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Sample records for activated carbon obtained

  1. Use of grape must as a binder to obtain activated carbon briquettes

    A. C. Deiana; D. L. Granados; L. M. Petkovic; M. F. Sardella; H. S. Silva

    2004-01-01

    The results of studies on briquetting activated-carbon-based adsorbent materials, prepared from raw materials from the region of Cuyo, Argentina, are reported in this article. Several steps were carried out to obtain activated-carbon briquettes from Eucalyptus camaldulensis Dehn wood. These steps included carbonization of wood to obtain char; blending of char and a novel binder, i.e., grape must; formation of cylinder-like briquettes by pressure; and activation of the resulting material. The ...

  2. Activated carbon from char obtained from vacuum pyrolysis of teak sawdust: pore structure development and characterization.

    Ismadji, S; Sudaryanto, Y; Hartono, S B; Setiawan, L E K; Ayucitra, A

    2005-08-01

    The preparation of activated carbon from vacuum pyrolysis char of teak sawdust was studied and the results are presented in this paper. The effects of process variables such as temperature and activation time on the pore structure of activated carbons were studied. The activated carbon prepared from char obtained by vacuum pyrolysis has higher surface area and pore volume than that from atmospheric pyrolysis char. The BET surface area and pore volume of activated carbon prepared from vacuum pyrolysis char were 1150 m2/g and 0.43 cm3/g, respectively. PMID:15792584

  3. Adsorption of cationic dye methylene blue onto activated carbon obtained from horse chestnut kernel

    Momčilović Milan Z.; Purenović Milovan M.; Miljković Milena N.; Bojić Aleksandar Lj.; Ranđelović Marjan S.

    2011-01-01

    Horse chestnut kernel was used as the precursor for the preparation of powdered activated carbon using phosphoric acid as the activating agent. Batch adsorption experiments for the adsorption of cationic dye methylene blue from aqueous solutions were carried out using the obtained carbon as adsorbent. Equilibrium and kinetic experiments were conducted. The equilibrium data were fitted with the Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin theoretical isotherm models. The best results was obtained in ...

  4. Use of grape must as a binder to obtain activated carbon briquettes

    A. C. Deiana

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The results of studies on briquetting activated-carbon-based adsorbent materials, prepared from raw materials from the region of Cuyo, Argentina, are reported in this article. Several steps were carried out to obtain activated-carbon briquettes from Eucalyptus camaldulensis Dehn wood. These steps included carbonization of wood to obtain char; blending of char and a novel binder, i.e., grape must; formation of cylinder-like briquettes by pressure; and activation of the resulting material. The material was activated with steam under different temperatures, activation times, and activating agent flow rates. Impact resistance index, axial compressive strength, tensile strength by diametrical compression, BET area, and pore volume were measured for product characterization. Satisfactory surface areas and mechanical strengths were found in the final products.

  5. Influence of process parameters on the surface and chemical properties of activated carbon obtained from biochar by chemical activation.

    Angın, Dilek; Altintig, Esra; Köse, Tijen Ennil

    2013-11-01

    Activated carbons were produced from biochar obtained through pyrolysis of safflower seed press cake by chemical activation with zinc chloride. The influences of process variables such as the activation temperature and the impregnation ratio on textural and chemical-surface properties of the activated carbons were investigated. Also, the adsorptive properties of activated carbons were tested using methylene blue dye as the targeted adsorbate. The experimental data indicated that the adsorption isotherms are well described by the Langmuir equilibrium isotherm equation. The optimum conditions resulted in activated carbon with a monolayer adsorption capacity of 128.21 mg g(-1) and carbon content 76.29%, while the BET surface area and total pore volume corresponded to 801.5m(2)g(-1) and 0.393 cm(3)g(-1), respectively. This study demonstrated that high surface area activated carbons can be prepared from the chemical activation of biochar with zinc chloride as activating agents. PMID:24080293

  6. Elaboration and characterization of a new activated carbon obtained from oregano residue: Application in environmental field

    Oumam N.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the valorization of extraction residues of medicinal plants which represent approximately 80% of the gross weight of the plant. In this context we proceeded to the transformation of “marc oregano” to a material adsorbent type activated carbon. The oregano marc, obtained after extraction of essential oils and organic compounds, has undergone a chemical activation using the phosphoric acid 85% (H3PO4. It is well known as precursors of lignocellulosic activating agent, allows the development of a large porosity in the activated material. The activated product has subsequently underwent heat treatment in the temperature range from 200 to 350 °C. The optimum temperature for development was set at 300 °C. The results obtained showed that the adsorbent material O300 has developed the interesting textural properties. It is an adsorbent material like activated carbon, which presents, according to the BET method, a specific surface of 1200 m2·g−1 (specific surface area of commercial activated carbon is of about 905 m2·g−1. The application of adsorbent material developed O300 in microbial decontamination of urban waste water, has revealed its effectiveness and its important adsorptive properties against pathogens pollutants from wastewater.

  7. Adsorption of cationic dye methylene blue onto activated carbon obtained from horse chestnut kernel

    Momčilović Milan Z.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Horse chestnut kernel was used as the precursor for the preparation of powdered activated carbon using phosphoric acid as the activating agent. Batch adsorption experiments for the adsorption of cationic dye methylene blue from aqueous solutions were carried out using the obtained carbon as adsorbent. Equilibrium and kinetic experiments were conducted. The equilibrium data were fitted with the Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin theoretical isotherm models. The best results was obtained in the case of Langmuir model, which indicates that monolayer adsorption occurs on finite number of the active adsorption sites on the carbon surface. The kinetic data were fitted with pseudo-first, pseudo-second, Elovich and interparticle diffusion model. Pseudo-second order model and Elovich model showed the best results of the kinetic data. The increasing of the solution pH led to a higher uptake of methylene blue due to the fact that competitive adsorption of methylene blue cation and proton exists in acidic solutions. The adsorption capacity for methylene blue in equilibrium study was significant (168.93 mg g-1. Comparison of the adsorption capacities of methylene blue onto activated carbons derived from various alternative precursors proves chestnut kernel to be efficient and low-cost material which could be substantially deployed in the future.

  8. Pb2+ adsorption from aqueous solutions on activated carbons obtained from lignocellulosic residues

    L. Giraldo

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Activated carbons obtained from cane sugar bagasse (ACB, African palm pit (ACP and sawdust (ACS were prepared through an impregnated with HNO3 and thermal treatment in an atmosphere in N2/steam water at 1173 K. Adsorption isotherms of N2 at 77 K and of CO2 at 273 K were determined for the activated carbons for which surface area and pore volume values were from 868 to 1100 m²g-1 and from 0.27 to 0.55cm³ g-1, respectively. These results were correlated, with the ones obtained for adsorption the adsorption isotherms of Pb2+ in aqueous solutions. Impregnation of the lignocellulosic materials with nitric acid produced acid-type activated carbons with total acid site contents between 4.13 and 6.93 mmol g-1 and pH at the point of zero charge values between 2.7 and 4.1, which were within range of the adsorption, at different pH values, since they determined, the surface charge of the activated carbons. Adsorption isotherms of Pb2+ at different pH values (2-8 at 298 K were determined. The ion adsorption capacity on ACB, ACP and ACS were 13.7, 15.2 and 17.5 mg.g-1, respectively. Experimental data were fitted to the Langmuir and Freundlich models and all cases the former fit better. The highest values for the quantity adsorbed on the monolayer, qm, were at pH 4, whereas the surface, charge of activated carbons was negative and the lead species mainly present was Pb2+. For higher pHs, the quantity of Pb2+ adsorbed decreased, and this had an important effect on adsorption, the surface characteristics of the solids and the hydroxilated lead species that were formed in the system.

  9. Investigation of physiologically active products obtained from carbon-ion irradiated actinomycetes

    Charged particles such as carbon-ions are superior to X-rays or gamma-rays in the physical and biological characteristics. The propose research project is aimed to provide new insights on antibiotic development. Carbon-ion exposure reduced cell growth. Product(s) from carbon-ion irradiated microorganera suppressed growth of human leukemia cells. We suggested that carbon-ion irradiated actinomycetes produce antitumor active product(s) for leukemia cells. (author)

  10. Fusion cross sections of carbon isotopes obtained with an ionization chamber in active target mode

    Carbon fusion has provided questions to both physicists and astronomers for at least the last 50 years. From fundamental nuclear structure to recent discoveries in stellar phenomena there are still open topics. Fusion in the 12C + 12C system show oscillations that are not present in neighboring systems and are yet not completely understood. Unexplained behavior in the threshold between 1p and 2s1d shells is seen as fusion cross sections show significant changes in systems which differ by only a nucleon. A new type of stellar explosions, called super bursts, in X-ray binaries were recently observed and are thought to require fusion of radioactive carbon isotopes for an explanation, opening new paths for stellar nucleosynthesis. These are a few interesting examples that motivated the development of a new measurement technique, which comprises a Multi Sampling Ionization Chamber (Music) operated in active target mode, with methane gas (C H4) as both counting gas and reaction target. This offers a high efficiency detection method where excitation functions can be sampled, using a single beam energy, in a range determined by the ionization gas pressure. This is a great advantage since it drastically reduces the measurement time and the data are automatically normalized. The high efficiency of the detector makes it ideal for experiments where the reaction cross section and/or the beam intensity are low, i.e. for processes involving radioactive nuclei. Using the Music, fusion cross sections in systems with carbon isotopes of mass numbers A = 10, 12, 13, 14, 15 impinging on a carbon-12 target have been measured. Beam energies of about 3 MeV/A were used for obtaining fusion excitation functions in the center of mass energy range between 10 and 20 MeV. In this contribution, the operation principle of the Music is discussed. Then, the experimental excitation functions are presented and compared with previous data (3when available) and different theoretical models

  11. Investigation of physiologically active products obtained from carbon-ion irradiated actinomycetes

    Charged particles such as carbon-ions are superior to X-rays or gamma-rays in the physical and biological characteristics. The propose research project is aimed to provide new insights on antibiotic development. Mutants were prepared by heavy ion irradiation, examined the effect of physiologically active substances produced. Product(s) from carbon-ion irradiated microorganera suppressed growth of human cololectal cancer cells and breast cancer cells. We suggested that carbon-ion irradiated actinomycetes produce antitumor active product(s) for cololectal and breast cancer cells. (author)

  12. Investigation of physiologically active products obtained from carbon-ion irradiated actinomycetes

    Charged particles such as carbon-ions are superior to X-rays or gamma-rays in the physical and biological characteristics. The propose research project is aimed to provide new insights on antibiotic development. Product(s) from carbon-ion irradiated microorganera suppressed growth of human leukemia cells and mammary tumor cells. This product(s) induced apoptosis in human leukemia cells. We suggested that carbon-ion irradiated actinomycetes produce antitumor active product(s) for leukemia cells and mammary tumor cells. (author)

  13. Physico-chemical characterization of powdered activated carbons obtained by thermo-chemical conversion of brown municipal waste

    Momčilović Milan Z.; Purenović Milovan M.; Miljković Milena N.; Bojić Aleksandar Lj.; Zarubica Aleksandra R.; Ranđelović Marjan S.

    2011-01-01

    Cones of the European Black pine and Horse chestnut kernel, regarded as brown municipal waste, was utilized in this work as a precursor for powdered activated carbons. Chemical activation was employed at 500°C in inert atmosphere of nitrogen. Standard physico-chemical analyses were performed to examine obtained products. FTIR method was employed to determine fuctional groups which were found to be typical for activated carbons. Acidic oxygen groups were quantitatively determined using B...

  14. Physico-chemical characterization of powdered activated carbons obtained by thermo-chemical conversion of brown municipal waste

    Momčilović Milan Z.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cones of the European Black pine and Horse chestnut kernel, regarded as brown municipal waste, was utilized in this work as a precursor for powdered activated carbons. Chemical activation was employed at 500°C in inert atmosphere of nitrogen. Standard physico-chemical analyses were performed to examine obtained products. FTIR method was employed to determine fuctional groups which were found to be typical for activated carbons. Acidic oxygen groups were quantitatively determined using Boehm titrations. It was established that carboxylic groups on pine cone activated carbon, and phenolic groups on chestnut kernel activated carbon were dominant from all acidic oxygen groups. Since both contact pH and pHPZC were determined to be fairly acidic, it could be concluded that obtained activated carbons belong to L-type. Shape and layout of micrometer dimensioned particles were observed by scanning electron microscopy. Particles of different shapes and dimensions along with small cracks and wide crevices and voids were noticed. Textural analysis was used to determine specific surface area and pore distribution of obtained activated carbons. Obtained products possess highly developed surface area and wide pore distribution.

  15. Adsorption of iron (III ion on activated carbons obtained from bagasse, pericarp of rubber fruit and coconut shell

    Orawan Sirichote

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available The adsorptions of iron (III from aqueous solution at room temperature on activated carbons obtaining from bagasse, pericarp of rubber fruit and coconut shell have been studied by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The activated carbons were prepared by carbonization of these raw materials and followed by activation with ZnCl2 . The adsorption behavior of iron (III on these activated carbons could be interpreted by Langmuir adsorption isotherm as monolayer coverage. The maximum amounts of iron (III adsorbed per gram of these activated carbons were 0.66 mmol/g, 0.41 mmol/g and 0.18 mmol/g, respectively. Study of the temperature dependence on these adsorptions has revealed them to be exothermic processes with the heats of adsorption of about -8.9 kJ/mol , -9.7 kJ/mol and -5.7 kJ/mol for bagasse, pericarp of rubber fruit and coconut shell, respectively.

  16. Removal of cationic surfactant (CTAB) from aqueous solution on to activated carbon obtained from corncob.

    S. M. Yakout; A. A. Nayl

    2009-01-01

    Direct and indirect releases of large quantities of surfactants to the environment may result in serious health and environmental problems. Therefore, surfactants should be removed from water before water is released to the environment or delivered for public use. Using powdered activated carbon (PAC) as adsorbent may be an effective technique to remove surfactants. In this study, the removal of surfactants by PAC was investigated and the influencesof the operating parameters on the effective...

  17. Removal of cationic surfactant (CTAB from aqueous solution on to activated carbon obtained from corncob.

    S. M. Yakout

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Direct and indirect releases of large quantities of surfactants to the environment may result in serious health and environmental problems. Therefore, surfactants should be removed from water before water is released to the environment or delivered for public use. Using powdered activated carbon (PAC as adsorbent may be an effective technique to remove surfactants. In this study, the removal of surfactants by PAC was investigated and the influencesof the operating parameters on the effectiveness on adsorption rate were studied. Cationic surfactant, Cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB was selected for the experiments. A series of batch experiments were performed to determine the sorption isotherms of surfactants to PAC. The results showed that carbon structure affect mainly on the surfactant adsorption. Surfactant equilibrium data fitted very well to the binary langmuir model. The pseudo first-,second- order and intraparticle diffusion kinetic models were applied. Both, the external mass transfer and intraparticle diffusion mechanisms involve in CTAB sorption.

  18. Sorption Characteristics of Activated Carbon Obtained from Rice Husks by Treatment with Lime

    The sorption studies of rice husk char prepared by carbonization and activation with lime, caustic soda and sulphuric acid have been investigated. Prior to impregnation with the lime; on a micro processing scale the pre-carbonization temperature of rice husk were determined by using TG-DTA thermal analysis. The impregnation with chemical was made after carbonization and the impregnated chars were subjected to activation at appropriate temperatures of about 300 C to 500 C depending on the impregnated chars. The physico-chemical properties of the prepared chars were tested by conventional and modern techniques. Sorption capacities with respect to colored dyes were determined for each of the char. These sorption capacities are indicative of the decolorizing nature and the acid or basic nature. The sorption capacities of the prepared chars towards the uptake of metals such as copper, iron, lead and cadmium were also studied and the lime activated char exhibits high adsorptive capacities for all the metals compared to other prepared chars as well as the commercial wood char. The evaluation of the sorption capacities of this chars were made on the basis of Freundlich and Langmuir monolayer coverage equations. Thus, based on batch dosage method and breakthrough flow method, the uptake of the metals were found to be in following order for the lime activated rice husk char; Cu > Fe > Pb > Cd. From this investigation, it can be inferred that a rice husk char impregnated with 20% technical grade CaO has the potential effect to be used as an effective metal adsorbent particularly for the uptake of toxic heavy metals in the secondary stage of water treatment processes.

  19. INVESTIGATION OF FLY ASH AND ACTIVATED CARBON OBTAINED FROM PULVERIZED COAL BOILERS

    Edward K. Levy; Christopher Kiely

    2005-11-01

    One of the techniques for Hg capture in coal-fired boilers involves injection of activated carbon (AC) into the boiler downstream of the air preheater. Hg is adsorbed onto the AC particles and fly ash, which are then both removed in an electrostatic precipitator or baghouse. This project addresses the issues of Hg on activated carbon and on fly ash from a materials re-use point of view. It also addresses the possible connection between SCR reactors, fly ash properties and Hg capture. The project is determining the feasibility of separating AC from fly ash in a fluidized bed and of regenerating the separated AC by heating the AC to elevated temperatures in a fluidized bed. The temperatures needed to drive off the Hg from the ash in a fluidized bed are also being determined. Finally, samples of fly ash from power plants with SCR reactors for NO{sub x} control, are being analyzed to determine the effect of SCR on the ash.

  20. Investigation of Fly Ash and Activated Carbon Obtained from Pulverized Coal Boilers

    Edward K. Levy; Christopher Kiely; Zheng Yao

    2006-08-31

    One of the techniques for Hg capture in coal-fired boilers involves injection of activated carbon (AC) into the boiler downstream of the air preheater. Hg is adsorbed onto the AC particles and fly ash, which are then both removed in an electrostatic precipitator or baghouse. This project addressed the issues of Hg on activated carbon and on fly ash from a materials re-use point of view. It also addressed the possible connection between SCR reactors, fly ash properties and Hg capture. The project has determined the feasibility of separating AC from fly ash in a fluidized bed and of regenerating the separated AC by heating the AC to elevated temperatures in a fluidized bed. The temperatures needed to drive off the Hg from the ash in a fluidized bed have also been determined. Finally, samples of fly ash from power plants with SCR reactors for NO{sub x} control have been analyzed in an effort to determine the effects of SCR on the ash.

  1. Upgrading the rice husk char obtained by flash pyrolysis for the production of amorphous silica and high quality activated carbon.

    Alvarez, Jon; Lopez, Gartzen; Amutio, Maider; Bilbao, Javier; Olazar, Martin

    2014-10-01

    The overall valorization of rice husk char obtained by flash pyrolysis in a conical spouted bed reactor (CSBR) has been studied in a two-step process. Thus, silica has been recovered in a first step and the remaining carbon material has been subjected to steam activation. The char samples used in this study have been obtained by continuous flash pyrolysis in a conical spouted bed reactor at 500°C. Extraction with Na2CO3 allows recovering 88% of the silica contained in the rice husk char. Activation of the silica-free rice husk char has been carried out in a fixed bed reactor at 800°C using steam as activating agent. The porous structure of the activated carbons produced includes a combination of micropores and mesopores, with a BET surface area of up to 1365m(2)g(-1) at the end of 15min. PMID:25127010

  2. Polyphenol-Retaining Decaffeinated Cocoa Powder Obtained by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Extraction and Its Antioxidant Activity

    Kinji Kobori

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Cocoa beans contain many functional ingredients such as theobromine and polyphenols, but also contain a relatively high amount of caffeine, which can negatively impact human health. It is therefore desirable to reduce caffeine levels in cocoa powder used to make chocolate or cocoa beverages while retaining functional ingredients. We have established conditions for supercritical carbon dioxide (SCCO2 extraction that remove 80.1% of the caffeine from cocoa powder while retaining theobromine (94.1% and polyphenols (84.7%. The antioxidant activity of the decaffeinated cocoa powder (DCP made with this optimized SCCO2 extraction method was 85.3% that of non-processed cocoa powder. The total procyanidin and total polyphenol concentrations of the DCPs resulting from various SCCO2 extractions showed a significant positive correlation with oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC. The correlation coefficient between total polyphenols and ORAC was higher than that between total procyanidins and ORAC; thus, the concentration of total polyphenols might be a greater factor in the antioxidant activity of DCP. These results indicate that we could remove large quantities of caffeine from conventional high-cocoa products while retaining the functional benefits of high polyphenol content. This SCCO2 extraction method is expected to be applicable high-cocoa products, such as dark chocolate.

  3. Effects of Temperature and Pore Structure on High Surface Area-Activated Carbon Obtained from Peanut Shells.

    Kalpana, D; Lee, Y S

    2016-03-01

    Activated carbon was synthesized from peanut shells by treating with H3PO4 with an intention to enhance the surface area and to find its electrochemical performance in EDLC as electrode material. The powdered peanut shells were pyrolyzed at three different temperatures namely 300 degrees C, 600 degrees C and 800 degrees C respectively. The structural and surface properties of the pyrolyzed carbon materials were studied using N2 adsorption/desorption, Raman, TEM and SEM analysis. There has been remarkable increase in the surface area of the carbon pyrolyzed at 600 degrees C due to the effect of pore generations. The surface area of the 600 degrees C pyrolyzed sample was found to be 1629 m2/g. The electrochemical properties of all the samples were evaluated by cyclic voltammetry, impedance spectroscopy, and galvanostatic charge-discharge tests. The system showed excellent cycleability and a maximum specific capacitance of 291 Fg(-1) was obtained in a 0.1 M H2SO4 electrolyte solution. The effects of the various properties of the activated carbon on the EDLC performance are discussed. PMID:27455740

  4. Chemical profile and antimicrobial activity of Boldo (Peumus boldus Molina extracts obtained by compressed carbon dioxide extraction

    M. Mazutti

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This work reports the effects of temperature (20 to 50ºC and pressure (100 to 250 bar on the extraction yield, chemical characteristics and antimicrobial activity of extracts of Peumus boldus Molina obtained by compressed carbon dioxide extraction. Results showed that the extraction variables affect the extraction yield and the chemical distribution of the major compounds present in the extracts. The extracts were chemically analyzed with regard to 1,8-cineole, trans-sabinene, pinocarveol, pinocarvone, 4-terpineol, ascaridole, piperitone oxide, limonene dioxide and n-eicosane in a GC/MSD. Antimicrobial tests demonstrated that the high-pressure CO2 extracts had activity against 13 bacteria and that better action was verified with extracts obtained at a lower CO2 extraction density and a higher temperature.

  5. Annealing effect on the particle size and chemical composition of activated carbon obtained from vacuum furnace of teak sawdust

    Armynah, B.; Tahir, D.; Jaya, N.

    2014-09-01

    Activated carbon was produced from sawdust by using physical method in a high temperature vacuum furnace without additional chemical. Fast pyrolysis process was carried out prior in fluidized a bed furnace to produce char before activation process. Experiments were conducted to investigate the influence of various process parameters such as particle size, activation temperature and activation time on the quality of the activated carbon. In addition, the chemical composition studies were done by using x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy. The crystallite sizes were calculated by using Scherer equation based on x-ray diffraction (XRD) spectroscopy data. The pyrolysis temperature and time were varied from 600°C to 900°C and from 3 hours to 6 hours, respectively. The particle size of activated carbon was increase with increasing temperature. The composition and crystallite size of the prepared activated carbon was compared with the non-activated carbon. The results indicated that the teak sawdust carbon could be employed as a low cost alternative to produce commercial activated carbon.

  6. Annealing effect on the particle size and chemical composition of activated carbon obtained from vacuum furnace of teak sawdust

    Activated carbon was produced from sawdust by using physical method in a high temperature vacuum furnace without additional chemical. Fast pyrolysis process was carried out prior in fluidized a bed furnace to produce char before activation process. Experiments were conducted to investigate the influence of various process parameters such as particle size, activation temperature and activation time on the quality of the activated carbon. In addition, the chemical composition studies were done by using x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy. The crystallite sizes were calculated by using Scherer equation based on x-ray diffraction (XRD) spectroscopy data. The pyrolysis temperature and time were varied from 600°C to 900°C and from 3 hours to 6 hours, respectively. The particle size of activated carbon was increase with increasing temperature. The composition and crystallite size of the prepared activated carbon was compared with the non-activated carbon. The results indicated that the teak sawdust carbon could be employed as a low cost alternative to produce commercial activated carbon

  7. Annealing effect on the particle size and chemical composition of activated carbon obtained from vacuum furnace of teak sawdust

    Armynah, B., E-mail: dtahir@fmipa.unhas.ac.id; Tahir, D., E-mail: dtahir@fmipa.unhas.ac.id; Jaya, N., E-mail: dtahir@fmipa.unhas.ac.id [Department of Physics, Hasanuddin University, Makassar 90245 (Indonesia)

    2014-09-25

    Activated carbon was produced from sawdust by using physical method in a high temperature vacuum furnace without additional chemical. Fast pyrolysis process was carried out prior in fluidized a bed furnace to produce char before activation process. Experiments were conducted to investigate the influence of various process parameters such as particle size, activation temperature and activation time on the quality of the activated carbon. In addition, the chemical composition studies were done by using x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy. The crystallite sizes were calculated by using Scherer equation based on x-ray diffraction (XRD) spectroscopy data. The pyrolysis temperature and time were varied from 600°C to 900°C and from 3 hours to 6 hours, respectively. The particle size of activated carbon was increase with increasing temperature. The composition and crystallite size of the prepared activated carbon was compared with the non-activated carbon. The results indicated that the teak sawdust carbon could be employed as a low cost alternative to produce commercial activated carbon.

  8. Adsorption efficiencies of calcium (II ion and iron (II ion on activated carbon obtained from pericarp of rubber fruit

    Orawan Sirichote

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Determination of adsorption efficiencies of activated carbon from pericarp of rubber fruit for calcium (II ion and iron (II ion has been performed by flowing the solutions of these ions through a column of activated carbon. The weights of activated carbon in 500 mL buret column (diameter 3.2 cm for flowing calcium (II ion and iron (II ion solutions were 15 g and 10 g, respectively. The initial concentration of calcium ion was prepared to be about eight times more diluted than the true concentration found in the groundwater from the lower part of southern Thailand. Calcium (II ion concentrations were analysed by EDTA titration and its initial concentration was found to be 23.55 ppm. With a flow rate of 26 mL/min, the adsorption efficiency was 11.4 % with passed through volume 4.75 L. Iron (II ion concentrations were analysed by spectrophotometric method; its initial concentration was found to be 1.5565 ppm. At a flow rate of 22 mL/min, the adsorption efficiency was 0.42 % with passed through volume of 34.0 L.

  9. Pyrolysis of heavy metal contaminated biomass: Characterization of obtained pyrolysis oils and study of derived activated carbon

    STALS, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Widespread heavy metal contamination in soils gives rise to problems; not only in Flanders, but in every location this contamination exists. These problems include (1) a risk of further spreading the contamination. e.g. to larger areas or contamination of groundwater and (2) lost income due to the impossibility to perform conventional agricultural activities (food production). Therefore, an onsite sanitation is required in order to reduce the impact on the environment. These problems may be o...

  10. Carbon and nitrogen determination in Zr by photon or proton activation analysis. Comparison between the results obtained by this method and other analytical techniques

    Carbon and nitrogen are determined by the following nuclear reactions: 12C(γ,n)11C and 14N(p,α)11C. The performances of the method and the main interferences are considered. The process developed for the separation of carbon-11 from zirconium is described and its efficiency evaluated. The results obtained are compared with those given by different laboratories using various analytical techniques

  11. Obtainment of calcium carbonate from mussels shell

    The mussels and oyster shell are discarded at environment, and this accumulation is causing negative consequences to ecosystem. Calcium carbonate is main constituent of the shell chemical composition. Aiming to reduce environmental aggression and generate income to shellfish producer, there was the possibility of using these shells as an alternative to commercial calcium carbonate. For this physics, chemicals and thermal properties were evaluated, using X-ray fluorescence, thermogravimetric analysis, size distribution, abrasiveness and scanning electronic microscopy. The results indicate that mussels shells have an initial degradation temperature higher than commercial calcium carbonate e same lost weight behavior and 95% of shell chemical composition is calcium carbonate. The sample size distribution was influenced by grinding condition and time as well as its abrasiveness. (author)

  12. Synthesis and characterization of carbon fibers obtained through plasma techniques

    The study of carbon, particularly the nano technology is a recent field, the one which has important implications in the science of new materials. It investigation is of great interest for industries producers of ceramic, metallurgy, electronic, energy storage, biomedicine, among others. The diverse application fields are a reason at national as international level, so that many works are focused in the production of nano fibers of carbon. The Thermal plasma applications laboratory (LAPT) of the National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ), it is carrying out works about carbon nano technology. The present work has as purpose to carry out the synthesis and characterization of the carbon nano fibers which are obtained by electric arch of alternating current (CA) to high frequencies and by a plasma gun of non transferred arch, where are used hydrocarbons like benzene, methane, acetylene like carbon source and ferrocene, nickel, yttrium and cerium oxide like catalysts. For both techniques its were thought about a relationship among hydrocarbon-catalyst that it favored to the nano fibers production. The obtained product of each experiment outlined it was analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), analysis with those were obtained pictures and diffraction graphs, which were observed to arrive to one conclusion on the operation conditions, same analysis with those were characterized the tests carried out according to the nano structures formation of carbon. (Author)

  13. Activated carbons and gold

    The literature on activated carbon is reviewed so as to provide a general background with respect to the effect of source material and activation procedure on carbon properties, the structure and chemical nature of the surface of the activated carbon, and the nature of absorption processes on carbon. The various theories on the absorption of gold and silver from cyanide solutions are then reviewed, followed by a discussion of processes for the recovery of gold and silver from cyanide solutions using activated carbon, including a comparison with zinc precipitation

  14. Chlorination of Carbon Nanotubes Obtained on the Different Metal Catalysts

    Iwona Pełech

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a chlorination method is proposed for simultaneous purification and functionalization of carbon nanotubes, thus increasing their ability to use. Carbon nanotubes were obtained by CVD method through ethylene decomposition on the nanocrystalline iron or cobalt or bimetallic iron-cobalt catalysts. The effects of temperature (50, 250, and 450°C in the case of carbon nanotubes obtained on the Fe-Co catalyst and type of catalyst (Fe, Co, Fe/Co on the effectiveness of the treatment and functionalization were tested. The phase composition of the samples was determined using the X-ray diffraction method. The quantitative analysis of metal impurity content was validated by means of the thermogravimetric analysis. Using X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS, Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS analysis, and also Mohr titration method, the presence of chlorine species on the surface of chlorinated samples was confirmed.

  15. Electrochemical Cell for Obtaining Oxygen from Carbon Dioxide Atmospheres

    Hooker, Matthew; Rast, H. Edward; Rogers, Darren K.; Borja, Luis; Clark, Kevin; Fleming, Kimberly; Mcgurren, Michael; Oldaker, Tom; Sweet, Nanette

    1989-01-01

    To support human life on the Martian surface, an electrochemical device will be required to obtain oxygen from the carbon dioxide rich atmosphere. The electrolyte employed in such a device must be constructed from extremely thin, dense membranes to efficiently acquire the oxygen necessary to support life. A forming process used industrially in the production of multilayer capacitors and electronic substrates was adapted to form the thin membranes required. The process, known as the tape casting, involves the suspension consisting of solvents and binders. The suspension is passed under a blade, resulting in the production of ceramic membranes between 0.1 and 0.5 mm thick. Once fired, the stabilized zirconia membranes were assembled into the cell design by employing a zirconium phosphate solution as the sealing agent. The resulting ceramic-to-ceramic seals were found to be structurally sound and gas-tight. Furthermore, by using a zirconia-based solution to assemble the cell, the problem of a thermal expansion mismatch was alleviated. By adopting an industrial forming process to produce thin membranes, an electrochemical cell for obtaining oxygen from carbon dioxide was produced. The proposed cell design is unique in that it does not require a complicated manifold system for separating the various gases present in this process, nor does it require a series of complex electrical connections. Thus, the device can reliably obtain the vital oxygen supply from the toxic carbon dioxide atmosphere.

  16. 76 FR 67142 - Certain Activated Carbon From the People's Republic of China: Final Results and Partial...

    2011-10-31

    ... Administrative Review, 75 FR 48644 (August 11, 2010) (``First Rescission''). \\5\\ See Certain Activated Carbon... activated carbon is a powdered, granular, or pelletized carbon product obtained by ``activating'' with heat... activated carbon, including powdered activated carbon (``PAC''), granular......

  17. The fungicidal properties of the carbon materials obtained from chitin and chitosan promoted by copper salts

    Ilnicka, Anna, E-mail: annakucinska@o2.pl; Walczyk, Mariusz; Lukaszewicz, Jerzy P.

    2015-07-01

    Renewable raw materials chitin and chitosan (N-deacetylated derivative of chitin) were subjected to action of different copper modifiers that were carbonized in the atmosphere of the N{sub 2} inert gas. As a result of the novel manufacturing procedure, a series of carbon materials was obtained with developed surface area and containing copper derivatives of differentiated form, size, and dispersion. The copper modifier and manufacturing procedure (concentration, carbonization temperature) influence the physical–chemical and fungicide properties of the carbons. The received carbons were chemically characterized using several methods like low-temperature adsorption of nitrogen, X-ray diffraction analysis, scanning electron microscopy, cyclic voltammetry, elemental analysis, and bioassay. Besides chemical testing, some biological tests were performed and let to select carbons with the highest fungicidal activity. Such carbons were characteristic of the specific form of copper derivatives occurring in them, i.e., nanocrystallites of Cu{sup 0} and/or Cu{sub 2}O of high dispersion on the surface of carbon. The carbons may find an application as effective contact fungistatic agents in cosmetology, medicine, food industry, etc. - Highlights: • The novel manufacturing procedure yields new functional carbon materials. • Two biopolymers chitin and chitosan can undergo copper(II) ion modification. • The Cu-modified carbon materials exhibit high fungicidal activity. • The fungicidal activity results from the presence of Cu{sup 0} and Cu{sub 2}O nano-crystallites.

  18. High density carbon materials obtained at relatively low temperature by spark plasma sintering of carbon nanofibers

    Borrell, Amparo; Torrecillas, Ramon [Nanomaterials and Nanotechnology Research Center (CINN), Principado de Asturias - Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), Univ. de Oviedo, Parque Tecnologico de Asturias, Llanera (Spain); Fernandez, Adolfo [Fundacion ITMA, Parque Tecnologico de Asturias, Llanera (Spain); Merino, Cesar [Grupo Antolin Ingenieria, Burgos (Spain)

    2010-01-15

    Graphitic materials obtained at low temperatures are interesting for a wide range of industrial applications including bipolar plates. In this work, graphite based nanocomposites have been obtained starting from carbon nanofibers and a mixture of carbon nanofibers with 20 vol.% of alumina nanopowders. High density carbon components were obtained by using Spark Plasma Sintering at temperatures as low as 1500-1800 C for this kind of materials. The effect of spark plasma sintering parameters on the final density, and the mechanical and electrical properties of resulting nanocomposites have been investigated. Pure carbon nanofibers with around 90% of theoretical density and fracture strength of 60 MPa have been obtained at temperatures as low as 1500 C applying a pressure of 80 MPa during sintering. It has been proved that attrition milling is a suitable method for preparing homogeneous mixtures of carbon nanofibers and alumina powders. (orig.)

  19. Determination of actinides in samples obtained during dismantling activities

    At present, some of the nuclear and radioactive facilities from CIEMAT employed in the past to perform activities related to the production of nuclear energy have been decommissioned as part of a more global on-going dismantling project. During the radiological characterization of a former laboratory a significant contamination of actinide elements in the old liquid effluents system was found. Samples obtained from two different locations (pipes and deposit) were measured by gamma- and alpha-spectrometry to quantify the contamination of the system. A quick and simple method using Actinide resin coupled with liquid scintillation counting (LSC) was employed for the determination of gross-alpha activity. The samples were also analyzed using a sequential leaching procedure to obtain information about the actinide association to certain geochemical phases with different solubilities such as carbonates, oxides, organic matter, etc., and thus, to choose the most appropriate clean-up method. Finally, the results obtained by the different techniques mentioned are compared and discussed. (author)

  20. Method for obtaining more precise measures of excreted organic carbon

    A new method for concentrating and measuring excreted organic carbon by lyophilization and scintillation counting is efficient, improves measurable radioactivity, and increases precision for estimates of organic carbon excreted by phytoplankton and macrophytes

  1. Nanostructured synthetic carbons obtained by pyrolysis of spherical acrylonitrile/divinylbenzene copolymers.

    Danish J Malik

    Full Text Available Novel carbon materials have been prepared by the carbonization of acrylonitrile (AN/divinylbenzene (DVB suspension porous copolymers having nominal crosslinking degrees in the range of 30-70% and obtained in the presence of various amounts of porogens. The carbons were obtained by pre-oxidation of AN/DVB copolymers at 250-350°C in air followed by pyrolysis at 850°C in an N(2 atmosphere. Both processes were carried out in one furnace and the resulting material needed no further activation. Resulting materials were characterized by XPS and low temperature nitrogen adsorption/desorption. It was found that maximum pyrolysis yield was ca. 50% depending on the oxidation conditions but almost independent of the crosslinking degree of the polymers. Porous structure of the carbons was characterized for the presence of micropores and macropores, when obtained from highly crosslinked polymers or polymers oxidized at 350°C and meso- and macropores in all other cases. The latter pores are prevailing in the structure of carbons obtained from less porous AN/DVB resins. Specific surface area (BET of polymer derived carbons can vary between 440 m(2/g and 250 m(2/g depending on the amount of porogen used in the synthesis of the AN/DVB polymeric precursors.

  2. Preparation of activated carbon by chemical activation under vacuum.

    Juan, Yang; Ke-Qiang, Qiu

    2009-05-01

    Activated carbons especially used for gaseous adsorption were prepared from Chinesefir sawdust by zinc chloride activation under vacuum condition. The micropore structure, adsorption properties, and surface morphology of activated carbons obtained under atmosphere and vacuum were investigated. The prepared activated carbons were characterized by SEM, FTIR, and nitrogen adsorption. It was found that the structure of the starting material is kept after activation. The activated carbon prepared under vacuum exhibited higher values of the BET surface area (up to 1079 m2 g(-1)) and total pore volume (up to 0.5665 cm3 g(-1)) than those of the activated carbon obtained under atmosphere. This was attributed to the effect of vacuum condition that reduces oxygen in the system and limits the secondary reaction of the organic vapor. The prepared activated carbon has well-developed microstructure and high microporosity. According to the data obtained, Chinese fir sawdust is a suitable precursor for activated carbon preparation. The obtained activated carbon could be used as a low-cost adsorbent with favorable surface properties. Compared with the traditional chemical activation, vacuum condition demands less energy consumption, simultaneity, and biomass-oil is collected in the procedure more conveniently. FTIR analysis showed that heat treatment would result in the aromatization of the carbon structure. PMID:19534162

  3. Spherical carbons: Synthesis, characterization and activation processes

    Romero Anaya, Aroldo José; Ouzzine, Mohammed; Lillo Ródenas, María Ángeles; Linares Solano, Ángel

    2014-01-01

    Spherical carbons have been prepared through hydrothermal treatment of three carbohydrates (glucose, saccharose and cellulose). Preparation variables such as treatment time, treatment temperature and concentration of carbohydrate have been analyzed to obtain spherical carbons. These spherical carbons can be prepared with particle sizes larger than 10 μm, especially from saccharose, and have subsequently been activated using different activation processes (H3PO4, NaOH, KOH or physical activati...

  4. Nanostructural activated carbons for hydrogen storage

    Li, Suoding

    A series of nanostructured activated carbons have been synthesized from poly(ether ether ketone) (PEEK), and its derivatives. These carbons, with surface area exceeding 3000 m2/g and with average pore diameters of ≤ 20 A, are proven to be superior hydrogen storage materials, with hydrogen storage capacities up to 5.5 wt% at 77 K and 45 atm. The porous texture of these carbons was controlled via optimizing three synthetic steps: thermo-oxidation of PEEK in air, pyrolysis or carbonization of the oxidized PEEK in an inert atmosphere, and activation of the pre-carbonized PEEK with metal hydroxide. Thermo-oxidation of PEEK and carbonization process were thoroughly studied. These processes have been investigated by MDSC, FTIR, TGA and Py-MS. The pyrolysis or carbonization of PEEK involves the degradation of PEEK chains in three stages. Carbon morphology, including crystallinity and porous texture, is readily controlled by adjusting carbonization temperature. Activation of PEEK carbons, using inorganic bases and other activation agents, produces microporous carbons having a very narrow pore size distribution and an average pore diameter of ≤ 20 A. The activation control parameters including activation agent, activation temperature, time and carbon morphology have been investigated extensively. High surface area activated carbon is obtained by activating a highly amorphous carbon with a high activation agent/carbon ratio at 800°C. Theoretical calculations show that the pores with smaller diameter, especially smaller than 7 A, favor hydrogen adsorption. The experimental results confirm this fact and show that: (1) the hydrogen adsorption capacity per unit surface area at 77 K and 1 bar is larger in the smaller pores, (2) gravimetric hydrogen storage capacity (W(H2)) is directly proportional to the ultramicropore (< 7 A) volume; and (3) the volumetric hydrogen storage capacity is directly proportional to the volume fraction of ultramicropores in carbon. Hydrogen

  5. Energy distribution of the particles obtained after irradiation of carbon nanotubes with carbon projectiles

    The idea of using carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as masks against irradiation has recently emerged, because of the region of a given material covered by a CNT can be protected from the effects of irradiation, creating nanowires. In this case, it is interesting to know in detail the number of generated recoils and their energy. In order to obtain these data, we simulate the irradiation of CNTs with carbon ions using a molecular dynamics code. To describe the interaction between carbon ions we use the Brenner potential joined smoothly to the Universal ZBL potential at short distances. We have analyzed the energy distributions of the carbon atoms emerging from the CNT for single projectile irradiation with incident energies from 30 eV to 5 keV. Our results show that the number and the energy of the recoil carbon atoms emerging from the CNT increases with the projectile incident energy. In average, each projectile with incident energy of 1 keV produces ∼3.6 recoils, which have a mean energy of 150 eV, while projectiles with 5 keV produce ∼7 recoils with a mean energy of 400 eV

  6. Optimization of the synthesis based on Resorcine and formaldehyde to obtain carbon nanoxérogels

    Zweg, A.; Elaloui, E.; Nouri, S.; Moussaoui, Y.

    2012-02-01

    The sol-gel method consists on obtaining very pure products from selected precursors. Indeed, synthesizing very pure activated carbon (> 99% carbon) using organic precursors containing only carbon and oxygen as hetero atoms to form a polymeric resin by pyrolysis. The proposed synthesis reaction is in the border of two sciences: the Sol-gel and polymerization. The polymerization by mechanism followed by the initiation and propagation, the sol-gel by evolution of the media environment starting with a solution of various ingredients to have the particle's sol in the emulsion solvent. The sol turns into a gel which is the result of three-dimensional crosslinking of the material trapping the solvent. In this work we propose to introduce a new method of synthesis of these nanoxérogels by polycondensation of resorcinol with formaldehyde in two different media (water and acetone) in the presence of two catalysts (acetic acid and sodium carbonate). By varying the following parameters: solvent, nature and quantity of catalyst, 16 samples were obtained. By the method of factorial design (2k): an optimization is realized by following three characteristics of nanoxerogels prepared: the density, the gel time and performance. The results indicate the best conditions for the synthesis of a carbon nanoxerogel: the lowest quantity of acid catalyst in aqueous media (A5).

  7. Activated Carbons From Grape Seeds By Chemical Activation With Potassium Carbonate And Potassium Hydroxide

    Okman, Irem; Karagöz, Selhan; Tay, Turgay; Erdem, Murat

    2014-02-01

    Activated carbons were produced from grape seed using either potassium carbonate (K2CO3) or potassium hydroxide (KOH). The carbonization experiments were accomplished at 600 and 800 °C. The effects of the experimental conditions (i.e., type of activation reagents, reagent concentrations, and carbonization temperatures) on the yields and the properties of these activated carbons were analyzed under identical conditions. An increase in the temperature at the same concentrations for both K2CO3 and KOH led to a decrease in the yields of the activated carbons. The lowest activated carbon yields were obtained at 800 °C at the highest reagent concentration (100 wt%) for both K2CO3 and KOH. The activated carbon with the highest surface area of 1238 m2g-1 was obtained at 800 °C in K2CO3 concentration of 50 wt% while KOH produced the activated carbon with the highest surface area of 1222 m2g-1 in a concentration of 25wt% at 800 °C. The obtained activated carbons were mainly microporous.

  8. Dewatering Peat With Activated Carbon

    Rohatgi, N. K.

    1984-01-01

    Proposed process produces enough gas and carbon to sustain itself. In proposed process peat slurry is dewatered to approximately 40 percent moisture content by mixing slurry with activated carbon and filtering with solid/liquid separation techniques.

  9. Natural gas storage in microporous carbon obtained from waste of the olive oil production

    Cecilia Solar

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A series of activated carbons (AC were prepared from waste of the olive oil production in the Cuyo Region, Argentine by two standard methods: a physical activation by steam and b chemical activation with ZnCl2. The AC samples were characterized by nitrogen adsorption at 77 K and evaluated for natural gas storage purposes through the adsorption of methane at high pressures. The activated carbons showed micropore volumes up to 0.50 cm³.g-1 and total pore volumes as high as 0.9 cm³.g-1. The BET surface areas reached, in some cases, more than 1000 m².g-1. The methane adsorption -measured in the range of 1-35 bar- attained values up to 59 V CH4/V AC and total uptakes of more than 120 cm³.g-1 (STP. These preliminary results suggest that Cuyo's olive oil waste is appropriate for obtaining activated carbons for the storage of natural gas.

  10. Process for encapsulating active agents obtaining a gel

    Yilmaz, G.; Jongboom, R.O.J.

    2001-01-01

    The present invention relates to a process for encapsulating an active agent in a biopolymer in the form of a gel, comprising the steps of: a) forming a dispersion or solution of the biopolymer in water; and b) adding the active agent to the dispersion or solution obtained in step a); wherein the biopolymer is at least partially dissolved before and/or after addition of the active agent. The gels obtained with the present invention are particularly suitable for coating or impregnating packagi...

  11. High capacity disordered carbons obtained from coconut shells as anode materials for lithium batteries

    Carbonaceous materials have been obtained by the pyrolysis of coconut shells at 800 and 900 deg. C with pore forming substances such as KOH and ZnCl2. The prepared carbons were subjected to XRD, SEM, BET-surface area and charge-discharge studies. The structure and morphology were greatly changed by porogens, which in turn influence the electrochemical properties of the carbonaceous materials. Nanocrystalline tin (Sn) particles were prepared by chemical reduction method. The cycling tests showed that the addition of nanotin with the active material offers a stable cycling behavior. The electrochemical impedance spectra for the Li/C cells have been made and the results are discussed

  12. Activated carbon for incinerator uses

    This paper reports the development of the activated carbon from palm oil kernel shell for use as absorbent and converter for incinerator gas. The procedure is developed in order to prepare the material in bulk quantity and be used in the incinerator. The effect of the use of activating chemicals, physical activation and the preparation parameter to the quality of the carbon products will be discussed. (Author)

  13. Efficient L-lactic acid fermentation by the mold Rhizopus oryzae using activated carbon

    Koide, M.; Hirata, M.; Gaw, M.; Takanashi, H.; Hano, T. [Oita Univ, Oita (Japan). Dept. of Applied Chemistry

    2004-11-01

    Batch fermentations of Rhizopus oryzae AHU 6537 in medium containing granular activated carbon from coal, powder activated carbon from coal or granular activated carbon from coconut were carried out in an airlift bioreactor. As a result, fermentation broths were decolorized by activated carbon, and clearer fermentation broths were obtained than in fermentation without activated carbon. With activated carbon from coal, the cells formed smaller pellets than in fermentation without activated carbon, and fermentation performance was improved. Productivity was further improved by increasing the amount of activated carbon from coal. Therefore, the productivity of lactic acid fermentation could be improved by selecting a suitable activated carbon and by controlling the amount of activated carbon.

  14. ACTIVATED CARBON FROM LIGNITE FOR WATER TREATMENT

    Edwin S. Olson; Daniel J. Stepan

    2000-07-01

    of sorption sites. The effect of pH on adsorption was investigated using buffered solutions. The sorption capacity decreased with increasing pH. A study of the effect of activation conditions on the adsorption capacity of the resulting carbon showed that steam activation at 750 C provides the optimum activity with the high-sodium char. An attempt to scale up the carbon production to the 2-kg scale failed to produce the same high activity that was obtained in the 100-g batch unit. Although this research demonstrated that a highly active carbon for water treatment can be produced from high-sodium lignites, much further work is needed to understand what methods and equipment will be needed for large-scale production of this carbon.

  15. Strengthened PAN-based carbon fibers obtained by slow heating rate carbonization.

    Kim, Min-A; Jang, Dawon; Tejima, Syogo; Cruz-Silva, Rodolfo; Joh, Han-Ik; Kim, Hwan Chul; Lee, Sungho; Endo, Morinobu

    2016-01-01

    Large efforts have been made over the last 40 years to increase the mechanical strength of polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based carbon fibers (CFs) using a variety of chemical or physical protocols. In this paper, we report a new method to increase CFs mechanical strength using a slow heating rate during the carbonization process. This new approach increases both the carbon sp(3) bonding and the number of nitrogen atoms with quaternary bonding in the hexagonal carbon network. Theoretical calculations support a crosslinking model promoted by the interstitial carbon atoms located in the graphitic interlayer spaces. The improvement in mechanical performance by a controlled crosslinking between the carbon hexagonal layers of the PAN based CFs is a new concept that can contribute further in the tailoring of CFs performance based on the understanding of their microstructure down to the atomic scale. PMID:27004752

  16. Production process for boron carbide coated carbon material and boron carbide coated carbon material obtained by the production process

    A boron carbide coated carbon material is used for a plasma facing material of a thermonuclear reactor. The surface of a carbon material is chemically reacted with boron oxide to convert it into boron carbide. Then, it is subjected to heat treatment at a temperature of not lower than 1600degC in highly evacuated or inactive atmosphere to attain a boron carbide coated carbon material. The carbon material used is an artificial graphite or a carbon fiber reinforced carbon composite material. In the heat treatment, when the atmosphere is in vacuum, it is highly evacuated to less than 10Pa. Alternatively, in a case of inactive atmosphere, argon or helium gas each having oxygen and nitrogen content of not more than 20ppm is used. With such procedures, there can be obtained a boron carbide-coated carbon material with low content of oxygen and nitrogen impurities contained in the boron carbide coating membrane thereby hardly releasing gases. (I.N.)

  17. PREPARATION OF ACTIVATED CARBON FROM PEAT

    Yasumitsu Uraki

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Peat with an approximate 60% carbon content collected in the suburbs of Palangka Raya, Indonesia, was carbonized, followed by activation with steam in an electric furnace. The resultant activated carbon (AC had ca. 900 m2/g of BET surface area and 1000 mg/g of iodine adsorption. This performance implies that this AC can be used as an adsorbent for environmental purification. We had a carbonizing furnace manufactured in Palangka Raya, which did not require electric power. Some AC having 350 mg/g of iodine adsorption was obtained by using this furnace. Although the adsorption ability was much lower than that of commercially available AC, the AC achieved significant decoloration and decrease in chemical oxygen demand of polluted river water. Thus, this article demonstrated the potential of tropical peat soil as a source of AC.

  18. Assimilation of labelled carbon substrates by Streptomyces thermovulgaris strain 127 variants obtained following gamma radiation

    As a result of a mutagenic gamma-irradiation treatment (dose rate 23,25 Gy/min and intensity 1x103 - 1.2x104) of a parent strain of S. thermovulgaris 127, high (+) and low glucose isomerase activity (-) variants have been obtained by screening in liquid media. A comparative study is conducted of the two variants relative to the control strain on cultivation for 12 to 66 hours in a liquid nutritional medium. The biomass level and the changes in the level of specific glucose isomerase activity (SGIA) has been determined. Results indicate that the maximum SGIA in the (+) var. is higher by 14.3% than the SGIA in the initial strain, and in the (-) var. - considerably lower (by 77%). A simmilar pattern has been observed with biomass accumulation. The kinetics of respiratory activity and the assimilation and dissimilation of radioactive sustrates 14C-glucose, 14C-xylose and 14C-xylitol and thier combimation have been studied as well. The results obtained witness the differences in the oxidation rates of the individual substrates. Radioactive carbon incorporation in cell biomass and the level of 14CO2 released are determined radiorespirometrically. An almost twofold enhancement of assimilation and dissimilation with respect to 14C-xylose in the (+) var. and their sharp reduction in the (-) var. is observed. It is concluded that demonstrained differences in the extends of assimilation and dissimination is important for undustrial cultivation of the discussed mutant forms. 4 fig., 6 refs

  19. ANTIRADICAL AND ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY OF PHENOLIC FRACTIONS OBTAINED FROM HONEYS.

    Mazol, Irena; Sroka, Zbigniew; Sowa, Alina; Ostrowska, Anna; Dryś, Andrzej; Gamian, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Honey is a natural product consisting of multiple components which determine its dietary and medicinal properties. In this work there were studied methanol fractions obtained from seven honeys from Lower Silesia (Poland) collected in different seasons of three successive years. Melissopalynologic studies revealed that two of them were polyfloral, and five were classified as monofloral (two buckwheat and three rapes). The amount of phenolic compounds in honeys varied from 0.09 to 0.38 mg per g of honey. Honeys harvested in 2010 were the richest in phenolic compounds and especially rich was buckwheat honey, comparing to 2011- 2012. Determination of antioxidant potential with the DPPH radical revealed that the strongest antiradical activity was exhibited by extracts obtained from polyfloral (1.22 TAU(515/mg)) and buckwheat (1.06 TAU(515lmg)) honeys, while the highest number of antiradical units was observed for rape honey (3.64 TAU(515/g)). Polyphenolic fractions exhibited various bactericidal activities against Klebsiella pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus and weak or no activity was observed against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. PMID:27180430

  20. Porous graphitic materials obtained from carbonization of organic xerogels doped with transition metal salts

    W Kiciński; M Bystrzejewski; M H Rümmeli; T Gemming

    2014-02-01

    Porous carbons with a well developed graphitic phase were obtained via the pyrolysis of FeCl3-, NiCl2-, and CoCl2-doped organic xerogels. Doping was realized through salt solubilization in a water/methanol solution of resorcinol and furfural. Carbon xerogels with tailored particles, porous morphology and various degrees of graphitization were obtained depending of the water/methanol ratio and the salt content and type in the starting solution of substrates. When obtained via pyrolysis, carbon xerogels retain the overall open-celled structure exhibiting depleted microporosity and a well-developed mesoporic region that expands into macropores. The removal of metal leads to carbon xerogels with specific surface areas between 170 and 585 m2/g and pore volume up to 0.76 cm3/g. The possibility of enhancing the porosity of xerogels via templating with colloidal silica was also investigated. It was assumed that from the three investigated salts, FeCl3 makes the best choice for graphitization catalyst precursor to obtain uniformly graphitized mesoporous carbon xerogels. The obtained carbon samples were characterized by means of SEM, TEM, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, N2 physisorption and thermogravimetric analysis.

  1. Flexural Properties of Activated Carbon Filled Epoxy Nano composites

    Activated carbon (AC) filled epoxy nano composites obtained by mixing the desired amount of nano AC viz., bamboo stem, oil palm empty fruit bunch, and coconut shell from agricultural biomass with the epoxy resin. Flexural properties of activated carbons filled epoxy nano composites with 1 %, and 5 % filler loading were measured. In terms of flexural strength and modulus, a significant increment was observed with addition of 1 % vol and 5 % vol nano-activated carbon as compared to neat epoxy. The effect of activated carbon treated by two chemical agents (potassium hydroxide and phosphoric acid) on the flexural properties of epoxy nano composites were also investigated. Flexural strength of activated carbon-bamboo stem, activated carbon-oil palm, and activated carbon-coconut shell reinforced epoxy nano composites showed almost same value in case of 5 % potassium hydroxide activated carbon. Flexural strength of potassium hydroxide activated carbon-based epoxy nano composites was higher than phosphoric acid activated carbon. The flexural toughness of both the potassium hydroxide and phosphoric acid activated carbon reinforced composites range between 0.79 - 0.92 J. It attributed that developed activated carbon filled epoxy nano composites can be used in different applications. (author)

  2. PROGRESS ON ACTIVATED CARBON FIBERS

    2002-01-01

    Activated carbon fiber is one kind of important adsorption materials. These novel fibrousadsorbents have high specific surface areas or abundant functional groups, which make them havegreater adsorption/desorption rates and larger adsorption capacities than other adsorbents. They canbe prepared as bundle, paper, cloth and felt to meet various technical requirement. They also showreduction property. In this paper the latest progress on the studies of the preparation and adsorptionproperties of activated carbon fibers is reviewed. The application of these materials in drinking waterpurification, environmental control, resource recovery, chemical industry, and in medicine and healthcare is also presented.

  3. ACTIVATION ENERGY OF DESORPTION OF DIBENZOFURAN ON ACTIVATED CARBONS

    LI Xiang; LI Zhong; XI Hongxia; LUO Lingai

    2004-01-01

    Three kinds of commercial activated carbons, such as Norit RB1, Monolith and Chemviron activated carbons, were used as adsorbents for adsorption of dibenzofuran. The average pore size and specific surface area of these activated carbons were measured. Temperature Programmed Desorption (TPD) experiments were conducted to measure the TPD curves of dibenzofuran on the activated carbons, and then the activation energy for desorption of dibenzofuran on the activated carbons was estimated. The results showed that the Chemviron and the Norit RB1 activated carbon maintained higher specific surface area and larger micropore pore volume in comparison with the Monolith activated carbon, and the activation energy for the desorption of dibenzofuran on these two activated carbons was higher than that on the Monolith activated carbon. The smaller the pore of the activated carbon was, the higher the activated energy of dibenzofuran desorption was.

  4. Neutron activation analysis of phytotherapic obtained from medicinal plants

    This paper determines the inorganic constituents in phytotherapic samples for posterior study of the relationship existent among the concentrations of the found elements and the their possible therapeutical effects. The samples of phytotherapic pills (Centella asiatica, Ginkgo biloba and Ginseng) were analysed by using neutron activation analysis (NAA). The As, Br, Ca, Co, Cr, Cs, Fe, K, La, Na, Rb, Sc, Se and Zn samples were determined in the phytotherapics, The Centella asiatica presented the higher concentrations of Br, Co, Cr, Fe, K, La, Na, Rb, Sc, Se and Zn. In the sample of Ginko biloba, higher levels of As and Ca were found, while in the sample ol Ginseng the element As were not detected. The found results have shown the the NAA method is appropriated for analysing this type of materials due to his simplicity, multielemental capacity and quality of the results obtained. (author)

  5. Electro-Optical Properties of Carbon Nanotubes Obtained by High Density Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Ana Paula Mousinho; Ronaldo D. Mansano

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we studied the electro-optical properties of high-aligned carbon nanotubes deposited at room temperature. For this, we used the High Density Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition system. This system uses a new concept of plasma generation: a planar coil is coupled to an RF system for plasma generation. This was used together with an electrostatic shield, for plasma densification, thereby obtaining high-density plasmas. The carbon nanotubes were deposited using pure methane plasmas. T...

  6. Natural gas storage in microporous carbon obtained from waste of the olive oil production

    Cecilia Solar; Fabiana Sardella; Cristina Deiana; Rochel Montero Lago; Andrea Vallone; Karim Sapag

    2008-01-01

    A series of activated carbons (AC) were prepared from waste of the olive oil production in the Cuyo Region, Argentine by two standard methods: a) physical activation by steam and b) chemical activation with ZnCl2. The AC samples were characterized by nitrogen adsorption at 77 K and evaluated for natural gas storage purposes through the adsorption of methane at high pressures. The activated carbons showed micropore volumes up to 0.50 cm³.g-1 and total pore volumes as high as 0.9 cm³.g-1. The B...

  7. THE ROLE OF ACTIVATED CARBON IN SOLVING ECOLOGICAL PROBLEMS

    V. M. Mukhin

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The authors present a brief analysis of the current global situation concerning the utilization of activated carbon in various fields. The article presents data concerning the synthesis and adsorption and structure properties of new activated carbons, used for solving ecological problems. The authors investigated the newly obtained activated carbons in comparison with several AC marks known in the world. It has been shown that currently synthesized AC are competitive with foreign marks.

  8. Highly ordered amorphous silicon-carbon alloys obtained by RF PECVD

    Pereyra, I; Carreno, M N P; Prado, R J; Fantini, M C A

    2000-01-01

    We have shown that close to stoichiometry RF PECVD amorphous silicon carbon alloys deposited under silane starving plasma conditions exhibit a tendency towards c-Si C chemical order. Motivated by this trend, we further explore the effect of increasing RF power and H sub 2 dilution of the gaseous mixtures, aiming to obtain the amorphous counterpart of c-Si C by the RF-PECVD technique. Doping experiments were also performed on ordered material using phosphorus and nitrogen as donor impurities and boron and aluminum as acceptor ones. For nitrogen a doping efficiency close to device quality a-Si:H was obtained, the lower activation energy being 0,12 eV with room temperature dark conductivity of 2.10 sup - sup 3 (OMEGA.cm). Nitrogen doping efficiency was higher than phosphorous for all studied samples. For p-type doping, results indicate that, even though the attained conductivity values are not device levels, aluminum doping conducted to a promising shift in the Fermi level. Also, aluminum resulted a more efficie...

  9. Active carbons from low temperature conversion chars

    Hulls obtained from the fruits of five tropical biomass have been subjected to low temperature conversion process and their chars activated by partial physical gasification to produce active carbons. The biomass are T. catappa, B. nitida, L leucophylla, D. regia and O. martiana. The bulk densities of the samples ranged from 0.32 g.cm3 to 0.52 g.cm3. Out of the samples T. catappa recorded the highest cellulose content (41.9 g.100g-1), while O. martiana contained the highest lignin content (40.7 g.100g-1). The ash of the samples were low (0.5 - 4.4%). The percentage of char obtained after conversion were high (33.7% - 38.6%). Active carbons obtained from T. catappa, D. regia and O. martiana, recorded high methylene blue numbers and iodine values. They also displayed good micro- and mesostructural characteristics. Micropore volume (Vmicro) was between 0.33cm3.g-1 - 0.40cm3.g-1, while the mesopore volume(Vmeso) was between 0.05 cm3.g-1 - 0.07 cm3.g-1. The BET specific surface exceeds 1000 m2.g-1. All these values compared favourably with high grade commercial active carbons. (author)

  10. Preparation of very pure active carbon

    The preparation of very pure active carbon is described. Starting from polyvinylidene chloride active carbon is prepared by carbonization in a nitrogen atmosphere, grinding, sieving and activation of the powder fraction with CO2 at 9500 to approximately 50% burn-off. The concentrations of trace and major elements are reduced to the ppb and ppm level, respectively. In the present set-up 100 g of carbon grains and approximately 50 g of active carbon powder can be produced weekly

  11. Characterization of biochar and bio-oil samples obtained from carbonization of various biomass materials

    Oezcimen, Didem; Ersoy-Mericboyu, Ayseguel [Istanbul Technical University, Chemical-Metallurgical Engineering Faculty, Department of Chemical Engineering, Maslak 34469, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2010-06-15

    Apricot stone, hazelnut shell, grapeseed and chestnut shell are important biomass residues obtained from the food processing industry in Turkey and they have a great importance as being a source of energy. In this study, the characteristics of bio-oil and biochar samples obtained from the carbonization of apricot stone, hazelnut shell, grapeseed and chestnut shell were investigated. It was found that the biochar products can be characterized as carbon rich, high heating value and relatively pollution-free potential solid biofuels. The bio-oil products were also presented as environmentally friendly green biofuel candidates. (author)

  12. Chemical and structural properties of carbonaceous products obtained by hydrothermal carbonization of saccharides.

    Sevilla, Marta; Fuertes, Antonio B

    2009-01-01

    Carbon-rich-quick scheme: A carbon-rich solid product made up of uniform micrometer-sized spheres of tunable diameter has been synthesized by the hydrothermal carbonization of saccharides. These microspheres possess a core-shell chemical structure based on the different nature of the oxygen functionalities between the core and the outer layer (see figure).A carbon-rich solid product, here denoted as hydrochar, has been synthesized by the hydrothermal carbonization of three different saccharides (glucose, sucrose, and starch) at temperatures ranging from 170 to 240 degrees C. This material is made up of uniform spherical micrometer-sized particles that have a diameter in the 0.4-6 mum range, which can be modulated by modifying the synthesis conditions (i.e., the concentration of the aqueous saccharide solution, the temperature of the hydrothermal treatment, the reaction time, and type of saccharide). The formation of the carbon-rich solid through the hydrothermal carbonization of saccharides is the consequence of dehydration, condensation, or polymerization and aromatization reactions. The microspheres thus obtained possess, from a chemical point of view, a core-shell structure consisting of a highly aromatic nucleus (hydrophobic) and a hydrophilic shell containing a high concentration of reactive oxygen functional groups (i.e., hydroxyl/phenolic, carbonyl, or carboxylic). PMID:19248078

  13. Photoconductivity of Activated Carbon Fibers

    Kuriyama, K.; Dresselhaus, M. S.

    1990-08-01

    The photoconductivity is measured on a high-surface-area disordered carbon material, namely activated carbon fibers, to investigate their electronic properties. Measurements of decay time, recombination kinetics and temperature dependence of the photoconductivity generally reflect the electronic properties of a material. The material studied in this paper is a highly disordered carbon derived from a phenolic precursor, having a huge specific surface area of 1000--2000m{sup 2}/g. Our preliminary thermopower measurements suggest that this carbon material is a p-type semiconductor with an amorphous-like microstructure. The intrinsic electrical conductivity, on the order of 20S/cm at room temperature, increases with increasing temperature in the range 30--290K. In contrast with the intrinsic conductivity, the photoconductivity in vacuum decreases with increasing temperature. The recombination kinetics changes from a monomolecular process at room temperature to a biomolecular process at low temperatures. The observed decay time of the photoconductivity is {approx equal}0.3sec. The magnitude of the photoconductive signal was reduced by a factor of ten when the sample was exposed to air. The intrinsic carrier density and the activation energy for conduction are estimated to be {approx equal}10{sup 21}/cm{sup 3} and {approx equal}20meV, respectively. The majority of the induced photocarriers and of the intrinsic carriers are trapped, resulting in the long decay time of the photoconductivity and the positive temperature dependence of the conductivity.

  14. Physicochemical properties of carbon materials obtained by combustion synthesis of perchlorinated hydrocarbons

    S. Cudziło

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available We present studies on the combustion synthesis of carbon materials from several perchlorinated organic compounds : tetrachloromethane (CCl4, hexachloroethane (C2Cl6, tetrachloroethylene (C2Cl4, hexachloro-1,3-butadiene (C4Cl6, hexachlorocyclopentadiene (C5Cl6. The porosity (obtained by low-temperature nitrogen adsorption, microstructure (SEM, structural arrangement (XRD and Raman spectroscopy, surface chemistry (FTIR and electrochemical behavior (cyclic voltammetry of the obtained carbons were investigated. The synthesized materials exhibit an ordered structure similar to carbon black. Their physicochemical properties strongly depended on the structure of the perchlorocarbon precursor. It was found that perchlorinated compounds with unsaturated bonds yielded more amorphous products. The electrochemical properties (e.g. edl capacity depend mainly on the mesopore surface area of the carbonaceous products.

  15. 77 FR 26496 - Certain Activated Carbon From the People's Republic of China: Preliminary Results of the Fourth...

    2012-05-04

    ... at Less Than Fair Value: Certain Activated Carbon From the People's Republic of China, 72 FR 15099... activated carbon is a powdered, granular, or pelletized carbon product obtained by ``activating'' with heat... activated carbon, including powdered activated carbon (``PAC''), granular activated......

  16. Characterization of calcium carbonate obtained from oyster and mussel shells and incorporation in polypropylene

    Michele Regina Rosa Hamester

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available There is a high content of calcium carbonate in mussel and oyster shells, which can be used in the formulation of medicine, in construction or as filler in polymer materials. This work has as its main objective to obtain calcium carbonate from mussel and oyster shells and used as filler in polypropylene compared their properties with polypropylene and commercial calcium carbonate composites. The shellfish was milling and heated at 500 ºC for 2 hours. The powder obtained from shellfish were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, X-ray fluorescence, particle size distribution and abrasiveness and compared with commercial CaCO3 and mixed with polypropylene. The thermal and mechanical properties of polypropylene with CaCO3 obtained from oyster and mussel shells and with commercial CaCO3 were analysed. The results showed that CaCO3­ can be obtained from oyster and mussel shell and is technically possible to replace the commercial CaCO3 for that obtained from the shells of shellfish in polypropylene composites.

  17. Carbon nanostructures obtained by underwater arc discharge of graphite electrodes: Synthesis and characterization

    In the present work, the application of the method of underwater arc discharge of graphite electrodes for obtaining several carbon nano structures is described. The analysis of the obtained products by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Raman spectroscopy, Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) showed that the samples collected from the material floating on the water surface were composed mainly by polyhedral onion-like particles, while those taken from the precipitate were a mixture multi walled nano-tubes, onion-like particles and other graphitic structures. The main features of the obtained nano structures are discussed. (Author)

  18. Utilization of press mud obtained by the carbonation of sugar industry

    Press mud is a waste product of sugar industry, it contains precipitated calcium carbonate with certain impurities. It is obtained after double carbonation of sugar. The utilization solid industrial wastes helps in reducing energy consumption which is to be required in shifting the waste to some disposable sites, in saving land and controlling pollution. Studies have been carried out to develop method for purification of the waste. The different parameters. The waste can be used as substitute for limestone for neutralization of spent acid. Recommendations have been made for the utilization of the waste as a substitute for limestone to be user for many purposes. (author)

  19. Biological Activity of Eucalyptus Extracts Obtained by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    Topiař, Martin; Sajfrtová, Marie; Machalová, Zdeňka; Karban, Jindřich; Pavela, R.

    Marseille: International Society for Advancement of Supercritical Fluids, 2014, s. 60. ISBN 978-2-37111-002-1. [European Meeting on Supercritical Fluids /14./. Marseille (FR), 18.05.2014-21.05.2014] R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA01010578 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : SFE * eucalyptus * fractionation Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering

  20. Determination of biologically active bioregulator obtained using nanocarbon sorbents

    Almagul Kerimkulova; J. Basygaraev; E. Abylayhanov; Murat Gilmanov; Zulkhair Mansurov

    2012-01-01

    It was obtained that treating by cytokinine produces the bioregulator. Purified bioregulator has ability to act at the concentrations 100 times less than other phytohormones. The new vegetative method on basis of new bioregulator was suggested for ecological aims.

  1. Studies on amylase activity of pancreatin obtained from bovine pancreas

    The main objective of this study was to prepare pancreatin in liquid and powder form and to determine its amylase activity in crude homogenate of animal tissue. Different conditions were optimized for estimation of maximal activity including pH, temperature and substrate concentration. The optimum pH was found to be 6.8. The enzyme was optimally active at 50 degree C. The effect of substrate concentration on enzyme activity was also studied and Km was found to be 0.5%. (author)

  2. Adsorption of light alkanes on coconut nanoporous activated carbon

    K. S. Walton

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents experimental results for adsorption equilibrium of methane, ethane, and butane on nanoporous activated carbon obtained from coconut shells. The adsorption data were obtained gravimetrically at temperatures between 260 and 300K and pressures up to 1 bar. The Toth isotherm was used to correlate the data, showing good agreement with measured values. Low-coverage equilibrium constants were estimated using virial plots. Heats of adsorption at different loadings were also estimated from the equilibrium data. Adsorption properties for this material are compared to the same properties for BPL activated carbon and BAX activated carbon.

  3. Determination of biologically active bioregulator obtained using nanocarbon sorbents

    Almagul Kerimkulova

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available It was obtained that treating by cytokinine produces the bioregulator. Purified bioregulator has ability to act at the concentrations 100 times less than other phytohormones. The new vegetative method on basis of new bioregulator was suggested for ecological aims.

  4. Fullerene-containing phases obtained from aqueous dispersions of carbon nanoparticles

    Rozhkov, S. P.; Kovalevskii, V. V.; Rozhkova, N. N.

    2007-06-01

    The hydration of fullerenes and shungite carbon nanoclusters in aqueous dispersions at various carbon concentrations is studied on frozen samples by EPR with spin probes. It is found that, for stable dispersions of both substances (at carbon concentrations of 0.1 mg/ml), the probe rotation frequency versus 1/T dependences exhibit a plateau in the range 243 257 K, which is probably associated with the peculiarities of freezing of water localized near hydrophobic structures of carbon nanoclusters. Solid phases isolated from supersaturated aqueous dispersions of fullerenes and shungites by slow evaporation of water at temperatures higher than 0°C are examines by electron diffraction and electron microscopy. It is established that obtained films of fullerenes contain at least two phases: fullerite with a face-centered cubic lattice and a phase similar in interplanar spacing and radically different in distribution of intensities of diffraction peaks. It is concluded that this phase is formed by the interaction of fullerenes and water (an analogous phase is found in shungite carbon films). It is found that the morphology of the new crystal phase is characterized by globules of size 20 to 70 nm, for fullerenes, and 10 to 400 nm for shungites. It is established that processes of crystallization of fullerites and fullerene-containing phases are very sensitive to temperature: a decrease in the temperature (within the range from 40 to 1°C) is accompanied by an increase in the new phase content.

  5. Obtaining and characterization of composite material base on ablative phenolic resin and carbon fibers

    Srebrenkoska, Vineta

    2002-01-01

    In this master paper is optimized a technological treatment for production of a molding compound based on short carbon fibers and ablative phenol- formaldehyde resin for high temperature application. The characterization of the starting raw materials is performed and molding compounds with different fiber/matrix ratio and different fiber length are obtained. From the different lab-samples molded parts are made by thermocompression. All physical, mechanical and thermal properties of the co...

  6. High-performance multi-functional reverse osmosis membranes obtained by carbon nanotube.polyamide nanocomposite

    Inukai, Shigeki; Cruz-Silva, Rodolfo; Ortiz-Medina, Josue; Morelos-Gomez, Aaron; Takeuchi, Kenji; Hayashi, Takuya; Tanioka, Akihiko; Araki, Takumi; Tejima, Syogo; Noguchi, Toru; Terrones, Mauricio; Endo, Morinobu

    2015-01-01

    Clean water obtained by desalinating sea water or by purifying wastewater, constitutes a major technological objective in the so-called water century. In this work, a high-performance reverse osmosis (RO) composite thin membrane using multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) and aromatic polyamide (PA), was successfully prepared by interfacial polymerization. The effect of MWCNT on the chlorine resistance, antifouling and desalination performances of the nanocomposite membranes were studied. We ...

  7. Polyurethane foams obtained from residues of PET manufacturing and modified with carbon nanotubes

    Stiebra, L.; Cabulis, U.; Knite, M.

    2016-04-01

    In this work we report the preparation of rigid microcellular polyurethane/carbon nanotube nanocomposites with different CNT loadings (0.09-0.46%) and various isocyanate indexes (110-260). Water was used as a blowing agent for samples. Density of all obtained samples – 200 ± 10 kg/m3. Electrical properties, as well as heat conductivity, cellular structure and mechanical properties of these nanocomposites were investigated.

  8. Obtaining of biologically active substances from dandelion (Taraxacum officinale Wigg.)

    Яблонська, К.М.; Національний авіаційний університет; Косоголова, Л. О.; Національний авіаційний університет; Мосюк, Л. І.; Національний авіаційний університет

    2015-01-01

    An aqueous extracts of dandelion (Taraxacum oficinale Wigg.) for the needs of diet. The optimum conditions for extraction of biologically active substances dandelion, namely the ratio of raw materials: extractant 1:20, extraction time – 30 minutes, the temperature – 55 °C. Extraction was carried out with distilled water.

  9. Volumetric and superficial characterization of carbon activated

    The activated carbon is the resultant material of the calcination process of natural carbonated materials as coconut shells or olive little bones. It is an excellent adsorbent of diluted substances, so much in colloidal form, as in particles form. Those substances are attracted and retained by the carbon surface. In this work is make the volumetric and superficial characterization of activated carbon treated thermically (300 Centigrade) in function of the grain size average. (Author)

  10. Adsorption of Imidacloprid on Powdered Activated Carbon and Magnetic Activated Carbon

    Zahoor, M.; Mahramanlioglu, M.

    2011-01-01

    The adsorptive characteristics of imidacloprid on magnetic activated carbon (MAC12) in comparison to powdered activated carbon (PAC) were investigated. Adsorption of imidacloprid onto powdered activated carbon and magnetic activated carbon was studied as a function of time, initial imidacloprid concentration, temperature and pH. Pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order and intraparticle diffusion models for both carbons were used to describe the kinetic data. The adsorption equilibrium data we...

  11. Adsorption of EDTA on activated carbon from aqueous solutions

    In this study, the adsorption of EDTA on activated carbon from aqueous solutions has been investigated in a batch stirred cell. Experiments have been carried out to investigate the effects of temperature, EDTA concentration, pH, activated carbon mass and particle size on EDTA adsorption. The experimental results manifest that the EDTA adsorption rate increases with its concentration in the aqueous solutions. EDTA adsorption also increases with temperature. The EDTA removal from the solution increases as activated carbon mass increases. The Langmuir and Freundlich equilibrium isotherm models are found to provide a good fitting of the adsorption data, with R2 = 0.9920 and 0.9982, respectively. The kinetic study shows that EDTA adsorption on the activated carbon is in good compliance with the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The thermodynamic parameters (Ea, ΔG0, ΔH0, ΔS0) obtained indicate the endothermic nature of EDTA adsorption on activated carbon.

  12. Measurement of carbon thermodynamic activity in sodium

    The report presents the brief outline on system of carbon activity detecting system in sodium (SCD), operating on the carbon-permeable membrane, of the methods and the results of testing it under the experimental circulating loop conditions. The results of carbon activity sensor calibration with the use of equilibrium samples of XI8H9, Fe -8Ni, Fe -12Mn materials are listed. The behaviour of carbon activity sensor signals in sodium under various transitional conditions and hydrodynamic perturbation in the circulating loop, containing carbon bearing impurities in the sodium flow and their deposits on the surfaces flushed by sodium, are described. (author)

  13. Production of activated carbon from Atili seed shells

    Nehemiah Samuel MAINA

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Activated carbon was produced from atili (black date seed shells by chemical activation with phosphoric acid as an activating agent. Carbonization was done at temperatures of 350°C, 450°C, 550°C, 650°C and at corresponding resident times of 20, 30, 40, 50 and 60 minutes respectively in a muffle furnace. The study involved the determination of yield, carbon content, burn-off, moisture content, and ash content as well as the temperature and suitable resident time for carbonization. The result showed that, increasing the carbonization temperature from 350°C to 650°C as well as increasing the corresponding resident time from 20 to 60 minutes led to a decrease in carbonization yield as well as an increase in burn off. An increase in carbonization time led to a decrease in ash content while an increase in carbonization temperature led to a decrease in the moisture content. The yield, burn-off and ash content obtained at a carbonization temperature of 650°C and at a corresponding time of 60 minutes were found to be 68.29%, 31.71% and 0.75% respectively while the highest carbon content (99.16 and lowest moisture content (0.09 was obtained at this same temperature and corresponding time. The activated carbon produced gave a yield of 99.37%, ash content (2.01%, moisture content (4.20%, carbon content (93.79%, burn off (0.63% and pH of 6.752. These properties therefore indicate the suitability of the activated carbon produced.

  14. NMR permeability estimators in "chalk" carbonate rocks obtained under different relaxation times and MICP size scalings

    Rios, Edmilson Helton; Figueiredo, Irineu; Moss, Adam Keith; Pritchard, Timothy Neil; Glassborow, Brent Anthony; Domingues, Ana Beatriz Guedes; Azeredo, Rodrigo Bagueira de Vasconcellos

    2016-04-01

    The effect of the selection of different nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation times for permeability estimation is investigated for a set of fully brine-saturated rocks acquired from Cretaceous carbonate reservoirs in the North Sea and Middle East. Estimators that are obtained from the relaxation times based on the Pythagorean means are compared with estimators that are obtained from the relaxation times based on the concept of a cumulative saturation cutoff. Select portions of the longitudinal (T1) and transverse (T2) relaxation-time distributions are systematically evaluated by applying various cutoffs, analogous to the Winland-Pittman approach for mercury injection capillary pressure (MICP) curves. Finally, different approaches to matching the NMR and MICP distributions using different mean-based scaling factors are validated based on the performance of the related size-scaled estimators. The good results that were obtained demonstrate possible alternatives to the commonly adopted logarithmic mean estimator and reinforce the importance of NMR-MICP integration to improving carbonate permeability estimates.

  15. Adsorption of Acenaphthene unto Activated Carbon Produced from Agricultural Wastes

    F.E. Adelowo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The suitability and the performance of activated carbon produced from flamboyant pod back, milk bush kernel shell and rice husk for the effective removal of acenaphthene from simulated wastewater under the influence of carbonization temperature and initial concentration were investigated. The adsorption capacities of all the activated carbons obtained from the selected raw materials are influenced by increasing carbonization temperature. Activated carbons obtained from rice husk at carbonisation temperature of 600°C had the maximum adsorption capacity (5.554 mg g-1 while carbons produced from milk bush at carbonisation temperature of 300°C had the minimum adsorption capacity (1.386 mg g-1, for the adsorption of acenaphthene from the simulated wastewater. The removal efficiencies of the investigated adsorbents generally rank high and the highest value (80.56% was obtained for the adsorption of acenaphthene by rice husk carbonized at 600°C. Furthermore, the removal efficiencies obtained in the study decreased as the initial concentrations of the adsorbate increased. The four selected isotherm models; Freundlich, Langmuir, Temkin and Dubinin-Radushkevich described well the equilibrium adsorption of acenaphthene unto activated carbon derived from Flamboyant pod bark, milk bush kernel shell and rice husk. Sequence of suitability of the selected isotherms in the study was Temkin ≈ Freundlich >Dubinin-Radushkevich>Langmuir for adsorption of acenaphthene. It therefore shows that Temkin isotherm is the most suitable model for fitting experimental data obtained from adsorption of acenaphthene from simulated wastewater unto activated carbon produced from Flamboyant pod bark, milk bush kernel shell and rice husk.

  16. Study of carbon-isotope exchange reactions between potassium cyanide and some carbonates, and their use for obtaining C14-labelled potassium cyanide

    The authors examine the results of a study on the isotope exchange of potassium cyanide with compounds differing greatly from it both in composition and structure, such as carbonates of alkaline and alkali-earth metals. The carbon-isotope exchange reaction in the KC12N-BaC14O3 system was studied at 600-800oC. The ratio between the components of this system and those given below agreed with the equimolecular ratio. The authors show that at high temperatures complete exchange between these compounds can be secured. The exchange reaction begins when the cyanide melt is formed; later it occurs between the liquid and the solid phases, and its speed increases with temperature; at 800oC it is completed in 2 h. With carbonates of alkali metals the exchange reaction occurs in the melt and is completed at lower temperatures. The authors obtained cyanide-labelled potassium by the following method : (1) The isotope exchange reaction KC12N-BaC14O3 is produced at 800oC in 2 h. (2) The mixture KCN+BaCO3 is separated by extracting the KCN with liquid ammonia in a circulating extractor. By exchanging the equimolecular quantities KCN and BaCO3, potassium cyanide is obtained with a chemical yield of more than 90% and a basic-substance content of 96-97%. By using BaCO3 with a high specific activity (60-70 mc/g), a KCN specific activity of over 80 mc/g may be obtained. The barium carbonate depleted of isotope C14 regenerates after the ammonia extraction without appreciable loss. (author)

  17. 5.3. Obtaining of cryolite-alumina concentrate from carbon-, and fluorine containing wastes by burning method

    The method of obtaining of cryolite-alumina concentrate from carbon-, and fluorine containing wastes by means of burning method was elaborated. The flowsheet of obtaining of cryolite-alumina concentrate from carbon-, and fluorine containing wastes by means of burning method was considered and presented in this article.

  18. ACTIVATED CARBONS FROM VEGETAL RAW MATERIALS TO SOLVE ENVIRONMENTAL PROBLEMS

    Viktor Mukhin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Technologies for active carbons obtaining from vegetable byproducts such as straw, nut shells, fruit stones, sawdust, hydrolysis products of corn cobs and sunflower husks have been developed. The physico-chemical characteristics, structural parameters and sorption characteristics of obtained active carbons were determined. The ability of carbonaceous adsorbents for detoxification of soil against pesticides, purification of surface waters and for removal of organic pollutants from wastewaters has been evaluated. The obtained results reveal the effectiveness of their use in a number of environmental technologies.

  19. Studies of activated carbon and carbon black for supercapacitor applications

    Richner, R.; Mueller, S.; Koetz, R.; Wokaun, A. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    Carbon Black and activated carbon materials providing high surface areas and a distinct pore distribution are prime materials for supercapacitor applications at frequencies < 0.5 Hz. A number of these materials were tested for their specific capacitance, surface and pore size distribution. High capacitance electrodes were manufactured on the laboratory scale with attention to ease of processability. (author) 1 fig., 1 ref.

  20. Methane storage in a commercial activated carbon.

    K. Wang

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available A commercial activated carbon was examined for possible methane storage application. The structural and surface propertiesof the carbon were characterized by Nitrogen adsorption isotherm at 77 oK. It was found that the carbon is largelymicroporous with a surface area of approximately 860 m2/g. Adsorption test shows the carbon is able to achieve a methanestorage capacity of approximately 70/cc.

  1. Kinetic and Equilibrium Studies for the Removal of Bromate by the Modified Activated Carbon

    Muqing Qiu; Shuiying Xiong

    2015-01-01

    Bromate which was formed bromide dissolved in water during the ozonation process, is carcinogenic and mutagenic to humans. To avoid bromate damage, many countries strictly control its concentration in drinking water. Activated carbon is an effective adsorbent material widely used in water treatment. In order to enhance the adsorption of bromate ion on activated carbon, the modified activated carbon was obtained from granular activated carbon by chemical activation using cationic surfactant as...

  2. Production of activated carbon from TCR char

    Stenzel, Fabian; Heberlein, Markus; Klinner, Tobias; Hornung, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    The utilization of char for adsorptive purposes is known since the 18th century. At that time the char was made of wood or bones and used for decoloration of fluids. In the 20th century the production of activated carbon in an industrial scale was started. The today's raw materials for activated carbon production are hard coal, peat, wood or coconut shells. All these materials entail costs especially the latter. Thus, the utilization of carbon rich residues (biomass) is an interesting economic opportunity because it is available for no costs or even can create income. The char is produced by thermo-catalytic reforming (TCR®). This process is a combination of an intermediate pyrolysis and subsequently a reforming step. During the pyrolysis step the material is decomposed in a vapor and a solid carbon enriched phase. In the second step the vapor and the solid phase get in an intensive contact and the quality of both materials is improved via the reforming process. Subsequently, the condensables are precipitated from the vapor phase and a permanent gas as well as oil is obtained. Both are suitable for heat and power production which is a clear advantage of the TCR® process. The obtained biochar from the TCR® process has special properties. This material has a very low hydrogen and oxygen content. Its stability is comparable to hard coal or anthracite. Therefore it consists almost only of carbon and ash. The latter depends from input material. Furthermore the surface structure and area can be influenced during the reforming step. Depending from temperature and residence time the number of micro pores and the surface area can be increased. Preliminary investigations with methylene blue solution have shown that a TCR® char made of digestate from anaerobic digestion has adsorptive properties. The decoloration of the solution was achieved. A further influencing factor of the adsorption performance is the particle size. Based on the results of the preliminary tests a

  3. Grafting of activated carbon cloths for selective adsorption

    Gineys, M.; Benoit, R.; Cohaut, N.; Béguin, F.; Delpeux-Ouldriane, S.

    2016-05-01

    Chemical functionalization of an activated carbon cloth with 3-aminophthalic acid and 4-aminobenzoic acid groups by the in situ formation of the corresponding diazonium salt in aqueous acidic solution is reported. The nature and amount of selected functions on an activated carbon surface, in particular the grafted density, were determined by potentiometric titration, elemental analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The nanotextural properties of the modified carbon were explored by gas adsorption. Functionalized activated carbon cloth was obtained at a discrete grafting level while preserving interesting textural properties and a large porous volume. Finally, the grafting homogeneity of the carbon surface and the nature of the chemical bonding were investigated using Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) technique.

  4. Characterization of activated carbon produced from urban organic waste

    Abdul Gani Haji

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The difficulties to decompose organic waste can be handled naturally by pyrolisis so it can  decomposes quickly that produces charcoal as the product. This study aims to investigate the characteristics of activated carbon from urban organic waste. Charcoal results of pyrolysis of organic waste activated with KOH 1.0 M at a temperature of 700 and 800oC for 60 to 120 minutes. Characteristics of activated carbon were identified by Furrier Transform Infra Red (FTIR, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD. However, their quality is determined yield, moisture content, ash, fly substances, fixed carbon, and the power of adsorption of iodine and benzene. The identified functional groups on activated carbon, such as OH (3448,5-3436,9 cm-1, and C=O (1639,4 cm-1. In general, the degree and distance between the layers of active carbon crystallites produced activation in all treatments showed no significant difference. The pattern of activated carbon surface topography structure shows that the greater the pore formation in accordance with the temperature increase the more activation time needed. The yield of activated carbon obtained ranged from 72.04 to 82.75%. The results of characterization properties of activated carbon was obtained from 1.11 to 5.41% water, 13.68 to 17.27% substance fly, 20.36 to 26.59% ash, and 56.14 to 62.31% of fixed carbon . Absorption of activated carbon was good enough at 800oC and 120 minutes of activation time, that was equal to 409.52 mg/g of iodine and 14.03% of benzene. Activated carbon produced has less good quality, because only the water content and flying substances that meet the standards.Doi: 10.12777/ijse.5.2.89-94 [How to cite this article: Haji, A.G., Pari, G., Nazar, M., and Habibati.  (2013. Characterization of activated carbon produced from urban organic waste . International Journal of Science and Engineering, 5(2,89-94. Doi: 10.12777/ijse.5.2.89-94

  5. Preparation and characterisation of activated carbon

    Activated carbon was prepared from Agricultural wastes, such as coconut shell, Palm oil Shell and mangrove trunk by destructive distillation under vakuum. Chemical and Physical properties of the activated carbon were studied and some potentially useful application in the fields of chemistry was also carried out

  6. Adsorption of organic substances to activated carbon

    Adsorption systems using activated carbon as an almost universal adsorbent for organic substances are widely applied for purifying exhaust air. The possibilities, limits and measures for an optimum design of activated carbon processes are given from the point of view of the plant designed and under the aspects of the present laws for environmental control. (orig.)

  7. Carbon ceramic electrodes obtained by basic catalysis of sol–gel process

    Highlights: • The CCE prepared by basic catalysis of sol–gel process are more porous. • The synthesized electrodes showed higher sensitivity. • The preparation conditions of CCE were obtained with factorial design. - Abstract: The preparation and characterization of carbon ceramic electrodes (CCEs) produced by the sol–gel method was reported. Different parameters for the manufacture of CCE were studied. Some factors such as the preparation method, type of precursor and catalyst, directly influence the conductive properties, mechanical and morphological characteristics of CCEs, and these are reflected in their electrochemical response. Such factors were evaluated using a 24 (two factors and four levels) factorial design analyzing the anodic peak currents (Ipa) and the variation of peak potential (ΔEp) responses of the respective cyclic voltammograms in presence of potassium ferrocyanide. Analyzing the set of results obtained from cyclic voltammetry, a higher reversibility was observed for the electrodes prepared by basic catalysis using methyltrimethoxysilicate, MTMS, as Si precursor. It is suggested that the obtained material presents a porous morphological structure, providing higher reversibility and better definition of voltammetric peaks. These electrodes were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XDR)

  8. Chemical composition of Nigella sativa L. seed extracts obtained by supercritical carbon dioxide.

    Tiruppur Venkatachallam, Suresh Kumar; Pattekhan, Hajimalang; Divakar, Soundar; Kadimi, Udaya Sankar

    2010-12-01

    Chemical composition of black cumin (Nigella sativa L.) seed extracts obtained by supercritical carbon dioxide at two different conditions that result in total extract (28 MPa/50°C, SFE 1) and major volatile part (12 MPa/40°C, SFE 2) and essential oil obtained by hydrodistillation of SFE-1 (HD SFE). SFE have been carried out to characterize the compounds and the variation of quinones and phenolics. The extracts were analysed by GC and GC-MS and the presence of phenolic compounds was further confirmed by 2D HSQCT (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy. Forty-seven volatile compounds were detected where sixteen compounds were reported for the first time in the oil of this seed. Moreover, thymoquinone (TQ), dithymoquinone (DTQ), thymohydroquinone (THQ) and thymol (THY) were the major phenolic compounds. It can be concluded that the chemical composition of extracts obtained by SC CO2 extraction of the seeds showed better recovery of phenolic compounds than HD SFE and proved the occurrence of thermally labile or photosensitive bioactive volatiles of four major quinonic phenol compounds. PMID:23572692

  9. Directly obtaining high strength silk fiber from silkworm by feeding carbon nanotubes

    By feeding silkworm with the carbon nanotube, CNT, we directly obtained high strength silk fiber, SF, from silkworm. The CNT-based SF, SF/CNT, has a stress at 1.69 GPa and a strain at about 24% both higher than those of the SF and are capable to compare with the super SF and even the spider fiber. Morphology comparison showed that the presence of CNT in SF caused the cross-section changed from triangle to ellipse. X-ray diffraction and infrared analysis indicated that the embedded CNT in SF caused an increase in silk-I structure. Specifically the amide-II structure reduced by about 5% and the amide-III structure increased by about 10%. Thermogravimetric analyses indicated that the presence of CNT in SF enhanced the thermal stability. Additionally, the presence of CNT in SF also enhanced the electrical property. - Highlights: • Pristine silk fibers in vivo reinforced by feeding carbon nanotubes to silkworms • Embedding CNTs into SFs improved the mechanical, thermal and electrical properties. • Embedding CNTs into SFs reduced amide II and increased amide III

  10. Preparation and characterization of activated carbon from sugarcane bagasse by physical activation with CO2 gas

    Bachrun, Sutrisno; AyuRizka, Noni; Annisa, SolichaHidayat; Arif, Hidayat

    2016-01-01

    A series of experiments have been conducted to study the effects of different carbonization temperatures (400, 600, and 800oC) on characteristics of porosity in activated carbon derived from carbonized sugarcane bagassechar at activation temperature of 800oC. The results showed that the activated carbon derived from high carbonized temperature of sugarcane bagassechars had higher BET surface area, total volume, micropore volume and yield as compared to the activated carbon derived from low carbonized temperature. The BET surface area, total volume and micropore volume of activated carbon prepared from sugarcane bagassechars obtained at 800oC of carbonized temperature and activation time of 120 min were 661.46m2/g, 0.2455cm3/g and 0.1989cm3/g, respectively. The high carbonization temperature (800oC) generated a highly microporous carbonwith a Type-I nitrogen adsorption isotherm, while the low carbonization temperature (400 and 600oC) generated a mesoporous one with an intermediate between types I and IInitrogen adsorption isotherm.

  11. Effects of CO 2 activation on porous structures of coconut shell-based activated carbons

    Guo, Shenghui; Peng, Jinhui; Li, Wei; Yang, Kunbin; Zhang, Libo; Zhang, Shimin; Xia, Hongying

    2009-07-01

    In this paper, textural characterization of an activated carbon derived from carbonized coconut shell char obtained at carbonization temperature of 600 °C for 2 h by CO 2 activation was investigated. The effects of activation temperature, activation time and flow rate of CO 2 on the BET surface area, total volume, micropore volume and yield of activated carbons prepared were evaluated systematically. The results showed that: (i) enhancing activation temperature was favorable to the formation of pores, widening of pores and an increase in mesopores; (ii) increasing activation time was favorable to the formation of micropores and mesopores, and longer activation time would result in collapsing of pores; (iii) increasing flow rate of CO 2 was favorable to the reactions of all active sites and formation of pores, further increasing flow rate of CO 2 would lead carbon to burn out and was unfavorable to the formation of pores. The degree of surface roughness of activated carbon prepared was measured by the fractal dimension which was calculated by FHH (Frenkel-Halsey-Hill) theory. The fractal dimensions of activated carbons prepared were greater than 2.6, indicating the activated carbon samples prepared had very irregular structures, and agreed well with those of average micropore size.

  12. Activated carbons from African oil palm waste shells and fibre for hydrogen storage

    Liliana Giraldo; Maria Fernanda González-Navarro; Juan Carlos Moreno-Piraján

    2013-01-01

    We prepared a series of activated carbons by chemical activation with two strong bases in-group that few use, and I with waste from shell and fibers and oil-palm African. Activated carbons are obtained with relatively high surface areas (1605 m2/g). We study the textural and chemical properties and its effect on hydrogen storage. The activated carbons obtained from fibrous wastes exhibit a high hydrogen storage capacity of 6.0 wt % at 77 K and 12 bar.

  13. Using the carbon nanotube (CNT)/CNT interaction to obtain hybrid conductive nanostructures

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) combine unique physical, electrical, chemical, thermal and mechanical properties with a huge surface area that qualify them to a broad range of applications. These potential applications, however, are often limited due to the strong inter-tubes van der Waals interactions, which results in poor dispersion in polymeric matrixes or solvents in general. Thus, the goal of this work was to use this limitation as an advantage, to produce novel conductive hybrid nanostructures, which consist of nonwoven Nylon 6 (PA6) mats of electrospun nanofibers with a large amount of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) strongly attached and adsorbed on the nanofibers´ surfaces. To produce such structures, the MWCNT were previously functionalized with carboxylic groups and subsequently incorporated in the nanofibers by two subsequent steps: i) preparation of nonwoven mats of PA6/MWCNT by electrospinning and ii) treatment of the mats in an aqueous dispersion of MWCNT/Triton X–100. Analyses of UV-visible light showed that carboxylic groups were actually inserted in the MWCNT. Thermogravimetric analyzes (TGA) showed that the amount of adsorbed MWCNT on the fibers´ surfaces at the end of the procedure was approximately 12 times higher than after the first step. Micrographs obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) confirmed this result and electrical conductivities measurements of the MWCNT/PA6, after the treatment in the aqueous solution, showed that these structures had conductivity of 10-2 S/m. It was concluded that the adhesion of CNTs at the surface of the nanofibers occurred due a combination of two types of bonding: hydrogen bonds between the carboxylic groups of the functionalized CNT and the PA6 and van der Waals interactions between the CNTs

  14. Using the carbon nanotube (CNT)/CNT interaction to obtain hybrid conductive nanostructures

    Santos, J.; Silva, A.; Bretas, R.

    2015-05-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) combine unique physical, electrical, chemical, thermal and mechanical properties with a huge surface area that qualify them to a broad range of applications. These potential applications, however, are often limited due to the strong inter-tubes van der Waals interactions, which results in poor dispersion in polymeric matrixes or solvents in general. Thus, the goal of this work was to use this limitation as an advantage, to produce novel conductive hybrid nanostructures, which consist of nonwoven Nylon 6 (PA6) mats of electrospun nanofibers with a large amount of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) strongly attached and adsorbed on the nanofiberś surfaces. To produce such structures, the MWCNT were previously functionalized with carboxylic groups and subsequently incorporated in the nanofibers by two subsequent steps: i) preparation of nonwoven mats of PA6/MWCNT by electrospinning and ii) treatment of the mats in an aqueous dispersion of MWCNT/Triton X-100. Analyses of UV-visible light showed that carboxylic groups were actually inserted in the MWCNT. Thermogravimetric analyzes (TGA) showed that the amount of adsorbed MWCNT on the fiberś surfaces at the end of the procedure was approximately 12 times higher than after the first step. Micrographs obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) confirmed this result and electrical conductivities measurements of the MWCNT/PA6, after the treatment in the aqueous solution, showed that these structures had conductivity of 10-2 S/m. It was concluded that the adhesion of CNTs at the surface of the nanofibers occurred due a combination of two types of bonding: hydrogen bonds between the carboxylic groups of the functionalized CNT and the PA6 and van der Waals interactions between the CNTs.

  15. Using the carbon nanotube (CNT)/CNT interaction to obtain hybrid conductive nanostructures

    Santos, J.; Silva, A.; Bretas, R., E-mail: joaopaulofsbrasil@hotmail.com, E-mail: bretas@ufscar.br [Department of Materials Engineering, Federal University of São Carlos, Rod. Washington Luís, Km 235, PO Box 676, São Carlos, SP, 13565-905 (Brazil)

    2015-05-22

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) combine unique physical, electrical, chemical, thermal and mechanical properties with a huge surface area that qualify them to a broad range of applications. These potential applications, however, are often limited due to the strong inter-tubes van der Waals interactions, which results in poor dispersion in polymeric matrixes or solvents in general. Thus, the goal of this work was to use this limitation as an advantage, to produce novel conductive hybrid nanostructures, which consist of nonwoven Nylon 6 (PA6) mats of electrospun nanofibers with a large amount of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) strongly attached and adsorbed on the nanofibers´ surfaces. To produce such structures, the MWCNT were previously functionalized with carboxylic groups and subsequently incorporated in the nanofibers by two subsequent steps: i) preparation of nonwoven mats of PA6/MWCNT by electrospinning and ii) treatment of the mats in an aqueous dispersion of MWCNT/Triton X–100. Analyses of UV-visible light showed that carboxylic groups were actually inserted in the MWCNT. Thermogravimetric analyzes (TGA) showed that the amount of adsorbed MWCNT on the fibers´ surfaces at the end of the procedure was approximately 12 times higher than after the first step. Micrographs obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) confirmed this result and electrical conductivities measurements of the MWCNT/PA6, after the treatment in the aqueous solution, showed that these structures had conductivity of 10-2 S/m. It was concluded that the adhesion of CNTs at the surface of the nanofibers occurred due a combination of two types of bonding: hydrogen bonds between the carboxylic groups of the functionalized CNT and the PA6 and van der Waals interactions between the CNTs.

  16. Carbon materials obtained from self-binding sugar cane bagasse and deciduous wood residues plastics

    It is demonstrated that dispersed biomass residues (bagasse, sawdust) can be processed into hard carbonaceous blocks, panels or boards with good strength and thermodynamic properties. There are two possible approaches: to mould dispersed biomass charcoal with a phenol-formaldehyde binder or to produce this material by carbonising the biomass fiberboard prepared by making use of steam explosion autohydrolysis pulp or steam explosion lignin as a binder. In the first step, steam explosion lignin, as a modifier and a binder is introduced to the lignocellulosic biomass by impregnation or during the hot pressing process to form a hard fiberboard. By subsequent carbonisation of the fiberboard panels or blocks, carbonised panels or blocks with high bending and crushing strength and suitable thermodynamic properties are obtained due to the formation of an internal lignin reinforcement in cell lumina and impregnation of cell walls with lignin solution or molten lignin. The carbonised panels demonstrate a good dimensional stability after a standard treatment with water. The bending strength of the carbonised panels after 24 h soaking in water is 93% of that in dry state. The thermodynamic properties and porosity of the carbonised panels demonstrate their suitability for use as a building material. Lignin, a natural binder of fiberboards, has proven to be suitable for preparation of cabonaceous panels and boards. In this respect new carbon building blocks and panels from moulded biomass and carbonised steam exploded biomass act as a concentrated form of long term carbon storage and will be a factor stabilizing the growing CO2 concentration in the atmosphere. [Proceedings of the First Workshop of QITS, Materials Life-Cycle and Environmentally Sustainable Development, March 2-4, Campinas, UNU/IAS San Paulo, Brazil, 1998, pp. 95-101; Proceedings of the Workshop in ''Targeting Zero Emissions for the Utilization of Renewable Resources'', ANESC, Tokyo, 1999, pp. 2-11.

  17. Carbon materials obtained from self-binding sugar cane bagasse and deciduous wood residues plastics

    Zandersons, J.; Gravitis, J.; Zhurinsh, A.; Kokorevics, A. [Latvian State Inst. of Wood Chemistry, Riga (Latvia); Kallavus, U. [Tallinn TechnicaL Univ. (Estonia). Center of Material Research; Suzuki, C.K. [University of Campinas (Brazil). Faculty of Mechanical Engineering

    2004-04-01

    It is demonstrated that dispersed biomass residues (bagasse, sawdust) can be processed into hard carbonaceous blocks, panels or boards with good strength and thermodynamic properties. There are two possible approaches: to mould dispersed biomass charcoal with a phenol-formaldehyde binder or to produce this material by carbonising the biomass fiberboard prepared by making use of steam explosion autohydrolysis pulp or steam explosion lignin as a binder. In the first step, steam explosion lignin, as a modifier and a binder is introduced to the lignocellulosic biomass by impregnation or during the hot pressing process to form a hard fiberboard. By subsequent carbonisation of the fiberboard panels or blocks, carbonised panels or blocks with high bending and crushing strength and suitable thermodynamic properties are obtained due to the formation of an internal lignin reinforcement in cell lumina and impregnation of cell walls with lignin solution or molten lignin. The carbonised panels demonstrate a good dimensional stability after a standard treatment with water. The bending strength of the carbonised panels after 24 h soaking in water is 93 % of that in dry state. The thermodynamic properties and porosity of the carbonised panels demonstrate their suitability for use as a building material. Lignin, a natural binder of fiberboards, has proven to be suitable for preparation of carbonaceous panels and boards. In this respect new carbon building blocks and panels from moulded biomass and carbonised steam exploded biomass act as a concentrated form of long term carbon storage and will be a factor stabilizing the growing CO{sub 2} concentration in the atmosphere.[Proceedings of the First Workshop of QITS, Materials Life-Cycle and Environmentally Sustainable Development, March 2-4, Campinas, UNU/IAS San Paulo, Brazil, 1998, pp. 95-101; Proceedings of the Workshop in ''Targeting Zero Emissions for the Utilization of Renewable Resources'', ANESC, Tokyo

  18. Microstructure of massive iron-carbon alloys obtained by mechanical alloying and sintering

    W. Pilarczyk

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The ultimate aim of this work was to investigate structure and properties massive Fe-6.67%mass.C and Fe-0.4%mass.C materials obtained by mechanical alloying and sintering.Design/methodology/approach: The powders of the iron-carbon alloys obtained by mechanical alloying method and after that the powders were sintering. The sintering process was conducted by using the impulse-plasma method. In this article the usability of mechanical alloying method and sintering to produce the massive Fe-C materials were presented. The morphology of voids of iron-carbon sinters was analyzed using the scanning electron microscopy method. The distribution of powder particles was determined by a laser particle analyzer. The observation of the shape and size of the grains was carried out by means of the LEICA optical microscope. Then one performed the measurements of the hardness with the Vickers method. The density of the sinters was measured using the Multivolume Pycnometer 1305.Findings: The laboratory tests show that, by using the mechanical alloying method, one can produce powder of Fe-6.67%mass.C and Fe-0.4%mass.C alloys with intentional chemical constitution and desirable structure. The structure of the alloyed materials is homogeneous and fine-grained and inside the materials didn’t find some impurities and undesirable phases. The sintering by using the impulse-plasma method makes the sinters with close to theoretical density with non-variable nanocrystaline structure possible. The hardness of the sinters were 1300 HV and 250 HV adequately.Research limitations/implications: Property of Fe-C alloys correction is possible by refinement of grains and modification of phases composition. Nanocrystaline size of grain is advisable to make it in correct technology of producing bulk materials with nanocrystaline structure. All of the presented experiments in this article are made on a laboratory scale. At the present time, most often, the mechanical

  19. Activated carbon from leather shaving wastes and its application in removal of toxic materials.

    Kantarli, Ismail Cem; Yanik, Jale

    2010-07-15

    In this study, utilization of a solid waste as raw material for activated carbon production was investigated. For this purpose, activated carbons were produced from chromium and vegetable tanned leather shaving wastes by physical and chemical activation methods. A detailed analysis of the surface properties of the activated carbons including acidity, total surface area, extent of microporosity and mesoporosity was presented. The activated carbon produced from vegetable tanned leather shaving waste produced has a higher surface area and micropore volume than the activated carbon produced from chromium tanned leather shaving waste. The potential application of activated carbons obtained from vegetable tanned shavings as adsorbent for removal of water pollutants have been checked for phenol, methylene blue, and Cr(VI). Adsorption capacities of activated carbons were found to be comparable to that of activated carbons derived from biomass. PMID:20382474

  20. Adsorption Properties of Lignin-derived Activated Carbon Fibers (LACF)

    Contescu, Cristian I. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gallego, Nidia C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Thibaud-Erkey, Catherine [United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), East Hartford, CT (United States); Karra, Reddy [United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), East Hartford, CT (United States)

    2016-04-01

    The object of this CRADA project between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and United Technologies Research Center (UTRC) is the characterization of lignin-derived activated carbon fibers (LACF) and determination of their adsorption properties for volatile organic compounds (VOC). Carbon fibers from lignin raw materials were manufactured at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) using the technology previously developed at ORNL. These fibers were physically activated at ORNL using various activation conditions, and their surface area and pore-size distribution were characterized by gas adsorption. Based on these properties, ORNL did down-select five differently activated LACF materials that were delivered to UTRC for measurement of VOC adsorption properties. UTRC used standard techniques based on breakthrough curves to measure and determine the adsorption properties of indoor air pollutants (IAP) - namely formaldehyde and carbon dioxide - and to verify the extent of saturated fiber regenerability by thermal treatments. The results are summarized as follows: (1) ORNL demonstrated that physical activation of lignin-derived carbon fibers can be tailored to obtain LACF with surface areas and pore size distributions matching the properties of activated carbon fibers obtained from more expensive, fossil-fuel precursors; (2) UTRC investigated the LACF potential for use in air cleaning applications currently pursued by UTRC, such as building ventilation, and demonstrated their regenerability for CO2 and formaldehyde, (3) Both partners agree that LACF have potential for possible use in air cleaning applications.

  1. Activation of Carbon Dioxide and Synthesis of Propylene Carbonate

    2002-01-01

    Cycloaddition of carbon dioxide and propylene oxide to propylene carbonate catalyzed by tetra-tert-butyl metal phthalocyanine in the presence of tributylamine (TBA) shows higher yield than catalyzed by unsubstituted metal phthalocyanine. Comparing different catalysts of diverse metals, (t-Bu)4PcMg is more active than (t-Bu)4PcFe. But (t-Bu)4PcCo and (t-Bu)4PcNi only have low catalytic activities towards the reaction. Moreover, the yield will increase as the temperature increases.

  2. ESTIMATION OF ACTIVATED ENERGY OF DESORPTION OF n-HEXANE ON ACTIVATED CARBONS BY TPD TECHNIQUE

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, six kinds of activated carbons such as Ag+-activated carbon, Cu2+-activated carbon, Fe3+- activated carbon, activated carbon, Ba2+- activated carbon and Ca2+-activated carbon were prepared. The model for estimating activated energy of desorption was established. Temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) experiments were conducted to measure the TPD curves of n-hexanol and then estimate the activation energy for desorption of n-hexanol on the activated carbons. Results showed that the activation energy for the desorption of n-hexanol on the Ag+- activated carbon, the Cu2+- activated carbon and the Fe3+- activated carbon were higher than those of n-hexanol on the activated carbon, the Ca2+- activated carbon and the Ba2+- activated carbon.

  3. ESTIMATION OF ACTIVATED ENERGY OF DESORPTION OF n—HEXANE ON ACTIVATED CARBONS BY PTD TECHNIQUE

    LIZhong; WANGHongjuan; 等

    2001-01-01

    In this paper,six kinds of activated carbons such as Ag+-activated carbon,Cu2+activated carbon,Fe3+-activated carbon,activated carbon,Ba2+-activated carbon and Ca2+activated carbon were prepared.The model for estimating activated energy of desorption was established.Temperature-programmed desorption(TPD)experiments were conducted to measure the TPD curves of n-hexanol and then estimate the activation energy for desorption of n-hexanol on the activated carbons.Results showed that the activation energy for the desorption of n-hexanol on the Ag+-activated carbon,the Cu2+-activated carbon and the Fe3+-activated carbon were higher than those of n-hexanol on the activated carbon,the Ca2+-activated carbon and the Ba2+-activated carbon.

  4. Carbon Activation Diagnostic for Tertiary Neutron Measurements

    Glebov, V.Yu.; Stoeckl, C.; Sangster, T.C.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Radha, P.B.; Padalino, S.; Baumgart, L.; Fuschino, J.

    2003-03-28

    OAK B202 The yield of tertiary neutrons with energies greater than 20 MeV has been proposed to determine the high rho R of inertial confinement fusion targets. The activation of carbon is a valuable measurement technique because of its high reaction threshold, the availability of high-purity samples, and relatively low cost. The 12C(n,2n)11C reaction has a Q value of 18.7 MeV, well above the 14.1 MeV primary DT neutron energy. The isotope 11C decays with a half-life of 20.3 min and emits a positron, resulting in the production of two back-to-back, 511 keV gamma rays upon annihilation. The positron decay of 11C is nearly identical to the copper decay used in the activation measurements of 14.1 MeV primary DT yields; therefore, the present copper activation gamma-detection system can be used to detect the tertiary-produced carbon activation. Because the tertiary neutron yield is more than six orders of magnitude lower than primary neutron yield, the carbon activation diagnostic requires ultrapure carbon samples, free from any positron-emitting contamination. In recent years we have developed carbon purification, packaging, and handling procedures that minimize the contamination signal to a level low enough to use carbon activation for tertiary neutron measurements in direct-drive implosion experiments with DT cryogenic targets on OMEGA. Experimental results of contamination measurements in carbon samples performed on high-neutron-yield shots on OMEGA in 2001-2002 will be presented. A concept for implementing a carbon activation system on the National Ignition Facility (NIF)will be discussed.

  5. PREPARATION OF MESOPOROUS CARBON BY CARBON DIOXIDE ACTIVATION WITH CATALYST

    W.Z.Shen; A.H.Lu; J.T.Zheng

    2002-01-01

    A mesoporous activated carbon (AC) can be successfully prepared by catalytic activa-tion with carbon dioxide. For iron oxide as catalyst, there were two regions of mesoporesize distribution, i.e. 2-5nm and 30-70nm. When copper oxide or magnesium oxidecoexisted with iron oxide as composite catalyst, the content of pores with sizes of 2-5nm was decreased, while the pores with 30 70nm were increased significantly. Forcomparison, AC reactivated by carbon dioxide directly was also investigated. It wasshown that the size of mesopores of the resulting AC concentrated in 2-5nm with lessvolume. The adsorption of Congo red was tested to evaluate the property of the result-ing AC. Furthermore, the factors affecting pore size distribution and the possibility ofmesopore formation were discussed.

  6. Activated carbon produced from Sasol-Lurgi gasifier pitch and its application as electrodes in supercapacitors

    A. Alonso; Ruiz Ruiz, Vanesa; Blanco Rodríguez, Clara; Santamaría Ramírez, Ricardo; Granda Ferreira, Marcos; Menéndez López, Rosa María; Jager, S.G.E. de

    2006-01-01

    [EN] A pyrolysis product derived from Sasol-Lurgi gasifier pitch was activated using different proportions of KOH. The increase of the amount of KOH used for activation caused the activation degree of the carbons to increase very significantly. The activated carbons obtained using lower amounts of KOH were mainly microporous, while the amount of mesopores developed in the samples progressively increased for the carbons activated with higher proportions of KOH. The gravimetric specific capacit...

  7. Organic solvent regeneration of granular activated carbon

    Cross, W. H.; Suidan, M. T.; Roller, M. A.; Kim, B. R.; Gould, J. P.

    1982-09-01

    The use of activated carbon for the treatment of industrial waste-streams was shown to be an effective treatment. The high costs associated with the replacement or thermal regeneration of the carbon have prohibited the economic feasibility of this process. The in situ solvent regeneration of activated carbon by means of organic solvent extraction was suggested as an economically alternative to thermal regeneration. The important aspects of the solvent regeneration process include: the physical and chemical characteristics of the adsorbent, the pore size distribution and energy of adsorption associated with the activated carbon; the degree of solubility of the adsorbate in the organic solvent; the miscibility of the organic solvent in water; and the temperature at which the generation is performed.

  8. Microwave-assisted regeneration of activated carbon.

    Foo, K Y; Hameed, B H

    2012-09-01

    Microwave heating was used in the regeneration of methylene blue-loaded activated carbons produced from fibers (PFAC), empty fruit bunches (EFBAC) and shell (PSAC) of oil palm. The dye-loaded carbons were treated in a modified conventional microwave oven operated at 2450 MHz and irradiation time of 2, 3 and 5 min. The virgin properties of the origin and regenerated activated carbons were characterized by pore structural analysis and nitrogen adsorption isotherm. The surface chemistry was examined by zeta potential measurement and determination of surface acidity/basicity, while the adsorptive property was quantified using methylene blue (MB). Microwave irradiation preserved the pore structure, original active sites and adsorption capacity of the regenerated activated carbons. The carbon yield and the monolayer adsorption capacities for MB were maintained at 68.35-82.84% and 154.65-195.22 mg/g, even after five adsorption-regeneration cycles. The findings revealed the potential of microwave heating for regeneration of spent activated carbons. PMID:22728787

  9. Antimicrobial Activity of Carbon-Based Nanoparticles

    Solmaz Maleki Dizaj

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Due to the vast and inappropriate use of the antibiotics, microorganisms have begun to develop resistance to the commonly used antimicrobial agents. So therefore, development of the new and effective antimicrobial agents seems to be necessary. According to some recent reports, carbon-based nanomaterials such as fullerenes, carbon nanotubes (CNTs (especially single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs and graphene oxide (GO nanoparticles show potent antimicrobial properties. In present review, we have briefly summarized the antimicrobial activity of carbon-based nanoparticles together with their mechanism of action. Reviewed literature show that the size of carbon nanoparticles plays an important role in the inactivation of the microorganisms. As major mechanism, direct contact of microorganisms with carbon nanostructures seriously affects their cellular membrane integrity, metabolic processes and morphology. The antimicrobial activity of carbon-based nanostructures may interestingly be investigated in the near future owing to their high surface/volume ratio, large inner volume and other unique chemical and physical properties. In addition, application of functionalized carbon nanomaterials as carriers for the ordinary antibiotics possibly will decrease the associated resistance, enhance their bioavailability and provide their targeted delivery.

  10. Activated coconut shell charcoal carbon using chemical-physical activation

    Budi, Esmar; Umiatin, Nasbey, Hadi; Bintoro, Ridho Akbar; Wulandari, Futri; Erlina

    2016-02-01

    The use of activated carbon from natural material such as coconut shell charcoal as metal absorbance of the wastewater is a new trend. The activation of coconut shell charcoal carbon by using chemical-physical activation has been investigated. Coconut shell was pyrolized in kiln at temperature about 75 - 150 °C for about 6 hours in producing charcoal. The charcoal as the sample was shieved into milimeter sized granule particle and chemically activated by immersing in various concentration of HCl, H3PO4, KOH and NaOH solutions. The samples then was physically activated using horizontal furnace at 400°C for 1 hours in argon gas environment with flow rate of 200 kg/m3. The surface morphology and carbon content of activated carbon were characterized by using SEM/EDS. The result shows that the pores of activated carbon are openned wider as the chemical activator concentration is increased due to an excessive chemical attack. However, the pores tend to be closed as further increasing in chemical activator concentration due to carbon collapsing.

  11. CHARACTERIZATION OF ACACIA MANGIUM WOOD BASED ACTIVATED CARBONS PREPARED IN THE PRESENCE OF BASIC ACTIVATING AGENTS

    Mohammed Danish

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to observe the effects of alkaline activating agents on the characteristics, composition, and surface morphology of the designed activated carbons. Activated carbons were prepared by pyrolysis of Acacia mangium wood in the presence of two basic activating agents (calcium oxide and potassium hydroxide. The extent of impregnation ratio of precursor to activating agents was fixed at 2:1(w/w. Prior to pyrolysis, 24 hours soaking was conducted at 348 K. Activation was carried out in a stainless steel capped graphite crucible at 773 K for 2 hours in the absence of purge gas. The burn-off percentage was found to be 70.27±0.93% for CaO activated carbon (COAC and 73.30±0.20% for KOH activated carbon (PHAC. The activating agents had a strong influence on the surface functional groups as well as elemental composition of these activated carbons. Characterization of the activated carbon obtained was performed with field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, and nitrogen adsorption as Brunauer, Emmett and Teller (BET and Dubinin-Radushkevich (DR isotherms.

  12. Production of activated carbons from almond shell

    Nabais, Joao M. Valente; Laginhas, Carlos Eduardo C.; Carrott, P.J.M.; Ribeiro Carrott, M.M.L. [Evora Univ. (Portugal). Centro de Quimica de Evora

    2011-02-15

    The production of activated carbons from almond shell, using physical activation by CO{sub 2} is reported in this work. The used method has produced activated carbons with apparent BET surface areas and micropore volume as high as 1138 m{sup 2} g{sup -1} and 0.49 cm{sup 3} g{sup -1}, respectively. The activated carbons produced have essentially primary micropores and only a small volume of wider micropores. By FTIR analysis it was possible to identify, in the surface of the activated carbons, several functional groups, namely hydroxyls (free and phenol), ethers, esters, lactones, pyrones and Si-H bonds. By the analysis of the XRD patterns it was possible to calculate the microcrystallites dimensions with height between 1.178 and 1.881 nm and width between 3.106 and 5.917 nm. From the XRD it was also possible to identify the presence of traces of inorganic heteroatoms such as Si, Pb, K, Fe and P. All activated carbons showed basic characteristics with point of zero charge between 9.42 and 10.43. (author)

  13. Refining of hydrochars/ hydrothermally carbonized biomass into activated carbons and their applications

    Hao, Wenming

    2014-01-01

    Hydrothermally treated biomass could not only be used as a fuel or a fertilizer but it can also be refined into high-value products. Activated carbons are one of those. In the studies of this thesis, four different hydrothermally carbonized (HTC) biomasses, including horse manure, grass cuttings, beer waste and biosludge, have been successfully made into activated carbons. The activated carbon materials were in the forms of powdered activated carbons, powdered composites of activated carbon a...

  14. Bisphenol A removal from water by activated carbon. Effects of carbon characteristics and solution chemistry.

    Bautista-Toledo, I; Ferro-García, M A; Rivera-Utrilla, J; Moreno-Castilla, C; Vegas Fernández, F J

    2005-08-15

    The present study aimed to analyze the behavior of different activated carbons in the adsorption and removal of bisphenol A (2-2-bis-4-hydroxypheniyl propane) from aqueous solutions in order to identify the parameters that determine this process. Two commercial activated carbons and one prepared in our laboratory from almond shells were used; they were texturally and chemically characterized, obtaining the surface area, pore size distribution, mineral matter content, elemental analysis, oxygen surface groups, and pH of the point of zero charge (pH(PZC)), among other parameters. Adsorption isotherms of bisphenol A and adsorption capacities were obtained. The capacity of the carbons to remove bisphenol A was related to their characteristics. Thus, the adsorption of bisphenol A on activated carbon fundamentally depends on the chemical nature of the carbon surface and the pH of the solution. The most favorable experimental conditions for this process are those in which the net charge density of the carbon is zero and the bisphenol A is in molecular form. Under these conditions, the adsorbent-adsorbate interactions that govern the adsorption mechanism are enhanced. Influences of the mineral matter present in the carbon samples and the solution chemistry (pH and ionic strength) were also analyzed. The presence of mineral matter in carbons reduces their adsorption capacity because of the hydrophilic nature of the matter. The presence of electrolytes in the solution favor the adsorption process because of the screening effect produced between the positively charged carbon surface and the bisphenol A molecules, with a resulting increase in adsorbent-adsorbate interactions. PMID:16173588

  15. Investigation of supercapacitors with carbon electrodes obtained from argon-acetylene arc plasma

    Kavaliauskas, Žydrūnas

    2010-01-01

    The dissertation examines topics related to the formation of supercapacitors using plasma technology and their analysis. Plasma spray technology was used to form supercapacitors electrodes. Carbon was deposited on stainless steel surface using the atmospheric pressure argon-acetylene plasma. The deposition of nickel oxide on the surface of carbon electrodes was made using magnetron sputtering method. The influence of acetylene amount to the supercapacitors electrodes and the electrical charac...

  16. Ignition properties of nuclear grade activated carbons

    The ignition property of new activated carbons used in air cleaning systems of nuclear facilities has been evaluated in the past, however very little information has been generated on the behavior of aged, weathered carbons which have been exposed to normal nuclear facility environment. Additionally the standard procedure for evaluation of ignition temperature of carbon is performed under very different conditions than those used in the design of nuclear air cleaning systems. Data were generated evaluating the ageing of activated carbons and comparing their CH3131I removal histories to their ignition temperatures. A series of tests were performed on samples from one nuclear power reactor versus use time, a second series evaluated samples from several plants showing the variability of atmospheric effects. The ignition temperatures were evaluated simulating the conditions existing in nuclear air cleaning systems, such as velocity, bed depth, etc., to eliminate potential confusion resulting from artifically set current standard conditions

  17. Osteoblast-like cell response to macro- and micro-patterned carbon scaffolds obtained from the sea rush Juncus maritimus

    Lopez-Alvarez, M; Pereiro, I; Serra, J; Gonzalez, P [Applied Physics Department, E. I. Industriais, Campus Lagoas-Marcosende, University of Vigo, 36310 Vigo (Pontevedra) (Spain); De Carlos, A, E-mail: miriammsd@uvigo.es, E-mail: ipereiro@uvigo.es, E-mail: jserra@uvigo.es, E-mail: adcarlos@uvigo.es, E-mail: pglez@uvigo.es [Biochemistry, Genetics and Immunology Department, Biology Faculty, Campus Lagoas-Marcosende, University of Vigo, 36310 Vigo (Pontevedra) (Spain)

    2011-08-15

    Carbon scaffolds with a directional patterned surface were obtained by pyrolysis of the sea rush Juncus maritimus. The structure of the scaffolds was investigated using scanning electron microscopy, mercury porosimetry and interferometric profilometry. X-ray diffraction and x-ray fluorescence were the techniques used for their chemical characterization. The alignment and differentiation of pre-osteoblasts (MC3T3-E1 cell line) incubated on the patterned scaffolds were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy, confocal laser scanning microscopy and by the quantification of the phosphatase alkaline activity and the osteocalcin synthesis. It was found that pyrolysis at 500 {sup 0}C preserved and even enhanced the natural macro- and micro-patterning of the plant. The results obtained for porosity and chemical composition validated these structures as viable scaffolds for tissue engineering applications. Finally, the patterned surface was confirmed to promote the oriented growth of the pre-osteoblasts MC3T3-E1, not only after short periods of incubation (hours) but also after longer ones (several weeks). The quantification of the cell differentiation markers together with the evaluation of the cell layer morphology up to 28 days of incubation confirmed the differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cells to osteoblasts.

  18. Osteoblast-like cell response to macro- and micro-patterned carbon scaffolds obtained from the sea rush Juncus maritimus

    Carbon scaffolds with a directional patterned surface were obtained by pyrolysis of the sea rush Juncus maritimus. The structure of the scaffolds was investigated using scanning electron microscopy, mercury porosimetry and interferometric profilometry. X-ray diffraction and x-ray fluorescence were the techniques used for their chemical characterization. The alignment and differentiation of pre-osteoblasts (MC3T3-E1 cell line) incubated on the patterned scaffolds were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy, confocal laser scanning microscopy and by the quantification of the phosphatase alkaline activity and the osteocalcin synthesis. It was found that pyrolysis at 500 0C preserved and even enhanced the natural macro- and micro-patterning of the plant. The results obtained for porosity and chemical composition validated these structures as viable scaffolds for tissue engineering applications. Finally, the patterned surface was confirmed to promote the oriented growth of the pre-osteoblasts MC3T3-E1, not only after short periods of incubation (hours) but also after longer ones (several weeks). The quantification of the cell differentiation markers together with the evaluation of the cell layer morphology up to 28 days of incubation confirmed the differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cells to osteoblasts.

  19. Osteoblast-like cell response to macro- and micro-patterned carbon scaffolds obtained from the sea rush Juncus maritimus.

    López-Álvarez, M; Pereiro, I; Serra, J; de Carlos, A; González, P

    2011-08-01

    Carbon scaffolds with a directional patterned surface were obtained by pyrolysis of the sea rush Juncus maritimus. The structure of the scaffolds was investigated using scanning electron microscopy, mercury porosimetry and interferometric profilometry. X-ray diffraction and x-ray fluorescence were the techniques used for their chemical characterization. The alignment and differentiation of pre-osteoblasts (MC3T3-E1 cell line) incubated on the patterned scaffolds were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy, confocal laser scanning microscopy and by the quantification of the phosphatase alkaline activity and the osteocalcin synthesis. It was found that pyrolysis at 500 °C preserved and even enhanced the natural macro- and micro-patterning of the plant. The results obtained for porosity and chemical composition validated these structures as viable scaffolds for tissue engineering applications. Finally, the patterned surface was confirmed to promote the oriented growth of the pre-osteoblasts MC3T3-E1, not only after short periods of incubation (hours) but also after longer ones (several weeks). The quantification of the cell differentiation markers together with the evaluation of the cell layer morphology up to 28 days of incubation confirmed the differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cells to osteoblasts. PMID:21772087

  20. Adsorption of dissolved natural organic matter by modified activated carbons.

    Cheng, Wei; Dastgheib, Seyed A; Karanfil, Tanju

    2005-06-01

    Adsorption of dissolved natural organic matter (DOM) by virgin and modified granular activated carbons (GACs) was studied. DOM samples were obtained from two water treatment plants before (i.e., raw water) and after coagulation/flocculation/sedimentation processes (i.e., treated water). A granular activated carbon (GAC) was modified by high temperature helium or ammonia treatment, or iron impregnation followed by high temperature ammonia treatment. Two activated carbon fibers (ACFs) were also used, with no modification, to examine the effect of carbon porosity on DOM adsorption. Size exclusion chromatography (SEC) and specific ultraviolet absorbance (SUVA(254)) were employed to characterize the DOMs before and after adsorption. Iron-impregnated (HDFe) and ammonia-treated (HDN) activated carbons showed significantly higher DOM uptakes than the virgin GAC. The enhanced DOM uptake by HDFe was due to the presence of iron species on the carbon surface. The higher uptake of HDN was attributed to the enlarged carbon pores and basic surface created during ammonia treatment. The SEC and SUVA(254) results showed no specific selectivity in the removal of different DOM components as a result of carbon modification. The removal of DOM from both raw and treated waters was negligible by ACF10, having 96% of its surface area in pores smaller than 1 nm. Small molecular weight (MW) DOM components were preferentially removed by ACF20H, having 33% of its surface area in 1--3 nm pores. DOM components with MWs larger than 1600, 2000, and 2700 Da of Charleston raw, Charleston-treated, and Spartanburg-treated waters, respectively, were excluded from the pores of ACF20H. In contrast to carbon fibers, DOM components from entire MW range were removed from waters by virgin and modified GACs. PMID:15927230

  1. Dynamic adsorption of radon on activated carbon

    The adsorption of 222Rn from air onto activated carbon was studied over the range 0 to 550C. A sharp pulse of radon was injected into an air stream that flowed through a bed of activated carbon. The radon concentration in the exit from the column was continuously monitored using a zinc sulfide α-scintillation flow cell. Elution curves were analyzed to determine the dynamic adsorption coefficient and the number of theoretical stages. Five types of activated carbon were tested and the dynamic adsorption coefficient was found to increase linearly with surface area in the range 1000 to 1300 m2g-1. The adsorptive capacity of activated carbon was reduced by up to 30% if the entering gas was saturated with water vapor and the bed was initially dry. If the bed was allowed to equilibrate with saturated air, the adsorptive capacity was too low to be of practical use. The minimum height equivalent to a theoretical stage (HETS) was about four times the particle diameter and occurred at superficial velocities within the range 0.002 to 0.02 m s-1. For superficial velocities above 0.05 m s-1, the HETS was determined by the rate of mass transfer. The application of these results to the design of activated carbon systems for radon retention is discussed

  2. Comparison Of The MWCNTs-Rh And MWCNTs-Re Carbon-Metal Nanocomposites Obtained In High-Temperature

    Dobrzańska-Danikiewicz A.D.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Carbon-metal nanocomposites consisting of multiwalled carbon nanotubes coated with rhodium or rhenium nanoparticles by the high-temperature method were fabricated during the research undertaken. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes fabricated by Catalytic-Chemical Vapour Deposition (CCVD were used in the investigations. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes functionalisation in acid or in a mixture of acids was applied to deposit rhodium or rhenium nanoparticles onto the surface of carbon nanotubes, and then the material was placed in a solution being a precursor of metallic nanoparticles. The material prepared was next subjected to high-temperature reduction in the atmosphere of argon and/or hydrogen to deposit rhodium or rhenium nanoparticles onto the surface of multiwalled carbon nanotubes. The investigations performed include, respectively: fabrication of a CNT-NPs (Carbon NanoTube-NanoParticles nanocomposite material; the characterisation of the material produced including examination of the structure and morphology, and the assessment of rhodium and/or rhenium nanoparticles distribution on the surface of carbon nanotubes. Micro- and spectroscopy techniques were employed to characterise the structure of the nanocomposites obtained.

  3. Adsorption of organic compounds onto activated carbons from recycled vegetables biomass.

    Mameli, Anna; Cincotti, Alberto; Lai, Nicola; Crisafulli, Carmelo; Sciré, Salvatore; Cao, Giacomo

    2004-01-01

    The removal of organic species from aqueous solution by activated carbons is investigated. The latter ones are prepared from olive husks and almond shells. A wide range of surface area values are obtained varying temperature and duration of both carbonization and activation steps. The adsorption isotherm of phenol, catechol and 2,6-dichlorophenol involving the activated carbons prepared are obtained at 25 degrees C. The corresponding behavior is quantitatively correlated using classical isotherm, whose parameters are estimated by fitting the equilibrium data. A two component isotherm (phenol/2,6-dichlorophenol) is determined in order to test activated carbon behavior during competitive adsorption. PMID:15347202

  4. Method to obtain carbon nano-onions by pyrolisys of propane

    Garcia-Martin, Tomas; Rincon-Arevalo, Pedro; Campos-Martin, Gemma

    2013-11-01

    We present a new and simple method for carbon nano-onions (CNOs) production which is based on the pyrolysis of Propane. CNOs are originated in a laminar premixed Propane/Oxygen flame of approximately 1.8 of stoichiometric coefficient. The stream of gasses resulting from the combustion drives the carbon particles towards the aluminium surface on which nano-onions are deposited and collected. The structure and size of the deposited carbon onion on the metal wall are characterized by High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy technique (HRTEM). The experimental images show the presence of two different types of CNOs. The first particles have diameters in the range of 18-25 nm and the second ones around 10 nm.

  5. Microcystin-LR Adsorption by Activated Carbon.

    Pendleton, Phillip; Schumann, Russell; Wong, Shiaw Hui

    2001-08-01

    We use a selection of wood-based and coconut-based activated carbons to investigate the factors controlling the removal of the hepatotoxin microcystin-LR (m-LR) from aqueous solutions. The wood carbons contain both micropores and mesopores. The coconut carbons contain micropores only. Confirming previously published observations, we also find that the wood-based carbons adsorb more microcystin than the coconut-based carbons. From a combination of a judicious modification of a wood-based carbon's surface chemistry and of the solution chemistry, we demonstrate that both surface and solution chemistry play minor roles in the adsorption process, with the adsorbent surface chemistry exhibiting less influence than the solution chemistry. Conformational changes at low solution pH probably contribute to the observed increase in adsorption by both classes of adsorbent. At the solution pH of 2.5, the coconut-based carbons exhibit a 400% increased affinity for m-LR compared with 100% increases for the wood-based carbons. In an analysis of the thermodynamics of adsorption, using multiple temperature adsorption chromatography methods, we indicate that m-LR adsorption is an entropy-driven process for each of the carbons, except the most hydrophilic and mesoporous carbon, B1. In this case, exothermic enthalpy contributions to adsorption also exist. From our overall observations, since m-LR contains molecular dimensions in the secondary micropore width range, we demonstrate that it is important to consider both the secondary micropore and the mesopore volumes for the adsorption of m-LR from aqueous solutions. Copyright 2001 Academic Press. PMID:11446779

  6. ADSORPTION CHARACTERISTICS OF L-HISTIDINE ON ACTIVE CARBON

    2005-01-01

    Adsorption properties of L-histidine on active carbon were studied in the paper, which are affected by the main parameters, such as the quantity percent of active carbon, pH value of the solution, the time of adsorption equilibrium and adsorption temperature. The results indicate that adsorption equilibrium time of L-his on active carbon is about 80 minutes. With the increasing of the quantity percent of active carbon, the adsorbance of L-his decreases sharply, and increases lighter after that. When the quantity percent of active carbon is 10%, the adsorbance reaches the minimum.pH value of solution and extraction temperature have great affection on the adsorption. When the pH value is higher or lower than the pI of L-his, the adsorbance is small, even zero. It is proven that the experimental equilibrium data which are obtained under the conditions of 80 ℃and pH=1.0, are fitted with the Freundlich equation: q=2.5914c0.8097. The results can provide certain references in L-his adsorption process of industrial operation.

  7. Magnetic resonance and optical study of carbonized silica obtained bypyrolysis of surface compounds

    Savchenko, Dariia; Kalabukhova, E.; Sitnikov, A.; Vasin, A.V.; Starik, S.; Gontar, O.; Rudko, G.; Nazarov, A.N.; Lysenko, V.S.; Tertykh, V.

    Zurich: Trans Tech Publications, 2014 - (Nazarov, A.; Lysenko, V.; Flandre, D.), s. 99-104. (Advanced Materials Research. 854). ISBN 9783037859421. ISSN 1022-6680. [International Workshop on Functional Nanomaterials and Devices /7./. Kyiv (UA), 08.04.2013-11.04.2013] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011029 Grant ostatní: SAFMAT(XE) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/22132 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : carbonized silica nanopowders * annealing * EPR * carbon radicals * PL * IR absorption Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  8. Chemical composition and bioactivity of Citrus medica L. cv. Diamante essential oil obtained by hydrodistillation, cold-pressing and supercritical carbon dioxide extraction.

    Menichini, Federica; Tundis, Rosa; Bonesi, Marco; de Cindio, Bruno; Loizzo, Monica R; Conforti, Filomena; Statti, Giancarlo A; Menabeni, Roberta; Bettini, Ruggero; Menichini, Francesco

    2011-04-01

    The chemical composition of the essential oil of Citrus medica L. cv. Diamante peel obtained by hydrodistillation, cold-pressing and supercritical carbon dioxide extraction techniques was determined by GC/MS analysis. Forty-six components were fully characterised. Limonene and γ-terpinene were the major components of the oils obtained by hydrodistillation (HD) and cold-pressing (CP), while citropten was the major constituent in the oil obtained by supercritical carbon dioxide extraction (SFE). Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) inhibitory activities were evaluated. The essential oil obtained by hydrodistillation exerted the highest inhibitory activity against BChE (IC₅₀ value of 154.6 µg mL⁻¹) and AChE (IC₅₀ value of 171.3 µg mL⁻¹. Interestingly, the oil obtained by cold-pressing exhibited a selective inhibitory activity against AChE. The essential oils have also been evaluated for the inhibition of NO production in LPS induced RAW 264.7 macrophages. The oil obtained by hydrodistillation exerted a significant inhibition of NO production with an IC₅₀ value of 17 µg mL⁻¹ (IC₅₀ of positive control 53 µg mL⁻¹). PMID:21337254

  9. Studies on adsorptive desulfurization by activated carbon

    Rakesh Kumar, D.; Srivastava, Vimal Chandra [Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee, Uttarakhand (India)

    2012-05-15

    Sulfur removal using adsorption requires a proper process parametric study to determine its optimal performance characteristics. In this study, response surface methodology was employed for sulfur removal from model oil (dibenzothiophene; DBT dissolved in iso-octane) using commercial activated carbon (CAC) as an adsorbent. Experiments were carried out as per central composite design with four input parameters such as initial concentration (C{sub 0}: 100-900 mg/L), adsorbent dosage (m: 2-22 g/L), time of adsorption (t: 15-735 min), and temperature (T: 10-50 C). Regression analysis showed good fit of the experimental data to the second-order polynomial model with coefficient of determination R{sup 2}-value of 0.9390 and Fisher F-value of 16.5. The highest removal of sulfur by CAC was obtained with m = 20 g/L, t = 6 h, and T = 30 C. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  10. Role of nitrogen in pore development in activated carbon prepared by potassium carbonate activation of lignin

    Tsubouchi, Naoto; Nishio, Megumi; Mochizuki, Yuuki

    2016-05-01

    The present work focuses on the role of nitrogen in the development of pores in activated carbon produced from lignin by K2CO3 activation, employing a fixed bed reactor under a high-purity He stream at temperatures of 500-900 °C. The specific surface area and pore volume obtained by activation of lignin alone are 230 m2/g and 0.13 cm3/g at 800 °C, and 540 m2/g and 0.31 cm3/g at 900 °C, respectively. Activation of a mixture of lignin and urea provides a significant increase in the surface area and volume, respectively reaching 3300-3400 m2/g and 2.0-2.3 cm3/g after holding at 800-900 °C for 1 h. Heating a lignin/urea/K2CO3 mixture leads to a significant decrease in the yield of released N-containing gases compared to the results for urea alone and a lignin/urea mixture, and most of the nitrogen in the urea is retained in the solid phase. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analyses clearly show that part of the remaining nitrogen is present in heterocyclic structures (for example, pyridinic and pyrrolic nitrogen), and the rest is contained as KOCN at ≤600 °C and as KCN at ≥700 °C, such that the latter two compounds can be almost completely removed by water washing. The fate of nitrogen during heating of lignin/urea/K2CO3 and role of nitrogen in pore development in activated carbon are discussed on the basis of the results mentioned above.

  11. Charge division using carbon filaments for obtaining coordinate information from detection of single electrons

    Bird, F.; Shapiro, S.; Ashford, V.; McShurley, D.; Reif, R.; Lirth, D.W.G.S.; Williams, S.

    1985-09-01

    Seven micron diameter Carbon filaments forming the anode of a multiwire proportional chamber have been used to detect single electrons. Charge division techniques applied to the 5 cm long wire resulted in a position resolution of sigma/L < 2% for a collected signal charge of 30 fC.

  12. Certain properties of thin-film niobium carbide coatings on carbon steels obtained in molten salts

    Niobium carbide coatings have been deposited by means of a currentless transfer of electronegative niobium metal to a more electropositive substratum made of carbon steel in molten salts containing niobium compounds. Corrosion resistance of niobium carbide coated products is studied, wear resistance and tribological characteristics of the coatings are determined

  13. Sheet-like carbon particles with graphene structures obtained from a Bunsen flame

    Ossler, Frederik; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal; Canton, Sophie E.;

    2010-01-01

    Carbon particle structures containing only a few graphene layers have been collected from a Bunsen (propane) diffusion flame in the low particle concentration pale yellow luminous regions close to the soot inception. These particles were sampled directly on transmission electron microscopy grids......-layered graphitic structures perpendicular to the graphene planes....

  14. Activated carbon monoliths for methane storage

    Chada, Nagaraju; Romanos, Jimmy; Hilton, Ramsey; Suppes, Galen; Burress, Jacob; Pfeifer, Peter

    2012-02-01

    The use of adsorbent storage media for natural gas (methane) vehicles allows for the use of non-cylindrical tanks due to the decreased pressure at which the natural gas is stored. The use of carbon powder as a storage material allows for a high mass of methane stored for mass of sample, but at the cost of the tank volume. Densified carbon monoliths, however, allow for the mass of methane for volume of tank to be optimized. In this work, different activated carbon monoliths have been produced using a polymeric binder, with various synthesis parameters. The methane storage was studied using a home-built, dosing-type instrument. A monolith with optimal parameters has been fabricated. The gravimetric excess adsorption for the optimized monolith was found to be 161 g methane for kg carbon.

  15. Carbon/Clay nanostructured composite obtained by hydrothermal method; Compositos nanoestruturados carbono/argila obtidos por metodo hidotermico

    Barin, G.B.; Bispo, T.S.; Gimenez, I.F.; Barreto, L.S., E-mail: gabriela.borin@gmail.co [Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFS), Aracaju, SE (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencia e Engenharia de Materiais; Souza Filho, A.G. [Universidade Federal do Ceara (UFC), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica

    2010-07-01

    The development of strategies for converting biomass into useful materials, more efficient energy carrier and / or hydrogen storage is shown a key issue for the present and future. Carbon nanostructure can be obtained by severe processing techniques such as arc discharge, chemical deposition and catalyzed pyrolysis of organic compounds. In this study we used hydrothermal methods for obtaining nanostructured composites of carbon / clay. To this end, we used coir dust and special clays. The samples were characterized by infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and Raman. The presence of the D band at 1350 cm{sup -1} in the Raman spectrum shows the formation of amorphous carbon with particle size of about 8.85 nm. (author)

  16. Preparation of activated carbons from olive-tree wood revisited. II. Physical activation with air

    Ould-Idriss, A.; Cuerda-Correa, E.M.; Fernandez-Gonzalez, C.; Alexandre-Franco, M.F.; Gomez-Serrano, V. [Extremadura Univ., Badajoz (Spain). Dept. of Organic and Inorganic Chemistry; Stitou, M. [Univ. Abdelmalek Esaadi, Tetouan (Morocco). Dept. de Chimie; Macias-Garcia, A. [Extremadura Univ., Badajoz (Spain). Dept. of Mechanical, Energetic and Materials Engineering

    2011-02-15

    Olive-tree has been grown in the Mediterranean countries for centuries. For an adequate development of the tree it must be subjected to different treatments such as trimming, large amounts of a woody residue being produced. Such a residue has been traditionally used as a domestic fuel or simply burnt in the landfield. In both cases greenhouse gases are generated to a large extent. Thus, the preparation of activated carbons from olive-tree wood appears as an attractive alternative to valorize this by-product. Commonly, two activation strategies are used with such an aim, namely chemical and physical activation. In this study, the optimization of the physical activation method with air for the production of activated carbon has been analyzed. The results obtained clearly show that if the preparation conditions are adequately controlled, it is possible to prepare activated carbons showing tailored properties in terms of micro- or mesoporous texture and surface area. (author)

  17. Breakthrough CO₂ adsorption in bio-based activated carbons.

    Shahkarami, Sepideh; Azargohar, Ramin; Dalai, Ajay K; Soltan, Jafar

    2015-08-01

    In this work, the effects of different methods of activation on CO2 adsorption performance of activated carbon were studied. Activated carbons were prepared from biochar, obtained from fast pyrolysis of white wood, using three different activation methods of steam activation, CO2 activation and Potassium hydroxide (KOH) activation. CO2 adsorption behavior of the produced activated carbons was studied in a fixed-bed reactor set-up at atmospheric pressure, temperature range of 25-65°C and inlet CO2 concentration range of 10-30 mol% in He to determine the effects of the surface area, porosity and surface chemistry on adsorption capacity of the samples. Characterization of the micropore and mesopore texture was carried out using N2 and CO2 adsorption at 77 and 273 K, respectively. Central composite design was used to evaluate the combined effects of temperature and concentration of CO2 on the adsorption behavior of the adsorbents. The KOH activated carbon with a total micropore volume of 0.62 cm(3)/g and surface area of 1400 m(2)/g had the highest CO2 adsorption capacity of 1.8 mol/kg due to its microporous structure and high surface area under the optimized experimental conditions of 30 mol% CO2 and 25°C. The performance of the adsorbents in multi-cyclic adsorption process was also assessed and the adsorption capacity of KOH and CO2 activated carbons remained remarkably stable after 50 cycles with low temperature (160°C) regeneration. PMID:26257348

  18. Antioxidant and antifungal activities of Camellia sinensis (L.) Kuntze leaves obtained by different forms of production.

    Camargo, L E A; Pedroso, L S; Vendrame, S C; Mainardes, R M; Khalil, N M

    2016-06-01

    The antioxidant and anticandidal activities of leaves obtained from Camellia sinensis by non-fermentation (green and white teas), semi-fermentation (red tea) and fermentation method (black tea) were investigated. It was evaluated the total phenolic content by Folin-Ciocalteau assay; antioxidant capacities were evaluated in vitro using DPPH and ABTS radicals, hypochlorous acid and superoxide anion scavenger assays, induced hemolysis, lipid peroxidation by conjugated diene formation and myeloperoxidase activity. Anticandidal activity was performed on three strains of Candida spp. The results showed that non-fermented teas have a higher concentration of phenolic compounds, and then presented the best inhibitory activity of AAPH-induced hemolysis, the best inhibition of conjugated diene formation and more pronounced antioxidant activity in all tests. The highest anticandidal activity was obtained from fermented tea, followed by non-fermented tea. These results indicate that the antioxidant activity demonstrated has no direct relation with the anticandidal activity. PMID:26983085

  19. Characterization of biochars and dissolved organic matter phases obtained upon hydrothermal carbonization of Elodea nuttallii.

    Poerschmann, J; Weiner, B; Wedwitschka, H; Zehnsdorf, A; Koehler, R; Kopinke, F-D

    2015-01-01

    The invasive aquatic plant Elodea nuttallii was subjected to hydrothermal carbonization at 200 °C and 240 °C to produce biochar. About 58% w/w of the organic carbon of the pristine plant was translocated into the solid biochar irrespectively of the operating temperature. The process water rich in dissolved organic matter proved a good substrate for biogas production. The E. nuttallii plants showed a high capability of incorporating metals into the biomass. This large inorganic fraction which was mainly transferred into the biochar (except sodium and potassium) may hamper the prospective application of biochar as soil amendment. The high ash content in biochar (∼ 40% w/w) along with its relatively low content of organic carbon (∼ 36% w/w) is associated with low higher heating values. Fatty acids were completely hydrolyzed from lipids due to hydrothermal treatment. Low molecular-weight carboxylic acids (acetic and lactic acid), phenols and phenolic acids turned out major organic breakdown products. PMID:25879182

  20. USING POWDERED ACTIVATED CARBON: A CRITICAL REVIEW

    Because the performance of powdered activated carbon (PAC) for uses other than taste and odor control is poorly documented, the purpose of this article is to critically review uses that have been reported (i.e., pesticides and herbicides, synthetic organic chemicals, and trihalom...

  1. MODELING MERCURY CONTROL WITH POWDERED ACTIVATED CARBON

    The paper presents a mathematical model of total mercury removed from the flue gas at coal-fired plants equipped with powdered activated carbon (PAC) injection for Mercury control. The developed algorithms account for mercury removal by both existing equipment and an added PAC in...

  2. Evaluation of activated carbon processes for removing trihalomethane precursors from a surface water impoundment

    Lavinder, Steven Robert

    1987-01-01

    A pilot plant study was conducted in Newport News, Virginia to investigate the effectiveness of powdered activated carbon [PAC] and granular activated carbon [GAC], with and without preoxidation, for reducing trihalomethane [THM] precursor concentrations in Harwood's Mill Reservoir water. Preoxidation with ozone followed by GAC is referred to as the "biological activated carbonâ [BAC] process. This study showed that the GAC and BAC processes obtained the same level of organic...

  3. Kinetic and Equilibrium Studies for the Removal of Bromate by the Modified Activated Carbon

    Muqing Qiu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Bromate which was formed bromide dissolved in water during the ozonation process, is carcinogenic and mutagenic to humans. To avoid bromate damage, many countries strictly control its concentration in drinking water. Activated carbon is an effective adsorbent material widely used in water treatment. In order to enhance the adsorption of bromate ion on activated carbon, the modified activated carbon was obtained from granular activated carbon by chemical activation using cationic surfactant as an activator. The adsorption characteristics of bromate ion on the modified activated carbon were investigated through adsorption experiments. The effects of temperature, pH in solution, contact time and initial bromate concentration on bromate adsorption by the modified activated carbon were investigated. The experimental data were analyzed by the Langmuir and Freundlich models of adsorption. Kinetic adsorption data were analyzed by the pseudo-first-order kinetic model and the pseudo-second-order model, respectively.

  4. Surface heterogeneity effects of activated carbons on the kinetics of paracetamol removal from aqueous solution

    Ruiz, B.; Cabrita, I.; Mestre, A. S.; Parra, J. B.; Pires, J.; Carvalho, A. P.; Ania, C. O.

    2010-06-01

    The removal of a compound with therapeutic activity (paracetamol) from aqueous solutions using chemically modified activated carbons has been investigated. The chemical nature of the activated carbon material was modified by wet oxidation, so as to study the effect of the carbon surface chemistry and composition on the removal of paracetamol. The surface heterogeneity of the carbon created upon oxidation was found to be a determinant in the adsorption capability of the modified adsorbents, as well as in the rate of paracetamol removal. The experimental kinetic data were fitted to the pseudo-second order and intraparticle diffusion models. The parameters obtained were linked to the textural and chemical features of the activated carbons. After oxidation the wettability of the carbon is enhanced, which favors the transfer of paracetamol molecules to the carbon pores (smaller boundary layer thickness). At the same time the overall adsorption rate and removal efficiency are reduced in the oxidized carbon due to the competitive effect of water molecules.

  5. Device for determining carbon activity through pressure

    A hollow iron capsule of annular shape having an interior layer of Fe0.947O and a near absolute internal vacuum is submersed within a molten metal with the inner chamber of the capsule connected to a pressure sensor. Carbon present in the molten metal diffuses through the capsule wall and reacts with the Fe0.947O layer to generate a CO2--CO gas mixture within the internal chamber. The total absolute pressure of the gas measured by the pressure sensor is directly proportional to the carbon activity of the molten metal

  6. Removal of Heavy Metal Ions with Acid Activated Carbons Derived from Oil Palm and Coconut Shells

    Mokhlesur M. Rahman

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this work, batch adsorption experiments were carried out to investigate the suitability of prepared acid activated carbons in removing heavy metal ions such as nickel(II, lead(II and chromium(VI. Acid activated carbons were obtained from oil palm and coconut shells using phosphoric acid under similar activation process while the differences lie either in impregnation condition or in both pretreatment and impregnation conditions. Prepared activated carbons were modified by dispersing hydrated iron oxide. The adsorption equilibrium data for nickel(II and lead(II were obtained from adsorption by the prepared and commercial activated carbons. Langmuir and Freundlich models fit the data well. Prepared activated carbons showed higher adsorption capacity for nickel(II and lead(II. The removal of chromium(VI was studied by the prepared acid activated, modified and commercial activated carbons at different pH. The isotherms studies reveal that the prepared activated carbon performs better in low concentration region while the commercial ones in the high concentration region. Thus, a complete adsorption is expected in low concentration by the prepared activated carbon. The kinetics data for Ni(II, Pb(II and Cr(VI by the best selected activated carbon fitted very well to the pseudo-second-order kinetic model.

  7. Supercapacitor Electrodes from Activated Carbon Monoliths and Carbon Nanotubes

    Dolah, B. N. M.; Othman, M. A. R.; Deraman, M.; Basri, N. H.; Farma, R.; Talib, I. A.; Ishak, M. M.

    2013-04-01

    Binderless monoliths of supercapacitor electrodes were prepared by the carbonization (N2) and activation (CO2) of green monoliths (GMs). GMs were made from mixtures of self-adhesive carbon grains (SACG) of fibers from oil palm empty fruit bunches and a combination of 5 & 6% KOH and 0, 5 & 6% carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by weight. The electrodes from GMs containing CNTs were found to have lower specific BET surface area (SBET). The electrochemical behavior of the supercapacitor fabricated using the prepared electrodes were investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and galvanostatic charge-discharge (GCD). In general an addition of CNTs into the GMs reduces the equivalent series resistance (ESR) value of the cells. A cell fabricated using electrodes from GM with 5% CNT and 5% KOH was found to have the largest reduction of ESR value than that from the others GMs containing CNT. The cell has steeper Warburg's slope than that from its respective non-CNT GM, which reflect the smaller resistance for electrolyte ions to move into pores of electrodes despite these electrodes having largest reduction in specific BET surface area. The cell also has the smallest reduction of specific capacitance (Csp) and maintains the specific power range despite a reduction in the specific energy range due to the CNT addition.

  8. Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis): a study of the composition, antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of extracts obtained with supercritical carbon dioxide Alecrim (Rosmarinus officinalis): estudo da composição, atividade antioxidante e antimicrobiana dos extratos obtidos com dióxido de carbono supercrítico

    Aziza Kamal Genena; Haiko Hense; Artur Smânia Junior; Simone Machado de Souza

    2008-01-01

    Rosemary leaf extracts were obtained by supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) and Soxhlet extraction. Their chemical compositions were evaluated by GC-MS. The extracts were analyzed for compounds reported in the literature as showing antimicrobial and antioxidant activities. The rosemary extracts were tested with regard to antioxidant (DPPH radical scavenging and total phenolic content - Folin-Denis reagent), antibacterial (Gram-positive bacteria - Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923 and Bacillus...

  9. The Structure and Content Peculiarities of Carbon Material Obtained under the Polyacrylonitrile Infra-red Heating

    L.V. Kozhitov; N.Ch. V’et; V.V. Kozlov; S.G. Emelyanov

    2013-01-01

    It is first determined by the semiempirical quantum chemical model MNDO for a carbon material (CM) structure based on polyacrylonitrile (PAN) heat-treated that the increase of a content N from 14 to 18 atoms in CM monolayers C46N14H10, C44N16H12, and C42N18H14 and a content H from 12 to 22 atoms in CM monolayers C44N16H12 and C44N16H22 leads to the decrease of the binding energy (EB) from 7.40; 7.12 to 6.88 and 6.25 eV, respectively; and to the increase of the differences between the maximum ...

  10. Modified Separator Using Thin Carbon Layer Obtained from Its Cathode for Advanced Lithium Sulfur Batteries.

    Liu, Naiqiang; Huang, Bicheng; Wang, Weikun; Shao, Hongyuan; Li, Chengming; Zhang, Hao; Wang, Anbang; Yuan, Keguo; Huang, Yaqin

    2016-06-29

    The realization of a practical lithium sulfur battery system, despite its high theoretical specific capacity, is severely limited by fast capacity decay, which is mainly attributed to polysulfide dissolution and shuttle effect. To address this issue, we designed a thin cathode inactive material interlayer modified separator to block polysulfides. There are two advantages for this strategy. First, the coating material totally comes from the cathode, thus avoids the additional weights involved. Second, the cathode inactive material modified separator improve the reversible capacity and cycle performance by combining gelatin to chemically bond polysulfides and the carbon layer to physically block polysulfides. The research results confirm that with the cathode inactive material modified separator, the batteries retain a reversible capacity of 644 mAh g(-1) after 150 cycles, showing a low capacity decay of about 0.11% per circle at the rate of 0.5C. PMID:27267483

  11. Microbial activity in granular activated carbon filters in drinking water treatment

    Knezev, A.

    2015-01-01

    The investigations described are carried out to analyse the microbiological processes in relation to the GAC characteristics and the removal of natural organic matter (NOM) in Granular Activated Carbon filters (GACFs) in water treatment. The main goal of the study was to obtain a qualitative descrip

  12. Results obtained with position sensitive multiwire proportional chambers with helium, carbon, and oxygen nuclei

    Emming, J. G.; Gilland, J. R.; Godden, G. D.; Smith, L. H.; Zardiackas, F.

    1974-01-01

    Spatial resolution performance results obtained at the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory Bevatron with prototype multiwire proportional chamber spatial detectors with integral delay line readout are presented. The effects due to incident nuclei charge, chamber operating parameters, chamber design, electronics, gas mixtures, and magnetic field presence have been investigated and are discussed.

  13. Voltammetric Response of Epinephrine at Carbon Nanotube Modified Glassy Carbon Electrode and Activated Glassy Carbon Electrode

    WANG Juan; TANG Ping; ZHAO Fa-qiong; ZENG Bai-zhao

    2005-01-01

    The electrochemical behavior of epinephrine at activated glassy carbon electrode and carbon nanotube-coated glassy carbon electrode was studied. Epinephrine could exhibit an anodic peak at about 0.2 V (vs. SCE) at bare glassy carbon electrode, but it was very small.However, when the electrode was activated at certain potential (i. e. 1.9V) or modified with carbon nanotube, the peak became more sensitive,resulting from the increase in electrode area in addition to the electrostatic attraction. Under the selected conditions, the anodic peak current was linear to epinephrine concentration in the range of 3.3 × 10-7-1.1 × 10-5mol/L at activated glassy carbon electrode and in the range of 1.0 × 10-6-5.0 × 10-5 mol/L at carbon nanotube-coated electrode. The correlation coefficients were 0. 998 and 0. 997, respectively. The determination limit was 1.0 × 10-7 mol/L. The two electrodes have been successfully applied for the determination of epinephrine in adrenaline hydrochloride injection with recovery of 95%-104%.

  14. Development of a technology for obtaining flotation reagent oxane-3 for carbon mineral raw materials of Kazakhstan

    Sergey Kalugin; Zhuldyz Shildebaeva; Madina Mametzhanova; Nazym Yelibaeva; Sergey Efremov; Sergey Nechipurenko; Dana Omarova

    2014-01-01

    The paper represents the results of development of a technology for obtaining oxane-3 and its application for enrichment of carbon mineral raw materials. Studies on enrichment of a shungite rock showed that the increase of a pulp temperature to 30°C significantly improves the characteristics and rate of the flotation process. Measured indicators of a shungite rock enrichment using Flotol B were lower in comparison with an enrichment by oxane-3. For schungite mineral, it was established that t...

  15. High-performance multi-functional reverse osmosis membranes obtained by carbon nanotube·polyamide nanocomposite

    Shigeki Inukai; Rodolfo Cruz-Silva; Josue Ortiz-Medina; Aaron Morelos-Gomez; Kenji Takeuchi; Takuya Hayashi; Akihiko Tanioka; Takumi Araki; Syogo Tejima; Toru Noguchi; Mauricio Terrones; Morinobu Endo

    2015-01-01

    Clean water obtained by desalinating sea water or by purifying wastewater, constitutes a major technological objective in the so-called water century. In this work, a high-performance reverse osmosis (RO) composite thin membrane using multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) and aromatic polyamide (PA), was successfully prepared by interfacial polymerization. The effect of MWCNT on the chlorine resistance, antifouling and desalination performances of the nanocomposite membranes were studied. We ...

  16. Development of a technology for obtaining flotation reagent oxane-3 for carbon mineral raw materials of Kazakhstan

    Sergey Kalugin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper represents the results of development of a technology for obtaining oxane-3 and its application for enrichment of carbon mineral raw materials. Studies on enrichment of a shungite rock showed that the increase of a pulp temperature to 30°C significantly improves the characteristics and rate of the flotation process. Measured indicators of a shungite rock enrichment using Flotol B were lower in comparison with an enrichment by oxane-3. For schungite mineral, it was established that the obtained heterocyclic compound can replace existing industrial flotation reagents in enrichment processes.

  17. Enhanced capacitive properties of commercial activated carbon by re-activation in molten carbonates

    Lu, Beihu; Xiao, Zuoan; Zhu, Hua; Xiao, Wei; Wu, Wenlong; Wang, Dihua

    2015-12-01

    Simple, affordable and green methods to improve capacitive properties of commercial activated carbon (AC) are intriguing since ACs possess a predominant role in the commercial supercapacitor market. Herein, we report a green reactivation of commercial ACs by soaking ACs in molten Na2CO3-K2CO3 (equal in mass ratios) at 850 °C combining the merits of both physical and chemical activation strategies. The mechanism of molten carbonate treatment and structure-capacitive activity correlations of the ACs are rationalized. Characterizations show that the molten carbonate treatment increases the electrical conductivity of AC without compromising its porosity and wettability of electrolytes. Electrochemical tests show the treated AC exhibited higher specific capacitance, enhanced high-rate capability and excellent cycle performance, promising its practical application in supercapacitors. The present study confirms that the molten carbonate reactivation is a green and effective method to enhance capacitive properties of ACs.

  18. Activated carbons from African oil palm waste shells and fibre for hydrogen storage

    Liliana Giraldo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We prepared a series of activated carbons by chemical activation with two strong bases in-group that few use, and I with waste from shell and fibers and oil-palm African. Activated carbons are obtained with relatively high surface areas (1605 m2/g. We study the textural and chemical properties and its effect on hydrogen storage. The activated carbons obtained from fibrous wastes exhibit a high hydrogen storage capacity of 6.0 wt % at 77 K and 12 bar.

  19. Production of activated carbon from microalgae

    Hernández Férez, María del Remedio; Valdés Barceló, Francisco Javier; García Cortés, Ángela Nuria; Marcilla Gomis, Antonio; Chápuli Fernández, Eloy

    2008-01-01

    Presentado como póster en el 11th Mediterranean Congress of Chemical Engineering, Barcelona 2008. Resumen publicado en el libro de actas del congreso. Activated carbon is an important filter material for the removal of different compounds such as hazardous components in exhaust gases, for purification of drinking water, waste water treatment, adsorption of pollution from liquid phases, in catalysis, electrochemistry or for gas storage and present an important demand. Theoretically, activat...

  20. ACTIVATED CARBON IN WATER TREATMENT FOR DRINKS

    Олійник, С. І.; Прибильский, В. Л.; Куц, A. М.; Ковальчук, В. П.; Коваленко, O. О.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of scientific research, the results of which are given in the article, is the improvement of the technology of water conditioning by sorption purification of water for the production of beverages, including alcoholic beverages. The subject of research was drinking water, prepared water, activated carbon such grades Silcarbon K1810, Silcarbon K835, Silcarbon K814 compared to Silcarbon K3060. During the research we are used the conventional methods of analysis in liqueur and vodka p...

  1. Interactions of xanthines with activated carbon

    Navarrete Casas, R. [Inorganic Chemistry Department, Granada University (Ugr), E-18071 Granada (Spain)]. E-mail: rncasas@ugr.es; Garcia Rodriguez, A. [Inorganic Chemistry Department, Granada University (Ugr), E-18071 Granada (Spain); Rey Bueno, F. [Inorganic Chemistry Department, Granada University (Ugr), E-18071 Granada (Spain); Espinola Lara, A. [Inorganic Chemistry Department, Granada University (Ugr), E-18071 Granada (Spain); Valenzuela Calahorro, C. [Inorganic Chemistry Department, Granada University (Ugr), E-18071 Granada (Spain); Navarrete Guijosa, A. [Inorganic Chemistry Department, Granada University (Ugr), E-18071 Granada (Spain)

    2006-06-30

    Because of their pharmaceutical and industrial applications, we have studied the adsorption of xanthine derivates (caffeine and theophylline) by activated carbon. To this end, we examined kinetic, equilibrium and thermodynamic aspects of the process. This paper reports the kinetics results. The experimental results indicate that the process was first order in C and the overall process was assumed to involve a single, reversible adsorption-desorption process obeying a kinetic law postulated by us.

  2. Nomex-derived activated carbon fibers as electrode materials in carbon based supercapacitors

    Leitner, K.; Lerf, A.; Winter, M.; Besenhard, J. O.; Villar-Rodil, S.; Suárez-García, F.; Martínez-Alonso, A.; Tascón, J. M. D.

    Electrochemical characterization has been carried out for electrodes prepared of several activated carbon fiber samples derived from poly (m-phenylene isophthalamide) (Nomex) in an aqueous solution. Depending on the burn-off due to activation the BET surface area of the carbons was in the order of 1300-2800 m 2 g -1, providing an extensive network of micropores. Their capability as active material for supercapacitors was evaluated by using cyclic voltammetry and impedance spectroscopy. Values for the capacitance of 175 F g -1 in sulfuric acid were obtained. Further on, it was observed that the specific capacitance and the performance of the electrode increase significantly with increasing burn-off degree. We believe that this fact can be attributed to the increase of surface area and porosity with increasing burn-off.

  3. Hierarchically porous carbon membranes containing designed nanochannel architectures obtained by pyrolysis of ion-track etched polyimide

    Muench, Falk, E-mail: muench@ca.tu-darmstadt.de [Department of Material- and Geoscience, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Alarich-Weiss-Straße 2, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Seidl, Tim; Rauber, Markus [Department of Material- and Geoscience, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Alarich-Weiss-Straße 2, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Material Research Department, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstraße 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Peter, Benedikt; Brötz, Joachim [Department of Material- and Geoscience, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Alarich-Weiss-Straße 2, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Krause, Markus; Trautmann, Christina [Department of Material- and Geoscience, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Alarich-Weiss-Straße 2, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Material Research Department, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstraße 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Roth, Christina [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Freie Universität Berlin, Takustraße 3, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Katusic, Stipan [Evonik Industries AG, Rodenbacher Chaussee 4, 63457 Hanau (Germany); Ensinger, Wolfgang [Department of Material- and Geoscience, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Alarich-Weiss-Straße 2, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2014-12-15

    Well-defined, porous carbon monoliths are highly promising materials for electrochemical applications, separation, purification and catalysis. In this work, we present an approach allowing to transfer the remarkable degree of synthetic control given by the ion-track etching technology to the fabrication of carbon membranes with porosity structured on multiple length scales. The carbonization and pore formation processes were examined with Raman, Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements, while model experiments demonstrated the viability of the carbon membranes as catalyst support and pollutant adsorbent. Using ion-track etching, specifically designed, continuous channel-shaped pores were introduced into polyimide foils with precise control over channel diameter, orientation, density and interconnection. At a pyrolysis temperature of 950 °C, the artificially created channels shrunk in size, but their shape was preserved, while the polymer was transformed to microporous, amorphous carbon. Channel diameters ranging from ∼10 to several 100 nm could be achieved. The channels also gave access to previously closed micropore volume. Substantial surface increase was realized, as it was shown by introducing a network consisting of 1.4 × 10{sup 10} channels per cm{sup 2} of 30 nm diameter, which more than tripled the mass-normalized surface of the pyrolytic carbon from 205 m{sup 2} g{sup −1} to 732 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}. At a pyrolysis temperature of 3000 °C, membranes consisting of highly ordered graphite were obtained. In this case, the channel shape was severely altered, resulting in a pronounced conical geometry in which the channel diameter quickly decreased with increasing distance to the membrane surface. - Highlights: • Pyrolysis of ion-track etched polyimide yields porous carbon membranes. • Hierarchic porosity: continuous nanochannels embedded in a microporous carbon matrix.

  4. Hierarchically porous carbon membranes containing designed nanochannel architectures obtained by pyrolysis of ion-track etched polyimide

    Well-defined, porous carbon monoliths are highly promising materials for electrochemical applications, separation, purification and catalysis. In this work, we present an approach allowing to transfer the remarkable degree of synthetic control given by the ion-track etching technology to the fabrication of carbon membranes with porosity structured on multiple length scales. The carbonization and pore formation processes were examined with Raman, Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements, while model experiments demonstrated the viability of the carbon membranes as catalyst support and pollutant adsorbent. Using ion-track etching, specifically designed, continuous channel-shaped pores were introduced into polyimide foils with precise control over channel diameter, orientation, density and interconnection. At a pyrolysis temperature of 950 °C, the artificially created channels shrunk in size, but their shape was preserved, while the polymer was transformed to microporous, amorphous carbon. Channel diameters ranging from ∼10 to several 100 nm could be achieved. The channels also gave access to previously closed micropore volume. Substantial surface increase was realized, as it was shown by introducing a network consisting of 1.4 × 1010 channels per cm2 of 30 nm diameter, which more than tripled the mass-normalized surface of the pyrolytic carbon from 205 m2 g−1 to 732 m2 g−1. At a pyrolysis temperature of 3000 °C, membranes consisting of highly ordered graphite were obtained. In this case, the channel shape was severely altered, resulting in a pronounced conical geometry in which the channel diameter quickly decreased with increasing distance to the membrane surface. - Highlights: • Pyrolysis of ion-track etched polyimide yields porous carbon membranes. • Hierarchic porosity: continuous nanochannels embedded in a microporous carbon matrix. • Freely adjustable meso- or

  5. The Structure and Content Peculiarities of Carbon Material Obtained under the Polyacrylonitrile Infra-red Heating

    L.V. Kozhitov

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available It is first determined by the semiempirical quantum chemical model MNDO for a carbon material (CM structure based on polyacrylonitrile (PAN heat-treated that the increase of a content N from 14 to 18 atoms in CM monolayers C46N14H10, C44N16H12, and C42N18H14 and a content H from 12 to 22 atoms in CM monolayers C44N16H12 and C44N16H22 leads to the decrease of the binding energy (EB from 7.40; 7.12 to 6.88 and 6.25 eV, respectively; and to the increase of the differences between the maximum and minimum bond lengths (∆l, between the maximum and minimum valence angles (∆Θ, and between the maximum and minimum local charges (∆q from 0.176 Å; 12.0°, and 0.487 to 0.238 Å; 20.8°, and 0.613, respectively, and promotes the CM structure curvature. Quantum chemical simulation results are confirmed by the element analysis of CM samples and a nanocomposite FeNi3 / C. As the IR heating temperature is increased from 30 to 500 °С, concenrations N (СN and H (СH in the CM and nanocomposite FeNi3 / C are decreased from 27 to 18 and 10 wt % and from 6 to 1 and 0.5 wt %, respectively.

  6. Antioxidant and antimicrobial activity of lecithin free egg yolk protein preparation hydrolysates obtained with digestive enzymes

    Aleksandra Zambrowicz

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT:Several biological activities have now been associated with egg protein- derived peptides, including antihypertensive, antimicrobial, immunomodulatory, anticancer and antioxidantactivities, highlighting the importance of these biopeptides in human health, and disease prevention and treatment. Special attention has been given to peptides with antioxidant and antimicrobial activities as a new source of natural preservatives in food industry. In this study, the antioxidant properties of the egg-yolk protein by-product (YP hydrolysates were evaluated based on their radical scavenging capacity (DPPH, Fe2+chelating effect and ferric reducing power (FRAP. Furthermore, antimicrobial properties of obtained hydrolysates against Bacillus species were studied. The degrees (DHs of hydrolysis for 4h hydrolysates were: 19.1%, 13.5% and 13.0%, for pepsin, chymotrypsin and trypsin, respectively. Pepsin was the most effective in producing the free amino groups (1410.3 μmolGly/g. The RP-HPLC profiles of the protein hydrolysates showed differences in the hydrophobicity of the generated peptides.Trypsin hydrolysate obtained after 4h reaction demonstrated the strongest DPPH free radical scavenging activity (0.85 µmol Troloxeq/mg. Trypsin and chymotrypsin hydrolysates obtained after 4h reaction exhibited 4 times higher ferric reducing capacity than those treated bypepsin. The hydrolysis products obtained from YP exhibited significant chelating activity. The 4h trypsin hydrolysate exhibited weak antimicrobial activity against B. subtilis B3; B. cereus B512; B. cereus B 3p and B. laterosporum B6.

  7. Measurement of the activity coefficient of carbon in steels in liquid sodium

    In sodium cooled fast reactors carbon is both a carbon impurity and element of structural materials. Carbon transfert through liquid sodium can produce carburization or decarburization of structural materials. Carbon content in sodium is determined with thin foils of austenitic alloys, when equilibrium is reached thermodynamic activity of carbon in sodium is deduced from carbon activity in alloys. Studied alloys are FeMn 20%, FeNi 30%, Z2CN 18-10 and Z3CND17-13. Carbon activity of alloys in sodium was between 5.10-3 and 10-1 at 600 and 6500C. Calibration was obtained with the alloys FeNi 30% in gaseous mixtures He-CO-CO2 of known activity

  8. Comparison of various sources of high surface area carbon prepared by different types of activation

    Activated carbon has been known as an excellent adsorbent and is widely used due to its large adsorption capacity. Activation condition and types of activation influence the surface area and porosity of the activated carbon produced. In this study, palm kernel shells and commercially activated carbon were used. To convert palm kernel shells into coal, two methods were employed, namely chemical activation and physical activation. For chemical activation, two activating agents, zinc chloride and potassium carbonate, were used. The activated carbons were analyzed using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, single point BET and free emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). The commercial activated carbon was also characterized. FTIR results indicate that all the palm kernel shells were successfully converted to carbon. Single point BET surface area of all the carbons prepared were obtained. From FESEM micrograph, the chemically activated palm kernel shells shows well highly defined cavities and pores. This study also shows that palm kernel shells can be used to be a better source of high surface area carbon. (author)

  9. Mechanism of antiulcerogenic activity of semi-synthetic crotonin obtained from Croton cajucara Benth.

    Ana Beatriz A. de Almeida; Alexandre M. Miotto; Nunes, Domingos S.; Regina C. Spadari-Bratifisch; Alba R. M. Souza Brito

    2002-01-01

    The bark of Croton cajucara Benth. is used in Brazilian folk medicine to treat gastrointestinal disorders. Transdehydrocrotonin (DHC) isolated from the bark of Croton cajucara has antiulcerogenic activity25. The presence of similar activity in semi-synthetic crotonin obtained from dehydrocrotonin from Croton cajucara was observed in gastric ulcer-induced models (HCl/ethanol, ethanol, indomethacin, stress and pylorus ligature). The aim of the present study was to assess the mechanisms involved...

  10. Evaluation of antioxidant activity and phenolic compounds content in methanol extract obtained from leaves Commiphora Myrrha

    Celia Eliane de Lara da Silva; Rosilene Valota; Karimi Sater Gebara; Rogerio Cesar de Lara da Silva; Euclesio Simionatto

    2013-01-01

    This work presents shows the study of antioxidant activity and quantification of phenolic content determined for the methanol extract obtained from Commiphora myrrha. The high content of phenolic compounds were evaluated against the potential to sequester free radical through the model 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrizil hydrazyl (DPPH) and compared with a standard rutin. The results show that the inhibitory capacity of the extract (IC50) was 0.21 mg.L-1. The extract pursued an antioxidant activity of 91...

  11. Antimicrobial activity of Brazilian copaiba oils obtained from different species of the Copaifera genus

    Adriana Oliveira dos Santos; Tânia Ueda-Nakamura; Benedito Prado Dias Filho; Valdir F. Veiga Junior; Angelo C. Pinto; Celso Vataru Nakamura

    2008-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity of copaiba oils was tested against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, yeast, and dermatophytes. Oils obtained from Copaifera martii, Copaifera officinalis, and Copaifera reticulata (collected in the state of Acre) were active against Gram-positive species (Staphylococcus aureus, methicillin-resistant S. aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Bacillus subtilis, and Enterococcus faecalis) with minimum inhibitory concentrations ranging from 31.3-62.5 µg/ml. The oil...

  12. Optimization of activated carbon from sewage sludge using response surface methodology

    Wastewater sludge cake was used to prepare activated carbon using physical activation method. The effects of three preparation variables; the activation temperature, activation time and carbon dioxide gas flow rate on chemical oxygen demand (COD) and ammonia removal from leachate solutions were investigated. Based on the central composite design (CCD), two quadratic models were developed to correlate the preparation variables to the COD and ammonia removal. From the analysis of variance (ANOVA), the significant factors on each experimental design response were identified. The optimum activated carbon prepared from wastewater sludge cake was obtained by using activation temperature of 510 degree Celsius, activation time of 30 min and carbon dioxide flow rate of 500 ml/ min. The optimum activated carbon showed COD and ammonia removal of 26 and 13 %, respectively. (author)

  13. Composite supercapacitor electrodes made of activated carbon/PEDOT:PSS and activated carbon/doped PEDOT

    T S Sonia; P A Mini; R Nandhini; Kalluri Sujith; Balakrishnan Avinash; S V Nair; K R V Subramanian

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, we report on the high electrical storage capacity of composite electrodes made from nanoscale activated carbon combined with either poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) or PEDOT doped with multiple dopants such as ammonium persulfate (APS) and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). The composites were fabricated by electropolymerization of the conducting polymers (PEDOT:PSS, doped PEDOT) onto the nanoscale activated carbon backbone, wherein the nanoscale activated carbon was produced by ball-milling followed by chemical and thermal treatments. Activated carbon/PEDOT:PSS yielded capacitance values of 640 F g-1 and 26mF cm-2, while activated carbon/doped PEDOT yielded capacitances of 1183 F g-1 and 42 mF cm-2 at 10 mV s-1. This is more than five times the storage capacity previously reported for activated carbon–PEDOT composites. Further, use of multiple dopants in PEDOT improved the storage performance of the composite electrode well over that of PEDOT:PSS. The composite electrodes were characterized for their electrochemical behaviour, structural and morphological details and electronic conductivity and showed promise as high-performance energy storage systems.

  14. Less-costly activated carbon for sewage treatment

    Ingham, J. D.; Kalvinskas, J. J.; Mueller, W. A.

    1977-01-01

    Lignite-aided sewage treatment is based on absorption of dissolved pollutants by activated carbon. Settling sludge is removed and dried into cakes that are pyrolyzed with lignites to yield activated carbon. Lignite is less expensive than activated carbon previously used to supplement pyrolysis yield.

  15. In vitro antifungal activity of essential oils obtained from officinal plants against dermatophytes.

    Lima, E O; Gompertz, O F; Giesbrecht, A M; Paulo, M Q

    1993-01-01

    Thirteen essential oils were isolated from officinal plants and tested in vitro against dermatophyte strains isolated from patients with dermatophytosis. Of the tested oils, those obtained from Cinnamomum zeylanicum, Ocimum gratissimum, Cymbopogon citratus, Eugenia uniflora and Alpinia speciosa were found to be the most active, inhibiting 80% of the dermatophyte strains tested and producing inhibition zones more than 10 mm in diameter. PMID:8015567

  16. Active carbon production from modified asphalt

    A granular activated carbons (GACs) have been prepared from some local raw materials such as Qiayarah asphalt (QA) after some modification treatments of this asphalt by various ratios of its original constituents (asphaltenes and maltens) at 180 degree C. Thermal carbonization method by sulfur and steam physical activation have been used for AC preparation. The carbons thus prepared were characterized in the term of iodine, methylene blue (MB), P-nitro phenol (PNP) and CCl4 adsorption. The BET surface area of the prepared ACs has been estimated via a calibration curve between iodine numbers and surface area determined from N2 adsorption isotherm from previous studies, also, the surface area of the prepared ACs were determined through another methods such as retention method by ethylene glycol mono ethyl ether (EGME), adsorption from vapor phase using acetone vapor and adsorption from solution method using PNP and MB as solutes. The results referred to the success of modification method for preparing ACs of good micro porosity as compared with the AC from the untreated asphalt as well as the commercial sample. (author)

  17. Metal doped carbon nanoneedles and effect of carbon organization with activity for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER).

    Araujo, Rafael A; Rubira, Adley F; Asefa, Tewodros; Silva, Rafael

    2016-02-10

    Cellulose nanowhiskers (CNW) from cotton, was prepared by acid hydrolysis and purified using a size selection process to obtain homogeneous samples with average particle size of 270 nm and 85.5% crystallinity. Purified CNW was used as precursor to carbon nanoneedles (CNN) synthesis. The synthesis of CNN loaded with different metals dopants were carried out by a nanoreactor method and the obtained CNNs applied as electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). In the carbon nanoneedles synthesis, Ni, Cu, or Fe worked as graphitization catalyst and the metal were found present as dopants in the final material. The used metal appeared to have direct influence on the degree of organization of the particles and also in the surface density of polar groups. It was evaluated the influence of the graphitic organization on the general properties and nickel was found as the more appropriate metal since it leads to a more organized material and also to a high activity toward HER. PMID:26686184

  18. Sampling strategy to obtain data used in models of global annual CO2 increase and global carbon cycle

    Simple models were constructed to assess with somewhat limited CO2 data the effects of both frequency of sampling and spatial distribution of sampling locations on the variance of estimates of interest to the global carbon cycle. The CO2 data for use in these models were obtained from seven air flask sampling locations, globally distributed in latitude but restricted to the longitude sector 800W to 1700W, during the period 1977--1979. The results of analysis with these models show (1) that locations north of 300N are quite important in possibly providing information on carbon cycle exchange processes and that (2) improved sampling techniques including greater sampling frequency would be desirable for sampling locations in the southern hemisphere

  19. Activated carbon from vetiver roots: gas and liquid adsorption studies.

    Gaspard, S; Altenor, S; Dawson, E A; Barnes, P A; Ouensanga, A

    2007-06-01

    Large quantities of lignocellulosic residues result from the industrial production of essential oil from vetiver grass (Vetiveria zizanioides) roots. These residues could be used for the production of activated carbon. The yield of char obtained after vetiver roots pyrolysis follows an equation recently developed [A. Ouensanga, L. Largitte, M.A. Arsene, The dependence of char yield on the amounts of components in precursors for pyrolysed tropical fruit stones and seeds, Micropor. Mesopor. Mater. 59 (2003) 85-91]. The N(2) adsorption isotherm follows either the Freundlich law K(F)P(alpha) which is the small alpha equation limit of a Weibull shaped isotherm or the classical BET isotherm. The surface area of the activated carbons are determined using the BET method. The K(F) value is proportional to the BET surface area. The alpha value increases slightly when the burn-off increases and also when there is a clear increase in the micropore distribution width. PMID:17092643

  20. An investigation of the functional groups on the surface of activated carbons

    MARYTE DERVINYTE; JURGIS BARKAUSKAS

    2004-01-01

    Activated carbons were produced in the laboratory from wood using a 20-run PlackettBurman experimental design for 19 factors. The obtained batches of activated carbon were analysed by potentiometric titration and FTIR spectroscopy to determine the surface functional groups. The results obtained by potentiometric titration displayed the distribution of individual acidity constants of those groups in the pK range. Considering this parameter, the surface functional groups were divided into carbo...

  1. Immersion Calorimetry for the Characterization of PD Catalysts Supported on Activated Carbon

    Liliana Giraldo; Juan Carlos Moreno-Piraján

    2009-01-01

    Activated carbons obtained from coconut peel were oxidized using hydrogen peroxide. Superficial characteristics of these carbons were determined through N2 and CO2 isotherms and functional groups were characterized by TPD. Finally, the microcalorimetry technique was used in order to obtain the immersion enthalpies in diverse liquids and established the relation between them and the results obtained by the other characterization techniques. The results suggested that the immersion calorimetry ...

  2. [Anticoagulant activity of low-molecular-weight heparins obtained using a hydrolase complex].

    Drozd, N N; Tolstenkov, A S; Bannikova, G E; Miftakhova, N T; Lapikova, E S; Makarov, V A; Varlamov, V P

    2007-01-01

    The anticoagulant activity of low-molecular weight heparins (LMWH-PC) with average distribution of molecular weights within 3.4-5.8 kD was investigated. The samples of LMWH-PC were obtained from unfractionated heparin using immobilized enzyme complex of protease C. The LMWH-PC derivatives inhibited the activity of blood coagulation factors IIa (thrombin) and Xa. The LMWH-PC derivatives had an anti-factor-Xa activity up to 131-208 IU/mg and anti-factor-IIa activity up to 81-175 IU/mg. All LMWH-PC derivatives form complexes with protamine sulfate during electrophoresis in agarose gel. The anticoagulant activity of rabbit plasma exhibits a doze-dependent increase upon the intravenous or subcutaneous injection of LMWH-PC with a molecular weight of 5.4 kD. PMID:18318190

  3. Characterization of carbon silica hybrid fillers obtained by pyrolysis of waste green tires by the STEM–EDX method

    Al-Hartomy, Omar A. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Tabuk, Tabuk 71491 (Saudi Arabia); Al-Ghamdi, Ahmed A. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Al Said, Said A. Farha [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Tabuk, Tabuk 71491 (Saudi Arabia); Dishovsky, Nikolay, E-mail: dishov@uctm.edu [Department of Polymer Engineering, University of Chemical Technology and Metallurgy, 8 Kl. Ohridski Blvd., 1756 Sofia (Bulgaria); Ward, Michael B. [LEMAS, Institute for Materials Research, SPEME, University of Leeds, LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Mihaylov, Mihail; Ivanov, Milcho [Department of Polymer Engineering, University of Chemical Technology and Metallurgy, 8 Kl. Ohridski Blvd., 1756 Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2015-03-15

    Dual phase carbon–silica hybrid fillers obtained by pyrolysis-cum-water vapor of waste green tires have been characterized by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in a scanning transmission electron microscope, silicate analysis, weight analysis, atomic absorption spectroscopy and by inductively coupled plasma–optical emission spectroscopy. The results achieved have shown that the location and distribution of the phases in the carbon silica hybrid fillers as well as their most essential characteristics are influenced by the pyrolysis conditions. The carbon phase of the filler thus obtained is located predominantly in the space among silica aggregates which have already been existing while it has been formed by elastomer destruction in the course of pyrolysis. The presence of ZnS also has been found in the hybrid fillers investigated. - Highlights: • Dual phase fillers obtained by pyrolysis of waste green tires have been characterized. • The STEM–EDX method was used for characterization. • The phase distributions in the fillers are influenced by the pyrolysis conditions.

  4. Characterization of carbon silica hybrid fillers obtained by pyrolysis of waste green tires by the STEM–EDX method

    Dual phase carbon–silica hybrid fillers obtained by pyrolysis-cum-water vapor of waste green tires have been characterized by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in a scanning transmission electron microscope, silicate analysis, weight analysis, atomic absorption spectroscopy and by inductively coupled plasma–optical emission spectroscopy. The results achieved have shown that the location and distribution of the phases in the carbon silica hybrid fillers as well as their most essential characteristics are influenced by the pyrolysis conditions. The carbon phase of the filler thus obtained is located predominantly in the space among silica aggregates which have already been existing while it has been formed by elastomer destruction in the course of pyrolysis. The presence of ZnS also has been found in the hybrid fillers investigated. - Highlights: • Dual phase fillers obtained by pyrolysis of waste green tires have been characterized. • The STEM–EDX method was used for characterization. • The phase distributions in the fillers are influenced by the pyrolysis conditions

  5. Operant behavior to obtain palatable food modifies ERK activity in the brain reward circuit.

    Guegan, Thomas; Cutando, Laura; Gangarossa, Giuseppe; Santini, Emanuela; Fisone, Gilberto; Martinez, Albert; Valjent, Emmanuel; Maldonado, Rafael; Martin, Miquel

    2013-03-01

    Food palatability produces behavioral modifications that resemble those induced by drugs of abuse. Palatability-induced behavioral changes require both, the activation of the endogenous cannabinoid system, and changes in structural plasticity in neurons of the brain reward pathway. The ERK intracellular pathway is activated by CB1 receptors (CB1-R) and plays a crucial role in neuroplasticity. We investigated the activation of the ERK signaling cascade in the mesocorticolimbic system induced by operant training to obtain highly palatable isocaloric food and the involvement of the CB1-R in these responses. Using immunofluorescence techniques, we analyzed changes in ERK intracellular pathway activation in the mesocorticolimbic system of wild-type and CB1 knockout mice (CB1-/-) trained on an operant paradigm to obtain standard, highly caloric or highly palatable isocaloric food. Operant training for highly palatable isocaloric food, but not for standard or highly caloric food, produced a robust activation of the ERK signaling cascade in the same brain areas where this training modified structural plasticity. These changes induced by the operant training were absent in CB1-/-. We can conclude that the activation of the ERK pathway is associated to the neuroplasticity induced by operant training for highly palatable isocaloric food and might be involved in CB1-R mediated alterations in behavior and structural plasticity. PMID:22580057

  6. Absorption and adsorption of methane and carbon dioxide in hard coal and active carbon

    Milewska-Duda, J.; Duda, J.; Nodzenski, A.; Lakatos, J. [Stanislaw Staszic University of Mining and Metallurgy, Krakow (Poland). Faculty of Fuels and Energy

    2000-07-01

    The paper shows what can be deduced on sorption mechanisms in hard coals and active carbon by using a theoretical model of sorption of small molecules in elastic submicroporous materials. This multiple sorption model (MSM) describes both adsorption and absorption phenomena. Basic assumptions and formulae of the MSM are presented. The computations were performed for isotherms of CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} at elevated pressures on three coal samples of different rank and on an active carbon. Nonideality of the sorbates is handled by an original state equation providing consistent information on fugacity and cohesion energy corresponding to a given molar volume of sorbate molecules in the sorption system. Surface structure of the studied coals and energetic parameters of the systems determined with MSM are compared to those obtained by using BET and Dubinin-Radushkievitch equations.

  7. Vibration damping with active carbon fiber structures

    Neugebauer, Reimund; Kunze, Holger; Riedel, Mathias; Roscher, Hans-Jürgen

    2007-04-01

    This paper presents a mechatronic strategy for active reduction of vibrations on machine tool struts or car shafts. The active structure is built from a carbon fiber composite with embedded piezofiber actuators that are composed of piezopatches based on the Macro Fiber Composite (MFC) technology, licensed by NASA and produced by Smart Material GmbH in Dresden, Germany. The structure of these actuators allows separate or selectively combined bending and torsion, meaning that both bending and torsion vibrations can be actively absorbed. Initial simulation work was done with a finite element model (ANSYS). This paper describes how state space models are generated out of a structure based on the finite element model and how controller codes are integrated into finite element models for transient analysis and the model-based control design. Finally, it showcases initial experimental findings and provides an outlook for damping multi-mode resonances with a parallel combination of resonant controllers.

  8. Antimicrobial activity of Anonna mucosa (Jacq. grown in vivo and obtained by in vitroculture

    Thiago José de Souza Barboza

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Brazilian flora includes numerous species of medicinal importance that can be used to develop new drugs. Plant tissue culture offers strategies for conservation and use of these species allowing continuous production of plants and bioactive substances. Annona mucosa has produced substances such as acetogenins and alkaloids that exhibit antimicrobial activities. The widespread use of antibiotics has led to an increase in multidrug-resistant bacteria, which represents a serious risk of infection. In view of this problem, the aim of this work was to evaluate the antibacterial potential of extracts of A. mucosa obtained by in vitro techniques and also cultured under in vivo conditions. Segments from seedlings were inoculated onto different culture media containing the auxin picloram and the cytokinin kinetin at different concentrations. The calluses obtained were used to produce cell suspension cultures. The materials were subjected to methanol extraction and subsequent fractionation in hexane and dichloromethane. The antimicrobial activity against 20 strains of clinical relevance was evaluated by the macrodilution method at minimum inhibitory and minimum bactericidal concentrations. The extracts showed selective antimicrobial activity, inhibiting the growth of Streptococcus pyogenes and Bacillus thuringiensis at different concentrations. The plant tissue culture methods produced plant materials with antibacterial properties, as well as in vivo grown plants. The antibacterial activity of material obtained through biotechnological procedures of A. mucosa is reported here for the first time.

  9. Antimicrobial activity of Anonna mucosa (Jacq.) grown in vivo and obtained by in vitroculture.

    Barboza, Thiago José de Souza; Ferreira, Andréa Fonseca; Ignacio, Ana Claudia de Paula Rosa; Albarello, Norma

    2015-01-01

    Brazilian flora includes numerous species of medicinal importance that can be used to develop new drugs. Plant tissue culture offers strategies for conservation and use of these species allowing continuous production of plants and bioactive substances. Annona mucosa has produced substances such as acetogenins and alkaloids that exhibit antimicrobial activities. The widespread use of antibiotics has led to an increase in multidrug-resistant bacteria, which represents a serious risk of infection. In view of this problem, the aim of this work was to evaluate the antibacterial potential of extracts of A. mucosa obtained by in vitro techniques and also cultured under in vivo conditions. Segments from seedlings were inoculated onto different culture media containing the auxin picloram and the cytokinin kinetin at different concentrations. The calluses obtained were used to produce cell suspension cultures. The materials were subjected to methanol extraction and subsequent fractionation in hexane and dichloromethane. The antimicrobial activity against 20 strains of clinical relevance was evaluated by the macrodilution method at minimum inhibitory and minimum bactericidal concentrations. The extracts showed selective antimicrobial activity, inhibiting the growth of Streptococcus pyogenes and Bacillus thuringiensis at different concentrations. The plant tissue culture methods produced plant materials with antibacterial properties, as well as in vivo grown plants. The antibacterial activity of material obtained through biotechnological procedures of A. mucosa is reported here for the first time. PMID:26413061

  10. Antimicrobial activity and composition profile of grape (Vitis vinifera) pomace extracts obtained by supercritical fluids.

    Oliveira, Daniela A; Salvador, Ana Augusta; Smânia, Artur; Smânia, Elza F A; Maraschin, Marcelo; Ferreira, Sandra R S

    2013-04-10

    The possibility of increasing the aggregated value of the huge amount of residues generated by wineries around the world foment studies using the grape pomace - the residue from the wine production, composed by seed, skin and stems - to obtain functional ingredients. Nowadays, consumers in general prefer natural and safe products mainly for food and cosmetic fields, where the supercritical fluid extraction is of great importance due to the purity of the extracts provided. Therefore, the objective of this work is to evaluate the global extraction yield, the antimicrobial activity and the composition profile of Merlot and Syrah grape pomace extracts obtained by supercritical CO2 (SC-CO2) and CO2 added with co-solvent at pressures up to 300 bar and temperatures of 50 and 60 °C. The results were compared with the ones obtained by Soxhlet and by ultrasound-assisted leaching extraction methods. The main components from the extracts, identified by HPLC, were gallic acid, p-OH-benzoic acid, vanillic acid and epicatechin. The antibacterial and antifungal activities of the extracts were evaluated using four strains of bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and three fungi strains (Candida albicans, Candida parapsilosis, Candida krusei). Despite lower extraction yield results, the supercritical fluid extracts presented the highest antimicrobial effectiveness compared to the other grape pomace extracts due to the presence of antimicrobial active compounds. Syrah extracts were less efficient against the microorganisms tested and Merlot extracts were more active against Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:23036924

  11. Use of Different Proteases to Obtain Flaxseed Protein Hydrolysates with Antioxidant Activity.

    Karamać, Magdalena; Kosińska-Cagnazzo, Agnieszka; Kulczyk, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The antioxidant activity of flaxseed protein hydrolysates obtained using five different enzymes was evaluated. Proteins were isolated from flaxseed cake and were separately treated with papain, trypsin, pancreatin, Alcalase and Flavourzyme. The degree of hydrolysis (DH) was determined as the percentage of cleaved peptide bonds using a spectrophotometric method with o-phthaldialdehyde. The distribution of the molecular weights (MW) of the hydrolysis products was profiled using Tricine-sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (Tricine-SDS-PAGE) and size exclusion-high performance liquid chromatography (SE-HPLC) separations. The antioxidant activities of the protein isolate and hydrolysates were probed for their radical scavenging activity using 2,2'-azino-bis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate) radical cation (ABTS(•+)) and photochemiluminescence (PCL-ACL) assays, and for their ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) and ability to bind Fe(2+). The hydrolysates were more effective as antioxidants than the protein isolate in all systems. The PCL-ACL values of the hydrolysates ranged from 7.2 to 35.7 μmol Trolox/g. Both the FRAP and ABTS(•+) scavenging activity differed among the hydrolysates to a lower extent, with the ranges of 0.20-0.24 mmol Fe(2+)/g and 0.17-0.22 mmol Trolox/g, respectively. The highest chelating activity (71.5%) was noted for the pancreatin hydrolysate. In general, the hydrolysates obtained using Alcalase and pancreatin had the highest antioxidant activity, even though their DH (15.4% and 29.3%, respectively) and the MW profiles of the peptides varied substantially. The O₂(•-) scavenging activity and the ability to chelate Fe(2+) of the Flavourzyme hydrolysate were lower than those of the Alcalase and pancreatin hydrolysates. Papain was the least effective in releasing the peptides with antioxidant activity. The study showed that the type of enzyme used for flaxseed protein hydrolysis determines the antioxidant activity

  12. Activated carbon and tungsten oxide supported on activated carbon catalysts for toluene catalytic combustion.

    Alvarez-Merino, M A; Ribeiro, M F; Silva, J M; Carrasco-Marín, F; Maldonado-Hódar, F J

    2004-09-01

    We have used activated carbon (AC) prepared from almond shells as a support for tungsten oxide to develop a series of WOx/AC catalysts for the catalytic combustion of toluene. We conducted the reaction between 300 and 350 degrees C, using a flow of 500 ppm of toluene in air and space velocity (GHSV) in the range 4000-7000 h(-1). Results show that AC used as a support is an appropriate material for removing toluene from dilute streams. By decreasing the GHSV and increasing the reaction temperature AC becomes a specific catalyst for the total toluene oxidation (SCO2 = 100%), but in less favorable conditions CO appears as reaction product and toluene-derivative compounds are retained inside the pores. WOx/AC catalysts are more selective to CO2 than AC due to the strong acidity of this oxide; this behavior improves with increased metal loading and reaction temperature and contact time. The catalytic performance depends on the nonstoichiometric tungsten oxide obtained during the pretreatment. In comparison with other supports the WOx/AC catalysts present, at low reaction temperatures, higher activity and selectivity than WO, supported on SiO2, TiO2, Al2O3, or Y zeolite. This is due to the hydrophobic character of the AC surface which prevents the adsorption of water produced from toluene combustion thus avoiding the deactivation of the active centers. However, the use of WOx/AC system is always restricted by its gasification temperature (around 400 degrees C), which limits the ability to increase the conversion values by increasing reaction temperatures. PMID:15461177

  13. Modeling equilibrium adsorption of organic micropollutants onto activated carbon

    De Ridder, David J.

    2010-05-01

    Solute hydrophobicity, polarizability, aromaticity and the presence of H-bond donor/acceptor groups have been identified as important solute properties that affect the adsorption on activated carbon. However, the adsorption mechanisms related to these properties occur in parallel, and their respective dominance depends on the solute properties as well as carbon characteristics. In this paper, a model based on multivariate linear regression is described that was developed to predict equilibrium carbon loading on a specific activated carbon (F400) for solutes reflecting a wide range of solute properties. In order to improve prediction accuracy, groups (bins) of solutes with similar solute properties were defined and solute removals were predicted for each bin separately. With these individual linear models, coefficients of determination (R2) values ranging from 0.61 to 0.84 were obtained. With the mechanistic approach used in developing this predictive model, a strong relation with adsorption mechanisms is established, improving the interpretation and, ultimately, acceptance of the model. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Carbon nanofibers grafted on activated carbon as an electrode in high-power supercapacitors.

    Gryglewicz, Grażyna; Śliwak, Agata; Béguin, François

    2013-08-01

    A hybrid electrode material for high-power supercapacitors was fabricated by grafting carbon nanofibers (CNFs) onto the surface of powdered activated carbon (AC) through catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD). A uniform thin layer of disentangled CNFs with a herringbone structure was deposited on the carbon surface through the decomposition of propane at 450 °C over an AC-supported nickel catalyst. CNF coating was controlled by the reaction time and the nickel content. The superior CNF/AC composite displays excellent electrochemical performance in a 0.5 mol L(-1) solution of K2 SO4 due to its unique structure. At a high scan rate (100 mV s(-1) ) and current loading (20 A g(-1) ), the capacitance values were three- and fourfold higher than those for classical AC/carbon black composites. Owing to this feature, a high energy of 10 Wh kg(-1) was obtained over a wide power range in neutral medium at a voltage of 0.8 V. The significant enhancement of charge propagation is attributed to the presence of herringbone CNFs, which facilitate the diffusion of ions in the electrode and play the role of electronic bridges between AC particles. An in situ coating of AC with short CNFs (below 200 nm) is a very attractive method for producing the next generation of carbon composite materials with a high power performance in supercapacitors working in neutral medium. PMID:23794416

  15. Aquatic carbon fluxes in HD: using in-situ sensors to obtain a high definition picture of carbon cycling in streams (Invited)

    Clow, D. W.; Dornblaser, M.; Saraceno, J.; Pellerin, B. A.; Mast, A.; Shanley, J. B.

    2013-12-01

    In-situ sensors provide a means to collect water-quality data in streams at time resolutions ranging from minutes to days, weeks, or months. Instruments may be deployed individually to investigate specific constituents of interest or in sensor arrays to provide a more complete picture for a suite of related compounds. Data from the instruments can provide direct measurements of some constituents (e.g., nitrate or dissolved CO2), or may be used as surrogates for other parameters (e.g., FDOM as a surrogate for DOC). These data may be used to improve estimates of nutrient or carbon fluxes, and to investigate processes influencing high-frequency variability in constituent concentrations. In this study, we examine high-temporal-resolution data from a suite of sensor arrays installed in mountain streams in Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado. The sensor arrays include fluorescing dissolved organic matter (FDOM), turbidity, and CO2 sensors, which are being used to characterize variability in dissolved and particulate forms of carbon. We will (1) compare these data to concentrations obtained through manual grab sampling to document the utility of in-situ measurements as surrogates for dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and particulate organic carbon (POC), (2) compare stream-water fluxes of carbon calculated using a conventional sample-based approach to those computed using high-temporal resolution data from in-situ sensors, and (3) use ancillary data from co-located stream gages (e.g. streamflow) and meteorological stations (e.g., solar radiation) to investigate the influences of hydrology and climate on high-frequency variability in carbon fluxes in streams.

  16. Photocatalytic degradation of organic contaminants under solar light using carbon dot/titanium dioxide nanohybrid, obtained through a facile approach

    Hazarika, Deepshikha; Karak, Niranjan

    2016-07-01

    In the present study, a novel, simple and green method was developed to synthesize highly luminescent nitrogen containing carbon dot (CD) using carbon resources like bio-based citric acid and glycerol in the presence of cost free cow urine. The as-synthesized CD showed exciting wavelength dependent down- and up-conversion flourescence properties. To utilize the advantage of up-conversion flourescence, a nanohybrid (CD@TiO2) was synthesized from the above carbon resources and titanium butoxide through a facile one pot single step hydrothermal protocol. Nanomaterials like bare TiO2 and nanohybrid of TiO2 in presence of CD (CD/TiO2) were also synthesized for comparison purpose. The optical properties and structural characteristics of the prepared CD, bare TiO2, CD@TiO2 and CD/TiO2 were examined by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), UV-vis and fluorescence spectroscopic, scanning electron microscopic (SEM), transmission electron microscopic (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies. The elemental compositions of bare CD and CD@TiO2 nanohybrid were obtained from EDX analyses. The poor crystalline nature and narrow distribution of spherical CD and anatase form of TiO2 were confirmed from XRD and TEM studies. Amongst the studied nanomaterials, CD@TiO2 exhibited the most promising photocatalytic degradation of organic pollutants like benzene and phenol as well as an anthrogenic pesticide under sunlight.

  17. Composition and morphology of metal-containing diamond-like carbon films obtained by reactive magnetron sputtering

    The addition of metal atoms within the matrix of diamond-like carbon films leads to the improvement of their mechanical properties. The present paper discusses the relationship between the composition and morphology of metal-containing (W, Nb, Mo, Ti) diamond-like carbon thin films deposited at room temperature by reactive magnetron sputtering from a metal target in an argon and methane atmosphere. Composition was measured either by electron microprobe technique or by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and shows a smooth variation with relative methane flow. High relative methane flows lead to a bulk saturation of carbon atoms, which leads to a lack of homogeneity in the films as confirmed by secondary ion mass spectrometry. Cross-section micrographs were observed by transmission electron microscopy and revealed a structure strongly influenced by the metal inserted and its abundance. The surface pattern obtained by scanning electrochemical potential microscopy provided the metallicity distribution. These measurements were completed with atomic force microscopy of the surface. Selected area electron diffraction and X-ray diffraction measurements provided data of the crystalline structure along with nano-crystallite size. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy provided images of these crystallites

  18. Use of Different Proteases to Obtain Flaxseed Protein Hydrolysates with Antioxidant Activity

    Magdalena Karamać; Agnieszka Kosińska-Cagnazzo; Anna Kulczyk

    2016-01-01

    The antioxidant activity of flaxseed protein hydrolysates obtained using five different enzymes was evaluated. Proteins were isolated from flaxseed cake and were separately treated with papain, trypsin, pancreatin, Alcalase and Flavourzyme. The degree of hydrolysis (DH) was determined as the percentage of cleaved peptide bonds using a spectrophotometric method with o-phthaldialdehyde. The distribution of the molecular weights (MW) of the hydrolysis products was profiled using Tricine-sodium d...

  19. Possibilities of using carbon dioxide as fillers for heat pipe to obtain low-potential geothermal energy

    Malcho M.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The use of low-potential heat is now possible especially in systems using heat pumps. There is a presumption that the trend will continue. Therefore, there is a need to find ways to be systems with a heat pump efficiencies. The usage of heat pipes seems to be an appropriate alternative to the establishedtechnology of obtaining heat through in-debt probes. This article describes a series of experiments on simulator for obtaining low-potential geothermal energy, in order to find the optimal amount of carbon dioxide per meter length of the heat pipe. For orientation and understanding of the conclusions of theexperiment, the article has also a detailed description of the device which simulates the transport of heat through geothermal heat pipes.

  20. Synthesis and characterization of carbon nanotube from coconut shells activated carbon

    Melati, A.; Hidayati, E.

    2016-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been explored in almost every single cancer treatment modality, including drug delivery, lymphatic targeted chemotherapy, photodynamic therapy, and gene therapy. They are considered as one of the most promising nanomaterial with the capability of both detecting the cancerous cells and delivering drugs or small therapeutic molecules to the cells. CNTs have unique physical and chemical properties such as high aspect ratio, ultralight weight, high mechanical strength, high electrical conductivity, and high thermal conductivity. Coconut Shell was researched as active carbon source on 500 - 600°C. These activated carbon was synthesized becomes carbon nanotube and have been proposed as a promising tool for detecting the expression of indicative biological molecules at early stage of cancer. Clinically, biomarkers cancer can be detected by CNT Biosensor. We are using pyrolysis methods combined with CVD process or Wet Chemical Process on 600°C. Our team has successfully obtained high purity, and aligned MWCNT (Multi Wall Nanotube) bundles on synthesis CNT based on coconut shells raw materials. CNTs can be used to cross the mammalian cell membrane by endocytosis or other mechanisms. SEM characterization of these materials have 179 nm bundles on phase 83° and their materials compound known by using FTIR characterization.

  1. Antibacterial activity of carbon-coated zinc oxide particles.

    Sawai, Jun; Yamamoto, Osamu; Ozkal, Burak; Nakagawa, Zenbe-E

    2007-03-01

    Particles of ZnO coated with carbon (ZnOCC) were prepared and evaluated for their antibacterial activity. ZnO powder and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) (polymerization degree: 2,000-95,000) were mixed at a mass ratio (ZnO/PVA) of 1, and then heated at 500-650 degree C for 3 h under argon gas with a flow rate of 50ml/min. Carbon deposited on the ZnOCC surface was amorphous as revealed by X-ray diffraction studies. The ZnOCC particles maintained their shape in water, even under agitation. The antibacterial activity of ZnOCC powder against Staphylococcus aureus was evaluated quantitatively by measuring the change in the electrical conductivity of the growth medium caused by bacterial metabolism (conductimetric assay). The conductivity curves obtained were analyzed using the growth inhibition kinetic model proposed by Takahashi for calorimetric evaluation, allowing the estimation of the antibacterial efficacy and kinetic parameters of ZnOCC. In a previous study, when ZnO was immobilized on materials, such as activated carbon, the amount of ZnO immobilized was approximately 10-50%, and the antibacterial activity markedly decreased compared to that of the original ZnO. On the other hand, the ZnOCC particles prepared in this study contained approximately 95% ZnO and possessed antibacterial activity similar to that of pure ZnO. The carbon-coating treatment could maintain the antibacterial efficacy of the ZnO and may be useful in the develop-ment of multifunctional antimicrobial materials. PMID:17408004

  2. Catalytic activity of poly[(methacrylato)aluminum(III)] obtained at different gamma-radiation doses

    Vilchis-Nestor, A.R. [Facultad de Quimica, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Paseo Tollocan and Paseo Colon, A.P. A-20, Toluca, C.P. 50120 (Mexico); Urena-Nunez, F., E-mail: fernando.urena@inin.gob.mx [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, km 36.5, Carretera Mexico-Toluca, Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico, C.P. 52750 (Mexico); Sanchez-Mendieta, V. [Facultad de Quimica, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Paseo Tollocan and Paseo Colon, A.P. A-20, Toluca, C.P. 50120 (Mexico); Perez-Hernandez, R. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, km 36.5, Carretera Mexico-Toluca, Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico, C.P. 52750 (Mexico)

    2011-11-15

    A novel coordination polymer was obtained throughout the polymerization of aluminum(III) methacrylate at different doses (10, 20, 30, 40, 50 and 80 kGy) using gamma-radiation as initiator. The materials were characterized by electronic paramagnetic resonance (EPR), thermogravimetric analyses (TGA) and scanning electron microscopy/electron dispersive X-ray analyses (SEM/EDAX) techniques; particle size distribution and surface areas were also determined. The samples of poly[(methacrylato)aluminum(III)] obtained at different {gamma}-doses were found to catalyze 2-propanol dehydrogenation and dehydration to acetone and propene. A noticeable activity was observed with Poly[(methacrylato)aluminum(III)] obtained at 50 kGy, which has higher conversion of 2-propanol and the highest selectivity to acetone ({approx}90%). Results suggest that the decomposition of 2-propanol is correlated with the effect of gamma-radiation on the structure and surface area of the catalysts. - Highlights: > We report the synthesis of micro-crystalline novel poly[(methacrylato)aluminum(III)]. > Polymer was obtained throughout the polymerization of Al(III) methacrylate at different doses. > PMALs were found to catalyze 2-propanol dehydrogenation and dehydration to acetone and propene. > PMAL obtained at 50 kGy has the higher conversion of 2-propanol and selectivity to acetone ({approx}90%).

  3. CO2-pressure swing activation for efficient production of highly porous carbons

    Wang, Shuwen; Kaneko, Katsumi

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we describe a new type of activation method of carbon materials using pressure swing of CO2. The porosity development markedly depends on the pressure swinging frequency. The porous carbon obtained from pressure-swing activation shows an additional porosity development without pitting corrosion on the surface, which occurs on CO2 activation without pressure-swing. This phenomenon is ascribed to the enhancement of Knudsen diffusion and/or configurational diffusion of CO2 which is...

  4. Characterization of Activated Carbons from Oil-Palm Shell by CO2 Activation with No Holding Carbonization Temperature

    S. G. Herawan; Hadi, M. S.; Md. R. Ayob; A. Putra

    2013-01-01

    Activated carbons can be produced from different precursors, including coals of different ranks, and lignocellulosic materials, by physical or chemical activation processes. The objective of this paper is to characterize oil-palm shells, as a biomass byproduct from palm-oil mills which were converted into activated carbons by nitrogen pyrolysis followed by CO2 activation. The effects of no holding peak pyrolysis temperature on the physical characteristics of the activated carbons are studied....

  5. Immobilization biological activated carbon used in advanced drinking water treatment

    2006-01-01

    Bacteria separated from a mature filter bed of groundwater treatment plants were incubated in a culture media containing iron and manganese. A consortium of 5 strains of bacteria removing iron and manganese were obtained by repeated enrichment culturing. It was shown from the experiments of effect factors that ironmanganese removal bacteria in the culture media containing both Fe and Mn grew better than in that containing only Fe, however, they were unable to grow in the culture media containing only Mn. When comparing the bacteria biomass in the case ofρ (DO) =2.8 mg/L andρ (DO) =9.0 mg/L, no significant difference was found.The engineering bacteria removing the organic and the bacteria removing iron and manganese were simultaneously inoculated into activated carbon reactor to treat the effluent of distribution network. The experimental results showed that by using IBAC ( Immobilization Biological Activated Carbon) treatment, the removal efficiency of iron, manganese and permanganate index was more than 98% , 96% and 55% , respectively. After the influent with turbidity of 1.5 NTU, color of 25 degree and offensive odor was treated, the turbidity and color of effluence were less than 0.5 NTU and 15 degree, respectively, and it was odorless. It is determined that the cooperation function of engineering bacteria and activated carbon achieved advanced drinking water treatment.

  6. Development of highly microporous activated carbon from the alcoholic beverage industry organic by-products

    This work has the aim to employ the agave bagasse, a waste from Tequila and Mescal industries, to obtain a product of high commercial value such as activated carbon. The activated carbon production methodology was based on a chemical activation, by using ZnCl2 and H3PO4 as activating agent and agave bagasse as a natural source of carbon. The activation temperature (150-450 oC), activation time (0-60 min) and weight ratio of activating agent to precursor (0.2-4) were studied. The produced carbon materials were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and nitrogen physisorption at -196 oC. In addition, the activating agent recovery was evaluated. We were able to obtain highly microporous activated carbons with micropore volumes between 0.24 and 1.20 cm3/g and a surface area within 300 and 2139 m2/g. These results demonstrated the feasibility to treat the industrial wastes of the Tequila and Mescal industries, being this wastes an excellent precursor to produce highly microporous activated carbons that can be processed at low activation temperatures in short times, with the possibility of recycling the activating agent.

  7. Influence of KOH activation techniques on pore structure and electrochemical property of carbon electrode materials

    LI Jing; LI Jie; LAI Yan-qing; SONG Hai-sheng; ZHANG Zhi-an; LIU Ye-xiang

    2006-01-01

    Taking the selection of coal-tar pitch as precursor and KOH as activated agent, the activated carbon electrode material was fabricated for supercapacitor. The surface area and the pore structure of activated carbon were analyzed by Nitro adsorption method. The electrochemical properties of the activated carbons were determined using two-electrode capacitors in 6 mol/L KOH aqueous electrolytes. The influences of activated temperature and mass ratio ofKOH to C on the pore structure and electrochemical property of porous activated carbon were investigated in detail. The reasons for the changes of pore structure and electrochemical performance of activated carbon prepared under different conditions were also discussed theoretically. The results indicate that the maximum specific capacitance of 240 F/g can be obtained in alkaline medium, and the surface area, the pore structure and the specific capacitance of activated carbon depend on the treatment methods; the capacitance variation of activated carbon cannot be interpreted only by the change of surface area and pore structure, the lattice order and the electrolyte wetting effect of the activated carbon should also be taken into account.

  8. Production of activated carbons from waste tyres for low temperature NOx control.

    Al-Rahbi, Amal S; Williams, Paul T

    2016-03-01

    Waste tyres were pyrolysed in a bench scale reactor and the product chars were chemically activated with alkali chemical agents, KOH, K2CO3, NaOH and Na2CO3 to produce waste tyre derived activated carbons. The activated carbon products were then examined in terms of their ability to adsorb NOx (NO) at low temperature (25°C) from a simulated industrial process flue gas. This study investigates the influence of surface area and porosity of the carbons produced with the different alkali chemical activating agents on NO capture from the simulated flue gas. The influence of varying the chemical activation conditions on the porous texture and corresponding NO removal from the flue gas was studied. The activated carbon sorbents were characterized in relation to BET surface area, micropore and mesopore volumes and chemical composition. The highest NO removal efficiency for the waste tyre derived activated carbons was ∼75% which was obtained with the adsorbent treated with KOH which correlated with both the highest BET surface area and largest micropore volume. In contrast, the waste tyre derived activated carbons prepared using K2CO3, NaOH and Na2CO3 alkali activating agents appeared to have little influence on NO removal from the flue gases. The results suggest problematic waste tyres, have the potential to be converted to activated carbons with NOx removal efficiency comparable with conventionally produced carbons. PMID:26856444

  9. Antimicrobial and antiradical activity of extracts obtained from leaves of three species of the genus pyrus.

    Zbigniew, Sroka; Beata, Żbikowska; Kamil, Janicki; Roman, Franiczek; Barbara, Krzyżanowska; Andrzej, Dryś

    2014-08-01

    In this study, extracts were obtained from leaves of Pyrus communis L., Pyrus elaeagrifolia Pall., and Pyrus pyrifolia (Bum.) Nak. These extracts were tested for antiradical and antibacterial activity, as well as for the amount of total phenolic compounds, hydroquinone and arbutin. The antiradical activity was measured using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical and antibacterial activity with the disk diffusion method. The amount of phenolic compounds was determined using Folin Ciocalteu's phenol reagent, but the amount of hydroquinone and arbutin was measured with high performance liquid chromatography. The strongest antiradical activity was observed for ethyl acetate extract from leaves of P. communis L., and the lowest for the poorly soluble fraction (precipitate) from leaves of P. elaeagrifolia Pall. The highest number of antiradical units per gram of raw materials was noted for leaves of P. communis. The strongest antibacterial activity was measured for ethyl acetate extracts. The calculation of Spearman rank correlation coefficients indicated the existence of a positive correlation between contents of hydroquinone in extracts and their antibacterial activity for almost all investigated bacterial strains. The strains of fungi such as Candida albicans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae were completely resistant to the action of extracts. PMID:24621262

  10. Preparation and hydrogen storage capacity of highly porous activated carbon materials derived from polythiophene

    Sevilla Solís, Marta; Fuertes Arias, Antonio Benito; Mokaya, R.

    2011-01-01

    [EN] Highly porous carbons have been successfully synthesized by chemical activation of polythiophene with KOH. The activation process was performed under relatively mild activation conditions, i. e., a KOH/polymer weight ratio of 2 and reaction temperatures in the 600–850 °C range. The porous carbons thus obtained possess very large surface areas, up to 3000 m2/g, and pore volumes of up to 1.75 cm3/g. The pore size distribution of these carbons can be tuned via modification of the activation...

  11. Clinical and radiographic study of activated carbon workers.

    Uragoda, C. G.

    1989-01-01

    Activated carbon is made in Sri Lanka by passing steam through charcoal made from coconut shells. The carbon does not contain free silica. Sixty six men who had worked in a factory making activated carbon for an average of 7.2 years had no more respiratory symptoms than a control group, and none showed radiological evidence of pneumoconiosis. There was no evidence that people exposed to charcoal and pure carbon for up to 11 years are at risk of developing pneumoconiosis.

  12. Use of Different Proteases to Obtain Flaxseed Protein Hydrolysates with Antioxidant Activity

    Magdalena Karamać

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The antioxidant activity of flaxseed protein hydrolysates obtained using five different enzymes was evaluated. Proteins were isolated from flaxseed cake and were separately treated with papain, trypsin, pancreatin, Alcalase and Flavourzyme. The degree of hydrolysis (DH was determined as the percentage of cleaved peptide bonds using a spectrophotometric method with o-phthaldialdehyde. The distribution of the molecular weights (MW of the hydrolysis products was profiled using Tricine-sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (Tricine-SDS-PAGE and size exclusion-high performance liquid chromatography (SE-HPLC separations. The antioxidant activities of the protein isolate and hydrolysates were probed for their radical scavenging activity using 2,2′-azino-bis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate radical cation (ABTS•+ and photochemiluminescence (PCL-ACL assays, and for their ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP and ability to bind Fe2+. The hydrolysates were more effective as antioxidants than the protein isolate in all systems. The PCL-ACL values of the hydrolysates ranged from 7.2 to 35.7 μmol Trolox/g. Both the FRAP and ABTS•+ scavenging activity differed among the hydrolysates to a lower extent, with the ranges of 0.20–0.24 mmol Fe2+/g and 0.17–0.22 mmol Trolox/g, respectively. The highest chelating activity (71.5% was noted for the pancreatin hydrolysate. In general, the hydrolysates obtained using Alcalase and pancreatin had the highest antioxidant activity, even though their DH (15.4% and 29.3%, respectively and the MW profiles of the peptides varied substantially. The O2•− scavenging activity and the ability to chelate Fe2+ of the Flavourzyme hydrolysate were lower than those of the Alcalase and pancreatin hydrolysates. Papain was the least effective in releasing the peptides with antioxidant activity. The study showed that the type of enzyme used for flaxseed protein hydrolysis determines the antioxidant

  13. Effects of microwave heating on porous structure of regenerated powdered activated carbon used in xylose.

    Li, Wei; Wang, Xinying; Peng, Jinhui

    2014-01-01

    The regeneration of spent powdered activated carbons used in xylose decolourization by microwave heating was investigated. Effects of microwave power and microwave heating time on the adsorption capacity of regenerated activated carbons were evaluated. The optimum conditions obtained are as follows: microwave power 800W; microwave heating time 30min. Regenerated activated carbon in this work has high adsorption capacities for the amount of methylene blue of 16 cm3/0.1 g and the iodine number of 1000.06mg/g. The specific surface areas of fresh commercial activated carbon, spent carbon and regenerated activated carbon were calculated according to the Brunauer, Emmett and Teller method, and the pore-size distributions of these carbons were characterized by non-local density functional theory (NLDFT). The results show that the specific surface area and the total pore volume of regenerated activated carbon are 1064 m2/g and 1.181 mL/g, respectively, indicating the feasibility of regeneration of spent powdered activated carbon used in xylose decolourization by microwave heating. The results of surface fractal dimensions also confirm the results of isotherms and NLDFT. PMID:24645431

  14. Analysis of structure and properties of active carbons and their copolymeric precursors

    Sobiesiak, M.; Gawdzik, B.; Puziy, A. M.; Poddubnaya, O. I.

    2010-06-01

    The relations between chemical structures of BM-DVB copolymers obtained with various monomer molar ratios and their carbonization products were studied. Three porous copolymers 1:4, 1:1, and 4:1 of BM to DVB were the starting materials for preparation of active carbons. Two activation agents were employed: air and phosphoric acid. The carbonization process was performed in the same way in these two cases. To characterize the obtained materials FTIR spectroscopy, thermal and elemental analyses were applied. Porous structure parameters were obtained by means of nitrogen sorption. The results proved that differences in the molar ratio of monomers used in the syntheses of polymeric precursor play a key role for structure and properties of copolymers but have rather small influence on properties of the obtained carbons. Preliminary treatment is more effective during the activation process. The carbons obtained by activation with phosphoric acid are microporous and have well developed porous structures. The air activated carbons are mesoporous with specific surface areas similar to those of polymeric precursors.

  15. Antimicrobial activity of Brazilian copaiba oils obtained from different species of the Copaifera genus.

    Santos, Adriana Oliveira Dos; Ueda-Nakamura, Tânia; Dias Filho, Benedito Prado; Veiga Junior, Valdir F; Pinto, Angelo C; Nakamura, Celso Vataru

    2008-05-01

    The antimicrobial activity of copaiba oils was tested against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, yeast, and dermatophytes. Oils obtained from Copaifera martii, Copaifera officinalis, and Copaifera reticulata (collected in the state of Acre) were active against Gram-positive species (Staphylococcus aureus, methicillin-resistant S. aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Bacillus subtilis, and Enterococcus faecalis) with minimum inhibitory concentrations ranging from 31.3-62.5 microg/ml. The oils showed bactericidal activity, decreasing the viability of these Gram-positive bacteria within 3 h. Moderate activity was observed against dermatophyte fungi (Trichophyton rubrum and Microsporum canis). The oils showed no activity against Gram-negative bacteria and yeast. Scannning electron microscopy of S. aureus treated with resin oil from C. martii revealed lysis of the bacteria, causing cellular agglomerates. Transmission electron microscopy revealed disruption and damage to the cell wall, resulting in the release of cytoplasmic compounds, alterations in morphology, and a decrease in cell volume, indicating that copaiba oil may affect the cell wall. PMID:18545856

  16. Antimicrobial activity of Brazilian copaiba oils obtained from different species of the Copaifera genus

    Adriana Oliveira dos Santos

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The antimicrobial activity of copaiba oils was tested against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, yeast, and dermatophytes. Oils obtained from Copaifera martii, Copaifera officinalis, and Copaifera reticulata (collected in the state of Acre were active against Gram-positive species (Staphylococcus aureus, methicillin-resistant S. aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Bacillus subtilis, and Enterococcus faecalis with minimum inhibitory concentrations ranging from 31.3-62.5 µg/ml. The oils showed bactericidal activity, decreasing the viability of these Gram-positive bacteria within 3 h. Moderate activity was observed against dermatophyte fungi (Trichophyton rubrum and Microsporum canis. The oils showed no activity against Gram-negative bacteria and yeast. Scannning electron microscopy of S. aureus treated with resin oil from C. martii revealed lysis of the bacteria, causing cellular agglomerates. Transmission electron microscopy revealed disruption and damage to the cell wall, resulting in the release of cytoplasmic compounds, alterations in morphology, and a decrease in cell volume, indicating that copaiba oil may affect the cell wall.

  17. Volumetric and superficial characterization of carbon activated; Caracterizacion volumetrica y superficial de carbon activado

    Carrera G, L.M.; Garcia S, I.; Jimenez B, J.; Solache R, M.; Lopez M, B.; Bulbulian G, S.; Olguin G, M.T. [Departamento de Quimica, Gerencia de Ciencias Basicas, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    The activated carbon is the resultant material of the calcination process of natural carbonated materials as coconut shells or olive little bones. It is an excellent adsorbent of diluted substances, so much in colloidal form, as in particles form. Those substances are attracted and retained by the carbon surface. In this work is make the volumetric and superficial characterization of activated carbon treated thermically (300 Centigrade) in function of the grain size average. (Author)

  18. Biodegradation of dairy effluent by using microbial isolates obtained from activated sludge

    H.J. Porwal; A. V. Mane; S.G. Velhal

    2015-01-01

    Water resources are of significant importance to human beings. The present investigation was carried out for biodegradation of dairy effluent by using selected aerobic microbial isolates and a model having layers of sawdust and activated charcoal as filtering media. Yeast isolates (DSI1) and two bacterial isolates (DSI2 and DSI3) were obtained from the dairy sludge. A mixed culture (DSI4) was prepared by taking 1:1, DSI1 and DSI3 to treat the effluent and check its efficiency. After aeration ...

  19. Activation energy for mullitization of gel fibres obtained from aluminum isopropoxide

    Hongbin Tan; Yaping Ding; Haihong Zhang; Jianfeng Yang; Guanjun Qiao

    2012-10-01

    Gel fibres of mullite precursor were prepared from an aqueous solution of aluminum nitrate (AN), aluminum isopropoxide (AIP) and tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS). A 4:1 molar ratio of aluminum isopropoxide and aluminum nitrate was optimized to obtain spinnable precursor sol for synthesis of fibres. Thermogravimetry–differential scanning calorimetry (TG–DSC), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses were used to characterize properties of the gel and ceramic fibres. The precursor gel completely transformed to mullite at 1200 °C. The activation energy of mullite crystallization was 993.5 kJ/mol by the Kissinger equation.

  20. Activated Carbon Composites for Air Separation

    Baker, Frederick S [ORNL; Contescu, Cristian I [ORNL; Tsouris, Costas [ORNL; Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL

    2011-09-01

    Coal-derived synthesis gas is a potential major source of hydrogen for fuel cells. Oxygen-blown coal gasification is an efficient approach to achieving the goal of producing hydrogen from coal, but a cost-effective means of enriching O2 concentration in air is required. A key objective of this project is to assess the utility of a system that exploits porous carbon materials and electrical swing adsorption to produce an O2-enriched air stream for coal gasification. As a complement to O2 and N2 adsorption measurements, CO2 was used as a more sensitive probe molecule for the characterization of molecular sieving effects. To further enhance the potential of activated carbon composite materials for air separation, work was implemented on incorporating a novel twist into the system; namely the addition of a magnetic field to influence O2 adsorption, which is accompanied by a transition between the paramagnetic and diamagnetic states. The preliminary findings in this respect are discussed.

  1. Highly porous activated carbons prepared from carbon rich Mongolian anthracite by direct NaOH activation

    Byamba-Ochir, Narandalai; Shim, Wang Geun; Balathanigaimani, M. S.; Moon, Hee

    2016-08-01

    Highly porous activated carbons (ACs) were prepared from Mongolian raw anthracite (MRA) using sodium hydroxide as an activation agent by varying the mass ratio (powdered MRA/NaOH) as well as the mixing method of chemical agent and powdered MRA. The specific BET surface area and total pore volume of the prepared MRA-based activated carbons (MACs) are in the range of 816-2063 m2/g and of 0.55-1.61 cm3/g, respectively. The pore size distribution of MACs show that most of the pores are in the range from large micropores to small mesopores and their distribution can be controlled by the mass ratio and mixing method of the activating agent. As expected from the intrinsic property of the MRA, the highly graphitic surface morphology of prepared carbons was confirmed from Raman spectra and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies. Furthermore the FTIR and XPS results reveal that the preparation of MACs with hydrophobic in nature is highly possible by controlling the mixing conditions of activating agent and powdered MRA. Based on all the results, it is suggested that the prepared MACs could be used for many specific applications, requiring high surface area, optimal pore size distribution, proper surface hydrophobicity as well as strong physical strength.

  2. [Antiviral activity of the complexes obtained at different ratios of complementary homopolyribonucleotides].

    Novokhatskiĭ, A S; Kogan, E M; Timkovskiĭ, A L

    1978-05-01

    Antiviral activity of the complexes of synthetic polyribonucleotides, i.e. poly (I).poly (C) and poly (G).poly (C) obtained at non-equimolar ratios of homopolymers was studied. The system of chick embryon fibroblasts and horse Venezuellan eguine encephalitis virus served as the model. It was shown that the active and stable complexes poly (I).poly (C) and poly (G).poly (C) were formed at some excess of poly (C), i.e. at the ratio of poly G) or poly (I) to poly (C) equal to 40/60 to 20/80 molar per cent. The role of the excessive poly (C) in formation of the stable secondary structure of the nucleotide complexes and its significance as one of the means for affecting the fine structure of double-stranded RNA were discussed. PMID:655685

  3. Stopping power and energy straggling of protons in graphite and amorphous carbon obtained from a resonance in BS spectra

    Tosaki, Mitsuo [Radioisotope Research Center, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)], E-mail: tosaki@barium.rirc.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Isozumi, Yasuhito [Radioisotope Research Center, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)

    2009-08-15

    Backscattering (BS) spectra with a sharp 4.8-MeV resonance for carbon targets have been measured using proton beams in an energy range 4.85-6.1 MeV per 100-keV step. By systematic analyses of the resonance peak profiles, values of stopping power and energy straggling have been deduced for proton energies from 0.8 to 3.4 MeV which corresponds to a penetration depth of 88 {mu}m. In particular, to investigate the difference in stopping power and straggling caused by target inhomogeneity, we used two target materials which were highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG, 2.26 g/cm{sup 3}) as a homogeneous material and amorphous carbon (1.73 g/cm{sup 3}) as an inhomogeneous material. We describe a method of measuring stopping power and straggling using a resonance in the BS spectra. The stopping powers obtained are compared with the values determined by SRIM-2006. Moreover, collision straggling and a density straggling due to the inhomogeneity of the target materials are evaluated from the width broadening of resonance peaks.

  4. Stopping power and energy straggling of protons in graphite and amorphous carbon obtained from a resonance in BS spectra

    Backscattering (BS) spectra with a sharp 4.8-MeV resonance for carbon targets have been measured using proton beams in an energy range 4.85-6.1 MeV per 100-keV step. By systematic analyses of the resonance peak profiles, values of stopping power and energy straggling have been deduced for proton energies from 0.8 to 3.4 MeV which corresponds to a penetration depth of 88 μm. In particular, to investigate the difference in stopping power and straggling caused by target inhomogeneity, we used two target materials which were highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG, 2.26 g/cm3) as a homogeneous material and amorphous carbon (1.73 g/cm3) as an inhomogeneous material. We describe a method of measuring stopping power and straggling using a resonance in the BS spectra. The stopping powers obtained are compared with the values determined by SRIM-2006. Moreover, collision straggling and a density straggling due to the inhomogeneity of the target materials are evaluated from the width broadening of resonance peaks.

  5. High-performance multi-functional reverse osmosis membranes obtained by carbon nanotube·polyamide nanocomposite.

    Inukai, Shigeki; Cruz-Silva, Rodolfo; Ortiz-Medina, Josue; Morelos-Gomez, Aaron; Takeuchi, Kenji; Hayashi, Takuya; Tanioka, Akihiko; Araki, Takumi; Tejima, Syogo; Noguchi, Toru; Terrones, Mauricio; Endo, Morinobu

    2015-01-01

    Clean water obtained by desalinating sea water or by purifying wastewater, constitutes a major technological objective in the so-called water century. In this work, a high-performance reverse osmosis (RO) composite thin membrane using multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) and aromatic polyamide (PA), was successfully prepared by interfacial polymerization. The effect of MWCNT on the chlorine resistance, antifouling and desalination performances of the nanocomposite membranes were studied. We found that a suitable amount of MWCNT in PA, 15.5 wt.%, not only improves the membrane performance in terms of flow and antifouling, but also inhibits the chlorine degradation on these membranes. Therefore, the present results clearly establish a solid foundation towards more efficient large-scale water desalination and other water treatment processes. PMID:26333385

  6. High-performance multi-functional reverse osmosis membranes obtained by carbon nanotube·polyamide nanocomposite

    Inukai, Shigeki; Cruz-Silva, Rodolfo; Ortiz-Medina, Josue; Morelos-Gomez, Aaron; Takeuchi, Kenji; Hayashi, Takuya; Tanioka, Akihiko; Araki, Takumi; Tejima, Syogo; Noguchi, Toru; Terrones, Mauricio; Endo, Morinobu

    2015-09-01

    Clean water obtained by desalinating sea water or by purifying wastewater, constitutes a major technological objective in the so-called water century. In this work, a high-performance reverse osmosis (RO) composite thin membrane using multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) and aromatic polyamide (PA), was successfully prepared by interfacial polymerization. The effect of MWCNT on the chlorine resistance, antifouling and desalination performances of the nanocomposite membranes were studied. We found that a suitable amount of MWCNT in PA, 15.5 wt.%, not only improves the membrane performance in terms of flow and antifouling, but also inhibits the chlorine degradation on these membranes. Therefore, the present results clearly establish a solid foundation towards more efficient large-scale water desalination and other water treatment processes.

  7. Measurement of carbon activity of sodium using nickel tabs and the Harwell Carbon Meter - Preliminary experience

    Carbon can have an important effect on the mechanical properties of certain constructional materials likely to be used in the LMFBRs. Transfer of carbon will occur between the metal and the sodium at any particular location to bring the chemical potential of carbon in both components to the sam: value. Thus, in a mixed system containing austenitic stainless steel and unstabilized ferritic steel, carbon could be transferred by the sodium from the high carbon activity ferritic to the lower activity austenitic steel. Loss of carbon from the unstabilized ferritic steel leads to a weaker, more ductile material, while carburization of the stainless steel could lead to its embrittlement. Similarly carbon entering the coolant in the form of oil from leaking mechanical pumps could have similar effects on the mechanical property of stainless steels. In the light of these possibilities it is essential to measure the carbon activity of the sodium so that its effect on materials properties can be predicted

  8. ACE-I Inhibitory Activity from Phaseolus lunatus and Phaseolus vulgaris Peptide Fractions Obtained by Ultrafiltration.

    Betancur-Ancona, David; Dávila-Ortiz, Gloria; Chel-Guerrero, Luis Antonio; Torruco-Uco, Juan Gabriel

    2015-11-01

    The involvement of angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE-I) as one of the mechanisms controlling blood pressure is being studied to find alternative means of control of hypertension on human beings. On the market there are synthetic drugs that can control it, but these can cause undesirable health side effects. In this work was assessed the fractionation by ultrafiltration of the Lima bean (Phaseolus lunatus) and Jamapa bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), protein hydrolysates obtained with Alcalase(®) and Flavourzyme(®) on ACE-I inhibitory activity. Four membranes of different molecular cutoffs (10, 5, 3, and 1 kDa) were used. Fractions that had a higher inhibitory activity in both legumes were denominated as E (Alcalase and Flavourzyme, respectively, and for the Phaseolus vulgaris with Alcalase and Flavourzyme with about 63.8 and 65.8 μg/mL values, respectively. The amino acid composition of these fractions showed residues in essential amino acids, which make a good source of energy and amino acids. On the other hand, the presence of hydrophobic amino acids such as V and P is a determining factor in the ACE-I inhibitor effect. The results suggest the possibility of obtaining and utilizing these peptide fractions in the development and innovation of a functional product that helps with treatment and/or prevention of hypertension. PMID:26061663

  9. Antiproliferative activity of VLC fractions obtained from Asparagopsis armata associated bacteria

    João Fonseca Francisco

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Many studies are showing the presence of bioactive compounds in marine organisms, such as algae and algae associated bacteria. Cancer is one of the major causes of death in the world, consequently research for new antitumor compounds is continuous and have high importance for the human health. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antitumor activity of Shewanella sp. associated bacteria from Asparagopsis armata. Crude extract of associated bacteria was obtained with methanol and dichloromethane (1:1 extraction. Then the crude extract was fractioned by vacuum liquid chromatography (VLC using cyclohexane with increasing amounts of 25% of ethyl acetate, in order to isolate different compounds obtained five fractions (F1-F5. The cell viability and the cell proliferation studies were performed on human breast adenocarcinoma cell line (MCF-7 cells according to MTT method. In cytotoxicity assay (1mg/ml; 24 hours, the highest reduction of MCF-7 viability was induced by F2 and F3 fractions (53.6% and 48.6% respectively. On the other hand in cell proliferation assay (1mg/ml; 24 hours, all fractions showed anti-proliferative activity (1mg/mL, however the highest inhibition of MCF-7 proliferation was exhibited by F3 and F5 fractions, 15% and 17,7%, respectively. These results suggest that the Shewanella sp. associated bacteria from Asparagopsis armata can be an interesting source of new antitumor drugs.

  10. HYDROGEN SULFIDE ADSORPTION BY ALKALINE IMPREGNATED COCONUT SHELL ACTIVATED CARBON

    HUI SUN CHOO

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Biogas is one type of renewable energy which can be burnt to produce heat and electricity. However, it cannot be burnt directly due to the presence of hydrogen sulfide (H2S which is highly corrosive to gas engine. In this study, coconut shell activated carbon (CSAC was applied as a porous adsorbent for H2S removal. The effect of amount of activated carbon and flow rate of gas stream toward adsorption capacity were investigated. Then, the activated carbons were impregnated by three types of alkaline (NaOH, KOH and K2CO3 with various ratios. The effects of various types of alkaline and their impregnation ratio towards adsorption capacity were analysed. In addition, H2S influent concentration and the reaction temperature on H2S adsorption were also investigated. The result indicated that adsorption capacity increases with the amount of activated carbon and decreases with flow rate of gas stream. Alkaline impregnated activated carbons had better performance than unimpregnated activated carbon. Among all impregnated activated carbons, activated carbon impregnated by K2CO3 with ratio 2.0 gave the highest adsorption capacity. Its adsorption capacity was 25 times higher than unimpregnated activated carbon. The result also indicated that the adsorption capacity of impregnated activated carbon decreased with the increment of H2S influent concentration. Optimum temperature for H2S adsorption was found to be 50˚C. In this study, the adsorption of H2S on K2CO3 impregnated activated carbon was fitted to the Langmuir isotherm. The fresh and spent K2CO3 impregnated activated carbon were characterized to study the adsorption process.