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Sample records for activated carbon adsorption

  1. Adsorption of organic substances to activated carbon

    Adsorption systems using activated carbon as an almost universal adsorbent for organic substances are widely applied for purifying exhaust air. The possibilities, limits and measures for an optimum design of activated carbon processes are given from the point of view of the plant designed and under the aspects of the present laws for environmental control. (orig.)

  2. Microcystin-LR Adsorption by Activated Carbon.

    Pendleton, Phillip; Schumann, Russell; Wong, Shiaw Hui

    2001-08-01

    We use a selection of wood-based and coconut-based activated carbons to investigate the factors controlling the removal of the hepatotoxin microcystin-LR (m-LR) from aqueous solutions. The wood carbons contain both micropores and mesopores. The coconut carbons contain micropores only. Confirming previously published observations, we also find that the wood-based carbons adsorb more microcystin than the coconut-based carbons. From a combination of a judicious modification of a wood-based carbon's surface chemistry and of the solution chemistry, we demonstrate that both surface and solution chemistry play minor roles in the adsorption process, with the adsorbent surface chemistry exhibiting less influence than the solution chemistry. Conformational changes at low solution pH probably contribute to the observed increase in adsorption by both classes of adsorbent. At the solution pH of 2.5, the coconut-based carbons exhibit a 400% increased affinity for m-LR compared with 100% increases for the wood-based carbons. In an analysis of the thermodynamics of adsorption, using multiple temperature adsorption chromatography methods, we indicate that m-LR adsorption is an entropy-driven process for each of the carbons, except the most hydrophilic and mesoporous carbon, B1. In this case, exothermic enthalpy contributions to adsorption also exist. From our overall observations, since m-LR contains molecular dimensions in the secondary micropore width range, we demonstrate that it is important to consider both the secondary micropore and the mesopore volumes for the adsorption of m-LR from aqueous solutions. Copyright 2001 Academic Press. PMID:11446779

  3. Dynamic adsorption of radon on activated carbon

    The adsorption of 222Rn from air onto activated carbon was studied over the range 0 to 550C. A sharp pulse of radon was injected into an air stream that flowed through a bed of activated carbon. The radon concentration in the exit from the column was continuously monitored using a zinc sulfide α-scintillation flow cell. Elution curves were analyzed to determine the dynamic adsorption coefficient and the number of theoretical stages. Five types of activated carbon were tested and the dynamic adsorption coefficient was found to increase linearly with surface area in the range 1000 to 1300 m2g-1. The adsorptive capacity of activated carbon was reduced by up to 30% if the entering gas was saturated with water vapor and the bed was initially dry. If the bed was allowed to equilibrate with saturated air, the adsorptive capacity was too low to be of practical use. The minimum height equivalent to a theoretical stage (HETS) was about four times the particle diameter and occurred at superficial velocities within the range 0.002 to 0.02 m s-1. For superficial velocities above 0.05 m s-1, the HETS was determined by the rate of mass transfer. The application of these results to the design of activated carbon systems for radon retention is discussed

  4. Adsorption of EDTA on activated carbon from aqueous solutions

    In this study, the adsorption of EDTA on activated carbon from aqueous solutions has been investigated in a batch stirred cell. Experiments have been carried out to investigate the effects of temperature, EDTA concentration, pH, activated carbon mass and particle size on EDTA adsorption. The experimental results manifest that the EDTA adsorption rate increases with its concentration in the aqueous solutions. EDTA adsorption also increases with temperature. The EDTA removal from the solution increases as activated carbon mass increases. The Langmuir and Freundlich equilibrium isotherm models are found to provide a good fitting of the adsorption data, with R2 = 0.9920 and 0.9982, respectively. The kinetic study shows that EDTA adsorption on the activated carbon is in good compliance with the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The thermodynamic parameters (Ea, ΔG0, ΔH0, ΔS0) obtained indicate the endothermic nature of EDTA adsorption on activated carbon.

  5. The Adsorption Mechanism of Modified Activated Carbon on Phenol

    Lin J. Q.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Modified activated carbon was prepared by thermal treatment at high temperature under nitrogen flow. The surface properties of the activated carbon were characterized by Boehm titration, BET and point of zero charge determination. The adsorption mechanism of phenol on modified activated carbon was explained and the adsorption capacity of modified activated carbon for phenol when compared to plain activated carbon was evaluated through the analysis of adsorption isotherms, thermodynamic and kinetic properties. Results shows that after modification the surface alkaline property and pHpzc value of the activated carbon increase and the surface oxygen-containing functional groups decrease. The adsorption processes of the plain and modified carbon fit with Langmuir isotherm equation well, and the maximum adsorption capacity increase from 123.46, 111.11, 103.09mg/g to 192.31, 178.57, 163,93mg/g under 15, 25 and 35°C after modification, respectively. Thermodynamic parameters show that the adsorption of phenol on activated carbon is a spontaneously exothermic process of entropy reduction, implying that the adsorption is a physical adsorption. The adsorption of phenol on activated carbon follows the pseudo-second-order kinetics (R2>0.99. The optimum pH of adsorption is 6~8.

  6. Adsorption of Imidacloprid on Powdered Activated Carbon and Magnetic Activated Carbon

    Zahoor, M.; Mahramanlioglu, M.

    2011-01-01

    The adsorptive characteristics of imidacloprid on magnetic activated carbon (MAC12) in comparison to powdered activated carbon (PAC) were investigated. Adsorption of imidacloprid onto powdered activated carbon and magnetic activated carbon was studied as a function of time, initial imidacloprid concentration, temperature and pH. Pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order and intraparticle diffusion models for both carbons were used to describe the kinetic data. The adsorption equilibrium data we...

  7. HYDROGEN SULFIDE ADSORPTION BY ALKALINE IMPREGNATED COCONUT SHELL ACTIVATED CARBON

    HUI SUN CHOO

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Biogas is one type of renewable energy which can be burnt to produce heat and electricity. However, it cannot be burnt directly due to the presence of hydrogen sulfide (H2S which is highly corrosive to gas engine. In this study, coconut shell activated carbon (CSAC was applied as a porous adsorbent for H2S removal. The effect of amount of activated carbon and flow rate of gas stream toward adsorption capacity were investigated. Then, the activated carbons were impregnated by three types of alkaline (NaOH, KOH and K2CO3 with various ratios. The effects of various types of alkaline and their impregnation ratio towards adsorption capacity were analysed. In addition, H2S influent concentration and the reaction temperature on H2S adsorption were also investigated. The result indicated that adsorption capacity increases with the amount of activated carbon and decreases with flow rate of gas stream. Alkaline impregnated activated carbons had better performance than unimpregnated activated carbon. Among all impregnated activated carbons, activated carbon impregnated by K2CO3 with ratio 2.0 gave the highest adsorption capacity. Its adsorption capacity was 25 times higher than unimpregnated activated carbon. The result also indicated that the adsorption capacity of impregnated activated carbon decreased with the increment of H2S influent concentration. Optimum temperature for H2S adsorption was found to be 50˚C. In this study, the adsorption of H2S on K2CO3 impregnated activated carbon was fitted to the Langmuir isotherm. The fresh and spent K2CO3 impregnated activated carbon were characterized to study the adsorption process.

  8. Studies on adsorptive desulfurization by activated carbon

    Rakesh Kumar, D.; Srivastava, Vimal Chandra [Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee, Uttarakhand (India)

    2012-05-15

    Sulfur removal using adsorption requires a proper process parametric study to determine its optimal performance characteristics. In this study, response surface methodology was employed for sulfur removal from model oil (dibenzothiophene; DBT dissolved in iso-octane) using commercial activated carbon (CAC) as an adsorbent. Experiments were carried out as per central composite design with four input parameters such as initial concentration (C{sub 0}: 100-900 mg/L), adsorbent dosage (m: 2-22 g/L), time of adsorption (t: 15-735 min), and temperature (T: 10-50 C). Regression analysis showed good fit of the experimental data to the second-order polynomial model with coefficient of determination R{sup 2}-value of 0.9390 and Fisher F-value of 16.5. The highest removal of sulfur by CAC was obtained with m = 20 g/L, t = 6 h, and T = 30 C. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  9. Adsorption of light alkanes on coconut nanoporous activated carbon

    K. S. Walton

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents experimental results for adsorption equilibrium of methane, ethane, and butane on nanoporous activated carbon obtained from coconut shells. The adsorption data were obtained gravimetrically at temperatures between 260 and 300K and pressures up to 1 bar. The Toth isotherm was used to correlate the data, showing good agreement with measured values. Low-coverage equilibrium constants were estimated using virial plots. Heats of adsorption at different loadings were also estimated from the equilibrium data. Adsorption properties for this material are compared to the same properties for BPL activated carbon and BAX activated carbon.

  10. Water vapor adsorption on activated carbon preadsorbed with naphtalene.

    Zimny, T; Finqueneisel, G; Cossarutto, L; Weber, J V

    2005-05-01

    The adsorption of water vapor on a microporous activated carbon derived from the carbonization of coconut shell has been studied. Preadsorption of naphthalene was used as a tool to determine the location and the influence of the primary adsorbing centers within the porous structure of active carbon. The adsorption was studied in the pressure range p/p0=0-0.95 in a static water vapor system, allowing the investigation of both kinetic and equilibrium experimental data. Modeling of the isotherms using the modified equation of Do and Do was applied to determine the effect of preadsorption on the mechanism of adsorption. PMID:15797395

  11. Adsorption of uranium from crude phosphoric acid using activated carbon

    The adsorption of uranium from crude phosphoric acid has been investigated using conventional activated carbons. It was found that treatment with nitric acid oxidized the surface of activated carbon and significantly increased the adsorption capacity for uranium in acidic solutions. The parameters that affect the uranium(VI) adsorption, such as contact time, solution pH, initial uranium(VI) concentration, and temperature, have been investigated. Equilibrium data were fitted to a simplified Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms for the oxidized samples which indicate that the uranium adsorption onto the activated carbon fitted well with Langmuir isotherm than Freundlich isotherm. Equilibrium studies evaluate the theoretical capacity of activated carbon to be 45.24 g kg-1. (author)

  12. Adsorption of Acenaphthene unto Activated Carbon Produced from Agricultural Wastes

    F.E. Adelowo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The suitability and the performance of activated carbon produced from flamboyant pod back, milk bush kernel shell and rice husk for the effective removal of acenaphthene from simulated wastewater under the influence of carbonization temperature and initial concentration were investigated. The adsorption capacities of all the activated carbons obtained from the selected raw materials are influenced by increasing carbonization temperature. Activated carbons obtained from rice husk at carbonisation temperature of 600°C had the maximum adsorption capacity (5.554 mg g-1 while carbons produced from milk bush at carbonisation temperature of 300°C had the minimum adsorption capacity (1.386 mg g-1, for the adsorption of acenaphthene from the simulated wastewater. The removal efficiencies of the investigated adsorbents generally rank high and the highest value (80.56% was obtained for the adsorption of acenaphthene by rice husk carbonized at 600°C. Furthermore, the removal efficiencies obtained in the study decreased as the initial concentrations of the adsorbate increased. The four selected isotherm models; Freundlich, Langmuir, Temkin and Dubinin-Radushkevich described well the equilibrium adsorption of acenaphthene unto activated carbon derived from Flamboyant pod bark, milk bush kernel shell and rice husk. Sequence of suitability of the selected isotherms in the study was Temkin ≈ Freundlich >Dubinin-Radushkevich>Langmuir for adsorption of acenaphthene. It therefore shows that Temkin isotherm is the most suitable model for fitting experimental data obtained from adsorption of acenaphthene from simulated wastewater unto activated carbon produced from Flamboyant pod bark, milk bush kernel shell and rice husk.

  13. Adsorption of radon from a humid atmosphere on activated carbon

    Temperature and relative humidity can influence the adsorption capacity of radon on activated carbon to a great extent, depending on the physical properties of the carbon. Experiments were carried out to measure the radon uptake by an activated carbon in the presence of water vapor in a specially designed adsorption apparatus. The radon concentrations in the gas and solid phases were measured simultaneously once the adsorption equilibrium and the radioactive equilibrium between the radon daughter products were reached. The experiments in the presence of water vapor were carried out using two approaches. In one case the activated carbon was preequilibrated with water vapor prior to exposing it to radon. In the other case the carbon was exposed to a mixture of water vapor and radon. The uptake capacity for radon decreased substantially when both components were introduced together compared to when carbon was preequilibrated with water

  14. PREPARATION OF ACTIVATED CARBON FIBER AND THEIR XENON ADSORPTION PROPERTIES (Ⅱ)-XENON ADSORPTION PROPERTIES

    2002-01-01

    The adsorption of xenon from air has an interest in the monitoring of nuclear explosion oraccident, or in the treatment of nuclear waste gas. In this paper, the pore structure of several series ofactivated carbon fibers has been characterized. The adsorption properties of xenon on theseactivated carbon fibers under different temperatures have been studied in details. The results showthat the xenon adsorption amount on activated carbon fibers do not increase with specific surfacearea of adsorbents, but are closely related to their pore size distribution. Pores whose radius equal toor narrow than 0.4nm would be more advantageous to the adsorption of xenon.

  15. Some aspects of activated carbon selection for radioactive iodine adsorption

    A method is suggested and technology developed for testing the activated carbon applicability for iodine filters. Testing results are presented for the air clean-up both under NPP normal operation conditions and during accidents. The activated carbon produced in Poland is compared with the imported one with respect to its integral and differential efficiency of CH3131I adsorption

  16. Breakthrough CO₂ adsorption in bio-based activated carbons.

    Shahkarami, Sepideh; Azargohar, Ramin; Dalai, Ajay K; Soltan, Jafar

    2015-08-01

    In this work, the effects of different methods of activation on CO2 adsorption performance of activated carbon were studied. Activated carbons were prepared from biochar, obtained from fast pyrolysis of white wood, using three different activation methods of steam activation, CO2 activation and Potassium hydroxide (KOH) activation. CO2 adsorption behavior of the produced activated carbons was studied in a fixed-bed reactor set-up at atmospheric pressure, temperature range of 25-65°C and inlet CO2 concentration range of 10-30 mol% in He to determine the effects of the surface area, porosity and surface chemistry on adsorption capacity of the samples. Characterization of the micropore and mesopore texture was carried out using N2 and CO2 adsorption at 77 and 273 K, respectively. Central composite design was used to evaluate the combined effects of temperature and concentration of CO2 on the adsorption behavior of the adsorbents. The KOH activated carbon with a total micropore volume of 0.62 cm(3)/g and surface area of 1400 m(2)/g had the highest CO2 adsorption capacity of 1.8 mol/kg due to its microporous structure and high surface area under the optimized experimental conditions of 30 mol% CO2 and 25°C. The performance of the adsorbents in multi-cyclic adsorption process was also assessed and the adsorption capacity of KOH and CO2 activated carbons remained remarkably stable after 50 cycles with low temperature (160°C) regeneration. PMID:26257348

  17. ADSORPTION CHARACTERISTICS OF L-HISTIDINE ON ACTIVE CARBON

    2005-01-01

    Adsorption properties of L-histidine on active carbon were studied in the paper, which are affected by the main parameters, such as the quantity percent of active carbon, pH value of the solution, the time of adsorption equilibrium and adsorption temperature. The results indicate that adsorption equilibrium time of L-his on active carbon is about 80 minutes. With the increasing of the quantity percent of active carbon, the adsorbance of L-his decreases sharply, and increases lighter after that. When the quantity percent of active carbon is 10%, the adsorbance reaches the minimum.pH value of solution and extraction temperature have great affection on the adsorption. When the pH value is higher or lower than the pI of L-his, the adsorbance is small, even zero. It is proven that the experimental equilibrium data which are obtained under the conditions of 80 ℃and pH=1.0, are fitted with the Freundlich equation: q=2.5914c0.8097. The results can provide certain references in L-his adsorption process of industrial operation.

  18. [Adsorption of perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) onto modified activated carbons].

    Tong, Xi-Zhen; Shi, Bao-You; Xie, Yue; Wang, Dong-Sheng

    2012-09-01

    Modified coal and coconut shell based powdered activated carbons (PACs) were prepared by FeCl3 and medium power microwave treatment, respectively. Batch experiments were carried out to evaluate the characteristics of adsorption equilibrium and kinetics of perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) onto original and modified PACs. Based on pore structure and surface functional groups characterization, the adsorption behaviors of modified and original PACs were compared. The competitive adsorption of humic acid (HA) and PFOS on original and modified coconut shell PACs were also investigated. Results showed that both Fe3+ and medium power microwave treatments changed the pore structure and surface functional groups of coal and coconut shell PACs, but the changing effects were different. The adsorption of PFOS on two modified coconut shell-based PACs was significantly improved. While the adsorption of modified coal-based activated carbons declined. The adsorption kinetics of PFOS onto original and modified coconut shell-based activated carbons were the same, and the time of reaching adsorption equilibrium was about 6 hours. In the presence of HA, the adsorption of PFOS by modified PAC was reduced but still higher than that of the original. PMID:23243870

  19. Nickel adsorption by sodium polyacrylate-grafted activated carbon

    Ewecharoen, A. [Division of Biotechnology, School of Bioresources and Technology, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, 83 Moo 8 Thakham, Bangkhuntien, Bangkok 10150 (Thailand); Thiravetyan, P., E-mail: paitip@hotmail.com [Division of Biotechnology, School of Bioresources and Technology, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, 83 Moo 8 Thakham, Bangkhuntien, Bangkok 10150 (Thailand); Wendel, E.; Bertagnolli, H. [Institut fuer Physikalische Chemie, Universitaet Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 55, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2009-11-15

    A novel sodium polyacrylate grafted activated carbon was produced by using gamma radiation to increase the number of functional groups on the surface. After irradiation the capacity for nickel adsorption was studied and found to have increased from 44.1 to 55.7 mg g{sup -1}. X-ray absorption spectroscopy showed that the adsorbed nickel on activated carbon and irradiation-grafted activated carbon was coordinated with 6 oxygen atoms at 2.04-2.06 A. It is proposed that this grafting technique could be applied to other adsorbents to increase the efficiency of metal adsorption.

  20. Nickel adsorption by sodium polyacrylate-grafted activated carbon.

    Ewecharoen, A; Thiravetyan, P; Wendel, E; Bertagnolli, H

    2009-11-15

    A novel sodium polyacrylate grafted activated carbon was produced by using gamma radiation to increase the number of functional groups on the surface. After irradiation the capacity for nickel adsorption was studied and found to have increased from 44.1 to 55.7 mg g(-1). X-ray absorption spectroscopy showed that the adsorbed nickel on activated carbon and irradiation-grafted activated carbon was coordinated with 6 oxygen atoms at 2.04-2.06 A. It is proposed that this grafting technique could be applied to other adsorbents to increase the efficiency of metal adsorption. PMID:19576692

  1. Factors governing the adsorption of ethanol on spherical activated carbons

    Romero Anaya, Aroldo José; Lillo Ródenas, María Ángeles; Linares Solano, Ángel

    2015-01-01

    Ethanol adsorption on different activated carbons (mostly spherical ones) was investigated covering the relative pressure range from 0.001 to 1. Oxygen surface contents of the ACs were modified by oxidation (in HNO3 solution or air) and/or by thermal treatment in N2. To differentiate the concomitant effects of porosity and oxygen surface chemistry on ethanol adsorption, different sets of samples were used to analyze different relative pressure ranges (below 1000 ppmv concentration and close t...

  2. Adsorption of dyes onto activated carbon prepared from olive stones

    Souad NAJAR-SOUISSI; Abdelmottaleb OUEDERNI; Abdelhamid RATEL

    2005-01-01

    Activated carbon was produced from olive stones(OSAC) by a physical process in two steps. The adsorption character of this activated carbon was tested on three colour dyes molecules in aqueous solution: Methylene blue(MB), Rhodamine B(RB) and Congo Red(CR). The adsorption equilibrium was studied through isotherms construction at 30℃, which were well described by Langmuir model.The adsorption capacity on the OSAC was estimated to be 303 mg/g, 217 mg/g and 167 mg/g respectively for MB, RB and CR. This activated carbon has a similar adsorption properties to that of commercial ones and show the same adsorption performances. The adsorption kinetics of the MB molecule in aqueous solution at different initial concentrations by OSAC was also studied. Kinetic experiments were well fitted by a simple intra-particle diffusion model. The measured kinetics constant was influenced by the initial concentration and we found the following correlation: Kid = 1.55 C00.51 .

  3. Adsorption Properties of Lignin-derived Activated Carbon Fibers (LACF)

    Contescu, Cristian I. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gallego, Nidia C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Thibaud-Erkey, Catherine [United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), East Hartford, CT (United States); Karra, Reddy [United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), East Hartford, CT (United States)

    2016-04-01

    The object of this CRADA project between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and United Technologies Research Center (UTRC) is the characterization of lignin-derived activated carbon fibers (LACF) and determination of their adsorption properties for volatile organic compounds (VOC). Carbon fibers from lignin raw materials were manufactured at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) using the technology previously developed at ORNL. These fibers were physically activated at ORNL using various activation conditions, and their surface area and pore-size distribution were characterized by gas adsorption. Based on these properties, ORNL did down-select five differently activated LACF materials that were delivered to UTRC for measurement of VOC adsorption properties. UTRC used standard techniques based on breakthrough curves to measure and determine the adsorption properties of indoor air pollutants (IAP) - namely formaldehyde and carbon dioxide - and to verify the extent of saturated fiber regenerability by thermal treatments. The results are summarized as follows: (1) ORNL demonstrated that physical activation of lignin-derived carbon fibers can be tailored to obtain LACF with surface areas and pore size distributions matching the properties of activated carbon fibers obtained from more expensive, fossil-fuel precursors; (2) UTRC investigated the LACF potential for use in air cleaning applications currently pursued by UTRC, such as building ventilation, and demonstrated their regenerability for CO2 and formaldehyde, (3) Both partners agree that LACF have potential for possible use in air cleaning applications.

  4. Tc-99 Adsorption on Selected Activated Carbons - Batch Testing Results

    Mattigod, Shas V.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Cordova, Elsa A.; Smith, Ronald M.

    2010-12-01

    CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) is currently developing a 200-West Area groundwater pump-and-treat system as the remedial action selected under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Record of Decision for Operable Unit (OU) 200-ZP-1. This report documents the results of treatability tests Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers conducted to quantify the ability of selected activated carbon products (or carbons) to adsorb technetium-99 (Tc-99) from 200-West Area groundwater. The Tc-99 adsorption performance of seven activated carbons (J177601 Calgon Fitrasorb 400, J177606 Siemens AC1230AWC, J177609 Carbon Resources CR-1240-AW, J177611 General Carbon GC20X50, J177612 Norit GAC830, J177613 Norit GAC830, and J177617 Nucon LW1230) were evaluated using water from well 299-W19-36. Four of the best performing carbons (J177606 Siemens AC1230AWC, J177609 Carbon Resources CR-1240-AW, J177611 General Carbon GC20X50, and J177613 Norit GAC830) were selected for batch isotherm testing. The batch isotherm tests on four of the selected carbons indicated that under lower nitrate concentration conditions (382 mg/L), Kd values ranged from 6,000 to 20,000 mL/g. In comparison. Under higher nitrate (750 mg/L) conditions, there was a measureable decrease in Tc-99 adsorption with Kd values ranging from 3,000 to 7,000 mL/g. The adsorption data fit both the Langmuir and the Freundlich equations. Supplemental tests were conducted using the two carbons that demonstrated the highest adsorption capacity to resolve the issue of the best fit isotherm. These tests indicated that Langmuir isotherms provided the best fit for Tc-99 adsorption under low nitrate concentration conditions. At the design basis concentration of Tc 0.865 µg/L(14,700 pCi/L), the predicted Kd values from using Langmuir isotherm constants were 5,980 mL/g and 6,870 mL/g for for the two carbons. These Kd values did not meet the target Kd value of 9,000 mL/g. Tests

  5. Adsorption of Remazol Black B dye on Activated Carbon Felt

    Donnaperna Lucio; Duclaux Laurent; Gadiou Roger

    2008-01-01

    The adsorption of Remazol Black B (anionic dye) on a microporous activated carbon felt is investigated from its aqueous solution. The surface chemistry of activated carbon is studied using X-ray microanalysis, "Boehm" titrations and pH of PZC measurements which indicates that the surface oxygenated groups are mainly acidic in nature. The kinetics of Remazol Black B adsorption is observed to be pH dependent and governed by the diffusion of the dye molecules. The experimental data can be explai...

  6. Enhanced adsorption of quaternary amine using modified activated carbon.

    Prahas, Devarly; Wang, M J; Ismadji, Suryadi; Liu, J C

    2014-01-01

    This study examined different methodologies to modify activated carbon (AC) for the removal of quaternary amine, tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH), from water. Commercial carbon (WAC) was treated by nitric acid oxidation (NA-WAC), silica impregnation (SM-WAC0.5), and oxygen plasma (P10-WAC), and their characteristics and adsorption capacity were compared. The Langmuir model fitted the equilibrium adsorption data well under different pH. The maximum adsorption capacity of WAC was 27.77 mg/g, while those of NA-WAC, SM-WAC 0.5, and P10-WAC were 37.46, 32.83 and 29.03 mg/g, respectively. Nitric acid oxidation was the most effective method for enhancing the adsorption capacity of TMAH. Higher pH was favorable for TMAH adsorption. Desorption study revealed that NA-WAC had no considerable reduction in performance even after five cycles of regeneration by 0.1 N hydrochloric acid. It was proposed that electrostatic interaction was the main mechanism of TMAH adsorption on activated carbon. PMID:24845325

  7. Adsorptive preconcentration of rareearth oxine complexes onto activated carbon

    This paper describes a method for the determination of traces of rare earth using energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectrometry (EDXRF) after preconcentration of their oxine complexes onto activated carbon. Various parameters that influence adsorptive preconcentration of rare earth onto activated carbon viz. pH, amounts of activated carbon and oxine, time of stirring and aqueous phase volume were systematically studied. A numerical method based on simple least square procedure using fifth order polynomial with 25 consecutive values was developed for smoothing and differentiation of EDXRF data which was previously digitized and averaged. First order derivative EDXRF in conjunction with adsorptive preconcentration on activated carbon enables one to determine as low as 10 ppb of each individual rare earth elements

  8. HYDROGEN SULFIDE ADSORPTION BY ALKALINE IMPREGNATED COCONUT SHELL ACTIVATED CARBON

    HUI SUN CHOO; LEE CHUNG LAU; ABDUL RAHMAN MOHAMED; KEAT TEONG LEE

    2013-01-01

    Biogas is one type of renewable energy which can be burnt to produce heat and electricity. However, it cannot be burnt directly due to the presence of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) which is highly corrosive to gas engine. In this study, coconut shell activated carbon (CSAC) was applied as a porous adsorbent for H2S removal. The effect of amount of activated carbon and flow rate of gas stream toward adsorption capacity were investigated. Then, the activated carbons were impregnated by three types of ...

  9. Improved Isotherm Data for Adsorption of Methane on Activated Carbons

    Loh, Wai Soong

    2010-08-12

    This article presents the adsorption isotherms of methane onto two different types of activated carbons, namely, Maxsorb III and ACF (A-20) at temperatures from (5 to 75) °C and pressures up to 2.5 MPa. The volumetric technique has been employed to measure the adsorption isotherms. The experimental results presented herein demonstrate the improved accuracy of the uptake values compared with previous measurement techniques for similar adsorbate-adsorbent combinations. The results are analyzed with various adsorption isotherm models. The heat of adsorption, which is concentration and temperature dependent, has been calculated from the measured isotherm data. Henry\\'s law coefficients for these adsorbent-methane pairs are also evaluated at various temperatures. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  10. Calculation of Binary Adsorption Equilibria: Hydrocarbons and Carbon Dioxide on Activated Carbon

    Marcussen, Lis; Krøll, A.

    1999-01-01

    Binary adsorption equilibria are calculated by means of a mathematical model for multicomponent mixtures combined with the SPD (Spreading Pressure Dependent) model for calculation of activity coefficients in the adsorbed phase. The model has been applied successfully for the adsorption of binary ...... mixtures of hydrocarbons and carbon dioxide on activated carbons. The model parameters have been determined, and the model has proven to be suited for prediction of adsorption equilibria in the investigated systems....

  11. Arsenic Adsorption Equilibrium Concentration and Adsorption Rate of Activated Carbon Coated with Ferric-Aluminum Hydroxides

    Zhang, M.; Sugita, H.; Oguma, T.; Hara, J.; Takahashi, S.

    2015-12-01

    In some areas of developing countries, ground or well water contaminated with arsenic has been reluctantly used as drinking water. It is highly desirable that effective and inexpensive arsenic removal agents should be developed and provided to reduce the potential health risk. Previous studies demonstrated that activated carbon coated with ferric-aluminum hydroxides (Fe-Al-C) has high adsorptive potential for removal of arsenic. In this study, a series of experiments using Fe-Al-C were carried to discuss adsorption equilibrium time, adsorption equilibrium concentration and adsorption rate of arsenic for Fe-Al-C. Fe-Al-C used in this study was provided by Astec Co., Ltd. Powder reagent of disodium hydrogen arsenate heptahydrate was dissolved into ion-exchanged water. The solution was then further diluted with ion-exchanged water to be 1 and 10 mg/L as arsenic concentration. The pH of the solution was adjusted to be around 7 by adding HCl and/or NaOH. The solution was used as artificial arsenic contaminated water in two types of experiments (arsenic adsorption equilibrium and arsenic adsorption rate tests). The results of the arsenic equilibrium tests were showed that a time period of about 3 days to reach apparent adsorption equilibrium for arsenic. The apparent adsorption equilibrium concentration and adsorbed amount of arsenic on Fe-Al-C adsorbent could be estimated by application of various adsorption isotherms, but the distribution coefficient of arsenic between solid and liquid varies with experimental conditions such as initial concentration of arsenic and addition concentration of adsorbent. An adsorption rate equation that takes into account the reduction in the number of effective adsorption sites on the adsorbent caused by the arsenic adsorption reaction was derived based on the data obtained from the arsenic adsorption rate tests.

  12. Adsorption of dissolved natural organic matter by modified activated carbons.

    Cheng, Wei; Dastgheib, Seyed A; Karanfil, Tanju

    2005-06-01

    Adsorption of dissolved natural organic matter (DOM) by virgin and modified granular activated carbons (GACs) was studied. DOM samples were obtained from two water treatment plants before (i.e., raw water) and after coagulation/flocculation/sedimentation processes (i.e., treated water). A granular activated carbon (GAC) was modified by high temperature helium or ammonia treatment, or iron impregnation followed by high temperature ammonia treatment. Two activated carbon fibers (ACFs) were also used, with no modification, to examine the effect of carbon porosity on DOM adsorption. Size exclusion chromatography (SEC) and specific ultraviolet absorbance (SUVA(254)) were employed to characterize the DOMs before and after adsorption. Iron-impregnated (HDFe) and ammonia-treated (HDN) activated carbons showed significantly higher DOM uptakes than the virgin GAC. The enhanced DOM uptake by HDFe was due to the presence of iron species on the carbon surface. The higher uptake of HDN was attributed to the enlarged carbon pores and basic surface created during ammonia treatment. The SEC and SUVA(254) results showed no specific selectivity in the removal of different DOM components as a result of carbon modification. The removal of DOM from both raw and treated waters was negligible by ACF10, having 96% of its surface area in pores smaller than 1 nm. Small molecular weight (MW) DOM components were preferentially removed by ACF20H, having 33% of its surface area in 1--3 nm pores. DOM components with MWs larger than 1600, 2000, and 2700 Da of Charleston raw, Charleston-treated, and Spartanburg-treated waters, respectively, were excluded from the pores of ACF20H. In contrast to carbon fibers, DOM components from entire MW range were removed from waters by virgin and modified GACs. PMID:15927230

  13. Adsorption of Gaseous Methyl Iodide by Active Carbons

    The impregnation of active carbons is known to be a useful means of improving the ability of these carbons to retain methyl iodide which might be formed during the accidental release of fission products from a reactor. Some basic work was done on both impregnated and unimpregnated materials, which involved: (a) the texture: (b) the reaction of Mel with the impregnants; (c) the adsorption of Mel on the carbons under dry and wet conditions at different temperatures. It was found that the carbons are highly microporous. A large part of this porosity disappears on impregnation with organic amine; These impregnants react chemically with the methyl iodide, which is thereby fixed on the carbon. For carbon which is impregnated with KI, a rapid exchange reaction takes place between the methyl iodide and KI under both dry and wet conditions. Consequently most of the iodine activity can be removed from the gas. (author)

  14. Grafting of activated carbon cloths for selective adsorption

    Gineys, M.; Benoit, R.; Cohaut, N.; Béguin, F.; Delpeux-Ouldriane, S.

    2016-05-01

    Chemical functionalization of an activated carbon cloth with 3-aminophthalic acid and 4-aminobenzoic acid groups by the in situ formation of the corresponding diazonium salt in aqueous acidic solution is reported. The nature and amount of selected functions on an activated carbon surface, in particular the grafted density, were determined by potentiometric titration, elemental analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The nanotextural properties of the modified carbon were explored by gas adsorption. Functionalized activated carbon cloth was obtained at a discrete grafting level while preserving interesting textural properties and a large porous volume. Finally, the grafting homogeneity of the carbon surface and the nature of the chemical bonding were investigated using Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) technique.

  15. TESTING GUIDELINES FOR TECHNETIUM-99 ADSORPTION ON ACTIVATED CARBON

    CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) is currently evaluating the potential use of activated carbon adsorption for removing technetium-99 from groundwater as a treatment method for the Hanford Site's 200 West Area groundwater pump-and-treat system. The current pump-and-treat system design will include an ion-exchange (IX) system for selective removal of technetium-99 from selected wells prior to subsequent treatment of the water in the central treatment system. The IX resin selected for technetium-99 removal is Purolite A530E. The resin service life is estimated to be approximately 66.85 days at the design technetium-99 loading rate, and the spent resin must be replaced because it cannot be regenerated. The resulting operating costs associated with resin replacement every 66.85 days are estimated at $0.98 million/year. Activated carbon pre-treatment is being evaluated as a potential cost-saving measure to offset the high operating costs associated with frequent IX resin replacement. This document is preceded by the Literature Survey of Technetium-99 Groundwater Pre-Treatment Option Using Granular Activated Carbon (SGW-43928), which identified and evaluated prior research related to technetium-99 adsorption on activated carbon. The survey also evaluated potential operating considerations for this treatment approach for the 200 West Area. The preliminary conclusions of the literature survey are as follows: (1) Activated carbon can be used to selectively remove technetium-99 from contaminated groundwater. (2) Technetium-99 adsorption onto activated carbon is expected to vary significantly based on carbon types and operating conditions. For the treatment approach to be viable at the Hanford Site, activated carbon must be capable of achieving a designated minimum technetium-99 uptake. (3) Certain radionuclides known to be present in 200 West Area groundwater are also likely to adsorb onto activated carbon. (4) Organic solvent contaminants of concern (COCs) will

  16. ORGANIC CHELATING REAGENT ON REDOX ADSORPTION OF ACTIVATED CARBON FIBER TOWARDS Au3+

    2002-01-01

    Organic chelating reagent influences upon the redox adsorption of activated carbon fibertowards Au3- were systematically investigated. The experimental results indicated that the presenceof organic chelating reagent on activated carbon fiber strongly affects adsorption capacity ofactivated carbon fiber towards Au3+. The reduction-adsorption amount of Au3+ increased three timesby the presence of 8-quinolinol. Furthermore, The reduction-adsorption amount of Au3+ depended onthe pH value of adsorption and temperature.

  17. CO2 adsorption on chemically modified activated carbon.

    Caglayan, Burcu Selen; Aksoylu, A Erhan

    2013-05-15

    CO2 adsorption capacity of a commercial activated carbon was improved by using HNO3 oxidation, air oxidation, alkali impregnation and heat treatment under helium gas atmosphere. The surface functional groups produced were investigated by diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectrometer (DRIFTS). CO2 adsorption capacities of the samples were determined by gravimetric analyses for 25-200°C temperature range. DRIFTS studies revealed the formation of carboxylic acid groups on the HNO3 oxidized adsorbents. Increased aromatization and uniform distribution of the Na particles were observed on the samples prepared by Na2CO3 impregnation onto HNO3 oxidized AC support. The adsorption capacities of the nonimpregnated samples were increased by high temperature helium treatments or by increasing the adsorption temperature; both leading to decomposition of surface oxygen groups, forming sites that can easily adsorb CO2. The adsorption capacity loss due to cyclic adsorption/desorption procedures was overcome with further surface stabilization of Na2CO3 modified samples with high temperature He treatments. With Na2CO3 impregnation the mass uptakes of the adsorbents at 20 bars and 25 °C were improved by 8 and 7 folds and at 1 bar were increased 15 and 16 folds, on the average, compared to their air oxidized and nitric acid oxidized supports, respectively. PMID:23500788

  18. Irreversible adsorption of phenolic compounds by activated carbons

    Studies were undertaken to determine the reasons why phenolic sorbates can be difficult to remove and recover from activated carbons. The chemical properties of the sorbate and the adsorbent surface, and the influences of changes in the adsorption and desorption conditions were investigated. Comparison of isotherms established after different contact times or at different temperatures indicated that phenolic compounds react on carbon surfaces. The reaction rate is a strong function of temperature. Regeneration of carbons by leaching with acetone recovered at least as much phenol as did regeneration with other solvents or with displacers. The physiochemical properties of adsorbents influences irreversible uptakes. Sorbates differed markedly in their tendencies to undergo irreversible adsorption. 64 refs., 47 figs., 32 tabs

  19. Modeling equilibrium adsorption of organic micropollutants onto activated carbon

    De Ridder, David J.

    2010-05-01

    Solute hydrophobicity, polarizability, aromaticity and the presence of H-bond donor/acceptor groups have been identified as important solute properties that affect the adsorption on activated carbon. However, the adsorption mechanisms related to these properties occur in parallel, and their respective dominance depends on the solute properties as well as carbon characteristics. In this paper, a model based on multivariate linear regression is described that was developed to predict equilibrium carbon loading on a specific activated carbon (F400) for solutes reflecting a wide range of solute properties. In order to improve prediction accuracy, groups (bins) of solutes with similar solute properties were defined and solute removals were predicted for each bin separately. With these individual linear models, coefficients of determination (R2) values ranging from 0.61 to 0.84 were obtained. With the mechanistic approach used in developing this predictive model, a strong relation with adsorption mechanisms is established, improving the interpretation and, ultimately, acceptance of the model. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Effect of calcium on adsorption capacity of powdered activated carbon.

    Li, Gang; Shang, Junteng; Wang, Ying; Li, Yansheng; Gao, Hong

    2013-12-01

    We investigated the effect of calcium ion on the adsorption of humic acid (HA) (as a target pollutant) by powered activated carbon. The HA adsorption isotherms at different pH and kinetics of two different solutions including HA alone and HA doped Ca(2+), were performed. It was showed that the adsorption capacity of powdered activated carbon (PAC) for HA was markedly enhanced when Ca(2+) was doped into HA. Also, HA and Ca(2+) taken as nitrate were tested on the uptake of each other respectively and it was showed that the adsorbed amounts of both of them were significantly promoted when HA and calcium co-existed. Furthermore, the adsorbed amount of HA slightly decreased with the increasing of Ca(2+) concentration, whereas the amount of calcium increased with the increasing of HA concentration, but all above the amounts without addition. Finally, the change of pH before and after adsorption process is studied. In the two different solutions including HA alone and HA doped Ca(2+), pH had a small rise, but the extent of pH of later solution was bigger. PMID:25078809

  1. A simplified adsorption model for water vapor adsorption on activated carbon

    姚小龙; 李立清; 李海龙; 马卫武

    2014-01-01

    A simplified model was developed to describe the water vapor adsorption on activated carbon. The development of the simplified model was started from the original model proposed by DO and his co-workers. Two different kinds of carbon materials were prepared for water vapor adsorption, and the adsorption experiments were conducted at different temperatures (20-50 °C) and relative humidities (5%-99%) to test the model. It is shown that the amount of adsorbed water vapor in micropore decreases with the temperature increasing, and the water molecules form larger water clusters around the functional group as the temperature is up to a higher value. The simplified model describes reasonably well for all the experimental data. According to the fitted values, the parameters of simplified model were represented by the temperature and then the model was used to calculate the water vapor adsorption amount at 25 °C and 35 °C. The results show that the model can get relatively accurate values to calculate the water vapor adsorption on activated carbon.

  2. Adsorption characteristics and heat of adsorption measurements of R-134a on activated carbon

    Saha, Bidyut B. [Mechanical Engineering Department, National University of Singapore, 10 Kent Ridge Crescent (Singapore); Habib, Khairul; Koyama, Shigeru [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Sciences, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasuga-koen, Kasuga-shi, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); El-Sharkawy, Ibrahim I. [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Sciences, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasuga-koen, Kasuga-shi, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Mechanical Power Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, Mansoura University, El-Mansoura (Egypt)

    2009-11-15

    This paper presents adsorption isotherms of R-134a (HFC-134a) on highly porous pitch based activated carbon (Maxsorb III) in the temperature range of 5-70 C and pressures up to 12 bar, using desorption method. The experimental data have been fitted with the Dubinin-Astakhov (D-A) isotherm equation. The adsorption isotherms of R-134a on Maxsorb III obtained from the present study are compared with the adsorption isotherm results of R-134a on similar type of adsorbents obtained by other researchers and they are found to be fairly consistent. The isosteric heat of adsorption of the assorted adsorbent-refrigerant pair has also been extracted from the present experimental data. (author)

  3. Enhanced mercury ion adsorption by amine-modified activated carbon

    Zhu Jianzhong [Center of Environmental Sciences, Lincoln University of Missouri, Jefferson City, MO 65102 (United States); Yang, John, E-mail: yangj@lincolnu.edu [Center of Environmental Sciences, Lincoln University of Missouri, Jefferson City, MO 65102 (United States); Deng Baolin [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States)

    2009-07-30

    Mercury (Hg) is one of the most toxic metals found in water and sediments. In an effort to develop an effective adsorbent for aqueous Hg removal, activated carbon (AC) was modified with an amino-terminated organosilicon (3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane, APTES). Surface properties of the APTES-modified AC (MAC) were characterized by the scanning electron microscopy in conjunction with the energy-dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), and potentiometry. The impacts of solvent, APTES concentration, reactive time and temperature on the surface modification were evaluated. The aqueous Hg adsorptive kinetics and capacity were also determined. Results demonstrated that the strong Hg-binding amine ligands were effectively introduced onto the AC surfaces through the silanol reaction between carbon surface functional groups (-COOH, -COH) and APTES molecules. The modification lowered the pH at the point of zero charge (pH{sub pzc}) to 4.54 from 9.6, favoring cation adsorption. MAC presented a faster rate of the Hg (II) adsorption and more than double adsorptive capacity as compared with AC.

  4. Liquid-phase adsorption of phenol onto activated carbons prepared with different activation levels

    Hsieh, C.T.; Teng, H.S.

    2000-07-01

    The paper investigates the influence of the pore size distribution of activated carbon on the adsorption of phenol from aqueous solutions. Activated carbons with different porous structures were prepared by gasifying a bituminous coal char to different extents of burn-off. The results of adsorption experiments show that the phenol capacity of these carbons does not proportionally increase with their BET surface area. This reflects the heterogeneity of the carbon surface for adsorption. The pore size distributions of these carbons were found to vary with the burn-off level. The paper demonstrates that the heterogeneity of carbon surface for the phenol adsorption can be attributed to the different energies required for adsorption in different-size micropores.

  5. Adsorption of naphthenic acids on high surface area activated carbons.

    Iranmanesh, Sobhan; Harding, Thomas; Abedi, Jalal; Seyedeyn-Azad, Fakhry; Layzell, David B

    2014-01-01

    In oil sands mining extraction, water is an essential component; however, the processed water becomes contaminated through contact with the bitumen at high temperature, and a portion of it cannot be recycled and ends up in tailing ponds. The removal of naphthenic acids (NAs) from tailing pond water is crucial, as they are corrosive and toxic and provide a substrate for microbial activity that can give rise to methane, which is a potent greenhouse gas. In this study, the conversion of sawdust into an activated carbon (AC) that could be used to remove NAs from tailings water was studied. After producing biochar from sawdust by a slow-pyrolysis process, the biochar was physically activated using carbon dioxide (CO2) over a range of temperatures or prior to producing biochar, and the sawdust was chemically activated using phosphoric acid (H3PO4). The physically activated carbon had a lower surface area per gram than the chemically activated carbon. The physically produced ACs had a lower surface area per gram than chemically produced AC. In the adsorption tests with NAs, up to 35 mg of NAs was removed from the water per gram of AC. The chemically treated ACs showed better uptake, which can be attributed to its higher surface area and increased mesopore size when compared with the physically treated AC. Both the chemically produced and physically produced AC provided better uptake than the commercially AC. PMID:24766592

  6. Activated carbon from vetiver roots: gas and liquid adsorption studies.

    Gaspard, S; Altenor, S; Dawson, E A; Barnes, P A; Ouensanga, A

    2007-06-01

    Large quantities of lignocellulosic residues result from the industrial production of essential oil from vetiver grass (Vetiveria zizanioides) roots. These residues could be used for the production of activated carbon. The yield of char obtained after vetiver roots pyrolysis follows an equation recently developed [A. Ouensanga, L. Largitte, M.A. Arsene, The dependence of char yield on the amounts of components in precursors for pyrolysed tropical fruit stones and seeds, Micropor. Mesopor. Mater. 59 (2003) 85-91]. The N(2) adsorption isotherm follows either the Freundlich law K(F)P(alpha) which is the small alpha equation limit of a Weibull shaped isotherm or the classical BET isotherm. The surface area of the activated carbons are determined using the BET method. The K(F) value is proportional to the BET surface area. The alpha value increases slightly when the burn-off increases and also when there is a clear increase in the micropore distribution width. PMID:17092643

  7. Adsorption of triton X100 and potassium hydrogen phthalate on granular activated carbon from date pits

    Merzougui, Z.; Nedjah, S.; Azoudj, Y.; Addoun, F. [Laboratoire d' etude physic-chimique des materiaux et application a l' environnement, Faculte de Chimie, USTHB (Algeria)], E-mail: zmerzougi@yahoo.fr

    2011-07-01

    Activated carbons, thanks to their versatility, are being used in the water treatment sector to absorb pollutants. Several factors influence the adsorption capacity of activated carbon and the aim of this study was to assess the effects of the porous texture and chemical nature of activated carbons on the adsorption of triton X100 and potassium hydrogen phthalate. Activated carbons used in this study were prepared from date pits with ZnCl2, KOH and H3PO4 by carbonization without adjuvant and adsorption of triton X100 and potassium hydrogen phthalate was conducted at 298K. Results showed that activated carbons prepared from date pits have a great potential for removing organic and inorganic pollutants from water and that the adsorption potential depends on the degree of activation of the activated carbons and on the compounds to absorb. This study highlighted that an increase of the carbon surface area and porosity results in a better adsorption capacity.

  8. Adsorption and biodegradation of high explosives on granular activated carbon

    Morley, M.C.; Shammas, S.; Speitel, G.E. Jr.

    1999-07-01

    Adsorption to granular activated carbon (GAC) is an effective method for removing high explosives (HE) compounds from water, but no permanent treatment is achieved. An off-line bioregeneration system, which combines adsorption and biodegradation, is being developed to reduce GAC usage rates and destroy RDX and HMX. Desorption is often the limiting mass transfer mechanism in bioregeneration systems; thus, two cosolvents, four surfactants, and two cyclodextrins were considered for improving desorption of RDX and HMX. In batch experiments, about 3% of the adsorbed RDX was desorbed over 11 days using buggered water as the desorption fluid. In comparison, about 96% of the RDX was extracted from the GAC by acetonitrile. Ethanol and methanol were both effective in desorbing RDX and HMX. Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), an anionic surfactant, desorbed 56.4% of the RDX at a concentration of 500 mg SDS/L. Cyclodextrins were marginally more effective than water. Continuous operation of a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) has effectively treated both contaminants. In an SBR that was operated with 4-day cycles for 72 days, mixed cultures consistently reduced RDX concentrations from 1 mg/L to non-detectable levels and HMX from 0.6 mg/L to 0.4 mg/L over each cycle. When removal from groundwater by adsorption is combined with enhanced desorption and subsequent biological treatment, the overall process is expected to effectively increase the GAC service life and provide a permanent treatment method for RDX and HMX.

  9. Dynamic adsorption properties of xenon on activated carbons and their structure characterization

    Background: In recent years, adsorption of radioactive xenon by activated carbon has been increasingly applied to the treatment of off-gas in nuclear power project. Though pore structure of activated carbon has a great impact on its dynamic adsorption coefficients for xenon, the concerned research is rare. Purpose: It is very necessary to figure out the relationship between the pore structure and the dynamic adsorption coefficients for the purpose of the selection and development of activated carbon. Methods: In this study, the dynamic adsorption coefficients of xenon on four kinds of activated carbons were measured on a dynamic adsorption platform under the condition of 25℃, OMPa (gauge pressure). And these four kinds of activated carbons were characterized by nitrogen adsorption and SEM. Results: The results show that the activated carbon of JH12-16 with the specific surface area of 991.9 m2·g-1 has the largest xenon dynamic adsorption coefficient among these activated carbons. Conclusions: The dynamic adsorption coefficient of xenon on activated carbon doesn't increase with the specific surface area or the pore volume. The mesopore and macropore only play the role of passageway for xenon adsorption. The most suitable pore for xenon adsorption is the pore with the pore size ranged from 0.55 to 0.6 nm. (authors)

  10. Activated Carbon Adsorption Properties of the Residual Matters in Textile Dyeing and Printing Secondary Effluent

    TIAN Qing; LI Fang; LIU Fang; YANG Bo; CHEN Ji-hua

    2008-01-01

    The research employed the adsorption isotherm measurement, the batch kinetic adsorption and the rapid small-scale carbon column test (RSSCT) to find out the characteristics and main impacting factors of granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorption, in treating the textile dyeing-printing/polyester alkali de-weighting secondary effluent (TSE). The adsorption affinities and capacities for the organics surrogated by CODCr, color and UV254 (UV absorbency at λ= 254 nm) predicted by isotherm, small-scale-fixed bed were discussed. Adsorption rates for CODCr, color and UV254 are much different and carbon particle size dependent. The color adsorption rate and capacity should be taken as the main consideration factors in designing bio-activated carbon filter(BACF). The breakthrough of GAC adsorption column is mainly influenced by the low MW readily adsorbable organics in TSE. UVm is a good adsorption breakthrough indicator. The study provides References for BACFs' design and operation control in textile secondary effluent (TSE) tertiary treatment.

  11. Adsorption of methylene blue and Congo red from aqueous solution by activated carbon and carbon nanotubes.

    Szlachta, M; Wójtowicz, P

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the adsorption removal of dyes by powdered activated carbon (PAC, Norit) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs, Chinese Academy of Science) from an aqueous solution. Methylene blue (MB) and Congo red (CR) were selected as model compounds. The adsorbents tested have a high surface area (PAC 835 m(2)/g, MWCNTs 358 m(2)/g) and a well-developed porous structure which enabled the effective treatment of dye-contaminated waters and wastewaters. To evaluate the capacity of PAC and MWCNTs to adsorb dyes, a series of batch adsorption experiments was performed. Both adsorbents exhibited a high adsorptive capacity for MB and CR, and equilibrium data fitted well with the Langmuir model, with the maximum adsorption capacity up to 400 mg/g for MB and 500 mg/g for CR. The separation factor, RL, revealed the favorable nature of the adsorption process under experimental conditions. The kinetics of adsorption was studied at various initial dye concentrations and solution temperatures. The pseudo-second-order model was used for determining the adsorption kinetics of MB and CR. The data obtained show that adsorption of both dyes was rapid in the initial stage and followed by slower processing to reach the plateau. The uptake of dyes increased with contact time, irrespective of their initial concentration and solution temperature. However, changes in the solution temperature did not significantly influence dye removal. PMID:24292474

  12. Surface modification of activated carbon for enhanced adsorption of perfluoroalkyl acids from aqueous solutions.

    Zhi, Yue; Liu, Jinxia

    2016-02-01

    The objective of the research was to examine the effect of increasing carbon surface basicity on uptake of perfluorooctane sulfonic (PFOS) and carboxylic acids (PFOA) by activated carbon. Granular activated carbons made from coal, coconut shell, wood, and phenolic-polymer-based activated carbon fibers were modified through high-temperature and ammonia gas treatments to facilitate systematical evaluation of the impact of basicity of different origins. Comparison of adsorption isotherms and adsorption distribution coefficients showed that the ammonia gas treatment was more effective than the high-temperature treatment in enhancing surface basicity. The resultant higher point of zero charges and total basicity (measured by total HCl uptake) correlated with improved adsorption affinity for PFOS and PFOA. The effectiveness of surface modification to enhance adsorption varied with carbon raw material. Wood-based carbons and activated carbon fibers showed enhancement by one to three orders of magnitudes while other materials could experience reduction in adsorption towards either PFOS or PFOA. PMID:26469934

  13. Uranium Adsorption on Granular Activated Carbon – Batch Testing

    Parker, Kent E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Golovich, Elizabeth C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wellman, Dawn M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-09-01

    The uranium adsorption performance of two activated carbon samples (Tusaar Lot B-64, Tusaar ER2-189A) was tested using unadjusted source water from well 299-W19-36. These batch tests support ongoing performance optimization efforts to use the best material for uranium treatment in the Hanford Site 200 West Area groundwater pump-and-treat system. A linear response of uranium loading as a function of the solution-to-solid ratio was observed for both materials. Kd values ranged from ~380,000 to >1,900,000 ml/g for the B-64 material and ~200,000 to >1,900,000 ml/g for the ER2-189A material. Uranium loading values ranged from 10.4 to 41.6 μg/g for the two Tusaar materials.

  14. Hydrogen Adsorption on Activated Carbon an Carbon Nanotubes Using Volumetric Differential Pressure Technique

    A simple hydrogen adsorption measurement system utilizing the volumetric differential pressure technique has been designed, fabricated and calibrated. Hydrogen adsorption measurements have been carried out at temperatures 298 K and 77 K on activate carbon and carbon nanotubes with different surface areas. The adsorption data obtained will be helpful in understanding the adsorption property of the studied carbon materials using the fundamentals of adsorption theory. The principle of the system follows the Sievert-type method. The system measures a change in pressure between the reference cell, R1 and the sample cell S1, S2, S3 over a certain temperature range, R1, S1, S2, and S3 having known fixed volume. The sample temperatures will be monitored by thermocouple TC while the pressures in R1 an S1, S2, S3 will be measured using a digital pressure transducer. The maximum operating pressure of the pressure transducer is 20 bar and calibrated with an accuracy of ±0.01 bar. High purity hydrogen is being used in the system and the amount of samples for the study is between 1.0-2.0 grams. The system was calibrated using helium gas without any samples in S1, S2 an S3. This will provide a correction factor during the adsorption process providing an adsorption free reference point when using hydrogen gas resulting in a more accurate reading of the adsorption process by eliminating the errors caused by temperature expansion effects and other non-adsorption related phenomena. The ideal gas equation of state is applied to calculate the hydrogen adsorption capacity based on the differential pressure measurements. Activated carbon with a surface area of 644.87 m2/g showed a larger amount of adsorption as compared to multiwalled nanotubes (commercial) with a surface area of 119.68 m2/g. This study als indicated that there is a direct correlation between the amounts of hydrogen adsorbed an surface area of the carbon materials under the conditions studied and that the adsorption

  15. Adsorption of uranium, cesium and strontium onto coconut shell activated carbon

    The adsorption of uranium (VI), cesium and strontium ions from aqueous solutions onto a commercial activated carbon obtained by physical activation of coconut shell has been studied in batch systems. In particular the adsorption of uranium, studied as a function of contact time and metal ion concentration, followed pseudo-first-order kinetics. Equilibrium adsorption data were fitted by Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models and the maximum adsorption capacity of the activated carbon resulted to be 55.32 mg/g. The study showed that the considered activated carbon could be successfully used for uranium adsorption from aqueous solutions. Feasibility of cesium and strontium adsorption onto the same activated carbon has been also investigated. Results showed that no affinities with both of these ions exist. (author)

  16. Modeling high adsorption capacity and kinetics of organic macromolecules on super-powdered activated carbon.

    Matsui, Yoshihiko; Ando, Naoya; Yoshida, Tomoaki; Kurotobi, Ryuji; Matsushita, Taku; Ohno, Koichi

    2011-02-01

    The capacity to adsorb natural organic matter (NOM) and polystyrene sulfonates (PSSs) on small particle-size activated carbon (super-powdered activated carbon, SPAC) is higher than that on larger particle-size activated carbon (powdered-activated carbon, PAC). Increased adsorption capacity is likely attributable to the larger external surface area because the NOM and PSS molecules do not completely penetrate the adsorbent particle; they preferentially adsorb near the outer surface of the particle. In this study, we propose a new isotherm equation, the Shell Adsorption Model (SAM), to explain the higher adsorption capacity on smaller adsorbent particles and to describe quantitatively adsorption isotherms of activated carbons of different particle sizes: PAC and SPAC. The SAM was verified with the experimental data of PSS adsorption kinetics as well as equilibrium. SAM successfully characterized PSS adsorption isotherm data for SPACs and PAC simultaneously with the same model parameters. When SAM was incorporated into an adsorption kinetic model, kinetic decay curves for PSSs adsorbing onto activated carbons of different particle sizes could be simultaneously described with a single kinetics parameter value. On the other hand, when SAM was not incorporated into such an adsorption kinetic model and instead isotherms were described by the Freundlich model, the kinetic decay curves were not well described. The success of the SAM further supports the adsorption mechanism of PSSs preferentially adsorbing near the outer surface of activated carbon particles. PMID:21172719

  17. Adsorption of Phenols and Chlorophenols in Wastewaters on Activated Carbon and Dried Activated Sludge

    YENER, Jülide

    1999-01-01

    One of the methods used for removal of phenols and chlorophenols from the wastewaters of petroleum refineries, coke, medicine, dye, plastics, pesticide, insecticide, and paper industry is the adsorption process. In this study, adsorption of phenol, o-chlorophenol and p-chlorophenol from aqueous solutions on to granular activated carbon and dried activated sludge was investigated as a function of pH, initial pollutant concentration and functional groups. Effects of these parameters on...

  18. Influence of activated carbon characteristics on toluene and hexane adsorption: Application of surface response methodology

    Izquierdo Pantoja, María Teresa; Yuso, A. M. de; Valenciano, Raquel; Rubio Villa, Begoña; Pino, María Rosa

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the adsorption capacity of toluene and hexane over activated carbons prepared according an experimental design, considering as variables the activation temperature, the impregnation ratio and the activation time. The response surface methodology was applied to optimize the adsorption capacity of the carbons regarding the preparation conditions that determine the physicochemical characteristics of the activated carbons. The methodology of preparation...

  19. ELEMENTAL MERCURY ADSORPTION BY ACTIVATED CARBON TREATED WITH SULFURIC ACID

    The paper gives results of a study of the adsorption of elemental mercury at 125 C by a sulfuric-acid (H2S04, 50% w/w/ solution)-treated carbon for the removal of mercury from flue gas. The pore structure of the sample was characterized by nitrogen (N2) at -196 C and the t-plot m...

  20. Surface modification, characterization and adsorptive properties of a coconut activated carbon

    Lu, Xincheng; Jiang, Jianchun; Sun, Kang; Xie, Xinping; Hu, Yiming

    2012-08-01

    A coconut activated carbon was modified using chemical methods. Different concentration of nitric acid oxidation of the conventional sample produced samples with weakly acidic functional groups. The oxidized samples were characterized by scanning electron micrograph, nitrogen absorption-desorption, Fourier transform infra red spectroscopy, Bothem method, pH titration, adsorption capacity of sodium and formaldehyde, and the adsorption mechanism of activated carbons was investigated. The results showed that BET surface area and pore volume of activated carbons were decreased after oxidization process, while acidic functional groups were increased. The surface morphology of oxidized carbons looked clean and eroded which was caused by oxidization of nitric acid. The oxidized carbons showed high adsorption capacity of sodium and formaldehyde, and chemical properties of activated carbon played an important role in adsorption of metal ions and organic pollutants.

  1. Surface modification, characterization and adsorptive properties of a coconut activated carbon

    A coconut activated carbon was modified using chemical methods. Different concentration of nitric acid oxidation of the conventional sample produced samples with weakly acidic functional groups. The oxidized samples were characterized by scanning electron micrograph, nitrogen absorption-desorption, Fourier transform infra red spectroscopy, Bothem method, pH titration, adsorption capacity of sodium and formaldehyde, and the adsorption mechanism of activated carbons was investigated. The results showed that BET surface area and pore volume of activated carbons were decreased after oxidization process, while acidic functional groups were increased. The surface morphology of oxidized carbons looked clean and eroded which was caused by oxidization of nitric acid. The oxidized carbons showed high adsorption capacity of sodium and formaldehyde, and chemical properties of activated carbon played an important role in adsorption of metal ions and organic pollutants.

  2. Adsorption uptake of synthetic organic chemicals by carbon nanotubes and activated carbons

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have shown great promise as high performance materials for adsorbing priority pollutants from water and wastewater. This study compared uptake of two contaminants of interest in drinking water treatment (atrazine and trichloroethylene) by nine different types of carbonaceous adsorbents: three different types of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), three different sized multi-walled nanotubes (MWNTs), two granular activated carbons (GACs) and a powdered activated carbon (PAC). On a mass basis, the activated carbons exhibited the highest uptake, followed by SWNTs and MWNTs. However, metallic impurities in SWNTs and multiple walls in MWNTs contribute to adsorbent mass but do not contribute commensurate adsorption sites. Therefore, when uptake was normalized by purity (carbon content) and surface area (instead of mass), the isotherms collapsed and much of the CNT data was comparable to the activated carbons, indicating that these two characteristics drive much of the observed differences between activated carbons and CNT materials. For the limited data set here, the Raman D:G ratio as a measure of disordered non-nanotube graphitic components was not a good predictor of adsorption from solution. Uptake of atrazine by MWNTs having a range of lengths and diameters was comparable and their Freundlich isotherms were statistically similar, and we found no impact of solution pH on the adsorption of either atrazine or trichloroethylene in the range of naturally occurring surface water (pH = 5.7–8.3). Experiments were performed using a suite of model aromatic compounds having a range of π-electron energy to investigate the role of π–π electron donor–acceptor interactions on organic compound uptake by SWNTs. For the compounds studied, hydrophobic interactions were the dominant mechanism in the uptake by both SWNTs and activated carbon. However, comparing the uptake of naphthalene and phenanthrene by activated carbon and SWNTs, size exclusion

  3. Adsorption uptake of synthetic organic chemicals by carbon nanotubes and activated carbons

    Brooks, A. J.; Lim, Hyung-nam; Kilduff, James E.

    2012-07-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have shown great promise as high performance materials for adsorbing priority pollutants from water and wastewater. This study compared uptake of two contaminants of interest in drinking water treatment (atrazine and trichloroethylene) by nine different types of carbonaceous adsorbents: three different types of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), three different sized multi-walled nanotubes (MWNTs), two granular activated carbons (GACs) and a powdered activated carbon (PAC). On a mass basis, the activated carbons exhibited the highest uptake, followed by SWNTs and MWNTs. However, metallic impurities in SWNTs and multiple walls in MWNTs contribute to adsorbent mass but do not contribute commensurate adsorption sites. Therefore, when uptake was normalized by purity (carbon content) and surface area (instead of mass), the isotherms collapsed and much of the CNT data was comparable to the activated carbons, indicating that these two characteristics drive much of the observed differences between activated carbons and CNT materials. For the limited data set here, the Raman D:G ratio as a measure of disordered non-nanotube graphitic components was not a good predictor of adsorption from solution. Uptake of atrazine by MWNTs having a range of lengths and diameters was comparable and their Freundlich isotherms were statistically similar, and we found no impact of solution pH on the adsorption of either atrazine or trichloroethylene in the range of naturally occurring surface water (pH = 5.7-8.3). Experiments were performed using a suite of model aromatic compounds having a range of π-electron energy to investigate the role of π-π electron donor-acceptor interactions on organic compound uptake by SWNTs. For the compounds studied, hydrophobic interactions were the dominant mechanism in the uptake by both SWNTs and activated carbon. However, comparing the uptake of naphthalene and phenanthrene by activated carbon and SWNTs, size exclusion effects

  4. Metal-loaded polystyrene-based activated carbons as DBT removal media via reactive adsorption

    Ovín Ania, María Concepción; Bandosz, T.J.

    2006-01-01

    [EN] To improve the desulfurization capability of activated carbons, new metal-loaded carbon-based sorbents containing sodium, cobalt, copper, and silver highly dispersed within the carbon matrix were prepared and tested at room temperature for dibenzothiophene (DBT) adsorption. The content of metals can be controlled by selective washing. The new adsorbents showed good adsorption capacities and selectivity towards DBT. The metals incorporated to the surface act not only as active sites for s...

  5. Application of activated carbon derived from scrap tires for adsorption of Rhodamine B.

    Li, Li; Liu, Shuangxi; Zhu, Tan

    2010-01-01

    Activated carbon derived from solid hazardous waste scrap tires was evaluated as a potential adsorbent for cationic dye removal. The adsorption process with respect to operating parameters was investigated to evaluate the adsorption characteristics of the activated pyrolytic tire char (APTC) for Rhodamine B (RhB). Systematic research including equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamic studies was performed. The results showed that APTC was a potential adsorbent for RhB with a higher adsorption capacity than most adsorbents. Solution pH and temperature exert significant influence while ionic strength showed little effect on the adsorption process. The adsorption equilibrium data obey Langmuir isotherm and the kinetic data were well described by the pseudo second-order kinetic model. The adsorption process followed intra-particle diffusion model with more than one process affecting the adsorption process. Thermodynamic study confirmed that the adsorption was a physisorption process with spontaneous, endothermic and random characteristics. PMID:21179969

  6. Removal of an endocrine disrupting chemical (17 alpha-ethinyloestradiol) from wastewater effluent by activated carbon adsorption: Effects of activated carbon type and competitive adsorption

    Ifelebuegu, A.O.; Lester, J.N.; Churchley, J.; Cartmell, E. [Cranfield University, Cranfield (United Kingdom). School of Water Science

    2006-12-15

    Granular activated carbon has been extensively used for the adsorption of organic micropollutants for potable water production. In this study the removal of an endocrine disrupting chemical from wastewater final effluent by three types of granular activated carbon (wood, coconut and coal based) has been investigated in batch adsorption experiments and correlated with the removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD), total organic carbon (TOC) and ultraviolet absorbance (UV). The results obtained demonstrated 17 alpha-ethinyloestradiol (EE2) removals of 98.6%, 99.3%, and 96.4% were achieved by the coal based (ACo), coconut based (ACn) and wood based (AWd) carbons respectively at the lowest dose of carbon (0.1 gl{sup -1}). The other adsorbates investigated all exhibited good removal. At an equilibrium concentration of 7 mgl{sup -1} the COD adsorption capacities were 3.16 mg g{sup -1}, 4.8 mg g{sup -1} and 7.1 mg g{sup -1} for the wood, coconut and coal based carbons respectively. Overall, the order of removal efficiency of EE2 and the other adsorbates for the three activated carbons was ACn {gt} ACo {gt} AWd. The adsorption capacities of the carbons were found to be reduced by the effects of other competing adsorbates in the wastewater effluent.

  7. A thermodynamic approach to assess organic solute adsorption onto activated carbon in water

    De Ridder, David J.

    2012-08-01

    In this paper, the hydrophobicity of 13 activated carbons is determined by various methods; water vapour adsorption, immersion calorimetry, and contact angle measurements. The quantity and type of oxygen-containing groups on the activated carbon were measured and related to the methods used to measure hydrophobicity. It was found that the water-activated carbon adsorption strength (based on immersion calorimetry, contact angles) depended on both type and quantity of oxygen-containing groups, while water vapour adsorption depended only on their quantity. Activated carbon hydrophobicity measurements alone could not be related to 1-hexanol and 1,3-dichloropropene adsorption. However, a relationship was found between work of adhesion and adsorption of these solutes. The work of adhesion depends not only on activated carbon-water interaction (carbon hydrophobicity), but also on solute-water (solute hydrophobicity) and activated carbon-solute interactions. Our research shows that the work of adhesion can explain solute adsorption and includes the effect of hydrogen bond formation between solute and activated carbon. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparative study of carbon nanotubes and granular activated carbon: Physicochemical properties and adsorption capacities.

    Gangupomu, Roja Haritha; Sattler, Melanie L; Ramirez, David

    2016-01-25

    The overall goal was to determine an optimum pre-treatment condition for carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to facilitate air pollutant adsorption. Various combinations of heat and chemical pre-treatment were explored, and toluene was tested as an example hazardous air pollutant adsorbate. Specific objectives were (1) to characterize raw and pre-treated single-wall (SW) and multi-wall (MW) CNTs and compare their physical/chemical properties to commercially available granular activated carbon (GAC), (2) to determine the adsorption capacities for toluene onto pre-treated CNTs vs. GAC. CNTs were purified via heat-treatment at 400 °C in steam, followed by nitric acid treatment (3N, 5N, 11N, 16N) for 3-12 h to create openings to facilitate adsorption onto interior CNT sites. For SWNT, Raman spectroscopy showed that acid treatment removed impurities up to a point, but amorphous carbon reformed with 10h-6N acid treatment. Surface area of SWNTs with 3 h-3N acid treatment (1347 m(2)/g) was higher than the raw sample (1136 m(2)/g), and their toluene maximum adsorption capacity was comparable to GAC. When bed effluent reached 10% of inlet concentration (breakthrough indicating time for bed cleaning), SWNTs had adsorbed 240 mg/g of toluene, compared to 150 mg/g for GAC. Physical/chemical analyses showed no substantial difference for pre-treated vs. raw MWNTs. PMID:26476807

  9. Adsorption of Xe-133 by activated carbon. Experimental results

    In several nuclear power stations carbon filters in the off-gas system are now used to reduce the emission of radioactive noble gases. A gradual deterioration of the filters can be expected. Methods for measuring the efficiency of filters and the quality of the carbon should therefore be available. A reduction in the separative ability for krypton should be a useful way to indicate an impaired retention for xenon. The advantage of this method lies in the in-situ process which does not affect the operation of the system. An experimental set up and equipment has been tested to measure the dynamic adsorption constant of zenon. Two carbon qualities have been measured at 25degC and - 70degC.(G.B.)

  10. Adsorption of phenol by activated carbon: Influence of activation methods and solution pH

    Cherry stone based activated carbon derived from a canning industry was evaluated for its ability to remove phenol from an aqueous solution in a batch process. A comparative adsorption on the uptake of phenol by using commercial activated carbon (Chemviron CPG-LF), and two non-functional commercial polymeric adsorbents (MN-200 and XAD-2) containing a styrene-divinylbenzene macroporous hyperreticulated network have been also examined. Equilibrium studies were conducted in 25 mg L-1 initial phenol concentrations, 6.5-9 solution pH and at temperature of 30 deg. C. The experimental data were analyzed by the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models. Besides, the cherry stone based activated carbons were carried out by using zinc chloride and KOH activation agents at different chemical ratios (activating agent/precursor), to develop carbons with well-developed porosity. The cherry stone activated carbon prepared using KOH as a chemical agent showed a high surface area. According to the results, activated carbons had excellent adsorptive characteristics in comparison with polymeric sorbents and commercial activated carbon for the phenol removal from the aqueous solutions.

  11. Adsorption of phenol by activated carbon: Influence of activation methods and solution pH

    Beker, Ulker, E-mail: ubeker@gmail.co [Yildiz Technical University, Chemical Engineering Department, Davutpasa Campus, 34210 Esenler, Istanbul (Turkey); Ganbold, Batchimeg [National University of Mongolia, Faculty of Organic Chemistry, Ikh Surguuliin Gudamj 1, P.O. Box 46a/523, 210646 Ulaanbaatar (Mongolia); Dertli, Halil [Istanbul Technical University, Chemical Engineering Department, Maslak, Istanbul (Turkey); Guelbayir, Dilek Duranoglu [Yildiz Technical University, Chemical Engineering Department, Davutpasa Campus, 34210 Esenler, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2010-02-15

    Cherry stone based activated carbon derived from a canning industry was evaluated for its ability to remove phenol from an aqueous solution in a batch process. A comparative adsorption on the uptake of phenol by using commercial activated carbon (Chemviron CPG-LF), and two non-functional commercial polymeric adsorbents (MN-200 and XAD-2) containing a styrene-divinylbenzene macroporous hyperreticulated network have been also examined. Equilibrium studies were conducted in 25 mg L{sup -1} initial phenol concentrations, 6.5-9 solution pH and at temperature of 30 deg. C. The experimental data were analyzed by the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models. Besides, the cherry stone based activated carbons were carried out by using zinc chloride and KOH activation agents at different chemical ratios (activating agent/precursor), to develop carbons with well-developed porosity. The cherry stone activated carbon prepared using KOH as a chemical agent showed a high surface area. According to the results, activated carbons had excellent adsorptive characteristics in comparison with polymeric sorbents and commercial activated carbon for the phenol removal from the aqueous solutions.

  12. Pore size distribution analysis of activated carbons prepared from coconut shell using methane adsorption data

    Ahmadpour, A.; Okhovat, A.; Darabi Mahboub, M. J.

    2013-06-01

    The application of Stoeckli theory to determine pore size distribution (PSD) of activated carbons using high pressure methane adsorption data is explored. Coconut shell was used as a raw material for the preparation of 16 different activated carbon samples. Four samples with higher methane adsorption were selected and nitrogen adsorption on these adsorbents was also investigated. Some differences are found between the PSD obtained from the analysis of nitrogen adsorption isotherms and their PSD resulting from the same analysis using methane adsorption data. It is suggested that these differences may arise from the specific interactions between nitrogen molecules and activated carbon surfaces; therefore caution is required in the interpretation of PSD obtained from the nitrogen isotherm data.

  13. Binary Adsorption Equilibrium of Benzene—Water Vapor Mixtures on Activated Carbon

    GAOHuasheng; YEYunchun; 等

    2002-01-01

    Adsorption equilibrium isotherms of benzene in the concentration range of 500-4000mg·m-3 on two commercial activated carbons were obtained using long-column method under 30℃ and different humidity conditions. Results show that the benzene and water vapors have depression effects upon the adsorption of each other and that the unfavorable effect of water vapor resembles its single-component isotherm on activated carbon.A competitive adsorption model was proposed to explore the depression mechanisms of the non-ideal,non-similar binary adsorption systems.A modified polanyi-Dubinin equation was set up to correlate the binary adsorption equilibrium and to calculte the isotherms of benzene on activated carbon in presence of water vapor with considerable precision.

  14. Adsorption of carbon dioxide by sodium hydroxide-modified granular coconut shell activated carbon in a fixed bed

    In the present work, commercial coconut shell activated carbon was impregnated with alkaline NaOH to investigate the efficiency of modified activated carbon for CO2 adsorption in a fixed-bed column adsorption system. The modification parameters, such as the NaOH concentration (24–48%) and dwelling time (1–4 h), were also investigated. The results showed that a 32% NaOH concentration with a 3 h dwelling time provided the best CO2 adsorption capacity. Later, the modified activated carbon was characterized by nitrogen adsorption–desorption, scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The effects of the CO2 % in the feed, the adsorption temperature, the feed flow rate and the amount of adsorbent in the column were investigated in the adsorption experiments. The maximum CO2 adsorption capacity in this study was 27.10 mg/g at 35 °C. This study also suggests that NaOH-modified activated carbon is a state-of-the-art adsorbent for CO2 adsorption. - Highlights: • Coconut shell activated carbon was impregnated with alkaline NaOH. • CO2 was adsorbed in a fixed-bed column adsorption system. • The effects of CO2 concentration, temperature, flow rate and dose are analyzed. • Regeneration of modified activated carbons was effectively tested for ten cycles

  15. Preparation of activated carbons and their adsorption properties for greenhouse gases: CH4 and CO2

    Hao Yang; Maochu Gong; Yaoqiang Chen

    2011-01-01

    Three kinds of activated carbons were prepared using coconut-shells as carbon precursors and characterized by XRD,FT-IR and texture property test.The results indicate that the prepared activated carbons were mainly amorphous and only a few impurity groups were adsorbed on their surfaces.The texture property test reveals that the activated carbons displayed different texture properties,especially the micropore size distribution.The adsorption capacities of the activated carbons were investigated by adsorbing CH4,CO2,N2 and O2 at 25 ℃ in the pressure range of 0-200 kPa.The results reveal that all the activated carbons had high CO2 adsorption capacity,one of which had the highest CO2 adsorption value of 2.55 mmol/g at 200 kPa.And the highest adsorption capacity for CH4 of the activated carbons can reach 1.93 mmol/g at 200 kPa.In the pressure range of 0-200 kPa,the adsorption capacities for N2 and O2 were increased linearly with the change of pressure and K-AC is an excellent adsorbent towards the adsorption separation of greenhouse gases.

  16. Adsorption of organic compounds onto activated carbons from recycled vegetables biomass.

    Mameli, Anna; Cincotti, Alberto; Lai, Nicola; Crisafulli, Carmelo; Sciré, Salvatore; Cao, Giacomo

    2004-01-01

    The removal of organic species from aqueous solution by activated carbons is investigated. The latter ones are prepared from olive husks and almond shells. A wide range of surface area values are obtained varying temperature and duration of both carbonization and activation steps. The adsorption isotherm of phenol, catechol and 2,6-dichlorophenol involving the activated carbons prepared are obtained at 25 degrees C. The corresponding behavior is quantitatively correlated using classical isotherm, whose parameters are estimated by fitting the equilibrium data. A two component isotherm (phenol/2,6-dichlorophenol) is determined in order to test activated carbon behavior during competitive adsorption. PMID:15347202

  17. TRICHLOROETHYLENE ADSORPTION BY ACTIVATED CARBON PRELOADED WITH HUMIC SUBSTANCES: EFFECTS OF SOLUTION CHEMISTRY. (R828157)

    AbstractTrichloroethylene (TCE) adsorption by activated carbon previously loaded ("preloaded") with humic substances was found to decrease with increasing concentrations of monovalent ions (NaCl), calcium (until solubility was exceeded), or dissolved oxygen in...

  18. Effect of agitation speed on adsorption of imidacloprid on activated carbon

    The adsorptive characteristics of imidacloprid on powdered activated carbon were described. The adsorption experiments were carried out as function of time, initial concentration and agitation speed. The equilibrium data fits well to Langmuir adsorption isotherm, while the kinetic data fits well to Pseudo second order kinetic model. The kinetic experiments were carried out at 200, 250, 300 and 350 rpm and it was found that the equilibrium time increases with increase in initial concentration and decreases with increase in agitation speed. This is due to the increased turbulence and as a consequence, the decrease boundary layer thickness around the adsorbent particles as a result of increasing the degree of mixing. At 300 rpm the adsorption capacity was maximum and beyond this there was no significant increase in adsorption capacity. Weber intra particle diffusion model was used to describe the adsorption mechanism. It was found that both the boundary layer and intra particle diffusion for both adsorbents played important role in the adsorption mechanisms of the adsorbate. The effects of temperature and pH on adsorption were also studied. It was found that the adsorption capacity of the adsorbent decreases with increase in temperature. There was no significant change in adsorption from pH 2 to 8, however at high pH a decrease in adsorption of imidacloprid on activated carbon was observed. (author)

  19. Adsorption of clofibric acid and ketoprofen onto powdered activated carbon: effect of natural organic matter.

    Gao, Yaohuan; Deshusses, Marc A

    2011-12-01

    The adsorption of two acidic pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs), clofibric acid and ketoprofen, onto powdered activated carbon (PAC) was investigated with a particular focus on the influence of natural organic matter (NOM) on the adsorption of the PhACs. Suwannee River humic acids (SRHAs) were used as a substitute for NOM. Batch adsorption experiments were conducted to obtain adsorption kinetics and adsorption isotherms with and without SRHAs in the system. The adsorption isotherms and adsorption kinetics showed that the adsorption ofclofibric acid was not significantly affected by the presence of SRHAs at a concentration of 5 mg (as carbon) L(-1). An adsorption capacity of 70 to 140 mg g(-1) was observed and equilibrium was reached within 48 h. In contrast, the adsorption of ketoprofen was markedly decreased (from about 120 mg g(-1) to 70-100 mg g(-1)) in the presence of SRHAs. Higher initial concentrations of clofibric acid than ketoprofen during testing may explain the different behaviours that were observed. Also, the more hydrophobic ketoprofen molecules may have less affinity for PAC when humic acids (which are hydrophilic) are present. The possible intermolecular forces that could account for the different behaviour of clofibric acid and ketoprofen adsorption onto PAC are discussed. In particular, the relevance of electrostatic forces, electron donor-acceptor interaction, hydrogen bonding and London dispersion forces are discussed PMID:22439557

  20. Single, competitive, and dynamic adsorption on activated carbon of compounds used as plasticizers and herbicides.

    Abdel daiem, Mahmoud M; Rivera-Utrilla, José; Sánchez-Polo, Manuel; Ocampo-Pérez, Raúl

    2015-12-15

    The main aim of this study was to investigate the single, competitive, and dynamic adsorption of phthalic acid (PA), bisphenol A (BPA), diphenolic acid (DPA), 2,4-dichlorophenoxy-acetic acid (2,4-D), and 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid (MCPA) on two activated carbons with different chemical natures and similar textural characteristics. The adsorption mechanism was also elucidated by analyzing the influence of solution pH and ionic strength. The activated carbons demonstrated high adsorption capacity to remove all micropollutants due to the presence of active sites on their surfaces, which increase dispersive interactions between the activated carbon graphene layers and the aromatic ring of pollutants. The adsorption capacity of the activated carbons increased in the order: DPAadsorption of contaminants is favored at acid pH (pH<5) due to the establishment of attractive electrostatic interactions. In dynamic regime, the amount of pollutant adsorbed was much higher for PA, followed by DPA, and was approximately similar for BPA, 2,4-D, and MCPA. Finally, the amount of BPA and DPA adsorbed on activated carbon decreased by around 50% and 70% in the presence of DPA and BPA, respectively, indicating that both compounds are adsorbed on the same adsorption sites of the activated carbon. PMID:26282767

  1. Oxygen-induced Decrease in the Equilibrium Adsorptive Capacities of Activated Carbons

    Ovín Ania, María Concepción; Parra Soto, José Bernardo; Pis Martínez, José Juan

    2004-01-01

    Special attention was paid in this work to the role of surface chemistry in the adsorption of phenol and salicylic acid onto activated carbons. To this end, two commercial activated carbons (granular and powdered) were oxidised using ammonium peroxodisulphate [(NH4) 2S2O8] and nitric acid in different concentrations. The structural and chemical properties of the oxidised adsorbents were characterised via nitrogen adsorption isotherms measured at –196 ° C and Boehm titrations. Phenol adsorptio...

  2. Adsorption of cationic dye methylene blue onto activated carbon obtained from horse chestnut kernel

    Momčilović Milan Z.; Purenović Milovan M.; Miljković Milena N.; Bojić Aleksandar Lj.; Ranđelović Marjan S.

    2011-01-01

    Horse chestnut kernel was used as the precursor for the preparation of powdered activated carbon using phosphoric acid as the activating agent. Batch adsorption experiments for the adsorption of cationic dye methylene blue from aqueous solutions were carried out using the obtained carbon as adsorbent. Equilibrium and kinetic experiments were conducted. The equilibrium data were fitted with the Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin theoretical isotherm models. The best results was obtained in ...

  3. Adsorption capacities of activated carbons for geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol vary with activated carbon particle size: Effects of adsorbent and adsorbate characteristics.

    Matsui, Yoshihiko; Nakao, Soichi; Sakamoto, Asuka; Taniguchi, Takuma; Pan, Long; Matsushita, Taku; Shirasaki, Nobutaka

    2015-11-15

    The adsorption capacities of nine activated carbons for geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol (MIB) were evaluated. For some carbons, adsorption capacity substantially increased when carbon particle diameter was decreased from a few tens of micrometers to a few micrometers, whereas for other carbons, the increase of adsorption capacity was small for MIB and moderate for geosmin. An increase of adsorption capacity was observed for other hydrophobic adsorbates besides geosmin and MIB, but not for hydrophilic adsorbates. The parameter values of a shell adsorption model describing the increase of adsorption capacity were negatively correlated with the oxygen content of the carbon among other characteristics. Low oxygen content indicated low hydrophilicity. The increase of adsorption capacity was related to the hydrophobic properties of both adsorbates and activated carbons. For adsorptive removal of hydrophobic micropollutants such as geosmin, it is therefore recommended that less-hydrophilic activated carbons, such as coconut-shell-based carbons, be microground to a particle diameter of a few micrometers to enhance their equilibrium adsorption capacity. In contrast, adsorption by hydrophilic carbons or adsorption of hydrophilic adsorbates occur in the inner pores, and therefore adsorption capacity is unchanged by particle size reduction. PMID:26302219

  4. Adsorption studies of methylene blue and phenol onto vetiver roots activated carbon prepared by chemical activation

    Vetiver roots have been utilized for the preparation of activated carbon (AC) by chemical activation with different impregnation ratios of phosphoric acid, XP (g H3PO4/g precursor): 0.5:1; 1:1 and 1.5:1. Textural characterization, determined by nitrogen adsorption at 77 K shows that mixed microporous and mesoporous structures activated carbons (ACs) with high surface area (>1000 m2/g) and high pore volume (up to 1.19 cm3/g) can be obtained. The surface chemical properties of these ACs were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Boehm titration. Their textural and chemical characteristics were compared to those of an AC sample obtained by steam activation of vetiver roots. Classical molecules used for characterizing liquid phase adsorption, phenol and methylene blue (MB), were used. Adsorption kinetics of MB and phenol have been studied using commonly used kinetic models, i.e., the pseudo-first-order model, the pseudo-second-order model, the intraparticle diffusion model and as well the fractal, BWS (Brouers, Weron and Sotolongo) kinetic equation. The correlation coefficients (R2) and the normalized standard deviation Δq (%) were determined showing globally, that the recently derived fractal kinetic equation could best describe the adsorption kinetics for the adsorbates tested here, indicating a complex adsorption mechanism. The experimental adsorption isotherms of these molecules on the activated carbon were as well analysed using four isotherms: the classical Freundlich, Langmuir, Redlich-Peterson equations, but as well the newly published deformed Weibull Brouers-Sotolongo isotherm. The results obtained from the application of the equations show that the best fits were achieved with the Brouers-Sotolongo equation and with the Redlich-Peterson equation. Influence of surface functional groups towards MB adsorption is as well studied using various ACs prepared from vetiver roots and sugar cane bagasse. Opposite effects governing MB and phenol

  5. Adsorption studies of methylene blue and phenol onto vetiver roots activated carbon prepared by chemical activation

    Altenor, Sandro [COVACHIMM, EA 3592 Universite des Antilles et de la Guyane, BP 250, 97157 Pointe a Pitre Cedex, Guadeloupe (France); LAQUE, Universite Quisqueya d' Haiti, Port-au-Prince (Haiti); Carene, Betty [COVACHIMM, EA 3592 Universite des Antilles et de la Guyane, BP 250, 97157 Pointe a Pitre Cedex, Guadeloupe (France); Emmanuel, Evens [LAQUE, Universite Quisqueya d' Haiti, Port-au-Prince (Haiti); Lambert, Jacques; Ehrhardt, Jean-Jacques [Laboratoire de Chimie Physique et Microbiologie pour l' Environnement, UMR 7564 CNRS-Nancy Universities, 405 rue de Vandoeuvre, F 54600 Villers-les-Nancy Cedex (France); Gaspard, Sarra, E-mail: sgaspard@univ-ag.fr [COVACHIMM, EA 3592 Universite des Antilles et de la Guyane, BP 250, 97157 Pointe a Pitre Cedex, Guadeloupe (France)

    2009-06-15

    Vetiver roots have been utilized for the preparation of activated carbon (AC) by chemical activation with different impregnation ratios of phosphoric acid, X{sub P} (g H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}/g precursor): 0.5:1; 1:1 and 1.5:1. Textural characterization, determined by nitrogen adsorption at 77 K shows that mixed microporous and mesoporous structures activated carbons (ACs) with high surface area (>1000 m{sup 2}/g) and high pore volume (up to 1.19 cm{sup 3}/g) can be obtained. The surface chemical properties of these ACs were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Boehm titration. Their textural and chemical characteristics were compared to those of an AC sample obtained by steam activation of vetiver roots. Classical molecules used for characterizing liquid phase adsorption, phenol and methylene blue (MB), were used. Adsorption kinetics of MB and phenol have been studied using commonly used kinetic models, i.e., the pseudo-first-order model, the pseudo-second-order model, the intraparticle diffusion model and as well the fractal, BWS (Brouers, Weron and Sotolongo) kinetic equation. The correlation coefficients (R{sup 2}) and the normalized standard deviation {Delta}q (%) were determined showing globally, that the recently derived fractal kinetic equation could best describe the adsorption kinetics for the adsorbates tested here, indicating a complex adsorption mechanism. The experimental adsorption isotherms of these molecules on the activated carbon were as well analysed using four isotherms: the classical Freundlich, Langmuir, Redlich-Peterson equations, but as well the newly published deformed Weibull Brouers-Sotolongo isotherm. The results obtained from the application of the equations show that the best fits were achieved with the Brouers-Sotolongo equation and with the Redlich-Peterson equation. Influence of surface functional groups towards MB adsorption is as well studied using various ACs prepared from vetiver roots and sugar cane bagasse

  6. Adsorption studies of methylene blue and phenol onto vetiver roots activated carbon prepared by chemical activation.

    Altenor, Sandro; Carene, Betty; Emmanuel, Evens; Lambert, Jacques; Ehrhardt, Jean-Jacques; Gaspard, Sarra

    2009-06-15

    Vetiver roots have been utilized for the preparation of activated carbon (AC) by chemical activation with different impregnation ratios of phosphoric acid, X(P) (gH(3)PO(4)/g precursor): 0.5:1; 1:1 and 1.5:1. Textural characterization, determined by nitrogen adsorption at 77K shows that mixed microporous and mesoporous structures activated carbons (ACs) with high surface area (>1000 m(2)/g) and high pore volume (up to 1.19 cm(3)/g) can be obtained. The surface chemical properties of these ACs were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Boehm titration. Their textural and chemical characteristics were compared to those of an AC sample obtained by steam activation of vetiver roots. Classical molecules used for characterizing liquid phase adsorption, phenol and methylene blue (MB), were used. Adsorption kinetics of MB and phenol have been studied using commonly used kinetic models, i.e., the pseudo-first-order model, the pseudo-second-order model, the intraparticle diffusion model and as well the fractal, BWS (Brouers, Weron and Sotolongo) kinetic equation. The correlation coefficients (R(2)) and the normalized standard deviation Deltaq (%) were determined showing globally, that the recently derived fractal kinetic equation could best describe the adsorption kinetics for the adsorbates tested here, indicating a complex adsorption mechanism. The experimental adsorption isotherms of these molecules on the activated carbon were as well analysed using four isotherms: the classical Freundlich, Langmuir, Redlich-Peterson equations, but as well the newly published deformed Weibull Brouers-Sotolongo isotherm. The results obtained from the application of the equations show that the best fits were achieved with the Brouers-Sotolongo equation and with the Redlich-Peterson equation. Influence of surface functional groups towards MB adsorption is as well studied using various ACs prepared from vetiver roots and sugar cane bagasse. Opposite effects governing MB

  7. Activated Carbons Modified by Ar and CO2 Plasmas – Acetone and Cyclohexane Adsorption

    Jacek TYCZKOWSKI

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Low temperature plasma treatment is currently a scope of many research as interesting tool for enhancing surface properties of many types of materials, e.g. polymers, metals, carbon blacks. Activated carbons (AC due to their physicochemical properties play a major role as a structural element of gas filters commonly used in respiratory protection for adsorption of many different vapors from contaminated air. It is well known that various surface function groups presented on the AC play a significant role in the hydrophobic/hydrophilic nature of them. This paper refers to the initial study of the effect of low temperature gas plasma treatment on commercially available activated carbon. To treat activated carbon by low temperature plasma, a granulated carbon was placed in a rotating test chamber. The chamber was filled with the relevant reactive gas. The effects of plasma treatment on activated carbon surface and the adsorption properties for two selected organic vapors were studied by analyzing water vapor adsorption isotherm as well as by measurement of adsorption dynamics of those vapors onto gas filter bed made of plasma treated carbons. On the basis of the obtained results it could be concluded that low temperature plasma technology may be used for improving activated carbon properties towards better adsorption of specific low temperature organic vapors.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.18.2.1919

  8. Molecular simulation of multi-component adsorption processes related to carbon capture in a high surface area, disordered activated carbon

    Di Biase, Emanuela; Sarkisov, Lev

    2015-01-01

    We employ a previously developed model of a high surface area activated carbon, based on a random packing of small fragments of a carbon sheet, functionalized with hydroxyl surface groups, to explore adsorption of water and multicomponent mixtures under conditions representing typical carbon capture processes. Adsorption of water is initialized and proceeds through the growth of clusters around the surface groups, in a process predominantly governed by hydrogen bond interactions. In contrast,...

  9. Adsorption characteristics of selected hydrophilic and hydrophobic micropollutants in water using activated carbon.

    Nam, Seung-Woo; Choi, Dae-Jin; Kim, Seung-Kyu; Her, Namguk; Zoh, Kyung-Duk

    2014-04-15

    In this study, we investigated adsorption characteristics of nine selected micropollutants (six pharmaceuticals, two pesticides, and one endocrine disruptor) in water using an activated carbon. The effects of carbon dosage, contact time, pH, DOM (dissolved organic matter), and temperature on the adsorption removal of micropollutants were examined. Increasing carbon dosage and contact time enhanced the removal of micropollutants. Sorption coefficients of hydrophilic compounds (caffeine, acetaminophen, sulfamethoxazole, and sulfamethazine) fit a linear isotherm and hydrophobic compounds (naproxen, diclofenac, 2, 4-D, triclocarban, and atrazine) fit a Freundlich isotherm. The removal of hydrophobic pollutants and caffeine were independent of pH changes, but acetaminophen, sulfamethazine, and sulfamethoxazole were adsorbed by mainly electrostatic interaction with activated carbon and so were affected by pH. The decrease in adsorption removal in surface water samples was observed and this decrease was more significant for hydrophobic than hydrophilic compounds. The decline in the adsorption capacity in surface water samples is caused by the competitive inhibition of DOM with micropollutants onto activated carbon. Low temperature (5°C) also decreased the adsorption removal of micropollutants, and affected hydrophobic compounds more than hydrophilic compounds. The results obtained in this study can be applied to optimize the adsorption capacities of micropollutants using activated carbon in water treatment process. PMID:24572271

  10. Adsorption of SO2 on bituminous coal char and activated carbon fiber

    DeBarr, J.A.; Lizzio, A.A.; Daley, M.A.

    1997-01-01

    The SO2 adsorption behaviors of activated carbons produced from Illinois coal and of commercially prepared activated carbon fibers (ACFs) were compared. There was no relation between surface area of coal-based carbons and SO2 adsorption, whereas adsorption of SO2 on the series of ACFs was inversely proportional to N2 BET surface area. Higher surface area ACFs had wider pores and adsorbed less SO2; thus, pore size distribution is thought to play a significant role in SO2 adsorption for these materials. Oxidation with HNO3 and/or H2SO4, followed by heat treatment at 700-925 ??C to remove carbon-oxygen complexes, resulted in increased SO2 adsorption for both coal chars and ACFs. This behavior was explained by an increase in the available number of free sites, previously occupied by oxygen and now available for SO2 adsorption. The use of nitrogen-containing functional groups on ACFs of proper pore size shows promise for further increasing SO2 adsorption capacities. Knowledge of the relationship among the number of free sites, pore size, and surface chemistry on corresponding SO2 adsorption should lead to the development of more efficient adsorbents prepared from either coal or ACFs.

  11. Adsorption of cationic dye methylene blue onto activated carbon obtained from horse chestnut kernel

    Momčilović Milan Z.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Horse chestnut kernel was used as the precursor for the preparation of powdered activated carbon using phosphoric acid as the activating agent. Batch adsorption experiments for the adsorption of cationic dye methylene blue from aqueous solutions were carried out using the obtained carbon as adsorbent. Equilibrium and kinetic experiments were conducted. The equilibrium data were fitted with the Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin theoretical isotherm models. The best results was obtained in the case of Langmuir model, which indicates that monolayer adsorption occurs on finite number of the active adsorption sites on the carbon surface. The kinetic data were fitted with pseudo-first, pseudo-second, Elovich and interparticle diffusion model. Pseudo-second order model and Elovich model showed the best results of the kinetic data. The increasing of the solution pH led to a higher uptake of methylene blue due to the fact that competitive adsorption of methylene blue cation and proton exists in acidic solutions. The adsorption capacity for methylene blue in equilibrium study was significant (168.93 mg g-1. Comparison of the adsorption capacities of methylene blue onto activated carbons derived from various alternative precursors proves chestnut kernel to be efficient and low-cost material which could be substantially deployed in the future.

  12. Enhanced adsorption of perfluorooctane sulfonate and perfluorooctanoate by bamboo-derived granular activated carbon.

    Deng, Shubo; Nie, Yao; Du, Ziwen; Huang, Qian; Meng, Pingping; Wang, Bin; Huang, Jun; Yu, Gang

    2015-01-23

    A bamboo-derived granular activated carbon with large pores was successfully prepared by KOH activation, and used to remove perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) from aqueous solution. The granular activated carbon prepared at the KOH/C mass ratio of 4 and activation temperature of 900°C had fast and high adsorption for PFOS and PFOA. Their adsorption equilibrium was achieved within 24h, which was attributed to their fast diffusion in the micron-sized pores of activated carbon. This granular activated carbon exhibited the maximum adsorbed amount of 2.32mmol/g for PFOS and 1.15mmol/g for PFOA at pH 5.0, much higher than other granular and powdered activated carbons reported. The activated carbon prepared under the severe activation condition contained many enlarged pores, favorable for the adsorption of PFOS and PFOA. In addition, the spent activated carbon was hardly regenerated in NaOH/NaCl solution, while the regeneration efficiency was significantly enhanced in hot water and methanol/ethanol solution, indicating that hydrophobic interaction was mainly responsible for the adsorption. The regeneration percent was up to 98% using 50% ethanol solution at 45°C. PMID:24721493

  13. Diffusion barriers in the kinetics of water vapor adsorption/desorption on activated carbons

    Harding, A.W.; Foley, N.J.; Thomas, K.M. [Univ. of Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom); Norman, P.R.; Francis, D.C. [CBD, Salisbury (United Kingdom)

    1998-07-07

    The adsorption of water vapor on a highly microporous coconut-shell-derived carbon and a mesoporous wood-derived carbon was studied. These carbons were chosen as they had markedly different porous structures. The adsorption and desorption characteristics of water vapor on the activated carbons were investigated over the relative pressure range p/p{degree} = 0--0.9 for temperatures in the range 285--313 K in a static water vapor system. The adsorption isotherms were analyzed using the Dubinin-Serpinski equation, and this provided an assessment of the polarity of the carbons. The kinetics of water vapor adsorption and desorption were studied with different amounts of preadsorbed water for set changes in pressure relative to the saturated vapor pressure (p/p{degree}). The adsorption kinetics for each relative pressure step were compared and used to calculate the activation energies for the vapor pressure increments. The kinetic results are discussed in relation to their relative position on the equilibrium isotherm and the adsorption mechanism of water vapor on activated carbons.

  14. Adsorption of uranium from aqueous solutions using activated carbon prepared from olive stones

    Full text: Separation and purification processes based on adsorption technique are important in nuclear industry where activated carbon is often used for the separation of metal ions from solutions, due to its selective adsorption, high radiation stability and high purity [1]. Activated carbons are unique adsorbents because of their extended surface area, microporous structure, high adsorption capacity and high degree of surface reactivity [2]. Aegean Region of Turkey is famous with olive trees. Therefore, there are considerable amount of olive stones as an agricultural by-product. Activated carbon can be produced by using every kind of carbonaceous material including agricultural by-products. Taking into consideration of its importance as an agricultural by-product, it can be widely used as a precursor for the preparation of activated carbon. The activated carbons used in this study were prepared by the chemical activation of olive stone. Adsorption experiments were carried out by a batch technique. Before and after adsorption, the concentration of uranium was determined by the ICP-OES. In this study 1:2 precursor/activating agent (ZnCl2) ratio and 600oC carbonization temperature were used for the preparation of adsorbent. The adsorption of uranium was studied as a function of shaking time, pH, initial uranium concentration and temperature. The optimum conditions were found as 5 minutes shaking time, pH 6, 25 ppm uranium concentration, and 30oC temperature. The results suggest that uranium is favorably adsorbed by activated carbon prepared from olive stones. We are of the opinion that the method can be used for preventing environmental contamination and adsorption of uranium from wastes in various stages of nuclear fuel production depending on uranium fuel cycle

  15. Experimental Investigation on Adsorption Capacity of a Variety of Activated Carbon/Refrigerant Pairs

    Ahmed N. Shmroukh

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to develop a device with minimum heat and mass transfer limitations between adsorbent and adsorbate, and subsequently to obtain practically applicable adsorption capacity data. Also, 5 kW adsorption chillers (evaporators, condensers and adsorbers are designed based on the experimental output data of the whole tested pairs. A finned-tube heat exchanger was employed and installed at the center adsorber, and each employed adsorbent was immobilized on its surfaces by using an adhesive agent. A variety of pairs: are activated carbon powder (ACP/R-134a, ACP/R-407c, ACP/R-507A, activated carbon granules (ACG/R-507A, ACG /R-407c and ACG /R-134a, were examined at different adsorption temperatures of 25, 30, 35 and 50°C. It was found that, at the adsorption temperature of 25°C the maximum adsorption capacity was 0.8352 kg kg-1 for ACP/R-134a, while at the adsorption temperature of 50°C the maximum adsorption capacity was 0.3207 kg kg-1 for ACP/R- 134a. Therefore, the ACP/R-134a pair is highly recommended to be employed as adsorption refrigeration working pair because of its higher maximum adsorption capacity higher than the other examined pairs.

  16. Batch studies of adsorption of copper and lead on activated carbon from Eucalyptus camaldulensis Dehn. Bark

    Phussadee Patnukao; Apipreeya Kongsuwan; Prasert Pavasant

    2008-01-01

    Powdered activated carbon (PAC) prepared from Eucalyptus camaldulensis Dehn. bark was tested for its adsorption capacity for Cu(Ⅱ) and Pb(Ⅱ). The experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of pH, contact time, initial metal concentration, and temperature. The best adsorption of both Cu(Ⅱ) and Pb(Ⅱ) occurred at pH 5, where the adsorption reached equilibrium within 45 min for the whole range of initial heavy metal concentrations (0.1-10 mmol/L). The adsorption kinetics was found to follow the pseudo-second order model where equilibrium adsorption capacities and adsorption rate constants increased with initial heavy metal concentrations. The adsorption isotherm followed Langmuir better than Freundlich models within the temperature range (25-60℃). The maximum adsorption capacities (qm) occurred at 60℃, where qm for Cu(Ⅱ) and Pb(Ⅱ) were 0.85 and 0.89 mmol/g, respectively. The enthalpies of Cu(Ⅱ) and Pb(Ⅱ) adsorption were 43.26 and 58.77 kJ/mol, respectively. The positive enthalpy of adsorption indicated an endothermic nature of the adsorption.

  17. Kinetic and equilibrium study of adsorption of di-azo dyes on commercial activated carbon

    This research work is concerned with studying the adsorption of a number of di-azo dyes on commercial activated carbon (CAC). The synthesized dyes vary in their structures by the central parts. which are either ortho, meta or para phenvlene diamine. This variation affects the linearity of molecules, their spatial arrangement and electron movement throughout the molecule by resonance. Factors a fleeting adsorption process, such as the efiect of contact time, initial concentration, p1-I of the adsorption medium, adsorbent dose, effect of solvent and temperature were studied. The results indicated that, the adsorption process is fast in the first 10 mm, then gradually decreased with time and approaches maximum within 70-80 min for all the studied dyes. The increase of initial concentration and temperature decreased the adsorption efficiency. The results also shows that, the adsorption is found to be more efficient at low Ph value. The increase of the adsorbent dose increases the adsorption efficiency and decreases its capacity. The variation of solvent (ethanol-water ratio) indicates that the decrease of dielectric constant lowers the adsorption efficiency. The study included application of three adsorption isotherms, Freundlich, Langmuir and Tempkin on the experimental data of the studied systems. The results indicated that, Freundlich isotherm fits better the adsorption data. Kinetic analysis of the adsorption data was also conducted by employing 4 kinetic models; pseudo first order and pseudo second order, Elovich and intra particle diffusion equations. The results obtained conclude that, the studied systems follow the Pseudo second order model. (author)

  18. Study On Adsorption of Bromate From Aqueous Solution On Modified Activated Carbon

    Liu, Tong-mian; Cui, Fu-yi; Zhao, Zhi-wei; Liu, Dong-mei; Zhu, Qi; Wang, Huan

    2010-11-01

    A coal-based activated carbon was treated chemically with nitric acid, sodium hydroxide and ammonia for its surface modification, and its adsorption capacity was investigated with bromate. Several techniques were used to characterize the physicochemical properties of these materials including BET, XPS, pHpzc and Boehm titration. The results indicated that the specific surface area of the activated carbon decreased after oxidation with nitric acid. But the amount of surface acidic oxygen-containing functional groups of the oxidized sample increased compared to the raw carbon and the points of zero charge (pHpzc) decreased. The specific surface area of the activated carbon also decreased after sodium hydroxide treatment and the points of zero charge increased. The changes of surface chemical properties after the ammonia treatment was opposite to the oxidized sample. As a result, the pHpzc of the carbon was increased to near pH9.3, the amount of surface basic groups was increased. Furthermore, the data of bromate adsorption on all the samples were fitted to the Langmuir isotherm model well which indicates monolayer adsorption. In addition, the adsorption capacity of ammonia treatment sample was the highest and its saturated adsorption capacity reached 1.55 mg/g. A strong correlation was found between basic groups and adsorption capacity of bromate. Enhancement of basic groups was favorable for bromate removal.

  19. Adsorption Studies of Chromium(VI) on Activated Carbon Derived from Mangifera indica (Mango) Seed Shell

    Mise, Shashikant; Patil, Trupti Nagendra

    2015-09-01

    The removal of chromium(VI) from synthetic sample by adsorption on activated carbon prepared from Mangifera indica (mango) seed shell have been carried out at room temperature 32 ± 1 °C. The removal of chromium(VI) from synthetic sample by adsorption on two types of activated carbon, physical activation and chemical activation (Calcium chloride and Sodium chloride), Impregnation Ratio's (IR) 0.25, 0.50, 0.75 for optimum time, optimum dosages and variation of pH were studied. It is observed that contact time differs for different carbons i.e. for physically and chemically activated carbons. The contact time decreases for chemically activated carbon compared to the physically activated carbon. It was observed that as dosage increases the adsorption increased along with the increase in impregnation ratio. It was also noted that as I.R. increases the surface area of Mangifera indica shell carbon increased. These dosage data were considered in the construction of isotherms and it was found that adsorption obeys Freundlich Isotherm and does not obey Langmuir Isotherm. The maximum removal of chromium (VI) was obtained in highly acidic medium at a pH of 1.50.

  20. Adsorption of atrazine on hemp stem-based activated carbons with different surface chemistry

    Lupul, Iwona; Yperman, Jan; Carleer, Robert; Gryglewicz, Grazyna

    2015-01-01

    Surface-modified hemp stem-based activated carbons (HACs) were prepared and used for the adsorption of atrazine from aqueous solution, and their adsorption performance was examined. A series of HACs were prepared by potassium hydroxide activation of hemp stems, followed by subsequent modification by thermal annealing, oxidation with nitric acid and amination. The resultant HACs differed in surface chemistry, while possessing similar porous structure. The surface group characteristics were exa...

  1. Absorption and adsorption of methane and carbon dioxide in hard coal and active carbon

    Milewska-Duda, J.; Duda, J.; Nodzenski, A.; Lakatos, J. [Stanislaw Staszic University of Mining and Metallurgy, Krakow (Poland). Faculty of Fuels and Energy

    2000-07-01

    The paper shows what can be deduced on sorption mechanisms in hard coals and active carbon by using a theoretical model of sorption of small molecules in elastic submicroporous materials. This multiple sorption model (MSM) describes both adsorption and absorption phenomena. Basic assumptions and formulae of the MSM are presented. The computations were performed for isotherms of CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} at elevated pressures on three coal samples of different rank and on an active carbon. Nonideality of the sorbates is handled by an original state equation providing consistent information on fugacity and cohesion energy corresponding to a given molar volume of sorbate molecules in the sorption system. Surface structure of the studied coals and energetic parameters of the systems determined with MSM are compared to those obtained by using BET and Dubinin-Radushkievitch equations.

  2. Adsorption of ethanol onto activated carbon: Modeling and consequent interpretations based on statistical physics treatment

    Bouzid, Mohamed; Sellaoui, Lotfi; Khalfaoui, Mohamed; Belmabrouk, Hafedh; Lamine, Abdelmottaleb Ben

    2016-02-01

    In this work, we studied the adsorption of ethanol on three types of activated carbon, namely parent Maxsorb III and two chemically modified activated carbons (H2-Maxsorb III and KOH-H2-Maxsorb III). This investigation has been conducted on the basis of the grand canonical formalism in statistical physics and on simplified assumptions. This led to three parameter equations describing the adsorption of ethanol onto the three types of activated carbon. There was a good correlation between experimental data and results obtained by the new proposed equation. The parameters characterizing the adsorption isotherm were the number of adsorbed molecules (s) per site n, the density of the receptor sites per unit mass of the adsorbent Nm, and the energetic parameter p1/2. They were estimated for the studied systems by a non linear least square regression. The results show that the ethanol molecules were adsorbed in perpendicular (or non parallel) position to the adsorbent surface. The magnitude of the calculated adsorption energies reveals that ethanol is physisorbed onto activated carbon. Both van der Waals and hydrogen interactions were involved in the adsorption process. The calculated values of the specific surface AS, proved that the three types of activated carbon have a highly microporous surface.

  3. Preparing activated carbon from charcoal and investigation of the selective uranium adsorption

    Preconcentration and separation procedures based on adsorption phenomena are important in nuclear and especially radiation chemistry, industry, medicine and daily life. Adsorption of uranium onto various solids is important from purification, environmental and radioactive waste disposal points of view . The treatment of aqueous nuclear waste solutions containing soluble metal ions requires concentration of the metal ions into smaller volume followed by recovery or secure disposal. For this purpose, many processes are being utilized such as precipitation, ion-exchange, solvent extraction and adsorption on solids etc. Interest in the adsorption of metal ions for recovery purposes has increased manyfold in recent years, because of its simplicity, selectivity and efficiency . The main advantage of adsorption is the separation of trace amount of elements from large volumes of solutions. In recent years, several studies have been made to recover radionuclides by adsorption using natural and synthetic adsorbents. Adsorption on charcoal is one of the most efficient techniques used in water treatment processes for the removal of organics and micropollutants from wastes and drinking waters. Adsorption processes have long been used in the removal of color, odor, and organic pollution. These processes are usually based on the use of activated carbon . Activated carbon consists mainly of carbon and is produced from every carbonaceous material. Activated carbon characterized by its high surface area and its wide distribution of porosity. The textural properties (surface area and porosity) of activated carbons play an important role in determining the capacity of the material in adsorption from aqueous solution. Chemistry of the surface is also important . Generally, activated carbons are mainly microporous, but in addition to micropores they contain meso- and macropores, which are very important in facilitating acces of the adsorbate molecules to the interior of carbon particles

  4. Adsorption properties of biomass-based activated carbon prepared with spent coffee grounds and pomelo skin by phosphoric acid activation

    Ma, Xiaodong; Ouyang, Feng

    2013-03-01

    Activated carbon prepared from spent coffee grounds and pomelo skin by phosphoric acid activation had been employed as the adsorbent for ethylene and n-butane at room temperature. Prepared activated carbon was characterized by means of nitrogen adsorption-desorption, X-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscope and Fourier transform infrared spectroscope. It was confirmed that pore structure played an important role during the adsorption testes. Adsorption isotherms of ethylene and n-butane fitted well with Langmuir equation. The prepared samples owned better adsorption capacity for n-butane than commercial activated carbon. Isosteric heats of adsorptions at different coverage were calculated through Clausius-Clapeyron equation. Micropore filling effect was explained in a thermodynamic way.

  5. Inhibition of nitrobenzene adsorption by water cluster formation at acidic oxygen functional groups on activated carbon.

    Kato, Yuichi; Machida, Motoi; Tatsumoto, Hideki

    2008-06-15

    The inhibition effect of nitrobenzene adsorption by water clusters formed at the acidic groups on activated carbon was examined in aqueous and n-hexane solution. The activated carbon was oxidized with nitric acid to introduce CO complexes and then outgassed in helium flow at 1273 K to remove them completely without changing the structural properties of the carbon as a reference adsorbent. The amounts of acidic functional groups were determined by applying Boehm titration. A relative humidity of 95% was used to adsorb water onto the carbon surface. Strong adsorption of water onto the oxidized carbon can be observed by thermogravimetric analysis. The adsorption kinetic rate was estimated to be controlled by diffusion from the kinetic analysis. Significant decline in both capacity and kinetic rate for nitrobenzene adsorption onto the oxidized carbon was also observed in n-hexane solution by preadsorption of water to the carbon surface, whereas it was not detected for the outgassed carbons. These results might reveal that water molecules forming clusters at the CO complexes inhibited the entrance of nitrobenzene into the interparticles of the carbon. PMID:18440013

  6. Adsorption Isotherms of CH 4 on Activated Carbon from Indonesian Low Grade Coal

    Martin, Awaludin

    2011-03-10

    This article presents an experimental approach for the determination of the adsorption isotherms of methane on activated carbon that is essential for methane storage purposes. The experiments incorporated a constant-volume- variable-pressure (CVVP) apparatus, and two types of activated carbon have been investigated, namely, activated carbon derived from the low rank coal of the East of Kalimantan, Indonesia, and a Carbotech activated carbon. The isotherm results which cover temperatures from (300 to 318) K and pressures up to 3.5 MPa are analyzed using the Langmuir, Tóth, and Dubinin-Astakhov (D-A) isotherm models. The heat of adsorption for the single component methane-activated carbon system, which is concentration- and temperature-dependent, is determined from the measured isotherm data. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  7. Tetracycline adsorption onto activated carbons produced by KOH activation of tyre pyrolysis char.

    Acosta, R; Fierro, V; Martinez de Yuso, A; Nabarlatz, D; Celzard, A

    2016-04-01

    Tyre pyrolysis char (TPC), produced when manufacturing pyrolysis oil from waste tyre, was used as raw material to prepare activated carbons (ACs) by KOH activation. KOH to TPC weight ratios (W) between 0.5 and 6, and activation temperatures from 600 to 800 °C, were used. An increase in W resulted in a more efficient development of surface area, microporosity and mesoporosity. Thus, ACs derived from TPC (TPC-ACs) with specific surface areas up to 814 m(2) g(-1) were obtained. TPC, TPC-ACs and a commercial AC (CAC) were tested for removing Tetracycline (TC) in aqueous phase, and systematic adsorption studies, including equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamic aspects, were performed. Kinetics was well described by the pseudo-first order model for TPC, and by a pseudo second-order kinetic model for ACs. TC adsorption equilibrium data were also fitted by different isotherm models: Langmuir, Freundlich, Sips, Dubinin-Radushkevich, Dubinin-Astokov, Temkin, Redlich-Peterson, Radke-Prausnitz and Toth. The thermodynamic study confirmed that TC adsorption onto TPC-ACs is a spontaneous process. TC adsorption data obtained in the present study were compared with those reported in the literature, and differences were explained in terms of textural properties and surface functionalities. TPC-ACs had similar performances to those of commercial ACs, and might significantly improve the economic balance of the production of pyrolysis oil from waste tyres. PMID:26855221

  8. Adsorption kinetics of propane on energetically heterogeneous activated carbon

    Ismail, Azhar Bin

    2014-11-01

    The modeling of the adsorption isotherms and kinetics of the adsorbent+adsorbate pair is essential in simulating the performance of a pressurized adsorption chiller. In this work, the adsorption kinetics is analyzed from data measured using a magnetic suspension balance. The Statistical Rate Theory describes the Dubinin-Astakhov (DA) equation and extended to obtain an expression for transient analysis. Hence both the experimental excess equilibria data and the adsorption kinetics data may then be fitted to obtain the necessary parameters to fit the curves. The results fit the data very well within 6% of the error of regression. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Production and Characterization of Activated Carbon from Oil-Palm Shell for Carboxylic Acid Adsorption

    Hector Ruiz

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the recovery of volatile carboxylic acids (VCA by adsorption onto activated carbon adsorbent (CA was explored. The CA was synthesized from palm-oil kernel shells using H3PO4 at 10 and 60% w/w as activating agent. The samples produced in this manner were labeled as CA10A, CA60A respectively. Also KOH was used as activating agent at 10 and 60% w/w. In this case, the produced samples were labeled as CA10B, CA60B respectively. After activation, the surface of all four CA samples was extensively characterized both physically and chemically. The obtained CA adsorption behavior for VCA was assessed by submerging samples of CA in solutions at a fixed initial VCA concentration. Because some of the acids were adsorbed on the CA surface, the VCA concentration in solution was reduced. Carbon CA60B exhibited the greatest adsorption capacity, reaching 1300 mg of adsorbed acids/g carbon. Five adsorption isotherms models were fitted to experimental data. The Langmuir-Freundlich model described best the adsorption phenomena. Desorption behavior was assessed by placing CA after adsorption in water and was not high, which forces to reconsider either de desorption mechanism proposed in this study and/or the use CA as synthesized here for VCA recovery.

  10. STUDY ON THE PROPERTIES OF DIFFERENT ACTIVATED CARBON FIBERS AND THEIR ADSORPTION CHARACTERISTICS FOR FORMALDEHYDE

    H.Q. Rong; Z.Y. Ryu; J.T. Zheng

    2001-01-01

    Porous structure and surface chemistry of activated carbon fibers obtained by differ-ent precursors and activation methods were investigated. Adsorption isotherms werecharacterized by nitrogen adsorption at 77K over a relative pressure range from 10 6to 1. The regularization method according to Density Functional Theory (DFT) wasemployed to calculate the pore size distribution in the samples. Their specific surfaceareas were calculated by BET method, micropore volume and microporous specificsurface area calculated by t-plot method and MPD by Horvath-Kawazoe equation. Mi-cropore volume of rayon-based ACF was higher than that of other samples. The staticand dynamic adsorption capacity for formaldehyde on different ACFs was determined.The results show that steam activated Rayon-based A CFs had higher adsorption capac-ity than that of steam and KOH activated PAN-A CFs. Breakthrough curves illustratedthat Rayon-ACFs had longer breakthrough time, thus they possessed higher adsorp-tion capacity for formaldehyde than that of PAN-ACFs. The entire sample had smalladsorption capacity and short breakthrough time for water. Rayon-A CFs had exccl-lent adsorption selectivity for formaldehyde than PAN-ACFs. And the samples withhigh surface areas had relatively high adsorption capacity for formaldehyde. Elementaicontent of different A CFs were performed. Rayon-based A CFs contained more oxygenthan PAN-ACFs, which may be attributed to their excellent adsorption capacity forformaldehyde.

  11. Effect of effluent organic matter on the adsorption of perfluorinated compounds onto activated carbon

    Yu, Jing [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210046 (China); College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Yangzhou University, 196 West Huayang Road, Yangzhou 225127 (China); Lv, Lu, E-mail: esellu@nju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210046 (China); Lan, Pei [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210046 (China); College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Yangzhou University, 196 West Huayang Road, Yangzhou 225127 (China); Zhang, Shujuan [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210046 (China); Pan, Bingcai, E-mail: bcpan@nju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210046 (China); Zhang, Weiming [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210046 (China)

    2012-07-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The presence of EfOM significantly reduced the adsorption capacities and rates of PFCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low-molecular-weight EfOM compounds (<1 kDa) compete for adsorption sites of PFSs directly. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Large-molecular-weight EfOM compounds (>30 kDa) affect the adsorption through pore blockage or restriction effect. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Changes in surface properties of PAC caused by preloaded EfOM could affect PFCs adsorption. - Abstract: Effect of effluent organic matter (EfOM) on the adsorption of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) onto powdered activated carbon (PAC) was quantitatively investigated at environmentally relevant concentration levels. The adsorption of both perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) onto PAC followed pseudo-second order kinetics and fitted the Freundlich model well under the given conditions. Intraparticle diffusion was found to be the rate-controlling step in the PFC adsorption process onto PAC in the absence and presence of EfOM. The presence of EfOM, either in PFC-EfOM simultaneous adsorption onto fresh PAC or in PFC adsorption onto EfOM-preloaded PAC, significantly reduced the adsorption capacities and sorption rates of PFCs. The pH of zero point of charge was found to be 7.5 for fresh PAC and 4.2 for EfOM-preloaded PAC, suggesting that the adsorbed EfOM imparted a negative charge on PAC surface. The effect of molecular weight distribution of EfOM on the adsorption of PFCs was investigated with two EfOM fractions obtained by ultrafiltration. The low-molecular-weight compounds (<1 kDa) were found to be the major contributors to the significant reduction in PFC adsorption capacity, while large-molecular-weight compounds (>30 kDa) had much less effect on PFC adsorption capacity.

  12. Pb2+ adsorption from aqueous solutions on activated carbons obtained from lignocellulosic residues

    L. Giraldo

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Activated carbons obtained from cane sugar bagasse (ACB, African palm pit (ACP and sawdust (ACS were prepared through an impregnated with HNO3 and thermal treatment in an atmosphere in N2/steam water at 1173 K. Adsorption isotherms of N2 at 77 K and of CO2 at 273 K were determined for the activated carbons for which surface area and pore volume values were from 868 to 1100 m²g-1 and from 0.27 to 0.55cm³ g-1, respectively. These results were correlated, with the ones obtained for adsorption the adsorption isotherms of Pb2+ in aqueous solutions. Impregnation of the lignocellulosic materials with nitric acid produced acid-type activated carbons with total acid site contents between 4.13 and 6.93 mmol g-1 and pH at the point of zero charge values between 2.7 and 4.1, which were within range of the adsorption, at different pH values, since they determined, the surface charge of the activated carbons. Adsorption isotherms of Pb2+ at different pH values (2-8 at 298 K were determined. The ion adsorption capacity on ACB, ACP and ACS were 13.7, 15.2 and 17.5 mg.g-1, respectively. Experimental data were fitted to the Langmuir and Freundlich models and all cases the former fit better. The highest values for the quantity adsorbed on the monolayer, qm, were at pH 4, whereas the surface, charge of activated carbons was negative and the lead species mainly present was Pb2+. For higher pHs, the quantity of Pb2+ adsorbed decreased, and this had an important effect on adsorption, the surface characteristics of the solids and the hydroxilated lead species that were formed in the system.

  13. Adsorptive removal of geosmin by ceramic membrane filtration with super-powdered activated carbon

    Matsui, Yoshihiko; Aizawa, Takako; Kanda, Fumiaki; Nigorikawa, Naoko; Mima, Satoru; Kawase, Yuji

    2007-01-01

    Tap water free from unpleasant taste and odour is important for consumer satisfaction. We applied a super-powdered activated carbon (S-PAC) and microfiltration (MF) system to the removal of geosmin, a taste- and odour-causing compound. We used a specially pulverised PAC with a submicron particle size, much smaller than the normal PAC (N-PAC) particle size, as an adsorption pretreatment agent. MF and adsorption pretreatment with S-PAC removed geosmin with considerably greater efficiency and at...

  14. Composition and structural effects on the adsorption of ionic liquids onto activated carbon

    Lemus, Jesús; Freire, Mara G.; Palomar, Jose; Neves, Catarina M. S. S.; Marques, Carlos F. C.; Coutinho, João A. P.

    2013-01-01

    The applications and variety of ionic liquids (ILs) have increased during the last few years, and their use at a large scale will require their removal/recovery from wastewater streams. Adsorption on activated carbons (ACs) has been recently proposed for this aim and this work presents a systematic analysis of the influence of the IL chemical structures (cation side chain, head group, anion type and the presence of functional groups) on their adsorption onto commercial AC from water solution....

  15. Relation between interfacial energy and adsorption of organic micropollutants onto activated carbon

    De Ridder, David J.

    2013-03-01

    The adsorption efficacy of 16 pharmaceuticals on six different activated carbons is correlated to the thermodynamic work of adhesion, which was derived following the surface tension component approach. Immersion calorimetry was used to determine the surface tension components of activated carbon, while contact angle measurements on compressed plates were used to determine these for solutes. We found that the acid-base surface tension components of activated carbon correlated to the activated carbon oxygen content. Solute-water interaction correlated well to their solubility, although four solutes deviated from the trend. In the interaction between solute and activated carbon, van der Waals interactions were dominant and explained 65-94% of the total interaction energy, depending on the hydrophobicity of the activated carbon and solute. A reasonable relationship (r2 > 70) was found between the calculated work of adhesion and the experimentally determined activated carbon loading. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Co-adsorption of Trichloroethylene and Arsenate by Iron-Impregnated Granular Activated Carbon.

    Deng, Baolin; Kim, Eun-Sik

    2016-05-01

    Co-adsorption of trichloroethylene (TCE) and arsenate [As(V)] was investigated using modified granular activated carbons (GAC): untreated, sodium hypochlorite-treated (NaClO-GAC), and NaClO with iron-treated GAC (NaClO/Fe-GAC). Batch experiments of single- [TCE or As(V)] and binary- [TCE and As(V)] components solutions are evaluated through Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models and adsorption kinetic tests. In the single-component system, the adsorption capacity of As(V) was increased by the NaClO-GAC and the NaClO/Fe-GAC. The untreated GAC showed a low adsorption capacity for As(V). Adsorption of TCE by the NaClO/Fe-GAC was maximized, with an increased Freundlich constant. Removal of TCE in the binary-component system was decreased 15% by the untreated GAC, and NaClO- and NaClO/Fe-GAC showed similar efficiency to the single-component system because of the different chemical status of the GAC surfaces. Results of the adsorption isotherms of As(V) in the binary-component system were similar to adsorption isotherms of the single-component system. The adsorption affinities of single- and binary-component systems corresponded with electron transfer, competitive adsorption, and physicochemical properties. PMID:27131303

  17. Kinetic for Adsorption of Dye Methyl Orange by the Modified Activated Carbon from Rice Husk

    Muqing Qiu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the modified activated carbon from rice husk is used as the low cost material to absorb dye Methyl Orange in aqueous solution. The effects of different process parameters like pH, initial dye concentration and contact time on the adsorption of dye are investigated. The kinetic data of adsorption studies are discussed by the pseudo first-order, pseudo second-order and intraparticle diffusion. The results were shown that the adsorption process is chemisorption, which involves a sharing of electrons between the adsorbate and the surface of the adsorbent.

  18. Uptake of Reactive Black 5 by pumice and walnut activated carbon: Chemistry and adsorption mechanisms

    Heibati, B.; Rodriguez-Couto, S.; Amrane, A; M. Rafatullah; Hawari, A.; Al-Ghouti, M. A.

    2014-01-01

    The potential of using pumice and walnut wood activated carbon as low-cost adsorbents for the removal of the diazo dye Reactive Black 5 (RB5) from aqueous solutions was investigated. The Langmuir isotherm fit to the data specified the presence of two different natures of adsorption sites with different binding energies on the AC-W surface. Kinetic modelling showed that the adsorption behaviour and mechanism of RB5 for both adsorbents is believed to happen via surface adsorption followed by di...

  19. Adsorption of organics from tar sand water by activated carbon in packed beds. Final report

    Hines, A.L.; Pedram, E.O.

    1982-12-30

    The adsorption of TS-1S and TS-2C tar sand waters were studied at 278 and 298/sup 0/K on activated carbon in both batch and packed bed experiments. The isotherms were nonlinear over the entire liquid concentration ranges. Breakthrough curves were obtained in packed bed experiments as a function of bed lengths, particle size, and liquid velocity. A mechanistic approach was used to solve the mass transfer equations for the packed adsorber, the mass transfer coefficients and the rates of adsorption were calculated. Also the breakthrough curves were analyzed to establish the relative importance of the various individual mechanisms that contributed to the overall adsorption process.

  20. Adsorption of cadmium from aqueous solutions on sulfurized activated carbon prepared from nut shells

    Fouladi Tajar, Amir [Chemical Engineering Department, Amirkabir University of Technology, No.424, Hafez Avenue, P.O. Box 15875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kaghazchi, Tahereh, E-mail: kaghazch@aut.ac.ir [Chemical Engineering Department, Amirkabir University of Technology, No.424, Hafez Avenue, P.O. Box 15875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Soleimani, Mansooreh [Chemical Engineering Department, Amirkabir University of Technology, No.424, Hafez Avenue, P.O. Box 15875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2009-06-15

    Low-cost activated carbon, derived from nut shells, and its modified sample have been used as replacements for the current expensive methods of removing cadmium from aqueous solutions and waste waters. Adsorption of cadmium onto four kinds of activated carbons has been studied; prepared activated carbon (PAC), commercial activated carbon (CAC), and the sulfurized ones (SPAC and SCAC). The activated carbon has been derived, characterized, treated with sulfur and then utilized for the removal of Cd{sup 2+}. Sulfurizing agent (SO{sub 2} gas) was successfully used in adsorbents' modification process at the ambient temperature. Samples were then characterized and tested as adsorbents of cadmium. Effect of some parameters such as contact time, initial concentration and pH were examined. With increasing pH, the adsorption of cadmium ions was increased and maximum removal, 92.4% for SPAC, was observed in pH > 8.0 (C{sub 0} = 100 mg/L). The H-type adsorption isotherms, obtained for the adsorbents, indicated a favorable process. Adsorption data on both prepared and commercial activated carbon, before and after sulfurization, followed both the Frendlich and Langmuir models. They were better fitted by Frendlich isotherm as compared to Langmuir. The maximum adsorption capacities were 90.09, 104.17, 126.58 and 142.86 mg/g for CAC, PAC, SCAC and SPAC, respectively. Accordingly, surface modification of activated carbons using SO{sub 2} greatly enhanced cadmium removal. The reversibility of the process has been studied in a qualitative manner and it shows that the spent SPAC can be effectively regenerated for further use easily.

  1. Adsorption of cadmium from aqueous solutions on sulfurized activated carbon prepared from nut shells

    Low-cost activated carbon, derived from nut shells, and its modified sample have been used as replacements for the current expensive methods of removing cadmium from aqueous solutions and waste waters. Adsorption of cadmium onto four kinds of activated carbons has been studied; prepared activated carbon (PAC), commercial activated carbon (CAC), and the sulfurized ones (SPAC and SCAC). The activated carbon has been derived, characterized, treated with sulfur and then utilized for the removal of Cd2+. Sulfurizing agent (SO2 gas) was successfully used in adsorbents' modification process at the ambient temperature. Samples were then characterized and tested as adsorbents of cadmium. Effect of some parameters such as contact time, initial concentration and pH were examined. With increasing pH, the adsorption of cadmium ions was increased and maximum removal, 92.4% for SPAC, was observed in pH > 8.0 (C0 = 100 mg/L). The H-type adsorption isotherms, obtained for the adsorbents, indicated a favorable process. Adsorption data on both prepared and commercial activated carbon, before and after sulfurization, followed both the Frendlich and Langmuir models. They were better fitted by Frendlich isotherm as compared to Langmuir. The maximum adsorption capacities were 90.09, 104.17, 126.58 and 142.86 mg/g for CAC, PAC, SCAC and SPAC, respectively. Accordingly, surface modification of activated carbons using SO2 greatly enhanced cadmium removal. The reversibility of the process has been studied in a qualitative manner and it shows that the spent SPAC can be effectively regenerated for further use easily.

  2. Effect of surface modification of activated carbon on its adsorption capacity for NH3

    SHAN Xiao-mei; ZHU Shu-quan; ZHANG Wen-hui

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the effects of carbon surface characteristics on NH3 adsorption, coal-based and coconut shell activated carbons were modified by treatment with oxidants. The surface properties of the carbons were characterized by low temperature nitrogen sorption, by Boehm's titrations and by XPS techniques. NH3 adsorption isotherms of the original and the modified carbons were determined. The results show that the carbons were oxidized by HNO3 and (NH4)2S2O8, and that there was an increase in oxygen containing functional groups on the surface. However, the pore-size distribution of the coal-based carbons was changed after KMnO4 treatment. It was found that the NH3 adsorption capacity of the modified carbons was enhanced and that the most pronounced enhancement results from (NH4)2S2O8 oxidation. Under our experimental conditions, the capacity is positively corrected to the number of surface functional groups containing oxygen, and to the number of micro-pores. Furthermore, an empirical model of the relationship between NH3 adsorption and multiple factors on the carbon surface was fit using a complex regression method.

  3. Removal of Toluene at Low Concentration with Activated Carbon Filter : Adsorption Analysis using Tenax Tube and TD-GCMSD

    Shan, Chi-En

    2016-01-01

    Various studies have demonstrated the usefulness of adsorption of activated carbon on VOCs removal. Large porosity and high adsorption allows activated carbon to remove very small particles. This project was commissioned by the company name Genano Oy to test the activated carbon filter in their air purifier and hence to provide a database for the company. The purpose of this thesis was to study the effectiveness of impregnated activated carbon filter on toluene removal. Experiment was co...

  4. Adsorption of Thiophenic Compounds from Model Diesel Fuel Using Copper and Nickel Impregnated Activated Carbons

    Ramin Karimzadeh

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Adsorption of sulfur compoundsby porous materials is an effective way to produce cleaner diesel fuel.In this study, adsorption of refractory thiophenic sulfur compounds, i.e., benzothiophene (BT, dibenzothiophene (DBT, and 4,6-dimethyldibenzothiophene (4,6-DMDBT in single-solute systems from n-hexane solutions onto metal-impregnated activated carbons was investigated. A hydrogen-treated activated carbon fiber was selectively loaded with Ni, NiO, Cu, Cu2O, and CuO species to systematically assess the impact of each metal species on the adsorption of thiophenic compounds (TC. Metal-loaded adsorbents had the same total metal contents and similar microporosities, but contained different types of copper or nickel species. All metal-loaded adsorbents showed enhanced adsorption of tested TC. Cu2O- or NiO-loaded adsorbents exhibited the highest uptakes, due to more specific interactions between Cu+ or Ni2+ species and TC molecules. The theoretical monolyer coverage of TC on the exposed Cu+ sites was estimated and compared with that calculated from the experimental data. Results suggested catalytic conversion of TC molecules to other compounds on the Cu+ sites, followed by adsorption of reaction products onto the carbon surface or multilayer accumulation of TC molecules on the Cu+sites. TC adsorption uptake of the majority of adsorbents followed the order of: 4,6-DMDBT > DBT > BT due to higher intensity of specific and non-specific interactions of larger TC molecules with adsorbents.

  5. ADSORPTION OF METHYLENE BLUE FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTION ON ACTIVATED CARBON PRODUCED FROM SOYBEAN OIL CAKE BY KOH ACTIVATION

    Turgay Tay; Murat Erdem; Burak Ceylan,; Selhan Karagöz

    2012-01-01

    This study presents the adsorption behavior of the methylene blue (MB) dye onto the activated carbon produced from soybean oil cake by chemical activation with KOH at 800 °C. The adsorption isotherms, kinetic models, and thermodynamic parameters of the adsorption were studied. The Langmuir isotherm showed a better fit than the Freundlich isotherm. The adsorption rate was described by pseudo-second-order kinetics. The negative values of ΔG° and the positive values of ΔH° indicate that the adso...

  6. Adsorption of methyl orange using activated carbon prepared from lignin by ZnCl2 treatment

    Mahmoudi, K.; Hamdi, N.; Kriaa, A.; Srasra, E.

    2012-08-01

    Lignocellulosic materials are good and cheap precursors for the production of activated carbon. In this study, activated carbons were prepared from the lignin at different temperatures (200 to 500°C) by ZnCl2. The effects influencing the surface area of the resulting activated carbon are activation temperature, activation time and impregnation ratio. The optimum condition, are found an impregnation ratio of 2, an activation temperature of 450°C, and an activation time of 2 h. The results showed that the surface area and micropores volume of activated carbon at the experimental conditions are achieved to 587 and 0.23 cm3 g-1, respectively. The adsorption behavior of methyl orange dye from aqueous solution onto activated lignin was investigated as a function of equilibrium time, pH and concentration. The Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption models were applied to describe the equilibrium isotherms. A maximum adsorption capacity of 300 mg g-1 of methyl orange by activated carbon was achieved.

  7. Adsorption of Reactive Red M-2BE dye from water solutions by multi-walled carbon nanotubes and activated carbon

    Machado, Fernando M.; Bergmann, Carlos P. [Department of Material, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Osvaldo Aranha 99, Laboratory 705C, ZIP 90035-190, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Fernandes, Thais H.M. [Institute of Chemistry, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Goncalves 9500, Postal Box 15003, ZIP 91501-970, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Lima, Eder C., E-mail: profederlima@gmail.com [Institute of Chemistry, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Goncalves 9500, Postal Box 15003, ZIP 91501-970, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Royer, Betina; Calvete, Tatiana [Institute of Chemistry, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Goncalves 9500, Postal Box 15003, ZIP 91501-970, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Fagan, Solange B. [Department of Nanoscience, UNIFRA, R. dos Andradas 1614, ZIP 97010-032, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil)

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: {yields} Multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) and powdered activated carbon (PAC) adsorbents. {yields} Reactive Red M-2BE textile dye adsorbate. {yields} Kinetics was followed by Avrami fractional-order. {yields} The maximum adsorption capacities were 335.7 and 260.7 mg g{sup -1} for MWCNT and PAC. {yields} Synthetic effluents treatment. - Abstract: Multi-walled carbon nanotubes and powdered activated carbon were used as adsorbents for the successful removal of Reactive Red M-2BE textile dye from aqueous solutions. The adsorbents were characterised by infrared spectroscopy, N{sub 2} adsorption/desorption isotherms and scanning electron microscopy. The effects of pH, shaking time and temperature on adsorption capacity were studied. In the acidic pH region (pH 2.0), the adsorption of the dye was favourable using both adsorbents. The contact time to obtain equilibrium at 298 K was fixed at 1 h for both adsorbents. The activation energy of the adsorption process was evaluated from 298 to 323 K for both adsorbents. The Avrami fractional-order kinetic model provided the best fit to the experimental data compared with pseudo-first-order or pseudo-second-order kinetic adsorption models. For Reactive Red M-2BE dye, the equilibrium data were best fitted to the Liu isotherm model. Simulated dyehouse effluents were used to check the applicability of the proposed adsorbents for effluent treatment.

  8. Assessment of CO₂ adsorption capacity on activated carbons by a combination of batch and dynamic tests.

    Balsamo, Marco; Silvestre-Albero, Ana; Silvestre-Albero, Joaquín; Erto, Alessandro; Rodríguez-Reinoso, Francisco; Lancia, Amedeo

    2014-05-27

    In this work, batch and dynamic adsorption tests are coupled for an accurate evaluation of CO2 adsorption performance of three different activated carbons (AC) obtained from olive stones by chemical activation followed by physical activation with CO2 at varying times (i.e., 20, 40, and 60 h). Kinetic and thermodynamic CO2 adsorption tests from simulated flue gas at different temperatures and CO2 pressures are carried out under both batch (a manometric equipment operating with pure CO2) and dynamic (a lab-scale fixed-bed column operating with a CO2/N2 mixture) conditions. The textural characterization of the AC samples shows a direct dependence of both micropore and ultramicropore volume on the activation time; hence, AC60 has the higher contribution. The adsorption tests conducted at 273 and 293 K showed that when CO2 pressure is lower than 0.3 bar, the lower the activation time, the higher CO2 adsorption capacity; a ranking of ω(eq)(AC20) > ω(eq)(AC40) > ω(eq)(AC60) can be exactly defined when T = 293 K. This result is likely ascribed to the narrower pore size distribution of the AC20 sample, whose smaller pores are more effective for CO2 capture at higher temperature and lower CO2 pressure, the latter representing operating conditions of major interest for decarbonation of flue gas effluent. Moreover, the experimental results obtained from dynamic tests confirm the results derived from the batch tests in terms of CO2 adsorption capacity. It is important to highlight the fact that the adsorption of N2 on the synthesized AC samples can be considered to be negligible. Finally, the importance of proper analysis for data characterization and adsorption experimental results is highlighted for the correct assessment of the CO2 removal performance of activated carbons at different CO2 pressures and operating temperatures. PMID:24784997

  9. Modeling adsorption rate of organic micropollutants present in landfill leachates onto granular activated carbon.

    Ocampo-Pérez, Raúl; Abdel daiem, Mahmoud M; Rivera-Utrilla, José; Méndez-Díaz, José D; Sánchez-Polo, Manuel

    2012-11-01

    The overall adsorption rate of single micropollutants present in landfill leachates such as phthalic acid (PA), bisphenol A (BPA), diphenolic acid (DPA), 2,4-dichlorophenoxy-acetic acid (2,4-D), and 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid (MCPA) on two commercial activated carbons was studied. The experimental data obtained were interpreted by using a diffusional model (PVSDM) that considers external mass transport, intraparticle diffusion, and adsorption on an active site. Furthermore, the concentration decay data were interpreted by using kinetics models. Results revealed that PVSDM model satisfactorily fitted the experimental data of adsorption rate on activated carbon. The tortuosity factor of the activated carbons used ranged from 2 to 4. The contribution of pore volume diffusion represented more than 92% of intraparticle diffusion confirming that pore volume diffusion is the controlling mechanism of the overall rate of adsorption and surface diffusion can be neglected. The experimental data were satisfactorily fitted the kinetic models. The second-order kinetic model was better fitted the experimental adsorption data than the first-order model. PMID:22858399

  10. Adsorption of mercury (II from liquid solutions using modified activated carbons

    Hugo Soé Silva

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Mercury is one of the most toxic metals present in the environment. Adsorption has been proposed among the technologies for mercury abatement. Activated carbons are universal adsorbents which have been found to be a very effective alternative for mercury removal from water. The effectiveness with which a contaminant is adsorbed by the solid surface depends, among other factors, on the charge of the chemical species in which the contaminant is in solution and on the net charge of the adsorbent surface which depend on the pH of the adsorption system. In this work, activated carbon from carbonized eucalyptus wood was used as adsorbent. Two sulphurization treatments by impregnation with sulphuric acid and with carbon disulphide, have been carried out to improve the adsorption capacity for mercury entrapment. Batch adsorption tests at different temperatures and pH of the solution were carried out. The influence of the textural properties, surface chemistry and operation conditions on the adsorption capacity, is discussed.

  11. Isotope microscopy visualization of the adsorption profile of 2-methylisoborneol and geosmin in powdered activated carbon.

    Matsui, Yoshihiko; Sakamoto, Asuka; Nakao, Soichi; Taniguchi, Takuma; Matsushita, Taku; Shirasaki, Nobutaka; Sakamoto, Naoya; Yurimoto, Hisayoshi

    2014-09-16

    Decreasing the particle size of powdered activated carbon may enhance its equilibrium adsorption capacity for small molecules and micropollutants, such as 2-methylisoborneol (MIB) and geosmin, as well as for macromolecules and natural organic matter. Shell adsorption, in which adsorbates do not completely penetrate the adsorbent but instead preferentially adsorb near the outer surface of the adsorbent, may explain this enhancement in equilibrium adsorption capacity. Here, we used isotope microscopy and deuterium-doped MIB and geosmin to directly visualize the solid-phase adsorbate concentration profiles of MIB and geosmin in carbon particles. The deuterium/hydrogen ratio, which we used as an index of the solid-phase concentration of MIB and geosmin, was higher in the shell region than in the inner region of carbon particles. Solid-phase concentrations of MIB and geosmin obtained from the deuterium/hydrogen ratio roughly agreed with those predicted by shell adsorption model analyses of isotherm data. The direct visualization of the localization of micropollutant adsorbates in activated carbon particles provided direct evidence of shell adsorption. PMID:25162630

  12. Porosity and adsorption properties of activated carbon derived from palm oil waste

    Activated carbon have extensively been used as adsorbents in industry for the removal of pollutant species from gases for the purpose of purification and recovery of chemicals. The adsorption properties of the carbons depend very much on the porosity and type of pore presents which can be generated and controlled during synthesis and activation steps. This paper reports the effect of chemical activation by ZnCl3, KOH and nh4OH on the porosity of carbon produced from palm oil industry waste. Type of pores will further be validated by the SEM micrograph. The amount of gas adsorbed, the adsorption capacities can also be estimated based on the BET experiments data. The applicability of the produced carbon materials for the removal and exchange of hazardous incinerator gas is discussed. (Author)

  13. 2, 4 dichlorophenol (2, 4-DCP) sorption from aqueous solution using granular activated carbon and polymeric adsorbents and studies on effect of temperature on activated carbon adsorption.

    Ghatbandhe, A S; Yenkie, M K N

    2008-04-01

    Adsorption equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamics of 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP), one of the most commonly used chlorophenol, onto bituminous coal based Filtrasorb-400 grade granular activated carbon, were studied in aqueous solution in a batch system with respect to temperature. Uptake capacity of activated carbon found to increase with temperature. Langmuir isotherm models were applied to experimental equilibrium data of 2, 4-DCP adsorption and competitive studies with respect to XAD resin were carried out. Equilibrium data fitted very well to the Langmuir equilibrium model. Adsorbent monolayer capacity 'Q0, Langmuir constant 'b' and adsorption rate constant 'k(a)' were evaluated at different temperatures for activated carbon adsorption. This data was then used to calculate the energy of activation of adsorption and also the thermodynamic parameters, namely the free energy of adsorption, deltaG0, enthalpy of adsorption, deltaH0 and the entropy of adsorption deltaS0. The obtained results showed that the monolayer capacity increases with the increase in temperatures. The obtained values of thermodynamic parameters showed that adsorption of 2,4 DCP is an endothermic process. Synthetic resin was not found efficient to adsorb 2,4 DCP compared to activated carbon. The order of adsorption efficiencies of three resins used in the study found as XAD7HP > XAD4 > XAD1180. PMID:19295102

  14. Effect of effluent organic matter on the adsorption of perfluorinated compounds onto activated carbon.

    Yu, Jing; Lv, Lu; Lan, Pei; Zhang, Shujuan; Pan, Bingcai; Zhang, Weiming

    2012-07-30

    Effect of effluent organic matter (EfOM) on the adsorption of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) onto powdered activated carbon (PAC) was quantitatively investigated at environmentally relevant concentration levels. The adsorption of both perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) onto PAC followed pseudo-second order kinetics and fitted the Freundlich model well under the given conditions. Intraparticle diffusion was found to be the rate-controlling step in the PFC adsorption process onto PAC in the absence and presence of EfOM. The presence of EfOM, either in PFC-EfOM simultaneous adsorption onto fresh PAC or in PFC adsorption onto EfOM-preloaded PAC, significantly reduced the adsorption capacities and sorption rates of PFCs. The pH of zero point of charge was found to be 7.5 for fresh PAC and 4.2 for EfOM-preloaded PAC, suggesting that the adsorbed EfOM imparted a negative charge on PAC surface. The effect of molecular weight distribution of EfOM on the adsorption of PFCs was investigated with two EfOM fractions obtained by ultrafiltration. The low-molecular-weight compounds (30kDa) had much less effect on PFC adsorption capacity. PMID:22609392

  15. Influence of the particle size of activated mineral carbon on the phenol and chlorophenol adsorption

    Water pollution by phenolic compounds is a problem that requires a solution since these phenolic compounds are not completely biodegradable, they accumulate through the food chains and they are quite toxic when enter in contact with living organisms. In human beings, ingestion or contact of the skin with this type of compounds produces irritation and damages mainly to the liver and kidneys. In fact, the Environmental Protection Agency of the United States (EPA assigned nine phenolic compounds among the 275 most toxic substances in 1991. Phenols are found in wastewater from agriculture and industry, because phenolic compounds are used as pesticides and in diverse industrial activities. The treatment of this type of water is not simple because they are generally composed of a mixture of residuals with different chemical nature A useful method for the removal of phenols is the adsorption by activated carbon, since this material has a great surface area and it can be regenerated. The adsorption process depends, among other factors, on the activated carbon characteristics. When they are modified, their capacity to remove pollutants from the water changes. The effect of activated carbon particle size on the removal of phenolic compounds has not been completely studied. Therefore, the aim of this work was to determine the influence of the mineral activated carbon particle size on the phenol and 4-chloro phenol adsorption in aqueous solution, on adsorption column system. The results of the present work indicate that the mineral activated carbon particle size has a very important influence on the adsorption of phenol and 4-chloro phenol. When the particles were smaller, the retention quantities of phenol and 4-chloro phenol increased. This behavior was related to the particle characteristics of the mineral activated carbon such as surface area and pore volume, while other factors such as elementary composition of the activated carbon did not influence the adsorption process

  16. An experimental design approach for modeling As(V) adsorption from aqueous solution by activated carbon.

    Bakkal Gula, C; Bilgin Simsek, E; Duranoglu, D; Beker, U

    2015-01-01

    The present paper discusses response surface methodology as an efficient approach for predictive model building and optimization of As(V) adsorption on activated carbon derived from a food industry waste: peach stones. The objectives of the study are application of a three-factor 2³ full factorial and central composite design technique for maximizing As(V) removal by produced activated carbon, and examination of the interactive effects of three independent variables (i.e., solution pH, temperature, and initial concentration) on As(V) adsorption capacity. Adsorption equilibrium was investigated by using Langmuir, Freundlich, and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherm models. First-order and second-order kinetic equations were used for modeling of adsorption kinetics. Thermodynamic parameters (ΔG °, ΔH °, and ΔS °) were calculated and used to explain the As(V) adsorption mechanism. The negative value of ΔH (-7.778 kJ mol⁻¹) supported the exothermic nature of the sorption process and the Gibbs free energy values (ΔG°) were found to be negative, which indicates that the As(V) adsorption is feasible and spontaneous. PMID:25633943

  17. Modeling and Optimization for Production of Rice Husk Activated Carbon and Adsorption of Phenol

    Y. S. Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Modeling of adsorption process establishes mathematical relationship between the interacting process variables and process optimization is important in determining the values of factors for which the response is at maximum. In this paper, response surface methodology was employed for the modeling and optimization of adsorption of phenol onto rice husk activated carbon. Among the action variables considered are activated carbon pretreatment temperature, adsorbent dosage, and initial concentration of phenol, while the response variables are removal efficiency and adsorption capacity. Regression analysis was used to analyze the models developed. The outcome of this research showed that 99.79% and 99.81% of the variations in removal efficiency and adsorption capacity, respectively, are attributed to the three process variables considered, that is, pretreatment temperature, adsorbent dosage, and initial phenol concentration. Therefore, the models can be used to predict the interaction of the process variables. Optimization tests showed that the optimum operating conditions for the adsorption process occurred at initial solute concentration of 40.61 mg/L, pretreatment temperature of 441.46°C, adsorbent dosage 4 g, adsorption capacity of 0.9595 mg/g, and removal efficiency of 97.16%. These optimum operating conditions were experimentally validated.

  18. Removal of nitrate from water by adsorption onto zinc chloride treated activated carbon

    Bhatnagar, A.; Ji, M.; Choi, Y.H.;

    2008-01-01

    Adsorption study with untreated and zinc chloride (ZnCl2) treated coconut granular activated carbon (GAC) for nitrate removal from water has been carried out. Untreated coconut GAC was treated with ZnCl2 and carbonized. The optimal conditions were selected by studying the influence of process...... variables such as chemical ratio and activation temperature. Experimental results reveal that chemical weight ratio of 200% and temperature of 500 degrees C was found to be optimum for the maximum removal of nitrate from water. Both untreated and ZnCl2 treated coconut GACs were characterized by scanning...... capacity of untreated and ZnCl2 treated coconut GACs were found 1.7 and 10.2 mg/g, respectively. The adsorption of nitrate on ZnCl2 treated coconut GAC was studied as a function of contact time, initial concentration of nitrate anion, temperature, and pH by batch mode adsorption experiments. The kinetic...

  19. Adsorption of iron (III ion on activated carbons obtained from bagasse, pericarp of rubber fruit and coconut shell

    Orawan Sirichote

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available The adsorptions of iron (III from aqueous solution at room temperature on activated carbons obtaining from bagasse, pericarp of rubber fruit and coconut shell have been studied by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The activated carbons were prepared by carbonization of these raw materials and followed by activation with ZnCl2 . The adsorption behavior of iron (III on these activated carbons could be interpreted by Langmuir adsorption isotherm as monolayer coverage. The maximum amounts of iron (III adsorbed per gram of these activated carbons were 0.66 mmol/g, 0.41 mmol/g and 0.18 mmol/g, respectively. Study of the temperature dependence on these adsorptions has revealed them to be exothermic processes with the heats of adsorption of about -8.9 kJ/mol , -9.7 kJ/mol and -5.7 kJ/mol for bagasse, pericarp of rubber fruit and coconut shell, respectively.

  20. Water vapor adsorption in activated carbon modified with hydrophilic organic salts

    姚小龙; 李立清; 李海龙; 池东

    2015-01-01

    Five different kinds of hydrophilic organic salts were used to modify commercial activated carbon in order to prepare hydrophilic carbon materials. Properties of the samples were analyzed by surface area analyzer and SEM-EDX. The hydrophilic organic salts with different properties were introduced into activated carbon and significantly affected the properties of the samples. During adsorption experiments, the water vapor adsorption amount in modified samples increases by 0.57−17.12 times in temperature range from 303 to 323 K and at relative pressure below 0.50. Water molecules combined with surface hydrophilic groups through H-bonding exhibit good thermo stability. The effects of temperature, oxygen content and properties of the hydrophilic organic salts on water vapor adsorption were studied. It is indicated that water vapor adsorption in modified samples is mainly affected by the surface oxygen content. The carboxylate radicals in the hydrophilic organic salts greatly affect the micropore structure of the modified samples, while the metal ions in them exhibit limited influence. Different adsorption capacity of modified samples can be explained with the electronegativity of elements presented by Pauling.

  1. Oil Spill Adsorption Capacity of Activated Carbon Tablets from Corncobs in Simulated Oil-Water Mixture

    Rhonalyn V. Maulion

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Oil spill in bodies of water is one of severe environmental problems that is facing all over the country and in the world. Since oil is an integral part of the economy, increasing trend for its demand and transport of has led to a great treat in the surface water. One of the promising techniques in the removal of the oil spills in water bodies is adsorption using activated carbon form waste material such as corn cobs. The purpose of this study is to determine the adsorption capacity of activated carbon tablets derived from corncobs in the removal of oil. The properties of activated carbon produced have a pH of 7.0, bulk density of 0.26 g//cm3 , average pore size of 45nm, particle size of 18% at 60 mesh and 39% at 80 mesh, iodine number of 1370 mg/g and surface area of 1205 g/m2. The amount of bentonite clay as binder (15%,20%,30%, number of ACT (1,2,3 and time of contact(30,60,90 mins has been varied to determine the optimum condition where the activated carbon will have the best adsorption capacity in the removal of oil. Results showed that at 15% binder, 60 mins contact time and 3 tablets of activated carbon is the optimum condition which give a percentage adsorption of 22.82% of oil. Experimental data also showed that a Langmuir isotherm was the best fit isotherm for adsorption of ACT.

  2. Use of activated carbon adsorption in conjunction with radiation treatment processes

    This report presents the results of an assessment of the potential applications of combined adsorption-irradiation treatment processes. The rationale for the study was to determine whether the cost of radiation treatment could be reduced by concentrating target species on an adsorbent in the radiation field. Several different studies on adsorption-irradiation treatment were identified in the literature, and experimental work was done on both the conversion of sulphur dioxide to elemental sulphur, and the removal of trihalomethanes from water by adsorption on activated carbon and subsequent irradiation. Adsorption-irradiation treatment would appear to be less costly than irradiation alone for radiolytic decomposition of target species at low concentration in liquid streams, in the presence of high-surface-area, electrically insulating adsorbents. 116 refs

  3. Characterization and adsorption behavior of a novel triolein-embedded activated carbon composite adsorbent

    RU Jia; LIU Huijuan; QU Jiuhui; WANG Aimin; DAI Ruihua

    2005-01-01

    A novel triolein-embedded activated carbon composite adsorbent was developed. Experiments were carried out in areas such as the preparation method, the characterization of physicochemical properties, and the adsorption behavior of the composite adsorbent in removing dieldrin from aqueous solution. Results suggested that the novel composite adsorbent was composed of the supporting activated carbon and the surrounding triolein-embedded cellulose acetate membrane. The adsorbent was stable in water, for no triolein leakage was detected after soaking the adsorbent for five weeks. The adsorbent had good adsorption capability to dieldrin, which was indicated by a residual dieldrin concentration of 0.204 μg·L-1. The removal efficiency of the composite adsorbent was higher than the traditional activated carbon adsorbent.

  4. Cadmium(II) adsorption using functional mesoporous silica and activated carbon

    Highlights: ► Mono-amino-functional groups were found better than di- and tri-amino for Cd(II) adsorption. ► Amino-functional group would serve as a basic adsorption site for heavy metal ions. ► Mercapto- and carboxyl-groups were found to behave as ion exchange sites for proton. ► Introduction of amino- and mercapto-groups onto silica was proven by XPS and FT-IR measurements. - Abstract: The role of surface functionality on silica and carbonaceous materials for adsorption of cadmium(II) was examined using various mesoporous silica and activated carbon. Silica surfaces were principally functionalized by mono-amino- and mercapto-groups, while carboxylic group was introduced to the activated carbons by oxidation. Functional groups on silica surface were formed using grafting and co-condensation techniques in their preparation. Mono-amino group was found more effective than di- and tri-amino groups for cadmium(II) adsorption on the grafted silica. Mono-amino groups prepared by co-condensation adsorbed cadmium(II) as much as 0.25 mmol/g compared to mercapto- and carboxyl-groups which adsorbed around 0.12 mmol/g, whereas Langmuir adsorption affinities were as strong as 50–60 L/mmol for all of the three functions. The working pH range was wider for mercapto- and carboxyl-functions than for amino-group. Basic site could be an adsorption center for amino-functional groups while ion exchange sites were found to work for the mercapto- and carboxyl-functions to adsorb cadmium(II) from aqueous phase. Based on the experimental results, surface functional groups rather than structure of silica and carbon seemed to play a decisive role for cadmium(II) adsorption.

  5. Adsorption of Malachite Green dye onto activated carbon derived from Borassus aethiopum flower biomass

    In the present study, chemically prepared activated carbon derived from Borassus aethiopum flower was used as adsorbent. Batch adsorption studies were performed for the removal of Malachite Green (MG) from aqueous solutions by varying the parameters like initial solution pH, adsorbent dosage, initial MG concentration and temperature with three different particle sizes such as 100 μm, 600 μm and 1000 μm. The zero point charge was 2.5 and the maximum adsorption occurred at the pH range from 6.0 to 8.0. Experimental data were analyzed by model equations such as Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin isotherms and it was found that the Langmuir isotherm model best fitted the adsorption data. Thermodynamic parameters such as ΔG, ΔH and ΔS were also calculated for the adsorption processes. Adsorption rate constants were determined using pseudo first-order, pseudo second-order rate equations and also Elovich model and intraparticle diffusion models. The results clearly showed that the adsorption of MG onto PFAC followed pseudo second-order model and the adsorption was both by film diffusion and by intraparticle diffusion.

  6. Adsorption and desorption of mixtures of organic vapors on beaded activated carbon.

    Wang, Haiyan; Jahandar Lashaki, Masoud; Fayaz, Mohammadreza; Hashisho, Zaher; Philips, John H; Anderson, James E; Nichols, Mark

    2012-08-01

    In this study, adsorption and desorption of mixtures of organic compounds commonly emitted from automotive painting operations were experimentally studied. A mixture of two alkanes and a mixture of eight organic compounds were adsorbed onto beaded activated carbon (BAC) and then thermally desorbed under nitrogen. Following both adsorption and regeneration, samples of the BAC were chemically extracted. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was used to quantify the compounds in the adsorption and desorption gas streams and in the BAC extracts. In general, for both adsorbate mixtures, competitive adsorption resulted in displacing low boiling point compounds by high boiling point compounds during adsorption. In addition to boiling point, adsorbate structure and functionality affected adsorption dynamics. High boiling point compounds such as n-decane and 2,2-dimethylpropylbenzene were not completely desorbed after three hours regeneration at 288 °C indicating that these two compounds contributed to heel accumulation on the BAC. Additional compounds not present in the mixtures were detected in the extract of regenerated BAC possibly due to decomposition or other reactions during regeneration. Closure analysis based on breakthrough curves, solvent extraction of BAC and mass balance on the reactor provided consistent results of the amount of adsorbates on the BAC after adsorption and/or regeneration. PMID:22742925

  7. Adsorption/oxidation of sulfur-containing gases on nitrogen-doped activated carbon

    Liu Qiang; Ke Ming; Yu Pei; Hu Hai Qiang; Yan Xi Ming

    2016-01-01

    Coconut shell-based activated carbon (CAC) was used for the removal of methyl mercaptan (MM). CAC was modified by urea impregnation and calcined at 450°C and 950°C. The desulfurization activity was determined in a fixed bed reactor under room temperature. The results showed that the methyl mercaptan adsorption/oxidation capacity of modified carbon caicined at 950°C is more than 3 times the capacity of original samples. On the other hand, the modified carbon caicined at 950°C also has a high c...

  8. Characteristics of competitive adsorption between 2-methylisoborneol and natural organic matter on superfine and conventionally sized powdered activated carbons

    Matsui, Yoshihiko; Yoshida, Tomoaki; Nakao, Soichi; Knappe, Detlef R. U.; Matsushita, Taku

    2012-01-01

    When treating water with activated carbon, natural organic matter (NOM) is not only a target for adsorptive removal but also an inhibitory substance that reduces the removal efficiency of trace compounds, such as 2-methylisoborneol (MIB), through adsorption competition. Recently, superfine (submicron-sized) activated carbon (SPAC) was developed by wet-milling commercially available powdered activated carbon (PAC) to a smaller particle size. It was reported that SPAC has a larger NOM adsorptio...

  9. Experimental study on solar-powered adsorption refrigeration cycle with activated alumina and activated carbon as adsorbent

    Himsar Ambarita

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Typical adsorbent applied in solar-powered adsorption refrigeration cycle is activated carbon. It is known that activated alumina shows a higher adsorption capacity when it is tested in the laboratory using a constant radiation heat flux. In this study, solar-powered adsorption refrigeration cycle with generator filled by different adsorbents has been tested by exposing to solar radiation in Medan city of Indonesia. The generator is heated using a flat-plate type solar collector with a dimension of 0.5 m×0.5 m. Four cases experiments of solar-powered adsorption cycle were carried out, they are with generator filled by 100% activated alumina (named as 100AA, by a mixed of 75% activated alumina and 25% activated carbon (75AA, by a mixed of 25% activated alumina and 75% activated carbon (25AA, and filled by 100% activated carbon. Each case was tested for three days. The temperature and pressure history and the performance have been presented and analyzed. The results show that the average COP of 100AA, 75AA, 25AA, and 100AC is 0.054, 0.056, 0.06, and 0.074, respectively. The main conclusion can be drawn is that for Indonesian condition and flat-plate type solar collector the pair of activated carbon and methanol is the better than activated alumina.

  10. Comparing graphene, carbon nanotubes, and superfine powdered activated carbon as adsorptive coating materials for microfiltration membranes.

    Ellerie, Jaclyn R; Apul, Onur G; Karanfil, Tanju; Ladner, David A

    2013-10-15

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), nano-graphene platelets (NGPs), and superfine powdered activated carbon (S-PAC) were comparatively evaluated for their applicability as adsorptive coatings on microfiltration membranes. The objective was to determine which materials were capable of contaminant removal while causing minimal flux reduction. Methylene blue and atrazine were the model contaminants. When applied as membrane coatings, MWCNTs had minimal retention capabilities for the model contaminants, and S-PAC had the fastest removal. The membrane coating approach was also compared with a stirred vessel configuration, in which the adsorbent was added to a stirred flask preceding the membrane cell. Direct application of the adsorbent to the membrane constituted a greater initial reduction in permeate concentrations of the model contaminants than with the stirred flask setup. All adsorbents except S-PAC showed flux reductions less than 5% after application as thin-layer membrane coatings, and flux recovery after membrane backwashing was greater than 90% for all materials and masses tested. PMID:23911830

  11. Experimental investigation on activated carbon-ethanol pair for solar powered adsorption cooling applications

    El-Sharkawy, I.I. [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Sciences, Kyushu University, Kasuga-koen 6-1, Kasuga-shi, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Mechanical Power Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, Mansoura University, El-Mansoura (Egypt); Saha, B.B.; Koyama, S. [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Sciences, Kyushu University, Kasuga-koen 6-1, Kasuga-shi, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); He, J.; Ng, K.C.; Yap, C. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National University of Singapore, 10 Kent Ridge Crescent (Singapore)

    2008-12-15

    Adsorption equilibrium uptake of ethanol onto a highly porous activated carbon based adsorbent, namely Maxsorb III, has been experimentally investigated using a thermo-gravimetric analyzer (TGA) unit over adsorption temperatures ranging from 20 to 60 C. The Dubinin-Astakhov (D-A) equation has been used to correlate the experimental data. Isosteric heat of adsorption is also estimated by using the Clausius-Clapeyron equation. Employing a thermodynamically equilibrium model, the performance of the ideal adsorption cooling cycle has also been studied and compared to that of activated carbon fiber (ACF)-ethanol pair. Experimental results show that Maxsorb III can adsorb up to 1.2 kg of ethanol per kilogram of adsorbent. Theoretical calculations show that, the Maxsorb III-ethanol adsorption cycle can achieve a specific cooling effect of about 420 kJ kg{sup -1} at an evaporator temperature of 7 C along with a heat source of temperature 80 C and thus the pair is recommended for solar cooling applications. (author)

  12. Removal of Bi(Ⅲ) with Adsorption Technique Using Coconut Shell Activated Carbon

    SARTAPE Ashish; MANDHARE Aniruddha; SALVI Prathmesh; PAWAR Dattatraya; RAUT Prakash; ANUSE Mansing; KOLEKAR Sanjay

    2012-01-01

    In present study,we report the preparation of coconut shell activated carbon as adsorbent and its appli-cation for Bi(Ⅲ) removal from aqueous solutions.The developed adsorbent was characterized with scanning elec-tron microscope(SEM),Fourier Transform Infrared(FTIR),C,H,N,S analyzer,and BET surface area analyzer.The parameters examined include agitation time,initial concentration of Bi(Ⅲ),adsorbent dose and temperature.The maximum adsorption of Bi(Ⅲ)(98.72%) was observed at 250 mg·L-1 of Bi(Ⅲ) and adsorbent dose of 0.7 g when agitation was at 160 r·min-1 for 240 min at(299±2) K.The thermodynamic parameters such as Gibb's free energy(△Gθ),enthalpy(△Hθ) and entropy(△Sθ) were evaluated.For the isotherm models applied to adsorption study,the Langmuir isotherm model fits better than the Freundlich isotherm.The maximum adsorption capacity from the Langmuir isotherm was 54.35 mg?g?1 of Bi(Ⅲ).The kinetic study of the adsorption shows that the pseudo second order model is more appropriate than the pseudo first order model.The result shows that,coconut shell ac-tivated carbon is an effective adsorbent to remove Bi(Ⅲ) from aqueous solutions with good adsorption capacity.

  13. Aqueous phase adsorption of different sized molecules on activated carbon fibers: Effect of textural properties.

    Prajapati, Yogendra N; Bhaduri, Bhaskar; Joshi, Harish C; Srivastava, Anurag; Verma, Nishith

    2016-07-01

    The effect that the textural properties of rayon-based activated carbon fibers (ACFs), such as the BET surface area and pore size distribution (PSD), have on the adsorption of differently sized molecules, namely, brilliant yellow (BY), methyl orange (MO) and phenol (PH), was investigated in the aqueous phase. ACF samples with different BET areas and PSDs were produced by steam-activating carbonized fibers for different activation times (0.25, 0.5, and 1 h). The samples activated for 0.25 h were predominantly microporous, whereas those activated for relatively longer times contained hierarchical micro-mesopores. The adsorption capacities of the ACFs for the adsorbate increased with increasing BET surface area and pore volume, and ranged from 51 to 1306 mg/g depending on the textural properties of the ACFs and adsorbate size. The adsorption capacities of the hierarchical ACF samples followed the order BY > MO > PH. Interestingly, the number of molecules adsorbed by the ACFs followed the reverse order: PH > MO > BY. This anomaly was attributed to the increasing molecular weight of the PH, MO and BY molecules. The equilibrium adsorption data were described using the Langmuir isotherm. This study shows that suitable textural modifications to ACFs are required for the efficient aqueous phase removal of an adsorbate. PMID:27107386

  14. Adsorption of Cd(II and Pb(II Ions from Aqueous Solution byActivated Carbon

    Hayder Mohammed Abdul-Hameed

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Heavy metal consider as major environmental pollutants. Many of industrial wastewater effluents contain a wide range of these heavy metals. The adsorption of Cd2+ and Pb2+ metal ions from aqueous solution by activated carbon was studied. The results showed that maximum adsorption capacity occurred at 486.9×10-3 mg/kg for Pb2+ ion and 548.8×10-3 mg/kg for Cd2+ ion. The adsorption in a mixture of the metal ions had a balancing effect on the adsorption capacity of the activated carbon. The adsorption capacity of each metal ion was affected by the presence of other metal ions rather than its presence individually. The study showed the presence of other heavy metals attribute to the reduction in the activated carbon capacity, and the adsorption process was found to obeys the Freundlich isotherm for both ions.

  15. Adsorption of Ferricyanide Ion onActivated Carbon and γ-Alumina

    J. Ketcha Mbadcam; G. F. Tchatat Wouaha; V. Hambate Gomdje

    2010-01-01

    Iron-cyanide complexes are present in soil and ground water due to anthropogenic inputs. We compared the adsorption of ferricyanide ion, on two commercial activated carbons (COM3 and COM4) and γ-alumina (A1G) in aqueous solution. Isotherm parameters obtained from batch experiments of iron-cyanide complex adsorption on these adsorbents were carried-out. The mass of the adsorbents were varied at 40 mg, 60 mg and 100 mg and the inorganic ion initial concentrations, Co also varied between 3.04×10...

  16. Oil Spill Adsorption Capacity of Activated Carbon Tablets from Corncobs in Simulated Oil-Water Mixture

    Rhonalyn V. Maulion; Sheila Adarlo Abacan; Gerald Garces Allorde; Ma. Cherrielyne Silda Umali

    2015-01-01

    Oil spill in bodies of water is one of severe environmental problems that is facing all over the country and in the world. Since oil is an integral part of the economy, increasing trend for its demand and transport of has led to a great treat in the surface water. One of the promising techniques in the removal of the oil spills in water bodies is adsorption using activated carbon form waste material such as corn cobs. The purpose of this study is to determine the adsorption capaci...

  17. Adsorption of cadmium ions from aqueous solution using granular activated carbon and activated clay

    Wasewar, Kailas L. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Visvesvaraya National Institute of Technology (VNIT), Nagpur, Maharashtra (India); Kumar, Pradeep; Teng, Tjoon Tow [Environmental Technology Division, School of Industrial Technology, University Science of Malaysia, Minden, Penang (Malaysia); Chand, Shri; Padmini, Bina N. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee (India)

    2010-07-15

    The present study was aimed at removing cadmium ions from aqueous solution through batch studies using adsorbents, such as, granular activated carbon (GAC) and activated clay (A-clay). GAC was of commercial grade where as the A-clay was prepared by acid treatment of clay with 1 mol/L of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. Bulk densities of A-clay and GAC were 1132 and 599 kg/m{sup 3}, respectively. The surface areas were 358 m{sup 2}/g for GAC and 90 m{sup 2}/g for A-clay. The adsorption studies were carried out to optimize the process parameters, such as, pH, adsorbent dosage, and contact time. The results obtained were analyzed for kinetics and adsorption isotherm studies. The pH value was optimized at pH 6 giving maximum Cd removal of 84 and 75.2% with GAC and A-clay, respectively. The adsorbent dosage was optimized and was found to be 5 g/L for GAC and 10 g/L for A-clay. Batch adsorption studies were carried out with initial adsorbate (Cd) concentration of 100 mg/L and adsorbent dosage of 10 g/L at pH 6. The optimum contact time was found to be 5 h for both the adsorbents. Kinetic studies showed Cd removal a pseudo second order process. The isotherm studies revealed Langmuir isotherm to better fit the data than Freundlich isotherm. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  18. Pore size distribution and supercritical hydrogen adsorption in activated carbon fibers

    Pore size distributions (PSD) and supercritical H2 isotherms have been measured for two activated carbon fiber (ACF) samples. The surface area and the PSD both depend on the degree of activation to which the ACF has been exposed. The low-surface-area ACF has a narrow PSD centered at 0.5 nm, while the high-surface-area ACF has a broad distribution of pore widths between 0.5 and 2 nm. The H2 adsorption enthalpy in the zero-coverage limit depends on the relative abundance of the smallest pores relative to the larger pores. Measurements of the H2 isosteric adsorption enthalpy indicate the presence of energy heterogeneity in both ACF samples. Additional measurements on a microporous, coconut-derived activated carbon are presented for reference.

  19. Pore size distribution and supercritical hydrogen adsorption in activated carbon fibers

    Purewal, J. J.; Kabbour, H.; Vajo, J. J.; Ahn, C. C.; Fultz, B.

    2009-05-01

    Pore size distributions (PSD) and supercritical H2 isotherms have been measured for two activated carbon fiber (ACF) samples. The surface area and the PSD both depend on the degree of activation to which the ACF has been exposed. The low-surface-area ACF has a narrow PSD centered at 0.5 nm, while the high-surface-area ACF has a broad distribution of pore widths between 0.5 and 2 nm. The H2 adsorption enthalpy in the zero-coverage limit depends on the relative abundance of the smallest pores relative to the larger pores. Measurements of the H2 isosteric adsorption enthalpy indicate the presence of energy heterogeneity in both ACF samples. Additional measurements on a microporous, coconut-derived activated carbon are presented for reference.

  20. Pore size distribution and supercritical hydrogen adsorption in activated carbon fibers

    Purewal, J J; Kabbour, H; Ahn, C C; Fultz, B [Division of Engineering and Applied Science, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States); Vajo, J J [HRL Laboratories, LLC, Malibu, CA (United States)], E-mail: purewal@caltech.edu

    2009-05-20

    Pore size distributions (PSD) and supercritical H{sub 2} isotherms have been measured for two activated carbon fiber (ACF) samples. The surface area and the PSD both depend on the degree of activation to which the ACF has been exposed. The low-surface-area ACF has a narrow PSD centered at 0.5 nm, while the high-surface-area ACF has a broad distribution of pore widths between 0.5 and 2 nm. The H{sub 2} adsorption enthalpy in the zero-coverage limit depends on the relative abundance of the smallest pores relative to the larger pores. Measurements of the H{sub 2} isosteric adsorption enthalpy indicate the presence of energy heterogeneity in both ACF samples. Additional measurements on a microporous, coconut-derived activated carbon are presented for reference.

  1. Visualization and Measurement of Adsorption/Desorption Process of Ethanol in Activated Carbon Adsorber

    Asano, Hitoshi; Murata, Kenta; Takenaka, Nobuyuki; Saito, Yasushi

    Adsorption refrigerator is one of the efficient tools for waste heat recovery, because the system is driven by heat at relative low temperature. However, the coefficient of performance is low due to its batch operation and the heat capacity of the adsorber. In order to improve the performance, it is important to optimize the configuration to minimize the amount of driving heat, and to clarify adsorption/desorption phenomena in transient conditions. Neutron radiography was applied to visualize and measure the adsorption amount distribution in an adsorber. The visualization experiments had been performed at the neutron radiography facility of E-2 port of Kyoto University Research Reactor. Activated carbon and ethanol were used as the adsorbent and refrigerant. From the acquired radiographs, adsorption amount was quantitatively measured by applying the umbra method using a checkered neutron absorber with boron powder. Then, transient adsorption and desorption processes of a rectangular adsorber with 84 mm in width, 50 mm in height and 20 mm in depth were visualized. As the result, the effect of fins in the adsorbent layer on the adsorption amount distribution was clearly visualized.

  2. Modeling of the thermal effects of hydrogen adsorption on activated carbon

    Richard, M.-A.; Chahine, R. [Univ. du Quebec a Trois-Rivieres, Inst. de recherche sur l' hydrogene, Trois-Rivieres, Quebec (Canada)]. E-mail: marc-andre.richard@uqtr.ca

    2006-07-01

    'Full text:' Heat management is one of the most critical issues for the design of efficient adsorption-based storage of hydrogen. We present simulations of mass and energy balance for hydrogen and nitrogen adsorption on activated carbon over wide temperature and pressure ranges. First, the Dubinin-Astakhov (DA) model is adapted to model excess hydrogen and nitrogen adsorption isotherms at high pressures and supercritical temperatures assuming a constant microporous adsorption volume. The five parameter modified D-A adsorption model is shown to fit the experimental data over the temperature range (35 K-293 K) for hydrogen and (93 K-298 K) for nitrogen and pressure range (0-6 MPa) within the experimental uncertainties of the measurement system. We derive the thermodynamic properties of the adsorbed phase from this analytical expression of the measured data. The mass and energy rate balance equations in a microporous adsorbent/adsorbate system are then presented and validated with nitrogen desorption experiments. Finally, simulations of adiabatic and isothermal filling of adsorption-based hydrogen storage are presented and discussed. (author)

  3. Carbon dioxide adsorption and activation on Ceria (110): A density functional theory study

    Cheng, Zhuo; Lo, Cynthia S

    2012-01-01

    Ceria (CeO2) is a promising catalyst for the reduction of carbon dioxide (CO2) to liquid fuels and commodity chemicals, in part because of its high oxygen storage capacity, yet the fundamentals of CO2 adsorption and initial activation on CeO2 surfaces remain largely unknown. We use density functional theory, corrected for onsite Coulombic interactions (DFT+U), to explore various adsorption sites and configurations for CO2 on stoichiometric and reduced CeO2 (110). Our model of reduced CeO2 (110) contains oxygen vacancies at the topmost atomic layer and undergoes surface reconstruction upon introduction of these vacancies. We find that CO2 adsorption on reduced CeO2 (110) is thermodynamically favored over the corresponding adsorption on stoichiometric CeO2 (110). The most stable adsorption configuration consists of CO2 adsorbed parallel to the reduced CeO2 (110) surface, with the molecule situated near the site of the oxygen vacancy. Structural changes in the CO2 molecule are also observed upon adsorption, so t...

  4. Removal of copper ions from wastewater by adsorption/electrosorption on modified activated carbon cloths.

    Huang, Chen-Chia; Su, Yu-Jhih

    2010-03-15

    Adsorption and electrosorption of copper ions (Cu(2+)) from wastewater were investigated with variously modified activated carbon fiber (ACF) cloth electrodes. Commercial polyacrylonitrile-based ACF cloths were modified by nitric acid or impregnated with chitosan solution. The surface characteristics of ACFs before and after modification were evaluated by nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms, zeta potential, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and cyclic voltammetry. Adsorption and electrosorption capacities of Cu(2+) on ACF cloths without and with a bias potential were measured, respectively, and the electrosorption isotherms were also investigated. The initial pH of the copper ion solution was adjusted to 4.0. Experimental results showed that electrosorption effectively increases adsorption capacity. The adsorption/electrosorption isotherms of Cu(2+) on ACF cloths were in good agreement with Langmuir and Freundlich equations. The equilibrium adsorption capacity at 0.3 V was 0.389 mmol/g, which is two times higher than that at open circuit. The maximum electrosorption capacity of Cu(2+) on chitosan impregnated ACF cloths was 0.854 mmol/g, which is about 2.2 times higher than that on the pristine cloths. PMID:19896268

  5. Remediation of hexachlorobenzene contaminated soils by rhamnolipid enhanced soil washing coupled with activated carbon selective adsorption.

    Wan, Jinzhong; Chai, Lina; Lu, Xiaohua; Lin, Yusuo; Zhang, Shengtian

    2011-05-15

    The present study investigates the selective adsorption of hexachlorobenzene (HCB) from rhamnolipid solution by a powdered activated carbon (PAC). A combined soil washing-PAC adsorption technique is further evaluated on the removal of HCB from two soils, a spiked kaolin and a contaminated real soil. PAC at a dosage of 10 g L(-1) could achieve a HCB removal of 80-99% with initial HCB and rhamnolipid concentrations of 1 mg L(-1) and 3.3-25 g L(-1), respectively. The corresponding adsorptive loss of rhamnolipid was 8-19%. Successive soil washing-PAC adsorption tests (new soil sample was subjected to washing for each cycle) showed encouraging leaching and adsorption performances for HCB. When 25 g L(-1) rhamnolipid solution was applied, HCB leaching from soils was 55-71% for three cycles of washing, and HCB removal by PAC was nearly 90%. An overall 86% and 88% removal of HCB were obtained for kaolin and real soil, respectively, by using the combined process to wash one soil sample for twice. Our investigation suggests that coupling AC adsorption with biosurfactant-enhanced soil washing is a promising alternative to remove hydrophobic organic compounds from soils. PMID:21397398

  6. Influence of oxidation process on the adsorption capacity of activated carbons from lignocellulosic precursors

    Mourao, P.A.M.; Laginhas, C.; Custodio, F.; Nabais, J.M.V.; Carrott, P.J.M.; Carrott, M.M.L. Ribeiro [Evora Univ. (Portugal). Centro de Quimica de Evora

    2011-02-15

    A set of activated carbon materials non-oxidised and oxidised, were successfully prepared from two different lignocellulosic precursors, almond shell and vine shoot, by physical activation with carbon dioxide and posterior oxidation with nitric acid. All samples were characterised in relation to their structural properties and chemical composition, by different techniques, namely nitrogen adsorption at 77 K, elemental analysis (C, H, N, O and S), point of zero charge (PZC) and FTIR. A judicious choice was made to obtain carbon materials with similar structural properties (apparent BET surface area {proportional_to} 850-950 m{sup 2}g{sup -1}, micropore volume {proportional_to} 0.4 cm{sup 3}g{sup -1}, mean pore width {proportional_to} 1.2 nm and external surface area {proportional_to} 14-26 m{sup 2}g{sup -1}). After their characterisation, these microporous activated carbons were also tested for the adsorption of phenolic compounds (p-nitrophenol and phenol) in the liquid phase at room temperature. The performance in liquid phase was correlated with their structural and chemical properties. The oxidation had a major impact at a chemical level but only a moderate modification of the porous structure of the samples. The Langmuir and Freundlich equations were applied to the experimental adsorption isotherms of phenolic compounds with good agreement for the different estimated parameters. (author)

  7. Adsorption/oxidation of sulfur-containing gases on nitrogen-doped activated carbon

    Liu Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Coconut shell-based activated carbon (CAC was used for the removal of methyl mercaptan (MM. CAC was modified by urea impregnation and calcined at 450°C and 950°C. The desulfurization activity was determined in a fixed bed reactor under room temperature. The results showed that the methyl mercaptan adsorption/oxidation capacity of modified carbon caicined at 950°C is more than 3 times the capacity of original samples. On the other hand, the modified carbon caicined at 950°C also has a high capacity for the simultaneous adsorption/oxidation of methyl mercaptan and hydrogen sulfide.The introduce of basic nitrogen groups siginificantly increases the desulfurization since it can facilitate the electron transfer process between sulfur and oxygen. The structure and chemical properties are characterized using Boehm titration, N2 adsorption-desorption method, thermal analysis and elemental analysis. The results showed that the major oxidation products were dimethyl disulfide and methanesulfonic acid which adsorbed in the activated carbon.

  8. Adsorption isotherms and kinetics for dibenzothiophene on activated carbon and carbon nanotube doped with nickel oxide nanoparticles

    MAZEN K NAZAL; GHASSAN A OWEIMREEN; MAZEN KHALED; MUATAZ A ATIEH; ISAM H ALJUNDI; ABDALLA M ABULKIBASH

    2016-04-01

    Activated carbon (AC) and multiwall carbon nanotubes (CNT) doped with 1, 5 and 10% Ni in the form of nickel oxide nanoparticles were prepared using the wetness impregnation method. These percentages were denoted by the endings NI1, NI5 and NI10 in the notations ACNI1, ACNI5, ACNI10 and CNTNI1, CNTNI5, CNTNIL10, respectively. The physicochemical properties for these adsorbents were characterized using N$_2$ adsorption–desorption surface area analyzer, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, field-emission transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectrometre. Adsorption isotherms were obtained and desulphurization kinetics were carried out on solutions of dibenzothiophene (DBT) and thiophene in a model fuel. The efficiencies of DBT and thiophene removal were reported. The adsorption isotherms fitted the Langmuir and Freundlich models. The highest adsorption capacity for DBT was $74\\pm 5$ mg g$^{−1}$ on ACNI5; the maximum adsorption capacities of the other adsorbents followed the trend ${\\rm ACNI1 > ACNI10 > AC > CNTNI5 > CNTNI1 > CNTNI10 > CNT}$. The adsorption rates for DBT and thiophene followed pseudo-second-order kinetics. The selective removal by these adsorbents of DBT relative to thiophene and naphthalene was evaluated. The adsorbents’ reusability and the effect of the percentage of aromaticcompounds on their adsorption capacity were also reported.

  9. Characteristic and mercury adsorption of activated carbon produced by CO2 of chicken waste

    HUANG Yaji; JIN Baosheng; ZHONG Zhaoping; ZHONG Wenqi; XIAO Rui

    2008-01-01

    Preparation of activated carbon from chicken waste is a promising way to produce a useful adsorbent for Hg removal.A three-stage activation process (drying at 200℃,pyrolysis in N2 atmosphere,followed by CO2 activation) was used for the production of activated samples.The effects of carbonization temperature (400-600 ℃),activation temperature (700-900 ℃),and activation time (1-2.5 h) on the physicochemieal properties (weight-loss and BET surface) of the prepared carbon were investigated.Adsorptive removal of mercury from real flue gas onto activated carbon has been studied.The activated carbon from chicken waste has the same mercury capacity as commercial activated carbon (Darco LH) (HgV:38.7% vs.53.5%,HgO:50.5% vs.68.8%),although its surface area is around 10 times smaller,89.5 m2/g vs.862 m2/g.The low cost activated carbon can be produced from chicken waste,and the procedure is suitable.

  10. Study on adsorption performance of coal based activated carbon to radioactive iodine and stable iodine

    Highlights: • The impregnated coal-based activated carbons as adsorbent for removing methyl iodide. • The coal-based activated carbons to remove stable iodine. • Iodine residues are under 0.5 μg/ml after adsorption treatment. • The decontamination factor is much higher than 1000. - Abstract: Nuclear power plant, nuclear reactors and nuclear powered ship exhaust contains a large amount of gaseous radioactive iodine, and can damage to the workplace and the surrounding environment. The quantitative test to remove methyl iodide and the qualitative test for removing stable iodine were investigated using the impregnated coal-based activated carbons and coal-based activated carbons as adsorbents. The research conducted in this work shows that iodine residues were under 0.5 μg/ml after adsorption treatment and the decontamination factor of the coal-based activated carbon for removing the stable iodine was more than 1000, which can achieve the purpose of removing harmful iodine, and satisfy the requirement of gaseous waste treatment of nuclear powered vessel and other nuclear plants

  11. Experimental Adsorption Isotherm of Methane onto Activated Carbon at Sub- and Supercritical Temperatures

    Rahman, Kazi Afzalur

    2010-11-11

    This paper presents the experimentally measured adsorption isotherm data for methane onto the pitch-based activated carbon type Maxsorb III for temperatures ranging from (120 to 220) K and pressures up to 1.4 MPa. These data are useful to study adsorbed natural gas (ANG) storage systems when the low temperature natural gas regasified from the liquid phase is considered to charge in the storage chamber. Adsorption parameters were evaluated from the isotherm data using the Tóth and Dubinin-Astakhov models. The isosteric heat of adsorption, which is concentration- and temperature-dependent, is extracted from the data. The Henry\\'s law coefficients for the methane/Maxsorb III pairs are evaluated at various temperatures. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  12. Adsorption of Hexavalent Chromium from Aqueous Solution Using Chemically Activated Carbon Prepared from Locally Available Waste of Bamboo (Oxytenanthera abyssinica)

    Dula, Tamirat; Siraj, Khalid; Kitte, Shimeles Addisu

    2014-01-01

    This study reports on the adsorption of Hexavalent Chromium from aqueous solutions using activated carbon prepared from bamboo (Oxytenanthera abyssinica) waste by KOH activation heating in an electrical furnace at 1073 K for 3 hrs. Batch adsorption experiments were also carried out as a function of pH, contact time, initial concentration of the adsorbate, adsorbent dosage, and temperature of the solution. Kinetic studies of the data showed that the adsorption follows the pseudo-second-order k...

  13. Removal of cyanobacteria toxins from drinking water by adsorption on activated carbon fibers

    Eden Cavalcanti de Albuquerque Júnior; Manoel Orlando Alvarez Méndez; Aparecido dos Reis Coutinho; Telma Teixeira Franco

    2008-01-01

    Natural fibers from macadamia nut shell, dried coconut shell endocarp, unripe coconut mesocarp, sugarcane bagasse and pine wood residue were used to prepare activated carbon fibers (ACF) with potential application for removing microcystins. The ACF from pine wood and sugar cane bagasse were used to remove [D-Leucine¹]MCYST-LR from water. After 10 minutes of contact time, more than 98% of toxin was removed by the ACF. The microcystin adsorption monolayer, q m, in the ACF recovered 200 and 161 ...

  14. Adsorption of mercury (II) from liquid solutions using modified activated carbons

    Hugo Soé Silva; Silvia Virginia Ruiz; Dolly Lucía Granados; Juan Manuel Santángelo

    2010-01-01

    Mercury is one of the most toxic metals present in the environment. Adsorption has been proposed among the technologies for mercury abatement. Activated carbons are universal adsorbents which have been found to be a very effective alternative for mercury removal from water. The effectiveness with which a contaminant is adsorbed by the solid surface depends, among other factors, on the charge of the chemical species in which the contaminant is in solution and on the net charge of the adsorbent...

  15. Removal of Triclocarban (TCC) and Diethyl Phthalate (DEP) from Greywater by Adsorption onto Activated Carbon

    Skår, Ingrid Frogner

    2014-01-01

    This Thesis is based on the findings from my specialization project, where an investigation of priority micropollutants in greywater from PCPs was conducted (Skår, 2013). The objective of the Master Thesis was to select two or three compounds from the list of priority compounds that was suitable for analyzing and monitoring in a greywater recycling scheme, and investigate the removal of those compounds with adsorption onto activated carbon. This was done by performing kinetic and isothe...

  16. Self-flocculated powdered activated carbon with different oxidation methods and their influence on adsorption behavior.

    Gong, Zailin; Li, Shujin; Ma, Jun; Zhang, Xiangdong

    2016-03-01

    The commercial powdered activated carbon (PAC) has been selectively oxidized by two methods. The two oxidized methods are wet oxidation with ammonium persulfate and thermal treatment after acidification with hydrochloride acid, respectively. The two oxidized PAC were then functionalized with thermoresponsive poly (N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) in aqueous solution at ambient temperature. Comparing the two oxidized PAC products and their grafted derivatives, the oxidized PAC modified with thermal treatment after acidification shows larger surface area of 1184 m(2)/g and better adsorption of bisphenol A. Its derivative also exhibits relatively large surface area and adsorption capacity after grafted with PNIPAM. The maximum surface adsorption capacity simulated under Langmuir Models reached 156 mg/g. In addition, the grafted PAC products show self-flocculation behaviors with rapid response to temperature because of the thermal phase transition and entanglement behaviors of PNIPAM. The present study provides a new way to obtain carboxyl-rich activated carbon with large surface area and better adsorption capacity. The retrievable grafted PAC with good self-flocculation effect responsive to temperature will have high potential application in water remediation which requires pre-heating and emergency water treatment in the wild. PMID:26551226

  17. Removal of cyanobacteria toxins from drinking water by adsorption on activated carbon fibers

    Eden Cavalcanti de Albuquerque Júnior

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Natural fibers from macadamia nut shell, dried coconut shell endocarp, unripe coconut mesocarp, sugarcane bagasse and pine wood residue were used to prepare activated carbon fibers (ACF with potential application for removing microcystins. The ACF from pine wood and sugar cane bagasse were used to remove [D-Leucine¹]MCYST-LR from water. After 10 minutes of contact time, more than 98% of toxin was removed by the ACF. The microcystin adsorption monolayer, q m, in the ACF recovered 200 and 161 µg.mg-1, with the Langmuir adsorption constant, K L, of 2.33 and 1.23 L.mg-1. Adsorption of [D-Leucine¹]MCYST-LR in continuous process was studied for a fixed-bed ACF prepared from coconut shell and sugar cane bagasse and for two commercial activated carbon samples from treatment water plants of two Brazilian hemodialysis centers. Saturation of the beds occurred after 80 to 320 minutes, and the adsorption capacity for that toxin varied from 4.11 to 12.82 µg.mg-1.

  18. Removal of N-nitrosodimethylamine precursors with powdered activated carbon adsorption.

    Beita-Sandí, Wilson; Ersan, Mahmut Selim; Uzun, Habibullah; Karanfil, Tanju

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to examine the roles of powdered activated carbon (PAC) characteristics (i.e., surface chemistry, pore size distribution, and surface area) in the removal of N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) formation potential (FP) in surface and wastewater-impacted waters. Also, the effects of natural attenuation of NDMA precursors in surface waters, NDMA FP concentration, and carbon dose on the removal of NDMA FP by PAC were evaluated. Finally, the removal of NDMA FP by PAC at two full-scale DWTPs was monitored. Wastewater-impacted and surface water samples were collected to conduct adsorption experiments using different PACs and activated carbon fibers (ACFs) with a wide range of physicochemical characteristics. The removal efficiency of NDMA FP by PAC was significantly higher in wastewater-impacted than surface waters. Adsorbable NDMA precursors showed a size distribution in the waters tested; the adsorbable fraction included precursors accessing the pore size regions of 10-20 Å and carbons showed higher removal of NDMA FP than acidic carbons on a surface area basis. The overall removal of NDMA FP by PAC on a mass basis depended on the surface area, pore size distribution and pHPZC. Thus, PACs with hybrid characteristics (micro and mesoporous), higher surface areas, and basic surface chemistry are more likely to be effective for NDMA precursor control by PAC adsorption. The application of PAC in DWTPs for taste and odor control resulted in an additional 20% removal of NDMA FP for the PAC doses of 7-10 mg/L. The natural attenuation of NDMA precursors through a combination of processes (biodegradation, photolysis and adsorption) decreased their adsorbability and removal by PAC adsorption. PMID:26584342

  19. Adsorption of malachite green on groundnut shell waste based powdered activated carbon

    In the present technologically fast changing situation related to waste management practices, it is desirable that disposal of plant waste should be done in a scientific manner by keeping in view economic and pollution considerations. This is only possible when the plant waste has the potential to be used as raw material for some useful product. In the present study, groundnut shell, an agricultural waste, was used for the preparation of an adsorbent by chemical activation using ZnCl2 under optimized conditions and its comparative characterisation was conducted with commercially available powdered activated carbon (CPAC) for its physical, chemical and adsorption properties. The groundnut shell based powdered activated carbon (GSPAC) has a higher surface area, iodine and methylene blue number compared to CPAC. Both of the carbons were used for the removal of malachite green dye from aqueous solution and the effect of various operating variables, viz. adsorbent dose (0.1-1 g l-1), contact time (5-120 min) and adsorbate concentrations (100-200 mg l-1) on the removal of dye, has been studied. The experimental results indicate that at a dose of 0.5 g l-1 and initial concentration of 100 mg l-1, GSPAC showed 94.5% removal of the dye in 30 min equilibrium time, while CPAC removed 96% of the dye in 15 min. The experimental isotherm data were analyzed using the linearized forms of Freundlich, Langmuir and BET equations to determine maximum adsorptive capacities. The equilibrium data fit well to the Freundlich isotherm, although the BET isotherm also showed higher correlation for both of the carbons. The results of comparative adsorption capacity of both carbons indicate that groundnut shell can be used as a low-cost alternative to commercial powdered activated carbon in aqueous solution for dye removal

  20. Adsorption of Reactive Red M-2BE dye from water solutions by multi-walled carbon nanotubes and activated carbon.

    Machado, Fernando M; Bergmann, Carlos P; Fernandes, Thais H M; Lima, Eder C; Royer, Betina; Calvete, Tatiana; Fagan, Solange B

    2011-09-15

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes and powdered activated carbon were used as adsorbents for the successful removal of Reactive Red M-2BE textile dye from aqueous solutions. The adsorbents were characterised by infrared spectroscopy, N(2) adsorption/desorption isotherms and scanning electron microscopy. The effects of pH, shaking time and temperature on adsorption capacity were studied. In the acidic pH region (pH 2.0), the adsorption of the dye was favourable using both adsorbents. The contact time to obtain equilibrium at 298K was fixed at 1h for both adsorbents. The activation energy of the adsorption process was evaluated from 298 to 323K for both adsorbents. The Avrami fractional-order kinetic model provided the best fit to the experimental data compared with pseudo-first-order or pseudo-second-order kinetic adsorption models. For Reactive Red M-2BE dye, the equilibrium data were best fitted to the Liu isotherm model. Simulated dyehouse effluents were used to check the applicability of the proposed adsorbents for effluent treatment. PMID:21724329

  1. Characteristics of competitive adsorption between 2-methylisoborneol and natural organic matter on superfine and conventionally sized powdered activated carbons.

    Matsui, Yoshihiko; Yoshida, Tomoaki; Nakao, Soichi; Knappe, Detlef R U; Matsushita, Taku

    2012-10-01

    When treating water with activated carbon, natural organic matter (NOM) is not only a target for adsorptive removal but also an inhibitory substance that reduces the removal efficiency of trace compounds, such as 2-methylisoborneol (MIB), through adsorption competition. Recently, superfine (submicron-sized) activated carbon (SPAC) was developed by wet-milling commercially available powdered activated carbon (PAC) to a smaller particle size. It was reported that SPAC has a larger NOM adsorption capacity than PAC because NOM mainly adsorbs close to the external adsorbent particle surface (shell adsorption mechanism). Thus, SPAC with its larger specific external surface area can adsorb more NOM than PAC. The effect of higher NOM uptake on the adsorptive removal of MIB has, however, not been investigated. Results of this study show that adsorption competition between NOM and MIB did not increase when NOM uptake increased due to carbon size reduction; i.e., the increased NOM uptake by SPAC did not result in a decrease in MIB adsorption capacity beyond that obtained as a result of NOM adsorption by PAC. A simple estimation method for determining the adsorbed amount of competing NOM (NOM that reduces MIB adsorption) is presented based on the simplified equivalent background compound (EBC) method. Furthermore, the mechanism of adsorption competition is discussed based on results obtained with the simplified EBC method and the shell adsorption mechanism. Competing NOM, which likely comprises a small portion of NOM, adsorbs in internal pores of activated carbon particles as MIB does, thereby reducing the MIB adsorption capacity to a similar extent regardless of adsorbent particle size. SPAC application can be advantageous because enhanced NOM removal does not translate into less effective removal of MIB. Molecular size distribution data of NOM suggest that the competing NOM has a molecular weight similar to that of the target compound. PMID:22763287

  2. Synthesis and characterization of Ag nanoparticles decorated mesoporous sintered activated carbon with antibacterial and adsorptive properties

    Wang, Wenxia; Xiao, Kaijun, E-mail: fekjxiao@scut.edu.cn; He, Tinglin; Zhu, Liang, E-mail: zhuliang@scut.edu.cn

    2015-10-25

    In this study, the sliver nanoparticles (AgNPs) immobilized on the sintered activated carbon (Ag/SAC) were synthesized by the ultrasonic-assisted impregnation method and were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and nitrogen adsorption. SEM showed that the AgNPs were well embedded in the SAC and immersion time had an important influence on final morphologies of AgNPs. Longer immersing duration caused significant aggregation of the AgNPs. The XRD data revealed that the successful synthesis of AgNPs on the SAC and immobilizing AgNPs on sintered active carbon did not change the crystalline degree of SAC. Texture characteristics were determined by analysis of the N{sub 2}/77 K isotherms. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of Ag/SAC against Escherichia coli (DH5α) and Staphyloccocus aureus (ATCC 29213) was evaluated by a broth dilution method. MICs such as 5 mg/L (against E. coli) and 10 mg/L (against S. aureus) suggest that Ag/SAC have predominant antibacterial activity compared to active carbon. - Highlights: • Sintered active carbon (SAC) was coated with Ag via a facile approach. • The Ag/SAC exhibit good adsorption properties and excellent antibacterial effects. • The Ag/SAC was durable and stable in the application of water purification.

  3. ADSORPTION PROPERTIES OF NICKEL-BASED MAGNETIC ACTIVATED CARBON PREPARED BY PD-FREE ELECTROLESS PLATING

    Boyang Jia

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Nickel-based magnetic activated carbon was synthesized from coconut shell activated carbon by electroless plating with palladium-free activation. The effect of plating solution volume on metallic ratio and adsorption capacity were evaluated. The effect of metallic ratio on specific area, pore volume, and magnetic properties were investigated. The morphologies of activated carbon before and after plating were observed by SEM, and the composition of the layer was analyzed by EDS analysis. The results showed that the metallic ratio was increased with the increase of the plating solution volume. The magnetic activated carbon showed high adsorption capacity for methylene blue and a high iodine number. Those values reached 142.5 mg/g and 1035 mg/g, respectively. The specific area and pore volume decreased from 943 m2/g to 859 m2/g and 0.462 ml/g to 0.417 ml/g, respectively. And the layer was more compact and continuous when the metallic ratio reached 16.37 wt.%. In the layer, there was about 97 wt.% nickel and 3 wt.% phosphorus, which indicates that the layer was a low-phosphorus one. At the same time, magnetism was enhanced, making the product suitable for some special applications.

  4. Adsorption of SO2 onto oxidized and heat-treated activated carbon fibers (ACFS)

    Daley, M.A.; Mangun, C.L.; DeBarr, J.A.; Riha, S.; Lizzio, A.A.; Donnals, G.L.; Economy, J.

    1997-01-01

    A series of activated carbon fibers (ACFs) and heat-treated oxidized ACFs prepared from phenolic fiber precursors have been studied to elucidate the role of pore size, pore surface chemistry and pore volume for the adsorption of SO2 and its catalytic conversion to H2SO4. For untreated ACFs, the initial rate of SO2 adsorption from flue gas was shown to be inversely related to pore size. At longer times, the amount of SO2 adsorbed from flue gas was dependent on both the pore size and pore volume. Oxidation of the ACFs, using an aqueous oxidant, decreased their adsorption capacity for SO2 from flue gas due to a decrease in pore volume and repulsion of the SO2 from acidic surface groups. If these samples were heat-treated to desorb the oxygen containing function groups, the amount of SO2 adsorption increased. This increase in adsorption capacity was directly correlated to the amount of CO2 evolved during heat-treatment of the oxidized ACFs. The amount of SO2 adsorbed for these samples was related to the pore size, pore surface chemistry and pore volume. This analysis is explained in more detail in this paper. ?? 1997 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Adsorption behaviour of aromatic in different activated carbon: (Frendlich and Langmuir models)

    Adsorption behavior of p-Cresol, Benzoic acid and nitrobenzene on the two different activated carbons was carried out at 301 K and at controlled ph conditions. In acidic conditions, well below the pKa of all solutes, it was observed that the adsorbate solubility and the electron density of its aromatic ring were the influencing factors on the extent of the adsorption by affecting the extent of London dispersion forces. In higher solution ph conditions, on the other hand, it was found that the electrostatic forces played a significant role on the extent on adsorption. The Effect of ph must be considered from its combined effects on the carbon surface and on the solute molecules. It was found that the uptake of the molecular form of the aromatic solute was dependent on the substituents of the aromatic ring. Adsorption of the solutes in higher ph values was found to be dependent on the concentration of anionic form of the solutes. All isotherms on the F 100 and S E I were fitted into Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm Equations, respectively to find the relative factors

  6. Kinetics of enhanced adsorption by polarization for organic pollutants on activated carbon fiber

    HAN Yanhe; QUAN Xie; ZHAO Huimin; CHEN Shuo; ZHAO Yazhi

    2007-01-01

    The adsorption kinetics for model pollutants on activated carbon fiber(ACF)by polarization was investigated in this work.Kinetics data obtained for the adsorption of these model pollutants at open-circuit.400 mV,and -400 mV polarization were applied to the Lagergren equation,and adsorption rate constants(Ka)were determined.With the anodic polarization of 400 mV,the capacity of sodium phenoxide was increased from 0.0083 mmol/g at open circuit to 0.18 mmol/g,and a 17-fold enhancement was achieved;however,the capacity of p-nitrophenol was decreased from 2.93 mmol/g at open-circuit to 2.65 mmol/g.With the cathodal polarization of -400 mV,the capacity of aniline was improved from 3.60 mmol/g at open-circuit to 3.88 mmol/g;however,the capacity of sodium dodecylben zene sulfonate was reduced from 2.20 mmol/g at open-circuit to 1.59 mmol/g.The enhancement for electrosorption changed with different groups substituting.Anodic polarization enhances the adsorption of benzene with the electron donating group.But whether anodic or not,cathodal polarization had less effect on the adsorption of electron-accepting aromatic compounds,and decreased the adsorption capacity of benzene-bearing donor-conjugate bridge-acceptor,while increasing its adsorption rate.Electrostatic interaction played a very important role in the electrosorption of ion-pollutants.

  7. Adsorption of volatile sulphur compounds onto modified activated carbons: Effect of oxygen functional groups

    Highlights: • HNO3 oxidation incorporates a higher amount of functionalities than O3 oxidation. • The loss of porosity is compensated by the massive incorporation of oxygen groups. • HNO3 oxidation increases OH groups in AC and the ETM and DMS adsorption capacities. • The oxygen functional groups in the AC surface did not affect the DMDS adsorption. • COSMO-RS predicts the important role of OH groups for VSC adsorption. -- Abstract: The effect of physical and chemical properties of activated carbon (AC) on the adsorption of ethyl mercaptan, dimethyl sulphide and dimethyl disulphide was investigated by treating a commercial AC with nitric acid and ozone. The chemical properties of ACs were characterised by temperature programme desorption and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. AC treated with nitric acid presented a larger amount of oxygen functional groups than materials oxidised with ozone. This enrichment allowed a significant improvement on adsorption capacities for ethyl mercaptan and dimethyl sulphide but not for dimethyl disulphide. In order to gain a deeper knowledge on the effect of the surface chemistry of AC on the adsorption of volatile sulphur compounds, the quantum-chemical COSMO-RS method was used to simulate the interactions between AC surface groups and the studied volatile sulphur compounds. In agreement with experimental data, this model predicted a greater affinity of dimethyl disulphide towards AC, unaffected by the incorporation of oxygen functional groups in the surface. Moreover, the model pointed out to an increase of the adsorption capacity of AC by the incorporation of hydroxyl functional groups in the case of ethyl mercaptan and dimethyl sulphide due to the hydrogen bond interactions

  8. Surface activated carbon nanospheres for fast adsorption of silver ions from aqueous solutions.

    Song, Xianghua; Gunawan, Poernomo; Jiang, Rongrong; Leong, Susanna Su Jan; Wang, Kean; Xu, Rong

    2011-10-30

    We report the synthesis and activation of colloidal carbon nanospheres (CNS) for adsorption of Ag(I) ions from aqueous solutions. CNS (400-500 nm in diameter) was synthesized via simple hydrothermal treatment of glucose solution. The surface of nonporous CNS after being activated by NaOH was enriched with -OH and -COO(-) functional groups. Despite the low surface area (nanoparticles on the external surface of CNS. The kinetic data can be well fitted to the pseudo-second-order kinetics model. The adsorbed silver can be easily recovered by dilute acid solutions and the CNS can be reactivated by the same treatment with NaOH solution. The excellent adsorption performance and reusability have also been demonstrated in a continuous mode. The NaOH activated CNS reported here could represent a new type of low-cost and efficient adsorbent nanomaterials for removal of trace Ag(I) ions for drinking water production. PMID:21862215

  9. Experimental and numerical investigation of the effect of pellet size on the adsorption characteristics of activated carbon/ethanol

    Elsayed, A.; Mahmoud, S; Al-Dadah, R.; Bowen, J.; Kaialy, W.

    2014-01-01

    Low temperature adsorption cooling is an attractive heat powered cooling technology suitable for various applications where waste heat is available. The use of activated carbon as adsorbent with ethanol offers potential for low temperature cooling applications like the food retail industry. Activated carbons are commercially available in the form of powders, granules and pellets. Although powder materials have the advantage of good adsorption kinetics but they are difficult to integrate in ad...

  10. Characterization and ciprofloxacin adsorption properties of activated carbons prepared from biomass wastes by H3PO4 activation.

    Sun, Yuanyuan; Li, Hong; Li, Guangci; Gao, Baoyu; Yue, Qinyan; Li, Xuebing

    2016-10-01

    As biomass wastes, Arundo donax Linn and pomelo peel were used as precursors for activated carbons (ALAC and PPAC) preparation by phosphoric acid activation. The pore structure and surface acidic functional groups of both carbons were characterized by nitrogen adsorption/desorption experiment, NH3-temperature-programmed desorption (NH3-TPD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). A batch of experiments was carried out to investigate the adsorption performances of ciprofloxacin under different conditions. Results showed that PPAC exhibited larger surface area (1252m(2)/g) and larger portion of mesoporous, while ALAC was typical of microporous materials. Results from NH3-TPD suggested that ALAC was characteristic of more acidic functional group than PPAC. The maximum monolayer adsorption capability was 244mg/g for ALAC and 400mg/L for PPAC. Kinetics studies showed intra-particle diffusion was not the unique rate-controlling step. Boundary layer resistance existed between adsorbent and adsorbate. PMID:27034157

  11. K2S-activated carbons developed from coal and their methane adsorption behaviors

    Feng, Yan-Yan; Yang, Wen; Chu, Wei

    2014-10-01

    The main purpose of this work is to prepare various activated carbons by K2S activation of coal with size fractions of 60-80 meshes, and investigate the microporosity development and corresponding methane storage capacities. Raw coal is mixed with K2S powder, and then heated at 750 °C-900 °C for 30 min-150 min in N2 atmosphere to produce the adsorbents. The texture and surface morphology are characterized by a N2 adsorption/desorption isotherm at 77 K and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The chemical properties of carbons are confirmed by ultimate analysis. The crystal structure and degree of graphitization are tested by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectra. The relationship between sulfur content and the specific surface area of the adsorbents is also determined. K2S activation is helps to bring about better development of pore texture. These adsorbents are microporous materials with textural parameters increasing in a range of specific surface area 72.27 m2/g-657.7 m2/g and micropore volume 0.035 cm3/g-0.334 cm3/g. The ability of activated carbons to adsorb methane is measured at 298 K and at pressures up to 5.0 MPa by a volumetric method. The Langmuir model fits the experimental data well. It is concluded that the high specific surface area and micropore volume of activated carbons do determine methane adsorption capacity. The adsorbents obtained at 800 °C for 90 min with K2S/raw coal mass ratios of 1.0 and 1.2 show the highest methane adsorption capacities amounting to 106.98 mg/g and 106.17 mg/g, respectively.

  12. Artificial neural network and multiple regression model for nickel(II) adsorption on powdered activated carbons.

    Hema, M; Srinivasan, K

    2011-07-01

    Nickel removal efficiency of powered activated carbons of coconut oilcake, neem oilcake and commercial carbon was investigated by using artificial neural network. The effective parameters for the removal of nickel (%R) by adsorption process, which included the pH, contact time (T), distinctiveness of activated carbon (Cn), amount of activated carbon (Cw) and initial concentration of nickel (Co) were investigated. Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) Back-propagation algorithm is used to train the network. The network topology was optimized by varying number of hidden layer and number of neurons in hidden layer. The model was developed in terms of training; validation and testing of experimental data, the test subsets that each of them contains 60%, 20% and 20% of total experimental data, respectively. Multiple regression equation was developed for nickel adsorption system and the output was compared with both simulated and experimental outputs. Standard deviation (SD) with respect to experimental output was quite higher in the case of regression model when compared with ANN model. The obtained experimental data best fitted with the artificial neural network. PMID:23029923

  13. Removal of sulfur compounds from petroleum refinery wastewater through adsorption on modified activated carbon.

    Ben Hariz, Ichrak; Al Ayni, Foued; Monser, Lotfi

    2014-01-01

    The adsorption of sulfur compounds from petroleum refinery wastewater on a chemically modified activated carbon (MAC) was investigated. The modification technique (nitric acid, hydrogen peroxide and thermal modification) enhanced the removal capacity of carbon and therefore decreases cost-effective removal of sulfide from refinery wastewater. Adsorption equilibrium and kinetics data were determined for sulfur removal from real refinery wastewater. The data were evaluated according to several adsorption isotherm and kinetics models. The Freundlich isotherm fitted well with the equilibrium data of sulfur on different adsorbents, whereas the kinetics data were best fitted by the pseudo-second-order model. Insights of sulfide removal mechanisms indicated that the sorption was controlled through the intraparticle diffusion mechanism with a significant contribution of film diffusion. The MAC adsorbent was found to have an effective removal capacity of approximately 2.5 times that of non-modified carbon. Using different MAC, sulfides were eliminated with a removal capacity of 52 mg g(-1). Therefore, MAC can be utilized as an effective and less expensive adsorbent for the reduction of sulfur in refinery wastewater. PMID:25353943

  14. Influence of the pore structure and surface chemical properties of activated carbon on the adsorption of mercury from aqueous solutions

    Highlights: • Activated carbons with different pore structure and surface chemical properties were prepared by modification process. • HgCl2 as a pollution target to evaluate the adsorption performance. • Influence of pore structure and surface chemical properties of activated carbon on adsorption of mercury was investigated. -- Abstract: Reactivation and chemical modification were used to obtain modified activated carbons with different pore structure and surface chemical properties. The samples were characterized by nitrogen absorption–desorption, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and the Bothem method. Using mercury chloride as the target pollutant, the Hg2+ adsorption ability of samples was investigated. The results show that the Hg2+ adsorption capacity of samples increased significantly with increases in micropores and acidic functional groups and that the adsorption process was exothermic. Different models and thermodynamic parameters were evaluated to establish the mechanisms. It was concluded that the adsorption occurred through a monolayer mechanism by a two-speed process involving both rapid adsorption and slow adsorption. The adsorption rate was determined by chemical reaction

  15. Production of granular activated carbon from agricultural wastes and determination of their physical, chemical and adsorption properties

    Ayguen, A.; Duman, I. [Istanbul Technical Univ., Inst. of Science and Technology, Dept. of Metallurgical Engineering, Istanbul (Turkey); Yenisoy-Karakas, S. [TUeBITAK Marmara Research Center (MRC), Materials and Chemical Technologies Research Inst., Gebze Kocaeli (Turkey)

    2004-07-01

    The aim of this study is to produce activated carbons with good mechanical strength and high adsorption capacities toward various organics from food wastes such as walnut, almond, hazelnut shells and apricot stones. Turkey has huge amounts of these wastes in canning industry. The chemical activation with ZnCl{sub 2} was preferred to manufacture activated carbons. The best activation temperature and time were determined. Granular activated carbons were discussed with respect to their physical, chemical, surface area and adsorption properties. For all raw materials, the specific surface areas of greater than 730 m{sup 2} g{sup -1} were reached. As a result of the adsorption studies, adsorption capacities were in order of hazelnut> apricot stones> walnut> almond. The correlation coefficients obtained from Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms are in good agreement with the experimental results. (orig.)

  16. Adsorption of doxorubicin on poly(methyl methacrylate)-chitosan-heparin-coated activated carbon beads.

    Miao, Jianjun; Zhang, Fuming; Takieddin, Majde; Mousa, Shaker; Linhardt, Robert J

    2012-03-01

    Extracorporeal filter cartridges, filled with an activated carbon bead (ACB) adsorbent, have been used for removal of overdosed cancer drugs from the blood. Coatings on adsorbent matrices, poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)/activated carbon bead and PMMA/chitosan/heparin/ACB composites, were tested to improve their biocompatibility and blood compatibility. PMMA coating on ACBs was accomplished in a straightforward manner using a PMMA solution in ethyl acetate. A one-step hybrid coating of ACBs with PMMA-anticoagulant heparin required the use of acetone and water co-solvents. Multilayer coatings with three components, PMMA, chitosan, and heparin, involved three steps: PMMA was first coated on ACBs; chitosan was then coated on the PMMA-coated surface; and finally, heparin was covalently attached to the chitosan coating. Surface morphologies were studied by scanning electron microscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed the -SO(3)(-) group. Adsorption, of a chemotherapy drug (doxorubicin) from both water and phosphate-buffered saline, by the coated ACBs was examined. The adsorption isotherm curves were fitted using the Freundlich model. The current adsorption system might find potential applications in the removal of high-dose regional chemotherapy drugs while maintaining high efficiency, biocompatibility, and blood compatibility. PMID:22313019

  17. Comparisons of kinetics, thermodynamics and regeneration of tetramethylammonium hydroxide adsorption in aqueous solution with graphene oxide, zeolite and activated carbon

    Chang, Shenteng; Lu, Chungsying; Lin, Kun-Yi Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO), sodium Y-type zeolite (NaY) and granular activated carbon (GAC) are selected as adsorbents to study their kinetics, thermodynamics and regeneration of tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) adsorption from water. The adsorption kinetics follows the pseudo-second-order rate law while the adsorption thermodynamics shows an exothermic reaction with GO and GAC but displays an endothermic reaction with NaY. The adsorbed TMAH can be readily desorbed from the surface of GO and NaY by 0.05 M NaCl solution. A comparative study on the cyclic TMAH adsorption with GO, NaY and GAC is also conducted and the results reveal that GO exhibits the greatest TMAH adsorption capacity as well as superior reversibility of TMAH adsorption over 10 cycles of adsorption and desorption process. These features indicate that GO is a promising and efficient adsorbent for TMAH removal in wastewater treatment.

  18. Production of granular activated carbon from waste walnut shell and its adsorption characteristics for Cu(2+) ion.

    Kim, J W; Sohn, M H; Kim, D S; Sohn, S M; Kwon, Y S

    2001-08-17

    Production of granular activated carbon by chemical activation has been attempted employing walnut shells as the raw material. The thermal characteristics of walnut shell were investigated by TG/DTA and the adsorption capacity of the produced activated carbon was evaluated using the titration method. As the activation temperature increased, the iodine value increased. However, a temperature higher than 400 degrees C resulted in a thermal degradation, which was substantiated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis, and the adsorption capacity decreased. Activation longer than 1h at 375 degrees C resulted in the destruction of the microporous structure of activated carbon. The iodine value increased with the increase in the concentration of ZnCl2 solution. However, excessive ZnCl2 in the solution decreased the iodine value. The extent of activation by ZnCl2 was compared with that by CaCl2 activation. Enhanced activation was achieved when walnut shell was activated by ZnCl2. Applicability of the activated carbon as adsorbent was examined for synthetic copper wastewater. Adsorption of copper ion followed the Freundlich model. Thermodynamic aspects of adsorption have been discussed based on experimental results. The adsorption capacity of the produced activated carbon met the conditions for commercialization and was found to be superior to that made from coconut shell. PMID:11489530

  19. Sustainable Activated Carbons from Agricultural Residues Dedicated to Antibiotic Removal by Adsorption

    Jonatan Torres-Perez; Claire Gerente; Yves Andres

    2012-01-01

    The. objectives.of this study are to convert at laboratory s.cale agric.ultural residues into activated carbons (AC) with specific properties, to characterize them and to test them in adsorption reactor for tetracycline removal, a common antibiotic. Two new ACs were produced by direct activation with steam from beet pulp (BP-H2O) and peanut hu_lls (PH-H2O) in environmental friendly conditions BP-H2O and PH-H2Opresentcarbon content rangedcarbons with different intrinsic properties.

  20. Pore size distribution and supercritical hydrogen adsorption in activated carbon fibers

    Purewal, J. J.; Kabbour, H.; Vajo, J. J.; Ahn, C. C.; Fultz, B.

    2009-01-01

    Pore size distributions (PSD) and supercritical H_2 isotherms have been measured for two activated carbon fiber (ACF) samples. The surface area and the PSD both depend on the degree of activation to which the ACF has been exposed. The low-surface-area ACF has a narrow PSD centered at 0.5 nm, while the high-surface-area ACF has a broad distribution of pore widths between 0.5 and 2 nm. The H_2 adsorption enthalpy in the zero-coverage limit depends on the relative abundance of the smallest pores...

  1. Impact of salinity and dispersed oil on adsorption of dissolved aromatic hydrocarbons by activated carbon and organoclay.

    Younker, Jessica M; Walsh, Margaret E

    2015-12-15

    Adsorption capacity of phenol and naphthalene by powdered activated carbon (PAC), a commercial organoclay (OC) and a lab synthesized organoclay (BTMA) was studied using batch adsorption experiments under variable feed water quality conditions including single- and multi- solute conditions, fresh water, saline water and oily-and-saline water. Increasing salinity levels was found to reduce adsorption capacity of OC, likely due to destabilization, aggregation and subsequent removal of organoclay from the water column, but did not negatively impact adsorption capacity of PAC or BTMA. Increased dispersed oil concentrations were found to reduce the surface area of all adsorbents. This decreased the adsorption capacity of PAC for both phenol and naphthalene, and reduced BTMA adsorption of phenol, but did not negatively affect naphthalene removals by either organoclay. The presence of naphthalene as a co-solute significantly reduced phenol adsorption by PAC, but had no impact on organoclay adsorption. These results indicated that adsorption by PAC occurred via a surface adsorption mechanism, while organoclay adsorption occurred by hydrophobic or pi electron interactions. In general, PAC was more sensitive to changes in water quality than either of the organoclays evaluated in this study. However, PAC exhibited a higher adsorption capacity for phenol and naphthalene compared to both organoclays even in adverse water quality conditions. PMID:26259095

  2. Comparisons of kinetics, thermodynamics and regeneration of tetramethylammonium hydroxide adsorption in aqueous solution with graphene oxide, zeolite and activated carbon

    Chang, Shenteng; Lu, Chungsying, E-mail: clu@nchu.edu.tw; Lin, Kun-Yi Andrew

    2015-01-30

    Graphical abstract: A comparison of TMAH adsorption capacity with GO, NaY and GAC is conducted and the result reveals that the magnitude of qe follows the order of GO > NaY > GAC. The adsorption capacity of GO is significantly higher than those of zeolite and activated carbon in this and reported studies, showing its encouraging potential. GO also exhibits good reversibility of TMAH adsorption through 10 cycles of adsorption and desorption process. This reflects that GO is a promising and efficient adsorbent for TMAH removal in wastewater treatment. - Highlights: • Adsorption kinetics and isotherms of TMAH to GO, NaY and GAC are compared. • Thermodynamics of TMAH adsorption to GO, NaY and GAC is determined. • GO exhibits the highest TMAH adsorption capacity, followed by NaY and GAC. • Recyclabilities of NaY and GO remain above 95% but that of GAC dropped to 70%. - Abstract: Graphene oxide (GO), sodium Y-type zeolite (NaY) and granular activated carbon (GAC) are selected as adsorbents to study their kinetics, thermodynamics and regeneration of tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) adsorption from water. The adsorption kinetics follows the pseudo-second-order rate law while the adsorption thermodynamics shows an exothermic reaction with GO and GAC but displays an endothermic reaction with NaY. The adsorbed TMAH can be readily desorbed from the surface of GO and NaY by 0.05 M NaCl solution. A comparative study on the cyclic TMAH adsorption with GO, NaY and GAC is also conducted and the results reveal that GO exhibits the greatest TMAH adsorption capacity as well as superior reversibility of TMAH adsorption over 10 cycles of adsorption and desorption process. These features indicate that GO is a promising and efficient adsorbent for TMAH removal in wastewater treatment.

  3. Comparisons of kinetics, thermodynamics and regeneration of tetramethylammonium hydroxide adsorption in aqueous solution with graphene oxide, zeolite and activated carbon

    Graphical abstract: A comparison of TMAH adsorption capacity with GO, NaY and GAC is conducted and the result reveals that the magnitude of qe follows the order of GO > NaY > GAC. The adsorption capacity of GO is significantly higher than those of zeolite and activated carbon in this and reported studies, showing its encouraging potential. GO also exhibits good reversibility of TMAH adsorption through 10 cycles of adsorption and desorption process. This reflects that GO is a promising and efficient adsorbent for TMAH removal in wastewater treatment. - Highlights: • Adsorption kinetics and isotherms of TMAH to GO, NaY and GAC are compared. • Thermodynamics of TMAH adsorption to GO, NaY and GAC is determined. • GO exhibits the highest TMAH adsorption capacity, followed by NaY and GAC. • Recyclabilities of NaY and GO remain above 95% but that of GAC dropped to 70%. - Abstract: Graphene oxide (GO), sodium Y-type zeolite (NaY) and granular activated carbon (GAC) are selected as adsorbents to study their kinetics, thermodynamics and regeneration of tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) adsorption from water. The adsorption kinetics follows the pseudo-second-order rate law while the adsorption thermodynamics shows an exothermic reaction with GO and GAC but displays an endothermic reaction with NaY. The adsorbed TMAH can be readily desorbed from the surface of GO and NaY by 0.05 M NaCl solution. A comparative study on the cyclic TMAH adsorption with GO, NaY and GAC is also conducted and the results reveal that GO exhibits the greatest TMAH adsorption capacity as well as superior reversibility of TMAH adsorption over 10 cycles of adsorption and desorption process. These features indicate that GO is a promising and efficient adsorbent for TMAH removal in wastewater treatment

  4. Decolorization of industrial wastewater by ozonation followed by adsorption on activated carbon

    Konsowa, A.H., E-mail: akonsowa@alex-eng.edu.eg [Chem Eng Dept., Faculty of Engineering, Alexandria University, Alexandria 21544 (Egypt); Ossman, M.E. [Mubarak City for Scientific Research and Technological Application, Alexandria (Egypt); Chen, Yongsheng [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332-0373 (United States); Crittenden, John C. [Civil and Environmental Engineering Dept., Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States)

    2010-04-15

    The decolorization of industrial wastewater containing direct dye (Drimarene Red CL-3B) by advanced oxidation process using ozonation in a semi-batch bubble column reactor followed by granule activated carbon (GAC) adsorption process was studied. The effect of initial dye concentration, ozone concentration, pH and ozone-air flow rate on the rate of dye decolorization were investigated. It was found that the rate of dye decolorization increases with increasing ozone concentration, ozone-air flow rate, and pH but decreases with increasing initial dye concentration. This study is a hybrid system conducted in combination between ozonation process and GAC adsorption to reveal higher and efficient removal of color and TOC. The process started with ozonation for efficient and rapid decolorization of dyeing wastewater, followed by GAC adsorption process to gain efficient removal of color and TOC. The adsorption process was found to be very efficient in removal of ozonation residual TOC, in view of high TOC removal, up to 37% TOC removal was obtained. Numerical correlation using regression analysis for decolorization time with the operating conditions of the ozonation process were presented.

  5. Adsorption of volatile sulphur compounds onto modified activated carbons: effect of oxygen functional groups.

    Vega, Esther; Lemus, Jesús; Anfruns, Alba; Gonzalez-Olmos, Rafael; Palomar, José; Martin, María J

    2013-08-15

    The effect of physical and chemical properties of activated carbon (AC) on the adsorption of ethyl mercaptan, dimethyl sulphide and dimethyl disulphide was investigated by treating a commercial AC with nitric acid and ozone. The chemical properties of ACs were characterised by temperature programme desorption and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. AC treated with nitric acid presented a larger amount of oxygen functional groups than materials oxidised with ozone. This enrichment allowed a significant improvement on adsorption capacities for ethyl mercaptan and dimethyl sulphide but not for dimethyl disulphide. In order to gain a deeper knowledge on the effect of the surface chemistry of AC on the adsorption of volatile sulphur compounds, the quantum-chemical COSMO-RS method was used to simulate the interactions between AC surface groups and the studied volatile sulphur compounds. In agreement with experimental data, this model predicted a greater affinity of dimethyl disulphide towards AC, unaffected by the incorporation of oxygen functional groups in the surface. Moreover, the model pointed out to an increase of the adsorption capacity of AC by the incorporation of hydroxyl functional groups in the case of ethyl mercaptan and dimethyl sulphide due to the hydrogen bond interactions. PMID:23708449

  6. Decolorization of industrial wastewater by ozonation followed by adsorption on activated carbon

    The decolorization of industrial wastewater containing direct dye (Drimarene Red CL-3B) by advanced oxidation process using ozonation in a semi-batch bubble column reactor followed by granule activated carbon (GAC) adsorption process was studied. The effect of initial dye concentration, ozone concentration, pH and ozone-air flow rate on the rate of dye decolorization were investigated. It was found that the rate of dye decolorization increases with increasing ozone concentration, ozone-air flow rate, and pH but decreases with increasing initial dye concentration. This study is a hybrid system conducted in combination between ozonation process and GAC adsorption to reveal higher and efficient removal of color and TOC. The process started with ozonation for efficient and rapid decolorization of dyeing wastewater, followed by GAC adsorption process to gain efficient removal of color and TOC. The adsorption process was found to be very efficient in removal of ozonation residual TOC, in view of high TOC removal, up to 37% TOC removal was obtained. Numerical correlation using regression analysis for decolorization time with the operating conditions of the ozonation process were presented.

  7. Simultaneous activated carbon adsorption within a membrane bioreactor for an enhanced micropollutant removal.

    Li, Xueqing; Hai, Faisal I; Nghiem, Long D

    2011-05-01

    Significant adsorption of sulfamethoxazole and carbamazepine to powdered activated carbon (PAC) was confirmed by a series of adsorption tests. In contrast, adsorption of these micropollutants to the sludge was negligible. The removal of these compounds in membrane bioreactor (MBR) was dependent on their hydrophobicity and loading as well as the PAC dosage. Sulfamethoxazole exhibited better removal rate during operation under no or low (0.1g/L) PAC dosage. When the PAC concentration in MBR was raised to 1.0 g/L, a sustainable and significantly improved performance in the removal of both compounds was observed - the removal efficiencies of sulfamethoxazole and carbamazepine increased to 82 ± 11% and 92 ± 15% from the levels of 64 ± 7%, and negligible removal, respectively. The higher removal efficiency of carbamazepine at high (1.0 g/L) PAC dosage could be attributed to the fact that carbamazepine is relatively more hydrophobic than sulfamethoxazole, which subsequently resulted in its higher adsorption affinity toward PAC. PMID:21145232

  8. Adsorption studies of recalcitrant compounds of molasses spentwash on activated carbons.

    Figaro, S; Louisy-Louis, S; Lambert, J; Ehrhardt, J-J; Ouensanga, A; Gaspard, S

    2006-10-01

    Due to high levels of residual chemical oxygen demand (COD) in the effluent of molasses spentwash (MSW) after anaerobic treatment, acceptable COD levels for discharge cannot be achieved without some form of post-treatment. In this study, the particulate composition of molasses spentwash after anaerobic digestion (MSWD), is characterised as to its particle size distribution, using micro- and ultrafiltration and three activated carbons are characterised as to their ability to reduce significantly the COD of MSWD effluent. The activated carbons tested as adsorbent, were characterised by XPS spectroscopy, elemental analysis, surface area, pore size distribution, and acid-base titration using the Boehm's method. Adsorption of phenol, used here as a reference compound, and of some organic compounds contained in MSWD (gallic acid, tannic acid, and melanoidin, respectively), was studied. It was clearly demonstrated that an activated carbon with a significant distribution of both micropores and mesopores and a significant amount of macropores that are assumed to act as conduits providing access to micro- and mesopores, have a good adsorption efficiency for compounds such as tannic acid and melanoidins. It is a good adsorbent for melanoidin and coloured compounds of MSWD, which represents a large source of the aqueous pollution in sugar cane industries. PMID:16987542

  9. ADSORPTION OF COPPER FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTION BY ELAIS GUINEENSIS KERNEL ACTIVATED CARBON

    NAJUA DELAILA TUMIN

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a series of batch laboratory experiments were conducted in order to investigate the feasibility of Elais Guineensis kernel or known as palm kernel shell (PKS-based activated carbon for the removal of copper from aqueous solution by the adsorption process. Investigation was carried out by studying the influence of initial solution pH, adsorbent dosage and initial concentration of copper. The particle size of PKS used was categorized as PKS–M. All batch experiments were carried out at a constant temperature of 30°C (±2°C using mechanical shaker that operated at 100 rpm. The single component equilibrium data was analyzed using Langmuir, Freundlich, Redlich-Peterson, Temkin and Toth adsorption isotherms.

  10. Adsorption of butanol vapor on active carbons with nitric acid hydrothermal modification.

    Cao, Yuhe; Wang, Keliang; Wang, Xiaomin; Gu, Zhengrong; Gibbons, William; Vu, Han

    2015-11-01

    Butanol can be produced from biomass via fermentation and used in vehicles. Unfortunately, butanol is toxic to the microbes, and this can slow fermentation rates and reduce butanol yields. Butanol can be efficiently removed from fermentation broth by gas stripping, thereby preventing its inhibitory effects. Original active carbon (AC) and AC samples modified by nitric acid hydrothermal modification were assessed for their ability to adsorb butanol vapor. The specific surface area and oxygen-containing functional groups of AC were tested before and after modification. The adsorption capacity of unmodified AC samples was the highest. Hydrothermal oxidation of AC with HNO3 increased the surface oxygen content, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area, micropore, mesopore and total pore volume of AC. Although the pore structure and specific surface area were greatly improved after hydrothermal oxidization with 4M HNO3, the increased oxygen on the surface of AC decreased the dynamic adsorption capacity. PMID:26291412

  11. Adsorption of organic acids from dilute aqueous solution onto activated carbon

    The radioisotope technique was used to study the removal of organic acid contaminants from dilute aqueous solutions onto activated carbon. Acetic acid, propionic acid, n-butyric acid, n-hexanoic acid and n-heptanoic acid were studied at 278, 298, and 3130K. Three bi-solute acid mixtures (acetic and propionic acids, acetic and butanoic acids, and propionic and butanoic acids) were studied at 278 and 2980K. Isotherms of the single-solute systems were obtained at three different temperatures in the very dilute concentration region (less than 1% by weight). These data are very important in the prediction of bi-solute equilibrium data. A Polanyi-based competitive adsorption potential theory was used to predict the bi-solute equilibrium uptakes. Average errors between calculated and experimental data ranges from 4% to 14%. It was found that the competitive adsorption potential theory gives slightly better results than the ideal adsorbed solution theory

  12. Optimum operating conditions for an adsorption cryocooler: a case of activated carbon + nitrogen system

    Radhika Rani Rao [Don Bosco Institute of Technology, Bangalore (India). Dept. of Physics; Madhu Prasad [ISRO Satellite Centre, Bangalore (India). Thermal Systems Group; Kandadai Srinivasan [Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore (India). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2005-03-01

    Adsorption cryocoolers are among the possible options for obtaining cryogenic temperatures, in particular for small cooling capacity applications such as cooling of infra red detectors. They need to be optimized for liquid yield. The performance of thermal compressors therein pivots around the adsorption characteristics of the adsorbent + adsorbate combination and how effectively one could pack requisite amounts of adsorbent into a given volume of the compressor housing. In addition, the overall performance of the cooler is a function of limits of operating temperatures and pressures across the compressor. This paper proposes a performance indicator-the product of liquid yield and the uptake efficiency of the compressor - and evaluates its values for various possible operating conditions for one specimen of activated carbon. It is shown that there is a limited domain of operation and that there is a condition of best performance within that domain. (author)

  13. Energetic changes in the surface of activated carbons and relationship with Ni(II) adsorption from aqueous solution

    Rodríguez-Estupiñan, Paola; Giraldo, Liliana; Moreno-Piraján, Juan Carlos

    2013-12-01

    This study investigated Ni(II) ion adsorption from aqueous solution on activated carbons obtained by chemically modifying the surface with the oxidizing agents nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide (CAGoxP and CAGoxN, respectively). The activated carbons were characterized by total acidity and basicity, pH at the point of charge zero determination and IR spectroscopy. Textural parameters such as the BET area and pore volumes were evaluated by gas adsorption. The BET area of the materials was between 816 and 876 m2 g-1. Additionally, the immersion enthalpies of the activated carbons in water and benzene were determined. The experimental results on adsorption in solution were adjusted to the Langmuir and Freundlich models, obtaining values for the monolayer capacity between 29.68 and 50.97 mg g-1, which indicates that the adsorption capacity depends largely on solid surface chemistry.

  14. Ozone treatment of coal- and coffee grounds-based active carbons: Water vapor adsorption and surface fractal micropores

    Tsunoda, Ryoichi; Ozawa, Takayoshi; Ando, Junichi [Kanagawa Industrial Technology Research Inst., Ebina, Kanagawa (Japan)

    1998-09-15

    Characteristics of the adsorption iostherms of water vapor on active carbons from coal and coffee grounds and those ozonized ones from the surface fractal dimension analysis are discussed. The upswing of the adsorption isotherms in the low relative pressure of coffee grounds-based active carbon, of which isotherms were not scarcely affected on ozonization, was attributed to the adsorption of water molecules on the metallic oxides playing the role of oxygen-surface complexes, which formed the corrugated surfaces on the basal planes of micropore walls with the surface fractal dimension D{sub s} > 2. On the other hand, coal-based active carbon with D{sub s} < 2, which indicated the flat surfaces of micropore walls, showed little effect on the upswing even on ozonization, even though the adsorption amounts of water vapor were increased in the low relative pressure.

  15. Biodegradation of persistent organics can overcome adsorption-desorption hysteresis in biological activated carbon systems.

    Abromaitis, V; Racys, V; van der Marel, P; Meulepas, R J W

    2016-04-01

    In Biological Activated Carbon (BAC) systems, persistent organic pollutants can be removed through a combination of adsorption, desorption and biodegradation. These processes might be affected by the presence of other organics, especially by the more abundant easily-biodegradable organics, like acetate. In this research these relations are quantified for the removal of the persistent pharmaceutical metoprolol. Acetate did not affect the adsorption and desorption of metoprolol, but it did greatly enhance the metoprolol biodegradation. At least part of the BAC biomass growing on acetate was also able to metabolise metoprolol, although metoprolol was only converted after the acetate was depleted. The presence of easily-degradable organics like acetate in the feeding water is therefore beneficial for the removal of metoprolol in BAC systems. The isotherms obtained from metoprolol adsorption and desorption experiments showed that BAC systems are subject to hysteresis; for AC bioregeneration to take place the microbial biomass has to reduce the concentration at the AC-biomass interface 2.7 times compared to the concentration at which the carbon was being loaded. However, given the threshold concentration of the MET degrading microorganisms (<0.08 μg/L) versus the average influent concentration (1.3 μg/L), bioregeneration is feasible. PMID:26855223

  16. Adsorption of some metal complexes derived from acetyl acetone on activated carbon and purolite S-930

    Salam A.H. Al-Ameri

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A new Schiff base (HL derived from condensation of p-anisidine and acetyl acetone has been prepared and used as a chelating ligand to prepare Cr(III, Mn(II, Co(II, Ni(II and Cu(II complexes. The study of the nature of these complexes formed in ethanol solution following the mole ratio method (2:1, L:M gave results which were compared successfully with these obtained from isolated solid state studies. These studies revealed that the complexes having square planner geometry of the type (ML2, M = Co(II, Ni(II and Cu(II, and octahedral geometry of the type [CrIIIL2(H2O2]Cl and [MNIIL2(H2O2]. The adsorption studies of three complexes Cr(III, Mn(II, and Co(II on activated carbon, H and Na-forms of purolite S-930 resin show high adsorption percentage for Cr(III on purolite S-930 due to ion exchange interaction compared with high adsorption of neutral Mn(II, Co(II complexes on activated charcoal. Linear plot of log Qe versus log Ce showed that the adsorption isotherm of these three complexes on activated carbon, H and Na-forms of purolite S-930 surface obeys Freundlich isotherm and was similar to S-curve type according to Giles classification which investigates heterogeneous adsorption. The regression values indicate that the adsorption data for these complexes fitted well within the Freundlich isothermal plots for the concentration studied. The accuracy and precision of the concentration measurements of these complexes were determined by preparing standard laboratory samples, the results show relative error ranging from ±1.08 to 5.31, ±1.04 to 4.82 and ±0.28 to 3.09 and the relative standard deviation did not exceed ±6.23, ±2.77 and ±4.38% for A1, A2 and A3 complexes, respectively.

  17. Theoretical and Experimental Study on the Adsorption and Desorption of Methane by Granular Activated Carbon at 25 ℃

    E. Salehi; V. Taghikhani; C. Ghotbi; E. Nemati Lay; A. Shojaei

    2007-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental study was conducted to accurately determine the amount of adsorption and desorption of methane by various Granular Activated Carbon (GAC) under different physical conditions. To carry out the experiments, the volumetric method was used up to 500 psia at constant temperature of 25 ℃. In these experiments, adsorption as well as desorption capacities of four different GAC in the adsorption of methane, the major constituent of natural gas, at various equilibrium pressures and a constant temperature were studied. Also, various adsorption isotherm models were used to model the experimental data collected from the experiments. The accuracy of the results obtained from the adsorption isotherm models was compared and the values for the regressed parameters were reported. The results shows that the physical characteristics of activated carbons such as BET surface area, micropore volume, packing density, and pore size distribution play an important role in the amount of methane to be adsorbed and desorbed.

  18. Modification of bamboo-based activated carbon using microwave radiation and its effects on the adsorption of methylene blue

    Modification of bamboo-based activated carbon was carried out in a microwave oven under N2 atmosphere. The virgin and modified activated carbons were characterized by means of low temperature N2 adsorption, acid-base titration, point of zero charge (pHpzc) measurement, FTIR and XPS spectra. A gradual decrease in the surface acidic groups was observed during the modification, while the surface basicity was enhanced to some extent, which gave rise to an increase in the pHpzc value. The species of the functional groups and relative content of various elements and groups were given further analysis using FTIR and XPS spectra. An increase in the micropores was found at the start, and the micropores were then extended into larger ones, resulting in an increase in the pore volume and average pore size. Adsorption studies showed enhanced adsorption of methylene blue on the modified activated carbons, caused mainly by the enlargement of the micropores. Adsorption isotherm fittings revealed that Langmuir and Freundlich models were applicable for the virgin and modified activated carbons, respectively. Kinetic studies exhibited faster adsorption rate of methylene blue on the modified activated carbons, and the pseudo-second-order model fitted well for all of the activated carbons.

  19. Dynamic measurement of mercury adsorption and oxidation on activated carbon in simulated cement kiln flue gas

    Zheng, Yuanjing; Jensen, Anker Degn; Windelin, Christian;

    2012-01-01

    of the sulfite converter is short and typically within 2min. Dynamic mercury adsorption and oxidation tests on commercial activated carbons Darco Hg and HOK standard were performed at 150°C using simulated cement kiln gas and a fixed bed reactor system. It is shown that the converter and analyzer...... applied. A sodium sulfite-based converter material was prepared by dry impregnation of sodium sulfite and calcium sulfate powders on zeolite pellets using water glass as binder. The sulfite converter works well at 500°C with less than 10ppmv HCl in the simulated cement kiln flue gas. The 95% response time...

  20. Xe-133 recuperation by adsorption in active carbon impregnated with PF5

    Since the Mo-99 Fission Project has the aim to produce Xe-133 from gases generated in the alkaline dissolution of Al-U plates irradiated with thermal neutrons and, considering the importance of this radioisotope from the nuclear medicine point of view, studies to improve and optimize the Xe-133 recuperation were continued. Experiences were made on 'static' equilibrium employing high purity xenon and for the 'dynamic' case, Xe-133 mixed with a carrier and nitrogen as gas carrier; in this case, a 44% and a 34% increase in the capacity of xenon adsorption relaxed with activated carbon without being impregnated and impregnated with AgF, were respectively achieved. (Author)

  1. Breakthrough adsorption study of a commercial activated carbon for pre-combustion CO2 capture

    García López, Susana; Gil Matellanes, María Victoria; Fernández Martín, Claudia; Pis Martínez, José Juan; Rubiera González, Fernando; Pevida García, Covadonga

    2011-01-01

    In this study a commercial activated carbon (Norit R2030CO2) was assessed as a solid sorbent for precombustion CO2 capture. This technology involves the removal of CO2 from the shifted-syngas prior to the generation of electricity and the production of high-purity clean H2. The CO2 equilibrium adsorption capacity and breakthrough time were evaluated in a flow-through system where the adsorbent was subjected to four consecutive adsorption–desorption cycles. A CO2/H2/N2 gas mixture (20/70/10 vo...

  2. Transient Behavior of Activated Carbon Fiber-Ethanol Based Two-Stage Adsorption Chiller

    El-Sharkawy, Ibrahim Ibrahim; Saha, Bidyut Baran; Hassan, Mahmoud; Koyama, Shigeru

    2008-01-01

    In this study, an analytical investigation on the performance of a low temperature solar or waste heat driven two-stage adsorption chiller is performed. Activated carbon fiber (ACF) of type (A-20) and ethanol are used as adsorbent-refrigerant pair. This innovative system can be driven by heat source of temperature between 50 and 70 degree C in combination with a heat sink of 30 degree C. A mathematical model is developed to analyze the dynamic behavior of the cycle as well as the influence of...

  3. Kinetics And Isotherm Studies On Cationic Dyes Adsorption Onto Annona Squmosa Seed Activated Carbon

    Santhi, T.; S. Manonmani; Smitha, T

    2010-01-01

    The use of low - cost, locally available and eco-friendly adsorbents has been investigated as an ideal alternative to the current expensive methods of removing dyes from wastewater. This study investigates the potential use of activated carbon prepared from the Annona squmosa seed for the removal of methylene blue (MB) , methyl red (MR) and malachite green (MG) dyes from simulated wastewater. Adsorption of MB, MR and MG dyes on the Annona squmosa seed showed highest values at around pH 7.0, a...

  4. Kinetic modeling of liquid-phase adsorption of Congo red dye using guava leaf-based activated carbon

    Ojedokun, Adedamola Titi; Bello, Olugbenga Solomon

    2016-02-01

    Guava leaf, a waste material, was treated and activated to prepare adsorbent. The adsorbent was characterized using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR) and Energy-Dispersive X-ray (EDX) techniques. The carbonaceous adsorbent prepared from guava leaf had appreciable carbon content (86.84 %). The adsorption of Congo red dye onto guava leaf-based activated carbon (GLAC) was studied in this research. Experimental data were analyzed by four different model equations: Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherms and it was found to fit Freundlich equation most. Adsorption rate constants were determined using pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, Elovich and intraparticle diffusion model equations. The results clearly showed that the adsorption of CR dye onto GLAC followed pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Intraparticle diffusion was involved in the adsorption process. The mean energy of adsorption calculated from D-R isotherm confirmed the involvement of physical adsorption. Thermodynamic parameters were obtained and it was found that the adsorption of CR dye onto GLAC was an exothermic and spontaneous process at the temperatures under investigation. The maximum adsorption of CR dye by GLAC was found to be 47.62 mg/g. The study shows that GLAC is an effective adsorbent for the adsorption of CR dye from aqueous solution.

  5. Adsorption of organic contaminants by graphene nanosheets, carbon nanotubes and granular activated carbons under natural organic matter preloading conditions.

    Ersan, Gamze; Kaya, Yasemin; Apul, Onur G; Karanfil, Tanju

    2016-09-15

    The effect of NOM preloading on the adsorption of phenanthrene (PNT) and trichloroethylene (TCE) by pristine graphene nanosheets (GNS) and graphene oxide nanosheet (GO) was investigated and compared with those of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT), a multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT), and two coal based granular activated carbons (GACs). PNT uptake was higher than TCE by all adsorbents on both mass and surface area bases. This was attributed to the hydrophobicity of PNT. The adsorption capacities of PNT and TCE depend on the accessibility of the organic molecules to the inner regions of the adsorbent which was influenced from the molecular size of OCs. The adsorption capacities of all adsorbents decreased as a result of NOM preloading due to site competition and/or pore/interstice blockage. However, among all adsorbents, GO was generally effected least from the NOM preloading for PNT, whereas there was not observed any trend of NOM competition with a specific adsorbent for TCE. In addition, SWCNT was generally affected most from the NOM preloading for TCE and there was not any trend for PNT. The overall results indicated that the fate and transport of organic contaminants by GNSs and CNTs type of nanoadsorbents and GACs in different natural systems will be affected by water quality parameters, characteristics of adsorbent, and properties of adsorbate. PMID:27107611

  6. Treatment of industrial effluents using electron beam accelerator and adsorption with activated carbon. A comparative study

    Several methods are used In the pollutant removal from Industrial and domestic wastewater. However when the degradation of toxic organic pollutants, mainly the recalcitrant is objectified, the conventional treatments usually do not meet the desirable performance in the elimination or decrease the impact when the effluent are released to the environment what takes to the research of alternative methods that seek the improvement of the efficiency of the wastewater treatment systems jointly employees or separately. This work presents a study of degradation/removal of pollutants organic compounds comparing two methods using radiation from industrial electron beam and granular activated carbon (GAC). The removal efficiency of the pollutants was evaluated and it was verified that the efficiency of adsorption with activated carbon is similar to the radiation method. The obtained results allowed to evaluated the relative costs of these methods. (author)

  7. Adsorption of Bismark Brown dye on activated carbons prepared from rubberwood sawdust (Hevea brasiliensis) using different activation methods

    Hevea brasiliensis or rubberwood tree, as it is commonly known finds limited use once the latex has been tapped. The sawdust of this tree is chosen to ascertain it viability as a precursor for activation. The carbons thus obtained were characterized in terms of iodine, methylene blue number and surface area. The best carbon in each method was utilized to study the adsorption of Bismark Brown, a dye used in the leather industry. Adsorption equilibrium studies were carried out with the synthetic solutions of the dye, at room temperature (298 K). Equilibrium data are fitted with the Langmuir and the Freundlich isotherms models for the system. The effects of contact time, adsorbent dosage and initial dye concentrations on sorption capacity were carried out. Excellent adsorption capacities of 2000 and 1111 mg g-1 were obtained for steam and chemical followed by steam-activated carbons, respectively. Pilot-plant experimental studies have been performed using packed-bed column with different feed concentrations, flow rates and bed heights, to evaluate sorption of Bismark Brown on steam-activated carbon. Bed depth service time (BDST) design model have been used to analyze the data

  8. Characterization and use of high surface area activated carbons prepared from cane pith for liquid-phase adsorption

    Carbonaceous adsorbents with controllable surface areas were chemically activated with KOH at 780 deg. C from char that had been carbonized from cane pith at 450 deg. C. The pore properties including the BET surface area, pore volume, pore size distribution, and mean pore diameter of these activated carbons were characterized and derived using the t-plot method based on N2 adsorption isotherms. The activated cane pith carbons, with KOH/char ratios of 2-6, exhibited BET surface areas ranging from 912 to 2299 m2 g-1. The scanning electron microscopic (SEM) observations revealed that the surface morphology of honeycombed holes on all activated cane pith carbons was significantly influenced by the KOH/char ratio. The adsorption kinetics and equilibrium isotherms of acid blue 74, methylene blue, basic brown 1, p-nitrophenol, p-chlorophenol, p-cresol, and phenol from water at 30 deg. C on the activated carbons were studied. The adsorption kinetics were suitably described by a simplified kinetic model, the Elovich equation. All adsorption equilibrium isotherms were in agreement with the Langmuir equation, and were used to compare the covered area (S c/S p) of the activated carbons at different KOH/char ratios. The high-surface-area activated carbons were proven to be promising adsorbents for pollution control and for other applications

  9. Equilibrium and kinetics study on the adsorption of perfluorooctanoic acid from aqueous solution onto powdered activated carbon

    Powdered activated carbon (PAC) was applied to remove perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) from the aqueous PFOA solution in this study. Contact time, adsorbent dose and temperature were analyzed as the effect factors in the adsorption reaction. The contact time of maximum PFOA uptake was around 1 h while the sorption removal efficiency increased with the PAC concentrations. And the process of adsorption increased from 303 K to 313 K and then decreased from 313 K to 323 K. Among four applied models, the experimental isotherm data were discovered to follow Langmuir isotherm model more closely. Thermodynamically, adsorption was endothermic because enthalpy, entropy and Gibbs constants were 198.5 kJ/mol, 0.709 kJ/mol/K and negative, respectively, which also indicated that the adsorption process was spontaneous and feasible. From kinetic analysis, the adsorption was suggested to be pseudo-second-order model. The adsorption of PFOA on the PAC was mainly controlled by particle diffusion.

  10. Removal of Methylene Blue from Wastewater by Adsorption onto ZnCl2 Activated Corn Husk Carbon Equilibrium Studies

    Maryam Khodaie; Nahid Ghasemi; Babak Moradi; Mohsen Rahimi

    2013-01-01

    The removal of methylene blue by activated carbon of corn husk by ZnCl2 activation () was investigated in the present study. Adsorption studies were performed by batch experiments. The effect of pH, initial dye concentration, adsorbent dose, the particle size of , agitation speed, temperature, and contact time was explored. The equilibrium adsorption data were analyzed using two widely applied isotherms: Langmuir, Freundlich. Best fits were found to be Freundlich isotherm. Langmuir adsorptio...

  11. Adsorption of odorous sulfur compounds onto activated carbons modified by gamma irradiation.

    Vega, Esther; Sánchez-Polo, Manuel; Gonzalez-Olmos, Rafael; Martin, María J

    2015-11-01

    A commercial activated carbon (AC) was modified by gamma irradiation and was tested as adsorbent for the removal of ethyl mercaptan, dimethyl disulfide and dimethyl disulfide in wet conditions. Modifications were carried out under five different conditions: irradiation in absence of water, in presence of ultrapure water, in ultrapure water at pH=1.0 and 1000 mg L(-1) Cl(-), in ultrapure water at pH=7.5 and 1000 mg L(-1) Br(-), and in ultrapure water at pH=12.5 and 1000 mg L(-1) NO3(-). The chemical properties of each AC were characterized by elemental analysis, temperature programmed desorption and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Outcomes show that a large number of oxygen functional groups were incorporated in the AC surface by gamma irradiation, especially in the AC irradiated in the presence of ultrapure water. The dynamic adsorption test results reveal that the incorporation of oxygen functional groups did not enhance the adsorption capacities for dimethyl sulfide and dimethyl disulfide. A significant improvement in the ethyl mercaptan adsorption capacity was correlated with the incorporation of phenolic groups in the AC surface. Moreover, diethyl disulfide was detected as by-product of ethyl mercaptan oxidation process under wet conditions and its formation depended on the chemical properties of ACs. PMID:26160734

  12. Removal of emerging contaminants by simultaneous application of membrane ultrafiltration, activated carbon adsorption, and ultrasound irradiation

    Highlights: • Above 99% of the emerging contaminants were removed in the USAMe process. • Influence of PAC dose and US frequency on removal is studied. • Improved performance is due to PAC adsorption enhancement and sonolytic degradation. • US irradiation improved efficiency and delayed declines in the removal of contaminants. • Performance of the hybrid process is better under lower frequency ultrasound irradiation. -- Abstract: Advanced wastewater treatment is necessary to effectively remove emerging contaminants (ECs) with chronic toxicity, endocrine disrupting effects, and the capability to induce the proliferation of highly resistant microbial strains in the environment from before wastewater disposal or reuse. This paper investigates the efficiency of a novel hybrid process that applies membrane ultrafiltration, activated carbon adsorption, and ultrasound irradiation simultaneously to remove ECs. Diclofenac, carbamazepine, and amoxicillin are chosen for this investigation because of their assessed significant environmental risks. Removal mechanisms and enhancement effects are analysed in single and combined processes. The influence of adsorbent dose and ultrasonic frequency to EC removal are also investigated. Results suggest that adsorption is probably the main removal mechanism and is affected by the nature of ECs and the presence of other components in the mixture. Almost complete removals are achieved in the hybrid process for all ECs

  13. The role of beaded activated carbon's surface oxygen groups on irreversible adsorption of organic vapors.

    Jahandar Lashaki, Masoud; Atkinson, John D; Hashisho, Zaher; Phillips, John H; Anderson, James E; Nichols, Mark

    2016-11-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the contribution of surface oxygen groups to irreversible adsorption (aka heel formation) during cyclic adsorption/regeneration of organic vapors commonly found in industrial systems, including vehicle-painting operations. For this purpose, three chemically modified activated carbon samples, including two oxygen-deficient (hydrogen-treated and heat-treated) and one oxygen-rich sample (nitric acid-treated) were prepared. The samples were tested for 5 adsorption/regeneration cycles using a mixture of nine organic compounds. For the different samples, mass balance cumulative heel was 14 and 20% higher for oxygen functionalized and hydrogen-treated samples, respectively, relative to heat-treated sample. Thermal analysis results showed heel formation due to physisorption for the oxygen-deficient samples, and weakened physisorption combined with chemisorption for the oxygen-rich sample. Chemisorption was attributed to consumption of surface oxygen groups by adsorbed species, resulting in formation of high boiling point oxidation byproducts or bonding between the adsorbates and the surface groups. Pore size distributions indicated that different pore sizes contributed to heel formation - narrow micropores (<7Å) in the oxygen-deficient samples and midsize micropores (7-12Å) in the oxygen-rich sample. The results from this study help explain the heel formation mechanism and how it relates to chemically tailored adsorbent materials. PMID:27295065

  14. Removal of emerging contaminants by simultaneous application of membrane ultrafiltration, activated carbon adsorption, and ultrasound irradiation

    Secondes, Mona Freda N. [Environmental Engineering Graduate Program, Department of Chemical Engineering, University of the Philippines – Diliman, Quezon City (Philippines); Naddeo, Vincenzo, E-mail: vnaddeo@unisa.it [Sanitary and Environmental Engineering Division (SEED), Department of Civil Engineering, University of Salerno, Fisciano 84084 (Saudi Arabia) (Italy); Belgiorno, Vincenzo [Sanitary and Environmental Engineering Division (SEED), Department of Civil Engineering, University of Salerno, Fisciano 84084 (Saudi Arabia) (Italy); Ballesteros, Florencio [Environmental Engineering Graduate Program, Department of Chemical Engineering, University of the Philippines – Diliman, Quezon City (Philippines)

    2014-01-15

    Highlights: • Above 99% of the emerging contaminants were removed in the USAMe process. • Influence of PAC dose and US frequency on removal is studied. • Improved performance is due to PAC adsorption enhancement and sonolytic degradation. • US irradiation improved efficiency and delayed declines in the removal of contaminants. • Performance of the hybrid process is better under lower frequency ultrasound irradiation. -- Abstract: Advanced wastewater treatment is necessary to effectively remove emerging contaminants (ECs) with chronic toxicity, endocrine disrupting effects, and the capability to induce the proliferation of highly resistant microbial strains in the environment from before wastewater disposal or reuse. This paper investigates the efficiency of a novel hybrid process that applies membrane ultrafiltration, activated carbon adsorption, and ultrasound irradiation simultaneously to remove ECs. Diclofenac, carbamazepine, and amoxicillin are chosen for this investigation because of their assessed significant environmental risks. Removal mechanisms and enhancement effects are analysed in single and combined processes. The influence of adsorbent dose and ultrasonic frequency to EC removal are also investigated. Results suggest that adsorption is probably the main removal mechanism and is affected by the nature of ECs and the presence of other components in the mixture. Almost complete removals are achieved in the hybrid process for all ECs.

  15. Experimental study on activated carbon-nitrogen pair in a prototype pressure swing adsorption refrigeration system

    Anupam, Kumar; Palodkar, Avinash V.; Halder, G. N.

    2016-04-01

    Pressure swing adsorption of nitrogen onto granular activated carbon in the single-bed adsorber-desorber chamber has been studied at six different pressures 6-18 kgf/cm2 to evaluate their performance as an alternative refrigeration technique. Refrigerating effect showed a linear rise with an increase in the operating pressure. However, the heat of adsorption and COP exhibited initial rise with the increasing operating pressure but decreased later after reaching a maximum value. The COP initially increases with operating pressures however, with the further rise of operating pressure it steadily decreased. The highest average refrigeration, maximum heat of adsorption and optimum coefficient of performance was evaluated to be 415.38 W at 18 kgf/cm2, 92756.35 J at 15 kgf/cm2 and 1.32 at 12 kgf/cm2, respectively. The system successfully produced chilled water at 1.7 °C from ambient water at 28.2 °C.

  16. Adsorption onto activated carbons in environmental engineering: some trends in water and air treatment processes

    Le Cloirec, P. [Ecole des Mines de Nantes, UMR CNRS 6144 GEPEA, 44 (France)

    2005-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Adsorption is commonly used in environmental protection processes and particularly in water and air treatment systems. Organic pollutants in aqueous or gaseous phases are transferred and adsorbed onto porous materials. Activated carbon (powder, grains) treatment is usually carried out and filters are used to eliminate volatile organic compounds (VOC), odors or micropollutants. The main objectives of this paper are to present examples of classical or new activated carbon processes used in drinking water production, wastewater purification or in air treatment in terms of processes, performances and modeling. - Water treatment: Micropollutants such as pesticides, herbicides... are classically removed by activated carbon granular systems in drinking water treatment plants. In order to get a good water quality and to safe money, the breakthrough time has to be accurately determined. Models with mass balance and transfer equations are proposed. However, some difficulties are found especially for complex solutions to get good agreement between experimental data and calculated values. A statistical approach using neural networks is proposed to simulate breakthrough curves. Examples are presented and compared to deterministic models. In order to intensify processes, a combination of ultrafiltration and activated carbon fiber cloth (ACFC) is presented to remove the large spectra of particles and organic molecules present in water. Systems (UF/ACFC) for surface water and industrial colored wastewater are applied and performances are determined as a function of operating conditions. - Air treatment: Activated carbon grain filters are used to control VOC emissions. Due to an exothermic reaction, an increase of local temperature in the reactor is noted and some fire accidents have been reported. For safety technologies, this temperature has to be previously determined. A model is proposed to simulate the breakthrough curves and temperatures

  17. The role of beaded activated carbon's pore size distribution on heel formation during cyclic adsorption/desorption of organic vapors.

    Jahandar Lashaki, Masoud; Atkinson, John D; Hashisho, Zaher; Phillips, John H; Anderson, James E; Nichols, Mark

    2016-09-01

    The effect of activated carbon's pore size distribution (PSD) on heel formation during adsorption of organic vapors was investigated. Five commercially available beaded activated carbons (BAC) with varying PSDs (30-88% microporous) were investigated. Virgin samples had similar elemental compositions but different PSDs, which allowed for isolating the contribution of carbon's microporosity to heel formation. Heel formation was linearly correlated (R(2)=0.91) with BAC micropore volume; heel for the BAC with the lowest micropore volume was 20% lower than the BAC with the highest micropore volume. Meanwhile, first cycle adsorption capacities and breakthrough times correlated linearly (R(2)=0.87 and 0.93, respectively) with BAC total pore volume. Micropore volume reduction for all BACs confirmed that heel accumulation takes place in the highest energy pores. Overall, these results show that a greater portion of adsorbed species are converted into heel on highly microporous adsorbents due to higher share of high energy adsorption sites in their structure. This differs from mesoporous adsorbents (low microporosity) in which large pores contribute to adsorption but not to heel formation, resulting in longer adsorbent lifetime. Thus, activated carbon with high adsorption capacity and high mesopore fraction is particularly desirable for organic vapor application involving extended adsorption/regeneration cycling. PMID:27173087

  18. Preparation of activated carbon from Tunisian olive-waste cakes and its application for adsorption of heavy metal ions

    The present work explored the use of Tunisian olive-waste cakes, a by-product of the manufacture process of olive oil in mills, as a potential feedstock for the preparation of activated carbon. Chemical activation of this precursor, using phosphoric acid as dehydrating agent, was adopted. To optimize the preparation method, the effect of the main process parameters (such as acid concentration, impregnation ratio, temperature of pyrolysis step) on the performances of the obtained activated carbons (expressed in terms of iodine and methylene blue numbers and specific surface area) was studied. The optimal activated carbon was fully characterized considering its adsorption properties as well as its chemical structure and morphology. To enhance the adsorption capacity of this carbon for heavy metals, a modification of the chemical characteristics of the sorbent surface was performed, using KMnO4 as oxidant. The efficiency of this treatment was evaluated considering the adsorption of Cu2+ ions as a model for metallic species. Column adsorption tests showed the high capacity of the activated carbon to reduce KMnO4 into insoluble manganese (IV) oxide (MnO2) which impregnated the sorbent surface. The results indicated also that copper uptake capacity was enhanced by a factor of up to 3 for the permanganate-treated activated carbon

  19. Preparation of activated carbon from Tunisian olive-waste cakes and its application for adsorption of heavy metal ions

    Baccar, R. [Laboratoire Eau Energie Environnement, Ecole Nationale d' Ingenieurs de Sfax, BP W 3038 Sfax (Tunisia)], E-mail: rym.baccar@tunet.tn; Bouzid, J. [Laboratoire Eau Energie Environnement, Ecole Nationale d' Ingenieurs de Sfax, BP W 3038 Sfax (Tunisia)], E-mail: jalel.bouzid@tunet.tn; Feki, M. [Unite de Recherche de Chimie Industrielle et Materiaux, Ecole Nationale d' Ingenieurs de Sfax, BP W 3038 Sfax (Tunisia)], E-mail: mongi.feki@yahoo.fr; Montiel, A. [Laboratoire Eau Energie Environnement, Ecole Nationale d' Ingenieurs de Sfax, BP W 3038 Sfax (Tunisia)], E-mail: montiel.antoine@free.fr

    2009-03-15

    The present work explored the use of Tunisian olive-waste cakes, a by-product of the manufacture process of olive oil in mills, as a potential feedstock for the preparation of activated carbon. Chemical activation of this precursor, using phosphoric acid as dehydrating agent, was adopted. To optimize the preparation method, the effect of the main process parameters (such as acid concentration, impregnation ratio, temperature of pyrolysis step) on the performances of the obtained activated carbons (expressed in terms of iodine and methylene blue numbers and specific surface area) was studied. The optimal activated carbon was fully characterized considering its adsorption properties as well as its chemical structure and morphology. To enhance the adsorption capacity of this carbon for heavy metals, a modification of the chemical characteristics of the sorbent surface was performed, using KMnO{sub 4} as oxidant. The efficiency of this treatment was evaluated considering the adsorption of Cu{sup 2+} ions as a model for metallic species. Column adsorption tests showed the high capacity of the activated carbon to reduce KMnO{sub 4} into insoluble manganese (IV) oxide (MnO{sub 2}) which impregnated the sorbent surface. The results indicated also that copper uptake capacity was enhanced by a factor of up to 3 for the permanganate-treated activated carbon.

  20. Overall adsorption rate of metronidazole, dimetridazole and diatrizoate on activated carbons prepared from coffee residues and almond shells.

    Flores-Cano, J V; Sánchez-Polo, M; Messoud, J; Velo-Gala, I; Ocampo-Pérez, R; Rivera-Utrilla, J

    2016-03-15

    This study analyzed the overall adsorption rate of metronidazole, dimetridazole, and diatrizoate on activated carbons prepared from coffee residues and almond shells. It was also elucidated whether the overall adsorption rate was controlled by reaction on the adsorbent surface or by intraparticle diffusion. Experimental data of the pollutant concentration decay curves as a function of contact time were interpreted by kinetics (first- and second-order) and diffusion models, considering external mass transfer, surface and/or pore volume diffusion, and adsorption on an active site. The experimental data were better interpreted by a first-order than second-order kinetic model, and the first-order adsorption rate constant varied linearly with respect to the surface area and total pore volume of the adsorbents. According to the diffusion model, the overall adsorption rate is governed by intraparticle diffusion, and surface diffusion is the main mechanism controlling the intraparticle diffusion, representing >90% of total intraparticle diffusion. PMID:26731310

  1. Studies on the Physical Adsorption Equilibria of Gases on Porous Solids over a Wide Temperature Range Spanning the Critical Region——Adsorption on Microporous Activated Carbon

    周亚平; 白书培; 周理; 杨斌

    2001-01-01

    Adsorption equilibria of nitrogen and methane on microporous (<2 nm) activated carbon were measured for a wide temperature range (103—298 K) spanning the critical region. Information relating to Henry constants, the isosteric heat of adsorption, and the amnount of limiting adsorption were evaluated. All isotherms show type-I features for both sub- and supercritical temperatures. A new isotherm equation and a consideration for the importance of the effect of the adsorbed phase volume allow this kind of isotherms to be modeled satisfactorily. The model parameter of the saturated amount of absolute adsorpaon (nt0) equals the limiting adsorption amount (nlim), leaving the physical meaning of the latter clarified, and the exponent parameter (q) proves to be an appropriate index of surface heterogeneity.

  2. Adsorptive removal of hydrophobic organic compounds by carbonaceous adsorbents: A comparative study of waste-polymer-based,coal-based activated carbon, and carbon nanotubes

    Fei Lian; Chun Chang; Yang Du; Lingyan Zhu; Baoshan Xing; Chang Liu

    2012-01-01

    Adsorption of the hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) trichloroethylene (TCE),1,3-dichlorobenzene (DCB),1,3-dinitrobenzene (DNB) and γ-hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) on five different carbonaceous materials was compared.The adsorbents included three polymer-based activated carbons,one coal-based activated carbon (F400) and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNT).The polymerbased activated carbons were prepared using KOH activation from waste polymers:polyvinyl chloride (PVC),polyethyleneterephthalate (PET) and tire rubber (TR).Compared with F400 and MWNT,activated carbons derived from PVC and PET exhibited fast adsorption kinetics and high adsorption capacity toward the HOCs,attributed to their extremely large hydrophobic surface area (2700 m2/g) and highly mesoporous structures.Adsorption of small-sized TCE was stronger on the tire-rubber-based carbon and F400 resulting from the pore-filling effect.In contrast,due to the molecular sieving effect,their adsorption on HCH was lower.MWNT exhibited the lowest adsorption capacity toward HOCs because of its low surface area and characteristic of aggregating in aqueous solution.

  3. Kinetic studies on the adsorption of methylene blue onto vegetal fiber activated carbons

    Cherifi, Hakima, E-mail: ha_cherifi@yahoo.fr [Université de Médéa, Laboratoire des Biomatériaux et Phénomènes de Transferts, 26000 Médéa (Algeria); Fatiha, Bentahar [Laboratoire des Phénomènes de Transferts, Université des Sciences et de la Technologie Houari Boumedien, Bab Ezzouar, BP 32, EL Alia, 16111 Alger (Algeria); Salah, Hanini [Laboratoire des Phénomènes de Transferts, Université des Sciences et de la Technologie Houari Boumedien, Bab Ezzouar, BP 32, EL Alia, 16111 Alger (Algeria); Université de Médéa, Laboratoire des Biomatériaux et Phénomènes de Transferts, 26000 Médéa (Algeria)

    2013-10-01

    The vegetable sponge of cylindrical loofa (CL), a natural product which grows in the north of Algeria, was used to prepare activated carbons. Two activated carbons, AC1 and AC2, by two physiochemical activation methods to be used for methylene blue removal from wastewater. The surface structure of AC1, AC2 and CL were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. Adsorption isotherm of methylene blue onto the prepared activated carbons was determined by batch tests. The effects of various parameters such as contact time, initial concentration, pH, temperature, adsorbent dose and granulometry were investigated, at agitation rate 150 rpm. The results showed that the equilibrium uptake increased with increasing initial MB concentration. The maximum % removal of MB obtained was 99% at 50 °C for AC1 and 82% at 30 °C for AC2. The increase in initial pH in the ranges of 2–10 increases the yields removal of MB on AC2. The pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order kinetic models were applied to test the experimental data. The latter provided the best correlation of the experimental data compared to the pseudo-first-order model.

  4. Kinetic studies on the adsorption of methylene blue onto vegetal fiber activated carbons

    The vegetable sponge of cylindrical loofa (CL), a natural product which grows in the north of Algeria, was used to prepare activated carbons. Two activated carbons, AC1 and AC2, by two physiochemical activation methods to be used for methylene blue removal from wastewater. The surface structure of AC1, AC2 and CL were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. Adsorption isotherm of methylene blue onto the prepared activated carbons was determined by batch tests. The effects of various parameters such as contact time, initial concentration, pH, temperature, adsorbent dose and granulometry were investigated, at agitation rate 150 rpm. The results showed that the equilibrium uptake increased with increasing initial MB concentration. The maximum % removal of MB obtained was 99% at 50 °C for AC1 and 82% at 30 °C for AC2. The increase in initial pH in the ranges of 2–10 increases the yields removal of MB on AC2. The pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order kinetic models were applied to test the experimental data. The latter provided the best correlation of the experimental data compared to the pseudo-first-order model.

  5. Removal of vertigo blue dyes from Batik textile wastewater by adsorption onto activated carbon and coal bottom ash

    Kusmiyati, L., Puspita Adi; Deni, V.; Robi Indra, S.; Islamica, Dlia; Fuadi, M.

    2016-04-01

    Removal of vertigo blue dye from batik textile wastewater was studied by adsorptionprocess onto activated carbon (AC) and coal bottom ash (CBA).The influence of experimental conditions (pH solution, dye concentration, and contact time) were studied on the both adsorbents. At equilibrium conditions, the data were fitted to Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption models. The maximum adsorption capacity calculated from the Langmuir model for carbon active was 6.29mg/g at pH that found to be considerably higher than that obtained for coal bottom ash 3.72mg/g pH 9. From Freundlich model, the maximum adsorption capacity is less for coal bottom ash (pH 9) than that for carbon active (pH4).

  6. Study of the Adsorbent-Adsorbate Interactions from Cd(II) and Pb(II) Adsorption on Activated Carbon and Activated Carbon Fiber

    The adsorption characteristics of Cd(II) and Pb(II) in aqueous solution using granular activated carbon (GAC), activated carbon fiber (ACF), modified ACF (NaACF), and a mixture of GAC and NaACF (GAC/NaACF) have been studied. The surface properties, such as morphology, surface functional groups, and composition of various adsorbents were determined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) measurements. The specific surface area, total pore volume, and pore size distribution were investigated using nitrogen adsorption, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), and Barrett-Joyner-Halenda (BJH) methods. In this study, NaACF showed a high adsorption capacity and rate for heavy metal ions due to the improvement of its ion-exchange capabilities by additional oxygen functional groups. Moreover, the GAC and NaACF mixture was used as an adsorbent to determine the adsorbent-adsorbate interaction in the presence of two competitive adsorbents

  7. Experimental Study On Thermal Wave Type Adsorption Refrigeration System Working On A Pair Of Activated Carbon And Methanol

    Grzebielec Andrzej; Rusowicz Artur; Laskowski Rafał

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the efficiency of the thermal wave type adsorption refrigerating equipment working on a pair of activated carbon and methanol. Adsorption units can work in trigeneration systems and in applications driven by waste heat. They can be built also as a part of hybrid sorption-compressor systems, and they are very popular in solar refrigeration systems and energy storage units. The device examined in this study operates in a special mode called thermal wave. This...

  8. Effect of aromatics on the adsorption of thiophenic sulfur compounds from model diesel fuel by activated carbon cloth

    NAVIRI FALLAH, Rahimeh; Azizian, Saeid; REGGERS, Guy; Carleer, Robert; Schreurs, Sonja; Ahenach, Janat; Meynen, Vera; Yperman, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The effects of aromatic compound presence in real diesel fuel on the adsorption of sulfur species onto activated carbon cloth (ACC) were investigated. Equilibrium and kinetics adsorption of benzothiophene (BT), dibenzothiophene (DBT) and 4,6-dimethyldibenzothiophene (DMDBT) in the presence of naphthalene (NP) and 1-methylnaphthalene (1-MNP) from prepared model diesel fuels onto ACC and its oxidized forms were studied. The total sulfur concentration inmodel diesel fuelwas 300 ppmw. The initial...

  9. Equilibria and dynamics of liquid-phase trinitrotoluene adsorption on granular activated carbon: effect of temperature and pH.

    Lee, Jae-Wook; Yang, Tae-Hoon; Shim, Wang-Geun; Kwon, Tae-Ouk; Moon, Il-Shik

    2007-03-01

    Environmental regulations for removal of trinitrotoluene (TNT) from wastewater have steadily become more stringent. This study focuses on the adsorption equilibrium, kinetics, and column dynamics of TNT on heterogeneous activated carbon. Adsorption equilibrium data obtained in terms of temperature (298.15, 313.15 and 323.15K) and pH (3, 8 and 10) were correlated by the Langmuir equation. In addition, the adsorption energy distribution functions which describe heterogeneous characteristics of porous solid sorbents were calculated by using the generalized nonlinear regularization method. Adsorption breakthrough curves were studied in activated column under various operating conditions such as temperature, pH, concentration, flow rate, and column length. We found that the effect of pH on adsorption breakthrough curves was considerably higher than other operating conditions. An adsorption model was formulated by employing the surface diffusion model inside the activated carbon particles. The model equation that was solved numerically by an orthogonal collocation method successfully simulated the adsorption breakthrough curves. PMID:16889891

  10. Adsorptive Removal of Para-chlorophenol Using Stratified Tapered Activated Carbon Column

    M.EE Sze; G. McKay

    2012-01-01

    The feasibility of adsorptive removal of single component organic compound (para-chlorophenol) by Calgon Filtrasorb 400 (F400) carbon was investigated. The Redlich-Peterson equation was found to be the best fit model for describing the equilibrium relationship between the para-chlorophenol adsorption onto F400 carbon. Four adsorption columns with different column geometry and adsorbent particle stratification were used to examine the adsorption kinetics onto F400 carbons. The Bed Depth Service Time (BDST) model was applied and modified to analyse the performance of the columns and the effect of different operating variables. When combining the effects of adsorption efficiency and the associated pressure drop of each type of adsorption columns tested, the carbon stratified tapered column has been determined to be the most efficient engineering option for removing organics, in which the enhancement of the adsorbent bed in terms of longer breakthrough time and higher saturation percentage is the greatest amongst the four types of columns with reasonably small pressure drop across the fixed-bed column.