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Sample records for action potential bias

  1. Perceptual and performance biases in action selection

    A. Wilson; E. van Bergen; L. van Swieten; S. Kent; M. Mon-Williams

    2008-01-01

    When we see an object in the world, there may be a large number of different ways to interact with that object. This large 'visuomotor space' can be constrained through affordances (perceptually available object properties defining potential uses), task demands and the actor's intentions. The effect

  2. Perfect Actions with Chemical Potential

    Bietenholz, W

    1998-01-01

    We show how to include a chemical potential \\mu in perfect lattice actions. It turns out that the standard procedure of multiplying the quark fields \\Psi, an example, the case of free fermions with chemical potential is worked out explicitly. Even after truncation, cut-off effects in the pressure and the baryon density are small. Using a (quasi-)perfect action, numerical QCD simulations for non-zero chemical potential become more powerful, because coarse lattices are sufficient for extracting continuum physics.

  3. Vacuum and sheath potential measurements with current biased emissive probes

    Data are presented which show that an electron emitting (''emissive'') probe with proper current bias can make accurate vacuum potential measurements. Data show that a probe which is current biased to make accurate vacuum potential measurements also makes accurate sheath potential measurements. The accuracy and time response of this ''current bias method'' is compared with the accuracy and time response of two other emissive probe techniques, the inflection point in the limit of zero emission technique and the floating potential of a strongly heated probe technique. In a vacuum, finite current biased emissive probes are shown to be more accurate and have better time response than zero current biased (floating) emissive probes. The measurements were made in DOLI I, a triple plasma device (length 0.5 m, radius 0.25 m). Base pressure was 5 x 10/sup -6/ torr. For the sheath potential measurements, the plasma density was approximately 10/sup 8/ cm/sup -3/, T ≅ 1 - 2eV and the operating Argon pressure was 5 x 10/sup -5/ torr. The proper current bias for accurate vacuum potential measurements was determined in an empty, grounded vacuum chamber. The proper current bias for any particular probe was determined by strongly heating the probe and then varying its current bias until its voltage was ground

  4. Assessing atmospheric bias correction for dynamical consistency using potential vorticity

    Correcting biases in atmospheric variables prior to impact studies or dynamical downscaling can lead to new biases as dynamical consistency between the ‘corrected’ fields is not maintained. Use of these bias corrected fields for subsequent impact studies and dynamical downscaling provides input conditions that do not appropriately represent intervariable relationships in atmospheric fields. Here we investigate the consequences of the lack of dynamical consistency in bias correction using a measure of model consistency—the potential vorticity (PV). This paper presents an assessment of the biases present in PV using two alternative correction techniques—an approach where bias correction is performed individually on each atmospheric variable, thereby ignoring the physical relationships that exists between the multiple variables that are corrected, and a second approach where bias correction is performed directly on the PV field, thereby keeping the system dynamically coherent throughout the correction process. In this paper we show that bias correcting variables independently results in increased errors above the tropopause in the mean and standard deviation of the PV field, which are improved when using the alternative proposed. Furthermore, patterns of spatial variability are improved over nearly all vertical levels when applying the alternative approach. Results point to a need for a dynamically consistent atmospheric bias correction technique which results in fields that can be used as dynamically consistent lateral boundaries in follow-up downscaling applications. (letter)

  5. Estimating Production Potentials: Expert Bias in Applied Decision Making

    A study was conducted to evaluate how workers predict manufacturing production potentials given positively and negatively framed information. Findings indicate the existence of a bias toward positive information and suggest that this bias may be reduced with experience but is never the less maintained. Experts err in the same way non experts do in differentially processing negative and positive information. Additionally, both experts and non experts tend to overestimate production potentials in a positive direction. The authors propose that these biases should be addressed with further research including cross domain analyses and consideration in training, workplace design, and human performance modeling

  6. Action Principle for Potential Flows

    Frønsdal, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The restriction of hydrodynamics to non-viscous, potential (gradient, irrotational) flows is a theory both simple and elegant; a favorite topic of introductory textbooks. It is known that this theory (under the stated limitations) can be formulated as an action principle. It finds its principle application to adiabatic systems and cannot account for viscosity or dissipation. However, it can be generalized to include non-potential flows, as this paper shows. The new theory is a combination of Eulerian and Lagrangian hydrodynamics, with an extension to thermodynamics. It describes adiabatic phenomena but does not account for viscosity or dissipation. Nevertheless, it is an approach within which quasi-static processes can be described. In the adiabatic context it appears to be an improvement of the Navier-Stokes equation, the principal advantage being a natural concept of energy in the form of a first integral of the motion, conserved by virtue of the Euler-Lagrange equations.

  7. Potential bias in ophthalmic pharmaceutical clinical trials

    Paul Varner

    2008-01-01

    Paul VarnerJohn J Pershing Veterans’ Administration Medical Center, Poplar Bluff, Missouri, USAAbstract: To make clinicians aware of potential sources of error in ophthalmic pharmaceutical clinical trials that can lead to erroneous interpretation of results, a critical review of the study design of various pharmaceutical ophthalmic clinical trials was completed. Discrepancies as a result of study shortcomings may explain observed differences between reported ophthalmic trial data an...

  8. Light-triggered action potentials in plants

    Kazimierz Trębacz

    2014-01-01

    Special attention is paid in this paper to the criteria of the light-triggered action potential, namely the all-or-none law, propagation, the occurrence of refractory periods. Such action potentials have been recorded in Acetabularia mediterranea, Asplenium trichomanes, Bryum pseudotriquetrum, Eremosphaera viridis and Concephalum conicum. In Acetabularia, action potentials are generated after sudden cessation of light stimuli of sufficient intensity. The depolarization phase of the action pot...

  9. Improved Lattice Actions with Chemical Potential

    Bietenholz, W

    1998-01-01

    We give a prescription how to include a chemical potential \\mu into a general lattice action. This inclusion does not cause any lattice artifacts. Hence its application to an improved - or even perfect - action at \\mu =0 yields an improved resp. perfect action at arbitrary \\mu. For short-ranged improved actions, a good scaling behavior holds over a wide region, and the upper bound for the baryon density - which is known for the standard lattice actions - can be exceeded.

  10. Abstract Action Potential Models for Toxin Recognition

    Peterson, James; Khan, Taufiquar

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we present a robust methodology using mathematical pattern recognition schemes to detect and classify events in action potentials for recognizing toxins in biological cells. We focus on event detection in action potential via abstraction of information content into a low dimensional feature vector within the constrained computational environment of a biosensor. We use generated families of action potentials from a classic Hodgkin–Huxley model to verify our methodology and build...

  11. Motherhood: a potential source of bias in employment decisions.

    Heilman, Madeline E; Okimoto, Tyler G

    2008-01-01

    Results of 2 experimental studies in which job incumbents were said to be applying for promotions to traditionally male positions demonstrated bias against mothers in competence expectations and in screening recommendations. This bias occurred regardless of whether the research participants were students (Study 1) or working people (Study 2). Although anticipated job commitment, achievement striving, and dependability were rated as generally lower for parents than for nonparents, anticipated competence was uniquely low for mothers. Mediational analyses indicated that, as predicted, negativity in competence expectations, not anticipated job commitment or achievement striving, promoted the motherhood bias in screening recommendations; expected deficits in agentic behaviors, not in dependability, were found to fuel these competence expectations. These findings suggest that motherhood can indeed hinder the career advancement of women and that it is the heightened association with gender stereotypes that occurs when women are mothers that is the source of motherhood's potentially adverse consequences. PMID:18211144

  12. Emotion biases voluntary vertical action only with visible cues.

    Sasaki, Kyoshiro; Yamada, Yuki; Miura, Kayo

    2016-01-01

    Emotional information influences our bodily experiences according to the space-valence metaphor (positive/negative is up/down). In the present study, we examined whether visible and invisible emotional stimuli could also modulate voluntary action. After observing an emotional image (e.g., positive, neutral, or negative), participants used a joystick to arbitrarily position a dot stimulus in a display. The emotional image was either masked (masked condition) or not (unmasked condition) via a continuous flash suppression technique, i.e., dynamic interocular masking. We found that in the unmasked condition, the placed position of the dot was significantly higher after observing the positive image compared with the negative image, but this difference was not present in the masked condition. Our findings suggest that conscious emotional information is necessary for activating sensorimotor representations of vertical directions, and voluntary action is performed based on these activations. PMID:26637931

  13. The precision of experienced action video-game players: line bisection reveals reduced leftward response bias.

    Latham, Andrew J; Patston, Lucy L M; Tippett, Lynette J

    2014-11-01

    Twenty-two experienced action video-game players (AVGPs) and 18 non-VGPs were tested on a pen-and-paper line bisection task that was untimed. Typically, right-handers bisect lines 2 % to the left of true centre, a bias thought to reflect the dominance of the right-hemisphere for visuospatial attention. Expertise may affect this bias, with expert musicians showing no bias in line bisection performance. Our results show that experienced-AVGPs also bisect lines with no bias with their right hand and a significantly reduced bias with their left hand compared to non-AVGPs. Bisections by experienced-AVGPs were also more precise than those of non-AVGPs. These findings show the cognitive proficiencies of experienced-AVGPs can generalize beyond computer based tasks, which resemble their training environment. PMID:25341651

  14. Screening action potentials: The power of light

    Lars eKaestner

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Action potentials reflect the concerted activity of all electrogenic constituents in the plasma membrane during the excitation of a cell. Therefore, the action potential is an integrated readout and a promising parameter to detect electrophysiological failures or modifications thereof in diagnosis as well as in drug screens. Cellular action potentials can be recorded by optical approaches. To fulfill the pre-requirements to scale up for e.g. pharmacological screens the following preparatory work has to be provided: (i model cells under investigation need to represent target cells in the best possible manner; (ii optical sensors that can be either small molecule dyes or genetically encoded potential probes need to provide a reliable readout with minimal interaction with the naive behavior of the cells and (iii devices need to be capable to stimulate the cells, read out the signals with the appropriate speed as well as provide the capacity for a sufficient throughput. Here we discuss several scenarios for all three categories in the field of cardiac physiology and pharmacology and provide a perspective to use the power of light in screening cardiac action potentials.

  15. Introducing the Action Potential to Psychology Students

    Simon-Dack, Stephanie L.

    2014-01-01

    For this simple active learning technique for teaching, students are assigned "roles" and act out the process of the action potential (AP), including the firing threshold, ion-specific channels for ions to enter and leave the cell, diffusion, and the refractory period. Pre-post test results indicated that students demonstrated increased…

  16. expression, physiological actions and therapeutic potential

    Steckelings, Ulrike

    2012-01-01

    Angiotensin II mediates its action via 2 receptor subtypes: the AT1- and AT2-receptor. The existence of more than one receptor for angiotensin II has been discovered not earlier than 1989. This "Habilitationsschrift" is based on six publications which represent mosaic stones within the growing picture of AT2-receptor expression, regulation of expression, physiological and patho-physiological function as well as potential therapeutic use. The first part is dealing with tissue specific ex...

  17. Publication Bias in Laboratory Animal Research: A Survey on Magnitude, Drivers, Consequences and Potential Solutions

    Gerben ter Riet; Daniel A Korevaar; Marlies Leenaars; Sterk, Peter J.; van Noorden, Cornelis J. F.; Bouter, Lex M; René Lutter; Ronald P Oude Elferink; Lotty Hooft

    2012-01-01

    CONTEXT: Publication bias jeopardizes evidence-based medicine, mainly through biased literature syntheses. Publication bias may also affect laboratory animal research, but evidence is scarce. OBJECTIVES: To assess the opinion of laboratory animal researchers on the magnitude, drivers, consequences and potential solutions for publication bias. And to explore the impact of size of the animals used, seniority of the respondent, working in a for-profit organization and type of research (fundament...

  18. Multilinear Biased Discriminant Analysis: A Novel Method for Facial Action Unit Representation

    Khademi, Mahmoud; Manzuri-Shalmani, Mohammad T

    2010-01-01

    In this paper a novel efficient method for representation of facial action units by encoding an image sequence as a fourth-order tensor is presented. The multilinear tensor-based extension of the biased discriminant analysis (BDA) algorithm, called multilinear biased discriminant analysis (MBDA), is first proposed. Then, we apply the MBDA and two-dimensional BDA (2DBDA) algorithms, as the dimensionality reduction techniques, to Gabor representations and the geometric features of the input image sequence respectively. The proposed scheme can deal with the asymmetry between positive and negative samples as well as curse of dimensionality dilemma. Extensive experiments on Cohn-Kanade database show the superiority of the proposed method for representation of the subtle changes and the temporal information involved in formation of the facial expressions. As an accurate tool, this representation can be applied to many areas such as recognition of spontaneous and deliberate facial expressions, multi modal/media huma...

  19. Bias-corrected estimation in potentially mildly explosive autoregressive models

    Haufmann, Hendrik; Kruse, Robinson

    This paper provides a comprehensive Monte Carlo comparison of different finite-sample bias-correction methods for autoregressive processes. We consider classic situations where the process is either stationary or exhibits a unit root. Importantly, the case of mildly explosive behaviour is studied...... indirect inference approach oers a valuable alternative to other existing techniques. Its performance (measured by its bias and root mean squared error) is balanced and highly competitive across many different settings. A clear advantage is its applicability for mildly explosive processes. In an empirical...... application to a long annual US Debt/GDP series we consider rolling window estimation of autoregressive models. We find substantial evidence for time-varying persistence and periods of explosiveness during the Civil War and World War II. During the recent years, the series is nearly explosive again. Further...

  20. Potential Biases in Service Research - Opportunity and Pitfall

    Bellm, Tilo

    2014-01-01

    People are not always rational, rely on heuristics and are influenced by situational factors being conducive to biased decisions. Hence, the decision outcome cannot be explained by consumers’ preferences exclusively. This offers opportunities to service managers to steer the decision outcome into a desirable direction by a beneficial design of situational factors. In contrast to the discussed opportunities, situational factors can also become a pitfall for researchers and managers. I show tha...

  1. The Potential of Deweyan-Inspired Action Research

    Stark, Jody L.

    2014-01-01

    In its broadest sense, pragmatism could be said to be the philosophical orientation of all action research. Action research is characterized by research, action, and participation grounded in democratic principles and guided by the aim of social improvement. Furthermore, action research is an active process of inquiry that does not admit separation between action and reflection or theory and practice. This paper considers the potential of action research informed specifically by Deweyan pragm...

  2. Examining Event-Related Potential (ERP correlates of decision bias in recognition memory judgments.

    Holger Hill

    Full Text Available Memory judgments can be based on accurate memory information or on decision bias (the tendency to report that an event is part of episodic memory when one is in fact unsure. Event related potentials (ERP correlates are important research tools for elucidating the dynamics underlying memory judgments but so far have been established only for investigations of accurate old/new discrimination. To identify the ERP correlates of bias, and observe how these interact with ERP correlates of memory, we conducted three experiments that manipulated decision bias within participants via instructions during recognition memory tests while their ERPs were recorded. In Experiment 1, the bias manipulation was performed between blocks of trials (automatized bias and compared to trial-by-trial shifts of bias in accord with an external cue (flexibly controlled bias. In Experiment 2, the bias manipulation was performed at two different levels of accurate old/new discrimination as the memory strength of old (studied items was varied. In Experiment 3, the bias manipulation was added to another, bottom-up driven manipulation of bias induced via familiarity. In the first two Experiments, and in the low familiarity condition of Experiment 3, we found evidence of an early frontocentral ERP component at 320 ms poststimulus (the FN320 that was sensitive to the manipulation of bias via instruction, with more negative amplitudes indexing more liberal bias. By contrast, later during the trial (500-700 ms poststimulus, bias effects interacted with old/new effects across all three experiments. Results suggest that the decision criterion is typically activated early during recognition memory trials, and is integrated with retrieved memory signals and task-specific processing demands later during the trial. More generally, the findings demonstrate how ERPs can help to specify the dynamics of recognition memory processes under top-down and bottom-up controlled retrieval conditions.

  3. Action potential broadening in a presynaptic channelopathy

    Begum, Rahima; Bakiri, Yamina; Volynski, Kirill E.; Kullmann, Dimitri M.

    2016-07-01

    Brain development and interictal function are unaffected in many paroxysmal neurological channelopathies, possibly explained by homoeostatic plasticity of synaptic transmission. Episodic ataxia type 1 is caused by missense mutations of the potassium channel Kv1.1, which is abundantly expressed in the terminals of cerebellar basket cells. Presynaptic action potentials of small inhibitory terminals have not been characterized, and it is not known whether developmental plasticity compensates for the effects of Kv1.1 dysfunction. Here we use visually targeted patch-clamp recordings from basket cell terminals of mice harbouring an ataxia-associated mutation and their wild-type littermates. Presynaptic spikes are followed by a pronounced afterdepolarization, and are broadened by pharmacological blockade of Kv1.1 or by a dominant ataxia-associated mutation. Somatic recordings fail to detect such changes. Spike broadening leads to increased Ca2+ influx and GABA release, and decreased spontaneous Purkinje cell firing. We find no evidence for developmental compensation for inherited Kv1.1 dysfunction.

  4. Teachers in Action Research: Assumptions and Potentials

    Li, Yuen-Ling

    2008-01-01

    Research literature has long indicated that action research may stimulate practitioners themselves to actively evaluate the quality of their practice. This study is designed to report the use of action research for the development of early years professional practice by analyzing the pre-project and the post-project video-filmed teaching events.…

  5. Action potential initiation in the hodgkin-huxley model.

    Colwell, Lucy J; Brenner, Michael P.

    2009-01-01

    A recent paper of B. Naundorf et al. described an intriguing negative correlation between variability of the onset potential at which an action potential occurs (the onset span) and the rapidity of action potential initiation (the onset rapidity). This correlation was demonstrated in numerical simulations of the Hodgkin-Huxley model. Due to this antagonism, it is argued that Hodgkin-Huxley-type models are unable to explain action potential initiation observed in cortical neurons in vivo or in...

  6. Spectral action, Weyl anomaly and the Higgs-Dilaton potential

    Andrianov, A.A.(V.A. Fock Department of Theoretical Physics, Saint-Petersburg State University, 1 ul. Ulyanovskaya, St. Petersburg, 198504, Russia); Kurkov, M.A.; Lizzi, Fedele

    2011-01-01

    We show how the bosonic spectral action emerges from the fermionic action by the renormalization group flow in the presence of a dilaton and the Weyl anomaly. The induced action comes out to be basically the Chamseddine-Connes spectral action introduced in the context of noncommutative geometry. The entire spectral action describes gauge and Higgs fields coupled with gravity. We then consider the effective potential and show, that it has the desired features of a broken and an unbroken phase,...

  7. Pattern-induced expectation bias in visual anticipation of action outcomes.

    Loffing, Florian; Stern, Ricarda; Hagemann, Norbert

    2015-10-01

    When anticipating an opponent's action intention, athletes may rely on both kinematic and contextual cues. Here we show that patterns of previous action outcomes (i.e., a contextual cue) bias visual anticipation of action outcome in subsequent trials. In two video-based experiments, skilled players and novices were presented with volleyball attacks stopping 360ms (Exp. 1) or 280ms (Exp. 2) before an attacker's hand-ball-contact and they were asked to predict the type of attack (smash or lob). Attacks were presented block-wise with six attacks per block. The fifth trial served as target trial where we presented identical attacks to control kinematic cues. We varied the outcomes of the preceding four attacks under three conditions: lobs only, smashes only or an alternating pattern of attack outcomes. In Exp. 1, skilled players but not novices were less accurate and responded later in target trials that were incongruent vs. congruent with preceding patterns. In Exp. 2, where the task was easier, another group of novices demonstrated a similar congruence effect for accuracy but not response time. Collectively, findings indicate that participants tended to preferentially expect the continuation of an attack pattern, while possibly attaching less importance to kinematic cues. Thus, overreliance on pattern continuation may be detrimental to anticipation in situations an action's outcome does not correspond to the pattern. From a methodological viewpoint, comparison of novices' performance in Exp. 1 and 2 suggests that task difficulty may be critical as to whether contextual cue effects can be identified in novices. PMID:26310873

  8. Testosterone biases automatic memory processes in women towards potential mates

    Wingen, G.A. van; Mattern, C.; Verkes, R.J.; Buitelaar, J.K.; Fernandez, G.S.E.

    2008-01-01

    Female mate choice involves the comparative evaluation of potential mates. Females use a pooled comparison of sampled males to maximize the perceived reproductive fitness of their partner, implying the memorization of sampled males. However, hormonal and reproductive states influence female choosine

  9. Testosterone biases automatic memory processes in women towards potential mates.

    Wingen, G van; Mattern, C.; Verkes, R.J.; Buitelaar, J.K.; Fernandez, G.S.E.

    2008-01-01

    Female mate choice involves the comparative evaluation of potential mates. Females use a pooled comparison of sampled males to maximize the perceived reproductive fitness of their partner, implying the memorization of sampled males. However, hormonal and reproductive states influence female choosine

  10. Action potentials reliably invade axonal arbors of rat neocortical neurons

    Cox, Charles L.; Denk, Winfried; Tank, David W.; Svoboda, Karel

    2000-01-01

    Neocortical pyramidal neurons have extensive axonal arborizations that make thousands of synapses. Action potentials can invade these arbors and cause calcium influx that is required for neurotransmitter release and excitation of postsynaptic targets. Thus, the regulation of action potential invasion in axonal branches might shape the spread of excitation in cortical neural networks. To measure the reliability and extent of action potential invasion into axonal arbors, we have used two-photon...

  11. Effect sizes and standardization in neighbourhood models of forest stands: potential biases and misinterpretations

    P. Stoll; Murrell, D. J.; Newbery, D. M.

    2015-01-01

    1. Effects of conspecific neighbours on survival and growth of trees have been found to be related to species abundance. Both positive and negative relationships may explain observed abundance patterns. Surprisingly, it is rarely tested whether such relationships could be biased or even spurious due to transforming neighbourhood variables or influences of spatial aggregation, distance decay of neighbour effects and standardization of effect sizes. 2. To investigate potential biases, co...

  12. Effective bias and potentials in steady-state quantum transport: A NEGF reverse-engineering study

    Karlsson, Daniel; Verdozzi, Claudio

    2016-03-01

    Using non-equilibrium Green's functions combined with many-body perturbation theory, we have calculated steady-state densities and currents through short interacting chains subject to a finite electric bias. By using a steady-state reverse-engineering procedure, the effective potential and bias which reproduce such densities and currents in a non-interacting system have been determined. The role of the effective bias is characterised with the aid of the so-called exchange-correlation bias, recently introduced in a steady-state density-functional- theory formulation for partitioned systems. We find that the effective bias (or, equivalently, the exchange-correlation bias) depends strongly on the interaction strength and the length of the central (chain) region. Moreover, it is rather sensitive to the level of many-body approximation used. Our study shows the importance of the effective/exchange-correlation bias out of equilibrium, thereby offering hints on how to improve the description of density- functional-theory based approaches to quantum transport.

  13. Critical Utopian Action Research: The Potential of Action Research in the Democratization of Society

    Nielsen, Birger Steen; Nielsen, Kurt Aagaard

    The specific concept of critical utopian action research is presented and discussed, as to its origin, use and potentials. The inspiration from Robert Jungk and his future creating workshops is elaborated.......The specific concept of critical utopian action research is presented and discussed, as to its origin, use and potentials. The inspiration from Robert Jungk and his future creating workshops is elaborated....

  14. Are Managed Futures Indices Telling Truth? Biases in CTA Databases and Proposals of Potential Enhancements

    Adam Zaremba

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Managed futures are an alternative asset class which has recently became considerably popular among investment industry. However, due to its characteristics, access to managed futures historical performance statistics is relatively confined. All available information originates from commercial and academic databases, reporting to which is entirely voluntary. This situation results in series of biases which distort the managed futures performance in the eyes of investors. The paper consists of two parts. First, the author reviews and describes various biases that influence the reliability of the managed futures indices and databases. The second section encompasses author’s proposals of potential enhancements, which aim to reduce the impact of the biases in order to derive a benchmark that could better reflect characteristics of managed futures investment from the point of view of a potential investor.

  15. [Individualised medicine - potentials and need for action].

    Hüsing, Bärbel

    2010-01-01

    Individualised medicine aims to classify seemingly homogenous patient groups into smaller clinically relevant subgroups (stratification) in order to be able to treat them differently, thus contributing to the improvement of health care services, to the prevention of inappropriate treatments and to the reduction of adverse effects. This article summarises a report to the Office of Technology Assessment at the German Bundestag and points out the need for action for transferring individualised medicine from research to clinical application: significant incentives are required in order to prove the clinical validity of newly identified biomarkers of complex diseases. Sustainable business models for the joint development of new applications by research institutions, biotechnology companies, pharmaceuticals and medical devices companies are required. Instruments for transferring knowledge from bench to bedside (translational research) and the existing regulatory framework should be further developed in order to strike an appropriate balance between incentives for accelerating the transfer of innovative technology to the health care sector while, at the same time, ensuring patient safety, high quality and clinical utility. PMID:21147435

  16. Assessing the potential for outcome reporting bias in a review: a tutorial

    Powell Colin

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Outcome reporting bias (ORB occurs when variables are selected for publication based on their results. This can impact upon the results of a meta-analysis, biasing the pooled treatment effect estimate. The aim of this paper is to show how to assess a systematic review and corresponding trial reports for ORB using an example review of intravenous and nebulised magnesium in the treatment of asthma. Methods The review was assessed for ORB by 1 checking the reasons, when available, for excluding studies to ensure that no studies were excluded because they did not report the outcomes of interest in the review; 2 assessing the eligible studies as to whether the review outcomes of interest were reported. Each study was classified using a system developed in the ORBIT (Outcome Reporting Bias In Trials project to indicate whether ORB was suspected and a reason for the suspicion. Authors of trials that did not report the outcomes of interest were contacted for information. A sensitivity analysis was performed to assess the robustness of the conclusions of the review to this potential source of bias. Results Twenty-four studies were included in the review; two studies had been excluded for not reporting either of the two outcomes of interest. Six included studies did not report hospital admission and two did not report pulmonary function. There was high suspicion of outcome reporting bias in four studies. Results from the sensitivity analysis indicate that review conclusions were not overturned. Conclusion This paper demonstrates, with the example of the magnesium review, how to assess a review for outcome reporting bias. A review should not exclude studies if they have not reported the outcomes of interest and should consider the potential for outcome reporting bias in all included studies.

  17. Angle-action estimation in a general axisymmetric potential

    Sanders, Jason

    2012-01-01

    The usefulness of angle-action variables in galaxy dynamics is well known, but their use is limited due to the difficulty of their calculation in realistic galaxy potentials. Here we present a method for estimating angle-action variables in a realistic Milky Way axisymmetric potential by locally fitting a St\\"ackel potential over the region an orbit probes. The quality of the method is assessed by comparison with other known methods for estimating angle-action variables of a range of disc and...

  18. Radial propagation of muscle action potential along the tubular system examined by potential-sensitive dyes

    Nakajima, S.; Gilai, A.

    1980-01-01

    Isolated single (Xenopus) muscle fibers were stained with a non-permeant potential-probing dye, merocyanine rhodanine (WW375) or merocyanine oxazolone (NK2367). When the fiber was massively stimulated, an absorption change (wave a), which seemed to reflect the action potential, occurred. Simultaneous recording of optical changes and intracellular action potentials revealed that the time-course of wave a was slower than the action potential: the peak of wave a was attained at 1 ms, and the pea...

  19. Kondo time scales for quantum dots: Response to pulsed bias potentials

    The response of a quantum dot in the Kondo regime to rectangular pulsed bias potentials of various strengths and durations is studied theoretically. It is found that the rise time is faster than the fall time, and also faster than time scales normally associated with the Kondo problem. For larger values of the pulsed bias, one can induce dramatic oscillations in the induced current with a frequency approximating the splitting between the Kondo peaks that would be present in steady state. The effect persists in the total charge transported per pulse, which should facilitate the experimental observation of the phenomenon. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  20. Pandemic influenza vaccine & narcolepsy: simulations on the potential impact of bias.

    Wijnans, Leonoor; Dodd, Caitlin; de Ridder, Maria; Romio, Silvana; Weibel, Daniel; Overeem, Sebastiaan; Lammers, Gert Jan; Bonhoeffer, Jan; Black, Steve; Sturkenboom, Miriam

    2016-05-01

    Several studies have identified an association between Pandemrix(TM), an AS03 adjuvanted pandemic influenza A(H1N1) vaccine, and narcolepsy, a rare and under-diagnosed sleep disorder with a median onset-to-diagnosis interval of ten years. This paper reviews potential sources of bias in published studies and aims to provide, through simulation, methodological recommendations for assessment of vaccine safety signals. Our simulation study showed that in the absence of an association between the vaccine and the outcome, presence of detection bias and differential exposure misclassification could account for elevated risk estimates. These may play a major role, particularly in alert situations when observation times are limited and the disease has a long latency period. Estimates from the case-control design were less inflated than those from the cohort design when these biases were present. Overall, these simulations provide useful insights for the design and interpretation of future studies. PMID:26967200

  1. Optogenetic stimulation in a computational model of the basal ganglia biases action selection and reward prediction error.

    Pierre Berthet

    Full Text Available Optogenetic stimulation of specific types of medium spiny neurons (MSNs in the striatum has been shown to bias the selection of mice in a two choices task. This shift is dependent on the localisation and on the intensity of the stimulation but also on the recent reward history. We have implemented a way to simulate this increased activity produced by the optical flash in our computational model of the basal ganglia (BG. This abstract model features the direct and indirect pathways commonly described in biology, and a reward prediction pathway (RP. The framework is similar to Actor-Critic methods and to the ventral/dorsal distinction in the striatum. We thus investigated the impact on the selection caused by an added stimulation in each of the three pathways. We were able to reproduce in our model the bias in action selection observed in mice. Our results also showed that biasing the reward prediction is sufficient to create a modification in the action selection. However, we had to increase the percentage of trials with stimulation relative to that in experiments in order to impact the selection. We found that increasing only the reward prediction had a different effect if the stimulation in RP was action dependent (only for a specific action or not. We further looked at the evolution of the change in the weights depending on the stage of learning within a block. A bias in RP impacts the plasticity differently depending on that stage but also on the outcome. It remains to experimentally test how the dopaminergic neurons are affected by specific stimulations of neurons in the striatum and to relate data to predictions of our model.

  2. Optogenetic stimulation in a computational model of the basal ganglia biases action selection and reward prediction error.

    Berthet, Pierre; Lansner, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Optogenetic stimulation of specific types of medium spiny neurons (MSNs) in the striatum has been shown to bias the selection of mice in a two choices task. This shift is dependent on the localisation and on the intensity of the stimulation but also on the recent reward history. We have implemented a way to simulate this increased activity produced by the optical flash in our computational model of the basal ganglia (BG). This abstract model features the direct and indirect pathways commonly described in biology, and a reward prediction pathway (RP). The framework is similar to Actor-Critic methods and to the ventral/dorsal distinction in the striatum. We thus investigated the impact on the selection caused by an added stimulation in each of the three pathways. We were able to reproduce in our model the bias in action selection observed in mice. Our results also showed that biasing the reward prediction is sufficient to create a modification in the action selection. However, we had to increase the percentage of trials with stimulation relative to that in experiments in order to impact the selection. We found that increasing only the reward prediction had a different effect if the stimulation in RP was action dependent (only for a specific action) or not. We further looked at the evolution of the change in the weights depending on the stage of learning within a block. A bias in RP impacts the plasticity differently depending on that stage but also on the outcome. It remains to experimentally test how the dopaminergic neurons are affected by specific stimulations of neurons in the striatum and to relate data to predictions of our model. PMID:24614169

  3. Prejudiced interactions: implicit racial bias reduces predictive simulation during joint action with an out-group avatar.

    Sacheli, Lucia Maria; Christensen, Andrea; Giese, Martin A; Taubert, Nick; Pavone, Enea Francesco; Aglioti, Salvatore Maria; Candidi, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    During social interactions people automatically apply stereotypes in order to rapidly categorize others. Racial differences are among the most powerful cues that drive these categorizations and modulate our emotional and cognitive reactivity to others. We investigated whether implicit racial bias may also shape hand kinematics during the execution of realistic joint actions with virtual in- and out-group partners. Caucasian participants were required to perform synchronous imitative or complementary reach-to-grasp movements with avatars that had different skin color (white and black) but showed identical action kinematics. Results demonstrate that stronger visuo-motor interference (indexed here as hand kinematics differences between complementary and imitative actions) emerged: i) when participants were required to predict the partner's action goal in order to on-line adapt their own movements accordingly; ii) during interactions with the in-group partner, indicating the partner's racial membership modulates interactive behaviors. Importantly, the in-group/out-group effect positively correlated with the implicit racial bias of each participant. Thus visuo-motor interference during joint action, likely reflecting predictive embodied simulation of the partner's movements, is affected by cultural inter-individual differences. PMID:25687636

  4. Intracellular recording of action potentials by nanopillar electroporation

    Xie, Chong; Lin, Ziliang; Hanson, Lindsey; Cui, Yi; Cui, Bianxiao

    2012-03-01

    Action potentials have a central role in the nervous system and in many cellular processes, notably those involving ion channels. The accurate measurement of action potentials requires efficient coupling between the cell membrane and the measuring electrodes. Intracellular recording methods such as patch clamping involve measuring the voltage or current across the cell membrane by accessing the cell interior with an electrode, allowing both the amplitude and shape of the action potentials to be recorded faithfully with high signal-to-noise ratios. However, the invasive nature of intracellular methods usually limits the recording time to a few hours, and their complexity makes it difficult to simultaneously record more than a few cells. Extracellular recording methods, such as multielectrode arrays and multitransistor arrays, are non-invasive and allow long-term and multiplexed measurements. However, extracellular recording sacrifices the one-to-one correspondence between the cells and electrodes, and also suffers from significantly reduced signal strength and quality. Extracellular techniques are not, therefore, able to record action potentials with the accuracy needed to explore the properties of ion channels. As a result, the pharmacological screening of ion-channel drugs is usually performed by low-throughput intracellular recording methods. The use of nanowire transistors, nanotube-coupled transistors and micro gold-spine and related electrodes can significantly improve the signal strength of recorded action potentials. Here, we show that vertical nanopillar electrodes can record both the extracellular and intracellular action potentials of cultured cardiomyocytes over a long period of time with excellent signal strength and quality. Moreover, it is possible to repeatedly switch between extracellular and intracellular recording by nanoscale electroporation and resealing processes. Furthermore, vertical nanopillar electrodes can detect subtle changes in action

  5. Compound sensory action potential in normal and pathological human nerves

    Krarup, Christian

    2004-01-01

    The compound sensory nerve action potential (SNAP) is the result of phase summation and cancellation of single fiber potentials (SFAPs) with amplitudes that depend on fiber diameter, and the amplitude and shape of the SNAP is determined by the distribution of fiber diameters. Conduction velocitie...

  6. Contamination, potential bias and humidity effects on electrical performance and corrosion reliability of electronic devices

    Piotrowska, Kamila; Verdingovas, Vadimas; Jellesen, Morten S.; Ambat, Rajan

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the interactions between flux contamination, humidity and po-tential bias and their effect on corrosion reliability. Water layer formation on laminate surfaces and behavior of different solder flux chemistries with humid conditions have been studied, together with their influence on electrical performance of electronics. The effect of the type of laminate’s solder mask on the formation of water film and droplets was investigated for two different types: smooth glossy and ...

  7. Contamination, potential bias and humidity effects on electrical performance and corrosion reliability of electronic devices

    Piotrowska, Kamila; Verdingovas, Vadimas; Jellesen, Morten S.;

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the interactions between flux contamination, humidity and po-tential bias and their effect on corrosion reliability. Water layer formation on laminate surfaces and behavior of different solder flux chemistries with humid conditions have been studied, together with their......-sponse of electronics is estimated as a function of contamination type under cycling humid conditions. The results show the correlation between the ionic contamination type and water layer formation on surfaces in the presence of the flux residue....

  8. Membrane, action, and oscillatory potentials in simulated protocells

    Syren, R. M.; Fox, S. W.; Przybylski, A. T.; Stratten, W. P.

    1982-01-01

    Electrical membrane potentials, oscillations, and action potentials are observed in proteinoid microspheres impaled with (3 M KCl) microelectrodes. Although effects are of greater magnitude when the vesicles contain glycerol and natural or synthetic lecithin, the results in the purely synthetic thermal protein structures are substantial, attaining 20 mV amplitude in some cases. The results add the property of electrical potential to the other known properties of proteinoid microspheres, in their role as models for protocells.

  9. Theophylline-induced potentiation of the antinociceptive action of baclofen.

    Sawynok, J

    1983-01-01

    1--Theophylline (35, 50 mg/kg) potentiated the antinociceptive action of intraperitoneally administered baclofen in the tail flick and hot plate tests. Potentiation was most marked when the pretreatment time was 1 h, but some potentiation was still apparent following a 2 h pretreatment. 2--Theophylline alone (50 mg/kg) produced only slight alterations in reaction latency in the two tests. 3--When baclofen was applied directly into the spinal subarachnoid space, a 1 h pretreatment with theophy...

  10. Membrane, action, and oscillatory potentials in simulated protocells

    Przybylski, Aleksander T.; Stratten, Wilford P.; Syren, Robert M.; Fox, Sidney W.

    1982-12-01

    Electrical membrane potentials, oscillations, and action potentials are observed in proteinoid microspheres impaled with (3 M KCl) microelectrodes. Although effects are of greater magnitude when the vesicles contain glycerol and natural or synthetic lecithin, the results in the purely synthetic thermal protein structures are substantial, attaining 20 mV amplitude in some cases. The results add the property of electrical potential to the other known properties of proteinoid microspheres, in their role as models for protocells.

  11. Numerical investigation of action potential transmission in plants

    Mariusz Pietruszka

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In context of a fairly concise review of recent literature and well established experimental results we reconsider the problem of action potential propagating steadily down the plant cell(s. Having adopted slightly modified Hodgkin-Huxley set of differential equations for the action potential we carried out the numerical investigation of these equations in the course of time. We argue that the Hodgkin-Huxley-Katz model for the nerve impulse can be used to describe the phenomena which take place in plants - this point of view seems to be plausible since the mechanisms involving active ionic transport across membranes from the mathematical point of view are similar. Besides, we compare in a qualitative way our theoretical outcomes with typical experimental results for the action potentials which arise as the reaction of plants to electrical, mechanical and light stimuli. Moreover, we point out the relevance of the sequence of events during the pulse with the appropriate ionic fluxes.

  12. ITS as an environmental DNA barcode for fungi: an in silico approach reveals potential PCR biases

    Taberlet Pierre

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the last 15 years the internal transcribed spacer (ITS of nuclear DNA has been used as a target for analyzing fungal diversity in environmental samples, and has recently been selected as the standard marker for fungal DNA barcoding. In this study we explored the potential amplification biases that various commonly utilized ITS primers might introduce during amplification of different parts of the ITS region in samples containing mixed templates ('environmental barcoding'. We performed in silico PCR analyses with commonly used primer combinations using various ITS datasets obtained from public databases as templates. Results Some of the ITS primers, such as ITS1-F, were hampered with a high proportion of mismatches relative to the target sequences, and most of them appeared to introduce taxonomic biases during PCR. Some primers, e.g. ITS1-F, ITS1 and ITS5, were biased towards amplification of basidiomycetes, whereas others, e.g. ITS2, ITS3 and ITS4, were biased towards ascomycetes. The assumed basidiomycete-specific primer ITS4-B only amplified a minor proportion of basidiomycete ITS sequences, even under relaxed PCR conditions. Due to systematic length differences in the ITS2 region as well as the entire ITS, we found that ascomycetes will more easily amplify than basidiomycetes using these regions as targets. This bias can be avoided by using primers amplifying ITS1 only, but this would imply preferential amplification of 'non-dikarya' fungi. Conclusions We conclude that ITS primers have to be selected carefully, especially when used for high-throughput sequencing of environmental samples. We suggest that different primer combinations or different parts of the ITS region should be analyzed in parallel, or that alternative ITS primers should be searched for.

  13. Far-field potentials recorded from action potentials and from a tripole in a hemicylindrical volume.

    Jewett, D L; Deupree, D L

    1989-05-01

    There is growing evidence in support of the hypothesis that far-field potentials are recorded when action potentials encounter discontinuities in the surrounding volume. The present study found further support for this hypothesis using two methods of experimentation. The first method recorded potentials when the action potential from an isolated bullfrog sciatic nerve in a hemicylindrical volume (i) encountered a change in the shape of the surrounding volume, (ii) crossed a boundary between 2 volumes of differing resistivities, (iii) reached a bend in the nerve, or (iv) reached the functional end of the nerve. In the second method, potentials were recorded when an electrical tripole, constructed in a way to produce the electrical equivalent of an action potential, encountered the same discontinuities as well as when it was configured to simulate a curved nerve. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that dipole components of an action potential predominant in far-field recordings. PMID:2469568

  14. Imaging when acting: picture but not word cues induce action-related biases of visual attention

    Agnieszka Wykowska

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In line with the Theory of Event Coding (Hommel et al., 2001, action planning has been shown to affect perceptual processing—an effect that has been attributed to a so-called intentional weighting mechanism (Memelink & Hommel, in press; Wykowska, Schubö, & Hommel, 2009, whose functional role is to provide information for open parameters of online action adjustment (Hommel, 2010. The aim of this study was to test whether different types of action representations induce intentional weighting to various degrees. To meet this aim, we introduced a paradigm in which participants performed a visual search task while preparing to grasp or to point. The to-be performed movement was signaled either by a picture of a required action or a word cue. We reasoned that picture cues might trigger a more concrete action representation that would be more likely to activate the intentional weighting of perceptual dimensions that provide information for online action control. In contrast, word cues were expected to trigger a more abstract action representation that would be less likely to induce intentional weighting. In two experiments, preparing for an action facilitated the processing of targets in an unrelated search task if they differed from distractors on a dimension that provided information for online action control. As predicted, however, this effect was observed only if action preparation was signaled by picture cues but not if it was signaled by word cues. We conclude that picture cues are more efficient than word cues in activating the intentional weighting of perceptual dimensions, presumably by specifying not only invariant characteristics of the planned action but also the dimensions of action-specific parameters.

  15. Imaging When Acting: Picture but Not Word Cues Induce Action-Related Biases of Visual Attention

    AgnieszkaWykowska; BernhardHommel; AnnaSchubö

    2012-01-01

    In line with the Theory of Event Coding (Hommel et al., 2001), action planning has been shown to affect perceptual processing—an effect that has been attributed to a so-called intentional weighting mechanism (Memelink & Hommel, in press; Wykowska, Schubö, & Hommel, 2009), whose functional role is to provide information for open parameters of online action adjustment (Hommel, 2010). The aim of this study was to test whether different types of action representations induce intentio...

  16. How You Move Is What You See: Action Planning Biases Selection in Visual Search

    Wykowska, Agnieszka; Schubo, Anna; Hommel, Bernhard

    2009-01-01

    Three experiments investigated the impact of planning and preparing a manual grasping or pointing movement on feature detection in a visual search task. The authors hypothesized that action planning may prime perceptual dimensions that provide information for the open parameters of that action. Indeed, preparing for grasping facilitated detection…

  17. Action Alters Object Identification: Wielding a Gun Increases the Bias to See Guns

    Witt, Jessica K.; Brockmole, James R.

    2012-01-01

    Stereotypes, expectations, and emotions influence an observer's ability to detect and categorize objects as guns. In light of recent work in action-perception interactions, however, there is another unexplored factor that may be critical: The action choices available to the perceiver. In five experiments, participants determined whether another…

  18. Action prediction based on anticipatory brain potentials during simulated driving

    Khaliliardali, Zahra; Chavarriaga, Ricardo; Gheorghe, Lucian Andrei; Millán, José del R.

    2015-12-01

    Objective. The ability of an automobile to infer the driver’s upcoming actions directly from neural signals could enrich the interaction of the car with its driver. Intelligent vehicles fitted with an on-board brain-computer interface able to decode the driver’s intentions can use this information to improve the driving experience. In this study we investigate the neural signatures of anticipation of specific actions, namely braking and accelerating. Approach. We investigated anticipatory slow cortical potentials in electroencephalogram recorded from 18 healthy participants in a driving simulator using a variant of the contingent negative variation (CNV) paradigm with Go and No-go conditions: count-down numbers followed by ‘Start’/‘Stop’ cue. We report decoding performance before the action onset using a quadratic discriminant analysis classifier based on temporal features. Main results. (i) Despite the visual and driving related cognitive distractions, we show the presence of anticipatory event related potentials locked to the stimuli onset similar to the widely reported CNV signal (with an average peak value of -8 μV at electrode Cz). (ii) We demonstrate the discrimination between cases requiring to perform an action upon imperative subsequent stimulus (Go condition, e.g. a ‘Red’ traffic light) versus events that do not require such action (No-go condition; e.g. a ‘Yellow’ light); with an average single trial classification performance of 0.83 ± 0.13 for braking and 0.79 ± 0.12 for accelerating (area under the curve). (iii) We show that the centro-medial anticipatory potentials are observed as early as 320 ± 200 ms before the action with a detection rate of 0.77 ± 0.12 in offline analysis. Significance. We show for the first time the feasibility of predicting the driver’s intention through decoding anticipatory related potentials during simulated car driving with high recognition rates.

  19. Explaining the discrepancy between intentions and actions: the case of hypothetical bias in contingent valuation.

    Ajzen, Icek; Brown, Thomas C; Carvajal, Franklin

    2004-09-01

    An experiment was designed to account for intention-behavior discrepancies by applying the theory of planned behavior to contingent valuation. College students (N = 160) voted in hypothetical and real payment referenda to contribute $8 to a scholarship fund. Overestimates of willingness to pay in the hypothetical referendum could not be attributed to moderately favorable latent dispositions. Instead, this hypothetical bias was explained by activation of more favorable beliefs and attitudes in the context of a hypothetical rather than a real referendum. A corrective entreaty was found to eliminate this bias by bringing beliefs, attitudes, and intentions in line with those in the real payment situation. As a result, the theory of planned behavior produced more accurate prediction of real payment when participants were exposed to the corrective entreaty. PMID:15359015

  20. Propagation of Action Potentials: An Active Participation Exercise.

    Felsten, Gary

    1998-01-01

    Describes an active participation exercise that demonstrates the propagation of action potentials (the ability to transmit information through the neural network, dependent upon chemical interactions in the brain). Students assume the structure and function of the network by lining up around the room and communicating through hand signals and…

  1. Compound muscle action potentials in newborn infants with spina bifida.

    Geerdink, N.; Pasman, J.W.; Rotteveel, J.J.; Roeleveld, N.; Mullaart, R.A.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between compound muscle action potentials (CMAPs) and neurological impairment in newborn infants with spina bifida. Thirty-one newborn infants (17 males, 14 females, mean gestational age 39 wks [SD 2]; mean birthweight 3336 g [SD 496]) with s

  2. Sodium and potassium conductance changes during a membrane action potential.

    Bezanilla, F; Rojas, E; Taylor, R E

    1970-12-01

    1. A method for turning a membrane potential control system on and off in less than 10 musec is described. This method was used to record membrane currents in perfused giant axons from Dosidicus gigas and Loligo forbesi after turning on the voltage clamp system at various times during the course of a membrane action potential.2. The membrane current measured just after the capacity charging transient was found to have an almost linear relation to the controlled membrane potential.3. The total membrane conductance taken from these current-voltage curves was found to have a time course during the action potential similar to that found by Cole & Curtis (1939).4. The instantaneous current voltage curves were linear enough to make it possible to obtain a good estimate of the individual sodium and potassium channel conductances, either algebraically or by clamping to the sodium, or potassium, reversal potentials. Good general agreement was obtained with the predictions of the Hodgkin-Huxley equations.5. We consider these results to constitute the first direct experimental demonstration of the conductance changes to sodium and potassium during the course of an action potential. PMID:5505231

  3. An investigation of a potential low bias in the MODIS aerosol products over Asia

    McHardy, T. M.; Shi, Y.; Zhang, J.; Reid, J. S.; Campbell, J. R.; Hsu, N. Y. C.

    2015-12-01

    Heavy aerosol plumes can be misidentified as clouds in passive satellite-based aerosol retrievals due to their relatively high visible reflectivity. Thus, over regions such as China, where a higher frequency of heavy aerosol plumes is expected, regional aerosol optical depth analyses reported from passive satellite-based aerosol products may biased low. This fundamental error can be suppressed under certain conditions. In this study, with a synergistic use of satellite observations from MODIS, OMI and CALIOP, a low bias in the MODIS Dark Target (DT) and Deep Blue (DB) aerosol products is studied over Asia for the influence of dense aerosol plume undersampling. A new scheme has been developed for detecting heavy aerosol plumes by coupling OMI aerosol index retrievals with available CALIOP level 1B and cloud and aerosol profile data. Collocated CALIOP, MODIS and OMI data are then used to further investigate the potential low bias in the MODIS DT and DB aerosol products, in an attempt to quantify the measure of undersampling in the regional DT and DB archive. Our preliminary results show that DT and DB aerosol algorithms detect about half heavy aerosol loading when CALIPSO and OMI AI believe there are heavy absorbing aerosols.

  4. Sex differences in event-related potentials and attentional biases to emotional facial stimuli

    Daniela M. Pfabigan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Attentional processes play an important role in the processing of emotional information. Previous research reported attentional biases during stimulus processing in anxiety and depression. However, sex differences in the processing of emotional stimuli and higher prevalence rates of anxiety disorders among women, compared to men, suggest that attentional biases may also differ between the two sexes. The present study used a modified version of the dot probe task with happy, angry, and neutral facial stimuli to investigate the time course of attentional biases in healthy volunteers. Moreover, associations of attentional biases with alexithymia were examined on the behavioral and physiological level. Event-related potentials were measured while 21 participants (11 women performed the task, utilizing also for the first time a difference wave approach in the analysis to highlight emotion-specific aspects. Women showed overall enhanced probe P1 amplitudes compared to men, in particular after rewarding facial stimuli. Under the difference wave approach, probe P1 amplitudes appeared specifically enhanced with regard to congruently presented happy facial stimuli among women, compared to men. Both methods yielded enhanced probe P1 amplitudes after presentation of the emotional stimulus in the left compared to the right visual hemifield. Probe P1 amplitudes correlated negatively with self-reported alexithymia, most of these correlations were only observable in women. Our results suggest that women orient their attention to a greater extent to facial stimuli than men and corroborate that alexithymia is a correlate of reduced emotional reactivity on a neuronal level. We recommend using a difference wave approach when addressing attentional processes of orientation and disengagement also in future studies.

  5. Action potential initiation in the hodgkin-huxley model.

    Lucy J Colwell

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A recent paper of B. Naundorf et al. described an intriguing negative correlation between variability of the onset potential at which an action potential occurs (the onset span and the rapidity of action potential initiation (the onset rapidity. This correlation was demonstrated in numerical simulations of the Hodgkin-Huxley model. Due to this antagonism, it is argued that Hodgkin-Huxley-type models are unable to explain action potential initiation observed in cortical neurons in vivo or in vitro. Here we apply a method from theoretical physics to derive an analytical characterization of this problem. We analytically compute the probability distribution of onset potentials and analytically derive the inverse relationship between onset span and onset rapidity. We find that the relationship between onset span and onset rapidity depends on the level of synaptic background activity. Hence we are able to elucidate the regions of parameter space for which the Hodgkin-Huxley model is able to accurately describe the behavior of this system.

  6. Virtual Cathodes near small electrodes biased near the plasma potential and its effects on Langmuir probes

    Yip, Chi-Shung; Hershkowitz, Noah; Severn, Greg

    2015-09-01

    Movable small (3cm x 3.8cm) plates biased near the plasma potential are immersed in a filament discharge in a multi-dipole chamber. The plates are small (Aplate /Achamber collection of an electrode in the presence of the virtual cathode, and was experimentally investigated by comparing I-V characteristics of the small plate and a 0.6cm diameter Langmuir probe. This work is supported by U.S. DOE under the Grant and Contract No. DE-FG02-97ER54437.

  7. Tuning an rf-SQUID flux qubit system's potential with magnetic flux bias

    At an extremely low temperature of 20 mK, we measured the loop current in a tunable rf superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) with a dc-SQUID. By adjusting the magnetic flux applied to the rf-SQUID loop (Φf) and the small dc-SQUID (Φfcjj), respectively, the potential shape of the system can be fully controlled in situ. Variation in the transition step and overlap size in the switching current with a barrier flux bias are analyzed, from which we can obtain some relevant device parameters and build a model to explain the experimental phenomenon

  8. Spatially periodic domain wall pinning potentials: Asymmetric pinning and dipolar biasing

    Metaxas, P. J.; Zermatten, P.-J.; Novak, R. L.; Rohart, S.; Jamet, J.-P.; Weil, R.; Ferré, J.; Mougin, A.; Stamps, R. L.; Gaudin, G.; Baltz, V.; Rodmacq, B.

    2013-02-01

    Domain wall propagation has been measured in continuous, weakly disordered, quasi-two-dimensional, Ising-like magnetic layers that are subject to spatially periodic domain wall pinning potentials. The potentials are generated non-destructively using the stray magnetic field of ordered arrays of magnetically hard [Co/Pt]m nanoplatelets, which are patterned above and are physically separated from the continuous magnetic layer. The effect of the periodic pinning potentials on thermally activated domain wall creep dynamics is shown to be equivalent, at first approximation, to that of a uniform, effective retardation field, Hret, which acts against the applied field, H. We show that Hret depends not only on the array geometry but also on the relative orientation of H and the magnetization of the nanoplatelets. A result of the latter dependence is that wall-mediated hysteresis loops obtained for a set nanoplatelet magnetization exhibit many properties that are normally associated with ferromagnet/antiferromagnet exchange bias systems. These include a switchable bias, coercivity enhancement, and domain wall roughness that is dependent on the applied field polarity.

  9. First-principles modeling of Pt/LaAlO3/SrTiO3 capacitors under an external bias potential

    Cazorla, Claudio; Stengel, Massimiliano

    2012-01-01

    We study the electrical properties of Pt/LaAlO3/SrTiO3 capacitors under the action of an external bias potential, using first-principles simulations performed at constrained electric displacement field. A complete set of band diagrams, together with the relevant electrical characteristics (capacitance and built-in fields), are determined as a function of LaAlO3 thickness and the applied potential.We find that the internal field in LaAlO3 monotonically decreases with increasing thickness; henc...

  10. Social Class and Social Action: The Middle-Class Bias of Democratic Theory in Education

    Schutz, Aaron

    2008-01-01

    Background: This article examines the emergence of the middle and working classes in America and describes key characteristics of these cultures as they manifest themselves today. It then explores the effects of social class on our conceptions of democracy. Purpose: To help educators understand the relationship between social action strategies and…

  11. Click- and chirp-evoked human compound action potentials

    Chertoff, Mark; Lichtenhan, Jeffery; Willis, Marie

    2010-01-01

    In the experiments reported here, the amplitude and the latency of human compound action potentials (CAPs) evoked from a chirp stimulus are compared to those evoked from a traditional click stimulus. The chirp stimulus was created with a frequency sweep to compensate for basilar membrane traveling wave delay using the O-Chirp equations from Fobel and Dau [(2004). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 116, 2213–2222] derived from otoacoustic emission data. Human cochlear traveling wave delay estimates were obta...

  12. Robotic action acquisition with cognitive biases in coarse-grained state space.

    Uragami, Daisuke; Kohno, Yu; Takahashi, Tatsuji

    2016-07-01

    Some of the authors have previously proposed a cognitively inspired reinforcement learning architecture (LS-Q) that mimics cognitive biases in humans. LS-Q adaptively learns under uniform, coarse-grained state division and performs well without parameter tuning in a giant-swing robot task. However, these results were shown only in simulations. In this study, we test the validity of the LS-Q implemented in a robot in a real environment. In addition, we analyze the learning process to elucidate the mechanism by which the LS-Q adaptively learns under the partially observable environment. We argue that the LS-Q may be a versatile reinforcement learning architecture, which is, despite its simplicity, easily applicable and does not require well-prepared settings. PMID:27195484

  13. Action potentials of curved nerves in finite limbs.

    Xiao, S; McGill, K C; Hentz, V R

    1995-06-01

    Previous simulations of volume-conducted nerve-fiber action-potentials have modeled the limb as semi-infinite or circularly cylindrical, and the fibers as straight lines parallel to the limb surface. The geometry of actual nerves and limbs, however, can be considerably more complicated. This paper presents a general method for computing the potentials of fibers with arbitrary paths in arbitrary finite limbs. It involves computing the propagating point-source response (PPSR), which is the potential arising from a single point source (dipole or tripole) travelling along the fiber. The PPSR can be applied to fibers of different conduction velocities by simple dilation or compression. The method is illustrated for oblique and spiralling nerve fibers. Potentials from oblique fibers are shown to be different for orthodromic and antidromic propagation. Such results show that the straight-line models are not always adequate for nerves with anatomical amounts of curvature. PMID:7790016

  14. Unconscious bias when experts are invited - and the results of conscious action

    Stadmark, Johanna; Conley, Daniel J.

    2016-04-01

    Visibility of different kinds is important in academic work. We publish papers, present results at conferences and are invited to give seminars and write contributions and reviews about other scientists' work. A few years back we reacted on the invitation-only sections in two of the leading scientific journals. We asked: "Who are invited to write about other researchers' newly published results?" The short answer could be: Experts in the field. However, we found that it was mainly male experts in the field when we reviewed/categorized the authors of the invitation-only sections News & Views and Perspective in Nature and Science, respectively, during the years 2010 and 2011 (in total 1663 authors). The proportion of female authors was compared to the proportion of female scientists within their respective fields within academia. We found that female scientists were invited less often than their male colleagues. We notified the two journals about the mismatch (Nature 2012: 488) and their encouraging reply was that they needed to improve how they reflect women's contributions to science (Nature 2012: 491). In 2013 and 2014 the invitation-only sections (with in total 1845 authors) had reached parity (compared to the pool of available scientists) for contributions regarding Earth and Environmental Science, and made steps forward for Medical/Biological/Chemical sciences and Physical sciences. By raising awareness about the unconscious biases we all have, e.g. both men and women, we can act to make progress towards parity in science.

  15. Beyond Bias and Barriers: Fulfilling the Potential of Women in Academic Science and Engineering

    Agogino, Alice

    2007-04-01

    Review of the report by the National Academies, with a focus on action strategies in the physical sciences. Women face barriers to hiring and promotion in research universities in many fields of science and engineering; a situation that deprives the United States of an important source of talent as the country faces increasingly stiff global competition in higher education, science and technology, and the marketplace. Eliminating gender bias in universities requires immediate, overarching reform and decisive action by university administrators, professional societies, government agencies, and Congress. Forty years ago, women made up only 3 percent of America's scientific and technical workers, but by 2003 they accounted for nearly one-fifth. In addition, women have earned more than half of the bachelor's degrees awarded in science and engineering since 2000. However, their representation on university and college faculties fails to reflect these gains. Among science and engineering Ph.D.s, four times more men than women hold full-time faculty positions. And minority women with doctorates are less likely than white women or men of any racial or ethnic group to be in tenure positions. The report urges higher education organizations and professional societies to form collaborative, self-monitoring body that would recommend standards for faculty recruitment, retention, and promotion; collect data; and track compliance across institutions. A ``report card'' template is provided in the report. To read the report online, add a comment, or purchase hard copy, go to: http://www.engineeringpathway.com/ep/learningresource/summary/index.jhtml?id=94A4929D-F1B2-432E-8167-63335569CB4E.

  16. Multiple Scattering of Laser Pulses in Snow Over Ice: Modeling the Potential Bias in ICESat Altimetry

    Davis, A. B.; Varnai, T.; Marshak, A.

    2010-01-01

    The primary goal of NASA's current ICESat and future ICESat2 missions is to map the altitude of the Earth's land ice with high accuracy using laser altimetry technology, and to measure sea ice freeboard. Ice however is a highly transparent optical medium with variable scattering and absorption properties. Moreover, it is often covered by a layer of snow with varying depth and optical properties largely dependent on its age. We describe a modeling framework for estimating the potential altimetry bias caused by multiple scattering in the layered medium. We use both a Monte Carlo technique and an analytical diffusion model valid for optically thick media. Our preliminary numerical results are consistent with estimates of the multiple scattering delay from laboratory measurements using snow harvested in Greenland, namely, a few cm. Planned refinements of the models are described.

  17. Numerical simulation of antiarrhythmic drugs effects on cardiac action potential

    Převorovská, Světlana; Maršík, František

    Brno : Brno University of Technology, 2006 - (Burša, J.; Fuis, V.), s. 170-171 ISBN 80-214-3232-2. [ Human Biomechanics 2006. Hrotovice (CZ), 13.11.2006-16.11.2006] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA106/03/1073; GA ČR(CZ) GA106/03/0958 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : human cardiovascular system * cardiac action potential * antiarrhytmmic drugs-cell channel interaction Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics

  18. Systematic biases on galaxy haloes parameters from Yukawa-like gravitational potentials

    Cardone, V F

    2011-01-01

    A viable alternative to the dark energy as a solution of the cosmic speed up problem is represented by Extended Theories of Gravity. Should this be indeed the case, there will be an impact not only on cosmological scales, but also at any scale, from the Solar System to extragalactic ones. In particular, the gravitational potential can be different from the Newtonian one commonly adopted when computing the circular velocity fitted to spiral galaxies rotation curves. Phenomenologically modelling the modified point mass potential as the sum of a Newtonian and a Yukawa like correction, we simulate observed rotation curves for a spiral galaxy described as the sum of an exponential disc and a NFW dark matter halo. We then fit these curves assuming parameterized halo models (either with an inner cusp or a core) and using the Newtonian potential to estimate the theoretical rotation curve. Such a study allows us to investigate the bias on the disc and halo model parameters induced by the systematic error induced by fo...

  19. Flexible graphene transistors for recording cell action potentials

    Blaschke, Benno M.; Lottner, Martin; Drieschner, Simon; Bonaccini Calia, Andrea; Stoiber, Karolina; Rousseau, Lionel; Lissourges, Gaëlle; Garrido, Jose A.

    2016-06-01

    Graphene solution-gated field-effect transistors (SGFETs) are a promising platform for the recording of cell action potentials due to the intrinsic high signal amplification of graphene transistors. In addition, graphene technology fulfills important key requirements for in-vivo applications, such as biocompability, mechanical flexibility, as well as ease of high density integration. In this paper we demonstrate the fabrication of flexible arrays of graphene SGFETs on polyimide, a biocompatible polymeric substrate. We investigate the transistor’s transconductance and intrinsic electronic noise which are key parameters for the device sensitivity, confirming that the obtained values are comparable to those of rigid graphene SGFETs. Furthermore, we show that the devices do not degrade during repeated bending and the transconductance, governed by the electronic properties of graphene, is unaffected by bending. After cell culture, we demonstrate the recording of cell action potentials from cardiomyocyte-like cells with a high signal-to-noise ratio that is higher or comparable to competing state of the art technologies. Our results highlight the great capabilities of flexible graphene SGFETs in bioelectronics, providing a solid foundation for in-vivo experiments and, eventually, for graphene-based neuroprosthetics.

  20. Metabolic syndrome potentiates the cardiac action potential-prolonging action of drugs: a possible 'anti-proarrhythmic' role for amlodipine.

    Caillier, Bertrand; Pilote, Sylvie; Patoine, Dany; Levac, Xavier; Couture, Christian; Daleau, Pascal; Simard, Chantale; Drolet, Benoit

    2012-03-01

    Type II diabetes was shown to prolong the QT interval on the ECG and to promote cardiac arrhythmias. This is not so clear for metabolic syndrome, a precursor state of type II diabetes. The objectives of the present study were to generate a guinea pig model of metabolic syndrome by long-term exposure to diabetogenic diets, and to evaluate the monophasic action potential duration (MAPD)-modulating effects of drugs in these animals. Male Hartley guinea pigs were fed with either the control, the High Fat High Sucrose (HFHS) or the High Fat High Fructose (HFHF) diet for 150 days. Evolution of weight, blood cholesterol, triglycerides, urea and glucose tolerance were regularly monitored. Histopathological evolution was also evaluated in target organs such as pancreas, heart, liver and kidneys. Ex vivo experiments using the Langendorff retroperfusion technique, isolated hearts from guinea pigs either fed with the control, the HFHS or the HFHF diet were exposed to dofetilide 20 nM (D), chromanol 293B 10 μM (C) and amlodipine 100 nM (A) in different drug combinations and monophasic action potential duration was measured at 90% repolarization (MAPD₉₀). Our data show that it is possible to generate a guinea pig model of metabolic syndrome by chronic exposure to diabetogenic diets. Minor histopathological abnormalities were observed, mainly in the pancreas and the liver. Metabolic syndrome potentiates the MAPD-prolonging actions of I(Kr)-blocking (dofetilide) and I(Ks)-blocking (chromanol 293B) drugs, an effect that is reversible upon administration of the calcium channel blocker amlodipine. PMID:22154802

  1. Bootstrapping Structural VARs: Avoiding a Potential Bias in Confidence Intervals for Impulse Response Functions

    Phillips, Kerk L.; David E. Spencer

    2010-01-01

    Constructing bootstrap confidence intervals for impulse response functions (IRFs) from structural vector autoregression (SVAR) models has become standard practice in empirical macroeconomic research. The accuracy of such confidence intervals can deteriorate severely, however, if the bootstrap IRFs are biased. We document an apparently common source of bias in the estimation of the VAR error covariance matrix which can be easily reduced by a scale adjustment. This bias is generally unrecogn...

  2. Influence of the substrate bias potential on the properties of ta-C coatings deposited using Venetian blind plasma filter

    Zavaleyev, V., E-mail: viktor.zavaleyev@tu.koszalin.pl; Walkowicz, J.

    2015-04-30

    The paper presents the research results on the formation of amorphous ta-C films with a minimum amount of defects, deposited by pulsed vacuum-arc method with the use of a water-cooled electromagnetic Venetian blind plasma filter. The subject of the research was the influence of the substrate bias voltage, in the range of − 25 to − 200 V, on the structural and mechanical properties of ta-C coatings. Dependence of the microstructure and phase composition of ta-C films on the substrate bias voltage were analyzed by Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results of the structural analysis of coatings showed characteristic changes in the content of the diamond-like sp{sup 3} fraction on the substrate potential. Mechanical properties of ta-C films — roughness, adhesion, hardness and Young's modulus were investigated using a profilometer, the scratch tester and a nanoindenter. The highest content of sp{sup 3} bonds, of about 63%, was obtained in the coating deposited at the substrate bias potential of − 100 V, which also showed the minimum surface roughness and maximum hardness and Young's modulus of 50 GPa and 371 GPa respectively. The ta-C coating synthesized at this bias potential had excellent adhesion — complete film delamination occurs at the load of 41 N. Our preliminary studies and the results described in this work enable the use of electromagnetic Venetian blind plasma filter for deposition of thin ta-C coatings with a minimum amount of defects. - Highlights: • ta-C films were deposited by pulsed arc method using a Venetian blind plasma filter. • Dependence of the film properties on the substrate bias potential was studied. • Substrate bias determines the content ratio of sp{sup 3} and sp{sup 2} phases in the ta-C films. • Substrate bias influences the roughness, microhardness, and adhesion of the films.

  3. Influence of the substrate bias potential on the properties of ta-C coatings deposited using Venetian blind plasma filter

    The paper presents the research results on the formation of amorphous ta-C films with a minimum amount of defects, deposited by pulsed vacuum-arc method with the use of a water-cooled electromagnetic Venetian blind plasma filter. The subject of the research was the influence of the substrate bias voltage, in the range of − 25 to − 200 V, on the structural and mechanical properties of ta-C coatings. Dependence of the microstructure and phase composition of ta-C films on the substrate bias voltage were analyzed by Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results of the structural analysis of coatings showed characteristic changes in the content of the diamond-like sp3 fraction on the substrate potential. Mechanical properties of ta-C films — roughness, adhesion, hardness and Young's modulus were investigated using a profilometer, the scratch tester and a nanoindenter. The highest content of sp3 bonds, of about 63%, was obtained in the coating deposited at the substrate bias potential of − 100 V, which also showed the minimum surface roughness and maximum hardness and Young's modulus of 50 GPa and 371 GPa respectively. The ta-C coating synthesized at this bias potential had excellent adhesion — complete film delamination occurs at the load of 41 N. Our preliminary studies and the results described in this work enable the use of electromagnetic Venetian blind plasma filter for deposition of thin ta-C coatings with a minimum amount of defects. - Highlights: • ta-C films were deposited by pulsed arc method using a Venetian blind plasma filter. • Dependence of the film properties on the substrate bias potential was studied. • Substrate bias determines the content ratio of sp3 and sp2 phases in the ta-C films. • Substrate bias influences the roughness, microhardness, and adhesion of the films

  4. Electronic transport and shot noise in a Thue-Morse bilayer graphene superlattice with interlayer potential bias

    Li, Yuanqiao; Zhang, Hongmei; Liu, De

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we evaluate the transport properties of a Thue-Morse AB-stacked bilayer graphene superlattice with different interlayer potential biases. Based on the transfer matrix method, the transmission coefficient, the conductance, and the Fano factor are numerically calculated and discussed. We find that the symmetry of the transmission coefficient with respect to normal incidence depends on the structural symmetry of the system and the new transmission peak appears in the energy band gap opening region. The conductance and the Fano factor can be greatly modulated not only by the Fermi energy and the interlayer potential bias but also by the generation number. Interestingly, the conductance exhibits the plateau of almost zero conductance and the Fano factor plateaus with Poisson value occur in the energy band gap opening region for large interlayer potential bias.

  5. The Potential of Deweyan-Inspired Action Research

    Stark, Jody L.

    2014-01-01

    In its broadest sense, pragmatism could be said to be the philosophical orientation of all action research. Action research is characterized by research, action, and participation grounded in democratic principles and guided by the aim of social improvement. Furthermore, action research is an active process of inquiry that does not admit…

  6. Pressure wave model for action potential propagation in excitable cells

    Rvachev, M M

    2003-01-01

    Speed of propagation of small-amplitude pressure waves through the cytoplasmic interior of myelinated and unmyelinated axons of different diameters is theoretically estimated and is found to generally agree with the action potential (AP) conduction velocities. This remarkable coincidence allows to surmise a model in which AP spread along axon is propelled not by straggling ionic currents as in the widely accepted local circuit theory, but by mechanoactivation of the membrane ion channels by a traveling pressure pulse. Hydraulic pulses propagating in the viscous axoplasm are calculated to decay over ~1 mm distances, and it is further hypothesized that it is the role of influxing during the AP calcium ions to activate membrane skeletal protein network attached to the membrane cytoplasmic side for a brief radial contraction amplifying the pressure pulse and preventing its decay. The model correctly predicts that the AP conduction velocity should vary as the one-half power of axon diameter for large unmyelinated ...

  7. Compound sensory action potential in normal and pathological human nerves

    Krarup, Christian

    2004-01-01

    at different conduction distances are determined by summation of SFAPs of varying fiber diameters, and differ in this respect, also, from the compound muscle action potential (CMAP) for which conduction velocities are determined by the very fastest fibers in the nerve. The effect and extent of temporal...... dispersion over increasing conduction distance is greater for the SNAP than CMAP, and demonstration of conduction block is therefore difficult. In addition, the effect of temporal dispersion on amplitude and shape is strongly dependent on the number of conducting fibers and their distribution, and...... in different polyneuropathies. In this review, different factors that characterize sensory fibers and set the SNAP apart from the CMAP are discussed to emphasize the supplementary and complementary information that can be obtained from sensory conduction studies. Sensory conduction studies require particular...

  8. Map-based model of the cardiac action potential

    A simple computationally efficient model which is capable of replicating the basic features of cardiac cell action potential is proposed. The model is a four-dimensional map and demonstrates good correspondence with real cardiac cells. Various regimes of cardiac activity, which can be reproduced by the proposed model, are shown. Bifurcation mechanisms of these regimes transitions are explained using phase space analysis. The dynamics of 1D and 2D lattices of coupled maps which model the behavior of electrically connected cells is discussed in the context of synchronization theory. -- Highlights: → Recent experimental-data based models are complicated for analysis and simulation. → The simplified map-based model of the cardiac cell is constructed. → The model is capable for replication of different types of cardiac activity. → The spatio-temporal dynamics of ensembles of coupled maps are investigated. → Received data are analyzed in context of biophysical processes in the myocardium.

  9. Influence of positive bias potential in plasma surface interactions and its application for simulation of radiolytic corrosion

    A simulation and acceleration test apparatus with helicon plasma for the radiolytic corrosion were arranged to investigate the corrosion phenomena of the metal surface under the heavy irradiation environment. The oxidation of 304 stainless steel by contact with the oxygen plasma was investigated. It was confirmed that the plasma oxidation phenomenon is enhanced by biasing the positive potential. (author)

  10. Attentional Bias in Patients with Decompensated Tinnitus: Prima Facie Evidence from Event-Related Potentials.

    Li, Zhicheng; Gu, Ruolei; Zeng, Xiangli; Zhong, Weifang; Qi, Min; Cen, Jintian

    2016-01-01

    Tinnitus refers to the auditory perception of sound in the absence of external sound or electric stimuli. The influence of tinnitus on cognitive processing is at the cutting edge of ongoing tinnitus research. In this study, we adopted an objective indicator of attentional processing, i.e. the mismatch negativity (MMN), to assess the attentional bias in patients with decompensated tinnitus. Three kinds of pure tones, D1 (8,000 Hz), S (8,500 Hz) and D2 (9,000 Hz), were used to induce event-related potentials (ERPs) in the normal ear. Employing the oddball paradigm, the task was divided into two blocks in which D1 and D2 were set as deviation stimuli, respectively. Only D2 induced a significant MMN in the tinnitus group, while neither D1 nor D2 was able to induce MMN in the control group. In addition, the ERPs in the left hemisphere, which were recorded within the time window of 90-150 ms (ERP90-150 ms), were significantly higher than those in the right hemisphere in the tinnitus group, while no significant difference was observed in the control group. Lastly, the amplitude of ERP90-150 ms in the tinnitus group was significantly higher than that in the control group. These findings suggest that patients with decompensated tinnitus showed automatic processing of acoustic stimuli, thereby indicating that these patients allocated more cognitive resources to acoustic stimulus processing. We suggest that the difficulty in disengaging or facilitated attention of patients might underlie this phenomenon. The limitations of the current study are discussed. PMID:26800229

  11. Short latency compound action potentials from mammalian gravity receptor organs

    Jones, T. A.; Jones, S. M.

    1999-01-01

    Gravity receptor function was characterized in four mammalian species using far-field vestibular evoked potentials (VsEPs). VsEPs are compound action potentials of the vestibular nerve and central relays that are elicited by linear acceleration ramps applied to the cranium. Rats, mice, guinea pigs, and gerbils were studied. In all species, response onset occurred within 1.5 ms of the stimulus onset. Responses persisted during intense (116 dBSPL) wide-band (50 to 50 inverted question mark omitted inverted question mark000 Hz) forward masking, whereas auditory responses to intense clicks (112 dBpeSPL) were eliminated under the same conditions. VsEPs remained after cochlear extirpation but were eliminated following bilateral labyrinthectomy. Responses included a series of positive and negative peaks that occurred within 8 ms of stimulus onset (range of means at +6 dBre: 1.0 g/ms: P1=908 to 1062 micros, N1=1342 to 1475 micros, P2=1632 to 1952 micros, N2=2038 to 2387 micros). Mean response amplitudes at +6 dBre: 1.0 g/ms ranged from 0.14 to 0.99 microV. VsEP input/output functions revealed latency slopes that varied across peaks and species ranging from -19 to -51 micros/dB. Amplitude-intensity slopes also varied ranging from 0.04 to 0.08 microV/dB for rats and mice. Latency values were comparable to those of birds although amplitudes were substantially smaller in mammals. VsEP threshold values were considerably higher in mammals compared to birds and ranged from -8.1 to -10.5 dBre 1.0 g/ms across species. These results support the hypothesis that mammalian gravity receptors are less sensitive to dynamic stimuli than are those of birds.

  12. Modelling Action Potential Generation and Propagation in Fibroblastic Cells

    Torres, J. J.; Cornelisse, L. N.; Harks, E. G. A.; Theuvenet, A. P. R.; Ypey, D. L.

    2003-04-01

    Using a standard Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) formalism, we present a mathematical model for action potential (AP) generation and intercellular AP propagation in quiescent (serum-deprived) normal rat kidney (NRK) fibroblasts [1], based on the recent experimental identification of the ion channels involved [2]. The principal ion channels described are those of an inwardly rectifying K+ conductance (GKIR), an L-type calcium conductance (GCaL), an intracellular calcium activated Cl- conductance (GCl(Ca)), a residual leak conductance Gleak, and gap junctional channels between the cells (Ggj). The role of each one of these components in the particular shape of the AP wave-form has been analyzed and compared with experimental observations. In addition, we have studied the role of subcellular processes like intracellular calcium dynamics and calcium buffering in AP generation. AP propagation between cells was reconstructed in a hexagonal model of cells coupled by Ggj with physiological conductance values. The model revealed an excitability mechanism of quiescent NRK cells with a particular role of intracellular calcium dynamics. It allows further explorations of the mechanism of signal generation and transmission in NRK cell cultures and its dependence on growth conditions.

  13. Pharmacological actions of statins: potential utility in COPD

    T. E. Eaton

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is characterised by minimally reversible airflow limitation and features of systemic inflammation. Current therapies for COPD have been shown to reduce symptoms and infective exacerbations and to improve quality of life. However, these drugs have little effect on the natural history of the disease (progressive decline in lung function and exercise tolerance and do not improve mortality. The anti-inflammatory effects of statins on both pulmonary and systemic inflammation through inhibition of guanosine triphosphatase and nuclear factor-B mediated activation of inflammatory and matrix remodelling pathways could have substantial benefits in patients with COPD due to the following. 1 Inhibition of cytokine production (tumour necrosis factor-, interleukin (IL-6 and IL-8 and neutrophil infiltration into the lung; 2 inhibition of the fibrotic activity in the lung leading to small airways fibrosis and irreversible airflow limitation; 3 antioxidant and anti-inflammatory (IL-6 mediated effects on skeletal muscle; 4 reduced inflammatory response to pulmonary infection; and 5 inhibition of the development (or reversal of epithelial-mesenchymal transition, a precursor event to lung cancer. This review examines the pleiotropic pharmacological action of statins which inhibit key inflammatory and remodelling pathways in COPD and concludes that statins have considerable potential as adjunct therapy in COPD.

  14. Pharmacological actions of statins: potential utility in COPD.

    Young, R P; Hopkins, R; Eaton, T E

    2009-12-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterised by minimally reversible airflow limitation and features of systemic inflammation. Current therapies for COPD have been shown to reduce symptoms and infective exacerbations and to improve quality of life. However, these drugs have little effect on the natural history of the disease (progressive decline in lung function and exercise tolerance) and do not improve mortality. The anti-inflammatory effects of statins on both pulmonary and systemic inflammation through inhibition of guanosine triphosphatase and nuclear factor-κB mediated activation of inflammatory and matrix remodelling pathways could have substantial benefits in patients with COPD due to the following. 1) Inhibition of cytokine production (tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8) and neutrophil infiltration into the lung; 2) inhibition of the fibrotic activity in the lung leading to small airways fibrosis and irreversible airflow limitation; 3) antioxidant and anti-inflammatory (IL-6 mediated) effects on skeletal muscle; 4) reduced inflammatory response to pulmonary infection; and 5) inhibition of the development (or reversal) of epithelial-mesenchymal transition, a precursor event to lung cancer. This review examines the pleiotropic pharmacological action of statins which inhibit key inflammatory and remodelling pathways in COPD and concludes that statins have considerable potential as adjunct therapy in COPD. PMID:20956147

  15. Potential fitting biases resulting from grouping data into variable width bins

    When reading peer-reviewed scientific literature describing any analysis of empirical data, it is natural and correct to proceed with the underlying assumption that experiments have made good faith efforts to ensure that their analyses yield unbiased results. However, particle physics experiments are expensive and time consuming to carry out, thus if an analysis has inherent bias (even if unintentional), much money and effort can be wasted trying to replicate or understand the results, particularly if the analysis is fundamental to our understanding of the universe. In this note we discuss the significant biases that can result from data binning schemes. As we will show, if data are binned such that they provide the best comparison to a particular (but incorrect) model, the resulting model parameter estimates when fitting to the binned data can be significantly biased, leading us to too often accept the model hypothesis when it is not in fact true. When using binned likelihood or least squares methods there is of course no a priori requirement that data bin sizes need to be constant, but we show that fitting to data grouped into variable width bins is particularly prone to produce biased results if the bin boundaries are chosen to optimize the comparison of the binned data to a wrong model. The degree of bias that can be achieved simply with variable binning can be surprisingly large. Fitting the data with an unbinned likelihood method, when possible to do so, is the best way for researchers to show that their analyses are not biased by binning effects. Failing that, equal bin widths should be employed as a cross-check of the fitting analysis whenever possible

  16. Potential biases in colorectal cancer screening using faecal occult blood test

    Riboe, Dea Grip; Dogan, Tilde Steen; Brodersen, John

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common types of cancer in European countries and associated with a high mortality rate. A 16% relative risk reduction (RRR) of mortality was found in a meta-analysis based on four randomized controlled trials (RCT) on CRC screening. The aim...... in their study. Data were collected from The Danish Data Archives. Authors of the Cochrane review were contacted. RESULTS: Six biases were identified, of which five favour screening. Three of the biases identified were specific to CRC screening: type of diagnostic method, place of surgery and diagnostic delay...

  17. Dynamics of the inward rectifier K+ current during the action potential of guinea pig ventricular myocytes.

    Ibarra, J; Morley, G E; Delmar, M

    1991-01-01

    The potassium selective, inward rectifier current (IK1) is known to be responsible for maintaining the resting membrane potential of quiescent ventricular myocytes. However, the contribution of this current to the different phases of the cardiac action potential has not been adequately established. In the present study, we have used the action potential clamp (APC) technique to characterize the dynamic changes of a cesium-sensitive (i.e., Ik1) current which occur during the action potential. ...

  18. High prevalence of potential biases threatens the interpretation of trials in patients with chronic disease

    Boyd Cynthia M

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The complexity of chronic diseases is a challenge for investigators conducting randomized trials. The causes for this include the often difficult control for confounding, the selection of outcomes from many potentially important outcomes, the risk of missing data with long follow-up and the detection of heterogeneity of treatment effects. Our aim was to assess such aspects of trial design and analysis for four prevalent chronic diseases. Methods We included 161 randomized trials on drug and non-drug treatments for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus, stroke and heart failure, which were included in current Cochrane reviews. We assessed whether these trials defined a single outcome or several primary outcomes, statistically compared baseline characteristics to assess comparability of treatment groups, reported on between-group comparisons, and we also assessed how they handled missing data and whether appropriate methods for subgroups effects were used. Results We found that only 21% of all chronic disease trials had a single primary outcome, whereas 33% reported one or more primary outcomes. Two of the fifty-one trials that tested for statistical significance of baseline characteristics adjusted the comparison for a characteristic that was significantly different. Of the 161 trials, 10% reported a within-group comparison only; 17% (n = 28 of trials reported how missing data were handled (50% (n = 14 carried forward last values, 27% (n = 8 performed a complete case analysis, 13% (n = 4 used a fixed value imputation and 10% (n = 3 used more advanced methods; and 27% of trials performed a subgroup analysis but only 23% of them (n = 10 reported an interaction test. Drug trials, trials published after wide adoption of the CONSORT (CONsolidated Standards of Reporting Trials statement (2001 or later and trials in journals with higher impact factors were more likely to report on some of these aspects of

  19. Acute nerve compression and the compound muscle action potential

    Baylor Kelly

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Detecting acute nerve compression using neurophysiologic studies is an important part of the practice of clinical intra-operative neurophysiology. The goal of this paper was to study the changes in the compound muscle action potential (CMAP during acute mechanical compression. This is the type of injury most likely to occur during surgery. Thus, understanding the changes in the CMAP during this type of injury will be useful in the detection and prevention using intra-operative neurophysiologic monitoring. The model involved compression of the hamster sciatic nerve over a region of 1.3 mm with pressures up to 2000 mmHg for times on the order of 3 minutes. In this model CMAP amplitude dropped to 50% of its baseline value when a pressure of roughly 1000 mmHg is applied while, at the same time, nerve conduction velocities decline by only 5%. The ability to detect statistically significant changes in the CMAP at low force levels using other descriptors of the CMAP including duration, latency variation, etc alone or in conjunction with amplitude and velocity measures was investigated. However, these other parameters did not allow for earlier detection of significant changes. This study focused on a model in which nerve injury on a short time scale is purely mechanical in origin. It demonstrated that a pure compression injury produced large changes in CMAP amplitude prior to large changes in conduction velocity. On the other hand, ischemic and stretch injuries are associated with larger changes in conduction velocity for a given value of CMAP amplitude reduction.

  20. Increased Event-Related Potentials and Alpha-, Beta-, and Gamma-Activity Associated with Intentional Actions

    Karch, Susanne; Loy, Fabian; Krause, Daniela; Schwarz, Sandra; Kiesewetter, Jan; Segmiller, Felix; Chrobok, Agnieszka I.; Keeser, Daniel; Pogarell, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Internally guided actions are defined as being purposeful, self-generated and offering choices between alternatives. Intentional actions are essential to reach individual goals. In previous empirical studies, internally guided actions were predominantly related to functional responses in frontal and parietal areas. The aim of the present study was to distinguish event-related potentials and oscillatory responses of intentional actions and externally guided actions. In addition, we ...

  1. The membrane actions of estrogens can potentiate their lordosis behavior-facilitating genomic actions

    Kow, Lee-Ming; Pfaff, Donald W.

    2004-01-01

    The membrane actions of estrogens can facilitate their genomic actions. To determine whether this facilitation bears on CNS mechanisms for estrogen-dependent behaviors, ovariectomized rats were subjected to a two-pulse treatment of estrogen directly in the hypothalamic ventromedial nucleus. Two days later, each rat was given progesterone and then tested for lordosis behavior, the induction of which requires the genomic actions of estrogen. When estrogen was given in both pulses (15 min to 2 h...

  2. Circadian- and Light-Dependent Regulation of Resting Membrane Potential and Spontaneous Action Potential Firing of Drosophila Circadian Pacemaker Neurons

    Sheeba, Vasu; Gu, Huaiyu; Sharma, Vijay K.; O'Dowd, Diane K.; Holmes, Todd C.

    2007-01-01

    The ventral lateral neurons (LNvs) of adult Drosophila brain express oscillating clock proteins and regulate circadian behavior. Whole cell current-clamp recordings of large LNvs in freshly dissected Drosophila whole brain preparations reveal two spontaneous activity patterns that correlate with two underlying patterns of oscillating membrane potential: tonic and burst firing of sodium-dependent action potentials. Resting membrane potential and spontaneous action potential firing are rapidly ...

  3. Scaling of the quark-antiquark potential and improved actions in SU(2) lattice gauge theory

    The scaling behaviour of the quark-antiquark potential is investigated by a high statistics Monte Carlo calculation in SU(2) lattice gauge theory. Besides the standard one-plaquette action we also use Symanzik's tree-level improved action and Wilson's block-spin improved action. No significant differences between Symanzik's action and the standard action have been observed. For small β Wilson's action scales differently. The string tension value chi extracted from the data corresponds to Λsub(latt) = (0.018 +- 0.001) √chi for the one-plaquette action. (orig.)

  4. Understanding the Electrical Behavior of the Action Potential in Terms of Elementary Electrical Sources

    Rodriguez-Falces, Javier

    2015-01-01

    A concept of major importance in human electrophysiology studies is the process by which activation of an excitable cell results in a rapid rise and fall of the electrical membrane potential, the so-called action potential. Hodgkin and Huxley proposed a model to explain the ionic mechanisms underlying the formation of action potentials. However,…

  5. Ontogeny of vestibular compound action potentials in the domestic chicken

    Jones, S. M.; Jones, T. A.

    2000-01-01

    Compound action potentials of the vestibular nerve were measured from the surface of the scalp in 148 chickens (Gallus domesticus). Ages ranged from incubation day 18 (E18) to 22 days posthatch (P22). Responses were elicited using linear acceleration cranial pulses. Response thresholds decreased at an average rate of -0.45 dB/day. The decrease was best fit by an exponential model with half-maturity time constant of 5.1 days and asymptote of approximately -25.9 dB re:1.0 g/ms. Mean threshold approached within 3 dB of the asymptote by ages P6-P9. Similarly, response latencies decreased exponentially to within 3% of mature values at ages beyond P9. The half-maturity time constant for peripheral response peak latencies P1, N1, and P2 was comparable to thresholds and ranged from approximately 4.6 to 6.2 days, whereas central peaks (N2, P3, and N3) ranged from 2.9 to 3.4 days. Latency-intensity slopes for P1, N1, and P2 tended to decrease with age, reaching mature values within approximately 100 hours of hatching. Amplitudes increased as a function of age with average growth rates for response peaks ranging from 0.04 to 0.09 microV/day. There was no obvious asymptote to the growth of amplitudes over the ages studied. Amplitude-intensity slopes also increased modestly with age. The results show that gravity receptors are responsive to transient cranial stimuli as early as E19 in the chicken embryo. The functional response of gravity receptors continues to develop for many days after all major morphological structures are in place. Distinct maturational processes can be identified in central and peripheral neural relays. Functional improvements during maturation may result from refinements in the receptor epithelia, improvements in central and peripheral synaptic transmission, increased neural myelination, as well as changes in the mechanical coupling between the cranium and receptor organ.

  6. Mathematical Distinction in Action Potential between Primo-Vessels and Smooth Muscle

    Seong-Jin Cho; Sang-Hun Lee; Wenji Zhang; Sae-Bhom Lee; Kwang-Ho Choi; Sun-Mi Choi; Yeon-Hee Ryu

    2012-01-01

    We studied the action potential of Primo-vessels in rats to determine the electrophysiological characteristics of these structures. We introduced a mathematical analysis method, a normalized Fourier transform that displays the sine and cosine components separately, to compare the action potentials of Primo-vessels with those for the smooth muscle. We found that Primo-vessels generated two types of action potential pulses that differed from those of smooth muscle: (1) Type I pulse had rapid de...

  7. Distribution of Action Potential Duration and T-wave Morphology: a Simulation Study

    Ryzhii, Elena; Ryzhii, Maxim; Wei, Daming

    2009-01-01

    The results of a simulation study of the action potential duration (APD) distribution and T-wave morphology taking into account the midmyocardial cells (M-cells) concept are described. To investigate the effect of M-cells we present a computer model in which ion channel action potential formulations are incorporated into three-dimensional whole heart model. We implemented inhomogeneous continuous action potential duration distribution based on different distributions of maximal slow delayed r...

  8. A Rabbit Ventricular Action Potential Model Replicating Cardiac Dynamics at Rapid Heart Rates

    Mahajan, Aman; Shiferaw, Yohannes; Sato, Daisuke; Baher, Ali; Olcese, Riccardo; Xie, Lai-Hua; Yang, Ming-Jim; Chen, Peng-Sheng; Restrepo, Juan G.; Karma, Alain; Garfinkel, Alan; Qu, Zhilin; Weiss, James N.

    2008-01-01

    Mathematical modeling of the cardiac action potential has proven to be a powerful tool for illuminating various aspects of cardiac function, including cardiac arrhythmias. However, no currently available detailed action potential model accurately reproduces the dynamics of the cardiac action potential and intracellular calcium (Cai) cycling at rapid heart rates relevant to ventricular tachycardia and fibrillation. The aim of this study was to develop such a model. Using an existing rabbit ven...

  9. On the excitation of action potentials by protons and its potential implications for cholinergic transmission

    Fillafer, Christian

    2014-01-01

    One of the most conserved mechanisms for transmission of a nerve pulse across a synapse relies on acetylcholine. Ever since the Nobel-prize winning works of Dale and Loewi, it has been assumed that acetylcholine - subsequent to its action on a postsynaptic cell - is split into inactive by-products by acetylcholinesterase. Herein, this widespread assumption is falsified. Excitable cells (Chara australis internodes), which had previously been unresponsive to acetylcholine, became acetylcholine-sensitive in presence of acetylcholinesterase. The latter was evidenced by a striking difference in cell membrane depolarisation upon exposure to 10 mM intact acetylcholine (deltaV=-2plus/minus5 mV) and its hydrolysate respectively (deltaV=81plus/minus19 mV) for 60 sec. This pronounced depolarization, which also triggered action potentials, was clearly attributed to one of the hydrolysis products: acetic acid (deltaV=87plus/minus9 mV at pH 4.0; choline ineffective in range 1-10 mM). In agreement with our findings, numerou...

  10. Dynamics of action potential initiation in the GABAergic thalamic reticular nucleus in vivo.

    Fabián Muñoz

    Full Text Available Understanding the neural mechanisms of action potential generation is critical to establish the way neural circuits generate and coordinate activity. Accordingly, we investigated the dynamics of action potential initiation in the GABAergic thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN using in vivo intracellular recordings in cats in order to preserve anatomically-intact axo-dendritic distributions and naturally-occurring spatiotemporal patterns of synaptic activity in this structure that regulates the thalamic relay to neocortex. We found a wide operational range of voltage thresholds for action potentials, mostly due to intrinsic voltage-gated conductances and not synaptic activity driven by network oscillations. Varying levels of synchronous synaptic inputs produced fast rates of membrane potential depolarization preceding the action potential onset that were associated with lower thresholds and increased excitability, consistent with TRN neurons performing as coincidence detectors. On the other hand the presence of action potentials preceding any given spike was associated with more depolarized thresholds. The phase-plane trajectory of the action potential showed somato-dendritic propagation, but no obvious axon initial segment component, prominent in other neuronal classes and allegedly responsible for the high onset speed. Overall, our results suggest that TRN neurons could flexibly integrate synaptic inputs to discharge action potentials over wide voltage ranges, and perform as coincidence detectors and temporal integrators, supported by a dynamic action potential threshold.

  11. Potential involvement of serotonergic signaling in ketamine's antidepressant actions

    du Jardin, Kristian Gaarn; Müller, Heidi Kaastrup; Elfving, Betina;

    2016-01-01

    A single i.v. infusion of ketamine, classified as an N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, may alleviate depressive symptoms within hours of administration in treatment resistant depressed patients, and the antidepressant effect may last for several weeks. These unique therapeutic...... properties have prompted researchers to explore the mechanisms mediating the antidepressant effects of ketamine, but despite many efforts, no consensus on its antidepressant mechanism of action has been reached. Recent preclinical reports have associated the neurotransmitter serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5......-HT) with the antidepressant-like action of ketamine. Here, we review the current evidence for a serotonergic role in ketamine's antidepressant effects. The pharmacological profile of ketamine may include equipotent activity on several non-NMDA targets, and the current hypotheses for the mechanisms...

  12. Characteristics of action potentials and their underlying outward currents in rat taste receptor cells.

    Chen, Y; Sun, X D; Herness, S

    1996-02-01

    1. Taste receptor cells produce action potentials as a result of transduction mechanisms that occur when these cells are stimulated with tastants. These action potentials are thought to be key signaling events in relaying information to the central nervous system. We explored the ionic basis of action potentials from dissociated posterior rat taste cells using the patch-clamp recording technique in both voltage-clamp and current-clamp modes. 2. Action potentials were evoked by intracellular injection of depolarizing current pulses from a holding potential of -80 mV. The threshold potential for firing of action potentials was approximately -35 mV; the input resistance of these cells averaged 6.9 G omega. With long depolarizing pulses, two or three action potentials could be elicited with successive attenuation of the spike height. Afterhyperpolarizations were observed often. 3. Both sodium and calcium currents contribute to depolarizing phases of the action potential. Action potentials were blocked completely in the presence of the sodium channel blocker tetrodotoxin. Calcium contributions could be visualized as prolonged calcium plateaus when repolarizing potassium currents were blocked and barium was used as a charge carrier. 4. Outward currents were composed of sustained delayed rectifier current, transient potassium current, and calcium-activated potassium current. Transient and sustained potassium currents activated close to -30 mV and increased monotonically with further depolarization. Up to half the outward current inactivated with decay constants on the order of seconds. Sustained and transient currents displayed steep voltage dependence in conductance and inactivation curves. Half inactivation occurred at -20 +/- 3.1 mV (mean +/- SE) with a decrease of 11.2 +/- 0.5 mV per e-fold. Half maximal conductance occurred at 3.6 +/- 1.8 mV and increased 12.2 +/- 0.6 mV per e-fold. Calcium-activated potassium current was evidenced by application of apamin and the

  13. Analysis of toxin induced changes in action potential shape for drug development

    Akanda, Nesar; Molnar, Peter; Stancescu, Maria; Hickman, James J.

    2009-01-01

    The generation of an action potential is a complex process in excitable cells which involves the temporal opening and closing of several voltage-dependent ion channels in the cell membrane. The shape of an action potential can carry information concerning the state of the involved ion channels and their relationship to cellular processes. Alteration of these ion channels by the administration of toxins, drugs, and biochemicals can change the action potential’s shape in a specific way which ca...

  14. Fish oil curtails the human action potential dome in a heterogeneous manner: Implication for arrhythmogenesis

    A.O. Verkerk; H.M. den Ruijter; N. de Jonge; R. Coronel

    2009-01-01

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (omega3-PUFAs) from fish oil modulate various ion channels, including the L-type calcium current (I(Ca,L)). As a result, fish oil shortens the cardiac action potential and may cause a loss of the dome of the action potential (AP). Under conditions of increased pre

  15. Potential for bias in 21st century semiempirical sea level projections

    Jevrejeva, S.; Moore, J. C.; Grinsted, A.

    2012-01-01

    We examine the limitations of a semiempirical model characterized by a sea level projection of 73 cm with RCP4.5 scenario by 2100. Calibrating the model with data to 1990 and then simulating the period 1993-2009 produces sea level in close agreement with acceleration in sea level rise observed by...... satellite altimetry. Nonradiative forcing contributors, such as long-term adjustment of Greenland and Antarctica ice sheets since Last Glacial Maximum, abyssal ocean warming, and terrestrial water storage, may bias model calibration which, if corrected for, tend to reduce median sea level projections at...... 2100 by 2-10 cm, though this is within the confidence interval. We apply the semiempirical approach to simulate individual contributions from thermal expansion and small glacier melting. Steric sea level projections agree within 3 cm of output from process-based climate models. In contrast...

  16. Triangulation of the monophasic action potential causes flattening of the electrocardiographic T-wave

    Bhuiyan, Tanveer Ahmed; Graff, Claus; Thomsen, Morten Bækgaard;

    2012-01-01

    It has been proposed that triangulation on the cardiac action potential manifests as a broadened, more flat and notched T-wave on the ECG but to what extent such morphology characteristics are indicative of triangulation is more unclear. In this paper, we have analyzed the morphological changes of...... the action potential under the effect of the IKr blocker sertindole and associated these changes to concurrent changes in the morphology of electrocardiographic T-waves in dogs. We show that, under the effect of sertindole, the peak changes in the morphology of action potentials occur at time points...... similar to those observed for the peak changes in T-wave morphology on the ECG. We further show that the association between action potential shape and ECG shape is dose-dependent and most prominent at the time corresponding to phase 3 of the action potential. © 2012 CCAL....

  17. Consumer-Related Food Waste: Causes and Potential for Action

    Jessica Aschemann-Witzel

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In the past decade, food waste has received increased attention on both academic and societal levels. As a cause of negative economic, environmental and social effects, food waste is considered to be one of the sustainability issues that needs to be addressed. In developed countries, consumers are one of the biggest sources of food waste. To successfully reduce consumer-related food waste, it is necessary to have a clear understanding of the factors influencing food waste-related consumer perceptions and behaviors. The present paper presents the results of a literature review and expert interviews on factors causing consumer-related food waste in households and supply chains. Results show that consumers’ motivation to avoid food waste, their management skills of food provisioning and food handling and their trade-offs between priorities have an extensive influence on their food waste behaviors. We identify actions that governments, societal stakeholders and retailers can undertake to reduce consumer-related food waste, highlighting that synergistic actions between all parties are most promising. Further research should focus on exploring specific food waste contexts and interactions more in-depth. Experiments and interventions in particular can contribute to a shift from analysis to solutions.

  18. Time-Dependent Action in φ~6 Potential

    Hatem Widyan; Mashhoor Al-Wardat

    2012-01-01

    The false vacuum decay in field theory from a coherently oscillating initial state is studied for φ6 potential. An oscillating bubble solution is obtained. The instantaneous bubble nucleation rate is calculated.

  19. Spatially periodic domain wall pinning potentials: Asymmetric pinning and dipolar biasing

    Metaxas, P. J.; Zermatten, P. -J.; Novak, R. L.; Rohart, S.; Jamet, J. -P.; Weil, R.; Ferré, J.; Mougin, A.; Stamps, R. L.; Gaudin, G.; Baltz, V.; Rodmacq, B.

    2013-01-01

    Domain wall propagation has been measured in continuous, weakly disordered, quasi-two-dimensional, Ising-like magnetic layers that are subject to spatially periodic domain wall pinning potentials. The potentials are generated non-destructively using the stray magnetic field of ordered arrays of magnetically hard [Co/Pt]$_m$ nanoplatelets which are patterned above and are physically separated from the continuous magnetic layer. The effect of the periodic pinning potentials on thermally activat...

  20. Alteration of neural action potential patterns by axonal stimulation: the importance of stimulus location

    Crago, Patrick E.; Makowski, Nathaniel S.

    2014-10-01

    Objective. Stimulation of peripheral nerves is often superimposed on ongoing motor and sensory activity in the same axons, without a quantitative model of the net action potential train at the axon endpoint. Approach. We develop a model of action potential patterns elicited by superimposing constant frequency axonal stimulation on the action potentials arriving from a physiologically activated neural source. The model includes interactions due to collision block, resetting of the neural impulse generator, and the refractory period of the axon at the point of stimulation. Main results. Both the mean endpoint firing rate and the probability distribution of the action potential firing periods depend strongly on the relative firing rates of the two sources and the intersite conduction time between them. When the stimulus rate exceeds the neural rate, neural action potentials do not reach the endpoint and the rate of endpoint action potentials is the same as the stimulus rate, regardless of the intersite conduction time. However, when the stimulus rate is less than the neural rate, and the intersite conduction time is short, the two rates partially sum. Increases in stimulus rate produce non-monotonic increases in endpoint rate and continuously increasing block of neurally generated action potentials. Rate summation is reduced and more neural action potentials are blocked as the intersite conduction time increases. At long intersite conduction times, the endpoint rate simplifies to being the maximum of either the neural or the stimulus rate. Significance. This study highlights the potential of increasing the endpoint action potential rate and preserving neural information transmission by low rate stimulation with short intersite conduction times. Intersite conduction times can be decreased with proximal stimulation sites for muscles and distal stimulation sites for sensory endings. The model provides a basis for optimizing experiments and designing neuroprosthetic

  1. A model for thermal exchange in axons during action potential propagation.

    Masson, Jean-Baptiste; Gallot, Guilhem

    2008-01-01

    International audience Several experiments have shown that during propagation of the action potential in axons, thermal energy is locally exchanged. In this paper, we use a simple model based on statistical physics to show that an important part of this exchange comes from the physics of the effusion. We evaluate, during the action potential propagation, the variation of internal energy and of the energy associated with the chemical potential of the effusion of water and ions to extract th...

  2. Potential Bias in Projecting Future Regional Megadrought Risk: Insights From A Global Data-Model Framework

    Overpeck, J. T.; Ault, T.; Cole, J. E.; Fasullo, J.; Loope, G. R.; Parsons, L. A.; Stevenson, S.

    2015-12-01

    Megadrought is one of the most significant and costly climate extremes, and one that stakeholders (e.g., water and other resource managers) the world over wish to understand better; in particular, they need estimates of the risk of severe droughts as a function of drought frequency, severity, duration, and atmospheric greenhouse gas concentration. In many dry-climate regions of the globe, megadrought is synonymous with multi-decadal drought. However, in other regions, megadrought can be defined as extended drought, mostly not seen in the period of instrumental observations, and that would have large impacts if it were to occur in the future. New and published paleoclimatic observations allow us to understand the spectrum of drought in many regions of the globe; droughts exceeding 50 years have occurred in recent Earth history in southwestern North America, sub-Saharan Africa, the Mediterranean and Australia, whereas shorter megadroughts have occurred in Monsoon Asia, Amazonia and elsewhere. Data-model comparisons for regions with sufficiently long (e.g., 1000-2000 years) records of observed hydroclimatic variability suggest that state-of-the-art models can provide realistic estimates of interannual to decadal drought risk, but underestimate the risk of megadrought. Likely reasons for this shortcoming are the lack of sufficient multi-decadal variability in simulations of the past and future, plus an underappreciated understanding about how temperature variability and land-surface feedbacks interact with hydrological and ecological drought, as well as the roles played by unusually wet hydroclimatic extremes (e.g., ENSO related) in ending droughts of long duration. Paleoclimatic records also provide the opportunity to estimate how much models underestimate megadrought risk as a function of locale, frequency, severity, duration, and atmospheric greenhouse gas concentration; they also aid in providing stakeholders with bias-corrected estimates of megadrought risk.

  3. Action potentials in retinal ganglion cells are initiated at the site of maximal curvature of the extracellular potential

    Eickenscheidt, Max; Zeck, Günther

    2014-06-01

    Objective. The initiation of an action potential by extracellular stimulation occurs after local depolarization of the neuronal membrane above threshold. Although the technique shows remarkable clinical success, the site of action and the relevant stimulation parameters are not completely understood. Approach. Here we identify the site of action potential initiation in rabbit retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) interfaced to an array of extracellular capacitive stimulation electrodes. We determine which feature of the extracellular potential governs action potential initiation by simultaneous stimulation and recording RGCs interfaced in epiretinal configuration. Stimulation electrodes were combined to areas of different size and were presented at different positions with respect to the RGC. Main results. Based on stimulation by electrodes beneath the RGC soma and simultaneous sub-millisecond latency measurement we infer axonal initiation at the site of maximal curvature of the extracellular potential. Stimulation by electrodes at different positions along the axon reveals a nearly constant threshold current density except for a narrow region close to the cell soma. These findings are explained by the concept of the activating function modified to consider a region of lower excitability close to the cell soma. Significance. We present a framework how to estimate the site of action potential initiation and the stimulus required to cross threshold in neurons tightly interfaced to capacitive stimulation electrodes. Our results underscore the necessity of rigorous electrical characterization of the stimulation electrodes and of the interfaced neural tissue.

  4. Biased Motion in a Symmetric Periodic Potential by Breaking Temporal Symmetry

    ZHENG Zhi-Gang; LI Xiao-Wen

    2001-01-01

    Unidirectional transport of a particle in a spatially periodic and symmetric potential under a periodic force with broken temporal symmetry is studied. With a collaboration of the potential field and the asymmetric ac force, a dc current can be observed. Resonant current steps are found for a finite period of the ac force. A phase diagram of these resonant steps is given. Stochastic-resonance-like directional transport induced by thermal noises is revealed.

  5. Fishery induces sperm depletion and reduction in male reproductive potential for crab species under male-biased harvest strategy.

    Pardo, Luis Miguel; Rosas, Yenifer; Fuentes, Juan Pablo; Riveros, Marcela Paz; Chaparro, Oscar Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Sperm depletion in males can occur when polygynous species are intensively exploited under a male-biased management strategy. In fisheries involving crabs species, the effects of this type of management on the reproductive potential is far from being understood. This study tests whether male-biased management of the principal Chilean crab fishery is able to affect the potential capacity of Metacarcinus edwardsii males to transfer sperm to females. Five localities in southern Chile, recording contrasting crab fishery landing, were selected to assess the potential of sperm depletion triggered by fishery. Seasonally, male crabs from each locality were obtained. Dry weight and histological condition of vasa deferentia and the Vaso-Somatic Index (VSI) were determined in order to use them as proxies for sperm depletion and male reproductive condition. A manipulative experiment was performed in the laboratory to estimate vasa deferentia weight and VSI from just-mated males in order to obtain a reference point for the potential effects of the fishery on sperm reserves. Sperm storage capacity is significantly affected by fisheries; during the mating season vasa deferentia from localities with low fishery intensity were heavier than those from high intensity fisheries, and these differences were even more evident in large males. Histological section showed that this disparity in vasa deferentia weight was explained principally by differences in the quantity of spermatophores rather than other seminal material. VSI was always higher in males from localities with low fishery intensity. Males from localities with high fishery intensity showed little capacity to recover sperm reserves and the VSI of these males remained below the values of the just-mated males. Detriment in the capacity of males to transfer sperm is the first step to sperm limitation in an exploited population, thus detection of sperm depletion can be an alert to introduce changes in the current management of

  6. Action Research’s Potential to Foster Institutional Change for Urban Water Management

    Dimitrios Zikos; Andreas Thiel

    2013-01-01

    The paper discusses the potential of action research to meet the challenges entailed in institutional design for urban water management. Our overall aim is to briefly present action research and discuss its methodological merits with regard to the challenges posed by the different conceptual bases for extrapolating the effects of institutional design on institutional change. Thus, our aim is to explore how Action Research meets the challenge of scoping the field in an open fashion for determi...

  7. Neuronal oscillations enhance stimulus discrimination by ensuring action potential precision

    Schaefer, Andreas T; Angelo, Kamilla; Spors, Hartwig;

    2006-01-01

    Although oscillations in membrane potential are a prominent feature of sensory, motor, and cognitive function, their precise role in signal processing remains elusive. Here we show, using a combination of in vivo, in vitro, and theoretical approaches, that both synaptically and intrinsically......--permitted accurate discernment of up to 1,000 different stimuli. At low oscillation frequencies, stimulus discrimination showed a clear phase dependence whereby inputs arriving during the trough and the early rising phase of an oscillation cycle were most robustly discriminated. Thus, by ensuring AP precision...

  8. The electrostatic potential profile along a biased molecular wire A model quantum mechanical calculation

    Pleutin, S; Ingold, G L; Nitzan, A; Pleutin, St\\'ephane; Grabert, Hermann; Ingold, Gert-Ludwig; Nitzan, Abraham

    2003-01-01

    We study the electrostatic potential of a molecular wire bridging two metallic electrodes in the limit of weak contacts. With the use of a tight-binding model including a fully three-dimensional treatment of the electrostatics of the molecular junction, the potential is shown to be poorly screened, dropping mostly along the entire molecule. In addition, we observe pronounced Friedel oscillations that can be related to the breaking of electron-hole symmetry. Our results are in semi-quantitative agreement with recent state-of-the-art ab initio calculations and point to the need of a three-dimensional treatment to properly capture the behavior of the electrostatic potential. Based on these results, current-voltage curves are calculated within the Landauer formalism. It is shown that Coulomb interaction partially compensates the localization of the charges induced by the electric field and consequently tends to suppress zones of negative differential resistance.

  9. More evidence for a refined Gribov-Zwanziger action based on an effective potential approach

    Vandersickel, N.; Dudal, D.; Sorella, S.P.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this proceeding is twofold. Firstly, we shall make the refining of the Gribov-Zwanziger action more complete by taking into account more condensates than considered so far. Secondly, we shall provide more evidence for the refined Gribov-Zwanziger action based on an effective potential approach.

  10. Synaptically evoked dendritic action potentials in rat neocortical pyramidal neurons.

    Schwindt, P C; Crill, W E

    1998-05-01

    In a previous study iontophoresis of glutamate on the apical dendrite of layer 5 pyramidal neurons from rat neocortex was used to identify sites at which dendritic depolarization evoked small, prolonged Ca2+ spikes and/or low-threshold Na+ spikes recorded by an intracellular microelectrode in the soma. These spikes were identified as originating in the dendrite. Here we evoke similar dendritic responses by electrical stimulation of presynaptic elements near the tip of the iontophoretic electrode with the use of a second extracellular electrode. In 9 of 12 recorded cells, electrically evoked excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) above a minimum size triggered all-or-none postsynaptic responses similar to those evoked by dendritic glutamate iontophoresis at the same site. Both the synaptically evoked and the iontophoretically evoked depolarizations were abolished reversibly by blockade of glutamate receptors. In all recorded cells, the combination of iontophoresis and an EPSP, each of which was subthreshold for the dendritic spike when given alone, evoked a dendritic spike similar to that evoked by a sufficiently large iontophoresis. In one cell tested, dendritic spikes could be evoked by the summation of two independent subthreshold EPSPs evoked by stimulation at two different locations. We conclude that the dendritic spikes are not unique to the use of glutamate iontophoresis because similar spikes can be evoked by EPSPs. We discuss the implications of these results for synaptic integration and for the interpretation of recorded synaptic potentials. PMID:9582218

  11. Distinct electrophysiological potentials for intention in action and prior intention for action

    Vinding, Mikkel Christoffer; Jensen, Mads; Overgaard, Morten

    2014-01-01

    The role of conscious intention in relation to motoric movements has become a major topic of investigation in neuroscience. Traditionally, reports of conscious intention have been compared to various features of the readiness-potential (RP) – an electrophysiological signal that appears before...... electrophysiological “intention potential” above the mid-frontal areas at the time participants formed a distal intention. This potential was only found when the distal intention was self-paced and not when the intention was formed in response to an external cue....

  12. Action potential detection by non-linear microscopy

    Sacconi, Leonardo; Lotti, Jacopo; O'Connor, Rodney P.; Mapelli, Jonathan; Gandolfi, Daniela; D'Angelo, Egidio; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2009-02-01

    In this work, we combined the advantages of second-harmonic generation (SHG) with a random access (RA) excitation scheme to realize a new microscope (RA-SHG) capable of optically recording fast membrane potential events occurring in a wide-field configuration. The RA-SHG microscope in combination with a bulk staining method with FM4-64 was used to simultaneously record electrical activity from clusters of Purkinje cells (PCs) in acute cerebellar slices. Spontaneous electrical activity was also monitored simultaneously in pairs of neurons, where APs were recorded in a single trial without averaging. These results show the strength of this technique to describe the temporal dynamics of neuronal assemblies.

  13. Control of Secretion by Encodes of Action Potentials in Neuronal Cells

    Kailai Duan; Zhuan Zhou

    2003-01-01

    @@ Action potentials (APs) are principle physiological stimuli of neurotransmitter secretion or synaptic transmis sion. Most studies on stimulus-secretion-coupling have been performed under voltage clamp using artificial electric stimulations.

  14. Dynamics of Action Potential Initiation in the GABAergic Thalamic Reticular Nucleus In Vivo

    Fabián Muñoz; Pablo Fuentealba

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the neural mechanisms of action potential generation is critical to establish the way neural circuits generate and coordinate activity. Accordingly, we investigated the dynamics of action potential initiation in the GABAergic thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) using in vivo intracellular recordings in cats in order to preserve anatomically-intact axo-dendritic distributions and naturally-occurring spatiotemporal patterns of synaptic activity in this structure that regulates the th...

  15. Cortical Action Potential Backpropagation Explains Spike Threshold Variability and Rapid-Onset Kinetics

    Yu, Yuguo; Shu, Yousheng; McCormick, David A.

    2008-01-01

    Neocortical action potential responses in vivo are characterized by considerable threshold variability, and thus timing and rate variability, even under seemingly identical conditions. This finding suggests that cortical ensembles are required for accurate sensorimotor integration and processing. Intracellularly, trial-to-trial variability results not only from variation in synaptic activities, but also in the transformation of these into patterns of action potentials. Through simultaneous ax...

  16. NeuroGrid: recording action potentials from the surface of the brain

    Khodagholy, Dion; Gelinas, Jennifer N.; Thesen, Thomas; Doyle, Werner; Devinsky, Orrin; Malliaras, George G.; Buzsáki, György

    2014-01-01

    Recording from neural networks at the resolution of action potentials is critical for understanding how information is processed in the brain. Here, we address this challenge by developing an organic material-based, ultra-conformable, biocompatible and scalable neural interface array (the ‘NeuroGrid’) that can record both LFP and action potentials from superficial cortical neurons without penetrating the brain surface. Spikes with features of interneurons and pyramidal cells were simultaneous...

  17. Pharmacological actions and potential uses of Momordica charantia: a review.

    Grover, J K; Yadav, S P

    2004-07-01

    Since ancient times, plants and herbal preparations have been used as medicine. Research carried out in last few decades has certified several such claims of use of several plants of traditional medicine. Popularity of Momordica charantia (MC) in various systems of traditional medicine for several ailments (antidiabetic, abortifacient, anthelmintic, contraceptive, dysmenorrhea, eczema, emmenagogue, antimalarial, galactagogue, gout, jaundice, abdominal pain, kidney (stone), laxative, leprosy, leucorrhea, piles, pneumonia, psoriasis, purgative, rheumatism, fever and scabies) focused the investigator's attention on this plant. Over 100 studies using modern techniques have authenticated its use in diabetes and its complications (nephropathy, cataract, insulin resistance), as antibacterial as well as antiviral agent (including HIV infection), as anthelmintic and abortifacient. Traditionally it has also been used in treating peptic ulcers, interestingly in a recent experimental studies have exhibited its potential against Helicobacter pylori. Most importantly, the studies have shown its efficacy in various cancers (lymphoid leukemia, lymphoma, choriocarcinoma, melanoma, breast cancer, skin tumor, prostatic cancer, squamous carcinoma of tongue and larynx, human bladder carcinomas and Hodgkin's disease). There are few reports available on clinical use of MC in diabetes and cancer patients that have shown promising results. PMID:15182917

  18. Detection of Variability of the Motor Unit Action Potential Shape by Means of the Firing Patterns

    Krarup, Christian; Nikolic, Mile; Dahl, Kristian;

    1997-01-01

    The motor unit action potential is a summation of the potentials of the individual muscle fibers from the same motor unit.By using a newly developed automatic EMG decomposition system, variability of the firing patterns of the muscle fibers are analyzed.......The motor unit action potential is a summation of the potentials of the individual muscle fibers from the same motor unit.By using a newly developed automatic EMG decomposition system, variability of the firing patterns of the muscle fibers are analyzed....

  19. Measurements of distribution of self-bias potential on an RF-plane electrode in plasma etching devices

    The self-bias potential (Vdc) induced on an RF-powdered electrode (153 mm diameter) in a plasma is measured using electrical probes which are buried in, dc-insulated from, and RF-connected to the electrode. The configuration of the probes allows to study the distribution of Vdc discretely on the electrode. The potential is homogeneous in the absence of external magnetic field. In the presence of a homogeneous magnetic field parallel to the electrode, it is reduced and a monotonous gradient takes place in its distribution due to the plasma shift induced by ExB drift. When the magnetic field is rotated along the axis of the RF-electrode at a frequency less than 50 Hz, the distribution, which is almost identical to the one in a static field, rotates with the magnetic field. On the coordinate system rotating with the magnetic field, the probes are regarded to be rotating. The potential distribution is obtained as a continuous function of the azimuthal angle. Thus the rotation of the field provides information for the experimental interpolation. (orig.)

  20. 76 FR 21938 - Potential Environmental Impacts of the Proposed Runway 13 Extension and Associated Actions for...

    2011-04-19

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Potential Environmental Impacts of the Proposed Runway 13 Extension and... Administration (FAA), Department of Transportation (DOT). ACTION: Notice of availability of a final EA and FONSI/ROD for the evaluation of the potential environmental impacts associated with the proposed Runway...

  1. 7 CFR 1945.19 - Reporting potential natural disasters and initial actions.

    2010-01-01

    ... assessment of agricultural production losses resulting from a potential natural disaster. These councils are...) Actions to be taken. Immediately after the occurrence of a potential natural disaster: (1) When physical... Administrator will decide whether a natural disaster has occurred. If it has, the Administrator will make...

  2. Perturbation analysis of spontaneous action potential initiation by stochastic ion channels

    Keener, James P.

    2011-07-01

    A stochastic interpretation of spontaneous action potential initiation is developed for the Morris-Lecar equations. Initiation of a spontaneous action potential can be interpreted as the escape from one of the wells of a double well potential, and we develop an asymptotic approximation of the mean exit time using a recently developed quasistationary perturbation method. Using the fact that the activating ionic channel\\'s random openings and closings are fast relative to other processes, we derive an accurate estimate for the mean time to fire an action potential (MFT), which is valid for a below-threshold applied current. Previous studies have found that for above-threshold applied current, where there is only a single stable fixed point, a diffusion approximation can be used. We also explore why different diffusion approximation techniques fail to estimate the MFT. © 2011 American Physical Society.

  3. An Examination of Potential Racial and Gender Bias in the Principal Version of the Interactive Computer Interview System

    DiPonio, Joseph M.

    2010-01-01

    The primary object of this study was to determine whether racial and/or gender bias were evidenced in the use of the ICIS-Principal. Specifically, will the use of the ICIS-Principal result in biased scores at a statistically significant level when rating current practicing administrators of varying gender and race. The study involved simulated…

  4. Initiation and blocking of the action potential in the axon in a weak ultrasonic field

    Shneider, M N

    2013-01-01

    It is shown that the longitudinal standing ultrasonic wave of low intensity leads to the lateral drift and to redistribution of the transmembrane ion channels in the initial segment of the myelinated axon of a neuron. The analysis is based on the Hodgkin - Huxley model of an axon. Redistribution of the density of transmembrane sodium channels, caused by ultrasound, may reduce the threshold of the action potential, up to its spontaneous initiation. At significant redistribution of sodium channels in membrane, the zones of rarefaction of the transmembrane channels density are formed blocking the propagation of the action potential. After switching the ultrasound off, the unperturbed uniform distribution of transmembrane channels in the axon recovers due to lateral diffusion. The blocking effect of the action potential can be used in anesthesia.

  5. DBI potential, DBI inflation action and general Lagrangian relative to phantom, K-essence and quintessence

    We derive a Dirac-Born-Infeld (DBI) potential and DBI inflation action by rescaling the metric. The determinant of the induced metric naturally includes the kinetic energy and the potential energy. In particular, the potential energy and kinetic energy can convert into each other in any order, which is in agreement with the limit of classical physics. This is quite different from the usual DBI action. We show that the Taylor expansion of the DBI action can be reduced into the form in the non-linear classical physics. These investigations are the support for the statement that the results of string theory are consistent with quantum mechanics and classical physics. We deduce the Phantom, K-essence, Quintessence and Generalized Klein-Gordon Equation from the DBI model

  6. Modeling and simulation of ion channels and action potentials in taste receptor cells

    2009-01-01

    Based on patch clamp data on the ionic currents of rat taste receptor cells, a mathematical model of mammalian taste receptor cells was constructed to simulate the action potentials of taste receptor cells and their corresponding ionic components, including voltage-gated Na+ currents and outward delayed rectifier K+ currents. Our simulations reproduced the action potentials of taste receptor cells in response to electrical stimuli or sour tastants. The kinetics of ion channels and their roles in action potentials of taste receptor cells were also analyzed. Our prototype model of single taste receptor cell and simulation results presented in this paper provide the basis for the further study of taste information processing in the gustatory system.

  7. Modeling and simulation of ion channels and action potentials in taste receptor cells

    CHEN PeiHua; LIU Xiaodong; ZHANG Wei; ZHOU Jun; WANG Ping; YANG Wei; LUO JianHong

    2009-01-01

    Based on patch clamp data on the ionic currents of rat taste receptor cells,a mathematical model of mammalian taste receptor cells was constructed to simulate the action potentials of taste receptor cells and their corresponding ionic components,including voltage-gated Na~+ currents and outward delayed rectifier K~+ currents.Our simulations reproduced the action potentials of taste receptor cells in response to electrical stimuli or sour tastants.The kinetics of ion channels and their roles in action potentials of taste receptor cells were also analyzed.Our prototype model of single taste receptor cell and simulation results presented in this paper provide the basis for the further study of taste information processing in the gustatory system.

  8. RXP-E: a connexin43-binding peptide that prevents action potential propagation block

    Lewandowski, Rebecca; Procida, Kristina; Vaidyanathan, Ravi;

    2008-01-01

    . Separately, RXP-E was concatenated to a cytoplasmic transduction peptide (CTP) for cytoplasmic translocation (CTP-RXP-E). The effect of RXP-E on action potential propagation was assessed by high-resolution optical mapping in monolayers of neonatal rat ventricular myocytes, containing approximately 20% of...... randomly distributed myofibroblasts. In contrast to control experiments, when heptanol (2 mmol/L) was added to the superfusate of monolayers loaded with CTP-RXP-E, action potential propagation was maintained, albeit at a slower velocity. Similarly, intracellular acidification (pH(i) 6.2) caused a loss of...... action potential propagation in control monolayers; however, propagation was maintained in CTP-RXP-E-treated cells, although at a slower rate. Patch-clamp experiments revealed that RXP-E did not prevent heptanol-induced block of sodium currents, nor did it alter voltage dependence or amplitude of Kir2...

  9. Phase lagging model of brain response to external stimuli - modeling of single action potential

    Seetharaman, Karthik; Kulish, Vladimir V

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we detail a phase lagging model of brain response to external stimuli. The model is derived using the basic laws of physics like conservation of energy law. This model eliminates the paradox of instantaneous propagation of the action potential in the brain. The solution of this model is then presented. The model is further applied in the case of a single neuron and is verified by simulating a single action potential. The results of this modeling are useful not only for the fundamental understanding of single action potential generation, but also they can be applied in case of neuronal interactions where the results can be verified against the real EEG signal.

  10. Optical magnetic detection of single-neuron action potentials using NV-diamond

    Turner, Matthew; Barry, John; Schloss, Jennifer; Glenn, David; Walsworth, Ron

    2016-05-01

    A key challenge for neuroscience is noninvasive, label-free sensing of action potential dynamics in whole organisms with single-neuron resolution. Here, we report a new approach to this problem: using nitrogen-vacancy (NV) color centers in diamond to measure the time-dependent magnetic fields produced by single-neuron action potentials. We demonstrate our method using excised single neurons from two invertebrate species, marine worm and squid; and then by single-neuron action potential magnetic sensing exterior to whole, live, opaque marine worms for extended periods with no adverse effect. The results lay the groundwork for real-time, noninvasive 3D magnetic mapping of functional mammalian neuronal networks.

  11. A phantom axon setup for validating models of action potential recordings.

    Rossel, Olivier; Soulier, Fabien; Bernard, Serge; Guiraud, David; Cathébras, Guy

    2016-08-01

    Electrode designs and strategies for electroneurogram recordings are often tested first by computer simulations and then by animal models, but they are rarely implanted for long-term evaluation in humans. The models show that the amplitude of the potential at the surface of an axon is higher in front of the nodes of Ranvier than at the internodes; however, this has not been investigated through in vivo measurements. An original experimental method is presented to emulate a single fiber action potential in an infinite conductive volume, allowing the potential of an axon to be recorded at both the nodes of Ranvier and the internodes, for a wide range of electrode-to-fiber radial distances. The paper particularly investigates the differences in the action potential amplitude along the longitudinal axis of an axon. At a short radial distance, the action potential amplitude measured in front of a node of Ranvier is two times larger than in the middle of two nodes. Moreover, farther from the phantom axon, the measured action potential amplitude is almost constant along the longitudinal axis. The results of this new method confirm the computer simulations, with a correlation of 97.6 %. PMID:27016364

  12. Incorporated fish oil fatty acids prevent action potential shortening induced by circulating fish oil fatty acids

    Hester M Den Ruijter

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Increased consumption of fatty fish, rich in omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (3-PUFAs reduces the severity and number of arrhythmias. Long term 3-PUFA-intake modulates the activity of several cardiac ion channels leading to cardiac action potential shortening. Circulating 3-PUFAs in the bloodstream and incorporated 3-PUFAs in the cardiac membrane have a different mechanism to shorten the action potential. It is, however, unknown whether circulating 3-PUFAs in the bloodstream enhance or diminish the effects of incorporated 3-PUFAs. In the present study, we address this issue. Rabbits were fed a diet rich in fish oil (3 or sunflower oil (9, as control for 3 weeks. Ventricular myocytes were isolated by enzymatic dissociation and action potentials were measured using the perforated patch clamp technique in the absence and presence of acutely administered 3-PUFAs. Plasma of 3 fed rabbits contained more free eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and isolated myocytes of 3 fed rabbits contained higher amounts of both EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA in their sarcolemma compared to control. In the absence of acutely administered fatty acids, 3 myocytes had a shorter action potential with a more negative plateau than 9 myocytes. In the 9 myocytes, but not in the 3 myocytes, acute administration of a mixture of EPA+DHA shortened the action potential significantly. From these data we conclude that incorporated 3-PUFAs into the sarcolemma and acutely administered 3 fatty acids do not have a cumulative effect on action potential duration and morphology. As a consequence, patients with a high cardiac 3-PUFA status will probably not benefit from short term 3 supplementation as an antiarrhythmic therapy.

  13. Differential effects of thioridazine enantiomers on action potential duration in rabbit papillary muscle

    Jensen, Ask Schou; Pennisi, Cristian Pablo; Sevcencu, Cristian;

    2015-01-01

    (+)-thioridazine. In this study we for the first time investigate the cardiotoxicity of the isolated thioridazine enantiomers and show their effects on ventricular repolarization. The effects of (+)-thioridazine, (-)-thioridazine, and racemate on the rabbit ventricular action potential duration (APD) were...... investigated in a randomized controlled blinded experiment. Action potentials were measured in papillary muscles isolated from 21 female rabbits, and the drug effect on 90% APD in comparison with control (DeltaDelta-APD90) was evaluated. Increasing concentrations of (+)-thioridazine and the racemate caused...

  14. A potential gender bias in assessing quality of life – a standard gamble experiment among university students

    Al Obaidi L

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Leath Al Obaidi,1 Jörg Mahlich2,3 1University of Nottingham, School of Economics, Nottingham, UK; 2Health Economics, Janssen KK, Tokyo, Japan; 3Düsseldorf Institute for Competition Economics (DICE, University of Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf, Germany Background: There are several methodologies that can be used for evaluating patients' perception of their quality of life. Most commonly, utilities are directly elicited by means of either the time-trade-off or the standard-gamble method. In both methods, risk attitudes determine the quality of life values. Methods: Quality of life values among 31 Austrian undergraduate students were elicited by means of the standard gamble approach. The impact of several variables such as gender, side job, length of study, and living arrangements on the quality of life were identified using different types of regression techniques (ordinary least squares, generalized linear model, Betafit. Results: Significant evidence was found that females are associated with a higher quality of life in all specifications of our estimations. Discussion: The observed gender differences in quality of life can be attributed to a higher degree of risk aversion of women. A higher risk aversion leads to a higher valuation of given health states and a potential gender bias in health economic evaluations. This result could have implications for health policy planners when it comes to budget allocation decisions. Keywords: quality of life, gender, risk aversion, standard gamble, students 

  15. Wogonin potentiates the antitumor action of etoposide and ameliorates its adverse effects.

    Enomoto, Riyo; Koshiba, Chika; Suzuki, Chie; Lee, Eibai

    2011-05-01

    Wogonin, a flavone in the roots of Scutellaria baicalensis, reduced etoposide-induced apoptotic cell death in normal cells, such as bone marrow cells and thymocytes. On the other hand, wogonin potentiated the proapoptotic or cytotoxic action of etoposide in tumor cells, such as Jurkat, HL-60, A549, and NCI-H226. These contradictory actions of wogonin on apoptosis are distinguished by normal or cancer cell types. Wogonin had no effect on apoptosis induced by other anticancer agents in the tumor cells. Thus, the potentiation effect of wogonin was observed only in etoposide-induced apoptosis in tumor cells. In a functional assay for P-glycoprotein (P-gp), wogonin suppressed excretion of calcein, a substrate for P-gp, in these tumor cells. Moreover, wogonin decreased the excretion of radiolabeled etoposide and accordingly increased intracellular content of this agent in the cells. P-gp inhibitors showed a similar potentiation effect on etoposide-induced apoptosis in these tumor cells. Thus, wogonin is likely to potentiate the anticancer action of etoposide due to P-gp inhibition and accumulation of this agent. These findings suggest that wogonin may be a useful chemotherapeutic adjuvant to potentiate the pharmacological action of etoposide and ameliorate its adverse effects. PMID:20658136

  16. Investigating a Potential Auxin-Related Mode of Hormetic/Inhibitory Action of the Phytotoxin Parthenin.

    Belz, Regina G

    2016-01-01

    Parthenin is a metabolite of Parthenium hysterophorus and is believed to contribute to the weed's invasiveness via allelopathy. Despite the potential of parthenin to suppress competitors, low doses stimulate plant growth. This biphasic action was hypothesized to be auxin-like and, therefore, an auxin-related mode of parthenin action was investigated using two approaches: joint action experiments with Lactuca sativa, and dose-response experiments with auxin/antiauxin-resistant Arabidopsis thaliana genotypes. The joint action approach comprised binary mixtures of subinhibitory doses of the auxin 3-indoleacetic acid (IAA) mixed with parthenin or one of three reference compounds [indole-3-butyric acid (IBA), 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid (TIBA), 2-(p-chlorophenoxy)-2-methylpropionic acid (PCIB)]. The reference compounds significantly interacted with IAA at all doses, but parthenin interacted only at low doses indicating that parthenin hormesis may be auxin-related, in contrast to its inhibitory action. The genetic approach investigated the response of four auxin/antiauxin-resistant mutants and a wildtype to parthenin or two reference compounds (IAA, PCIB). The responses of mutant plants to the reference compounds confirmed previous reports, but differed from the responses observed for parthenin. Parthenin stimulated and inhibited all mutants independent of resistance. This provided no indication for an auxin-related action of parthenin. Therefore, the hypothesis of an auxin-related inhibitory action of parthenin was rejected in two independent experimental approaches, while the hypothesis of an auxin-related stimulatory effect could not be rejected. PMID:26686984

  17. Inhibition by TRPA1 agonists of compound action potentials in the frog sciatic nerve

    Matsushita, Akitomo; Ohtsubo, Sena; Fujita, Tsugumi; Kumamoto, Eiichi, E-mail: kumamote@cc.saga-u.ac.jp

    2013-04-26

    Highlights: •TRPA1 agonists inhibited compound action potentials in frog sciatic nerves. •This inhibition was not mediated by TRPA1 channels. •This efficacy was comparable to those of lidocaine and cocaine. •We found for the first time an ability of TRPA1 agonists to inhibit nerve conduction. -- Abstract: Although TRPV1 and TRPM8 agonists (vanilloid capsaicin and menthol, respectively) at high concentrations inhibit action potential conduction, it remains to be unknown whether TRPA1 agonists have a similar action. The present study examined the actions of TRPA1 agonists, cinnamaldehyde (CA) and allyl isothiocyanate (AITC), which differ in chemical structure from each other, on compound action potentials (CAPs) recorded from the frog sciatic nerve by using the air-gap method. CA and AITC concentration-dependently reduced the peak amplitude of the CAP with the IC{sub 50} values of 1.2 and 1.5 mM, respectively; these activities were resistant to a non-selective TRP antagonist ruthenium red or a selective TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031. The CA and AITC actions were distinct in property; the latter but not former action was delayed in onset and partially reversible, and CA but not AITC increased thresholds to elicit CAPs. A CAP inhibition was seen by hydroxy-α-sanshool (by 60% at 0.05 mM), which activates both TRPA1 and TRPV1 channels, a non-vanilloid TRPV1 agonist piperine (by 20% at 0.07 mM) and tetrahydrolavandulol (where the six-membered ring of menthol is opened; IC{sub 50} = 0.38 mM). It is suggested that TRPA1 agonists as well as TRPV1 and TRPM8 agonists have an ability to inhibit nerve conduction without TRP activation, although their agonists are quite different in chemical structure from each other.

  18. Inhibition by TRPA1 agonists of compound action potentials in the frog sciatic nerve

    Highlights: •TRPA1 agonists inhibited compound action potentials in frog sciatic nerves. •This inhibition was not mediated by TRPA1 channels. •This efficacy was comparable to those of lidocaine and cocaine. •We found for the first time an ability of TRPA1 agonists to inhibit nerve conduction. -- Abstract: Although TRPV1 and TRPM8 agonists (vanilloid capsaicin and menthol, respectively) at high concentrations inhibit action potential conduction, it remains to be unknown whether TRPA1 agonists have a similar action. The present study examined the actions of TRPA1 agonists, cinnamaldehyde (CA) and allyl isothiocyanate (AITC), which differ in chemical structure from each other, on compound action potentials (CAPs) recorded from the frog sciatic nerve by using the air-gap method. CA and AITC concentration-dependently reduced the peak amplitude of the CAP with the IC50 values of 1.2 and 1.5 mM, respectively; these activities were resistant to a non-selective TRP antagonist ruthenium red or a selective TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031. The CA and AITC actions were distinct in property; the latter but not former action was delayed in onset and partially reversible, and CA but not AITC increased thresholds to elicit CAPs. A CAP inhibition was seen by hydroxy-α-sanshool (by 60% at 0.05 mM), which activates both TRPA1 and TRPV1 channels, a non-vanilloid TRPV1 agonist piperine (by 20% at 0.07 mM) and tetrahydrolavandulol (where the six-membered ring of menthol is opened; IC50 = 0.38 mM). It is suggested that TRPA1 agonists as well as TRPV1 and TRPM8 agonists have an ability to inhibit nerve conduction without TRP activation, although their agonists are quite different in chemical structure from each other

  19. Examining the Potential for Gender Bias in the Prediction of Symptom Validity Test Failure by MMPI-2 Symptom Validity Scale Scores

    Lee, Tayla T. C.; Graham, John R.; Sellbom, Martin; Gervais, Roger O.

    2012-01-01

    Using a sample of individuals undergoing medico-legal evaluations (690 men, 519 women), the present study extended past research on potential gender biases for scores of the Symptom Validity (FBS) scale of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 by examining score- and item-level differences between men and women and determining the…

  20. A dual potassium channel activator improves repolarization reserve and normalizes ventricular action potentials

    Calloe, Kirstine; Di Diego, José M; Hansen, Rie Schultz;

    2016-01-01

    cultured canine cardiac myocytes and determined whether a dual K(+) current activator can normalize K(+) currents and restore action potential (AP) configuration. METHODS AND RESULTS: Ventricular myocytes were isolated and cultured for up to 48h. Current and voltage clamp recordings were made using patch...... of EADs. Our results suggest a potential benefit of K(+) current activators under conditions of reduced repolarization reserve including heart failure....

  1. Quantitative analysis of single muscle fibre action potentials recorded at known distances

    Albers, B.A.; Put, J.H.M.; Wallinga, W.; Wirtz, P.

    1989-01-01

    In vivo records of single fibre action potentials (SFAPs) have always been obtained at unknown distance from the active muscle fibre. A new experimental method has been developed enabling the derivation of the recording distance in animal experiments. A single fibre is stimulated with an intracellu

  2. ACTION OF PROGESTERONE ON THE DEPOLARIZATION OF THE MEMBRANE POTENTIAL IN TOAD OOCYTES INDUCED BY LEUCINE

    WANGYu-Feng

    1989-01-01

    The depolarization of the membrane potential in toad oocytes induced by leucine was found in our previous experiment. In this paper, a possible action or progesterone in the process was further investigated. After oocytes had been incubated for 16 to 24 hours with

  3. Preservation of cardiac function by prolonged action potentials in mice deficient of KChIP2

    Grubb, Søren Jahn; Aistrup, Gary L; Koivumäki, Jussi T;

    2015-01-01

    Inherited ion channelopathies and electrical remodeling in heart disease alter the cardiac action potential with important consequences for excitation-contraction coupling. Potassium channel-interacting protein 2 (KChIP2) is reduced in heart failure and interacts under physiological conditions with...

  4. Youth Participatory Action Research and Educational Transformation: The Potential of Intertextuality as a Methodological Tool

    Bertrand, Melanie

    2016-01-01

    In this article, Melanie Bertrand explores the potential of using the concept of intertextuality--which captures the way snippets of written or spoken text from one source become incorporated into other sources--in the study and practice of youth participatory action research (YPAR). Though this collective and youth-centered form of research…

  5. Effect of ethanol on action potential in ventricular cardiomyocytes: experimental and computational approach

    Pásek, Michal; Bébarová, M.; Christé, G.; Šimurdová, M.; Šimurda, J.

    London: The Physiological Society, 2014. 208P. [Physiology 2014. 30.06.2014-02.07.2014, London] R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NT14301-3/2013 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : rat ventricular cardiomyocyte * action potential * ethanol * rat ventricular cell model Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  6. Effects of benactyzine on action potentials and contractile force of guinea pig papillary muscles

    2000-01-01

    Aim:To explore the effects of benactyzine (BEN) on the action potential and contractile force in guinea pig papillary muscles.Methods:Conventional microelectrode technique was used to record the fast action potentials (FAP) and slow action potentials (SAP) of guinea pig papillary muscles.Results:Benactyzine 5,10,50 μmol·L-1 suppressed the maximal upstroke velocity (vmax) of FAP and contractile force (Fc) concentration-dependently while prolonged the action potential duration at 50%,90% repolarization (APD50,APD90) and effective refractory period (ERP) of FAP.The suppression on the vmax was frequency-dependent.Benactyzine 5,10,50μmol·L-1 lengthened the APD50,APD90 of SAP induced by isoprenaline or histamine when perfused with KCl 22 mmol·L-1 Tyrode's solution.The vmax of the SAP was not decreased by benactyzine 5,10 μmol·L-1 but by 50 μmol·L-1.The effects on the SAP were antagonized by elevation of the extracellular calcium from 2.0 to 5.6 mmol·L-1.The effects of benactyzine on SAP elicited by tetrodotoxin resembled that by isoprenaline or histamine except the more pronounced suppression on vmax and action potential amplitude (APA).The persistent rapid spontaneous activity and triggered tachyarrhythmia induced by ouabain were also abolished immediately by benactyzine 5 μmol·L-1.Conclusion:Benactyzine can inhibit Na+,K+,Ca2+ transmembrane movement and intracellular Ca2+ mobilization in the myocardium,and this may be the electrophysiological basis of its effects against experimental arrhythmias.

  7. Axonal sodium channel distribution shapes the depolarized action potential threshold of dentate granule neurons.

    Kress, Geraldine J; Dowling, Margaret J; Eisenman, Lawrence N; Mennerick, Steven

    2010-04-01

    Intrinsic excitability is a key feature dictating neuronal response to synaptic input. Here we investigate the recent observation that dentate granule neurons exhibit a more depolarized voltage threshold for action potential initiation than CA3 pyramidal neurons. We find no evidence that tonic GABA currents, leak or voltage-gated potassium conductances, or the expression of sodium channel isoform differences can explain this depolarized threshold. Axonal initial segment voltage-gated sodium channels, which are dominated by the Na(V)1.6 isoform in both cell types, distribute more proximally and exhibit lower overall density in granule neurons than in CA3 neurons. To test possible contributions of sodium channel distributions to voltage threshold and to test whether morphological differences participate, we performed simulations of dentate granule neurons and of CA3 pyramidal neurons. These simulations revealed that cell morphology and sodium channel distribution combine to yield the characteristic granule neuron action potential upswing and voltage threshold. Proximal axon sodium channel distribution strongly contributes to the higher voltage threshold of dentate granule neurons for two reasons. First, action potential initiation closer to the somatodendritic current sink causes the threshold of the initiating axon compartment to rise. Second, the proximity of the action potential initiation site to the recording site causes somatic recordings to more faithfully reflect the depolarized threshold of the axon than in cells like CA3 neurons, with distally initiating action potentials. Our results suggest that the proximal location of axon sodium channels in dentate granule neurons contributes to the intrinsic excitability differences between DG and CA3 neurons and may participate in the low-pass filtering function of dentate granule neurons. PMID:19603521

  8. The DBI action, higher-derivative supergravity, and flattening inflaton potentials

    Bielleman, Sjoerd; Ibáñez, Luis E.; Pedro, Francisco G.; Valenzuela, Irene; Wieck, Clemens

    2016-05-01

    In string theory compactifications it is common to find an effective Lagrangian for the scalar fields with a non-canonical kinetic term. We study the effective action of the scalar position moduli of Type II D p-branes. In many instances the kinetic terms are in fact modified by a term proportional to the scalar potential itself. This can be linked to the appearance of higher-dimensional supersymmetric operators correcting the Kähler potential. We identify the supersymmetric dimension-eight operators describing the α' corrections captured by the D-brane Dirac-Born-Infeld action. Our analysis then allows an embedding of the D-brane moduli effective action into an {N}=1 supergravity formulation. The effects of the potential-dependent kinetic terms may be very important if one of the scalars is the inflaton, since they lead to a flattening of the scalar potential. We analyze this flattening effect in detail and compute its impact on the CMB observables for single-field inflation with monomial potentials.

  9. Acute NMDA receptor antagonism disrupts synchronization of action potential firing in rat prefrontal cortex.

    Leonardo A Molina

    Full Text Available Antagonists of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDAR have psychotomimetic effects in humans and are used to model schizophrenia in animals. We used high-density electrophysiological recordings to assess the effects of acute systemic injection of an NMDAR antagonist (MK-801 on ensemble neural processing in the medial prefrontal cortex of freely moving rats. Although MK-801 increased neuron firing rates and the amplitude of gamma-frequency oscillations in field potentials, the synchronization of action potential firing decreased and spike trains became more Poisson-like. This disorganization of action potential firing following MK-801 administration is consistent with changes in simulated cortical networks as the functional connections among pyramidal neurons become less clustered. Such loss of functional heterogeneity of the cortical microcircuit may disrupt information processing dependent on spike timing or the activation of discrete cortical neural ensembles, and thereby contribute to hallucinations and other features of psychosis induced by NMDAR antagonists.

  10. Voltage-gated sodium channel expression and action potential generation in differentiated NG108-15 cells

    Liu Jinxu; Tu Huiyin; Zhang Dongze; Zheng Hong; Li Yu-Long

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The generation of action potential is required for stimulus-evoked neurotransmitter release in most neurons. Although various voltage-gated ion channels are involved in action potential production, the initiation of the action potential is mainly mediated by voltage-gated Na+ channels. In the present study, differentiation-induced changes of mRNA and protein expression of Na+ channels, Na+ currents, and cell membrane excitability were investigated in NG108-15 cells. Result...

  11. Simulation and calculation of the contribution of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channels to action potentials

    Liao Liping; Lin Xianguang; Hu Jielin; Wu Xin; Yang Xiaofei; Wang Wei; Li Chenhong

    2016-01-01

    The hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channel, which mediates the influx of cations, has an important role in action potential generation. In this article, we describe the contribution of the HCN channel to action potential generation. We simulated several common ion channels in neuron membranes based on data from rat dorsal root ganglion cells and modeled the action potential. The ion channel models employed in this paper were based...

  12. The DBI Action, Higher-derivative Supergravity, and Flattening Inflaton Potentials

    Bielleman, Sjoerd; Pedro, Francisco G; Valenzuela, Irene; Wieck, Clemens

    2016-01-01

    In string theory compactifications it is common to find an effective Lagrangian for the scalar fields with a non-canonical kinetic term. We study the effective action of the scalar position moduli of Type II D$p$-branes. In many instances the kinetic terms are in fact modified by a term proportional to the scalar potential itself. This can be linked to the appearance of higher-dimensional supersymmetric operators correcting the K\\"ahler potential. We identify the supersymmetric dimension-eight operators describing the $\\alpha'$ corrections captured by the D-brane Dirac-Born-Infeld action. Our analysis then allows an embedding of the D-brane moduli effective action into an $\\mathcal N = 1$ supergravity formulation. The effects of the potential-dependent kinetic terms may be very important if one of the scalars is the inflaton, since they lead to a flattening of the scalar potential. We analyze this flattening effect in detail and compute its impact on the CMB observables for single-field inflation with monomia...

  13. The potential for regional-scale bias in top-down CO2 flux estimates due to atmospheric transport errors

    S. M. Miller

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Estimates of CO2 fluxes that are based on atmospheric data rely upon a meteorological model to simulate atmospheric CO2 transport. These models provide a quantitative link between surface fluxes of CO2 and atmospheric measurements taken downwind. Therefore, any errors in the meteorological model can propagate into atmospheric CO2 transport and ultimately bias the estimated CO2 fluxes. These errors, however, have traditionally been difficult to characterize. To examine the effects of CO2 transport errors on estimated CO2 fluxes, we use a global meteorological model-data assimilation system known as "CAM–LETKF" to quantify two aspects of the transport errors: error variances (standard deviations and temporal error correlations. Furthermore, we develop two case studies. In the first case study, we examine the extent to which CO2 transport uncertainties can bias CO2 flux estimates. In particular, we use a common flux estimate known as CarbonTracker to discover the minimum hypothetical bias that can be detected above the CO2 transport uncertainties. In the second case study, we then investigate which meteorological conditions may contribute to month-long biases in modeled atmospheric transport. We estimate 6 hourly CO2 transport uncertainties in the model surface layer that range from 0.15 to 9.6 ppm (standard deviation, depending on location, and we estimate an average error decorrelation time of ∼2.3 days at existing CO2 observation sites. As a consequence of these uncertainties, we find that CarbonTracker CO2 fluxes would need to be biased by at least 29%, on average, before that bias were detectable at existing non-marine atmospheric CO2 observation sites. Furthermore, we find that persistent, bias-type errors in atmospheric transport are associated with consistent low net radiation, low energy boundary layer conditions. The meteorological model is not necessarily more uncertain in these conditions. Rather, the extent to which meteorological

  14. Potentiators of Defective ΔF508-CFTR Gating that Do Not Interfere with Corrector Action.

    Phuan, Puay-Wah; Veit, Guido; Tan, Joseph A; Finkbeiner, Walter E; Lukacs, Gergely L; Verkman, A S

    2015-10-01

    Combination drug therapies under development for cystic fibrosis caused by the ∆F508 mutation in cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) include a "corrector" to improve its cellular processing and a "potentiator" to improve its chloride channel function. Recently, it was reported that the approved potentiator N-(2,4-di-tert-butyl-5-hydroxyphenyl)-4-oxo-1,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxamide (Ivacaftor) reduces ∆F508-CFTR cellular stability and the efficacy of investigational correctors, including 3-(6-[([1-(2,2-difluoro-1,3-benzodioxol-5-yl)cyclopropyl]carbonyl) amino]-3-methyl-2-pyridinyl)-benzoic acid and 1-(2,2-difluoro-1,3-benzodioxol-5-yl)-N-(1-[(2R)-2,3-dihydroxypropyl]-6-fluoro-2-(2-hydroxy-1,1-dimethylethyl)-1H-indol-5-yl), which might contribute to the modest reported efficacy of combination therapy in clinical trials. Here, we report the identification and characterization of potentiators that do not interfere with ∆F508-CFTR stability or corrector action. High-throughput screening and structure-activity analysis identified several classes of potentiators that do not impair corrector action, including tetrahydrobenzothiophenes, thiooxoaminothiazoles, and pyrazole-pyrrole-isoxazoles. The most potent compounds have an EC(50) for ∆F508-CFTR potentiation down to 18 nM and do not reduce corrector efficacy in heterologous ∆F508-CFTR-expressing cells or primary cultures of ∆F508/∆F508 human bronchial epithelia. The ΔF508-CFTR potentiators also activated wild-type and G551D CFTR, albeit weakly. The efficacy of combination therapy for cystic fibrosis caused by the ∆F508 mutation may be improved by replacement of Ivacaftor with a potentiator that does not interfere with corrector action. PMID:26245207

  15. Spatial and frequency domain ring source models for the single muscle fiber action potential

    Henneberg, Kaj-åge; R., Plonsey

    1994-01-01

    In the paper, single-fibre models for the extracellular action potential are developed that will allow the potential to the evaluated at an arbitrary field point in the extracellular space. Fourier-domain models are restricted in that they evaluate potentials at equidistant points along a line...... parallel to the fibre axis. Consequently, they cannot easily evaluate the potential at the boundary nodes of a boundary-element electrode model. The Fourier-domain models employ axial-symmetric ring source models, and thereby provide higher accuracy that the line source model, where the source is lumped...... examples including anisotropy show that the spatial models require extreme care in the integration procedure owing to the singularity in the weighting functions. With adequate sampling, the spatial models can evaluate extracellular potentials with high accuracy....

  16. Real-time imaging of action potentials in nerves using changes in birefringence.

    Badreddine, Ali H; Jordan, Tomas; Bigio, Irving J

    2016-05-01

    Polarized light can be used to measure the electrical activity associated with action potential propagation in nerves, as manifested in simultaneous dynamic changes in their intrinsic optical birefringence. These signals may serve as a tool for minimally invasive neuroimaging in various types of neuroscience research, including the study of neuronal activation patterns with high spatiotemporal resolution. A fast linear photodiode array was used to image propagating action potentials in an excised portion of the lobster walking leg nerve. We show that the crossed-polarized signal (XPS) can be reliably imaged over a ≥2 cm span in our custom nerve chamber, by averaging multiple-stimulation signals, and also in single-scan real-time "movies". This demonstration paves the way toward utilizing changes in the optical birefringence to image more complex neuronal activity in nerve fibers and other organized neuronal tissue. PMID:27231635

  17. Application of Emergency Action Levels from Potential Release at Research Reactor HANARO

    Execution of the protective action promptly is possible that Emergency Action Levels (EALs) must be established for a radiological release from nuclear facility. The EALs for electric power reactor are already developed and applied to recognize an emergency situation rapidly. Recently the IAEA published the safety report including the EALs for research reactor. This paper describes the EALs to apply for a potential release pathway at the research reactor HANARO. The results of table 1 and 2 will be higher than actual because the weather condition in real situation is difference. However, the EALs applying the potential stack release, ground release and site can be useful for research reactor HANARO making the emergency declaration. The EALs at the site boundary of the table 3 can be applied to protect the off-site public

  18. Application of Emergency Action Levels from Potential Release at Research Reactor HANARO

    Kim, Jongsoo; Lee, Goan Yub; Lee, Hae Choi; Kim, Bong Suk [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Execution of the protective action promptly is possible that Emergency Action Levels (EALs) must be established for a radiological release from nuclear facility. The EALs for electric power reactor are already developed and applied to recognize an emergency situation rapidly. Recently the IAEA published the safety report including the EALs for research reactor. This paper describes the EALs to apply for a potential release pathway at the research reactor HANARO. The results of table 1 and 2 will be higher than actual because the weather condition in real situation is difference. However, the EALs applying the potential stack release, ground release and site can be useful for research reactor HANARO making the emergency declaration. The EALs at the site boundary of the table 3 can be applied to protect the off-site public.

  19. Action Potential Energy Efficiency Varies Among Neuron Types in Vertebrates and Invertebrates

    Biswa Sengupta; Martin Stemmler; Simon B Laughlin; Niven, Jeremy E.

    2010-01-01

    The initiation and propagation of action potentials (APs) places high demands on the energetic resources of neural tissue. Each AP forces ATP-driven ion pumps to work harder to restore the ionic concentration gradients, thus consuming more energy. Here, we ask whether the ionic currents underlying the AP can be predicted theoretically from the principle of minimum energy consumption. A long-held supposition that APs are energetically wasteful, based on theoretical analysis of the squid giant ...

  20. Correlation of compound action potential and electromyography with facial muscle tension

    Goodnight, J W; Dulguerov, Pavel; Berke, G S; Lesavoy, M; Hoffman, L. F.

    1995-01-01

    Functional electric stimulation is a new method for dynamic rehabilitation of paralyzed muscles. The output of such prosthetic devices needs to be modulated by some index of the muscle movement. In facial paralysis a measure of the muscle contractions of the normal contralateral side seems to be an appropriate input. In the rabbit, we simultaneously measured the compound action potential of the buccal branch of the facial nerve, the electromyogram of the zygomaticus major muscle, and the musc...

  1. Depth-Resolved Measurement of Transient Structural Changes during Action Potential Propagation

    Akkin, T.; Joo, C.; Boer

    2007-01-01

    We report noncontact optical measurement of fast transient structural changes in the crustacean nerve during action potential propagation without the need for exogenous chemicals or reflection coatings. The technique, spectral domain optical coherence tomography, provides real-time cross-sectional images of the nerve with micron-scale resolution to select a specific region for functional assessment and interferometric phase sensitivity for subnanometer-scale motion detection. Noncontact optic...

  2. Bimodal action of menthol on the transient receptor potential channel TRPA1

    Karashima, Yuji; Damann, Nils; Prenen, Jean; Talavera Pérez, Karel; Segal Stanciu, Andrei; Voets, Thomas; Nilius, Bernd

    2007-01-01

    TRPA1 is a calcium-permeable nonselective cation transient receptor potential (TRP) channel that functions as an excitatory ionotropic receptor in nociceptive neurons. TRPA1 is robustly activated by pungent substances in mustard oil, cinnamon, and garlic and mediates the inflammatory actions of environmental irritants and proalgesic agents. Here, we demonstrate a bimodal sensitivity of TRPA1 to menthol, a widely used cooling agent and known activator of the related cold receptor TRPM8. In who...

  3. Variability of Action Potentials Within and Among Cardiac Cell Clusters Derived from Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    Renjun Zhu; Millrod, Michal A.; Zambidis, Elias T.; Leslie Tung

    2016-01-01

    Electrophysiological variability in cardiomyocytes derived from pluripotent stem cells continues to be an impediment for their scientific and translational applications. We studied the variability of action potentials (APs) recorded from clusters of human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hESC-CMs) using high-resolution optical mapping. Over 23,000 APs were analyzed through four parameters: APD30, APD80, triangulation and fractional repolarization. Although measures were taken to re...

  4. Action Potential Morphology Influences Intracellular Calcium Handling Stability and the Occurrence of Alternans

    Jordan, Peter N; Christini, David J

    2005-01-01

    Instability in the intracellular Ca2+ handling system leading to Ca2+ alternans is hypothesized to be an underlying cause of electrical alternans. The highly coupled nature of membrane voltage and Ca2+ regulation suggests that there should be reciprocal effects of membrane voltage on the stability of the Ca2+ handling system. We investigated such effects using a mathematical model of the cardiac intracellular Ca2+ handling system. We found that the morphology of the action potential has a sig...

  5. Relation of recurrent laryngeal nerve compound action potential to laryngeal biomechanics

    Nasri, S.; Dulguerov, Pavel; Damrose, E J; Ye, M.; Kreiman, J; Berke, G S

    1995-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the compound action potential (CAP) of the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) and to correlate this electrophysiologic signal to laryngeal biomechanics and phonatory function. Four adult mongrel canines were anesthetized. The RLN was isolated and stimulated, and recording electrodes were applied. The electromyographic (EMG) electrode was placed in the thyroarytenoid (TA) muscle. The RLN CAP and the EMG of the TA muscle were recorded and compared to the stim...

  6. Human sensory nerve compound action potential amplitude: variation with sex and finger circumference.

    Bolton, C F; Carter, K M

    1980-01-01

    The amplitude of human, antidromic, sensory compound action potentials (CAP) recorded from median and ulnar digital nerves is greater in females than males. This sex difference is probably due entirely to females having digits of smaller circumference, resulting in digital nerves being closer to the recording ring electrode enclosing the digit. The negative linear correlation between CAP amplitude and circumference holds true for persons of the same sex.

  7. Axonal sodium channel distribution shapes the depolarized action potential threshold of dentate granule neurons

    Kress, Geraldine J.; Dowling, Margaret; Eisenman, Lawrence N.; Mennerick, Steven

    2010-01-01

    Intrinsic excitability is a key feature dictating neuronal response to synaptic input. Here we investigate the recent observation that dentate granule neurons exhibit a more depolarized voltage threshold for action potential initiation than CA3 pyramidal neurons. We find no evidence that tonic GABA currents, leak or voltage-gated potassium conductances, or the expression of sodium channel isoform differences can explain this depolarized threshold. Axonal initial segment voltage-gated sodium c...

  8. Variety of the Wave Change in Compound Muscle Action Potential in an Animal Model

    ITO, ZENYA; Imagama, Shiro; Ando, Kei; Muramoto, Akio; Kobayashi, Kazuyoshi; Hida, Tetsuro; Ito, Kenyu; Ishikawa, Yoshimoto; Tsushima, Mikito; Matsumoto, Akiyuki; Tanaka, Satoshi; Morozumi, Masayoshi; Matsuyama, Yukihiro; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Animal study. Purpose To review the present warning point criteria of the compound muscle action potential (CMAP) and investigate new criteria for spinal surgery safety using an animal model. Overview of Literature Little is known about correlation palesis and amplitude of spinal cord monitoring. Methods After laminectomy of the tenth thoracic spinal lamina, 2-140 g force was delivered to the spinal cord with a tension gage to create a bilateral contusion injury. The study morpho...

  9. Effect of ethanol on action potential and ionic membrane currents in rat ventricular myocytes

    Bébarová, M.; Matejovič, P.; Pásek, Michal; Ohlídalová, D.; Jansová, D.; Šimurdová, M.; Šimurda, J.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 200, č. 4 (2010), s. 301-314. ISSN 1748-1708 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : action potential * ethanol * rat ventricular myocyte Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.138, year: 2010 http:// apps .isiknowledge.com/full_record.do?product=UA&search_mode=GeneralSearch&qid=15&SID=Y1pmpi@7k2HPEc8ehEE&page=1&doc=1&colname=WOS

  10. Experimental determination of compound action potential direction and propagation velocity from multi-electrode nerve cuffs.

    Rieger, R; Taylor, J; Comi, E; Donaldson, N; Russold, M; Mahony, C M O; McLaughlin, J A; McAdams, E; Demosthenous, A; Jarvis, J C

    2004-07-01

    Information extracted from whole-nerve electroneurograms, recorded using electrode cuffs, can provide signals to neuroprostheses. However, the amount of information that can be extracted from a single tripole is limited. This communication demonstrates how previously unavailable information about the direction of action potential propagation and velocity can be obtained using a multi-electrode cuff and that the arrangement acts as a velocity-selective filter. Results from in vitro experiments on frog nerves are presented. PMID:15234689

  11. Comparative investigations of manual action representations: evidence that chimpanzees represent the costs of potential future actions involving tools

    Frey, Scott H.; POVINELLI, DANIEL J.

    2012-01-01

    The ability to adjust one's ongoing actions in the anticipation of forthcoming task demands is considered as strong evidence for the existence of internal action representations. Studies of action selection in tool use reveal that the behaviours that we choose in the present moment differ depending on what we intend to do next. Further, they point to a specialized role for mechanisms within the human cerebellum and dominant left cerebral hemisphere in representing the likely sensory costs of ...

  12. Is the cultural transmission of irrelevant tool actions in adult humans (Homo sapiens best explained as the result of an evolved conformist bias?

    Nicola McGuigan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent studies of social learning have revealed that adult humans are "over-imitators" who frequently reproduce a model's causally irrelevant tool actions to the detriment of task efficiency. At present our knowledge of adult over-imitation is limited to the fact that adults do over-imitate, we know very little about the causes of this behavior. The current study aimed to provide novel insights into adult over-imitation by extending a paradigm recently used with human children to explore social aspects of over-imitation. In the child study observers saw two models demonstrate a tool-use task using the same inefficient approach, or two models demonstrate different approaches to the task (one inefficient and one efficient. The manipulation of social influence came in the testing phase where the observer completed the task in the presence of either an inefficient model or an efficient model. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We adapted the paradigm used in the child study to provide the first systematic exploration of factors which may lead to adult over-imitation including: 1 the presence of the model(s during testing, 2 the presence of a competing efficient task demonstration, 3 the presence of a majority displaying the inefficient approach, and 4 the 'removal' of the experimental context during task completion. We show that the adult participants only over-imitated in conditions where the inefficient strategy was the majority approach witnessed. This tendency towards over-imitation was almost entirely eliminated when the participants interacted with the task when they believed the experiment to be complete. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that adult over-imitation is best explained as a result of an evolved 'conformist bias' argued to be crucial to the transmission of human cultural behavior and one which may be unique in the animal kingdom.

  13. Intergroup bias.

    Hewstone, Miles; Rubin, Mark; Willis, Hazel

    2002-01-01

    This chapter reviews the extensive literature on bias in favor of in-groups at the expense of out-groups. We focus on five issues and identify areas for future research: (a) measurement and conceptual issues (especially in-group favoritism vs. out-group derogation, and explicit vs. implicit measures of bias); (b) modern theories of bias highlighting motivational explanations (social identity, optimal distinctiveness, uncertainty reduction, social dominance, terror management); (c) key moderators of bias, especially those that exacerbate bias (identification, group size, status and power, threat, positive-negative asymmetry, personality and individual differences); (d) reduction of bias (individual vs. intergroup approaches, especially models of social categorization); and (e) the link between intergroup bias and more corrosive forms of social hostility. PMID:11752497

  14. Action Research’s Potential to Foster Institutional Change for Urban Water Management

    Dimitrios Zikos

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the potential of action research to meet the challenges entailed in institutional design for urban water management. Our overall aim is to briefly present action research and discuss its methodological merits with regard to the challenges posed by the different conceptual bases for extrapolating the effects of institutional design on institutional change. Thus, our aim is to explore how Action Research meets the challenge of scoping the field in an open fashion for determining the appropriate mechanisms of institutional change and supporting the emerging of new water institutions. To accomplish this aim, we select the Water Framework Directive (WFD as an illustrative driving force requiring changes in water management practices and implying the need for the emergence of new institutions. We employ a case of urban water management in the Volos Metropolitan Area, part of the Thessaly region in Greece, where a Pilot River Basin Plan was implemented. By applying action research and being involved in a long process of interaction between stakeholders, we examine the emergence of new institutions dealing with urban water management under the general principles of the major driving force for change: the WFD.

  15. Optimistic bias and Facebook use: self-other discrepancies about potential risks and benefits of Facebook use.

    Kim, Sunny Jung; Hancock, Jeffrey T

    2015-04-01

    Despite the accumulating evidence on the positive and negative outcomes of Facebook use, how people perceive themselves to be subject to these outcomes as well as the consequences and mechanisms of these perceptions are underexplored. According to optimistic bias, Facebook users may perceive that bad things are more likely to happen to others than to themselves, while good things are more likely to happen to them than to others. The findings from an online survey among Facebook users indicate that the negative psychological and social outcomes of using Facebook were perceived to be more likely to happen to other Facebook users than to themselves, pInternet regulation, Sobel z=2.49, p=0.01. For positive outcomes of Facebook use, the direction of optimistic bias was reversed, t(235) = -5.52, pbenefits of Facebook use. PMID:25879379

  16. Reply to Cohen's letter on 'The potential for bias in Cohen's ecological analysis of lung cancer and residential radon'

    Dear Sir, In the above letter, Cohen repeats arguments that he as made in the past; however, the thrust of those comments indicates a fundamental misunderstanding of the point of my article and indeed of my prior articles on this topic. It was not and has never been my goal to identify a specific factor (or several factors) that induced the negative correlation between the estimates of county-level mean radon concentration and county lung cancer mortality rates. Other investigators have offered powerful examples, both theoretical and practical, that Cohen's results are indeed an artifact of ecological regression. The primary purpose of my contributions to this topic has been to demonstrate the fundamental deficiencies of the methodology itself, in particular the unboundedness of the bias. The current article demonstrates that the ecological fallacy always applies, that the addition of county-level adjustment variables does not reduce bias and increase validity, and that an observed ecological risk pattern can differ markedly from the true risk pattern. Because of these deficiencies, epidemiologists have never used ecological regression as a tool for confirmatory analysis. For radon and lung cancer, results of 25-30 analytic studies of individuals clearly prove the deficiency of the method. There are numerous risks factors for lung cancer, including smoking, age, various occupational exposures, air pollution, previous lung diseases, and so on. I take an extremely simplified model for lung cancer in radon and smoking status, and demonstrate that the induced county-level model is non-linear. A more realistic, and complex, model for lung cancer would include all principal risk factors, and would also generate a non-linear model at the county level. Cohen's claims, which are based on his linear (or linear-quadratic) model for county lung cancer rates, are therefore built on a false premise, and his continual reference to the 'scientific method' is fatuous. One could

  17. A critical examination of spatial biases between MODIS and MISR aerosol products – application for potential AERONET deployment

    T. F. Eck

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET data are the primary benchmark for evaluating satellite-retrieved aerosol properties. However, despite its extensive coverage, the representativeness of the AERONET data is rarely discussed. Indeed, many studies have shown that satellite retrieval biases have a significant degree of spatial correlation that may be problematic for higher-level processes or inverse-emissions-modeling studies. To consider these issues and evaluate relative performance in regions of few surface observations, cross-comparisons between the Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD products of operational MODIS Collection 5.1 Dark Target (DT and operational MODIS Collection 5.1 Deep Blue (DB with MISR version 22 were conducted. Through such comparisons, we can observe coherent spatial features of the AOD bias while sidestepping the full analysis required for determining when or where either retrieval is more correct. We identify regions where MODIS to MISR AOD ratios were found to be above 1.4 and below 0.7. Regions where lower boundary condition uncertainty is likely to be a dominant factor include portions of Western North America, the Andes mountains, Saharan Africa, the Arabian Peninsula, and Central Asia. Similarly, microphysical biases may be an issue in South America, and specific parts of Southern Africa, India Asia, East Asia, and Indonesia. These results help identify high-priority locations for possible future deployments of both in situ and ground based remote sensing measurements. The Supplement includes a kml file.

  18. A Critical Examination of Spatial Biases Between MODIS and MISR Aerosol Products - Application for Potential AERONET Deployment

    Shi, Y.; Zhang, J.; Reid, J. S.; Hyer, E. J.; Eck, T. F.; Holben, B. N.; Kahn, R. A.

    2011-01-01

    AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) data are the primary benchmark for evaluating satellite-retrieved aerosol properties. However, despite its extensive coverage, the representativeness of the AERONET data is rarely discussed. Indeed, many studies have shown that satellite retrieval biases have a significant degree of spatial correlation that may be problematic for higher-level processes or inverse-emissions-modeling studies. To consider these issues and evaluate relative performance in regions of few surface observations, cross-comparisons between the Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) products of operational MODIS Collection 5.1 Dark Target (DT) and operational MODIS Collection 5.1 Deep Blue (DB) with MISR version 22 were conducted. Through such comparisons, we can observe coherent spatial features of the AOD bias while side-stepping the full analysis required for determining when or where either retrieval is more correct. We identify regions where MODIS to MISR AOD ratios were found to be above 1.4 and below 0.7. Regions where lower boundary condition uncertainty is likely to be a dominant factor include portions of Western North America, the Andes mountains, Saharan Africa, the Arabian Peninsula, and Central Asia. Similarly, microphysical biases may be an issue in South America, and specific parts of Southern Africa, India Asia, East Asia, and Indonesia. These results help identify high-priority locations for possible future deployments of both in situ and ground based remote sensing measurements. The Supplement includes a km1 file.

  19. The use of interim data and Data Monitoring Committee recommendations in randomized controlled trial reports: frequency, implications and potential sources of bias

    Hampton John

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interim analysis of accumulating trial data is important to protect participant safety during randomized controlled trials (RCTs. Data Monitoring Committees (DMCs often undertake such analyses, but their widening role may lead to extended use of interim analysis or recommendations that could potentially bias trial results. Methods Systematic search of eight major publications: Annals of Internal Medicine, BMJ, Circulation, CID, JAMA, JCO, Lancet and NEJM, including all randomised controlled trials (RCTs between June 2000 and May 2005 to identify RCTs that reported use of interim analysis, with or without DMC involvement. Recommendations made by the DMC or based on interim analysis were identified and potential sources of bias assessed. Independent double data extraction was performed on all included trials. Results We identified 1772 RCTs, of which 470 (27%; 470/1772 reported the use of a DMC and a further 116 (7%; 116/1772 trials reported some form of interim analysis without explicit mention of a DMC. There were 28 trials (24 with a formal DMC, randomizing a total of 79396 participants, identified as recommending changes to the trial that may have lead to biased results. In most of these, some form of sample size re-estimation was recommended with four trials also reporting changes to trial endpoints. The review relied on information reported in the primary publications and methods papers relating to the trials, higher rates of use may have occurred but not been reported. Conclusion The reported use of interim analysis and DMCs in clinical trials has been increasing in recent years. It is reassuring that in most cases recommendations were made in the interest of participant safety. However, in practice, recommendations that may lead to potentially biased trial results are being made.

  20. Possibilities of structural engineering in multilayer vacuum-arc ZrN/CrN coatings by varying the nanolayer thickness and application of a bias potential

    Sobol', O. V.; Andreev, A. A.; Gorban', V. F.; Stolbovoy, V. A.; Melekhov, A. A.; Postelnyk, A. A.

    2016-07-01

    The possibility of attaining an superhard state in multilayer vacuum-arc ZrN/CrN coatings with a layer thickness of about 20 nm has been established. It has been shown that the application of a constant negative potential for structural engineering during deposition leads to the formation of solid solutions due to mixing of interfaces. The hardness of these systems exceeds 30 GPa. The application of a pulsed high-voltage bias potential at which the ordering of atoms stimulated by elevated mobility is observed makes it possible to suppress the mixing of the interfaces and to attain elevated hardness (up to 42 GPa) for nanometer layer thicknesses.

  1. Population of Computational Rabbit-Specific Ventricular Action Potential Models for Investigating Sources of Variability in Cellular Repolarisation

    Philip Gemmell; Kevin Burrage; Blanca Rodriguez; T Alexander Quinn

    2014-01-01

    Variability is observed at all levels of cardiac electrophysiology. Yet, the underlying causes and importance of this variability are generally unknown, and difficult to investigate with current experimental techniques. The aim of the present study was to generate populations of computational ventricular action potential models that reproduce experimentally observed intercellular variability of repolarisation (represented by action potential duration) and to identify its potential causes. A s...

  2. Effects of Potassium Currents upon Action Potential of Cardiac Cells Exposed to External Electric fields

    An-Ying Zhang; Xiao-Feng Pang

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies show that exposure to high-voltage electric fields would influence the electro cardiogram both in experimental animate and human beings. The effects of the external electric fields upon action potential of cardiac cells are studied in this paper based on the dynamical model, LR91. Fourth order Runger-Kuta is used to analyze the change of potassium ion channels exposed to external electric fields in detail. Results indicate that external electric fields could influence the current of potassium ion by adding an induced component voltage on membrane. This phenomenon might be one of the reasons of heart rate anomaly under the high-voltage electric fields.

  3. Ranolazine inhibits shear sensitivity of endogenous Na+ current and spontaneous action potentials in HL-1 cells

    Strege, Peter; Beyder, Arthur; Bernard, Cheryl; Crespo-Diaz, Ruben; Behfar, Atta; Terzic, Andre; Ackerman, Michael; Farrugia, Gianrico

    2012-01-01

    NaV1.5 is a mechanosensitive voltage-gated Na+ channel encoded by the gene SCN5A, expressed in cardiac myocytes and required for phase 0 of the cardiac action potential (AP). In the cardiomyocyte, ranolazine inhibits depolarizing Na+ current and delayed rectifier (IKr) currents. Recently, ranolazine was also shown to be an inhibitor of NaV1.5 mechanosensitivity. Stretch also accelerates the firing frequency of the SA node, and fluid shear stress increases the beating rate of cultured cardiomy...

  4. On modelling of physical effects accompanying the propagation of action potentials in nerve fibres

    Engelbrecht, Jüri; Tamm, Kert; Laasmaa, Martin; Vendelin, Marko

    2016-01-01

    The recent theoretical and experimental studies have revealed many details of signal propagation in nervous systems. In this paper an attempt is made to unify various mathematical models which describe the signal propagation in nerve fibres. The analysis of existing single models permits to select the leading physiological effects. As a result, a more general mathematical model is described based on the coupling of action potentials with mechanical waves in a nerve fibre. The crucial issue is how to model coupling effects which are strongly linked to the ion currents through biomembranes.

  5. Effects of terpineol on the compound action potential of the rat sciatic nerve

    M.R. Moreira; G.M.P. Cruz; Lopes, M S; A.A.C. Albuquerque; J.H. Leal-Cardoso

    2001-01-01

    Terpineol, a volatile terpenoid alcohol of low toxicity, is widely used in the perfumery industry. It is an important chemical constituent of the essential oil of many plants with widespread applications in folk medicine and in aromatherapy. The effects of terpineol on the compound action potential (CAP) of rat sciatic nerve were studied. Terpineol induced a dose-dependent blockade of the CAP. At 100 µM, terpineol had no demonstrable effect. At 300 µM terpineol, peak-to-peak amplitude and con...

  6. The optimal distance between two electrode tips during recording of compound nerve action potentials in the rat median nerve

    Yongping Li; Jie Lao; Xin Zhao; Dong Tian; Yi Zhu; Xiaochun Wei

    2014-01-01

    The distance between the two electrode tips can greatly inlfuence the parameters used for record-ing compound nerve action potentials. To investigate the optimal parameters for these recordings in the rat median nerve, we dissociated the nerve using different methods and compound nerve action potentials were orthodromically or antidromically recorded with different electrode spac-ings. Compound nerve action potentials could be consistently recorded using a method in which the middle part of the median nerve was intact, with both ends dissociated from the surrounding fascia and a ground wire inserted into the muscle close to the intact part. When the distance be-tween two stimulating electrode tips was increased, the threshold and supramaximal stimulating intensity of compound nerve action potentials were gradually decreased, but the amplitude was not changed signiifcantly. When the distance between two recording electrode tips was increased, the amplitude was gradually increased, but the threshold and supramaximal stimulating intensity exhibited no signiifcant change. Different distances between recording and stimulating sites did not produce signiifcant effects on the aforementioned parameters. A distance of 5 mm between recording and stimulating electrodes and a distance of 10 mm between recording and stimulating sites were found to be optimal for compound nerve action potential recording in the rat median nerve. In addition, the orthodromic compound action potential, with a biphasic waveform that was more stable and displayed less interference (however also required a higher threshold and higher supramaximal stimulus), was found to be superior to the antidromic compound action potential.

  7. Toward a Better Understanding of the Relationship between Belief in the Paranormal and Statistical Bias: The Potential Role of Schizotypy.

    Dagnall, Neil; Denovan, Andrew; Drinkwater, Kenneth; Parker, Andrew; Clough, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The present paper examined relationships between schizotypy (measured by the Oxford-Liverpool Inventory of Feelings and Experience; O-LIFE scale brief), belief in the paranormal (assessed via the Revised Paranormal Belief Scale; RPBS) and proneness to statistical bias (i.e., perception of randomness and susceptibility to conjunction fallacy). Participants were 254 volunteers recruited via convenience sampling. Probabilistic reasoning problems appeared framed within both standard and paranormal contexts. Analysis revealed positive correlations between the Unusual Experience (UnExp) subscale of O-LIFE and paranormal belief measures [RPBS full scale, traditional paranormal beliefs (TPB) and new age philosophy]. Performance on standard problems correlated negatively with UnExp and belief in the paranormal (particularly the TPB dimension of the RPBS). Consideration of specific problem types revealed that perception of randomness associated more strongly with belief in the paranormal than conjunction; both problem types related similarly to UnExp. Structural equation modeling specified that belief in the paranormal mediated the indirect relationship between UnExp and statistical bias. For problems presented in a paranormal context a framing effect occurred. Whilst UnExp correlated positively with conjunction proneness (controlling for perception of randomness), there was no association between UnExp and perception of randomness (controlling for conjunction). PMID:27471481

  8. Characterization of action potential-triggered [Ca2+]i transients in single smooth muscle cells of guinea-pig ileum

    Kohda, M.; Komori, S.; Unno, T; Ohashi, H

    1997-01-01

    To characterize increases in cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) associated with discharge of action potentials, membrane potential and [Ca2+]i were simultaneously recorded from single smooth muscle cells of guinea-pig ileum by use of a combination of nystatin-perforated patch clamp and fura-2 fluorimetry techniques.A single action potential in response to a depolarizing current pulse elicited a transient rise in [Ca2+]i. When the duration of the current pulse was prolonged, action po...

  9. Non-destructive generation of nano-scale periodic pinning potentials for magnetic domain walls: a way to bias domain wall propagation

    Metaxas, Peter; Zermatten, Pierre-Jean; Novak, Rafael; Jamet, Jean-Pierre; Weil, Raphael; Rohart, Stanislas; Ferre, Jacques; Mougin, Alexandra; Stamps, Robert; Baltz, Vincent; Rodmacq, Bernard; Gaudin, Gilles

    2012-02-01

    The stray magnetic field of an array of ferromagnetic nanodots is used to generate a spatially periodic pinning potential for domain walls moving through a physically separate, weakly disordered, magnetic layer lying beneath the array. This technique represents a non-destructive method to create tunable and localised pinning sites for domain walls which are consequently subject to co-existing (but independent) periodic and disordered pinning potentials. Beyond the fundamentally attractive application of creating a model experimental system to study interface motion through multiple co-existing pinning potentials, our system interestingly exhibits many characteristics that are normally associated with exchange bias. This is a direct result of the fact that pinning effects induced by the periodic pinning potential depend upon the polarity of the applied magnetic field which drives the domain wall motion, a phenomenon which manifests itself in field-polarity-dependent domain wall mobilities and profiles.

  10. Action of hallucinogens on raphe-evoked dorsal root potentials (DRPs) in the cat.

    Larson, A A; Anderson, E G

    1986-02-01

    The dorsal root potential (DRP) evoked by stimulation of the inferior central nucleus (ICN) of the cat is affected by administration of a variety of hallucinogenic agents. It has been previously shown that a single low dose of LSD is unique in that it potentiates this DRP, while injections of 5-methoxy-N,N- dimethyltryptamine (5-MeODMT), ketamine or phencyclidine (PCP) inhibit its production. Tolerance develops to the facilitatory effect of low doses of LSD on the DRP, but not to the inhibitory action of 5-MeODMT. Repeated injections of ketamine every 30 minutes also fail to produce tachyphylaxis to the inhibitory effect of this dissociative anesthetic. The raphe-evoked DRP is a long latency potential that is inhibited by a wide variety of putative serotonin antagonists and has therefore been traditionally thought to be mediated by serotonin. However, in light of the inability of either tryptophan or fluoxetine to potentiate this DRP, and the resistance of this DRP to blockade by parachlorophenylalanine, reserpine or intrathecally administered 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine, it appears that this potential may in fact be mediated, at least in part, by a non-serotonergic transmitter. PMID:3952125

  11. Quantitative assessment of the distributions of membrane conductances involved in action potential backpropagation along basal dendrites.

    Acker, Corey D; Antic, Srdjan D

    2009-03-01

    Basal dendrites of prefrontal cortical neurons receive strong synaptic drive from recurrent excitatory synaptic inputs. Synaptic integration within basal dendrites is therefore likely to play an important role in cortical information processing. Both synaptic integration and synaptic plasticity depend crucially on dendritic membrane excitability and the backpropagation of action potentials. We carried out multisite voltage-sensitive dye imaging of membrane potential transients from thin basal branches of prefrontal cortical pyramidal neurons before and after application of channel blockers. We found that backpropagating action potentials (bAPs) are predominantly controlled by voltage-gated sodium and A-type potassium channels. In contrast, pharmacologically blocking the delayed rectifier potassium, voltage-gated calcium, or I(h) conductance had little effect on dendritic AP propagation. Optically recorded bAP waveforms were quantified and multicompartmental modeling was used to link the observed behavior with the underlying biophysical properties. The best-fit model included a nonuniform sodium channel distribution with decreasing conductance with distance from the soma, together with a nonuniform (increasing) A-type potassium conductance. AP amplitudes decline with distance in this model, but to a lesser extent than previously thought. We used this model to explore the mechanisms underlying two sets of published data involving high-frequency trains of APs and the local generation of sodium spikelets. We also explored the conditions under which I(A) down-regulation would produce branch strength potentiation in the proposed model. Finally, we discuss the hypothesis that a fraction of basal branches may have different membrane properties compared with sister branches in the same dendritic tree. PMID:19118105

  12. The characteristics of action potential and nonselective cation current of cardiomyocytes in rabbit superior vena cava

    WANG Pan; YANG XinChun; LIU XiuLan; BAO RongFeng; LIU TaiFeng

    2008-01-01

    As s special focus in initiating and maintaining atrial fibrillation (AF), cardiomyocytes in superior vena cavs (SVC) have distinctive electrophysiological characters. In this study, we found that comparing with the right atrial (RA) cardiomyoctyes, the SVC cardiomyoctyes had longer APD90 at the different basic cycle lengths; the conduction block could be observed on both RA and SVC cardiomyoctyes. A few of SVC cardiomyoctyes showed slow response action potentials with automatic activity and some others showed early afterdepolarization (EAD) spontaneously. Further more, we found that there are nonselective cation current (INs) in both SVC and RA cardiomyocytes. The peak density of INs in SVC cardiomyocytes was smaller than that in RA cardiomyocytes. Removal of extracellular divalent cation and glucose could increase INs in SVC cardiomyocytes. The agonist or the antagonist of INs may increase or decrease APD. To sum up, some SVC cardiomyocytes possess the ability of spontaneous activity; the difference of transmembrane action potentials between SVC and RA cardiomyocytes is partly because of the different density of INs between them; the agonist or the antagonist of INs can increase or decrease APD leading to the enhancement or reduction of EAD genesis in SVC cardiomyocytes. INs in rabbit myocytes is fairly similar to TRPC3 current in electrophysiological property, which might play an important role in the mechanisms of AF.

  13. Biophysical foundations for the study of the electrical excitability and action potential propagation in myocardium

    The electric current flow in the heterogeneous and anysotropic volume conductor of the myocardium is studied. The equations of bidomain theory are derived using an approach framed in the theory of averaged fields, introducing microscopic, mesoscopic and macroscopic spatial scales. However, the procedure, compatible with the histological and the anatomical details of the organ, is different from the multiple scale asymptotic expansions usually applied in homogeneization problems. A probabilistic approach framed in large numbers theorems is used to derive the equation for membrane ionic current from the stochastic activity of the channels at the microscopic level. An operational procedure suitable to define a sharp bidomain boundary from the fuzzy distribution of structural details and physical properties at the histological level is given. The problem of threshold is studied. The sizes and shapes of critical masses of cardiac cells that must be depolarized above threshold in order to produce a propagated action potential are determined by an approximate analytical procedure. The concept of family of threshold patterns for the emergence of action potentials in the heart is introduced. This concept is applied to discuss the conditions of emergence of ectopic focus. Analytical formulae are derived, for the time constant and the rheobase for electrical stimulation of the myocardium. These formulae are in good agreement with known experimental results. New experiments that could be done to confirm or reject them are suggested

  14. Ventricular filling slows epicardial conduction and increases action potential duration in an optical mapping study of the isolated rabbit heart

    Sung, Derrick; Mills, Robert W.; Schettler, Jan; Narayan, Sanjiv M.; Omens, Jeffrey H.; McCulloch, Andrew D.; McCullough, A. D. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Mechanical stimulation can induce electrophysiologic changes in cardiac myocytes, but how mechanoelectric feedback in the intact heart affects action potential propagation remains unclear. METHODS AND RESULTS: Changes in action potential propagation and repolarization with increased left ventricular end-diastolic pressure from 0 to 30 mmHg were investigated using optical mapping in isolated perfused rabbit hearts. With respect to 0 mmHg, epicardial strain at 30 mmHg in the anterior left ventricle averaged 0.040 +/- 0.004 in the muscle fiber direction and 0.032 +/- 0.006 in the cross-fiber direction. An increase in ventricular loading increased average epicardial activation time by 25%+/- 3% (P action potential duration at 20% repolarization (APD20) but did at 80% repolarization (APD80), from 179 +/- 7 msec to 207 +/- 5 msec (P action potential duration by a load-dependent mechanism that may not involve stretch-activated channels.

  15. The Belem Framework for Action: Harnessing the Power and Potential of Adult Learning and Education for a Viable Future

    Adult Learning, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the Belem Framework for Action. This framework focuses on harnessing the power and potential of adult learning and education for a viable future. This framework begins with a preamble on adult education and towards lifelong learning.

  16. Regulation of action potential waveforms by axonal GABAA receptors in cortical pyramidal neurons.

    Yang Xia

    Full Text Available GABAA receptors distributed in somatodendritic compartments play critical roles in regulating neuronal activities, including spike timing and firing pattern; however, the properties and functions of GABAA receptors at the axon are still poorly understood. By recording from the cut end (bleb of the main axon trunk of layer -5 pyramidal neurons in prefrontal cortical slices, we found that currents evoked by GABA iontophoresis could be blocked by picrotoxin, indicating the expression of GABAA receptors in axons. Stationary noise analysis revealed that single-channel properties of axonal GABAA receptors were similar to those of somatic receptors. Perforated patch recording with gramicidin revealed that the reversal potential of the GABA response was more negative than the resting membrane potential at the axon trunk, suggesting that GABA may hyperpolarize the axonal membrane potential. Further experiments demonstrated that the activation of axonal GABAA receptors regulated the amplitude and duration of action potentials (APs and decreased the AP-induced Ca2+ transients at the axon. Together, our results indicate that the waveform of axonal APs and the downstream Ca2+ signals are modulated by axonal GABAA receptors.

  17. Action potential-simulated weak electric fields can directly initiate myelination

    Lei Liu; Shifu Zhao; Haiming Wang

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Myelination is a process whereby glial cells identify, adhere, wrap and enclose axons to form a spiral myelin sheath.OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of action potential-simulated weak electric fields on myelination in the central nervous system.DESIGN AND SETTING: This single-sample observation study was performed at the 324 Hospital of Chinese PLA.MATERIALS: Two 5 μm carbon fibers were provided by the Institute of Neuroscience, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences. One Sprague Dawley rat, aged 1 day, was used.METHODS: Cerebral cortex was harvested from the rat to prepare a suspension [(1-2)×105/mL] containing neurons and glial cells. To simulate the axon, carbon fibers were placed at the bottom of the neuron-glial cell coculture dish, and were electrified with a single phase square wave current, 1×10-2, 1×10-3, 1×10-4, and 1×10-5 seconds, 1 Hz, 40 mV, and 10 μA, 30 minutes each, once aday for 10 consecutive days to simulate weak negative electric fields during action potential conduction.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Glial cell growth and wrapping of carbon fibers were observed by phase contrast microscopy and immunohistochemistry.RESULTS: On culture day 7, cell groups were found to adhere to negative carbon fibers in the 1×10-3 seconds square wave group. Cell membrane-like substances grew out of cell groups, wrapped the carbon fibers, and stretched to the ends of carbon fibers. Only some small and round cells close to negative carbon fibers were found on culture day 12. In the 1×10-4 and 1×10-3 seconds square wave groups, the negative carbon fibers were wrapped by oligodendrocytes or their progenitor cells.CONCLUSION: The local negative electric field which is generated by action potentials at 1×(10-4-10-3)seconds, 40 mV can directly initiate and participate in myelination in the central nervous system.

  18. Hindsight Bias.

    Roese, Neal J; Vohs, Kathleen D

    2012-09-01

    Hindsight bias occurs when people feel that they "knew it all along," that is, when they believe that an event is more predictable after it becomes known than it was before it became known. Hindsight bias embodies any combination of three aspects: memory distortion, beliefs about events' objective likelihoods, or subjective beliefs about one's own prediction abilities. Hindsight bias stems from (a) cognitive inputs (people selectively recall information consistent with what they now know to be true and engage in sensemaking to impose meaning on their own knowledge), (b) metacognitive inputs (the ease with which a past outcome is understood may be misattributed to its assumed prior likelihood), and (c) motivational inputs (people have a need to see the world as orderly and predictable and to avoid being blamed for problems). Consequences of hindsight bias include myopic attention to a single causal understanding of the past (to the neglect of other reasonable explanations) as well as general overconfidence in the certainty of one's judgments. New technologies for visualizing and understanding data sets may have the unintended consequence of heightening hindsight bias, but an intervention that encourages people to consider alternative causal explanations for a given outcome can reduce hindsight bias. PMID:26168501

  19. Intracellular recordings of action potentials by an extracellular nanoscale field-effect transistor

    Duan, Xiaojie; Gao, Ruixuan; Xie, Ping; Cohen-Karni, Tzahi; Qing, Quan; Choe, Hwan Sung; Tian, Bozhi; Jiang, Xiaocheng; Lieber, Charles M.

    2012-03-01

    The ability to make electrical measurements inside cells has led to many important advances in electrophysiology. The patch clamp technique, in which a glass micropipette filled with electrolyte is inserted into a cell, offers both high signal-to-noise ratio and temporal resolution. Ideally, the micropipette should be as small as possible to increase the spatial resolution and reduce the invasiveness of the measurement, but the overall performance of the technique depends on the impedance of the interface between the micropipette and the cell interior, which limits how small the micropipette can be. Techniques that involve inserting metal or carbon microelectrodes into cells are subject to similar constraints. Field-effect transistors (FETs) can also record electric potentials inside cells, and because their performance does not depend on impedance, they can be made much smaller than micropipettes and microelectrodes. Moreover, FET arrays are better suited for multiplexed measurements. Previously, we have demonstrated FET-based intracellular recording with kinked nanowire structures, but the kink configuration and device design places limits on the probe size and the potential for multiplexing. Here, we report a new approach in which a SiO2 nanotube is synthetically integrated on top of a nanoscale FET. This nanotube penetrates the cell membrane, bringing the cell cytosol into contact with the FET, which is then able to record the intracellular transmembrane potential. Simulations show that the bandwidth of this branched intracellular nanotube FET (BIT-FET) is high enough for it to record fast action potentials even when the nanotube diameter is decreased to 3 nm, a length scale well below that accessible with other methods. Studies of cardiomyocyte cells demonstrate that when phospholipid-modified BIT-FETs are brought close to cells, the nanotubes can spontaneously penetrate the cell membrane to allow the full-amplitude intracellular action potential to be

  20. Cancer Driver Log (CanDL): Catalog of Potentially Actionable Cancer Mutations.

    Damodaran, Senthilkumar; Miya, Jharna; Kautto, Esko; Zhu, Eliot; Samorodnitsky, Eric; Datta, Jharna; Reeser, Julie W; Roychowdhury, Sameek

    2015-09-01

    Massively parallel sequencing technologies have enabled characterization of genomic alterations across multiple tumor types. Efforts have focused on identifying driver mutations because they represent potential targets for therapy. However, because of the presence of driver and passenger mutations, it is often challenging to assign the clinical relevance of specific mutations observed in patients. Currently, there are multiple databases and tools that provide in silico assessment for potential drivers; however, there is no comprehensive resource for mutations with functional characterization. Therefore, we created an expert-curated database of potentially actionable driver mutations for molecular pathologists to facilitate annotation of cancer genomic testing. We reviewed scientific literature to identify variants that have been functionally characterized in vitro or in vivo as driver mutations. We obtained the chromosome location and all possible nucleotide positions for each amino acid change and uploaded them to the Cancer Driver Log (CanDL) database with associated literature reference indicating functional driver evidence. In addition to a simple interface, the database allows users to download all or selected genes as a comma-separated values file for incorporation into their own analysis pipeline. Furthermore, the database includes a mechanism for third-party contributions to support updates for novel driver mutations. Overall, this freely available database will facilitate rapid annotation of cancer genomic testing in molecular pathology laboratories for mutations. PMID:26320871

  1. Electrophysiological Motor Unit Number Estimation (MUNE) Measuring Compound Muscle Action Potential (CMAP) in Mouse Hindlimb Muscles.

    Arnold, W David; Sheth, Kajri A; Wier, Christopher G; Kissel, John T; Burghes, Arthur H; Kolb, Stephen J

    2015-01-01

    Compound muscle action potential (CMAP) and motor unit number estimation (MUNE) are electrophysiological techniques that can be used to monitor the functional status of a motor unit pool in vivo. These measures can provide insight into the normal development and degeneration of the neuromuscular system. These measures have clear translational potential because they are routinely applied in diagnostic and clinical human studies. We present electrophysiological techniques similar to those employed in humans to allow recordings of mouse sciatic nerve function. The CMAP response represents the electrophysiological output from a muscle or group of muscles following supramaximal stimulation of a peripheral nerve. MUNE is an electrophysiological technique that is based on modifications of the CMAP response. MUNE is a calculated value that represents the estimated number of motor neurons or axons (motor control input) supplying the muscle or group of muscles being tested. We present methods for recording CMAP responses from the proximal leg muscles using surface recording electrodes following the stimulation of the sciatic nerve in mice. An incremental MUNE technique is described using submaximal stimuli to determine the average single motor unit potential (SMUP) size. MUNE is calculated by dividing the CMAP amplitude (peak-to-peak) by the SMUP amplitude (peak-to-peak). These electrophysiological techniques allow repeated measures in both neonatal and adult mice in such a manner that facilitates rapid analysis and data collection while reducing the number of animals required for experimental testing. Furthermore, these measures are similar to those recorded in human studies allowing more direct comparisons. PMID:26436455

  2. Optical magnetic detection of single-neuron action potentials using quantum defects in diamond

    Barry, J F; Schloss, J M; Glenn, D R; Song, Y; Lukin, M D; Park, H; Walsworth, R L

    2016-01-01

    A key challenge for neuroscience is noninvasive, label-free sensing of action potential (AP) dynamics in whole organisms with single-neuron resolution. Here, we present a new approach to this problem: using nitrogen-vacancy (NV) quantum defects in diamond to measure the time-dependent magnetic fields produced by single-neuron APs. Our technique has a unique combination of features: (i) it is noninvasive, as the light that probes the NV sensors stays within the biocompatible diamond chip and does not enter the organism, enabling activity monitoring over extended periods; (ii) it is label-free and should be widely applicable to most organisms; (iii) it provides high spatial and temporal resolution, allowing precise measurement of the AP waveforms and conduction velocities of individual neurons; (iv) it directly determines AP propagation direction through the inherent sensitivity of NVs to the associated AP magnetic field vector; (v) it is applicable to neurons located within optically opaque tissue or whole org...

  3. Anthropomorphizing the Mouse Cardiac Action Potential via a Novel Dynamic Clamp Method

    Ahrens-Nicklas, Rebecca C.; Christini, David J.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Interspecies differences can limit the translational value of excitable cells isolated from model organisms. It can be difficult to extrapolate from a drug- or mutation-induced phenotype in mice to human pathophysiology because mouse and human cardiac electrodynamics differ greatly. We present a hybrid computational-experimental technique, the cell-type transforming clamp, which is designed to overcome such differences by using a calculated compensatory current to convert the macroscopic electrical behavior of an isolated cell into that of a different cell type. We demonstrate the technique's utility by evaluating drug arrhythmogenicity in murine cardiomyocytes that are transformed to behave like human myocytes. Whereas we use the cell-type transforming clamp in this work to convert between mouse and human electrodynamics, the technique could be adapted to convert between the action potential morphologies of any two cell types of interest. PMID:19917221

  4. Effect of sampling frequency on the measurement of phase-locked action potentials.

    Go eAshida

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Phase-locked spikes in various types of neurons encode temporal information. To quantify the degree of phase-locking, the metric called vector strength (VS has been most widely used. Since VS is derived from spike timing information, error in measurement of spike occurrence should result in errors in VS calculation. In electrophysiological experiments, the timing of an action potential is detected with finite temporal precision, which is determined by the sampling frequency. In order to evaluate the effects of the sampling frequency on the measurement of VS, we derive theoretical upper and lower bounds of VS from spikes collected with finite sampling rates. We next estimate errors in VS assuming random sampling effects, and show that our theoretical calculation agrees with data from electrophysiological recordings in vivo. Our results provide a practical guide for choosing the appropriate sampling frequency in measuring VS.

  5. BK channels regulate spontaneous action potential rhythmicity in the suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    Jack Kent

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Circadian ( approximately 24 hr rhythms are generated by the central pacemaker localized to the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN of the hypothalamus. Although the basis for intrinsic rhythmicity is generally understood to rely on transcription factors encoded by "clock genes", less is known about the daily regulation of SCN neuronal activity patterns that communicate a circadian time signal to downstream behaviors and physiological systems. Action potentials in the SCN are necessary for the circadian timing of behavior, and individual SCN neurons modulate their spontaneous firing rate (SFR over the daily cycle, suggesting that the circadian patterning of neuronal activity is necessary for normal behavioral rhythm expression. The BK K(+ channel plays an important role in suppressing spontaneous firing at night in SCN neurons. Deletion of the Kcnma1 gene, encoding the BK channel, causes degradation of circadian behavioral and physiological rhythms. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To test the hypothesis that loss of robust behavioral rhythmicity in Kcnma1(-/- mice is due to the disruption of SFR rhythms in the SCN, we used multi-electrode arrays to record extracellular action potentials from acute wild-type (WT and Kcnma1(-/- slices. Patterns of activity in the SCN were tracked simultaneously for up to 3 days, and the phase, period, and synchronization of SFR rhythms were examined. Loss of BK channels increased arrhythmicity but also altered the amplitude and period of rhythmic activity. Unexpectedly, Kcnma1(-/- SCNs showed increased variability in the timing of the daily SFR peak. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that BK channels regulate multiple aspects of the circadian patterning of neuronal activity in the SCN. In addition, these data illustrate the characteristics of a disrupted SCN rhythm downstream of clock gene-mediated timekeeping and its relationship to behavioral rhythms.

  6. Modulation of hERG potassium channel gating normalizes action potential duration prolonged by dysfunctional KCNQ1 potassium channel

    Zhang, Hongkang; Zou, Beiyan; Yu, Haibo; Moretti, Alessandra; Wang, Xiaoying; Yan, Wei; Babcock, Joseph J.; Bellin, Milena; McManus, Owen B.; Tomaselli, Gordon; Nan, Fajun; Laugwitz, Karl-Ludwig; Li, Min

    2012-01-01

    Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a genetic disease characterized by a prolonged QT interval in an electrocardiogram (ECG), leading to higher risk of sudden cardiac death. Among the 12 identified genes causal to heritable LQTS, ∼90% of affected individuals harbor mutations in either KCNQ1 or human ether-a-go-go related genes (hERG), which encode two repolarizing potassium currents known as IKs and IKr. The ability to quantitatively assess contributions of different current components is therefore important for investigating disease phenotypes and testing effectiveness of pharmacological modulation. Here we report a quantitative analysis by simulating cardiac action potentials of cultured human cardiomyocytes to match the experimental waveforms of both healthy control and LQT syndrome type 1 (LQT1) action potentials. The quantitative evaluation suggests that elevation of IKr by reducing voltage sensitivity of inactivation, not via slowing of deactivation, could more effectively restore normal QT duration if IKs is reduced. Using a unique specific chemical activator for IKr that has a primary effect of causing a right shift of V1/2 for inactivation, we then examined the duration changes of autonomous action potentials from differentiated human cardiomyocytes. Indeed, this activator causes dose-dependent shortening of the action potential durations and is able to normalize action potentials of cells of patients with LQT1. In contrast, an IKr chemical activator of primary effects in slowing channel deactivation was not effective in modulating action potential durations. Our studies provide both the theoretical basis and experimental support for compensatory normalization of action potential duration by a pharmacological agent. PMID:22745159

  7. Calcium Transients Closely Reflect Prolonged Action Potentials in iPSC Models of Inherited Cardiac Arrhythmia

    C. Ian Spencer

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Long-QT syndrome mutations can cause syncope and sudden death by prolonging the cardiac action potential (AP. Ion channels affected by mutations are various, and the influences of cellular calcium cycling on LQTS cardiac events are unknown. To better understand LQTS arrhythmias, we performed current-clamp and intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i measurements on cardiomyocytes differentiated from patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS-CM. In myocytes carrying an LQT2 mutation (HERG-A422T, APs and [Ca2+]i transients were prolonged in parallel. APs were abbreviated by nifedipine exposure and further lengthened upon releasing intracellularly stored Ca2+. Validating this model, control iPS-CM treated with HERG-blocking drugs recapitulated the LQT2 phenotype. In LQT3 iPS-CM, expressing NaV1.5-N406K, APs and [Ca2+]i transients were markedly prolonged. AP prolongation was sensitive to tetrodotoxin and to inhibiting Na+-Ca2+ exchange. These results suggest that LQTS mutations act partly on cytosolic Ca2+ cycling, potentially providing a basis for functionally targeted interventions regardless of the specific mutation site.

  8. Variability of Action Potentials Within and Among Cardiac Cell Clusters Derived from Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

    Zhu, Renjun; Millrod, Michal A; Zambidis, Elias T; Tung, Leslie

    2016-01-01

    Electrophysiological variability in cardiomyocytes derived from pluripotent stem cells continues to be an impediment for their scientific and translational applications. We studied the variability of action potentials (APs) recorded from clusters of human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hESC-CMs) using high-resolution optical mapping. Over 23,000 APs were analyzed through four parameters: APD30, APD80, triangulation and fractional repolarization. Although measures were taken to reduce variability due to cell culture conditions and rate-dependency of APs, we still observed significant variability in APs among and within the clusters. However, similar APs were found in spatial locations with close proximity, and in some clusters formed distinct regions having different AP characteristics that were reflected as separate peaks in the AP parameter distributions, suggesting multiple electrophysiological phenotypes. Using a recently developed automated method to group cells based on their entire AP shape, we identified distinct regions of different phenotypes within single clusters and common phenotypes across different clusters when separating APs into 2 or 3 subpopulations. The systematic analysis of the heterogeneity and potential phenotypes of large populations of hESC-CMs can be used to evaluate strategies to improve the quality of pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes for use in diagnostic and therapeutic applications and in drug screening. PMID:26729331

  9. Optimisation of Ionic Models to Fit Tissue Action Potentials: Application to 3D Atrial Modelling

    Amr Al Abed

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 3D model of atrial electrical activity has been developed with spatially heterogeneous electrophysiological properties. The atrial geometry, reconstructed from the male Visible Human dataset, included gross anatomical features such as the central and peripheral sinoatrial node (SAN, intra-atrial connections, pulmonary veins, inferior and superior vena cava, and the coronary sinus. Membrane potentials of myocytes from spontaneously active or electrically paced in vitro rabbit cardiac tissue preparations were recorded using intracellular glass microelectrodes. Action potentials of central and peripheral SAN, right and left atrial, and pulmonary vein myocytes were each fitted using a generic ionic model having three phenomenological ionic current components: one time-dependent inward, one time-dependent outward, and one leakage current. To bridge the gap between the single-cell ionic models and the gross electrical behaviour of the 3D whole-atrial model, a simplified 2D tissue disc with heterogeneous regions was optimised to arrive at parameters for each cell type under electrotonic load. Parameters were then incorporated into the 3D atrial model, which as a result exhibited a spontaneously active SAN able to rhythmically excite the atria. The tissue-based optimisation of ionic models and the modelling process outlined are generic and applicable to image-based computer reconstruction and simulation of excitable tissue.

  10. Optophysiological approach to resolve neuronal action potentials with high spatial and temporal resolution in cultured neurons

    Stephane ePages

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Cell to cell communication in the central nervous system is encoded into transient and local membrane potential changes (ΔVm. Deciphering the rules that govern synaptic transmission and plasticity entails to be able to perform Vm recordings throughout the entire neuronal arborization. Classical electrophysiology is, in most cases, not able to do so within small and fragile neuronal subcompartments. Thus, optical techniques based on the use of fluorescent voltage-sensitive dyes (VSDs have been developed. However, reporting spontaneous or small ΔVm from neuronal ramifications has been challenging, in part due to the limited sensitivity and phototoxicity of VSD-based optical measurements. Here we demonstrate the use of water soluble VSD, ANNINE-6plus, with laser scanning microscopy to optically record ΔVm in cultured neurons. We show that the sensitivity (> 10 % of fluorescence change for 100 mV depolarization and time response (submillisecond of the dye allows the robust detection of action potentials (APs even without averaging, allowing the measurement of spontaneous neuronal firing patterns. In addition, we show that back-propagating APs can be recorded, along distinct dendritic sites and within dendritic spines. Importantly, our approach does not induce any detectable phototoxic effect on cultured neurons. This optophysiological approach provides a simple, minimally invasive and versatile optical method to measure electrical activity in cultured neurons with high temporal (ms resolution and high spatial (µm resolution.

  11. Small-conductance calcium-activated potassium (SK) channels contribute to action potential repolarization in human atria

    Skibsbye, Lasse; Poulet, Claire; Diness, Jonas Goldin;

    2014-01-01

    (+) currents by ∼15% and prolonged action potential duration (APD), but no effect was observed in myocytes from AF patients. In trabeculae muscle strips from right atrial appendages of SR patients, both compounds increased APD and effective refractory period, and depolarized the resting membrane potential...

  12. Potential involvement of serotonergic signaling in ketamine's antidepressant actions: A critical review.

    du Jardin, Kristian Gaarn; Müller, Heidi Kaastrup; Elfving, Betina; Dale, Elena; Wegener, Gregers; Sanchez, Connie

    2016-11-01

    A single i.v. infusion of ketamine, classified as an N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, may alleviate depressive symptoms within hours of administration in treatment resistant depressed patients, and the antidepressant effect may last for several weeks. These unique therapeutic properties have prompted researchers to explore the mechanisms mediating the antidepressant effects of ketamine, but despite many efforts, no consensus on its antidepressant mechanism of action has been reached. Recent preclinical reports have associated the neurotransmitter serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) with the antidepressant-like action of ketamine. Here, we review the current evidence for a serotonergic role in ketamine's antidepressant effects. The pharmacological profile of ketamine may include equipotent activity on several non-NMDA targets, and the current hypotheses for the mechanisms responsible for ketamine's antidepressant activity do not appear to preclude the possibility that non-glutamate neurotransmitters are involved in the antidepressant effects. At multiple levels, the serotonergic and glutamatergic systems interact, and such crosstalk could support the notion that changes in serotonergic neurotransmission may impact ketamine's antidepressant potential. In line with these prospects, ketamine may increase 5-HT levels in the prefrontal cortex of rats, plausibly via hippocampal NMDA receptor inhibition and activation of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) receptors. In addition, a number of preclinical studies suggest that the antidepressant-like effects of ketamine may depend on endogenous activation of 5-HT receptors. Recent imaging and behavioral data predominantly support a role for 5-HT1A or 5-HT1B receptors, but the full range of 5-HT receptors has currently not been systematically investigated in this context. Furthermore, the nature of any 5-HT dependent mechanism in ketamine's antidepressant effect is currently not

  13. CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES OF LARGE AMPLITUDE ACTION POTENTIAL OF THE SUFFERED FACIAL MUSCLES IN INTRATEMPORAL FACIAL NERVE PARALYSIS

    1999-01-01

    Ojective. To testify the phenomenon that large amplitude action potential appears at the early stage of facial paralysis, and to search for the mechanism through clinical and experimental studies. Patients(animals) and methods. The action potentials of the orbicular ocular and oral muscles were recorded in 34 normal persons by electromyogram instruments. The normal range of amplitude percentage was found out according to he normal distribution. One hundred patients with facial paralysis were also studied. The action potentials of facial muscles were recorded in 17 guinea pigs before and after the facial nerve was compressed and the facial nerve was examined under electromicroscope before and after the compression.Results. The amplitude percentage of the suffered ide to the healthy side was more than 153 percent in 6 of the 100 patients. Lare amplitude action potential ocured in 35 per cent guinea pigs which were performed the experiment of facial nrve compression. Electromicroscopic examination revealed separation of the lammae of the facial nerve's myelin sheath in the guinea pigs which exhibited large amplitude action potential.Conclusion. The facial nerve exhibited a temporary over-exciability at the early stage of facial nerve injury in some patients and guinea pigs. If the injury waslimited in the myelin sheath, te prognosis was relatively good.

  14. CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES OF LARGE AMPLITUDE ACTION POTENTIAL OF THE SUFFERED FACIAL MUSCLES IN INTRATEMPORAL FACIAL NERVE PARALYSIS

    任重; 惠莲

    1999-01-01

    Objctive. To testify the phenomenon that large amplitude action potential appears at the early stage oil facial paralysis, and to search for the mechanism through clinical and experimental studies. Patients(aninmls) and methods. The action potentials of the orbicular ocular and oral museles were recorded in 34 normal persons by electromyogram instrtiments. The normal range of amplitude percentage was found out according to the normal distribution, One hundred patients with facial paralysis were also studied. The action potentials of facial muscles were recorded ia 17 guinea pigs before and after the facial nerve was comp~ and the facial nerve was examined under electromicroscope before and after the compression.Results. The amplitude percentage of the suffered side to the healthy side was more than 153 percent in 6 of the 100 patients. Large amplitude action potential occured in 35 per cent guinea pigs which were performed the experiment of facial nerve compression. Electromicroscopic examination revealed separation of the lammae of the facial nerve's myelin sheath in the guinea pigs which exhibited large amplitude action potential Conclusion. The facial nerve exhibited a temporary over-excitability at the early stage of facial nerve injury in scane patients and guinea pigs. If the injury was limited in the myelin sheath, the prognods was relatively good.

  15. Surface electrocardiogram and action potential in mice lacking urea transporter UT-B

    2009-01-01

    UT-B is a urea transporter protein expressed in the kidney and in many non-renal tissues including erythrocytes, brain, heart, bladder and the testis. The objective of this study was to determine the phenotype of UT-B deletion in the heart. UT-B expression in the heart was studied in wild-type mice vs UT-B null mice by utilizing RT-PCR and Western blot. A surface electrocardiogram (ECG) recording (lead II) was measured in wild-type mice and UT-B null mice at the ages of 6, 16 and 52 weeks. For the action potential recording, the ventricular myocytes of 16 w mice were isolated and recorded by floating microelectrode method. The sodium current was recorded by the patch clamp technique. RT-PCR and Western blot showed the UT-B expression in the heart of wild-type mice. No UT-B transcript and protein was found in UT-B null mice. The ECG recording showed that the P-R interval was significantly prolonged in UT-B null mice ((43.5 ± 4.2), (45.5 ± 6.9) and (43.8 ± 7.6) ms at ages of 6, 16 and 52 weeks) vs wild-type mice ((38.6 ± 2.9), (38.7 ± 5.6) and (38.2 ± 7.3) ms, P<0.05). The atrial ventricular heart block type II and III only appeared in the aging UT-B null mice (52 w old). The amplitude of action potential and Vmax decreased significantly in UT-B null mice ((92.17 ± 10.56) and (101.89 ± 9.54) mV/s) vs those in wild-type mice (vs (110.51 ± 10.38) and (109.53 ± 10.64) mV/s, P<0.05). The action potential duration at 50% and 90% (APD50 and APD90) was significantly prolonged in UT-B null mice ((123.83 ± 11.17) and (195.43 ± 16.41) ms) vs that in wild-type mice ((108.27 ± 10.85) and (171.00 ± 15.53) ms, P<0.05). The maximal sodium current decreased significantly in UT-B null mice (-8.80 ± 0.92) nA vs that in wild-type mice ((-5.98 ± 1.07) nA, P<0.05). These results provide the first evidence that UT-B deletion causes progressive heart block in mice.

  16. Surface electrocardiogram and action potential in mice lacking urea transporter UT-B

    MENG Yan; ZHAO ChunYan; ZHANG XueXin; ZHAO HuaShan; GUO LiRong; Lü Bin; ZHAO XueJian; YANG BaoXue

    2009-01-01

    UT-B is a urea transporter protein expressed in the kidney and in many non-renal tissues including erythrocytes, brain, heart, bladder and the testis. The objective of this study was to determine the phenotype of UT-B deletion in the heart. UT-B expression in the heart was studied in wild-type mice vs UT-B null mice by utilizing RT-PCR and Western blot. A surface electrocardiogram (ECG) recording (lead Ⅱ) was measured in wild-type mice and UT-B null mice at the ages of 6, 16 and 52 weeks. For the action potential recording, the ventricular myocytes of 16 w mice were isolated and recorded by float-ing microelectrode method. The sodium current was recorded by the patch clamp technique. RT-PCR and Western blot showed the UT-B expression in the heart of wild-type mice. No UT-B transcript and protein was found in UT-B null mice. The ECG recording showed that the P-R interval was significantly prolonged in UT-B null mice ((43.5±4.2), (45.5±6.9) and (43.8±7.6) ms at ages of 6, 16 and 52 weeks) vs wild-type mice ((38.6±2.9), (38.7±5.6) and (38.2±7.3) ms, P<0.05). The atrial ventricular heart block type Ⅱ and Ⅲ only appeared in the aging UT-B null mice (52 w old). The amplitude of action potential and Vmax decreased significantly in UT-B null mice ((92.17±10.56) and (101.89±9.54) mV/s) vs those in wild-type mice (vs (110.51±10.38) and (109.53±10.64) mV/s, P<0.05). The action potential duration at 50% and 90% (APD50 and APD90) was significantly prolonged in UT-B null mice ((123.83±11.17) and (195.43±16.41) ms) vs that in wild-type mice ((108.27±10.85) and (171.00±15.53) ms, P<0.05). The maximal sodium current decreased significantly in UT-B null mice (-8.80±0.92) nA vs that in wild-type mice ((-5.98±1.07) nA, P<0.05). These results provide the first evidence that UT-B deletion causes progressive heart block in mice.

  17. Intention seekers: conspiracist ideation and biased attributions of intentionality.

    Brotherton, Robert; French, Christopher C

    2015-01-01

    Conspiracist beliefs are widespread and potentially hazardous. A growing body of research suggests that cognitive biases may play a role in endorsement of conspiracy theories. The current research examines the novel hypothesis that individuals who are biased towards inferring intentional explanations for ambiguous actions are more likely to endorse conspiracy theories, which portray events as the exclusive product of intentional agency. Study 1 replicated a previously observed relationship between conspiracist ideation and individual differences in anthropomorphisation. Studies 2 and 3 report a relationship between conspiracism and inferences of intentionality for imagined ambiguous events. Additionally, Study 3 again found conspiracist ideation to be predicted by individual differences in anthropomorphism. Contrary to expectations, however, the relationship was not mediated by the intentionality bias. The findings are discussed in terms of a domain-general intentionality bias making conspiracy theories appear particularly plausible. Alternative explanations are suggested for the association between conspiracism and anthropomorphism. PMID:25970175

  18. Intention seekers: conspiracist ideation and biased attributions of intentionality.

    Robert Brotherton

    Full Text Available Conspiracist beliefs are widespread and potentially hazardous. A growing body of research suggests that cognitive biases may play a role in endorsement of conspiracy theories. The current research examines the novel hypothesis that individuals who are biased towards inferring intentional explanations for ambiguous actions are more likely to endorse conspiracy theories, which portray events as the exclusive product of intentional agency. Study 1 replicated a previously observed relationship between conspiracist ideation and individual differences in anthropomorphisation. Studies 2 and 3 report a relationship between conspiracism and inferences of intentionality for imagined ambiguous events. Additionally, Study 3 again found conspiracist ideation to be predicted by individual differences in anthropomorphism. Contrary to expectations, however, the relationship was not mediated by the intentionality bias. The findings are discussed in terms of a domain-general intentionality bias making conspiracy theories appear particularly plausible. Alternative explanations are suggested for the association between conspiracism and anthropomorphism.

  19. Potential bias in testing for hyperprolactinemia and pituitary tumors in risperidone-treated patients: a claims-based study

    Wu Jasmanda; Mahmoud Ramy; Pandina Gahan; Gianfrancesco Frank D; Wang Ruey H

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background A reporting association of risperidone with pituitary tumors has been observed. Because such tumors are highly prevalent, there may be other reasons why they were revealed in association with risperidone treatment. We assessed two potential explanations: disproportionately more prolactin assessment and head/brain imaging in risperidone-treated patients vs patients treated with other antipsychotics. Methods Treatment episodes with risperidone, clozapine, olanzapine, quetiap...

  20. Cognitive Biases and Nonverbal Cue Availability in Detecting Deception

    Burgoon, Judee K.; Blair, J. Pete; Strom, Renee E.

    2008-01-01

    In potentially deceptive situations, people rely on mental shortcuts to help process information. These heuristic judgments are often biased and result in inaccurate assessments of sender veracity. Four such biases--truth bias, visual bias, demeanor bias, and expectancy violation bias--were examined in a judgment experiment that varied nonverbal…

  1. Potential effects of bias and nitrogen pressure on structural-stress state and properties of nitride coatings, obtained by evaporation of high-entropy alloys by vacuum arc

    A study of the influence of the negative bias potential and pressure of the atmosphere of nitrogen on the structural properties of the stress state and vacuum-arc nitride coatings. The comparison data for the three groups of coatings: 1 - (Ti, V, Zr, Nb, Hf) N, 2 - (Ti, V, Zr, Nb, Hf, Ta) N , and 3 - TiN. Excluding the drop component, multielement nitride coatings deposited in nitrogen are single phase with cubic fcc lattice (structural type NaCl). At the level of substructure in these coatings increase the nitrogen pressure leads to an increase in the crystallite size and micro strain relaxation , and increase the capacity of displacement - the opposite effect. The absolute value of micro deformation in such coatings is higher and the size of crystallites - less than mononitrides. Maximum hardness of 70 GPa achieved nitride coatings deposited by vacuum arc evaporation (Ti, V, Zr, Nb, Hf) alloy at a nitrogen pressure of 0.35 Pa

  2. Spin chemical potential bias induced surface current evidenced by spin pumping into the topological insulator B i2T e3

    Abdulahad, Faris Basheer; Lin, Jin-Han; Liou, Yung; Chiu, Wen-Kai; Chang, Liang-Juan; Kao, Ming-Yi; Liang, Jun-Zhi; Hung, Dung-Shing; Lee, Shang-Fan

    2015-12-01

    A spin chemical potential bias can induce a spin-polarized current by the exchange interaction of a ferromagnet with the spin-momentum locking surface states of the topological insulators. We carried out our ferromagnetic resonance experiment in a NiFe /B i2T e3 heterostructure. Apart from the enhanced Gilbert damping constant, we observed strong enhancement of the effective magnetic field at low temperatures. The enhanced field decreased exponentially with increasing temperature at an energy scale of 2.5 meV, representing the strength of the exchange coupling. We attribute the enhanced field to the induced spin-polarized current in the surface states of B i2T e3 .

  3. Unlearning Implicit Social Biases During Sleep **

    Hu, Xiaoqing; Antony, James W.; Creery, Jessica D.; Vargas, Iliana M.; Bodenhausen, Galen V.; Paller, Ken A.

    2015-01-01

    Although people may endorse egalitarianism and tolerance, social biases can remain operative and drive harmful actions in an unconscious manner. Here we investigated training to reduce implicit racial and gender bias. Forty participants processed counter-stereotype information paired with one sound for each type of bias. Biases were reduced immediately after training. During subsequent slow-wave sleep, one sound was unobtrusively presented to each participant, repeatedly, to reactivate one ty...

  4. The Venus Flytrap Dionaea muscipula Counts Prey-Induced Action Potentials to Induce Sodium Uptake

    Böhm, Jennifer; Scherzer, Sönke; Krol, Elzbieta; Kreuzer, Ines; von Meyer, Katharina; Lorey, Christian; Mueller, Thomas D.; Shabala, Lana; Monte, Isabel; Solano, Roberto; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A.S.; Rennenberg, Heinz; Shabala, Sergey; Neher, Erwin; Hedrich, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    Summary Carnivorous plants, such as the Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula), depend on an animal diet when grown in nutrient-poor soils. When an insect visits the trap and tilts the mechanosensors on the inner surface, action potentials (APs) are fired. After a moving object elicits two APs, the trap snaps shut, encaging the victim. Panicking preys repeatedly touch the trigger hairs over the subsequent hours, leading to a hermetically closed trap, which via the gland-based endocrine system is flooded by a prey-decomposing acidic enzyme cocktail. Here, we asked the question as to how many times trigger hairs have to be stimulated (e.g., now many APs are required) for the flytrap to recognize an encaged object as potential food, thus making it worthwhile activating the glands. By applying a series of trigger-hair stimulations, we found that the touch hormone jasmonic acid (JA) signaling pathway is activated after the second stimulus, while more than three APs are required to trigger an expression of genes encoding prey-degrading hydrolases, and that this expression is proportional to the number of mechanical stimulations. A decomposing animal contains a sodium load, and we have found that these sodium ions enter the capture organ via glands. We identified a flytrap sodium channel DmHKT1 as responsible for this sodium acquisition, with the number of transcripts expressed being dependent on the number of mechano-electric stimulations. Hence, the number of APs a victim triggers while trying to break out of the trap identifies the moving prey as a struggling Na+-rich animal and nutrition for the plant. Video Abstract PMID:26804557

  5. MCH and apomorphine in combination enhance action potential firing of nucleus accumbens shell neurons in vitro

    F Woodward Hopf

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The MCH and dopamine receptor systems have been shown to modulate a number of behaviors related to reward processing, addiction, and neuropsychiatric conditions such as schizophrenia and depression. In addition, MCH and dopamine receptors can interact in a positive manner, for example in the expression of cocaine self-administration. A recent report (Chung et al., 2011a showed that the DA1/DA2 dopamine receptor activator apomorphine suppresses pre-pulse inhibition, a preclinical model for some aspects of schizophrenia. Importantly, MCH can enhance the effects of lower doses of apomorphine, suggesting that co-modulation of dopamine and MCH receptors might alleviate some symptoms of schizophrenia with a lower dose of dopamine receptor modulator and thus fewer potential side effects. Here, we investigated whether MCH and apomorphine could enhance action potential firing in vitro in the nucleus accumbens shell (NAshell, a region which has previously been shown to mediate some behavioral effects of MCH. Using whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology, we found that MCH, which has no effect on firing on its own, was able to increase NAshell firing when combined with a subthreshold dose of apomorphine. Further, this MCH/apomorphine increase in firing was prevented by an antagonist of either a DA1 or a DA2 receptor, suggesting that apomorphine acts through both receptor types to enhance NAshell firing. The MCH/apomorphine-mediated firing increase was also prevented by an MCH receptor antagonist or a PKA inhibitor. Taken together, our results suggest that MCH can interact with lower doses of apomorphine to enhance NAshell firing, and thus that MCH and apomorphine might interact in vivo within the NAshell to suppress pre-pulse inhibition.

  6. The Venus Flytrap Dionaea muscipula Counts Prey-Induced Action Potentials to Induce Sodium Uptake.

    Böhm, Jennifer; Scherzer, Sönke; Krol, Elzbieta; Kreuzer, Ines; von Meyer, Katharina; Lorey, Christian; Mueller, Thomas D; Shabala, Lana; Monte, Isabel; Solano, Roberto; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A S; Rennenberg, Heinz; Shabala, Sergey; Neher, Erwin; Hedrich, Rainer

    2016-02-01

    Carnivorous plants, such as the Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula), depend on an animal diet when grown in nutrient-poor soils. When an insect visits the trap and tilts the mechanosensors on the inner surface, action potentials (APs) are fired. After a moving object elicits two APs, the trap snaps shut, encaging the victim. Panicking preys repeatedly touch the trigger hairs over the subsequent hours, leading to a hermetically closed trap, which via the gland-based endocrine system is flooded by a prey-decomposing acidic enzyme cocktail. Here, we asked the question as to how many times trigger hairs have to be stimulated (e.g., now many APs are required) for the flytrap to recognize an encaged object as potential food, thus making it worthwhile activating the glands. By applying a series of trigger-hair stimulations, we found that the touch hormone jasmonic acid (JA) signaling pathway is activated after the second stimulus, while more than three APs are required to trigger an expression of genes encoding prey-degrading hydrolases, and that this expression is proportional to the number of mechanical stimulations. A decomposing animal contains a sodium load, and we have found that these sodium ions enter the capture organ via glands. We identified a flytrap sodium channel DmHKT1 as responsible for this sodium acquisition, with the number of transcripts expressed being dependent on the number of mechano-electric stimulations. Hence, the number of APs a victim triggers while trying to break out of the trap identifies the moving prey as a struggling Na(+)-rich animal and nutrition for the plant. PMID:26804557

  7. Burst analysis tool for developing neuronal networks exhibiting highly varying action potential dynamics

    Fikret Emre eKapucu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we propose a firing statistics based neuronal network burst detection algorithm for neuronal networks exhibiting highly variable action potential dynamics. Electrical activity of neuronal networks is generally analyzed by the occurrences of spikes and bursts both in time and space. Commonly accepted analysis tools employ burst detection algorithms based on predefined criteria. However, maturing neuronal networks, such as those originating from human embryonic stem cells (hESC, exhibit highly variable network structure and time-varying dynamics. To explore the developing burst/spike activities of such networks, we propose a burst detection algorithm which utilizes the firing statistics based on interspike interval (ISI histograms. Moreover, the algorithm calculates interspike interval thresholds for burst spikes as well as for pre-burst spikes and burst tails by evaluating the cumulative moving average and skewness of the ISI histogram. Because of the adaptive nature of the proposed algorithm, its analysis power is not limited by the type of neuronal cell network at hand. We demonstrate the functionality of our algorithm with two different types of microelectrode array (MEA data recorded from spontaneously active hESC-derived neuronal cell networks. The same data was also analyzed by two commonly employed burst detection algorithms and the differences in burst detection results are illustrated. The results demonstrate that our method is both adaptive to the firing statistics of the network and yields successful burst detection from the data. In conclusion, the proposed method is a potential tool for analyzing of hESC-derived neuronal cell networks and thus can be utilized in studies aiming to understand the development and functioning of human neuronal networks and as an analysis tool for in vitro drug screening and neurotoxicity assays.

  8. Action potential energy efficiency varies among neuron types in vertebrates and invertebrates.

    Sengupta, Biswa; Stemmler, Martin; Laughlin, Simon B; Niven, Jeremy E

    2010-01-01

    The initiation and propagation of action potentials (APs) places high demands on the energetic resources of neural tissue. Each AP forces ATP-driven ion pumps to work harder to restore the ionic concentration gradients, thus consuming more energy. Here, we ask whether the ionic currents underlying the AP can be predicted theoretically from the principle of minimum energy consumption. A long-held supposition that APs are energetically wasteful, based on theoretical analysis of the squid giant axon AP, has recently been overturned by studies that measured the currents contributing to the AP in several mammalian neurons. In the single compartment models studied here, AP energy consumption varies greatly among vertebrate and invertebrate neurons, with several mammalian neuron models using close to the capacitive minimum of energy needed. Strikingly, energy consumption can increase by more than ten-fold simply by changing the overlap of the Na(+) and K(+) currents during the AP without changing the APs shape. As a consequence, the height and width of the AP are poor predictors of energy consumption. In the Hodgkin-Huxley model of the squid axon, optimizing the kinetics or number of Na(+) and K(+) channels can whittle down the number of ATP molecules needed for each AP by a factor of four. In contrast to the squid AP, the temporal profile of the currents underlying APs of some mammalian neurons are nearly perfectly matched to the optimized properties of ionic conductances so as to minimize the ATP cost. PMID:20617202

  9. Action potential energy efficiency varies among neuron types in vertebrates and invertebrates.

    Biswa Sengupta

    Full Text Available The initiation and propagation of action potentials (APs places high demands on the energetic resources of neural tissue. Each AP forces ATP-driven ion pumps to work harder to restore the ionic concentration gradients, thus consuming more energy. Here, we ask whether the ionic currents underlying the AP can be predicted theoretically from the principle of minimum energy consumption. A long-held supposition that APs are energetically wasteful, based on theoretical analysis of the squid giant axon AP, has recently been overturned by studies that measured the currents contributing to the AP in several mammalian neurons. In the single compartment models studied here, AP energy consumption varies greatly among vertebrate and invertebrate neurons, with several mammalian neuron models using close to the capacitive minimum of energy needed. Strikingly, energy consumption can increase by more than ten-fold simply by changing the overlap of the Na(+ and K(+ currents during the AP without changing the APs shape. As a consequence, the height and width of the AP are poor predictors of energy consumption. In the Hodgkin-Huxley model of the squid axon, optimizing the kinetics or number of Na(+ and K(+ channels can whittle down the number of ATP molecules needed for each AP by a factor of four. In contrast to the squid AP, the temporal profile of the currents underlying APs of some mammalian neurons are nearly perfectly matched to the optimized properties of ionic conductances so as to minimize the ATP cost.

  10. Sensitivity analysis of potential events affecting the double-shell tank system and fallback actions

    Knutson, B.J.

    1996-09-27

    Sensitivity analyses were performed for fall-back positions (i.e., management actions) to accommodate potential off-normal and programmatic change events overlaid on the waste volume projections and their uncertainties. These sensitivity analyses allowed determining and ranking tank system high-risk parameters and fall- back positions that will accommodate the respective impacts. This quantification of tank system impacts shows periods where tank capacity is sensitive to certain variables that must be carefully managed and/or evaluated. Identifying these sensitive variables and quantifying their impact will allow decision makers to prepare fall-back positions and focus available resources on the highest impact parameters where technical data are needed to reduce waste projection uncertainties. For noncomplexed waste, the period of capacity vulnerability occurs during the years of single-shell tank (SST) retrieval (after approximately 2009) due to the sensitivity to several variables. Ranked by importance these variables include the pretreatment rate and 200-East SST solids transfer volume. For complexed waste, the period of capacity vulnerability occurs during the period after approximately 2005 due to the sensitivity to several variables. Ranked by importance these variables include the pretreatment rate. 200-East SST solids transfer volume. complexed waste reduction factor using evaporation, and 200-west saltwell liquid porosity.

  11. The transformative potential of action research and ICT in the Second Language (L2 classroom

    Farren Margaret

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study shows the transformative potential of action research and information and communications technology (ICT in the second language (L2 classroom. Two enquiries from teacher-researchers are detailed in the article. Their engagement in a collaborative professional development Masters programme was pivotal in designing and implementing ICT creatively in their classroom. Gee (2008 advocates the use of the preferred media of our classroom students in order to address their learning. Prensky (2001 urges us to feel the fear and do it anyway with our digital native classes. A post-primary teacher and a primary teacher show us how they felt the fear, did it and transformed aspects of their own teaching in the process. The Masters programme required the teachers to engage with innovative practices, informed by their own values, and integrate technologies that were new to them into their repertoire of classroom strategies. Peer validation meetings with colleagues enabled meaningful insights to emerge from the research. The teachers improve and transform their second language (L2 practice in collaboration and validation with others.

  12. Effects of terpineol on the compound action potential of the rat sciatic nerve

    M.R. Moreira

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Terpineol, a volatile terpenoid alcohol of low toxicity, is widely used in the perfumery industry. It is an important chemical constituent of the essential oil of many plants with widespread applications in folk medicine and in aromatherapy. The effects of terpineol on the compound action potential (CAP of rat sciatic nerve were studied. Terpineol induced a dose-dependent blockade of the CAP. At 100 µM, terpineol had no demonstrable effect. At 300 µM terpineol, peak-to-peak amplitude and conduction velocity of CAP were significantly reduced at the end of 180-min exposure of the nerve to the drug, from 3.28 ± 0.22 mV and 33.5 ± 7.05 m/s, respectively, to 1.91 ± 0.51 mV and 26.2 ± 4.55 m/s. At 600 µM, terpineol significantly reduced peak-to-peak amplitude and conduction velocity from 2.97 ± 0.55 mV and 32.8 ± 3.91 m/s to 0.24 ± 0.23 mV and 2.72 ± 2.72 m/s, respectively (N = 5. All these effects developed slowly and were reversible upon 180-min washout.

  13. Genetic structure and rabies spread potential in raccoons: the role of landscape barriers and sex-biased dispersal.

    Côté, Héloïse; Garant, Dany; Robert, Karine; Mainguy, Julien; Pelletier, Fanie

    2012-06-01

    Identifying natural barriers to movements of hosts associated with infectious diseases is essential for developing effective control strategies. Raccoon rabies variant (RRV) is a zoonosis of concern for humans because its main vector, the raccoon (Procyon lotor), is found near residential areas. In Québec, Canada, all cases of RRV found in raccoons since 2006 were detected on the eastern side of the Richelieu River, suggesting that this river acts as a barrier to gene flow and thus the potential for RRV to spread. The objectives of this study were to characterize the genetic structure of raccoon populations and assess the effect of the Richelieu River on the population structure in southern Québec, Canada. We also evaluated whether RRV spread potential differed between sex and at a larger spatial scale. Our analyses revealed a weak signal of genetic differentiation among individuals located on each side of the Richelieu River. At a larger spatial scale, genetic structuring was weak. Our results suggest that rivers might not always efficiently restrain raccoon movements and spread of RRV. We suggest that the difference in genetic structure found between sexes can be partly explained by male movements during the breeding season in winter, when ice bridges allow passage over most rivers in Québec. PMID:25568059

  14. Modeling the action-potential-sensitive nonlinear-optical response of myelinated nerve fibers and short-term memory

    Shneider, M. N.; Voronin, A. A.; Zheltikov, A. M.

    2011-11-01

    The Goldman-Albus treatment of the action-potential dynamics is combined with a phenomenological description of molecular hyperpolarizabilities into a closed-form model of the action-potential-sensitive second-harmonic response of myelinated nerve fibers with nodes of Ranvier. This response is shown to be sensitive to nerve demyelination, thus enabling an optical diagnosis of various demyelinating diseases, including multiple sclerosis. The model is applied to examine the nonlinear-optical response of a three-neuron reverberating circuit—the basic element of short-term memory.

  15. Potential bias in testing for hyperprolactinemia and pituitary tumors in risperidone-treated patients: a claims-based study

    Wu Jasmanda

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A reporting association of risperidone with pituitary tumors has been observed. Because such tumors are highly prevalent, there may be other reasons why they were revealed in association with risperidone treatment. We assessed two potential explanations: disproportionately more prolactin assessment and head/brain imaging in risperidone-treated patients vs patients treated with other antipsychotics. Methods Treatment episodes with risperidone, clozapine, olanzapine, quetiapine, ziprasidone, aripiprazole, haloperidol, perphenazine and 'other typical' antipsychotics were identified in two databases (large commercial, Medicaid. Comparisons used proportional hazards regression to determine whether prolactin testing was disproportionate with risperidone, regardless of prior potentially prolactin-related adverse events (PPAEs. Logistic regression determined whether magnetic resonance imaging (MRI/computed tomography (CT were disproportionate in risperidone-treated patients vs other patients, regardless of hyperprolactinemia or PPAEs. In each regression, the 'other typical' antipsychotic category served as the comparator. Regression models controlled for age, gender, and other factors. Results Altogether, 197,926 treatment episodes were analyzed (63,878 risperidone. Among patients with or without preceding PPAEs, risperidone treatment was associated with a significantly greater likelihood of prolactin assessment (hazard ratio (HR 1.34, 95% confidence interval (CI = 1.09 to 1.66, p = 0.007. Among patients with hyperprolactinemia or PPAEs, those treated with risperidone (odds ratio (OR 1.66, 95% CI 1.23 to 2.23, p = 0.001 or ziprasidone (OR 1.66, 95% CI 1.06 to 2.62, p = 0.028 had a higher likelihood of MRI/CT. Conclusion Risperidone-treated patients are more likely to undergo prolactin assessment regardless of prior PPAEs, and more likely to undergo MRI/CT in association with hyperprolactinemia or PPAEs. Thus, a predisposition for

  16. Toxicity, sublethal effects, and potential modes of action of select fungicides on freshwater fish and invertebrates

    Elskus, Adria A.

    2012-01-01

    Despite decades of agricultural and urban use of fungicides and widespread detection of these pesticides in surface waters, relatively few data are available on the effects of fungicides on fish and invertebrates in the aquatic environment. Nine fungicides are reviewed in this report: azoxystrobin, boscalid, chlorothalonil, fludioxonil, myclobutanil, fenarimol, pyraclostrobin, pyrimethanil, and zoxamide. These fungicides were identified as emerging chemicals of concern because of their high or increasing global use rates, detection frequency in surface waters, or likely persistence in the environment. A review of the literature revealed significant sublethal effects of fungicides on fish, aquatic invertebrates, and ecosystems, including zooplankton and fish reproduction, fish immune function, zooplankton community composition, metabolic enzymes, and ecosystem processes, such as leaf decomposition in streams, among other biological effects. Some of these effects can occur at fungicide concentrations well below single-species acute lethality values (48- or 96-hour concentration that effects a response in 50 percent of the organisms, that is, effective concentration killing 50 percent of the organisms in 48 or 96 hours) and chronic sublethal values (for example, 21-day no observed adverse effects concentration), indicating that single-species toxicity values may dramatically underestimate the toxic potency of some fungicides. Fungicide modes of toxic action in fungi can sometimes reflect the biochemical and (or) physiological effects of fungicides observed in vertebrates and invertebrates; however, far more studies are needed to explore the potential to predict effects in nontarget organisms based on specific fungicide modes of toxic action. Fungicides can also have additive and (or) synergistic effects when used with other fungicides and insecticides, highlighting the need to study pesticide mixtures that occur in surface waters. For fungicides that partition to

  17. Amphetamine elevates nucleus accumbens dopamine via an action potential-dependent mechanism that is modulated by endocannabinoids.

    Covey, Dan P; Bunner, Kendra D; Schuweiler, Douglas R; Cheer, Joseph F; Garris, Paul A

    2016-06-01

    The reinforcing effects of abused drugs are mediated by their ability to elevate nucleus accumbens dopamine. Amphetamine (AMPH) was historically thought to increase dopamine by an action potential-independent, non-exocytotic type of release called efflux, involving reversal of dopamine transporter function and driven by vesicular dopamine depletion. Growing evidence suggests that AMPH also acts by an action potential-dependent mechanism. Indeed, fast-scan cyclic voltammetry demonstrates that AMPH activates dopamine transients, reward-related phasic signals generated by burst firing of dopamine neurons and dependent on intact vesicular dopamine. Not established for AMPH but indicating a shared mechanism, endocannabinoids facilitate this activation of dopamine transients by broad classes of abused drugs. Here, using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry coupled to pharmacological manipulations in awake rats, we investigated the action potential and endocannabinoid dependence of AMPH-induced elevations in nucleus accumbens dopamine. AMPH increased the frequency, amplitude and duration of transients, which were observed riding on top of slower dopamine increases. Surprisingly, silencing dopamine neuron firing abolished all AMPH-induced dopamine elevations, identifying an action potential-dependent origin. Blocking cannabinoid type 1 receptors prevented AMPH from increasing transient frequency, similar to reported effects on other abused drugs, but not from increasing transient duration and inhibiting dopamine uptake. Thus, AMPH elevates nucleus accumbens dopamine by eliciting transients via cannabinoid type 1 receptors and promoting the summation of temporally coincident transients, made more numerous, larger and wider by AMPH. Collectively, these findings are inconsistent with AMPH eliciting action potential-independent dopamine efflux and vesicular dopamine depletion, and support endocannabinoids facilitating phasic dopamine signalling as a common action in drug reinforcement

  18. Facilitating Youth to Take Sustainability Actions: The Potential of Peer Education

    de Vreede, Catherine; Warner, Alan; Pitter, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Peer education is an understudied yet valuable strategy for sustainability educators in shifting youth to take action for sustainability. This case study conceptualizes the change process in facilitating youth to take sustainability actions, and explores the benefits, dynamics, and challenges of peer education as a strategy in facilitating change.…

  19. Predicting Crashes Using Traffic Offences. A Meta-Analysis that Examines Potential Bias between Self-Report and Archival Data

    af Wåhlberg, Anders; Freeman, James; Watson, Barry; Watson, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Background Traffic offences have been considered an important predictor of crash involvement, and have often been used as a proxy safety variable for crashes. However the association between crashes and offences has never been meta-analysed and the population effect size never established. Research is yet to determine the extent to which this relationship may be spuriously inflated through systematic measurement error, with obvious implications for researchers endeavouring to accurately identify salient factors predictive of crashes. Methodology and Principal Findings Studies yielding a correlation between crashes and traffic offences were collated and a meta-analysis of 144 effects drawn from 99 road safety studies conducted. Potential impact of factors such as age, time period, crash and offence rates, crash severity and data type, sourced from either self-report surveys or archival records, were considered and discussed. After weighting for sample size, an average correlation of r = .18 was observed over the mean time period of 3.2 years. Evidence emerged suggesting the strength of this correlation is decreasing over time. Stronger correlations between crashes and offences were generally found in studies involving younger drivers. Consistent with common method variance effects, a within country analysis found stronger effect sizes in self-reported data even controlling for crash mean. Significance The effectiveness of traffic offences as a proxy for crashes may be limited. Inclusion of elements such as independently validated crash and offence histories or accurate measures of exposure to the road would facilitate a better understanding of the factors that influence crash involvement. PMID:27128093

  20. The intentionality bias and schizotypy

    Moore, James W.; Pope, A.

    2014-01-01

    The “intentionality bias” refers to our automatic tendency to judge other people's actions to be intentional. In this experiment we extended research on this effect in two key ways. First, we developed a novel nonlinguistic task for assessing the intentionality bias. This task used video stimuli of ambiguous movements. Second, we investigated the relationship between the strength of this bias and schizotypy (schizophrenia-like symptoms in healthy individuals). Our results showed that the inte...

  1. Effect of temperature on isoprenaline- and barium-induced slow action potentials in guinea-pig ventricular strips.

    Manzini, S; Parlani, M; Martucci, E; Maggi, C A; Meli, A

    1986-01-01

    The effect of variation in temperature (37-32 and 27 degrees C) on electrical and mechanical activity of depolarized and isoprenaline- or barium-reactivated guinea pig ventricular strips was studied. Lowering the temperature brings a marked prolongation of isoprenaline-induced slow action potentials. In addition the maximal rate of depolarization was strongly reduced at lower temperatures. These effects were observed at an extracellular Ca2+ concentration of either 0.9 or 2.5 mM. The accompanying mechanical activities was significantly increased by reduction in temperature. Barium-induced slow action potentials were similarly affected by temperature variations. These observations suggest that hypothermia exert a sort of calcium antagonistic action probably coupled to a reduction of repolarizing outward potassium currents. PMID:2430855

  2. Effect of knockout of α2δ-1 on action potentials in mouse sensory neurons.

    Margas, Wojciech; Ferron, Laurent; Nieto-Rostro, Manuela; Schwartz, Arnold; Dolphin, Annette C

    2016-08-01

    Gene deletion of the voltage-gated calcium channel auxiliary subunit α2δ-1 has been shown previously to have a cardiovascular phenotype, and a reduction in mechano- and cold sensitivity, coupled with delayed development of neuropathic allodynia. We have also previously shown that dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neuron calcium channel currents were significantly reduced in α2δ-1 knockout mice. To extend our findings in these sensory neurons, we have examined here the properties of action potentials (APs) in DRG neurons from α2δ-1 knockout mice in comparison to their wild-type (WT) littermates, in order to dissect how the calcium channels that are affected by α2δ-1 knockout are involved in setting the duration of individual APs and their firing frequency. Our main findings are that there is reduced Ca(2+) entry on single AP stimulation, particularly in the axon proximal segment, reduced AP duration and reduced firing frequency to a 400 ms stimulation in α2δ-1 knockout neurons, consistent with the expected role of voltage-gated calcium channels in these events. Furthermore, lower intracellular Ca(2+) buffering also resulted in reduced AP duration, and a lower frequency of AP firing in WT neurons, mimicking the effect of α2δ-1 knockout. By contrast, we did not obtain any consistent evidence for the involvement of Ca(2+)-activation of large conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK) and small conductance calcium-activated potassium (SK) channels in these events. In conclusion, the reduced Ca(2+) elevation as a result of single AP stimulation is likely to result from the reduced duration of the AP in α2δ-1 knockout sensory neurons.This article is part of the themed issue 'Evolution brings Ca(2+) and ATP together to control life and death'. PMID:27377724

  3. Natural cures for type 1 diabetes: a review of phytochemicals, biological actions, and clinical potential.

    Chang, C L T; Chen, Yi-Ching; Chen, Hui-Ming; Yang, Ning-Sun; Yang, Wen-Chin

    2013-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases are the third largest category of illness in the industrialized world, following cardiovascular diseases and cancers. Among them, type 1 diabetes, also named autoimmune diabetes, afflicts 10 million people worldwide. This disease is caused by autoimmunity-mediated destruction of pancreatic β-cells, leading to insulin deficiency, hyperglycemia and complications. Currently, there is no cure for type 1 diabetes. Insulin injection is the only medication; however, it accompanies serious medical complications. Current strategies to cure type 1 diabetes include immunotherapy, replacement therapy, and combination therapy. Despite recent advances in anti-diabetic strategies, no strategy is clinically successful. How to cure type 1 diabetes without undesirable side effects still remains a formidable challenge in drug research and development. Plants provide an extraordinary source of natural medicines for different diseases. Moreover, secondary metabolites of plant origin serve as an invaluable chemical library for drug discovery and current medicinal chemistry in the pharmaceutical industry. Over the past 25 years, 50% of prescription drugs have been developed from natural products and their derivatives. In this article, we review more than 20 plant compounds and extracts reported in the literature to prevent and treat type-1 diabetes. Emphasis is placed on their chemistry and biology in terms of regulation of immune cells and pancreatic β-cells. We summarize recent progress in understanding the biological actions, mechanisms and therapeutic potential of the compounds and extracts of plant origin in type 1 diabetes. New views on phytocompound-based strategies for prevention and treatment of type 1 diabetes are also discussed. PMID:23210779

  4. Effects of estragole on the compound action potential of the rat sciatic nerve

    J.H. Leal-Cardoso

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Estragole, a relatively nontoxic terpenoid ether, is an important constituent of many essential oils with widespread applications in folk medicine and aromatherapy and known to have potent local anesthetic activity. We investigated the effects of estragole on the compound action potential (CAP of the rat sciatic nerve. The experiments were carried out on sciatic nerves dissected from Wistar rats. Nerves, mounted in a moist chamber, were stimulated at a frequency of 0.2 Hz, with electric pulses of 50-100-µs duration at 10-20 V, and evoked CAP were monitored on an oscilloscope and recorded on a computer. CAP control parameters were: peak-to-peak amplitude (PPA, 9.9 ± 0.55 mV (N = 15, conduction velocity, 92.2 ± 4.36 m/s (N = 15, chronaxy, 45.6 ± 3.74 µs (N = 5, and rheobase, 3.9 ± 0.78 V (N = 5. Estragole induced a dose-dependent blockade of the CAP. At 0.6 mM, estragole had no demonstrable effect. At 2.0 and 6.0 mM estragole, PPA was significantly reduced at the end of 180-min exposure of the nerve to the drug to 85.6 ± 3.96 and 13.04 ± 1.80% of control, respectively. At 4.0 mM, estragole significantly altered PPA, conduction velocity, chronaxy, and rheobase (P <= 0.05, ANOVA; N = 5 to 49.3 ± 6.21 and 77.7 ± 3.84, 125.9 ± 10.43 and 116.7 ± 4.59%, of control, respectively. All of these effects developed slowly and were reversible upon a 300-min wash-out. The data show that estragole dose-dependently blocks nerve excitability.

  5. Contribution of auditory nerve fibers to compound action potential of the auditory nerve.

    Bourien, Jérôme; Tang, Yong; Batrel, Charlène; Huet, Antoine; Lenoir, Marc; Ladrech, Sabine; Desmadryl, Gilles; Nouvian, Régis; Puel, Jean-Luc; Wang, Jing

    2014-09-01

    Sound-evoked compound action potential (CAP), which captures the synchronous activation of the auditory nerve fibers (ANFs), is commonly used to probe deafness in experimental and clinical settings. All ANFs are believed to contribute to CAP threshold and amplitude: low sound pressure levels activate the high-spontaneous rate (SR) fibers, and increasing levels gradually recruit medium- and then low-SR fibers. In this study, we quantitatively analyze the contribution of the ANFs to CAP 6 days after 30-min infusion of ouabain into the round window niche. Anatomic examination showed a progressive ablation of ANFs following increasing concentration of ouabain. CAP amplitude and threshold plotted against loss of ANFs revealed three ANF pools: 1) a highly ouabain-sensitive pool, which does not participate in either CAP threshold or amplitude, 2) a less sensitive pool, which only encoded CAP amplitude, and 3) a ouabain-resistant pool, required for CAP threshold and amplitude. Remarkably, distribution of the three pools was similar to the SR-based ANF distribution (low-, medium-, and high-SR fibers), suggesting that the low-SR fiber loss leaves the CAP unaffected. Single-unit recordings from the auditory nerve confirmed this hypothesis and further showed that it is due to the delayed and broad first spike latency distribution of low-SR fibers. In addition to unraveling the neural mechanisms that encode CAP, our computational simulation of an assembly of guinea pig ANFs generalizes and extends our experimental findings to different species of mammals. Altogether, our data demonstrate that substantial ANF loss can coexist with normal hearing threshold and even unchanged CAP amplitude. PMID:24848461

  6. Impedance and electrically evoked compound action potential (ECAP drop within 24 hours after cochlear implantation.

    Joshua Kuang-Chao Chen

    Full Text Available Previous animal study revealed that post-implantation electrical detection levels significantly declined within days. The impact of cochlear implant (CI insertion on human auditory pathway in terms of impedance and electrically evoked compound action potential (ECAP variation within hours after surgery remains unclear, since at this time frequency mapping can only commence weeks after implantation due to factors associated with wound conditions. The study presented our experiences with regards to initial switch-on within 24 hours, and thus the findings about the milieus inside cochlea within the first few hours after cochlear implantation in terms of impedance/ECAP fluctuations. The charts of fifty-four subjects with profound hearing impairment were studied. A minimal invasive approach was used for cochlear implantation, characterized by a small skin incision (≈ 2.5 cm and soft techniques for cochleostomy. Impedance/ECAP was measured intro-operatively and within 24 hours post-operatively. Initial mapping within 24 hours post-operatively was performed in all patients without major complications. Impedance/ECAP became significantly lower measured within 24 hours post-operatively as compared with intra-operatively (p<0.001. There were no differences between pre-operative and post-operative threshold for air-conduction hearing. A significant drop of impedance/ECAP in one day after cochlear implantation was revealed for the first time in human beings. Mechanisms could be related to the restoration of neuronal sensitivity to the electrical stimulation, and/or the interaction between the matrix enveloping the electrodes and the electrical stimulation of the initial switch-on. Less wound pain/swelling and soft techniques both contributed to the success of immediate initial mapping, which implied a stable micro-environment inside the cochlea despite electrodes insertion. Our research invites further studies to correlate initial impedance/ECAP changes

  7. Inconsistencies in quality of life data collection in clinical trials: a potential source of bias? Interviews with research nurses and trialists.

    Derek Kyte

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Patient-reported outcomes (PROs, such as health-related quality of life (HRQL are increasingly used to evaluate treatment effectiveness in clinical trials, are valued by patients, and may inform important decisions in the clinical setting. It is of concern, therefore, that preliminary evidence, gained from group discussions at UK-wide Medical Research Council (MRC quality of life training days, suggests there are inconsistent standards of HRQL data collection in trials and appropriate training and education is often lacking. Our objective was to investigate these reports, to determine if they represented isolated experiences, or were indicative of a potentially wider problem. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We undertook a qualitative study, conducting 26 semi-structured interviews with research nurses, data managers, trial coordinators and research facilitators involved in the collection and entry of HRQL data in clinical trials, across one primary care NHS trust, two secondary care NHS trusts and two clinical trials units in the UK. We used conventional content analysis to analyze and interpret our data. Our study participants reported (1 inconsistent standards in HRQL measurement, both between, and within, trials, which appeared to risk the introduction of bias; (2, difficulties in dealing with HRQL data that raised concern for the well-being of the trial participant, which in some instances led to the delivery of non-protocol driven co-interventions, (3, a frequent lack of HRQL protocol content and appropriate training and education of trial staff, and (4 that HRQL data collection could be associated with emotional and/or ethical burden. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest there are inconsistencies in the standards of HRQL data collection in some trials resulting from a general lack of HRQL-specific protocol content, training and education. These inconsistencies could lead to biased HRQL trial results. Future research should aim to develop

  8. Flattening of the electrocardiographic T-wave is a sign of proarrhythmic risk and a reflection of action potential triangulation

    Bhuiyan, Tanveer Ahmed; Graff, Claus; Kanters, J.K.;

    2013-01-01

    Drug-induced triangulation of the cardiac action potential is associated with increased risk of arrhythmic events. It has been suggested that triangulation causes a flattening of the electrocardiographic T-wave but the relationship between triangulation, T-wave flattening and onset of arrhythmia...

  9. Serotonin spillover onto the axon initial segment of motoneurons induces central fatigue by inhibiting action potential initiation

    Cotel, Florence; Exley, Richard; Cragg, Stephanie;

    2013-01-01

    --as during motor exercise--activated 5-HT1A receptors that decreased motoneuronal excitability. Electrophysiological tests combined with pharmacology showed that focal activation of 5-HT1A receptors at the axon initial segment (AIS), but not on other motoneuronal compartments, inhibited the action potential...

  10. Synthesis of a dendritic estrogen cluster: A potential tool for studies of nuclear versus extranuclear pathways of estrogen actions

    Jian Chen; Hu Zheng; Yan Song; Yu Feng Liang; Qing Rong Qi

    2012-01-01

    A novel estrogen dendrimer has been synthesized through a combination of divergent and convergent approaches in 9 practical steps and in good yields.It was characterized and confirmed by elemental analysis,FT-IR,MS,1H NMR,13C NMR.The dendrimer contains 16 estrone units and is potentially a useful tool for the studies of estrogen actions.

  11. Assessing the Potential Impact of a Nationwide Class-Based Affirmative Action System

    Xiang, Alice; Rubin, Donald B.

    2015-01-01

    We examine the possible consequences of a change in law school admissions in the United States from an affirmative action system based on race to one based on socioeconomic class. Using data from the 1991-1996 Law School Admission Council Bar Passage Study, students were reassigned attendance by simulation to law school tiers by transferring the affirmative action advantage for black students to students from low socioeconomic backgrounds. The hypothetical academic outcomes for the students w...

  12. Mode of action of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry and Cyt toxins and their potential for insect control

    Bravo, Alejandra; Gill, Sarjeet S.; Soberón, Mario

    2006-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis Cry and Cyt protein families are a diverse group of proteins with activity against insects of different orders - Lepidoptera, Coleoptera, Diptera and also against other invertebrates such as nematodes. Their primary action is to lyse midgut epithelial cells by inserting into the target membrane and forming pores. Among this group of proteins, members of the 3-Domain Cry family are used worldwide for insect control, and their mode of action has been characterized in some...

  13. Antibacterial free fatty acids : activities, mechanisms of action and biotechnological potential

    Desbois, Andrew Paul; Smith, Valerie Jane

    2010-01-01

    Amongst the diverse and potent biological activities of free fatty acids (FFAs) is the ability to kill or inhibit the growth of bacteria. The antibacterial properties of FFAs are used by many organisms to defend against parasitic or pathogenic bacteria. Whilst their antibacterial mode of action is still poorly understood, the prime target of FFA action is the cell membrane, where FFAs disrupt the electron transport chain and oxidative phosphorylation. Besides interfering with cellular energy ...

  14. Effects of nerve growth factor on the action potential duration and repolarizing currents in a rabbit model of myocardial infarction

    Yun-Feng Lan; Yang Li; Jian-Cheng Zhang; Jin-Lao Gao; Xue-Ping Wang; Zhou Fang; Yi-Cheng Fu; Mei-Yan Chen; Min Lin; Qiao Xue

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the effect of nerve growth factor (NGF) on the action potential and potassium currents of non-infarcted myocardium in the myocardial infarcted rabbit model. Methods Rabbits with occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery were prepared and allowed to recover for eight weeks (healed myocardial infarction, HMI). During ligation surgery of the left coronary artery, a polyethylene tube was placed near the left stellate ganglion in the subcutis of the neck for the purpose of administering NGF 400 U/d for eight weeks (HMI + NGF group). Cardiomyocytes were isolated from regions of the non-infarcted left ventricular wall and the action potentials and ion currents in these cells were recorded using whole-cell patch clamps. Results Compared with HMI and control cardiomyocytes, significant prolongation of APD50 or APD90 (Action potential duration (APD) measured at 50% and 90% of repolarization) in HMI + NGF cardiomyocytes was found. The results showed that the 4-aminopyridine sensitive transient outward potassium current (Ito), the rapidly activated omponent of delayed rectifier potassium current (IKr), the slowly activated component of delayed rectifier potassium current (IKs), and the L-type calcium current (ICaL) were significantly altered in NGF + HMI cardiomyocytes compared with HMI and control cells. Conclusions Our results suggest that NGF treatment significantly prolongs APD in HMI cardiomyocytes and that a decrease in outward potassium currents and an increase of inward Ca2+ current are likely the underlying mechanism of action.

  15. Governance issues, potentials and failures of participative collective action in the Kafue Flats, Zambia

    Harry Nixon Chabwela

    2010-09-01

    2004 for creating by-laws based on initiatives of local staff of the Department of Fisheries, local interest groups and researchers. A broad local debate on how to manage the fisheries in a sustainable way and develop locally based by-laws for joint management of fisheries gives good potential for success and appears promising for the future of fisheries in Kafue Flats. Despite many difficulties it is an example of local collective action in order to scale up governance of common-pool resources.

  16. Preparing Social Justice Oriented Teachers: The Potential Role of Action Research in the PDS

    Dodman, Stephanie L.; Lai, Kerri; Campet, Melissa; Cavallero-Lotocki, Renee; Hopkins, Aaron; Onidi, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Deliberate investigation into practice is an essential of the National Association for Professional Development Schools' defining elements of a Professional Development School (PDS). This article reports on the pilot efforts of one PDS as it initiated deliberate investigation through action research with a small group of teacher candidates.…

  17. Mode of action of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry and Cyt toxins and their potential for insect control.

    Bravo, Alejandra; Gill, Sarjeet S; Soberón, Mario

    2007-03-15

    Bacillus thuringiensis Crystal (Cry) and Cytolitic (Cyt) protein families are a diverse group of proteins with activity against insects of different orders--Lepidoptera, Coleoptera, Diptera and also against other invertebrates such as nematodes. Their primary action is to lyse midgut epithelial cells by inserting into the target membrane and forming pores. Among this group of proteins, members of the 3-Domain Cry family are used worldwide for insect control, and their mode of action has been characterized in some detail. Phylogenetic analyses established that the diversity of the 3-Domain Cry family evolved by the independent evolution of the three domains and by swapping of domain III among toxins. Like other pore-forming toxins (PFT) that affect mammals, Cry toxins interact with specific receptors located on the host cell surface and are activated by host proteases following receptor binding resulting in the formation of a pre-pore oligomeric structure that is insertion competent. In contrast, Cyt toxins directly interact with membrane lipids and insert into the membrane. Recent evidence suggests that Cyt synergize or overcome resistance to mosquitocidal-Cry proteins by functioning as a Cry-membrane bound receptor. In this review we summarize recent findings on the mode of action of Cry and Cyt toxins, and compare them to the mode of action of other bacterial PFT. Also, we discuss their use in the control of agricultural insect pests and insect vectors of human diseases. PMID:17198720

  18. The Potential of General Classroom Observation: Turkish EFL Teachers' Perceptions, Sentiments, and Readiness for Action

    Merç, Ali

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine Turkish EFL teachers' attitudes towards classroom observation. 204 teachers from different school settings responded to an online questionnaire. Data were analyzed according to three types of attitudes towards classroom observation: perceptions, sentiments, and readiness for action. The findings revealed…

  19. Doubts about actions and flanker incongruity-related potentials and performance

    Tops, Mattie; Wijers, Albertus A.

    2012-01-01

    The brain networks that are involved in flanker incongruity and error processing are also consistently implicated in mental disorders such as obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) that feature increased "Doubts about Actions" (DaA) scores. In the present study we investigated whether DaA scores, simil

  20. Potentiating action of propofol at GABAA receptors of retinal bipolar cells

    Yue, Lan; Xie, An; Bruzik, Karol S;

    2011-01-01

    specific retinal neurons. The authors investigated the action of propofol on GABA-elicited membrane current responses of retinal bipolar cells, which have both GABA(A) and GABA(C) receptors. Methods. Single, enzymatically dissociated bipolar cells obtained from rat retina were treated with propofol...

  1. Neural Networks for Template Matching: Application to Real-Time Classification of the Action Potentials of Real Neurons

    Wong, Yiu-fai; Banik, Jashojiban; Bower, James M.

    1988-01-01

    Much experimental study of real neural networks relies on the proper classification of extracellulary sampled neural signals (i .e. action potentials) recorded from the brains of experimental animals. In most neurophysiology laboratories this classification task is simplified by limiting investigations to single, electrically well-isolated neurons recorded one at a time. However, for those interested in sampling the activities of many single neurons simultaneously, waveform cla...

  2. Back-propagation of physiological action potential output in dendrites of slender-tufted L5A pyramidal neurons

    Grewe, Benjamin F.; Audrey Bonnan; Andreas Frick

    2010-01-01

    Pyramidal neurons of layer 5A are a major neocortical output type and clearly distinguished from layer 5B pyramidal neurons with respect to morphology, in vivo firing patterns, and connectivity; yet knowledge of their dendritic properties is scant. We used a combination of whole-cell recordings and Ca2+ imaging techniques in vitro to explore the specific dendritic signalling role of physiological action potential patterns recorded in vivo in layer 5A pyramidal neurons of the whisker-related &...

  3. Amplitude of sensory nerve action potential in early stage diabetic peripheral neuropathy:an analysis of 500 cases

    Yunqian Zhang; Jintao Li; Tingjuan Wang; Jianlin Wang

    2014-01-01

    Early diagnosis of diabetic peripheral neuropathy is important for the successful treatment of diabetes mellitus. In the present study, we recruited 500 diabetic patients from the Fourth Afifl-iated Hospital of Kunming Medical University in China from June 2008 to September 2013: 221 cases showed symptoms of peripheral neuropathy (symptomatic group) and 279 cases had no symptoms of peripheral impairment (asymptomatic group). One hundred healthy control sub-jects were also recruited. Nerve conduction studies revealed that distal motor latency was longer, sensory nerve conduction velocity was slower, and sensory nerve action potential and amplitude of compound muscle action potential were signiifcantly lower in the median, ulnar, posterior tibial and common peroneal nerve in the diabetic groups compared with control subjects. More-over, the alterations were more obvious in patients with symptoms of peripheral neuropathy. Of the 500 diabetic patients, neural conduction abnormalities were detected in 358 cases (71.6%), among which impairment of the common peroneal nerve was most prominent. Sensory nerve abnormality was more obvious than motor nerve abnormality in the diabetic groups. The ampli-tude of sensory nerve action potential was the most sensitive measure of peripheral neuropathy. Our results reveal that varying degrees of nerve conduction changes are present in the early, as-ymptomatic stage of diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

  4. Potential pathways of pesticide action on erectile function-a contributory factor in male infertility

    RP Kaur; V Gupta; AF Christopher; P Bansal

    2015-01-01

    One of the important objectives of this manuscript is to focus on the place of erectile dysfunction as an important factor for infertility. The review is about correlating the indiscriminate use of pesticides and to find out and highlight the evidences for mechanism of action of these pesticides for erectile dysfunction and find out the most used and most dangerous pesticide from erectile dysfunction point of view. The review suggests that erectile dysfunction is having a significant place as a causal factor for infertility. Study infers that pesticides are having multiple mechanisms of action through which these cause erectile dysfunction. It also reflects that acetamiprid is having most devastating effect causing erectile dysfunction as it acts through multiple inhibitory pathways. The review successfully highlights the indiscriminate regional use of pesticides.

  5. Evaluation of the potential carcinogenic action of radiocalcium internal irradiation in Swiss albino mice

    The carcinogenic action of 45Ca on inducing hepatocelluar carcinoma (HCC) in Swiss albino mice has been statistically evaluated. HCC proved to be radiation-induced and not due to spontaneous origin. Also, the higher incidence of male hepatocarcinogenesis due to internal irradiation has been found to be significant. The precise possible mechanism regarding the higher male susceptibility to liver cancer has been discussed in the light of available literature. (author)

  6. Reading Humboldt through the theory of communicative action: the democratic potential of symbolic interaction

    McLuskie, Ed

    2015-01-01

    Wilhelm von Humboldt's studies of language during the nineteenth century anticipated twentieth-century symbolic interactionism, suggesting a two-century intellectual history stressing the communicating subject as an intersubjective actor. Jürgen Habermas's theory of communicative action, well known for its inclusion of George Herbert Mead's symbolic interactionism, appeals in the same breath to von Humboldt's work, thus inviting a critical re-appropriation of Mead beyond the social-psychologi...

  7. Reading Humboldt through the theory of communicative action: the democratic potential of symbolic interaction:

    McLuskie, Ed

    2003-01-01

    Wilhelm von Humboldt's studies of language during the nineteenth century anticipated twentieth-century symbolic interactionism, suggesting a two-century intellectual history stressing the communicating subject as an intersubjective actor. Jürgen Habermas's theory of communicative action, well known for its inclusion of George Herbert Mead's symbolic interactionism, appeals in the same breath to von Humboldt's work, thus inviting a critical re-appropriation of Mead beyond the social-psychologi...

  8. Carnosine: can understanding its actions on energy metabolism and protein homeostasis inform its therapeutic potential?

    Hipkiss, Alan R; Cartwright, Stephanie P.; Bromley, Clare; Gross, Stephane R.; Bill, Roslyn M.

    2013-01-01

    The dipeptide carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine) has contrasting but beneficial effects on cellular activity. It delays cellular senescence and rejuvenates cultured senescent mammalian cells. However, it also inhibits the growth of cultured tumour cells. Based on studies in several organisms, we speculate that carnosine exerts these apparently opposing actions by affecting energy metabolism and/or protein homeostasis (proteostasis). Specific effects on energy metabolism include the dipeptide’s ...

  9. Effect of top gate potential on bias-stress for dual gate amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin film transistor

    Chun, Minkyu; Um, Jae Gwang; Park, Min Sang; Chowdhury, Md Delwar Hossain; Jang, Jin

    2016-07-01

    We report the abnormal behavior of the threshold voltage (VTH) shift under positive bias Temperature stress (PBTS) and negative bias temperature stress (NBTS) at top/bottom gate in dual gate amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) thin-film transistors (TFTs). It is found that the PBTS at top gate shows negative transfer shift and NBTS shows positive transfer shift for both top and bottom gate sweep. The shift of bottom/top gate sweep is dominated by top gate bias (VTG), while bottom gate bias (VBG) is less effect than VTG. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) depth profile provides the evidence of In metal diffusion to the top SiO2/a-IGZO and also the existence of large amount of In+ under positive top gate bias around top interfaces, thus negative transfer shift is observed. On the other hand, the formation of OH- at top interfaces under the stress of negative top gate bias shows negative transfer shift. The domination of VTG both on bottom/top gate sweep after PBTS/NBTS is obviously occurred due to thin active layer.

  10. Voter Confirmation Bias and Electoral Accountability

    Lockwood, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    This paper considers the implications of an important cognitive bias in information processing, confirmation bias, in a political agency setting. In the baseline two-period case where only the politician’s actions are observable before the election, we show that when voters have this bias, it decreases pandering by the incumbent, and can raise voter welfare as a consequence. This result is robust in several directions, including to the case where the voter can also observe payoffs with some p...

  11. Understanding Implicit Bias: What Educators Should Know

    Staats, Cheryl

    2016-01-01

    The desire to ensure the best for children is precisely why educators should become aware of the concept of implicit bias: the attitudes or stereotypes that affect our understanding, actions, and decisions in an unconscious manner. Operating outside of our conscious awareness, implicit biases are pervasive, and they can challenge even the most…

  12. Biases in Children's and Adults' Moral Judgments

    Powell, Nina L.; Derbyshire, Stuart W. G.; Guttentag, Robert E.

    2012-01-01

    Two experiments examined biases in children's (5/6- and 7/8-year-olds) and adults' moral judgments. Participants at all ages judged that it was worse to produce harm when harm occurred (a) through action rather than inaction (omission bias), (b) when physical contact with the victim was involved (physical contact principle), and (c) when the harm…

  13. Conservation laws of wave action and potential enstrophy for Rossby waves in a stratified atmosphere

    Straus, D. M.

    1983-01-01

    The evolution of wave energy, enstrophy, and wave motion for atmospheric Rossby waves in a variable mean flow are discussed from a theoretical and pedagogic standpoint. In the absence of mean flow gradients, the wave energy density satisfies a local conservation law, with the appropriate flow velocity being the group velocity. In the presence of mean flow variations, wave energy is not conserved, but wave action is, provided the mean flow is independent of longitude. Wave enstrophy is conserved for arbitrary variations of the mean flow. Connections with Eliassen-Palm flux are also discussed.

  14. Unlearning Implicit Social Biases During Sleep **

    Hu, Xiaoqing; Antony, James W.; Creery, Jessica D.; Vargas, Iliana M.; Bodenhausen, Galen V.; Paller, Ken A.

    2015-01-01

    Although people may endorse egalitarianism and tolerance, social biases can remain operative and drive harmful actions in an unconscious manner. Here we investigated training to reduce implicit racial and gender bias. Forty participants processed counter-stereotype information paired with one sound for each type of bias. Biases were reduced immediately after training. During subsequent slow-wave sleep, one sound was unobtrusively presented to each participant, repeatedly, to reactivate one type of training. Corresponding bias reductions were fortified in comparison to the social bias not externally reactivated during sleep. This advantage remained one week later, the magnitude of which was associated with time in slow-wave and rapid-eye-movement sleep after training. We conclude that memory reactivation during sleep enhances counter-stereotype training, and that maintaining a bias reduction is sleep-dependent. PMID:26023137

  15. Selection bias in rheumatic disease research

    Choi, Hyon K.; Nguyen, Uyen-Sa; Niu, Jingbo; Danaei, Goodarz; Zhang, Yuqing

    2014-01-01

    The identification of modifiable risk factors for the development of rheumatic conditions and their sequelae is crucial for reducing the substantial worldwide burden of these diseases. However, the validity of such research can be threatened by sources of bias, including confounding, measurement and selection biases. In this Review, we discuss potentially major issues of selection bias—a type of bias frequently overshadowed by other bias and feasibility issues, despite being equally or more p...

  16. Waveform Similarity Analysis: A Simple Template Comparing Approach for Detecting and Quantifying Noisy Evoked Compound Action Potentials.

    Jason Robert Potas

    Full Text Available Experimental electrophysiological assessment of evoked responses from regenerating nerves is challenging due to the typical complex response of events dispersed over various latencies and poor signal-to-noise ratio. Our objective was to automate the detection of compound action potential events and derive their latencies and magnitudes using a simple cross-correlation template comparison approach. For this, we developed an algorithm called Waveform Similarity Analysis. To test the algorithm, challenging signals were generated in vivo by stimulating sural and sciatic nerves, whilst recording evoked potentials at the sciatic nerve and tibialis anterior muscle, respectively, in animals recovering from sciatic nerve transection. Our template for the algorithm was generated based on responses evoked from the intact side. We also simulated noisy signals and examined the output of the Waveform Similarity Analysis algorithm with imperfect templates. Signals were detected and quantified using Waveform Similarity Analysis, which was compared to event detection, latency and magnitude measurements of the same signals performed by a trained observer, a process we called Trained Eye Analysis. The Waveform Similarity Analysis algorithm could successfully detect and quantify simple or complex responses from nerve and muscle compound action potentials of intact or regenerated nerves. Incorrectly specifying the template outperformed Trained Eye Analysis for predicting signal amplitude, but produced consistent latency errors for the simulated signals examined. Compared to the trained eye, Waveform Similarity Analysis is automatic, objective, does not rely on the observer to identify and/or measure peaks, and can detect small clustered events even when signal-to-noise ratio is poor. Waveform Similarity Analysis provides a simple, reliable and convenient approach to quantify latencies and magnitudes of complex waveforms and therefore serves as a useful tool for

  17. Adaptation decision-making in the Nordic Countries: assessing the potential for joint action

    Juhola, Sirkku; Goodsite, Michael Evan; Davis, Marion;

    2014-01-01

    the issue. This paper explores the potential for Nordic cooperation on adaptation; specifically, for the development of a regional adaptation strategy. In particular, it addresses two questions (1) What is the current state of adaptation in the Nordic countries? and (2) What are the potential benefits...... and weaknesses of a Nordic strategy for adaptation? In order to answer these two questions, this paper examines reviews the current national adaptation policies of each Nordic country and discusses the challenges facing a Nordic strategy and finally assesses the potential for common Nordic adaptation...

  18. A model of the magnetic fields created by single motor unit compound action potentials in skeletal muscle.

    Parker, K K; Wikswo, J P

    1997-10-01

    We have developed a computationally simple model for calculating the magnetic-field strength at a point due to a single motor unit compound action potential (SMUCAP). The motor unit is defined only in terms of its anatomical features, and the SMUCAP is approximated using the tripole model. The distributed current density J is calculated within the volume defined by the motor unit. The law of Biot and Savart can then be cast in a form necessitating that J be integrated only over the region containing current sources or conductivity boundaries. The magnetic-field strength is defined as the summation of the contributions to the field made by every muscle fiber in the motor unit. Applying this model to SMUCAP measurements obtained using a high-resolution SUper Conducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometer may yield information regarding the distribution of action currents (AC's) and the anatomical properties of single motor units within a muscle bundle. PMID:9311164

  19. Opposing actions of chronic Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabinoid antagonists on hippocampal long-term potentiation

    Hoffman, Alexander F; Oz, Murat; Yang, Ruiqin; Lichtman, Aron H.; Carl R Lupica

    2007-01-01

    Memory deficits produced by marijuana arise partly via interaction of the psychoactive component, Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC), with cannabinoid receptors in the hippocampus. Although cannabinoids acutely reduce glutamate release and block hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP), a potential substrate for learning and memory, the consequences of prolonged exposure to Δ9-THC for hippocampal function are poorly understood. Rats were injected with Δ9-THC (10 mg/kg, i.p., q.d.) for 1, 3, or ...

  20. Characterising action potential in virtual game worlds applied with the mind module

    Eladhari, Mirjam Palosaari

    2009-01-01

    Because games set in persistent virtual game worlds (VGWs) have massive numbers of players, these games need methods of characterisation for playable characters (PCs) that differ from the methods used in traditional narrative media. VGWs have a number of particularly interesting qualities. Firstly, VGWs are places where players interact with and create elements carrying narrative potential. Secondly, players add goals, motives and driving forces to the narrative potential of a VGW, which some...

  1. Computational modeling of voltage-gated Ca channels inhibition: identification of different effects on uterine and cardiac action potentials

    Wing Chiu eTong

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The uterus and heart share the important physiological feature whereby contractile activation of the muscle tissue is regulated by the generation of periodic, spontaneous electrical action potentials (APs. Preterm birth arising from premature uterine contractions is a major complication of pregnancy and there remains a need to pursue avenues of research that facilitate the use of drugs, tocolytics, to limit these inappropriate contractions without deleterious actions on cardiac electrical excitation. A novel approach is to make use of mathematical models of uterine and cardiac APs, which incorporate many ionic currents contributing to the AP forms, and test the cell-specific responses to interventions. We have used three such models – of uterine smooth muscle cells (USMC, cardiac sinoatrial node cells (SAN and ventricular cells – to investigate the relative effects of reducing two important voltage-gated Ca currents – the L-type (ICaL and T-type (ICaT Ca currents. Reduction of ICaL (10% alone, or ICaT (40% alone, blunted USMC APs with little effect on ventricular APs and only mild effects on SAN activity. Larger reductions in either current further attenuated the USMC APs but with also greater effects on SAN APs. Encouragingly, a combination of ICaL and ICaT reduction did blunt USMC APs as intended with little detriment to APs of either cardiac cell type. Subsequent overlapping maps of ICaL and ICaT inhibition profiles from each model revealed a range of combined reductions of ICaL and ICaT over which an appreciable diminution of USMC APs could be achieved with no deleterious action on cardiac SAN or ventricular APs. This novel approach illustrates the potential for computational biology to inform us of possible uterine and cardiac cell-specific mechanisms. Incorporating such computational approaches in future studies directed at designing new, or repurposing existing, tocolytics will be beneficial for establishing a desired uterine

  2. Potential mechanisms of action of lithium in bipolar disorder. Current understanding.

    Malhi, Gin S; Tanious, Michelle; Das, Pritha; Coulston, Carissa M; Berk, Michael

    2013-02-01

    Lithium has been used for over half a century for the treatment of bipolar disorder as the archetypal mood stabilizer, and has a wealth of empirical evidence supporting its efficacy in this role. Despite this, the specific mechanisms by which lithium exerts its mood-stabilizing effects are not well understood. Given the inherently complex nature of the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder, this paper aims to capture what is known about the actions of lithium ranging from macroscopic changes in mood, cognition and brain structure, to its effects at the microscopic level on neurotransmission and intracellular and molecular pathways. A comprehensive literature search of databases including MEDLINE, EMBASE and PsycINFO was conducted using relevant keywords and the findings from the literature were then reviewed and synthesized. Numerous studies report that lithium is effective in the treatment of acute mania and for the long-term maintenance of mood and prophylaxis; in comparison, evidence for its efficacy in depression is modest. However, lithium possesses unique anti-suicidal properties that set it apart from other agents. With respect to cognition, studies suggest that lithium may reduce cognitive decline in patients; however, these findings require further investigation using both neuropsychological and functional neuroimaging probes. Interestingly, lithium appears to preserve or increase the volume of brain structures involved in emotional regulation such as the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus and amygdala, possibly reflecting its neuroprotective effects. At a neuronal level, lithium reduces excitatory (dopamine and glutamate) but increases inhibitory (GABA) neurotransmission; however, these broad effects are underpinned by complex neurotransmitter systems that strive to achieve homeostasis by way of compensatory changes. For example, at an intracellular and molecular level, lithium targets second-messenger systems that further modulate neurotransmission. For

  3. Cardiovascular Actions and Therapeutic Potential of Tetramethylpyrazine (Active Component Isolated from Rhizoma Chuanxiong): Roles and Mechanisms

    Guo, Ming; Liu, Yue; Shi, Dazhuo

    2016-01-01

    Tetramethylpyrazine (TMP), a pharmacologically active component isolated from the rhizome of the Chinese herb Rhizoma Chuanxiong (Chuanxiong), has been clinically used in China and Southeast Asian countries for the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) for about fifty years. The pharmacological effects of TMP on the cardiovascular system have attracted great interest. Emerging experimental studies and clinical trials have demonstrated that TMP prevents atherosclerosis as well as ischemia-reperfusion injury. The cardioprotective effects of TMP are mainly related to its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, or calcium-homeostasis effects. This review focuses on the roles and mechanisms of action of TMP in the cardiovascular system and provides a novel perspective on TMP's clinical use. PMID:27314011

  4. Assessing potential targets of calcium action in light-modulated gravitropism

    Roux, S. J.

    1995-01-01

    Light, through the mediation of the pigment phytochrome, modulates the gravitropic response of the shoots and roots of many plants. The transduction of both light and gravity stimuli appears to involve Ca(2+)-regulated steps, one or more of which may represent points of intersection between the two transduction chains. To be confident that Ca2+ plays a critical role in stimulus-response coupling for gravitropism, it will be important to identify specific targets of Ca2+ action whose function can be clearly linked to the regulation of growth. Calcium typically exerts its influence on cell metabolism through binding to and activating key regulatory proteins. The three best characterized of these proteins in plants are the calmodulins, calcium-dependent protein kinases, and annexins. In this review we summarize what is known about the structure and function of these proteins and speculate on how their activation by Ca2+ could influence the differential growth response of gravitropism.

  5. Metal-organic frameworks: mechanisms of antibacterial action and potential applications.

    Wyszogrodzka, Gabriela; Marszałek, Bartosz; Gil, Barbara; Dorożyński, Przemysław

    2016-06-01

    The growing resistance of pathogens to conventional antibiotics has become a public health problem and raises the need to seek new effective solutions. Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are porous, hybrid materials comprising metal ions linked by organic binding ligands. The possibility of using a variety of chemical building components in MOFs enables the formation of structures with desired properties. They can act as a reservoir of metal ions, providing their gradual release and resulting in a sustained antibacterial action analogous to that proposed for metal/metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs) but different to that of antibiotics. These features make MOFs promising candidates for pharmaceutical and biomedical applications, as illustrated by examples discussed in this review. PMID:27091434

  6. HMGB1 Inhibition During Zymosan-Induced Inflammation: The Potential Therapeutic Action of Riboflavin.

    Mazur-Bialy, Agnieszka Irena; Pocheć, Ewa

    2016-04-01

    Sepsis, also known as systemic inflammatory response syndrome, is a life-threatening condition caused by a pathogenic agent and leading to multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. One of the factors responsible for the excessive intensification of the inflammatory response in the course of inflammation is high-mobility group protein B1 (HMGB1). HMG-1 is a nuclear protein which, after being released to the intercellular space, has a highly pro-inflammatory effect and acts as a late mediator of lethal damage. The purpose of this study was to examine whether the anti-inflammatory action of riboflavin is accompanied by inhibition of HMGB1 release during peritoneal inflammation and zymosan stimulation of macrophages. Peritonitis was induced in male BALB/c and C57BL/6J mice via intraperitoneal injection of zymosan (40 mg/kg). RAW 264.7 macrophages were activated with zymosan (250 µg/ml). Riboflavin (mice, 50 mg/kg; RAW 264.7, 25 µg/ml) was administered 30 min before zymosan, simultaneously with, or 2, 4, 6 h after zymosan. Additionally, mRNA expression of HMGB1 and its intracellular and serum levels were evaluated. The research showed that riboflavin significantly reduces both the expression and the release of HMGB1; however, the effect of riboflavin was time-dependent. The greatest efficacy was found when riboflavin was given 30 min prior to zymosan, and also 2 and 4 h (C57BL/6J; RAW 264.7) or 4 and 6 h (BALB/c) after zymosan. Research showed that riboflavin influences the level of HMGB1 released in the course of inflammation; however, further study is necessary to determine its mechanisms of action. PMID:26445809

  7. Bursting regimes in a reaction-diffusion system with action potential-dependent equilibrium.

    Stephen R Meier

    Full Text Available The equilibrium Nernst potential plays a critical role in neural cell dynamics. A common approximation used in studying electrical dynamics of excitable cells is that the ionic concentrations inside and outside the cell membranes act as charge reservoirs and remain effectively constant during excitation events. Research into brain electrical activity suggests that relaxing this assumption may provide a better understanding of normal and pathophysiological functioning of the brain. In this paper we explore time-dependent ionic concentrations by allowing the ion-specific Nernst potentials to vary with developing transmembrane potential. As a specific implementation, we incorporate the potential-dependent Nernst shift into a one-dimensional Morris-Lecar reaction-diffusion model. Our main findings result from a region in parameter space where self-sustaining oscillations occur without external forcing. Studying the system close to the bifurcation boundary, we explore the vulnerability of the system with respect to external stimulations which disrupt these oscillations and send the system to a stable equilibrium. We also present results for an extended, one-dimensional cable of excitable tissue tuned to this parameter regime and stimulated, giving rise to complex spatiotemporal pattern formation. Potential applications to the emergence of neuronal bursting in similar two-variable systems and to pathophysiological seizure-like activity are discussed.

  8. Novel experimental results in human cardiac electrophysiology: measurement of the Purkinje fibre action potential from the undiseased human heart.

    Nagy, Norbert; Szél, Tamás; Jost, Norbert; Tóth, András; Gy Papp, Julius; Varró, András

    2015-09-01

    Data obtained from canine cardiac electrophysiology studies are often extrapolated to the human heart. However, it has been previously demonstrated that because of the lower density of its K(+) currents, the human ventricular action potential has a less extensive repolarization reserve. Since the relevance of canine data to the human heart has not yet been fully clarified, the aim of the present study was to determine for the first time the action potentials of undiseased human Purkinje fibres (PFs) and to compare them directly with those of dog PFs. All measurements were performed at 37 °C using the conventional microelectrode technique. At a stimulation rate of 1 Hz, the plateau potential of human PFs is more positive (8.0 ± 1.8 vs 8.6 ± 3.4 mV, n = 7), while the amplitude of the spike is less pronounced. The maximal rate of depolarization is significantly lower in human PKs than in canine PFs (406.7 ± 62 vs 643 ± 36 V/s, respectively, n = 7). We assume that the appreciable difference in the protein expression profiles of the 2 species may underlie these important disparities. Therefore, caution is advised when canine PF data are extrapolated to humans, and further experiments are required to investigate the characteristics of human PF repolarization and its possible role in arrhythmogenesis. PMID:26320996

  9. Potentiation of bradykinin action on smooth muscle by a scorpion venom extract.

    Araujo, R L; Gomez, M V

    1976-08-01

    Gel filtration of the water extract of the venom of the scorpion T. serrulatus showed four peaks; the first peak (P1) is devoid of toxic activity but increases the bradykinin-induced contraction of isolated rat uterus and guinea-pig ileum. The stepwise fractionation of the pooled P1 peak was performed in a DEAE-cellulose column and the bradykinin potentiating activity was found in the second protein peak. Finger-printing of this material showed that the bradykinin potentiating material migrates to the anode, giving two spots when submitted to chromatography, the activity being found in the spot that presents the greatest Rf. The potentiator is destroyed by heating at 97 degrees C, is not dialysable and is destroyed by incubation with pronase. Some of these properties differentiate it from the BPF's from snake venoms. PMID:976731

  10. EFFECTS OF DESENSITIZATION AND REBOUND TO ADENOSINE ON ACTION POTENTIAL AND CONTRACTILITY IN ATRIAL CELLS IN GUINEA-PIGS

    张凤杰; 臧伟进; 于晓江; 胡浩; 张春虹; 孙强; 吕军

    2002-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of desensitization and rebound to adenosine(Ado) on action potential duration(APD) and contractility in guinea-pig atrial cells. Methods Electrical activity was recorded using standard intracellular microelectrode technique and contractility was recorded using. We studied the effects of adenosine on the action potential and desensitization of contractility and rebound of contractility. Results The results showed that action potential duration were shortened by 1,10,100μmol*L-1Ado, the ratio of shortened APD was (9.58±1.40)%,(13.80±2.26)%,(24.80±3.19)%, respectively. 1μmol*L-1Ado had no desensitization (P>0.05), but the time of desensitization of 10μmol*L-1 Ado and 100μmol*L-1 Ado was 1 minute(P<0.05) and 5 minutes(P<0.05), respectively. The desensitization of contractility of 10*!μmol*L-1 Ado was obvious in atrial cells, the decrease of contractility of 10*!μmol*L-1 Ado was obvious in atrial cells, the decrease of contractility was changed from (31.4±16.04)%(2 minutes) to (50.60±15.87)% (4 minutes), compared with control. After washing out Ado, contractility was shown to rebound, the ratio of increase of contractility by 1,10,100μmol*L-1 Ado was (12.38±7.50)%,(19.00±8.14)% and (27.60±13.44)%, respectively. Conclusion Ado can abbreviate APD in atrial cells. The desensitization of Ado on APD is characterized by concentration-dependent and time-dependent in atrial cells, and the desensitization of contractility of Ado is obvious and contractility was shown to rebound after washing out Ado.

  11. Action potential generation in the small intestine of W mutant mice that lack interstitial cells of Cajal

    Malysz, J; Thuneberg, L; Mikkelsen, Hanne Birte; Huizinga, J D

    , K+ channel blockade evoked the typical spikelike action potentials. Electron microscopy identified few methylene blue-positive cells in the W/Wv small intestine associated with Auerbach's plexus as individual ICC. Numbers of resident macrophage-like cells (MLC) and fibroblast-like cells (FLC) were...... significantly changed. Neither FLC nor MLC were part of a network nor did they form specialized junctions with neighboring cells as ICC do. Hence no cell type had replaced ICC at their normal morphological position associated with Auerbach's plexus. ICC were present in W/Wv mice at the deep muscular plexus in...

  12. Potential need for re-definition of the highest priority recovery action in the Krsko SAG-1

    Replacement of old SG (Steam Generators) [7] and the characteristic of new ones throws the question of proper accident management strategy, which leans on philosophy that repair and recovery actions have first priority. In the current NPP Krsko SAMGs (Severe Accident Management Guidelines), water supply to the SG has priority over re-injection water into the core. NPP Krsko reconsidered the highest priority of SAG-1 (inject water to the SG), against the WOG (Westinghouse Owners Group) generic approach (inject water into the core) and potential revision of Severe Accident Phenomenology Evaluations using MAAP (Modular accident Analysis Program) 4.0.5 code. (author)

  13. Motor unit action potential topography and its use in motor unit number estimation.

    Blok, J.H.; Dijk, J.P. van; Zwarts, M.J.; Stegeman, D.F.

    2005-01-01

    High-density multichannel electromyography (EMG) recordings add spatial information to the temporal information content of the surface EMG (sEMG) signal. This study explores the potential value of such multichannel information at a single motor unit level, in particular for the improvement of motor

  14. Mapping HIV-1 vaccine induced T-cell responses: bias towards less-conserved regions and potential impact on vaccine efficacy in the Step study.

    Fusheng Li

    Full Text Available T cell directed HIV vaccines are based upon the induction of CD8+ T cell memory responses that would be effective in inhibiting infection and subsequent replication of an infecting HIV-1 strain, a process that requires a match or near-match between the epitope induced by vaccination and the infecting viral strain. We compared the frequency and specificity of the CTL epitope responses elicited by the replication-defective Ad5 gag/pol/nef vaccine used in the Step trial with the likelihood of encountering those epitopes among recently sequenced Clade B isolates of HIV-1. Among vaccinees with detectable 15-mer peptide pool ELISpot responses, there was a median of four (one Gag, one Nef and two Pol CD8 epitopes per vaccinee detected by 9-mer peptide ELISpot assay. Importantly, frequency analysis of the mapped epitopes indicated that there was a significant skewing of the T cell response; variable epitopes were detected more frequently than would be expected from an unbiased sampling of the vaccine sequences. Correspondingly, the most highly conserved epitopes in Gag, Pol, and Nef (defined by presence in >80% of sequences currently in the Los Alamos database www.hiv.lanl.gov were detected at a lower frequency than unbiased sampling, similar to the frequency reported for responses to natural infection, suggesting potential epitope masking of these responses. This may be a generic mechanism used by the virus in both contexts to escape effective T cell immune surveillance. The disappointing results of the Step trial raise the bar for future HIV vaccine candidates. This report highlights the bias towards less-conserved epitopes present in the same vaccine used in the Step trial. Development of vaccine strategies that can elicit a greater breadth of responses, and towards conserved regions of the genome in particular, are critical requirements for effective T-cell based vaccines against HIV-1.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00849680, A Study of Safety, Tolerability

  15. Interwell radiative recombination in the presence of random potential fluctuations in GaAs/AlGaAs biased double quantum wells

    Timofeev, V.B.; Larionov, A.V.; Ioselevich, A.S.;

    1998-01-01

    The interwell radiative recombination from biased double quantum wells (DQW) in pin GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures is investigated at different temperatures and external electrical fields. The luminescence line of interwell recombination of spatially separated electron-hole pairs exhibits systematic...

  16. Ameliorating treatment-refractory depression with intranasal ketamine: potential NMDA receptor actions in the pain circuitry representing mental anguish.

    Opler, Lewis A; Opler, Mark G A; Arnsten, Amy F T

    2016-02-01

    This article reviews the antidepressant actions of ketamine, an N-methyl-D-aspartame glutamate receptor (NMDAR) antagonist, and offers a potential neural mechanism for intranasal ketamine's ultra-rapid actions based on the key role of NMDAR in the nonhuman primate prefrontal cortex (PFC). Although intravenous ketamine infusions can lift mood within hours, the current review describes how intranasal ketamine administration can have ultra-rapid antidepressant effects, beginning within minutes (5-40 minutes) and lasting hours, but with repeated treatments needed for sustained antidepressant actions. Research in rodents suggests that increased synaptogenesis in PFC may contribute to the prolonged benefit of ketamine administration, beginning hours after administration. However, these data cannot explain the relief that occurs within minutes of intranasal ketamine delivery. We hypothesize that the ultra-rapid effects of intranasal administration in humans may be due to ketamine blocking the NMDAR circuits that generate the emotional representations of pain (eg, Brodmann Areas 24 and 25, insular cortex), cortical areas that can be overactive in depression and which sit above the nasal epithelium. In contrast, NMDAR blockade in the dorsolateral PFC following systemic administration of ketamine may contribute to cognitive deficits. This novel view may help to explain how intravenous ketamine can treat the symptoms of depression yet worsen the symptoms of schizophrenia. PMID:25619798

  17. Immunomodulatory effects of fluoxetine: A new potential pharmacological action for a classic antidepressant drug?

    Di Rosso, María Emilia; Palumbo, María Laura; Genaro, Ana María

    2016-07-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are frequently used antidepressants. In particular, fluoxetine is usually chosen for the treatment of the symptoms of depression, obsessive-compulsive, panic attack and bulimia nervosa. Antidepressant therapy has been associated with immune dysfunction. However, there is contradictory evidence about the effect of fluoxetine on the immune system. Experimental findings indicate that lymphocytes express the serotonin transporter. Moreover it has been shown that fluoxetine is able to modulate the immune function through a serotonin-dependent pathway and through a novel independent mechanism. In addition, several studies have shown that fluoxetine can alter tumor cell viability. Thus, it was recently demonstrated in vivo that chronic fluoxetine treatment inhibits tumor growth by increasing antitumor T-cell activity. Here we briefly review some of the literature referring to how fluoxetine is able to modify, for better or worse, the functionality of the immune system. These results of our analysis point to the relevance of the novel pharmacological action of this drug as an immunomodulator helping to treat several pathologies in which immune deficiency and/or deregulation is present. PMID:26644208

  18. Bursting Regimes in a Reaction-Diffusion System with Action Potential-Dependent Equilibrium

    Meier, Stephen R.; Lancaster, Jarrett L.; Starobin, Joseph M.

    2015-01-01

    The equilibrium Nernst potential plays a critical role in neural cell dynamics. A common approximation used in studying electrical dynamics of excitable cells is that the ionic concentrations inside and outside the cell membranes act as charge reservoirs and remain effectively constant during excitation events. Research into brain electrical activity suggests that relaxing this assumption may provide a better understanding of normal and pathophysiological functioning of the brain. In this pap...

  19. Molecular actions and therapeutic potential of lithium in preclinical and clinical studies of CNS disorders

    Chiu, Chi-Tso; Chuang, De-Maw

    2010-01-01

    Lithium has been used clinically to treat bipolar disorder for over half a century, and remains a fundamental pharmacological therapy for patients with this illness. Although lithium’s therapeutic mechanisms are not fully understood, substantial in vitro and in vivo evidence suggests that it has neuroprotective/neurotrophic properties against various insults, and considerable clinical potential for the treatment of several neurodegenerative conditions. Evidence from pharmacological and gene m...

  20. HDL-replacement therapy: mechanism of action, types of agents and potential clinical indications

    Remaley, Alan T.; Amar, Marcelo; Sviridov, Dmitri

    2008-01-01

    HDL-replacement therapy is a promising new treatment strategy involving the acute administration of HDL to rapidly stabilize patients at imminent risk for developing a myocardial infarction, such as those with acute coronary syndrome. This review will first focus on the anti-atherogenic mechanisms for HDL, such as the stimulation of the reverse cholesterol transport pathway, and then discuss the other potential beneficial biological effects of HDL on atherosclerosis. The various types of HDL-...

  1. Cognitive Bias in Systems Verification

    Larson, Steve

    2012-01-01

    Working definition of cognitive bias: Patterns by which information is sought and interpreted that can lead to systematic errors in decisions. Cognitive bias is used in diverse fields: Economics, Politics, Intelligence, Marketing, to name a few. Attempts to ground cognitive science in physical characteristics of the cognitive apparatus exceed our knowledge. Studies based on correlations; strict cause and effect is difficult to pinpoint. Effects cited in the paper and discussed here have been replicated many times over, and appear sound. Many biases have been described, but it is still unclear whether they are all distinct. There may only be a handful of fundamental biases, which manifest in various ways. Bias can effect system verification in many ways . Overconfidence -> Questionable decisions to deploy. Availability -> Inability to conceive critical tests. Representativeness -> Overinterpretation of results. Positive Test Strategies -> Confirmation bias. Debiasing at individual level very difficult. The potential effect of bias on the verification process can be managed, but not eliminated. Worth considering at key points in the process.

  2. Effects of imidapril on heterogeneity of action potential and calcium current of ventriclar myocytes in infarcted rabbits

    YangLI; QiaoXUE; JieMA; Cun-taiZHANG; PingQIU; LinWANG; WeiGAO; ReiCHENG; Zai-yinLU; Shi-wenWANG

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of chronic treatment with imidapril on the electrophysiologic heterogeneous change of the noninfarcted myocardium of rabbits after myocardial infarction and the mechanism of its antiarrhythmic efficacy. METHODS: Rabbits with left coronary artery ligation were prepared and allowed to recover for 8 weeks. Myocytes were isolated from subendocardial, midmyocardial, and subepicardial regions of the noninfarcted left ventricular wall. Action potentials and calcium current were recorded using whole-cell patch clamp technique. RESULTS: The action potential duration of repolarization 90 % (APD90) was more prolonged in midmyocardium rather than in subepicardium and subendocardium with healed myocardial infarction. The transmural dispersion of repolarization (TDR) was increased in the three ventricular regions. The amplitude of/Ca-L was enhanced but its density was decreased in noninfarcted ventricular myocytes due to increased cell membrane capacitance. The increased differences of calcium currents among subepicardium, midmyocardium, and subendocardium were also discovered. Normalization of heterogeneous changes in repolarization after treatment with imidapril was observed and decrease of TDR in noninfarcted area was measured. Early after depolarization (EAD) events of noninfarcted midmyocardium were markedly decreased by imidapril. CONCLUSION: Imidapril reduced the electrophysiologic heterogeneities in noninfarcted area in rabbits after myocardial infarction. This ability of imidapril may contribute to its antiarrhythmic efficacy.

  3. Effects of imidapril on heterogeneity of action potential and calcium current of ventriclar myocytes in infarcted rabbits

    Yang LI; Shi-wen WANG; Qiao XUE; Jie MA; Cun-tai ZHANG; Ping QIU; Lin WANG; Wei GAO; Rei CHENG; Zai-ying LU

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of chronic treatment with imidapril on the electrophysiologic heterogeneous change of the noninfarcted myocardium of rabbits after myocardial infarction and the mechanism of its antiarrhythmic efficacy. METHODS: Rabbits with left coronary artery ligation were prepared and allowed to recover for 8 weeks.Myocytes were isolated from subendocardial, midmyocardial, and subepicardial regions of the noninfarcted left ventricular wall. Action potentials and calcium current were recorded using whole-cell patch clamp technique.RESULTS: The action potential duration of repolarization 90 % (APD90)was more prolonged in midmyocardium rather than in subepicardium and subendocardium with healed myocardial infarction. The transmural dispersion of repolarization (TDR) was increased in the three ventricular regions. The amplitude of ICa-L was enhanced but its density was decreased in noninfarcted ventricular myocytes due to increased cell membrane capacitance. The increased differences of calcium currents among subepicardium, midmyocardium, and subendocardium were also discovered. Normalization of heterogeneous changes in repolarization after treatment with imidapril was observed and decrease of TDR in noninfarcted area was measvred. Early after depolarization (EAD) events of noninfarcted midmyocardium were markedly decreased by imidapril. CONCLUSION: Imidapril reduced the electrophysiologic heterogeneities in noninfarcted area in rabbits after myocardial infarction. This ability of imidapril may contribute to its antiarrhythmic efficacy.

  4. The characteristics of action potential and nonselec-tive cation current of cardiomyocytes in rabbit superior vena cava

    2008-01-01

    As a special focus in initiating and maintaining atrial fibrillation (AF), cardiomyocytes in superior vena cava (SVC) have distinctive electrophysiological characters. In this study, we found that comparing with the right atrial (RA) cardiomyoctyes, the SVC cardiomyoctyes had longer APD90 at the different basic cycle lengths; the conduction block could be observed on both RA and SVC cardiomyoctyes. A few of SVC cardiomyoctyes showed slow response action potentials with automatic activity and some others showed early afterdepolarization (EAD) spontaneously. Further more, we found that there are nonselective cation current (INs) in both SVC and RA cardiomyocytes. The peak density of INs in SVC cardiomyocytes was smaller than that in RA cardiomyocytes. Removal of extracellular divalent cation and glucose could increase INs in SVC cardiomyocytes. The agonist or the antagonist of INs may in-crease or decrease APD. To sum up, some SVC cardiomyocytes possess the ability of spontaneous activity; the difference of transmembrane action potentials between SVC and RA cardiomyocytes is partly because of the different density of INs between them; the agonist or the antagonist of INs can in-crease or decrease APD leading to the enhancement or reduction of EAD genesis in SVC cardiomyo-cytes. INs in rabbit myocytes is fairly similar to TRPC3 current in electrophysiological property, which might play an important role in the mechanisms of AF.

  5. Sensitivity of Rabbit Ventricular Action Potential and Ca2+ Dynamics to Small Variations in Membrane Currents and Ion Diffusion Coefficients

    Yuan Hung Lo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about how small variations in ionic currents and Ca2+ and Na+ diffusion coefficients impact action potential and Ca2+ dynamics in rabbit ventricular myocytes. We applied sensitivity analysis to quantify the sensitivity of Shannon et al. model (Biophys. J., 2004 to 5%–10% changes in currents conductance, channels distribution, and ion diffusion in rabbit ventricular cells. We found that action potential duration and Ca2+ peaks are highly sensitive to 10% increase in L-type Ca2+ current; moderately influenced by 10% increase in Na+-Ca2+ exchanger, Na+-K+ pump, rapid delayed and slow transient outward K+ currents, and Cl− background current; insensitive to 10% increases in all other ionic currents and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ fluxes. Cell electrical activity is strongly affected by 5% shift of L-type Ca2+ channels and Na+-Ca2+ exchanger in between junctional and submembrane spaces while Ca2+-activated Cl−-channel redistribution has the modest effect. Small changes in submembrane and cytosolic diffusion coefficients for Ca2+, but not in Na+ transfer, may alter notably myocyte contraction. Our studies highlight the need for more precise measurements and further extending and testing of the Shannon et al. model. Our results demonstrate usefulness of sensitivity analysis to identify specific knowledge gaps and controversies related to ventricular cell electrophysiology and Ca2+ signaling.

  6. Effects of rapid and slow potassium repolarization currents and calcium dynamics on hysteresis in restitution of action potential duration.

    Wu, Runze; Patwardhan, Abhijit

    2007-04-01

    We used a mathematical model to investigate effects of repolarizing currents I(kr) and I(ks), calcium (Ca) current I(CaL), and Ca dynamics in network sarcoplasmic reticulum and junctional sarcoplasmic reticulum (JSR) on hysteresis in restitution of action potential duration. Enhanced I(kr) increased slope of restitution, hysteresis loop thickness, and delay between peaks of diastolic intervals and action potential duration. Increase in I(ks) decreased loop thickness and peak delay. Decrease in I(CaL) had effects similar to increasing I(kr), except slope of restitution decreased markedly. Uptake of Ca into the network sarcoplasmic reticulum had less effect on hysteresis than transfer of Ca into JSR. Faster transfer of Ca into JSR markedly decreased loop thickness and peak delay. Our results provide insight into mechanisms responsible for this newly identified property of restitution. Such information will be valuable in studies where modification of hysteresis is used to investigate its role in arrhythmogenesis. PMID:16895773

  7. Whey protein potentiates the intestinotrophic action of glucagon-like peptide-2 in parenterally fed rats

    Liu, Xiaowen; Murali, Sangita G; Holst, Jens J;

    2009-01-01

    protein component, casein, soy, or whey protein, potentiates the intestinal growth response to GLP-2 in rats with PN-induced mucosal hypoplasia. Rats received PN and continuous intravenous infusion of GLP-2 (100 microg/kg/day) for 7 days. Six EN groups received PN+GLP-2 for days 1-3 and partial PN+GLP-2...... plus EN for days 4-7. EN was provided by ad libitum intake of a semielemental liquid diet with different protein sources: casein, hydrolyzed soy, whey protein concentrate (WPC), and hydrolyzed WPC+casein. Controls received PN+GLP-2 alone. EN induced significantly greater jejunal sucrase activity and...... whey protein, and not casein or soy, potentiated the ability of GLP-2 to reverse PN-induced mucosal hypoplasia and further increase ileal villus height, crypt depth, and mucosa cellularity compared with PN+GLP-2 alone, P < 0.05. The ability of whey protein to induce greater mucosal surface area was...

  8. BUSINESS LEADERSHIP BIASES: ANDROCENTRISM, ETHNOCENTRISM AND CHRONOCENTRISM

    SOFICA Aurelian; NEGRUTA Adina

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to explore the unconscious biases that accompany the business leadership icons. The main objectives of the paper are: to look for evidence of leadership biases on ground of gender (androcentrism), ethnicity (ethnocentrism) and age (cronocentrism); to look for potential reasons behind the biases and for potential effects at the organizational and social level. The article confirms some of the evidence from various international empirical or theoretical studies, and prop...

  9. Adjuvant potential of resiquimod with inactivated Newcastle disease vaccine and its mechanism of action in chicken.

    Sachan, Swati; Ramakrishnan, Saravanan; Annamalai, Arunsaravanakumar; Sharma, Bal Krishan; Malik, Hina; Saravanan, B C; Jain, Lata; Saxena, Meeta; Kumar, Ajay; Krishnaswamy, Narayanan

    2015-08-26

    Resiquimod (R-848), an imidazoquinoline compound, is a potent synthetic Toll-like receptor (TLR) 7 agonist. Although the solitary adjuvant potential of R-848 is well established in mammals, such reports are not available in avian species hitherto. Hence, the adjuvant potential of R-848 was tested in SPF chicken in this study. Two week old chicks were divided into four groups (10 birds/group) viz., control (A), inactivated Newcastle disease virus (NDV) vaccine prepared from velogenic strain (B), commercial oil adjuvanted inactivated NDV vaccine prepared from lentogenic strain (C) and inactivated NDV vaccine prepared from velogenic strain with R-848 (D). Booster was given two weeks post primary vaccination. Humoral immune response was assessed by haemagglutination inhibition (HI) test and ELISA while the cellular immune response was quantified by lymphocyte transformation test (LTT) and flow cytometry post-vaccination. Entire experiment was repeated twice to check the reproducibility. Highest HI titre was observed in group D at post booster weeks 1 and 2 that corresponds to mean log2 HI titre of 6.4 ± 0.16 and 6.8 ± 0.13, respectively. The response was significantly higher than that of group B or C (Pstimulation index (P ≤ 0.01) as well as CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells in flow cytometry (P<0.05) were significantly high and maximum in group D. Group D conferred complete protection against virulent NDV challenge, while it was only 80% in group B and C. To understand the effects of R-848, the kinetics of immune response genes in spleen were analyzed using quantitative real-time PCR after R-848 administration (50 μg/bird, i.m. route). Resiquimod significantly up-regulated the expression of IFN-α, IFN-β, IFN-γ, IL-1β, IL-4, iNOS and MHC-II genes (P<0.01). In conclusion, the study demonstrated the adjuvant potential of R-848 when co-administered with inactivated NDV vaccine in SPF chicken which is likely due to the up-regulation of immune response genes. PMID:26192354

  10. Potential food applications of biobased materials. An EU- concerted action project

    Haugaard, V.K.; Udsen, A.M.; Mortensen, G.;

    2001-01-01

    films and coatings to food but novel commercial applications of these are scarce. Based on information currently available on the properties of biobased packaging materials the study identified products in the fresh meat, dairy, ready meal, beverage, fruit and vegetable, snack, frozen food and dry food......The objective of the study was to ascertain the state of the art with regard to the applicability of biobased packaging materials to foods and to identify potential food applications for biobased materials. The study revealed relatively few examples of biobased materials used as primary, secondary...... or tertiary packaging materials for foods. This is due to the fact that published investigations on the use of biobased materials are still scarce, and results obtained remain unpublished because of commercial pressures. The scientific literature contains numerous reports on applications of edible...

  11. Dipeptidyl peptidase IV as a potential target for selective prodrug activation and chemotherapeutic action in cancers.

    Dahan, Arik; Wolk, Omri; Yang, Peihua; Mittal, Sachin; Wu, Zhiqian; Landowski, Christopher P; Amidon, Gordon L

    2014-12-01

    The efficacy of chemotherapeutic drugs is often offset by severe side effects attributable to poor selectivity and toxicity to normal cells. Recently, the enzyme dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPPIV) was considered as a potential target for the delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs. The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of targeting chemotherapeutic drugs to DPPIV as a strategy to enhance their specificity. The expression profile of DPPIV was obtained for seven cancer cell lines using DNA microarray data from the DTP database, and was validated by RT-PCR. A prodrug was then synthesized by linking the cytotoxic drug melphalan to a proline-glycine dipeptide moiety, followed by hydrolysis studies in the seven cell lines with a standard substrate, as well as the glycyl-prolyl-melphalan (GP-Mel). Lastly, cell proliferation studies were carried out to demonstrate enzyme-dependent activation of the candidate prodrug. The relative RT-PCR expression levels of DPPIV in the cancer cell lines exhibited linear correlation with U95Av2 Affymetrix data (r(2) = 0.94), and with specific activity of a standard substrate, glycine-proline-p-nitroanilide (r(2) = 0.96). The significantly higher antiproliferative activity of GP-Mel in Caco-2 cells (GI₅₀ = 261 μM) compared to that in SK-MEL-5 cells (GI₅₀ = 807 μM) was consistent with the 9-fold higher specific activity of the prodrug in Caco-2 cells (5.14 pmol/min/μg protein) compared to SK-MEL-5 cells (0.68 pmol/min/μg protein) and with DPPIV expression levels in these cells. Our results demonstrate the great potential to exploit DPPIV as a prodrug activating enzyme for efficient chemotherapeutic drug targeting. PMID:25365774

  12. Selection bias in rheumatic disease research

    Choi, Hyon K.; Nguyen, Uyen-Sa; Niu, Jingbo; Danaei, Goodarz; Zhang, Yuqing

    2014-01-01

    The identification of modifiable risk factors for the development of rheumatic conditions and their sequelae is crucial for reducing the substantial worldwide burden of these diseases. However, the validity of such research can be threatened by sources of bias, including confounding, measurement and selection biases. In this Review, we discuss potentially major issues of selection bias—a type of bias frequently overshadowed by other bias and feasibility issues, despite being equally or more problematic—in key areas of rheumatic disease research. We present index event bias (a type of selection bias) as one of the potentially unifying reasons behind some unexpected findings, such as the ‘risk factor paradox’—a phenomenon exemplified by the discrepant effects of certain risk factors on the development versus the progression of osteoarthritis (OA) or rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We also discuss potential selection biases owing to differential loss to follow-up in RA and OA research, as well as those due to the depletion of susceptibles (prevalent user bias) and immortal time bias. The lesson remains that selection bias can be ubiquitous and, therefore, has the potential to lead the field astray. Thus, we conclude with suggestions to help investigators avoid such issues and limit the impact on future rheumatology research. PMID:24686510

  13. Potassium conductances mediate bidirectional state-dependent modulation of action potential evoked dendritic calcium signals in dentate gyrus granule cells

    János Brunner

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Backpropagating action potentials (bAPs and local calcium signals that they trigger are fundamental for dendritic functions. Here we addressed the question what extent the changes of local dendritic membrane properties can contribute to the shaping of the coupling between dendritic action potentials and the local calcium responses. Using a combination of in vitro electrophysiological and confocal imaging techniques we found that activation of dendritic GIRK channels via mGlu2 or GABAB receptors enhanced the bAP¬-triggered calcium signals in the dendrites of dentate gyrus granule cells (GCs. The enhancement of calcium signals was significant only in those dendritic regions, where these receptors are predominantly expressed. Similarly to GIRK channel activation, somatic hyperpolarization by DC current injection (from -64 mV to -77 mV, significantly increased bAP-associated calcium signals in the proximal dendrites. The hyperpolarization was associated with a decrease in the input resistance due to the rectification of the membrane potential of GCs. The effect of hyperpolarization on the calcium signals was maintained when T-type calcium currents were blocked but it decreased when GIRK channels were inhibited. Simultaneous dual somato-dendritic recordings from GCs showed that somatic hyperpolarization accelerated the repolarization phase of dendritic bAP in the proximal region whereas the rising phase and peak amplitude was not affected. We hypothesize that the larger driving force for calcium ions during the faster repolarization can contribute to the increasing in calcium signals. Employment of previously recorded dendritic bAP waveforms from hyperpolarized membrane potential as voltage command evoked larger calcium currents in nucleated patches compared to bAP waveform from the same recording at depolarized membrane potential. Furthermore, addition of native, high-voltage activated, inactivating potassium conductance by somatic dynamic clamp

  14. Methanol extract of Tephrosia vogelii leaves potentiates the contractile action of acetylcholine on isolated rabbit jejunum

    Tavershima Dzenda; Joseph Olusegun Ayo; Alexander Babatunde Adelaiye; Ambrose Osemattah Adaudi

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the modulating role of methanol extract of Tephrosia vogelii leaves on acetylcholine (ACh)-induced contraction of isolated rabbit jejunum. Methods: Rabbit jejunum segment was removed and placed in an organ bath containing Tyrode’s solution, and its contractions were recorded isometrically. Results: ACh (2.0 × 10-10 g/mL) and the extract (2.0 × 10-4 g/mL) individually increased the frequency of contraction (mean ± SEM) of the isolated smooth muscle tissue by 47.6% ± 9.5%and 77.8% ± 66.5%, respectively. When ACh and the extract were combined, the frequency of contraction of the tissue was increased by 222.2% ± 25.9%, representing a 366.7% increase (P < 0.001) over the effect of ACh alone. Similarly, ACh (2.0 × 10-9 g/mL) and the extract individually increased significantly (P < 0.001) the amplitude of contraction of the tissue by 685.7% ± 61.1% and 455.2% ± 38.1%, respectively. When ACh and the extract were combined, the amplitude of contraction of the tissue rose by 1263.8% ± 69.0%, representing 84.3% increase over the effect of ACh alone. Conclusions: The findings demonstrate that methanol extract of Tephrosia vogelii leaves potentiates the contractile effect of ACh on intestinal smooth muscle, supporting the traditional claim that the plant is purgative.

  15. Control of Postharvest Bacterial Soft Rot by Gamma Irradiation and its Potential Modes of Action.

    Jeong, Rae-Dong; Chu, Eun-Hee; Park, Duck Hwan; Park, Hae-Jun

    2016-04-01

    Gamma irradiation was evaluated for its in vitro and in vivo antibacterial activity against a postharvest bacterial pathogen, Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora (Ecc). Gamma irradiation in a bacteria cell suspension resulted in a dramatic reduction of the viable counts as well as an increase in the amounts of DNA and protein released from the cells. Gamma irradiation showed complete inactivation of Ecc, especially at a dose of 0.6 kGy. In addition, scanning electron microscopy of irradiated cells revealed severe damage on the surface of most bacterial cells. Along with the morphological changes of cells by gamma irradiation, it also affected the membrane integrity in a dose-dependent manner. The mechanisms by which the gamma irradiation decreased the bacterial soft rot can be directly associated with the disruption of the cell membrane of the bacterial pathogen, along with DNA fragmentation, results in dose-dependent cell inactivation. These findings suggest that gamma irradiation has potential as an antibacterial approach to reduce the severity of the soft rot of paprika. PMID:27147935

  16. Anthocyanins in obesity-associated thrombogenesis: a review of the potential mechanism of action.

    Thompson, Kiara; Pederick, Wayne; Santhakumar, Abishek Bommannan

    2016-05-18

    Platelet dysfunction, oxidative stress and dyslipidemia are important contributors to pro-thrombotic progression particularly in obese and hyper-cholesterolemic populations. Becoming an increasingly widespread endemic, obesity causes a dysfunction in the metabolic system by initiating endothelial dysfunction; increasing free radical production; lipid peroxidation; platelet hyperactivity and aggregation; thereby accelerating thrombogenesis. In the event of increased free radical generation under pro-thrombotic conditions, antioxidants act as scavengers in reducing physiological oxidative stress; free radical-mediated thrombosis and hemostatic function. Anthocyanin, a subclass of the polyphenol family flavonoids has been shown to exhibit anti-dyslipidemic and anti-thrombotic properties by virtue of its antioxidant activity. Current anti-platelet/coagulant therapeutics target specific receptor pathways to relieve the extent of dysfunction and plaque acceleration in pro-thrombotic individuals. Though effective, they have been associated with high bleeding risk and increased response variability. The following review focuses on the potential role of natural dietary anthocyanins in targeting simultaneous mechanistic pathways in alleviating platelet activation, dyslipidemia, and oxidative stress-associated thrombus acceleration in obese pro-thrombotic populations. PMID:27043127

  17. Control of Postharvest Bacterial Soft Rot by Gamma Irradiation and its Potential Modes of Action

    Jeong, Rae-Dong; Chu, Eun-Hee; Park, Duck Hwan; Park, Hae-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Gamma irradiation was evaluated for its in vitro and in vivo antibacterial activity against a postharvest bacterial pathogen, Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora (Ecc). Gamma irradiation in a bacteria cell suspension resulted in a dramatic reduction of the viable counts as well as an increase in the amounts of DNA and protein released from the cells. Gamma irradiation showed complete inactivation of Ecc, especially at a dose of 0.6 kGy. In addition, scanning electron microscopy of irradiated cells revealed severe damage on the surface of most bacterial cells. Along with the morphological changes of cells by gamma irradiation, it also affected the membrane integrity in a dose-dependent manner. The mechanisms by which the gamma irradiation decreased the bacterial soft rot can be directly associated with the disruption of the cell membrane of the bacterial pathogen, along with DNA fragmentation, results in dose-dependent cell inactivation. These findings suggest that gamma irradiation has potential as an antibacterial approach to reduce the severity of the soft rot of paprika. PMID:27147935

  18. Awareness Reduces Racial Bias

    Pope, Devin G.; Price, Joseph; Wolfers, Justin

    2014-01-01

    Can raising awareness of racial bias subsequently reduce that bias? We address this question by exploiting the widespread media attention highlighting racial bias among professional basketball referees that occurred in May 2007 following the release of an academic study. Using new data, we confirm that racial bias persisted in the years after the study's original sample, but prior to the media coverage. Subsequent to the media coverage though, the bias completely disappeared. We examine poten...

  19. Exploring potential mechanisms of action of natalizumab in secondary progressive multiple sclerosis.

    Sellebjerg, Finn; Cadavid, Diego; Steiner, Deborah; Villar, Luisa Maria; Reynolds, Richard; Mikol, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a common and chronic central nervous system (CNS) demyelinating disease and a leading cause of permanent disability. Patients most often present with a relapsing-remitting disease course, typically progressing over time to a phase of relentless advancement in secondary progressive MS (SPMS), for which approved disease-modifying therapies are limited. In this review, we summarize the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in the development of SPMS and the rationale and clinical potential for natalizumab, which is currently approved for the treatment of relapsing forms of MS, to exert beneficial effects in reducing disease progression unrelated to relapses in SPMS. In both forms of MS, active brain-tissue injury is associated with inflammation; but in SPMS, the inflammatory response occurs at least partly behind the blood-brain barrier and is followed by a cascade of events, including persistent microglial activation that may lead to chronic demyelination and neurodegeneration associated with irreversible disability. In patients with relapsing forms of MS, natalizumab therapy is known to significantly reduce intrathecal inflammatory responses which results in reductions in brain lesions and brain atrophy as well as beneficial effects on clinical measures, such as reduced frequency and severity of relapse and reduced accumulation of disability. Natalizumab treatment also reduces levels of cerebrospinal fluid chemokines and other biomarkers of intrathecal inflammation, axonal damage and demyelination, and has demonstrated the ability to reduce innate immune activation and intrathecal immunoglobulin synthesis in patients with MS. The efficacy of natalizumab therapy in SPMS is currently being investigated in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. PMID:26788129

  20. Microelectrode array recordings of cardiac action potentials as a high throughput method to evaluate pesticide toxicity.

    Natarajan, A; Molnar, P; Sieverdes, K; Jamshidi, A; Hickman, J J

    2006-04-01

    The threat of environmental pollution, biological warfare agent dissemination and new diseases in recent decades has increased research into cell-based biosensors. The creation of this class of sensors could specifically aid the detection of toxic chemicals and their effects in the environment, such as pyrethroid pesticides. Pyrethroids are synthetic pesticides that have been used increasingly over the last decade to replace other pesticides like DDT. In this study we used a high-throughput method to detect pyrethroids by using multielectrode extracellular recordings from cardiac cells. The data from this cell-electrode hybrid system was compared to published results obtained with patch-clamp electrophysiology and also used as an alternative method to further understand pyrethroid effects. Our biosensor consisted of a confluent monolayer of cardiac myocytes cultured on microelectrode arrays (MEA) composed of 60 substrate-integrated electrodes. Spontaneous activity of these beating cells produced extracellular field potentials in the range of 100 microV to nearly 1200 microV with a beating frequency of 0.5-4 Hz. All of the tested pyrethroids; alpha-Cypermethrin, Tetramethrin and Tefluthrin, produced similar changes in the electrophysiological properties of the cardiac myocytes, namely reduced beating frequency and amplitude. The sensitivity of our toxin detection method was comparable to earlier patch-clamp studies, which indicates that, in specific applications, high-throughput extracellular methods can replace single-cell studies. Moreover, the similar effect of all three pyrethroids on the measured parameters suggests, that not only detection of the toxins but, their classification might also be possible with this method. Overall our results support the idea that whole cell biosensors might be viable alternatives when compared to current toxin detection methods. PMID:16198528

  1. Potential Causes of Significant Inventory Differences at Bulk Handling Facilities and the Importance of Inventory Difference Action Levels

    Accountancy for nuclear material can be split into two categories. Firstly, where possible, accountancy should be in terms of items that can be transferred as discrete packages and their contents fixed at the time of their creation. All items must remain accounted for at all times, and a single missing item is considered significant. Secondly, where nuclear material is unconstrained, for example in a reprocessing plant where it can change form, there is an uncertainty that relates to the amount of material present in any location. Cumulatively, these uncertainties can be summed and provide a context for any estimate of material in a process. Any apparent loss or gain between what has been physically measured within a facility during its physical inventory take and what is reported within its nuclear material accounts is known as an inventory difference. The cumulative measurement uncertainties can be used to set an action level for the inventory difference so that if an inventory difference is observed outside of such action levels, the difference is classified as significant and an investigation to find the root cause(s) is required. The purpose of this paper is to explore the potential causes of significant inventory differences and to provide a framework within which an inventory difference investigation can be carried out.

  2. Potential self-selection bias in a nested case-control study on indoor environmental factors and their association with asthma and allergic symptoms among pre-school children

    Bornehag, Carl-Gustaf; Sundell, Jan; Sigsgaard, T.;

    2006-01-01

    , including health, building characteristics of the home, and socioeconomic factors between participating and non-participating families in a nested case-control study on asthma and allergy among children. Information was collected in a baseline questionnaire to the parents of 14,077 children aged 1-6 years...... in a first step. In a second step 2,156 of the children were invited to participate in a case-control study. Of these, 198 cases and 202 controls were finally selected. For identifying potential selection bias, information concerning all invited families in the case-control study was obtained from...... problems in the case families, and health-related lifestyle factors, such as non-smoking parents. The overall conclusion of this study is that there are selection biases involved in studies that need close cooperation with the families involved. One solution to this problem is stratification, i...

  3. Resveratrol exhibits a strong cytotoxic activity in cultured cells and has an antiviral action against polyomavirus: potential clinical use

    Galati Gaspare

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Resveratrol is a non flavonoid polyphenol compound present in many plants and fruits and, at especially high concentrations, in the grape berries of Vitis vinifera. This compound has a strong bioactivity and its cytoprotective action has been demonstrated, however at high concentrations the drug exhibits also an effective anti-proliferative action. We recently showed its ability to abolish the effects of oxidative stress in cultured cells. In this work we assayed the bioactivity of resveratrol as antiproliferative and antiviral drug in cultured fibroblasts. Studies by other Authors showed that this natural compound inhibits the proliferation of different viruses such as herpes simplex, varicella-zoster and influenza A. The results presented here show an evident toxic activity of the drug at high concentrations, on the other hand at sub-cytotoxic concentrations, resveratrol can effectively inhibit the synthesis of polyomavirus DNA. A possible interpretation is that, due to the damage caused by resveratrol to the plasma membrane, the transfer of the virus from the endoplasmic reticulum to the nucleus, may be hindered thus inhibiting the production of viral DNA. Methods The mouse fibroblast line 3T6 and the human tumor line HL60 were used throughout the work. Cell viability and vital cell count were assessed respectively, by the MTT assay and Trypan Blue staining. Cytotoxic properties and evaluation of viral DNA production by agarose gel electrophoresis were performed according to standard protocols. Results Our results show a clear dose dependent both cytotoxic and antiviral effect of resveratrol respectively at high and low concentrations. The cytotoxic action is exerted towards a stabilized cell-line (3T6 as well as a tumor-line (HL60. Furthermore the antiviral action is evident after the phase of virion entry, therefore data suggest that the drug acts during the synthesis of the viral progeny DNA. Conclusion Resveratrol is

  4. Effect of mental challenge induced by movie clips on action potential duration in normal human subjects independent of heart rate

    Child, Nicholas; Hanson, Ben; Bishop, Martin; Rinaldi, Christopher A; Bostock, Julian; Western, David; Cooklin, Michael; O’Neil, Mark; Wright, Matthew; Razavi, Reza; Gill, Jaswinder; Taggart, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background Mental stress and emotion have long been associated with ventricular arrhythmias and sudden death in animal models and humans. The effect of mental challenge on ventricular action potential duration (APD) in conscious healthy humans has not been reported. Methods and Results Activation recovery intervals (ARI) measured from unipolar electrograms as a surrogate for APD (n=19) were recorded from right and left ventricular endocardium during steady state pacing while subjects watched an emotionally charged film clip. To assess the possible modulating role of altered respiration on APD, the subjects then repeated the same breathing pattern they had during the stress, but without the movie clip. Haemodynamic parameters (mean, systolic, and diastolic blood pressure, and rate of pressure increase) and respiration rate increased during the stressful part of the film clip (p=0.001). APD decreased during the stressful parts of the film clip, eg for global RV ARI at end of film clip 193.8ms (SD 14) vs 198.0ms (SD13) during the matched breathing control (end film LV 199.8ms (SD16) vs control 201.6ms (SD15), p=0.004. Respiration rate increased during the stressful part of the film clip (by 2 breaths/minute), and was well matched in the respective control period without any haemodynamic or ARI changes. Conclusions Our results document for the first time direct recordings of the effect of a mental challenge protocol on ventricular action potential duration in conscious humans. The effect of mental challenge on APD was not secondary to emotionally-induced altered respiration or heart rate. PMID:24833641

  5. Potential bias in estimates of abundance and distribution of North Sea cod (Gadus morhua) due to strong winds prevailing prior or during a survey

    Wieland, Kai; Olesen, Hans Jakob; Pedersen, Eva Maria;

    2011-01-01

    The impact of strong winds on catches of cod (Gadus morhua) was studied using different fishing methods during small-scale surveys with commercial fishing vessels in the north-eastern central North Sea. Catch per unit effort of a flyshooter and a trawler were considerably lower in the shallower...... survey had significant effects on the catch rates in particular for the trawler. These results supports fishermen's opinion that strong winds may cause an underestimation of biomass of cod in shallow waters and a bias in the resulting spatial distribution derived from bottom trawl surveys....

  6. The effects of propofol on local field potential spectra, action potential firing rate, and their temporal relationship in humans and felines

    Sara Hanrahan

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Propofol is an intravenous sedative hypnotic, which, acting as a GABAA agonist, results in neocortical inhibition. While propofol has been well studied at the molecular and clinical level, less is known about the effects of propofol at the level of individual neurons and local neocortical networks. We used Utah Electrode Arrays (UEAs to investigate the effects of propofol anesthesia on action potentials (APs and local field potentials (LFPs. UEAs were implanted into the neocortex of two humans and three felines. The two human patients and one feline received propofol by bolus injection, while the other two felines received target-controlled infusions. We examined the changes in LFP power spectra and AP firing at different levels of anesthesia. Increased propofol concentration correlated with decreased high-frequency power in LFP spectra and decreased AP firing rates, and the generation of large amplitude spike-like LFP activity; however, the temporal relationship between APs and LFPs remained relatively consistent at all levels of propofol. The probability that an AP would fire at this local minimum of the LFP increased with propofol administration. The propofol-induced suppression of neocortical network activity allowed LFPs to be dominated by low-frequency spike-like activity, and correlated with sedation and unconsciousness. As the low-frequency spike-like activity increased and the AP-LFP relationship became more predictable firing rate encoding capacity is impaired. This suggests a mechanism for decreased information processing in the neocortex that accounts for propofol-induced unconsciousness.

  7. Effect of microbial action on the corrosion potential of austenitic alloy containers for high-level nuclear waste

    The safe disposal of high-level nuclear waste (HLW) entails the ability to ensure the integrity of waste containers for prolonged time periods. It is generally accepted that under certain conditions, microbial action may change local benign environments to those in which localized corrosion can be actively promoted. The use of repassivation potential (Erp) in relation to the value of the corrosion potential (Ecorr) has been proposed as a means of assessing the propensity of a metallic material to localized corrosion. Microbial activity is known to influence Ecorr however, the precise mechanism is unresolved. Shewanella putrefaciens, a bacteria with many of the characteristics of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), are being grown under controlled conditions on 316L stainless steel (SS) surfaces to understand the relationship between Ecorr and metabolic activity. It has been observed that the growth of the bacteria under aerobic conditions, without the production of metabolic sulfide, leads to only minor variation in Ecorr. These changes possibly correlate to the periods of active bacterial growth

  8. Effect of microbial action on the corrosion potential of austenitic alloy containers for high-level nuclear waste

    Angell, P.; Dunn, D.S.; Cragnolino, G.A. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States). Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses

    1996-08-01

    The safe disposal of high-level nuclear waste (HLW) entails the ability to ensure the integrity of waste containers for prolonged time periods. It is generally accepted that under certain conditions, microbial action may change local benign environments to those in which localized corrosion can be actively promoted. The use of repassivation potential (E{sub rp}) in relation to the value of the corrosion potential (E{sub corr}) has been proposed as a means of assessing the propensity of a metallic material to localized corrosion. Microbial activity is known to influence E{sub corr} however, the precise mechanism is unresolved. Shewanella putrefaciens, a bacteria with many of the characteristics of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), are being grown under controlled conditions on 316L stainless steel (SS) surfaces to understand the relationship between E{sub corr} and metabolic activity. It has been observed that the growth of the bacteria under aerobic conditions, without the production of metabolic sulfide, leads to only minor variation in E{sub corr}. These changes possibly correlate to the periods of active bacterial growth.

  9. Sources of actual and potential radioactive contamination at the Dnieper River basin with regard to preparation of strategic action plan

    Full text: The Dnieper River basin is one of the largest drainage areas in Europe. The modern Dnieper is a cascade of large artificial reservoirs (Kiev, Kanev, Kremenchug, Dniprodzerzhinsk, Zaporozhie, Kakhovske) carrying its water to the Black Sea. It is largest water artery of Ukraine where more then 20 million of peoples live, and which water extensively use for water supply, fishery, irrigation and recreation in the region. At the same time the Dnieper basin is the most important industrial, agricultural congested area. About 20 units of Nuclear Reactors are in operation of 6 NPP situated on the territory of Ukraine (4) and Russia (2) as well. This area was also heavy contaminated mainly with long-lived radionuclides such as Cs 137 and Sr 90 and Pu due to Chernobyl releases in 1986. In the central part of Ukraine Uranium mining and uranium ores re-processing industry are developed. At the moment most of these facilities are suspended their activity because economical reason. However the problem of uranium tailing of liquid and solid wastes are remain to be one of the serious sources for the Environmental contamination and uncertainties with its impact to the human health in the region (Zheltie Vodi town and Dnieprodzerzhinsk). The Radiation Risk Assessment of the environmental impacts of these sources ('Hot spots') in the basin and Priorities for potential actions to reduce the ecological Risks of its impacts are considering. The Results of this study are the basis for Strategic Action Plan recommended for three countries (Ukraine, Russia and Belarus) at the Dnieper River Basin obtained using Optimization Procedures and experience of Radiation Protection Practice

  10. Effectiveness of elite female basketball players’ technical-tactic actions and ways for their improvement at stage of maximal realization of individual potentials

    Sushko R.A.

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: study effectiveness of elite female basketball players’ technical-tactic actions and determine the ways for their improvement at stage of maximal realization of individual potentials. Material: the authors analyzed competition functioning’s indicators of female basketball players of national combined team of Ukraine and their age characteristics. Results: effectiveness of technical-tactic actions in structure of national female basketball players’ combined team of Ukraine competition functioning at European championship. The authors present: indicators of team composition; roles in team; won and lost games; quantity of scored and skipped points; technical-tactic actions; age of sportswomen. Age indicators of elite female basketball players at stage of maximal realization have been given. Conclusions: we have composed a list of the most important technical-tactic actions in competition functioning. We also outlined ways for their perfection at stage of maximal realization of individual potentials of elite female basketball players of different game roles.

  11. Assessing the Electrode-Neuron Interface with the Electrically Evoked Compound Action Potential, Electrode Position, and Behavioral Thresholds.

    DeVries, Lindsay; Scheperle, Rachel; Bierer, Julie Arenberg

    2016-06-01

    Variability in speech perception scores among cochlear implant listeners may largely reflect the variable efficacy of implant electrodes to convey stimulus information to the auditory nerve. In the present study, three metrics were applied to assess the quality of the electrode-neuron interface of individual cochlear implant channels: the electrically evoked compound action potential (ECAP), the estimation of electrode position using computerized tomography (CT), and behavioral thresholds using focused stimulation. The primary motivation of this approach is to evaluate the ECAP as a site-specific measure of the electrode-neuron interface in the context of two peripheral factors that likely contribute to degraded perception: large electrode-to-modiolus distance and reduced neural density. Ten unilaterally implanted adults with Advanced Bionics HiRes90k devices participated. ECAPs were elicited with monopolar stimulation within a forward-masking paradigm to construct channel interaction functions (CIF), behavioral thresholds were obtained with quadrupolar (sQP) stimulation, and data from imaging provided estimates of electrode-to-modiolus distance and scalar location (scala tympani (ST), intermediate, or scala vestibuli (SV)) for each electrode. The width of the ECAP CIF was positively correlated with electrode-to-modiolus distance; both of these measures were also influenced by scalar position. The ECAP peak amplitude was negatively correlated with behavioral thresholds. Moreover, subjects with low behavioral thresholds and large ECAP amplitudes, averaged across electrodes, tended to have higher speech perception scores. These results suggest a potential clinical role for the ECAP in the objective assessment of individual cochlear implant channels, with the potential to improve speech perception outcomes. PMID:26926152

  12. Study of crotoxin mechanism of action to mammary carcinomas and evaluation of its potential as a radiopharmaceutical

    Crotoxin, the main component of Crotalus durissus terrificus snake venom, has been studied since 1938. It is a natural polypeptidic complex with pharmacological potential because of its antitumoral properties which has attracted great interest for diagnosis and therapy of oncological diseases. However, Crotoxin mechanism of action and sites of specific interaction on tumor cells are still misunderstood. Breast cancer is the second most frequent type in the world and the most common cancer in women. About 30 to 60% of mammary tumors overexpress epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a transmembrane protein related to cell proliferation. Since literature has reported that Crotoxin antitumoral effect is more potent on cells with EGFR overexpression the objectives of this work were to evaluate Crotoxin cytotoxic effects on mammary tumor cells human breast carcinoma (MCF-7) and Ehrlich tumor cells (murine ascitics carcinoma), and to investigate the specific molecular interaction of Crotoxin on Ehrlich tumor cells. Initially, Crotoxin was radiolabelled with iodine-125 (125I-Crotoxin) and iodine-131 (131I-Crotoxin). Saturation and competition assay were carried out to characterize Crotoxin in vitro interaction; Crotoxin biodistribution studies and singlephoton emission computed tomography (SPECT) of mice bearing Ehrlich tumor have been evaluated to describe in vivo interaction. Our results showed that Crotoxin presented cytotoxic effect against Ehrlich with DL50 in vitro (concentration of compound which is lethal for 50% of cells) of about one micromolar, but did not present significant effect against MCF-7. Morphological alterations characteristic of apoptosis suggests programmed cell death. 125I-Crotoxin interaction with Ehrlich tumor cells was saturable with approximately 70% specificity, and presented Kd=24.98 nmol/L and Bmax=16,570 sites/cell for low affinity binding sites and Kd=0.06 nmol/L and Bmax=210 sites/cell high affinity binding sites; moreover, the

  13. Negativity Bias in Dangerous Drivers.

    Chai, Jing; Qu, Weina; Sun, Xianghong; Zhang, Kan; Ge, Yan

    2016-01-01

    The behavioral and cognitive characteristics of dangerous drivers differ significantly from those of safe drivers. However, differences in emotional information processing have seldom been investigated. Previous studies have revealed that drivers with higher anger/anxiety trait scores are more likely to be involved in crashes and that individuals with higher anger traits exhibit stronger negativity biases when processing emotions compared with control groups. However, researchers have not explored the relationship between emotional information processing and driving behavior. In this study, we examined the emotional information processing differences between dangerous drivers and safe drivers. Thirty-eight non-professional drivers were divided into two groups according to the penalty points that they had accrued for traffic violations: 15 drivers with 6 or more points were included in the dangerous driver group, and 23 drivers with 3 or fewer points were included in the safe driver group. The emotional Stroop task was used to measure negativity biases, and both behavioral and electroencephalograph data were recorded. The behavioral results revealed stronger negativity biases in the dangerous drivers than in the safe drivers. The bias score was correlated with self-reported dangerous driving behavior. Drivers with strong negativity biases reported having been involved in mores crashes compared with the less-biased drivers. The event-related potentials (ERPs) revealed that the dangerous drivers exhibited reduced P3 components when responding to negative stimuli, suggesting decreased inhibitory control of information that is task-irrelevant but emotionally salient. The influence of negativity bias provides one possible explanation of the effects of individual differences on dangerous driving behavior and traffic crashes. PMID:26765225

  14. Effects of Ginkgolide B on action potential and calcium,potassium current in guinea pig ventricular myocytes

    Xiao-yan QI; Zhi-xiong ZHANG; You-qiu XU

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of Ginkgolide B (GB) on action potential (AP), delayed rectifier potassium current (IK), and L-type calcium current (ICa-L) in guinea pig ventricular myocytes. METHODS: Single ventricular myocytes were isolated by an enzymatic dissociation method. AP, IK, ICa-L were recorded by whole-cell patch-clamp technique in either current or voltage clamp mode. RESULTS: GB shortened APD in a concentration-dependent manner. GB 0.1, 1, and 10 μmol/L shortened APD50 by 7.9 % (n=5, P>0.05), 18.4 % (n=5, P<0.01), and 28.9 % (n=6, P<0.01), respectively; APD90 by 12.4 % (n=5, P>0.05), 17.6 % (n=5, P<0.01), 26.4 % (n=5, P<0.01),respectively. GB increased IK in a concentration-dependent manner. GB 0.1, 1, and l0 μmol/L increased IK by 20.1% (n=6, P<0.05), 43.1% (n=6, P<0.01), 55.6 % (n=6, P<0.05); increased IKtail by 10.7 % (n=6, P<0.05),25.1% (n=6, P<0.05), and 37.7 % (n=6, P<0.05), respectively at testing potential of +50 mV and shift the I-V curve of Ik upward. But GB had no significant effect on ICa-L at above concentrations. CONCLUSION: GB significantly shortened APD in a concentration-dependent manner which mainly due to increase of IK.

  15. Percutaneous method for single-catheter multiple monophasic action potential recordings during magnetocardiographic mapping in spontaneously breathing rodents

    To test the feasibility of a novel method to combine magnetocardiographic (MCG) estimate of ventricular repolarization (VR) and multiple monophasic action potential (MultiMAP) recording in spontaneously breathing rodents with percutaneous sub-xyphoid epicardial placement of a MCG-compatible amagnetic catheter (AC), ten Wistar rats (WRs) and ten guinea pigs (GPs) were studied. Under fluoroscopic control, the AC was moved until four stable MAPs were recorded (fixed inter-electrode distance of 1.2 mm). 36-channel DC-SQUID (sensitivity 20 fT Hz–½) were used for MCG mapping. MAPs, differentially amplified (BW: DC-500 Hz), were digitized at 1 kHz. AC pacing provided local ventricular effective refractory period (VERP) estimate. MAP duration (MAPd) was measured at 50% and 90% levels of repolarization. Simultaneous MCG mapping and MultiMAP recording were successful in all animals. Average MAPd50% and MAPd90% were shorter in WRs than in GPs (26.4 ± 2.9 ms versus 110.6 ± 14.3 ms and 60.7 ± 5.4 ms versus 127.7 ± 15.3 ms, respectively). VERP was 51 ± 4.8 ms in WRs and 108.4 ± 12.9 ms in GPs, respectively. The MAP amplitude was 16.9 ± 4.5 in WRs and 16.2 ± 4.2 in GPs. MAP and MCG parameters of VR were in good agreement. All animals survived the procedure. Two also survived a second invasive study; one was followed up until natural death at 52 months. Percutaneous MultiMAP recording is minimally invasive, usually avoids animal sacrifice, is compatible with simultaneous surface MCG mapping and might be used for experimental validation of MCG VR abnormality, to study the arrhythmogenic potential of new drugs and/or animal models of ventricular arrhythmias. (paper)

  16. Copper(II)-Bis(Thiosemicarbazonato) Complexes as Antibacterial Agents: Insights into Their Mode of Action and Potential as Therapeutics.

    Djoko, Karrera Y; Goytia, Maira M; Donnelly, Paul S; Schembri, Mark A; Shafer, William M; McEwan, Alastair G

    2015-10-01

    There is increasing interest in the use of lipophilic copper (Cu)-containing complexes to combat bacterial infections. In this work, we showed that Cu complexes with bis(thiosemicarbazone) ligands [Cu(btsc)] exert antibacterial activity against a range of medically significant pathogens. Previous work using Neisseria gonorrhoeae showed that Cu(btsc) complexes may act as inhibitors of respiratory dehydrogenases in the electron transport chain. We now show that these complexes are also toxic against pathogens that lack a respiratory chain. Respiration in Escherichia coli was slightly affected by Cu(btsc) complexes, but our results indicate that, in this model bacterium, the complexes act primarily as agents that deliver toxic Cu ions efficiently into the cytoplasm. Although the chemistry of Cu(btsc) complexes may dictate their mechanism of action, their efficacy depends heavily on bacterial physiology. This is linked to the ability of the target bacterium to tolerate Cu and, additionally, the susceptibility of the respiratory chain to direct inhibition by Cu(btsc) complexes. The physiology of N. gonorrhoeae, including multidrug-resistant strains, makes it highly susceptible to damage by Cu ions and Cu(btsc) complexes, highlighting the potential of Cu(btsc) complexes (and Cu-based therapeutics) as a promising treatment against this important bacterial pathogen. PMID:26239980

  17. Liénard-type models for the simulation of the action potential of cardiac nodal cells

    Podziemski, P.; Żebrowski, J. J.

    2013-10-01

    Existing models of cardiac cells which include multi-variable cardiac transmembrane current are too complex to simulate the long time dynamical properties of the heart rhythm. The large number of parameters that need to be defined and set for such models make them not only cumbersome to use but also require a large computing power. Consequently, the application of such models for the bedside analysis of heart rate of a specific patient may be difficult. Other ways of modelling need to be investigated. We consider the general problem of developing a model of cardiac pacemaker tissue that allows to combine the investigation of phenomena at a time scale of thousands of heart beats with the ability to reproduce realistic tissue-level characteristics of cell dynamics. We propose a modified van der Pol-Duffing equation-a Liénard-type oscillator-as a phenomenological model for cardiac nodal tissue, with certain important physiological similarities to ion-channel models of cardiac pacemaker cells. The model presented here is specifically designed to qualitatively reproduce mesoscopic characteristics of cell dynamics, including action potential duration (APD) restitution properties, phase response characteristics, and phase space structure. We show that these characteristics agree qualitatively with the extensive ionic models and experimental results in the literature [Anumonwo et al., 1991, [33], Cao et al., 1999, [49], Coster and Celler, 2003, [31], Qu, 2004, [45], Tsalikakis et al., 2007, [32], Inada et al., 2009, [14], Qu et al., 2010, [50

  18. Theoretical study of L-type Ca(2+) current inactivation kinetics during action potential repolarization and early afterdepolarizations.

    Morotti, Stefano; Grandi, Eleonora; Summa, Aurora; Ginsburg, Kenneth S; Bers, Donald M

    2012-09-15

    Sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) release mediates excitation–contraction coupling (ECC) in cardiac myocytes. It is triggered upon membrane depolarization by entry of Ca(2+) via L-type Ca(2+) channels (LTCCs), which undergo both voltage- and Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation (VDI and CDI, respectively). We developed improved models of L-type Ca(2+) current and SR Ca(2+) release within the framework of the Shannon-Bers rabbit ventricular action potential (AP) model. The formulation of SR Ca(2+) release was modified to reproduce high ECC gain at negative membrane voltages. An existing LTCC model was extended to reflect more faithfully contributions of CDI and VDI to total inactivation. Ba(2+) current inactivation included an ion-dependent component (albeit small compared with CDI), in addition to pure VDI. Under physiological conditions (during an AP) LTCC inactivates predominantly via CDI, which is controlled mostly by SR Ca(2+) release during the initial AP phase, but by Ca(2+) through LTCCs for the remaining part. Simulations of decreased CDI or K(+) channel block predicted the occurrence of early and delayed after depolarizations. Our model accurately describes ECC and allows dissection of the relative contributions of different Ca(2+) sources to total CDI, and the relative roles of CDI and VDI, during normal and abnormal repolarization. PMID:22586219

  19. Electrophysiological evaluation of nerve function in inferior alveolar nerve injury: relationship between nerve action potentials and histomorphometric observations.

    Murayama, M; Sasaki, K; Shibahara, T

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to improve the accuracy of diagnosis of inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) injury by determining degrees of nerve disturbance using the sensory nerve action potential (SNAP) and sensory nerve conduction velocity (SCV). Crush and partial and complete nerve amputation injuries were applied to the IAN of rabbits, then SNAPs and histomorphometric observations were recorded at 1, 5, and 10 weeks. For crush injury, most nerves were smaller in diameter at 5 weeks than at 1 week, however after 10 weeks, extensive nerve regeneration was observed. The SNAP showed a decrease in SCV at weeks 1 and 5, followed by an increase at week 10. For partial nerve amputation, small to medium-sized nerve fibres were observed at weeks 1 and 5, then larger nerves were seen at week 10. Minimal changes in SCV were observed at weeks 1 and 5, however SCV increased at week 10. For complete nerve amputation, nerve fibres were sparse at week 1, but gradual nerve regeneration was observed at weeks 5 and 10. SNAPs were detectable from week 10, however the SCV was extremely low. This study showed SCV to be an effective factor in the evaluation of nerve injury and regeneration. PMID:26433750

  20. A simple model for biased divertors

    Lachambre, J.-L.; Quirion, B.; Gunn, J.; Boucher, C.; Stansfield, B.; Gauvreau, J.-L. [Centre canadien de fusion magnetique, 1804, boulevard Lionel-Boulet, Varennes, Quebec, J3X 1S1 (Canada)

    1997-12-01

    Ionization near the target plate is shown to play an important role in biasing experiments. Our previous SOL model, which calculates the induced radial electric field, is found to be inadequate to treat the new divertor geometry of TdeV. When recycling is included via the measured D{sub {alpha}} emission near the plate, the upgraded model correctly reproduces all the observed electric currents and fields during biasing in the new divertor configuration. A simple divertor model using this calculated field has been developed to simulate the evolution of the divertor ion and neutral parameters under the action of neutralization plate biasing. Using a 1D adiabatic fluid model for the divertor ions, a 1D convective representation for the SOL neutrals and a 0D calculation for the plenum pressure, this divertor model satisfactorily simulates most of the TdeV biasing experiments at all biasing voltages and all toroidal field directions at low line-averaged densities. The weaker agreement at high densities is largely a consequence of the crudeness of the general divertor physics rather than of the deficiency of the biasing physics implemented in the model. The model is finally used to explain the polarity asymmetries observed in divertor efficiencies during biasing, and to demonstrate that no mechanism other than plate current saturation is required to interpret the saturation of toroidal rotation observed in the SOL at large biasing voltages of either polarity. (author)

  1. National Board for Professional Teaching Standards Assessor Training: Impact of Bias Reduction Exercises

    Szpara, Michelle Y.; Wylie, E. Caroline

    2005-01-01

    This study is an in-depth investigation of the NBPTS bias reduction training from the perspective of assessors. The research examined how successful the bias training was in guiding assessors to recognize their biases and to identify actions to be used to reduce the impact of bias. The study focused on portfolio video entries to allow for a…

  2. An exploratory investigation of various modes of action and potential adverse outcomes of fluoxetine in marine mussels

    Highlights: • Mode of action (MOA) related endpoints and biomarkers of toxicity were assessed in mussels exposed to fluoxetine (FX). • Significant FX bioaccumulation was observed in tissues of mussels exposed to 30 and 300 ng/L FX. • Alterations of cAMP-related cell signaling were observed in exposed mussels as part of the MOA of FX. • FX reduced the health status of mussels inducing lysosomal effects in digestive gland and antioxidant responses in gills. • The importance of considering additional MOAs and adverse outcome pathways for FX impacts on mussels is highlighted. - Abstract: The present study investigated possible adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) of the antidepressant fluoxetine (FX) in the marine mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. An evaluation of molecular endpoints involved in modes of action (MOAs) of FX and biomarkers for sub-lethal toxicity were explored in mussels after a 7-day administration of nominal FX concentrations encompassing a range of environmentally relevant values (0.03–300 ng/L). FX bioaccumulated in mussel tissues after treatment with 30 and 300 ng/L FX, resulting in bioconcentration factor (BCF) values ranging from 200 to 800, which were higher than expected based solely on hydrophobic partitioning models. Because FX acts as a selective serotonin (5-HT) re-uptake inhibitor increasing serotonergic neurotransmission at mammalian synapses, cell signaling alterations triggered by 5-HT receptor occupations were assessed. cAMP levels and PKA activities were decreased in digestive gland and mantle/gonads of FX-treated mussels, consistent with an increased occupation of 5-HT1 receptors negatively coupled to the cAMP/PKA pathway. mRNA levels of a ABCB gene encoding the P-glycoprotein were also significantly down-regulated. This membrane transporter acts in detoxification towards xenobiotics and in altering pharmacokinetics of antidepressants; moreover, it is under a cAMP/PKA transcriptional regulation in mussels. Potential stress

  3. An exploratory investigation of various modes of action and potential adverse outcomes of fluoxetine in marine mussels

    Franzellitti, Silvia, E-mail: silvia.franzellitti@unibo.it [University of Bologna, Interdepartment Centre for Environmental Science Research, via S. Alberto 163, 48123 Ravenna (Italy); University of Bologna, Department of Biological, Geological, and Environmental Sciences, via Selmi 3, 40100 Bologna (Italy); Buratti, Sara; Capolupo, Marco [University of Bologna, Interdepartment Centre for Environmental Science Research, via S. Alberto 163, 48123 Ravenna (Italy); Du, Bowen; Haddad, Samuel P. [Department of Environmental Science, Baylor University, Waco, TX 76798 (United States); Chambliss, C. Kevin [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Baylor University, Waco, TX 76798 (United States); Brooks, Bryan W. [Department of Environmental Science, Baylor University, Waco, TX 76798 (United States); Fabbri, Elena [University of Bologna, Interdepartment Centre for Environmental Science Research, via S. Alberto 163, 48123 Ravenna (Italy); University of Bologna, Department of Biological, Geological, and Environmental Sciences, via Selmi 3, 40100 Bologna (Italy)

    2014-06-01

    Highlights: • Mode of action (MOA) related endpoints and biomarkers of toxicity were assessed in mussels exposed to fluoxetine (FX). • Significant FX bioaccumulation was observed in tissues of mussels exposed to 30 and 300 ng/L FX. • Alterations of cAMP-related cell signaling were observed in exposed mussels as part of the MOA of FX. • FX reduced the health status of mussels inducing lysosomal effects in digestive gland and antioxidant responses in gills. • The importance of considering additional MOAs and adverse outcome pathways for FX impacts on mussels is highlighted. - Abstract: The present study investigated possible adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) of the antidepressant fluoxetine (FX) in the marine mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. An evaluation of molecular endpoints involved in modes of action (MOAs) of FX and biomarkers for sub-lethal toxicity were explored in mussels after a 7-day administration of nominal FX concentrations encompassing a range of environmentally relevant values (0.03–300 ng/L). FX bioaccumulated in mussel tissues after treatment with 30 and 300 ng/L FX, resulting in bioconcentration factor (BCF) values ranging from 200 to 800, which were higher than expected based solely on hydrophobic partitioning models. Because FX acts as a selective serotonin (5-HT) re-uptake inhibitor increasing serotonergic neurotransmission at mammalian synapses, cell signaling alterations triggered by 5-HT receptor occupations were assessed. cAMP levels and PKA activities were decreased in digestive gland and mantle/gonads of FX-treated mussels, consistent with an increased occupation of 5-HT1 receptors negatively coupled to the cAMP/PKA pathway. mRNA levels of a ABCB gene encoding the P-glycoprotein were also significantly down-regulated. This membrane transporter acts in detoxification towards xenobiotics and in altering pharmacokinetics of antidepressants; moreover, it is under a cAMP/PKA transcriptional regulation in mussels. Potential stress

  4. Heeding a Call to Action for U.S. Coral Reefs: the Untapped Potential of the Clean Water Act

    A recently published call to action by Dodge et al. (2008) identifies nine actions needed to protect coral reefs. The authors identify several management goals that cannot be accomplished with MPAs alone, the traditional approach to coral reef protection. For U.S. waters, the Cle...

  5. Action potential-evoked calcium release is impaired in single skeletal muscle fibers from heart failure patients.

    Marino DiFranco

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Exercise intolerance in chronic heart failure (HF has been attributed to abnormalities of the skeletal muscles. Muscle function depends on intact excitation-contraction coupling (ECC, but ECC studies in HF models have been inconclusive, due to deficiencies in the animal models and tools used to measure calcium (Ca2+ release, mandating investigations in skeletal muscle from HF patients. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that Ca2+ release is significantly impaired in the skeletal muscle of HF patients in whom exercise capacity is severely diminished compared to age-matched healthy volunteers. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Using state-of-the-art electrophysiological and optical techniques in single muscle fibers from biopsies of the locomotive vastus lateralis muscle, we measured the action potential (AP-evoked Ca2+ release in 4 HF patients and 4 age-matched healthy controls. The mean peak Ca2+ release flux in fibers obtained from HF patients (10±1.2 µM/ms was markedly (2.6-fold and significantly (p<0.05 smaller than in fibers from healthy volunteers (28±3.3 µM/ms. This impairment in AP-evoked Ca2+ release was ubiquitous and was not explained by differences in the excitability mechanisms since single APs were indistinguishable between HF patients and healthy volunteers. CONCLUSIONS: These findings prove the feasibility of performing electrophysiological experiments in single fibers from human skeletal muscle, and offer a new approach for investigations of myopathies due to HF and other diseases. Importantly, we have demonstrated that one step in the ECC process, AP-evoked Ca2+ release, is impaired in single muscle fibers in HF patients.

  6. Elevated heart rate triggers action potential alternans and sudden death. translational study of a homozygous KCNH2 mutation.

    Ulrich Schweigmann

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Long QT syndrome (LQTS leads to arrhythmic events and increased risk for sudden cardiac death (SCD. Homozygous KCNH2 mutations underlying LQTS-2 have previously been termed "human HERG knockout" and typically express severe phenotypes. We studied genotype-phenotype correlations of an LQTS type 2 mutation identified in the homozygous index patient from a consanguineous Turkish family after his brother died suddenly during febrile illness. METHODS AND RESULTS: Clinical work-up, DNA sequencing, mutagenesis, cell culture, patch-clamp, in silico mathematical modelling, protein biochemistry, confocal microscopy were performed. Genetic analysis revealed a homozygous C-terminal KCNH2 mutation (p.R835Q in the index patient (QTc ∼506 ms with notched T waves. Parents were I° cousins - both heterozygous for the mutation and clinically unremarkable (QTc ∼447 ms, father and ∼396 ms, mother. Heterologous expression of KCNH2-R835Q showed mildly reduced current amplitudes. Biophysical properties of ionic currents were also only nominally changed with slight acceleration of deactivation and more negative V50 in R835Q-currents. Protein biochemistry and confocal microscopy revealed similar expression patterns and trafficking of WT and R835Q, even at elevated temperature. In silico analysis demonstrated mildly prolonged ventricular action potential duration (APD compared to WT at a cycle length of 1000 ms. At a cycle length of 350 ms M-cell APD remained stable in WT, but displayed APD alternans in R835Q. CONCLUSION: Kv11.1 channels affected by the C-terminal R835Q mutation display mildly modified biophysical properties, but leads to M-cell APD alternans with elevated heart rate and could precipitate SCD under specific clinical circumstances associated with high heart rates.

  7. Evaluation of nystatin containing chitosan hydrogels as potential dual action bio-active restorative materials: in vitro approach.

    Perchyonok, V Tamara; Reher, Vanessa; Zhang, Shengmiao; Basson, Nicki; Grobler, Sias

    2014-01-01

    Healing is a specific biological process related to the general phenomenon of growth and tissue regeneration and is a process generally affected by several systemic conditions or as detrimental side-effects of chemotherapy- and radiotherapy-induced inflammation of the oral mucosa. The objectives of this study is to evaluate the novel chitosan based functional drug delivery systems, which can be successfully incorporated into "dual action bioactive restorative materials", capable of inducing in vitro improved wound healing prototype and containing an antibiotic, such as nystatin, krill oil as an antioxidant and hydroxyapatite as a molecular bone scaffold, which is naturally present in bone and is reported to be successfully used in promoting bone integration when implanted as well as promoting healing. The hydrogels were prepared using a protocol as previously reported by us. The physico-chemical features, including surface morphology (SEM), release behaviors, stability of the therapeutic agent-antioxidant-chitosan, were measured and compared to the earlier reported chitosan-antioxidant containing hydrogels. Structural investigations of the reactive surface of the hydrogel are reported. Release of nystatin was investigated for all newly prepared hydrogels. Bio-adhesive studies were performed in order to assess the suitability of these designer materials. Free radical defense capacity of the biomaterials was evaluated using established in vitro model. The bio-adhesive capacity of the materials in the in vitro system was tested and quantified. It was found that the favorable synergistic effect of free radical built-in defense mechanism of the new functional materials increased sustainable bio-adhesion and therefore acted as a functional multi-dimensional restorative material with potential application in wound healing in vitro. PMID:25459982

  8. Evaluation of Nystatin Containing Chitosan Hydrogels as Potential Dual Action Bio-Active Restorative Materials: in Vitro Approach

    V. Tamara Perchyonok

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Healing is a specific biological process related to the general phenomenon of growth and tissue regeneration and is a process generally affected by several systemic conditions or as detrimental side-effects of chemotherapy- and radiotherapy-induced inflammation of the oral mucosa. The objectives of this study is to evaluate the novel chitosan based functional drug delivery systems, which can be successfully incorporated into “dual action bioactive restorative materials”, capable of inducing in vitro improved wound healing prototype and containing an antibiotic, such as nystatin, krill oil as an antioxidant and hydroxyapatite as a molecular bone scaffold, which is naturally present in bone and is reported to be successfully used in promoting bone integration when implanted as well as promoting healing. The hydrogels were prepared using a protocol as previously reported by us. The physico-chemical features, including surface morphology (SEM, release behaviors, stability of the therapeutic agent-antioxidant-chitosan, were measured and compared to the earlier reported chitosan-antioxidant containing hydrogels. Structural investigations of the reactive surface of the hydrogel are reported. Release of nystatin was investigated for all newly prepared hydrogels. Bio-adhesive studies were performed in order to assess the suitability of these designer materials. Free radical defense capacity of the biomaterials was evaluated using established in vitro model. The bio-adhesive capacity of the materials in the in vitro system was tested and quantified. It was found that the favorable synergistic effect of free radical built-in defense mechanism of the new functional materials increased sustainable bio-adhesion and therefore acted as a functional multi-dimensional restorative material with potential application in wound healing in vitro.

  9. Problems, Prescriptions and Potential in Actionable Climate Change Science - A Case Study from California Coastal Marsh Research

    MacDonald, G. M.; Ambrose, R. F.; Thorne, K.; Takekawa, J.; Brown, L. N.; Fejtek, S.; Gold, M.; Rosencranz, J.

    2015-12-01

    Frustrations regarding the provision of actionable science extend to both producers and consumers. Scientists decry the lack of application of their research in shaping policy and practices while decision makers bemoan the lack of applicability of scientific research to the specific problems at hand or its narrow focus relative to the plethora of engineering, economic and social considerations that they must also consider. Incorporating climate change adds additional complexity due to uncertainties in estimating many facets of future climate, the inherent variability of climate and the decadal scales over which significant changes will develop. Recently a set of guidelines for successful science-policy interaction was derived from the analysis of transboundary water management. These are; 1 recognizing that science is a crucial but bounded input into the decision-making processes, 2 early establishment of conditions for collaboration and shared commitment among participants, 3 understanding that science-policy interactions are enhanced through greater collaboration and social or group-learning processes, 4 accepting that the collaborative production of knowledge is essential to build legitimate decision-making processes, and 5 engaging boundary organizations and informal networks as well as formal stakeholders. Here we present as a case study research on California coastal marshes, climate change and sea-level that is being conducted by university and USGS scientists under the auspices of the Southwest Climate Science Center. We also present research needs identified by a seperate analysis of best practices for coastal marsh restoration in the face of climate change that was conducted in extensive consultation with planners and managers. The initial communication, scientific research and outreach-dissemination of the marsh scientfic study are outlined and compared to best practices needs identified by planners and the science-policy guidelines outlined above

  10. Lagrangian bias in the local bias model

    It is often assumed that the halo-patch fluctuation field can be written as a Taylor series in the initial Lagrangian dark matter density fluctuation field. We show that if this Lagrangian bias is local, and the initial conditions are Gaussian, then the two-point cross-correlation between halos and mass should be linearly proportional to the mass-mass auto-correlation function. This statement is exact and valid on all scales; there are no higher order contributions, e.g., from terms proportional to products or convolutions of two-point functions, which one might have thought would appear upon truncating the Taylor series of the halo bias function. In addition, the auto-correlation function of locally biased tracers can be written as a Taylor series in the auto-correlation function of the mass; there are no terms involving, e.g., derivatives or convolutions. Moreover, although the leading order coefficient, the linear bias factor of the auto-correlation function is just the square of that for the cross-correlation, it is the same as that obtained from expanding the mean number of halos as a function of the local density only in the large-scale limit. In principle, these relations allow simple tests of whether or not halo bias is indeed local in Lagrangian space. We discuss why things are more complicated in practice. We also discuss our results in light of recent work on the renormalizability of halo bias, demonstrating that it is better to renormalize than not. We use the Lognormal model to illustrate many of our findings

  11. On commercial media bias

    Germano, Fabrizio

    2008-01-01

    Within the spokes model of Chen and Riordan (2007) that allows for non-localized competition among arbitrary numbers of media outlets, we quantify the effect of concentration of ownership on quality and bias of media content. A main result shows that too few commercial outlets, or better, too few separate owners of commercial outlets can lead to substantial bias in equilibrium. Increasing the number of outlets (commercial and non-commercial) tends to bring down this bias; but the strong...

  12. Identity and collective action among European Kurds.

    Ufkes, Elze G; Dovidio, John F; Tel, Gulizar

    2015-03-01

    This research investigated the role of group-based anger and efficacy in explaining the effects of subgroup (ethnic) and common (European) identity on collective action among Kurds in Europe responding to different types of disadvantage. Whereas stronger Kurdish identity positively predicted intentions for collective action (mediated by anger and efficacy), stronger common ingroup identity was negatively related to collective action intentions. This effect occurred primarily when structural disadvantage was salient, not when attention was drawn to a specific incident of disadvantage, and was mediated by anger but not efficacy. The findings complement recent work demonstrating that intergroup harmony can undermine social change, suggesting that stronger common-group identification reduces collective action by reducing minority-group members' sensitivity to potential bias against them. PMID:25257157

  13. Biophysical characterization of inwardly rectifying potassium currents (I(K1) I(K,ACh), I(K,Ca)) using sinus rhythm or atrial fibrillation action potential waveforms

    Tang, Chuyi; Skibsbye, Lasse; Yuan, Lei; Bentzen, Bo H; Jespersen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    voltage protocols adapted from atrial action potentials recorded in human tissue at 1 and 3 Hz. The current recordings were performed in the HEK-293 heterologous cell system expressing either I(K1), I(K,ACh) or I(K,Ca) to establish the individual contribution of each of these currents during the voltage...

  14. Sensitivity of action potential to changes of inward rectifier potassium current IK1 is different in recent models of human ventricular cardiomyocytes

    Pásek, Michal; Šimurda, J.; Christé, G.

    Brno: Brno University of Technology, 2014 - (Fuis, V.), s. 476-479 ISBN 978-80-214-4871-1. ISSN 1805-8248. [Engineering Mechanics 2014. Svratka (CZ), 12.05.2014-15.05.2014] Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : human ventricular cardiomyocyte * action potential * inward rectifier potassium current * human ventricular cell model Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  15. Bias aware Kalman filters

    Drecourt, J.-P.; Madsen, H.; Rosbjerg, Dan

    2006-01-01

    This paper reviews two different approaches that have been proposed to tackle the problems of model bias with the Kalman filter: the use of a colored noise model and the implementation of a separate bias filter. Both filters are implemented with and without feedback of the bias into the model state...... illustrated on a simple one-dimensional groundwater problem. The results show that the presented filters outperform the standard Kalman filter and that the implementations with bias feedback work in more general conditions than the implementations without feedback. 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  16. Interwell Radiative Recombination in the Presence of Random Potential Fluctuations in GaAs/AlGaAs Biased Double Quantum Wells

    Timofeev, V.B.; Larionov, A.V.; Ioselevich, A.S.; Zeman, J.; Martinez, G.; Falko, V.I.; Hvam, Jørn Märcher; Sørensen, Claus B.

    1999-01-01

    The interwell luminescence (PL) of spatially separated e-h pairs exhibits systematic narrowing with temperature increase which are explained in terms of lateral thermo-activated tunneling of e-h pairs localized by random potential fluctuations (RPF). At critical temperatures the quasi-equilibrium......The interwell luminescence (PL) of spatially separated e-h pairs exhibits systematic narrowing with temperature increase which are explained in terms of lateral thermo-activated tunneling of e-h pairs localized by random potential fluctuations (RPF). At critical temperatures the quasi...

  17. Antiproliferative and apoptotic effects of selective phenolic acids on T47D human breast cancer cells: potential mechanisms of action

    Kampa, Marilena; Alexaki, Vassilia-Ismini; Notas, George; Nifli, Artemissia-Phoebe; Nistikaki, Anastassia; Hatzoglou, Anastassia; Bakogeorgou, Efstathia; Kouimtzoglou, Elena; Blekas, George; Boskou, Dimitrios; Gravanis, Achille; Castanas, Elias

    2003-01-01

    Introduction The oncoprotective role of food-derived polyphenol antioxidants has been described but the implicated mechanisms are not yet clear. In addition to polyphenols, phenolic acids, found at high concentrations in a number of plants, possess antioxidant action. The main phenolic acids found in foods are derivatives of 4-hydroxybenzoic acid and 4-hydroxycinnamic acid. Methods This work concentrates on the antiproliferative action of caffeic acid, syringic acid, sinapic acid, protocatech...

  18. Opinion Dynamics with Confirmation Bias

    Allahverdyan, Armen E.; Aram Galstyan

    2014-01-01

    Background: Confirmation bias is the tendency to acquire or evaluate new information in a way that is consistent with one's preexisting beliefs. It is omnipresent in psychology, economics, and even scientific practices. Prior theoretical research of this phenomenon has mainly focused on its economic implications possibly missing its potential connections with broader notions of cognitive science. Methodology/Principal Findings: We formulate a (non-Bayesian) model for revising subjective proba...

  19. Sampler bias -- Phase 1

    This documents Phase 1 determinations on sampler induced bias for four sampler types used in tank characterization. Each sampler, grab sampler or bottle-on-a-string, auger sampler, sludge sampler and universal sampler, is briefly discussed and their physical limits noted. Phase 2 of this document will define additional testing and analysis to further define Sampler Bias

  20. A computational model of the ionic currents, Ca2+ dynamics and action potentials underlying contraction of isolated uterine smooth muscle.

    Wing-Chiu Tong

    Full Text Available Uterine contractions during labor are discretely regulated by rhythmic action potentials (AP of varying duration and form that serve to determine calcium-dependent force production. We have employed a computational biology approach to develop a fuller understanding of the complexity of excitation-contraction (E-C coupling of uterine smooth muscle cells (USMC. Our overall aim is to establish a mathematical platform of sufficient biophysical detail to quantitatively describe known uterine E-C coupling parameters and thereby inform future empirical investigations of physiological and pathophysiological mechanisms governing normal and dysfunctional labors. From published and unpublished data we construct mathematical models for fourteen ionic currents of USMCs: Ca2+ currents (L- and T-type, Na+ current, an hyperpolarization-activated current, three voltage-gated K+ currents, two Ca2+-activated K+ current, Ca2+-activated Cl current, non-specific cation current, Na+-Ca2+ exchanger, Na+-K+ pump and background current. The magnitudes and kinetics of each current system in a spindle shaped single cell with a specified surface area:volume ratio is described by differential equations, in terms of maximal conductances, electrochemical gradient, voltage-dependent activation/inactivation gating variables and temporal changes in intracellular Ca2+ computed from known Ca2+ fluxes. These quantifications are validated by the reconstruction of the individual experimental ionic currents obtained under voltage-clamp. Phasic contraction is modeled in relation to the time constant of changing [Ca2+]i. This integrated model is validated by its reconstruction of the different USMC AP configurations (spikes, plateau and bursts of spikes, the change from bursting to plateau type AP produced by estradiol and of simultaneous experimental recordings of spontaneous AP, [Ca2+]i and phasic force. In summary, our advanced mathematical model provides a powerful tool to

  1. Potential hazards to embryo implantation: A human endometrial in vitro model to identify unwanted antigestagenic actions of chemicals

    Fischer, L.; Deppert, W.R. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University Hospital Freiburg (Germany); Pfeifer, D. [Department of Hematology and Oncology, University Hospital Freiburg (Germany); Stanzel, S.; Weimer, M. [Department of Biostatistics, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Hanjalic-Beck, A.; Stein, A.; Straßer, M.; Zahradnik, H.P. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University Hospital Freiburg (Germany); Schaefer, W.R., E-mail: wolfgang.schaefer@uniklinik-freiburg.de [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University Hospital Freiburg (Germany)

    2012-05-01

    Embryo implantation is a crucial step in human reproduction and depends on the timely development of a receptive endometrium. The human endometrium is unique among adult tissues due to its dynamic alterations during each menstrual cycle. It hosts the implantation process which is governed by progesterone, whereas 17β-estradiol regulates the preceding proliferation of the endometrium. The receptors for both steroids are targets for drugs and endocrine disrupting chemicals. Chemicals with unwanted antigestagenic actions are potentially hazardous to embryo implantation since many pharmaceutical antiprogestins adversely affect endometrial receptivity. This risk can be addressed by human tissue-specific in vitro assays. As working basis we compiled data on chemicals interacting with the PR. In our experimental work, we developed a flexible in vitro model based on human endometrial Ishikawa cells. Effects of antiprogestin compounds on pre-selected target genes were characterized by sigmoidal concentration–response curves obtained by RT-qPCR. The estrogen sulfotransferase (SULT1E1) was identified as the most responsive target gene by microarray analysis. The agonistic effect of progesterone on SULT1E1 mRNA was concentration-dependently antagonized by RU486 (mifepristone) and ZK137316 and, with lower potency, by 4-nonylphenol, bisphenol A and apigenin. The negative control methyl acetoacetate showed no effect. The effects of progesterone and RU486 were confirmed on the protein level by Western blotting. We demonstrated proof of principle that our Ishikawa model is suitable to study quantitatively effects of antiprogestin-like chemicals on endometrial target genes in comparison to pharmaceutical reference compounds. This test is useful for hazard identification and may contribute to reduce animal studies. -- Highlights: ► We compare progesterone receptor-mediated endometrial effects of chemicals and drugs. ► 4-Nonylphenol, bisphenol A and apigenin exert weak

  2. A Comparative Study On The Action Potential Simulation (APS Therapy And The Routine Physiotherapy Protocol In Knee Osteoarthritisin Elderly People

    Abbas Rahimi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Knee osteoarthritis is the most common cause for which the elderly people refere to physiotherapy outpatient clinics. This study aimed to investigate the effects of the Action Potential Stimulation (APS Therapy and the routine physiotherapy (PT protocol on relieving pain and swelling as well as the duration of the relief period in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Materials and Methods: 69 patients (62 females & 7 males with knee osteoarthritis were recruited in this study. The subjects were divided into two groups including APS Therapy (n=37, mean age: 55±13 years old and the routine PT protocol (n=32, mean age: 61±14 years old groups. A 10-session treatment period was carried out for each group; and their pain and swelling were measured at the first, fifth and tenth sessions and also one-month after the last session (follow up. The swelling was measured using measuring the circumference of the knee on the patella, 5 Cm above and 5 Cm below the patella. The routine PT protocol consisted of hot pack, ultrasound, TENS and exercise; and the APS therapy protocol included hot pack, APS Therapy and the same exercise. During the follow up, 50 out of 61 subjects were called on the phone and any pain changes were recorded.Results: In terms of swelling, the results showed significant reduction just on the patella only in the APS Therapy group (P<0.05. Visual Analogue Pain Scale (VAPS indicated a significant pain reduction in both groups. However, the APS Therapy group showed significantly pain reduction at the end of sessions five, ten and the follow up session (P<0.05. It was also revealed that while routine PT subjects showed no significant pain changes between the tenth and the follow up session, a gradual pain reduction was seen in the APS therapy group during this period (P<0.05. A gradual dosage reduction was recorded only in the APS therapy group, indicating a slight correlation with pain reduction (r=0.4.Conclusion: The

  3. Composite biasing in Monte Carlo radiative transfer

    Baes, Maarten; Lunttila, Tuomas; Bianchi, Simone; Camps, Peter; Juvela, Mika; Kuiper, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Biasing or importance sampling is a powerful technique in Monte Carlo radiative transfer, and can be applied in different forms to increase the accuracy and efficiency of simulations. One of the drawbacks of the use of biasing is the potential introduction of large weight factors. We discuss a general strategy, composite biasing, to suppress the appearance of large weight factors. We use this composite biasing approach for two different problems faced by current state-of-the-art Monte Carlo radiative transfer codes: the generation of photon packages from multiple components, and the penetration of radiation through high optical depth barriers. In both cases, the implementation of the relevant algorithms is trivial and does not interfere with any other optimisation techniques. Through simple test models, we demonstrate the general applicability, accuracy and efficiency of the composite biasing approach. In particular, for the penetration of high optical depths, the gain in efficiency is spectacular for the spe...

  4. Placebo effect studies are susceptible to response bias and to other types of biases

    Hróbjartsson, Asbjørn; Kaptchuk, Ted J; Miller, Franklin G

    2011-01-01

    Investigations of the effect of placebo are often challenging to conduct and interpret. The history of placebo shows that assessment of its clinical significance has a real potential to be biased. We analyze and discuss typical types of bias in studies on placebo....

  5. Cognitive neuroscience. Unlearning implicit social biases during sleep.

    Hu, Xiaoqing; Antony, James W; Creery, Jessica D; Vargas, Iliana M; Bodenhausen, Galen V; Paller, Ken A

    2015-05-29

    Although people may endorse egalitarianism and tolerance, social biases can remain operative and drive harmful actions in an unconscious manner. Here, we investigated training to reduce implicit racial and gender bias. Forty participants processed counterstereotype information paired with one sound for each type of bias. Biases were reduced immediately after training. During subsequent slow-wave sleep, one sound was unobtrusively presented to each participant, repeatedly, to reactivate one type of training. Corresponding bias reductions were fortified in comparison with the social bias not externally reactivated during sleep. This advantage remained 1 week later, the magnitude of which was associated with time in slow-wave and rapid-eye-movement sleep after training. We conclude that memory reactivation during sleep enhances counterstereotype training and that maintaining a bias reduction is sleep-dependent. PMID:26023137

  6. Application and investigation of a bound for outcome reporting bias

    Gamble Carrol; Williamson Paula R

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Direct empirical evidence for the existence of outcome reporting bias is accumulating and this source of bias is recognised as a potential threat to the validity of meta-analysis of randomised clinical trials. Methods A method for calculating the maximum bias in a meta-analysis due to publication bias is adapted for the setting where within-study selective non-reporting of outcomes is suspected, and compared to the alternative approach of missing data imputation. The prope...

  7. The multiple outcomes bias in antidepressants research.

    Procopio, Marco

    2005-01-01

    Despite the widespread use of antidepressant medication, there are no signs that the burden of depression and suicide is decreasing in the industrialised world. This is generating mounting scepticism on the effectiveness of this class of drugs as an approach for the treatment of mood disorders. These doubts are also fuelled by the increasing awareness that the literature on antidepressants is fundamentally flawed and under the control of the pharmaceutical companies. This article describes systematically for the first time what is probably the most insidious and misleading of the biases that affect this area of research: the "multiple outcomes bias". Most trials on the effectiveness of antidepressants, instead of first establishing a hypothesis and then trying to demonstrate it, following the scientific method, start instead "data mining", without a clear hypothesis, and then select for publication, amongst a multitude of outcomes, only the ones that favour the antidepressant drug, ignoring the others. This method has obviously no scientific validity and is very misleading, allowing the manipulation of the data without any overt fraudulent action. There is the need to generate new research, independently funded and with clear hypotheses established "a priori ". What is at stake is not only the appraisal of the balance between benefits and potential damage to the patients when using this class of medications, after the realisation that they are not as harmless as believed. It is also to establish whether the research on antidepressant medication has gone on a "wild goose chase" over the last half century, concentrating almost exclusively on molecules that modify the monoaminergic transmission at synaptic level and virtually ignoring any other avenue. PMID:15922120

  8. Potential role of TBC1D4 in enhanced post-exercise insulin action in human skeletal muscle

    Treebak, Jonas Thue; Frøsig, Christian; Pehmøller, Christian;

    2009-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: TBC1 domain family, member 4 (TBC1D4; also known as AS160) is a cellular signalling intermediate to glucose transport regulated by insulin-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity is increased after acute exercise by an unknown mechanism that doe...... insulin action after exercise....

  9. Opinion Dynamics with Confirmation Bias

    Allahverdyan, A E

    2014-01-01

    Background: Confirmation bias is the tendency to acquire or evaluate new information in a way that is consistent with one's preexisting beliefs. It is omnipresent in psychology, economics, and even scientific practices. Prior theoretical research of this phenomenon has mainly focused on its economic implications possibly missing its potential connections with broader notions of cognitive science. Methodology/Principal Findings: We formulate a (non-Bayesian) model for revising subjective probabilistic opinion of a confirmationally-biased agent in the light of a persuasive opinion. The revision rule ensures that the agent does not react to persuasion that is either far from his current opinion or coincides with it. We demonstrate that the model accounts for the basic phenomenology of the social judgment theory, and allows to study various phenomena such as cognitive dissonance and boomerang effect. The model also displays the order of presentation effect|when consecutively exposed to two opinions, the preferenc...

  10. Action-potential duration and the modulation of transmitter release from the sensory neurons of Aplysia in presynaptic facilitation and behavioral sensitization

    Hochner, Binyamin; Klein, Marc; Schacher, Samuel; Kandel, Eric R.

    1986-01-01

    Presynaptic facilitation of transmitter release from Aplysia sensory neurons is an important contributor to behavioral sensitization of the gill and siphon withdrawal reflex. The enhanced release is accompanied by reduction of the serotonin-sensitive S current in the sensory neurons and a consequent increase in duration of the presynaptic action potential (ranging from 10% to 30%). We find that changes of similar magnitude in the duration of depolarizing voltage-clamp steps in sensory neurons...

  11. Anti-cancer and potential chemopreventive actions of ginseng by activating Nrf2 (NFE2L2) anti-oxidative stress/anti-inflammatory pathways

    Wu Qing; Saw Constance; Kong Ah-Ng Tony

    2010-01-01

    Abstract This article reviews recent basic and clinical studies of ginseng, particularly the anti-cancer effects and the potential chemopreventive actions by activating the transcriptional factor, nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2 or NFE2L2)-mediated anti-oxidative stress or anti-inflammatory pathways. Nrf2 is a novel target for cancer prevention as it regulates the antioxidant responsive element (ARE), a critical regulatory element in the promoter region of genes encoding cel...

  12. Harassment, Bias, and Discrimination.

    Welliver, Paul W.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses a new principle which has been added to the AECT (Association for Educational Communications and Technology) Code of Professional Ethics regarding discrimination, harassment, and bias. An example is presented which illustrates a violation of a professional colleague's rights. (LRW)

  13. Simulating publication bias

    Paldam, Martin

    censoring: selection by the size of estimate; SR3 selects the optimal combination of fit and size; and SR4 selects the first satisficing result. The last four SRs are steered by priors and result in bias. The MST and the FAT-PET have been developed for detection and correction of such bias. The simulations...... are made by data variation, while the model is the same. It appears that SR0 generates narrow funnels much at odds with observed funnels, while the other four funnels look more realistic. SR1 to SR4 give the mean a substantial bias that confirms the prior causing the bias. The FAT-PET MRA works well...

  14. Introduction to Unconscious Bias

    Schmelz, Joan T.

    2010-05-01

    We all have biases, and we are (for the most part) unaware of them. In general, men and women BOTH unconsciously devalue the contributions of women. This can have a detrimental effect on grant proposals, job applications, and performance reviews. Sociology is way ahead of astronomy in these studies. When evaluating identical application packages, male and female University psychology professors preferred 2:1 to hire "Brian” over "Karen” as an assistant professor. When evaluating a more experienced record (at the point of promotion to tenure), reservations were expressed four times more often when the name was female. This unconscious bias has a repeated negative effect on Karen's career. This talk will introduce the concept of unconscious bias and also give recommendations on how to address it using an example for a faculty search committee. The process of eliminating unconscious bias begins with awareness, then moves to policy and practice, and ends with accountability.

  15. Australia's Bond Home Bias

    Mishra, Anil V; Umaru B. Conteh

    2014-01-01

    This paper constructs the float adjusted measure of home bias and explores the determinants of bond home bias by employing the International Monetary Fund's high quality dataset (2001 to 2009) on cross-border bond investment. The paper finds that Australian investors' prefer investing in countries with higher economic development and more developed bond markets. Exchange rate volatility appears to be an impediment for cross-border bond investment. Investors prefer investing in countries with ...

  16. Measuring agricultural policy bias

    Jensen, Henning Tarp; Robinson, Sherman; Tarp, Finn

    2010-01-01

    that the agricultural price incentive bias generally perceived to exist during the 1980s was largely eliminated during the 1990s. Results also demonstrate that general equilibrium effects and country-specific characteristics are crucial for determining the sign and magnitude of agricultural bias. Our comprehensive...... protection measure is therefore uniquely suited to capture the full impact of trade policies on relative agricultural price incentives....

  17. Publication bias in situ

    Phillips Carl V

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Publication bias, as typically defined, refers to the decreased likelihood of studies' results being published when they are near the null, not statistically significant, or otherwise "less interesting." But choices about how to analyze the data and which results to report create a publication bias within the published results, a bias I label "publication bias in situ" (PBIS. Discussion PBIS may create much greater bias in the literature than traditionally defined publication bias (the failure to publish any result from a study. The causes of PBIS are well known, consisting of various decisions about reporting that are influenced by the data. But its impact is not generally appreciated, and very little attention is devoted to it. What attention there is consists largely of rules for statistical analysis that are impractical and do not actually reduce the bias in reported estimates. PBIS cannot be reduced by statistical tools because it is not fundamentally a problem of statistics, but rather of non-statistical choices and plain language interpretations. PBIS should be recognized as a phenomenon worthy of study – it is extremely common and probably has a huge impact on results reported in the literature – and there should be greater systematic efforts to identify and reduce it. The paper presents examples, including results of a recent HIV vaccine trial, that show how easily PBIS can have a large impact on reported results, as well as how there can be no simple answer to it. Summary PBIS is a major problem, worthy of substantially more attention than it receives. There are ways to reduce the bias, but they are very seldom employed because they are largely unrecognized.

  18. Information-aggregation bias

    Goodfriend, Marvin

    1991-01-01

    Aggregation in the presence of data-processing lags distorts the information content of data, violating orthogonality restrictions that hold at the individual level. Though the phenomenon is general, it is illustrated here for the life-cycle-permanent-income model. Cross-section and pooled-panel data induce information-aggregation bias akin to that in aggregate time series. Calculations show that information aggregation can seriously bias tests of the life-cycle model on aggregate time series...

  19. Early Afterdepolarizations with Growing Amplitudes via Delayed Subcritical Hopf Bifurcations and Unstable Manifolds of Saddle Foci in Cardiac Action Potential Dynamics

    Kügler, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Early afterdepolarizations (EADs) are pathological oscillations in cardiac action potentials during the repolarization phase and may be caused by drug side effects, ion channel disease or oxidative stress. The most widely observed EAD pattern is characterized by oscillations with growing amplitudes. So far, its occurence has been explained in terms of a supercritical Hopf bifurcation in the fast subsystem of the action potential dynamics from which stable limit cycles with growing amplitudes emerge. The novel contribution of this article is the introduction of two alternative explanations of EAD genesis with growing amplitudes that do not involve stable limit cycles in fast subsystems. In particular, we demonstrate that EAD patterns with growing amplitudes may alternatively arise due to a delayed subcritical Hopf bifurcation or an unstable manifold of a saddle focus fixed point in the full fast-slow system modelling the action potential. Our work extends the list of possible dynamical EAD mechanisms and may contribute to a classification of drug effects in preclinical cardiotoxicity testing. PMID:26977805

  20. Biased causal inseparable game

    Bhattacharya, Some Sankar

    2015-01-01

    Here we study the \\emph{causal inseparable} game introduced in [\\href{http://www.nature.com/ncomms/journal/v3/n10/full/ncomms2076.html}{Nat. Commun. {\\bf3}, 1092 (2012)}], but it's biased version. Two separated parties, Alice and Bob, generate biased bits (say input bit) in their respective local laboratories. Bob generates another biased bit (say decision bit) which determines their goal: whether Alice has to guess Bob's bit or vice-verse. Under the assumption that events are ordered with respect to some global causal relation, we show that the success probability of this biased causal game is upper bounded, giving rise to \\emph{biased causal inequality} (BCI). In the \\emph{process matrix} formalism, which is locally in agreement with quantum physics but assume no global causal order, we show that there exist \\emph{inseparable} process matrices that violate the BCI for arbitrary bias in the decision bit. In such scenario we also derive the maximal violation of the BCI under local operations involving tracele...

  1. Evaluation of Nystatin Containing Chitosan Hydrogels as Potential Dual Action Bio-Active Restorative Materials: in Vitro Approach

    V. Tamara Perchyonok; Vanessa Reher; Shengmiao Zhang; Nicki Basson; Sias Grobler

    2014-01-01

    Healing is a specific biological process related to the general phenomenon of growth and tissue regeneration and is a process generally affected by several systemic conditions or as detrimental side-effects of chemotherapy- and radiotherapy-induced inflammation of the oral mucosa. The objectives of this study is to evaluate the novel chitosan based functional drug delivery systems, which can be successfully incorporated into “dual action bioactive restorative materials”, capable of inducing i...

  2. Antiproliferative and apoptotic effects of selective phenolic acids on T47D human breast cancer cells: potential mechanisms of action

    The oncoprotective role of food-derived polyphenol antioxidants has been described but the implicated mechanisms are not yet clear. In addition to polyphenols, phenolic acids, found at high concentrations in a number of plants, possess antioxidant action. The main phenolic acids found in foods are derivatives of 4-hydroxybenzoic acid and 4-hydroxycinnamic acid. This work concentrates on the antiproliferative action of caffeic acid, syringic acid, sinapic acid, protocatechuic acid, ferulic acid and 3,4-dihydroxy-phenylacetic acid (PAA) on T47D human breast cancer cells, testing their antioxidant activity and a number of possible mechanisms involved (interaction with membrane and intracellular receptors, nitric oxide production). The tested compounds showed a time-dependent and dose-dependent inhibitory effect on cell growth with the following potency: caffeic acid > ferulic acid = protocatechuic acid = PAA > sinapic acid = syringic acid. Caffeic acid and PAA were chosen for further analysis. The antioxidative activity of these phenolic acids in T47D cells does not coincide with their inhibitory effect on tumoral proliferation. No interaction was found with steroid and adrenergic receptors. PAA induced an inhibition of nitric oxide synthase, while caffeic acid competes for binding and results in an inhibition of aryl hydrocarbon receptor-induced CYP1A1 enzyme. Both agents induce apoptosis via the Fas/FasL system. Phenolic acids exert a direct antiproliferative action, evident at low concentrations, comparable with those found in biological fluids after ingestion of foods rich in phenolic acids. Furthermore, the direct interaction with the aryl hydrocarbon receptor, the nitric oxide synthase inhibition and their pro-apoptotic effect provide some insights into their biological mode of action

  3. Promoting HIV Vaccine Research in African American Communities: Does the Theory of Reasoned Action Explain Potential Outcomes of Involvement?

    Frew, Paula M; Archibald, Matthew; Martinez, Nina; del Rio, Carlos; Mulligan, Mark J.

    2007-01-01

    The HIV/AIDS pandemic continues to challenge the African American community with disproportionate rates of infection, particularly among young women ages 25 to 34 years. Development of a preventive HIV vaccine may bring a substantial turning point in this health crisis. Engagement of the African American community is necessary to improve awareness of the effort and favorably influence attitudes and referent norms. The Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA) may be a useful framework for exploration o...

  4. Gender Bias in Tax Systems

    Janet Gale Stotsky

    1996-01-01

    This paper examines the nature of gender bias in tax systems. Gender bias takes both explicit and implicit forms. Explicit gender bias is found in many personal income tax systems. Several countries, especially those in Western Europe, have undertaken to eliminate explicit gender bias in recent years. It is more difficult to identify implicit gender bias, since this depends in large part on value judgments as to desirable social and economic behavior. Implicit gender bias has also been a targ...

  5. Deleting the accessory subunit KChIP2 results in loss of I(to,f) and increased I(K,slow) that maintains normal action potential configuration

    Thomsen, Morten B; Sosunov, Eugene A; Anyukhovsky, Evgeny P; Ozgen, Nazira; Boyden, Penelope A; Rosen, Michael R

    2008-01-01

    potential duration (APD) is maintained in KChIP2 knockout mice. OBJECTIVE: We tested the role of KChIP2 in regulating APD and studied the underlying ionic currents. METHODS: We used microelectrode techniques, whole-cell patch clamp studies, and real-time polymerase chain reaction amplification to...... characterize ventricular repolarization and its determinants in wild-type and KChIP2(-/-) mice. RESULTS: Despite comparable baseline action potentials, APD was more markedly prolonged by 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) in KChIP2(-/-) preparations. Peak K(+) current densities were similar in wild-type and KChIP2...

  6. Differential expression of hERG1 channel isoforms reproduces properties of native I(Kr) and modulates cardiac action potential characteristics

    Larsen, Anders Peter; Olesen, Søren-Peter

    2010-01-01

    The repolarizing cardiac rapid delayed rectifier current, I(Kr), is composed of ERG1 channels. It has been suggested that two isoforms of the ERG1 protein, ERG1a and ERG1b, both contribute to I(Kr). Marked heterogeneity in the kinetic properties of native I(Kr) has been described. We hypothesized...... that the heterogeneity of native I(Kr) can be reproduced by differential expression of ERG1a and ERG1b isoforms. Furthermore, the functional consequences of differential expression of ERG1 isoforms were explored as a potential mechanism underlying native heterogeneity of action potential duration (APD...

  7. The Influence of the Bias Potential on the Phase Composition, Structure, Substructure and Mechanical Properties of Multilayer TiN / ZrN System Obtained by Vacuum Arc Evaporation

    O.V. Sobol’

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Influence of constant and pulsed negative bias potential applied to the substrate during the deposition on the phase composition, structure, substructure and mechanical properties of multilayer ZrN / TiN coatings with a bilayer thickness of 50-200 nm was studied. Two-phase coating obtained from ZrN and TiN phases of the fcc structure of NaCl type without a significant loss of planarity and mixing layers is established. The use of high-voltage pulses would greatly change the structure and properties at Ub < 100 V. At larger value of Ub, constant potential becomes crucial for the structural engineering of the coating. It is shown that the greatest hardness is inherent to the coatings obtained by Ub = – 140...– 150 V, and H/E reaches a large value of 0.14, which is difficult to obtain in the single-layer coatings.

  8. Reactor safety and energy policy in Eastern Europe. Hazard potentials and possibilities for action. Lectures and discussions

    The eleven lectures given at the meeting attempt an interim statement on the safety of eastern European nuclear power stations and deal with the Chernobyl reactor accident and its consequences as well as with the energy-political constraints and perspectives for eastern European states that were brought about especially by the collapse of the USSR and the associated infra-structural changes. A further six statements made at the panel discussion describe possibilities of action for the West in order to enhance reactor safety in eastern Europe. (DG)

  9. Motion, identity and the bias toward agency

    Chris eFields

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The well-documented human bias toward agency as a cause and therefore an explanation of observed events is typically attributed to evolutionary selection for a social brain. Based on a review of developmental and adult behavioral and neurocognitive data, it is argued that the bias toward agency is a result of the default human solution, developed during infancy, to the computational requirements of object re-identification over gaps in observation of more than a few seconds. If this model is correct, overriding the bias toward agency to construct mechanistic explanations of observed events requires structure-mapping inferences, implemented by the pre-motor action planning system, that replace agents with mechanisms as causes of unobserved changes in contextual or featural properties of objects. Experiments that would test this model are discussed.

  10. Dopamine modulates Spike Timing-Dependent Plasticity and action potential properties in CA1 pyramidal neurons of acute rat hippocampal slices

    Elke eEdelmann

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Spike Timing-Dependent Plasticity (STDP is a cellular model of hebbian synaptic plasticity which is believed to underlie memory formation. In an attempt to establish a STDP paradigm in CA1 of acute hippocampal slices from juvenile rats (P15-20, we found that changes in excitability resulting from different slice preparation protocols correlate with the success of STDP induction. Slice preparation with sucrose containing ACSF prolonged rise time, reduced frequency adaptation, and decreased latency of action potentials in CA1 pyramidal neurons compared to preparation in conventional ASCF, while other basal electrophysiological parameters remained unaffected. Whereas we observed prominent timing-dependent (t-LTP to 171 ± 10% of controls in conventional ACSF, STDP was absent in sucrose prepared slices. This sucrose-induced STDP deficit could not be rescued by stronger STDP paradigms, applying either more pre- and/or postsynaptic stimuli, or by a higher stimulation frequency. Importantly, slice preparation with sucrose containing ACSF did not eliminate theta-burst stimulation induced LTP in CA1 in field potential recordings in our rat hippocampal slices. Application of dopamine (for 10-20 min to sucrose prepared slices completely rescued t-LTP and recovered action potential properties back to levels observed in ACSF prepared slices. Conversely, acute inhibition of D1 receptor signaling impaired t-LTP in ACSF prepared slices. No similar restoring effect for STDP as seen with dopamine was observed in response to the β-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol. ELISA measurements demonstrated a significant reduction of endogenous dopamine levels (to 61.9 ± 6.9% of ACSF values in sucrose prepared slices. These results lead us to suggest that dopamine dependent regulation of action potential properties correlates with the efficiency to elicit STDP in CA1 pyramidal neurons.

  11. Potentiation of Sulfonylurea Action by an EPAC-selective cAMP Analog in INS-1 Cells: Comparison of Tolbutamide and Gliclazide and a Potential Role for EPAC Activation of a 2-APB-sensitive Ca2+ Influx

    Jarrard, Rachel E.; Wang, Yuchen; Salyer, Amy E.; Pratt, Evan P. S.; Soderling, Ian M.; Guerra, Marcy L.; Lange, Allison M.; Broderick, Hilary J.; Hockerman, Gregory H.

    2013-01-01

    Tolbutamide and gliclazide block the KATP channel Kir6.2/Sur1, causing membrane depolarization and stimulating insulin secretion in pancreatic beta cells. We examined the ability of the EPAC-selective cAMP analog 8-pCPT-2′-O-Me-cAMP-AM to potentiate the action of these drugs and the mechanism that might account for it. Insulin secretion stimulated by both 200 μM tolbutamide and 20 μM gliclazide, concentrations that had equivalent effects on membrane potential, was inhibited by thapsigargin (1...

  12. Measuring Agricultural Bias

    Jensen, Henning Tarp; Robinson, Sherman; Tarp, Finn

    The measurement issue is the key issue in the literature on trade policy-induced agri-cultural price incentive bias. This paper introduces a general equilibrium effective rate of protection (GE-ERP) measure, which extends and generalizes earlier partial equilibrium nominal protection measures....... For the 15 sample countries, the results indicate that the agricultural price incentive bias, which was generally perceived to exist during the 1980s, was largely eliminated during the 1990s. The results also demonstrate that general equilibrium effects and country-specific characteristics - including trade...... shares and intersectoral linkages - are crucial for determining the sign and magnitude of trade policy bias. The GE-ERP measure is therefore uniquely suited to capture the full impact of trade policies on agricultural price incentives. A Monte Carlo procedure confirms that the results are robust...

  13. Remarkable relations for the expectation values of simultaneous action of the kinetic and potential energy operators on Schrodinger wavefunctions

    Joubert, D

    2001-01-01

    For Psi an eigenfunction of the Hamiltonian operator H = T + V, where T is the kinetic energy operator and V the potential energy operator, the following relations between expectation values are satisfied: = , ^2 = , ^2 = .

  14. Long term cardioprotective action of trimetazidine and potential effect on the inflammatory process in patients with ischaemic dilated cardiomyopathy

    Di Napoli, P; Taccardi, A A; Barsotti, A

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the long term effects of trimetazidine in patients with dilated ischaemic cardiomyopathy. The effects of trimetazidine on left ventricular function as well as its tolerability profile and potential anti-inflammatory effects were studied.

  15. Donnan effect on chloride ion distribution as a determinant of body fluid composition that allows action potentials to spread via fast sodium channels

    Kurbel Sven

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Proteins in any solution with a pH value that differs from their isoelectric point exert both an electric Donnan effect (DE and colloid osmotic pressure. While the former alters the distribution of ions, the latter forces water diffusion. In cells with highly Cl--permeable membranes, the resting potential is more dependent on the cytoplasmic pH value, which alters the Donnan effect of cell proteins, than on the current action of Na/K pumps. Any weak (positive or negative electric disturbances of their resting potential are quickly corrected by chloride shifts. In many excitable cells, the spreading of action potentials is mediated through fast, voltage-gated sodium channels. Tissue cells share similar concentrations of cytoplasmic proteins and almost the same exposure to the interstitial fluid (IF chloride concentration. The consequence is that similar intra- and extra-cellular chloride concentrations make these cells share the same Nernst value for Cl-. Further extrapolation indicates that cells with the same chloride Nernst value and high chloride permeability should have similar resting membrane potentials, more negative than -80 mV. Fast sodium channels require potassium levels >20 times higher inside the cell than around it, while the concentration of Cl- ions needs to be >20 times higher outside the cell. When osmotic forces, electroneutrality and other ions are all taken into account, the overall osmolarity needs to be near 280 to 300 mosm/L to reach the required resting potential in excitable cells. High plasma protein concentrations keep the IF chloride concentration stable, which is important in keeping the resting membrane potential similar in all chloride-permeable cells. Probable consequences of this concept for neuron excitability, erythrocyte membrane permeability and several features of circulation design are briefly discussed.

  16. Is GC bias in the nuclear genome of the carnivorous plant Utricularia driven by ROS-based mutation and biased gene conversion?

    Ibarra-Laclette, Enrique; Albert, Victor A; Herrera-Estrella, Alfredo; Herrera-Estrella, Luis

    2011-11-01

    At less than 90 Mbp, the tiny nuclear genome of the carnivorous bladderwort plant Utricularia is an attractive model system for studying molecular evolutionary processes leading to genome miniaturization. Recently, we reported that expression of genes encoding DNA repair and reactive oxygen species (ROS) detoxification enzymes is highest in Utricularia traps, and we argued that ROS mutagenic action correlates with the high nucleotide substitution rates observed in the Utricularia plastid, mitochondrial, and nuclear genomes. Here, we extend our analysis of 100 nuclear genes from Utricularia and related asterid eudicots to examine nucleotide substitution biases and their potential correlation with ROS-induced DNA lesions. We discovered an unusual bias toward GC nucleotides, most prominently in transition substitutions at the third position of codons, which are presumably silent with respect to adaptation. Given the general tendency of biased gene conversion to drive GC bias, and of ROS to induce double strand breaks requiring recombinational repair, we propose that some of the unusual features of the bladderwort and its genome may be more reflective of these nonadaptive processes than of natural selection. PMID:22057327

  17. Eugenia uniflora L. Essential Oil as a Potential Anti-Leishmania Agent: Effects on Leishmania amazonensis and Possible Mechanisms of Action

    Klinger Antonio da Franca Rodrigues; Layane Valéria Amorim; Jamylla Mirck Guerra de Oliveira; Clarice Noleto Dias; Denise Fernandes Coutinho Moraes; Eloisa Helena de Aguiar Andrade; Jose Guilherme Soares Maia; Sabrina Maria Portela Carneiro; Fernando Aécio de Amorim Carvalho

    2013-01-01

    Eugenia uniflora L. is a member of the Myrtaceae family and is commonly known as Brazilian cherry tree. In this study, we evaluated the chemical composition of Eugenia uniflora L. essential oil (EuEO) by using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and assessed its anti-Leishmania activity. We also explored the potential mechanisms of action and cytotoxicity of EuEO. Thirty-two compounds were identified, which constituted 92.65% of the total oil composition. The most abundant components...

  18. Determination of thermodynamic potentials and the aggregation number for micelles with the mass-action model by isothermal titration calorimetry

    Olesen, Niels Erik; Westh, Peter; Holm, René

    2015-01-01

    The aggregation number (n), thermodynamic potentials (ΔG, ΔH, ΔS) and critical micelle concentration (CMC) for 6 natural bile salts were determined on the basis of both original and previously published isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) data. Different procedures to estimate parameters of...

  19. Awareness and minimisation of systematic bias in research.

    Malone, Helen

    2014-03-01

    A major goal of nursing and midwifery is the delivery of evidence-based practice. Consequently, it is essential for the quality and safety of patient\\/client care that policy makers, educators and practitioners are aware of the presence of potential systematic bias in research practice and research publications so that only sound evidence translates into practice. The main aim of this paper is to highlight the need for ongoing awareness of the potential presence of systematic bias in research practice, to explore commonly reported types of systematic bias and to report some methods that can be applied to minimise systematic bias in research.

  20. 4-Phenylselenyl-7-chloroquinoline, a new quinoline derivative containing selenium, has potential antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory actions.

    Pinz, Mikaela; Reis, Angélica S; Duarte, Vanessa; da Rocha, Márcia J; Goldani, Bruna S; Alves, Diego; Savegnago, Lucielli; Luchese, Cristiane; Wilhelm, Ethel A

    2016-06-01

    The development of new drugs to treat painful and inflammatory clinical conditions continues to be of great interest. The present study evaluated the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of 4-phenylselenyl-7-chloroquinoline (4-PSQ). Mice were orally (p.o.) pretreated with 4-PSQ (0.1-25mg/kg), meloxicam (25mg/kg, a reference drug) or vehicle, 30min prior to the acetic acid, formalin, hot-plate and open-field tests. 4-PSQ reduced abdominal writhing induced by acetic acid and it caused an increase in latency time in the hot-plate test. 4-PSQ inhibited early and late phases of nociception and reduced the paw edema caused by formalin. Locomotor and exploratory activities in the open field test were not altered by treatments. In addition, a time-response curve was carried out by administration of 4-PSQ (25mg/kg; p.o.) at different times before the acetic acid injection. The antinociceptive effect in inhibiting acetic acid-induced abdominal writhing of 4-PSQ started at 0.5h and remained significant up to 4h after administration. Indeed, the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties of 4-PSQ were investigated. 4-PSQ diminished the edema formation and decreased the myeloperoxidase activity and reactive species levels induced by croton oil in the ear tissue. 4-PSQ partially protected against the decrease of the 2,2'-Azinobis-3-ethylbenzothiazoline 6-sulfonic acid (ABTS) and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) levels induced by croton oil. Meloxicam presented similar results for 4-PSQ in tests evaluated. These results demonstrated that 4-PSQ exerts acute anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive actions, suggesting that it may represent an alternative in the development of future new therapeutic strategies. PMID:27020552

  1. Biases in Visual, Auditory, and Audiovisual Perception of Space.

    Brian Odegaard

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Localization of objects and events in the environment is critical for survival, as many perceptual and motor tasks rely on estimation of spatial location. Therefore, it seems reasonable to assume that spatial localizations should generally be accurate. Curiously, some previous studies have reported biases in visual and auditory localizations, but these studies have used small sample sizes and the results have been mixed. Therefore, it is not clear (1 if the reported biases in localization responses are real (or due to outliers, sampling bias, or other factors, and (2 whether these putative biases reflect a bias in sensory representations of space or a priori expectations (which may be due to the experimental setup, instructions, or distribution of stimuli. Here, to address these questions, a dataset of unprecedented size (obtained from 384 observers was analyzed to examine presence, direction, and magnitude of sensory biases, and quantitative computational modeling was used to probe the underlying mechanism(s driving these effects. Data revealed that, on average, observers were biased towards the center when localizing visual stimuli, and biased towards the periphery when localizing auditory stimuli. Moreover, quantitative analysis using a Bayesian Causal Inference framework suggests that while pre-existing spatial biases for central locations exert some influence, biases in the sensory representations of both visual and auditory space are necessary to fully explain the behavioral data. How are these opposing visual and auditory biases reconciled in conditions in which both auditory and visual stimuli are produced by a single event? Potentially, the bias in one modality could dominate, or the biases could interact/cancel out. The data revealed that when integration occurred in these conditions, the visual bias dominated, but the magnitude of this bias was reduced compared to unisensory conditions. Therefore, multisensory integration not only

  2. A combined method to estimate parameters of the thalamocortical model from a heavily noise-corrupted time series of action potential

    Wang, Ruofan; Wang, Jiang; Deng, Bin, E-mail: dengbin@tju.edu.cn; Liu, Chen; Wei, Xile [Department of Electrical and Automation Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin (China); Tsang, K. M.; Chan, W. L. [Department of Electrical Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2014-03-15

    A combined method composing of the unscented Kalman filter (UKF) and the synchronization-based method is proposed for estimating electrophysiological variables and parameters of a thalamocortical (TC) neuron model, which is commonly used for studying Parkinson's disease for its relay role of connecting the basal ganglia and the cortex. In this work, we take into account the condition when only the time series of action potential with heavy noise are available. Numerical results demonstrate that not only this method can estimate model parameters from the extracted time series of action potential successfully but also the effect of its estimation is much better than the only use of the UKF or synchronization-based method, with a higher accuracy and a better robustness against noise, especially under the severe noise conditions. Considering the rather important role of TC neuron in the normal and pathological brain functions, the exploration of the method to estimate the critical parameters could have important implications for the study of its nonlinear dynamics and further treatment of Parkinson's disease.

  3. A combined method to estimate parameters of the thalamocortical model from a heavily noise-corrupted time series of action potential

    A combined method composing of the unscented Kalman filter (UKF) and the synchronization-based method is proposed for estimating electrophysiological variables and parameters of a thalamocortical (TC) neuron model, which is commonly used for studying Parkinson's disease for its relay role of connecting the basal ganglia and the cortex. In this work, we take into account the condition when only the time series of action potential with heavy noise are available. Numerical results demonstrate that not only this method can estimate model parameters from the extracted time series of action potential successfully but also the effect of its estimation is much better than the only use of the UKF or synchronization-based method, with a higher accuracy and a better robustness against noise, especially under the severe noise conditions. Considering the rather important role of TC neuron in the normal and pathological brain functions, the exploration of the method to estimate the critical parameters could have important implications for the study of its nonlinear dynamics and further treatment of Parkinson's disease

  4. Sustained Exocytosis after Action Potential-Like Stimulation at Low Frequencies in Mouse Chromaffin Cells Depends on a Dynamin-Dependent Fast Endocytotic Process

    Moya-Díaz, José; Álvarez, Yanina D.; Montenegro, Mauricio; Bayonés, Lucas; Belingheri, Ana V.; González-Jamett, Arlek M.; Cárdenas, Ana M.; Marengo, Fernando D.

    2016-01-01

    Under basal conditions the action potential firing rate of adrenal chromaffin cells is lower than 0.5 Hz. The maintenance of the secretory response at such frequencies requires a continuous replenishment of releasable vesicles. However, the mechanism that allows such vesicle replenishment remains unclear. Here, using membrane capacitance measurements on mouse chromaffin cells, we studied the mechanism of replenishment of a group of vesicles released by a single action potential-like stimulus (APls). The exocytosis triggered by APls (ETAP) represents a fraction (40%) of the immediately releasable pool, a group of vesicles highly coupled to voltage dependent calcium channels. ETAP was replenished with a time constant of 0.73 ± 0.11 s, fast enough to maintain synchronous exocytosis at 0.2–0.5 Hz stimulation. Regarding the mechanism involved in rapid ETAP replenishment, we found that it depends on the ready releasable pool; indeed depletion of this vesicle pool significantly delays ETAP replenishment. On the other hand, ETAP replenishment also correlates with a dynamin-dependent fast endocytosis process (τ = 0.53 ± 0.01 s). In this regard, disruption of dynamin function markedly inhibits the fast endocytosis and delays ETAP replenishment, but also significantly decreases the synchronous exocytosis during repetitive APls stimulation at low frequencies (0.2 and 0.5 Hz). Considering these findings, we propose a model in where both the transfer of vesicles from ready releasable pool and fast endocytosis allow rapid ETAP replenishment during low stimulation frequencies. PMID:27507935

  5. Systematic review of the empirical evidence of study publication bias and outcome reporting bias.

    Kerry Dwan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The increased use of meta-analysis in systematic reviews of healthcare interventions has highlighted several types of bias that can arise during the completion of a randomised controlled trial. Study publication bias has been recognised as a potential threat to the validity of meta-analysis and can make the readily available evidence unreliable for decision making. Until recently, outcome reporting bias has received less attention. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We review and summarise the evidence from a series of cohort studies that have assessed study publication bias and outcome reporting bias in randomised controlled trials. Sixteen studies were eligible of which only two followed the cohort all the way through from protocol approval to information regarding publication of outcomes. Eleven of the studies investigated study publication bias and five investigated outcome reporting bias. Three studies have found that statistically significant outcomes had a higher odds of being fully reported compared to non-significant outcomes (range of odds ratios: 2.2 to 4.7. In comparing trial publications to protocols, we found that 40-62% of studies had at least one primary outcome that was changed, introduced, or omitted. We decided not to undertake meta-analysis due to the differences between studies. CONCLUSIONS: Recent work provides direct empirical evidence for the existence of study publication bias and outcome reporting bias. There is strong evidence of an association between significant results and publication; studies that report positive or significant results are more likely to be published and outcomes that are statistically significant have higher odds of being fully reported. Publications have been found to be inconsistent with their protocols. Researchers need to be aware of the problems of both types of bias and efforts should be concentrated on improving the reporting of trials.

  6. Publication Bias The "File-Drawer Problem" in Scientific Inference

    Scargle, J D

    1999-01-01

    Publication bias arises whenever the probability that a study is published depends on the statistical significance of its results. This bias, often called the file-drawer effect since the unpublished results are imagined to be tucked away in researchers' file cabinets, is potentially a severe impediment to combining the statistical results of studies collected from the literature. With almost any reasonable quantitative model for publication bias, only a small number of studies lost in the file-drawer will produce a significant bias. This result contradicts the well known Fail Safe File Drawer (FSFD) method for setting limits on the potential harm of publication bias, widely used in social, medical and psychic research. This method incorrectly treats the file drawer as unbiased, and almost always misestimates the seriousness of publication bias. A large body of not only psychic research, but medical and social science studies, has mistakenly relied on this method to validate claimed discoveries. Statistical c...

  7. Conjugated docosahexaenoic acid suppresses KPL-1 human breast cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo: potential mechanisms of action

    The present study was conducted to examine the effect of conjugated docosahexaenoic acid (CDHA) on cell growth, cell cycle progression, mode of cell death, and expression of cell cycle regulatory and/or apoptosis-related proteins in KPL-1 human breast cancer cell line. This effect of CDHA was compared with that of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). KPL-1 cell growth was assessed by colorimetric 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay; cell cycle progression and mode of cell death were examined by flow cytometry; and levels of expression of p53, p21Cip1/Waf1, cyclin D1, Bax, and Bcl-2 proteins were examined by Western blotting analysis. In vivo tumor growth was examined by injecting KPL-1 cells subcutaneously into the area of the right thoracic mammary fat pad of female athymic mice fed a CDHA diet. CDHA inhibited KPL-1 cells more effectively than did DHA (50% inhibitory concentration for 72 hours: 97 μmol/l and 270 μmol/l, respectively). With both CDHA and DHA growth inhibition was due to apoptosis, as indicated by the appearance of a sub-G1 fraction. The apoptosis cascade involved downregulation of Bcl-2 protein; Bax expression was unchanged. Cell cycle progression was due to G0/G1 arrest, which involved increased expression of p53 and p21Cip1/Waf1, and decreased expression of cyclin D1. CDHA modulated cell cycle regulatory proteins and apoptosis-related proteins in a manner similar to that of parent DHA. In the athymic mouse system 1.0% dietary CDHA, but not 0.2%, significantly suppressed growth of KPL-1 tumor cells; CDHA tended to decrease regional lymph node metastasis in a dose dependent manner. CDHA inhibited growth of KPL-1 human breast cancer cells in vitro more effectively than did DHA. The mechanisms of action involved modulation of apoptosis cascade and cell cycle progression. Dietary CDHA at 1.0% suppressed KPL-1 cell growth in the athymic mouse system

  8. Identification of sodium channel isoforms that mediate action potential firing in lamina I/II spinal cord neurons

    Smith Paula L

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Voltage-gated sodium channels play key roles in acute and chronic pain processing. The molecular, biophysical, and pharmacological properties of sodium channel currents have been extensively studied for peripheral nociceptors while the properties of sodium channel currents in dorsal horn spinal cord neurons remain incompletely understood. Thus far, investigations into the roles of sodium channel function in nociceptive signaling have primarily focused on recombinant channels or peripheral nociceptors. Here, we utilize recordings from lamina I/II neurons withdrawn from the surface of spinal cord slices to systematically determine the functional properties of sodium channels expressed within the superficial dorsal horn. Results Sodium channel currents within lamina I/II neurons exhibited relatively hyperpolarized voltage-dependent properties and fast kinetics of both inactivation and recovery from inactivation, enabling small changes in neuronal membrane potentials to have large effects on intrinsic excitability. By combining biophysical and pharmacological channel properties with quantitative real-time PCR results, we demonstrate that functional sodium channel currents within lamina I/II neurons are predominantly composed of the NaV1.2 and NaV1.3 isoforms. Conclusions Overall, lamina I/II neurons express a unique combination of functional sodium channels that are highly divergent from the sodium channel isoforms found within peripheral nociceptors, creating potentially complementary or distinct ion channel targets for future pain therapeutics.

  9. Temperature trend biases

    Venema, Victor; Lindau, Ralf

    2016-04-01

    In an accompanying talk we show that well-homogenized national dataset warm more than temperatures from global collections averaged over the region of common coverage. In this poster we want to present auxiliary work about possible biases in the raw observations and on how well relative statistical homogenization can remove trend biases. There are several possible causes of cooling biases, which have not been studied much. Siting could be an important factor. Urban stations tend to move away from the centre to better locations. Many stations started inside of urban areas and are nowadays more outside. Even for villages the temperature difference between the centre and edge can be 0.5°C. When a city station moves to an airport, which often happened around WWII, this takes the station (largely) out of the urban heat island. During the 20th century the Stevenson screen was established as the dominant thermometer screen. This screen protected the thermometer much better against radiation than earlier designs. Deficits of earlier measurement methods have artificially warmed the temperatures in the 19th century. Newer studies suggest we may have underestimated the size of this bias. Currently we are in a transition to Automatic Weather Stations. The net global effect of this transition is not clear at this moment. Irrigation on average decreases the 2m-temperature by about 1 degree centigrade. At the same time, irrigation has increased significantly during the last century. People preferentially live in irrigated areas and weather stations serve agriculture. Thus it is possible that there is a higher likelihood that weather stations are erected in irrigated areas than elsewhere. In this case irrigation could lead to a spurious cooling trend. In the Parallel Observations Science Team of the International Surface Temperature Initiative (ISTI-POST) we are studying influence of the introduction of Stevenson screens and Automatic Weather Stations using parallel measurements

  10. Biased Range Trees

    Dujmovic, Vida; Morin, Pat

    2008-01-01

    A data structure, called a biased range tree, is presented that preprocesses a set S of n points in R^2 and a query distribution D for 2-sided orthogonal range counting queries. The expected query time for this data structure, when queries are drawn according to D, matches, to within a constant factor, that of the optimal decision tree for S and D. The memory and preprocessing requirements of the data structure are O(n log n).

  11. Low Frequency Biasing

    Kadelbach, Irmgard

    2003-01-01

    Die Elektrocochleographie (EcoG) ist eine der vielversprechendsten Methoden, cochleäre Dysfunktionen mit objektiver Diagnostik zu verifizieren. Erweitert durch das Prinzip des Biasings, also der gleichzeitigen Präsentation von Testtönen in einen niederfrequenten 52-Hz-Sinusdauerton, läßt sich die Funktion der Cochlea und eine möglicherweise pathologische Arbeitsweise aufdecken. In der Auswertung der Amplituden des Summationspotentials (SP), des cochleären Mikrophonpotentials (CM) und des Summ...

  12. Photoconductivity of biased graphene

    Freitag, Marcus; Low, Tony; Xia, Fengnian; Avouris, Phaedon

    2012-01-01

    Graphene is a promising candidate for optoelectronic applications such as photodetectors, terahertz imagers, and plasmonic devices. The origin of photoresponse in graphene junctions has been studied extensively and is attributed to either thermoelectric or photovoltaic effects. In addition, hot carrier transport and carrier multiplication are thought to play an important role. Here we report the intrinsic photoresponse in biased but otherwise homogeneous graphene. In this classic photoconduct...

  13. Decision Aiding to Overcome Biases in Object Identification

    Mary Fendley; Narayanan, S.

    2012-01-01

    Human decision makers typically use heuristics under time-pressured situations. These heuristics can potentially degrade task performance through the impact of their associated biases. Using object identification in image analysis as the context, this paper identifies cognitive biases that play a role in decision making. We propose a decision support system to help overcome these biases in this context. Results show that the decision support system improved human decision making in object ide...

  14. The impact of anchoring bias in the UK equity market

    Koskinen, Matti

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE OF THE STUDY The purpose of this thesis is to study how the anchoring bias, a cognitive bias, affects equity analysts' forecasts and what kind of implications this bias has for investors and managers of listed companies in the UK stock market. I test whether industry median forecast earnings per share can work as an anchor when analysts are estimating companies' future earnings and how this potential anchoring affects forecast errors, future stock returns, earnings surprises and s...

  15. The role of dietary coconut for the prevention and treatment of Alzheimer's disease: potential mechanisms of action.

    Fernando, W M A D B; Martins, Ian J; Goozee, K G; Brennan, Charles S; Jayasena, V; Martins, R N

    2015-07-14

    Coconut, Cocos nucifera L., is a tree that is cultivated to provide a large number of products, although it is mainly grown for its nutritional and medicinal values. Coconut oil, derived from the coconut fruit, has been recognised historically as containing high levels of saturated fat; however, closer scrutiny suggests that coconut should be regarded more favourably. Unlike most other dietary fats that are high in long-chain fatty acids, coconut oil comprises medium-chain fatty acids (MCFA). MCFA are unique in that they are easily absorbed and metabolised by the liver, and can be converted to ketones. Ketone bodies are an important alternative energy source in the brain, and may be beneficial to people developing or already with memory impairment, as in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Coconut is classified as a highly nutritious 'functional food'. It is rich in dietary fibre, vitamins and minerals; however, notably, evidence is mounting to support the concept that coconut may be beneficial in the treatment of obesity, dyslipidaemia, elevated LDL, insulin resistance and hypertension - these are the risk factors for CVD and type 2 diabetes, and also for AD. In addition, phenolic compounds and hormones (cytokinins) found in coconut may assist in preventing the aggregation of amyloid-β peptide, potentially inhibiting a key step in the pathogenesis of AD. The purpose of the present review was to explore the literature related to coconut, outlining the known mechanistic physiology, and to discuss the potential role of coconut supplementation as a therapeutic option in the prevention and management of AD. PMID:25997382

  16. Healthy universities--time for action: a qualitative research study exploring the potential for a national programme.

    Dooris, Mark; Doherty, Sharon

    2010-03-01

    Despite the absence of national or international steers, there is within England growing interest in the Healthy University approach. This article introduces Healthy Universities; reports on a qualitative study exploring the potential for a national programme contributing to health, well-being and sustainable development; and concludes with reflections and recommendations. The study used questionnaires and interviews with key informants from English higher education institutions and national stakeholder organizations. The findings confirmed that higher education offers significant potential to impact positively on the health and well-being of students, staff and wider communities through education, research, knowledge exchange and institutional practice. There was strong support for extending the healthy settings approach beyond schools and further education, through a National Healthy Higher Education Programme that provides a whole system Healthy University Framework. Informants argued that although there are important public health drivers, it will also be necessary to show how a Healthy Universities can help achieve core business objectives and contribute to related agendas such as sustainability. Two models were discussed: an accreditation scheme with externally assessed standardized achievement criteria; and a flexible and light-touch framework focusing on change-related processes and utilizing self-assessment. While highlighting the appeal of league tables, many informants feared that a top-down approach could backfire, generating resistance and resulting in minimal compliance. In contrast, the majority felt that a process-focused aspirational model would be more likely to win hearts and minds and facilitate system-level change. Key recommendations relate to national programme development, research and evaluation and international collaboration and networking. PMID:20167825

  17. PDE type-4 inhibition increases L-type Ca(2+) currents, action potential firing, and quantal size of exocytosis in mouse chromaffin cells.

    Marcantoni, A; Carabelli, V; Vandael, D H; Comunanza, V; Carbone, E

    2009-03-01

    We studied the effects of the cAMP-hydrolyzing enzyme phosphodiesterase type-4 (PDE4) on the L-type Ca(2+) channels (LTCCs) and Ca(2+)-dependent secretion in mouse chromaffin cells (MCCs). The selective PDE4 inhibitor rolipram (3 microM) had a specific potentiating action on Ca(2+) currents of MCCs (40% increase within 3 min). A similar effect was produced by the selective beta(1)-AR agonist denopamine (1 microM) and by the unselective PDEs inhibitor IBMX (100 microM). Rolipram and denopamine actions were selective for LTCCs, and the Ca(2+) current increase remained unchanged if the two compounds were applied simultaneously. This suggests that at rest, LTCCs in MCCs are down-regulated by the low levels of cAMP determined by PDE4 activity and that LTCCs can be up-regulated by either inhibiting PDE4 or activating beta(1)-AR. No other PDEs are likely involved in this specific action. PDE4 inhibition had also a marked effect on the spontaneous firing of resting MCCs and catecholamine secretion. Rolipram up-regulated the LTCCs contributing to the "pace-maker" current underlying action potential (AP) discharges and accelerated the firing rate, with no significant effects on AP waveform. Acceleration of AP firing was also induced by the LTCC-agonist Bay K (1 microM), while nifedipine (3 microM) reduced the firing frequency, suggesting that LTCCs and intracellular cAMP play a key role in setting the pace-maker current regulating MCCs excitability. Rolipram increased also the size of the ready-releasable pool and the quantal content of secretory vesicles without affecting their probability of release. Thus, rolipram acts on MCCs by up-regulating both exocytosis and AP firings. These two processes are effectively down-regulated by PDE4 at rest and can dramatically increase the quantity of released catecholamines when PDE4 is inhibited and/or cAMP is raised. PMID:18779976

  18. Recent actions taken on methyl bromide under the Montreal Protocol: Their potential economic implications on international trade

    Methyl bromide (MB) produced and used by man is a versatile, highly effective, fastacting fumigant employed in a number of important ways to kill organisms destructive to plants. A wide spectrum of commodities is treated with MB. The compound is unique in that it provides a wide range of pest control, may be applied to a broad spectrum of both food and non-food commodities, can be used for fumigation of large and small quantities of materials, and, when applied properly, leaves no residues of toxicological significance. Recently, this compound has come under scientific scrutiny and has been identified as a potentially potent ozone depleting chemical. As a result, countries operating under the Montreal Protocol will be restricting its use, and, in some cases, eliminating its use altogether. To date there are no alternative chemical fumigants to replace methyl bromide. Non-chemical treatments such as irradiation, hot and cold treatments, modified atmosphere, etc., are the most promising. The paper focuses on the magnitude of the economic consequences on international trade and the necessity to have available alternative treatments that are highly effective, fast-acting, and practical. 8 refs, 12 tabs

  19. [Algorithm study on the three-dimensional cardiac tissue based on the model of ventricular action potential].

    Zhang, Hong; Ming, Lequn; Jin, Yinbin; Li, Mingjun; Zhang, Zhenxi; Lin, Yang

    2010-02-01

    Cardiac reentry is one of the important factors to induce arrhythmias. It could lead to ventricular tachycardia (VT) or even fibrillation (VF), resulting in sudden cardiac death. With the wide use of computer in the quantitative study of electrophysiology, the three-dimensional virtual heart for simulations needs to be developed imminently in computer. In this paper, numerical algorithm of the model was studied. The three-dimensional model was constructed by integrating Luo-Rudy 1991 ventricular cell model and diffusion equation. The operator splitting method was employed to solve the model. The alternate direction iterative (ADI) format and seven-point centered difference method were used for the partial differential equation. And the discrete format with second-order accuracy was taken for the boundary conditions. The results showed that the ADI format and seven-point centered difference method both could successfully figure out the membrane potential and electrical activities with good numerical stability. However, computing consumption could be greatly reduced with the ADI format, implying that the ADI method with large time step was more powerful in numerical simulations. PMID:20337013

  20. The angiogenic effect of dracorhodin perchlorate on human umbilical vein endothelial cells and its potential mechanism of action.

    Li, Feng; Jiang, Tao; Liu, Wei; Hu, Quan; Yin, Huinan

    2016-08-01

    Hyperglycemia is the key clinical feature of diabetes, and may induce refractory wound lesions and impaired angiogenesis. Dracorhodin perchlorate (Dra) is the major ingredient of dragon's blood and it has been used as a medicine to treat chronic wounds, such as diabetic foot, since ancient times in many cultures. The current study aimed to investigate the effect of Dra on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) under high‑glucose (HG) stimulation and its potential mechanism. Dra was observed to increase the multiplication capacity of HUVECs both under low glucose (LG) and HG concentrations. Additionally, migration and tube formation in HUVECs was facilitated by Dra. The expression levels of Ras, mitogen‑activated protein kinase (MAPK) and vascular endothelial growth factor, which are key components of the Ras/MAPK pathway, were upregulated following Dra treatment. The present study is the first report, to the best of our knowledge, of the effects of Dra on wound healing, and the association with the Ras/MAPK signaling pathway. PMID:27357516

  1. Social biases determine spatiotemporal sparseness of ciliate mating heuristics.

    Clark, Kevin B

    2012-01-01

    Ciliates become highly social, even displaying animal-like qualities, in the joint presence of aroused conspecifics and nonself mating pheromones. Pheromone detection putatively helps trigger instinctual and learned courtship and dominance displays from which social judgments are made about the availability, compatibility, and fitness representativeness or likelihood of prospective mates and rivals. In earlier studies, I demonstrated the heterotrich Spirostomum ambiguum improves mating competence by effecting preconjugal strategies and inferences in mock social trials via behavioral heuristics built from Hebbian-like associative learning. Heuristics embody serial patterns of socially relevant action that evolve into ordered, topologically invariant computational networks supporting intra- and intermate selection. S. ambiguum employs heuristics to acquire, store, plan, compare, modify, select, and execute sets of mating propaganda. One major adaptive constraint over formation and use of heuristics involves a ciliate's initial subjective bias, responsiveness, or preparedness, as defined by Stevens' Law of subjective stimulus intensity, for perceiving the meaningfulness of mechanical pressures accompanying cell-cell contacts and additional perimating events. This bias controls durations and valences of nonassociative learning, search rates for appropriate mating strategies, potential net reproductive payoffs, levels of social honesty and deception, successful error diagnosis and correction of mating signals, use of insight or analysis to solve mating dilemmas, bioenergetics expenditures, and governance of mating decisions by classical or quantum statistical mechanics. I now report this same social bias also differentially affects the spatiotemporal sparseness, as measured with metric entropy, of ciliate heuristics. Sparseness plays an important role in neural systems through optimizing the specificity, efficiency, and capacity of memory representations. The present

  2. Assessing Bias in Search Engines.

    Mowshowitz, Abbe; Kawaguchi, Akira

    2002-01-01

    Addresses the measurement of bias in search engines on the Web, defining bias as the balance and representation of items in a collection retrieved from a database for a set of queries. Assesses bias by measuring the deviation from the ideal of the distribution produced by a particular search engine. (Author/LRW)

  3. Molecular mechanisms of action and potential biomarkers of growth inhibition of dasatinib (BMS-354825) on hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    Molecular targeted therapy has emerged as a promising treatment of Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). One potential target is the Src family Kinase (SFK). C-Src, a non-receptor tyrosine kinase is a critical link of multiple signal pathways that regulate proliferation, invasion, survival, metastasis, and angiogenesis. In this study, we evaluated the effects of a novel SFK inhibitor, dasatinib (BMS-354825), on SFK/FAK/p130CAS, PI3K/PTEN/Akt/mTOR, Ras/Raf/MAPK and Stats pathways in 9 HCC cell lines. Growth inhibition was assessed by MTS assay. EGFR, Src and downstream proteins FAK, Akt, MAPK42/44, Stat3 expressions were measured by western blot. Cell adhesion, migration and invasion were performed with and without dasatinib treatment. The IC50 of 9 cell lines ranged from 0.7 μM ~ 14.2 μM. In general the growth inhibition by dasatinib was related to total Src (t-Src) and the ratio of activated Src (p-Src) to t-Src. There was good correlation of the sensitivity to dasatinib and the inhibition level of p-Src, p-FAK576/577 and p-Akt. No inhibition was found on Stat3 and MAPK42/44 in all cell lines. The inhibition of cell adhesion, migration and invasion were correlated with p-FAK inhibition. Dasatinib inhibits the proliferation, adhesion, migration and invasion of HCC cells in vitro via inhibiting of Src tyrosine kinase and affecting SFK/FAK and PI3K/PTEN/Akt, but not Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK and JAK/Stat pathways. T-Src and p-Src/t-Src may be useful biomarkers to select HCC patients for dasatinib treatment

  4. Addictive evaluation of cholic acid-verticinone ester, a potential cough therapeutic agent with agonist action of opioid receptor

    Jiu-liang ZHANG; Hui WANG; Chang CHEN; Hui-fang PI; Han-li RUAN; Peng ZHANG; Ji-zhou WU

    2009-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this work was to search for potential drugs with potent antitussive and expectorant activities as well as a low toxicity, but without addictive properties. Cholic acid-verticinone ester (CA-Ver) was synthesized based on the clearly elucidated antitussive and expectorant activities of verticinone in bulbs of Fritillaria and different bile acids in Snake Bile. In our previous study, CA-Vet showed a much more potent activity than codeine phosphate. This study was carried out to investigate the central antitussive mechanism and the addictive evaluation of CA-Ver.Methods: Testing on a capsaicin-induced cough model of mice pretreated with naloxone, a non-selective opioid receptor antagonist, was performed for the observation of CA-Ver's central antitussive mechanism. We then took naloxone-induced withdrawal tests of mice for the judgment of CA-Ver's addiction. Lastly, we determined the opioid dependence of CA-Ver in the guinea pig ileum. Results: The test on the capsaicin-induced cough model showed that naloxone could block the antitussive effect of CA-Ver,suggesting the antitussive mechanism of CA-Ver was related to the central opioid receptors. The naloxone-urged withdrawal tests of the mice showed that CA-Ver was not addictive, and the test of the opioid dependence in the guinea pig ileum showed that CA-Ver had no withdrawal response.Conclusion: These findings suggested that CA-Ver deserved attention for its potent antitussive effects related to the central opioid receptors, but without addiction, and had a good development perspective.

  5. Test Bias and the Elimination of Racism

    Sedlacek, William E.

    1977-01-01

    Three types of test bias are discussed: content bias, atmosphere bias, and use bias. Use bias is considered the most important. Tests reflect the bias in society, and eliminating test bias means eliminating racism and sexism in society. A six-stage model to eliminate racism and sexism is presented. (Author)

  6. Contextual modulation of biases in face recognition.

    Fatima Maria Felisberti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The ability to recognize the faces of potential cooperators and cheaters is fundamental to social exchanges, given that cooperation for mutual benefit is expected. Studies addressing biases in face recognition have so far proved inconclusive, with reports of biases towards faces of cheaters, biases towards faces of cooperators, or no biases at all. This study attempts to uncover possible causes underlying such discrepancies. METHODOLOGY AND FINDINGS: Four experiments were designed to investigate biases in face recognition during social exchanges when behavioral descriptors (prosocial, antisocial or neutral embedded in different scenarios were tagged to faces during memorization. Face recognition, measured as accuracy and response latency, was tested with modified yes-no, forced-choice and recall tasks (N = 174. An enhanced recognition of faces tagged with prosocial descriptors was observed when the encoding scenario involved financial transactions and the rules of the social contract were not explicit (experiments 1 and 2. Such bias was eliminated or attenuated by making participants explicitly aware of "cooperative", "cheating" and "neutral/indifferent" behaviors via a pre-test questionnaire and then adding such tags to behavioral descriptors (experiment 3. Further, in a social judgment scenario with descriptors of salient moral behaviors, recognition of antisocial and prosocial faces was similar, but significantly better than neutral faces (experiment 4. CONCLUSION: The results highlight the relevance of descriptors and scenarios of social exchange in face recognition, when the frequency of prosocial and antisocial individuals in a group is similar. Recognition biases towards prosocial faces emerged when descriptors did not state the rules of a social contract or the moral status of a behavior, and they point to the existence of broad and flexible cognitive abilities finely tuned to minor changes in social context.

  7. Social reward shapes attentional biases.

    Anderson, Brian A

    2016-01-01

    Paying attention to stimuli that predict a reward outcome is important for an organism to survive and thrive. When visual stimuli are associated with tangible, extrinsic rewards such as money or food, these stimuli acquire high attentional priority and come to automatically capture attention. In humans and other primates, however, many behaviors are not motivated directly by such extrinsic rewards, but rather by the social feedback that results from performing those behaviors. In the present study, I examine whether positive social feedback can similarly influence attentional bias. The results show that stimuli previously associated with a high probability of positive social feedback elicit value-driven attentional capture, much like stimuli associated with extrinsic rewards. Unlike with extrinsic rewards, however, such stimuli also influence task-specific motivation. My findings offer a potential mechanism by which social reward shapes the information that we prioritize when perceiving the world around us. PMID:25941868

  8. Remote Monitoring of the Heart Condition of Athletes by Measuring the Cardiac Action Potential Propagation Time Using a Wireless Sensor Network

    Amang Sudarsono

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Highly performing athletes are susceptible to cardiac damage of several kinds which may be irreversible. The monitoring of heart rate and ECG waveforms from such subjects by wireless sensor networks has been reported in health and sports care documents. However, a more decisive parameter for instant to instant changes would be the time of Cardiac Action Potential Propagation. This time, which can be between 15-20 ms would shoot suddenly in acute stress in highly performing athletes for short durations. Repeated incidents of such rising values will tend to cause irreversible damage to the heart. We developed the technique of measuring this time and reporting it through a wireless sensor network to monitoring station.

  9. Action potential initial dynamical control and analysis of a minimum neuron model%最小神经元模型放电起始动态控制与分析

    金淇涛; 王江; 魏熙乐; 邓斌; 车艳秋

    2011-01-01

    本文采用最小神经元模型,从生理学角度设计wash-out滤波器,实现了不同放电起始动态机理之间的转换,并证明wash-out滤波器控制通过影响阈下电流的竞争结果改变了神经元的放电起始动态机理.%Neuron is a basic unit of information transmission in the nervous system . Neuron encodes the information input from the dendrites by generating action potential sequences of different firing patterns. The different firing patterns result from different action potential initial dynamic mechanisms for neurons to generate spikes. The result of competition between neuron ion currents with different dynamic features in the sub threshold potential determines the action potential initial dynamic mechanism. In this paper, we adopt a minimum neuron model to design the wash-out filter from a physiological view for achieving the transition between different action potential initial dynamic mechanisms and for verifying that the wash-out filter control changes the action potential initial dynamic mechanism of neuron by affecting the result of competition between currents with different dynamic features in the sub-threshold potential.

  10. 3 keys to defeating unconscious bias watch, think, act

    Thiederman, Sondra

    2015-01-01

    Have you ever had a biased thought? If the answer is “yes,” join the club. Everybody has biases and, although that doesn’t make us bad people, it does mean we compromise our ability to get along with people who are different from us. The good news is, there’s a lot we can do to defeat bias. Calling on Dr. Sondra Thiederman’s twenty-five years of experience in the diversity/inclusion field, the book lays out an innovative WATCH, THINK, ACT strategy that each of us can immediately apply to the task. Easy-to-read and filled with anecdotes and activities, 3 Keys shows the reader: • How to WATCH their thoughts, experiences, and actions to identify unconscious biases and target them for extinction. • How to THINK in such a way as to weaken and control our biases. • How to ACT to defeat our biases and cultivate the kind of common ground that we know to be inhospitable to the survival of bias. Designed to motivate real change, the answer to defeating our biases is in these pages. The rest is up to you...

  11. Associations between Depressive Symptoms, Rumination, Overgeneral Autobiographical Memory and Interpretation Bias within a Clinically Depressed Sample

    D.M. Lievaart (Marien); C. van der Heiden (Colin); E.G. Geraerts (Elke)

    2013-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ There is ample research demonstrating that biases in cognitive processes, such as a negative interpretation bias, rumination, and overgeneral autobiographical memory, are potential vulnerability factors for depression. However, a key limitation is that most studies con

  12. Motor imagery during action observation modulates automatic imitation effects in rhythmical actions

    Daniel Lloyd Eaves

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We have previously shown that passively observing a task-irrelevant rhythmical action can bias the cycle time of a subsequently executed rhythmical action. Here we use the same paradigm to investigate the impact of different forms of motor imagery (MI during action observation (AO on this automatic imitation (AI effect. Participants saw a picture of the instructed action followed by a rhythmical distractor movie, wherein cycle time was subtly manipulated across trials. They then executed the instructed rhythmical action. When participants imagined performing the instructed action in synchrony with the distractor action (AO + MI, a strong imitation bias was found that was significantly greater than in our previous study. The bias was pronounced equally for compatible and incompatible trials, wherein observed and imagined actions were different in type (e.g., face washing vs. painting or plane of movement, or both. In contrast, no imitation bias was observed when MI conflicted with AO. In Experiment 2, motor execution synchronised with AO produced a stronger imitation bias compared to AO + MI, showing an advantage in synchronisation for overt execution over MI. Furthermore, the bias was stronger when participants synchronised the instructed action with the distractor movie, compared to when they synchronised the distractor action with the distractor movie. Although we still observed a significant bias in the latter condition, this finding indicates a degree of specificity in AI effects for the identity of the synchronised action. Overall, our data show that MI can substantially modulate the effects of AO on subsequent execution, wherein: (1 combined AO + MI can enhance AI effects relative to passive AO; (2 observed and imagined actions can be flexibly coordinated across different action types and planes; and (3 conflicting AO + MI can abolish AI effects. Therefore, combined AO + MI instructions should be considered in motor training and

  13. Determination of thermodynamic potentials and the aggregation number for micelles with the mass-action model by isothermal titration calorimetry: A case study on bile salts.

    Olesen, Niels Erik; Westh, Peter; Holm, René

    2015-09-01

    The aggregation number (n), thermodynamic potentials (ΔG, ΔH, ΔS) and critical micelle concentration (CMC) for 6 natural bile salts were determined on the basis of both original and previously published isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) data. Different procedures to estimate parameters of micelles with ITC were compared to a mass-action model (MAM) of reaction type: n⋅S⇌Mn. This analysis can provide guidelines for future ITC studies of systems behaving in accordance with this model such as micelles and proteins that undergo self-association to oligomers. Micelles with small aggregation numbers, as those of bile salts, are interesting because such small aggregates cannot be characterized as a separate macroscopic phase and the widely applied pseudo-phase model (PPM) is inaccurate. In the present work it was demonstrated that the aggregation number of micelles was constant at low concentrations enabling determination of the thermodynamic potentials by the MAM. A correlation between the aggregation number and the heat capacity was found, which implies that the dehydrated surface area of bile salts increases with the aggregation number. This is in accordance with Tanford's principles of opposing forces where neighbouring molecules in the aggregate are better able to shield from the surrounding hydrophilic environment when the aggregation number increases. PMID:25978555

  14. Approach-bias predicts development of cannabis problem severity in heavy cannabis users: results from a prospective FMRI study.

    Janna Cousijn

    Full Text Available A potentially powerful predictor for the course of drug (abuse is the approach-bias, that is, the pre-reflective tendency to approach rather than avoid drug-related stimuli. Here we investigated the neural underpinnings of cannabis approach and avoidance tendencies. By elucidating the predictive power of neural approach-bias activations for future cannabis use and problem severity, we aimed at identifying new intervention targets. Using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI, neural approach-bias activations were measured with a Stimulus Response Compatibility task (SRC and compared between 33 heavy cannabis users and 36 matched controls. In addition, associations were examined between approach-bias activations and cannabis use and problem severity at baseline and at six-month follow-up. Approach-bias activations did not differ between heavy cannabis users and controls. However, within the group of heavy cannabis users, a positive relation was observed between total lifetime cannabis use and approach-bias activations in various fronto-limbic areas. Moreover, approach-bias activations in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC independently predicted cannabis problem severity after six months over and beyond session-induced subjective measures of craving. Higher DLPFC/ACC activity during cannabis approach trials, but lower activity during cannabis avoidance trials were associated with decreases in cannabis problem severity. These findings suggest that cannabis users with deficient control over cannabis action tendencies are more likely to develop cannabis related problems. Moreover, the balance between cannabis approach and avoidance responses in the DLPFC and ACC may help identify individuals at-risk for cannabis use disorders and may be new targets for prevention and treatment.

  15. Exchange bias theory

    Research on the exchange bias (EB) phenomenon has witnessed a flurry of activity during recent years, which stems from its use in magnetic sensors and as stabilizers in magnetic reading heads. EB was discovered in 1956 but it attracted only limited attention until these applications, closely related to giant magnetoresistance, were developed during the last decade. In this review, I initially give a short introduction, listing the most salient experimental results and what is required from an EB theory. Next, I indicate some of the obstacles in the road towards a satisfactory understanding of the phenomenon. The main body of the text reviews and critically discusses the activity that has flourished, mainly during the last 5 years, in the theoretical front. Finally, an evaluation of the progress made, and a critical assessment as to where we stand nowadays along the road to a satisfactory theory, is presented

  16. Measuring nonlocal Lagrangian peak bias

    Biagetti, Matteo; Desjacques, Vincent; Paranjape, Aseem

    2013-01-01

    In the Lagrangian approach to halo clustering, nonlocal bias can be generated either in the initial conditions or by the subsequent gravitational motions. Here, we investigate nonlocal Lagrangian bias contributions involving gradients of the linear density field, for which we have predictions from the excursion set peak formalism. We reformulate this approach in order to explicitly take into account the variable describing the crossing of the collapse barrier. This enables us to write down a bias expansion which includes all the bias terms, including the nonlocal ones. Having checked that the model furnishes a reasonable fit to the halo mass function, we extend the 1-point cross-correlation technique of Musso, Paranjape & Sheth (2012) to bias contributions that are chi-squared distributed. We validate the method with numerical realizations of peaks of Gaussian random fields before applying it to N-body simulations. We focus on the lowest (quadratic) order nonlocal bias factors predicted by the excursion s...

  17. Target selection biases from recent experience transfer across effectors.

    Moher, Jeff; Song, Joo-Hyun

    2016-02-01

    Target selection is often biased by an observer's recent experiences. However, not much is known about whether these selection biases influence behavior across different effectors. For example, does looking at a red object make it easier to subsequently reach towards another red object? In the current study, we asked observers to find the uniquely colored target object on each trial. Randomly intermixed pre-trial cues indicated the mode of action: either an eye movement or a visually guided reach movement to the target. In Experiment 1, we found that priming of popout, reflected in faster responses following repetition of the target color on consecutive trials, occurred regardless of whether the effector was repeated from the previous trial or not. In Experiment 2, we examined whether an inhibitory selection bias away from a feature could transfer across effectors. While priming of popout reflects both enhancement of the repeated target features and suppression of the repeated distractor features, the distractor previewing effect isolates a purely inhibitory component of target selection in which a previewed color is presented in a homogenous display and subsequently inhibited. Much like priming of popout, intertrial suppression biases in the distractor previewing effect transferred across effectors. Together, these results suggest that biases for target selection driven by recent trial history transfer across effectors. This indicates that representations in memory that bias attention towards or away from specific features are largely independent from their associated actions. PMID:26563393

  18. Potential sources of bias in the use of individual's recall of the frequency of exposure to air pollution for use in exposure assessment in epidemiological studies: a cross-sectional survey

    Bickerstaff Karen; Hunter Paul R; Davies Maria A

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Background In a previous study it has been shown that mean population perception of air pollution correlates well with physical measures of actual air pollution and could be used as a measure of exposure to air pollution, at least for those forms of pollution perceptible to humans. However, for such a measure to be valid researchers would need to be confident that it was not strongly biased by possible confounding variables. This study reports the association between perception of ab...

  19. Character of diaphragm compound muscle action potential and phrenic nerve conduction time in patients with obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome

    Yuhong Hou; Rongchang Chen; Jinbing Pan; Yuanming Luo; Nanshan Zhong

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Both hypoxia and carbon dioxide retention can damage phrenic nerve and muscle conduction, as well as diaphragm function. Diaphragm compound muscle action potential and phrenic nerve conduction time are reliable indicators for measuring phrenic nerve and diaphragm function.OBJECTIVES: To verify the hypothesis that changes of phrenic nerve conduction time (PNCT) and diaphragm compound muscle action potential (CMAP) in obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) patients might contribute to the decline of phrenic nerve and diaphragm function. PNCT and CMAP were measured with multipair esophageal electrodes combined with unilateral magnetic stimulation.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: Case controlled study. The experiment was carried out in Guangzhou Institute of Respiratory Disease, Guangzhou Medical College, from June 2005 to April 2006.PARTICIPANTS: Twenty seven OSAHS patients and eight primary snoring subjects from Guangzhou Institute of Respiratory Disease, Guangzhou Medical College were recruited and all subjects were diagnosed by polysomnography (PSG). Sixteen healthy, non-snoring subjects in the hospital for medical examination during the same time period were selected as the control group.METHODS: Esophageal electrodes, made by Guangzhou Institute of Respiratory Disease, combined with unilateral magnetic stimulation, were used to measure PNCT and CMAP of all subjects. PNCT was defined as the time from stimulation artifact to the onset of CMAP and diaphragm CMAP amplitude was measured from peak to peak. Oxygen desaturation index and apnea-hypopnea index were measured using PSG, and their relevance to PNCT and CMAP were analyzed. PNCT and CMAP in five OSAHS patients were repeatedly measured after effective nasal continuous positive airway pressure treatment for more than 2 months.MAIN OUTCOME MEAAURES: (1) PNCT and diaphragm CMAP of suhjects in each group. (2) Relevance of oxygen desaturation index and apnea-hypopnea index to PNCT and CMAP. (3

  20. Gender and Racial Bias in Juvenile Computer Books.

    Bishop, Kay; Bishop, Jennifer

    2000-01-01

    This action research study looks at a sample of 30 juvenile computer books from the past 30 years and analyzes the illustrations for evidence of gender and racial bias as well as career depiction. Examines the gender of authors and illustrators and discusses library media implications. (Author/LRW)

  1. Spatial bias: attentional and intentional influence in normal subjects.

    Schwartz, R L; Adair, J C; Na, D; Williamson, D J; Heilman, K M

    1997-01-01

    Normal subjects often demonstrate a spatial bias on line bisection (LB) and cancellation (CA) tasks. We wanted to learn if horizontal spatial bias found in normal subjects may be dissociable into sensory-attentional (ATT) and motor-intentional (INT) subgroups similar to those described in brain-injured patients with spatial neglect. We studied the influence of ATT and INT factors on the spatial bias observed in normal subjects using a new technique that uncouples the direction of action from the direction of attention. This technique also allowed us to test both LB and CA tasks on the same individuals. Our results show that ATT bias significantly influenced performance on an LB task, whereas performance on a CA task was influenced by biases in both the ATT and INT systems. In addition, the overall bias on these two tasks reflects an interaction between the biases induced by the ATT and INT systems that may be in the same or different directions. PMID:9008524

  2. Application of bias correction methods to improve the accuracy of quantitative radar rainfall in Korea

    J.-K. Lee

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available There are many potential sources of the biases in the radar rainfall estimation process. This study classified the biases from the rainfall estimation process into the reflectivity measurement bias and the rainfall estimation bias by the Quantitative Precipitation Estimation (QPE model and also conducted the bias correction methods to improve the accuracy of the Radar-AWS Rainrate (RAR calculation system operated by the Korea Meteorological Administration (KMA. In the Z bias correction for the reflectivity biases occurred by measuring the rainfalls, this study utilized the bias correction algorithm. The concept of this algorithm is that the reflectivity of the target single-pol radars is corrected based on the reference dual-pol radar corrected in the hardware and software bias. This study, and then, dealt with two post-process methods, the Mean Field Bias Correction (MFBC method and the Local Gauge Correction method (LGC, to correct the rainfall estimation bias by the QPE model. The Z bias and rainfall estimation bias correction methods were applied to the RAR system. The accuracy of the RAR system was improved after correcting Z bias. For the rainfall types, although the accuracy of the Changma front and the local torrential cases was slightly improved without the Z bias correction the accuracy of the typhoon cases got worse than the existing results in particular. As a result of the rainfall estimation bias correction, the Z bias_LGC was especially superior to the MFBC method because the different rainfall biases were applied to each grid rainfall amount in the LGC method. For the rainfall types, the results of the Z bias_LGC showed that the rainfall estimates for all types was more accurate than only the Z bias and, especially, the outcomes in the typhoon cases was vastly superior to the others.

  3. A novel method for the description of voltage-gated ionic currents based on action potential clamp results - Application to hippocampal mossy fiber boutons

    John R Clay

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Action potential clamp (AP-clamp recordings of the delayed rectifier K+ current IK and the fast-activated Na+ current INa in rat hippocampal mossy fiber boutons (MFBs are analyzed using a computational technique recently reported. The method is implemented using a digitized AP from an MFB and computationally applying that that data set to published models of IK and INa. These numerical results are compared with experimental AP-clamp recordings. The INa result is consistent with experiment; the IK result is not. The difficulty with the IK model concerns the fully activated current-voltage relation, which is described here by the Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz dependence of the driving force (V-EK rather than (V-EK itself, the standard model for this aspect of ion permeation. That revision leads to the second - a much steeper voltage dependent activation curve for IK than the one obtained from normalization of a family of IK records by (V-EK. The revised model provides an improved description of the AP-clamp measurement of IK in MFBs compared with the standard approach The method described here is general. It can be used to test models of ionic currents in any excitable cell. In this way it provides a novel approach to the relationship between ionic currents and membrane excitability in neurons.

  4. Simultaneous recording of the action potential and its whole-cell associated ion current on NG108-15 cells cultured over a MWCNT electrode

    Morales-Reyes, I.; Seseña-Rubfiaro, A.; Acosta-García, M. C.; Batina, N.; Godínez-Fernández, R.

    2016-08-01

    It is well known that, in excitable cells, the dynamics of the ion currents (I i) is extremely important to determine both the magnitude and time course of an action potential (A p). To observe these two processes simultaneously, we cultured NG108-15 cells over a multi-walled carbon nanotubes electrode (MWCNTe) surface and arranged a two independent Patch Clamp system configuration (Bi-Patch Clamp). The first system was used in the voltage or current clamp mode, using a glass micropipette as an electrode. The second system was modified to connect the MWCNTe to virtual ground. While the A p was recorded through the micropipette electrode, the MWCNTe was used to measure the underlying whole-cell current. This configuration allowed us to record both the membrane voltage (V m) and the current changes simultaneously. Images acquired by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) indicate that cultured cells developed a complex network of neurites, which served to establish the necessary close contact and strong adhesion to the MWCNTe surface. These features were a key factor to obtain the recording of the whole-cell I i with a high signal to noise ratio (SNR). The experimental results were satisfactorily reproduced by a theoretical model developed to simulate the proposed system. Besides the contribution to a better understanding of the fundamental mechanisms involved in cell communication, the developed method could be useful in cell physiology studies, pharmacology and diseases diagnosis.

  5. Bystander Effects Induced by Continuous Low-Dose-Rate 125I Seeds Potentiate the Killing Action of Irradiation on Human Lung Cancer Cells In Vitro

    Purpose: To investigate bystander effects of low-dose-rate (LDR) 125I seed irradiation on human lung cancer cells in vitro. Methods and Materials: A549 and NCI-H446 cell lines of differing radiosensitivity were directly exposed to LDR 125I seeds irradiation for 2 or 4 Gy and then cocultured with nonirradiated cells for 24 hours. Induction of micronucleus (MN), γH2AX foci, and apoptosis were assayed. Results: After 2 and 4 Gy irradiation, micronucleus formation rate (MFR) and apoptotic rate of A549 and NCI-H446 cells were increased, and the MFR and apoptotic rate of NCI-H446 cells was 2.1-2.8 times higher than that of A549 cells. After coculturing nonirradiated bystander cells with 125I seed irradiated cells for 24 hours, MFR and the mean number of γH2AX foci/cells of bystander A549 and NCI-H446 cells were similar and significantly higher than those of control (p 125I seeds could induce bystander effects, which potentiate the killing action on tumor cells and compensate for the influence of nonuniform distribution of radiation dosage on therapeutic outcomes

  6. A method for additive bias correction in cross-cultural surveys

    Scholderer, Joachim; Grunert, Klaus G.; Brunsø, Karen

    2001-01-01

    Measurement bias in cross-cultural surveys can seriously threaten the validity of hypothesis tests. Direct comparisons of means depend on the assumption that differences in observed variables reflect differences in the underlying constructs, and not an additive bias that may be caused by cultural...... additive bias from cross-cultural data. The procedure involves four steps: (1) embed a potentially biased item in a factor-analytic measurement model, (2) test for the existence of additive bias between populations, (3) use the factor-analytic model to estimate the magnitude of the bias, and (4) replace...

  7. Bias in clinical intervention research

    Gluud, Lise Lotte

    2006-01-01

    Research on bias in clinical trials may help identify some of the reasons why investigators sometimes reach the wrong conclusions about intervention effects. Several quality components for the assessment of bias control have been suggested, but although they seem intrinsically valid, empirical...

  8. Potential self-selection bias in a nested case-control study on indoor environmental factors and their association with asthma and allergic symptoms among pre-school children

    Bornehag, Carl-Gustaf; Sundell, Jan; Sigsgaard, T.; Janson, S.

    2006-01-01

    , including health, building characteristics of the home, and socioeconomic factors between participating and non-participating families in a nested case-control study on asthma and allergy among children. Information was collected in a baseline questionnaire to the parents of 14,077 children aged 1-6 years...... health problems in the case families, and health-related lifestyle factors, such as non-smoking parents. The overall conclusion of this study is that there are selection biases involved in studies that need close cooperation with the families involved. One solution to this problem is stratification, i...

  9. Application and investigation of a bound for outcome reporting bias

    Gamble Carrol

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Direct empirical evidence for the existence of outcome reporting bias is accumulating and this source of bias is recognised as a potential threat to the validity of meta-analysis of randomised clinical trials. Methods A method for calculating the maximum bias in a meta-analysis due to publication bias is adapted for the setting where within-study selective non-reporting of outcomes is suspected, and compared to the alternative approach of missing data imputation. The properties of both methods are investigated in realistic small sample situations. Results The results suggest that the adapted Copas and Jackson approach is the preferred method for reviewers to apply as an initial assessment of robustness to within-study selective non-reporting. Conclusion The Copas and Jackson approach is a useful method for systematic reviewers to apply to assess robustness to outcome reporting bias.

  10. Systematic tests for position-dependent additive shear bias

    van Uitert, Edo

    2016-01-01

    We present new tests to identify stationary position-dependent additive shear biases in weak gravitational lensing data sets. These tests are important diagnostics for currently ongoing and planned cosmic shear surveys, as such biases induce coherent shear patterns that can mimic and potentially bias the cosmic shear signal. The central idea of these tests is to determine the average ellipticity of all galaxies with shape measurements in a grid in the pixel plane. The distribution of the absolute values of these averaged ellipticities can be compared to randomized catalogues; a difference points to systematics in the data. In addition, we introduce a method to quantify the spatial correlation of the additive bias, which suppresses the contribution from cosmic shear and therefore eases the identification of a position-dependent additive shear bias in the data. We apply these tests to the publicly available shear catalogues from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey (CFHTLenS) and the Kilo Degree Su...

  11. Comment on 'Are survival rates for northern spotted owls biased?'

    Franklin, A.B.; Nichols, J.D.; Anthony, R.G.; Burnham, K.P.; White, Gary C.; Forsman, E.D.; Anderson, D.R.

    2006-01-01

    Loehle et al. recently estimated survival rates from radio-telemetered northern spotted owls (Strix occidentalis caurina (Merriam, 1898)) and suggested that survival rates estimated for this species from capture-recapture studies were negatively biased, which subsequently resulted in the negatively biased estimates of rates of population change (lambda) reported by Anthony et al. (Wildl. Monogr. No. 163, pp. 1-47 (2006)). We argue that their survival estimates were inappropriate for comparison with capture-recapture estimates because (i) the manner in which they censored radio-telemetered individuals had the potential to positively bias their survival estimates, (ii) their estimates of survival were not valid for evaluating bias, and (iii) the size and distribution of their radiotelemetry study areas were sufficiently different from capture-recapture study areas to preclude comparisons. In addition, their inferences of negative bias in rates of population change estimated by Anthony et al. were incorrect and reflected a misunderstanding about those estimators.

  12. FIP Bias Evolution in a Decaying Active Region

    Baker, D; Démoulin, P; Yardley, S L; van Driel-Gesztelyi, L; Long, D M; Green, L M

    2015-01-01

    Solar coronal plasma composition is typically characterized by first ionization potential (FIP) bias. Using spectra obtained by Hinode's EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) instrument, we present a series of large-scale, spatially resolved composition maps of active region (AR) 11389. The composition maps show how FIP bias evolves within the decaying AR from 2012 January 4-6. Globally, FIP bias decreases throughout the AR. We analyzed areas of significant plasma composition changes within the decaying AR and found that small-scale evolution in the photospheric magnetic field is closely linked to the FIP bias evolution observed in the corona. During the AR's decay phase, small bipoles emerging within supergranular cells reconnect with the pre-existing AR field, creating a pathway along which photospheric and coronal plasmas can mix. The mixing time scales are shorter than those of plasma enrichment processes. Eruptive activity also results in shifting the FIP bias closer to photospheric in the affected areas. Final...

  13. Nonlinear vs. linear biasing in Trp-cage folding simulations

    Spiwok, Vojtěch, E-mail: spiwokv@vscht.cz; Oborský, Pavel; Králová, Blanka [Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, University of Chemistry and Technology, Prague, Technická 3, Prague 6 166 28 (Czech Republic); Pazúriková, Jana [Institute of Computer Science, Masaryk University, Botanická 554/68a, 602 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Křenek, Aleš [Institute of Computer Science, Masaryk University, Botanická 554/68a, 602 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Center CERIT-SC, Masaryk Univerzity, Šumavská 416/15, 602 00 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2015-03-21

    Biased simulations have great potential for the study of slow processes, including protein folding. Atomic motions in molecules are nonlinear, which suggests that simulations with enhanced sampling of collective motions traced by nonlinear dimensionality reduction methods may perform better than linear ones. In this study, we compare an unbiased folding simulation of the Trp-cage miniprotein with metadynamics simulations using both linear (principle component analysis) and nonlinear (Isomap) low dimensional embeddings as collective variables. Folding of the mini-protein was successfully simulated in 200 ns simulation with linear biasing and non-linear motion biasing. The folded state was correctly predicted as the free energy minimum in both simulations. We found that the advantage of linear motion biasing is that it can sample a larger conformational space, whereas the advantage of nonlinear motion biasing lies in slightly better resolution of the resulting free energy surface. In terms of sampling efficiency, both methods are comparable.

  14. Nonlinear vs. linear biasing in Trp-cage folding simulations

    Biased simulations have great potential for the study of slow processes, including protein folding. Atomic motions in molecules are nonlinear, which suggests that simulations with enhanced sampling of collective motions traced by nonlinear dimensionality reduction methods may perform better than linear ones. In this study, we compare an unbiased folding simulation of the Trp-cage miniprotein with metadynamics simulations using both linear (principle component analysis) and nonlinear (Isomap) low dimensional embeddings as collective variables. Folding of the mini-protein was successfully simulated in 200 ns simulation with linear biasing and non-linear motion biasing. The folded state was correctly predicted as the free energy minimum in both simulations. We found that the advantage of linear motion biasing is that it can sample a larger conformational space, whereas the advantage of nonlinear motion biasing lies in slightly better resolution of the resulting free energy surface. In terms of sampling efficiency, both methods are comparable

  15. A Biased Review of Biases in Twitter Studies on Political Collective Action

    Cihon, Peter

    2016-01-01

    In recent years researchers have gravitated to social media platforms, especially Twitter, as fertile ground for empirical analysis of social phenomena. Social media provides researchers access to trace data of interactions and discourse that once went unrecorded in the offline world. Researchers have sought to use these data to explain social phenomena both particular to social media and applicable to the broader social world. This paper offers a minireview of Twitter-based research on political crowd behavior. This literature offers insight into particular social phenomena on Twitter, but often fails to use standardized methods that permit interpretation beyond individual studies. Moreover, the literature fails to ground methodologies and results in social or political theory, divorcing empirical research from the theory needed to interpret it. Rather, papers focus primarily on methodological innovations for social media analyses, but these too often fail to sufficiently demonstrate the validity of such met...

  16. Minireview: More than just a hammer: ligand "bias" and pharmaceutical discovery.

    Luttrell, Louis M

    2014-03-01

    Conventional orthosteric drug development programs targeting G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have focused on the concepts of agonism and antagonism, in which receptor structure determines the nature of the downstream signal and ligand efficacy determines its intensity. Over the past decade, the emerging paradigms of "pluridimensional efficacy" and "functional selectivity" have revealed that GPCR signaling is not monolithic, and that ligand structure can "bias" signal output by stabilizing active receptor states in different proportions than the native ligand. Biased ligands are novel pharmacologic entities that possess the unique ability to qualitatively change GPCR signaling, in effect creating "new receptors" with distinct efficacy profiles driven by ligand structure. The promise of biased agonism lies in this ability to engender "mixed" effects not attainable using conventional agonists or antagonists, promoting therapeutically beneficial signals while antagonizing deleterious ones. Indeed, arrestin pathway-selective agonists for the type 1 parathyroid hormone and angiotensin AT1 receptors, and G protein pathway-selective agonists for the GPR109A nicotinic acid and μ-opioid receptors, have demonstrated unique, and potentially therapeutic, efficacy in cell-based assays and preclinical animal models. Conversely, activating GPCRs in "unnatural" ways may lead to downstream biological consequences that cannot be predicted from prior knowledge of the actions of the native ligand, especially in the case of ligands that selectively activate as-yet poorly characterized G protein-independent signaling networks mediated via arrestins. Although much needs to be done to realize the clinical potential of functional selectivity, biased GPCR ligands nonetheless appear to be important new additions to the pharmacologic toolbox. PMID:24433041

  17. Application of bias correction methods to improve the accuracy of quantitative radar rainfall in Korea

    J.-K. Lee

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available There are many potential sources of bias in the radar rainfall estimation process. This study classified the biases from the rainfall estimation process into the reflectivity measurement bias and QPE model bias and also conducted the bias correction methods to improve the accuracy of the Radar-AWS Rainrate (RAR calculation system operated by the Korea Meteorological Administration (KMA. For the Z bias correction, this study utilized the bias correction algorithm for the reflectivity. The concept of this algorithm is that the reflectivity of target single-pol radars is corrected based on the reference dual-pol radar corrected in the hardware and software bias. This study, and then, dealt with two post-process methods, the Mean Field Bias Correction (MFBC method and the Local Gauge Correction method (LGC, to correct rainfall-bias. The Z bias and rainfall-bias correction methods were applied to the RAR system. The accuracy of the RAR system improved after correcting Z bias. For rainfall types, although the accuracy of Changma front and local torrential cases was slightly improved without the Z bias correction, especially, the accuracy of typhoon cases got worse than existing results. As a result of the rainfall-bias correction, the accuracy of the RAR system performed Z bias_LGC was especially superior to the MFBC method because the different rainfall biases were applied to each grid rainfall amount in the LGC method. For rainfall types, Results of the Z bias_LGC showed that rainfall estimates for all types was more accurate than only the Z bias and, especially, outcomes in typhoon cases was vastly superior to the others.

  18. Potential sources of bias in the use of individual's recall of the frequency of exposure to air pollution for use in exposure assessment in epidemiological studies: a cross-sectional survey

    Bickerstaff Karen

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In a previous study it has been shown that mean population perception of air pollution correlates well with physical measures of actual air pollution and could be used as a measure of exposure to air pollution, at least for those forms of pollution perceptible to humans. However, for such a measure to be valid researchers would need to be confident that it was not strongly biased by possible confounding variables. This study reports the association between perception of above average levels of air pollution compared with others in the neighbourhood and a number of factors that may influence reporting. Methods This was a postal cross-sectional study of 3402 households in England in a mixed rural and urban area adjacent to a large industrial complex. Respondents were asked about their social and demographic characteristics, the presence of respiratory symptoms and frequency of exposure to a range of pollution types. Results and discussion There were strong associations (p Conclusions We did not find any evidence of bias that would substantially invalidate mean population reporting of air pollution severity as a measure of exposure in epidemiological studies, though care may be needed in interpreting results where those factors found to be significant in this study vary substantially between areas.

  19. Bias changing molecule–lead couple and inducing low bias negative differential resistance for electrons acceptor predicted by first-principles study

    A first-principles study of the transport properties of 3,13-dimercaptononacene–6,21-dione molecule sandwiched between two gold leads is reported. The strong effect of negative differential resistance with large peak-to-valley ratio of 710% is present under low bias. We found that bias can change molecule–lead couple and induce low bias negative differential resistance for electrons acceptor, which may promise the potential applications in molecular devices with low-power dissipation in the future. - Highlights: • Acceptor is constructed to negative differential resistor (NDR). • NDR effect is present under low bias. • Bias change molecule–lead couple and induce NDR effect

  20. Administrative bias in South Africa

    E S Nwauche

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews the interpretation of section 6(2(aii of the Promotion of Administrative Justice Act which makes an administrator “biased or reasonably suspected of bias” a ground of judicial review. In this regard, the paper reviews the determination of administrative bias in South Africa especially highlighting the concept of institutional bias. The paper notes that inspite of the formulation of the bias ground of review the test for administrative bias is the reasonable apprehension test laid down in the case of President of South Africa v South African Rugby Football Union(2 which on close examination is not the same thing. Accordingly the paper urges an alternative interpretation that is based on the reasonable suspicion test enunciated in BTR Industries South Africa (Pty Ltd v Metal and Allied Workers Union and R v Roberts. Within this context, the paper constructs a model for interpreting the bias ground of review that combines the reasonable suspicion test as interpreted in BTR Industries and R v Roberts, the possibility of the waiver of administrative bias, the curative mechanism of administrative appeal as well as some level of judicial review exemplified by the jurisprudence of article 6(1 of the European Convention of Human Rights, especially in the light of the contemplation of the South African Magistrate Court as a jurisdictional route of judicial review.

  1. Audibility and visual biasing in speech perception

    Clement, Bart Richard

    Although speech perception has been considered a predominantly auditory phenomenon, large benefits from vision in degraded acoustic conditions suggest integration of audition and vision. More direct evidence of this comes from studies of audiovisual disparity that demonstrate vision can bias and even dominate perception (McGurk & MacDonald, 1976). It has been observed that hearing-impaired listeners demonstrate more visual biasing than normally hearing listeners (Walden et al., 1990). It is argued here that stimulus audibility must be equated across groups before true differences can be established. In the present investigation, effects of visual biasing on perception were examined as audibility was degraded for 12 young normally hearing listeners. Biasing was determined by quantifying the degree to which listener identification functions for a single synthetic auditory /ba-da-ga/ continuum changed across two conditions: (1)an auditory-only listening condition; and (2)an auditory-visual condition in which every item of the continuum was synchronized with visual articulations of the consonant-vowel (CV) tokens /ba/ and /ga/, as spoken by each of two talkers. Audibility was altered by presenting the conditions in quiet and in noise at each of three signal-to- noise (S/N) ratios. For the visual-/ba/ context, large effects of audibility were found. As audibility decreased, visual biasing increased. A large talker effect also was found, with one talker eliciting more biasing than the other. An independent lipreading measure demonstrated that this talker was more visually intelligible than the other. For the visual-/ga/ context, audibility and talker effects were less robust, possibly obscured by strong listener effects, which were characterized by marked differences in perceptual processing patterns among participants. Some demonstrated substantial biasing whereas others demonstrated little, indicating a strong reliance on audition even in severely degraded acoustic

  2. Hemispheric biases and the control of visuospatial attention: an ERP study

    Banich Marie T

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We examined whether individual differences in hemispheric utilization can interact with the intrinsic attentional biases of the cerebral hemispheres. Evidence suggests that the hemispheres have competing biases to direct attention contralaterally, with the left hemisphere (LH having a stronger bias than the right hemisphere. There is also evidence that individuals have characteristic biases to utilize one hemisphere more than the other for processing information, which can induce a bias to direct attention to contralateral space. We predicted that LH-biased individuals would display a strong rightward attentional bias, which would create difficulty in selectively attending to target stimuli in the left visual field (LVF as compared to right in the performance of a bilateral flanker task. Results Consistent with our hypothesis, flanker interference effects were found on the N2c event-related brain potential and error rate for LH-biased individuals in the Attend-LVF condition. The error rate effect was correlated with the degree of hemispheric utilization bias for the LH-Bias group. Conclusion We conclude that hemispheric utilization bias can enhance a hemisphere's contralateral attentional bias, at least for individuals with a LH utilization bias. Hemispheric utilization bias may play an important and largely unrecognized role in visuospatial attention.

  3. Intentional Action and Action Slips.

    Heckhausen, Heinz; Beckmann, Jurgen

    1990-01-01

    An explanation of action slips is offered that examines controlled actions in the context of an intentional behavior theory. Actions are considered guided by mentally represented intentions, subdivided into goal intentions and contingent instrumental intentions. Action slips are categorized according to problem areas in the enactment of goal…

  4. Stochasticity intrinsic to coupled-clock mechanisms underlies beat-to-beat variability of spontaneous action potential firing in sinoatrial node pacemaker cells

    Yaniv, Yael; Lyashkov, Alexey E.; Sirenko, Syevda; Okamoto, Yosuke; Guiriba, Toni-Rose; Ziman, Bruce D.; Morrell, Christopher H.; Lakatta, Edward G.

    2014-01-01

    Recent evidence indicates that the spontaneous action potential (AP) of isolated sinoatrial node cells (SANC) is regulated by a system of stochastic mechanisms embodied within two clocks: ryanodine receptors of the “Ca2+ clock” within the sarcoplasmic reticulum, spontaneously activate during diastole and discharge local Ca2+ releases (LCRs) beneath the cell surface membrane; clock crosstalk occurs as LCRs activate an inward Na+/Ca2+ exchanger current (INCX), which together with If and decay of K+ channels prompts the “M clock,” the ensemble of sarcolemmal-electrogenic molecules, to generate APs. Prolongation of the average LCR period accompanies prolongation of the average AP beating interval (BI). Moreover, prolongation of the average AP BI accompanies increased AP BI variability. We hypothesized that both the average AP BI and AP BI variability are dependent upon stochasticity of clock mechanisms reported by the variability of LCR period. We perturbed the coupled-clock system by directly inhibiting the M clock by ivabradine (IVA) or the Ca2+ clock by cyclopiazonic acid (CPA). When either clock is perturbed by IVA (3, 10 and 30μM), which has no direct effect on Ca2+ cycling, or CPA ( 0.5 and 5μM), which has no direct effect on the M clock ion channels, the clock system failed to achieve the basal AP BI and both AP BI and AP BI variability increased. The changes in average LCR period and its variability in response to perturbations of the coupled-clock system were correlated with changes in AP beating interval and AP beating interval variability. We conclude that the stochasticity within the coupled-clock system affects and is affected by the AP BI firing rate and rhythm via modulation of the effectiveness of clock coupling. PMID:25257916

  5. Eugenia uniflora L. Essential Oil as a Potential Anti-Leishmania Agent: Effects on Leishmania amazonensis and Possible Mechanisms of Action

    Klinger Antonio da Franca Rodrigues

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Eugenia uniflora L. is a member of the Myrtaceae family and is commonly known as Brazilian cherry tree. In this study, we evaluated the chemical composition of Eugenia uniflora L. essential oil (EuEO by using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS and assessed its anti-Leishmania activity. We also explored the potential mechanisms of action and cytotoxicity of EuEO. Thirty-two compounds were identified, which constituted 92.65% of the total oil composition. The most abundant components were sesquiterpenes (91.92%, with curzerene (47.3%, γ-elemene (14.25%, and trans-β-elemenone (10.4% being the major constituents. The bioactivity shown by EuEO against promastigotes (IC50, 3.04 μg·mL−1 and amastigotes (IC50, 1.92 μg·mL−1 suggested significant anti-Leishmania activity. In the cytotoxicity determination, EuEO was 20 times more toxic to amastigotes than to macrophages. Hemolytic activity was 63.22% at the highest concentration tested (400 μg·mL−1; however, there appeared to be no toxicity at 50 μg·mL−1. While the data show that EuEO activity is not mediated by nitric oxide production, they do suggest that macrophage activation may be involved in EuEO anti-Leishmania activity, as evidenced by increases in both the phagocytic capacity and the lysosomal activity. More studies are needed to determine in vivo activity as well as additional mechanisms of the anti-Leishmania activity.

  6. Sevoflurane postconditioning alleviates action potential duration shortening and L-type calcium current suppression induced by ischemia/reperfusion injury in rat epicardial myocytes

    GONG Jun-song; YAO Yun-tai; FANG Neng-xin; HUANG Jian; LI Li-huan

    2012-01-01

    Background It has been proved that sevoflurane postconditioning (SpostC) could protect the heart against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury,however,there has been few research focused on the electrophysiological effects of SpostC.The objective of the study was to investigate the effects of SpostC on action potential duration (APD) and L-type calcium current (ICa,L) in isolated cardiomyocytes.Methods Langendorff perfused SD rat hearts were randomly assigned to one of the time control (TC),ischemia/reperfusion (I/R,25 minutes of ischemia followed by 30 minutes of reperfusion),and SpostC (postconditioned with 3% sevoflurane) groups.At the end of reperfusion,epicardial myocytes were dissociated enzymatically for patch clamp studies.Results Sevoflurane directly prolonged APD and decreased peak Ica,L densities in epicardial myocytes of the TC group (P<0.05).I/R injury shortened APD and decreased peak Ica,L densities in epicardial myocytes of the I/R group (P<0.05).SpostC prolonged APD and increased peak Ica,L densities in epicardial myocytes exposed to I/R injury (P<0.05).SpostC decreased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels,reduced the incidence of ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation,and decreased reperfusion arrhythmia scores compared with the I/R group (all P<0.05).Conclusions SpostC attenuates APDshortening and ICa,L suppression induced by I/R injury.The regulation of APD and Ica,L by SpostC might be related with intracellular ROS modulation,which contributes to the alleviation of reperfusion ventricular arrhythmia.Chin Med J 2012;125(19):3485-3491

  7. Eugenia uniflora L. Essential Oil as a Potential Anti-Leishmania Agent: Effects on Leishmania amazonensis and Possible Mechanisms of Action.

    Rodrigues, Klinger Antonio da Franca; Amorim, Layane Valéria; de Oliveira, Jamylla Mirck Guerra; Dias, Clarice Noleto; Moraes, Denise Fernandes Coutinho; Andrade, Eloisa Helena de Aguiar; Maia, Jose Guilherme Soares; Carneiro, Sabrina Maria Portela; Carvalho, Fernando Aécio de Amorim

    2013-01-01

    Eugenia uniflora L. is a member of the Myrtaceae family and is commonly known as Brazilian cherry tree. In this study, we evaluated the chemical composition of Eugenia uniflora L. essential oil (EuEO) by using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and assessed its anti-Leishmania activity. We also explored the potential mechanisms of action and cytotoxicity of EuEO. Thirty-two compounds were identified, which constituted 92.65% of the total oil composition. The most abundant components were sesquiterpenes (91.92%), with curzerene (47.3%), γ -elemene (14.25%), and trans- β -elemenone (10.4%) being the major constituents. The bioactivity shown by EuEO against promastigotes (IC50, 3.04  μ g·mL(-1)) and amastigotes (IC50, 1.92  μ g·mL(-1)) suggested significant anti-Leishmania activity. In the cytotoxicity determination, EuEO was 20 times more toxic to amastigotes than to macrophages. Hemolytic activity was 63.22% at the highest concentration tested (400  μ g·mL(-1)); however, there appeared to be no toxicity at 50  μ g·mL(-1). While the data show that EuEO activity is not mediated by nitric oxide production, they do suggest that macrophage activation may be involved in EuEO anti-Leishmania activity, as evidenced by increases in both the phagocytic capacity and the lysosomal activity. More studies are needed to determine in vivo activity as well as additional mechanisms of the anti-Leishmania activity. PMID:23533469

  8. Perceptive biases in major depressive episode.

    Marine Naudin

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Alterations in emotional processing occur during a major depressive episode (MDE, and olfaction and facial expressions have implications in emotional and social interactions. To gain a better understanding of these processes, we characterized the perceptive sensorial biases, potential links, and potential remission after antidepressant treatment of MDE. METHODS: We recruited 22 patients with acute MDE, both before and after three months of antidepressant treatment, and 41 healthy volunteers matched by age and smoking status. The participants underwent a clinical assessment (Mini International Neuropsychiatry Interview, Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, Physical and Social Anhedonia scales, Pleasure-Displeasure Scale, an olfactory evaluation (hedonic aspect, familiarity and emotional impact of odors, and a computerized Facial Affect Recognition task. RESULTS: MDE was associated with an olfactory bias concerning hedonic and emotional aspects, including negative olfactory alliesthesia (unpleasant odorants perceived as more unpleasant, facial emotion expression recognition (happy facial expressions, and in part olfactory anhedonia (pleasant odorants perceived as less pleasant. In addition, the results revealed that these impairments represent state markers of MDE, suggesting that the patients recovered the same sensory processing as healthy subjects after antidepressant treatment. DISCUSSION: This study demonstrated that MDE is associated with negative biases toward olfactory perception and the recognition of facial emotional expressions. The link between these two sensory parameters suggests common underlying processes.

  9. Loss of ATP-Sensitive Potassium Channel Surface Expression in Heart Failure Underlies Dysregulation of Action Potential Duration and Myocardial Vulnerability to Injury.

    Zhan Gao

    Full Text Available The search for new approaches to treatment and prevention of heart failure is a major challenge in medicine. The adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium (KATP channel has been long associated with the ability to preserve myocardial function and viability under stress. High surface expression of membrane KATP channels ensures a rapid energy-sparing reduction in action potential duration (APD in response to metabolic challenges, while cellular signaling that reduces surface KATP channel expression blunts APD shortening, thus sacrificing energetic efficiency in exchange for greater cellular calcium entry and increased contractile force. In healthy hearts, calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII phosphorylates the Kir6.2 KATP channel subunit initiating a cascade responsible for KATP channel endocytosis. Here, activation of CaMKII in a transaortic banding (TAB model of heart failure is coupled with a 35-40% reduction in surface expression of KATP channels compared to hearts from sham-operated mice. Linkage between KATP channel expression and CaMKII is verified in isolated cardiomyocytes in which activation of CaMKII results in downregulation of KATP channel current. Accordingly, shortening of monophasic APD is slowed in response to hypoxia or heart rate acceleration in failing compared to non-failing hearts, a phenomenon previously shown to result in significant increases in oxygen consumption. Even in the absence of coronary artery disease, failing myocardium can be further injured by ischemia due to a mismatch between metabolic supply and demand. Ischemia-reperfusion injury, following ischemic preconditioning, is diminished in hearts with CaMKII inhibition compared to wild-type hearts and this advantage is largely eliminated when myocardial KATP channel expression is absent, supporting that the myocardial protective benefit of CaMKII inhibition in heart failure may be substantially mediated by KATP channels. Recognition of Ca

  10. Regulation of action potential delays via voltage-gated potassium Kv1.1 channels in dentate granule cells during hippocampal epilepsy

    Florian eKirchheim

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Action potential (AP responses of dentate gyrus granule (DG cells have to be tightly regulated to maintain hippocampal function. However, which ion channels control the response delay of DG cells is not known. In some neuron types, spike latency is influenced by a dendrotoxin (DTX-sensitive delay current (ID mediated by unidentified combinations of voltage-gated K+ (Kv channels of the Kv1 family Kv1.1-6. In DG cells, the ID has not been characterized and its molecular basis is unknown. The response phenotype of mature DG cells is usually considered homogenous but intrinsic adaptations likely occur in particular in conditions of hyperexcitability, for example during temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE. In this study, we examined response delays of DG cells and underlying ion channel molecules by employing a new combination of gramicidin-perforated patch-clamp recordings in acute brain slices and single-cell reverse transcriptase quantitative polymerase chain reaction (SC RT-qPCR experiments. An in vivo mouse model of TLE consisting of intrahippocampal kainate (KA injection was used to examine epilepsy-related plasticity. Response delays of DG cells were DTX-sensitive and strongly increased in KA-injected hippocampi; Kv1.1 mRNA was elevated 10-fold, and the response delays correlated with Kv1.1 mRNA abundance on the single cell level. Other Kv1 subunits did not show overt changes in mRNA levels. Kv1.1 immunolabeling was enhanced in KA DG cells. The biophysical properties of ID and the delay heterogeneity between inner and outer DG cell layer were characterized. Using organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHCs, where KA incubation also induced ID upregulation, reversibility and neuroprotective potential for DG cells were tested. In summary, the AP timing of DG cells is effectively controlled via scaling of Kv1.1 subunit transcription. With this antiepileptic mechanism, DG cells delay their

  11. Effects of Ascorbic Acid on the Amplitude of Ventral Tegmental Area Field Action Potential in Morphine-Exposed Rats (An Electrophysiology Study

    K Saadipour

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Evidences have indicated that the Ventral Tegmental Area (VTA is the major source of dopamine (DA neurons projecting to cortical and limbic regions involved in cognitive and motivational aspects of addiction. Also, studies have indicated that the Ascorbic acid (vitamin C can reduce the dependency symptoms of opioids such as morphine via effect of activity on dopaminergic neuron in VTA. For this reason, the aim of this study was to assess the effects of ascorbic acid on the amplitude of Ventral Tegmental Area field action potential in morphine-exposed rats. Materials & Methods: Forty male Wistar’s rats were used in this experimental study conducted at Yasuj University of Medical Sciences in 2010. Animals were randomly divided into four groups after electrode implantation and recovery period: 1. No- Vit C and No-Addicted group (nVitC.nA 2. Vit C and No-Addicted group (VitC.nA 3. No- Vit C and Addicted group (nVitCA 4.Vit C and Addicted (VitC.A, The Vit C groups received 500 mg/kg of Vit C during 20 days. For addicted groups morphine was administrated once daily for 20 days. In the 20th day, the field potential recording was accomplished. Two-way ANOVA was used for data analysis followed by the Tukey test for post hoc analysis. Results were considered significant at P < 0.05. Results: This study shows the exposure to morphine declined the power of Delta and Beta bands (p<0.05 and Vit C solely enhance power of Theta and Beta (p<0.05, p<0.001 in VTA nuclei. Furthermore, Vit C could alter power of some bands which were affected by morphine. Therefore it seems that Vit C has an increasing effects on them (p<0.05. Conclusion: Although the effect of Vit C on power of the VTA bands is not well known, but it is supposed that this phenomenon can be related to alteration in activity of dopaminergic neuron in the brain.

  12. Temporal perception in joint action: This is MY action.

    Capozzi, Francesca; Becchio, Cristina; Garbarini, Francesca; Savazzi, Silvia; Pia, Lorenzo

    2016-02-01

    Here we investigated the temporal perception of self- and other-generated actions during sequential joint actions. Participants judged the perceived time of two events, the first triggered by the participant and the second by another agent, during a cooperative or competitive interaction, or by an unspecified mechanical cause. Results showed that participants perceived self-generated events as shifted earlier in time (anticipation temporal judgment bias) and non-self-generated events as shifted later in time (repulsion temporal judgment bias). This latter effect was observed independently from the kind of cause (i.e., agentive or mechanical) or interaction (i.e., cooperative or competitive). We suggest that this might represent a mental process which allows discriminating events that cannot plausibly be linked to one's own action. When an event immediately follows a self-generated one, temporal judgment biases operate as self-serving biases in order to separate self-generated events from events of another physical causality. PMID:26741858

  13. Body posture modulates action perception

    Zimmermann, M; Toni, I.; Lange, F.P. de

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have highlighted cognitive and neural similarities between planning and perceiving actions. Given that action planning involves a simulation of potential action plans that depends on the actor's body posture, we reasoned that perceiving actions may also be influenced by one's body posture. Here, we test whether and how this influence occurs by measuring behavioral and cerebral (fMRI) responses in human participants predicting goals of observed actions, while manipulating postur...

  14. Training Of Manual Actions Improves Language Understanding of Semantically-Related Action Sentences

    MarcoTettamanti

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Conceptual knowledge accessed by language may involve the re-activation of the associated primary sensory-motor processes. Whether these embodied representations are indeed constitutive to conceptual knowledge is hotly debated, particularly since direct evidence that sensory-motor expertise can improve conceptual processing is scarce. In this study, we sought for this crucial piece of evidence, by training naive healthy subjects to perform complex manual actions and by measuring, before and after training, their performance in a semantic language task. 19 participants engaged in 3 weeks of motor training. Each participant was trained in 3 complex manual actions (e.g. origami. Before and after the training period, each subject underwent a series of manual dexterity tests and a semantic language task. The latter consisted of a sentence-picture semantic congruency judgment task, with 6 target congruent sentence-picture pairs (semantically related to the trained manual actions, 6 non-target congruent pairs (semantically unrelated, and 12 filler incongruent pairs. Manual action training induced a significant improvement in all manual dexterity tests, demonstrating the successful acquisition of sensory-motor expertise. In the semantic language task, the reaction times to both target and non-target congruent sentence-image pairs decreased after action training, indicating a more efficient conceptual-semantic processing. Noteworthy, the reaction times for target pairs decreased more than those for non-target pairs, as indicated by the 2x2 interaction. These results were confirmed when controlling for the potential bias of increased frequency of use of target lexical items during manual training. The results of the present study suggest that sensory-motor expertise gained by training of specific manual actions can lead to an improvement of cognitive-linguistic skills related to the specific conceptual-semantic domain associated to the trained actions.

  15. First principle simulations of a bias-dependent electrochemical cell

    Pedroza, Luana; Brandimarte, Pedro; Fernandez-Serra, Marivi; Rocha, Alexandre R.

    Understanding the local structure of water molecules at the interfaces of metallic electrodes is a key problem in many electrochemical problems. Notably the system is under an external potential bias, which makes the task of simulating this setup difficult. To correctly compute the effect of an external bias potential applied to electrodes, we combine density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green's functions methods, with and without van der Waals interactions. In this work, we apply this methodology to study the electronic properties and forces of water molecules at the interface of different metallic electrodes. We find that the water molecule is sensitive to the sign and magnitude of the applied bias. We also show that it changes the position and orientation of the most stable configuration indicating that the external bias plays an important role in the structural properties of the interface. The authors thank FAPESP and CNPq for financial support.

  16. First priciples simulations of a bias-dependent electrochemical cell

    Pedroza, Luana S; Rocha, Alexandre Reily; Fernández-Serra, Marivi

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the local structure of liquid water at the interfaces of metallic electrodes is a key problem in aqueous-based electrochemistry. Notably the system is under an external potential bias, which makes the task of simulating this setup difficult. To correctly compute the effect of an external bias potential applied to electrodes, we combine density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green's functions methods. Our method now allows to explicitly consider an external applied bias, in direct correspondence to the experiments. In this work, we apply this methodology to study the electronic properties and atomic forces of one water molecule at the interface of gold electrodes. We find that, as expected, the water molecule is sensitive to the sign and magnitude of the applied bias.

  17. Action Potential Classification Based on PCA and Improved K-means Algorithm%基于PCA和改进K均值算法的动作电位分类

    师黎; 杨振兴; 王治忠; 王岩

    2011-01-01

    微电极阵列记录的神经元信号往往是电极临近区域数个神经元的动作电位信号以及大量背景噪声的混叠,研究神经系统的信息处理机制以及神经编码、解码机理需了解相关每个神经元的动作电位,因此需从记录信号中分离出每个神经元的动作电位.基于此,提出基于主元分析(PCA)和改进K均值相结合的动作电位分类方法.该方法采用PCA提取动作电位特征,使用改进K均值算法实现动作电位分类.实验结果表明,该方法降低了动作电位的特征维数以及K均值算法对初始分类重心的依赖,提高动作电位分类结果的正确率及稳定性.尤其是在处理低信噪比信号时,分类正确率仍能达到理想水平.%Neural signal recorded by the microelectrode array is often the mixture which is composed of action potentials of several neurons near the electrodes and the background noises. Researches on the nervous system information processing mechanism and neural coding and decoding mechanism need know every related neuron's action potential. Therefore, every neuron's action potential is essential to be separated from the recorded signal. This paper proposes a method based on Principal Component Analysis(PCA) combined with improved K-means for action potential classification. The action potentials' features are extracted by PCA, the action potential classification is implemented by the improved K-means algorithm. Experimental results show that the method brings down action potential's feature dimensions and dependence of the initial classification center for the K-means algorithm, and increases the accuracy and stability of the classification results. Particularly, when processing the low Signal to Noise Ratio(SNR) signals, it can also achieve an expected purpose.

  18. Cognitive biases and language universals

    Baronchelli, Andrea; Puglisi, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Language universals have been longly attributed to an innate Universal Grammar. An alternative explanation states that linguistic universals emerged independently in every language in response to shared cognitive, though non language-specific, biases. A computational model has recently shown how this could be the case, focusing on the paradigmatic example of the universal properties of color naming patterns, and producing results in accurate agreement with the experimental data. Here we investigate thoroughly the role of a cognitive bias in the framework of this model. We study how, and to what extent, the structure of the bias can influence the corresponding linguistic universal patterns. We show also that the cultural history of a group of speakers introduces population-specific constraints that act against the uniforming pressure of the cognitive bias, and we clarify the interplay between these two forces. We believe that our simulations can help to shed light on the possible mechanisms at work in the evol...

  19. Preferences, country bias, and international trade

    S. Roy (Santanu); J.M.A. Viaene (Jean-Marie)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractAnalyzes international trade where consumer preferences exhibit country bias. Why country biases arise; How trade can occur in the presence of country bias; Implication for the pattern of trade and specialization.

  20. Detecting and Punishing Unconscious Bias

    Tetlock, Philip E; Gregory Mitchell; L. Jason Anastasopoulos

    2013-01-01

    We present experimental results demonstrating how ideology shapes evaluations of technology aimed at detecting unconscious biases: (1) liberals supported use of the technology to detect unconscious racism but not unconscious anti-Americanism, whereas conservatives showed the reverse pattern, (2) liberals and conservatives opposed punishing individuals for unconscious bias but supported punishing organizations failing to use the technology to root out, respectively, racism or anti-Americanism,...