power harnessing, while the interlinking converters focus more on meeting the load reactive demand. If necessary, backup active power from an underloaded microgrid can also be...

  6. Antibacterial Activity and Global Reactivity Descriptors of Some Newly Synthesized Unsymmetrical Sulfamides

    Amel Bendjeddou

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In the present study a series of unsymmetric linear sulfamides (1-9 starting from a primary amine were synthesized and their structures were confirmed by elemental analyses, mass spectrometry and 1H NMR techniques. All the synthesized compounds were screened for their antibacterial activities by both disc diffusion and minimal inhibition concentration (MIC methods. Frontier molecular orbital (FMO analysis and global reactivity descriptors have been performed using the density functional theory (DFT with the B3LYP functional. The results indicated that these derivatives, depending of their substituted radical, bring about an improvement in the bacterial activity.

  7. Activating Aluminum Reactivity with Fluoropolymer Coatings for Improved Energetic Composite Combustion.

    McCollum, Jena; Pantoya, Michelle L; Iacono, Scott T

    2015-08-26

    Aluminum (Al) particles are passivated by an aluminum oxide (Al2O3) shell. Energetic blends of nanometer-sized Al particles with liquid perfluorocarbon-based oxidizers such as perfluoropolyethers (PFPE) excite surface exothermic reaction between fluorine and the Al2O3 shell. The surface reaction promotes Al particle reactivity. Many Al-fueled composites use solid oxidizers that induce no Al2O3 surface exothermicity, such as molybdenum trioxide (MoO3) or copper oxide (CuO). This study investigates a perfluorinated polymer additive, PFPE, incorporated to activate Al reactivity in Al-CuO and Al-MoO3. Flame speeds, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and quadrupole mass spectrometry (QMS) were performed for varying percentages of PFPE blended with Al/MoO3 or Al/CuO to examine reaction kinetics and combustion performance. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was performed to identify product species. Results show that the performance of the thermite-PFPE blends is highly dependent on the bond dissociation energy of the metal oxide. Fluorine-Al-based surface reaction with MoO3 produces an increase in reactivity, whereas the blends with CuO show a decline when the PFPE concentration is increased. These results provide new evidence that optimizing Al combustion can be achieved through activating exothermic Al surface reactions. PMID:26263844

  8. Khat (Catha edulis) generates reactive oxygen species and promotes hepatic cell apoptosis via MAPK activation.

    Abid, Morad Dirhem Naji; Chen, Juan; Xiang, Min; Zhou, Jie; Chen, Xiaoping; Gong, Feili

    2013-08-01

    A number of studies have suggested an association between khat (Catha edulis) chewing and acute liver lesions or chronic liver disease. However, little is known about the effects of khat on hepatic cells. In the current study, we investigated the mechanism behind khat-induced apoptosis in the L02 human hepatic cell line. We used cell growth inhibition assay, flow cytometry and Hoechst 33258 staining to measure hepatocyte apoptosis induced by khat. Western blot analysis was used to detect the expression levels of caspase-8 and -9, as well as those of Bax and Bcl-2. We also measured reactive oxygen species production. The results indicated that khat induced significant hepatocyte apoptosis in L02 cells. We found that khat activated caspase-8 and -9, upregulated Bax protein expression and downregulated Bcl-2 expression levels, which resulted in the coordination of apoptotic signals. Khat-induced hepatocyte apoptosis is primarily regulated through the sustained activation of the c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway and only partially via the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) cascade. Furthermore, the khat-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and the activation of the ROS scavenger, N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), attenuated the khat-induced activation of JNK and ERK. Our results demonstrate that khat triggers the generation of intracellular ROS and sequentially induces the sustainable activation of JNK, which in turn results in a decrease in cell viability and an increase in cell apoptosis. PMID:23708648

  9. THE STUDY OF CONDUCTING TRAINS MODES, WITH TAKING INTO ACCOUNT THE VALUE OF ACTIVE AND REACTIVE POWER

    O. P. Ivanov

    2007-01-01

    The improved computation model for traction modes which takes into account the cost of both active and reactive energy in the conditions of application of variable tariffs for payment of electric power is developed.

  10. Measurement based analysis of active and reactive power losses in a distribution network with wind farms and chips

    Lund, Torsten

    2007-01-01

    The paper presents an investigation of the active and reactive power losses in a distribution network with wind turbines and combined heat and power plants. The investigation is based on 15 min average power measurements and load flow calculations in the power system simulation tool PowerFactory®. Based on the measurements and simulations, a regressive model for calculation and allocation of active and reactive power losses has been derived. The influence of the covariance between load and pr...

  11. Uptake of Reactive Black 5 by pumice and walnut activated carbon: Chemistry and adsorption mechanisms

    Heibati, B.; Rodriguez-Couto, S.; Amrane, A; M. Rafatullah; Hawari, A.; Al-Ghouti, M. A.

    2014-01-01

    The potential of using pumice and walnut wood activated carbon as low-cost adsorbents for the removal of the diazo dye Reactive Black 5 (RB5) from aqueous solutions was investigated. The Langmuir isotherm fit to the data specified the presence of two different natures of adsorption sites with different binding energies on the AC-W surface. Kinetic modelling showed that the adsorption behaviour and mechanism of RB5 for both adsorbents is believed to happen via surface adsorption followed by di...

  12. Active and reactive behaviour in human mobility: the influence of attraction points on pedestrians

    Sagarra, O.; Oltra, A.; Palmer, J. R. B.; Bartumeus, F.; Díaz-Guilera, A.; Perelló, J.

    2016-01-01

    Human mobility is becoming an accessible field of study, thanks to the progress and availability of tracking technologies as a common feature of smart phones. We describe an example of a scalable experiment exploiting these circumstances at a public, outdoor fair in Barcelona (Spain). Participants were tracked while wandering through an open space with activity stands attracting their attention. We develop a general modelling framework based on Langevin dynamics, which allows us to test the influence of two distinct types of ingredients on mobility: reactive or context-dependent factors, modelled by means of a force field generated by attraction points in a given spatial configuration and active or inherent factors, modelled from intrinsic movement patterns of the subjects. The additive and constructive framework model accounts for some observed features. Starting with the simplest model (purely random walkers) as a reference, we progressively introduce different ingredients such as persistence, memory and perceptual landscape, aiming to untangle active and reactive contributions and quantify their respective relevance. The proposed approach may help in anticipating the spatial distribution of citizens in alternative scenarios and in improving the design of public events based on a facts-based approach. PMID:27493774

  13. In patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration, physical activity may influence C-reactive protein levels

    Subhi, Yousif; Singh, Amardeep; Falk, Mads Krüger;

    2014-01-01

    Association of neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) with C-reactive protein (CRP) was previously reported, indicating a relation to systemic low-grade inflammation. However, visual impairment limits physical activity, and physical activity modulates CRP levels. Here, we investigated...... the impact of physical activity on CRP levels in patients with neovascular AMD and control individuals....

  14. Continuous Wavelet and Hilbert-Huang Transforms Applied for Analysis of Active and Reactive Power Consumption

    Avdakovic Samir

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of power consumption presents a very important issue for power distribution system operators. Some power system processes such as planning, demand forecasting, development, etc.., require a complete understanding of behaviour of power consumption for observed area, which requires appropriate techniques for analysis of available data. In this paper, two different time-frequency techniques are applied for analysis of hourly values of active and reactive power consumption from one real power distribution transformer substation in urban part of Sarajevo city. Using the continuous wavelet transform (CWT with wavelet power spectrum and global wavelet spectrum some properties of analysed time series are determined. Then, empirical mode decomposition (EMD and Hilbert-Huang Transform (HHT are applied for the analyses of the same time series and the results showed that both applied approaches can provide very useful information about the behaviour of power consumption for observed time interval and different period (frequency bands. Also it can be noticed that the results obtained by global wavelet spectrum and marginal Hilbert spectrum are very similar, thus confirming that both approaches could be used for identification of main properties of active and reactive power consumption time series.

  15. Voltage stability in low voltage microgrids in aspects of active and reactive power demand

    Parol Mirosław

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Low voltage microgrids are autonomous subsystems, in which generation, storage and power and electrical energy consumption appear. In the paper the main attention has been paid to the voltage stability issue in low voltage microgrid for different variants of its operation. In the introduction a notion of microgrid has been presented, and also the issue of influence of active and reactive power balance on node voltage level has been described. Then description of voltage stability issue has been presented. The conditions of voltage stability and indicators used to determine voltage stability margin in the microgrid have been described. Description of the low voltage test microgrid, as well as research methodology along with definition of considered variants of its operation have been presented further. The results of exemplary calculations carried out for the daily changes in node load of the active and reactive power, i.e. the voltage and the voltage stability margin indexes in nodes have been presented. Furthermore, the changes of voltage stability margin indexes depending on the variant of the microgrid operation have been presented. Summary and formulation of conclusions related to the issue of voltage stability in microgrids have been included at the end of the paper.

  16. Radiation influencing of catalytic activity and reactivity of selected mixed oxides

    Two mixed oxides, viz. CuO-Bi2O3 and NiO-Bi2O3, of various compositions were studied with respect to their physico-chemical properties, catalytic activity, and chemical reactivity, using hydrogen peroxide decomposition and hydrogen reduction as the test reactions. Pre-irradiation of the CuO-Bi2O3 catalyst with 60Co gamma rays (0.5, 1.0, 1.5, or 3.0 MGy) and accelerated electrons (4 MeV) brought about changes in the mutual influence of the system components accompanied by formation of induced catalytic sites. The reduction rate decrease in the two side regions after electron irradiation and after gamma irradiation applying the extremely high dose of 3 MGy can be correlated with the increase in the concentration of the strongly bonded oxygen forms, giving rise to centres for donor hydrogen chemisorption. The NiO-Bi2O3 system seems to be less stable than the CuO-Bi2O3 system. Gamma irradiation (1 MGy) in water brought about decrease in the catalytic activity but no change in the mutual influence of the two components of the system. In the same conditions the reduction rate decreased appreciably, whereas pre-irradiation in air led to acceleration of the reduction process. This can be ascribed to a higher concentration of the stabilized charge defects, enhancing the reactivity of the interface. (author). 4 figs., 6 refs

  17. Active and reactive behaviour in human mobility: the influence of attraction points on pedestrians

    Gutiérrez-Roig, Mario; Oltra, Aitana; Bartumeus, Frederic; Diaz-Guilera, Albert; Perelló, Josep

    2015-01-01

    Human mobility is becoming an accessible field of study thanks to the progress and availability of tracking technologies as a common feature of smart phones. We describe an example of a scalable experiment exploiting these circumstances at a public, outdoor fair in Barcelona (Spain). Participants were tracked while wandering through an open space with activity stands attracting their attention. We develop a general modeling framework based on Langevin Dynamics, which allows us to test the influence of two distinct types of ingredients on mobility: reactive or context-dependent factors, modelled by means of a force field generated by attraction points in a given spatial configuration, and active or inherent factors, modelled from intrinsic movement patterns of the subjects. The additive and constructive framework model accounts for the observed features. Starting with the simplest model (purely random walkers) as a reference, we progressively introduce different ingredients such as persistence, memory, and per...

  18. Wolbachia Do Not Induce Reactive Oxygen Species-Dependent Immune Pathway Activation in Aedes albopictus

    Jennifer C. Molloy

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Aedes albopictus is a major vector of dengue (DENV and chikungunya (CHIKV viruses, causing millions of infections annually. It naturally carries, at high frequency, the intracellular inherited bacterial endosymbiont Wolbachia strains wAlbA and wAlbB; transinfection with the higher-density Wolbachia strain wMel from Drosophila melanogaster led to transmission blocking of both arboviruses. The hypothesis that reactive oxygen species (ROS-induced immune activation plays a role in arbovirus inhibition in this species was examined. In contrast to previous observations in Ae. aegypti, elevation of ROS levels was not observed in either cell lines or mosquito lines carrying the wild-type Wolbachia or higher-density Drosophila Wolbachia strains. There was also no upregulation of genes controlling innate immune pathways or with antioxidant/ROS-producing functions. These data suggest that ROS-mediated immune activation is not an important component of the viral transmission-blocking phenotype in this species.

  19. Electron transport chain inhibitors induce microglia activation through enhancing mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production.

    Ye, Junli; Jiang, Zhongxin; Chen, Xuehong; Liu, Mengyang; Li, Jing; Liu, Na

    2016-01-15

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are believed to be mediators of excessive microglial activation, yet the resources and mechanism are not fully understood. Here we stimulated murine microglial BV-2 cells and primary microglial cells with different inhibitors of electron transport chain (ETC), rotenone, thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTFA), antimycin A, and NaN3 to induce mitochondrial ROS production and we observed the role of mitochondrial ROS in microglial activation. Our results showed that ETC inhibitors resulted in significant changes in cell viability, microglial morphology, cell cycle arrest and mitochondrial ROS production in a dose-dependent manner in both primary cultural microglia and BV-2 cell lines. Moreover, ETC inhibitors, especially rotenone and antimycin A stimulated secretion of interleukin 1β (IL-1β), interleukin 6 (IL-6), interleukin 12 (IL-12) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) by microglia with marked activation of mitogen-activated proteinkinases (MAPKs) and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), which could be blocked by specific inhibitors of MAPK and NF-κB and mitochondrial antioxidants, Mito-TEMPO. Taken together, our results demonstrated that inhibition of mitochondrial respiratory chain in microglia led to production of mitochondrial ROS and therefore may activate MAPK/NF-кB dependent inflammatory cytokines release in microglia, which indicated that mitochondrial-derived ROS were contributed to microglial activation. PMID:26511505

  20. Leishmania donovani activates nuclear transcription factor-κB in macrophages through reactive oxygen intermediates

    Interaction of Leishmania donovani with macrophages antagonizes host defense mechanisms by interfering with a cascade of cell signaling processes in the macrophages. An early intracellular signaling event that follows receptor engagement is the activation of transcription factor NF-κB. It has been reported earlier that NF-κB-dependent signaling pathway regulates proinflammatory cytokine release. We therefore investigated the effect of L. donovani infectivity on this nuclear transcription factor in macrophage cell line J774A.1. Both L. donovani and its surface molecule lipophosphoglycan (LPG) resulted in a dose- and time-dependent activation of NF-κB-DNA binding activity in an electrophoretic mobility shift assay. We also report the involvement of IκB-α and IκB-β in the persistent activation of NF-κB by L. donovani. We demonstrate that the NF-κB activation was independent of viability of the parasite. Electrophoretic mobility supershift assay indicated that the NF-κB complex consists of p65 and c-rel subunits. The interaction of parasite with the macrophages and not the cellular uptake was important for NF-κB activation. Both p38 and ERK mitogen activated protein kinase (MAP) activation appears to be necessary for NF-κB activation by LPG. Preincubation of cells with antioxidants resulted in inhibition of L. donovani induced NF-κB activation, thereby suggesting a potential role of reactive oxygen species in L. donovani induced intracellular signaling. The present data indicate that antioxidants could play an important role in working out various therapeutic modalities to control leishmaniasis

  1. Arsenite activates NFκB through induction of C-reactive protein

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is an acute phase protein in humans. Elevated levels of CRP are produced in response to inflammatory cytokines and are associated with atherosclerosis, hypertension, cardiovascular disease and insulin resistance. Exposure to inorganic arsenic, a common environmental toxicant, also produces cardiovascular disorders, namely atherosclerosis and is associated with insulin-resistance. Inorganic arsenic has been shown to contribute to cardiac toxicities through production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that result in the activation of NFκB. In this study we show that exposure of the hepatic cell line, HepG2, to environmentally relevant levels of arsenite (0.13 to 2 μM) results in elevated CRP expression and secretion. ROS analysis of the samples showed that a minimal amount of ROS are produced by HepG2 cells in response to these concentrations of arsenic. In addition, treatment of FvB mice with 100 ppb sodium arsenite in the drinking water for 6 months starting at weaning age resulted in dramatically higher levels of CRP in both the liver and inner medullary region of the kidney. Further, mouse Inner Medullary Collecting Duct cells (mIMCD-4), a mouse kidney cell line, were stimulated with 10 ng/ml CRP which resulted in activation of NFκB. Pretreatment with 10 nM Y27632, a known Rho-kinase inhibitor, prior to CRP exposure attenuated NFκB activation. These data suggest that arsenic causes the expression and secretion of CRP and that CRP activates NFκB through activation of the Rho-kinase pathway, thereby providing a novel pathway by which arsenic can contribute to metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease. -- Highlights: ► Exposure to arsenic can induce the expression and secretion of CRP. ► Mice treated with NaAsO2 showed higher levels of CRP in both the liver and kidney. ► mIMCD-3 were stimulated with CRP which resulted in activation of NFκB. ► CRP activates NFκB through activation of the Rho-kinase pathway. ► Data provide

  2. Arsenite activates NFκB through induction of C-reactive protein

    Druwe, Ingrid L.; Sollome, James J.; Sanchez-Soria, Pablo; Hardwick, Rhiannon N.; Camenisch, Todd D.; Vaillancourt, Richard R., E-mail: vaillancourt@pharmacy.arizona.edu

    2012-06-15

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is an acute phase protein in humans. Elevated levels of CRP are produced in response to inflammatory cytokines and are associated with atherosclerosis, hypertension, cardiovascular disease and insulin resistance. Exposure to inorganic arsenic, a common environmental toxicant, also produces cardiovascular disorders, namely atherosclerosis and is associated with insulin-resistance. Inorganic arsenic has been shown to contribute to cardiac toxicities through production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that result in the activation of NFκB. In this study we show that exposure of the hepatic cell line, HepG2, to environmentally relevant levels of arsenite (0.13 to 2 μM) results in elevated CRP expression and secretion. ROS analysis of the samples showed that a minimal amount of ROS are produced by HepG2 cells in response to these concentrations of arsenic. In addition, treatment of FvB mice with 100 ppb sodium arsenite in the drinking water for 6 months starting at weaning age resulted in dramatically higher levels of CRP in both the liver and inner medullary region of the kidney. Further, mouse Inner Medullary Collecting Duct cells (mIMCD-4), a mouse kidney cell line, were stimulated with 10 ng/ml CRP which resulted in activation of NFκB. Pretreatment with 10 nM Y27632, a known Rho-kinase inhibitor, prior to CRP exposure attenuated NFκB activation. These data suggest that arsenic causes the expression and secretion of CRP and that CRP activates NFκB through activation of the Rho-kinase pathway, thereby providing a novel pathway by which arsenic can contribute to metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease. -- Highlights: ► Exposure to arsenic can induce the expression and secretion of CRP. ► Mice treated with NaAsO{sub 2} showed higher levels of CRP in both the liver and kidney. ► mIMCD-3 were stimulated with CRP which resulted in activation of NFκB. ► CRP activates NFκB through activation of the Rho-kinase pathway. ► Data

  3. Adsorption of the reactive azo dyes onto NH4Cl-induced activated carbon

    Sakine Shekoohiyan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The efficacy of NH4Cl-induced activated carbon (NAC was examined in order to adsorb RR198, an azo reactive model dye, from an aqueous solution. Methods: The effects of pH (3 to 10, adsorbent dose (0.1 to 1.2 g/L, dye concentration and contact time on the adsorption efficiency were investigated. Results: The results showed that the removal of dye was highest at a solution pH of 7 and a powder dose of 1.1 g/L. The 85.9%, 72.6% and 65.4% removal of RR198 was obtained for a concentration of 25, 50 and 100 mg/L, respectively, at a relatively short contact time of 30 minutes, and at optimum pH and NAC concentrations of 1 g/L. The experimental data for kinetic analysis illustrated a best fit to the pseudo-second-order model. The study data on equilibrium were modeled using Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin–Radushkevich models; the Langmuir equation provided the best fit for the data. Conclusion: Therefore, the NAC appears to be an efficient and appropriate adsorbent for the removal of reactive azo dyes from waste streams.

  4. Lessons learned from reactive transport modeling of a low-activity waste glass disposal system

    Bacon, Diana H.; Peter McGrail, B.

    2003-04-01

    A set of reactive chemical transport calculations were conducted with the Subsurface Transport Over Reactive Multi-phases (STORM) code to evaluate the long-term performance of a representative low-activity waste glass in a shallow subsurface disposal system located on the Hanford site. Two different trench designs were considered, one with four rows of small waste packages (old design), the other with three layers of larger waste packages (new design). One-dimensional (1D) simulations were carried out to 20,000 yr, whereas two-dimensional (2D) simulations could only be carried out for 10,000 yr due to constraints on computational time. Both the 1D and 2D simulations predicted that the technetium release rate from the waste packages would be lower for the new trench design at times greater than 1 yr. Having fewer, larger waste packages decreases the glass surface area exposed to reaction with pore water. In the 2D simulations, water can flow around the waste packages, which causes a decrease in the water flux through the waste packages and lower release rates than predicted in the 1D simulations. This result reinforces the importance of performing multi-dimensional waste form release simulations.

  5. Probabilistic Approach to Optimizing Active and Reactive Power Flow in Wind Farms Considering Wake Effects

    Yong-Cheol Kang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel probabilistic optimization algorithm for simultaneous active and reactive power dispatch in power systems with significant wind power integration. Two types of load and wind-speed uncertainties have been assumed that follow normal and Weibull distributions, respectively. A PV bus model for wind turbines and the wake effect for correlated wind speed are used to achieve accurate AC power flow analysis. The power dispatch algorithm for a wind-power integrated system is modeled as a probabilistic optimal power flow (P-OPF problem, which is operated through fixed power factor control to supply reactive power. The proposed P-OPF framework also considers emission information, which clearly reflects the impact of the energy source on the environment. The P-OPF was tested on a modified IEEE 118-bus system with two wind farms. The results show that the proposed technique provides better system operation performance evaluation, which is helpful in making decisions about power system optimal dispatch under conditions of uncertainty.

  6. The influence of pH, temperature and hydrolyzate concentration on the removal of volatile and nonvolatile compounds from sugarcane bagasse hemicellulosic hydrolyzate treated with activated charcoal before or after vacuum evaporation

    R.C.L.B. Rodrigues

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the influence of pH, temperature and degree of hydrolyzate concentration on the removal of volatile and nonvolatile compounds from sugarcane bagasse hemicellulosic hydrolyzate treated with activated charcoal before or after the vacuum evaporation process. Furfural and 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural were almost totally removed in all the experiments, irrespective of pH and temperature and whether the charcoal was added before or after the vacuum evaporation process. Adding activated charcoal before the vacuum evaporation process favored the removal of phenolic compounds for all values of pH. Acetic acid, on the contrary, was most effectively removed when the activated charcoal was added after the vacuum evaporation process at an acid pH (0.92 and at the highest degree of hydrolyzate concentration (f=4. However, addition of activated charcoal before or after vacuum evaporation at an acid pH (0.92 and at the highest degree of hydrolyzate concentration (f=4 favored the removal of both acetic acid and phenolic compounds.

  7. Low temperature syntheses and reactivity of Cu2O2 active-site models.

    Citek, Cooper; Herres-Pawlis, Sonja; Stack, T Daniel P

    2015-08-18

    Nature's facility with dioxygen outmatches modern chemistry in the oxidation and oxygenation of materials and substrates for biosynthesis and cellular metabolism. The Earth's most abundant naturally occurring oxidant is-frankly-poorly understood and controlled, and thus underused. Copper-based enzyme metallocofactors are ubiquitous to the efficient consumption of dioxygen by all domains of life. Over the last several decades, we have joined many research groups in the study of copper- and dioxygen-dependent enzymes through close investigation of synthetically derived, small-molecule active-site analogs. Simple copper-dioxygen clusters bearing structural and spectroscopic similarity to dioxygen-activating enzymes can be probed for their fundamental geometrical, electronic, and reactive properties using the tools available to inorganic and synthetic chemistry. Our exploration of the copper-dioxygen arena has sustained product evaluation of the key dynamics and reactivity of binuclear Cu2O2 compounds. Almost exclusively operating at low temperatures, from -78 °C to solution characterization even at -125 °C, we have identified numerous compounds supported by simple and easily accessed, low molecular weight ligands-chiefly families of bidentate diamine chelates. We have found that by stripping away complexity in comparison to extended protein tertiary structures or sophisticated, multinucleating architectures, we can experimentally manipulate activated compounds and open pathways of reactivity toward exogenous substrates that both inform on and extend fundamental mechanisms of oxygenase enzymes. Our recent successes have advanced understanding of the tyrosinase enzyme, and related hemocyanin and NspF, and the copper membrane monooxygenases, specifically particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) and ammonia monooxygenase (AMO). Tyrosinase, ubiquitously distributed throughout life, is fundamental to the copper-based oxidation of phenols and the production of chromophores

  8. Effect of Black Hole Active Attack on Reactive Routing Protocol AODV in MANET using Network Simulator

    Arunima Patel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mobile Ad-Hoc Network is a collection of mobile nodes that are dynamically and arbitrarily located in such a manner that the interconnections between nodes are capable of changing on continual basis. MANET has potential applications in very unpredictable and dynamic environments. Due to security vulnerabilities of the routing protocols, wireless ad-hoc networks are unprotected to attacks of the malicious nodes. One of these attacks is the Black Hole Attack. In this paper, we focus on analyzing the effect of active Black Hole Attack on one of famous reactive routing protocol AODV. Our aim is to simulate the effect of Black Hole Attack on AODV protocol using various performance metric parameters.

  9. Comparison of activated carbon and bottom ash removal of reactive dye from aqueous solution

    Dincer, A.R.; Gunes, Y.; Karakaya, N.; Gunes, E. [Trakya University, Tekirdag (Turkey). Dept. of Environmental Engineering

    2007-03-15

    The adsorption of reactive dye from synthetic aqueous solution onto granular activated carbon (GAC) and coal-based bottom ash (CBBA) were studied under the same experimental conditions. As an alternative to GAC CBBA was used as adsorbent for dye removal from aqueous solution. The amount of Vertigo Navy Marine (VNM) adsorbed onto CBBA was lower compared with GAC at equilibrium and dye adsorption capacity increased from 0.71 to 3.82 mg g{sup -1}, and 0.73 to 6.35 mg g{sup -1} with the initial concentration of dye from 25 to 300 mg l{sup -1} respectively. The initial dye uptake of CBBA was not so rapid as in the case of GAC and the dye uptake was slow and gradually attained equilibrium.

  10. Copper compound induces autophagy and apoptosis of glioma cells by reactive oxygen species and jnk activation

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive of the primary brain tumors, with a grim prognosis despite intensive treatment. In the past decades, progress in research has not significantly increased overall survival rate. The in vitro antineoplastic effect and mechanism of action of Casiopeina III-ia (Cas III-ia), a copper compound, on rat malignant glioma C6 cells was investigated. Cas III-ia significantly inhibited cell proliferation, inducing autophagy and apoptosis, which correlated with the formation of autophagic vacuoles, overexpression of LC3, Beclin 1, Atg 7, Bax and Bid proteins. A decrease was detected in the mitochondrial membrane potential and in the activity of caspase 3 and 8, together with the generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and increased activity of c-jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK). The presence of 3-methyladenine (as selective autophagy inhibitor) increased the antineoplastic effect of Cas III-ia, while Z-VAD-FMK only showed partial protection from the antineoplastic effect induced by Cas III-ia, and ROS antioxidants (N-acetylcysteine) decreased apoptosis, autophagy and JNK activity. Moreover, the JNK –specific inhibitor SP600125 prevented Cas III-ia-induced cell death. Our data suggest that Cas III-ia induces cell death by autophagy and apoptosis, in part due to the activation of ROS –dependent JNK signaling. These findings support further studies of Cas III-ia as candidate for treatment of human malignant glioma

  11. Acrolein activates matrix metalloproteinases by increasing reactive oxygen species in macrophages

    Acrolein is a ubiquitous component of environmental pollutants such as automobile exhaust, cigarette, wood, and coal smoke. It is also a natural constituent of several foods and is generated endogenously during inflammation or oxidation of unsaturated lipids. Because increased inflammation and episodic exposure to acrolein-rich pollutants such as traffic emissions or cigarette smoke have been linked to acute myocardial infarction, we examined the effects of acrolein on matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), which destabilize atherosclerotic plaques. Our studies show that exposure to acrolein resulted in the secretion of MMP-9 from differentiated THP-1 macrophages. Acrolein-treatment of macrophages also led to an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS), free intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i), and xanthine oxidase (XO) activity. ROS production was prevented by allopurinol, but not by rotenone or apocynin and by buffering changes in [Ca2+]I with BAPTA-AM. The increase in MMP production was abolished by pre-treatment with the antioxidants Tiron and N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) or with the xanthine oxidase inhibitors allopurinol or oxypurinol. Finally, MMP activity was significantly stimulated in aortic sections from apoE-null mice containing advanced atherosclerotic lesions after exposure to acrolein ex vivo. These observations suggest that acrolein exposure results in MMP secretion from macrophages via a mechanism that involves an increase in [Ca2+]I, leading to xanthine oxidase activation and an increase in ROS production. ROS-dependent activation of MMPs by acrolein could destabilize atherosclerotic lesions during brief episodes of inflammation or pollutant exposure.

  12. Desorption, partitioning, and dechlorination characteristics of PCBs in sediments in interaction with reactive activated carbon

    Choi, Hyeok, E-mail: hchoi@uta.edu [Department of Civil Engineering, The University of Texas at Arlington, 416 Yates Street, Arlington, TX 76019-0308 (United States); Environmental and Earth Sciences Program, The University of Texas at Arlington, 500 Yates Street, Arlington, TX 76019-0049 (United States); Lawal, Wasiu [Environmental and Earth Sciences Program, The University of Texas at Arlington, 500 Yates Street, Arlington, TX 76019-0049 (United States); Al-Abed, Souhail R. [National Risk Management Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 26 W. Martin Luther King Dr., Cincinnati, OH 45268 (United States)

    2015-04-28

    Highlights: • Problematic aged real PCBs-contaminated sediment (WHS) was examined. • Performance of reactive activated carbon (RAC) impregnated with Pd–ZVI was tested. • Fate and transport of PCBs bound to WHS in the presence of RAC was fully traced. • Direct mixing configuration was compared with compartment configuration. • Results reflected real world complexities associated with slow desorption of PCBs. - Abstract: Sediment (WHS) in Waukegan Harbor, Illinois, heavily contaminated and aged with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), was treated with reactive activated carbon (RAC) impregnated with palladized iron nanoparticles. Lab test proceeded in a direct mixing configuration of RAC and WHS. A compartment configuration, where RAC was physically separated from WHS, was also designed to trace the sequential transport and fate of PCBs, including desorption, adsorption, dechlorination, and re-partitioning. PCBs, once desorbed from WHS, were immediately sequestrated to RAC and subject to dechlorination. Direct mixing of WHS with RAC was one-order of magnitude more effective for dechlorination than compartment configuration. Compared to their desorption-followed by-adsorption route, direct physical contact of RAC with PCBs bound to WHS exhibited negligible contribution to the availability of PCBs for dechlorination reaction. Addition of RAC even in compartment configuration facilitated PCBs desorption from WHS. However, slow desorption of PCBs limited overall performance, resulting in a five-order of magnitude lower dechlorination yield when compared with treatment of purely aqueous PCBs. The low dechlorination yield reflected real world complexities in treating 3.19% organic carbon-containing WHS aged with PCBs for 40 years. These observations were further supported when compared with results on clean Cesar Creek sediment spiked with 2-chlorinated biphenyls.

  13. Desorption, partitioning, and dechlorination characteristics of PCBs in sediments in interaction with reactive activated carbon

    Highlights: • Problematic aged real PCBs-contaminated sediment (WHS) was examined. • Performance of reactive activated carbon (RAC) impregnated with Pd–ZVI was tested. • Fate and transport of PCBs bound to WHS in the presence of RAC was fully traced. • Direct mixing configuration was compared with compartment configuration. • Results reflected real world complexities associated with slow desorption of PCBs. - Abstract: Sediment (WHS) in Waukegan Harbor, Illinois, heavily contaminated and aged with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), was treated with reactive activated carbon (RAC) impregnated with palladized iron nanoparticles. Lab test proceeded in a direct mixing configuration of RAC and WHS. A compartment configuration, where RAC was physically separated from WHS, was also designed to trace the sequential transport and fate of PCBs, including desorption, adsorption, dechlorination, and re-partitioning. PCBs, once desorbed from WHS, were immediately sequestrated to RAC and subject to dechlorination. Direct mixing of WHS with RAC was one-order of magnitude more effective for dechlorination than compartment configuration. Compared to their desorption-followed by-adsorption route, direct physical contact of RAC with PCBs bound to WHS exhibited negligible contribution to the availability of PCBs for dechlorination reaction. Addition of RAC even in compartment configuration facilitated PCBs desorption from WHS. However, slow desorption of PCBs limited overall performance, resulting in a five-order of magnitude lower dechlorination yield when compared with treatment of purely aqueous PCBs. The low dechlorination yield reflected real world complexities in treating 3.19% organic carbon-containing WHS aged with PCBs for 40 years. These observations were further supported when compared with results on clean Cesar Creek sediment spiked with 2-chlorinated biphenyls

  14. Embryonic turkey liver: activities of biotransformation enzymes and activation of DNA-reactive carcinogens

    Perrone, Carmen E.; Duan, Jian Dong; Jeffrey, Alan M.; Williams, Gary M. [New York Medical College, Department of Pathology, Valhalla (United States); Ahr, Hans-Juergen; Schmidt, Ulrich [Bayer AG, Institute of Toxicology, Wuppertal (Germany); Enzmann, Harald H. [Federal Institute for Drugs and Medical Devices, Bonn (Germany)

    2004-10-01

    Avian embryos are a potential alternative model for chemical toxicity and carcinogenicity research. Because the toxic and carcinogenic effects of some chemicals depend on bioactivation, activities of biotransformation enzymes and formation of DNA adducts in embryonic turkey liver were examined. Biochemical analyses of 22-day in ovoturkey liver post-mitochondrial fractions revealed activities of the biotransformation enzymes 7-ethoxycoumarin de-ethylase (ECOD), 7-ethoxyresorufin de-ethylase (EROD), aldrin epoxidase (ALD), epoxide hydrolase (EH), glutathione S-transferase (GST), and UDP-glucuronyltransferase (GLUT). Following the administration of phenobarbital (24 mg/egg) on day 21, enzyme activities of ECOD, EROD, ALD, EH and GLUT, but not of GST, were increased by two-fold or higher levels by day 22. In contrast, acute administration of 3-methylcholanthrene (5 mg/egg) induced only ECOD and EROD activities. Bioactivation of structurally diverse pro-carcinogens was also examined using {sup 32}P-postlabeling for DNA adducts. In ovoexposure of turkey embryos on day 20 of gestation to 2-acetylaminofluorene (AAF), 4,4'-methylenebis(2-chloroaniline) (MOCA), benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), and 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (MeIQx) resulted in the formation of DNA adducts in livers collected by day 21. Some of the DNA adducts had {sup 32}P-postlabeling chromatographic migration patterns similar to DNA adducts found in livers from Fischer F344 rats exposed to the same pro-carcinogens. We conclude that 21-day embryonic turkey liver is capable of chemical biotransformation and activation of genotoxic carcinogens to form DNA adducts. Thus, turkey embryos could be utilized to investigate potential chemical toxicity and carcinogenicity. (orig.)

  15. Reactive oxygen species mediate TNFR1 increase after TRPV1 activation in mouse DRG neurons

    Westlund Karin N

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1 is activated by low pH/protons and is well known to be involved in hyperalgesia during inflammation. Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α, a proinflammatory cytokine, is involved in nociceptive responses causing hyperalgesia through TNF receptor type 1 (TNFR1 activation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS production is also prominently increased in inflamed tissue. The present study investigated TNFR1 receptors in primary cultured mouse dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons after TRPV1 activation and the involvement of ROS. C57BL/6 mice, both TRPV1 knockout and wild type, were used for immunofluorescent and live cell imaging. The L4 and L5 DRGs were dissected bilaterally and cultured overnight. TRPV1 was stimulated with capsaicin or its potent analog, resiniferatoxin. ROS production was measured with live cell imaging and TNFR1 was detected with immunofluorescence in DRG primary cultures. The TRPV1 knockout mice, TRPV1 antagonist, capsazepine, and ROS scavenger, N-tert-Butyl-α-phenylnitrone (PBN, were employed to explore the functional relationship among TRPV1, ROS and TNFR1 in these studies. Results The results demonstrate that TRPV1 activation increases TNFR1 receptors and ROS generation in primary cultures of mouse DRG neurons. Activated increases in TNFR1 receptors and ROS production are absent in TRPV1 deficient mice. The PBN blocks increases in TNFR1 and ROS production induced by capsaicin/resiniferatoxin. Conclusion TRPV1 activation increases TNFR1 in cultured mouse DRG neurons through a ROS signaling pathway, a novel sensitization mechanism in DRG neurons.

  16. Inhibitory activities of soluble and bound millet seed phenolics on free radicals and reactive oxygen species.

    Chandrasekara, Anoma; Shahidi, Fereidoon

    2011-01-12

    Oxidative stress, caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS), is responsible for modulating several pathological conditions and aging. Soluble and bound phenolic extracts of commonly consumed millets, namely, kodo, finger (Ravi), finger (local), foxtail, proso, little, and pearl, were investigated for their phenolic content and inhibition of 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical and ROS, namely, hydroxyl radical, peroxyl radical, hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), hypochlorous acid (HOCl), and singlet oxygen ((1)O(2)). Inhibition of DPPH and hydroxyl radicals was detrmined using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The peroxyl radical inhibitory activity was measured using the oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) assay. The scavenging of H(2)O(2), HOCl, and (1)O(2) was evaluated using colorimetric methods. The results were expressed as micromoles of ferulic acid equivalents (FAE) per gram of grain on a dry weight basis. In addition, major hydroxycinnamic acids were identified and quantified using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and HPLC-mass spectrometry (MS). All millet varieties displayed effective radical and ROS inhibition activities, which generally positively correlated with phenolic contents, except for hydroxyl radical. HPLC analysis revealed the presence of ferulic and p-coumaric acids as major hydroxycinnamic acids in phenolic extract and responsible for the observed effects. Bound extracts of millet contributed 38-99% to ROS scavenging, depending on the variety and the test system employed. Hence, bound phenolics must be included in the evaluation of the antioxidant activity of millets and other cereals. PMID:21133411

  17. New hybrid active power filter for harmonic current suppression and reactive power compensation

    Biricik, Samet; Cemal Ozerdem, Ozgur; Redif, Soydan; Sezai Dincer, Mustafa

    2016-08-01

    In the case of undistorted and balanced grid voltages, low ratio shunt active power filters (APFs) can give unity power factors and achieve current harmonic cancellation. However, this is not possible when source voltages are distorted and unbalanced. In this study, the cost-effective hybrid active power filter (HAPF) topology for satisfying the requirements of harmonic current suppression and non-active power compensation for industry is presented. An effective strategy is developed to observe the effect of the placement of power capacitors and LC filters with the shunt APF. A new method for alleviating the negative effects of a nonideal grid voltage is proposed that uses a self-tuning filter algorithm with instantaneous reactive power theory. The real-time control of the studied system was achieved with a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) architecture, which was developed using the OPAL-RT system. The performance result of the proposed HAPF system is tested and presented under nonideal supply voltage conditions.

  18. Measurement based analysis of active and reactive power losses in a distribution network with wind farms and CHPs

    Lund, Torsten

    2007-01-01

    The paper presents an investigation of the active and reactive power losses in a distribution network with wind turbines and combined heat and power plants. The investigation is based on 15 min average power measurements and load flow calculations in the power system simulation tool Power......Factory®. Based on the measurements and simulations, a regressive model for calculation and allocation of active and reactive power losses has been derived. The influence of the covariance between load and production on the system losses is investigated separately....

  19. Measure Guideline: Evaporative Condensers

    German, A [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), Davis, CA (United States); Dakin, B. [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), Davis, CA (United States); Hoeschele, M. [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), Davis, CA (United States)

    2012-03-01

    This measure guideline on evaporative condensers provides information on properly designing, installing, and maintaining evaporative condenser systems as well as understanding the benefits, costs, and tradeoffs. This is a prescriptive approach that outlines selection criteria, design and installation procedures, and operation and maintenance best practices.

  20. Reactive oxygen species are involved in regulating α1-adrenoceptor-activated vascular smooth muscle contraction

    Tsai Ming-Ho

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reactive oxygen species (ROS were shown to mediate aberrant contractility in hypertension, yet the physiological roles of ROS in vascular smooth muscle contraction have remained elusive. This study aimed to examine whether ROS regulate α1-adrenoceptor-activated contraction by altering myosin phosphatase activities. Methods Using endothelium-denuded rat tail artery (RTA strips, effects of anti-oxidants on isometric force, ROS production, phosphorylation of the 20-kDa myosin light chain (MLC20, and myosin phosphatase stimulated by α1-adrenoceptor agonist phenylephrine were examined. Results An antioxidant, N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC, and two NADPH oxidase inhibitors, apocynin and VAS2870, dose-dependently inhibited contraction activated by phenylephrine. Phenylephrine stimulated superoxide anion production that was diminished by the pretreatment of apocynin, VAS2870, superoxide scavenger tiron or mitochondria inhibitor rotenone, but not by xanthine oxidase inhibitor allopurinol or cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin. Concurrently, NADPH oxidase activity in RTA homogenates increased within 1 min upon phenylephrine stimulation, sustained for 10 min, and was abolished by the co-treatment with apocynin, but not allopurinol or rotenone. Phenylephrine-induced MLC20 phosphorylation was dose-dependently decreased by apocynin. Furthermore, apocynin inhibited phenylephrine-stimulated RhoA translocation to plasma membrane and phosphorylation of both myosin phosphatase regulatory subunit MYPT1Thr855 and myosin phosphatase inhibitor CPI-17Thr38. Conclusions ROS, probably derived from NADPH oxidase and mitochondria, partially regulate α1-adrenoceptor-activated smooth muscle contraction by altering myosin phosphatase-mediated MLC20 phosphorylation through both RhoA/Rho kinase- and CPI-17-dependent pathways.

  1. Integrating active sensing into reactive synthesis with temporal logic constraints under partial observations

    Fu, Jie; Topcu, Ufuk

    2014-01-01

    We introduce the notion of online reactive planning with sensing actions for systems with temporal logic constraints in partially observable and dynamic environments. With incomplete information on the dynamic environment, reactive controller synthesis amounts to solving a two-player game with partial observations, which has impractically computational complexity. To alleviate the high computational burden, online replanning via sensing actions avoids solving the strategy in the reactive syst...

  2. A New Robust Decoupled Control of the Stator Active and Reactive Currents for Grid-Connected Doubly-Fed Induction Generators

    Ahmad Bashar Ataji; Yushi Miura; Toshifumi Ise; Hiroki Tanaka

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses the grid-connected variable speed doubly-fed induction generator, and proposes a new decoupled control to replace the conventional decoupled active and reactive powers (P-Q) control. The proposed decoupled control is based on decoupling the stator active and reactive currents, in contrast with the conventional decoupled P-Q control, which is based on decoupling the stator active and reactive powers by forcing the stator d- or q-voltage to zero. The proposed decoupled cont...

  3. Reactive oxygen species–independent activation of the IL-1β inflammasome in cells from patients with chronic granulomatous disease

    Van De Veerdonk, Frank L.; Smeekens, Sanne P.; Joosten, Leo A. B.; Kullberg, Bart Jan; Dinarello, Charles A.; van der Meer, Jos W.M.; Netea, Mihai G.

    2010-01-01

    Humans with chronic granulomatous diseases (CGDs) due to mutations in p47-phox have defective NADPH activity and thus cannot generate NADPH-dependent reactive oxygen species (ROS). The role of ROS in inflammation is controversial; some in vitro studies suggest that ROS are crucial for secretion of IL-1β via inflammasome activation, whereas mice defective for ROS and patients with CGD have a proinflammatory phenotype. In this study, we evaluated activation of the IL-1β inflammasome in cells fr...

  4. Removal of reactive blue 19 from aqueous solution by pomegranate residual-based activated carbon: optimization by response surface methodology

    Radaei, Elham; Alavi Moghaddam, Mohammad Reza; Arami, Mokhtar

    2014-01-01

    Background In this research, response surface methodology (RSM) was applied to optimize Reactive Blue 19 removal by activated carbon from pomegranate residual. A 24 full factorial central composite design (CCD) was applied to evaluate the effects of initial pH, adsorbent dose, initial dye concentration, and contact time on the dye removal efficiency. Methodology The activated carbon prepared by 50 wt.% phosphoric acid activation under air condition at 500°C. The range of pH and initial dye co...

  5. Early activation of STAT3 regulates reactive astrogliosis induced by diverse forms of neurotoxicity.

    James P O'Callaghan

    Full Text Available Astrogliosis, a cellular response characterized by astrocytic hypertrophy and accumulation of GFAP, is a hallmark of all types of central nervous system (CNS injuries. Potential signaling mechanisms driving the conversion of astrocytes into "reactive" phenotypes differ with respect to the injury models employed and can be complicated by factors such as disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB. As denervation tools, neurotoxicants have the advantage of selective targeting of brain regions and cell types, often with sparing of the BBB. Previously, we found that neuroinflammation and activation of the JAK2-STAT3 pathway in astrocytes precedes up regulation of GFAP in the MPTP mouse model of dopaminergic neurotoxicity. Here we show that multiple mechanistically distinct mouse models of neurotoxicity (MPTP, AMP, METH, MDA, MDMA, KA, TMT engender the same neuroinflammatory and STAT3 activation responses in specific regions of the brain targeted by each neurotoxicant. The STAT3 effects seen for TMT in the mouse could be generalized to the rat, demonstrating cross-species validity for STAT3 activation. Pharmacological antagonists of the neurotoxic effects blocked neuroinflammatory responses, pSTAT3tyr705 and GFAP induction, indicating that damage to neuronal targets instigated astrogliosis. Selective deletion of STAT3 from astrocytes in STAT3 conditional knockout mice markedly attenuated MPTP-induced astrogliosis. Monitoring STAT3 translocation in GFAP-positive cells indicated that effects of MPTP, METH and KA on pSTAT3tyr705 were localized to astrocytes. These findings strongly implicate the STAT3 pathway in astrocytes as a broadly triggered signaling pathway for astrogliosis. We also observed, however, that the acute neuroinflammatory response to the known inflammogen, LPS, can activate STAT3 in CNS tissue without inducing classical signs of astrogliosis. Thus, acute phase neuroinflammatory responses and neurotoxicity-induced astrogliosis both

  6. Asian Dust Particles Induce Macrophage Inflammatory Responses via Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Activation and Reactive Oxygen Species Production

    Kazuma Higashisaka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Asian dust is a springtime meteorological phenomenon that originates in the deserts of China and Mongolia. The dust is carried by prevailing winds across East Asia where it causes serious health problems. Most of the information available on the impact of Asian dust on human health is based on epidemiological investigations, so from a biological standpoint little is known of its effects. To clarify the effects of Asian dust on human health, it is essential to assess inflammatory responses to the dust and to evaluate the involvement of these responses in the pathogenesis or aggravation of disease. Here, we investigated the induction of inflammatory responses by Asian dust particles in macrophages. Treatment with Asian dust particles induced greater production of inflammatory cytokines interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α compared with treatment with soil dust. Furthermore, a soil dust sample containing only particles ≤10 μm in diameter provoked a greater inflammatory response than soil dust samples containing particles >10 μm. In addition, Asian dust particles-induced TNF-α production was dependent on endocytosis, the production of reactive oxygen species, and the activation of nuclear factor-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinases. Together, these results suggest that Asian dust particles induce inflammatory disease through the activation of macrophages.

  7. porewater chemistry experiment at Mont Terri rock laboratory. Reactive transport modelling including bacterial activity

    Document available in extended abstract form only. An in-situ test in the Opalinus Clay formation, termed pore water Chemistry (PC) experiment, was run for a period of five years. It was based on the concept of diffusive equilibration whereby traced water with a composition close to that expected in the formation was continuously circulated and monitored in a packed off borehole. The main original focus was to obtain reliable data on the pH/pCO2 of the pore water, but because of unexpected microbially- induced redox reactions, the objective was then changed to elucidate the biogeochemical processes happening in the borehole and to understand their impact on pH/pCO2 and pH in the low permeability clay formation. The biologically perturbed chemical evolution of the PC experiment was simulated with reactive transport models. The aim of this modelling exercise was to develop a 'minimal-' model able to reproduce the chemical evolution of the PC experiment, i.e. the chemical evolution of solute inorganic and organic compounds (organic carbon, dissolved inorganic carbon etc...) that are coupled with each other through the simultaneous occurrence of biological transformation of solute or solid compounds, in-diffusion and out-diffusion of solute species and precipitation/dissolution of minerals (in the borehole and in the formation). An accurate description of the initial chemical conditions in the surrounding formation together with simplified kinetics rule mimicking the different phases of bacterial activities allowed reproducing the evolution of all main measured parameters (e.g. pH, TOC). Analyses from the overcoring and these simulations evidence the high buffer capacity of Opalinus clay regarding chemical perturbations due to bacterial activity. This pH buffering capacity is mainly attributed to the carbonate system as well as to the clay surfaces reactivity. Glycerol leaching from the pH-electrode might be the primary organic source responsible for

  8. Iron-clay reactivity in radioactive waste disposal - Impacts of bacterial activities and heterogeneities

    This study focuses on the interactions between two materials that may be introduced in a geological disposal of radioactive waste: metallic materials such as the high-level waste overpack, and clay materials such as the clay host rock. Indeed, the interactions between these two materials in such conditions could induce a change of their initial confinement properties. This work aimed at determining the influence of heterogeneities (technological gaps and fractures) and bacterial activities on these interactions, in terms of evolution of chemical and hydraulic properties of clayey materials. To this end, two percolation cells have been conducted during 13 months: the first one with two bacteria (SRB, IRB), the second one without bacteria. These experiments, carried out at 60 C, involved circulating synthetic water representative of the Tournemire pore water through iron powder and through Toarcian artificially cracked argillite from Tournemire. An iron rod was also placed into the argillite. Thus, solid characterizations (SEM, SEM/EDS, Raman, XRD, X-ray tomography) allowed the study of both interfaces: the iron powder/argillite interface and the iron rod/argillite interface. The water probably circulated into the crack during the entire test, which was confirmed by reactive transport modeling with the HYTEC reactive transport code. However, no secondary phase was identified in the crack. In addition, bacteria survival in the biotic cell was confirmed during the experiment by monitoring their population and by analyzing their genetic diversity at the end of the experiment. A strong decrease in sulfate concentration was measured in the output, which confirms the SRB activity. Solid characterization conducted at the end of the experiments have highlighted, with and without bacteria, the occurrence of magnetite and chukanovite in the iron powder, the latter being mainly located close to the argillite interface. In the argillite, a Fe-enriched zone (10 μm) was

  9. Methane Activation Mediated by a Series of Cerium-Vanadium Bimetallic Oxide Cluster Cations: Tuning Reactivity by Doping.

    Ma, Jia-Bi; Meng, Jing-Heng; He, Sheng-Gui

    2016-04-18

    The reactions of cerium-vanadium cluster cations Cex Vy Oz (+) with CH4 are investigated by time-of-flight mass spectrometry and density functional theory calculations. (CeO2 )m (V2 O5 )n (+) clusters (m=1,2, n=1-5; m=3, n=1-4) with dimensions up to nanosize can abstract one hydrogen atom from CH4 . The theoretical study indicates that there are two types of active species in (CeO2 )m (V2 O5 )n (+) , V[(Ot )2 ](.) and [(Ob )2 CeOt ](.) (Ot and Ob represent terminal and bridging oxygen atoms, respectively); the former is less reactive than the latter. The experimentally observed size-dependent reactivities can be rationalized by considering the different active species and mechanisms. Interestingly, the reactivity of the (CeO2 )m (V2 O5 )n (+) clusters falls between those of (CeO2 )2-4 (+) and (V2 O5 )1-5 (+) in terms of C-H bond activation, thus the nature of the active species and the cluster reactivity can be effectively tuned by doping. PMID:26714587

  10. Synthesis and High Photocatalytic Activity of Zn-doped TiO{sub 2} Nanoparticles by Sol-gel and Ammonia-Evaporation Method

    Nguyen, Thanh Binh; Hwang, Moon Jin; Ryu, Kwang Sun [University of Ulsan, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-01-15

    Photocatalysis has been applied to decompose the waste and toxic materials produced in daily life and in the global environment. Pure TiO{sub 2} (Zn-TiO{sub 2}-0) and Zn-doped TiO{sub 2} (Zn-TiO{sub 2}-x, x = 3-10 mol %) samples were synthesized using a novel sol-gel and ammonia-evaporation method. The Zn-doped TiO{sub 2} samples showed high photocatalytic activity for the degradation of methylene blue (MB). The physicochemical properties of the samples were investigated using XRD, SEM, ICP, DLS and BET methods. In addition, the most important measurement of photocatalytic ability was investigated by a UV-vis spectrophotometer. The effects of the mol % of zinc ion doping in TiO{sub 2} on photocatalytic activity were studied. Among the mol % Zn ions investigated, the Zn-TiO{sub 2}-9 sample showed the highest photoreactivity. This sample removed 91.4% of the MB after 4 h, while the pure TiO{sub 2} only removed 46.4% of the MB.

  11. A new class of radiation-activating antitumor prodrugs releasing 5-fluorodeoxyuridine: synthesis, reactivity and biological activity

    A number of 3-substituted 5-fluorodeoxyuridine (5-FdUrd) derivatives (1-6) were synthesized to evaluate their radiation reactivity and biological activity as a new class of prodrugs that can be radiation-activated to release 5-FdUrd. The compounds 2-6 bearing substituents with a 2-oxo group underwent radiolytic reduction to release 5-FdUrd in considerably high yields under anoxic conditions, while the compound 1 without 2-oxo substituent was inactive in releasing 5-FdUrd. The cytotoxicities of 2-6 toward P388 T cells of mouse leukemia were less than 5-FdUrd, as indicated by an MTT assay. The apparent cytotoxicities were significantly enhanced by X-irradiation under hypoxic conditions. A conclusion was that 2-6 have no antitumor effect in contrast to 5-FdUrd, but can potentiate the effect of cancer radiotherapy by releasing a cell-killing component 5-FdUrd. (author)

  12. Quantifying nonisothermal subsurface soil water evaporation

    Deol, Pukhraj; Heitman, Josh; Amoozegar, Aziz; Ren, Tusheng; Horton, Robert

    2012-11-01

    Accurate quantification of energy and mass transfer during soil water evaporation is critical for improving understanding of the hydrologic cycle and for many environmental, agricultural, and engineering applications. Drying of soil under radiation boundary conditions results in formation of a dry surface layer (DSL), which is accompanied by a shift in the position of the latent heat sink from the surface to the subsurface. Detailed investigation of evaporative dynamics within this active near-surface zone has mostly been limited to modeling, with few measurements available to test models. Soil column studies were conducted to quantify nonisothermal subsurface evaporation profiles using a sensible heat balance (SHB) approach. Eleven-needle heat pulse probes were used to measure soil temperature and thermal property distributions at the millimeter scale in the near-surface soil. Depth-integrated SHB evaporation rates were compared with mass balance evaporation estimates under controlled laboratory conditions. The results show that the SHB method effectively measured total subsurface evaporation rates with only 0.01-0.03 mm h-1difference from mass balance estimates. The SHB approach also quantified millimeter-scale nonisothermal subsurface evaporation profiles over a drying event, which has not been previously possible. Thickness of the DSL was also examined using measured soil thermal conductivity distributions near the drying surface. Estimates of the DSL thickness were consistent with observed evaporation profile distributions from SHB. Estimated thickness of the DSL was further used to compute diffusive vapor flux. The diffusive vapor flux also closely matched both mass balance evaporation rates and subsurface evaporation rates estimated from SHB.

  13. Oscillatory brain activity related to control mechanisms during laboratory-induced reactive aggression

    Ulrike M Krämer

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Aggressive behavior is a common reaction in humans after an interpersonal provocation, but little is known about the underlying brain mechanisms. The present study analyzed oscillatory brain activity while participants were involved in an aggressive interaction to examine the neural processes subserving the associated decision and evaluation processes. Participants were selected from a larger sample because of their high scores in trait aggressiveness. We used a competitive reaction time task that induces aggressive behavior through provocation. Each trial is separated in a decision phase, during which the punishment for the opponent is set, and an outcome phase, during which the actual punishment is applied or received. We observed provocation-related differences during the decision phase in the theta band which differed depending on participants’ aggressive behavior: High provocation was associated with an increased frontal theta response in participants refraining from retaliation, but with reduced theta power in those who got back to the opponent. Moreover, more aggressive decisions after being punished were associated with a decrease of frontal theta power. Non-aggressive and aggressive participants differed also in their outcome-related response: Being punished led to an increased frontal theta power compared to win trials in the latter only, pointing to differences in evaluation processes associated with their different behavioral reactions. The data thus support previous evidence for a role of prefrontal areas in the control of reactive aggression and extend behavioral studies on associations between aggression or violence and impaired prefrontal functions.

  14. DNA binding, anti-tumour activity and reactivity toward cell thiols of acridin-9-ylalkenoic derivatives

    O Salem; M Vilkova; J Plsikova; A Grolmusova; M Burikova; M Prokaiova; H Paulikova; J Imrich; M Kozurkova

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we describe the synthesis, biochemical properties and biological activity of a series of new 9-substituted acridine derivatives with a reactive alkene moiety: 9-[(E)-2-phenylethenyl] acridine (1) and methyl (2E)-3-(acridin-9-yl)-prop-2-enoate (2). The interaction of derivatives 1 and 2 with calf thymus DNA was investigated using UV-Vis, fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopy. The binding constants K were estimated as being in the range of 1.9 to 7.1 × 105 M−1, and the percentage of hypochromism was found to be 40–57% (from spectral titration). UV-Vis, fluorescence, and CD measurements indicate that the compounds were effective DNA-intercalating agents. Electrophoretic separation proved that ligands 1 and 2 relaxed topoisomerase I at a concentration of 5 M. Ester 2 was shown to have a stronger cytostatic effect on leukemia cell line L1210 than alkene 1. The incubation of ligands 1 and 2 with the ovarian carcinoma cell line A2780 confirmed their extensive cytotoxic effects, an effect which was particularly pronounced in the case of ligand 2. Cytotoxicity tests against A2780 cells demonstrate that a conjugate of compound 2 with -cysteine (3) is less cytotoxic than compound 2, especially at concentrations greater than 10 M.

  15. Deposition of Visible Light Active Photocatalytic Bismuth Molybdate Thin Films by Reactive Magnetron Sputtering

    Marina Ratova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bismuth molybdate thin films were deposited by reactive magnetron co-sputtering from two metallic targets in an argon/oxygen atmosphere, reportedly for the first time. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX analysis showed that the ratio of bismuth to molybdenum in the coatings can be effectively controlled by varying the power applied to each target. Deposited coatings were annealed in air at 673 K for 30 min. The crystalline structure was assessed by means of Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD. Oxidation state information was obtained by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS. Photodegradation of organic dyes methylene blue and rhodamine B was used for evaluation of the photocatalytic properties of the coatings under a visible light source. The photocatalytic properties of the deposited coatings were then compared to a sample of commercial titanium dioxide-based photocatalytic product. The repeatability of the dye degradation reactions and photocatalytic coating reusability are discussed. It was found that coatings with a Bi:Mo ratio of approximately 2:1 exhibited the highest photocatalytic activity of the coatings studied; its efficacy in dye photodegradation significantly outperformed a sample of commercial photocatalytic coating.

  16. Reactivity of NO2 and CO2 with hardened cement paste containing activated carbon

    Horgnies, M.; Dubois-Brugger, I.; Krou, N. J.; Batonneau-Gener, I.; Belin, T.; Mignard, S.

    2015-07-01

    The development of building materials to reduce the concentration of NO2 is growing interest in a world where the air quality in urban areas is affected by the car traffic. The main binder in concrete is the cement paste that is partly composed of calcium hydroxide. This alkaline hydrate composing the hardened cement paste shows a high BET surface area (close to 100 m2.g-1) and can absorb low-concentrations of NO2. However, the presence of CO2 in the atmosphere limits the de-polluting effect of reference cement paste, mainly due to carbonation of the alkaline hydrates (reaction leading to the formation of calcium carbonate). The results established in this paper demonstrate that the addition of activated carbon in the cement paste, because of its very high BET surface area (close to 800 m2.g-1) and its specific reactivity with NO2, can significantly improve and prolong the de-polluting effect in presence of CO2 and even after complete carbonation of the surface of the cement paste.

  17. Noninvasive bioluminescence imaging of the dynamics of sanguinarine induced apoptosis via activation of reactive oxygen species

    Dai, Yunpeng; Shi, Yaru; Zeng, Qi; Wang, Fu

    2016-01-01

    Most chemotherapeutic drugs exert their anti-tumor effects primarily by triggering a final pathway leading to apoptosis. Noninvasive imaging of apoptotic events in preclinical models would greatly facilitate the development of apoptosis-inducing compounds and evaluation of their therapeutic efficacy. Here we employed a cyclic firefly luciferase (cFluc) reporter to screen potential pro-apoptotic compounds from a number of natural agents. We demonstrated that sanguinarine (SANG) could induce apoptosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner in UM-SCC-22B head and neck cancer cells. Moreover, SANG-induced apoptosis was associated with the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and activation of c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) and nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) signal pathways. After intravenous administration with SANG in 22B-cFluc xenograft models, a dramatic increase of luminescence signal can be detected as early as 48 h post-treatment, as revealed by longitudinal bioluminescence imaging in vivo. Remarkable apoptotic cells reflected from ex vivo TUNEL staining confirmed the imaging results. Importantly, SANG treatment caused distinct tumor growth retardation in mice compared with the vehicle-treated group. Taken together, our results showed that SANG is a candidate anti-tumor drug and noninvasive imaging of apoptosis using cFluc reporter could provide a valuable tool for drug development and therapeutic efficacy evaluation. PMID:26968950

  18. ADENOSINE DEAMINASE ACTIVITY AND SERUM C-REACTIVE PROTEIN AS PROGNOSTIC MARKERS OF CHAGAS DISEASE SEVERITY

    Iván Darío BRAVO-TOBAR

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY Chagas disease is a public health problem worldwide. The availability of diagnostic tools to predict the development of chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy is crucial to reduce morbidity and mortality. Here we analyze the prognostic value of adenosine deaminase serum activity (ADA and C-reactive protein serum levels (CRP in chagasic individuals. One hundred and ten individuals, 28 healthy and 82 chagasic patients were divided according to disease severity in phase I (n = 35, II (n = 29, and III (n = 18. A complete medical history, 12-lead electrocardiogram, chest X-ray, and M-mode echocardiogram were performed on each individual. Diagnosis of Chagas disease was confirmed by ELISA and MABA using recombinant antigens; ADA was determined spectrophotometrically and CRP by ELISA. The results have shown that CRP and ADA increased linearly in relation to disease phase, CRP being significantly higher in phase III and ADA at all phases. Also, CRP and ADA were positively correlated with echocardiographic parameters of cardiac remodeling and with electrocardiographic abnormalities, and negatively with ejection fraction. CRP and ADA were higher in patients with cardiothoracic index ≥ 50%, while ADA was higher in patients with ventricular repolarization disturbances. Finally, CRP was positively correlated with ADA. In conclusion, ADA and CRP are prognostic markers of cardiac dysfunction and remodeling in Chagas disease.

  19. Chemical analysis of reactive species and antimicrobial activity of/nwater treated by nanosecond pulsed DBD air plasma

    Laurita, R.; Barbieri, D.; Gherardi, M.; Colombo, V.; Lukeš, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 2 (2015), s. 53-61. ISSN 2212-8166 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD14080 Grant ostatní: European Cooperation in Science and Technology(XE) COST TD1208 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : Dielectric barrier discharge * Plasma activated water * Reactive species * Peroxynitrite * Phenol degradation * Candida albicans * Staphylococcus aureus * Antimicrobial activity * Nosocomial infections Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2212816615300081

  20. Measure Guideline: Evaporative Condensers

    German, A.; Dakin, B.; Hoeschele, M.

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this measure guideline on evaporative condensers is to provide information on a cost-effective solution for energy and demand savings in homes with cooling loads. This is a prescriptive approach that outlines selection criteria, design and installation procedures, and operation and maintenance best practices. This document has been prepared to provide a process for properly designing, installing, and maintaining evaporative condenser systems as well as understanding the benefits, costs, and tradeoffs.

  1. Boilers, evaporators, and condensers

    This book reports on the boilers, evaporators and condensers that are used in power plants including nuclear power plants. Topics included are forced convection for single-phase side heat exchangers, heat exchanger fouling, industrial heat exchanger design, fossil-fuel-fired boilers, once through boilers, thermodynamic designs of fossil fuel-first boilers, evaporators and condensers in refrigeration and air conditioning systems (with respect to reducing CFC's) and nuclear steam generators

  2. Advanced Chemical Reduction of Reduced Graphene Oxide and Its Photocatalytic Activity in Degrading Reactive Black 5

    Christelle Pau Ping Wong

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Textile industries consume large volumes of water for dye processing, leading to undesirable toxic dyes in water bodies. Dyestuffs are harmful to human health and aquatic life, and such illnesses as cholera, dysentery, hepatitis A, and hinder the photosynthetic activity of aquatic plants. To overcome this environmental problem, the advanced oxidation process is a promising technique to mineralize a wide range of dyes in water systems. In this work, reduced graphene oxide (rGO was prepared via an advanced chemical reduction route, and its photocatalytic activity was tested by photodegrading Reactive Black 5 (RB5 dye in aqueous solution. rGO was synthesized by dispersing the graphite oxide into the water to form a graphene oxide (GO solution followed by the addition of hydrazine. Graphite oxide was prepared using a modified Hummers’ method by using potassium permanganate and concentrated sulphuric acid. The resulted rGO nanoparticles were characterized using ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry (UV-Vis, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD, Raman, and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM to further investigate their chemical properties. A characteristic peak of rGO-48 h (275 cm−1 was observed in the UV spectrum. Further, the appearance of a broad peak (002, centred at 2θ = 24.1°, in XRD showing that graphene oxide was reduced to rGO. Based on our results, it was found that the resulted rGO-48 h nanoparticles achieved 49% photodecolorization of RB5 under UV irradiation at pH 3 in 60 min. This was attributed to the high and efficient electron transport behaviors of rGO between aromatic regions of rGO and RB5 molecules.

  3. Production and characterization of activated carbon prepared from safflower seed cake biochar and its ability to absorb reactive dyestuff

    Angın, Dilek, E-mail: angin@sakarya.edu.tr [Department of Food Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Sakarya University, Sakarya (Turkey); Köse, T. Ennil, E-mail: ennilb@ogu.edu.tr [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Architecture, Eskisehir Osmangazi University, 26480 Meselik-Eskisehir (Turkey); Selengil, Uğur, E-mail: uselen@ogu.edu.tr [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Architecture, Eskisehir Osmangazi University, 26480 Meselik-Eskisehir (Turkey)

    2013-09-01

    The use of activated carbon obtained from biochar for the removal of reactive dyestuff from aqueous solutions at various contact times, pHs and temperatures was investigated. The biochar was chemically modified with potassium hydroxide. The surface area and micropore volume of activated carbon was 1277 m{sup 2}/g and 0.4952 cm{sup 3}/g, respectively. The surface characterization of both biochar and activated carbon was undertaken using by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The experimental data indicated that the adsorption isotherms are well described by the Dubinin–Radushkevich (DR) isotherm equation. The adsorption kinetics of reactive dyestuff obeys the pseudo second-order kinetic model. The thermodynamic parameters such as ΔG{sup o}, ΔH{sup o} and ΔS{sup o} were calculated to estimate the nature of adsorption. The activation energy of the system was calculated as 1.12 kJ/mol. According to these results, prepared activated carbon could be used as a low-cost adsorbent to compare with the commercial activated carbon for the removal reactive dyestuff from waste water.

  4. Production and characterization of activated carbon prepared from safflower seed cake biochar and its ability to absorb reactive dyestuff

    Angın, Dilek; Köse, T. Ennil; Selengil, Uğur

    2013-09-01

    The use of activated carbon obtained from biochar for the removal of reactive dyestuff from aqueous solutions at various contact times, pHs and temperatures was investigated. The biochar was chemically modified with potassium hydroxide. The surface area and micropore volume of activated carbon was 1277 m2/g and 0.4952 cm3/g, respectively. The surface characterization of both biochar and activated carbon was undertaken using by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The experimental data indicated that the adsorption isotherms are well described by the Dubinin-Radushkevich (DR) isotherm equation. The adsorption kinetics of reactive dyestuff obeys the pseudo second-order kinetic model. The thermodynamic parameters such as ΔG̊, ΔH̊ and ΔS̊ were calculated to estimate the nature of adsorption. The activation energy of the system was calculated as 1.12 kJ/mol. According to these results, prepared activated carbon could be used as a low-cost adsorbent to compare with the commercial activated carbon for the removal reactive dyestuff from wastewater.

  5. The Optimization of Immobilization for the Low-Activity Waste of theEvaporation Product with Cement

    The experimental investigation of immobilization the low active wasteconcentration containing 2.44x10-3 μCi/cc a great deal of NaNO3 withcement was done. The immobilization process was carried out by mixing cement,water, concentrate, and Ca-bentonite with a given ratio within a glassbeaker. The mixture was then stirred with an electrical hand mixer untilhomogeneous. The studied immobilization condition were the influences of theweight ratio water to cement, the weight ratio of concentrate to cement withwhich the concentrate pH was varied, and the influence of the addition ofCa-bentonite (% in weight) with the optimum pH of concentrate. The sample inthe container with the size of 2.54 cm in diameter and 3.0 cm in height wasmade of polyethylene and was covered by a tight lid and was cured for 28days. After the sample was cured for 28 days and then it was taken out of thecontainer. This sample quality was ready for being tested. The quality ofcementation product tested compressive strength, density, chemical stability,irradiation stability and thermal stability. The optimum results ofinvestigation were the weight ratio of water to cement = 0.30, thecompressive strength of 30.37 N/mm2. For the immobilization of the waste andcement with the optimum pH being used, yielded in the compressive strength of28.07 N/mm2. Further more from the condition of waste and cement at theoptimum pH which was added by the optimum Ca-bentonite gained the compressivestrength of 33.64 N/mm2 before irradiation, where as after irradiation thecompressive strength was 32.41 N/mm2. The optimum thermal test resultachieved was 250 oC with the compressive strength of 44.10 N/mm2. For theleaching test results after being cured for 91 days in the distilled watermedia was 0.47x10-4 gcm-2day-1, while in the sea water was 0.66x10-4gcm-2day-1. Water medium activity until 91 days = 3.1x10-7 μCi/cc,MPC from ICRP = 8.1x10-7 μCi/cc. The experimental investigation ofcemented waste monolith block resulted

  6. Antibacterial activity of reactive quaternary ammonium compounds in solution and in nonleachable coatings

    Gozzelino, G.; Romero Tobar, D.E.; Chaitiemwong, N.; Hazeleger, W.C.; Beumer, R.R.

    2011-01-01

    Antibacterial polymers suitable for coating applications without leaching of the biocidal component have been obtained by UV copolymerization of acrylic resins with acrylic monomers containing quaternary ammonium moieties. Suitable reactive biocides, based on quaternary ammonium monomers (QAMs), end

  7. Voltage/Pitch Control for Maximization and Regulation of Active/Reactive Powers in Wind Turbines with Uncertainties

    Guo, Yi; Jiang, John N; Tang, Choon Yik; Ramakumar, Rama G

    2010-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of controlling a variable-speed wind turbine with a Doubly Fed Induction Generator (DFIG), modeled as an electromechanically-coupled nonlinear system with rotor voltages and blade pitch angle as its inputs, active and reactive powers as its outputs, and most of the aerodynamic and mechanical parameters as its uncertainties. Using a blend of linear and nonlinear control strategies (including feedback linearization, pole placement, uncertainty estimation, and gradient-based potential function minimization) as well as time-scale separation in the dynamics, we develop a controller that is capable of maximizing the active power in the Maximum Power Tracking (MPT) mode, regulating the active power in the Power Regulation (PR) mode, seamlessly switching between the two modes, and simultaneously adjusting the reactive power to achieve a desired power factor. The controller consists of four cascaded components, uses realistic feedback signals, and operates without knowledge of the C_p-...

  8. Evaporation of Boric Acid from Sea Water

    Gast, James A.; Thompson, Thomas G.

    2011-01-01

    Previous investigators have shown that the boron-chlorinity ratios of rain waters are many times greater than the boron-chlorinity ratio of sea water. The presence of boron in the atmosphere has been attributed to sea spray, volcanic activity, accumulation in dust, evaporation from plants, and industrial pollution. In this paper data are presented to demonstrate that boric acid in sea water has a vapor pressure at ordinary temperatures of the sea and, when sea water evaporates, boric acid occ...

  9. Evaluation of novel reactive MgO activated slag binder for the immobilisation of lead and zinc.

    Jin, Fei; Al-Tabbaa, Abir

    2014-12-01

    Although Portland cement is the most widely used binder in the stabilisation/solidification (S/S) processes, slag-based binders have gained significant attention recently due to their economic and environmental merits. In the present study, a novel binder, reactive MgO activated slag, is compared with hydrated lime activated slag in the immobilisation of lead and zinc. A series of lead or zinc-doped pastes and mortars were prepared with metal to binder ratio from 0.25% to 1%. The hydration products and microstructure were studied by X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis and scanning electron microscopy. The major hydration products were calcium silicate hydrate and hydrotalcite-like phases. The unconfined compressive strength was measured up to 160 d. Findings show that lead had a slight influence on the strength of MgO-slag paste while zinc reduced the strength significantly as its concentration increased. Leachate results using the TCLP tests revealed that the immobilisation degree was dependent on the pH and reactive MgO activated slag showed an increased pH buffering capacity, and thus improved the immobilisation efficiency compared to lime activated slag. It was proposed that zinc was mainly immobilised within the structure of the hydrotalcite-like phases or in the form of calcium zincate, while lead was primarily precipitated as the hydroxide. It is concluded, therefore, that reactive MgO activated slag can serve as clinker-free alternative binder in the S/S process. PMID:25123653

  10. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species enhance AMP-activated protein kinase activation in the endothelium of patients with coronary artery disease and diabetes

    Mackenzie, Ruth M.; Salt, Ian P.; Miller, William H.; et al.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether the endothelial dysfunction associated with CAD (coronary artery disease) and T2D (Type 2 diabetes mellitus) is concomitant with elevated mtROS (mitochondrial reactive oxygen species) production in the endothelium and establish if this, in turn, regulates the activity of endothelial AMPK (AMP-activated protein kinase). We investigated endothelial function, mtROS production and AMPK activation in saphenous veins from patients with advanced ...

  11. Aging Enhances the Production of Reactive Oxygen Species and Bactericidal Activity in Peritoneal Macrophages by Upregulating Classical Activation Pathways

    Smallwood, Heather S.; López-Ferrer, Daniel; Squier, Thomas C.

    2011-10-07

    . Collectively, these results indicate that macrophages isolated from old mice are in a preactivated state that enhances their sensitivities to LPS exposure. The hyper-responsive activation of macrophages in aged animals may act to minimize infection by general bacterial threats that arise due to age-dependent declines in adaptive immunity. Finally, however, this hypersensitivity and the associated increase in the level of formation of reactive oxygen species are likely to contribute to observed age-dependent increases in the level of oxidative damage that underlie many diseases of the elderly.

  12. Treatment of liquid radioactive waste: Evaporation

    About 10.000 m3 of low active liquid waste (LLW) arise in the Nuclear Research Center Karlsruhe. Chemical contents of this liquid waste are generally not declared. Resulting from experiments carried out in the Center during the early sixties, the evaporator facility was built in 1968 for decontamination of LLW. The evaporators use vapor compression and concentrate recirculation in the evaporator sump by pumps. Since 1971 the medium active liquid waste (MLW) from the Karlsruhe Reprocessing Plant (WAK) was decontaminated in this evaporator facility, too. By this time the amount of low liquid waste (LLW) had been decontaminated without mentionable interruptions. Afterwards a lot of interruptions of operations occurred, mainly due to leakages of pumps, valves and pipes. There was also a very high radiation level for the operating personnel. As a consequence of this experience a new evaporator facility for decontamination of medium active liquid waste was built in 1974. This facility started operation in 1976. The evaporator has natural circulation and is heated by steam through a heat exchanger. (orig./RW)

  13. The experience of liquid radwaste evaporator performance improvement

    Ulchin NPP has only one monobloc evaporation column which treated all radwaste liquid for two units. Since commercial operation in 1988 the evaporator performance is very poor. I think that the bad condition of evaporator is because of the bad quality of liquid radwaste, the large volume of liquid radwaste to treated, the poor skill of operation and some mistake in equipment design. Because of above conditions the average released activity by liquid radwaste is 35.153mCi/year in last eight years(1988∼1995). So it is necessary that we have to improve the evaporator performance and to reduce the liquid radwaste volume to evaporate

  14. Loss of receptor on tuberculin-reactive T-cells marks active pulmonary tuberculosis.

    Mathias Streitz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tuberculin-specific T-cell responses have low diagnostic specificity in BCG vaccinated populations. While subunit-antigen (e.g. ESAT-6, CFP-10 based tests are useful for diagnosing latent tuberculosis infection, there is no reliable immunological test for active pulmonary tuberculosis. Notably, all existing immunological tuberculosis-tests are based on T-cell response size, whereas the diagnostic potential of T-cell response quality has never been explored. This includes surface marker expression and functionality of mycobacterial antigen specific T-cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Flow-cytometry was used to examine over-night antigen-stimulated T-cells from tuberculosis patients and controls. Tuberculin and/or the relatively M. tuberculosis specific ESAT-6 protein were used as stimulants. A set of classic surface markers of T-cell naïve/memory differentiation was selected and IFN-gamma production was used to identify T-cells recognizing these antigens. The percentage of tuberculin-specific T-helper-cells lacking the surface receptor CD27, a state associated with advanced differentiation, varied considerably between individuals (from less than 5% to more than 95%. Healthy BCG vaccinated individuals had significantly fewer CD27-negative tuberculin-reactive CD4 T-cells than patients with smear and/or culture positive pulmonary tuberculosis, discriminating these groups with high sensitivity and specificity, whereas individuals with latent tuberculosis infection exhibited levels in between. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Smear and/or culture positive pulmonary tuberculosis can be diagnosed by a rapid and reliable immunological test based on the distribution of CD27 expression on peripheral blood tuberculin specific T-cells. This test works very well even in a BCG vaccinated population. It is simple and will be of great utility in situations where sputum specimens are difficult to obtain or sputum-smear is negative. It will also help

  15. Ru(0) and Ru(II) nitrosyl pincer complexes: structure, reactivity, and catalytic activity.

    Fogler, Eran; Iron, Mark A; Zhang, Jing; Ben-David, Yehoshoa; Diskin-Posner, Yael; Leitus, Gregory; Shimon, Linda J W; Milstein, David

    2013-10-01

    Despite considerable interest in ruthenium carbonyl pincer complexes and their substantial catalytic activity, there has been relatively little study of the isoelectronic ruthenium nitrosyl complexes. Here we describe the synthesis and reactivity of several complexes of this type as well as the catalytic activity of complex 6. Reaction of the PNP ligand (PNP = 2,6-bis((t)Bu2PCH2)pyridine) with RuCl3(NO)(PPh3)2 yielded the Ru(II) complex 3. Chloride displacement by BAr(F-) (BAr(F-) = tetrakis(3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)borate) gave the crystallographicaly characterized, linear NO Ru(II) complex 4, which upon treatment with NaBEt3H yielded the Ru(0) complexes 5. The crystallographically characterized Ru(0) square planar complex 5·BF4 bears a linear NO ligand located trans to the pyridilic nitrogen. Further treatment of 5·BF4 with excess LiOH gave the crystallographicaly characterized Ru(0) square planar, linear NO complex 6. Complex 6 catalyzes the dehydrogenative coupling of alcohols to esters, reaching full conversion under air or under argon. Reaction of the PNN ligand (PNN = 2-((t)Bu2PCH2)-6-(Et2NCH2)pyridine) with RuCl3(NO)(H2O)2 in ethanol gave an equilibrium mixture of isomers 7a and 7b. Further treatment of 7a + 7b with 2 equivalent of sodium isopropoxide gave the crystallographicaly characterized, bent-nitrosyl, square pyramidal Ru(II) complex 8. Complex 8 was also synthesized by reaction of PNN with RuCl3(NO)(H2O)2 and Et3N in ethanol. Reaction of the "long arm" PN(2)N ligand (PN(2)N = 2-((t)Bu2PCH2-)-6-(Et2NCH2CH2)pyridine) with RuCl3(NO)(H2O)2 in ethanol gave complex 9, which upon treatment with 2 equiv of sodium isopropoxide gave complex 10. Complex 10 was also synthesized directly by reaction of PN(2)N with RuCl3(NO)(H2O)2 and a base in ethanol. A noteworthy aspect of these nitrosyl complexes is their preference for the Ru(0) oxidization state over Ru(II). This preference is observed with both aromatized and dearomatized pincer ligands, in

  16. Independent Control of Active and Reactive Powers of a DFIG Based Wind Energy Conversion System by Vector Control

    Ibrahim Ahmad A

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with a design and implementation of a doubly fed induction generator (DFIG wind energy conversion system (WECS connected to the power grid. A back-to-back AC/DC/AC converter is incorporated between the stator and the rotor windings of a DFIG, in order to obtain variable speed operation. The DFIG can be controlled from sub-synchronous speed to super synchronous speed operation. The main objective of the paper is to control the flow of the Active and Reactive powers produced by the DFIG based wind energy conversion system. A vector control strategy with stator flux orientation is applied to both the grid side converter and the rotor side converter for the independent control of Active and reactive powers produced by the DFIG based wind energy conversion system. The system along with its control circuit were simulated in a Matlab/simulink and the results are presented and discussed.

  17. High reactivity of nanosized niobium oxide cluster cations in methane activation: A comparison with vanadium oxides

    The reactions between methane and niobium oxide cluster cations were studied and compared to those employing vanadium oxides. Hydrogen atom abstraction (HAA) reactions were identified over stoichiometric (Nb2O5)N+ clusters for N as large as 14 with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The reactivity of (Nb2O5)N+ clusters decreases as the N increases, and it is higher than that of (V 2O5)N+ for N ≥ 4. Theoretical studies were conducted on (Nb2O5)N+ (N = 2–6) by density functional calculations. HAA reactions on these clusters are all favorable thermodynamically and kinetically. The difference of the reactivity with respect to the cluster size and metal type (Nb vs V) was attributed to thermodynamics, kinetics, the electron capture ability, and the distribution of the unpaired spin density. Nanosized Nb oxide clusters show higher HAA reactivity than V oxides, indicating that niobia may serve as promising catalysts for practical methane conversion

  18. Evaporation reduction from tritiated water pools

    Spent-fuel storage and disassembly basins at heavy water reactor facilities have maximum allowable temperature and tritium activity levels to protect personnel from exposure to radiation from the tritiated water vapor emanating from these basins. Means of reducing this exposure by suppressing basin water evaporation through the use of monolayer films are presented. The effect of tritiated water on the performance of the monolayer film has been experimentally examined, and tritiated water does not detrimentally affect the film's ability to reduce evaporation. Large-scale light water experiments have demonstrated that an octadecanol monolayer can reduce evaporation by ∼50%. A method for applying and maintaining a monolayer film over large areas with complex surface geometries has been developed. The results demonstrate the feasibility of using octadecanol monolayers to suppress evaporation from tritiated water pools

  19. 300 Area solvent evaporator closure plan

    This document describes activities for the closure of a dangerous waste treatment tank facility, owned and operated by the US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) and co-operated by the Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford). This tank treatment facility is the 300 Area Solvent Evaporator (300 ASE), which was located in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site from 1975 to 1986, and was managed for the DOE-RL by UNC Nuclear Industries, Incorporated. The 300 ASE evaporator unit was a modified load lugger (dumpster) in which solvent wastes were evaporated, and the adjacent 333 East Concrete Pad, where 55-gallon barrels of waste solvents were temporarily stored while awaiting liquid transfers into the evaporator. 26 refs., 14 figs., 6 tabs

  20. Chlorpyrifos Induces the Expression of the Epstein-Barr Virus Lytic Cycle Activator BZLF-1 via Reactive Oxygen Species

    Ling Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Organophosphate pesticides (OPs are among the most widely used synthetic chemicals for the control of a wide variety of pests, and reactive oxygen species (ROS caused by OPs may be involved in the toxicity of various pesticides. Previous studies have demonstrated that a reactivation of latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV could be induced by oxidative stress. In this study, we investigated whether OPs could reactivate EBV through ROS accumulation. The Raji cells were treated with chlorpyrifos (CPF, one of the most commonly used OPs. Oxidative stress indicators and the expression of the EBV immediate-early gene BZLF-1 were determined after CPF treatment. Our results show that CPF induces oxidative stress as evidenced by decreased malondialdehyde (MDA level, accompanied by an increase in ROS production, DNA damage, glutathione (GSH level, and superoxide dismutase (SOD and catalase (CAT activity. Moreover, CPF treatment significantly enhances the expression of BZLF-1, and the increased BZLF-1 expression was ameliorated by N-acetylcysteine (NAC incubation. These results suggest that OPs could contribute to the reactivation of the EBV lytic cycle through ROS induction, a process that may play an important role in the development of EBV-associated diseases.

  1. Heavy metal removal from MSWI fly ash by electrokinetic remediation coupled with a permeable activated charcoal reactive barrier

    Tao Huang; Dongwei Li; Liu Kexiang; Yuewei Zhang

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the investigations into the feasibility of the application of a remediation system that couples electrokinetic remediation (EKR) with the permeable reactive barrier (PRB) concept for municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash with activated charcoal as the PRB material. The experimental results of this study showed that the proposed combined method can effectively improve the remediation efficiency and that the addition of the oxalic acid to the PRB media before the...

  2. Determination of reactive oxygen species from ZnO micro-nano structures with shape-dependent photocatalytic activity

    He, Weiwei; Zhao, Hongxiao; Jia, Huimin [Key Laboratory of Micro-Nano Materials for Energy Storage and Conversion of Henan Province, Institute of Surface Micro and Nano Materials, Xuchang University, Henan 461000 (China); Yin, Jun-Jie [Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, College Park, MD 20740 (United States); Zheng, Zhi, E-mail: zhengzhi99999@gmail.com [Key Laboratory of Micro-Nano Materials for Energy Storage and Conversion of Henan Province, Institute of Surface Micro and Nano Materials, Xuchang University, Henan 461000 (China)

    2014-05-01

    Graphical abstract: ZnO micro/nano structures with shape dependent photocatalytic activity were prepared by hydrothermal reaction. The generations of hydroxyl radical, superoxide and singlet oxygen from irradiated ZnO were identified precisely by electron spin resonance spectroscopy. The type of reactive oxygen species was determined by band gap structure of ZnO. - Highlights: • ZnO micro/nano structures with different morphologies were prepared by solvothermal reaction. • Multi-pod like ZnO structures exhibited superior photocatalytic activity. • The generations of hydroxyl radical, superoxide and singlet oxygen from irradiated ZnO were characterized precisely by electron spin resonance spectroscopy. • The type of reactive oxygen species was determined by band gap structure of ZnO. - Abstract: ZnO micro/nano structures with different morphologies have been prepared by the changing solvents used during their synthesis by solvothermal reaction. Three typical shapes of ZnO structures including hexagonal, bell bottom like and multi-pod formed and were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Multi pod like ZnO structures exhibited the highest photocatalytic activity toward degradation of methyl orange. Using electron spin resonance spectroscopy coupled with spin trapping techniques, we demonstrate an effective way to identify precisely the generation of hydroxyl radicals, superoxide and singlet oxygen from the irradiated ZnO multi pod structures. The type of reactive oxygen species formed was predictable from the band gap structure of ZnO. These results indicate that the shape of micro-nano structures significantly affects the photocatalytic activity of ZnO, and demonstrate the value of electron spin resonance spectroscopy for characterizing the type of reactive oxygen species formed during photoexcitation of semiconductors.

  3. Boryl (Hetero)aryne Precursors as Versatile Arylation Reagents: Synthesis through C–H Activation and Orthogonal Reactivity

    Demory, Emilien; Devaraj, Karthik; Orthaber, Andreas; Gates, Paul J; Pilarski, Lukasz T

    2015-01-01

    (Pinacolato)boryl ortho-silyl(hetero)aryl triflates are presented as a new class of building blocks for arylation. They demonstrate unique versatility by delivering boronate or (hetero)aryne reactivity chemoselectively in a broad range of transformations. This approach enables the unprecedented postfunctionalization of fluoride-activated (hetero)aryne precursors, for example, as substrates in transition-metal catalysis, and offers valuable new possibilities for aryl boronate postfunctionalization without the use of specialized protecting groups. PMID:26270451

  4. Active suppression of in vitro reactivity of spleen cells after BCG treatment

    It was found that spleen cells from mice injected i.v. with large doses of BCG responded to PHA stimulation less intensely than did normal spleen cells. It was shown that nylon wool column purified BCG treated T cells also had a low PHA reactivity. Unfractionated spleen cells, adherent cells or T-enriched populations from BCG treated mice, when added to normal T cells lowered their PHA reactivity. When the same BCG treated cell populations were added to tumor cells in vitro, they inhibited their growth. (author)

  5. Adsorption of Reactive Red M-2BE dye from water solutions by multi-walled carbon nanotubes and activated carbon

    Machado, Fernando M.; Bergmann, Carlos P. [Department of Material, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Osvaldo Aranha 99, Laboratory 705C, ZIP 90035-190, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Fernandes, Thais H.M. [Institute of Chemistry, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Goncalves 9500, Postal Box 15003, ZIP 91501-970, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Lima, Eder C., E-mail: profederlima@gmail.com [Institute of Chemistry, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Goncalves 9500, Postal Box 15003, ZIP 91501-970, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Royer, Betina; Calvete, Tatiana [Institute of Chemistry, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Goncalves 9500, Postal Box 15003, ZIP 91501-970, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Fagan, Solange B. [Department of Nanoscience, UNIFRA, R. dos Andradas 1614, ZIP 97010-032, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil)

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: {yields} Multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) and powdered activated carbon (PAC) adsorbents. {yields} Reactive Red M-2BE textile dye adsorbate. {yields} Kinetics was followed by Avrami fractional-order. {yields} The maximum adsorption capacities were 335.7 and 260.7 mg g{sup -1} for MWCNT and PAC. {yields} Synthetic effluents treatment. - Abstract: Multi-walled carbon nanotubes and powdered activated carbon were used as adsorbents for the successful removal of Reactive Red M-2BE textile dye from aqueous solutions. The adsorbents were characterised by infrared spectroscopy, N{sub 2} adsorption/desorption isotherms and scanning electron microscopy. The effects of pH, shaking time and temperature on adsorption capacity were studied. In the acidic pH region (pH 2.0), the adsorption of the dye was favourable using both adsorbents. The contact time to obtain equilibrium at 298 K was fixed at 1 h for both adsorbents. The activation energy of the adsorption process was evaluated from 298 to 323 K for both adsorbents. The Avrami fractional-order kinetic model provided the best fit to the experimental data compared with pseudo-first-order or pseudo-second-order kinetic adsorption models. For Reactive Red M-2BE dye, the equilibrium data were best fitted to the Liu isotherm model. Simulated dyehouse effluents were used to check the applicability of the proposed adsorbents for effluent treatment.

  6. Separation and activity determination of 239+240Pu, 241Am and Curium (242and244Cm) in evaporator concentrate by Alpha Spectrometry

    Alpha spectrometry analysis was used for activity determinations of Pu, Am and Cm isotopes in evaporator concentrate samples from nuclear power plants. Using a sequential procedure the first step was Pu isolation by an anion exchange column followed by an Am and Cm separation of U and Fe by a co-precipitation with oxalic acid. The precipitate was used for americium and curium separation of strontium by using a TRU resin extraction chromatography column. Due to their chemical similarities and energy difference it was seen that the simultaneous determination of 241Am, 242Cm and 243,244Cm isotopes is possible using the 243Am as tracer, once they have peaks in different region of interest (ROI) in the alpha spectrum. In this work it was used tracers, 238Pu, 243Am, 244Cm and 232U, for determination and quantification of theirs isotopes, respectively. The standard deviations for replicate analysis were calculated and for 241Am it was (1,040 ± 160 mBqKg-1), relative standard deviation 15.38%, and for 239+240Pu it was (551 +- 44 mBqKg-1), relative standard deviation 7.98%. In addition, for the 242Cm isotope the standard deviation for determinations was(75 ± 23 mBqKg-1), with the relative standard deviation 30.67% higher than for 241Am and 239+240Pu. The radiometric yields ranged from 90% to 105% and the lower limit of detection was estimated as being 2.05 mBqKg-1. (author)

  7. Active robot vision camera heads, model based navigation and reactive control

    Christensen, H I; Bunke, H

    1993-01-01

    One of the series in Machine Perception and Artificial Intelligence, this book covers subjects including the Harvard binocular head; heads, eyes, and head-eye systems; a binocular robot head with torsional eye movements; and escape and dodging behaviours for reactive control.

  8. Measuring Physical Activity with Pedometers in Older Adults with Intellectual Disability : Reactivity and Number of Days

    Hilgenkamp, Thessa; Van Wijck, Ruud; Evenhuis, Heleen

    2012-01-01

    The minimum number of days of pedometer monitoring needed to estimate valid average weekly step counts and reactivity was investigated for older adults with intellectual disability. Participants (N = 268) with borderline to severe intellectual disability ages 50 years and older were instructed to we

  9. Feed-forward active contour analysis for improved brachial artery reactivity testing.

    Pugliese, Daniel N; Sehgal, Chandra M; Sultan, Laith R; Reamer, Courtney B; Mohler, Emile R

    2016-08-01

    The object of this study was to utilize a novel feed-forward active contour (FFAC) algorithm to find a reproducible technique for analysis of brachial artery reactivity. Flow-mediated dilation (FMD) is an important marker of vascular endothelial function but has not been adopted for widespread clinical use given its technical limitations, including inter-observer variability and differences in technique across clinical sites. We developed a novel FFAC algorithm with the goal of validating a more reliable standard. Forty-six healthy volunteers underwent FMD measurement according to the standard technique. Ultrasound videos lasting 5-10 seconds each were obtained pre-cuff inflation and at minutes 1 through 5 post-cuff deflation in longitudinal and transverse views. Automated segmentation using the FFAC algorithm with initial boundary definition from three different observers was used to analyze the images to measure diameter/cross-sectional area over the cardiac cycle. The %FMD was calculated for average, minimum, and maximum diameters/areas. Using the FFAC algorithm, the population-specific coefficient of variation (CV) at end-diastole was 3.24% for transverse compared to 9.96% for longitudinal measurements; the subject-specific CV was 15.03% compared to 57.41%, respectively. For longitudinal measurements made via the conventional method, the population-specific CV was 4.77% and subject-specific CV was 117.79%. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for transverse measurements was 0.97 (95% CI: 0.95-0.98) compared to 0.90 (95% CI: 0.84-0.94) for longitudinal measurements with FFAC and 0.72 (95% CI: 0.51-0.84) for conventional measurements. In conclusion, transverse views using the novel FFAC method provide less inter-observer variability than traditional longitudinal views. Improved reproducibility may allow adoption of FMD testing in a clinical setting. The FFAC algorithm is a robust technique that should be evaluated further for its ability to replace the

  10. Experimental Antithrombotic Effect of Garlic Varieties Measured by a Global In Vitro Test of Platelet Reactivity and Spontaneous Thrombolytic Activity

    Yoshinobu Ijiri

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Prevention of arterial thrombotic diseases has high priority over treatment in developed countries. Unsuitable life style such as inappropriate quality and quantity of daily diet is known to increase the risk for acute thrombotic events, while a regular diet with proven antithrombotic effects might be beneficial in preventing the disease. The present study was undertaken as a part of a series of research in screening vegetables, fruits and medicinal herbs for antithrombotic activity by animal models of thrombosis. In the present study the effects of fifteen garlic varieties (accessions on platelet reactivity and spontaneous (endogenous thrombolytic activity were measured ex vivo from saline-diluted rat blood by the Global Thrombosis Test (GTT. All accessions showed antithrombotic activity but the activity varied between accessions. The heat stable antithrombotic activity was dominantly due to inhibition of platelet reactivity to high shear stress while the spontaneous thrombolytic activity was not affected. These findings suggest that daily intake of garlic as part of an antithrombotic diet may be beneficial for the prevention of arterial thrombotic disorders.

  11. Evaporation/Hadronization Correspondence

    Allahbakhshi, Davood

    2016-01-01

    A holographic duality is proposed between black hole evaporation in the bulk and hadronization (confinement) in dual field theory. Information paradox is discussed in this duality. We also propose that the recently introduced semi black brane solution is holographically dual to a mixed plasma of quarks, gluons and hadrons in global equilibrium.

  12. Passive evaporative cooling

    Tzoulis, A.

    2011-01-01

    This "designers' manual" is made during the TIDO-course AR0531 Smart & Bioclimatic Design. Passive techniques for cooling are a great way to cope with the energy problem of the present day. This manual introduces passive cooling by evaporation. These methods have been used for many years in traditi

  13. Investigation of the behavior of a three phase grid-connected photovoltaic system to control active and reactive power

    Tsengenes, Georgios; Adamidis, Georgios [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Engineering, Democritus University of Thrace, University Campus Kimmeria, 67100 Xanthi (Greece)

    2011-01-15

    In this paper, a photovoltaic (PV) system, with maximum power point tracking (MPPT), connected to a three phase grid is presented. The connection of photovoltaic system on the grid takes place in one stage using voltage source inverter (VSI). For a better utilization of the photovoltaic system, the control strategy applied is based on p-q theory. According to this strategy during sunlight the system sends active power to the grid and at the same time compensates the reactive power of the load. In case there is no sunlight (during the night for instance), the inverter only compensates the reactive power of the load. In this paper the use of p-q theory to supply the grid with active power and compensate the reactive power of the load is investigated. The advantage of this control strategy is that the photovoltaic system is operated the whole day. Furthermore, the p-q theory uses simple algebraic calculations without demanding the use of PLL to synchronize the inverter with the grid. (author)

  14. Impacts of powdered activated carbon addition on trihalomethane formation reactivity of dissolved organic matter in membrane bioreactor effluent.

    Ma, Defang; Gao, Yue; Gao, Baoyu; Wang, Yan; Yue, Qinyan; Li, Qian

    2014-12-01

    Characteristics and trihalomethane (THM) formation reactivity of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in effluents from two membrane bioreactors (MBRs) with and without powdered activated carbon (PAC) addition (referred to as PAC/MBR and MBR, respectively) were examined to investigate the effects of PAC addition on THM formation of MBR effluent during chlorination. PAC addition increased the specific UV absorbance. Hydrophobic DOM especially hydrophobic acids in PAC/MBR effluent (50%) were more than MBR effluent (42%). DOM with molecular weight <1 kDa constituted 12% of PAC/MBR effluent DOM, which was less than that of MBR effluent (16%). Data obtained from excitation and emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy revealed that PAC/MBR effluent DOM contained more simple aromatic protein, but had less fulvic acid-like and soluble microbial by-product-like. PAC addition reduced the formation of bromine-containing THMs during chlorination of effluents, but increased THM formation reactivity of effluent DOM. PMID:25150685

  15. UVB radiation exposes fibrinogen binding sites on platelets by activating protein kinase C via reactive oxygen species

    Kooy, M. van M.; Akkerman, J.W.N.; Asbeck, S. van; Borghuis, Lizette; Prooijen, H.C. van (Utrecht Univ. Hospital (Netherlands))

    1993-02-01

    In the present study the authors have further investigated the routes of platelet activation following UVB exposure. Evidence is provided that UVB radiation does not activate the platelets via the classical Phospholipase A[sub 2] and Phospholipase C routes. Despite this observation, UVB-induced fibrinogen binding was found to be correlated with a 40% increase in phosphorylated 47 kD protein. Both findings could be completely inhibited in the presence of staurosporine, a potent inhibitor of protein kinase C (PK-C). In efforts to explain the mechanism of PK-C activation by UV radiation they found that both UV-induced PK-C activation and platelet aggregation were significantly reduced in the presence of specific scavengers for reactive oxygen species including superoxide dismutase and catalase. It is concluded that exposure of platelets to UVB radiation can activate PK-C via oxygen radicals, resulting in exposure of fibrinogen binding sites and subsequent platelet aggregation. (Author).

  16. Titanium dioxide induces apoptotic cell death through reactive oxygen species-mediated Fas upregulation and Bax activation

    Yoon TH

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Ki-Chun Yoo1, Chang-Hwan Yoon1, Dongwook Kwon2, Kyung-Hwan Hyun1, Soo Jung Woo1, Rae-Kwon Kim1, Eun-Jung Lim1, Yongjoon Suh1, Min-Jung Kim1, Tae Hyun Yoon2, Su-Jae Lee11Laboratory of Molecular Biochemistry, 2Laboratory of Nanoscale Characterization and Environmental Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, Hanyang University, Seoul, Republic of KoreaBackground: Titanium dioxide (TiO2 has been widely used in many areas, including biomedicine, cosmetics, and environmental engineering. Recently, it has become evident that some TiO2 particles have a considerable cytotoxic effect in normal human cells. However, the molecular basis for the cytotoxicity of TiO2 has yet to be defined.Methods and results: In this study, we demonstrated that combined treatment with TiO2 nanoparticles sized less than 100 nm and ultraviolet A irradiation induces apoptotic cell death through reactive oxygen species-dependent upregulation of Fas and conformational activation of Bax in normal human cells. Treatment with P25 TiO2 nanoparticles with a hydrodynamic size distribution centered around 70 nm (TiO2P25–70 together with ultraviolet A irradiation-induced caspase-dependent apoptotic cell death, accompanied by transcriptional upregulation of the death receptor, Fas, and conformational activation of Bax. In line with these results, knockdown of either Fas or Bax with specific siRNA significantly inhibited TiO2-induced apoptotic cell death. Moreover, inhibition of reactive oxygen species with an antioxidant, N-acetyl-L-cysteine, clearly suppressed upregulation of Fas, conformational activation of Bax, and subsequent apoptotic cell death in response to combination treatment using TiO2P25–70 and ultraviolet A irradiation.Conclusion: These results indicate that sub-100 nm sized TiO2 treatment under ultraviolet A irradiation induces apoptotic cell death through reactive oxygen species-mediated upregulation of the death receptor, Fas, and activation of the preapoptotic protein

  17. High reactivity of nanosized niobium oxide cluster cations in methane activation: A comparison with vanadium oxides.

    Ding, Xun-Lei; Wang, Dan; Wu, Xiao-Nan; Li, Zi-Yu; Zhao, Yan-Xia; He, Sheng-Gui

    2015-09-28

    The reactions between methane and niobium oxide cluster cations were studied and compared to those employing vanadium oxides. Hydrogen atom abstraction (HAA) reactions were identified over stoichiometric (Nb2O5)N(+) clusters for N as large as 14 with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The reactivity of (Nb2O5)N(+) clusters decreases as the N increases, and it is higher than that of (V 2O5)N(+) for N ≥ 4. Theoretical studies were conducted on (Nb2O5)N(+) (N = 2-6) by density functional calculations. HAA reactions on these clusters are all favorable thermodynamically and kinetically. The difference of the reactivity with respect to the cluster size and metal type (Nb vs V) was attributed to thermodynamics, kinetics, the electron capture ability, and the distribution of the unpaired spin density. Nanosized Nb oxide clusters show higher HAA reactivity than V oxides, indicating that niobia may serve as promising catalysts for practical methane conversion. PMID:26429016

  18. Lake Evaporation: A Model Study

    Amayreh, Jumah

    1995-01-01

    Reliable evaporation data are an essential requirement in any water and/or energy budget studies. This includes operation and management of both urban and agricultural water resources. Evaporation from large, open water surfaces such as lakes and reservoirs may influence many agricultural and irrigation decisions. In this study evaporation from Bear Lake in the states of Idaho and Utah was measured using advanced research instruments (Bowen Ratio and Eddy Correlation). Actual over-lake evapor...

  19. Climate analysis of evaporation ducts in the South China Sea

    McKeon, Brian D.

    2013-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Evaporation ducts have important implications for U.S. Naval activities involving electromagnetic propagation. The presence of an evaporation duct can affect naval operations involving communications, surveillance, electronic warfare, and detection of low-flying missiles, surface ships, or submarine periscopes. We conducted a climate scale analysis of evaporation duct heights (EDH) in the northern South China Sea (SCS), including how ...

  20. Quantum Soliton Evaporation

    Villari, Leone Di Mauro; Biancalana, Fabio; Conti, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    We have very little experience of the quantum dynamics of the ubiquitous nonlinear waves. Observed phenomena in high energy physics are perturbations to linear waves, and classical nonlinear waves, like solitons, are barely affected by quantum effects. We know that solitons, immutable in classical physics, exhibit collapse and revivals according to quantum mechanics. However this effect is very weak and has never been observed experimentally. By predicting black hole evaporation Hawking first introduced a distinctly quantum effect in nonlinear gravitational physics.Here we show the existence of a general and universal quantum process whereby a soliton emits quantum radiation with a specific frequency content, and a temperature given by the number of quanta, the soliton Schwarzschild radius, and the amount of nonlinearity, in a precise and surprisingly simple way. This result may ultimately lead to the first experimental evidence of genuine quantum black hole evaporation. In addition, our results show that bla...

  1. Stimulated Black Hole Evaporation

    Spaans, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Black holes are extreme expressions of gravity. Their existence is predicted by Einstein's theory of general relativity and is supported by observations. Black holes obey quantum mechanics and evaporate spontaneously. Here it is shown that a mass rate $R_f\\sim 3\\times 10^{-8} (M_0/M)^{1/2}$ $M_0$ yr$^{-1}$ onto the horizon of a black hole with mass $M$ (in units of solar mass $M_0$) stimulates a black hole into rapid evaporation. Specifically, $\\sim 3 M_0$ black holes can emit a large fraction of their mass, and explode, in $M/R_f \\sim 3\\times 10^7 (M/M_0)^{3/2}$ yr. These stimulated black holes radiate a spectral line power $P \\sim 2\\times 10^{39} (M_0/M)^{1/2}$ erg s$^{-1}$, at a wavelength $\\lambda \\sim 3\\times 10^5 (M/M_0)$ cm. This prediction can be observationally verified.

  2. A multi-objective optimization of the active and reactive resource scheduling at a distribution level in a smart grid context

    Sousa, Tiago; Morais, Hugo; Vale, Zita;

    2015-01-01

    distribution level, due to the high number of resources connected in distribution levels. This paper proposes a new multi-objective methodology to deal with the optimal resource scheduling considering the distributed generation, electric vehicles and capacitor banks for the joint active and reactive power......In the traditional paradigm, the large power plants supply the reactive power required at a transmission level and the capacitors and transformer tap changer were also used at a distribution level. However, in a near future will be necessary to schedule both active and reactive power at a...

  3. Evaporated VOx Thin Films

    Stapinski, Tomasz; Leja, E.

    1989-03-01

    VOx thin films on glass were obtained by thermal evaporation of V205, powder. The structural investigations were carried out with the use of X-ray diffractometer. The electrical properties of the film were examined by means of temperature measurements of resistivity for the samples heat-treated in various conditions. Optical transmission and reflection spectra of VOX films of various composition showed the influence of the heat treatment.

  4. Water Membrane Evaporator

    Ungar, Eugene K.; Almlie, Jay C.

    2010-01-01

    A water membrane evaporator (WME) has been conceived and tested as an alternative to the contamination-sensitive and corrosion-prone evaporators currently used for dissipating heat from space vehicles. The WME consists mainly of the following components: An outer stainless-steel screen that provides structural support for the components mentioned next; Inside and in contact with the stainless-steel screen, a hydrophobic membrane that is permeable to water vapor; Inside and in contact with the hydrophobic membrane, a hydrophilic membrane that transports the liquid feedwater to the inner surface of the hydrophobic membrane; Inside and in contact with the hydrophilic membrane, an annular array of tubes through which flows the spacecraft coolant carrying the heat to be dissipated; and An inner exclusion tube that limits the volume of feedwater in the WME. In operation, a pressurized feedwater reservoir is connected to the volume between the exclusion tube and the coolant tubes. Feedwater fills the volume, saturates the hydrophilic membrane, and is retained by the hydrophobic membrane. The outside of the WME is exposed to space vacuum. Heat from the spacecraft coolant is conducted through the tube walls and the water-saturated hydrophilic membrane to the liquid/vapor interface at the hydrophobic membrane, causing water to evaporate to space. Makeup water flows into the hydrophilic membrane through gaps between the coolant tubes.

  5. Distributed control of hybrid AC microgrids with dynamic active and reactive power capacity tuning

    Nutkani, Inam Ullah; Loh, Poh Chiang; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2012-01-01

    power converters, whose control should preferably be done autonomously without demanding communication links. This paper proposes distributed control for power management between two Microgrids interlinked through inverters. The control scheme aims to reduce the reactive power loading stress on DERs and......Microgrids comprise of emerging generation technologies such as fuel cell, solar PV, wind turbine generator, storage and loads. They can, in principle, operate at different voltages and frequencies. Tying them either to the mains grid or among themselves would certainly require some interlinking...

  6. Deposition of Visible Light Active Photocatalytic Bismuth Molybdate Thin Films by Reactive Magnetron Sputtering

    Marina Ratova; Kelly, Peter J; Glen T. West; Xiaohong Xia; Yun Gao

    2016-01-01

    Bismuth molybdate thin films were deposited by reactive magnetron co-sputtering from two metallic targets in an argon/oxygen atmosphere, reportedly for the first time. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analysis showed that the ratio of bismuth to molybdenum in the coatings can be effectively controlled by varying the power applied to each target. Deposited coatings were annealed in air at 673 K for 30 min. The crystalline structure was assessed by means of Raman spectroscopy and X-ra...

  7. TOWARDS USING AN ACTIVE / REACTIVE SIMULATION TOOL FOR GRID DEVELOPMENT STUDIES

    Henry, Jerome

    2008-01-01

    As part of the KTH civil engineer degree, this final degree project was done at RTE, the company responsible for operating, maintaining and developing the French electricity grid, within the group responsible for the 400 kV grid and interconnection studies. After studying how adding production influences flows in a neighboring area, in order to get familiar with simulation tools, the next step was to work on RTE’s grid model, aiming at updating it with reactive data. Moreover, another task ha...

  8. ANTIDIABETIC ACTIVITY OF PARKINSONIA ACCULEATA LINN IN RABBITS, EMPHASIS ON C REACTIVE PROTIENS

    Ghalib I. Hundekari*, M.A. Shukoor, A.N. Nagappa, Syeda Shahana, Shaikh Roohi, Syeda Saba, Shaikh Samina and Deepali Ambekar

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Parkinsonia acculeata is used in traditional medicine for the treatment of jaundice and diabetes. Accordingly, the present study was designed to investigate the effects of Pet ether and aqueous extracts of the leaves of Parkinsonia acculeata on glucose homeostasis in alloxan induced diabetis in rabbits. After 7 days of study it showed that Parkinsonia acculeata reduced glucose levels significantly. The extracts were also able to reduce quantatively C reactive proteins and levels of SGOT and SGPT enzymes. It was concluded that due to its potent antioxidant and antidiabetic properties, the Parkinsonia acculeata extract exerts remarkable antidiabetogenic effect.

  9. Independent Control of Active and Reactive Powers of a DFIG Based Wind Energy Conversion System by Vector Control

    Ibrahim Ahmad A; Anitha, D.

    2015-01-01

    The paper deals with a design and implementation of a doubly fed induction generator (DFIG) wind energy conversion system (WECS) connected to the power grid. A back-to-back AC/DC/AC converter is incorporated between the stator and the rotor windings of a DFIG, in order to obtain variable speed operation. The DFIG can be controlled from sub-synchronous speed to super synchronous speed operation. The main objective of the paper is to control the flow of the Active and Reactive power...

  10. A new diamantane functionalized tris(aryloxide) ligand system for small molecule activation chemistry at reactive uranium complexes

    Lam, O.P.; Heinemann, F.W.; Meyer, K. [Department of Chemistry and Pharmacy, Inorganic Chemistry, University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen (Germany); Lam, O.P. [University of California, San Diego, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2010-06-15

    The diamantane functionalized triazacyclononane ligand ({sup Dia}ArOH){sub 3}tacn (L{sub 3}) has been synthesized and the reactivity of its U(III) metallated product [(({sup Dia}ArO){sub 3}tacn)U] (1) has been explored. Complex 1 promotes dichloromethane and azido-trimethyl-silane activation to generate U(IV) complex [(({sup Dia}ArO){sub 3}tacn)U(Cl)] (2) and U(V) complex [(({sup Dia}ArO){sub 3}tacn)U(NTMS)] (3), respectively. Spectroscopic investigations of complexes 1, 2, and 3 will be discussed, along with molecular structures where possible. (authors)

  11. A new diamantane functionalized tris(aryloxide) ligand system for small molecule activation chemistry at reactive uranium complexes

    The diamantane functionalized triazacyclononane ligand (DiaArOH)3tacn (L3) has been synthesized and the reactivity of its U(III) metallated product [((DiaArO)3tacn)U] (1) has been explored. Complex 1 promotes dichloromethane and azido-trimethyl-silane activation to generate U(IV) complex [((DiaArO)3tacn)U(Cl)] (2) and U(V) complex [((DiaArO)3tacn)U(NTMS)] (3), respectively. Spectroscopic investigations of complexes 1, 2, and 3 will be discussed, along with molecular structures where possible. (authors)

  12. Quantitative determination of phases in the alkali activation of fly ash. Part I. Potential ash reactivity

    A. Fernandez-Jimenez; A.G. de la Torre; A. Palomo; G. Lopez-Olmo; M.M. Alonso; M.A.G. Aranda [Eduardo Torroja Institute (CSIC), Madrid (Spain)

    2006-03-15

    The various (vitreous and crystalline) components of two type F fly ashes are quantified in this paper using three techniques: chemical analysis with selective solutions, X-ray powder diffraction combined with the Rietveld method and nuclear magnetic resonance. The findings confirm the suitability of the techniques to pursue the objectives while providing further insight into the chemical composition of the vitreous phase of the ash as well as an understanding of the thermal history of these materials. Finally, the paper corroborates the grounds established in prior research for regarding the glassy constituents of an ash to be instrumental in the control of its alkali reactivity during the manufacture of 'alkaline cements'. 24 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Operation experience and anti-foam study on the HALW evaporator at the Tokai Reprocessing Plant

    Volume reduction of highly active liquid waste is a key issue for processing and management of nuclear waste. In this paper we will introduce our twenty-years operation experience of a highly active waste evaporator at Tokai Reprocessing Plant. The evaporator has been working very well generally. However, operation of the evaporator has been sometimes affected by foaming. To suppress the foaming, evaporation rate is limited. We studied behavior of foaming and effect of antifoam chemicals by using a 1/11 scale model evaporator. We could reproduce foaming in the model apparatus and concluded that some antifoam chemicals will be effective for the actual evaporator. (author)

  14. Association between serum levels of high sensitive C-reactive protein and inflammation activity in chronic gastritis patients.

    Rahmani, Asghar; Moradkhani, Atefeh; Hafezi Ahmadi, Mohammad Reza; Jafari Heirdarlo, Ali; Abangah, Ghobad; Asadollahi, Khairollah; Sayehmiri, Kourosh

    2016-05-01

    Background Gastritis is an important premalignant lesion and recent studies suggested a production of inflammatory cytokine-like C-reactive protein during gastritis. This study aimed to determine any relationship between high sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and inflammation activity among patients with gastritis. Methods Demographic and clinical variables of participants were collected by a validated questionnaire. Using histology of the gastric mucosa, Helicobacter pylori status was investigated and serum concentrations of hs-CRP were measured among dyspeptic patients. Correlation between hs-CRP serum levels and inflammation activities was evaluated by logistic regression analysis. The relation between active inflammation and other variables was evaluated by logic link function model. Results Totally 239 patients (56.6% female) were analysed. The prevalence of mild, moderate and severe inflammation activities was 66.5%, 23.8% and 9.6% respectively. Mean ± SD of hs-CRP among men and women were 2.85 ± 2.84 mg/dl and 2.80 ± 4.80 mg/dl (p = 0.047) respectively. Mean ± SD of hs-CRP among patients with H. pylori infection, gland atrophy, metaplasia and dysplasia were 2.83 ± 3.80 mg/dl, 3.52 ± 5.1 mg/dl, 2.22 ± 2.3 mg/dl and 5.3 ± 5.04 mg/dl respectively. Relationship between hs-CRP and inflammation activities (p gastritis, elevated hs-CRP levels may be considered as a predictive marker of changes in gastric mucosa and a promising therapeutic target for patients with gastritis. PMID:26758551

  15. VOLATILE COMPONENT RECOVERY FROM SULFITE EVAPORATOR CONDENSATE

    This study is on the operation and modification of a demonstration unit to remove sulfur dioxide, methanol, furfural, and acetic acid from its sulfite evaporator condensate. This unit consisted of a steam stripper, vent tank SO2 recovery, activated carbon adsorption columns, and ...

  16. New insights into the anticancer activity of carnosol: p53 reactivation in the U87MG human glioblastoma cell line.

    Giacomelli, Chiara; Natali, Letizia; Trincavelli, Maria Letizia; Daniele, Simona; Bertoli, Alessandra; Flamini, Guido; Braca, Alessandra; Martini, Claudia

    2016-05-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is an aggressive brain tumour with high resistance to radio- and chemotherapy. As such, increasing attention has focused on developing new therapeutic strategies to improve treatment responses. Recently, attention has been shifted to natural compounds that are able to halt tumour development. Among them, carnosol (CAR), a phenolic diterpene present in rosemary, has become a promising molecule that is able to prevent certain types of solid cancer. However, no data are available on the effects of CAR in GBM. Here, CAR activity decreased the proliferation of different human glioblastoma cell lines, particularly cells that express wild type p53. The p53 pathway is involved in the control of apoptosis and is often impaired in GBM. Notably, CAR, through the dissociation of p53 from its endogenous inhibitor MDM2, was able to increase the intracellular p53 levels in GBM cells. Accordingly, functional reactivation of p53 was demonstrated by the stimulation of p53 target genes' transcription, the induction of apoptosis and cell cycle blockade. Most importantly, CAR produced synergistic effects with temozolomide (TMZ) and reduced the restoration of the tumour cells' proliferation after drug removal. Thus, for the first time, these data highlighted the potential use of the diterpene in the sensitization of GBM cells to chemotherapy through a direct re-activation of p53 pathway. Furthermore, progress has been made in delineating the biochemical mechanisms underlying the pro-apoptotic effects of this molecule. PMID:26939786

  17. Proteasome inhibition mediates p53 reactivation and anti-cancer activity of 6-Gingerol in cervical cancer cells

    Rastogi, Namrata; Duggal, Shivali; Singh, Shailendra Kumar; Porwal, Konica; Srivastava, Vikas Kumar; Maurya, Rakesh; Bhatt, Madan L.B.; Mishra, Durga Prasad

    2015-01-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) expressing E6 and E7 oncoproteins, is known to inactivate the tumor suppressor p53 through proteasomal degradation in cervical cancers. Therefore, use of small molecules for inhibition of proteasome function and induction of p53 reactivation is a promising strategy for induction of apoptosis in cervical cancer cells. The polyphenolic alkanone, 6-Gingerol (6G), present in the pungent extracts of ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) has shown potent anti-tumorigenic and pro-apoptotic activities against a variety of cancers. In this study we explored the molecular mechanism of action of 6G in human cervical cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. 6G potently inhibited proliferation of the HPV positive cervical cancer cells. 6G was found to: (i) inhibit the chymotrypsin activity of proteasomes, (ii) induce reactivation of p53, (iii) increase levels of p21, (iv) induce DNA damage and G2/M cell cycle arrest, (v) alter expression levels of p53-associated apoptotic markers like, cleaved caspase-3 and PARP, and (vi) potentiate the cytotoxicity of cisplatin. 6G treatment induced significant reduction of tumor volume, tumor weight, proteasome inhibition and p53 accumulation in HeLa xenograft tumor cells in vivo. The 6G treatment was devoid of toxic effects as it did not affect body weights, hematological and osteogenic parameters. Taken together, our data underscores the therapeutic and chemosensitizing effects of 6G in the management and treatment of cervical cancer. PMID:26621832

  18. Adsorption of Reactive Red M-2BE dye from water solutions by multi-walled carbon nanotubes and activated carbon.

    Machado, Fernando M; Bergmann, Carlos P; Fernandes, Thais H M; Lima, Eder C; Royer, Betina; Calvete, Tatiana; Fagan, Solange B

    2011-09-15

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes and powdered activated carbon were used as adsorbents for the successful removal of Reactive Red M-2BE textile dye from aqueous solutions. The adsorbents were characterised by infrared spectroscopy, N(2) adsorption/desorption isotherms and scanning electron microscopy. The effects of pH, shaking time and temperature on adsorption capacity were studied. In the acidic pH region (pH 2.0), the adsorption of the dye was favourable using both adsorbents. The contact time to obtain equilibrium at 298K was fixed at 1h for both adsorbents. The activation energy of the adsorption process was evaluated from 298 to 323K for both adsorbents. The Avrami fractional-order kinetic model provided the best fit to the experimental data compared with pseudo-first-order or pseudo-second-order kinetic adsorption models. For Reactive Red M-2BE dye, the equilibrium data were best fitted to the Liu isotherm model. Simulated dyehouse effluents were used to check the applicability of the proposed adsorbents for effluent treatment. PMID:21724329

  19. Can systemically generated reactive oxygen species help to monitor disease activity in generalized vitiligo? A pilot study

    Richeek Pradhan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Generalized vitiligo is a disease with unpredictable bursts of activity, goal of treatment during the active phase being to stabilize the lesions. This emphasizes the need for a prospective marker for monitoring disease activity to help decide the duration of therapy. Aims and Objectives: In the present study, we examined whether reactive oxygen species (ROS generated in erythrocytes can be translated into a marker of activity in vitiligo. Materials and Methods: Level of intracellular ROS was measured flow cytometrically in erythrocytes from venous blood of 21 patients with generalized vitiligo and 21 healthy volunteers using the probe dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate. Results: The levels of ROS differed significantly between patients and healthy controls, as well as between active versus stable disease groups. In the active disease group, ROS levels were significantly lower in those being treated with systemic steroids than those that were not. ROS levels poorly correlated with disease duration or body surface area involved. Conclusion: A long-term study based on these findings can be conducted to further validate the potential role of ROS in monitoring disease activity vitiligo.

  20. CFD analysis of evaporation cooling experimental tests

    Ambrosini, W.; Forgione, N.; Mazzini, D.; Oriolo, F. [Pisa Univ., DIMNP (Italy); He, S. [British Energy Generation Ltd, Barnwood Gloucester (United Kingdom)

    2001-07-01

    Falling film evaporation cooling is investigated by a CFD (computational fluid dynamics) code. The experimental activity, carried out at the University of Pisa using the EFFE facility, is aimed to contribute to the understanding of the heat and mass transfer mechanisms involved in cooling of a metallic wall by evaporation of falling water films in a countercurrent air flow. This problem is relevant for innovative nuclear reactor containment. The mathematical model, the governing equations and the boundary conditions implemented in the code are briefly described; a detailed description of the method adopted to account for mass transfer and the presence of the film follows. Then, the calculated results are analysed and compared with experimental data, highlighting the improvement in the cooling capabilities obtained owing to evaporation with respect to the case of pure convection. (authors)

  1. CFD analysis of evaporation cooling experimental tests

    Falling film evaporation cooling is investigated by a CFD (computational fluid dynamics) code. The experimental activity, carried out at the University of Pisa using the EFFE facility, is aimed to contribute to the understanding of the heat and mass transfer mechanisms involved in cooling of a metallic wall by evaporation of falling water films in a countercurrent air flow. This problem is relevant for innovative nuclear reactor containment. The mathematical model, the governing equations and the boundary conditions implemented in the code are briefly described; a detailed description of the method adopted to account for mass transfer and the presence of the film follows. Then, the calculated results are analysed and compared with experimental data, highlighting the improvement in the cooling capabilities obtained owing to evaporation with respect to the case of pure convection. (authors)

  2. Method of evaporation

    Dufresne, Eugene R.

    1987-01-01

    Liquids, such as juices, milk, molten metal and the like are concentrated by forming uniformly-sized, small droplets in a precision droplet forming assembly and deploying the droplets in free fall downwardly as a central column within an evacuated column with cool walls. A portion of the solvent evaporates. The vapor flows to the wall, condenses, and usually flows down the wall as a film to condensate collector and drain. The vertical column of freely falling droplets enters the splash guard. The condensate can be collected, sent to other towers or recycled.

  3. KEPLER PLANETS: A TALE OF EVAPORATION

    Inspired by the Kepler mission's planet discoveries, we consider the thermal contraction of planets close to their parent star, under the influence of evaporation. The mass-loss rates are based on hydrodynamic models of evaporation that include both X-ray and EUV irradiation. We find that only low mass planets with hydrogen envelopes are significantly affected by evaporation, with evaporation being able to remove massive hydrogen envelopes inward of ∼0.1 AU for Neptune-mass objects, while evaporation is negligible for Jupiter-mass objects. Moreover, most of the evaporation occurs in the first 100 Myr of stars' lives when they are more chromospherically active. We construct a theoretical population of planets with varying core masses, envelope masses, orbital separations, and stellar spectral types, and compare this population with the sizes and densities measured for low-mass planets, both in the Kepler mission and from radial velocity surveys. This exercise leads us to conclude that evaporation is the driving force of evolution for close-in Kepler planets. In fact, some 50% of the Kepler planet candidates may have been significantly eroded. Evaporation explains two striking correlations observed in these objects: a lack of large radius/low density planets close to the stars and a possible bimodal distribution in planet sizes with a deficit of planets around 2 R⊕. Planets that have experienced high X-ray exposures are generally smaller than this size, and those with lower X-ray exposures are typically larger. A bimodal planet size distribution is naturally predicted by the evaporation model, where, depending on their X-ray exposure, close-in planets can either hold on to hydrogen envelopes ∼0.5%-1% in mass or be stripped entirely. To quantitatively reproduce the observed features, we argue that not only do low-mass Kepler planets need to be made of rocky cores surrounded with hydrogen envelopes, but few of them should have initial masses above 20 M⊕ and the

  4. The potential for using slags activated with near neutral salts as immobilisation matrices for nuclear wastes containing reactive metals

    Bai, Y. [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Engineering Materials, Sir Robert Hadfield Building, University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Collier, N.C., E-mail: nick.collier@nnl.co.uk [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Engineering Materials, Sir Robert Hadfield Building, University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Milestone, N.B. [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Engineering Materials, Sir Robert Hadfield Building, University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Yang, C.H. [Department of Building Materials and Engineering, College of Materials and Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400045 (China)

    2011-06-30

    The UK currently uses composite blends of Portland cement and other inorganic cementitious material such as blastfurnace slag and pulverised fuel ash to encapsulate or immobilise intermediate and low level radioactive wastes. Typically levels up 9:1 blast furnace slag:Portland cement or 4:1 pulverised fuel ash:Portland cement are used. Whilst these systems offer many advantages, their high pH causes corrosion of various metallic intermediate level radioactive wastes. To address this issue, lower pH/weakly alkaline cementitious systems have to be explored. While the blast furnace slag:Portland cement system is referred to as a composite cement system, the underlying reaction is actually an indirect activation of the slag hydration by the calcium hydroxide generated by the cement hydration, and by the alkali ions and gypsum present in the cement. However, the slag also can be activated directly with activators, creating a system known as alkali-activated slag. Whilst these activators used are usually strongly alkaline, weakly alkaline and near neutral salts can also be used. In this paper, the potential for using weakly alkaline and near neutral salts to activate slag in this manner is reviewed and discussed, with particular emphasis placed on the immobilisation of reactive metallic nuclear wastes.

  5. Colorimetric Detection of Caspase 3 Activity and Reactive Oxygen Derivatives: Potential Early Indicators of Thermal Stress in Corals

    Mickael Ros

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There is an urgent need to develop and implement rapid assessments of coral health to allow effective adaptive management in response to coastal development and global change. There is now increasing evidence that activation of caspase-dependent apoptosis plays a key role during coral bleaching and subsequent mortality. In this study, a “clinical” approach was used to assess coral health by measuring the activity of caspase 3 using a commercial kit. This method was first applied while inducing thermal bleaching in two coral species, Acropora millepora and Pocillopora damicornis. The latter species was then chosen to undergo further studies combining the detection of oxidative stress-related compounds (catalase activity and glutathione concentrations as well as caspase activity during both stress and recovery phases. Zooxanthellae photosystem II (PSII efficiency and cell density were measured in parallel to assess symbiont health. Our results demonstrate that the increased caspase 3 activity in the coral host could be detected before observing any significant decrease in the photochemical efficiency of PSII in the algal symbionts and/or their expulsion from the host. This study highlights the potential of host caspase 3 and reactive oxygen species scavenging activities as early indicators of stress in individual coral colonies.

  6. Constitutive NF-κB activation and tumor-growth promotion by Romo1-mediated reactive oxygen species production

    Highlights: • Romo1 expression is required for constitutive nuclear DNA-binding activity of NF-κB. • Romo1 depletion suppresses tumor growth in vivo. • Romo1 presents a potential therapeutic target for diseases. - Abstract: Deregulation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and related pathways contribute to tumor cell proliferation and invasion. Mechanisms for constitutive NF-κB activation are not fully explained; however, the underlying defects appear to generate and maintain pro-oxidative conditions. In hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tissues, up-regulation of reactive oxygen species modulator 1 (Romo1) correlates positively with tumor size. In the present study, we showed that Romo1 expression is required to maintain constitutive nuclear DNA-binding activity of NF-κB and transcriptional activity through constitutive IκBα phosphorylation. Overexpression of Romo1 promoted p65 nuclear translocation and DNA-binding activity. We also show that Romo1 depletion suppressed anchorage-independent colony formation by HCC cells and suppressed tumor growth in vivo. Based on these findings, Romo1 may be a principal regulatory factor in the maintenance of constitutive NF-κB activation in tumor cells. In the interest of anti-proliferative treatments for cancer, Romo1 may also present a productive target for drug development

  7. Intermolecular C-H activation with an Ir-METAMORPhos piano-stool complex--multiple reaction steps at a reactive ligand.

    Oldenhof, S; Lutz, M; van der Vlugt, J I; Reek, J N H

    2015-10-21

    Substrate activation by means of a reactive ligand is a topic of much interest. Herein we describe a stoichiometric anti-Markovnikov C-N bond formation involving ligand reactivity in multiple steps along the reaction coordinate, including ligand assisted substrate (de)protonation and C-N bond formation, as illustrated by a combined experimental, spectroscopic and computational study. This affords a highly unusual four-membered iridacycle bearing an exo-cyclic C=C double bond. PMID:26329519

  8. Pyrylium Salts as Reactive Matrices for MALDI-MS Imaging of Biologically Active Primary Amines

    Shariatgorji, Mohammadreza; Nilsson, Anna; Källback, Patrik; Karlsson, Oskar; Zhang, Xiaoqun; Svenningsson, Per; Andren, Per E.

    2015-06-01

    Many neuroactive substances, including endogenous biomolecules, environmental compounds, and pharmaceuticals possess primary amine functional groups. Among these are catecholamine neurotransmitters (e.g., dopamine), many substituted phenethylamines (e.g., amphetamine), as well as amino acids and neuropeptides. In most cases, mass spectrometric (ESI and MALDI) analyses of trace amounts of such compounds are challenging because of their poor ionization properties. We present a method for chemical derivatization of primary amines by reaction with pyrylium salts that facilitates their detection by MALDI-MS and enables the imaging of primary amines in brain tissue sections. A screen of pyrylium salts revealed that the 2,4-diphenyl-pyranylium ion efficiently derivatizes primary amines and can be used as a reactive MALDI-MS matrix that induces both derivatization and desorption. MALDI-MS imaging with such matrix was used to map the localization of dopamine and amphetamine in brain tissue sections and to quantitatively map the distribution of the neurotoxin β- N-methylamino-L-alanine.

  9. Adaptive Control with SSNN of UPFC System for the Compensation of Active and Reactive Power

    A. Bouanane

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The focus of this study is the effectiveness of the controller’s Unified Power Flow Controller UPFC with the choice of a control strategy. This Unified Power Flow Controller (UPFC is used to control the power flow in the transmission systems by controlling the impedance, voltage magnitude and phase angle. This controller offers advantages in terms of static and dynamic operation of the power system. It also brings in new challenges in power electronics and power system design. To evaluate the performance and robustness of the system, we proposed a hybrid control combining the concept of identification neural networks with conventional regulators and with the changes in characteristics of the transmission line in order to improve the stability of the electrical power network. With its unique capability to control simultaneously real and reactive power flows on a transmission line as well as to regulate voltage at the bus where it is connected, this device creates a tremendous quality impact on power system stability. The result which has been obtained from using MATLAB and SIMULINK software showed a good agreement with the simulation result.

  10. Using fluorescence-activated flow cytometry to determine reactive oxygen species formation and membrane lipid peroxidation in viable boar spermatozoa.

    Guthrie, H David; Welch, Glenn R

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescence-activated flow cytometry analyses were developed for determination of reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and membrane lipid peroxidation in live spermatozoa loaded with, respectively, hydroethidine (HE) or the lipophilic probe 4,4-difluoro-5-(4-phenyl-1,3-butadienyl)-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene-3-undecanoic acid, C(11)BODIPY(581/591) (BODIPY). ROS was detected by red fluorescence emission from oxidization of HE and membrane lipid peroxidation was detected by green fluorescence emission from oxidation of BODIPY in individual live sperm. Of the reactive oxygen species generators tested, BODIPY oxidation was specific for FeSo4/ascorbate (FeAc), because menadione and H(2)O(2) had little or no effect. The oxidization of hydroethidine to ethidium was specific for menadione and H(2)O(2); FeAc had no effect. The incidence of basal or spontaneous ROS formation and membrane lipid peroxidation were low in boar sperm (semen or after low temperature storage; however the sperm were quite susceptible to treatment-induced ROS formation and membrane lipid peroxidation. PMID:20072917

  11. Low-Level Laser Therapy Activates NF-kB via Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species in Mouse Embryonic Fibroblasts

    Huang, Ying-Ying; Tomkinson, Elizabeth M.; Sharma, Sulbha K.; Kharkwal, Gitika B.; Saleem, Taimur; Mooney, David; Yull, Fiona E.; Blackwell, Timothy S.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2011-01-01

    Background Despite over forty years of investigation on low-level light therapy (LLLT), the fundamental mechanisms underlying photobiomodulation at a cellular level remain unclear. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we isolated murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) from transgenic NF-kB luciferase reporter mice and studied their response to 810 nm laser radiation. Significant activation of NF-kB was observed at fluences higher than 0.003 J/cm2 and was confirmed by Western blot analysis. NF-kB was activated earlier (1 hour) by LLLT compared to conventional lipopolysaccharide treatment. We also observed that LLLT induced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production similar to mitochondrial inhibitors, such as antimycin A, rotenone and paraquat. Furthermore, we observed similar NF-kB activation with these mitochondrial inhibitors. These results, together with inhibition of laser induced NF-kB activation by antioxidants, suggests that ROS play an important role in the laser induced NF-kB signaling pathways. However, LLLT, unlike mitochondrial inhibitors, induced increased cellular ATP levels, which indicates that LLLT also upregulates mitochondrial respiration. Conclusion We conclude that LLLT not only enhances mitochondrial respiration, but also activates the redox-sensitive NFkB signaling via generation of ROS. Expression of anti-apoptosis and pro-survival genes responsive to NFkB could explain many clinical effects of LLLT. PMID:21814580

  12. Influence of reactive oxygen species on the enzyme stability and activity in the presence of ionic liquids.

    Pankaj Attri

    Full Text Available In this paper, we have examined the effect of ammonium and imidazolium based ionic liquids (ILs on the stability and activity of proteolytic enzyme α-chymotrypsin (CT in the presence of cold atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ. The present work aims to illustrate the state of art implementing the combined action of ILs and APPJ on the enzyme stability and activity. Our circular dichroism (CD, fluorescence and enzyme activity results of CT have revealed that buffer and all studied ILs {triethylammonium hydrogen sulphate (TEAS from ammonium family and 1-butyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride ([Bmim][Cl], 1-methylimidazolium chloride ([Mim][Cl] from imidazolium family} are notable to act as protective agents against the deleterious action of the APPJ, except triethylammonium dihydrogen phosphate (TEAP ammonium IL. However, TEAP attenuates strongly the deleterious action of reactive oxygen species (ROS created by APPJ on native structure of CT. Further, TEAP is able to retain the enzymatic activity after APPJ exposure which is absent in all the other systems.This study provides the first combined effect of APPJ and ILs on biomolecules that may generate many theoretical and experimental opportunities. Through this methodology, we can utilise both enzyme and plasma simultaneously without affecting the enzyme structure and activity on the material surface; which can prove to be applicable in various fields.

  13. Low-level laser therapy activates NF-kB via generation of reactive oxygen species in mouse embryonic fibroblasts.

    Aaron C-H Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite over forty years of investigation on low-level light therapy (LLLT, the fundamental mechanisms underlying photobiomodulation at a cellular level remain unclear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we isolated murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEF from transgenic NF-kB luciferase reporter mice and studied their response to 810 nm laser radiation. Significant activation of NF-kB was observed at fluences higher than 0.003 J/cm(2 and was confirmed by Western blot analysis. NF-kB was activated earlier (1 hour by LLLT compared to conventional lipopolysaccharide treatment. We also observed that LLLT induced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS production similar to mitochondrial inhibitors, such as antimycin A, rotenone and paraquat. Furthermore, we observed similar NF-kB activation with these mitochondrial inhibitors. These results, together with inhibition of laser induced NF-kB activation by antioxidants, suggests that ROS play an important role in the laser induced NF-kB signaling pathways. However, LLLT, unlike mitochondrial inhibitors, induced increased cellular ATP levels, which indicates that LLLT also upregulates mitochondrial respiration. CONCLUSION: We conclude that LLLT not only enhances mitochondrial respiration, but also activates the redox-sensitive NFkB signaling via generation of ROS. Expression of anti-apoptosis and pro-survival genes responsive to NFkB could explain many clinical effects of LLLT.

  14. Increased stress reactivity is associated with reduced hippocampal activity and neuronal integrity along with changes in energy metabolism.

    Knapman, Alana; Kaltwasser, Sebastian F; Martins-de-Souza, Daniel; Holsboer, Florian; Landgraf, Rainer; Turck, Christoph W; Czisch, Michael; Touma, Chadi

    2012-02-01

    Patients suffering from major depression have repeatedly been reported to have dysregulations in hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity along with deficits in cognitive processes related to hippocampal and prefrontal cortex (PFC) malfunction. Here, we utilized three mouse lines selectively bred for high (HR), intermediate, or low (LR) stress reactivity, determined by the corticosterone response to a psychological stressor, probing the behavioral and functional consequences of increased vs. decreased HPA axis reactivity on the hippocampus and PFC. We assessed performance in hippocampus- and PFC-dependent tasks and determined the volume, basal activity, and neuronal integrity of the hippocampus and PFC using in vivo manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The hippocampal proteomes of HR and LR mice were also compared using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. HR mice were found to have deficits in the performance of hippocampus- and PFC-dependent tests and showed decreased N-acetylaspartate levels in the right dorsal hippocampus and PFC. In addition, the basal activity of the hippocampus, as assessed by manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging, was reduced in HR mice. The three mouse lines, however, did not differ in hippocampal volume. Proteomic analysis identified several proteins that were differentially expressed in HR and LR mice. In accordance with the notion that N-acetylaspartate levels, in part, reflect dysfunctional mitochondrial metabolism, these proteins were found to be involved in energy metabolism pathways. Thus, our results provide further support for the involvement of a dysregulated HPA axis and mitochondrial dysfunction in the etiology and pathophysiology of affective disorders. PMID:22288479

  15. Role of codon usage and tRNA changes in rat cytomegalovirus latency and (re)activation.

    Kanduc, Darja

    2016-06-01

    Herpesviruses can remain in their hosts by establishing a latent infection with a low pattern of viral gene expression. Passage from latency to reactivation may occur under particular conditions such as immunosuppressive treatments or during fetal development, and often is accompanied by heavy pathologic sequelae. To investigate the molecular basis underlying herpesvirus latency and (re)activation, codon usage of rat cytomegalovirus was comparatively analyzed with respect to the rat codon usage. Two major points stand out as follows: (i) six codons - GCG (Ala), CCG (Pro), CGG (Arg), CGC (Arg), TCG (Ser), and ACG (Thr) - are rare in rat genes and intensively used in rat cytomegalovirus coding sequences; (ii) in many instances, the codons seldom used by the host are clustered along viral sequences coding for single amino acid repeats such as poly-Ala and poly-Thr stretches. The results indicate that rare host codons and their iteration along viral sequences might represent major constraints that lock rat cytomegalovirus translation in its host during the viral latent phase. Consequently, the data also suggest a link between rat cytomegalovirus quiescence/activation and the functional tRNA coadaptation phenomenon. Indeed, increases in minor tRNA species corresponding to rare rat codons mark rat cell proliferation and might rescue difficult viral translational contexts. Ala isoaccepting-tRNA (CGC) is reported as an example. On the whole, the present findings may contribute to explain how the molecular mechanisms that normally control host gene expression can silence/(re)activate viral gene expression, and might address research toward new approaches in anti-viral therapeutics. PMID:26875974

  16. Enhanced Multisensory Integration and Motor Reactivation after Active Motor Learning of Audiovisual Associations

    Butler, Andrew J.; James, Thomas W.; James, Karin Harman

    2011-01-01

    Everyday experience affords us many opportunities to learn about objects through multiple senses using physical interaction. Previous work has shown that active motor learning of unisensory items enhances memory and leads to the involvement of motor systems during subsequent perception. However, the impact of active motor learning on subsequent…

  17. The role of membrane fusion activity of a whole inactivated influenza virus vaccine in (re)activation of influenza-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    Budimir, Natalija; Meijerhof, Tjarko; Wilschut, Jan; Huckriede, Anke; de Haan, Aalzen

    2010-12-01

    Induction of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity against conserved influenza antigens, e.g. nucleoprotein (NP) could be a step towards cross-protective influenza vaccine. The major challenge for non-replicating influenza vaccines aiming for activation of CTLs is targeting of antigen to the MHC class I processing and presentation pathway of professional antigen presenting cells, in particular dendritic cells (DCs). Intrinsic fusogenic properties of the vaccine particle itself can enable direct cytosolic delivery of the antigen by enhancing release of the antigen from the endosome to the cytosol. Alternatively, the vaccine particle would need to possess the capacity to activate DCs thereby triggering cell-intrinsic mechanisms of cross-presentation, processes that do not require fusion. Here, using fusion-active and fusion-inactive whole inactivated virus (WIV) as a vaccine model, we studied the relative contribution of these two pathways on priming and reactivation of influenza NP-specific CTLs in a murine model. We show that activation of bone marrow-derived DCs by WIV, as well as reactivation of NP-specific CTLs in vitro and in vivo were not affected by inactivation of membrane fusion of the WIV particles. However, in vivo priming of naive CTLs was optimal only upon vaccination with fusion-active WIV. Thus, DC-intrinsic mechanisms of cross-presentation are involved in the activation of CTLs upon vaccination with WIV. However, for optimal priming of naive CTLs these mechanisms should be complemented by delivery of antigen to the cytosol mediated by the membrane fusion capacity of the WIV particles. PMID:20965298

  18. Cadmium induces neuronal cell death through reactive oxygen species activated by GADD153

    Kim Seungwoo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cadmium(Cd, a heavy metal, which has a potent harmful effects, is a highly stress-inducible material that is robustly expressed following disruption of homeostasis in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER (so-called ER stress. The mechanism Cd induced cell death of neuroblastoma cells complex, involving cellular signaling pathways as yet incompletely defined but, in part, involving the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Several studies have correlated GADD153 expression with cell death, but a mechanistic link between GADD153 and apoptosis has never been demonstrated. Results SH-SY5Y cells were treated Cd led to increase in intracellular ROS levels. ROS generation is not consistent with intracellular [Ca2+]. The exposure of neuroblastoma cells to Cd led to increase in intracellular GADD153 and Bak levels in a doses and time dependent manner. The induction of these genes by Cd was attenuated by NAC. Cd-induced apoptosis is decreased in GADD153 knockdown cells compared with normal cells. The effect of GADD153 on the binding of C/EBP to the Bak promoters were analyzed ChIP assay. Basal constitutive GADD153 recruitment to the –3,398/–3,380 region of the Bak promoter is observed in SH-SY5Y cells. Conclusions The exposure of SH-SY5Y cells to Cd led to increase in intracellular ROS levels in a doses and time dependent manner. The generation of ROS result in the induction of GADD153 is causative of cadmium-induced apoptosis. GADD153 regulates Bak expression by its binding to promoter region (between −3,398 and −3,380. Therefore, we conclude that GADD153 sensitizes cells to ROS through mechanisms that involve up-regulation of BAK and enhanced oxidant injury.

  19. Low level laser therapy activates NF-kB via generation of reactive oxygen species in mouse embryonic fibroblasts

    Chen, Aaron Chih-Hao; Arany, Praveen R.; Huang, Ying-Ying; Tomkinson, Elizabeth M.; Saleem, Taimur; Yull, Fiona E.; Blackwell, Timothy S.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2009-02-01

    Despite over forty years of investigation on low-level light therapy (LLLT), the fundamental mechanisms underlying photobiomodulation remain unclear. In this study, we isolated murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) from transgenic NF-kB luciferase reporter mice and studied their response to 810-nm laser radiation. Significant activation of NFkB was observed for fluences higher than 0.003 J/cm2. NF-kB activation by laser was detectable at 1-hour time point. Moreover, we demonstrated that laser phosphorylated both IKK α/β and NF-kB 15 minutes after irradiation, which implied that laser activates NF-kB via phosphorylation of IKK α/β. Suspecting mitochondria as the source of NF-kB activation signaling pathway, we demonstrated that laser increased both intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) by fluorescence microscopy with dichlorodihydrofluorescein and ATP synthesis by luciferase assay. Mitochondrial inhibitors, such as antimycin A, rotenone and paraquat increased ROS and NF-kB activation but had no effect on ATP. The ROS quenchers N-acetyl-L-cysteine and ascorbic acid abrogated laser-induced NF-kB and ROS but not ATP. These results suggested that ROS might play an important role in the signaling pathway of laser induced NF-kB activation. However, the western blot showed that antimycin A, a mitochondrial inhibitor, did not activate NF-kB via serine phosphorylation of IKK α/β as the laser did. On the other hand, LLLT, unlike mitochondrial inhibitors, induced increased cellular ATP levels, which indicates that light also upregulates mitochondrial respiration. ATP upregulation reached a maximum at 0.3 J/cm2 or higher. We conclude that LLLT not only enhances mitochondrial respiration, but also activates the redox-sensitive transcription factor NF-kB by generating ROS as signaling molecules.

  20. Fabrication of thin target of 138Ba by vacuum evaporation

    Target fabrication is a highly sophisticated and crucial step in nuclear physics experiments. The success of any nuclear experiment is primarily determined by the quality and quantity of the target. 138Ba target is prepared for the evaporation residue cross section measurement of 188Pt populated through the reaction with 50Ti ion beam. Barium is a highly reactive metal and upon exposure to air at room temperature it will readily react with oxygen. Presently no information is available in the literature for the thin barium target fabrication through vacuum evaporation method. The two previous attempts available in literature were in sputtering method using barium nitrate or barium carbonate

  1. Metal-loaded polystyrene-based activated carbons as DBT removal media via reactive adsorption

    Ovín Ania, María Concepción; Bandosz, T.J.

    2006-01-01

    [EN] To improve the desulfurization capability of activated carbons, new metal-loaded carbon-based sorbents containing sodium, cobalt, copper, and silver highly dispersed within the carbon matrix were prepared and tested at room temperature for dibenzothiophene (DBT) adsorption. The content of metals can be controlled by selective washing. The new adsorbents showed good adsorption capacities and selectivity towards DBT. The metals incorporated to the surface act not only as active sites for s...

  2. Regulation of cathepsin G reduces the activation of proinsulin-reactive T cells from type 1 diabetes patients.

    Fang Zou

    Full Text Available Autoantigenic peptides resulting from self-proteins such as proinsulin are important players in the development of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D. Self-proteins can be processed by cathepsins (Cats within endocytic compartments and loaded to major histocompatibility complex (MHC class II molecules for CD4(+ T cell inspection. However, the processing and presentation of proinsulin by antigen-presenting cells (APC in humans is only partially understood. Here we demonstrate that the processing of proinsulin by B cell or myeloid dendritic cell (mDC1-derived lysosomal cathepsins resulted in several proinsulin-derived intermediates. These intermediates were similar to those obtained using purified CatG and, to a lesser extent, CatD, S, and V in vitro. Some of these intermediates polarized T cell activation in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC from T1D patients indicative for naturally processed T cell epitopes. Furthermore, CatG activity was found to be elevated in PBMC from T1D patients and abrogation of CatG activity resulted in functional inhibition of proinsulin-reactive T cells. Our data suggested the notion that CatG plays a critical role in proinsulin processing and is important in the activation process of diabetogenic T cells.

  3. Selective estrogen receptor modulator BC-1 activates antioxidant signaling pathway in vitro via formation of reactive metabolites

    Bo-lan YU; Zi-xin MAI; Xu-xiang LIU; Zhao-feng HUANG

    2013-01-01

    Aim:Benzothiophene compounds are selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs),which are recently found to activate antioxidant signaling.In this study the molecular mechanisms of antioxidant signaling activation by benzothiophene compound BC-1 were investigated.Methods:HepG2 cells were stably transfected with antioxidant response element (ARE)-Iuciferase reporter (HepG2-ARE cells).The expression of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) in HepG2-ARE cells was suppressed using siRNA.The metabolites of BC-1 in rat liver microsome incubation were analyzed using LC-UV and LC-MS.Results:Addition of BC-1 (5 μmol/L) in HepG2-ARE cells resulted in a 17-fold increase of ARE-luciferase activity.Pretreatment with the estrogen receptor agonist E2 (5 μmol/L) or antagonist ICl 182,780 (5 μmol/L) did not affect BC-1-induced ARE-luciferase activity.However,transfection of the cells with anti-Nrf2 siRNA suppressed this effect by 79%.Addition of BC-1 in rat microsome incubation resulted in formation of di-quinone methides and o-quinones,followed by formation of GSH conjugates.BC-1 analogues with hydrogen (BC-2) or fluorine (BC-3) at the 4' position did not form the di-quinone methides.Both BC-2 and BC-3 showed comparable estrogenic activity with BC-1,but did not induce ARE-luciferase activity in HepG2-ARE cells.Conclusion:Benzothiophene compound BC-1 activates ARE signaling via reactive metabolite formation that is independent of estrogen receptors.

  4. What, no black hole evaporation

    Tipler has claimed that the inward flux of negative energy across the horizon which (according to the semi-classical approximation) accompanies the evaporation of a black hole would cause a solar mass black hole to evaporate in less than a second. It is shown that this claim is in error. (orig.)

  5. Characteristic Research on Evaporated Explosive Film

    2005-01-01

    The evaporation source of evaporated explosive was designed and improved based on the inherent specialties of explosive. The compatibility of explosives and addition agent with evaporation vessels was analyzed. The influence of substrate temperature on explosive was analyzed, the control method of substrate temperature was suggested. The influences of evaporation rate on formation of explosive film and mixed explosive film were confirmed. Optimum evaporation rate for evaporation explosive and the better method for evaporating mixed explosive were presented. The necessary characteristics of the evaporated explosive film were obtained by the research of the differences between the evaporated explosive and other materials.

  6. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species-mediated NLRP3 inflammasome activation contributes to aldosterone-induced renal tubular cells injury.

    Ding, Wei; Guo, Honglei; Xu, Chengyan; Wang, Bin; Zhang, Minmin; Ding, Feng

    2016-04-01

    Aldosterone (Aldo) is an independent risk factor for chronic kidney disease (CKD), and although Aldo directly induces renal tubular cell injury, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. NLRP3 inflammasome and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) have recently been implicated in various kinds of CKD. The present study hypothesized that mitochondrial ROS and NLRP3 inflammasome mediated Aldo-induced tubular cell injury. The NLRP3 inflammasome is induced by Aldo in a dose- and time-dependent manner, as evidenced by increased NLRP3, ASC, caspase-1, and downstream cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-18. The activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome was significantly prevented by the selective mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonist eplerenone (EPL) (P < 0.01). Mice harboring genetic knock-out of NLRP3 (NLRP3(-/-)) showed decreased maturation of renal IL-1β and IL-18, reduced renal tubular apoptosis, and improved renal epithelial cell phenotypic alternation, and attenuated renal function in response to Aldo-infusion. In addition, mitochondrial ROS was also increased in Aldo-stimulated HK-2 cells, as assessed by MitoSOXTM red reagent. Mito-Tempo, the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant, significantly decreased HK-2 cell apoptosis, oxidative stress, and the activation of NLRP3 inflammasome. We conclude that Aldo induces renal tubular cell injury via MR dependent, mitochondrial ROS-mediated NLRP3 inflammasome activation. PMID:27014913

  7. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species-mediated NLRP3 inflammasome activation contributes to aldosterone-induced renal tubular cells injury

    Ding, Wei; Guo, Honglei; Xu, Chengyan; Wang, Bin; Zhang, Minmin; Ding, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Aldosterone (Aldo) is an independent risk factor for chronic kidney disease (CKD), and although Aldo directly induces renal tubular cell injury, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. NLRP3 inflammasome and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) have recently been implicated in various kinds of CKD. The present study hypothesized that mitochondrial ROS and NLRP3 inflammasome mediated Aldo–induced tubular cell injury. The NLRP3 inflammasome is induced by Aldo in a dose- and time-dependent manner, as evidenced by increased NLRP3, ASC, caspase-1, and downstream cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-18. The activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome was significantly prevented by the selective mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonist eplerenone (EPL) (P < 0.01). Mice harboring genetic knock-out of NLRP3 (NLRP3−/−) showed decreased maturation of renal IL-1β and IL-18, reduced renal tubular apoptosis, and improved renal epithelial cell phenotypic alternation, and attenuated renal function in response to Aldo-infusion. In addition, mitochondrial ROS was also increased in Aldo-stimulated HK-2 cells, as assessed by MitoSOXTM red reagent. Mito-Tempo, the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant, significantly decreased HK-2 cell apoptosis, oxidative stress, and the activation of NLRP3 inflammasome. We conclude that Aldo induces renal tubular cell injury via MR dependent, mitochondrial ROS-mediated NLRP3 inflammasome activation. PMID:27014913

  8. Piperlongumine selectively kills glioblastoma multiforme cells via reactive oxygen species accumulation dependent JNK and p38 activation.

    Liu, Ju Mei; Pan, Feng; Li, Li; Liu, Qian Rong; Chen, Yong; Xiong, Xin Xin; Cheng, Kejun; Yu, Shang Bin; Shi, Zhi; Yu, Albert Cheung-Hoi; Chen, Xiao Qian

    2013-07-19

    Piperlongumine (PL), a natural alkaloid isolated from the long pepper, may have anti-cancer properties. It selectively targets and kills cancer cells but leaves normal cells intact. Here, we reported that PL selectively killed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells via accumulating reactive oxygen species (ROS) to activate JNK and p38. PL at 20μM could induce severe cell death in three GBM cell lines (LN229, U87 and 8MG) but not astrocytes in cultures. PL elevated ROS prominently and reduced glutathione levels in LN229 and U87 cells. Antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) completely reversed PL-induced ROS accumulation and prevented cell death in LN229 and U87 cells. In LN229 and U87 cells, PL-treatment activated JNK and p38 but not Erk and Akt, in a dosage-dependent manner. These activations could be blocked by NAC pre-treatment. JNK and p38 specific inhibitors, SB203580 and SP600125 respectively, significantly blocked the cytotoxic effects of PL in LN229 and U87 cells. Our data first suggests that PL may have therapeutic potential for one of the most malignant and refractory tumors GBM. PMID:23796709

  9. Preliminary Evidence for Impaired Brain Activity of Neural Reward Processing in Children and Adolescents with Reactive Attachment Disorder.

    Tomoda, Akemi

    2016-01-01

    Childhood maltreatment, which markedly increases risks for psychopathology, is associated with structural and functional brain differences. Especially, exposure to parental verbal abuse (PVA) or interparental violence during childhood is associated with negative outcomes such as depression, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and reduced cognitive abilities. Other forms of childhood maltreatment have been associated with brain structure or developmental alteration. Our earlier studies elucidated potential discernible effects of PVA and witnessing domestic violence during childhood on brain morphology, including gray matter volume or cortical thickness. Brain regions that process and convey the adverse sensory input of the abuse might be modified specifically by such experiences, particularly in subjects exposed to a single type of maltreatment. Exposure to multiple types of maltreatment is more commonly associated with morphological alterations in the corticolimbic regions. These findings fit with preclinical studies showing that sensory cortices are highly plastic structures. Using tasks with high and low monetary rewards while subjects underwent functional MRI, we also examined whether neural activity during reward processing was altered, or not, in children and adolescents with reactive attachment disorder (RAD). Significantly reduced activity in the caudate and nucleus accumbens was observed during a high monetary reward condition in the RAD group compared to the typically developed group. The striatal neural reward activity in the RAD group was also markedly decreased. The present results suggest that dopaminergic dysfunction occurred in the striatum in children and adolescents with RAD, potentially leading to a future risk of psychiatric disorders such as dependence. PMID:27150924

  10. Reactive Oxygen Species Mediated Activation of a Dormant Singlet Oxygen Photosensitizer: From Autocatalytic Singlet Oxygen Amplification to Chemicontrolled Photodynamic Therapy.

    Durantini, Andrés M; Greene, Lana E; Lincoln, Richard; Martínez, Sol R; Cosa, Gonzalo

    2016-02-01

    Here we show the design, preparation, and characterization of a dormant singlet oxygen ((1)O2) photosensitizer that is activated upon its reaction with reactive oxygen species (ROS), including (1)O2 itself, in what constitutes an autocatalytic process. The compound is based on a two segment photosensitizer-trap molecule where the photosensitizer segment consists of a Br-substituted boron-dipyrromethene (BODIPY) dye. The trap segment consists of the chromanol ring of α-tocopherol, the most potent naturally occurring lipid soluble antioxidant. Time-resolved absorption, fluorescence, and (1)O2 phosphorescence studies together with fluorescence and (1)O2 phosphorescence emission quantum yields collected on Br2B-PMHC and related bromo and iodo-substituted BODIPY dyes show that the trap segment provides a total of three layers of intramolecular suppression of (1)O2 production. Oxidation of the trap segment with ROS restores the sensitizing properties of the photosensitizer segment resulting in ∼40-fold enhancement in (1)O2 production. The juxtaposed antioxidant (chromanol) and prooxidant (Br-BODIPY) antagonistic chemical activities of the two-segment compound enable the autocatalytic, and in general ROS-mediated, activation of (1)O2 sensitization providing a chemical cue for the spatiotemporal control of (1)O2.The usefulness of this approach to selectively photoactivate the production of singlet oxygen in ROS stressed vs regular cells was successfully tested via the photodynamic inactivation of a ROS stressed Gram negative Escherichia coli strain. PMID:26789198