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Sample records for activate membrane fusion

  1. Membrane fusion

    Bendix, Pól Martin

    2015-01-01

    At Stanford University, Boxer lab, I worked on membrane fusion of small unilamellar lipid vesicles to flat membranes tethered to glass surfaces. This geometry closely resembles biological systems in which liposomes fuse to plasma membranes. The fusion mechanism was studied using DNA zippering...... between complementary strands linked to the two apposing membranes closely mimicking the zippering mechanism of SNARE fusion complexes....

  2. Sendai Virus Fusion Activity as Modulated by Target Membrane Components

    Nunes-Correia, Isabel; Ramalho-Santos, João; Maria C Pedroso de Lima

    1998-01-01

    We have studied the differences between erythrocytes and erythrocyte ghosts as target membranes for the study of Sendai virus fusion activity. Fusion was monitored continuously by fluorescence dequenching of R18-labeled virus. Experiments were carried out either with or without virus/target membrane prebinding. When Sendai virus was added directly to a erythrocyte/erythrocyte ghost suspension, fusion was always lower than that obtained when experiments were carried out with virus already boun...

  3. Membrane-mobility agent-promoted fusion of erythrocytes: fusibility is correlated with attack by calcium-activated cytoplasmic proteases on membrane proteins.

    Kosower, N S; Glaser, T; Kosower, E M

    1983-01-01

    Rat, but not human, erythrocytes undergo fusion promoted by the membrane-mobility agent 2-(2-methoxyethoxy)-ethyl cis-8-(2-octylcyclopropyl)octanoate (A2C). The difference in behavior is correlated with rat erythrocyte membrane protein degradation caused by Ca2+-activated proteases. The human erythrocyte is deficient in such protease activity. Membrane protein degradation is a necessary, but not sufficient, requirement for membrane fusion. Membrane protein degradation probably releases membra...

  4. Fusion-Triggered Switching of Enzymatic Activity on an Artificial Cell Membrane

    Jun-ichi Kikuchi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available A nanosensory membrane device was constructed for detecting liposome fusion through changes in an enzymatic activity. Inspired by a biological signal transduction system, the device design involved functionalized liposomal membranes prepared by self-assembly of the following molecular components: a synthetic peptide lipid and a phospholipid as matrix membrane components, a Schiff’s base of pyridoxal 5’-phosphate with phosphatidylethanolamine as a thermo-responsive artificial receptor, NADH-dependent L-lactate dehydrogenase as a signal amplifier, and Cu2+ ion as a signal mediator between the receptor and enzyme. The enzymatic activity of the membrane device was adjustable by changing the matrix lipid composition, reflecting the thermotropic phase transition behavior of the lipid membranes, which in turn controlled receptor binding affinity toward the enzyme-inhibiting mediator species. When an effective fusogen anionic polymer was added to these cationic liposomes, membrane fusion occurred, and the functionalized liposomal membranes responded with changes in enzymatic activity, thus serving as an effective nanosensory device for liposome fusion detection.

  5. Viral membrane fusion

    Membrane fusion is an essential step when enveloped viruses enter cells. Lipid bilayer fusion requires catalysis to overcome a high kinetic barrier; viral fusion proteins are the agents that fulfill this catalytic function. Despite a variety of molecular architectures, these proteins facilitate fusion by essentially the same generic mechanism. Stimulated by a signal associated with arrival at the cell to be infected (e.g., receptor or co-receptor binding, proton binding in an endosome), they undergo a series of conformational changes. A hydrophobic segment (a “fusion loop” or “fusion peptide”) engages the target-cell membrane and collapse of the bridging intermediate thus formed draws the two membranes (virus and cell) together. We know of three structural classes for viral fusion proteins. Structures for both pre- and postfusion conformations of illustrate the beginning and end points of a process that can be probed by single-virion measurements of fusion kinetics. - Highlights: • Viral fusion proteins overcome the high energy barrier to lipid bilayer merger. • Different molecular structures but the same catalytic mechanism. • Review describes properties of three known fusion-protein structural classes. • Single-virion fusion experiments elucidate mechanism

  6. Viral membrane fusion

    Harrison, Stephen C., E-mail: harrison@crystal.harvard.edu

    2015-05-15

    Membrane fusion is an essential step when enveloped viruses enter cells. Lipid bilayer fusion requires catalysis to overcome a high kinetic barrier; viral fusion proteins are the agents that fulfill this catalytic function. Despite a variety of molecular architectures, these proteins facilitate fusion by essentially the same generic mechanism. Stimulated by a signal associated with arrival at the cell to be infected (e.g., receptor or co-receptor binding, proton binding in an endosome), they undergo a series of conformational changes. A hydrophobic segment (a “fusion loop” or “fusion peptide”) engages the target-cell membrane and collapse of the bridging intermediate thus formed draws the two membranes (virus and cell) together. We know of three structural classes for viral fusion proteins. Structures for both pre- and postfusion conformations of illustrate the beginning and end points of a process that can be probed by single-virion measurements of fusion kinetics. - Highlights: • Viral fusion proteins overcome the high energy barrier to lipid bilayer merger. • Different molecular structures but the same catalytic mechanism. • Review describes properties of three known fusion-protein structural classes. • Single-virion fusion experiments elucidate mechanism.

  7. Fusion of biological membranes

    K Katsov; M Müller; M Schick

    2005-06-01

    The process of membrane fusion has been examined by Monte Carlo simulation, and is found to be very different than the conventional picture. The differences in mechanism lead to several predictions, in particular that fusion is accompanied by transient leakage. This prediction has recently been verified. Self-consistent field theory is applied to examine the free energy barriers in the different scenarios.

  8. Poxvirus entry and membrane fusion

    The study of poxvirus entry and membrane fusion has been invigorated by new biochemical and microscopic findings that lead to the following conclusions: (1) the surface of the mature virion (MV), whether isolated from an infected cell or by disruption of the membrane wrapper of an extracellular virion, is comprised of a single lipid membrane embedded with non-glycosylated viral proteins; (2) the MV membrane fuses with the cell membrane, allowing the core to enter the cytoplasm and initiate gene expression; (3) fusion is mediated by a newly recognized group of viral protein components of the MV membrane, which are conserved in all members of the poxvirus family; (4) the latter MV entry/fusion proteins are required for cell to cell spread necessitating the disruption of the membrane wrapper of extracellular virions prior to fusion; and furthermore (5) the same group of MV entry/fusion proteins are required for virus-induced cell-cell fusion. Future research priorities include delineation of the roles of individual entry/fusion proteins and identification of cell receptors

  9. Membrane fusion during phage lysis.

    Rajaure, Manoj; Berry, Joel; Kongari, Rohit; Cahill, Jesse; Young, Ry

    2015-04-28

    In general, phages cause lysis of the bacterial host to effect release of the progeny virions. Until recently, it was thought that degradation of the peptidoglycan (PG) was necessary and sufficient for osmotic bursting of the cell. Recently, we have shown that in Gram-negative hosts, phage lysis also requires the disruption of the outer membrane (OM). This is accomplished by spanins, which are phage-encoded proteins that connect the cytoplasmic membrane (inner membrane, IM) and the OM. The mechanism by which the spanins destroy the OM is unknown. Here we show that the spanins of the paradigm coliphage lambda mediate efficient membrane fusion. This supports the notion that the last step of lysis is the fusion of the IM and OM. Moreover, data are provided indicating that spanin-mediated fusion is regulated by the meshwork of the PG, thus coupling fusion to murein degradation by the phage endolysin. Because endolysin function requires the formation of μm-scale holes by the phage holin, the lysis pathway is seen to require dramatic dynamics on the part of the OM and IM, as well as destruction of the PG. PMID:25870259

  10. Physical Aspects of Viral Membrane Fusion

    Laura Wessels; Keith Weninger

    2009-01-01

    Enveloped viruses commonly employ membrane fusion during cell penetration in order to deliver their genetic material across the cell boundary. Large conformational changes in the proteins embedded in the viral membrane play a fundamental role in the membrane fusion process. Despite the tremendously wide variety of viruses that contain membranes, it appears that they all contain membrane fusion protein machinery with a remarkably conserved mechanism of action. Much of our current biochemical u...

  11. Membrane lysis during biological membrane fusion: collateral damage by misregulated fusion machines

    Engel, Alex; Walter, Peter

    2008-01-01

    In the canonical model of membrane fusion, the integrity of the fusing membranes is never compromised, preserving the identity of fusing compartments. However, recent molecular simulations provided evidence for a pathway to fusion in which holes in the membrane evolve into a fusion pore. Additionally, two biological membrane fusion models—yeast cell mating and in vitro vacuole fusion—have shown that modifying the composition or altering the relative expression levels of membrane fusion comple...

  12. Rabies Virus-Induced Membrane Fusion Pathway

    Gaudin, Yves

    2000-01-01

    Fusion of rabies virus with membranes is triggered at low pH and is mediated by the viral glycoprotein (G). The rabies virus-induced fusion pathway was studied by investigating the effects of exogenous lipids having various dynamic molecular shapes on the fusion process. Inverted cone-shaped lysophosphatidylcholines (LPCs) blocked fusion at a stage subsequent to fusion peptide insertion into the target membrane. Consistent with the stalk-hypothesis, LPC with shorter alkyl chains inhibited fus...

  13. The role of membrane fusion activity of a whole inactivated influenza virus vaccine in (re)activation of influenza-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    Budimir, Natalija; Meijerhof, Tjarko; Wilschut, Jan; Huckriede, Anke; de Haan, Aalzen

    2010-12-01

    Induction of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity against conserved influenza antigens, e.g. nucleoprotein (NP) could be a step towards cross-protective influenza vaccine. The major challenge for non-replicating influenza vaccines aiming for activation of CTLs is targeting of antigen to the MHC class I processing and presentation pathway of professional antigen presenting cells, in particular dendritic cells (DCs). Intrinsic fusogenic properties of the vaccine particle itself can enable direct cytosolic delivery of the antigen by enhancing release of the antigen from the endosome to the cytosol. Alternatively, the vaccine particle would need to possess the capacity to activate DCs thereby triggering cell-intrinsic mechanisms of cross-presentation, processes that do not require fusion. Here, using fusion-active and fusion-inactive whole inactivated virus (WIV) as a vaccine model, we studied the relative contribution of these two pathways on priming and reactivation of influenza NP-specific CTLs in a murine model. We show that activation of bone marrow-derived DCs by WIV, as well as reactivation of NP-specific CTLs in vitro and in vivo were not affected by inactivation of membrane fusion of the WIV particles. However, in vivo priming of naive CTLs was optimal only upon vaccination with fusion-active WIV. Thus, DC-intrinsic mechanisms of cross-presentation are involved in the activation of CTLs upon vaccination with WIV. However, for optimal priming of naive CTLs these mechanisms should be complemented by delivery of antigen to the cytosol mediated by the membrane fusion capacity of the WIV particles. PMID:20965298

  14. Sphingolipids activate membrane fusion of Semliki Forest virus in a stereospecific manner

    Moesby, Lise; Corver, J; Erukulla, R K; Bittman, R; Wilschut, J

    1995-01-01

    assessed by flotation on sucrose density gradients, was not dependent on the presence of fusion-competent or fusion-incompetent sphingolipids in the liposomes. The results of this study support the notion that a stereospecific interaction of the viral fusion protein with D-erythro sphingolipids in the...

  15. Fusion of the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondrial outer membrane in rats brown adipose tissue: activation of thermogenesis by Ca2+.

    de Meis, Leopoldo; Ketzer, Luisa A; da Costa, Rodrigo Madeiro; de Andrade, Ivone Rosa; Benchimol, Marlene

    2010-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) mitochondria thermogenesis is regulated by uncoupling protein 1 (UCP 1), GDP and fatty acids. In this report, we observed fusion of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane with the mitochondrial outer membrane of rats BAT. Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA 1) was identified by immunoelectron microscopy in both ER and mitochondria. This finding led us to test the Ca(2+) effect in BAT mitochondria thermogenesis. We found that Ca(2+) increased the rate of respiration and heat production measured with a microcalorimeter both in coupled and uncoupled mitochondria, but had no effect on the rate of ATP synthesis. The Ca(2+) concentration needed for half-maximal activation varied between 0.08 and 0.11 microM. The activation of respiration was less pronounced than that of heat production. Heat production and ATP synthesis were inhibited by rotenone and KCN. Liver mitochondria have no UCP1 and during respiration synthesize a large amount of ATP, produce little heat, GDP had no effect on mitochondria coupling, Ca(2+) strongly inhibited ATP synthesis and had little or no effect on the small amount of heat released. These finding indicate that Ca(2+) activation of thermogenesis may be a specific feature of BAT mitochondria not found in other mitochondria such as liver. PMID:20209153

  16. Investigation of SNARE-Mediated Membrane Fusion Mechanism Using Atomic Force Microscopy

    Abdulreda, Midhat H.; Moy, Vincent T.

    2009-01-01

    Membrane fusion is driven by specialized proteins that reduce the free energy penalty for the fusion process. In neurons and secretory cells, soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor-attachment protein (SNAP) receptors (SNAREs) mediate vesicle fusion with the plasma membrane during vesicular content release. Although, SNAREs have been widely accepted as the minimal machinery for membrane fusion, the specific mechanism for SNARE-mediated membrane fusion remains an active area of research. Her...

  17. Fusion of the Endoplasmic Reticulum and Mitochondrial Outer Membrane in Rats Brown Adipose Tissue: Activation of Thermogenesis by Ca2+

    de Meis, Leopoldo; Ketzer, Luisa A.; da Costa, Rodrigo Madeiro; de Andrade, Ivone Rosa; Benchimol, Marlene

    2010-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) mitochondria thermogenesis is regulated by uncoupling protein 1 (UCP 1), GDP and fatty acids. In this report, we observed fusion of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane with the mitochondrial outer membrane of rats BAT. Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA 1) was identified by immunoelectron microscopy in both ER and mitochondria. This finding led us to test the Ca2+ effect in BAT mitochondria thermogenesis. We found that Ca2+ increased the rate of respiration and heat production ...

  18. Minimum Membrane Bending Energies of Fusion Pores

    Jackson, Meyer B.

    2009-01-01

    Membranes fuse by forming highly curved intermediates, culminating in structures described as fusion pores. These hourglass-like figures that join two fusing membranes have high bending energies, which can be estimated using continuum elasticity models. Fusion pore bending energies depend strongly on shape, and the present study developed a method for determining the shape that minimizes bending energy. This was first applied to a fusion pore modeled as a single surface and then extended to a...

  19. The role of cholesterol in membrane fusion.

    Yang, Sung-Tae; Kreutzberger, Alex J B; Lee, Jinwoo; Kiessling, Volker; Tamm, Lukas K

    2016-09-01

    Cholesterol modulates the bilayer structure of biological membranes in multiple ways. It changes the fluidity, thickness, compressibility, water penetration and intrinsic curvature of lipid bilayers. In multi-component lipid mixtures, cholesterol induces phase separations, partitions selectively between different coexisting lipid phases, and causes integral membrane proteins to respond by changing conformation or redistribution in the membrane. But, which of these often overlapping properties are important for membrane fusion?-Here we review a range of recent experiments that elucidate the multiple roles that cholesterol plays in SNARE-mediated and viral envelope glycoprotein-mediated membrane fusion. PMID:27179407

  20. A high throughput Cre-lox activated viral membrane fusion assay identifies pharmacological inhibitors of HIV entry.

    Esposito, Anthony M; Cheung, Pamela; Swartz, Talia H; Li, Hongru; Tsibane, Tshidi; Durham, Natasha D; Basler, Christopher F; Felsenfeld, Dan P; Chen, Benjamin K

    2016-03-01

    Enveloped virus entry occurs when viral and cellular membranes fuse releasing particle contents into the target cell. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) entry occurs by cell-free virus or virus transferred between infected and uninfected cells through structures called virological synapses. We developed a high-throughput cell-based assay to identify small molecule inhibitors of cell-free or virological synapse-mediated entry. An HIV clone carrying Cre recombinase as a Gag-internal gene fusion releases active Cre into cells upon viral entry activating a recombinatorial gene switch changing dsRed to GFP-expression. A screen of a 1998 known-biological profile small molecule library identified pharmacological HIV entry inhibitors that block both cell-free and cell-to-cell infection. Many top hits were noted as HIV inhibitors in prior studies, but not previously recognized as entry antagonists. Modest therapeutic indices for simvastatin and nigericin were observed in confirmatory HIV infection assays. This robust assay is adaptable to study HIV and heterologous viral pseudotypes. PMID:26803470

  1. Mechanical tension drives cell membrane fusion

    Kim, Ji Hoon; Ren, Yixin; Ng, Win Pin; Li, Shuo; Son, Sungmin; Kee, Yee-Seir; Zhang, Shiliang; Zhang, Guofeng; Fletcher, Daniel A.; Robinson, Douglas N.; Chen, Elizabeth H.

    2015-01-01

    Membrane fusion is an energy-consuming process that requires tight juxtaposition of two lipid bilayers. Little is known about how cells overcome energy barriers to bring their membranes together for fusion. Previously, we have shown that cell-cell fusion is an asymmetric process in which an “attacking” cell drills finger-like protrusions into the “receiving” cell to promote cell fusion. Here we show that the receiving cell mounts a Myosin II (MyoII)-mediated mechanosensory response to its inv...

  2. Separate fusion of outer and inner mitochondrial membranes

    Malka, Florence; Guillery, Olwenn; Cifuentes-Diaz, Carmen; Guillou, Emmanuelle; Belenguer, Pascale; Lombès, Anne; Rojo, Manuel

    2005-01-01

    Mitochondria are enveloped by two closely apposed boundary membranes with different properties and functions. It is known that they undergo fusion and fission, but it has remained unclear whether outer and inner membranes fuse simultaneously, coordinately or separately. We set up assays for the study of inner and outer membrane fusion in living human cells. Inner membrane fusion was more sensitive than outer membrane fusion to inhibition of glycolysis. Fusion of the inner membrane, but not of...

  3. SARS-coronavirus spike S2 domain flanked by cysteine residues C822 and C833 is important for activation of membrane fusion

    The S2 domain of the coronavirus spike (S) protein is known to be responsible for mediating membrane fusion. In addition to a well-recognized cleavage site at the S1-S2 boundary, a second proteolytic cleavage site has been identified in the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) S2 domain (R797). C-terminal to this S2 cleavage site is a conserved region flanked by cysteine residues C822 and C833. Here, we investigated the importance of this well conserved region for SARS-CoV S-mediated fusion activation. We show that the residues between C822-C833 are well conserved across all coronaviruses. Mutagenic analysis of SARS-CoV S, combined with cell-cell fusion and pseudotyped virion infectivity assays, showed a critical role for the core-conserved residues C822, D830, L831, and C833. Based on available predictive models, we propose that the conserved domain flanked by cysteines 822 and 833 forms a loop structure that interacts with components of the SARS-CoV S trimer to control the activation of membrane fusion.

  4. Proteolytic cleavage of Opa1 stimulates mitochondrial inner membrane fusion and couples fusion to oxidative phosphorylation

    Mishra, Prashant; Carelli, Valerio; Manfredi, Giovanni; Chan, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial fusion is essential for maintenance of mitochondrial function. The mitofusin GTPases control mitochondrial outer membrane fusion, whereas the dynamin-related GTPase Opa1 mediates inner membrane fusion. We show that mitochondrial inner membrane fusion is tuned by the level of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), whereas outer membrane fusion is insensitive. Consequently, cells from patients with pathogenic mtDNA mutations show a selective defect in mitochondrial inner membrane fus...

  5. Palaeontological evidence of membrane relationship in step-by-step membrane fusion

    Wang, Xin; Liu, Wenzhe; DU, KAIHE

    2010-01-01

    Studies on membrane fusion in living cells indicate that initiation of membrane fusion is a transient and hard to capture process. Despite previous research, membrane behaviour at this point is still poorly understood. Recent palaeobotanical research has revealed snapshots of membrane fusion in a 15-million-year-old fossil pinaceous cone. To reveal the membrane behaviour during the fusion, we conducted more observations on the same fossil material. Several discernible steps of membrane fusion...

  6. Defensins promote fusion and lysis of negatively charged membranes.

    Fujii, G; Selsted, M E; Eisenberg, D.

    1993-01-01

    Defensins, a family of cationic peptides isolated from mammalian granulocytes and believed to permeabilize membranes, were tested for their ability to cause fusion and lysis of liposomes. Unlike alpha-helical peptides whose lytic effects have been extensively studied, the defensins consist primarily of beta-sheet. Defensins fuse and lyse negatively charged liposomes but display reduced activity with neutral liposomes. These and other experiments suggest that fusion and lysis is mediated prima...

  7. Pseudorabies Virus Glycoprotein M Inhibits Membrane Fusion

    Klupp, Barbara G.; Nixdorf, Ralf; Mettenleiter, Thomas C.

    2000-01-01

    A transient transfection-fusion assay was established to investigate membrane fusion mediated by pseudorabies virus (PrV) glycoproteins. Plasmids expressing PrV glycoproteins under control of the immediate-early 1 promoter-enhancer of human cytomegalovirus were transfected into rabbit kidney cells, and the extent of cell fusion was quantitated 27 to 42 h after transfection. Cotransfection of plasmids encoding PrV glycoproteins B (gB), gD, gH, and gL resulted in formation of polykaryocytes, as...

  8. Induction of heterosubtypic cross-protection against influenza by a whole inactivated virus vaccine: the role of viral membrane fusion activity.

    Natalija Budimir

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The inability of seasonal influenza vaccines to effectively protect against infection with antigenically drifted viruses or newly emerging pandemic viruses underlines the need for development of cross-reactive influenza vaccines that induce immunity against a variety of virus subtypes. Therefore, potential cross-protective vaccines, e.g., whole inactivated virus (WIV vaccine, that can target conserved internal antigens such as the nucleoprotein (NP and/or matrix protein (M1 need to be explored. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the current study we show that a WIV vaccine, through induction of cross-protective cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs, protects mice from heterosubtypic infection. This protection was abrogated after depletion of CD8+ cells in vaccinated mice, indicating that CTLs were the primary mediators of protection. Previously, we have shown that different procedures used for virus inactivation influence optimal activation of CTLs by WIV, most likely by affecting the membrane fusion properties of the virus. Specifically, inactivation with formalin (FA severely compromises fusion activity of the virus, while inactivation with β-propiolactone (BPL preserves fusion activity. Here, we demonstrate that vaccination of mice with BPL-inactivated H5N1 WIV vaccine induces solid protection from lethal heterosubtypic H1N1 challenge. By contrast, vaccination with FA-inactivated WIV, while preventing death after lethal challenge, failed to protect against development of disease and severe body weight loss. Vaccination with BPL-inactivated WIV, compared to FA-inactivated WIV, induced higher levels of specific CD8+ T cells in blood, spleen and lungs, and a higher production of granzyme B in the lungs upon H1N1 virus challenge. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The results underline the potential use of WIV as a cross-protective influenza vaccine candidate. However, careful choice of the virus inactivation procedure is important to retain membrane

  9. The Flocculating Cationic Polypetide from Moringa oleifera Seeds Damages Bacterial Cell Membranes by Causing Membrane Fusion.

    Shebek, Kevin; Schantz, Allen B; Sines, Ian; Lauser, Kathleen; Velegol, Stephanie; Kumar, Manish

    2015-04-21

    A cationic protein isolated from the seeds of the Moringa oleifera tree has been extensively studied for use in water treatment in developing countries and has been proposed for use in antimicrobial and therapeutic applications. However, the molecular basis for the antimicrobial action of this peptide, Moringa oleifera cationic protein (MOCP), has not been previously elucidated. We demonstrate here that a dominant mechanism of MOCP antimicrobial activity is membrane fusion. We used a combination of cryogenic electron microscopy (cryo-EM) and fluorescence assays to observe and study the kinetics of fusion of membranes in liposomes representing model microbial cells. We also conducted cryo-EM experiments on E. coli cells where MOCP was seen to fuse the inner and outer membranes. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of membrane vesicles with MOCP molecules were used to elucidate steps in peptide adsorption, stalk formation, and fusion between membranes. PMID:25845029

  10. Dissipative Particle Dynamics of Tension-induced Membrane Fusion

    Grafmueller, Andrea; Lipowsky, Reinhard; Shillcock, Julian C.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Recent studies of tension-induced membrane fusion using dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations are briefly reviewed. The stochastic nature of the fusion process makes it necessary to simulate a large number of fusion attempts in order to obtain reliable fusion statistics and to extract meaningful values for the fusion probability and the average fusion times. All successful fusion events follow the same pathway. In this fusion pathway, configurations of individual...

  11. IM30 triggers membrane fusion in cyanobacteria and chloroplasts.

    Hennig, Raoul; Heidrich, Jennifer; Saur, Michael; Schmüser, Lars; Roeters, Steven J; Hellmann, Nadja; Woutersen, Sander; Bonn, Mischa; Weidner, Tobias; Markl, Jürgen; Schneider, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    The thylakoid membrane of chloroplasts and cyanobacteria is a unique internal membrane system harbouring the complexes of the photosynthetic electron transfer chain. Despite their apparent importance, little is known about the biogenesis and maintenance of thylakoid membranes. Although membrane fusion events are essential for the formation of thylakoid membranes, proteins involved in membrane fusion have yet to be identified in photosynthetic cells or organelles. Here we show that IM30, a conserved chloroplast and cyanobacterial protein of approximately 30 kDa binds as an oligomeric ring in a well-defined geometry specifically to membranes containing anionic lipids. Triggered by Mg(2+), membrane binding causes destabilization and eventually results in membrane fusion. We propose that IM30 establishes contacts between internal membrane sites and promotes fusion to enable regulated exchange of proteins and/or lipids in cyanobacteria and chloroplasts. PMID:25952141

  12. Dissipative Particle Dynamics of tension-induced membrane fusion

    Shillcock, Julian C.

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies of tension-induced membrane fusion using dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations are briefly reviewed. The stochastic nature of the fusion process makes it necessary to simulate a large number of fusion attempts in order to obtain reliable fusion statistics and to extract...

  13. Expansion of the fusion stalk and its implication for biological membrane fusion

    Risselada, H.; Bubnis, G.; Grubmüller, H.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, it has been widely accepted that membrane fusion proceeds via a hemifusion step before opening of the productive fusion pore. An initial hourglass-shaped lipid structure, the fusion stalk, is formed between the adjacent membrane leaflets (cis leaflets). It remains controversial if and how fusion proteins drive the subsequent transition (expansion) of the stalk into a fusion pore. Here, we propose a comprehensive and consistent thermodynamic understanding in terms of th...

  14. Stalk model of membrane fusion: solution of energy crisis.

    Kozlovsky, Yonathan; Kozlov, Michael M.

    2002-01-01

    Membrane fusion proceeds via formation of intermediate nonbilayer structures. The stalk model of fusion intermediate is commonly recognized to account for the major phenomenology of the fusion process. However, in its current form, the stalk model poses a challenge. On one hand, it is able to describe qualitatively the modulation of the fusion reaction by the lipid composition of the membranes. On the other, it predicts very large values of the stalk energy, so that the related energy barrier...

  15. Oligomerization of Fusogenic Peptides Promotes Membrane Fusion by Enhancing Membrane Destabilization

    Lau, Wai Leung; Ege, David S.; Lear, James D.; Hammer, Daniel A.; DeGrado, William F.

    2004-01-01

    A key element of membrane fusion reactions in biology is the involvement of specific fusion proteins. In many viruses, the proteins that mediate membrane fusion usually exist as homotrimers. Furthermore, they contain extended triple-helical coiled-coil domains and fusogenic peptides. It has been suggested that the coiled-coil domains present the fusogenic peptide in a conformation or geometry favorable for membrane fusion. To test the hypothesis that trimerization of fusogenic peptide is rela...

  16. Membrane fusion machines of paramyxoviruses: capture of intermediates of fusion

    Charles J Russell; Theodore S Jardetzky; Lamb, Robert A.

    2001-01-01

    Peptides derived from heptad repeat regions adjacent to the fusion peptide and transmembrane domains of many viral fusion proteins form stable helical bundles and inhibit fusion specifically. Paramyxovirus SV5 fusion (F) protein-mediated fusion and its inhibition by the peptides N-1 and C-1 were analyzed. The temperature dependence of fusion by F suggests that thermal energy, destabilizing proline residues and receptor binding by the hemagglutinin–neuraminidase (HN) protein collectively contr...

  17. Fusion Pore Diameter Regulation by Cations Modulating Local Membrane Anisotropy

    Doron Kabaso

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The fusion pore is an aqueous channel that is formed upon the fusion of the vesicle membrane with the plasma membrane. Once the pore is open, it may close again (transient fusion or widen completely (full fusion to permit vesicle cargo discharge. While repetitive transient fusion pore openings of the vesicle with the plasma membrane have been observed in the absence of stimulation, their frequency can be further increased using a cAMP-increasing agent that drives the opening of nonspecific cation channels. Our model hypothesis is that the openings and closings of the fusion pore are driven by changes in the local concentration of cations in the connected vesicle. The proposed mechanism of fusion pore dynamics is considered as follows: when the fusion pore is closed or is extremely narrow, the accumulation of cations in the vesicle (increased cation concentration likely leads to lipid demixing at the fusion pore. This process may affect local membrane anisotropy, which reduces the spontaneous curvature and thus leads to the opening of the fusion pore. Based on the theory of membrane elasticity, we used a continuum model to explain the rhythmic opening and closing of the fusion pore.

  18. Observations of membrane fusion in a liposome dispersion: the missing fusion intermediate?

    Marianna Foldvari

    2015-01-01

    Early intermediate structures of liposome-liposome fusion events were captured by freeze-fracture electron microscopic (EM) technique. The images show the morphology of the fusion interface at several different stages of the fusion event. One of the intermediates was captured at a serendipitous stage of two vesicles’ membranes (both leaflets) merging and their contents starting to intermix clearly showing the fusion interface with a previously unseen fusion rim. From the morphological informa...

  19. Membrane Fusion Induced by Small Molecules and Ions

    Sutapa Mondal Roy; Munna Sarkar

    2011-01-01

    Membrane fusion is a key event in many biological processes. These processes are controlled by various fusogenic agents of which proteins and peptides from the principal group. The fusion process is characterized by three major steps, namely, inter membrane contact, lipid mixing forming the intermediate step, pore opening and finally mixing of inner contents of the cells/vesicles. These steps are governed by energy barriers, which need to be overcome to complete fusion. Structural reorganizat...

  20. Acidification triggers Andes hantavirus membrane fusion and rearrangement of Gc into a stable post-fusion homotrimer.

    Acuña, Rodrigo; Bignon, Eduardo A; Mancini, Roberta; Lozach, Pierre-Yves; Tischler, Nicole D

    2015-11-01

    The hantavirus membrane fusion process is mediated by the Gc envelope glycoprotein from within endosomes. However, little is known about the specific mechanism that triggers Gc fusion activation, and its pre- and post-fusion conformations. We established cell-free in vitro systems to characterize hantavirus fusion activation. Low pH was sufficient to trigger the interaction of virus-like particles with liposomes. This interaction was dependent on a pre-fusion glycoprotein arrangement. Further, low pH induced Gc multimerization changes leading to non-reversible Gc homotrimers. These trimers were resistant to detergent, heat and protease digestion, suggesting characteristics of a stable post-fusion structure. No acid-dependent oligomerization rearrangement was detected for the trypsin-sensitive Gn envelope glycoprotein. Finally, acidification induced fusion of glycoprotein-expressing effector cells with non-susceptible CHO cells. Together, the data provide novel information on the Gc fusion trigger and its non-reversible activation involving lipid interaction, multimerization changes and membrane fusion which ultimately allow hantavirus entry into cells. PMID:26310672

  1. A role for a TIMP-3-sensitive, Zn(2+)-dependent metalloprotease in mammalian gamete membrane fusion.

    Correa, L M; Cho, C; Myles, D G; Primakoff, P

    2000-09-01

    During fertilization, sperm and egg plasma membranes adhere and then fuse by a mechanism that is not well understood. Zinc metalloproteases are necessary for some intercellular fusion events, for instance, cell-cell fusion in yeast. In this study we tested the effects of class-specific and family-specific protease inhibitors on mouse gamete fusion. Capacitated, acrosome-reacted sperm and zona-free eggs were used in assays designed to define the effects of inhibitors on sperm-egg plasma membrane binding or fusion. Inhibitors of the aspartic, cysteine, and serine protease classes had no effect on sperm-egg binding or fusion. Both a synthetic metalloprotease substrate (succinyl-Ala-Ala-Phe-amidomethylcoumarin) and the zinc chelator 1,10-phenanthroline inhibited sperm-egg fusion but did not decrease sperm-egg binding. The fusion-inhibition effect of phenanthroline was reversible and activity of the inhibitable zinc metalloprotease was shown to be required during a short time window, the first 15 min after insemination. Tissue inhibitor of metalloprotease-3 and Ro 31-9790, specific inhibitors of zinc metalloproteases in the matrixin and adamalysin families, also inhibited sperm-egg fusion but not sperm-egg binding. These data indicate a role in gamete fusion for one or more zinc metalloproteases of the matrixin and/or adamalysin families that act after plasma membrane binding and before sperm-egg membrane fusion. PMID:10964469

  2. A compensatory mutation provides resistance to disparate HIV fusion inhibitor peptides and enhances membrane fusion.

    Matthew P Wood

    Full Text Available Fusion inhibitors are a class of antiretroviral drugs used to prevent entry of HIV into host cells. Many of the fusion inhibitors being developed, including the drug enfuvirtide, are peptides designed to competitively inhibit the viral fusion protein gp41. With the emergence of drug resistance, there is an increased need for effective and unique alternatives within this class of antivirals. One such alternative is a class of cyclic, cationic, antimicrobial peptides known as θ-defensins, which are produced by many non-human primates and exhibit broad-spectrum antiviral and antibacterial activity. Currently, the θ-defensin analog RC-101 is being developed as a microbicide due to its specific antiviral activity, lack of toxicity to cells and tissues, and safety in animals. Understanding potential RC-101 resistance, and how resistance to other fusion inhibitors affects RC-101 susceptibility, is critical for future development. In previous studies, we identified a mutant, R5-tropic virus that had evolved partial resistance to RC-101 during in vitro selection. Here, we report that a secondary mutation in gp41 was found to restore replicative fitness, membrane fusion, and the rate of viral entry, which were compromised by an initial mutation providing partial RC-101 resistance. Interestingly, we show that RC-101 is effective against two enfuvirtide-resistant mutants, demonstrating the clinical importance of RC-101 as a unique fusion inhibitor. These findings both expand our understanding of HIV drug-resistance to diverse peptide fusion inhibitors and emphasize the significance of compensatory gp41 mutations.

  3. Cell-based analysis of Chikungunya virus E1 protein in membrane fusion

    Kuo Szu-Cheng

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chikungunya fever is a pandemic disease caused by the mosquito-borne Chikungunya virus (CHIKV. E1 glycoprotein mediation of viral membrane fusion during CHIKV infection is a crucial step in the release of viral genome into the host cytoplasm for replication. How the E1 structure determines membrane fusion and whether other CHIKV structural proteins participate in E1 fusion activity remain largely unexplored. Methods A bicistronic baculovirus expression system to produce recombinant baculoviruses for cell-based assay was used. Sf21 insect cells infected by recombinant baculoviruses bearing wild type or single-amino-acid substitution of CHIKV E1 and EGFP (enhanced green fluorescence protein were employed to investigate the roles of four E1 amino acid residues (G91, V178, A226, and H230 in membrane fusion activity. Results Western blot analysis revealed that the E1 expression level and surface features in wild type and mutant substituted cells were similar. However, cell fusion assay found that those cells infected by CHIKV E1-H230A mutant baculovirus showed little fusion activity, and those bearing CHIKV E1-G91D mutant completely lost the ability to induce cell-cell fusion. Cells infected by recombinant baculoviruses of CHIKV E1-A226V and E1-V178A mutants exhibited the same membrane fusion capability as wild type. Although the E1 expression level of cells bearing monomeric-E1-based constructs (expressing E1 only was greater than that of cells bearing 26S-based constructs (expressing all structural proteins, the sizes of syncytial cells induced by infection of baculoviruses containing 26S-based constructs were larger than those from infections having monomeric-E1 constructs, suggesting that other viral structure proteins participate or regulate E1 fusion activity. Furthermore, membrane fusion in cells infected by baculovirus bearing the A226V mutation constructs exhibited increased cholesterol-dependences and lower pH thresholds

  4. Membrane fusion by VAMP3 and plasma membrane t-SNAREs

    Pairing of SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor) proteins on vesicles (v-SNAREs) and SNARE proteins on target membranes (t-SNAREs) mediates intracellular membrane fusion. VAMP3/cellubrevin is a v-SNARE that resides in recycling endosomes and endosome-derived transport vesicles. VAMP3 has been implicated in recycling of transferrin receptors, secretion of α-granules in platelets, and membrane trafficking during cell migration. Using a cell fusion assay, we examined membrane fusion capacity of the ternary complexes formed by VAMP3 and plasma membrane t-SNAREs syntaxin1, syntaxin4, SNAP-23 and SNAP-25. VAMP3 forms fusogenic pairing with t-SNARE complexes syntaxin1/SNAP-25, syntaxin1/SNAP-23 and syntaxin4/SNAP-25, but not with syntaxin4/SNAP-23. Deletion of the N-terminal domain of syntaxin4 enhanced membrane fusion more than two fold, indicating that the N-terminal domain negatively regulates membrane fusion. Differential membrane fusion capacities of the ternary v-/t-SNARE complexes suggest that transport vesicles containing VAMP3 have distinct membrane fusion kinetics with domains of the plasma membrane that present different t-SNARE proteins

  5. Herpesvirus glycoproteins undergo multiple antigenic changes before membrane fusion.

    Daniel L Glauser

    Full Text Available Herpesvirus entry is a complicated process involving multiple virion glycoproteins and culminating in membrane fusion. Glycoprotein conformation changes are likely to play key roles. Studies of recombinant glycoproteins have revealed some structural features of the virion fusion machinery. However, how the virion glycoproteins change during infection remains unclear. Here using conformation-specific monoclonal antibodies we show in situ that each component of the Murid Herpesvirus-4 (MuHV-4 entry machinery--gB, gH/gL and gp150--changes in antigenicity before tegument protein release begins. Further changes then occurred upon actual membrane fusion. Thus virions revealed their final fusogenic form only in late endosomes. The substantial antigenic differences between this form and that of extracellular virions suggested that antibodies have only a limited opportunity to block virion membrane fusion.

  6. The dengue virus type 2 envelope protein fusion peptide is essential for membrane fusion

    The flaviviral envelope (E) protein directs virus-mediated membrane fusion. To investigate membrane fusion as a requirement for virus growth, we introduced 27 unique mutations into the fusion peptide of an infectious cDNA clone of dengue 2 virus and recovered seven stable mutant viruses. The fusion efficiency of the mutants was impaired, demonstrating for the first time the requirement for specific FP AAs in optimal fusion. Mutant viruses exhibited different growth kinetics and/or genetic stabilities in different cell types and adult mosquitoes. Virus particles could be recovered following RNA transfection of cells with four lethal mutants; however, recovered viruses could not re-infect cells. These viruses could enter cells, but internalized virus appeared to be retained in endosomal compartments of infected cells, thus suggesting a fusion blockade. Mutations of the FP also resulted in reduced virus reactivity with flavivirus group-reactive antibodies, confirming earlier reports using virus-like particles.

  7. The effect of acute microgravity on mechanically-induced membrane damage and membrane-membrane fusion events

    Clarke, M. S.; Vanderburg, C. R.; Feeback, D. L.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Although it is unclear how a living cell senses gravitational forces there is no doubt that perturbation of the gravitational environment results in profound alterations in cellular function. In the present study, we have focused our attention on how acute microgravity exposure during parabolic flight affects the skeletal muscle cell plasma membrane (i.e. sarcolemma), with specific reference to a mechanically-reactive signaling mechanism known as mechanically-induced membrane disruption or "wounding". Both membrane rupture and membrane resealing events mediated by membrane-membrane fusion characterize this response. We here present experimental evidence that acute microgravity exposure can inhibit membrane-membrane fusion events essential for the resealing of sarcolemmal wounds in individual human myoblasts. Additional evidence to support this contention comes from experimental studies that demonstrate acute microgravity exposure also inhibits secretagogue-stimulated intracellular vesicle fusion with the plasma membrane in HL-60 cells. Based on our own observations and those of other investigators in a variety of ground-based models of membrane wounding and membrane-membrane fusion, we suggest that the disruption in the membrane resealing process observed during acute microgravity is consistent with a microgravity-induced decrease in membrane order.

  8. Molecular View of the Role of Fusion Peptides in Promoting Positive Membrane Curvature

    Fuhrmans, Marc; Marrink, Siewert J.

    2012-01-01

    Fusion peptides are moderately hydrophobic segments of viral and nonviral membrane fusion proteins that enable these proteins to fuse two closely apposed biological membranes. In vitro assays furthermore show that even isolated fusion peptides alone can support membrane fusion in model systems. In a

  9. ITER activities and fusion technology

    At the 21st IAEA Fusion Energy Conference, 68 and 67 papers were presented in the categories of ITER activities and fusion technology, respectively. ITER performance prediction, results of technology R and D and the construction preparation provide good confidence in ITER realization. The superconducting tokamak EAST achieved the first plasma just before the conference. The construction of other new experimental machines has also shown steady progress. Future reactor studies stress the importance of down sizing and a steady-state approach. Reactor technology in the field of blanket including the ITER TBM programme and materials for the demonstration power plant showed sound progress in both R and D and design activities

  10. Two coiled-coil domains of Chlamydia trachomatis IncA affect membrane fusion events during infection.

    Erik Ronzone

    Full Text Available Chlamydia trachomatis replicates in a parasitophorous membrane-bound compartment called an inclusion. The inclusions corrupt host vesicle trafficking networks to avoid the degradative endolysosomal pathway but promote fusion with each other in order to sustain higher bacterial loads in a process known as homotypic fusion. The Chlamydia protein IncA (Inclusion protein A appears to play central roles in both these processes as it participates to homotypic fusion and inhibits endocytic SNARE-mediated membrane fusion. How IncA selectively inhibits or activates membrane fusion remains poorly understood. In this study, we analyzed the spatial and molecular determinants of IncA's fusogenic and inhibitory functions. Using a cell-free membrane fusion assay, we found that inhibition of SNARE-mediated fusion requires IncA to be on the same membrane as the endocytic SNARE proteins. IncA displays two coiled-coil domains showing high homology with SNARE proteins. Domain swap and deletion experiments revealed that although both these domains are capable of independently inhibiting SNARE-mediated fusion, these two coiled-coil domains cooperate in mediating IncA multimerization and homotypic membrane interaction. Our results support the hypothesis that Chlamydia employs SNARE-like virulence factors that positively and negatively affect membrane fusion and promote infection.

  11. Molecular View of the Role of Fusion Peptides in Promoting Positive Membrane Curvature

    Fuhrmans, Marc; Marrink, Siewert J.

    2012-01-01

    Fusion peptides are moderately hydrophobic segments of viral and nonviral membrane fusion proteins that enable these proteins to fuse two closely apposed biological membranes. In vitro assays furthermore show that even isolated fusion peptides alone can support membrane fusion in model systems. In addition, the fusion peptides have a distinct effect on the phase diagram of lipid mixtures. Here, we present molecular dynamics simulations investigating the effect of a particular fusion peptide, ...

  12. Flavivirus cell entry and membrane fusion

    Smit, Jolanda M.; Moesker, Bastiaan; Rodenhuis-Zybert, Izabela; Wilschut, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Flaviviruses, such as dengue virus and West Nile virus, are enveloped viruses that infect cells through receptor-mediated endocytosis and fusion from within acidic endosomes. The cell entry process of flaviviruses is mediated by the viral E glycoprotein. This short review will address recent advance

  13. Protection of immunocompromised mice against lethal infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa by active or passive immunization with recombinant P. aeruginosa outer membrane protein F and outer membrane protein I fusion proteins.

    von Specht, B U; Knapp, B.; Muth, G; Bröker, M.; Hungerer, K D; Diehl, K D; Massarrat, K; Seemann, A; Domdey, H

    1995-01-01

    Recombinant outer membrane proteins (Oprs) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were expressed in Escherichia coli as glutathione S-transferase (GST)-linked fusion proteins. GST-linked Oprs F and I (GST-OprF190-350 [GST linked to OprF spanning amino acids 190 to 350] and GST-OprI21-83, respectively) and recombinant hybrid Oprs (GST-OprF190-342-OprI21-83 and GST-OprI21-83-OprF190-350) were isolated and tested for their efficacy as vaccines in immunodeficient mice. GST-OprF-OprI protected the mice against...

  14. The destructive effect of botulinum neurotoxins on the SNARE protein: SNAP-25 and synaptic membrane fusion

    Bin Lu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Synaptic exocytosis requires the assembly of syntaxin 1A and SNAP-25 on the plasma membrane and synaptobrevin 2 (VAMP2 on the vesicular membrane to bridge the two opposite membranes. It is believed that the three SNARE proteins assemble in steps along the dynamic assembly pathway. The C-terminus of SNAP-25 is known to be the target of botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT/A and BoNT/E that block neurotransmitters release in vivo. In this study, we employed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR spectroscopy to investigate the conformation of the SNAP-25 C-terminus in binary and ternary SNARE complexes. The fluorescence lipid mixing assay shows that the C-terminal of SNAP-25 is essential for membrane fusion, and that the truncated SNAP-25 mutants cleaved by BoNT/A and BoNT/E display different inhibition effects on membrane fusion: SNAP-25E (Δ26 abolishes the fusion activity of the SNARE complex, while SNAP-25A (Δ9 loses most of its function, although it can still form a SDS-resistant SNARE complex as the wild-type SNAP-25. CW-EPR spectra validate the unstable structures of the SNARE complex formed by SNAP-25 mutants. We propose that the truncated SNAP-25 mutants will disrupt the assembly of the SNARE core complex, and then inhibit the synaptic membrane fusion accordingly.

  15. Membrane Bending Energy and Fusion Pore Kinetics in Ca2+-Triggered Exocytosis

    Zhang, Zhen; Jackson, Meyer B.

    2010-01-01

    A fusion pore composed of lipid is an obligatory kinetic intermediate of membrane fusion, and its formation requires energy to bend membranes into highly curved shapes. The energetics of such deformations in viral fusion is well established, but the role of membrane bending in Ca2+-triggered exocytosis remains largely untested. Amperometry recording showed that during exocytosis in chromaffin and PC12 cells, fusion pores formed by smaller vesicles dilated more rapidly than fusion pores formed...

  16. Amino Acid Sequence Requirements of the Transmembrane and Cytoplasmic Domains of Influenza Virus Hemagglutinin for Viable Membrane Fusion

    Melikyan, Grigory B.; Lin, Sasa; Roth, Michael G.; Cohen, Fredric S.

    1999-01-01

    The amino acid sequence requirements of the transmembrane (TM) domain and cytoplasmic tail (CT) of the hemagglutinin (HA) of influenza virus in membrane fusion have been investigated. Fusion properties of wild-type HA were compared with those of chimeras consisting of the ectodomain of HA and the TM domain and/or CT of polyimmunoglobulin receptor, a nonviral integral membrane protein. The presence of a CT was not required for fusion. But when a TM domain and CT were present, fusion activity w...

  17. Importin β Negatively Regulates Nuclear Membrane Fusion and Nuclear Pore Complex Assembly

    Harel, Amnon; Chan, Rene C.; Lachish-Zalait, Aurelie; Zimmerman, Ella; Elbaum, Michael; Forbes, Douglass J.

    2003-01-01

    Assembly of a eukaryotic nucleus involves three distinct events: membrane recruitment, fusion to form a double nuclear membrane, and nuclear pore complex (NPC) assembly. We report that importin β negatively regulates two of these events, membrane fusion and NPC assembly. When excess importin β is added to a full Xenopus nuclear reconstitution reaction, vesicles are recruited to chromatin but their fusion is blocked. The importin β down-regulation of membrane fusion is Ran-GTP reversible. Inde...

  18. Tri-membrane nanoparticles produced by combining liposome fusion and a novel patchwork of bicelles to overcome endosomal and nuclear membrane barriers to cargo delivery.

    Yamada, Asako; Mitsueda, Asako; Hasan, Mahadi; Ueda, Miho; Hama, Susumu; Warashina, Shota; Nakamura, Takashi; Harashima, Hideyoshi; Kogure, Kentaro

    2016-02-23

    Membrane fusion is a rational strategy for crossing intracellular membranes that present barriers to liposomal nanocarrier-mediated delivery of plasmid DNA into the nucleus of non-dividing cells, such as dendritic cells. Based on this strategy, we previously developed nanocarriers consisting of a nucleic acid core particle coated with four lipid membranes [Akita, et al., Biomaterials, 2009, 30, 2940-2949]. However, including the endosomal membrane and two nuclear membranes, cells possess three intracellular membranous barriers. Thus, after entering the nucleus, nanoparticles coated with four membranes would still have one lipid membrane remaining, and could impede cargo delivery. Until now, coating a core particle with an odd number of lipid membranes was challenging. To produce nanocarriers with an odd number of lipid membranes, we developed a novel coating method involving lipid nano-discs, also known as bicelles, as a material for packaging DNA in a carrier with an odd number of lipid membranes. In this procedure, bicelles fuse to form an outer coating that resembles a patchwork quilt, which allows the preparation of nanoparticles coated with only three lipid membranes. Moreover, the transfection activity of dendritic cells with these three-membrane nanoparticles was higher than that for nanoparticles coated with four lipid membranes. In summary, we developed novel nanoparticles coated with an odd number of lipid membranes using the novel "patchwork-packaging method" to deliver plasmid DNA into the nucleus via membrane fusion. PMID:26667208

  19. Shear-Induced Membrane Fusion in Viscous Solutions

    Kogan, Maxim

    2014-05-06

    Large unilamellar lipid vesicles do not normally fuse under fluid shear stress. They might deform and open pores to relax the tension to which they are exposed, but membrane fusion occurring solely due to shear stress has not yet been reported. We present evidence that shear forces in a viscous solution can induce lipid bilayer fusion. The fusion of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3- phosphocholine (DOPC) liposomes is observed in Couette flow with shear rates above 3000 s-1 provided that the medium is viscous enough. Liposome samples, prepared at different viscosities using a 0-50 wt % range of sucrose concentration, were studied by dynamic light scattering, lipid fusion assays using Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET), and linear dichroism (LD) spectroscopy. Liposomes in solutions with 40 wt % (or more) sucrose showed lipid fusion under shear forces. These results support the hypothesis that under suitable conditions lipid membranes may fuse in response to mechanical-force- induced stress. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  20. Conflicting views on the membrane fusion machinery and the fusion pore

    Sørensen, Jakob B

    2009-01-01

    of the assembly of the fusogenic SNARE-complex. Here, I review conflicting views on the function of the core fusion machinery consisting of the SNAREs, Munc18, complexin, and synaptotagmin. Munc18 controls docking of vesicles to the plasma membrane and initial SNARE-complex assembly, whereas complexin...

  1. Towards fully automated Identification of Vesicle-Membrane Fusion Events in TIRF Microscopy

    Vallotton, Pascal; James, David E.; Hughes, William E.

    2007-11-01

    Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy (TIRFM) is imposing itself as the tool of choice for studying biological activity in close proximity to the plasma membrane. For example, the exquisite selectivity of TIRFM allows monitoring the diffusion of GFP-phogrin vesicles and their recruitment to the plasma membrane in pancreatic β-cells. We present a novel computer vision system for automatically identifying the elusive fusion events of GFP-phogrin vesicles with the plasma membrane. Our method is based on robust object tracking and matched filtering. It should accelerate the quantification of TIRFM data and allow the extraction of more biological information from image data to support research in diabetes and obesity.

  2. Reversible Merger of Membranes at the Early Stage of Influenza Hemagglutinin-mediated Fusion

    Leikina, Eugenia; Chernomordik, Leonid V.

    2000-01-01

    Fusion mediated by influenza hemagglutinin (HA), a prototype fusion protein, is commonly detected as lipid and content mixing between fusing cells. Decreasing the surface density of fusion-competent HA inhibited these advanced fusion phenotypes and allowed us to identify an early stage of fusion at physiological temperature. Although lipid flow between membranes was restricted, the contacting membrane monolayers were apparently transiently connected, as detected by the transformation of this ...

  3. The Gaussian Curvature Elastic Energy of Intermediates in Membrane Fusion

    Siegel, David P.

    2008-01-01

    The Gaussian curvature elastic energy contribution to the energy of membrane fusion intermediates has usually been neglected because the Gaussian curvature elastic modulus, κ, was unknown. It is now possible to measure κ for phospholipids that form bicontinuous inverted cubic (QII) phases. Here, it is shown that one can estimate κ for lipids that do not form QII phases by studying the phase behavior of lipid mixtures. The method is used to estimate κ for several lipid compositions in excess w...

  4. Membrane interaction and structure of the transmembrane domain of influenza hemagglutinin and its fusion peptide complex

    Lin Chi-Hui

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To study the organization and interaction with the fusion domain (or fusion peptide, FP of the transmembrane domain (TMD of influenza virus envelope glycoprotein for its role in membrane fusion which is also essential in the cellular trafficking of biomolecules and sperm-egg fusion. Results The fluorescence and gel electrophoresis experiments revealed a tight self-assembly of TMD in the model membrane. A weak but non-random interaction between TMD and FP in the membrane was found. In the complex, the central TMD oligomer was packed by FP in an antiparallel fashion. FP insertion into the membrane was altered by binding to TMD. An infrared study exhibited an enhanced membrane perturbation by the complex formation. A model was built to illustrate the role of TMD in the late stages of influenza virus-mediated membrane fusion reaction. Conclusion The TMD oligomer anchors the fusion protein in the membrane with minimal destabilization to the membrane. Upon associating with FP, the complex exerts a synergistic effect on the membrane perturbation. This effect is likely to contribute to the complete membrane fusion during the late phase of fusion protein-induced fusion cascade. The results presented in the work characterize the nature of the interaction of TMD with the membrane and TMD in a complex with FP in the steps leading to pore initiation and dilation during virus-induced fusion. Our data and proposed fusion model highlight the key role of TMD-FP interaction and have implications on the fusion reaction mediated by other type I viral fusion proteins. Understanding the molecular mechanism of membrane fusion may assist in the design of anti-viral drugs.

  5. Regulation of membrane fusion and secretory events in the sea urchin embryo

    Membrane fusion and secretory events play a key role in fertilization and early development in the sea urchin embryo. To investigate the mechanism of membrane fusion, the effect of inhibitors of metalloendoprotease activity was studied on two model systems of cell fusion; fertilization and spiculogenesis by primary mesenchyme cells in the embryo. Both the zinc chelator, 1,10-phenanthroline, and peptide metalloprotease substrates were found to inhibit both fertilization and gamete fusion, while peptides that are not substrates of metalloproteases did not affect either process. Primary mesenchyme cells form the larval skeleton in the embryo by deposition of mineral and an organic matrix into a syncytial cavity formed by fusion of filopodia of these cells. Metalloprotease inhibitors were found to inhibit spiculogenesis both in vivo and in cultures of isolated primary mesenchyme cells, and the activity of a metalloprotease of the appropriate specificity was found in the primary mesenchyme cells. These two studies implicate the activity of a metalloprotease in a necessary step in membrane fusion. Following fertilization, exocytosis of the cortical granules results in the formation of the fertilization envelope and the hyaline layer, that surround the developing embryo. The hatching enzyme is secreted by the blastula stage sea urchin embryo, which proteolyzes the fertilization envelope surrounding the embryo, allowing the embryo to hatch. Using an assay that measures 125I-fertilization envelope degradation, the hatching enzyme was identified as a 33 kDa metalloprotease, and was purified by ion-exchange and affinity chromatography from the hatching media of Strongylocentrotus purpuratus embryos. The hatching enzyme showed a substrate preference for only a minor subset of fertilization envelope proteins

  6. Viral membrane fusion: is glycoprotein G of rhabdoviruses a representative of a new class of viral fusion proteins?

    A.T. Da Poian

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Enveloped viruses always gain entry into the cytoplasm by fusion of their lipid envelope with a cell membrane. Some enveloped viruses fuse directly with the host cell plasma membrane after virus binding to the cell receptor. Other enveloped viruses enter the cells by the endocytic pathway, and fusion depends on the acidification of the endosomal compartment. In both cases, virus-induced membrane fusion is triggered by conformational changes in viral envelope glycoproteins. Two different classes of viral fusion proteins have been described on the basis of their molecular architecture. Several structural data permitted the elucidation of the mechanisms of membrane fusion mediated by class I and class II fusion proteins. In this article, we review a number of results obtained by our laboratory and by others that suggest that the mechanisms involved in rhabdovirus fusion are different from those used by the two well-studied classes of viral glycoproteins. We focus our discussion on the electrostatic nature of virus binding and interaction with membranes, especially through phosphatidylserine, and on the reversibility of the conformational changes of the rhabdovirus glycoprotein involved in fusion. Taken together, these data suggest the existence of a third class of fusion proteins and support the idea that new insights should emerge from studies of membrane fusion mediated by the G protein of rhabdoviruses. In particular, the elucidation of the three-dimensional structure of the G protein or even of the fusion peptide at different pH's might provide valuable information for understanding the fusion mechanism of this new class of fusion proteins.

  7. Low activation materials for fusion

    The viability of fusion as a future energy source may eventually be determined by safety and environmental factors. Control of the induced radioactivity characteristics of the materials used in the first wall and blanket could have a major favorable impact on these issues. In the United States, materials program efforts are focused on developing new structural alloys with radioactive decay characteristics which would greatly simplify long-term waste disposal of reactor components. A range of alloy systems is being explored in order to maintain the maximum number of design options. Significant progress has been made, and it now appears probable that reduced-activation engineering alloys with properties at least equivalent to conventional alloys can be successfully developed and commercialized. 10 refs., 1 fig

  8. Mutations in the DI-DII Linker of Human Parainfluenza Virus Type 3 Fusion Protein Result in Diminished Fusion Activity.

    Wenyan Xie

    Full Text Available Human parainfluenza virus type 3 (HPIV3 can cause severe respiratory tract diseases in infants and young children, but no licensed vaccines or antiviral agents are currently available for treatment. Fusing the viral and target cell membranes is a prerequisite for its entry into host cells and is directly mediated by the fusion (F protein. Although several domains of F are known to have important effects on regulating the membrane fusion activity, the roles of the DI-DII linker (residues 369-374 of the HPIV3 F protein in the fusogenicity still remains ill-defined. To facilitate our understanding of the role of this domain might play in F-induced cell-cell fusion, nine single mutations were engineered into this domain by site-directed mutagenesis. A vaccinia virus-T7 RNA polymerase transient expression system was employed to express the wild-type or mutated F proteins. These mutants were analyzed for membrane fusion activity, cell surface expression, and interaction between F and HN protein. Each of the mutated F proteins in this domain has a cell surface expression level similar to that of wild-type F. All of them resulted in a significant reduction in fusogenic activity in all steps of membrane fusion. Furthermore, all these fusion-deficient mutants reduced the amount of the HN-F complexes at the cell surface. Together, the results of our work suggest that this region has an important effect on the fusogenic activity of F.

  9. An Ion Switch Regulates Fusion of Charged Membranes

    Siepi, Evgenios; Lutz, Silke; Meyer, Sylke; Panzner, Steffen

    2011-01-01

    Here we identify the recruitment of solvent ions to lipid membranes as the dominant regulator of lipid phase behavior. Our data demonstrate that binding of counterions to charged lipids promotes the formation of lamellar membranes, whereas their absence can induce fusion. The mechanism applies to anionic and cationic liposomes, as well as the recently introduced amphoteric liposomes. In the latter, an additional pH-dependent lipid salt formation between anionic and cationic lipids must occur, as indicated by the depletion of membrane-bound ions in a zone around pH 5. Amphoteric liposomes fuse under these conditions but form lamellar structures at both lower and higher pH values. The integration of these observations into the classic lipid shape theory yielded a quantitative link between lipid and solvent composition and the physical state of the lipid assembly. The key parameter of the new model, κ(pH), describes the membrane phase behavior of charged membranes in response to their ion loading in a quantitative way. PMID:21575575

  10. Membrane technologies for tritium recovering in the fusion fuel cycle

    Palladium and palladium-silver permeators have been obtained by coating porous ceramic tubes with a thin metal layer. Three coating techniques have been studied and characterized: sputtering, chemical electroless deposition and cold-rolling. The Pd-Ag membranes obtained by cold-rolling and annealing of thin metal foils have shown complete hydrogen selectivity and chemical and physical stability meeting the requirements of the fuel cycle applications. These rolled membranes have been tested at 300-400 deg. C with a hydrogen transmembrane pressure in the range of 100-280 kPa and hydrogen flow rates up to 2.5x10-6m3/s. By filling the Pd-Ag membranes with a catalyst selective for the water gas shift reaction, membrane reactors have been obtained for recovering hydrogen isotopes in elemental form from tritiated water. Particularly, a closed-loop process based on a Pd-Ag membrane reactor has been studied for the tritium recovery system of an ITER scale fusion reactor. (author)

  11. β2 Adrenergic Receptor Fluorescent Protein Fusions Traffic to the Plasma Membrane and Retain Functionality

    Bubnell, Jaclyn; Pfister, Patrick; Sapar, Maria L.; Rogers, Matthew E.; Feinstein, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) has proven useful for the study of protein interactions and dynamics for the last twenty years. A variety of new fluorescent proteins have been developed that expand the use of available excitation spectra. We have undertaken an analysis of seven of the most useful fluorescent proteins (XFPs), Cerulean (and mCerulean3), Teal, GFP, Venus, mCherry and TagRFP657, as fusions to the archetypal G-protein coupled receptor, the β2 adrenergic receptor (β2AR). We have characterized these β2AR::XFP fusions in respect to membrane trafficking and G-protein activation. We noticed that in the mouse neural cell line, OP 6, that membrane bound β2AR::XFP fusions robustly localized in the filopodia identical to gap::XFP fusions. All β2AR::XFP fusions show responses indistinguishable from each other and the non-fused form after isoprenaline exposure. Our results provide a platform by which G-protein coupled receptors can be dissected for their functionality. PMID:24086401

  12. Insulin-stimulated plasma membrane fusion of Glut4 glucose transporter-containing vesicles is regulated by phospholipase D1.

    Huang, Ping; Altshuller, Yelena M; Hou, June Chunqiu; Pessin, Jeffrey E; Frohman, Michael A

    2005-06-01

    Insulin stimulates glucose uptake in fat and muscle by mobilizing Glut4 glucose transporters from intracellular membrane storage sites to the plasma membrane. This process requires the trafficking of Glut4-containing vesicles toward the cell periphery, docking at exocytic sites, and plasma membrane fusion. We show here that phospholipase D (PLD) production of the lipid phosphatidic acid (PA) is a key event in the fusion process. PLD1 is found on Glut4-containing vesicles, is activated by insulin signaling, and traffics with Glut4 to exocytic sites. Increasing PLD1 activity facilitates glucose uptake, whereas decreasing PLD1 activity is inhibitory. Diminished PA production does not substantially hinder trafficking of the vesicles or their docking at the plasma membrane, but it does impede fusion-mediated extracellular exposure of the transporter. The fusion block caused by RNA interference-mediated PLD1 deficiency is rescued by exogenous provision of a lipid that promotes fusion pore formation and expansion, suggesting that the step regulated by PA is late in the process of vesicle fusion. PMID:15772157

  13. The SI strain of measles virus derived from a patient with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis possesses typical genome alterations and unique amino acid changes that modulate receptor specificity and reduce membrane fusion activity.

    Seki, Fumio; Yamada, Kentaro; Nakatsu, Yuichiro; Okamura, Koji; Yanagi, Yusuke; Nakayama, Tetsuo; Komase, Katsuhiro; Takeda, Makoto

    2011-11-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) is a fatal sequela associated with measles and is caused by persistent infection of the brain with measles virus (MV). The SI strain was isolated in 1976 from a patient with SSPE and shows neurovirulence in animals. Genome nucleotide sequence analyses showed that the SI strain genome possesses typical genome alterations for SSPE-derived strains, namely, accumulated amino acid substitutions in the M protein and cytoplasmic tail truncation of the F protein. Through the establishment of an efficient reverse genetics system, a recombinant SI strain expressing a green fluorescent protein (rSI-AcGFP) was generated. The infection of various cell types with rSI-AcGFP was evaluated by fluorescence microscopy. rSI-AcGFP exhibited limited syncytium-forming activity and spread poorly in cells. Analyses using a recombinant MV possessing a chimeric genome between those of the SI strain and a wild-type MV strain indicated that the membrane-associated protein genes (M, F, and H) were responsible for the altered growth phenotype of the SI strain. Functional analyses of viral glycoproteins showed that the F protein of the SI strain exhibited reduced fusion activity because of an E300G substitution and that the H protein of the SI strain used CD46 efficiently but used the original MV receptors on immune and epithelial cells poorly because of L482F, S546G, and F555L substitutions. The data obtained in the present study provide a new platform for analyses of SSPE-derived strains as well as a clear example of an SSPE-derived strain that exhibits altered receptor specificity and limited fusion activity. PMID:21917959

  14. Insulin-stimulated Plasma Membrane Fusion of Glut4 Glucose Transporter-containing Vesicles Is Regulated by Phospholipase D1D⃞

    Huang, Ping; Altshuller, Yelena M.; Hou, June Chunqiu; Jeffrey E Pessin; Frohman, Michael A.

    2005-01-01

    Insulin stimulates glucose uptake in fat and muscle by mobilizing Glut4 glucose transporters from intracellular membrane storage sites to the plasma membrane. This process requires the trafficking of Glut4-containing vesicles toward the cell periphery, docking at exocytic sites, and plasma membrane fusion. We show here that phospholipase D (PLD) production of the lipid phosphatidic acid (PA) is a key event in the fusion process. PLD1 is found on Glut4-containing vesicles, is activated by insu...

  15. Point-Like Protrusion as a Prestalk Intermediate in Membrane Fusion Pathway

    Efrat, Avishay; Chernomordik, Leonid V; Kozlov, Michael M.

    2007-01-01

    The widely accepted pathway of membrane fusion begins with the fusion stalk representing the initial intermediate of hemifusion. The lipid structures preceding hemifusion and their possible influence on fusion kinetics were not addressed. Here, we suggest the point-like protrusion as a prestalk fusion intermediate, which has energy lower than that of stalk and, therefore, does not limit the fusion rate. We demonstrate that by calculating the energy of the point-like protrusion, which depends ...

  16. Pathway of membrane fusion with two tension-dependent energy barriers

    Shillcock, Julian C.

    2007-01-01

    Fusion of bilayer membranes is studied via dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations. A new set of DPD parameters is introduced which leads to an energy barrier for flips of lipid molecules between adhering membranes. A large number of fusion events is monitored for a vesicle in contact...

  17. Trans-complex formation by proteolipid channels in the terminal phase of membrane fusion

    Peters, C; Bayer, M J; Bühler, S;

    2001-01-01

    SNAREs (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors) and Rab-GTPases, together with their cofactors, mediate the attachment step in the membrane fusion of vesicles. But how bilayer mixing--the subsequent core process of fusion--is catalysed remains unclear. Ca2+/calmodu......SNAREs (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors) and Rab-GTPases, together with their cofactors, mediate the attachment step in the membrane fusion of vesicles. But how bilayer mixing--the subsequent core process of fusion--is catalysed remains unclear. Ca2......+/calmodulin controls this terminal process in many intracellular fusion events. Here we identify V0, the membrane-integral sector of the vacuolar H+-ATPase, as a target of calmodulin on yeast vacuoles. Between docking and bilayer fusion, V0 sectors from opposing membranes form complexes. V0 trans...

  18. A host–guest system to study structure–function relationships of membrane fusion peptides

    Han, Xing; Tamm, Lukas K.

    2000-01-01

    We designed a host–guest fusion peptide system, which is completely soluble in water and has a high affinity for biological and lipid model membranes. The guest sequences are those of the fusion peptides of influenza hemagglutinin, which are solubilized by a highly charged unstructured C-terminal host sequence. These peptides partition to the surface of negatively charged liposomes or erythrocytes and elicit membrane fusion or hemolysis. They undergo a conformational ...

  19. Protein secretion by hybrid bacterial ABC-transporters: specific functions of the membrane ATPase and the membrane fusion protein.

    Binet, R; Wandersman, C

    1995-01-01

    The Erwinia chrysanthemi metalloprotease C and the Serratia marcescens haem acquisition protein HasA are both secreted from Gram-negative bacteria by a signal peptide-independent pathway which requires a C-terminal secretion signal and a specific ABC-transporter made up of three proteins: a membrane ATPase (the ABC-protein), a second inner membrane component belonging to the membrane fusion protein family and an outer membrane polypeptide. HasA and protease C transporters are homologous altho...

  20. Inhibition of HIV-1 endocytosis allows lipid mixing at the plasma membrane, but not complete fusion

    de la Vega Michelle

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We recently provided evidence that HIV-1 enters HeLa-derived TZM-bl and lymphoid CEMss cells by fusing with endosomes, whereas its fusion with the plasma membrane does not proceed beyond the lipid mixing step. The mechanism of restriction of HIV-1 fusion at the cell surface and/or the factors that aid the virus entry from endosomes remain unclear. Results We examined HIV-1 fusion with a panel of target cells lines and with primary CD4+ T cells. Kinetic measurements of fusion combined with time-resolved imaging of single viruses further reinforced the notion that HIV-1 enters the cells via endocytosis and fusion with endosomes. Furthermore, we attempted to deliberately redirect virus fusion to the plasma membrane, using two experimental strategies. First, the fusion reaction was synchronized by pre-incubating the viruses with cells at reduced temperature to allow CD4 and coreceptors engagement, but not the virus uptake or fusion. Subsequent shift to a physiological temperature triggered accelerated virus uptake followed by entry from endosomes, but did not permit fusion at the cell surface. Second, blocking HIV-1 endocytosis by a small-molecule dynamin inhibitor, dynasore, resulted in transfer of viral lipids to the plasma membrane without any detectable release of the viral content into the cytosol. We also found that a higher concentration of dynasore is required to block the HIV-endosome fusion compared to virus internalization. Conclusions Our results further support the notion that HIV-1 enters disparate cell types through fusion with endosomes. The block of HIV-1 fusion with the plasma membrane at a post-lipid mixing stage shows that this membrane is not conducive to fusion pore formation and/or enlargement. The ability of dynasore to interfere with the virus-endosome fusion suggests that dynamin could be involved in two distinct steps of HIV-1 entry - endocytosis and fusion within intracellular compartments.

  1. Influenza viral membrane fusion is sensitive to sterol concentration but surprisingly robust to sterol chemical identity.

    Zawada, Katarzyna E; Wrona, Dominik; Rawle, Robert J; Kasson, Peter M

    2016-01-01

    Influenza virions are enriched in cholesterol relative to the plasma membrane from which they bud. Previous work has shown that fusion between influenza virus and synthetic liposomes is sensitive to the amount of cholesterol in either the virus or the target membrane. Here, we test the chemical properties of cholesterol required to promote influenza fusion by replacing cholesterol with other sterols and assaying viral fusion kinetics. We find that influenza fusion with liposomes is surprisingly robust to sterol chemical identity, showing no significant dependence on sterol identity in target membranes for any of the sterols tested. In the viral membrane, lanosterol slowed fusion somewhat, while polar sterols produced a more pronounced slowing and inhibition of fusion. No other sterols tested showed a significant perturbation in fusion rates, including ones previously shown to alter membrane bending moduli or phase behavior. Although fusion rates depend on viral cholesterol, they thus do not require cholesterol's ability to support liquid-liquid phase coexistence. Using electron cryo-microscopy, we further find that sterol-dependent changes to hemagglutinin spatial patterning in the viral membrane do not require liquid-liquid phase coexistence. We therefore speculate that local sterol-hemagglutinin interactions in the viral envelope may control the rate-limiting step of fusion. PMID:27431907

  2. SNARE-mediated rapid lysosome fusion in membrane raft clustering and dysfunction of bovine coronary arterial endothelium

    Han, Wei-Qing; Xia, Min; Zhang, Chun; Zhang, Fan; Xu, Ming; Li, Ning-Jun; Li, Pin-Lan

    2011-01-01

    The present study attempted to evaluate whether soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNAREs) mediate lysosome fusion in response to death receptor activation and contribute to membrane raft (MR) clustering and consequent endothelial dysfunction in coronary arterial endothelial cells. By immunohistochemical analysis, vesicle-associated membrane proteins 2 (VAMP-2, vesicle-SNAREs) were found to be abundantly expressed in the endothelium of bovine coronary arte...

  3. The Fusion of Membranes and Vesicles: Pathway and Energy Barriers from Dissipative Particle Dynamics

    Grafmüller, Andrea; Shillcock, Julian; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2009-01-01

    The fusion of lipid bilayers is studied with dissipative particle dynamics simulations. First, to achieve control over membrane properties, the effects of individual simulation parameters are studied and optimized. Then, a large number of fusion events for a vesicle and a planar bilayer are simulated using the optimized parameter set. In the observed fusion pathway, configurations of individual lipids play an important role. Fusion starts with individual lipids assuming a splayed tail configu...

  4. HIV fusion peptide penetrates, disorders, and softens T-cell membrane mimics.

    Tristram-Nagle, Stephanie; Chan, Rob; Kooijman, Edgar; Uppamoochikkal, Pradeep; Qiang, Wei; Weliky, David P; Nagle, John F

    2010-09-10

    This work investigates the interaction of N-terminal gp41 fusion peptide (FP) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) with model membranes in order to elucidate how FP leads to fusion of HIV and T-cell membranes. FP constructs were (i) wild-type FP23 (23 N-terminal amino acids of gp41), (ii) water-soluble monomeric FP that adds six lysines on the C-terminus of FP23 (FPwsm), and (iii) the C-terminus covalently linked trimeric version (FPtri) of FPwsm. Model membranes were (i) LM3 (a T-cell mimic), (ii) 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, (iii) 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine/30 mol% cholesterol, (iv) 1,2-dierucoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, and (v) 1,2-dierucoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine/30 mol% cholesterol. Diffuse synchrotron low-angle x-ray scattering from fully hydrated samples, supplemented by volumetric data, showed that FP23 and FPtri penetrate into the hydrocarbon region and cause membranes to thin. Depth of penetration appears to depend upon a complex combination of factors including bilayer thickness, presence of cholesterol, and electrostatics. X-ray data showed an increase in curvature in hexagonal phase 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine, which further indicates that FP23 penetrates into the hydrocarbon region rather than residing in the interfacial headgroup region. Low-angle x-ray scattering data also yielded the bending modulus K(C), a measure of membrane stiffness, and wide-angle x-ray scattering yielded the S(xray) orientational order parameter. Both FP23 and FPtri decreased K(C) and S(xray) considerably, while the weak effect of FPwsm suggests that it did not partition strongly into LM3 model membranes. Our results are consistent with the HIV FP disordering and softening the T-cell membrane, thereby lowering the activation energy for viral membrane fusion. PMID:20655315

  5. Binding and Fusion of Extracellular Vesicles to the Plasma Membrane of Their Cell Targets.

    Prada, Ilaria; Meldolesi, Jacopo

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes and ectosomes, extracellular vesicles of two types generated by all cells at multivesicular bodies and the plasma membrane, respectively, play critical roles in physiology and pathology. A key mechanism of their function, analogous for both types of vesicles, is the fusion of their membrane to the plasma membrane of specific target cells, followed by discharge to the cytoplasm of their luminal cargo containing proteins, RNAs, and DNA. Here we summarize the present knowledge about the interactions, binding and fusions of vesicles with the cell plasma membrane. The sequence initiates with dynamic interactions, during which vesicles roll over the plasma membrane, followed by the binding of specific membrane proteins to their cell receptors. Membrane binding is then converted rapidly into fusion by mechanisms analogous to those of retroviruses. Specifically, proteins of the extracellular vesicle membranes are structurally rearranged, and their hydrophobic sequences insert into the target cell plasma membrane which undergoes lipid reorganization, protein restructuring and membrane dimpling. Single fusions are not the only process of vesicle/cell interactions. Upon intracellular reassembly of their luminal cargoes, vesicles can be regenerated, released and fused horizontally to other target cells. Fusions of extracellular vesicles are relevant also for specific therapy processes, now intensely investigated. PMID:27517914

  6. International program activities in magnetic fusion energy

    The following areas of our international activities in magnetic fusion are briefly described: (1) policy; (2) background; (3) strategy; (4) strategic considerations and concerns; (5) domestic program inplications, and (6) implementation. The current US activities are reviewed. Some of our present program needs are outlined

  7. Implication des peptides de fusion des glycoprotéines de fusion virales de classe I dans la fusion membranaire

    Brasseur R.; Charloteaux B.; Lins L.; Lorin A.

    2007-01-01

    The implication of fusion peptides of class I viral fusion glycoproteins in the membrane fusion. Viral infection involves fusion between the viral envelope and the target cell plasmic membrane. The fusion is induced by a glycoprotein anchored in the viral envelope. After activation, the glycoprotein undergoes a conformational change inducing the exposure of a region named « fusion peptide » essential for the fusion process. Studies on glycoproteins and on isolated fusion peptides have allowed...

  8. N-(3-Cyanophenyl)-2-phenylacetamide, an effective inhibitor of morbillivirus-induced membrane fusion with low cytotoxicity.

    Singethan, K; Hiltensperger, G; Kendl, S; Wohlfahrt, J; Plattet, P; Holzgrabe, U; Schneider-Schaulies, J

    2010-11-01

    Based on the structural similarity of viral fusion proteins within the family Paramyxoviridae, we tested recently described and newly synthesized acetanilide derivatives for their capacity to inhibit measles virus (MV)-, canine distemper virus (CDV)- and Nipah virus (NiV)-induced membrane fusion. We found that N-(3-cyanophenyl)-2-phenylacetamide (compound 1) has a high capacity to inhibit MV- and CDV-induced (IC(50) μM), but not NiV-induced, membrane fusion. This compound is of outstanding interest because it can be easily synthesized and its cytotoxicity is low [50 % cytotoxic concentration (CC(50)) ≥ 300 μM], leading to a CC(50)/IC(50) ratio of approximately 100. In addition, primary human peripheral blood lymphocytes and primary dog brain cell cultures (DBC) also tolerate high concentrations of compound 1. Infection of human PBMC with recombinant wild-type MV is inhibited by an IC(50) of approximately 20 μM. The cell-to-cell spread of recombinant wild-type CDV in persistently infected DBC can be nearly completely inhibited by compound 1 at 50 μM, indicating that the virus spread between brain cells is dependent on the activity of the viral fusion protein. Our findings demonstrate that this compound is a most applicable inhibitor of morbillivirus-induced membrane fusion in tissue culture experiments including highly sensitive primary cells. PMID:20685931

  9. Mitochondrial DNA mutations provoke dominant inhibition of mitochondrial inner membrane fusion.

    Cécile Sauvanet

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are highly dynamic organelles that continuously move, fuse and divide. Mitochondrial dynamics modulate overall mitochondrial morphology and are essential for the proper function, maintenance and transmission of mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA. We have investigated mitochondrial fusion in yeast cells with severe defects in oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS due to removal or various specific mutations of mtDNA. We find that, under fermentative conditions, OXPHOS deficient cells maintain normal levels of cellular ATP and ADP but display a reduced mitochondrial inner membrane potential. We demonstrate that, despite metabolic compensation by glycolysis, OXPHOS defects are associated to a selective inhibition of inner but not outer membrane fusion. Fusion inhibition was dominant and hampered the fusion of mutant mitochondria with wild-type mitochondria. Inhibition of inner membrane fusion was not systematically associated to changes of mitochondrial distribution and morphology, nor to changes in the isoform pattern of Mgm1, the major fusion factor of the inner membrane. However, inhibition of inner membrane fusion correlated with specific alterations of mitochondrial ultrastructure, notably with the presence of aligned and unfused inner membranes that are connected to two mitochondrial boundaries. The fusion inhibition observed upon deletion of OXPHOS related genes or upon removal of the entire mtDNA was similar to that observed upon introduction of point mutations in the mitochondrial ATP6 gene that are associated to neurogenic ataxia and retinitis pigmentosa (NARP or to maternally inherited Leigh Syndrome (MILS in humans. Our findings indicate that the consequences of mtDNA mutations may not be limited to OXPHOS defects but may also include alterations in mitochondrial fusion. Our results further imply that, in healthy cells, the dominant inhibition of fusion could mediate the exclusion of OXPHOS-deficient mitochondria from

  10. On the Fusion of Confucianism, Buddhism and Taoism in Chinese Cognitive Membrane

    Jiawei Geng; H. J. Cai

    2014-01-01

    The coexistence of Confucianism, Buddhism and Taoism in China is phenomenal through world cultural history, which was explained by putting emphasis on the particularity or complementarity of those three doctrines. We proposed that, Chinese long-term self-assertiveness demands and their evolution lead to enduring competitions among them and eventual fusion of them, within Chinese Cognitive Membrane. It is emphasized that Chinese Cognitive Membrane needs further fusion with spirits of modern sc...

  11. Membrane pumping technology for helium and hydrogen isotope separation in the fusion reactor

    Pistunovich, V.I. [Kurchatov Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation). NFI RRC; Pigarov, A.Yu. [Kurchatov Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation). NFI RRC; Busnyuk, A.O. [Bonch-Bruyevich University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Livshits, A.I. [Bonch-Bruyevich University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Notkin, M.E. [Bonch-Bruyevich University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Samartsev, A.A. [Bonch-Bruyevich University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Borisenko, K.L. [Efremov Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Darmogray, V.V. [Efremov Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Ershov, B.D. [Efremov Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Filippova, L.V. [Efremov Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Mudugin, B.G. [Efremov Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Odintsov, V.N. [Efremov Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Saksagansky, G.L. [Efremov Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Serebrennikov, D.V. [Efremov Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1995-03-01

    A gas pumping system for ITER, improved by implementation of superpermeable membranes for selective hydrogen isotope exhaust, is considered. A study of the pumping capability of a niobium membrane for a hydrogen-helium mixture has been performed.Monte Carlo simulations of gas behaviour for the experimental facility and fusion reactor have been done.The scheme of the ITER pumping system with the membranes and membrane pumping technology was considered. The conceptual study the membrane pump for the ITER was done. This work gives good prospects for the membrane pumping use in ITER to reduce the total inventory of tritium necessary for reactor operation. (orig.).

  12. Mitotic phosphorylation of VCIP135 blocks p97ATPase-mediated Golgi membrane fusion

    Totsukawa, Go; Matsuo, Ayaka; Kubota, Ayano; Taguchi, Yuya; Kondo, Hisao, E-mail: hk228@med.kyushu-u.ac.jp

    2013-04-05

    Highlights: •VCIP135 is mitotically phosphorylated on Threonine-760 and Serine-767 by Cdc2. •Phosphorylated VCIP135 does not bind to p97ATPase. •The phosphorylation of VCIP135 inhibits p97ATPase-mediated Golgi membrane fusion. -- Abstract: In mammals, the Golgi apparatus is disassembled early mitosis and reassembled at the end of mitosis. For Golgi disassembly, membrane fusion needs to be blocked. Golgi biogenesis requires two distinct p97ATPase-mediated membrane fusion, the p97/p47 and p97/p37 pathways. We previously reported that p47 phosphorylation on Serine-140 and p37 phosphorylation on Serine-56 and Threonine-59 result in mitotic inhibition of the p97/p47 and the p97/p37 pathways, respectively [11,14]. In this study, we show another mechanism of mitotic inhibition of p97-mediated Golgi membrane fusion. We clarified that VCIP135, an essential factor in both p97 membrane fusion pathways, is phosphorylated on Threonine-760 and Serine-767 by Cdc2 at mitosis and that this phosphorylated VCIP135 does not bind to p97. An in vitro Golgi reassembly assay revealed that VCIP135(T760E, S767E), which mimics mitotic phosphorylation, caused no cisternal regrowth. Our results indicate that the phosphorylation of VCIP135 on Threonine-760 and Serine-767 inhibits p97-mediated Golgi membrane fusion at mitosis.

  13. The structural dynamics of the flavivirus fusion peptide-membrane interaction.

    Ygara S Mendes

    Full Text Available Membrane fusion is a crucial step in flavivirus infections and a potential target for antiviral strategies. Lipids and proteins play cooperative roles in the fusion process, which is triggered by the acidic pH inside the endosome. This acidic environment induces many changes in glycoprotein conformation and allows the action of a highly conserved hydrophobic sequence, the fusion peptide (FP. Despite the large volume of information available on the virus-triggered fusion process, little is known regarding the mechanisms behind flavivirus-cell membrane fusion. Here, we evaluated the contribution of a natural single amino acid difference on two flavivirus FPs, FLA(G ((98DRGWGNGCGLFGK(110 and FLA(H ((98DRGWGNHCGLFGK(110, and investigated the role of the charge of the target membrane on the fusion process. We used an in silico approach to simulate the interaction of the FPs with a lipid bilayer in a complementary way and used spectroscopic approaches to collect conformation information. We found that both peptides interact with neutral and anionic micelles, and molecular dynamics (MD simulations showed the interaction of the FPs with the lipid bilayer. The participation of the indole ring of Trp appeared to be important for the anchoring of both peptides in the membrane model, as indicated by MD simulations and spectroscopic analyses. Mild differences between FLA(G and FLA(H were observed according to the pH and the charge of the target membrane model. The MD simulations of the membrane showed that both peptides adopted a bend structure, and an interaction between the aromatic residues was strongly suggested, which was also observed by circular dichroism in the presence of micelles. As the FPs of viral fusion proteins play a key role in the mechanism of viral fusion, understanding the interactions between peptides and membranes is crucial for medical science and biology and may contribute to the design of new antiviral drugs.

  14. Class II fusion protein of alphaviruses drives membrane fusion through the same pathway as class I proteins

    Zaitseva, Elena; Mittal, Aditya; Griffin, Diane E.; Chernomordik, Leonid V.

    2005-01-01

    Viral fusion proteins of classes I and II differ radically in their initial structures but refold toward similar conformations upon activation. Do fusion pathways mediated by alphavirus E1 and influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) that exemplify classes II and I differ to reflect the difference in their initial conformations, or concur to reflect the similarity in the final conformations? Here, we dissected the pathway of low pH–triggered E1-mediated cell–cell fusion by reducing the numbers of a...

  15. Synthesis of CDP-diacylglycerol by rat liver rough microsomes as visualized by electron microscopic autoradiography: Relationship to GTP-stimulated membrane fusion

    Following conditions of incubation for the analysis of liponucleotide synthesis, we compared GTP-dependent formation of CDP-diacylglycerol (CDP-DG) and membrane fusion in RNA-depleted rough microsomes from rat liver. After incubation of stripped rough microsomes (SRM) in the presence of GTP and [5-3H]-CTP, radioactivity was recovered in lipid extracts and identified by thin-layer chromatography as a single spot which co-migrated with CDP-DG. The nucleotide requirement for CDP-DG synthesis and that for membrane fusion were observed to be identical. We next carried out an electron microscopic autoradiographic analysis on incubated membranes to determine the site of incorporation of [5-3H]-CTP. Silver grains were observed directly over the unilamellar membranes of natural vesicles. In confirmation of the biochemical data, quantitation of silver grain density indicated more grains over membranes incubated in the presence of GTP than over those incubated in the absence of this nucleotide. For membranes incubated in the presence of GTP, the grain density was similar over fused and unfused membranes in the same preparation. When SRM were incubated with the enzyme co-factors required for synthesis of phosphatidylinositol, a GTP-independent membrane fusion was observed by both transmission and freeze-fracture electron microscopy. Together with the biochemical and autoradiographic data, this suggests that phospholipid metabolism may be activated by GTP and lead to the fusion of RER membrane

  16. Geometry of the Contact Zone between Fused Membrane-Coated Beads Mimicking Cell-Cell Fusion.

    Savić, Filip; Kliesch, Torben-Tobias; Verbeek, Sarah; Bao, Chunxiao; Thiart, Jan; Kros, Alexander; Geil, Burkhard; Janshoff, Andreas

    2016-05-24

    The fusion of lipid membranes is a key process in biology. It enables cells and organelles to exchange molecules with their surroundings, which otherwise could not cross the membrane barrier. To study such complex processes we use simplified artificial model systems, i.e., an optical fusion assay based on membrane-coated glass spheres. We present a technique to analyze membrane-membrane interactions in a large ensemble of particles. Detailed information on the geometry of the fusion stalk of fully fused membranes is obtained by studying the diffusional lipid dynamics with fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments. A small contact zone is a strong obstruction for the particle exchange across the fusion spot. With the aid of computer simulations, fluorescence-recovery-after-photobleaching recovery times of both fused and single-membrane-coated beads allow us to estimate the size of the contact zones between two membrane-coated beads. Minimizing delamination and bending energy leads to minimal angles close to those geometrically allowed. PMID:27224487

  17. HIV Fusion Peptide Penetrates, Disorders, and Softens T-Cell Membrane Mimics

    Tristram-Nagle, Stephanie; Chan, Rob; Kooijman, Edgar; Uppamoochikkal, Pradeep; Qiang, Wei; Weliky, David P.; Nagle, John F.

    2010-01-01

    This work investigates the interaction of N-terminal gp41 fusion peptide (FP) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) with model membranes in order to elucidate how FP leads to fusion of HIV and T-cell membranes. FP constructs were (i) wild-type FP23 (23 N-terminal amino acids of gp41), (ii) water-soluble monomeric FP that adds six lysines on the C-terminus of FP23 (FPwsm), and (iii) the C-terminus covalently linked trimeric version (FPtri) of FPwsm. Model membranes were (i) LM3 (a T-c...

  18. European Activation File for fusion

    This paper describes the work performed to revise and extend the European Activation File (EAF). Extensions, revisions and improvements made in the first two versions of the file (EAF-1, EAF-2) are discussed as well as the work which is planned for EAF-3. The EAF-2 file contains cross-sections for all stable and unstable nuclides with half-lifes exceeding 0.5 day. Cross-sections leading to isomeric states are given separately and those isomeric states with T1/2>0/5 day are included as targets. The EAF-2 version contains about 11000 reactions on 667 targets. The EAF-2 data file will be further extended and improved and will be supplied with uncertainty information. (author). 30 refs.; 5 figs.; 4 tabs

  19. How Membrane-Active Peptides Get into Lipid Membranes.

    Sani, Marc-Antoine; Separovic, Frances

    2016-06-21

    The structure-function relationship for a family of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) from the skin of Australian tree frogs is discussed and compared with that of peptide toxins from bee and Australian scorpion venoms. Although these membrane-active peptides induce a similar cellular fate by disrupting the lipid bilayer integrity, their lytic activity is achieved via different modes of action, which are investigated in relation to amino acid sequence, secondary structure, and membrane lipid composition. In order to better understand what structural features govern the interaction between peptides and lipid membranes, cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), which translocate through the membrane without compromising its integrity, are also discussed. AMPs possess membrane lytic activities that are naturally designed to target the cellular membrane of pathogens or competitors. They are extremely diverse in amino acid composition and often show specificity against a particular strain of microbe. Since our antibiotic arsenal is declining precariously in the face of the rise in multiantibiotic resistance, AMPs increasingly are seen as a promising alternative. In an effort to understand their molecular mechanism, biophysical studies of a myriad of AMPs have been reported, yet no unifying mechanism has emerged, rendering difficult the rational design of drug leads. Similarly, a wide variety of cytotoxic peptides are found in venoms, the best known being melittin, yet again, predicting their activity based on a particular amino acid composition or secondary structure remains elusive. A common feature of these membrane-active peptides is their preference for the lipid environment. Indeed, they are mainly unstructured in solution and, in the presence of lipid membranes, quickly adsorb onto the surface, change their secondary structure, eventually insert into the hydrophobic core of the membrane bilayer, and finally disrupt the bilayer integrity. These steps define the molecular

  20. Activation of interfacial enzymes at membrane surfaces

    Mouritsen, Ole G.; Andresen, Thomas Lars; Halperin, Avi;

    2006-01-01

    A host of water-soluble enzymes are active at membrane surfaces and in association with membranes. Some of these enzymes are involved in signalling and in modification and remodelling of the membranes. A special class of enzymes, the phospholipases, and in particular secretory phospholipase A2 (s......PLA2), are only activated at the interface between water and membrane surfaces, where they lead to a break-down of the lipid molecules into lysolipids and free fatty acids. The activation is critically dependent on the physical properties of the lipid-membrane substrate. A topical review is given of...

  1. Water activation in a fusion environment

    Water is activated in a fusion environment by the 16O(n,p)16N reaction. In this work nuclear responses in the magnets, induced by gamma rays from the activated cooling water, for the current design of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), are calculated with a detailed Monte Carlo model of the chimney region through which the cooling pipes leave the machine. It is found that, despite a significant dose, the nuclear responses induced by these gamma-rays do not pose an obvious threat to the operation of the magnets. 8 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  2. Activation of interfacial enzymes at membrane surfaces

    Mouritsen, Ole G.; Andresen, Thomas Lars; Halperin, Avi; Hansen, Per Lyngs; Jakobsen, Ask F.; Bernchou Jensen, Uffe; Jensen, Morten Ø.; Jørgensen, Kent; Kaasgaard, Thomas; Leidy, Chad; Simonsen, Adam Cohen; Peters, Günther H.J.; Weiss, Matthias

    2006-01-01

    A host of water-soluble enzymes are active at membrane surfaces and in association with membranes. Some of these enzymes are involved in signalling and in modification and remodelling of the membranes. A special class of enzymes, the phospholipases, and in particular secretory phospholipase A2 (s...

  3. Engineering hybrid exosomes by membrane fusion with liposomes

    Sato, Yuko T.; Kaori Umezaki; Shinichi Sawada; Sada-atsu Mukai; Yoshihiro Sasaki; Naozumi Harada; Hiroshi Shiku; Kazunari Akiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes are a valuable biomaterial for the development of novel nanocarriers as functionally advanced drug delivery systems. To control and modify the performance of exosomal nanocarriers, we developed hybrid exosomes by fusing their membranes with liposomes using the freeze–thaw method. Exosomes embedded with a specific membrane protein isolated from genetically modified cells were fused with various liposomes, confirming that membrane engineering methods can be combined with genetic modifi...

  4. Susceptibility to virus-cell fusion at the plasma membrane is reduced through expression of HIV gp41 cytoplasmic domains

    The cytoplasmic tail of the HIV transmembrane protein plays an important role in viral infection. In this study we analyzed the role of retroviral cytoplasmic tails in modulating the cytoskeleton and interfering with virus-cell fusion. HeLaP4 cells expressing different HIV cytoplasmic tail constructs showed reduced acetylated tubulin levels whereas the cytoplasmic tail of MLV did not alter microtubule stability indicating a unique function for the lentiviral cytoplasmic tail. The effect on tubulin is mediated through the membrane proximal region of the HIV cytoplasmic tail and was independent of membrane localization. Site-directed mutagenesis identified three motifs in the HIV-2 cytoplasmic tail required to effect the reduction in acetylated tubulin. Both the YxxΦ domain and amino acids 21 to 45 of the HIV-2 cytoplasmic tail need to be present to change the level of acetylated tubulin in transfected cells. T-cells stably expressing one HIV-2 cytoplasmic tail derived construct showed also a reduction in acetylated tubulin thus confirming the importance of this effect not only for HeLaP4 and 293T cells. Challenge experiments using transiently transfected HeLaP4 cells and T cells stably expressing an HIV cytoplasmic tail construct revealed both reduced virus-cell fusion and replication of HIV-1NL4.3 compared to control cells. In the virus-cell fusion assay only virions pseudotyped with either HIV or MLV envelopes showed reduced fusion efficiency, whereas VSV-G pseudotyped virions where not affected by the expression of HIV derived cytoplasmic tail constructs, indicating that fusion at the plasma but not endosomal membrane is affected. Overexpression of human histone-deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) and constitutively active RhoA resulted in a reduction of acetylated tubulin and reduced virus-cell fusion as significant as that observed following expression of HIV cytoplasmic tail constructs. Inhibition of HDAC6 showed a strong increase in acetylated tubulin and increase of

  5. The fusion-related hydrophobic domain of Sendai F protein can be moved through the cytoplasmic membrane of Escherichia coli.

    Davis, N G; Hsu, M. C.

    1986-01-01

    Recent work on a prokaryotic membrane protein, gene III protein (pIII) of coliphage f1, showed that polypeptide segments of sufficient hydrophobicity functioned to stop transfer of the polypeptide across the cell membrane: strings of 16 or more hydrophobic amino acids sufficed. A fusion-related hydrophobic domain (FRHD) of Sendai F protein, a sequence of 26 consecutive uncharged residues, has been implicated in the fusion of the viral membrane envelope and the target-cell membrane through a h...

  6. Activation analyses for different fusion structural alloys

    The leading candidate structural materials, viz., the vanadium alloys, the nickel or the manganese stabilized austenitic steels, and the ferritic steels, are analysed in terms of their induced activation in the TPSS fusion power reactor. The TPSS reactor has 1950 MW fusion power and inboard and outboard average neutron wall loading of 3.75 and 5.35 MW/m2 respectively. The results shows that, after one year of continuous operation, the vanadium alloys have the least radioactivity at reactor shutdown. The maximum difference between the induced radioactivity in the vanadium alloys and in the other iron-based alloys occurs at about 10 years after reactor shutdown. At this time, the total reactor radioactivity, using the vanadium alloys, is about two orders of magnitude less than the total reactor radioactivity utilizing any other alloy. The difference is even larger in the first wall, the FW-vanadium activation is 3 orders of magnitude less than other alloys' FW activation. 2 refs., 7 figs

  7. Expression and purification of Tat-GFP fusion protein and its cell membrane penetrating activity%Tat-GFP融合蛋白的表达纯化及其穿膜活性

    关新刚; 苏维恒; 于欣; 佟海滨; 孙新

    2014-01-01

    Objective To obtain the Tat-GFP fusion proteins with penetrating activity and labeled with green fluorescence protein (GFP), and to explore the cell membrane penetrating activity of Tat-GFP in MCF-7 cells. Methods The plasmid pET-24a-Tat-GFP was transformed into Escherichia coli BL21 cells. Different concentrations (0.5 and 1.0 mmol · L-1 ) of isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG ) and cell culture temperatures (22℃ and 37℃)were used to optimize the protein expression.The Tat-GFP proteins in supernatant were purified using Ni-IDA resins. Western blotting analysis was used to identify the Tat-GFP protein, and confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM ) was used to examine the cell penetration of Tat-GFP protein. Results There was no significant difference in the Tat-GFP protein production induced by 0.5 and 1.0 mmol·L-1 IPTG;however,the low temperature (22℃)-induced BL21 cells expressed more Tat-GFP proteins than that at 37℃ induction.The Western blotting analysis results showed that GFP antibody could specifically recognize the proteins in PVDF membranes in dose-dependent manner;the CLSM results indicated the distribution of green fluorescence in cytoplasm and nucleus of MCF-7 cells.Conclusion The Tat-GFP protein highly expresses in the supenatant of Escherichia coli i BL2 1 cells at low temperature;the obtained Tat-GFP protein with green fluorescence preserves the cell penetrating activity.%目的:获得具备穿膜活性与绿色荧光蛋白(GFP)标记的 Tat-GFP 融合蛋白,探讨 Tat-GFP 在MCF-7细胞中的跨膜转运特性。方法:应用 pET-24a-Tat-GFP质粒转化大肠杆菌 BL21感受态细胞,检测不同异丙基硫代半乳糖苷(IPTG)浓度(0.5和1.0 mmol·L-1)和不同温度(22℃和37℃)诱导融合蛋白的表达情况;利用 Ni-IDA树脂亲和纯化Tat-GFP蛋白,利用 GFP特异性抗体采用 Western blotting法分析洗脱液中的蛋白;激光共聚焦荧光显微镜下检测Tat-GFP融合蛋白

  8. Engineering hybrid exosomes by membrane fusion with liposomes

    Sato, Yuko T.; Umezaki, Kaori; Sawada, Shinichi; Mukai, Sada-atsu; Sasaki, Yoshihiro; Harada, Naozumi; Shiku, Hiroshi; Akiyoshi, Kazunari

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes are a valuable biomaterial for the development of novel nanocarriers as functionally advanced drug delivery systems. To control and modify the performance of exosomal nanocarriers, we developed hybrid exosomes by fusing their membranes with liposomes using the freeze–thaw method. Exosomes embedded with a specific membrane protein isolated from genetically modified cells were fused with various liposomes, confirming that membrane engineering methods can be combined with genetic modification techniques. Cellular uptake studies performed using the hybrid exosomes revealed that the interactions between the developed exosomes and cells could be modified by changing the lipid composition or the properties of the exogenous lipids. These results suggest that the membrane-engineering approach reported here offers a new strategy for developing rationally designed exosomes as hybrid nanocarriers for use in advanced drug delivery systems. PMID:26911358

  9. Canadian Fusion Fuels Technology Project activities report

    The Canadian Fusion Fuels Technology Project was formally established in 1982. The project is directed toward the further development of Canadian capabilities in five major areas: tritium technology, breeder technology, materials technology, equipment development and safety and the environment. The project is funded by three partners - Government of Canada (50%), Ontario Provincial Government (25%) and Ontario Hydro (25%). The fiscal year 1984/85 represents the third year of operation of the project. In 1984/85, 108 contracts were awarded totalling $4 million. Supplementary funding by subcontractors added approximately $1.9 million to the total project value. More than 200 people participated in the technical work involved in the project. Sixteen people were on attachment to foreign facilities for terms ranging from 1 month to 2.5 years. Five patents were applied for including a tritium discrimination monitor, a new radio-chemical tritium separation method, a new variation of fuel cleanup by gas chromatography, a passive tritium permeation system using bimetallic membranes, and a new breeder process using lithium salts dissolved in heavy water

  10. Lysosome fusion to the cell membrane is mediated by the dysferlin C2A domain in coronary arterial endothelial cells

    Han, Wei-Qing; Xia, Min; Xu, Ming; Krishna M Boini; Ritter, Joseph K.; Li, Ning-Jun; Li, Pin-Lan

    2012-01-01

    Dysferlin has recently been reported to participate in cell membrane repair in muscle and other cells through lysosome fusion. Given that lysosome fusion is a crucial mechanism that leads to membrane raft clustering, the present study attempted to determine whether dysferlin is involved in this process and its related signalling, and explores the mechanism underlying dysferlin-mediated lysosome fusion in bovine coronary arterial endothelial cells (CAECs). We found that dysferlin is clustered ...

  11. Reconstitution of Membrane Proteins into Model Membranes: Seeking Better Ways to Retain Protein Activities

    Trevor Lithgow; Lisa Martin; Hsin-Hui Shen

    2013-01-01

    The function of any given biological membrane is determined largely by the specific set of integral membrane proteins embedded in it, and the peripheral membrane proteins attached to the membrane surface. The activity of these proteins, in turn, can be modulated by the phospholipid composition of the membrane. The reconstitution of membrane proteins into a model membrane allows investigation of individual features and activities of a given cell membrane component. However, the activity of mem...

  12. Membrane Requirement for Folding of the Herpes Simplex Virus 1 gB Cytodomain Suggests a Unique Mechanism of Fusion Regulation

    Silverman, Jessica L.; Greene, Neil G.; King, David S.; Heldwein, Ekaterina E.

    2012-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) enters cells by fusion of its envelope with a host cell membrane, which requires four viral glycoproteins and a cellular receptor. Viral fusion glycoprotein B (gB) mediates membrane fusion through the action of its ectodomain, while its cytoplasmic domain (cytodomain) regulates fusion from the opposite face of the membrane by an unknown mechanism. The gB cytodomain appears to restrict fusion, because point or truncation mutations within it increase the exte...

  13. A Programmable DNA Origami Platform to Organize SNAREs for Membrane Fusion.

    Xu, Weiming; Nathwani, Bhavik; Lin, Chenxiang; Wang, Jing; Karatekin, Erdem; Pincet, Frederic; Shih, William; Rothman, James E

    2016-04-01

    Soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complexes are the core molecular machinery of membrane fusion, a fundamental process that drives inter- and intracellular communication and trafficking. One of the questions that remains controversial has been whether and how SNAREs cooperate. Here we show the use of self-assembled DNA-nanostructure rings to template uniform-sized small unilamellar vesicles containing predetermined maximal number of externally facing SNAREs to study the membrane-fusion process. We also incorporated lipid-conjugated complementary ssDNA as tethers into vesicle and target membranes, which enabled bypass of the rate-limiting docking step of fusion reactions and allowed direct observation of individual membrane-fusion events at SNARE densities as low as one pair per vesicle. With this platform, we confirmed at the single event level that, after docking of the templated-SUVs to supported lipid bilayers (SBL), one to two pairs of SNAREs are sufficient to drive fast lipid mixing. Modularity and programmability of this platform makes it readily amenable to studying more complicated systems where auxiliary proteins are involved. PMID:26938705

  14. Structure and membrane interaction of the internal fusion peptide of avian sarcoma leukosis virus.

    Cheng, Shu-Fang; Wu, Cheng-Wei; Kantchev, Eric Assen B; Chang, Ding-Kwo

    2004-12-01

    The structure and membrane interaction of the internal fusion peptide (IFP) fragment of the avian sarcoma and leucosis virus (ASLV) envelope glycoprotein was studied by an array of biophysical methods. The peptide was found to induce lipid mixing of vesicles more strongly than the fusion peptide derived from the N-terminal fusion peptide of influenza virus (HA2-FP). It was observed that the helical structure was enhanced in association with the model membranes, particularly in the N-terminal portion of the peptide. According to the infrared study, the peptide inserted into the membrane in an oblique orientation, but less deeply than the influenza HA2-FP. Analysis of NMR data in sodium dodecyl sulfate micelle suspension revealed that Pro13 of the peptide was located near the micelle-water interface. A type II beta-turn was deduced from NMR data for the peptide in aqueous medium, demonstrating a conformational flexibility of the IFP in analogy to the N-terminal FP such as that of gp41. A loose and multimodal self-assembly was deduced from the rhodamine fluorescence self-quenching experiments for the peptide bound to the membrane bilayer. Oligomerization of the peptide and its variants can also be observed in the electrophoretic experiments, suggesting a property in common with other N-terminal FP of class I fusion proteins. PMID:15606759

  15. Membrane support of accelerated fuel capsules for inertial fusion energy reactors

    The use of a thin membrane to suspend an (inertial fusion energy) fuel capsule in a holder for injection into a reactor chamber is investigated. Capsule displacement and membrane deformation angle are calculated for an axisymmetric geometry for a range of membrane strain and capsule size. This information is used to calculate maximum target accelerations. Membranes must be thin (perhaps of order one micron) to minimize their effect on capsule implosion symmetry. For example, a 5 μm thick cryogenic mylar membrane is calculated to allow 1,000 m/s2 acceleration of a 3 mm radius, 100 mg capsule. Vibration analysis (for a single membrane support) shows that if membrane vibration is not deliberately minimized, allowed acceleration may be reduced by a factor of four. A two membrane alternative geometry would allow several times greater acceleration. Therefore, alternative membrane geometry's should be used to provide greater target acceleration potential and reduce capsule displacement within the holder (for a given membrane thickness)

  16. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics study of membrane fusion: Curvature effects on free energy barriers along the stalk mechanism

    The effects of membrane curvature on the free energy barrier for membrane fusion have been investigated using coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CG-MD) simulations, assuming that fusion takes place through a stalk intermediate. Free energy barriers were estimated for stalk formation as well as for fusion pore formation using the guiding potential method. Specifically, the three different geometries of two apposed membranes were considered: vesicle–vesicle, vesicle–planar, and planar–planar membranes. The free energy barriers for the resulting fusion were found to depend importantly on the fusing membrane geometries; the lowest barrier was obtained for vesicular membranes. Further, lipid sorting was observed in fusion of the mixed membranes of dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine and dioleoyl phosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE). Specifically, DOPE molecules were found to assemble around the stalk to support the highly negative curved membrane surface. A consistent result for lipid sorting was observed when a simple continuum model (CM) was used, where the Helfrich energy and mixing entropy of the lipids were taken into account. However, the CM predicts a much higher free energy barrier than found using CG-MD. This discrepancy originates from the conformational changes of lipids, which were not considered in the CM. The results of the CG-MD simulations reveal that a large conformational change in the lipid takes place around the stalk region, which results in a reduction of free energy barriers along the stalk mechanism of membrane fusion

  17. Identification of a Small Molecular Anti - HIV - 1 Compound that Interferes with Formation of the Fusion - active gp41 Core

    2001-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV - 1 ) envelope glycoprotein gp41 plays a critical role in the fusion of viral and target cell membranes. The gp41 extracellular domain, which contains fusion peptide (FP), N - and C - terminal hydrophobic heptad repeats (NHR and CHR, respectively). Peptides derived from NHR and CHR regions,designated N- and C- peptides, respectively, can interact with each other to form a six - stranded coiled - coil domain, representing the fusion-active gp41 core. Our previous studies demonstrated that the C- peptides have potent inhibitory activity against HIV- 1 infection.These peptides inhibit HIV- 1 -mediated membrane fusion by binding to NHR regions for preventing the formation of fusion- active gp41 core. One of the C - peptides, T - 20, which is in the phase Ⅲ clinical trails, is expected to become the first peptide HIV fusion inhibitory drug in the near future. However, this peptide HIV fusion inhibitor lacks oral availability and is sensitive to the proteolytic digestion.Therefore, it is essential to develop small molecular non -peptide HIV fusion inhibitors having similar mechanism of action as the C- peptides. We have established an ELISA- based screening assay using a unique monoclonal antibody, NC- 1, which can specifically bind to a conformational epitope on the gp41 core domain. Using this screening assay, we have identified a small molecular anti- HIV- 1 compound,named ADS-Jl, which inhibits HIV- 1- mediated membrane fusion by blocking the interaction between the NHR and CHR regions to form the fusion - active gp41 core. This compound will be used as a lead to design and develop novel HIV fusion inhibitors as new drugs for the treatment of HIV infection and/or AIDS.

  18. Is the optimal pH for membrane fusion in host cells by avian influenza viruses related to host range and pathogenicity?

    Okamatsu, Masatoshi; Motohashi, Yurie; Hiono, Takahiro; Tamura, Tomokazu; Nagaya, Kazuki; Matsuno, Keita; Sakoda, Yoshihiro; Kida, Hiroshi

    2016-08-01

    Influenza viruses isolated from wild ducks do not replicate in chickens. This fact is not explained solely by the receptor specificity of the hemagglutinin (HA) from such viruses for target host cells. To investigate this restriction in host range, the fusion activities of HA molecules from duck and chicken influenza viruses were examined. Influenza viruses A/duck/Mongolia/54/2001 (H5N2) (Dk/MNG) and A/chicken/Ibaraki/1/2005 (H5N2) (Ck/IBR), which replicate only in their primary hosts, were used. The optimal pH for membrane fusion of Ck/IBR was 5.9, higher than that of Dk/MNG at 4.9. To assess the relationship between the optimal pH for fusion and the host range of avian influenza viruses, the optimal pH for fusion of 55 influenza virus strains isolated from ducks and chickens was examined. No correlation was found between the host range and optimal pH for membrane fusion by the viruses, and this finding applied also to the H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses. The optimal pH for membrane fusion for avian influenza viruses was shown to not necessarily be correlated with their host range or pathogenicity in ducks and chickens. PMID:27231009

  19. Versatile membrane deformation potential of activated pacsin.

    Shih Lin Goh

    Full Text Available Endocytosis is a fundamental process in signaling and membrane trafficking. The formation of vesicles at the plasma membrane is mediated by the G protein dynamin that catalyzes the final fission step, the actin cytoskeleton, and proteins that sense or induce membrane curvature. One such protein, the F-BAR domain-containing protein pacsin, contributes to this process and has been shown to induce a spectrum of membrane morphologies, including tubules and tube constrictions in vitro. Full-length pacsin isoform 1 (pacsin-1 has reduced activity compared to its isolated F-BAR domain, implicating an inhibitory role for its C-terminal Src homology 3 (SH3 domain. Here we show that the autoinhibitory, intramolecular interactions in pacsin-1 can be released upon binding to the entire proline-rich domain (PRD of dynamin-1, resulting in potent membrane deformation activity that is distinct from the isolated F-BAR domain. Most strikingly, we observe the generation of small, homogenous vesicles with the activated protein complex under certain experimental conditions. In addition, liposomes prepared with different methods yield distinct membrane deformation morphologies of BAR domain proteins and apparent activation barriers to pacsin-1's activity. Theoretical free energy calculations suggest bimodality of the protein-membrane system as a possible source for the different outcomes, which could account for the coexistence of energetically equivalent membrane structures induced by BAR domain-containing proteins in vitro. Taken together, our results suggest a versatile role for pacsin-1 in sculpting cellular membranes that is likely dependent both on protein structure and membrane properties.

  20. Structural criteria for regulation of membrane fusion and virion incorporation by the murine leukemia virus TM cytoplasmic domain

    The cytoplasmic domains of viral glycoproteins influence the trafficking and subcellular localization of the glycoproteins and their incorporation into virions. They also promote correct virus morphology and viral budding. The cytoplasmic domains of murine-leukemia-virus envelope-protein TM subunits regulate membrane fusion. During virion maturation the carboxy-terminal 16 amino acid residues of the TM protein are removed by the retroviral protease. Deletion of these residues activates envelope-protein-mediated membrane fusion. Our quantitative analysis of the effects of Moloney murine leukemia virus TM mutations on envelope-protein function support the proposition that a trimeric coiled coil in the TM cytoplasmic domain inhibits fusion. The data demonstrate that cleavage of the TM cytoplasmic domain is not required for viral entry and provide evidence for a model in which fusogenic and nonfusogenic conformations of the envelope protein exists in an equilibrium that is regulated by the cytoplasmic domain. In addition, a conserved tyrosine residue in the TM cytoplasmic domain was shown to play an important role in envelope-protein incorporation into retroviral particles

  1. The fusion of membranes and vesicles: pathway and energy barriers from Dissipative Particle Dynamics

    Shillcock, Julian C.

    2009-01-01

    The fusion of lipid bilayers is studied with dissipative particle dynamics simulations. First, to achieve control over membrane properties, the effects of individual simulation parameters are studied and optimized. Then, a large number of fusion events for a vesicle and a planar bilayer...... measure the average work for interbilayer flips of a lipid tail, i.e., the average work to displace one lipid tail from one bilayer to the other. This energy barrier is found to depend strongly on a certain dissipative particle dynamics parameter, and, thus, can be adjusted in the simulations. Overall...

  2. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division: Summary of activities, 1986

    1987-04-15

    This report contains a summary of activities at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Accelerator and Fusion Research Division for the year 1986. Topics and facilities investigated in individual papers are: 1-2 GeV Synchrotron Radiation Source, the Center for X-Ray Optics, Accelerator Operations, High-Energy Physics Technology, Heavy-Ion Fusion Accelerator Research and Magnetic Fusion Energy. Six individual papers have been indexed separately. (LSP)

  3. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division: Summary of activities, 1986

    This report contains a summary of activities at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Accelerator and Fusion Research Division for the year 1986. Topics and facilities investigated in individual papers are: 1-2 GeV Synchrotron Radiation Source, the Center for X-Ray Optics, Accelerator Operations, High-Energy Physics Technology, Heavy-Ion Fusion Accelerator Research and Magnetic Fusion Energy. Six individual papers have been indexed separately

  4. Activity assay of membrane transport proteins

    Hao Xie

    2008-01-01

    Membrane transport proteins are integral membrane proteins and considered as potential drug targets. Activity assay of transport proteins is essential for developing drugs to target these proteins. Major issues related to activity assessment of transport proteins include availability of transporters,transport activity of transporters, and interactions between ligands and transporters. Researchers need to consider the physiological status of proteins (bound in lipid membranes or purified), availability and specificity of substrates, and the purpose of the activity assay (screening, identifying, or comparing substrates and inhibitors) before choosing appropriate assay strategies and techniques. Transport proteins bound in vesicular membranes can be assayed for transporting substrate across membranes by means of uptake assay or entrance counterflow assay. Alternatively, transport proteins can be assayed for interactions with ligands by using techniques such as isothermal titration calorimetry, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, or surface plasmon resonance. Other methods and techniques such as fluorometry, scintillation proximity assay, electrophysiological assay, or stopped-flow assay could also be used for activity assay of transport proteins. In this paper the major strategies and techniques for activity assessment of membrane transport proteins are reviewed.

  5. Aqueous extract from a Chaga medicinal mushroom, Inonotus obliquus (higher Basidiomycetes), prevents herpes simplex virus entry through inhibition of viral-induced membrane fusion.

    Pan, Hong-Hui; Yu, Xiong-Tao; Li, Ting; Wu, Hong-Ling; Jiao, Chun-Wei; Cai, Mian-Hua; Li, Xiang-Min; Xie, Yi-Zhen; Wang, Yi; Peng, Tao

    2013-01-01

    Chaga medicinal mushroom, Inonotus obliquus, a popular prescription in traditional medicine in Europe and Asia, was used to reduce inflammation in the nasopharynx and to facilitate breathing. The aqueous extract from I. obliquus (AEIO) exhibited marked decrease in herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection (the 50% inhibitory concentration was 3.82 μg/mL in the plaque reduction assay and 12.29 μg/mL in the HSV-1/blue assay) as well as safety in Vero cells (the 50% cellular cytotoxicity was > 1 mg/mL, and selection index was > 80). Using a time course assay, effective stage analysis, and fusion inhibition assay, the mechanism of anti-HSV activity was found against the early stage of viral infection through inhibition of viral-induced membrane fusion. Therefore, AEIO could effectively prevent HSV-1 entry by acting on viral glycoproteins, leading to the prevention of membrane fusion, which is different from nucleoside analog antiherpetics. PMID:23510282

  6. Viral Membrane Fusion and Nucleocapsid Delivery into the Cytoplasm are Distinct Events in Some Flaviviruses

    Nour, Adel M.; Li, Yue; Wolenski, Joseph; Modis, Yorgo

    2013-01-01

    Author Summary Many viruses package their genetic material into a lipid envelope. In order to deliver their genome into the host-cell cytoplasm, where it can be replicated, viruses must fuse their envelope with a cellular lipid membrane. This fusion event is therefore a critical step in the entry of an enveloped virus into the cell. In this study, we used various cell biological and biochemical approaches to map precisely the cell entry pathway of two major human pathogens from the flavivirus...

  7. Association of the pr Peptides with Dengue Virus at Acidic pH Blocks Membrane Fusion

    Yu, I.-M.; Holdaway, H.A.; Chipman, P.R.; Kuhn, R.J.; Rossmann, M.G.; Chen, J.; Purdue

    2010-07-27

    Flavivirus assembles into an inert particle that requires proteolytic activation by furin to enable transmission to other hosts. We previously showed that immature virus undergoes a conformational change at low pH that renders it accessible to furin (I. M. Yu, W. Zhang, H. A. Holdaway, L. Li, V. A. Kostyuchenko, P. R. Chipman, R. J. Kuhn, M. G. Rossmann, and J. Chen, Science 319:1834-1837, 2008). Here we show, using cryoelectron microscopy, that the structure of immature dengue virus at pH 6.0 is essentially the same before and after the cleavage of prM. The structure shows that after cleavage, the proteolytic product pr remains associated with the virion at acidic pH, and that furin cleavage by itself does not induce any major conformational changes. We also show by liposome cofloatation experiments that pr retention prevents membrane insertion, suggesting that pr is present on the virion in the trans-Golgi network to protect the progeny virus from fusion within the host cell.

  8. Fusion technology activities at JET: Latest results

    Barbier, Dominique, E-mail: dominique.barbier@jet.efda.org [JET- EFDA- Close Support Unit, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); CEA-DSM/IRFM, Centre de Cadarache, 13108 St Paul Lez Durance (France); Batistoni, Paola [ENEA - Fusion Technical Unit Via E. Fermi, 45 I-00044 FRASCATI, Rome (Italy); Coad, Paul [Association Euratom/CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Likonen, Jari [Association Euratom/TEKES, VTT, P.O. Box 1000, FIN-02044 VTT (Finland)

    2011-10-15

    The JET Task Force Fusion Technology (TF-FT) was launched in 2000 to use the unique capabilities, facilities and operating experience at JET to provide significant contributions to the research programme on both JET and ITER. This paper presents the most recent results obtained within the JET TF-FT programme. The Tritium (T) retention measurements have confirmed high surface but little bulk T concentrations on the MKII-SRP divertor tiles and T thermal desorption tests confirmed the necessity to reach at least 600 deg. C. From the 2007 shutdown the MKII-HD (more ITER like) divertor has revealed some slight changes in the nature of the erosion/deposition. In order to improve analysis, time resolution devices such as quartz micro-balances and rotating collectors have been located beneath the divertor for deposition and plasma physics correlations. Due to improvement of dedicated models and technologies, in situ laser techniques for detritiation and characterisation/removal have provided encouraging results on quantitative characteristics (composition, thickness, adherence, temperature) of deposited films on plasma facing components. A particular effort on temperature control of the new metallic ITER-like wall (ILW) that is presently being installed in JET has been pursued with active laser infrared thermography. JET TF-FT also contributes to the operator strategy to comply with the safety agency requirements for T management. Recent results on two major topics purification of tritiated water and development of the {sup 3}He method for the determination of the T concentration in waste drums are presented. Finally, this paper also presents some activities in preparation of the ILW for the pre-characterisation of marker tiles and the refurbishment of diagnostics for deposition characterisation.

  9. A molecular model for membrane fusion based on solution studies of an amphiphilic peptide from HIV gp41.

    Fujii, G; Horvath, S.; Woodward, S.; Eiserling, F.; Eisenberg, D.

    1992-01-01

    The mechanism of protein-mediated membrane fusion and lysis has been investigated by solution-state studies of the effects of peptides on liposomes. A peptide (SI) corresponding to a highly amphiphilic C-terminal segment from the envelope protein (gp41) of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was synthesized and tested for its ability to cause lipid membranes to fuse together (fusion) or to break open (lysis). These effects were compared to those produced by the lytic and fusogenic peptide ...

  10. Two Coiled-Coil Domains of Chlamydia trachomatis IncA Affect Membrane Fusion Events during Infection

    Ronzone, Erik; Paumet, Fabienne

    2013-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis replicates in a parasitophorous membrane-bound compartment called an inclusion. The inclusions corrupt host vesicle trafficking networks to avoid the degradative endolysosomal pathway but promote fusion with each other in order to sustain higher bacterial loads in a process known as homotypic fusion. The Chlamydia protein IncA (Inclusion protein A) appears to play central roles in both these processes as it participates to homotypic fusion and inhibits endocytic SNARE-me...

  11. A GALA lipopeptide mediates pH- and membrane charge dependent fusion with stable giant unilamellar vesicles

    Etzerodt, Thomas P.; Trier, Sofie; Henriksen, Jonas R.; Andresen, Thomas L.

    2012-01-01

    Peptides capable of mediating fusion between lipid membranes are widely observed in nature, and have attracted considerable attention in the liposome drug delivery field. However, studies that are proving the benefit of small synthetic fusion peptides as components in drug delivery systems remain...

  12. Septins promote macropinosome maturation and traffic to the lysosome by facilitating membrane fusion.

    Dolat, Lee; Spiliotis, Elias T

    2016-08-29

    Macropinocytosis, the internalization of extracellular fluid and material by plasma membrane ruffles, is critical for antigen presentation, cell metabolism, and signaling. Macropinosomes mature through homotypic and heterotypic fusion with endosomes and ultimately merge with lysosomes. The molecular underpinnings of this clathrin-independent endocytic pathway are largely unknown. Here, we show that the filamentous septin GTPases associate preferentially with maturing macropinosomes in a phosphatidylinositol 3,5-bisphosphate-dependent manner and localize to their contact/fusion sites with macropinosomes/endosomes. Septin knockdown results in large clusters of docked macropinosomes, which persist longer and exhibit fewer fusion events. Septin depletion and overexpression down-regulates and enhances, respectively, the delivery of fluid-phase cargo to lysosomes, without affecting Rab5 and Rab7 recruitment to macropinosomes/endosomes. In vitro reconstitution assays show that fusion of macropinosomes/endosomes is abrogated by septin immunodepletion and function-blocking antibodies and is induced by recombinant septins in the absence of cytosol and polymerized actin. Thus, septins regulate fluid-phase cargo traffic to lysosomes by promoting macropinosome maturation and fusion with endosomes/lysosomes. PMID:27551056

  13. The role of fusion activity of influenza A viruses in their biological properties.

    Jakubcová, L; Hollý, J; Varečková, E

    2016-06-01

    Influenza A viruses (IAVs) cause acute respiratory infections of humans, which are repeated yearly. Human IAV infections are associated with significant morbidity and mortality and therefore they represent a serious health problem. All human IAV strains are originally derived from avian IAVs, which, after their adaptation to humans, can spread in the human population and cause pandemics with more or less severe course of the disease. Presently, however, the potential of avian IAV to infect humans and to cause the disease cannot be predicted. Many studies are therefore focused on factors influencing the virulence and pathogenicity of IAV viruses in a given host. The virus-host interaction starts by virus attachment via the envelope glycoprotein hemagglutinin (HA) to the receptors on the cell surface. In addition to receptor binding, HA mediates also the fusion of viral and endosomal membranes, which follows the virus endocytosis. The fusion potential of HA trimer, primed by proteolytic cleavage, is activated by low pH in endosomes, resulting in HA refolding into the fusion-active form. The HA conformation change is predetermined by its 3-D structure, is pH-dependent, irreversible and strain-specific. The process of fusion activation of IAV hemagglutinin is crucial for virus entry into the cell and for the ability of the virus to replicate in the host. Here we discuss the known data about the characteristics of fusion activation of HA in relation to IAV virulence and pathogenicity. PMID:27265461

  14. Inhibition of Nipah Virus Infectin In Vivo: Targeting an Early Stage of Paramyxovirus Fusion Activation during Viral Entry

    M Porotto; B Rockx; C Yokoyama; A Talekar; I DeVito; l Palermo; J Liu; R Cortese; M Lu; et al.

    2011-12-31

    In the paramyxovirus cell entry process, receptor binding triggers conformational changes in the fusion protein (F) leading to viral and cellular membrane fusion. Peptides derived from C-terminal heptad repeat (HRC) regions in F have been shown to inhibit fusion by preventing formation of the fusogenic six-helix bundle. We recently showed that the addition of a cholesterol group to HRC peptides active against Nipah virus targets these peptides to the membrane where fusion occurs, dramatically increasing their antiviral effect. In this work, we report that unlike the untagged HRC peptides, which bind to the postulated extended intermediate state bridging the viral and cell membranes, the cholesterol tagged HRC-derived peptides interact with F before the fusion peptide inserts into the target cell membrane, thus capturing an earlier stage in the F-activation process. Furthermore, we show that cholesterol tagging renders these peptides active in vivo: the cholesterol-tagged peptides cross the blood brain barrier, and effectively prevent and treat in an established animal model what would otherwise be fatal Nipah virus encephalitis. The in vivo efficacy of cholesterol-tagged peptides, and in particular their ability to penetrate the CNS, suggests that they are promising candidates for the prevention or therapy of infection by Nipah and other lethal paramyxoviruses.

  15. Revised graphs of activation data for fusion reactor applications

    Activation data are required for calculation of induced activity in a fusion reactor. This report gives in graphical form, the activation data which have been evaluated based on recent measurements and calculations, for use in the activation calculation code system THIDA-2. It shows transmutation and decay chain data, activation cross sections and decay gamma-ray emission data for 152 nuclides of interest in terms of fusion reactor design. This report is an updated and enlarged version of a similar report compiled in 1982 for the activation data of 116 nuclides, which had been shown to be extremely effective in referring the activation data and in locating and correcting inappropriate data. (author)

  16. Active membrane cholesterol as a physiological effector.

    Lange, Yvonne; Steck, Theodore L

    2016-09-01

    Sterols associate preferentially with plasma membrane sphingolipids and saturated phospholipids to form stoichiometric complexes. Cholesterol in molar excess of the capacity of these polar bilayer lipids has a high accessibility and fugacity; we call this fraction active cholesterol. This review first considers how active cholesterol serves as an upstream regulator of cellular sterol homeostasis. The mechanism appears to utilize the redistribution of active cholesterol down its diffusional gradient to the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria, where it binds multiple effectors and directs their feedback activity. We have also reviewed a broad literature in search of a role for active cholesterol (as opposed to bulk cholesterol or lipid domains such as rafts) in the activity of diverse membrane proteins. Several systems provide such evidence, implicating, in particular, caveolin-1, various kinds of ABC-type cholesterol transporters, solute transporters, receptors and ion channels. We suggest that this larger role for active cholesterol warrants close attention and can be tested easily. PMID:26874289

  17. Health physics aspects of activation products from fusion reactors

    A review of the activation products from fusion reactors and their attendant impacts is discussed. This includes a discussion on their production, expected inventories, and the status of metabolic data on these products

  18. cBid, Bax and Bcl-xL exhibit opposite membrane remodeling activities.

    Bleicken, S; Hofhaus, G; Ugarte-Uribe, B; Schröder, R; García-Sáez, A J

    2016-01-01

    The proteins of the Bcl-2 family have a crucial role in mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization during apoptosis and in the regulation of mitochondrial dynamics. Current models consider that Bax forms toroidal pores at mitochondria that are responsible for the release of cytochrome c, whereas Bcl-xL inhibits pore formation. However, how Bcl-2 proteins regulate mitochondrial fission and fusion remains poorly understood. By using a systematic analysis at the single vesicle level, we found that cBid, Bax and Bcl-xL are able to remodel membranes in different ways. cBid and Bax induced a reduction in vesicle size likely related to membrane tethering, budding and fission, besides membrane permeabilization. Moreover, they are preferentially located at highly curved membranes. In contrast, Bcl-xL not only counterbalanced pore formation but also membrane budding and fission. Our findings support a mechanism of action by which cBid and Bax induce or stabilize highly curved membranes including non-lamellar structures. This molecular activity reduces the energy for membrane remodeling, which is a necessary step in toroidal pore formation, as well as membrane fission and fusion, and provides a common mechanism that links the two main functions of Bcl-2 proteins. PMID:26913610

  19. Membrane cholesterol regulates lysosome-plasma membrane fusion events and modulates Trypanosoma cruzi invasion of host cells.

    Bárbara Hissa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi are able to invade several types of non-phagocytic cells through a lysosomal dependent mechanism. It has been shown that, during invasion, parasites trigger host cell lysosome exocytosis, which initially occurs at the parasite-host contact site. Acid sphingomyelinase released from lysosomes then induces endocytosis and parasite internalization. Lysosomes continue to fuse with the newly formed parasitophorous vacuole until the parasite is completely enclosed by lysosomal membrane, a process indispensable for a stable infection. Previous work has shown that host membrane cholesterol is also important for the T. cruzi invasion process in both professional (macrophages and non-professional (epithelial phagocytic cells. However, the mechanism by which cholesterol-enriched microdomains participate in this process has remained unclear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: In the present work we show that cardiomyocytes treated with MβCD, a drug able to sequester cholesterol from cell membranes, leads to a 50% reduction in invasion by T. cruzi trypomastigotes, as well as a decrease in the number of recently internalized parasites co-localizing with lysosomal markers. Cholesterol depletion from host membranes was accompanied by a decrease in the labeling of host membrane lipid rafts, as well as excessive lysosome exocytic events during the earlier stages of treatment. Precocious lysosomal exocytosis in MβCD treated cells led to a change in lysosomal distribution, with a reduction in the number of these organelles at the cell periphery, and probably compromises the intracellular pool of lysosomes necessary for T. cruzi invasion. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Based on these results, we propose that cholesterol depletion leads to unregulated exocytic events, reducing lysosome availability at the cell cortex and consequently compromise T. cruzi entry into host cells. The results also suggest that two different pools of

  20. Membrane Fusion Mediated by pH-Low-Insertion-Peptide (pHLIP)

    Daniels, Jennifer; Yao, Lan; Engelman, Donald; Andreev, Oleg; Reshetnyak, Yana

    2012-02-01

    Liposomes are traditionally used as drug delivery carriers. The major mechanism of liposome entry into cell is endocytotic. First, the endocytotic pathway of cellular entry is non-specific: the delivery of therapeutics occurs to cells in both diseased and healthy tissues. Second, liposomes are usually trapped in endosome/lysosome, which prevents delivery of therapeutics to cytoplasm. We proposed to use pHLIP (pH-Low-Insertion-Peptide) to promote selective delivery of the liposome content to cytoplasm of cancer cells. We showed that liposomes coated with PEG polymer and pHLIP peptide enhance membrane fusion in acidic environments. pHLIP promotes fusion between lipid bilayer of liposome and plasma membrane or membrane of endosome/lysosome, which results in intracellular delivery of payload. Liposomes composed of 5 % pHLIP and 5 % PEG were ideal for the delivery. Since cancer and other pathological states produce an acid extracellular environment, this allows the liposome to target diseased tissue while avoiding healthy tissue (with neutral pH in extracellular space). The work is supported by NIH grants CA133890 to OAA, DME, YRK.

  1. Comparison of activation in fission and fusion spectrum neutron beams

    The materials used in the construction of fusion reactors have to satisfy a number of criterions, one of the important being low activation due to neutron irradiation. Experimental analysis of the activation of candidate materials for the first wall is performed with the irradiation of samples in various neutron fields, frequently in the field of a fission reactor. In the present work a calculation is performed to compare the expected activation of candidate materials intended to be used for the first wall in fusion reactors with the activation of a sample of the same material in a fission reactor beam. The FISPACT code is used for activation calculations. An investigation, to what extent the results of activation in a fission spectrum neutron beam, where most neutrons have energies of less than 2 MeV, mimic the real situation in a fusion reactor with the peak neutron energy around 14 MeV, is performed. (author)

  2. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division: summary of activities, 1983

    The activities described in this summary of the Accelerator and Fusion Research Division are diverse, yet united by a common theme: it is our purpose to explore technologically advanced techniques for the production, acceleration, or transport of high-energy beams. These beams may be the heavy ions of interest in nuclear science, medical research, and heavy-ion inertial-confinement fusion; they may be beams of deuterium and hydrogen atoms, used to heat and confine plasmas in magnetic fusion experiments; they may be ultrahigh-energy protons for the next high-energy hadron collider; or they may be high-brilliance, highly coherent, picosecond pulses of synchrotron radiation

  3. Study on a multi-component palladium alloy membrane for the fusion fuel cleanup system

    Demonstration Tests with (D,T)2 gas to examine the reported hydrogen embrittlement and helium damage on Pd and Pd-Ag binary alloy are needed for a palladium alloy membrane for its application to a fusion fuel system. T2-gas circulating and T2-gas immersion tests with a multi-component palladium alloy, which had been selected for use of tritum purification, have been performed in the Tritium Systems Test Assembly(TSTA) at Los Alamos National Laboratory under the Japan/US Fusion Cooperation Program. Mechanical tensile tests and metallographic studies have been conducted in these durability tests. Similar tests had been performed on the same material under tritium-free atmospheres(H2, N2) to analyse the data obtained by the T2-gas tests. This report describes the results of the mechanical tensile tests and the test conditions. (author)

  4. Ebola virus glycoprotein needs an additional trigger, beyond proteolytic priming for membrane fusion.

    Shridhar Bale

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ebolavirus belongs to the family filoviridae and causes severe hemorrhagic fever in humans with 50-90% lethality. Detailed understanding of how the viruses attach to and enter new host cells is critical to development of medical interventions. The virus displays a trimeric glycoprotein (GP(1,2 on its surface that is solely responsible for membrane attachment, virus internalization and fusion. GP(1,2 is expressed as a single peptide and is cleaved by furin in the host cells to yield two disulphide-linked fragments termed GP1 and GP2 that remain associated in a GP(1,2 trimeric, viral surface spike. After entry into host endosomes, GP(1,2 is enzymatically cleaved by endosomal cathepsins B and L, a necessary step in infection. However, the functional effects of the cleavage on the glycoprotein are unknown. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We demonstrate by antibody binding and Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry (DXMS of glycoproteins from two different ebolaviruses that although enzymatic priming of GP(1,2 is required for fusion, the priming itself does not initiate the required conformational changes in the ectodomain of GP(1,2. Further, ELISA binding data of primed GP(1,2 to conformational antibody KZ52 suggests that the low pH inside the endosomes also does not trigger dissociation of GP1 from GP2 to effect membrane fusion. SIGNIFICANCE: The results reveal that the ebolavirus GP(1,2 ectodomain remains in the prefusion conformation upon enzymatic cleavage in low pH and removal of the glycan cap. The results also suggest that an additional endosomal trigger is necessary to induce the conformational changes in GP(1,2 and effect fusion. Identification of this trigger will provide further mechanistic insights into ebolavirus infection.

  5. Chemical studies of viral entry mechanisms: I. Hydrophobic protein-lipid interactions during Sendai virus membrane fusion. II. Kinetics of bacteriophage λ DNA injection

    Sendai virus glycoprotein interactions with target membranes during the early stages of fusion were examined using time-resolved hydrophobic photoaffinity labeling with the lipid-soluble carbene generator 3-(trifluoromethyl)-3-(m[125I] iodophenyl)diazirine. During Sendai virus fusion with liposomes composed of cardiolipin or phosphatidylserine, the viral fusion (F) protein is preferentially labeled at early time points, supporting the hypothesis that hydrophobic interaction of the fusion peptide at the N-terminus of the F1 subunit with the target membrane is an initiating event in fusion. Correlation of hydrophobic interactions with independently monitored fusion kinetics further supports this conclusion. The F1 subunit, containing the putative hydrophobic fusion sequence, is exclusively labeled, and the F2 subunit does not participate in fusion. Labeling shows temperature and pH dependence consistent with a need for protein conformational mobility and fusion at neutral pH. Higher amounts of labeling during fusion with CL vesicles than during virus-PS vesicle fusion reflects membrane packing regulation of peptide insertion into target membranes. Labeling of the viral hemagglutinin/neuraminidase (HN) at low pH indicates that HN-mediated fusion is triggered by hydrophobic interactions. Controls for diffusional labeling exclude a major contribution from this source. Labeling during reconstituted Sendai virus envelope-liposome fusion shows that functional reconstitution involves protein retention of the ability to undergo hydrophobic interactions. Examination of Sendai virus fusion with erythrocyte membranes indicates that hydrophobic interactions also trigger fusion between biological membranes. The data show that hydrophobic fusion protein interaction with both artificial and biological membranes is a triggering event in fusion

  6. A role for sperm surface protein disulfide isomerase activity in gamete fusion: evidence for the participation of ERp57.

    Ellerman, Diego A; Myles, Diana G; Primakoff, Paul

    2006-06-01

    In mammals, sperm-egg interaction is based on molecular events either unique to gametes or also present in somatic cells. In gamete fusion, it is unknown which features are gamete specific and which are shared with other systems. Conformational changes mediated by thiol-disulfide exchange are involved in the activation of some virus membrane fusion proteins. Here we asked whether that mechanism is also operative in sperm-egg fusion. Different inhibitors of protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) activity were able to inhibit sperm-egg fusion in vitro. While pretreatment of oocytes had no effect, pretreatment of sperm reduced their fusion ability. Some members of the PDI family were detected on the sperm head, and use of specific antibodies and substrates suggested that the oxidoreductase ERp57 has a role in gamete fusion. The results support the idea that thiol-disulfide exchange is a mechanism that may act in gamete fusion to produce conformational changes in fusion-active proteins. PMID:16740484

  7. Fusion alpha loss diagnostic for ITER using activation technique

    Bonheure, G.; Hult, M.; González de Orduña, R.; Vermaercke, P.; Murari, A.; Popovichev, S.; Mlynář, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 86, 6-8 (2011), s. 1298-1301. ISSN 0920-3796. [Symposium on Fusion Technology (SOFT) /26th./. Porto, 27.09.2010-01.10.2010] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : ITER * fusion product * burning plasma diagnostics * alpha losses * activation technique Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.490, year: 2011 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0920379611002778

  8. SNARE Molecules in Marchantia polymorpha: Unique and Conserved Features of the Membrane Fusion Machinery.

    Kanazawa, Takehiko; Era, Atsuko; Minamino, Naoki; Shikano, Yu; Fujimoto, Masaru; Uemura, Tomohiro; Nishihama, Ryuichi; Yamato, Katsuyuki T; Ishizaki, Kimitsune; Nishiyama, Tomoaki; Kohchi, Takayuki; Nakano, Akihiko; Ueda, Takashi

    2016-02-01

    The membrane trafficking pathway has been diversified in a specific way for each eukaryotic lineage, probably to fulfill specific functions in the organisms. In green plants, comparative genomics has supported the possibility that terrestrialization and/or multicellularization could be associated with the elaboration and diversification of membrane trafficking pathways, which have been accomplished by an expansion of the numbers of genes required for machinery components of membrane trafficking, including soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) proteins. However, information regarding membrane trafficking pathways in basal land plant lineages remains limited. In the present study, we conducted extensive analyses of SNARE molecules, which mediate membrane fusion between target membranes and transport vesicles or donor organelles, in the liverwort, Marchantia polymorpha. The M. polymorpha genome contained at least 34 genes for 36 SNARE proteins, comprising fundamental sets of SNARE proteins that are shared among land plant lineages with low degrees of redundancy. We examined the subcellular distribution of a major portion of these SNARE proteins by expressing Citrine-tagged SNARE proteins in M. polymorpha, and the results showed that some of the SNARE proteins were targeted to different compartments from their orthologous products in Arabidopsis thaliana. For example, MpSYP12B was localized to the surface of the oil body, which is a unique organelle in liverworts. Furthermore, we identified three VAMP72 members with distinctive structural characteristics, whose N-terminal extensions contain consensus sequences for N-myristoylation. These results suggest that M. polymorpha has acquired unique membrane trafficking pathways associated with newly acquired machinery components during evolution. PMID:26019268

  9. Preliminary design of fusion reactor fuel cleanup system by palladium alloy membrane method

    A design of palladium diffuser and Fuel Cleanup System (FCU) for D-T fusion reactor is proposed. Feasibility of palladium alloy membrane method is discussed based on the early studies by the authors. Operating conditions of the palladium diffuser are determined experimentally. Dimensions of the diffuser are estimated from computer simulation. FCU system is designed under the feed conditions of Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. The system is composed of Pd-diffusers, catalytic oxidizer, freezer and zink beds, and has some advantages in system layout and operation. This design can readily be extended to other conditions of plasma exhaust gases. (author)

  10. Sensor Fusion for Nuclear Proliferation Activity Monitoring

    Adel Ghanem, Ph D

    2007-03-30

    The objective of Phase 1 of this STTR project is to demonstrate a Proof-of-Concept (PoC) of the Geo-Rad system that integrates a location-aware SmartTag (made by ZonTrak) and a radiation detector (developed by LLNL). It also includes the ability to transmit the collected radiation data and location information to the ZonTrak server (ZonService). The collected data is further transmitted to a central server at LLNL (the Fusion Server) to be processed in conjunction with overhead imagery to generate location estimates of nuclear proliferation and radiation sources.

  11. Rating criteria for activated waste from fusion reactors

    In the past, Shallow Land Burial (SLB) was considered one suitable solution for the management of fusion activated waste, the other being recycling. These concepts have influenced the development of low activation materials for fusion (LAMs), having reduced long-term radioactivity. Present European studies, however, do not consider SLB a viable option and concentrate more on Geological Disposal (GD). A classification of activated materials into High-, Medium-, and Low-Level Waste is proposed, taking into account contact dose rates and decay heat levels, in compliance with the GD and Recycling alternatives. This proposal is also consistent with integral criteria to classify LAMs, based on both the short- and long-term radioactive behavior. Applications of these rating criteria to activated components from various fusion designs are shown

  12. Small Mismatches in Fatty Acyl Tail Lengths Can Effect Non Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug Induced Membrane Fusion.

    Majumdar, Anupa; Sarkar, Munna

    2016-06-01

    Biological membranes are made up of a variety of lipids with diverse physicochemical properties. The lipid composition modulates different lipidic parameters, such as hydration, dynamics, lipid packing, curvature strain, etc. Changes in these parameters affect various membrane-mediated processes, such as membrane fusion which is an integral step in many biological processes. Packing defects, which originate either from mismatch in the headgroup region or in the hydrophobic acyl tail region, play a major role in modulating membrane dynamics. In this study, we demonstrate how even a small mismatch in the fatty acyl chain length, achieved by incorporation of low concentrations (up to 30 mol %) of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) into dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs), alters several lipidic parameters like packing, dynamics, and headgroup hydration. This in turn affects non steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) induced membrane fusion. Dynamic light scattering, differential scanning calorimetry, second-derivative absorption spectrophotometry, and steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence have been used to elucidate the effect of small mismatch in the tails in DMPC/DPPC mixed vesicles and how it modulates membrane fusion induced by the oxicam NSAIDs, meloxicam (Mx), piroxicam (Px), and tenoxicam (Tx). Fusion kinetics was monitored using fluorescence based fusion assays. At low DPPC concentration of 10 mol %, additional fluidization promotes lipid mixing to some extent for Mx, but at higher mol % of DPPC, subsequent increase in rigidity of membrane interior along with increase in headgroup hydration, synergistically inhibits fusion to various extents for the three different drugs, Mx, Px, and Tx. PMID:27153337

  13. Automatically Identifying Fusion Events between GLUT4 Storage Vesicles and the Plasma Membrane in TIRF Microscopy Image Sequences

    Jian Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative analysis of the dynamic behavior about membrane-bound secretory vesicles has proven to be important in biological research. This paper proposes a novel approach to automatically identify the elusive fusion events between VAMP2-pHluorin labeled GLUT4 storage vesicles (GSVs and the plasma membrane. The differentiation is implemented to detect the initiation of fusion events by modified forward subtraction of consecutive frames in the TIRFM image sequence. Spatially connected pixels in difference images brighter than a specified adaptive threshold are grouped into a distinct fusion spot. The vesicles are located at the intensity-weighted centroid of their fusion spots. To reveal the true in vivo nature of a fusion event, 2D Gaussian fitting for the fusion spot is used to derive the intensity-weighted centroid and the spot size during the fusion process. The fusion event and its termination can be determined according to the change of spot size. The method is evaluated on real experiment data with ground truth annotated by expert cell biologists. The evaluation results show that it can achieve relatively high accuracy comparing favorably to the manual analysis, yet at a small fraction of time.

  14. Membrane separation technologies: their application to the fusion reactor fuel cycle

    The future fusion reactor fuel will be a mixture of deuterium and tritium. Deuterium is produced using traditional separation technology. Tritium, on the contrary, must be produced by means of a nuclear reaction between neutrons and lithium atoms within the reactor breeder which could be a lithiated ceramic material or a liquid metal containing lithium. The tritium produced in the breeder needs a proper extraction process to reach the required purity level. A conceptual modified version of the tritium recovery plant for a solid ceramic breeder, working with two membranes reaction/separation units, is studied in this work. The first considered membrane unit is a catalytic ceramic membrane reactor to remove, via oxidation, the hydrogen isotopes from the purge gas (He); the second is a Pd/Ag membrane permeator to separate the hydrogen isotopes from the water shift reactor gaseous products. The modelling and the mass balances have been obtained either on the basis of data in the literature or on experimental results. (orig.)

  15. Effects of retroviral envelope-protein cleavage upon trafficking, incorporation, and membrane fusion

    Retroviral envelope glycoproteins undergo proteolytic processing by cellular subtilisin-like proprotein convertases at a polybasic amino-acid site in order to produce the two functional subunits, SU and TM. Most previous studies have indicated that envelope-protein cleavage is required for rendering the protein competent for promoting membrane fusion and for virus infectivity. We have investigated the role of proteolytic processing of the Moloney murine leukemia virus envelope-protein through site-directed mutagenesis of the residues near the SU-TM cleavage site and have established that uncleaved glycoprotein is unable either to be incorporated into virus particles efficiently or to induce membrane fusion. Additionally, the results suggest that cleavage of the envelope protein plays an important role in intracellular trafficking of protein via the cellular secretory pathway. Based on our results it was concluded that a positively charged residue located at either P2 or P4 along with the arginine at P1 is essential for cleavage.

  16. Implication des peptides de fusion des glycoprotéines de fusion virales de classe I dans la fusion membranaire

    Brasseur R.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The implication of fusion peptides of class I viral fusion glycoproteins in the membrane fusion. Viral infection involves fusion between the viral envelope and the target cell plasmic membrane. The fusion is induced by a glycoprotein anchored in the viral envelope. After activation, the glycoprotein undergoes a conformational change inducing the exposure of a region named « fusion peptide » essential for the fusion process. Studies on glycoproteins and on isolated fusion peptides have allowed to better understand the mechanisms involved in membrane fusion. It was notably shown that fusion peptides induce fusion and leakage of membranes. These peptides are able to insert obliquely in a membrane when helical. This orientation induces lipid destabilisation, favouring membrane fusion. However, to date, none of these in vitro, in vivo or in silico studies has determined the minimal sequence required for membrane fusion. Using the obliquity-fusogenicity relationship, the latter was determined by molecular modelling for two viruses, the Human Immunodeficiency Virus and the Bovine Leukaemia Virus. These new results are of particular interest in the development of vaccines and antiviral drugs.

  17. Identification and characterization of LFD-2, a predicted fringe protein required for membrane integrity during cell fusion in neurospora crassa.

    Palma-Guerrero, Javier; Zhao, Jiuhai; Gonçalves, A Pedro; Starr, Trevor L; Glass, N Louise

    2015-03-01

    The molecular mechanisms of membrane merger during somatic cell fusion in eukaryotic species are poorly understood. In the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa, somatic cell fusion occurs between genetically identical germinated asexual spores (germlings) and between hyphae to form the interconnected network characteristic of a filamentous fungal colony. In N. crassa, two proteins have been identified to function at the step of membrane fusion during somatic cell fusion: PRM1 and LFD-1. The absence of either one of these two proteins results in an increase of germling pairs arrested during cell fusion with tightly appressed plasma membranes and an increase in the frequency of cell lysis of adhered germlings. The level of cell lysis in ΔPrm1 or Δlfd-1 germlings is dependent on the extracellular calcium concentration. An available transcriptional profile data set was used to identify genes encoding predicted transmembrane proteins that showed reduced expression levels in germlings cultured in the absence of extracellular calcium. From these analyses, we identified a mutant (lfd-2, for late fusion defect-2) that showed a calcium-dependent cell lysis phenotype. lfd-2 encodes a protein with a Fringe domain and showed endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi membrane localization. The deletion of an additional gene predicted to encode a low-affinity calcium transporter, fig1, also resulted in a strain that showed a calcium-dependent cell lysis phenotype. Genetic analyses showed that LFD-2 and FIG1 likely function in separate pathways to regulate aspects of membrane merger and repair during cell fusion. PMID:25595444

  18. Fusion

    Mahaffey, James A

    2012-01-01

    As energy problems of the world grow, work toward fusion power continues at a greater pace than ever before. The topic of fusion is one that is often met with the most recognition and interest in the nuclear power arena. Written in clear and jargon-free prose, Fusion explores the big bang of creation to the blackout death of worn-out stars. A brief history of fusion research, beginning with the first tentative theories in the early 20th century, is also discussed, as well as the race for fusion power. This brand-new, full-color resource examines the various programs currently being funded or p

  19. Fusion blanket materials development and recent R and D activities

    Development of structural materials plays an important role in the feasibility of fusion power plant. The candidate structural materials for future fusion reactors are Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic (RAFM) steel, nano structured ODS Steel, vanadium alloys and SiC/SiCf composite etc. RAFM steel is presently considered as the structural material for Lead Lithium Ceramic Breeder (LLCB) Test Blanket Module (TBM) because of its high void swelling resistance and improved thermal properties compared to austenitic steel. Development of RAFM steel in India is being carried out in full swing in collaboration with various research laboratories and steel industries. This paper presents an overview of the Indian activities on fusion blanket materials and describes in brief the efforts made to develop IN-RAFM steel as structural material for the LLCB TBM. In future, due to enhanced properties of vanadium base alloy and nano structured materials like ODS RAFMS, RAFM steel may be replaced by these materials for its application in DEMO relevant fusion reactor. Future R and D activities will be specifically towards the development of these structural materials for fusion reactor

  20. Effect of Amphipathic HIV Fusion Inhibitor Peptides on POPC and POPC/Cholesterol Membrane Properties: A Molecular Simulation Study

    Luís M. S. Loura

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available T-20 and T-1249 fusion inhibitor peptides were shown to interact with 1-palmitoyl-2-oleyl-phosphatidylcholine (POPC (liquid disordered, ld and POPC/cholesterol (1:1 (POPC/Chol (liquid ordered, lo bilayers, and they do so to different extents. Although they both possess a tryptophan-rich domain (TRD, T-20 lacks a pocket binding domain (PBD, which is present in T-1249. It has been postulated that the PBD domain enhances FI interaction with HIV gp41 protein and with model membranes. Interaction of these fusion inhibitor peptides with both the cell membrane and the viral envelope membrane is important for function, i.e., inhibition of the fusion process. We address this problem with a molecular dynamics approach focusing on lipid properties, trying to ascertain the consequences and the differences in the interaction of T-20 and T-1249 with ld and lo model membranes. T-20 and T-1249 interactions with model membranes are shown to have measurable and different effects on bilayer structural and dynamical parameters. T-1249’s adsorption to the membrane surface has generally a stronger influence in the measured parameters. The presence of both binding domains in T-1249 appears to be paramount to its stronger interaction, and is shown to have a definite importance in membrane properties upon peptide adsorption.

  1. Applications of superpermeable membranes in fusion: the flux density problem and experimental progress

    Livshits, A. [Bonch-Bruyevich Univ., St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Ohyabu, N. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Furoh-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-01 (Japan); Notkin, M. [Bonch-Bruyevich Univ., St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Alimov, V. [Bonch-Bruyevich Univ., St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Suzuki, H. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Furoh-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-01 (Japan); Samartsev, A. [Bonch-Bruyevich Univ., St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Solovyov, M. [Bonch-Bruyevich Univ., St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Grigoriadi, I. [Bonch-Bruyevich Univ., St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Glebovsky, A. [Bonch-Bruyevich Univ., St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Busnyuk, A. [Bonch-Bruyevich Univ., St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Doroshin, A. [Bonch-Bruyevich Univ., St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Komatsu, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Furoh-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-01 (Japan)

    1997-02-01

    Superpermeable membranes whose permeability to energetic hydrogen approaches the permeability of an opening of the same area can be employed to separate D/T and He in fusion machine exhausts, to control the edge plasma and divertor conditions (by pumping and/or arranging of gas circulation through SOL or divertor) and to pump and recuperate D/T in auxiliary systems e.g. in pellet or neutral beam injection. One of the key points is the operation at permeation flux densities of up to 10{sup 16}-10{sup 19} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. Theory predicts that the highest flux densities may be reached with superpermeable membranes based on the V group metals: the limit conditioned by a maximum permissible hydrogen concentration in bulk metal is expected to be as high as {proportional_to}10{sup 19} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. The experimental membrane system comprised a cylindrical Nb membrane and an incandescent Ta/Nb atomizer placed inside. The hydrogen pumping speed by this system amounts to {proportional_to}10{sup 3} l/s, with a specific pumping speed of {proportional_to}1 l/s per cm{sup 2} membrane area and {proportional_to}8 l/s per cm{sup 2} atomizer area. Superpermeability was observed at record parameters referring both to the flux density of 3 x 10{sup 17} H/cm{sup 2}/s (by one order of magnitude larger than ever before) and to the operational pressure of 3 x 10{sup -2} Torr. A long-term reliable operation of this system proved being possible even in a vacuum far inferior to UHV conditions. (orig.).

  2. TRAIL-CM4 fusion protein shows in vitro antibacterial activity and a stronger antitumor activity than solo TRAIL protein.

    Sang, Ming; Zhang, Jiaxin; Li, Bin; Chen, Yuqing

    2016-06-01

    A TRAIL-CM4 fusion protein in soluble form with tumor selective apoptosis and antibacterial functions was expressed in the Escherichia coli expression system and isolated through dialysis refolding and histidine-tag Nickel-affinity purification. Fresh Jurkat cells were treated with the TRAIL-CM4 fusion protein. Trypan blue staining and MTT analyses showed that, similar to a TRAIL positive control, Jurkat cell proliferation was significantly inhibited. Flow cytometry analyses using Annexin V-fluorescein revealed that Jurkat cells treated with the TRAIL-CM4 fusion protein exhibited increased apoptosis. Laser confocal microscopy showed that APB-CM4 and the fusion protein TRAIL-CM4 can bind to Jurkat cell membranes and initiate their destruction. ABP-CM4 enhances the antitumor activity of TRAIL by targeting and damaging the tumor cell membrane. In antibacterial experiments, agar well diffusion and bacterial growth inhibition curve assays revealed concentration-dependent TRAIL-CM4 antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli K12D31. The expressed TRAIL-CM4 fusion protein exhibited enhanced antitumor and antibacterial activities. Fusion protein expression allowed the two different proteins to function in combination. PMID:26926590

  3. Line tension at lipid phase boundaries as driving force for HIV fusion peptide-mediated fusion.

    Yang, Sung-Tae; Kiessling, Volker; Tamm, Lukas K

    2016-01-01

    Lipids and proteins are organized in cellular membranes in clusters, often called 'lipid rafts'. Although raft-constituent ordered lipid domains are thought to be energetically unfavourable for membrane fusion, rafts have long been implicated in many biological fusion processes. For the case of HIV gp41-mediated membrane fusion, this apparent contradiction can be resolved by recognizing that the interfaces between ordered and disordered lipid domains are the predominant sites of fusion. Here we show that line tension at lipid domain boundaries contributes significant energy to drive gp41-fusion peptide-mediated fusion. This energy, which depends on the hydrophobic mismatch between ordered and disordered lipid domains, may contribute tens of kBT to fusion, that is, it is comparable to the energy required to form a lipid stalk intermediate. Line-active compounds such as vitamin E lower line tension in inhomogeneous membranes, thereby inhibit membrane fusion, and thus may be useful natural viral entry inhibitors. PMID:27113279

  4. Comparative study of somatostatin-human serum albumin fusion proteins and natural somatostatin on receptor binding, internalization and activation.

    Ying Peng

    Full Text Available Albumin fusion technology, the combination of small molecular proteins or peptides with human serum albumin (HSA, is an effective method for improving the medicinal values of natural small molecular proteins or peptides. However, comparative studies between HSA-fusion proteins or peptides and the parent small molecules in biological and molecular mechanisms are less reported. In this study, we examined the binding property of two novel somatostatin-HSA fusion proteins, (SST142-HSA and (SST282-HSA, to human SSTRs in stably expressing SSTR1-5 HEK 293 cells; observed the regulation of receptor internalization and internalized receptor recycling; and detected the receptors activation of HSA fusion proteins in stably expressing SSTR2- and SSTR3-EGFP cells. We showed that both somatostatin-HSA fusion proteins had high affinity to all five SSTRs, stimulated the ERK1/2 phosphorylation and persistently inhibited the accumulation of forskolin-stimulated cAMP in SSTR2- and SSTR3-expressing cells; but were less potent than the synthetic somatostatin-14 (SST-14. Our experiments also showed that somatostatin-HSA fusion proteins did not induce the receptors internalization; rather, they accelerated the recycling of the internalized receptors induced by SST-14 to the plasma membrane. Our results indicated that somatostatin-HSA fusion proteins, different from SST-14, exhibit some particular properties in binding, regulating, and activating somatostatin receptors.

  5. Charged fusion product loss measurements using nuclear activation

    In ITER, α particle loss measurements will be required in order to understand the alpha particle physics. Techniques capable of operating in a fusion reactor environment need further development. Recent experimental studies on JET demonstrated the potential of nuclear activation to measure the flux of escaping MeV ions. New results from MeV ion induced activation of metallic, ceramic, and crystal samples placed near the plasma edge are reported. Activation products were measured as function of orientation with respect to the magnetic field as well as function of the distance to the plasma. Sample activity was measured using ultralow-level gamma-ray spectrometry. Distribution of 14.68 MeV fusion proton induced activation products is strongly anisotropic in agreement with simulations and falls off sharply with increasing distance to the plasma. Prospects for using the technique in ITER are discussed.

  6. Minor differences in the molecular machinery mediating regulated membrane fusion has major impact on metabolic health.

    Valladolid-Acebes, Ismael; Daraio, Teresa; Brismar, Kerstin; Hökfelt, Tomas; Bark, Christina

    2016-01-01

    The exocytosis of signaling molecules from neuronal, neuroendocrine and endocrine cells is regulated by membrane fusion involving SNAP-25 and associated SNARE proteins. The importance of this process for metabolic control recently became evident by studies of mouse mutants genetically engineered to only express one of 2 closely related, alternatively-spliced variants of SNAP-25. The results showed that even minor differences in the function of proteins regulating exocytosis are sufficient to provoke metabolic disease, including hyperglycaemia, liver steatosis, adipocyte hypertrophy and obesity. Thus, an imbalance in the dynamics of hormonal and/or neurotransmitter release can cause obesity and type 2 diabetes. This recent discovery highlights the fact that metabolic health requires a perfectly operating interplay between the SNARE protein machinery in excitable cells and the organs responding to these messengers. PMID:27617177

  7. Early Events in Chikungunya Virus Infection—From Virus CellBinding to Membrane Fusion

    Mareike K. S. van Duijl-Richter

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Chikungunya virus (CHIKV is a rapidly emerging mosquito-borne alphavirus causing millions of infections in the tropical and subtropical regions of the world. CHIKV infection often leads to an acute self-limited febrile illness with debilitating myalgia and arthralgia. A potential long-term complication of CHIKV infection is severe joint pain, which can last for months to years. There are no vaccines or specific therapeutics available to prevent or treat infection. This review describes the critical steps in CHIKV cell entry. We summarize the latest studies on the virus-cell tropism, virus-receptor binding, internalization, membrane fusion and review the molecules and compounds that have been described to interfere with virus cell entry. The aim of the review is to give the reader a state-of-the-art overview on CHIKV cell entry and to provide an outlook on potential new avenues in CHIKV research.

  8. Early Events in Chikungunya Virus Infection-From Virus Cell Binding to Membrane Fusion.

    van Duijl-Richter, Mareike K S; Hoornweg, Tabitha E; Rodenhuis-Zybert, Izabela A; Smit, Jolanda M

    2015-07-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a rapidly emerging mosquito-borne alphavirus causing millions of infections in the tropical and subtropical regions of the world. CHIKV infection often leads to an acute self-limited febrile illness with debilitating myalgia and arthralgia. A potential long-term complication of CHIKV infection is severe joint pain, which can last for months to years. There are no vaccines or specific therapeutics available to prevent or treat infection. This review describes the critical steps in CHIKV cell entry. We summarize the latest studies on the virus-cell tropism, virus-receptor binding, internalization, membrane fusion and review the molecules and compounds that have been described to interfere with virus cell entry. The aim of the review is to give the reader a state-of-the-art overview on CHIKV cell entry and to provide an outlook on potential new avenues in CHIKV research. PMID:26198242

  9. Highly specific inhibition of leukaemia virus membrane fusion by interaction of peptide antagonists with a conserved region of the coiled coil of envelope

    van Aalten Daan MF

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human T-cell leukaemia virus (HTLV-1 and bovine leukaemia virus (BLV entry into cells is mediated by envelope glycoprotein catalyzed membrane fusion and is achieved by folding of the transmembrane glycoprotein (TM from a rod-like pre-hairpin intermediate to a trimer-of-hairpins. For HTLV-1 and for several virus groups this process is sensitive to inhibition by peptides that mimic the C-terminal α-helical region of the trimer-of-hairpins. Results We now show that amino acids that are conserved between BLV and HTLV-1 TM tend to map to the hydrophobic groove of the central triple-stranded coiled coil and to the leash and C-terminal α-helical region (LHR of the trimer-of-hairpins. Remarkably, despite this conservation, BLV envelope was profoundly resistant to inhibition by HTLV-1-derived LHR-mimetics. Conversely, a BLV LHR-mimetic peptide antagonized BLV envelope-mediated membrane fusion but failed to inhibit HTLV-1-induced fusion. Notably, conserved leucine residues are critical to the inhibitory activity of the BLV LHR-based peptides. Homology modeling indicated that hydrophobic residues in the BLV LHR likely make direct contact with a pocket at the membrane-proximal end of the core coiled-coil and disruption of these interactions severely impaired the activity of the BLV inhibitor. Finally, the structural predictions assisted the design of a more potent antagonist of BLV membrane fusion. Conclusion A conserved region of the HTLV-1 and BLV coiled coil is a target for peptide inhibitors of envelope-mediated membrane fusion and HTLV-1 entry. Nevertheless, the LHR-based inhibitors are highly specific to the virus from which the peptide was derived. We provide a model structure for the BLV LHR and coiled coil, which will facilitate comparative analysis of leukaemia virus TM function and may provide information of value in the development of improved, therapeutically relevant, antagonists of HTLV-1 entry into cells.

  10. Functional Implications of Plasma Membrane Condensation for T Cell Activation

    Rentero, Carles; Zech, Tobias; Quinn, Carmel M.; Engelhardt, Karin; Williamson, David; Grewal, Thomas; Jessup, Wendy; Harder, Thomas; Gaus, Katharina

    2008-01-01

    The T lymphocyte plasma membrane condenses at the site of activation but the functional significance of this receptor-mediated membrane reorganization is not yet known. Here we demonstrate that membrane condensation at the T cell activation sites can be inhibited by incorporation of the oxysterol 7-ketocholesterol (7KC), which is known to prevent the formation of raft-like liquid-ordered domains in model membranes. We enriched T cells with 7KC, or cholesterol as control, to assess the importa...

  11. Identification and purification of a sperm surface protein with a potential role in sperm-egg membrane fusion.

    Primakoff, P; Hyatt, H; Tredick-Kline, J

    1987-01-01

    Sperm-egg plasma membrane fusion during fertilization was studied using guinea pig gametes and mAbs to sperm surface antigens. The mAb, PH-30, strongly inhibited sperm-egg fusion in a concentration-dependent fashion. When zona-free eggs were inseminated with acrosome-reacted sperm preincubated in saturating (140 micrograms/ml) PH-30 mAb, the percent of eggs showing fusion was reduced 75%. The average number of sperm fused per egg was also reduced by 75%. In contrast a control mAb, PH-1, preincubated with sperm at 400 micrograms/ml, caused no inhibition. The PH-30 and PH-1 mAbs apparently recognize the same antigen but bind to two different determinants. Both mAbs immunoprecipitated the same two 125I-labeled polypeptides with Mr 60,000 (60 kD) and Mr 44,000 (44 kD). Boiling a detergent extract of sperm severely reduced the binding of PH-30 but had essentially no effect on the binding of PH-1, indicating that the two mAbs recognize different epitopes. Immunoelectron microscopy revealed that PH-30 mAb binding was restricted to the sperm posterior head surface and was absent from the equatorial region. The PH-30 and PH-1 mAbs did not bind to sperm from the testis, the caput, or the corpus epididymis. PH-30 mAb binding was first detectable on sperm from the proximal cauda epididymis, i.e., sperm at the developmental stage where fertilization competence appears. After purification by mAb affinity chromatography, the PH-30 protein retained antigenic activity, binding both the PH-30 and PH-1 mAbs. The purified protein showed two polypeptide bands of 60 and 44 kD on reducing SDS PAGE. The two polypeptides migrated further (to approximately 49 kD and approximately 33 kD) on nonreducing SDS PAGE, showing that they do not contain interchain disulfide bonds, but probably have intrachain disulfides. 44 kD appears not to be a proteolytic fragment of 60 kD because V8 protease digestion patterns did not reveal related peptide patterns from the 44- and 60-kD bands. In the absence of

  12. Reassessment of the lineage fusion hypothesis for the origin of double membrane bacteria.

    Kristen S Swithers

    Full Text Available In 2009, James Lake introduced a new hypothesis in which reticulate phylogeny reconstruction is used to elucidate the origin of gram-negative bacteria (Nature 460: 967-971. The presented data supported the gram-negative bacteria originating from an ancient endosymbiosis between the Actinobacteria and Clostridia. His conclusion was based on a presence-absence analysis of protein families that divided all prokaryotes into five groups: Actinobacteria, Double Membrane bacteria (DM, Clostridia, Archaea and Bacilli. Of these five groups, the DM are by far the largest and most diverse group compared to the other groupings. While the fusion hypothesis for the origin of double membrane bacteria is enticing, we show that the signal supporting an ancient symbiosis is lost when the DM group is broken down into smaller subgroups. We conclude that the signal detected in James Lake's analysis in part results from a systematic artifact due to group size and diversity combined with low levels of horizontal gene transfer.

  13. Convenient synthesis and application of versatile nucleic acid lipid membrane anchors in the assembly and fusion of liposomes

    Ries, Oliver; Löffler, Philipp M. G.; Vogel, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Hydrophobic moieties like lipid membrane anchors are highly demanded modifications for nucleic acid oligomers. Membrane-anchor modified oligonucleotides are applicable in biomedicine leading to new delivery strategies as well as in biophysical investigations towards assembly and fusion of liposomes...... or the construction of DNA origami structures. We herein present the synthesis and applications of versatile lipid membrane anchor building blocks suitable for solid phase oligonucleotide synthesis. These are readily synthesized in bulk in five to seven steps from commercially available precursors...... and can be incorporated at any position within an oligonucleotide without significantly altering duplex stability and structure as proven by thermal denaturation experiments and circular dichroism. Furthermore, applicability could be demonstrated by assembly and fusion of liposomes mediated by lipid...

  14. Overview of Fusion Nuclear Technology Activities at SWIP

    The fusion nuclear technology (FNT) activities at SWIP are overviewed, which are including the design and R and D of the helium-cooled solid breeder test blanket module (TBM), development of Liquid metal blanket technology, structure and function materials research for ITER shielding and test blanket, ITER shielding blanket material development and the joining technologies and the R and D for ITER gravity support.

  15. The role of blood cell membrane lipids on the mode of action of HIV-1 fusion inhibitor sifuvirtide

    Research highlights: → Sifuvirtide interacts with erythrocyte and lymphocyte membrane in a concentration dependent manner by decreasing its dipole potential. → Dipole potential variations in lipid vesicles show sifuvirtide's lipid selectivity towards saturated phosphatidylcholines. → This peptide-membrane interaction may direct the drug towards raft-like membrane domains where the receptors used by HIV are located, facilitating its inhibitory action. -- Abstract: Sifuvirtide is a gp41 based peptide that inhibits HIV-1 fusion with the host cells and is currently under clinical trials. Previous studies showed that sifuvirtide partitions preferably to saturated phosphatidylcholine lipid membranes, instead of fluid-phase lipid vesicles. We extended the study to the interaction of the peptide with circulating blood cells, by using the dipole potential sensitive probe di-8-ANEPPS. Sifuvirtide decreased the dipole potential of erythrocyte and lymphocyte membranes in a concentration dependent manner, demonstrating its interaction. Also, the lipid selectivity of the peptide towards more rigid phosphatidylcholines was confirmed based on the dipole potential variations. Overall, the interaction of the peptide with the cell membranes is a contribution of different lipid preferences that presumably directs the peptide towards raft-like domains where the receptors are located, facilitating the reach of the peptide to its molecular target, the gp41 in its pre-fusion conformation.

  16. Low pH-dependent Hepatitis C Virus Membrane Fusion Depends on E2 Integrity, Target Lipid Composition, and Density of Virus Particles*

    Haid, Sibylle; Pietschmann, Thomas; Pécheur, Eve-Isabelle

    2009-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is an enveloped, positive strand RNA virus of about 9.6 kb. Like all enveloped viruses, the HCV membrane fuses with the host cell membrane during the entry process and thereby releases the genome into the cytoplasm, initiating the viral replication cycle. To investigate the features of HCV membrane fusion, we developed an in vitro fusion assay using cell culture-produced HCV and fluorescently labeled liposomes. With this model we could show that HCV-mediated fusion can...

  17. A cell penetrating peptide-integrated and enediyne-energized fusion protein shows potent antitumor activity.

    Ru, Qin; Shang, Bo-Yang; Miao, Qing-Fang; Li, Liang; Wu, Shu-Ying; Gao, Rui-Juan; Zhen, Yong-Su

    2012-11-20

    Arginine-rich peptides belong to a subclass of cell penetrating peptides that are taken up by living cells and can be detected freely diffusing inside the cytoplasm and nucleoplasm. This phenomenon has been attributed to either an endocytotic mode of uptake and a subsequent release from vesicles or a direct membrane penetration. Lidamycin is an antitumor antibiotic, which consists of an active enediyne chromophore (AE) and a noncovalently bound apoprotein (LDP). In the present study, a fusion protein (Arg)(9)-LDP composed of cell penetrating peptide (Arg)(9) and LDP was prepared by DNA recombination, and the enediyne-energized fusion protein (Arg)(9)-LDP-AE was prepared by molecular reconstitution. The data in fixed cells demonstrated that (Arg)(9)-LDP could rapidly enter cells, and the results based on fluorescence activated cell sorting indicated that the major route for (Arg)(9)-mediated cellular uptake of protein molecules was endocytosis. (Arg)(9)-LDP-AE demonstrated more potent cytotoxicity against different carcinoma cell lines than lidamycin in vitro. In the mouse hepatoma 22 model, (Arg)(9)-LDP-AE (0.3mg/kg) suppressed the tumor growth by 89.2%, whereas lidamycin (0.05 mg/kg) by 74.6%. Furthermore, in the glioma U87 xenograft model in nude mice, (Arg)(9)-LDP-AE at 0.2mg/kg suppressed tumor growth by 88.8%, compared with that of lidamycin by 62.9% at 0.05 mg/kg. No obvious toxic effects were observed in all groups during treatments. The results showed that energized fusion protein (Arg)(9)-LDP-AE was more effective than lidamycin and would be a promising candidate for glioma therapy. In addition, this approach to manufacturing fusion proteins might serve as a technology platform for the development of new cell penetrating peptides-based drugs. PMID:22982402

  18. A common landscape for membrane-active peptides

    Last, Nicholas B.; Schlamadinger, Diana E.; Miranker, Andrew D.

    2013-01-01

    Three families of membrane-active peptides are commonly found in nature and are classified according to their initial apparent activity. Antimicrobial peptides are ancient components of the innate immune system and typically act by disruption of microbial membranes leading to cell death. Amyloid peptides contribute to the pathology of diverse diseases from Alzheimer's to type II diabetes. Preamyloid states of these peptides can act as toxins by binding to and permeabilizing cellular membranes...

  19. delta-Opioid receptors exhibit high efficiency when activating trimeric G proteins in membrane domains.

    Bourova, Lenka; Kostrnova, Alexandra; Hejnova, Lucie; Moravcova, Zuzana; Moon, Hyo-Eun; Novotny, Jiri; Milligan, Graeme; Svoboda, Petr

    2003-04-01

    Low-density membrane fragments (domains) were separated from the bulk of plasma membranes of human embryonic kidney (HEK)293 cells expressing a delta-opioid (DOP) receptor-Gi1alpha fusion protein by drastic homogenization and flotation on equilibrium sucrose density gradients. The functional activity of trimeric G proteins and capacity of the DOP receptor to stimulate both the fusion protein-linked Gi1alpha and endogenous pertussis-toxin sensitive G proteins was measured as d-Ala2, d-Leu5-enkephalin stimulated high-affinity GTPase or guanosine-5'-[gamma-35S]triphosphate ([35S]GTPgammaS) binding. The maximum d-Ala2-d-Leu5 enkephalin (DADLE)-stimulated GTPase was two times higher in low-density membrane fragments than in bulk of plasma membranes; 58 and 27 pmol/mg/min, respectively. The same difference was obtained for [35S]GTPgammaS binding. Contrarily, the low-density domains contained no more than half the DOP receptor binding sites (Bmax = 6.6 pmol/mg versus 13.6 pmol/mg). Thus, when corrected for expression levels of the receptor, low-density domains exhibited four times higher agonist-stimulated GTPase and [35S]GTPgammaS binding than the bulk plasma membranes. The regulator of G protein signaling RGS1, enhanced further the G protein functional activity but did not remove the difference between domain-bound and plasma membrane pools of G protein. The potency of the agonist in functional studies and the affinity of specific [3H]DADLE binding to the receptor were, however, the same in both types of membranes - EC50 = 4.5 +/- 0.1 x 10(-8) and 3.2 +/- 1.4 x 10(-8) m for GTPase; Kd = 1.2 +/- 0.1 and 1.3 +/- 0.1 nm for [3H]DADLE radioligand binding assay. Similar results were obtained when sodium bicarbonate was used for alkaline isolation of membrane domains. By contrast, detergent-insensitive membrane domains isolated following treatment of cells with Triton X100 exhibited no DADLE-stimulated GTPase or GTPgammaS binding. Functional coupling between the DOP receptor

  20. Probing plasma membrane microdomains in cowpea protoplasts using lipidated GFP-fusion proteins and multimode FRET microscopy.

    Vermeer, J.E.M.; Munster, van, B.C.; Vischer, N O; Gadella, Th.W.J.

    2004-01-01

    Multimode fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) microscopy was applied to study the plasma membrane organization using different lipidated green fluorescent protein (GFP)-fusion proteins co-expressed in cowpea protoplasts. Cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) was fused to the hyper variable region of a small maize GTPase (ROP7) and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) was fused to the N-myristoylation motif of the calcium-dependent protein kinase 1 (LeCPK1) of tomato. Upon co-expressing in cowp...

  1. Active Nuclear Import of Membrane Proteins Revisited

    Laba, Justyna K; Steen, Anton; Popken, Petra; Chernova, Alina; Poolman, Bert; Veenhoff, Liesbeth M

    2015-01-01

    It is poorly understood how membrane proteins destined for the inner nuclear membrane pass the crowded environment of the Nuclear Pore Complex (NPC). For the Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins Src1/Heh1 and Heh2, a transport mechanism was proposed where the transmembrane domains diffuse through the m

  2. Dolichol phosphate induces non-bilayer structures, vesicle fusion and transbilayer movements of lipids in model membranes

    de Kruijff, B.; Van Duijn, G.; Valtersson, C.; Chojnacki, T.; Verkleij, A.J.; Dallner, G.

    1987-05-01

    The effect of dolichols, polyprenols, dolichol esterified with fatty acids, and dolichol phosphate on the structure and fluidity of model membranes was studied using different biophysical techniques. These studies suggest that (1) dolichol and dolichol derivatives destabilize unsaturated PE-containing bilayers and promote hexagonal II phase formation; (2) high concentrations of dolichol induce lipid structures characterized by isotropic T P NMR and particulate fracture faces. The effect of dolichol and dolichyl phosphate on fusion between large unilamellar vesicles of DOPC and DOPE was studied using a fluroescence resonance energy transfer assay. The influence of dolichyl phosphate on the transbilary movement of DOPC in multilamellar vesicles (MLV) and large unilamellar vesicles (LUV) composed of DOPC and DOPE (1:2) was investigated by using the PC-specified transfer protein. The results indicate that: (1) both dolichol and dolichyl phosphate enhance vesicle fusion in a comparable and concentration-dependent way; (2) the amount of exchangeable PC from MLVs is increased by dolichyl phosphate probably as a result of fusion processes. It thus appears that these polyprenols are potent destabilizers of bilayer structure and that this process is accompanied by membrane fusion and transbilayer transport of phospholipids.

  3. Dolichol phosphate induces non-bilayer structures, vesicle fusion and transbilayer movements of lipids in model membranes

    The effect of dolichols, polyprenols, dolichol esterified with fatty acids, and dolichol phosphate on the structure and fluidity of model membranes was studied using different biophysical techniques. These studies suggest that (1) dolichol and dolichol derivatives destabilize unsaturated PE-containing bilayers and promote hexagonal II phase formation; (2) high concentrations of dolichol induce lipid structures characterized by isotropic 31P NMR and particulate fracture faces. The effect of dolichol and dolichyl phosphate on fusion between large unilamellar vesicles of DOPC and DOPE was studied using a fluroescence resonance energy transfer assay. The influence of dolichyl phosphate on the transbilary movement of DOPC in multilamellar vesicles (MLV) and large unilamellar vesicles (LUV) composed of DOPC and DOPE (1:2) was investigated by using the PC-specified transfer protein. The results indicate that: (1) both dolichol and dolichyl phosphate enhance vesicle fusion in a comparable and concentration-dependent way; (2) the amount of exchangeable PC from MLVs is increased by dolichyl phosphate probably as a result of fusion processes. It thus appears that these polyprenols are potent destabilizers of bilayer structure and that this process is accompanied by membrane fusion and transbilayer transport of phospholipids

  4. Activation Calculation for a Fusion Experimental Breeder FEB-E

    FENGKaiming

    2002-01-01

    A fusion breeder might be an essential intermediate application of fusion energy at earlier term, since it has the potential to provide plenty of commercial fissile fuel. Based on fusion physics and technologies available at present and in the near future, the realistic fusion experimental breeder, FEB-E was designed.

  5. Membrane-associated chromate reductase activity from Enterobacter cloacae.

    P. C. Wang; Mori, T.; Toda, K.; Ohtake, H

    1990-01-01

    Washed cells of Enterobacter cloacae HO1 reduced hexavalent chromium (chromate: CrO4(2-) anaerobically. Chromate reductase activity was preferentially associated with the membrane fraction of the cells. Right-side-out membrane vesicles prepared from E. cloacae cells showed high chromate reductase activities when ascorbate-reduced phenazine methosulfate was added as an electron donor.

  6. Saccharomyces cerevisiae nuclear fusion requires prior activation by alpha factor.

    Rose, M D; Price, B R; Fink, G. R.

    1986-01-01

    We have developed a protocol for efficient fusion of spheroplasts of the same mating type. Nuclear fusion in this whole-cell system is also efficient and closely parallels nuclear fusion in heterosexual mating of intact cells. In the spheroplast fusion system, nuclear fusion is dependent on both the KAR1 gene and prior exposure to alpha factor. The major products of nuclear fusion in the spheroplast fusion assay were true diploids that were homozygous at the mating-type locus. An additional 1...

  7. Water permeation through Nafion membranes: the role of water activity.

    Majsztrik, Paul; Bocarsly, Andrew; Benziger, Jay

    2008-12-25

    The permeation of water through 1100 equivalent weight Nation membranes has been measured for film thicknesses of 51-254 microm, temperatures of 30-80 degrees C, and water activities (a(w)) from 0.3 to 1 (liquid water). Water permeation coefficients increased with water content in Nafion. For feed side water activity in the range 0 permeation coefficients increased linearly with water activity and scaled inversely with membrane thickness. The permeation coefficients were independent of membrane thickness when the feed side of the membrane was in contact with liquid water (a(w) = 1). The permeation coefficient for a 127 microm thick membrane increased by a factor of 10 between contacting the feed side of the membrane to water vapor (a(w) = 0.9) compared to liquid water (a(w) = 1). Water permeation couples interfacial transport across the fluid membrane interface with water transport through the hydrophilic phase of Nafion. At low water activity the hydrophilic volume fraction is small and permeation is limited by water diffusion. The volume fraction of the hydrophilic phase increases with water activity, increasing water transport. As a(w) --> 1, the effective transport rate increased by almost an order of magnitude, resulting in a change of the limiting transport resistance from water permeation across the membrane to interfacial mass transport at the gas/membrane interface. PMID:19053672

  8. Fusion of liposomes with the plasma membrane of epithelial cells: Fate of incorporated lipids as followed by freeze fracture and autoradiography of plastic sections

    Knoll, G.; Burger, K.N.J.; Bron, R.; van Meer, G.; Verkleij, A. J.

    1988-01-01

    The fusion of liposomes with the plasma membrane of influenza virus- infected monolayers of an epithelial cell line, Madin-Darby canine kidney cells (van Meer et al., 1985. Biochemistry. 24:3593-3602), has been analyzed by morphological techniques. The distribution of liposomal lipids over the apical and basolateral plasma membrane domains after fusion was assessed by autoradiography of liposomal [3H]dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine after rapid freezing or chemical fixation and further processi...

  9. Fusion of liposomes with the plasma membrane of epithelial cells: Fate of incorporated lipids as followed by freeze fracture and autoradiography of plastic sections

    Knoll, G; Burger, K.N.J.; Bron, R.; van Meer, G.; Verkleij, A J

    1988-01-01

    The fusion of liposomes with the plasma membrane of influenza virus-infected monolayers of an epithelial cell line, Madin-Darby canine kidney cells (van Meer et al., 1985. Biochemistry, 24: 3593-3602), has been analyzed by morphological techniques. The distribution of liposomal lipids over the apical and basolateral plasma membrane domains after fusion was assessed by autoradiography of liposomal [3H]dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine after rapid freezing or chemical fixation and further processi...

  10. Fusion of liposomes with the plasma membrane of epithelial cells: fate of incorporated lipids as followed by freeze fracture and autoradiography of plastic sections

    1988-01-01

    The fusion of liposomes with the plasma membrane of influenza virus- infected monolayers of an epithelial cell line, Madin-Darby canine kidney cells (van Meer et al., 1985. Biochemistry. 24:3593-3602), has been analyzed by morphological techniques. The distribution of liposomal lipids over the apical and basolateral plasma membrane domains after fusion was assessed by autoradiography of liposomal [3H]dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine after rapid freezing or chemical fixation and further processi...

  11. The effect of acclimation temperature on the fusion kinetics of lipid vesicles derived from endoplasmic reticulum membranes of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) liver.

    Miranda, Estuardo J; Hazel, Jeffrey R

    2002-02-01

    Membrane fusion is an obligatory step in many vital cellular processes. The well-established enrichment of bilayer-destabilizing lipids in membranes of poikilotherms subjected to growth at low temperatures leads to the prediction that such membranes will possess a greater propensity to undergo fusion. This hypothesis was explicitly tested in the present study by determining the kinetics of fusion between small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs) prepared from endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes of thermally-acclimated (to 5 and 20 degrees C) rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) liver and bovine brain phosphatidylserine (BBPS). At temperatures above 10 degrees C, ER vesicles from 5 degrees C-acclimated trout, fused more rapidly and to a greater extent with BBPS vesicles (by average factors of 1.25- and 1.45-fold, respectively) than ER vesicles of 20 degrees C-acclimated trout. At temperatures >35 degrees C, apparent fusion rates declined while the extent of fusion increased in both acclimation groups. Fusion kinetics were found to be well correlated with and limited by the physical properties and phase state of the BBPS vesicles. These results indicate that dynamic attributes of biological membranes, such as the propensity to undergo fusion, are of potential regulatory significance and are partially conserved when growth or environmental temperature changes. PMID:11818217

  12. Charged fusion product loss measurements using nuclear activation

    Bonheure, G.; Hult, M.; González de Orduña, R.; Arnold, D.; Dombrowski, H.; Laubenstein, M.; Wieslander, E.; Vermaercke, P.; Murari, A.; Popovichev, S.; Mlynář, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 81, č. 10 (2010), 10D331. ISSN 0034-6748. [TOPICAL CONFERENCE ON HIGH-TEMPERATURE PLASMA DIAGNOSTICS/18th./. Wildwood, New Jersey, 16.05.2010-20.05.2010] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/10/2055; GA MŠk LA08048 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : fusion * fast particle loss * diagnostics * activation Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.598, year: 2010 http://rsi.aip.org/resource/1/rsinak/v81/i10/p10D331_s1

  13. Fusing simulation and experiment: The effect of mutations on the structure and activity of the influenza fusion peptide

    Lousa, Diana; Pinto, Antónia R. T.; Victor, Bruno L.; Laio, Alessandro; Veiga, Ana S.; Castanho, Miguel A. R. B.; Soares, Cláudio M.

    2016-01-01

    During the infection process, the influenza fusion peptide (FP) inserts into the host membrane, playing a crucial role in the fusion process between the viral and host membranes. In this work we used a combination of simulation and experimental techniques to analyse the molecular details of this process, which are largely unknown. Although the FP structure has been obtained by NMR in detergent micelles, there is no atomic structure information in membranes. To answer this question, we performed bias-exchange metadynamics (BE-META) simulations, which showed that the lowest energy states of the membrane-inserted FP correspond to helical-hairpin conformations similar to that observed in micelles. BE-META simulations of the G1V, W14A, G12A/G13A and G4A/G8A/G16A/G20A mutants revealed that all the mutations affect the peptide’s free energy landscape. A FRET-based analysis showed that all the mutants had a reduced fusogenic activity relative to the WT, in particular the mutants G12A/G13A and G4A/G8A/G16A/G20A. According to our results, one of the major causes of the lower activity of these mutants is their lower membrane affinity, which results in a lower concentration of peptide in the bilayer. These findings contribute to a better understanding of the influenza fusion process and open new routes for future studies. PMID:27302370

  14. Fusing simulation and experiment: The effect of mutations on the structure and activity of the influenza fusion peptide.

    Lousa, Diana; Pinto, Antónia R T; Victor, Bruno L; Laio, Alessandro; Veiga, Ana S; Castanho, Miguel A R B; Soares, Cláudio M

    2016-01-01

    During the infection process, the influenza fusion peptide (FP) inserts into the host membrane, playing a crucial role in the fusion process between the viral and host membranes. In this work we used a combination of simulation and experimental techniques to analyse the molecular details of this process, which are largely unknown. Although the FP structure has been obtained by NMR in detergent micelles, there is no atomic structure information in membranes. To answer this question, we performed bias-exchange metadynamics (BE-META) simulations, which showed that the lowest energy states of the membrane-inserted FP correspond to helical-hairpin conformations similar to that observed in micelles. BE-META simulations of the G1V, W14A, G12A/G13A and G4A/G8A/G16A/G20A mutants revealed that all the mutations affect the peptide's free energy landscape. A FRET-based analysis showed that all the mutants had a reduced fusogenic activity relative to the WT, in particular the mutants G12A/G13A and G4A/G8A/G16A/G20A. According to our results, one of the major causes of the lower activity of these mutants is their lower membrane affinity, which results in a lower concentration of peptide in the bilayer. These findings contribute to a better understanding of the influenza fusion process and open new routes for future studies. PMID:27302370

  15. Active membrane having uniform physico-chemically functionalized ion channels

    Gerald, II, Rex E; Ruscic, Katarina J; Sears, Devin N; Smith, Luis J; Klingler, Robert J; Rathke, Jerome W

    2012-09-24

    The present invention relates to a physicochemically-active porous membrane for electrochemical cells that purports dual functions: an electronic insulator (separator) and a unidirectional ion-transporter (electrolyte). The electrochemical cell membrane is activated for the transport of ions by contiguous ion coordination sites on the interior two-dimensional surfaces of the trans-membrane unidirectional pores. One dimension of the pore surface has a macroscopic length (1 nm-1000 .mu.m) and is directed parallel to the direction of an electric field, which is produced between the cathode and the anode electrodes of an electrochemical cell. The membrane material is designed to have physicochemical interaction with ions. Control of the extent of the interactions between the ions and the interior pore walls of the membrane and other materials, chemicals, or structures contained within the pores provides adjustability of the ionic conductivity of the membrane.

  16. Nonequilibrium fluctuations, traveling waves, and instabilities in active membranes.

    Ramaswamy, S; Toner, J; Prost, J

    2000-04-10

    The stability of a flexible fluid membrane containing a distribution of mobile, active proteins (e.g., proton pumps) is shown to depend on the structure and functional asymmetry of the proteins. A stable active membrane is in a nonequilibrium steady state with height fluctuations whose statistical properties are governed by the protein activity. Disturbances are predicted to travel as waves at sufficiently long wavelength, with speed set by the normal velocity of the pumps. The unstable case involves a spontaneous, pump-driven undulation of the membrane, with clumping of the proteins in regions of high activity. PMID:11019123

  17. Mechanics of nonplanar membranes with force-dipole activity

    Lomholt, Michael Andersen

    2006-01-01

    A study is made of how active membrane proteins can modify the long wavelength mechanics of fluid membranes. The activity of the proteins is modelled as disturbing the protein surroundings through nonlocal force distributions of which a force-dipole distribution is the simplest example. An analyt...... contributions to mechanical properties such as tension and bending moments become apparent. It is also explained how the activity can induce a hydrodynamic attraction between the active proteins in the membrane. © 2006 The American Physical Society....

  18. Development of low activation vanadium steel for fusion applications

    Proposed fusion reactors may enjoy significant advantages regarding public safety and waste disposal over current fission reactors. Neutron activation to the structural materials can be minimized by the appropriate choice of alloys. Unfortunately, commercially developed alloys for high temperature applications become activated with neutron absorption leading to sometimes very long decay chains. The present paper discusses the results of a new ''low activation'' ferritic alloy (UCVS-1) developed at UCLA. This new alloy, which contains vanadium instead of molybdenum for high temperature strength, shows very promising combinations of strength, ductility and low long-term radioactive products. It is shown in this paper that the strength and ductility of UCVS-1 are comparable to 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo up to 4000C, achieving significant advantages regarding safety and radioactive waste disposal

  19. Chloroquine Increases Glucose Uptake via Enhancing GLUT4 Translocation and Fusion with the Plasma Membrane in L6 Cells

    Qi Zhou

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Chloroquine can induce an increase in the cellular uptake of glucose; however, the underlying mechanism is unclear. Methods: In this study, translocation of GLUT4 and intracellular Ca2+ changes were simultaneously observed by confocal microscope in L6 cells stably over-expressing IRAP-mOrange. The GLUT4 fusion with the plasma membrane (PM was traced using HA-GLUT4-GFP. Glucose uptake was measured using a cell-based glucose uptake assay. GLUT4 protein was detected by Western blotting and mRNA level was detected by RT-PCR. Results: We found that chloroquine induced significant increases in glucose uptake, glucose transporter GLUT4 translocation to the plasma membrane (GTPM, GLUT4 fusion with the PM, and intracellular Ca2+ in L6 muscle cells. Chloroquine-induced increases of GTPM and intracellular Ca2+ were inhibited by Gallein (Gβγ inhibitor and U73122 (PLC inhibitor. However, 2-APB (IP3R blocker only blocked the increase in intracellular Ca2+ but did not inhibit GTPM increase. These results indicate that chloroquine, via the Gβγ-PLC-IP3-IP3R pathway, induces elevation of Ca2+, and this Ca2+ increase does not play a role in chloroqui-ne-evoked GTPM increase. However, GLUT4 fusion with the PM and glucose uptake were significantly inhibited with BAPTA-AM. This suggests that Ca2+ enhances GLUT4 fusion with the PM resulting in glucose uptake increase. Conclusion: Our data indicate that chloroquine via Gβγ-PLC-IP3-IP3R induces Ca2+ elevation, which in turn promotes GLUT4 fusion with the PM. Moreover, chloroquine can enhance GLUT4 trafficking to the PM. These mechanisms eventually result in glucose uptake increase in control and insulin-resistant L6 cells. These findings suggest that chloroquine might be a potential drug for improving insulin tolerance in diabetic patients.

  20. Effect of components in activated sludge liquor on membrane fouling in a submerged membrane bioreactor

    YU Shui-li; ZHAO Fang-bo; ZHANG Xiao-hui; JING Guo-lin; ZHEN Xiang-hua

    2006-01-01

    By a membrane bioreactor with a settle tank in long-term operation and batch experiments, the effects of flocs, soluble microorganism products (SMPs) and metal ions in activated sludge liquor on membrane fouling were investigated. The results showed that foulants absorbed each other and formed a fouling layer as a "second membrane" influencing the permeability of the membrane.The "gel layer" caused by SMPs and "cake layer" by flocs showed great differences in morphology by analysis of scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscope. The "gel layer" was more compact and of poor permeability. When the membrane flux was MPa/h). SMPs played very important roles on membrane fouling. In the bu1king sludge, with SMPs increasing, the rate of membrane fouling (0.0132 MPa/h) was faster. While after flocculation of the SMPs, the rate of fouling decreased to 0.0034 MPa/h. Flocs could keep holes in their overlaps. They could alleviate membrane fouling by preventing the SMPs directly attaching on membrane surface.

  1. Nonequilibrium Fluctuations, Travelling Waves, and Instabilities in Active Membranes

    Ramaswamy, Sriram; Toner, John; Prost, Jacques

    1999-01-01

    The stability of a flexible fluid membrane containing a distribution of mobile, active proteins (e.g. proton pumps) is shown to depend on the structure and functional asymmetry of the proteins. A stable active membrane is in a nonequilibrium steady state with height fluctuations whose statistical properties are governed by the protein activity. Disturbances are predicted to travel as waves at sufficiently long wavelength, with speed set by the normal velocity of the pumps. The unstable case i...

  2. Accelerator ampersand Fusion Research Division 1991 summary of activities

    This report discusses research projects in the following areas: Heavy-ion fusion accelerator research; magnetic fusion energy; advanced light source; center for x-ray optics; exploratory studies; superconducting magnets; and bevalac operations

  3. Accelerator Fusion Research Division 1991 summary of activities

    Berkner, Klaus H.

    1991-12-01

    This report discusses research projects in the following areas: Heavy-ion fusion accelerator research; magnetic fusion energy; advanced light source; center for x-ray optics; exploratory studies; superconducting magnets; and bevalac operations.

  4. Accelerator & Fusion Research Division 1991 summary of activities

    1991-12-01

    This report discusses research projects in the following areas: Heavy-ion fusion accelerator research; magnetic fusion energy; advanced light source; center for x-ray optics; exploratory studies; superconducting magnets; and bevalac operations.

  5. Accelerator and fusion research division. 1992 Summary of activities

    1992-12-01

    This report contains brief discussions on research topics in the following area: Heavy-Ion Fusion Accelerator Research; Magnetic Fusion Energy; Advanced Light Source; Center for Beam Physics; Superconducting Magnets; and Bevalac Operations.

  6. Elementary Active Membranes Have the Power of Counting

    Porreca, Antonio E.; Leporati, Alberto; Mauri, Giancarlo; Zandron, Claudio; Research Group on Natural Computing (Universidad de Sevilla) (Coordinador)

    2011-01-01

    We prove that uniform families of P systems with active membranes operat- ing in polynomial time can solve the whole class of PP decision problems, without using nonelementary membrane division or dissolution rules. This result also holds for families having a stricter uniformity condition than the usual one.

  7. Molecular dynamics analysis of conformational change of paramyxovirus F protein during the initial steps of membrane fusion

    Highlights: ► Initial conformational change of paramyxovirus F protein is caused only by mechanical forces. ► HRA region undergoes a structural change from a beta + alpha conformation to an extended coil and then to an all-alpha conformation. ► HRS domains of F protein form three single α-helices prior to generation of the coiled coil. -- Abstract: The fusion of paramyxovirus to the cell membrane is mediated by fusion protein (F protein) present in the virus envelope, which undergoes a dramatic conformational change during the process. Unlike hemagglutinin in orthomyxovirus, this change is not mediated by an alteration of environmental pH, and its cause remains unknown. Steered molecular dynamics analysis leads us to suggest that the conformational modification is mediated only by stretching mechanical forces once the transmembrane fusion peptide of the protein is anchored to the cell membrane. Such elongating forces will generate major secondary structure rearrangement in the heptad repeat A region of the F protein; from β-sheet conformation to an elongated coil and then spontaneously to an α-helix. In addition, it is proposed that the heptad repeat A region adopts a final three-helix coiled coil and that this structure appears after the formation of individual helices in each monomer.

  8. Development of new cloning vectors for the production of immunogenic outer membrane fusion proteins in Escherichia coli

    Cornelis, P.; Sierra, J.C.; Lim, A. Jr.; Malur, A. [Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Paardenstraat (Belgium)] [and others

    1996-02-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa lipoprotein gene (oprI) was modified by cloning an in-frame polylinker in both orientations at the end of oprI. The resulting plasmids pVUBI and pVUB2 allow high lipoprotein production in E. coli after IPTG induction. The modified lipoproteins are present in the outer membrane and surface-exposed. Outer membrane-bound fusion proteins of different sizes were produced and used to generate antibodies without use of adjuvant. An 87 bp DNA fragment from the vp72 capsid protein gene of African Swine Fever virus (ASFV) and the entire Leishmania major glycoprotein gp63 gene were expressed in this system. Finally, a fusion lipoprotein containing a 16 amino acid epitope from the preS2b region of Hepatitis B virus (HBV) was presented by an antigen-presenting cell line to a T-cell hybridoma while the corresponding cross-linked S2b peptide was not. The results suggest that OprI-based fusion proteins can be used to generate both humoral and cellular immune responses. 44 refs., 7 figs.

  9. Molecular dynamics analysis of conformational change of paramyxovirus F protein during the initial steps of membrane fusion

    Martin-Garcia, Fernando; Mendieta-Moreno, Jesus Ignacio; Mendieta, Jesus [Centro de Biologia Molecular ' Severo Ochoa' (CSIC/UAM), C/ Nicolas Cabrera, 1, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Biomol-Informatics SL, Parque Cientifico de Madrid, C/ Faraday, 7, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Gomez-Puertas, Paulino, E-mail: pagomez@cbm.uam.es [Centro de Biologia Molecular ' Severo Ochoa' (CSIC/UAM), C/ Nicolas Cabrera, 1, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Initial conformational change of paramyxovirus F protein is caused only by mechanical forces. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HRA region undergoes a structural change from a beta + alpha conformation to an extended coil and then to an all-alpha conformation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HRS domains of F protein form three single {alpha}-helices prior to generation of the coiled coil. -- Abstract: The fusion of paramyxovirus to the cell membrane is mediated by fusion protein (F protein) present in the virus envelope, which undergoes a dramatic conformational change during the process. Unlike hemagglutinin in orthomyxovirus, this change is not mediated by an alteration of environmental pH, and its cause remains unknown. Steered molecular dynamics analysis leads us to suggest that the conformational modification is mediated only by stretching mechanical forces once the transmembrane fusion peptide of the protein is anchored to the cell membrane. Such elongating forces will generate major secondary structure rearrangement in the heptad repeat A region of the F protein; from {beta}-sheet conformation to an elongated coil and then spontaneously to an {alpha}-helix. In addition, it is proposed that the heptad repeat A region adopts a final three-helix coiled coil and that this structure appears after the formation of individual helices in each monomer.

  10. A Histidine Switch in Hemagglutinin-Neuraminidase Triggers Paramyxovirus-Cell Membrane Fusion▿

    Krishnan, Anuja; Santosh K Verma; Mani, Prashant; Gupta, Rahul; Kundu, Suman; Sarkar, Debi P

    2008-01-01

    Most paramyxovirus fusion proteins require coexpression of and activation by a homotypic attachment protein, hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN), to promote membrane fusion. However, the molecular mechanism of the activation remains unknown. We previously showed that the incorporation of a monohistidylated lipid into F-virosome (Sendai viral envelope containing only fusion protein) enhanced its fusion to hepatocytes, suggesting that the histidine residue in the lipid accelerated membrane fusion....

  11. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division 1989 summary of activities

    1990-06-01

    This report discusses the research being conducted at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Accelerator and Fusion Research Division. The main topics covered are: heavy-ion fusion accelerator research; magnetic fusion energy; advanced light source; center for x-ray optics; exploratory studies; high-energy physics technology; and bevalac operations.

  12. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division 1989 summary of activities

    This report discusses the research being conducted at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Accelerator and Fusion Research Division. The main topics covered are: heavy-ion fusion accelerator research; magnetic fusion energy; advanced light source; center for x-ray optics; exploratory studies; high-energy physics technology; and bevalac operations

  13. Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Measurements of HIV Fusion Peptide 13CO to Lipid 31P Proximities Support Similar Partially Inserted Membrane Locations of the α Helical and β Sheet Peptide Structures

    Gabrys, Charles M.; Qiang, Wei; Sun, Yan; Xie, Li; Schmick, Scott D.; Weliky, David P.

    2013-10-01

    Fusion of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) membrane and the host cell membrane is an initial step of infection of the host cell. Fusion is catalyzed by gp41, which is an integral membrane protein of HIV. The fusion peptide (FP) is the -25 N-terminal residues of gp41 and is a domain of gp41 that plays a key role in fusion catalysis likely through interaction with the host cell membrane. Much of our understanding of the FP domain has been accomplished with studies of -HFP-, i.e., a -25-residue peptide composed of the FP sequence but lacking the rest of gp41. HFP catalyzes fusion between membrane vesicles and serves as a model system to understand fusion catalysis. HFP binds to membranes and the membrane location of HFP is likely a significant determinant of fusion catalysis perhaps because the consequent membrane perturbation reduces the fusion activation energy. In the present study, many HFPs were synthesized and differed in the residue position that was 13CO backbone labeled. Samples were then prepared that each contained a singly 13CO labeled HFP incorporated into membranes that lacked cholesterol. HFP had distinct molecular populations with either α helical or oligomeric - sheet structure. Proximity between the HFP 13CO nuclei and 31P nuclei in the membrane headgroups was probed by solid-state NMR (SSNMR) rotational-echo double-resonance (REDOR) measurements. For many samples, there were distinct 13CO shifts for the α helical and - sheet structures so that the proximities to 31P nuclei could be determined for each structure. Data from several differently labeled HFPs were then incorporated into a membrane location model for the particular structure. In addition to the 13CO labeled residue position, the HFPs also differed in sequence and/or chemical structure. -HFPmn- was a linear peptide that contained the 23 N-terminal residues of gp41. -HFPmn_V2E- contained the V2E mutation that for HIV leads to greatly reduced extent of fusion and infection. The

  14. Fusion reactor technology studies common development activities of CEA and KFK in the frame of the european community fusion programme

    In 1982, it was decided in the European Community to complement the fusion programme by a technology part. The initial content of this technology programme was defined by European experts. The laboratories associated to Euratom were invited to participate with proposals, which were then selected by the Fusion Technology Steering Committee. Coherent with these activities, steps were taken to define the next generation of fusion experiments by the newly founded Next European Torus (NET) Team. To contribute in the most efficient way, CEA and KfK have agreed to cooperate by complementary activities, common experiments and by forming common research groups. The particular agreements have been kept open for partners from other EC laboratories to join. The different cooperative activities in the field of nuclear technologies are described below together with first results and findings

  15. Silver-enhanced block copolymer membranes with biocidal activity

    Madhavan, Poornima

    2014-11-12

    Silver nanoparticles were deposited on the surface and pore walls of block copolymer membranes with highly ordered pore structure. Pyridine blocks constitute the pore surfaces, complexing silver ions and promoting a homogeneous distribution. Nanoparticles were then formed by reduction with sodium borohydride. The morphology varied with the preparation conditions (pH and silver ion concentration), as confirmed by field emission scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Silver has a strong biocide activity, which for membranes can bring the advantage of minimizing the growth of bacteria and formation of biofilm. The membranes with nanoparticles prepared under different pH values and ion concentrations were incubated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa and compared with the control. The strongest biocidal activity was achieved with membranes containing membranes prepared under pH 9. Under these conditions, the best distribution with small particle size was observed by microscopy.

  16. Targeting of a chimeric human histone fusion mRNA to membrane-bound polysomes in HeLa cells

    The subcellular location of histone mRNA-containing polysomes may play a key role in the posttranscriptional events that mediate histone mRNA turnover following inhibition of DNA synthesis. Previously, it has been shown that histone mRNA is found primarily on free polysomes that are associated with the cytoskeleton. The authors report here the construction of an Escherichia coli pBR322 β-lactamase signal peptide-human H3 histone fusion gene. The fusion transcript is targeted to membrane-bound polysomes and remains stable following interruption of DNA replication. Relocating mRNA within the cell may provide a procedure for studying the posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression

  17. Targeting of a chimeric human histone fusion mRNA to membrane-bound polysomes in HeLa cells

    Zambetti, G.; Stein, J.; Stein, G.

    1987-05-01

    The subcellular location of histone mRNA-containing polysomes may play a key role in the posttranscriptional events that mediate histone mRNA turnover following inhibition of DNA synthesis. Previously, it has been shown that histone mRNA is found primarily on free polysomes that are associated with the cytoskeleton. The authors report here the construction of an Escherichia coli pBR322 ..beta..-lactamase signal peptide-human H3 histone fusion gene. The fusion transcript is targeted to membrane-bound polysomes and remains stable following interruption of DNA replication. Relocating mRNA within the cell may provide a procedure for studying the posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression.

  18. An Extended Membrane System with Active Membranes to Solve Automatic Fuzzy Clustering Problems.

    Peng, Hong; Wang, Jun; Shi, Peng; Pérez-Jiménez, Mario J; Riscos-Núñez, Agustín

    2016-05-01

    This paper focuses on automatic fuzzy clustering problem and proposes a novel automatic fuzzy clustering method that employs an extended membrane system with active membranes that has been designed as its computing framework. The extended membrane system has a dynamic membrane structure; since membranes can evolve, it is particularly suitable for processing the automatic fuzzy clustering problem. A modification of a differential evolution (DE) mechanism was developed as evolution rules for objects according to membrane structure and object communication mechanisms. Under the control of both the object's evolution-communication mechanism and the membrane evolution mechanism, the extended membrane system can effectively determine the most appropriate number of clusters as well as the corresponding optimal cluster centers. The proposed method was evaluated over 13 benchmark problems and was compared with four state-of-the-art automatic clustering methods, two recently developed clustering methods and six classification techniques. The comparison results demonstrate the superiority of the proposed method in terms of effectiveness and robustness. PMID:26790484

  19. Pandemic H1N1 influenza A directly induces a robust and acute inflammatory gene signature in primary human bronchial epithelial cells downstream of membrane fusion

    Paquette, Stéphane G. [Division of Experimental Therapeutics, Toronto General Hospital Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Institute of Medical Science, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Banner, David [Division of Experimental Therapeutics, Toronto General Hospital Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Chi, Le Thi Bao [Department of Microbiology, Hue University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Thua Thien Hue (Viet Nam); Carlo Urbani Centre, Hue University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Thua Thien Hue (Viet Nam); Leon, Alberto J. [Division of Experimental Therapeutics, Toronto General Hospital Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); International Institute of Infection and Immunity, Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong (China); Xu, Luoling; Ran, Longsi [Division of Experimental Therapeutics, Toronto General Hospital Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Huang, Stephen S.H. [Division of Experimental Therapeutics, Toronto General Hospital Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Farooqui, Amber [Division of Experimental Therapeutics, Toronto General Hospital Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); International Institute of Infection and Immunity, Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong (China); and others

    2014-01-05

    Pandemic H1N1 influenza A (H1N1pdm) elicits stronger pulmonary inflammation than previously circulating seasonal H1N1 influenza A (sH1N1), yet mechanisms of inflammatory activation in respiratory epithelial cells during H1N1pdm infection are unclear. We investigated host responses to H1N1pdm/sH1N1 infection and virus entry mechanisms in primary human bronchial epithelial cells in vitro. H1N1pdm infection rapidly initiated a robust inflammatory gene signature (3 h post-infection) not elicited by sH1N1 infection. Protein secretion inhibition had no effect on gene induction. Infection with membrane fusion deficient H1N1pdm failed to induce robust inflammatory gene expression which was rescued with restoration of fusion ability, suggesting H1N1pdm directly triggered the inflammatory signature downstream of membrane fusion. Investigation of intra-virion components revealed H1N1pdm viral RNA (vRNA) triggered a stronger inflammatory phenotype than sH1N1 vRNA. Thus, our study is first to report H1N1pdm induces greater inflammatory gene expression than sH1N1 in vitro due to direct virus–epithelial cell interaction. - Highlights: • We investigated H1N1pdm/sH1N1 infection in primary epithelial cells. • H1N1pdm directly initiated a robust inflammatory gene signature, sH1N1 did not. • H1N1pdm viral RNA triggered a stronger response than sH1N1. • H1N1pdm induces greater response due to direct virus–cell interaction. • These results have potential to impact vaccine and therapeutic development.

  20. Pandemic H1N1 influenza A directly induces a robust and acute inflammatory gene signature in primary human bronchial epithelial cells downstream of membrane fusion

    Pandemic H1N1 influenza A (H1N1pdm) elicits stronger pulmonary inflammation than previously circulating seasonal H1N1 influenza A (sH1N1), yet mechanisms of inflammatory activation in respiratory epithelial cells during H1N1pdm infection are unclear. We investigated host responses to H1N1pdm/sH1N1 infection and virus entry mechanisms in primary human bronchial epithelial cells in vitro. H1N1pdm infection rapidly initiated a robust inflammatory gene signature (3 h post-infection) not elicited by sH1N1 infection. Protein secretion inhibition had no effect on gene induction. Infection with membrane fusion deficient H1N1pdm failed to induce robust inflammatory gene expression which was rescued with restoration of fusion ability, suggesting H1N1pdm directly triggered the inflammatory signature downstream of membrane fusion. Investigation of intra-virion components revealed H1N1pdm viral RNA (vRNA) triggered a stronger inflammatory phenotype than sH1N1 vRNA. Thus, our study is first to report H1N1pdm induces greater inflammatory gene expression than sH1N1 in vitro due to direct virus–epithelial cell interaction. - Highlights: • We investigated H1N1pdm/sH1N1 infection in primary epithelial cells. • H1N1pdm directly initiated a robust inflammatory gene signature, sH1N1 did not. • H1N1pdm viral RNA triggered a stronger response than sH1N1. • H1N1pdm induces greater response due to direct virus–cell interaction. • These results have potential to impact vaccine and therapeutic development

  1. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division: 1984 summary of activities

    1985-05-01

    During fiscal 1984, major programmatic activities in AFRD continued in each of five areas: accelerator operations, highlighted by the work of nuclear science users, who produced clear evidence for the formation of compressed nuclear matter during heavy-ion collisions; high-energy physics, increasingly dominated by our participation in the design of the Superconducting Super Collider; heavy-ion fusion accelerator research, which focused on the design of a four-beam experiment as a first step toward assessing the promise of heavy-ion inertial-confinement fusion; and research at the Center for X-Ray Optics, which completed its first year of broadly based activities aimed at the exploitation of x-ray and ultraviolet radiation. At the same time, exploratory studies were under way, aimed at investigating major new programs for the division. During the past year, for example, we took a preliminary look at how we could use the Bevatron as an injector for a pair of colliding-beam rings that might provide the first glimpse of a hitherto unobserved state of matter called the quark-gluon plasma. Together with Livermore scientists, we also conducted pioneering high-gain free-electron laser (FEL) experiments and proposed a new FEL-based scheme (called the two-beam accelerator) for accelerating electrons to very high energies. And we began work on the design of the Coherent XUV Facility (CXF), an advanced electron storage ring for the production of intense coherent radiation from either undulators or free-electron lasers.

  2. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division: 1984 summary of activities

    During fiscal 1984, major programmatic activities in AFRD continued in each of five areas: accelerator operations, highlighted by the work of nuclear science users, who produced clear evidence for the formation of compressed nuclear matter during heavy-ion collisions; high-energy physics, increasingly dominated by our participation in the design of the Superconducting Super Collider; heavy-ion fusion accelerator research, which focused on the design of a four-beam experiment as a first step toward assessing the promise of heavy-ion inertial-confinement fusion; and research at the Center for X-Ray Optics, which completed its first year of broadly based activities aimed at the exploitation of x-ray and ultraviolet radiation. At the same time, exploratory studies were under way, aimed at investigating major new programs for the division. During the past year, for example, we took a preliminary look at how we could use the Bevatron as an injector for a pair of colliding-beam rings that might provide the first glimpse of a hitherto unobserved state of matter called the quark-gluon plasma. Together with Livermore scientists, we also conducted pioneering high-gain free-electron laser (FEL) experiments and proposed a new FEL-based scheme (called the two-beam accelerator) for accelerating electrons to very high energies. And we began work on the design of the Coherent XUV Facility (CXF), an advanced electron storage ring for the production of intense coherent radiation from either undulators or free-electron lasers

  3. RACC-PULSE, Neutron Activation in Fusion Reactor System

    1 - Description of program or function: CCC-0388/RACC was specifically developed to compute the radioactivity and radioactivity-related parameters (e.g. afterheat, biological hazard potential, etc.) due to neutron activation within Inertial Fusion Energy and Magnetic Fusion energy reactor systems. It can also be utilized to compute the radioactivity in fission, accelerator or any other neutron generating and neutron source system. This new designated RACC-PULSE is based on CCC-0388 and has the capability to model irradiation histories of varying flux levels having varying pulse widths (on times) and dwell periods (off times) and varying maintenance periods. This provides the user with the flexibility of modeling most any complexity of irradiation history beginning with simple steady state operating systems to complex multi-flux level pulse/intermittent operating systems. 2 - Method of solution: The solution method implemented within the RACC-PULSE code is a matrix based method which relies on the evaluation of the Matrix Exponential for the pulse period (on period), dwell period (off time) and post shutdown periods. For the pulsed and dwell periods, the Matrix Exponential was evaluated using the squaring and scaling technique outlined in a review article by Molar and Van Loan entitled Nineteen Dubious Ways to Compute the Exponential of a Matrix. A balanced binary tree method utilized for parameter storage in information systems was employed to evaluate the linear chains constructed for the post shutdown period. The RACC-Pulse code retains the capability of modeling the standard slab, cylinder, sphere and torus geometries in multi-dimensions as well as the point or zero-dimension geometry for Monte Carlo code interfacing. It provides easy interfacing with many of the standard multigroup, multidimensional neutron/photon transport code systems currently employed by the fusion community and implemented on the UNICOS Cray 2 System at NERSC. An auxiliary code is provided

  4. Effects of a perfusion bioreactor activated novel bone substitute in spine fusion in sheep

    Sørensen, Jesper Roed; Koroma, Kariatta Ester; Ding, Ming; Wendt, David; Jespersen, Stig; Juhl, Maria Vinther; Theilgaard, Naseem; Martin, Ivan; Overgaard, Søren

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of a large perfusion-bioreactor cell-activated bone substitute, on a two-level large posterolateral spine fusion sheep model.......To evaluate the effect of a large perfusion-bioreactor cell-activated bone substitute, on a two-level large posterolateral spine fusion sheep model....

  5. Drainin required for membrane fusion of the contractile vacuole in Dictyostelium is the prototype of a protein family also represented in man.

    Becker, M; Matzner, M; Gerisch, G

    1999-01-01

    The contractile vacuole expels water by forming a channel with the plasma membrane and thus enables cells to survive in a hypo-osmotic environment. Here we characterize drainin, a Dictyostelium protein involved in this process, as the first member of a protein family represented in fission yeast, Caenorhabditis elegans and man. Gene replacement in Dictyostelium shows that drainin acts at a checkpoint of channel formation between the contractile vacuole and the plasma membrane. A green fluorescent protein fusion of drainin localizes specifically to the contractile vacuole and rescues its periodic discharge in drainin-null cells. Drainin is a peripheral membrane protein, requiring a short hydrophobic stretch in its C-terminal region for localization and function. We suggest that drainin acts in a signaling cascade that couples a volume-sensing device in the vacuolar membrane to the membrane fusion machinery. PMID:10369671

  6. Development of transcriptional fusions to assess Leptospira interrogans promoter activity.

    Gustavo M Cerqueira

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Leptospirosis is a zoonotic infectious disease that affects both humans and animals. The existing genetic tools for Leptospira spp. have improved our understanding of the biology of this spirochete as well as the interaction of pathogenic leptospires with the mammalian host. However, new tools are necessary to provide novel and useful information to the field. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A series of promoter-probe vectors carrying a reporter gene encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP were constructed for use in L. biflexa. They were tested by constructing transcriptional fusions between the lipL41, Leptospiral Immunoglobulin-like A (ligA and Sphingomyelinase 2 (sph2 promoters from L. interrogans and the reporter gene. ligA and sph2 promoters were the most active, in comparison to the lipL41 promoter and the non-induced controls. The results obtained are in agreement with LigA expression from the L. interrogans Fiocruz L1-130 strain. CONCLUSIONS: The novel vectors facilitated the in vitro evaluation of L. interrogans promoter activity under defined growth conditions which simulate the mammalian host environment. The fluorescence and rt-PCR data obtained closely reflected transcriptional regulation of the promoters, thus demonstrating the suitability of these vectors for assessing promoter activity in L. biflexa.

  7. Recruitment and SNARE-mediated fusion of vesicles in furrow membrane remodeling during cytokinesis in zebrafish embryos

    Cytokinesis is the final stage in cell division that serves to partition cytoplasm and daughter nuclei into separate cells. Membrane remodeling at the cleavage plane is a required feature of cytokinesis in many species. In animal cells, however, the precise mechanisms and molecular interactions that mediate this process are not yet fully understood. Using real-time imaging in live, early stage zebrafish embryos, we demonstrate that vesicles labeled with the v-SNARE, VAMP-2, are recruited to the cleavage furrow during deepening in a microtubule-dependent manner. These vesicles then fuse with, and transfer their VAMP-2 fluorescent label to, the plasma membrane during both furrow deepening and subsequent apposition. This observation indicates that new membrane is being inserted during these stages of cytokinesis. Inhibition of SNAP-25 (a cognate t-SNARE of VAMP-2), using a monoclonal antibody, blocked VAMP-2 vesicle fusion and furrow apposition. Transient expression of mutant forms of SNAP-25 also produced defects in furrow apposition. SNAP-25 inhibition by either method, however, did not have any significant effect on furrow deepening. Thus, our data clearly indicate that VAMP-2 and SNAP-25 play an essential role in daughter blastomere apposition, possibly via the delivery of components that promote the cell-to-cell adhesion required for the successful completion of cytokinesis. Our results also support the idea that new membrane addition, which occurs during late stage cytokinesis, is not required for furrow deepening that results from contractile band constriction

  8. History, progress, achievement and future prospect of research activities on fusion materials by Japanese university researchers

    Research activities on fusion materials by Japanese university researchers are reviewed. Organized research on fusion materials has been initiated around mid 1970s under auspices of Monbusho (Ministry of Education, Science and Culture). Particularly effective was the Special Research Project on Fusion for fiscal year 1980 - 1989. At the same time, Japan/U.S. collaboration on fusion materials (1982 - 2000) has been very successful, yielding numerous useful results. The highlights of the technical achievement of these projects are briefly summarized. Both of these projects may be characterized to be composed of two major tasks, namely, fundamental aspects of alloy development for fusion and high fluence irradiation effects under fusion reactor environment. The basic philosophy of the project is discussed. The recent trend is to organize the university research activities into a comprehensive research network. (orig.)

  9. Constant-space P systems with active membranes

    A. Leporati; Manzoni, L; Mauri, G; Porreca, A; Zandron, C

    2014-01-01

    We show that a constant amount of space is sufficient to simulate a polynomial-space bounded Turing machine by P systems with active membranes. We thus obtain a new characterisation of PSPACE, which raises interesting questions about the definition of space complexity for P systems. We then propose an alternative definition, where the size of the alphabet and the number of membrane labels of each P system are also taken into account. Finally we prove that, when less than a logarithmic number ...

  10. Modeling and vibration control of an active membrane mirror

    Ruggiero, Eric J.; Inman, Daniel J.

    2009-09-01

    The future of space satellite technology lies in ultra-large mirrors and radar apertures for significant improvements in imaging and communication bandwidths. The availability of optical-quality membranes drives a parallel effort for structural models that can capture the dominant dynamics of large, ultra-flexible satellite payloads. Unfortunately, the inherent flexibility of membrane mirrors wreaks havoc with the payload's on-orbit stability and maneuverability. One possible means of controlling these undesirable dynamics is by embedding active piezoelectric ceramics near the boundary of the membrane mirror. In doing so, active feedback control can be used to eliminate detrimental vibration, perform static shape control, and evaluate the health of the structure. The overall motivation of the present work is to design a control system using distributed bimorph actuators to eliminate any detrimental vibration of the membrane mirror. As a basis for this study, a piezoceramic wafer was attached in a bimorph configuration near the boundary of a tensioned rectangular membrane sample. A finite element model of the system was developed to capture the relevant system dynamics from 0 to 300 Hz. The finite element model was compared against experimental results, and fair agreement found. Using the validated finite element models, structural control using linear quadratic regulator control techniques was then used to numerically demonstrate effective vibration control. Typical results show that less than 12 V of actuation voltage is required to eliminate detrimental vibration of the membrane samples in less than 15 ms. The functional gains of the active system are also derived and presented. These spatially descriptive control terms dictate favorable regions within the membrane domain for placing sensors and can be used as a design guideline for structural control applications. The results of the present work demonstrate that thin plate theory is an appropriate modeling

  11. Induction of petite yeast mutants by membrane-active agents.

    Jiménez, J.; Longo, E.; Benítez, T

    1988-01-01

    Ethanol proved to be a strong mutagenic agent of Saccharomyces mitochondrial DNA. Other active membrane solvents, such as tert-butanol, isopropanol, and sodium dodecyl sulfate, also turned out to be powerful petite mutation [rho-] inducers. Mutants defective in ergosterol synthesis (erg mutants) showed an extremely high frequency of spontaneous petite cells, suggesting that mitochondrial membrane alterations that were caused either by changes in its composition, as in the erg mutants, or by t...

  12. Activation of methane using solid oxide membranes

    Elshof, ten, J.E.; Hassel, van, E Edwin; Bouwmeester, H.J.M.

    1995-01-01

    Dense membranes of mixed-conducting perovskite-type oxides La0.6Sr0.4,CO0.8Fe0.2O3 and La0.8Ba0.2Co0.8Fe0.2O3 were used for methane coupling by application of pressure-driven O2 permeation. High operating temperatures, typically above 800°C, were needed to obtain reasonable oxygen fluxes. Conversions were small (1–3%). Both compositions showed comparable C2 selectivities at low methane partial pressures. At higher pressures the selectivity to C2 hydrocarbons for La0.6Sr0.4CO0.8Fe0.2O3 increas...

  13. Beryllium neutron activation detector for pulsed DD fusion sources

    A compact fast neutron detector based on beryllium activation has been developed to perform accurate neutron fluence measurements on pulsed DD fusion sources. It is especially well suited to moderate repetition-rate (9Be(n,α)6He cross-section, energy calibration of the proportional counters, and numerical simulations of neutron interactions and beta-particle paths using MCNP5. The response function R(En) is determined over the neutron energy range 2-4 MeV. The count rate capability of the detector has been studied and the corrections required for high neutron fluence measurements are discussed. For pulsed DD neutron fluencies >3×104 cm-2, the statistical uncertainty in the fluence measurement is better than 1%. A small plasma focus device has been employed as a pulsed neutron source to test two of these new detectors, and their responses are found to be practically identical. Also the level of interfering activation is found to be sufficiently low as to be negligible.

  14. Management of a water leak on actively cooled fusion devices

    ITER will be the most important machine equipped with actively cooled plasma facing components (PFCs). In case of abnormal events during a discharge, the PFC will be submitted to localized transient phenomena (high power densities, run away electrons, etc.), leading, in the worst case, to the degradation of the PFC wall and possibly to a water leak. In any case, a leak will have important consequences for the PFCs and equipment located in the vacuum vessel or connected to the ports such as seals, pumping systems or diagnostics. Considerable experience of these events has been gained at Tore Supra over a period of more than 10 years [J.J. Cordier, Ten years of maintenance on Tore Supra actively cooled components, in: Proceedings of the 21th Symp. of Fusion Technology (SOFT), Madrid, Spain, September, 2000.], which will be useful for the next step machines. This paper describes for each leak size type the procedures for maintaining save conditions in the vacuum vessel. It also presents the methods used at Tore Supra to drain-off the primary loop circuits and to identify the leaky PFC

  15. Activation and waste management considerations of fusion materials

    Cheng, E. T.; Saji, G.

    1994-09-01

    Inconel-625 (Ni625), SS316, Ti-6Al-4V (Ti64), ferritic steel (FS), reduced activity ferritic steel (RAFS), manganese steel (Mn-steel), and V5Cr5Ti (V55), were examined for a near-term experimental D-T fueled fusion power reactor with respect to waste management. Activation calculations for these materials were performed assuming one year continuous operation at 1 MW/m 2 wall loading. The results show that the blanket components made of V55, Ti64, Mn-steel, and FS will be allowed for transfer to an on-site dry storage facility after 10 years of cooling after discharge. To transport the discharged blanket components to a permanent disposal site, the cooling time needed can be within 10 years for Ti64 and V55, provided that the impurities (mainly Ni, Nb and Mo) be controlled to an acceptable level. The RAFS and Mn-steel will need about 30 y cooling time because of its Fe and Mn contents. Ni625, 316SS, and FS, however, will require more than 50000 y cooling time because of their Nb and Mo contents. The RAFS, Mn-steel, Ti64 and V55 can be shallow-land wastes if the impurity level for Nb and Mo is dropped below 10 ppm.

  16. Fusion Machinery

    Sørensen, Jakob Balslev; Milosevic, Ira

    2015-01-01

    SNARE proteins constitute the minimal machinery needed for membrane fusion. SNAREs operate by forming a complex, which pulls the lipid bilayers into close contact and provides the mechanical force needed for lipid bilayer fusion. At the chemical synapse, SNARE-complex formation between the vesicu......SNARE proteins constitute the minimal machinery needed for membrane fusion. SNAREs operate by forming a complex, which pulls the lipid bilayers into close contact and provides the mechanical force needed for lipid bilayer fusion. At the chemical synapse, SNARE-complex formation between...

  17. Expression Screening of Integral Membrane Proteins by Fusion to Fluorescent Reporters.

    Bird, Louise E; Nettleship, Joanne E; Järvinen, Valtteri; Rada, Heather; Verma, Anil; Owens, Raymond J

    2016-01-01

    The production of recombinant integral membrane proteins for structural and functional studies remains technically challenging due to their relatively low levels of expression. To address this problem, screening strategies have been developed to identify the optimal membrane sequence and expression host for protein production. A common approach is to genetically fuse the membrane protein to a fluorescent reporter, typically Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) enabling expression levels, localization and detergent solubilisation to be assessed. Initially developed for screening the heterologous expression of bacterial membrane proteins in Escherichia coli, the method has been extended to eukaryotic hosts, including insect and mammalian cells. Overall, GFP-based expression screening has made a major impact on the number of membrane protein structures that have been determined in the last few years. PMID:27553231

  18. DNA Duplexes with Hydrophobic Modifications Inhibit Fusion between HIV-1 and Cell Membranes

    Xu, Liang; Cai, Lifeng; Chen, Xueliang; Jiang, Xifeng; Chong, Huihui; Zheng, Baohua; Wang, Kun; He, Junlin; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Tao; Cheng, Maosheng; He, Yuxian; Liu, Keliang

    2013-01-01

    Discovery of new drugs for the treatment of AIDS typically possessing unique structures associated with novel mechanisms of action has been of great importance due to the quick drug-resistant mutations of HIV-1 strains. The work presented in this report describes a novel class of DNA duplex-based HIV-1 fusion inhibitors. Hydrophobic groups were introduced into a DNA duplex skeleton either at one end, at both ends, or in the middle. These modified DNA duplexes inhibited fusion between HIV-1 an...

  19. Lipid protrusions membrane softness, and enzymatic activity

    Jensen, Morten Østergaard; Høyrup, P.; Callisen, T.H.;

    2004-01-01

    protrusion modes and mechanical softness of phospholipid bilayers and on the other side the activity of enzymes acting on lipid bilayers composed of different unsaturated lipids. Specifically, our experiments show a correlation between the bilayer bending rigidity and the apparent Arrhenius activation energy...

  20. Confidence building in and through fission and fusion activities

    The peaceful uses of atomic energy are most suitable for achieving worldwide confidence building for the following reasons. (1) In spite of the need for peaceful uses of nuclear energy, the world is facing difficulties in the public perception and acceptance of nuclear works and facilities. (2) The above difficulties are due to many factors, such as the two sides of nuclear energy peaceful and military, the possibility of a large-scale reactor accident, the lack of understanding about radiation and radioactivity, and finally, emotion and egoism. Some of these factors are unique to nuclear-energy, but in other cases of public reactions, there are many facets similar to the above factors. (3) The public concern about safety is at its highest, broadest and severest point ever, coincident with the highest life expectancy in history. Over-precaution and over-protection about certain things may sometimes spoil one's health. Nuclear energy is most definitely suffering from such a trend. As a result, a severe nuclear accident in any country results in severe damage worldwide no manner in what form the real physical effects reach other countries. (4) The huge science and technology efforts required for fission and fusion activities cannot be fully achieved by one country. Explanations of some of the above factors are given. 2 refs

  1. Status of fusion power reactor design activity in JAERI

    A number of fusion power reactor design studies conducted in JAERI over the past 22 years are reviewed and the present status of reactor studies is introduced. A helium gas cooled power reactor which has a blanket with solid lithium ceramics such as Li2O for the breeding material and incolloy-800 for the structural material was proposed in 1973. This is one of the first reactor design using a lithium ceramics blanket concept. Another power reactor design called the Swimming Pool-type Tokamak Reactor (SPTR-P) was completed in 1983. In SPTR-P, the tokamak reactor is submerged in a water pool to utilize water as the shield to reduce long term radioactive waste and to achieve easy repair and maintenance. In 1990, the Steady State Tokamak Reactor (SSTR) concept was proposed as a realistic fusion reactor to be built in the near future. The major feature of SSTR is the maximum utilization of a bootstrap current in order to reduce the power required to maintain steady state operation. It is cooled by pressurized water and uses low activation ferritic steel as the structural material. A study of SSTR-2 to improve the safety and economic aspects of SSTR by replacing the water coolant by a mixture of helium gas and fine solid particles was carried out in 1992. Light yet highly heat resistant material, titanium aluminide intermetallic compound (TiAl), is used as the structural material. The net thermal efficiency larger than 40 % can be achieved with the gas-particulate mixture at 5 MPa and the outlet coolant temperature of 700degC. A concept of a Drastically Easy Maintenance (DREAM) tokamak reactor has recently been proposed. For easy replacement of blanket and divertor, a plasma configuration with high aspect ratio around 6 and a small number of torus sectoring of 12 are selected. A 1/12 torus sector is horizontally pulled out between the TF coils with a straight radial motion. It is estimated that the availability of 85 % can be achieved. (author)

  2. Towards a reduced activation structural materials database for fusion reactors

    Full text: The development of First Wall, Blanket and Divertor materials which are capable of withstanding many years the high neutron and heat fluxes, is a critical path to fusion power. Therefore, the timely availability of a sound materials database has become an indispensable element in international fusion road maps. In order to provide a related materials database for design, construction, licensing and safe operation of the ITER Test Blanket Modules and of a DEMO reactor, a wealth of R and D results on the European reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steel EUROFER, and on oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) variants have become available, mainly in the temperature window 250-700 deg. C. Industrial EUROFER-batches of 3.5 and 8.0 tons have been produced with a variety of semi-finished, quality-assured product forms. Extensive chipless shaping and joining experience taking into account different welding procedures and powder technology product forms have demonstrated that EUROFER type steel complies with a wide range of established manufacturing processes. EUROFER is also resistant to high temperature aging, and the existing creep-rupture properties (∼30000 h) indicated long term stability and predictability. To increase the thermal efficiency of blankets beyond 45%, high temperature resistant SiCf/SiC channel inserts for liquid metal coolant tubes are developed. Mechanical and thermal properties of various SiCf/SiC composits have been measured after neutron radiation. Regarding radiation damage resistance of blanket structural materials, a broad based reactor irradiation programme counts several steps from 2 needs to be removed, the design is presently based on tiles made of W (∼2000 deg. C), as well as on structural materials like W-alloy (∼700-1300 deg. C) and RAF(M)-ODS steel (∼650 deg. C). Severe plastic deformation of pure W and W alloys improves ductility, but does not prevent from re-crystallisation between 850 and 1200 deg. C. For the

  3. Dysferlin Binds SNAREs (Soluble N-Ethylmaleimide-sensitive Factor (NSF) Attachment Protein Receptors) and Stimulates Membrane Fusion in a Calcium-sensitive Manner.

    Codding, Sara J; Marty, Naomi; Abdullah, Nazish; Johnson, Colin P

    2016-07-01

    Resealing of tears in the sarcolemma of myofibers is a necessary step in the repair of muscle tissue. Recent work suggests a critical role for dysferlin in the membrane repair process and that mutations in dysferlin are responsible for limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2B and Miyoshi myopathy. Beyond membrane repair, dysferlin has been linked to SNARE-mediated exocytotic events including cytokine release and acid sphingomyelinase secretion. However, it is unclear whether dysferlin regulates SNARE-mediated membrane fusion. In this study we demonstrate a direct interaction between dysferlin and the SNARE proteins syntaxin 4 and SNAP-23. In addition, analysis of FRET and in vitro reconstituted lipid mixing assays indicate that dysferlin accelerates syntaxin 4/SNAP-23 heterodimer formation and SNARE-mediated lipid mixing in a calcium-sensitive manner. These results support a function for dysferlin as a calcium-sensing SNARE effector for membrane fusion events. PMID:27226605

  4. Re-evaluation of the use of low activation materials in waste management strategies for fusion

    The world fusion programs have had a long goal that fusion power stations should produce only low level waste and thus not pose a burden for the future generations. However, the environmental impact of waste material is determined not only by the level of activation, but also the total volume of activated material. Since a tokamak power plant is large, the potential to generate a correspondingly large volume of activated material exists. The adoption of low activation materials, while important for reducing the radiotoxicity of the most active components, should be done as part of a strategy that also minimizes the volume of waste material that might be categorized as radioactive, even if lower in level. In this paper we examine different fusion blanket and shield designs in terms of their ability to limit the activation of the large vessel/ex-vessel components (e.g. vacuum vessel, magnets) and we identify the trends that allow improved in-vessel shielding to result in reduced vessel/ex-vessel activation. Recycling and clearance are options for reducing the volume of radioactive waste in a fusion power plant. Thus, the performance of typical fusion power plant designs with respect to recycling and clearance criteria are also assessed, to show the potential for improvement in waste volume reduction by careful selection of materials' combinations. We discuss the impact of these results on fusion waste strategies and on the development of fusion power in the future

  5. Assessment report of research and development activities. Activity: 'Fusion research and development' (Interim report)

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (hereinafter referred to as 'JAEA') asked the assessment committee, 'Evaluation Committee of Research and Development Activities for Fusion' (hereinafter referred to as 'Committee') for interim assessment of 'Research and Development of the technical system for extraction of fusion energy,' in accordance with 'General Guideline for the Evaluation of Government R and D Activities' by Cabinet Office, Government of Japan, 'Guideline for Evaluation of R and D in Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology' and 'Regulation on Conduct for Evaluation of R and D Activities' by JAEA. In response to the JAEA's request, the Committee assessed the research program of the Fusion Research and Development Directorate (hereinafter referred to as 'FRDD') during the period of four years from October 2005 to August 2009. The Committee evaluated the management and research activities of the FRDD based on the explanatory documents prepared by the FRDD, the oral presentations with questions-and-answers by the Director General and the Deputy Director Generals. (author)

  6. Role of lipid phase separations and membrane hydration in phospholipid vesicle fusion.

    Hoekstra, D.

    1982-01-01

    The relationship between lipid phase separation and fusion of small unilamellar phosphatidylserine-containing vesicles was investigated. The kinetics of phase separation were monitored by following the increase of self-quenching of the fluorescent phospholipid analogue N-(7-nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazol

  7. Crystal Structure of Dengue Virus Type 1 Envelope Protein in the Postfusion Conformation and Its Implications for Membrane Fusion

    Nayak, Vinod; Dessau, Moshe; Kucera, Kaury; Anthony, Karen; Ledizet, Michel; Modis, Yorgo; (Yale); (L2 Diagnostics)

    2009-07-31

    Dengue virus relies on a conformational change in its envelope protein, E, to fuse the viral lipid membrane with the endosomal membrane and thereby deliver the viral genome into the cytosol. We have determined the crystal structure of a soluble fragment E (sE) of dengue virus type 1 (DEN-1). The protein is in the postfusion conformation even though it was not exposed to a lipid membrane or detergent. At the domain I-domain III interface, 4 polar residues form a tight cluster that is absent in other flaviviral postfusion structures. Two of these residues, His-282 and His-317, are conserved in flaviviruses and are part of the 'pH sensor' that triggers the fusogenic conformational change in E, at the reduced pH of the endosome. In the fusion loop, Phe-108 adopts a distinct conformation, forming additional trimer contacts and filling the bowl-shaped concavity observed at the tip of the DEN-2 sE trimer.

  8. Micropipette manipulation technique for the monitoring of pH-dependent membrane lysis as induced by the fusion peptide of influenza virus.

    Soltesz, S A; Hammer, D A

    1995-01-01

    We have assembled a micropipette aspiration assay to measure membrane destabilization events in which large (20-30 microns diameter) unilamellar vesicles are manipulated and exposed to membrane destabilizing agents. Single events can be seen with a light microscope and are recorded using both a video camera and a photomultiplier tube. We have performed experiments with a wild-type fusion peptide from influenza virus (X31) and found that it induces pH-dependent, stochastic lysis of large unila...

  9. Effect of increase in orientational order of lipid chains and head group spacing on non steroidal anti-inflammatory drug induced membrane fusion.

    Roy, Sutapa Mondal; Bansode, Amol S; Sarkar, Munna

    2010-12-21

    Membrane fusion is a key event in many biological processes. The fusion process, both in vivo and in vitro, is induced by different agents which include mainly proteins and peptides. For protein- and peptide-mediated membrane fusion, conformational reorganization serves as a driving force. Small drug molecules do not share this advantage; hence, drug induced membrane fusion occurring in absence of any other fusogenic agent and at physiologically relevant concentration of the drugs is a very rare event. To date, only three drugs, namely, meloxicam (Mx), piroxicam (Px), and tenoxicam (Tx), belonging to the oxicam group of non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), have been shown by us to induce fusion at very low drug to lipid ratio without the aid of any other fusogenic agent. In our continued effort to understand the interplay of different physical and chemical parameters of both the participating drugs and the membrane on the mechanism of this drug induced membrane fusion, we present here the effect of increase in orientational order of the lipid chains and increase in head group spacing. This is achieved by studying the effect of low concentration cholesterol (gel to fluid transition temperature, is mainly known to increase orientational order of the lipid chains and increase head group spacing. To isolate the effect of these parameters, small unilameller vesicles (SUVs) formed by dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) with an average diameter of 50-60 nm were used as simple model membranes. Fluorescence assays were used to probe the time dependence of lipid mixing, content mixing, and leakage and also used to determine the partitioning of the drugs in the membrane bilayer. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was used to study the effect of drugs in the presence of cholesterol on the chain-melting temperature which reflects the fluidization effect of the hydrophobic tail region of the bilayer. Our results show contradictory effect of low concentration

  10. Comparison of fusion methods based on DST and DBN in human activity recognition

    2011-01-01

    Ambient assistive living environments require sophisticated information fusion and reasoning techniques to accurately identify activities of a person under care. In this paper, we explain, compare and discuss the application of two powerful fusion methods, namely dynamic Bayesian networks (DBN) and Dempster-Shafer theory (DST), for human activity recognition. Both methods are described, the implementation of activity recognition based on these methods is explained, and model acquisition and composition are ...